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Sample records for severely hypoxic conditions

  1. Sodium bicarbonate supplementation improves severe-intensity intermittent exercise under moderate acute hypoxic conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deb, Sanjoy K; Gough, Lewis A; Sparks, S Andy; McNaughton, Lars R

    2018-03-01

    Acute moderate hypoxic exposure can substantially impair exercise performance, which occurs with a concurrent exacerbated rise in hydrogen cation (H + ) production. The purpose of this study was therefore, to alleviate this acidic stress through sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO 3 ) supplementation and determine the corresponding effects on severe-intensity intermittent exercise performance. Eleven recreationally active individuals participated in this randomised, double-blind, crossover study performed under acute normobaric hypoxic conditions (FiO 2 % = 14.5%). Pre-experimental trials involved the determination of time to attain peak bicarbonate anion concentrations ([HCO 3 - ]) following NaHCO 3 ingestion. The intermittent exercise tests involved repeated 60-s work in their severe-intensity domain and 30-s recovery at 20 W to exhaustion. Participants ingested either 0.3 g kg bm -1 of NaHCO 3 or a matched placebo of 0.21 g kg bm -1 of sodium chloride prior to exercise. Exercise tolerance (+ 110.9 ± 100.6 s; 95% CI 43.3-178 s; g = 1.0) and work performed in the severe-intensity domain (+ 5.8 ± 6.6 kJ; 95% CI 1.3-9.9 kJ; g = 0.8) were enhanced with NaHCO 3 supplementation. Furthermore, a larger post-exercise blood lactate concentration was reported in the experimental group (+ 4 ± 2.4 mmol l -1 ; 95% CI 2.2-5.9; g = 1.8), while blood [HCO 3 - ] and pH remained elevated in the NaHCO 3 condition throughout experimentation. In conclusion, this study reported a positive effect of NaHCO 3 under acute moderate hypoxic conditions during intermittent exercise and therefore, may offer an ergogenic strategy to mitigate hypoxic induced declines in exercise performance.

  2. Hypoxic conditioning as a new therapeutic modality

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    Samuel eVerges

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Preconditioning refers to a procedure by which a single noxious stimulus below the threshold of damage is applied to the tissue in order to increase resistance to the same or even different noxious stimuli given above the threshold of damage. Hypoxic preconditioning relies on complex and active defenses that organisms have developed to counter the adverse consequences of oxygen deprivation. The protection it confers against ischemic attack for instance as well as the underlying biological mechanisms have been extensively investigated in animal models. Based on these data, hypoxic conditioning (consisting in recurrent exposure to hypoxia has been suggested a potential non-pharmacological therapeutic intervention to enhance some physiological functions in individuals in whom acute or chronic pathological events are anticipated or existing. In addition to healthy subjects, some benefits have been reported in patients with cardiovascular and pulmonary diseases as well as in overweight and obese individuals. Hypoxic conditioning consisting in sessions of intermittent exposure to moderate hypoxia repeated over several weeks may induce hematological, vascular, metabolic and neurological effects. This review addresses the existing evidence regarding the use of hypoxic conditioning as a potential therapeutic modality and emphasizes on many remaining issues to clarify and future researches to be performed in the field.

  3. Hypoxic pretreatment protects against neuronal damage of the rat hippocampus induced by severe hypoxia.

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    Gorgias, N; Maidatsi, P; Tsolaki, M; Alvanou, A; Kiriazis, G; Kaidoglou, K; Giala, M

    1996-04-01

    The present study investigates whether under conditions of successive hypoxic exposures pretreatment with mild (15% O(2)) or moderate (10% O(2)) hypoxia, protects hippocampal neurones against damage induced by severe (3% O(2)) hypoxia. The ultrastructural findings were also correlated with regional superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity changes. In unpretreated rats severe hypoxia induced ultrastructural changes consistent with the aspects of delayed neuronal death (DND). However, in preexposed animals hippocampal damage was attenuated in an inversely proportional way with the severity of the hypoxic pretreatment. The ultrastructural hypoxic tolerance findings were also closely related to increased regional SOD activity levels. Thus the activation of the endogenous antioxidant defense by hypoxic preconditioning, protects against hippocampal damage induced by severe hypoxia. The eventual contribution of increased endogenous adenosine and/or reduced excitotoxicity to induce hypoxic tolerance is discussed.

  4. Gold nanoparticle cellular uptake, toxicity and radiosensitisation in hypoxic conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jain, Suneil; Coulter, Jonathan A.; Butterworth, Karl T.; Hounsell, Alan R.; McMahon, Stephen J.; Hyland, Wendy B.; Muir, Mark F.; Dickson, Glenn R.; Prise, Kevin M.; Currell, Fred J.; Hirst, David G.; O’Sullivan, Joe M.

    2014-01-01

    Background and purpose: Gold nanoparticles (GNPs) are novel agents that have been shown to cause radiosensitisation in vitro and in vivo. Tumour hypoxia is associated with radiation resistance and reduced survival in cancer patients. The interaction of GNPs with cells in hypoxia is explored. Materials and methods: GNP uptake, localization, toxicity and radiosensitisation were assessed in vitro under oxic and hypoxic conditions. Results: GNP cellular uptake was significantly lower under hypoxic than oxic conditions. A significant reduction in cell proliferation in hypoxic MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells exposed to GNPs was observed. In these cells significant radiosensitisation occurred in normoxia and moderate hypoxia. However, in near anoxia no significant sensitisation occurred. Conclusions: GNP uptake occurred in hypoxic conditions, causing radiosensitisation in moderate, but not extreme hypoxia in a breast cancer cell line. These findings may be important for the development of GNPs for cancer therapy

  5. Transient hypoxic respiratory failure in a patient with severe hypophosphatemia.

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    Oud, Lavi

    2009-03-01

    Respiratory failure in severely hypophosphatemic patients has been attributed to respiratory muscle weakness, leading to ventilatory failure. While frequently documenting hypercarbic respiratory failure, previous reports of hypophosphatemia-related respiratory failure in patients otherwise free of pulmonary or airway disease often did not provide sufficient information on gas exchange and pulmonary function, precluding inference on alternative or additional sources of respiratory dysfunction in this population. We report a case of acute hypoxic respiratory failure in a 26 year-old bulimic woman with severe hypophosphatemia. The patient presented with acute onset of dyspnea, paresthesias, limb shaking, and severe hyperventilation. SpO2 was 74%, requiring administration of 100% O2, with normal chest radiograph. Serum phosphate was <0.3 mmol/liter (1.0 mg/dL). Further evaluation did not support pulmonary, vascular, neurogenic or external exposure-related causes of hypoxic respiratory failure, which rapidly resolved with parenteral correction of hypophosphatemia. To date, hypoxic respiratory failure has not been reported in association with hypophosphatemia. Increased awareness and further investigations can help elucidate the mechanisms of hypophosphatemia-associated hypoxemia.

  6. Transcriptome analysis of severe hypoxic stress during development in zebrafish

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    I.G. Woods

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Hypoxia causes critical cellular injury both in early human development and in adulthood, leading to cerebral palsy, stroke, and myocardial infarction. Interestingly, a remarkable phenomenon known as hypoxic preconditioning arises when a brief hypoxia exposure protects target organs against subsequent, severe hypoxia. Although hypoxic preconditioning has been demonstrated in several model organisms and tissues including the heart and brain, its molecular mechanisms remain poorly understood. Accordingly, we used embryonic and larval zebrafish to develop a novel vertebrate model for hypoxic preconditioning, and used this model to identify conserved hypoxia-regulated transcripts for further functional study as published in Manchenkov et al. (2015 in G3: Genes|Genomes|Genetics. In this Brief article, we provide extensive annotation for the most strongly hypoxia-regulated genes in zebrafish, including their human orthologs, and describe in detail the methods used to identify, filter, and annotate hypoxia-regulated transcripts for downstream functional and bioinformatic assays using the source data provided in Gene Expression Omnibus Accession GSE68473.

  7. [Autonomic regulation at emotional stress under hypoxic conditions in the elderly with physiological and accelerated aging: effect of hypoxic training].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Os'mak, E D; Asanov, É O

    2014-01-01

    The effect of hypoxic training on autonomic regulation in psycho-emotional stress conditions in hypoxic conditions in older people with physiological (25 people) and accelerated (28 people) aging respiratory system. It is shown that hypoxic training leads to an increase in vagal activity indicators (HF) and reduced simpatovagal index (LF/HF), have a normalizing effect on the autonomic balance during stress loads in older people with different types of aging respiratory system.

  8. In vitro effects of piracetam on the radiosensitivity of hypoxic cells (adaptation of MTT assay to hypoxic conditions)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gheuens, E.E.O.; Bruijn, E.A. de; Van der Heyden, S.; Van Oosterom, A.T.; Lagarde, P.; Pooter, C.M.J. de; Chomy, F.

    1995-01-01

    This paper describes the adaptation of the MTT assay to hypoxic conditions in order to test the in vitro effect of piracetam on hypoxic cells and particularly on the radiosensitivity of hypoxic cells since this drug has shown clinical effect on acute and chronic hypoxia. The V79 cell line was selected by reference to preliminary hypoxic experiments using clonogenic assay and euoxic experiments using clonogenic and MTT assays. Cell growth and survival in our hypoxic conditions were assessed using MTT assay with an enclosure and special 48-well plates both made of glass. Growth curves on glass plates after 1-hour exposure to nitrogen versus air were comparable, so there is no bias effect due to gas composition. Survival curves using MTT versus reference clonogenic assay were comparable after radiation exposure in eu- and hypoxic conditions, and confirm the validity of our original technique for creating hypoxia. The Oxygen Enhancement Ratio was of about 3 for 1-hour hypoxic exposure. Piracetam gave no cytotoxic effect up to 10 mM of piracetam. Growth curves after continuous drug exposure and 1-hour euoxic versus hypoxic exposure gave no cytotoxic effect up to 10 mM of piracetam. Survival curves after continuous drug exposure to 10 mM of piracetam gave no significant effect on the radiosensitivity of hypoxic V79 cells using MTT or clonogenic assay. (author). 32 refs., 6 figs

  9. Physiological Responses to Two Hypoxic Conditioning Strategies in Healthy Subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chacaroun, Samarmar; Borowik, Anna; Morrison, Shawnda A; Baillieul, Sébastien; Flore, Patrice; Doutreleau, Stéphane; Verges, Samuel

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Hypoxic exposure can be used as a therapeutic tool by inducing various cardiovascular, neuromuscular, and metabolic adaptations. Hypoxic conditioning strategies have been evaluated in patients with chronic diseases using either sustained (SH) or intermittent (IH) hypoxic sessions. Whether hypoxic conditioning via SH or IH may induce different physiological responses remains to be elucidated. Methods: Fourteen healthy active subjects (7 females, age 25 ± 8 years, body mass index 21.5 ± 2.5 kg·m -2 ) performed two interventions in a single blind, randomized cross-over design, starting with either 3 x SH (48 h apart), or 3 x IH (48 h apart), separated by a 2 week washout period. SH sessions consisted of breathing a gas mixture with reduced inspiratory oxygen fraction (FiO 2 ), continuously adjusted to reach arterial oxygen saturations (SpO 2 ) of 70-80% for 1 h. IH sessions consisted of 5 min with reduced FiO 2 (SpO 2 = 70-80%), followed by 3-min normoxia, repeated seven times. During the first (S1) and third (S3) sessions of each hypoxic intervention, cardiorespiratory parameters, and muscle and pre-frontal cortex oxygenation (near infrared spectroscopy) were assessed continuously. Results : Minute ventilation increased significantly during IH sessions (+2 ± 2 L·min -1 ) while heart rate increased during both SH (+11 ± 4 bpm) and IH (+13 ± 5 bpm) sessions. Arterial blood pressure increased during all hypoxic sessions, although baseline normoxic systolic blood pressure was reduced from S1 to S3 in IH only (-8 ± 11 mmHg). Muscle oxygenation decreased significantly during S3 but not S1, for both hypoxic interventions (S3: SH -6 ± 5%, IH -3 ± 4%); pre-frontal oxygenation decreased in S1 and S3, and to a greater extent in SH vs. IH (-13 ± 3% vs. -6 ± 6%). Heart rate variability indices indicated a significantly larger increase in sympathetic activity in SH vs. IH (lower SDNN, PNN50, and RMSSD values in SH). From S1 to S3, further reduction in heart

  10. Seizure Severity Is Correlated With Severity of Hypoxic-Ischemic Injury in Abusive Head Trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dingman, Andra L; Stence, Nicholas V; O'Neill, Brent R; Sillau, Stefan H; Chapman, Kevin E

    2017-12-12

    The objective of this study was to characterize hypoxic-ischemic injury and seizures in abusive head trauma. We performed a retrospective study of 58 children with moderate or severe traumatic brain injury due to abusive head trauma. Continuous electroencephalograms and magnetic resonance images were scored. Electrographic seizures (51.2%) and hypoxic-ischemic injury (77.4%) were common in our cohort. Younger age was associated with electrographic seizures (no seizures: median age 13.5 months, interquartile range five to 25 months, versus seizures: 4.5 months, interquartile range 3 to 9.5 months; P = 0.001). Severity of hypoxic-ischemic injury was also associated with seizures (no seizures: median injury score 1.0, interquartile range 0 to 3, versus seizures: 4.5, interquartile range 3 to 8; P = 0.01), but traumatic injury severity was not associated with seizures (no seizures: mean injury score 3.78 ± 1.68 versus seizures: mean injury score 3.83 ± 0.95, P = 0.89). There was a correlation between hypoxic-ischemic injury severity and seizure burden when controlling for patient age (r s =0.61, P interquartile range 0 to 0.23 on magnetic resonance imaging done within two days versus median restricted diffusion ratio 0.13, interquartile range 0.01 to 0.43 on magnetic resonance imaging done after two days, P = 0.03). Electrographic seizures are common in children with moderate to severe traumatic brain injury from abusive head trauma, and therefore children with suspected abusive head trauma should be monitored with continuous electroencephalogram. Severity of hypoxic-ischemic brain injury is correlated with severity of seizures, and evidence of hypoxic-ischemic injury on magnetic resonance imaging may evolve over time. Therefore children with a high seizure burden should be reimaged to evaluate for evolving hypoxic-ischemic injury. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  11. Low-dose radiation suppresses Pokemon expression under hypoxic conditions.

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    Kim, Seung-Whan; Yu, Kweon; Shin, Kee-Sun; Kwon, Kisang; Hwang, Tae-Sik; Kwon, O-Yu

    2014-01-01

    Our previous data demonstrated that CoCl2-induced hypoxia controls endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress-associated and other intracellular factors. One of them, the transcription factor Pokemon, was differentially regulated by low-dose radiation (LDR). There are limited data regarding how this transcription factor is involved in expression of the unfolded protein response (UPR) under hypoxic conditions. The purpose of this study was to obtain clues on how Pokemon is involved in the UPR. Pokemon was selected as a differentially expressed gene under hypoxic conditions; however, its regulation was clearly repressed by LDR. It was also demonstrated that both expression of ER chaperones and ER stress sensors were affected by hypoxic conditions, and the same results were obtained when cells in which Pokemon was up- or down-regulated were used. The current state of UPR and LDR research associated with the Pokemon pathway offers an important opportunity to understand the oncogenesis, senescence, and differentiation of cells, as well as to facilitate introduction of new therapeutic radiopharmaceuticals.

  12. Oxygen saturation index and severity of hypoxic respiratory failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rawat, Munmun; Chandrasekharan, Praveen K; Williams, Ashley; Gugino, Sylvia; Koenigsknecht, Carmon; Swartz, Daniel; Ma, Chang Xing; Mathew, Bobby; Nair, Jayasree; Lakshminrusimha, Satyan

    2015-01-01

    The oxygenation index (OI = mean airway pressure, MAP × FiO2 × 100 : PaO2) is used to assess the severity of hypoxic respiratory failure (HRF) and persistent pulmonary hypertension of the newborn (PPHN). An indwelling arterial line or arterial punctures are necessary to obtain PaO2 for the calculation of OI. Oxygenation can be continuously and noninvasively assessed using pulse oximetry. The use of the oxygen saturation index (OSI = MAP × FiO2 × 100 : SpO2) can be an alternate method of assessing the severity of HRF. To evaluate the correlation between OSI and OI in the following: (1) neonates with HRF and (2) a lamb model of meconium aspiration syndrome. Human neonates: a retrospective chart review of 74 ventilated late preterm/term neonates with indwelling arterial access and SpO2 values in the first 24 h of life was conducted. OSI and OI were calculated and correlated. Lamb model: arterial blood gases were drawn and preductal SpO2 was documented in 40 term newborn lambs with asphyxia and meconium aspiration. OI and OSI were calculated and correlated with pulmonary vascular resistance (PVR). Mean values of OSI and OI showed a correlation coefficient of 0.952 in neonates (mean value of 308 observations in 74 neonates) and 0.948 in lambs (mean value of 743 observations in 40 lambs). In lambs, with increasing PVR, there was a decrease in OI and OSI. OSI correlates significantly with OI in infants with HRF. This noninvasive measure may be used to assess the severity of HRF and PPHN in neonates without arterial access. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel

  13. Uptake and excretion of organochlorine pesticides by Nereis virens under normoxic and hypoxic conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haya, K.; Burridge, L.E.

    1988-01-01

    The marine polychaete worm, Nereis virens, is resistant to organochlorine pesticides. When exposed to each of five pesticides (endosulfan, chlordane, endrin, dieldrin, and DDT) in concentrations ranging from 0.03 mg/L (DDT) to 22.0 mg/L (chlordane), only endosulfan and chlordane killed Nereis. In comparison, the same compounds were much more toxic to another marine invertebrate, Crangon septemspinosa. The authors wondered if the resistance of N. virens to organochlorines was related to their response to hypoxia. N. virens is a sediment dweller often found in intertidal regions and consequently may experience periods of severe oxygen deprivation; varying degrees of hypoxia can initiate a switch to anaerobic energy metabolism. When N. virens encounter hypoxic conditions, they can also exhibit a compensatory ventilation response. In the present study, the authors measured the bioaccumulation of endosulfan, dieldrin, and DDT by N. virens under normoxic and hypoxic conditions

  14. Nitric oxide metabolites in goldfish under normoxic and hypoxic conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Marie N.; Jensen, Frank Bo

    2010-01-01

    – and it is metabolized to nitrite and nitrate. Nitrite is used as a marker for NOS activity but it is also a NO donor that can be activated by various cellular proteins under hypoxic conditions. Here, we report the first systematic study of NO metabolites (nitrite, nitrate, S-nitroso, N-nitroso and Fe-nitrosyl compounds...... to and below the critical PO2] for two days caused large decreases in plasma nitrite and nitrate, which suggests reduced NOS activity and increased nitrite/nitrate utilization or loss. Tissue NO metabolites were largely maintained at their tissue-specific values under hypoxia, pointing at nitrite transfer from...... extracellular to intracellular compartments and cellular NO generation from nitrite. The data highlights the preference of goldfish to defend intracellular NO homeostasis during hypoxia....

  15. Considerations on hypoxic conditions. On the past setback of classic radiation biology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakatsugawa, Shigekazu; Klimova, S.V.; Tamasu, Shogo; Nakamura, Hideaki; Murayama, Chieko

    2002-01-01

    Considerations on hypoxic cancer cell environment are made on classic radiation biology concept and on a new proposal of the anti-cancer strategy. Classic radiation biology knowledge of hypoxic cancer cells has produced many of clinical trials, which, however, have failed after all. This is because the knowledge is that the cells are recognized to be in a rather static hypoxic condition. Based on authors' investigations, made is the proposal that improvement of dynamic, acute hypoxic conditions yielded via blood circulation between the heterogeneous malignant cancer cells and the dynamic homeostatic systems of normal cells including immunity is important as one of cancer therapy approaches. (N.I.)

  16. Cell-cycle distributions and radiation responses of Chinese hamster cells cultured continuously under hypoxic conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tokita, N.; Carpenter, S.G.; Raju, M.R.

    1984-01-01

    Cell-cycle distributions were measured by flow cytometry for Chinese hamster (CHO) cells cultured continuously under hypoxic conditions. DNA histograms showed an accumulation of cells in the early S phase followed by a traverse delay through the S phase, and a G 2 block. During hypoxic culturing, cell viability decreased rapidly to less than 0.1% at 120 h. Radiation responses for cells cultured under these conditions showed an extreme radioresistance at 72 h. Results suggest that hypoxia induces a condition similar to cell synchrony which itself changes the radioresistance of hypoxic cells. (author)

  17. Hypoxia-activated prodrug TH-302 decreased survival rate of canine lymphoma cells under hypoxic condition.

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    Yamazaki, Hiroki; Lai, Yu-Chang; Tateno, Morihiro; Setoguchi, Asuka; Goto-Koshino, Yuko; Endo, Yasuyuki; Nakaichi, Munekazu; Tsujimoto, Hajime; Miura, Naoki

    2017-01-01

    We tested the hypotheses that hypoxic stimulation enhances growth potentials of canine lymphoma cells by activating hypoxia-inducible factor 1α (HIF-1α), and that the hypoxia-activated prodrug (TH-302) inhibits growth potentials in the cells. We investigated how hypoxic culture affects the growth rate, chemoresistance, and invasiveness of canine lymphoma cells and doxorubicin (DOX)-resistant lymphoma cells, and influences of TH-302 on survival rate of the cells under hypoxic conditions. Our results demonstrated that hypoxic culture upregulated the expression of HIF-1α and its target genes, including ATP-binding cassette transporter B1 (ABCB1), ATP-binding cassette transporter G2 (ABCG2), platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), and survivin, and enhanced the growth rate, DOX resistance, and invasiveness of the cells. Additionally, TH-302 decreased the survival rate of the cells under hypoxic condition. Our studies suggest that hypoxic stimulation may advance the tumorigenicity of canine lymphoma cells, favoring malignant transformation. Therefore, the data presented may contribute to the development of TH-302-based hypoxia-targeting therapies for canine lymphoma.

  18. CHANGES IN THE GLUTATHIONE SYSTEM IN P19 EMBRYONAL CARCINOMA CELLS UNDER HYPOXIC CONDITIONS

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    D. S. Orlov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. According to modern perceptions, tumor growth, along with oxidative stress formation, is accompanied by hypoxia. Nowadays studying the regulation of cellular molecular system functioning by conformational changes in proteins appears to be a topical issue. Research goal was to evaluate the state of the glutathione system and the level of protein glutathionylation in P19 embryonal carcinoma (EC cells under hypoxic conditions.Material and methods. P19 EC cells (mouse embryonal carcinoma cultured under normoxic and hypox-ic conditions served the research material.The concentration of total, oxidized, reduced and protein-bound glutathione, the reduced to oxidized thiol ratio as well as glutathione peroxidase and glutathione reductase activity were determined by spectropho-tometry.Results. Glutathione imbalance was accompanied by a decrease in P19 EC cell redox status under hypox-ic conditions against the backdrop of a rise in protein-bound glutathione.Conclusions. As a result of the conducted study oxidative stress formation was identified when modeling hypoxia in P19 embryonal carcinoma cells. The rise in the concentration of protein-bound glutathione may indicate the role of protein glutathionylation in regulation of P19 cell metabolism and functions un-der hypoxia. 

  19. Amplitude-integrated Electroencephalography in Full-term Newborns without Severe Hypoxic-ischemic Encephalopathy: Case Series

    OpenAIRE

    Osredkar, Damjan; Derganc, Metka; Paro-Panjan, Darja; Neubauer, David

    2006-01-01

    Aim: To assess the diagnostic value of amplitude-integrated electroencephalography (EEG) in comparison to standard EEG in newborns without severe hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy who were at risk for seizures. Methods: The study included a consecutive series of 18 term newborns without severe hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy, but with clinical signs suspicious of epileptic seizures, history of loss of social contact, disturbance of muscle tone, hyperirritability, and/or jitteriness. Amplitud...

  20. In vitro effects of piracetam on the radiosensitivity of hypoxic cells (adaptation of MTT assay to hypoxic conditions); Effets in vitro du piracetam sur la radiosensibilite des cellules hypoxiques (adapatation du test au MTT aux conditions d`hypoxie)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gheuens, E.E.O.; Bruijn, E.A. de; Van der Heyden, S.; Van Oosterom, A.T. [Universitaire Instelling Antwerpen, Antwerp (Belgium); Lagarde, P. [Universitaire Instelling Antwerpen, Antwerp (Belgium)]|[Institut Bergonie, 33 - Bordeaux (France); Pooter, C.M.J. de [Universitaire Instelling Antwerpen, Antwerp (Belgium)]|[Hopital de Middelheim, Anvers (Belgium); Chomy, F. [Institut Bergonie, 33 - Bordeaux (France)

    1995-12-31

    This paper describes the adaptation of the MTT assay to hypoxic conditions in order to test the in vitro effect of piracetam on hypoxic cells and particularly on the radiosensitivity of hypoxic cells since this drug has shown clinical effect on acute and chronic hypoxia. The V79 cell line was selected by reference to preliminary hypoxic experiments using clonogenic assay and euoxic experiments using clonogenic and MTT assays. Cell growth and survival in our hypoxic conditions were assessed using MTT assay with an enclosure and special 48-well plates both made of glass. Growth curves on glass plates after 1-hour exposure to nitrogen versus air were comparable, so there is no bias effect due to gas composition. Survival curves using MTT versus reference clonogenic assay were comparable after radiation exposure in eu- and hypoxic conditions, and confirm the validity of our original technique for creating hypoxia. The Oxygen Enhancement Ratio was of about 3 for 1-hour hypoxic exposure. Piracetam gave no cytotoxic effect up to 10 mM of piracetam. Growth curves after continuous drug exposure and 1-hour euoxic versus hypoxic exposure gave no cytotoxic effect up to 10 mM of piracetam. Survival curves after continuous drug exposure to 10 mM of piracetam gave no significant effect on the radiosensitivity of hypoxic V79 cells using MTT or clonogenic assay. (author). 32 refs., 6 figs.

  1. Increased betulinic acid induced cytotoxicity and radiosensitivity in glioma cells under hypoxic conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bache, Matthias; Taubert, Helge; Vordermark, Dirk; Zschornak, Martin P; Passin, Sarina; Keßler, Jacqueline; Wichmann, Henri; Kappler, Matthias; Paschke, Reinhard; Kaluđerović, Goran N; Kommera, Harish

    2011-01-01

    Betulinic acid (BA) is a novel antineoplastic agent under evaluation for tumor therapy. Because of the selective cytotoxic effects of BA in tumor cells (including gliomas), the combination of this agent with conservative therapies (such as radiotherapy and chemotherapy) may be useful. Previously, the combination of BA with irradiation under hypoxic conditions had never been studied. In this study, the effects of 3 to 30 μM BA on cytotoxicity, migration, the protein expression of PARP, survivin and HIF-1α, as well as radiosensitivity under normoxic and hypoxic conditions were analyzed in the human malignant glioma cell lines U251MG and U343MG. Cytotoxicity and radiosensitivity were analyzed with clonogenic survival assays, migration was analyzed with Boyden chamber assays (or scratch assays) and protein expression was examined with Western blot analyses. Under normoxic conditions, a half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC 50 ) of 23 μM was observed in U251MG cells and 24 μM was observed in U343MG cells. Under hypoxic conditions, 10 μM or 15 μM of BA showed a significantly increased cytotoxicity in U251MG cells (p = 0.004 and p = 0.01, respectively) and U343MG cells (p < 0.05 and p = 0.01, respectively). The combination of BA with radiotherapy resulted in an additive effect in the U343MG cell line under normoxic and hypoxic conditions. Weak radiation enhancement was observed in U251MG cell line after treatment with BA under normoxic conditions. Furthermore, under hypoxic conditions, the incubation with BA resulted in increased radiation enhancement. The enhancement factor, at an irradiation dose of 15 Gy after treatment with 10 or 15 μM BA, was 2.20 (p = 0.02) and 4.50 (p = 0.03), respectively. Incubation with BA led to decreased cell migration, cleavage of PARP and decreased expression levels of survivin in both cell lines. Additionally, BA treatment resulted in a reduction of HIF-1α protein under hypoxic conditions. Our results suggest that BA is capable

  2. Oxygen Generating Biomaterials Preserve Skeletal Muscle Homeostasis under Hypoxic and Ischemic Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-26

    injection” protocol for myogenic cell transplantation throughout large volumes of muscles in a Duchenne muscular dystrophy patient: eighteen months follow-up...Oxygen Generating Biomaterials Preserve Skeletal Muscle Homeostasis under Hypoxic and Ischemic Conditions Catherine L. Ward, Benjamin T. Corona...investigation was to determine if sodium percarbonate (SPO), an oxygen generating biomaterial, is capable of maintaining resting skeletal muscle

  3. Temporal Transcriptome of Mouse ATDC5 Chondroprogenitors Differentiating under Hypoxic Conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Li; Fink, Trine; Ebbesen, Peter

    2006-01-01

    The formation of cartilage takes place in vivo in an environment of reduced oxygen tension. To study the effect of hypoxia on the process of chondrogenesis, ATDC5 mouse chondroprogenitor cells were induced to differentiate by the addition of insulin and cultured under ambient and hypoxic conditions...

  4. Extreme Hypoxic Conditions Induce Selective Molecular Responses and Metabolic Reset in Detached Apple Fruit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cukrov, Dubravka; Zermiani, Monica; Brizzolara, Stefano; Cestaro, Alessandro; Licausi, Francesco; Luchinat, Claudio; Santucci, Claudio; Tenori, Leonardo; Van Veen, Hans; Zuccolo, Andrea; Ruperti, Benedetto; Tonutti, Pietro

    2016-01-01

    The ripening physiology of detached fruit is altered by low oxygen conditions with profound effects on quality parameters. To study hypoxia-related processes and regulatory mechanisms, apple (Malus domestica, cv Granny Smith) fruit, harvested at commercial ripening, were kept at 1°C under normoxic (control) and hypoxic (0.4 and 0.8 kPa oxygen) conditions for up to 60 days. NMR analyses of cortex tissue identified eight metabolites showing significantly different accumulations between samples, with ethanol and alanine displaying the most pronounced difference between hypoxic and normoxic treatments. A rapid up-regulation of alcohol dehydrogenase and pyruvate-related metabolism (lactate dehydrogenase, pyruvate decarboxylase, alanine aminotransferase) gene expression was detected under both hypoxic conditions with a more pronounced effect induced by the lowest (0.4 kPa) oxygen concentration. Both hypoxic conditions negatively affected ACC synthase and ACC oxidase transcript accumulation. Analysis of RNA-seq data of samples collected after 24 days of hypoxic treatment identified more than 1000 genes differentially expressed when comparing 0.4 vs. 0.8 kPa oxygen concentration samples. Genes involved in cell-wall, minor and major CHO, amino acid and secondary metabolisms, fermentation and glycolysis as well as genes involved in transport, defense responses, and oxidation-reduction appeared to be selectively affected by treatments. The lowest oxygen concentration induced a higher expression of transcription factors belonging to AUX/IAA, WRKY, HB, Zinc-finger families, while MADS box family genes were more expressed when apples were kept under 0.8 kPa oxygen. Out of the eight group VII ERF members present in apple genome, two genes showed a rapid up-regulation under hypoxia, and western blot analysis showed that apple MdRAP2.12 proteins were differentially accumulated in normoxic and hypoxic samples, with the highest level reached under 0.4 kPa oxygen. These data suggest

  5. Irradiation combined with Bleomycin treatment of synchronized cells in culture under oxic and hypoxic conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Midander, J.; Littbrand, B.; Edsmyr, F.

    1980-01-01

    Bleomycin-treated cells are sensitized to radiation delivered under oxic conditions both in the early S and G 2 phases of the cycle, irradiated under hypoxic conditions, sensitization occurs only in the early S phase. This difference in the sensitizing effect of the drug is discussed in regard to the possible clinical advantages of a combined treatment of tumours with irradiation and Bleomycin. (Auth.)

  6. Mangiferin ameliorates insulin resistance by inhibiting inflammation and regulatiing adipokine expression in adipocytes under hypoxic condition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chao-Qiang; Xu, Jing-Hua; Yan, Dan-Dan; Liu, Bao-Lin; Liu, Kang; Huang, Fang

    2017-09-01

    Adipose tissue hypoxia has been recognized as the initiation of insulin resistance syndromes. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of mangiferin on the insulin signaling pathway and explore whether mangiferin could ameliorate insulin resistance caused by hypoxia in adipose tissue. Differentiated 3T3-L1 adipocytes were incubated under normal and hypoxic conditions, respectively. Protein expressions were analyzed by Western blotting. Inflammatory cytokines and HIF-1-dependent genes were tested by ELISA and q-PCR, respectively. The glucose uptake was detected by fluorescence microscopy. HIF-1α was abundantly expressed during 8 h of hypoxic incubation. Inflammatory reaction was activated by up-regulated NF-κB phosphorylation and released cytokines like IL-6 and TNF-α. Glucose uptake was inhibited and insulin signaling pathway was damaged as well. Mangiferin substantially inhibited the expression of HIF-1α. Lactate acid and lipolysis, products released by glycometabolism and lipolysis, were also inhibited. The expression of inflammatory cytokines was significantly reduced and the damaged insulin signaling pathway was restored to proper functional level. The glucose uptake of hypoxic adipocytes was promoted and the dysfunction of adipocytes was relieved. These results showed that mangiferin could not only improve the damaged insulin signaling pathway in hypoxic adipocytes, but also ameliorate inflammatory reaction and insulin resistance caused by hypoxia. Copyright © 2017 China Pharmaceutical University. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Conditioned medium from hypoxic bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells enhances wound healing in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Chen

    Full Text Available Growing evidence indicates that bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BM-MSCs enhance wound repair via paracrine. Because the extent of environmental oxygenation affects the innate characteristics of BM-MSCs, including their stemness and migration capacity, the current study set out to elucidate and compare the impact of normoxic and hypoxic cell-culture conditions on the expression and secretion of BM-MSC-derived paracrine molecules (e.g., cytokines, growth factors and chemokines that hypothetically contribute to cutaneous wound healing in vivo. Semi-quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA analyses of normoxic and hypoxic BM-MSCs and their conditioned medium fractions showed that the stem cells expressed and secreted significantly higher amounts of basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF,vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGF-A interleukin 6 (IL-6 and interleukin 8 (IL-8 under hypoxic conditions. Moreover, hypoxic BM-MSC-derived conditioned medium (hypoCM vs. normoxic BM-MSC-derived conditioned medium (norCM or vehicle control medium significantly enhanced the proliferation of keratinocytes, fibroblasts and endothelial cells, the migration of keratinocytes, fibroblasts, endothelial cells and monocytes, and the formation of tubular structures by endothelial cells cultured on Matrigel matrix. Consistent with these in vitro results, skin wound contraction was significantly accelerated in Balb/c nude mice treated with topical hypoCM relative to norCM or the vehicle control. Notably increased in vivo cell proliferation, neovascularization as well as recruitment of inflammatory macrophages and evidently decreased collagen I, and collagen III were also found in the hypoCM-treated group. These findings suggest that BM-MSCs promote murine skin wound healing via hypoxia-enhanced paracrine.

  8. [SOS response of DNA repair and genetic cell instability under hypoxic conditions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasil'eva, S V; Strel'tsova, D A

    2011-01-01

    The SOS DNA repair pathway is induced in E. coli as a multifunctional cell response to a wide variety of signals: UV, X or gamma-irradiation, mitomycin C or nalidixic acid treatment, thymine starvation, etc. Triggering of the system can be used as a general and early sign of DNA damage. Additionally, the SOS-response is known to be an "error-prone" DNA repair pathway and one of the sources of genetic instability. Hypoxic conditions are established to be the major factor of genetic instability as well. In this paper we for the first time studied the SOS DNA repair response under hypoxic conditions induced by the well known aerobic SOS-inducers. The SOS DNA repair response was examined as a reaction of E. coli PQ37 [sfiA::lacZ] cells to UVC, NO-donating agents and 4NQO. Here we provide evidence that those agents were able to induce the SOS DNA repair response in E. coli at anaerobic growth conditions. The process does not depend on the transcriptional activity of the universal protein of E. col anaerobic growth Fnr [4Fe-4S]2+ or can not be referred to as an indicator of genetic instability in hypoxic conditions.

  9. Susceptibility profiles of amphotericin B and posaconazole against clinically relevant mucorales species under hypoxic conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maurer, Elisabeth; Binder, Ulrike; Sparber, Manuela; Lackner, Michaela; Caramalho, Rita; Lass-Flörl, Cornelia

    2015-02-01

    The effect of hypoxic conditions on the in vitro efficacy of amphotericin B and posaconazole against Mucorales was evaluated by defining MICs with Etest and broth microdilution and identifying minimal fungicidal concentrations (MFCs). With Etest, oxygen-dependent changes were detected, while the MIC and the MFC determined with broth microdilution remained unaltered with reduced oxygen levels. The observed differences depended on the method used. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  10. Clusterin and chemotherapy sensitivity under normoxic and graded hypoxic conditions in colorectal cancer.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kevans, David

    2012-06-01

    In vitro studies have shown that clusterin modulates treatment sensitivity in a number of human cancers; however, the interaction between clusterin expression and hypoxia in controlling treatment response in CRC has not previously been examined. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of clusterin overexpression in CRC cells on sensitivity to 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), oxaliplatin and FOLFOX treatment under normoxic and graded hypoxic conditions.

  11. Hypoxia-inducible factor 1-mediated human GATA1 induction promotes erythroid differentiation under hypoxic conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Feng-Lin; Shen, Guo-Min; Liu, Xiao-Ling; Wang, Fang; Zhao, Ying-Ze; Zhang, Jun-Wu

    2012-08-01

    Hypoxia-inducible factor promotes erythropoiesis through coordinated cell type-specific hypoxia responses. GATA1 is essential to normal erythropoiesis and plays a crucial role in erythroid differentiation. In this study, we show that hypoxia-induced GATA1 expression is mediated by HIF1 in erythroid cells. Under hypoxic conditions, significantly increased GATA1 mRNA and protein levels were detected in K562 cells and erythroid induction cultures of CD34(+) haematopoietic stem/progenitor cells. Enforced HIF1α expression increased GATA1 expression, while HIF1α knockdown by RNA interference decreased GATA1 expression. In silico analysis revealed one potential hypoxia response element (HRE). The results from reporter gene and mutation analysis suggested that this element is necessary for hypoxic response. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP)-PCR showed that the putative HRE was recognized and bound by HIF1 in vivo. These results demonstrate that the up-regulation of GATA1 during hypoxia is directly mediated by HIF1.The mRNA expression of some erythroid differentiation markers was increased under hypoxic conditions, but decreased with RNA interference of HIF1α or GATA1. Flow cytometry analysis also indicated that hypoxia, desferrioxamine or CoCl(2) induced expression of erythroid surface markers CD71 and CD235a, while expression repression of HIF1α or GATA1 by RNA interference led to a decreased expression of CD235a. These results suggested that HIF1-mediated GATA1 up-regulation promotes erythropoiesis in order to satisfy the needs of an organism under hypoxic conditions. © 2011 The Authors Journal of Cellular and Molecular Medicine © 2011 Foundation for Cellular and Molecular Medicine/Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  12. Detailed assessment of gene activation levels by multiple hypoxia-responsive elements under various hypoxic conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeuchi, Yasuto; Inubushi, Masayuki; Jin, Yong-Nan; Murai, Chika; Tsuji, Atsushi B; Hata, Hironobu; Kitagawa, Yoshimasa; Saga, Tsuneo

    2014-12-01

    HIF-1/HRE pathway is a promising target for the imaging and the treatment of intractable malignancy (HIF-1; hypoxia-inducible factor 1, HRE; hypoxia-responsive element). The purposes of our study are: (1) to assess the gene activation levels resulting from various numbers of HREs under various hypoxic conditions, (2) to evaluate the bidirectional activity of multiple HREs, and (3) to confirm whether multiple HREs can induce gene expression in vivo. Human colon carcinoma HCT116 cells were transiently transfected by the constructs containing a firefly luciferase reporter gene and various numbers (2, 4, 6, 8, 10, and 12) of HREs (nHRE+, nHRE-). The relative luciferase activities were measured under various durations of hypoxia (6, 12, 18, and 24 h), O2 concentrations (1, 2, 4, 8, and 16 %), and various concentrations of deferoxamine mesylate (20, 40, 80, 160, and 320 µg/mL growth medium). The bidirectional gene activation levels by HREs were examined in the constructs (dual-luc-nHREs) containing firefly and Renilla luciferase reporter genes at each side of nHREs. Finally, to test whether the construct containing 12HRE and the NIS reporter gene (12HRE-NIS) can induce gene expression in vivo, SPECT imaging was performed in a mouse xenograft model. (1) gene activation levels by HREs tended to increase with increasing HRE copy number, but a saturation effect was observed in constructs with more than 6 or 8 copies of an HRE, (2) gene activation levels by HREs increased remarkably during 6-12 h of hypoxia, but not beyond 12 h, (3) gene activation levels by HREs decreased with increasing O2 concentrations, but could be detected even under mild hypoxia at 16 % O2, (4) the bidirectionally proportional activity of the HRE was confirmed regardless of the hypoxic severity, and (5) NIS expression driven by 12 tandem copies of an HRE in response to hypoxia could be visualized on in vivo SPECT imaging. The results of this study will help in the understanding and assessment of

  13. The dietary flavonoid kaempferol effectively inhibits HIF-1 activity and hepatoma cancer cell viability under hypoxic conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mylonis, Ilias; Lakka, Achillia; Tsakalof, Andreas; Simos, George

    2010-01-01

    Research highlights: → Kaempferol inhibits HIF-1 activity in hepatocarcinoma cells; → Kaempferol causes cytoplasmic mislocalization of HIF-1α by impairing the MAPK pathway. → Viability of hepatocarcinoma cells under hypoxia is reduced by kaempferol. -- Abstract: Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is characterized by high mortality rates and resistance to conventional treatment. HCC tumors usually develop local hypoxia, which stimulates proliferation of cancer cells and renders them resilient to chemotherapy. Adaptation of tumor cells to the hypoxic conditions depends on the hypoxia-inducible factor 1 (HIF-1). Over-expression of its regulated HIF-1α subunit, an important target of anti-cancer therapy, is observed in many cancers including HCC and is associated with severity of tumor growth and poor patient prognosis. In this report we investigate the effect of the dietary flavonoid kaempferol on activity, expression levels and localization of HIF-1α as well as viability of human hepatoma (Huh7) cancer cells. Treatment of Huh7 cells with kaempferol under hypoxic conditions (1% oxygen) effectively inhibited HIF-1 activity in a dose-dependent manner (IC 50 = 5.16 μM). The mechanism of this inhibition did not involve suppression of HIF-1α protein levels but rather its mislocalization into the cytoplasm due to inactivation of p44/42 MAPK by kaempferol (IC 50 = 4.75 μM). Exposure of Huh7 cells to 10 μΜ kaempferol caused significant reduction of their viability, which was remarkably more evident under hypoxic conditions. In conclusion, kaempferol, a non-toxic natural food component, inhibits both MAPK and HIF-1 activity at physiologically relevant concentrations (5-10 μM) and suppresses hepatocarcinoma cell survival more efficiently under hypoxia. It has, therefore, potential as a therapeutic or chemopreventive anti-HCC agent.

  14. The dietary flavonoid kaempferol effectively inhibits HIF-1 activity and hepatoma cancer cell viability under hypoxic conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mylonis, Ilias; Lakka, Achillia; Tsakalof, Andreas [Laboratory of Biochemistry, School of Medicine, University of Thessaly, BIOPOLIS, 41110 Larissa (Greece); Institute of Biomedical Research and Technology (BIOMED), 51 Papanastasiou str., 41222 Larissa (Greece); Simos, George, E-mail: simos@med.uth.gr [Laboratory of Biochemistry, School of Medicine, University of Thessaly, BIOPOLIS, 41110 Larissa (Greece); Institute of Biomedical Research and Technology (BIOMED), 51 Papanastasiou str., 41222 Larissa (Greece)

    2010-07-16

    Research highlights: {yields} Kaempferol inhibits HIF-1 activity in hepatocarcinoma cells; {yields} Kaempferol causes cytoplasmic mislocalization of HIF-1{alpha} by impairing the MAPK pathway. {yields} Viability of hepatocarcinoma cells under hypoxia is reduced by kaempferol. -- Abstract: Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is characterized by high mortality rates and resistance to conventional treatment. HCC tumors usually develop local hypoxia, which stimulates proliferation of cancer cells and renders them resilient to chemotherapy. Adaptation of tumor cells to the hypoxic conditions depends on the hypoxia-inducible factor 1 (HIF-1). Over-expression of its regulated HIF-1{alpha} subunit, an important target of anti-cancer therapy, is observed in many cancers including HCC and is associated with severity of tumor growth and poor patient prognosis. In this report we investigate the effect of the dietary flavonoid kaempferol on activity, expression levels and localization of HIF-1{alpha} as well as viability of human hepatoma (Huh7) cancer cells. Treatment of Huh7 cells with kaempferol under hypoxic conditions (1% oxygen) effectively inhibited HIF-1 activity in a dose-dependent manner (IC{sub 50} = 5.16 {mu}M). The mechanism of this inhibition did not involve suppression of HIF-1{alpha} protein levels but rather its mislocalization into the cytoplasm due to inactivation of p44/42 MAPK by kaempferol (IC{sub 50} = 4.75 {mu}M). Exposure of Huh7 cells to 10 {mu}{Mu} kaempferol caused significant reduction of their viability, which was remarkably more evident under hypoxic conditions. In conclusion, kaempferol, a non-toxic natural food component, inhibits both MAPK and HIF-1 activity at physiologically relevant concentrations (5-10 {mu}M) and suppresses hepatocarcinoma cell survival more efficiently under hypoxia. It has, therefore, potential as a therapeutic or chemopreventive anti-HCC agent.

  15. The dietary flavonoid kaempferol effectively inhibits HIF-1 activity and hepatoma cancer cell viability under hypoxic conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mylonis, Ilias; Lakka, Achillia; Tsakalof, Andreas; Simos, George

    2010-07-16

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is characterized by high mortality rates and resistance to conventional treatment. HCC tumors usually develop local hypoxia, which stimulates proliferation of cancer cells and renders them resilient to chemotherapy. Adaptation of tumor cells to the hypoxic conditions depends on the hypoxia-inducible factor 1 (HIF-1). Over-expression of its regulated HIF-1alpha subunit, an important target of anti-cancer therapy, is observed in many cancers including HCC and is associated with severity of tumor growth and poor patient prognosis. In this report we investigate the effect of the dietary flavonoid kaempferol on activity, expression levels and localization of HIF-1alpha as well as viability of human hepatoma (Huh7) cancer cells. Treatment of Huh7 cells with kaempferol under hypoxic conditions (1% oxygen) effectively inhibited HIF-1 activity in a dose-dependent manner (IC(50)=5.16microM). The mechanism of this inhibition did not involve suppression of HIF-1alpha protein levels but rather its mislocalization into the cytoplasm due to inactivation of p44/42 MAPK by kaempferol (IC(50)=4.75microM). Exposure of Huh7 cells to 10microM kaempferol caused significant reduction of their viability, which was remarkably more evident under hypoxic conditions. In conclusion, kaempferol, a non-toxic natural food component, inhibits both MAPK and HIF-1 activity at physiologically relevant concentrations (5-10microM) and suppresses hepatocarcinoma cell survival more efficiently under hypoxia. It has, therefore, potential as a therapeutic or chemopreventive anti-HCC agent. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Antimycobacterial Efficacy of Andrographis paniculata Leaf Extracts Under Intracellular and Hypoxic Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatter, Purva; Gupta, Pooja; Daswani, Poonam; Tetali, Pundarikakshudu; Birdi, Tannaz

    2015-01-01

    The inhibition of the growth of Mycobacterium tuberculosis by the extracts of Andrographis paniculata has been studied using intracellular and axenic hypoxic conditions. The inhibition (confirmed using the gold standard colony forming unit assay) was found to increase with "double stimuli" or higher concentration of the extract. Organic solvent extracts were found to inhibit bacterial growth more than the aqueous extracts under microaerophilic conditions mimicked through axenic and intracellular assays. This could be further explored to evaluate the potential of the plant to be used against nonreplicating/dormant bacilli. © The Author(s) 2014.

  17. The role of heat shock protein (HSP as inhibitor apoptosis in hypoxic conditions of bone marrow stem cell culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sri Wigati Mardi Mulyani

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: The concept of stem cell therapy is one of the new hope as a medical therapy on salivary gland defect. However, the lack of viability of the transplanted stem cells survival rate led to the decrease of effectiveness of stem cell therapy. The underlying assumption in the decrease of viability and function of stem cells is an increase of apoptosis incidence. It suggests that the microenvironment in the area of damaged tissues is not conducive to support stem cell viability. One of the microenvironment is the hypoxia condition. Several scientific journals revealed that the administration of hypoxic cell culture can result in stress cells but on the other hand the stress condition of the cells also stimulates heat shock protein 27 (HSP 27 as antiapoptosis through inhibition of caspase 9. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to examine the role of heat shock protein 27 as inhibitor apoptosis in hypoxic conditions of bone marrow stem cell culture. Methods: Stem cell culture was performed in hypoxic conditions (O2 1% and measured the resistance to apoptosis through HSP 27 and caspase 9 expression of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells by using immunoflorecence and real time PCR. Results: The result of study showed that preconditioning hypoxia could inhibit apoptosis through increasing HSP 27 and decreasing level of caspase 9. Conclusion: The study suggested that hypoxic precondition could reduce apoptosis by increasing amount of heat shock protein 27 and decreasing caspase 9.Latar belakang: Konsep terapi stem cell merupakan salah satu harapan baru sebagai terapi medis kelainan kelenjar ludah. Namun, rendahnya viabilitas stem cell yang ditransplantasikan menyebabkan penurunan efektivitas terapi. Asumsi yang mendasari rendahnya viabilitas dan fungsi stem cell adalah tingginya kejadian apoptosis. Hal ini menunjukkan bahwa lingkungan mikro di daerah jaringan yang rusak tidak kondusif untuk mendukung viabilitas stem cell. Salah satu lingkungan

  18. Proliferation and differentiation of bone marrow stromal cells under hypoxic conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hongying, Ren; Huiguo, Cai; Zhongchao, Han; Renchi, Yang; Zhao, Qinjun [State Key Lab of Experimental Hematology, Institute of Hematology and Blood Disease Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union of Medical College, Tianjin (China); Ying, Cao; Jing, Li [Institute of Basic Medical Sciences and School of Basic Medicine, Center of Excellence in Tissue Engineering, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Beijing (China); Cixiang, Zhou [Health Science Center, Shanghai Institutes of Biological Sciences, Chinese Academy of Science-SSMU, Shanghai (China); Lianming, Liao; Mingyue, Jia [Institute of Basic Medical Sciences and School of Basic Medicine, Center of Excellence in Tissue Engineering, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Beijing (China); Qian, Zhao [Health Science Center, Shanghai Institutes of Biological Sciences, Chinese Academy of Science-SSMU, Shanghai (China); Guoqiang, Chen [Health Science Center, Shanghai Institutes of Biological Sciences, Chinese Academy of Science-SSMU, Shanghai (China); Zhao, R C [State Key Lab of Experimental Hematology, Institute of Hematology and Blood Disease Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union of Medical College, Tianjin (China); [Institute of Basic Medical Sciences and School of Basic Medicine, Center of Excellence in Tissue Engineering, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Beijing (China)]. E-mail: chunhuaz@public.tpt.tj.cn

    2006-08-18

    Low oxygen tension is a potent differentiation inducer of numerous cell types and an effective stimulus of many gene expressions. Here, we described that under 8% O{sub 2}, bone marrow stromal cells (MSCs) exhibited proliferative and morphologic changes. The level of differentiated antigen H-2Dd and the number of G{sub 2}/S/M phase cells increased evidently under 8% O{sub 2} condition. Also, the proportion of wide, flattened, and epithelial-like cells (which were alkaline phosphatase staining positive) in MSCs increased significantly. When cultured in adipogenic medium, there was a 5- to 6-fold increase in the number of lipid droplets under hypoxic conditions compared with that in normoxic culture. We also demonstrated the existence of MSC differentiation under hypoxic conditions by electron microscopy. Expression of Oct4 was inhibited under 8% O{sub 2} condition, but after adipocyte differentiation in normoxic culture and hypoxia-mimicking agents cobalt chloride (CoCl{sub 2}) and deferoxamine mesylate (DFX) treatments, Oct4 was still expressed in MSCs. These results indicate hypoxia accelerates MSC differentiation and hypoxia and hypoxia-mimicking agents exert different effects on MSC differentiation.

  19. HIF-1α-induced HSP70 regulates anabolic responses in articular chondrocytes under hypoxic conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuchida, Shinji; Arai, Yuji; Takahashi, Kenji A; Kishida, Tsunao; Terauchi, Ryu; Honjo, Kuniaki; Nakagawa, Shuji; Inoue, Hiroaki; Ikoma, Kazuya; Ueshima, Keiichiro; Matsuki, Tomohiro; Mazda, Osam; Kubo, Toshikazu

    2014-08-01

    We assessed whether heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) is involved in hypoxia inducible factor 1 alpha (HIF-1α)-dependent anabolic pathways in articular chondrocytes under hypoxic conditions. Primary rabbit chondrocytes were cultured under normoxia (20% oxygen condition) or hypoxia (1% oxygen condition). Alternatively, cells cultured under normoxia were treated with CoCl2 , which induces HIF-1α, to simulate hypoxia, or transfected with siRNAs targeting HIF-1α (si-HIF-1α) and HSP70 (si-HSP70) under hypoxia. HSP70 expression was enhanced by the increased expression of HIF-1α under hypoxia or simulated hypoxia, but not in the presence of si-HIF-1α. Hypoxia-induced overexpression of ECM genes was significantly suppressed by si-HIF-1α or si-HSP70. Cell viability positively correlated with hypoxia, but transfection with si-HIF-1α or si-HSP70 abrogated the chondroprotective effects of hypoxia. Although LDH release from sodium nitroprusside-treated cells and the proportion of TUNEL positive cells were decreased under hypoxia, transfection with si-HIF-1α or si-HSP70 almost completely blocked these effects. These findings indicated that HIF-1α-induced HSP70 overexpression increased the expression levels of ECM genes and cell viability, and protected chondrocytes from apoptosis. HIF-1α may regulate the anabolic effects of chondrocytes under hypoxic conditions by regulating HSP70 expression. © 2014 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Proliferation and differentiation of bone marrow stromal cells under hypoxic conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ren Hongying; Cao Ying; Zhao, Qinjun; Li Jing; Zhou Cixiang; Liao Lianming; Jia Mingyue; Zhao Qian; Cai Huiguo; Han Zhongchao; Yang Renchi; Chen Guoqiang; Zhao, R.C.

    2006-01-01

    Low oxygen tension is a potent differentiation inducer of numerous cell types and an effective stimulus of many gene expressions. Here, we described that under 8% O 2 , bone marrow stromal cells (MSCs) exhibited proliferative and morphologic changes. The level of differentiated antigen H-2Dd and the number of G 2 /S/M phase cells increased evidently under 8% O 2 condition. Also, the proportion of wide, flattened, and epithelial-like cells (which were alkaline phosphatase staining positive) in MSCs increased significantly. When cultured in adipogenic medium, there was a 5- to 6-fold increase in the number of lipid droplets under hypoxic conditions compared with that in normoxic culture. We also demonstrated the existence of MSC differentiation under hypoxic conditions by electron microscopy. Expression of Oct4 was inhibited under 8% O 2 condition, but after adipocyte differentiation in normoxic culture and hypoxia-mimicking agents cobalt chloride (CoCl 2 ) and deferoxamine mesylate (DFX) treatments, Oct4 was still expressed in MSCs. These results indicate hypoxia accelerates MSC differentiation and hypoxia and hypoxia-mimicking agents exert different effects on MSC differentiation

  1. Energy metabolism in human melanoma cells under hypoxic and acidic conditions in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skøyum, R; Eide, K; Berg, K; Rofstad, E K

    1997-01-01

    The response to treatment and the malignant progression of tumours are influenced by the ability of the tumour cells to withstand severe energy deprivation during prolonged exposure to hypoxia at normal or low extracellular pH (pHe). The objective of the present work was to demonstrate intertumour heterogeneity under conditions of microenvironment-induced energy deprivation and to investigate whether the heterogeneity can be attributed to differences in the capacity of the tumour cells to generate energy in an oxygen-deficient microenvironment. Cultures of four human melanoma cell lines (BEX-c, COX-c, SAX-c, WIX-c) were exposed to hypoxia in vitro at pHe 7.4, 7.0 or 6.6 for times up to 31 h by using the steel-chamber method. High-performance liquid chromatography was used to assess adenylate energy charge as a function of exposure time. Cellular rates of glucose uptake and lactate release were determined by using standard enzymatic test kits. The adenylate energy charge decreased with time under hypoxia in all cell lines. The decrease was most pronounced shortly after the treatment had been initiated and then tapered off. BEX-c and SAX-c showed a significantly higher adenylate energy charge under hypoxic conditions than did COX-c and WIX-c whether the pHe was 7.4, 7.0 or 6.6, showing that tumours can differ in the ability to avoid energy deprivation during microenvironmental stress. There was no correlation between the adenylate energy charge and the rates of glucose uptake and lactate release. Intertumour heterogeneity in the ability to withstand energy deprivation in an oxygen-deficient microenvironment cannot therefore be attributed mainly to differences in the capacity of the tumour cells to generate energy by anaerobic metabolism. The data presented here suggest that the heterogeneity is rather caused by differences in the capacity of the tumour cells to reduce the rate of energy consumption when exposed to hypoxia.

  2. The toxicokinetics of cadmium in carp under normoxic and hypoxic conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hattink, Jasper; Boeck, Gudrun De; Blust, Ronny

    2005-01-01

    Temporal depletion of oxygen, i.e. hypoxic events, frequently occurs in natural waters. It has been suggested that accumulation of micro-pollutants increases in aquatic animals as a result of an increased ventilation rate during such occasions. The observed increased toxicity under hypoxia of micro-pollutants may support this hypothesis, but for heavy metals the available uptake studies are contradictory. The present study tests whether accumulation of cadmium in common carp, Cyprinus carpio (L.) is increased under hypoxia and if the toxicokinetics are altered. A cadmium toxicity study was performed in which the cadmium uptake rates were determined using the radiotracer 109 Cd under hypoxia and normoxia. The cadmium toxicokinetics were studied with radiotracer experiments at 100% air saturation, 50%, and 25% saturation from 6.5 nmol/L Cd at 25 deg C. We could confirm the higher sensitivity of carp to cadmium under hypoxia. Hypoxic conditions did not influence the uptake rates or the accumulation dynamics. Therefore, the increased sensitivity of carp for Cd under hypoxia cannot be explained by a higher Cd body burden, initiated by a higher uptake rate or lower elimination rate under hypoxia. Additional, possible indirect effects, such as internal anoxia due to gill damage, could play a role in Cd toxicity under hypoxia

  3. The toxicokinetics of cadmium in carp under normoxic and hypoxic conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hattink, Jasper [University of Antwerp, Department of Biology, Laboratory of Ecophysiology, Biochemistry, and Toxicology, Groenenborgerlaan 171, 2020 Antwerp (Belgium)]. E-mail: jasper.hattink@ua.ac.be; Boeck, Gudrun De [University of Antwerp, Department of Biology, Laboratory of Ecophysiology, Biochemistry, and Toxicology, Groenenborgerlaan 171, 2020 Antwerp (Belgium); Blust, Ronny [University of Antwerp, Department of Biology, Laboratory of Ecophysiology, Biochemistry, and Toxicology, Groenenborgerlaan 171, 2020 Antwerp (Belgium)

    2005-10-05

    Temporal depletion of oxygen, i.e. hypoxic events, frequently occurs in natural waters. It has been suggested that accumulation of micro-pollutants increases in aquatic animals as a result of an increased ventilation rate during such occasions. The observed increased toxicity under hypoxia of micro-pollutants may support this hypothesis, but for heavy metals the available uptake studies are contradictory. The present study tests whether accumulation of cadmium in common carp, Cyprinus carpio (L.) is increased under hypoxia and if the toxicokinetics are altered. A cadmium toxicity study was performed in which the cadmium uptake rates were determined using the radiotracer {sup 109}Cd under hypoxia and normoxia. The cadmium toxicokinetics were studied with radiotracer experiments at 100% air saturation, 50%, and 25% saturation from 6.5 nmol/L Cd at 25 deg C. We could confirm the higher sensitivity of carp to cadmium under hypoxia. Hypoxic conditions did not influence the uptake rates or the accumulation dynamics. Therefore, the increased sensitivity of carp for Cd under hypoxia cannot be explained by a higher Cd body burden, initiated by a higher uptake rate or lower elimination rate under hypoxia. Additional, possible indirect effects, such as internal anoxia due to gill damage, could play a role in Cd toxicity under hypoxia.

  4. Metabolite analysis of Mycobacterium species under aerobic and hypoxic conditions reveals common metabolic traits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drapal, Margit; Wheeler, Paul R; Fraser, Paul D

    2016-08-01

    A metabolite profiling approach has been implemented to elucidate metabolic adaptation at set culture conditions in five Mycobacterium species (two fast- and three slow-growing) with the potential to act as model organisms for Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb). Analysis has been performed over designated growth phases and under representative environments (nutrient and oxygen depletion) experienced by Mtb during infection. The procedure was useful in determining a range of metabolites (60-120 compounds) covering nucleotides, amino acids, organic acids, saccharides, fatty acids, glycerols, -esters, -phosphates and isoprenoids. Among these classes of compounds, key biomarker metabolites, which can act as indicators of pathway/process activity, were identified. In numerous cases, common metabolite traits were observed for all five species across the experimental conditions (e.g. uracil indicating DNA repair). Amino acid content, especially glutamic acid, highlighted the different properties between the fast- and slow-growing mycobacteria studied (e.g. nitrogen assimilation). The greatest similarities in metabolite composition between fast- and slow-growing mycobacteria were apparent under hypoxic conditions. A comparison to previously reported transcriptomic data revealed a strong correlation between changes in transcription and metabolite content. Collectively, these data validate the changes in the transcription at the metabolite level, suggesting transcription exists as one of the predominant modes of cellular regulation in Mycobacterium. Sectors with restricted correlation between metabolites and transcription (e.g. hypoxic cultivation) warrant further study to elucidate and exploit post-transcriptional modes of regulation. The strong correlation between the laboratory conditions used and data derived from in vivo conditions, indicate that the approach applied is a valuable addition to our understanding of cell regulation in these Mycobacterium species.

  5. Introduction to altitude/hypoxic training symposium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilber, Randall L

    2007-09-01

    Altitude/hypoxic training has traditionally been an intriguing and controversial area of research and sport performance. This controversial aspect was evident recently in the form of scholarly debates in highly regarded professional journals, as well as the World Anti-Doping Agency's (WADA) consideration of placing "artificially-induced hypoxic conditions" on the 2007 Prohibited List of Substances/Methods. In light of the ongoing controversy surrounding altitude/hypoxic training, this symposium was organized with the following objectives in mind: 1) to examine the primary physiological responses and underlying mechanisms associated with altitude/hypoxic training, including the influence of genetic predisposition; 2) to present evidence supporting the effect of altitude/hypoxic acclimatization on both hematological and nonhematological markers, including erythrocyte volume, skeletal muscle-buffering capacity, hypoxic ventilatory response, and physiological efficiency/economy; 3) to evaluate the efficacy of several contemporary simulated altitude modalities and training strategies, including hypoxic tents, nitrogen apartments, and intermittent hypoxic exposure (IHE) or training, and to address the legal and ethical issues associated with the use of simulated altitude; and 4) to describe different altitude/hypoxic training strategies used by elite-level athletes, including Olympians and military special forces. In addressing these objectives, papers will be presented on the topics of: 1) effect of hypoxic "dose" on physiological responses and sea-level performance (Drs. Benjamin Levine and James Stray-Gundersen), 2) nonhematological mechanisms of improved performance after hypoxic exposure (Dr. Christopher Gore), 3) application of altitude/hypoxic training by elite athletes (Dr. Randall Wilber), and 4) military applications of hypoxic training (Dr. Stephen Muza).

  6. Methylation-mediated silencing of miR-124 facilitates chondrogenesis by targeting NFATc1 under hypoxic conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Ming; Liang, Tangzhao; Jin, Song; Dai, Xuejun; Zhou, Zhiyu; Gao, Manman; Huang, Sheng; Luo, Jiaquan; Zou, Lijin; Zou, Xuenong

    2017-01-01

    Chondrogenic differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells is regulated by many different pathways. Recent studies have established that hypoxia and epigenetic alterations potently affect expression of chondrogenesis marker genes. Sox9 is generally regarded as a master regulator of chondrogenesis and microRNA-124 (miRNA-124) regulates gene expression in murine bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells. Therefore, in this study we investigated whether epigenetic regulation of miRNA-124 could affect the expression of Sox9 and thereby regulate chondrogenesis. A cell pellet culture model was used to induce chondrogenesis in C3H10T1/2 cells under hypoxic conditions (2% O 2 ) to determine the effects of hypoxia on miR-124 expression and DNA methylation. The expression of miR-124 was significantly downregulated under hypoxic conditions compared to normoxic conditions (21% O 2 ). The expression of chondrogenesis marker genes was significantly increased under hypoxic conditions. Bisulfite sequencing of the CpG islands in the promoter region of miR-124-3 showed that CpG methylation was significantly increased under hypoxic conditions. Treating the cells with the DNA demethylating agent 5'-AZA significantly increased miR-124 expression and decreased expression of markers of chondrogenesis. Overexpressing miR-124 under hypoxic conditions inhibited NFATc1 reporter activity. NFATc1 was shown to bind to the promoter region of Sox9. Taken together, our data provide evidence that miR-124 acts as an inhibitor of NFATc1. Under hypoxic conditions when miR-124 is downregulated by methylation of CpG islands in the promoter, NFATc1 can bind to the Sox9 promoter and induce the expression of Sox9 leading to chondrogenesis. These results support the role of epigenetic regulation in establishing and maintaining a chondrogenic phenotype.

  7. Important hypercalcemia due to subcutaneous fat necrosis treated with pamidronate in an infant with severe hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy

    OpenAIRE

    Pasqua Anna Quitadamo; Antonio Villani; Piero Paolo Cristalli; Marina Marinelli; Anita Riganti; Michele Bisceglia; Alberto Gatta

    2016-01-01

    Subcutaneous fat necrosis (SCFN) of the newborn is an uncommon form of panniculitis that occurs after fetal distress and involves fatty areas during the first weeks of life. This rare disorder is generally self-limiting and undergoes complete regression. However, it can be complicated with a potentially life-threatening hypercalcemia. We report a case of severe hypercalcemia due to SCFN occurring after serious perinatal hypoxic injury, which resolved by intravenous administration of pamidrona...

  8. Placental growth factor expression is reversed by antivascular endothelial growth factor therapy under hypoxic conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Ai-Yi; Bai, Yu-Jing; Zhao, Min; Yu, Wen-Zhen; Huang, Lv-Zhen; Li, Xiao-Xin

    2014-08-01

    Clinical trials have revealed that the antivascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) therapies are effective in retinopathy of prematurity (ROP). But the low level of VEGF was necessary as a survival signal in healthy conditions, and endogenous placental growth factor (PIGF) is redundant for development. The purpose of this study was to elucidate the PIGF expression under hypoxia as well as the influence of anti-VEGF therapy on PIGF. CoCl2-induced hypoxic human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) were used for an in vitro study, and oxygen-induced retinopathy (OIR) mice models were used for an in vivo study. The expression patterns of PIGF under hypoxic conditions and the influence of anti-VEGF therapy on PIGF were evaluated by quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RTPCR). The retinal avascular areas and neovascularization (NV) areas of anti-VEGF, anti-PIGF and combination treatments were calculated. Retina PIGF concentration was evaluated by ELISA after treatment. The vasoactive effects of exogenous PIGF on HUVECs were investigated by proliferation and migration studies. PIGF mRNA expression was reduced by hypoxia in OIR mice, in HUVECs under hypoxia and anti-VEGF treatment. However, PIGF expression was reversed by anti-VEGF therapy in the OIR model and in HUVECs under hypoxia. Exogenous PIGF significantly inhibited HUVECs proliferation and migration under normal conditions, but it stimulated cell proliferation and migration under hypoxia. Anti-PIGF treatment was effective for neovascular tufts in OIR mice (P<0.05). The finding that PIGF expression is iatrogenically up-regulated by anti-VEGF therapy provides a consideration to combine it with anti-PIGF therapy.

  9. Reduced miR-659-3p levels correlate with progranulin increase in hypoxic conditions: implications for frontotemporal dementia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paola ePiscopo

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Progranulin (PGRN is a secreted protein expressed ubiquitously throughout the body, including the brain, where it localizes in neurons and activated microglia. Loss-of-function mutations in the GRN gene are an important cause of familial Frontotemporal Lobar Degeneration (FTLD. PGRN has a neurotrophic and anti-inflammatory activity, and it is neuroprotective in several injury conditions, such as oxygen or glucose deprivation, oxidative injury, and hypoxic stress. Indeed, we have previously demonstrated that hypoxia induces the up-regulation of GRN transcripts. Several studies have shown microRNAs involvement in hypoxia. Moreover, in FTLD patients with a genetic variant of GRN (rs5848, the reinforcement of miR-659-3p binding site has been suggested to be a risk factor. Here, we report that miR-659-3p interacts directly with GRN 3’UTR as shown by luciferase assay in HeLa cells and ELISA and Western Blot analysis in HeLa and Kelly cells. Moreover, we demonstrate the physical binding between GRN mRNA and miR-659-3p employing a miRNA capture-affinity technology in SK-N-BE and Kelly cells. In order to study miRNAs involvement in hypoxia-mediated up-regulation of GRN, we evaluated miR-659-3p levels in SK-N-BE cells after 24h of hypoxic treatment, finding them inversely correlated to GRN transcripts. Furthermore, we analyzed an animal model of asphyxia, finding that GRN mRNA levels increased at post-natal day (pnd 1 and pnd 4 in rat cortices subjected to asphyxia in comparison to control rats and miR-659-3p decreased at pnd 4 just when GRN reached the highest levels. Our results demonstrate the interaction between miR-659-3p and GRN transcript and the involvement of miR-659-3p in GRN up-regulation mediated by hypoxic/ischemic insults.

  10. Effectiveness of beneficial plant-microbe interactions under hypobaric and hypoxic conditions in an advanced life support system

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacIntyre, Olathe; Stasiak, Michael; Cottenie, Karl; Trevors, Jack; Dixon, Mike

    An assembled microbial community in the hydroponics solution of an advanced life support system may improve plant performance and productivity in three ways: (1) exclusion of plant pathogens from the initial community, (2) resistance to infection, and (3) plant-growth promotion. However, the plant production area is likely to have a hypobaric (low pressure) and hypoxic (low oxygen) atmosphere to reduce structural mass and atmosphere leakage, and these conditions may alter plant-microbe interactions. Plant performance and productivity of radish (Raphanus sativus L. cv. Cherry Bomb II) grown under hypobaric and hypoxic conditions were investigated at the University of Guelph's Controlled Environment Systems Research Facility. Changes in the microbial communities that routinely colonized the re-circulated nutrient solution, roots, and leaves of radishes in these experiments were quantified in terms of similarity in community composition, abundance of bacteria, and community diversity before and after exposure to hypobaric and hypoxic conditions relative to communities maintained at ambient growth conditions. The microbial succession was affected by extreme hypoxia (2 kPa oxygen partial pressure) while hypobaria as low as 10 kPa total pressure had little effect on microbial ecology. There were no correlations found between the physiological profile of these unintentional microbial communities and radish growth. The effects of hypobaric and hypoxic conditions on specific plant-microbe interactions need to be determined before beneficial gnotobiotic communities can be developed for use in space. The bacterial strains Tal 629 of Bradyrhizobium japonicum and WCS417 of Pseudomonas fluorescens, and the plant pathogen Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. raphani will be used in future experiments. B. japonicum Tal 629 promotes radish growth in hydroponics systems and P. fluorescens WCS417 induces systemic resistance to fusarium wilt (F. oxysporum f. sp. raphani) in radish under ambient

  11. Important hypercalcemia due to subcutaneous fat necrosis treated with pamidronate in an infant with severe hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pasqua Anna Quitadamo

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Subcutaneous fat necrosis (SCFN of the newborn is an uncommon form of panniculitis that occurs after fetal distress and involves fatty areas during the first weeks of life. This rare disorder is generally self-limiting and undergoes complete regression. However, it can be complicated with a potentially life-threatening hypercalcemia. We report a case of severe hypercalcemia due to SCFN occurring after serious perinatal hypoxic injury, which resolved by intravenous administration of pamidronate. This treatment was rapidly effective and well tolerated. We suggest that pamidronate could be the first-line therapy for severe hypercalcemia in SCFN.

  12. Heart-rate mediated blood pressure control in preterm fetal sheep under normal and hypoxic-ischemic conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zwanenburg, A.A.; Jellema, R.K.; Jennekens, W.; Ophelders, D.; Vullings, R.; Hunnik, van A.; Pul, van C.; Bennet, L.; Delhaas, T.; Kramer, B.W.; Andriessen, P.

    2013-01-01

    Background: The understanding of hypoxemia-induced changes in baroreflex function is limited and may be studied in a fetal sheep experiment before, during, and after standardized hypoxic conditions. Methods: Preterm fetal lambs were instrumented at 102 d gestation (term: 146 d). At 106 d,

  13. Food consumption in ground beetles is limited under hypoxic conditions in response to ad libitum feeding, but not restricted feeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gudowska, Agnieszka; Bauchinger, Ulf

    2018-02-09

    Habitats on land with low oxygen availability provide unique niches inhabited by numerous species. The occupation of such hypoxic niches by animals is hypothesized to come at a cost linked to the limitations of aerobic metabolism and thus energy budget but may also provide benefits through physical protection from predators and parasitoids or reduced competition for food. We investigated the effects of hypoxic conditions on standard metabolic rate (SMR) and specific dynamic action (SDA) in male Carabus nemoralis. SMR and SDA were determined under three manipulated oxygen availabilities: 7, 14 and 21% O 2 and two feeding regimes: limited or ad libitum food consumption. In both hypoxic conditions, C. nemoralis was able to maintain SMR at levels similar to those in normoxia. When the meal size was limited, SDA duration did not differ among the oxygen availability conditions, but SDA was smaller under hypoxic conditions than at normoxic levels. The relative cost of digestion was significantly higher in normoxia than in hypoxia, but it did not affect net energy intake. In contrast, when offered a large meal to simulate ad libitum food conditions, beetles reduced their food consumption and net energy gain by 30% under hypoxia. Oxygen availability may influence the consumed prey size: the hypoxic condition did not limit net energy gain when the beetles fed on a small meal but did when they fed on a large meal. The results indicate that meal size is an important variable in determining differences in physiological costs and whole animal energy budgets at different concentrations of environmental oxygen levels. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Large errors and severe conditions

    CERN Document Server

    Smith, D L; Van Wormer, L A

    2002-01-01

    Physical parameters that can assume real-number values over a continuous range are generally represented by inherently positive random variables. However, if the uncertainties in these parameters are significant (large errors), conventional means of representing and manipulating the associated variables can lead to erroneous results. Instead, all analyses involving them must be conducted in a probabilistic framework. Several issues must be considered: First, non-linear functional relations between primary and derived variables may lead to significant 'error amplification' (severe conditions). Second, the commonly used normal (Gaussian) probability distribution must be replaced by a more appropriate function that avoids the occurrence of negative sampling results. Third, both primary random variables and those derived through well-defined functions must be dealt with entirely in terms of their probability distributions. Parameter 'values' and 'errors' should be interpreted as specific moments of these probabil...

  15. The experimental investigation of fibrinolytic system under the influence of flocalin in conditions of acute hypoxic kidney injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. I. Gozhenko

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available In the experiments on rats subjected to acute hypoxic histochemical nephropathy, caused by sodium nitrite and 2,4-dinitrophenol, fibrinolytic activities of blood plasma, urine, renal cortex, medulla, and papilla after treatment with flocalin – the activator of KATP channels, were studied­. It was shown that in the conditions of acute kidney hypoxic injury flocalin administration resulted in the increase and essential restoration of fibrinolysis in blood plasma diminished under hypoxia, which was due to the growth of non-enzymatic fibrinolysis, whereas in urine and renal medulla the appreciable increase of enzymatic fibrinolytic activity took place. Moreover, the treatment of hypoxic nephropathy animals by flocalin resulted in the marked restoration of kidney ion regulatory and protein excretory functions that proves the positive influence of KATP channels activation on the one of the biochemical mechanisms of acute kidney injury as well as the protective effect of flocalin in relation to tubular cells of nephron. The obtained results testify to the beneficial effects of KATP channels activation in the conditions of acute hypoxic kidneys injury.

  16. Benthic-pelagic coupling in the Gulf of Mexico hypoxic area: Sedimentary enhancement of hypoxic conditions and near bottom primary production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunnally, Clifton C.; Quigg, Antonietta; DiMarco, Steve; Chapman, Piers; Rowe, Gilbert T.

    2014-08-01

    The seasonal bottom water hypoxia that covers large portions of the Louisiana continental shelf (USA) can extend far beyond the nutrient-rich Mississippi River plume. The hypoxia usually persists under surface-water that is all but depleted of nitrogen and phosphorous. Steep near-bottom gradients of NH4+ during summer hypoxic conditions suggest that the sediments may become a net source of fixed nitrogen, potentially providing an important limiting nutrient to the system. Coupled measurements of benthic ammonium fluxes and water column NH4+ profiles are combined to estimate turnover time of ammonium below the pycnocline. A tight, statistical relationship between photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) and NH4+ reflects uptake by photosynthesis in the chlorophyll maximum, but utilization by nitrifiers and heterotrophic microbes could also be important at low levels of light, consuming oxygen (and thus contributing to hypoxia) and removing fixed nitrogen by denitrification.

  17. Influence of hypothermia combined with erythropoietin on serum neurological function indexes in newborns with severe hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hua Tian

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To study the influence of hypothermia combined with erythropoietin (EPO on serum neurological function indexes in newborns with severe hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy (HIE. Methods: A total of 48 cases of newborns with severe hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy in our hospital were enrolled and divided into control group and observation group according to random number table, 24 cases in each group. On the basis of conventional treatment, patients in control group were treated with mild hypothermia, and those in observation group were treated with mild hypothermia combined with EPO. Serum nerve injury indexes, neurological function indexes and nerve apoptosis indexes were compared between two groups before and after treatment. Results: Before treatment, differences in the levels of nerve injury indexes, neurological function indexes and nerve apoptosis indexes were not statistically significant between two groups. After treatment, serum nerve injury indexes NSE and S-100B levels of observation group were lower than those of control group, neurolocial function indexes BDNF, NGF, IGF-1 and GH levels of observation group were higher than those of control group, and nerve apoptosis indexes sFas and sFasL levels of observation group were lower than those of control group. Conclusion: Mild hypothermia combined with EPO can reduce the neurological damage and inhibit neuronal apoptosis in children with severe HIE.

  18. Ubiquitination is absolutely required for the degradation of hypoxia-inducible factor - 1 alpha protein in hypoxic conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Ronghai; Zhang, Ping; Li, Jinhang; Guan, Hongzai; Shi, Guangjun

    2016-01-01

    The hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) is recognized as the master regulator of hypoxia response. HIF-α subunits expression are tightly regulated. In this study, our data show that ts20 cells still expressed detectable E1 protein even at 39.5° C for 12 h, and complete depletion of E1 protein expression at 39.5° C by siRNA enhanced HIF-1α and P53 protein expression. Further inhibition of E1 at 39.5 °C by siRNA, or E1 inhibitor Ube1-41 completely blocked HIF-1α degradation. Moreover, immunoprecipitations of co-transfection of HA-ubiquitin and FLAG–HIF–1α plasmids directly confirmed the involvement of ubiquitin in the hypoxic degradation of HIF-1α. Additionally, hypoxic HIF-1 α degradation is independent of HAF, RACK1, sumoylation or nuclear/cytoplasmic localization. Taken together, our data suggest that constitutive HIF-1α protein degradation in hypoxia is absolutely ubiquitination-dependent, and unidentified E3 ligase may exist for this degradation pathway. - Highlights: • HIF-1α protein is constitutively degraded in hypoxic conditions. • Requirement of ubiquitination for HIF-1α degradation in hypoxia. • Hypoxic HIF-1α degradation is independent of HAF, RACK1, sumoylation or nuclear/cytoplasmic localization.

  19. Ubiquitination is absolutely required for the degradation of hypoxia-inducible factor - 1 alpha protein in hypoxic conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Ronghai [Department of Urology, Linzi District People' s Hospital, Zibo, 255400 (China); Zhang, Ping, E-mail: zpskx001@163.com [Department of Gynecology, Qingdao Municipal Hospital, Qingdao, 266011 (China); Li, Jinhang [Department of Gynecology, Qingdao Municipal Hospital, Qingdao, 266011 (China); Guan, Hongzai [Laboratory Department, School of Medicine, Qingdao University, Qingdao, 266071 (China); Shi, Guangjun, E-mail: qdmhshigj@yahoo.com [Department of Hepatobiliary Surgery, Qingdao Municipal Hospital, Qingdao, 266071 (China)

    2016-01-29

    The hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) is recognized as the master regulator of hypoxia response. HIF-α subunits expression are tightly regulated. In this study, our data show that ts20 cells still expressed detectable E1 protein even at 39.5° C for 12 h, and complete depletion of E1 protein expression at 39.5° C by siRNA enhanced HIF-1α and P53 protein expression. Further inhibition of E1 at 39.5 °C by siRNA, or E1 inhibitor Ube1-41 completely blocked HIF-1α degradation. Moreover, immunoprecipitations of co-transfection of HA-ubiquitin and FLAG–HIF–1α plasmids directly confirmed the involvement of ubiquitin in the hypoxic degradation of HIF-1α. Additionally, hypoxic HIF-1 α degradation is independent of HAF, RACK1, sumoylation or nuclear/cytoplasmic localization. Taken together, our data suggest that constitutive HIF-1α protein degradation in hypoxia is absolutely ubiquitination-dependent, and unidentified E3 ligase may exist for this degradation pathway. - Highlights: • HIF-1α protein is constitutively degraded in hypoxic conditions. • Requirement of ubiquitination for HIF-1α degradation in hypoxia. • Hypoxic HIF-1α degradation is independent of HAF, RACK1, sumoylation or nuclear/cytoplasmic localization.

  20. Cell inactivation studies on yeast cells under euoxic and hypoxic condition using electron beam from microtron accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Praveen Joseph; Santhosh Acharya; Ganesh Sanjeev; Narayana, Y.; Bhat, N.N.

    2011-01-01

    In the case of sparsely ionizing radiation such as electron, the dose rate and the pattern of energy deposition of the radiation are the important physical factors which can affect the amount of damage in living cells. In the present study, the differences in the cell survival efficiency and dose rate effect in diploid yeast strains Saccharomyces cerevisiae X2180 and Saccharomyces cerevisiae D7 under euoxic and hypoxic condition have been quantified. Irradiation was carried out using 8 MeV pulsed electron beam from Microtron accelerator. The dose per pulse and pulse width of the beam used was 0.6 Gy and 2.3 μs, respectively, which correspond to an instantaneous dose rate of 2.6 x 10 5 Gy s -1 . For survival studies doses were delivered at a rate of 50 pulses per second (an average dose rate of 1,800 Gy s -1 ). Fricke and alanine dosimeters were used to measure the dose delivered to the sample. A significant difference in the dose response has been observed under euoxic and hypoxic condition. Dose rate effect has been studied by changing the pulse repetition rate of the Microtron and the dose rate used was from 180 to 1800 Gy min -1 . A significant dose rate effect was observed under euoxic condition for Saccharomyces cerevisiae X2180 but the same was absent under hypoxic condition. The dose rate effect was absent for Saccharomyces cerevisiae D7 under both irradiation condition. The survival curves are found to be sigmoidal in shape under both condition but with a wider shoulder under hypoxic condition. The D 0 value and the Oxygen Enhancement Ratio (OER) at that point have been derived. (author)

  1. General anesthetics inhibit erythropoietin induction under hypoxic conditions in the mouse brain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomoharu Tanaka

    Full Text Available Erythropoietin (EPO, originally identified as a hematopoietic growth factor produced in the kidney and fetal liver, is also endogenously expressed in the central nervous system (CNS. EPO in the CNS, mainly produced in astrocytes, is induced under hypoxic conditions in a hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF-dependent manner and plays a dominant role in neuroprotection and neurogenesis. We investigated the effect of general anesthetics on EPO expression in the mouse brain and primary cultured astrocytes.BALB/c mice were exposed to 10% oxygen with isoflurane at various concentrations (0.10-1.0%. Expression of EPO mRNA in the brain was studied, and the effects of sevoflurane, halothane, nitrous oxide, pentobarbital, ketamine, and propofol were investigated. In addition, expression of HIF-2α protein was studied by immunoblotting. Hypoxia-induced EPO mRNA expression in the brain was significantly suppressed by isoflurane in a concentration-dependent manner. A similar effect was confirmed for all other general anesthetics. Hypoxia-inducible expression of HIF-2α protein was also significantly suppressed with isoflurane. In the experiments using primary cultured astrocytes, isoflurane, pentobarbital, and ketamine suppressed hypoxia-inducible expression of HIF-2α protein and EPO mRNA.Taken together, our results indicate that general anesthetics suppress activation of HIF-2 and inhibit hypoxia-induced EPO upregulation in the mouse brain through a direct effect on astrocytes.

  2. Erythropoietin and a nonerythropoietic peptide analog promote aortic endothelial cell repair under hypoxic conditions: role of nitric oxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heikal L

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Lamia Heikal,1 Pietro Ghezzi,1 Manuela Mengozzi,1 Blanka Stelmaszczuk,2 Martin Feelisch,2 Gordon AA Ferns1 1Brighton and Sussex Medical School, Falmer, Brighton, 2Clinical and Experimental Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, University of Southampton, Southampton General Hospital and Institute for Life Sciences, Southampton, UK Abstract: The cytoprotective effects of erythropoietin (EPO and an EPO-related nonerythropoietic analog, pyroglutamate helix B surface peptide (pHBSP, were investigated in an in vitro model of bovine aortic endothelial cell injury under normoxic (21% O2 and hypoxic (1% O2 conditions. The potential molecular mechanisms of these effects were also explored. Using a model of endothelial injury (the scratch assay, we found that, under hypoxic conditions, EPO and pHBSP enhanced scratch closure by promoting cell migration and proliferation, but did not show any effect under normoxic conditions. Furthermore, EPO protected bovine aortic endothelial cells from staurosporine-induced apoptosis under hypoxic conditions. The priming effect of hypoxia was associated with stabilization of hypoxia inducible factor-1α, EPO receptor upregulation, and decreased Ser-1177 phosphorylation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (NOS; the effect of hypoxia on the latter was rescued by EPO. Hypoxia was associated with a reduction in nitric oxide (NO production as assessed by its oxidation products, nitrite and nitrate, consistent with the oxygen requirement for endogenous production of NO by endothelial NOS. However, while EPO did not affect NO formation in normoxia, it markedly increased NO production, in a manner sensitive to NOS inhibition, under hypoxic conditions. These data are consistent with the notion that the tissue-protective actions of EPO-related cytokines in pathophysiological settings associated with poor oxygenation are mediated by NO. These findings may be particularly relevant to atherogenesis and postangioplasty restenosis. Keywords

  3. Hybrid TiO2 -Ruthenium Nano-photosensitizer Synergistically Produces Reactive Oxygen Species in both Hypoxic and Normoxic Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilson, Rebecca C; Black, Kvar C L; Lane, Daniel D; Achilefu, Samuel

    2017-08-28

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is widely used to treat diverse diseases, but its dependence on oxygen to produce cytotoxic reactive oxygen species (ROS) diminishes the therapeutic effect in a hypoxic environment, such as solid tumors. Herein, we developed a ROS-producing hybrid nanoparticle-based photosensitizer capable of maintaining high levels of ROS under both normoxic and hypoxic conditions. Conjugation of a ruthenium complex (N3) to a TiO 2 nanoparticle afforded TiO 2 -N3. Upon exposure of TiO 2 -N3 to light, the N3 injected electrons into TiO 2 to produce three- and four-fold more hydroxyl radicals and hydrogen peroxide, respectively, than TiO 2 at 160 mmHg. TiO 2 -N3 maintained three-fold higher hydroxyl radicals than TiO 2 under hypoxic conditions via N3-facilitated electron-hole reduction of adsorbed water molecules. The incorporation of N3 transformed TiO 2 from a dual type I and II PDT agent to a predominantly type I photosensitizer, irrespective of the oxygen content. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. The Effects of Sympathetic Inhibition on Metabolic and Cardiopulmonary Responses to Exercise in Hypoxic Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scalzo, Rebecca L; Peltonen, Garrett L; Binns, Scott E; Klochak, Anna L; Szallar, Steve E; Wood, Lacey M; Larson, Dennis G; Luckasen, Gary J; Irwin, David; Schroeder, Thies; Hamilton, Karyn L; Bell, Christopher

    2015-12-01

    Pre-exertion skeletal muscle glycogen content is an important physiological determinant of endurance exercise performance: low glycogen stores contribute to premature fatigue. In low-oxygen environments (hypoxia), the important contribution of carbohydrates to endurance performance is further enhanced as glucose and glycogen dependence is increased; however, the insulin sensitivity of healthy adult humans is decreased. In light of this insulin resistance, maintaining skeletal muscle glycogen in hypoxia becomes difficult, and subsequent endurance performance is impaired. Sympathetic inhibition promotes insulin sensitivity in hypoxia but may impair hypoxic exercise performance, in part due to suppression of cardiac output. Accordingly, we tested the hypothesis that hypoxic exercise performance after intravenous glucose feeding in a low-oxygen environment will be attenuated when feeding occurs during sympathetic inhibition. On 2 separate occasions, while breathing a hypoxic gas mixture, 10 healthy men received 1 hour of parenteral carbohydrate infusion (20% glucose solution in saline; 75 g), after which they performed stationary cycle ergometer exercise (~65% maximal oxygen uptake) until exhaustion. Forty-eight hours before 1 visit, chosen randomly, sympathetic inhibition via transdermal clonidine (0.2 mg/d) was initiated. The mean time to exhaustion after glucose feeding both with and without sympathetic inhibition was not different (22.7 ± 5.4 minutes vs 23.5 ± 5.1 minutes; P = .73). Sympathetic inhibition protects against hypoxia-mediated insulin resistance without influencing subsequent hypoxic endurance performance. Copyright © 2015 Wilderness Medical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. A behavioural study of neuroglobin-overexpressing mice under normoxic and hypoxic conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Leuven, Wendy; Van Dam, Debby; Moens, Luc; De Deyn, Peter Paul; Dewilde, Sylvia

    Neuroglobin (Ngb), a neuron-specific heme-binding protein that binds O-2, CO and NO reversibly, and promotes in vivo and in vitro cell survival after hypoxic and ischaemic insult Although the mechanisms of this neuroprotection remain unknown, Ngb might play an important role in counteracting the

  6. Environmental conditions unexpectedly affect the long-term extent of cell death following an hypoxic episode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isaacson, Robert L; Fahey, Jeanne M; Mughairbi, Fadwa Al

    2003-05-01

    Previously we reported delayed cell death, defined by clear-cut cell loss 60 days after a nitrite-induced hypoxic episode. The loss of cells was not apparent two weeks after the treatment, although some changes in cellular appearance were observed at that time. A similar delayed loss of neurons in the hippocampus after hypoxia induced by blood vessel occlusion has also been found. In addition, we reported that the amount of methemoglobinemia induced by the sodium nitrite can be reduced by the stress produced by handling and the injection of saline 2 or 24 h before the nitrite administration. The degree of methemoglobin formed is directly related to cell death in certain areas of the brain, including regions within the hippocampus. Considering the many effects that can be produced by chronic and acute stress of several kinds and the length of time during which these effects manifest themselves, we undertook to determine the histologic effects of the stresses of transport on the neuroanatomic effects of sodium nitrite administration 60 days post administration. Comparisons were made of the effects of two methods of transport from the laboratory in which the animals (male CD-1 mice) were injected with the sodium nitrite or saline (Tufts Medical School) to the laboratory in which the histologic evaluations were made (Binghamton University). The animals began their travel several hours after the injections. One transport method was by commuter airline and the other was by automobile. All animals had the same transport from the supplier to the Boston location (truck). Thus, the stress of experimental interest occurred after the nitrite administration. Upon arrival at Binghamton University, the animals were housed at the University in their own colony room for 60 days before sacrifice. After sacrifice, sections from their brains were subjected to a number of histologic staining procedures, including PTAH, the Bielschowsky silver method, GFAP, and the standard Nissl

  7. Hypoxia inducible factor-1α-dependent epithelial to mesenchymal transition under hypoxic conditions in prostate cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Mingchuan; Wang, Yong Xing; Luo, Yong; Zhao, Jiahui; Li, Qing; Zhang, Jiao; Jiang, Yongguang

    2016-07-01

    Prostate cancer is the most commonly diagnosed cancer in men and the second leading cause of cancer death. Hypoxia is an environmental stimulus that plays an important role in the development and cancer progression especially for solid tumors. The key regulator under hypoxic conditions is stabilized hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-1α. In the present study, immune-fluorescent staining, siRNAs, qRT-PC, immunoblotting, cell migration and invasion assays were carried out to test typical epithelial to mesenchymal transition under hypoxia and the key regulators of this process in PC3, a human prostate cancer cell line. Our data demonstrated that hypoxia induces diverse molecular, phenotypic and functional changes in prostate cancer cells that are consistent with EMT. We also showed that a cell signal factor such as HIF-1α, which might be stabilized under hypoxic environment, is involved in EMT and cancer cell invasive potency. The induced hypoxia could be blocked by HIF-1α gene silencing and reoxygenation of EMT in prostate cancer cells, hypoxia partially reversed accompanied by a process of mesenchymal-epithelial reverting transition (MErT). EMT might be induced by activation of HIF-1α-dependent cell signaling in hypoxic prostate cancer cells.

  8. Transcriptional signature of human adipose tissue-derived stem cells (hASCs) preconditioned for chondrogenesis in hypoxic conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pilgaard, L.; Lund, P.; Duroux, M.; Lockstone, H.; Taylor, J.; Emmersen, J.; Fink, T.; Ragoussis, J.; Zachar, V.

    2009-01-01

    Hypoxia is an important factor involved in the control of stem cells. To obtain a better insight into the phenotypical changes brought about by hypoxic preconditioning prior to chondrogenic differentiation; we have investigated growth, colony-forming and chondrogenic capacity, and global transcriptional responses of six adipose tissue-derived stem cell lines expanded at oxygen concentrations ranging from ambient to 1%. The assessment of cell proliferation and colony-forming potential revealed that the hypoxic conditions corresponding to 1% oxygen played a major role. The chondrogenic inducibility, examined by high-density pellet model, however, did not improve on hypoxic preconditioning. While the microarray analysis revealed a distinctive inter-donor variability, the exposure to 1% hypoxia superseded the biological variability and produced a specific expression profile with 2581 significantly regulated genes and substantial functional enrichment in the pathways of cell proliferation and apoptosis. Additionally, exposure to 1% oxygen resulted in upregulation of factors related to angiogenesis and cell growth. In particular, leptin (LEP), the key regulator of body weight and food intake was found to be highly upregulated. In conclusion, the results of this investigation demonstrate the significance of donor demographics and the importance of further studies into the use of regulated oxygen tension as a tool for preparation of ASCs in order to exploit their full potential.

  9. Hypothermia broadens the therapeutic time window of mesenchymal stem cell transplantation for severe neonatal hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, So Yoon; Chang, Yun Sil; Sung, Dong Kyung; Sung, Se In; Park, Won Soon

    2018-05-16

    Recently, we have demonstrated that concurrent hypothermia and mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) transplantation synergistically improved severe neonatal hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy (HIE). The current study was designed to determine whether hypothermia could extend the therapeutic time window of MSC transplantation for severe neonatal HIE. To induce HIE, newborn rat pups were exposed to 8% oxygen for 2 h following unilateral carotid artery ligation on postnatal day (P) 7. After approving severe HIE involving >50% of the ipsilateral hemisphere volume, hypothermia (32 °C) for 2 days was started. MSCs were transplanted 2 days after HIE modeling. Follow-up brain MRI, sensorimotor function tests, assessment of inflammatory cytokines in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), and histological evaluation of peri-infarction area were performed. HIE induced progressively increasing brain infarction area over time, increased cell death, reactive gliosis and brain inflammation, and impaired sensorimotor function. All these damages observed in severe HIE showed better, robust improvement with a combination treatment of hypothermia and delayed MSC transplantation than with either stand-alone therapy. Hypothermia itself did not significantly reduce brain injury, but broadened the therapeutic time window of MSC transplantation for severe newborn HIE.

  10. Phylogenetic and Molecular Evolutionary Analysis of Mitophagy Receptors under Hypoxic Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaomei Wu

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available As animals evolved to use oxygen as the main strategy to produce ATP through the process of mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation, the ability to adapt to fluctuating oxygen concentrations is a crucial component of evolutionary pressure. Three mitophagy receptors, FUNDC1, BNIP3 and NIX, induce the removal of dysfunctional mitochondria (mitophagy under prolonged hypoxic conditions in mammalian cells, to maintain oxygen homeostasis and prevent cell death. However, the evolutionary origins and structure-function relationships of these receptors remain poorly understood. Here, we found that FUN14 domain-containing proteins are present in archaeal, bacterial and eukaryotic genomes, while the family of BNIP3 domain-containing proteins evolved from early animals. We investigated conservation patterns of the critical amino acid residues of the human mitophagy receptors. These residues are involved in receptor regulation, mainly through phosphorylation, and in interaction with LC3 on the phagophore. Whereas FUNDC1 may be able to bind to LC3 under the control of post-translational regulations during the early evolution of vertebrates, BINP3 and NIX had already gained the ability for LC3 binding in early invertebrates. Moreover, FUNDC1 and BNIP3 each lack a layer of phosphorylation regulation in fishes that is conserved in land vertebrates. Molecular evolutionary analysis revealed that BNIP3 and NIX, as the targets of oxygen sensing HIF-1α, showed higher rates of substitution in fishes than in mammals. Conversely, FUNDC1 and its regulator MARCH5 showed higher rates of substitution in mammals. Thus, we postulate that the structural traces of mitophagy receptors in land vertebrates and fishes may reflect the process of vertebrate transition from water onto land, during which the changes in atmospheric oxygen concentrations acted as a selection force in vertebrate evolution. In conclusion, our study, combined with previous experimental results, shows that

  11. Impact of Mental and Physical Stress on Blood Pressure and Pulse Pressure under Normobaric versus Hypoxic Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trapp, Michael; Trapp, Eva-Maria; Egger, Josef W.; Domej, Wolfgang; Schillaci, Giuseppe; Avian, Alexander; Rohrer, Peter M.; Hörlesberger, Nina; Magometschnigg, Dieter; Cervar-Zivkovic, Mila; Komericki, Peter; Velik, Rosemarie; Baulmann, Johannes

    2014-01-01

    Objective Hypobaric hypoxia, physical and psychosocial stress may influence key cardiovascular parameters including blood pressure (BP) and pulse pressure (PP). We investigated the effects of mild hypobaric hypoxia exposure on BP and PP reactivity to mental and physical stress and to passive elevation by cable car. Methods 36 healthy volunteers participated in a defined test procedure consisting of a period of rest 1, mental stress task (KLT-R), period of rest 2, combined mental (KLT-R) and physical task (bicycle ergometry) and a last period of rest both at Graz, Austria (353 m asl) and at the top station Dachstein (2700 m asl). Beat-to-beat heart rate and BP were analysed both during the test procedures at Graz and at Dachstein and during passive 1000 m elevation by cable car (from 1702 m to 2700 m). Results A significant interaction of kind of stress (mental vs. combined mental and physical) and study location (Graz vs. Dachstein) was found in the systolic BP (p = .007) and PP (p = .002) changes indicating that during the combined mental and physical stress task sBP was significantly higher under hypoxic conditions whereas sBP and PP were similar during mental stress both under normobaric normoxia (Graz) and under hypobaric hypoxia (Dachstein). During the passive ascent in cable car less trivialization (psychological coping strategy) was associated with an increase in PP (p = .004). Conclusion Our data show that combined mental and physical stress causes a significant higher raise in sBP and PP under hypoxic conditions whereas isolated mental stress did not affect sBP and PP under hypoxic conditions. PP-reaction to ascent in healthy subjects is not uniform. BP reactions to ascent that represents an accumulation of physical (mild hypobaric hypoxia) and psychological stressors depend on predetermined psychological traits (stress coping strategies). Thus divergent cardiovascular reactions can be explained by applying the multidimensional aspects of the

  12. Impact of mental and physical stress on blood pressure and pulse pressure under normobaric versus hypoxic conditions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Trapp

    Full Text Available Hypobaric hypoxia, physical and psychosocial stress may influence key cardiovascular parameters including blood pressure (BP and pulse pressure (PP. We investigated the effects of mild hypobaric hypoxia exposure on BP and PP reactivity to mental and physical stress and to passive elevation by cable car.36 healthy volunteers participated in a defined test procedure consisting of a period of rest 1, mental stress task (KLT-R, period of rest 2, combined mental (KLT-R and physical task (bicycle ergometry and a last period of rest both at Graz, Austria (353 m asl and at the top station Dachstein (2700 m asl. Beat-to-beat heart rate and BP were analysed both during the test procedures at Graz and at Dachstein and during passive 1000 m elevation by cable car (from 1702 m to 2700 m.A significant interaction of kind of stress (mental vs. combined mental and physical and study location (Graz vs. Dachstein was found in the systolic BP (p = .007 and PP (p = .002 changes indicating that during the combined mental and physical stress task sBP was significantly higher under hypoxic conditions whereas sBP and PP were similar during mental stress both under normobaric normoxia (Graz and under hypobaric hypoxia (Dachstein. During the passive ascent in cable car less trivialization (psychological coping strategy was associated with an increase in PP (p = .004.Our data show that combined mental and physical stress causes a significant higher raise in sBP and PP under hypoxic conditions whereas isolated mental stress did not affect sBP and PP under hypoxic conditions. PP-reaction to ascent in healthy subjects is not uniform. BP reactions to ascent that represents an accumulation of physical (mild hypobaric hypoxia and psychological stressors depend on predetermined psychological traits (stress coping strategies. Thus divergent cardiovascular reactions can be explained by applying the multidimensional aspects of the biopsychosocial concept.

  13. Bioremediation of polychlorinated-p-dioxins/dibenzofurans contaminated soil using simulated compost-amended landfill reactors under hypoxic conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Wei-Yu; Wu, Jer-Horng, E-mail: enewujh@mail.ncku.edu.tw; Lin, Shih-Chiang; Chang, Juu-En

    2016-07-15

    Highlights: • We developed a new hypoxic reactor system for remediating PCDD/Fs. • We demonstrated effects of compost on the degradation of PCDD/Fs. • We uncovered microbial compositions and dynamics during the degradation of PCDD/Fs. - Abstract: Compost-amended landfill reactors were developed to reduce polychlorinated-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans (PCDD/Fs) in contaminated soils. By periodically recirculating leachate and suppling oxygen, the online monitoring of the oxidation reduction potential confirmed that the reactors were maintained under hypoxic conditions, with redox levels constantly fluctuating between −400 and +80 mV. The subsequent reactor operation demonstrated that PCDD/F degradation in soil could be facilitated by amending compost originating from the cow manure and waste sludge and that the degradation might be affected by the availability of easily degradable substrates in the soil and compost. The pyrosequencing analysis of V4/V5 regions of bacterial 16S rRNA genes suggested that species richness of the soil microbial community was increased by a factor of 1.37–1.61. Although the bacterial community varied with the compost origin and changed markedly during reactor operation, it was dominated by Alphaproteobacteria, Gammaproteobacteria, Actinobacteria, and Firmicutes. The aerotolerant anaerobic Sedimentibacter and Propionibacterium spp., and the uncultured Chloroflexi group could be temporarily induced to a high abundance by amending the cow manure compost; the bacterial growths were associated with the rapid degradation of PCDD/Fs. Overall, the novel bioremediation method for PCDD/F-contaminated soils using hypoxic conditions was effective, simple, energy saving, and thus easily practicable.

  14. Bioremediation of polychlorinated-p-dioxins/dibenzofurans contaminated soil using simulated compost-amended landfill reactors under hypoxic conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Wei-Yu; Wu, Jer-Horng; Lin, Shih-Chiang; Chang, Juu-En

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • We developed a new hypoxic reactor system for remediating PCDD/Fs. • We demonstrated effects of compost on the degradation of PCDD/Fs. • We uncovered microbial compositions and dynamics during the degradation of PCDD/Fs. - Abstract: Compost-amended landfill reactors were developed to reduce polychlorinated-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans (PCDD/Fs) in contaminated soils. By periodically recirculating leachate and suppling oxygen, the online monitoring of the oxidation reduction potential confirmed that the reactors were maintained under hypoxic conditions, with redox levels constantly fluctuating between −400 and +80 mV. The subsequent reactor operation demonstrated that PCDD/F degradation in soil could be facilitated by amending compost originating from the cow manure and waste sludge and that the degradation might be affected by the availability of easily degradable substrates in the soil and compost. The pyrosequencing analysis of V4/V5 regions of bacterial 16S rRNA genes suggested that species richness of the soil microbial community was increased by a factor of 1.37–1.61. Although the bacterial community varied with the compost origin and changed markedly during reactor operation, it was dominated by Alphaproteobacteria, Gammaproteobacteria, Actinobacteria, and Firmicutes. The aerotolerant anaerobic Sedimentibacter and Propionibacterium spp., and the uncultured Chloroflexi group could be temporarily induced to a high abundance by amending the cow manure compost; the bacterial growths were associated with the rapid degradation of PCDD/Fs. Overall, the novel bioremediation method for PCDD/F-contaminated soils using hypoxic conditions was effective, simple, energy saving, and thus easily practicable.

  15. Normobaric hypoxic conditioning to maximize weight loss and ameliorate cardio-metabolic health in obese populations: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hobbins, L; Hunter, S; Gaoua, N; Girard, O

    2017-09-01

    Normobaric hypoxic conditioning (HC) is defined as exposure to systemic and/or local hypoxia at rest (passive) or combined with exercise training (active). HC has been previously used by healthy and athletic populations to enhance their physical capacity and improve performance in the lead up to competition. Recently, HC has also been applied acutely (single exposure) and chronically (repeated exposure over several weeks) to overweight and obese populations with the intention of managing and potentially increasing cardio-metabolic health and weight loss. At present, it is unclear what the cardio-metabolic health and weight loss responses of obese populations are in response to passive and active HC. Exploration of potential benefits of exposure to both passive and active HC may provide pivotal findings for improving health and well being in these individuals. A systematic literature search for articles published between 2000 and 2017 was carried out. Studies investigating the effects of normobaric HC as a novel therapeutic approach to elicit improvements in the cardio-metabolic health and weight loss of obese populations were included. Studies investigated passive ( n = 7; 5 animals, 2 humans), active ( n = 4; all humans) and a combination of passive and active ( n = 4; 3 animals, 1 human) HC to an inspired oxygen fraction ([Formula: see text]) between 4.8 and 15.0%, ranging between a single session and daily sessions per week, lasting from 5 days up to 8 mo. Passive HC led to reduced insulin concentrations (-37 to -22%) in obese animals and increased energy expenditure (+12 to +16%) in obese humans, whereas active HC lead to reductions in body weight (-4 to -2%) in obese animals and humans, and blood pressure (-8 to -3%) in obese humans compared with a matched workload in normoxic conditions. Inconclusive findings, however, exist in determining the impact of acute and chronic HC on markers such as triglycerides, cholesterol levels, and fitness capacity

  16. Regulation of glucose transporter protein-1 and vascular endothelial growth factor by hypoxia inducible factor 1α under hypoxic conditions in Hep-2 human cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Ou; Li, Xiaoming; Qu, Yongtao; Liu, Shuang; An, Jie; Wang, Maoxin; Sun, Qingjia; Zhang, Wen; Lu, Xiuying; Pi, Lihong; Zhang, Min; Shen, Yupeng

    2012-12-01

    The present study evaluated the regulation of glucose transporter protein-1 (Glut-1) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) by hypoxia inducible factor 1α (HIF-1α) under hypoxic conditions in Hep-2 human cells to explore the feasibility of these three genes as tumor markers. Hep-2 cells were cultured under hypoxic and normoxic conditions for 6, 12, 24, 36 and 48 h. The proliferation of Hep-2 cells was evaluated using an MTT assay. The protein and mRNA expression levels of HIF-1α, Glut-1 and VEGF were detected using the S-P immunocytochemical method, western blotting and reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). The results revealed that the expression levels of HIF-1α, Glut-1 and VEGF protein in Hep-2 cells were significantly elevated under hypoxic conditions compared with those under normoxic conditions over 36 h. Under hypoxic conditions, mRNA levels of HIF-1α were stable, while mRNA levels of Glut-1 and VEGF changed over time. In conclusion, Glut-1 and VEGF were upregulated by HIF-1α under hypoxic conditions in a time-dependent manner in Hep-2 cells and their co-expression serves as a tumor marker.

  17. Prevalence, severity and early outcomes of hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy among newborns at a tertiary hospital, in northern Tanzania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simiyu, Irene N; Mchaile, Deborah N; Katsongeri, Kahindo; Philemon, Rune N; Msuya, Sia E

    2017-05-25

    Hypoxic Ischemic Encephalopathy (HIE) remains a problem of great concern worldwide especially in developing countries. The occurrence of a neurological syndrome can be an indicator of insult to the brain. We aimed to determine the prevalence, HIE proportions, neurological signs and early outcomes of newborns that developed birth asphyxia at KCMC Tanzania. A prospective study was conducted at KCMC from November 2014 to April 2015 among newborns with birth asphyxia. Sarnat and Sarnat score was used to assess newborns immediately after birth to classify HIE and were later followed daily for 7 days or until discharge. Of the 1752 deliveries during the study period, 11.5% (n = 201) had birth asphyxia. Of the 201 newborns, 187 had HIE. Of these 187 with HIE; 39.0% had moderate HIE and 10.2% had severe HIE according to the Sarnat and Sarnat classification. Neurological signs that were observed during the study period were; weak/absent reflexes (46.0%), hypotonia (43.3%) and lethargy (42.2%). Mortality was 9.1% among the 187 newborns with HIE. Mortality was higher among newborns with severe HIE 84.2% (16/19) compared to those with moderate HIE 1.4% (1/73). On the 7th day after delivery, 17.1% (32/187) of the newborns did not show any change from the initial score at delivery. Prevalence of birth asphyxia is high in our setting and most of the newborns (49%) end up with moderate/severe HIE. Good obstetric care and immediate resuscitation of newborns are vital in reducing the occurrence of HIE and improving the general outcome of newborns.

  18. Impact of pavement conditions on crash severity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yingfeng; Liu, Chunxiao; Ding, Liang

    2013-10-01

    Pavement condition has been known as a key factor related to ride quality, but it is less clear how exactly pavement conditions are related to traffic crashes. The researchers used Geographic Information System (GIS) to link Texas Department of Transportation (TxDOT) Crash Record Information System (CRIS) data and Pavement Management Information System (PMIS) data, which provided an opportunity to examine the impact of pavement conditions on traffic crashes in depth. The study analyzed the correlation between several key pavement condition ratings or scores and crash severity based on a large number of crashes in Texas between 2008 and 2009. The results in general suggested that poor pavement condition scores and ratings were associated with proportionally more severe crashes, but very poor pavement conditions were actually associated with less severe crashes. Very good pavement conditions might induce speeding behaviors and therefore could have caused more severe crashes, especially on non-freeway arterials and during favorable driving conditions. In addition, the results showed that the effects of pavement conditions on crash severity were more evident for passenger vehicles than for commercial vehicles. These results provide insights on how pavement conditions may have contributed to crashes, which may be valuable for safety improvement during pavement design and maintenance. Readers should notice that, although the study found statistically significant effects of pavement variables on crash severity, the effects were rather minor in reality as suggested by frequency analyses. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Insulin-like growth factor stimulation increases radiosensitivity of a pancreatic cancer cell line through endoplasmic reticulum stress under hypoxic conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isohashi, Fumiaki; Endo, Hiroko; Mukai, Mutsuko; Inoue, Masahiro; Inoue, Takehiro

    2008-01-01

    Tumor hypoxia is an obstacle to radiotherapy. Radiosensitivity under hypoxic conditions is determined by molecular oxygen levels, as well as by various biological cellular responses. The insulin-like growth factor (IGF) signaling pathway is a widely recognized survival signal that confers radioresistance. However, under hypoxic conditions the role of IGF signaling in radiosensitivity is still poorly understood. Here, we demonstrate that IGF-II stimulation decreases clonogenic survival under hypoxic conditions in the pancreatic cancer cell lines AsPC-1 and Panc-1, and in the human breast cancer cell line MCF-7. IGF treatment under hypoxic conditions suppressed increased radiation sensitivity in these cell lines by pharmacologically inhibiting the phosphoinositide 3-kinase-mammalian target of rapamycin pathway, a major IGF signal-transduction pathway. Meanwhile, IGF-II induced the endoplasmic reticulum stress response under hypoxia, including increased protein levels of CHOP and ATF4, mRNA levels of CHOP, GADD34, and BiP as well as splicing levels of XBP-1. The response was suppressed by inhibiting phosphoinositide 3-kinase and mammalian target of rapamycin activity. Overexpression of CHOP in AsPC-1 cells increased radiation sensitivity by IGF-II simulation under hypoxic conditions, whereas suppression of CHOP expression levels with small hairpin RNA or a dominant negative form of a proline-rich extensin-like receptor protein kinase in hypoxia decreased IGF-induced radiosensitivity. IGF-induced endoplasmic reticulum stress contributed to radiosensitization independent of cell cycle status. Taken together, IGF stimulation increased radiosensitivity through the endoplasmic reticulum stress response under hypoxic conditions. (author)

  20. Relative survival of hybrid x-ray-resistant, and normally sensitive mammalian cells exposed to x rays and protons under aerobic and hypoxic conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, J.R.; Gould, R.G.; Flynn, D.; Robertson, J.B.; Little, J.B.

    1978-01-01

    Survival of an x-ray-resistant hybrid cell line (HD 1 ) and a normally responsive cell line (H 4 ) have been compared when irradiated under induced hypoxia by both protons and X rays. The two cell lines are similarly protected when irradiated under hypoxic conditions with oxygen enhancement ratios of 2.8 and 2.7, respectively. The protection is consistent with a dose-modifying factor. No statistically significant difference is observed between cell inactivation by x rays and protons in either cell line, whether irradiated under aerobic or hypoxic conditions

  1. Bacillus anthracis Co-Opts Nitric Oxide and Host Serum Albumin for Pathogenicity in Hypoxic Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen eSt John

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Bacillus anthracis is a dangerous pathogen of humans and many animal species. Its virulence has been mainly attributed to the production of Lethal and Edema toxins as well as the antiphagocytic capsule. Recent data indicate that the nitric oxide (NO synthase (baNOS plays an important pathogenic role at the early stage of disease by protecting bacteria from the host reactive species and S-nytrosylating the mitochondrial proteins in macrophages. In this study we for the first time present evidence that bacteria-derived NO participates in the generation of highly reactive oxidizing species which could be abolished by the NOS inhibitor L-NAME, free thiols, and superoxide dismutase but not catalase. The formation of toxicants is likely a result of the simultaneous formation of NO and superoxide leading to a labile peroxynitrite and its stable decomposition product, nitrogen dioxide. The toxicity of bacteria could be potentiated in the presence of bovine serum albumin. This effect is consistent with the property of serum albumin to serves as a trap of a volatile NO accelerating its reactions. Our data suggest that during infection in the hypoxic environment of pre-mortal host the accumulated NO is expected to have a broad toxic impact on host cell functions.

  2. Efficacy of passive hypothermia and adverse events during transport of asphyxiated newborns according to the severity of hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carreras, Nuria; Alsina, Miguel; Alarcon, Ana; Arca-Díaz, Gemma; Agut, Thais; García-Alix, Alfredo

    To determine if the efficacy of passive hypothermia and adverse events during transport are related to the severity of neonatal hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy. This was a retrospective study of 67 infants with hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy, born between April 2009 and December 2013, who were transferred for therapeutic hypothermia and cooled during transport. Fifty-six newborns (84%) were transferred without external sources of heat and 11 (16%) needed an external heat source. The mean temperature at departure was 34.4±1.4°C and mean transfer time was 3.3±2.0h. Mean age at arrival was 5.6±2.5h. Temperature at arrival was between 33 and 35°C in 41 (61%) infants, between 35°C and 36.5°C in 15 (22%) and encephalopathy had greater risk of having an admission temperatureencephalopathy and the umbilical artery pH were independent risk factors for a low temperature on admission (pencephalopathy. The risk of overcooling during transport is greater in newborns with severe hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy and those with more severe acidosis at birth. The most common adverse events during transport are related to physiological deterioration and bleeding from the endotracheal tube. This observation provides useful information to identify those asphyxiated infants who require closer clinical surveillance during transport. Copyright © 2017 Sociedade Brasileira de Pediatria. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  3. Developing a New Two-Step Protocol to Generate Functional Hepatocytes from Wharton’s Jelly-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells under Hypoxic Condition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patcharee Prasajak

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The shortage of donor livers and hepatocytes is a major limitation of liver transplantation. Thus, generation of hepatocyte-like cells may provide alternative choice for therapeutic applications. In this study, we developed a new method to establish hepatocytes from Wharton’s jelly-derived mesenchymal stem cells (WJ-MSCs cell lines named WJMSCs-SUT1 and WJMSCs-SUT2 under hypoxic condition. This new method could rapidly drive both WJ-MSCs cell lines into hepatic lineage within 18 days. The achievement of hepatogenic differentiation was confirmed by the characterization of both phenotypes and functions. More than 80% MSCs-derived hepatocyte-like cells (MSCDHCs achieved functional hepatocytes including hepatic marker expressions both at gene and protein levels, glycogen storage, low-density lipoprotein uptake, urea production, and albumin secretion. This study highlights the establishment of new hepatogenic induction protocol under hypoxic condition in order to mimic hypoxic microenvironment in typical cell physiology. In conclusion, we present a simple, high-efficiency, and time saving protocol for the generation of functional hepatocyte-like cells from WJ-MSCs in hypoxic condition. The achievement of this method may overcome the limitation of donor hepatocytes and provides a new avenue for therapeutic value in cell-based therapy for life-threatening liver diseases, regenerative medicine, toxicity testing for pharmacological drug screening, and other medical related applications.

  4. Cysteine residues 244 and 458–459 within the catalytic subunit of Na,K-ATPase control the enzyme's hydrolytic and signaling function under hypoxic conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irina Yu. Petrushanko

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Our previous findings suggested that reversible thiol modifications of cysteine residues within the actuator (AD and nucleotide binding domain (NBD of the Na,K-ATPase may represent a powerful regulatory mechanism conveying redox- and oxygen-sensitivity of this multifunctional enzyme. S-glutathionylation of Cys244 in the AD and Cys 454-458-459 in the NBD inhibited the enzyme and protected cysteines’ thiol groups from irreversible oxidation under hypoxic conditions. In this study mutagenesis approach was used to assess the role these cysteines play in regulation of the Na,K-ATPase hydrolytic and signaling functions. Several constructs of mouse α1 subunit of the Na,K-ATPase were produced in which Cys244, Cys 454-458-459 or Cys 244-454-458-459 were replaced by alanine. These constructs were expressed in human HEK293 cells. Non-transfected cells and those expressing murine α1 subunit were exposed to hypoxia or treated with oxidized glutathione (GSSG. Both conditions induced inhibition of the wild type Na,K-ATPase. Enzymes containing mutated mouse α1 lacking Cys244 or all four cysteines (Cys 244-454-458-459 were insensitive to hypoxia. Inhibitory effect of GSSG was observed for wild type murine Na,K-ATPase, but was less pronounced in Cys454-458-459Ala mutant and completely absent in the Cys244Ala and Cys 244-454-458-459Ala mutants. In cells, expressing wild type enzyme, ouabain induced activation of Src and Erk kinases under normoxic conditions, whereas under hypoxic conditions this effect was inversed. Cys454-458-459Ala substitution abolished Src kinase activation in response to ouabain treatment, uncoupled Src from Erk signaling, and interfered with O2-sensitivity of Na,K-ATPase signaling function. Moreover, modeling predicted that S-glutathionylation of Cys 458 and 459 should prevent inhibitory binding of Src to NBD. Our data indicate for the first time that cysteine residues within the AD and NBD influence hydrolytic as well as receptor

  5. Enhancing Contents of γ-Aminobutyric Acid (GABA) and Other Micronutrients in Dehulled Rice during Germination under Normoxic and Hypoxic Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Junzhou; Yang, Tewu; Feng, Hao; Dong, Mengyi; Slavin, Margaret; Xiong, Shanbai; Zhao, Siming

    2016-02-10

    Biofortification of staple grains with high contents of essential micronutrients is an important strategy to overcome micronutrient malnutrition. However, few attempts have targeted at γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA), a functional nutrient for aging populations. In this study, two rice cultivars, Heinuo and Xianhui 207, were used to investigate changes in GABA and other nutritional compounds of dehulled rice after germination under normoxic and hypoxic conditions. Forty-one metabolites were identified in both cultivars treated by normoxic germination, whereas the germinated dehulled rice of Heinuo and Xianhui 207 under hypoxic treatment had 43 and 41 metabolites identified, respectively. GABA increased in dehulled rice after germination, especially under hypoxia. Meanwhile, a number of other health-beneficial and/or flavor-related compounds such as lysine and d-mannose increased after the hypoxic treatment. The accumulation of GABA exhibited genotype-specific modes in both normoxic and hypoxic treatments. With regard to GABA production, Xianhui 207 was more responsive to the germination process than Heinuo, whereas Heinuo was more responsive to hypoxia than Xianhui 207. This study provides a promising approach to biofortify dehulled rice with increased GABA and other nutrients through metabolomic-based regulation.

  6. Lipid accumulation in smooth muscle cells under LDL loading is independent of LDL receptor pathway and enhanced by hypoxic conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wada, Youichiro; Sugiyama, Akira; Yamamoto, Takashi; Naito, Makoto; Noguchi, Noriko; Yokoyama, Shinji; Tsujita, Maki; Kawabe, Yoshiki; Kobayashi, Mika; Izumi, Akashi; Kohro, Takahide; Tanaka, Toshiya; Taniguchi, Hirokazu; Koyama, Hidenori; Hirano, Ken-ichi; Yamashita, Shizuya; Matsuzawa, Yuji; Niki, Etsuo; Hamakubo, Takao; Kodama, Tatsuhiko

    2002-10-01

    The effect of a variety of hypoxic conditions on lipid accumulation in smooth muscle cells (SMCs) was studied in an arterial wall coculture and monocultivation model. Low density lipoprotein (LDL) was loaded under various levels of oxygen tension. Oil red O staining of rabbit and human SMCs revealed that lipid accumulation was greater under lower oxygen tension. Cholesterol esters were shown to accumulate in an oxygen tension-dependent manner by high-performance liquid chromatographic analysis. Autoradiograms using radiolabeled LDL indicated that LDL uptake was more pronounced under hypoxia. This result holds in the case of LDL receptor-deficient rabbit SMCs. However, cholesterol biosynthesis and cellular cholesterol release were unaffected by oxygen tension. Hypoxia significantly increases LDL uptake and enhances lipid accumulation in arterial SMCs, exclusive of LDL receptor activity. Although the molecular mechanism is not clear, the model is useful for studying lipid accumulation in arterial wall cells and the difficult-to-elucidate events in the initial stage of atherogenesis.

  7. [The process of heme synthesis in bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells cultured under fibroblast growth factor bFGF and hypoxic conditions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poleshko, A G; Lobanok, E S; Mezhevikina, L M; Fesenko, E E; Volotkovskiĭ, I D

    2014-01-01

    It was demonstrated that fibroblast growth factor bFGF influences the process of heme synthesis, the proliferation activity and viability of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells in culture under hypoxic conditions. The addition of fibroblast growth factor bFGF (7 ng/ml) to the medium under above conditions led to the accumulation of aminolevulinic acid--an early porphyrin and heme precursor, an increase in CD 71 expression--a transferrin receptor, and also a decrease in porphyrin pigments and heme contents--a late precursor and end products of heme synthesis, respectively. It was found that cultivation of the cells under hypoxic conditions and bFGF is an optimum to maintain high viability and proliferation capacity of the mesenchymal stem cells.

  8. Concrete under severe conditions. Environment and loading

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-01-01

    The objective of the CONSEC Conferences is to focus on concrete infrastructures, either subjected to severe environment or severe loading, or any combination of severe conditions. Experience from the performance of existing concrete structures, and especially under severe environmental conditions, severe accidental loading or extended lifespan, has demonstrated the need for better integration of structural and durability design, new design concepts including reliability-based durability design, performance-based material requirements, structural robustness, and an improved basis for documentation of obtained construction quality and durability properties during concrete construction. An improved basis for operation and preventive maintenance of concrete structures including repairs and retrofitting is also very important. Premature corrosion of reinforcing steel, inadequate structural design for seismic or blast loading, are examples of reduced service life of concrete structures that not only represent technical and economical problems, but also a huge waste of natural resources and hence also, an environmental and ecological problem. Experience of structures effectively submitted to severe conditions represents a unique benchmark for quantifying the actual safety and durability margin of concrete structures. In fact for several reasons, most concrete design codes, job specifications and other requirements for concrete structures have frequently shown to yield insufficient and unsatisfactory results and ability to solve the above problems, as well as issues raised by specific very long-term or very severe requirements for nuclear and industrial waste management, or civil works of strategic relevance. Recently available high to ultra-high performance concrete may find rational and valuable application in such cases. It is very important, therefore, to bring people with different professional backgrounds together to exchange experience and develop multi

  9. Cell Death Conversion under Hypoxic Condition in Tumor Development and Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Qiu

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Hypoxia, which is common during tumor progression, plays important roles in tumor biology. Failure in cell death in response to hypoxia contributes to progression and metastasis of tumors. On the one hand, the metabolic and oxidative stress following hypoxia could lead to cell death by triggering signal cascades, like LKB1/AMPK, PI3K/AKT/mTOR, and altering the levels of effective components, such as the Bcl-2 family, Atg and p62. On the other hand, hypoxia-induced autophagy can serve as a mechanism to turn over nutrients, so as to mitigate the adverse condition and then avoid cell death potentially. Due to the effective role of hypoxia, this review focuses on the crosstalk in cell death under hypoxia in tumor progression. Additionally, the illumination of cell death in hypoxia could shed light on the clinical applications of cell death targeted therapy.

  10. Digoxin Downregulates NDRG1 and VEGF through the Inhibition of HIF-1α under Hypoxic Conditions in Human Lung Adenocarcinoma A549 Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong Wei

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Digoxin, an inhibitor of Na+/K+ ATPase, has been used in the treatment of heart-related diseases (such as congestive heart failure and atrial arrhythmia for decades. Recently, it was reported that digoxin is also an effective HIF-1α inhibitor. We investigated whether digoxin could suppress tumor cell growth through HIF-1α in non-small cell lung cancer cells (A549 cells under hypoxic conditions. An MTT assay was used to measure cell viability. RT-PCR and western blotting were performed to analyze the mRNA and protein expression of VEGF, NDRG1, and HIF-1α. HIF-1α nuclear translocation was then determined by EMSA. Digoxin was found to inhibit the proliferation of A549 cells under hypoxic conditions. Our results showed that hypoxia led to the upregulation of VEGF, NDRG1, and HIF-1α both at the mRNA and protein levels. We also found that the hypoxia-induced overexpression of VEGF, NDRG1, and HIF-1α was suppressed by digoxin in a concentration-dependent manner. As expected, our EMSA results demonstrated that under hypoxic conditions HIF-1α nuclear translocation was also markedly reduced by digoxin in a concentration-dependent manner. Our results suggest that digoxin downregulated hypoxia-induced overexpression of VEGF and NDRG1 at the transcriptional level probably through the inhibition of HIF-1α synthesis in A549 cells.

  11. Knockdown of hypoxia-inducible factor-1 alpha reduces proliferation, induces apoptosis and attenuates the aggressive phenotype of retinoblastoma WERI-Rb-1 cells under hypoxic conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Tian; Cheng, Hao; Zhu, Yu

    2014-01-01

    Hypoxia-inducible factor-1 alpha (HIF-1α) plays a critical role in tumor cell adaption to hypoxia by inducing the transcription of numerous genes. The role of HIF-1α in malignant retinoblastoma remains unclear. We analyzed the role of HIF-1α in WERI-Rb-1 retinoblastoma cells under hypoxic conditions. CoCl2 (125 mmol/L) was added to the culture media to mimic hypoxia. HIF-1α was silenced using siRNA. Gene and protein expression were measured by semi-quantitative RT-PCR and Western blotting. Cell cycle and apoptosis were analyzed by flow cytometry. Cell proliferation, adhesion and invasion were assayed using MTT, Transwell invasion, and cell adhesion assays respectively. Hypoxia significantly upregulated HIF-1α protein expression and the HIF-1α target genes VEGF, GLUT1, and Survivin mRNA. HIF-1α mRNA expression was not affected by hypoxia. Transfection of the siRNA expression plasmid pRNAT-CMV3.2/Neo-HIF-1α silenced HIF-1α by approximately 80% in hypoxic WERI-Rb-1 cells. The knockdown of HIF-1α under hypoxic conditions downregulated VEGF, GLUT1, and Survivin mRNA. It also inhibited proliferation, promoted apoptosis, induced the G0/G1 phase cell cycle arrest, and reduced the adhesion and invasion of WERI-Rb-1 cells. HIF-1α plays a major role in the survival and aggressive phenotype of retinoblastoma cells under hypoxic conditions. Targeting HIF-1α may be a promising therapeutic strategy for human malignant retinoblastoma.

  12. Hypoxic enhancement of exosome release by breast cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    King, Hamish W; Michael, Michael Z; Gleadle, Jonathan M

    2012-01-01

    Exosomes are nanovesicles secreted by tumour cells which have roles in paracrine signalling during tumour progression, including tumour-stromal interactions, activation of proliferative pathways and bestowing immunosuppression. Hypoxia is an important feature of solid tumours which promotes tumour progression, angiogenesis and metastasis, potentially through exosome-mediated signalling. Breast cancer cell lines were cultured under either moderate (1% O 2 ) or severe (0.1% O 2 ) hypoxia. Exosomes were isolated from conditioned media and quantitated by nanoparticle tracking analysis (NTA) and immunoblotting for the exosomal protein CD63 in order to assess the impact of hypoxia on exosome release. Hypoxic exosome fractions were assayed for miR-210 by real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and normalised to exogenous and endogenous control genes. Statistical significance was determined using the Student T test with a P value of < 0.05 considered significant. Exposure of three different breast cancer cell lines to moderate (1% O 2 ) and severe (0.1% O 2 ) hypoxia resulted in significant increases in the number of exosomes present in the conditioned media as determined by NTA and CD63 immunoblotting. Activation of hypoxic signalling by dimethyloxalylglycine, a hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) hydroxylase inhibitor, resulted in significant increase in exosome release. Transfection of cells with HIF-1α siRNA prior to hypoxic exposure prevented the enhancement of exosome release by hypoxia. The hypoxically regulated miR-210 was identified to be present at elevated levels in hypoxic exosome fractions. These data provide evidence that hypoxia promotes the release of exosomes by breast cancer cells, and that this hypoxic response may be mediated by HIF-1α. Given an emerging role for tumour cell-derived exosomes in tumour progression, this has significant implications for understanding the hypoxic tumour phenotype, whereby hypoxic cancer cells may release

  13. The age dependent characteristics of the metabolic syndrome manifestation in animals exposed to ionized radiation in hypoxic conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gorban', Je.M.; Topol'nyikova, N.V.; Pod'yachenko, O.V.; Osipovyich, M.V.

    2011-01-01

    To study the influence of combination a single x-ray irradiation at a sublethal dose of adult and old rats with simultaneous hypoxic exposure to a number of manifestations of radioinduced changes, typical for metabolic syndrome (MS), 30 days after ionizing irradiation.

  14. Expression and function of hypoxia inducible factor-1 alpha in human melanoma under non-hypoxic conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshi Sandeep S

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hypoxia inducible factor-1 alpha (HIF-1α protein is rapidly degraded under normoxic conditions. When oxygen tensions fall HIF-1α protein stabilizes and transactivates genes involved in adaptation to hypoxic conditions. We have examined the normoxic expression of HIF-1α RNA and protein in normal human melanocytes and a series of human melanoma cell lines isolated from radial growth phase (RGP, vertical growth phase (VGP and metastatic (MET melanomas. Results HIF-1α mRNA and protein was increased in RGP vs melanocytes, VGP vs RGP and MET vs VGP melanoma cell lines. We also detected expression of a HIF-1α mRNA splice variant that lacks part of the oxygen-dependent regulation domain in WM1366 and WM9 melanoma cells. Over-expression of HIF-1α and its splice variant in the RGP cell line SbCl2 resulted in a small increase in soft agar colony formation and a large increase in matrigel invasion relative to control transfected cells. Knockdown of HIF-1α expression by siRNA in the MET WM9 melanoma cell line resulted in a large decrease in both soft agar colony formation and matrigel invasion relative to cells treated with non-specific siRNA. There is a high level of ERK1/2 phosphorylation in WM9 cells, indicating an activated Ras-Raf-MEK-ERK1/2 MAPK pathway. Treatment of WM9 cells with 30 μM U0126 MEK inhibitor, decreased ERK1/2 phosphorylation and resulted in a decrease in HIF-1α expression. However, a 24 h treatment with 10 μM U0126 totally eliminated Erk1/2 phosphorylation, but did not change HIF-1alpha levels. Furthermore, siRNA knockdown of MEK siRNA did not change HIF-1alpha levels. Conclusion We speculate that metabolic products of U0126 decrease HIF-1alpha expression through "off target" effects. Overall our data suggest that increased HIF-1α expression under normoxic conditions contributes to some of the malignant phenotypes exhibited by human melanoma cells. The expanded role of HIF-1α in melanoma biology increases

  15. Chemical phenomena under severe accident conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Powers, D.A.

    1988-01-01

    A severe nuclear reactor accident is expected to involve a vast number of chemical processes. The chemical processes of major safety significance begin with the production of hydrogen during steam oxidation of fuel cladding. Physico-chemical changes in the fuel and the vaporization of radionuclides during reactor accidents have captured much of the attention of the safety community in recent years. Protracted chemical interactions of core debris with structural concrete mark the conclusion of dynamic events in a severe accident. An overview of the current understanding of chemical processes in severe reactor accident is provided in this paper. It is shown that most of this understanding has come from application of findings from other fields though a few areas have in the past been subject to in-depth study of a fundamental nature. Challenges in the study of severe accident chemistry are delineated

  16. Sestrin2 induced by hypoxia inducible factor1 alpha protects the blood-brain barrier via inhibiting VEGF after severe hypoxic-ischemic injury in neonatal rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Xudan; Doycheva, Desislava Met; Xu, Liang; Tang, Jiping; Yan, Min; Zhang, John H

    2016-11-01

    Hypoxic ischemic (HI) encephalopathy remains the leading cause of perinatal brain injury resulting in long term disabilities. Stabilization of blood brain barrier (BBB) after HI is an important target, therefore, in this study we aim to determine the role of sestrin2, a stress inducible protein which is elevated after various insults, on BBB stabilization after moderate and severe HI injuries. Rat pups underwent common carotid artery ligation followed by either 150min (severe model) or 100min (moderate model) of hypoxia. 1h post HI, rats were intranasally administered with recombinant human sestrin2 (rh-sestrin2) and sacrificed for infarct area, brain water content, righting reflex and geotaxis reflex. Sestrin2 was silenced using siRNA and an activator/inhibitor of hypoxia inducible factor1α (HIF1α) was used to examine their roles on BBB permeability. Rats subjected to severe HI exhibited larger infarct area and higher sestrin2 expression compared to rats in the moderate HI group. rh-sestrin2 attenuated brain infarct and edema, while silencing sestrin2 reversed these protective effects after severe HI. HIF1α induced sestrin2 activation in severe HI but not in moderate HI groups. A HIF1a agonist was shown to increase permeability of the BBB via vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) after moderate HI. However, after severe HI, HIF1α activated both VEGF and sestrin2. But HIF1α dependent sestrin2 activation was the predominant pathway after severe HI which inhibited VEGF and attenuated BBB permeability. rh-sestrin2 attenuated BBB permeability via upregulation of endogenous sestrin2 which was induced by HIF1α after severe HI. However, HIF1α's effects as a prodeath or prosurvival signal were influenced by the severity of HI injury. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Enhancement of gene expression under hypoxic conditions using fragments of the human vascular endothelial growth factor and the erythropoietin genes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shibata, Toru; Akiyama, Nobutake; Noda, Makoto; Sasai, Keisuke; Hiraoka, Masahiro

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: Selective gene expression in response to tumor hypoxia may provide new avenues, not only for radiotherapy and chemotherapy, but also for gene therapy. In this study, we have assessed the extent of hypoxia responsiveness of various DNA constructs by the luciferase assay to help design vectors suitable for cancer therapy. Materials and Methods: Reporter plasmids were constructed with fragments of the human vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and the erythropoietin (Epo) genes encompassing the putative hypoxia-responsive elements (HRE) and the pGL3 promoter vector. Test plasmids and the control pRL-CMV plasmid were cotransfected into tumor cells by the calcium phosphate method. After 6 h hypoxic treatment, the reporter assay was performed. Results: The construct pGL3/VEGF containing the 385 bp fragment of the 5' flanking region in human VEGF gene showed significant increases in luciferase activity in response to hypoxia. The hypoxic/aerobic ratios were about 3-4, and 8-12 for murine and human tumor cells, respectively. Despite the very high degree of conservation among the HREs of mammalian VEGF genes, murine cells showed lower responsiveness than human cells. We next tested the construct pGL3/Epo containing the 150 bp fragment of the 3' flanking region in the Epo gene. Luciferase activity of pGL3/Epo was increased with hypoxia only in human cell lines. The insertion of 5 copies of the 35-bp fragments derived from the VEGF HREs and 32 bp of the E1b minimal promoter resulted in maximal enhancement of hypoxia responsiveness. Conclusions: The constructs with VEGF or Epo fragments containing HRE may be useful for inducing specific gene expression in hypoxic cells. Especially, the application of multiple copies of the HREs and an E1b minimal promoter appears to have the advantage of great improvement in hypoxia responsiveness

  18. Interaction of radionuclides in severe accident conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagrale, Dhanesh B.; Bera, Subrata; Deo, Anuj Kumar; Paul, U.K.; Prasad, M.; Gaikwad, A.J.

    2015-01-01

    Nuclear power plants are designed with inherent engineering safety systems and associated operational procedures that provide an in-depth defence against accidents. Radionuclides such as Iodine, Cesium, Tellurium, Barium, Strontium, Rubidium, Molybdenum and many others may get released during a severe accident. Among these, Iodine, one of the fission products, behaviour is significant for the analysis of severe accident consequences because iodine is a chemically more active to the potential components released to the environment. During severe accident, Iodine is released and transported in aqueous, organic and inorganic forms. Iodine release from fuel, iodine transport in primary coolant system, containment, and reaction with control rods are some of the important phases in a severe accident scenario. The behaviour of iodine is governed by aerosol physics, depletion mechanisms gravitational settling, diffusiophoresis and thermophoresis. The presence of gaseous organic compounds and oxidizing compounds on iodine, reactions of aerosol iodine with boron and formation of cesium iodide which results in more volatile iodine release in containment play significant roles. Water radiolysis products due to presence of dissolved impurities, chloride ions, organic impurities should be considered while calculating iodine release. Containment filtered venting system (CFVS) consists of venturi scrubber and a scrubber tank which is dosed with NaOH and NaS_2O_3 in water where iodine will react with the chemicals and convert into NaI and Na_2SO_4. This paper elaborates the issues with respect to interaction of radionuclides and its consideration in modeling of severe accident. (author)

  19. Ubiquitination is absolutely required for the degradation of hypoxia-inducible factor--1 alpha protein in hypoxic conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ronghai; Zhang, Ping; Li, Jinhang; Guan, Hongzai; Shi, Guangjun

    2016-01-29

    The hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) is recognized as the master regulator of hypoxia response. HIF-α subunits expression are tightly regulated. In this study, our data show that ts20 cells still expressed detectable E1 protein even at 39.5° C for 12 h, and complete depletion of E1 protein expression at 39.5° C by siRNA enhanced HIF-1α and P53 protein expression. Further inhibition of E1 at 39.5 °C by siRNA, or E1 inhibitor Ube1-41 completely blocked HIF-1α degradation. Moreover, immunoprecipitations of co-transfection of HA-ubiquitin and FLAG-HIF-1α plasmids directly confirmed the involvement of ubiquitin in the hypoxic degradation of HIF-1α. Additionally, hypoxic HIF-1 α degradation is independent of HAF, RACK1, sumoylation or nuclear/cytoplasmic localization. Taken together, our data suggest that constitutive HIF-1α protein degradation in hypoxia is absolutely ubiquitination-dependent, and unidentified E3 ligase may exist for this degradation pathway. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Radioresistance and hypoxic cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ando, Koichi

    1989-01-01

    Current progress to explore further understanding of tumor hypoxia was reviewed. At subcellular level, hypoxia induces specific proteins, inhibits DNA synthesis as well as initiation of DNA replicon. Radioresistant characteristics of hypoxic cells is questioned in condition where irradiated cells were kept hypoxia during colony formation. Chronically hypoxic cells recovered from the inner layer of V79 multicellular spheroids are more sensitive to radiation than those from the oxic, outer layer. A novel sandwich culture method, which enables to reoxygenate chronic hypoxia, implies that chronically hypoxic cells are less sensitive to radiation after reoxygenation than oxic cells. For in vivo tumor, two types of tumor hypoxia are reported: diffusion-limited, chronic hypoxia and perfusion-limited, acute hypoxia. Evidence supporting the existence of perfusion-limited hypoxia is provided by an elegant method using vital staining and cell sorter. Data of our own laboratory also implies 2 types of tumor hypoxia; fractional hypoxia and incomplete hypoxia. Fractional hypoxia corresponds to a radioresistant tail on a biphasic tumor cell survival curves while tumors with incomplete hypoxia demonstrate only single component with radioresistant characteristics, instead. (author)

  1. Astrocyte - neuron lactate shuttle may boost more ATP supply to the neuron under hypoxic conditions - in silico study supported by in vitro expression data

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Neuro-glial interactions are important for normal functioning of the brain as well as brain energy metabolism. There are two major working models - in the classical view, both neurons and astrocytes can utilize glucose as the energy source through oxidative metabolism, whereas in the astrocyte-neuron lactate shuttle hypothesis (ANLSH) it is the astrocyte which can consume glucose through anaerobic glycolysis to pyruvate and then to lactate, and this lactate is secreted to the extracellular space to be taken up by the neuron for further oxidative degradation. Results In this computational study, we have included hypoxia-induced genetic regulation of these enzymes and transporters, and analyzed whether the ANLSH model can provide an advantage to either cell type in terms of supplying the energy demand. We have based this module on our own experimental analysis of hypoxia-dependent regulation of transcription of key metabolic enzymes. Using this experimentation-supported in silico modeling, we show that under both normoxic and hypoxic conditions in a given time period ANLSH model does indeed provide the neuron with more ATP than in the classical view. Conclusions Although the ANLSH is energetically more favorable for the neuron, it is not the case for the astrocyte in the long term. Considering the fact that astrocytes are more resilient to hypoxia, we would propose that there is likely a switch between the two models, based on the energy demand of the neuron, so as to maintain the survival of the neuron under hypoxic or glucose-and-oxygen-deprived conditions. PMID:21995951

  2. Astrocyte - neuron lactate shuttle may boost more ATP supply to the neuron under hypoxic conditions - in silico study supported by in vitro expression data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kurnaz Isil A

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Neuro-glial interactions are important for normal functioning of the brain as well as brain energy metabolism. There are two major working models - in the classical view, both neurons and astrocytes can utilize glucose as the energy source through oxidative metabolism, whereas in the astrocyte-neuron lactate shuttle hypothesis (ANLSH it is the astrocyte which can consume glucose through anaerobic glycolysis to pyruvate and then to lactate, and this lactate is secreted to the extracellular space to be taken up by the neuron for further oxidative degradation. Results In this computational study, we have included hypoxia-induced genetic regulation of these enzymes and transporters, and analyzed whether the ANLSH model can provide an advantage to either cell type in terms of supplying the energy demand. We have based this module on our own experimental analysis of hypoxia-dependent regulation of transcription of key metabolic enzymes. Using this experimentation-supported in silico modeling, we show that under both normoxic and hypoxic conditions in a given time period ANLSH model does indeed provide the neuron with more ATP than in the classical view. Conclusions Although the ANLSH is energetically more favorable for the neuron, it is not the case for the astrocyte in the long term. Considering the fact that astrocytes are more resilient to hypoxia, we would propose that there is likely a switch between the two models, based on the energy demand of the neuron, so as to maintain the survival of the neuron under hypoxic or glucose-and-oxygen-deprived conditions.

  3. Defined xenogeneic-free and hypoxic environment provides superior conditions for long-term expansion of human adipose-derived stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Sufang; Pilgaard, Linda; Chase, Lucas G; Boucher, Shayne; Vemuri, Mohan C; Fink, Trine; Zachar, Vladimir

    2012-08-01

    Development and implementation of therapeutic protocols based on stem cells or tissue-engineered products relies on methods that enable the production of substantial numbers of cells while complying with stringent quality and safety demands. In the current study, we aimed to assess the benefits of maintaining cultures of adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs) in a defined culture system devoid of xenogeneic components (xeno-free) and hypoxia over a 49-day growth period. Our data provide evidence that conditions involving StemPro mesenchymal stem cells serum-free medium (SFM) Xeno-Free and hypoxia (5% oxygen concentration) in the culture atmosphere provide a superior proliferation rate compared to a standard growth environment comprised of alpha-modified Eagle medium (A-MEM) supplemented with fetal calf serum (FCS) and ambient air (20% oxygen concentration) or that of A-MEM supplemented with FCS and hypoxia. Furthermore, a flow cytometric analysis and in vitro differentiation assays confirmed the immunophenotype stability and maintained multipotency of ASCs when expanded under xeno-free conditions and hypoxia. In conclusion, our data demonstrate that growth conditions utilizing a xeno-free and hypoxic environment not only provide an improved environment for the expansion of ASCs, but also set the stage as a culture system with the potential broad spectrum utility for regenerative medicine and tissue engineering applications.

  4. Influence of one-year neurologic outcome of treatment on newborns with moderate and severe hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy by rhuEP0 combined with ganglioside (GM1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, X-Y; Ye, M-Y; Zhang, A-M; Wang, W-D; Zeng, F; Li, J-L; Fang, F

    2015-10-01

    To observe the one-year neurologic prognostic outcome of newborns with moderate and severe hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE) who received recombinant human erythropoietin (rhuEPO) combined with exogenous monosialotetrahexosylganglioside (GM1) treatment to provide new guidelines for clinical treatment. Seventy-six newborns with moderate and severe HIE were selected from February 2011 to February 2014 in our hospital. This study received the informed consent of our hospital's Ethics Committee and the newborns' guardians. The newborns were divided to an observation group (n = 34 cases) and a control group (n = 42 cases). All newborns underwent hypothermia and conventional treatment for their conditions. The control group received GMl treatment and observation group received rhuEPO combined with GMl treatment. The curative differences and neural behavior from these two groups were compared. The excellent, efficient proportion and total effective rate of the newborns from the observation group were higher than the control group. The death rate, cerebral palsy and the invalid ratio of the newborns from the observation group were lower than that of the control group. Awareness, muscle tension, primitive reflex and increased intracranial pressure recovery time of the newborns in the observation group were less than those of the control group. The Neonatal Behavior Neurological Assessment (NBNA) score of both groups after the treatment of 7, 14 and 28 days were significantly higher and increased with time (p newborns from the two groups all increased after treatment of 3, 6 and 12 months than those of before, which increased with time (p newborns with HIE improves short-term clinical effects and long-term neurological symptoms.

  5. Hypoxic areas, density-dependence and food limitation drive the body condition of a heavily exploited marine fish predator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Casini, Michele; Käll, Filip; Hansson, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Investigating the factors regulating fish condition is crucial in ecology and the management of exploited fish populations. The body condition of cod (Gadus morhua) in the Baltic Sea has dramatically decreased during the past two decades, with large implications for the fishery relying on this re...

  6. Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells express the pericyte marker 3G5 in culture and show enhanced chondrogenesis in hypoxic conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Wasim S; Adesida, Adetola B; Tew, Simon R; Lowe, Emma T; Hardingham, Timothy E

    2010-06-01

    Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells are a potential source of cells for the repair of articular cartilage defects. Hypoxia has been shown to improve chondrogenesis in some cells. In this study, bone marrow-derived stem cells were characterized and the effects of hypoxia on chondrogenesis investigated. Adherent bone marrow colony-forming cells were characterized for stem cell surface epitopes, and then cultured as cell aggregates in chondrogenic medium under normoxic (20% oxygen) or hypoxic (5% oxygen) conditions. The cells stained strongly for markers of adult mesenchymal stem cells, and a high number of cells were also positive for the pericyte marker 3G5. The cells showed a chondrogenic response in cell aggregate cultures and, in lowered oxygen, there was increased matrix accumulation of proteoglycan, but less cell proliferation. In hypoxia, there was increased expression of key transcription factor SOX6, and of collagens II and XI, and aggrecan. Pericytes are a candidate stem cell in many tissue, and our results show that bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells express the pericyte marker 3G5. The response to chondrogenic culture in these cells was enhanced by lowered oxygen tension. This has important implications for tissue engineering applications of bone marrow-derived stem cells. (c) 2010 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Nuclear factor-κB-dependent epithelial to mesenchymal transition induced by HIF-1α activation in pancreatic cancer cells under hypoxic conditions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhuo-Xin Cheng

    Full Text Available Epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT induced by hypoxia is one of the critical causes of treatment failure in different types of human cancers. NF-κB is closely involved in the progression of EMT. Compared with HIF-1α, the correlation between NF-κB and EMT during hypoxia has been less studied, and although the phenomenon was observed in the past, the molecular mechanisms involved remained unclear.Here, we report that hypoxia or overexpression of hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α promotes EMT in pancreatic cancer cells. On molecular or pharmacologic inhibition of NF-κB, hypoxic cells regained expression of E-cadherin, lost expression of N-cadherin, and attenuated their highly invasive and drug-resistant phenotype. Introducing a pcDNA3.0/HIF-1α into pancreatic cancer cells under normoxic conditions heightened NF-κB activity, phenocopying EMT effects produced by hypoxia. Conversely, inhibiting the heightened NF-κB activity in this setting attenuated the EMT phenotype.These results suggest that hypoxia or overexpression of HIF-1α induces the EMT that is largely dependent on NF-κB in pancreatic cancer cells.

  8. USING OXYGEN-CONSUMING THERMOSET PLASTICS TO GENERATE HYPOXIC CONDITIONS IN MICROFLUIDIC DEVICES FOR POTENTIAL CELL CULTURE APPLICATIONS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sticker, Drago; Rothbauer, Mario; Ehgartner, Josef

    The precise control of the oxygen concentration in a cellular environment allows the study of cells under physiologically relevant conditions. This work reports on a novel method for the generation of reduced dissolved oxygen concentrations in microfluidic chambers for cell- and organ-on-chip app......The precise control of the oxygen concentration in a cellular environment allows the study of cells under physiologically relevant conditions. This work reports on a novel method for the generation of reduced dissolved oxygen concentrations in microfluidic chambers for cell- and organ...

  9. Hypoxic conditions and oxygen supply in nests of the mangrove ant, Camponotus anderseni, during and after inundation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Mogens Gissel; Christian, K.; Malte, H.

    2009-01-01

    The small ant Camponotus anderseni lives exclusively in twigs of the mangrove tree Sonneratia alba, and during inundation, the entrance hole is blocked with a soldier's head which effectively prevents flooding. The nests can be very crowded, with the ants and coccids filling up to 50% of the volume...... is to avoid drowning without suffering anoxia or hypercapnia, and they show a remarkable ability to adapt to the extreme conditions in the mangrove and exploit a niche where the density of other ants is insignificant....

  10. Generation of iPSC line iPSC-FH2.1 in hypoxic conditions from human foreskin fibroblasts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Questa

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Human foreskin fibroblasts were used to generate the iPSC line iPSC-FH2.1 using the EF1a-hSTEMCCA-loxP vector expressing OCT4, SOX2, c-MYC and KLF4, in 5% O2 culture conditions. Stemness was confirmed, as was pluripotency both in vivo and in vitro, in normoxia and hypoxia. Human Embryonic Stem Cell (hESC line WA-09 and reprogrammed fibroblast primary culture HFF-FM were used as controls.

  11. Transcription and splicing regulation in human umbilical vein endothelial cells under hypoxic stress conditions by exon array

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu Yonghong

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The balance between endothelial cell survival and apoptosis during stress is an important cellular process for vessel integrity and vascular homeostasis, and it is also pivotal in angiogenesis during the development of many vascular diseases. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms remain largely unknown. Although both transcription and alternative splicing are important in regulating gene expression in endothelial cells under stress, the regulatory mechanisms underlying this state and their interactions have not yet been studied on a genome-wide basis. Results Human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs were treated with cobalt chloride (CoCl2 both to mimic hypoxia and to induce cell apoptosis and alternative splicing responses. Cell apoptosis rate analysis indicated that HUVECs exposed to 300 μM CoCl2 for 24 hrs were initially counterbalancing apoptosis with cell survival. We therefore used the Affymetrix exon array system to determine genome-wide transcript- and exon-level differential expression. Other than 1583 differentially expressed transcripts, 342 alternatively spliced exons were detected and classified by different splicing types. Sixteen alternatively spliced exons were validated by RT-PCR. Furthermore, direct evidence for the ongoing balance between HUVEC survival and apoptosis was provided by Gene Ontology (GO and protein function, as well as protein domain and pathway enrichment analyses of the differentially expressed transcripts. Importantly, a novel molecular module, in which the heat shock protein (HSP families play a significant role, was found to be activated under mimicked hypoxia conditions. In addition, 46% of the transcripts containing stress-modulated exons were differentially expressed, indicating the possibility of combinatorial regulation of transcription and splicing. Conclusion The exon array system effectively profiles gene expression and splicing on the genome-wide scale. Based on

  12. Epigenetic control of hypoxia inducible factor-1α-dependent expression of placental growth factor in hypoxic conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tudisco, Laura; Della Ragione, Floriana; Tarallo, Valeria; Apicella, Ivana; D'Esposito, Maurizio; Matarazzo, Maria Rosaria; De Falco, Sandro

    2014-04-01

    Hypoxia plays a crucial role in the angiogenic switch, modulating a large set of genes mainly through the activation of hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) transcriptional complex. Endothelial cells play a central role in new vessels formation and express placental growth factor (PlGF), a member of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) family, mainly involved in pathological angiogenesis. Despite several observations suggest a hypoxia-mediated positive modulation of PlGF, the molecular mechanism governing this regulation has not been fully elucidated. We decided to investigate if epigenetic modifications are involved in hypoxia-induced PlGF expression. We report that PlGF expression was induced in cultured human and mouse endothelial cells exposed to hypoxia (1% O 2), although DNA methylation at the Plgf CpG-island remains unchanged. Remarkably, robust hyperacetylation of histones H3 and H4 was observed in the second intron of Plgf, where hypoxia responsive elements (HREs), never described before, are located. HIF-1α, but not HIF-2α, binds to identified HREs. Noteworthy, only HIF-1α silencing fully inhibited PlGF upregulation. These results formally demonstrate a direct involvement of HIF-1α in the upregulation of PlGF expression in hypoxia through chromatin remodeling of HREs sites. Therefore, PlGF may be considered one of the putative targets of anti-HIF therapeutic applications.

  13. Full-length fuel rod behavior under severe accident conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lombardo, N.J.; Lanning, D.D.; Panisko, F.E.

    1992-12-01

    This document presents an assessment of the severe accident phenomena observed from four Full-Length High-Temperature (FLHT) tests that were performed by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) in the National Research Universal (NRU) reactor at Chalk River, Ontario, Canada. These tests were conducted for the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) as part of the Severe Accident Research Program. The objectives of the test were to simulate conditions and provide information on the behavior of full-length fuel rods during hypothetical, small-break, loss-of-coolant severe accidents, in commercial light water reactors

  14. [Characteristics of the sympathoadrenal system response to psychoemotional stress under hypoxic conditions in aged people with physiological and accelerated aging of the respiratory system].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asanov, E O; Os'mak, Ie D; Kuz'mins'ka, L A

    2013-01-01

    The peculiarities of the response of the sympathoadrenal system to psychoemotional and hypoxic stress in healthy young people and in aged people with physiological and accelerated aging of respiratory system were studied. It was shown that in aging a more pronounced response of the sympathoadrenal system to psychoemotional stress. At the same time, elderly people with different types of aging of the respiratory system did not demonstrate a difference in the response of the sympathoadrenal system to psychoemotional stress. Unlike in young people, in aged people, combination of psychoemotional and hypoxic stresses resulted in further activation of the sympathoadrenal system. The reaction of the sympathoadrenal system was more expressed in elderly people with accelerated ageing of the respiratory system.

  15. Solid oxide fuel cell performance under severe operating conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koch, Søren; Hendriksen, P.V.; Mogensen, Mogens Bjerg

    2006-01-01

    The performance and degradation of Solid Oxide Fuel Cells (SOFC) were studied under severe operating conditions. The cells studied were manufactured in a small series by ECN, in the framework of the EU funded CORE-SOFC project. The cells were of the anode-supported type with a double layer LSM...... cathode. They were operated at 750 °C or 850 °C in hydrogen with 5% or 50% water at current densities ranging from 0.25 A cm–2 to 1 A cm–2 for periods of 300 hours or more. The area specific cell resistance, corrected for fuel utilisation, ranged between 0.20 Ω cm2 and 0.34 Ω cm2 at 850 °C and 520 m......V, and between 0.51 Ω cm2 and 0.92 Ω cm2 at 750 °C and 520 mV. The degradation of cell performance was found to be low (ranging from 0 to 8%/1,000 hours) at regular operating conditions. Voltage degradation rates of 20 to 40%/1,000 hours were observed under severe operating conditions, depending on the test...

  16. Postnatal morphology of hematoencephalic barrier in hypoxic lesion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. V. Kikhtenko

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available In infants with perinatal hypoxic lesion of the central nervous system swelling and death of the endothelium, thickening of the capillary basement membranes, karyorrhexis and plasmorrhexis of astrocytes are observed. The severity and degree of pathological changes depends on the time of hypoxic exposure (antenatal or intrapartum period and the term of postnatal life.

  17. Most likely failure location during severe accident conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rempe, J.L.; Allison, C.M.

    1991-01-01

    This paper describes preliminary results from which finite element calculation results are used in conjunction with analytical calculation results to predict failure in different LWR vessel designs during a severe accident. Detailed analyses are being performed to investigate the relative likelihood of a BWR vessel and drain line penetration to fail during a wide range of severe accident conditions. Analytically developed failure maps, which were developed in terms of dimensionless groups, are applied to consider geometries and materials occurring in other LWR vessel designs. Preliminary numerical analysis results indicate that if ceramic debris relocates within the BWR drain line to a distance below the lower head, the drain line will reach failure temperatures before the vessel fails. Application of failure maps for these debris conditions to other LWR geometries indicate that in-vessel tube melting will occur in either BWR or PWR vessel designs. Furthermore, if this melt is assumed to fill the entire penetration flow area, the melt is predicted to travel well below the lower head in any of the reference LWR penetrations. However, failure maps suggest the result that ex-vessel tube temperatures exceed the penetration's ultimate strength is specific to the BWR drain line because of its material composition and relatively large effective diameter for melt flow

  18. Preclinical assessment of hypoxic marker specificity and sensitivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iyer, Renuka V.; Engelhardt, Edward L.; Stobbe, Corinne C.; Schneider, Richard F.; Chapman, J. Donald

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: In the search for a sensitive, accurate, and noninvasive technique for quantifying human tumor hypoxia, our laboratory has synthesized several potential radiodiagnostic agents. The purpose of this study was to assess and compare the hypoxic marking properties of both radioiodinated and Tc-99m labeled markers in appropriate test systems which can predict for in vivo activity. Materials and Methods: Preclinical assessment of hypoxic marker specificity and sensitivity employed three laboratory assays with tumor cells in vitro and in vivo. Radiolabeled marker uptake and/or binding to whole EMT-6 tumor cells under extremely hypoxic and aerobic conditions was measured and their ratio defined hypoxia-specific factor (HSF). Marker specificity to hypoxic tumor tissue was estimated from its selective avidity to two rodent tumors in vivo, whose radiobiologic hypoxic fractions (HF) had been measured. The ratios of % injected dose/gram (%ID/g) of marker at various times in EMT-6 tumor tissue relative to that in the blood and muscle of scid mice were used to quantify hypoxia-specific activity. This tumor in this host exhibited an average radiobiologic HF of ∼35%. As well, nuclear medicine images were acquired from R3327-AT (HF ≅15%) and R3327-H (no measurable HF) prostate carcinomas growing in rats to distinguish between marker avidity due to hypoxia versus perfusion. Results: The HSF for FC-103 and other iodinated markers were higher (5-40) than those for FC-306 and other Tc-99m labeled markers. The latter did not show hypoxia-specific uptake into cells in vitro. Qualitative differences were observed in the biodistribution and clearance kinetics of the iodinated azomycin nucleosides relative to the technetium chelates. The largest tumor/blood (T/B) and tumor/muscle (T/M) ratios were observed for compounds of the azomycin nucleoside class in EMT-6 tumor-bearing scid mice. These markers also showed a 3-4 x higher uptake into R3327-AT tumors relative to the well

  19. Hypoxia-inducible factor-1α mediates the toll-like receptor 4 signaling pathway leading to anti-tumor effects in human hepatocellular carcinoma cells under hypoxic conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaoyu; Li, Shuchen; Li, Mingrong; Huang, Haiying; Li, Jingyuan; Zhou, Changwei

    2016-08-01

    Hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) and toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) are involved in numerous mechanisms of cancer biology, including cell proliferation and survival; however the interaction of the two factors under hypoxic conditions remains unclear. The present study investigated the in vitro mechanism that results in the suppression of tumor cell growth and cellular functions when HIF-1α is silenced. In the present study, the human hepatocellular carcinoma HepG2 cell line was transfected with short hairpin RNA (shRNA) against HIF-1α and cultured under hypoxic conditions (1% O 2 for 24 h). The expression of HIF-1α and various growth factors, including epidermal growth factor (EGF), hepatocyte growth factor (HGF), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF2), were examined using quantitative polymerase chain reaction and immunoblotting. Tumor growth was measured using a Cell Counting Kit-8 assay and tumor activity was measured using tumor cell invasion and migration assays. Lipopolysaccharide and TAK-242 were used to activate and inhibit TLR4, respectively, to observe the role of TLR4 in the HIF-1α silenced tumor cells. The expression of TLR4 signaling pathway associates, including myeloid differentiation primary response gene 88 (MyD88), apoptosis signal-regulating kinase 1 (ASK1), p38 mitogen-activated protein kinases and HIF-1α, were analyzed by western blot assay. Under hypoxic conditions, silencing of HIF-1α expression suppressed tumor cell growth and regulated the expression of tumor growth-associated genes, including EGF, HGF, VEGF and FG2. Suppression of tumor cell invasion and migration was also observed in the HIF-1α silenced HepG2 cell line. In addition, TLR4 was identified to be involved in HIF-1α and MyD88 accumulation, and activation of ASK1 and p38 were demonstrated to be critical for TLR4-mediated HIF-1α pathway. In conclusion, silencing of HIF-1α expression may induce anti-tumor effects under hypoxic

  20. Extracellular nucleotide derivatives protect cardiomyctes against hypoxic stress

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Golan, O; Issan, Y; Isak, A

    2011-01-01

    assures cardioprotection. Treatment with extracellular nucleotides, or with tri/di-phosphate, administered under normoxic conditions or during hypoxic conditions, led to a decrease in reactive oxygen species production. CONCLUSIONS: Extracellular tri/di-phosphates are apparently the molecule responsible...

  1. Oil spill cleanup in severe weather and open ocean conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kowalski, T.

    1993-01-01

    Most serious oil spills occur in open water under severe weather conditions. At first the oil stays on the surface, where it is spread by winds and water currents. The action of the waves then mixes the oil into the water column. With time the light elements of crude oil evaporate. The remaining residue is of very low commercial value, but of significant environmental impact. The oil spill can move either out to sea or inshore, where it ends up on the beaches. Normal procedures are to let outbound oil disperse by evaporation and mixing into the water column, and to let the inbound oil collect on the beaches, where the cleanup operations are concentrated. The reason for this is that there is no capability to clean the surface of the water in wave conditions-present-day oil skimmers are ineffective in waves approaching 4 ft in height. It would be simpler, more effective and environmentally more beneficial to skim the oil right at the spill location. This paper describes a method to do this. In the case of an oil spill in open water and high wave conditions, it is proposed to reduce the height of the ocean waves by the use of floating breakwaters to provide a relatively calm area. In such protected areas existing oil skimmers can be used to recover valuable oil and clean up the spill long before it hits the beaches. A floating breakwater developed at the University of Rhode Island by the author can be of great benefit in oil spill cleanup for open ocean conditions. This breakwater is constructed from scrap automobile tires. It is built in units of 20 tires each, which are easily transportable and can be connected together at the spill site to form any desired configuration

  2. Differential patterns of injury to the proximal tubule of renal cortical slices following in vitro exposure to mercuric chloride, potassium dichromate, or hypoxic conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruegg, C E; Gandolfi, A J; Nagle, R B; Brendel, K

    1987-09-15

    The innate susceptibility of renal cell types to these agents was investigated using precision-cut rabbit renal cortical slices made perpendicular to the cortical-papillary axis. Slices were incubated in DME/F12 medium containing 10 microM, 100 microM, or 1 mM concentrations of either metal for 12 hr or in Krebs-Hepes buffer gassed with nitrogen (100%) for 0.75 to 5 hr of hypoxic exposure. To simulate postischemic reperfusion, some slices were transferred to vessels gassed with oxygen after an initial hypoxic period. Mercuric chloride (100 microM) exposure resulted in damage to the straight regions of proximal tubules by 12 hr leaving convoluted regions unaffected. Hypoxia (2.25 hr) and potassium dichromate (100 microM for 12 hr) both caused injury to the convoluted proximal tubules without affecting straight proximal tubular regions. Mercury concentrations of 10 microM and 1 mM had no effect or injured all cell types within the slice, respectively. Similar results were observed for hypoxic periods less than 1.5 hr or greater than 3 hr of exposure. Potassium dichromate had no measurable affect at 10 microM, but at 1 mM focal lesions were observed after 4 hr of exposure, and by 12 hr all cell types within the slice were affected. Intracellular potassium content normalized to DNA correlated well, but always preceded the pathological lesions observed. These results demonstrate that injury to specific regions of the proximal tubule by these agents relates to an innate susceptibility of the intoxicated cell type independent of physiologic feedback or blood delivery patterns proposed as mechanisms of selective injury from in vivo studies.

  3. Hypoxic radiosensitization: adored and ignored

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Overgaard, Jens

    2007-01-01

    resistance can be eliminated or modified by normobaric or hyperbaric oxygen or by the use of nitroimidazoles as hypoxic radiation sensitizers. More recently, attention has been given to hypoxic cytotoxins, a group of drugs that selectively or preferably destroys cells in a hypoxic environment. An updated......Since observations from the beginning of the last century, it has become well established that solid tumors may contain oxygen-deficient hypoxic areas and that cells in such areas may cause tumors to become radioresistant. Identifying hypoxic cells in human tumors has improved by the help of new...

  4. Hypoxia-inducible factor 1-alpha up-regulates the expression of phospholipase D2 in colon cancer cells under hypoxic conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Maoxi; Du, Kunli; Fu, Zhongxue; Zhang, Shouru; Wu, Xingye

    2015-01-01

    Hypoxia is a common characteristic of solid tumors. Recent studies confirmed that phospholipase D2 (PLD2) plays significant roles in cancer progression. In this study, correlation between the expression of PLD2 and the change in the protein level of hypoxia-inducible factor 1-alpha (HIF1-α) was studied. Thirty human colon cancer tissues were examined for the expression of HIF1-α and PLD2 protein, and mRNA levels. SW480 and SW620 cells were exposed to normoxia (20 %) or hypoxia (Hypoxic stress induced PLD2 mRNA and protein expression in SW480 and SW620 cells. Cells transfected with HIF1-α siRNA showed attenuation of hypoxia stress-induced PLD2 expression. In vivo growth decreased in response to HIF1-α and PLD2 inhibition. These results suggest that PLD2 expression in colon cancer cells is up-regulated via HIF1-α in response to hypoxic stress and underscores the crucial role of HIF1-α-induced PLD2 in tumor growth.

  5. Numerical Study of Severe Accidents on Containment Venting Conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Na Rae; Bang, Young Suk; Park, Tong Kyu; Lee, Doo Yong [FNC Technology Co., Yongin (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Yu Jung; Lee, Sang Won; Kim, Hyeong Taek [KHNP-CRI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-10-15

    Under severe accident, the containment integrity can be challenged due to over-pressurization by steam and non-condensable gas generation. According to Seismic Probabilistic Safety Assessment (PSA) result, the late containment failure by over-pressurization has been identified as the most probable containment failure mode. In addition, the analyses of Fukushima nuclear power plant accident reveal the necessity of the proper containment depressurization to prevent the large release of the radionuclide to environment. Containment venting has been considered as an effective approach to maintain the containment integrity from over-pressurization. Basic idea of containment venting is to relieve the pressure inside of the containment by establishing a flow path to the external environment. To ensure the containment integrity under over-pressure conditions, it is crucial to conduct the containment vent in a timely manner with a sufficient discharge flow rate. It is also important to optimize the vent line size to prevent additional risk of leakage and to install at the site with limited space availability. The purpose of this study is to identify the effective venting conditions for preventing the containment over-pressurization and investigate the vent flow characteristics to minimize the consequence of the containment ventilation.. In order that, thermodynamic behavior of the containment and the discharged flow depending on different vent strategies are analyzed and compared. The representative accident scenarios are identified by reviewing the Level 2 PSA result and the sensitivity analyses with varying conditions (i.e. vent line size and vent initiation pressure) are conducted. MAAP5 model for the OPR1000 Korea nuclear power plant has been used for severe accident simulations. Containment venting can be an effective strategy to prevent the significant failure of the containment due to over-pressurization. However, it should be carefully conducted because the vented

  6. Numerical Study of Severe Accidents on Containment Venting Conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Na Rae; Bang, Young Suk; Park, Tong Kyu; Lee, Doo Yong; Choi, Yu Jung; Lee, Sang Won; Kim, Hyeong Taek

    2014-01-01

    Under severe accident, the containment integrity can be challenged due to over-pressurization by steam and non-condensable gas generation. According to Seismic Probabilistic Safety Assessment (PSA) result, the late containment failure by over-pressurization has been identified as the most probable containment failure mode. In addition, the analyses of Fukushima nuclear power plant accident reveal the necessity of the proper containment depressurization to prevent the large release of the radionuclide to environment. Containment venting has been considered as an effective approach to maintain the containment integrity from over-pressurization. Basic idea of containment venting is to relieve the pressure inside of the containment by establishing a flow path to the external environment. To ensure the containment integrity under over-pressure conditions, it is crucial to conduct the containment vent in a timely manner with a sufficient discharge flow rate. It is also important to optimize the vent line size to prevent additional risk of leakage and to install at the site with limited space availability. The purpose of this study is to identify the effective venting conditions for preventing the containment over-pressurization and investigate the vent flow characteristics to minimize the consequence of the containment ventilation.. In order that, thermodynamic behavior of the containment and the discharged flow depending on different vent strategies are analyzed and compared. The representative accident scenarios are identified by reviewing the Level 2 PSA result and the sensitivity analyses with varying conditions (i.e. vent line size and vent initiation pressure) are conducted. MAAP5 model for the OPR1000 Korea nuclear power plant has been used for severe accident simulations. Containment venting can be an effective strategy to prevent the significant failure of the containment due to over-pressurization. However, it should be carefully conducted because the vented

  7. Iodine/steel reactions under severe accident conditions in LWR's

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Funke, F.; Greger, G-U.; Hellman, S.; Bleier, A.; Morell, W.

    1994-01-01

    Due to large surface areas, the reaction of volatile, molecular iodine (I 2 ) with steel surfaces in the containment may play an important role in predicting the source term to the environment. Both wall retention of iodine and conversion of volatile into non-volatile iodine compounds at steel surfaces have to be considered. Two types of laboratory experiments were carried out at Siemens/KWU in order to investigate the reaction of I 2 at steel surfaces representative for German power plants. 1) For steel coupons submerged in an I 2 solution at T = 50 deg C, 90 deg C or 140 deg C the reaction rate of the I 2 /I - conversion was determined. No iodine loading was observed on the steel in the aqueous phase tests. I 2 reacts with the steel components (Fe, Cr or Ni) to form metal iodides on the surface which are all immediately dissolved in water under dissociation into the metal and the iodide ions. From these experiments, the I 2 /I - conversion rate constants over the temperature range 50 deg C - 140 deg C as well as the activation energy were determined. The measured data are suitable to be included in severe accident iodine codes such as IMPAIR. 2) Steel tubes were exposed to a steam/I 2 flow under dry air at T=120 deg C and steam-condensing conditions at T= 120 deg C and 160 deg C. In dry air I 2 was retained on the steel surface and a deposition rate constant was measured. Under steam-condensing conditions there is an effective conversion of volatile I 2 to non-volatile I - which is subsequently washed off from the steel surface. The I 2 /I - conversion rate constants suitable for modelling this process were determined. No temperature dependency was found in the range 120 deg C - 160 deg C. (author). 4 refs., 2 tabs., 7 figs

  8. Hypoxic sensitizers (A review)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohno, Tadao; Shikita, Mikio

    1976-01-01

    Since the early works of Bridges (1960) and Adams (1963), electron-affinic compounds have long been the subject of a number of studies in the search for a drug which sensitizes radio-resistant hypoxic tumor cells for improvement of radiotherapy of cancer. However, clinical application of this kind of drugs has been hampered by the fact that most of the compounds which exhibited radiosensitizing action in vitro exerted no such action against hypoxic tumor cells in vivo, because of rapid metabolical decomposition or because of great toxicity in vivo. Low solubility of these compounds in aqueous solution was another problem which made it difficult to use the compounds in proper concentrations. The authors have found that furylfuramide (AF-2), possesses a typical radiosensitizing potency. The radiosensitizing action of AF-2 was demonstrated in hypoxic yeasts as well as in mouse leukemic cells (L-5178 Y). Injection of 4.7 μg of AF-2 into a mouse mammary carcinoma 5 min before a single dose (3500 rad) of x-irradiation reduced regrowth of the tumors to a greater extent than irradiation alone, giving an enhancing ratio of 1.6. The effect of AF-2 was insignificant when radiation was given in divided doses (800 rad for 5 times) with the drug injected each time prior to irradiation. (auth.)

  9. Hypoxic-cell sensitizers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dische, S.

    1983-01-01

    There is now 6 years of clinical experience with misonidazole as a hypoxic-cell sensitizer. Neurotoxicity limits the total dose which may be given, and so relatively low concentrations of radiosensitizing drugs are likely to be achieved in hypoxic cells in man as compared with those in animal tumors. It is likely that benefit will only be shown in those situations where radioresistant hypoxic cells strongly dominate as a cause of radiation failure. Many clinical trials are underway, and thus far some show no benefit while in others there is a definite advantage to the patients given the drug. These trials must be continued to their conclusion, but misonidazole must be regarded as the first of a series of radiosensitizers to reach the clinic for trial. There is a promise of more effective drugs becoming available within the next few years. Those showing a lower lipophilicity than misonidazole have been found to have a shorter half-life and a lower uptake in neural tissue in animal studies. One such drug, desmethylmisonidazole, is presently undergoing clinical trial

  10. Hypoxia-inducible factor-1β (HIF-1β) is upregulated in a HIF-1α-dependent manner in 518A2 human melanoma cells under hypoxic conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mandl, Markus, E-mail: mmandl@mail.austria.com; Kapeller, Barbara; Lieber, Roman; Macfelda, Karin

    2013-04-26

    Highlights: •HIF-1β is a hypoxia-responsive protein in 518A2 human melanoma cells. •HIF-1β is upregulated in a HIF-1α-dependent manner under hypoxic conditions. •HIF-1β is not elevated due to heterodimerization with HIF-1α per se. •HIF-1β inducibility has a biological relevance as judged in Het-CAM model. -- Abstract: Solid tumors include hypoxic areas due to excessive cell proliferation. Adaptation to low oxygen levels is mediated by the hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) pathway promoting invasion, metastasis, metabolic alterations, chemo-resistance and angiogenesis. The transcription factor HIF-1, the major player within this pathway consists of HIF-1α and HIF-1β. The alpha subunit is continuously degraded under normoxia and becomes stabilized under reduced oxygen supply. In contrast, HIF-1β is generally regarded as constitutively expressed and being present in excess within the cell. However, there is evidence that the expression of this subunit is more complex. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of HIF-1β in human melanoma cells. Among a panel of five different cell lines, in 518A2 cells exposed to the hypoxia-mimetic cobalt chloride HIF-1β was rapidly elevated on protein level. Knockdown experiments performed under cobalt chloride-exposure and hypoxia revealed that this effect was mediated by HIF-1α. The non-canonical relationship between these subunits was further confirmed by pharmacologic inhibition of HIF-1α and by expression of a dominant-negative HIF mutant. Overexpression of HIF-1α showed a time delay in HIF-1β induction, thus arguing for HIF-1β de novo synthesis rather than protein stabilization by heterodimerization. A Hen’s egg test-chorioallantoic membrane model of angiogenesis and invasion indicated a local expression of HIF-1β and implies a biological relevance of these findings. In summary, this study demonstrates the HIF-1α-dependent regulation of HIF-1β under hypoxic conditions for the first time. The

  11. Hypoxia-inducible factor-1β (HIF-1β) is upregulated in a HIF-1α-dependent manner in 518A2 human melanoma cells under hypoxic conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mandl, Markus; Kapeller, Barbara; Lieber, Roman; Macfelda, Karin

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: •HIF-1β is a hypoxia-responsive protein in 518A2 human melanoma cells. •HIF-1β is upregulated in a HIF-1α-dependent manner under hypoxic conditions. •HIF-1β is not elevated due to heterodimerization with HIF-1α per se. •HIF-1β inducibility has a biological relevance as judged in Het-CAM model. -- Abstract: Solid tumors include hypoxic areas due to excessive cell proliferation. Adaptation to low oxygen levels is mediated by the hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) pathway promoting invasion, metastasis, metabolic alterations, chemo-resistance and angiogenesis. The transcription factor HIF-1, the major player within this pathway consists of HIF-1α and HIF-1β. The alpha subunit is continuously degraded under normoxia and becomes stabilized under reduced oxygen supply. In contrast, HIF-1β is generally regarded as constitutively expressed and being present in excess within the cell. However, there is evidence that the expression of this subunit is more complex. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of HIF-1β in human melanoma cells. Among a panel of five different cell lines, in 518A2 cells exposed to the hypoxia-mimetic cobalt chloride HIF-1β was rapidly elevated on protein level. Knockdown experiments performed under cobalt chloride-exposure and hypoxia revealed that this effect was mediated by HIF-1α. The non-canonical relationship between these subunits was further confirmed by pharmacologic inhibition of HIF-1α and by expression of a dominant-negative HIF mutant. Overexpression of HIF-1α showed a time delay in HIF-1β induction, thus arguing for HIF-1β de novo synthesis rather than protein stabilization by heterodimerization. A Hen’s egg test-chorioallantoic membrane model of angiogenesis and invasion indicated a local expression of HIF-1β and implies a biological relevance of these findings. In summary, this study demonstrates the HIF-1α-dependent regulation of HIF-1β under hypoxic conditions for the first time. The

  12. Effect of fractionated hyperthermia on hypoxic cells in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nielson, O.S.

    1981-01-01

    The lethal response of asynchronous exponentially growing mouse lung (L1A2) cells heated to 42 0 C under hypoxic conditions was demonstrated in vitro. Acutely hypoxic cells (i.e. heated immediately after 30 min of N 2 +CO 2 gassing) and aerobic cells treated under the same extracellular pH were equally sensitive to a single hyperthermic treatment, and incubation under hypoxia for up to 24 hours prior to treatment did not influence cell survival. Similarly, under controlled pH conditions (pH within 7.0 to 7.4) recovery from hyperthermic damage demonstrated by two-dose hyperthermic fractionation (each of 1.5 hours at 42 0 C) was identical in hypoxic and aerobic cells, and the highest recovery was found at a 10-hour interval Preheating for 1.5 hours at 42 0 C induced thermal resistance. to a second treatment at 42 0 C (thermotolerance). At the 10-hour interval the degree of thermotolerance was not influenced by incubation under hypoxic conditions (thermotolerance ratio, TTR = 4.7 in both aerobic and hypoxic cells). The data indicate that hypoxic conditions do not influence the heat response in L1A2 cells to either a single or a two-dose fractionated hyperthermic treatment in which hypoxia or aerobic conditions were maintained in the interval between the heat treatments. (author)

  13. Numerical module for debris behavior under severe accident conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kisselev, A.E.; Kobelev, G.V.; Strizhov, V.F.; Vasiliev, A.D.

    2005-01-01

    The late phase of a hypothetical severe accident in a nuclear reactor is characterized by the appearance of porous debris and liquid pools in core region and lower head of the reactor vessel. Thermal hydraulics and heat transfer in these regions are very important for adequate analysis of severe accident dynamics. The purpose of this work is to develop a universal module which is able to model above-mentioned phenomena on the basis of modern physical concepts. The original approach for debris evolution is developed from classical principles using a set of parameters including debris porosity; average particle diameter; temperatures and mass fractions of solid, liquid and gas phases; specific interface areas between different phases; effective thermal conductivity of each phase, including radiative heat conductivity; mass and energy fluxes through the interfaces. The calculation results of several tests on modeling of porous debris behavior, including the MP-1 experiment, are presented in comparison with experimental data. The results are obtained using this module implemented into the Russian best estimate code, RATEG/SVECHA/HEFEST, which was developed for modeling severe accident thermal hydraulics and late phase phenomena in VVER nuclear power plants. (author)

  14. Radiosensitization of hypoxic tumor cells in vitro by nitric oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Griffin, Robert J.; Makepeace, Carol M.; Hur, Won-Joo; Song, Chang W.

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: The effects of nitric oxide (NO) on the radiosensitivity of SCK tumor cells in oxic and hypoxic environments in vitro were studied. Methods and Materials: NO was delivered to cell suspensions using the NO donors 2,2-diethyl-1-nitroso-oxyhydrazine sodium salt (DEA/NO), and a spermine/nitric oxide complex (SPER/NO), which release NO at half-lives of 2.1 min and 39 min at pH 7.4, respectively. The cells were suspended in media containing DEA/NO or SPER/NO for varying lengths of time under oxic or hypoxic conditions, irradiated, and the clonogenicity determined. Results: Both compounds markedly radiosensitized the hypoxic cells. The drug enhancement ratios (DER) for 0.1, 1.0, and 2.0 mM DEA/NO were 2.0, 2.3 and 3.0, respectively, and those for 0.1, 1.0, and 2.0 mM SPER/NO were 1.6, 2.3, and 2.8, respectively. Aerobic cells were not radiosensitized by DEA/NO or SPER/NO. When DEA/NO and SPER/NO were incubated in solution overnight to allow release of NO, they were found to have no radiosensitizing effect under hypoxic or oxic conditions indicating the sensitization by the NO donors was due to the NO molecule released from these drugs. At the higher concentrations, SPER/NO was found to be cytotoxic in aerobic conditions but not in hypoxic conditions. DEA/NO was only slightly toxic to the cells in both aerobic and hypoxic conditions. Conclusions: NO released from NO donors DEA/NO and SPER/NO is as effective as oxygen to radiosensitize hypoxic cells in vitro. Its application to the radiosensitization of hypoxic cells in solid tumors remains to be investigated

  15. Appetite and gut hormone responses to moderate-intensity continuous exercise versus high-intensity interval exercise, in normoxic and hypoxic conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Daniel P; Smith, Lindsey R; Chrismas, Bryna C; Taylor, Lee; Stensel, David J; Deighton, Kevin; Douglas, Jessica A; Kerr, Catherine J

    2015-06-01

    This study investigated the effects of continuous moderate-intensity exercise (MIE) and high-intensity interval exercise (HIIE) in combination with short exposure to hypoxia on appetite and plasma concentrations of acylated ghrelin, peptide YY (PYY), and glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1). Twelve healthy males completed four, 2.6 h trials in a random order: (1) MIE-normoxia, (2) MIE-hypoxia, (3) HIIE-normoxia, and (4) HIIE-hypoxia. Exercise took place in an environmental chamber. During MIE, participants ran for 50 min at 70% of altitude-specific maximal oxygen uptake (V˙O2max) and during HIIE performed 6 × 3 min running at 90% V˙O2max interspersed with 6 × 3 min active recovery at 50% V˙O2max with a 7 min warm-up and cool-down at 70% V˙O2max (50 min total). In hypoxic trials, exercise was performed at a simulated altitude of 2980 m (14.5% O2). Exercise was completed after a standardised breakfast. A second meal standardised to 30% of participants' daily energy requirements was provided 45 min after exercise. Appetite was suppressed more in hypoxia than normoxia during exercise, post-exercise, and for the full 2.6 h trial period (linear mixed modelling, p  0.05). These findings demonstrate that short exposure to hypoxia causes suppressions in appetite and plasma acylated ghrelin concentrations. Furthermore, appetite responses to exercise do not appear to be influenced by exercise modality. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Modeling concrete under severe conditions as a multiphase material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dal Pont, S., E-mail: dalpont@lcpc.f [Division Betons et Composites Cimentaires, BCC-LCPC, 58 Bd.Lefebvre 75738 Paris cedex 15 (France); Meftah, F. [Laboratoire Mecanique et Materiaux du Genie Civil, Universite Cergy-Pontoise, 5 mail Gay Lussac, Neuville-sur-Oise, 95031 Cergy-Pontoise Cedex (France); Schrefler, B.A. [Dipartimento di Costruzioni e Trasporti, Universita di Padova, via Marzolo 9, 35131 Padova (Italy)

    2011-03-15

    The description as well as the prediction of the behavior of concrete under severe high temperature-pressure loading such as those typical of a loss-of-coolant accidental scenario considered for PWR containment buildings, matter in the study of such engineering applications and are also of interest in other fields such as safety evaluations during fire. The purpose of this paper is to present a flexible staggered finite element thermo-hygral model and then to use it as a numerical tool to determine the temperature and gas pressure fields that develop in concrete when heated.

  17. Hypoxia-inducible factor-1β (HIF-1β) is upregulated in a HIF-1α-dependent manner in 518A2 human melanoma cells under hypoxic conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandl, Markus; Kapeller, Barbara; Lieber, Roman; Macfelda, Karin

    2013-04-26

    Solid tumors include hypoxic areas due to excessive cell proliferation. Adaptation to low oxygen levels is mediated by the hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) pathway promoting invasion, metastasis, metabolic alterations, chemo-resistance and angiogenesis. The transcription factor HIF-1, the major player within this pathway consists of HIF-1α and HIF-1β. The alpha subunit is continuously degraded under normoxia and becomes stabilized under reduced oxygen supply. In contrast, HIF-1β is generally regarded as constitutively expressed and being present in excess within the cell. However, there is evidence that the expression of this subunit is more complex. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of HIF-1β in human melanoma cells. Among a panel of five different cell lines, in 518A2 cells exposed to the hypoxia-mimetic cobalt chloride HIF-1β was rapidly elevated on protein level. Knockdown experiments performed under cobalt chloride-exposure and hypoxia revealed that this effect was mediated by HIF-1α. The non-canonical relationship between these subunits was further confirmed by pharmacologic inhibition of HIF-1α and by expression of a dominant-negative HIF mutant. Overexpression of HIF-1α showed a time delay in HIF-1β induction, thus arguing for HIF-1β de novo synthesis rather than protein stabilization by heterodimerization. A Hen's egg test-chorioallantoic membrane model of angiogenesis and invasion indicated a local expression of HIF-1β and implies a biological relevance of these findings. In summary, this study demonstrates the HIF-1α-dependent regulation of HIF-1β under hypoxic conditions for the first time. The results indicate a novel cell specific mechanism which might prevent HIF-1β to become a limiting factor. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Accelerated Testing with Multiple Failure Modes under Several Temperature Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zongyue Yu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A complicated device may have multiple failure modes, and some of the failure modes are sensitive to low temperatures. To assess the reliability of a product with multiple failure modes, this paper presents an accelerated testing in which both of the high temperatures and the low temperatures are applied. Firstly, an acceleration model based on the Arrhenius model but accounting for the influence of both the high temperatures and low temperatures is proposed. Accordingly, an accelerated testing plan including both the high temperatures and low temperatures is designed, and a statistical analysis method is developed. The reliability function of the product with multiple failure modes under variable working conditions is given by the proposed statistical analysis method. Finally, a numerical example is studied to illustrate the proposed accelerated testing. The results show that the proposed accelerated testing is rather efficient.

  19. Understanding Hypoxic Drive and the Release of Hypoxic Vasoconstriction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inkrott, Jon C

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the hypoxic drive and release of hypoxic vasoconstriction in the chronic obstructive pulmonary disease population can be somewhat confusing and misunderstood. Furthermore, the hypoxic drive theory is one in which there really is no scientific evidence to support and yet continues to prosper in every aspect of care in regard to the chronic lung patient, from prehospital all the way to intensive care unit and home care therapy. This subject review will hopefully enhance some understanding of what exactly goes on with these patients and the importance of providing oxygen when it is desperately needed. Copyright © 2016 Air Medical Journal Associates. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Adzuki beans (Vigna angularis seed quality under several drying conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Osvaldo Resende

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available This study analyzed the drying process and the seed quality of adzuki beans (Vigna angularis. Grains of adzuki beans, with moisture content of 1.14 (decimal dry basis at harvest and dried until the moisture content of 0.11 (decimal dry basis. were used. Drying was done in an experimental drier maintened at controlled temperatures of 30, 40, 50, 60, and 70 ºC and relative humidity of 52.0, 28.0, 19.1, 13.1, and 6.8%, respectively. Physiological and technological seed quality was evaluated using the germination test, Index of Germination Velocity (IGV, electrical conductivity, and water absorption, respectively. Under the conditions tested in the present study, it can be concluded that drying time for adzuki beans decreases with the higher air temperatures of 60 and 70 ºC, and it affected the physiological and technological seed quality. Thus, to avoid compromising adzuki seeds quality, it is recommended to promote its drying up to 50 ºC.

  1. Radiation deterioration of several aromatic polymers under oxidative conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasuga, Tsuneo; Hagiwara, Miyuki

    1987-01-01

    Radiation-induced oxidative irradiation effects (with γ-rays under oxygen pressure) or poly(aryl sulphones) (U-PS and PES), poly(aryl ester) (U-Polymer), poly(aryl amide) (A-Film) and poly(aryl ether ether ketone) (PEEK) have been studied based on changes in tensile properties. The deterioration dose estimated from the decrease in the elongation at break was as low as one-fifth to one-tenth of that in high-dose-rate electron-beam irradiation, but the order of radiation resistance of the polymers did not differ from that in electron-beam irradiation, i.e. PEEK > A-Film > U-Polymer > U-PS > PES. The radiation stability of aromatic units under oxidative conditions was estimated from a comparison of the radiation resistance of the polymers themselves and their chemical structures. The following order was obtained: diphenyl ether, diphenyl ketone > aromatic amide>> bisphenol A > diphenyl sulphone. The deterioration mechanism of PEEK under oxidative irradiation was studied by measuring dynamic viscoelastic properties. It was concluded that deterioration in mechanical properties under oxidative irradiation was brought about by chain scission only. (author)

  2. [Follow-up of newborns with hypoxic-ischaemic encephalopathy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Biarge, M; Blanco, D; García-Alix, A; Salas, S

    2014-07-01

    Hypothermia treatment for newborn infants with hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy reduces the number of neonates who die or have permanent neurological deficits. Although this therapy is now standard of care, neonatal hypoxic-ischaemic encephalopathy still has a significant impact on the child's neurodevelopment and quality of life. Infants with hypoxic-ischaemic encephalopathy should be enrolled in multidisciplinary follow-up programs in order to detect impairments, to initiate early intervention, and to provide counselling and support for families. This article describes the main neurodevelopmental outcomes after term neonatal hypoxic-ischaemic encephalopathy. We offer recommendations for follow-up based on the infant's clinical condition and other prognostic indicators, mainly neonatal neuroimaging. Other aspects, such as palliative care and medico-legal issues, are also briefly discussed. Copyright © 2013 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  3. Trace methane oxidation studied in several Euryarchaeota under diverse conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James J. Moran

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available We used 13C-labeled methane to document the extent of trace methane oxidation by Archaeoglobus fulgidus, Archaeoglobus lithotrophicus, Archaeoglobus profundus, Methanobacterium thermoautotrophicum, Methanosarcina barkeri and Methanosarcina acetivorans. The results indicate trace methane oxidation during growth varied among different species and among methanogen cultures grown on different substrates. The extent of trace methane oxidation by Mb. thermoautotrophicum (0.05 ± 0.04%, ± 2 standard deviations of the methane produced during growth was less than that by M. barkeri (0.15 ± 0.04%, grown under similar conditions with H2 and CO2. Methanosarcina acetivorans oxidized more methane during growth on trimethylamine (0.36 ± 0.05% than during growth on methanol (0.07 ± 0.03%. This may indicate that, in M. acetivorans, either a methyltransferase related to growth on trimethylamine plays a role in methane oxidation, or that methanol is an intermediate of methane oxidation. Addition of possible electron acceptors (O2, NO3–, SO22–, SO32– or H2 to the headspace did not substantially enhance or diminish methane oxidation in M. acetivorans cultures. Separate growth experiments with FAD and NAD+ showed that inclusion of these electron carriers also did not enhance methane oxidation. Our results suggest trace methane oxidized during methanogenesis cannot be coupled to the reduction of these electron acceptors in pure cultures, and that the mechanism by which methane is oxidized in methanogens is independent of H2 concentration. In contrast to the methanogens, species of the sulfate-reducing genus Archaeoglobus did not significantly oxidize methane during growth (oxidizing 0.003 ± 0.01% of the methane provided to A. fulgidus, 0.002 ± 0.009% to A. lithotrophicus and 0.003 ± 0.02% to A. profundus. Lack of observable methane oxidation in the three Archaeoglobus species examined may indicate that methyl-coenzyme M reductase, which is not present in

  4. Activation of radiosensitizers by hypoxic cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olive, P.L.; Durand, R.E.

    1978-01-01

    Hypoxic cells metabolize nitroheterocyclic compounds to produce toxic intermediates capable of affecting the survival of neighboring oxygenated cells. Mutagenesis experiments with E. coli WP-2 343 (deficient in nitro-reductase) indicated that reduction of nitroheterocyclics outside bacteria causes killing and mutations within bacteria, presumably due to the transfer of the 'active' specie(s). Using animal tissue slices to reduce nitrofurans, cultured L-929 cells incubated under aerobic conditions were far more sensitive to the toxic and DNA damaging effects of these drugs. Transfer of the active species also occurs in a tissue-like environment in multicell spheroids where the presence of a hypoxic central core served to convert the nitroheterocyclics to intermediates which also damaged the neighbouring oxygenated cells. (author)

  5. Activation of radiosensitizers by hypoxic cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olive, P L; Durand, R E [Wisconsin Clinical Cancer Center, Madison (USA). Dept. of Human Oncology

    1978-06-01

    Hypoxic cells metabolize nitroheterocyclic compounds to produce toxic intermediates capable of affecting the survival of neighboring oxygenated cells. Mutagenesis experiments with E. coli WP-2 343 (deficient in nitro-reductase) indicated that reduction of nitroheterocyclics outside bacteria causes killing and mutations within bacteria, presumably due to the transfer of the 'active' specie(s). Using animal tissue slices to reduce nitrofurans, cultured L-929 cells incubated under aerobic conditions were far more sensitive to the toxic and DNA damaging effects of these drugs. Transfer of the active species also occurs in a tissue-like environment in multicell spheroids where the presence of a hypoxic central core served to convert the nitroheterocyclics to intermediates which also damaged the neighbouring oxygenated cells.

  6. Reduction of 99mTc-sestamibi and 99mTc-tetrofosmin uptake in MRP-expressing breast cancer cells under hypoxic conditions is independent of MRP function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kinuya, Seigo; Li, Xiao-Feng; Yokoyama, Kunihiko; Michigishi, Takatoshi; Tonami, Norihisa; Mori, Hirofumi; Shiba, Kazuhiro; Watanabe, Naoto; Shuke, Noriyuki; Bunko, Hisashi

    2003-01-01

    Hypoxia reduces the uptake of technetium-99m sestamibi (MIBI) in human cancer cell lines. In the current investigation, we attempted to identify the relationship between hypoxia-induced alteration of 99m Tc-MIBI accumulation and expression of multi-drug resistance-associated protein (MRP) in the MCF7/WT breast cancer cell line and its subclonal cell line, MCF7/VP, which expresses high levels of MRP1. A second cationic compound, 99m Tc-tetrofosmin (TF), was also examined. Cellular uptake of 99m Tc-MIBI and 99m Tc-TF was significantly higher in parental MCF7/WT cells than in MCF7/VP cells. Hypoxic conditions generated with a mixture of 95% N 2 and 5% CO 2 reduced cellular uptake of the two tracers in both parental MCF7/WT cells and MRP1-expressing MCF7/VP cells. Cell binding assay with iodine-125-labelled anti-MRP1 antibody demonstrated its specific binding to MCF7/VP cells. Hypoxia did not affect the amount of antibody bound to MCF7/VP cells. These results indicate that hypoxia-induced reduction of tracer uptake in tumour cells is a phenomenon independent of MRP function. (orig.)

  7. Dinitrobenzamide mustard prodrugs - hypoxic cytotoxins and dual substrates for E.coli nitroreductase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patterson, A.V.; Hogg, A.; Pullen, S.; Degenkolbe, A.; Li, D.; Chappell, A.; Ying, S.; Atwell, G.J.; Denny, W.A.; Anderson, R.F.; Wilson, W.R.

    2003-01-01

    Conditional replicating adenoviral vectors (CRAds) have received considerable attention as therapeutic tools in combination with radiotherapy. Viral distribution and micro-regional geometry are likely to be important issues in the treatment of human solid tumours with gene therapy, particularly following intravenous virus administration. The use of CRAds that are 'armed' with enzyme/prodrug systems may overcome some of the perceived limitations; CRAds can redistribute and self-amplify in a cytolytic fashion whilst prodrug metabolites may elicit a local bystander effect. Either or both of these cytotoxic properties could have favourable interactions with radiotherapy (IR). Nevertheless, they may be insufficient to avoid pockets of vector-naive tumour cells beyond the diffusion limits of cytotoxic prodrug metabolites, such as when perivascular seeding occurs. Under such circumstances hypoxic tumour cells may represent the least accessible compartment for vector transfection; the same tumour subpopulation that is likely to be radioresistant. E.coli nitroreductase (NTR) can bioactivate dinitrobenzamide mustards (DNBMs) and is a promising enzyme/prodrug system for 'arming' CRAds. Notably DNMBs can also be activated by endogenous human reductases under low oxygen conditions providing an opportunity to identify dual hypoxic cytotoxins/NTR substrates that may circumvent some of the geometry issues and provide complementarity with IR. To identify a prodrug for NTR that is also active as a hypoxic cytotoxin in vivo. From a set of 164 DNB prodrugs, 19 with favourable activity in vitro against a panel of four NTR-expressing cancer cells were selected and screened for activity as hypoxic cytotoxins in vitro. Measured E17 values ranged from -444 to -366 mV. Seven DNBMs possessed acceptable hypoxic selectivity against the human NSCLC cell line A549WT or clones engineered to overexpress either a human single-electron reductase, cytochrome P450 reductase (A549P450R), or oxic

  8. MRI patterns of hypoxic-ischemic brain injury in preterm and full term infants – classical and less common MR findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cabaj, Astra; Bekiesińska-Figatowska, Monika; Mądzik, Jaroslaw

    2012-01-01

    Hypoxic-ischemic brain injury occurring in antenatal, perinatal or early postnatal period constitutes an important diagnostic problem in both term and prematurely born neonates. Over the past several years magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has become relatively easily accessible in Poland. On the basis of the central nervous system MRI, the experienced radiologist are able to determine the location of the hypoxic-ischemic lesions, their extent and evolution. Therefore he can help clinicians to answer the question whether the brain damage of the newborn is responsible for its clinical condition and he can contribute to determining the prognosis of the infant’s future development. The aim of this study is to present the current knowledge of different types of hypoxic-ischemic brain lesions based on our personal experience and MR images from the archives of the Department of Diagnostic Imaging at the Institute of Mother and Child

  9. Hypoxic-induced stress protein expression in rat cardiac myocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howard, G.; Geoghegan, T.E.

    1986-01-01

    Mammalian stress proteins can be induced in cells and tissues exposed to a variety of conditions including hyperthermia and diminished O 2 supply. The authors have previously shown that the expression of three stress proteins (71, 85, and 95 kDa) was induced in cardiac tissue from mice exposed to hypoxic conditions. The expression of mRNAs coding for the 85 and 95 kDa proteins increase with time of exposure to hypoxia, while the mRNA coding for the 71 kDa protein is transiently induced. The authors extended these studies to investigate the expression of stress proteins in isolated rat cardiac myocytes. Freshly prepared myocytes were exposed to control, hypoxic, anoxic, or heat-shock environments for up to 16 h. The proteins were then labeled for 6 hours with [ 35 S]methionine. Analysis of the solubilized proteins by SDS-PAGE and autoradiography showed that there was a 6-fold increase in synthesis of the 85 kDa protein upon exposure to hypoxia but not heat-shock conditions. The 71 kDa protein was present at high levels in both control and treated myocyte protein preparations, and presumably had been induced during the isolation procedure. Total RNA isolated from intact rat heart and isolated myocytes was compared by cell-free translation analysis and showed induction of RNAs coding for several stress proteins in the myocyte preparation. The induced proteins at 85 and 95 kDa have molecular weights similar to reported cell stress and/or glucose-regulated proteins

  10. Development of a real-time imaging system for hypoxic cell apoptosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Go Kagiya

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Hypoxic regions within the tumor form due to imbalances between cell proliferation and angiogenesis; specifically, temporary closure or a reduced flow due to abnormal vasculature. They create environments where cancer cells acquire resistance to therapies. Therefore, the development of therapeutic approaches targeting the hypoxic cells is one of the most crucial challenges for cancer regression. Screening potential candidates for effective diagnostic modalities even under a hypoxic environment would be an important first step. In this study, we describe the development of a real-time imaging system to monitor hypoxic cell apoptosis for such screening. The imaging system is composed of a cyclic luciferase (luc gene under the control of an improved hypoxic-responsive promoter. The cyclic luc gene product works as a caspase-3 (cas-3 monitor as it gains luc activity in response to cas-3 activation. The promoter composed of six hypoxic responsible elements and the CMV IE1 core promoter drives the effective expression of the cyclic luc gene in hypoxic conditions, enhancing hypoxic cell apoptosis visualization. We also confirmed real-time imaging of hypoxic cell apoptosis in the spheroid, which shares properties with the tumor. Thus, this constructed system could be a powerful tool for the development of effective anticancer diagnostic modalities.

  11. Simple preconditioning technique: empirical formula for condition number reduction at a junction of several wires

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Lysko, AA

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available The condition number for a method-of-moments’ impedance matrix resulting from a junction of several wires is frequency dependant and can be minimized at a given frequency using several approaches. An empirical formula for an optimum, condition...

  12. Post-hypoxic recovery of respiratory rhythm generation is gender dependent.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfredo J Garcia

    Full Text Available The preBötzinger complex (preBötC is a critical neuronal network for the generation of breathing. Lesioning the preBötC abolishes respiration, while when isolated in vitro, the preBötC continues to generate respiratory rhythmic activity. Although several factors influence rhythmogenesis from this network, little is known about how gender may affect preBötC function. This study examines the influence of gender on respiratory activity and in vitro rhythmogenesis from the preBötC. Recordings of respiratory activity from neonatal mice (P10-13 show that sustained post-hypoxic depression occurs with greater frequency in males compared to females. Moreover, extracellular population recordings from the preBötC in neonatal brainstem slices (P10-13 reveal that the time to the first inspiratory burst following reoxygenation (TTFB is significantly delayed in male rhythmogenesis when compared to the female rhythms. Altering activity of ATP sensitive potassium channels (KATP with either the agonist, diazoxide, or the antagonist, tolbutamide, eliminates differences in TTFB. By contrast, glucose supplementation improves post-hypoxic recovery of female but not male rhythmogenesis. We conclude that post-hypoxic recovery of respiration is gender dependent, which is, in part, centrally manifested at the level of the preBötC. Moreover, these findings provide potential insight into the basis of increased male vulnerability in a variety of conditions such as Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS.

  13. Hypoxic training methods for improving endurance exercise performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacob A. Sinex

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Endurance athletic performance is highly related to a number of factors that can be altered through altitude and hypoxic training including increases in erythrocyte volume, maximal aerobic exercise capacity, capillary density, and economy. Physiological adaptations in response to acute and chronic exposure to hypoxic environments are well documented and range from short-term detrimental effects to longer-term adaptations that can improve performance at altitude and in sea-level competitions. Many altitude and hypoxic training protocols have been developed, employing various combinations of living and training at sea-level, low, moderate, and high altitudes and utilizing natural and artificial altitudes, with varying degrees of effectiveness. Several factors have been identified that are associated with individual responses to hypoxic training, and techniques for identifying those athletes most likely to benefit from hypoxic training continue to be investigated. Exposure to sufficiently high altitude (2000–3000 m for more than 12 h/day, while training at lower altitudes, for a minimum of 21 days is recommended. Timing of altitude training related to competition remains under debate, although general recommendations can be considered.

  14. Hypothermia therapy for newborns with hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silveira, Rita C; Procianoy, Renato S

    2015-01-01

    Therapeutic hypothermia reduces cerebral injury and improves the neurological outcome secondary to hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy in newborns. It has been indicated for asphyxiated full-term or near-term newborn infants with clinical signs of hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE). A search was performed for articles on therapeutic hypothermia in newborns with perinatal asphyxia in PubMed; the authors chose those considered most significant. There are two therapeutic hypothermia methods: selective head cooling and total body cooling. The target body temperature is 34.5 °C for selective head cooling and 33.5 °C for total body cooling. Temperatures lower than 32 °C are less neuroprotective, and temperatures below 30 °C are very dangerous, with severe complications. Therapeutic hypothermia must start within the first 6h after birth, as studies have shown that this represents the therapeutic window for the hypoxic-ischemic event. Therapy must be maintained for 72 h, with very strict control of the newborn's body temperature. It has been shown that therapeutic hypothermia is effective in reducing neurologic impairment, especially in full-term or near-term newborns with moderate hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy. Therapeutic hypothermia is a neuroprotective technique indicated for newborn infants with perinatal asphyxia and hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy. Copyright © 2015 Sociedade Brasileira de Pediatria. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  15. Toxic clinical hypoxic radiation sensitizers plus radiation-induced toxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richmond, R.C.

    1984-01-01

    The operational definition espoused twelve years ago that clinical hypoxic radiation sensitizers should be nontoxic interferes with the recognition and research of useful radiation sensitizers. Eight years ago the toxic antitumor drug cis-dichlorodiammineplatinum(II) was reported to be a hypoxic radiation sensitizer and the selective antitumor action of this drug was stressed as potentially creating tumor-targeted radiation sensitization. This rationale of oxidative antitumor drugs as toxic and targeted clinical sensitizers is useful, and has led to the study reported here. The antitumor drug cis-(1,1-cyclobutane-dicarboxylato)diammineplatinum(II), or JM-8, is being tested in clinical trials. Cells of S. typhimurium in PBS in the presence of 0.2mM JM-8 are found to be sensitized to irradiation under hypoxic, but not oxic, conditions. JM-8 is nontoxic to bacteria at this concentration, but upon irradiation the JM-8 solution becomes highly toxic. This radiation induced toxicity of JM-8 preferentially develops from hypoxic solution, and thus contributes to the rationale of hypoxic tumor cell destruction

  16. Hypoxia modifies the feeding preferences of Drosophila. Consequences for diet dependent hypoxic survival

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frelin Christian

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent attention has been given to the relationships between diet, longevity, aging and resistance to various forms of stress. Flies do not simply ingest calories. They sense different concentrations of carbohydrate and protein macronutrients and they modify their feeding behavior in response to changes in dietary conditions. Chronic hypoxia is a major consequence of cardiovascular diseases. Dietary proteins have recently been shown to decrease the survival of chronically hypoxic Drosophila. Whether flies modify their feeding behavior in response to hypoxia is not currently known. This study uses the recently developed capillary feeding assay to analyze the feeding behavior of normoxic and chronically hypoxic Drosophila melanogaster. Results The intakes rates of sucrose and yeast by normoxic or chronically hypoxic flies (5% O2 were analyzed under self selecting and "no choice" conditions. Chronically hypoxic flies fed on pure yeast diets or mixed diets under self selection conditions stopped feeding on yeast. Flies fed on mixed diets under "no choice" conditions reduced their food intakes. Hypoxia did not modify the adaptation of flies to diluted diets or to imbalanced diets. Mortality was assessed in parallel experiments. Dietary yeast had two distinct effects on hypoxic flies (i a repellent action which eventually led to starvation and which was best observed in the absence of dietary sucrose and (ii a toxic action which led to premature death. Finally we determined that hypoxic survivals were correlated to the intakes of sucrose, which suggested that dietary yeast killed flies by reducing their intake of sucrose. The feeding preferences of adult Drosophila were insensitive to NO scavengers, NO donor molecules and inhibitors of phosphodiesterases which are active on Drosophila larvae. Conclusion Chronically hypoxic flies modify their feeding behavior. They avoid dietary yeast which appears to be toxic. Hypoxic survival is

  17. Fentanyl activates hypoxia-inducible factor 1 in neuronal SH-SY5Y cells and mice under non-hypoxic conditions in a μ-opioid receptor-dependent manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daijo, Hiroki; Kai, Shinichi; Tanaka, Tomoharu; Wakamatsu, Takuhiko; Kishimoto, Shun; Suzuki, Kengo; Harada, Hiroshi; Takabuchi, Satoshi; Adachi, Takehiko; Fukuda, Kazuhiko; Hirota, Kiichi

    2011-09-30

    Hypoxia-inducible factor 1 (HIF-1) is the main transcription factor responsible for hypoxia-induced gene expression. Perioperative drugs including anesthetics have been reported to affect HIF-1 activity. However, the effect of fentanyl on HIF-1 activity is not well documented. In this study, we investigated the effect of fentanyl and other opioids on HIF-1 activity in human SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells, hepatoma Hep3B cells, lung adenocarcinoma A549 cells and mice. Cells were exposed to fentanyl, and HIF-1 protein expression was examined by Western blot analysis using anti-HIF-1α and β antibodies. HIF-1-dependent gene expression was investigated by semi-quantitative real-time reverse transcriptase (RT)-PCR (qRT-PCR) and luciferase assay. Furthermore, fentanyl was administered intraperitoneally and HIF-1-dependent gene expression was investigated by qRT-PCR in the brains and kidneys of mice. A 10-μM concentration of fentanyl and other opioids, including 1 μM morphine and 4 μM remifentanil, induced HIF-1α protein expression and HIF-1 target gene expression in an opioid receptor-dependent manner in SH-SY5Y cells with activity peaking at 24h. Fentanyl did not augment HIF-1α expression during hypoxia-induced induction. HIF-1α stabilization assays and experiments with cycloheximide revealed that fentanyl increased translation from HIF-1α mRNA but did not stabilize the HIF-1α protein. Furthermore, fentanyl induced HIF-1 target gene expression in the brains of mice but not in their kidneys in a naloxone-sensitive manner. In this report, we describe for the first time that fentanyl, both in vitro and in vivo, induces HIF-1 activation under non-hypoxic conditions, leading to increases in expression of genes associated with adaptation to hypoxia. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Hypoxic Living and Exercise Training Alter Adipose Tissue Leptin/Leptin Receptor in Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yingli Lu

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Hypobaric hypoxia results in weight loss in obese individuals, and exercise training is advocated for the treatment of obesity and its related metabolic dysfunctions. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of hypoxic living and exercise training on obesity and adipose tissue leptin/leptin receptor in dietary-induced obese rats. Methods: One hundred and thirty high-fat diet fed Sprague-Dawley rats were assigned into one of the following groups (n=10 each: control, sedentary hypoxic living for 1 to 4 weeks (SH1, SH2, SH3, and SH4, living and exercise training in normoxic conditions for 1 to 4 weeks (TN1, TN2, TN3, and TN4, and living and exercise training in hypoxic conditions for 1 to 4 weeks (TN1, TN2, TN3, and TN4. Epididymal adipose tissue expression levels of leptin and leptin receptor were determined. Results: Compared to hypoxic living and living and exercise training in normoxic conditions, living and exercise training in hypoxic conditions for 3-4 weeks resulted in lower Lee index (P<0.05 to P<0.01, and higher expression of leptin and leptin receptor (P<0.05 to P<0.01 in adipose tissue. Conclusion: In a rodent model of altitude training, living and exercise training in hypoxic conditions resulted in greater alterations in obesity and adipose tissue leptin/leptin receptor than hypoxic living alone and living and exercise training in normoxic conditions.

  19. Application of altitude/hypoxic training by elite athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilber, Randall L

    2007-09-01

    At the Olympic level, differences in performance are typically less than 0.5%. This helps explain why many contemporary elite endurance athletes in summer and winter sport incorporate some form of altitude/hypoxic training within their year-round training plan, believing that it will provide the "competitive edge" to succeed at the Olympic level. The purpose of this paper is to describe the practical application of altitude/hypoxic training as used by elite athletes. Within the general framework of the paper, both anecdotal and scientific evidence will be presented relative to the efficacy of several contemporary altitude/hypoxic training models and devices currently used by Olympic-level athletes for the purpose of legally enhancing performance. These include the three primary altitude/hypoxic training models: 1) live high+train high (LH+TH), 2) live high+train low (LH+TL), and 3) live low+train high (LL+TH). The LH+TL model will be examined in detail and will include its various modifications: natural/terrestrial altitude, simulated altitude via nitrogen dilution or oxygen filtration, and hypobaric normoxia via supplemental oxygen. A somewhat opposite approach to LH+TL is the altitude/hypoxic training strategy of LL+TH, and data regarding its efficacy will be presented. Recently, several of these altitude/hypoxic training strategies and devices underwent critical review by the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) for the purpose of potentially banning them as illegal performance-enhancing substances/methods. This paper will conclude with an update on the most recent statement from WADA regarding the use of simulated altitude devices.

  20. Analyzing Traffic Crash Severity in Work Zones under Different Light Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinxin Wei

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies have investigated various factors that contribute to the severity of work zone crashes. However, little has been done on the specific effects of light conditions. Using the data from the Enhanced Tennessee Roadway Information Management System (E-TRIMS, crashes that occurred in the Tennessee work zones during 2003–2015 are categorized into three light conditions: daylight, dark-lighted, and dark-not-lighted. One commonly used decision tree method—Classification and Regression Trees (CART—is adopted to investigate the factors contributing to crash severity in highway work zones under these light conditions. The outcomes from the three decision trees with differing light conditions show significant differences in the ranking and importance of the factors considered in the study, thereby indicating the necessity of examining traffic crashes according to light conditions. By separately considering the crash characteristics under different light conditions, some new findings are obtained from this study. The study shows that an increase in the number of lanes increases the crash severity level in work zones during the day while decreasing the severity at night. Similarly, drugs and alcohol are found to increase the severity level significantly under the dark-not-lighted condition, while they have a limited influence under daylight and dark-lighted conditions.

  1. Russian standards and design practice of ensuring NPP reliability under severe external loading conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Birbraer, A N [St. Petersburg Research and Design Institute Atomenergoproject, St. Petersburt (Russian Federation)

    1993-07-01

    Russian Standards and design practice of ensuring NPP reliability under severe external loading conditions are described. The main attention is paid to the seismic design requirements. Explosions, aircraft impact, and tornado are briefly examined too (author)

  2. Russian standards and design practice of ensuring NPP reliability under severe external loading conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Birbraer, A.N.

    1993-01-01

    Russian Standards and design practice of ensuring NPP reliability under severe external loading conditions are described. The main attention is paid to the seismic design requirements. Explosions, aircraft impact, and tornado are briefly examined too (author)

  3. Perinatal Hypoxic-Ischemic brain injury; MR findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Dong Woo; Seo, Chang Hye

    1994-01-01

    To characterize the MR findings of hypoxic-ischemic brain injury and to assess the value of the MR imaging. SE T1-, T2-weighted, and IR brain MR images of 44 infants and children with the past history of perinatal hypoxic insults were reviewed. Abnormal brain MR findings of 8 patients with birth history of prematurity and 36 patients with birth history of full-term/posterm including 7 with severe anoxic insult history, were compared in regard to the location and the character of the lesions. MRI demonstrated the followings; (1)abnormal signal intensity lesions of subcortical and/or deep cerebral white matter, cortex, and deep gray matter, (2)atrophy of the cerebral white matter, cortex and corpus callosum, with/without ventriculomegaly, and (3)delay in myelination. Periventricular and deep white matter lesions were demonstrated in the prematurity, the deep white matter lesions and/ or subcortical white matter lesions in the term/post-term, and deep gray matter lesions in the 7 patients with severe anoxic insults history. MR imaging was useful in the diagnosis of the hypoxic-ischemic brain injury, and the white and gray matter lesions were correlated with the time of the injury and the severity of hypoxic insult

  4. Reconstitution activity of hypoxic cultured human cord blood CD34-positive cells in NOG mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shima, Haruko; Takubo, Keiyo; Iwasaki, Hiroko; Yoshihara, Hiroki; Gomei, Yumiko; Hosokawa, Kentaro; Arai, Fumio; Takahashi, Takao; Suda, Toshio

    2009-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) reside in hypoxic areas of the bone marrow. However, the role of hypoxia in the maintenance of HSCs has not been fully characterized. We performed xenotransplantation of human cord blood cells cultured in hypoxic or normoxic conditions into adult NOD/SCID/IL-2Rγ null (NOG) mice. Hypoxic culture (1% O 2 ) for 6 days efficiently supported the maintenance of HSCs, although cell proliferation was suppressed compared to the normoxic culture. In contrast, hypoxia did not affect in vitro colony-forming ability. Upregulation of a cell cycle inhibitor, p21, was observed in hypoxic culture. Immunohistochemical analysis of recipient bone marrow revealed that engrafted CD34 + CD38 - cord blood HSCs were hypoxic. Taken together, these results demonstrate the significance of hypoxia in the maintenance of quiescent human cord blood HSCs.

  5. Hypoxic tumor environments exhibit disrupted collagen I fibers and low macromolecular transport.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samata M Kakkad

    Full Text Available Hypoxic tumor microenvironments result in an aggressive phenotype and resistance to therapy that lead to tumor progression, recurrence, and metastasis. While poor vascularization and the resultant inadequate drug delivery are known to contribute to drug resistance, the effect of hypoxia on molecular transport through the interstitium, and the role of the extracellular matrix (ECM in mediating this transport are unexplored. The dense mesh of fibers present in the ECM can especially influence the movement of macromolecules. Collagen 1 (Col1 fibers form a key component of the ECM in breast cancers. Here we characterized the influence of hypoxia on macromolecular transport in tumors, and the role of Col1 fibers in mediating this transport using an MDA-MB-231 breast cancer xenograft model engineered to express red fluorescent protein under hypoxia. Magnetic resonance imaging of macromolecular transport was combined with second harmonic generation microscopy of Col1 fibers. Hypoxic tumor regions displayed significantly decreased Col1 fiber density and volume, as well as significantly lower macromolecular draining and pooling rates, than normoxic regions. Regions adjacent to severely hypoxic areas revealed higher deposition of Col1 fibers and increased macromolecular transport. These data suggest that Col1 fibers may facilitate macromolecular transport in tumors, and their reduction in hypoxic regions may reduce this transport. Decreased macromolecular transport in hypoxic regions may also contribute to poor drug delivery and tumor recurrence in hypoxic regions. High Col1 fiber density observed around hypoxic regions may facilitate the escape of aggressive cancer cells from hypoxic regions.

  6. Biomarkers of Hypoxic Ischemic Encephalopathy in Newborns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martha V. Douglas-Escobar

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available As neonatal intensive care has evolved, the focus has shifted from improving mortality alone to an effort to improve both mortality and morbidity. The most frequent source of neonatal brain injury occurs as a result of hypoxic-ischemic injury. Hypoxic-ischemic injury occurs in about 2 of 1,000 full-term infants and severe injured infants will have lifetime disabilities and neurodevelopmental delays. Most recently, remarkable efforts toward neuroprotection have been started with the advent of therapeutic hypothermia and a key step in the evolution of neonatal neuroprotection is the discovery of biomarkers that enable the clinician-scientist to screen infants for brain injury, monitor progression of disease, identify injured brain regions, and assess efficacy of neuroprotective clinical trials. Lastly, biomarkers offer great hope identifying when an injury occurred shedding light on the potential pathophysiology and the most effective therapy. In this article, we will review biomarkers of HIE including S100b, neuron specific enolase, umbilical cord IL-6, CK-BB, GFAP, myelin basic protein, UCHL-1, and pNF-H. We hope to contribute to the awareness, validation and clinical use of established as well as novel neonatal brain injury biomarkers.

  7. Evaluation of nitrobenzimidazoles as hypoxic cell radiosensitizers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wright, J.; Frank, L.R.; Bush, D.; Harrison, G.H.

    1983-01-01

    Radiobiological and pharmacokinetic assays were performed to determine the potential of 2-nitrobenzimidazole (NBI) as a hypoxic cell radiosensitizing agent. As judged by comparing survival curve slopes of Serratia marcescens irradiated under aerated and hypoxic conditions, the NBI enhancement ratio (ER) at 2 mM concentration was 2.4 +- 0.2, compared with an oxygen enhancement ratio of 3.3 +- 0.3. 2,5-Dinitrobenzimidazole (DNBI) was investigated in vitro; its ER was 3.0 +- 0.3 at 4 mM concentration. Very poor tissue penetration of DNBI precluded further testing in vivo. Acute toxic signs appeared in C3H/HeJ mice following ip injection of NBI at 100 mg/kg. These would be partly attributable to the stress caused by the high pH of the injection vehicle. The LD 50 was estimated to be 125 to 150 mg/kg. Mammary adenocarcinoma tumors grown in the flanks of these mice exhibited maximum NBI levels at 5 min postinjection (ip). Peak tumor radiosensitization occurred in the interval between 5 and 10 min postinjection. The ER for tumor regrowth delay was 2.1 +- 0.3 following 50 mg/kg injected into mice 5 min before irradiation. Functional evaluation up to 40 days after treatment revealed no evidence of neurological deficit

  8. Evaluation of nitrobenzimidazoles as hypoxic cell radiosensitizers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wright, J.; Frank, L.R.; Bush, D.; Harrison, G.H.

    1983-01-01

    Radiobiological and pharmacokinetic assays were performed to determine the potential of 2-nitrobenzimidazole (NBI) as a hypoxic cell radiosensitizing agent. As judged by comparing survival curve slopes of Serratia marcescens irradiated under aerated and hypoxic conditions, the NBI enhancement ratio (ER) at 2 mM concentration was 2.4 +/- 0.2, compared with an oxygen enhancement ratio of 3.3 +/- 0.3. 2,5-Dinitrobenzimidazole (DNBI) was investigated in vitro; its ER was 3.0 +/- 0.3 at 4 mM concentration. Very poor tissue penetration of DNBI precluded further testing in vivo. Acute toxic signs appeared in C3H/HeJ mice following ip injection of NBI at 100 mg/kg. These would be partly attributable to the stress caused by the high pH of the injection vehicle. The LD50 was estimated to be 125-150 mg/kg. Mammary adenocarcinoma tumors grown in the flanks of these mice exhibited maximum NBI levels at 5 min postinjection (ip). Peak tumor radiosensitization occurred in the interval between 5 and 10 min postinjection. The ER for tumor regrowth delay was 2.1 +/- 0.3 following 50 mg/kg injected into mice 5 min before irradiation. Functional evaluation up to 40 days after treatment revealed no evidence of neurological deficit

  9. Hypoxic contraction of cultured pulmonary vascular smooth muscle cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murray, T.R.; Chen, L.; Marshall, B.E.; Macarak, E.J.

    1990-01-01

    The cellular events involved in generating the hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction response are not clearly understood, in part because of the multitude of factors that alter pulmonary vascular tone. The goal of the present studies was to determine if a cell culture preparation containing vascular smooth muscle (VSM) cells could be made to contract when exposed to a hypoxic atmosphere. Cultures containing only fetal bovine pulmonary artery VSM cells were assessed for contractile responses to hypoxic stimuli by two methods. In the first, tension forces generated by cells grown on a flexible growth surface (polymerized polydimethyl siloxane) were manifested as wrinkles and distortions of the surface under the cells. Wrinkling of the surface was noted to progressively increase with time as the culture medium bathing the cells was made hypoxic (PO2 approximately 25 mmHg). The changes were sometimes reversible upon return to normoxic conditions and appeared to be enhanced in cells already exhibiting evidence of some baseline tone. Repeated passage in culture did not diminish the hypoxic response. Evidence for contractile responses to hypoxia was also obtained from measurements of myosin light chain (MLC) phosphorylation. Conversion of MLC to the phosphorylated species is an early step in the activation of smooth muscle contraction. Lowering the PO2 in the culture medium to 59 mmHg caused a 45% increase in the proportion of MLC in the phosphorylated form as determined by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. Similarly, cultures preincubated for 4 h with 32P and then exposed to normoxia or hypoxia for a 5-min experimental period showed more than twice as much of the label in MLCs of the hypoxic cells

  10. Electrical equipment performance under severe accident conditions (BWR/Mark 1 plant analysis): Summary report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bennett, P.R.; Kolaczkowski, A.M.; Medford, G.T.

    1986-09-01

    The purpose of the Performance Evaluation of Electrical Equipment during Severe Accident States Program is to determine the performance of electrical equipment, important to safety, under severe accident conditions. In FY85, a method was devised to identify important electrical equipment and the severe accident environments in which the equipment was likely to fail. This method was used to evaluate the equipment and severe accident environments for Browns Ferry Unit 1, a BWR/Mark I. Following this work, a test plan was written in FY86 to experimentally determine the performance of one selected component to two severe accident environments

  11. Experimental results from containment piping bellows subjected to severe accident conditions: Results from bellows tested in corroded conditions. Volume 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lambert, L.D.; Parks, M.B.

    1995-10-01

    Bellows are an integral part of the containment pressure boundary in nuclear power plants. They are used at piping penetrations to allow relative movement between piping and the containment wall, while minimizing the load imposed on the piping and wall. Piping bellows are primarily used in steel containments; however, they have received limited use in some concrete (reinforced and prestressed) containments. In a severe accident they may be subjected to pressure and temperature conditions that exceed the design values, along with a combination of axial and lateral deflections. A test program to determine the leak-tight capacity of containment penetration bellows is being conducted at Sandia National Laboratories under the sponsorship of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. Several different bellows geometries, representative of actual containment bellows, have been subjected to extreme deflections along with pressure and temperature loads. The bellows geometries and loading conditions are described along with the testing apparatus and procedures. A total of nineteen bellows have been tested. Thirteen bellows were tested in ''like-new'' condition (results reported in Volume 1), and six were tested in a corroded condition. The tests showed that bellows in ''like-new'' condition are capable of withstanding relatively large deformations, up to, or near, the point of full compression or elongation, before developing leakage, while those in a corroded condition did not perform as well, depending on the amount of corrosion. The corroded bellows test program and results are presented in this report

  12. Risk of early or severe pre-eclampsia related to pre-existing conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Catov, Janet M; Ness, Roberta B; Kip, Kevin E

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Preeclampsia (PE), especially severe or early PE, is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality among mothers and infants. We estimated the population attributable fractions of severe or early PE associated with pre-existing conditions among nulliparous and multiparous women. METHODS...

  13. Identification of severe wind conditions using a Reynolds averaged Navier-Stokes solver

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Niels N.; Bechmann, Andreas; Johansen, Jeppe

    2007-01-01

    The present paper describes the application of a Navier-Stokes solver to predict the presence of severe flow conditions in complex terrain, capturing conditions that may be critical to the siting of wind turbines in the terrain. First it is documented that the flow solver is capable of predicting...

  14. Reducing condition number by appropriate current decomposition on a multiplet of several wires

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Lysko, AA

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses a numerical investigation in connection with the dependency of the condition number of the impedance matrix on the decomposition of current on a junction with several attached wires (multiplet). It is shown that the condition...

  15. Hypoxia-Induced Signaling Promotes Prostate Cancer Progression: Exosomes Role as Messenger of Hypoxic Response in Tumor Microenvironment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deep, Gagan; Panigrahi, Gati K.

    2017-01-01

    Prostate cancer (PCA) is the leading malignancy in men and the second leading cause of cancer-related deaths. Hypoxia (low O2 condition) is considered an early event in prostate carcinogenesis associated with an aggressive phenotype. In fact, clinically, hypoxia and hypoxia-related biomarkers are associated with treatment failure and disease progression. Hypoxia-inducible factor 1 (HIF-1) is the key factor that is activated under hypoxia, and mediates adaptation of cells to hypoxic conditions through regulating the expression of genes associated with angiogenesis, epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT), metastasis, survival, proliferation, metabolism, stemness, hormone-refractory progression, and therapeutic resistance. Besides HIF-1, several other signaling pathways including PI3K/Akt/mTOR, NADPH oxidase (NOX), Wnt/β-catenin, and Hedgehog are activated in cancer cells under hypoxic conditions, and also contribute in hypoxia-induced biological effects in HIF-1-dependent and -independent manners. Hypoxic cancer cells cause extensive changes in the tumor microenvironment both local and distant, and recent studies have provided ample evidence supporting the crucial role of nanosized vesicles “exosomes” in mediating hypoxia-induced tumor microenvironment remodeling. Exosomes’ role has been reported in hypoxia-induced angiogenesis, stemness, activation of cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs), and EMT. Together, existing literature suggests that hypoxia plays a predominant role in PCA growth and progression, and PCA could be effectively prevented and treated via targeting hypoxia/hypoxia-related signaling pathways. PMID:27279239

  16. Assessment of Equipment Capability to Perform Reliably under Severe Accident Conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2017-07-01

    The experience from the last 40 years has shown that severe accidents can subject electrical and instrumentation and control (I&C) equipment to environmental conditions exceeding the equipment’s original design basis assumptions. Severe accident conditions can then cause rapid degradation or damage to various degrees up to complete failure of such equipment. This publication provides the technical basis to consider when assessing the capability of electrical and I&C equipment to perform reliably during a severe accident. It provides examples of calculation tools to determine the environmental parameters as well as examples and methods that Member States can apply to assess equipment reliability.

  17. Identification of severe wind conditions using a Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes solver

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soerensen, N N; Bechmann, A; Johansen, J; Myllerup, L; Botha, P; Vinther, S; Nielsen, B S

    2007-01-01

    The present paper describes the application of a Navier-Stokes solver to predict the presence of severe flow conditions in complex terrain, capturing conditions that may be critical to the siting of wind turbines in the terrain. First it is documented that the flow solver is capable of predicting the flow in the complex terrain by comparing with measurements from two meteorology masts. Next, it is illustrated how levels of turbulent kinetic energy can be used to easily identify areas with severe flow conditions, relying on a high correlation between high turbulence intensity and severe flow conditions, in the form of high wind shear and directional shear which may seriously lower the lifetime of a wind turbine

  18. Radiosensitization effect of CMNa on hypoxic pancreatic cancer cell in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yin Lijie; Zhang Li; Ding Tiangui; Peng Zhaoxiang; Yu Huan; Gao Yuwei

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the effects of glycodidazolum natrium (CMNa) on pancreatic cancer cells under hypoxic condition. Methods: The human pancreatic cancer Panc-1 cells were exposed to a single fraction of high-dose γ-ray radiation either with CMNa or under hypoxic condition. The percentage of dead cells was detected with a multiwell plated reader, and fluorescence intensities of propidium iodide were measured before and after digitonin treatment. The sensitizing effect of CMNa on cell killing induced by high-dose irradiation was evaluated by time and concentration dependence. The selective radiosensitive effect of CMNa on hypoxia was evaluated by flow cytometry. Results: The death rate of pancreatic cancer Panc-1 cells paralleled with the increasing concentration of CMNa under hypoxic condition after 30 gray irradiation. The selective radiosensitive effect of CMNa on hypoxia was time-dependent. Conclusions: CMNa can enhance the radiosensitivity of pancreatic cancer Pane-1 cells under hypoxic condition with high-dose irradiation. (authors)

  19. Key Parameters for Operator Diagnosis of BWR Plant Condition during a Severe Accident

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clayton, Dwight A [ORNL; Poore III, Willis P [ORNL

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this research is to examine the key information needed from nuclear power plant instrumentation to guide severe accident management and mitigation for boiling water reactor (BWR) designs (specifically, a BWR/4-Mark I), estimate environmental conditions that the instrumentation will experience during a severe accident, and identify potential gaps in existing instrumentation that may require further research and development. This report notes the key parameters that instrumentation needs to measure to help operators respond to severe accidents. A follow-up report will assess severe accident environmental conditions as estimated by severe accident simulation model analysis for a specific US BWR/4-Mark I plant for those instrumentation systems considered most important for accident management purposes.

  20. New avenues in hypoxic cell sensitization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huilgol, N.G.; Chatterjee, N.A.; Singh, B.B.

    1995-01-01

    Hypoxic cells in tumors represent a population of cells that are resistant to radiotherapy. Bio-reductive agents like RSU 1069, RBU 6145 and EOg and vasoactive drugs in conjunction with hypoxic cell sensitizers are being evaluated as hypoxic cell cytotoxins. Chlorpromazine a membrane active drug and AK-2123- a nitrotriazole with a potential to deplete intracellular thiols induced vasoconstriction and sensitize hypoxic cells have stretched the boundaries of innovation. A preliminary experience with these drugs is discussed. 8 refs., 2 tabs., 2 figs

  1. IgE sensitization and sociodemographic conditions as determinant factors in asthma severity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Gaviria

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: In Latin America there are few data about the factors that influence the control and severity of asthma. Objective: To describe the association between IgE sensitization to intra-home allergens and housing conditions in the severity of asthma. Methods: Sensitization to aero-allergens was evaluated by skin prick test and socio-demographic data by a questionnaire in a population between 6 and 14 years of age with diagnosis of asthma. Asthma control was measured according to spirometric results and to the application of the ACT (Asthma Control Test; the severity and symptom control was evaluated according to the GINA guideline. Results: A total of 150 resident patients from the Aburra Valley (Colombia were included. The median age of participants was 11 years, 95 (63.3 % male. 92 % of the patients resided in the urban area. Mite sensitization was the most prevalent in controlled and uncontrolled patients. Sensitization to cockroach and some poverty conditions were risk factors for asthma severity. Conclusion: Poverty conditions appear to favor the development of severe asthma and in turn IgE sensitization to cockroaches. This sensitization could serve as a biomarker of severity.

  2. Severe Pulmonary Toxicity After Myeloablative Conditioning Using Total Body Irradiation: An Assessment of Risk Factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelsey, Chris R.; Horwitz, Mitchell E.; Chino, Junzo P.; Craciunescu, Oana; Steffey, Beverly; Folz, Rodney J.; Chao, Nelson J.; Rizzieri, David A.; Marks, Lawrence B.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To assess factors associated with severe pulmonary toxicity after myeloablative conditioning using total body irradiation (TBI) followed by allogeneic stem cell transplantation. Methods and Materials: A total of 101 adult patients who underwent TBI-based myeloablative conditioning for hematologic malignancies at Duke University between 1998 and 2008 were reviewed. TBI was combined with high-dose cyclophosphamide, melphalan, fludarabine, or etoposide, depending on the underlying disease. Acute pulmonary toxicity, occurring within 90 days of transplantation, was scored using Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 3.0. Actuarial overall survival and the cumulative incidence of acute pulmonary toxicity were calculated via the Kaplan-Meier method and compared using a log-rank test. A binary logistic regression analysis was performed to assess factors independently associated with acute severe pulmonary toxicity. Results: The 90-day actuarial risk of developing severe (Grade 3-5) pulmonary toxicity was 33%. Actuarial survival at 90 days was 49% in patients with severe pulmonary toxicity vs. 94% in patients without (p < 0.001). On multivariate analysis, the number of prior chemotherapy regimens was the only factor independently associated with development of severe pulmonary toxicity (odds ratio, 2.7 per regimen). Conclusions: Severe acute pulmonary toxicity is prevalent after TBI-based myeloablative conditioning regimens, occurring in approximately 33% of patients. The number of prior chemotherapy regimens appears to be an important risk factor.

  3. Shipping container response to severe highway and railway accident conditions: Main report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fischer, L.E.; Chou, C.K.; Gerhard, M.A.; Kimura, C.Y.; Martin, R.W.; Mensing, R.W.; Mount, M.E.; Witte, M.C.

    1987-02-01

    This report describes a study performed by the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory to evaluate the level of safety provided under severe accident conditions during the shipment of spent fuel from nuclear power reactors. The evaluation is performed using data from real accident histories and using representative truck and rail cask models that likely meet 10 CFR 71 regulations. The responses of the representative casks are calculated for structural and thermal loads generated by severe highway and railway accident conditions. The cask responses are compared with those responses calculated for the 10 CFR 71 hypothetical accident conditions. By comparing the responses it is determined that most highway and railway accident conditions fall within the 10 CFR 71 hypothetical accident conditions. For those accidents that have higher responses, the probabilities anf potential radiation exposures of the accidents are compared with those identified by the assessments made in the ''Final Environmental Statement on the Transportation of Radioactive Material by Air and other Modes,'' NUREG-0170. Based on this comparison, it is concluded that the radiological risks from spent fuel under severe highway and railway accident conditions as derived in this study are less than risks previously estimated in the NUREG-0170 document

  4. Hypoxic Episodes in Bronchopulmonary Dysplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Richard J; Di Fiore, Juliann M; Walsh, Michele C

    2015-12-01

    Hypoxic episodes are troublesome components of bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) in preterm infants. Immature respiratory control seems to be the major contributor, superimposed on abnormal respiratory function. Relatively short respiratory pauses may precipitate desaturation and bradycardia. This population is predisposed to pulmonary hypertension; it is likely that pulmonary vasoconstriction also plays a role. The natural history has been well-characterized in the preterm population at risk for BPD; however, the consequences are less clear. Proposed associations of intermittent hypoxia include retinopathy of prematurity, sleep disordered breathing, and neurodevelopmental delay. Future study should address whether these associations are causal relationships. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Exploratory Use of Decision Tree Analysis in Classification of Outcome in Hypoxic-Ischemic Brain Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phan, Thanh G; Chen, Jian; Singhal, Shaloo; Ma, Henry; Clissold, Benjamin B; Ly, John; Beare, Richard

    2018-01-01

    Prognostication following hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy (brain injury) is important for clinical management. The aim of this exploratory study is to use a decision tree model to find clinical and MRI associates of severe disability and death in this condition. We evaluate clinical model and then the added value of MRI data. The inclusion criteria were as follows: age ≥17 years, cardio-respiratory arrest, and coma on admission (2003-2011). Decision tree analysis was used to find clinical [Glasgow Coma Score (GCS), features about cardiac arrest, therapeutic hypothermia, age, and sex] and MRI (infarct volume) associates of severe disability and death. We used the area under the ROC (auROC) to determine accuracy of model. There were 41 (63.7% males) patients having MRI imaging with the average age 51.5 ± 18.9 years old. The decision trees showed that infarct volume and age were important factors for discrimination between mild to moderate disability and severe disability and death at day 0 and day 2. The auROC for this model was 0.94 (95% CI 0.82-1.00). At day 7, GCS value was the only predictor; the auROC was 0.96 (95% CI 0.86-1.00). Our findings provide proof of concept for further exploration of the role of MR imaging and decision tree analysis in the early prognostication of hypoxic ischemic brain injury.

  6. Analysis of the behaviour of the Kozloduy NPP Unit 3 under severe accident conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Velev, V.; Saraeva, V.

    2004-01-01

    The objective of the analysis is to study the behaviour of the Kozloduy NPP Unit 3 under severe accident conditions. The analysis is performed using computer code MELCOR 1.8.4. This report includes a brief description of Unit 3 active core as well as description and comparison of the key events

  7. [Circadian blood pressure variation under several pathophysiological conditions including secondary hypertension].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imai, Yutaka; Hosaka, Miki; Satoh, Michihiro

    2014-08-01

    Abnormality of circadian blood pressure (BP) variation, i.e. non-dipper, riser, nocturnal hypertension etc, is brought by several pathophysiological conditions especially by secondary hypertension. These pathophysiological conditions are classified into several categories, i.e. disturbance of autonomic nervous system, metabolic disorder, endocrine disorder, disorder of Na and water excretion (e.g. sodium sensitivity), severe target organ damage and ischemia, cardiovascular complications and drug induced hypertension. Each pathophysiological condition which brings disturbance of circadian BP variation is included in several categories, e.g. diabetes mellitus is included in metabolic disorder, autonomic imbalance, sodium sensitivity and endocrine disorder. However, it seems that unified principle of the genesis of disturbance of circadian BP variation in many pathophysiological conditions is autonomic imbalance. Thus, it is concluded that disturbance of circadian BP variation is not purposive biological behavior but the result of autonomic imbalance which looks as if compensatory reaction such as exaggerated Na-water excretion during night in patient with Na-water retention who reveals disturbed circadian BP variation.

  8. Modeling and Forecasting the Onset and Duration of Severe Radiation Fog under Frost Conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Velde, I. R.; Steeneveld, G. J.; Schreur, B. G. J. Wichers; Holtslag, A. A. M.

    2010-01-01

    A case of a severe radiation fog during frost conditions is analyzed as a benchmark for the development of a very high-resolution NWP model Results by the Weather Research and Forecasting model (WRF) and the High Resolution Limited Area Model (H I RLAM) are evaluated against detailed observations to

  9. Modeling and Forecasting the Onset and Duration of Severe Radiation Fog under Frost Conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Velde, van der I.R.; Steeneveld, G.J.; Wichers Schreur, B.G.J.; Holtslag, A.A.M.

    2010-01-01

    A case of a severe radiation fog during frost conditions is analyzed as a benchmark for the development of a very high resolution NWP model. Results by the Weather Research and Forecasting model (WRF) and the High resolution limited area model (HIRLAM) are evaluated against detailed observations to

  10. Operating features of decorative polymer-impregnated concretes under severe operating conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kapustina, I.B.; Lobasenok, V.A.; Yakimtsiv, V.P.

    1991-01-01

    The study was carried out to investigate the possibility of a decorative polymer-impregnated concrete as a lining material in radiation-endangered rooms. Their extreme properties such as radiation resistance, decontamination ability, fire resistance and melting-freezing cycle resistance were studied. The material proposed shows substantially high resistance under severe operating conditions

  11. Condition assessment of timber bridges. 2, Evaluation of several stress-wave tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brian K. Brashaw; Robert J. Vatalaro; James P. Wacker; Robert J. Ross

    2005-01-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate the accuracy and reliability of several stress-wave devices widely used for locating deteriorated areas in timber bridge members. Bridge components containing different levels of natural decay were tested using various devices. The specimens were then sawn (along their length) into slabs to expose their interior condition. The...

  12. Hypoxic stress-induced changes in ribosomes of maize seedling roots

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bailey-Serres, J.; Freeling, M.

    1990-01-01

    The hypoxic stress response of Zea mays L. seedling roots involves regulation of gene expression at transcriptional and posttranscriptional levels. We investigated the effect of hypoxia on the translational machinery of seedling roots. The levels of monoribosomes and ribosomal subunits increased dramatically within 1 hour of stress. Prolonged hypoxia resulted in continued accumulation of nontranslating ribosomes, as well as increased levels of small polyribosomes. The return of seedlings to normal aerobic conditions resulted in recovery of normal polyribosome levels. Comparison of ribosomal proteins from control and hypoxic roots revealed differences in quantity and electrophoretic mobility. In vivo labeling of roots with [ 35 S]methionine revealed variations in newly synthesized ribosomal proteins. In vivo labeling of roots with [ 32 P]orthophosphate revealed a major reduction in the phosphorylation of a 31 kilodalton ribosomal protein in hypoxic stressed roots. In vitro phosphorylation of ribosomal proteins by endogenous kinases was used to probe for differences in ribosome structure and composition. The patterns of in vitro kinased phosphoproteins of ribosomes from control and hypoxic roots were not identical. Variation in phosphoproteins of polyribosomes from control and hypoxic roots, as well as among polyribosomes from hypoxic roots were observed. These results indicate that modification of the translational machinery occurs in response to hypoxic stress

  13. A scenario and forecast model for Gulf of Mexico hypoxic area and volume

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scavia, Donald; Evans, Mary Anne; Obenour, Daniel R.

    2013-01-01

    For almost three decades, the relative size of the hypoxic region on the Louisiana-Texas continental shelf has drawn scientific and policy attention. During that time, both simple and complex models have been used to explore hypoxia dynamics and to provide management guidance relating the size of the hypoxic zone to key drivers. Throughout much of that development, analyses had to accommodate an apparent change in hypoxic sensitivity to loads and often cull observations due to anomalous meteorological conditions. Here, we describe an adaptation of our earlier, simple biophysical model, calibrated to revised hypoxic area estimates and new hypoxic volume estimates through Bayesian estimation. This application eliminates the need to cull observations and provides revised hypoxic extent estimates with uncertainties, corresponding to different nutrient loading reduction scenarios. We compare guidance from this model application, suggesting an approximately 62% nutrient loading reduction is required to reduce Gulf hypoxia to the Action Plan goal of 5,000 km2, to that of previous applications. In addition, we describe for the first time, the corresponding response of hypoxic volume. We also analyze model results to test for increasing system sensitivity to hypoxia formation, but find no strong evidence of such change.

  14. Comparing the reported burn conditions for different severity burns in porcine models: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, Christine J; Cuttle, Leila

    2017-12-01

    There are many porcine burn models that create burns using different materials (e.g. metal, water) and different burn conditions (e.g. temperature and duration of exposure). This review aims to determine whether a pooled analysis of these studies can provide insight into the burn materials and conditions required to create burns of a specific severity. A systematic review of 42 porcine burn studies describing the depth of burn injury with histological evaluation is presented. Inclusion criteria included thermal burns, burns created with a novel method or material, histological evaluation within 7 days post-burn and method for depth of injury assessment specified. Conditions causing deep dermal scald burns compared to contact burns of equivalent severity were disparate, with lower temperatures and shorter durations reported for scald burns (83°C for 14 seconds) compared to contact burns (111°C for 23 seconds). A valuable archive of the different mechanisms and materials used for porcine burn models is presented to aid design and optimisation of future models. Significantly, this review demonstrates the effect of the mechanism of injury on burn severity and that caution is recommended when burn conditions established by porcine contact burn models are used by regulators to guide scald burn prevention strategies. © 2017 Medicalhelplines.com Inc and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Failure Mode Estimation of Wolsong Unit 1 Containment Building with respect to Severe Accident Condition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hahm, Dae Gi; Choi, In Kil

    2009-01-01

    The containment buildings in a nuclear power plant (NPP) are final barriers against the exposure of harmful radiation materials at severe accident condition. Since the accident at Three Mile Island nuclear plant in 1979, it has become necessary to evaluate the internal pressure capacity of the containment buildings for the assessment of the safety of nuclear power plants. According to this necessity, many researchers including Yonezawa et al. and Hu and Lin analyzed the ultimate capacity of prestressed concrete containments subjected to internal pressure which can be occurred at sever accident condition. Especially in Wolsong nuclear power plant, the Unit 1 containment structures were constructed in the late 1970 to early 1980, so that the end of its service life will be reached in near future. Since that the complete decommission and reconstruction of the NPP may cause a huge expenses, an extension of the service time can be a cost-effective alternative. To extend the service time of NPP, an overall safety evaluation of the containment building under severe accident condition should be performed. In this study, we assessed the pressure capacity of Wolsong Unit 1 containment building under severe accident, and estimated the responses at all of the probable critical areas. Based on those results, we found the significant failure modes of Wolsong Unit 1 containment building with respect to the severe accident condition. On the other hand, for the aged NPP, the degradation of their structural performance must also be explained in the procedure of the internal pressure capacity evaluation. Therefore, in this study, we performed a parametric study on the degradation effects and evaluated the internal pressure capacity of Wolsong Unit 1 containment building with considering aging and degradation effects

  16. Lethal Effect of Thermal Neutrons on Hypoxic Elirlich Ascites Tumour Cells in vitro

    OpenAIRE

    MITSUHIKO, AKABOSHI; KENICHI, KAWAI; HIROTOSHI, MAKI; Research Reactor Institute, Kyoto University; Research Reactor Institute, Kyoto University; Research Reactor Institute, Kyoto University

    1985-01-01

    Ehrlich ascites tumour cells were irradiated in vitro with thermal neutrons under aerobic and hypoxic conditions, and the survival of their reproductive capacity was assayed in vivo. Only a slight hypoxic protection was observed for thermal neutron irradiation with an oxygen enhancement ratio (OER) of 1.2, as compared with OER of 3.3 for ^Co-γ-rays. Absorbed dose of thermal neutrons was calculated by assuming that the energies of recoiled nuclei were completely absorbed within a cell nucleus....

  17. Preparations for Severe Winter Conditions by Emergency Health Personnel in Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calışkan, Cüneyt; Algan, Aysun; Koçak, Hüseyin; Biçer, Burcu Küçük; Sengelen, Meltem; Cakir, Banu

    2014-04-23

    Emergency and core ambulance personnel work under all environmental conditions, including severe weather condtions. We evaluated emergency medical personnel in Çanakkale, Turkey, for their degree of preparedness. A descriptive study was conducted in Çanakkale, Turkey, within 112 emergency service units and their 17 district stations. Surveys were developed to measure the level of preparedness for serious winter conditions that individual workers made for themselves, their homes, and their cars. Of the 167 survey participants, the mean age was 29.8 ± 7.9 years; 52.7% were women; more than half (54.75%) were emergency medical technicians; and 53.3% were married. Only 10.4% of those who heated their homes with natural gas had carbon monoxide detectors. Scores relating to household and individual preparation for severe winter conditions increased by participants' age (P tires (P winter conditions (P = .016). Many of the surveyed emergency health personel demonstrated insufficient preparations for serious winter conditions. To increase the safety and efficiency of emergency medical personnel, educational training programs should be rountinely conducted. (Disaster Med Public Health Preparedness. 2014;0:1-4).

  18. Relationships Between Denitrifier Abundance, Denitrifier Diversity and Denitrification in Gulf of Mexico Hypoxic Zone Sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proctor, L. M.; Childs, C.; MacAuley, S.

    2002-12-01

    The largest zone of anthropogenic bottom water hypoxia in the Western Hemisphere occurs seasonally in the northern Gulf of Mexico. This hypoxic zone reaches its greatest extent in the summer months and is a consequence of seasonal stratification of the water column combined with the decomposition of organic matter derived from accelerated rates of primary production. The enhanced primary production is driven by inorganic nitrogen input from the Mississippi River and these conditions would seem ideal for supporting high levels of denitrification. Yet sediment denitrification exhibited a wide range, even at the height of the seasonal hypoxia. Therefore, we compared benthic denitrifier abundances and denitrifier diversity at several stations over two seasons exhibiting extremes in denitrification to evaluate the relationship between abundances, diversity and denitrification levels. Sediment denitrification ranged from 20 to 100 umol m-2 h-1, with rates in July, 2000 approximately half that observed in July, 2001. The highest rates were generally observed at stations with bottom water DO concentrations between 1 and 3 mg l-1. Relative denitrifier abundances, using nirS and nirK as proxies for denitrifiers, suggested a direct relationship between abundances and denitrification while denitrifier diversity, measured by T-RFLPs of nirS and nirK, suggested an inverse relationship between diversity and denitrification. These results suggest that several factors are important in understanding what controls denitrification in Gulf of Mexico hypoxic zone sediments.

  19. Global Transcription Profiling Reveals Comprehensive Insights into Hypoxic Response in Arabidopsis1[w

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Fenglong; VanToai, Tara; Moy, Linda P.; Bock, Geoffrey; Linford, Lara D.; Quackenbush, John

    2005-01-01

    Plants have evolved adaptation mechanisms to sense oxygen deficiency in their environments and make coordinated physiological and structural adjustments to enhance their hypoxic tolerance. To gain insight into how plants respond to low-oxygen stress, gene expression profiling using whole-genome DNA amplicon microarrays was carried out at seven time points over 24 h, in wild-type and transgenic PSAG12:ipt Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) plants under normoxic and hypoxic conditions. Transcript levels of genes involved in glycolysis and fermentation pathways, ethylene synthesis and perception, calcium signaling, nitrogen utilization, trehalose metabolism, and alkaloid synthesis were significantly altered in response to oxygen limitation. Analysis based on gene ontology assignments suggested a significant down-regulation of genes whose functions are associated with cell walls, nucleosome structures, water channels, and ion transporters and a significant up-regulation of genes involved in transcriptional regulation, protein kinase activity, and auxin responses under conditions of oxygen shortage. Promoter analysis on a cluster of up-regulated genes revealed a significant overrepresentation of the AtMYB2-binding motif (GT motif), a sugar response element-like motif, and a G-box-related sequence, and also identified several putative anaerobic response elements. Finally, quantitative real-time polymerase chain reactions using 29 selected genes independently verified the microarray results. This study represents one of the most comprehensive analyses conducted to date investigating hypoxia-responsive transcriptional networks in plants. PMID:15734912

  20. Global transcription profiling reveals comprehensive insights into hypoxic response in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Fenglong; Vantoai, Tara; Moy, Linda P; Bock, Geoffrey; Linford, Lara D; Quackenbush, John

    2005-03-01

    Plants have evolved adaptation mechanisms to sense oxygen deficiency in their environments and make coordinated physiological and structural adjustments to enhance their hypoxic tolerance. To gain insight into how plants respond to low-oxygen stress, gene expression profiling using whole-genome DNA amplicon microarrays was carried out at seven time points over 24 h, in wild-type and transgenic P(SAG12):ipt Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) plants under normoxic and hypoxic conditions. Transcript levels of genes involved in glycolysis and fermentation pathways, ethylene synthesis and perception, calcium signaling, nitrogen utilization, trehalose metabolism, and alkaloid synthesis were significantly altered in response to oxygen limitation. Analysis based on gene ontology assignments suggested a significant down-regulation of genes whose functions are associated with cell walls, nucleosome structures, water channels, and ion transporters and a significant up-regulation of genes involved in transcriptional regulation, protein kinase activity, and auxin responses under conditions of oxygen shortage. Promoter analysis on a cluster of up-regulated genes revealed a significant overrepresentation of the AtMYB2-binding motif (GT motif), a sugar response element-like motif, and a G-box-related sequence, and also identified several putative anaerobic response elements. Finally, quantitative real-time polymerase chain reactions using 29 selected genes independently verified the microarray results. This study represents one of the most comprehensive analyses conducted to date investigating hypoxia-responsive transcriptional networks in plants.

  1. Effects of temperature and hypoxic stress on the oxygen ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The specific oxygen consumption rate (VO2lMb) of Labeo capensis, the freshwater mudsucker, was determined for small and large fish at winter (8°C) and summer (23°C) temperatures. VO2lMb was also determined during hypoxic conditions of the experimental water. It was found that VO2lMb does not differ substantially ...

  2. Advancing hypoxic training in team sports: from intermittent hypoxic training to repeated sprint training in hypoxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faiss, Raphaël; Girard, Olivier; Millet, Grégoire P

    2013-12-01

    Over the past two decades, intermittent hypoxic training (IHT), that is, a method where athletes live at or near sea level but train under hypoxic conditions, has gained unprecedented popularity. By adding the stress of hypoxia during 'aerobic' or 'anaerobic' interval training, it is believed that IHT would potentiate greater performance improvements compared to similar training at sea level. A thorough analysis of studies including IHT, however, leads to strikingly poor benefits for sea-level performance improvement, compared to the same training method performed in normoxia. Despite the positive molecular adaptations observed after various IHT modalities, the characteristics of optimal training stimulus in hypoxia are still unclear and their functional translation in terms of whole-body performance enhancement is minimal. To overcome some of the inherent limitations of IHT (lower training stimulus due to hypoxia), recent studies have successfully investigated a new training method based on the repetition of short (<30 s) 'all-out' sprints with incomplete recoveries in hypoxia, the so-called repeated sprint training in hypoxia (RSH). The aims of the present review are therefore threefold: first, to summarise the main mechanisms for interval training and repeated sprint training in normoxia. Second, to critically analyse the results of the studies involving high-intensity exercises performed in hypoxia for sea-level performance enhancement by differentiating IHT and RSH. Third, to discuss the potential mechanisms underpinning the effectiveness of those methods, and their inherent limitations, along with the new research avenues surrounding this topic.

  3. The hTERT promoter enhances the antitumor activity of an oncolytic adenovirus under a hypoxic microenvironment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuuri Hashimoto

    Full Text Available Hypoxia is a microenvironmental factor that contributes to the invasion, progression and metastasis of tumor cells. Hypoxic tumor cells often show more resistance to conventional chemoradiotherapy than normoxic tumor cells, suggesting the requirement of novel antitumor therapies to efficiently eliminate the hypoxic tumor cells. We previously generated a tumor-specific replication-competent oncolytic adenovirus (OBP-301: Telomelysin, in which the human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT promoter drives viral E1 expression. Since the promoter activity of the hTERT gene has been shown to be upregulated by hypoxia, we hypothesized that, under hypoxic conditions, the antitumor effect of OBP-301 with the hTERT promoter would be more efficient than that of the wild-type adenovirus 5 (Ad5. In this study, we investigated the antitumor effects of OBP-301 and Ad5 against human cancer cells under a normoxic (20% oxygen or a hypoxic (1% oxygen condition. Hypoxic condition induced nuclear accumulation of the hypoxia-inducible factor-1α and upregulation of hTERT promoter activity in human cancer cells. The cytopathic activity of OBP-301 was significantly higher than that of Ad5 under hypoxic condition. Consistent with their cytopathic activity, the replication of OBP-301 was significantly higher than that of Ad5 under the hypoxic condition. OBP-301-mediated E1A was expressed within hypoxic areas of human xenograft tumors in mice. These results suggest that the cytopathic activity of OBP-301 against hypoxic tumor cells is mediated through hypoxia-mediated activation of the hTERT promoter. Regulation of oncolytic adenoviruses by the hTERT promoter is a promising antitumor strategy, not only for induction of tumor-specific oncolysis, but also for efficient elimination of hypoxic tumor cells.

  4. Hydrogen generation, distribution and combustion under severe LWR accident conditions: a state-of-technology report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Postma, A.K.; Hilliard, R.K.

    1983-03-01

    This report reviews the current state of technology regarding hydrogen safety issues in light water reactor plants. Topics considered in this report include hydrogen generation, distribution in containment, and combustion characteristics. A companion report addresses hydrogen control. The objectives of the study were to identify the key safety issues related to hydrogen produced under severe accident conditions, to describe the state of technology for each issue, and to point out ongoing programs aimed at resolving the open issues

  5. Estimate of radionuclide release characteristics into containment under severe accident conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nourbakhsh, H.P.

    1993-11-01

    A detailed review of the available light water reactor source term information is presented as a technical basis for development of updated source terms into the containment under severe accident conditions. Simplified estimates of radionuclide release and transport characteristics are specified for each unique combination of the reactor coolant and containment system combinations. A quantitative uncertainty analysis in the release to the containment using NUREG-1150 methodology is also presented

  6. Seed vigour tests for predicting field emergence of maize under severe conditions

    OpenAIRE

    García de Yzaguirre, Álvaro; Lasa Dolhagaray, José Manuel

    1989-01-01

    [EN] With 40 to 50 different seed vigour tests available, appropiate procedures for choosing the best single test or combination the best predictors of seedling emergence of maize (Zea Mays L.) under severe conditions. Thirteen vigour tests and various field emergence trials were performed on six inbred lines and two commercial hybrids. The best single predictors of field emergence were identified by calculating simple correlation coefficients. The calculation of the geometric mean of the res...

  7. Weather conditions conducive to Beijing severe haze more frequent under climate change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Wenju; Li, Ke; Liao, Hong; Wang, Huijun; Wu, Lixin

    2017-03-01

    The frequency of Beijing winter severe haze episodes has increased substantially over the past decades, and is commonly attributed to increased pollutant emissions from China’s rapid economic development. During such episodes, levels of fine particulate matter are harmful to human health and the environment, and cause massive disruption to economic activities, as occurred in January 2013. Conducive weather conditions are an important ingredient of severe haze episodes, and include reduced surface winter northerlies, weakened northwesterlies in the midtroposphere, and enhanced thermal stability of the lower atmosphere. How such weather conditions may respond to climate change is not clear. Here we project a 50% increase in the frequency and an 80% increase in the persistence of conducive weather conditions similar to those in January 2013, in response to climate change. The frequency and persistence between the historical (1950-1999) and future (2050-2099) climate were compared in 15 models under Representative Concentration Pathway 8.5 (RCP8.5). The increased frequency is consistent with large-scale circulation changes, including an Arctic Oscillation upward trend, weakening East Asian winter monsoon, and faster warming in the lower troposphere. Thus, circulation changes induced by global greenhouse gas emissions can contribute to the increased Beijing severe haze frequency.

  8. Thermalydraulic processes in the reactor coolant system of a BWR under severe accident conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hodge, S.A.

    1990-01-01

    Boiling water reactors (BWRs) incorporate many unique structural features that make their expected response under severe accident conditions very different from that predicted in the case of pressurized water reactor accident sequences. Automatic main steam isolation valve (MIV) closure as the vessel water level approaches the top of the core would cause reactor vessel isolation while automatic recirculation pump trip would limit the in-vessel flows to those characteristic of natural circulation (as disturbed by vessel relief valve actuation). This paper provides a discussion of the BWR control blade, channel box, core plate, control rod guide tube, and reactor vessel safety relief valve (SRV) configuration and the effects of these structural components upon thermal hydraulic processes within the reactor vessel under severe accident conditions. The dominant BWR severe accident sequences as determined by probabilistic risk assessment are described and the expected timing of events for the unmitigated short-term station blackout severe accident sequence at the Peach Bottom atomic power station is presented

  9. Effects of Burn Severity and Environmental Conditions on Post-Fire Regeneration in Siberian Larch Forest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thuan Chu

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Post-fire forest regeneration is strongly influenced by abiotic and biotic heterogeneity in the pre- and post-fire environments, including fire regimes, species characteristics, landforms, hydrology, regional climate, and soil properties. Assessing these drivers is key to understanding the long-term effects of fire disturbances on forest succession. We evaluated multiple factors influencing patterns of variability in a post-fire boreal Larch (Larix sibirica forest in Siberia. A time-series of remote sensing images was analyzed to estimate post-fire recovery as a response variable across the burned area in 1996. Our results suggested that burn severity and water content were primary controllers of both Larch forest recruitment and green vegetation cover as defined by the forest recovery index (FRI and the fractional vegetation cover (FVC, respectively. We found a high rate of Larch forest recruitment in sites of moderate burn severity, while a more severe burn was the preferable condition for quick occupation by vegetation that included early seral communities of shrubs, grasses, conifers and broadleaf trees. Sites close to water and that received higher solar energy during the summer months showed a higher rate of both recovery types, defined by the FRI and FVC, dependent on burn severity. In addition to these factors, topographic variables and pre-fire condition were important predictors of post-fire forest patterns. These results have direct implications for the post-fire forest management in the Siberian boreal Larch region.

  10. Cardiac biomarkers in neonatal hypoxic ischaemia.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Sweetman, D

    2012-04-01

    Following a perinatal hypoxic-ischaemic insult, term infants commonly develop cardiovascular dysfunction. Troponin-T, troponin-I and brain natriuretic peptide are sensitive indicators of myocardial compromise. The long-term effects of cardiovascular dysfunction on neurodevelopmental outcome following perinatal hypoxic ischaemia remain controversial. Follow-up studies are warranted to ensure optimal cardiac function in adulthood. CONCLUSION: Cardiac biomarkers may improve the diagnosis of myocardial injury, help guide management, estimate mortality risk and may also aid in longterm neurodevelopmental outcome prediction following neonatal hypoxic-ischaemia.

  11. Metabolic fates and effects of nitrite in brown trout under normoxic and hypoxic conditions: blood and tissue nitrite metabolism and interactions with branchial NOS, Na+/K+-ATPase and hsp70 expression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Frank Bo; Gerber, Lucie; Hansen, Marie Niemann

    2015-01-01

    were higher in hypoxia than normoxia, suggesting increased NOS activity. Nitrite exposure strongly elevated nitrite concentrations in plasma, erythrocytes, heart tissue and white muscle, which was associated with an extensive metabolism of nitrite to nitrate and to iron-nitrosylated and S......Nitrite secures essential nitric oxide (NO) bioavailability in hypoxia at low endogenous concentrations, whereas it becomes toxic at high concentrations. We exposed brown trout to normoxic and hypoxic water in the absence and presence of added ambient nitrite to decipher the cellular metabolism...... and effects of nitrite at basal and elevated concentrations under different oxygen regimes. We also tested hypotheses concerning the influence of nitrite on branchial nitric oxide synthase (NOS), Na+/K+-ATPase (nka) and heat shock protein (hsp70) mRNA expression. Basal plasma and erythrocyte nitrite levels...

  12. Oxidative conditions prevail in severe IUGR with vascular disease and Doppler anomalies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maisonneuve, Emeline; Delvin, Edgard; Edgard, Annie; Morin, Lucie; Dubé, Johanne; Boucoiran, Isabelle; Moutquin, Jean-Marie; Fouron, Jean-Claude; Klam, Stephanie; Levy, Emile; Leduc, Line

    2015-08-01

    Intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) and prenatal exposure to oxidative stress are thought to lead to increased risks of cardiovascular disease later in life. The objective of the present study was to document whether cord blood oxidative stress biomarkers vary with the severity of IUGR and of vascular disease in the twin pregnancy model in which both fetuses share the same maternal environment. This prospective cohort study involved dichorionic twin pairs, with one co-twin with IUGR. Oxidative stress biomarkers were measured in venous cord blood samples from each neonate of 32 twin pairs, and compared, according to severity of IUGR (IUGR <5th percentile), Doppler anomalies of the umbilical artery and early onset IUGR (in the second trimester) of the growth restricted twin. Oxidized Low-Density Lipoproteins (oxLDL) and Malondialdehyde (MDA) concentrations were increased proportionally in cases of severe IUGR. OxLDL concentrations were also increased in cases of IUGR with Doppler anomaly. Our data indicate that severe IUGR, is related to a derangement in redox balance, illustrated by increased venous cord blood oxidative stress biomarkers concentrations. Severe IUGR and IUGR with abnormal Doppler can be translated into conditions with intense oxidative stress.

  13. Effects of bleomycin and irradiation on euoxic and hypoxic cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shrieve, D.C.; Harris, J.W.

    1979-01-01

    EMT6 cells in vitro were exposed to bleomycin (BLM), either alone (under euoxic or hypoxic conditions) or in conjunction with x-radiation. Hypoxic and euoxic cells were equally sensitive to the drug in both of the systems used to induce hypoxia (ampules or chambers). Exposure to BLM immediately before x-irradiation altered the shape of the radiation survival curve decreasing the D 0 by a factor of 1.3. Simultaneous exposure to x-ray and BLM resulted in lower survivals than when radiation was given either before or after drug treatment. Cells recovered quickly from BLM damage if trypsinization was delayed. The results indicate that BLM and x-rays interact to lower cell survival but that cells recover from this effect if trypsinization is delayed

  14. Conditions for oxygen-deficient combustion during accidents with severe core concrete thermal attack

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luangdilok, W.; Elicson, G.T.; Berger, W.E. Jr.

    1993-01-01

    This paper addresses the interactions between MCCI (molten core-concrete interactions)-induced offgas releases, mostly the combustible gases, natural circulation between the cavity and the lower containment based on recent research developments in the area of mixed convection flow (Epstein, et al., 1989; Epstein, 1988; Epstein, 1992) between compartments, and their effects on combustion in PWR containments during prolonged severe accidents. Specifically, large dry PWR containments undergoing severe core-concrete attack during station blackouts where the containment atmosphere is expected to be inerted are objects of this analysis. The purpose of this paper, given the conditions that oxygen can be brought to the cavity, is to demonstrate that consumption of most oxygen present in the containment can be achieved in a reasonable time scale assuming that combustion is not subject to flammability limits due to the high cavity temperatures. The conditions for cavity combustion depend on several factors including good gas flowpaths between the cavity and other containment regions, and combustion processes within the cavity with the hot debris acting as the ignition source

  15. Thermal stress analysis of reactor containment building considering severe weather condition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Yun; Kim, Yun-Yong; Hyun, Jung-Hwan; Kim, Do-Gyeum

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • We examine that through-wall crack risk in cold weather is high. • It is predicted that cracking in concrete wall will not happen in hot region. • Cracking due to hydration heat can be controlled by appropriate curing condition. • Temperature differences between inner and outer face is relatively small in hot weather. - Abstract: Prediction of concrete cracking due to hydration heat in mass concrete such as reactor containment building (RCB) in nuclear power plant is a crucial issue in construction site. In this study, the numerical analysis for heat transfer and stress development is performed for the containment wall in RCB by considering the severe weather conditions. Finally, concrete cracking risk in hot and cold weather is discussed based on analysis results. In analyses considering severe weather conditions, it is found that the through-wall cracking risk in cold weather is high due to the abrupt temperature difference between inside concrete and the ambient air in cold region. In hot weather, temperature differences between inner and outer face is relatively small, and accordingly the relevant cracking risk is relatively low in contrast with cold weather

  16. Evaluation of the leakage behavior of inflatable seals subject to severe accident conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parks, M.B.

    1989-11-01

    Sandia National Laboratories, under the sponsorship of the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission, is currently developing test validated methods to predict the pressure capacity of light water reactor containment buildings when subjected to postulated severe accident conditions. These conditions are well beyond the design basis. Scale model tests of steel and reinforced concrete containments have been conducted as well as tests of typical containment penetrations. As a part of this effort, a series of tests was recently conducted to determine the leakage behavior of inflatable seals. These seals are used to prevent leakage around personnel and escape lock doors of some containments. The results of the inflatable seals tests are the subject of this report. Inflatable seals were tested at both room temperature and at elevated temperatures representative of postulated severe accident conditions. Both aged (radiation and thermal) and unaged seals were included in the test program. The internal seal pressure at the beginning of each test was varied to cover the range of seal pressures actually used in containments. For each seal pressure level, the external (containment) pressure was increased until significant leakage past the seals was observed. Parameters that were monitored and recorded during the tests were the internal seal pressure, chamber pressure, leakage past the seals, and temperature of the test chamber and fixture to which the seals were attached. 8 refs., 34 figs., 7 tabs

  17. Transesterification of soybean oil with methanol and acetic acid at lower reaction severity under subcritical conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Go, Alchris Woo; Sutanto, Sylviana; NguyenThi, Bich Thuyen; Cabatingan, Luis K.; Ismadji, Suryadi; Ju, Yi-Hsu

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • (trans)Esterification of oils under subcritical conditions. • Acetic acid as catalyst and co-solvent in biodiesel production. • Influence of reactor hydrodynamic (loading and stirring) on FAME yield. • High methyl ester yield can be obtained at less severe reaction conditions. - Abstract: Soybean oil (56–80 g) was reacted with methanol (40–106 mL) to produce fatty acid methyl ester in the presence of 1–6% acetic acid under subcritical condition at 250 °C. Stirring and loading of the reaction system affected the yield and severity of the process. The presence of acetic acid improved the yield of FAME from 32.1% to 89.5% at a methanol to oil molar ratio of 20 mL/g. Acetic acid was found to act strongly as an acid catalyst and to some extent improved the solubility between oil and methanol. Reaction pressure higher than the supercritical pressure of methanol (7.85 MPa) was not required to achieve high FAME yield (89.5–94.8%) in short time (30–60 min)

  18. Durability study and lifetime prediction of baseline proton exchange membrane fuel cell under severe operating conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marrony, M.; Quenet, S.; Aslanides, A. [European Institute for Energy Research, Emmy-Noether Strasse 11, 76131 Karlsruhe (Germany); Barrera, R.; Ginocchio, S.; Montelatici, L. [Edison, Via Giorgio La Pira 2, 10028 Trofarello (Italy)

    2008-08-01

    Comparative studies of mechanical and electrochemical properties of Nafion{sup registered} - and sulfonated polyetheretherketone polymer-type membranes are carried out under severe fuel cell conditions required by industrials, within stationary and cycling electric load profiles. These membranes are proposed to be used in PEM between 70 and 90 C as fluorinated or non-fluorinated baseline membranes, respectively. Thus, though the performance of both membranes remains suitable, Nafion{sup registered} backbone brought better mechanical properties and higher electrochemical stabilities than sulfonated polyetheretherketone backbone. The performance stability and the mechanical strength of the membrane-electrode assembly were shown to be influenced by several intrinsic properties of the membrane (e.g., thermal pre-treatment, thickness) and external conditions (fuel cell operating temperature, relative humidity). Finally, a lifetime prediction for membranes under stationary conditions is proposed depending on the operation temperature. At equivalent thicknesses (i.e. 50 {mu}m), Nafion{sup registered} membranes were estimated able to operate into the 80-90 C range while sulfonated polyetheretherketone would be limited into the 70-80 C range. This approach brings baseline information about the capability of these types of polymer electrolyte membrane under fuel cell critical operations. Finally, it is revealed as a potential tool for the selection of the most promising advanced polymers for the ensuing research phase. (author)

  19. Associations of emotional arousal, dissociation and symptom severity with operant conditioning in borderline personality disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paret, Christian; Hoesterey, Steffen; Kleindienst, Nikolaus; Schmahl, Christian

    2016-10-30

    Those with borderline personality disorder (BPD) display altered evaluations regarding reward and punishment compared to others. The processing of rewards is basal for operant conditioning. However, studies addressing operant conditioning in BPD patients are rare. In the current study, an operant conditioning task combining learning acquisition and reversal was used. BPD patients and matched healthy controls (HCs) were exposed to aversive and neutral stimuli to assess the influence of emotion on learning. Picture content, dissociation, aversive tension and symptom severity were rated. Error rates were measured. Results showed no group interactions between aversive versus neutral scenes. The higher emotional arousal, dissociation and tension, the worse the acquisition, but not reversal, scores were for BPD patients. Scores from the Borderline Symptom List were associated with more errors in the reversal, but not the acquisition phase. The results are preliminary evidence for impaired acquisition learning due to increased emotional arousal, dissociation and tension in BPD patients. A failure to process punishment in the reversal phase was associated with symptom severity and may be related to neuropsychological dysfunctioning involving the ventromedial prefrontal cortex. Conclusions are limited due to the correlational study design and the small sample size. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Glyoxylic compounds as radiosensitizers of hypoxic cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cornago, M.P.; Lopez Zumel, M.C.; Alvarez, M.V.; Izquierdo, M.C.

    1990-01-01

    The radiosensitizing effect of five glyoxal derivatives on the survival of TC-SV40 cells has been measured, under aerobic and hypoxic conditions. A toxicity study was previously performed in order to use nontoxic concentrations. The OER for the TC-SV40 cells was 2.74. None of the glyoxylic compounds showed radiosensitizing activity under aerobic conditions while in hypoxia their radiosensitizing factors decreased in the order phenylglyoxylic acid (1.68 at 8 x 10(-3) mole dm-3) greater than phenylglyoxal (1.55 at 5 x 10(-6) mole dm-3) greater than 2-2' furil (1.48 at 5 x 10(-5) mole dm-3) greater than glyoxylic acid (1.39 at 1 x 10(-3) mole dm-3) greater than glyoxal (1.30 at 5 x 10(-5) mole dm-3). The dose-modifying factors were also determined at two equimolar concentrations 5 x 10(-5) and 5 x 10(-6) mole dm-3. A concentration effect was noticed for all the compounds although their relative radiosensitizing activity kept, independently of the concentration, the same order noted above. Glyoxals with aromatic or heterocyclic rings exert a greater radiosensitization than the others. The acidic compounds have less radiosensitizing activity than their aldehydic counterparts. Interaction of these glyoxals with NPSH cellular groups was tested and the low degree of inhibition shows that this mechanism would contribute very little, if any, to the radiosensitization effect

  1. Predictions of structural integrity of steam generator tubes under normal operating, accident, and severe accident conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Majumdar, S.

    1996-09-01

    Available models for predicting failure of flawed and unflawed steam generator tubes under normal operating, accident, and severe accident conditions are reviewed. Tests conducted in the past, though limited, tended to show that the earlier flow-stress model for part-through-wall axial cracks overestimated the damaging influence of deep cracks. This observation is confirmed by further tests at high temperatures as well as by finite element analysis. A modified correlation for deep cracks can correct this shortcoming of the model. Recent tests have shown that lateral restraint can significantly increase the failure pressure of tubes with unsymmetrical circumferential cracks. This observation is confirmed by finite element analysis. The rate-independent flow stress models that are successful at low temperatures cannot predict the rate sensitive failure behavior of steam generator tubes at high temperatures. Therefore, a creep rupture model for predicting failure is developed and validated by tests under varying temperature and pressure loading expected during severe accidents

  2. Experiments to evaluate behavior of containment piping bellows under severe accident conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lambert, L.D.; Parks, M.B.

    1993-01-01

    Bellows are an integral part of the containment pressure boundary in nuclear power plants. They are used at piping penetrations to allow relative movement between piping and the containment wall. In a severe accident they may be subjected to high pressure and temperature, and a combination of axial and lateral deflections. A test program to determine the leak-tight capacity of containment penetration bellows is being conducted at Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico. Several different bellows geometries, representative of actual containment bellows, are being subjected to extreme deflections along with pressure and temperature loads. The bellows geometries and loading conditions are described along with the testing apparatus and procedures. A total of thirteen tests have been conducted. The tests showed that withstanding relatively large bellows are capable of deformations, up to, or near, the point of full compression before developing leakage. The test data is presented and discussed

  3. Capability of LOFT vital batteries to supply emergency power demands during severe cold weather conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yeates, J.A.

    1978-01-01

    This study evaluates the capability of the vital batteries (PPS) to provide electrical power via the vital DC-AC motor generator sets to the LOFT PPS loads during severe cold weather conditions. It is concluded that these batteries while at a temperature of 5 0 F will supply the necessary PPS electrical loads for a time in excess of the one hour permitted to start the diesel generators and are, therefore, adequate at this temperature. This Revision B of the LTR includes revised, more recent, and complete technical data relating to MG set efficiency, battery operating procedures and cold temperature derating. Revision B supersedes and replaces all previous issues

  4. Hydrogen-control systems for severe LWR accident conditions - a state-of-technology report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hilliard, R.K.; Postma, A.K.; Jeppson, D.W.

    1983-03-01

    This report reviews the current state of technology regarding hydrogen safety issues in light water reactor plants. Topics considered in this report relate to control systems and include combustion prevention, controlled combustion, minimization of combustion effects, combination of control concepts, and post-accident disposal. A companion report addresses hydrogen generation, distribution, and combustion. The objectives of the study were to identify the key safety issues related to hydrogen produced under severe accident conditions, to describe the state of technology for each issue, and to point out ongoing programs aimed at resolving the open issues

  5. Vertical flow constructed wetlands for domestic wastewater treatment on tropical conditions: effect of several design parameters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bohorquez, Eliana; Paredes, Diego; Arias, Carlos Alberto

    Vertical flow constructed wetlands (VFWC) design and operation takes into account several variables which affect performance its performance. These aspects had been evaluated and documented among others in countries like USA, Denmark, Austria. In contrast, VFCW had not been studied in tropical...... countries and, specifically in Colombia, design and operation parameters are not defined yet. The objective of this study was evaluate the effects of filter medium, the feeding frequency and Heliconia psittacorum presence, a typical local plant, on the domestic wastewater treatment in tropical conditions....

  6. Hypoxic encephalopathy after heart valve replacement: etiology and pathogenesis, diagnostic criteria and treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    В. Г. Постнов

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Reviewed in this paper are modern approaches in the intensive therapy of acute hypoxic encephalopathy developing in a number of occasions after the heart valve replacement surgery. The study is based on the results of neurological, neuropsychological and neurophysiological (EEG examinations of 240 patients who underwent heart valve replacement surgery under cardiopulmonary bypass conditions complicated later by the development of hypoxic encephalopathies of varying severity and who received complex intensive care. Relying on many years of experience in the treatment of heart surgery patients in whom manifestations of encephalopathy developed in the early postoperative period, or were delayed, we have formulated the following algorithms of therapy. (1 Maintenance of normal blood gas: Hb>100 g/L, pH 7.45, PaCO2 35 mmHg. (2 Maintenance of hemodynamics: ABPsystolic>90 mmHg. (3 Supplying fluids and electrolytes: isoosmolar infusion solutions, adding of KCl and MgSO4 to the infusion. (4 Antiedemic therapy: 15% mannitol or 40% glycerol solution. (5 If necessary (in case of psychomotor agitation, seizures, short-acting barbiturates (sodium thiopental, neuroleptics (haloperidol, propofol. No benzodiazepines in case of psychoses (6 Cerebral metabolism stimulation (not earlier than 48 hours after surgery with cholinomimetics, nootropics, cerebral blood flow protectors. Cholinomimetics are allowed on the first day after surgery. This algorithm and the above-mentioned groups of drugs, especially central cholinomimetics, allow for correcting the neurocognitive impairment in the discussed group of patients quickly and effectively.

  7. Hypoxic survival requires a 2-on-2 hemoglobin in a process involving nitric oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemschemeier, Anja; Düner, Melis; Casero, David; Merchant, Sabeeha S.; Winkler, Martin; Happe, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Hemoglobins are recognized today as a diverse family of proteins present in all kingdoms of life and performing multiple reactions beyond O2 chemistry. The physiological roles of most hemoglobins remain elusive. Here, we show that a 2-on-2 (“truncated”) hemoglobin, termed THB8, is required for hypoxic growth and the expression of anaerobic genes in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. THB8 is 1 of 12 2-on-2 hemoglobins in this species. It belongs to a subclass within the 2-on-2 hemoglobin class I family whose members feature a remarkable variety of domain arrangements and lengths. Posttranscriptional silencing of the THB8 gene results in the mis-regulation of several genes and a growth defect under hypoxic conditions. The latter is intensified in the presence of an NO scavenger, which also impairs growth of wild-type cells. As recombinant THB8 furthermore reacts with NO, the results of this study indicate that THB8 is part of an NO-dependent signaling pathway. PMID:23754374

  8. Limit strains for severe accident conditions. Final report of the EU-project LISSAC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krieg, R.; Seidenfuss, M.

    2003-10-01

    The local failure strains of essential reactor vessel components are investigated. The size influence of the components is of special interest. Typical severe accident conditions including elevated temperatures and dynamic loads are considered. The main part of work consists of test families with specimens under uniaxial and biaxial static and dynamic loads. Within one test family the specimen geometries and the load conditions are similar, the temperature is the same; but the size is varied up to reactor dimensions. Special attention is given to geometries with a hole or a notch causing non-uniform stress and strain distributions typical for reactor components. There are indications that for such non-uniform distributions size effects may be stronger than for uniform distributions. Thus size effects on the failure strains and failure processes are determined under realistic conditions. Several tests with nominal identical parameters are performed for small size specimens. In this way some information is obtained about the scatter. A reduced number of tests is carried out for medium size specimens and only a few tests are carried out for large size specimens to reduce the costs to an acceptable level. To manufacture all specimens sufficient material was available from the unused reactor pressure vessel Biblis C consisting of the material 22NiMoCr37. Thus variations of the mechanical material properties, which could impair the interpretation of the test results, are quite small. This has been confirmed by an adequate number of additional quality assurance tests. A key problem was the definition of failure and the determination of the local strains at failure for very different specimens under varying load conditions. Here appropriate methods had to be developed including the so-called 'vanishing gap method' and the 'forging die method'. They are based on post test geometrical measurements of the fracture surfaces and reconstructions of the related strain fields

  9. Cooling for newborns with hypoxic ischaemic encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Susan E; Berg, Marie; Hunt, Rod; Tarnow-Mordi, William O; Inder, Terrie E; Davis, Peter G

    2013-01-31

    Newborn animal studies and pilot studies in humans suggest that mild hypothermia following peripartum hypoxia-ischaemia in newborn infants may reduce neurological sequelae without adverse effects. To determine the effect of therapeutic hypothermia in encephalopathic asphyxiated newborn infants on mortality, long-term neurodevelopmental disability and clinically important side effects. We used the standard search strategy of the Cochrane Neonatal Review Group as outlined in The Cochrane Library (Issue 2, 2007). Randomised controlled trials evaluating therapeutic hypothermia in term and late preterm newborns with hypoxic ischaemic encephalopathy were identified by searching the Oxford Database of Perinatal Trials, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL, The Cochrane Library, 2007, Issue 2), MEDLINE (1966 to June 2007), previous reviews including cross-references, abstracts, conferences, symposia proceedings, expert informants and journal handsearching. We updated this search in May 2012. We included randomised controlled trials comparing the use of therapeutic hypothermia with standard care in encephalopathic term or late preterm infants with evidence of peripartum asphyxia and without recognisable major congenital anomalies. The primary outcome measure was death or long-term major neurodevelopmental disability. Other outcomes included adverse effects of cooling and 'early' indicators of neurodevelopmental outcome. Four review authors independently selected, assessed the quality of and extracted data from the included studies. Study authors were contacted for further information. Meta-analyses were performed using risk ratios (RR) and risk differences (RD) for dichotomous data, and weighted mean difference for continuous data with 95% confidence intervals (CI). We included 11 randomised controlled trials in this updated review, comprising 1505 term and late preterm infants with moderate/severe encephalopathy and evidence of intrapartum asphyxia

  10. Adapting radiotherapy to hypoxic tumours

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malinen, Eirik; Søvik, Åste; Hristov, Dimitre; Bruland, Øyvind S.; Rune Olsen, Dag

    2006-10-01

    In the current work, the concepts of biologically adapted radiotherapy of hypoxic tumours in a framework encompassing functional tumour imaging, tumour control predictions, inverse treatment planning and intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) were presented. Dynamic contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCEMRI) of a spontaneous sarcoma in the nasal region of a dog was employed. The tracer concentration in the tumour was assumed related to the oxygen tension and compared to Eppendorf histograph measurements. Based on the pO2-related images derived from the MR analysis, the tumour was divided into four compartments by a segmentation procedure. DICOM structure sets for IMRT planning could be derived thereof. In order to display the possible advantages of non-uniform tumour doses, dose redistribution among the four tumour compartments was introduced. The dose redistribution was constrained by keeping the average dose to the tumour equal to a conventional target dose. The compartmental doses yielding optimum tumour control probability (TCP) were used as input in an inverse planning system, where the planning basis was the pO2-related tumour images from the MR analysis. Uniform (conventional) and non-uniform IMRT plans were scored both physically and biologically. The consequences of random and systematic errors in the compartmental images were evaluated. The normalized frequency distributions of the tracer concentration and the pO2 Eppendorf measurements were not significantly different. 28% of the tumour had, according to the MR analysis, pO2 values of less than 5 mm Hg. The optimum TCP following a non-uniform dose prescription was about four times higher than that following a uniform dose prescription. The non-uniform IMRT dose distribution resulting from the inverse planning gave a three times higher TCP than that of the uniform distribution. The TCP and the dose-based plan quality depended on IMRT parameters defined in the inverse planning procedure (fields

  11. Adapting radiotherapy to hypoxic tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malinen, Eirik; Soevik, Aste; Hristov, Dimitre; Bruland, Oeyvind S; Olsen, Dag Rune

    2006-01-01

    In the current work, the concepts of biologically adapted radiotherapy of hypoxic tumours in a framework encompassing functional tumour imaging, tumour control predictions, inverse treatment planning and intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) were presented. Dynamic contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCEMRI) of a spontaneous sarcoma in the nasal region of a dog was employed. The tracer concentration in the tumour was assumed related to the oxygen tension and compared to Eppendorf histograph measurements. Based on the pO 2 -related images derived from the MR analysis, the tumour was divided into four compartments by a segmentation procedure. DICOM structure sets for IMRT planning could be derived thereof. In order to display the possible advantages of non-uniform tumour doses, dose redistribution among the four tumour compartments was introduced. The dose redistribution was constrained by keeping the average dose to the tumour equal to a conventional target dose. The compartmental doses yielding optimum tumour control probability (TCP) were used as input in an inverse planning system, where the planning basis was the pO 2 -related tumour images from the MR analysis. Uniform (conventional) and non-uniform IMRT plans were scored both physically and biologically. The consequences of random and systematic errors in the compartmental images were evaluated. The normalized frequency distributions of the tracer concentration and the pO 2 Eppendorf measurements were not significantly different. 28% of the tumour had, according to the MR analysis, pO 2 values of less than 5 mm Hg. The optimum TCP following a non-uniform dose prescription was about four times higher than that following a uniform dose prescription. The non-uniform IMRT dose distribution resulting from the inverse planning gave a three times higher TCP than that of the uniform distribution. The TCP and the dose-based plan quality depended on IMRT parameters defined in the inverse planning procedure

  12. Sensorimotor difficulties are associated with the severity of autism spectrum conditions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Penelope Hannant

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Present diagnostic criteria for autism spectrum conditions (ASC include social communication and interaction difficulties, repetitive behaviour and movement, and atypical sensory responsivity. Few studies have explored the influence of motor coordination and sensory responsivity on severity of ASC symptoms. In the current study, we explore whether sensory responsivity and motor coordination differences can account for the severity of autistic behaviours in children with ASC. 36 children took part: 18 (13 male, 5 female with ASC (ages 7-16: mean age 9.93 years and 18 (7 male, 11 female typically developing (TD children (ages 6-12; mean age 9.16 years. Both groups completed a battery of assessments that included motor coordination, sensory responsivity, receptive language, non-verbal reasoning and social communication measures Children with ASC also completed the Autism Diagnostic Observation Schedule and Autism Diagnostic Interview – Revised.. Results showed that children with ASC scored significantly lower on receptive language, coordination and sensory responsivity and a sensorimotor subscale, Modulation of Activity (MoA compared to the TD group. In the ASC group, MoA significantly predicted ASC severity across all ASC measures; receptive language and sensory responsivity significantly predicted parental reported autism measures; and coordination significantly predicted examiner observed reported scores. Additionally, specific associations were found between the somatosensory perceptive modalities and ASC severity. The results show that sensorimotor skills are associated with severity of ASC symptoms; furthering the need to research sensorimotor integration in ASC and also implying that diagnosis of ASC should also include the assessment of both coordination deficit and atypical sensory responsivity.

  13. TYPHOID FEVER WITH FATAL OUTCOME IN PEOPLE WITH SEVERE TROPHOLOGICAL FAILURE IN EXTREME CONDITIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu. I. Lyashenko

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available For purpose of clinical and morphological characterization of typhoid fever with fatal outcome was perform analysis of medical documentation as well as postmortem studies of internal tissues in 36men aged 21 to 34 years with severe body weight loss and in the conditions of combat stress in period from 1983 to 1985. The results of the study find a number of clinical and pathomorphological features of typhoid fever in patients with body weight deficiency that were in extreme conditions. Focal changes of the central nervous system were detected. The defeat of the respiratory system was characterized from the first days of the disease by bronchitis, and in the subsequent development of pneumonia, plevritis and empyema of the pleura. Majority of patients had symptoms of cardiovascular and renal failure. In died in the first week of the disease and in 2/3 parts – in a later period were combined with the symptoms of infectious-toxic encephalopathy and severe acute respiratory failure. All died had postmortem dystrophic changes of cardiomyocytes, and in patients had fatal outcome in 2–5 weeks – also focal or diffuse myocarditis. In a third of the patients who died, the disease was complicated by intestinal perforations. In a number of cases, peritonitis was a consequence of necrosis of mesenteric lymph nodes. In all patients with a fatal outcome, hemorrhagic (thrombohemorrhagic syndrome was diagnosed. A significant proportion of patients posthumously detected signs of sepsis and other complications, many of which could be the cause of death.

  14. Evolution of the Sensor Fish Device for Measuring Physical Conditions in Severe Hydraulic Environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carlson, Thomas J.; Duncan, Joanne P.

    2003-02-28

    To assist in deriving biological specifications for design of turbine rehabilitation measures, new ''fish-friendly'' turbines, and spillway designs and operations, scientists at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) have developed and tested an autonomous multi-sensor device called a Sensor Fish that can acquire pressure and tri-axial linear acceleration data during passage through severe hydraulic conditions. The purpose of the Sensor Fish is to characterize physical conditions fish experience during passage through hydro turbines, spill stilling basins, high-discharge outfalls, and other dam passage routes. The Sensor Fish was developed with the support of the U.S. Department of Energy's Advanced Hydropower Turbine System program. Field tests of the Sensor Fish at Rock Island, McNary, The Dalles, Bonneville, and Wanapum dams on the Columbia River and the Prosser Irrigation District on the Yakima River have shown that the device can withstand the severe environments of turbine, spill, and fish bypass passage and provide useful environmental data that can ultimately aid in the design and operation of new and existing turbines, spill, and dam fish bypass facilities.

  15. Evolution of the sensor fish device for measuring physical conditions in sever hydraulic environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carlson, Thomas J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Duncan, J. P. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2003-03-01

    To assist in deriving biological specifications for design of turbine rehabilitation measures, new “fish-friendly” turbines, and spillway designs and operations, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) scientists have developed and tested an autonomous multi-sensor device called a Sensor Fish that can acquire pressure and tri-axial linear acceleration data during passage through severe hydraulic conditions. The purpose of the Sensor Fish is to characterize physical conditions fish experience during passage through hydro turbines, spill stilling basins, high-discharge outfalls, and other dam passage routes. This report discusses the development and field tests of the Sensor Fish at Rock Island, McNary, The Dalles, Bonneville, and Wanapum dams on the Columbia River and the Prosser Irrigation District on the Yakima River, which have shown that the device can withstand the severe environments of turbine, spill, and fish bypass passage and provide useful environmental data that can ultimately aid in the design and operation of new and existing turbines, spill, and dam fish bypass facilities.

  16. Hypoxic fraction and binding of misonidazole in EMT6/Ed multicellular tumor spheroids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Franko, A.J.

    1985-01-01

    Misonidazole has been shown to bind selectively to hypoxic cells in tissue culture and to cells which are presumed to be chronically hypoxic in EMT6 spheroids and tumors. Thus it has considerable potential as a marker of hypoxic cells in vivo. To further evaluate this potential EMT6/Ed spheroids were used to quantitate misonidazole binding under conditions which resulted in hypoxic fractions between 0 and 1. The patterns of binding of 14 C-labeled misonidazole determined by autoradiography were consistent with the regions of radiobiological hypoxia as predicted by oxygen diffusion theory. The overall uptake of 3 H-labeled misonidazole by spheroids correlated well with the hypoxic fraction, although binding to aerobic cells and necrotic tissue contributed appreciably to the total label in the spheroids. It is concluded that misonidazole is an excellent marker of hypoxia in EMT6/Ed spheroids at the microscopic level, and the total amount bound per spheroid provides a potentially useful measure of the hypoxic fraction

  17. Apoptosis, energy metabolism, and fraction of radiobiologically hypoxic cells: a study of human melanoma multicellular spheroids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rofstad, E K; Eide, K; Skøyum, R; Hystad, M E; Lyng, H

    1996-09-01

    The magnitude of the fraction of radiobiologically hypoxic cells in tumours is generally believed to reflect the efficiency of the vascular network. Theoretical studies have suggested that the hypoxic fraction might also be influenced by biological properties of the tumour cells. Quantitative experimental results of cell energy metabolism, hypoxia- induced apoptosis, and radiobiological hypoxia are reported here. Human melanoma multicellular spheroids (BEX-c and WIX-c) were used as tumour models to avoid confounding effects of the vascular network. Radiobiological studies showed that the fractions of hypoxic cells in 1000-microM spheroids were 32 +/- 12% (BEX-c) and 2.5 +/- 1.1% (WIX-c). The spheroid hypoxic volume fractions (28 +/- 6% (BEX-c) and 1.4 +/- 7% (WIX-c)), calculated from the rate of oxygen consumption per cell, the cell packing density, and the thickness of the viable rim, were similar to the fractions of radiobiologically hypoxic cells. Large differences between tumours in fraction of hypoxic cells are therefore not necessarily a result of differences in the efficiency of the vascular network. Studies of monolayer cell cultures, performed to identify the biological properties of the BEX-c and WIX-c cells leading to this large difference in fraction of hypoxic cells, gave the following results: (1) WIX-c showed lower cell surviving fractions after exposure to hypoxia than BEX-c, (2) WIX-c showed higher glucose uptake and lactate release rates than BEX-c both under aerobic and hypoxic conditions, and (3) hypoxia induced apoptosis in WIX-c but not in BEX-c. These observations suggested that the difference between BEX-c and WIX-c spheroids in fraction of hypoxic cells resulted partly from differences in cell energy metabolism and partly from a difference in capacity to retain viability under hypoxic stress. The induction of apoptosis by hypoxia was identified as a phenomenon which has an important influence on the magnitude of the fraction of

  18. Cerebral circulation and prognosis of the patients with hypoxic encephalopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nogami, Kenichiro; Fujii, Masami; Kashiwagi, Shiro; Sadamitsu Daikai; Maekawa, Tsuyoshi

    2000-01-01

    Recent progress in cardiopulmonary resuscitation techniques improved the survival rate of patients with acute cardiopulmonary disturbances. However, severe cerebral complications remained frequently in patients who survived the acute stage. Early prediction of cerebral prognosis is important to optimize the management of these patients. We examined the relations between radiological findings (Xe-CT and MRI) and cerebral prognosis. Patients included in this study were selected from all patients with hypoxic encephalopathy admitted to our hospital. There were 11 men and 10 women. Causes of hypoxic encephalopathy were heart disease (11 cases), suffocation (4 cases), CO intoxication (2 cases), asthma (1 case), pneumothorax (1 case), anaphyraxy shock (1 case) and electric shock (1 case). Xe-CT and MRI were carried out 3 weeks after the onset. Cerebral blood flow (CBF) of the patients was measured at rest and 15 minutes after intravenous administration of acetazolamide (1 g). The prognosis was evaluated 3 months after the onset in accordance with Glasgow Outcome Scale (GOS). Low hemispheric CBF (30 ml/100 g/min), poor reactivity of acetazolamide challenge test (10 ml/100 g/min), presence of hyperintensity areas in the basal ganglia in T1 weighted images (T1WI) and T2 weighted images (T2WI) are the factors associated with poor outcome in hypoxic encephalopathy. (author)

  19. Hypoxic Response of Tumor Tissues in a Microfluidic Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morshed, Adnan; Dutta, Prashanta

    2017-11-01

    Inside a tumor tissue, cells growing further away from the blood vessel often suffer from low oxygen levels known as hypoxia. Cancer cells have shown prolonged survival in hostile hypoxic conditions by sharply changing the cellular metabolism. In this work, different stages of growth of the tumor tissue and the oxygen transport across the tissue are investigated. The tissue was modeled as a contiguous block of cells inside a microfluidic environment with nutrient transport through advection and diffusion. While oxygen uptake inside the tissue is through diffusion, ascorbate transport from the extracellular medium is addressed by a concentration dependent uptake model. By varying the experimentally observed oxygen consumption rate, different types of cancer cells and their normoxic and hypoxic stages were studied. Even when the oxygen supply in the channel is maintained at normoxic levels, our results show the onset of hypoxia within minutes inside the cellblock. Interestingly, modeled cell blocks with and without a structured basal layer showed less than 5% variation in hypoxic response in chronic hypoxia. Results also indicate that the balance of cell survival and growth are affected by the flow rate of nutrients and the oxygen consumption rate. This work was supported in part by the National Science Foundation under Grant No. DMS 1317671.

  20. Clinical heterogeneity among people with high functioning autism spectrum conditions: evidence favouring a continuous severity gradient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Woodbury-Smith Marc

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Autism Spectrum Conditions (ASCs are characterized by a high degree of clinical heterogeneity, but the extent to which this variation represents a severity gradient versus discrete phenotypes is unclear. This issue has complicated genetic studies seeking to investigate the genetic basis of the high hereditability observed clinically in those with an ASC. The aim of this study was to examine the possible clustering of symptoms associated with ASCs to determine whether the observed distribution of symptom type and severity supported either a severity or a symptom subgroup model to account for the phenotypic variation observed within the ASCs. Methods We investigated the responses of a group of adults with higher functioning ASCs on the fifty clinical features examined in the Autism Spectrum Quotient, a screening questionnaire used in the diagnosis of higher functioning ASCs. In contrast to previous studies we have used this instrument with no a priori assumptions about any underlying factor structure of constituent items. The responses obtained were analyzed using complete linkage hierarchical cluster analysis. For the members of each cluster identified the mean score on each Autism Spectrum Quotient question was calculated. Results Autism Spectrum Quotient responses from a total of 333 individuals between the ages of 16.6 and 78.0 years were entered into the hierarchical cluster analysis. The four cluster solution was the one that generated the largest number of clusters that did not also include very small cluster sizes, defined as a membership comprising 10 individuals or fewer. Examination of these clusters demonstrated that they varied in total Autism Spectrum Quotient but that the profiles across the symptoms comprising the Autism Spectrum Quotient did not differ independently of this severity factor. Conclusion These results are consistent with a unitary spectrum model, suggesting that the clinical heterogeneity observed

  1. Failure strains and proposed limit strains for an reactor pressure vessel under severe accident conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krieg, R.

    2005-01-01

    The local failure strains of essential design elements of a reactor vessel are investigated. The size influence of the structure is of special interest. Typical severe accident conditions including elevated temperatures and dynamic loads are considered. The main part of work consists of test families with specimens under uniaxial and biaxial load. Within one test family the specimen geometry and the load conditions are similar, but the size is varied up to reactor dimensions. Special attention is given to geometries with a hole or a notch causing non-uniform stress and strain distributions typical for the reactor vessel. A key problem is to determine the local failure strain. Here suitable methods had to be developed including the so-called 'vanishing gap method', and the 'forging die method'. They are based on post-test geometrical measurements of the fracture surfaces and reconstructions of the related strain fields using finite element models. The results indicate that stresses versus dimensionless deformations are approximately size independent up to failure for specimens of similar geometry under similar load conditions. Local failure strains could be determined. The values are rather high and size dependent. Statistical evaluation allow the proposal of limit strains which are also size dependent. If these limit strains are not exceeded, the structures will not fracture

  2. Study On Safety Analysis Of PWR Reactor Core In Transient And Severe Accident Conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Dai Dien; Hoang Minh Giang; Nguyen Thi Thanh Thuy; Nguyen Thi Tu Oanh; Le Thi Thu; Pham Tuan Nam; Tran Van Trung; Le Van Hong; Vo Thi Huong

    2014-01-01

    The cooperation research project on the Study on Safety Analysis of PWR Reactor Core in Transient and Severe Accident Conditions between Institute for Nuclear Science and Technology (INST), VINATOM and Korean Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI), Korea has been setup to strengthen the capability of researches in nuclear safety not only in mastering the methods and computer codes, but also in qualifying of young researchers in the field of nuclear safety analysis. Through the studies on the using of thermal hydraulics computer codes like RELAP5, COBRA, FLUENT and CFX the thermal hydraulics research group has made progress in the research including problems for safety analysis of APR1400 nuclear reactor, PIRT methodologies and sub-channel analysis. The study of severe accidents has been started by using MELCOR in collaboration with KAERI experts and the training on the fundamental phenomena occurred in postulated severe accident. For Vietnam side, VVER-1000 nuclear reactor is also intensively studied. The design of core catcher, reactor containment and severe accident management are the main tasks concerning VVER technology. The research results are presented in the 9 th National Conference on Mechanics, Ha Noi, December 8-9, 2012, the 10 th National Conference on Nuclear Science and Technology, Vung Tau, August 14-15, 2013, as well as published in the journal of Nuclear Science and Technology, Vietnam Nuclear Society and other journals. The skills and experience from using computer codes like RELAP5, MELCOR, ANSYS and COBRA in nuclear safety analysis are improved with the nuclear reactors APR1400, Westinghouse 4 loop PWR and especially the VVER-1000 chosen for the specific studies. During cooperation research project, man power and capability of Nuclear Safety center of INST have been strengthen. Three masters were graduated, 2 researchers are engaging in Ph.D course at Hanoi University of Science and Technology and University of Science and Technology, Korea

  3. Total lymphoid irradiation based conditioning for hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in severe aplastic anemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Yun Hee; Kim, Ji Yoon; Choi, Byung Ock; Ryu, Mi Ryeong; Chung, Su Mi

    2012-01-01

    To retrospectively evaluate the outcome and toxicity of total lymphoid irradiation (TLI) based conditioning regimen for allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) in severe aplastic anemia (SAA) patients who experienced an engraftment failure from prior HSCT or were heavily transfused. Between 1995 and 2006, 20 SAA patients received TLI for conditioning of HSCT. All patients were multi-transfused or had long duration of disease. Fifteen (75%) patients had graft failure from prior HSCT. In 18 (90%) patients, the donors were human leukocyte antigen identical siblings. The stem cell source was the peripheral blood stem cell in 15 (75%) patients. The conditioning regimen was composed of antithymocyte globulin plus TLI with a median dose of 750 cGy in 1 fraction. The graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) prophylaxis used cyclosporine with methotrexate. With a median follow-up of 10.8 years, graft failures developed in 6 patients. Among them, 3 patients received their third HSCT to be engrafted finally. The Kaplan-Meier overall survival rate was 85.0% and 83.1% at 5 and 10 years, respectively. The incidence of acute and chronic GVHD was 20% and 20%, respectively. None of the patients have developed a malignancy after HSCT. In our study, TLI based conditioning in allogeneic HSCT was feasible with acceptable rates of GVHD in SAA patients who experienced graft failure from prior HSCT or was at a high risk of graft rejection. We achieved relatively better results of engraftment and survival with a long term follow-up.

  4. Total lymphoid irradiation based conditioning for hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in severe aplastic anemia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Yun Hee; Kim, Ji Yoon; Choi, Byung Ock; Ryu, Mi Ryeong; Chung, Su Mi [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, The Catholic University of Korea College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-12-15

    To retrospectively evaluate the outcome and toxicity of total lymphoid irradiation (TLI) based conditioning regimen for allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) in severe aplastic anemia (SAA) patients who experienced an engraftment failure from prior HSCT or were heavily transfused. Between 1995 and 2006, 20 SAA patients received TLI for conditioning of HSCT. All patients were multi-transfused or had long duration of disease. Fifteen (75%) patients had graft failure from prior HSCT. In 18 (90%) patients, the donors were human leukocyte antigen identical siblings. The stem cell source was the peripheral blood stem cell in 15 (75%) patients. The conditioning regimen was composed of antithymocyte globulin plus TLI with a median dose of 750 cGy in 1 fraction. The graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) prophylaxis used cyclosporine with methotrexate. With a median follow-up of 10.8 years, graft failures developed in 6 patients. Among them, 3 patients received their third HSCT to be engrafted finally. The Kaplan-Meier overall survival rate was 85.0% and 83.1% at 5 and 10 years, respectively. The incidence of acute and chronic GVHD was 20% and 20%, respectively. None of the patients have developed a malignancy after HSCT. In our study, TLI based conditioning in allogeneic HSCT was feasible with acceptable rates of GVHD in SAA patients who experienced graft failure from prior HSCT or was at a high risk of graft rejection. We achieved relatively better results of engraftment and survival with a long term follow-up.

  5. Astrocyte-derived proinflammatory cytokines induce hypomyelination in the periventricular white matter in the hypoxic neonatal brain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yiyu Deng

    Full Text Available Hypoxic exposure in the perinatal period causes periventricular white matter damage (PWMD, a condition associated with myelination abnormalities. Under hypoxic conditions, glial cells were activated and released a large number of inflammatory mediators in the PWM in neonatal brain, which may result in oligodendrocyte (OL loss and axonal injury. This study aims to determine if astrocytes are activated and generate proinflammatory cytokines that may be coupled with the oligodendroglial loss and hypomyelination observed in hypoxic PWMD. Twenty-four 1-day-old Wistar rats were exposed to hypoxia for 2 h. The rats were then allowed to recover under normoxic conditions for 7 or 28 days before being killed. Another group of 24 rats kept outside the chamber was used as age-matched controls. Upregulated expression of TNF-α and IL-1β was observed in astrocytes in the PWM of P7 hypoxic rats by double immunofluorescence, western blotting and real time RT-PCR. This was linked to apoptosis and enhanced expression of TNF-R1 and IL-1R1 in APC(+ OLs. PLP expression was decreased significantly in the PWM of P28d hypoxic rats. The proportion of myelinated axons was markedly reduced by electron microscopy (EM and the average g-ratios were higher in P28d hypoxic rats. Upregulated expression of TNF-α and IL-1β in primary cultured astrocytes as well as their corresponding receptors in primary culture APC(+ oligodendrocytes were detected under hypoxic conditions. Our results suggest that following a hypoxic insult, astrocytes in the PWM of neonatal rats produce inflammatory cytokines such as TNF-α and IL-1β, which induce apoptosis of OLs via their corresponding receptors associated with them. This results in hypomyelination in the PWM of hypoxic rats.

  6. Analysis of effects of calandria tube uncovery under severe accident conditions in CANDU reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rogers, J.T.; Currie, T.C.; Atkinson, J.C.; Dick, R.

    1983-01-01

    A study is being undertaken for the Atomic Energy Control Board to assess the thermal and hydraulic behaviour of CANDU reactor cores under accident conditions more severe than those normally considered in the licensing process. In this paper, we consider the effects on a coolant channel of the uncovery of a calandria tube by moderator boil-off following a LOCA in a Bruce reactor unit in which emergency cooling is ineffective and the moderator heat sink is impaired by the failure of the moderator cooling system. Calandria tube uncovery and its immediate consequences, as described here, constitute only one part of the entire accident sequence. Other aspects of this sequence as well as results of the analysis of the other accident sequences studied will be described in the final report on the project and in later papers

  7. Ultra-high temperature tensile properties of ODS steel claddings under severe accident conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yano, Y., E-mail: yano.yasuhide@jaea.go.jp [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 4002, Narita-cho, Oarai-machi, Ibaraki, 311-1393 (Japan); Tanno, T.; Oka, H.; Ohtsuka, S.; Inoue, T.; Kato, S.; Furukawa, T.; Uwaba, T.; Kaito, T. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 4002, Narita-cho, Oarai-machi, Ibaraki, 311-1393 (Japan); Ukai, S.; Oono, N. [Materials Science and Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Hokkaido University, N13, W-8, Kita-ku, Sapporo, Hokkaido, 060-8628 (Japan); Kimura, A. [Institute of Advanced Energy, Kyoto University, Gokasho, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan); Hayashi, S. [Tokyo Institute of Technology, 2-12-1, Ookayama, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 152-8550 (Japan); Torimaru, T. [Nippon Nuclear Fuel Development Co., Ltd., 2163, Narita-cho, Oarai-machi, Ibaraki, 311-1313 (Japan)

    2017-04-15

    Ultra-high temperature ring tensile tests were performed to investigate the tensile behavior of oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) steel claddings and wrapper materials under severe accident conditions with temperatures ranging from room temperature to 1400 °C which is close to the melting point of core materials. The experimental results showed that the tensile strength of 9Cr-ODS steel claddings was highest in the core materials at ultra-high temperatures of 900–1200 °C, but there was significant degradation in the tensile strength of 9Cr-ODS steel claddings above 1200 °C. This degradation was attributed to grain boundary sliding deformation with γ/δ transformation, which is associated with reduced ductility. By contrast, the tensile strength of recrystallized 12Cr-ODS and FeCrAl-ODS steel claddings retained its high value above 1200 °C, unlike the other tested materials.

  8. Ultra-high temperature tensile properties of ODS steel claddings under severe accident conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yano, Y.; Tanno, T.; Oka, H.; Ohtsuka, S.; Inoue, T.; Kato, S.; Furukawa, T.; Uwaba, T.; Kaito, T.; Ukai, S.; Oono, N.; Kimura, A.; Hayashi, S.; Torimaru, T.

    2017-04-01

    Ultra-high temperature ring tensile tests were performed to investigate the tensile behavior of oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) steel claddings and wrapper materials under severe accident conditions with temperatures ranging from room temperature to 1400 °C which is close to the melting point of core materials. The experimental results showed that the tensile strength of 9Cr-ODS steel claddings was highest in the core materials at ultra-high temperatures of 900-1200 °C, but there was significant degradation in the tensile strength of 9Cr-ODS steel claddings above 1200 °C. This degradation was attributed to grain boundary sliding deformation with γ/δ transformation, which is associated with reduced ductility. By contrast, the tensile strength of recrystallized 12Cr-ODS and FeCrAl-ODS steel claddings retained its high value above 1200 °C, unlike the other tested materials.

  9. Vaporization of low-volatile fission products under severe CANDU reactor accident conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lewis, B.J.; Corse, B.J.; Thompson, W.T.; Kaye, M.H.; Iglesias, F.C.; Elder, P.; Dickson, R.; Liu, Z.

    1997-01-01

    An analytical model has been developed to describe the release behaviour of low-volatile fission products from uranium dioxide fuel under severe reactor accident conditions. The effect of the oxygen potential on the chemical form and volatility of fission products is determined by Gibbs-energy minimization. The release kinetics are calculated according to the rate-controlling step of diffusional transport in the fuel matrix or fission product vaporization from the fuel surface. The effect of fuel volatilization (i.e., matrix stripping) on the release behaviour is also considered. The model has been compared to data from an out-of-pile annealing experiment performed in steam at the Chalk River Laboratories. (author)

  10. Modelling of Zircaloy-steam-oxidation under severe fuel damage conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malang, S.; Neitzel, H.J.

    1983-01-01

    Small break loss-of-coolant accidents and special transients in an LWR, in combination with loss of required safety systems, may lead to an uncovered core for an extended period of time. As a consequence, the cladding temperature could rise up to the melting point due to the decay heat, resulting in severely damaged fuel rods. During heat-up the claddings oxidize due to oxygen uptake from the steam atmosphere in the core. The modeling and assessment of the Zircaloy-steam oxidation under such conditions is important, mainly for two reasons: The oxidation of the cladding influences the temperature transients due to the exothermic heat of reaction; the amount of liquified fuel depends on the oxide layer thickness and the oxygen content of the remaining Zircaloy metal when the melting point is reached. (author)

  11. Using RNA-seq to determine the transcriptional landscape and the hypoxic response of the pathogenic yeast Candida parapsilosis

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Guida, Alessandro

    2011-12-22

    Abstract Background Candida parapsilosis is one of the most common causes of Candida infection worldwide. However, the genome sequence annotation was made without experimental validation and little is known about the transcriptional landscape. The transcriptional response of C. parapsilosis to hypoxic (low oxygen) conditions, such as those encountered in the host, is also relatively unexplored. Results We used next generation sequencing (RNA-seq) to determine the transcriptional profile of C. parapsilosis growing in several conditions including different media, temperatures and oxygen concentrations. We identified 395 novel protein-coding sequences that had not previously been annotated. We removed > 300 unsupported gene models, and corrected approximately 900. We mapped the 5\\' and 3\\' UTR for thousands of genes. We also identified 422 introns, including two introns in the 3\\' UTR of one gene. This is the first report of 3\\' UTR introns in the Saccharomycotina. Comparing the introns in coding sequences with other species shows that small numbers have been gained and lost throughout evolution. Our analysis also identified a number of novel transcriptional active regions (nTARs). We used both RNA-seq and microarray analysis to determine the transcriptional profile of cells grown in normoxic and hypoxic conditions in rich media, and we showed that there was a high correlation between the approaches. We also generated a knockout of the UPC2 transcriptional regulator, and we found that similar to C. albicans, Upc2 is required for conferring resistance to azole drugs, and for regulation of expression of the ergosterol pathway in hypoxia. Conclusion We provide the first detailed annotation of the C. parapsilosis genome, based on gene predictions and transcriptional analysis. We identified a number of novel ORFs and other transcribed regions, and detected transcripts from approximately 90% of the annotated protein coding genes. We found that the transcription factor

  12. Turnover rate of hypoxic cells in solid tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ljungkvist, A.S.E.; Bussink, J.; Rijken, P.F.J.W.; Van Der Kogel, A.J.

    2003-01-01

    Most solid tumors contain hypoxic cells, and both the amount and duration of tumor hypoxia has been shown to influence the effect of radiation treatment negatively. It is important to understand the dynamic processes within the hypoxic cell population in non-treated tumors, and the effect of different treatment modalities on the kinetics of hypoxic cells to be able to design optimal combined modality treatments. The turnover rate of hypoxic cells was analyzed in three different solid tumor models with a double bio-reductive hypoxic marker assay with sequential injection of the two hypoxic markers. Previously it was shown that this assay could be used to detect both a decrease and an increase of tumor hypoxia in relation to the tumor vasculature with high spatial resolution. In this study the first hypoxic marker, pimonidazole, was administered at variable times relative to tumor harvest, and the second hypoxic marker, CCI-103F, was injected at a fixed time before harvest. The hypoxic cell turnover rate was calculated as the loss of pimonidazole positive cells relative to CCI-103F. The murine C38 line had the fastest hypoxic turnover rate of 60% /24h and the human xenograft line SCCNij3 had the slowest hypoxic turnover rate of 30% /24 h. The hypoxic turnover rate was most heterogeneous in the SCCNij3 line that even contained viable groups of cells that had been hypoxic for at least 5 days. The human xenograft line MEC82 fell in between with a hypoxic turnover rate of 50% /24 h. The hypoxic cell turnover was related to the potential tumor volume doubling time (Tpot) with a Tpot of 26h in C38 and 103h in SCCNij3. The dynamics of hypoxic cells, quantified with a double hypoxic marker method, showed large differences in hypoxic cell turnover rate and were related to Tpot

  13. Analysis of flammability in the attached buildings to containment under severe accident conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosa, J.C. de la, E-mail: juan-carlos.de-la-rosa-blul@ec.europa.eu [European Commission Joint Research Centre (Netherlands); Fornós, Joan, E-mail: jfornosh@anacnv.com [Asociación Nuclear Ascó-Vandellós (Spain)

    2016-11-15

    Highlights: • Analysis of flammability conditions in buildings outside containment. • Stepwise approach easily applicable for any kind of containment and attached buildings layout. • Detailed application for real plant conditions has been included. - Abstract: Right after the events unfolded in Fukushima Daiichi, the European Union countries agreed in subjecting Nuclear Power Plants to Stress Tests as developed by WENRA and ENSREG organizations. One of the results as implemented in many European countries derived from such tests consisted of mandatory technical instructions issued by nuclear regulatory bodies on the analysis of potential risk of flammable gases in attached buildings to containment. The current study addresses the key aspects of the analysis of flammable gases leaking to auxiliary buildings attached to Westinghouse large-dry PWR containment for the specific situation where mitigating systems to prevent flammable gases to grow up inside containment are available, and containment integrity is preserved – hence avoiding isolation system failure. It also provides a full practical exercise where lessons learned derived from the current study – hence limited to the imposed boundary conditions – are applied. The leakage of gas from the containment to the support buildings is based on separate calculations using the EPRI-owned Modular Accident Analysis Program, MAAP4.07. The FATE™ code (facility Flow, Aerosol, Thermal, and Explosion) was used to model the transport and distribution of leaked flammable gas (H{sub 2} and CO) in the penetration buildings. FATE models the significant mixing (dilution) which occurs as the released buoyant gas rises and entrains air. Also, FATE accounts for the condensation of steam on room surfaces, an effect which acts to concentrate flammable gas. The results of the analysis show that during a severe accident, flammable conditions are unlikely to occur in compartmentalized buildings such as the one used in the

  14. Analysis of flammability in the attached buildings to containment under severe accident conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosa, J.C. de la; Fornós, Joan

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Analysis of flammability conditions in buildings outside containment. • Stepwise approach easily applicable for any kind of containment and attached buildings layout. • Detailed application for real plant conditions has been included. - Abstract: Right after the events unfolded in Fukushima Daiichi, the European Union countries agreed in subjecting Nuclear Power Plants to Stress Tests as developed by WENRA and ENSREG organizations. One of the results as implemented in many European countries derived from such tests consisted of mandatory technical instructions issued by nuclear regulatory bodies on the analysis of potential risk of flammable gases in attached buildings to containment. The current study addresses the key aspects of the analysis of flammable gases leaking to auxiliary buildings attached to Westinghouse large-dry PWR containment for the specific situation where mitigating systems to prevent flammable gases to grow up inside containment are available, and containment integrity is preserved – hence avoiding isolation system failure. It also provides a full practical exercise where lessons learned derived from the current study – hence limited to the imposed boundary conditions – are applied. The leakage of gas from the containment to the support buildings is based on separate calculations using the EPRI-owned Modular Accident Analysis Program, MAAP4.07. The FATE™ code (facility Flow, Aerosol, Thermal, and Explosion) was used to model the transport and distribution of leaked flammable gas (H_2 and CO) in the penetration buildings. FATE models the significant mixing (dilution) which occurs as the released buoyant gas rises and entrains air. Also, FATE accounts for the condensation of steam on room surfaces, an effect which acts to concentrate flammable gas. The results of the analysis show that during a severe accident, flammable conditions are unlikely to occur in compartmentalized buildings such as the one used in the

  15. Control Efficacy of Fungicides on Chinese Cabbage Clubroot under Several Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min-Yong Eom

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available To develop the efficient screening methods for antifungal compound active to Chinese cabbage clubroot caused by Plasmodiophora brassicae, the control efficacy of three fungicides fluazinam, ethaboxam, and cyazofamid on the disease was tested under several conditions such as soil types, cultivars of Chinese cabbage, growth stages of the host, and inoculum concentrations. The in vivo antifungal activities of the fungicides on clubroot of two Chinese cabbage cultivars were hardly different. At 7- and 14-day-old seedlings, the fungicides were more effective to control of clubroot than at 21-day-old seedlings. In a commercial horticulture media soil (CNS, disease severity of untreated controls was higher and control activity of the fungicides was less than in a mixture of CNS and upland soil (1:1, v/v. Disease development of the seedlings inoculated with P. brassicae at 1.8×10(7 spores/pot to 1.1×10(9 spores/pot was almost same, but control efficacy of the fungicides was negatively correlated with inoculum dosages. To effectively select in vivo antifungal compound on Chinese cabbage clubroot, 14-day-old seedlings need to be inoculated with P. brassicae by drenching the spore suspension to give 1×10(8 spores/pot 1 day after chemical treatment. To develop clubroot, the inoculated plants are incubated in a growth chamber at 20℃ for 2 days, and then cultivated in a greenhouse (20±5℃ for four weeks.

  16. influence of severe conditions on the concrete employed in nuclear technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khalil, W.M.K.S.

    2006-01-01

    this thesis is mainly concentrating on honing the efficiency of heavy-weight high -performance (HWHP) concrete, developed from local aggregates together with additives that are waste products of other manufacturing processes, for the purpose of producing radiation shields, to attenuate gamma-rays in peaceful active-service facilitations . in other words, the thesis is in attempt to develop a special type of heavy concrete of various advantages that would enhance its performance in severe environment. such advantages may embrace concurrent improvements; such as high specific gravity, workability, high compressive strength, efficient attenuator for gamma radiation, and resistant to elevated temperature along with chemical attack.the named HWHP concrete was mainly prepared using two types of heavy aggregates, ilmenite (iron ore) and barite . in addition usual concrete (dolomite/sand) was also employed in this thesis to compare the obtained HWHP concrete. the practical facet of this thesis accounts for evaluating the influence of severe conditions, concomitantly and consecutively, on mechanical , morphological and attenuation characteristics for the three types of concrete

  17. The Influence of Safety, Efficacy, and Medical Condition Severity on Natural versus Synthetic Drug Preference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meier, Brian P; Lappas, Courtney M

    2016-11-01

    Research indicates that there is a preference for natural v. synthetic products, but the influence of this preference on drug choice in the medical domain is largely unknown. We present 5 studies in which participants were asked to consider a hypothetical situation in which they had a medical issue requiring pharmacological therapy. Participants ( N = 1223) were asked to select a natural, plant-derived, or synthetic drug. In studies 1a and 1b, approximately 79% of participants selected the natural v. synthetic drug, even though the safety and efficacy of the drugs were identical. Furthermore, participants rated the natural drug as safer than the synthetic drug, and as that difference increased, the odds of choosing the natural over synthetic drug increased. In studies 2 and 3, approximately 20% of participants selected the natural drug even when they were informed that it was less safe (study 2) or less effective (study 3) than the synthetic drug. Finally, in study 4, approximately 65% of participants chose a natural over synthetic drug regardless of the severity of a specific medical condition (mild v. severe hypertension), and this choice was predicted by perceived safety and efficacy differences. Overall, these data indicate that there is a bias for natural over synthetic drugs. This bias could have implications for drug choice and usage. © The Author(s) 2015.

  18. Potential for containment leak paths through electrical penetration assemblies under severe accident conditions. [PWR; BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sebrell, W.

    1983-07-01

    The leakage behavior of containments beyond design conditions and knowledge of failure modes is required for evaluation of mitigation strategies for severe accidents, risk studies, emergency preparedness planning, and siting. These studies are directed towards assessing the risk and consequences of severe accidents. An accident sequence analysis conducted on a Boiling Water Reactor (BWR), Mark I (MK I), indicated very high temperatures in the dry-well region, which is the location of the majority of electrical penetration assemblies. Because of the high temperatures, it was postulated in the ORNL study that the sealants would fail and all the electrical penetration assemblies would leak before structural failure would occur. Since other containments had similar electrical penetration assemblies, it was concluded that all containments would experience the same type of failure. The results of this study, however, show that this conclusion does not hold for PWRs because in the worst accident sequence, the long time containment gases stabilize to 350/sup 0/F. BWRs, on the other hand, do experience high dry-well temperatures and have a higher potential for leakage.

  19. Potential for containment leak paths through electrical penetration assemblies under severe accident conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sebrell, W.

    1983-07-01

    The leakage behavior of containments beyond design conditions and knowledge of failure modes is required for evaluation of mitigation strategies for severe accidents, risk studies, emergency preparedness planning, and siting. These studies are directed towards assessing the risk and consequences of severe accidents. An accident sequence analysis conducted on a Boiling Water Reactor (BWR), Mark I (MK I), indicated very high temperatures in the dry-well region, which is the location of the majority of electrical penetration assemblies. Because of the high temperatures, it was postulated in the ORNL study that the sealants would fail and all the electrical penetration assemblies would leak before structural failure would occur. Since other containments had similar electrical penetration assemblies, it was concluded that all containments would experience the same type of failure. The results of this study, however, show that this conclusion does not hold for PWRs because in the worst accident sequence, the long time containment gases stabilize to 350 0 F. BWRs, on the other hand, do experience high dry-well temperatures and have a higher potential for leakage

  20. Post-test investigation result on the WWER-1000 fuel tested under severe accident conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goryachev, A.; Shtuckert, Yu.; Zwir, E.; Stupina, L.

    1996-01-01

    The model bundle of WWER-type were tested under SFD condition in the out-of-pile CORA installation. The objective of the test was to provide an information on the WWER-type fuel bundles behaviour under severe fuel damage accident conditions. Also it was assumed to compare the WWER-type bundle damage mechanisms with these experienced in the PWR-type bundle tests with aim to confirm a possibility to use the various code systems, worked our for PWR as applied to WWER. In order to ensure the possibility of the comparison of the calculated core degradation parameters with the real state of the tested bundle, some parameters have been measured on the bundle cross-sections under examination. Quantitative parameters of the bundle degradation have been evaluated by digital image processing of the bundle cross-sections. The obtained results are shown together with corresponding results obtained by the other participants of this investigation. (author). 3 refs, 13 figs

  1. Development of systematic models for aerosol agglomeration and spray removal under severe accident conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kajimoto, Mitsuhiro

    2008-01-01

    Radionuclide behavior during various severe accident conditions has been addressed as one of the important issues to discuss environmental safety in nuclear power plants. The present paper deals with the development of analytical models and their validations for the agglomeration of multiple-component aerosol and spray removal that controls source terms to the environment of both aerosols and gaseous radionuclides during recirculation mode operation in a containment system for a light water reactor. As for aerosol agglomeration, the single collision kernel model that can cover all types of two-body collision of aerosol was developed. In addition, the dynamic model that can treat aerosol and vapor transfer leading to the equilibrium condition under the containment spray operation was developed. The validations of the present models for multiple-component aerosol growth by agglomeration were performed by comparisons with Nuclear Safety Pilot Plant (NSPP) experiments at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and AB experiments at Hanford Engineering National Laboratory (HEDL). In addition, the spray removal models were applied to the analysis of containment spray experiment (CSE) at HEDL. The results calculated by the models showed good agreements with experimental results. (author)

  2. Inclusion of models to describe severe accident conditions in the fuel simulation code DIONISIO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lemes, Martín; Soba, Alejandro [Sección Códigos y Modelos, Gerencia Ciclo del Combustible Nuclear, Comisión Nacional de Energía Atómica, Avenida General Paz 1499, 1650 San Martín, Provincia de Buenos Aires (Argentina); Daverio, Hernando [Gerencia Reactores y Centrales Nucleares, Comisión Nacional de Energía Atómica, Avenida General Paz 1499, 1650 San Martín, Provincia de Buenos Aires (Argentina); Denis, Alicia [Sección Códigos y Modelos, Gerencia Ciclo del Combustible Nuclear, Comisión Nacional de Energía Atómica, Avenida General Paz 1499, 1650 San Martín, Provincia de Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2017-04-15

    The simulation of fuel rod behavior is a complex task that demands not only accurate models to describe the numerous phenomena occurring in the pellet, cladding and internal rod atmosphere but also an adequate interconnection between them. In the last years several models have been incorporated to the DIONISIO code with the purpose of increasing its precision and reliability. After the regrettable events at Fukushima, the need for codes capable of simulating nuclear fuels under accident conditions has come forth. Heat removal occurs in a quite different way than during normal operation and this fact determines a completely new set of conditions for the fuel materials. A detailed description of the different regimes the coolant may exhibit in such a wide variety of scenarios requires a thermal-hydraulic formulation not suitable to be included in a fuel performance code. Moreover, there exist a number of reliable and famous codes that perform this task. Nevertheless, and keeping in mind the purpose of building a code focused on the fuel behavior, a subroutine was developed for the DIONISIO code that performs a simplified analysis of the coolant in a PWR, restricted to the more representative situations and provides to the fuel simulation the boundary conditions necessary to reproduce accidental situations. In the present work this subroutine is described and the results of different comparisons with experimental data and with thermal-hydraulic codes are offered. It is verified that, in spite of its comparative simplicity, the predictions of this module of DIONISIO do not differ significantly from those of the specific, complex codes.

  3. Limit strains for severe accident conditions. Synthesis report of the EU-project LISSAC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krieg, R.; Seidenfuss, M.

    2003-10-01

    The local failure strains of essential reactor vessel components are investigated. The size influence of the components is of special interest. Typical severe accident conditions including elevated temperatures and dynamic loads are considered. The main part of work consists of test families with specimens under uniaxial and biaxial static and dynamic loads. Within one test family the specimen geometry and the load conditions are similar, the temperature is the same; but the size is varied up to reactor dimensions. Special attention is given to geometries with a hole or a notch causing non-uniform stress and strain distributions typical for reactor components. To manufacture all specimens sufficient material was available from the unused reactor pressure vessel Biblis C. Thus variations of the mechanical material properties, which could impair the interpretation of the test results, are rather small. This has been confirmed by an adequate number of additional quality assurance tests. A key problem was to determine the local strain at failure. Here suitable methods had to be developed including the so-called ''vanishing gap method'' and the ''forging die method''. They are based on post test geometrical measurements of the fracture surfaces and reconstructions of the related strain fields using finite element calculations, for instance. To deepen the understanding of structural degradation and fracture and to allow extrapolations, advanced computational methods including damage models have been developed and validated. Several approaches were tried in parallel including so-called non-local concepts and descriptions of stochastic properties at grain size level. The experimental results indicate that stresses versus dimensionless deformations are approximately size independent up to failure for specimens of similar geometry under similar load conditions. Also the maximum stress is approximately size independent, if failure occurs after the maximum stress is reached

  4. Hypoxic cytotoxicity of chlorpromazine and the modification of radiation response in E. coli B/r

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shenoy, M.A.; Singh, B.B.

    1978-01-01

    Chlorpromazine (0.1 mM) was cytotoxic to E. coli B/r cells under hypoxic but not euoxic conditions. Under nitrogen bubbling, there was no further enhancement in cellular lethality beyond 45 min contact time. The presence of the free drug seemed necessary for the cytocidal action to be demonstrated. Hypoxic cytotoxicity increased steadily with temperature between 30 and 37 0 C. Treatment of cells with N-ethyl maleimide (0.5 mM) completely abolished the subsequent hypoxic cytotoxicity of chlorpromazine (0.1 mM). Hypoxic gamma irradiation of cells pretreated for 45 min with chlorpromazine under nitrogen bubbling gave a DMF for survival of almost twice that produced by oxygen. Irradiation under aerobic conditions of cells subjected to the same pretreatment produced only the normal oxygen effect. The results indicate that the differential cytotoxicity of chlorpromazine is due to its effect on the changes induced in the membrane-associated biochemical state of the cells under euoxic and hypoxic conditions. (U.K.)

  5. Metabolic profiling of hypoxic cells revealed a catabolic signature required for cell survival.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Frezza

    Full Text Available Hypoxia is one of the features of poorly vascularised areas of solid tumours but cancer cells can survive in these areas despite the low oxygen tension. The adaptation to hypoxia requires both biochemical and genetic responses that culminate in a metabolic rearrangement to counter-balance the decrease in energy supply from mitochondrial respiration. The understanding of metabolic adaptations under hypoxia could reveal novel pathways that, if targeted, would lead to specific death of hypoxic regions. In this study, we developed biochemical and metabolomic analyses to assess the effects of hypoxia on cellular metabolism of HCT116 cancer cell line. We utilized an oxygen fluorescent probe in anaerobic cuvettes to study oxygen consumption rates under hypoxic conditions without the need to re-oxygenate the cells and demonstrated that hypoxic cells can maintain active, though diminished, oxidative phosphorylation even at 1% oxygen. These results were further supported by in situ microscopy analysis of mitochondrial NADH oxidation under hypoxia. We then used metabolomic methodologies, utilizing liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS, to determine the metabolic profile of hypoxic cells. This approach revealed the importance of synchronized and regulated catabolism as a mechanism of adaptation to bioenergetic stress. We then confirmed the presence of autophagy under hypoxic conditions and demonstrated that the inhibition of this catabolic process dramatically reduced the ATP levels in hypoxic cells and stimulated hypoxia-induced cell death. These results suggest that under hypoxia, autophagy is required to support ATP production, in addition to glycolysis, and that the inhibition of autophagy might be used to selectively target hypoxic regions of tumours, the most notoriously resistant areas of solid tumours.

  6. In vivo evidence suggesting reciprocal renal hypoxia-inducible factor-1 upregulation and signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 activation in response to hypoxic and non-hypoxic stimuli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nechemia-Arbely, Yael; Khamaisi, Mogher; Rosenberger, Christian; Koesters, Robert; Shina, Ahuva; Geva, Carmit; Shriki, Anat; Klaus, Stephen; Rosen, Seymour; Rose-John, Stefan; Galun, Eithan; Axelrod, Jonathan H; Heyman, Samuel N

    2013-04-01

    In vitro studies suggest that combined activation of hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) and signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) promotes the hypoxia response. However, their interrelationship in vivo remains poorly defined. The present study investigated the possible relationship between HIF-1 upregulation and STAT3 activation in the rodent kidney in vivo. Activation of HIF-1 and STAT3 was analysed by immunohistochemical staining and western blot analysis in: (i) models of hypoxia-associated kidney injury induced by radiocontrast media or rhabdomyolysis; (ii) following activation of STAT3 by the interleukin (IL)-6-soluble IL-6 receptor complex; or (iii) following HIF-1α stabilization using hypoxic and non-hypoxic stimuli (mimosine, FG-4497, CO, CoCl(2)) and in targeted von Hippel-Lindau-knockout mice. Western blot analysis and immunostaining revealed marked induction of both transcription factors under all conditions tested, suggesting that in vivo STAT3 can trigger HIF and vice versa. Colocalization of HIF-1α and phosphorylated STAT3 was detected in some, but not all, renal cell types, suggesting that in some cells a paracrine mechanism may be responsible for the reciprocal activation of the two transcription factors. Nevertheless, in several cell types spatial concordance was observed under the majority of conditions tested, suggesting that HIF-1 and STAT3 may act as cotranscription factors. These in vivo studies suggest that, in response to renal hypoxic-stress, upregulation of HIF-1 and activation of STAT3 may be both reciprocal and cell type dependent. © 2013 The Authors Clinical and Experimental Pharmacology and Physiology © 2013 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  7. Fission product releases at severe LWR accident conditions: ORNL/CEA measurements versus calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andre, B.; Ducros, G.; Leveque, J.P. [CEA Centre d`Etudes de Grenoble, 38 (France). Dept. de Thermohydraulique et de Physique; Osborne, M.F.; Lorenz, R.A. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Maro, D. [CEA Centre d`Etudes de Fontenay-aux-Roses, 92 (France). Dept. de Protection de l`Environnement et des Installations

    1995-12-31

    Experimental programs in the United States and France have followed similar paths in supplying much of the data needed to analyze severe accidents. Both the HI/VI program, conducted at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) under the sponsorship of the U. S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), and the HEVA/VERCORS program, supported by IPSN-Commissariat a l`Energie Atomique (CEA) and carried out at the Centre d`Etudes Nucleaires de Grenoble, have studied fission product release from light water reactor (LWR) fuel samples during test sequences representative of severe accidents. Recognizing that more accurate data, i.e., a better defined source term, could reduce the safety margins included in the rather conservative source terms originating from WASH-1400, the primary objective of these programs has been to improve the data base concerning fission product release and behavior at high temperatures. To facilitate the comparison, a model based on fission product diffusion mechanisms that was developed at ORNL and adapted with CEA experimental data is proposed. This CEA model is compared with the ORNL experimental data in a blind test. The two experimental programs used similar techniques in out-of-pile studies. Highly irradiated fuel samples were heated in radiofrequency induction furnaces to very high temperatures (up to 2700 K at ORNL and 2750 K at CEA) in oxidizing (H{sub 2}O), reducing (H{sub 2}) or mixed (H{sub 2}O+H{sub 2}) environments. The experimental parameters, which were chosen from calculated accident scenarios, did not duplicate specific accidents, but rather emphasized careful control of test conditions to facilitate extrapolation of the results to a wide variety of accident situations. This paper presents a broad and consistent database from ORNL and CEA release results obtained independently since the early 1980`S. A comparison of CORSOR and CORSOR Booth calculations, currently used in safety analysis, and the experimental results is presented and

  8. Basic study on PWR plant behavior under the condition of severe accident (1)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ozaki, Yoshihiko; Ida, Shohma; Nakamura, Shinya

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we report on the results using the PWR plant simulator about the plant behavior under the condition of the severe accident that LOCA occurs but ECCS fails the water irrigation into the reactor core. As for the results about the relationship between the LOCA area and the time from LOCA occurs until fuel temperature rise start, the time became shorter as the area was the larger. But, in LOCA area of 1000 cm 2 or more large, the time was almost constant regardless of the area. For small LOCA of 25 cm 2 area, from the results of the comparative experiments for RCS natural circulation cooling effect in the case of SG open or not, in SG open condition compared with SG not open, the effect was observed more, but the reactor water level was greatly reduced and the time until the fuel temperature rise start was shortened, so the fuel temperature at the time of water irrigation into the reactor core has become higher. On the other hand, for the large LOCA of 1000 cm 2 , the effect was not observed regardless of SG open or not. In addition, the reactor core damage was not spared in the irrigation into the reactor core after 30 minutes from LOCA, however, the hydrogen concentration in the containment building is less than the lower limit of hydrogen detonation, and also the pressure in the containment building is less than the designed value. That is, although suffered the core damage, the integrity of the containment building has been shown to be secured. (author)

  9. Quantifying Physiological, Behavioral and Ecological Consequences of Hypoxic Events in Kelp Forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litvin, S. Y.; Beers, J. M.; Woodson, C. B.; Leary, P.; Fringer, O. B.; Goldbogen, J. A.; Micheli, F.; Monismith, S. G.; Somero, G. N.

    2016-02-01

    Rocky reef kelp forests that extend along the coast of central California, like many habitats in upwelling systems, often experience inundations of low dissolved oxygen (DO) or hypoxic waters. These events have the potential to influence the structure and function of coastal ecosystems. The ecological consequences of hypoxia for these systems will be mediated by physiological thresholds and behavioral responses of resident organisms in the context of the spatial and temporal variability of DO, and other potential stressors. Our research focuses on Sebastes (i.e. rockfish) because of their commercial, recreational and ecological importance, high abundance across near shore habitats and the potentially severe impacts of physiological stress due to hypoxia. In the lab, to investigate how hypoxic events physiologically effect rockfish, we exposed young of the year (YOY) of 5 species and two life stages of blue rockfish, S. mystinus (YOY and 1+), to DO concentrations representative of upwelling conditions and measured a suite of whole organisms and tissue level responses including metabolic rate, ventilation, tissue-level metabolism, and blood biochemistry. Results demonstrate species and life stage specific differences in physiological stress under upwelling driven hypoxic conditions and suggest YOY rockfishes may currently be living near their physiological limits. In the laboratory we further explored if physiological impacts result in behavioral consequences by examining the startle response of YOY rockfish, a relative measure of predator avoidance ability, under a range of DO concentrations and exposure durations. To further explore behavioral responses of rockfish to low in DO within the kelp forest we are using two approaches, monitoring the vertical distribution of fish communities across the water column using an acoustic imaging camera (ARIS 3000, Soundmetrics Inc.) and acoustic tagging, with 3-D positioning ability (VPS, VEMCO Inc.), of larger blue rockfish

  10. Interleukin-17 limits hypoxia-inducible factor 1α and development of hypoxic granulomas during tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domingo-Gonzalez, Racquel; Das, Shibali; Griffiths, Kristin L; Ahmed, Mushtaq; Bambouskova, Monika; Gopal, Radha; Gondi, Suhas; Muñoz-Torrico, Marcela; Salazar-Lezama, Miguel A; Cruz-Lagunas, Alfredo; Jiménez-Álvarez, Luis; Ramirez-Martinez, Gustavo; Espinosa-Soto, Ramón; Sultana, Tamanna; Lyons-Weiler, James; Reinhart, Todd A; Arcos, Jesus; de la Luz Garcia-Hernandez, Maria; Mastrangelo, Michael A; Al-Hammadi, Noor; Townsend, Reid; Balada-Llasat, Joan-Miquel; Torrelles, Jordi B; Kaplan, Gilla; Horne, William; Kolls, Jay K; Artyomov, Maxim N; Rangel-Moreno, Javier; Zúñiga, Joaquín; Khader, Shabaana A

    2017-10-05

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) is a global health threat, compounded by the emergence of drug-resistant strains. A hallmark of pulmonary tuberculosis (TB) is the formation of hypoxic necrotic granulomas, which upon disintegration, release infectious Mtb. Furthermore, hypoxic necrotic granulomas are associated with increased disease severity and provide a niche for drug-resistant Mtb. However, the host immune responses that promote the development of hypoxic TB granulomas are not well described. Using a necrotic Mtb mouse model, we show that loss of Mtb virulence factors, such as phenolic glycolipids, decreases the production of the proinflammatory cytokine IL-17 (also referred to as IL-17A). IL-17 production negatively regulates the development of hypoxic TB granulomas by limiting the expression of the transcription factor hypoxia-inducible factor 1α (HIF1α). In human TB patients, HIF1α mRNA expression is increased. Through genotyping and association analyses in human samples, we identified a link between the single nucleotide polymorphism rs2275913 in the IL-17 promoter (-197G/G), which is associated with decreased IL-17 production upon stimulation with Mtb cell wall. Together, our data highlight a potentially novel role for IL-17 in limiting the development of hypoxic necrotic granulomas and reducing disease severity in TB.

  11. Small interfering RNA targeting HIF-1{alpha} reduces hypoxia-dependent transcription and radiosensitizes hypoxic HT 1080 human fibrosarcoma cells in vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Staab, Adrian [Wuerzburg Univ. (Germany). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland); Fleischer, Markus [Wuerzburg Univ. (Germany). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Wuerzburg Univ. (Germany). Medical Clinic II; Loeffler, Juergen; Einsele, Herrmann [Wuerzburg Univ. (Germany). Medical Clinic II; Said, Harun M.; Katzer, Astrid; Flentje, Michael [Wuerzburg Univ. (Germany). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Plathow, Christian [Freiburg Univ. (Germany). Dept. of Nuclear Medicine; Vordermark, Dirk [Wuerzburg Univ. (Germany). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Halle-Wittenberg Univ. (Germany). Dept. of Radiation Oncology

    2011-04-15

    Background: Hypoxia inducible factor-1 has been identified as a potential target to overcome hypoxia-induced radioresistance The aim of the present study was to investigate whether selective HIF-1 inhibition via small interfering RNA (siRNA) targeting hypoxia-inducible factor 1{alpha} (HIF-1{alpha}) affects hypoxia-induced radioresistance in HT 1080 human fibrosarcoma cells. Material and Methods: HIF-1{alpha} expression in HT 1080 human fibrosarcoma cells in vitro was silenced using HIF-1{alpha} siRNA sequence primers. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction assay was performed to quantify the mRNA expression of HIF-1{alpha}. HIF-1{alpha} protein levels were studied by Western blotting at 20% (air) or after 12 hours at 0.1% O{sub 2} (hypoxia). Cells were assayed for clonogenic survival after irradiation with 2, 5, or 10 Gy, under normoxic or hypoxic conditions in the presence of HIF-1{alpha}-targeted or control siRNA sequences. A modified oxygen enhancement ratio (OER') was calculated as the ratio of the doses to achieve the same survival at 0.1% O{sub 2} as at ambient oxygen tensions. OER' was obtained at cell survival levels of 50%, 37%, and 10%. Results: HIF-1{alpha}-targeted siRNA enhanced radiation treatment efficacy under severely hypoxic conditions compared to tumor cells treated with scrambled control siRNA. OER was reduced on all survival levels after treatment with HIF-1{alpha}-targeted siRNA, suggesting that inhibition of HIF-1 activation by using HIF-1{alpha}-targeted siRNA increases radiosensitivity of hypoxic tumor cells in vitro. Conclusion: Inhibition of HIF-1 activation by using HIF-1{alpha}-targeted siRNA clearly acts synergistically with radiotherapy and increase radiosensitivity of hypoxic cells in vitro. (orig.)

  12. Small interfering RNA targeting HIF-1α reduces hypoxia-dependent transcription and radiosensitizes hypoxic HT 1080 human fibrosarcoma cells in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Staab, Adrian; Fleischer, Markus; Wuerzburg Univ.; Loeffler, Juergen; Einsele, Herrmann; Said, Harun M.; Katzer, Astrid; Flentje, Michael; Plathow, Christian; Vordermark, Dirk; Halle-Wittenberg Univ.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Hypoxia inducible factor-1 has been identified as a potential target to overcome hypoxia-induced radioresistance The aim of the present study was to investigate whether selective HIF-1 inhibition via small interfering RNA (siRNA) targeting hypoxia-inducible factor 1α (HIF-1α) affects hypoxia-induced radioresistance in HT 1080 human fibrosarcoma cells. Material and Methods: HIF-1α expression in HT 1080 human fibrosarcoma cells in vitro was silenced using HIF-1α siRNA sequence primers. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction assay was performed to quantify the mRNA expression of HIF-1α. HIF-1α protein levels were studied by Western blotting at 20% (air) or after 12 hours at 0.1% O 2 (hypoxia). Cells were assayed for clonogenic survival after irradiation with 2, 5, or 10 Gy, under normoxic or hypoxic conditions in the presence of HIF-1α-targeted or control siRNA sequences. A modified oxygen enhancement ratio (OER') was calculated as the ratio of the doses to achieve the same survival at 0.1% O 2 as at ambient oxygen tensions. OER' was obtained at cell survival levels of 50%, 37%, and 10%. Results: HIF-1α-targeted siRNA enhanced radiation treatment efficacy under severely hypoxic conditions compared to tumor cells treated with scrambled control siRNA. OER was reduced on all survival levels after treatment with HIF-1α-targeted siRNA, suggesting that inhibition of HIF-1 activation by using HIF-1α-targeted siRNA increases radiosensitivity of hypoxic tumor cells in vitro. Conclusion: Inhibition of HIF-1 activation by using HIF-1α-targeted siRNA clearly acts synergistically with radiotherapy and increase radiosensitivity of hypoxic cells in vitro. (orig.)

  13. [Collagenolytic activity in several species of deuteromycetes under various storage conditions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iakovleva, M B; Khoang, T L; Nikitina, Z K

    2006-01-01

    The ability of deuteromycetes of the genera Penicillium, Aspergillus, and Botrytis to retain collagenolytic activity was studied after both 2 and 10 years of storage on a Czapek medium under a layer of mineral oil at 4 degrees C, as well as in silica gel granules at 20 and -60 degrees C. The enzymatic activity of several species, including Botrytis terrestris, Penicillium janthinellum, Penicillium chrysogenum, and Penicillium citrinum, was retained under both conditions of storage. Aspergillus repens retained enzymatic activity only if stored under a layer of mineral oil. The viability of conidia and the collagenolytic activity of Botrytis terrestris, P. janthinellum, P. chrysogenum, and Penicillium citrinum, maintained on silica gel for 10 years, depended on the storage temperature. The viability of the test strains improved after storage on a silica gel at -60 degrees C. A strain of Aspergillus repens lost its ability to dissolve collagen at various storage temperatures on the silica gel. The index of lysis for three strains of Penicillium deuteromycetes (Penicillium janthinellum, Penicillium chrysogenum, and Penicillium citrinum) increased after a 10-year storage on silica gel at -60 degrees C.

  14. Noble gas control room accident filtration system for severe accident conditions (N-CRAFT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hill, Axel; Stiepani, Cristoph; Drechsler, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Severe accidents might cause the release of airborne radioactive substances to the environment of the NPP either due to containment leakages or due to intentional filtered containment venting. In the latter case aerosols and iodine are retained, however noble gases are not retainable by the FCVS or by conventional air filtration systems like HEPA filters and iodine absorbers. Radioactive noble gases nevertheless dominate the activity release depending on the venting procedure and the weather conditions. To prevent unacceptable contamination of the control room atmosphere by noble gases, AREVA GmbH has developed a noble gas control room accident filtration system (CRAFT) which can supply purified fresh air to the control room without time limitation. The retention process is based on dynamic adsorption of noble gases on activated carbon. The system consists of delay lines (carbon columns) which are operated by a continuous and simultaneous adsorption and desorption process. CRAFT allows minimization of the dose rate inside the control room and ensures low radiation exposure to the staff by maintaining the control room environment suitable for prolonged occupancy throughout the duration of the accident. CRAFT consists of a proven modular design either transportable or permanently installed. (author)

  15. Fission product release in conditions of a spent fuel pool severe accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohai, Dumitru

    2007-01-01

    Full text: Depending on the residence time, fuel burnup, and fuel rack configuration, there may be sufficient decay heat for the fuel clad to heat up, swell, and burst in case of a loss of pool water. Initiating event categories can be: loss of offsite power from events initiated by severe weather, internal fire, loss of pool cooling, loss of coolant inventory, seismic event, aircraft impact, tornado, missile attack. The breach in the clad releases the radioactive gases present in the gap between the fuel and clad, what is called 'gap release'. If the fuel continues to heat up, the zirconium clad will reach the point of rapid oxidation in air. This reaction of zirconium and air, or zirconium and steam is exothermic. The energy released from the reaction, combined with the fuel's decay energy, can cause the reaction to become self-sustaining and ignite the zirconium. The increase in heat from the oxidation reaction can also raise the temperature in adjacent fuel assemblies and propagate the oxidation reaction. Simultaneously, the sintered UO 2 pellets resulting from pins destroying are oxidized. Due to the self-disintegration of pellets by oxidation, fission gases and low volatile fission products are released. The release rate, the chemical nature and the amount of fission products depend on powder granulation distribution and environmental conditions. The zirconium burning and pellets self-disintegration will result in a significant release of spent fuel fission products that will be dispersed from the reactor site. (author)

  16. Structural performance of circular columns confined by recycled GFRP stirrups and exposed to severe conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed S. Sayed

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Since 1980, Egyptian government investment has been directed to the infrastructure projects. Water supply and water drainage networks are among those projects which are very costly; therefore they are designed with a life span of about one hundred years. There is a new trend toward the use of durable and maintenance free systems. The “GFRP” pipes are one of the economic solutions if the project life span is taken into consideration. A number of investors currently produce the “GFRP” pipes in the Egyptian market and although they follow the latest technologies in their production lines, they still suffer 2–5% deficiency of their produced pipes which consequently regarded as rejected pipes. This percentage has a negative impact on the environmental and economical issues. This research is a trial to investigate the behavior of circular columns confined by GFRP stirrups and exposed to severe conditions. A number of waste pipes were randomly selected and sliced to be used as circular column transverse reinforcement. An experimental program consisting of ten short circular columns was designed to study the effect of corrosion, high degrees of temperature, and sulfate attack on the structural behavior of the axially loaded short circular columns. The experimental results showed that columns laterally reinforced by GFRP slices have a comparable behavior to conventionally reinforced concrete columns especially for those columns exposed to corrosion and sulfate attack.

  17. Nuclear waste shipping container response to severe accident conditions, A brief critique of the modal study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Audin, L.

    1990-12-01

    The Modal Study (NUREG/CR-4829) attempts to upgrade the analysis of spent nuclear fuel transportation accidents, and to verify the validity of the present regulatory scheme of cask performance standards as a means to minimize risk. While an improvement over many prior efforts in this area (such as NUREG-0170), it unfortunately fails to create a realistic simulation either of a shipping cask, the severe conditions to which it could be subjected, or the potential damage to the spent fuel cargo during an accident. There are too many deficiencies in its analysis to allow acceptance of its results for the presumed cask design, and many pending changes in new containers, cargoes and shipping patterns will limit applicability of the Modal Study to future shipments. In essence, the Modal Study is a good start, but is too simplistic, incomplete, outdated and open to serious question to be used as the basis for any present-day environmental or risk assessment of spent fuel transportation. It needs to be redone, with peer review during its production and experimental verification of its assumptions, before it has any relevance to the shipments planned to Yucca Mountain. Finally, it must be expanded into a full risk assessment by inputing its radiological release fractions and probabilities into a valid dispersal simulation to properly determine the impact of its results. 51 refs

  18. Aerosol resuspension in the reactor cooling system of LWR's under severe accident conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alonso, A.; Bolado, R.; Hontanon, E.

    1991-07-01

    Aerosol resuspension from the pipes of the RCS under severe accident conditions happens when the carrier gas flow is turbulent. The origin of such phenomenon seems to be the existence of turbulent bursts in the neighbourhood of the pipe wall. These bursts are of random nature, in space and time. Three theoretical models have been found in available literature; those are: Cleaver and Yates', RESUS and Reeks' models. The first two of them are force balance models, in which particle detachment is supposed whenever aerodynamic lift or drag forces, respectively exceed adhesive forces, and the third one is an energy balance model in which resuspension happens when particle vibrational energy exceeds adhesive potential. From experimental evidence it seems that the studied phenomenon is a force balance problem and RESUS seems to be the most appropriate to it, among the available ones. Small-scale experiments have shown, as main parameters affecting resuspension, the Reynolds number of the flow, aerosol composition and initial loading per unit of area. Moreover, the resuspension rate decreases with time in all experiments where temporal measurements were taken

  19. Perspectives on Severe Accident Management by Depressurization and External Water Injection under Extended SBO Conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seol, Wookcheol; Park, Jongwoon

    2014-01-01

    Three major issues of severe accident management guideline (SAMG) after this sort of extended SBO would be depressurization of the primary system, external water injection and hydrogen management inside a containment. Under this situation, typical SAM actions would be depressurization and external water delivery into the core. However, limited amount of external water would necessitate optimization between core cooling, containment integrity and fission product removal. In this paper, effects of SAM actions such as depressurization and external water injection on the reactor and containment conditions after extended SBO are analyzed using MAAP4 code. Positive and negative aspects are discussed with respect to core cooling and fission product retention inside a primary system. Conclusions are made as following: Firstly, early depressurization action itself has two-faces: positive with respect to delay of the reactor vessel failure but negative with respect to the containment failure and fission product retention inside the primary system. Secondly, in order to prevent containment overpressure failure after external water injection, re-closing of PORV later should be considered in SAM, which has never been considered in the previous SAMG. Finally, in case of external water injection, the flow rate should be optimized considering not only the cooling effect but also the long term fission product retention inside the primary system

  20. Multi-phase model development to assess RCIC system capabilities under severe accident conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kirkland, Karen Vierow [Texas A & M Univ., College Station, TX (United States); Ross, Kyle [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Beeny, Bradley [Texas A & M Univ., College Station, TX (United States); Luthman, Nicholas [Texas A& M Engineering Experiment Station, College Station, TX (United States); Strater, Zachary [Texas A & M Univ., College Station, TX (United States)

    2017-12-23

    The Reactor Core Isolation Cooling (RCIC) System is a safety-related system that provides makeup water for core cooling of some Boiling Water Reactors (BWRs) with a Mark I containment. The RCIC System consists of a steam-driven Terry turbine that powers a centrifugal, multi-stage pump for providing water to the reactor pressure vessel. The Fukushima Dai-ichi accidents demonstrated that the RCIC System can play an important role under accident conditions in removing core decay heat. The unexpectedly sustained, good performance of the RCIC System in the Fukushima reactor demonstrates, firstly, that its capabilities are not well understood, and secondly, that the system has high potential for extended core cooling in accident scenarios. Better understanding and analysis tools would allow for more options to cope with a severe accident situation and to reduce the consequences. The objectives of this project were to develop physics-based models of the RCIC System, incorporate them into a multi-phase code and validate the models. This Final Technical Report details the progress throughout the project duration and the accomplishments.

  1. INTERMITTENT HYPOBARIC HYPOXIC STIMULATION IN TREATMENT OF CHILDREN WITH BRONCHIAL ASTHMA AT THE PERIOD OF REHABILITATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G.D. Alemanova

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Bronchial asthma is one of the widespread chronic diseases of lungs. Immune mechanisms of disorder are one of the causes which lead to pathologic changes in lungs. The aim: to determine the clinical and immunologic effectiveness of pressure adaptation to the periodical hypobaric hypoxic stimulation of treatment of children with bronchial asthma of prepubertal and pubertal periods. In the present work there were observed the clinical and immunologic parameters of 129 children with the verified atopic bronchial asthma of different degree at the remission period before and after the course of pressure adaptation to the periodical hypobaric hypoxic stimulation in conditions of the medical hypobaric pressure chamber with many seats «Ural'1». Clinic effectiveness of hypobaric hypoxic stimulation revealed in continuation of remissions and diminishing of total numerical score of asthma degree. The positive dynamic indexes of cytokine profile was observed. It revealed in reduction of IL 1_, IL 4, IL 5, IL 18 levels and stimulated production of IFN - in blood serum. The course of hypobaric hypoxic stimulation has the positive impact on the named indexes of the patients with bronchial asthma and its intensity depends on the degree of disease and of the age of the child' patient. Thus the use of pressure adaptation to the periodical hypobaric hypoxic stimulation in treatment of children's with bronchial asthma led to the immunologic positive dynamics, especially of the children of prepubertal period. Determination of the immunologic indexes and the level of the cytokines can be used as the additional tests for the evaluation of the effectiveness of pressure adaptation to the periodical hypobaric hypoxic stimulation of children.Key words: bronchial asthma, periodical hypobaric hypoxic stimulation, cytokines, children.

  2. Reduced hypoxic ventilatory response in newborn mice knocked-out for the progesterone receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potvin, Catherine; Rossignol, Orlane; Uppari, NagaPraveena; Dallongeville, Arnaud; Bairam, Aida; Joseph, Vincent

    2014-11-01

    Recent studies showed that progesterone stimulates the hypoxic ventilatory response and may reduce apnoea frequency in newborn rats, but so far we still do not know by what mechanisms and whether endogenous progesterone might contribute to respiratory control in neonates. We therefore determined the role of the nuclear progesterone receptor (PR; member of the steroid receptor superfamily) by using wild-type (WT) and PR knock-out (PRKO) mice at postnatal days (P) 1, 4 and 10. We measured the hypoxic ventilatory response (14 and 12% O2, 20 min each) and apnoea frequency in both male and female mice by using whole-body plethysmography. In response to hypoxia, WT male mice had a marked hypoxic ventilatory response at P1 and P10, but not at P4. At P1 and P10, PRKO male mice had a lower hypoxic ventilatory response than WT males. Wild-type female mice had a marked hypoxic ventilatory response at P10, but not at P1 and P4. At P1 and P10, PRKO female mice had a lower hypoxic ventilatory response than WT females. In basal conditions, apnoea frequency was similar in WT and PRKO mice at P1, P4 and P10. During hypoxia, apnoea frequency was higher in WT male mice compared with PRKO male mice and WT female mice at P1. We conclude that PR is a key contributor to the hypoxic ventilatory response in newborn mice, but PR deletion does not increase the frequency of apnoea during normoxia or hypoxia. © 2014 The Authors. Experimental Physiology © 2014 The Physiological Society.

  3. Effects of Hypoxic Training versus Normoxic Training on Exercise Performance in Competitive Swimmers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hun-Young Park, Kiwon Lim

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available In swimming competition, optimal swimming performance is characterized by a variety of interchangeable components, such as aerobic exercise capacity, anaerobic power and muscular function. Various hypoxic training methods would potentiate greater performance improvements compared to similar training at sea-level. Therefore, this study aimed to evaluate the effects of six-weeks of hypoxic training on exercise performance in moderately trained competitive swimmers. Twenty swimmers were equally divided into a normoxic training group (n = 10 for residing and training at sea-level (PIO2 = 149.7 mmHg, and a hypoxic training group (n = 10 for residing at sea-level but training at 526 mmHg hypobaric hypoxic condition (PIO2 = 100.6 mmHg. Aerobic exercise capacity, anaerobic power, muscular function, hormonal response and 50 and 400 m swimming performance were measured before and after training, which was composed of warm-up, continuous training, interval training, elastic resistance training, and cool-down. The training frequency was 120 min, 3 days per week for 6 weeks. Muscular function and hormonal response parameters showed significant interaction effects (all p 0.288 in muscular strength and endurance, growth hormone; GH, insulin like growth factor-1; IGF-1, and vascular endothelial growth factor; VEGF. The other variables demonstrated no significant interaction effects. However, a hypoxic training group also showed significantly increased maximal oxygen consumption; VO2max (p = 0.001, peak anaerobic power (p = 0.001, and swimming performances for 50 m (p = 0.000 and 400 m (p = 0.000. These results indicated that the hypoxic training method proposed in our study is effective for improvement of muscular strength and endurance in moderately trained competitive swimmers compared to control group. However, our hypoxic training method resulted in unclear changes in aerobic exercise capacity (VO2max, anaerobic power, and swimming performance of 50 m and

  4. Research activities at JAERI on core material behaviour under severe accident conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uetsuka, H.; Katanashi, S.; Ishijima, K.

    1996-01-01

    At the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI), experimental studies on physical phenomena under the condition of a severe accident have been conducted. This paper presents the progress of the experimental studies on fuel and core materials behaviour such as the thermal shock fracture of fuel cladding due to quenching, the chemical interaction of core materials at high temperatures and the examination of TMI-2 debris. The mechanical behaviour of fuel rod with heavily embrittled cladding tube due to the thermal shock during delayed reflooding have been investigated at the Nuclear Safety Research Reactor (NSSR) of JAERI. A test fuel rod was heated in steam atmosphere by both electric and nuclear heating using the NSSR, then the rod was quenched by reflooding at the test section. Melting of core component materials having relatively low melting points and their eutectic reaction with other materials significantly influence on the degradation and melt down of fuel bundles during severe accidents. Therefore basic information on the reaction of core materials is necessary to understand and analyze the progress of core melting and relocation. Chemical interactions have been widely investigated at high temperatures for various binary systems of core component materials including absorber materials such as Zircaloy/Inconel, Zircaloy/stainless steel, Zircaloy/(Ag-In-Cd), stainless steel B 4 C and Zircaloy/B 4 C. It was found that the reaction generally obeyed a parabolic rate law and the reaction rate was determined for each reaction system. Many debris samples obtained from the degraded core of TMI-2 were transported to JAERI for numerous examinations and analyses. The microstructural examination revealed that the most part of debris was ceramic and it was not homogeneous in a microscopic sense. The thermal diffusivity data was also obtained for the temperature range up to about 1800K. The data from the large scale integral experiments were also obtained through the

  5. Noble gas control room accident filtration system for severe accident conditions N-CRAFT. System design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hill, Axel

    2014-01-01

    Severe accidents might cause the release of airborne radioactive substances to the environment of the NPP. This can either be due to leakages of the containment or due to a filtered containment venting in order to ensure the overall integrity of the containment. During the containment venting process aerosols and iodine can be retained by the FCVS which prevents long term ground contamination. Noble gases are not retainable by the FCVS. From this it follows that a large amount of radioactive noble gases (e.g. xenon, krypton) might be present in the nearby environment of the plant dominating the activity release, depending on the venting procedure and the weather conditions. Accident management measures are necessary in case of severe accidents and the prolonged stay of staff inside the main control room (MCR) or emergency response center (ERC) is essential. Therefore, the in leakage and contamination of the MRC and ERC with airborne activity has to be prevented. The radiation exposure of the crises team needs to be minimized. The entrance of noble gases cannot be sufficiently prevented by the conventional air filtration systems such as HEPA filters and iodine absorbers. With the objective to prevent an unacceptable contamination of the MCR/ERC atmosphere by noble gases AREVA GmbH has developed a noble gas retention system. The noble gas control room accident filtration system CRAFT is designed for this case and provides supply of fresh air to the MCR/ERC without time limitation. The retention process of the system is based on the dynamic adsorption of noble gases on activated carbon. The system consists of delay lines (carbon columns) which are operated by a continuous and simultaneous adsorption and desorption process. These cycles ensure a periodic load and flushing of the delay lines retaining the noble gases from entering the MCR. CRAFT allows a minimization of the dose rate inside MCR/ERC and ensures a low radiation exposure to the staff on shift maintaining

  6. Modelling of RPV lower head under core melt severe accident condition using OpenFOAM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Madokoro, Hiroshi; Kretzschmar, Frank; Miassoedov, Alexei

    2017-01-01

    Although six years have been passed since the tragic severe accident at Fukushima Daiichi, still large uncertainties exist in modeling of core degradation and reactor pressure vessel (RPV) failure. It is extremely important to obtain a better understanding of complex phenomena in the lower head in order to improve accident management measures. The possible failure mode of reactor pressure vessel and its failure time are especially a matter of importance. Thermal behavior of the molten pool can be simulated by the Phase-change Effective Convectivity Model (PECM), which is a distributed-parameter model developed in the Royal Institute of Technology (KTH), Sweden. The model calculates convective currents not using a pure CFD approach but based on so called “characteristic velocities” that are determined by empirical correlations depending on the geometry and physical properties of the molten pool. At the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), the PECM has been implemented in the open-source CFD software OpenFOAM in order to receive detailed predictions of a core melt behavior in the RPV lower head under severe accident conditions. An advantage of using OpenFOAM is that it is very flexible to add and modify models and physical properties. In the current work, the solver is extended to couple PECM with a structure analysis model of the vessel wall. The model considers thermal expansion, plasticity, creep and damage. The model and physical properties are based on those implemented in ANSYS. Although the previous implementation had restriction that the amount of and geometry of the melt cannot be changed, our coupled model allows flexibility of the melt amount and geometry. The extended solver was used to simulate the LIVE-L1 and -L7V experiments and has demonstrated good prediction of the temperature distribution in the molten pool and heat flux distribution through the vessel wall. Regarding the vessel failure the model was applied to one of the FOREVER tests

  7. Hypoxic hypoxia as a means of modifying radiosensibility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neumeister, K.; Niemiec, C.; Bolck, M.; Jahns, J.; Kamprad, F.; Arnold, P.; Johannsen, U.; Koch, F.; Mehlhorn, G.

    1977-01-01

    Following an overview of the various possibilities of creating hypoxia in mammals, the problem of reducing radioresistance of hypoxic tumor cells is treated. Furthermore, the results of irradiation experiments with mice, rats and pigs breathing hypoxic mixtures of O 2 and N 2 are given and discussed with a view to applying hypoxic hypoxia in the radiotherapy of human tumors. (author)

  8. Analyses of a steel containment vessel with an outer contact structure under severe internal overpressurization conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Porter, V.L.

    1994-01-01

    Many Mark-I and Mark-II BWR plants are designed with a steel vessel as the primary containment. Typically, the steel containment vessel (SCV) is enclosed within a reinforced concrete shield building with only a small gap (74-90 mm) separating the two structures. This paper describes finite element analyses performed to evaluate the effects of contact and friction between a steel containment vessel and an outer contact structure when the containment vessel is subjected to large internal pressures. These computations were motivated by a joint program on containment integrity involving the Nuclear Power Engineering Corporation (NUPEC) of Japan, the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), and Sandia National Laboratories for testing model containments. Under severe accident loading conditions, the steel containment vessel in a typical Mark-I or Mark-II plant may deform under internal pressurization such that it contacts the inner surface of a shield building wall. (Thermal expansion from increasing accident temperatures would also close the gap between the SCV and the shield building, but temperature effects are not considered in these analyses.) The amount and location of contact and the pressure at which it occurs all affect how the combined structure behaves. A preliminary finite element model has been developed to analyze a model of a typical steel containment vessel con-ling into contact with an outer structure. Both the steel containment vessel and the outer contact structure were modelled with axisymmetric shell finite elements. Of particular interest are the influence that the contact structure has on deformation and potential failure modes of the containment vessel. Furthermore, the coefficient of friction between the two structures was varied to study its effects on the behavior of the containment vessel and on the uplift loads transmitted to the contact structure. These analyses show that the material properties of an outer contact structure and the amount

  9. Meibomian Gland Dysfunction Determines the Severity of the Dry Eye Conditions in Visual Display Terminal Workers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Nuo; Yang, Fan; Lin, Zhirong; Shang, Xumin; Li, Cheng

    2014-01-01

    Objective To explore meibomian gland dysfunction (MGD) may determine the severity of dry eye conditions in visual display terminal (VDT) workers. Methodology Prospective, case-control study carried out in China.106 eyes of 53 patients (VDT work time >4 hour per day) were recruited as the Long time VDT group; 80 eyes of 40 control subjects (VDT work time ≤4 hour per day) served as the Short time VDT group. A questionnaire of Ocular Surface Disease Index (OSDI) and multiple tests were performed. Three dry eye tests: tear film breakup time (BUT), corneal fluorescein staining, Schirmer I test; and three MGD parameters: lid margin abnormality score, meibum expression assessment (meibum score), and meibomian gland dropout degree (meiboscore) using Keratograph 5 M. Principal Findings OSDI and corneal fluorescein score were significantly higher while BUT was dramatically shorter in the long time VDT group than the short time VDT group. However, the average of Schirmer tear volumes was in normal ranges in both groups. Interestingly, the three MGD parameters were significantly higher in the long time VDT group than the short time one (Peyes with Schirmer eyes with Schirmer ≥10 mm were separated from the long time VDT workers, no significant differences were found between the two subgroups in OSDI, fluorescein staining and BUT, as well as the three MGD parameters. All three MGD parameters were positively correlated with VDT working time (Pdry eye patients in long term VDT workers with higher OSDI scores whereas some of those patients presenting a normal tear volume. PMID:25144638

  10. Severity of chronic Lyme disease compared to other chronic conditions: a quality of life survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorraine Johnson

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Overview. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC health-related quality of life (HRQoL indicators are widely used in the general population to determine the burden of disease, identify health needs, and direct public health policy. These indicators also allow the burden of illness to be compared across different diseases. Although Lyme disease has recently been acknowledged as a major health threat in the USA with more than 300,000 new cases per year, no comprehensive assessment of the health burden of this tickborne disease is available. This study assesses the HRQoL of patients with chronic Lyme disease (CLD and compares the severity of CLD to other chronic conditions.Methods. Of 5,357 subjects who responded to an online survey, 3,090 were selected for the study. Respondents were characterized as having CLD if they were clinically diagnosed with Lyme disease and had persisting symptoms lasting more than 6 months following antibiotic treatment. HRQoL of CLD patients was assessed using the CDC 9-item metric. The HRQoL analysis for CLD was compared to published analyses for the general population and other chronic illnesses using standard statistical methods.Results. Compared to the general population and patients with other chronic diseases reviewed here, patients with CLD reported significantly lower health quality status, more bad mental and physical health days, a significant symptom disease burden, and greater activity limitations. They also reported impairment in their ability to work, increased utilization of healthcare services, and greater out of pocket medical costs.Conclusions. CLD patients have significantly impaired HRQoL and greater healthcare utilization compared to the general population and patients with other chronic diseases. The heavy burden of illness associated with CLD highlights the need for earlier diagnosis and innovative treatment approaches that may reduce the burden of illness and concomitant costs posed

  11. Severity of chronic Lyme disease compared to other chronic conditions: a quality of life survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Lorraine; Wilcox, Spencer; Mankoff, Jennifer

    2014-01-01

    Overview. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) health-related quality of life (HRQoL) indicators are widely used in the general population to determine the burden of disease, identify health needs, and direct public health policy. These indicators also allow the burden of illness to be compared across different diseases. Although Lyme disease has recently been acknowledged as a major health threat in the USA with more than 300,000 new cases per year, no comprehensive assessment of the health burden of this tickborne disease is available. This study assesses the HRQoL of patients with chronic Lyme disease (CLD) and compares the severity of CLD to other chronic conditions. Methods. Of 5,357 subjects who responded to an online survey, 3,090 were selected for the study. Respondents were characterized as having CLD if they were clinically diagnosed with Lyme disease and had persisting symptoms lasting more than 6 months following antibiotic treatment. HRQoL of CLD patients was assessed using the CDC 9-item metric. The HRQoL analysis for CLD was compared to published analyses for the general population and other chronic illnesses using standard statistical methods. Results. Compared to the general population and patients with other chronic diseases reviewed here, patients with CLD reported significantly lower health quality status, more bad mental and physical health days, a significant symptom disease burden, and greater activity limitations. They also reported impairment in their ability to work, increased utilization of healthcare services, and greater out of pocket medical costs. Conclusions. CLD patients have significantly impaired HRQoL and greater healthcare utilization compared to the general population and patients with other chronic diseases. The heavy burden of illness associated with CLD highlights the need for earlier diagnosis and innovative treatment approaches that may reduce the burden of illness and concomitant costs posed by this

  12. Extended survival of several organisms and amino acids under simulated martian surface conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, A. P.; Pratt, L. M.; Vishnivetskaya, T.; Pfiffner, S.; Bryan, R. A.; Dadachova, E.; Whyte, L.; Radtke, K.; Chan, E.; Tronick, S.; Borgonie, G.; Mancinelli, R. L.; Rothschild, L. J.; Rogoff, D. A.; Horikawa, D. D.; Onstott, T. C.

    2011-02-01

    Recent orbital and landed missions have provided substantial evidence for ancient liquid water on the martian surface as well as evidence of more recent sedimentary deposits formed by water and/or ice. These observations raise serious questions regarding an independent origin and evolution of life on Mars. Future missions seek to identify signs of extinct martian biota in the form of biomarkers or morphological characteristics, but the inherent danger of spacecraft-borne terrestrial life makes the possibility of forward contamination a serious threat not only to the life detection experiments, but also to any extant martian ecosystem. A variety of cold and desiccation-tolerant organisms were exposed to 40 days of simulated martian surface conditions while embedded within several centimeters of regolith simulant in order to ascertain the plausibility of such organisms' survival as a function of environmental parameters and burial depth. Relevant amino acid biomarkers associated with terrestrial life were also analyzed in order to understand the feasibility of detecting chemical evidence for previous biological activity. Results indicate that stresses due to desiccation and oxidation were the primary deterrent to organism survival, and that the effects of UV-associated damage, diurnal temperature variations, and reactive atmospheric species were minimal. Organisms with resistance to desiccation and radiation environments showed increased levels of survival after the experiment compared to organisms characterized as psychrotolerant. Amino acid analysis indicated the presence of an oxidation mechanism that migrated downward through the samples during the course of the experiment and likely represents the formation of various oxidizing species at mineral surfaces as water vapor diffused through the regolith. Current sterilization protocols may specifically select for organisms best adapted to survival at the martian surface, namely species that show tolerance to radical

  13. Hypoxic Preconditioning Promotes the Bioactivities of Mesenchymal Stem Cells via the HIF-1?-GRP78-Akt Axis

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Jun Hee; Yoon, Yeo Min; Lee, Sang Hun

    2017-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) are ideal materials for stem cell-based therapy. As MSCs reside in hypoxic microenvironments (low oxygen tension of 1% to 7%), several studies have focused on the beneficial effects of hypoxic preconditioning on MSC survival; however, the mechanisms underlying such effects remain unclear. This study aimed to uncover the potential mechanism involving 78-kDa glucose-regulated protein (GRP78) to explain the enhanced MSC bioactivity and survival in hindlimb ischemia. ...

  14. Prolonged hypoxic culture and trypsinization increase the pro-angiogenic potential of human adipose tissue-derived stem cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Jeppe Grøndahl; Frøbert, Ole; Pilgaard, Linda

    2011-01-01

    Transplantation of mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC), including adipose tissue-derived stem cells (ASC), is a promising option in the treatment of vascular disease. Short-term hypoxic culture of MSC augments secretion of anti-apoptotic and angiogenic cytokines. We hypothesized that prolonged hypoxic...... (1% and 5% oxygen) culture and trypsinization would augment ASC expression of anti-apoptotic and angiogenic cytokines and increase the angiogenic potential of ASC-conditioned media....

  15. Anti-hypoxic activity of the ethanol extract from Portulaca oleracea in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Cheng-Jie; Wang, Wan-Yin; Wang, Xiao-Li; Dong, Li-Wei; Yue, Yi-Tian; Xin, Hai-Liang; Ling, Chang-Quan; Li, Min

    2009-07-15

    To investigate the effects of the ethanol extract from Portulaca oleracea (EEPO) on hypoxia models mice and to find the possible mechanism of its anti-hypoxic actions so as to elucidate the anti-hypoxia activity and provide scientific basis for the clinical use of Portulaca oleracea. EEPO was evaluated on anti-hypoxic activity in several hypoxia mice models, including closed normobaric hypoxia and sodium nitrite or potassium cyanide toxicosis. To verify the possible mechanism(s), we detected the activities of pyruvate kinase (PK), phosphofructokinase (PFK), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and the level of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) in mice cortices. Given orally, the EEPO at doses of 100, 200, 400 mg/kg could dose-dependently enhance the survival time of mice in both of the normobaric and chemical hypoxia models. The activity of the glycolysis enzymes and the level of ATP were higher than those of the control. In the pentobarbital sodium-induced sleeping time test and the open-field test, EEPO neither significantly enhanced the pentobarbital sodium-induced sleeping time nor impaired the motor performance, indicating that the observed anti-hypoxic activity was unlikely due to sedation or motor abnormality. These results demonstrated that the EEPO possessed notable anti-hypoxic activity, which might be related to promoting the activity of the key enzymes in glycolysis and improving the level of ATP in hypoxic mice.

  16. Enhanced induction of SCEs in hypoxic mammalian cells by ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tofilon, P.J.; Meyn, R.E.

    1985-01-01

    Ionizing radiation is, in general, a poor inducer of sister chromatoid exchanges (SCEs). However, the authors previously observed an increase in X-ray induced DNA-protein crosslinks in hypoxic cells, as compared to aerated cells, suggesting that in the absence of oxygen, X rays induce a qualitatively different DNA lesion. Therefore, they examined the effect of X-rays on SCE induction under hypoxic conditions. CHO cells were rendered hypoxic by incubation at 37 0 for 3 hr. in evacuated glass ampules and irradiated with graded doses of X-rays. After irradiation, cells were incubated in medium containing BrdUrd and the SCE assay performed. At each dose tested (0-900 rads) the number of SCEs induced by X-rays in hypoxic cells was approximately 2.5 fold the number induced in aerated cells. When a 16-hr. repair-incubation interval was allowed between irradiation and BrdUrd labeling, the number of SCEs returned to background levels. In further experiments, repair-deficient cells, incapable of completely removing crosslinks from their DNA, did not completely restore SCE levels to background within the repair period. These data provide further evidence suggesting that hypoxic cells respond differently to radiation in a qualitative sense, in addition to the well known quantitative sense

  17. An HRE-Binding Py-Im Polyamide Impairs Hypoxic Signaling in Tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szablowski, Jerzy O; Raskatov, Jevgenij A; Dervan, Peter B

    2016-04-01

    Hypoxic gene expression contributes to the pathogenesis of many diseases, including organ fibrosis, age-related macular degeneration, and cancer. Hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF1), a transcription factor central to the hypoxic gene expression, mediates multiple processes including neovascularization, cancer metastasis, and cell survival. Pyrrole-imidazole polyamide 1: has been shown to inhibit HIF1-mediated gene expression in cell culture but its activity in vivo was unknown. This study reports activity of polyamide 1: in subcutaneous tumors capable of mounting a hypoxic response and showing neovascularization. We show that 1: distributes into subcutaneous tumor xenografts and normal tissues, reduces the expression of proangiogenic and prometastatic factors, inhibits the formation of new tumor blood vessels, and suppresses tumor growth. Tumors treated with 1: show no increase in HIF1α and have reduced ability to adapt to the hypoxic conditions, as evidenced by increased apoptosis in HIF1α-positive regions and the increased proximity of necrotic regions to vasculature. Overall, these results show that a molecule designed to block the transcriptional activity of HIF1 has potent antitumor activity in vivo, consistent with partial inhibition of the tumor hypoxic response. Mol Cancer Ther; 15(4); 608-17. ©2015 AACR. ©2015 American Association for Cancer Research.

  18. CT diagnosis of hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Xiang; Ma Jiwei; Wu Lide

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To explore CT characteristics of hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy (HIE), and to improve the accuracy of CT diagnosis. Methods: 50 cases of neonatal asphyxia in perinatal period diagnosed as hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy by CT was analyzed. Results: The main manifestation of hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy is cerebral edema and intracranial hemorrhage. Focal or diffuse hypo-dense lesion and hyper-dense area in various location and morphology were seen on CT images. (1) Localized diffuse hypo-dense area in 1 or 2 cerebral lobe were found in 17 cases, and the lesions were localized in frontal lobe (n=6), in frontotemporal lobe (n=5), and in temporo-occipital lobe (n=6). (2) Hypo-density region involving more than three cerebral lobes were found in 18 cases, and abnormalities were found in frontotemporal and parietal lobe (n=8), accompanying with subarachnoid hemorrhage (n=2); in frontal, temporal and occipital lobe (n=6), in which cerebral hemorrhage was complicated (n=1); and in other cerebral lobe (n=4). (3) Diffuse low-density region in all cerebral lobe were found in 15 cases, in which subarachnoid hemorrhage was complicated in 4 cases, and ventricular hemorrhage was found in 2 case. Conclusion: CT imaging plays an important role in diagnosis of hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy and has shown its clinical value

  19. Hypoxic challenge test applied to healthy children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kobbernagel, Helene Elgaard; Nielsen, Kim Gjerum; Hanel, Birgitte

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Commercial aircraft are pressurised to ~2438 m (8000 ft) above sea level that equates breathing 15% oxygen at sea level. A preflight hypoxic challenge test (HCT) is therefore recommended for children with cystic fibrosis or other chronic lung diseases and inflight oxygen is advised if...

  20. The lifetime of hypoxic human tumor cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Durand, Ralph E.; Sham, Edward

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: For hypoxic and anoxic cells in solid tumors to be a therapeutic problem, they must live long enough to be therapeutically relevant, or else be rapidly recruited into the proliferating compartment during therapy. We have, therefore, estimated lifetime and recruitment rate of hypoxic human tumor cells in multicell spheroids in vitro, or in xenografted tumors in SCID mice. Materials and Methods: Cell turnover was followed by flow cytometry techniques, using antibodies directed at incorporated halogenated pyrimidines. The disappearance of labeled cells was quantified, and verified to be cell loss rather than label dilution. Repopulation was studied in SiHa tumor xenografts during twice-daily 2.5-Gy radiation exposures. Results: The longevity of hypoxic human tumor cells in spheroids or xenografts exceeded that of rodent cell lines, and cell turnover was slower in xenografts than under static growth as spheroids. Human tumor cells remained viable in the hypoxic regions of xenografts for 4-10 days, compared to 3-5 days in spheroids, and 1-3 days for most rodent cells in spheroids. Repopulation was observed within the first few radiation treatments for the SiHa xenografts and, with accumulated doses of more than 10 Gy, virtually all recovered cells had progressed through at least one S-phase. Conclusion: Our results suggest an important difference in the ability of human vs. rodent tumor cells to withstand hypoxia, and raise questions concerning the increased longevity seen in vivo relative to the steady-state spheroid system

  1. Tracking hypoxic signaling within encapsulated cell aggregates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skiles, Matthew L; Sahai, Suchit; Blanchette, James O

    2011-12-16

    , is therefore reduced and limited by diffusion. This reduced oxygen availability may especially impact β-cells whose insulin secretory function is highly dependent on oxygen. Capsule composition and geometry will also impact diffusion rates and lengths for oxygen. Therefore, we also describe a technique for identifying hypoxic cells within our PEG capsules. Infection of the cells with a recombinant adenovirus allows for a fluorescent signal to be produced when intracellular hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) pathways are activated. As HIFs are the primary regulators of the transcriptional response to hypoxia, they represent an ideal target marker for detection of hypoxic signaling. This approach allows for easy and rapid detection of hypoxic cells. Briefly, the adenovirus has the sequence for a red fluorescent protein (Ds Red DR from Clontech) under the control of a hypoxia-responsive element (HRE) trimer. Stabilization of HIF-1 by low oxygen conditions will drive transcription of the fluorescent protein (Figure 1). Additional details on the construction of this virus have been published previously. The virus is stored in 10% glycerol at -80° C as many 150 μL aliquots in 1.5 mL centrifuge tubes at a concentration of 3.4 x 10(10) pfu/mL. Previous studies in our lab have shown that MIN6 cells encapsulated as aggregates maintain their viability throughout 4 weeks of culture in 20% oxygen. MIN6 aggregates cultured at 2 or 1% oxygen showed both signs of necrotic cells (still about 85-90% viable) by staining with ethidium bromide as well as morphological changes relative to cells in 20% oxygen. The smooth spherical shape of the aggregates displayed at 20% was lost and aggregates appeared more like disorganized groups of cells. While the low oxygen stress does not cause a pronounced drop in viability, it is clearly impacting MIN6 aggregation and function as measured by glucose-stimulated insulin secretion. Western blot analysis of encapsulated cells in 20% and 1% oxygen also

  2. Carbon monoxide - hydrogen combustion characteristics in severe accident containment conditions. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-03-01

    Carbon monoxide can be produced in severe accidents from interaction of ex-vessel molten core with concrete. Depending on the particular core-melt scenario, the type of concrete and geometric factors affecting the interaction, the quantities of carbon monoxide produced can vary widely, up to several volume percent in the containment. Carbon monoxide is a combustible gas. The carbon monoxide thus produced is in addition to the hydrogen produced by metal-water reactions and by radiolysis, and represents a possibly significant contribution to the combustible gas inventory in the containment. Assessment of possible accident loads to containment thus requires knowledge of the combustion properties of both CO and H 2 in the containment atmosphere. Extensive studies have been carried out and are still continuing in the nuclear industry to assess the threat of hydrogen in a severe reactor accident. However the contribution of carbon monoxide to the combustion threat has received less attention. Assessment of scenarios involving ex-vessel interactions require additional attention to the potential contribution of carbon monoxide to combustion loads in containment, as well as the effectiveness of mitigation measures designed for hydrogen to effectively deal with particular aspects of carbon monoxide. The topic of core-concrete interactions has been extensively studied; for more complete background on the issue and on the physical/thermal-hydraulics phenomena involved, the reader is referred to Proceedings of CSNI Specialists Meetings (Ritzman, 1987; Alsmeyer, 1992) and a State-of-Art Report (European Commission, 1995). The exact amount of carbon monoxide present in a reactor pit or in various compartments (or rooms) in a containment building is specific to the type of concrete and the accident scenario considered. Generally, concrete containing limestone and sand have a high percentage of CaCO 3 . Appendix A provides an example of results of estimates of CO and CO 2

  3. Basic study on BWR plant behavior under the condition of severe accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ozaki, Yoshihiko; Jyohko, Shingo; Dohgo, Hirofumi

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we report on the results using the BWR plant simulator about the plant behavior under the condition of the severe accident that LOCA occurs but ECCS fails the water irrigation into the reactor core. The simulation experiments were carried out for the cases that LOCA has occurred in the main steam piping or in the recirculation piping, respectively. As for the results about the relationship between the LOCA area and the time from LOCA occurs until the fuel temperature rise start, the effect that RCIC operated was extremely big for LOCA area of up to 100 cm"2 for both type LOCA. In the case of main steam system LOCA, the core water level suddenly decreased for large LOCA of 2000 cm"2 area, however, if the irrigation into the reactor core was carried out 30 min after LOCA occurrence, the core had little damage. In addition, the H_2 concentration in the containment vessel did not exceed both limits of H_2 explosion nor detonation. The pressure of the containment vessel was around 3 kg/cm"2 of design value, so the soundness of the containment vessel was confirmed. On the other hand, for the recirculation system LOCA of 2000 cm"2 area, a drop of the core water level was extremely in comparison with main steam system LOCA, and the fuel assemblies were completely exposed during up to 30 min, to the irrigation from approximately 100 sec, after LOCA occurrence. Therefore, the fuel temperature during the irrigation had reached approximately 1900degC. Thus, the fuel cladding were damaged approximately less than 10%, and H_2 concentration in the containment vessel was approximately 9% which did not exceed H_2 detonation limit of 13% but exceeded H_2 explosion limit of 4%. However, the containment vessel internal pressure was settled around design pressure value of containment vessel. As the results, some core damage could not be avoided, but soundness of the containment vessel, which should take the role of 'confine', was found to be secured. (author)

  4. Basic study on BWR plant behavior under the condition of severe accident (2)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ozaki, Yoshihiko; Ueda, Masataka; Sasaki, Hajime

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we report on the results using the BWR plant simulator about the plant behavior under the condition of the two types of severe accidents that LOCA occurs but ECCS fails the water irrigation into the reactor core and SBO occurs and at the same time the reclosed failure of SRV occurs. The simulation experiments were carried out for the cases that LOCA has occurred in the main feed-water piping. As for the results about the relationship between the LOCA area and the time from LOCA occurs until the fuel temperature rise start, the effect that RCIC operated was extremely big for small and middle LOCA area. In the case of main feed-water system LOCA, the core water level suddenly decreased for large LOCA of 2000 cm"2 area, however, if the irrigation into the reactor core was carried out 30 min after LOCA occurrence, the core had little damage. In addition, the H_2 concentration in the containment vessel did not exceed both limits of H_2 explosion nor detonation. The pressure of the containment vessel was around 3 kg/cm"2 of design value, so the soundness of the containment vessel was confirmed. On the other hand, for the accident of SBO with reclosed failure of SRV, it has been shown that the accidents continue to progress rapidly as compared with the case of normally operating of SRV. Because SRV has the function that keep the inside pressure of reactor core by repeating opened and closed in response of the inside pressure and prevent the decrease of water level inside reactor core. However, if the irrigation into the reactor core was carried out 30 min after SBO occurrence, the core had little damage and also the H_2 concentration in the containment vessel did not exceed limits of H_2 explosion. Further, as for the accident of reclosed failure of SRV, it has been shown that there are very good correspondence with the simulation results of main steam piping LOCA of area 180 cm"2 corresponding to the inlet cross-sectional area SRV installed on the piping

  5. Out-of-pile UO2/Zircaloy-4 experiments under severe fuel damage conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hofmann, P.

    1983-01-01

    Chemical interactions between UO 2 fuel and Zircaloy-4 cladding up to the melting point of zircaloy (Zry) are described. Out-of-pile UO 2 /zircaloy reaction experiments have been performed to investigate the chemical interaction behavior under possible severe fuel damage conditions (very high temperatures and external overpressure). The tests have been conducted in inert gas (1 to 80 bar) with 10-cm-long zircaloy cladding specimens filled with UO 2 pellets. The annealing temperature varied between 1000 and 1700 deg. C and the annealing period between 1 and 150 min. The extent of the chemical reaction depends decisively on whether or not good contact between UO 2 and zircaloy has been established. If solid contact exists, zircaloy reduces the UO 2 to form oxygen-stabilized α-Zr(O) and uranium metal. The uranium reacts with zircaloy to form a (U,Zr) alloy rich in uranium. The (U,Zr) alloy, which is liquid above approx. 1150 deg. C, lies between two α-Zr(O) layers. The UO 2 /zircaloy reaction obeys a parabolic rate law. The degree of chemical interaction is determined by the extent of oxygen diffusion into the cladding, and hence by the time and temperature. The affinity of zirconium for oxygen, which results in an oxygen gradient across the cladding, is the driving force for the reaction. The growth of the reaction layers can be represented in an Arrhenius diagram. The UO 2 /Zry-4 reaction occurs as rapidly as the steam/Zry-4 reaction above about 1100 deg. C. The extent of the interaction is independent of external pressure above about 10 bar at 1400 deg. C and 5 bar at 1700 deg. C. The maximum measured oxygen content of the cladding is approx. 6wt.%. Up to approx. 9 volume % of the UO 2 can be chemically dissolved by the zircaloy. In an actual fuel rod, complete release of the fission products in this region of the fuel must therefore be assumed. (author)

  6. Cross-polarization microwave radar return at severe wind conditions: laboratory model and geophysical model function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troitskaya, Yuliya; Abramov, Victor; Ermoshkin, Alexey; Zuikova, Emma; Kazakov, Vassily; Sergeev, Daniil; Kandaurov, Alexandr

    2014-05-01

    Satellite remote sensing is one of the main techniques of monitoring severe weather conditions over the ocean. The principal difficulty of the existing algorithms of retrieving wind based on dependence of microwave backscattering cross-section on wind speed (Geophysical Model Function, GMF) is due to its saturation at winds exceeding 25 - 30 m/s. Recently analysis of dual- and quad-polarization C-band radar return measured from satellite Radarsat-2 suggested that the cross-polarized radar return has much higher sensitivity to the wind speed than co-polarized back scattering [1] and conserved sensitivity to wind speed at hurricane conditions [2]. Since complete collocation of these data was not possible and time difference in flight legs and SAR images acquisition was up to 3 hours, these two sets of data were compared in [2] only statistically. The main purpose of this paper is investigation of the functional dependence of cross-polarized radar cross-section on the wind speed in laboratory experiment. Since cross-polarized radar return is formed due to scattering at small-scale structures of the air-sea interface (short-crested waves, foam, sprays, etc), which are well reproduced in laboratory conditions, then the approach based on laboratory experiment on radar scattering of microwaves at the water surface under hurricane wind looks feasible. The experiments were performed in the Wind-wave flume located on top of the Large Thermostratified Tank of the Institute of Applied Physics, where the airflow was produced in the flume with the straight working part of 10 m and operating cross section 0.40?0.40 sq. m, the axis velocity can be varied from 5 to 25 m/s. Microwave measurements were carried out by a coherent Doppler X-band (3.2 cm) scatterometer with the consequent receive of linear polarizations. Experiments confirmed higher sensitivity to the wind speed of the cross-polarized radar return. Simultaneously parameters of the air flow in the turbulent boundary layer

  7. Detection of hypoxic fractions in murine tumors by comet assay: Comparison with other techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu, Q.; Kavanagh, M.C.; Newcombe, D.

    1995-01-01

    The alkaline comet assay was used to detect the hypoxic fractions of murine tumors. A total of four tumor types were tested using needle aspiration biopsies taken immediately after a radiation dose of 15 Gy. Initial studies confirmed that the normalized tail moment, a parameter reflecting single-strand DNA breaks induced by the radiation, was linearly related to radiation dose. Further, it was shown that for a mixed population (1:1) of cells irradiated under air-breathing or hypoxic conditions, the histogram of normal tail moment values obtained from analyzing 400 cells in the population had a double peak which, when fitted with two Gaussian distributions, gave a good estimate of the proportion of the two subpopulations. For the four tumor types, the means of the calculated hypoxic fractions from four or five individual tumors were 0.15 ± 0.04 for B16F1, 0.08 ± 0.04 for KHT-LP1, 0.17 ± 0.04 for RIF-1 and 0.04 ± 0.01 for SCCVII. Analysis of variance showed that the hypoxic fraction in KHT-LP1 tumors is significantly lower than those of the other three tumors (P = 0.026) but that there is no significant difference in hypoxic fraction between B16F1, RIF-1 and SCCVII tumors (P = 0.574). Results from multiple samples taken from each of five RIF-1 tumors showed that the intertumor heterogeneity of hypoxic fractions was greater than that within the same tumor. The mean hypoxic fraction obtained using the comet assay for the four tumor types was compared with the hypoxic fraction determined by the clonogenic assay, or median pO 2 values, or [ 3 H]misonidazole binding in the same tumor types. The values of hypoxic fraction obtained with the comet assay were two to four times lower than those measured by the paired survival method. Preliminary results obtained with a dose of 5 Gy were consistent with those obtained using 15 Gy. These results suggest the further development of the comet assay for clinical studies. 21 refs., 7 figs., 5 tabs

  8. Hypoxic-ischemic encefalopathy: Clinical course and prognosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ćosić-Cerovac Nataša

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Establishing the value of neurological examination, and additional diagnostic methods (ultrasonography and magnetic resonance imaging of the brain in the diagnosis and prognosis of hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy and its treatment, tracking the clinical course, and making the prognosis of neurological development in newborn infants with hypoxic-ischemic encefalopathy. Methods. The group of 40 term newborn infants with suspected intrauterine asphyxia was examined. All the infants were prospectivelly followed untill the 3rd year of age at the Clinic for Neurology and Psychiatry for Children and Youth in order to estimate their neurological development and to diagnose the occurence of persistent neurological disorders. All the infants were analyzed by their gestational age and Apgar score in the 1st and the 5th minute of life. They were all examined neurologically and by ultrasonography in the first week of life and, repeatedly, at the age of 1, 3, 6, 9, 12, 18, as well as in the 24th month of life. They were treated by the standard methods for this disease. Finally, all the infants were examined neurologically and by magnetic resonance imaging of the brain in their 3rd year of age. On the basis of neurological finding infants were devided into 3 groups: infants with normal neurological finding, infants with mild neurological symptomatology, and infants with severe neurological disorders. Results. It was shown that neurological finding, ultrasonography and magnetic resonance imaging of the brain positively correlated with the later neurological development of the infants with hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy. Conclusion. Only the combined use of these techniques had full diagnostic and prognostic significance emphasizing that the integrative approach was very important in the diagnosis of brain lesions in infants.

  9. Adverse psychosocial working conditions and risk of severe depressive symptoms. Do effects differ by occupational grade?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rugulies, Reiner; Aust, Birgit; Madsen, Ida E. H.; Burr, Hermann; Siegrist, Johannes; Bultmann, Ute

    Background: Depression is a major concern for public health. Both adverse working conditions and low socio-economic position are suspected to increase risk of depression. In a representative sample of the Danish workforce we investigated (i) whether adverse psychosocial working conditions, defined

  10. Laboratory modeling of air-sea interaction under severe wind conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troitskaya, Yuliya; Vasiliy, Kazakov; Nicolay, Bogatov; Olga, Ermakova; Mikhail, Salin; Daniil, Sergeev; Maxim, Vdovin

    2010-05-01

    velocity profile was measured by WindSonic ultrasonic wind sensor. The water elevation was measured by the three-channel wave-gauge. Top and side views of the water surface were fixed by CCD-camera. Wind friction velocity and surface drag coefficients were retrieved from the measurements by the profile method. Obtained values are in good agreement with the data of measurements by Donelan et al (2004). The directional frequency-wave-number spectra of surface waves were retrieved by the wavelet directional method (Donelan et al, 1996). The obtained dependencies of parameters of the wind waves indicate existing of two regimes of the waves with the critical wind speed Ucr about 30 m/s. For U10Ucr the dependencies of peak wave period, peak wavelength, significant wave height on the wind speed tend to saturation, in the same time the peak wave slope has the maximum at approximately Ucr and then decreases with the tendency to saturation. The surface drag also tends to saturation for U10>Ucr similarly to (Donelan et al, 2004). Video filming indicates onset of wave breaking with white-capping and spray generation at wind speeds approximately equal to Ucr. We compared the obtained experimental dependencies with the predictions of the quasi-linear model of the turbulent boundary layer over the waved water surface (Reutov&Troitskaya, 1995). Comparing shows that theoretical predictions give low estimates for the measured drag coefficient and wave fields. Taking into account momentum flux associated with the spray generation yields theoretical estimations in good agreement with the experimental data. Basing on the experimental data a possible physical mechanism of the drag is suggested. Tearing of the wave crests at severe wind conditions leads to the effective smoothing (decreasing wave slopes) of the water surface, which in turn reduces the aerodynamic roughness of the water surface. Quantitative agreement of the experimental data and theoretical estimations od the surface drag occurs

  11. Modification of the radioprotective effect of hypoxic hypoxia by the artificial hibernation of the organism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ovakimov, V.G.; Yarmonenko, S.P.; Akademiya Meditsinskikh Nauk SSSR, Moscow. Inst. Ehksperimental'noj i Klinicheskoj Onkologii)

    1975-01-01

    A significant weakening of the radioprotective effect of hypoxic hypoxia has been noted in the hibernated mice the resistance of which to acute oxygen deficiency is artificially hibernated (hypothermia under conditions of neuroplegia). The dose decrease factor is about 1.27 and 2.5 for hibernated and nonhibernated animals, respectively

  12. Peritoneal milky spots serve as a hypoxic niche and favor gastric cancer stem/progenitor cell peritoneal dissemination through hypoxia-inducible factor 1α.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miao, Zhi-Feng; Wang, Zhen-Ning; Zhao, Ting-Ting; Xu, Ying-Ying; Gao, Jian; Miao, Feng; Xu, Hui-Mian

    2014-12-01

    Peritoneal dissemination is the most common cause of death in gastric cancer patients. The hypoxic microenvironment plays a major role in controlling the tumor stem cell phenotype and is associated with patients' prognosis through hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α), a key transcriptional factor that responds to hypoxic stimuli. During the peritoneal dissemination process, gastric cancer stem/progenitor cells (GCSPCs) are thought to enter into and maintained in peritoneal milky spots (PMSs), which have hypoxic microenvironments. However, the mechanism through which the hypoxic environment of PMSs regulated GCSPC maintenance is still poorly understood. Here, we investigated whether hypoxic PMSs were an ideal cancer stem cell niche suitable for GCSPC engraftment. We also evaluated the mechanisms through which the HIF-1α-mediated hypoxic microenvironment regulated GCSPC fate. We observed a positive correlation between HIF-1α expression and gastric cancer peritoneal dissemination (GCPD) in gastric cancer patients. Furthermore, the GCSPC population expanded in primary gastric cancer cells under hypoxic condition in vitro, and hypoxic GCSPCs showed enhanced self-renewal ability, but reduced differentiation capacity, mediated by HIF-1α. In an animal model, GCSPCs preferentially resided in the hypoxic zone of PMSs; moreover, when the hypoxic microenvironment in PMSs was destroyed, GCPD was significantly alleviated. In conclusion, our results demonstrated that PMSs served as a hypoxic niche and favored GCSPCs peritoneal dissemination through HIF-1α both in vitro and in vivo. These results provided new insights into the GCPD process and may lead to advancements in the clinical treatment of gastric cancer. © 2014 The Authors. STEM CELLS Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of AlphaMed Press.

  13. On the use of mobile inflatable hypoxic marquees for sport-specific altitude training in team sports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girard, Olivier; Brocherie, Franck; Millet, Grégoire P

    2013-12-01

    With the evolving boundaries of sports science and greater understanding of the driving factors in the human performance physiology, one of the limiting factors has now become the technology. The growing scientific interest on the practical application of hypoxic training for intermittent activities such as team and racket sports legitimises the development of innovative technologies serving athletes in a sport-specific setting. Description of a new mobile inflatable simulated hypoxic equipment. The system comprises two inflatable units-that is, a tunnel and a rectangular design, each with a 215 m(3) volume and a hypoxic trailer generating over 3000 Lpm of hypoxic air with FiO₂ between 0.21 and 0.10 (a simulated altitude up to 5100 m). The inflatable units offer a 45 m running lane (width=1.8 m and height=2.5 m) as well as a 8 m × 10 m dome tent. FiO₂ is stable within a range of 0.1% in normal conditions inside the tunnel. The air supplied is very dry-typically 10-15% relative humidity. This mobile inflatable simulated hypoxic equipment is a promising technological advance within sport sciences. It offers an opportunity for team-sport players to train under hypoxic conditions, both for repeating sprints (tunnel configuration) or small-side games (rectangular configuration).

  14. Shipping container response to severe highway and railway accident conditions: Appendices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fischer, L.E.; Chou, C.K.; Gerhard, M.A.; Kimura, C.Y.; Martin, R.W.; Mensing, R.W.; Mount, M.E.; Witte, M.C.

    1987-02-01

    Volume 2 contains the following appendices: Severe accident data; truck accident data; railroad accident data; highway survey data and bridge column properties; structural analysis; thermal analysis; probability estimation techniques; and benchmarking for computer codes used in impact analysis. (LN)

  15. Analysis of the injury severity of crashes by considering different lighting conditions on two-lane rural roads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jafari Anarkooli, A; Hadji Hosseinlou, M

    2016-02-01

    Many studies have examined different factors contributing to the injury severity of crashes; however, relatively few studies have focused on the crashes by considering the specific effects of lighting conditions. This research investigates lighting condition differences in the injury severity of crashes using 3-year (2009-2011) crash data of two-lane rural roads of the state of Washington. Separate ordered-probit models were developed to predict the effects of a set of factors expected to influence injury severity in three lighting conditions; daylight, dark, and dark with street lights. A series of likelihood ratio tests were conducted to determine if these lighting condition models were justified. The modeling results suggest that injury severity in specific lighting conditions are associated with contributing factors in different ways, and that such differences cannot be uncovered by focusing merely on one aggregate model. Key differences include crash location, speed limit, shoulder width, driver action, and three collision types (head-on, rear-end, and right-side impact collisions). This paper highlights the importance of deploying street lights at and near intersections (or access points) on two-lane rural roads because injury severity highly increases when crashes occur at these points in dark conditions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd and National Safety Council. All rights reserved.

  16. Induction of long noncoding RNA MALAT1 in hypoxic mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lelli A

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Aurelia Lelli,1,2,* Karen A Nolan,1,2,* Sara Santambrogio,1,2 Ana Filipa Gonçalves,1,2 Miriam J Schönenberger,1,2 Anna Guinot,1,2 Ian J Frew,1,2 Hugo H Marti,3 David Hoogewijs,1,2,4 Roland H Wenger1,2 1Institute of Physiology and Zurich Center for Human Physiology (ZIHP, University of Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland; 2National Center of Competence in Research "Kidney.CH", Zurich, Switzerland; 3Institute of Physiology and Pathophysiology, University of Heidelberg, Heidelberg, Germany; 4Institute of Physiology, University of Duisburg-Essen, Essen, Germany *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Long thought to be “junk DNA”, in recent years it has become clear that a substantial fraction of intergenic genomic DNA is actually transcribed, forming long noncoding RNA (lncRNA. Like mRNA, lncRNA can also be spliced, capped, and polyadenylated, affecting a multitude of biological processes. While the molecular mechanisms underlying the function of lncRNAs have just begun to be elucidated, the conditional regulation of lncRNAs remains largely unexplored. In genome-wide studies our group and others recently found hypoxic transcriptional induction of a subset of lncRNAs, whereof nuclear-enriched abundant/autosomal transcript 1 (NEAT1 and metastasis-associated lung adenocarcinoma transcript 1 (MALAT1 appear to be the lncRNAs most ubiquitously and most strongly induced by hypoxia in cultured cells. Hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF-2 rather than HIF-1 seems to be the preferred transcriptional activator of these lncRNAs. For the first time, we also found strong induction primarily of MALAT1 in organs of mice exposed to inspiratory hypoxia. Most abundant hypoxic levels of MALAT1 lncRNA were found in kidney and testis. In situ hybridization revealed that the hypoxic induction in the kidney was confined to proximal rather than distal tubular epithelial cells. Direct oxygen-dependent regulation of MALAT1 lncRNA was confirmed using isolated primary

  17. Analysis of overload conditions in distance relay under severe system contingencies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Halim Abu Bakar, Ab. [Department of Electrical Engineering, Universiti Malaya (Malaysia); Yatim, Fazilah Mat; Othman, Mohd Ridzal [Transmission Division, Tenaga Nasional Berhad (Malaysia); Yusof, Sallehuddin [Advanced Powor Solutions (Malaysia)

    2010-06-15

    Distance relay protection is widely used worldwide for protection scheme on high voltage transmission lines. This protection tends to be prone to load encroachment condition causing possible undesired tripping condition. Investigations of two system disturbances that occurred in TNB's (Tenaga Nasional Berhad) Grid in the year 2003 and 2005 have clearly revealed the occurrence of load encroachment condition following line overloads after large number of line tripping. Examination of the impedance locus trajectory during the overload events have enabled a distinction be made between power swing and load encroachment phenomena. This paper presents the analysis and findings of the investigation of the load encroachment phenomena of the two events, including other related transmission line contingencies. (author)

  18. Association of NOS3 gene variants and clinical contributors of hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuzmanić Šamija, R. [Department of Pediatrics, University Hospital Split, Split (Croatia); Primorac, D. [School of Medicine Split, University of Split, Split (Croatia); Department of Pediatrics, School of Medicine, University of Osijek, Osijek (Croatia); Eberly College of Science, Penn State University, University Park, PA (United States); St. Catherine Speciality Hospital, Zabok (Croatia); Rešić, B. [School of Medicine Split, University of Split, Split (Croatia); Pavlov, V. [Department of Neonatology, University Hospital Split, Split (Croatia); Čapkun, V. [Department of Nuclear Medicine, University Hospital Split, Split (Croatia); Punda, H. [School of Medicine Split, University of Split, Split (Croatia); Lozić, B. [Department of Pediatrics, University Hospital Split, Split (Croatia); Zemunik, T. [Department of Medical Biology, School of Medicine Split, University of Split, Split (Croatia)

    2014-08-15

    The aim of this study was to analyze the association of different clinical contributors of hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy with NOS3 gene polymorphisms. A total of 110 children with hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy and 128 control children were selected for this study. Association of gender, gestational age, birth weight, Apgar score, cranial ultrasonography, and magnetic resonance imaging findings with genotypic data of six haplotype-tagging single nucleotide polymorphisms and the most commonly investigated rs1800779 and rs2070744 polymorphisms was analyzed. The TGT haplotype of rs1800783, rs1800779, and rs2070744 polymorphisms was associated with hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy. Children with the TGT haplotype were infants below 32 weeks of gestation and they had the most severe brain damage. Increased incidence of the TT genotype of the NOS3 rs1808593 SNP was found in the group of hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy patients with medium and severe brain damage. The probability of brain damage was twice as high in children with the TT genotype than in children with the TG genotype of the same polymorphism. Furthermore, the T allele of the same polymorphism was twice as frequent in children with lower Apgar scores. This study strongly suggests associations of NOS3 gene polymorphism with intensity of brain damage and severity of the clinical picture in affected children.

  19. Association of NOS3 gene variants and clinical contributors of hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuzmanić Šamija, R.; Primorac, D.; Rešić, B.; Pavlov, V.; Čapkun, V.; Punda, H.; Lozić, B.; Zemunik, T.

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the association of different clinical contributors of hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy with NOS3 gene polymorphisms. A total of 110 children with hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy and 128 control children were selected for this study. Association of gender, gestational age, birth weight, Apgar score, cranial ultrasonography, and magnetic resonance imaging findings with genotypic data of six haplotype-tagging single nucleotide polymorphisms and the most commonly investigated rs1800779 and rs2070744 polymorphisms was analyzed. The TGT haplotype of rs1800783, rs1800779, and rs2070744 polymorphisms was associated with hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy. Children with the TGT haplotype were infants below 32 weeks of gestation and they had the most severe brain damage. Increased incidence of the TT genotype of the NOS3 rs1808593 SNP was found in the group of hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy patients with medium and severe brain damage. The probability of brain damage was twice as high in children with the TT genotype than in children with the TG genotype of the same polymorphism. Furthermore, the T allele of the same polymorphism was twice as frequent in children with lower Apgar scores. This study strongly suggests associations of NOS3 gene polymorphism with intensity of brain damage and severity of the clinical picture in affected children

  20. Activation analysis of several species of marine invertebrates as indicators of environmental conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukushima, M.; Tamate, H.; Nakano, Y.

    2000-01-01

    Marine invertebrates are well known to accumulate trace metals from seawater, plankton, sea plants, and sediments. To test the usefulness of such organisms as a bio-indicator of environmental conditions, we have determined levels of trace elements in tissue of twelve species of marine invertebrates by photon and neutron activation analysis. Relatively higher concentration of elements were observed for Ni and Sn in mid-gut gland, for Cu and Zn in oyster tissues, for Se in swimming crabs, for Cu, Fe, and Se in gills of swimming crabs. Our results indicate that mid-gut gland of ear-shell will be useful as the indicator of environmental conditions. (author)

  1. Effect of the Discharge Water which Mixed Sewage Disposal Water with Seawater Desalting Treated Sewage for Bottom Sediment and Hypoxic Water Mass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Ryoichi; Yamasaki, Koreyoshi; Minagawa, Tomoko; Iyooka, Hiroki; Kitano, Yoshinori

    For every time in summer season, hypoxic water mass has formed at the inner part of Hakata Bay. Field observation study has carried out at the inner part of Hakata Bay since 2004 with the particular aim of tracking the movement of hypoxic water mass. Hypoxic water masses form the end of June to September on this area because the consumption of oxygen in bottom water layers exceeds the re-supply of oxygen from the atmosphere. Under such hypoxic conditions, the seawater desalination plant has begun to use in 2005. After seawater desalination plant operation starting, hypoxic water mass tends to improve. In this research, the authors show the following result. After seawater desalination plant has begun to operate, the hypoxia around the mixed discharge water outlet tends to be improved.

  2. Design of hypoxia-targeting radiopharmaceuticals: selective uptake of copper-64 complexes in hypoxic cells in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dearling, J.L.J.; Lewis, J.S.; Mullen, G.E.D.; Rae, M.T.; Zweit, J.; Blower, P.J.

    1998-01-01

    The well-known perfusion tracer CuPTSM, labelled with 62 Cu or 64 Cu, is believed to be trapped in cells non-selectively by a bioreductive mechanism. It is proposed that by modifying the ligand to increase its electron donor strength (for example by adding alkyl functionality or replacing sulphur ligands with oxygen ligands), the copper complexes will become less easily reduced and tracers with selectivity for hypoxic tissues could thus be developed. The aim of this work was to prepare 64 Cu-labelled complexes of two series of ligands, based on the bis(thiosemicarbazone) (13 ligands) and bis(salicylaldimine) (3 ligands) skeletons, and to evaluate the hypoxia dependence of their uptake in cells. The complexes were incubated with Chinese hamster ovary cells under normoxic and hypoxic conditions, and the cells isolated by centrifugation to determine radioactivity uptake at various time points up to 90 min. Several members of both series demonstrated significant (P 60 Cu, 61 Cu, 62 Cu, 64 Cu) and targeted radiotherapy ( 64 Cu, 67 Cu). (orig.)

  3. Evaluation of High-Pressure RCS Natural Circulations Under Severe Accident Conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Byung Chul; Bang, Young Suk; Suh, Nam Duk

    2006-01-01

    Since TMI-2 accident, the occurrence of severe accident natural circulations inside RCS during entire in-vessel core melt progressions before the reactor vessel breach had been emphasized and tried to clarify its thermal-hydraulic characteristics. As one of consolidated outcomes of these efforts, sophisticated models have been presented to explain the effects of a variety of engineering and phenomenological factors involved during severe accident mitigation on the integrity of RCS pressure boundaries, i.e. reactor pressure vessel(RPV), RCS coolant pipe and steam generator tubes. In general, natural circulation occurs due to density differences, which for single phase flow, is typically generated by temperature differences. Three natural circulation flows can be formed during severe accidents: in-vessel, hot leg countercurrent flow and flow through the coolant loops. Each of these flows may be present during high-pressure transients such as station blackout (SBO) and total loss of feedwater (TLOFW). As a part of research works in order to contribute on the completeness of severe accident management guidance (SAMG) in domestic plants by quantitatively assessing the RCS natural circulations on its integrity, this study presents basic approach for this work and some preliminary results of these efforts with development of appropriately detailed RCS model using MELCOR computer code

  4. Therapeutic hypothermia for neonates with hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming-Chou Chiang

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Therapeutic hypothermia (TH is a recommended regimen for newborn infants who are at or near term with evolving moderate-to-severe hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy (HIE. The Task Force of the Taiwan Child Neurology Society and the Taiwan Society of Neonatology held a joint meeting in 2015 to establish recommendations for using TH on newborn patients with HIE. Based on current evidence and experts' experiences, this review article summarizes the key points and recommendations regarding TH for newborns with HIE, including: (1 selection criteria for TH; (2 choices of method and equipment for TH; (3 TH prior to and during transport; (4 methods for temperature maintenance, monitoring, and rewarming; (5 systemic care of patients during TH, including the care of respiratory and cardiovascular systems, management of fluids, electrolytes, and nutrition, as well as sedation and drug metabolism; (6 monitoring and management of seizures; (7 neuroimaging, prognostic factors, and outcomes; and (8 adjuvant therapy for TH. Key Words: hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy, neonate, patient care, perinatal asphyxia, therapeutic hypothermia

  5. Plasticity in the Neonatal Brain following Hypoxic-Ischaemic Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eridan Rocha-Ferreira

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Hypoxic-ischaemic damage to the developing brain is a leading cause of child death, with high mortality and morbidity, including cerebral palsy, epilepsy, and cognitive disabilities. The developmental stage of the brain and the severity of the insult influence the selective regional vulnerability and the subsequent clinical manifestations. The increased susceptibility to hypoxia-ischaemia (HI of periventricular white matter in preterm infants predisposes the immature brain to motor, cognitive, and sensory deficits, with cognitive impairment associated with earlier gestational age. In term infants HI causes selective damage to sensorimotor cortex, basal ganglia, thalamus, and brain stem. Even though the immature brain is more malleable to external stimuli compared to the adult one, a hypoxic-ischaemic event to the neonate interrupts the shaping of central motor pathways and can affect normal developmental plasticity through altering neurotransmission, changes in cellular signalling, neural connectivity and function, wrong targeted innervation, and interruption of developmental apoptosis. Models of neonatal HI demonstrate three morphologically different types of cell death, that is, apoptosis, necrosis, and autophagy, which crosstalk and can exist as a continuum in the same cell. In the present review we discuss the mechanisms of HI injury to the immature brain and the way they affect plasticity.

  6. Evaluation of 80 Term Neonates with Hypoxic Ischemic Encephalopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selahattin Katar

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to review the etiology, clinical - laboratory features and mortality rate of term 80 neonates with perinatal asphyxia admitted to our neonatal unit between January 2005-April 2006. The sex distribution was 24 (%30 female and 56 (% 70 male. The mean gestational age was 38.6±1.3 weeks and weight 3156±561 gram. Of the patients % 46.25 were delivered with a cesarean section and % 53.75 with spontaneous vaginal delivery. The etiologic factors for hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy were % 31.25 force delivery, meconium aspiration, and % 66.25 preeclampsia, eclampsia and diabetic mother’s infant. The distribution of patients according to HIE statging system (Sarnat&Sarnat were as follows: 33 patients (% 41.25 in stage 1, 20 (% 25 in stage 2 and 27 (% 33.75 in stage 3. Seizures were observed in % 33.75 of patients. The mean duration of hospital stay was 10.6±7.7 days for the surviving patients and 4.2±3.4 days for patients who died. Except from central nervous system, liver and kidney were the most involved organs.Perinatal asphyxia remains to be leading cause of neonatal mortality. Hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy is a common newborn problem and cause important mortality and morbidity where low-social –cultural –education conditions with in regions.

  7. Radiosensitization of hypoxic tumor cells by simultaneous administration of hyperthermia and nitroimidazoles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hofer, K.G.; Hofer, M.G.; Ieracitano, J.; McLaughlin, W.H.

    1977-01-01

    The radiation response of oxygenated and hypoxic L1210 leukemia cells subjected to in vivo treatments with hyperthermia and/or chemical radiosensitizers was evaluated with the [ 125 I]iododeoxyuridine prelabeling assay. X irradiation of L1210 cells at body temperatures of 41 0 C or higher resulted in strongly enhanced tumor cell death. The magnitude of this thermal effect increased with increasing temperatures. Hypoxic L1210 cells were particularly sensitive to heat induced enhancement of radiation damage, i.e., the sensitizing effects were more pronounced and occurred at lower temperatures. Chemical radiosensitizers (metronidazole, Ro 7-0582) selectively sensitized hypoxic L1210 populations; fully oxygenated cells were not affected. Considerable radiosensitization was achieved at nontoxic dose levels of the two sensitizers. Experiments designed to determine the degree of radiosensititization as a function of drug dose showed that Ro 7-0582 was consistently more effective than metronidazole in sensitizing hypoxic tumor populations. At the highest drug dose used (3 mg/g body wt) the DMF was 2.2 for metronidazole and 2.8 for Ro 7-0582. Combined administration of hyperthermia and Ro 7-0582 (or metronidazole) produced synergistic potentiation of radiation damage in hypoxic L1210 populations (DMF of 4.2). Under optimal conditions, hypoxic L1210 cells subjected simultaneously to both modes of radiosensitization became more radiosensitive than untreated, fully oxygenated L1210 cells. Experiments on two other tumor lines (BP-8 murine sarcoma and Ehrlich ascites cells) indicate that such synergistic radiosensitization effects are not unique to L1210 cells

  8. Acute kidney injury with hypoxic respiratory failure

    OpenAIRE

    Neubert, Zachary; Hoffmann, Paul; Owshalimpur, David

    2014-01-01

    A 27-year-old Caucasian man was transferred from a remote clinic with acute kidney injury for the prior 7–10 days preceded by gastroenteritis. His kidney biopsy showed non-specific mesangiopathic glomerular changes, minimal tubulointerstitial disease without sclerosis, crescents, nor evidence of vasculitis. On his third hospital day, he developed acute hypoxic respiratory failure requiring intubation and mechanical ventilation. Pulmonary renal syndromes ranked highest on his differential diag...

  9. Hypoxic survival strategies in two fishes: extreme anoxia tolerance in the North European crucian carp and natural hypoxic preconditioning in a coral-reef shark.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsson, Göran E; Renshaw, Gillian M C

    2004-08-01

    Especially in aquatic habitats, hypoxia can be an important evolutionary driving force resulting in both convergent and divergent physiological strategies for hypoxic survival. Examining adaptations to anoxic/hypoxic survival in hypoxia-tolerant animals may offer fresh ideas for the treatment of hypoxia-related diseases. Here, we summarise our present knowledge of two fishes that have evolved to survive hypoxia under very different circumstances. The crucian carp (Carassius carassius) is of particular interest because of its extreme anoxia tolerance. During the long North European winter, it survives for months in completely oxygen-deprived freshwater habitats. The crucian carp also tolerates a few days of anoxia at room temperature and, unlike anoxia-tolerant freshwater turtles, it is still physically active in anoxia. Moreover, the crucian carp does not appear to reduce neuronal ion permeability during anoxia and may primarily rely on more subtle neuromodulatory mechanisms for anoxic metabolic depression. The epaulette shark (Hemiscyllium ocellatum) is a tropical marine vertebrate. It lives on shallow reef platforms that repeatedly become cut off from the ocean during periods of low tides. During nocturnal low tides, the water [O(2)] can fall by 80% due to respiration of the coral and associated organisms. Since the tides become lower and lower over a period of a few days, the hypoxic exposure during subsequent low tides will become progressively longer and more severe. Thus, this shark is under a natural hypoxic preconditioning regimen. Interestingly, hypoxic preconditioning lowers its metabolic rate and its critical P(O(2)). Moreover, repeated anoxia appears to stimulate metabolic depression in an adenosine-dependent way.

  10. VICTORIA: A mechanistic model of radionuclide behavior in the reactor coolant system under severe accident conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heams, T.J.; Williams, D.A.; Johns, N.A.; Mason, A.; Bixler, N.E.; Grimley, A.J.; Wheatley, C.J.; Dickson, L.W.; Osborn-Lee, I.; Domagala, P.; Zawadzki, S.; Rest, J.; Alexander, C.A.; Lee, R.Y.

    1992-12-01

    The VICTORIA model of radionuclide behavior in the reactor coolant system (RCS) of a light water reactor during a severe accident is described. It has been developed by the USNRC to define the radionuclide phenomena and processes that must be considered in systems-level models used for integrated analyses of severe accident source terms. The VICTORIA code, based upon this model, predicts fission product release from the fuel, chemical reactions involving fission products, vapor and aerosol behavior, and fission product decay heating. Also included is a detailed description of how the model is implemented in VICTORIA, the numerical algorithms used, and the correlations and thermochemical data necessary for determining a solution. A description of the code structure, input and output, and a sample problem are provided

  11. Spatiotemporal characteristics of severe dry and wet conditions in the Free State Province, South Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mbiriri, M.; Mukwada, G.; Manatsa, D.

    2018-02-01

    This paper assesses the spatiotemporal characteristics of agricultural droughts and wet conditions in the Free State Province of South Africa for the period between 1960 and 2013. Since agriculturally, the Free State Province is considered the bread basket of the country, understanding the variability of drought and wet conditions becomes necessary. The Standardised Precipitation Index (SPI) computed from gridded monthly precipitation data was used to assess the rainfall extreme conditions. Hot spot analysis was used to divide the province into five homogenous clusters where the spatiotemporal characteristics for each cluster were analysed. The results show a west to east increase in seasonal average total precipitation. However, the eastern part of the province demonstrates higher occurrences of droughts, with SPI ≤ - 1.282. This is despite the observation that the region shows a recent increase in droughts unlike the western region. It is also noted that significant differences in drought/wet intensities between clusters are more pronounced during the early compared to the late summer period.

  12. Evaluation of severe accident environmental conditions taking accident management strategy into account for equipment survivability assessments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Byung Chul; Jeong, Ji Hwan; Na, Man Gyun; Kim, Soong Pyung

    2003-01-01

    This paper presents a methodology utilizing accident management strategy in order to determine accident environmental conditions in equipment survivability assessments. In case that there is well-established accident management strategy for specific nuclear power plant, an application of this tool can provide a technical rationale on equipment survivability assessment so that plant-specific and time-dependent accident environmental conditions could be practically and realistically defined in accordance with the equipment and instrumentation required for accident management strategy or action appropriately taken. For this work, three different tools are introduced; Probabilistic Safety Assessment (PSA) outcomes, major accident management strategy actions, and Accident Environmental Stages (AESs). In order to quantitatively investigate an applicability of accident management strategy to equipment survivability, the accident simulation for a most likely scenario in Korean Standard Nuclear Power Plants (KSNPs) is performed with MAAP4 code. The Accident Management Guidance (AMG) actions such as the Reactor Control System (RCS) depressurization, water injection into the RCS, the containment pressure and temperature control, and hydrogen concentration control in containment are applied. The effects of these AMG actions on the accident environmental conditions are investigated by comparing with those from previous normal accident simulation, especially focused on equipment survivability assessment. As a result, the AMG-involved case shows the higher accident consequences along the accident environmental stages

  13. Simulation of experiment on aerosol behaviour at severe accident conditions in the LACE experimental facility with the ASTEC CPA code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kljenak, I.; Mavko, B.

    2007-01-01

    The experiment LACE LA4 on thermal-hydraulics and aerosol behavior in a nuclear power plant containment, which was performed in the LACE experimental facility, was simulated with the ASTEC CPA module of the severe accident computer code ASTEC V1.2. The specific purpose of the work was to assess the capability of the module (code) to simulate thermal-hydraulic conditions and aerosol behavior in the containment of a light-water-reactor nuclear power plant at severe accident conditions. The test was simulated with boundary conditions, described in the experiment report. Results of thermal-hydraulic conditions in the test vessel, as well as dry aerosol concentrations in the test vessel atmosphere, are compared to experimental results and analyzed. (author)

  14. The contribution of woody plant materials on the several conditions in a space environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomita-Yokotani, Kaori; Baba, Keiichi; Suzuki, Toshisada; Kimura, Shunta; Sato, Seigo; Katoh, Hiroshi; Abe, Yusuke; Katayama, Takeshi

    Woody plant materials have several utilization elements in our habitation environment on earth. The studies of woody plants under a space-environment in the vegetable kingdom have a high contribution to the study of various and exotic environmental responses, too. Woody plants can produce an excess oxygen, woody materials for the living cabin, and provide a biomass by cultivating crops and other species of creatures. Tree material would become to be a tool in closed bio-ecosystems such as an environment in a space. We named the trees used as material for the experiment related to space environments “CosmoBon”, small tree bonsai. Japanese cherry tree, “Sakura”, is famous and lovely tree in Japan. One species of “Sakura”, “Mamezakura, Prunus incisa”, is not only lovely tree species, but also suitable tree for the model tree of our purpose. The species of Prunus incisa is originally grown in volcano environment. That species of Sakura is originally grown on Mt. Fuji aria, oligotrophic place. We will try to build the best utilization usage of woody plant under the space environment by “Mamezakura” as a model tree. Here, we will show the importance of uniformity of materials when we will use the tree materials in a space environment. We will also discuss that tree has a high possibility of utilization under the space environments by using our several results related to this research.

  15. Development of high-performance monitoring system under severe accident condition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takeuchi, Tomoaki; Tsuchiya, Kunihiro; Ishihara, Masahiro; Komanome, H.; Miura, K.

    2017-01-01

    A research and development of a monitoring system for NPPs situations even during severe accidents have been performed. The R and D consists of the three objectives. The major findings are briefly summarized in the followings: 1) Radiation-resistant monitoring camera. The image sensor with the photogate and three transistors was found to be advantageous in terms of dark current and sensitivity. In addition, radiation-resistant optical parts and signal circuits were successfully fabricated. The results suggested that the monitoring camera system with 10 6 Gy in radiation resistance was possible. 2) Radiation-resistant in-water wireless transmission system. A two-dimensional LED matrix with 10 6 Gy in radiation resistance and a camera were used as the transmission devices. The results of the in-water transmission tests suggested that stable wireless transmission between 5 m distance was possible even with bubble, turbidity, or obstacles. 3) Heat-resistant signal cable. In order to develop a cable that can transmit the data inside reactor pressure vessels, heat-proof tests were performed for candidate metallic sheath materials of mineral insulation (MI) cables. The results indicated MI cables which can be used at 1000degC in air were possible. These results indicate the feasibility of the monitoring system even during severe accidents. (author)

  16. Preliminary safety analysis of the PWR with accident-tolerant fuels during severe accident conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Xiaoli; Li, Wei; Wang, Yang; Zhang, Yapei; Tian, Wenxi; Su, Guanghui; Qiu, Suizheng; Liu, Tong; Deng, Yongjun; Huang, Heng

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Analysis of severe accident scenarios for a PWR fueled with ATF system is performed. • A large-break LOCA without ECCS is analyzed for the PWR fueled with ATF system. • Extended SBO cases are discussed for the PWR fueled with ATF system. • The accident-tolerance of ATF system for application in PWR is illustrated. - Abstract: Experience gained in decades of nuclear safety research and previous nuclear accidents direct to the investigation of passive safety system design and accident-tolerant fuel (ATF) system which is now becoming a hot research point in the nuclear energy field. The ATF system is aimed at upgrading safety characteristics of the nuclear fuel and cladding in a reactor core where active cooling has been lost, and is preferable or comparable to the current UO 2 –Zr system when the reactor is in normal operation. By virtue of advanced materials with improved properties, the ATF system will obviously slow down the progression of accidents, allowing wider margin of time for the mitigation measures to work. Specifically, the simulation and analysis of a large break loss of coolant accident (LBLOCA) without ECCS and extended station blackout (SBO) severe accident are performed for a pressurized water reactor (PWR) loaded with ATF candidates, to reflect the accident-tolerance of ATF

  17. CN molecule vibrational spectra excitation in several LTE plasma sources conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iova, I.; Iova, Floriana; Ionita, I.; Bazavan, M.; Ilie, Gh.; Stanescu, G.

    2001-01-01

    Our interest in CN plasma study steams of the facilities to obtain the CN radicals in a free atmosphere electric discharge where the C of the coal electrodes can to combine in the enough high temperature plasma with the atmospheric nitrogen. Also of much interest is the very important phenomena in which the CN vibrational spectra can be implied and used as a diagnostic tool (plasma chemistry, astrophysics and so on). A peculiar importance presents the CN vibrational spectra in the transient plasmas. It is the reason why we have investigated here some internal processes of a continued and interrupted arc of various pulse lengths. To these purposes we present with enough accuracy the behaviour of the relative band head intensities of the sequences Δ v = +1 and Δ v = 0 belonging to the CN electronic transition (B 2 Σ - X 2 Σ), as a function of the pulse length (50 - 200 ms) as well as a function of the cathode to anode separation. These behaviours give us indications on the vibrational levels of the electronic state populations in several regions of the arc plasma as well on the efficiency of these levels excitation for several plasma pulse lengths. (authors)

  18. Feeding behaviour and growth of the Peruvian scallop (Argopecten purpuratus) under daily cyclic hypoxia conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguirre-Velarde, Arturo; Jean, Fred; Thouzeau, Gérard; Flye-Sainte-Marie, Jonathan

    2018-01-01

    As a secondary consequence of the high productivity of the upwelling system, organisms inhabiting Peruvian coastal bays are frequently exposed to hypoxic conditions. The aim of the present paper was to investigate the effects of daily-cyclic-severe hypoxia on energetics of a species presenting little escape ability when facing hypoxia. For this purpose, juvenile Peruvian scallops (Argopecten purpuratus) were exposed to four experimental conditions: fed and starved, combined or not to nightly severe hypoxia (5% oxygen saturation) for ≈ 12 h over a 21-day experiment. In both fed conditions, clearance rate was measured by the mean of an open-flow system. Our results indicate that the Peruvian scallop is able to maintain an active filtration even at low oxygen saturation, at least during expositions up to 12 h. During the first phase of exposure to hypoxia, clearance rate decreased abruptly when oxygen saturation dropped below 10%, but rapidly recovered to values close to those found under normoxia. As a consequence of this ability to feed during hypoxia, no difference in soft tissue dry weight (digestive gland not included) was observed at the end of the experimental period between oxic conditions among fed scallops. However, shell growth was negatively affected by hypoxic condition. Starved individuals exhibited similar weight loss between hypoxic and normoxic conditions indicating no or little effect of oxic condition on maintenance costs. Considering the observed responses for feeding, growth and maintenance, we can hypothesize that this species presents metabolic/bioenergetic efficient adaptations to deal with hypoxic conditions that are recurrent in Peruvian coastal bays. We hypothesize that the small observed effects might be modelled in the context of the Dynamic Energy Budget theory as a restriction of reserve mobilization under hypoxic conditions.

  19. Protein S100B in umbilical cord blood as a potential biomarker of hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy in asphyxiated newborns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaigham, Mehreen; Lundberg, Fredrik; Olofsson, Per

    2017-09-01

    Neonatal hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy (HIE) is a devastating condition resulting from a sustained lack of oxygen during birth. The interest in identifying a relevant biomarker of HIE has thrown into limelight the role of protein S100B as a clinical diagnostic marker of hypoxic brain damage in neonates. To evaluate the diagnostic value of protein S100B, measured in umbilical cord blood immediately after birth, as a useful biomarker in the diagnosis of HIE Sarnat stages II-III as well as a marker for long-term mortality and morbidity. Protein S100B was analyzed in cord blood sampled at birth from 13 newborns later diagnosed with stage II-III HIE and compared with 21 healthy controls. S100B concentrations were related to cord artery pH, amplitude-integrated electroencephalography (aEEG), stage of HIE, and death/sequelae up to an age of 6years. Both parametric and non-parametric statistics were used with a two-sided P<0.05 considered significant. The difference in S100B concentration was marginally statistically significant between HIE cases and controls (P=0.056). Cord blood acidosis (P=0.046), aEEG pattern severity (P=0.030), HIE severity (P=0.027), and condition at 6-year follow-up (healthy/permanent sequelae/death; P=0.027) were all related to an increase in S100B concentration. Protein S100B in neonates suffering from HIE stages II-III appeared elevated in umbilical cord blood at birth. The S100B concentrations were positively associated to the severity of disease and the risk of suffering from neurodevelopmental sequelae and even death. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  20. Thermal and hydraulic behaviour of CANDU cores under severe accident conditions - final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rogers, J.T.

    1984-06-01

    This volume of appendices presents listings and sample runs of the computer codes used in the study of the thermalhydraulic behaviour of CANDU reactor cores during severe loss of coolant accidents. The codes, written in standard FORTRAN, are MODBOIL, to calculate moderator temperatures, pressures and water levels; DEBRIS, to calculate the transient temperature distribution in the debris of calandria and pressure tubes and fuel pellets; MOLTENPOOL, to calculate the temperature history in a pool of molten debris; CONFILM, to calculate the behaviour of a condensing film of vaporized core debris on the calandria wall, and BLDG, to calculate the pressurization of the containment during the expulsion of moderator through pressure relief ducts. In addition there are discussions of the average condensation heat transfer coefficient for vaporized core material on the calandria wall, and of vapor explosions

  1. Bioactivity of Several Herbicides on the Nanogram Level Under Different Soil Moisture Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, S C; Kuk, Y I; Senseman, S A; Ahn, H G; Seong, C N; Lee, D J

    2015-01-01

    In this study, a double-tube centrifuge method was employed to determine the effects of soil moisture on the bioactivity of cafenstrole, pretilachlor, benfuresate, oxyfluorfen and simetryn. In general, the available herbicide concentration in soil solution (ACSS) showed little change as soil moisture increased for herbicides. The total available herbicide in soil solution (TASS) typically increased as soil moisture increased for all herbicides. The relationship between TASS and % growth rate based on dry weight showed strong linear relationships for both cafenstrole and pretilachlor, with r2 values of 0.95 and 0.84, respectively. Increasing TASS values were consistent with increasing herbicide water solubility, with the exception of the ionizable herbicide simetryn. Plant absorption and % growth rate exhibited a strong linear relationship with TASS. According to the results suggested that TASS was a better predictor of herbicidal bioactivity than ACSS for all herbicides under unsaturated soil moisture conditions.

  2. The influence of the crust layer on RPV structural failure under severe accident condition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mao, Jianfeng, E-mail: jianfeng-mao@163.com [Institute of Process Equipment and Control Engineering, Zhejiang University of Technology Hangzhou, Zhejiang 310032 (China); Engineering Research Center of Process Equipment and Re-manufacturing, Ministry of Education (China); Li, Xiangqing [Institute of Process Equipment and Control Engineering, Zhejiang University of Technology Hangzhou, Zhejiang 310032 (China); Bao, Shiyi [Institute of Process Equipment and Control Engineering, Zhejiang University of Technology Hangzhou, Zhejiang 310032 (China); Engineering Research Center of Process Equipment and Re-manufacturing, Ministry of Education (China); Luo, Lijia [Institute of Process Equipment and Control Engineering, Zhejiang University of Technology Hangzhou, Zhejiang 310032 (China); Gao, Zengliang [Institute of Process Equipment and Control Engineering, Zhejiang University of Technology Hangzhou, Zhejiang 310032 (China); Engineering Research Center of Process Equipment and Re-manufacturing, Ministry of Education (China)

    2017-05-15

    Highlights: • The crust layer greatly affects the RPV structural behavior. • The RPV failure is investigated in depth under severe accident. • The creep and plastic damage mainly contribute to RPV failure. • An elastic core in RPV wall is essential for ensuring RPV integrity. • The multiaxial state of stress accelerates the total damage evolution. - Abstract: The so called ‘in-vessel retention (IVR)’ is regarded as a severe accident (SA) mitigation strategy, which is widely used in most of advanced nuclear power plants. The effectiveness of IVR strategy is to employ the external water flooding to cool the reactor pressure vessel (RPV). The RPV integrity has to be maintained within a required period during the IVR period. The degraded melting core is assumed to be arrested in the lower head (LH) to form the melting pool that is bounded by upper, side and lower crusts. Consequently, the existence of the crust layer greatly affects the RPV structural behavior as well as failure process. In order to disclose this influence caused by the crust layer, a detailed investigation is conducted by using numerical simulation on the two RPVs with and without crust layer respectively. Taking the RPV without crust layer as a basis for the comparison, the present study assesses the likelihood and potential failure location, time and mode of the LH under the loadings of the critical heat flux (CHF) and slight internal pressure. Due to the high temperature melt on the inside and nucleate boiling on the outside, the RPV integrity is found to be compromised by melt-through, creep, elasticity, plasticity as well as thermal expansion. Through in-depth investigation, it is found that the creep and plasticity are of vital importance to the final structural failure, and the introduction of crust layer results in a significant change on field parameters in terms of temperature, deformation, stress(strain), triaxiality factor and total damage.

  3. Effect of Maize Hybrid and Foliar Fungicides on Yield Under Low Foliar Disease Severity Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallowa, Sally O; Esker, Paul D; Paul, Pierce A; Bradley, Carl A; Chapara, Venkata R; Conley, Shawn P; Robertson, Alison E

    2015-08-01

    Foliar fungicide use in the U.S. Corn Belt increased in the last decade; however, questions persist pertaining to its value and sustainability. Multistate field trials were established from 2010 to 2012 in Illinois, Iowa, Ohio, and Wisconsin to examine how hybrid and foliar fungicide influenced disease intensity and yield. The experimental design was in a split-split plot with main plots consisting of hybrids varying in resistance to gray leaf spot (caused by Cercospora zeae-maydis) and northern corn leaf blight (caused by Setosphaera turcica), subplots corresponding to four application timings of the fungicide pyraclostrobin, and sub-subplots represented by inoculations with either C. zeae-maydis, S. turcica, or both at two vegetative growth stages. Fungicide application (VT/R1) significantly reduced total disease severity relative to the control in five of eight site-years (P<0.05). Disease was reduced by approximately 30% at Wisconsin in 2011, 20% at Illinois in 2010, 29% at Iowa in 2010, and 32 and 30% at Ohio in 2010 and 2012, respectively. These disease severities ranged from 0.2 to 0.3% in Wisconsin in 2011 to 16.7 to 22.1% in Illinois in 2010. The untreated control had significantly lower yield (P<0.05) than the fungicide-treated in three site-years. Fungicide application increased the yield by approximately 6% at Ohio in 2010, 5% at Wisconsin in 2010 and 6% in 2011. Yield differences ranged from 8,403 to 8,890 kg/ha in Wisconsin 2011 to 11,362 to 11,919 kg/ha in Wisconsin 2010. Results suggest susceptibility to disease and prevailing environment are important drivers of observed differences. Yield increases as a result of the physiological benefits of plant health benefits under low disease were not consistent.

  4. The influence of the crust layer on RPV structural failure under severe accident condition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mao, Jianfeng; Li, Xiangqing; Bao, Shiyi; Luo, Lijia; Gao, Zengliang

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • The crust layer greatly affects the RPV structural behavior. • The RPV failure is investigated in depth under severe accident. • The creep and plastic damage mainly contribute to RPV failure. • An elastic core in RPV wall is essential for ensuring RPV integrity. • The multiaxial state of stress accelerates the total damage evolution. - Abstract: The so called ‘in-vessel retention (IVR)’ is regarded as a severe accident (SA) mitigation strategy, which is widely used in most of advanced nuclear power plants. The effectiveness of IVR strategy is to employ the external water flooding to cool the reactor pressure vessel (RPV). The RPV integrity has to be maintained within a required period during the IVR period. The degraded melting core is assumed to be arrested in the lower head (LH) to form the melting pool that is bounded by upper, side and lower crusts. Consequently, the existence of the crust layer greatly affects the RPV structural behavior as well as failure process. In order to disclose this influence caused by the crust layer, a detailed investigation is conducted by using numerical simulation on the two RPVs with and without crust layer respectively. Taking the RPV without crust layer as a basis for the comparison, the present study assesses the likelihood and potential failure location, time and mode of the LH under the loadings of the critical heat flux (CHF) and slight internal pressure. Due to the high temperature melt on the inside and nucleate boiling on the outside, the RPV integrity is found to be compromised by melt-through, creep, elasticity, plasticity as well as thermal expansion. Through in-depth investigation, it is found that the creep and plasticity are of vital importance to the final structural failure, and the introduction of crust layer results in a significant change on field parameters in terms of temperature, deformation, stress(strain), triaxiality factor and total damage.

  5. Shellfish Fishery Severely Reduces Condition and Survival of Oystercatchers Despite Creation of Large Marine Protected Areas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon Verhulst

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Fisheries and other human activities pose a global threat to the marine environment. Marine protected areas (MPAs are an emerging tool to cope with such threats. In the Dutch Wadden Sea, large MPAs (covering 31% of all intertidal flats have been created to protect shellfish-eating birds and allow recovery of important habitats. Even though shellfish fishing is prohibited in these areas, populations of shellfish-eating birds in the Wadden Sea have declined sharply. The role of shellfish fisheries in these declines is hotly debated, therefore, we investigated the effectiveness of MPAs for protecting oystercatcher (Haematopus ostralegus populations. Shellfish stocks (cockles, Cerastoderma edule were substantially higher in the MPAs, but surprisingly this has not resulted in a redistribution of wintering oystercatchers. Oystercatchers in unprotected areas had less shellfish in their diet and lower condition (a combined measure of mass and haematological parameters, and their estimated mortality was 43% higher. It is likely, therefore, that shellfish fishing explains at least part of the 40% decline in oystercatcher numbers in recent years. Condition and mortality effects were strongest in males, and the population sex ratio was female biased, in agreement with the fact that males rely more on shellfish. The unprotected areas apparently function as an "ecological trap," because oystercatchers did not respond as anticipated to the artificial spatial heterogeneity in food supply. Consequently, the MPAs are effective on a local scale, but not on a global scale. Similar problems are likely to exist in terrestrial ecosystems, and distribution strategies of target species need to be considered when designing terrestrial and marine protected areas if they are to be effective.

  6. Hypoxic cell turnover in different solid tumor lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ljungkvist, Anna S.E.; Bussink, Johan; Kaanders, Johannes H.A.M.; Rijken, Paulus F.J.W.; Begg, Adrian C.; Raleigh, James A.; Kogel, Albert J. van der

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: Most solid tumors contain hypoxic cells, and the amount of tumor hypoxia has been shown to have a negative impact on the outcome of radiotherapy. The efficacy of combined modality treatments depends both on the sequence and timing of the treatments. Hypoxic cell turnover in tumors may be important for optimal scheduling of combined modality treatments, especially when hypoxic cell targeting is involved. Methods and Materials: Previously we have shown that a double bioreductive hypoxic marker assay could be used to detect changes of tumor hypoxia in relation to the tumor vasculature after carbogen and hydralazine treatments. This assay was used in the current study to establish the turnover rate of hypoxic cells in three different tumor models. The first hypoxic marker, pimonidazole, was administered at variable times before tumor harvest, and the second hypoxic marker, CCI-103F, was injected at a fixed time before harvest. Hypoxic cell turnover was defined as loss of pimonidazole (first marker) relative to CCI-103F (second marker). Results: The half-life of hypoxic cell turnover was 17 h in the murine C38 colon carcinoma line, 23 h and 49 h in the human xenograft lines MEC82 and SCCNij3, respectively. Within 24 h, loss of pimonidazole-stained areas in C38 and MEC82 occurred concurrent with the appearance of pimonidazole positive cell debris in necrotic regions. In C38 and MEC82, most of the hypoxic cells had disappeared after 48 h, whereas in SCCNij3, viable cells that had been labeled with pimonidazole were still observed after 5 days. Conclusions: The present study demonstrates that the double hypoxia marker assay can be used to study changes in both the proportion of hypoxic tumor cells and their lifespan at the same time. The present study shows that large differences in hypoxic cell turnover rates may exist among tumor lines, with half-lives ranging from 17-49 h

  7. Therapeutic Plasmapheresis. A Gate to an Effective Treatment of Severe Pathological Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Stefanutti

    2014-07-01

        Table 1. Different clinical use of conventional and selective apheresis techniques in relation to the pathology to be treated in emergency or on long (chronic-term.  Throughout the acute phase of hyperlipidemic pancreatitis (HLP, PEX (Lipid-apheresis could be of considerable assistance not only in lowering TG levels but also in the prevention of recurrent HLP (3. Furthermore, patients with homo-, double- compound-, and heterozygous Familial Hypercholesterolemia and HyperLp(a lipoproteinemia would benefit lipoprotein-apheresis (LA as an extracorporeal procedure providing selective removal of lipids and lipoproteins including Low Density Lipoproteins (LDL and other apolipoprotein B100-containing lipoproteins (4, 5. Having numerous metabolic and clinical superiorities, LA characterizes an upgraded selective form of conventional extracorporeal therapies, e.g. plasma-exchange (PEX- Lipid-apheresis, which were broadly-used for managing severe hypercholesterolemia in the seventies. However, LA is primarily used in the treatment of previously-mentioned severe forms of dyslipidemia. FH patients are particularly prone to coronary ischemic events necessitating a tailored, intensive, efficient, continuous, and unceasing form of treatment. Obviously, a therapeutic approach exclusively relying on existing accessible medications would not lead to preferred clinical outcomes. The above reported clinical examples clearly suggest what differences exist between the non-selective and selective apheresis techniques as far as different pathologies exhibiting affinity are concerned. In particular, the clinical presentation, emergency or not, greatly affects the use of a given extracorporeal technique. However, depending upon the indication, a selective technique not usually utilized in emergency, such as selective dextran sulfate cellulose LA was recently suggested to treat acutely preeclampsia, where targeted therapies to stabilize the clinical manifestations and prolong

  8. Overendocytosis of gold nanoparticles increases autophagy and apoptosis in hypoxic human renal proximal tubular cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ding F

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Fengan Ding,1 Yiping Li,1 Jing Liu,1 Lei Liu,1 Wenmin Yu,1 Zhi Wang,1 Haifeng Ni,2 Bicheng Liu,2 Pingsheng Chen1,2 1School of Medicine, Southeast University, Nanjing, People’s Republic of China; 2Institute of Nephrology, The Affiliated Zhongda Hospital, Southeast University, Nanjing, People’s Republic of China Background: Gold nanoparticles (GNPs can potentially be used in biomedical fields ranging from therapeutics to diagnostics, and their use will result in increased human exposure. Many studies have demonstrated that GNPs can be deposited in the kidneys, particularly in renal tubular epithelial cells. Chronic hypoxic is inevitable in chronic kidney diseases, and it results in renal tubular epithelial cells that are susceptible to different types of injuries. However, the understanding of the interactions between GNPs and hypoxic renal tubular epithelial cells is still rudimentary. In the present study, we characterized the cytotoxic effects of GNPs in hypoxic renal tubular epithelial cells.Results: Both 5 nm and 13 nm GNPs were synthesized and characterized using various biophysical methods, including transmission electron microscopy, dynamic light scattering, and ultraviolet–visible spectrophotometry. We detected the cytotoxicity of 5 and 13 nm GNPs (0, 1, 25, and 50 nM to human renal proximal tubular cells (HK-2 by Cell Counting Kit-8 assay and lactate dehydrogenase release assay, but we just found the toxic effect in the 5 nm GNP-treated cells at 50 nM dose under hypoxic condition. Furthermore, the transmission electron microscopy images revealed that GNPs were either localized in vesicles or free in the lysosomes in 5 nm GNPs-treated HK-2 cells, and the cellular uptake of the GNPs in the hypoxic cells was significantly higher than that in normoxic cells. In normoxic HK-2 cells, 5 nm GNPs (50 nM treatment could cause autophagy and cell survival. However, in hypoxic conditions, the GNP exposure at the same condition led to the

  9. Raim – A model for iodine behavior in containment under severe accident condition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Han-Chul Kim

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Following a severe accident in a nuclear power plant, iodine is a major contributor to the potential health risks for the public. Because the amount of iodine released largely depends on its volatility, iodine's behavior in containment has been extensively studied in international programs such as International Source Term Programme-Experimental Program on Iodine Chemistry under Radiation (EPICUR, Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD-Behaviour of Iodine Project, and OECD-Source Term Evaluation and Mitigation. Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety (KINS has joined these programs and is developing a simplified, stand-alone iodine chemistry model, RAIM (Radio-Active Iodine chemistry Model, based on the IMOD methodology and other previous studies. This model deals with chemical reactions associated with the formation and destruction of iodine species and surface reactions in the containment atmosphere and the sump in a simple manner. RAIM was applied to a simulation of four EPICUR tests and one Radioiodine Test Facility test, which were carried out in aqueous or gaseous phases. After analysis, the results show a trend of underestimation of organic and molecular iodine for the gas-phase experiments, the opposite of that for the aqueous-phase ones, whereas the total amount of volatile iodine species agrees well between the experiment and the analysis result.

  10. Tourette syndrome and comorbid conditions: a spectrum of different severities and complexities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizzo, Renata; Gulisano, Mariangela; Pellico, Alessandra; Calì, Paola Valeria; Curatolo, Paolo

    2014-10-01

    To investigate clinical correlates of Tourette syndrome and to identify the impact of comorbidities, we retrospectively recruited 92 young people affected by Tourette syndrome compared with 102 healthy controls. Neuropsychological assessment included: Youth Quality of Life-Research, Multidimensional Anxiety Scale for Children, Children's Depression Inventory, and Conner's and Child Behavior Checklist; moreover, Tourette syndrome patients completed the Yale Global Tic Severity Rating Scale and the Yale-Brown Obsessive Compulsive Scale. Four clinical subgroups were identified: pure Tourette syndrome (49.8%), Tourette syndrome plus attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) (22.2%), Tourette syndrome plus obsessive-compulsive disorder (21.5%), and Tourette syndrome plus ADHD plus obsessive-compulsive disorder (6.5%). Our findings suggested that emotional lability appeared in all Tourette syndrome subgroups, independently from comorbidities, representing a clinical feature of Tourette syndrome itself. Moreover, our data suggested that all 4 clinical subgroups had higher statistically significant behavioral problems compared with the healthy controls (P = .000), whereas affective and anxiety symptoms were overrepresented in Tourette syndrome plus comorbidities subgroups. Finally, Tourette syndrome patients had a lower quality of life compared with the healthy controls. These differences were statistically significant between the pure Tourette syndrome subgroups and Tourette syndrome plus comorbidities subgroups, as well as Tourette syndrome plus comorbidities subgroups and healthy controls. © The Author(s) 2014.

  11. RAIM-A model for iodine behavior in containment under severe accident condition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Han Chul; Cho, Yeong Hun [Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-12-15

    Following a severe accident in a nuclear power plant, iodine is a major contributor to the potential health risks for the public. Because the amount of iodine released largely depends on its volatility, iodine's behavior in containment has been extensively studied in international programs such as International Source Term Programme-Experimental Program on Iodine Chemistry under Radiation (EPICUR), Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD)-Behaviour of Iodine Project, and OECD-Source Term Evaluation and Mitigation. Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety (KINS) has joined these programs and is developing a simplified, stand-alone iodine chemistry model, RAIM (Radio-Active Iodine chemistry Model), based on the IMOD methodology and other previous studies. This model deals with chemical reactions associated with the formation and destruction of iodine species and surface reactions in the containment atmosphere and the sump in a simple manner. RAIM was applied to a simulation of four EPICUR tests and one Radioiodine Test Facility test, which were carried out in aqueous or gaseous phases. After analysis, the results show a trend of underestimation of organic and molecular iodine for the gas-phase experiments, the opposite of that for the aqueous-phase ones, whereas the total amount of volatile iodine species agrees well between the experiment and the analysis result.

  12. Grain boundary sweeping and dissolution effects on fission product behavior under severe fuel damage accident conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rest, J.

    1985-10-01

    The theoretical FASTGRASS-VFP model has been used in the interpretation of fission gas, iodine, tellurium, and cesium release from severe-fuel-damage (SFD) tests performed in the PBF reactor in Idaho. A theory of grain boundary sweeping of gas bubbles, gas bubble behavior during fuel liquefaction (destruction of grain boundaries due to formation of a U-rich melt phase), and during U-Zr eutectic melting has been included within the FASTGRASS-VFP formalism. The grain-boundary-sweeping theory considers the interaction between the moving grain boundary and two distinct size classes of bubbles, those on grain faces and on grain edges. The theory of the effects of fuel liquefaction and U-Zr eutectic melting on fission product behavior considers the migration and coalescence of fission gas bubbles in either molten uranium, or a zircaloy-uranium eutectic melt. The FASTGRASS-VFP predictions, measured release rates from the above tests, and previously published release rates are compared and differences between fission product behavior in trace-irradiated and in normally irradiated fuel are highlighted

  13. Relation between the Atmospheric Boundary Layer and Impact Factors under Severe Surface Thermal Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yinhuan Ao

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper reported a comprehensive analysis on the diurnal variation of the Atmospheric Boundary Layer (ABL in summer of Badain Jaran Desert and discussed deeply the effect of surface thermal to ABL, including the Difference in Surface-Air Temperature (DSAT, net radiation, and sensible heat, based on limited GPS radiosonde and surface observation data during two intense observation periods of experiments. The results showed that (1 affected by topography of the Tibetan Plateau, the climate provided favorable external conditions for the development of Convective Boundary Layer (CBL, (2 deep CBL showed a diurnal variation of three- to five-layer structure in clear days and five-layer ABL structure often occurred about sunset or sunrise, (3 the diurnal variation of DSAT influenced thickness of ABL through changes of turbulent heat flux, (4 integral value of sensible heat which rapidly converted by surface net radiation had a significant influence on the growth of CBL throughout daytime. The cumulative effect of thick RML dominated the role after CBL got through SBL in the development stage, especially in late summer, and (5 the development of CBL was promoted and accelerated by the variation of wind field and distribution of warm advection in high and low altitude.

  14. Hypoxic stress up-regulates Kir2.1 expression and facilitates cell proliferation in brain capillary endothelial cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamamura, Hideto; Suzuki, Yoshiaki; Yamamura, Hisao [Department of Molecular & Cellular Pharmacology, Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Nagoya City University, Nagoya (Japan); Asai, Kiyofumi [Department of Molecular Neurobiology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Nagoya City University, Nagoya (Japan); Imaizumi, Yuji, E-mail: yimaizum@phar.nagoya-cu.ac.jp [Department of Molecular & Cellular Pharmacology, Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Nagoya City University, Nagoya (Japan)

    2016-08-05

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) is mainly composed of brain capillary endothelial cells (BCECs), astrocytes and pericytes. Brain ischemia causes hypoxic encephalopathy and damages BBB. However, it remains still unclear how hypoxia affects BCECs. In the present study, t-BBEC117 cells, an immortalized bovine brain endothelial cell line, were cultured under hypoxic conditions at 4–5% oxygen for 72 h. This hypoxic stress caused hyperpolarization of resting membrane potential. Patch-clamp recordings revealed a marked increase in Ba{sup 2+}-sensitive inward rectifier K{sup +} current in t-BBEC117 cells after hypoxic culture. Western blot and real-time PCR analyses showed that Kir2.1 expression was significantly up-regulated at protein level but not at mRNA level after the hypoxic culture. Ca{sup 2+} imaging study revealed that the hypoxic stress enhanced store-operated Ca{sup 2+} (SOC) entry, which was significantly reduced in the presence of 100 μM Ba{sup 2+}. On the other hand, the expression of SOC channels such as Orai1, Orai2, and transient receptor potential channels was not affected by hypoxic stress. MTT assay showed that the hypoxic stress significantly enhanced t-BBEC117 cell proliferation, which was inhibited by approximately 60% in the presence of 100 μM Ba{sup 2+}. We first show here that moderate cellular stress by cultivation under hypoxic conditions hyperpolarizes membrane potential via the up-regulation of functional Kir2.1 expression and presumably enhances Ca{sup 2+} entry, resulting in the facilitation of BCEC proliferation. These findings suggest potential roles of Kir2.1 expression in functional changes of BCECs in BBB following ischemia. -- Highlights: •Hypoxic culture of brain endothelial cells (BEC) caused membrane hyperpolarization. •This hyperpolarization was due to the increased expression of Kir2.1 channels. •Hypoxia enhanced store-operated Ca{sup 2+} (SOC) entry via Kir2.1 up-regulation. •Expression levels of putative SOC

  15. Hypoxic stress up-regulates Kir2.1 expression and facilitates cell proliferation in brain capillary endothelial cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamura, Hideto; Suzuki, Yoshiaki; Yamamura, Hisao; Asai, Kiyofumi; Imaizumi, Yuji

    2016-01-01

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) is mainly composed of brain capillary endothelial cells (BCECs), astrocytes and pericytes. Brain ischemia causes hypoxic encephalopathy and damages BBB. However, it remains still unclear how hypoxia affects BCECs. In the present study, t-BBEC117 cells, an immortalized bovine brain endothelial cell line, were cultured under hypoxic conditions at 4–5% oxygen for 72 h. This hypoxic stress caused hyperpolarization of resting membrane potential. Patch-clamp recordings revealed a marked increase in Ba 2+ -sensitive inward rectifier K + current in t-BBEC117 cells after hypoxic culture. Western blot and real-time PCR analyses showed that Kir2.1 expression was significantly up-regulated at protein level but not at mRNA level after the hypoxic culture. Ca 2+ imaging study revealed that the hypoxic stress enhanced store-operated Ca 2+ (SOC) entry, which was significantly reduced in the presence of 100 μM Ba 2+ . On the other hand, the expression of SOC channels such as Orai1, Orai2, and transient receptor potential channels was not affected by hypoxic stress. MTT assay showed that the hypoxic stress significantly enhanced t-BBEC117 cell proliferation, which was inhibited by approximately 60% in the presence of 100 μM Ba 2+ . We first show here that moderate cellular stress by cultivation under hypoxic conditions hyperpolarizes membrane potential via the up-regulation of functional Kir2.1 expression and presumably enhances Ca 2+ entry, resulting in the facilitation of BCEC proliferation. These findings suggest potential roles of Kir2.1 expression in functional changes of BCECs in BBB following ischemia. -- Highlights: •Hypoxic culture of brain endothelial cells (BEC) caused membrane hyperpolarization. •This hyperpolarization was due to the increased expression of Kir2.1 channels. •Hypoxia enhanced store-operated Ca 2+ (SOC) entry via Kir2.1 up-regulation. •Expression levels of putative SOC channels were not affected by hypoxia.

  16. Grain boundary sweeping and dissolution effects on fission product behaviour under severe fuel damage accident conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rest, J.

    1986-01-01

    The theoretical FASTGRASS-VFP model has been used in the interpretation of fission gas, iodine, tellurium, and cesium release from severe-fuel-damage (SFD) tests performed in the PBF reactor in Idaho. A theory of grain boundary sweeping of gas bubbles, gas bubble behavior during fuel liquefaction (destruction of grain boundaries due to formation of a U-rich melt phase), and during U-Zr eutectic melting has been included within the FASTGRASS-VFP formalism. The grain-boundary-sweeping theory considers the interaction between the moving grain boundary and two distinct size classes of bubbles, those on grain faces and on grain edges. The theory of the effects of fuel liquefaction and U-Zr eutectic melting on fission product behaviour considers the migration and coalescence of fission gas bubbles in either molten uranium, or a Zircaloy-Uranium eutectic melt. Results of the analyses demonstrate that intragranular fission product behavior during the tests can be interpreted in terms of a grain-growth/grain-boundary-sweeping mechanism that enhances the flow of fission products from within the grains to the grain boundaries. Whereas fuel liquefaction leads to an enhanced release of fission products in trace-irradiated fuel, the occurrence of fuel liquefaction in normally-irradiated fuel can degrade fission product release. This phenomenon is due in part to reduced gas-bubble mobilities in a viscous medium as compared to vapor transport, and in part to a degradation of grain growth rates and the subsequent decrease in grain-boundary sweeping of intragranular fission products into the liquified lamina. The analysis shows that total UO 2 dissolution due to eutectic melting leads to increased release for both trace-irradiated and normally-irradiated fuel. The FASTGRASS-VFP predictions, measured release rates from the above tests, and previously published release rates are compared and differences between fission product behavior in trace-irradiated and in normally

  17. Thermal and hydraulic behaviour of CANDU cores under severe accident conditions - final report. Vol. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rogers, J.T.

    1984-06-01

    This report gives the results of a study of the thermo-hydraulic aspects of severe accident sequences in CANDU reactors. The accident sequences considered are the loss of the moderator cooling system and the loss of the moderator heat sink, each following a large loss-of-coolant accident accompanied by loss of emergency coolant injection. Factors considered include expulsion and boil-off of the moderator, uncovery, overheating and disintegration of the fuel channels, quenching of channel debris, re-heating of channel debris following complete moderator expulsion, formation and possible boiling of a molten pool of core debris and the effectiveness of the cooling of the calandria wall by the shield tank water during the accident sequences. The effects of these accident sequences on the reactor containment are also considered. Results show that there would be no gross melting of fuel during moderator expulsion from the calandria, and for a considerable time thereafter, as quenched core debris re-heats. Core melting would not begin until about 135 minutes after accident initiation in a loss of the moderator cooling system and until about 30 minutes in a loss of the moderator heat sink. Eventually, a pool of molten material would form in the bottom of the calandria, which may or may not boil, depending on property values. In all cases, the molten core would be contained within the calandria, as long as the shield tank water cooling system remains operational. Finally, in the period from 8 to 50 hours after the initiation of the accident, the molten core would re-solidify within the calandria. There would be no consequent damage to containment resulting from these accident sequences, nor would there be a significant increase in fission product releases from containment above those that would otherwise occur in a dual failure LOCA plus LOECI

  18. The ability of silicide coating to delay the catastrophic oxidation of vanadium under severe conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chaia, N., E-mail: nabil.chaia@univ-lorraine.fr [Université de Lorraine, Institut Jean Lamour – UMR7198, Boulevard des Aiguillettes, BP70239, 54506 Vandoeuvre-lès-Nancy Cedex (France); Mathieu, S., E-mail: stephane.mathieu@univ-lorraine.fr [Université de Lorraine, Institut Jean Lamour – UMR7198, Boulevard des Aiguillettes, BP70239, 54506 Vandoeuvre-lès-Nancy Cedex (France); Rouillard, F., E-mail: fabien.rouillard@cea.fr [CEA, DEN, DPC, SCCME, Laboratoire d’Etude de la Corrosion Non Aqueuse, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Vilasi, M., E-mail: michel.vilasi@univ-lorraine.fr [Université de Lorraine, Institut Jean Lamour – UMR7198, Boulevard des Aiguillettes, BP70239, 54506 Vandoeuvre-lès-Nancy Cedex (France)

    2015-02-15

    Highlights: • Oxidation protection is due to the formation of a pure silica layer. • V–4Cr–4Ti with V{sub x}Si{sub y} silicide coating withstands 400 1-h cycles (1100 °C-T{sub amb}) in air. • Three-point flexure testing at 950 °C and 75 MPa does not induce coating breakdown. • No delamination between coating and substrate is observed in any test. - Abstract: V–4Cr–4Ti vanadium alloy is a potential cladding material for sodium-cooled fast-neutron reactors (SFRs). However, its affinity for oxygen and the subsequent embrittlement that oxygen induces causes a need for an oxygen diffusion barrier, which can be obtained by manufacturing a multi-layered silicide coating. The present work aims to evaluate the effects of thermal cycling (using a cyclic oxidation device) and tensile and compressive stresses (using the three-point flexure test) on the coated alloy system. Tests were performed in air up to 1100 °C, which is 200 °C higher than the accidental temperature for SFR applications. The results showed that the VSi{sub 2} coating was able to protect the vanadium substrate from oxidation for more than 400 1-h cycles between 1100 °C and room temperature. The severe bending applied to the coated alloy at 950 °C using a load of 75 MPa did not lead to specimen breakage. It can be suggested that the VSi{sub 2} coating has mechanical properties compatible with the V–4Cr–4Ti alloy for SFR applications.

  19. Patterns of nocturnal rehydration in root tissues of Vaccinium corymbosum L. under severe drought conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valenzuela-Estrada, Luis R; Richards, James H; Diaz, Andres; Eissensat, David M

    2009-01-01

    Although roots in dry soil layers are commonly rehydrated by internal hydraulic redistribution during the nocturnal period, patterns of tissue rehydration are poorly understood. Rates of nocturnal rehydration were examined in roots of different orders in Vaccinium corymbosum L. 'Bluecrop' (Northern highbush blueberry) grown in a split-pot system with one set of roots in relatively moist soil and the other set of roots in dry soil. Vaccinium is noted for a highly branched and extremely fine root system. It is hypothesized that nocturnal root tissue rehydration would be slow, especially in the distal root orders because of their greater hydraulic constraints (smaller vessel diameters and fewer number of vessels). Vaccinium root hydraulic properties delayed internal water movement. Even when water was readily available to roots in the wet soil and transpiration was minimal, it took a whole night-time period of 12 h for the distal finest roots (1st to 4th order) under dry soil conditions to reach the same water potentials as fine roots in moist soil (1st to 4th order). Even though roots under dry soil equilibrated with roots in moist soil, the equilibrium point reached before sunrise was about -1.2 MPa, indicating that tissues were not fully rehydrated. Using a single-branch root model, it was estimated that individual roots exhibiting the lowest water potentials in dry soil were 1st order roots (distal finest roots of the root system). However, considered at the branch level, root orders with the highest hydraulic resistances corresponded to the lowest orders of the permanent root system (3rd-, 4th-, and 5th-order roots), thus indicating possible locations of hydraulic safety control in the root system of this species.

  20. The effect of self-leveling on debris bed coolability under severe accident conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Basso, S.; Konovalenko, A. [Division of Nuclear Power Safety, Royal Institute of Technology (KTH), Roslagstullsbacken 21, D5, Stockholm 106 91 (Sweden); Yakush, S.E. [Institute for Problems in Mechanics of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Ave. Vernadskogo 101 Bldg 1, Moscow 119526 (Russian Federation); Kudinov, P. [Division of Nuclear Power Safety, Royal Institute of Technology (KTH), Roslagstullsbacken 21, D5, Stockholm 106 91 (Sweden)

    2016-08-15

    Highlights: • A model for coolability of a self-leveling, variable-shape debris bed is proposed. • Sensitivity analysis is performed to screen out the less influential input parameters. • A small fraction of scenarios has initially a non-coolable debris bed configuration. • The fraction of non-coolable scenarios decreases with time due to self-leveling. - Abstract: Nordic-type boiling water reactors employ melt fragmentation, quenching, and long term cooling of the debris bed in a deep pool of water under the reactor vessel as a severe accident (SA) mitigation strategy. The height and shape of the bed are among the most important factors that determine if decay heat can be removed from the porous debris bed by natural circulation of water. The debris bed geometry depends on its formation process (melt release, fragmentation, sedimentation and settlement on the containment basemat), but it also changes with time afterwards, due to particle redistribution promoted by coolant flow (self-leveling). The ultimate goal of this work is to develop an approach to the assessment of the probability that debris in such a variable-shape bed can reach re-melting (which means failure of SA mitigation strategy), i.e. the time necessary for the slumping debris bed to reach a coolable configuration is larger than the time necessary for the debris to reach the re-melting temperature. For this purpose, previously developed models for particulate debris spreading by self-leveling and debris bed dryout are combined to assess the time necessary to reach a coolable state and evaluate its uncertainty. Sensitivity analysis was performed to screen out less important input parameters, after which Monte Carlo simulation was carried out in order to collect statistical characteristics of the coolability time. The obtained results suggest that, given the parameters ranges typical of Nordic BWRs, only a small fraction of debris beds configurations exhibits the occurrence of dryout. Of the

  1. Guidance of reactor operators and TSC personnel with the severe accident management guidance under shutdown and low power conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Haesendonck, M.F.; Prior, R.P.

    2000-01-01

    The Westinghouse Owners Group Severe Accident Management Guidance (WOG SAMG) was developed between 1991 and 1994. The primary goals for severe accident management that form the basis of the WOG SAMG are to terminate any radioactive releases to the environment; to prevent failure of any containment fission product boundary and to return the plant to a controlled stable condition. The WOG SAMG is primarily a TSC tool for mitigation of low probability core damage events. The philosophy is that control room operators should remain focused on the prevention of core damage, whereas the TSC personnel should concentrate on the mitigation of the severe accident. The symptom based package is built up as a structured process for choosing appropriate actions based on actual plant conditions. No detailed knowledge of severe accident phenomena is required. The scope of the WOG SAMG is limited to severe accidents resulting from initiating events occurring during full power operation. However, a number of studies such as the EdF EPS 1300 Probabilistic Safety Assessment (PSA), the shutdown Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA) for Surry, the BERA shutdown PRA for Beznau, the EPRI/ Westinghouse ORAM methodology etc. have shown that the frequency of core damage (a severe accident) during shutdown and low power operation can be of the same order of magnitude as for full power operation. The at-power SAMG is viewed as the resolution of the severe accident issue. Similarly, it is expected that as shutdown PRAs mature, the final resolution of the severe accident issue will lie in SAMG for low power and shutdown operation. Therefore in resolution of this issue, Westinghouse has developed the Shutdown Severe Accident Management Guidance (SSAMG) which gives guidance for both control room and TSC personnel to mitigate a severe accident under shutdown or low power conditions. In the last few years, many LWR plants have been implementing SAMG. In the US, all plants have developed SAMG, and many

  2. Hypoxic cell radiosensitization by moderate hyperthermia and glucose deprivation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, J.H.; Kim, S.H.; Hahn, E.W.

    1983-01-01

    Cell culture studies were carried out to determine whether moderate hyperthermia reduces the oxygen enhancement ratio of cells under well-defined cultural conditions. Using asynchronously growing HeLa cells, the OER of cells with and without glucose was determined following exposure of cells to moderate hyperthermia, 40.5omicronC for 1 hr, immediately after X irradiation. The OER of cells with 5 mM glucose was 3.2, whereas the OER of glucose-deprived cells was reduced to 2.0. The pH of the cell culture medium was kept at 7.4 throughtout the experiments. The present finding may provide a clue toward further enhancing the radiosensitization of hypoxic cells by heat

  3. Hypoxic cell radiosensitization by moderate hyperthermia and glucose deprivation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, J.H.; Kim, S.H.; Hahn, E.W.

    1983-01-01

    Cell culture studies were carried out to determine whether moderate hyperthermia reduces the oxygen enhancement ratio of cells under well-defined cultural conditions. Using asynchronously growing HeLa cells, the OER of cells with and without glucose was determined following exposure of cells to moderate hyperthermia, 40.5 degrees C for 1 hr, immediately after X irradiation. The OER of cells with 5 mM glucose was 3.2, whereas the OER of glucose-deprived cells was reduced to 2.0. The pH of the cell culture medium was kept at 7.4 throughout the experiments. The present finding may provide a clue toward further enhancing the radiosensitization of hypoxic cells by heat

  4. Current Theory on the Cerebral Mechanisms of Hypoxic PRE- and Postconditioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rybnikova, E A; Samoilov, M O

    2016-01-01

    An exposure of the organism to several episodes of mild hypoxia results in the development of brain hypoxic/ischemic tolerance, as well as cross-tolerance to the stressful factors of psychoemotional nature. Such kind of preconditioning by mild hypoxia functions as “alarm signalization” by I.P. Pavlov, preparing the organism and, in particularly, brain to the forthcoming harmful event. Dose-dependent action of hypoxia on the brain can be considered as one particular case of the general phenomenon termed hormesis, or neurohormesis. Endogenous defense processes launched by the hypoxic preconditioning and leading to the development of cerebral tolerance are associated with activation of intracellular signal cascades, transcriptional factors, regulatory proteins and expression of pro-adaptive genes and their products in the susceptible brain regions. Important mechanism of systemic adaptation induced by hypoxic preconditioning includes modifications of pituitary-adrenal axis aimed at enhancement of its adaptive resources. All these components are involved in the neuroprotective processes in three sequential phases - initiation, induction, and expression. Important role belongs also to epigenetic mechanisms controlling the activity of pro-adaptive genes. In contrast to the preconditioning, hypoxic postconditioning is comparatively novel phenomenon and therefore its mechanisms are less studied. The involvement of hypoxia-inducible factor HIF-1, and non-specific protective processes as up-regulation of anti-apoptotic factors and neurotrophines.

  5. Time Domains of the Hypoxic Ventilatory Response and Their Molecular Basis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pamenter, Matthew E.; Powell, Frank L.

    2016-01-01

    Ventilatory responses to hypoxia vary widely depending on the pattern and length of hypoxic exposure. Acute, prolonged, or intermittent hypoxic episodes can increase or decrease breathing for seconds to years, both during the hypoxic stimulus, and also after its removal. These myriad effects are the result of a complicated web of molecular interactions that underlie plasticity in the respiratory control reflex circuits and ultimately control the physiology of breathing in hypoxia. Since the time domains of the physiological hypoxic ventilatory response (HVR) were identified, considerable research effort has gone toward elucidating the underlying molecular mechanisms that mediate these varied responses. This research has begun to describe complicated and plastic interactions in the relay circuits between the peripheral chemoreceptors and the ventilatory control circuits within the central nervous system. Intriguingly, many of these molecular pathways seem to share key components between the different time domains, suggesting that varied physiological HVRs are the result of specific modifications to overlapping pathways. This review highlights what has been discovered regarding the cell and molecular level control of the time domains of the HVR, and highlights key areas where further research is required. Understanding the molecular control of ventilation in hypoxia has important implications for basic physiology and is emerging as an important component of several clinical fields. PMID:27347896

  6. Magneto-aerotactic bacteria deliver drug-containing nanoliposomes to tumour hypoxic regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felfoul, Ouajdi; Mohammadi, Mahmood; Taherkhani, Samira; de Lanauze, Dominic; Zhong Xu, Yong; Loghin, Dumitru; Essa, Sherief; Jancik, Sylwia; Houle, Daniel; Lafleur, Michel; Gaboury, Louis; Tabrizian, Maryam; Kaou, Neila; Atkin, Michael; Vuong, Té; Batist, Gerald; Beauchemin, Nicole; Radzioch, Danuta; Martel, Sylvain

    2016-11-01

    Oxygen-depleted hypoxic regions in the tumour are generally resistant to therapies. Although nanocarriers have been used to deliver drugs, the targeting ratios have been very low. Here, we show that the magneto-aerotactic migration behaviour of magnetotactic bacteria, Magnetococcus marinus strain MC-1 (ref. 4), can be used to transport drug-loaded nanoliposomes into hypoxic regions of the tumour. In their natural environment, MC-1 cells, each containing a chain of magnetic iron-oxide nanocrystals, tend to swim along local magnetic field lines and towards low oxygen concentrations based on a two-state aerotactic sensing system. We show that when MC-1 cells bearing covalently bound drug-containing nanoliposomes were injected near the tumour in severe combined immunodeficient beige mice and magnetically guided, up to 55% of MC-1 cells penetrated into hypoxic regions of HCT116 colorectal xenografts. Approximately 70 drug-loaded nanoliposomes were attached to each MC-1 cell. Our results suggest that harnessing swarms of microorganisms exhibiting magneto-aerotactic behaviour can significantly improve the therapeutic index of various nanocarriers in tumour hypoxic regions.

  7. Resistance of hypoxic cells to ionizing radiation is influenced by homologous recombination status

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sprong, Debbie; Janssen, Hilde L.; Vens, Conchita; Begg, Adrian C.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the role of DNA repair in hypoxic radioresistance. Methods and Materials: Chinese hamster cell lines with mutations in homologous recombination (XRCC2, XRCC3, BRAC2, RAD51C) or nonhomologous end-joining (DNA-PKcs) genes were irradiated under normoxic (20% oxygen) and hypoxic (<0.1% oxygen) conditions, and the oxygen enhancement ratio (OER) was calculated. In addition, Fanconi anemia fibroblasts (complementation groups C and G) were compared with fibroblasts from nonsyndrome patients. RAD51 foci were studied using immunofluorescence. Results: All hamster cell lines deficient in homologous recombination showed a decrease in OER (1.5-2.0 vs. 2.6-3.0 for wild-types). In contrast, the OER for the DNA-PKcs-deficient line was comparable to wild-type controls. The two Fanconi anemia cell strains also showed a significant reduction in OER. The OER for RAD51 foci formation at late times after irradiation was considerably lower than that for survival in wild-type cells. Conclusion: Homologous recombination plays an important role in determining hypoxic cell radiosensitivity. Lower OERs have also been reported in cells deficient in XPF and ERCC1, which, similar to homologous recombination genes, are known to play a role in cross-link repair. Because Fanconi anemia cells are also sensitive to cross-linking agents, this strengthens the notion that the capacity to repair cross-links determines hypoxic radiosensitivity

  8. Severe obesity and comorbid condition impact on the weight-related quality of life of the adolescent patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeller, Meg H; Inge, Thomas H; Modi, Avani C; Jenkins, Todd M; Michalsky, Marc P; Helmrath, Michael; Courcoulas, Anita; Harmon, Carroll M; Rofey, Dana; Baughcum, Amy; Austin, Heather; Price, Karin; Xanthakos, Stavra A; Brandt, Mary L; Horlick, Mary; Buncher, Ralph

    2015-03-01

    To assess links between comorbid health status, severe excess weight, and weight-related quality of life (WRQOL) in adolescents with severe obesity and undergoing weight-loss surgery (WLS) to inform clinical care. Baseline (preoperative) data from Teen Longitudinal Assessment of Bariatric Surgery, a prospective multicenter observational study of 242 adolescents with severe obesity (MedianBMI = 50.5 kg/m(2); Meanage = 17.1; 75.6% female; 71.9% white) undergoing WLS, were used to examine the impact of demographics, body mass index (BMI), presence/absence of 16 comorbid conditions, and a cumulative comorbidity load (CLoad) index on WRQOL scores (Impact of Weight on Quality of Life-Kids). WRQOL was significantly lower than reference samples of healthy weight, overweight, and obese samples. Of 16 comorbid conditions, the most prevalent were dyslipidemia (74.4%), chronic pain (58.3%), and obstructive sleep apnea (56.6%). Male subjects had a greater CLoad (P = .01) and BMI (P = .01), yet less impairment in total WRQOL (P conditions (eg, stress urinary incontinence) also emerged as contributors to lower WRQOL. WRQOL impairment is substantial for adolescents with severe obesity undergoing WLS, with predictors varying by sex. These patient-data highlight targets for education, support, and adjunctive care referrals before WLS. Furthermore, they provide a comprehensive empirical base for understanding heterogeneity in adolescent WRQOL outcomes after WLS, as weight and comorbidity profiles change over time. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Role of Passive Safety Features in Prevention And Mitigation of Severe Plant Conditions in Indian Advanced Heavy Water Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jain, Vikas; Nayak, A.; Dhiman, M.; Kulkarni, P. P.; Vijayan, P. K.; Vaze, K. K. [Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai (India)

    2013-10-15

    Pressing demands of economic competitiveness, the need for large-scale deployment, minimizing the need of human intervention, and experience from the past events and incidents at operating reactors have guided the evolution and innovations in reactor technologies. Indian innovative reactor 'AHWR' is a pressure-tube type natural circulation based boiling water reactor that is designed to meet such requirements, which essentially reflect the needs of next generation reactors. The reactor employs various passive features to prevent and mitigate accidental conditions, like a slightly negative void reactivity coefficient, passive poison injection to scram the reactor in event of failure of the wired shutdown systems, a large elevated pool of water as a heat sink inside the containment, passive decay heat removal based on natural circulation and passive valves, passive ECC injection, etc. It is designed to meet the fundamental safety requirements of safe shutdown, safe decay heat removal and confinement of activity with no impact in public domain, and hence, no need for emergency planning under all conceivable scenarios. This paper examines the role of the various passive safety systems in prevention and mitigation of severe plant conditions that may arise in event of multiple failures. For the purpose of demonstration of the effectiveness of its passive features, postulated scenarios on the lines of three major severe accidents in the history of nuclear power reactors are considered, namely; the Three Mile Island (TMI), Chernobyl and Fukushima accidents. Severe plant conditions along the lines of these scenarios are postulated to the extent conceivable in the reactor under consideration and analyzed using best estimate system thermal-hydraulics code RELAP5/Mod3.2. It is found that the various passive systems incorporated enable the reactor to tolerate the postulated accident conditions without causing severe plant conditions and core degradation.

  10. ROLE OF PASSIVE SAFETY FEATURES IN PREVENTION AND MITIGATION OF SEVERE PLANT CONDITIONS IN INDIAN ADVANCED HEAVY WATER REACTOR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    VIKAS JAIN

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Pressing demands of economic competitiveness, the need for large-scale deployment, minimizing the need of human intervention, and experience from the past events and incidents at operating reactors have guided the evolution and innovations in reactor technologies. Indian innovative reactor ‘AHWR’ is a pressure-tube type natural circulation based boiling water reactor that is designed to meet such requirements, which essentially reflect the needs of next generation reactors. The reactor employs various passive features to prevent and mitigate accidental conditions, like a slightly negative void reactivity coefficient, passive poison injection to scram the reactor in event of failure of the wired shutdown systems, a large elevated pool of water as a heat sink inside the containment, passive decay heat removal based on natural circulation and passive valves, passive ECC injection, etc. It is designed to meet the fundamental safety requirements of safe shutdown, safe decay heat removal and confinement of activity with no impact in public domain, and hence, no need for emergency planning under all conceivable scenarios. This paper examines the role of the various passive safety systems in prevention and mitigation of severe plant conditions that may arise in event of multiple failures. For the purpose of demonstration of the effectiveness of its passive features, postulated scenarios on the lines of three major severe accidents in the history of nuclear power reactors are considered, namely; the Three Mile Island (TMI, Chernobyl and Fukushima accidents. Severe plant conditions along the lines of these scenarios are postulated to the extent conceivable in the reactor under consideration and analyzed using best estimate system thermal-hydraulics code RELAP5/Mod3.2. It is found that the various passive systems incorporated enable the reactor to tolerate the postulated accident conditions without causing severe plant conditions and core degradation.

  11. Studies on the role of molybdenum on iodine transport in the RCS in nuclear severe accident conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grégoire, A.-C.; Kalilainen, J.; Cousin, F.; Mutelle, H.; Cantrel, L.; Auvinen, A.; Haste, T.; Sobanska, S.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • In oxidising conditions, Mo reacts with Cs and thus promotes gaseous iodine release. • In reducing conditions, CsI remains the dominant form for released iodine. • The nature of released iodine is well reproduced by the ASTEC code. - Abstract: The effect of molybdenum on iodine transport in the reactor coolant system (RCS) under PWR severe accident conditions was investigated in the framework of the EU SARNET project. Experiments were conducted at the VTT-Institute and at IRSN and simulations of the experimental results were performed with the ASTEC severe accident simulation code. As molybdenum affects caesium chemistry by formation of molybdates, it may have a significant impact on iodine transport in the RCS. Experimentally it has been shown that the formation of gaseous iodine is promoted in oxidising conditions, as caesium can be completely consumed to form caesium polymolybdates and is thus not available for reacting with gaseous iodine and leading to CsI aerosols. In reducing conditions, CsI remains the dominant form of iodine, as the amount of oxygen is not sufficient to allow formation of quantitative caesium polymolybdates. An I–Mo–Cs model has been developed and it reproduces well the experimental trends on iodine transport

  12. Dataset for the proteomic inventory and quantitative analysis of the breast cancer hypoxic secretome associated with osteotropism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cox, T.R.; Schoof, Erwin; Gartland, A.

    2015-01-01

    secretomes are known to be active mediators of both local and distant host cells and play an important role in the progression and dissemination of cancer. Here we have quantitatively profiled both the composition of breast cancer secretomes associated with osteotropism, and their modulation under normoxic...... and hypoxic conditions. We detect and quantify 162 secretome proteins across all conditions which show differential hypoxic induction and association with osteotropism. Mass Spectrometry proteomics data have been deposited to the ProteomeXchange Consortium with the dataset identifier PXD000397...

  13. Decursin reduce radio-resistance of hypoxic regions under the proton beam therapy by induced HIF-1α degradation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, Myung Hwan; Kim, Kye Ryung

    2013-01-01

    Protons induce cancer-cell apoptosis in vitro and block blood vessel formation in vivo through the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). The fact that proton severely inhibits blood vessel development in zebrafish embryos suggests a higher sensitivity of vascular endothelial cells to proton beam. Decursin, a coumarin compound, was originally isolated from Angelica gigas Nakai (Dang Gui). A. gigas root has been traditionally used in Korean folk medicine for the treatment of anemia and other common diseases. In previous reports, decursin was reported to exhibit anti-tumor activity against various cancer cells and to inhibit the activities of the androgen and androgen-receptor (AR) signaling pathway in prostate cancer, induction of cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in various cancer cells, such as prostate, breast, bladder, and colon cancer cells. Decursin also inhibits VEGF-induced angiogenesis through the suppression of the VEGFR-2-signaling pathway. However, the mechanism of decursin mediates change of HIF-1α activities is not clear. In this research, we identified regulations of the HIF-1α and the anti-angiogenesis effects of decursin in proton-beam-irradiated human lung cancer, prostate cancer and Hepatic cancer cells. We investigated the underlying mechanisms of positive effects of protonbeam-induced anti-angiogenesis. Our data indicate that the groups co-treated with decursin and a proton-beam had significant reduced HIF-1α activity compared with the groups treated with only a proton beam under the hypoxic condition caused by DFX(desferrioxamine). Decursin was found to induced HIF-1α degradation. Therefore, we suggest that decursin may be a potential candidate for use as a sensitizer for proton-beaminduced cell apoptosis. Here we have shown that decursin successfully reduced HIF-1α stability under hypoxic condition by induced desferrioxamine. We showed novel candidates for anti-angiogenic compound, decursin, leading to complete inhibition of radio

  14. Decursin reduce radio-resistance of hypoxic regions under the proton beam therapy by induced HIF-1α degradation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Myung Hwan; Kim, Kye Ryung [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-10-15

    Protons induce cancer-cell apoptosis in vitro and block blood vessel formation in vivo through the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). The fact that proton severely inhibits blood vessel development in zebrafish embryos suggests a higher sensitivity of vascular endothelial cells to proton beam. Decursin, a coumarin compound, was originally isolated from Angelica gigas Nakai (Dang Gui). A. gigas root has been traditionally used in Korean folk medicine for the treatment of anemia and other common diseases. In previous reports, decursin was reported to exhibit anti-tumor activity against various cancer cells and to inhibit the activities of the androgen and androgen-receptor (AR) signaling pathway in prostate cancer, induction of cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in various cancer cells, such as prostate, breast, bladder, and colon cancer cells. Decursin also inhibits VEGF-induced angiogenesis through the suppression of the VEGFR-2-signaling pathway. However, the mechanism of decursin mediates change of HIF-1α activities is not clear. In this research, we identified regulations of the HIF-1α and the anti-angiogenesis effects of decursin in proton-beam-irradiated human lung cancer, prostate cancer and Hepatic cancer cells. We investigated the underlying mechanisms of positive effects of protonbeam-induced anti-angiogenesis. Our data indicate that the groups co-treated with decursin and a proton-beam had significant reduced HIF-1α activity compared with the groups treated with only a proton beam under the hypoxic condition caused by DFX(desferrioxamine). Decursin was found to induced HIF-1α degradation. Therefore, we suggest that decursin may be a potential candidate for use as a sensitizer for proton-beaminduced cell apoptosis. Here we have shown that decursin successfully reduced HIF-1α stability under hypoxic condition by induced desferrioxamine. We showed novel candidates for anti-angiogenic compound, decursin, leading to complete inhibition of radio

  15. Experimental results from containment piping bellows subjected to severe accident conditions. Volume 1, Results from bellows tested in 'like-new' conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lambert, L.D.; Parks, M.B.

    1994-09-01

    Bellows are an integral part of the containment pressure boundary in nuclear power plants. They are used at piping penetrations to allow relative movement between piping and the containment wall, while minimizing the load imposed on the piping and wall. Piping bellows are primarily used in steel containments; however, they have received limited use in some concrete (reinforced and prestressed) containments. In a severe accident they may be subjected to pressure and temperature conditions that exceed the design values, along with a combination of axial and lateral deflections. A test program to determine the leak-tight capacity of containment penetration bellows is being conducted under the sponsorship of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission at Sandia National Laboratories. Several different bellows geometries, representative of actual containment bellows, have been subjected to extreme deflections along with pressure and temperature loads. The bellows geometries and loading conditions are described along with the testing apparatus and procedures. A total of thirteen bellows have been tested, all in the 'like-new' condition. (Additional tests are planned of bellows that have been subjected to corrosion.) The tests showed that bellows are capable of withstanding relatively large deformations, up to, or near, the point of full compression or elongation, before developing leakage. The test data is presented and discussed

  16. Retinal neuroprotection by hypoxic preconditioning is independent of hypoxia-inducible factor-1 alpha expression in photoreceptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiersch, Markus; Lange, Christina; Joly, Sandrine; Heynen, Severin; Le, Yun Zheng; Samardzija, Marijana; Grimm, Christian

    2009-06-01

    Hypoxic preconditioning stabilizes hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) 1 alpha in the retina and protects photoreceptors against light-induced cell death. HIF-1 alpha is one of the major transcription factors responding to low oxygen tension and can differentially regulate a large number of target genes. To analyse whether photoreceptor-specific expression of HIF-1 alpha is essential to protect photoreceptors by hypoxic preconditioning, we knocked down expression of HIF-1 alpha specifically in photoreceptor cells, using the cyclization recombinase (Cre)-lox system. The Cre-mediated knockdown caused a 20-fold reduced expression of Hif-1 alpha in the photoreceptor cell layer. In the total retina, RNA expression was reduced by 65%, and hypoxic preconditioning led to only a small increase in HIF-1 alpha protein levels. Accordingly, HIF-1 target gene expression after hypoxia was significantly diminished. Retinas of Hif-1 alpha knockdown animals did not show any pathological alterations, and tolerated hypoxic exposure in a comparable way to wild-type retinas. Importantly, the strong neuroprotective effect of hypoxic preconditioning against light-induced photoreceptor degeneration persisted in knockdown mice, suggesting that hypoxia-mediated survival of light exposure does not depend on an autocrine action of HIF-1 alpha in photoreceptor cells. Hypoxia-mediated stabilization of HIF-2 alpha and phosphorylation of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT 3) were not affected in the retinas of Hif-1 alpha knockdown mice. Thus, these factors are candidates for regulating the resistance of photoreceptors to light damage after hypoxic preconditioning, along with several potentially neuroprotective genes that were similarly induced in hypoxic knockdown and control mice.

  17. Reoxygenation of hypoxic cells by tumor shrinkage during irradiation. A computer simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kocher, M.; Treuer, H.

    1995-01-01

    A 3-dimensional computer simulation was developed in order to estimate the impact of tumor shrinkage on reoxygenation of chronic hypoxic tumor cells during a full course of fractionated irradiation. The growth of a small tumor situated in a vascularized stroma with 350 capillary cross-sections/mm 3 which were displaced by the growing tumor was simulated. Tumors contained 10 4 cells when irradiation started, intrinsic radiosensitivity was set to either low (α=0.3 Gy -1 , β=0.03 Gy -2 ) or high (α=0.4 Gy -1 , β=0.04 Gy -2 ) values. Oxygen enhancement ratio was 3.0, potential tumor doubling time T pot =1, 2 or 5 days. A simulated fractionated radiotherapy was carried out with daily fractions of 2.0 Gy, total dose 50 to 70 Gy. The presence or absence of factors preventing tumor cord shrinkage was also included. During the growth phase, all tumors developed a necrotic core with a hypoxic cell fraction of 25% under these conditions. During irradiation, the slower growing tumors (T pot =2 to 5 days) showed complete reoxygenation of the hypoxic cells after 30 to 40 Gy independent from radiosensitivity, undisturbed tumor shrinkage provided. If shrinkage was prevented, the hypoxic fraction rose to 100% after 30 to 50 Gy. Local tumor control, defined as the destruction of all clonogenic and hypoxic tumor cells increased by 20 to 100% due to reoxygenation and 50 Gy were enough in order to sterilize the tumors in these cases. In the fast growing tumors (T pot =1 day), reoxygenation was only observed in the case of high radiosensitivity and undisturbed tumor shrinkage. In these tumors reoxygenation increased the control rates by up to 60%. (orig./MG) [de

  18. Investigation of Focusing Effect according to the Cooling Condition and Height of the Metallic layer in a Severe Accident

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moon, Je-Young; Chung, Bum-Jin [Kyung Hee University, Yongin (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    The Fukushima nuclear power plant accident has led to renewed research interests in severe accidents of nuclear power plants. In-Vessel Retention (IVR) of core melt is one of key severe accident management strategies adopted in nuclear power plant design. The metallic layer is heated from below by the radioactive decay heat generated at the oxide pool, and is cooled from above and side walls. During the IVR process, reactor vessel may be cooled externally (ERVC) and the heat fluxes to the side wall increase with larger temperature difference than above. This {sup F}ocusing effect{sup i}s varied by cooling condition of upper boundary and height of the metallic layer. A sulfuric acid–copper sulfate (H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} - CuSO{sub 4}) electroplating system was adopted as the mass transfer system. Numerical analysis using the commercial CFD program FLUENT 6.3 were carried out with the same material properties and cooling conditions to examine the variation of the cell. The experimental and numerical studies were performed to investigate the focusing effect according to cooling condition of upper boundary and the height in metallic layer. The height of the side wall was varied for three different cooling conditions: top only, side only, and both top and side. Mass transfer experiments, based on the analogy concept, were carried out in order to achieve high Rayleigh number. The experimental results agreed well with the Rayleigh-Benard convection correlations of Dropkin and Somerscales and Globe and Dropkin. The heat transfer on side wall cooling condition without top cooling is highest and was enhanced by decreasing the aspect ratio. The numerical results agreed well with the experimental results. Each cell pattern (cell size, cell direction, central location of cell) differed in the cooling condition. Therefore, it is difficult to predict the internal flow due to complexity of cell formation behavior.

  19. The research of melatonin in hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun Bin; Feng Xing; Qian Zhihong; Shi Ming

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To elucidate the function of melatonin in the pathogenesis and the prognosis of hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE) and provide the pathophysiology basis for therapying HIE with melatonin. Methods: The level of plasma melatonin of twenty normal term infants and twenty modest HIE and twenty middle-severity HIE in their acute phase and recovery phase were assayed respectively with radioimmunoassay (RIA). Then compare the difference of the melatonin level among these neonates. Results: (1) For modest HIE, the melatonin level was higher than that in the normal in the acute phase and there was no difference to the normal in the recovery phase. (2) There was no difference between the melatonin level in middle-severity HIE in the acute phase and that in the normal, but in the recovery phase it was higher than that in the normal. (3) For modest HIE, the melatonin level in acute phase was higher than that in the recovery phase, but for middle-severity HIE, it was adverse. (4) In the acute phase, the level in modest HIE was higher than that in the middle-severity HIE, but on the contrary in the recovery phase. Conclusion: Melatonin have protection action on HIE. The prognosis of modest HIE neonates with rising melatonin level in the acute phase is better than that with lower melatonin level of middle-severity HIE. (authors)

  20. Ischemic preconditioning of the lower extremity attenuates the normal hypoxic increase in pulmonary artery systolic pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, Gary P; Westerdahl, Daniel E; Foster, Laura A; Hsu, Jeffrey V; Anholm, James D

    2011-12-15

    Ischemic pre-condition of an extremity (IPC) induces effects on local and remote tissues that are protective against ischemic injury. To test the effects of IPC on the normal hypoxic increase in pulmonary pressures and exercise performance, 8 amateur cyclists were evaluated under normoxia and hypoxia (13% F(I)O(2)) in a randomized cross-over trial. IPC was induced using an arterial occlusive cuff to one thigh for 5 min followed by deflation for 5 min for 4 cycles. In the control condition, the resting pulmonary artery systolic pressure (PASP) increased from a normoxic value of 25.6±2.3 mmHg to 41.8±7.2 mmHg following 90 min of hypoxia. In the IPC condition, the PASP increased to only 32.4±3.1 mmHg following hypoxia, representing a 72.8% attenuation (p=0.003). No significant difference was detected in cycle ergometer time trial duration between control and IPC conditions with either normoxia or hypoxia. IPC administered prior to hypoxic exposure was associated with profound attenuation of the normal hypoxic increase of pulmonary artery systolic pressure. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  1. Response Analysis on Electrical Pulses under Severe Nuclear Accident Temperature Conditions Using an Abnormal Signal Simulation Analysis Module

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kil-Mo Koo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Unlike design basis accidents, some inherent uncertainties of the reliability of instrumentations are expected while subjected to harsh environments (e.g., high temperature and pressure, high humidity, and high radioactivity occurring in severe nuclear accident conditions. Even under such conditions, an electrical signal should be within its expected range so that some mitigating actions can be taken based on the signal in the control room. For example, an industrial process control standard requires that the normal signal level for pressure, flow, and resistance temperature detector sensors be in the range of 4~20 mA for most instruments. Whereas, in the case that an abnormal signal is expected from an instrument, such a signal should be refined through a signal validation process so that the refined signal could be available in the control room. For some abnormal signals expected under severe accident conditions, to date, diagnostics and response analysis have been evaluated with an equivalent circuit model of real instruments, which is regarded as the best method. The main objective of this paper is to introduce a program designed to implement a diagnostic and response analysis for equivalent circuit modeling. The program links signal analysis tool code to abnormal signal simulation engine code not only as a one body order system, but also as a part of functions of a PC-based ASSA (abnormal signal simulation analysis module developed to obtain a varying range of the R-C circuit elements in high temperature conditions. As a result, a special function for abnormal pulse signal patterns can be obtained through the program, which in turn makes it possible to analyze the abnormal output pulse signals through a response characteristic of a 4~20 mA circuit model and a range of the elements changing with temperature under an accident condition.

  2. Hypoxic-Ischemic Encephalopathy after Bee Sting and Treatment with Zolpidem: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Turgay Demir

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE, a metabolic encephalopathy, develops as a result of cessation or reduction of oxygen and blood flow to the brain. The clinical picture may vary in severity from minimal neurologic deficits to coma. In living patients, permanent neuropsychological sequelae can develop. Herein, we present a case of HIE that occured after anaphylactic reaction due to bee sting, which was treatedm with zolpidem.

  3. Sodium Pyruvate Reduced Hypoxic-Ischemic Injury to Neonatal Rat Brain

    OpenAIRE

    Pan, Rui; Rong, Zhihui; She, Yun; Cao, Yuan; Chang, Li-Wen; Lee, Wei-Hua

    2012-01-01

    Background Neonatal hypoxia-ischemia (HI) remains a major cause of severe brain damage and is often associated with high mortality and lifelong disability. Immature brains are extremely sensitive to hypoxia-ischemia, shown as prolonged mitochondrial neuronal death. Sodium pyruvate (SP), a substrate of the tricarboxylic acid cycle and an extracellular antioxidant, has been considered as a potential treatment for hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE), but its effects have not been evaluated in ...

  4. Nitric oxide improves the hemodynamic performance of the hypoxic goldfish (Carassius auratus) heart

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Imbrogno, Sandra; Capria, C.; Tota, Bruno

    2014-01-01

    Goldfish tolerate prolonged and severe hypoxia, thus representing a well-suited model to study the maintenance of cardiac function when O2 availability represents a limiting factor. Using a working heart preparation, we explored the role of the intracardiac nitric oxide synthase (NOS)- derived...... complemented by Western blotting analysis which revealed increased expressions of NOS and hypoxia inducible factor α(HIF-1α). In conclusion, we demonstrated that intracardiac NO/NOS enhances goldfish heart performance, remarkably expanding its hypoxic tolerance....

  5. Selective toxicity of 5-(3,3-dimethyl-1-triazeno)imidazole-4-carboxamide toward hypoxic mammalian cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rauth, A.M.; Mohindra, J.K.

    1981-01-01

    The chemotherapeutic agent 5-(3,3-dimethyl-1-triazeno)-imidazole-4-carboxamide (DTIC) is used in the treatment of malignant melanoma where response rates of 15 to 30% have been reported. Some current interest exists in combining DTIC chemotherapy with localized high-dose (800 rads)-per-fraction radiotherapy in the treatment of unresectable metastatic melanoma. The present work investigates the radiosensitizing and chemotherapeutic properties of DTIC in an in vitro system using Chinese hamster ovary or HeLa cells and in vivo, using the KHT transplantable murine tumor. No evidence of a radiosensitizing effect of DTIC was found towards hypoxic or aerobic cells either in vitro or in vivo. In vitro, high drug concentrations (1 mg/ml) were approximately 5 times more effective in killing hypoxic Chinese hamster ovary or HeLa cells than in killing aerobic cells over exposure times of 0 to 12 hr. The degree of toxicity was drug dose and temperature dependent but was not highly dependent on cell number or cell type. In vivo plasma levels of DTIC were measured with high-pressure liquid chromatography after i.p. injection of drug into C3H mice. At the highest drug doses tested, near the 50% lethal dose in mice for DTIC (0.5 mg/g), the drug was toxic to both aerobic and hypoxic tumor cells with some evidence of increased toxicity towards hypoxic cells. The present work suggests that DTIC may be more efficiently activated under hypoxic conditions as compared to aerobic conditions. The increased toxicity of DTIC under hypoxic versus aerobic conditions may prove to be a feature of this drug that can be exploited in its clinical use and in the design of new analogs of DTIC

  6. Study some mechanical properties of self-compacting concrete with nano silica under severe saline environment conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Habeeb Ghalib

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The main aim of this research is to evaluate the performance of Nano silica self-compacting concrete which is subjected to severe saline conditions that contain sulfates and chlorides at concentrations similar to those existing in the soils and ground water of the middle and southern parts of Iraq. For this purpose, ordinary and sulfate resistant Portland cement without and with 3% Nano silica addition by weight of cementitious materials were used. Splitting tensile strength, flexural strength, static modulus of elasticity and ultrasonic pulse velocity were investigated for all exposure conditions and all types of mixes of self-compacting concrete at ages of 28, 60, 90, 120 and 180 days. Test results revealed that the inclusion of Nano Silica in concrete mixes improved clearly the mechanical properties of self-compacting concrete compared with reference concrete.

  7. The relationship between stressful working conditions and high alcohol consumption and severe alcohol problems in an urban general population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Romelsjö, A; Hasin, D; Hilton, M

    1992-01-01

    The relationship between 15 measures of stressful working conditions and high alcohol consumption (35 g 100% ethanol per day or more for men and 25 g or more for women) was studied, using cross-sectional data from a general population survey of 1344 males and 1494 females; the ages 25-64 years......-adjusted odds ratios, were positive and some were negative when high alcohol consumption was the endpoint, but there was a clear variation by sex and social class. Generally the positive associations were stronger among male non-manual employees. Among males, there was a clear association between stressful...... increased odds ratios were lower when subjects with an alcohol diagnosis at inpatient care during 1980-84 were excluded in the analyses. On the whole, our findings are not conclusive. The strong, but imprecise associations between stressful working conditions and severe alcohol problems, are however...

  8. Blood carbon dioxide levels and adverse outcome in neonatal hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Nadeem, Montasser

    2012-01-31

    We investigated pCO(2) patterns and the relationship between pCO(2) levels and neurodevelopmental outcome in term infants with hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy. Blood gases during the first 72 hours of life were collected from 52 infants with hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy. Moderate hypocapnia (pCO(2) <3.3 kPa), severe hypocapnia (pCO(2) <2.6 kPa), and hypercapnia (pCO(2) >6.6 kPa) were correlated to neurodevelopmental outcome at 24 months. Normocapnia was documented in 416\\/551 (75.5%) of samples and was present during the entire 72 hours in only 6 out of 52 infants. Mean (standard deviation) pCO(2) values did not differ between infants with normal and abnormal outcomes: 5.43 (2.4) and 5.41 (2.03), respectively. There was no significant association between moderate hypocapnia, severe hypocapnia, or hypercapnia and adverse outcome (odds ratio [OR] = 1.84, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.49 to 6.89; OR = 3.16, CI = 0.14 to 28.45; and OR = 1.07, CI = 0.24 to 5.45, respectively). In conclusion, only one in nine newborns had normocapnia throughout the first 72 hours. Severe hypocapnia was rare and occurred only in ventilated babies. Hypercapnia and hypocapnia in infants with hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy during the first 72 hours of life were not associated with adverse outcome.

  9. Early results from an experimental program to determine the behavior of containment piping penetration bellows subjected to severe accident conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lambert, L.D.; Parks, M.B.

    1994-01-01

    Containment piping penetration bellows are an integral part of the pressure boundary in steel containments in the United States (US). Their purpose is to minimize loading on the containment shell caused by differential movement between the piping and the containment. This differential movement is typically caused by thermal gradients generated during startup and shutdown of the reactor, but can be caused by earthquake, a loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA), or ''severe'' accidents. In the event of a severe accident, the bellows would be subjected to pressure, temperature, and deflection well beyond the design basis. Most bellows are installed such that they would be subjected to elevated internal pressure, elevated temperature, axial compression, and lateral deflection during a severe accident. A few bellows would be subjected to external pressure and axial elongation, as well as elevated temperature and lateral deflection. The purpose of this experimental program is to examine the potential for leakage of containment bellows during a severe accident. The test series subjects bellows to various levels and combinations of internal pressure, elevated temperature, axial compression or elongation, and lateral deformation. The experiments are being conducted in two parts. For Part 1, all bellows specimens are tested in ''like-new'' condition, without regard for the possible degrading effect of corrosion that has been observed in some containment piping bellows in the US Part I testing, which included 13 bellows tests, has been completed. The second part of the experimental program, in which bellows are subjected to simulated corrosive environments prior to testing, has just just begun. The Part I experiments have shown that bellows in ''like-new'' condition can withstand elevated temperatures and pressures along with large deformations before leaking. In most cases, the like-new bellows were fully compressed without developing any leakage

  10. The hypoxic tumour cell in radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trott, K.R.; Gesellschaft fuer Strahlen- und Umweltforschung m.b.H., Neuherberg/Muenchen

    1976-01-01

    In most tumours there is a disproportion between the tumour cells and vascular connective tissue. A lack of oxygen depending on extent and duration, leads to changes of the metabolism and of the proliferative properties of the cells, to an increase of radiation resistance and to a reduction of the ability to recover from radiation injuries. Finally with longer duration, hypoxy leads to cell killing. As a result of irradiation, a reoxygenation of a part of the previous hypoxic tumour cell occurs more or less quickly. The time and topographic changes of these factors are involved in a complex manner in the radiotherapy of malignant tumours and essentially share the responsibility regarding the curative success of radiotherapy. (orig./LH) [de

  11. Clinical evaluation of hypoxic cell sensitizer (Misonidazole)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asakawa, Hiroshi (Miyagi Prefectural Adult Disease Center, Natori (Japan)); Watarai, Jiro; Hoshino, Toshiaki

    1984-06-01

    Clinical effectiveness and toxicity of Misonidazole were analyzed and discussed in 22 cases of carcinoma of uterine cervix, 17 cases of esophageal cancer and 11 with other malignancies treated by radiation. By clinical and histologic examination in the controlled trial, it was shown that radiation response of tumor was slightly sensitized in the treated group with this drug, compared with that in the control group. It was confirmed that there was no significant difference between radiation response of tumor in both groups. Peripheral neuropathy was a complication in 10% and toxicodermatitis in 12% even if the total dose administered was below 10 g/m/sup 2/. From these results, it was strongly suggested that this drug is not suitable in combination with simple fractionated irradiation as a hypoxic cell sensitizer.

  12. Radiation-induced changes in nucleoid halo diameteres of aerobic and hypoxic SF-126 human brain tumor cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, J.; Basu, H.S.; Hu, L.; Feuerstein, B.G.; Deen, D.F.

    1995-01-01

    Nucleoid halo diameters were measured to assay changes in DNA supercoiling in human brain tumor cell line SF-126 after irradiation under aerobic or hypoxic conditions. In unirradiated aerobic cells, a typical propidium iodide titration curve showed that with increasing concentrations of propodium iodide, the halo diameter increased and then decreased with the unwinding and subsequent rewinding of DNA supercoils. In irradiated cells, the rewinding of DNA supercoils was inhibited, resulting in an increased halo diameter, in a radiation dose-dependent manner. To produce equal increases in halo diameter required about a threefold higher radiation dose in hypoxic cells than in aerobic cells. Quantitatively similiar differences in the radiation sensitivities of hypoxic and aerobic cells were demonstrated by a colony-forming efficiency assay. These findings suggest that the nucleoid halo assay may be used as a rapid measure of the inherent radiation sensitivity of human tumors. 22 refs., 5 figs

  13. Hypoxic exosomes facilitate bladder tumor growth and development through transferring long non-coding RNA-UCA1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Mei; Chen, Wei; Xiang, An; Wang, Ruiqi; Chen, He; Pan, Jingjing; Pang, Huan; An, Hongli; Wang, Xiang; Hou, Huilian; Li, Xu

    2017-08-25

    To overcome the hostile hypoxic microenvironment of solid tumors, tumor cells secrete a large number of non-coding RNA-containing exosomes that facilitate tumor development and metastasis. However, the precise mechanisms of tumor cell-derived exosomes during hypoxia are unknown. Here, we aim to clarify whether hypoxia affects tumor growth and progression by transferring long non-coding RNA-urothelial cancer-associated 1 (lncRNA-UCA1) enriched exosomes secreted from bladder cancer cells. We used bladder cancer 5637 cells with high expression of lncRNA-UCA1 as exosome-generating cells and bladder cancer UMUC2 cells with low expression of lncRNA-UCA1 as recipient cells. Exosomes derived from 5637 cells cultured under normoxic or hypoxic conditions were isolated and identified by transmission electron microscopy, nanoparticle tracking analysis and western blotting analysis. These exosomes were co-cultured with UMUC2 cells to evaluate cell proliferation, migration and invasion. We further investigated the roles of exosomal lncRNA-UCA1 derived from hypoxic 5637 cells by xenograft models. The availability of lncRNA-UCA1 in serum-derived exosomes as a biomarker for bladder cancer was also assessed. We found that hypoxic exosomes derived from 5637 cells promoted cell proliferation, migration and invasion, and hypoxic exosomal RNAs could be internalized by three bladder cancer cell lines. Importantly, lncRNA-UCA1 was secreted in hypoxic 5637 cell-derived exosomes. Compared with normoxic exosomes, hypoxic exosomes derived from 5637 cells showed the higher expression levels of lncRNA-UCA1. Moreover, Hypoxic exosomal lncRNA-UCA1 could promote tumor growth and progression though epithelial-mesenchymal transition, in vitro and in vivo. In addition, the expression levels of lncRNA-UCA1 in the human serum-derived exosomes of bladder cancer patients were higher than that in the healthy controls. Together, our results demonstrate that hypoxic bladder cancer cells remodel tumor

  14. A voxel-based multiscale model to simulate the radiation response of hypoxic tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espinoza, I; Peschke, P; Karger, C P

    2015-01-01

    In radiotherapy, it is important to predict the response of tumors to irradiation prior to the treatment. This is especially important for hypoxic tumors, which are known to be highly radioresistant. Mathematical modeling based on the dose distribution, biological parameters, and medical images may help to improve this prediction and to optimize the treatment plan. A voxel-based multiscale tumor response model for simulating the radiation response of hypoxic tumors was developed. It considers viable and dead tumor cells, capillary and normal cells, as well as the most relevant biological processes such as (i) proliferation of tumor cells, (ii) hypoxia-induced angiogenesis, (iii) spatial exchange of cells leading to tumor growth, (iv) oxygen-dependent cell survival after irradiation, (v) resorption of dead cells, and (vi) spatial exchange of cells leading to tumor shrinkage. Oxygenation is described on a microscopic scale using a previously published tumor oxygenation model, which calculates the oxygen distribution for each voxel using the vascular fraction as the most important input parameter. To demonstrate the capabilities of the model, the dependence of the oxygen distribution on tumor growth and radiation-induced shrinkage is investigated. In addition, the impact of three different reoxygenation processes is compared and tumor control probability (TCP) curves for a squamous cells carcinoma of the head and neck (HNSSC) are simulated under normoxic and hypoxic conditions. The model describes the spatiotemporal behavior of the tumor on three different scales: (i) on the macroscopic scale, it describes tumor growth and shrinkage during radiation treatment, (ii) on a mesoscopic scale, it provides the cell density and vascular fraction for each voxel, and (iii) on the microscopic scale, the oxygen distribution may be obtained in terms of oxygen histograms. With increasing tumor size, the simulated tumors develop a hypoxic core. Within the model, tumor shrinkage was

  15. A voxel-based multiscale model to simulate the radiation response of hypoxic tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Espinoza, I.; Peschke, P.; Karger, C. P.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: In radiotherapy, it is important to predict the response of tumors to irradiation prior to the treatment. This is especially important for hypoxic tumors, which are known to be highly radioresistant. Mathematical modeling based on the dose distribution, biological parameters, and medical images may help to improve this prediction and to optimize the treatment plan. Methods: A voxel-based multiscale tumor response model for simulating the radiation response of hypoxic tumors was developed. It considers viable and dead tumor cells, capillary and normal cells, as well as the most relevant biological processes such as (i) proliferation of tumor cells, (ii) hypoxia-induced angiogenesis, (iii) spatial exchange of cells leading to tumor growth, (iv) oxygen-dependent cell survival after irradiation, (v) resorption of dead cells, and (vi) spatial exchange of cells leading to tumor shrinkage. Oxygenation is described on a microscopic scale using a previously published tumor oxygenation model, which calculates the oxygen distribution for each voxel using the vascular fraction as the most important input parameter. To demonstrate the capabilities of the model, the dependence of the oxygen distribution on tumor growth and radiation-induced shrinkage is investigated. In addition, the impact of three different reoxygenation processes is compared and tumor control probability (TCP) curves for a squamous cells carcinoma of the head and neck (HNSSC) are simulated under normoxic and hypoxic conditions. Results: The model describes the spatiotemporal behavior of the tumor on three different scales: (i) on the macroscopic scale, it describes tumor growth and shrinkage during radiation treatment, (ii) on a mesoscopic scale, it provides the cell density and vascular fraction for each voxel, and (iii) on the microscopic scale, the oxygen distribution may be obtained in terms of oxygen histograms. With increasing tumor size, the simulated tumors develop a hypoxic core. Within the

  16. Hypoxic training: Clinical benefits on cardiometabolic risk factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wee, Justin; Climstein, Mike

    2015-01-01

    The main aim of this review was to evaluate the effectiveness of hypoxic training on the modulation of cardiometabolic risk factors. Literature review. An electronic search encompassing five databases (PUBMED, EMBASE, MEDLINE, CINAHL, and SPORTDiscus) was conducted. A total of 2138 articles were retrieved. After excluding non-relevant articles, duplications and outcomes not related to cardiometabolic risk factors, 25 articles were chosen for review. Body weight and body composition were reported to be significantly improved when hypoxic training (≥1700 m) was used in conjunction with exercise regimes, at least three times a week, however extreme altitudes (>5000 m) resulted in a loss of fat-free muscle mass. Fasting blood glucose levels generally improved over time (≥21 days) at moderate levels of altitude (1500 m-3000 m), although reductions in blood glucose tolerance were observed when subjects were exposed to extreme hypoxia (>4000 m). Resting systolic and diastolic blood pressure levels improved as much as 26 mmHg and 13 mmHg respectively, with hypoxic training (1285 m-2650 m) in medicated, stable hypertensive subjects. Effects of hypoxic training when used in combination with exercise training on cholesterol levels were mixed. While there were improvements in total cholesterol (-4.2% to -30%) and low-density lipoprotein (-2.6% to -14.3%) reported as a result of hypoxic training, available evidence does not substantiate hypoxic training for the improvement of high-density lipoprotein and triglycerides. In conclusion, hypoxic training may be used as an adjunct treatment to modify some cardiometabolic risk factors. Measurement of hypoxic load may be used to individualize and ascertain appropriate levels of hypoxic training. Copyright © 2013 Sports Medicine Australia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Inhibition of Siah2 Ubiquitin Ligase by Vitamin K3 Attenuates Chronic Myeloid Leukemia Chemo-Resistance in Hypoxic Microenvironment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jixian; Lu, Ziyuan; Xiao, Yajuan; He, Bolin; Pan, Chengyun; Zhou, Xuan; Xu, Na; Liu, Xiaoli

    2018-02-05

    BACKGROUND A hypoxic microenvironment is associated with resistance to tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) and a poor prognosis in chronic myeloid leukemia (CML). The E3 ubiquitin ligase Siah2 plays a vital role in the regulation of hypoxia response, as well as in leukemogenesis. However, the role of Siah2 in CML resistance is unclear, and it is unknown whether vitaminK3 (a Siah2 inhibitor) can improve the chemo-sensitivity of CML cells in a hypoxic microenvironment. MATERIAL AND METHODS The expression of Siah2 was detected in CML patients (CML-CP and CML-BC), K562 cells, and K562-imatinib-resistant cells (K562-R cells). We measured the expression of PHD3, HIF-1α, and VEGF in both cell lines under normoxia and hypoxic conditions, and the degree of leukemic sensitivity to imatinib and VitaminK3 were evaluated. RESULTS Siah2 was overexpressed in CML-BC patients (n=9) as compared to CML-CP patients (n=13). Similarly, K562-imatinib-resistant cells (K562-R cells) showed a significantly higher expression of Siah2 as compared to K562 cells in a hypoxic microenvironment. Compared to normoxia, under hypoxic conditions, both cell lines had lower PHD3, higher HIF-1α, and higher VEGF expression. Additionally, Vitamin K3 (an inhibitor of Siah2) reversed these changes and promoted a higher degree of leukemic sensitivity to imatinib. CONCLUSIONS Our findings indicate that the Siah2-PHD3- HIF-1α-VEGF axis is an important hypoxic signaling pathway in a leukemic microenvironment. An inhibitor of Siah2, combined with TKIs, might be a promising therapy for relapsing and refractory CML patients.

  18. Mitigative techniques and analysis of generic site conditions for ground-water contamination associated with severe accidents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shafer, J.M.; Oberlander, P.L.; Skaggs, R.L.

    1984-04-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the feasibility of using ground-water contaminant mitigation techniques to control radionuclide migration following a severe commercial nuclear power reactor accident. The two types of severe commercial reactor accidents investigated are: (1) containment basemat penetration of core melt debris which slowly cools and leaches radionuclides to the subsurface environment, and (2) containment basemat penetration of sump water without full penetration of the core mass. Six generic hydrogeologic site classifications are developed from an evaluation of reported data pertaining to the hydrogeologic properties of all existing and proposed commercial reactor sites. One-dimensional radionuclide transport analyses are conducted on each of the individual reactor sites to determine the generic characteristics of a radionuclide discharge to an accessible environment. Ground-water contaminant mitigation techniques that may be suitable, depending on specific site and accident conditions, for severe power plant accidents are identified and evaluated. Feasible mitigative techniques and associated constraints on feasibility are determined for each of the six hydrogeologic site classifications. The first of three case studies is conducted on a site located on the Texas Gulf Coastal Plain. Mitigative strategies are evaluated for their impact on contaminant transport and results show that the techniques evaluated significantly increased ground-water travel times. 31 references, 118 figures, 62 tables.

  19. Mitigative techniques and analysis of generic site conditions for ground-water contamination associated with severe accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shafer, J.M.; Oberlander, P.L.; Skaggs, R.L.

    1984-04-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the feasibility of using ground-water contaminant mitigation techniques to control radionuclide migration following a severe commercial nuclear power reactor accident. The two types of severe commercial reactor accidents investigated are: (1) containment basemat penetration of core melt debris which slowly cools and leaches radionuclides to the subsurface environment, and (2) containment basemat penetration of sump water without full penetration of the core mass. Six generic hydrogeologic site classifications are developed from an evaluation of reported data pertaining to the hydrogeologic properties of all existing and proposed commercial reactor sites. One-dimensional radionuclide transport analyses are conducted on each of the individual reactor sites to determine the generic characteristics of a radionuclide discharge to an accessible environment. Ground-water contaminant mitigation techniques that may be suitable, depending on specific site and accident conditions, for severe power plant accidents are identified and evaluated. Feasible mitigative techniques and associated constraints on feasibility are determined for each of the six hydrogeologic site classifications. The first of three case studies is conducted on a site located on the Texas Gulf Coastal Plain. Mitigative strategies are evaluated for their impact on contaminant transport and results show that the techniques evaluated significantly increased ground-water travel times. 31 references, 118 figures, 62 tables

  20. The use of drugs which deplete intracellular glutathione in hypoxic cell radiosensitization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bump, E.A.; Yu, N.Y.; Brown, J.M.

    1982-01-01

    Diethylmaleate (DEM) is a thiol-biding reagent with specificity toward glutathione. Treatment of chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells in vitro with 2 x 10 -4 M DEM for one hour results in a decrease in glutathione content to less than 5% of control, without cytotoxicity. This treatment results in dose-modifying sensitization to radiation under hypoxic conditions, with no effect on the shoulder of the radiation survival curve. No effect on the radiation sensitivity of oxygenated cells was seen. DEM pretreatment enhances the radiosensitization of hypoxic cells by misonidazole, as well. Similar results were obtained in vivo with EMT6 tumors in BALB/c mice. Analysis of DNA damage by the alkaline elution assay indicates that DEM enhances radiation-induced single-strand breaks, but does not significantly affect repair, while diamide and N-ethylmaleimide inhibit repair, in addition to enhancing radiation-induced single-strand breaks

  1. Perceptual relearning of binocular fusion after hypoxic brain damage: four controlled single-case treatment studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaadt, Anna-Katharina; Schmidt, Lena; Kuhn, Caroline; Summ, Miriam; Adams, Michaela; Garbacenkaite, Ruta; Leonhardt, Eva; Reinhart, Stefan; Kerkhoff, Georg

    2014-05-01

    Hypoxic brain damage is characterized by widespread, diffuse-disseminated brain lesions, which may cause severe disturbances in binocular vision, leading to diplopia and loss of stereopsis, for which no evaluated treatment is currently available. The study evaluated the effects of a novel binocular vision treatment designed to improve binocular fusion and stereopsis as well as to reduce diplopia in patients with cerebral hypoxia. Four patients with severely reduced convergent fusion, stereopsis, and reading duration due to hypoxic brain damage were treated in a single-subject baseline design, with three baseline assessments before treatment to control for spontaneous recovery (pretherapy), an assessment immediately after a treatment period of 6 weeks (posttherapy), and two follow-up tests 3 and 6 months after treatment to assess stability of improvements. Patients received a novel fusion and dichoptic training using 3 different devices designed to slowly increase fusional and disparity angle. After the treatment, all 4 patients improved significantly in binocular fusion, subjective reading duration until diplopia emerged, and 2 of 4 patients improved significantly in local stereopsis. No significant changes were observed during the pretherapy baseline period and the follow-up period, thus ruling out spontaneous recovery and demonstrating long-term stability of treatment effects. This proof-of-principle study indicates a substantial treatment-induced plasticity after hypoxia in the relearning of binocular vision and offers a viable treatment option. Moreover, it provides new hope and direction for the development of effective rehabilitation strategies to treat neurovisual deficits resulting from hypoxic brain damage.

  2. Reactive nitrogen species in mitochondria and their implications in plant energy status and hypoxic stress tolerance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kapuganti Jagadis Gupta

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Hypoxic and anoxic conditions result in the energy crisis that leads to cell damage. Since mitochondria are the primary organelles for energy production, the support of these organelles in a functional state is an important task during oxygen deprivation. Plant mitochondria adapted the strategy to survive under hypoxia by keeping electron transport operative even without oxygen via the use of nitrite as a terminal electrons acceptor. The process of nitrite reduction to nitric oxide (NO in the mitochondrial electron transport chain recycles NADH and leads to a limited rate of ATP production. The produced ATP alongside with the ATP generated by fermentation supports the processes of transcription and translation required for hypoxic survival and recovery of plants. Non-symbiotic hemoglobins (called phytoglobins in plants scavenge NO and thus contribute to regeneration of NAD+ and nitrate required for the operation of anaerobic energy metabolism. This overall operation represents an important strategy of biochemical adaptation that results in the improvement of energy status and thereby in protection of plants in the conditions of hypoxic stress.

  3. Dietary interventions designed to protect the perinatal brain from hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy--Creatine prophylaxis and the need for multi-organ protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellery, Stacey J; Dickinson, Hayley; McKenzie, Matthew; Walker, David W

    2016-05-01

    Birth asphyxia or hypoxia arises from impaired placental gas exchange during labor and remains one of the leading causes of neonatal morbidity and mortality worldwide. It is a condition that can strike in pregnancies that have been uneventful until these final moments, and leads to fundamental loss of cellular energy reserves in the newborn. The cascade of metabolic changes that occurs in the brain at birth as a result of hypoxia can lead to significant damage that evolves over several hours and days, the severity of which can be ameliorated with therapeutic cerebral hypothermia. However, this treatment is only applied to a subset of newborns that meet strict inclusion criteria and is usually administered only in facilities with a high level of medical surveillance. Hence, a number of neuropharmacological interventions have been suggested as adjunct therapies to improve the efficacy of hypothermia, which alone improves survival of the post-hypoxic infant but does not altogether prevent adverse neurological outcomes. In this review we discuss the prospect of using creatine as a dietary supplement during pregnancy and nutritional intervention that can significantly decrease the risk of brain damage in the event of severe oxygen deprivation at birth. Because brain damage can also arise secondarily to compromise of other fetal organs (e.g., heart, diaphragm, kidney), and that compromise of mitochondrial function under hypoxic conditions may be a common mechanism leading to damage of these tissues, we present data suggesting that dietary creatine supplementation during pregnancy may be an effective prophylaxis that can protect the fetus from the multi-organ consequences of severe hypoxia at birth. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Effect of self-ion irradiation on the microstructural changes of alloy EK-181 in annealed and severely deformed conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aydogan, E. [Texas A& M University, College Station, TX 77840 (United States); Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Chen, T.; Gigax, J.G.; Chen, D.; Wang, X. [Texas A& M University, College Station, TX 77840 (United States); Dzhumaev, P.S.; Emelyanova, O.V.; Ganchenkova, M.G.; Kalin, B.A.; Leontiva-Smirnova, M. [National Research Nuclear University (MEPhI), Moscow (Russian Federation); Valiev, R.Z. [Institute of Physics of Advanced Materials and Nanocenter, Ufa State Aviation Technical University, Ufa (Russian Federation); Saint Petersburg State University, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Enikeev, N.A.; Abramova, M.M. [Institute of Physics of Advanced Materials and Nanocenter, Ufa State Aviation Technical University, Ufa (Russian Federation); Wu, Y.; Lo, W.Y.; Yang, Y. [University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States); Short, M. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Maloy, S.A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Garner, F.A. [Texas A& M University, College Station, TX 77840 (United States); National Research Nuclear University (MEPhI), Moscow (Russian Federation); Shao, L., E-mail: lshao@tamu.edu [Texas A& M University, College Station, TX 77840 (United States)

    2017-04-15

    EK-181 is a low-activation ferritic/martensitic steel that is an attractive candidate for in-core component materials for both fast reactors and fusion reactors. To assess the effect of microstructural engineering on radiation response, two variants of EK-181 were studied: one in an annealed condition and the other subject to severe plastic deformation. These specimens were irradiated with 3.5 MeV Fe self-ions up to 400 peak displacements per atom (dpa) at temperatures ranging from 400 °C to 500 °C. The deformation did not suppress swelling over the whole irradiated region. Instead, deformed samples showed higher swelling in the near-surface region. Void swelling was found to be correlated with grain boundary instability. Significant grain growth occurred when steady-state void growth started.

  5. Analysis of several hazardous conditions for large transfer and back-dilution sequences in Tank 241-SY-101

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    CW Stewart; LA Mahoney; WB Barton

    2000-01-01

    The first transfer of 89 kgal of waste and back-dilution of 61 kgal of water in Hanford Tank 241-SY-101 was accomplished December 18--20, 1999. Limits were placed on the transfer and back-dilution volumes because of concerns about potential gas release, crust sinking, and degradation of mixer pump performance. Additional transfers and back-dilutions are being planned that will bring the total to 500 kgal, which should dissolve a large fraction of the solids in the tank and dilute it well beyond the point where significant gas retention can occur. This report provides the technical bases for removing the limits on transfer and back-dilution volume by evaluating the potential consequences of several postulated hazardous conditions in view of the results of the first campaign and results of additional analyses of waste behavior

  6. The Role of Intrinsic Motivation and the Satisfaction of Basic Psychological Needs Under Conditions of Severe Resource Scarcity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Egmond, Marieke Christina; Navarrete Berges, Andrés; Omarshah, Tariq; Benton, Jennifer

    2017-06-01

    An emerging field of research is beginning to examine the ways in which socioeconomic disparities affect emotional, cognitive, and social processes. In this study, we took a two-step approach to examining the role that resource scarcity plays in the predictive power of intrinsic motivation on school attendance, as well as its influence on the precursors of intrinsic motivation: the psychological needs of relatedness, autonomy, and competence. Results revealed that intrinsic motivation predicts school attendance even under conditions of extreme adversity. The satisfaction of the basic needs is more important for participants who are exposed to severe rather than mild levels of deprivation. Our findings illustrate ecological effects on the mechanism underlying goal-directed behavior. They provide evidence in favor of self-determination theory's depiction of humans as active, growth-oriented organisms and for the potential of psychological interventions to reduce poverty.

  7. Analysis of several hazardous conditions for large transfer and back-dilution sequences in Tank 241-SY-101

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    CW Stewart; LA Mahoney; WB Barton

    2000-01-28

    The first transfer of 89 kgal of waste and back-dilution of 61 kgal of water in Hanford Tank 241-SY-101 was accomplished December 18--20, 1999. Limits were placed on the transfer and back-dilution volumes because of concerns about potential gas release, crust sinking, and degradation of mixer pump performance. Additional transfers and back-dilutions are being planned that will bring the total to 500 kgal, which should dissolve a large fraction of the solids in the tank and dilute it well beyond the point where significant gas retention can occur. This report provides the technical bases for removing the limits on transfer and back-dilution volume by evaluating the potential consequences of several postulated hazardous conditions in view of the results of the first campaign and results of additional analyses of waste behavior.

  8. Prevalence of oral health-related conditions that could trigger accidents for patients with moderate-to-severe dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Naoki; Soga, Yoshihiko; Maekawa, Kyoko; Kanda, Yuko; Kobayashi, Eiko; Inoue, Hisako; Kanao, Ayana; Himuro, Yumiko; Fujiwara, Yumi

    2017-03-01

    This study was performed to determine the prevalence of oral health conditions unnoticed by doctors and ward staff that may increase risk of incidents and/or accidents in hospitalised patients with moderate-severe dementia. Dementia patients may not recognise risks in the mouth, such as tooth mobility or ill-fitting dental prostheses and/or dentures. In addition to the risk of choking, injury by sharp edges of collapsed teeth or prosthodontics could pose risks. However, many previous publications were limited to case reports or series. Ninety-two consecutive hospitalised dementia patients (M: 52, F: 40, median age: 82.5 years, range: 62-99 years, from 2011 to 2014), referred for dentistry for dysphagia rehabilitation, were enrolled in this study. Participants referred for dental treatment with dental problems detected by ward staff were excluded. All participants had a Global Clinical Dementia Rating Score >2. Their dental records were evaluated retrospectively for issues that may cause incidents and/or accidents. Problems in the mouth, for example tooth stumps, dental caries, and ill-fitting dentures, were detected in 51.1% of participants (47/92). Furthermore, 23.9% (22/92) showed risk factors that could lead to incidents and/or accidents, for example falling out of teeth and/or prosthodontics or injury by sharp edges of teeth and/or prosthodontics. Hospitalised moderate-severe dementia patients had a high prevalence of oral health conditions unnoticed by doctors and ward staff that may increase risk of incidents and/or accidents. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S and The Gerodontology Association. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Hypoxic stress up-regulates the expression of Toll-like receptor 4 in macrophages via hypoxia-inducible factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, So Young; Choi, Yong Jun; Joung, Sun Myung; Lee, Byung Ho; Jung, Yi-Sook; Lee, Joo Young

    2010-04-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are germline-encoded innate immune receptors that recognize invading micro-organisms and induce immune and inflammatory responses. Deregulation of TLRs is known to be closely linked to various immune disorders and inflammatory diseases. Cells at sites of inflammation are exposed to hypoxic stress, which further aggravates inflammatory processes. We have examined if hypoxic stress modulates the TLR activity of macrophages. Hypoxia and CoCl(2) (a hypoxia mimetic) enhanced the expression of TLR4 messenger RNA and protein in macrophages (RAW264.7 cells), whereas the messenger RNA of other TLRs was not increased. To determine the underlying mechanism, we investigated the role of hypoxia-inducible factor 1 (HIF-1) in the regulation of TLR4 expression. Knockdown of HIF-1alpha expression by small interfering RNA inhibited hypoxia-induced and CoCl(2)-induced TLR4 expression in macrophages, while over-expression of HIF-1alpha potentiated TLR4 expression. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays revealed that HIF-1alpha binds to the TLR4 promoter region under hypoxic conditions. In addition, deletion or mutation of a putative HIF-1-binding motif in the TLR4 promoter greatly attenuated HIF-1alpha-induced TLR4 promoter reporter expression. Up-regulation of TLR4 expression by hypoxic stress enhanced the response of macrophages to lipopolysaccharide, resulting in increased expression of cyclooxygenase-2, interleukin-6, regulated on activation normal T cell expressed and secreted, and interferon-inducible protein-10. These results demonstrate that TLR4 expression in macrophages is up-regulated via HIF-1 in response to hypoxic stress, suggesting that hypoxic stress at sites of inflammation enhances susceptibility to subsequent infection and inflammatory signals by up-regulating TLR4.

  10. Development of simplified 1D and 2D models for studying a PWR lower head failure under severe accident conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koundy, V.; Dupas, J.; Bonneville, H.; Cormeau, I.

    2005-01-01

    In the study of severe accidents of nuclear pressurized water reactors, the scenarios that describe the relocation of significant quantities of liquid corium at the bottom of the lower head are investigated from the mechanical point of view. In these scenarios, the risk of a breach and the possibility of a large quantity of corium being released from the lower head exist. This may lead to direct heating of the containment or outer vessel steam explosion. These issues are important due to their early containment failure potential. Since the TMI-2 accident, many theoretical and experimental investigations, relating to lower head mechanical behaviour under severe thermo-mechanical loading in the event of a core meltdown accident have been performed. IRSN participated actively in the one-fifth scale USNRC/SNL LHF and OECD LHF (OLHF) programs. Within the framework of these programs, two simplified models were developed by IRSN: the first is a simplified 1D approach based on the theory of pressurized spherical shells and the second is a simplified 2D model based on the theory of shells of revolution under symmetric loading. The mathematical formulation of both models and the creep constitutive equations used are presented in detail in this paper. The corresponding models were used to interpret some of the OLHF program experiments and the calculation results were quite consistent with the experimental data. The two simplified models have been used to simulate the thermo-mechanical behaviour of a 900 MWe pressurized water reactor lower head under severe accident conditions leading to failure. The average transient heat flux produced by the corium relocated at the bottom of the lower head has been determined using the IRSN HARAR code. Two different methods, both taking into account the ablation of the internal surface, are used to determine the temperature profiles across the lower head wall and their effect on the time to failure is discussed. Using these simplified models

  11. Predictability of iodine chemistry in the containment of a nuclear power plant under hypothetical severe accident conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herranz, L.E.; Vela-Garcia, M.; Fontanet, J. [Unit of Nuclear Safety Research, CIEMAT, Madrid (Spain)

    2007-07-01

    One of the areas of top interest in the arena of severe accidents to get an accurate prediction of Source Term is Iodine Chemistry. In this paper an assessment of the current capability of MELCOR and ASTEC to predict iodine chemistry within containment in case of a postulated severe accident has been carried out. The experiments FPT1 and FPT2 of the PHEBUS-FP project have been used for comparisons, since they were carried out under rather different containment conditions during the chemistry phase (subcooled vs. saturated sump or acid vs. alkaline pH), which makes them very suitable to assess the current modeling capability of in-containment iodine chemistry models. The results obtained indicate that, even though, both integral codes have specific areas related to iodine chemistry that should be further developed and that their approach to the matter is drastically different, at present ASTEC-IODE allows for a more comprehensive simulation of the containment iodine chemistry. More importantly, lack of maturity of these codes would potentially maximize the so-called user-effect, so that it would be highly recommendable to perform sensitivity studies around iodine chemistry aspects when calculating Source Term scenarios. Key aspects needed of further research are: gaseous iodine chemistry (absent in MELCOR), organic iodine chemistry and adsorption/desorption on/from containment surfaces. (authors)

  12. TRUMP-BD: A computer code for the analysis of nuclear fuel assemblies under severe accident conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lombardo, N.J.; Marseille, T.J.; White, M.D.; Lowery, P.S.

    1990-06-01

    TRUMP-BD (Boil Down) is an extension of the TRUMP (Edwards 1972) computer program for the analysis of nuclear fuel assemblies under severe accident conditions. This extension allows prediction of the heat transfer rates, metal-water oxidation rates, fission product release rates, steam generation and consumption rates, and temperature distributions for nuclear fuel assemblies under core uncovery conditions. The heat transfer processes include conduction in solid structures, convection across fluid-solid boundaries, and radiation between interacting surfaces. Metal-water reaction kinetics are modeled with empirical relationships to predict the oxidation rates of steam-exposed Zircaloy and uranium metal. The metal-water oxidation models are parabolic in form with an Arrhenius temperature dependence. Uranium oxidation begins when fuel cladding failure occurs; Zircaloy oxidation occurs continuously at temperatures above 13000 degree F when metal and steam are available. From the metal-water reactions, the hydrogen generation rate, total hydrogen release, and temporal and spatial distribution of oxide formations are computed. Consumption of steam from the oxidation reactions and the effect of hydrogen on the coolant properties is modeled for independent coolant flow channels. Fission product release from exposed uranium metal Zircaloy-clad fuel is modeled using empirical time and temperature relationships that consider the release to be subject to oxidation and volitization/diffusion (''bake-out'') release mechanisms. Release of the volatile species of iodine (I), tellurium (Te), cesium (Ce), ruthenium (Ru), strontium (Sr), zirconium (Zr), cerium (Cr), and barium (Ba) from uranium metal fuel may be modeled

  13. Comparative Analysis of Culture Conditions for the Optimization of Carotenoid Production in Several Strains of the Picoeukaryote Ostreococcus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Baptiste Guyon

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Microalgae are promising sources for the sustainable production of compounds of interest for biotechnologies. Compared to higher plants, microalgae have a faster growth rate and can be grown in industrial photobioreactors. The microalgae biomass contains specific metabolites of high added value for biotechnology such as lipids, polysaccharides or carotenoid pigments. Studying carotenogenesis is important for deciphering the mechanisms of adaptation to stress tolerance as well as for biotechnological production. In recent years, the picoeukaryote Ostreococcus tauri has emerged as a model organism thanks to the development of powerful genetic tools. Several strains of Ostreococcus isolated from different environments have been characterized with respect to light response or iron requirement. We have compared the carotenoid contents and growth rates of strains of Ostreococcus (OTTH595, RCC802 and RCC809 under a wide range of light, salinity and temperature conditions. Carotenoid profiles and productivities varied in a strain-specific and stress-dependent manner. Our results also illustrate that phylogenetically related microalgal strains originating from different ecological niches present specific interests for the production of specific molecules under controlled culture conditions.

  14. TRUMP-BD: A computer code for the analysis of nuclear fuel assemblies under severe accident conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lombardo, N.J.; Marseille, T.J.; White, M.D.; Lowery, P.S.

    1990-06-01

    TRUMP-BD (Boil Down) is an extension of the TRUMP (Edwards 1972) computer program for the analysis of nuclear fuel assemblies under severe accident conditions. This extension allows prediction of the heat transfer rates, metal-water oxidation rates, fission product release rates, steam generation and consumption rates, and temperature distributions for nuclear fuel assemblies under core uncovery conditions. The heat transfer processes include conduction in solid structures, convection across fluid-solid boundaries, and radiation between interacting surfaces. Metal-water reaction kinetics are modeled with empirical relationships to predict the oxidation rates of steam-exposed Zircaloy and uranium metal. The metal-water oxidation models are parabolic in form with an Arrhenius temperature dependence. Uranium oxidation begins when fuel cladding failure occurs; Zircaloy oxidation occurs continuously at temperatures above 13000{degree}F when metal and steam are available. From the metal-water reactions, the hydrogen generation rate, total hydrogen release, and temporal and spatial distribution of oxide formations are computed. Consumption of steam from the oxidation reactions and the effect of hydrogen on the coolant properties is modeled for independent coolant flow channels. Fission product release from exposed uranium metal Zircaloy-clad fuel is modeled using empirical time and temperature relationships that consider the release to be subject to oxidation and volitization/diffusion ( bake-out'') release mechanisms. Release of the volatile species of iodine (I), tellurium (Te), cesium (Ce), ruthenium (Ru), strontium (Sr), zirconium (Zr), cerium (Cr), and barium (Ba) from uranium metal fuel may be modeled.

  15. Reduced intensity conditioning, combined transplantation of haploidentical hematopoietic stem cells and mesenchymal stem cells in patients with severe aplastic anemia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-Hong Li

    Full Text Available We examined if transplantation of combined haploidentical hematopoietic stem cells (HSC and mesenchymal stem cells (MSC affected graft failure and graft-versus-host disease (GVHD in patients with severe aplastic anemia (SAA. Patients with SAA-I (N = 17 received haploidentical HSCT plus MSC infusion. Stem cell grafts used a combination of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF-primed bone marrow and G-CSF-mobilized peripheral blood stem cells of haploidentical donors and the culture-expanded third-party donor-derived umbilical cord MSCs (UC-MSCs, respectively. Reduced intensity conditioning consisted of fludarabine (30 mg/m2·d+cyclosphamide (500 mg/m2·d+anti-human thymocyte IgG. Transplant recipients also received cyclosporin A, mycophenolatemofetil, and CD25 monoclonal antibody. A total of 16 patients achieved hematopoietic reconstitution. The median mononuclear cell and CD34 count was 9.3×10(8/kg and 4.5×10(6/kg. Median time to ANC was >0.5×10(9/L and PLT count >20×10(9/L were 12 and 14 days, respectively. Grade III-IV acute GVHD was seen in 23.5% of the cases, while moderate and severe chronic GVHD were seen in 14.2% of the cases. The 3-month and 6-month survival rates for all patients were 88.2% and 76.5%, respectively; mean survival time was 56.5 months. Combined transplantation of haploidentical HSCs and MSCs on SAA without an HLA-identical sibling donor was safe, effectively reduced the incidence of severe GVHD, and improved patient survival.

  16. Distribution of hydrogen within the HDR-containment under severe accident conditions. OECD standard problem. Final comparison report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karwat, H.

    1992-08-01

    The present report summarizes the results of the International Standard Problem Exercise ISP-29, based on the HDR Hydrogen Distribution Experiment E11.2. Post-test analyses are compared to experimentally measured parameters, well-known to the analysis. This report has been prepared by the Institute for Reactor Dynamics and Reactor Safety of the Technical University Munich under contract with the Gesellschaft fuer Anlagen- und Reaktorsicherheit (GRS) which received funding for this activity from the German Ministry for Research and Technology (BMFT) under the research contract RS 792. The HDR experiment E11.2 has been performed by the Kernforschungszentrum Karlsruhe (KfK) in the frame of the project 'Projekt HDR-Sicherheitsprogramm' sponsored by the BMFT. Ten institutions from eight countries participated in the post-test analysis exercise which was focussing on the long-lasting gas distribution processes expected inside a PWR containment under severe accident conditions. The gas release experiment was coupled to a long-lasting steam release into the containment typical for an unmitigated small break loss-of-coolant accident. In lieu of pure hydrogen a gas mixture consisting of 15% hydrogen and 85% helium has been applied in order to avoid reaching flammability during the experiment. Of central importance are common overlay plots comparing calculated transients with measurements of the global pressure, the local temperature-, steam- and gas concentration distributions throughout the entire HDR containment. The comparisons indicate relatively large margins between most calculations and the experiment. Having in mind that this exercise was specified as an 'open post-test' analysis of well-known measured data the reasons for discrepancies between measurements and simulations were extensively discussed during a final workshop. It was concluded that analytical shortcomings as well as some uncertainties of experimental boundary conditions may be responsible for deviations

  17. Distribution of hydrogen within the HDR-containment under severe accident conditions. OECD standard problem. Final comparison report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karwat, H

    1992-08-15

    The present report summarizes the results of the International Standard Problem Exercise ISP-29, based on the HDR Hydrogen Distribution Experiment E11.2. Post-test analyses are compared to experimentally measured parameters, well-known to the analysis. This report has been prepared by the Institute for Reactor Dynamics and Reactor Safety of the Technical University Munich under contract with the Gesellschaft fuer Anlagen- und Reaktorsicherheit (GRS) which received funding for this activity from the German Ministry for Research and Technology (BMFT) under the research contract RS 792. The HDR experiment E11.2 has been performed by the Kernforschungszentrum Karlsruhe (KfK) in the frame of the project 'Projekt HDR-Sicherheitsprogramm' sponsored by the BMFT. Ten institutions from eight countries participated in the post-test analysis exercise which was focussing on the long-lasting gas distribution processes expected inside a PWR containment under severe accident conditions. The gas release experiment was coupled to a long-lasting steam release into the containment typical for an unmitigated small break loss-of-coolant accident. In lieu of pure hydrogen a gas mixture consisting of 15% hydrogen and 85% helium has been applied in order to avoid reaching flammability during the experiment. Of central importance are common overlay plots comparing calculated transients with measurements of the global pressure, the local temperature-, steam- and gas concentration distributions throughout the entire HDR containment. The comparisons indicate relatively large margins between most calculations and the experiment. Having in mind that this exercise was specified as an 'open post-test' analysis of well-known measured data the reasons for discrepancies between measurements and simulations were extensively discussed during a final workshop. It was concluded that analytical shortcomings as well as some uncertainties of experimental boundary conditions may be responsible for deviations

  18. Meteorological conditions during a severe, prolonged regional heavy air pollution episode in eastern China from December 2016 to January 2017

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Xueliang; Cao, Weihua; Huo, Yanfeng; Yang, Guanying; Yu, Caixia; He, Dongyan; Deng, Weitao; Fu, Wei; Ding, Heming; Zhai, Jing; Cheng, Long; Zhao, Xuhui

    2018-03-01

    A severe, prolonged and harmful regional heavy air pollution episode occurred in eastern China from December 2016 to January 2017. In this paper, the pollutant characteristics and the meteorological formation mechanism of this pollution event, including climate anomalies, surface weather conditions, planetary boundary layer structure and large-scale circulation features, were analysed based on observational pollution data, surface meteorological data, sounding data and ERA-Interim reanalysis data. The results are as follows. (1) Five pollution stages were identified in eastern China. The two most severe episodes occurred from December 27, 2016 to January 4, 2017 and from January 8 to 12 2017. During these two pollution episodes, fine mode particles were major contributors, and hourly PM2.5 concentrations often exceeded 150 μg/m3, reaching a maximum of 333 μg/m3 at Fuyang station. Gaseous pollutants were transformed into secondary aerosols through heterogeneous reactions on the surface of PM2.5. (2) Compared with the same period over the years 2000-2016, 2017 presented meteorological field climate anomalies in conjunction with unfavourable surface conditions (weak winds, high relative humidity, fewer hours of sunshine, high cloud cover) and adverse atmospheric circulation (weak East Asian winter monsoon and an abnormal geopotential height of 500 hPa), which caused poorer visibility in 2017 than in the other analysed years. (3) During the development of heavy pollution event, unfavourable surface weather conditions, including poorer visibility, weaker pressure, higher relative humidity, lower wind speed with unfavourable wind direction and less precipitation suppressed the horizontal diffusion ability of air pollutants. Furthermore, the unfavourable structure of the atmospheric boundary layer was the key cause of the rapid PM2.5 increase. The deep, strong temperature inversion layer and weak vertical wind velocity could have suppressed vertical motion and enhanced

  19. PKA activity exacerbates hypoxia-induced ROS formation and hypoxic injury in PC-12 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gozal, Evelyne; Metz, Cynthia J; Dematteis, Maurice; Sachleben, Leroy R; Schurr, Avital; Rane, Madhavi J

    2017-09-05

    Hypoxia is a primary factor in many pathological conditions. Hypoxic cell death is commonly attributed to metabolic failure and oxidative injury. cAMP-dependent protein kinase A (PKA) is activated in hypoxia and regulates multiple enzymes of the mitochondrial electron transport chain, thus may be implicated in cellular energy depletion and hypoxia-induced cell death. Wild type (WT) PC-12 cells and PKA activity-deficient 123.7 PC-12 cells were exposed to 3, 6, 12 and 24h hypoxia (0.1% or 5% O 2 ). Hypoxia, at 24h 0.1% O 2 , induced cell death and increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) in WT PC-12 cells. Despite lower ATP levels in normoxic 123.7 cells than in WT cells, hypoxia only decreased ATP levels in WT cells. However, menadione-induced oxidative stress similarly affected both cell types. While mitochondrial COX IV expression remained consistently higher in 123.7 cells, hypoxia decreased COX IV expression in both cell types. N-acetyl cysteine antioxidant treatment blocked hypoxia-induced WT cell death without preventing ATP depletion. Transient PKA catα expression in 123.7 cells partially restored hypoxia-induced ROS but did not alter ATP levels or COX IV expression. We conclude that PKA signaling contributes to hypoxic injury, by regulating oxidative stress rather than by depleting ATP levels. Therapeutic strategies targeting PKA signaling may improve cellular adaptation and recovery in hypoxic pathologies. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. A novel gene therapy-based approach that selectively targets hypoxic regions within solid tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dougherty, S.T.; Dougherty, G.J.; Davis, P.D.

    2003-01-01

    There is compelling evidence that malignant cells present within the hypoxic regions that are commonly found within solid tumors contribute significantly to local recurrence following radiation therapy. We describe now a novel strategy designed to target such cells that exploits the differential production within hypoxic regions of the pro-angiogenic cytokine vascular endothelial cell growth factor (VEGF). Specifically, we have generated cDNA constructs that encode two distinct chimeric cell surface proteins that incorporate, respectively, the extracellular domains of the VEGF receptors Flk-1 or Flt-1, fused in frame to the membrane spanning and cytoplasmic domains of the pro-apoptotic protein Fas. Both chimeric proteins (Flk/Fas and Flt/Fas) appear stable and can be readily detected on the surface of transfected cells by Western blot and/or FACS analysis. Importantly, tumor cells expressing the chimeric proteins were rapidly killed in a dose-dependent fashion upon the addition of exogenous recombinant VEGF. Adenoviral vectors encoding Flk/Fas have been generated and shown to induce tumor cells to undergo apoptosis upon transfer to hypoxic conditions in vitro. This activity is dependent upon the endogenous production of VEGF. Studies are currently underway to test the ability of adenoviral Flk/Fas (Ad.Flk/Fas) to reduce tumor recurrence in vivo when used as an adjuvant therapy in conjunction with clinically relevant doses of ionizing radiation

  1. Imaging and Targeting of Hypoxic Tumor Cells with Use of HIF-1-2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kizaka-Kondoh, Shinae; Harada, Hiroshi; Tanaka, Shotaro; Hiraoka, Masahiro

    2006-01-01

    This paper describes imaging (visualization) of transplanted tumor cells under hypoxia in vivo and molecular targeting to kill those cells by inducing their apoptosis. HIF (hypoxia inducible factor) concerned with angiogenesis is induced specifically in hypoxic tumor cells and its activity can be visualized by transfection of reporter vector construct of fluorescent protein GFP or luciferase. Authors established the transfected tumor cells with the plasmid p5HRE-luciferase and when transplanted in the nude mouse, those cells emitted light dependently to their hypoxic conditions, which could be visualized by in vivo imaging system (IVIS) with CCD camera. Authors prepared the oxygen-dependent degradation-procaspase 3-fusion protein (TOP3) to target the hypoxic tumor cells for enhancing their apoptotic signaling, whose apoptosis was actually observed by the IVIS. Reportedly, radiation transiently activates HIF-1 and combination treatment of radiation and TOP3 resulted in the enhanced death of tumor cells. Interestingly, the suppression of tumor growth lasted longer than expected, probably due to inhibition of angiogenesis. Authors called this anti-tumor strategy as the micro-environmental targeting. (T.I.)

  2. Early blood glucose profile and neurodevelopmental outcome at two years in neonatal hypoxic-ischaemic encephalopathy.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Nadeem, Montasser

    2012-01-31

    BACKGROUND: To examine the blood glucose profile and the relationship between blood glucose levels and neurodevelopmental outcome in term infants with hypoxic-ischaemic encephalopathy. METHODS: Blood glucose values within 72 hours of birth were collected from 52 term infants with hypoxic-ischaemic encephalopathy. Hypoglycaemia [< 46.8 mg\\/dL (2.6 mmol\\/L)] and hyperglycaemia [> 150 mg\\/dL (8.3 mmol\\/L)] were correlated to neurodevelopmental outcome at 24 months of age. RESULTS: Four fifths of the 468 blood samples were in the normoglycaemic range (392\\/468:83.8%). Of the remaining 76 samples, 51.3% were in the hypoglycaemic range and (48.7%) were hyperglycaemic. A quarter of the hypoglycaemic samples (28.2%:11\\/39) and a third of the hyperglycaemic samples (32.4%:12\\/37) were recorded within the first 30 minutes of life. Mean (SD) blood glucose values did not differ between infants with normal and abnormal outcomes [4.89(2.28) mmol\\/L and 5.02(2.35) mmol\\/L, p value = 0.15] respectively. In term infants with hypoxic-ischaemic encephalopathy, early hypoglycaemia (between 0-6 hours of life) was associated with adverse outcome at 24 months of age [OR = 5.8, CI = 1.04-32)]. On multivariate analysis to adjust for grade of HIE this association was not statistically significant. Late hypoglycaemia (6-72 hours of life) was not associated with abnormal outcome [OR = 0.22, CI (0.04-1.14)]. The occurrence of hyperglycaemia was not associated with adverse outcome. CONCLUSION: During the first 72 hours of life, blood glucose profile in infants with hypoxic-ischaemic encephalopathy varies widely despite a management protocol. Early hypoglycaemia (0-6 hours of life) was associated with severe HIE, and thereby; adverse outcome.

  3. Early blood glucose profile and neurodevelopmental outcome at two years in neonatal hypoxic-ischaemic encephalopathy

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Nadeem, Montasser

    2011-02-04

    Abstract Background To examine the blood glucose profile and the relationship between blood glucose levels and neurodevelopmental outcome in term infants with hypoxic-ischaemic encephalopathy. Methods Blood glucose values within 72 hours of birth were collected from 52 term infants with hypoxic-ischaemic encephalopathy. Hypoglycaemia [< 46.8 mg\\/dL (2.6 mmol\\/L)] and hyperglycaemia [> 150 mg\\/dL (8.3 mmol\\/L)] were correlated to neurodevelopmental outcome at 24 months of age. Results Four fifths of the 468 blood samples were in the normoglycaemic range (392\\/468:83.8%). Of the remaining 76 samples, 51.3% were in the hypoglycaemic range and (48.7%) were hyperglycaemic. A quarter of the hypoglycaemic samples (28.2%:11\\/39) and a third of the hyperglycaemic samples (32.4%:12\\/37) were recorded within the first 30 minutes of life. Mean (SD) blood glucose values did not differ between infants with normal and abnormal outcomes [4.89(2.28) mmol\\/L and 5.02(2.35) mmol\\/L, p value = 0.15] respectively. In term infants with hypoxic-ischaemic encephalopathy, early hypoglycaemia (between 0-6 hours of life) was associated with adverse outcome at 24 months of age [OR = 5.8, CI = 1.04-32)]. On multivariate analysis to adjust for grade of HIE this association was not statistically significant. Late hypoglycaemia (6-72 hours of life) was not associated with abnormal outcome [OR = 0.22, CI (0.04-1.14)]. The occurrence of hyperglycaemia was not associated with adverse outcome. Conclusion During the first 72 hours of life, blood glucose profile in infants with hypoxic-ischaemic encephalopathy varies widely despite a management protocol. Early hypoglycaemia (0-6 hours of life) was associated with severe HIE, and thereby; adverse outcome.

  4. Early cerebral hemodynamic, metabolic and histological changes in hypoxic-ischemic fetal lambs during postnatal life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen eRey-Santano

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The hemodynamic, metabolic and biochemical changes produce during transition from fetal to neonatal life could be aggravated if asphyctic event occur during fetal life. The aim of the study was to examine the regional cerebral blood flow (RCBF, histological changes, and cerebral brain metabolism in preterm lambs, and to analyze the role of oxidative stress for the first hours of postnatal life following severe fetal asphyxia. 18 chronically instrumented fetal lambs were assigned to: hypoxic-ischemic group, following fetal asphyxia animals were delivered and maintained on intermittent-positive-pressure-ventilation for 3 hours, and non-injured animals that were managed similarly to the previous group and used as control group. During hypoxic-ischemic insult, injured group developed acidosis, hypoxia, hypercapnia, latacidaemia and tachycardia in comparison to control group, without hypotension. Intermittent-positive-pressure-ventilation transiently improved gas exchange and cardiovascular parameters. After HI injury and during ventilation-support, the increased RCBF in inner zones was maintained for hypoxic-ischemic group, but cortical flow did not exhibit differences compared to the control group. Also, the increase of TUNEL positive cells (apoptosis and antioxidant enzymes, and decrease of ATP reserves was significantly higher in the brain regions where the RCBF were not increased.In conclusion, early metabolic, histological and hemodynamic changes involved in brain damage have been intensively investigated and reported in premature asphyctic lambs for the first 3 hours of postnatal life. Those changes have been described in human neonates, so our model could be useful to test the security and the effectiveness of different neuroprotective or ventilatory strategies when are applied in the first hours after fetal hypoxic-ischemic injury.

  5. Aerobic and anaerobic metabolism for the zebrafish, Danio rerio, reared under normoxic and hypoxic conditions and exposed to acute hypoxia during development Metabolismo aeróbico e anaeróbico do paulistinha Danio rerio, mantidos sob normóxia e hipóxia moderada e expostos a hipóxia aguda durante diferentes estágios de desenvolvimento

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    WR Barrionuevo

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available In order to verify the influence of chronic and acute ambient oxygen levels from egg to adult stage of the zebrafish, in vivo oxygen consumption (MO2, critical tensions of oxygen (Pcrit, heart rate (fH and total body lactate concentration (Lc were determined for Danio rerio (Hamilton, 1822 raised at 28 °C under normoxic (7.5 mgO2.L-1 or 80 mm.Hg-1 and hypoxic conditions (4.3 mgO2.L-1 and exposed to acute hypoxia during different developmental stages. Our findings confirmed that very early stages do not respond effectively to ambient acute hypoxia. However, after the stage corresponding to the age of 30 days, D. rerio was able to respond to acute hypoxia through effective physiological mechanisms involving aerobic and anaerobic metabolism. Such responses were more efficient for the fishes reared under hypoxia which showed that D. rerio survival capability increased during acclimation to mild hypoxia. Measurements of body mass and length showed that moderate hypoxia did not affect growth significantly until the fish reached the stage of 60 days. Moreover, a growth delay was verified for the hypoxic-reared animals. Also, the D. rerio eggs-to-larvae survival varied from 87.7 to 62.4% in animals reared under normoxia and mild hypoxia, respectively. However, the surviving animals raised under moderated hypoxia showed a better aptitude to regulate aerobic and anaerobic capacities when exposed to acute hypoxia.A influência de diferentes níveis de oxigênio no desenvolvimento (ovos a adulto do peixe paulistinha Danio rerio (Hamilton, 1822 foi verificada por meio de medidas experimentais de consumo de oxigênio (MO2, tensões críticas de oxigênio (Pcrit, taxa de batimentos cardíacos (fH e concentração total de lactato nos tecidos (Lc, para os animais mantidos a 28 ºC sob níveis normóxicos de oxigênio (7.5 mgO2.L-1 ou 80 mmHg e hipóxicos (4.3 mgO2.L-1 e submetidos a hipóxia ambiental aguda, em diferentes estágios de desenvolvimento. Os

  6. [Disturbed respiratory cycle accompanying hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Yoshiaki; Masuko, Kaori; Kaneko, Kaori; Saito, Kazuyo; Chikumaru, Yuri; Iwamoto, Hiroko; Matsui, Akira; Kimura, Seiji

    2005-09-01

    We report the case of a 2-year-old boy who experienced total asphyxia at 4 months of age, and suffered abnormalities at specific phases of the respiratory cycle. The patient was bedridden due to severe tetraplegia and showed little response to external stimuli. He has been tube-fed since the initial asphyxia and a tracheotomy was performed after recurrent hypoxic episodes as a result of the respiratory dysfunction. Upon examination, his respiratory pattern was characterized by arrest during the inspiratory phase with a possible over-riding secondary inspiration. The respiratory pause at the inspiratory phase was markedly prolonged during an episode of pulmonary infection, resulting in recurrent cyanosis that necessitated artificial ventilation. The "second" inspiration typically occurred during the mid- or late-inspiratory phases, with this pattern often shown to be variable after epileptic seizures. The characteristic breathing of this patient suggested that difficulty in forming a normal respiratory cycle, other than during periods of hypoventilation or apnoea, could be a significant respiratory dysfunction following asphyxiation. Strategies for the management of such patients should be carefully designed after close observation of breathing patterns within the respiratory cycle, and with consideration for the influence of epileptic seizures and other inputs from somatic afferents.

  7. Hypoxic regulation of the noncoding genome and NEAT1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhry, Hani

    2016-01-01

    Activation of hypoxia pathways is both associated with and contributes to an aggressive phenotype across multiple types of solid cancers. The regulation of gene transcription by hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) is a key element in this response. HIF directly upregulates the expression of many hundreds of protein-coding genes, which act to both improve oxygen delivery and to reduce oxygen demand. However, it is now becoming apparent that many classes of noncoding RNAs are also regulated by hypoxia, with several (e.g. micro RNAs, long noncoding RNAs and antisense RNAs) under direct transcriptional regulation by HIF. These hypoxia-regulated, noncoding RNAs may act as effectors of the indirect response to HIF by acting on specific coding transcripts or by affecting generic RNA-processing pathways. In addition, noncoding RNAs may also act as modulators of the HIF pathway, either by integrating other physiological responses or, in the case of HIF-regulated, noncoding RNAs, by providing negative or positive feedback and feedforward loops that affect upstream or downstream components of the HIF cascade. These hypoxia-regulated, noncoding transcripts play important roles in the aggressive hypoxic phenotype observed in cancer. PMID:26590207

  8. North Pacific deglacial hypoxic events linked to abrupt ocean warming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Praetorius, Summer K; Mix, Alan C.; Davies, Maureen H.; Wolhowe, Matthew D; Addison, Jason A.; Prahl, Frederick G

    2015-01-01

    Marine sediments from the North Pacific document two episodes of expansion and strengthening of the subsurface oxygen minimum zone (OMZ) accompanied by seafloor hypoxia during the last deglacial transition1, 2, 3, 4. The mechanisms driving this hypoxia remain under debate1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11. We present a new high-resolution alkenone palaeotemperature reconstruction from the Gulf of Alaska that reveals two abrupt warming events of 4–5 degrees Celsius at the onset of the Bølling and Holocene intervals that coincide with sudden shifts to hypoxia at intermediate depths. The presence of diatomaceous laminations and hypoxia-tolerant benthic foraminiferal species, peaks in redox-sensitive trace metals12, 13, and enhanced 15N/14N ratio of organic matter13, collectively suggest association with high export production. A decrease in 18O/16O values of benthic foraminifera accompanying the most severe deoxygenation event indicates subsurface warming of up to about 2 degrees Celsius. We infer that abrupt warming triggered expansion of the North Pacific OMZ through reduced oxygen solubility and increased marine productivity via physiological effects; following initiation of hypoxia, remobilization of iron from hypoxic sediments could have provided a positive feedback on ocean deoxygenation through increased nutrient utilization and carbon export. Such a biogeochemical amplification process implies high sensitivity of OMZ expansion to warming.

  9. Diving bradycardia: a mechanism of defence against hypoxic damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alboni, Paolo; Alboni, Marco; Gianfranchi, Lorella

    2011-06-01

    A feature of all air-breathing vertebrates, diving bradycardia is triggered by apnoea and accentuated by immersion of the face or whole body in cold water. Very little is known about the afferents of diving bradycardia, whereas the efferent part of the reflex circuit is constituted by the cardiac vagal fibres. Diving bradycardia is associated with vasoconstriction of selected vascular beds and a reduction in cardiac output. The diving response appears to be more pronounced in mammals than in birds. In humans, the bradycardic response to diving varies greatly from person to person; the reduction in heart rate generally ranges from 15 to 40%, but a small proportion of healthy individuals can develop bradycardia below 20 beats/min. During prolonged dives, bradycardia becomes more pronounced because of activation of the peripheral chemoreceptors by a reduction in the arterial partial pressure of oxygen (O2), responsible for slowing of heart rate. The vasoconstriction is associated with a redistribution of the blood flow, which saves O2 for the O2-sensitive organs, such as the heart and brain. The results of several investigations carried out both in animals and in humans show that the diving response has an O2-conserving effect, both during exercise and at rest, thus lengthening the time to the onset of serious hypoxic damage. The diving response can therefore be regarded as an important defence mechanism for the organism.

  10. Development of Assessment Methodology of Chemical Behavior of Volatile Iodide under Severe Accident Conditions Using EPICUR Experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oh, Jae Yong; Yun, Jong Il; Kim, Do Sam; Han Chul

    2011-01-01

    Iodine is one of the most important fission products produced in nuclear power plants. Under severe accident condition, iodine exists as a variety of species in the containment such as aqueous iodide, gaseous iodide, iodide aerosol, etc. Following release of iodine from the reactor, mostly in the form of CsI aerosol, volatile iodine can be generated from the containment sump and release to the environment. Especially, volatile organic iodide can be produced from interaction between nonvolatile iodine and organic substances present in the containment. Volatile iodide could significantly influence the alienated residents surrounding the nuclear power plant. In particular, thyroid is vulnerable to radioiodine due to its high accumulation. Therefore, it is necessary for the Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety (KINS) to develop an evaluation model which can simulate iodine behavior in the containment following a severe accident. KINS also needs to make up its methodology for radiological consequence analysis, based on MELCOR-MACCS2 calculation, by coupling a simple iodine model which can conveniently deal with organic iodides. In the long term, such a model can contribute to develop an accident source term, which is one of urgent domestic needs. Our strategy for developing the model is as follows: 1. Review the existing methodologies, 2. Develop a simple stand-alone model, 3. Validate the model using ISTP-EPICUR (Experimental Program on Iodine Chemistry under Radiation) and OECD-BIP (Behavior of Iodine Project) experimental data. In this paper we present the context of development and validation of our model named RAIM (Radio-active iodine chemistry model)

  11. Development of Assessment Methodology of Chemical Behavior of Volatile Iodide under Severe Accident Conditions Using EPICUR Experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oh, Jae Yong; Yun, Jong Il [KAIST, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Do Sam; Han Chul [Korea Institue of Nuclear Safety, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-05-15

    Iodine is one of the most important fission products produced in nuclear power plants. Under severe accident condition, iodine exists as a variety of species in the containment such as aqueous iodide, gaseous iodide, iodide aerosol, etc. Following release of iodine from the reactor, mostly in the form of CsI aerosol, volatile iodine can be generated from the containment sump and release to the environment. Especially, volatile organic iodide can be produced from interaction between nonvolatile iodine and organic substances present in the containment. Volatile iodide could significantly influence the alienated residents surrounding the nuclear power plant. In particular, thyroid is vulnerable to radioiodine due to its high accumulation. Therefore, it is necessary for the Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety (KINS) to develop an evaluation model which can simulate iodine behavior in the containment following a severe accident. KINS also needs to make up its methodology for radiological consequence analysis, based on MELCOR-MACCS2 calculation, by coupling a simple iodine model which can conveniently deal with organic iodides. In the long term, such a model can contribute to develop an accident source term, which is one of urgent domestic needs. Our strategy for developing the model is as follows: 1. Review the existing methodologies, 2. Develop a simple stand-alone model, 3. Validate the model using ISTP-EPICUR (Experimental Program on Iodine Chemistry under Radiation) and OECD-BIP (Behavior of Iodine Project) experimental data. In this paper we present the context of development and validation of our model named RAIM (Radio-active iodine chemistry model)

  12. Multi objective large power system planning under sever loading condition using learning DE-APSO-PS strategy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahdad, Belkacem; Srairi, K.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • An efficient planning strategy using DE and APSO in coordination with PS algorithm is proposed. • An interactive process is proposed to balance the exploitation and exploration capability of (DE-APSO) and PS. • Fuel cost, power loss, and voltage deviation considering loading condition are optimized. • The proposed strategy (DE-APSO-PS) is validated on three large practical test systems. - Abstract: This paper introduces an efficient planning strategy using new hybrid interactive differential evolution (DE), adaptive particle swarm optimization (APSO), and pattern search (PS) for solving the security optimal power flow (SOPF) considering multi distributed static VAR compensator (SVC). Three objective functions such as fuel cost, power loss and voltage deviation are considered and optimized considering sever loading conditions. The main idea of the proposed strategy is that variable controls are optimized based on superposition mechanism, the best solutions evaluated by DE and APSO at specified stages are communicated to PS to exploit new regions around this solution, alternatively the new solution achieved by PS is also communicated to DE and APSO, this interactive mechanism search between global and local search is to balance the exploitation and exploration capability which allows individuals from different methods to react more by learning and changing experiences. The robustness of the proposed strategy is tested and validated on large practical power system test (IEEE 118-Bus, IEEE 300-Bus, and 40 units). Comparison results with the standard global optimization methods such as DE, APSO PS and to other recent techniques showed the superiority and perspective of the proposed hybrid technique for solving practical power system problems

  13. Effect of nontronite smectite clay on the chemical evolution of several organic molecules under simulated Mars surface UV radiation conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poch, Olivier; Dequaire, Tristan; Stalport, Fabien; Jaber, Maguy; Lambert, Jean-François; Szopa, Cyril; Coll, Patrice

    2015-04-01

    The search for organic carbon-containing molecules at the surface of Mars, as clues of past habitability or remnants of life, is a major scientific goal for Mars exploration. Several lines of evidence, including the detection of phyllosilicates, suggest that early Mars offered favorable conditions for long-term sustaining of water. As a consequence, we can assume that in those days, endogenous chemical processes, or even primitive life, may have produced organic matter on Mars. Moreover, exogenous delivery from small bodies or dust particles is likely to have brought fresh organic molecules to the surface of Mars up today. Organic matter is therefore expected to be present at the surface/subsurface of the planet. But the current environmental conditions at the surface - UV radiation, oxidants and energetic particles - generate physico-chemical processes that may affect organic molecules. On the other hand, on Earth, phyllosilicates are known to accumulate and preserve organic matter. But are phyllosilicates efficient at preserving organic molecules under the current environmental conditions at the surface of Mars? We have monitored the qualitative and quantitative evolutions of glycine, urea and adenine interacting with the Fe3+-smectite clay nontronite, one of the most abundant phyllosilicates present at the surface of Mars, under simulated Martian surface ultraviolet light (190-400 nm), mean temperature (218 ± 2 K) and pressure (6 ± 1 mbar) in a laboratory simulation setup. We have tested organic-rich samples which may be representative of the evaporation of a warm little pond of liquid water having concentrated organics on Mars. For each molecule, we have observed how the nontronite influences the quantum efficiency of its photodecomposition and the nature of its solid evolution products. The results reveal a pronounced photoprotective effect of nontronite on the evolution of glycine and adenine: their efficiencies of photodecomposition are reduced by a factor

  14. Hypoxic regulation of cytoglobin and neuroglobin expression in human normal and tumor tissues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emara Marwan

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cytoglobin (Cygb and neuroglobin (Ngb are recently identified globin molecules that are expressed in vertebrate tissues. Upregulation of Cygb and Ngb under hypoxic and/or ischemic conditions in vitro and in vivo increases cell survival, suggesting possible protective roles through prevention of oxidative damage. We have previously shown that Ngb is expressed in human glioblastoma multiforme (GBM cell lines, and that expression of its transcript and protein can be significantly increased after exposure to physiologically relevant levels of hypoxia. In this study, we extended this work to determine whether Cygb is also expressed in GBM cells, and whether its expression is enhanced under hypoxic conditions. We also compared Cygb and Ngb expression in human primary tumor specimens, including brain tumors, as well as in human normal tissues. Immunoreactivity of carbonic anhydrase IX (CA IX, a hypoxia-inducible metalloenzyme that catalyzes the hydration of CO2 to bicarbonate, was used as an endogenous marker of hypoxia. Results Cygb transcript and protein were expressed in human GBM cells, and this expression was significantly increased in most cells following 48 h incubation under hypoxia. We also showed that Cygb and Ngb are expressed in both normal tissues and human primary cancers, including GBM. Among normal tissues, Cygb and Ngb expression was restricted to distinct cell types and was especially prominent in ductal cells. Additionally, certain normal organs (e.g. stomach fundus, small bowel showed distinct regional co-localization of Ngb, Cygb and CA IX. In most tumors, Ngb immunoreactivity was significantly greater than that of Cygb. In keeping with previous in vitro results, tumor regions that were positively stained for CA IX were also positive for Ngb and Cygb, suggesting that hypoxic upregulation of Ngb and Cygb also occurs in vivo. Conclusions Our finding of hypoxic up-regulation of Cygb/Ngb in GBM cell lines and human

  15. Priming of the Cells: Hypoxic Preconditioning for Stem Cell Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Zheng Z; Zhu, Yan-Bing; Zhang, James Y; McCrary, Myles R; Wang, Song; Zhang, Yong-Bo; Yu, Shan-Ping; Wei, Ling

    2017-10-05

    Stem cell-based therapies are promising in regenerative medicine for protecting and repairing damaged brain tissues after injury or in the context of chronic diseases. Hypoxia can induce physiological and pathological responses. A hypoxic insult might act as a double-edged sword, it induces cell death and brain damage, but on the other hand, sublethal hypoxia can trigger an adaptation response called hypoxic preconditioning or hypoxic tolerance that is of immense importance for the survival of cells and tissues. This review was based on articles published in PubMed databases up to August 16, 2017, with the following keywords: "stem cells," "hypoxic preconditioning," "ischemic preconditioning," and "cell transplantation." Original articles and critical reviews on the topics were selected. Hypoxic preconditioning has been investigated as a primary endogenous protective mechanism and possible treatment against ischemic injuries. Many cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying the protective effects of hypoxic preconditioning have been identified. In cell transplantation therapy, hypoxic pretreatment of stem cells and neural progenitors markedly increases the survival and regenerative capabilities of these cells in the host environment, leading to enhanced therapeutic effects in various disease models. Regenerative treatments can mobilize endogenous stem cells for neurogenesis and angiogenesis in the adult brain. Furthermore, transplantation of stem cells/neural progenitors achieves therapeutic benefits via cell replacement and/or increased trophic support. Combinatorial approaches of cell-based therapy with additional strategies such as neuroprotective protocols, anti-inflammatory treatment, and rehabilitation therapy can significantly improve therapeutic benefits. In this review, we will discuss the recent progress regarding cell types and applications in regenerative medicine as well as future applications.

  16. Conditioning of alpha and beta-gamma ashes of incinerator, obtained by radioactive wastes incinerating and encapsulation in several matrices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kertesz, C.J.; Chenavas, P.R.; Auffret, L.

    1993-01-01

    In this final report, the work carried out, and the results, obtained on the ash incinerator conditioning study, by means of encapsulation in several matrices, are presented. Three encapsulation matrices were checked: - a ternary cement, containing OPC, blast furnace slag and flying ash, - a two component epoxide system, - an epoxide-cement compound matrix. Three ash categories were employed: - real alpha ash, coming from plutonium bearing wastes, - ash, from inactive combustible waste, obtained by treatment in an incinerator prototype, - ash coming from inactive waste incineration plant. Using three different matrices, the encapsulated form properties were determined: at the laboratory scale, the encapsulating formulation was established, and physico mechanical data were obtained, - on active encapsulated forms, containing a calculated amount of 238 Pu, a radiolysis study was performed in order to measure the composition and volume of the radiolytic gas flow, - at the industrial scale, a pilot plant operating the polyvalent encapsulating process, was designed and put into service. Bench-scale experiments were done, on alpha ash embedded forms using the modified sulphur cement matrix as embedding agent. 4 refs., 30 figs., 27 tabs

  17. Psychometric properties of the Sleep Condition Indicator and Insomnia Severity Index in the evaluation of insomnia disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Mark Lawrence; Lau, Kristy Nga Ting; Espie, Colin A; Luik, Annemarie I; Kyle, Simon D; Lau, Esther Yuet Ying

    2017-05-01

    The Sleep Condition Indicator (SCI) and Insomnia Severity Index (ISI) are commonly used instruments to assess insomnia. We evaluated their psychometric properties, particularly their discriminant validity against structured clinical interview (according to DSM-5 and ICSD-3), and their concurrent validity with measures of sleep and daytime functioning. A total of 158 young adults, 16% of whom were diagnosed with DSM-5 insomnia disorder and 13% with ICSD-3 Chronic Insomnia by structured interview, completed the ISI and SCI twice in 7-14 days, in addition to measures of sleep and daytime function. The Chinese version of the SCI was validated with good psychometric properties (ICC = 0.882). A cutoff of ≥8 on the ISI, ≤5 on the SCI short form, and ≤21 on the SCI achieved high discriminant validity (AUC > 0.85) in identifying individuals with insomnia based on both DSM-5 and ICSD-3 criteria. The SCI and ISI had comparable associations with subjective (0.18 sleep (0.31 disorder. Moreover, they showed good concordance with measures of daytime dysfunction, as well as subjective and objective sleep. The SCI and ISI are recommended for use in clinical and research settings. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Modelling the release of volatile fission product cesium from CANDU fuel under severe accident conditions using artificial neural networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrews, W.S.; Lewis, B.J.; Cox, D.S.

    1997-01-01

    An artificial neural network (ANN) model has been developed to predict the release of volatile fission products from CANDU fuel under severe accident conditions. The model was based on data for the release Of 134 Cs measured during three annealing experiments (Hot Cell Experiments 1 and 2, or HCE- 1, HCE-2 and Metallurgical Cell Experiment 1, or MCE- 1) at Chalk River Laboratories. These experiments were comprised of a total of 30 separate tests. The ANN established a correlation among 14 separate input variables and predicted the cumulative fractional release for a set of 386 data points drawn from 29 tests to a normalized error, E n , of 0.104 and an average absolute error, E abs , of 0.064. Predictions for a blind validation set (test HCE2-CM6) had an E n of 0.064 and an E abs of 0.054. A methodology is presented for deploying the ANN model by providing the connection weights. Finally, the performance of an ANN model was compared to a fuel oxidation model developed by Lewis et al. and to the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission's CORSOR-M. (author)

  19. Ruthenium release modelling in air and steam atmospheres under severe accident conditions using the MAAP4 code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beuzet, Emilie; Lamy, Jean-Sylvestre; Perron, Hadrien; Simoni, Eric; Ducros, Gérard

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► We developed a new modelling of fuel oxidation and ruthenium release in the EDF version of the MAAP4 code. ► We validated this model against some VERCORS experiments. ► Ruthenium release prediction quantitatively and qualitatively well reproduced under air and steam atmospheres. - Abstract: In a nuclear power plant (NPP), a severe accident is a low probability sequence that can lead to core fusion and fission product (FP) release to the environment (source term). For instance during a loss-of-coolant accident, water vaporization and core uncovery can occur due to decay heat. These phenomena enhance core degradation and, subsequently, molten materials can relocate to the lower head of the vessel. Heat exchange between the debris and the vessel may cause its rupture and air ingress. After lower head failure, steam and air entering in the vessel can lead to degradation and oxidation of materials that are still intact in the core. Indeed, Zircaloy-4 cladding oxidation is very exothermic and fuel interaction with the cladding material can decrease its melting temperature by several hundred of Kelvin. FP release can thus be increased, noticeably that of ruthenium under oxidizing conditions. Ruthenium is of particular interest because of its high radio-toxicity due to 103 Ru and 106 Ru isotopes and its ability to form highly volatile compounds, even at room temperature, such as gaseous ruthenium tetra-oxide (RuO 4 ). It is consequently of great need to understand phenomena governing steam and air oxidation of the fuel and ruthenium release as prerequisites for the source term issues. A review of existing data on these phenomena shows relatively good understanding. In terms of oxygen affinity, the fuel is oxidized before ruthenium, from UO 2 to UO 2+x . Its oxidation is a rate-controlling surface exchange reaction with the atmosphere, so that the stoichiometric deviation and oxygen partial pressure increase. High temperatures combined with the presence

  20. The effects of nicotine exposure during Pavlovian conditioning in rats on several measures of incentive motivation for a conditioned stimulus paired with water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guy, Elizabeth Glenn; Fletcher, Paul J

    2014-06-01

    Nicotine enhances approach toward and operant responding for conditioned stimuli (CSs), but the effect of exposure during different phases of Pavlovian incentive learning on these measures remains to be determined. These studies examined the effects of administering nicotine early, late or throughout Pavlovian conditioning trials on discriminated approach behavior, nicotine-enhanced responding for conditioned reinforcement, extinction, and the reinstatement of responding for conditioned reinforcement. We also tested the effect of nicotine on approach to a lever-CS in a Pavlovian autoshaping procedure and for this CS to serve as a conditioned reinforcer. Thirsty rats were exposed to 13 conditioning sessions where a light/tone CS was paired with the delivery of water. Nicotine was administered either prior to the first or last seven sessions, or throughout the entire conditioning procedure. Responding for conditioned reinforcement, extinction, and the reinstatement of responding by the stimulus and nicotine were compared across exposure groups. Separately, the effects of nicotine on conditioned approach toward a lever-CS during autoshaping, and responding for that CS as a conditioned reinforcer, were examined. Nicotine exposure was necessary for nicotine-enhanced responding for conditioned reinforcement and the ability for nicotine and the stimulus to additively reinstate responding on the reinforced lever. Nicotine increased contacts with a lever-CS during autoshaping, and removal of nicotine abolished this effect. Prior nicotine exposure was necessary for nicotine-enhanced responding reinforced by the lever. Enhancements in the motivating properties of CSs by nicotine occur independently from duration and timing effects of nicotine exposure during conditioning.

  1. Inter-Labeler and Intra-Labeler Variability of Condition Severity Classification Models Using Active and Passive Learning Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nissim, Nir; Shahar, Yuval; Boland, Mary Regina; Tatonetti, Nicholas P; Elovici, Yuval; Hripcsak, George; Moskovitch, Robert

    2018-01-01

    Background and Objectives Labeling instances by domain experts for classification is often time consuming and expensive. To reduce such labeling efforts, we had proposed the application of active learning (AL) methods, introduced our CAESAR-ALE framework for classifying the severity of clinical conditions, and shown its significant reduction of labeling efforts. The use of any of three AL methods (one well known [SVM-Margin], and two that we introduced [Exploitation and Combination_XA]) significantly reduced (by 48% to 64%) condition labeling efforts, compared to standard passive (random instance-selection) SVM learning. Furthermore, our new AL methods achieved maximal accuracy using 12% fewer labeled cases than the SVM-Margin AL method. However, because labelers have varying levels of expertise, a major issue associated with learning methods, and AL methods in particular, is how to best to use the labeling provided by a committee of labelers. First, we wanted to know, based on the labelers’ learning curves, whether using AL methods (versus standard passive learning methods) has an effect on the Intra-labeler variability (within the learning curve of each labeler) and inter-labeler variability (among the learning curves of different labelers). Then, we wanted to examine the effect of learning (either passively or actively) from the labels created by the majority consensus of a group of labelers. Methods We used our CAESAR-ALE framework for classifying the severity of clinical conditions, the three AL methods and the passive learning method, as mentioned above, to induce the classifications models. We used a dataset of 516 clinical conditions and their severity labeling, represented by features aggregated from the medical records of 1.9 million patients treated at Columbia University Medical Center. We analyzed the variance of the classification performance within (intra-labeler), and especially among (inter-labeler) the classification models that were induced by

  2. Inter-labeler and intra-labeler variability of condition severity classification models using active and passive learning methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nissim, Nir; Shahar, Yuval; Elovici, Yuval; Hripcsak, George; Moskovitch, Robert

    2017-09-01

    Labeling instances by domain experts for classification is often time consuming and expensive. To reduce such labeling efforts, we had proposed the application of active learning (AL) methods, introduced our CAESAR-ALE framework for classifying the severity of clinical conditions, and shown its significant reduction of labeling efforts. The use of any of three AL methods (one well known [SVM-Margin], and two that we introduced [Exploitation and Combination_XA]) significantly reduced (by 48% to 64%) condition labeling efforts, compared to standard passive (random instance-selection) SVM learning. Furthermore, our new AL methods achieved maximal accuracy using 12% fewer labeled cases than the SVM-Margin AL method. However, because labelers have varying levels of expertise, a major issue associated with learning methods, and AL methods in particular, is how to best to use the labeling provided by a committee of labelers. First, we wanted to know, based on the labelers' learning curves, whether using AL methods (versus standard passive learning methods) has an effect on the Intra-labeler variability (within the learning curve of each labeler) and inter-labeler variability (among the learning curves of different labelers). Then, we wanted to examine the effect of learning (either passively or actively) from the labels created by the majority consensus of a group of labelers. We used our CAESAR-ALE framework for classifying the severity of clinical conditions, the three AL methods and the passive learning method, as mentioned above, to induce the classifications models. We used a dataset of 516 clinical conditions and their severity labeling, represented by features aggregated from the medical records of 1.9 million patients treated at Columbia University Medical Center. We analyzed the variance of the classification performance within (intra-labeler), and especially among (inter-labeler) the classification models that were induced by using the labels provided by seven

  3. Effects of hypercapnia and NO synthase inhibition in sustained hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Acute respiratory disorders may lead to sustained alveolar hypoxia with hypercapnia resulting in impaired pulmonary gas exchange. Hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction (HPV) optimizes gas exchange during local acute (0-30 min), as well as sustained (> 30 min) hypoxia by matching blood perfusion to alveolar ventilation. Hypercapnia with acidosis improves pulmonary gas exchange in repetitive conditions of acute hypoxia by potentiating HPV and preventing pulmonary endothelial dysfunction. This study investigated, if the beneficial effects of hypercapnia with acidosis are preserved during sustained hypoxia as it occurs, e.g in permissive hypercapnic ventilation in intensive care units. Furthermore, the effects of NO synthase inhibitors under such conditions were examined. Method We employed isolated perfused and ventilated rabbit lungs to determine the influence of hypercapnia with or without acidosis (pH corrected with sodium bicarbonate), and inhibitors of endothelial as well as inducible NO synthase on acute or sustained HPV (180 min) and endothelial permeability. Results In hypercapnic acidosis, HPV was intensified in sustained hypoxia, in contrast to hypercapnia without acidosis when HPV was amplified during both phases. L-NG-Nitroarginine (L-NNA), a non-selective NO synthase inhibitor, enhanced acute as well as sustained HPV under all conditions, however, the amplification of sustained HPV induced by hypercapnia with or without acidosis compared to normocapnia disappeared. In contrast 1400 W, a selective inhibitor of inducible NO synthase (iNOS), decreased HPV in normocapnia and hypercapnia without acidosis at late time points of sustained HPV and selectively reversed the amplification of sustained HPV during hypercapnia without acidosis. Hypoxic hypercapnia without acidosis increased capillary filtration coefficient (Kfc). This increase disappeared after administration of 1400 W. Conclusion Hypercapnia with and without acidosis increased HPV during

  4. Effects of hypercapnia and NO synthase inhibition in sustained hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ketabchi Farzaneh

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Acute respiratory disorders may lead to sustained alveolar hypoxia with hypercapnia resulting in impaired pulmonary gas exchange. Hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction (HPV optimizes gas exchange during local acute (0-30 min, as well as sustained (> 30 min hypoxia by matching blood perfusion to alveolar ventilation. Hypercapnia with acidosis improves pulmonary gas exchange in repetitive conditions of acute hypoxia by potentiating HPV and preventing pulmonary endothelial dysfunction. This study investigated, if the beneficial effects of hypercapnia with acidosis are preserved during sustained hypoxia as it occurs, e.g in permissive hypercapnic ventilation in intensive care units. Furthermore, the effects of NO synthase inhibitors under such conditions were examined. Method We employed isolated perfused and ventilated rabbit lungs to determine the influence of hypercapnia with or without acidosis (pH corrected with sodium bicarbonate, and inhibitors of endothelial as well as inducible NO synthase on acute or sustained HPV (180 min and endothelial permeability. Results In hypercapnic acidosis, HPV was intensified in sustained hypoxia, in contrast to hypercapnia without acidosis when HPV was amplified during both phases. L-NG-Nitroarginine (L-NNA, a non-selective NO synthase inhibitor, enhanced acute as well as sustained HPV under all conditions, however, the amplification of sustained HPV induced by hypercapnia with or without acidosis compared to normocapnia disappeared. In contrast 1400 W, a selective inhibitor of inducible NO synthase (iNOS, decreased HPV in normocapnia and hypercapnia without acidosis at late time points of sustained HPV and selectively reversed the amplification of sustained HPV during hypercapnia without acidosis. Hypoxic hypercapnia without acidosis increased capillary filtration coefficient (Kfc. This increase disappeared after administration of 1400 W. Conclusion Hypercapnia with and without acidosis

  5. Effects of hypercapnia and NO synthase inhibition in sustained hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ketabchi, Farzaneh; Ghofrani, Hossein A; Schermuly, Ralph T; Seeger, Werner; Grimminger, Friedrich; Egemnazarov, Bakytbek; Shid-Moosavi, S Mostafa; Dehghani, Gholam A; Weissmann, Norbert; Sommer, Natascha

    2012-01-31

    Acute respiratory disorders may lead to sustained alveolar hypoxia with hypercapnia resulting in impaired pulmonary gas exchange. Hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction (HPV) optimizes gas exchange during local acute (0-30 min), as well as sustained (> 30 min) hypoxia by matching blood perfusion to alveolar ventilation. Hypercapnia with acidosis improves pulmonary gas exchange in repetitive conditions of acute hypoxia by potentiating HPV and preventing pulmonary endothelial dysfunction. This study investigated, if the beneficial effects of hypercapnia with acidosis are preserved during sustained hypoxia as it occurs, e.g in permissive hypercapnic ventilation in intensive care units. Furthermore, the effects of NO synthase inhibitors under such conditions were examined. We employed isolated perfused and ventilated rabbit lungs to determine the influence of hypercapnia with or without acidosis (pH corrected with sodium bicarbonate), and inhibitors of endothelial as well as inducible NO synthase on acute or sustained HPV (180 min) and endothelial permeability. In hypercapnic acidosis, HPV was intensified in sustained hypoxia, in contrast to hypercapnia without acidosis when HPV was amplified during both phases. L-NG-Nitroarginine (L-NNA), a non-selective NO synthase inhibitor, enhanced acute as well as sustained HPV under all conditions, however, the amplification of sustained HPV induced by hypercapnia with or without acidosis compared to normocapnia disappeared. In contrast 1400 W, a selective inhibitor of inducible NO synthase (iNOS), decreased HPV in normocapnia and hypercapnia without acidosis at late time points of sustained HPV and selectively reversed the amplification of sustained HPV during hypercapnia without acidosis. Hypoxic hypercapnia without acidosis increased capillary filtration coefficient (Kfc). This increase disappeared after administration of 1400 W. Hypercapnia with and without acidosis increased HPV during conditions of sustained hypoxia. The

  6. Hypoxic Preconditioning Promotes the Bioactivities of Mesenchymal Stem Cells via the HIF-1α-GRP78-Akt Axis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jun Hee; Yoon, Yeo Min; Lee, Sang Hun

    2017-06-21

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) are ideal materials for stem cell-based therapy. As MSCs reside in hypoxic microenvironments (low oxygen tension of 1% to 7%), several studies have focused on the beneficial effects of hypoxic preconditioning on MSC survival; however, the mechanisms underlying such effects remain unclear. This study aimed to uncover the potential mechanism involving 78-kDa glucose-regulated protein (GRP78) to explain the enhanced MSC bioactivity and survival in hindlimb ischemia. Under hypoxia (2% O₂), the expression of GRP78 was significantly increased via hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-1α. Hypoxia-induced GRP