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Sample records for severe cerebellum hypoplasia

  1. MR findings in pontocerebellar hypoplasia

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    Uhl, M.; Pawlik, H.; Laubenberger, J.; Langer, M. [Department of Radiology, Division of Paediatric Radiology, University Hospital of Freiburg, Freiburg (Germany); Darge, K. [Department of Paediatric Radiology, Children`s Hospital of the University of Heidelberg, Heidelberg (Germany); Baborie, A. [Department of Neuropathology, Neurozentrum, University of Freiburg, Freiburg (Germany); Korinthenberg, R. [Department of Neuropaediatrics, Children`s Hospital, University of Freiburg, Freiburg (Germany)

    1998-07-01

    We present four cases with combined hypoplasia of the cerebellum and the ventral pons - pontocerebellar hypoplasia (PCH). PCH represents an autosomal recessive neurodegenerative disorder with fetal onset. The disease is rare, with less than 20 cases having been reported. The main findings of PCH and the inclusion criteria for our cases can be summarised as progressive microcephaly from birth, pontocerebellar hypoplasia documented by MRI and marked chorea, which may change, later in childhood, to more dystonic patterns. The cerebral cortex becomes progressively atrophic. Motor and mental development are delayed, and epilepsy, mainly tonic-clonic seizures, is frequent. The MRI features in all of our cases were: (1) Hypoplastic cerebellum situated close to the tentorium. The hypoplastic cerebellum has a reduced number of folia, in contrast to the normal number of thin folia in simple cerebellar atrophy. (2) The cerebellar hemispheres are reduced to bean-like or wing-like structures. The cerebellar hemispheres appear to `float` in the posterior fossa. (3) Markedly hypoplastic ventral pons. (4) Slight atrophy of the supratentorial gyral pattern. (5) Dilated cerebromedullary cistern and fourth ventricle. (6) Delayed myelination of the white matter. (7) No significant disorganisation of brain architecture and no severe corpus callosum defect. (orig.) With 3 figs., 2 tabs., 13 refs.

  2. MR findings in pontocerebellar hypoplasia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uhl, M.; Pawlik, H.; Laubenberger, J.; Langer, M.; Darge, K.; Baborie, A.; Korinthenberg, R.

    1998-01-01

    We present four cases with combined hypoplasia of the cerebellum and the ventral pons - pontocerebellar hypoplasia (PCH). PCH represents an autosomal recessive neurodegenerative disorder with fetal onset. The disease is rare, with less than 20 cases having been reported. The main findings of PCH and the inclusion criteria for our cases can be summarised as progressive microcephaly from birth, pontocerebellar hypoplasia documented by MRI and marked chorea, which may change, later in childhood, to more dystonic patterns. The cerebral cortex becomes progressively atrophic. Motor and mental development are delayed, and epilepsy, mainly tonic-clonic seizures, is frequent. The MRI features in all of our cases were: (1) Hypoplastic cerebellum situated close to the tentorium. The hypoplastic cerebellum has a reduced number of folia, in contrast to the normal number of thin folia in simple cerebellar atrophy. (2) The cerebellar hemispheres are reduced to bean-like or wing-like structures. The cerebellar hemispheres appear to 'float' in the posterior fossa. (3) Markedly hypoplastic ventral pons. (4) Slight atrophy of the supratentorial gyral pattern. (5) Dilated cerebromedullary cistern and fourth ventricle. (6) Delayed myelination of the white matter. (7) No significant disorganisation of brain architecture and no severe corpus callosum defect. (orig.)

  3. Treatment of Severe Maxillary Hypoplasia With Combined Orthodontics and Distraction Osteogenesis.

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    Lucchese, Alessandra; Albertini, Paolo; Asperio, Paolo; Manuelli, Maurizio; Gastaldi, Giorgio

    2018-01-05

    Distraction osteogenesis (DO) is a technique that allows the generation of new bone in a gap between 2 vascularized bone surfaces in response to the application of graduated tensile stress across the bone gap.Distraction osteogenesis has become a routine treatment of choice to correct skeletal deformities and severe bone defects in the craniofacial complex over the past decade. Distraction osteogenesis has been successfully chosen in lengthening the maxilla and the mandible; in the maxilla and recently in the mandible, the jawbones have been distracted and widened transversely to relieve severe anterior dental crowding and transverse discrepancies between the dental arches.Distraction osteogenesis for maxillary advancement started in 1993 and is now widely used, especially in patients with skeletal Class III malocclusion caused by maxillary hypoplasia.The aim of this study was to present the efficiency of combined orthodontic and DO in the severe maxillary hypoplasia.A 35-year-old Italian man presented to our clinical practice with the chief complaint of esthetic and functionally problems because of skeletal Class III malocclusion with anterior crossbite.Considering that the severity of the skeletal discrepancy is remarkable but compensated by the DO potential, the combined orthodontic and DO treatment was considered adequate, like less invasive and equally effective.It was obtained a good alignment with the upper and lower arch dental alveolar maxillary advancement that allowed to correct the sagittal relationships.The patient was satisfied for the treatment results and had considerable improvement in his self-esteem.

  4. Severe hypoplasia of the omasal laminae in a Japanese Black steer with chronic bloat--a case report.

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    Takagi, Mitsuhiro; Mukai, Shuhei; Fushimi, Yasuo; Matsushita, Kouhei; Miyoshi, Nobuaki; Yasuda, Nobuhiro; Kitajima, Hideo; Takamure, Senro; Matsushita, Toshihiko; Kitamura, Nobuo; Deguchi, Eisaburo

    2007-12-01

    An 11-month-old Japanese Black steer with chronic bloat underwent clinical and histological analyses. During the observation period, it showed normal appetite and fecal volume but persistent chronic bloat symptoms. Compared to controls, the steer's feces contained undigested large straws. Necropsy revealed normal rumen, reticulum, and abomasum but a small omasum. The rumen, reticulum, and abomasum mucosa was normal, with well-developed ruminal papillae. However, severe hypoplasia of the omasal laminae was observed along with hypoplasia reticular groove and ruminoreticular fold. The contents of the reticulum, omasum, and abomasums comprised undigested large sized hay particles. The omasum papillae showed no pathological abnormalities. This is a rare case of a steer with chronic bloat probably caused by severe hypoplasia of the omasal laminae.

  5. Treatment of severe maxillary cleft hypoplasia in a case with missing premaxilla with anterior maxillary distraction using tooth-borne hyrax appliance

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    Akshai Shetty

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Cleft orthodontics generally poses a challenge and a missing premaxilla adds to the difficulty in managing them. The lack of bone support and anterior teeth in a case with missing premaxilla accounts not only for difficulty in rehabilitation but also in increasing the maxillary hypoplasia. This article presents a case report where planned orthodontic and surgical management using distraction has helped treat a severe maxillary hypoplasia in a patient with missing premaxilla. The treatment plan and method can be used to treat severe maxillary hypoplasia and yield reasonably acceptable results for such patients.

  6. Anterior maxillary segmental distraction in the treatment of severe maxillary hypoplasia secondary to cleft lip and palate.

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    Li, Hongliang; Dai, Jiewen; Si, Jiawen; Zhang, Jianfei; Wang, Minjiao; Shen, Steve Guofang; Yu, Hongbo

    2015-01-01

    Anterior maxillary segmental distraction (AMSD) is an effective surgical procedure in the treatment of maxillary hypoplasia secondary to cleft lip and palate. Its unique advantage of preserving velopharyngeal function makes this procedure widely applied. In this study, the application of AMSD was described and its long-term stability was explored. Eight patients with severe maxillary hypoplasia secondary to CLP were included in this study. They were treated with AMSD using rigid external distraction (RED) device. Cephalometric analysis was performed twice at three time points for evaluation: before surgery (T1), after distraction (T2), and 2 years after treatment (T3). One-way analysis of variance was used to assess the differences statistically. All the distractions completed smoothly, and maxilla was distracted efficiently. The value of SNA, NA-FH, Ptm-A, U1-PP, overjet and PP (ANS-PNS) increased significantly after the AMSD procedure (P 0.05). Changes of palatopharyngeal depth and soft palatal length were insignificant. AMSD with RED device provided an effective way to correct maxillary hypoplasia secondary to CLP, extended the palatal and arch length, avoided damage on velopharyngeal closure function and reduced the relapse rate. It is a promising and valuable technique in this potentially complicated procedure.

  7. Cerebellar Hypoplasia

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    ... hypoplasia is a feature of a number of congenital (present at birth) malformation syndromes, such as Walker-Warburg syndrome (a form ... hypoplasia is a feature of a number of congenital (present at birth) malformation syndromes, such as Walker-Warburg syndrome (a form ...

  8. Severe mental retardation, epilepsy, anal anomalies, and distal phalangeal hypoplasia in siblings.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marcelis, C.L.M.; Rieu, P.N.M.A.; Beemer, F.; Brunner, H.G.

    2007-01-01

    We report two sisters born to consanguineous parents with an identical syndrome consisting of severe mental retardation and epilepsy, hypoplastic terminal phalanges, and anteriorly displaced anus. Further metabolic and genetic testing failed to detect the etiology. A whole genome linkage scan showed

  9. Brain stem hypoplasia associated with Cri-du-Chat syndrome

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    Hong, Jin Ho; Lee, Ha Young; Lim, Myung Kwan; Kim, Mi Young; Kang, Young Hye; Lee, Kyung Hee; Cho, Soon Gu [Dept. of Radiology, Inha University Hospital, Inha University School of Medicine, Incheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-12-15

    Cri-du-Chat syndrome, also called the 5p-syndrome, is a rare genetic abnormality, and only few cases have been reported on its brain MRI findings. We describe the magnetic resonance imaging findings of a 1-year-old girl with Cri-du-Chat syndrome who showed brain stem hypoplasia, particularly in the pons, with normal cerebellum and diffuse hypoplasia of the cerebral hemispheres. We suggest that Cri-du-Chat syndrome chould be suspected in children with brain stem hypoplasia, particularly for those with high-pitched cries.

  10. Cerebral white matter hypoplasia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dietrich, R.B.; Shields, W.D.; Sankar, R.

    1990-01-01

    This paper demonstrates the MR imaging findings in children with cerebral white matter hypoplasia (CWMH). The MR studies of four children, aged 3-7 y (mean age, 2.3 y) with a diagnosis of CWMH were reviewed. In all cases multiplanar T1-weighted and T2-weighted spin-echo images were obtained. All children had similar histories of severe developmental delay and nonprogressive neurologic deficits despite normal gestational and birth histories. In two cases there was a history of maternal cocaine abuse. Autopsy correlation was available in one child. The MR images of all four children demonstrated diffuse lack of white matter and enlarged ventricles but normal-appearing gray matter. The corpus callosum, although completely formed, was severely thinned. There was no evidence of gliosis or porencephaly, and the distribution of myelin deposition was normal for age in all cases. Autopsy finding in one child correlated exactly with the MR finding

  11. Genetics Home Reference: pontocerebellar hypoplasia

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    ... PCH1 also have very weak muscle tone (hypotonia), joint deformities called contractures, vision impairment, and breathing and ... InfoSearch: Pontocerebellar hypoplasia type 6 MalaCards: pontocerebellar hypoplasia Neuromuscular Disease Center, Washington University, St. Louis: Pontocerebellar Hypoplasia ...

  12. Focal dermal hypoplasia without focal dermal hypoplasia

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    Contreras-Capetillo, Silvina N.; Lombardi, Maria Paola; Pinto-Escalante, Doris; Hennekam, Raoul C.

    2014-01-01

    Focal dermal hypoplasia (FDH; Goltz-Gorlin syndrome) is an X-linked dominant disorder affecting mainly tissues of ectodermal and mesodermal origin. The phenotype is characterized by hypoplastic linear skin lesions, eye malformations, hair and teeth anomalies, and multiple limbs malformations. The

  13. Pontoneocerebellar hypoplasia: definition of MR features

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goasdoue, P.; Lalande, G.; Adamsbaum, C.; Rodriguez, D.; Moutard, M.-L.; Robain, O.

    2001-01-01

    We report five patients with pontoneocerebellar hypoplasia. Because the issue of cerebellar malformations is a difficult subject, we tried to define criteria for diagnosis on MRI: a thin flat pons with disappearance of the anterior curve, a small cerebellum with predominant flattening of the hemispheres and shortened cerebellar fissures, in contrast to atrophy. The posterior fossa is not enlarged. We emphasize the probable late onset of the disease in fetal life because of the demonstration of the abnormalities at US during the last trimester of the pregnancy in one patient. Prenatal diagnosis is important because of possible autosomal recessive transmission. (orig.)

  14. Optic nerve hypoplasia

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    Savleen Kaur

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Optic nerve hypoplasia (ONH is a congenital anomaly of the optic disc that might result in moderate to severe vision loss in children. With a vast number of cases now being reported, the rarity of ONH is obviously now refuted. The major aspects of ophthalmic evaluation of an infant with possible ONH are visual assessment, fundus examination, and visual electrophysiology. Characteristically, the disc is small, there is a peripapillary double-ring sign, vascular tortuosity, and thinning of the nerve fiber layer. A patient with ONH should be assessed for presence of neurologic, radiologic, and endocrine associations. There may be maternal associations like premature births, fetal alcohol syndrome, maternal diabetes. Systemic associations in the child include endocrine abnormalities, developmental delay, cerebral palsy, and seizures. Besides the hypoplastic optic nerve and chiasm, neuroimaging shows abnormalities in ventricles or white- or gray-matter development, septo-optic dysplasia, hydrocephalus, and corpus callosum abnormalities. There is a greater incidence of clinical neurologic abnormalities in patients with bilateral ONH (65% than patients with unilateral ONH. We present a review on the available literature on the same to urge caution in our clinical practice when dealing with patients with ONH. Fundus photography, ocular coherence tomography, visual field testing, color vision evaluation, neuroimaging, endocrinology consultation with or without genetic testing are helpful in the diagnosis and management of ONH. (Method of search: MEDLINE, PUBMED.

  15. Vermian aplasia and hypoplasia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fitz, C.R.

    1990-01-01

    This paper reports vermian aplasia or hypoplasia unrelated to Dandy-Walker complex or Joubert syndrome. Vermian hypoplasia is most commonly associated with the malformations of Dandy-Walker cyst or variant. There have been few reports of familial vermian anomaly (Joubert syndrome) with episodes of polypnea and apnea. Five patients with vermian hypoplasia or absence were prospectively discovered among 1,130 children undergoing brain MR imaging. Ages ranged from 2 mo to 15 y at the time of discovery: The abnormalities were poorly defined in three patients who had previously undergone CT. There was no common link in these patients with a variable number of other systemic, brain, or facial abnormalities. No unifying symptoms were identified. Two patients had the MR imaging appearance of Joubert syndrome, but none had the cyclical respiratory symptoms usually associated with this syndrome

  16. MRI measurements of the pons and cerebellum in children born preterm; associations with the severity of periventricular leukomalacia and perinatal risk factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Argyropoulou, M.I.; Xydis, V.; Argyropoulou, P.I.; Efremidis, S.C.; Drougia, A.; Andronikou, S.; Tzoufi, M.; Bassounas, A.

    2003-01-01

    Our purpose was to measure the size of the pons and cerebellum in preterm babies with periventricular leukomalacia (PVL), and to study their relationship with the severity of PVL and with perinatal risk factors. We examined 33 premature children, mean gestational age 31 weeks, range 26-36 weeks with PVL on MRI, and 27 full-term controls. On MRI at 0.4-5.5 years (mean 1.4 years) we measured the area of the corpus callosum and vermis, the anteroposterior diameter of the pons and the volume of the cerebellum. The area of the corpus callosum was used as a marker of white matter loss and PVL severity. All regional brain measurements except that of the vermis were significantly lower in patients than controls: corpus callosum (mm 2 ): 239.6±92.5 vs 434.8±126.8, P 3 ): 68.2±31.6 vs 100.6±28.3, P 2 ): 808.1±292.2 vs 942.2±246.2, NS. Significant reduction in the area of the vermis: 411.3±203.3 vs 935±252.6 mm 2 ; cerebellar volume: 16.3±12.5 vs 96.6±20.2 mm 3 ; and the diameter of the pons: 10.1±2.2 vs 17.5±1.3 mm (P <0.01) were observed in seven children with gestational age ≤28 weeks, severe hypotension and large patent ductus arteriosus (PDA). There was a significant correlation between the duration of mechanical ventilation and the size of the vermis, pons and cerebellum (R=-0.65, -0.57 and -0.73, respectively, P <0.01). (orig.)

  17. Original Research. The Evaluation of Caries Severity Index and Dental Hypoplasia in Children with Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia. Results from a Romanian Medical Center

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    Bica Cristina

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL is a type of cancer that most frequently affects children, and its treatment involves intensive chemotherapy, which might interfere with the normal development of dental tissues. The aim of our study was to measure the incidence of dental caries and enamel hypoplasia in children diagnosed with ALL treated according to the Berlin-Frankfurt-Munster-95 (ALL-BFM-95 protocol during the complete remission phase. Two groups of children between 8-12 years of age were investigated: Group 1 consisted of 36 children with ALL, and Group 2 of 58 control age-matched children. The decay-missing-filling index for the deciduous teeth (DMFT and the presence of hypoplasia in the first permanent molars (MH or in both incisors and molars (MIH were recorded. The results were statistically analyzed and showed that there were no differences between the groups regarding the DMFT values (p >0.05, but there was a statistically significant difference in the incidence of MH and MIH between groups (p <0.05. According to our results, chemotherapy was not responsible for the decay process, as there were no differences in DMFT indices between the groups, but the high incidence of MH and MIH in the ALL group indicates the need of a good dental care for these children in order to prevent future dental complications.

  18. The radiological features of Goltz syndrome: Focal dermal hypoplasia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boothyrod, A.E.; Hall, C.M.

    1988-01-01

    Two female infants with Goltz syndrome (focal dermal hypoplasia) were recently investigated for severe feeding problems and failure to thrive. Both demonstrated severe skeletal malformations and marked gastrooesophageal reflux with laxity of the hiatus. One child (case 1) exhibited nasal regurgitation during feeding. Interestingly, both children had undergone surgery; Case 1 or a right parasagittal abdominal hernia associated with focal dermal hypoplasia of the abdominal wall and Case 2 for an exomphalos also associated with dermal hypoplasia. This observation suggests more widespread mesodermal abnormality. (orig./GDG)

  19. Ischial hypoplasia, tibial hypoplasia and facial abnormalities: a new syndrome?

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    Nishimura, G. [Department of Radiology, Dokkyo University School of Medicine (Japan); Haga, Yoshihiko [Department of Orthopaedics, Shizuoka Children`s Hospital, Shizuoka (Japan); Aoki, Katsuhiko [Department of Radiology, Shizuoka Children`s Hospital, Shizuoka (Japan); Hasegawa, Tomoko [Division of Clinical Genetics, Shizuoka Children`s Hospital, Shizuoka (Japan)

    1998-12-01

    A child with facial abnormalities, short stature and a variety of skeletal alterations is reported. The facial abnormalities comprised low-set ears, short nose with a long philtrum, micrognathia and cleft palate. The skeletal alterations included ischial hypoplasia, malformations of the cervical spine, hypoplasia of the lesser trochanters, tibial hypoplasia with bowing of the lower legs, tibio-fibular diastasis with malformed distal tibial epiphyses, clubfeet and brachymesophalangy. The constellation of clinical and radiological findings in the present patient do not fit any known malformation syndrome. (orig.) With 4 figs., 8 refs.

  20. Ischial hypoplasia, tibial hypoplasia and facial abnormalities: a new syndrome?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishimura, G.; Haga, Yoshihiko; Aoki, Katsuhiko; Hasegawa, Tomoko

    1998-01-01

    A child with facial abnormalities, short stature and a variety of skeletal alterations is reported. The facial abnormalities comprised low-set ears, short nose with a long philtrum, micrognathia and cleft palate. The skeletal alterations included ischial hypoplasia, malformations of the cervical spine, hypoplasia of the lesser trochanters, tibial hypoplasia with bowing of the lower legs, tibio-fibular diastasis with malformed distal tibial epiphyses, clubfeet and brachymesophalangy. The constellation of clinical and radiological findings in the present patient do not fit any known malformation syndrome. (orig.)

  1. Gene transfer to the cerebellum.

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    Louboutin, Jean-Pierre; Reyes, Beverly A S; Van Bockstaele, Elisabeth J; Strayer, David S

    2010-12-01

    There are several diseases for which gene transfer therapy to the cerebellum might be practicable. In these studies, we used recombinant Tag-deleted SV40-derived vectors (rSV40s) to study gene delivery targeting the cerebellum. These vectors transduce neurons and microglia very effectively in vitro and in vivo, and so we tested them to evaluate gene transfer to the cerebellum in vivo. Using a rSV40 vector carrying human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-Nef with a C-terminal FLAG epitope, we characterized the distribution, duration, and cell types transduced. Rats received test and control vectors by stereotaxic injection into the cerebellum. Transgene expression was assessed 1, 2, and 4 weeks later by immunostaining of serial brain sections. FLAG epitope-expressing cells were seen, at all times after vector administration, principally detected in the Purkinje cells of the cerebellum, identified as immunopositive for calbindin. Occasional microglial cells were tranduced; transgene expression was not detected in astrocytes or oligodendrocytes. No inflammatory or other reaction was detected at any time. Thus, SV40-derived vectors can deliver effective, safe, and durable transgene expression to the cerebellum.

  2. Cerebellum - function (image)

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    The cerebellum processes input from other areas of the brain, spinal cord and sensory receptors to provide precise timing ... the skeletal muscular system. A stroke affecting the cerebellum may cause dizziness, nausea, balance and coordination problems.

  3. Enamel hypoplasia in the middle pleistocene hominids from Atapuerca (Spain).

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    Bermúdez de Castro, J M; Pérez, P J

    1995-03-01

    The prevalence and chronology of enamel hypoplasias were studied in a hominid dental sample from the Sima de los Huesos (SH) Middle Pleistocene site at the Sierra de Atapuerca (Burgos, northern Spain). A total of 89 permanent maxillary teeth, 143 permanent mandibular teeth, and one deciduous lower canine, belonging to a minimum of 29 individuals, were examined. Excluding the antimeres (16 maxillary and 37 mandibular cases) from the sample, the prevalence of hypoplasias in the permanent dentition is 12.8% (23/179), whereas the deciduous tooth also showed an enamel defect. No statistically significant differences were found between both arcades and between the anterior and postcanine teeth for the prevalence of hypoplasias. In both the maxilla and the mandible the highest frequency of enamel hypoplasias was recorded in the canines. Only one tooth (a permanent upper canine) showed two different enamel defects, and most of the hypoplasias were expressed as faint linear horizontal defects. Taking into account the limitations that the incompleteness of virtually all permanent dentitions imposes, we have estimated that the frequency by individual in the SH hominid sample was not greater than 40%. Most of the hypoplasias occurred between birth and 7 years (N = 18, X = 3.5, SD = 1.3). Both the prevalence and severity of the hypoplasias of the SH hominid sample are significantly less than those of a large Neandertal sample. Furthermore, prehistoric hunter-gatherers and historic agricultural and industrial populations exhibit a prevalence of hypoplasias generally higher than that of the SH hominids. Implications for the survival strategies and life quality of the SH hominids are also discussed.

  4. Effects of focal lesions produced by beta irradiating the cerebellums in fetal and infant rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pulliam, J.A.

    1976-01-01

    A beam of beta radiation, 2mm in diameter, was used to irradiate the cerebellum in 29 rat fetuses and in 90 infant rats and to irradiate the cerebrum in 51 rat fetuses and in 72 infant rats. The age range of the rats was from the 15th fetal day to the 6th postnatal day. Localized beta radiation produced lesions limited to the cerebrum, to the cerebellum, to one cerebral hemisphere, or to one cerebellar hemisphere and the vermis in rat fetes and in infant rats. Varying degrees of ataxia were produced in the irradiated rats. This ataxia was proportional to the hypoplasia of the cerebellum. Severe reduction in the size of the cerebrum caused no motor deficits. The lesions produced by localized beta radiation were similar to lesions produced by x radiation, except that beta radiation produced lesions that were more localized and that were asymmetrical. Also the beta radiation offered the investigator more flexibility in selecting the site of the lesion regardless to the age of the rat fetus or the infant rat

  5. Genetics Home Reference: focal dermal hypoplasia

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    ... in people with focal dermal hypoplasia is an omphalocele , which is an opening in the wall of ... Dermal Hypoplasia MedlinePlus Encyclopedia: Ectodermal dysplasia MedlinePlus Encyclopedia: Omphalocele General Information from MedlinePlus (5 links) Diagnostic Tests ...

  6. Trans-sinusal maxillary distraction for correction of midfacial hypoplasia: long-term clinical results.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nadjmi, N.; Schutyser, F.A.C.; Erum, R. van

    2006-01-01

    Maxillary distraction osteogenesis is indicated in severe angle class III malocclusions, and severe maxillary hypoplasia among some cleft patients and other craniofacial deformities. Twenty patients, aged 8-48 years (mean 17.8+/-10.5 SD) with maxillary and midfacial hypoplasia were treated. The

  7. The Cerebellum and Neurodevelopmental Disorders.

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    Stoodley, Catherine J

    2016-02-01

    Cerebellar dysfunction is evident in several developmental disorders, including autism, attention deficit-hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), and developmental dyslexia, and damage to the cerebellum early in development can have long-term effects on movement, cognition, and affective regulation. Early cerebellar damage is often associated with poorer outcomes than cerebellar damage in adulthood, suggesting that the cerebellum is particularly important during development. Differences in cerebellar development and/or early cerebellar damage could impact a wide range of behaviors via the closed-loop circuits connecting the cerebellum with multiple cerebral cortical regions. Based on these anatomical circuits, behavioral outcomes should depend on which cerebro-cerebellar circuits are affected. Here, we briefly review cerebellar structural and functional differences in autism, ADHD, and developmental dyslexia, and discuss clinical outcomes following pediatric cerebellar damage. These data confirm the prediction that abnormalities in different cerebellar subregions produce behavioral symptoms related to the functional disruption of specific cerebro-cerebellar circuits. These circuits might also be crucial to structural brain development, as peri-natal cerebellar lesions have been associated with impaired growth of the contralateral cerebral cortex. The specific contribution of the cerebellum to typical development may therefore involve the optimization of both the structure and function of cerebro-cerebellar circuits underlying skill acquisition in multiple domains; when this process is disrupted, particularly in early development, there could be long-term alterations of these neural circuits, with significant impacts on behavior.

  8. Impairment of DNA synthesis in Gunn rat cerebellum.

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    Yamada, N; Sawasaki, Y; Nakajima, H

    1977-05-06

    Brain DNA synthesis was developmentally investigated in Gunn rat with marked cerebellar hypoplasia due to hereditary hyperbilirubinemia. In this mutant rat, the Purkinje cell was nearly selectively affected in the cerebellar cortex by bilirubin. The impaired DNA synthesis was observed in homozygous (jj) Gunn rat cerebellum, in which the DNA content and [3H]thymidine incorporation rate into DNA decreased after 10 days of age compared to those in the heterozygous (Jj)littermate. In contrast, these impairments were not found in the non-cerebellar parts of the brain and liver of jj Gunn rat. The activity of cerebellar thymidine kinase in jj Gunn rat decreased from a very early stae, being 80% of Jj rat at 6 days, and 50% at 10 days of age. The enzyme activity was not affected in the non-cerebellar parts of the brain. Although bilirubin competitively inhibited cerebellar thymidine kinase activity in vitro (15% at 10(-5) M), such bilirubin level was found to be about 1000-fold that in vivo. Moreover, photo-degradation of bilirubin in jj cerebellum exhibited no improvement in thymidine kinase activity, and the presence of an enzyme inactivator was not suggested in jj cerebellum. These results seem to indicate that the induction of thymidine kinase might be affected in jj Gunn rat cerebellum. The possibility that the impaired DNA synthesis in the external granular cells in jj cerebellum may be due to Purkinje cell damage is discussed.

  9. Dissecting the links between cerebellum and dystonia.

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    Malone, Ailish; Manto, Mario; Hass, Chris

    2014-12-01

    Dystonia is a common movement disorder characterized by sustained muscle contractions. These contractions generate twisting and repetitive movements or typical abnormal postures, often exacerbated by voluntary movement. Dystonia can affect almost all the voluntary muscles. For several decades, the discussion on the pathogenesis has been focused on basal ganglia circuits, especially striatal networks. So far, although dystonia has been observed in some forms of ataxia such as dominant ataxias, the link between the cerebellum and dystonia has remained unclear. Recent human studies and experimental data mainly in rodents show that the cerebellum circuitry could also be a key player in the pathogenesis of some forms of dystonia. In particular, studies based on behavioral adaptation paradigm shed light on the links between dystonia and cerebellum. The spectrum of movement disorders in which the cerebellum is implicated is continuously expanding, and manipulation of cerebellar circuits might even emerge as a candidate therapy in the coming years.

  10. The effect of trichlorfon and methylazoxymethanol on the development of guinea pig cerebellum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mehl, Anna; Schanke, Tore M.; Torvik, Ansgar; Fonnum, Frode

    2007-01-01

    The pesticide trichlorfon (125 mg/kg on days 42-44 in gestation) gives hypoplasia of Brain of the offspring without any significant reduction in their body weights. The hypoplasia may be caused by trichlorfon itself or by its metabolite dichlorvos. This period of development coincides with the growth spurt period of guinea pig brain. The largest changes occurred in the cerebellum. Electron microscopic examination of the cerebellar cortex showed increased apoptotic death of cells in the granule cell layer after trichlorfon treatment. A reduction in thickness of the external germinal layer of the cerebellar cortex and an elevated amount of pyknotic and karyorrhexic cells in the granule cell layer was found. There was a significant reduction in choline esterase, choline acetyltransferase and glutamate decarboxylase activities in the cerebellum. Methylazoxymethanol (15 mg/kg body weight, day 43) was examined for comparison and caused similar hypoplasia of the guinea pig cerebellum, but did also induce a reduction in body weight. Trichloroethanol, the main metabolite of trichlorfon, did not give brain hypoplasia

  11. Cerebellar and brainstem hypoplasia in a child with a partial monosomy for the short arm of chromosome 5 and partial trisomy for the short arm of chromosome 10

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arts, W F M; Hofstee, Y; Drejer, G F; Beverstock, G C; Oosterwijk, J C

    A child with hypoplasia of the cerebellum and brainstem in association with an unbalanced translocation, resulting in a partial deletion of the short arm of chromosome 5 and a partial trisomy of the short arm of chromosome 10, is described. A balanced translocation was present in his mother and

  12. Cerebellum and apraxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariën, Peter; van Dun, Kim; Verhoeven, Jo

    2015-02-01

    As early as the beginning of the nineteenth century, a variety of nonmotor cognitive and affective impairments associated with cerebellar pathology were occasionally documented. A causal link between cerebellar disease and nonmotor cognitive and affective disorders has, however, been dismissed for almost two centuries. During the past decades, the prevailing view of the cerebellum as a mere coordinator of autonomic and somatic motor function has changed fundamentally. Substantial progress has been made in elucidating the neuroanatomical connections of the cerebellum with the supratentorial association cortices that subserve nonmotor cognition and affect. Furthermore, functional neuroimaging studies and neurophysiological and neuropsychological research have shown that the cerebellum is crucially involved in modulating cognitive and affective processes. This paper presents an overview of the clinical and neuroradiological evidence supporting the view that the cerebellum plays an intrinsic part in purposeful, skilled motor actions. Despite the increasing number of studies devoted to a further refinement of the typology and anatomoclinical configurations of apraxia related to cerebellar pathology, the exact underlying pathophysiological mechanisms of cerebellar involvement remain to be elucidated. As genuine planning, organization, and execution disorders of skilled motor actions not due to motor, sensory, or general intellectual failure, the apraxias following disruption of the cerebrocerebellar network may be hypothetically considered to form part of the executive cluster of the cerebellar cognitive affective syndrome (CCAS), a highly influential concept defined by Schmahmann and Sherman (Brain 121:561-579, 1998) on the basis of four symptom clusters grouping related neurocognitive and affective deficits (executive, visuospatial, affective, and linguistic impairments). However, since only a handful of studies have explored the possible role of the cerebellum in

  13. Clinical Features and Management of Cartilage-Hair Hypoplasia: A Narrative Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kobra Shiasi Arani

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Cartilage-hair hypoplasia is a rare hereditary cause of short stature. The aim of this study was to familiarize physicians with this rare but important disease. Evidence Acquisition: This article is a narrative review of the scientific literature to inform about clinical features and management of Cartilage-hair hypoplasia. A systematic search identified 127 papers include original and review articles and case reports. Results: Cartilage-Hair Hypoplasia characterized by short-limb dwarfism associated with metaphyseal chondrodysplasia. The inheritance is autosomal recessive. Other findings include hair hypoplasia, anemia, immunodeficiency, propensity to infections, gastrointestinal disorders (Hirschsprung disease, anal stenosis, esophageal atresia and malabsorption, defective spermatogenesis, increased risk of malignancies and higher rate of mortality. Immunodeficiency in cartilage-hair hypoplasia may be an isolated B-cell or isolated T-cell immunodeficiency or combined B and T-cell immunodeficiency; however, severe combined immunodeficiency is rare. There is no known treatment for hair hypoplasia. Growth hormone was used with conflicting results for short stature in children with Cartilage-hair hypoplasia. Skeletal problems must be managed with physiotherapy and appropriate orthopedic interventions. Hirschsprung disease, anal stenosis and esophageal atresia should be surgically corrected. Patients with severe hypoplastic anemia require repeated transfusions. Bone marrow transplantation may be required for patients with severe combined immunodeficiency or severe persistent hypoplastic anemia. Treatment with G-CSF is useful for neutropenia. Patients should be monitored closely for developing malignancy such as skin neoplasms, lymphomas and leukemias. Conclusions: Cartilage-hair hypoplasia is an important hereditary disease with different medical aspects. The high rate of consanguineous marriages in Iran necessitates considering CHH in any

  14. Treatment of enamel hypoplasia in a patient with Usher syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Peña, Victor Alonso; Valea, Martín Caserío

    2011-08-01

    Usher syndrome (USH) is a group of autosomal recessive diseases characterized by the association of retinitis pigmentosa with sensorineural hearing loss. There are three types of USH. In addition, in people with USH and hypoplasia, the thickness of the enamel is reduced. The authors describe a case of a patient with USH type II associated with severe enamel hypoplasia and multiple unerupted teeth. The authors placed direct composite crowns and extracted severely affected and impacted molars. There is little information available on the oral pathologies of USH. Because the authors did not know how the patient's condition would progress and the patient still was growing, the authors treated the patient conservatively by placing direct composite crowns. The treatment has met both esthetic and functional expectations for 10 years. Copyright © 2011 American Dental Association. All rights reserved.

  15. [The cerebellum as a major player in motor disturbances related to Autistic Syndrome Disorders].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaber, M

    2017-04-01

    Autism spectrum disorders (ASD) are neurodevelopmental disorders associated with disturbances in communication, social interactions, cognition and affect. ASD are also accompanied by complex movement disorders, including ataxia. A special focus of recent research in this area is made on the striatum and the cerebellum, two structures known not only to control movement but also to be involved in cognitive functions such as memory and language. Dysfunction within the motor system may be associated with abnormal movements in ASD that are translated into ataxia, abnormal pattern of righting, gait sequencing, development of walking, and hand positioning. This line of study may generate new knowledge and understanding of motor symptoms associated with ASD and aims to deliver fresh perspectives for early diagnosis and therapeutic strategies against ASD. Despite the relative paucity of research in this area (compared to the social, linguistic, and behavioural disturbances in ASD), there is evidence that the frontostriatal motor system and/or the cerebellar motor systems may be the site of dysfunction in ASD. Indeed, the cerebellum seems to be essential in the development of basic social capabilities, communication, repetitive/restrictive behaviors, and motor and cognitive behaviors that are all impaired in ASD. Cerebellar neuropathology including cerebellar hypoplasia and reduced cerebellar Purkinje cell numbers are the most consistent neuropathologies linked to ASD. The functional state of the cerebellum and its impact on brain function in ASD is the focus of this review. This review starts by recapitulating historical findings pointing towards an implication of the cerebellum, and to a lesser extent the basal ganglia structures, in TSA. We then detail the structure/function of the cerebellum at the regional and cellular levels before describing human and animal findings indicating a role of the cerebellum and basal ganglia in ASD. Several studies have attempted to

  16. The cerebellum and psychiatric disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph ePhillips

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The cerebellum has been considered for a long time to play a role solely in motor coordination. However, studies over the past two decades have shown that the cerebellum also plays a key role in many motor, cognitive, and emotional processes. In addition, studies have also shown that the cerebellum is implicated in many psychiatric disorders including attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, autism spectrum disorders, schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, major depressive disorder and anxiety disorders. In this review, we discuss existing studies reporting cerebellar dysfunction in various psychiatric disorders. We will also discuss future directions for studies linking the cerebellum to psychiatric disorders.

  17. The emotional cerebellum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strata, Piergiorgio

    2015-10-01

    Great attention has been given so far to cerebellar control of posture and of skilled movements despite the well-demonstrated interconnections between the cerebellum and the autonomic nervous system. Here is a review of the link between these two structures and a report on the recently acquired evidence for its involvement in the world of emotions. In rodents, the reversible inactivation of the vermis during the consolidation or the reconsolidation period hampers the retention of the fear memory trace. In this region, there is a long-term potentiation of both the excitatory synapses between the parallel fibres and the Purkinje cells and of the feed-forward inhibition mediated by molecular layer interneurons. This concomitant potentiation ensures the temporal fidelity of the system. Additional contacts between mossy fibre terminals and Golgi cells provide morphological evidence of the potentiation of another feed-forward inhibition in the granular layer. Imaging experiments show that also in humans the cerebellum is activated during mental recall of emotional personal episodes and during learning of a conditioned or unconditioned association involving emotions. The vermis participates in fear learning and memory mechanisms related to the expression of autonomic and motor responses of emotions. In humans, the cerebellar hemispheres are also involved at a higher emotional level. The importance of these findings is evident when considering the cerebellar malfunctioning in psychiatric diseases like autism and schizophrenia which are characterized behaviourally by emotion processing impairments.

  18. Cerebellum and personality traits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrosini, Laura; Cutuli, Debora; Picerni, Eleonora; Laricchiuta, Daniela

    2015-02-01

    Personality traits are multidimensional traits comprising cognitive, emotional, and behavioral characteristics, and a wide array of cerebral structures mediate individual variability. Differences in personality traits covary with brain morphometry in specific brain regions. A cerebellar role in emotional and affective processing and on personality characteristics has been suggested. In a large sample of healthy subjects of both sexes and differently aged, the macro- and micro-structural variations of the cerebellum were correlated with the scores obtained in the Temperament and Character Inventory (TCI) by Cloninger. Cerebellar volumes were associated positively with Novelty Seeking scores and negatively with Harm Avoidance scores. Given the cerebellar contribution in personality traits and emotional processing, we investigated the cerebellar involvement even in alexithymia, construct of personality characterized by impairment in cognitive, emotional, and affective processing. Interestingly, the subjects with high alexithymic traits had larger volumes in the bilateral Crus 1. The cerebellar substrate for some personality dimensions extends the relationship between personality and brain areas to a structure up to now thought to be involved mainly in motor and cognitive functions, much less in emotional processes and even less in personality individual differences. The enlarged volumes of Crus 1 in novelty seekers and alexithymics support the tendency to action featuring both personality constructs. In fact, Novelty Seeking and alexithymia are rooted in behavior and inescapably have a strong action component, resulting in stronger responses in the structures more focused on action and embodiment, as the cerebellum is.

  19. Regional functionality of the cerebellum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Witter, Laurens; De Zeeuw, Chris I

    2015-01-01

    Over the recent years, advances in brain imaging, optogenetics and viral tracing have greatly advanced our understanding of the cerebellum and its connectivity. It has become clear that the cerebellum can be divided into functional units, each connected with particular brain areas involved in

  20. The Sleeping Cerebellum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canto, Cathrin B; Onuki, Yoshiyuki; Bruinsma, Bastiaan; van der Werf, Ysbrand D; De Zeeuw, Chris I

    2017-05-01

    We sleep almost one-third of our lives and sleep plays an important role in critical brain functions like memory formation and consolidation. The role of sleep in cerebellar processing, however, constitutes an enigma in the field of neuroscience; we know little about cerebellar sleep-physiology, cerebro-cerebellar interactions during sleep, or the contributions of sleep to cerebellum-dependent memory consolidation. Likewise, we do not understand why cerebellar malfunction can lead to changes in the sleep-wake cycle and sleep disorders. In this review, we evaluate how sleep and cerebellar processing may influence one another and highlight which scientific routes and technical approaches could be taken to uncover the mechanisms underlying these interactions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. MR assessment of fetal pulmonary hypoplasia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuwashima, Shigeko; Kohno, Atsushi; Saiki, Natoru; Iimura, Fumitoshi; Kohno, Tatsuo; Hashimoto, Teisuke; Fujioka, Mutsuhisa [Dokkyo Univ. School of Medicine, Mibu, Tochigi (Japan)

    2000-08-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate pulmonary hypoplasia of the fetus using MRI. The subjects consisted of 36 fetuses (18 to 40 weeks' gestation). All fetuses or mothers had major anomalies diagnosed on fetal ultrasonography. MR imaging was performed with a 1.5-T magnet and HASTE (half-Fourier acquisition single-shot turbo spin-echo) sequence. MR images were evaluated with special attention to the intensity of the lung. A diagnosis of pulmonary hypoplasia was based on the clinical, surgical, and autopsy findings. All fetuses with normal pulmonary development showed high intensity in the lung, while all fetuses with pulmonary hypoplasia showed a low intensity in the lung, obscured pulmonary vessels and a small thorax. There was a close correlation between the lung intensity and pulmonary growth. MR assessment of lung intensity may facilitate the diagnosis of pulmonary hypoplasia, particularly after 26 weeks' gestation. Some of the normally developing lung showed a low intensity from 20 to 24 weeks of gestational age. The change to normal lung intensity may occur during this period. (author)

  2. Genetics Home Reference: Leydig cell hypoplasia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... normal male sexual development before birth and during puberty. In Leydig cell hypoplasia , affected individuals with a typical male chromosomal pattern (46,XY) may have a range of genital abnormalities. Affected males may have a small penis (micropenis), the opening of the urethra on the ...

  3. Focal dermal hypoplasia: A rare case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sahana M Srinivas

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Focal dermal hypoplasia (Goltz syndrome is a rare genetic multisystem disorder primarily involving the skin, skeletal system, eyes, and face. We report the case of an eight-month-old female child who presented with multiple hypopigmented atrophic macules along the lines of blaschko, skeletal anomalies, umbilical hernia, developmental delay, hypoplastic nails, syndactyly, and lobster claw deformity characteristic of Goltz syndrome.

  4. Tooth enamel hypoplasia in PHACE syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Yvonne E; Siegel, Dawn H; Drolet, Beth A; Hodgson, Brian D

    2014-01-01

    Individuals with PHACE syndrome (posterior fossa malformations, hemangiomas, arterial anomalies, cardiac defects, eye abnormalities, sternal cleft, and supraumbilical raphe syndrome) have reported dental abnormalities to their healthcare providers and in online forums, but dental involvement has not been comprehensively studied. A study was conducted at the third PHACE Family Conference, held in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, in July 2012. A pediatric dentist examined subjects at enrollment. Eighteen subjects were enrolled. The median age was 4.2 years (range 9 mos-9 yrs; 14 girls, 4 boys). Eleven of 18 patients had intraoral hemangiomas and five of these (50%) had hypomature enamel hypoplasia. None of the seven patients without intraoral hemangiomas had enamel hypoplasia. No other dental abnormalities were seen. Enamel hypoplasia may be a feature of PHACE syndrome when an intraoral hemangioma is present. Enamel hypoplasia increases the risk of caries, and clinicians should refer children with PHACE syndrome to a pediatric dentist by 1 year of age. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Spectrum of pontocerebellar hypoplasia in 13 girls and boys with CASK mutations: confirmation of a recognizable phenotype and first description of a male mosaic patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burglen Lydie

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pontocerebellar hypoplasia (PCH is a heterogeneous group of diseases characterized by lack of development and/or early neurodegeneration of cerebellum and brainstem. According to clinical features, seven subtypes of PCH have been described, PCH type 2 related to TSEN54 mutations being the most frequent. PCH is most often autosomal recessive though de novo anomalies in the X-linked gene CASK have recently been identified in patients, mostly females, presenting with intellectual disability, microcephaly and PCH (MICPCH. Methods Fourteen patients (12 females and two males; aged 16 months-14 years presenting with PCH at neuroimaging and with clinical characteristics unsuggestive of PCH1 or PCH2 were included. The CASK gene screening was performed using Array-CGH and sequencing. Clinical and neuroradiological features were collected. Results We observed a high frequency of patients with a CASK mutation (13/14. Ten patients (8 girls and 2 boys had intragenic mutations and three female patients had a Xp11.4 submicroscopic deletion including the CASK gene. All were de novo mutations. Phenotype was variable in severity but highly similar among the 11 girls and was characterized by psychomotor retardation, severe intellectual disability, progressive microcephaly, dystonia, mild dysmorphism, and scoliosis. Other signs were frequently associated, such as growth retardation, ophthalmologic anomalies (glaucoma, megalocornea and optic atrophy, deafness and epilepsy. As expected in an X-linked disease manifesting mainly in females, the boy hemizygous for a splice mutation had a very severe phenotype with nearly no development and refractory epilepsy. We described a mild phenotype in a boy with a mosaic truncating mutation. We found some degree of correlation between severity of the vermis hypoplasia and clinical phenotype. Conclusion This study describes a new series of PCH female patients with CASK inactivating mutations and confirms that

  6. Hallermann-Streiff syndrome associated with small cerebellum, endocrinopathy and increased chromosomal breakage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, J W

    2003-07-01

    Hallermann-Streiff syndrome (HSS) is a rare clinic entity of unknown aetiology. Further clinical and metabolic-genetic evaluations are indicated. A 2-mo-old female baby presented with ocular abnormalities and severe failure to thrive since birth. The clinical features were compatible with the diagnosis of HSS. Further imaging, metabolic and cytogenetic examinations were performed. Features characteristic of HSS were dyscephaly with mandibular and nasal cartilage hypoplasia, microphthalmia, bilateral cataracts with congenital glaucoma, natal teeth and proportionate dwarfism. Rare anomalies such as choanal atresia and small cerebellum, very low insulin-like growth factor I level, hypothyroidism, generalized organic aciduria were also noticed. An increased chromosomal breakage rate is suggestive of the existence of some DNA repair defects in HSS patients. The associated anomalies in this patient may broaden the clinical spectrum of HSS. Underlying conditions of organic aciduria, growth factor deficiency and impaired DNA repair are likely to contribute to the progeria-like facies, congenital cataracts and growth failure.

  7. Linking Essential Tremor to the Cerebellum: Neurochemical Evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marin-Lahoz, Juan; Gironell, Alexandre

    2016-06-01

    The pathophysiology and the exact anatomy of essential tremor (ET) is not well known. One of the pillars that support the cerebellum as the main anatomical locus in ET is neurochemistry. This review examines the link between neurochemical abnormalities found in ET and cerebellum. The review is based on published data about neurochemical abnormalities described in ET both in human and in animal studies. We try to link those findings with cerebellum. γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) is the main neurotransmitter involved in the pathophysiology of ET. There are several studies about GABA that clearly points to a main role of the cerebellum. There are few data about other neurochemical abnormalities in ET. These include studies with noradrenaline, glutamate, adenosine, proteins, and T-type calcium channels. One single study reveals high levels of noradrenaline in the cerebellar cortex. Another study about serotonin neurotransmitter results negative for cerebellum involvement. Finally, studies on T-type calcium channels yield positive results linking the rhythmicity of ET and cerebellum. Neurochemistry supports the cerebellum as the main anatomical locus in ET. The main neurotransmitter involved is GABA, and the GABA hypothesis remains the most robust pathophysiological theory of ET to date. However, this hypothesis does not rule out other mechanisms and may be seen as the main scaffold to support findings in other systems. We clearly need to perform more studies about neurochemistry in ET to better understand the relations among the diverse systems implied in ET. This is mandatory to develop more effective pharmacological therapies.

  8. Intertooth patterns of hypoplasia expression: implications for childhood health in the classic Maya collapse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, L E

    1997-02-01

    Enamel hypoplasias, which record interacting stresses of nutrition and illness during the period of tooth formation, are a key tool in the study of childhood health in prehistory. But interpretation of the age of peak morbidity is complicated by differences in susceptibility to stress both between tooth positions and within a single tooth. Here, hypoplasias are used to evaluate the prevailing ecological model for the collapse of Classic Period Lowland Maya civilization, circa AD 900. Hypoplasias were recorded in the full dentition of 160 adult skeletons from six archaeological sites in the Pasion River region of Guatemala. Instead of constructing a composite scale of stress experience, teeth are considered separately by position in the analysis. No statistical differences are found in the proportion of teeth affected by hypoplasia between "Early," Late Classic, and Terminal Classic Periods for anterior teeth considered to be most susceptible to stress, indicating stability in the overall stress loads affecting children of the three chronological periods. However, hypoplasia trends in posterior teeth may imply a change in the ontogenetic-timing of more severe stress episodes during the final occupation and perhaps herald a shift in child-care practices. These results provide little support for the ecological model of collapse but do call to attention the potential of posterior teeth to reveal subtle changes in childhood morbidity when consideredindividually.

  9. The cerebellum mediates conflict resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schweizer, Tom A; Oriet, Chris; Meiran, Nachshon; Alexander, Michael P; Cusimano, Michael; Stuss, Donald T

    2007-12-01

    Regions within the frontal and parietal cortex have been implicated as important neural correlates for cognitive control during conflict resolution. Despite the extensive reciprocal connectivity between the cerebellum and these putatively critical cortical areas, a role for the cerebellum in conflict resolution has never been identified. We used a task-switching paradigm that separates processes related to task-set switching and the management of response conflict independent of motor processing. Eleven patients with chronic, focal lesions to the cerebellum and 11 healthy controls were compared. Patients were slower and less accurate in conditions involving conflict resolution. In the absence of response conflict, however, tasks-witching abilities were not impaired in our patients. The cerebellum may play an important role in coordinating with other areas of cortex to modulate active response states. These results are the first demonstration of impaired conflict resolution following cerebellar lesions in the presence of an intact prefrontal cortex.

  10. Consensus Paper: Cerebellum and Emotion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamaszek, M; D'Agata, F; Ferrucci, R; Habas, C; Keulen, S; Kirkby, K C; Leggio, M; Mariën, P; Molinari, M; Moulton, E; Orsi, L; Van Overwalle, F; Papadelis, C; Priori, A; Sacchetti, B; Schutter, D J; Styliadis, C; Verhoeven, J

    2017-04-01

    Over the past three decades, insights into the role of the cerebellum in emotional processing have substantially increased. Indeed, methodological refinements in cerebellar lesion studies and major technological advancements in the field of neuroscience are in particular responsible to an exponential growth of knowledge on the topic. It is timely to review the available data and to critically evaluate the current status of the role of the cerebellum in emotion and related domains. The main aim of this article is to present an overview of current facts and ongoing debates relating to clinical, neuroimaging, and neurophysiological findings on the role of the cerebellum in key aspects of emotion. Experts in the field of cerebellar research discuss the range of cerebellar contributions to emotion in nine topics. Topics include the role of the cerebellum in perception and recognition, forwarding and encoding of emotional information, and the experience and regulation of emotional states in relation to motor, cognitive, and social behaviors. In addition, perspectives including cerebellar involvement in emotional learning, pain, emotional aspects of speech, and neuropsychiatric aspects of the cerebellum in mood disorders are briefly discussed. Results of this consensus paper illustrate how theory and empirical research have converged to produce a composite picture of brain topography, physiology, and function that establishes the role of the cerebellum in many aspects of emotional processing.

  11. Analysis of the enamel hypoplasia using micro-CT scanner versus classical method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchewka, Justyna; Skrzat, Janusz; Wróbel, Andrzej

    2014-01-01

    This article demonstrates the use of micro-CT scanning of the teeth surface for recognizing and evaluating severity of the enamel hypoplasia. To test capabilities of the microtomography versus classical method of evaluation hypoplastic defects of the enamel we selected two human teeth (C, M(2)) showing different types of enamel hypoplasia: linear, pits, and groove. Examined samples derive from archeological material dated on XVII-XVIII AD and excavated in Poland. In the current study we proved that micro-CT scanning is a powerful technique not only for imaging all kinds of the enamel hypoplasia but also allows to perform accurate measurements of the enamel defects. We figure out that contrary to the classical method of scoring enamel defects, the micro-computed tomography yields adequate data which serve for estimating the length of stress episode and length of interval between them.

  12. Circulatory CNP Rescues Craniofacial Hypoplasia in Achondroplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamanaka, S; Nakao, Kazumasa; Koyama, N; Isobe, Y; Ueda, Y; Kanai, Y; Kondo, E; Fujii, T; Miura, M; Yasoda, A; Nakao, Kazuwa; Bessho, K

    2017-12-01

    Achondroplasia is the most common genetic form of human dwarfism, characterized by midfacial hypoplasia resulting in occlusal abnormality and foramen magnum stenosis, leading to serious neurologic complications and hydrocephalus. Currently, surgery is the only way to manage jaw deformity, neurologic complications, and hydrocephalus in patients with achondroplasia. We previously showed that C-type natriuretic peptide (CNP) is a potent stimulator of endochondral bone growth of long bones and vertebrae and is also a potent stimulator in the craniofacial region, which is crucial for midfacial skeletogenesis. In this study, we analyzed craniofacial morphology in a mouse model of achondroplasia, in which fibroblast growth factor receptor 3 (FGFR3) is specifically activated in cartilage ( Fgfr3 ach mice), and investigated the mechanisms of jaw deformities caused by this mutation. Furthermore, we analyzed the effect of CNP on the maxillofacial area in these animals. Fgfr3 ach mice exhibited midfacial hypoplasia, especially in the sagittal direction, caused by impaired endochondral ossification in craniofacial cartilage and by premature closure of the spheno-occipital synchondrosis, an important growth center in craniomaxillofacial skeletogenesis. We crossed Fgfr3 ach mice with transgenic mice in which CNP is expressed in the liver under the control of the human serum amyloid-P component promoter, resulting in elevated levels of circulatory CNP ( Fgfr3 ach /SAP-Nppc-Tg mice). In the progeny, midfacial hypoplasia in the sagittal direction observed in Fgfr3 ach mice was improved significantly by restoring the thickness of synchondrosis and promoting proliferation of chondrocytes in the craniofacial cartilage. In addition, the foramen magnum stenosis observed in Fgfr3 ach mice was significantly ameliorated in Fgfr3 ach /SAP-Nppc-Tg mice due to enhanced endochondral bone growth of the anterior intraoccipital synchondrosis. These results clearly demonstrate the therapeutic

  13. Causes of congenital unilateral pulmonary hypoplasia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Currarino, G.; Williams, B.; Children's Medical Center, Dallas, TX

    1985-01-01

    A review of the roentgenograms and clinical records of 33 children with primary congenital underdevelopment of one lung showed that 9 patients had simple pulmonary hypoplasia, 8 had anomalous venous return to the right atrium or the inferior vena cava (scimitar syndrome), 7 had an absence of ipsilateral pulmonary artery, 7 had an accessory diaphragm, and 2 had a pulmonary sequestration adjacent to a small diaphragmatic hernia. (orig.)

  14. The helical three-dimensional CT in the diagnosis of torticollis with occipitocondylar hypoplasia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ilkko, E.; Tikkakoski, T.; Pyhtinen, J.

    1998-01-01

    Congenital anomalies of the atlanto-occipital and atlantoaxial joints are rare. Those most commonly reported are atlantoaxial instability, basilar impression, anomalies of the odontoid process, laxity of the transverse atlantal ligament and atlanto-occipital fusion. Occipital condylar hypoplasia is infrequent and difficult to recognise. We recently diagnosed it using helical 3D CT in association with torticollis in two patients. The first patient had a several year history of torticollis. The second patient had acute cervical lymphadenitis associated with post-operative torticollis. 3D CT distinctly revealed atlantoaxial subluxation with hypoplasia of the occipital condyles in both cases. (Copyright (c) 1998 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam. All rights reserved.)

  15. The helical three-dimensional CT in the diagnosis of torticollis with occipitocondylar hypoplasia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ilkko, E.; Tikkakoski, T.; Pyhtinen, J.

    1998-01-01

    Congenital anomalies of the atlanto-occipital and atlantoaxial joints are rare. Those most commonly reported are atlantoaxial instability, basilar impression, anomalies of the odontoid process, laxity of the transverse atlantal ligament and atlanto-occipital fusion. Occipital condylar hypoplasia is infrequent and difficult to recognise. We recently diagnosed it using helical 3D CT in association with torticollis in two patients. The first patient had a several year history of torticollis. The second patient had acute cervical lymphadenitis associated with post-operative torticollis. 3D CT distinctly revealed atlantoaxial subluxation with hypoplasia of the occipital condyles in both cases

  16. Congenital Unilateral Hypoplasia of Depressor Anguli Oris

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seckin O. Ulualp

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. Asymmetric facial appearance may originate from abnormalities of facial musculature or facial innervation. We describe clinical features of congenital hypoplasia of depressor anguli oris muscle in a child. Material and Methods. Chart of a 10-month-old female referred to a tertiary care pediatric hospital for assessment of facial paralysis was reviewed. Data included relevant history and physical examination, diagnostic work up, and management. Results. The child presented with asymmetric movement of lower lip since birth. Asymmetry of lower lip was more pronounced when she smiled and cried. Rest of the face movement was symmetric. On examination, the face appeared symmetric at rest. The child had inward deviation of right lower lip when she smiled. Facial nerve function, as determined by frowning/forehead, wrinkling, eye closure, nasolabial fold depth, and tearing, was symmetric. Magnetic resonance imaging of the temporal bones and internal auditory canals were within normal limits. Echocardiogram did not show cardiac abnormality. Auditory brainstem response showed no abnormality. Conclusions. Congenital hypoplasia of depressor anguli oris is a rare anomaly that causes asymmetric crying face. Pediatricians and otolaryngologists need to be cognizant of cardiac, head and neck, and central nervous system anomalies associated with congenital unilateral hypoplasia of depressor anguli oris.

  17. Glenoid hypoplasia: a report of 2 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, Christopher J; Taylor, John A M; Buchberger, Dale J

    2008-06-01

    This article discusses the imaging findings, clinical findings, and conservative chiropractic management of 2 patients with glenoid hypoplasia. Conventional radiographs of both patients revealed a hypoplastic glenoid bilaterally. Notch-like defects along with signs of degenerative disease were evident within the lower portion of the glenoid rims bilaterally in 1 patient and in the left glenoid rim of the other patient. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed a degenerative cyst or cortical defect in one patient along the anterior humeral head. The second patient showed a small slightly lobulated cystic region just posterior to the glenoid rim, consistent with the appearance of a synovial or ganglion cyst. Computed tomography with 3-dimensional reconstruction in 1 patient confirmed the presence of large posterior and superior osteophytes arising from the significantly hypoplastic glenoid. These images also revealed a slight posterior subluxation of the humeral head, widening of the anterior glenohumeral joint space, and retroversion of the glenoid. Treatment consisted of manual joint manipulation, soft tissue therapies, and therapeutic exercise for both patients. Both patients experienced improvements in symptoms, function, and physical examination findings. Glenoid hypoplasia is a developmental anomaly of the scapular neck which is predominantly bilateral and symmetric. Cross-sectional imaging studies should be considered in patients with symptoms that fail to improve over time. Conservative chiropractic care may be effective in managing symptoms in patients with glenoid hypoplasia.

  18. Method for imaging pulmonary arterial hypoplasia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Triantafillou, M.

    2000-01-01

    Full text: Pulmonary hypoplasia represents an incomplete development of the lung, resulting in the reduction of distended lung volume. This is associated with small or absent number of airway divisions, alveoli, arteries and veins. Unilateral pulmonary Hypoplasia is often asymptomatic and may be demonstrated as a hypodense lung on a chest X-ray. Computer Tomography (CT) scanning would show anatomical detail and proximal vessels. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) will show no more detail than which the CT scan has already demonstrated. It is, also, difficult to visualise collateral vessels from systemic and/or bronchial vessels on both these modalities. Pulmonary Angiography would give the definitive answer, but it is time consuming and has significant risks associated with the procedure. There are high costs associated with these modalities. Nuclear Medicine Ventilation/Perfusion (V/Q) scan performed on these patients would demonstrate diminished ventilation due to reduced lung volume and absence of perfusion to the hypoplastic lung. To date, we have performed V/Q lung scan on two children in our department. Both cases demonstrate diminished ventilation with no perfusion to the hypoplastic lung. Though the gold standard is Pulmonary Angiography, V/Q scanning is cost effective, less time consuming and a non invasive procedure that can be performed as an outpatient. It is accurate as it demonstrates absent lung perfusion, confirming the patient has pulmonary arterial hypoplasia. Copyright (2000) The Australian and New Zealand Society of Nuclear Medicine Inc

  19. A Case of Fatal Pulmonary Hypoplasia with Congenital Diaphragmatic Hernia, Thoracic Myelomeningocele, and Thoracic Dysplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Ai; Fujinaga, Hideshi; Matsui, Sachiko; Tago, Kumiko; Iwasaki, Yuka; Fujino, Shuhei; Nagasawa, Junko; Amari, Shoichiro; Kaneshige, Masao; Wada, Yuka; Takahashi, Shigehiro; Tsukamoto, Keiko; Miyazaki, Osamu; Yoshioka, Takako; Ishiguro, Akira; Ito, Yushi

    2017-10-01

    Background  Congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH) is fatal in severe cases of pulmonary hypoplasia. We experienced a fatal case of pulmonary hypoplasia due to CDH, thoracic myelomeningocele (MMC), and thoracic dysplasia. This constellation of anomalies has not been previously reported. Case Report  A male infant with a prenatal diagnosis of thoracic MMC with severe hydrocephalus and scoliosis was born at 36 weeks of gestation. CDH was found after birth and the patient died of respiratory failure due to pulmonary hypoplasia and persistent pulmonary hypertension of the newborn at 30 hours of age despite neonatal intensive care. An autopsy revealed a left CDH without herniation of the liver or stomach into the thoracic cavity, severe hydrocephalus, Chiari malformation type II, MMC with spina bifida from Th4 to Th12, hemivertebrae, fused ribs, deformities of the thoracic cage and legs, short trunk, and agenesis of the left kidney. Conclusion  We speculate that two factors may be associated with the severe pulmonary hypoplasia: decreased thoracic space due to the herniation of visceral organs caused by CDH and thoracic dysplasia due to skeletal deformity and severe scoliosis.

  20. Growth hormone treatment in cartilage-hair hypoplasia: effects on growth and the immune system.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bocca, G.; Weemaes, C.M.R.; Burgt, C.J.A.M. van der; Otten, B.J.

    2004-01-01

    Cartilage-hair hypoplasia (CHH) is a rare autosomal recessive disorder characterized by metaphyseal chondrodysplasia with severe growth retardation and impaired immunity. We studied the effects of growth hormone treatment on growth parameters and the immune system in four children with CHH. The

  1. CARTILAGE HAIR HYPOPLASIA, METAPHYSEAL CHONDRODYSPLASIA TYPE MCKUSICK - DESCRIPTION OF 7 PATIENTS AND REVIEW OF THE LITERATURE

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VANDERBURGT, [No Value; HARALDSSON, A; OOSTERWIJK, JC; VANESSEN, AJ; WEEMAES, C; HAMEL, B

    1991-01-01

    We describe 7 cases of cartilage hair hypoplasia (CHH) with emphasis on the clinical and immunological aspects. The literature on CHH is reviewed and symptoms in 63 non-Amish cases are summarized. In this autosomal recessive disorder the immunodeficiency, hair abnormalities, and severity of skeletal

  2. The cerebellum after trauma: Resting-state functional connectivity of the cerebellum in posttraumatic stress disorder and its dissociative subtype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabellino, Daniela; Densmore, Maria; Théberge, Jean; McKinnon, Margaret C; Lanius, Ruth A

    2018-04-17

    The cerebellum plays a key role not only in motor function but also in affect and cognition. Although several psychopathological disorders have been associated with overall cerebellar dysfunction, it remains unclear whether different regions of the cerebellum contribute uniquely to psychopathology. Accordingly, we compared seed-based resting-state functional connectivity of the anterior cerebellum (lobule IV-V), of the posterior cerebellum (Crus I), and of the anterior vermis across posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD; n = 65), its dissociative subtype (PTSD + DS; n = 37), and non-trauma-exposed healthy controls (HC; n = 47). Here, we observed decreased functional connectivity of the anterior cerebellum and anterior vermis with brain regions involved in somatosensory processing, multisensory integration, and bodily self-consciousness (temporo-parietal junction, postcentral gyrus, and superior parietal lobule) in PTSD + DS as compared to PTSD and HC. Moreover, the PTSD + DS group showed increased functional connectivity of the posterior cerebellum with cortical areas related to emotion regulation (ventromedial prefrontal and orbito-frontal cortex, subgenual anterior cingulum) as compared to PTSD. By contrast, PTSD showed increased functional connectivity of the anterior cerebellum with cortical areas associated with visual processing (fusiform gyrus), interoceptive awareness (posterior insula), memory retrieval, and contextual processing (hippocampus) as compared to HC. Finally, we observed decreased functional connectivity between the posterior cerebellum and prefrontal regions involved in emotion regulation, in PTSD as compared to HC. These findings not only highlight the crucial role of each cerebellar region examined in the psychopathology of PTSD but also reveal unique alterations in functional connectivity distinguishing the dissociative subtype of PTSD versus PTSD. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. WDR73 missense mutation causes infantile onset intellectual disability and cerebellar hypoplasia in a consanguineous family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Chen; Gai, Nan; Zou, Yongyi; Zheng, Yu; Ma, Ruiyu; Wei, Xianda; Liang, Desheng; Wu, Lingqian

    2017-01-01

    Galloway-Mowat syndrome (GMS) is a very rare autosomal-recessive disorder characterized by nephrotic syndrome associated with microcephaly, and various central nervous system abnormalities, mostly cerebral hypoplasia or cerebellar atrophy, intellectual disability and neural-migration defects. WDR73 is the only gene known to cause GMS, and has never been implicated in other disease. Here we present a Chinese consanguineous family with infantile onset intellectual disability and cerebellar hypoplasia but no microcephaly. Whole exome sequencing identified a WDR73 p.W371G missense mutation. The mutation is confirmed to be segregated in this family by Sanger sequencing according to a recessive inheritance pattern. It is predicted to be deleterious by multiple algorithms and affect highly conserved site. Structural modeling revealed conformational differences between the wild type protein and the p.W371G protein. Real-time PCR and Western blotting revealed altered mRNA and protein levels in mutated samples. Our study indicates the novel WDR73 p.W371G missense mutation causes infantile onset intellectual disability and cerebellar hypoplasia in recessive mode of inheritance. Our findings imply that microcephaly is a variable phenotype in WDR73-related disease, suggest WDR73 to be a candidate gene of severe intellectual disability and cerebellar hypoplasia, and expand the molecular spectrum of WDR73-related disease. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Does the cerebellum initiate movement?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thach, W T

    2014-02-01

    Opinion is divided on what the exact function of the cerebellum is. Experiments are summarized that support the following views: (1) the cerebellum is a combiner of multiple movement factors; (2) it contains anatomically fixed permanent focal representation of individual body parts (muscles and segments) and movement modes (e.g., vestibular driven vs. cognitive driven); (3) it contains flexible changing representations/memory of physical properties of the body parts including muscle strength, segment inertia, joint viscosity, and segmental interaction torques (dynamics); (4) it contains mechanisms for learning and storage of the properties in item no. 3 through trial-and-error practice; (5) it provides for linkage of body parts, motor modes, and motordynamics via the parallel fiber system; (6) it combines and integrates the many factors so as to initiate coordinated movements of the many body parts; (7) it is thus enabled to play the unique role of initiating coordinated movements; and (8) this unique causative role is evidenced by the fact that: (a) electrical stimulation of the cerebellum can initiate compound coordinated movements; (b) in naturally initiated compound movements, cerebellar discharge precedes that in downstream target structures such as motor cerebral cortex; and (c) cerebellar ablation abolishes the natural production of compound movements in the awake alert individuals.

  5. Consensus paper: the role of the cerebellum in perceptual processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumann, Oliver; Borra, Ronald J; Bower, James M; Cullen, Kathleen E; Habas, Christophe; Ivry, Richard B; Leggio, Maria; Mattingley, Jason B; Molinari, Marco; Moulton, Eric A; Paulin, Michael G; Pavlova, Marina A; Schmahmann, Jeremy D; Sokolov, Arseny A

    2015-04-01

    Various lines of evidence accumulated over the past 30 years indicate that the cerebellum, long recognized as essential for motor control, also has considerable influence on perceptual processes. In this paper, we bring together experts from psychology and neuroscience, with the aim of providing a succinct but comprehensive overview of key findings related to the involvement of the cerebellum in sensory perception. The contributions cover such topics as anatomical and functional connectivity, evolutionary and comparative perspectives, visual and auditory processing, biological motion perception, nociception, self-motion, timing, predictive processing, and perceptual sequencing. While no single explanation has yet emerged concerning the role of the cerebellum in perceptual processes, this consensus paper summarizes the impressive empirical evidence on this problem and highlights diversities as well as commonalities between existing hypotheses. In addition to work with healthy individuals and patients with cerebellar disorders, it is also apparent that several neurological conditions in which perceptual disturbances occur, including autism and schizophrenia, are associated with cerebellar pathology. A better understanding of the involvement of the cerebellum in perceptual processes will thus likely be important for identifying and treating perceptual deficits that may at present go unnoticed and untreated. This paper provides a useful framework for further debate and empirical investigations into the influence of the cerebellum on sensory perception.

  6. Implications of Lateral Cerebellum in Proactive Control of Saccades.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunimatsu, Jun; Suzuki, Tomoki W; Tanaka, Masaki

    2016-06-29

    Although several lines of evidence establish the involvement of the medial and vestibular parts of the cerebellum in the adaptive control of eye movements, the role of the lateral hemisphere of the cerebellum in eye movements remains unclear. Ascending projections from the lateral cerebellum to the frontal and parietal association cortices via the thalamus are consistent with a role of these pathways in higher-order oculomotor control. In support of this, previous functional imaging studies and recent analyses in subjects with cerebellar lesions have indicated a role for the lateral cerebellum in volitional eye movements such as anti-saccades. To elucidate the underlying mechanisms, we recorded from single neurons in the dentate nucleus of the cerebellum in monkeys performing anti-saccade/pro-saccade tasks. We found that neurons in the posterior part of the dentate nucleus showed higher firing rates during the preparation of anti-saccades compared with pro-saccades. When the animals made erroneous saccades to the visual stimuli in the anti-saccade trials, the firing rate during the preparatory period decreased. Furthermore, local inactivation of the recording sites with muscimol moderately increased the proportion of error trials, while successful anti-saccades were more variable and often had shorter latency during inactivation. Thus, our results show that neuronal activity in the cerebellar dentate nucleus causally regulates anti-saccade performance. Neuronal signals from the lateral cerebellum to the frontal cortex might modulate the proactive control signals in the corticobasal ganglia circuitry that inhibit early reactive responses and possibly optimize the speed and accuracy of anti-saccades. Although the lateral cerebellum is interconnected with the cortical eye fields via the thalamus and the pons, its role in eye movements remains unclear. We found that neurons in the caudal part of the lateral (dentate) nucleus of the cerebellum showed the increased

  7. The Cerebellum and Premenstrual Dysphoric Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapkin, Andrea J; Berman, Steven M; London, Edythe D

    2014-01-01

    The cerebellum constitutes ten percent of brain volume and contains the majority of brain neurons. Although it was historically viewed primarily as processing motoric computations, current evidence supports a more comprehensive role, where cerebro-cerebellar feedback loops also modulate various forms of cognitive and affective processing. Here we present evidence for a role of the cerebellum in premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD), which is characterized by severe negative mood symptoms during the luteal phase of the menstrual cycle. Although a link between menstruation and cyclical dysphoria has long been recognized, neuroscientific investigations of this common disorder have only recently been explored. This article reviews functional and structural brain imaging studies of PMDD and the similar but less well defined condition of premenstrual syndrome (PMS). The most consistent findings are that women with premenstrual dysphoria exhibit greater relative activity than other women in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex and posterior lobules VI and VII of the neocerebellum. Since both brain areas have been implicated in emotional processing and mood disorders, working memory and executive functions, this greater activity probably represents coactivation within a cerebro-cerebellar feedback loop regulating emotional and cognitive processing. Some of the evidence suggests that increased activity within this circuit may preserve cerebellar structure during aging, and possible mechanisms and implications of this finding are discussed.

  8. Pontocerebellar hypoplasia associated with respiratory-chain defects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Koning, T. J.; de Vries, L. S.; Groenendaal, F.; Ruitenbeek, W.; Jansen, G. H.; Poll-The, B. T.; Barth, P. G.

    1999-01-01

    Pontocerebellar hypoplasias are congenital disorders of brain morphogenesis which include such diverse etiologies as carbohydrate-deficient glycoprotein syndrome type 1, cerebromuscular dystrophies (Walker-Warburg syndrome, Fukuyama syndrome, muscle-eye-brain disease) and at least two types of

  9. Genetics Home Reference: VLDLR-associated cerebellar hypoplasia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... hypoplasia include moderate to profound intellectual disability, impaired speech (dysarthria) or a lack of speech, and eyes that do not look in the ... the United States. This condition has also been reported in families from Iran and Turkey. Related Information ...

  10. Impairment of enzymatic antioxidant defenses is associated with bilirubin-induced neuronal cell death in the cerebellum of Ugt1 KO mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bortolussi, G; Codarin, E; Antoniali, G; Vascotto, C; Vodret, S; Arena, S; Cesaratto, L; Scaloni, A; Tell, G; Muro, A F

    2015-01-01

    Severe hyperbilirubinemia is toxic during central nervous system development. Prolonged and uncontrolled high levels of unconjugated bilirubin lead to bilirubin-induced encephalopathy and eventually death by kernicterus. Despite extensive studies, the molecular and cellular mechanisms of bilirubin toxicity are still poorly defined. To fill this gap, we investigated the molecular processes underlying neuronal injury in a mouse model of severe neonatal jaundice, which develops hyperbilirubinemia as a consequence of a null mutation in the Ugt1 gene. These mutant mice show cerebellar abnormalities and hypoplasia, neuronal cell death and die shortly after birth because of bilirubin neurotoxicity. To identify protein changes associated with bilirubin-induced cell death, we performed proteomic analysis of cerebella from Ugt1 mutant and wild-type mice. Proteomic data pointed-out to oxidoreductase activities or antioxidant processes as important intracellular mechanisms altered during bilirubin-induced neurotoxicity. In particular, they revealed that down-representation of DJ-1, superoxide dismutase, peroxiredoxins 2 and 6 was associated with hyperbilirubinemia in the cerebellum of mutant mice. Interestingly, the reduction in protein levels seems to result from post-translational mechanisms because we did not detect significant quantitative differences in the corresponding mRNAs. We also observed an increase in neuro-specific enolase 2 both in the cerebellum and in the serum of mutant mice, supporting its potential use as a biomarker of bilirubin-induced neurological damage. In conclusion, our data show that different protective mechanisms fail to contrast oxidative burst in bilirubin-affected brain regions, ultimately leading to neurodegeneration. PMID:25950469

  11. Consensus Paper: Pathological Role of the Cerebellum in Autism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fatemi, S. Hossein; Aldinger, Kimberly A.; Ashwood, Paul; Bauman, Margaret L.; Blaha, Charles D.; Blatt, Gene J.; Chauhan, Abha; Chauhan, Ved; Dager, Stephen R.; Dickson, Price E.; Estes, Annette M.; Goldowitz, Dan; Heck, Detlef H.; Kemper, Thomas L.; King, Bryan H.; Martin, Loren A.; Millen, Kathleen J.; Mittleman, Guy; Mosconi, Matthew W.; Persico, Antonio M.; Sweeney, John A.; Webb, Sara J.; Welsh, John P.

    2013-01-01

    There has been significant advancement in various aspects of scientific knowledge concerning the role of cerebellum in the etiopathogenesis of autism. In the current consensus paper, we will observe the diversity of opinions regarding the involvement of this important site in the pathology of autism. Recent emergent findings in literature related to cerebellar involvement in autism are discussed, including: cerebellar pathology, cerebellar imaging and symptom expression in autism, cerebellar genetics, cerebellar immune function, oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction, GABAergic and glutamatergic systems, cholinergic, dopaminergic, serotonergic, and oxytocin related changes in autism, motor control and cognitive deficits, cerebellar coordination of movements and cognition, gene-environment interactions, therapeutics in autism and relevant animal models of autism. Points of consensus include presence of abnormal cerebellar anatomy, abnormal neurotransmitter systems, oxidative stress, cerebellar motor and cognitive deficits, and neuroinflammation in subjects with autism. Undefined areas or areas requiring further investigation include lack of treatment options for core symptoms of autism, vermal hypoplasia and other vermal abnormalities as a consistent feature of autism, mechanisms underlying cerebellar contributions to cognition, and unknown mechanisms underlying neuroinflammation. PMID:22370873

  12. Consensus paper: pathological role of the cerebellum in autism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fatemi, S Hossein; Aldinger, Kimberly A; Ashwood, Paul; Bauman, Margaret L; Blaha, Charles D; Blatt, Gene J; Chauhan, Abha; Chauhan, Ved; Dager, Stephen R; Dickson, Price E; Estes, Annette M; Goldowitz, Dan; Heck, Detlef H; Kemper, Thomas L; King, Bryan H; Martin, Loren A; Millen, Kathleen J; Mittleman, Guy; Mosconi, Matthew W; Persico, Antonio M; Sweeney, John A; Webb, Sara J; Welsh, John P

    2012-09-01

    There has been significant advancement in various aspects of scientific knowledge concerning the role of cerebellum in the etiopathogenesis of autism. In the current consensus paper, we will observe the diversity of opinions regarding the involvement of this important site in the pathology of autism. Recent emergent findings in literature related to cerebellar involvement in autism are discussed, including: cerebellar pathology, cerebellar imaging and symptom expression in autism, cerebellar genetics, cerebellar immune function, oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction, GABAergic and glutamatergic systems, cholinergic, dopaminergic, serotonergic, and oxytocin-related changes in autism, motor control and cognitive deficits, cerebellar coordination of movements and cognition, gene-environment interactions, therapeutics in autism, and relevant animal models of autism. Points of consensus include presence of abnormal cerebellar anatomy, abnormal neurotransmitter systems, oxidative stress, cerebellar motor and cognitive deficits, and neuroinflammation in subjects with autism. Undefined areas or areas requiring further investigation include lack of treatment options for core symptoms of autism, vermal hypoplasia, and other vermal abnormalities as a consistent feature of autism, mechanisms underlying cerebellar contributions to cognition, and unknown mechanisms underlying neuroinflammation.

  13. Serotonergic control of the developing cerebellum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oostland, M.

    2013-01-01

    The work described in this thesis gives insights in the mechanism behind the serotonergic control of the cerebellum during postnatal development. The findings present a powerful role for serotonin in the physiology of the developing cerebellum. The effects of the serotonergic control extend both

  14. [Pulmonary hypoplasia: An analysis of cases over a 20-year period].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delgado-Peña, Yanny Paola; Torrent-Vernetta, Alba; Sacoto, Gabriela; de Mir-Messa, Inés; Rovira-Amigo, Sandra; Gartner, Silvia; Moreno-Galdó, Antonio; Molino-Gahete, José Andrés; Castillo-Salinas, Felíx

    2016-08-01

    Pulmonary hypoplasia is the most frequent congenital anomaly associated with perinatal mortality. A retrospective and descriptive review was conducted on cases of patients diagnosed with pulmonary hypoplasia between 1995 and 2014 in a tertiary university hospital. An analysis was made of the prenatal imaging, clinical manifestations, post-natal diagnostic tests, treatment and management, long-term follow up, and survival data. A total of 60 cases were identified, all of them with prenatal imaging. Sixteen patients required foetal surgery. Congenital diaphragmatic hernia was the most frequent diagnosis. Main clinical presentation was respiratory distress with severe hypoxemia and high requirements of mechanical ventilation. Mortality rate was 47% within first 60 days of life, and 75% for the first day of life. Pneumonia and recurrent bronchitis episodes were observed during follow-up. They had a lung function obstructive pattern, and their quality of life and exercise tolerance was good. High neonatal mortality and significant long-term morbidity associated with pulmonary hypoplasia requires an early diagnosis and a specialised multidisciplinary team management. Copyright © 2015 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  15. New roles for the cerebellum in health and disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stacey L Reeber

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The cerebellum has a well-established role in maintaining motor coordination and studies of cerebellar learning suggest that it does this by recognizing neural patterns, which it uses to predict optimal movements. Serious damage to the cerebellum impairs this learning and results in a set of motor disturbances called ataxia. However, recent work implicates the cerebellum in cognition and emotion, and it has been argued that cerebellar dysfunction contributes to non-motor conditions such as autism spectrum disorders. Based on human and animal model studies, two major questions arise. Does the cerebellum contribute to non-motor as well as motor diseases, and if so, how does altering its function contribute to such diverse symptoms? The architecture and connectivity of cerebellar circuits may hold the answers to these questions. An emerging view is that cerebellar defects can trigger motor and non-motor neurological conditions by globally influencing brain function. Furthermore, during development cerebellar circuits may play a role in wiring events necessary for higher cognitive functions such as social behavior and language. We discuss genetic, electrophysiological, and behavioral evidence that implicates Purkinje cell dysfunction as a major culprit in several diseases and offer a hypothesis as to how canonical cerebellar functions might be at fault in non-motor as well as motor diseases.

  16. The cerebellum and visual perceptual learning: evidence from a motion extrapolation task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deluca, Cristina; Golzar, Ashkan; Santandrea, Elisa; Lo Gerfo, Emanuele; Eštočinová, Jana; Moretto, Giuseppe; Fiaschi, Antonio; Panzeri, Marta; Mariotti, Caterina; Tinazzi, Michele; Chelazzi, Leonardo

    2014-09-01

    Visual perceptual learning is widely assumed to reflect plastic changes occurring along the cerebro-cortical visual pathways, including at the earliest stages of processing, though increasing evidence indicates that higher-level brain areas are also involved. Here we addressed the possibility that the cerebellum plays an important role in visual perceptual learning. Within the realm of motor control, the cerebellum supports learning of new skills and recalibration of motor commands when movement execution is consistently perturbed (adaptation). Growing evidence indicates that the cerebellum is also involved in cognition and mediates forms of cognitive learning. Therefore, the obvious question arises whether the cerebellum might play a similar role in learning and adaptation within the perceptual domain. We explored a possible deficit in visual perceptual learning (and adaptation) in patients with cerebellar damage using variants of a novel motion extrapolation, psychophysical paradigm. Compared to their age- and gender-matched controls, patients with focal damage to the posterior (but not the anterior) cerebellum showed strongly diminished learning, in terms of both rate and amount of improvement over time. Consistent with a double-dissociation pattern, patients with focal damage to the anterior cerebellum instead showed more severe clinical motor deficits, indicative of a distinct role of the anterior cerebellum in the motor domain. The collected evidence demonstrates that a pure form of slow-incremental visual perceptual learning is crucially dependent on the intact cerebellum, bearing the notion that the human cerebellum acts as a learning device for motor, cognitive and perceptual functions. We interpret the deficit in terms of an inability to fine-tune predictive models of the incoming flow of visual perceptual input over time. Moreover, our results suggest a strong dissociation between the role of different portions of the cerebellum in motor versus

  17. Blaschko Linear Enamel Defects - A Marker for Focal Dermal Hypoplasia: Case Report of Focal Dermal Hypoplasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Gysin

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Focal dermal hypoplasia (FDH is a rare genetic skin disorder. The inheritance of FDH or Goltz-Gorlin syndrome is X-linked dominant and the disease is associated with a PORCN gene mutation. This gene plays a key role in the Wnt pathway, which has an impact on embryonic development. Every tissue derived from meso- and ectoderm can be affected. Patients suffer from cutaneous, ocular, osseous, oral and dental defects. The skin and dental alterations manifest along the Blaschko lines. We present a woman (born in 1962 suffering from FDH with congenital skin changes and Blaschko linear enamel defects. Typical symptoms (e.g. fat herniations, scoliosis, syndactyly, microphthalmia, caries and alopecia plus vertical grooving of all teeth gave a first indication. Molecular genetic testing confirmed the definitive diagnosis of FDH. We hypothesize that, in the context of typical skin changes, visible Blaschko lines on the teeth in the form of vertical grooves are almost pathognomonic for FDH.

  18. Biliary atresia and cerebellar hypoplasia in polysplenia syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vanderdood, Kurt; Op de Beeck, Bart; Desprechins, Brigitte; Osteaux, Michel [Department of Radiology, Free University Brussels, AZ-VUB, Laarbeeklaan 101, 1090 Brussels (Belgium)

    2003-09-01

    We report a 3.5-month-old boy with polysplenia syndrome who demonstrated hemiazygos continuation of the inferior vena cava, extrahepatic biliary atresia, multiple splenunculi, bowel malrotation, and the rare finding of brainstem and cerebellar hypoplasia. A possible pathogenesis for cerebellar hypoplasia in this syndrome is suggested after review of the literature. The importance of seeking associated anomalies in biliary atresia, which may be possible indicators of polysplenia syndrome, is stressed since these patients need appropriate management when surgery is considered. (orig.)

  19. Emotion and Theory of Mind in Schizophrenia-Investigating the Role of the Cerebellum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mothersill, Omar; Knee-Zaska, Charlotte; Donohoe, Gary

    2016-06-01

    Social cognitive dysfunction, including deficits in facial emotion recognition and theory of mind, is a core feature of schizophrenia and more strongly predicts functional outcome than neurocognition alone. Although traditionally considered to play an important role in motor coordination, the cerebellum has been suggested to play a role in emotion processing and theory of mind, and also shows structural and functional abnormalities in schizophrenia. The aim of this systematic review was to investigate the specific role of the cerebellum in emotion and theory of mind deficits in schizophrenia using previously published functional neuroimaging studies. PubMed and PsycINFO were used to search for all functional neuroimaging studies reporting altered cerebellum activity in schizophrenia patients during emotion processing or theory of mind tasks, published until December 2014. Overall, 14 functional neuroimaging studies were retrieved. Most emotion studies reported lower cerebellum activity in schizophrenia patients relative to healthy controls. In contrast, the theory of mind studies reported mixed findings. Altered activity was observed across several posterior cerebellar regions involved in emotion and cognition. Weaker cerebellum activity in schizophrenia patients relative to healthy controls during emotion processing may contribute to blunted affect and reduced ability to recognise emotion in others. This research could be expanded by examining the relationship between cerebellum function, symptomatology and behaviour, and examining cerebellum functional connectivity in patients during emotion and theory of mind tasks.

  20. CERES: A new cerebellum lobule segmentation method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero, Jose E; Coupé, Pierrick; Giraud, Rémi; Ta, Vinh-Thong; Fonov, Vladimir; Park, Min Tae M; Chakravarty, M Mallar; Voineskos, Aristotle N; Manjón, Jose V

    2017-02-15

    The human cerebellum is involved in language, motor tasks and cognitive processes such as attention or emotional processing. Therefore, an automatic and accurate segmentation method is highly desirable to measure and understand the cerebellum role in normal and pathological brain development. In this work, we propose a patch-based multi-atlas segmentation tool called CERES (CEREbellum Segmentation) that is able to automatically parcellate the cerebellum lobules. The proposed method works with standard resolution magnetic resonance T1-weighted images and uses the Optimized PatchMatch algorithm to speed up the patch matching process. The proposed method was compared with related recent state-of-the-art methods showing competitive results in both accuracy (average DICE of 0.7729) and execution time (around 5 minutes). Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. The Cerebellum, Sensitive Periods, and Autism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Samuel S.-H.; Kloth, Alexander D.; Badura, Aleksandra

    2014-01-01

    Cerebellar research has focused principally on adult motor function. However, the cerebellum also maintains abundant connections with nonmotor brain regions throughout postnatal life. Here we review evidence that the cerebellum may guide the maturation of remote nonmotor neural circuitry and influence cognitive development, with a focus on its relationship with autism. Specific cerebellar zones influence neocortical substrates for social interaction, and we propose that sensitive-period disruption of such internal brain communication can account for autism's key features. PMID:25102558

  2. Rhabdomyolysis in pontocerebellar hypoplasia type 2 (PCH-2)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barth, Peter G.; Ryan, Monique M.; Webster, Richard I.; Aronica, Eleonora; Kan, Alex; Ramkema, Marja; Jardine, Philip; Poll-The, Bwee Tien

    2008-01-01

    Pontocerebellar hypoplasia type 2, an autosomal recessive neurodegeneration with prenatal onset, is characterised by progressive microcephaly and chorea/dystonia and has not previously been associated with muscular involvement. The gene associated with PCH-2 is unknown. An episode of rhabdomyolysis

  3. Amelogenesis Imperfect, Enamel Hypoplasia and Fluorosis Dental - Literature Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flávia Magnani Bevilacqua

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The developmental disorders of enamel are abnormalities of structure which can affect both dentitions. These abnormalities include amelogenesis imperfecta, enamel hypoplasia and dental fluorosis. The amelogenesis imperfecta is a hereditary change and enamel hypoplasia is a quantitative defect of enamel that occurs as a result of systemic problems, local and also inherited factors, or even the combination of them. Dental fluorosis is a hypoplasia caused by the chronic ingestion of fluoride during odontogenesis. All these anomalies have similar clinical characteristics, and it is necessary to be careful in their assessment. It is extremely important to know these abnormalities to establish a differential diagnosis and, consequently, a treatment plan, which can be set for each situation. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to review the literature regarding these three anomalies: amelogenesis imperfecta, enamel hypoplasia and dental fluorosis. It was concluded that to establish the differential diagnosis of these abnormalities as well as a proper treatment plan, it is indispensable the professional knowledge associated with the clinical examination. The examination has to consist of medical history and physical examination, and in some cases, x-ray examination.

  4. Congenital bicuspid stenosis with left ventricular hypoplasia in a kitten.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Nie, C J; van Messel, M A; Straatman, T J

    1980-01-15

    Congenital bicuspid stenosis with left ventricular hypoplasia was diagnosed in a kitten. Clinical weakness, dyspnoea and marked cardiomegaly (X rays) were related to postmortem findings. The cardiomegaly had resulted from an enlargement of the left auricular appendage. It is supposed the cardiomegaly developed after the closing of the foramen ovale.

  5. Hypoplasia of the internal carotid artery with intercavernous anastomosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, C.J.; Wang, L.J.; Wong, Y.C.; Chen, S.T.; Hsieh, F.Y.

    1998-01-01

    We report a symptomatic case of unilateral hypoplasia of the internal carotid artery with an intercavernous anastomosis, a very rare developmental anomaly. The symptoms were caused by occlusion of the proximal middle cerebral artery which possibly related to the haemodynamic stress caused by the anomalous intercavernous anastomosis. (orig.)

  6. Cellular commitment in the developing cerebellum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marzban, Hassan; Del Bigio, Marc R.; Alizadeh, Javad; Ghavami, Saeid; Zachariah, Robby M.; Rastegar, Mojgan

    2014-01-01

    The mammalian cerebellum is located in the posterior cranial fossa and is critical for motor coordination and non-motor functions including cognitive and emotional processes. The anatomical structure of cerebellum is distinct with a three-layered cortex. During development, neurogenesis and fate decisions of cerebellar primordium cells are orchestrated through tightly controlled molecular events involving multiple genetic pathways. In this review, we will highlight the anatomical structure of human and mouse cerebellum, the cellular composition of developing cerebellum, and the underlying gene expression programs involved in cell fate commitments in the cerebellum. A critical evaluation of the cell death literature suggests that apoptosis occurs in ~5% of cerebellar cells, most shortly after mitosis. Apoptosis and cellular autophagy likely play significant roles in cerebellar development, we provide a comprehensive discussion of their role in cerebellar development and organization. We also address the possible function of unfolded protein response in regulation of cerebellar neurogenesis. We discuss recent advancements in understanding the epigenetic signature of cerebellar compartments and possible connections between DNA methylation, microRNAs and cerebellar neurodegeneration. Finally, we discuss genetic diseases associated with cerebellar dysfunction and their role in the aging cerebellum. PMID:25628535

  7. Cellular Commitment in the Developing Cerebellum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hassan eMarzban

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The mammalian cerebellum is located in the posterior cranial fossa and is critical for motor coordination and non-motor functions including cognitive and emotional processes. The anatomical structure of cerebellum is distinct with a three-layered cortex. During development, neurogenesis and fate decisions of cerebellar primordium cells are orchestrated through tightly controlled molecular events involving multiple genetic pathways. In this review, we will highlight the anatomical structure of human and mouse cerebellum, the cellular composition of developing cerebellum, and the underlying gene expression programs involved in cell fate commitments in the cerebellum. A critical evaluation of the cell death literature suggests that apoptosis occurs in ~5% of cerebellar cells, most shortly after mitosis. Apoptosis and cellular autophagy likely play significant roles in cerebellar development, we provide a comprehensive discussion of their role in cerebellar development and organization. We also address the possible function of unfolded protein response in regulation of cerebellar neurogenesis. We discuss recent advancements in understanding the epigenetic signature of cerebellar compartments and possible connections between DNA methylation, microRNAs and cerebellar neurodegeneration. Finally, we then discuss genetic diseases associated with cerebellar dysfunction and their role in the aging cerebellum.

  8. Two cases of pontocerebellar hypoplasia: ethical and prenatal diagnostic dilemma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajibola, Ayodeji J; Netzloff, Michael; Samaraweera, Ranji; Omar, Said A

    2010-02-01

    We report the clinical characteristics and the outcome of two cases of pontocerebellar hypoplasia (PCH) in one family. The objective of this report is to describe the mode of presentation, discuss the clinical course, and address the dilemma of prenatal diagnosis and the prospects for genetic diagnosis for PCH. The first case is a 4-year-old boy in whom the diagnosis was made in the neonatal period. Despite extensive prenatal follow-up during the mother's subsequent pregnancy, prenatal diagnosis could not be made and a second affected child was born. Both siblings have severe developmental delay. The cases raise an important ethical dilemma about the most appropriate intervention if the mother of a child affected with PCH becomes pregnant. PCH is considered to have an autosomal-recessive mode of inheritance and a recurrence risk of 25% in each pregnancy. Until recently when genetic mutations in PCH types 2, 4, and 6 began to be identified, the lack of well-recognized genetic testing precluded experts from making clear recommendations. The best advice to these parents was difficult or elusive. With two children currently affected, should the parents terminate or continue with the latest pregnancy? Extensive monitoring with serial prenatal ultrasound failed in the previous pregnancy and resulted in the birth of the second affected child. It is evident that serial ultrasound scan may not be helpful in making the diagnosis prenatally. Therefore, other diagnostic modalities such as magnetic resonance imaging may be necessary and should be considered. With the identification of genetic basis or mutations in PCH types 2, 4, and 6 and possible development of commercial genetic testing for these types of PCH, reproductive decision or genetic testing during pregnancy should be recommended to affected families to enable informed choices. Thieme Medical Publishers.

  9. Genetics Home Reference: cartilage-hair hypoplasia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... complex called mitochondrial RNA-processing endoribonuclease, or RNase MRP. The RNase MRP enzyme is thought to be involved in several ... energy-producing centers of cells ( mitochondria ). The RNase MRP enzyme probably also processes ribosomal RNA , which is ...

  10. Intelligent Network Management and Functional Cerebellum Synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loebner, Egon E.

    1989-01-01

    Transdisciplinary modeling of the cerebellum across histology, physiology, and network engineering provides preliminary results at three organization levels: input/output links to central nervous system networks; links between the six neuron populations in the cerebellum; and computation among the neurons of the populations. Older models probably underestimated the importance and role of climbing fiber input which seems to supply write as well as read signals, not just to Purkinje but also to basket and stellate neurons. The well-known mossy fiber-granule cell-Golgi cell system should also respond to inputs originating from climbing fibers. Corticonuclear microcomplexing might be aided by stellate and basket computation and associate processing. Technological and scientific implications of the proposed cerebellum model are discussed.

  11. Palatoglossal fusion with cleft palate and hypoplasia of cerebellar vermis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shailesh Solanki

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A new-born male presented within 12 h of birth with respiratory distress. On examination and workup, he had palatoglossal fusion, cleft palate and hypoplasia of the cerebellar vermis. A 2.5 Fr endotracheal tube was inserted into the pharynx through nostril as a nasopharyngeal stent, following which his respiratory distress improved. Once child was optimised, then feeding was started by nasogastric tube and feeds were tolerated well. Elective tracheostomy and gastrostomy were done, followed by release of adhesions between the tongue and palate at a later stage. Review of literature suggests that palatoglossal fusion is uncommon and presents as an emergency. Mostly, these oral synechiae are associated with digital and/or cardiac anomaly. Other disorders associated with intra-oral synechiae include congenital alveolar synechiae, van der Woude syndrome, popliteal pterygium syndrome and oromandibular limb hypogenesis syndrome. The authors report a hitherto undescribed association of palatoglossal fusion with cleft palate and hypoplasia of the cerebellar vermis.

  12. Trans-sinusal maxillary distraction for correction of midfacial hypoplasia: long-term clinical results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadjmi, N; Schutyser, F; Van Erum, R

    2006-10-01

    Maxillary distraction osteogenesis is indicated in severe angle class III malocclusions, and severe maxillary hypoplasia among some cleft patients and other craniofacial deformities. Twenty patients, aged 8-48 years (mean 17.8+/-10.5 SD) with maxillary and midfacial hypoplasia were treated. The follow-up period was 13-65 months (mean 35+/-16.3 SD). A trans-sinusal maxillary distractor was placed intraorally at each side of the maxilla. The distraction vector was predicted using specialist software, and was transferred to the patients using stereolithographic models and individual templates. A (high) Le Fort I type osteotomy was performed. The amount of activation varied from 8 to 17.5 mm (mean 13.1+/-2.9 SD). Soft and hard tissue formation resulted in complete healing across the distraction gaps. The distractors are almost completely submerged, and can be left in place as long as necessary to avoid relapse. Wit's appraisal was used to measure the stability of the long-term distraction results. Results up to 5 years after distraction showed considerable maxillary advancement with long-term stability. Ongoing growth of the facial skeleton must be considered when distraction osteogenesis is chosen in growing patients.

  13. Ischio-pubic-patellar hypoplasia: is it a new syndrome?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Habboub, H.K.; Thneibat, W.A.

    1997-01-01

    Aplasia/hypoplasia of the patella has been described as an isolated finding or, more commonly, as a part of congenital syndromes. We describe here bilateral absence of the patella in an 11-year-old girl with absence of the ischial and inferior pubic rami bilaterally. Other associated skeletal and soft-tissue deformities are also reported. To our knowledge, the constellation of these findings has not been described previously and represents a unique syndrome. (orig.). With 1 fig

  14. Indirect veneer treatment of anterior maxillary teeth with enamel hypoplasia

    OpenAIRE

    Juniarti, Devi Eka

    2010-01-01

    Background: Nowadays, aesthetic rehabilitation becomes a necessity. It is affected by patient’s background, especially career, social and economic status. The aesthetic abnormality of anterior teeth i.e discoloration, malposition and malformation can affect patient’s appearance, especially during smile. These dental abnormalities, as a result, can decrease patient’s performance. Dental malformation, for instance, can be caused by developmental tooth defect, such as enamel hypoplasia. Enamel h...

  15. Triplets with growth failure, microcephaly, mental retardation, nail hypoplasia and corpus callosum agenesis: is it a variant of Coffin-Siris or a new syndrome?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirel, B; Kural, N; Yakut, A; Adapinar, B

    2000-01-01

    We report eight-year-old triplet girls whose clinical features included microcephaly, severe mental retardation, hypoplasia of distal phalanges of both fifth and second fingers and nail hypoplasia on second fingers, dysmorphic facial features, and partial corpus callosum agenesis. During infancy, a Pavlik harness was used for congenital hip dislocation, and they had difficulty in feeding. One had been operated for patent ductus arteriosus. To our knowledge, this rare combination has not been previously reported in triplets whose clinical features closely resemble those of Coffin-Siris syndrome. The other diagnostic possibilities are also reviewed.

  16. De rijping van het cerebellum; a study of the postnatal development of the rat cerebellum.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ebels, E.J.

    1969-01-01

    Chapter I: INTRODUCTION In this investigation the development of the rat cerebellum from 0 -30 days after birth is studied morphologically, by means of enzymchistochemistry and electronmicroscopy. Enzymchistochemistry and electronmicroscopy were chosen because changes in enzyme content or enzyme

  17. Pristanic acid provokes lipid, protein, and DNA oxidative damage and reduces the antioxidant defenses in cerebellum of young rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busanello, Estela Natacha Brandt; Lobato, Vannessa Gonçalves Araujo; Zanatta, Ângela; Borges, Clarissa Günther; Tonin, Anelise Miotti; Viegas, Carolina Maso; Manfredini, Vanusa; Ribeiro, César Augusto João; Vargas, Carmen Regla; de Souza, Diogo Onofre Gomes; Wajner, Moacir

    2014-12-01

    Zellweger syndrome (ZS) and some peroxisomal diseases are severe inherited disorders mainly characterized by neurological symptoms and cerebellum abnormalities, whose pathogenesis is poorly understood. Biochemically, these diseases are mainly characterized by accumulation of pristanic acid (Prist) and other fatty acids in the brain and other tissues. In this work, we evaluated the in vitro influence of Prist on redox homeostasis by measuring lipid, protein, and DNA damage, as well as the antioxidant defenses and the activities of aconitase and α-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase in cerebellum of 30-day-old rats. The effect of Prist on DNA damage was also evaluated in blood of these animals. Some parameters were also evaluated in cerebellum from neonatal rats and in cerebellum neuronal cultures. Prist significantly increased malondialdehyde (MDA) levels and carbonyl formation and reduced sulfhydryl content and glutathione (GSH) concentrations in cerebellum of young rats. It also caused DNA strand damage in cerebellum and induced a high micronuclei frequency in blood. On the other hand, this fatty acid significantly reduced α-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase and aconitase activities in rat cerebellum. We also verified that Prist-induced increase of MDA levels was totally prevented by melatonin and attenuated by α-tocopherol but not by the nitric oxide synthase inhibitor N(ω)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester, indicating the involvement of reactive oxygen species in this effect. Cerebellum from neonate rats also showed marked alterations of redox homeostasis, including an increase of MDA levels and a decrease of sulfhydryl content and GSH concentrations elicited by Prist. Finally, Prist provoked an increase of dichlorofluorescein (DCFH) oxidation in cerebellum-cultivated neurons. Our present data indicate that Prist compromises redox homeostasis in rat cerebellum and blood and inhibits critical enzymes of the citric acid cycle that are susceptible to free radical attack. The

  18. Isolated unilateral pulmonary artery hypoplasia with accompanying pulmonary parenchymal findings on CT: A case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Surin; Cha, Yoon Ki; Kim, Jeung Sook; Kwon, Jae Hyun; Jeong, Yun Jeong [Dongguk University Ilsan Hospital, Dongguk University College of Medicine, Goyang (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Seon Jeong [Dept. of Radiology, Myongji Hospital, Goyang (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-05-15

    Unilateral pulmonary artery hypoplasia or agenesis without congenital cardiovascular anomalies is rare in adults. We report a case of a 36-year-old man with isolated left unilateral pulmonary artery hypoplasia with recurrent hemoptysis. On computed tomography (CT), the left pulmonary artery showed hypoplasia with multiple collateral vessels seen in the mediastinum and the left hemithorax. Also, parenchymal bands and peripheral linear opacities were seen in the affected lung, which were probably due to chronic infarction induced by unilateral pulmonary artery hypoplasia. There are only a few reports focusing on the radiologic findings in the pulmonary parenchyma induced by unilateral pulmonary artery hypoplasia, such as parenchymal bands and peripheral linear opacities. Therefore we report this case, which focused on the CT findings in the pulmonary parenchyma due to isolated unilateral pulmonary artery hypoplasia.

  19. Isolated unilateral pulmonary artery hypoplasia with accompanying pulmonary parenchymal findings on CT: A case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Surin; Cha, Yoon Ki; Kim, Jeung Sook; Kwon, Jae Hyun; Jeong, Yun Jeong; Kim, Seon Jeong

    2017-01-01

    Unilateral pulmonary artery hypoplasia or agenesis without congenital cardiovascular anomalies is rare in adults. We report a case of a 36-year-old man with isolated left unilateral pulmonary artery hypoplasia with recurrent hemoptysis. On computed tomography (CT), the left pulmonary artery showed hypoplasia with multiple collateral vessels seen in the mediastinum and the left hemithorax. Also, parenchymal bands and peripheral linear opacities were seen in the affected lung, which were probably due to chronic infarction induced by unilateral pulmonary artery hypoplasia. There are only a few reports focusing on the radiologic findings in the pulmonary parenchyma induced by unilateral pulmonary artery hypoplasia, such as parenchymal bands and peripheral linear opacities. Therefore we report this case, which focused on the CT findings in the pulmonary parenchyma due to isolated unilateral pulmonary artery hypoplasia

  20. Autism spectrum disorders and neuropathology of the cerebellum

    OpenAIRE

    Hampson, David R.; Blatt, Gene J.

    2015-01-01

    The cerebellum contains the largest number of neurons and synapses of any structure in the central nervous system. The concept that the cerebellum is solely involved in fine motor function has become outdated; substantial evidence has accumulated linking the cerebellum with higher cognitive functions including language. Cerebellar deficits have been implicated in autism for more than two decades. The computational power of the cerebellum is essential for many, if not most of the processes ...

  1. Proton Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy Study on the Metabolism Changes of Cerebellum in Patients with Post-Stroke Depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lei; Sui, Ru-Bo

    2017-01-01

    To study the metabolic changes of cerebellum by proton magnetic resonance Spectroscopy (1H-MRS) and discuss the relationships between the cerebellar changes and depression severity in patients with post-stroke depression. Data of demographic characteristics, individual history and life style of all subjects were collected. 40 patients with stroke and 20 controls were enrolled. All groups received T1WI, T2WI, DWI and 1H-MRS examination. The cerebral infarction volume and the distribution and severity of leukoaraiosis were evaluated. The ratios of NAA/Cr, Cho/Cr and Cho/NAA in the cerebellum were calculated. There were no statistical significant difference in the NAA/Cr, Cho/Cr and Cho/NAA ratios in bilateral cerebellum between CONT group and NORM group. The Cho/Cr and Cho/NAA ratios in the cerebellum contralateral to the stroke region were higher in PSD group than those in NORM and CONT groups, and the Cho/Cr and Cho/NAA ratios in the cerebellum ipsilateral to the stroke region were similar with those in NORM and CONT groups. However, there were no statistical significant difference in the NAA/Cr ratios in bilateral cerebellum among three groups. The result shows preliminarily that the cerebellum involves in the development of post-stroke depression. © 2017 The Author(s). Published by S. Karger AG, Basel.

  2. A detailed study of enamel hypoplasia in a post-medieval adolescent of known age and sex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, T; Hillson, S; Humphrey, L T

    2002-01-01

    Developmental disturbances that affect the secretion of enamel matrix can cause defective enamel structure. Linear hypoplasia is one type of enamel defect and manifests itself as a furrow that runs around the circumference of the tooth. Such defects range in size from the microscopic to those that are several millimetres wide. Enamel defects have been widely used by anthropologists for the investigation of growth disruptions in past populations, as they provide a permanent record of disturbances during much of a child's developmental period. This is a detailed case study of enamel growth disruptions in a 15-year-old female from the 18th and 19th century crypt of Christ Church, Spitalfields. The method used relates linear enamel hypoplasia to the incremental structures in the enamel surface, the perikymata, in order to investigate the timing of growth disturbances. Linear enamel hypoplasia was defined here as a greater than expected spacing between neighbouring pairs of perikymata. In addition, this study used recently published histological data on the precise timing of tooth development to establish chronologies for growth disruptions. Defects were matched in at least two teeth with overlapping developmental schedules to ensure that systemic disturbances, as opposed to localised traumas, were identified. Thirteen enamel defects were matched between five different teeth from the same individual from Spitalfields. Most linear enamel hypoplasias were evident on the anterior dentition. Using an 8-day average perikymata periodicity, the age at first defect in this individual was calculated as 1.5 years and the last growth disruption occurred when she was 4.6 years of age. The distribution of the defects was examined to identify any seasonal pattern in the occurrence of the growth disturbances.

  3. New mutations of DAX-1 genes in two Japanese patients with X-linked congenital adrenal hypoplasia and hypogonadotropic hypogonadism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yanase, Toshihiko; Takayanagi, Ryoichi; Oba, Koichi [Kyushu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan)] [and others

    1996-02-01

    Congenital adrenal hypoplasia, an X-linked disorder, is characterized by primary adrenal insufficiency and frequent association with hypogonadotropic hypogonadism. The X-chromosome gene DAX-1 has been most recently identified and shown to be responsible for this disorder. We analyzed the DAX-1 genes of two unrelated Japanese patients with congenital adrenal hypoplasia and hypogonadotropic hypogonadism by using PCR amplification of genomic DNA and its complete exonic sequencing. In a family containing several affected individuals, the proband male patient had a stop codon (TGA) in place of tryptophan (TGG) at amino acid position 171. As expected, his mother was a heterozygous carrier for the mutation, whereas his father and unaffected brother did not carry this mutation. In another male patient with noncontributory family history, sequencing revealed a 1-bp (T) deletion at amino acid position 280, leading to a frame shift and, subsequently a premature stop codon at amino acid position 371. The presence of this mutation in the patients` genome was further confirmed by digestion of genomic PCR product with MspI created by this mutation. Family studies using MspI digestion of genomic PCR products revealed that neither parent of this individual carried the mutation. These results clearly indicate that congenital adrenal hypoplasia and hypogonadotropic hypogonadism result from not only inherited but also de novo mutation in the DAX-1 gene. 31 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  4. Unilateral Glenoid Hypoplasia: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashish Suryawanshi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Glenoid hypoplasia is a relatively rare alteration that in most cases involves the pectoral girdle in a bilateral and symmetrical manner. In general, glenoid hypoplasia is associated with skeletal changes such as hypoplasia of the humeral head or changes in the morphology of the acromion and of the coracoid. We describe a rare case of unilateral glenoid hypoplasia without instability and not involving humeral head. The patient was managed effectively with nonoperative measures that featured specific rehabilitation exercises for the shoulder.

  5. Effect of low frequency rTMS stimulation over lateral cerebellum: a FDG PET study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Eun Jin; Cho, Sang Soo; Bang, Soong Ae; Park, Hyun Soo; Kim, Sang Eun [Seoul National Univ. College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-07-01

    Several lines of evidence suggested the involvement of cerebellum in cognitive function as well as motor function. Because of the measurement difficulty of functional connectivity, little is known about the underlying mechanism involvement of cerebellum in motor and cognitive function in living human brain. To understand the role of cerebellum within the neural network, we investigated the changes of neuronal activity elicited by the cerebellar repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS). 11 right-handed normal volunteers (age: 23.4{+-}2.5 y;6 males) were studied with FDG PET under two conditions; sham and 1Hz rTMS over left lateral cerebellum. With 10 min inter-block interval, three blocks of rTMS were started with the intravenous injection of [18F]FDG. In each block, 5min rTMS were delivered with an intensity of 90% of the resting motor threshold (RMT). Sham rTMS was delivered with same protocol but the coil was positioned perpendicular to the target area with 50% RMT. PET scans were acquired immediately after the rTMS stimulation. Sham and 1Hz rTMS images compared using paired t-test with SPM2. Inhibited neuronal activity compare to the sham condition were revealed in the stimulated left lateral cerebellum and orbitofrontal gyrus and right motor related areas (S1, SMA and posterior parietal cortex). While enhanced neuronal activity compare to the sham condition were revealed in the bilateral inferior frontal gyri including Broca's area and superior temporal gyrus including primary auditory cortex. Bilateral middle temporal, left precentral and right middle occipital gyri were also showed enhanced neuronal activity. This result showed that rTMS over left lateral cerebellum modulate direct vicinity of the targeted region and a large network of remote interconnected contralateral motor and ipsilateral language related brain regions. Present result provide evidence that cerebellum may contribute to language related cognitive function as well as motor

  6. Effect of low frequency rTMS stimulation over lateral cerebellum: a FDG PET study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoon, Eun Jin; Cho, Sang Soo; Bang, Soong Ae; Park, Hyun Soo; Kim, Sang Eun

    2007-01-01

    Several lines of evidence suggested the involvement of cerebellum in cognitive function as well as motor function. Because of the measurement difficulty of functional connectivity, little is known about the underlying mechanism involvement of cerebellum in motor and cognitive function in living human brain. To understand the role of cerebellum within the neural network, we investigated the changes of neuronal activity elicited by the cerebellar repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS). 11 right-handed normal volunteers (age: 23.4±2.5 y;6 males) were studied with FDG PET under two conditions; sham and 1Hz rTMS over left lateral cerebellum. With 10 min inter-block interval, three blocks of rTMS were started with the intravenous injection of [18F]FDG. In each block, 5min rTMS were delivered with an intensity of 90% of the resting motor threshold (RMT). Sham rTMS was delivered with same protocol but the coil was positioned perpendicular to the target area with 50% RMT. PET scans were acquired immediately after the rTMS stimulation. Sham and 1Hz rTMS images compared using paired t-test with SPM2. Inhibited neuronal activity compare to the sham condition were revealed in the stimulated left lateral cerebellum and orbitofrontal gyrus and right motor related areas (S1, SMA and posterior parietal cortex). While enhanced neuronal activity compare to the sham condition were revealed in the bilateral inferior frontal gyri including Broca's area and superior temporal gyrus including primary auditory cortex. Bilateral middle temporal, left precentral and right middle occipital gyri were also showed enhanced neuronal activity. This result showed that rTMS over left lateral cerebellum modulate direct vicinity of the targeted region and a large network of remote interconnected contralateral motor and ipsilateral language related brain regions. Present result provide evidence that cerebellum may contribute to language related cognitive function as well as motor control

  7. Hypoplasia of the thumb. Clinical presentation and reconstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vergara A, Enrique M

    2008-01-01

    In the genesis of the partial or total absence of the thumb they are genetic, environmental factors or a combination of both. It is take part of a syndrome or to be isolated and frequently associated with problems of radial longitudinal deficiency of the forearm. Objective. The purpose of this study is shown the experience, the focus of the processing and the results obtained since the point esthetic and functional view. The most it accepted classification is the proposal by Blauth that helps to determine the forecast and the processing. Materials and methods. it is a work type series of cases in 22 children with hypoplasia of the thumb, with a minimum of 12 months, (average 28 months). In 15 cases there were association of radial dysplasia or another anomaly among them 4 patients with VATER, and the 7 remaining they corresponded to hypoplasia of the thumb as only entity. We carried out tendon transfer, with opening of the first comisure in 2 patients with hypoplasia type II. In 3 patients, with hypoplasia type III A, one carries out corner opening, transfer of the superficial flexor of the 4 finger to correct instability of the articulation MF and opposition of the thumb, and transfer for extension of the thumb. In 17 cases one carries out politicization of the index. Results. The outcome was evaluated in: non pinch, lateral pinch and fingertip pinch; the grade of opposition like good, minimal and non opposition, and the aesthetic result according to the satisfaction of the parents in bad, regular and good. The five children reconstructed with transfers of tendons and comisure opening had good result. In 17 children with politicization one patient had a necrosis, of the 16 remaining a good or acceptable result was obtained. Discussion. It is not easy to follow a good system of measure of the functional results. We find that a practical way to evaluate was the clip, opposition and aesthetics. Previous to the surgeries it is required to evaluate alterations

  8. Congenital bilateral perisylvian syndrome with pituitary hypoplasia and ectopic neurohypophysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yekeler, Ensar; Genchellac, Hakan; Dursun, Memduh; Acunas, Gulden [Istanbul Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Istanbul (Turkey); Ozmen, Meral [Istanbul Faculty of Medicine, Department of Paediatric Neurology, Istanbul (Turkey)

    2004-11-01

    Congenital bilateral perisylvian syndrome (CBPS) is a congenital neurological syndrome characterized by pseudobulbar palsy, cognitive deficits and bilateral perisylvian abnormalities observed on imaging. The described abnormality in CBPS is polymicrogyria located in the frontal, parietal, and/or occipital lobes. A few syndromes or abnormalities associated with this syndrome have been documented. Pituitary abnormalities are rare disorders. Association of CBPS with pituitary abnormalities has not been reported previously. In this case, a combination of bilateral perisylvian polymicrogyria with pituitary hypoplasia and ectopic neurohypophysis, caused by a possible single common insult, is presented. (orig.)

  9. Congenital bilateral perisylvian syndrome with pituitary hypoplasia and ectopic neurohypophysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yekeler, Ensar; Genchellac, Hakan; Dursun, Memduh; Acunas, Gulden; Ozmen, Meral

    2004-01-01

    Congenital bilateral perisylvian syndrome (CBPS) is a congenital neurological syndrome characterized by pseudobulbar palsy, cognitive deficits and bilateral perisylvian abnormalities observed on imaging. The described abnormality in CBPS is polymicrogyria located in the frontal, parietal, and/or occipital lobes. A few syndromes or abnormalities associated with this syndrome have been documented. Pituitary abnormalities are rare disorders. Association of CBPS with pituitary abnormalities has not been reported previously. In this case, a combination of bilateral perisylvian polymicrogyria with pituitary hypoplasia and ectopic neurohypophysis, caused by a possible single common insult, is presented. (orig.)

  10. The therapeutic potential of the cerebellum in schizophrenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krystal Lynn Parker

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The cognitive role of the cerebellum is critically tied to its distributed connections throughout the brain. Accumulating evidence from anatomical, structural and functional imaging, and lesion studies advocate a cognitive network involving indirect connections between the cerebellum and non-motor areas in the prefrontal cortex. Cerebellar stimulation dynamically influences activity in several regions of the frontal cortex and effectively improves cognition in schizophrenia. In this manuscript, we summarize current literature on the cingulocerebellar circuit and we introduce a method to interrogate this circuit combining opotogenetics, neuropharmacology, and electrophysiology in awake-behaving animals while minimizing incidental stimulation of neighboring cerebellar nuclei. We propose the novel hypothesis that optogenetic cerebellar stimulation can restore aberrant frontal activity and rescue impaired cognition in schizophrenia. We focus on how a known cognitive region in the frontal cortex, the anterior cingulate, is influenced by the cerebellum. This circuit is of particular interest because it has been confirmed using tracing studies, neuroimaging reveals its role in cognitive tasks, it is conserved from rodents to humans, and diseases such as schizophrenia and autism appear in its aberrancy. Novel tract tracing results presented here provide support for how these two areas communicate. The primary pathway involves a disynaptic connection between the cerebellar dentate nuclei and the anterior cingulate cortex. Secondarily, the pathway from cerebellar fastigial nuclei to the ventral tegmental area, which supplies dopamine to the prefrontal cortex, may play a role as schizophrenia characteristically involves dopamine deficiencies. We hope that the hypothesis described here will inspire new therapeutic strategies targeting currently untreatable cognitive impairments in schizophrenia.

  11. Spontaneous anaplasia in pilocytic astrocytoma of cerebellum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lach, B; Al Shail, E; Patay, Z

    2003-06-01

    We report a cystic cerebellar astrocytoma with a mural nodule that contained an additional focus of astrocytoma with the histological features of anaplasia, and showed up to 48% of aneuploid and 3% S-phase cells on flow cytometry. This focus was detectable on the enhanced, as well as non-enhanced T1 and T2 images. This appears to be the first case of pilocytic astrocytoma of cerebellum with focal anaplasia detected on histological and radiological studies.

  12. Neuroimmune regulation of neurophysiology in the cerebellum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruol, Donna L

    2013-06-01

    Recent studies have established the existence of an innate immune system in the central nervous system (CNS) and implicated a critical role for this system in both normal and pathological processes. Astrocytes and microglia, normal components of the CNS, are the primary cell types that comprise the innate immune system of the CNS. Basic to their role during normal and adverse conditions is the production of neuroimmune factors such as cytokines and chemokines, which are signaling molecules that initiate or coordinate downstream cellular actions. During adverse conditions, cytokines and chemokines function in defensive and repair. However, if expression of these factors becomes dysregulated, abnormal CNS function can result. Both neurons and glial cells of the CNS express receptors for cytokines and chemokines, but the biological consequence of receptor activation has yet to be fully resolved. Our studies show that neuroadaptive changes are produced in primary cultures of rat cerebellar cells chronically treated with the cytokine interleukin-6 (IL-6) and in the cerebellum of transgenic mice that chronically express elevated levels of IL-6 in the CNS. In the cerebellum in culture and in vivo, the neuroadaptive changes included alterations in the level of expression of proteins involved in gene expression, signal transduction, and synaptic transmission. Associated with these changes were alterations in neuronal function. A comparison of results from the cultured cerebellar cells and cerebellum of the transgenic mice indicated that the effects of IL-6 can vary across neuronal types. However, alterations in mechanisms involved in Ca(2+) homeostasis were observed in all cell types studied. These results indicate that modifications in cerebellar function are likely to occur in disorders associated with elevated levels of IL-6 in the cerebellum.

  13. Visuomotor cerebellum in human and nonhuman primates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voogd, Jan; Schraa-Tam, Caroline K L; van der Geest, Jos N; De Zeeuw, Chris I

    2012-06-01

    In this paper, we will review the anatomical components of the visuomotor cerebellum in human and, where possible, in non-human primates and discuss their function in relation to those of extracerebellar visuomotor regions with which they are connected. The floccular lobe, the dorsal paraflocculus, the oculomotor vermis, the uvula-nodulus, and the ansiform lobule are more or less independent components of the visuomotor cerebellum that are involved in different corticocerebellar and/or brain stem olivocerebellar loops. The floccular lobe and the oculomotor vermis share different mossy fiber inputs from the brain stem; the dorsal paraflocculus and the ansiform lobule receive corticopontine mossy fibers from postrolandic visual areas and the frontal eye fields, respectively. Of the visuomotor functions of the cerebellum, the vestibulo-ocular reflex is controlled by the floccular lobe; saccadic eye movements are controlled by the oculomotor vermis and ansiform lobule, while control of smooth pursuit involves all these cerebellar visuomotor regions. Functional imaging studies in humans further emphasize cerebellar involvement in visual reflexive eye movements and are discussed.

  14. The pedunculopontine tegmental nucleus as a motor and cognitive interface between the cerebellum and basal ganglia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fumika Mori

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available As an important component of ascending activating systems, brainstem cholinergic neurons in the pedunculopontine tegmental nucleus (PPTg are involved in the regulation of motor control (locomotion, posture and gaze and cognitive processes (attention, learning, and memory. The PPTg is highly interconnected with several regions of the basal ganglia, and one of its key functions is to regulate and relay activity from the basal ganglia. Together, they have been implicated in the motor control system (such as voluntary movement initiation or inhibition, and modulate aspects of executive function (such as motivation. In addition to its intimate connection with the basal ganglia, projections from the PPTg to the cerebellum have been recently reported to synaptically activate the deep cerebellar nuclei. Classically, the cerebellum and basal ganglia were regarded as forming separated anatomical loops that play a distinct functional role in motor and cognitive behavioral control. Here, we suggest that the PPTg may also act as an interface device between the basal ganglia and cerebellum. As such, part of the therapeutic effect of PPTg deep brain stimulation to relieve gait freezing and postural instability in advanced Parkinson’s disease patients might also involve modulation of the cerebellum. We review the anatomical position and role of the PPTg in the pathway of basal ganglia and cerebellum in relation to motor control, cognitive function, and Parkinson’s disease.

  15. The Pedunculopontine Tegmental Nucleus as a Motor and Cognitive Interface between the Cerebellum and Basal Ganglia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, Fumika; Okada, Ken-Ichi; Nomura, Taishin; Kobayashi, Yasushi

    2016-01-01

    As an important component of ascending activating systems, brainstem cholinergic neurons in the pedunculopontine tegmental nucleus (PPTg) are involved in the regulation of motor control (locomotion, posture and gaze) and cognitive processes (attention, learning and memory). The PPTg is highly interconnected with several regions of the basal ganglia, and one of its key functions is to regulate and relay activity from the basal ganglia. Together, they have been implicated in the motor control system (such as voluntary movement initiation or inhibition), and modulate aspects of executive function (such as motivation). In addition to its intimate connection with the basal ganglia, projections from the PPTg to the cerebellum have been recently reported to synaptically activate the deep cerebellar nuclei. Classically, the cerebellum and basal ganglia were regarded as forming separated anatomical loops that play a distinct functional role in motor and cognitive behavioral control. Here, we suggest that the PPTg may also act as an interface device between the basal ganglia and cerebellum. As such, part of the therapeutic effect of PPTg deep brain stimulation (DBS) to relieve gait freezing and postural instability in advanced Parkinson's disease (PD) patients might also involve modulation of the cerebellum. We review the anatomical position and role of the PPTg in the pathway of basal ganglia and cerebellum in relation to motor control, cognitive function and PD.

  16. Indirect veneer treatment of anterior maxillary teeth with enamel hypoplasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Devi Eka Juniarti

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Nowadays, aesthetic rehabilitation becomes a necessity. It is affected by patient’s background, especially career, social and economic status. The aesthetic abnormality of anterior teeth i.e discoloration, malposition and malformation can affect patient’s appearance, especially during smile. These dental abnormalities, as a result, can decrease patient’s performance. Dental malformation, for instance, can be caused by developmental tooth defect, such as enamel hypoplasia. Enamel hypoplasia is a developmental defect caused by the lack of matrix amount which leads to thin and porous enamel. Enamel hypoplasia can also be caused by matrix calcification disturbance starting from the formation and development of enamel matrix causing defect and permanent changes which can occur on one or more tooth. Purpose: The aim of the study is to improve dental discoloration and tooth surface texture on anterior maxillary teeth with enamel hypoplasia by using indirect veneer with porcelain material. Case: A 20 years-old woman with enamel hypoplasia came to the Dental Hospital, Faculty of Dentistry Airlangga University. The patient wanted to improve her anterior maxillary teeth. It is clinically known that there were some opaque white spots (chalky spotted and porous on anterior teeth’s surface. Case management: Indirect veneer with porcelain material had been chosen as a restoration treatment which has excellent aesthetics and strength, and did not cause gingival irritation. As a result, the treatment could improve the confidence of the patient, and could also make their function normal. Conclusion: Indirect veneer is an effective treatment, which can improve patient’s appearance and self confidence.Latar belakang: Saat ini perbaikan estetik menjadi suatu kebutuhan. Kebutuhan akan estetik dipengaruhi latar belakang penderita, terutama karir, status sosial dan ekonomi. Hal ini disebabkan, kelainan estetik seperti diskolorasi, malposisi

  17. Right Lateral Cerebellum Represents Linguistic Predictability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lesage, Elise; Hansen, Peter C; Miall, R Chris

    2017-06-28

    Mounting evidence indicates that posterolateral portions of the cerebellum (right Crus I/II) contribute to language processing, but the nature of this role remains unclear. Based on a well-supported theory of cerebellar motor function, which ascribes to the cerebellum a role in short-term prediction through internal modeling, we hypothesize that right cerebellar Crus I/II supports prediction of upcoming sentence content. We tested this hypothesis using event-related fMRI in male and female human subjects by manipulating the predictability of written sentences. Our design controlled for motor planning and execution, as well as for linguistic features and working memory load; it also allowed separation of the prediction interval from the presentation of the final sentence item. In addition, three further fMRI tasks captured semantic, phonological, and orthographic processing to shed light on the nature of the information processed. As hypothesized, activity in right posterolateral cerebellum correlated with the predictability of the upcoming target word. This cerebellar region also responded to prediction error during the outcome of the trial. Further, this region was engaged in phonological, but not semantic or orthographic, processing. This is the first imaging study to demonstrate a right cerebellar contribution in language comprehension independently from motor, cognitive, and linguistic confounds. These results complement our work using other methodologies showing cerebellar engagement in linguistic prediction and suggest that internal modeling of phonological representations aids language production and comprehension. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT The cerebellum is traditionally seen as a motor structure that allows for smooth movement by predicting upcoming signals. However, the cerebellum is also consistently implicated in nonmotor functions such as language and working memory. Using fMRI, we identify a cerebellar area that is active when words are predicted and

  18. Intrinsic connectivity networks within cerebellum and beyond in eating disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amianto, F; D'Agata, F; Lavagnino, L; Caroppo, P; Abbate-Daga, G; Righi, D; Scarone, S; Bergui, M; Mortara, P; Fassino, S

    2013-10-01

    Cerebellum seems to have a role both in feeding behavior and emotion regulation; therefore, it is a region that warrants further neuroimaging studies in eating disorders, severe conditions that determine a significant impairment in the physical and psychological domain. The aim of this study was to examine the cerebellum intrinsic connectivity during functional magnetic resonance imaging resting state in anorexia nervosa (AN), bulimia nervosa (BN), and healthy controls (CN). Resting state brain activity was decomposed into intrinsic connectivity networks (ICNs) using group spatial independent component analysis on the resting blood oxygenation level dependent time courses of 12 AN, 12 BN, and 10 CN. We extracted the cerebellar ICN and compared it between groups. Intrinsic connectivity within the cerebellar network showed some common alterations in eating disordered compared to healthy subjects (e.g., a greater connectivity with insulae, vermis, and paravermis and a lesser connectivity with parietal lobe); AN and BN patients were characterized by some peculiar alterations in connectivity patterns (e.g., greater connectivity with the insulae in AN compared to BN, greater connectivity with anterior cingulate cortex in BN compared to AN). Our data are consistent with the presence of different alterations in the cerebellar network in AN and BN patients that could be related to psychopathologic dimensions of eating disorders.

  19. Linking Essential Tremor to the Cerebellum-Neuroimaging Evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerasa, Antonio; Quattrone, Aldo

    2016-06-01

    Essential tremor (ET) is the most common pathological tremor disorder in the world, and post-mortem evidence has shown that the cerebellum is the most consistent area of pathology in ET. In the last few years, advanced neuroimaging has tried to confirm this evidence. The aim of the present review is to discuss to what extent the evidence provided by this field of study may be generalised. We performed a systematic literature search combining the terms ET with the following keywords: MRI, VBM, MRS, DTI, fMRI, PET and SPECT. We summarised and discussed each study and placed the results in the context of existing knowledge regarding the cerebellar involvement in ET. A total of 51 neuroimaging studies met our search criteria, roughly divided into 19 structural and 32 functional studies. Despite clinical and methodological differences, both functional and structural imaging studies showed similar findings but without defining a clear topography of neurodegeneration. Indeed, the vast majority of studies found functional and structural abnormalities in several parts of the anterior and posterior cerebellar lobules, but it remains to be established to what degree these neural changes contribute to clinical symptoms of ET. Currently, advanced neuroimaging has confirmed the involvement of the cerebellum in pathophysiological processes of ET, although a high variability in results persists. For this reason, the translation of this knowledge into daily clinical practice is again partially limited, although new advanced multivariate neuroimaging approaches (machine-learning) are proving interesting changes of perspective.

  20. CD44-positive cells are candidates for astrocyte precursor cells in developing mouse cerebellum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Na; Kurachi, Masashi; Shibasaki, Koji; Okano-Uchida, Takayuki; Ishizaki, Yasuki

    2012-03-01

    Neural stem cells are generally considered to be committed to becoming precursor cells before terminally differentiating into either neurons or glial cells during neural development. Neuronal and oligodendrocyte precursor cells have been identified in several areas in the murine central nervous system. The presence of astrocyte precursor cells (APCs) is not so well understood. The present study provides several lines of evidence that CD44-positive cells are APCs in the early postnatal mouse cerebellum. In developing mouse cerebellum, CD44-positive cells, mostly located in the white matter, were positive for the markers of the astrocyte lineage, but negative for the markers of mature astrocytes. CD44-positive cells were purified from postnatal cerebellum by fluorescence-activated cell sorting and characterized in vitro. In the absence of any signaling molecule, many cells died by apoptosis. The surviving cells gradually expressed glial fibrillary acidic protein, a marker for mature astrocytes, indicating that differentiation into mature astrocytes is the default program for these cells. The cells produced no neurospheres nor neurons nor oligodendrocytes under any condition examined, indicating these cells are not neural stem cells. Leukemia inhibitory factor greatly promoted astrocytic differentiation of CD44-positive cells, whereas bone morphogenetic protein 4 (BMP4) did not. Fibroblast growth factor-2 was a potent mitogen for these cells, but was insufficient for survival. BMP4 inhibited activation of caspase-3 and greatly promoted survival, suggesting a novel role for BMP4 in the control of development of astrocytes in cerebellum. We isolated and characterized only CD44 strongly positive large cells and discarded small and/or CD44 weakly positive cells in this study. Further studies are necessary to characterize these cells to help determine whether CD44 is a selective and specific marker for APCs in the developing mouse cerebellum. In conclusion, we succeeded in

  1. Cerebellum Abnormalities, the 5th C in CHARGE Syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wong, Tsz; de Geus, Christa; Meiners, Linda C; Sival, Deborah; Yu, Tian; Basson, M. Albert; Arts, Cornelia

    Introduction and background: Children with CHARGE syndrome often have balance problems due to hypoplasia of the semicircular canals. Balance involves the complex task of integrating postural responses and multisensory (visual, labyrinthine from the semi-circular canals, and proprioceptive) feedback.

  2. The cerebellum and cognition: evidence from functional imaging studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoodley, Catherine J

    2012-06-01

    Evidence for a role of the human cerebellum in cognitive functions comes from anatomical, clinical and neuroimaging data. Functional neuroimaging reveals cerebellar activation during a variety of cognitive tasks, including language, visual-spatial, executive, and working memory processes. It is important to note that overt movement is not a prerequisite for cerebellar activation: the cerebellum is engaged during conditions which either control for motor output or do not involve motor responses. Resting-state functional connectivity data reveal that, in addition to networks underlying motor control, the cerebellum is part of "cognitive" networks with prefrontal and parietal association cortices. Consistent with these findings, regional differences in activation patterns within the cerebellum are evident depending on the task demands, suggesting that the cerebellum can be broadly divided into functional regions based on the patterns of anatomical connectivity between different regions of the cerebellum and sensorimotor and association areas of the cerebral cortex. However, the distinct contribution of the cerebellum to cognitive tasks is not clear. Here, the functional neuroimaging evidence for cerebellar involvement in cognitive functions is reviewed and related to hypotheses as to why the cerebellum is active during such tasks. Identifying the precise role of the cerebellum in cognition-as well as the mechanism by which the cerebellum modulates performance during a wide range of tasks-remains a challenge for future investigations.

  3. The anatomy of fear learning in the cerebellum : A systematic meta-analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lange, Iris; Kasanova, Zuzana; Goossens, Liesbet; Leibold, Nicole; De Zeeuw, Chris I; van Amelsvoort, Therese; Schruers, Koen

    2015-01-01

    Recent neuro-imaging studies have implicated the cerebellum in several higher-order functions. Its role in human fear conditioning has, however, received limited attention. The current meta-analysis examines the loci of cerebellar contributions to fear conditioning in healthy subjects, thus mapping,

  4. The cerebellum for jocks and nerds alike.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popa, Laurentiu S; Hewitt, Angela L; Ebner, Timothy J

    2014-01-01

    Historically the cerebellum has been implicated in the control of movement. However, the cerebellum's role in non-motor functions, including cognitive and emotional processes, has also received increasing attention. Starting from the premise that the uniform architecture of the cerebellum underlies a common mode of information processing, this review examines recent electrophysiological findings on the motor signals encoded in the cerebellar cortex and then relates these signals to observations in the non-motor domain. Simple spike firing of individual Purkinje cells encodes performance errors, both predicting upcoming errors as well as providing feedback about those errors. Further, this dual temporal encoding of prediction and feedback involves a change in the sign of the simple spike modulation. Therefore, Purkinje cell simple spike firing both predicts and responds to feedback about a specific parameter, consistent with computing sensory prediction errors in which the predictions about the consequences of a motor command are compared with the feedback resulting from the motor command execution. These new findings are in contrast with the historical view that complex spikes encode errors. Evaluation of the kinematic coding in the simple spike discharge shows the same dual temporal encoding, suggesting this is a common mode of signal processing in the cerebellar cortex. Decoding analyses show the considerable accuracy of the predictions provided by Purkinje cells across a range of times. Further, individual Purkinje cells encode linearly and independently a multitude of signals, both kinematic and performance errors. Therefore, the cerebellar cortex's capacity to make associations across different sensory, motor and non-motor signals is large. The results from studying how Purkinje cells encode movement signals suggest that the cerebellar cortex circuitry can support associative learning, sequencing, working memory, and forward internal models in non

  5. Maxillary Hypoplasia With Congenital Oligodontia Treated by Maxillary Distraction Osteogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishima, Sayaka; Yamaguchi, Takako; Watanabe, Takuma; Komatani, Toru; Nakao, Kazumasa; Takahashi, Katsu; Bessho, Kazuhisa

    2018-02-27

    It is known that congenitally missing teeth can often cause differences in craniofacial morphology; however, there are few reported cases of orthognathic surgical treatment for these patients. Herein, the authors report a rare case of maxillary hypoplasia with congenital oligodontia treated by maxillary distraction osteogenesis with internal device. A 17-year-old male presenting with multiple tooth agenesis and maxillary recession was referred to our hospital for orthognathic surgical treatment. Preoperative simulation surgery was performed using Full-Color 3-dimensional salt model. After surgery, improvement in maxillary recession and occlusal stability was observed. This report demonstrates the advantages of the method used herein, which includes reduction in operating time with increase in the safety of the procedure.

  6. Distraction osteogenesis of radiation-induced orbitozygomatic hypoplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grover, Ramon; Murray, Dylan; Fialkov, Jeffrey A

    2008-05-01

    In the last decade, the application of distraction osteogenesis to the craniofacial skeleton has grown to include not only deformities of the mandible, but of the midface, palate, dentoalveolar region, and calvarium. A major advantage of distraction osteogenesis lies in the simultaneous soft tissue histogenesis that accompanies the bony distraction process, allowing for potentially lower relapse rates and improved cosmesis. Although this may seem appropriately suited to irradiation-induced deformities of both hard and soft tissues, there is little in the literature as to the efficacy of this technique in patients who have received radiotherapy. To introduce an effective application of this technology, and highlight some advantages and disadvantages of its application in the irradiated craniofacial skeleton, we present a case of distraction osteogenesis of the orbitozygomatic complex in a patient with radiation induced orbitozygomatic hypoplasia.

  7. Bone marrow hypoplasia associated with fenbendazole administration in a dog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gary, Anthony T; Kerl, Marie E; Wiedmeyer, Charles E; Turnquist, Susan E; Cohn, Leah A

    2004-01-01

    A 1.5-year-old Doberman pinscher was presented with sudden-onset of fever and malaise. Twelve days prior to presentation, fenbendazole therapy was initiated for a suspected lungworm infection. Results of a complete blood count on presentation showed pancytopenia, while histopathological evaluation of a bone marrow core sample revealed bone marrow hypoplasia of undetermined etiology. Bactericidal antibiotics and fluid therapy, as well as discontinuation of fenbendazole administration, led to a complete resolution of clinical and hematological abnormalities within 15 days. An idiosyncratic reaction to fenbendazole was suspected based on the absence of infectious, neoplastic, autoimmune, and toxic etiologies, as well as resolution of clinical signs and pancytopenia upon drug withdrawal.

  8. Functionally heterogenous ryanodine receptors in avian cerebellum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sierralta, J; Fill, M; Suárez-Isla, B A

    1996-07-19

    The functional heterogeneity of the ryanodine receptor (RyR) channels in avian cerebellum was defined. Heavy endoplasmic reticulum microsomes had significant levels of ryanodine and inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate binding. Scatchard analysis and kinetic studies indicated the existence of at least two distinct ryanodine binding sites. Ryanodine binding was calcium-dependent but was not significantly enhanced by caffeine. Incorporation of microsomes into planar lipid bilayers revealed ion channels with pharmacological features (calcium, magnesium, ATP, and caffeine sensitivity) similar to the RyR channels found in mammalian striated muscle. Despite a wide range of unitary conductances (220-500 picosiemens, symmetrical cesium methanesulfonate), ryanodine locked both channels into a characteristic slow gating subconductance state, positively identifying them as RyR channels. Two populations of avian RyR channels were functionally distinguished by single channel calcium sensitivity. One population was defined by a bell-shaped calcium sensitivity analogous to the skeletal muscle RyR isoform (type I). The calcium sensitivity of the second RyR population was sigmoidal and analogous to the cardiac muscle RyR isoform (type II). These data show that there are at least two functionally distinct RyR channel populations in avian cerebellum. This leads to the possibility that these functionally distinct RyR channels are involved in different intracellular calcium signaling pathways.

  9. The cerebellum and decision making under uncertainty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackwood, Nigel; Ffytche, Dominic; Simmons, Andrew; Bentall, Richard; Murray, Robin; Howard, Robert

    2004-06-01

    This study aimed to identify the neural basis of probabilistic reasoning, a type of inductive inference that aids decision making under conditions of uncertainty. Eight normal subjects performed two separate two-alternative-choice tasks (the balls in a bottle and personality survey tasks) while undergoing functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). The experimental conditions within each task were chosen so that they differed only in their requirement to make a decision under conditions of uncertainty (probabilistic reasoning and frequency determination required) or under conditions of certainty (frequency determination required). The same visual stimuli and motor responses were used in the experimental conditions. We provide evidence that the neo-cerebellum, in conjunction with the premotor cortex, inferior parietal lobule and medial occipital cortex, mediates the probabilistic inferences that guide decision making under uncertainty. We hypothesise that the neo-cerebellum constructs internal working models of uncertain events in the external world, and that such probabilistic models subserve the predictive capacity central to induction. Copyright 2004 Elsevier B.V.

  10. Overexpression of mutant ataxin-3 in mouse cerebellum induces ataxia and cerebellar neuropathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nóbrega, Clévio; Nascimento-Ferreira, Isabel; Onofre, Isabel; Albuquerque, David; Conceição, Mariana; Déglon, Nicole; de Almeida, Luís Pereira

    2013-08-01

    Machado-Joseph disease (MJD), also known as spinocerebellar ataxia type 3 (SCA3), is a fatal, dominant neurodegenerative disorder caused by the polyglutamine-expanded protein ataxin-3. Clinical manifestations include cerebellar ataxia and pyramidal signs culminating in severe neuronal degeneration. Currently, there is no therapy able to modify disease progression. In the present study, we aimed at investigating one of the most severely affected brain regions in the disorder--the cerebellum--and the behavioral defects associated with the neuropathology in this region. For this purpose, we injected lentiviral vectors encoding full-length human mutant ataxin-3 in the mouse cerebellum of 3-week-old C57/BL6 mice. We show that circumscribed expression of human mutant ataxin-3 in the cerebellum mediates within a short time frame--6 weeks, the development of a behavioral phenotype including reduced motor coordination, wide-based ataxic gait, and hyperactivity. Furthermore, the expression of mutant ataxin-3 resulted in the accumulation of intranuclear inclusions, neuropathological abnormalities, and neuronal death. These data show that lentiviral-based expression of mutant ataxin-3 in the mouse cerebellum induces localized neuropathology, which is sufficient to generate a behavioral ataxic phenotype. Moreover, this approach provides a physiologically relevant, cost-effective and time-effective animal model to gain further insights into the pathogenesis of MJD and for the evaluation of experimental therapeutics of MJD.

  11. Pulmonary Hypoplasia Caused by Fetal Ascites in Congenital Cytomegalovirus Infection Despite Fetal Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazumichi Fujioka

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available We report two cases of pulmonary hypoplasia due to fetal ascites in symptomatic congenital cytomegalovirus (CMV infections despite fetal therapy. The patients died soon after birth. The pathogenesis of pulmonary hypoplasia in our cases might be thoracic compression due to massive fetal ascites as a result of liver insufficiency. Despite aggressive fetal treatment, including multiple immunoglobulin administration, which was supposed to diminish the pathogenic effects of CMV either by neutralization or immunomodulatory effects, the fetal ascites was uncontrollable. To prevent development of pulmonary hypoplasia in symptomatic congenital CMV infections, further fetal intervention to reduce ascites should be considered.

  12. Anterior maxillary segmental distraction for correction of maxillary hypoplasia and dental crowding in cleft palate patients: a preliminary report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, X-X; Wang, X; Li, Z-L; Yi, B; Liang, C; Jia, Y-L; Zou, B-S

    2009-12-01

    To evaluate the feasibility of anterior maxillary segmental distraction (AMSD) to correct maxillary hypoplasia and severe dental crowding in cleft lip and palate (CLP) patients, 7 patients (average age 16.4 years) with maxillary hypoplasia, shortened maxillary dental arch length and severe anterior dental crowding secondary to CLP were selected for this study. After anterior maxillary segmental osteotomy, 3 patients were treated using bilateral internal distraction devices, and 4 patients were treated using rigid external distraction devices. Photographs and radiographs were taken to review the improvement in facial profile and occlusion after distraction. An average 10.25 mm anterior maxillary advancement was obtained in all patients after 10-23 days of distraction and 9-16 weeks of consolidation. The sella-nasion-point A (SNA) angle increased from 69.5 degrees to 79.6 degrees. Midface convexity was greatly improved and velopharyngeal competence was preserved. The maxillary dental arch length was greatly increased by 10.1 mm (P<0.01). Dental crowding and malocclusion were corrected by orthodontic treatment. These results show that AMSD can effectively correct the hypoplastic maxilla and severe dental crowding associated with CLP by increasing the midface convexity and dental arch length while preserving velopharyngeal function, and dental crowding can be corrected without requiring tooth extraction.

  13. Morphometric Studies Of The Cerebellum And Forebrain Of The ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Morphometric studies were undertaken using the brains of six African giant rats. The mean of weights and lengths (tip of the olfactory bulb to the caudal border of the cerebellum) were observed tobe 4.88 0.183g and 4.40 0.193g, respectively. Similarly, the mean weight and length of the cerebellum and the forebrain ...

  14. Multiple sclerosis impairs regional functional connectivity in the cerebellum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dogonowski, Anne-Marie; Andersen, Kasper Winther; Madsen, Kristoffer Hougaard

    2013-01-01

    in the cerebellum in MS. This might be caused by a functional disruption of cortico-ponto-cerebellar and spino-cerebellar inputs, since patients with higher lesion load in the left cerebellar peduncles showed a stronger reduction in cerebellar homogeneity. In patients, two clusters in the left posterior cerebellum...

  15. Consensus Paper: The Cerebellum's Role in Movement and Cognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koziol, Leonard F.; Budding, Deborah; Andreasen, Nancy; D'Arrigo, Stefano; Bulgheroni, Sara; Imamizu, Hiroshi; Ito, Masao; Manto, Mario; Marvel, Cherie; Parker, Krystal; Pezzulo, Giovanni; Ramnani, Narender; Riva, Daria; Schmahmann, Jeremy; Vandervert, Larry; Yamazaki, Tadashi

    2014-01-01

    While the cerebellum's role in motor function is well recognized, the nature of its concurrent role in cognitive function remains considerably less clear. The current consensus paper gathers diverse views on a variety of important roles played by the cerebellum across a range of cognitive and emotional functions. This paper considers the cerebellum in relation to neurocognitive development, language function, working memory, executive function, and the development of cerebellar internal control models and reflects upon some of the ways in which better understanding the cerebellum's status as a “supervised learning machine” can enrich our ability to understand human function and adaptation. As all contributors agree that the cerebellum plays a role in cognition, there is also an agreement that this conclusion remains highly inferential. Many conclusions about the role of the cerebellum in cognition originate from applying known information about cerebellar contributions to the coordination and quality of movement. These inferences are based on the uniformity of the cerebellum's compositional infrastructure and its apparent modular organization. There is considerable support for this view, based upon observations of patients with pathology within the cerebellum. PMID:23996631

  16. Role of cerebellum in deglutition and deglutition disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rangarathnam, Balaji; Kamarunas, Erin; McCullough, Gary H

    2014-12-01

    The objective of this review is to gather available evidence regarding the role of the cerebellum in swallowing-related functions. We reviewed literature on cerebellar functions related to healthy swallowing, patterns of dysphagia in individuals with cerebellar lesions, and the role of the cerebellum in therapeutic intervention of neurogenic dysphagia since 1980. A collective understanding of these studies suggests that both hemispheres of the cerebellum, predominantly the left, participate in healthy swallowing. Also, it appears that the cerebellum contributes to specific physiological functions within the entire act of swallowing, but this is not clearly understood. The understanding of patterns of dysphagia in cerebellar lesions remains ambiguous with equivocal results across a small number of studies. The cerebellum appears to be involved in oral exercises for dysphagia in the relationship between oral movements in such exercises, and deglutition remains uncertain. There is increasing evidence to suggest successful use of transcranial magnetic stimulation of the cerebellum to improve neuromotor control of swallowing. Future studies should address activation of the cerebellum with swallowing of different consistencies and tastes in healthy adults to gain better insights. Studies should also investigate dynamics of neural activation during different stages of recovery from dysphagia following strokes to cortical centers to determine if the cerebellum plays a compensatory role during instances of increased neural demands.

  17. How the cerebellum may monitor sensory information for spatial representation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rondi-Reig, Laure; Paradis, Anne-Lise; Lefort, Julie M.; Babayan, Benedicte M.; Tobin, Christine

    2014-01-01

    The cerebellum has already been shown to participate in the navigation function. We propose here that this structure is involved in maintaining a sense of direction and location during self-motion by monitoring sensory information and interacting with navigation circuits to update the mental representation of space. To better understand the processing performed by the cerebellum in the navigation function, we have reviewed: the anatomical pathways that convey self-motion information to the cerebellum; the computational algorithm(s) thought to be performed by the cerebellum from these multi-source inputs; the cerebellar outputs directed toward navigation circuits and the influence of self-motion information on space-modulated cells receiving cerebellar outputs. This review highlights that the cerebellum is adequately wired to combine the diversity of sensory signals to be monitored during self-motion and fuel the navigation circuits. The direct anatomical projections of the cerebellum toward the head-direction cell system and the parietal cortex make those structures possible relays of the cerebellum influence on the hippocampal spatial map. We describe computational models of the cerebellar function showing that the cerebellum can filter out the components of the sensory signals that are predictable, and provides a novelty output. We finally speculate that this novelty output is taken into account by the navigation structures, which implement an update over time of position and stabilize perception during navigation. PMID:25408638

  18. The cerebellum: a neuronal learning machine?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raymond, J. L.; Lisberger, S. G.; Mauk, M. D.

    1996-01-01

    Comparison of two seemingly quite different behaviors yields a surprisingly consistent picture of the role of the cerebellum in motor learning. Behavioral and physiological data about classical conditioning of the eyelid response and motor learning in the vestibulo-ocular reflex suggests that (i) plasticity is distributed between the cerebellar cortex and the deep cerebellar nuclei; (ii) the cerebellar cortex plays a special role in learning the timing of movement; and (iii) the cerebellar cortex guides learning in the deep nuclei, which may allow learning to be transferred from the cortex to the deep nuclei. Because many of the similarities in the data from the two systems typify general features of cerebellar organization, the cerebellar mechanisms of learning in these two systems may represent principles that apply to many motor systems.

  19. REPETITIVE TMS ON LEFT CEREBELLUM AFFECTS IMPULSIVITY IN BORDERLINE PERSONALITY DISORDER : A PILOT STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giulia Zelda De Vidovich

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The borderline personality disorder (BPD is characterized by a severe pattern of instability in emotional regulation, interpersonal relationships, identity, and impulse control. These functions are related to the prefrontal cortex (PFC, and since PFC shows a rich anatomical connectivity with the cerebellum, the functionality of the cerebellar-PFC axis may impact on BPD. In this study we investigated the potential involvement of cerebello-thalamo-cortical connections in impulsive reactions through a pre/post stimulation design. BPD patients (n=8 and healthy controls (HC; n=9 performed an Affective Go/No-Go task (AGN assessing information processing biases for positive and negative stimuli before and after repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS; 1 Hz/10 min, 80% RMT over the left lateral cerebellum. The AGN task consisted of four blocks requiring associative capacities of increasing complexity. BPD patients performed significantly worse than the HC, especially when cognitive demands was high (3rd and 4th block, but their performace approached that of HC after rTMS (rTMS was almost ineffective in HC. The more evident effect of rTMS in complex associative tasks might have occurred since the cerebellum is deeply involved in integration and coordination of different stimuli. We hypothesize that, in BPD patients, cerebello-thalamo-cortical communication is altered, resulting in emotional dysregulation and disturbed impulse control. The rTMS over the left cerebellum might have interfered with existing functional connections exerting a facilitating effect on PFC control.

  20. Repetitive TMS on Left Cerebellum Affects Impulsivity in Borderline Personality Disorder: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Vidovich, Giulia Zelda; Muffatti, Riccardo; Monaco, Jessica; Caramia, Nicoletta; Broglia, Davide; Caverzasi, Edgardo; Barale, Francesco; D'Angelo, Egidio

    2016-01-01

    The borderline personality disorder (BPD) is characterized by a severe pattern of instability in emotional regulation, interpersonal relationships, identity and impulse control. These functions are related to the prefrontal cortex (PFC), and since PFC shows a rich anatomical connectivity with the cerebellum, the functionality of the cerebellar-PFC axis may impact on BPD. In this study, we investigated the potential involvement of cerebello-thalamo-cortical connections in impulsive reactions through a pre/post stimulation design. BPD patients ( n = 8) and healthy controls (HC; n = 9) performed an Affective Go/No-Go task (AGN) assessing information processing biases for positive and negative stimuli before and after repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS; 1 Hz/10 min, 80% resting motor threshold (RMT) over the left lateral cerebellum. The AGN task consisted of four blocks requiring associative capacities of increasing complexity. BPD patients performed significantly worse than the HC, especially when cognitive demands were high (third and fourth block), but their performance approached that of HC after rTMS (rTMS was almost ineffective in HC). The more evident effect of rTMS in complex associative tasks might have occurred since the cerebellum is deeply involved in integration and coordination of different stimuli. We hypothesize that in BPD patients, cerebello-thalamo-cortical communication is altered, resulting in emotional dysregulation and disturbed impulse control. The rTMS over the left cerebellum might have interfered with existing functional connections exerting a facilitating effect on PFC control.

  1. Functional imaging and the cerebellum: recent developments and challenges. Editorial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habas, Christophe

    2012-06-01

    Recent neuroimaging developments allow a better in vivo characterization of the structural and functional connectivity of the human cerebellum. Ultrahigh fields, which considerably increase spatial resolution, enable to visualize deep cerebellar nuclei and cerebello-cortical sublayers. Tractography reconstructs afferent and efferent pathway of the cerebellum. Resting-state functional connectivity individualizes the prewired, parallel close-looped sensorimotor, cognitive, and affective networks passing through the cerebellum. These results are un agreement with activation maps obtained during stimulation functional neuroimaging or inferred from neurological deficits due to cerebellar lesions. Therefore, neuroimaging supports the hypothesis that cerebellum constitutes a general modulator involved in optimizing mental performance and computing internal models. However, the great challenges will remain to unravel: (1) the functional role of red and bulbar olivary nuclei, (2) the information processing in the cerebellar microcircuitry, and (3) the abstract computation performed by the cerebellum and shared by sensorimotor, cognitive, and affective domains.

  2. A robot conditioned reflex system modeled after the cerebellum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albus, J. S.

    1972-01-01

    Reduction of a theory of cerebellar function to computer software for the control of a mechanical manipulator. This reduction is achieved by considering the cerebellum, along with the higher-level brain centers which control it, as a type of finite-state machine with input entering the cerebellum via mossy fibers from the periphery and output from the cerebellum occurring via Purkinje cells. It is hypothesized that the cerebellum learns by an error-correction system similar to Perceptron training algorithms. An electromechanical model of the cerebellum is then developed for the control of a mechanical arm. The problem of modeling the granular layer which selects the set of parallel fibers which are active at any instant of time is considered, and a relevance matrix is constructed to model the relative degree of influence which mossy fibers from the various joints have on the sets of granule cells unique to each joint.

  3. The cerebellum for jocks and nerds alike

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurentiu ePopa

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Historically the cerebellum has been implicated in the control of movement. However, the cerebellum’s role in non-motor functions, including cognitive and emotional processes, has also received increasing attention. Starting from the premise that the uniform architecture of the cerebellum underlies a common mode of information processing, this review examines recent electrophysiological findings on the motor signals encoded in the cerebellar cortex and then relates these signals to observations in the non-motor domain. Simple spike firing of individual Purkinje cells encodes performance errors, both predicting upcoming errors as well as providing feedback about those errors. Further, this dual temporal encoding of prediction and feedback involves a change in the sign of the simple spike modulation. Therefore, Purkinje cell simple spike firing both predicts and responds to feedback about a specific parameter, consistent with computing sensory prediction errors in which the predictions about the consequences of a motor command are compared with the feedback resulting from the motor command execution. These new findings are in contrast with the historical view that complex spikes encode errors. Evaluation of the kinematic coding in the simple spike discharge shows the same dual temporal encoding, suggesting this is a common mode of signal processing in the cerebellar cortex. Decoding analyses show the considerable accuracy of the predictions provided by Purkinje cells across a range of times. Further, individual Purkinje cells encode linearly and independently a multitude of signals, both kinematic and performance errors. Therefore, the cerebellar cortex’s capacity to make associations across different sensory, motor and non-motor signals is large. The results from studying how Purkinje cells encode movement signals suggest that the cerebellar cortex circuitry can support associative learning, sequencing, working memory, and forward internal

  4. Osteopathia striata: a characteristic X-ray finding in focal dermal hypoplasia (Goltz-Gorlin syndrome)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barthels, W.; Boepple, D.; Petzel, H.

    1982-12-01

    Two cases of the very rare Goltz-Gorlin syndrome are presented. The relationship of osteopathia striata and focal dermal hypoplasia is discussed, and it is concluded that the osteopathia striata represents the characteristic picture of this ectopic mesodermal abnormality.

  5. Hypoplasia of bone marrow and cytopenia in non-hemic diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turbina, N.S.

    1987-01-01

    Common (stereotype) and different links in pathogenesis of hemodepressions pronounced in the form of cytopenia and/or hypoplasia of hemopoiesis are considered. Pathogenesis and signs of the diseases, as well as their diagnosis, are studied in detail

  6. CEREBELLUM: LINKS BETWEEN DEVELOPMENT, DEVELOPMENTAL DISORDERS AND MOTOR LEARNING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario U Manto

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The study of the links and interactions between development and motor learning has noticeable implications for the understanding and management of neurodevelopmental disorders. This is particularly relevant for the cerebellum which is critical for sensorimotor learning. The olivocerebellar pathway is a key pathway contributing to learning of motor skills. Its developmental maturation and remodelling are being unravelled. Advances in genetics have led to major improvements in our appraisal of the genes involved in cerebellar development, especially studies in mutant mice. Cerebellar neurogenesis is compartmentalized in relationship with neurotransmitter fate. The Engrailed-2 gene is a major actor of the specification of cerebellar cell types and late embryogenic morphogenesis. Math1, expressed by the rhombic lip (RL, is required for the genesis of glutamatergic neurons. Mutants deficient for the transcription factor Ptf1a display a lack of Purkinje cells and gabaergic interneurons. Rora gene contributes to the developmental signalling between granule cells and Purkinje neurons. The expression profile of SHH (Sonic hedgehog in postnatal stages determines the final size/shape of the cerebellum. Genes affecting the development impact upon the physiological properties of the cerebellar circuits. For instance, receptors are developmentally regulated and their action interferes directly with developmental processes. Another field of research which is expanding relates to very preterm neonates. They are at risk for cerebellar lesions, which may themselves impair the developmental events. Very preterm neonates often show sensori-motor deficits, highlighting another major link between impaired development and learning deficiencies. Pathways playing a critical role in cerebellar development are likely to become therapeutical targets for several neurodevelopmental disorders.

  7. Clinical and immunologic outcome of patients with cartilage hair hypoplasia after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bordon, Victoria; Gennery, Andrew R; Slatter, Mary A; Vandecruys, Els; Laureys, Genevieve; Veys, Paul; Qasim, Waseem; Waseem, Qasim; Friedrich, Wilhelm; Wulfraat, Nico M; Scherer, Franziska; Cant, Andrew J; Fischer, Alain; Cavazzana-Calvo, Marina; Cavazanna-Calvo, Marina; Bredius, Robbert G M; Notarangelo, Luigi D; Mazzolari, Evelina; Neven, Benedicte; Güngör, Tayfun; Tayfun, Güngör

    2010-07-08

    Cartilage-hair hypoplasia (CHH) is a rare autosomal recessive disease caused by mutations in the RMRP gene. Beside dwarfism, CHH has a wide spectrum of clinical manifestations including variable grades of combined immunodeficiency, autoimmune complications, and malignancies. Previous reports in single CHH patients with significant immunodeficiencies have demonstrated that allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is an effective treatment for the severe immunodeficiency, while growth failure remains unaffected. Because long-term experience in larger cohorts of CHH patients after HSCT is currently unreported, we performed a European collaborative survey reporting on 16 patients with CHH and immunodeficiency who underwent HSCT. Immune dysregulation, lymphoid malignancy, and autoimmunity were important features in this cohort. Thirteen patients were transplanted in early childhood ( approximately 2.5 years). The other 3 patients were transplanted at adolescent age. Of 16 patients, 10 (62.5%) were long-term survivors, with a median follow-up of 7 years. T-lymphocyte numbers and function have normalized, and autoimmunity has resolved in all survivors. HSCT should be considered in CHH patients with severe immunodeficiency/autoimmunity, before the development of severe infections, major organ damage, or malignancy might jeopardize the outcome of HSCT and the quality of life in these patients.

  8. Cerebellar Hypoplasia and Dysmorphia in Neurofibromatosis Type 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toelle, Sandra P; Poretti, Andrea; Weber, Peter; Seute, Tatjana; Bromberg, Jacoline E C; Scheer, Ianina; Boltshauser, Eugen

    2015-12-01

    Unidentified bright objects (UBO) and tumors are well-known cerebellar abnormalities in neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1). Literature reports on malformative cerebellar anomalies in neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1), however, are scant. We retrospectively studied the clinical and neuroimaging findings of 5 patients with NF1 (4 females, age 6 to 29 years at last follow-up) and cerebellar anomalies. Cerebellar symptoms on neurological examination were mild or even not evident whereas learning disabilities were more or less pronounced in four patients. Two patients had cerebellar hypoplasia (diffusely enlarged cerebellar interfoliar spaces) and three cerebellar dysmorphias involving mainly one cerebellar hemisphere. In NF1, malformative cerebellar anomalies are rare (estimated prevalence of about 1%), but most likely underestimated and easily overlooked, because physicians tend to focus on more prevalent, obvious, and well-known findings such as optic pathway gliomas, other tumors, and UBO. This kind of cerebellar anomaly in NF1 has most likely a malformative origin, but the exact pathogenesis is unknown. The individual clinical significance is difficult to determine. We suggest that cerebellar anomalies should be systematically evaluated in neuroimaging studies of NF1 patients.

  9. Regional disc change in segmental hypoplasia of the lumbosacral vertebral bodies: MR findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Sung Kyu; Lee Seung Ro; Moon, Won Jin; Park, Dong Woo; Hahm, Chang Kok

    2000-01-01

    To classify types of vertebral hypoplasia and to investigate the prevalence and patterns of associated disc degeneration. Defining vertebral hypoplasia as occurring when the AP diameter of a lower vertebral body is smaller than that of an upper ones, we retrospectively reviewed the MR images obtained in 34 cases of this condition involving young adults. Two major types and two subtypes, a total of four different entities were classified as follows; type I: hypoplasia involving a single vertebral body; type II: hypoplasia involving serial lower segmental vertebral bodies; subtype a: hypoplastic body located anteriorly along the anterior spinal line; subtype b: hypoplastic body located posteriorly along the posterior spinal line. We also investigated each type of vertebral hypoplasia and patterns of associated disc changes. Three different types were observed. In type IIa (n=3D29), posterior disc occurred in 8/29 cases, diffuse degeneration in 21/29 patients, and posterior disc herniation in all. All type Ia cases (3/3) showed diffuse disc degeneration at both upper and lower disc levels, with posterior disc herniation, while both type IIb cases (2/2) showed diffuse disc degeneration, with bidirectional disc herniation. By identifying the exact patterns of vertebral hypoplasia, we were able to predict which portion of the disc was likely to degenerate. (author)

  10. Effect of x irradiation on the biochemical maturation of rat cerebellum: postnatal cell formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patel, A.J.; Balazs, R.; Altman, J.; Anderson, W.J.

    1975-01-01

    Rat cerebellum was irradiated with 100 R daily doses from birth to 10 days of age, and the animals were studied during the next 13 days. The growth of the body and of the forebrain were little affected, but that of the cerebellum was severely retarded. This was primarily due to a depression in new cell acquisition which during the irradiation period was only about 10 percent of that in the controls. On the other hand, it seems that the development of cells formed prior to irradiation was little affected; at day 10, the average size and the RNA and protein contents of the cells were significantly higher than at birth and they were more than double the values observed in the control. However, cell formation was not irreversibly affected: in the fortnight after the termination of irradiation the rise in cell numbers was more than 80 percent of that occurring in the control rats. A relatively normal development of the cerebellar cortex was indicated by the finding that the molecular and the internal granular layers increased substantially in size during the postirradiation period. Further, by 23 days of age the external granular layer, which is a main germinal site in the cerebellum disappeared, as in controls, and the concentration of DNA (packing density of cells) and the cellular contents of RNA and protein were normal. However, restitution was not complete: at 23 days of age, in comparison with controls, the weight of the cerebellum was 60 percent and the reduction in the total number of cells (-40 percent) was similar to the reduction in size of the internal granular layer, which contains the highest concentration of nerve cells in the cerebellum. (U.S.)

  11. Limb/pelvis hypoplasia/aplasia with skull defect (Schinzel phocomelia): distinctive features and prenatal detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olney, R S; Hoyme, H E; Roche, F; Ferguson, K; Hintz, S; Madan, A

    2001-11-01

    Schinzel phocomelia syndrome is characterized by limb/pelvis hypoplasia/aplasia: specifically, intercalary limb deficiencies and absent or hypoplastic pelvic bones. The phenotype is similar to that described in a related multiple malformation syndrome known as Al-Awadi/Raas-Rothschild syndrome. The additional important feature of large parietooccipital skull defects without meningocele, encephalocele, or other brain malformation has thus far been reported only in children with Schinzel phocomelia syndrome. We recently evaluated a boy affected with Schinzel phocomelia born to nonconsanguineous healthy parents of Mexican origin. A third-trimester fetal ultrasound scan showed severe limb deficiencies and an absent pelvis. The infant died shortly after birth. Dysmorphology examination, radiographs, and autopsy revealed quadrilateral intercalary limb deficiencies with preaxial toe polydactyly; an absent pelvis and a 7 x 3-cm skull defect; and extraskeletal anomalies including microtia, telecanthus, micropenis with cryptorchidism, renal cysts, stenosis of the colon, and a cleft alveolar ridge. A normal 46,XY karyotype was demonstrated, and autosomal recessive inheritance was presumed on the basis of previously reported families. This case report emphasizes the importance of recognizing severe pelvic and skull deficiencies (either post- or prenatally) in differentiating infants with Schinzel phocomelia from other multiple malformation syndromes that feature intercalary limb defects, including thalidomide embryopathy and Roberts-SC phocomelia. Copyright 2001 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  12. Mandibular hypoplasia, deafness, progeroid features and lipodystrophy (MDPL) syndrome in the context of inherited lipodystrophies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinier, Frederic; Zoledziewska, Magdalena; Hanna, David; Smith, Josh D; Valentini, Maria; Zara, Ilenia; Berutti, Riccardo; Sanna, Serena; Oppo, Manuela; Cusano, Roberto; Satta, Rosanna; Montesu, Maria Antonietta; Jones, Chris; Cerimele, Decio; Nickerson, Deborah A; Angius, Andrea; Cucca, Francesco; Cottoni, Francesca; Crisponi, Laura

    2015-11-01

    Lipodystrophies are a large heterogeneous group of genetic or acquired disorders characterized by generalized or partial fat loss, usually associated with metabolic complications such as diabetes mellitus, hypertriglyceridemia and hepatic steatosis. Many efforts have been made in the last years in identifying the genetic etiologies of several lipodystrophy forms, although some remain to be elucidated. We report here the clinical description of a woman with a rare severe lipodystrophic and progeroid syndrome associated with hypertriglyceridemia and diabetes whose genetic bases have been clarified through whole-exome sequencing (WES) analysis. This article reports the 5th MDPL (Mandibular hypoplasia, deafness, progeroid features, and lipodystrophy syndrome) patient with the same de novo p.S605del mutation in POLD1. We provided further genetic evidence that this is a disease-causing mutation along with a plausible molecular mechanism responsible for this recurring event. Moreover we overviewed the current classification of the inherited forms of lipodystrophy, along with their underlying molecular basis. Progress in the identification of lipodystrophy genes will help in better understanding the role of the pathways involved in the complex physiology of fat. This will lead to new targets towards develop innovative therapeutic strategies for treating the disorder and its metabolic complications, as well as more common forms of adipose tissue redistribution as observed in the metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Internal Carotid Artery Hypoplasia: Role of Color-Coded Carotid Duplex Sonography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Pei-Ya; Liu, Hung-Yu; Lim, Kun-Eng; Lin, Shinn-Kuang

    2015-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the role of color-coded carotid duplex sonography for diagnosis of internal carotid artery hypoplasia. We retrospectively reviewed 25,000 color-coded carotid duplex sonograms in our neurosonographic database to establish more diagnostic criteria for internal carotid artery hypoplasia. A definitive diagnosis of internal carotid artery hypoplasia was made in 9 patients. Diagnostic findings on color-coded carotid duplex imaging include a long segmental small-caliber lumen (52% diameter) with markedly decreased flow (13% flow volume) in the affected internal carotid artery relative to the contralateral side but without intraluminal lesions. Indirect findings included markedly increased total flow volume (an increase of 133%) in both vertebral arteries, antegrade ipsilateral ophthalmic arterial flow, and a reduced vessel diameter with increased flow resistance in the ipsilateral common carotid artery. Ten patients with distal internal carotid artery dissection showed a similar color-coded duplex pattern, but the reductions in the internal and common carotid artery diameters and increase in collateral flow from the vertebral artery were less prominent than those in hypoplasia. The ipsilateral ophthalmic arterial flow was retrograde in 40% of patients with distal internal carotid artery dissection. In addition, thin-section axial and sagittal computed tomograms of the skull base could show the small diameter of the carotid canal in internal carotid artery hypoplasia and help distinguish hypoplasia from distal internal carotid artery dissection. Color-coded carotid duplex sonography provides important clues for establishing a diagnosis of internal carotid artery hypoplasia. A hypoplastic carotid canal can be shown by thin-section axial and sagittal skull base computed tomography to confirm the final diagnosis. © 2015 by the American Institute of Ultrasound in Medicine.

  14. Active Inference and Learning in the Cerebellum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friston, Karl; Herreros, Ivan

    2016-09-01

    This letter offers a computational account of Pavlovian conditioning in the cerebellum based on active inference and predictive coding. Using eyeblink conditioning as a canonical paradigm, we formulate a minimal generative model that can account for spontaneous blinking, startle responses, and (delay or trace) conditioning. We then establish the face validity of the model using simulated responses to unconditioned and conditioned stimuli to reproduce the sorts of behavior that are observed empirically. The scheme's anatomical validity is then addressed by associating variables in the predictive coding scheme with nuclei and neuronal populations to match the (extrinsic and intrinsic) connectivity of the cerebellar (eyeblink conditioning) system. Finally, we try to establish predictive validity by reproducing selective failures of delay conditioning, trace conditioning, and extinction using (simulated and reversible) focal lesions. Although rather metaphorical, the ensuing scheme can account for a remarkable range of anatomical and neurophysiological aspects of cerebellar circuitry-and the specificity of lesion-deficit mappings that have been established experimentally. From a computational perspective, this work shows how conditioning or learning can be formulated in terms of minimizing variational free energy (or maximizing Bayesian model evidence) using exactly the same principles that underlie predictive coding in perception.

  15. Trace element distribution in the rat cerebellum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwiatek, W.M.; Long, G.J.; Pounds, J.G.; Reuhl, K.R.; Hanson, A.L.; Jones, K.W.

    1989-10-01

    Spatial distributions and concentrations of trace elements (TE) in the brain are important because TE perform catalytic structural functions in enzymes which regulate brain function and development. We have investigated the distributions of TE in rat cerebellum. Structures were sectioned and analyzed by the Synchrotron Radiation Induced X-ray Emission (SRIXE) method using the NSLS X-26 white-light microprobe facility. Advantages important for TE analysis of biological specimens with x-ray microscopy include short time of measurement, high brightness and flux, good spatial resolution, multielemental detection, good sensitivity, and non-destructive irradiation. Trace elements were measured in thin rat brain sections of 20-micrometers thickness. The analyses were performed on sample volumes as small as 0.2 nl with Minimum Detectable Limits (MDL) of 50 ppb wet weight for Fe, 100 ppb wet weight for Cu, and Zn, and 1 ppM wet weight for Pb. The distribution of TE in the molecular cell layer, granule cell layer and fiber tract of rat cerebella was investigated. Both point analyses and two-dimensional semi-quantitative mapping of the TE distribution in a section were used

  16. Children with optic nerve hypoplasia face a high risk of neurodevelopmental disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahl, Sara; Wickström, Ronny; Ek, Ulla; Teär Fahnehjelm, Kristina

    2018-03-01

    Optic nerve hypoplasia (ONH) is a congenital ocular malformation that has been associated with neurodevelopmental disorders, but the prevalence in unilateral disease and less severe visual impairment is unknown. We studied intellectual disability and autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) in patients with ONH. This was a population-based cross-sectional cohort study of 65 patients (33 female) with ONH below 20 years of age, living in Stockholm in December 2009, with data analysed in January 2016. Of these 35 were bilateral and 30 were unilateral. Neurodevelopmental disorders were diagnosed or confirmed by neurological assessments, the Five to Fifteen parent questionnaire and reviewing previous neuropsychological investigations or conducting neuropsychological tests. Bilateral ONH patients had lower mean full scale intelligence quotient scores than unilateral patients (84.4 and 99.4, respectively, p = 0.049). We assessed intellectual disability in 55 eligible patients, and it was more common in patients with bilateral ONH (18 of 32, 56%) than unilateral ONH (two of 23, 9%, p neurodevelopmental disorders, especially intellectual disability. The risk was lower in unilateral ONH, but the levels of neurodevelopmental disorders warrant screening of both groups. ©2017 Foundation Acta Paediatrica. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Internal jugular vein thrombosis associated with venous hypoplasia and protein S deficiency revealed by ultrasonography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Byung Gun; Kim, Young Min; Kim, Heezoo; Lim, Sang Ho; Lee, Mi Kyoung

    2011-12-01

    A 41-year-old woman, who had no thrombotic risk factors and past history except congenital scoliosis, underwent central venous catheterization (CVC) before correction of the scoliosis. When internal jugular vein (IJV) catheterization using the anatomical landmark technique failed, CVC under ultrasound guidance was tried. As a consequence, thrombosis and hypoplasia of the right IJV were incidentally detected by ultrasonography. Central venous catheters were then successfully placed in other veins under ultrasound guidance. Also, after examinations to rule out the possibility of pulmonary embolism and to clarify the causes of the IJV thrombosis, the patient was found to have protein S deficiency. CVC under ultrasound guidance should be recommended to prevent the failure of cannulation and complications such as thromboembolism in patients who could possibly have anomalies of vessels as a result of anatomical deformities caused by severe scoliosis, even if patients do not have thrombotic risk factors such as a history of central catheter insertion or intravenous drug abuse, cancer, advanced age, cerebral infarction, and left ventricular dysfunction. Also, if venous thrombosis is found in patients without predisposing risk factors, one should ascertain the cause of the hypercoagulable state, for example protein S deficiency, and perform appropriate treatment and prevention of venous thromboembolism.

  18. The cerebellum on the rise in human emotion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schutter, D.J.L.G.; Honk, J. van

    2005-01-01

    For decennia the cerebellum has largely been excluded from scientific enquiry beyond motor function. However, the intimate afferent and efferent connections to the midbrain and limbic system provide for the neuroanatomical foundation of cerebellar involvement in emotion and emotional disorders.

  19. Prefrontal control of cerebellum-dependent associative motor learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hao; Yang, Li; Xu, Yan; Wu, Guang-yan; Yao, Juan; Zhang, Jun; Zhu, Zhi-ru; Hu, Zhi-an; Sui, Jian-feng; Hu, Bo

    2014-02-01

    Behavioral studies have demonstrated that both medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) and cerebellum play critical roles in trace eyeblink conditioning. However, little is known regarding the mechanism by which the two brain regions interact. By use of electrical stimulation of the caudal mPFC as a conditioned stimulus, we show evidence that persistent outputs from the mPFC to cerebellum are necessary and sufficient for the acquisition and expression of a trace conditioned response (CR)-like response. Specifically, the persistent outputs of caudal mPFC are relayed to the cerebellum via the rostral part of lateral pontine nuclei. Moreover, interfering with persistent activity by blockade of the muscarinic Ach receptor in the caudal mPFC impairs the expression of learned trace CRs. These results suggest an important way for the caudal mPFC to interact with the cerebellum during associative motor learning.

  20. fMRI activities in the emotional cerebellum: a preference for negative stimuli and goal-directed behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schraa-Tam, Caroline K L; Rietdijk, Willem J R; Verbeke, Willem J M I; Dietvorst, Roeland C; van den Berg, Wouter E; Bagozzi, Richard P; De Zeeuw, Chris I

    2012-03-01

    Several studies indicate that the cerebellum might play a role in experiencing and/or controlling emphatic emotions, but it remains to be determined whether there is a distinction between positive and negative emotions, and, if so, which specific parts of the cerebellum are involved in these types of emotions. Here, we visualized activations of the cerebellum and extracerebellar regions using high-field fMRI, while we asked participants to observe and imitate images with pictures of human faces expressing different emotional states or with moving geometric shapes as control. The state of the emotions could be positive (happiness and surprise), negative (anger and disgust), or neutral. The positive emotional faces only evoked mild activations of crus 2 in the cerebellum, whereas the negative emotional faces evoked prominent activations in lobules VI and VIIa in its hemispheres and lobules VIII and IX in the vermis. The cerebellar activations associated with negative emotions occurred concomitantly with activations of mirror neuron domains such as the insula and amygdala. These data suggest that the potential role of the cerebellum in control of emotions may be particularly relevant for goal-directed behavior that is required for observing and reacting to another person's (negative) expressions.

  1. Functional activity of the sensorimotor cortex and cerebellum relates to cervical dystonia symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burciu, Roxana G; Hess, Christopher W; Coombes, Stephen A; Ofori, Edward; Shukla, Priyank; Chung, Jae Woo; McFarland, Nikolaus R; Wagle Shukla, Aparna; Okun, Michael S; Vaillancourt, David E

    2017-09-01

    Cervical dystonia (CD) is the most common type of focal dystonia, causing abnormal movements of the neck and head. In this study, we used noninvasive imaging to investigate the motor system of patients with CD and uncover the neural correlates of dystonic symptoms. Furthermore, we examined whether a commonly prescribed anticholinergic medication in CD has an effect on the dystonia-related brain abnormalities. Participants included 16 patients with CD and 16 healthy age-matched controls. We collected functional MRI scans during a force task previously shown to extensively engage the motor system, and diffusion and T1-weighted MRI scans from which we calculated free-water and brain tissue densities. The dystonia group was also scanned ca. 2 h after a 2-mg dose of trihexyphenidyl. Severity of dystonia was assessed pre- and post-drug using the Burke-Fahn-Marsden Dystonia Rating Scale. Motor-related activity in CD was altered relative to controls in the primary somatosensory cortex, cerebellum, dorsal premotor and posterior parietal cortices, and occipital cortex. Most importantly, a regression model showed that increased severity of symptoms was associated with decreased functional activity of the somatosensory cortex and increased activity of the cerebellum. Structural imaging measures did not differ between CD and controls. The single dose of trihexyphenidyl altered the fMRI signal in the somatosensory cortex but not in the cerebellum. Symptom severity was not significantly reduced post-treatment. Findings show widespread changes in functional brain activity in CD and most importantly that dystonic symptoms relate to disrupted activity in the somatosensory cortex and cerebellum. Hum Brain Mapp 38:4563-4573, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. The Effect of Spaceflight on the Ultrastructure of the Cerebellum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holstein, Gay R.; Martinelli, Giorgio P.

    2003-01-01

    In weightlessness, astronauts and cosmonauts may experience postural illusions as well as motion sickness symptoms known as the space adaptation syndrome. Upon return to Earth, they have irregularities in posture and balance. The adaptation to microgravity and subsequent re-adaptation to Earth occurs over several days. At the cellular level, a process called neuronal plasticity may mediate this adaptation. The term plasticity refers to the flexibility and modifiability in the architecture and functions of the nervous system. In fact, plastic changes are thought to underlie not just behavioral adaptation, but also the more generalized phenomena of learning and memory. The goal of this experiment was to identify some of the structural alterations that occur in the rat brain during the sensory and motor adaptation to microgravity. One brain region where plasticity has been studied extensively is the cerebellar cortex-a structure thought to be critical for motor control, coordination, the timing of movements, and, most relevant to the present experiment, motor learning. Also, there are direct as well as indirect connections between projections from the gravity-sensing otolith organs and several subregions of the cerebellum. We tested the hypothesis that alterations in the ultrastructural (the structure within the cell) architecture of rat cerebellar cortex occur during the early period of adaptation to microgravity, as the cerebellum adapts to the absence of the usual gravitational inputs. The results show ultrastructural evidence for neuronal plasticity in the central nervous system of adult rats after 24 hours of spaceflight. Qualitative studies conducted on tissue from the cerebellar cortex (specifically, the nodulus of the cerebellum) indicate that ultrastructural signs of plasticity are present in the cerebellar zones that receive input from the gravity-sensing organs in the inner ear (the otoliths). These changes are not observed in this region in cagematched

  3. Autism spectrum disorders and neuropathology of the cerebellum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hampson, David R; Blatt, Gene J

    2015-01-01

    The cerebellum contains the largest number of neurons and synapses of any structure in the central nervous system. The concept that the cerebellum is solely involved in fine motor function has become outdated; substantial evidence has accumulated linking the cerebellum with higher cognitive functions including language. Cerebellar deficits have been implicated in autism for more than two decades. The computational power of the cerebellum is essential for many, if not most of the processes that are perturbed in autism including language and communication, social interactions, stereotyped behavior, motor activity and motor coordination, and higher cognitive functions. The link between autism and cerebellar dysfunction should not be surprising to those who study its cellular, physiological, and functional properties. Postmortem studies have revealed neuropathological abnormalities in cerebellar cellular architecture while studies on mouse lines with cell loss or mutations in single genes restricted to cerebellar Purkinje cells have also strongly implicated this brain structure in contributing to the autistic phenotype. This connection has been further substantiated by studies investigating brain damage in humans restricted to the cerebellum. In this review, we summarize advances in research on idiopathic autism and three genetic forms of autism that highlight the key roles that the cerebellum plays in this spectrum of neurodevelopmental disorders.

  4. Autism Spectrum Disorders and Neuropathology of the Cerebellum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David R Hampson

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The cerebellum contains the largest number of neurons and synapses of any structure in the central nervous system. The concept that the cerebellum is solely involved in fine motor function has become outdated; substantial evidence has accumulated linking the cerebellum with higher cognitive functions including language. Cerebellar deficits have been implicated in autism for more than two decades. The computational power of the cerebellum is essential for many, if not most of the processes that are perturbed in autism including language and communication, social interactions, stereotyped behavior, motor activity and motor coordination, and higher cognitive functions. The link between autism and cerebellar dysfunction should not be surprising to those who study its cellular, physiological, and functional properties. Postmortem studies have revealed neuropathological abnormalities in cerebellar cellular architecture while studies on mouse lines with cell loss or mutations in single genes restricted to cerebellar Purkinje cells have also strongly implicated this brain structure in contributing to the autistic phenotype. This connection has been further substantiated by studies investigating brain damage in humans restricted to the cerebellum. In this review, we summarize advances in research on idiopathic autism and three genetic forms of autism that highlight the key roles that the cerebellum plays in this spectrum of neurodevelopmental disorders.

  5. Purkinje Cell Compartmentation in the Cerebellum of the Lysosomal Acid Phosphatase 2 Mutant Mouse (Nax - Naked-Ataxia Mutant Mouse)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Karen; Rahimi Balaei, Maryam; Mannan, Ashraf; Del Bigio, Marc R.; Marzban, Hassan

    2014-01-01

    The Acp2 gene encodes the beta subunit of lysosomal acid phosphatase, which is an isoenzyme that hydrolyzes orthophosphoric monoesters. In mice, a spontaneous mutation in Acp2 results in severe cerebellar defects. These include a reduced size, abnormal lobulation, and an apparent anterior cerebellar disorder with an absent or hypoplastic vermis. Based on differential gene expression in the cerebellum, the mouse cerebellar cortex can normally be compartmentalized anteroposteriorly into four transverse zones and mediolaterally into parasagittal stripes. In this study, immunohistochemistry was performed using various Purkinje cell compartmentation markers to examine their expression patterns in the Acp2 mutant. Despite the abnormal lobulation and anterior cerebellar defects, zebrin II and PLCβ4 showed similar expression patterns in the nax mutant and wild type cerebellum. However, fewer stripes were found in the anterior zone of the nax mutant, which could be due to a lack of Purkinje cells or altered expression of the stripe markers. HSP25 expression was uniform in the central zone of the nax mutant cerebellum at around postnatal day (P) 18–19, suggesting that HSP25 immunonegative Purkinje cells are absent or delayed in stripe pattern expression compared to the wild type. HSP25 expression became heterogeneous around P22–23, with twice the number of parasagittal stripes in the nax mutant compared to the wild type. Aside from reduced size and cortical disorganization, both the posterior zone and nodular zone in the nax mutant appeared less abnormal than the rest of the cerebellum. From these results, it is evident that the anterior zone of the nax mutant cerebellum is the most severely affected, and this extends beyond the primary fissure into the rostral central zone/vermis. This suggests that ACP2 has critical roles in the development of the anterior cerebellum and it may regulate anterior and central zone compartmentation. PMID:24722417

  6. Alternative kynurenic acid synthesis routes studied in the rat cerebellum

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    Tonali eBlanco Ayala

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Kynurenic acid (KYNA, an astrocyte-derived, endogenous antagonist of α7 nicotinic acetylcholine and excitatory amino acid receptors, regulates glutamatergic, GABAergic, cholinergic and dopaminergic neurotransmission in several regions of the rodent brain. Synthesis of KYNA in the brain and elsewhere is generally attributed to the enzymatic conversion of L-kynurenine (L-KYN by kynurenine aminotransferases (KATs. However, alternative routes, including KYNA formation from D-kynurenine (D-KYN by D-amino acid oxidase (DAAO and the direct transformation of kynurenine to KYNA by reactive oxygen species (ROS, have been demonstrated in the rat brain. Using the rat cerebellum, a region of low KAT activity and high DAAO activity, the present experiments were designed to examine KYNA production from L-KYN or D-KYN by KAT and DAAO, respectively, and to investigate the effect of ROS on KYNA synthesis. In chemical combinatorial systems, both L-KYN and D-KYN interacted directly with peroxynitrite (ONOO- and hydroxyl radicals (OH•, resulting in the formation of KYNA. In tissue homogenates, the non-specific KAT inhibitor aminooxyacetic acid (AOAA; 1 mM reduced KYNA production from L-KYN and D-KYN by 85.1 ± 1.7% and 27.1 ± 4.5%, respectively. Addition of DAAO inhibitors (benzoic acid, kojic acid or 3-methylpyrazole-5-carboxylic acid; 5 µM each attenuated KYNA formation from L-KYN and D-KYN by ~35% and ~66%, respectively. ONOO- (25 µM potentiated KYNA production from both L-KYN and D-KYN, and these effects were reduced by DAAO inhibition. AOAA attenuated KYNA production from L-KYN + ONOO- but not from D-KYN + ONOO-. In vivo, extracellular KYNA levels increased rapidly after perfusion of ONOO- and, more prominently, after subsequent perfusion with L-KYN or D-KYN (100 µM. Taken together, these results suggest that different mechanisms are involved in KYNA production in the rat cerebellum, and that, specifically, DAAO and ROS can function as alternative routes

  7. Enamel hypoplasia and its role in identification of individuals: A review of literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanchan, Tanuj; Machado, Meghna; Rao, Ashwin; Krishan, Kewal; Garg, Arun K.

    2015-01-01

    Identification of individuals is the mainstay of any forensic investigation especially in cases of mass disasters when mutilated remains are brought for examination. Dental examination helps in establishing the identity of an individual and thus, has played a vital role in forensic investigation process since long. In this regard, description on the role of enamel hypoplasia is limited in the literature. The present article reviews the literature on the enamel hypoplasia and discusses its utility in forensic identification. Enamel hypoplasia is a surface defect of the tooth crown caused by disturbance of enamel matrix secretion. Enamel defects can be congenital or acquired. In cases of mass disasters, or when the body is completely charred, putrefied and mutilated beyond recognition, the unique dental features can help in identification of the victims. PMID:26097340

  8. Pregnancy Outcome in Cartilage-Hair Hypoplasia, a Rare Form of Dwarfism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harshithaa Thavarajah

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. This case report discusses the pregnancy outcome of a patient with cartilage-hair hypoplasia, a rare form of dwarfism, and multiple previous orthopedic surgeries. Literature on pregnancy outcomes in patients with cartilage-hair hypoplasia is limited. Case. A 32-year-old patient with cartilage-hair hypoplasia presented at 12 weeks’ gestation to the high-risk obstetrics clinic for care. Preterm labor resulted in cesarean delivery at 34 weeks’ gestation with general anesthetic. Breastfeeding was stopped at 6 weeks due to neonatal complications. Conclusion. Pregnancy and delivery were uncomplicated. A multidisciplinary approach allowed for effective management during pregnancy and postnatal care. This is the first known documented case of prenatal care, delivery, and breastfeeding in a woman with this rare disorder.

  9. Goldenhar Syndrome with Dextrocardia and Right Pulmonary Hypoplasia: An Unusual Association

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nagendra Chaudhary

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Goldenhar syndrome (GS, a rare condition, occurring due to defect in development of first and second branchial arches, is characterized by a combination of various anomalies involving face, eyes, ears, vertebrae, heart, and lungs. The etiology of GS is not fully known, although various hypotheses have been proposed along with its genetic association and many other causes. Facial asymmetry and hypoplasia of the mandible are characteristic features of GS along with microtia and preauricular appendages and pits. Dextrocardia or pulmonary hypoplasia in GS has previously been reported separately. We report a 7-year-old female child of GS with combination of anomalies, dextrocardia, and pulmonary hypoplasia, which is a rare association.

  10. Use of repeat anterior maxillary distraction to correct residual midface hypoplasia in cleft patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Sunil; Krishna, Shreya; Bansal, Avi

    2017-12-01

    The study was designed to evaluate the efficacy of performing a second, repeat anterior maxillary distraction (AMD) to treat residual cleft maxillary hypoplasia. Five patients between the ages of 12 to 15 years with a history of AMD and with residual cleft maxillary hypoplasia were included in the study. Inclusion was irrespective of gender, type of cleft lip and palate, and the amount of advancement needed. Repeat AMD was executed in these patients 4 to 5 years after the primary AMD procedure to correct the cleft maxillary hypoplasia that had developed since the initial procedure. Orthopantomogram (OPG) and lateral cephalograms were taken for evaluation preoperatively, immediately after distraction, after consolidation, and one year postoperatively. The data obtained was tabulated and a Mann Whitney U-test was used for statistical comparisons. At the time of presentation, a residual maxillary hypoplasia was observed with a well maintained distraction gap on the OPG which ruled out the occurrence of a relapse. Favorable movement of the segments without any resistance was seen in all patients. Mean maxillary advancement of 10.56 mm was achieved at repeat AMD. Statistically significant increases in midfacial length, SNA angle, and nasion perpendicular to point A distance was achieved ( P =0.012, P =0.011, and P =0.012, respectively). Good profile was achieved for all patients. Minimal transient complications, for example anterior open bite and bleeding episodes, were managed. Addressing the problem of cleft maxillary hypoplasia at an early age (12-15 years) is beneficial for the child. Residual hypoplasia may develop in some patients, which may require additional corrective procedures. The results of our study show that AMD can be repeated when residual deformity develops with the previous procedure having no negative impact on the results of the repeat procedure.

  11. X-linked congenital adrenal hypoplasia associated with hypospadias in an Egyptian baby: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Metwalley Kotb

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction X-linked congenital adrenal hypoplasia is a rare developmental disorder of the human adrenal cortex and is caused by deletion or mutation of the dosage-sensitive sex reversal adrenal hypoplasia congenita critical region of the X chromosome, gene 1 (DAX-1 gene. Most affected children present with failure to thrive, salt wasting and hypoglycemic convulsions in the first months of life. Hypospadias affects approximately one in 250 live male births. Mutations in the mastermind-like domain-containing 1 (MAMLD1 gene have been implicated as one of the causes of hypospadias in children. To the best of our knowledge, an association between congenital adrenal hypoplasia due to a DAX-1 mutation and hypospadias due to mutation of the MAMLD1 gene has not previously been reported in the literature. Case presentation A 35-day-old male Egyptian baby was referred to our institution for the evaluation of a two-week history of recurrent vomiting associated with electrolyte imbalance. On examination, our patient was found to have hypotension and dehydration. A genital examination showed distal penile hypospadias with chordee and normal testes. He had hyponatremia, hyperkalemia, hypoglycemia and metabolic acidosis. Endocrinological investigations revealed low levels of cortisol, 17-hydroxyprogesterone and aldosterone, with a high level of adrenocorticotrophic hormone. A provisional diagnosis of congenital adrenal hypoplasia associated with hypospadias was made. A molecular genetics study confirmed the diagnosis of X-linked congenital adrenal hypoplasia due to DAX-1 mutations and hypospadias due to MAMLD1 mutation. He was started on hydrocortisone and fludrocortisone treatment. After three weeks of treatment, his symptoms improved and his blood sugar, sodium, potassium and cortisol levels normalized. Conclusions We report the case of an Egyptian baby with an association of congenital adrenal hypoplasia due to DAX-1 mutation and hypospadias due

  12. Consensus paper: Language and the cerebellum: an ongoing enigma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariën, Peter; Ackermann, Herman; Adamaszek, Michael; Barwood, Caroline H S; Beaton, Alan; Desmond, John; De Witte, Elke; Fawcett, Angela J; Hertrich, Ingo; Küper, Michael; Leggio, Maria; Marvel, Cherie; Molinari, Marco; Murdoch, Bruce E; Nicolson, Roderick I; Schmahmann, Jeremy D; Stoodley, Catherine J; Thürling, Markus; Timmann, Dagmar; Wouters, Ellen; Ziegler, Wolfram

    2014-06-01

    In less than three decades, the concept "cerebellar neurocognition" has evolved from a mere afterthought to an entirely new and multifaceted area of neuroscientific research. A close interplay between three main strands of contemporary neuroscience induced a substantial modification of the traditional view of the cerebellum as a mere coordinator of autonomic and somatic motor functions. Indeed, the wealth of current evidence derived from detailed neuroanatomical investigations, functional neuroimaging studies with healthy subjects and patients and in-depth neuropsychological assessment of patients with cerebellar disorders shows that the cerebellum has a cardinal role to play in affective regulation, cognitive processing, and linguistic function. Although considerable progress has been made in models of cerebellar function, controversy remains regarding the exact role of the "linguistic cerebellum" in a broad variety of nonmotor language processes. This consensus paper brings together a range of different viewpoints and opinions regarding the contribution of the cerebellum to language function. Recent developments and insights in the nonmotor modulatory role of the cerebellum in language and some related disorders will be discussed. The role of the cerebellum in speech and language perception, in motor speech planning including apraxia of speech, in verbal working memory, in phonological and semantic verbal fluency, in syntax processing, in the dynamics of language production, in reading and in writing will be addressed. In addition, the functional topography of the linguistic cerebellum and the contribution of the deep nuclei to linguistic function will be briefly discussed. As such, a framework for debate and discussion will be offered in this consensus paper.

  13. Linking Essential Tremor to the Cerebellum: Physiological Evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filip, Pavel; Lungu, Ovidiu V; Manto, Mario-Ubaldo; Bareš, Martin

    2016-12-01

    Essential tremor (ET), clinically characterized by postural and kinetic tremors, predominantly in the upper extremities, originates from pathological activity in the dynamic oscillatory network comprising the majority of nodes in the central motor network. Evidence indicates dysfunction in the thalamus, the olivocerebellar loops, and intermittent cortical engagement. Pathology of the cerebellum, a structure with architecture intrinsically predisposed to oscillatory activity, has also been implicated in ET as shown by clinical, neuroimaging, and pathological studies. Despite electrophysiological studies assessing cerebellar impairment in ET being scarce, their impact is tangible, as summarized in this review. The electromyography-magnetoencephalography combination provided the first direct evidence of pathological alteration in cortico-subcortical communication, with a significant emphasis on the cerebellum. Furthermore, complex electromyography studies showed disruptions in the timing of agonist and antagonist muscle activation, a process generally attributed to the cerebellum. Evidence pointing to cerebellar engagement in ET has also been found in electrooculography measurements, cerebellar repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation studies, and, indirectly, in complex analyses of the activity of the ventral intermediate thalamic nucleus (an area primarily receiving inputs from the cerebellum), which is also used in the advanced treatment of ET. In summary, further progress in therapy will require comprehensive electrophysiological and physiological analyses to elucidate the precise mechanisms leading to disease symptoms. The cerebellum, as a major node of this dynamic oscillatory network, requires further study to aid this endeavor.

  14. Role of the cerebellum in reaching movements in humans. II. A neural model of the intermediate cerebellum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schweighofer, N; Spoelstra, J; Arbib, M A; Kawato, M

    1998-01-01

    The cerebellum is essential for the control of multijoint movements; when the cerebellum is lesioned, the performance error is more than the summed errors produced by single joints. In the companion paper (Schweighofer et al., 1998), a functional anatomical model for visually guided arm movement was proposed. The model comprised a basic feedforward/feedback controller with realistic transmission delays and was connected to a two-link, six-muscle, planar arm. In the present study, we examined the role of the cerebellum in reaching movements by embedding a novel, detailed cerebellar neural network in this functional control model. We could derive realistic cerebellar inputs and the role of the cerebellum in learning to control the arm was assessed. This cerebellar network learned the part of the inverse dynamics of the arm not provided by the basic feedforward/feedback controller. Despite realistically low inferior olive firing rates and noisy mossy fibre inputs, the model could reduce the error between intended and planned movements. The responses of the different cell groups were comparable to those of biological cell groups. In particular, the modelled Purkinje cells exhibited directional tuning after learning and the parallel fibres, due to their length, provide Purkinje cells with the input required for this coordination task. The inferior olive responses contained two different components; the earlier response, locked to movement onset, was always present and the later response disappeared after learning. These results support the theory that the cerebellum is involved in motor learning.

  15. Osteopathia striata: A characteristic X-ray finding in focal dermal hypoplasia (Goltz-Gorlin syndrome)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barthels, W.; Boepple, D.; Petzel, H.

    1982-01-01

    Two cases of the very rare Goltz-Gorlin syndrome are presented. The relationship of osteopathia striata and focal dermal hypoplasia is discussed, and it is concluded that the osteopathia striata represents the characteristic picture of this ectopic mesodermal abnormality. (orig.)

  16. Mutations in X-linked PORCN, a putative regulator of Wnt signaling, cause focal dermal hypoplasia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Focal dermal hypoplasia is an X-linked dominant disorder characterized by patchy hypoplastic skin and digital, ocular, and dental malformations. We used array comparative genomic hybridization to identify a 219-kb deletion in Xp11.23 in two affected females. We sequenced genes in this region and fou...

  17. Thanatophoric dysplasia type II with encephalocele and aortic hypoplasia diagnosed in an anatomical specimen

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jap-A-Joe, Simone M. E. A. A.; Oostra, Roelof-Jan; Maas, Mario; Stoker, Jaap; van der Horst, Chantal M. A. M.

    2003-01-01

    A hitherto unknown combination of congenital anomalies was found in an anatomical specimen of a female neonate. External examination and additional CT and MRI studies showed thanatophoric dysplasia type II with cloverleaf skull and concomitant parietal meningoencephalocele and hypoplasia of the

  18. Unusual right ventricle aneurysm and dysplastic pulmonary valve with mitral valve hypoplasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ozge Pamukcu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a newborn with an unusual combination of aneurysmally dilated thin-walled right ventricle with hypertrophy of the apical muscles of the right ventricle. There was narrow pulmonary annulus, pulmonary regurgitation, and hypoplasia of the mitral valve and left ventricle. We propose that this heart represents a partial form of Uhl`s anomaly.

  19. Parvovirus associated cerebellar hypoplasia and hydrocephalus in day-old broiler chickens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerebellar hypoplasia and hydrocephalus were detected in day-old broiler chickens. Brains of chickens evaluated at necropsy appeared to be abnormal; some were disfigured and cerebellae appeared to be smaller than normal. Histopathologic examination of brains revealed cerebellar folia that were sho...

  20. Prenatal evaluation of the middle ear and diagnosis of middle ear hypoplasia using MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Katorza, Eldad; Nahama-Allouche, Catherine; Ducou le Pointe, Hubert; Garel, Catherine [Hopital d' Enfants Armand-Trousseau, Service de Radiologie, Paris (France); Castaigne, Vanina [Hopital Saint-Antoine, Service de Gynecologie-Obstetrique, Paris (France); Gonzales, Marie; Marlin, Sandrine [Hopital d' Enfants Armand-Trousseau, Service de Genetique et Embryologie medicales, Paris (France); Galliani, Eva [Hopital d' Enfants Armand-Trousseau, Service de Chirurgie maxillo-faciale, Paris (France); Jouannic, Jean-Marie; Rosenblatt, Jonathan [Hopital d' Enfants Armand-Trousseau, Service de Gynecologie-Obstetrique, Centre pluridisciplinaire de diagnostic prenatal, Paris (France)

    2011-05-15

    Analysis of the middle ear with fetal MRI has not been previously reported. To show the contribution of fetal MRI to middle ear imaging. The tympanic cavity was evaluated in 108 fetal cerebral MRI examinations (facial and/or cerebral malformation excluded) and in two cases, one of Treacher Collins syndrome (case 1) and the other of oculo-auriculo-vertebral (OUV) spectrum (case 2) with middle ear hypoplasia identified by MRI at 27 and 36 weeks' gestation, respectively. In all 108 fetuses (mean gestational age 32.5 weeks), the tympanic cavity and T2 hypointensity related to the ossicles were well visualised on both sides. Case 1 had micro/retrognathia and bilateral external ear deformity and case 2 had retrognathism with a left low-set and deformed ear. MRI made it possible to recognize the marked hypoplasia of the tympanic cavity, which was bilateral in case 1 and unilateral in case 2. Both syndromes are characterized by craniofacial abnormalities including middle ear hypoplasia, which cannot be diagnosed with US. The middle ear cavity can be visualized with fetal MRI. We emphasize the use of this imaging modality in the diagnosis of middle ear hypoplasia. (orig.)

  1. Recessive Mutations in SLC38A8 Cause Foveal Hypoplasia and Optic Nerve Misrouting without Albinism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Poulter, James A.; Al-Araimi, Musallam; Conte, Ivan; van Genderen, Maria M.; Sheridan, Eamonn; Carr, Ian M.; Parry, David A.; Shires, Mike; Carrella, Sabrina; Bradbury, John; Khan, Kamron; Lakeman, Phillis; Sergouniotis, Panagiotis I.; Webster, Andrew R.; Moore, Anthony T.; Pal, Bishwanath; Mohamed, Moin D.; Venkataramana, Anandula; Ramprasad, Vedam; Shetty, Rohit; Saktivel, Murugan; Kumaramanickavel, Govindasamy; Tan, Alex; Mackey, David A.; Hewitt, Alex W.; Banfi, Sandro; Ali, Manir; Inglehearn, Chris F.; Toomes, Carmel

    2013-01-01

    Foveal hypoplasia and optic nerve misrouting are developmental defects of the visual pathway and only co-occur in connection with albinism; to date, they have only been associated with defects in the melanin-biosynthesis pathway. Here, we report that these defects can occur independently of albinism

  2. Bilateral familial vertical Duane Syndrome with synergistic convergence, aberrant trigeminal innervation, and facial hypoplasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malvika Gupta

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A 5-year-old girl presented with bilateral familial vertical  Duane retraction syndrome with alternating esotropia, elevation deficit, Marcus gunn phenomenon, and facial hypoplasia. Abnormal adducting downshoots on attempting abduction suggestive of a synergistic convergence were noted. Hypothesis suggests aberrant innervations or peripheral anatomic connections between inferior and medial recti.

  3. Consensus Paper: Language and the Cerebellum: an Ongoing Enigma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariën, Peter; Ackermann, Herman; Adamaszek, Michael; Barwood, Caroline H. S.; Beaton, Alan; Desmond, John; De Witte, Elke; Fawcett, Angela J.; Hertrich, Ingo; Küper, Michael; Leggio, Maria; Marvel, Cherie; Molinari, Marco; Murdoch, Bruce E.; Nicolson, Roderick I.; Schmahmann, Jeremy D.; Stoodley, Catherine J.; Thürling, Markus; Timmann, Dagmar; Wouters, Ellen; Ziegler, Wolfram

    2014-01-01

    In less than three decades, the concept “cerebellar neurocognition” has evolved from a mere afterthought to an entirely new and multifaceted area of neuroscientific research. A close interplay between three main strands of contemporary neuroscience induced a substantial modification of the traditional view of the cerebellum as a mere coordinator of autonomic and somatic motor functions. Indeed, the wealth of current evidence derived from detailed neuroanatomical investigations, functional neuroimaging studies with healthy subjects and patients and in-depth neuropsychological assessment of patients with cerebellar disorders shows that the cerebellum has a cardinal role to play in affective regulation, cognitive processing, and linguistic function. Although considerable progress has been made in models of cerebellar function, controversy remains regarding the exact role of the “linguistic cerebellum” in a broad variety of nonmotor language processes. This consensus paper brings together a range of different viewpoints and opinions regarding the contribution of the cerebellum to language function. Recent developments and insights in the nonmotor modulatory role of the cerebellum in language and some related disorders will be discussed. The role of the cerebellum in speech and language perception, in motor speech planning including apraxia of speech, in verbal working memory, in phonological and semantic verbal fluency, in syntax processing, in the dynamics of language production, in reading and in writing will be addressed. In addition, the functional topography of the linguistic cerebellum and the contribution of the deep nuclei to linguistic function will be briefly discussed. As such, a framework for debate and discussion will be offered in this consensus paper. PMID:24318484

  4. Where did the motor function of the cerebellum come from?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coco, Marinella; Perciavalle, Vincenzo

    2015-01-01

    Until the end of 18th century, the role of the cerebellum remained obscure. The turning point occurred when Luigi Galvani showed that muscle contraction is due to electricity and Alessandro Volta produced the battery, an apparatus based on the pairing of silver and zinc plates separated by brine soaked paper disks, capable to generate electricity. Luigi Rolando, at beginning of 19th century, was impressed by these two observations. He thought that, since the brain generates the movement, it must contain a device generating electricity. As a battery, it should be formed by overlapping disks and the cerebellum for Rolando seemed to be the right structure for such a characteristic laminar organization. He argued that, if the cerebellum is the battery that produces electricity for muscle activity, its removal would produce paralysis. Consequently, Rolando removed the cerebellum in a young goat and observed that the animal, before dying, could no longer stand up. He concluded that the cerebellum is a motor structure as it generates the electricity which produces the movement. The conclusions of Rolando were criticized by Marie-Jean-Pierre Flourens who observed that animals undergoing cerebellectomy were still able to move, even if with problems of balance. Flourens concluded that the role of the cerebellum "is to put in order or to coordinate movements wanted by certain parts of the nervous system, excited by others". It was necessary to wait up to 1891 when Luigi Luciani, observing a dog survived the cerebellectomy, described a triad of symptoms (asthenia, atony and astasis), unquestionably of cerebellar origin.

  5. The evolution of cerebellum structure correlates with nest complexity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Zachary J; Street, Sally E; Healy, Susan D

    2013-01-01

    Across the brains of different bird species, the cerebellum varies greatly in the amount of surface folding (foliation). The degree of cerebellar foliation is thought to correlate positively with the processing capacity of the cerebellum, supporting complex motor abilities, particularly manipulative skills. Here, we tested this hypothesis by investigating the relationship between cerebellar foliation and species-typical nest structure in birds. Increasing complexity of nest structure is a measure of a bird's ability to manipulate nesting material into the required shape. Consistent with our hypothesis, avian cerebellar foliation increases as the complexity of the nest built increases, setting the scene for the exploration of nest building at the neural level.

  6. Arterial territories of human brain: brainstem and cerebellum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tatu, L.; Moulin, T.; Bogousslavsky, J.; Duvernoy, H.

    1997-01-01

    The development of neuroimaging has allowed clinicians to improve clinico-anatomic correlations in patients with strokes. Brainstem and cerebellum structures are well delineated on MRI, but there is a lack of standardization in their arterial supply. We present a system of 12 brainstem and cerebellum axial sections, depicting the dominant arterial territories and the most important anatomic structures. These sections may be used as a practical tool to determine arterial territories on MRI, and may help establish consistent clinico-anatomic correlations in patients with brainstem and cerebellar ischemic strokes. (authors)

  7. Have we been ignoring the elephant in the room? Seven arguments for considering the cerebellum as part of addiction circuitry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miquel, Marta; Vazquez-Sanroman, Dolores; Carbo-Gas, María; Gil-Miravet, Isis; Sanchis-Segura, Carla; Carulli, Daniela; Manzo, Jorge; Coria-Avila, Genaro A

    2016-01-01

    Addiction involves alterations in multiple brain regions that are associated with functions such as memory, motivation and executive control. Indeed, it is now well accepted that addictive drugs produce long-lasting molecular and structural plasticity changes in corticostriatal-limbic loops. However, there are brain regions that might be relevant to addiction other than the prefrontal cortex, amygdala, hippocampus and basal ganglia. In addition to these circuits, a growing amount of data suggests the involvement of the cerebellum in many of the brain functions affected in addicts, though this region has been overlooked, traditionally, in the addiction field. Therefore, in the present review we provide seven arguments as to why we should consider the cerebellum in drug addiction. We present and discuss compelling evidence about the effects of drugs of abuse on cerebellar plasticity, the involvement of the cerebellum in drug-induced cue-related memories, and several findings showing that the instrumental memory and executive functions also recruit the cerebellar circuitry. In addition, a hypothetical model of the cerebellum's role relative to other areas within corticostriatal-limbic networks is also provided. Our goal is not to review animal and human studies exhaustively but to support the inclusion of cerebellar alterations as a part of the physiopathology of addiction disorder. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Functional categorization of gene expression changes in the cerebellum of a Cln3-knockout mouse model for Batten disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, Andrew I; Chattopadhyay, Subrata; Mitchison, Hannah M; Nussbaum, Robert L; Pearce, David A

    2003-01-01

    Juvenile neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis (JNCL or Batten Disease) is the most common progressive neurodegenerative disorder of childhood. The disease is inherited in an autosomal recessive manner and is the result of mutations in the CLN3 gene. One brain region severely affected in Batten disease is the cerebellum. Using a mouse model for Batten disease which shares pathological similarities to the disease in humans we have used oligonucleotide arrays to profile approximately 19000 mRNAs in the cerebellum. We have identified reproducible changes of twofold or more in the expression of 756 gene products in the cerebellum of 10-week-old Cln3-knockout mice as compared to wild-type controls. We have subsequently divided these genes with altered expression into 14 functional categories. We report a significant alteration in expression of genes associated with neurotransmission, neuronal cell structure and development, immune response and inflammation, and lipid metabolism. An apparent shift in metabolism toward gluconeogenesis is also evident in Cln3-knockout mice. Further experimentation will be necessary to understand the contribution of these changes in expression to a disease state. Detailed analysis of the functional consequences of altered expression of genes in the cerebellum of the Cln3-knockout mice may provide valuable clues in understanding the molecular basis of the pathological mechanisms underlying Batten disease.

  9. Oscillations, Timing, Plasticity, and Learning in the Cerebellum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheron, G; Márquez-Ruiz, J; Dan, B

    2016-04-01

    The highly stereotyped, crystal-like architecture of the cerebellum has long served as a basis for hypotheses with regard to the function(s) that it subserves. Historically, most clinical observations and experimental work have focused on the involvement of the cerebellum in motor control, with particular emphasis on coordination and learning. Two main models have been suggested to account for cerebellar functioning. According to Llinás's theory, the cerebellum acts as a control machine that uses the rhythmic activity of the inferior olive to synchronize Purkinje cell populations for fine-tuning of coordination. In contrast, the Ito-Marr-Albus theory views the cerebellum as a motor learning machine that heuristically refines synaptic weights of the Purkinje cell based on error signals coming from the inferior olive. Here, we review the role of timing of neuronal events, oscillatory behavior, and synaptic and non-synaptic influences in functional plasticity that can be recorded in awake animals in various physiological and pathological models in a perspective that also includes non-motor aspects of cerebellar function. We discuss organizational levels from genes through intracellular signaling, synaptic network to system and behavior, as well as processes from signal production and processing to memory, delegation, and actual learning. We suggest an integrative concept for control and learning based on articulated oscillation templates.

  10. In vivo three-photon imaging of deep cerebellum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Mengran; Wang, Tianyu; Wu, Chunyan; Li, Bo; Ouzounov, Dimitre G.; Sinefeld, David; Guru, Akash; Nam, Hyung-Song; Capecchi, Mario R.; Warden, Melissa R.; Xu, Chris

    2018-02-01

    We demonstrate three-photon microscopy (3PM) of mouse cerebellum at 1 mm depth by imaging both blood vessels and neurons. We compared 3PM and 2PM in the mouse cerebellum for imaging green (using excitation sources at 1300 nm and 920 nm, respectively) and red fluorescence (using excitation sources at 1680 nm and 1064 nm, respectively). 3PM enabled deeper imaging than 2PM because the use of longer excitation wavelength reduces the scattering in biological tissue and the higher order nonlinear excitation provides better 3D localization. To illustrate these two advantages quantitatively, we measured the signal decay as well as the signal-to-background ratio (SBR) as a function of depth. We performed 2-photon imaging from the brain surface all the way down to the area where the SBR reaches 1, while at the same depth, 3PM still has SBR above 30. The segmented decay curve shows that the mouse cerebellum has different effective attenuation lengths at different depths, indicating heterogeneous tissue property for this brain region. We compared the third harmonic generation (THG) signal, which is used to visualize myelinated fibers, with the decay curve. We found that the regions with shorter effective attenuation lengths correspond to the regions with more fibers. Our results indicate that the widespread, non-uniformly distributed myelinated fibers adds heterogeneity to mouse cerebellum, which poses additional challenges in deep imaging of this brain region.

  11. Cerebellum, Language, and Cognition in Autism and Specific Language Impairment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodge, Steven M.; Makris, Nikos; Kennedy, David N.; Caviness, Verne S., Jr.; Howard, James; McGrath, Lauren; Steele, Shelly; Frazier, Jean A.; Tager-Flusberg, Helen; Harris, Gordon J.

    2010-01-01

    We performed cerebellum segmentation and parcellation on magnetic resonance images from right-handed boys, aged 6-13 years, including 22 boys with autism [16 with language impairment (ALI)], 9 boys with Specific Language Impairment (SLI), and 11 normal controls. Language-impaired groups had reversed asymmetry relative to unimpaired groups in…

  12. Linking Essential Tremor to the Cerebellum: Clinical Evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benito-León, Julián; Labiano-Fontcuberta, Andrés

    2016-06-01

    Essential tremor (ET) might be a family of diseases unified by the presence of kinetic tremor, but also showing etiological, pathological, and clinical heterogeneity. In this review, we will describe the most significant clinical evidence, which suggests that ET is linked to the cerebellum. Data for this review were identified by searching PUBMED (January 1966 to May 2015) crossing the terms "essential tremor" (ET) and "cerebellum," which yielded 201 entries, 11 of which included the term "cerebellum" in the article title. This was supplemented by articles in the author's files that pertained to this topic. The wide spectrum of clinical features of ET that suggest that it originates as a cerebellar or cerebellar outflow problem include the presence of intentional tremor, gait and balance abnormalities, subtle features of dysarthria, and oculomotor abnormalities, as well as deficits in eye-hand coordination, motor learning deficits, incoordination during spiral drawing task, abnormalities in motor timing and visual reaction time, impairment of social abilities, improvement in tremor after cerebellar stroke, efficacy of deep brain stimulation (which blocks cerebellar outflow), and cognitive dysfunction. It is unlikely, however, that cerebellar dysfunction, per se, fully explains ET-associated dementia, because the cognitive deficits that have been described in patients with cerebellar lesions are generally mild. Overall, a variety of clinical findings suggest that in at least a sizable proportion of patients with ET, there is an underlying abnormality of the cerebellum and/or its pathways.

  13. The Cerebellum and Language: Evidence from Patients with Cerebellar Degeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoodley, Catherine J.; Schmahmann, Jeremy D.

    2009-01-01

    Clinical and imaging studies suggest that the cerebellum is involved in language tasks, but the extent to which slowed language production in cerebellar patients contributes to their poor performance on these tasks is not clear. We explored this relationship in 18 patients with cerebellar degeneration and 16 healthy controls who completed measures…

  14. Editorial: The Cerebellum: Not Just an Anatomical Structure ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Evidences from cognitive studies further suggest that cerebellar pathology may be associated with alterations mainly in mental function, instead of motor processes. These pools of evidences continue to attract a sizeable number of researches into the neuroanatomy, neurobiology and neurobehavioral role of the cerebellum ...

  15. File list: InP.Neu.20.AllAg.Cerebellum [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  16. File list: Pol.Neu.10.AllAg.Cerebellum [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  17. File list: ALL.Neu.10.AllAg.Cerebellum [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  19. File list: His.Neu.50.AllAg.Cerebellum [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  20. File list: InP.Neu.05.AllAg.Cerebellum [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  1. File list: His.Neu.05.AllAg.Cerebellum [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  3. File list: Pol.Neu.50.AllAg.Cerebellum [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  4. File list: InP.Neu.10.AllAg.Cerebellum [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  5. File list: ALL.Neu.20.AllAg.Cerebellum [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  6. File list: DNS.Neu.20.AllAg.Cerebellum [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  7. File list: Pol.Neu.05.AllAg.Cerebellum [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  8. File list: InP.Neu.50.AllAg.Cerebellum [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  14. File list: ALL.Neu.05.AllAg.Cerebellum [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  15. File list: ALL.Neu.05.AllAg.Cerebellum [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  16. Cannabinoid receptor expression and phosphorylation are differentially regulated between male and female cerebellum and brain stem after repeated stress: implication for PTSD and drug abuse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Guoqiang; Carlton, Janis; Zhang, Lei; Jiang, Xiaolong; Fullerton, Carol; Li, He; Ursano, Robert

    2011-09-08

    Recent study demonstrated a close relationship between cerebellum atrophy and symptom severity of pediatric maltreatment-related posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). It has also been known that females are more vulnerable than males in developing anxiety disorders after exposure to traumatic stress. The mechanisms are unknown. Because cannabinoid receptors (CB₁ and CB₂) are neuroprotective and highly expressed in the cerebellum, we investigated cerebellar CB expression in stressed rats. Young male and female Sprague-Dawley rats were given 40 unpredictable electric tail-shocks for 2h daily on 3 consecutive days. CB₁ and CB₂ mRNA and protein levels in rat cerebellum and brain stem were determined using quantitative real-time PCR and Western blot, respectively. Two-way ANOVA revealed significant gender and stress effects on cerebellar CB₁ mRNA expression, with females and non-stressed rats exhibiting higher CB₁ mRNA levels than the males (3 fold, pstressed rats (30%, pstress increased the level of phosphorylated CB₁ receptors, the inactivated CB₁, in rat cerebellum (pstress interaction. Thus, repeated severe stress caused greater CB₁ mRNA suppression and CB₁ receptor phosphorylation in female cerebellum that could lead to increased susceptibility to stress-related anxiety disorders including PTSD. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Patient-Reported Esthetic and Functional Outcomes of Primary Total Laparoscopic Intestinal Vaginoplasty in Transgender Women With Penoscrotal Hypoplasia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bouman, M.B.; Sluis, W.B. van der; Woudenberg Hamstra, L.E. van; Buncamper, M.E.; Kreukels, B.P.; Meijerink, W.J.H.J.; Mullender, M.G.

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Puberty-suppressing hormonal treatment may result in penoscrotal hypoplasia in transgender women, making standard penile inversion vaginoplasty not feasible. For these patients, intestinal vaginoplasty is a surgical alternative, but knowledge on patient-reported postoperative outcomes

  18. MRI and three dimensional ultrasonography in the assessment of pulmonary hypoplasia in fetuses with urinary tract anomalies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariam Raafat

    2016-12-01

    Conclusion: There is a good concordance between 3D-US and MRI in the evaluation of PH in fetuses with UTM. MRI could be reserved for borderline cases of pulmonary hypoplasia and the difficult diagnostic situations.

  19. Ischemic stroke in patient with existing congenital hypoplasia of the middle cerebral artery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manchev, I.; Manolova, T.; Manchev, L.

    2015-01-01

    Presented is a clinical case of a woman 29 years old with ischemic stroke (IS), which has developed abruptly in existing congenital hypoplasia and occlusion of the middle cerebral artery. There are no other well or less well documented risk factors for cerebrovascular disease. In family history noted that the father of the patient died suddenly at the age of 45 years from stroke, also without evidence of vascular disease. On magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the brain is found high signal zone in the left nucleus lentiformis. We discussed the possibilities for implementing conventional angiography and eventually surgical procedures unfortunately rejected due to the high risk to the patient. Key words: Ischemic Stroke. Magnetic Resonance Imaging. Hypoplasia

  20. Unilateral hypoplasia with contralateral hypertrophy of anterior belly of digastric muscle: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ochoa-Escudero, Martin; Juliano, Amy F

    2016-10-01

    Anomalies of the anterior belly of the digastric muscle (DM) are uncommon. We present a case of hypoplasia of the anterior belly of the left DM with hypertrophy of the anterior belly of the contralateral DM. The importance of recognizing this finding is to differentiate hypoplasia of the anterior belly of the DM from denervation atrophy, and not to confuse contralateral hypertrophy with a submental mass or lymphadenopathy. In denervation atrophy of the anterior belly of the DM, associated atrophy of the ipsilateral mylohyoid muscle is present. Hypertrophy of the anterior belly of the contralateral DM can be differentiated from a submental mass or lymphadenopathy by recognizing its isodensity on computed tomography and isointensity on magnetic resonance imaging to other muscles, without abnormal contrast enhancement.

  1. Management of Cleft Maxillary Hypoplasia with Anterior Maxillary Distraction: Our Experience

    OpenAIRE

    Chacko, Tojan; Vinod, Sankar; Mani, Varghese; George, Arun; Sivaprasad, K. K.

    2013-01-01

    Maxillary hypoplasia is a common developmental problem in cleft lip and palate deformities. Since 1970s these deformities have traditionally been corrected by means of orthognathic surgery. Management of skeletal deformities in the maxillofacial region has been an important challenge for maxillofacial surgeons and orthodontists. Distraction osteogenesis is a surgical technique that uses body’s own repairing mechanisms for optimal reconstruction of the tissues. We present four cases of anterio...

  2. Mechanisms of cadmium-caused eye hypoplasia and hypopigmentation in zebrafish embryos

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Ting; Zhou, Xin-Ying; Ma, Xu-Fa; Liu, Jing-Xia

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: Using high-throughput in situ hybridization screening, we found that genes labeling the neural crest and its derivative pigment cells were sensitive to cadmium toxicity during zebrafish organogenesis, which might contribute to the molecular mechanisms underlying the phenotype defects of head and eye hypoplasia and hypopigmentation in cadmium-exposed embryos. Based on neural crest markers, we identified the doses and times of cadmium exposure that cause damage to the zebrafish organogenesis, and we also found that compounds BIO or RA could neutralize the toxic effects of cadmium. - Abstract: Cadmium-caused head and eye hypoplasia and hypopigmentation has been recognized for a long time, but knowledge of the underlying mechanisms is limited. In this study, we found that high mortality occurred in exposed embryos after 24 hpf, when cadmium (Cd) dosage was above 17.8 μM. Using high-throughput in situ hybridization screening, we found that genes labelling the neural crest and its derivative pigment cells exhibited obviously reduced expression in Cd-exposed embryos from 24 hpf, 2 days earlier than head and eye hypoplasia and hypopigmentation occurred. Moreover, based on expression of crestin, a neural crest marker, we found that embryos before the gastrula stage were more sensitive to cadmium toxicity and that damage caused by Cd on embryogenesis was dosage dependent. In addition, by phenotype observation and detection of neural crest and pigment cell markers, we found that BIO and retinoic acid (RA) could neutralize the toxic effects of Cd on zebrafish embryogenesis. In this study, we first determined that Cd blocked the formation of the neural crest and inhibited specification of pigment cells, which might contribute to the molecular mechanisms underlying the phenotype defects of head and eye hypoplasia and hypopigmentation in Cd-exposed embryos. Moreover, we found that compounds BIO or RA could neutralize the toxic effects of Cd.

  3. Bilateral congenital absence of flexor pollicis longus with thumb hypoplasia and thenar atrophy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaudhary, Vikas; Sehgal, Harsha; Bano, Shahina; Parmar, Pranjali R; Kumar, Sanjay

    2014-01-01

    Congenital absence of flexor pollicis longus with or without associated anomalies of thenar muscles and thumb is of rare occurrence. Inability to flex the interphalangeal joint of the thumb and absent dorsal wrinkles and flexion creases of the thumb are important clues to the diagnosis. Routine radiography and cross-sectional imaging help to confirm and document the condition. This article presents an extremely rare case of bilateral congenital absence of flexor pollicis longus tendon with thumb hypoplasia and thenar atrophy

  4. Correction of axial deformity during lengthening in fibular hypoplasia: Hexapodal versus monorail external fixation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chalopin, A; Geffroy, L; Pesenti, S; Hamel, A; Launay, F

    2017-09-01

    Childhood fibular hypoplasia is a rare pathology which may or may not involve limb-length discrepancy and axial deformity in one or more dimensions. The objective of the present study was to compare the quality of the axial correction achieved in lengthening procedures by hexapodal versus monorail external fixators. The hypothesis was that the hexapodal fixator provides more precise correction. A retrospective multicenter study included 52 children with fibular hypoplasia. Seventy-two tibias were analyzed, in 2 groups: 52 using a hexapodal fixator, and 20 using a monorail fixator. Mean age was 10.2 years. Mean lengthening was 5.7cm. Deformities were analyzed and measured in 3 dimensions and classified in 4 preoperative types and 4 post-lengthening types according to residual deformity. Complete correction was achieved in 26 tibias in the hexapodal group (50%) and 2 tibias in the monorail group (10%). Mean post-correction mechanical axis deviation was smaller in the hexapodal group: 12.83mm, versus 14.29mm in the monorail group. Mean post-correction mechanical lateral distal femoral angle was 87.5° in the hexapodal group, versus 84.3° in the monorail group (P=0.002), and mean mechanical medial proximal tibial angle 86.9° versus 89.5°, respectively (P=0.015). No previous studies focused on this congenital pathology in lengthening and axial correction programs for childhood lower-limb deformity. The present study found the hexapodal fixator to be more effective in conserving or restoring mechanical axes during progressive bone lengthening for fibular hypoplasia. The hexapodal fixator met the requirements of limb-length equalization in childhood congenital lower-limb hypoplasia, providing better axial correction than the monorail fixator. IV. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  5. Unilateral Pulmonary Artery Agenesis with Ipsilateral Pulmonary Hypoplasia as Incidental Finding in an Asthmatic Patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catalina Contreras-Arias

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Unilateral absence of a pulmonary artery is an uncommon congenital heart disease. It can be related to respiratory symptoms such as asthma, an unsual nding in some of these patients. This paper reports the case of a 4-year-old male with recurrent respiratory infections and asthma symptoms, in who further studies found agenesia of right pulmonary artery with pulmonary hypoplasia of the same side.

  6. Generalized seizures in the right hippocampus sclerosis combined with hypoplasia of the right vertebral artery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manchev, L.; Toneva, J.; Manolova, T.; Manchev, I.; Valcheva, V.

    2016-01-01

    We present a clinical case of generalized epileptic seizures, occurring suddenly. The common finding from MRI of the brain is sclerosis of the right hippocampus, while MR angiography shows hypoplasia of the right vertebral artery. There are EEG signs for single foci of abnormal activity more on the right side. An anticonvulsant and symptomatic treatment demonstrate a favorable result. Under discussion is the question of surgery treatment. Key words: Hippocampal Sclerosis. MRI. Epileptic Seizures

  7. Mechanisms of cadmium-caused eye hypoplasia and hypopigmentation in zebrafish embryos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Ting, E-mail: zting@webmail.hzau.edu.cn; Zhou, Xin-Ying, E-mail: 290356082@qq.com; Ma, Xu-Fa, E-mail: xufama@mail.hzau.edu.cn; Liu, Jing-Xia, E-mail: ichliu@mail.hzau.edu.cn

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: Using high-throughput in situ hybridization screening, we found that genes labeling the neural crest and its derivative pigment cells were sensitive to cadmium toxicity during zebrafish organogenesis, which might contribute to the molecular mechanisms underlying the phenotype defects of head and eye hypoplasia and hypopigmentation in cadmium-exposed embryos. Based on neural crest markers, we identified the doses and times of cadmium exposure that cause damage to the zebrafish organogenesis, and we also found that compounds BIO or RA could neutralize the toxic effects of cadmium. - Abstract: Cadmium-caused head and eye hypoplasia and hypopigmentation has been recognized for a long time, but knowledge of the underlying mechanisms is limited. In this study, we found that high mortality occurred in exposed embryos after 24 hpf, when cadmium (Cd) dosage was above 17.8 μM. Using high-throughput in situ hybridization screening, we found that genes labelling the neural crest and its derivative pigment cells exhibited obviously reduced expression in Cd-exposed embryos from 24 hpf, 2 days earlier than head and eye hypoplasia and hypopigmentation occurred. Moreover, based on expression of crestin, a neural crest marker, we found that embryos before the gastrula stage were more sensitive to cadmium toxicity and that damage caused by Cd on embryogenesis was dosage dependent. In addition, by phenotype observation and detection of neural crest and pigment cell markers, we found that BIO and retinoic acid (RA) could neutralize the toxic effects of Cd on zebrafish embryogenesis. In this study, we first determined that Cd blocked the formation of the neural crest and inhibited specification of pigment cells, which might contribute to the molecular mechanisms underlying the phenotype defects of head and eye hypoplasia and hypopigmentation in Cd-exposed embryos. Moreover, we found that compounds BIO or RA could neutralize the toxic effects of Cd.

  8. Foveal hemorrhage in an eye with foveal hypoplasia associated with albinism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masuda N

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Naonori Masuda, Taiji Hasegawa, Mariko Yamashita, Nahoko Ogata Department of Ophthalmology, Nara Medical University, Nara, Japan Abstract: Oculocutaneous albinism is a group of congenital disorders caused by alterations of melanin biosynthesis. We report our findings in a patient with oculocutaneous albinism who presented with foveal hypoplasia and a foveal hemorrhage. A 48-year-old man noted a dark spot in the middle of the visual field of his right eye. He had depigmented skin, white hair, white eyebrows, and white cilia. He also had horizontal nystagmus and depigmented irides. His best-corrected visual acuity was 2/100 with -14.0 diopters in the right eye and 3/100 with -5.0 diopters in the left eye. Ophthalmoscopy showed diffuse depigmentation in both eyes and a foveal hemorrhage in the right eye. Optical coherence tomography showed the absence of a foveal pit in both eyes and a subretinal hyperreflective lesion corresponding to the foveal hemorrhage in the right eye. Fluorescein angiography showed that the retinal and choroidal vessels were relatively hypofluorescent because of the lack of a blocking effect of the pigments in the retinal pigment epithelium. Fluorescein angiography and indocyanine green angiography did not show any evidence of choroidal neovascularization in either eye. The foveal hemorrhage in the right eye spontaneously regressed and finally resolved at 3 months after onset. At the final examination, the patient reported that his vision had recovered. A foveal hemorrhage is a rare condition in an eye with foveal hypoplasia associated with albinism. The hemorrhage may be related to high myopia and also to the hypoplasia of the fovea associated with albinism. Keywords: albinism, foveal hemorrhage, foveal hypoplasia, simple hemorrhage

  9. Prune belly syndrome with urethral hypoplasia and vesico-cutaneous fistula: A case report and review of literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Osama M Sarhan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Association between Prune belly syndrome (PBS and urethral hypoplasia is an unusual condition. It is usually fatal unless there is a communication between the fetal bladder and the amniotic sac. We report a case of PBS with urethral hypoplasia and congenital vesico-cutaneous fistula in a male neonate. Patient underwent cutaneous vesicostomy and was discharged for close follow up of his renal function and for future reconstruction.

  10. Prune belly syndrome with urethral hypoplasia and vesico-cutaneous fistula: A case report and review of literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarhan, Osama M; Al-Ghanbar, Mustafa S; Nakshabandi, Ziad M

    2013-10-01

    Association between Prune belly syndrome (PBS) and urethral hypoplasia is an unusual condition. It is usually fatal unless there is a communication between the fetal bladder and the amniotic sac. We report a case of PBS with urethral hypoplasia and congenital vesico-cutaneous fistula in a male neonate. Patient underwent cutaneous vesicostomy and was discharged for close follow up of his renal function and for future reconstruction.

  11. Short limbed dwarfism, genital hypoplasia, sparse hair, and vertebral anomalies: a variant of Ellis-van Creveld syndrome?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fryns, J P; Moerman, P

    1993-01-01

    A male newborn with acromesomelic short limbed dwarfism, genital hypoplasia, and vertebral anomalies is reported. As the child had an important number of clinical and radiological symptoms seen in patients with Ellis-van Creveld syndrome, we raise the question of whether he may represent a variant example of this syndrome despite the absence of cardinal symptoms such as postaxial polydactyly and ectodermal changes (nail hypoplasia). Images PMID:8487282

  12. Short limbed dwarfism, genital hypoplasia, sparse hair, and vertebral anomalies: a variant of Ellis-van Creveld syndrome?

    OpenAIRE

    Fryns, J P; Moerman, P

    1993-01-01

    A male newborn with acromesomelic short limbed dwarfism, genital hypoplasia, and vertebral anomalies is reported. As the child had an important number of clinical and radiological symptoms seen in patients with Ellis-van Creveld syndrome, we raise the question of whether he may represent a variant example of this syndrome despite the absence of cardinal symptoms such as postaxial polydactyly and ectodermal changes (nail hypoplasia).

  13. [Risk factors for teeth aplasia and hypoplasia in cleft lip and palate children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korolenkova, M V; Starikova, N V; Ageeva, L V

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the study was to assess the significance of environmental risk factors for teeth aplasia and hypoplasia in cleft lip and palate children. Two hundred and forty-seven cleft lip and palate (CLP) children were enrolled in the study including 105 (42.5%) with bilateral CLP and 57.5% with unilateral CLP. The mean age was 11.2±4.9 years. Teeth condition was assessed clinically and radiologically. The impact of risk factors for teeth anomalies was analyzed by retrospective data obtained from computer database (absence of preoperative orthopedic treatment, palatal defects after primary palatoplasty and type of primary procedures). Surgical trauma by early periosteoplasty (at the age of 3-4 months), excessive scarring and tissue traction due to absence of early orthopedic treatment and palatal defect were associated with significantly higher incidence of incisors hypoplasia (both developmental enamel defects and microdentia) and aplasia of central incisors not seen in the other study subgroups. Incisors aplasia and hypoplasia in CLP patients do not always have disembryogenic origin but may depend on external environmental factors, including surgical trauma.

  14. Urethral hydrodistension for management of urethral hypoplasia in prune belly syndrome: long-term results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kajbafzadeh, Abdol-Mohammad; Rasouli, Mohammad Reza; Dianat, SeyedSaeid; Nezami, Behtash G; Mahboubi, Amir Hassan; Sina, Alireza

    2010-11-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of urethral hydrodistension for management of urethral hypoplasia in prune belly syndrome (PBS). During a 10-year period, 7 infants with PBS and urethral hypoplasia presented either with open urachus or surgically created urinary diversion referred to our hospital. Five milliliters of normal saline was pushed via a 22-gauge plastic angiocatheter into the urethra with simultaneous finger pressure on the perineum to occlude the proximal urethra that was repeated with higher volumes of the solution (up to 20 mL). The procedure was continued until a 6F or 8F feeding tube catheter confirmed the urethral patency. Hydrodistension was repeated in 3-month intervals till complete patency was confirmed by imaging. Median age of the infants was 6 (1-8) months. All urethral hydrodistension were successful after 1 to 3 sessions. Follow-up imaging studies showed significant improvement in all patients except one. Natural and surgically created urinary diversions were closed in 6 infants. The hydrodistension create an equal and constant pressure into the urethral wall without any urethral damage. This technique can be considered along with the other available methods for management of urethral hypoplasia in selected cases of PBS. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Diffuse large B-cell lymphoma chemotherapy reveals a combined immunodeficiency syndrome in cartilage hair hypoplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Alexandre; Martin Silva, Nicolas; de Boysson, Hubert; Damaj, Gandhi; Aouba, Achille

    2018-04-24

    Cartilage hair hypoplasia (CHH) is a rare autosomal recessive ribosomopathy characterised by skeletal and integumentary system manifestations. It may also present with varied forms and intensities of haematopoietic and/or immune disorders. We report a 27-year-old female who presented a picture of combined immunodeficiency after receiving an adriamycin-based chemotherapy regimen followed by autologous stem cell transplantation. Her medical history indicated neonatal dwarfism, recurrent ear, nose and throat and respiratory infections, and hypogammaglobulinaemia, which were suggestive of a primary minor B-cell immune deficiency. Taken together, the diagnosis of cartilage hair hypoplasia was suspected and confirmed by means of molecular biological analysis. Here, we discuss the causal relationship and molecular mechanisms existing between both primary immunodeficiency and lymphoma conditions and between chemotherapy cytotoxicity and aggravation of the immune system and associated hematopoietic dysfunction, considering the role of all these components in light of the initially undiagnosed cartilage hair hypoplasia. Finally, this case highlights the importance of screening for primary immunodeficiencies in the setting of a diagnosis of lymphoma and/or dwarfism; moreover, CHH must be distinguished from other causes of small size; its diagnosis and complete check-up must include the molecular characterisation, and its management must be global in collaboration with haematologists, immunologists and internists.

  16. Maxillary hypoplasia in the cleft patient: contribution of orthodontic dental space closure to orthognathic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Justine C; Slack, Ginger C; Walker, Ryann; Graves, Lindsay; Yen, Sandra; Woo, Jessica; Ambaram, Rishal; Martz, Martin G; Kawamoto, Henry K; Bradley, James P

    2014-02-01

    Cleft lip and palate surgery in the developing child is known to be associated with maxillary hypoplasia. However, the effects of nonsurgical manipulations on maxillary growth have not been well investigated. The authors present the contribution of orthodontic dental space closure with canine substitution to maxillary hypoplasia and the need for orthognathic surgery. Cleft lip/palate and cleft palate patients older than 15 years of age were reviewed for dental anomalies, orthodontic canine substitution, and Le Fort I advancement. Skeletal relationships of the maxilla to the skull base (SNA), mandible (ANB), and facial height were determined on lateral cephalograms. Logistic regression analyses were performed to estimate odds ratios. Ninety-five patients were reviewed (mean age, 18.1 years). In 65 patients with congenitally missing teeth, 55 percent with patent dental spaces required Le Fort I advancement. In contrast, 89 percent who underwent canine substitution required Le Fort I advancement (p = 0.004). Canine substitution is associated with a statistically significant increase in maxillary retrognathia when compared with dental space preservation on lateral cephalograms (mean SNA, 75.2 and 79.0, respectively; p = 0.006). Adjusting for missing dentition, logistic regression analyses demonstrated that canine substitution is an independent predictor for orthognathic surgery (OR, 6.47) and maxillary retrusion defined by SNA orthodontic cleft closure using canine substitution with maxillary hypoplasia and subsequent Le Fort I advancement, and suggest systematic criteria for management of cleft-related dental agenesis. Therapeutic, III.

  17. Mechanisms of cadmium-caused eye hypoplasia and hypopigmentation in zebrafish embryos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ting; Zhou, Xin-Ying; Ma, Xu-Fa; Liu, Jing-Xia

    2015-10-01

    Cadmium-caused head and eye hypoplasia and hypopigmentation has been recognized for a long time, but knowledge of the underlying mechanisms is limited. In this study, we found that high mortality occurred in exposed embryos after 24 hpf, when cadmium (Cd) dosage was above 17.8 μM. Using high-throughput in situ hybridization screening, we found that genes labelling the neural crest and its derivative pigment cells exhibited obviously reduced expression in Cd-exposed embryos from 24 hpf, 2 days earlier than head and eye hypoplasia and hypopigmentation occurred. Moreover, based on expression of crestin, a neural crest marker, we found that embryos before the gastrula stage were more sensitive to cadmium toxicity and that damage caused by Cd on embryogenesis was dosage dependent. In addition, by phenotype observation and detection of neural crest and pigment cell markers, we found that BIO and retinoic acid (RA) could neutralize the toxic effects of Cd on zebrafish embryogenesis. In this study, we first determined that Cd blocked the formation of the neural crest and inhibited specification of pigment cells, which might contribute to the molecular mechanisms underlying the phenotype defects of head and eye hypoplasia and hypopigmentation in Cd-exposed embryos. Moreover, we found that compounds BIO or RA could neutralize the toxic effects of Cd. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Foveal hemorrhage in an eye with foveal hypoplasia associated with albinism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masuda, Naonori; Hasegawa, Taiji; Yamashita, Mariko; Ogata, Nahoko

    2014-01-01

    Oculocutaneous albinism is a group of congenital disorders caused by alterations of melanin biosynthesis. We report our findings in a patient with oculocutaneous albinism who presented with foveal hypoplasia and a foveal hemorrhage. A 48-year-old man noted a dark spot in the middle of the visual field of his right eye. He had depigmented skin, white hair, white eyebrows, and white cilia. He also had horizontal nystagmus and depigmented irides. His best-corrected visual acuity was 2/100 with -14.0 diopters in the right eye and 3/100 with -5.0 diopters in the left eye. Ophthalmoscopy showed diffuse depigmentation in both eyes and a foveal hemorrhage in the right eye. Optical coherence tomography showed the absence of a foveal pit in both eyes and a subretinal hyperreflective lesion corresponding to the foveal hemorrhage in the right eye. Fluorescein angiography showed that the retinal and choroidal vessels were relatively hypofluorescent because of the lack of a blocking effect of the pigments in the retinal pigment epithelium. Fluorescein angiography and indocyanine green angiography did not show any evidence of choroidal neovascularization in either eye. The foveal hemorrhage in the right eye spontaneously regressed and finally resolved at 3 months after onset. At the final examination, the patient reported that his vision had recovered. A foveal hemorrhage is a rare condition in an eye with foveal hypoplasia associated with albinism. The hemorrhage may be related to high myopia and also to the hypoplasia of the fovea associated with albinism.

  19. Ectopic KIT copy number variation underlies impaired migration of primordial germ cells associated with gonadal hypoplasia in cattle (Bos taurus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heli Venhoranta

    Full Text Available Impaired migration of primordial germ cells during embryonic development causes hereditary gonadal hypoplasia in both sexes of Northern Finncattle and Swedish Mountain cattle. The affected gonads exhibit a lack of or, in rare cases, a reduced number of germ cells. Most affected animals present left-sided gonadal hypoplasia. However, right-sided and bilateral cases are also found. This type of gonadal hypoplasia prevails in animals with white coat colour. Previous studies indicated that gonadal hypoplasia is inherited in an autosomal recessive fashion with incomplete penetrance. In order to identify genetic regions underlying gonadal hypoplasia, a genome-wide association study (GWAS and a copy number variation (CNV analysis were performed with 94 animals, including 21 affected animals, using bovine 777,962 SNP arrays. The GWAS and CNV results revealed two significantly associated regions on bovine chromosomes (BTA 29 and 6, respectively (P=2.19 x 10(-13 and P=5.65 x 10(-6. Subsequent cytogenetic and PCR analyses demonstrated that homozygosity of a ~500 kb chromosomal segment translocated from BTA6 to BTA29 (Cs29 allele is the underlying genetic mechanism responsible for gonadal hypoplasia. The duplicated segment includes the KIT gene that is known to regulate the migration of germ cells and precursors of melanocytes. This duplication is also one of the two translocations associated with colour sidedness in various cattle breeds.

  20. Using a million cell simulation of the cerebellum: network scaling and task generality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wen-Ke; Hausknecht, Matthew J; Stone, Peter; Mauk, Michael D

    2013-11-01

    Several factors combine to make it feasible to build computer simulations of the cerebellum and to test them in biologically realistic ways. These simulations can be used to help understand the computational contributions of various cerebellar components, including the relevance of the enormous number of neurons in the granule cell layer. In previous work we have used a simulation containing 12000 granule cells to develop new predictions and to account for various aspects of eyelid conditioning, a form of motor learning mediated by the cerebellum. Here we demonstrate the feasibility of scaling up this simulation to over one million granule cells using parallel graphics processing unit (GPU) technology. We observe that this increase in number of granule cells requires only twice the execution time of the smaller simulation on the GPU. We demonstrate that this simulation, like its smaller predecessor, can emulate certain basic features of conditioned eyelid responses, with a slight improvement in performance in one measure. We also use this simulation to examine the generality of the computation properties that we have derived from studying eyelid conditioning. We demonstrate that this scaled up simulation can learn a high level of performance in a classic machine learning task, the cart-pole balancing task. These results suggest that this parallel GPU technology can be used to build very large-scale simulations whose connectivity ratios match those of the real cerebellum and that these simulations can be used guide future studies on cerebellar mediated tasks and on machine learning problems. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Cerebellum in levodopa-induced dyskinesias: the unusual suspect in the motor network

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    Asha eKishore

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The exact mechanisms that generate levodopa-induced dyskinesias (LID during chronic levodopa therapy for Parkinson’s disease (PD are not yet fully established. The most widely accepted theories incriminate the non-physiological synthesis, release and reuptake of dopamine generated by exogenously administered levodopa in the striatum, and the aberrant plasticity in the corticostriatal loops. However, normal motor performance requires the correct recruitment of motor maps. This depends on a high level of synergy within the primary motor cortex (M1 as well as between M1 and other cortical and subcortical areas, for which dopamine is necessary. The plastic mechanisms within M1 which are crucial for the maintenance of this synergy are disrupted both during OFF and dyskinetic states in PD. When tested without levodopa, dyskinetic patients show loss of treatment benefits on long-term potentiation and long-term depression-like plasticity of the intracortical circuits. When tested with the regular pulsatile levodopa doses, they show further impairment of the M1 plasticity, such as inability to depotentiate an already facilitated synapse and paradoxical facilitation in response to afferent input aimed at synaptic inhibition. Dyskinetic patients have also severe impairment of the associative, sensorimotor plasticity of M1 attributed to deficient cerebellar modulation of sensory afferents to M1. Here we review the anatomical and functional studies, including the recently described bidirectional connections between the cerebellum and the basal ganglia that support a key role of the cerebellum in the generation of LID. This model stipulates that aberrant neuronal synchrony in PD with LID may propagate from the sub thalamic nucleus to the cerebellum and lock the cerebellar cortex in a hyperactive state. This could affect critical cerebellar functions such as the dynamic and discrete modulation of M1 plasticity and the matching of motor commands with sensory

  2. Targeting the Cerebellum by Noninvasive Neurostimulation: a Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Dun, Kim; Bodranghien, Florian; Manto, Mario; Mariën, Peter

    2017-06-01

    Transcranial magnetic and electric stimulation of the brain are novel and highly promising techniques currently employed in both research and clinical practice. Improving or rehabilitating brain functions by modulating excitability with these noninvasive tools is an exciting new area in neuroscience. Since the cerebellum is closely connected with the cerebral regions subserving motor, associative, and affective functions, the cerebello-thalamo-cortical pathways are an interesting target for these new techniques. Targeting the cerebellum represents a novel way to modulate the excitability of remote cortical regions and their functions. This review brings together the studies that have applied cerebellar stimulation, magnetic and electric, and presents an overview of the current knowledge and unsolved issues. Some recommendations for future research are implemented as well.

  3. Cerebellum developmental challenges: From morphology to molecular issues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrei Cosma

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: It is known that, throughout the development of the nervous system, the cellular migratory routes are an important part of its expansion; therefore, the cerebellum is ‘sprinkled’ with cellular changes during its growth. The aim of this study was to analyse the morphological features of the cerebellum cells in all the layers, during its development. Material and methods: We examined 14 cases of human cerebellum, ranging between 1 to 12 months by histopathology and immunohistochemistry. Results: Haematoxylin and eosin staining method confirmed the age-linked migration of the cells from the external granular layer into the internal granular layer. Moreover, immunohistochemical evaluation using PROX1 and NFAP showed positivity for the Purkinje cells. However, these cells exposed negativity on NSE stained specimens. On the other hand, the transience of the EGL was analyzed using OCT3/4, which showed the migration of the EGL cells through the molecular layer to the IGL. Also, GFAP and NFAP proved to be a useful tool for the identification of the climbing fibres and the variation of their density connected the age of the patient. Conclusions: The human cerebellum undergoes different morphological and molecular changes throughout its evolution during embryogenesis. The markers used in our study have proved to present a differential, stage-dependant reactivity and appeared as useful tools for the identification of different cerebellar structures. Our study is a challenging attempt to understand the basics of cerebellar development at a morphological and molecular level and may bring new perspectives for a better approach of cerebellar associated pathologies.

  4. CEREBELLUM DEVELOPMENTAL CHALLENGES: FROM MORPHOLOGY TO MOLECULAR ISSUES

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    Andrei Cosma ¹

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: It is known that, throughout the development of the nervous system, the cellular migratory routes are an important part of its expansion; therefore, the cerebellum is ‘sprinkled’ with cellular changes during its growth. The aim of this study was to analyse the morphological features of the cerebellum cells in all the layers, during its development. MATERIAL AND METHODS: We examined 14 cases of human cerebellum, ranging between 1 month to 12 years by histopathology and immunohistochemistry. RESULTS: Haematoxylin and eosin staining method confirmed the age-linked migration of the cells from the external granular layer into the internal granular layer. Moreover, immunohistochemical evaluation using PROX1 and NFAP showed positivity for the Purkinje cells. However, these cells exposed negativity on NSE stained specimens. On the other hand, the transience of the EGL was analysed using OCT3/4, which showed the migration of the EGL cells through the molecular layer to the IGL. Also, GFAP and NFAP proved to be a useful tool for the identification of the climbing fibres and the variation of their density connected the age of the patient. CONCLUSIONS: The human cerebellum undergoes different morphological and molecular changes throughout its evolution during embryogenesis. The markers used in our study have proved to present a differential, stage-dependant reactivity and appeared as useful tools for the identification of different cerebellar structures. Our study is a challenging attempt to understand the basics of cerebellar development at a morphological and molecular level and may bring new perspectives for a better approach of cerebellar associated pathologies.

  5. Enamel hypoplasia in the deciduous teeth of great apes: variation in prevalence and timing of defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukacs, J R

    2001-11-01

    The prevalence of enamel hypoplasia in the deciduous teeth of great apes has the potential to reveal episodes of physiological stress in early stages of ontogenetic development. However, little is known about enamel defects of deciduous teeth in great apes. Unresolved questions addressed in this study are: Do hypoplastic enamel defects occur with equal frequency in different groups of great apes? Are enamel hypoplasias more prevalent in the deciduous teeth of male or female apes? During what phase of dental development do enamel defects tend to form? And, what part of the dental crown is most commonly affected? To answer these questions, infant and juvenile skulls of two sympatric genera of great apes (Gorilla and Pan) were examined for dental enamel hypoplasias. Specimens from the Powell-Cotton Museum (Quex Park, UK; n = 107) are reported here, and compared with prior findings based on my examination of juvenile apes at the Cleveland Museum of Natural History (Hamman-Todd Collection; n = 100) and Smithsonian Institution (National Museum of Natural History; n = 36). All deciduous teeth were examined by the author with a x10 hand lens, in oblique incandescent light. Defects were classified using Fédération Dentaire International (FDI)/Defects of Dental Enamel (DDE) standards; defect size and location on the tooth crown were measured and marked on dental outline charts. Enamel defects of ape deciduous teeth are most common on the labial surface of canine teeth. While deciduous incisor and molar teeth consistently exhibit similar defects with prevalences of approximately 10%, canines average between 70-75%. Position of enamel defects on the canine crown was analyzed by dividing it into three zones (apical, middle, and cervical) and calculating defect prevalence by zone. Among gorillas, enamel hypoplasia prevalence increases progressively from the apical zone (low) to the middle zone to the cervical zone (highest), in both maxillary and mandibular canine teeth

  6. A role for cerebellum in the hereditary dystonia DYT1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fremont, Rachel; Tewari, Ambika; Angueyra, Chantal; Khodakhah, Kamran

    2017-01-01

    DYT1 is a debilitating movement disorder caused by loss-of-function mutations in torsinA. How these mutations cause dystonia remains unknown. Mouse models which have embryonically targeted torsinA have failed to recapitulate the dystonia seen in patients, possibly due to differential developmental compensation between rodents and humans. To address this issue, torsinA was acutely knocked down in select brain regions of adult mice using shRNAs. TorsinA knockdown in the cerebellum, but not in the basal ganglia, was sufficient to induce dystonia. In agreement with a potential developmental compensation for loss of torsinA in rodents, torsinA knockdown in the immature cerebellum failed to produce dystonia. Abnormal motor symptoms in knockdown animals were associated with irregular cerebellar output caused by changes in the intrinsic activity of both Purkinje cells and neurons of the deep cerebellar nuclei. These data identify the cerebellum as the main site of dysfunction in DYT1, and offer new therapeutic targets. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.22775.001 PMID:28198698

  7. Functional relationship between the cerebrum and cerebellum in normal subjects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanyu, Haruo; Arai, Hisayuki; Hatano, Nobuyoshi; Abe, Shinei; Katsunuma, Hideyo

    1991-01-01

    To determine whether a functional relationship between the cerebrum and cerebellum exists in normal subjects, the correlation between asymmetry in cerebral blood flow and asymmetry in cerebellar blood flow was investigated. Twenty-one healthy right-handed subjects were studied using SPECT with N-isopropyl-p-( 123 I)iodoamphetamine while in a resting state. The asymmetry index (AI) for both the cerebral and cerebellar hemisphere was calculated as follows. AI=right side - left side/right side + left side/200 (%). A negative correlation was found between AI in the cerebellum and AI in the cerebrum. Especially, AI in the cerebellar hemisphere was significantly correlated with AIs in the upper frontal cortex (r=-0.58, p<0.01), middle frontal cortex (r=-0.55, p<0.02), lower frontal cortex (r=-0.49, p<0.05), and mean cerebral hemisphere (r=-0.52, p<0.02). These results suggest the existence of a functional relationship between the cerebral hemisphere and the contralateral cerebellar hemisphere in the resting state of normal subjects. We strongly suspect that the frontal cortex exert an influence on the function in the contralateral cerebellum, probably due to a transneuronal mechanism, mainly through the corticopontocerebellar pathway. (author)

  8. Nitric oxide in the rat cerebellum after hypoxia/ischemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigo, José; Fernández, Ana Patricia; Alonso, David; Serrano, Julia; Fernández-Vizarra, Paula; Martínez-Murillo, Ricardo; Bentura, María Luisa; Martinez, Alfredo

    2004-01-01

    Nitric oxide is a regulatory biological substance and an important intracellular messenger that acts as a specific mediator of various neuropathological disorders. In mammals and invertebrates, nitric oxide is synthesized from L-arginine in the central and peripheral neural structures by the endothelial, neuronal and inducible enzymatic isoforms of nitric oxide synthase. Nitric oxide may affect the function of various neurotransmitter-specific systems, and is involved in neuromodulation, reproductive function, immune response, and regulation of the cerebral blood circulation. This makes nitric oxide the main candidate in brain responses to brain ischemia/hypoxia. The cerebellum has been reported to be the area of the brain that has the highest nitric oxide synthase activity and the highest concentration of glutamate and aspartate. By glutamate receptors and physiological action of nitric oxide, cyclic guanisine-5'-monophosphate may be rapidly increased. The cerebellum significantly differs with respect to ischemia and hypoxia, this response being directly related to the duration and intensity of the injury. The cerebellum could cover the eventual need for nitric oxide during the hypoxia, boosting the nitric oxide synthase activity, but overall ischemia would require de novo protein synthesis, activating the inducible nitric oxide synthase to cope with the new situation. The specific inhibitors of nitric oxide synthesis show neuroprotective effects.

  9. Effect of Maternal Diabetes on Cerebellum Histomorphometry in Neonatal Rats

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    Z Khaksar

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: In pregnant mothers, maternal diabetes occurs when pancreas can't produce enough insulin resulting in increased blood glucose levels in the mother and subsequently in the fetus. This investigation was conducted to evaluate the effects of maternal diabetes on cerebellum of offspring of diabetic mothers (ODM, which was carried out at the veterinary faculty of Shiraz University in 2007-2008. Methods: This was an experimental study that included sixteen normal adult female rats divided in two groups. Diabetes was induced in one group by Alloxan agent. Both groups became pregnant by natural mating . At 7, 14, 21 and 28 days after birth, the cerebellum of all offsprings were collected and the weight of neonates was also measured. After producing histological slides, Olympus BX51 microscope and ‍‍‍‍‍‍‍ Olysia softwarwere used. Various histological parameters used included gray and white matters thicknesses (µ, the number of cells in gray and white matter separately per unit and the ratio of gray matter to white matter. Results: Cerebellar parameters decreased in ODM as compared to the control group. The body weight of ODM was significantly more than that of the control group (p< 0.05. Conclusions: Maternal hyperglycaemia exhibited deleterious effects on cerebellum during fetal life, which remained persistent during postneonatal period. Maternal diabetes also resulted in reduction of number of cells and thicknesses of both gray and white matter.

  10. Isolated femoral hypoplasia: an intrauterine differential diagnosis to campomelia

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    Koerber, Friederike; Benz-Bohm, Gabriele [University of Cologne, Department of Paediatric Radiology, Cologne (Germany); Schoenau, Eckard [University of Cologne, Department of Paediatrics, Cologne (Germany); Horwitz, A.Eldad [Klinikum Krefeld, Department of Paediatric Radiology, Krefeld (Germany)

    2005-06-01

    The isolated form of femoral bowing is an important differential diagnosis of campomelia. Therefore, knowledge of isolated anomalies is fundamental for prenatal diagnosis, especially for the differential diagnosis from severe syndromes. Four cases are presented to discuss the differential diagnosis of femoral bowing including a review of the literature. We report four newborn babies with unilateral bowing and shortening of the femur. Three had no further anomaly; one child had additional abnormalities due to coumarin embryopathy. The radiological findings were shortened femora with bowing and varus deformity and cortical thickening on the concave side. All other parts showed normal bone structure. The aetiology of femoral bowing is unknown. Early damage of the cartilaginous model followed by remodelling with thickening on the concave side of the bone similar to the healing of malaligned fractures is suspected. The isolated form of femoral bowing without any other anomalies has to be differentiated from complex and more often severe congenital syndromes such as campomelia. Postpartum radiological examination should be reduced to a single exposure of the affected limb and follow-up should be done by clinical examination. (orig.)

  11. Circadian Clock Proteins and Melatonin Receptors in Neurons and Glia of the Sapajus apella Cerebellum

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    Leila M. Guissoni Campos

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Oscillations of brain proteins in circadian rhythms are important for determining several cellular and physiological processes in anticipation of daily and seasonal environmental rhythms. In addition to the suprachiasmatic nucleus, the primary central oscillator, the cerebellum shows oscillations in gene and protein expression. The variety of local circuit rhythms that the cerebellar cortex contains influences functions such as motivational processes, regulation of feeding, food anticipation, language, and working memory. The molecular basis of the cerebellar oscillator has been demonstrated by “clock gene” expression within cells of the cerebellar layers. Genetic and epidemiological evidence suggests that disruption of circadian rhythms in humans can lead to many pathological conditions. Despite this importance, data about clock gene and protein expression in the cerebellum of diurnal (day-active species, specifically primates, is currently poorly explored, mainly in regard to cellular identity, as well as the relationship with other molecules also involved in cerebellar functions. These studies could contribute to clarification of the possible mechanisms behind cerebellar rhythmicity. Considering that calcium binding proteins (CaBPs play crucial roles in preserving and modulating cerebellar functions and that clock gene expression can be controlled by afferent projections or paracrine circadian signals such as the hormone melatonin, the present study aimed to describe cellular identities, distribution patterns and day/night expression changes in PER1, PER2, CaBPs, and MT1 and MT2 melatonin receptors in the cerebellar cortex of a diurnal primate using conventional fluorescence and peroxidase-antiperoxidase immunocytochemical techniques. PER1 and PER2 immunoreactive (IR cells were observed in the Purkinje cells of the cerebellum, and MT1 and MT2 receptors were localized around Purkinje cells in the Pj layer in Bergmann cells. This identity

  12. Pulmonary hypoplasia on preterm infant associated with diffuse chorioamniotic hemosiderosis caused by intrauterine hemorrhage due to massive subchorial hematoma: report of a neonatal autopsy case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Sohsuke; Marutani, Takamitsu; Hisaoka, Masanori; Tasaki, Takashi; Nabeshima, Atsunori; Shiraishi, Mika; Sasaguri, Yasuyuki

    2012-08-01

    A male infant born prematurely at 31 weeks of gestation weighed 789 g and had mildly brown-colored oral/tracheal aspirates at delivery. The amniotic fluid was also discolored, and its index was below 5. The patient died of hypoxemic respiratory and cardiac failure 2 hours after birth. The maternal profiles showed placenta previa and intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) at 22 weeks of gestation, and revealed recurrent episodes of antenatal and substantial vaginal bleeding and oligohydramnios, indicating chronic abruption-oligohydramnios sequence. The thickened placenta, weighing 275 g, grossly displayed unevenness and diffuse opacity with green to brown discoloration in the chorioamniotic surface, and revealed chronic massive subchorial hematomas (Breus' mole) with old peripheral blood clot, circumvallation, and infarction. Microscopically, diffuse Berlin-blue staining-positive hemosiderin deposits were readily encountered in the chorioamniotic layers of the chorionic plate, consistent with diffuse chorioamniotic hemosiderosis (DCH) due to Breus' mole, accompanied by diffuse amniotic necrosis. At autopsy, an external examination showed several surface anomalies and marked pulmonary hypoplasia, 0.006 (less 0.012) of lung:body weight ratio. Since Breus' mole has a close relationship with intrauterine hemorrhage, resulting in DCH, IUGR, and/or pulmonary hypoplasia of the newborn, the present features might be typical. © 2012 The Authors. Pathology International © 2012 Japanese Society of Pathology and Blackwell Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  13. Marrow hypoplasia: a rare complication of untreated Grave's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Juliana; França, Larissa de; Ellinger, Vivian; Wolff, Mônica

    2014-12-01

    Atypical presentation forms of hyperthyroidism are always a challenge to the clinician. We present a female patient with the typical symptoms of thyrotoxicosis, without any thionamides treatment before, associated with pancytopenia, which recovered after euthyroidism state was achieved. Although the major cases of pancytopenia in Grave's disease are seen as a complication of antithyroid drugs (thioamides), in this case report the alteration in blood tests was associated with untreated hyperthyroidism. In the literature review, we found 19 case reports between 1981 to 2012, but it has been related to a hypercellular bone marrow with periferic destruction. Our case, however, is about a hypocellular bone marrow without fibrosis or fat tissue replacement, which proceeded with a periferic improvement following thyroid treatment. Although rare, pancytopenia, when present, may develop as an unusual and severe manifestation in untreated subjects.

  14. Impaired redox state and respiratory chain enzyme activities in the cerebellum of vitamin A-treated rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, Marcos Roberto de; Fonseca Moreira, Jose Claudio

    2008-01-01

    Vitamin A is a micronutrient that participates in the maintenance of the mammalian cells homeostasis. However, excess of vitamin A, which may be achieved through increased intake of the vitamin either therapeutically or inadvertently, induces several deleterious effects in a wide range of mammalian cells, including neuronal cells. Vitamin A is a redox-active molecule, and it was previously demonstrated that it induces oxidative stress in several cell types. Therefore, in the present work, we investigated the effects of vitamin A supplementation at clinical doses (1000-9000 IU/(kg day)) on redox environment and respiratory chain activity in the adult rat cerebellum. Glutathione-S-transferase (GST) enzyme activity was also measured here. The animals were treated for 3, 7, or 28 days with vitamin A as retinol palmitate. We found increased levels of molecular markers of oxidative damage in the rat cerebellum in any period analyzed. Additionally, vitamin A supplementation impaired cerebellar mitochondrial electron transfer chain (METC) activity. GST enzyme activity was increased in the cerebellum of rats chronically treated with vitamin A. Based on our results and data previously published, we recommend more caution in prescribing vitamin A at high doses even clinically, since there is a growing concern regarding toxic effects associated to vitamin A intake

  15. Extensive grey matter pathology in the cerebellum in multiple sclerosis is linked to inflammation in the subarachnoid space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howell, Owain W; Schulz-Trieglaff, Elena Katharina; Carassiti, Daniele; Gentleman, Steven M; Nicholas, Richard; Roncaroli, Federico; Reynolds, Richard

    2015-10-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a progressive inflammatory neurological disease affecting myelin, neurons and glia. Demyelination and neurodegeneration of cortical grey matter contribute to a more severe disease, and inflammation of the forebrain meninges associates with pathology of the underlying neocortical grey matter, particularly in deep sulci. We assessed the extent of meningeal inflammation of the cerebellum, another structure with a deeply folded anatomy, to better understand the association between subarachnoid inflammation and grey matter pathology in progressive MS. We examined demyelinating and neuronal pathology in the context of meningeal inflammation in cerebellar tissue blocks from a cohort of 27 progressive MS cases previously characterized on the basis of the absence/presence of lymphoid-like aggregates in the forebrain meninges, in comparison with 11 non-neurological controls. Demyelination and meningeal inflammation of the cerebellum was greatest in those cases previously characterized as harbouring lymphoid-like structures in the forebrain regions. Meningeal inflammation was mild to moderate in cerebellar tissue blocks, and no lymphoid-like structures were seen. Quantification of meningeal macrophages, CD4+, CD8+ T lymphocytes, B cells and plasma cells revealed that the density of meningeal macrophages associated with microglial activation in the grey matter, and the extent of grey matter demyelination correlated with the density of macrophages and plasma cells in the overlying meninges, and activated microglia of the parenchyma. These data suggest that chronic inflammation is widespread throughout the subarachnoid space and contributes to a more severe subpial demyelinating pathology in the cerebellum. © 2014 British Neuropathological Society.

  16. Physiological and pharmacological properties of Purkinje cells in rat cerebellum degranulated by postnatal x irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woodward, D.J.; Hoffer, B.J.; Altman, J.

    1974-01-01

    Elimination of most granule, basket, and stellate interneurons in the rat cerebellum was achieved by repeated doses of low level x irradiation applied during the first two weeks of postnatal life. Purkinje neurons in these rats, studied when adults, exhibited sustained spiking activity in Halothane anesthetized preparations. Mean firing rates were 35 to 40/sec, no different from normal. Spontaneous bursts presumed to be generated by climbing fiber synaptic activity differed from normal by often consisting of full sized spikes rather than characteristic inactivation responses. Intracellularly observed correlates of bursts consisted of epsp's of several discretely different amplitudes appearing independently in time. Stimulation of white matter revealed evidence for, a) graded synaptic excitation of Purkinje cells indicating more than one converging excitatory synapse, and b) inhibitory actions on Purkinje cells either through a few remaining inhibitory interneurons or through Purkinje cell recurrent collaterals. Iontophoretic drug application studies showed normal chemosensitivity of the Purkinje cell membrane, i.e., excitation by flutamate and inhibition by gamma-amino butyric acid, serotonin, norepinephrine, and 3'5' cyclic AMP. These studies indicate considerable autonomy of Purkinje cell ontogenesis in the absence of normal interneuronal input. A unique synaptic relation only rarely found in normal cerebellum is the innervation of single Purkinje cells by more than one climbing fiber. (U.S.)

  17. Automated measurement of uptake in cerebellum, liver, and aortic arch in full-body FDG PET/CT scans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Christian; Sun, Shanhui; Sun, Wenqing; Otis, Justin; Wallace, Audrey; Smith, Brian J; Sunderland, John J; Graham, Michael M; Sonka, Milan; Buatti, John M; Beichel, Reinhard R

    2012-06-01

    The purpose of this work was to develop and validate fully automated methods for uptake measurement of cerebellum, liver, and aortic arch in full-body PET/CT scans. Such measurements are of interest in the context of uptake normalization for quantitative assessment of metabolic activity and/or automated image quality control. Cerebellum, liver, and aortic arch regions were segmented with different automated approaches. Cerebella were segmented in PET volumes by means of a robust active shape model (ASM) based method. For liver segmentation, a largest possible hyperellipsoid was fitted to the liver in PET scans. The aortic arch was first segmented in CT images of a PET/CT scan by a tubular structure analysis approach, and the segmented result was then mapped to the corresponding PET scan. For each of the segmented structures, the average standardized uptake value (SUV) was calculated. To generate an independent reference standard for method validation, expert image analysts were asked to segment several cross sections of each of the three structures in 134 F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) PET/CT scans. For each case, the true average SUV was estimated by utilizing statistical models and served as the independent reference standard. For automated aorta and liver SUV measurements, no statistically significant scale or shift differences were observed between automated results and the independent standard. In the case of the cerebellum, the scale and shift were not significantly different, if measured in the same cross sections that were utilized for generating the reference. In contrast, automated results were scaled 5% lower on average although not shifted, if FDG uptake was calculated from the whole segmented cerebellum volume. The estimated reduction in total SUV measurement error ranged between 54.7% and 99.2%, and the reduction was found to be statistically significant for cerebellum and aortic arch. With the proposed methods, the authors have demonstrated that

  18. The use of internal maxillary distraction for maxillary hypoplasia: a preliminary report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Sickels, Joseph E; Madsen, Mathew J; Cunningham, Larry L; Bird, Douglas

    2006-12-01

    Distraction osteogenesis is a useful alternative to advance the maxilla in complicated cases of maxillary hypoplasia. The purpose of this article is to review the workup, experience, and preliminary results with the use of internal distraction osteogenesis for maxillary hypoplasia at one teaching institution. Over a 5-year period, more than 300 patients with craniofacial and dentofacial defects have undergone oral and maxillofacial surgery at our center to correct their skeletal discrepancies. Of these, 10 have had maxillary distraction osteogenesis done with internal distractors. Follow-up of 6 months or more was available for 8 patients. Stereolithographic models were used to bend distractors prior to surgery in 6 patients. Latency prior to the start of distraction was 3 to 7 days and varied with the age of the patient. Distraction occurred at approximately 1 mm per day with an average distraction length of 8.5 mm (range, 6-10 mm). Excellent occlusal results were obtained in 5 patients. Major complications including nonunion and failure to achieve acceptable occlusal results were observed in 3 patients. Minor complications including pain and loosening of the distracter devices were observed in 2 patients, but did not appear to affect the esthetic and functional results. Distraction osteogenesis is a useful alternative to traditional orthognathic surgery to treat maxillary hypoplasia. Internal distractions are attractive to patients, but are more difficult to place and can cause discomfort to patients when trying to achieve an ideal primary vector of distraction. Stereolithographic models can help with placement of the device. Changes in design of distractors may help with patient discomfort.

  19. Posterior communicating artery hypoplasia as a risk factor for acute ischemic stroke in the absence of carotid artery occlusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuang, Yu-Ming; Liu, Chih-Yang; Pan, Po-Jung; Lin, Ching-Po

    2008-12-01

    Posterior communicating artery (PCoA) hypoplasia is a fetal variant of the Circle of Willis. According to angiograms and autopsy reports, this congenital variation is found in 6-21% of the general population. PCoA hypoplasia only becomes a risk factor for ischemic stroke in the presence of ipsilateral internal carotid artery (ICA) occlusion. The aim of our study was to determine the role of PCoA hypoplasia in acute ischemic stroke in the absence of ICA occlusion. We examined 310 acute ischemic stroke patients (mean age+/-standard deviation; 68.9+/-15.6 years). Cerebral magnetic resonance angiography was performed within 72 hours of ischemic stroke onset. For comparison, a risk factor-matched control group was recruited. Conditional logistic regression was used to calculate odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) to estimate the independent effect of potential risk factors. The overall incidence of PCoA hypoplasia in our experimental group was 19.35% (n=60), which was significantly higher than in the control group (8.20%, n=22, p=0.036, OR, 3.21; 95% CI, 1.43-9.62). The most common ischemic event was ipsilateral thalamic lacunar infarctions with or without occipital lobe involvement. Based on our results, PCoA hypoplasia appears to be a contributor to the risk of ischemic stroke, even in the absence of ICA occlusion. This risk is especially pronounced for strokes involving arteries that penetrate the thalamus.

  20. Prenatal and neonatal variables associated with enamel hypoplasia in deciduous teeth in low birth weight preterm infants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kátia Maria Dmytraczenko Franco

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated possible prenatal and neonatal variables that may influence the prevalence of tooth enamel hypoplasia in preterm and low birth weight children (LBW and a matched control group of term children with normal birth weight (NBW. The study sample consisted of 61 children born preterm and with LBW examined at 18-34 months of age. The control group was formed by 61 infants born full term and with NBW examined at 31-35 months of age. All children were born at the Center of Integrated Attention of Women's Health (CAISM-UNICAMP. FDI criteria were followed for dental examination. Medical data was collected retrospectively from hospital records. Among preterms, 57.4% had some type of developmental defects of enamel (DDE, 52.5 % had opacities and 21.3 % presented hypoplasia. Among full-term children, 24.6% presented DDE, 24.6% had opacities and 3.3% had hypoplasia. LBW preterm infants presented a higher prevalence of hypoplasia than NBW controls. The deciduous teeth most affected by hypoplasia were maxillary incisors. There was no significant association with prenatal variables; among neonatal variables there was a significant association with respiratory distress syndrome and neurological examination at discharge with an altered result.

  1. Management of Cleft Maxillary Hypoplasia with Anterior Maxillary Distraction: Our Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chacko, Tojan; Vinod, Sankar; Mani, Varghese; George, Arun; Sivaprasad, K K

    2014-12-01

    Maxillary hypoplasia is a common developmental problem in cleft lip and palate deformities. Since 1970s these deformities have traditionally been corrected by means of orthognathic surgery. Management of skeletal deformities in the maxillofacial region has been an important challenge for maxillofacial surgeons and orthodontists. Distraction osteogenesis is a surgical technique that uses body's own repairing mechanisms for optimal reconstruction of the tissues. We present four cases of anterior maxillary distraction osteogenesis with tooth borne distraction device-Hyrax, which were analyzed retrospectively for the efficacy of the tooth borne device-Hyrax and skeletal stability of distracted anterior maxillary segment.

  2. Congenital hypoplasia of the medical hallucial sesamoid with avascular necrosis: A case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Yoonah; Lee, Seunghun; Joo, Kyung Bin; Choi, Chan Bum [Hanyang University College of Medicine, Seoul Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Ryu, Jeong Ah [Dept. of Radiology, Hanyang University College of Medicine, Guri Hospital, Guri (Korea, Republic of); Bae, Ji Yoon [Dept. of Pathology, National Police Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-10-15

    Avascular necrosis of the hallucial sesamoids is an uncommon cause of metatarsalgia, and the congenital absence of the medial sesamoid is also a rarely reported condition in the podiatric literature. It must be distinguished from other painful conditions of the sesamoid due to the opposite direction of treatment. To our knowledge, there is no reported case of congenital hypoplasia of the medial sesamoid with osteonecrosis. We report a case of nontraumatic metatarsal pains with progressive sclerosis and fragmentation of the medial sesamoid on serial radiographs, magnetic resonance imaging, and ultrasonography with an incidental finding for the absence of contralateral medial sesamoid in a 33-year-old female.

  3. Schizencephaly with optic nerve hypoplasia simulating septo-optic dysplasia and other syndromes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osborn, R.E.; Byrd, S.E.

    1988-01-01

    Three patients with fused-lip schizencephaly with optic nerve hypoplasia were evaluated radiographically. The computed tomographic and magnetic resonance findings demonstrated unilateral or bilateral gray matter lined clefts in the cerebral hemisphere which allowed differentiation from the clinical diagnosis of septo-optic dysplasia in each case. Schizencephaly has also been mistakenly labelled as part of a syndrome known as the syndrome of absence of the septum pellucidum with porencephalies and as heterotopias with absence of the septum pellucidum. 15 refs.; 3 figs

  4. Clinical and molecular diagnosis of a cartilage-hair hypoplasia with IGF-1 deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castilla-Cortázar, Inma; Rodríguez De Ita, Julieta; Martín-Estal, Irene; Castorena, Fabiola; Aguirre, Gabriel A; García de la Garza, Rocío; Elizondo, Martha I

    2017-02-01

    Cartilage-hair hypoplasia syndrome (CHH) is a rare autosomal recessive condition characterized by metaphyseal chondrodysplasia and characteristic hair, together with a myriad of other symptoms, being most common immunodeficiency and gastrointestinal complications. A 15-year-old Mexican male initially diagnosed with Hirschsprung disease and posterior immunodeficiency, presents to our department for genetic and complementary evaluation for suspected CHH. Physical, biochemical, and genetic studies confirmed CHH together with IGF-1 deficiency. For this reason, we propose IGF-1 replacement therapy for its well-known actions on hematopoiesis, immune function and maturation, and metabolism. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Congenital hypoplasia of the medical hallucial sesamoid with avascular necrosis: A case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Yoonah; Lee, Seunghun; Joo, Kyung Bin; Choi, Chan Bum; Ryu, Jeong Ah; Bae, Ji Yoon

    2013-01-01

    Avascular necrosis of the hallucial sesamoids is an uncommon cause of metatarsalgia, and the congenital absence of the medial sesamoid is also a rarely reported condition in the podiatric literature. It must be distinguished from other painful conditions of the sesamoid due to the opposite direction of treatment. To our knowledge, there is no reported case of congenital hypoplasia of the medial sesamoid with osteonecrosis. We report a case of nontraumatic metatarsal pains with progressive sclerosis and fragmentation of the medial sesamoid on serial radiographs, magnetic resonance imaging, and ultrasonography with an incidental finding for the absence of contralateral medial sesamoid in a 33-year-old female.

  6. Effects of Ethanol on the Cerebellum: Advances and Prospects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Jia

    2015-08-01

    Alcohol abuse causes cerebellar dysfunction and cerebellar ataxia is a common feature in alcoholics. Alcohol exposure during development also impacts the cerebellum. Children with fetal alcohol spectrum disorder (FASD) show many symptoms associated specifically with cerebellar deficits. However, the cellular and molecular mechanisms are unclear. This special issue discusses the most recent advances in the study of mechanisms underlying alcoholinduced cerebellar deficits. The alteration in GABAA receptor-dependent neurotransmission is a potential mechanism for ethanol-induced cerebellar dysfunction. Recent advances indicate ethanol-induced increases in GABA release are not only in Purkinje cells (PCs), but also in molecular layer interneurons and granule cells. Ethanol is shown to disrupt the molecular events at the mossy fiber - granule cell - Golgi cell (MGG) synaptic site and granule cell parallel fibers - PCs (GPP) synaptic site, which may be responsible for ethanol-induced cerebellar ataxia. Aging and ethanol may affect the smooth endoplasmic reticulum (SER) of PC dendrites and cause dendritic regression. Ethanol withdrawal causes mitochondrial damage and aberrant gene modifications in the cerebellum. The interaction between these events may result in neuronal degeneration, thereby contributing to motoric deficit. Ethanol activates doublestranded RNA (dsRNA)-activated protein kinase (PKR) and PKR activation is involved ethanolinduced neuroinflammation and neurotoxicity in the developing cerebellum. Ethanol alters the development of cerebellar circuitry following the loss of PCs, which could result in modifications of the structure and function of other brain regions that receive cerebellar inputs. Lastly, choline, an essential nutrient is evaluated for its potential protection against ethanol-induced cerebellar damages. Choline is shown to ameliorate ethanol-induced cerebellar dysfunction when given before ethanol exposure.

  7. Linking Essential Tremor to the Cerebellum: Neuropathological Evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louis, Elan D

    2016-06-01

    A fundamental question about essential tremor (ET) is whether its associated pathological changes and disease mechanisms are linkable to a specific brain region. To that end, recent tissue-based studies have made significant strides in elucidating changes in the ET brain. Emerging from these studies is increasing neuropathological evidence linking ET to the cerebellum. These studies have systematically identified a broad range of structural, degenerative changes in the ET cerebellum, spanning across all Purkinje cell compartments. These include the dendritic compartment (where there is an increase in number of Purkinje cell dendritic swellings, a pruning of the dendritic arbor, and a reduction in spine density), the cell body (where, aside from reductions in Purkinje cell linear density in some studies, there is an increase in the number of heterotopic Purkinje cell soma), and the axonal compartment (where a plethora of changes in axonal morphology have been observed, including an increase in the number of thickened axonal profiles, torpedoes, axonal recurrent collaterals, axonal branching, and terminal axonal sprouting). Additional changes, possibly due to secondary remodeling, have been observed in neighboring neuronal populations. These include a hypertrophy of basket cell axonal processes and changes in the distribution of climbing fiber-Purkinje cell synapses. These changes all distinguish ET from normal control brains. Initial studies further indicate that the profile (i.e., constellation) of these changes may separate ET from other diseases of the cerebellum, thereby serving as a disease signature. With the discovery of these changes, a new model of ET has arisen, which posits that it may be a neurodegenerative disorder centered in the cerebellar cortex. These newly emerging neuropathological studies pave the way for anatomically focused, hypothesis-driven, molecular mechanistic studies of disease pathogenesis.

  8. The human cerebellum: a review of physiologic neuroanatomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roostaei, Tina; Nazeri, Arash; Sahraian, Mohammad Ali; Minagar, Alireza

    2014-11-01

    The cerebellum resides in the posterior cranial fossa dorsal to the brainstem and has diverse connections to the cerebrum, brain stem, and spinal cord. It is anatomically and physiologically divided into distinct functional compartments and is composed of highly regular arrays of neuronal units, each sharing the same basic cerebellar microcircuitry. Its circuitry is critically involved in motor control and motor learning, and its role in nonmotor cognitive and affective functions is becoming increasingly recognized. This article describes the cerebellar gross and histologic neuroanatomy in relation to its function, and the relevance of cerebellar circuitry and firing patterns to motor learning. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Cerebellum as a forward but not inverse model in visuomotor adaptation task: a tDCS-based and modeling study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yavari, Fatemeh; Mahdavi, Shirin; Towhidkhah, Farzad; Ahmadi-Pajouh, Mohammad-Ali; Ekhtiari, Hamed; Darainy, Mohammad

    2016-04-01

    Despite several pieces of evidence, which suggest that the human brain employs internal models for motor control and learning, the location of these models in the brain is not yet clear. In this study, we used transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) to manipulate right cerebellar function, while subjects adapt to a visuomotor task. We investigated the effect of this manipulation on the internal forward and inverse models by measuring two kinds of behavior: generalization of training in one direction to neighboring directions (as a proxy for inverse models) and localization of the hand position after movement without visual feedback (as a proxy for forward model). The experimental results showed no effect of cerebellar tDCS on generalization, but significant effect on localization. These observations support the idea that the cerebellum is a possible brain region for internal forward, but not inverse model formation. We also used a realistic human head model to calculate current density distribution in the brain. The result of this model confirmed the passage of current through the cerebellum. Moreover, to further explain some observed experimental results, we modeled the visuomotor adaptation process with the help of a biologically inspired method known as population coding. The effect of tDCS was also incorporated in the model. The results of this modeling study closely match our experimental data and provide further evidence in line with the idea that tDCS manipulates FM's function in the cerebellum.

  10. What Do We Know About the Influence of the Cerebellum on Walking Ability? Promising Findings from Transcranial Alternating Current Stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naro, Antonino; Milardi, Demetrio; Cacciola, Alberto; Russo, Margherita; Sciarrone, Francesca; La Rosa, Gianluca; Bramanti, Alessia; Bramanti, Placido; Calabrò, Rocco Salvatore

    2017-08-01

    Several cerebellar functions related to upper limb motor control have been studied using non-invasive brain stimulation paradigms. We have recently shown that transcranial alternating current stimulation (tACS) may be a promising approach in shaping the plasticity of cerebellum-brain pathways in a safe and effective manner. This study aimed to assess whether cerebellar tACS at different frequencies may tune M1-leg excitability and modify gait control in healthy human subjects. To this end, we tested the effects of different cerebellar tACS frequencies over the right cerebellar hemisphere (at 10, 50, and 300 Hz, besides a sham-tACS) on M1-leg excitability, cerebellum-brain inhibition (CBI), and gait parameters in a sample of 25 healthy volunteers. Fifty and 300 Hz tACS differently modified M1-leg excitability and CBI from both lower limbs, without significant gait perturbations. We hypothesize that tACS aftereffect may depend on a selective entrainment of distinct cerebellar networks related to lower limb motor functions. Therefore, cerebellar tACS might represent a useful tool to modulate walking training in people with cerebellum-related gait impairment, given that tACS may potentially reset abnormal cerebellar circuitries.

  11. Apoptosis of Purkinje and granular cells of the cerebellum following chronic ethanol intake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Suelen A; Chuffa, Luiz Gustavo A; Fioruci-Fontanelli, Beatriz Aparecida; Lizarte Neto, Fermino Sanches; Novais, Paulo Cezar; Tirapelli, Luiz Fernando; Oishi, Jorge Camargo; Takase, Luiz Fernando; Stefanini, Maira Aparecida; Martinez, Marcelo; Martinez, Francisco Eduardo

    2014-12-01

    Ethanol alters motricity, learning, cognition, and cellular metabolism in the cerebellum. We evaluated the effect of ethanol on apoptosis in Golgi, Purkinje, and granule cells of the cerebellum in adult rats. There were two groups of 20 rats: a control group that did not consume ethanol and an experimental group of UChA rats that consumed ethanol at 10% (cerebellum of adult UChA rats.

  12. Current Opinions and Areas of Consensus on the Role of the Cerebellum in Dystonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shakkottai, Vikram G; Batla, Amit; Bhatia, Kailash; Dauer, William T; Dresel, Christian; Niethammer, Martin; Eidelberg, David; Raike, Robert S; Smith, Yoland; Jinnah, H A; Hess, Ellen J; Meunier, Sabine; Hallett, Mark; Fremont, Rachel; Khodakhah, Kamran; LeDoux, Mark S; Popa, Traian; Gallea, Cécile; Lehericy, Stéphane; Bostan, Andreea C; Strick, Peter L

    2017-04-01

    A role for the cerebellum in causing ataxia, a disorder characterized by uncoordinated movement, is widely accepted. Recent work has suggested that alterations in activity, connectivity, and structure of the cerebellum are also associated with dystonia, a neurological disorder characterized by abnormal and sustained muscle contractions often leading to abnormal maintained postures. In this manuscript, the authors discuss their views on how the cerebellum may play a role in dystonia. The following topics are discussed: The relationships between neuronal/network dysfunctions and motor abnormalities in rodent models of dystonia. Data about brain structure, cerebellar metabolism, cerebellar connections, and noninvasive cerebellar stimulation that support (or not) a role for the cerebellum in human dystonia. Connections between the cerebellum and motor cortical and sub-cortical structures that could support a role for the cerebellum in dystonia. Overall points of consensus include: Neuronal dysfunction originating in the cerebellum can drive dystonic movements in rodent model systems. Imaging and neurophysiological studies in humans suggest that the cerebellum plays a role in the pathophysiology of dystonia, but do not provide conclusive evidence that the cerebellum is the primary or sole neuroanatomical site of origin.

  13. The Infant with Aortic Arch Hypoplasia and Small Left Heart Structures: Echocardiographic Indices of Mitral and Aortic Hypoplasia Predicting Successful Biventricular Repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plymale, Jennifer M; Frommelt, Peter C; Nugent, Melodee; Simpson, Pippa; Tweddell, James S; Shillingford, Amanda J

    2017-08-01

    In infants with aortic arch hypoplasia and small left-sided cardiac structures, successful biventricular repair is dependent on the adequacy of the left-sided structures. Defining accurate thresholds of echocardiographic indices predictive of successful biventricular repair is paramount to achieving optimal outcomes. We sought to identify pre-operative echocardiographic indices of left heart size that predict intervention-free survival in infants with small left heart structures undergoing primary aortic arch repair to establish biventricular circulation (BVC). Infants ≤2 months undergoing aortic arch repair from 1999 to 2010 with aortic and/or mitral valve hypoplasia, (Z-score ≤-2) were included. Pre-operative and follow-up echocardiograms were reviewed. Primary outcome was successful biventricular circulation (BVC), defined as freedom from death, transplant, or single ventricular conversion at 1 year. Need for catheter based or surgical re-intervention (RI), valve annular growth, and significant late aortic or mitral valve obstruction were additional outcomes. Fifty one of 73 subjects (79%) had successful BVC and were free of RI at 1 year. Seven subjects failed BVC; four of those died. The overall 1 year survival for the cohort was 95%. Fifteen subjects underwent a RI but maintained BVC. In univariate analysis, larger transverse aorta (p = 0.006) and aortic valve (p = 0.02) predicted successful BVC without RI. In CART analysis, the combination of mitral valve (MV) to tricuspid valve (TV) ratio ≤0.66 with an aortic valve (AV) annulus Z-score ≤-3 had the greatest power to predict BVC failure (sensitivity 71%, specificity 94%). In those with successful BVC, the combination of both AV and MV Z-score ≤-2.5 increased the odds of RI (OR 3.8; CI 1.3-11.4). Follow-up of non-RI subjects revealed improvement in AV and MV Z-score (median AV annulus changed over time from -2.34 to 0.04 (p indices. In this complex population, 1 year survival is high, but

  14. Liver segment IV hypoplasia as a risk factor for bile duct injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercado, Miguel Angel; Franssen, Bernardo; Arriola, Juan Carlos; Garcia-Badiola, Artemio; Arámburo, Rigoberto; Elnecavé, Alejandro; Cortés-González, Rubén

    2011-09-01

    Bile duct injury remains constant in the era of laparoscopic cholecystectomy and misidentification of structures remains one of the most common causes of such injuries. Abnormalities in liver segment IV, which is fully visible during laparoscopic cholecystectomy, may contribute to misidentification as proposed herein. We describe the case of a 36-year-old female who had a bile duct injury during a laparoscopic cholecystectomy where the surgeon noticed an unusually small distance between the gallbladder and the round ligament. We define hypoplasia of liver segment IV as well as describe the variation of the biliary anatomy in the case. We also intend to fit it in a broader spectrum of developmental anomalies that have both hyopoplasia of some portion of the liver and variations in gallbladder and bile duct anatomy that may contribute to bile duct injury. To our knowledge, hypoplasia of liver segment IV has not been suggested in the literature as a risk factor for bile duct injury except in the extreme case of a left-sided gallbladder. Surgeons should be vigilant during laparoscopic cholecystectomy when they become aware of an unusually small distance between the gallbladder bed and the round ligament prior to beginning their dissection, variations in the common bile duct and cystic duct should be expected.

  15. Role of association cortices and cerebellum during motor consolidation process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagata, Ken; Wright, David K.; Box, Georgia A.

    2008-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) studies of cerebral circulation activated during the first (naive) and second (learned) visual-motor tasks were performed to confirm the hypothesis that activated brain regions are different before and after the motor work. Subjects were 30 normal healthy right-handed volunteers (av. age 21 y), who had the first 10 tasks of cursor tracing (regular tracing, rt), as rapidly and accurately as possible, along the given star features and then second 15 tasks of tracing with the cursor with inverse polarity (mirror tracing, mt). During the tasks, PET images were obtained at 7th and 9th rt, and 10 times (1st-15th) during mt, with the high-resolution positron camera (HEADTOME V) to measure the cerebral blood flow after intravenous 15 O-water and were processed into 3D for statistics. At the 1st mt (under the most unfamiliar condition), stimulated were the right frontal and supplementary motor areas and temporal lobe, bilateral centriciput lobe, anterior cingulated gyrus, and left cerebellum hemisphere. Under the learned condition (at 15th mt), the primary motor area, lingual gyrus, cuneus, anterior cuneus, occipital lobe involving posterior cingulated gyrus and left cerebellum hemisphere were activated. Thus the hypothesis above was confirmed: reconfirmation of the brain plasticity. (R.T.)

  16. The cerebellum: a new key structure in the navigation system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christelle eRochefort

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Early investigations of cerebellar function focused on motor learning, in particular on eyeblink conditioning and adaptation of the vestibulo-ocular reflex, and led to the general view that cerebellar Long Term Depression (LTD at parallel fiber-Purkinje cell synapses is the neural correlate of cerebellar motor learning. Thereafter, while the full complexity of cerebellar plasticities was being unraveled, cerebellar involvement in more cognitive tasks - including spatial navigation - was further investigated. However, cerebellar implication in spatial navigation remains a matter of debate because motor deficits frequently associated with cerebellar damage often prevent the dissociation between its role in spatial cognition from its implication in motor function. Here, we review recent findings from behavioral and electrophysiological analyses of cerebellar mutant mouse models, which show that the cerebellum might participate in the construction of hippocampal spatial representation map (i.e. place cells and thereby in goal-directed navigation. These recent advances in cerebellar research point toward a model in which computation from the cerebellum could be required for spatial representation and would involve the integration of multi-source self-motion information to: 1 transform the reference frame of vestibular signals and 2 distinguish between self- and externally-generated vestibular signals. We eventually present herein anatomical and functional connectivity data supporting a cerebello-hippocampal interaction. Whilst a direct cerebello-hippocampal projection has been suggested, recent investigations rather favor a multi-synaptic pathway involving posterior parietal and retrosplenial cortices, two regions critically involved in spatial navigation.

  17. Non invasive blood flow measurement in cerebellum detects minimal hepatic encephalopathy earlier than psychometric tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felipo, Vicente; Urios, Amparo; Giménez-Garzó, Carla; Cauli, Omar; Andrés-Costa, Maria-Jesús; González, Olga; Serra, Miguel A; Sánchez-González, Javier; Aliaga, Roberto; Giner-Durán, Remedios; Belloch, Vicente; Montoliu, Carmina

    2014-09-07

    To assess whether non invasive blood flow measurement by arterial spin labeling in several brain regions detects minimal hepatic encephalopathy. Blood flow (BF) was analyzed by arterial spin labeling (ASL) in different brain areas of 14 controls, 24 cirrhotic patients without and 16 cirrhotic patients with minimal hepatic encephalopathy (MHE). Images were collected using a 3 Tesla MR scanner (Achieva 3T-TX, Philips, Netherlands). Pulsed ASL was performed. Patients showing MHE were detected using the battery Psychometric Hepatic Encephalopathy Score (PHES) consisting of five tests. Different cognitive and motor functions were also assessed: alterations in selective attention were evaluated using the Stroop test. Patients and controls also performed visuo-motor and bimanual coordination tests. Several biochemical parameters were measured: serum pro-inflammatory interleukins (IL-6 and IL-18), 3-nitrotyrosine, cGMP and nitrates+nitrites in plasma, and blood ammonia. Bivariate correlations were evaluated. In patients with MHE, BF was increased in cerebellar hemisphere (P = 0.03) and vermis (P = 0.012) and reduced in occipital lobe (P = 0.017). BF in cerebellar hemisphere was also increased in patients without MHE (P = 0.02). Bimanual coordination was impaired in patients without MHE (P = 0.05) and much more in patients with MHE (P battery and with CFF. BF in cerebellar hemisphere correlates with plasma cGMP and nitric oxide (NO) metabolites. BF in vermis cerebellar also correlates with NO metabolites and with 3-nitrotyrosine. IL-18 in plasma correlates with BF in thalamus and occipital lobe. Non invasive BF determination in cerebellum using ASL may detect MHE earlier than the PHES. Altered NO-cGMP pathway seems to be associated to altered BF in cerebellum.

  18. Cerebellum: from Fundamentals to Translational Approaches. The Seventh International Symposium of the Society for Research on the Cerebellum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manto, Mario; Mariën, Peter

    2016-02-01

    In terms of cerebellar research and ataxiology, a most fascinating period is currently going on. Numerous academic groups are now focusing their innovative research on the so-called little brain, hidden at the bottom of our brain. Indeed, its unique anatomical features make the cerebellum a wonderful window to address major questions about the central nervous system. The seventh international symposium of the SRC was held in Brussels at the Palace of Academies from May 8 to 10, 2015. The main goal of this dense symposium was to gather in a 2-day meeting senior researchers of exceptional scientific quality and talented junior scientists from all over the world working in the multidisciplinary field of cerebellar research. Fundamental and clinical researchers shared the latest knowledge and developments in this rapidly growing field. New ideas, addressed in a variety of inspiring talks, provoked a vivid debate. Advances in genetics, development, electrophysiology, neuroimaging, neurocognition and affect, as well as in the cerebellar ataxias and the controversies on the roles and functions of the cerebellum were presented. The Ferdinando Rossi lecture and the key-note lecture were delivered by Jan Voogd and Chris De Zeeuw, respectively. Contacts between researchers of different neuroscientific disciplines established a robust basis for novel trends and promising new cooperations between researchers and their centers spread all over the world.

  19. Essential Tremor, the Cerebellum, and Motor Timing: Towards Integrating Them into One Complex Entity

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    Martin Bareš

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Essential tremor (ET is the most common movement disorder in humans. It is characterized by a postural and kinetic tremor most commonly affecting the forearms and hands. Isolated head tremor has been found in 1–10% of patients, suggesting that ET may be a composite of several phenotypes. The exact pathophysiology of ET is still unknown. ET has been repeatedly shown as a disorder of mild cerebellar degeneration, particularly in postmortem studies. Clinical observations, electrophysiological, volumetric and functional imaging studies all reinforce the fact that the cerebellum is involved in the generation of ET. However, crucial debate exists as to whether ET is a neurodegenerative disease. Data suggesting that it is neurodegenerative include postmortem findings of pathological abnormalities in the brainstem and cerebellum, white matter changes on diffusion tensor imaging, and clinical studies demonstrating an association with cognitive and gait changes. There is also conflicting evidence against ET as a neurodegenerative disease: the improvement of gait abnormalities with ethanol administration, lack of gray matter volume loss on voxel-based morphometry, failure to confirm the prominent presence of Lewy bodies in the locus ceruleus, and other pathological findings. To clarify this issue, future research is needed to describe the mechanism of cellular changes in the ET brain and to understand the order in which they occur. The cerebellum has been shown to be involved in the timing of movement and sensation, acting as an internal timing system that provides the temporal representation of salient events spanning hundreds of milliseconds. It has been reported that cerebellar timing function is altered in patients with ET, showing an increased variability of rhythmic hand movements as well as diminished performance during predictive motor timing task. Based on current knowledge and observations, we argue that ET is essentially linked with cerebellar

  20. Participação do cerebelo no processamento auditivo Participation of the cerebellum in auditory processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrícia Maria Sens

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available O cerebelo era tradicionalmente visto como um órgão coordenador da motricidade, entretanto é atualmente considerado como um importante centro de integração de sensibilidades e coordenação de várias fases do processo cognitivo. OBJETIVO: é sistematizar as informações da literatura quanto à participação do cerebelo na percepção auditiva. MÉTODOS: foram selecionados na literatura trabalhos em animais sobre a fisiologia e anatomia das vias auditivas do cerebelo, além de trabalhos em humanos sobre diversas funções do cerebelo na percepção auditiva. Foram discutidos os achados da literatura, que há evidências que o cerebelo participa das seguintes funções cognitivas relacionadas à audição: geração verbal; processamento auditivo; atenção auditiva; memória auditiva; raciocínio abstrato; timing; solução de problemas; discriminação sensorial; informação sensorial; processamento da linguagem; operações lingüísticas. CONCLUSÃO: Foi constatado que são incompletas as informações sobre as estruturas, funções e vias auditivas do cerebelo.The cerebellum, traditionally conceived as a controlling organ of motricity, it is today considered an all-important integration center for both sensitivity and coordination of the various phases of the cognitive process. AIM: This paper aims at gather and sort literature information on the cerebellum’s role in the auditory perception. METHODS: We have selected animal studies of both the physiology and the anatomy of the cerebellum auditory pathway, as well as papers on humans discussing several functions of the cerebellum in auditory perception. As for the literature, it has been discussed and concluded that there is evidence that the cerebellum participates in many cognitive functions related to hearing: speech generation, auditory processing, auditory memory, abstract reasoning, timing, solution of problems, sensorial discrimination, sensorial information, language

  1. Vygotsky Meets Neuroscience: The Cerebellum and the Rise of Culture through Play

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandervert, Larry

    2017-01-01

    The author suggests the brain's cerebellum and cerebral cortex are the origin of culture and considers the cerebellar models that came to constitute culture to be derived specifically from play. He summarizes recent research on the behavioral, cognitive, and affective evolution of the cerebellum and the cerebral cortex that shows the development…

  2. Evolutionary mechanisms that generate morphology and neural-circuit diversity of the cerebellum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hibi, Masahiko; Matsuda, Koji; Takeuchi, Miki; Shimizu, Takashi; Murakami, Yasunori

    2017-05-01

    The cerebellum is derived from the dorsal part of the anterior-most hindbrain. The vertebrate cerebellum contains glutamatergic granule cells (GCs) and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)ergic Purkinje cells (PCs). These cerebellar neurons are generated from neuronal progenitors or neural stem cells by mechanisms that are conserved among vertebrates. However, vertebrate cerebella are widely diverse with respect to their gross morphology and neural circuits. The cerebellum of cyclostomes, the basal vertebrates, has a negligible structure. Cartilaginous fishes have a cerebellum containing GCs, PCs, and deep cerebellar nuclei (DCNs), which include projection neurons. Ray-finned fish lack DCNs but have projection neurons termed eurydendroid cells (ECs) in the vicinity of the PCs. Among ray-finned fishes, the cerebellum of teleost zebrafish has a simple lobular structure, whereas that of weakly electric mormyrid fish is large and foliated. Amniotes, which include mammals, independently evolved a large, foliated cerebellum, which contains massive numbers of GCs and has functional connections with the dorsal telencephalon (neocortex). Recent studies of cyclostomes and cartilaginous fish suggest that the genetic program for cerebellum development was already encoded in the genome of ancestral vertebrates. In this review, we discuss how alterations of the genetic and cellular programs generated diversity of the cerebellum during evolution. © 2017 Japanese Society of Developmental Biologists.

  3. Interactions between Prefrontal Cortex and Cerebellum Revealed by Trace Eyelid Conditioning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalmbach, Brian E.; Ohyama, Tatsuya; Kreider, Joy C.; Riusech, Frank; Mauk, Michael D.

    2009-01-01

    Eyelid conditioning has proven useful for analysis of learning and computation in the cerebellum. Two variants, delay and trace conditioning, differ only by the relative timing of the training stimuli. Despite the subtlety of this difference, trace eyelid conditioning is prevented by lesions of the cerebellum, hippocampus, or medial prefrontal…

  4. Glioblastoma multiforme of the cerebellum: description of three cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luccarelli, G

    1980-01-01

    Only 43 cases of glioblastoma multiforme of the cerebellum have been reported in the literature. This report is based on the findings of 3 cerebellar glioblastomas in a review of 1,206 consecutive confirmed cases of glioblastoma operated on between 1947 and 1977 at the Istituto Neurologico of Milan, giving an incidence of 0.24%. Clinical features are similar to those of any other fast-growing subtentorial tumour. Neuroradiological studies, including CAT, are of little help in predicting the exact nature of these tumours before surgery. A correct diagnosis can be reached only by microscopic examination. Histological patterns appear in no way to differ from those of cerebral glioblastoma. The biological behaviour of these tumours is in all respects identical to that of glioblastoma of cerebral hemispheres.

  5. Wavelet analysis of MR functional data from the cerebellum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karen, Romero Sánchez; Vásquez Reyes Marcos, A.; González Gómez Dulce, I.; Hernández López, Javier M.; Silvia, Hidalgo Tobón; Pilar, Dies Suarez; Eduardo, Barragán Pérez; Benito, De Celis Alonso

    2014-01-01

    The main goal of this project was to create a computer algorithm based on wavelet analysis of BOLD signals, which automatically diagnosed ADHD using information from resting state MR experiments. Male right handed volunteers (infants with ages between 7 and 11 years old) were studied and compared with age matched controls. Wavelet analysis, which is a mathematical tool used to decompose time series into elementary constituents and detect hidden information, was applied here to the BOLD signal obtained from the cerebellum 8 region of all our volunteers. Statistical differences between the values of the a parameters of wavelet analysis was found and showed significant differences (p<0.02) between groups. This difference might help in the future to distinguish healthy from ADHD patients and therefore diagnose ADHD

  6. Wavelet analysis of MR functional data from the cerebellum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karen, Romero Sánchez, E-mail: alphacentauri-hp@hotmail.com, E-mail: marcos-vaquezr@hotmail.com, E-mail: isabeldgg@hotmail.com; Vásquez Reyes Marcos, A., E-mail: alphacentauri-hp@hotmail.com, E-mail: marcos-vaquezr@hotmail.com, E-mail: isabeldgg@hotmail.com; González Gómez Dulce, I., E-mail: alphacentauri-hp@hotmail.com, E-mail: marcos-vaquezr@hotmail.com, E-mail: isabeldgg@hotmail.com; Hernández López, Javier M., E-mail: javierh@fcfm.buap.mx [Faculty of Physics and Mathematics, BUAP, Puebla, Pue (Mexico); Silvia, Hidalgo Tobón, E-mail: shidbon@gmail.com [Infant Hospital of Mexico, Federico Gómez, Mexico DF. Mexico and Physics Department, Universidad Autónoma Metropolitana. Iztapalapa, Mexico DF. (Mexico); Pilar, Dies Suarez, E-mail: pilydies@yahoo.com, E-mail: neurodoc@prodigy.net.mx; Eduardo, Barragán Pérez, E-mail: pilydies@yahoo.com, E-mail: neurodoc@prodigy.net.mx [Infant Hospital of Mexico, Federico Gómez, Mexico DF. (Mexico); Benito, De Celis Alonso, E-mail: benileon@yahoo.com [Faculty of Physics and Mathematics, BUAP, Puebla, Pue. Mexico and Foundation for Development Carlos Sigüenza. Puebla, Pue. (Mexico)

    2014-11-07

    The main goal of this project was to create a computer algorithm based on wavelet analysis of BOLD signals, which automatically diagnosed ADHD using information from resting state MR experiments. Male right handed volunteers (infants with ages between 7 and 11 years old) were studied and compared with age matched controls. Wavelet analysis, which is a mathematical tool used to decompose time series into elementary constituents and detect hidden information, was applied here to the BOLD signal obtained from the cerebellum 8 region of all our volunteers. Statistical differences between the values of the a parameters of wavelet analysis was found and showed significant differences (p<0.02) between groups. This difference might help in the future to distinguish healthy from ADHD patients and therefore diagnose ADHD.

  7. Immunohistochemical detection of autophagy-related microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3 (LC3) in the cerebellums of dogs naturally infected with canine distemper virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabak, Y B; Sozmen, M; Yarim, M; Guvenc, T; Karayigit, M O; Gulbahar, M Y

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the expression of microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3 (LC3) protein in the cerebellums of dogs infected with canine distemper virus (CDV) using immunohistochemistry to detect autophagy. The cerebellums of 20 dogs infected with CDV were used. Specimens showing demyelination of white matter were considered to have an acute infection, whereas specimens showing signs of severe perivascular cuffing and demyelination of white matter were classified as having chronic CDV. Cerebellar sections were immunostained with CDV and LC3 antibodies. The cytoplasm of Purkinje cells, granular layer cells, motor neurons in large cerebellar ganglia and some neurons in white matter were positive for the LC3 antibody in both the control and CDV-infected dogs. In the infected cerebellums, however, white matter was immunostained more intensely, particularly the neurons and gemistocytic astrocytes in the demyelinated areas, compared to controls. Autophagy also was demonstrated in CDV-positive cells using double immunofluorescence staining. Our findings indicate that increased autophagy in the cerebellum of dogs naturally infected with CDV may play a role in transferring the virus from cell to cell.

  8. Organohalogen contaminants and metabolites in cerebrospinal fluid and cerebellum gray matter in short-beaked common dolphins and Atlantic white-sided dolphins from the western North Atlantic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montie, Eric W.; Reddy, Christopher M.; Gebbink, Wouter A.; Touhey, Katie E.; Hahn, Mark E.; Letcher, Robert J.

    2009-01-01

    Concentrations of several congeners and classes of organohalogen contaminants (OHCs) and/or their metabolites, namely organochlorine pesticides (OCs), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), hydroxylated-PCBs (OH-PCBs), methylsulfonyl-PCBs (MeSO 2 -PCBs), polybrominated diphenyl ether (PBDE) flame retardants, and OH-PBDEs, were measured in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of short-beaked common dolphins (n = 2), Atlantic white-sided dolphins (n = 8), and gray seal (n = 1) from the western North Atlantic. In three Atlantic white-sided dolphins, cerebellum gray matter (GM) was also analyzed. The levels of OCs, PCBs, MeSO 2 -PCBs, PBDEs, and OH-PBDEs in cerebellum GM were higher than the concentrations in CSF. 4-OH-2,3,3',4',5-pentachlorobiphenyl (4-OH-CB107) was the only detectable OH-PCB congener present in CSF. The sum (Σ) OH-PCBs/Σ PCB concentration ratio in CSF was approximately two to three orders of magnitude greater than the ratio in cerebellum GM for dolphins. - Organohalogens and/or metabolites in cerebrospinal fluid and cerebellum gray matter in short-beaked common dolphins, Atlantic white-sided dolphins, and gray seal.

  9. Cerebellum and cognition in multiple sclerosis: the fall status matters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalron, Alon; Allali, Gilles; Achiron, Anat

    2018-04-01

    Cerebellar volume has been linked with cognitive performances in MS; however, the association in terms of fall status has never been compared. Therefore, the objective of the current study was to compare cognitive performance with cerebellar volume between MS fallers and non-fallers. The cross-sectional study included 140 PwMS (96 women). MRI volumetric analysis was based on the FreeSurfer image analysis suite. Volumes of the cerebellar gray and white matter were identified as the region of interest. Cognitive function included scores obtained from a computerized cognitive battery of tests. The sample was divided into fallers and non-fallers. MS fallers demonstrated a lower global cognitive performance and reduced gray and white matter cerebellar volumes compared to non-fallers. A significant association was found between total gray and white matter cerebellar volume and visual spatial subdomain (P value = 0.044 and 0.032, respectively) in the non-fallers group. The association remained significant after controlling for the total cranial volume and neurological disability (P value = 0.026 and 0.047, respectively). A relationship was found between the visual spatial score and the left gray matter cerebellum volume; R 2  = 0.44, P value = 0.021. We believe that a unique relationship exists between the cerebellum structure and cognitive processing according to fall history in PwMS and should be considered when investigating the association between brain functioning and cognitive performances in MS.

  10. Discrepancy in compliance between the clinical and genetic diagnosis of choroidal hypoplasia in Danish Rough Collies and Shetland Sheepdogs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fredholm, Merete; Larsen, R. C.; Jönsson, M.

    2016-01-01

    Collie eye anomaly (CEA) is a congenital, inherited ocular disorder which is widespread in herding breeds. Clinically, the two major lesions associated with CEA are choroidal hypoplasia (CH) and coloboma, and both lesions are diagnosed based on ophthalmological examination. A 7.8-kb intronic dele...

  11. CDKL5 knockout leads to altered inhibitory transmission in the cerebellum of adult mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivilia, S; Mangano, C; Beggiato, S; Giuliani, A; Torricella, R; Baldassarro, V A; Fernandez, M; Lorenzini, L; Giardino, L; Borelli, A C; Ferraro, L; Calzà, L

    2016-06-01

    Mutations in the X-linked cyclin-dependent kinase-like 5 gene (CDKL5) are associated to severe neurodevelopmental alterations including motor symptoms. In order to elucidate the neurobiological substrate of motor symptoms in CDKL5 syndrome, we investigated the motor function, GABA and glutamate pathways in the cerebellum of CDKL5 knockout female mice. Behavioural data indicate that CDKL5-KO mice displayed impaired motor coordination on the Rotarod test, and altered steps, as measured by the gait analysis using the CatWalk test. A higher reduction in spontaneous GABA efflux, than that in glutamate, was observed in CDKL5-KO mouse cerebellar synaptosomes, leading to a significant increase of spontaneous glutamate/GABA efflux ratio in these animals. On the contrary, there were no differences between groups in K(+) -evoked GABA and glutamate efflux. The anatomical analysis of cerebellar excitatory and inhibitory pathways showed a selective defect of the GABA-related marker GAD67 in the molecular layer in CDKL5-KO mice, while the glutamatergic marker VGLUT1 was unchanged in the same area. Fine cerebellar structural abnormalities such as a reduction of the inhibitory basket 'net' estimated volume and an increase of the pinceau estimated volume were also observed in CDKL5-KO mice. Finally, the BDNF mRNA expression level in the cerebellum, but not in the hippocampus, was reduced compared with WT animals. These data suggest that CDKL5 deletion during development more markedly impairs the establishment of a correct GABAergic cerebellar network than that of glutamatergic one, leading to the behavioural symptoms associated with CDKL5 mutation. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd and International Behavioural and Neural Genetics Society.

  12. Low estriol levels in the maternal marker screen as a predictor of X-linked adrenal hypoplasia congenita: Case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Durković Jasmina

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. X-linked adrenal hypoplasia congenita (AHC is a rare cause of adrenocortical insufficiency. Early postnatal diagnosis may prevent severe hypoglycemia, Addisonian crises and death. Low maternal estriol (E3 levels in the second trimester of pregnancy could indicate the possibility that the fetus suffers from a disorder that causes adrenal insufficiency. Suspicion is based on the fact that E3 originates from dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA synthesized in the fetal adrenals. In case of adrenal insufficiency, the impaired production of fetal DHEA leads to a subsequent reduction of E3 concentrations in maternal serum. There are only a few reports of AHC suspected prenatally due to low maternal E3 levels. Case Outline. We describe two brothers with adrenal insufficiency due to AHC. The older brother was admitted to the hospital at the age of 33 days due to failure to thrive, vomiting, and dehydration. Genetic analysis revealed a hemizygous mutation in DAX-1 gene, thus confirming the diagnosis of ACH. The same mutation was detected in his mother. In the second pregnancy, E3 concentrations were determined from maternal serum. Estriol levels during the second trimester were extremely low suggesting the diagnosis of AHC. The diagnosis was confirmed during the neonatal period by genetic testing, and replacement therapy was started at the age of 10 days. This boy never experienced an adverse episode such as hypoglycemia or adrenal crises. Conclusion. Since determination of E3 is a simple, sensitive, noninvasive and cheap method, its use as an obligatory prenatal screening test should be accepted as a standard practice in Serbia.

  13. A deletion in the VLDLR gene in Eurasier dogs with cerebellar hypoplasia resembling a Dandy-Walker-like malformation (DWLM.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martina Gerber

    Full Text Available Dandy-Walker-like malformation (DWLM is the result of aberrant brain development and mainly characterized by cerebellar hypoplasia. DWLM affected dogs display a non-progressive cerebellar ataxia. Several DWLM cases were recently observed in the Eurasier dog breed, which strongly suggested a monogenic autosomal recessive inheritance in this breed. We performed a genome-wide association study (GWAS with 9 cases and 11 controls and found the best association of DWLM with markers on chromosome 1. Subsequent homozygosity mapping confirmed that all 9 cases were homozygous for a shared haplotype in this region, which delineated a critical interval of 3.35 Mb. We sequenced the genome of an affected Eurasier and compared it with the Boxer reference genome and 47 control genomes of dogs from other breeds. This analysis revealed 4 private non-synonymous variants in the critical interval of the affected Eurasier. We genotyped these variants in additional dogs and found perfect association for only one of these variants, a single base deletion in the VLDLR gene encoding the very low density lipoprotein receptor. This variant, VLDLR:c.1713delC is predicted to cause a frameshift and premature stop codon (p.W572Gfs*10. Variants in the VLDLR gene have been shown to cause congenital cerebellar ataxia and mental retardation in human patients and Vldlr knockout mice also display an ataxia phenotype. Our combined genetic data together with the functional knowledge on the VLDLR gene from other species thus strongly suggest that VLDLR:c.1713delC is indeed causing DWLM in Eurasier dogs.

  14. Unusual congenital pulmonary anomaly with presumed left lung hypoplasia in a young dog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, C M; Kim, J H; Kang, M H; Eom, K D; Park, H M

    2014-05-01

    A seven-month-old, entire, male miniature schnauzer dog was referred with acute vomiting, inappetence and depression primarily as a result of a gastric foreign body (pine cones). During investigations, thoracic radiographs revealed increased volume of the right lung lobes, deviated cardiomediastinal structures and elevation of the heart from the sternum. Thoracic computed tomography revealed left cranial lung lobe hypoplasia and extension of the right cranial lung parenchyma across the midline to the left hemithorax. Branches of the right pulmonary vessels and bronchi also crossed the midline and extended to the left caudal lung lobe. These findings suggested that the right and left lungs were fused. In humans this finding is consistent with horseshoe lung, which is an uncommon congenital malformation. To the authors' knowledge, this case represents the first report of such a pulmonary anomaly in a dog. © 2014 British Small Animal Veterinary Association.

  15. Isolated left-sided pulmonary artery agenesis with left lung hypoplasia: A report of two cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V Govindaraj

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Unilateral absence of pulmonary artery or pulmonary artery agenesis (UAPA is a rare congenital malformation that can present as an isolated lesion or in association with other cardiac anomalies. Though congenital, presentation in adults are also reported. Most common presentation in adults is of exercise intolerance. The developing lung on the affected side is hypoplastic. Diagnosis of UAPA is established by imaging methods like CT and MRI . There is no specific treatment for this condition. Treatment depends on patients symptomatology, presence of pulmonary hypertension and collateral circulation. Presence of pulmonary hypertension carries a bad prognosis. We present two adult patients with isolated left sided unilateral pulmonary artery agenesis with ipsilateral lung hypoplasia. The diagnosis was confirmed by CT chest and perfusion scan.

  16. Bilateral bony fusion around the supraspinatus muscle inducing muscle hypoplasia and shoulder pain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Son, YeNa; Jin, Wook; Park, So Young [Kyung Hee University Hospital at Gangdong, Department of Radiology, 892, Dongnam-ro, Gangdong-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Ryu, Kyung Nam; Park, Ji Seon [Kyung Hee University Hospital, Department of Radiology, 23 Kyunghee-daero, Dongdaemun-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-03-15

    We describe the case of a 30-year-old man who developed chronic bilateral shoulder pain that relapsed and remitted over the course of 1 year. The patient was diagnosed with congenital shoulder fusion anomalies. The right shoulder showed anomalous accessory articulation between the distal third of the clavicle and the acromion along with normal articulation of the shoulder on CT. At the left shoulder, bony fusions were present between the distal portion of the clavicle, the acromion, and the coracoid process, and between the coracoid process, upper portion of the glenoid, and upper body of the scapula, which formed a bony canal and was responsible for hypoplasia of the supraspinatus muscle on CT and MRI. To our knowledge, this is the first description of such congenital shoulder anomalies with extreme bony fusion and is an illustrative example of how imaging may be used to differentiate fusion from other congenital abnormalities of the shoulder to aid diagnosis. (orig.)

  17. [3H]GABA uptake as a marker for cell type in primary cultures of cerebellum and olfactory bulb

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Currie, D.N.; Dutton, G.R.

    1980-01-01

    Uptake of [ 3 H]GABA into cell cultures of rat cerebellum and olfactory bulb was studied by autoradiography, using β-alanine and aminocyclohexane carboxylic acid to distinguish neuronal-specific and glial-specific uptake. Neurons and astrocytes were also labelled by tetanus toxin and anti-GFAP respectively. This combination of markers allowed identification and quantification of several cell types. Cerebellar cultures were found to contain 77% granule neurons, 7.5% inhibitory neurons (probably stellate and basket cells) and 15% astrocytes. Olfactory bulb cultures were over 50% in small neurons which accumulated GABA, the olfactory bulb granule neuron being GABAergic in vivo. (Auth.)

  18. Perceptual Speech Assessment After Anterior Maxillary Distraction in Patients With Cleft Maxillary Hypoplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Sunil; Seelan, Nikkie S; Selvaraj, Dhivakar; Khandeparker, Rakshit V; Gnanamony, Sangeetha

    2016-06-01

    To assess speech outcomes after anterior maxillary distraction (AMD) in patients with cleft-related maxillary hypoplasia. Fifty-eight patients at least 10 years old with cleft-related maxillary hypoplasia were included in this study irrespective of gender, type of cleft lip and palate, and amount of required advancement. AMD was carried out in all patients using a tooth-borne palatal distractor by a single oral and maxillofacial surgeon. Perceptual speech assessment was performed by 2 speech language pathologists preoperatively, before placement of the distractor device, and 6 months postoperatively using the scoring system of Perkins et al (Plast Reconstr Surg 116:72, 2005); the system evaluates velopharyngeal insufficiency (VPI), resonance, nasal air emission, articulation errors, and intelligibility. The data obtained were tabulated and subjected to statistical analysis using Wilcoxon signed rank test. A P value less than .05 was considered significant. Eight patients were lost to follow-up. At 6-month follow-up, improvements of 62% (n = 31), 64% (n = 32), 50% (n = 25), 68% (n = 34), and 70% (n = 35) in VPI, resonance, nasal air emission, articulation, and intelligibility, respectively, were observed, with worsening of all parameters in 1 patient (2%). The results for all tested parameters were highly significant (P ≤ .001). AMD offers a substantial improvement in speech for all 5 parameters of perceptual speech assessment. Copyright © 2016 The American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Staged Transcatheter Treatment of Portal Hypoplasia and Congenital Portosystemic Shunts in Children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruckheimer, Elchanan; Dagan, Tamir; Atar, Eli; Schwartz, Michael; Kachko, Ludmila; Superina, Riccardo; Amir, Gabriel; Shapiro, Rivka; Birk, Einat

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Congenital portosystemic shunts (CPSS) with portal venous hypoplasia cause hyperammonemia. Acute shunt closure results in portal hypertension. A transcatheter method of staged shunt reduction to afford growth of portal vessels followed by shunt closure is reported. Methods: Pressure measurements and angiography in the CPSS or superior mesenteric artery (SMA) during temporary occlusion of the shunt were performed. If vessels were diminutive and the pressure was above 18 mmHg, a staged approach was performed, which included implantation of a tailored reducing stent to reduce shunt diameter by ∼50 %. Recatheterization was performed approximately 3 months later. If the portal pressure was below 18 mmHg and vessels had developed, the shunt was closed with a device. Results: Six patients (5 boys, 1 girl) with a median age of 3.3 (range 0.5–13) years had CPSS portal venous hypoplasia and hyperammonemia. Five patients underwent staged closure. One patient tolerated acute closure. One patient required surgical shunt banding because a reducing stent could not be positioned. At median follow-up of 3.8 (range 2.2–8.4) years, a total of 21 procedures (20 transcatheter, 1 surgical) were performed. In all patients, the shunt was closed with a significant reduction in portal pressure (27.7 ± 11.3 to 10.8 ± 1.8 mmHg; p = 0.016), significant growth of the portal vessels (0.8 ± 0.5 to 4.0 ± 2.4 mm; p = 0.037), and normalization of ammonia levels (202.1 ± 53.6 to 65.7 ± 9.6 μmol/L; p = 0.002) with no complications. Conclusion: Staged CPSS closure is effective in causing portal vessel growth and treating hyperammonemia

  20. X-linked adrenal hypoplasia congenita: a case report and ethical dilemma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismail, Heba M; Rincon, Marielisa

    2014-07-01

    Our objective is to present the first case report of X-linked adrenal hypoplasia congenita in a child conceived by a donated egg and which also presented atypically, with initial mineralocorticoid deficiency. Case report with literature review. A late preterm fraternal twin male, conceived by in vitro fertilization of donated eggs, presented shortly after birth with feeding intolerance, hyponatremia, and hyperkalemia. Testing revealed a low aldosterone level, high plasma renin activity, normal cortisol level, and normal 17-hydroxyprogesterone level. He was diagnosed with 18-hydroxylase deficiency based on low 18-hydroxycorticosterone levels and was treated with mineralocorticoid successfully for 17 months. At age 18 months, he presented with dehydration secondary to herpetic gingivostomatitis and was found to be hypoglycemic, hyponatremic, hyperkalemic, and acidotic, with a low serum cortisol level. An adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) stimulation test revealed low levels of all adrenal cortex products, with an elevated ACTH level. He was started on glucocorticoids. Genetic testing confirmed X-linked adrenal hypoplasia congenita (AHC). His asymptomatic fraternal twin underwent genetic testing and the results were negative. The fertility center records indicated that the mother had donated eggs to other families, but none of the children were known to have this disorder. The egg donor was informed but did not pursue genetic testing. We report a case of X-linked AHC presenting in the context of extraordinary ethical considerations. Our case raises a question unique to the era of assisted reproduction: should routine genetic screening of gamete donors be done for rare but potentially life-threatening conditions?

  1. Staged Transcatheter Treatment of Portal Hypoplasia and Congenital Portosystemic Shunts in Children

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruckheimer, Elchanan, E-mail: elchananb@bezeqint.net; Dagan, Tamir [Schneider Children' s Medical Center Israel, Section of Pediatric Cardiology (Israel); Atar, Eli; Schwartz, Michael [Schneider Children' s Medical Center Israel, Section of Radiology (Israel); Kachko, Ludmila [Schneider Children' s Medical Center Israel, Section of Anesthesiology (Israel); Superina, Riccardo; Amir, Gabriel [Schneider Children' s Medical Center Israel, Section of Pediatric Cardiology (Israel); Shapiro, Rivka [Schneider Children' s Medical Center Israel, Section of Gastroenterology (Israel); Birk, Einat [Schneider Children' s Medical Center Israel, Section of Pediatric Cardiology (Israel)

    2013-12-15

    Purpose: Congenital portosystemic shunts (CPSS) with portal venous hypoplasia cause hyperammonemia. Acute shunt closure results in portal hypertension. A transcatheter method of staged shunt reduction to afford growth of portal vessels followed by shunt closure is reported. Methods: Pressure measurements and angiography in the CPSS or superior mesenteric artery (SMA) during temporary occlusion of the shunt were performed. If vessels were diminutive and the pressure was above 18 mmHg, a staged approach was performed, which included implantation of a tailored reducing stent to reduce shunt diameter by {approx}50 %. Recatheterization was performed approximately 3 months later. If the portal pressure was below 18 mmHg and vessels had developed, the shunt was closed with a device. Results: Six patients (5 boys, 1 girl) with a median age of 3.3 (range 0.5-13) years had CPSS portal venous hypoplasia and hyperammonemia. Five patients underwent staged closure. One patient tolerated acute closure. One patient required surgical shunt banding because a reducing stent could not be positioned. At median follow-up of 3.8 (range 2.2-8.4) years, a total of 21 procedures (20 transcatheter, 1 surgical) were performed. In all patients, the shunt was closed with a significant reduction in portal pressure (27.7 {+-} 11.3 to 10.8 {+-} 1.8 mmHg; p = 0.016), significant growth of the portal vessels (0.8 {+-} 0.5 to 4.0 {+-} 2.4 mm; p = 0.037), and normalization of ammonia levels (202.1 {+-} 53.6 to 65.7 {+-} 9.6 {mu}mol/L; p = 0.002) with no complications. Conclusion: Staged CPSS closure is effective in causing portal vessel growth and treating hyperammonemia.

  2. Reliability of magnetic resonance imaging for the detection of hypopituitarism in children with optic nerve hypoplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramakrishnaiah, Raghu H; Shelton, Julie B; Glasier, Charles M; Phillips, Paul H

    2014-01-01

    It is essential to identify hypopituitarism in children with optic nerve hypoplasia (ONH) because they are at risk for developmental delay, seizures, or death. The purpose of this study is to determine the reliability of neurohypophyseal abnormalities on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for the detection of hypopituitarism in children with ONH. Cross-sectional study. One hundred one children with clinical ONH who underwent MRI of the brain and orbits and a detailed pediatric endocrinologic evaluation. Magnetic resonance imaging studies were performed on 1.5-Tesla scanners. The imaging protocol included sagittal T1-weighted images, axial fast fluid-attenuated inversion-recovery/T2-weighted images, and diffusion-weighted images of the brain. Orbital imaging included fat-saturated axial and coronal images and high-resolution axial T2-weighted images. The MRI studies were reviewed by 2 pediatric neuroradiologists for optic nerve hypoplasia, absent or ectopic posterior pituitary, absent pituitary infundibulum, absent septum pellucidum, migration anomalies, and hemispheric injury. Medical records were reviewed for clinical examination findings and endocrinologic status. All patients underwent a clinical evaluation by a pediatric endocrinologist and a standardized panel of serologic testing that included serum insulin-like growth factor-1, insulin-like growth factor binding protein-3, prolactin, cortisol, adrenocorticotropic hormone, thyroid-stimulating hormone, and free thyroxine levels. Radiologists were masked to patients' endocrinologic status and funduscopic findings. Sensitivity and specificity of MRI findings for the detection of hypopituitarism. Neurohypophyseal abnormalities, including absent pituitary infundibulum, ectopic posterior pituitary bright spot, and absent posterior pituitary bright spot, occurred in 33 children. Magnetic resonance imaging disclosed neurohypophyseal abnormalities in 27 of the 28 children with hypopituitarism (sensitivity, 96%). A

  3. PCB-INDUCED CHANGES IN THE DNA BINDING OF SEVERAL TRANSCRIPTION FACTORS IN THE DEVELOPING CEREBELLUM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) are a class of persistent chemical pollutants prevalent in the environment despite the ban of their use for decades. Disturbances in brain development and cognition are among the neurotoxic manifestations of PCBs. The cellular and molecular basis...

  4. The organization of the human cerebellum estimated by intrinsic functional connectivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krienen, Fenna M.; Castellanos, Angela; Diaz, Julio C.; Yeo, B. T. Thomas

    2011-01-01

    The cerebral cortex communicates with the cerebellum via polysynaptic circuits. Separate regions of the cerebellum are connected to distinct cerebral areas, forming a complex topography. In this study we explored the organization of cerebrocerebellar circuits in the human using resting-state functional connectivity MRI (fcMRI). Data from 1,000 subjects were registered using nonlinear deformation of the cerebellum in combination with surface-based alignment of the cerebral cortex. The foot, hand, and tongue representations were localized in subjects performing movements. fcMRI maps derived from seed regions placed in different parts of the motor body representation yielded the expected inverted map of somatomotor topography in the anterior lobe and the upright map in the posterior lobe. Next, we mapped the complete topography of the cerebellum by estimating the principal cerebral target for each point in the cerebellum in a discovery sample of 500 subjects and replicated the topography in 500 independent subjects. The majority of the human cerebellum maps to association areas. Quantitative analysis of 17 distinct cerebral networks revealed that the extent of the cerebellum dedicated to each network is proportional to the network's extent in the cerebrum with a few exceptions, including primary visual cortex, which is not represented in the cerebellum. Like somatomotor representations, cerebellar regions linked to association cortex have separate anterior and posterior representations that are oriented as mirror images of one another. The orderly topography of the representations suggests that the cerebellum possesses at least two large, homotopic maps of the full cerebrum and possibly a smaller third map. PMID:21795627

  5. The control of a manipulator by a computer model of the cerebellum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albus, J. S.

    1973-01-01

    Extension of previous work by Albus (1971, 1972) on the theory of cerebellar function to an application of a computer model of the cerebellum to manipulator control. Following a discussion of the cerebellar function and of a perceptron analogy of the cerebellum, particularly in regard to learning, an electromechanical model of the cerebellum is considered in the form of an IBM 1800 computer connected to a Rancho Los Amigos arm with seven degrees of freedom. It is shown that the computer memory makes it possible to train the arm on some representative sample of the universe of possible states and to achieve satisfactory performance.

  6. File list: His.Neu.20.AllAg.Cerebellum [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Neu.20.AllAg.Cerebellum mm9 Histone Neural Cerebellum SRX545939,SRX026427,SRX062951,SRX085450,SRX026429,SRX545929,SRX026428,SRX026430,SRX545934,SRX545933,SRX545924,SRX545923,SRX545926,SRX545940,SRX545936,SRX545935,SRX545938,SRX545937,SRX545928,SRX112921,SRX185818,SRX026433,SRX545930,SRX545925,SRX545927,SRX022870,SRX022871,SRX998311,SRX026434,SRX026432,SRX026431,SRX185811,SRX085441,SRX062950,SRX022869,SRX022868 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Neu.20.AllAg.Cerebellum.bed ...

  7. Aroclor 1254, a developmental neurotoxicant, alters energy metabolism- and intracellular signaling-associated protein networks in rat cerebellum and hippocampus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kodavanti, Prasada Rao S.; Osorio, Cristina; Royland, Joyce E.; Ramabhadran, Ram; Alzate, Oscar

    2011-01-01

    The vast literature on the mode of action of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) indicates that PCBs are a unique model for understanding the mechanisms of toxicity of environmental mixtures of persistent chemicals. PCBs have been shown to adversely affect psychomotor function and learning and memory in humans. Although the molecular mechanisms for PCB effects are unclear, several studies indicate that the disruption of Ca 2+ -mediated signal transduction plays significant roles in PCB-induced developmental neurotoxicity. Culminating events in signal transduction pathways include the regulation of gene and protein expression, which affects the growth and function of the nervous system. Our previous studies showed changes in gene expression related to signal transduction and neuronal growth. In this study, protein expression following developmental exposure to PCB is examined. Pregnant rats (Long Evans) were dosed with 0.0 or 6.0 mg/kg/day of Aroclor-1254 from gestation day 6 through postnatal day (PND) 21, and the cerebellum and hippocampus from PND14 animals were analyzed to determine Aroclor 1254-induced differential protein expression. Two proteins were found to be differentially expressed in the cerebellum following PCB exposure while 18 proteins were differentially expressed in the hippocampus. These proteins are related to energy metabolism in mitochondria (ATP synthase, sub unit β (ATP5B), creatine kinase, and malate dehydrogenase), calcium signaling (voltage-dependent anion-selective channel protein 1 (VDAC1) and ryanodine receptor type II (RyR2)), and growth of the nervous system (dihydropyrimidinase-related protein 4 (DPYSL4), valosin-containing protein (VCP)). Results suggest that Aroclor 1254-like persistent chemicals may alter energy metabolism and intracellular signaling, which might result in developmental neurotoxicity. -- Highlights: ► We performed brain proteomic analysis of rats exposed to the neurotoxicant, Aroclor 1254. ► Cerebellum and

  8. Cerebellum engages in automation of verb-generation skill.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhi; Wu, Paula; Weng, Xuchu; Bandettini, Peter A

    2014-03-01

    Numerous studies have shown cerebellar involvement in item-specific association, a form of explicit learning. However, very few have demonstrated cerebellar participation in automation of non-motor cognitive tasks. Applying fMRI to a repeated verb-generation task, we sought to distinguish cerebellar involvement in learning of item-specific noun-verb association and automation of verb generation skill. The same set of nouns was repeated in six verb-generation blocks so that subjects practiced generating verbs for the nouns. The practice was followed by a novel block with a different set of nouns. The cerebellar vermis (IV/V) and the right cerebellar lobule VI showed decreased activation following practice; activation in the right cerebellar Crus I was significantly lower in the novel challenge than in the initial verb-generation task. Furthermore, activation in this region during well-practiced blocks strongly correlated with improvement of behavioral performance in both the well-practiced and the novel blocks, suggesting its role in the learning of general mental skills not specific to the practiced noun-verb pairs. Therefore, the cerebellum processes both explicit verbal associative learning and automation of cognitive tasks. Different cerebellar regions predominate in this processing: lobule VI during the acquisition of item-specific association, and Crus I during automation of verb-generation skills through practice.

  9. [Pulmonary nocardiasis with abscesses spreading to cerebrum, cerebellum and orbits].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borchers, M; von der Mülbe, B; Teikemeier, F; Theegarten, D

    2006-05-12

    A 71-year-old woman presented with suspected tuberculosis. She reported having productive coughs, unwanted weight loss and subfebrile temperature in the preceding 3 months. She was known to have chronic obstructive pulmonary disease treated with corticoids given systemically and by inhalation. She was a heavy smoker. Computed tomography revealed a left apical lung abscess. In the further course of the disease magnetic resonance imaging of the head demonstrated multiple abscesses in both cerebral hemispheres and an abscess, 3.4 cm in diameter, in the right side of the cerebellum, as well as a intra-orbital tumor on the right. Needle aspirate of the eyeball grew Nocardia farcinica. Over 3 weeks antimicrobial treatment was given with imipenem and amikacin, followed by oral cotrimoxazole for 12 months. The abscesses completely regressed and after 12 months no recurrence was demonstrated either radiologically or clinically. Although nocardiasis is rare in Germany it must be included in the differential diagnosis of pneumonia with abscesses. This is especially so if acid-fast bacilli are found. As the resistance pattern of N. farcinica to antibiotics varies, early treatment is essential with antibiotics to which it is sensitive.

  10. Switching On Depression and Potentiation in the Cerebellum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew R. Gallimore

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Long-term depression (LTD and long-term potentiation (LTP in the cerebellum are important for motor learning. However, the signaling mechanisms controlling whether LTD or LTP is induced in response to synaptic stimulation remain obscure. Using a unified model of LTD and LTP at the cerebellar parallel fiber-Purkinje cell (PF-PC synapse, we delineate the coordinated pre- and postsynaptic signaling that determines the direction of plasticity. We show that LTP is the default response to PF stimulation above a well-defined frequency threshold. However, if the calcium signal surpasses the threshold for CaMKII activation, then an ultrasensitive “on switch” activates an extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK-based positive feedback loop that triggers LTD instead. This postsynaptic feedback loop is sustained by another, trans-synaptic, feedback loop that maintains nitric oxide production throughout LTD induction. When full depression is achieved, an automatic “off switch” inactivates the feedback loops, returning the network to its basal state and demarcating the end of the early phase of LTD.

  11. Dysplastic gangliocytoma of the cerebellum (Lhermitte-Duclos disease)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uki, Jiro; Kanda, Shinji; Asakura, Ken; Takeda, Fumikazu

    1985-01-01

    A case of dysplastic gangliocytoma of the cerebellum, or Lhermitte-Duclos disease, is reported along with its CT findings, and the cases so far reported in the literature are reviewed. This is the 50th case report since the first description in 1920. This 61-year-old female had suffered from right hemifacial spasms for more than 20 years and from bilateral tinnitus with auditory disturbances for two years. Four years before admission, she underwent gastric resection and cancer chemotherapy for gastric cancer. Plain craniograms showed a thinned and ballooned occipital squama on the right side. Vertebral angiograms revealed a large tumor stain, with early venous filling, in the right posterior fossa. A CT scan showed a large, low-density mass, with small calcified areas in it, in the right posterior fossa. A postcontrast CT scan revealed no contrast enhancement, except for dilated vascular enhancement, within the tumor. No hydrocephalus was observed. Metrizamide CT cisternography revealed a huge intraaxial mass compressing the brain stem. (J.P.N.)

  12. Ethanol Neurotoxicity in the Developing Cerebellum: Underlying Mechanisms and Implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ambrish Kumar

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Ethanol is the main constituent of alcoholic beverages that exerts toxicity to neuronal development. Ethanol affects synaptogenesis and prevents proper brain development. In humans, synaptogenesis takes place during the third trimester of pregnancy, and in rodents this period corresponds to the initial few weeks of postnatal development. In this period neuronal maturation and differentiation begin and neuronal cells start migrating to their ultimate destinations. Although the neuronal development of all areas of the brain is affected, the cerebellum and cerebellar neurons are more susceptible to the damaging effects of ethanol. Ethanol’s harmful effects include neuronal cell death, impaired differentiation, reduction of neuronal numbers, and weakening of neuronal plasticity. Neuronal development requires many hormones and growth factors such as retinoic acid, nerve growth factors, and cytokines. These factors regulate development and differentiation of neurons by acting through various receptors and their signaling pathways. Ethanol exposure during development impairs neuronal signaling mechanisms mediated by the N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA receptors, the retinoic acid receptors, and by growth factors such as brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF, insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-I, and basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF. In combination, these ethanol effects disrupt cellular homeostasis, reduce the survival and migration of neurons, and lead to various developmental defects in the brain. Here we review the signaling mechanisms that are required for proper neuronal development, and how these processes are impaired by ethanol resulting in harmful consequences to brain development.

  13. Tooth-Borne Anterior Maxillary Distraction for Cleft Maxillary Hypoplasia: Our Experience With 147 Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Sunil; Selvaraj, Dhivakar; Khandeparker, Rakshit V; Seelan, Nikkie S; Richardson, Shweta

    2016-12-01

    To evaluate the results of anterior maxillary distraction for its efficacy and long-term stability in the management of cleft maxillary hypoplasia in a large series of patients with a long-term follow-up extending to 4 years. One hundred sixty-four patients at least 10 years old with cleft maxillary hypoplasia who presented to the authors' unit from January 2009 through October 2014 were evaluated retrospectively, irrespective of gender, type of cleft lip and palate, and amount of advancement needed. Anterior maxillary distraction using a tooth-borne distractor appliance was carried out in all patients and all patients were followed up to 4 years (range, 1 to 4 yr) to evaluate the stability of the procedure and to document any relapse using digitalized lateral cephalograms taken before distraction, immediately after distraction (T2), and at the last follow-up visit (T3; range, 1 to 4 yr). Seventeen patients were subsequently lost to follow-up; therefore, a complete set of records was available for 147 patients. In a subset of 50 patients, perceptual speech assessment was carried out preoperatively and 6 months postoperatively by 2 speech pathologists using the Perkins scoring system that allowed the evaluation of 5 parameters (velopharyngeal insufficiency, resonance, nasal air emission, articulation, and intelligibility). None of these patients underwent speech therapy during the course of evaluation. The development of complications intra- or postoperatively was noted. The data were tabulated and analyzed. An advancement ranging from 4.0 to 13.1 mm (mean, 9.42 mm) was achieved in all patients. One hundred forty patients (95.23%) showed stable results on lateral cephalograms and when T2 values were compared with T3 values. Seven patients (4.76%) exhibited skeletal relapse in various linear and angular measurements assessed on lateral cephalograms. At 6-month follow-up, improvements of 62% (n = 31), 64% (n = 32), 50% (n = 25), 68% (n = 34), and 70% (n

  14. Exome sequencing reveals a de novo POLD1 mutation causing phenotypic variability in mandibular hypoplasia, deafness, progeroid features, and lipodystrophy syndrome (MDPL).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elouej, Sahar; Beleza-Meireles, Ana; Caswell, Richard; Colclough, Kevin; Ellard, Sian; Desvignes, Jean Pierre; Béroud, Christophe; Lévy, Nicolas; Mohammed, Shehla; De Sandre-Giovannoli, Annachiara

    2017-06-01

    Mandibular hypoplasia, deafness, progeroid features, and lipodystrophy syndrome (MDPL) is an autosomal dominant systemic disorder characterized by prominent loss of subcutaneous fat, a characteristic facial appearance and metabolic abnormalities. This syndrome is caused by heterozygous de novo mutations in the POLD1 gene. To date, 19 patients with MDPL have been reported in the literature and among them 14 patients have been characterized at the molecular level. Twelve unrelated patients carried a recurrent in-frame deletion of a single codon (p.Ser605del) and two other patients carried a novel heterozygous mutation in exon 13 (p.Arg507Cys). Additionally and interestingly, germline mutations of the same gene have been involved in familial polyposis and colorectal cancer (CRC) predisposition. We describe a male and a female patient with MDPL respectively affected with mild and severe phenotypes. Both of them showed mandibular hypoplasia, a beaked nose with bird-like facies, prominent eyes, a small mouth, growth retardation, muscle and skin atrophy, but the female patient showed such a severe and early phenotype that a first working diagnosis of Hutchinson-Gilford Progeria was made. The exploration was performed by direct sequencing of POLD1 gene exon 15 in the male patient with a classical MDPL phenotype and by whole exome sequencing in the female patient and her unaffected parents. Exome sequencing identified in the latter patient a de novo heterozygous undescribed mutation in the POLD1 gene (NM_002691.3: c.3209T>A), predicted to cause the missense change p.Ile1070Asn in the ZnF2 (Zinc Finger 2) domain of the protein. This mutation was not reported in the 1000 Genome Project, dbSNP and Exome sequencing databases. Furthermore, the Isoleucine1070 residue of POLD1 is highly conserved among various species, suggesting that this substitution may cause a major impairment of POLD1 activity. For the second patient, affected with a typical MDPL phenotype, direct sequencing

  15. TMS Over the Cerebellum Interferes with Short-term Memory of Visual Sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrari, C; Cattaneo, Z; Oldrati, V; Casiraghi, L; Castelli, F; D'Angelo, E; Vecchi, T

    2018-04-30

    Growing evidence suggests that the cerebellum is not only involved in motor functions, but it significantly contributes to sensory and cognitive processing as well. In particular, it has been hypothesized that the cerebellum identifies recurrent serial events and recognizes their violations. Here we used transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) to shed light on the role of the cerebellum in short-term memory of visual sequences. In two experiments, we found that TMS over the right cerebellar hemisphere impaired participants' ability to recognize the correct order of appearance of geometrical stimuli varying in shape and/or size. In turn, cerebellar TMS did not affect recognition of highly familiar short sequences of letters or numbers. Overall, our data suggest that the cerebellum is involved in memorizing the order in which (concatenated) stimuli appear, this process being important for sequence learning.

  16. A functional MRI study of somatotopic representation of somatosensory stimulation in the cerebellum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takanashi, M.; Abe, K.; Yanagihara, T.; Sakoda, S. [Dept. of Neurology D4, Osaka Univ. Graduate School of Medicine, Suita City, Osaka (Japan); Tanaka, H.; Hirabuki, N.; Nakamura, H.; Fujita, N. [Dept. of Radiology, Osaka Univ. Graduate School of Medicine, Suita City, Osaka (Japan)

    2003-03-01

    Somatotopic representation in the cerebral cortex of somatosensory stimulation has been widely reported, but that in the cerebellum has not. We investigated the latter in the human cerebellum by functional MRI (fMRI). Using a 1.5 tesla imager, we obtained multislice blood oxygen level-dependent fMRI with single-shot gradient-echo echoplanar imaging in seven right-handed volunteers during electrical stimulation of the left index finger and big toe. In the anterior and posterior cerebellum, activated pixels for the index finger were separate from those for the toe. This suggests that somatosensory stimulation of different parts of the body may involve distinct areas of in the cerebellum as well as the cerebral cortex. (orig.)

  17. A functional MRI study of somatotopic representation of somatosensory stimulation in the cerebellum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takanashi, M.; Abe, K.; Yanagihara, T.; Sakoda, S.; Tanaka, H.; Hirabuki, N.; Nakamura, H.; Fujita, N.

    2003-01-01

    Somatotopic representation in the cerebral cortex of somatosensory stimulation has been widely reported, but that in the cerebellum has not. We investigated the latter in the human cerebellum by functional MRI (fMRI). Using a 1.5 tesla imager, we obtained multislice blood oxygen level-dependent fMRI with single-shot gradient-echo echoplanar imaging in seven right-handed volunteers during electrical stimulation of the left index finger and big toe. In the anterior and posterior cerebellum, activated pixels for the index finger were separate from those for the toe. This suggests that somatosensory stimulation of different parts of the body may involve distinct areas of in the cerebellum as well as the cerebral cortex. (orig.)

  18. Computational Architecture of the Granular Layer of Cerebellum-Like Structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bratby, Peter; Sneyd, James; Montgomery, John

    2017-02-01

    In the adaptive filter model of the cerebellum, the granular layer performs a recoding which expands incoming mossy fibre signals into a temporally diverse set of basis signals. The underlying neural mechanism is not well understood, although various mechanisms have been proposed, including delay lines, spectral timing and echo state networks. Here, we develop a computational simulation based on a network of leaky integrator neurons, and an adaptive filter performance measure, which allows candidate mechanisms to be compared. We demonstrate that increasing the circuit complexity improves adaptive filter performance, and relate this to evolutionary innovations in the cerebellum and cerebellum-like structures in sharks and electric fish. We show how recurrence enables an increase in basis signal duration, which suggest a possible explanation for the explosion in granule cell numbers in the mammalian cerebellum.

  19. Selective survival of β1-adenergic receptors in rat cerebellum following neonatal X-irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minneman, K.P.; Pittman, R.N.; Wolfe, B.B.; Molinoff, P.B.

    1981-01-01

    To investigate the cellular localization of β 1 - and β 2 -adrenergic receptors, the effects of intermittent neonatal X-irradiation focused on the cerebellum were determined on the densities of the two subtypes of β-adrenergic receptor. This treatment destroys the late-maturing cerebellar interneurons including the granule, basket and stellate cells. The total number of β 2 -adrenergic receptors per cerebellum was reduced by 81-83% in 6- and 12-week-old X-irradiated rats. However, the number of β 1 -adrenergic receptors per cerebellum in 6- and 12-week-old X-irradiated rats was not significantly different from that in control animals. The results suggest that β 2 receptors in the rat cerebellum are primarily associated with the small interneurons destroyed by neonatal X-irradiation. The β 1 receptors may be located on a cell population which is unaffected by this treatment, possibly on cerebellar Purkinje cells. (Auth.)

  20. The cerebellum: its role in language and related cognitive and affective functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Smet, Hyo Jung; Paquier, Philippe; Verhoeven, Jo; Mariën, Peter

    2013-12-01

    The traditional view on the cerebellum as the sole coordinator of motor function has been substantially redefined during the past decades. Neuroanatomical, neuroimaging and clinical studies have extended the role of the cerebellum to the modulation of cognitive and affective processing. Neuroanatomical studies have demonstrated cerebellar connectivity with the supratentorial association areas involved in higher cognitive and affective functioning, while functional neuroimaging and clinical studies have provided evidence of cerebellar involvement in a variety of cognitive and affective tasks. This paper reviews the recently acknowledged role of the cerebellum in linguistic and related cognitive and behavioral-affective functions. In addition, typical cerebellar syndromes such as the cerebellar cognitive affective syndrome (CCAS) and the posterior fossa syndrome (PFS) will be briefly discussed and the current hypotheses dealing with the presumed neurobiological mechanisms underlying the linguistic, cognitive and affective modulatory role of the cerebellum will be reviewed. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Psychophysiological interaction between superior temporal gyrus (STG) and cerebellum: An fMRI study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yusoff, A. N.; Teng, X. L.; Ng, S. B.; Hamid, A. I. A.; Mukari, S. Z. M.

    2016-03-01

    This study aimed to model the psychophysiological interaction (PPI) between the bilateral STG and cerebellum (lobule VI and lobule VII) during an arithmetic addition task. Eighteen young adults participated in this study. They were instructed to solve single-digit addition tasks in quiet and noisy backgrounds during an fMRI scan. Results showed that in both hemispheres, the response in the cerebellum was found to be linearly influenced by the activity in STG (vice-versa) for both in-quiet and in-noise conditions. However, the influence of the cerebellum on STG seemed to be modulated by noise. A two-way PPI model between STG and cerebellum is suggested. The connectivity between the two regions during a simple addition task in a noisy condition is modulated by the participants’ higher attention to perceive.

  2. The Cerebellum and Its Wrapping Meninge: Developmental Interplay between Two Major Structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catala, Martin

    2017-10-01

    Meninges have long been considered as a protective and supportive tissue for the central nervous system. Nevertheless, new developmental roles are now attributed to them. The meninges that surround the cerebellum come from the cephalic mesoderm. They are essential for the cerebellum to develop normally. They induce and maintain the basal lamina and glia limitans. In the absence of these structures, the external granular cells of the cerebellum migrate aberrantly and penetrate the subarachnoid space. The molecules involved in the recognition between the cerebellar primordium and the basal lamina belong to two groups in humans: dystroglycan and laminin on the one hand, and GPR56 and collagen III on the other. Finally, molecules secreted by the meninges and acting on the cerebellum begin to be demonstrated; such is the case of SDF1 secreted under the action of FOXC1. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  3. Neuro-protective effects of Crocin on brain and cerebellum tissues in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... make the neurons and astrocytes more sensitive against oxidative damage. ... Malondialdehyde (MDA), glutathione (GSH), blood glucose, HbA1c levels and ... appearence of the cerebrum and cerebellum were normal in the control group.

  4. Transient developmental Purkinje cell axonal torpedoes in healthy and ataxic mouse cerebellum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lovisa Ljungberg

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Information is carried out of the cerebellar cortical microcircuit via action potentials propagated along Purkinje cell axons. In several human neurodegenerative diseases, focal axonal swellings on Purkinje cells – known as torpedoes – have been associated with Purkinje cell loss. Interestingly, torpedoes are also reported to appear transiently during development in rat cerebellum. The function of Purkinje cell axonal torpedoes in health as well as in disease is poorly understood. We investigated the properties of developmental torpedoes in the postnatal mouse cerebellum of wildtype and transgenic mice. We found that Purkinje cell axonal torpedoes transiently appeared on axons of Purkinje neurons, with the largest number of torpedoes observed at postnatal day 11 (P11. This was after peak developmental apoptosis had occurred, when Purkinje cell counts in a lobule were static, suggesting that most developmental torpedoes appear on axons of neurons that persist into adulthood. We found that developmental torpedoes were not associated with a presynaptic GABAergic marker, indicating that they are not synapses. They were seldom found at axonal collateral branch points, and lacked microglia enrichment, suggesting that they are unlikely to be involved in axonal refinement. Interestingly, we found several differences between developmental torpedoes and disease-related torpedoes: developmental torpedoes occured largely on myelinated axons, and were not associated with changes in basket cell innervation on their parent soma. Disease-related torpedoes are typically reported to contain neurofilament; while the majority of developmental torpedoes did as well, a fraction of smaller developmental torpedoes did not. These differences indicate that developmental torpedoes may not be functionally identical to disease-related torpedoes. To study this further, we used a mouse model of spinocerebellar ataxia type 6 (SCA6, and found elevated disease

  5. Prevalence of dental anomalies and enamel hypoplasia in primary dentition among preschool children of West Godavari District, Andhra Pradesh -A cross - sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzan Sahana

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: It is axiomatic that Pediatric dental anomalies and enamel hypoplasia (E.H are routinely encountered in primary dentition and early detection and prudent management of the condition facilitates normal occlusal development. Objectives: To determine the prevalence of various dental anomalies and enamel hypoplasia in preschool children between two to six years of age. Materials & Method: A total of 1898 children, between two to six years were randomly selected and screened for dental anomalies and enamel hypoplasia The chi square test was used to analyze the data statistically. Results: The overall prevalence rate of dental anomalies and enamel hypoplasia in this study was 0.63% and 8.95% respectively. Double teeth were the most frequently reported dental anomaly while supernumerary teeth were least reported. None of them reported with hypodontia.

  6. CT volumetry of lumbar vertebral bodies in patients with hypoplasia L5 and bilateral spondylolysis and in normal controls

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilms, Guido E.; Demaerel, Philippe; Keyzer, Frederik de; Willems, Endry

    2012-01-01

    To examine the feasibility and results of calculating the volume of lumbar vertebral bodies in normal patients and patients with suspected hypoplasia of L5. Lumbar multi-detector CT was performed in 38 patients with bilateral spondylolysis and hypoplasia of L5 and in 38 normal patients. Lumbar vertebral body volume of L3, L4 and L5 was measured by CT volumetry with a semi-automated program, created with MeVisLab. In the control group, the average vertebral body volume (in cubic centimeters) of L3 was 35.93 (±7.33), 36.34 (±7.13) for L4 and 34.63 (±6.88) for L5. In patients with suspected hypoplasia L5 the average body volume (in cubic centimeters) of L3 was 36.85 (±7.37), 36.90 (±6.99) for L4 and 33.14 (±6.57) for L5. The difference in mean vertebral body volume for L3, L4 and L5 between both groups was statistically not significant. However, there was a statistically significant difference of the ratio L5/L4 (P < 0.001) between both groups: the mean ratio L5/L4 in the control group was 95.3 ± 3.9%, the ratio for the hypoplastic L5 group was 89.9 ± 6.3%. There was no significant difference in the vertebral body volume for L3, L4 and L5 between both groups due to inter-patient variability. However, the relation between the body volume of L5 and L4 is significantly different between both groups. The volume of the vertebral body of L5 proved to be on average 10.2% smaller than the volume of L4 in the group with hypoplasia L5 versus 4.7% in the control group. (orig.)

  7. CT volumetry of lumbar vertebral bodies in patients with hypoplasia L5 and bilateral spondylolysis and in normal controls

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilms, Guido E.; Demaerel, Philippe; Keyzer, Frederik de [UZ Leuven, Campus Gasthuisberg, Department of Radiology, Leuven (Belgium); Willems, Endry [ZOL, Department of Radiology, Genk (Belgium)

    2012-08-15

    To examine the feasibility and results of calculating the volume of lumbar vertebral bodies in normal patients and patients with suspected hypoplasia of L5. Lumbar multi-detector CT was performed in 38 patients with bilateral spondylolysis and hypoplasia of L5 and in 38 normal patients. Lumbar vertebral body volume of L3, L4 and L5 was measured by CT volumetry with a semi-automated program, created with MeVisLab. In the control group, the average vertebral body volume (in cubic centimeters) of L3 was 35.93 ({+-}7.33), 36.34 ({+-}7.13) for L4 and 34.63 ({+-}6.88) for L5. In patients with suspected hypoplasia L5 the average body volume (in cubic centimeters) of L3 was 36.85 ({+-}7.37), 36.90 ({+-}6.99) for L4 and 33.14 ({+-}6.57) for L5. The difference in mean vertebral body volume for L3, L4 and L5 between both groups was statistically not significant. However, there was a statistically significant difference of the ratio L5/L4 (P < 0.001) between both groups: the mean ratio L5/L4 in the control group was 95.3 {+-} 3.9%, the ratio for the hypoplastic L5 group was 89.9 {+-} 6.3%. There was no significant difference in the vertebral body volume for L3, L4 and L5 between both groups due to inter-patient variability. However, the relation between the body volume of L5 and L4 is significantly different between both groups. The volume of the vertebral body of L5 proved to be on average 10.2% smaller than the volume of L4 in the group with hypoplasia L5 versus 4.7% in the control group. (orig.)

  8. Characterization of beta-adrenergic receptors in synaptic membranes from rat cerebral cortex and cerebellum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lautens, L.

    1986-01-01

    Beta-adrenergic receptor ligand binding sites have been characterized in synaptic membranes from rat cerebral cortex and cerebellum using radioligand binding techniques. The equilibrium and kinetic properties of binding were assessed. The binding sites were non-interacting and exhibited two states of agonist binding which were sensitive to guanyl nucleotide. Synaptic membranes from cerebral cortex contained an equal number of beta 1 - and beta 2 -receptors; membranes from cerebellum possessed more beta 2 -than beta 1 -receptors. Photoaffinity labeling experiments revealed two different beta-adrenergic receptor polypeptides, R 1 and R 2 (and possibly a third, R 3 ) in synaptic membranes. The ratios of incorporation of photoaffinity label into R 1 : 2 were approximately 1:1 (cerebral cortex) and 5:1 (cerebellum). Photoaffinity labeling of R 1 and R 2 was inhibited equally well by both agonist and antagonist in synaptic membranes from cerebellum; whereas agonist was a less potent inhibitor in membranes from cerebral cortex. Both subtypes of beta-adrenergic receptors exhibited the same apparent molecular weight in synaptic membranes from cerebral cortex. The beta-adrenergic receptors in synaptic membranes from cerebral cortex and cerebellum were glycoproteins which exhibited the same apparent molecular weight after exposure to endoglycosidase F. The partial proteolytic digest maps of photoaffinity labeled beta-adrenergic receptors from rat cerebral cortex, cerebellum, lung and heart were compared

  9. Quantifying Cerebellum Grey Matter and White Matter Perfusion Using Pulsed Arterial Spin Labeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiufeng Li

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available To facilitate quantification of cerebellum cerebral blood flow (CBF, studies were performed to systematically optimize arterial spin labeling (ASL parameters for measuring cerebellum perfusion, segment cerebellum to obtain separate CBF values for grey matter (GM and white matter (WM, and compare FAIR ASST to PICORE. Cerebellum GM and WM CBF were measured with optimized ASL parameters using FAIR ASST and PICORE in five subjects. Influence of volume averaging in voxels on cerebellar grey and white matter boundaries was minimized by high-probability threshold masks. Cerebellar CBF values determined by FAIR ASST were 43.8 ± 5.1 mL/100 g/min for GM and 27.6 ± 4.5 mL/100 g/min for WM. Quantitative perfusion studies indicated that CBF in cerebellum GM is 1.6 times greater than that in cerebellum WM. Compared to PICORE, FAIR ASST produced similar CBF estimations but less subtraction error and lower temporal, spatial, and intersubject variability. These are important advantages for detecting group and/or condition differences in CBF values.

  10. Quantifying cerebellum grey matter and white matter perfusion using pulsed arterial spin labeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiufeng; Sarkar, Subhendra N; Purdy, David E; Briggs, Richard W

    2014-01-01

    To facilitate quantification of cerebellum cerebral blood flow (CBF), studies were performed to systematically optimize arterial spin labeling (ASL) parameters for measuring cerebellum perfusion, segment cerebellum to obtain separate CBF values for grey matter (GM) and white matter (WM), and compare FAIR ASST to PICORE. Cerebellum GM and WM CBF were measured with optimized ASL parameters using FAIR ASST and PICORE in five subjects. Influence of volume averaging in voxels on cerebellar grey and white matter boundaries was minimized by high-probability threshold masks. Cerebellar CBF values determined by FAIR ASST were 43.8 ± 5.1 mL/100 g/min for GM and 27.6 ± 4.5 mL/100 g/min for WM. Quantitative perfusion studies indicated that CBF in cerebellum GM is 1.6 times greater than that in cerebellum WM. Compared to PICORE, FAIR ASST produced similar CBF estimations but less subtraction error and lower temporal, spatial, and intersubject variability. These are important advantages for detecting group and/or condition differences in CBF values.

  11. Quantifying Cerebellum Grey Matter and White Matter Perfusion Using Pulsed Arterial Spin Labeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiufeng; Sarkar, Subhendra N.; Purdy, David E.; Briggs, Richard W.

    2014-01-01

    To facilitate quantification of cerebellum cerebral blood flow (CBF), studies were performed to systematically optimize arterial spin labeling (ASL) parameters for measuring cerebellum perfusion, segment cerebellum to obtain separate CBF values for grey matter (GM) and white matter (WM), and compare FAIR ASST to PICORE. Cerebellum GM and WM CBF were measured with optimized ASL parameters using FAIR ASST and PICORE in five subjects. Influence of volume averaging in voxels on cerebellar grey and white matter boundaries was minimized by high-probability threshold masks. Cerebellar CBF values determined by FAIR ASST were 43.8 ± 5.1 mL/100 g/min for GM and 27.6 ± 4.5 mL/100 g/min for WM. Quantitative perfusion studies indicated that CBF in cerebellum GM is 1.6 times greater than that in cerebellum WM. Compared to PICORE, FAIR ASST produced similar CBF estimations but less subtraction error and lower temporal, spatial, and intersubject variability. These are important advantages for detecting group and/or condition differences in CBF values. PMID:24949416

  12. Cell-type-specific expression of NFIX in the developing and adult cerebellum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraser, James; Essebier, Alexandra; Gronostajski, Richard M; Boden, Mikael; Wainwright, Brandon J; Harvey, Tracey J; Piper, Michael

    2017-07-01

    Transcription factors from the nuclear factor one (NFI) family have been shown to play a central role in regulating neural progenitor cell differentiation within the embryonic and post-natal brain. NFIA and NFIB, for instance, promote the differentiation and functional maturation of granule neurons within the cerebellum. Mice lacking Nfix exhibit delays in the development of neuronal and glial lineages within the cerebellum, but the cell-type-specific expression of this transcription factor remains undefined. Here, we examined the expression of NFIX, together with various cell-type-specific markers, within the developing and adult cerebellum using both chromogenic immunohistochemistry and co-immunofluorescence labelling and confocal microscopy. In embryos, NFIX was expressed by progenitor cells within the rhombic lip and ventricular zone. After birth, progenitor cells within the external granule layer, as well as migrating and mature granule neurons, expressed NFIX. Within the adult cerebellum, NFIX displayed a broad expression profile, and was evident within granule cells, Bergmann glia, and interneurons, but not within Purkinje neurons. Furthermore, transcriptomic profiling of cerebellar granule neuron progenitor cells showed that multiple splice variants of Nfix are expressed within this germinal zone of the post-natal brain. Collectively, these data suggest that NFIX plays a role in regulating progenitor cell biology within the embryonic and post-natal cerebellum, as well as an ongoing role within multiple neuronal and glial populations within the adult cerebellum.

  13. Functional imaging of the cerebellum and basal ganglia during predictive motor timing in early Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Husárová, Ivica; Lungu, Ovidiu V; Mareček, Radek; Mikl, Michal; Gescheidt, Tomáš; Krupa, Petr; Bareš, Martin

    2014-01-01

    The basal ganglia and the cerebellum have both emerged as important structures involved in the processing of temporal information. We examined the roles of the cerebellum and striatum in predictive motor timing during a target interception task in healthy individuals (HC group; n = 21) and in patients with early Parkinson's disease (early stage PD group; n = 20) using functional magnetic resonance imaging. Despite having similar hit ratios, the PD failed more often than the HC to postpone their actions until the right moment and to adapt their behavior from one trial to the next. We found more activation in the right cerebellar lobule VI in HC than in early stage PD during successful trials. Successful trial-by-trial adjustments were associated with higher activity in the right putamen and lobule VI of the cerebellum in HC. We conclude that both the cerebellum and striatum are involved in predictive motor timing tasks. The cerebellar activity is associated exclusively with the postponement of action until the right moment, whereas both the cerebellum and striatum are needed for successful adaptation of motor actions from one trial to the next. We found a general ''hypoactivation'' of basal ganglia and cerebellum in early stage PD relative to HC, indicating that even in early stages of the PD there could be functional perturbations in the motor system beyond striatum. Copyright © 2011 by the American Society of Neuroimaging.

  14. Contributions of the cerebellum to disturbed central processing of visceral stimuli in irritable bowel syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenberger, Christina; Thürling, Markus; Forsting, Michael; Elsenbruch, Sigrid; Timmann, Dagmar; Gizewski, Elke R

    2013-04-01

    There is evidence to support that the cerebellum contributes to the neural processing of both emotions and painful stimuli. This could be particularly relevant in conditions associated with chronic abdominal pain, such as the irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), which are often also characterized by affective disturbances. We aimed to test the hypothesis that in IBS, symptoms of anxiety and depression modulate brain activation during visceral stimulation within the cerebellum. We reanalyzed a previous data set from N = 15 female IBS patients and N = 12 healthy women with a specific focus on the cerebellum using advanced normalization methods. Rectal distension-induced brain activation was measured with functional magnetic resonance imaging using non-painful and painful rectal distensions. Symptoms of anxiety and depression, assessed with the Hospital Anxiety and Depression scale, were correlated with cerebellar activation within IBS patients. Within IBS, depression scores were associated with non-painful distension-induced activation in the right cerebellum primarily in Crus II and lobule VIIIb, and additionally in Crus I. Depression scores were also associated with painful distension-induced activation predominantly in vermal lobule V with some extension to the intermediate cerebellum. Anxiety scores correlated significantly with non-painful induced activation in Crus II. Symptoms of anxiety and depression, which are frequently found in chronic pain conditions like IBS, modulate activation during visceral sensory signals not only in cortical and subcortical brain areas but also in the cerebellum.

  15. Moving Forward: Age Effects on the Cerebellum Underlie Cognitive and Motor Declines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernard, Jessica A.; Seidler, Rachael D.

    2014-01-01

    Though the cortical contributions to age-related declines in motor and cognitive performance are well-known, the potential contributions of the cerebellum are less clear. The diverse functions of the cerebellum make it an important structure to investigate in aging. Here, we review the extant literature on this topic. To date, there is evidence to indicate that there are morphological age differences in the cerebellum that are linked to motor and cognitive behavior. Cerebellar morphology is often as good as -- or even better -- at predicting performance than the prefrontal cortex. We also touch on the few studies using functional neuroimaging and connectivity analyses that further implicate the cerebellum in age-related performance declines. Importantly, we provide a conceptual framework for the cerebellum influencing age differences in performance, centered on the notion of degraded internal models. The evidence indicating that cerebellar age differences associate with performance highlights the need for additional work in this domain to further elucidate the role of the cerebellum in age differences in movement control and cognitive function. PMID:24594194

  16. Cerebellar nicotinic cholinergic receptors are intrinsic to the cerebellum: implications for diverse functional roles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Jill R; Ortinski, Pavel I; Sherrard, Rachel M; Kellar, Kenneth J

    2011-12-01

    Although recent studies have delineated the specific nicotinic subtypes present in the mammalian cerebellum, very little is known about their location or function within the cerebellum. This is of increased interest since nicotinic receptors (nAChRs) in the cerebellum have recently been implicated in the pathology of autism spectrum disorders. To begin to better understand the roles of these heteromeric nAChRs in the cerebellar circuitry and their therapeutic potential as targets for drug development, we used various chemical and stereotaxic lesion models in conjunction with slice electrophysiology to examine how specific heteromeric nAChR subtypes may influence the surrounding cerebellar circuitry. Using subunit-specific immunoprecipitation of radiolabeled nAChRs in the cerebella following N-(2-chloroethyl)-N-ethyl-2-bromobenzylamine hydrochloride, p-chloroamphetamine, and pendunculotomy lesions, we show that most, if not all, cerebellar nicotinic receptors are present in cells within the cerebellum itself and not in extracerebellar afferents. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the β4-containing, but not the β2-containing, nAChRs intrinsic to the cerebellum can regulate inhibitory synaptic efficacy at two major classes of cerebellar neurons. These tandem findings suggest that nAChRs may present a potential drug target for disorders involving the cerebellum.

  17. Detection of increased frequency of thyroid hypoplasia in subjects irradiated in utero as the results of Chernobyl catastrophe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drozd, V.; Danilova, L.; Lushchyk, M.; Leonova, T.; Platonova, T. [International Fund Arnica, Minsk (Belarus); Grigorovich, A.; Sivuda, V. [Brest Regional Endocrinological Dispensary, Brest (Belarus); Branovan, I. [Chernobyl Project, New-York (United States); Biko, I.; Reiners, C. [Clinic and Policlinic of Nuclear Medicine, University of Wurzburg, Wursburg (Germany)

    2012-07-01

    For the 24 years passed after the Chernobyl catastrophe a significant experience in estimation of medical consequences of thyroid irradiation among Belarus patients had been accumulated. The aim of our screening of ultrasonic examination was the detection of the thyroid hypoplasia prevalence in the regions affected with radionuclide fallout. Since 2004 to 2007 thyroid ultrasound with volume estimation was performed in 3311 Belarus subjects, living on the areas of Brest region with the different contamination rate density. Examined subjects were divided in 3 groups: 1) irradiated at the age of 1 to 3 years old at the moment of Chernobyl catastrophe, 2) irradiated in utero, and 3) born after the catastrophe. It was revealed that thyroid hypoplasia was detected in 3% of group 1 (out of 1876 persons), in 5, 8% of group 2 (out of 503 persons, P<0.05) and in 1, 7% of the third group (out of 932 persons). The separation of the irradiated in utero subjects (group 2) to subgroups in dependence of the gestation period, showed the highest prevalence of thyroid hypoplasia among the irradiated in the first trimester of gestation: 7, 7% (P<0.05), in the second trimester: 5, 3%, in the third trimester: 4, 7%

  18. Detection of increased frequency of thyroid hypoplasia in subjects irradiated in utero as the results of Chernobyl catastrophe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drozd, V.; Danilova, L.; Lushchyk, M.; Leonova, T.; Platonova, T.; Grigorovich, A.; Sivuda, V.; Branovan, I.; Biko, I.; Reiners, C.

    2012-01-01

    For the 24 years passed after the Chernobyl catastrophe a significant experience in estimation of medical consequences of thyroid irradiation among Belarus patients had been accumulated. The aim of our screening of ultrasonic examination was the detection of the thyroid hypoplasia prevalence in the regions affected with radionuclide fallout. Since 2004 to 2007 thyroid ultrasound with volume estimation was performed in 3311 Belarus subjects, living on the areas of Brest region with the different contamination rate density. Examined subjects were divided in 3 groups: 1) irradiated at the age of 1 to 3 years old at the moment of Chernobyl catastrophe, 2) irradiated in utero, and 3) born after the catastrophe. It was revealed that thyroid hypoplasia was detected in 3% of group 1 (out of 1876 persons), in 5, 8% of group 2 (out of 503 persons, P<0.05) and in 1, 7% of the third group (out of 932 persons). The separation of the irradiated in utero subjects (group 2) to subgroups in dependence of the gestation period, showed the highest prevalence of thyroid hypoplasia among the irradiated in the first trimester of gestation: 7, 7% (P<0.05), in the second trimester: 5, 3%, in the third trimester: 4, 7%

  19. [Bilateral hypoplasia of the internal carotid arteries associated with aneurysm of the right posterior communicating artery. Apropos of a case].

    Science.gov (United States)

    el Khamlichi, A; Amrani, F; el Azzusi, M; el Oufir, M; Khamlichi, A M

    1989-01-01

    The authors report a case of bilateral hypoplasia of the internal carotid arteries associated with aneurysm of the right posterior communicating artery in a 17 year old female patient. This anomaly was discovered following a meningeal haemorrhage, which recurred 18 months later, causing the patient's death. Surgical operation was refused by the patient and her family. Bilateral hypoplasia of the internal carotid arteries is a rare congenital malformation (16 cases have been reported in the literature, our case constitutes the 17th). It is distinguished from aplasia by the presence of a patent but very reduced vascular lumen, while aplasia is associated with vestiges of non-patent vessels. The mechanism of development of such a malformation is unclear: some authors have suggested secondary regression of the internal carotid artery following a phase of normal development, while others consider it to represent arrest of the development of the internal carotid artery, at a given moment in time. The frequency of associated aneurysm would be due to the haemodynamic disruption induced by the malformation, especially as parietal defects are more frequent in a malformed vasculature. Bilateral hypoplasia of the internal carotid arteries may be compatible with normal life for an indefinite period of time due to the development of a large number of collateral vessels. However, the new vasculature is threatened by rupture with meningeal haemorrhage and by acute ischaemia, which would probably involve another aetiological factor.

  20. Adrenal hypoplasia congenita: a rare cause of primary adrenal insufficiency and hypogonadotropic hypogonadism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Loureiro

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Primary adrenal insufficiency is defined by the impaired synthesis of adrenocortical hormones due to an intrinsic disease of the adrenal cortex. Determining its etiology is crucial to allow adequate long-term management and genetic counseling. We report the case of a male adolescent that presented in the neonatal period with adrenal crisis and received replacement therapy for primary adrenal insufficiency. During follow-up, adrenal hypoplasia congenita (AHC was suspected given his persistently raised adrenocorticotropic hormone levels, with markedly low 17-OH progesterone and androstenedione levels. DNA sequence analysis revealed a mutation in NR0B1 gene (c.1292delG, confirming the diagnosis. Delayed puberty and persistent low levels of gonadotropins led to testosterone replacement therapy. X-linked AHC is a rare cause of primary adrenal insufficiency and hypogonadotropic hypogonadism, related to mutations in NR0B1 gene. Despite its rarity, AHC should be considered in patients who present with primary adrenal failure, low levels of 17-OH progesterone and hypogonadotropic hypogonadism.

  1. Recessive mutations in SLC38A8 cause foveal hypoplasia and optic nerve misrouting without albinism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poulter, James A; Al-Araimi, Musallam; Conte, Ivan; van Genderen, Maria M; Sheridan, Eamonn; Carr, Ian M; Parry, David A; Shires, Mike; Carrella, Sabrina; Bradbury, John; Khan, Kamron; Lakeman, Phillis; Sergouniotis, Panagiotis I; Webster, Andrew R; Moore, Anthony T; Pal, Bishwanath; Mohamed, Moin D; Venkataramana, Anandula; Ramprasad, Vedam; Shetty, Rohit; Saktivel, Murugan; Kumaramanickavel, Govindasamy; Tan, Alex; Mackey, David A; Hewitt, Alex W; Banfi, Sandro; Ali, Manir; Inglehearn, Chris F; Toomes, Carmel

    2013-12-05

    Foveal hypoplasia and optic nerve misrouting are developmental defects of the visual pathway and only co-occur in connection with albinism; to date, they have only been associated with defects in the melanin-biosynthesis pathway. Here, we report that these defects can occur independently of albinism in people with recessive mutations in the putative glutamine transporter gene SLC38A8. Nine different mutations were identified in seven Asian and European families. Using morpholino-mediated ablation of Slc38a8 in medaka fish, we confirmed that pigmentation is unaffected by loss of SLC38A8. Furthermore, by undertaking an association study with SNPs at the SLC38A8 locus, we showed that common variants within this gene modestly affect foveal thickness in the general population. This study reveals a melanin-independent component underpinning the development of the visual pathway that requires a functional role for SLC38A8. Copyright © 2013 The American Society of Human Genetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Growth, nutritional, and gastrointestinal aspects of focal dermal hypoplasia (Goltz-Gorlin syndrome).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motil, Kathleen J; Fete, Mary; Fete, Timothy J

    2016-03-01

    Focal dermal hypoplasia (FDH) is a rare genetic disorder caused by mutations in the PORCN gene located on the X-chromosome. In the present study, we characterized the pattern of growth, body composition, and the nutritional and gastrointestinal aspects of children and adults (n = 19) affected with this disorder using clinical anthropometry and a survey questionnaire. The mean birth length (P < 0.06) and weight (P < 0.001) z-scores of the participants were lower than the reference population. The mean head circumference (P < 0.001), height (length) (P < 0.001), weight (P < 0.01), and BMI (P < 0.05) for age z-scores of the participants were lower than the reference population. The height-for-age and weight-for-age z-scores of the participants did not differ significantly between birth and current measurements. Three-fourths of the group reported having one or more nutritional or gastrointestinal problems including short stature (65%), underweight (77%), oral motor dysfunction (41%), gastroesophageal reflux (24%), gastroparesis (35%), and constipation (35%). These observations provide novel clinical information about growth, body composition, and nutritional and gastrointestinal aspects of children and adults with FDH and underscore the importance of careful observation and early clinical intervention in the care of individuals affected with this disorder. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Enamel hypoplasias and physiological stress in the Sima de los Huesos Middle Pleistocene hominins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunha, E; Rozzi, F Ramirez; Bermúdez de Castro, J M; Martinón-Torres, M; Wasterlain, S N; Sarmiento, S

    2004-11-01

    This study presents an analysis of linear enamel hypoplasias (LEH) and plane-form defects (PFD) in the hominine dental sample from the Sima de los Huesos (SH) Middle Pleistocene site in Atapuerca (Spain). The SH sample comprises 475 teeth, 467 permanent and 8 deciduous, belonging to a minimum of 28 individuals. The method for recording PFD and LEH is discussed, as well as the definition of LEH. The prevalence of LEH and PFD in SH permanent dentition (unilateral total count) is 4.6% (13/280). Only one deciduous tooth (lower dc) showed an enamel disruption. Prevalence by individual ranges from 18.7-30%. The most likely explanation for the relatively low LEH and PFD prevalence in the SH sample suggests that the SH population exhibited a low level of developmental stress. The age at occurrence of LEH and PFD was determined by counting the number of perikymata between each lesion and the cervix of the tooth. Assuming a periodicity of nine days for the incremental lines, the majority of LEH in the SH sample occurred during the third year of life and may be related to the metabolic stress associated with weaning.

  4. Vertebral Artery Hypoplasia and Posterior Circulation Infarction in Patients with Isolated Vertigo with Stroke Risk Factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Dao Pei; Lu, Gui Feng; Zhang, Jie Wen; Zhang, Shu Ling; Ma, Qian Kun; Yin, Suo

    2017-02-01

    We aimed in this study to investigate the prevalence of vertebral artery hypoplasia (VAH) in a population with isolated vertigo in association with stroke risk factors, to determine whether VAH is an independent risk factor for posterior circulation infarction (PCI). We sequentially enrolled 245 patients with isolated vertigo with at least 1 vascular risk factor, who were divided into PCI and non-PCI groups, according to present signs of acute infarction on diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging. All patients underwent magnetic resonance angiography and cervical contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography to screen for VAH. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses were performed to identify the significant risk factors for PCI. VAH was found in 64 of 245 patients (26%). VAH (odds ratio [OR] = 2.70, 95%confidence interval [CI] 1.17-6.23, P = .020), median stenosis of the posterior circulation (OR = 7.09, 95%CI = 2.54-19.79, P vertigo with PCI complicated by VAH was mainly small-artery occlusion. Our findings suggest that VAH is an independent risk factor for PCI in patients with isolated vertigo with confirmed risk from stroke. Copyright © 2017 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Constitutive Activation of Smoothened in the Renal Collecting Ducts Leads to Renal Hypoplasia, Hydronephrosis, and Hydroureter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Deepak Prasad; Hwang, Jae-Won; Cho, Eui-Sic; Kim, Won; Song, Chang Ho; Chai, Ok Hee

    2017-01-01

    Sonic Hedgehog (Shh) signaling plays a major role in and is essential for regulation, patterning, and proliferation during renal development. Smoothened (Smo) plays a pivot role in transducing the Shh-glioma-associated oncogene Kruppel family member. However, the cellular and molecular mechanism underlying the role of sustained Smo activation in postnatal kidney development is still not clearly understood. Using a conditional knockin mouse model that expresses a constitutively activated form of Smo (SmoM2) upon Homeobox-B7-mediated recombination (Hoxb7-Cre), the effects of Shh signaling were determined in postnatal kidney development. SmoM2;Hoxb7-Cre mutant mice showed growth retardation with a reduction of body weight. Constitutive activation of Smo in the renal collecting ducts caused renal hypoplasia, hydronephrosis, and hydroureter. The parenchymal area and glomerular numbers were reduced, but the glomerular density was increased in SmoM2;Hoxb7-Cre mutant mice. The expression of Patched 1, the receptor of Shh and a downstream target gene of the Shh signaling pathway, was highly restricted and it was upregulated in the inner medullary collecting ducts of the kidney. The proliferative cells in the mesenchyme and collecting ducts were decreased in SmoM2;Hoxb7-Cre mutant mice. This study showed for the first time that sustained Smo inhibits postnatal kidney development by suppressing the proliferation of the mesenchyme and medullary collecting ducts in mice. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  6. Spondylolysis and isthmic spondylolisthesis: impact of vertebral hypoplasia on the use of the Meyerding classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niggemann, P; Kuchta, J; Grosskurth, D; Beyer, H K; Hoeffer, J; Delank, K S

    2012-04-01

    Spondylolysis and isthmic spondylolisthesis are common multifactorial disorders. The extent of slipping of the spondylolytic vertebra is considered a major predicator for prognosis and further follow-up. Vertebral hypoplasia is a common finding associated with spondylolysis. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the incidence of hypoplastic vertebral bodies in patients with spondylolysis and in the general population and to analyse the impact of the findings on the measurement and grading of spondylolisthesis. 140 patients with 141 levels of spondylolysis identified by MRI were included in this study. The slippage of the spondylolytic vertebral body and the size in the midline sagittal image were measured and correlated. In addition, a randomised control group was evaluated to test the hypothesis that shortened, hypoplastic vertebral bodies can also be found in the general population. Shortened, hypoplastic vertebrae were found in 50 patients with spondylolysis and none was found in the control group. These shortened vertebrae mimicked spondylolisthesis and in 19 patients the slippage equalled the shortening, thus mimicking spondylolisthesis, although only spondylolysis was present. Sagittal shortening of the spondylolytic vertebra is common and may mimic spondylolisthesis. In order to define and measure spondylolisthesis the shortening of the spondylolytic vertebra has to be taken into account.

  7. Abnormal platelet-derived growth factor signaling accounting for lung hypoplasia in experimental congenital diaphragmatic hernia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dingemann, Jens; Doi, Takashi; Ruttenstock, Elke; Puri, Prem

    2010-10-01

    The pathogenesis of pulmonary hypoplasia in congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH) is not fully understood. Platelet-derived growth factor A (PDGFA) and platelet-derived growth factor receptor α (PDGFRα) play a crucial role in lung development. It has been reported that PDGF induces H(2)O(2)-production and that oxidative stress may be an important mechanism for the impaired lung development in the nitrofen rat model. We hypothesized that pulmonary expression of PDGFA and PDGFRα is altered in the nitrofen induced CDH model. Pregnant rats received 100 mg nitrofen or vehicle on gestational day 9 (D9) and were sacrificed on D15, D18 or D21. RNA was extracted from fetal left lungs and mRNA levels of PDGFA and PDGFRα were determined using real-time polymerase chain reaction. Immunohistochemistry for protein expression of PDGFA and PDGFRα was performed. Pulmonary H(2)O(2) was measured colorimetrically. mRNA levels of PDGFRα at D15 (4.50 ± 0.87) and PDGFA at D18 (2.90 ± 1.38) were increased in the nitrofen group (P stress during lung development. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Yeast artificial chromosome cloning in the glycerol kinase and adrenal hypoplasia congenita region of Xp21

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Worley, K.C.; Ellison, K.A.; Zhang, Y.H.; Wang, D.F.; Mason, J.; Roth, E.J.; Adams, V.; Fogt, D.D.; Zhu, X.M.; Towbin, J.A. [Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX (United States)] [and others

    1993-05-01

    The adrenal hypoplasia congenita (AHC) and glycerol kinase (GK) loci are telomeric to the Duchenne muscular dystrophy locus in Xp21. The authors developed a pair of yeast artificial chromosome (YAC) contigs spanning at least 1.2 Mb and encompassing the region from the telomeric end of the Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) locus to beyond YHX39 (DXS727), including the genes for AHC and GK. The centromeric contig consists of 13 YACs reaching more than 600 kb from DMD through GK. The telomeric contig group consists of 8 YACs containing more than 600 kb including the markers YHX39 (DXS727) and QST-59 (DXS319). Patient deletion breakpoints in the region of the two YAC contigs define at least eight intervals, and seven deletion breakpoints are contained within these contigs. In addition to the probes developed from YAC ends, they have mapped eight Alu-PCR probes amplified from a radiation-reduced somatic cell hybrid, two anonymous DNA probes, and one Alu-PCR product amplified from a cosmid end, for a total of 26 new markers within this region of 2 Mb or less. One YAC in the centromeric contig contains an insert encompassing the minimum interval for GK deficiency defined by patient deletion breakpoints, and this clone includes all or part of the GK gene. 33 refs., 3 figs., 5 tabs.

  9. Serum prolactin concentrations in relation to hypopituitarism and obesity in children with optic nerve hypoplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vedin, Amy M; Garcia-Filion, Pamela; Fink, Cassandra; Borchert, Mark; Geffner, Mitchell E

    2012-01-01

    The majority of children with optic nerve hypoplasia (ONH) develop hypopituitarism and many also become obese. These associated conditions are a major cause of morbidity and are possibly due to hypothalamic dysfunction. Because mild hyperprolactinemia often occurs in subjects with disorders of the hypothalamus, we examined whether hyperprolactinemia was present in children with ONH during the first 3 years of life and whether it was a marker for hypopituitarism and/or obesity. Data were retrospectively analyzed from a registry study of children with ONH. The initial serum prolactin was obtained prior to age 36 months (n = 125) and compared with pituitary function and body mass index at age 5. 72% of subjects had an elevated initial serum prolactin and 60% had hypopituitarism. An elevated initial prolactin was associated with hypopituitarism (OR 2.58; 95% CI 1.16, 5.73), specifically with growth hormone deficiency (OR 2.77; 95% CI 1.21, 6.34). 31% of subjects had a body mass index ≥ 85th percentile, but this did not correlate with initial hyperprolactinemia. Early hyperprolactinemia correlates with the presence of hypopituitarism in children with ONH, but it is not a reliable prognosticator of hypopituitarism. Additionally, hyperprolactinemia does not predict future weight excess. Copyright © 2012 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  10. EXTRAPULMONARY SEQUESTRATION WITH PULMONARY HYPOPLASIA AND MULTICYSTIC RENAL DYSPLASIA : A RARE CASE REPORT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anita

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Pulmonary sequestration is a rare anomaly which consists of the presence of pulmonary tissue that is not attached to the rest of the lung and does not communicate with the trachea. [1] It could be intrapulmonary or extrapulmonary. We report a case of extrapulmonary sequestration with brief review of literature. A 22 years old primigravida underwent an ultrasonography at 24 weeks of gestation which revealed a single live fetus with bilateral pleural effusion, fetal hydrops and the fetal thorax showed mediastinal shift to the right. A hyperechoic mass was present in the left thoracic cavity with a systemic blood supply to it. Termination of pregnancy was advised as the findings were incompatible with life and the fetus autopsied. Significant gross findings were a hypoplastic left lung, a grey - white spongy mass adjacent to the left lung but no t attached to it and present outside the pleural cavity which derived its blood supply via a branch from the thoracic aorta and caused a shift in the mediastinal structures to the right. Both kidneys showed multiple cystic spaces. Microscopically the mass showed multiple cystically dilated alveolar spaces and ducts lined by cuboidal to tall columnar epithelium, the left lung showed features of pulmonary hypoplasia and the microscopic findings in both the kidneys were suggestive of multicystic renal dysplasi a. Hence, it was reported as a case of left sided extrapulmonary sequestration with hypoplastic left lung and bilateral renal cystic dysplasia.

  11. Compliance between clinical and genetic diagnosis of choroidal hypoplasia in 103 Norwegian Border Collie puppies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grosås, Siv; Lingaas, Frode; Prestrud, Kristin Wear; Ropstad, Ernst-Otto

    2017-11-07

    To describe the frequency of the nonhomologous end-joining factor 1 (NHEJ1) mutation and the compliance between clinical and genetic diagnosis of choroidal hypoplasia (CH) in a group of Norwegian Border Collies. Border collie puppies in the age from 5 to 8 weeks. Puppies included in the study had a complete ophthalmological examination. All findings were recorded, and an ECVO scheme form was issued for each puppy. DNA samples were achieved from buccal swabs. Genetic typing was performed for the 7.8-kb deletion in the gene encoding NHEJ1. Dogs with none, one, or two copies of the mutated allele were classified as free, carriers, and affected, respectively. 103 Border Collie puppies from 16 litters, 52 females and 51 males, were included in the study. Ages ranged from 5.1 to 8.9 weeks. One puppy had clinical findings consistent with CH and optic nerve coloboma compatible with the diagnosis Collie Eye Anomaly (CEA). Findings on ophthalmological examination of the remaining puppies were within normal limits. On genetic testing, 85 puppies were clear of the mutation in the NHEJ1 gene, 17 puppies were carriers, and one puppy was genetically affected. A good compliance between the clinical diagnosis and the genetic test results was found in all of the puppies examined. The allele frequency of the mutation was 6.3%. © 2017 American College of Veterinary Ophthalmologists.

  12. Linking Essential Tremor to the Cerebellum-Animal Model Evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handforth, Adrian

    2016-06-01

    In this review, we hope to stimulate interest in animal models as opportunities to understand tremor mechanisms within the cerebellar system. We begin by considering the harmaline model of essential tremor (ET), which has ET-like anatomy and pharmacology. Harmaline induces the inferior olive (IO) to burst fire rhythmically, recruiting rhythmic activity in Purkinje cells (PCs) and deep cerebellar nuclei (DCN). This model has fostered the IO hypothesis of ET, which postulates that factors that promote excess IO, and hence PC complex spike synchrony, also promote tremor. In contrast, the PC hypothesis postulates that partial PC cell loss underlies tremor of ET. We describe models in which chronic partial PC loss is associated with tremor, such as the Weaver mouse, and others with PC loss that do not show tremor, such as the Purkinje cell degeneration mouse. We postulate that partial PC loss with tremor is associated with terminal axonal sprouting. We then discuss tremor that occurs with large lesions of the cerebellum in primates. This tremor has variable frequency and is an ataxic tremor not related to ET. Another tremor type that is not likely related to ET is tremor in mice with mutations that cause prolonged synaptic GABA action. This tremor is probably due to mistiming within cerebellar circuitry. In the final section, we catalog tremor models involving neurotransmitter and ion channel perturbations. Some appear to be related to the IO hypothesis of ET, while in others tremor may be ataxic or due to mistiming. In summary, we offer a tentative framework for classifying animal action tremor, such that various models may be considered potentially relevant to ET, subscribing to IO or PC hypotheses, or not likely relevant, as with mistiming or ataxic tremor. Considerable further research is needed to elucidate the mechanisms of tremor in animal models.

  13. Grey matter volume in the cerebellum is related to the processing of grammatical rules in a second language: a structural voxel-based morphometry study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pliatsikas, Christos; Johnstone, Tom; Marinis, Theodoros

    2014-02-01

    The experience of learning and using a second language (L2) has been shown to affect the grey matter (GM) structure of the brain. Importantly, GM density in several cortical and subcortical areas has been shown to be related to performance in L2 tasks. Here, we show that bilingualism can lead to increased GM volume in the cerebellum, a structure that has been related to the processing of grammatical rules. Additionally, the cerebellar GM volume of highly proficient L2 speakers is correlated to their performance in a task tapping on grammatical processing in an L2, demonstrating the importance of the cerebellum for the establishment and use of grammatical rules in an L2.

  14. Microarray Analysis Reveals Higher Gestational Folic Acid Alters Expression of Genes in the Cerebellum of Mice Offspring—A Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subit Barua

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Folate is a water-soluble vitamin that is critical for nucleotide synthesis and can modulate methylation of DNA by altering one-carbon metabolism. Previous studies have shown that folate status during pregnancy is associated with various congenital defects including the risk of aberrant neural tube closure. Maternal exposure to a methyl supplemented diet also can alter DNA methylation and gene expression, which may influence the phenotype of offspring. We investigated if higher gestational folic acid (FA in the diet dysregulates the expression of genes in the cerebellum of offspring in C57BL/6 J mice. One week before gestation and throughout the pregnancy, groups of dams were supplemented with FA either at 2 mg/kg or 20 mg/kg of diet. Microarray analysis was used to investigate the genome wide gene expression profile in the cerebellum from day old pups. Our results revealed that exposure to the higher dose FA diet during gestation dysregulated expression of several genes in the cerebellum of both male and female pups. Several transcription factors, imprinted genes, neuro-developmental genes and genes associated with autism spectrum disorder exhibited altered expression levels. These findings suggest that higher gestational FA potentially dysregulates gene expression in the offspring brain and such changes may adversely alter fetal programming and overall brain development.

  15. The quantification of COMT mRNA in post mortem cerebellum tissue: diagnosis, genotype, methylation and expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Craig Ian W

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The COMT gene is located on chromosome 22q11, a region strongly implicated in the aetiology of several psychiatric disorders, in particular schizophrenia. Previous research has suggested that activity and expression of COMT is altered in schizophrenia, and is mediated by one or more polymorphisms within the gene, including the functional Val158Met polymorphism. Method In this study we examined the expression levels of COMT mRNA using quantitative RT-PCR in 60 post mortem cerebellum samples derived from individuals with schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, depression, and no history of psychopathology. Furthermore, we have examined the methylation status of two CpG sites in the promoter region of the gene. Results We found no evidence of altered COMT expression or methylation in any of the psychiatric diagnoses examined. We did, however, find evidence to suggest that genotype is related to COMT gene expression, replicating the findings of two previous studies. Specifically, val158met (rs165688; Val allele rs737865 (G allele and rs165599 (G allele all showed reduced expression (P COMT expression, with females exhibiting significantly greater levels of COMT mRNA. Conclusion The expression of COMT does not appear to be altered in the cerebellum of individuals suffering from schizophrenia, bipolar disorder or depression, but does appear to be influenced by single nucleotide polymorphisms within the gene.

  16. The contributions of the cerebellum in sensorimotor control: what are the prevailing opinions which will guide forthcoming studies?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manto, Mario; Oulad Ben Taib, Nordeyn

    2013-06-01

    Although considerable progress has been made in developing models of cerebellar function in sensorimotor control, the exact nature of the basic operations performed by the cerebellum remain elusive. Several major theories have emerged these last decades. According to the hypothesis of Marr and Albus, the climbing fiber input carries an error signal weakening the strength of a subset of parallel fibers/Purkinje neurons synapses in the cerebellar cortex. Cerebellar circuits would gain the control of movement through trial and error. The hypothesis of internal models emulating movements is currently highly cited. There is a general agreement that (1) the central nervous system has to cope with an intrinsic time delay of sensory feedback related to motor activities and (2) estimations of future motor states are essential to perform fast and accurate movements. According to this second theory, cerebellar dysmetria, one of the cardinal cerebellar deficits, would result from a distorted predictive control. A third popular theory relates to the inverse models that would be stored in the cerebellum. Acquisition of a motor act would require forward models, and the acquisition process itself would generate an inverse model to allow an unconscious coordinated movement. Recently, an international panel of experts from various disciplines discussed the prevailing opinions in a consensus statement and tried to extract their clinical relevance in terms of pathogenesis of the clinical symptoms. Although a consensus is still not reached, the prevailing opinions provide a sound framework to conduct novel studies and try to discover the secrets of cerebellar circuits.

  17. Frequency and developmental timing of linear enamel hypoplasia defects in Early Archaic Texan hunter-gatherers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Colette Berbesque

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Digital photographs taken under controlled conditions were used to examine the incidence of linear enamel hypoplasia defects (LEHs in burials from the Buckeye Knoll archaeological site (41VT98 Victoria county, Texas, which spans the Early to Late Archaic Period (ca. 2,500–6,500 BP uncorrected radiocarbon. The majority (68 of 74 burials date to the Texas Early Archaic, including one extremely early burial dated to 8,500 BP. The photogrammetric data collection method also results in an archive for Buckeye Knoll, a significant rare Archaic period collection that has been repatriated and reinterred. We analyzed the incidence and developmental timing of LEHs in permanent canines. Fifty-nine percent of permanent canines (n = 54 had at least one defect. There were no significant differences in LEH frequency between the maxillary and mandibular canines (U = 640.5, n1 = 37, n2 = 43, p = .110. The sample studied (n = 92 permanent canines had an overall mean of 0.93 LEH defect per tooth, with a median of one defect, and a mode of zero defects. Average age at first insult was 3.92 (median = 4.00, range = 2.5–5.4 and the mean age of all insults per individual was 4.18 years old (range = 2.5–5.67. Age at first insult is consistent with onset of weaning stress—the weaning age range for hunter-gatherer societies is 1–4.5. Having an earlier age of first insult was associated with having more LEHs (n = 54, rho = −0.381, p = 0.005.

  18. Contribution of the supplementary motor area and the cerebellum to the anticipatory postural adjustments and execution phases of human gait initiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richard, Aliénor; Van Hamme, Angèle; Drevelle, Xavier; Golmard, Jean-Louis; Meunier, Sabine; Welter, Marie-Laure

    2017-09-01

    Several brain structures including the brainstem, the cerebellum and the frontal cortico-basal ganglia network, with the primary and premotor areas have been shown to participate in the functional organization of gait initiation and postural control in humans, but their respective roles remain poorly understood. The aim of this study was to better understand the role of the supplementary motor area (SMA) and posterior cerebellum in the gait initiation process. Gait initiation parameters were recorded in 22 controls both before and after continuous theta burst transcranial stimulation (cTBS) of the SMA and cerebellum, and were compared to sham stimulation, using a randomized double-blind design study. The two phases of gait initiation process were analyzed: anticipatory postural adjustments (APAs) and execution, with recordings of soleus and tibialis anterior muscles. Functional inhibition of the SMA led to a shortened APA phase duration with advanced and increased muscle activity; during execution, it also advanced muscle co-activation and decreased the duration of stance soleus activity. Cerebellar functional inhibition did not influence the APA phase duration and amplitude but increased muscle co-activation, it decreased execution duration and showed a trend to increase velocity, with increased swing soleus muscle duration and activity. The results suggest that the SMA contributes to both the timing and amplitude of the APAs with no influence on step execution and the posterior cerebellum in the coupling between the APAs and execution phases and leg muscle activity pattern during gait initiation. Copyright © 2017 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Potassium Bromate-induced Changes in the Adult Mouse Cerebellum Are Ameliorated by Vanillin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Saad, Hajer; Driss, Dorra; Jaballi, Imen; Ghozzi, Hanen; Boudawara, Ons; Droguet, Michael; Magné, Christian; Nasri, Monsef; Zeghal, Khaled Mounir; Hakim, Ahmed; Ben Amara, Ibtissem

    2018-02-01

    The current study aimed to elucidate the effect of vanillin on behavioral changes, oxidative stress, and histopathological changes induced by potassium bromate (KBrO3), an environmental pollutant, in the cerebellum of adult mice. The animals were divided into four groups: group 1 served as a control, group 2 received KBrO3, group 3 received KBrO3 and vanillin, and group 4 received only vanillin. We then measured behavioral changes, oxidative stress, and molecular and histological changes in the cerebellum. We observed significant behavioral changes in KBrO3-exposed mice. When investigating redox homeostasis in the cerebellum, we found that mice treated with KBrO3 had increased lipid peroxidation and protein oxidation in the cerebellum. These effects were accompanied by decreased Na+-K+ and Mg2+ ATPase activity and antioxidant enzyme gene expression when compared to the control group. Additionally, there was a significant increase in cytokine gene expression in KBrO3-treated mice. Microscopy revealed that KBrO3 intoxication resulted in numerous degenerative changes in the cerebellum that were substantially ameliorated by vanillin supplementation. Co-administration of vanillin blocked the biochemical and molecular anomalies induced by KBrO3. Our results demonstrate that vanillin is a potential therapeutic agent for oxidative stress associated with neurodegenerative diseases. Copyright © 2018 The Editorial Board of Biomedical and Environmental Sciences. Published by China CDC. All rights reserved.

  20. The cerebro-cerebellum: Could it be loci of forward models?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikawa, Takahiro; Tomatsu, Saeka; Izawa, Jun; Kakei, Shinji

    2016-03-01

    It is widely accepted that the cerebellum acquires and maintain internal models for motor control. An internal model simulates mapping between a set of causes and effects. There are two candidates of cerebellar internal models, forward models and inverse models. A forward model transforms a motor command into a prediction of the sensory consequences of a movement. In contrast, an inverse model inverts the information flow of the forward model. Despite the clearly different formulations of the two internal models, it is still controversial whether the cerebro-cerebellum, the phylogenetically newer part of the cerebellum, provides inverse models or forward models for voluntary limb movements or other higher brain functions. In this article, we review physiological and morphological evidence that suggests the existence in the cerebro-cerebellum of a forward model for limb movement. We will also discuss how the characteristic input-output organization of the cerebro-cerebellum may contribute to forward models for non-motor higher brain functions. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  1. Generalized role for the cerebellum in encoding internal models: evidence from semantic processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moberget, Torgeir; Gullesen, Eva Hilland; Andersson, Stein; Ivry, Richard B; Endestad, Tor

    2014-02-19

    The striking homogeneity of cerebellar microanatomy is strongly suggestive of a corresponding uniformity of function. Consequently, theoretical models of the cerebellum's role in motor control should offer important clues regarding cerebellar contributions to cognition. One such influential theory holds that the cerebellum encodes internal models, neural representations of the context-specific dynamic properties of an object, to facilitate predictive control when manipulating the object. The present study examined whether this theoretical construct can shed light on the contribution of the cerebellum to language processing. We reasoned that the cerebellum might perform a similar coordinative function when the context provided by the initial part of a sentence can be highly predictive of the end of the sentence. Using functional MRI in humans we tested two predictions derived from this hypothesis, building on previous neuroimaging studies of internal models in motor control. First, focal cerebellar activation-reflecting the operation of acquired internal models-should be enhanced when the linguistic context leads terminal words to be predictable. Second, more widespread activation should be observed when such predictions are violated, reflecting the processing of error signals that can be used to update internal models. Both predictions were confirmed, with predictability and prediction violations associated with increased blood oxygenation level-dependent signal in the posterior cerebellum (Crus I/II). Our results provide further evidence for cerebellar involvement in predictive language processing and suggest that the notion of cerebellar internal models may be extended to the language domain.

  2. The mystery of the cerebellum: clues from experimental and clinical observations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrenson, Charlotte; Bares, Martin; Kamondi, Anita; Kovács, Andrea; Lumb, Bridget; Apps, Richard; Filip, Pavel; Manto, Mario

    2018-01-01

    The cerebellum has a striking homogeneous cytoarchitecture and participates in both motor and non-motor domains. Indeed, a wealth of evidence from neuroanatomical, electrophysiological, neuroimaging and clinical studies has substantially modified our traditional view on the cerebellum as a sole calibrator of sensorimotor functions. Despite the major advances of the last four decades of cerebellar research, outstanding questions remain regarding the mechanisms and functions of the cerebellar circuitry. We discuss major clues from both experimental and clinical studies, with a focus on rodent models in fear behaviour, on the role of the cerebellum in motor control, on cerebellar contributions to timing and our appraisal of the pathogenesis of cerebellar tremor. The cerebellum occupies a central position to optimize behaviour, motor control, timing procedures and to prevent body oscillations. More than ever, the cerebellum is now considered as a major actor on the scene of disorders affecting the CNS, extending from motor disorders to cognitive and affective disorders. However, the respective roles of the mossy fibres, the climbing fibres, cerebellar cortex and cerebellar nuclei remains unknown or partially known at best in most cases. Research is now moving towards a better definition of the roles of cerebellar modules and microzones. This will impact on the management of cerebellar disorders.

  3. Arrangement and Applying of Movement Patterns in the Cerebellum Based on Semi-supervised Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solouki, Saeed; Pooyan, Mohammad

    2016-06-01

    Biological control systems have long been studied as a possible inspiration for the construction of robotic controllers. The cerebellum is known to be involved in the production and learning of smooth, coordinated movements. Therefore, highly regular structure of the cerebellum has been in the core of attention in theoretical and computational modeling. However, most of these models reflect some special features of the cerebellum without regarding the whole motor command computational process. In this paper, we try to make a logical relation between the most significant models of the cerebellum and introduce a new learning strategy to arrange the movement patterns: cerebellar modular arrangement and applying of movement patterns based on semi-supervised learning (CMAPS). We assume here the cerebellum like a big archive of patterns that has an efficient organization to classify and recall them. The main idea is to achieve an optimal use of memory locations by more than just a supervised learning and classification algorithm. Surely, more experimental and physiological researches are needed to confirm our hypothesis.

  4. ALDH1A3 loss of function causes bilateral anophthalmia/microphthalmia and hypoplasia of the optic nerve and optic chiasm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yahyavi, Mani; Abouzeid, Hana; Gawdat, Ghada; de Preux, Anne-Sophie; Xiao, Tong; Bardakjian, Tanya; Schneider, Adele; Choi, Alex; Jorgenson, Eric; Baier, Herwig; El Sada, Mohamad; Schorderet, Daniel F; Slavotinek, Anne M

    2013-08-15

    The major active retinoid, all-trans retinoic acid, has long been recognized as critical for the development of several organs, including the eye. Mutations in STRA6, the gene encoding the cellular receptor for vitamin A, in patients with Matthew-Wood syndrome and anophthalmia/microphthalmia (A/M), have previously demonstrated the importance of retinol metabolism in human eye disease. We used homozygosity mapping combined with next-generation sequencing to interrogate patients with anophthalmia and microphthalmia for new causative genes. We used whole-exome and whole-genome sequencing to study a family with two affected brothers with bilateral A/M and a simplex case with bilateral anophthalmia and hypoplasia of the optic nerve and optic chiasm. Analysis of novel sequence variants revealed homozygosity for two nonsense mutations in ALDH1A3, c.568A>G, predicting p.Lys190*, in the familial cases, and c.1165A>T, predicting p.Lys389*, in the simplex case. Both mutations predict nonsense-mediated decay and complete loss of function. We performed antisense morpholino (MO) studies in Danio rerio to characterize the developmental effects of loss of Aldh1a3 function. MO-injected larvae showed a significant reduction in eye size, and aberrant axonal projections to the tectum were noted. We conclude that ALDH1A3 loss of function causes anophthalmia and aberrant eye development in humans and in animal model systems.

  5. Neuroimaging findings in Joubert syndrome with C5orf42 gene mutations: A milder form of molar tooth sign and vermian hypoplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enokizono, Mikako; Aida, Noriko; Niwa, Tetsu; Osaka, Hitoshi; Naruto, Takuya; Kurosawa, Kenji; Ohba, Chihiro; Suzuki, Toshifumi; Saitsu, Hirotomo; Goto, Tomohide; Matsumoto, Naomichi

    2017-05-15

    Little is known regarding neuroimaging-genotype correlations in Joubert syndrome (JBTS). To elucidate one of these correlations, we investigated the neuroimaging findings of JBTS patients with C5orf42 mutations. Neuroimaging findings in five JBTS patients with C5orf42 mutations were retrospectively assessed with regard to the infratentorial and supratentorial structures on T1-magnetization prepared rapid gradient echo (MPRAGE), T2-weighted images, and color-coded fractional anisotropy (FA) maps; the findings were compared to those in four JBTS patients with mutations in other genes (including three with AHI1 and one with TMEM67 mutations). In C5orf42-mutant patients, the infratentorial magnetic resonance (MR) images showed normal or minimally thickened and minimally elongated superior cerebellar peduncles (SCP), normal or minimally deepened interpeduncular fossa (IF), and mild vermian hypoplasia (VH). However, in other patients, all had severe abnormalities in the SCP and IF, and moderate to marked VH. Supratentorial abnormalities were found in one individual in other JBTS. In JBTS with all mutations, color-coded FA maps showed the absence of decussation of the SCP (DSCP). The morphological neuroimaging findings in C5orf42-mutant JBTS were distinctly mild and made diagnosis difficult. However, the absence of DSCP on color-coded FA maps may facilitate the diagnosis of JBTS. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Comprehensive investigation of CASK mutations and other genetic etiologies in 41 patients with intellectual disability and microcephaly with pontine and cerebellar hypoplasia (MICPCH.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shin Hayashi

    Full Text Available The CASK gene (Xp11.4 is highly expressed in the mammalian nervous system and plays several roles in neural development and synaptic function. Loss-of-function mutations of CASK are associated with intellectual disability and microcephaly with pontine and cerebellar hypoplasia (MICPCH, especially in females. Here, we present a comprehensive investigation of 41 MICPCH patients, analyzed by mutational search of CASK and screening of candidate genes using an SNP array, targeted resequencing and whole-exome sequencing (WES. In total, we identified causative or candidate genomic aberrations in 37 of the 41 cases (90.2%. CASK aberrations including a rare mosaic mutation in a male patient, were found in 32 cases, and a mutation in ITPR1, another known gene in which mutations are causative for MICPCH, was found in one case. We also found aberrations involving genes other than CASK, such as HDAC2, MARCKS, and possibly HS3ST5, which may be associated with MICPCH. Moreover, the targeted resequencing screening detected heterozygous variants in RELN in two cases, of uncertain pathogenicity, and WES analysis suggested that concurrent mutations of both DYNC1H1 and DCTN1 in one case could lead to MICPCH. Our results not only identified the etiology of MICPCH in nearly all the investigated patients but also suggest that MICPCH is a genetically heterogeneous condition, in which CASK inactivating mutations appear to account for the majority of cases.

  7. Enamel hypoplasia in deciduous teeth of great apes: do differences in defect prevalence imply differential levels of physiological stress?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukacs, J R

    1999-11-01

    This paper presents new data on enamel hypoplasia in the deciduous canine teeth of great apes. The enamel defect under consideration is known as localized hypoplasia of primary canines (LHPC), and is characterized by an area of thin or missing enamel on the labial surface of deciduous canine teeth (Skinner [1986a] Am. J. Phys. Anthropol. 69:59-69). Goals of this study are: 1) to determine if significant differences in the frequency of LHPC occur among three genera of great apes, and 2) to evaluate variation in LHPC prevalence among great apes as evidence of differential physiological stress. Infant and juvenile apes with deciduous teeth were examined at the Cleveland Museum of Natural History (n = 100) and at the Smithsonian Institution, National Museum of Natural History (n = 36). Deciduous teeth were observed under oblique incandescent light, with the naked eye and with a 10x hand lens. Enamel hypoplasia was scored using Federation Dentaire International (FDI)-Defects of Dental Enamel (DDE) standards. Hypoplasias were recorded by drawing defect location and size on a dental chart, and by measuring defect size and location with Helios needlepoint dial calipers. The prevalence of LHPC is reported by genus and sex, using two approaches: 1) the frequency of affected individuals-those having one or more deciduous canine teeth scored positive for LHPC; and 2) the number of canine teeth scored positive for LHPC as a percentage of all canine teeth observed. Variation in defect size and location will be described elsewhere. Localized hypoplasia of primary canine teeth was found in 62.5% of 128 individual apes, and in 45.5% of 398 great ape deciduous canines. As in humans, LHPC is the most common form of enamel hypoplasia in deciduous teeth of great apes, while LEH is rare or absent. The distribution and pattern of expression of LHPC in great apes is similar to that described in humans: side differences are not significant, but mandibular canines exhibit the defect two to

  8. Statistical shape (ASM) and appearance (AAM) models for the segmentation of the cerebellum in fetal ultrasound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes López, Misael; Arámbula Cosío, Fernando

    2017-11-01

    The cerebellum is an important structure to determine the gestational age of the fetus, moreover most of the abnormalities it presents are related to growth disorders. In this work, we present the results of the segmentation of the fetal cerebellum applying statistical shape and appearance models. Both models were tested on ultrasound images of the fetal brain taken from 23 pregnant women, between 18 and 24 gestational weeks. The accuracy results obtained on 11 ultrasound images show a mean Hausdorff distance of 6.08 mm between the manual segmentation and the segmentation using active shape model, and a mean Hausdorff distance of 7.54 mm between the manual segmentation and the segmentation using active appearance model. The reported results demonstrate that the active shape model is more robust in the segmentation of the fetal cerebellum in ultrasound images.

  9. Differentiating Patients with Parkinson's Disease from Normal Controls Using Gray Matter in the Cerebellum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Ling-Li; Xie, Liang; Shen, Hui; Luo, Zhiguo; Fang, Peng; Hou, Yanan; Tang, Beisha; Wu, Tao; Hu, Dewen

    2017-02-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is one of the most common neurodegenerative disorders in the world. Previous studies have focused on the basal ganglia and cerebral cortices. To date, the cerebellum has not been systematically investigated in patients with PD. In the current study, 45 probable PD patients and 40 age- and gender-matched healthy controls underwent structural magnetic resonance imaging, and we used support vector machines combining with voxel-based morphometry to explore the cerebellar structural changes in the probable PD patients relative to healthy controls. The results revealed that the gray matter alterations were primarily located within the cerebellar Crus I, implying a possible important role of this region in PD. Furthermore, the gray matter alterations in the cerebellum could differentiate the probable PD patients from healthy controls with accuracies of more than 95 % (p cerebellum in the clinical diagnosis of PD.

  10. MR measurement of normal brainstem cerebellum and corpus callosum on midsagittal section

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kogame, Saeko; Sawa, S.; Inoue, Yuichi; Fukuda, Teruo; Tada, Takuji; Shakudo, Miyuki; Yahata, Kunifumi; Shimizu, Hiroshi; Onoyama, Yasuhito.

    1989-01-01

    The dimensions of the brainstem, cerebellum and corpus callosum were measured on magnetic resonance (MR) images with sagittal spin-echo sequence. Eighty-two normal adults (average 49.6 years old) were measured. The mesencephalic, pontine or cerebellar diamaters and lengths could be measured more accurately and reproducibly than medullary diameter and length. The anterio-posterior diameter of the pons and the cerebellum was 23.2±1.4 mm and 26.4±2.5 mm respectively. The length of the pons and the cerebellum was 27.8±2 mm and 45.8±3.5 mm respectively. We have observed focal thinning at the body of corpus callosum in 73%. This narrowing is almost unquestionably a normal variant. (author)

  11. Alcohol exposure decreases CREB binding protein expression and histone acetylation in the developing cerebellum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weixiang Guo

    Full Text Available Fetal alcohol exposure affects 1 in 100 children making it the leading cause of mental retardation in the US. It has long been known that alcohol affects cerebellum development and function. However, the underlying molecular mechanism is unclear.We demonstrate that CREB binding protein (CBP is widely expressed in granule and Purkinje neurons of the developing cerebellar cortex of naïve rats. We also show that exposure to ethanol during the 3(rd trimester-equivalent of human pregnancy reduces CBP levels. CBP is a histone acetyltransferase, a component of the epigenetic mechanism controlling neuronal gene expression. We further demonstrate that the acetylation of both histone H3 and H4 is reduced in the cerebellum of ethanol-treated rats.These findings indicate that ethanol exposure decreases the expression and function of CBP in the developing cerebellum. This effect of ethanol may be responsible for the motor coordination deficits that characterize fetal alcohol spectrum disorders.

  12. Reduced ventral cingulum integrity and increased behavioral problems in children with isolated optic nerve hypoplasia and mild to moderate or no visual impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, Emma A; O'Reilly, Michelle A; Clayden, Jonathan D; Seunarine, Kiran K; Dale, Naomi; Salt, Alison; Clark, Chris A; Dattani, Mehul T

    2013-01-01

    To assess the prevalence of behavioral problems in children with isolated optic nerve hypoplasia, mild to moderate or no visual impairment, and no developmental delay. To identify white matter abnormalities that may provide neural correlates for any behavioral abnormalities identified. Eleven children with isolated optic nerve hypoplasia (mean age 5.9 years) underwent behavioral assessment and brain diffusion tensor imaging, Twenty four controls with isolated short stature (mean age 6.4 years) underwent MRI, 11 of whom also completed behavioral assessments. Fractional anisotropy images were processed using tract-based spatial statistics. Partial correlation between ventral cingulum, corpus callosum and optic radiation fractional anisotropy, and child behavioral checklist scores (controlled for age at scan and sex) was performed. Children with optic nerve hypoplasia had significantly higher scores on the child behavioral checklist (pchildren with optic nerve hypoplasia. Right ventral cingulum fractional anisotropy correlated with total and externalising child behavioral checklist scores (r = -0.52, pchildren with optic nerve hypoplasia and mild to moderate or no visual impairment require behavioral assessment to determine the presence of clinically significant behavioral problems. Reduced structural integrity of the ventral cingulum correlated with behavioral scores, suggesting that these white matter abnormalities may be clinically significant. The presence of reduced fractional anisotropy in the optic radiations of children with mild to moderate or no visual impairment raises questions as to the pathogenesis of these changes which will need to be addressed by future studies.

  13. Moebius syndrome with macular hyperpigmentation, skeletal anomalies, and hypoplasia of pectoralis major muscle in an Egyptian child

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rabah M. Shawky

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available We report a 4 month old female infant, 3rd in order of birth of the first cousin consanguineous parents. The patient has congenital right facial nerve palsy, with asymmetry of facial expression during crying and difficulty in swallowing. Associated anomalies include abnormal facial features, bilateral finger anomalies, bilateral talipes equinovarus, kyphoscoliosis, hypotonia, high frequency hearing loss. Bilateral macular hyperpigmentation was detected in our patient on fundus examination which was not reported previously in Moebius syndrome cases. In addition there is hypoplasia of the right pectoralis major muscle.

  14. The first Japanese patient with mandibular hypoplasia, deafness, progeroid features and lipodystrophy diagnosed via POLD1 mutation detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okada, Asami; Kohmoto, Tomohiro; Naruto, Takuya; Yokota, Ichiro; Kotani, Yumiko; Shimada, Aki; Miyamoto, Yoko; Takahashi, Rizu; Goji, Aya; Masuda, Kiyoshi; Kagami, Shoji; Imoto, Issei

    2017-01-01

    Mandibular hypoplasia, deafness, progeroid features and lipodystrophy (MDPL) syndrome is a rare autosomal dominant disorder caused by heterozygous POLD1 mutations. To date, 13 patients affected by POLD1 mutation-caused MDPL have been described. We report a clinically undiagnosed 11-year-old male who noted joint contractures at 6 years of age. Targeted exome sequencing identified a known POLD1 mutation [NM_002691.3:c.1812_1814del, p.(Ser605del)] that diagnosed him as the first Japanese/East Asian MDPL case.

  15. A Giant Gastroschisis Associated with Pulmonary Hypoplasia and Spinal Anomaly: A Case Report and a Literature Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Surasak Puvabanditsin

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Gastroschisis most often occurs as an isolated anomaly and extragastrointestinal associations are rare. Most commonly, the anomalies associated with gastroschisis are cardiac and central nervous system abnormalities. Respiratory insufficiency has sometimes been reported in association with giant abdominal wall defects. Poor outcomes and prolonged ventilator support have been reported in giant gastroschisis and omphalocele, especially if associated with herniation of the majority of the liver. We report a case of a large gastroschisis that was associated with a kyphoscoliosis and pulmonary hypoplasia.

  16. Congenital dislocation of the deep digital flexor tendon associated with hypoplasia of the sustentaculum tali in a Thoroughbred colt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lepage, O.M.; Leveille, R.; Breton, L.; Marcoux, M.

    1995-01-01

    An 11-month-old Thoroughbred colt was presented with a hard swelling at the proximal third of the right 4th metatarsal bone. A medial dislocation of the deep digital flexor tendon (flexor digitorum profundus) was also observed on the same leg. On the plantaroproximal-plantarodistal projection of the calcaneus, there was flattening and shortening of the sustentaculum tali. The smooth bony proliferation at the proximal third of the right 4th metatarus was compatible with a chronic splint bone fracture. This report describes a medial deep digital flexor dislocation associated with hypoplasia of the sustentaculum tali

  17. Effects of Cinnamon Extract on Cerebellum Histomorphometry in Diabetic Rats’ Fetus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AR Rafati

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background & aim: In pregnant women, maternal diabetes occurs when the pancreas does not produce enough insulin, so glucose increases in the mother's blood and the blood of the fetus therefore causing many complications in children. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of cinnamon on morphometric histologic changes on fetal cerebellum of diabetic rats at days 18 and 20. Methods: In this study, 32 healthy female Wistar rats were prepared and randomly divided into four groups, normal control, diabetic, healthy subjects treated with cinnamon and cinnamon extract-treated diabetic groups. Diabetic groups were subjected by intraperitoneal of streptozotocin. All groups were charged with natural mating and they received a dose of 60 mg/ kg of cinnamon at the first day off pregnancy. After formation of the nervous system, in the eighteenth and twentieth day of pregnancy, the mother of the four mice were anesthetized and the fetus was removed for sampling. The histological slides were prepared and various parameters were studied in the cerebellum. Data were analyzed using one-way ANOVA and Duncan test. Results: The thickness of gray matter, and the gray matter white cells in the cerebellum of diabetic rats compared to other groups tested at days of18 and 20 and embryonic cells in the white matter of the cerebellum at day 18 was significantly decreased (p< 0.05. Conclusion: Administration of cinnamon extract reduces mothers’ blood sugar levels therefore preventing the complications of diabetes on the fetal cerebellum. Key words: cinnamon extract, Diabetes, cerebellum, Rat.

  18. An intact action-perception coupling depends on the integrity of the cerebellum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, Andrea; Giese, Martin A; Sultan, Fahad; Mueller, Oliver M; Goericke, Sophia L; Ilg, Winfried; Timmann, Dagmar

    2014-05-07

    It is widely accepted that action and perception in humans functionally interact on multiple levels. Moreover, areas originally suggested to be predominantly motor-related, as the cerebellum, are also involved in action observation. However, as yet, few studies provided unequivocal evidence that the cerebellum is involved in the action perception coupling (APC), specifically in the integration of motor and multisensory information for perception. We addressed this question studying patients with focal cerebellar lesions in a virtual-reality paradigm measuring the effect of action execution on action perception presenting self-generated movements as point lights. We measured the visual sensitivity to the point light stimuli based on signal detection theory. Compared with healthy controls cerebellar patients showed no beneficial influence of action execution on perception indicating deficits in APC. Applying lesion symptom mapping, we identified distinct areas in the dentate nucleus and the lateral cerebellum of both hemispheres that are causally involved in APC. Lesions of the right ventral dentate, the ipsilateral motor representations (lobules V/VI), and most interestingly the contralateral posterior cerebellum (lobule VII) impede the benefits of motor execution on perception. We conclude that the cerebellum establishes time-dependent multisensory representations on different levels, relevant for motor control as well as supporting action perception. Ipsilateral cerebellar motor representations are thought to support the somatosensory state estimate of ongoing movements, whereas the ventral dentate and the contralateral posterior cerebellum likely support sensorimotor integration in the cerebellar-parietal loops. Both the correct somatosensory as well as the multisensory state representations are vital for an intact APC.

  19. Deleting the Arntl clock gene in the granular layer of the mouse cerebellum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bering, Tenna; Carstensen, Mikkel Bloss; Rath, Martin Fredensborg

    2017-01-01

    nucleus. It has been suggested that the cerebellar circadian oscillator is involved in food anticipation, but direct molecular evidence of the role of the circadian oscillator of the cerebellar cortex is currently unavailable. To investigate the hypothesis that the circadian oscillator of the cerebellum...... is involved in circadian physiology and food anticipation, we therefore by use of Cre-LoxP technology generated a conditional knockout mouse with the core clock gene Arntl deleted specifically in granule cells of the cerebellum, since expression of clock genes in the cerebellar cortex is mainly located...

  20. Aroclor 1254, a developmental neurotoxicant, alters energy metabolism- and intracellular signaling-associated protein networks in rat cerebellum and hippocampus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kodavanti, Prasada Rao S., E-mail: kodavanti.prasada@epa.gov [Neurotoxicology Branch, NHEERL, ORD, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, North Carolina (United States); Osorio, Cristina [Systems Proteomics Center, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, North Carolina (United States); Program on Molecular Biology and Biotechnology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, North Carolina (United States); Royland, Joyce E.; Ramabhadran, Ram [Genetic and Cellular Toxicology Branch, NHEERL, ORD, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, North Carolina (United States); Alzate, Oscar [Department of Cellular and Developmental Biology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, North Carolina (United States); Systems Proteomics Center, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, North Carolina (United States); Program on Molecular Biology and Biotechnology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, North Carolina (United States)

    2011-11-15

    The vast literature on the mode of action of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) indicates that PCBs are a unique model for understanding the mechanisms of toxicity of environmental mixtures of persistent chemicals. PCBs have been shown to adversely affect psychomotor function and learning and memory in humans. Although the molecular mechanisms for PCB effects are unclear, several studies indicate that the disruption of Ca{sup 2+}-mediated signal transduction plays significant roles in PCB-induced developmental neurotoxicity. Culminating events in signal transduction pathways include the regulation of gene and protein expression, which affects the growth and function of the nervous system. Our previous studies showed changes in gene expression related to signal transduction and neuronal growth. In this study, protein expression following developmental exposure to PCB is examined. Pregnant rats (Long Evans) were dosed with 0.0 or 6.0 mg/kg/day of Aroclor-1254 from gestation day 6 through postnatal day (PND) 21, and the cerebellum and hippocampus from PND14 animals were analyzed to determine Aroclor 1254-induced differential protein expression. Two proteins were found to be differentially expressed in the cerebellum following PCB exposure while 18 proteins were differentially expressed in the hippocampus. These proteins are related to energy metabolism in mitochondria (ATP synthase, sub unit {beta} (ATP5B), creatine kinase, and malate dehydrogenase), calcium signaling (voltage-dependent anion-selective channel protein 1 (VDAC1) and ryanodine receptor type II (RyR2)), and growth of the nervous system (dihydropyrimidinase-related protein 4 (DPYSL4), valosin-containing protein (VCP)). Results suggest that Aroclor 1254-like persistent chemicals may alter energy metabolism and intracellular signaling, which might result in developmental neurotoxicity. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We performed brain proteomic analysis of rats exposed to the neurotoxicant

  1. Structural Covariance of Sensory Networks, the Cerebellum, and Amygdala in Autism Spectrum Disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Garrett J. Cardon

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Sensory dysfunction is a core symptom of autism spectrum disorder (ASD, and abnormalities with sensory responsivity and processing can be extremely debilitating to ASD patients and their families. However, relatively little is known about the underlying neuroanatomical and neurophysiological factors that lead to sensory abnormalities in ASD. Investigation into these aspects of ASD could lead to significant advancements in our general knowledge about ASD, as well as provide targets for treatment and inform diagnostic procedures. Thus, the current study aimed to measure the covariation of volumes of brain structures (i.e., structural magnetic resonance imaging that may be involved in abnormal sensory processing, in order to infer connectivity of these brain regions. Specifically, we quantified the structural covariation of sensory-related cerebral cortical structures, in addition to the cerebellum and amygdala by computing partial correlations between the structural volumes of these structures. These analyses were performed in participants with ASD (n = 36, as well as typically developing peers (n = 32. Results showed decreased structural covariation between sensory-related cortical structures, especially between the left and right cerebral hemispheres, in participants with ASD. In contrast, these same participants presented with increased structural covariation of structures in the right cerebral hemisphere. Additionally, sensory-related cerebral structures exhibited decreased structural covariation with functionally identified cerebellar networks. Also, the left amygdala showed significantly increased structural covariation with cerebral structures related to visual processing. Taken together, these results may suggest several patterns of altered connectivity both within and between cerebral cortices and other brain structures that may be related to sensory processing.

  2. Theta synchronization between medial prefrontal cortex and cerebellum is associated with adaptive performance of associative learning behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hao; Wang, Yi-jie; Yang, Li; Sui, Jian-feng; Hu, Zhi-an; Hu, Bo

    2016-01-01

    Associative learning is thought to require coordinated activities among distributed brain regions. For example, to direct behavior appropriately, the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) must encode and maintain sensory information and then interact with the cerebellum during trace eyeblink conditioning (TEBC), a commonly-used associative learning model. However, the mechanisms by which these two distant areas interact remain elusive. By simultaneously recording local field potential (LFP) signals from the mPFC and the cerebellum in guinea pigs undergoing TEBC, we found that theta-frequency (5.0–12.0 Hz) oscillations in the mPFC and the cerebellum became strongly synchronized following presentation of auditory conditioned stimulus. Intriguingly, the conditioned eyeblink response (CR) with adaptive timing occurred preferentially in the trials where mPFC-cerebellum theta coherence was stronger. Moreover, both the mPFC-cerebellum theta coherence and the adaptive CR performance were impaired after the disruption of endogenous orexins in the cerebellum. Finally, association of the mPFC -cerebellum theta coherence with adaptive CR performance was time-limited occurring in the early stage of associative learning. These findings suggest that the mPFC and the cerebellum may act together to contribute to the adaptive performance of associative learning behavior by means of theta synchronization. PMID:26879632

  3. Distraction osteogenesis versus orthognathic surgery for the treatment of maxillary hypoplasia in cleft lip and palate patients: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Austin, S L; Mattick, C R; Waterhouse, P J

    2015-05-01

    To compare the effectiveness of distraction osteogenesis to orthognathic surgery for the treatment of maxillary hypoplasia in individuals with cleft lip and palate. A systematic review of prospective randomized, quasi-randomized or controlled clinical trials. MEDLINE, EMBASE, Scopus, Web of Science, CINAHL, CENTRAL, trial registers and grey literature were searched. Hand searching of five relevant journals was completed. Two reviewers independently completed inclusion assessment. Data extraction and risk of bias assessment were completed by a single reviewer and checked by a second reviewer. Five publications all reporting different outcomes of a single randomized controlled trial are included within the review. The quality of the evidence was low with a high risk of bias. Both surgical interventions produce significant soft tissue improvement. Horizontal relapse of the maxilla was statistically significantly greater following orthognathic surgery. There was no statistically significant difference in speech and velo-pharyngeal function between the interventions. Maxillary distraction initially lowered social self-esteem, but this improved with time resulting in higher satisfaction with life in the long term. The low quality of evidence included within the review means there is insufficient evidence to conclude whether there is a difference in effectiveness between maxillary distraction and osteotomy for the treatment of cleft-related maxillary hypoplasia. There is a need for further high-quality randomized controlled trials to allow conclusive recommendations to be made. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Evaluation of posterior lateral femoral condylar hypoplasia using axial MRI images in patients with complete discoid meniscus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Zhihong; Chen, Dongyang; Shi, Dongquan; Dai, Jin; Yao, Yao; Jiang, Qing

    2016-03-01

    Hypoplasia of the lateral femoral condyle has been reported in discoid lateral meniscus patients, but associated imaging findings in the axial plane have not been characterized. In this study, we aimed to identify differences in the lateral femoral condyle between patients with discoid lateral meniscus and those with normal menisci using axial MRI images. Twenty-three patients (24 knees) with complete discoid lateral meniscus, 43 (45 knees) with incomplete discoid lateral meniscus, and 50 with normal menisci (50 knees) were enrolled and distributed into three groups. Two new angles, posterior lateral condylar angle (PLCA) and posterior medial condylar angle (PMCA), were measured on axial MRI images; the posterior condylar angle (PCA) was also measured. Differences between the three groups in the PLCA, PMCA, PCA, and PLCA/PMCA were analysed. The predictive value of PLCA and PLCA/PMCA for complete discoid lateral meniscus was assessed. In the complete discoid lateral meniscus group, PLCA and PLCA/PMCA were significantly smaller compared with the normal meniscus group and the incomplete discoid lateral meniscus group (P meniscus group compared with the incomplete discoid lateral meniscus group (P meniscus group (P meniscus. Hypoplasia of the posterior lateral femoral condyle is typically seen in patients with complete discoid lateral meniscus. PLCA and PLCA/PMCA can be measured from axial MRI images and used as excellent predictive parameters for complete discoid lateral meniscus. Diagnostic study, Level III.

  5. Application of mitomycin C after endoscopic lysis of congenital laryngeal web combined with epiglottic hypoplasia in a middle-aged man.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roh, Jong-Lyel

    2006-04-01

    Laryngeal webs and epiglottic hypoplasias are uncommon congenital anomalies. Anterior glottic web combined with epiglottic hypoplasia was found in a middle-aged man presenting with hoarseness and dyspnea on exertion. This can be considered as a unique isolated defect of the larynx during early fetal development. The laryngeal web can be successfully treated in a single stage with endoscopic lysis and topical application of mitomycin C for prevention of anterior glottic restenosis. This case and prior reports suggest that the novel approach may be effective in the treatment of laryngeal webs.

  6. Methylmercury exposure for 14 days (short-term) produces behavioral and biochemical changes in mouse cerebellum, liver, and serum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macedo-Júnior, Sérgio José; Luiz-Cerutti, Murilo; Nascimento, Denise B; Farina, Marcelo; Soares Santos, Adair Roberto; de Azevedo Maia, Alcíbia Helena

    2017-01-01

    Various studies on methylmercury (MeHg)-induced toxicity focused on the central nervous system (CNS) as a primary target. However, MeHg-mediated toxicity is related to metallic interaction with electrophilic groups, which are not solely restricted to the CNS, but these reactive groups are present ubiquitously in several systems/organs. The aim of this study was thus to examine MeHg-induced systemic toxicity in mice using a standardized neurotoxicology testing exposure model to measure cerebellar neurotoxicity by determining biochemical and behavioral parameters in the cerebellum. After 2 weeks exposure to MeHg (40 µg/ml; diluted in drinking water; ad libitum), adult male Swiss mice showed a marked motor impairment characteristic of cerebellar toxicity as noted in the following tests: rotarod, beam walking, pole, and hind limb clasping. MeHg treatment resulted in Hg deposition in the cerebellum as well as reduction in cerebellar weight, glutathione peroxidase (GPx) activity, and interleukin (IL)-6 levels. MeHg ingestion increased cerebellar glutathione reductase (GR) activity and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) levels. In addition to cerebellar toxicity, MeHg treatment also elevated total and non-high density lipoprotein (non-HDL) cholesterol levels, as well as serum aspartate transaminase (AST) and alanine transaminase (ALT) enzymatic activities, systemic parameters. Increased liver weight and reduced serum urea levels were also noted in MeHg-exposed mice. Taken together, our findings demonstrated that a well-standardized exposure protocol to examine MeHg-induced neurotoxicity also produced systemic toxicity in mice, which was characterized by changes in markers of hepatic function as well as serum lipid homeostasis.

  7. Respiratory Neuron Activity in the Mesencephalon, Diencephalon and Cerebellum of the Carp

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ballintijn, C.M.; Luiten, P.G.M.; Jüch, P.J.W.

    1979-01-01

    The functional properties, localization and connections of neurons with a respiratory-rhythmic firing pattern in the mesencephalon, diencephalon and cerebellum of the carp were studied. Some neurons acquire respiratory rhythm only as a side effect of respiration via sensory stimulation by movements

  8. Cerebellum segmentation in MRI using atlas registration and local multi-scale image descriptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van der Lijn, F.; de Bruijne, M.; Hoogendam, Y.Y.

    2009-01-01

    We propose a novel cerebellum segmentation method for MRI, based on a combination of statistical models of the structure's expected location in the brain and its local appearance. The appearance model is obtained from a k-nearest-neighbor classifier, which uses a set of multi-scale local image...

  9. Monitoring the native phosphorylation state of plasma membrane proteins from a single mouse cerebellum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schindler, J.; Ye, J. Y.; Jensen, Ole Nørregaard

    2013-01-01

    Neuronal processing in the cerebellum involves the phosphorylation and dephosphorylation of various plasma membrane proteins such as AMPA or NMDA receptors. Despite the importance of changes in phosphorylation pattern, no global phospho-proteome analysis has yet been performed. As plasma membrane...

  10. Information to cerebellum on spinal motor networks mediated by the dorsal spinocerebellar tract

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stecina, Katinka; Fedirchuk, Brent; Hultborn, Hans

    2013-01-01

    of peripheral sensory input to the cerebellum in general, and during rhythmic movements such as locomotion and scratch. In contrast, the VSCT was seen as conveying a copy of the output of spinal neuronal circuitry, including those circuits generating rhythmic motor activity (the spinal central pattern generator...

  11. AβPP/PS1 Transgenic Mice Show Sex Differences in the Cerebellum Associated with Aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ordoñez-Gutierrez, Lara; Fernandez-Perez, Ivan; Herrera, Jose Luis; Anton, Marta; Benito-Cuesta, Irene; Wandosell, Francisco

    2016-09-06

    Cerebellar pathology has been related to presenilin 1 mutations in certain pedigrees of familial Alzheimer's disease. However, cerebellum tissue has not been intensively analyzed in transgenic models of mutant presenilins. Furthermore, the effect of the sex of the mice was not systematically analyzed, despite the fact that important gender differences in the evolution of the disease in the human population have been described. We analyzed whether the progression of amyloidosis in a double transgenic mouse, AβPP/PS1, is susceptible to aging and differentially affects males and females. The accumulation of amyloid in the cerebellum differentially affects males and females of the AβPP/PS1 transgenic line, which was found to be ten-fold higher in 15-month-old females. Amyloid-β accumulation was more evident in the molecular layer of the cerebellum, but glia reaction was only observed in the granular layer of the older mice. The sex divergence was also observed in other neuronal, survival, and autophagic markers. The cerebellum plays an important role in the evolution of the pathology in this transgenic mouse model. Sex differences could be crucial for a complete understanding of this disease. We propose that the human population could be studied in this way. Sex-specific treatment strategies in human populations could show a differential response to the therapeutic approach.

  12. Localization and functional roles of corticotropin-releasing factor receptor type 2 in the cerebellum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gounko, Natalia V.; Gramsbergen, Albert; van der Want, Johannes J. L.

    The corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) type 2 receptor has three splice variants alpha, beta, and gamma. In the rodent brain only CRF-R2 alpha is present. In the cerebellum, CRF-R2 alpha has two different isoforms: a full-length form (fl) and truncated (tr). Both forms CRF-R2 have a unique

  13. A single episode of neonatal seizures alters the cerebellum of immature rats

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Lomoio, S.; Necchi, D.; Mareš, Vladislav; Scherini, E.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 93, č. 1 (2011), s. 17-24 ISSN 0920-1211 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : metrazol seizures * cerebellum * Purkinje cells * GluR2/3 * GLT1 Subject RIV: FH - Neurology Impact factor: 2.290, year: 2011

  14. Deficient PKR in RAX/PKR Association Ameliorates Ethanol-Induced Neurotoxicity in the Developing Cerebellum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hui; Chen, Jian; Qi, Yuanlin; Dai, Lu; Zhang, Mingfang; Frank, Jacqueline A; Handshoe, Jonathan W; Cui, Jiajun; Xu, Wenhua; Chen, Gang

    2015-08-01

    Ethanol-induced neuronal loss is closely related to the pathogenesis of fetal alcohol spectrum disorders. The cerebellum is one of the brain areas that are most sensitive to ethanol. The mechanism underlying ethanol neurotoxicity remains unclear. Our previous in vitro studies have shown that the double-stranded RNA (dsRNA)-activated protein kinase (PKR) regulates neuronal apoptosis upon ethanol exposure and ethanol activates PKR through association with its intracellular activator RAX. However, the role of PKR and its interaction with RAX in vivo have not been investigated. In the current study, by utilizing N-PKR-/- mice, C57BL/6J mice with a deficient RAX-binding domain in PKR, we determined the critical role of RAX/PKR association in PKR-regulated ethanol neurotoxicity in the developing cerebellum. Our data indicate that while N-PKR-/- mice have a similar BAC profile as wild-type mice, ethanol induces less brain/body mass reduction as well as cerebellar neuronal loss. In addition, ethanol promotes interleukin-1β (IL-1β) secretion, and IL-1β is a master cytokine regulating inflammatory response. Importantly, ethanol-promoted IL-1β secretion is inhibited in the developing cerebellum of N-PKR-/- mice. Thus, RAX/PKR interaction and PKR activation regulate ethanol neurotoxicity in the developing cerebellum, which may involve ethanol-induced neuroinflammation. Further, PKR could be a possible target for pharmacological intervention to prevent or treat fetal alcohol spectrum disorder (FASD).

  15. The Cerebellum Generates Motor-to-Auditory Predictions: ERP Lesion Evidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knolle, Franziska; Schroger, Erich; Baess, Pamela; Kotz, Sonja A.

    2012-01-01

    Forward predictions are crucial in motor action (e.g., catching a ball, or being tickled) but may also apply to sensory or cognitive processes (e.g., listening to distorted speech or to a foreign accent). According to the "internal forward model," the cerebellum generates predictions about somatosensory consequences of movements. These predictions…

  16. A case of illusory own-body perceptions after transcranial magnetic stimulation of the cerebellum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schutter, D.J.L.G.; Kammers, M.P.M.; Enter, D.; Honk, E.J. van

    2006-01-01

    Illusory own-body perceptions are 'body in space' misinterpretations of the brain and belong to the class of out-of-body experiences wherein the angular gyrus seems importantly implicated. In the present study additional cerebellum involvement in illusory own-body perceptions was investigated in a

  17. The cerebellum in Alzheimer's disease: evaluating its role in cognitive decline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Heidi I L; Hopkins, David A; Mayrhofer, Helen C; Bruner, Emiliano; van Leeuwen, Fred W; Raaijmakers, Wijnand; Schmahmann, Jeremy D

    2018-01-01

    The cerebellum has long been regarded as essential only for the coordination of voluntary motor activity and motor learning. Anatomical, clinical and neuroimaging studies have led to a paradigm shift in the understanding of the cerebellar role in nervous system function, demonstrating that the cerebellum appears integral also to the modulation of cognition and emotion. The search to understand the cerebellar contribution to cognitive processing has increased interest in exploring the role of the cerebellum in neurodegenerative and neuropsychiatric disorders. Principal among these is Alzheimer's disease. Here we review an already sizeable existing literature on the neuropathological, structural and functional neuroimaging studies of the cerebellum in Alzheimer's disease. We consider these observations in the light of the cognitive deficits that characterize Alzheimer's disease and in so doing we introduce a new perspective on its pathophysiology and manifestations. We propose an integrative hypothesis that there is a cerebellar contribution to the cognitive and neuropsychiatric deficits in Alzheimer's disease. We draw on the dysmetria of thought theory to suggest that this cerebellar component manifests as deficits in modulation of the neurobehavioural deficits. We provide suggestions for future studies to investigate this hypothesis and, ultimately, to establish a comprehensive, causal clinicopathological disease model. © The Author (2017). Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Guarantors of Brain. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. Gating of Long-Term Potentiation by Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptors at the Cerebellum Input Stage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    F. Prestori (Francesca); C. Bonardi (Claudia); L. Mapelli (Lisa); P. Lombardo (Paola); R. Goselink (Rianne); M.E. de Stefano (Maria Egle); D. Gandolfi (Daniela); J. Mapelli (Jonathan); D. Bertrand (Daniel); M. Schonewille (Martijn); C.I. de Zeeuw (Chris); E. D'Angelo (Egidio)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractThe brain needs mechanisms able to correlate plastic changes with local circuit activity and internal functional states. At the cerebellum input stage, uncontrolled induction of long-term potentiation or depression (LTP or LTD) between mossy fibres and granule cells can saturate synaptic

  19. The role of the cerebellum in the regulation of language functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starowicz-Filip, Anna; Chrobak, Adrian Andrzej; Moskała, Marek; Krzyżewski, Roger M; Kwinta, Borys; Kwiatkowski, Stanisław; Milczarek, Olga; Rajtar-Zembaty, Anna; Przewoźnik, Dorota

    2017-08-29

    The present paper is a review of studies on the role of the cerebellum in the regulation of language functions. This brain structure until recently associated chiefly with motor skills, visual-motor coordination and balance, proves to be significant also for cognitive functioning. With regard to language functions, studies show that the cerebellum determines verbal fluency (both semantic and formal) expressive and receptive grammar processing, the ability to identify and correct language mistakes, and writing skills. Cerebellar damage is a possible cause of aphasia or the cerebellar mutism syndrome (CMS). Decreased cerebellocortical connectivity as well as anomalies in the structure of the cerebellum are emphasized in numerous developmental dyslexia theories. The cerebellum is characterized by linguistic lateralization. From the neuroanatomical perspective, its right hemisphere and dentate nucleus, having multiple cerebellocortical connections with the cerebral cortical language areas, are particularly important for language functions. Usually, language deficits developed as a result of a cerebellar damage have subclinical intensity and require applying sensitive neuropsychological diagnostic tools designed to assess higher verbal functions.

  20. The role of the cerebellum in schizophrenia: from cognition to molecular pathways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peyman Yeganeh-Doost

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Beside its role in motor coordination, the cerebellum is involved in cognitive function such as attention, working memory, verbal learning, and sensory discrimination. In schizophrenia, a disturbed prefronto-thalamo-cerebellar circuit has been proposed to play a role in the pathophysiology. In addition, a deficit in the glutamatergic N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDAf receptor has been hypothesized. The risk gene neuregulin 1 may play a major role in this process. We demonstrated a higher expression of the NMDA receptor subunit 2D in the right cerebellar regions of schizophrenia patients, which may be a secondary upregulation due to a dysfunctional receptor. In contrast, the neuregulin 1 risk variant containing at least one C-allele was associated with decreased expression of NMDA receptor subunit 2C, leading to a dysfunction of the NMDA receptor, which in turn may lead to a dysfunction of the gamma amino butyric acid (GABA system. Accordingly, from post-mortem studies, there is accumulating evidence that GABAergic signaling is decreased in the cerebellum of schizophrenia patients. As patients in these studies are treated with antipsychotics long term, we evaluated the effect of long-term haloperidol and clozapine treatment in an animal model. We showed that clozapine may be superior to haloperidol in restoring a deficit in NMDA receptor subunit 2C expression in the cerebellum. We discuss the molecular findings in the light of the role of the cerebellum in attention and cognitive deficits in schizophrenia.

  1. Reliability of Visual and Somatosensory Feedback in Skilled Movement: The Role of the Cerebellum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizelle, J C; Oparah, Alexis; Wheaton, Lewis A

    2016-01-01

    The integration of vision and somatosensation is required to allow for accurate motor behavior. While both sensory systems contribute to an understanding of the state of the body through continuous updating and estimation, how the brain processes unreliable sensory information remains to be fully understood in the context of complex action. Using functional brain imaging, we sought to understand the role of the cerebellum in weighting visual and somatosensory feedback by selectively reducing the reliability of each sense individually during a tool use task. We broadly hypothesized upregulated activation of the sensorimotor and cerebellar areas during movement with reduced visual reliability, and upregulated activation of occipital brain areas during movement with reduced somatosensory reliability. As specifically compared to reduced somatosensory reliability, we expected greater activations of ipsilateral sensorimotor cerebellum for intact visual and somatosensory reliability. Further, we expected that ipsilateral posterior cognitive cerebellum would be affected with reduced visual reliability. We observed that reduced visual reliability results in a trend towards the relative consolidation of sensorimotor activation and an expansion of cerebellar activation. In contrast, reduced somatosensory reliability was characterized by the absence of cerebellar activations and a trend towards the increase of right frontal, left parietofrontal activation, and temporo-occipital areas. Our findings highlight the role of the cerebellum for specific aspects of skillful motor performance. This has relevance to understanding basic aspects of brain functions underlying sensorimotor integration, and provides a greater understanding of cerebellar function in tool use motor control.

  2. Resting-State Functional Connectivity and Network Analysis of Cerebellum with Respect to IQ and Gender

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasileios C. Pezoulas

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available During the last years, it has been established that the prefrontal and posterior parietal brain lobes, which are mostly related to intelligence, have many connections to cerebellum. However, there is a limited research investigating cerebellum's relationship with cognitive processes. In this study, the network of cerebellum was analyzed in order to investigate its overall organization in individuals with low and high fluid Intelligence Quotient (IQ. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI data were selected from 136 subjects in resting-state from the Human Connectome Project (HCP database and were further separated into two IQ groups composed of 69 low-IQ and 67 high-IQ subjects. Cerebellum was parcellated into 28 lobules/ROIs (per subject using a standard cerebellum anatomical atlas. Thereafter, correlation matrices were constructed by computing Pearson's correlation coefficients between the average BOLD time-series for each pair of ROIs inside the cerebellum. By computing conventional graph metrics, small-world network properties were verified using the weighted clustering coefficient and the characteristic path length for estimating the trade-off between segregation and integration. In addition, a connectivity metric was computed for extracting the average cost per network. The concept of the Minimum Spanning Tree (MST was adopted and implemented in order to avoid methodological biases in graph comparisons and retain only the strongest connections per network. Subsequently, six global and three local metrics were calculated in order to retrieve useful features concerning the characteristics of each MST. Moreover, the local metrics of degree and betweenness centrality were used to detect hubs, i.e., nodes with high importance. The computed set of metrics gave rise to extensive statistical analysis in order to examine differences between low and high-IQ groups, as well as between all possible gender-based group combinations. Our results

  3. Robust Machine Learning-Based Correction on Automatic Segmentation of the Cerebellum and Brainstem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jun Yi; Ngo, Michael M; Hessl, David; Hagerman, Randi J; Rivera, Susan M

    2016-01-01

    Automated segmentation is a useful method for studying large brain structures such as the cerebellum and brainstem. However, automated segmentation may lead to inaccuracy and/or undesirable boundary. The goal of the present study was to investigate whether SegAdapter, a machine learning-based method, is useful for automatically correcting large segmentation errors and disagreement in anatomical definition. We further assessed the robustness of the method in handling size of training set, differences in head coil usage, and amount of brain atrophy. High resolution T1-weighted images were acquired from 30 healthy controls scanned with either an 8-channel or 32-channel head coil. Ten patients, who suffered from brain atrophy because of fragile X-associated tremor/ataxia syndrome, were scanned using the 32-channel head coil. The initial segmentations of the cerebellum and brainstem were generated automatically using Freesurfer. Subsequently, Freesurfer's segmentations were both manually corrected to serve as the gold standard and automatically corrected by SegAdapter. Using only 5 scans in the training set, spatial overlap with manual segmentation in Dice coefficient improved significantly from 0.956 (for Freesurfer segmentation) to 0.978 (for SegAdapter-corrected segmentation) for the cerebellum and from 0.821 to 0.954 for the brainstem. Reducing the training set size to 2 scans only decreased the Dice coefficient ≤0.002 for the cerebellum and ≤ 0.005 for the brainstem compared to the use of training set size of 5 scans in corrective learning. The method was also robust in handling differences between the training set and the test set in head coil usage and the amount of brain atrophy, which reduced spatial overlap only by segmentation and corrective learning provides a valuable method for accurate and efficient segmentation of the cerebellum and brainstem, particularly in large-scale neuroimaging studies, and potentially for segmenting other neural regions as

  4. De Sedibus et Causis Morborum: is Essential Tremor a Primary Disease of the Cerebellum?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louis, Elan D

    2016-06-01

    Morgagni's 1761 publication of De sedibus et causis morborum (i.e., of the Seats and Causes of Diseases) represented a paradigmatic moment in the history of medicine. The book ushered in a new way of conceptualizing human disease, shattering old dogma, and linking constellations of symptoms and signs (i.e., clinical disease) with anatomic pathology in specific organs (i.e., organ disease). This was the anatomical-clinical method, and it attempted to unveil "the seat" of each disease in a specific organ. Essential tremor (ET) is among the most common neurological diseases. There is little debate that the origin of ET lies in the brain, but if one tries to delve more deeply than this, things become murky. The dogma for the past 40 years has been that the seat of ET is the inferior olivary nucleus. Closer scrutiny of this model, however, has revealed its many flaws, and the model, based on little if any empiric evidence, has increasingly lost favor. Arising from a wealth of research in recent years is a growing body of knowledge that links ET to a disarrangement of the cerebellum. Data from a variety of sources reviewed in this issue (clinical, neuroimaging, neurochemical, animal model, physiological, and pathological) link ET to the cerebellum. That the cerebellum is involved in an abnormal brain loop that is responsible for ET is not debated. The tantalizing question is whether an abnormality in the cerebellum is the prime mover, and whether the cerebellum is the seat of this particular disease.

  5. The morphometric study of the pons and cerebellum in Korean using MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Hyun Sook; Kim, Dong Ik; Yun, Mi Jin; Chung, In Hyuk; Cho, Young Kook

    1995-01-01

    To evaluate the size of normal pons and cerebellum in vivo and the change in size according to age, and to compare those with measurement of the diseased pons and cerebellum. 121 normal adults (M:F=54:67), 5 patients with OPCD and 19 patients with Wallerian degeneration were studied. The normal group was divided into 5 subgroups according to the age (ranged from 20 to 72 years). 1.5T GE Signa MR unit was used. On axial plane, the AP(A) and transverse(B) diameters of the pons, the size of the middle cerebellar peduncle(C), and transverse diameter of the posterior fossa(D) and the cerebellum(E) were measured. On midsagittal plane, the longitudinal(F) and AP(G) diameters of the basis pontis were measured. The ratios of E/D and F/G were calculated. The student t test was used for statistical analysis. C, E and F/G were 15.5 mm ± 1.3, 99.8 mm ± 4.3 and 1.63 ± 10, respectively. F/G, H/I, and H/J were larger in male (ρ < .01). All data of the pons showed no statistically significant differences among age groups. E of the seventh decades was shorter than that of the third decades (ρ < .05). C(12.7 mm ± 1.4) in OPCD and F/G(1.81 ± .10) in Wallerian degeneration (± < .01) showed the most significant differences when they were compared to the normal. Although the cerebellum decreased in size with age, the pons maintained its size up to eighth decades. The measurement of middle cerebellar peduncle on axial plane (C) and the ratio of basis pontis on midsagittal plane (F/G) were important in the evaluation of OPCD and Wallerian degeneration, respectively

  6. GENE EXPRESSION PROFILES IN THE DEVELOPING RAT CEREBELLUM AND HIPPOCAMPUS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Development of the nervous system is a complex program, involving coordinated growth of axons and their targets. In rodents, rapid brain growth occurs during early postnatal development. At this time, several fundamental processes, such as dendritic and axonal outgrowth and the e...

  7. Clinical significance of brain SPECT abnormalities of thalami and cerebellum in cerebral palsy with normal MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, C. H.; Lim, S. Y.; Lee, I. Y.; Kim, O. H.; Bai, M. S.; Kim, S. J.; Yoon, S. N.; Cho, C. W.

    1997-01-01

    The cerebral palsy(CP) encephalopathies are often of uncertain etiology and various functional image findings comparing with anatomical image findings have been reported. However, only a few have mentioned its clinical implications. The purpose of our report is to compare clinical severity and functional SPECT abnormalities of thalami and cerebellum in CP patients with normal MRI. Thirty six CP patients with bilateral spastic palsy who had normal MRI and brain SPECT were studied from July 1996 to September 1997. The patients' age at the time of SPECT was 22.84±17.69 months. The patients were divided into two groups according to motor quotient(MQ); moderate defect (>50MQ : n=27 MQ=22.78±10.36), mild defect ( 2 test. Brain SPECT was performed following IV administration of 0.05-0.1 mCi/kg (minimum 2.0 mCi) of Tc-99m ECD and chloral hydrate sedation (50-80 mg/kg p.o) using a triple head system (MS 3, Siemens). Interpretation of brain SPECT was visual analysis: severe decrease is defined when the defect is moderate to marked and mild decrease in rCBF as mild. Seven of 36 (19.4%) showed unilateral or bilateral moderate decrease in rCBF in thalami, 20(55.6%) showed mild decrease, and 9(25.0%) showed no decreased rCBF. All 7 who had moderate thalamic defect reveled moderate motor defect clinically. Ten of 36(27.9%) revealed unilateral or bilateral moderate rCBF defect, 23 (63.9%) depicted mild defect, and 3(8.3%) showed no defect. Sixteen with moderate thalamic rCBF defect showed moderate motor defect in 15 patients. There was statistically significant (p=0.02605) relationship between rCBF defect and motor defect in our CP patients. In conclusion, brain SPECT appears sensitive, non-invasive tool in the evaluation as well as in the prognostication of bilateral spastic cerebral palsy patients and deserves further study using larger number of patients

  8. Clinical significance of brain SPECT abnormalities of thalami and cerebellum in cerebral palsy with normal MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, C. H.; Lim, S. Y.; Lee, I. Y.; Kim, O. H.; Bai, M. S.; Kim, S. J.; Yoon, S. N.; Cho, C. W. [College of Medicine, Ajou Univ., Suwon (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-07-01

    The cerebral palsy(CP) encephalopathies are often of uncertain etiology and various functional image findings comparing with anatomical image findings have been reported. However, only a few have mentioned its clinical implications. The purpose of our report is to compare clinical severity and functional SPECT abnormalities of thalami and cerebellum in CP patients with normal MRI. Thirty six CP patients with bilateral spastic palsy who had normal MRI and brain SPECT were studied from July 1996 to September 1997. The patients' age at the time of SPECT was 22.84{+-}17.69 months. The patients were divided into two groups according to motor quotient(MQ); moderate defect (>50MQ : n=27 MQ=22.78{+-}10.36), mild defect (<50MQ : n=9, MQ=66.11{+-}13.87). The degree of rCBF decrease between the two groups was evaluated by {chi}{sup 2} test. Brain SPECT was performed following IV administration of 0.05-0.1 mCi/kg (minimum 2.0 mCi) of Tc-99m ECD and chloral hydrate sedation (50-80 mg/kg p.o) using a triple head system (MS 3, Siemens). Interpretation of brain SPECT was visual analysis: severe decrease is defined when the defect is moderate to marked and mild decrease in rCBF as mild. Seven of 36 (19.4%) showed unilateral or bilateral moderate decrease in rCBF in thalami, 20(55.6%) showed mild decrease, and 9(25.0%) showed no decreased rCBF. All 7 who had moderate thalamic defect reveled moderate motor defect clinically. Ten of 36(27.9%) revealed unilateral or bilateral moderate rCBF defect, 23 (63.9%) depicted mild defect, and 3(8.3%) showed no defect. Sixteen with moderate thalamic rCBF defect showed moderate motor defect in 15 patients. There was statistically significant (p=0.02605) relationship between rCBF defect and motor defect in our CP patients. In conclusion, brain SPECT appears sensitive, non-invasive tool in the evaluation as well as in the prognostication of bilateral spastic cerebral palsy patients and deserves further study using larger number of patients.

  9. Consensus Paper: Towards a Systems-Level View of Cerebellar Function: the Interplay Between Cerebellum, Basal Ganglia, and Cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caligiore, Daniele; Pezzulo, Giovanni; Baldassarre, Gianluca; Bostan, Andreea C; Strick, Peter L; Doya, Kenji; Helmich, Rick C; Dirkx, Michiel; Houk, James; Jörntell, Henrik; Lago-Rodriguez, Angel; Galea, Joseph M; Miall, R Chris; Popa, Traian; Kishore, Asha; Verschure, Paul F M J; Zucca, Riccardo; Herreros, Ivan

    2017-02-01

    Despite increasing evidence suggesting the cerebellum works in concert with the cortex and basal ganglia, the nature of the reciprocal interactions between these three brain regions remains unclear. This consensus paper gathers diverse recent views on a variety of important roles played by the cerebellum within the cerebello-basal ganglia-thalamo-cortical system across a range of motor and cognitive functions. The paper includes theoretical and empirical contributions, which cover the following topics: recent evidence supporting the dynamical interplay between cerebellum, basal ganglia, and cortical areas in humans and other animals; theoretical neuroscience perspectives and empirical evidence on the reciprocal influences between cerebellum, basal ganglia, and cortex in learning and control processes; and data suggesting possible roles of the cerebellum in basal ganglia movement disorders. Although starting from different backgrounds and dealing with different topics, all the contributors agree that viewing the cerebellum, basal ganglia, and cortex as an integrated system enables us to understand the function of these areas in radically different ways. In addition, there is unanimous consensus between the authors that future experimental and computational work is needed to understand the function of cerebellar-basal ganglia circuitry in both motor and non-motor functions. The paper reports the most advanced perspectives on the role of the cerebellum within the cerebello-basal ganglia-thalamo-cortical system and illustrates other elements of consensus as well as disagreements and open questions in the field.

  10. Developmental Anatomy of Cerebellum of Long-Tailed Macaque (Macaca fascicularis at the First Trimester of Gestation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tri Wahyu Pangestiningsih

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Long tailed macaque was one of animal models in biomedical research because it has  many similarities with humans, both anatomical and physiological properties. There were many research about cerebellum associated with its role in the coordination of muscle activity. Understanding of normal development of cerebellum long tailed macaque may help to understand about the development in human cerebellum and its abnormalities. Embryonic and fetal brain samples were obtained through caesarean section and were  then made for histological preparation stained with cresyl violet. Staining results were observed using a microscope with a digital camera. Images obtained are processed by graphics software Adobe Photoshop CS 8.0. Cerebellum Macaca fascicularis Ed40 showed the isthmus and rhombic lip that were composed of ventricular layer, mantle layer, and marginal layer. Cerebellum Macaca fascicularis Fd55 showed future lobes and future  fissures, but the cortex and medulla are not bounded clear. The cortex consisted of the external granular layer, neuroblast basket, and neuroblast stellate, while the  medulla consisted of neuroblast deep cerebellar nuclei. From this research, we concluded that neurons were on stage of proliferation and migration in the embryo aged 40 days, then differentiated and migrated to form cortex  cerebellum and deep cerebellar nuclei at the age of 55 days, but the development of the cerebellum was not fully completed yet.

  11. A novel single nucleotide splice site mutation in FHL1 confirms an Emery-Dreifuss plus phenotype with pulmonary artery hypoplasia and facial dysmorphology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pen, A.E.; Nyegaard, M.; Fang, M.; Jiang, H.; Christensen, R.; Molgaard, H.; Andersen, H.; Ulhoi, B.P.; Ostergaard, J.R.; Vaeth, S.; Sommerlund, M.; Brouwer, A.P.M. de; Zhang, X.; Jensen, U.B.

    2015-01-01

    We describe a Danish family with an, until recently, unknown X-linked disease with muscular dystrophy (MD), facial dysmorphology and pulmonary artery hypoplasia. One patient died suddenly before age 20 and another was resuscitated from cardiac arrest at the age of 28. Linkage analysis pointed to a

  12. The spinal muscular atrophy with pontocerebellar hypoplasia gene VRK1 regulates neuronal migration through an amyloid-β precursor protein-dependent mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinograd-Byk, Hadar; Sapir, Tamar; Cantarero, Lara; Lazo, Pedro A; Zeligson, Sharon; Lev, Dorit; Lerman-Sagie, Tally; Renbaum, Paul; Reiner, Orly; Levy-Lahad, Ephrat

    2015-01-21

    Spinal muscular atrophy with pontocerebellar hypoplasia (SMA-PCH) is an infantile SMA variant with additional manifestations, particularly severe microcephaly. We previously identified a nonsense mutation in Vaccinia-related kinase 1 (VRK1), R358X, as a cause of SMA-PCH. VRK1-R358X is a rare founder mutation in Ashkenazi Jews, and additional mutations in patients of different origins have recently been identified. VRK1 is a nuclear serine/threonine protein kinase known to play multiple roles in cellular proliferation, cell cycle regulation, and carcinogenesis. However, VRK1 was not known to have neuronal functions before its identification as a gene mutated in SMA-PCH. Here we show that VRK1-R358X homozygosity results in lack of VRK1 protein, and demonstrate a role for VRK1 in neuronal migration and neuronal stem cell proliferation. Using shRNA in utero electroporation in mice, we show that Vrk1 knockdown significantly impairs cortical neuronal migration, and affects the cell cycle of neuronal progenitors. Expression of wild-type human VRK1 rescues both proliferation and migration phenotypes. However, kinase-dead human VRK1 rescues only the migration impairment, suggesting the role of VRK1 in neuronal migration is partly noncatalytic. Furthermore, we found that VRK1 deficiency in human and mouse leads to downregulation of amyloid-β precursor protein (APP), a known neuronal migration gene. APP overexpression rescues the phenotype caused by Vrk1 knockdown, suggesting that VRK1 affects neuronal migration through an APP-dependent mechanism. Copyright © 2015 the authors 0270-6474/15/350936-08$15.00/0.

  13. Inherited occipital hypoplasia/syringomyelia in the cavalier King Charles spaniel: experiences in setting up a worldwide DNA collection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusbridge, Clare; Knowler, Penny; Rouleau, Guy A; Minassian, Berge A; Rothuizen, Jan

    2005-01-01

    Inherited diseases commonly emerge within pedigree dog populations, often due to use of repeatedly bred carrier sire(s) within a small gene pool. Accurate family records are usually available making linkage analysis possible. However, there are many factors that are intrinsically difficult about collecting DNA and collating pedigree information from a large canine population. The keys to a successful DNA collection program include (1) the need to establish and maintain support from the pedigree breed clubs and pet owners; (2) committed individual(s) who can devote the considerable amount of time and energy to coordinating sample collection and communicating with breeders and clubs; and (3) providing means by which genotypic and phenotypic information can be easily collected and stored. In this article we described the clinical characteristics of inherited occipital hypoplasia/syringomyelia (Chiari type I malformation) in the cavalier King Charles spaniel and our experiences in establishing a pedigree and DNA database to study the disease.

  14. Effect of Cerebellum Radiation Dosimetry on Cognitive Outcomes in Children With Infratentorial Ependymoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merchant, Thomas E., E-mail: thomas.merchant@stjude.org [Division of Radiation Oncology, St. Jude Children' s Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee (United States); Sharma, Shelly [Division of Radiation Oncology, St. Jude Children' s Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee (United States); Xiong, Xiaoping; Wu, Shengjie [Department of Biostatistics, St. Jude Children' s Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee (United States); Conklin, Heather [Department of Psychology, St. Jude Children' s Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee (United States)

    2014-11-01

    Purpose: Cognitive decline is a recognized effect of radiation therapy (RT) in children treated for brain tumors. The importance of the cerebellum and its contribution to cognition have been recognized; however, the effect of RT on cerebellum-linked neurocognitive deficits has yet to be explored. Methods and Materials: Seventy-six children (39 males) at a median 3.3 years of age (range, 1-17 years old) were irradiated for infratentorial ependymoma from 1997 to 2008. The total prescribed dose was 54 to 59.4 Gy administered to the postoperative tumor bed with 5- or 10-mm clinical target volume margin. Age-appropriate cognitive and academic testing was performed prior to the start of RT and was then repeated at 6 months and annually throughout 5 years. The anterior and posterior cerebellum and other normal brain volumes were contoured on postcontrast, T1-weighted postoperative magnetic resonance images registered to treatment planning computed tomography images. Mean doses were calculated and used with time after RT and other clinical covariates to model their effect on neurocognitive test scores. Results: Considering only the statistically significant rates in longitudinal changes for test scores and models that included mean dose, there was a correlation between mean infratentorial dose and intelligence quotient (IQ; −0.190 patients/Gy/year; P=.001), math (−0.164 patients/Gy/year; P=.010), reading (−0.137 patients/Gy/year; P=.011), and spelling scores (−0.147 patients/Gy/year; P=.012), where Gy was measured as the difference between the mean dose received by an individual patient and the mean dose received by the patient group. There was a correlation between mean anterior cerebellum dose and IQ scores (−0.116 patients/Gy/year; P=.042) and mean posterior cerebellum dose and IQ (−0.150 patients/Gy/year; P=.002), math (−0.120 patients/Gy/year; P=.023), reading (−0.111 patients/Gy/year; P=.012), and spelling (−0.117 patients/Gy/year; P=.015

  15. Effect of Cerebellum Radiation Dosimetry on Cognitive Outcomes in Children With Infratentorial Ependymoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merchant, Thomas E.; Sharma, Shelly; Xiong, Xiaoping; Wu, Shengjie; Conklin, Heather

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Cognitive decline is a recognized effect of radiation therapy (RT) in children treated for brain tumors. The importance of the cerebellum and its contribution to cognition have been recognized; however, the effect of RT on cerebellum-linked neurocognitive deficits has yet to be explored. Methods and Materials: Seventy-six children (39 males) at a median 3.3 years of age (range, 1-17 years old) were irradiated for infratentorial ependymoma from 1997 to 2008. The total prescribed dose was 54 to 59.4 Gy administered to the postoperative tumor bed with 5- or 10-mm clinical target volume margin. Age-appropriate cognitive and academic testing was performed prior to the start of RT and was then repeated at 6 months and annually throughout 5 years. The anterior and posterior cerebellum and other normal brain volumes were contoured on postcontrast, T1-weighted postoperative magnetic resonance images registered to treatment planning computed tomography images. Mean doses were calculated and used with time after RT and other clinical covariates to model their effect on neurocognitive test scores. Results: Considering only the statistically significant rates in longitudinal changes for test scores and models that included mean dose, there was a correlation between mean infratentorial dose and intelligence quotient (IQ; −0.190 patients/Gy/year; P=.001), math (−0.164 patients/Gy/year; P=.010), reading (−0.137 patients/Gy/year; P=.011), and spelling scores (−0.147 patients/Gy/year; P=.012), where Gy was measured as the difference between the mean dose received by an individual patient and the mean dose received by the patient group. There was a correlation between mean anterior cerebellum dose and IQ scores (−0.116 patients/Gy/year; P=.042) and mean posterior cerebellum dose and IQ (−0.150 patients/Gy/year; P=.002), math (−0.120 patients/Gy/year; P=.023), reading (−0.111 patients/Gy/year; P=.012), and spelling (−0.117 patients/Gy/year; P=.015

  16. Multiple affinity forms of the calcitonin gene-related peptide receptor in rat cerebellum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chatterjee, T.K.; Fisher, R.A.

    1991-01-01

    Binding of 125I-calcitonin gene-related peptide (125I-CGRP) to rat cerebellum membranes and the sensitivity to guanine nucleotides of binding were investigated. Cerebellum binding sites labeled by 125I-CGRP appear to be highly specific, inasmuch as CGRP inhibited binding with an IC50 of 100 pM but other peptides were inactive or much less active in displacing 125I-CGRP from these sites. 125I-CGRP binding sites in cerebellum membranes were saturable and of high affinity. Scatchard analysis of the saturation binding data revealed a homogeneous population of binding sites, with a KD of 224 ± 28 pM and Bmax of 131 ± 15 fmol/mg of protein. In the presence of guanosine 5'-O-(3-thiotriphosphate) (GTP gamma S) (100 microM), a single population of binding sites, with a KD of 464 ± 77 pM and Bmax of 100 ± 14 fmol/mg of protein, was observed. The kinetics of association of 125I-CGRP with cerebellum membranes were monophasic at all ligand concentrations tested. However, the observed association rate constant (kobs) was not dependent on [125I-CGRP] in a linear fashion in either the absence or the presence of GTP gamma S (100 microM). The kinetics of dissociation of 125I-CGRP from cerebellum membranes were multiexponential, with fast and slow dissociating components having rate constants of 0.34 ± 0.01 and 0.025 ± 0.001 min-1, respectively. The fast dissociating component represented 60 ± 2% of the total specific binding sites. Dissociation of 125I-CGRP from cerebellum sites was much faster in the presence of GTP gamma S (100 microM) but still exhibited dissociation from two affinity components. The rate constants for these components of dissociation were 0.67 ± 0.03 and 0.077 ± 0.007 min-1, with the faster dissociating component representing 66 ± 1% of the total specific binding sites

  17. Reduced ventral cingulum integrity and increased behavioral problems in children with isolated optic nerve hypoplasia and mild to moderate or no visual impairment.

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    Emma A Webb

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: To assess the prevalence of behavioral problems in children with isolated optic nerve hypoplasia, mild to moderate or no visual impairment, and no developmental delay. To identify white matter abnormalities that may provide neural correlates for any behavioral abnormalities identified. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Eleven children with isolated optic nerve hypoplasia (mean age 5.9 years underwent behavioral assessment and brain diffusion tensor imaging, Twenty four controls with isolated short stature (mean age 6.4 years underwent MRI, 11 of whom also completed behavioral assessments. Fractional anisotropy images were processed using tract-based spatial statistics. Partial correlation between ventral cingulum, corpus callosum and optic radiation fractional anisotropy, and child behavioral checklist scores (controlled for age at scan and sex was performed. RESULTS: Children with optic nerve hypoplasia had significantly higher scores on the child behavioral checklist (p<0.05 than controls (4 had scores in the clinically significant range. Ventral cingulum, corpus callosum and optic radiation fractional anisotropy were significantly reduced in children with optic nerve hypoplasia. Right ventral cingulum fractional anisotropy correlated with total and externalising child behavioral checklist scores (r = -0.52, p<0.02, r = -0.46, p<0.049 respectively. There were no significant correlations between left ventral cingulum, corpus callosum or optic radiation fractional anisotropy and behavioral scores. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings suggest that children with optic nerve hypoplasia and mild to moderate or no visual impairment require behavioral assessment to determine the presence of clinically significant behavioral problems. Reduced structural integrity of the ventral cingulum correlated with behavioral scores, suggesting that these white matter abnormalities may be clinically significant. The presence of reduced fractional anisotropy in the optic

  18. Hydroxyurea Treatment and Development of the Rat Cerebellum: Effects on the Neurogenetic Profiles and Settled Patterns of Purkinje Cells and Deep Cerebellar Nuclei Neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martí, Joaquín; Santa-Cruz, M C; Serra, Roger; Hervás, José P

    2016-11-01

    The current paper analyzes the development of the male and female rat cerebellum exposed to hydroxyurea (HU) (300 or 600 mg/kg) as embryo and collected at postnatal day 90. Our study reveals that the administration of this drug compromises neither the cytoarchitecture of the cerebellar cortex nor deep nuclei (DCN). However, in comparison with the saline group, we observed that several cerebellar parameters were lower in the HU injected groups. These parameters included area of the cerebellum, cerebellar cortex length, molecular layer area, Purkinje cell number, granule cell counts, internal granular layer, white matter and cerebellar nuclei areas, and number of deep cerebellar nuclei neurons. These features were larger in the rats injected with saline, smaller in those exposed to 300 mg/kg of HU and smallest in the group receiving 600 mg/kg of this agent. No sex differences in the effect of the HU were observed. In addition, we infer the neurogenetic timetables and the neurogenetic gradients of PCs and DCN neurons in rats exposed to either saline or HU as embryos. For this purpose, 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine was injected into pregnant rats previously administered with saline or HU. This thymidine analog was administered following a progressively delayed cumulative labeling method. The data presented here show that systematic differences exist in the pattern of neurogenesis and in the spatial location of cerebellar neurons between rats injected with saline or HU. No sex differences in the effect of the HU were observed. These findings have implications for the administration of this compound to women in gestation as the effects of HU on the development of the cerebellum might persist throughout their offsprings' life.

  19. Intermittent Theta-Burst Stimulation of the Lateral Cerebellum Increases Functional Connectivity of the Default Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farzan, Faranak; Eldaief, Mark C.; Schmahmann, Jeremy D.; Pascual-Leone, Alvaro

    2014-01-01

    Cerebral cortical intrinsic connectivity networks share topographically arranged functional connectivity with the cerebellum. However, the contribution of cerebellar nodes to distributed network organization and function remains poorly understood. In humans, we applied theta-burst transcranial magnetic stimulation, guided by subject-specific connectivity, to regions of the cerebellum to evaluate the functional relevance of connections between cerebellar and cerebral cortical nodes in different networks. We demonstrate that changing activity in the human lateral cerebellar Crus I/II modulates the cerebral default mode network, whereas vermal lobule VII stimulation influences the cerebral dorsal attention system. These results provide novel insights into the distributed, but anatomically specific, modulatory impact of cerebellar effects on large-scale neural network function. PMID:25186750

  20. MRI measurements of the brain stem and cerebellum in high functioning autistic children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hashimoto, Toshiaki; Tayama, Masanobu; Miyazaki, Masahito; Murakawa, Kazuyoshi; Kuroda, Yasuhiro

    1994-01-01

    To determine involvements of the brain stem and/or cerebellum in autism, we compared midsagittal magnetic resonance images of the brains of high functioning autistic children with those of normal controls. We found that the midbrain and medulla oblongata were significantly smaller in these autistic children than in the control children. The pons area did not differ between the two groups, nor was there any difference in the cerebellar vermis area. The ratio of the brain stem and cerebellum to the posterior fossa area did not differ significantly between the high functioning autistic and the control children. The development of the cerebellar vermis area was delayed in autistic children as compared with that in the control children. Thus, it was suggested that significant anatomical changes in the midbrain and medulla oblongata existed in the autistic children. (author)

  1. MRI measurements of the brain stem and cerebellum in high functioning autistic children

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hashimoto, Toshiaki; Tayama, Masanobu; Miyazaki, Masahito; Murakawa, Kazuyoshi; Kuroda, Yasuhiro [Tokushima Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine

    1994-01-01

    To determine involvements of the brain stem and/or cerebellum in autism, we compared midsagittal magnetic resonance images of the brains of high functioning autistic children with those of normal controls. We found that the midbrain and medulla oblongata were significantly smaller in these autistic children than in the control children. The pons area did not differ between the two groups, nor was there any difference in the cerebellar vermis area. The ratio of the brain stem and cerebellum to the posterior fossa area did not differ significantly between the high functioning autistic and the control children. The development of the cerebellar vermis area was delayed in autistic children as compared with that in the control children. Thus, it was suggested that significant anatomical changes in the midbrain and medulla oblongata existed in the autistic children. (author).

  2. Chronological changes in nonhaemorrhagic brain infarcts with short T1 in the cerebellum and basal ganglia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Komiyama, M.; Nakajima, H.; Nishikawa, M.; Yasui, T. [Dept. of Neurosurgery, Osaka City General Hospital, Miyakojima-Hondouri, Miyakojima, Osaka (Japan)

    2000-07-01

    Our purpose was to investigate nonhaemorrhagic infarcts with a short T1 in the cerebellum and basal ganglia. We carried out repeat MRI on 12 patients with infarcts in the cerebellum or basal ganglia with a short T1. Cerebellar cortical lesions showed high signal on T1-weighted spin-echo images beginning at 2 weeks, which became prominent from 3 weeks to 2 months, and persisted for as long as 14 months after the ictus. The basal ganglia lesions demonstrated slightly high signal from a week after the ictus, which became more intense thereafter. Signal intensity began to fade gradually after 2 months. High signal could be seen at the periphery until 5 months, and then disappeared, while low or isointense signal, seen in the central portion from day 20, persisted thereafter. (orig.)

  3. Quantification of cell death in developing cerebellum by a 14C tracer method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Griffin, W.S.; Woodward, D.J.; Chanda, R.

    1978-01-01

    To study the question of whether or not cell death contributes significantly to normal or stressed postnatal brain development in a way which is biochemically quantifiable, we carried out an experiment to assess the amount of cell death in developing cerebellum. By measuring the loss of DNA content and the loss of 14 C from labelled thymidine previously incorporated into the DNA fraction (DNAF) in X-irradiated neonatal animals, shown by histological methods to have cell death to the degree of degranulating the external granular layer (EGL), we showed that when cells die both label and DNA content are greatly decreased in the cerebellum. Experiments on both normal and malnourished animals showed that cell death does not contribute significantly to cerebellar development in either malnutrition-stressed or normal animals. Here, we present a biochemical tool for assessing cell death and evidence that cell death does not contribute significantly to cerebellar development

  4. Volumetric analysis of regional variability in the cerebellum of children with dyslexia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez, Vindia G; Stuebing, Karla; Juranek, Jenifer; Fletcher, Jack M

    2013-12-01

    Cerebellar deficits and subsequent impairment in procedural learning may contribute to both motor difficulties and reading impairment in dyslexia. We used quantitative magnetic resonance imaging to investigate the role of regional variation in cerebellar anatomy in children with single-word decoding impairments (N = 23), children with impairment in fluency alone (N = 8), and typically developing children (N = 16). Children with decoding impairments (dyslexia) demonstrated no statistically significant differences in overall grey and white matter volumes or cerebellar asymmetry; however, reduced volume in the anterior lobe of the cerebellum relative to typically developing children was observed. These results implicate cerebellar involvement in dyslexia and establish an important foundation for future research on the connectivity of the cerebellum and cortical regions typically associated with reading impairment.

  5. Cerebellum tunes the excitability of the motor system: evidence from peripheral motor axons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nodera, Hiroyuki; Manto, Mario

    2014-12-01

    Cerebellum is highly connected with the contralateral cerebral cortex. So far, the motor deficits observed in acute focal cerebellar lesions in human have been mainly explained on the basis of a disruption of the cerebello-thalamo-cortical projections. Cerebellar circuits have also numerous anatomical and functional interactions with brainstem nuclei and projects also directly to the spinal cord. Cerebellar lesions alter the excitability of peripheral motor axons as demonstrated by peripheral motor threshold-tracking techniques in cerebellar stroke. The biophysical changes are correlated with the functional scores. Nerve excitability measurements represent an attractive tool to extract the rules underlying the tuning of excitability of the motor pathways by the cerebellum and to discover the contributions of each cerebellar nucleus in this key function, contributing to early plasticity and sensorimotor learning.

  6. Chronological changes in nonhaemorrhagic brain infarcts with short T1 in the cerebellum and basal ganglia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Komiyama, M.; Nakajima, H.; Nishikawa, M.; Yasui, T.

    2000-01-01

    Our purpose was to investigate nonhaemorrhagic infarcts with a short T1 in the cerebellum and basal ganglia. We carried out repeat MRI on 12 patients with infarcts in the cerebellum or basal ganglia with a short T1. Cerebellar cortical lesions showed high signal on T1-weighted spin-echo images beginning at 2 weeks, which became prominent from 3 weeks to 2 months, and persisted for as long as 14 months after the ictus. The basal ganglia lesions demonstrated slightly high signal from a week after the ictus, which became more intense thereafter. Signal intensity began to fade gradually after 2 months. High signal could be seen at the periphery until 5 months, and then disappeared, while low or isointense signal, seen in the central portion from day 20, persisted thereafter. (orig.)

  7. Pain Experience is Somatotopically Organized and Overlaps with Pain Anticipation in the Human Cerebellum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michelle Welman, F H S; Smit, Albertine E; Jongen, Joost L M; Tibboel, Dick; van der Geest, Jos N; Holstege, Jan C

    2018-02-26

    Many fMRI studies have shown activity in the cerebellum after peripheral nociceptive stimulation. We investigated whether the areas in the cerebellum that were activated after nociceptive thumb stimulation were separate from those after nociceptive toe stimulation. In an additional experiment, we investigated the same for the anticipation of a nociceptive stimulation on the thumb or toe. For his purpose, we used fMRI after an electrical stimulation of the thumb and toe in 19 adult healthy volunteers. Following nociceptive stimulation, different areas were activated by stimulation on the thumb (lobule VI ipsilaterally and Crus II mainly contralaterally) and toe (lobules VIII-IX and IV-V bilaterally and lobule VI contralaterally), i.e., were somatotopically organized. Cerebellar areas innervated non-somatotopically by both toe and thumb stimulation were the posterior vermis and Crus I, bilaterally. In the anticipation experiment, similar results were found. However, here, the somatotopically activated areas were relatively small for thumb and negligible for toe stimulation, while the largest area was innervated non-somatotopically and consisted mainly of Crus I and lobule VI bilaterally. These findings indicate that nociceptive stimulation and anticipation of nociceptive stimulation are at least partly processed by the same areas in the cerebellum. This was confirmed by an additional conjunction analysis. Based on our findings, we hypothesize that input that is organized in a somatotopical manner reflects direct input from the spinal cord, while non-somatotopically activated parts of the cerebellum receive their information indirectly through cortical and subcortical connections, possibly involved in processing contextual emotional states, like the expectation of pain.

  8. Zebrin II Is Expressed in Sagittal Stripes in the Cerebellum of Dragon Lizards (Ctenophorus sp.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wylie, Douglas R; Hoops, Daniel; Aspden, Joel W; Iwaniuk, Andrew N

    2016-01-01

    Aldolase C, also known as zebrin II (ZII), is a glycolytic enzyme that is expressed in cerebellar Purkinje cells of the vertebrate cerebellum. In both mammals and birds, ZII is expressed heterogeneously, such that there are sagittal stripes of Purkinje cells with high ZII expression (ZII+) alternating with stripes of Purkinje cells with little or no expression (ZII-). In contrast, in snakes and turtles, ZII is not expressed heterogeneously; rather all Purkinje cells are ZII+. Here, we examined the expression of ZII in the cerebellum of lizards to elucidate the evolutionary origins of ZII stripes in Sauropsida. We focused on the central netted dragon (Ctenophorus nuchalis) but also examined cerebellar ZII expression in 5 other dragon species (Ctenophorus spp.). In contrast to what has been observed in snakes and turtles, we found that in these lizards, ZII is heterogeneously expressed. In the posterior part of the cerebellum, on each side of the midline, there were 3 sagittal stripes consisting of Purkinje cells with high ZII expression (ZII+) alternating with 2 sagittal stripes with weaker ZII expression (ZIIw). More anteriorly, most of the Purkinje cells were ZII+, except laterally, where the Purkinje cells did not express ZII (ZII-). Finally, all Purkinje cells in the auricle (flocculus) were ZII-. Overall, the parasagittal heterogeneous expression of ZII in the cerebellum of lizards is similar to that in mammals and birds, and contrasts with the homogenous ZII+ expression seen in snakes and turtles. We suggest that a sagittal heterogeneous expression of ZII represents the ancestral condition in stem reptiles which was lost in snakes and turtles. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  9. Influence of Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation to the Cerebellum on Standing Posture Control

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    Yasuto Inukai

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Damage to the vestibular cerebellum results in dysfunctional standing posture control. Patients with cerebellum dysfunction have a larger sway in the center of gravity while standing compared with healthy subjects. Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS is a noninvasive technique for selectively exciting or inhibiting specific neural structures with potential applications in functional assessment and treatment of neural disorders. However, the specific stimulation parameters for influencing postural control have not been assessed. In this study, we investigated the influence of tDCS when applied over the cerebellum on standing posture control. Sixteen healthy subjects received tDCS (20 min, 2 mA over the scalp 2 cm below the inion. In experiment 1, all 16 subjects received tDCS under three stimulus conditions, Sham, Cathodal, and Anodal, in a random order with the second electrode placed on the forehead. In experiment 2, five subjects received cathodal stimulation only with the second electrode placed over the right buccinator muscle. Center of gravity sway was measured twice for 60 s before and after tDCS in a standing posture with eyes open and legs closed, and average total locus length, locus length per second, rectangular area, and enveloped area were calculated. In experiment 1, total locus length and locus length per second decreased significantly after cathodal stimulation but not after anodal or sham stimulation, while no tDCS condition influenced rectangular or enveloped areas. In experiment 2, cathodal tDCS again significantly reduced total locus length and locus length per second but not rectangular and enveloped areas. The effects of tDCS on postural control are polarity-dependent, likely reflecting the selective excitation or inhibition of cerebellar Purkinje cells. Cathodal tDCS to the cerebellum of healthy subjects can alter body sway (velocity.

  10. Migraineurs without aura show microstructural abnormalities in the cerebellum and frontal lobe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granziera, C; Romascano, D; Daducci, A; Roche, A; Vincent, M; Krueger, G; Hadjikhani, N

    2013-12-01

    The involvement of the cerebellum in migraine pathophysiology is not well understood. We used a biparametric approach at high-field MRI (3 T) to assess the structural integrity of the cerebellum in 15 migraineurs with aura (MWA), 23 migraineurs without aura (MWoA), and 20 healthy controls (HC). High-resolution T1 relaxation maps were acquired together with magnetization transfer images in order to probe microstructural and myelin integrity. Clusterwise analysis was performed on T1 and magnetization transfer ratio (MTR) maps of the cerebellum of MWA, MWoA, and HC using an ANOVA and a non-parametric clusterwise permutation F test, with age and gender as covariates and correction for familywise error rate. In addition, mean MTR and T1 in frontal regions known to be highly connected to the cerebellum were computed. Clusterwise comparison among groups showed a cluster of lower MTR in the right Crus I of MWoA patients vs. HC and MWA subjects (p = 0.04). Univariate and bivariate analysis on T1 and MTR contrasts showed that MWoA patients had longer T1 and lower MTR in the right and left pars orbitalis compared to MWA (p < 0.01 and 0.05, respectively), but no differences were found with HC. Lower MTR and longer T1 point at a loss of macromolecules and/or micro-edema in Crus I and pars orbitalis in MWoA patients vs. HC and vs. MWA. The pathophysiological implications of these findings are discussed in light of recent literature.

  11. Cerebellum-specific and age-dependent expression of an endogenous retrovirus with intact coding potential

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    Itoh Takayuki

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Endogenous retroviruses (ERVs, including murine leukemia virus (MuLV type-ERVs (MuLV-ERVs, are presumed to occupy ~10% of the mouse genome. In this study, following the identification of a full-length MuLV-ERV by in silico survey of the C57BL/6J mouse genome, its distribution in different mouse strains and expression characteristics were investigated. Results Application of a set of ERV mining protocols identified a MuLV-ERV locus with full coding potential on chromosome 8 (named ERVmch8. It appears that ERVmch8 shares the same genomic locus with a replication-incompetent MuLV-ERV, called Emv2; however, it was not confirmed due to a lack of relevant annotation and Emv2 sequence information. The ERVmch8 sequence was more prevalent in laboratory strains compared to wild-derived strains. Among 16 different tissues of ~12 week-old female C57BL/6J mice, brain homogenate was the only tissue with evident expression of ERVmch8. Further ERVmch8 expression analysis in six different brain compartments and four peripheral neuronal tissues of C57BL/6J mice revealed no significant expression except for the cerebellum in which the ERVmch8 locus' low methylation status was unique compared to the other brain compartments. The ERVmch8 locus was found to be surrounded by genes associated with neuronal development and/or inflammation. Interestingly, cerebellum-specific ERVmch8 expression was age-dependent with almost no expression at 2 weeks and a plateau at 6 weeks. Conclusions The ecotropic ERVmch8 locus on the C57BL/6J mouse genome was relatively undermethylated in the cerebellum, and its expression was cerebellum-specific and age-dependent.

  12. Hypoglycemia induced changes in cholinergic receptor expression in the cerebellum of diabetic rats

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    Anju TR

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Glucose homeostasis in humans is an important factor for the functioning of nervous system. Hypoglycemia and hyperglycemia is found to be associated with central and peripheral nerve system dysfunction. Changes in acetylcholine receptors have been implicated in the pathophysiology of many major diseases of the central nervous system (CNS. In the present study we showed the effects of insulin induced hypoglycemia and streptozotocin induced diabetes on the cerebellar cholinergic receptors, GLUT3 and muscle cholinergic activity. Results showed enhanced binding parameters and gene expression of Muscarinic M1, M3 receptor subtypes in cerebellum of diabetic (D and hypoglycemic group (D + IIH and C + IIH. α7nAchR gene expression showed a significant upregulation in diabetic group and showed further upregulated expression in both D + IIH and C + IIH group. AchE expression significantly upregulated in hypoglycemic and diabetic group. ChAT showed downregulation and GLUT3 expression showed a significant upregulation in D + IIH and C + IIH and diabetic group. AchE activity enhanced in the muscle of hypoglycemic and diabetic rats. Our studies demonstrated a functional disturbance in the neuronal glucose transporter GLUT3 in the cerebellum during insulin induced hypoglycemia in diabetic rats. Altered expression of muscarinic M1, M3 and α7nAchR and increased muscle AchE activity in hypoglycemic rats in cerebellum is suggested to cause cognitive and motor dysfunction. Hypoglycemia induced changes in ChAT and AchE gene expression is suggested to cause impaired acetycholine metabolism in the cerebellum. Cerebellar dysfunction is associated with seizure generation, motor deficits and memory impairment. The results shows that cerebellar cholinergic neurotransmission is impaired during hyperglycemia and hypoglycemia and the hypoglycemia is causing more prominent imbalance in cholinergic neurotransmission which is suggested to be a cause of cerebellar

  13. Multiple zebrafish atoh1 genes specify a diversity of neuronal types in the zebrafish cerebellum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kidwell, Chelsea U; Su, Chen-Ying; Hibi, Masahiko; Moens, Cecilia B

    2018-06-01

    A single Atoh1 basic-helix-loop-helix transcription factor specifies multiple neuron types in the mammalian cerebellum and anterior hindbrain. The zebrafish genome encodes three paralagous atoh1 genes whose functions in cerebellum and anterior hindbrain development we explore here. With use of a transgenic reporter, we report that zebrafish atoh1c-expressing cells are organized in two distinct domains that are separated both by space and developmental time. An early isthmic expression domain gives rise to an extracerebellar population in rhombomere 1 and an upper rhombic lip domain gives rise to granule cell progenitors that migrate to populate all four granule cell territories of the fish cerebellum. Using genetic mutants we find that of the three zebrafish atoh1 paralogs, atoh1c and atoh1a are required for the full complement of granule neurons. Surprisingly, the two genes are expressed in non-overlapping granule cell progenitor populations, indicating that fish use duplicate atoh1 genes to generate granule cell diversity that is not detected in mammals. Finally, live imaging of granule cell migration in wildtype and atoh1c mutant embryos reveals that while atoh1c is not required for granule cell specification per se, it is required for granule cells to delaminate and migrate away from the rhombic lip. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Relationship between structural abnormalities in the cerebellum and dementia, posttraumatic stress disorder and bipolar disorder

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    Leonardo Baldaçara

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT. New evidence suggests that the cerebellum has structural and functional abnormalities in psychiatric disorders. Objective: In this research, the goal was to measure the volume of the cerebellum and its subregions in individuals with psychiatric disorders and to relate these findings to their symptoms. Methods: Patients with different degrees of cognitive impairment (Epidemiology of the Elderly - UNIFESP and patients with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD from population studies were analyzed. Also, patients with bipolar disorder from an outpatient clinic (Center for the Study of Mood and Anxiety Disorders, Universidade Federal da Bahia were recruited for this study. All subjects underwent a 1.5T structural magnetic resonance scan. Volumetric measures and symptom measurements, by psychometric scales, were performed and compared between patients and controls. Results: The cerebellum volume was reduced in patients with cognitive impairment without dementia and with dementia, in patients with PTSD, and in patients with bipolar disorder compared to controls. In dementia and PTSD, the left cerebellar hemisphere and vermis volume were reduced. In bipolar disorder, volumes of both hemispheres and the vermis were reduced. In the first two studies, these cerebellar volumetric reductions correlated with symptoms of the disease. Conclusion: The exact nature of cerebellar involvement in mental processes is still not fully understood. However, abnormalities in cerebellar structure and its functions have been reported in some of these diseases. Future studies with larger samples are needed to clarify these findings and investigate whether they are important for treatment and prognosis.

  15. Red sorrel (Hibiscus Sabdariffa) prevents the ethanol-induced deficits of Purkinje cells in the cerebellum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suryanti, S; Partadiredja, G; Atthobari, J

    2015-01-01

    The present study is aimed at investigating the possible protective effects of H. sabdariffa on ethanol-elicited deficits of motor coordination and estimated total number of the Purkinje cells of the cerebellums of adolescent male Wistar rats. Forty male Wistar rats aged 21 days were divided into five groups. Na/wtr group was given water orally and injected with normal saline intra peritoneally (ip). Eth/wtr group was given water orally and ethanol (ip). Another three experimental groups (Eth/Hsab) were given different dosages of H. sabdariffa and ethanol (ip). All groups were treated intermittently for the total period of treatment of two weeks. The motor coordination of rats was tested prior and subsequent to the treatments. The rats were euthanized, and their cerebellums were examined. The total number of Purkinje cells was estimated using physical fractionator method. Upon revolving drum test, the number of falls of rats increased following ethanol treatment. There was no significant difference between the total number of falls prior and subsequent to treatment in all Eth/Hsab groups. The estimated total number of Purkinje cells in Eth/Hsab groups was higher than in Eth/wtr group. H. sabdariffa may prevent the ethanol-induced deficits of motor coordination and estimated total number of Purkinje cells of the cerebellums in adolescent rats (Tab. 3, Fig. 1, Ref. 42).

  16. Postnatal Expression of V2 Vasopressin Receptor Splice Variants in the Rat Cerebellum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas, Karina J.; Sarmiento, José M.; Ehrenfeld, Pamela; Añazco, Carolina C.; Villanueva, Carolina I.; Carmona, Pamela L.; Brenet, Marianne; Navarro, Javier; Müller-Esterl, Werner; Figueroa, Carlos D.; González, Carlos B.

    2010-01-01

    The V2 vasopressin receptor gene contains an alternative splice site in exon-3, which leads to the generation of two splice variants (V2a and V2b) first identified in the kidney. The open reading frame of the alternatively spliced V2b transcripten codes a truncated receptor, showing the same amino acid sequence as the canonical V2a receptor up to the 6th transmembrane segment, but displaying a distinct sequence to the corresponding 7th transmembrane segment and C-terminal domain relative to the V2a receptor. Here, we demonstrate the postnatal expression of V2a and V2b variants in the rat cerebellum. Most importantly, we showed by in situ hybridization and immunocytochemistry that both V2 splice variants were preferentially expressed in Purkinje cells, from early to late postnatal development. In addition, both variants were transiently expressed in the neuroblastic external granule cells and Bergmann fibers. These results indicate that the cellular distributions of both splice variants are developmentally regulated, and suggest that the transient expression of the V2 receptor is involved in the mechanisms of cerebellar cytodifferentiation by AVP. Finally, transfected CHO-K1 .expressing similar amounts of both V2 splice variants, as that found in the cerebellum, showed a significant reduction in the surface expression of V2a receptors, suggesting that the differential expression of the V2 splice variants regulate the vasopressin signaling in the cerebellum. PMID:19281786

  17. Zebrin II compartmentation of the cerebellum in a basal insectivore, the Madagascan hedgehog tenrec Echinops telfairi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sillitoe, Roy V; Künzle, Heinz; Hawkes, Richard

    2003-01-01

    The mammalian cerebellum is histologically uniform. However, underlying the simple laminar architecture is a complex arrangement of parasagittal stripes and transverse zones that can be revealed by the expression of zebrin II/aldolase C. The cerebellar cortex of rodents, for example, is organized into four transverse zones: anterior, central, posterior and nodular. Within the anterior and posterior zones, parasagittal stripes of Purkinje cells expressing zebrin II alternate with those that do not. Zonal boundaries appear to be independent of cerebellar lobulation. To explore this model further, and to broaden our understanding of the evolution of cerebellar patterning, zebrin II expression has been studied in the cerebellum of the Madagascan hedgehog tenrec (Echinops telfairi), a basal insectivore with a lissiform cerebellum with only five lobules. Zebrin II expression in the tenrec reveals an array of four transverse zones as in rodents, two with homogeneous zebrin II expression, two further subdivided into stripes, that closely resembles the expression pattern described in other mammals. We conclude that a zone-and-stripe organization may be a common feature of the mammalian cerebellar vermis and hemispheres, and that zonal boundaries and cerebellar lobules and fissures form independently. PMID:14529046

  18. Study of automated segmentation of the cerebellum and brainstem on brain MR images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayashi, Norio; Matsuura, Yukihiro; Sanada, Shigeru; Suzuki, Masayuki

    2005-01-01

    MR imaging is an important method for diagnosing abnormalities of the brain. This paper presents an automated method to segment the cerebellum and brainstem for brain MR images. MR images were obtained from 10 normal subjects (male 4, female 6; 22-75 years old, average 31.0 years) and 15 patients with brain atrophy (male 3, female 12; 62-85 years of age, average 76.0 years). The automated method consisted of the following four steps: segmentation of the brain on original images, detection of an upper plane of the cerebellum using the Hough transform, correction of the plane using three-dimensional (3D) information, and segmentation of the cerebellum and brainstem using the plane. The results indicated that the regions obtained by the automated method were visually similar to those obtained by a manual method. The average rates of coincidence between the automated method and manual method were 83.0±9.0% in normal subjects and 86.4±3.6% in patients. (author)

  19. Contribution of the Cerebellum in Cue-Dependent Force Changes During an Isometric Precision Grip Task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kutz, Dieter F; Schmid, Barbara C; Meindl, Tobias; Timmann, Dagmar; Kolb, Florian P

    2016-08-01

    The "raspberry task" represents a precision grip task that requires continuous adjustment of grip forces and pull forces. During this task, subjects use a specialised grip rod and have to increase the pull force linearly while the rod is locked. The positions of the fingers are unrestrained and freely selectable. From the finger positions and the geometry of the grip rod, a physical lever was derived which is a comprehensive measurement of the subject's grip behaviour. In this study, the involvement of the cerebellum in establishing cued force changes (CFC) was examined. The auditory stimulus was associated with a motor behaviour that has to be readjusted during an ongoing movement that already started. Moreover, cerebellar involvement on grip behaviour was examined. The results show that patients presenting with degenerating cerebellar disease (CBL) were able to elicit CFC and were additionally able to optimise grip behaviour by minimising the lever. Comparison of the results of CBL with a control group of healthy subjects showed, however, that the CFC incidence was significantly lower and the reduction of the lever was less in CBL. Hence, the cerebellum is involved not only in the classical conditioning of reflexes but also in the association of sensory stimuli with complex changes in motor behaviour. Furthermore, the cerebellum is involved in the optimisation of grip behaviour during ongoing movements. Recent studies lead to the assumption that the cerebello-reticulo-spinal pathway might be important for the reduced optimisation of grip behaviour in CBL.

  20. Stimulating the cerebellum affects visuomotor adaptation but not intermanual transfer of learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Block, Hannah; Celnik, Pablo

    2013-12-01

    When systematic movement errors occur, the brain responds with a systematic change in motor behavior. This type of adaptive motor learning can transfer intermanually; adaptation of movements of the right hand in response to training with a perturbed visual signal (visuomotor adaptation) may carry over to the left hand. While visuomotor adaptation has been studied extensively, it is unclear whether the cerebellum, a structure involved in adaptation, is important for intermanual transfer as well. We addressed this question with three experiments in which subjects reached with their right hands as a 30° visuomotor rotation was introduced. Subjects received anodal or sham transcranial direct current stimulation on the trained (experiment 1) or untrained (experiment 2) hemisphere of the cerebellum, or, for comparison, motor cortex (M1). After the training period, subjects reached with their left hand, without visual feedback, to assess intermanual transfer of learning aftereffects. Stimulation of the right cerebellum caused faster adaptation, but none of the stimulation sites affected transfer. To ascertain whether cerebellar stimulation would increase transfer if subjects learned faster as well as a larger amount, in experiment 3 anodal and sham cerebellar groups experienced a shortened training block such that the anodal group learned more than sham. Despite the difference in adaptation magnitude, transfer was similar across these groups, although smaller than in experiment 1. Our results suggest that intermanual transfer of visuomotor learning does not depend on cerebellar activity and that the number of movements performed at plateau is an important predictor of transfer.

  1. Cerebellum-from J. E. Purkyně up to Contemporary Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vožeh, František

    2017-06-01

    Jan. Evangelista Purkyně, the most famous among Czech physiologists, was the first who identified and described the largest nerve cells in the cerebellum. The most distinguished researchers of the nervous system then recommended naming these neurons Purkinje cells in his honor. Through experiments by Purkinje and his followers, the function of the cerebellum was properly attributed to the precision of motor movements and skills. This traditional concept was valid until early 1990s, when it was readjusted and replenished with new and important findings. It was discovered that the cerebellar cortex contains more neurons than the cerebral cortex and shortly thereafter was gradually revealed that such enormous numbers of neural cells are not without impact on brain functions. It was shown that the cerebellum, in addition to its traditional role, also participates in higher nervous activity. These new findings were obtained thanks to the introduction of modern methods of examination into the clinical praxis, and experimental procedures using animal models of cerebellar disorders described in this work.

  2. Cutaneous and periodontal inputs to the cerebellum of the naked mole-rat (Heterocephalus glaber).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarko, Diana K; Leitch, Duncan B; Catania, Kenneth C

    2013-01-01

    The naked mole-rat (Heterocephalus glaber) is a small fossorial rodent with specialized dentition that is reflected by the large cortical area dedicated to representation of the prominent incisors. Due to naked mole-rats' behavioral reliance on the incisors for digging and for manipulating objects, as well as their ability to move the lower incisors independently, we hypothesized that expanded somatosensory representations of the incisors would be present within the cerebellum in order to accommodate a greater degree of proprioceptive, cutaneous, and periodontal input. Multiunit electrophysiological recordings targeting the ansiform lobule were used to investigate tactile inputs from receptive fields on the entire body with a focus on the incisors. Similar to other rodents, a fractured somatotopy appeared to be present with discrete representations of the same receptive fields repeated within each folium of the cerebellum. These findings confirm the presence of somatosensory inputs to a large area of the naked mole-rat cerebellum with particularly extensive representations of the lower incisors and mystacial vibrissae. We speculate that these extensive inputs facilitate processing of tactile cues as part of a sensorimotor integration network that optimizes how sensory stimuli are acquired through active exploration and in turn adjusts motor outputs (such as independent movement of the lower incisors). These results highlight the diverse sensory specializations and corresponding brain organizational schemes that have evolved in different mammals to facilitate exploration of and interaction with their environment.

  3. Cutaneous and periodontal inputs to the cerebellum of the naked mole-rat (Heterocephalus glaber

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana K Sarko

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The naked mole-rat (Heterocephalus glaber is a small fossorial rodent with specialized dentition that is reflected by the large cortical area dedicated to representation of the prominent incisors. Due to naked mole-rats’ behavioral reliance on the incisors for digging and for manipulating objects, as well as their ability to move the lower incisors independently, we hypothesized that expanded somatosensory representations of the incisors would be present within the cerebellum in order to accommodate a greater degree of proprioceptive, cutaneous, and periodontal input. Multiunit electrophysiological recordings targeting the ansiform lobule were used to investigate tactile inputs from receptive fields on the entire body with a focus on the incisors. Similar to other rodents, a fractured somatotopy appeared to be present with discrete representations of the same receptive fields repeated within each folium of the cerebellum. These findings confirm the presence of somatosensory inputs to a large area of the naked mole-rat cerebellum with particularly extensive representations of the lower incisors and mystacial vibrissae. We speculate that these extensive inputs facilitate processing of tactile cues as part of a sensorimotor integration network that optimizes how sensory stimuli are acquired through active exploration and in turn adjusts motor outputs (such as independent movement of the lower incisors. These results highlight the diverse sensory specializations and corresponding brain organizational schemes that have evolved in different mammals to facilitate exploration of and interaction with their environment.

  4. Relationship between structural abnormalities in the cerebellum and dementia, posttraumatic stress disorder and bipolar disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldaçara, Leonardo; Borgio, João Guilherme Fiorani; Araújo, Célia; Nery-Fernandes, Fabiana; Lacerda, Acioly Luiz Taveres; Moraes, Walter André Dos Santos; Montaño, Maria Beatriz Marcondes Macedo; Rocha, Marlos; Quarantini, Lucas C; Schoedl, Aline; Pupo, Mariana; Mello, Marcelo F; Andreoli, Sergio B; Miranda-Scippa, Angela; Ramos, Luiz Roberto; Mari, Jair J; Bressan, Rodrigo Affonseca; Jackowski, Andrea Parolin

    2012-01-01

    New evidence suggests that the cerebellum has structural and functional abnormalities in psychiatric disorders. In this research, the goal was to measure the volume of the cerebellum and its subregions in individuals with psychiatric disorders and to relate these findings to their symptoms. Patients with different degrees of cognitive impairment (Epidemiology of the Elderly - UNIFESP) and patients with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) from population studies were analyzed. Also, patients with bipolar disorder from an outpatient clinic (Center for the Study of Mood and Anxiety Disorders, Universidade Federal da Bahia) were recruited for this study. All subjects underwent a 1.5T structural magnetic resonance scan. Volumetric measures and symptom measurements, by psychometric scales, were performed and compared between patients and controls. The cerebellum volume was reduced in patients with cognitive impairment without dementia and with dementia, in patients with PTSD, and in patients with bipolar disorder compared to controls. In dementia and PTSD, the left cerebellar hemisphere and vermis volume were reduced. In bipolar disorder, volumes of both hemispheres and the vermis were reduced. In the first two studies, these cerebellar volumetric reductions correlated with symptoms of the disease. The exact nature of cerebellar involvement in mental processes is still not fully understood. However, abnormalities in cerebellar structure and its functions have been reported in some of these diseases. Future studies with larger samples are needed to clarify these findings and investigate whether they are important for treatment and prognosis.

  5. Abnormal trajectories in cerebellum and brainstem volumes in carriers of the fragile X premutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jun Yi; Hessl, David; Hagerman, Randi J; Simon, Tony J; Tassone, Flora; Ferrer, Emilio; Rivera, Susan M

    2017-07-01

    Fragile X-associated tremor/ataxia syndrome (FXTAS) is a late-onset neurodegenerative disorder typically affecting male premutation carriers with 55-200 CGG trinucleotide repeat expansions in the FMR1 gene after age 50. The aim of this study was to examine whether cerebellar and brainstem changes emerge during development or aging in late life. We retrospectively analyzed magnetic resonance imaging scans from 322 males (age 8-81 years). Volume changes in the cerebellum and brainstem were contrasted with those in the ventricles and whole brain. Compared to the controls, premutation carriers without FXTAS showed significantly accelerated volume decrease in the cerebellum and whole brain, flatter inverted U-shaped trajectory of the brainstem, and larger ventricles. Compared to both older controls and premutation carriers without FXTAS, carriers with FXTAS exhibited significant volume decrease in the cerebellum and whole brain and accelerated volume decrease in the brainstem. We therefore conclude that cerebellar and brainstem volumes were likely affected during both development and progression of neurodegeneration in premutation carriers, suggesting that interventions may need to start early in adulthood to be most effective. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. The evolution of the vertebrate cerebellum: absence of a proliferative external granule layer in a basal ray-finned fish

    OpenAIRE

    Butts, Thomas; Modrell, Melinda S.; Baker, Clare V. H.; Wingate, Richard J. T.

    2014-01-01

    The cerebellum represents one of the most morphologically variable structures in the vertebrate brain. To shed light on its evolutionary history, we have examined the molecular anatomy and proliferation of the developing cerebellum of the North American paddlefish, Polyodon spathula. Absence of an external proliferative cerebellar layer and the restriction of Atonal1 expression to the rhombic lip and valvular primordium demonstrate that transit amplification in a cerebellar external germinal ...

  7. Robust Machine Learning-Based Correction on Automatic Segmentation of the Cerebellum and Brainstem.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Yi Wang

    Full Text Available Automated segmentation is a useful method for studying large brain structures such as the cerebellum and brainstem. However, automated segmentation may lead to inaccuracy and/or undesirable boundary. The goal of the present study was to investigate whether SegAdapter, a machine learning-based method, is useful for automatically correcting large segmentation errors and disagreement in anatomical definition. We further assessed the robustness of the method in handling size of training set, differences in head coil usage, and amount of brain atrophy. High resolution T1-weighted images were acquired from 30 healthy controls scanned with either an 8-channel or 32-channel head coil. Ten patients, who suffered from brain atrophy because of fragile X-associated tremor/ataxia syndrome, were scanned using the 32-channel head coil. The initial segmentations of the cerebellum and brainstem were generated automatically using Freesurfer. Subsequently, Freesurfer's segmentations were both manually corrected to serve as the gold standard and automatically corrected by SegAdapter. Using only 5 scans in the training set, spatial overlap with manual segmentation in Dice coefficient improved significantly from 0.956 (for Freesurfer segmentation to 0.978 (for SegAdapter-corrected segmentation for the cerebellum and from 0.821 to 0.954 for the brainstem. Reducing the training set size to 2 scans only decreased the Dice coefficient ≤0.002 for the cerebellum and ≤ 0.005 for the brainstem compared to the use of training set size of 5 scans in corrective learning. The method was also robust in handling differences between the training set and the test set in head coil usage and the amount of brain atrophy, which reduced spatial overlap only by <0.01. These results suggest that the combination of automated segmentation and corrective learning provides a valuable method for accurate and efficient segmentation of the cerebellum and brainstem, particularly in large

  8. The prominent role of the cerebellum in the learning, origin and advancement of culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandervert, Larry

    2016-01-01

    Vandervert described how, in collaboration with the cerebral cortex, unconscious learning of cerebellar internal models leads to enhanced executive control in working memory in expert music performance and in scientific discovery. Following Vandervert's arguments, it is proposed that since music performance and scientific discovery, two pillars of cultural learning and advancement, are learned through in cerebellar internal models, it is reasonable that additional if not all components of culture may be learned in the same way. Within this perspective strong evidence is presented that argues that the learning, maintenance, and advancement of culture are accomplished primarily by recently-evolved (the last million or so years) motor/cognitive functions of the cerebellum and not primarily by the cerebral cortex as previously assumed. It is suggested that the unconscious cerebellar mechanism behind the origin and learning of culture greatly expands Ito's conception of the cerebellum as "a brain for an implicit self." Through the mechanism of predictive sequence detection in cerebellar internal models related to the body, other persons, or the environment, it is shown how individuals can unconsciously learn the elements of culture and yet, at the same time, be in social sync with other members of culture. Further, this predictive, cerebellar mechanism of socialization toward the norms of culture is hypothesized to be diminished among children who experience excessive television viewing, which results in lower grades, poor socialization, and diminished executive control. It is concluded that the essential components of culture are learned and sustained not by the cerebral cortex alone as many traditionally believe, but are learned through repetitious improvements in prediction and control by internal models in the cerebellum. From this perspective, the following new explanations of culture are discussed: (1) how culture can be learned unconsciously but yet be socially

  9. Effect of x irradiation on the biochemical maturation of rat cerebellum: Metabolism of [14C]glucose and [14C]acetate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patel, A.J.; Balazs, R.

    1975-01-01

    The effect was studied of selective x-irradiation of the cerebellum (100 R daily in the first 10 days after birth) on the maturation of glucose metabolism and the development of metabolic compartmentation, in 10-, 16-, and 23-day-old rats by using, respectively, [2- 14 C]glucose and [1- 14 C] acetate (40 μ Ci/100 g body weight each) as precursors. At day 10 significant changes, in comparison with the unirradiated controls, were observed: aspartate and γ-aminobutyrate, respectively, contained 36 percent and 64 percent more and glutamine 42 percent less glucose-carbon combined in amino acids; the glutamine/glutamate specific radioactivity ratio (RSA) was 25 percent less, and the conversion of both glucose and acetate carbons into acid-insoluble constituents was markedly reduced. However, in the postirradiation period both the conversion of glucose carbon into amino acids, and the RSA of glutamine after the administration of [ 14 C]acetate increased in a more or less normal fashion, although certain quantitative differences were noted. It seems, therefore, that the normal progress of biochemical differentiation was only affected to a small degree by the irradiation of the cerebellum, although the treatment interfered severely with cell proliferation. (U.S.)

  10. CHANGES IN THE DNA-BINDING OF SEVERAL TRANSCRIPTION FACTORS IN THE DEVELOPING RAT CEREBELLUM BY PCBS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    PCBs are a class of persistent halogenated aromatic hydrocarbon chemical pollutants and considered as one of the major environmental contaminants resulting from intensive industrial use and inadequate disposal. In utero exposure to PCBs has been known to cause delayed neuronal de...

  11. A rare severe enamel defect on an upper pig molar from an early medieval stronghold in Prague (Czech Republic) - short communication

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Teegen, W.-R.; Kyselý, René

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 86, č. 2 (2016), s. 273-285 ISSN 0372-5480 Institutional support: RVO:67985912 Keywords : enamel hypoplasia * severe dental malformation * infection * pig (Sus domesticus) * Middle Ages * weaning Subject RIV: AC - Archeology, Anthropology, Ethnology Impact factor: 0.302, year: 2016 http://www-staro.vef.unizg.hr/vetarhiv/papers/2016-86-2-11.pdf

  12. Spike timing regulation on the millisecond scale by distributed synaptic plasticity at the cerebellum input stage: a simulation study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesus A Garrido

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The way long-term synaptic plasticity regulates neuronal spike patterns is not completely understood. This issue is especially relevant for the cerebellum, which is endowed with several forms of long-term synaptic plasticity and has been predicted to operate as a timing and a learning machine. Here we have used a computational model to simulate the impact of multiple distributed synaptic weights in the cerebellar granular layer network. In response to mossy fiber bursts, synaptic weights at multiple connections played a crucial role to regulate spike number and positioning in granule cells. The weight at mossy fiber to granule cell synapses regulated the delay of the first spike and the weight at mossy fiber and parallel fiber to Golgi cell synapses regulated the duration of the time-window during which the first-spike could be emitted. Moreover, the weights of synapses controlling Golgi cell activation regulated the intensity of granule cell inhibition and therefore the number of spikes that could be emitted. First spike timing was regulated with millisecond precision and the number of spikes ranged from 0 to 3. Interestingly, different combinations of synaptic weights optimized either first-spike timing precision or spike number, efficiently controlling transmission and filtering properties. These results predict that distributed synaptic plasticity regulates the emission of quasi-digital spike patterns on the millisecond time scale and allows the cerebellar granular layer to flexibly control burst transmission along the mossy fiber pathway.

  13. A case of hypoplasia of left lung with very rare associations with congenital absence of left pulmonary artery and right-sided aortic arch

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trilok Chand

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The absence of one of the pulmonary artery with associated hypoplasia of lung and great vessel abnormality is a rare finding. The incidence of this rare congenital abnormality is around 1 in 200,000 live birth. The absence of the left side pulmonary artery is again uncommon, and associated cardiac malformations are usually tetralogy of fallot or septal defects rather than an aortic arch defect. Our case is a unique case in It’s associated congenital anomalies. He was presented with recurrent pneumothorax and hemoptysis, and on thorough workup, he was diagnosed to have an absence of left pulmonary artery with hypoplasia of the left lung and associated right-sided aortic arch. The patient’s family has declined the surgical option, and he was managed conservatively and kept in close follow-up.

  14. Nasomaxillary hypoplasia with a congenitally missing tooth treated with LeFort II osteotomy, autotransplantation, and nickel-titanium alloy wire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishida, Takayoshi; Ikemoto, Shigehiro; Ono, Takashi

    2015-09-01

    In some skeletal Class III adult patients with nasomaxillary hypoplasia, the LeFort I osteotomy provides insufficient correction. This case report describes a 20-year-old woman with a combination of nasomaxillary hypoplasia and a protrusive mandible with a congenitally missing mandibular second premolar. We performed a LeFort II osteotomy for maxillary advancement. Autotransplantation of a tooth was also performed; the donor tooth was used to replace the missing permanent tooth. To increase the chance of success, we applied light continuous force with an improved superelastic nickel-titanium alloy wire technique before extraction and after transplantation. The patient's profile and malocclusion were corrected, and the autotransplanted tooth functioned well. The postero-occlusal relationships were improved, and ideal overbite and overjet relationships were achieved. The methods used in this case represent a remarkable treatment. Copyright © 2015 American Association of Orthodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Chronic Bilateral Slipped Capital Femoral Epiphysis as an Unusual Presentation of Congenital Panhypopituitarism due to Pituitary Hypoplasia in a 17-Year-Old Female

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sasigarn A. Bowden

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available We report an interesting case of a 17-year-old normal-statured female who was diagnosed with congenital panhypopituitarism due to pituitary hypoplasia at the presentation of bilateral slipped capital femoral epiphysis. We emphasized the importance of endocrinologic evaluation in patients with atypical slipped capital femoral epiphysis to prevent potential complication of adrenal crisis during surgery. This case also demonstrates growth without growth hormone which resulted in a delay in diagnosis of congenital hypopituitarism in this patient.

  16. Chronic Bilateral Slipped Capital Femoral Epiphysis as an Unusual Presentation of Congenital Panhypopituitarism due to Pituitary Hypoplasia in a 17-Year-Old Female

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klingele KevinE

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available We report an interesting case of a 17-year-old normal-statured female who was diagnosed with congenital panhypopituitarism due to pituitary hypoplasia at the presentation of bilateral slipped capital femoral epiphysis. We emphasized the importance of endocrinologic evaluation in patients with atypical slipped capital femoral epiphysis to prevent potential complication of adrenal crisis during surgery. This case also demonstrates growth without growth hormone which resulted in a delay in diagnosis of congenital hypopituitarism in this patient.

  17. Three dimensional endo-cardiovascular volume-rendered cine computed tomography of isolated left ventricular apical hypoplasia; A case report and literature review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Sun Hwa; Kim, Yang Min; Lee, Hyun Jong [Sejong General Hospital, Bucheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-02-15

    We report multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) and cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) findings of a 34-year-old female with isolated left ventricular apical hypoplasia. The MDCT and CMR scans displayed a spherical left ventricle (LV) with extensive fatty infiltration within the myocardium at the apex, interventricular septum and inferior wall, anteroapical origin of the papillary muscle, right ventricle wrapping around the deficient LV apex, and impaired systolic function. MDCT visualized morphologic and also functional findings of this unique cardiomyopathy.

  18. Improved imaging of cochlear nerve hypoplasia using a 3-Tesla variable flip-angle turbo spin-echo sequence and a 7-cm surface coil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giesemann, Anja M; Raab, Peter; Lyutenski, Stefan; Dettmer, Sabine; Bültmann, Eva; Frömke, Cornelia; Lenarz, Thomas; Lanfermann, Heinrich; Goetz, Friedrich

    2014-03-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging of the temporal bone has an important role in decision making with regard to cochlea implantation, especially in children with cochlear nerve deficiency. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the usefulness of the combination of an advanced high-resolution T2-weighted sequence with a surface coil in a 3-Tesla magnetic resonance imaging scanner in cases of suspected cochlear nerve aplasia. Prospective study. Seven patients with cochlear nerve hypoplasia or aplasia were prospectively examined using a high-resolution three-dimensional variable flip-angle turbo spin-echo sequence using a surface coil, and the images were compared with the same sequence in standard resolution using a standard head coil. Three neuroradiologists evaluated the magnetic resonance images independently, rating the visibility of the nerves in diagnosing hypoplasia or aplasia. Eight ears in seven patients with hypoplasia or aplasia of the cochlear nerve were examined. The average age was 2.7 years (range, 9 months-5 years). Seven ears had accompanying malformations. The inter-rater reliability in diagnosing hypoplasia or aplasia was greater using the high-resolution three-dimensional variable flip-angle turbo spin-echo sequence (fixed-marginal kappa: 0.64) than with the same sequence in lower resolution (fixed-marginal kappa: 0.06). Examining cases of suspected cochlear nerve aplasia using the high-resolution three-dimensional variable flip-angle turbo spin-echo sequence in combination with a surface coil shows significant improvement over standard methods. © 2013 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  19. Hypoplasia of the basi-occipital bone and persistance of the spheno-occipital synchondrosis in a patient with transitory supplementary fissure of the basi-occipital

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wackenheim, A.

    1985-01-01

    The author had the opportunity to observe the progressive development of a special form of basilar impression characterized by transitory supplementary fissure of the basi-occipital bone, persistance of the spheno-occipital synchondrosis and hypoplasia of the basi-occipital. He proposes to dissociate the general concept of basilar impression and to consider anatomo-clinical entities such as the example described in this paper. (orig.)

  20. Dental enamel Hypoplasia. Investigations on the Bones Exhumed from the Medieval Necropole of Lozova (Republic of Moldova, XIVth–XVth Centuries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Daniel Simalcsik

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Dental hypoplasia is a developmental anomaly based on perturbations of amelogenesis. Hypoplasia defects are part of the unspecific quantitative indicators for the state of health and / or nutritional state during the formation of the dental buds. It is a response of the human organism to physiological stress. The incidence of this dysplasia in a past population can indicate its biological frailty in its attempt to adapt to the environmental changes. The osteological material was excavated in the interval 2010 – 2011 by archaeologists from the Archaeology Centre in Chisinau, from the Medieval cemetery of Lozova (Straseni County, Republic of Moldova, dated for the XIVth and XVth centuries. Fifty one skeletons from 50 inhumation graves have been excavated and analyzed so far. Only 40 individuals had most of their teeth present. The enamel hypoplasia is of linear transversal type, located on the labial surface of the dental crowns, in the median third. The canine is the most affected tooth, followed by the incisors. The incidence of dental enamel hypoplasia at population level (based on the data collected and on the number of graves excavates so far, which does not illustrate the entire population of the cemetery is 7.5%. The incidence of dental caries is 23.53%, of cribra orbitalia – 11.75%, and of cribra cranii externa – 1.96%. The results obtained for a relatively small rural community illustrate a good adaptation to the stressing environmental factors. The possible malnutrition and illness episodes suffered during early childhood were recovered along the growth and development processes.

  1. Subchronic Exposure to Arsenic Represses the TH/TRβ1-CaMK IV Signaling Pathway in Mouse Cerebellum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huai Guan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We previously reported that arsenic (As impaired learning and memory by down-regulating calmodulin-dependent protein kinase IV (CaMK IV in mouse cerebellum. It has been documented that the thyroid hormone receptor (TR/retinoid X receptor (RXR heterodimer and thyroid hormone (TH may be involved in the regulation of CaMK IV. To investigate whether As affects the TR/RXR heterodimer and TH, we determined As concentration in serum and cerebellum, 3,5,3’-triiodothyronine (T3 and thyroxin (T4 levels in serum, and expression of CaMK IV, TR and RXR in cerebellum of mice exposed to As. Cognition function was examined by the step-down passive avoidance task and Morris water maze (MWM tests. Morphology of the cerebellum was observed by Hematoxylin-Eosin staining under light microscope. Our results showed that the concentrations of As in the serum and cerebellum of mice both increased with increasing As-exposure level. A significant positive correlation was found between the two processes. Adeficit in learning and memory was found in the exposed mice. Abnormal morphologic changes of Purkinje cells were observed in cerebellum of the exposed mice. Moreover, the cerebellar expressions of CaMK IV protein and the TRβ gene, and TRβ1 protein were significantly lower in As-exposed mice than those in controls. Subchronic exposure to As appears to increase its level in serum and cerebella of mice, impairing learning and memory and down-regulating expression of TRβ1 as well as down-stream CaMK IV. It is also suggested that the increased As may be responsible for down-regulation of TRβ1 and CaMK IV in cerebellum and that the down-regulated TRβ1 may be involved in As-induced impairment of learning and memory via inhibiting CaMK IV and its down-stream pathway.

  2. Subchronic Exposure to Arsenic Represses the TH/TRβ1-CaMK IV Signaling Pathway in Mouse Cerebellum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Huai; Li, Shuangyue; Guo, Yanjie; Liu, Xiaofeng; Yang, Yi; Guo, Jinqiu; Li, Sheng; Zhang, Cong; Shang, Lixin; Piao, Fengyuan

    2016-01-26

    We previously reported that arsenic (As) impaired learning and memory by down-regulating calmodulin-dependent protein kinase IV (CaMK IV) in mouse cerebellum. It has been documented that the thyroid hormone receptor (TR)/retinoid X receptor (RXR) heterodimer and thyroid hormone (TH) may be involved in the regulation of CaMK IV. To investigate whether As affects the TR/RXR heterodimer and TH, we determined As concentration in serum and cerebellum, 3,5,3'-triiodothyronine (T3) and thyroxin (T4) levels in serum, and expression of CaMK IV, TR and RXR in cerebellum of mice exposed to As. Cognition function was examined by the step-down passive avoidance task and Morris water maze (MWM) tests. Morphology of the cerebellum was observed by Hematoxylin-Eosin staining under light microscope. Our results showed that the concentrations of As in the serum and cerebellum of mice both increased with increasing As-exposure level. A significant positive correlation was found between the two processes. Adeficit in learning and memory was found in the exposed mice. Abnormal morphologic changes of Purkinje cells were observed in cerebellum of the exposed mice. Moreover, the cerebellar expressions of CaMK IV protein and the TRβ gene, and TRβ1 protein were significantly lower in As-exposed mice than those in controls. Subchronic exposure to As appears to increase its level in serum and cerebella of mice, impairing learning and memory and down-regulating expression of TRβ1 as well as down-stream CaMK IV. It is also suggested that the increased As may be responsible for down-regulation of TRβ1 and CaMK IV in cerebellum and that the down-regulated TRβ1 may be involved in As-induced impairment of learning and memory via inhibiting CaMK IV and its down-stream pathway.

  3. Cerebellum and psychiatric disorders O cerebelo e os transtornos psiquiátricos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonardo Baldaçara

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The objective of this update article is to report structural and functional neuroimaging studies exploring the potential role of cerebellum in the pathophysiology of psychiatric disorders. METHOD: A non-systematic literature review was conducted by means of Medline using the following terms as a parameter: "cerebellum", "cerebellar vermis", "schizophrenia", "bipolar disorder", "depression", "anxiety disorders", "dementia" and "attention deficit hyperactivity disorder". The electronic search was done up to April 2008. DISCUSSION: Structural and functional cerebellar abnormalities have been reported in many psychiatric disorders, namely schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, major depressive disorder, anxiety disorders, dementia and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. Structural magnetic resonance imaging studies have reported smaller total cerebellar and vermal volumes in schizophrenia, mood disorders and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. Functional magnetic resonance imaging studies using cognitive paradigms have shown alterations in cerebellar activity in schizophrenia, anxiety disorders and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. In dementia, the cerebellum is affected in later stages of the disease. CONCLUSION: Contrasting with early theories, cerebellum appears to play a major role in different brain functions other than balance and motor control, including emotional regulation and cognition. Future studies are clearly needed to further elucidate the role of cerebellum in both normal and pathological behavior, mood regulation, and cognitive functioning.OBJETIVO: Este artigo de atualização tem como objetivo avaliar estudos em neuroimagem estrutural e funcional a fim de explorar o papel do cerebelo na patofisiologia dos transtornos psiquiátricos. MÉTODO: Uma revisão não sistemática foi realizada através do Medline utilizando-se como parâmetro os seguintes termos: "cerebellum", "cerebellar vermis", "schizophrenia

  4. Skeletal manifestations of stress in child victims of the Great Irish Famine (1845-1852): prevalence of enamel hypoplasia, Harris lines, and growth retardation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geber, Jonny

    2014-09-01

    The Great Irish Famine of 1845-1852 is among the worst food crises in human history. While numerous aspects of this period have been studied by generations of scholars, relatively little attention has so far been given to the physiological impact it is likely to have had on the people who suffered and succumbed to it. This study examines the prevalence of enamel hypoplasia, Harris lines, and growth retardation in the nonadult proportion of a skeletal population comprising victims of the Famine who died in the workhouse in the city of Kilkenny between 1847 and 1851. The frequency of enamel hypoplasia in these children does not appear to have increased as a consequence of famine, although this fact is likely to be a reflection of the osteological paradox. Harris lines and growth retardation; however, were very prevalent, and the manifestation and age-specific distribution of these may be indicators of the Famine experience. While there was no clear correlation in the occurrence of the assessed markers, the presence of cribra orbitalia displayed a significant relationship to enamel hypoplasia in 1- to 5-year-old children. While starvation, metabolic disorders and infectious diseases are likely to have greatly contributed to the manifestation of the markers, the psychosocial stress relating to institutionalization in the workhouse should not be underestimated as a substantial causative factor for skeletal stress in this population. Copyright © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. [Exploration for micro-osteotomy assisted orthodontic treatment of skeletal Class III malocclusions with alveolar hypoplasia in the lower anterior region].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Bo; Shen, Guo-fang; Fang, Bing; Sun, Liang-yan; Wu, Yong; Jiang, Ling-yong; Zhu, Min

    2012-10-01

    To investigate the changes of periodontal conditions after micro-osteotomy assisted lower incisor decompensation for skeletal Class III malocclusions with alveolar hypoplasia in the lower anterior region. The sample consisted of 22 cases diagnosed as skeletal Class III malocclusions with alveolar hypoplasia in the lower anterior region, selected from consecutive patients of Department of Oral & Cranio-maxillofacial Science of Shanghai Ninth People's Hospital during 2009-2012. The samples were divided into 2 groups; G1 comprised 10 patients who accepted micro-osteotomy assisted lower incisor decompensation; G2 comprised 12 patients who chose traditional pre-surgical decomposition. The changes of periodontal conditions of both groups were evaluated with the help of cone-beam CT(CBCT). Data was processed using SAS8.02 software package. For subjects in G1, during the micro-osteotomy assisted pre-surgical orthodontics, no significant difference was found in the amount of root resorption of lower incisors.But labial and lingual vertical alveolar bone loss were 2.60 mm and 2.22 mm; alveolar bone thickness increased by 3.05 mm on the labial side and decreased by 0.88 mm on the lingual side (Ppre-surgical orthodontics was much safer than traditional orthodontics for skeletal Class III malocclusions with alveolar hypoplasia in the lower anterior region.

  6. Maxillary distraction osteogenesis in cleft lip and palate cases with midface hypoplasia using rigid external distractor: an alternative technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dua, Gaurav; Navin Kumar, Andrews; Roy, Indranil Deb; Roy, Supriyo Kumar

    2014-05-01

    Patients with operated cleft lip and palate present with a problem of midface hypoplasia, and such patients have been traditionally treated with orthognathic surgery. Such a procedure has its own limitations of relapse and hence a newer modality of distraction osteogenesis with histiogenesis can be chosen to overcome such limitations for midfacial advancement. The purpose of this study is to evaluate an alternative technique and its postoperative stability in maxillary distraction osteogenesis in patients of cleft lip and cleft palate using a rigid external device (RED). Nine patients with midface bone stock deficiency were selected for maxillary advancement. At the first surgery under general anesthesia, after Le Fort I osteotomy, RED system was used with the alternative technique. After distraction, evaluation was done for ease of the procedure, stability, and complications. Lateral cephalograms were evaluated at 3 stages: T1, pre-distraction; T2, post-distraction; and T3, 1 year post-distraction. A mean 13.4-mm midface advancement was shown with bone formation at the pterygomaxillary region without losing the vector and having a standby mode in case the wire broke during distraction The results were stable even at 1 year of follow-up. Maxillary position improved in relation to the cranial base. This study showed that the RED was versatile in midface advancement.

  7. Progressive behavioral changes during the maturation of rats with early radiation-induced hypoplasia of fascia dentata granule cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mickley, G.A.; Ferguson, J.L.; Mulvihill, M.A.; Nemeth, T.J.

    1989-01-01

    Localized exposure of the neonatal rat brain to X-rays produces neuronal hypoplasia specific to the granule cell layer of the hippocampal dentate gyrus. This brain damage causes locomotor hyperactivity, slowed acquisition of passive avoidance tasks and long bouts of spontaneous turning (without reversals) in a bowl apparatus. Here we report how these behavioral deficits change as a function of subject aging and behavioral test replications. Portions of the neonatal rat cerebral hemispheres were X-irradiated in order to selectively damage the granule cells of the dentate gyrus. The brains of experimental animals received a fractionated dose of X rays (13 Gy total) over postnatal days 1 to 16 and control animals were sham-irradiated. Rats between the ages of 71-462 days were tested 3 separate times on each of the following 3 behavioral tests: (1) spontaneous locomotion, (2) passive avoidance acquisition, and (3) spontaneous circling in a large plastic hemisphere. Rats with radiation-induced damage to the fascia dentata exhibited long bouts of slow turns without reversals. Once they began, irradiated subjects perseverated in turning to an extent significantly greater than sham-irradiated control subjects. This irradiation effect was significant during all test series. Moreover, in time, spontaneous perseverative turning was significantly potentiated in rats with hippocampal damage but increased only slightly in controls. Early radiation exposure produced locomotor hyperactivity in young rats. While activity levels of controls remained fairly stable throughout the course of the experiment, the hyperactivity of the irradiated animals decreased significantly as they matured

  8. Lung hypoplasia and its associated major congenital abnormalities in perinatal death: an autopsy study of 850 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aghabiklooei, A; Goodarzi, P; Kariminejad, Mohammad H

    2009-11-01

    To determine the relative frequency of causes of lung hypoplasia (LH) and its associated congenital malformations among perinatal deaths. 850 medical reports of perinatal autopsies, in a 25-year period, assessed for LH as a cause of death. LH found in 96 (11.3%) cases, 89 (92.7%) were associated with major congenital malformation (secondary type) and primary type was seen in 7 cases (7.3%). Fourteen cases were associated with multiple congenital anomalies. 32 cases (33.3%) with Genito-urinary anomalies were the most common associated major malformations, followed by 19 cases (19.8%) of diaphragmatic impairment, 15 cases (15.6%) of musculoskeletal abnormalities and 11 cases (11.4%) of kidney agenesis. The most common musculoskletal abnormality was thanatophoric dwarfism in 10 cases (10.4%). Meckle-Gruber syndrome with 7 affected fetuses (7.3%) was the most common malformation syndrome associated with LH. More than ninety percent of LH was secondary to pathology outside the respiratory tract. Renal agenesis is the most common association observed in LH, followed by diaphragmatic hernia and thanatophoric dysplasia.

  9. Optical coherence tomography detection of characteristic retinal nerve fiber layer thinning in nasal hypoplasia of the optic disc.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haruta, M; Kodama, R; Yamakawa, R

    2017-12-01

    PurposeTo determine the clinical usefulness of optical coherence tomography (OCT) for detecting thinning of the retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) in eyes with nasal hypoplasia of the optic discs (NHOD).Patients and methodsThe medical records of five patients (eight eyes) with NHOD were reviewed. The ratio of the disc-macula distance to the disc diameter (DM/DD) and the disc ovality ratio of the minimal to maximal DD were assessed using fundus photographs. The RNFL thicknesses of the temporal, superior, nasal, and inferior quadrants were evaluated using OCT quadrant maps.ResultsAll eight eyes had temporal visual field defects that respected the vertical meridians that needed to be differentiated from those related to chiasmal compression. The mean DM/DD ratio was 3.1 and the mean disc ovality ratio was 0.81. The mean RNFL thicknesses of the temporal, superior, nasal, and inferior quadrants were 90.3, 103.1, 34.8, and 112.8 microns, respectively.ConclusionSmall optic discs and tilted discs might be associated with NHOD. Measurement of the RNFL thickness around the optic disc using OCT scans clearly visualized the characteristic RNFL thinning of the nasal quadrants corresponding to the temporal sector visual field defects in eyes with NHOD. OCT confirmed the presence of NHOD and might differentiate eyes with NHOD from those with chiasmal compression.

  10. Neuropathologic features in the hippocampus and cerebellum of three older men with fragile X syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Greco Claudia M

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Fragile X syndrome (FXS is the most common inherited form of intellectual disability, and is the most common single-gene disorder known to be associated with autism. Despite recent advances in functional neuroimaging and our understanding of the molecular pathogenesis, only limited neuropathologic information on FXS is available. Methods Neuropathologic examinations were performed on post-mortem brain tissue from three older men (aged 57, 64 and 78 years who had received a clinical or genetic diagnosis of FXS. In each case, physical and cognitive features were typical of FXS, and one man was also diagnosed with autism. Guided by reports of clinical and neuroimaging abnormalities of the limbic system and cerebellum of individuals with FXS, the current analysis focused on neuropathologic features present in the hippocampus and the cerebellar vermis. Results Histologic and immunologic staining revealed abnormalities in both the hippocampus and cerebellar vermis. Focal thickening of hippocampal CA1 and irregularities in the appearance of the dentate gyrus were identified. All lobules of the cerebellar vermis and the lateral cortex of the posterior lobe of the cerebellum had decreased numbers of Purkinje cells, which were occasionally misplaced, and often lacked proper orientation. There were mild, albeit excessive, undulations of the internal granular cell layer, with patchy foliar white matter axonal and astrocytic abnormalities. Quantitative analysis documented panfoliar atrophy of both the anterior and posterior lobes of the vermis, with preferential atrophy of the posterior lobule (VI to VII compared with age-matched normal controls. Conclusions Significant morphologic changes in the hippocampus and cerebellum in three adult men with FXS were identified. This pattern of pathologic features supports the idea that primary defects in neuronal migration, neurogenesis and aging may underlie the neuropathology reported in FXS.

  11. In vivo binding of [11C]nemonapride to sigma receptors in the cortex and cerebellum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishiwata, K; Senda, M

    1999-08-01

    Radiolabeled nemonapride (NEM, YM-09151-2) is widely used as a representative dopamine D2-like receptor ligand in pharmacological and neurological studies, and 11C-labeled analog ([11C]NEM) has been developed for positron emission tomography (PET) studies. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether [11C]NEM binds in vivo to sigma receptors. [11C]NEM and one of six dopamine D2-like receptor ligands or seven sigma receptor ligands were co-injected into mice, and the regional brain uptake of [11C]NEM was measured by a tissue dissection method. The striatal uptake of [11C]NEM was reduced by D2-like receptor ligands, NEM, haloperidol, (+)-butaclamol, raclopride, and sulpiride, but not by a D4 receptor ligand clozapine. In the cortex and cerebellum the uptake was also reduced by D2-like receptor ligands with affinity for sigma receptors, but not by raclopride. Although none of seven sigma receptor ligands, SA6298, N,N-dipropyl-2-[4-methoxy-3-(2-phenylethoxy)phenyl]ethylamine hydrochloride (NE-100), (+)-pentazocine, R(-)-N-(3-phenyl-1-propyl)-1-phenyl-2-aminopropane hydrochloride ([-]-PPAP), (-)-pentazocine, R(+)-3-(3-hydroxyphenyl)-N-propylpiperidine hydrochloride ([+]-3-PPP), and (+)-N-allylnormetazocine hydrochloride ([+]-SKF 10047), blocked the striatal uptake, five of them with relatively higher affinity significantly reduced the [11C]NEM uptake by the cortex, and four of them reduced that by the cerebellum. We concluded that [11C]NEM binds in vivo not only to dopamine D2-like receptors in the striatum but also to sigma receptors in other regions such as cortex and cerebellum.

  12. Maternal stress in pregnancy affects myelination and neurosteroid regulatory pathways in the guinea pig cerebellum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Greer A; Palliser, Hannah K; Shaw, Julia C; Palazzi, Kerrin L; Walker, David W; Hirst, Jonathan J

    2017-11-01

    Prenatal stress predisposes offspring to behavioral pathologies. These may be attributed to effects on cerebellar neurosteroids and GABAergic inhibitory signaling, which can be linked to hyperactivity disorders. The aims were to determine the effect of prenatal stress on markers of cerebellar development, a key enzyme in neurosteroid synthesis and the expression of GABA A receptor (GABA A R) subunits involved in neurosteroid signaling. We used a model of prenatal stress (strobe light exposure, 2 h on gestational day 50, 55, 60 and 65) in guinea pigs, in which we have characterized anxiety and neophobic behavioral outcomes. The cerebellum and plasma were collected from control and prenatally stressed offspring at term (control fetus: n = 9 male, n = 7 female; stressed fetus: n = 7 male, n = 8 female) and postnatal day (PND) 21 (control: n = 8 male, n = 8 female; stressed: n = 9 male, n = 6 female). We found that term female offspring exposed to prenatal stress showed decreased expression of mature oligodendrocytes (∼40% reduction) and these deficits improved to control levels by PND21. Reactive astrocyte expression was lower (∼40% reduction) following prenatal stress. GABA A R subunit (δ and α6) expression and circulating allopregnanolone concentrations were not affected by prenatal stress. Prenatal stress increased expression (∼150-250% increase) of 5α-reductase type-1 mRNA in the cerebellum, which may be a neuroprotective response to promote GABAergic inhibition and aid in repair. These observations indicate that prenatal stress exposure has marked effects on the development of the cerebellum. These findings suggest cerebellar changes after prenatal stress may contribute to adverse behavioral outcomes after exposure to these stresses.

  13. Cocaine promotes oxidative stress and microglial-macrophage activation in rat cerebellum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosa M López-Pedrajas

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Different mechanisms have been suggested for cocaine neurotoxicity, including oxidative stress alterations. Nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB, considered a sensor of oxidative stress and inflammation, is involved in drug toxicity and addiction. NF-κB is a key mediator for immune responses that induces microglial/macrophage activation under inflammatory processes and neuronal injury/degeneration. Although cerebellum is commonly associated to motor control, muscular tone and balance. Its relation with addiction is getting relevance, being associated to compulsive and perseverative behaviors. Some reports indicate that cerebellar microglial activation induced by cannabis or ethanol, promote cerebellar alterations and these alterations could be associated to addictive-related behaviors. After considering the effects of some drugs on cerebellum, the aim of the present work analyzes pro-inflammatory changes after cocaine exposure. Rats received daily 15 mg/kg cocaine i.p. for 18 days. Reduced and oxidized forms of glutathione (GSH and GSSG, glutathione peroxidase (GPx activity and glutamate were determined in cerebellar homogenates. NF-κB activity, CD68 and GFAP expression were determined.Cerebellar GPx activity and GSH/GSSG ratio are significantly decreased after cocaine exposure. A significant increase of glutamate concentration is also observed. Interestingly, increased NF-κB activity is also accompanied by an increased expression of the lysosomal mononuclear phagocytic marker ED1 without GFAP alterations.Current trends in addiction biology are focusing on the role of cerebellum on addictive behaviors. Cocaine-induced cerebellar changes described herein fit with previosus data showing cerebellar alterations on addict subjects and support the proposed role of cerebelum in addiction.

  14. Cognitive aspects of human motor activity: Contribution of right hemisphere and cerebellum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sedov A. S.

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Background. Concepts of movement and action are not completely synonymous, but what distinguishes one from the other? Movement may be defined as stimulus- driven motor acts, while action implies realization of a specific motor goal, essential for cognitively driven behavior. Although recent clinical and neuroimaging studies have revealed some areas of the brain that mediate cognitive aspects of human motor behavior, the identification of the basic neural circuit underlying the interaction between cognitive and motor functions remains a challenge for neurophysiology and psychology. Objective. In the current study, we used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI to investigate elementary cognitive aspects of human motor behavior. Design. Twenty healthy right-handed volunteers were asked to perform stimulus-driven and goal-directed movements by clenching the right hand into a fist (7 times. The cognitive component lay in anticipation of simple stimuli signals. In order to disentangle the purely motor component of stimulus-driven movements, we used the event-related (ER paradigm. FMRI was performed on a 3 Tesla Siemens Magnetom Verio MR-scanner with 32-channel head coil. Results. We have shown differences in the localization of brain activity depending on the involvement of cognitive functions. These differences testify to the role of the cerebellum and the right hemisphere in motor cognition. In particular, our results suggest that right associative cortical areas, together with the right posterolateral cerebellum (Crus I and lobule VI and basal ganglia, de ne cognitive control of motor activity, promoting a shift from a stimulus-driven to a goal-directed mode. Conclusion. These results, along with recent data from research on cerebro-cerebellar circuitry, redefine the scope of tasks for exploring the contribution of the cerebellum to diverse aspects of human motor behavior and cognition.

  15. Altered cerebro-cerebellum resting-state functional connectivity in HIV-infected male patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Huijuan; Li, Ruili; Zhou, Yawen; Wang, Yanming; Cui, Jin; Nguchu, Benedictor Alexander; Qiu, Bensheng; Wang, Xiaoxiao; Li, Hongjun

    2018-05-21

    In addition to the role of planning and executing movement, the cerebellum greatly contributes to cognitive process. Numerous studies have reported structural and functional abnormalities in the cerebellum for HIV-infected patients, but little is known about the altered functional connectivity of particular cerebellar subregions and the cerebrum. Therefore, this study aimed to explore the resting-state functional connectivity (rsFC) changes of the cerebellum and further analyze the relationship between the rsFC changes and the neuropsychological evaluation. The experiment involved 26 HIV-infected men with asymptomatic neurocognitive impairment (ANI) and 28 healthy controls (HC). We selected bilateral hemispheric lobule VI and lobule IX as seed regions and mapped the whole-brain rsFC for each subregion. Results revealed that right lobule VI showed significant increased rsFC with the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) in HIV-infected subjects. In addition, the correlation analysis on HIV-infected subjects illustrated the increased rsFC was negatively correlated with the attention/working memory score. Moreover, significantly increased cerebellar rsFCs were also observed in HIV-infected patients related to right inferior frontal gyrus (IFG) and right superior medial gyrus (SMG) while decreased rsFC was just found between right lobule VI and the left hippocampus (HIP). These findings suggested that, abnormalities of cerebro-cerebellar functional connectivity might be associated with cognitive dysfunction in HIV-infected men, particularly working memory impairment. It could also be the underlying mechanism of ANI, providing further evidence for early injury in the neural substrate of HIV-infected patients.

  16. In vivo binding of [11C]nemonapride to sigma receptors in the cortex and cerebellum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishiwata, Kiichi; Senda, Michio

    1999-01-01

    Radiolabeled nemonapride (NEM, YM-09151-2) is widely used as a representative dopamine D 2 -like receptor ligand in pharmacological and neurological studies, and 11 C-labeled analog ([ 11 C]NEM) has been developed for positron emission tomography (PET) studies. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether [ 11 C]NEM binds in vivo to sigma receptors. [ 11 C]NEM and one of six dopamine D 2 -like receptor ligands or seven sigma receptor ligands were co-injected into mice, and the regional brain uptake of [ 11 C]NEM was measured by a tissue dissection method. The striatal uptake of [ 11 C]NEM was reduced by D 2 -like receptor ligands, NEM, haloperidol, (+)-butaclamol, raclopride, and sulpiride, but not by a D 4 receptor ligand clozapine. In the cortex and cerebellum the uptake was also reduced by D 2 -like receptor ligands with affinity for sigma receptors, but not by raclopride. Although none of seven sigma receptor ligands, SA6298, N,N-dipropyl-2-[4-methoxy-3-(2-phenylethoxy)phenyl]ethylamine hydrochloride (NE-100), (+)-pentazocine, R(-)-N-(3-phenyl-1-propyl)-1-phenyl-2-aminopropane hydrochloride ([-]-PPAP), (-)-pentazocine, R(+)-3-(3-hydroxyphenyl)-N-propylpiperidine hydrochloride ([+]-3-PPP), and (+)-N-allylnormetazocine hydrochloride ([+]-SKF 10047), blocked the striatal uptake, five of them with relatively higher affinity significantly reduced the [ 11 C]NEM uptake by the cortex, and four of them reduced that by the cerebellum. We concluded that [ 11 C]NEM binds in vivo not only to dopamine D 2 -like receptors in the striatum but also to sigma receptors in other regions such as cortex and cerebellum

  17. Shape of the feline cerebellum and occipital bone related to breed on MRI of 200 cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huizing, Xander; Sparkes, Andy; Dennis, Ruth

    2017-10-01

    Objectives The MRI features of the feline cerebellum and occipital bone have not previously been described in the literature. The aims of this study were three-fold. Firstly, to document variations in cerebellar shape on MRI in neurologically normal cats to support our hypothesis that crowding of the contents of the caudal fossa or herniation of the cerebellar vermis through the foramen magnum occurs frequently as an anatomical variant. Secondly, to document variations in the morphology of the occipital bone. Thirdly, to see whether these variations in shape of the feline cerebellum and occipital bone could be associated with head conformation, such as brachycephaly. Methods The imaging records of the small animal clinic at the Animal Health Trust between 2000 and 2013 were searched retrospectively to identify adult cats that had undergone high-field (1.5 T) MRI investigation which included the brain. Exclusion criteria included evidence of intracranial disease or the presence of cervical syringomyelia. Midline sagittal T2-weighted and transverse images were used to assess the occipital bone morphology and cerebellar shape, and to measure the width to length ratio of the cranial cavity. Results Fourteen different breeds were represented. A cerebellar shape consistent with crowding of the contents of the caudal fossa, or herniation through the foramen magnum was present in 40% of the entire population. Persians (recognised as a brachycephalic breed) had a higher proportion of cerebellar crowding or herniation than all other breeds. There was no significant difference in the distribution of occipital bone morphology between these breed groups. Conclusions and relevance It is important to recognise morphological variations of the feline cerebellum and occipital bone in order to avoid false-positive diagnoses of raised intracranial pressure and pathological herniation on MRI.

  18. Neuropathologic features in the hippocampus and cerebellum of three older men with fragile X syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Fragile X syndrome (FXS) is the most common inherited form of intellectual disability, and is the most common single-gene disorder known to be associated with autism. Despite recent advances in functional neuroimaging and our understanding of the molecular pathogenesis, only limited neuropathologic information on FXS is available. Methods Neuropathologic examinations were performed on post-mortem brain tissue from three older men (aged 57, 64 and 78 years) who had received a clinical or genetic diagnosis of FXS. In each case, physical and cognitive features were typical of FXS, and one man was also diagnosed with autism. Guided by reports of clinical and neuroimaging abnormalities of the limbic system and cerebellum of individuals with FXS, the current analysis focused on neuropathologic features present in the hippocampus and the cerebellar vermis. Results Histologic and immunologic staining revealed abnormalities in both the hippocampus and cerebellar vermis. Focal thickening of hippocampal CA1 and irregularities in the appearance of the dentate gyrus were identified. All lobules of the cerebellar vermis and the lateral cortex of the posterior lobe of the cerebellum had decreased numbers of Purkinje cells, which were occasionally misplaced, and often lacked proper orientation. There were mild, albeit excessive, undulations of the internal granular cell layer, with patchy foliar white matter axonal and astrocytic abnormalities. Quantitative analysis documented panfoliar atrophy of both the anterior and posterior lobes of the vermis, with preferential atrophy of the posterior lobule (VI to VII) compared with age-matched normal controls. Conclusions Significant morphologic changes in the hippocampus and cerebellum in three adult men with FXS were identified. This pattern of pathologic features supports the idea that primary defects in neuronal migration, neurogenesis and aging may underlie the neuropathology reported in FXS. PMID:21303513

  19. Recruitment of the prefrontal cortex and cerebellum in Parkinsonian rats following skilled aerobic exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhuo; Guo, Yumei; Myers, Kalisa G; Heintz, Ryan; Holschneider, Daniel P

    2015-05-01

    Exercise modality and complexity play a key role in determining neurorehabilitative outcome in Parkinson's disease (PD). Exercise training (ET) that incorporates both motor skill training and aerobic exercise has been proposed to synergistically improve cognitive and automatic components of motor control in PD patients. Here we introduced such a skilled aerobic ET paradigm in a rat model of dopaminergic deafferentation. Rats with bilateral, intra-striatal 6-hydroxydopamine lesions were exposed to forced ET for 4weeks, either on a simple running wheel (non-skilled aerobic exercise, NSAE) or on a complex wheel with irregularly spaced rungs (skilled aerobic exercise, SAE). Cerebral perfusion was mapped during horizontal treadmill walking or at rest using [(14)C]-iodoantipyrine 1week after the completion of ET. Regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) was quantified by autoradiography and analyzed in 3-dimensionally reconstructed brains by statistical parametric mapping. SAE compared to NSAE resulted in equal or greater recovery in motor deficits, as well as greater increases in rCBF during walking in the prelimbic area of the prefrontal cortex, broad areas of the somatosensory cortex, and the cerebellum. NSAE compared to SAE animals showed greater activation in the dorsal caudate-putamen and dorsal hippocampus. Seed correlation analysis revealed enhanced functional connectivity in SAE compared to NSAE animals between the prelimbic cortex and motor areas, as well as altered functional connectivity between midline cerebellum and sensorimotor regions. Our study provides the first evidence for functional brain reorganization following skilled aerobic exercise in Parkinsonian rats, and suggests that SAE compared to NSAE results in enhancement of prefrontal cortex- and cerebellum-mediated control of motor function. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Chronic exposure to hypergravity affects thyrotropin-releasing hormone levels in rat brainstem and cerebellum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daunton, N. G.; Tang, F.; Corcoran, M. L.; Fox, R. A.; Man, S. Y.

    1998-01-01

    In studies to determine the neurochemical mechanisms underlying adaptation to altered gravity we have investigated changes in neuropeptide levels in brainstem, cerebellum, hypothalamus, striatum, hippocampus, and cerebral cortex by radioimmunoassay. Fourteen days of hypergravity (hyperG) exposure resulted in significant increases in thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH) content of brainstem and cerebellum, but no changes in levels of other neuropeptides (beta-endorphin, cholecystokinin, met-enkephalin, somatostatin, and substance P) examined in these areas were found, nor were TRH levels significantly changed in any other brain regions investigated. The increase in TRH in brainstem and cerebellum was not seen in animals exposed only to the rotational component of centrifugation, suggesting that this increase was elicited by the alteration in the gravitational environment. The only other neuropeptide affected by chronic hyperG exposure was met-enkephalin, which was significantly decreased in the cerebral cortex. However, this alteration in met-enkephalin was found in both hyperG and rotation control animals and thus may be due to the rotational rather than the hyperG component of centrifugation. Thus it does not appear as if there is a generalized neuropeptide response to chronic hyperG following 2 weeks of exposure. Rather, there is an increase only of TRH and that occurs only in areas of the brain known to be heavily involved with vestibular inputs and motor control (both voluntary and autonomic). These results suggest that TRH may play a role in adaptation to altered gravity as it does in adaptation to altered vestibular input following labyrinthectomy, and in cerebellar and vestibular control of locomotion, as seen in studies of ataxia.

  1. Cerebellum neurotransmission during postnatal development: [Pt(O,O'-acac)(γ-acac)(DMS)] vs cisplatin and neurotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piccolini, Valeria Maria; Esposito, Alessandra; Dal Bo, Veronica; Insolia, Violetta; Bottone, Maria Grazia; De Pascali, Sandra Angelica; Fanizzi, Francesco Paolo; Bernocchi, Graziella

    2015-02-01

    Several chemotherapeutic drugs are known to cause neurotoxicity. Platinum-based agents in use or in clinical trials display neurotoxic potential accompanied by neurological complications; recent studies have identified a large number of behavioural issues in paediatric oncology patients. To understand the toxicity of platinum drugs at the molecular and cellular levels, this study compares the possible cytotoxic effects of an older platinum compound, cisplatin and a new platinum compound, [Pt(O,O'-acac)(γ-acac)(DMS)], on the CNS of postnatally developing rats, which is much more vulnerable to injury than the CNS of adult rats. Since several drugs interact with neurotransmitters during neuronal maturation, we performed immunostainings with antibodies raised against markers of glutamate and GABA, the major neurotransmitters in the cerebellum. After a single injection of cisplatin at postnatal day 10 (PD10), the labelling of Purkinje cells with the neurotransmitter markers evidenced alterations between PD11 and PD30, i.e. atrophy of the dendrite tree, changes in the distribution of synaptic contacts of parallel and climbing fibres, delay in the elimination of transient synapses on cell soma and severely impaired pinceau formation at the axon hillock. After treatment with [Pt(O,O'-acac)(γ-acac)(DMS)], the sole relevant change concerned the timing of climbing fibres elimination; the transient synapses disappearance on the Purkinje cell soma was delayed in some cells; instead, the growth of Purkinje cell dendrite tree was normal as was the formation of inhibitory synaptic contacts on these neurons. These findings add new evidence not only on the lower neurotoxicity of [Pt(O,O'-acac)(γ-acac)(DMS)] vs cisplatin but also on the involvement of neurotransmitters and relative synaptic connections in the maturation of central nerve tissue. Copyright © 2014 ISDN. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Chronic lithium treatment with or without haloperidol fails to affect the morphology of the rat cerebellum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Licht, R W; Larsen, Jytte Overgaard; Smith, D

    2003-01-01

    We used unbiased stereological principles to determine whether long-term administration of lithium at human therapeutic levels, with or without haloperidol, affects the number or sizes of cerebellar Purkinje cells or the volume of histological layers in the rat cerebellum. Twenty-eight rats were...... randomly divided into three groups, receiving either no treatment, lithium, or lithium combined with haloperidol. The serum lithium levels ranged from 0.50 to 0.77 mmol/l. Haloperidol was given at a daily dose of 1 mg/kg. After 30 weeks of treatment, the animals were killed and the cerebelli were...

  3. Delayed neurochemical effects of prenatal exposure to MeHg in the cerebellum of developing rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heimfarth, Luana; Delgado, Jeferson; Mingori, Moara Rodrigues; Moresco, Karla Suzana; Pureur, Regina Pessoa; Gelain, Daniel Pens; Moreira, José Cláudio Fonseca

    2018-03-01

    Human fetuses and neonates are particularly vulnerable to methylmercury (MeHg)-induced brain damage and are sensitive even to low exposure levels. Previous work of our group evidence that prenatal exposure to MeHg causes cognitive and behavioral alterations and disrupt hippocampus signaling. The current study aimed to investigate the effect of gestational exposure of rats to MeHg at low doses (1 or 2 mg/kg) on parameters of redox imbalance and key signaling pathways in the cerebellum of their offspring. Pregnant females received MeHg (treated group) or 0.9% saline water (control group) by gavage in alternated days from gestational day 5 (GD5) until parturition and analyzes were proceed in the cerebellum of 30-day-old pups. We found increased lipid peroxidation and protein carbonylation levels as well as decreased SH content in pups prenatally exposed to 2 mg/kg MeHg. In addition, misregulated SOD/catalase activities supported imbalanced redox equilibrium. We found decreased GSK3β(Ser9) phosphorylation, suggesting activation of this enzyme and dephosphorylation/inhibition of ERK1/2 and JNK pathways. Increased PKAα catalytic subunit could be upstream of hyperphosphorylated c-Raf(Ser259) and downregulated MAPK pathway. In addition, we found raised levels of the Ca 2+ -dependent protein phosphatase 2 B (PP2B). We also found preserved immunohistochemical staining for both glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) and NeuN in MeHg-exposed pups. Western blot analysis showed unaltered levels of BAX/BCL-XL, BAD/BCL-2 and active caspase 3. Together, these findings support absence of reactive astrocytes, neuronal damage and apoptotic cell death in the cerebellum of MeHg treated pups. The present study provides evidence that prenatal exposure to MeHg leads to later redox imbalance and disrupted signaling mechanisms in the cerebellum of 30-day-old pups potentially predisposing them to long-lasting neurological impairments in CNS. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights

  4. Screening of TYR, OCA2, GPR143, and MC1R in patients with congenital nystagmus, macular hypoplasia, and fundus hypopigmentation indicating albinism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preising, Markus N.; Gonser, Miriam; Lorenz, Birgit

    2011-01-01

    Background A broad spectrum of pigmentation of the skin and hair is found among patients diagnosed with ocular albinism (OA) and oculocutaneous albinism (OCA). Even though complexion is variable, three ocular features, i.e., hypopigmentation of the fundus, hypoplasia of the macula, and nystagmus, are classical pathological findings in these patients. We screened 172 index patients with a clinical diagnosis of OA or OCA based on the classical findings, to evaluate the frequency of sequence variants in tyrosinase (TYR), P-gene, P-protein (OCA2), and the G-protein-coupled receptor 143 gene, OA1 (GPR143). In addition, we investigated the association of sequence variants in the melanocortin receptor 1 gene (MC1R) and OCA2. Methods Pigmentation of the hair, skin, iris, and fundus were included in the evaluation of OCA and OA. Male OA patients showing X-linked inheritance were screened for GPR143. Females showing OA without family history were regarded as representing autosomal recessive OA (OA3). Direct sequencing was applied to PCR products showing aberrant single-strand conformation polymorphism–banding patterns. Results Fifty-seven male index patients were screened for OA. We identified 16 potentially pathogenic sequence variations in GPR143 (10 novel) in 22 males. In TYR, we identified 23 (7 novel), and in OCA2 28 (11 novel) possibly pathogenic variants. Variants on both alleles were identified in TYR or OCA2 in 29/79 OCA patients and 14/71 OA patients. Sequence changes in TYR were identified almost exclusively in OCA patients, while sequence changes in OCA2 occurred in OCA and OA patients. MC1R sequencing was performed in 47 patients carrying mutations in OCA2 and revealed MC1R mutations in 42 of them. Conclusions TYR gene mutations have a more severe effect on pigmentation than mutations in OCA2 and the GPR143 gene. Nevertheless, mutations in these genes affect the development of visual function either directly or by interaction with other genes like MC1R, which

  5. Both rare and de novo copy number variants are prevalent in agenesis of the corpus callosum but not in cerebellar hypoplasia or polymicrogyria.

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    Samin A Sajan

    Full Text Available Agenesis of the corpus callosum (ACC, cerebellar hypoplasia (CBLH, and polymicrogyria (PMG are severe congenital brain malformations with largely undiscovered causes. We conducted a large-scale chromosomal copy number variation (CNV discovery effort in 255 ACC, 220 CBLH, and 147 PMG patients, and 2,349 controls. Compared to controls, significantly more ACC, but unexpectedly not CBLH or PMG patients, had rare genic CNVs over one megabase (p = 1.48×10⁻³; odds ratio [OR] = 3.19; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.89-5.39. Rare genic CNVs were those that impacted at least one gene in less than 1% of the combined population of patients and controls. Compared to controls, significantly more ACC but not CBLH or PMG patients had rare CNVs impacting over 20 genes (p = 0.01; OR = 2.95; 95% CI = 1.69-5.18. Independent qPCR confirmation showed that 9.4% of ACC patients had de novo CNVs. These, in comparison to inherited CNVs, preferentially overlapped de novo CNVs previously observed in patients with autism spectrum disorders (p = 3.06×10⁻⁴; OR = 7.55; 95% CI = 2.40-23.72. Interestingly, numerous reports have shown a reduced corpus callosum area in autistic patients, and diminished social and executive function in many ACC patients. We also confirmed and refined previously known CNVs, including significantly narrowing the 8p23.1-p11.1 duplication present in 2% of our current ACC cohort. We found six novel CNVs, each in a single patient, that are likely deleterious: deletions of 1p31.3-p31.1, 1q31.2-q31.3, 5q23.1, and 15q11.2-q13.1; and duplications of 2q11.2-q13 and 11p14.3-p14.2. One ACC patient with microcephaly had a paternally inherited deletion of 16p13.11 that included NDE1. Exome sequencing identified a recessive maternally inherited nonsense mutation in the non-deleted allele of NDE1, revealing the complexity of ACC genetics. This is the first systematic study of CNVs in congenital brain malformations, and

  6. Hypothesis for the causes and periodicity of repetitive linear enamel hypoplasia in large, wild African (Pan troglodytes and Gorilla gorilla) and Asian (Pongo pygmaeus) apes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skinner, Mark F; Hopwood, David

    2004-03-01

    Repetitive linear enamel hypoplasia (rLEH) is often observed in recent large-bodied apes from Africa and Asia as well as Mid- to Late Miocene sites from Spain to China. The ubiquity and periodicity of rLEH are not understood. Its potential as an ontogenetic marker of developmental stress in threatened species (as well as their ancient relatives) makes rLEH an important if enigmatic problem. We report research designed to show the periodicity of rLEH among West African Pan troglodytes (12 male, 32 female), Gorilla gorilla (10 male, 10 female), and Bornean and Sumatran Pongo pygmaeus (11 male, 9 female, 9 unknown) from collections in Europe. Two methods were employed. In the common chimpanzees and gorillas, the space between adjacent, macroscopically visible LEH grooves on teeth with two or more episodes was expressed as an absolute measure and as a ratio of complete unworn crown height. In the orangutans, the number of perikymata between episode onsets, as well as duration of rLEH, was determined from scanning electron micrographs of casts of incisors and canines. We conclude that stress in the form of LEH commences as early as 2.5 years of age in all taxa and lasts for several years, and even longer in orangutans; the stress is not chronic but episodic; the stressor has a strong tendency to occur in pulses of two occurrences each; and large apes from both land masses exhibit rLEH with an average periodicity of 6 months (or multiples thereof; Sumatran orangutans seem to show only annual stress), but this needs further research. This is supported by evidence of spacing between rLEH as well as perikymata counts. Duration of stress in orangutans averages about 6 weeks. Finally, the semiannual stressor transcends geographic and temporal boundaries, and is attributed to regular moisture cycles associated with the intertropical convergence zone modified by the monsoon. While seasonal cycles can influence both disease and nutritional stress, it is likely the combination of

  7. Assessment of the Toxicity of Sub-chronic Low and High Doses of the Bio-insecticide Spinosad on the Liver, Kidney and the Cerebellum in Male Albino Mice

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    Sabry A El-Naggar

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Spinosad (SPD is a highly selective insect control product. However, it was reported that SPD has toxicity toward other non-target organisms. This study was conducted to address the toxic effect of two sub-chronic low and high doses; 35 and 350 mg/kg SPD on some biochemical, histological and immunohistochemical parameters of the liver, kidney and cerebellum. Thirty-six male Swiss mice were divided into three groups of 12 mice each; first group (G1 served as a control, second group (G2 received a low sub-chronic dose of SPD that is equal to 35 mg/kg, and third group (G3 received a high sub-chronic dose of SPD that is equal to 350 mg/kg. The results showed that mice which were received 350 mg/kg SPD showed a significant decrease in the body weight and a significant increase in their relative kidney and spleen weights. They also showed a significant increase in alanine aminotransferase (ALT, triglycerides and urea levels. Histopathological examination showed cytoplasmic degeneration and cell necrosis in the liver and kidney. Immunohistochemical examination showed that cerebellum illustrated several neurodegenerative changes and a down-regulation of synaptophysin-Syp. In conclusion, exposure to a high dose of SPD that is equal to 350 mg/kg could cause a marked toxicity on the liver, kidney and cerebellum in male albino mice.

  8. The morphofunctional state of Purkin'e cells in the cerebellum of new-born rats following laser and gamma-ray exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zubkova, S.M.; Popov, V.I.

    1993-01-01

    Following of local laser (632.8 nm, 6.3. J/cm 2 ) and whole-body Gy gamma-ray exposures of new-born rats the contrast changes of morphometrical indices, RNA amount, and chromatophilia of Purkin'e cells in the cerebellum were seen. The preliminary laser exposure of new-born rat cerebellum artially increased activity of karyogene structures of the cerebellum cells which were inhibited by 6.37 Gy gamma-rays

  9. Near-Infrared Confocal Laser Reflectance Cytoarchitectural Imaging of the Substantia Nigra and Cerebellum in the Fresh Human Cadaver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheyuo, Cletus; Grand, Walter; Balos, Lucia L

    2017-01-01

    Cytoarchitectural neuroimaging remains critical for diagnosis of many brain diseases. Fluorescent dye-enhanced, near-infrared confocal in situ cellular imaging of the brain has been reported. However, impermeability of the blood-brain barrier to most fluorescent dyes limits clinical utility of this modality. The differential degree of reflectance from brain tissue with unenhanced near-infrared imaging may represent an alternative technique for in situ cytoarchitectural neuroimaging. We assessed the utility of unenhanced near-infrared confocal laser reflectance imaging of the cytoarchitecture of the cerebellum and substantia nigra in 2 fresh human cadaver brains using a confocal near-infrared laser probe. Cellular images based on near-infrared differential reflectance were captured at depths of 20-180 μm from the brain surface. Parts of the cerebellum and substantia nigra imaged using the probe were subsequently excised and stained with hematoxylin and eosin for histologic correlation. Near-infrared reflectance imaging revealed the 3-layered cytoarchitecture of the cerebellum, with Purkinje cells appearing hyperreflectant. In the substantia nigra, neurons appeared hyporeflectant with hyperreflectant neuromelanin cytoplasmic inclusions. Cytoarchitecture of the cerebellum and substantia nigra revealed on near-infrared imaging closely correlated with the histology on hematoxylin-eosin staining. We showed that unenhanced near-infrared reflectance imaging of fresh human cadaver brain can reliably identify and distinguish neurons and detailed cytoarchitecture of the cerebellum and substantia nigra. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. A Modified Triple Pelvic Osteotomy for the Treatment of Hip Hypoplasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hassan Rahimi

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: The prevalence of hip dysplasia is 1 in 1000. Several pelvic osteotomy methods have been developed to prevent early osteoarthritis, such as triple osteotomy. In this study we are going to introduce our new technique that was done on 4 patients with favorable short-term results.   Methods: Four patients underwent triple osteotomy and fixation using a reconstruction plate and early weight bearing was started. Results: The Harris Hip Score, limb length, center-edge angle, and acetabular inclination showed improvement. Conclusion: This modified technique is suggested for corrective surgery on adult dysplastic hips.

  11. Introduction of a new removable adjustable intraoral maxillary distraction system for correction of maxillary hypoplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueroa, Alvaro A; Polley, John W; Figueroa, Alexander L

    2009-09-01

    Distraction osteogenesis has become a treatment alternative to treat severe craniofacial skeletal dysplasias. A rigid external distraction device has been successfully used to advance the maxilla as well as the maxillary, orbital, and forehead complex (monobloc) in children as young as 2 years, adolescents, and adults. For this severe group of patients, the technique has been found to be simpler and safer than traditional surgical methods. Maxillary and midfacial advancement through distraction has been found to be extremely stable in the patients in whom the technique was used.The authors introduce an intraoral distractor for those patients requiring a moderate maxillary advancement. The advantages of the device include ease of insertion, vector adjustability, reactivation capabilities, and no need for second procedure for its removal.The above approaches have provided predictable and stable results. A detailed description of the device, necessary orthodontic and surgical procedures, case reports, and cephalometric outcomes are presented. The techniques can be applied alone or as an adjunct to traditional orthognathic and craniofacial surgical procedures.

  12. Motor and linguistic linking of space and time in the cerebellum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveri, Massimiliano; Bonnì, Sonia; Turriziani, Patrizia; Koch, Giacomo; Lo Gerfo, Emanuele; Torriero, Sara; Vicario, Carmelo Mario; Petrosini, Laura; Caltagirone, Carlo

    2009-11-20

    Recent literature documented the presence of spatial-temporal interactions in the human brain. The aim of the present study was to verify whether representation of past and future is also mapped onto spatial representations and whether the cerebellum may be a neural substrate for linking space and time in the linguistic domain. We asked whether processing of the tense of a verb is influenced by the space where response takes place and by the semantics of the verb. Responses to past tense were facilitated in the left space while responses to future tense were facilitated in the right space. Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) of the right cerebellum selectively slowed down responses to future tense of action verbs; rTMS of both cerebellar hemispheres decreased accuracy of responses to past tense in the left space and to future tense in the right space for non-verbs, and to future tense in the right space for state verbs. The results suggest that representation of past and future is mapped onto spatial formats and that motor action could represent the link between spatial and temporal dimensions. Right cerebellar, left motor brain networks could be part of the prospective brain, whose primary function is to use past experiences to anticipate future events. Both cerebellar hemispheres could play a role in establishing the grammatical rules for verb conjugation.

  13. Multiagent data warehousing and multiagent data mining for cerebrum/cerebellum modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wen-Ran

    2002-03-01

    An algorithm named Neighbor-Miner is outlined for multiagent data warehousing and multiagent data mining. The algorithm is defined in an evolving dynamic environment with autonomous or semiautonomous agents. Instead of mining frequent itemsets from customer transactions, the new algorithm discovers new agents and mining agent associations in first-order logic from agent attributes and actions. While the Apriori algorithm uses frequency as a priory threshold, the new algorithm uses agent similarity as priory knowledge. The concept of agent similarity leads to the notions of agent cuboid, orthogonal multiagent data warehousing (MADWH), and multiagent data mining (MADM). Based on agent similarities and action similarities, Neighbor-Miner is proposed and illustrated in a MADWH/MADM approach to cerebrum/cerebellum modeling. It is shown that (1) semiautonomous neurofuzzy agents can be identified for uniped locomotion and gymnastic training based on attribute relevance analysis; (2) new agents can be discovered and agent cuboids can be dynamically constructed in an orthogonal MADWH, which resembles an evolving cerebrum/cerebellum system; and (3) dynamic motion laws can be discovered as association rules in first order logic. Although examples in legged robot gymnastics are used to illustrate the basic ideas, the new approach is generally suitable for a broad category of data mining tasks where knowledge can be discovered collectively by a set of agents from a geographically or geometrically distributed but relevant environment, especially in scientific and engineering data environments.

  14. An fMRI Study of Intra-Individual Functional Topography in the Human Cerebellum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine J. Stoodley

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Neuroimaging studies report cerebellar activation during both motor and non-motor paradigms, and suggest a functional topography within the cerebellum. Sensorimotor tasks activate the anterior lobe, parts of lobule VI, and lobule VIII, whereas higher-level tasks activate lobules VI and VII in the posterior lobe. To determine whether these activation patterns are evident at a single-subject level, we conducted functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI during five tasks investigating sensorimotor (finger tapping, language (verb generation, spatial (mental rotation, working memory (N-back, and emotional processing (viewing images from the International Affective Picture System. Finger tapping activated the ipsilateral anterior lobe (lobules IV-V as well as lobules VI and VIII. Activation during verb generation was found in right lobules VII and VIIIA. Mental rotation activated left-lateralized clusters in lobules VII-VIIIA, VI-Crus I, and midline VIIAt. The N-back task showed bilateral activation in right lobules VI-Crus I and left lobules VIIB-VIIIA. Cerebellar activation was evident bilaterally in lobule VI while viewing arousing vs. neutral images. This fMRI study provides the first proof of principle demonstration that there is topographic organization of motor execution vs. cognitive/emotional domains within the cerebellum of a single individual, likely reflecting the anatomical specificity of cerebro-cerebellar circuits underlying different task domains. Inter-subject variability of motor and non-motor topography remains to be determined.

  15. Volumetric Magnetic Resonance Imaging Study of Brain and Cerebellum in Children with Cerebral Palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kułak, Piotr; Maciorkowska, Elżbieta; Gościk, Elżbieta

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Quantitative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies are rarely used in the diagnosis of patients with cerebral palsy. The aim of present study was to assess the relationships between the volumetric MRI and clinical findings in children with cerebral palsy compared to control subjects. Materials and Methods. Eighty-two children with cerebral palsy and 90 age- and sex-matched healthy controls were collected. Results. The dominant changes identified on MRI scans in children with cerebral palsy were periventricular leukomalacia (42%) and posthemorrhagic hydrocephalus (21%). The total brain and cerebellum volumes in children with cerebral palsy were significantly reduced in comparison to controls. Significant grey matter volume reduction was found in the total brain in children with cerebral palsy compared with the control subjects. Positive correlations between the age of the children of both groups and the grey matter volumes in the total brain were found. Negative relationship between width of third ventricle and speech development was found in the patients. Positive correlations were noted between the ventricles enlargement and motor dysfunction and mental retardation in children with cerebral palsy. Conclusions. By using the voxel-based morphometry, the total brain, cerebellum, and grey matter volumes were significantly reduced in children with cerebral palsy.

  16. Gating of long-term potentiation by nicotinic acetylcholine receptors at the cerebellum input stage.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca Prestori

    Full Text Available The brain needs mechanisms able to correlate plastic changes with local circuit activity and internal functional states. At the cerebellum input stage, uncontrolled induction of long-term potentiation or depression (LTP or LTD between mossy fibres and granule cells can saturate synaptic capacity and impair cerebellar functioning, which suggests that neuromodulators are required to gate plasticity processes. Cholinergic systems innervating the cerebellum are thought to enhance procedural learning and memory. Here we show that a specific subtype of acetylcholine receptors, the α7-nAChRs, are distributed both in cerebellar mossy fibre terminals and granule cell dendrites and contribute substantially to synaptic regulation. Selective α7-nAChR activation enhances the postsynaptic calcium increase, allowing weak mossy fibre bursts, which would otherwise cause LTD, to generate robust LTP. The local microperfusion of α7-nAChR agonists could also lead to in vivo switching of LTD to LTP following sensory stimulation of the whisker pad. In the cerebellar flocculus, α7-nAChR pharmacological activation impaired vestibulo-ocular-reflex adaptation, probably because LTP was saturated, preventing the fine adjustment of synaptic weights. These results show that gating mechanisms mediated by specific subtypes of nicotinic receptors are required to control the LTD/LTP balance at the mossy fibre-granule cell relay in order to regulate cerebellar plasticity and behavioural adaptation.

  17. Ablation of BRaf impairs neuronal differentiation in the postnatal hippocampus and cerebellum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verena Pfeiffer

    Full Text Available This study focuses on the role of the kinase BRaf in postnatal brain development. Mice expressing truncated, non-functional BRaf in neural stem cell-derived brain tissue demonstrate alterations in the cerebellum, with decreased sizes and fuzzy borders of the glomeruli in the granule cell layer. In addition we observed reduced numbers and misplaced ectopic Purkinje cells that showed an altered structure of their dendritic arborizations in the hippocampus, while the overall cornus ammonis architecture appeared to be unchanged. In male mice lacking BRaf in the hippocampus the size of the granule cell layer was normal at postnatal day 12 (P12 but diminished at P21, as compared to control littermates. This defect was caused by a reduced ability of dentate gyrus progenitor cells to differentiate into NeuN positive granule cell neurons. In vitro cell culture of P0/P1 hippocampal cells revealed that BRaf deficient cells were impaired in their ability to form microtubule-associated protein 2 positive neurons. Together with the alterations in behaviour, such as autoaggression and loss of balance fitness, these observations indicate that in the absence of BRaf all neuronal cellular structures develop, but neuronal circuits in the cerebellum and hippocampus are partially disturbed besides impaired neuronal generation in both structures.

  18. From movement to thought: executive function, embodied cognition, and the cerebellum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koziol, Leonard F; Budding, Deborah Ely; Chidekel, Dana

    2012-06-01

    This paper posits that the brain evolved for the control of action rather than for the development of cognition per se. We note that the terms commonly used to describe brain-behavior relationships define, and in many ways limit, how we conceptualize and investigate them and may therefore constrain the questions we ask and the utility of the "answers" we generate. Many constructs are so nonspecific and over-inclusive as to be scientifically meaningless. "Executive function" is one such term in common usage. As the construct is increasingly focal in neuroscience research, defining it clearly is critical. We propose a definition that places executive function within a model of continuous sensorimotor interaction with the environment. We posit that control of behavior is the essence of "executive function," and we explore the evolutionary advantage conferred by being able to anticipate and control behavior with both implicit and explicit mechanisms. We focus on the cerebellum's critical role in these control processes. We then hypothesize about the ways in which procedural (skill) learning contributes to the acquisition of declarative (semantic) knowledge. We hypothesize how these systems might interact in the process of grounding knowledge in sensorimotor anticipation, thereby directly linking movement to thought and "embodied cognition." We close with a discussion of ways in which the cerebellum instructs frontal systems how to think ahead by providing anticipatory control mechanisms, and we briefly review this model's potential applications.

  19. Humor, laughter, and the cerebellum: insights from patients with acute cerebellar stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, B; Andrzejewski, K; Göricke, S; Wondzinski, E; Siebler, M; Wild, B; Timmann, D

    2013-12-01

    Extent of cerebellar involvement in cognition and emotion is still a topic of ongoing research. In particular, the cerebellar role in humor processing and control of laughter is not well known. A hypermetric dysregulation of affective behavior has been assumed in cerebellar damage. Thus, we aimed at investigating humor comprehension and appreciation as well as the expression of laughter in 21 patients in the acute or subacute state after stroke restricted to the cerebellum, and in the same number of matched healthy control subjects. Patients with acute and subacute cerebellar damage showed preserved comprehension and appreciation of humor using a validated humor test evaluating comprehension, funniness and aversiveness of cartoons ("3WD Humor Test"). Additionally, there was no difference when compared to healthy controls in the number and intensity of facial reactions and laughter while observing jokes, humorous cartoons, or video sketches measured by the Facial Action Coding System. However, as depression scores were significantly increased in patients with cerebellar stroke, a concealing effect of accompanying depression cannot be excluded. Current findings add to descriptions in the literature that cognitive or affective disorders in patients with lesions restricted to the cerebellum, even in the acute state after damage, are frequently mild and might only be present in more sensitive or specific tests.

  20. Volumetric analysis of cerebellum in short-track speed skating players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, In Sung; Lee, Nam Joon; Kim, Tae-Young; Park, Jin-Hoon; Won, Yu-Mi; Jung, Yong-Ju; Yoon, Jin-Hwan; Rhyu, Im Joo

    2012-12-01

    The cerebellum is associated with balance control and coordination, which might be important for gliding on smooth ice at high speeds. A number of case studies have shown that cerebellar damage induces impaired balance and coordination. As a positive model, therefore, we investigated whether plastic changes in the volumes of cerebellar subregions occur in short-track speed skating players who must have extraordinary abilities of balance and coordination, using three-dimensional magnetic resonance imaging volumetry. The manual tracing was performed and the volumes of cerebellar hemisphere and vermian lobules were compared between short-track speed skating players (n=16) and matched healthy controls (n=18). We found larger right cerebellar hemisphere volume and vermian lobules VI-VII (declive, folium, and tuber) in short-track speed skating players in comparison with the matched controls. The finding suggests that the specialized abilities of balance and coordination are associated with structural plasticity of the right hemisphere of cerebellum and vermian VI-VII and these regions play an essential role in balance and coordination.