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Sample records for serum iron ferritin

  1. Concentration-dependent sedimentation properties of ferritin: implications for estimation of iron contents of serum ferritins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niitsu, Y.; Adachi, C.; Takahashi, F.; Goto, Y.; Kohgo, Y.; Urushizaki, I.; Listowsky, I.

    1985-01-01

    Serum ferritins from various sources sedimented at lower densities than tissue ferritins in sucrose gradient centrifugation systems. The sedimentation patterns of ferritins, however, were shown to be dependent on the concentration of the protein; as the concentration decreased the protein appeared to sediment at lower densities. Thus, at the low concentration levels usually used for analysis of serum ferritin, tissue ferritins also sedimented in the same lower density regions. Iron labeling experiments indicated that the sedimentation changes upon dilution were not due to release of iron or was there any indication that the protein dissociated into subunits. The anomalous sedimentation behavior of serum ferritin should therefore not be interpreted in terms of its iron content. The disclosure that serum ferritins may have full complements of iron is counter to the prevalent view that serum ferritins are low iron forms and has potential implications with regard to the sources and possible function of this protein in the circulation

  2. Serum ferritin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rochna Viola, E.M.; Diaz de Domingo, N.B.; Lazarowski, A.

    1981-01-01

    Serum ferritin (SF) concentration as determined by the immunoradiometric method allows the direct measurement of a fraction of the body ferritin pool. In normal subjects, SF is an excellent index of body iron stores. In certain conditions associated with increased ferritin synthesis (such as liver disease, inflammation, malignancy, chronic disorders, ineffective erythropoiesis, or during ferrotherapy), SF may not accurately reflect body iron stores. In hyposideremic anemias SF concentration permits to differentiate those due to iron deficiency from those due to chronic disorders. With a good assay quality, subnormal SF levels are incontrovertible in the diagnosis of iron deficiency. SF determination has been investigated as possible tumor marker. When performed in combination with the alpha-fetoprotein assay, SF enhances the specificity of serodiagnosis of hepatoma. SF results must be interpreted bearing in mind the possible participation of circumstances that i) modify the body iron stores and ii) lead to increased ferritin synthesis. (author) [es

  3. Relation between Serum Ferritin and Iron Parameters with Preeclampsia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robabeh Taheripanah

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Preeclampsia is one of the most important complications of pregnancy that is associated with increased morbidity and mortality. The aim of this study was to investigate the relation between serum iron status and ferritin with pre-eclampsia. Materials and Methods: This case control study evaluated 33 preeclamptic patients and 33 normal pregnant women before parturition in Imam Hossein hospital, from March 2003 till March 2004. Anemia, diabetes and multiple pregnancies were excluded from the study. Blood samples were taken before delivery and patients with HELLP syndrome were considered separately.  Data were analyzed using the SPSS software and P value <0.05 was considered statistically significant. T-test, chi-square and Fisher exact test were used.  Results: The mean of serum iron level in case and control group was 79.9±32.4µg/dl and 88.6±40.8 µg/dl, respectively (NS. TIBC was 443.4±55.0 µmol/l and 383.7±63.6 µmol/l in normal patients and preeclamptics respectively (P = 0.002. Mean serum ferritin was 32.1±16.2 ng/dl in control group and 123.8±46.1 ng/dl in preeclamptics (P<0.001. No meaningful relation was observed between hematocrit, ferritin and iron. Conclusions: Ferritin increases and TIBC decreases in preeclampsia regardless of hepatic function. It seems that elevated serum ferritin (as an oxidative stress can accelerate vascular damage. So, routine iron supplementation in preeclamptic women is questationable.

  4. Iron and ADHD: Time to Move beyond Serum Ferritin Levels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donfrancesco, Renato; Parisi, Pasquale; Vanacore, Nicola; Martines, Francesca; Sargentini, Vittorio; Cortese, Samuele

    2013-01-01

    Objective: (a) To compare serum ferritin levels in a sample of stimulant-naive children with ADHD and matched controls and (b) to assess the association of serum ferritin to ADHD symptoms severity, ADHD subtypes, and IQ. Method: The ADHD and the control groups included 101 and 93 children, respectively. Serum ferritin levels were determined with…

  5. Changes in Serum Ferritin and Other Factors Associated with Iron Metabolism During Chronic Hyperbaric Exposure

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gilman, Sara C; Hunter, Jr., W. L; Mooney, L. W

    1979-01-01

    .... during these simulated dives progressive and correlated increases in serum ferritin and iron occurred. No significant changes were observed in bilirubin, hemoglobin, neurloplasmia, transferrin, cooper, or total iron binding capacity...

  6. Quantitating Iron in Serum Ferritin by Use of ICP-MS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Scott M.; Gillman, Patricia L.

    2003-01-01

    A laboratory method has been devised to enable measurement of the concentration of iron bound in ferritin from small samples of blood (serum). Derived partly from a prior method that depends on large samples of blood, this method involves the use of an inductively-coupled-plasma mass spectrometer (ICP-MS). Ferritin is a complex of iron with the protein apoferritin. Heretofore, measurements of the concentration of serum ferritin (as distinguished from direct measurements of the concentration of iron in serum ferritin) have been used to assess iron stores in humans. Low levels of serum ferritin could indicate the first stage of iron depletion. High levels of serum ferritin could indicate high levels of iron (for example, in connection with hereditary hemochromatosis an iron-overload illness that is characterized by progressive organ damage and can be fatal). However, the picture is complicated: A high level of serum ferritin could also indicate stress and/or inflammation instead of (or in addition to) iron overload, and low serum iron concentration could indicate inflammation rather than iron deficiency. Only when concentrations of both serum iron and serum ferritin increase and decrease together can the patient s iron status be assessed accurately. Hence, in enabling accurate measurement of the iron content of serum ferritin, the present method can improve the diagnosis of the patient s iron status. The prior method of measuring the concentration of iron involves the use of an atomic-absorption spectrophotometer with a graphite furnace. The present method incorporates a modified version of the sample- preparation process of the prior method. First, ferritin is isolated; more specifically, it is immobilized by immunoprecipitation with rabbit antihuman polyclonal antibody bound to agarose beads. The ferritin is then separated from other iron-containing proteins and free iron by a series of centrifugation and wash steps. Next, the ferritin is digested with nitric acid

  7. Blood Transfusion, Serum Ferritin, and Iron in Hemodialysis Patients in Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kouegnigan Rerambiah, Leonard; Essola Rerambiah, Laurence; Mbourou Etomba, Armel; Mouguiama, Rose Marlène; Issanga, Phanie Brunelle; Biyoghe, Axel Sydney; Batchilili, Batchelili; Akone Assembe, Sylvestre; Djoba Siawaya, Joel Fleury

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objectives. There is no data analyzing the outcome of blood transfusions and oral iron therapy in patients with kidneys failure in sub-Saharan Africa. The present study aimed to fill that gap and assess the value of ferritin in the diagnosis of iron overload and deficiency. Design. From January to February 2012, we prospectively studied 85 hemodialysis patients (78% of males and 22% of females aged 20 to 79 years) attending the Gabonese National Hemodialysis Centre. Results. Correlation studies showed (a) a strong positive linear relationship between the number of blood transfusions and high serum ferritin in hemodialysis patient (Spearman r : 0.74; P value: 0.0001); (b) a weak association between the number of blood transfusions and serum iron concentrations (Spearman r : 0.32; P value: 0.04); (c) a weak association between serum ferritin and serum iron (Spearman r : 0.32; P value: 0.003). Also, the strength of agreement beyond chance between the levels of ferritin and iron in the serum was poor (κ = 0.14). The prevalence of iron overload was 10.6%, whereas the prevalence of iron deficiency was 2.3%, comparing (1) patients with a maximum of one transfusion not on iron therapy; (2) patients with a maximum of one transfusion on iron therapy; (3) polytransfused patients not on iron therapy; and (4) polytransfused patients on oral iron therapy. The “Kruskal-Wallis test” showed that ferritin levels varied significantly between the groups (P value: 0.0001). Conclusion. Serum ferritin is not reliable as a marker of iron overload. For patients undergoing regular transfusion we recommend routine serum ferritin measurement and yearly measurement of LIC. PMID:25685597

  8. Internal distribution of excess iron and sources of serum ferritin in patients with thalassemia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cazzola, M; Bergamaschi, G; Dezza, L; Borgna-Pignatti, C C; De Stefano, P; Bongo, I G; Avato, F [Pavia Univ. (Italy)

    1983-01-01

    Liver and spleen iron concentrations, serum ferritin level and binding of S-ferritin to concanavalin A (Con A) were measured in 12 patients with thalassemia major or intermedia at the time of splenectomy. All these subjects had increased liver iron concentration, most of them had hepatic fibrosis but none of them had histological evidence of chronic hepatitis. No patient had ascorbic acid deficiency. Serum ferritin concentration was increased in all cases, ranging from 266 to 5504 ..mu..g/l. In all but 2 subjects most of the protein did not bind to Con A, thus behaving as tissue ferritin. There were highly significant correlations between serum ferritin concentration, amount of blood transfused and liver iron concentration. On the average, iron concentration in the liver was about 3 times that in the spleen. The findings obtained suggest that in patients with thalassemia major or intermedia most of the iron is deposited in parenchymal tissues and most of the S-ferritin derives by leakage from the cytosol of iron-loaded parenchymal cells. S-ferritin is a valid index of liver iron overload in thalassemic patients witout complications such as viral hepatitis and/or ascorbic acid defiency.

  9. Internal distribution of excess iron and sources of serum ferritin in patients with thalassaemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cazzola, M.; Bergamaschi, G.; Dezza, L.; Borgna-Pignatti, C.C.; De Stefano, P.; Bongo, I.G.; Avato, F.

    1983-01-01

    Liver and spleen iron concentrations, serum ferritin level and binding of S-ferritin to concanavalin A (Con A) were measured in 12 patients with thalassaemia major or intermedia at the time of splenectomy. All these subjects had increased liver iron concentration, most of them had hepatic fibrosis but none of them had histological evidence of chronic hepatitis. No patient had ascorbic acid deficiency. Serum ferritin concentration was increased in all cases, ranging from 266 to 5504 μg/l. In all but 2 subjects most of the protein did not bind to Con A, thus behaving as tissue ferritin. There were highly significant correlations between serum ferritin concentration, amount of blood transfused and liver iron concentration. On the avarage, iron concentration in the liver was about 3 times that in the spleen. The findings obtained suggest that in patients with thalassaemia major or intermedia most of the iron is deposited in parenchymal tissues and most of the S-ferritin derives by leakage from the cytosol of iron-loaded parenchymal cells. S-ferritin is a valid index of liver iron overload in thalassaemic patients witout complications such as viral hepatitis and/or ascorbic acid defiency. (author)

  10. Evaluation and association of serum iron and ferritin levels in children with dental caries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkatesh Babu, N S; Bhanushali, Parin Vasant

    2017-01-01

    Iron deficiency anemia accounts for 90% of all types of anemia in the world. Although the prevalence has declined in recent years, it remains an important pediatric public health problem. Iron deficiency has also been associated with dental caries. It impairs salivary gland function causing reduced salivary secretion and buffering capacity leading to increased caries activity. The aim of the study is to explore an association between dental caries and serum levels of iron and ferritin in children aged 3-12 years. Subjectsand Methods: The study group included 120 children, hospitalized for uncomplicated medical problems. Blood reports were evaluated to determine serum iron and ferritin levels. Dental caries experience was assessed using deft index. The collected data were tabulated and analyzed using Student's t-test and Pearson's correlation coefficient. Out of 120 children, 38 children showed low serum iron levels of which 31 children had dental caries and nine out of 15 children in the high serum iron level group showed dental caries. High ferritin levels were seen in three children among which two children were caries-free and only one child had a low ferritin level who also had a positive deft score. Based on the results, it was concluded that there is an inverse association between serum iron levels and dental caries whereas there is no association between serum ferritin levels and dental caries.

  11. Changes in Serum Ferritin and Other Factors Associated with Iron Metabolism During Chronic Hyperbaric Exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-03-01

    tech- jects prior to their participation included standard radio- ques , using- radioisotopes ("SFe and S"Tcm-- diphospho- graphic surveys for evidence of... es were apparent by the third dive day for iron and the iv than ABN. It is of interest that no VGE were heard ajt seventh dive day for ferrtin. No...source of the increased amounts of ferritin levels in acute bepatocellular damage from serum ferritin and iron found during these dives ap.- paracetamol

  12. Serum ferritin concentrations and body iron stores in a multicenter, multiethnic primary-care population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordeuk, Victor R; Reboussin, David M; McLaren, Christine E; Barton, James C; Acton, Ronald T; McLaren, Gordon D; Harris, Emily L; Reiss, Jacob A; Adams, Paul C; Speechley, Mark; Phatak, Pradyumna D; Sholinsky, Phyliss; Eckfeldt, John H; Chen, Wen-Pin; Passmore, Leah; Dawkins, Fitzroy W

    2008-08-01

    How often elevated serum ferritin in primary-care patients reflects increased iron stores (normally 0.8 g in men, 0.4 g in women) is not known. The Hereditary Hemochromatosis and Iron Overload Screening (HEIRS) study screened 101,168 primary-care participants (44% Caucasians, 27% African-Americans, 14% Asians/Pacific Islanders, 13% Hispanics, 2% others). Follow-up clinical evaluation was performed in 302 of 333 HFE C282Y homozygotes regardless of iron measures and 1,375 of 1,920 nonhomozygotes with serum ferritin >300 microg/L (men), >200 microg/L (women) and transferrin saturation >50% (men), >45% (women). Quantitative phlebotomy was conducted in 122 of 175 C282Y homozygotes and 122 of 1,102 nonhomozygotes with non-transfusional serum ferritin elevation at evaluation. The estimated prevalence in the Caucasian population of C282Y homozygotes with serum ferritin >900 microg/L at evaluation was 20 per 10,000 men and 4 per 10,000 women; this constellation was predictive of iron stores >4 g in men and >2 g in women. The estimated prevalence per 10,000 of non-C282Y homozygotes with serum ferritin >900 microg/L at evaluation was 7 among Caucasians, 13 among Hispanics, 20 among African Americans, and 38 among Asians and Pacific Islanders, and this constellation was predictive of iron stores >2 g but 900 microg/L after initial elevations of both serum ferritin and transferrin saturation is predictive of mildly increased iron stores in multiple ethnic populations regardless of HFE genotype. Serum ferritin >900 microg/L in male C282Y homozygotes is predictive of moderately increased iron stores. Copyright 2008 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  13. Studies on the 2-site immunoradiometric assay of serum ferritin and its applications for diagnosis of iron deficiency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koseki, J.; Niitsu, Y. (Sapporo Medical Coll. (Japan). Cancer Research Inst.)

    1980-10-01

    The 2-site immunoradiometric assay using paper discs as a solid phase material was established for the measurement of serum ferritin. The standard curve was found the range from 0.5ng -- 500ng ferritin per ml and the sensitivity limit of the assay was 0.1ng ferritin per ml. The clinical value of serum ferritin assay was then investigated for diagnosis of iron deficiency. The mean serum ferritin concentrations of normal subjects were greater for males (119.8+-55.5ng/ml) than for females (56.5+-55.5ng/ml) although this sex difference was not distinct beyond the age of 45. All 15 patients with iron deficient anemia had serum ferritin concentrations below the normal range, whereas in other anemias including anemia associated with chronic inflammation, pernicious anemia, aplastic anemia, serum ferritin concentrations were normal or elevated. In 116 apparently normal subjects, 13.8% of total females had abnormally low serum ferritin concentrations with normal hemoglobin levels. The cytochrome c oxidase activity of peripheral leucocytes from those subjects were generally depleted. Most of them frequently suffered from easy fatigability, weakness, and dizziness and these complications were clearly relieved by the administration of iron. Measurement of serum ferritin was found to be quite useful for diagnosis and assessment of iron deficient states.

  14. Studies on the 2-site immunoradiometric assay of serum ferritin and its applications for diagnosis of iron deficiency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koseki, Junichi; Niitsu, Yoshiro

    1980-01-01

    The 2-site immunoradiometric assay using paper discs as a solid phase material was established for the measurement of serum ferritin. The standard curve was found the range from 0.5ng -- 500ng ferritin per ml and the sensitivity limit of the assay was 0.1ng ferritin per ml. The clinical value of serum ferritin assay was then investigated for diagnosis of iron deficiency. The mean serum ferritin concentrations of normal subjects were greater for males (119.8+-55.5ng/ml) than for females (56.5+-55.5ng/ml) although this sex difference was not distinct beyond the age of 45. All 15 patients with iron deficient anemia had serum ferritin concentrations below the normal range, whereas in other anemias including anemia associated with chronic inflammation, pernicious anemia, aplastic anemia, serum ferritin concentrations were normal oe elevated. In 116 apparently normal subjects, 13.8% of total females had abnormally low serum ferritin concentrations with normal hemoglobin levels. The cytochrome c oxidase activity of peripheral leucocytes from those subjects were generally depleted. Most of them frequently suffered from easy fatiguability, weakness, and dizziness and these complications were clearly relieved by the administration of iron. Measurement of serum ferritin was found to be quite useful for diagnosis and assessment of iron deficient states. (author)

  15. Assessment of iron status of Sudanese pregnant women by serum ferritin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eltayeb, E.A.; Khangi, F.A.; Satti, G.M.; Abu Salab, A.

    2004-03-01

    Eighty five normal pregnant women were included in the study at the start of the second trimester. Two blood samples were taken during the second trimester and two blood samples during the third trimester. The height of all subjects was measured. The weights of the subjects were under iron-supplementation throughout the gestation period. Sixty four normal non-parentage women were included in the study to serve as controls. Iron status was assessed for the groups with following parameters, haemoglobin (Hb), packed corpuscular volume (PCV), red blood cells count, peripheral blood film, mean corpuscular volume (MCV), mean cell haemoglobin (MCH), Mean haemoglobin concentration (MCH C), serum iron (Si), total iron binding capacity (T IBC), serum transferrin saturation (Ts) and serum ferritin (Sf). No significant difference was observed in the mean haemoglobin concentrations but the PCV of the non-pregnant women was higher than that of the pregnant women at different stages of gestation (p<0.05). MCV, MCH and MCH C values of the non-pregnant women were lower than those of the of the pregnant at different stages of gestation (p<0.05). Serum iron and transferrin saturation of the non-pregnant women were higher than those of the pregnant women, this difference was statistically significant at weeks (16-18) and (22-24) (p<0.05). Serum ferritin of the non-pregnant women was higher than that of the pregnant women and decreased continuously during the pregnancy, but this decrease was not statistically significant. Iron deficiency anaemia was observed in both pregnant and non-pregnant women. The best parameter that could be used as a marker for iron deficiency is serum ferritin. Iron supplementation s corrected for haemoglobin but not for iron status, but more studies were needed to cover this issue using different parameters.(Author)

  16. Serum iron, ferritin, transferrin and haptoglobin concentration variations during repeated show jumping competition in horse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Assenza

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Modifications of the iron profile in athlete horses during two international three star (*** show jumping competitions performed in two consecutive weekends were evaluated. Serum iron, ferritin, transferrin, and haptoglobin were assessed in 12 well-trained Italian Saddle horses. Blood samplings were performed before the first day of competition (R1, within 10 min from the end of each competition (J1, J2 and on the day after competition (R2. The same plan was followed during the second weekend (J3, J4 and R3. One-way repeated measures analysis of variance (ANOVA was applied on obtained data, and a significant effect of exercise (P < 0.05 on all studied indices was found. These results suggest that serum iron, transferrin, ferritin and haptoglobin are responsive to intense exercise and could be considered important indicators that may give important information about the horse’s performance.

  17. Serum ferritin in normal subjects and assessment of iron status during pregnancy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eltayeb, Ahmed Eltayeb

    1997-12-01

    This study was conducted with two main objectives;the estimation of serum ferritin level in normal subjects in khartoum area and the assessment of iron status during pregnancy at second and third trimesters. To fulfill the first objective,two hundred and sixty symptoms-free subjects were included in the study,103 males with ages ranging from 15 to 36 years and 157 females with ages ranging from 15 to 45 years.Serum ferritin was determined by radioimmunoassay (RIA). It was found that the mean concentration of male serum ferritin was much higher than that of the females. For the assessment of iron status during pregnancy,eighty five normal pregnant women were included in the study at the start of the second trimester.Two blood samples were taken during the second trimester and two blood samples during the third trimester. The height of all subjects was measured.The weights of the subjects were measured with each sample. All subjects were under iron-supplementations throughout the gestation period.Sixty four normal non pregnant women were included in the study to serve as controls. No significant difference was observed in the mean haemoglobin concentrations but the PCV of the non-pregnant women was higher than that of the pregnant women at different stages of gestation. MCV, MCH and MCHC values of the non-pregnant women were lower than those of the pregnant women at different stages of gestation. Serum iron and transferrin saturation of the non-pregnant women were higher than those of the pregnant women,this difference was statistically significant at weeks (16 -18) and weeks (22-24). Serum ferritin of the non-pregnant women was higher than that of the pregnant women and decreased continously during the prgnancy, but this decrease was not statistically significant. Iron deficiency anaemia was observed in both pregnant and non-pregnant women. The best parameter which could be used as a marker for iron deficiency is serum ferritin. Iron supplementations corrected for

  18. Serum ferritin in normal subjects and assessment of iron status during pregnancy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eltayeb, Ahmed Eltayeb [Sudan Atomic Energy Commission, Khartoum (Sudan)

    1997-12-01

    This study was conducted with two main objectives;the estimation of serum ferritin level in normal subjects in khartoum area and the assessment of iron status during pregnancy at second and third trimesters. To fulfill the first objective,two hundred and sixty symptoms-free subjects were included in the study,103 males with ages ranging from 15 to 36 years and 157 females with ages ranging from 15 to 45 years.Serum ferritin was determined by radioimmunoassay (RIA). It was found that the mean concentration of male serum ferritin was much higher than that of the females. For the assessment of iron status during pregnancy,eighty five normal pregnant women were included in the study at the start of the second trimester.Two blood samples were taken during the second trimester and two blood samples during the third trimester. The height of all subjects was measured.The weights of the subjects were measured with each sample. All subjects were under iron-supplementations throughout the gestation period.Sixty four normal non pregnant women were included in the study to serve as controls. No significant difference was observed in the mean haemoglobin concentrations but the PCV of the non-pregnant women was higher than that of the pregnant women at different stages of gestation. MCV, MCH and MCHC values of the non-pregnant women were lower than those of the pregnant women at different stages of gestation. Serum iron and transferrin saturation of the non-pregnant women were higher than those of the pregnant women,this difference was statistically significant at weeks (16 -18) and weeks (22-24). Serum ferritin of the non-pregnant women was higher than that of the pregnant women and decreased continously during the prgnancy, but this decrease was not statistically significant. Iron deficiency anaemia was observed in both pregnant and non-pregnant women. The best parameter which could be used as a marker for iron deficiency is serum ferritin. Iron supplementations corrected for

  19. Serum-ferritin and iron absorption for the study of body iron stored in the Thai population

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plehachinda, R.

    1984-05-01

    Measurements of serum ferritin by an ''in-house'' immunoradiometric assay (IRMA) method were used in conjunction with estimations of gastro-intestinal iron absorption from a standard test dose of ferrous ascorbate, measurements of blood haemoglobin and measurements of other haematological parameters to study body iron status in various population groups and to assess changes in body iron status after food-iron fortification. The IRMA method particularly covered the lower range of serum ferritin levels from 0.5 to 10 μg/litre, corresponding to iron deficiency. Quality control indicated satisfactory assay performance. In preliminary studies, serum ferritin level was found to be well correlated with gastro-intestinal iron absorption as an indicator of body iron status. Normal adult male subjects in Bangkok showed levels of 21-314 μg/litre and normal adult female levels of 13-173 μg/litre, in general agreement with values reported by other authors. Measurements were then extended to subjects in an area of north-eastern Thailand where iron-deficiency was common, to assess the effectiveness of food-iron fortification programmes. Measurements were also made on male blood donors in Bangkok, pregnant female subjects in Bangkok and north-eastern Thailand, school children in an area of southern Thailand where hookworm infestation was common and schoolchildren and adult female subjects in an area of northern Thailand where goitre was endemic. The results of all these studies are presented

  20. Diagnostic relevance of radioiron-absorption-measurements and immunoradiometric serum-ferritin-assay in the evaluation of iron stores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heinrich, H.C.

    1978-01-01

    Negative iron balance and enhanced iron demand respectively causes deficient iron stores (prelatent iron deficiency) with increased iron absorption, later on decrease of serum iron and increase of transferrin (latent Fe deficiency) and at least iron deficient anemia (manifest iron deficiency). In prelatend iron deficiency diagnostic 59 Fe 2+ absorption is increased and the RES cells do not show storage iron cytochemically. In latent iron deficiency in addition serum iron, transferrin iron saturation and serum ferritin is decreased and hypochromic mikrocytic anemia completes the signs of manifest iron deficiency. Besides rare cases of primary hemochromatosis and marked hyperdasia of ineffective erythropoiesis in homocygotic beta-thalassemia, hereditary non-spherocytic hemolytic anemia caused by pyruvate kinase deficiency and some sideroblastic anemias increased 59 Fe 2+ absorption is a reliable measure of exhausted iron stores. In these exceptional cases differential diagnosis between sideroachrestic and siderosensitive iron deficiency anemia can be made by measurement of serum iron and serum ferritin respectively. The etiology of iron deficiency is to be cleared by measurement of 59 Fe absorption from 59 Fe 2+ and 59 Fe-marked meat with consecutive estimation of whole body 59 Fe elimination. Shortly after completion or during oral iron therapy serum ferritin concentration is not suitable to evaluate the content of iron stores. (orig.) [de

  1. Body iron and individual prophylaxis in pregnancy-should the iron dose be adjusted according to serum  ferritin?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Milman, N; Byg, KE; Bergholt, T

    2006-01-01

    ferritin, serum soluble transferrin receptor (sTfR), haemoglobin] were recorded at 18, 32 and 39 weeks gestation and 8 weeks postpartum. Body iron was calculated using the serum sTfR/serum ferritin ratio. ID was defined by serum ferritin ...This study aims to evaluate iron prophylaxis in pregnant women from the individual aspect, i.e. according to serum ferritin levels at the beginning of pregnancy, and to assess which dose of iron would be adequate to prevent iron deficiency (ID) and iron deficiency anaemia (IDA) during pregnancy...... and postpartum. A randomised, double-blind study comprising 301 healthy Danish pregnant women allocated into four groups taking ferrous iron (as fumarate) in doses of 20 mg (n=74), 40 mg (n=76), 60 mg (n=77) and 80 mg (n=75) from 18 weeks gestation (inclusion) to 8 weeks postpartum. Iron status markers [serum...

  2. Initial Serum Ferritin Predicts Number of Therapeutic Phlebotomies to Iron Depletion in Secondary Iron Overload

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panch, Sandhya R.; Yau, Yu Ying; West, Kamille; Diggs, Karen; Sweigart, Tamsen; Leitman, Susan F.

    2014-01-01

    Background Therapeutic phlebotomy is increasingly used in patients with transfusional siderosis to mitigate organ injury associated with iron overload (IO). Laboratory response parameters and therapy duration are not well characterized in such patients. Methods We retrospectively evaluated 99 consecutive patients undergoing therapeutic phlebotomy for either transfusional IO (TIO, n=88; 76% had undergone hematopoietic transplantation) or non-transfusional indications (hyperferritinemia or erythrocytosis) (n=11). CBC, serum ferritin (SF), transferrin saturation, and transaminases were measured serially. Phlebotomy goal was an SF< 300 mcg/L. Results Mean SF prior to phlebotomy among TIO and nontransfusional subjects was 3,093 and 396 mcg/L, respectively. Transfusion burden in the TIO group was 94 ± 108 (mean ± SD) RBC units; about half completed therapy with 24 ± 23 phlebotomies (range 1–103). One-third was lost to follow-up. Overall, 15% had mild adverse effects, including headache, nausea, and dizziness, mainly during first phlebotomy. Prior transfusion burden correlated poorly with initial ferritin and total number of phlebotomies to target (NPT) in the TIO group. However, NPT was strongly correlated with initial SF (R2=0.8; p<0.0001) in both TIO and nontransfusional groups. ALT decreased significantly with serial phlebotomy in all groups (mean initial and final values, 61 and 39 U/L; p = 0.03). Conclusions Initial SF but not transfusion burden predicted number of phlebotomies to target in patients with TIO. Despite good treatment tolerance, significant losses to follow-up were noted. Providing patients with an estimated phlebotomy number and follow-up duration, and thus a finite endpoint, may improve compliance. Hepatic function improved with iron off-loading. PMID:25209879

  3. Iron status of pregnant Filipino women as measured by serum ferritin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perlas, L A; Kuizon, M D; Tajaon, R T; Desnacido, J A

    1992-12-01

    Iron status of pregnant women at different stages of pregnancy was evaluated by comparing values for hemoglobin (Hb), red cell indices, serum iron (SI), transferrin saturation (TS) and serum ferritin (SF) values with those of a group of non-pregnant women of comparable age and socio-economic status. Mean SF values on the second and third trimesters (9.3 +/- 2.60 ng/ml and 7.1 +/- 2.19 ng/ml) were significantly lower compared to that in the first trimester (22.6 +/- 2.20 ng/ml). These levels were also lower than that found in the non-pregnant controls. The trend was the same for TS. Hemoglobin levels of the pregnant subjects were significantly lower than those of the non-pregnant women. Prevalence of iron deficiency based on SF < 12.0 ng/ml and TS < 16.0% was highest at term and lowest during the first trimester indicating a decrease in iron stores as pregnancy progressed. Sensitivity for each of the iron parameters was computed, and it was found that for the diagnosis of iron deficiency in pregnant women, SF has a greater sensitivity than TS, SI, MCV and MCH.

  4. Serum hepcidin-25 may replace the ferritin index in the Thomas plot in assessing iron status in anemic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, C; Kobold, U; Balan, S; Roeddiger, R; Thomas, L

    2011-04-01

    Biochemical markers of iron deficiency do not distinguish iron-deficient anemia (IDA) from the anemia of chronic disease (ACD) and the combined state of ACD/IDA. Serum hepcidin-25 might be a marker resolving this problem. We investigated the extent to which serum hepcidin-25 enables the differentiation of the states above in comparison with the ferritin index plot, the so-called Thomas plot [soluble transferrin receptor (sTfR)/log ferritin and the reticulocyte hemoglobin content (CHr)]. Serum hepcidin-25 was determined in 155 anemic patients who were classified as having latent iron deficiency (latent ID), IDA, ACD, or ACD/IDA using the ferritin index plot (Thomas plot). Hepcidin-25 was determined using an isotope-dilution micro-HPLC-tandem mass spectrometry method. The ability to discriminate among these states based on serum hepcidin-25 alone or in combination with the CHr was evaluated in a receiver operating characteristic curve analysis and a comparison with the recently established ferritin index plot. Serum hepcidin-25 correlated with ferritin and the ferritin index. Use of a hepcidin-25 cutoff level of ≤4 nmol/l allowed the differentiation of IDA from ACD and ACD/IDA. Furthermore, the discrimination of ACD/IDA from ACD required combination with CHr in a new plot (hepcidin-25 and the CHr). The hepcidin-25 plot and the ferritin index plot showed a good correspondence in the differentiation of iron states in patients with anemia. Patients with IDA can be differentiated from ACD and ACD/IDA but not ACD from ACD/IDA based on hepcidin-25 alone. The combination of hepcidin-25 with CHr in the hepcidin-25 plot was useful for the differentiation of the states above. © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  5. Iron stores in 70-year-old Danish men and women. Evaluation in 469 individuals by serum ferritin and hemoglobin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Milman, N; Schultz-Larsen, K

    1994-01-01

    Iron status, including serum (S-) ferritin and hemoglobin (Hb) was assessed in a population survey of 469 old subjects (70 years of age; 254 men, 215 women); 7.9% of the participants had abnormal laboratory tests indicating diseases which might be connected with inappropriately high S-ferritin le......Iron status, including serum (S-) ferritin and hemoglobin (Hb) was assessed in a population survey of 469 old subjects (70 years of age; 254 men, 215 women); 7.9% of the participants had abnormal laboratory tests indicating diseases which might be connected with inappropriately high S......-ferritin levels. Men had a median S-ferritin of 114 micrograms/L, 5-95 percentile 28-373 micrograms/L; 2.4% had values depleted iron stores), 3.5% values from 15-30 micrograms/L (i.e., small iron stores), and 94.1% values > 30 micrograms/L (e.g., replete iron stores); 74.4% had values...

  6. Serum ferritin in recurrent oral ulceration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Challacombe, S.J.; Scully, C.; Keevil, B.; Lehner, T.

    1983-01-01

    A sensitive radio-assay for ferritin was developed and used to examine serum ferritin levels in 105 patients with recurrent oral ulceration (ROU), 41 patients with Behcet's syndrome (BS), 42 with other ulcerative oral lesions, 35 patients with non-ulcerative oral lesions and in 78 controls. Ferritin levels increased with age and were significantly higher in males than females. The mean ferritin concentrations in male patients with ROU, BS or with other oral ulcers were significantly reduced in comparison with controls, and in female patients were significantly reduced in those with major aphthous ulcers. The prevalence of low serum ferritin levels was about 8% in patients with ROU, 15% in BS and 9.5% in patients with other ulcerative oral lesions, compared with less than 3% in patients with non-ulcerative oral disorders and in controls. Most of the iron-deficient patients were female. Serum ferritin levels did not directly correlate with serum iron levels and may be a more accurate indicator of iron deficiency. Furthermore, serum ferritin can distinguish between patients with true iron deficiency and those with secondary sideropenia. It is suggested that in a small number of patients, oral ulceration may be a presenting sign of iron deficiency, and that in a further small proportion of patients, ROU already present will be exacerbated by concurrent iron deficiency. Both groups will show a therapeutic response to correction of the iron deficiency. The results suggest that serum ferritin levels are a useful part of the haematological investigatons in patients with ROU. (author)

  7. Investigation and management of a raised serum ferritin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cullis, Jonathan O; Fitzsimons, Edward J; Griffiths, William Jh; Tsochatzis, Emmanouil; Thomas, D Wayne

    2018-05-01

    Serum ferritin level is one of the most commonly requested investigations in both primary and secondary care. Whilst low serum ferritin levels invariably indicate reduced iron stores, raised serum ferritin levels can be due to multiple different aetiologies, including iron overload, inflammation, liver or renal disease, malignancy, and the recently described metabolic syndrome. A key test in the further investigation of an unexpected raised serum ferritin is the serum transferrin saturation. This guideline reviews the investigation and management of a raised serum ferritin level. The investigation and management of genetic haemochromatosis is not dealt with however and is the subject of a separate guideline. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Iron Deficiency Anemia in Adult Onset Still's Disease with a Serum Ferritin of 26,387 μg/L

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheetal Patel

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Serum ferritin rises in the anemia of chronic inflammation reflecting increased iron storage and other changes mediated by inflammation. When iron deficiency coexists, the ferritin may not always decline into the subnormal range. We describe the rare interaction of iron deficiency with the extreme hyperferritinemia characteristic of adult onset Still's disease. The combination has clinical relevance and allows deductions about the presence of serum ferritin at 26,387 μg/L despite obvious iron depletion. The diagnosis of iron deficiency anemia was delayed and became fully obvious when her Still's disease remitted and serum ferritin decreased to 6.5 μg/L. The coexistence of iron deficiency should be considered when evaluating a patient with anemia of chronic inflammation even when the ferritin level is elevated several hundredfold. Further insights on ferritin metabolism in Still's disease are suggested by the likelihood that the patient's massive hyperferritinemia in the acute phase of Still's disease was almost entirely of the iron-free apoferritin form.

  9. Immunoradiometric assay for ferritin in human serum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leyland, M.J.; Ganguli, P.C.; Blower, D.; Delamore, I.W.

    1975-01-01

    A sensitiv specific and precise immunoradiometric assay for ferritin has been developed. Ferritin was measured in the serum of 160 hospital controls, 101 females (118 plus/minus 9 μg/l) and 59 males (189 plus/minus 16 μg/l). This difference was statistically significant. In 28 patients with untreated iron deficiency anemia, serum ferritin concentration (6.1plus/minus 0.7 μg/l) was significantly lower than in the controls, but it was within the normal range in 14 cases of polycythaemia vera treated by repeated phlebotomy. In 4 patients with primary haemachromatosis (2884 plus/minus 56 μg/l), 25 with secondary iron overload states (5702 plus/minus 1235 μg/l) and 8 with haemolytic anaemia (1612 plus/minus 605 μg/l), serum ferritin levels were markedly elevated. In 14 cases of transfusional siderosis there was a highly significant correlation between serum ferritin concentration and units of blood transfused. A circadian rhythmin serum ferritin concentration was observed in 7 healthy subjects. (author)

  10. Helicobacter pylori infection and serum ferritin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berg, Gabriele; Bode, G; Blettner, M

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Helicobacter pylori may possibly affect the iron metabolism by occult bleeding, impaired absorption of non-hem iron, and by scavenging hem iron or ferritin, as some studies have suggested. The aim of this study was to analyze the association between H. pylori infection and serum ferritin...... in 1987/1988. The examination included a detailed questionnaire on medical history and lifestyle factors, a 7-day food record, and blood samples. Infection with H. pylori was measured serologically by ELISA and Westernblot. RESULTS: In total, 39.2% of 1806 persons aged 18 to 89 yr included in the study...... were H. pylori positive, of whom 57.6% had an infection with a CagA-positive H. pylori strain. Age- and sex-adjusted geometric mean of ferritin was 54.5 microg/dl among H. pylori-infected compared with 63.8 microg/dl among uninfected persons. A multiple linear regression model with log...

  11. Pre-Altitude Serum Ferritin Levels and Daily Oral Iron Supplement Dose Mediate Iron Parameter and Hemoglobin Mass Responses to Altitude Exposure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew D Govus

    Full Text Available To investigate the influence of daily oral iron supplementation on changes in hemoglobin mass (Hbmass and iron parameters after 2-4 weeks of moderate altitude exposure.Hematological data collected from 178 athletes (98 males, 80 females exposed to moderate altitude (1,350-3,000 m were analysed using linear regression to determine how altitude exposure combined with oral iron supplementation influenced Hbmass, total iron incorporation (TII and blood iron parameters [ferritin and transferrin saturation (TSAT].Altitude exposure (mean ± s: 21 ± 3 days increased Hbmass by 1.1% [-0.4, 2.6], 3.3% [1.7, 4.8], and 4.0% [2.0, 6.1] from pre-altitude levels in athletes who ingested nil, 105 mg and 210 mg respectively, of oral iron supplement daily. Serum ferritin levels decreased by -33.2% [-46.9, -15.9] and 13.8% [-32.2, 9.7] from pre-altitude levels in athletes who supplemented with nil and 105 mg of oral iron supplement daily, but increased by 36.8% [1.3, 84.8] in athletes supplemented with 210 mg of oral iron daily. Finally, athletes who ingested either 105 mg or 210 mg of oral iron supplement daily had a greater TII compared with non-supplemented athletes (0 versus 105 mg: effect size (d = -1.88 [-2.56, -1.17]; 0 versus 210 mg: effect size (d = -2.87 [-3.88, -1.66].Oral iron supplementation during 2-4 weeks of moderate altitude exposure may enhance Hbmass production and assist the maintenance of iron balance in some athletes with low pre-altitude iron stores.

  12. Iron overload in very low birth weight infants: Serum Ferritin and adverse outcomes

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Barrett, M

    2011-11-01

    Adequate iron isessential for growth and haematpoiesis. Oral iron supplementation is the standard of care in VLBW infants. Post mortem evidence has confirmed significant iron overload. Excessive free iron has been associated with free radical formation and brain injury in term infants.

  13. Evaluation of iron deposits in the reticuloendothelial system using T2-relaxation rate of MRI. Relation with serum ferritin and Fe concentration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ootsuka, Kae; Togami, Izumi; Kitagawa, Takahiro

    1996-01-01

    MR imaging is a useful non-invasive technique to detect iron deposits in many organs, but it is difficult to evaluate quantitatively. This study was performed to determine the possibility whether T2 relaxation rate (1/T2) could quantify iron deposits in the reticuloendothelial system (liver, spleen and bone marrow) of 11 patients and four normal volunteers. A moderate correlation was obtained between T2-relaxation rate and the serum ferritin level. These results suggest that T2-relaxation rate may provide useful information for the repeated quantitative evaluation of patients with iron-overload-syndromes. (author)

  14. Room-temperature susceptometry predicts biopsy-determined hepatic iron in patients with elevated serum ferritin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maliken, Bryan D; Avrin, William F; Nelson, James E; Mooney, Jody; Kumar, Sankaran; Kowdley, Kris V

    2012-01-01

    There is an ongoing clinical need for novel methods to measure hepatic iron content (HIC) noninvasively. Both magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) methods have previously shown promise for estimation of HIC, but these methods can be expensive and are not widely available. Room-temperature susceptometry (RTS) represents an inexpensive alternative and was previously found to be strongly correlated with HIC estimated by SQUID measurements among patients with transfusional iron overload related to thalassemia. The goal of the current study was to examine the relationship between RTS and biochemical HIC measured in liver biopsy specimens in a more varied patient cohort. Susceptometry was performed in a diverse group of patients with hyperferritinemia due to hereditary hemochromatosis (HHC) (n = 2), secondary iron overload (n = 3), nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) (n = 2), and chronic viral hepatitis (n = 3) within one month of liver biopsy in the absence of iron depletion therapy. The correlation coefficient between HIC estimated by susceptometry and by biochemical iron measurement in liver tissue was 0.71 (p = 0.022). Variance between liver iron measurement and susceptometry measurement was primarily related to reliance on the patient's body-mass index (BMI) to estimate the magnetic susceptibility of tissue overlying the liver. We believe RTS holds promise for noninvasive measurement of HIC. Improved measurement techniques, including more accurate overlayer correction, may further improve the accuracy of liver susceptometry in patients with liver disease.

  15. Red cell ferritin and iron stores in chronic granulocytic leukemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cermak, J.; Neuwirth, J.; Voglova, J.; Brabec, V.; Chrobak, L.

    1994-01-01

    Basic red cell ferritin was investigated in 28 patients with different phases of chronic granulocytic leukemia (GCL). Red cell ferritin was significantly decreased in remission after busulphan treatment and significantly elevated in the blast crisis as compared to healthy controls. Bone marrow stainable iron was decreased or absent in 86% of patients in the initial phase at the time of diagnosis and in 92% of those in remission. Red cell ferritin correlated with serum ferritin, however, serum ferritin level remained above normal range during all phases of the disease. A negative correlation between red cell ferritin and hemoglobin (Hb) (r = -0.605, p < 0.001) suggested that red cell ferritin level reflected the rate of iron utilization for heme synthesis. Decrease red cell iron observed in the remission may be explained by regression of dyserythropoiesis and by restoration of normal Hb synthesis after busulphan treatment. A progressive dyserythropoiesis in the blast crisis may lead to an increased red cell ferritin level. (author)

  16. Ferritin and iron levels in children with autistic disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hergüner, Sabri; Keleşoğlu, Fatih Mehmet; Tanıdır, Cansaran; Cöpür, Mazlum

    2012-01-01

    Iron has an important role on cognitive, behavioral, and motor development. High prevalence of iron deficiency has been reported in autism. The aim of this study was to investigate iron status in a group of children with autistic disorder. The sample was composed of 116 children between 3 and 16 years with a diagnosis of autistic disorder according to DSM-IV criteria. Serum ferritin, iron, hemoglobin, hematocrit, mean corpuscular volume, and red cell distribution width values were measured. We found that 24.1% of subjects had iron deficiency, and 15.5% had anemia. There was a significant positive correlation between age and ferritin and hematological measures. Results of this study confirmed that iron deficiency and anemia are common in children with autistic disorder. These findings suggest that ferritin levels should be measured in subjects with autism as a part of routine investigation.

  17. Assay of serum ferritin by two different radioimmunometric methods and its clinical significance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaltwasser, J.P.; Werner, E.; Gesellschaft fuer Strahlen- und Umweltforschung m.b.H., Frankfurt am Main

    1977-01-01

    Serum ferritin was measured by two different radioimmunometric methods a) the Addison assay, b) a commercial radioimmunoassay. Iron storage in the body was determined using 59 Fe. A dose correlation was found between serum ferritin and iron storage in the body. (AJ) [de

  18. The Prognostic Significance of Elevated Serum Ferritin Levels Prior to Transplantation in Patients With Lymphoma Who Underwent Autologous Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation (autoHSCT): Role of Iron Overload.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivgin, Serdar; Karamustafaoglu, Mehmet Fatih; Yildizhan, Esra; Zararsiz, Gokmen; Kaynar, Leylagul; Eser, Bulent; Cetin, Mustafa; Unal, Ali

    2016-08-01

    Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation is a common and preferred treatment of lymphomas in many centers. Our goal was to determine the association between pretransplant iron overload and survival in patients who underwent autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (autoHSCT). A total of 165 patients with lymphoma, who underwent autoHSCT between the years of 2007 and 2014, were included in this study. Ferritin levels were used to determine iron status; the cut-off value was 500 ng/mL. The relationship between iron overload and survival was assessed by statistical analysis. The median ferritin level in the normal ferritin (ferritin < 500) group was 118 ng/mL (range, 9-494 ng/mL) and in the high-ferritin group (ferritin ≥ 500), it was 908 ng/mL (range, 503-4549 ng/mL). A total of 64 (38.8%) patients died during follow-up. Of these patients that died, 52 (81.25%) were in the high-ferritin group, and 12 (18.75%) were in the normal ferritin group (P ≤ .001). Twelve (14.1%) of 85 patients died in the normal ferritin group, and 52 (65.0%) of 80 patients died in the high-ferritin group. The overall mortality was significantly higher in the high-ferritin group (P < .001). The median overall survival was 42 months (range, 25-56 months) in the normal-ferritin group and20 months (range, 5-46) in the high-ferritin group. The difference between the groups was statistically significant (P < .001). The median disease-free survival was 39 months (range, 16-56) in the normal ferritin group and 10 months (range, 3-29) in the high-ferritin group. The difference between the groups was statistically significant (P < .001). Elevated serum ferritin levels might predict poorer survival in autoHSCT recipients. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Iron supplementation is positively associated with increased serum ferritin levels in 9-month-old Danish infants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gondolf, Ulla Holmboe; Tetens, Inge; Michaelsen, Kim Fleischer

    2013-01-01

    recommendation (>400 ml Fe-fortified formula or 8 mg Fe/d) is associated with more favourable levels of Fe status indicators compared to those not following the recommendation. A random sample of 9-month-old infants living in Copenhagen was established and 312 healthy term infants were examined at 9·1 (sd 0......Fe deficiency is still common in infancy, even in affluent societies, and has prompted Fe fortification of food products and use of Fe supplements in many populations. In the present study, we tested the hypothesis that Fe status among 9-month-old infants following the Danish Fe supplementation......·3) months of age. Blood samples were available from 278 infants. Overall, twenty infants (7·8 %) had Fe deficiency (serum ferritin

  20. HIV and other predictors of serum folate, serum ferritin, and hemoglobin in pregnancy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friis, Henrik; Gomo, E; Kæstel, Pernille

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Folate and iron status and hemoglobin concentrations are important to maternal and infant health. OBJECTIVE: Our goal was to identify predictors of serum folate, serum ferritin, and hemoglobin. DESIGN: This was a cross-sectional study of 1669 pregnant women (22-35 wk of gestation) in ...

  1. Dietary Iron Intake and Serum Ferritin Concentration in 213 Patients Homozygous for the HFEC282Y Hemochromatosis Mutation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor R Gordeuk

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: HFEC282Y homozygotes have an increased risk for developing increased iron stores and related disorders. It is controversial whether dietary iron restrictions should be recommended to such individuals.

  2. A genetic risk factor for low serum ferritin levels in Danish blood donors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Erik; Grau, Katrine; Berg, Trine

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Iron deficiency is a frequent side effect of blood donation. In recent years, several studies have described genetic variants associated with iron concentrations. However, the impact of these variants on iron levels is unknown in blood donors. Knowledge of genetic variants....../or restless leg syndrome (RLS) were investigated in two groups of female blood donors. The first group had low iron stores (serum ferritin ≤ 12 µg/L, n = 657), and the second group had normal to high iron stores (serum ferritin > 30 µg/L, n = 645). Genotype distribution for each of the SNPs was compared......: A frequent polymorphism in BTBD9 was significantly associated with serum ferritin. This polymorphism has previously been associated with RLS, but not low iron stores in blood donors....

  3. Serum iron parameters in liver cirrhosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siregar, G. A.; Maail, W.

    2018-03-01

    The liver plays a fundamental role in iron homeostasis. Iron parameters change, especially ferritin, need to be evaluated in patients with liver cirrhosis. Serum ferritin could predict the prognosis of patients with decompensated cirrhosis since it reflects immunemediated and infectious stimuli. Ferritin could express the severity of liver disease and possible subsequent complications. Finally, it might reflect an iron overload condition resulting in significant morbidity and early mortality. 70 patients with decompensated liver cirrhosis divided into three Child-Pugh subgroups. Serum iron parameters include serum iron (SI), total iron binding capacity (TIBC) and ferritin was measured in these groups. From these 70 patients, 30 (42.9%) with HbsAg positive, 26 (37.1%) with anti-HCV positive and 14 (20%) with both HbsAg and anti-HCV positive. Of the 70 patients, 14 (20%) had CTP Class A cirrhosis, 17 (24.3%) had CTP Class B cirrhosis, and 39 (55.7%) had CTP C cirrhosis. The median (range) value of serum iron was 36 (10-345) μg/dl, TIBC was 160 (59-520) μg/dl, Ferritin was 253.5 (8-6078) ng/ml and the transferrin saturation was 22.9 (3.65-216.98) %.We found a significant difference in serum ferritin level with CTP score. Ferritin levels increased as Child-Pugh class progressed (p<0.001).

  4. Variability of ferritin measurements in chronic kidney disease; implications for iron management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, Bradley A; Coyne, Daniel W; Eby, Charles S; Scott, Mitchell G

    2009-01-01

    Serum ferritin levels are a proxy measure of iron stores; and existing guidelines for managing anemia in hemodialysis patients suggest that serum ferritin concentrations should be maintained at >200 ng/ml. The KDOQI recommendations further state there is insufficient evidence advocating routine intravenous iron when ferritin levels exceed 500 ng/ml. Here we determined the interassay differences and short-term intraindividual variability of serum ferritin measurements in patients on chronic hemodialysis to illustrate how these variances may affect treatment decisions. Intermethod variations of up to 150 ng/ml were found comparing six commonly used ferritin assays that evaluated thirteen pools of serum from hemodialysis and nonhemodialysis patients. The intraindividual variability for ferritin in 60 stable hemodialysis patients ranged between 2-62% measured over an initial two-week period and from 3-52% when factored over a six-week period. Our results suggests that single serum ferritin values should not be used to guide clinical decisions regarding treatment of chronic hemodialysis patients with intravenous iron due to significant analytical and intraindividual variability.

  5. Assessing the Association between Serum Ferritin, Transferrin Saturation, and C-Reactive Protein in Northern Territory Indigenous Australian Patients with High Serum Ferritin on Maintenance Haemodialysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandawana William Majoni

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To determine the significance of high serum ferritin observed in Indigenous Australian patients on maintenance haemodialysis in the Northern Territory, we assessed the relationship between ferritin and transferrin saturation (TSAT as measures of iron status and ferritin and C-reactive protein (CRP as markers of inflammation. Methods. We performed a retrospective cohort analysis of data from adult patients (≥18 years on maintenance haemodialysis (>3 months from 2004 to 2011. Results. There were 1568 patients. The mean age was 53.9 (11.9 years. 1244 (79.3% were Indigenous. 44.2% (n=693 were male. Indigenous patients were younger (mean age [52.3 (11.1 versus 57.4 (15.2, p<0.001] and had higher CRP [14.7 mg/l (7–35 versus 5.9 mg/l (1.9–17.5, p<0.001], higher median serum ferritin [1069 µg/l (668–1522 versus 794.9 µg/l (558.5–1252.0, p<0.001], but similar transferrin saturation [26% (19–37 versus 28% (20–38, p=0.516]. We observed a small positive correlation between ferritin and TSAT (r2=0.11, p<0.001, no correlation between ferritin and CRP (r2 = 0.001, p<0.001, and positive association between high serum ferritin and TSAT (p<0.001, Indigenous ethnicity (p<0.001, urea reduction ratio (p=0.001, and gender (p<0.001 after adjustment in mixed regression analysis. Conclusion. Serum ferritin and TSAT may inadequately reflect iron status in this population. The high ferritin was poorly explained by inflammation.

  6. Could the erythrocyte indices or serum ferritin predict the therapeutic response to a trial with oral iron during pregnancy? Results from the Accuracy study for Maternal Anaemia diagnosis (AMA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bresani Salvi, Cristiane Campello; Braga, Maria Cynthia; Figueirôa, José Natal; Batista Filho, Malaquias

    2016-08-12

    Treatment of maternal iron-deficiency anaemia can reduce risks of prematurity and low birth weight; hence a reliable diagnosis of maternal iron needs is critical. However, erythrocyte indices and serum ferritin have shown a weak correlation with iron status during pregnancy. This study verified the accuracy of those tests to predict the responsiveness to a therapeutic test with oral iron as reference standard for iron deficiency in pregnant women. A prospective diagnostic study phase 3 was conducted in a single prenatal care center in Northeast Brazil. Between August 2011 and October 2012 a consecutive sampling included 187 women in their 2(nd)-3(rd) trimesters of low-risk pregnancy and having anaemia (haemoglobin <11.0 g/dL). Until December 2012, 139 women completed a trial with daily pills of ferrous sulfate (40 mg of iron), during 23 to 125 days. Haemoglobin (Hb), other erythrocyte indices and ferritin (index-tests) were assessed pre-treatment by automated analyzers. Hb was performed also post-treatment to assess the therapeutic response by its post-pretreatment differences. We estimated sensitivity (Se), specificity (Sp), predictive values (PV), likelihood ratios (LR), diagnostic Odds Ratio (OR), area under Receiver Operating Characteristic curve (AUC), accuracy ratio and agreement coefficient of the index-tests against an increase of at least 0.55 Hb Z-score (reference standard test). We calculated the Z-scores according to the reference population from Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Hb had a mean increase of 0.24 Z-score after 30 iron pills (p 0.013). All index-tests demonstrated PV- above 70 %, PV+ around 40 %, LR around 1.0, and AUC of 0.5 to 0.6. Hb and haematocrit had Se of 50 % (95 % CI 40 to 70); and Sp of 59 % (95 % CI 43 to 74) and 47 % (95 % CI 38 to 57), respectively. Ferritin, Mean Corpuscular Volume, Mean Corpuscular Haemoglobin, Mean Corpuscular Haemoglobin Concentration and Red blood cell Distribution Width had Se below 40

  7. Effect of RBC concentrate transfusions on serum ferritin content in children with acute leukaemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bebeshko, V G; Bruslova, E M; Tsvietkova, N M; Iatsemirskii, S M; Puchkareva, T I; Gonchar, L A; Krukovska, V V; Zelinska, A V; Mishchenko, L P

    2013-01-01

    To study the serum ferritin levels in children with acute leukemia, depending on the number of transfusions of RBC concentrate and period of disease. We studied the red blood count, serum iron and ferritin levels in 54 patients with acute leukemia before chemotherapy, at the time of a standardized treatment protocol, and after transfusions of RBC concentrates. In the debute of acute leukemia just before treatment lauch the serum ferritin in 81.5% of children was 2.3-2.5 higher than normal. The need for transfusion of RBC concentrates was higher under serum ferritin level exceeding 500 ng/mL. The association was established between ferritin content and age of the children, variant of acute leukemia and period of the disease. The level of serum ferritin can be used as a marker of ferrokinetic status for timely diagnosis of iron overload in children with acute leukemias and for application of treatment-and-prophylactic actions. Bebeshko V. G., Bruslova K. M., Cvjetkova N. M., Jacemyrskyj S. M., Pushkarova T. I., Gonchar L. O., Krukovska V. V., Zelinska A. V., Mishhenko L. P., 2013.

  8. Association of Serum Ferritin Levels with Metabolic Syndrome and Insulin Resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padwal, Meghana K; Murshid, Mohsin; Nirmale, Prachee; Melinkeri, R R

    2015-09-01

    The impact of CVDs and Type II DM is increasing over the last decade. It has been estimated that by 2025 their incidence will double. Ferritin is one of the key proteins regulating iron homeostasis and is a widely available clinical biomarker of iron status. Some studies suggest that prevalence of atherosclerosis and insulin resistance increases significantly with increasing serum ferritin. Metabolic syndrome is known to be associated with increased risk of atherosclerosis as well as insulin resistance. The present study was designed to explore the association of serum ferritin levels with metabolic syndrome and insulin resistance. The present study was prospective, cross sectional. The study protocol was approved by IEC. The study group consisted of 90 participants (50 cases of metabolic syndrome and 40 age and sex matched controls). Diagnosis of metabolic syndrome was done as per NCEP ATP III criteria. Estimation of serum Ferritin and Insulin was done by Chemiluminescence Immunoassay (CLIA) while Glucose by Glucose Oxidase and Peroxidase (GOD-POD) method. Insulin Resistance was calculated by HOMA IR score. Data obtained was statistically analysed by using student t-test. We found statistically significant rise in the levels of serum ferritin (p=syndrome as compared with controls. High serum ferritin levels though within normal range are significantly associated with both metabolic syndrome and insulin resistance.

  9. Iron induction of ferritin synthesis in soybean cell suspensions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proudhon, D; Briat, J F; Lescure, A M

    1989-06-01

    In animal cells specialized for iron storage, iron-induced accumulation of ferritin is known to result from a shift of stored mRNA from the ribonucleoprotein fraction to polysomes. Previous reports with bean leaves suggested that in plants iron induction of ferritin synthesis would result from a regulation at the transcriptional level (F van der Mark, F Bienfait, H van der Ende [1983] Biochem Biophys Res Commun 115:463-469). Soybean (Glycine max, cv Mandarin) cell suspension cultures have been used here to support these findings. Ferritin induction is obtained by addition of Fe-citrate to the culture medium. A good correlation is found between cellular iron content and the amount of ferritin accumulation. This protein accumulation corresponds to an increase of in vitro translatable ferritin mRNA. Addition of 4 micrograms actinomycin D per milliliter to the cultures inhibits completely in vivo RNA synthesis, whereas protein synthesis was poorly affected, at least for 24 hours. During the same time, this concentration of actinomycin D strongly inhibits the iron-induced synthesis of ferritin. These results show that in soybean cell cultures, the mechanism of regulation of ferritin synthesis in response to iron does not result from recruitment of preexisting mRNA. They confirm that in plant systems, ferritin synthesis results from increased transcription of the corresponding genes.

  10. Relationship of serum ferritin level and tic severity in children with Tourette syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Debabrata; Burkman, Elizabeth

    2017-08-01

    Tics can be considered hyperkinetic movements akin to restless leg syndrome (RLS). Drawing the analogy of iron deficiency as an etiology of RLS, it is conceivable that iron deficiency may underlie or worsen tics in Tourette syndrome (TS). The purpose of this study was to evaluate the relationship between serum ferritin levels and tic severity, as well as consequent impact on life, in children with TS. Children tic severity, impact on life, medication, comorbidities, blood count, and serum ferritin at diagnosis and follow-up. In fifty-seven patients, M:F = 2:1, serum ferritin was 48.0 ± 33.28 ng/mL, tic severity score 2.3 ± 0.80, impact on life score 2.2 ± 0.93, and composite score 4.57 ± 1.6. Serum ferritin was not influenced by comorbid obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD), attention deficit hyperactive disorder (ADHD), or anxiety (P > 0.16). Thirty-eight percent with low serum ferritin (≤50 ng/mL) (n = 37) had severe tics (>5 composite score), compared with 25% in normal ferritin group (n = 20). Over 6-12 months, tic severity score improved in both iron treated groups, deficient (2.70 to 1.90) and sufficient (2.40 to 1.95), whereas tics worsened or remained the same when not treated with iron. Our data suggest iron deficiency may be associated with more severe tics with higher impact on TS children, independent of the presence of OCD, ADHD, or anxiety. Iron supplementation showed a trend towards improvement of tic severity upon follow-up. We suggest a double-blind, placebo-controlled prospective study to reach a definite conclusion.

  11. IRON, ZINC, AND FERRITIN ACCUMULATION IN COMMON BEANS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Urbanski, Dorian Fabian; Sørensen, Kirsten; Jurkiewicz, Anna Malgorzata

    Iron and zinc malnutrition are major threats to human health and development around the world. The World Health Organization states that over two billion people are affected by iron deficiency. In particular children and pregnant women in developing countries are affected by iron deficiency...... in mature seeds, but the ferritin protein was suggested to be the major iron storing protein in legumes [1]. Both iron and zinc localization, as well as speciation, can have an impact on their nutritional availability. We will present detailed information about iron, zinc, and ferritin distribution...

  12. Atomic absorption assessment of mineral iron quantity in ferritin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marinova, M.; Vladimirova, L.

    2009-01-01

    Possibilities for quantitative determination of the number of iron atoms in the mineral core of ferritin by atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS) are investigated in the work. Different measurements with AAS show an iron content from 1000 up to 4500 atoms per molecule ferritin. This motivated us to investigate the amount of iron in the Horse Spleen Ferritin with atomic absorption spectroscopy under application of the Bulgarian standard BDS EN 14082/2003 Foodstuffs - Determination of trace elements - Determination of lead, cadmium, zinc, copper, iron and chromium by atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS) after dry ashing. The obtained results give approx. 1800 atoms per molecule Ferritin. It is in accordance with previous results, published by leading researchers. The investigation of the iron content with AAS under the use of the Bulgarian standard is a good opportunity to study many other objects of biological interest. (authors)

  13. Serum ferritin, serum nitric oxide, and cognitive function in pediatric thalassemia major

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Septiana Nur Qurbani

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Background Hemolysis and repeated blood transfusions in children with thalassemia major cause iron overload in various organs, including the brain, and may lead to neurodegeneration. Hemolysis also causes decreased levels of nitric oxide, which serves as a volume transmitter and slow dynamic modulation, leading to cognitive impairment. Objective To assess for correlations between serum ferritin as well as nitric oxide levels and cognitive function in children with thalassemia major.  Methods This analytical study with cross-sectional design on 40 hemosiderotic thalassemia major patients aged 6−14 years, was done at the Thalassemia Clinic in Dr. Hasan Sadikin Hospital, Bandung, West Java, from May to June 2015. Serum ferritin measurements were performed by an electrochemiluminescence immunoassay; serum nitric oxide was assayed by a colorimetric procedure based on Griess reaction; and cognitive function was assessed by the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children test. Statistical analysis was done using Spearman’s Rank correlation, with a significance value of 0.05. Results Abnormal values in verbal, performance, and full scale IQ were found in 35%, 57.5% and 57.5%, respectively. Serum nitric oxide level was significantly correlated with performance IQ (P=0.022, but not with verbal IQ (P=0.359 or full scale IQ (P=0.164. There were also no significant correlations between serum ferritin level and full scale, verbal, or performance IQ (P=0.377, 0.460, and 0.822, respectively. Conclusion Lower serum nitric oxide level is significantly correlated to lower cognitive function, specifically in the performance IQ category. However, serum ferritin level has no clear correlation with cognitive function.

  14. Serum Ferritin Is Associated with Metabolic Syndrome and Red Meat Consumption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Avila Felipe

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims. Hyperferritinemia has been related with a wide spectrum of pathologies, including diabetes, cardiovascular disease, neurodegenerative disorders, and metabolic syndrome. The aim of this study was to investigate the association between hyperferritinemia and iron consumption. Methods and Results. Serum ferritin concentration was evaluated in 66 presumed healthy men, along with other clinical and biochemical markers of chronic diseases. A three-day food questionnaire was applied for nutrition information. Hyperferritinemia was a condition found in 13.4% of the volunteers analyzed. Significant correlations were found between serum ferritin concentration and metabolic syndrome parameters (HDL cholesterol, triglycerides, and fasting glucose as well as an increase of the serum ferritin mean value with the number of risk factors of metabolic syndrome. Also, oxidative stress markers (carbonyl groups, AOPP, and glycated hemoglobin, hepatic damage markers (GGT, SGOT, and parameters related to insulin resistance (HOMA, blood insulin, and blood glucose correlate significantly with serum ferritin. Volunteers had an excessive iron intake, principally by bread consumption. Analyses of food intake showed that red meat consumption correlates significantly with serum ferritin. Conclusion. Red meat consumption, metabolic syndrome, and chronic disease markers are associated with hyperferritinemia in a population of Chilean men.

  15. Tissue-specific histochemical localization of iron and ferritin gene ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ficient and inappropriate diet is a severe nutritional problem. (Goto et al. 2001) that affects ... Ferritin is an iron storage protein which stores 4500 iron atoms in its central ... content in a high-economic-value indica rice variety (Oryza sativa L. cv.

  16. Serum iron test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fe+2; Ferric ion; Fe++; Ferrous ion; Iron - serum; Anemia - serum iron; Hemochromatosis - serum iron ... A blood sample is needed. Iron levels are highest in the morning. Your health care provider will likely have you do this test in the morning.

  17. Predicting C282Y Homozygote Genotype for Hemochromatosis Using Serum Ferritin and Transferrin Saturation Values from 44,809 Participants of the HEIRS Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Lim

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: The simultaneous interpretation of serum ferritin level and transferrin saturation has been used as a clinical guide to diagnose genetic hemochromatosis. The Hemochromatosis and Iron Overload Screening (HEIRS Study screened 101,168 North American participants for serum ferritin level and transferrin saturation, and C282Y genotyping for the HFE gene.

  18. Association of Increased Serum Ferritin With Impaired Muscle Strength/Quality in Hemodialysis Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakagawa, Chie; Inaba, Masaaki; Ishimura, Eiji; Yamakawa, Tomoyuki; Shoji, Shigeichi; Okuno, Senji

    2016-07-01

    We reported previously that muscle quality and muscle strength provide clinically relevant predictors for better survival in hemodialysis patients. Iron overload might impair muscle function by its accumulation in muscle in such patients. Serum ferritin, a marker for body iron store, was examined for its association with handgrip strength (HGS) and muscle quality which was defined as the ratio of HGS to arm lean mass measured with dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. In 300 Japanese hemodialysis patients, age, hemodialysis duration, body mass index, and serum albumin were 58.0 ±12.0 (mean ± standard deviation) years, 4.2 (1.8-10.4) (median [25th-75th percentile]) years, 20.4 ± 2.8 kg/m(2), 4.0 ± 0.3 g/dL, respectively. Hemoglobin and hematocrit were 8.9 ± 1.2 g/dL, and 28.8 ± 3.9%, respectively, whereas transferrin saturation and serum ferritin were 29.8 ± 11.0% and 100 (54-172) ng/mL, respectively. Serum ferritin significantly correlated in a positive manner with the total dose of iron orally administered during the previous 6 months (r = 0.185, P = .0013). HGS and muscle quality were 23.1 ± 10.4 kg and 11.6 ± 3.8 kg/kg, respectively. In multivariate analysis to elucidate the factors associated with HGS and muscle quality in 300 hemodialysis patients, which included transferrin saturation and log serum ferritin, in addition to age, gender, hemodialysis duration, the presence/absence of diabetes, body mass index as independent variables, log serum ferritin emerged as a significant and independent factor which associated in a negative fashion with HGS (β = -0.091, P = .0395) and tendency toward negative association with muscle quality (β = -0.100, P = .0754). In summary, the present study demonstrated the significant association of serum ferritin with HGS and muscle quality in hemodialysis patients and thus suggested that we should be careful of iron overload to avoid its possible harmful effect on muscle in such patients. Copyright © 2016 National Kidney

  19. Ferritin gene transcription is regulated by iron in soybean cell cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lescure, A M; Proudhon, D; Pesey, H; Ragland, M; Theil, E C; Briat, J F

    1991-09-15

    Iron-regulated ferritin synthesis in animals is dominated by translational control of stored mRNA; iron-induced transcription of ferritin genes, when it occurs, changes the subunit composition of ferritin mRNA and protein and is coupled to translational control. Ferritins in plants and animals have evolved from a common progenitor, based on the similarity of protein sequence; however, sequence divergence occurs in the C termini; structure prediction suggests that plant ferritin has the E-helix, which, in horse ferritin, forms a large channel at the tetrameric interface. In contemporary plants, a transit peptide is encoded by ferritin mRNA to target the protein to plastids. Iron-regulated synthesis of ferritin in plants and animals appears to be very different since the 50- to 60-fold increases of ferritin protein, previously observed to be induced by iron in cultured soybean cells, is accompanied by an equivalent accumulation of hybridizable ferritin mRNA and by increased transcription of ferritin genes. Ferritin mRNA from iron-induced cells and the constitutive ferritin mRNA from soybean hypocotyls are identical. The iron-induced protein is translocated normally to plastids. Differences in animal ferritin structure coincide with the various iron storage functions (reserve for iron proteins and detoxification). In contrast, the constancy of structure of soybean ferritin, iron-induced and constitutive, coupled with the potential for vacuolar storage of excess iron in plants suggest that rapid synthesis of ferritin from a stored ferritin mRNA may not be needed in plants for detoxification of iron.

  20. Sequence analysis of dolphin ferritin H and L subunits and possible iron-dependent translational control of dolphin ferritin gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sasaki Yukako

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Iron-storage protein, ferritin plays a central role in iron metabolism. Ferritin has dual function to store iron and segregate iron for protection of iron-catalyzed reactive oxygen species. Tissue ferritin is composed of two kinds of subunits (H: heavy chain or heart-type subunit; L: light chain or liver-type subunit. Ferritin gene expression is controlled at translational level in iron-dependent manner or at transcriptional level in iron-independent manner. However, sequencing analysis of marine mammalian ferritin subunits has not yet been performed fully. The purpose of this study is to reveal cDNA-derived amino acid sequences of cetacean ferritin H and L subunits, and demonstrate the possibility of expression of these subunits, especially H subunit, by iron. Methods Sequence analyses of cetacean ferritin H and L subunits were performed by direct sequencing of polymerase chain reaction (PCR fragments from cDNAs generated via reverse transcription-PCR of leukocyte total RNA prepared from blood samples of six different dolphin species (Pseudorca crassidens, Lagenorhynchus obliquidens, Grampus griseus, Globicephala macrorhynchus, Tursiops truncatus, and Delphinapterus leucas. The putative iron-responsive element sequence in the 5'-untranslated region of the six different dolphin species was revealed by direct sequencing of PCR fragments obtained using leukocyte genomic DNA. Results Dolphin H and L subunits consist of 182 and 174 amino acids, respectively, and amino acid sequence identities of ferritin subunits among these dolphins are highly conserved (H: 99–100%, (99→98 ; L: 98–100%. The conserved 28 bp IRE sequence was located -144 bp upstream from the initiation codon in the six different dolphin species. Conclusion These results indicate that six different dolphin species have conserved ferritin sequences, and suggest that these genes are iron-dependently expressed.

  1. Ferritin-iron increases killing of Chinese hamster ovary cells by X-irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nelson, J.M.; Stevens, R.G.

    1992-01-01

    Stationary-phase Chinese hamster ovary cells were cultured in medium containing ferritin (∼19% iron by weight) added at concentrations ranging from 0 to 128 μg/ml. One set of cultures was unirradiated, another set exposed to 4.0 Gy of X-ray. Clonogenic cell survival was assessed in each set of cultures. In the absence of added ferritin, 4.0 Gy killed approximately 50% of the cells. In the absence of radiation, ferritin was not toxic at less than 48 μg/ml; above 48 μg/ml, toxicity increased with concentration. Apoferritin was not toxic at any concentration tested (up to 1000 μg/ml). Although 32 μg/ml ferritin, reflecting only a 3-6 fold increase in iron concentration over normal serum, was not toxic, it reduced survival of X-irradiated cells by an additional 75%. These results indicate that a sublethal concentration of ferritin can be a potent radiosensitizer. (Author)

  2. Serum ferritin in patients with cancer: determination with antibodies to HeLa cell and spleen ferritin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, B.M.; Worwood, M.; Jacobs, A.

    1980-01-01

    Some malignant tissues and cell lines contain acidic isoferritins and it has been suggested that the assay of such isoferritins in serum may be of value in the diagnosis of malignancy. This paper describes a radioimmunoassay for acidic ferritin purified from HeLa cells. Examination of purified heart, kidney, liver and spleen ferritin showed that the assay was highly specific for acidic isoferritins. Ferritin concentrations have been measured with antibodies to HeLa cell and spleen ferritin in extracts of normal and tumour tissue. Although the tumours contained more HeLa type ferritin than the corresponding normal tissue the HeLa/spleen type ferritin ratio was low. HeLa-type ferritin concentrations have been compared with values obtained with anti-spleen ferritin in over 1000 sera from normal subjects and patients with cancer and leukaemia. HeLa-type ferritin was not detected (<2 μg/l) in most normal sera. Concentrations of up to 53 μg/l were found in sera from patients with malignant disease but the HeLa/spleen type ferritin ratio was always very low. There appears to be little application for antibodies to HeLa cell or heart ferritin in the diagnosis or monitoring of cancer. (Auth.)

  3. Raising of Antiserum and development od IRMA serum ferritin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdalla, Omer Mohamed; Ali, Nagi Ibrahim; Elbagir, Nabila Musa

    1998-02-01

    Antiserum to human liver ferritin was developed by immunizing sheep with purified human liver ferritin. This antiserum has been purified using ammonium sulphate. A part of it was linked chemically to magnetisale particles, while the other part was adsorbed physically onto polystyrene beads in order to develop two IRMAs. The anti-ferritin antibody obtained was purified and diluted 200,000 folds before being coated to polystyrene beads, or coupled to magnetisable particles. Assay validation, sensitivity and accuracy tests for the two IRMAs were performed. The polystyrene beads IRMA system showed better performance than the magnetisable particles system. It was found that, the minimum detectable dose in the bead system was 0.6 ng/ml, whereas it was 6.0 ng/ml in the magnetisable one. In the beads system, the mean recovery of ferritin was found to be 98.5% while the linearity tests showed a correlation coefficient of 0.996. The comparison between our coated beads IRMA with NETRIA's IRMA serum ferritin showed a correlation coefficient of 0.982. (Author)

  4. Iron release from ferritin and lipid peroxidation by radiolytically generated reducing radicals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reif, D.W.; Schubert, J.; Aust, S.D.

    1988-01-01

    Iron is involved in the formation of oxidants capable of damaging membranes, protein, and DNA. Using 137 Cs gamma radiation, we investigated the release of iron from ferritin and concomitant lipid peroxidation by radiolytically generated reducing radicals, superoxide and the carbon dioxide anion radical. Both radicals released iron from ferritin with similar efficiencies and iron mobilization from ferritin required an iron chelator. Radiolytically generated superoxide anion resulted in peroxidation of phospholipid liposomes as measured by malondialdehyde formation only when ferritin was included as an iron source and the released iron was found to be chelated by the phospholipid liposomes

  5. "SERUM FERRITIN IN TYPE 2 DIABETES MELLITUS AND ITS RELATIONSHIP WITH HbA1c"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Sharifi Sh. Sazandeh

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes mellitus (DM type 2 is one of the most common endocrine disorders affecting more than 135 million people in the world. The etiology of the disease is not fully understood, but recently subclinical hemochromatosis has been considered as one of the probable causes of DM. This study was carried out to examine the relationship between serum ferritin as a marker of iron overload with DM and HbA1c. This study was conducted on 97 patients with type 2 DM who were referred to Zanjan Diabetes Clinic. Ninety-four normal age-matched individuals were included in the study as the control group. Ferritin, hemoglobin, HbA1c, and fasting blood sugar were measured in blood samples. Exclusion criteria included anemia, or any other disease or drug that could affect ferritin levels. Results were analyzed statistically by Chi-square test, t-test and Pearson regression coefficient test. One hundred ninety-one cases including 97 diabetics (37 males and 60 females and 94 normal individuals were studied. There were no significant differences between the two groups regarding age, hemoglobin and body mass index. Mean serum ferritin was significantly higher in diabetics than in the control group (101±73 mg/ml vs. 43.5+42 mg/ml, p<0.001. There was no correlation between serum ferritin and HbA1c in diabetic patients of either sex. Ferritin levels in patients with DM is high, but not related to levels of HbA1c and blood glucose control.

  6. The Correlation between Troponin and Ferritin Serum Levels in the Patients with Major Beta-Thalassemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iraj Shahramian

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Thalassemia is a hereditary hemoglobinopathy whose most common complication is cardiac involvement which ends up in these patients’ death. Since troponin is a sensitive and specific marker for the detection of microinfarct, we studied the relationship between troponin and ferritin serum levels for early diagnosis of cardiac involvement in these patients. Materials and Methods: This case-control study was performed on 80 patients, including 40 patients with major thalassemia and normal echocardiography and 40 healthy volunteers ranging from 6 months to 16 years old. All the children were examined and the eligible children who were not infected with known heart disease, iron deficiency anemia, kidney disease, diabetes, fever, and systemic diseases were enrolled into the study after obtaining written informed consents from their parents. At 8:00 A.M. before breakfast, 5cc blood was drawn from these children. After collecting the samples, ferritin and troponin serum levels were evaluated using ELISA and electro- kymonolonsense methods, respectively. The gathered data were analyzed through the SPSS statistical software (v. 20 and T-test. Besides, P value<0.05 was considered as statistically significant. Results: The study results revealed a significant difference between the two groups regarding the mean of the serum levels of troponin (P=0.045 and ferritin (P=0.001. In this study, no significant correlation was observed between serum troponin and ferritin levels and age and BMI in the two groups. Also, no significant relationship was found between serum troponin level and sex (P=0.264. Conclusions: In microinfarct, troponin increases independent of ferritin; therefore, it can be used for early detection of cardiac involvement in thalassemia patients to determine the sub-clinical effects.

  7. Observation on the changes of serum erythropoietin (EPO) and ferritin (SF) levels after preserved red cells (PRC) transfusion in patients with iron deficiency anemia (IDA)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Keqin; Lv Haijun; Li Xinghua

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To study the changes of serum EPO and SF levels after preserved red cells transfusion in patients with IDA. Methods: Serum EPO and SF levels were detected with RIA both before and after transfusing preserved red cells in 35 patients with IDA as well as in 30 controls. Results: Before transfusion serum EPO levels in the patients were significantly higher than those in the controls (P 0.05). Conclusion: Transfusing preserved red cells is an effective treatment and has important role in clinical application. (authors)

  8. Magnetic resonance imaging of reconstructed ferritin as an iron-induced pathological model system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balejcikova, Lucia [Institute of Experimental Physics SAS, Watsonova 47, 040 01 Kosice (Slovakia); Institute of Measurement Science SAS, Dubravska cesta 9, 841 04 Bratislava 4 (Slovakia); Strbak, Oliver [Institute of Measurement Science SAS, Dubravska cesta 9, 841 04 Bratislava 4 (Slovakia); Biomedical Center Martin, Jessenius Faculty of Medicine in Martin, Comenius University in Bratislava, Mala Hora 4, 036 01 Martin (Slovakia); Baciak, Ladislav [Faculty of Chemical and Food Technology STU, Radlinskeho 9, 812 37 Bratislava (Slovakia); Kovac, Jozef [Institute of Experimental Physics SAS, Watsonova 47, 040 01 Kosice (Slovakia); Masarova, Marta; Krafcik, Andrej; Frollo, Ivan [Institute of Measurement Science SAS, Dubravska cesta 9, 841 04 Bratislava 4 (Slovakia); Dobrota, Dusan [Biomedical Center Martin, Jessenius Faculty of Medicine in Martin, Comenius University in Bratislava, Mala Hora 4, 036 01 Martin (Slovakia); Kopcansky, Peter [Institute of Experimental Physics SAS, Watsonova 47, 040 01 Kosice (Slovakia)

    2017-04-01

    Iron, an essential element of the human body, is a significant risk factor, particularly in the case of its concentration increasing above the specific limit. Therefore, iron is stored in the non-toxic form of the globular protein, ferritin, consisting of an apoferritin shell and iron core. Numerous studies confirmed the disruption of homeostasis and accumulation of iron in patients with various diseases (e.g. cancer, cardiovascular or neurological conditions), which is closely related to ferritin metabolism. Such iron imbalance enables the use of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as a sensitive technique for the detection of iron-based aggregates through changes in the relaxation times, followed by the change in the inherent image contrast. For our in vitrostudy, modified ferritins with different iron loadings were prepared by chemical reconstruction of the iron core in an apoferritin shell as pathological model systems. The magnetic properties of samples were studied using SQUID magnetometry, while the size distribution was detected via dynamic light scattering. We have shown that MRI could represent the most advantageous method for distinguishing native ferritin from reconstructed ferritin which, after future standardisation, could then be suitable for the diagnostics of diseases associated with iron accumulation. - Highlights: • MRI is the sensitive technique for detecting iron-based aggregates. • Reconstructed Ferritin is suitable model system of iron-related disorders. • MRI allow distinguish of native ferritin from reconstructed ferritin. • MRI could be useful for diagnostics of diseases associated with iron accumulation.

  9. Relationship between high serum ferritin level and glaucoma in a South Korean population: the Kangbuk Samsung health study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gye, Hyo Jung; Kim, Joon Mo; Yoo, Chungkwon; Shim, Seong Hee; Won, Yu Sam; Sung, Ki Chul; Lee, Mi Yeon; Park, Ki Ho

    2016-12-01

    To investigate the association between serum ferritin levels and glaucoma in a South Korean population. This retrospective cross-sectional study included 164 029 subjects who underwent screening at Kangbuk Samsung Hospital Health Screening Center between August 2012 and July 2013. All subjects underwent a physical examination, answered sociodemographic and behavioural questions, and provided samples for laboratory analyses. A digital fundus photograph of both eyes was taken, and all photographs were reviewed by ophthalmologists. The ophthalmologists determined if an eye had glaucoma based on criteria set forth by the International Society of Geographical and Epidemiological Ophthalmology and the appearance of the retinal nerve fibre layer and optic disc. The mean serum ferritin level was 56.98 ng/mL in women and 223.82 ng/mL in men. After adjusting for age, serum iron, total iron-binding capacity (TIBC), transferrin saturation, white blood cell (WBC) count, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (HsCRP) and total vitamin D level, males in the highest quartile for serum ferritin level had a higher OR for glaucoma than males in the lowest quartile (OR=1.176, 95% CI 1.030 to 1.342, p=0.016); we did not observe this relationship among women. Other markers of iron metabolism, such as iron level, transferrin saturation and TIBC, and inflammation measures, including WBC, HsCRP and total vitamin D, were not associated with glaucoma. High serum ferritin level was associated with a high risk of glaucoma in men, but not in women. Because serum ferritin is related to oxidative stress and inflammation, it might play a role in glaucoma development. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  10. Estimation of serum ferritin for normal subject living in Khartoum area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eltayeb, E.A; Khangi, F.A.; Satti, G.M.; Abu Salab, A.

    2003-01-01

    This study was conducted with a main objective; the estimation of serum ferritin level in normal subjects in Khartoum area.To fulfil this objective, two hundred and sixty symptoms-free subjects were included in the study, 103 males with 15 to 45 years. serum ferritin was determined by radioimmunoassay (RIA). It was found that the mean concentration of males' serum ferritin was much higher than that of the females' (p<0.001). (Author)

  11. The clinical utility of serum ferritin levels in patients with malignant tumors treated by radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitsuhashi, Norio; Okazaki, Atsushi; Hayakawa, Kazushige; Nakano, Takashi; Yamanaka, Mikio

    1983-01-01

    The serum levels of ferritin in 394 patients, including 339 patients with various malignant tumors and 23 with various non-malignant diseases, and 32 healthy subjects were determined. The normal levels of ferritin were 82.7 +- 42.3 ng/ml for males and 42.0 +- 36.9 ng/ml for females. The positive ratio of serum ferritin level was 28% in patients with malignant tumors and 22% in patients with non-malignant diseases. The usefulness of serum ferritin assay in screening for malignant tumors appeared to be limited. High serum levels of ferritin were found in patients with malignant lymphoma (positive ratio: 42%), pulmonary cancer (38%) and esophageal cancer (37%). According to the histological types, epidermoid cancer appeared to produce a higher serum level of ferritin than adenocarcinoma in patients with pulmonary cancer. It was interesting that malignant lymphoma had a high serum level of ferritin in spite of its low serum level of CEA. Carcinoma of the digestive tracts except for esophagus was considered to have a normal serum ferritin level in spite of the advanced stage. There was no close relationship between serum ferritin levels and CEA levels in patients with pulmonary cancer and breast cancer. Serum CEA assay was more useful for detection of tumors than serum ferritin assay in patients with breast cancer. Serum ferritin levels in patients with good prognosis decreased following radiation therapy, but those in patients with poor prognosis elevated or unchanged in spite of therapy. Therefore, serial ferritin determinations may be useful for evaluation of radiotherapy and assessment of prognosis. (J.P.N.)

  12. Central role for ferritin in the day/night regulation of iron homeostasis in marine phytoplankton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botebol, Hugo; Lesuisse, Emmanuel; Šuták, Robert; Six, Christophe; Lozano, Jean-Claude; Schatt, Philippe; Vergé, Valérie; Kirilovsky, Amos; Morrissey, Joe; Léger, Thibaut; Camadro, Jean-Michel; Gueneugues, Audrey; Bowler, Chris; Blain, Stéphane; Bouget, François-Yves

    2015-01-01

    In large regions of the open ocean, iron is a limiting resource for phytoplankton. The reduction of iron quota and the recycling of internal iron pools are among the diverse strategies that phytoplankton have evolved to allow them to grow under chronically low ambient iron levels. Phytoplankton species also have evolved strategies to cope with sporadic iron supply such as long-term storage of iron in ferritin. In the picophytoplanktonic species Ostreococcus we report evidence from observations both in the field and in laboratory cultures that ferritin and the main iron-binding proteins involved in photosynthesis and nitrate assimilation pathways show opposite diurnal expression patterns, with ferritin being maximally expressed during the night. Biochemical and physiological experiments using a ferritin knock-out line subsequently revealed that this protein plays a central role in the diel regulation of iron uptake and recycling and that this regulation of iron homeostasis is essential for cell survival under iron limitation. PMID:26553998

  13. Evaluation of the Ramco kit for serum ferritin assay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dempster, W S; Knight, G J [Red Cross War Memorial Children' s Hospital, Cape Town (South Africa). Department of Paediatrics and Child Health; Jacobs, P [Cape Town Univ. (South Africa). Dept. of Haematology

    1979-12-22

    The determination of serum ferritin levels may be of diagnostic importance in medicine. To establish whether values obtained using a commercially available kit (Ramco) were adequate for this purpose, a comparison was undertaken using a two-site immunoradiometric assay that had been developed and standardized in our laboratories. Over the range 6..mu..g/l to greater than 2 000 ..mu..g/l there was a correlation coefficient between the two methods of 0,8284 (P smaller than 0,001). It is concluded that the Ramco kit is suitable for use in clinical practice.

  14. An evaluation of the Ramco kit for serum ferritin assay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dempster, W.S.; Knight, G.J.; Jacobs, P.

    1979-01-01

    The determination of serum ferritin levels may be of diagnostic importance in medicine. To establish whether values obtained using a commercially available kit (Ramco) were adequate for this purpose, a comparison was undertaken using a two-site immunoradiometric assay that had been developed and standardized in our laboratories. Over the range 6μg/l to greater than 2 000 μg/l there was a correlation coefficient between the two methods of 0,8284 (P smaller than 0,001). It is concluded that the Ramco kit is suitable for use in clinical practice

  15. "SERUM FERRITIN IN TYPE 2 DIABETES MELLITUS AND ITS RELATIONSHIP WITH HbA1c"

    OpenAIRE

    F. Sharifi Sh. Sazandeh

    2004-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) type 2 is one of the most common endocrine disorders affecting more than 135 million people in the world. The etiology of the disease is not fully understood, but recently subclinical hemochromatosis has been considered as one of the probable causes of DM. This study was carried out to examine the relationship between serum ferritin as a marker of iron overload with DM and HbA1c. This study was conducted on 97 patients with type 2 DM who were referred to Zanjan Diabetes...

  16. Targeting higher ferritin concentrations with intravenous iron dextran lowers erythropoietin requirement in hemodialysis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeVita, M V; Frumkin, D; Mittal, S; Kamran, A; Fishbane, S; Michelis, M F

    2003-11-01

    Although clinical use of recombinant human erythropoietin (rHuEPO) since 1989 has improved anemia in most end-stage renal disease patients, there are still many hemodialysis patients unable to maintain an adequate hematocrit (HCT) without large doses of rHuEPO. This suggests that anemia is not solely a consequence of rHuEPO deficiency, but may be due to other factors including functional iron deficiency. Since the optimal prescription for iron replacement is not yet known, we evaluated the effect of intravenous iron dextran (IVFe) infusion on serum ferritin (SFer) concentration and rHuEPO dose. Our objective was to raise and maintain serum ferritin concentrations to 2 different levels above the National Kidney Foundation Dialysis Outcome Quality Initiative standard of 100 ng/ml to determine whether, and by what degree rHuEPO dose could be lowered. HD patients on i.v. rHuEPO with a SFer concentration > or = 70 ng/ml and an HCT of requirements.

  17. Serum Iron Protects from Renal Postischemic Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaugier, Céline; Amano, Mariane T; Chemouny, Jonathan M; Dussiot, Michael; Berrou, Claire; Matignon, Marie; Ben Mkaddem, Sanae; Wang, Pamella H M; Fricot, Aurélie; Maciel, Thiago T; Grapton, Damien; Mathieu, Jacques R R; Beaumont, Carole; Peraldi, Marie-Noëlle; Peyssonnaux, Carole; Mesnard, Laurent; Daugas, Eric; Vrtovsnik, François; Monteiro, Renato C; Hermine, Olivier; Ginzburg, Yelena Z; Benhamou, Marc; Camara, Niels O S; Flamant, Martin; Moura, Ivan C

    2017-12-01

    Renal transplants remain a medical challenge, because the parameters governing allograft outcome are incompletely identified. Here, we investigated the role of serum iron in the sterile inflammation that follows kidney ischemia-reperfusion injury. In a retrospective cohort study of renal allograft recipients ( n =169), increased baseline levels of serum ferritin reliably predicted a positive outcome for allografts, particularly in elderly patients. In mice, systemic iron overload protected against renal ischemia-reperfusion injury-associated sterile inflammation. Furthermore, chronic iron injection in mice prevented macrophage recruitment after inflammatory stimuli. Macrophages cultured in high-iron conditions had reduced responses to Toll-like receptor-2, -3, and -4 agonists, which associated with decreased reactive oxygen species production, increased nuclear localization of the NRF2 transcription factor, increased expression of the NRF2-related antioxidant response genes, and limited NF- κ B and proinflammatory signaling. In macrophage-depleted animals, the infusion of macrophages cultured in high-iron conditions did not reconstitute AKI after ischemia-reperfusion, whereas macrophages cultured in physiologic iron conditions did. These findings identify serum iron as a critical protective factor in renal allograft outcome. Increasing serum iron levels in patients may thus improve prognosis of renal transplants. Copyright © 2017 by the American Society of Nephrology.

  18. Clinical survey of blood dyscrasias among Hiroshima A-bomb survivors by periodical health examination, (6). Serum ferritin determination of anemic patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abe, T.; Dohy, H.; Okita, H. (Hiroshima Univ. (Japan). Research Inst. for Nuclear Medicine and Biology)

    1980-11-01

    Serum ferritin was determined in A-bomb survivors, and its significance was evaluated. A low-ferritin group included many of the females under the age of 50, who mostly had iron deficient anemia. A high-ferritin group included many older-aged A-bomb survivors who had secondary anemia due to hemochromatosis, paroxismal nocturnal hemoglobinuria (PNH), and multiple myeloma. Secondary anemia due to hemochromatosis, PNH, leukemia, and sideroblastic anemia was detected in those who were old and had underlying moderate or severe anemia with a high ferritin level. As the results of this investigation, blood examination combined with serum ferritin determination is valuable for diagnosis of anemia and detection of underlying diseases.

  19. [Current status of vitamin A deficiency in preschool children in Dongguan, China and the effect of vitamin A on serum ferritin and red blood cell parameters].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhen-Hong; Ni, Ming; Hu, Yuan

    2018-03-01

    To investigate the current status of vitamin A deficiency in preschool children in Dongguan, China, as well as the effect of vitamin A on serum ferritin, red blood cell, and reticulocyte parameters. Cluster sampling was performed from April 2015 to December 2016 to select 2 085 preschool children (3-6 years old) without any disease in Dongguan. Routine blood test, reticulocyte count, serum ferritin measurement, hemoglobin electrophoresis, and vitamin A measurement were performed for all children. The associations of age and sex with vitamin A and serum ferritin concentrations were analyzed. The effect of vitamin A concentration on serum ferritin, red blood cell, and reticulocyte parameters and the effect of reduced iron storage caused by vitamin A deficiency on red blood cell parameters were evaluated. Of the 2 085 children, 140 (6.71%) had reduced iron storage, and 678 (32.52%) had vitamin A deficiency. Among the 678 children with vitamin A deficiency, 647 (95.4%) had subclinical deficiency and 31 (4.6%) had clinical deficiency. There was no significant difference in vitamin A concentration between boys and girls, however girls had a significantly higher serum ferritin concentration than boys (P<0.05). The clinical vitamin A deficiency group had a significantly higher serum ferritin concentration than the subclinical vitamin A deficiency group and the normal group (P<0.05). In cases of vitamin A deficiency, the reduced iron storage group had significant reductions in mean corpuscular volume and mean corpuscular hemoglobin than the normal iron storage group (P<0.05). Compared with the normal vitamin A group, the vitamin A deficiency group had significantly lower hemoglobin concentration, mean corpuscular hemoglobin, red blood cell count, hematocrit, absolute reticulocyte count, reticulocyte percentage, and reticulocyte hemoglobin content, as well as a significantly higher mean corpuscular volume (P<0.05). Vitamin A deficiency is prevalent in preschool children

  20. Hepatic iron content is independently associated with serum hepcidin levels in subjects with obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno-Navarrete, José María; Moreno, María; Puig, Josep; Blasco, Gerard; Ortega, Francisco; Xifra, Gemma; Ricart, Wifredo; Fernández-Real, José Manuel

    2017-10-01

    Serum hepcidin concentration is known to increase in parallel to circulating markers of iron stores. We aimed to investigate whether this is reflected at the tissue level in subjects with obesity. Serum hepcidin and ferritin levels (ELISA) and hepatic iron content (using magnetic resonance imaging) were analyzed longitudinally in 44 participants (19 without obesity and 25 with obesity). In a subgroup of 16 participants with obesity, a weight loss intervention was performed. Serum hepcidin, ferritin and hepatic iron content (HIC) were significantly increased in participants with obesity. Age- and gender-adjusted serum hepcidin was positively correlated with BMI, hsCRP, ferritin and HIC. In addition, age- and gender-adjusted serum hepcidin was positively correlated with ferritin and HIC in both non-obese and obese participants. In multivariate regression analysis, hepatic iron content (p obesity. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd and European Society for Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism. All rights reserved.

  1. Gender difference in relationship between serum ferritin and 25-hydroxyvitamin D in Korean adults.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeong Min Seong

    Full Text Available The present study was conducted to assess the gender difference in the relationship between serum ferritin and 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OHD] in Korean adults.A total of 5,147 adults (2,162 men, 1,563 premenopausal women, and 1,422 postmenopausal women aged ≥ 20 years from the Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (KNHANES data (2012 were analyzed. A covariance test adjusted for covariates was performed for serum ferritin levels in relation to vitamin D status (vitamin D deficiency, 25(OHD < 10.0 ng/mL; vitamin D insufficiency, 25(OHD ≥ 10.0, < 20.0 ng/mL; vitamin D sufficiency, 25(OHD ≥ 20.0 ng/mL.The key study results were as follows: First, in men, in terms of serum ferritin levels by serum 25(OHD level after adjusting for age, smoking, alcohol drinking, regular exercise, SBP, DBP, WM. TC, TGs, HDL-C, FPG, Hb, Hct, MCV, and Fe, serum ferritin levels were inversely increased with the increasing of serum 25(OHD level (P = 0.012. Second, in premenopausal women, after adjusting for related variables, serum ferritin levels were increased with the increasing of serum 25(OHD level (P = 0.003. Third, in postmenopausal women, after adjusting for related variables, serum ferritin levels were not significantly increased with the increasing of serum 25(OHD level (P = 0.456.Serum 25(OHD level was inversely associated with the serum ferritin levels in men, but was positively associated with the serum ferritin levels in premenopausal women, and was not associated with the serum ferritin levels in postmenopausal women.

  2. Iron Acquisition in Bacillus cereus: The Roles of IlsA and Bacillibactin in Exogenous Ferritin Iron Mobilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buisson, Christophe; Daou, Nadine; Kallassy, Mireille; Lereclus, Didier; Arosio, Paolo; Bou-Abdallah, Fadi; Nielsen Le Roux, Christina

    2014-01-01

    In host-pathogen interactions, the struggle for iron may have major consequences on the outcome of the disease. To overcome the low solubility and bio-availability of iron, bacteria have evolved multiple systems to acquire iron from various sources such as heme, hemoglobin and ferritin. The molecular basis of iron acquisition from heme and hemoglobin have been extensively studied; however, very little is known about iron acquisition from host ferritin, a 24-mer nanocage protein able to store thousands of iron atoms within its cavity. In the human opportunistic pathogen Bacillus cereus, a surface protein named IlsA (Iron-regulated leucine rich surface protein type A) binds heme, hemoglobin and ferritin in vitro and is involved in virulence. Here, we demonstrate that IlsA acts as a ferritin receptor causing ferritin aggregation on the bacterial surface. Isothermal titration calorimetry data indicate that IlsA binds several types of ferritins through direct interaction with the shell subunits. UV-vis kinetic data show a significant enhancement of iron release from ferritin in the presence of IlsA indicating for the first time that a bacterial protein might alter the stability of the ferritin iron core. Disruption of the siderophore bacillibactin production drastically reduces the ability of B. cereus to utilize ferritin for growth and results in attenuated bacterial virulence in insects. We propose a new model of iron acquisition in B. cereus that involves the binding of IlsA to host ferritin followed by siderophore assisted iron uptake. Our results highlight a possible interplay between a surface protein and a siderophore and provide new insights into host adaptation of B. cereus and general bacterial pathogenesis. PMID:24550730

  3. Iron acquisition in Bacillus cereus: the roles of IlsA and bacillibactin in exogenous ferritin iron mobilization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diego Segond

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available In host-pathogen interactions, the struggle for iron may have major consequences on the outcome of the disease. To overcome the low solubility and bio-availability of iron, bacteria have evolved multiple systems to acquire iron from various sources such as heme, hemoglobin and ferritin. The molecular basis of iron acquisition from heme and hemoglobin have been extensively studied; however, very little is known about iron acquisition from host ferritin, a 24-mer nanocage protein able to store thousands of iron atoms within its cavity. In the human opportunistic pathogen Bacillus cereus, a surface protein named IlsA (Iron-regulated leucine rich surface protein type A binds heme, hemoglobin and ferritin in vitro and is involved in virulence. Here, we demonstrate that IlsA acts as a ferritin receptor causing ferritin aggregation on the bacterial surface. Isothermal titration calorimetry data indicate that IlsA binds several types of ferritins through direct interaction with the shell subunits. UV-vis kinetic data show a significant enhancement of iron release from ferritin in the presence of IlsA indicating for the first time that a bacterial protein might alter the stability of the ferritin iron core. Disruption of the siderophore bacillibactin production drastically reduces the ability of B. cereus to utilize ferritin for growth and results in attenuated bacterial virulence in insects. We propose a new model of iron acquisition in B. cereus that involves the binding of IlsA to host ferritin followed by siderophore assisted iron uptake. Our results highlight a possible interplay between a surface protein and a siderophore and provide new insights into host adaptation of B. cereus and general bacterial pathogenesis.

  4. Serum vitamin B12, folic acid and ferritin levels in patients with migraine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdullah Acar

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: It has been reported that disability due to migraine may be reduced with homocysteine-lowering treatment including folic acid and vitamin B12. In addition, recently the periaqueductal gray matter iron deposits have been found to be increased in migraine patients. There are few studies regarding vitamin B12, folic acid, ferritin and transferrin levels in patients with migraine. The aims of this study was to measure vitamin B12, folic acid, ferritin and transferrin levels in patients with migraine and compare them with the control group. METHODS: Fifty-one consecutive newly diagnosed migraine patients who did not receive any vitamin supplement medication were enrolled. The study group consisted of 51 patients, suffering from migraine with aura (n= 23 and migraine without aura (n= 28. The control group consisted of 28 healthy participants without history of headache, anemia and vitamin supplement. Serum vitamin B12, folic acid, ferritin and transferin levels were measured using a chemiluminescence method. RESULTS: Migraine patients had significantly lower concentrations of vitamin B12 and folic acid compared with the healthy controls (for vitamin B12; 215.6±133.7 pg/ml vs. 289.9±12 pg/ml, respectively, p=0.005; for folic acid; 6.74 ± 4.31 pg/ml vs. 8.47 ± 1.85 pg/ml, respectively, p=0.048. The vitamin B12 levels were found to be significantly lower during attacks in migraine patients than in interictal periods (177.3 ± 139.2 pg/ml vs 252.5 ± 119.5 pg/ml, p=0.043. There were no differences in folic acid, ferritin, and transferritin levels between during attacks and in interictal period of patients with migraine (p>0.05. The ferritin levels were found to be significantly lower during attacks in migraine patients than in interictal periods (43.4 ± 41.1 mg/ml, vs 75.4 ± 51.7, mg/ml, p=0.018. CONCLUSION: Migraine patients had lower serum vitamin B12 and folic acid levels than healthy subjects. These findings supported that vitamin B12

  5. Biological Signatures of Brain Damage Associated with High Serum Ferritin Levels in Patients with Acute Ischemic Stroke and Thrombolytic Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mónica Millán

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and purpose: Increased body iron stores have been related to greater oxidative stress and brain injury in clinical and experimental cerebral ischemia and reperfusion. We aimed to investigate the biological signatures of excitotoxicity, inflammation and blood brain barrier disruption potentially associated with high serum ferritin levels-related damage in acute stroke patients treated with i.v. t-PA.

  6. HBsAg carrier status and the association between gestational diabetes with increased serum ferritin concentration in Chinese women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lao, Terence T; Tse, Ka-Yu; Chan, Louis Y; Tam, Kar-Fai; Ho, Lai-Fong

    2003-11-01

    To determine whether the high prevalence of hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) carriage in our population can explain the previous observation of an association between increased maternal serum ferritin concentration and gestational diabetes in Hong Kong Chinese women. A retrospective study was performed on 767 nonanemic women with singleton pregnancy who had iron status assessed at 28-30 weeks. The result of the routine antenatal HBsAg screening was retrieved from patient records. The HBsAg-positive and -negative groups were compared for maternal characteristics, prevalence of gestational diabetes in the third trimester, prevalence of high serum ferritin and iron concentrations, and transferrin saturation, which is defined as a value in the highest quartile established by the measurements obtained from the HBsAg-negative group. The incidences of oral glucose tolerance test and gestational diabetes were significantly increased in the HBsAg-positive group. The HBsAg-positive women with gestational diabetes had significantly increased prevalence of high serum ferritin compared with the HBsAg-negative women, irrespective of the latter's gestational diabetes status. Multiple logistic regression analysis confirmed the independent association between HBsAg carrier status with gestational diabetes (relative risk 3.51, 95% CI 1.83-6.73) but excluded high ferritin as an independent factor. Our results indicate that maternal HBsAg carriage could explain in part the association between increased serum ferritin concentration with gestational diabetes in Hong Kong Chinese women, and that HBsAg carrier status is an independent risk factor for gestational diabetes.

  7. Purification and characterization of an iron-induced ferritin from soybean (Glycine max) cell suspensions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lescure, A M; Massenet, O; Briat, J F

    1990-11-15

    Ferric citrate induces ferritin synthesis and accumulation in soybean (Glycine max) cell suspension cultures [Proudhon, Briat & Lescure (1989) Plant Physiol. 90, 586-590]. This iron-induced ferritin has been purified from cells grown for 72 h in the presence of either 100 microM- or 500 microM-ferric citrate. It has a molecular mass of about 600 kDa and is built up from a 28 kDa subunit which is recognized by antibodies raised against pea (Pisum sativum) seed ferritin and it has the same N-terminal sequence as this latter, except for residue number 3, which is alanine in pea seed ferritin instead of valine in iron-induced soybean cell ferritin. It contains an average of 1800 atoms of iron per molecule whatever the ferric citrate concentration used to induce its synthesis. It is shown that the presence of 100 microM- or 500 microM-ferric citrate in the culture medium leads respectively to an 11- and 28-fold increase in the total intracellular iron concentration and to a 30- and 60-fold increase in the ferritin concentration. However, the percentage of iron stored in the mineral core of ferritin remains constant whatever the ferric citrate concentration used and represents only 5-6% of cellular iron.

  8. The iron content and ferritin contribution in fresh, dried, and toasted nori, Pyropia yezoensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masuda, Taro; Yamamoto, Ami; Toyohara, Haruhiko

    2015-01-01

    Iron is one of the essential trace elements for humans. In this study, the iron contents in fresh, dried, and toasted nori (Pyropia yezoensis) were analyzed. The mean iron content of fresh, dried, and toasted nori were 19.0, 22.6, and 26.2 mg/100 g (dry weight), respectively. These values were superior to other food of plant origin. Furthermore, most of the iron in nori was maintained during processing, such as washing, drying, and toasting. Then, the form of iron in fresh, dried, and toasted nori was analyzed. As a result, an iron storage protein ferritin contributed to iron storage in raw and dried nori, although the precise rate of its contribution is yet to be determined, while ferritin protein cage was degraded in the toasted nori. It is the first report that verified the ferritin contribution to iron storage in such edible macroalgae with commercial importance.

  9. Increased serum ferritin levels are independently related to incidence of prediabetes in adult populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, G; Yang, H; Bao, X; Zhang, Q; Liu, L; Wu, H; Du, H; Xia, Y; Shi, H; Guo, X; Liu, X; Li, C; Su, Q; Gu, Y; Fang, L; Yu, F; Sun, S; Wang, X; Zhou, M; Jia, Q; Guo, Q; Song, K; Huang, G; Wang, G; Wu, Y; Niu, K

    2017-04-01

    To comprehensively and exhaustively assess the relationship between serum ferritin levels and incidence of prediabetes in a prospective study. This prospective cohort study (n=7380) with a mean follow-up of 3.07 years (range: 1-7, 95% CI: 3.03-3.12) was conducted in Tianjin, China. Blood fasting glucose, oral glucose tolerance test, serum ferritin levels and other potentially confounding factors were measured at baseline and at each year of follow-up. Adjusted Cox proportional hazards regression models were used to assess the gender-specific relationship between baseline and mean serum ferritin quintiles and prediabetes. The incidence of prediabetes was 85 per 1000 person-years among men and 44 per 1000 person-years among women during follow-up (from 2007 to 2014). After adjusting for potential confounders, hazard ratios (95% CI) for prediabetes across baseline ferritin quintiles were: for men, 1.00, 1.13 (0.90-1.40), 1.20 (0.97-1.48), 1.41 (1.14-1.73) and 1.73 (1.41-2.11); and for women, 1.00, 1.01 (0.74-1.38), 0.68 (0.48-0.96), 0.84 (0.61-1.15) and 1.07 (0.80-1.45), respectively. Similar results were also observed for mean ferritin levels. Both baseline and mean serum ferritin levels were significantly and linearly related to prediabetes in men, whereas U-shaped relationships were observed between baseline and mean serum ferritin and prediabetes in women. The relationship between prediabetes risk and mean serum ferritin levels may be more stable than one with baseline serum ferritin levels. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  10. Serum ferritin and stomach cancer risk among A-bomb survivors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akiba, Suminori; Neriishi, Kazuo; Blot, W.J.; Kabuto, Michinori; Stevens, R.G.; Kato, Hiroo; Land, C.E.

    1990-02-01

    Using stored serum samples collected from 1970-72 and/or from 1977-79, serum ferritin, transferrin, and ceruloplasmin levels were immunologically determined for 233 stomach cancer and 84 lung cancer cases diagnosed from 1973-83 and for 385 matched controls from a fixed population of Hiroshima and Nagasaki atomic bomb survivors. Elevated stomach cancer risk was associated with low serum ferritin levels, with more than a threefold excess among those in the lowest quintile as compared to the highest ferritin quintile. The average serum ferritin concentration was 8% lower in the stomach cancer cases than in the controls. Risk did not vary with the time between blood collection and stomach cancer onset, remaining high among those with low ferritin levels five or more years before cancer diagnosis. Low ferritin combined with achlorhydria, diagnosed about 10 years before the blood collection and up to 25 years before cancer diagnosis, was an exceptionally strong marker of increased stomach cancer risk. No effect of transferrin or ceruloplasmin independent of ferritin was observed on gastric cancer risk. Lung cancer risk was not related to these three serum proteins. (author)

  11. The association of markers of oxidative-inflammatory status with malnutrition in hemodialysis patients with serum ferritin lower than 500 ng/mL

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    Simone Gonçalves de Almeida

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Enhanced inflammatory-oxidative status is well established in chronic kidney disease. OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study was to evaluate the oxidative- inflammatory status and iron indices in patients undergoing maintenance hemodialysis (HD with serum ferritin lower than 500ng/mL, and to correlate them with nutritional status. METHOD: In a cross-sectional survey 35 HD patients (23 with normal nutritional status, 12 with Protein-Energy-Wasting syndrome, PEW, and healthy volunteers (n = 35 were studied. Serum concentration of iron, ferritin, transferrin saturation, malondialdehyde (MDA, protein carbonyl (PC, high-sensitive serum C -reactive protein (hs-CRP and blood counts were determined. The nutritional status was determined by anthropometric and biochemical criteria. RESULTS: HD patients showed low values of hemoglobin and higher values of ferritin, MDA and PC when compared with healthy volunteers. HD subjects with PEW had higher values of PC and hs-PCR as compared to HD patients with normal nutritional status. A multiple logistic regression analysis showed that the independent variables PC (Wald Statistic 4.25, p = 0.039 and hs-CRP (Wald Statistic 4.83, p = 0.028 where related with the patients' nutritional condition. CONCLUSION: In HD patients with serum ferritin below 500 ng/mL was observed one association of the markers of oxidative stress and inflammation with poor nutritional status independently of serum ferritin, gender and age.

  12. The pupylation machinery is involved in iron homeostasis by targeting the iron storage protein ferritin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Küberl, Andreas; Polen, Tino; Bott, Michael

    2016-04-26

    The balance of sufficient iron supply and avoidance of iron toxicity by iron homeostasis is a prerequisite for cellular metabolism and growth. Here we provide evidence that, in Actinobacteria, pupylation plays a crucial role in this process. Pupylation is a posttranslational modification in which the prokaryotic ubiquitin-like protein Pup is covalently attached to a lysine residue in target proteins, thus resembling ubiquitination in eukaryotes. Pupylated proteins are recognized and unfolded by a dedicated AAA+ ATPase (Mycobacterium proteasomal AAA+ ATPase; ATPase forming ring-shaped complexes). In Mycobacteria, degradation of pupylated proteins by the proteasome serves as a protection mechanism against several stress conditions. Other bacterial genera capable of pupylation such as Corynebacterium lack a proteasome, and the fate of pupylated proteins is unknown. We discovered that Corynebacterium glutamicum mutants lacking components of the pupylation machinery show a strong growth defect under iron limitation, which was caused by the absence of pupylation and unfolding of the iron storage protein ferritin. Genetic and biochemical data support a model in which the pupylation machinery is responsible for iron release from ferritin independent of degradation.

  13. Biological Signatures of Brain Damage Associated with High Serum Ferritin Levels in Patients with Acute Ischemic Stroke and Thrombolytic Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millán, Mónica; Sobrino, Tomás; Arenillas, Juan Francisco; Rodríguez-Yáñez, Manuel; García, María; Nombela, Florentino; Castellanos, Mar; de la Ossa, Natalia Pérez; Cuadras, Patricia; Serena, Joaquín; Castillo, José; Dávalos, Antoni

    2008-01-01

    Background and purpose: Increased body iron stores have been related to greater oxidative stress and brain injury in clinical and experimental cerebral ischemia and reperfusion. We aimed to investigate the biological signatures of excitotoxicity, inflammation and blood brain barrier disruption potentially associated with high serum ferritin levels-related damage in acute stroke patients treated with i.v. t-PA. Methods: Serum levels of ferritin (as index of increased cellular iron stores), glutamate, interleukin-6, matrix metalloproteinase-9 and cellular fibronectin were determined in 134 patients treated with i.v. t-PA within 3 hours from stroke onset in blood samples obtained before t-PA treatment, at 24 and 72 hours. Results: Serum ferritin levels before t-PA infusion correlated to glutamate (r = 0.59, p < 0.001) and interleukin-6 (r = 0.55, p <0.001) levels at baseline, and with glutamate (r = 0.57,p <0.001), interleukin-6 (r = 0.49,p <0.001), metalloproteinase-9 (r = 0.23, p = 0.007) and cellular fibronectin (r = 0.27, p = 0.002) levels measured at 24 hours and glutamate (r = 0.415, p < 0.001), interleukin-6 (r = 0.359, p < 0.001) and metalloproteinase-9 (r = 0.261, p = 0.004) at 72 hours. The association between ferritin and glutamate levels remained after adjustment for confounding factors in generalized linear models. Conclusions: Brain damage associated with increased iron stores in acute ischemic stroke patients treated with iv. tPA may be mediated by mechanisms linked to excitotoxic damage. The role of inflammation, blood brain barrier disruption and oxidative stress in this condition needs further research. PMID:19096131

  14. The diagnostic value of pleural effusion ferritin and the ratio of it to serum ferritin in differentiating exudates from transudates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Liu; Liu Junfeng; Yu Jiuru; Ju Ping; Ke Caiming

    2003-01-01

    To explore the diagnostic value of measuring the level of ferritin in pleural and peritoneal effusion for differentiating exudates from transudates, 128 effusion samples were initially detected for differentiating exudates from transudates by traditional method and Light's criteria. Ferritin in the effusions and serum ferritin were detected simultaneously, and the ratio of effusion ferritin (P Ft ) to serum ferritin (S Ft ) was counted. Based on the clinical data, the samples were divided into four groups and P Ft and P Ft /S Ft were compared. At the same time, the sensitivity and specificity of P Ft and P Ft /S Ft in differentiating exudates from transudates were compared with traditional method and Light's criteria. The results showed that in the groups of tuberculous pleurisy, non-tuberculous, benign pleurisy, and malignant tumor, the concentration of Ft in the effusions was significantly higher than that in the group of congestive heart failure and cirrhosis; and the Ft in exudates was significantly higher than that in transudates (P 0.05). If the cut-off value was set up for Ft in the effusion as 100 μg/L and P Ft /S Ft ratio as 0.5, respectively, the differentiating sensitivity and specificity were 94.2% and 87.0%, respectively. Conclusion was that the concentration of P Ft and P Ft /S Ft in exudates are higher than 100 μg/L and 0.5, respectively. On the contrary, they are lower than the cut-off level in transudates. P Ft and P Ft /S Ft have high sensitivity and high specificity in differentiating exudates from transudates, and have great diagnostic value

  15. Wheat ferritins: Improving the iron content of the wheat grain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borg, Søren; Brinch-Pedersen, Henrik; Tauris, Birgitte

    2012-01-01

    The characterization of the full complement of wheat ferritins show that the modern hexaploid wheat genome contains two ferritin genes, TaFer1 and TaFer2, each represented by three homeoalleles and placed on chromosome 5 and 4, respectively. The two genes are differentially regulated and expresse...

  16. Assessment of serum ferritin levels in thalassemia and non-thalassemia patients presented with anemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed Mahdi Abdulomohsin AL-Zubaidi

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to assess serum ferritin levels in B-thalassemia patients, and to compare it with non-thalassemic anemia and healthy control. Materials and methods : A prospective cross sectional study conducted at Thalassemia Center in Ibn Al- Baladi Hospital for Children and Women during the period from1st February to 30th May 2014 during their attendance to out-patient clinic. A total .number of 101 patients complaining of anemia (51 patients with thalassemia, 50 with non-thalassemia in addition to 50 healthy subjects considered as control. All patients were tested for Serum ferritin levels and all results were obtained through automated quantitative test for use Vidas machine Results : The mean serum ferritin levels in cases of thalassemia was 9542 ± 782 ng/ml while serum ferritin levels in control sample was 138 ± 323 ng/ml in male and 28 ± 108 ng/ml in female . in patients with non-thalassemia anemia, the levels of serum ferritin was 1 ± 80 ng/ml. Age of all patients in this study ranged from 3day-9year .the age of thalassemia patients ranged from 1-6 year and p-value was(0.23 while the age of patients with non-thalassemia anemia was 1-5 year and p-value was (0.11. Conclusion: This study confirm that serum ferritin is high in patients wih thalassemia than non thalassemia.

  17. Lack of a relationship between serum ferritin levels and coronary atherosclerosis evaluated by coronary arteriography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W.C. Manfroi

    1999-03-01

    Full Text Available Many clinical and epidemiological studies have demonstrated the relationship between serum ferritin and ischemic heart disease. In the present study we evaluated the relationship between coronary heart disease (CHD and serum ferritin levels in patients submitted to coronary arteriography. We evaluated 307 patients (210 (68.7% males; median age: 60 years who were submitted to coronary angiography, measurement of serum ferritin and identification of clinical events of ischemic heart disease. Serum ferritin is reported as quartiles. Ninety-six patients (31.27% had normal coronary angiography (group 1 and 211 (68.73% had coronary heart disease (group 2. Of the patients with CHD, 61 (28.9% had serum ferritin levels higher than 194 ng/ml (4th quartile, as opposed to only 14 (14.58% of those without CHD (P = 0.0067. In the 2nd quartile, 39 patients (18.48% had CHD, while 35 patients (36.46% had normal coronary arteries (P = 0.00064. Multivariate analysis of the data showed that the difference between groups was not statistically significant (P = 0.33. We conclude that there is no independent relationship between coronary heart disease and increased levels of serum ferritin.

  18. Serum Ferritin Levels Are Lower in Children With Tic Disorders Compared with Children Without Tics: A Cross-Sectional Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avrahami, Matan; Barzilay, Ran; HarGil, Miki; Weizman, Abraham; Watemberg, Nathan

    2017-03-01

    Alteration in peripheral iron indices has been reported in a number of movement disorders, particularly Parkinson's disease. We hypothesized that iron stores may be diminished in children at an early stage of tic disorder. Using data retrieved from electronic medical records, we compared serum ferritin levels, an indicator of body iron store balance, in drug-naive children diagnosed for the first time with tic disorder (study group; N = 47, 32 boys/15 girls, aged 8.66 ± 3.17 years) compared to age- and sex-matched children with headaches (comparison group, n = 100, 62 boys/38 girls, aged 9.51 ± 3.15 years) treated in the same pediatric neurological clinic. Mean serum ferritin levels were significantly lower (-32%, p = 0.01) in the tic disorder group compared to the headache group. No significant differences were detected in circulatory hemoglobin, iron, transferrin, and platelet count between the two groups. Our findings suggest that body iron stores may be reduced in children with recent-onset tic disorder.

  19. Clinical Significances of Serum Vitamin B12, Folate and Ferritin Levels in Patients with Malignant Tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monn, Youn Sung; Soung, In Whan; Kim, Sam Yong; Ro, Heung Kyu; Lee, Bok Hee

    1987-01-01

    In order to evaluate the clinical significances of the serum vitamin B 12 , folate and ferritin levels in patients with malignant tumors, the levels were measured in 10 normal control subjects, 70 patients with malignant tumors, 7 patients with liver cirrhosis and 25 patients with other benign diseases. The results are as follows: 1) In normal control subjects, mean serum values for vitamin B 12 , folate and ferritin level were 588.80±131.58 pg/ml, 5.59±1.52 ng/ml and 89.22±42.78 ng/ml retrospectively. 2) There was no significant difference in serum levels between patients with benign diseases and normal control subjects. 3) The serum vitamin B 12 and ferritin levels in patients with liver cirrhosis were significantly higher than in normal control, and the serum folate levels in these patients were lower than in normal control subjects. 4) The serum vitamin B 12 and ferritin levels in patients with malignant tumors were significantly higher than in normal control subjects, and the serum folate levels in these patients were significantly lower than in normal control subjects. The above results suggest that the serum vitamin B 12 and ferritin may be useful as tumor markers in patients with malignant tumors.

  20. Dietary pattern, serum magnesium, ferritin, C-reactive protein and anaemia among older people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xiaoyue; Hall, John; Byles, Julie; Shi, Zumin

    2017-04-01

    Epidemiological data of dietary patterns and anaemia among older Chinese remains extremely scarce. We examined the association between dietary patterns and anaemia in older Chinese, and to assess whether biomarkers of serum magnesium, C-reactive protein (CRP) and serum ferritin can mediate these associations. We analysed the 2009 China Health and Nutrition Survey data (2401 individuals aged ≥60 years for whom both dietary and biomarker data are available). Dietary data was obtained using 24 h-recall over three consecutive days. Fasting blood samples and anthropometry measurement were also collected. Factor analysis was used to identify dietary patterns. Factor scores representing dietary patterns were used in Poisson regression models to explore the association between each dietary pattern and anaemia. Of the 2401 participants, 18.9% had anaemia, 1.9% had anaemia related to inflammation (AI), and 1.3% had iron-deficiency anaemia (IDA). A traditional dietary pattern (high intake of rice, pork and vegetables) was positively associated with anaemia; a modern dietary pattern (high intake of fruit and fast food) was inversely associated with anaemia. Progressively lower magnesium and BMI levels were associated with increasing traditional dietary quartiles; while a progressively higher magnesium and BMI levels were associated with increasing modern dietary quartiles (p  0.05) in CRP and serum ferritin across quartiles for either dietary pattern. In the fully adjusted model, the prevalence ratio (PR) of anaemia, comparing the fourth quartile to the first quartile, was 1.75 (95% CI: 1.33; 2.29) for a traditional dietary pattern, and 0.89 (95% CI: 0.68; 1.16) for a modern dietary pattern. The association between dietary patterns and anaemia is mediated by serum magnesium. Traditional dietary pattern is associated with a higher prevalence of anaemia among older Chinese. Future studies need to examine whether correcting micronutrient deficiency (e.g. magnesium) by

  1. Time-resolved immunofluorometric assay of serum ferritin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yan, Yao [China Inst. of Atomic Energy, Beijing (China)

    2007-06-15

    This assay is a solid phase, two-site fluoroimmunometric assay based on the direct sandwish technique. Standards or samples containing ferritin are first reacted with immobilized anti-ferritin antibodies. Then the europium-lablled antibodies are reacted with the bound antigen. The range of this assay is 2-1000 ng/mL. The analytical sentivity is better than 0.05 ng/mL. The intra-assay variation and inter-assay variation are both below 5%; This kit was compared with Wallac DELFIA kit. The correlation is r=0.96. (authors)

  2. The hepcidin gene promoter nc.-1010C > T; -582A > G haplotype modulates serum ferritin in individuals carrying the common H63D mutation in HFE gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Bruno; Pita, Lina; Gomes, Susana; Gonçalves, João; Faustino, Paula

    2014-12-01

    Hereditary hemochromatosis is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by severe iron overload. It is usually associated with homozygosity for the HFE gene mutation c.845G > A; p.C282Y. However, in some cases, another HFE mutation (c.187C > G; p.H63D) seems to be associated with the disease. Its penetrance is very low, suggesting the possibility of other iron genetic modulators being involved. In this work, we have screened for HAMP promoter polymorphisms in 409 individuals presenting normal or increased serum ferritin levels together with normal or H63D-mutated HFE genotypes. Our results show that the hepcidin gene promoter TG haplotype, originated by linkage of the nc.-1010C > T and nc.-582A > G polymorphisms, is more frequent in the HFE_H63D individuals presenting serum ferritin levels higher than 300 μg/L than in those presenting the HFE_H63D mutation but with normal serum ferritin levels or in the normal control group.Moreover, it was observed that the TG haplotype was associated to increased serum ferritin levels in the overall pool of HFE_H63D individuals. Thus, our data suggest that screening for these polymorphisms could be of interest in order to explain the phenotype. However, this genetic condition seems to have no clinical significance.

  3. Evaluation of the influence of UV/IR radiation on iron release from ferritin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gritzkov, M.; Kochev, V.; Vladimirova, L

    2010-01-01

    In the present work the influence of UV/IR radiation on the iron-releasing process from ferritin is investigated. The ferritins are a family of iron-storing proteins playing a key role in the biochemical reactions between iron and oxygen-processes of exclusive importance for the existence of all living organisms. The iron is stored within the ferritin core in the form of insoluble crystals containing Fe(III). Therefore for its release, the mineral matrix has to be decomposed, usually through a reduction of Fe(III) to Fe(II). Our study considers the action of UV/IR radiation on the structure of the protein molecule. Eventual changes in the ferritin conformation under the irradiation could result in the change of channel forming regions responsible for the iron efflux. This can be assess by the quantity of Fe (II) obtained in a subsequent mobilization procedure evoked by exogenous reducing agents. In our case the content of the reduced iron is determined electrochemically by the method of potentiometric titration. As already was shown, this method promises to become highly useful for quantitative evaluation of released Fe 2+ . (Author)

  4. MRI contrast demonstration of antigen-specific targeting with an iron-based ferritin construct

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walsh, Edward G., E-mail: edward_walsh@brown.edu [Brown University, Department of Neuroscience (United States); Mills, David R. [Rhode Island Hospital/Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University, Division of Hematology and Oncology, Department of Medicine (United States); Lim, Sierin; Sana, Barindra [Nanyang Technological University, Division of Bioengineering (Singapore); Brilliant, Kate E. [Rhode Island Hospital/Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University, Division of Hematology and Oncology, Department of Medicine (United States); Park, William K. C. [Rhode Island Hospital, Department of Diagnostic Imaging (United States)

    2013-01-15

    A genetically modified ferritin has been examined for its properties as a tumor-selective magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agent. The engineered ferritin described herein was derived from Archaeoglobus fulgidus (AfFtn-AA), which stores a significantly greater quantity of iron than wild-type ferritins. Relaxivity measurements were taken at 3 Tesla of ferritin particles uniformly distributed in an agarose gel to assess relaxivities r{sub 1} and r{sub 2}. The r{sub 1} and r{sub 2} values of the uniformly distributed modified ferritin were significantly higher (r{sub 1} = 1,290 mM{sup -1} s{sup -1} and r{sub 2} = 5,740 mM{sup -1} s{sup -1}) than values observed for wild-type ferritin (e.g., horse spleen, r{sub 1} = 0.674 mM{sup -1} s{sup -1}, r{sub 2} = 95.54 mM{sup -1} s{sup -1}). The modified iron-enriched ferritin (14.5 nm diameter) was conjugated with a monoclonal antibody (10 nm length) against rat Necl-5, a cell surface glycoprotein overexpressed by many epithelial cancers. In vitro studies showed strong reactivity of the assembled nanoconjugate to transformed Necl-5 positive rat prostate epithelial cells. Furthermore, MRI demonstrated a significant T{sub 2} contrast with negligible T{sub 1} effect when bound to cells. These findings highlight the utility of the modified ferritin construct as a novel MRI contrast agent that can be manipulated to target antigen-specific tissues.

  5. Liver volume in thalassaemia major: relationship with body weight, serum ferritin, and liver function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chan Yuleung; Law Manyee; Howard, Robert [Chinese University of Hong Kong, Department of Diagnostic Radiology and Organ Imaging, Prince of Wales Hospital, Hong Kong (China); Li Chikong; Chik Kiwai [Chinese University of Hong Kong, Department of Paediatrics, Prince of Wales Hospital, Hong Kong (China)

    2005-02-01

    It is not known whether body weight alone can adjust for the volume of liver in the calculation of the chelating dose in {beta}-thalassaemia major patients, who frequently have iron overload and hepatitis. The hypothesis is that liver volume in children and adolescents suffering from {beta}-thalassaemia major is affected by ferritin level and liver function. Thirty-five {beta}-thalassaemia major patients aged 7-18 years and 35 age- and sex-matched controls had liver volume measured by MRI. Serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and ferritin levels were obtained in the thalassaemia major patients. Body weight explained 65 and 86% of the change in liver volume in {beta}-thalassaemia major patients and age-matched control subjects, respectively. Liver volume/kilogram body weight was significantly higher (P<0.001) in thalassaemia major patients than in control subjects. There was a significant correlation between ALT level and liver volume/kilogram body weight (r=0.55, P=0.001). Patients with elevated ALT had significantly higher liver volume/kilogram body weight (mean 42.9{+-}12 cm{sup 3}/kg) than control subjects (mean 23.4{+-}3.6 cm{sup 3}/kg) and patients with normal ALT levels (mean 27.4{+-}3.6 cm{sup 3}/kg). Body weight is the most important single factor for liver-volume changes in thalassaemia major patients, but elevated ALT also has a significant role. Direct liver volume measurement for chelation dose adjustment may be advantageous in patients with elevated ALT. (orig.)

  6. Serum ferritin levels, socio-demographic factors and desferrioxamine therapy in multi-transfused thalassemia major patients at a government tertiary care hospital of Karachi, Pakistan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rehman Anis

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Beta thalassemia is the most frequent genetic disorder of haemoglobin synthesis in Pakistan. Recurrent transfusions lead to iron-overload manifested by increased serum Ferritin levels, for which chelation therapy is required. Findings The study was conducted in the Pediatric Emergency unit of Civil Hospital Karachi after ethical approval by the Institutional Review Board of Dow University of Health Sciences. Seventy nine cases of beta thalassemia major were included after a written consent. The care takers were interviewed for the socio-demographic variables and the use of Desferrioxamine therapy, after which a blood sample was drawn to assess the serum Ferritin level. SPSS 15.0 was employed for data entry and analysis. Of the seventy-nine patients included in the study, 46 (58.2% were males while 33 (41.8% were females. The mean age was 10.8 (± 4.5 years with the dominant age group (46.2% being 10 to 14 years. In 62 (78.8% cases, the care taker education was below the tenth grade. The mean serum Ferritin level in our study were 4236.5 ng/ml and showed a directly proportional relationship with age. Desferrioxamine was used by patients in 46 (58.2% cases with monthly house hold income significant factor to the use of therapy. Conclusions The mean serum Ferritin levels are approximately ten times higher than the normal recommended levels for normal individuals, with two-fifths of the patients not receiving iron chelation therapy at all. Use of iron chelation therapy and titrating the dose according to the need can significantly lower the iron load reducing the risk of iron-overload related complications leading to a better quality of life and improving survival in Pakistani beta thalassemia major patients. Conflicts of Interest: None

  7. Relationship between Serum Iron Profile and Blood Groups among the Voluntary Blood Donors of Bangladesh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoque, M M; Adnan, S D; Karim, S; Al-Mamun, M A; Faruki, M A; Islam, K; Nandy, S

    2016-04-01

    Blood donation results in a substantial iron loss and subsequent mobilization from body stores. Chronic iron deficiency is a well-recognized complication of regular blood donation. The present study conducted to compare the level of serum ferritin, serum iron, total iron binding capacity (TIBC) and percentage transferrin saturation in different ABO and Rhesus type blood groups among the voluntary blood donors of Bangladesh. The present prospective study included 100 healthy voluntary donors attending at Department of Blood Transfusion, Dhaka Medical College, Dhaka between the periods of July 2013 to Jun 2014. From each donor 10mL venous blood sample was taken and divided into heparinized and non-heparinized tubes for determination of hemoglobin (Hb), hematocrit (Hct), serum iron (SI), total iron binding capacity (TIBC) and serum ferritin by standard laboratory methods. Percentage of transferrin saturation (TS) calculated from serum iron and TIBC. Data were analyzed with SPSS (version 16) software and comparisons between groups were made using student's t-test and one way ANOVA. In the present study mean±SD of age of the respondents was 27.2±6.5 years with a range of 18 to 49 years and 81.0% were male and 19.0% were female. Among the donors 18.0% had blood group A, 35.0% had blood group B, 14.0% had blood group AB and 33.0% had blood group O. Among the donors 91.0% had rhesus positive and 9.0% had rhesus negative. Donors with blood group O had lowest haemoglobin, serum iron and transferring saturation levels. Donors with blood group A had highest TIBC level. Donors with blood group B had lowest serum ferritin level. An independent samples 't' test showed statistically significant difference in serum ferritin and percentage transferrin saturation between blood group AB and blood group O and in percentage transferrin saturation between blood group B and blood group O. One way ANOVA showed that there is no significant difference in haemoglobin, serum iron, serum

  8. Potentiometric assessment of iron release during ferritin reduction by exogenous agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vladimirova, Lilia S; Kochev, Valery K

    2010-09-01

    This work studied the possibilities for quantitative determination of iron mobilization in connection with ferritin reduction by ascorbic acid (vitamin C) and sodium dithionite in vitro. The iron storage protein was incubated with an excess of reductant in aerobic conditions in the absence of complexing agents in the medium. The release of Fe(2+) was let to go to completion, and the overall content of Fe(2+) in the solution was evaluated with the aid of potentiometric titration using Ce(4+) as an oxidizing titrant. Results suggest a moderate iron efflux under the influence of the chosen reducing agents. Although such a reduction of the protein mineral core by dihydroxyfumarate contributes greatly to the iron mobilization, ferritin behavior with vitamin C and dithionite seems to be different. Although redox properties of dihydroxyfumarate are determined by hydroxyl groups similar to those of ascorbic acid, the two compounds differ significantly in structure, and this could be the basis for an explanation of the specificities in their interaction with ferritin. As revealed by the study, potentiometric titration promises to be a reliable tool for evaluation of the amount of Fe(2+) present in the solution as a result of the reduction of the ferritin's mineral core. 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Decreased serum hepcidin concentration correlates with brain iron deposition in patients with HBV-related cirrhosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong Lin

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: Excessive brain iron accumulation contributes to cognitive impairments in hepatitis B virus (HBV-related cirrhotic patients. The underlying mechanism remains unclear. Hepcidin, a liver-produced, 25-aminoacid peptide, is the major regulator of systemic iron metabolism. Abnormal hepcidin level is a key factor in some body iron accumulation or deficiency disorders, especially in those associated with liver diseases. Our study was aimed to explore the relationship between brain iron content in patients with HBV-related cirrhosis and serum hepcidin level. METHODS: Seventy HBV-related cirrhotic patients and forty age- sex-matched healthy controls were enrolled. Brain iron content was quantified by susceptibility weighted phase imaging technique. Serum hepcidin as well as serum iron, serum transferrin, ferritin, soluble transferrin receptor, total iron binding capacity, and transferrin saturation were tested in thirty cirrhotic patients and nineteen healthy controls. Pearson correlation analysis was performed to investigate correlation between brain iron concentrations and serum hepcidin, or other iron parameters. RESULTS: Cirrhotic patients had increased brain iron accumulation compared to controls in the left red nuclear, the bilateral substantia nigra, the bilateral thalamus, the right caudate, and the right putamen. Cirrhotic patients had significantly decreased serum hepcidin concentration, as well as lower serum transferring level, lower total iron binding capacity and higher transferrin saturation, compared to controls. Serum hepcidin level negatively correlated with the iron content in the right caudate, while serum ferritin level positively correlated with the iron content in the bilateral putamen in cirrhotic patients. CONCLUSIONS: Decreased serum hepcidin level correlated with excessive iron accumulation in the basal ganglia in HBV-related cirrhotic patients. Our results indicated that systemic iron overload underlined regional

  10. Neurodegeneration with inflammation is accompanied by accumulation of iron and ferritin in microglia and neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomsen, Maj Schneider; Andersen, Michelle Vandborg; Christoffersen, Pia Rægaard; Jensen, Malene Duedal; Lichota, Jacek; Moos, Torben

    2015-09-01

    Chronic inflammation in the substantia nigra (SN) accompanies conditions with progressive neurodegeneration. This inflammatory process contributes to gradual iron deposition that may catalyze formation of free-radical mediated damage, hence exacerbating the neurodegeneration. This study examined proteins related to iron-storage (ferritin) and iron-export (ferroportin) (aka metal transporter protein 1, MTP1) in a model of neurodegeneration. Ibotenic acid injected stereotactically into the striatum leads to loss of GABAergic neurons projecting to SN pars reticulata (SNpr), which subsequently leads to excitotoxicity in the SNpr as neurons here become vulnerable to their additional glutamatergic projections from the subthalamic nucleus. This imbalance between glutamate and GABA eventually led to progressive shrinkage of the SNpr and neuronal loss. Neuronal cell death was accompanied by chronic inflammation as revealed by the presence of cells expressing ED1 and CD11b in the SNpr and the adjacent white matter mainly denoted by the crus cerebri. The SNpr also exhibited changes in iron metabolism seen as a marked accumulation of inflammatory cells containing ferric iron and ferritin with morphology corresponding to macrophages and microglia. Ferritin was detected in neurons of the lesioned SNpr in contrast to the non-injected side. Compared to non-injected rats, surviving neurons of the SNpr expressed ferroportin at unchanged level. Analyses of dissected SNpr using RT-qPCR showed a rise in ferritin-H and -L transcripts with increasing age but no change was observed in the lesioned side compared to the non-lesioned side, indicating that the increased expression of ferritin in the lesioned side occurred at the post-transcriptional level. Hepcidin transcripts were higher in the lesioned side in contrast to ferroportin mRNA that remained unaltered. The continuous entry of iron-containing inflammatory cells into the degenerating SNpr and their subsequent demise is probably

  11. Two kinds of ferritin protect ixodid ticks from iron overload and consequent oxidative stress.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Remil Linggatong Galay

    Full Text Available Ticks are obligate hematophagous parasites that have successfully developed counteractive means against their hosts' immune and hemostatic mechanisms, but their ability to cope with potentially toxic molecules in the blood remains unclear. Iron is important in various physiological processes but can be toxic to living cells when in excess. We previously reported that the hard tick Haemaphysalis longicornis has an intracellular (HlFER1 and a secretory (HlFER2 ferritin, and both are crucial in successful blood feeding and reproduction. Ferritin gene silencing by RNA interference caused reduced feeding capacity, low body weight and high mortality after blood meal, decreased fecundity and morphological abnormalities in the midgut cells. Similar findings were also previously reported after silencing of ferritin genes in another hard tick, Ixodes ricinus. Here we demonstrated the role of ferritin in protecting the hard ticks from oxidative stress. Evaluation of oxidative stress in Hlfer-silenced ticks was performed after blood feeding or injection of ferric ammonium citrate (FAC through detection of the lipid peroxidation product, malondialdehyde (MDA and protein oxidation product, protein carbonyl. FAC injection in Hlfer-silenced ticks resulted in high mortality. Higher levels of MDA and protein carbonyl were detected in Hlfer-silenced ticks compared to Luciferase-injected (control ticks both after blood feeding and FAC injection. Ferric iron accumulation demonstrated by increased staining on native HlFER was observed from 72 h after iron injection in both the whole tick and the midgut. Furthermore, weak iron staining was observed after Hlfer knockdown. Taken together, these results show that tick ferritins are crucial antioxidant molecules that protect the hard tick from iron-mediated oxidative stress during blood feeding.

  12. Iron and ferritin accumulate in separate cellular locations in Phaseolus seeds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cvitanich, Cristina; Przybylowicz, Wojciech J; Urbanski, Dorian Fabian

    2010-01-01

    and will assist in the production of staples with increased bioavailable iron. Results Here we reveal the distribution of iron in seeds of three Phaseolus species including thirteen genotypes of P. vulgaris, P. coccineus, and P. lunatus. We showed that high concentrations of iron accumulate in cells surrounding...... the provascular tissue of P. vulgaris and P. coccineus seeds. Using the Perls' Prussian blue method, we were able to detect iron in the cytoplasm of epidermal cells, cells near the epidermis, and cells surrounding the provascular tissue. In contrast, the protein ferritin that has been suggested as the major iron...... to P. vulgaris and P. coccineus, we did not observe iron accumulation in the cells surrounding the provascular tissues of P. lunatus cotyledons. A novel iron-rich genotype, NUA35, with a high concentration of iron both in the seed coat and cotyledons was bred from a cross between an Andean...

  13. Serum levels of iron in Sør-Varanger, Northern Norway--an iron mining municipality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broderstad, Ann R; Smith-Sivertsen, Tone; Dahl, Inger Marie S; Ingebretsen, Ole Christian; Lund, Eiliv

    2006-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate iron status in a population with a high proportion of miners in the northernmost part of Norway. Cross-sectional, population-based study performed in order to investigate possible health effects of pollution in the population living on both sides of the Norwegian-Russian border. All individuals living in the community of Sør-Varanger were invited for screening in 1994. In 2000, blood samples from 2949 participants (response rate 66.8 %), age range 30-69 years, were defrosted. S-ferritin and transferrin saturation were analysed in samples from 1548 women and 1401 men. About 30 % (n = 893) were employed in the iron mining industry, 476 of whom were miners and 417 had other tasks in the company. Type and duration of employment and time since last day of work at the company were used as indicators of exposure. Both s-ferritin levels and transferrin saturation were higher in men than in women. S-ferritin increased with increasing age in women, while the opposite was true for men. Iron deficiency occurred with higher frequencies in women (16 %) than in men (4 %). Iron overload was uncommon in both sexes. Adjustment for smoking and self-reported pulmonary diseases did not show any effect on iron levels. Miners had non-significant higher mean s-ferritin and transferrin saturation than non-miners. Neither duration, nor time since employment in the mine, had any impact on iron status. Our analyses did not show any associations between being a miner in the iron mining industry and serum iron levels compared to the general population.

  14. Patients blood serum ferritin concentrations changes associated with Caesium-137 incorporation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shishkyina, V.V.; Chebotar'ova, E.D.; Zamyatyin, S.S.; Vlasenko, O.O.

    1993-01-01

    The results of radioimmune study of ferritin and carcinoembryonic antigen in 60 persons: 35 those who took part in liquidation of the Chernobyl accident and incorporated 25.9-70.4 MBq of Cesium-137,25 residents of Rivno Region with 7.4-203.5 MBq of the radionuclide in the organism are reported. The increased concentration of ferritin and carcinoembryonic antigen in blood serum was noted to be determined more often in the residents of the areas polluted with Caesium-137 than in l iquidators . The tumor markers levels depended to some extent on bad habits (smoking, alcohol) and existing chronic diseases of the alimentary system

  15. Serum Ferritin in Patients With Cirrhosis is Associated With Markers of Liver Insufficiency and Circulatory Dysfunction, but Not of Portal Hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ripoll, Cristina; Keitel, Felix; Hollenbach, Marcus; Greinert, Robin; Zipprich, Alexander

    2015-10-01

    Iron overload is an increasingly recognized phenomenon in nonhemochromatosis cirrhosis. To evaluate the relationship between iron overload and liver insufficiency and portal hypertension. Cirrhotics with hepatic hemodynamic and ferritin measurement (within 30 d) were included. Exclusion criteria were malignancy (except hepatocellular carcinoma Milan-in), severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, acute events in the previous 2 weeks, immunosuppression, transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt or portal vein thrombosis, and end-stage renal disease. Patients were followed-up until death or liver transplant. Univariate and multivariate analysis were used. Fifty-one patients were included (male 61%; median age 57 y; interquartile range, 47 to 66 y); Child-Pugh A 11/B 25/C 15). A positive correlation was observed between ferritin and markers of inflammation (C-reactive protein: r=0.273, P=0.06 and aspartate aminotransferase: r=0.302, P=0.035). No correlation between ferritin and hepatic venous pressure gradient was seen. Negative correlations were observed between ferritin and circulatory dysfunction (mean arterial pressure: r=-0.360, P=0.014 and serum sodium: r=-0.419, P=0.002). In contrast, associations to markers of liver failure such as international normalized ratio (r=0.333, P=0.005), bilirubin (r=0.378, P=0.007), albumin (r=-0.265, P=0.082), model for end-stage liver disease (r=0.293, P=0.041), and Child-Pugh score (r=0.392, P=0.009) were observed. No differences in survival according to ferritin was detected. In patients with cirrhosis, serum ferritin levels are associated with markers of liver insufficiency, inflammation, and circulatory dysfunction but not portal hypertension.

  16. Comparison of Serum Ferritin and Vitamin D in Association with the Severity of Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease in Korean Adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong Wook Jeong

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundIncreased serum ferritin and decreased vitamin D levels associated with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD. However, their association with the severity of NAFLD has not been fully evaluated. The aim of this study was to compare the association of serum ferritin and 25(OHD3 levels with the severity of ultrasonographically detected NAFLD (US-NAFLD and hepatic steatosis defined by fatty liver index (FLI in Korean adults.MethodsA cross-sectional analysis of clinical and anthropometric data, including serum ferritin and 25(OHD3, from men (n=295 and women (n=263 who underwent a routine health check-up in 2012.ResultsIn men, with an increase in the quartile of serum ferritin level, the incidences of subjects with metabolic syndrome (P=0.002, US-NAFLD (P=0.041, and FLI ≥60 (P=0.010 were significantly elevated. In women, the incidence of subjects with US-NAFLD was also significantly elevated with increases in the serum ferritin quartile (P=0.012. Regarding 25(OHD3, no statistical differences were observed among the different quartiles in either gender. Serum ferritin level significantly increased as the severity of US-NAFLD increased (P<0.001; however, no significant differences in 25(OHD3 level were observed in men. No significant differences in either serum ferritin or 25(OHD3 level were observed among women with different levels of severity of US-NAFLD.ConclusionIncreased serum ferritin level showed a closer association with severity of NAFLD compared with level of serum vitamin D, suggesting that serum ferritin level may be a better marker than vitamin D level for predicting the severity of US-NAFLD and hepatic steatosis in a clinical setting.

  17. Iron- and ferritin-dependent reactive oxygen species distribution: impact on Arabidopsis root system architecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyt, Guilhem; Boudouf, Soukaina; Boucherez, Jossia; Gaymard, Frédéric; Briat, Jean-Francois

    2015-03-01

    Iron (Fe) homeostasis is integrated with the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), and distribution at the root tip participates in the control of root growth. Excess Fe increases ferritin abundance, enabling the storage of Fe, which contributes to protection of plants against Fe-induced oxidative stress. AtFer1 and AtFer3 are the two ferritin genes expressed in the meristematic zone, pericycle and endodermis of the Arabidopsis thaliana root, and it is in these regions that we observe Fe stained dots. This staining disappears in the triple fer1-3-4 ferritin mutant. Fe excess decreases primary root length in the same way in wild-type and in fer1-3-4 mutant. In contrast, the Fe-mediated decrease of lateral root (LR) length and density is enhanced in fer1-3-4 plants due to a defect in LR emergence. We observe that this interaction between excess Fe, ferritin, and root system architecture (RSA) is in part mediated by the H2O2/O2·- balance between the root cell proliferation and differentiation zones regulated by the UPB1 transcription factor. Meristem size is also decreased in response to Fe excess in ferritin mutant plants, implicating cell cycle arrest mediated by the ROS-activated SMR5/SMR7 cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors pathway in the interaction between Fe and RSA. Copyright © 2015 The Author. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Association between Serum Ferritin Concentrations and Depressive Symptoms among Chinese Adults: A Population Study from the Tianjin Chronic Low-Grade Systemic Inflammation and Health (TCLSIHealth Cohort Study.

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    Qian Su

    Full Text Available Depressive symptoms have become the most important global public health issue. Iron plays an important role in brain function, cognition, and behavior, and its impacts on depressive symptoms may be multifactorial with both positive and negative effects. Previous observational studies focusing on the association between iron status and depressive symptoms showed inconsistent results. Ferritin is a ubiquitous intracellular protein that can store and release iron and is widely used as a clinical biomarker to evaluate iron status. We performed a cross-sectional study to examine the relationship between serum ferritin and depressive symptoms among 3,839 subjects who were from the Tianjin Chronic Low-grade Systemic Inflammation and Health (TCLSIHealth cohort. Depressive symptoms were assessed using the Chinese version of 20-item self-rating Depression Scale (SDS with 4 cutoffs (40, 45, 48 and 50 to indicate elevated depressive symptoms (40 was the primary cut-off. The prevalence of depressive symptoms was 36.5%, 17.6%, 11.0% and 7.0% for SDS ≥40, ≥45, ≥48 and ≥50, respectively. With the primary cut-off point of 40, multiple potential confounding factors were adjusted and the odds ratios (95% confidence interval of having elevated depressive symptoms by quartiles of serum ferritin concentrations were 1.00 (reference, 1.10 (0.91, 1.34, 0.81 (0.66, 1.01 and 1.02 (0.81, 1.28 for the first, second, third and fourth quartile, respectively (P for trend = 0.76. Similar relations were observed with the use of other cut-offs as a definition of depressive symptoms. In conclusion, there is no significant relationship between serum ferritin concentrations and depressive symptoms among Chinese adults.

  19. Using Soluble Transferrin Receptor and Taking Inflammation into Account When Defining Serum Ferritin Cutoffs Improved the Diagnosis of Iron Deficiency in a Group of Canadian Preschool Inuit Children from Nunavik

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    Huguette Turgeon O’Brien

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The prevalence of iron depletion, iron deficient erythropoiesis (IDE, and iron deficiency anemia (IDA was assessed in preschool Inuit children using soluble transferrin receptor (sTfR and traditional indicators of iron status while disregarding or taking inflammation into account when defining SF cutoffs. Iron depletion was defined as follows: (1 SF 5 mg/L, respectively. IDE corresponded to iron depletion combined with total iron binding capacity > 72 μmol/L and/or transferrin saturation < 16%. Iron depletion and IDE affected almost half of the children when accounting for inflammation, compared to one-third when the SF cutoff was defined regardless of CRP level (P<0.0001. The prevalence of IDE adjusted for inflammation (45.1% was very similar to the prevalence observed when sTfR was used as a sole marker of IDE (47.4%. The prevalence of anemia was 15%. The prevalence of IDA (IDE + hemoglobin < 110 g/L was higher when accounting for than when disregarding inflammation (8.0% versus 6.2%, P=0.083. Using sTfR and different SF cutoffs for children with versus without inflammation improved the diagnosis of iron depletion and IDE. Our results confirm that Inuit children are at particularly high risk for iron deficiency.

  20. Association of serum ferritin levels with immunological status and clinical staging of HIV patients: a retrospective study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saragih, R. H.; Mardia, A. I.; Purba, G. C. F.; Syahrini, H.

    2018-03-01

    Serum ferritin has long known as an acute phase reactant during inflammation. It works as an oxidative stress marker beside its role in the storage of intracellular iron. The increase of serum ferritin levels (SFL) has been reported found in HIV patients. It remains unclear though whether it causes, or is the cause, to the progressivity of the disease. The purpose of this study was to find the association between the SFL and the progressivity of the HIV disease. A retrospective study of 91 patients was carried out at the Haji Adam Malik Central General Hospital. All of the study population were HIV positive inpatients admitted from January to December 2016. The data needed to be all obtained from the patient’s medical records. The WHO Clinical Staging System was used to assess the HIV clinical staging. An inverse relationship was found between the SFL with the immunological status of the HIV patients (r=-0.213) based on their CD4+ count. There was no association found between the SFL with the clinical staging of the HIV patients (p=0.953). The elevated SFL is a feature found in HIV-diagnosed patients with the low CD4+ count, and it affects the progressivity of the disease.

  1. Using decision tree to predict serum ferritin level in women with anemia

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    Parisa Safaee

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Data mining is known as a process of discovering and analysing large amounts of data in order to find meaningful rules and trends. In healthcare, data mining offers numerous opportunities to study the unknown patterns in a data set. These patterns can be used to diagnosis, prognosis and treatment of patients by physicians. The main objective of this study was to predict the level of serum ferritin in women with anemia and to specify the basic predictive factors of iron deficiency anemia using data mining techniques. Methods: In this research 690 patients and 22 variables have been studied in women population with anemia. These data include 11 laboratories and 11 clinical variables of patients related to the patients who have referred to the laboratory of Imam Hossein and Shohada-E- Haft Tir hospitals from April 2013 to April 2014. Decision tree technique has been used to build the model. Results: The accuracy of the decision tree with all the variables is 75%. Different combinations of variables were examined in order to determine the best model to predict. Regarding the optimum obtained model of the decision tree, the RBC, MCH, MCHC, gastrointestinal cancer and gastrointestinal ulcer were identified as the most important predictive factors. The results indicate if the values of MCV, MCHC and MCH variables are normal and the value of RBC variable is lower than normal limitation, it is diagnosed that the patient is likely 90% iron deficiency anemia. Conclusion: Regarding the simplicity and the low cost of the complete blood count examination, the model of decision tree was taken into consideration to diagnose iron deficiency anemia in patients. Also the impact of new factors such as gastrointestinal hemorrhoids, gastrointestinal surgeries, different gastrointestinal diseases and gastrointestinal ulcers are considered in this paper while the previous studies have been limited only to assess laboratory variables. The rules of the

  2. THE ASSOCIATION BETWEEN SERUM FERRITIN AND URIC ACID IN HUMANS

    Science.gov (United States)

    OBJECTIVE: Urate forms a coordination complex with Fe(3+) which does not support electron transport. The only enzymatic source of urate is xanthine oxidoreductase. If a major purpose of xanthine oxidoreductase is the production of urate to function as an iron chelator and antioxi...

  3. Rate of Iron Transfer Through the Horse Spleen Ferritin Shell Determined by the Rate of Formation of Prussian Blue and Fe-desferrioxamine Within the Ferritin Cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Bo; Watt, Richard K.; Galvez, Natividad; Dominquez-Vera, Jose M.; Watt, Gerald D.

    2005-01-01

    Iron (2+ and 3+) is believed to transfer through the three-fold channels in the ferritin shell during iron deposition and release in animal ferritins. However, the rate of iron transit in and out through these channels has not been reported. The recent synthesis of [Fe(CN)(sub 6)](3-), Prussian Blue (PB) and desferrioxamine (DES) all trapped within the horse spleen ferritin (HoSF) interior makes these measurements feasible. We report the rate of Fe(2+) penetrating into the ferritin interior by adding external Fe(2+) to [Fe(CN)(sub 6)](3-) encapsulated in the HoSF interior and measuring the rate of formation of the resulting encapsulated PB. The rate at which Fe(2+) reacts with [Fe(CN)(sub 6)](3-) in the HoSF interior is much slower than the formation of free PB in solution and is proceeded by a lag period. We assume this lag period and the difference in rate represent the transfer of Fe(2+) through the HoSF protein shell. The calculated diffusion coefficient, D approx. 5.8 x 10(exp -20) square meters per second corresponds to the measured lag time of 10-20 s before PB forms within the HoSF interior. The activation energy for Fe(2+) transfer from the outside solution through the protein shell was determined to be 52.9 kJ/mol by conducting the reactions at 10 to approximately 40 C. The reaction of Fe(3+) with encapsulated [Fe(CN)6](4-) also readily forms PB in the HoSF interior, but the rate is faster than the corresponding Fe(2+) reaction. The rate for Fe(3+) transfer through the ferritin shell was confirmed by measuring the rate of the formation of Fe-DES inside HoSF and an activation energy of 58.4 kJ/mol was determined. An attempt was made to determine the rate of iron (2+ and 3+) transit out from the ferritin interior by adding excess bipyridine or DES to PB trapped within the HoSF interior. However, the reactions are slow and occur at almost identical rates for free and HoSF-encapsulated PB, indicating that the transfer of iron from the interior through the

  4. Serum ferritin is an independent predictor of histologic severity and advanced fibrosis in patients with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowdley, Kris V; Belt, Patricia; Wilson, Laura A; Yeh, Matthew M; Neuschwander-Tetri, Brent A; Chalasani, Naga; Sanyal, Arun J; Nelson, James E

    2012-01-01

    Serum ferritin (SF) levels are commonly elevated in patients with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) because of systemic inflammation, increased iron stores, or both. The aim of this study was to examine the relationship between elevated SF and NAFLD severity. Demographic, clinical, histologic, laboratory, and anthropometric data were analyzed in 628 adult patients with NAFLD (age, ≥ 18 years) with biopsy-proven NAFLD and an SF measurement within 6 months of their liver biopsy. A threshold SF >1.5 × upper limit of normal (ULN) (i.e., >300 ng/mL in women and >450 ng/mL in men) was significantly associated with male sex, elevated serum alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase, iron, transferrin-iron saturation, iron stain grade, and decreased platelets (P 1.5 × ULN, including steatosis, fibrosis, hepatocellular ballooning, and diagnosis of NASH (P 1.5 × ULN was independently associated with advanced hepatic fibrosis (odds ratio [OR], 1.66; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.05-2.62; P = 0.028) and increased NAFLD Activity Score (NAS) (OR, 1.99; 95% CI, 1.06-3.75; P = 0.033). A SF >1.5 × ULN is associated with hepatic iron deposition, a diagnosis of NASH, and worsened histologic activity and is an independent predictor of advanced hepatic fibrosis among patients with NAFLD. Furthermore, elevated SF is independently associated with higher NAS, even among patients without hepatic iron deposition. We conclude that SF is useful to identify NAFLD patients at risk for NASH and advanced fibrosis. Copyright © 2011 American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases.

  5. Iron Deposition and Ferritin Heavy Chain (Fth Localization in Rodent Teeth

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    Wen Xin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background An iron rich layer on the labial surface is characteristic of the enamel of rodent incisors. In order to address a role for iron content in continuously growing incisors during odontogenesis, we studied iron deposition patterns in enamel and dentine using Perls’ blue staining and ferritin heavy chain (Fth immunolocalization. Fth expression is regulated by iron level; therefore its localization can be used as a sensitive indicator for iron deposition. Results Sagittal sections of 4-week old rat incisors showed a gradual increase in iron level in the enamel organ from secretory to maturation stages. In addition, iron was detected in ameloblasts of erupting third molars of 4-week old rats, suggesting iron plays a role in both incisor and molar development. In odontoblasts, the presence of iron was demonstrated, and this is consistent with iron’s role in collagen synthesis. Using postnatal 3-, 6-, 9-day old mice, the spatial and temporal expression of Fth in tooth development again indicated the presence of iron in mature ameloblasts and odontoblasts. Conclusions While these data do not explain what functional role iron has in tooth formation, it does highlight a significant molecular activity associated with the formation of the rodent dentition.

  6. A case report of spontaneous mutation (C33>U) in the iron-responsive element of L-ferritin causing hyperferritinemia-cataract syndrome.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Cao, Wei

    2010-01-15

    The hereditary hyperferritinemia cataract syndrome (HHCS) is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by juvenile-onset cataracts and elevated serum ferritin levels. It is caused by mutation in the iron response element (IRE) within the 5\\'UTR of L-ferritin gene. The mutation results in a loss of post-transcriptional negative feedback exerted by the interaction between iron regulatory proteins 1, 2 (IRP1 and IRP2) and IRE, which leads to uncontrolled expression of L-ferritin. In this paper, we describe the molecular pathogenesis of non-hereditary hyperferritinemia cataract syndrome (non-H-HCS) in a patient with typical HHCS ocular lens morphology and high ferritin levels without obvious family history. Initial sequencing of the full-length L-ferritin cloned from genomic DNA demonstrated a mutation (C33>T) in the IRE of the affected patient but not in her unaffected family members. The mutation (C\\/T heterozygote) was also detected in cDNA derived from her blood mononuclear cells. Structure-prediction-modeling indicates that this mutation would significantly alter the secondary structure of the IRE, resulting in a loss of the interaction between IRP and IRE. By using IRP1\\/IRP2-human IgG1 Fc fusion proteins, we established a novel in vitro report system (modified ELISA) to verify impaired IRE\\/IRP binding. Both the C33>U and A40G mutations (the first identified mutation for HHCS) showed a dramatically decreased binding to IRP1\\/IRP2 protein, compared to the normal IRE RNA. Surprisingly, a decrease in L-ferritin mRNA levels was observed in the affected patient compared to controls suggesting a mechanism of transcriptional negative feedback by high intracellular L-ferritin protein levels not described heretofore. Taken together, spontaneous mutation in the IRE of L-ferritin may cause non-H-HCS by the same mechanism as HHCS. In addition, under abnormal circumstances, the protein level of L-ferritin may be principally controlled by post

  7. Insulin resistance and serum parameters of iron status in type 2 diabetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zafar, U.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is a predominant public health concern worldwide, accounting for 90% of the cases of diabetes globally. Pathogenesis of T2DM involves insulin resistance, defective insulin secretion and increased glucose production by the liver. Subclinical haemochromatosis has been considered as one of the probable causes of insulin resistance and diabetes mellitus. The aim of this study was to determine and correlate insulin resistance and serum parameters of iron status (serum ferritin and transferrin saturation) in type 2 diabetics. Methods: It was a correlational study. This study was conducted on sixty male patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Fasting blood sample was taken from each subject and analysed for glucose, haemoglobin, insulin, iron, Total Iron Binding Capacity (TIBC) and ferritin. Insulin resistance was determined by HOMA-IR index. Transferrin saturation was calculated from serum iron and TIBC. Data was analysed using SPSS-17. Results: There was significant positive correlation between insulin resistance and transferrin saturation, but there was no significant correlation of insulin resistance with blood haemoglobin, serum iron and serum ferritin in type 2 diabetics. Conclusion: Correlation between insulin resistance and transferrin saturation reveals that iron has negative impact on insulin sensitivity in type 2 diabetics. (author)

  8. Study on changes of serum ferritin (SF), folic acid (FA) and vitamin B12 levels after transfusion of preserved red cells (PRC) in patients with iron deficiency anemia (IDA)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Hongsu; Li Xinhua; Li Keqin

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To explore the changes of serum SF, FA and VitB 12 levels after transfusion of preserved red cells in patients with IDA. Methods: Serum SF, FA and VitB 12 levels (with RIA) were detected both before and after transfusion of preserved red cells in 32 patients with IDA as well as in 35 controls. Results: Before transfusion of preserved red cells, the serum SF levels were significantly lower than those in controls (P 12 levels were significantly higher (P 12 were not much different from those in the controls. Conclusion: Transfusion of preserved red cells proves to be very useful. (authors)

  9. Iron environment in ferritin with large amounts of phosphate, from Azotobacter vinelandii and horse spleen, analyzed using Extended X-ray Absorption fine Structure (EXAFS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rohrer, J.S.; Islam, Q.T.; Sayes, D.E.; Theil, E.C.; Watt, G.D.

    1990-01-01

    The iron core of proteins in the ferritin family displays structural variations that includes phosphate content was well as the number and the degree of ordering of the iron atoms. Earlier studies had shown that ferritin iron cores naturally high in phosphate, e.g., Azotobacter vinelandii (AV) ferritin had decreased long-range order. Here, the influence of phosphate on the local structure around iron in ferritin cores is reported, comparing the EXAFS of AV ferritin, reconstituted ferritin and native horse spleen ferritin. In contrast, when the phosphate content was high in AV ferritin and horse spleen ferritin reconstituted with phosphate, the average iron atom had five to six phosphorus neighbors at 3.17 angstrom. Moreover, the number of detectable iron neighbors was lower when phosphate was high or present during reconstitution and the interatomic distance was longer indicating that some phosphate bridges neighboring iron atoms. However, the decrease in the number of detectable iron-iron neighbors compared to HSF and the higher number of Fe-P interactions relative to Fe-Fe interactions suggest that some phosphate ligands were chain termini, or blocked crystal growth, and/or introduced defects which contributed both to the long-range disorder and to altered redox properties previously observed in AV ferritin

  10. Stability of serum ferritin measured by immunoturbidimetric assay after storage at -80°C for several years.

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    Anne-Sylvia Sacri

    Full Text Available Iron deficiency (ID may impair long-term neurological development when it occurs in young infants. In cohort studies, it is sometimes necessary to evaluate ID with sera kept frozen for several years. To assess ID, learned societies recommend measuring serum ferritin (SF level combined with C-reactive protein level. The long-term stability of C-reactive protein in frozen samples is well established but not ferritin.We measured SF level (immunoturbidimetric assay; in micrograms per liter immediately after collection from 53 young adults recruited and followed-up in Porto, Portugal, from 2011 to 2013 (SF1, and then, in 2016 in two aliquots kept frozen at- 80°C for 3 to 5 years: one without (SF2A and one with (SF2B intermediate thawing in 2014. We compared SF1 to SF2A then SF2B; statistical agreement was evaluated by the Bland and Altman method and the effect of intermediate thawing by regression modelling.Mean SF2A-SF1 and SF2B-SF1 differences were -2.1 (SD 7.0 and 48.9 (SD 66.9. Values for Bland and Altman 95% limits of agreement were higher for the comparison of SF2B and SF1 than SF2A and SF1: -82.2 to 179.9 and -15.8 to 11.8, respectively; the effect of thawing was highly significant (p <0.001.Agreement between SF values before and after 3 to 5 years of constant freezing at -80°C was in a generally accepted range, which supports the hypothesis of ferritin's stability at this temperature for a long period. In long-term storage by freezing, intermediate thawing induced a major increase in values.

  11. SERUM IRON PARAMETERS IN ALCOHOLIC CIRRHOSIS, CRYPTOGENIC CIRRHOSIS, CHRONIC HEPATITIS B AND CHRONIC HEPATITIS C

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    Sajeevan K. C

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Regular monitoring of serum iron parameters is helpful for assessing the severity of alcoholic liver disease. Assessment of serum iron parameters are used for screening hereditary haemochromatosis in chronic liver disease. Serum iron parameters in chronic liver disease have not been clearly described in most of the studies. The aim of this study was to assess the serum iron, Total Iron Binding Capacity (TIBC, transferrin saturation and ferritin levels in common chronic liver disease like alcoholic cirrhosis, cryptogenic cirrhosis, chronic hepatitis C and chronic hepatitis B. MATERIALS AND METHODS 110 consecutive patients with chronic liver disease admitted to the Gastroenterology Department, Government Medical College, Kozhikode were selected for the study. The categories of chronic liver disease included in our study were alcoholic cirrhosis (Group I, n = 40, cryptogenic cirrhosis (Group II, n = 30, chronic hepatitis C (Group III, n = 20 and chronic hepatitis B (Group IV, n = 20. Serum iron, ferritin, total iron binding capacity and transferrin saturation were estimated in the fasting sample. Statistical Analysis- Analysis was performed using nonparametric Kruskal-Wallis and Bonferroni test to assess statistical significance of difference of continuous variables among and between groups, respectively. The results were considered statistically significant at the level of p <0.05. RESULTS The serum iron level was normal and total iron binding capacity was low in all the four groups of chronic liver disease. Serum ferritin and transferrin saturation were significantly higher in alcoholic cirrhosis in comparison with cryptogenic cirrhosis and chronic hepatitis B, but was not statistically significant in comparison with chronic hepatitis C. CONCLUSION We observed irregularities in iron status in patients with alcoholic cirrhosis, cryptogenic cirrhosis, chronic hepatitis C and chronic hepatitis B.

  12. Iron and ferritin dependent ROS distribution impact Arabidopsis root system architecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyt, Guilhem; Boudouf, Soukaina; Boucherez, Jossia; Gaymard, Frédéric; Briat, Jean-Franois

    2014-11-09

    Iron (Fe) homeostasis is integrated with the production of Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) whose distribution at the root tip participates in the control of root growth. Excess Fe increases ferritin abundance, enabling the storage of Fe which contributes to protection of plants against Fe-induced oxidative stress. AtFer1 and AtFer3 are the two ferritin genes expressed in the meristematic zone, pericycle and endodermis of the Arabidopsis thaliana (Arabidopsis) root, and it is in these regions that we observe Fe stained dots. This staining disappears in the triple fer1-3-4 ferritin mutant. Fe excess decreases primary root length in the same way in wild-type and in fer1-3-4 mutant. In contrast, the Fe mediated decrease of lateral root (LR) length and density is enhanced in fer1-3-4 plants due to a defect in LR emergence. We observe that this interaction between excess Fe, ferritin and RSA is in part mediated by the H 2 O 2 /O 2 .- balance between the root cell proliferation and differentiation zones regulated by the UPB1 transcription factor. Further, meristem size is also decreased in response to Fe excess in ferritin mutant plants, implicating cell cycle arrest mediated by the ROS-activated SMR5/SMR7 cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors pathway in the interaction between Fe and RSA. © The Author 2014. Published by the Molecular Plant Shanghai Editorial Office in association with Oxford University Press on behalf of CSPB and IPPE, SIBS, CAS.

  13. Iron-Restricted Diet Affects Brain Ferritin Levels, Dopamine Metabolism and Cellular Prion Protein in a Region-Specific Manner

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    Jessica M. V. Pino

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Iron is an essential micronutrient for several physiological functions, including the regulation of dopaminergic neurotransmission. On the other hand, both iron, and dopamine can affect the folding and aggregation of proteins related with neurodegenerative diseases, such as cellular prion protein (PrPC and α-synuclein, suggesting that deregulation of iron homeostasis and the consequential disturbance of dopamine metabolism can be a risk factor for conformational diseases. These proteins, in turn, are known to participate in the regulation of iron and dopamine metabolism. In this study, we evaluated the effects of dietary iron restriction on brain ferritin levels, dopamine metabolism, and the expression levels of PrPC and α-synuclein. To achieve this goal, C57BL/6 mice were fed with iron restricted diet (IR or with normal diet (CTL for 1 month. IR reduced iron and ferritin levels in liver. Ferritin reduction was also observed in the hippocampus. However, in the striatum of IR group, ferritin level was increased, suggesting that under iron-deficient condition, each brain area might acquire distinct capacity to store iron. Increased lipid peroxidation was observed only in hippocampus of IR group, where ferritin level was reduced. IR also generated discrete results regarding dopamine metabolism of distinct brain regions: in striatum, the level of dopamine metabolites (DOPAC and HVA was reduced; in prefrontal cortex, only HVA was increased along with the enhanced MAO-A activity; in hippocampus, no alterations were observed. PrPC levels were increased only in the striatum of IR group, where ferritin level was also increased. PrPC is known to play roles in iron uptake. Thus, the increase of PrPC in striatum of IR group might be related to the increased ferritin level. α-synuclein was not altered in any regions. Abnormal accumulation of ferritin, increased MAO-A activity or lipid peroxidation are molecular features observed in several neurological

  14. Enhanced iron and zinc accumulation in genetically engineered pineapple plants using soybean ferritin gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mhatre, Minal; Srinivas, Lingam; Ganapathi, Thumballi R

    2011-12-01

    Pineapple (Ananas comosus L. Merr., cv. "Queen") leaf bases were transformed with Agrobacterium tumefaciens strain EHA 105 harboring the pSF and pEFESF plasmids with soybean ferritin cDNA. Four to eight percent of the co-cultivated leaf bases produced multiple shoots 6 weeks after transfer to Murashige and Skoog's medium supplemented with α-naphthalene acetic acid 1.8 mg/l, indole-3-butyric acid 2.0 mg/l, kinetin 2.0 mg/l, cefotaxime 400 mg/l, and kanamycin 50 mg/l. Putatively transformed shoots (1-2 cm) were selected and multiplied on medium of the same composition and elongated shoots (5 cm) were rooted on liquid rooting medium supplemented with cefotaxime 400 mg/l and kanamycin 100 mg/l. The rooted plants were analyzed through PCR, genomic Southern analysis, and reverse transcription PCR. The results clearly confirmed the integration and expression of soybean ferritin gene in the transformed plants. Atomic absorption spectroscopic analysis carried out with six independently transformed lines of pSF and pEFE-SF revealed a maximum of 5.03-fold increase in iron and 2.44-fold increase in zinc accumulation in the leaves of pSF-transformed plants. In pEFE-SF-transformed plants, a 3.65-fold increase in iron and 2.05-fold increase in zinc levels was observed. Few of the transgenic plants were hardened in the greenhouse and are being grown to maturity to determine the enhanced iron and zinc accumulation in the fruits. To the best of our knowledge this is the first report on the transformation of pineapple with soybean ferritin for enhanced accumulation of iron and zinc content in the transgenic plants.

  15. Clinical significance of determination of changes of serum ferritin, MMP-2 and MMP-9 levels and after transfusion of red blood cells in patients with chronic nephritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuan Haitao; Li Xinhua; He Haoming

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To explore the changes of serum Ferritin, MMP-2 and MMP-9 contents after transfusion of red blood cells in patients with chronic nephritis. Methods: Serum Ferritin (with RIA) and serum MMP-2, MMP-9 (with ELISA) levels were measured in 32 patients with chronic nephritis both before and after a course of transfusion of red blood cells and 35 controls. Results: Before transfusion, the serum Ferritin, MMP-9 levels in the patients were significantly lower than those in controls (P 0.05). Conclusion: Determination of serum Ferritin, MMP-2 and MMP-9 levels is clinically useful for management of patients with chronic nephritis. (authors)

  16. Clinical Significance of Serum Ferritin at Diagnosis in Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia: A YACHT Multicenter Retrospective Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tachibana, Takayoshi; Andou, Taiki; Tanaka, Masatsugu; Ito, Satomi; Miyazaki, Takuya; Ishii, Yoshimi; Ogusa, Eriko; Koharazawa, Hideyuki; Takahashi, Hiroyuki; Motohashi, Kenji; Aoki, Jun; Nakajima, Yuki; Matsumoto, Kenji; Hagihara, Maki; Hashimoto, Chizuko; Taguchi, Jun; Fujimaki, Katsumichi; Fujita, Hiroyuki; Fujisawa, Shin; Kanamori, Heiwa; Nakajima, Hideaki

    2018-06-01

    A multicenter retrospective analysis was performed to evaluate the clinical significance of serum ferritin at diagnosis in patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML). The study cohort included 305 patients who were newly diagnosed with AML from 2000 to 2015 and received standard induction chemotherapy. Transplantation was performed in 168 patients. The median ferritin value was 512 ng/mL (range, 8-9475 ng/mL). Ferritin correlated with lactate dehydrogenase, C-reactive protein, white blood cell count, and blast count, and elevation of ferritin was associated with poor performance status. The median follow-up period was 58 months (range, 4-187 months) among survivors. The high ferritin group (≥ 400 ng/mL) demonstrated inferior event-free survival (EFS) at the 5-year interval (30% vs. 40%; P = .033) compared to the low ferritin group. Multivariate analysis in the high-risk karyotype revealed that high ferritin levels predicted worse EFS (hazard ratio = 2.07; 95% confidence interval, 1.28-3.33; P = .003). Elevated ferritin at diagnosis may indicate tumor burden in patients with AML and predict worse EFS in the high-risk group. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. First comparative characterization of three distinct ferritin subunits from a teleost: Evidence for immune-responsive mRNA expression and iron depriving activity of seahorse (Hippocampus abdominalis) ferritins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Minyoung; Umasuthan, Navaneethaiyer; Elvitigala, Don Anushka Sandaruwan; Wan, Qiang; Jo, Eunyoung; Ko, Jiyeon; Noh, Gyeong Eon; Shin, Sangok; Rho, Sum; Lee, Jehee

    2016-02-01

    Ferritins play an indispensable role in iron homeostasis through their iron-withholding function in living beings. In the current study, cDNA sequences of three distinct ferritin subunits, including a ferritin H, a ferritin M, and a ferritin L, were identified from big belly seahorse, Hippocampus abdominalis, and molecularly characterized. Complete coding sequences (CDS) of seahorse ferritin H (HaFerH), ferritin M (HaFerM), and ferritin L (HaFerL) subunits were comprised of 531, 528, and 522 base pairs (bp), respectively, which encode polypeptides of 177, 176, and 174 amino acids, respectively, with molecular masses of ∼20-21 kDa. Our in silico analyses demonstrate that these three ferritin subunits exhibit the typical characteristics of ferritin superfamily members including iron regulatory elements, domain signatures, and reactive centers. The coding sequences of HaFerH, M, and L were cloned and the corresponding proteins were overexpressed in a bacterial system. Recombinantly expressed HaFer proteins demonstrated detectable in vivo iron sequestrating (ferroxidase) activity, consistent with their putative iron binding capability. Quantification of the basal expression of these three HaFer sequences in selected tissues demonstrated a gene-specific ubiquitous spatial distribution pattern, with abundance of mRNA in HaFerM in the liver and predominant expression of HaFerH and HaFerL in blood. Interestingly, the basal expression of all three ferritin genes was found to be significantly modulated against pathogenic stress mounted by lipopolysaccharides (LPS), poly I:C, Streptococcus iniae, and Edwardsiella tarda. Collectively, our findings suggest that the three HaFer subunits may be involved in iron (II) homeostasis in big belly seahorse and that they are important in its host defense mechanisms. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Reference values for serum ferritin and percentage of transferrin saturation in Korean children and adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Hea Lin; Lee, Jun Ah; Kim, Dong Ho; Lim, Jung Sub

    2018-03-01

    Ferritin reference values vary by age, gender, and ethnicity. We aimed to determine reference values of serum ferritin (SF) and the percentage of transferrin saturation (TSAT) for Korean children and adolescents. We analyzed data from 2,487 participants (1,311 males and 1,176 females) aged 10-20 years from the Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (2010-2012). We calculated age- and gender-stratified means and percentile values for SF and TSAT. We first plotted mean SF and TSAT by gender and according to age. In males, mean SF tended to be relatively constant among participants aged 10 to 14 years, with an upward trend thereafter. Mean SF trended downward among female participants until the age of 15 years and remained constant thereafter. Thus, significant gender differences in ferritin exist from the age of 14 years. High levels of SF were associated with obesity, and lower SF levels were associated with anemia and menarche status. We established reference values of SF and TSAT according to age and gender. The reference values for SF calculated in this study can be used to test the association between SF values and other defined diseases in Korean children and adolescents.

  19. Production of antisera and development of radioimmunoassay for serum T3, T4, and ferritin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elhag, Omer Mohamed Abdalla

    1998-05-01

    In this study twelve local rabbits and sixteen New-zealand rabbits were subjected to immunization against T3 and T4 immunogens. Two local sheep (ovis aris) were immunized against human liver ferritin. The T3 and T4 immunogens were prepared by conjugation of the haptens to carrier proteins (bovine serum albumin ''BSA'' and horse serum protein ''HSP''), using water soluble carboiimide as coupling agent. The local and New-zealand rabbits were immunized against these conjugates emulsified in freund's complete adjuvant (FCA) in the first and second injections, and emulsified in freund's incomplete adjuvant (FIA) in the following injections. The blood samples obtained from rabbits after each injection were tested for antibodies as well as for the effect of immunization on rabbits biochemical and haematological parameters. The blood samples obtained from sheep were tested for anti-ferritin antibodies using crude antiserum, then this antiserum was purified using ammonium sulphate. A part of it was adsorbed physically onto polystyrene beads while the other part was linked chemically to magnitisable particles inorder to develop to IRMAs. The purified antiferritin antibody was diluted 200,000 folds before being coated to polystyrene beads, and different dilutions were tried with coupling to magnetic solid phase. Optimization and validation procedures for the two IRMAs ferritin were performed. The results obtained showed poor response of rabbits to immunization against T3 and T4 immunogen conjugates, where the percent bound (B%) of tracer with the antibody ranged from (0.0-22%) for local rabbits using charcoal seperation technique, and (0.0-2.9%) using second antibody precipitation technique. The B% for the antiserum obtained from New-zealand rabbits ranged from (0.0-18.1) using second antibody precipitation technique. Serum T3, T4 and TSH of the immunized rabbits were measured and found to be not significantly different form the controls (p=0.2211, 0.098, 0.35 respectively

  20. Production of antisera and development of radioimmunoassay for serum T3, T4, and ferritin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elhag, Omer Mohamed Abdalla [Department of Biochemistry, Faculty of Veterinary Science, University of Khartoum, Khartoum (Sudan)

    1998-05-01

    In this study twelve local rabbits and sixteen New-zealand rabbits were subjected to immunization against T3 and T4 immunogens. Two local sheep (ovis aris) were immunized against human liver ferritin. The T3 and T4 immunogens were prepared by conjugation of the haptens to carrier proteins (bovine serum albumin ``BSA`` and horse serum protein ``HSP``), using water soluble carboiimide as coupling agent. The local and New-zealand rabbits were immunized against these conjugates emulsified in freund`s complete adjuvant (FCA) in the first and second injections, and emulsified in freund`s incomplete adjuvant (FIA) in the following injections. The blood samples obtained from rabbits after each injection were tested for antibodies as well as for the effect of immunization on rabbits biochemical and haematological parameters. The blood samples obtained from sheep were tested for anti-ferritin antibodies using crude antiserum, then this antiserum was purified using ammonium sulphate. A part of it was adsorbed physically onto polystyrene beads while the other part was linked chemically to magnitisable particles inorder to develop to IRMAs. The purified antiferritin antibody was diluted 200,000 folds before being coated to polystyrene beads, and different dilutions were tried with coupling to magnetic solid phase. Optimization and validation procedures for the two IRMAs ferritin were performed. The results obtained showed poor response of rabbits to immunization against T3 and T4 immunogen conjugates, where the percent bound (B%) of tracer with the antibody ranged from (0.0-22%) for local rabbits using charcoal seperation technique, and (0.0-2.9%) using second antibody precipitation technique. The B% for the antiserum obtained from New-zealand rabbits ranged from (0.0-18.1) using second antibody precipitation technique. Serum T3, T4 and TSH of the immunized rabbits were measured and found to be not significantly different form the controls (p=0.2211, 0.098, 0.35 respectively

  1. Serum ferritin concentration in early pregnancy and risk of subsequent development of gestational diabetes: A prospective study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sedigheh Soheilykhah

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Elevated serum ferritin concentration is associated with insulin resistance and diabetes. Recently it has also been described in gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM. Objective: A prospective study was done to determine whether there was a relationship between serum ferritin concentration in early pregnancy and the risk of GDM. Materials and Methods: A study was performed on 1,384 pregnant women with gestational age of 12-16 weeks. A blood sample was obtained for measurement of ferritin in the first trimester. Diagnosis of GDM was done by 75 gr oral glucose tolerance test between 24-28 wk. Results: Women who developed GDM had a higher concentration of serum ferritin than women who did not develop GDM (p=0.01. A ferritin concentration of 45 ng/ml was calculated to be the 75th percentile for healthy pregnant women. Considering this level 32% in the GDM group and 25.2%of normal subjects exhibited high ferritin levels (p=0.01. The risk of GDM with these high levels of ferritin was 1.4-fold higher than that for subjects with lower concentrations. The Odds Ratio was 1.4 (95% CI= 1-1.87 (p=0.01. After adjusted for age Odds Ratio was 1.38 (95% CI=1.02-1.86 (p=0.03 and after adjustment for pre-pregnancy Body Mass index, the adjusted odds ratio was 1.31 (CI= 0.96-1.79 (p=0.08. After multivariable adjustment (age and body mass index, the adjusted odds ratio was 1.3 (0.95-1.8 (p=0.09. Conclusion: High serum ferritin can be regarded as a significant risk factor for the development of gestational diabetes.

  2. Increased serum ferritin levels in patients with Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever: can it be a new severity criterion?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barut, Sener; Dincer, Fatma; Sahin, Idris; Ozyurt, Huseyin; Akkus, Mehmet; Erkorkmaz, Unal

    2010-01-01

    Serum ferritin is one of the markers indicating hemophagocytosis that may have a role in the pathogenesis of Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever (CCHF). This study was designed to determine any correlation between serum ferritin and routine diagnostic laboratory markers of CCHF, and to investigate the relationship between serum ferritin levels and disease severity. Sixty-six patients with CCHF admitted to the hospital during the spring and summer months of 2006 and 2007 were included in the study. Serum ferritin levels were measured in sera obtained during the initial days of hospitalization. Data from 53 patients showing decreasing platelet counts over the first three days were used for further analysis and these patients were divided into two groups according to disease severity: group A included severe cases with lowest platelet counts 20x10(9)/l. Forty patients (60.6%) were male (mean age 43+/-17 years). Three patients died, thus the fatality rate was 4.5%. Fifty-one patients (77.3%) had abnormal serum ferritin levels, with levels above 500 ng/ml in 62.1%. There was a significant negative correlation between ferritin levels and concordant platelet counts (p or =1862ng/ml had a sensitivity of 87.5% and a specificity of 83.8% in differentiating severe cases from mild ones. Increased serum ferritin levels may suggest a significant role of hemophagocytosis in the pathogenesis of CCHF and may be a useful marker for diagnosis, disease activity, and prognosis. Copyright 2009 International Society for Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Relationship between myocardial T2* values and cardiac volumetric and functional parameters in β-thalassemia patients evaluated by cardiac magnetic resonance in association with serum ferritin levels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liguori, Carlo, E-mail: c.liguori@unicampus.it [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Campus Bio Medico University, via Alvaro del Portillo 200, 00128 Rome (Italy); Pitocco, Francesca, E-mail: f.pitocco@unicampus.it [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Campus Bio Medico University, via Alvaro del Portillo 200, 00128 Rome (Italy); Di Giampietro, Ilenia, E-mail: i.digiampietro@unicampus.it [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Campus Bio Medico University, via Alvaro del Portillo 200, 00128 Rome (Italy); Vivo, Aldo Eros de, E-mail: devivoeros@gmail.com [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Campus Bio Medico University, via Alvaro del Portillo 200, 00128 Rome (Italy); Schena, Emiliano, E-mail: e.schena@unicampus.it [Unit of Measurements and Biomedical Instrumentation, Campus Bio Medico University, via Alvaro del Portillo 200, 00128 Rome (Italy); Cianciulli, Paolo, E-mail: CIANCIULLI.PAOLO@aslrmc.it [Thalassemia Unit, Ospedale Sant Eugenio, Piazzale dell’Umanesimo 10, 00143 Rome (Italy); Zobel, Bruno Beomonte, E-mail: b.zobel@unicampus.it [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Campus Bio Medico University, via Alvaro del Portillo 200, 00128 Rome (Italy)

    2013-09-15

    Purpose: Myocardial T2* cardiovascular magnetic resonance provides a rapid and reproducible assessment of cardiac iron load in thalassemia patients. Although cardiac involvement is mainly characterized by left ventricular dysfunction caused by iron overload, little is known about right ventricular function. The aim of this study was to assess the relationship between T2* value in myocardium and left–right ventricular volumetric and functional parameters and to evaluate the existing associations between left–right ventricles volumetric and functional parameter, myocardial T2* values and blood ferritin levels. Materials and methods: A retrospective analysis of 208 patients with β-thalassemia major and thalassemia intermedia was performed (109 males and 99 females; mean age 37.7 ± 13 years; 143 thalassemia major, 65 thalassemia intermedia). Myocardial iron load was assessed by T2* measurements, and volumetric functions were analyzed using the steady state free precession sequence. Results: A significant correlation was observed between EFLV and T2* (p = 0.0001), EFRV and T2* (p = 0.0279). An inverse correlation was present between DVLV and T2* (p = 0.0468), SVLV and T2* (p = 0.0003), SVRV and T2* (p = 0.0001). There was no significant correlation between cardiac T2* and LV–RV mass indices. A significant correlation was observed between T2* and serum ferritin levels (p < 0.001) and between EFLV and serum ferritin (p < 0.05). Conclusion: Myocardial iron load assessed by T2* cardiac magnetic resonance is associated with deterioration in left–right ventricular function; this is more evident when T2* values fall below 14 ms. CMR appears to be a promising approach for cardiac risk evaluation in TM patients.

  4. Relationship between myocardial T2* values and cardiac volumetric and functional parameters in β-thalassemia patients evaluated by cardiac magnetic resonance in association with serum ferritin levels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liguori, Carlo; Pitocco, Francesca; Di Giampietro, Ilenia; Vivo, Aldo Eros de; Schena, Emiliano; Cianciulli, Paolo; Zobel, Bruno Beomonte

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Myocardial T2* cardiovascular magnetic resonance provides a rapid and reproducible assessment of cardiac iron load in thalassemia patients. Although cardiac involvement is mainly characterized by left ventricular dysfunction caused by iron overload, little is known about right ventricular function. The aim of this study was to assess the relationship between T2* value in myocardium and left–right ventricular volumetric and functional parameters and to evaluate the existing associations between left–right ventricles volumetric and functional parameter, myocardial T2* values and blood ferritin levels. Materials and methods: A retrospective analysis of 208 patients with β-thalassemia major and thalassemia intermedia was performed (109 males and 99 females; mean age 37.7 ± 13 years; 143 thalassemia major, 65 thalassemia intermedia). Myocardial iron load was assessed by T2* measurements, and volumetric functions were analyzed using the steady state free precession sequence. Results: A significant correlation was observed between EFLV and T2* (p = 0.0001), EFRV and T2* (p = 0.0279). An inverse correlation was present between DVLV and T2* (p = 0.0468), SVLV and T2* (p = 0.0003), SVRV and T2* (p = 0.0001). There was no significant correlation between cardiac T2* and LV–RV mass indices. A significant correlation was observed between T2* and serum ferritin levels (p < 0.001) and between EFLV and serum ferritin (p < 0.05). Conclusion: Myocardial iron load assessed by T2* cardiac magnetic resonance is associated with deterioration in left–right ventricular function; this is more evident when T2* values fall below 14 ms. CMR appears to be a promising approach for cardiac risk evaluation in TM patients

  5. HFE Cys282Tyr homozygotes with serum ferritin concentrations below 1000 microg/L are at low risk of hemochromatosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Katrina J; Bertalli, Nadine A; Osborne, Nicholas J; Constantine, Clare C; Delatycki, Martin B; Nisselle, Amy E; Nicoll, Amanda J; Gertig, Dorota M; McLaren, Christine E; Giles, Graham G; Hopper, John L; Anderson, Gregory J; Olynyk, John K; Powell, Lawrie W; Gurrin, Lyle C

    2010-09-01

    Hemochromatosis gene (HFE)-associated hereditary hemochromatosis (HH) is a genetic predisposition to iron overload and subsequent signs and symptoms of disease that potentially affects approximately 80,000 persons in Australia and almost 1 million persons in the United States. Most clinical cases are homozygous for the Cys282Tyr (C282Y) mutation in the HFE gene, with serum ferritin (SF) concentration >1000 microg/L as the strongest predictor of cirrhosis. The optimal treatment regimen for those with SF concentrations above the normal range but aged 40-69 years. An HFE-stratified random sample of 1438 participants including all C282Y homozygotes with iron studies 12 years apart were examined by physicians blinded to participants' HFE genotype. All previously undiagnosed C282Y homozygotes (35 male, 67 female) and all HFE wild-types (131 male, 160 female) with baseline and follow-up SF concentrations age when disease would be expected to have developed. These observations have implications for the management of C282Y homozygotes.

  6. Ferritin levels, inflammatory biomarkers, and mortality in peripheral arterial disease: a substudy of the Iron (Fe) and Atherosclerosis Study (FeAST) Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Depalma, Ralph G; Hayes, Virginia W; Chow, Bruce K; Shamayeva, Galina; May, Patricia E; Zacharski, Leo R

    2010-06-01

    This study delineated correlations between ferritin, inflammatory biomarkers, and mortality in a cohort of 100 cancer-free patients with peripheral arterial disease (PAD) participating in the Veterans Affairs (VA) Cooperative Study #410, the Iron (Fe) and Atherosclerosis Study (FeAST). FeAST, a prospective, randomized, single-blind clinical trial, tested the hypothesis that reduction of iron stores using phlebotomy would influence clinical outcomes in 1227 PAD patients randomized to iron reduction or control groups. The effects of statin administration were also examined in the Sierra Nevada Health Care (SNHC) cohort by measuring serum ferritin levels at entry and during the 6-year study period. No difference was documented between treatment groups in all-cause mortality and secondary outcomes of death plus nonfatal myocardial infarction and stroke. Iron reduction in the main study caused a significant age-related improvement in cardiovascular disease outcomes, new cancer diagnoses, and cancer-specific death. Tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha, TNF-alpha receptors 1 and 2, interleukin (IL)-2, IL-6, IL-10, and high-sensitivity C reactive protein (hs-CRP) were measured at entry and at 6-month intervals for 6 years. Average levels of ferritin and lipids at entry and at the end of the study were compared. The clinical course and ferritin levels of 23 participants who died during the study were reviewed. At entry, mean age of entry was 67 +/- 9 years for the SNHCS cohort, comparable to FeAST and clinical and laboratory parameters were equivalent in substudy participants randomized to iron reduction (n = 51) or control (n = 49). At baseline, 53 participants on statins had slightly lower mean entry-level ferritin values (114.06 ng/mL; 95% confidence interval [CI] 93.43-134.69) vs the 47 off statins (127.62 ng/mL; 95% CI, 103.21-152.02). Longitudinal analysis of follow-up data, after adjusting for the phlebotomy treatment effect, showed that statin use was associated with

  7. Analysis of iron storage proteins in chicken liver and spleen tissues in comparison with human liver ferritin by Moessbauer spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oshtrakh, M.I.; Milder, O.B.; Semionkin, V.A.; Malakheeva, L.I.; Prokopenko, P.G.

    2006-01-01

    Characterization of iron storage proteins in liver and spleen from normal chicken and chicken with lymphoid leukemia in comparison with human liver ferritin were considered by Moessbauer spectroscopy (preliminary results). Small differences in Moessbauer hyperfine parameters for both normal and lymphoid leukemia chicken liver and spleen were observed. The value of quadrupole splitting for human liver ferritin was higher than those for chicken tissues. A decrease of iron content in lymphoid leukemia chicken tissues was also found, however, the reason of this fact (pathology or feeding) was not clear yet. (author)

  8. Antioxidant capacity of parsley cells (Petroselinum crispum L.) in relation to iron-induced ferritin levels and static magnetic field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajabbeigi, Elham; Ghanati, Faezeh; Abdolmaleki, Parviz; Payez, Atefeh

    2013-12-01

    This study was aimed to evaluate antioxidant response of parsley cells to 21 ppm iron and static magnetic field (SMF; 30 mT). The activity of catalase (CAT) and ascorbate peroxidase (APX) and the contents of malonyldialdehyde, iron and ferritin were measured at 6 and 12 h after treatments. Exposure to SMF increased the activity of CAT in treated cells, while combination of iron and SMF treatments as well as iron supply alone decreased CAT activity, compared to that of control cells. Combination of SMF with iron treatment reduced iron content of the cells and ameliorated mal effect of iron on CAT activity. All treatments reduced APX activity; however, the content of total ascorbate increased in response to iron and SMF+iron. The results showed that among the components of antioxidant system of parsley cells, enhanced activity of CAT in SMF-treated cells and increase of ascorbate in SMF+Fe-treated ones were responsible for the maintenance of membranes integrity. Ferritin contents of SMF- and SMF+Fe-treated cells also decreased significantly 12 h after treatments, compared to those of the control cells. These results cast doubt on the proposed functions of ferritin as a putative reactive oxygen species detoxifying molecule.

  9. Study of the rhizobacterium Azospirillum brasilense Sp245 using Mössbauer spectroscopy with a high velocity resolution: Implication for the analysis of ferritin-like iron cores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alenkina, I. V.; Oshtrakh, M. I.; Tugarova, A. V.; Biró, B.; Semionkin, V. A.; Kamnev, A. A.

    2014-09-01

    The results of a comparative study of two samples of the rhizobacterium Azospirillum brasilense (strain Sp245) prepared in different conditions and of human liver ferritin using Mössbauer spectroscopy with a high velocity resolution demonstrated the presence of ferritin-like iron (i.e. iron similar to that found in ferritin-like proteins) in the bacterium. Mössbauer spectra of these samples were fitted in two ways: as a rough approximation using a one quadrupole doublet fit (the homogeneous iron core model) and using a superposition of quadrupole doublets (the heterogeneous iron core model). Both results demonstrated differences in the Mössbauer parameters for mammalian ferritin and for bacterial ferritin-like iron. Moreover, some differences in the Mössbauer parameters were observed between the two samples of A. brasilense Sp245 related to the differences in their preparation conditions.

  10. Abnormal iron metabolism and oxidative stress in mice expressing a mutant form of the ferritin light polypeptide gene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbeito, Ana G.; Garringer, Holly J.; Baraibar, Martin A.; Gao, Xiaoying; Arredondo, Miguel; Núñez, Marco T.; Smith, Mark A.; Ghetti, Bernardino; Vidal, Ruben

    2009-01-01

    Insertional mutations in exon 4 of the ferritin light chain (FTL) gene are associated with hereditary ferritinopathy (HF) or neuroferritinopathy, an autosomal dominant neurodegenerative disease characterized by progressive impairment of motor and cognitive functions. To determine the pathogenic mechanisms by which mutations in FTL lead to neurodegeneration, we investigated iron metabolism and markers of oxidative stress in the brain of transgenic (Tg) mice that express the mutant human FTL498-499InsTC cDNA. Compared with wild-type mice, brain extracts from Tg (FTL-Tg) mice showed an increase in the cytoplasmic levels of both FTL and ferritin heavy chain polypeptides, a decrease in the protein and mRNA levels of transferrin receptor-1, and a significant increase in iron levels. Transgenic mice also showed the presence of markers for lipid peroxidation, protein carbonyls, and nitrone–protein adducts in the brain. However, gene expression analysis of iron management proteins in the liver of Tg mice indicates that the FTL-Tg mouse liver is iron deficient. Our data suggest that disruption of iron metabolism in the brain has a primary role in the process of neurodegeneration in HF and that the pathogenesis of HF is likely to result from a combination of reduction in iron storage function and enhanced toxicity associated with iron-induced ferritin aggregates in the brain. PMID:19519778

  11. Dopamine mediated iron release from ferritin is enhanced at higher temperatures: Possible implications for fever-induced Parkinson's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Babincova, Melania; Babinec, Peter

    2005-01-01

    A new molecular mechanism is proposed to explain the pathogenesis of fever-induced Parkinson's disease. This proposal is based on dopamine and 6-hydroxydopamine-mediated free iron release from ferritin magnetic nanoparticles, which is enhanced at higher temperatures, and which may lead to substantial peroxidation and injury of lipid biomembranes of the substantia nigra in the brain

  12. Changes in serum iron, total iron binding capacity and transferrin ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Iron is a vital constituent of cells but in excess may be harmful and is associated with a raised risk for some malignant diseases including breast cancer. We aimed to study changes in iron profile in Sudanese females newly diagnosed with breast cancer. Methods: A case- control study in which serum iron, Total ...

  13. Immunocytochemical analysis of the subcellular distribution of ferritin in Imperata cylindrica (L.) Raeuschel, an iron hyperaccumulator plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Fuente, Vicenta; Rodríguez, Nuria; Amils, Ricardo

    2012-05-01

    Ferritin is of interest at the structural and functional level not only as storage for iron, a critical element, but also as a means to prevent cell damage produced by oxidative stress. The main objective of this work was to confirm by immunocytochemistry the presence and the subcellular distribution of the ferritin detected by Mösbauer spectroscopy in Imperata cylindrica, a plant which accumulates large amounts of iron. The localization of ferritin was performed in epidermal, parenchymal and vascular tissues of shoots and leaves of I. cylindrica. The highest density of immunolabeling in shoots appeared in the intracellular space of cell tissues, near the cell walls and in the cytoplasm. In leaves, ferritin was detected in the proximity of the dense network of the middle lamella of cell walls, following a similar path to that observed in shoots. Immunolabeling was also localized in chloroplasts. The abundance of immunogold labelling in mitochondria for I. cylindrica was rather low, probably because the study dealt with tissues from old plants. These results further expand the localization of ferritin in cell components other than chloroplasts and mitochondria in plants. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  14. Relationship of Baseline Hemoglobin Level with Serum Ferritin, Postphlebotomy Hemoglobin Changes, and Phlebotomy Requirements among HFE C282Y Homozygotes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed Ali Mousavi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. We aimed to examine whether baseline hemoglobin levels in C282Y-homozygous patients are related to the degree of serum ferritin (SF elevation and whether patients with different baseline hemoglobin have different phlebotomy requirements. Methods. A total of 196 patients (124 males and 72 females who had undergone therapeutic phlebotomy and had SF and both pre- and posttreatment hemoglobin values were included in the study. Results. Bivariate correlation analysis suggested that baseline SF explains approximately 6 to 7% of the variation in baseline hemoglobin. The results also showed that males who had higher (≥150 g/L baseline hemoglobin levels had a significantly greater reduction in their posttreatment hemoglobin despite requiring fewer phlebotomies to achieve iron depletion than those who had lower (<150 g/L baseline hemoglobin, regardless of whether baseline SF was below or above 1000 µg/L. There were no significant differences between hemoglobin subgroups regarding baseline and treatment characteristics, except for transferrin saturation between male subgroups with SF above 1000 µg/L. Similar differences were observed when females with higher (≥138 g/L baseline hemoglobin were compared with those with lower (<138 g/L baseline hemoglobin. Conclusion. Dividing C282Y-homozygous patients into just two subgroups according to the degree of baseline SF elevation may obscure important subgroup variations.

  15. Effect of Average Annual Mean Serum Ferritin Levels on QTc Interval and QTc Dispersion in Beta-Thalassemia Major

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yazdan Ghandi

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Background There is evidence indicating impaired cardiomyocytic contractility, delayed electrical conduction and increased electrophysiological heterogeneities due to iron toxicity in beta-thalassemia major patients. In the present study, we compared the electrocardiographic and echocardiographic features of beta-thalassemia major patients with a healthy control group. Materials and Methods The average annual serum ferritin levels of fifty beta-thalassemia major patients were assessed. For each patient, corrected QT (QTc intervals and QTc dispersions (QTcd were calculated and V1S and V5R were measured. All subjects underwent two-dimensional M-mode echocardiography and Doppler study and were compared with 50 healthy subjects as a control group. Results QTc interval and dispersion were significantly higher in beta-thalassemia major patients (P= 0.001. The mean V5R (20.04 ± 4.34 vs. 17.14 ± 2.55 mm and V1S (10.24 ± 2.62 vs. 7.83 ± 0.38 mm showed considerably higher mean values in patients in comparison with control group.Peak mitral inflow velocity at early diastole and early to late ratio in the case- group was markedly higher(P

  16. Relationship of Baseline Hemoglobin Level with Serum Ferritin, Postphlebotomy Hemoglobin Changes, and Phlebotomy Requirements among HFE C282Y Homozygotes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mousavi, Seyed Ali; Mahmood, Faiza; Aandahl, Astrid; Knutsen, Teresa Risopatron; Llohn, Abid Hussain

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. We aimed to examine whether baseline hemoglobin levels in C282Y-homozygous patients are related to the degree of serum ferritin (SF) elevation and whether patients with different baseline hemoglobin have different phlebotomy requirements. Methods. A total of 196 patients (124 males and 72 females) who had undergone therapeutic phlebotomy and had SF and both pre- and posttreatment hemoglobin values were included in the study. Results. Bivariate correlation analysis suggested that baseline SF explains approximately 6 to 7% of the variation in baseline hemoglobin. The results also showed that males who had higher (≥150 g/L) baseline hemoglobin levels had a significantly greater reduction in their posttreatment hemoglobin despite requiring fewer phlebotomies to achieve iron depletion than those who had lower (baseline hemoglobin, regardless of whether baseline SF was below or above 1000 µg/L. There were no significant differences between hemoglobin subgroups regarding baseline and treatment characteristics, except for transferrin saturation between male subgroups with SF above 1000 µg/L. Similar differences were observed when females with higher (≥138 g/L) baseline hemoglobin were compared with those with lower (baseline hemoglobin. Conclusion. Dividing C282Y-homozygous patients into just two subgroups according to the degree of baseline SF elevation may obscure important subgroup variations. PMID:26380265

  17. Iron status of Filipino infants and preschoolers using plasma ferritin and transferrin receptor levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuizon, M D; Madriaga, J R; Desnacido, J A; Cheong, R L; Perlas, L A

    1996-06-01

    Iron status of 1,861 Filipino infants and preschoolers was evaluated by measurements of plasma ferritin (PF), transferrin receptor (TR) and hemoglobin (Hb). One group of subjects (Group I) consisted of all anemic subjects together with a systematic subsample from the Fourth National Nutrition Survey-Biochemical Phase. Results showed that depleted iron stores based on PF ( 8.5 mg/l) was present in higher proportion (80.0% and 73.7% for infants and preschoolers) which was comparable to the proportion of anemia (80.3%). In a subgroup of subjects from the Country Program for Children IV (Group 2) elevated TR was present in 61.4% of infants and 46.5% of preschoolers. A lower proportion of depleted iron stores of 22.7% in infants and 15.2% in preschoolers was observed. Correlation test showed that there was a closer relationship between Hb and TR (r = -0.42) than Hb and PF (r = 0.20) even if PF was expected to give a higher proportion of values below normal. The occurrence of anemia in the presence of elevated TR without any decrease in PF values suggest that the diagnostic ability of PF could be limited in the presence of infection. Therefore, future studies should include biochemical tests such as C-reactive proteins (CRP) to determine the extent of association between anemia and infection.

  18. Evaluation of the mobile phone electromagnetic radiation on serum iron parameters in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çetkin, Murat; Demirel, Can; Kızılkan, Neşe; Aksoy, Nur; Erbağcı, Hülya

    2017-03-01

    Electromagnetic fields (EMF) created by mobile phones during communication have harmful effects on different organs. It was aimed to investigate the effects of an EMF created by a mobile phone on serum iron level, ferritin, unsaturated iron binding capacity and total iron binding capacity within a rat experiment model. A total of 32 male Wistar albino rats were randomly divided into the control, sham, mobile phone speech (2h/day) and stand by (12 h/day) groups. The speech and stand by groups were subjected to the EMF for a total of 10 weeks. No statistically significant difference was observed between the serum iron and ferritin values of the rats in the speech and stand by groups than the control and sham groups (p>0.05). The unsaturated iron binding capacity and total iron capacity values of the rats in the speech and stand by groups were significantly lower in comparison to the control group (p<0.01). It was found that exposure to EMF created by mobile phones affected unsaturated iron binding capacity and total iron binding capacity negatively.

  19. Elevated serum ferritin concentration is associated with incident type 2 diabetes mellitus in a Chinese population: A prospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ling; Li, Yufeng; Zhang, Fang; Zhang, Simin; Zhou, Xianghai; Ji, Linong

    2018-03-08

    We aimed to evaluate the association between serum ferritin levels and incident type 2 diabetes mellitus risk in a Chinese population. This cohort study assessed 2225 Chinese individuals aged 25-75 years. Diabetes mellitus was diagnosed using the 1999 World Health Organization definition with a median follow-up period of 20 months. Cox proportional hazard models were used to estimate adjusted hazard ratios and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for incident diabetes when serum ferritin concentrations increased by one standard deviation. During the follow-up period, 112 cases (62 men and 50 women) of type 2 diabetes mellitus were identified. Baseline serum ferritin levels were higher in the diabetes than the non-diabetes group. After adjusting for age, body mass index, waist circumference, mean arterial pressure, fasting plasma glucose, fasting insulin, hemoglobin A1c, total cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, alanine transaminase and triglyceride levels, family history of diabetes mellitus, pork meat consumption, neutrophil/lymphocyte ratio, education, and annual household income, the hazard ratios for incident diabetes corresponding to one standard deviation increase in serum ferritin levels were 1.17 (95% CI 1.03, 1.34), 1.20 (95% CI 1.003, 1.43), and 1.03 (95% CI 0.82, 1.31) for the total population, men, and women, respectively. High serum ferritin levels were associated with a higher risk of incident type 2 diabetes mellitus independent of traditional risk factors in the total population and men. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Role of Serum Uric Acid and Ferritin in the Development and Progression of NAFLD

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    Rosa Lombardi

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD, tightly linked to the metabolic syndrome (MS, has emerged as a leading cause of chronic liver disease worldwide. Since it is potentially progressive towards non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH and hepatic fibrosis, up to cirrhosis and its associated complications, the need for predictive factors of NAFLD and of its advanced forms is mandatory. Despite the current “gold standard” for the assessment of liver damage in NAFLD being liver biopsy, in recent years, several non-invasive tools have been designed as alternatives to histology, of which fibroscan seems the most promising. Among the different serum markers considered, serum uric acid (SUA and ferritin have emerged as possible predictors of severity of liver damage in NAFLD. In fact, as widely described in this review, they share common pathogenetic pathways and are both associated with hepatic steatosis and MS, thus suggesting a likely synergistic action. Nevertheless, the power of these serum markers seems to be too low if considered alone, suggesting that they should be included in a wider perspective together with other metabolic and biochemical parameters in order to predict liver damage.

  1. Adult Kawasaki's disease with myocarditis, splenomegaly, and highly elevated serum ferritin levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunha, Burke A; Pherez, Francisco M; Alexiadis, Varvara; Gagos, Marios; Strollo, Stephanie

    2010-01-01

    erythema. We present a case of adult Kawasaki's disease with myocarditis and splenomegaly. The patient's myocarditis rapidly resolved, and he did not develop coronary artery aneurysms. In addition to splenomegaly, this case of adult Kawasaki's disease is remarkable because the patient had highly elevated serum ferritin levels of 944-1303 ng/mL; (normalfever for> or =5 days with conjunctival suffusion, cervical adenopathy, swelling of the dorsum of the hands/feet, thrombocytosis and otherwise unexplained highly elevated ferritin levels. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Effects of exercise on the markers of iron status in serum of cross-country skiers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Malczewska-Lenczowska

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The study aim was to assess the within-subject, day-to-day variability for ferritin and soluble transferrin receptor (sTfR concentrations in serum of 6 female and 8 male cross-country skiers aged 16-18 years under a regular training regimen throughout 8 consecutive days. The concentrations of iron status variables and creatine kinase (CK activities were adjusted to plasma volume changes. Mean ferritin concentrations were 30.6 • 1.142[sup]±1[/sup] and 22.6 • 1.167[sup]±1[/sup] μg/l for men and women, respectively, the average within-subject, mean day-to-day variability coefficients (CV being 13.4% in men and 15.2% in women. Mean sTfR was 2.14 • 1.050[sup]±1[/sup] and 2.62 • 1.047[sup]±1[/sup] mg/l, respectively, and mean day-to-day CV 6.5% and 4.6%. Mean CV for sTfR/logFerr were 6.0% and 7.4%, respectively. Neither index correlated with training loads or CK activities. Thus, the training performed once daily had no significant effect on ferritin concentrations on the following morning, so ferritin alone may prove insufficient in detecting iron deficiency in endurance athletes. The low variability of sTfR under endurance loads made it useful in detecting iron deficiency together with ferritin and the sTfR/logFerr index. Adjusting the concentrations of ferritin and sTfR by changes in plasma volume might be recommendable for endurance athletes.

  3. Gender differences in associations of serum ferritin and diabetes, metabolic syndrome, and obesity in the China Health and Nutrition Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Ling-ling; Wang, Yu-xia; Li, Jia; Zhang, Xiao-lei; Bian, Che; Wang, He; Du, Shufa; Suo, Lin-na

    2014-11-01

    This study examines gender differences in associations of serum ferritin and diabetes, metabolic syndrome (MetS), and obesity in Chinese. Based on a nationwide, population-based China Health and Nutrition survey this study included 8564 men and women aged 18 years or older. Anthropometric and fasting blood glucose, insulin, lipids, ferritin, and transferrin data were collected. Ferritin concentrations were higher in men than women (201.55 ± 3.6 versus 80.46 ± 1.64 ng/mL, p obesity, and overweight were 8.05, 8.97, 4.67, 25.88% among men and 14.23, 6.58, 5.81, 26.82% among women, respectively. Elevated ferritin concentrations were associated with higher body mass index, waist circumference, lipids, insulin, glucose (all p obesity (p = 0.010), overweight (p gender difference in associations between ferritin and MetS, obesity, and diabetes in Chinese adults. Further evaluations of the variation in gender on these associations are warranted to understand the mechanisms behind gender differences. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Blood mercury can be a factor of elevated serum ferritin: analysis of Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (KNHANES 2008-2012).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joo, Nam-Seok; Choi, Young-Hwa; Yeum, Kyung-Jin; Park, Soo-Jung; Choi, Beomhee; Kim, Young-Sang

    2015-03-01

    Serum ferritin as well as blood mercury are reported to be associated with chronic inflammation. However, the relation between serum ferritin and blood mercury has not yet been established. We utilized the Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (KNHANES, 2008-2012) 10,977 subjects (5433 males and 5544 females). To evaluate the association of serum ferritin and blood mercury cross-sectionally, complex sample analysis was conducted after adjustment for the relevant variables. Serum concentrations of ferritin and blood mercury were higher in males than in females (115.7 ± 1.7 vs. 40.9 ± 0.7 ng/mL and 5.0 ± 0.1 vs. 3.6 ± 0.1 μg/L, respectively). Serum ferritin and blood mercury concentrations had significant correlations in both genders after adjustment (r = 0.062, P mercury (P = 0.007) in males. The adjusted odds ratio of having the highest tertile of serum ferritin in the top tertile of blood mercury in males was 1.52 (95 % confidence interval (CI), 1.05-2.21). Thus, the current study indicates that blood mercury concentration can be a factor for the elevated serum ferritin concentration.

  5. Relation between serum lipoperoxide concentrations and iron or copper status over one year in Cuban adult men

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arnaud, J.; Renversez, J.C.; Favier, A.E. [Dept. de Biologie Integree, CHUG, Grenoble (France); Fleites, P.; Perez-Cristia, R. [Centro national de Toxicologia (CENATOX), La Habana (Cuba); Chassagne, M.; Barnouin, J. [INRA, Unite d' Ecopathologie, Saint Genes Champanelle (France); Verdura, T. [Inst. Finlay, La Lisa, La Habana (Cuba); Garcia, I.G. [Inst. de Farmacia y Alimentos, La Coronela, La Lisa, Ciudad de la Habana (Cuba); Tressol, J.C. [INRA, Unite maladies metaboliques et micronutriments, Saint Genes Champanelle (France)

    2001-07-01

    The aims of this study were to determine the relations between iron and copper status and lipid peroxidation at different periods over one year in low-income and low-energy intake healthy subjects. The study was conducted in 199 middle-aged healthy Cuban men from March 1995 to February 1996. Iron status was assessed by the determination of serum ferritin, transferrin saturation, whole blood hemoglobin and iron intakes. Copper status was evaluated by the determination of serum copper and copper intakes. Serum thiobarbituric acid substances (TBARS) determination was used as an index of lipid peroxidation. Rank correlations were observed between serum TBARS concentrations and iron or copper status indices at different periods. In period 3 (end of the rainy season), serum TBARS and ferritin concentrations were maximum whereas blood hemoglobin levels and iron intake were minimum. Serum TBARS concentrations were significantly higher than the reference values of the laboratory whereas, iron and copper status were within the reference ranges. These results suggested that iron and copper status may be associated with lipid peroxidation in subjects without metal overloads and that variations over the year needed to be taken in account. (orig.)

  6. Effect of HFE gene polymorphism on sustained virological response in patients with chronic hepatitis C and elevated serum ferritin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Coelho-Borges

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: Abnormal serum ferritin levels are found in approximately 20%-30% of the patients with chronic hepatitis C and are associated with a lower response rate to interferon therapy. OBJECTIVE: To determine if the presence of HFE gene mutations had any effect on the sustained virological response rate to interferon based therapy in chronic hepatitis C patients with elevated serum ferritin. METHODS: A total of 44 treatment naÏve patients with histologically demonstrated chronic hepatitis C, all infected with hepatitis C virus genotype non-1 (38 genotype 3; 6 genotype 2 and serum ferritin above 500 ng/mL were treated with interferon (3 MU, 3 times a week and ribavirin (1.000 mg, daily for 24 weeks. RESULTS: Sustained virological response was defined as negative qualitative HCV-RNA more than 24 weeks after the end of treatment. Serum HCV-RNA was measured by qualitative in house polymerase chain reaction with a limit of detection of 200 IU/mL. HFE gene mutation was detected using restriction-enzyme digestion with RsaI (C282Y mutation analysis and BclI (H63D mutation analysis in 16 (37% patients, all heterozygous (11 H63D, 2 C282Y and 3 both. Sustained virological response was achieved in 0 of 16 patients with HFE gene mutations and 11 (41% of 27 patients without HFE gene mutations (P = 0.002; exact Fisher test. CONCLUSION: Heterozigozity for H63D and/or C282Y HFE gene mutation predicts absence of sustained virological response to combination treatment with interferon and ribavirin in patients with chronic hepatitis C, non-1 genotype and serum ferritin levels above 500 ng/mL.

  7. Effect of HFE gene polymorphism on sustained virological response in patients with chronic hepatitis C and elevated serum ferritin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coelho-Borges, Silvia; Cheinquer, Hugo; Wolff, Fernando Herz; Cheinquer, Nelson; Krug, Luciano; Ashton-Prolla, Patricia

    2012-01-01

    Abnormal serum ferritin levels are found in approximately 20%-30% of the patients with chronic hepatitis C and are associated with a lower response rate to interferon therapy. To determine if the presence of HFE gene mutations had any effect on the sustained virological response rate to interferon based therapy in chronic hepatitis C patients with elevated serum ferritin. A total of 44 treatment naÏve patients with histologically demonstrated chronic hepatitis C, all infected with hepatitis C virus genotype non-1 (38 genotype 3; 6 genotype 2) and serum ferritin above 500 ng/mL were treated with interferon (3 MU, 3 times a week) and ribavirin (1.000 mg, daily) for 24 weeks. Sustained virological response was defined as negative qualitative HCV-RNA more than 24 weeks after the end of treatment. Serum HCV-RNA was measured by qualitative in house polymerase chain reaction with a limit of detection of 200 IU/mL. HFE gene mutation was detected using restriction-enzyme digestion with RsaI (C282Y mutation analysis) and BclI (H63D mutation analysis) in 16 (37%) patients, all heterozygous (11 H63D, 2 C282Y and 3 both). Sustained virological response was achieved in 0 of 16 patients with HFE gene mutations and 11 (41%) of 27 patients without HFE gene mutations (P = 0.002; exact Fisher test). Heterozigozity for H63D and/or C282Y HFE gene mutation predicts absence of sustained virological response to combination treatment with interferon and ribavirin in patients with chronic hepatitis C, non-1 genotype and serum ferritin levels above 500 ng/mL.

  8. The role of serum transferrin receptor in the diagnosis of iron deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remacha, A F; Sarda, M P; Parellada, M; Ubeda, J; Manteiga, R

    1998-11-01

    Iron deficiency anemia (IDA) is often associated with inflammatory disorders. The most conventional parameters of iron metabolism are therefore affected, making the evaluation of iron status difficult. Serum transferrin receptor (sTfR) levels are raised in iron deficiency but are not influenced by inflammatory changes. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of sTfR in differentiating IDA with inflammatory features. A diagnostic study of sTfR measured by immunoassay was carried out in IDA and anemia of chronic disorders (ACD). The cut-off points of sTfR and the ratio of sTfR/serum ferritin, which were obtained after comparing IDA and ACD, were applied to a group of 64 patients with mixed iron patterns (MIX) (16 with ACD and 48 with IDA). The best cut-off point of sTfR between IDA and ACD was 4.7 mg/L. Applying this cut-off to the MIX group, an efficiency of 87% was obtained (sensitivity 92% and specificity 81%). This level of sTfR correctly classified 53 out of 64 cases of the MIX group (83%). Using the ratio of sTfRx 100/serum ferritin, the best cut-off point was 8 (efficiency 100%), which correctly classified 62 out of 64 cases of the MIX group (97%). This study demonstrates that sTfR in conjunction with other iron parameters is very useful in iron deficiency evaluation, especially in hospital practice. Iron treatment should be considered in patients with mixed patterns of iron status, in which the diagnosis of IDA versus ACD is difficult, when the levels of sTfR exceed the cut-off point.

  9. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of iron regulatory protein 1 in complex with ferritin IRE RNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Selezneva, Anna I.; Cavigiolio, Giorgio; Theil, Elizabeth C.; Walden, William E.; Volz, Karl

    2006-01-01

    The iron regulatory protein IRP1 has been crystallized in a complex with ferritin IRE RNA and a complete data set has been collected to 2.8 Å resolution. Iron regulatory protein 1 (IRP1) is a bifunctional protein with activity as an RNA-binding protein or as a cytoplasmic aconitase. Interconversion of IRP1 between these mutually exclusive states is central to cellular iron regulation and is accomplished through iron-responsive assembly and disassembly of a [4Fe–4S] cluster. When in its apo form, IRP1 binds to iron responsive elements (IREs) found in mRNAs encoding proteins of iron storage and transport and either prevents translation or degradation of the bound mRNA. Excess cellular iron stimulates the assembly of a [4Fe–4S] cluster in IRP1, inhibiting its IRE-binding ability and converting it to an aconitase. The three-dimensional structure of IRP1 in its different active forms will provide details of the interconversion process and clarify the selective recognition of mRNA, Fe–S sites and catalytic activity. To this end, the apo form of IRP1 bound to a ferritin IRE was crystallized. Crystals belong to the monoclinic space group P2 1 , with unit-cell parameters a = 109.6, b = 80.9, c = 142.9 Å, β = 92.0°. Native data sets have been collected from several crystals with resolution extending to 2.8 Å and the structure has been solved by molecular replacement

  10. Serum ferritin level is higher in male adolescents with obesity: results from the Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2010

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yeon Jin Jeon

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available PurposePrevious reports show an association between high serum ferritin levels and metabolic syndrome (MS in adults. In adolescents, little information is available with obesity and serum ferritin levels.MethodsThis is a cross-sectional study. Data were obtained from the 5th Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (K-NHANES conducted during 2010 by the Korean Ministry of Health and Welfare. A total of 849 subjects aged 10-18 years participated in the 2010 survey. A body mass index (BMI ≥95th percentile for age and sex or a BMI ≥25 was used to diagnose as obesity.ResultsThe weighted prevalence of obesity was 13.4% (62/462 in male and 8.5% (33/387 in female. We observed significantly higher serum ferritin in male than in female (mean±standard error [SE], 50.5±2.3 µU/L vs. 30.6±1.3 µU/L; P<0.0001. In male, serum ferritin is positively correlated with age (P<0.0001. White blood cell (WBC count, serum fasting blood sugar, triglyceride (TG, total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein, insulin, homeostasis model assessment-insulin resistance (HOMA-IR, systolic and diastolic blood pressure, and ferritin levels were higher and high-density lipoprotein (HDL were lower in the obesity than in the normal group. In female adolescents, WBC count, TG, insulin, and HOMA-IR were higher and HDL were lower in the obesity than in the normal group. In male, serum ferritin levels showed positive association with obesity (β=21.196, P=0.016.ConclusionSerum ferritin levels appear to be associated with obesity in Korean male adolescents.

  11. Iron-induced nitric oxide leads to an increase in the expression of ferritin during the senescence of Lotus japonicus nodules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chungopast, Sirinapa; Duangkhet, Mallika; Tajima, Shigeyuki; Ma, Jian Feng; Nomura, Mika

    2017-01-01

    Iron is an essential nutrient for legume-rhizobium symbiosis and accumulates abundantly in the nodules. However, the concentration of free iron in the cells is strictly controlled to avoid toxicity. It is known that ferritin accumulates in the cells as an iron storage protein. During nodule senescence, the expression of the ferritin gene, Ljfer1, was induced in Lotus japonicus. We investigated a signal transduction pathway leading to the increase of Ljfer1 in the nodule. The Ljfer1 promoter of L. japonicus contains a conserved Iron-Dependent Regulatory Sequence (IDRS). The expression of Ljfer1 was induced by the application of iron or sodium nitroprusside, which is a nitric oxide (NO) donor. The application of iron to the nodule increased the level of NO. These data strongly suggest that iron-induced NO leads to increased expression of Ljfer1 during the senescence of L. japonicus nodules. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  12. Comparative study of the iron cores in human liver ferritin, its pharmaceutical models and ferritin in chicken liver and spleen tissues using Moessbauer spectroscopy with a high velocity resolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alenkina, I.V.; Semionkin, V.A. [Faculty of Physical Techniques and Devices for Quality Control, Ural Federal University, Ekaterinburg (Russian Federation); Faculty of Experimental Physics, Ural Federal University, Ekaterinburg (Russian Federation); Oshtrakh, M.I. [Faculty of Physical Techniques and Devices for Quality Control, Ural Federal University, Ekaterinburg (Russian Federation); Klepova, Yu.V.; Sadovnikov, N.V. [Faculty of Physiology and Biotechnology, Ural State Agricultural Academy, Ekaterinburg, (Russian Federation); Dubiel, S.M. [Faculty of Physics and Applied Computer Science, AGH University of Science and Technology, Krakow (Poland)

    2011-07-01

    Full text: Application of the Moessbauer spectroscopy with a high velocity resolution (4096 channels) for a study of iron-containing biological species is of great interest. Improving the velocity resolution allows to reveal small variations in the electronic structure of iron, and to obtain hyperfine parameters with smaller instrumental (systematic) errors in comparison with measurements performed in 512 channels or less. It also allows a more reliable fitting of complex Moessbauer spectra. In the present study the Moessbauer spectroscopy with the high velocity resolution was used for a comparative analysis of ferritin and its pharmaceutically important models as well as iron storage proteins in a chicken liver and a spleen. The ferritin, an iron storage protein, consists of a nanosized polynuclear iron core formed by a ferrihydrite surrounded by a protein shell. Iron-polysaccharide complexes contain {beta}-FeOOH iron cores coated with various polysaccharides. The Moessbauer spectra of the ferritin and commercial products Imferon, MaltoferR and Ferrum Lek as well as those of the chicken liver and spleen tissues were measured with the high velocity resolution at 295 and 90 K. They were fitted using two models: (1) with a homogeneous iron core (an approximation using one quadrupole doublet), and (2) with a heterogeneous iron core (an approximation using several quadrupole doublets). The model (1) can be used as the first approximation fit to visualize small variations in the hyperfine parameters. Using this model, differences in the Moessbauer hyperfine parameters were obtained in both 295 and 90 K Moessbauer spectra. However, this model was considered as a rough approximation because the measured Moessbauer spectra had non-Lorentzian line shapes. Therefore, the spectra of the ferritin, Imferon, MaltoferR and Ferrum Lek as well as those of the liver and spleen tissues were fitted again using the model (2) in which a different number of the quadrupole doublets was

  13. HFE p.C282Y homozygosity predisposes to rapid serum ferritin rise after menopause: A genotype-stratified cohort study of hemochromatosis in Australian women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warne, Charles D; Zaloumis, Sophie G; Bertalli, Nadine A; Delatycki, Martin B; Nicoll, Amanda J; McLaren, Christine E; Hopper, John L; Giles, Graham G; Anderson, Greg J; Olynyk, John K; Powell, Lawrie W; Allen, Katrina J; Gurrin, Lyle C

    2017-04-01

    Women who are homozygous for the p.C282Y mutation in the HFE gene are at much lower risk of iron overload-related disease than p.C282Y homozygous men, presumably because of the iron-depleting effects of menstruation and pregnancy. We used data from a population cohort study to model the impact of menstruation cessation at menopause on serum ferritin (SF) levels in female p.C282Y homozygotes, with p.C282Y/p.H63D simple or compound heterozygotes and those with neither p.C282Y nor p.H63D mutations (HFE wild types) as comparison groups. A sample of the Melbourne Collaborative Cohort Study was selected for the "HealthIron" study (n = 1438) including all HFE p.C282Y homozygotes plus a random sample stratified by HFE-genotype (p.C282Y and p.H63D). The relationship between the natural logarithm of SF and time since menopause was examined using linear mixed models incorporating spline smoothing. For p.C282Y homozygotes, SF increased by a factor of 3.6 (95% CI (1.8, 7.0), P HFE genotype groups increase more gradually and did not show a distinction between premenopausal and postmenopausal SF levels. Only p.C282Y homozygotes had predicted SF exceeding 200 μg/L postmenopause, but the projected SF did not increase the risk of iron overload-related disease. These data provide the first documented evidence that physiological blood loss is a major factor in determining the marked gender difference in expression of p.C282Y homozygosity. © 2016 Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology Foundation and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  14. Folato, vitamina B12 e ferritina sérica e defeitos do tubo neural Folate, vitamin B12, serum ferritin and defects of the neural tube

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gizele Thame

    1998-09-01

    Full Text Available Objetivo: verificar os níveis de folatos, vitamina B12 e ferritina em pacientes cujos fetos apresentaram defeitos de tubo neural (DTN. O folato sangüíneo e a vitamina B12 atuam como cofatores para as enzimas envolvidas na biossíntese do DNA. A interrupção deste processo pode impedir o fechamento do tubo neural. A suplementação vitamínica contendo folato pode reduzir as taxas de ocorrência de defeitos de tubo neural, embora exista a preocupação de que esta prevenção possa mascarar a deficiência de vitamina B12. Métodos: dosagens de vitamina B12 e ferritina pelo método de enzimaimunoensaio com micropartículas e a dosagens de ácido fólico pelo método de captura iônica (IMx ABBOTT. Resultados: a porcentagem de gestantes com deficiência de vitamina B12 (níveis séricos Purpose: to determine folate, vitamin B12 and ferritin levels in patients whose fetuses presented neural-tube defects (NTD. Blood folate and vitamin B12 act as cofactors of enzymes involved in DNA biosynthesis. Interruption of this process may block neural-tube closing. Vitamin supplementation with folate may reduce occurrence rates and recurrence of NTD, although there is concern about the fact that this prevention may mask vitamin B12 deficiency. Methods: vitamin B12 and ferritin determinations by enzyme immunoassay with microparticles and folic acid determination using the ion capture method (IMx ABBOTT. Results: the percentage of pregnant women with vitamin B12 deficirncy (serum levels < 150 pg/ml was 11.8%. There was no case of folate deficiency (serum levels < 3.0 ng/ml and prevalence of pregnant women with iron store deficiency was 47.1% (serum levels < ng/mg. Conclusions: occording to the results obtained in this study (prevalence of 11.8% of vitamin B12 and 0% of folate deficient pregnant women we suggest that supplementation should be administered after serum vitamin B12 determination.

  15. Elevated serum ferritin and mercury concentrations are associated with hypertension; analysis of the fourth and fifth Korea national health and nutrition examination survey (KNHANES IV-2, 3, 2008-2009 and V-1, 2010).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Beomhee; Yeum, Kyung-Jin; Park, Soo-Jung; Kim, Kyu-Nam; Joo, Nam-Seok

    2015-01-01

    The impact of simultaneously elevated serum ferritin and mercury concentrations on hypertension in the general population is not known. To determine the association of serum ferritin and mercury concentrations with hypertension, 6213 subjects (3060 men and 3153 women) over 20 years of age from 2008 to 2010 Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey were divided into tertiles according to serum ferritin and mercury concentrations in each gender. Serum ferritin (258.2 vs. 94.8 pmol/L) and mercury concentrations (28.4 vs. 19.9 nmol/L) were higher in men than in women. Serum ferritin (men; P = 0.029, women; P mercury (men; P mercury concentrations in both men (r = 0.193, P mercury tertiles increased after proper adjustments. Furthermore, significantly higher odds ratios of hypertension were found in the second (OR = 1.86, 95% CI; 1.05-3.30), and third (OR = 1.84, 95% CI; 1.01-3.36) tertiles of serum ferritin with the top tertile of serum mercury in men. The current study indicate that serum ferritin and mercury concentrations are associated with the prevalence of hypertension and that simultaneously elevated serum ferritin and mercury concentrations are related to the risk for hypertension in men. © 2013 The Authors. The Environmental Toxicology published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Serum iron and total iron binding capacity levels among the abo ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Iron deficiency anaemia is a common tropical disease. Iron plays a very important role in the human body. The understanding of the different blood groups ability to retain iron in their system can give an insight into their ability to handle the disease Iron deficiency anaemia. Serum Iron, Total Iron Binding Capacity (TIBC) and ...

  17. Serum Hepcidin and Soluble Transferrin Receptor in the Assessment of Iron Metabolism in Children on a Vegetarian Diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambroszkiewicz, Jadwiga; Klemarczyk, Witold; Mazur, Joanna; Gajewska, Joanna; Rowicka, Grażyna; Strucińska, Małgorzata; Chełchowska, Magdalena

    2017-12-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the effect of vegetarian diet on iron metabolism parameters paying special attention to serum hepcidin and soluble transferrin receptor (sTfR) concentrations in 43 prepubertal children (age range 4.5-9.0 years) on vegetarian and in 46 children on omnivorous diets. There were no significant differences according to age, weight, height, and body mass index (BMI) between vegetarian and omnivorous children. Vegetarians had similar intake of iron and vitamin B 12 and a significantly higher intake of vitamin C (p vegetarians. Hematologic parameters and serum iron concentrations were within the reference range in both groups of children. Serum transferrin levels were similar in all subjects; however, ferritin concentrations were significantly (p vegetarians than in omnivores. In children on a vegetarian diet, median hepcidin levels were lower (p vegetarians. We did not find significant associations with concentration of sTfR and selected biochemical, anthropometric, and dietary parameters in any of the studied groups of children. As hematologic parameters and iron concentrations in vegetarians and omnivores were comparable and ferritin level was lower in vegetarians, we suggest that inclusion of novel markers, in particular sTfR (not cofounded by inflammation) and hepcidin, can better detect subclinical iron deficiency in children following vegetarian diets.

  18. Iron and zinc complexation in wild-type and ferritin-expressing wheat grain: implications for mineral transport into developing grain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Neal, Andrew L; Geraki, Kalotina; Borg, Søren

    2013-01-01

    of modified complexation of both metals in transgenic grain overexpressing wheat ferritin. For zinc, there is a consistent doubling of the number of complexing phosphorus atoms. Although there is some EXAFS evidence for iron phytate in ferritin-expressing grain, there is also evidence of a structure lacking......We have used synchrotron-based X-ray fluorescence and absorption techniques to establish both metal distribution and complexation in mature wheat grains. In planta, extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy reveals iron phytate and zinc phytate structures in aleurone cells...... of ferritin-expressing grains is quite different from that in wild-type grain. This may explain why the raised levels of minerals transported to the developing grain accumulate within the crease region of the transgenic grain....

  19. Molecular characterization of the iron binding protein ferritin in Eisenia andrei earthworms

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Procházková, Petra; Dvořák, Jiří; Šilerová, Marcela; Roubalová, Radka; Škanta, František; Halada, Petr; Bilej, Martin

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 485, č. 2 (2011), s. 73-80 ISSN 0378-1119 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA206/07/0378; GA ČR GD310/08/H077; GA AV ČR IAA600200704; GA MŠk 2B06155; GA MŠk LC07017 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : Earthworms * Invertebrates * Ferritin Subject RIV: EC - Immunology Impact factor: 2.341, year: 2011

  20. Evidence for ferritin as dominant iron-bearing species in the rhizobacterium Azospirillum brasilense Sp7 provided by low-temperature/in-field Mössbauer spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovács, Krisztina; Kamnev, Alexander A; Pechoušek, Jiří; Tugarova, Anna V; Kuzmann, Ernő; Machala, Libor; Zbořil, Radek; Homonnay, Zoltán; Lázár, Károly

    2016-02-01

    For the ubiquitous diazotrophic rhizobacterium Azospirillum brasilense, which has been attracting the attention of researchers worldwide for the last 35 years owing to its significant agrobiotechnological and phytostimulating potential, the data on iron acquisition and its chemical speciation in cells are scarce. In this work, for the first time for azospirilla, low-temperature (at 80 K, 5 K, as well as at 2 K without and with an external magnetic field of 5 T) transmission Mössbauer spectroscopic studies were performed for lyophilised biomass of A. brasilense (wild-type strain Sp7 grown with (57)Fe(III) nitrilotriacetate complex as the sole source of iron) to enable quantitative chemical speciation analysis of the intracellular iron. In the Mössbauer spectrum at 80 K, a broadened quadrupole doublet of high-spin iron(III) was observed with a few percent of a high-spin iron(II) contribution. In the spectrum measured at 5 K, a dominant magnetically split component appeared with the parameters typical of ferritin species from other bacteria, together with a quadrupole doublet of a superparamagnetic iron(III) component and a similarly small contribution from the high-spin iron(II) component. The Mössbauer spectra recorded at 2 K (with or without a 5 T external field) confirmed the assignment of ferritin species. About 20% of total Fe in the dry cells of A. brasilense strain Sp7 were present in iron(III) forms superparamagnetic at both 5 and 2 K, i.e. either different from ferritin cores or as ferritin components with very small particle sizes.

  1. Aqueous humor ferritin in hereditary hyperferritinemia cataract syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenzhofer, Markus; Schroedl, Falk; Trost, Andrea; Kaser-Eichberger, Alexandra; Wiedemann, Helmut; Strohmaier, Clemens; Hohensinn, Melchior; Strasser, Michael; Muckenthaler, Martina U; Grabner, Guenther; Aigner, Elmar; Reitsamer, Herbert A

    2015-04-01

    Hereditary hyperferritinemia cataract syndrome (HHCS) is a rare autosomal dominant hereditary disease, characterized by hyperferritinemia but with absence of body iron excess and early onset of bilateral cataracts. Although 5- to 20-fold increased serum ferritin concentrations have been reported in HHCS patients, data of ferritin levels in aqueous humor have not been obtained. We therefore aimed to investigate the ferritin levels in aqueous humor and serum and further present histological and ultrastructural data of the lens. During cataract extraction and intraocular lens implantation, aqueous humor and lens aspirate of a 37-year-old HHCS patient were obtained from both eyes. Ferritin levels in serum and aqueous humor were quantitatively analyzed via immunoassays in the HHCS patient and healthy control subjects (n = 6). Lens aspirate in HHCS was analyzed histologically and at the ultrastructural level. Further, genetic mutation screening by polymerase chain reaction and DNA sequencing in blood was performed. Serum ferritin levels in the control group were 142.2 ± 38.7 μg/L, whereas in the HHCS patient, this parameter was excessively increased (1086 μg/L). Analysis of ferritin in aqueous humor revealed 6.4 ± 3.8 μg/L in normal control subjects and 146.3 μg/L (OD) and 160.4 μg/L (OS) in the HHCS patient. DNA analysis detected a C>A mutation on position +18, a T>G mutation on position +22, a T>C mutation on position +24, and a T>G polymorphism on position +26 in the iron-responsive element of the light-chain ferritin (L-ferritin) gene. In the HHCS patient, a 23-fold (OD) to 25-fold (OS) increased aqueous humor ferritin level was detected. Therefore, the formation of bilateral cataract in HHCS is most likely a result of elevated aqueous humor ferritin. In addition, a novel mutation in this rare disease in the iron-responsive element of L-ferritin gene is reported.

  2. HFE Genotyping in Patients with Elevated Serum Iron Indices and Liver Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreia Silva Evangelista

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Iron abnormalities in chronic liver disease may be the result of genetic diseases or secondary factors. The present study aimed to identify subjects with HFE-HH in order to describe the frequency of clinical manifestations, identify risk factors for iron elevation, and compare the iron profile of HFE-HH to other genotypes in liver disease patients. A total of 108 individuals with hepatic disease, transferrin saturation (TS > 45%, and serum ferritin (SF > 350 ng/mL were tested for HFE mutations. Two groups were characterized: C282Y/C282Y or C282Y/H63D genotypes (n=16 were the HFE hereditary hemochromatosis (HFE-HH group; and C282Y and H63D single heterozygotes, the H63D/H63D genotype, and wild-type were considered group 2 (n=92. Nonalcoholic liver disease, alcoholism, and chronic hepatitis C were detected more frequently in group 2, whereas arthropathy, hepatocarcinoma, diabetes, and osteoporosis rates were significantly higher in the HFE-HH group. TS > 82%, SF > 2685 ng/mL, and serum iron > 178 μg/dL were the cutoffs for diagnosis of HFE-HH in patients with liver disease. Thus, in non-Caucasian populations with chronic liver disease, HFE-HH diagnosis is more predictable in those with iron levels higher than those proposed in current guidelines for the general population.

  3. Body iron is a contributor to oxidative damage of DNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tuomainen, Tomi-Pekka; Loft, Steffen; Nyyssönen, Kristiina

    2007-01-01

    The transition metal iron is catalytically highly active in vitro, and not surprisingly, body iron has been suggested to promote oxidative stress in vivo. In the current analysis we studied the association of serum ferritin concentration and serum soluble transferrin receptor concentration.......17 (95% CI 0.08-0.26, P = 0.001), and serum soluble transferrin receptor to ferritin concentration ratio (TfR/ferritin) predicted the excretion rate at B = - 0.13 (95% CI - 0.21 to - 0.05, P = 0.002). Our data suggest that body iron contributes to excess oxidative stress already at non-iron overload...

  4. Association between baseline serum hepcidin levels and infection in kidney transplant recipients: Potential role for iron overload.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Ruiz, Mario; Parra, Patricia; Ruiz-Merlo, Tamara; López-Medrano, Francisco; San Juan, Rafael; Polanco, Natalia; González, Esther; Andrés, Amado; Aguado, José María

    2018-02-01

    The liver-synthesized peptide hepcidin is a key regulator of iron metabolism and correlates with total iron stores. We analyzed the association between pre-transplant hepcidin-25 levels and infection after kidney transplantation (KT). Serum hepcidin-25 levels were measured at baseline by high-sensitivity ELISA in 91 patients undergoing KT at our institution between December 2011 and March 2013. The impact of this biomarker on the incidence of post-transplant infection (excluding lower urinary tract infection) during the first year was assessed by Cox regression. Mean hepcidin-25 level was 82.3 ± 67.4 ng/mL and strongly correlated with serum ferritin (Spearman's rho = 0.703; P role for iron overload in the individual susceptibility to post-transplant infection. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Impact of daily consumption of iron fortified ready-to-eat cereal and pumpkin seed kernels (Cucurbita pepo) on serum iron in adult women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naghii, Mohammad Reza; Mofid, Mahmood

    2007-01-01

    Iron deficiency, anemia, is the most prevalent nutritional problem in the world today. The objective of this study was to consider the effectiveness of consumption of iron fortified ready-to-eat cereal and pumpkin seed kernels as two sources of dietary iron on status of iron nutrition and response of hematological characteristics of women at reproductive ages. Eight healthy female, single or non pregnant subjects, aged 20-37 y consumed 30 g of iron fortified ready-to-eat cereal (providing 7.1 mg iron/day) plus 30 g of pumpkin seed kernels (providing 4.0 mg iron/day) for four weeks. Blood samples collected on the day 20 of menstrual cycles before and after consumption and indices of iron status such as reticulocyte count, hemoglobin (Hb), hematocrit (Ht), serum ferritin, iron, total iron-binding capacity (TIBC), transferrin and transferrin saturation percent were determined. Better response for iron status was observed after consumption period. The statistical analysis showed a significant difference between the pre and post consumption phase for higher serum iron (60 +/- 22 vs. 85 +/- 23 ug/dl), higher transferrin saturation percent (16.8 +/- 8.0 vs. 25.6 +/- 9.0%), and lower TIBC (367 +/- 31 vs. 339 +/- 31 ug/dl). All individuals had higher serum iron after consumption. A significant positive correlation (r=0.981, p=0.000) between the differences in serum iron levels and differences in transferrin saturation percentages and a significant negative correlation (r=-0.916, pfoods contribute to maintaining optimal nutritional status and minimizing the likelihood of iron insufficiencies and use of fortified ready-to-eat cereals is a common strategy. The results showed that adding another food source of iron such as pumpkin seed kernels improves the iron status. Additional and longer studies using these two food products are recommended to further determine the effect of iron fortification on iron nutrition and status among the target population, and mainly in young

  6. Time- and cell-type specific changes in iron, ferritin, and transferrin in the gerbil hippocampal CA1 region after transient forebrain ischemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dae Young Yoo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, we used immunohistochemistry and western blot analysis to examine changes in the levels and cellular localization of iron, heavy chain ferritin (ferritin-H, and transferrin in the gerbil hippocampal CA1 region from 30 minutes to 7 days following transient forebrain ischemia. Relative to sham controls, iron reactivity increased significantly in the stratum pyramidale and stratum oriens at 12 hours following ischemic insult, transiently decreased at 1-2 days and then increased once again within the CA1 region at 4-7 days after ischemia. One day after ischemia, ferritin-H immunoreactivity increased significantly in the stratum pyramidale and decreased at 2 days. At 4-7 days after ischemia, ferritin-H immunoreactivity in the glial components in the CA1 region was significantly increased. Transferrin immunoreactivity was increased significantly in the stratum pyramidale at 12 hours, peaked at 1 day, and then decreased significantly at 2 days after ischemia. Seven days after ischemia, Transferrin immunoreactivity in the glial cells of the stratum oriens and radiatum was significantly increased. Western blot analyses supported these results, demonstrating that compared to sham controls, ferritin H and transferrin protein levels in hippocampal homogenates significantly increased at 1 day after ischemia, peaked at 4 days and then decreased. These results suggest that iron overload-induced oxidative stress is most prominent at 12 hours after ischemia in the stratum pyramidale, suggesting that this time window may be the optimal period for therapeutic intervention to protect neurons from ischemia-induced death.

  7. Serum Iron and Nitric Oxide Production in Trypanosoma brucei ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    JTEkanem

    reduction in the serum iron status and a modulation of nitric oxide synthase activity of T. brucei infected rats. ... inflammation and tissue damage15. ... The serum iron level was determined ... concentration or of total nitrate and nitrite ... 15. 16. 17. 18. Days. S e ru m iro n lev e l mg. /ml. Infected treated. Infected untreated. 0.

  8. Ferritin levels and risk of heart failure-the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silvestre, Odilson M; Gonçalves, Alexandra; Nadruz, Wilson; Claggett, Brian; Couper, David; Eckfeldt, John H; Pankow, James S; Anker, Stefan D; Solomon, Scott D

    2017-03-01

    Severe iron overload is associated with cardiac damage, while iron deficiency has been related to worse outcomes in subjects with heart failure (HF). This study investigated the relationship between ferritin, a marker of iron status, and the incidence of HF in a community-based cohort. We examined 1063 participants who were free of heart failure from the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) Study in whom ferritin serum levels were measured at baseline (1987-1989). The participants (mean age 52.7 ± 5.5 years, 62% women), were categorized in low (200 ng/mL in women and >300 ng/mL in men; n = 247) ferritin levels. Multivariable Cox proportional hazards models were used to evaluate the relationship between ferritin and incident HF. After 21 ± 4.6 years of follow-up, HF occurred in 144 (13.5%) participants. When compared with participants with normal ferritin levels, participants with low ferritin levels had a higher risk of HF [hazard ratio (HR) = 2.24, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.15-4.35; P = 0.02] as did those with high ferritin levels (HR = 1.81, 95% CI 1.01-3.25; P = 0.04), after adjusting for potential confounders. Notably, low ferritin levels remained associated with incident HF even after excluding subjects with anaemia (HR = 2.28, 95% CI 1.11-4.68; P = 0.03). Derangements in iron metabolism, either low or high ferritin serum levels, were associated with higher risk of incident HF in a general population, even without concurrent anaemia. These findings suggest that iron imbalance might play a role in the development of HF. © 2016 The Authors. European Journal of Heart Failure © 2016 European Society of Cardiology.

  9. Ferritin Assembly in Enterocytes of Drosophila melanogaster

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abraham Rosas-Arellano

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Ferritins are protein nanocages that accumulate inside their cavity thousands of oxidized iron atoms bound to oxygen and phosphates. Both characteristic types of eukaryotic ferritin subunits are present in secreted ferritins from insects, but here dimers between Ferritin 1 Heavy Chain Homolog (Fer1HCH and Ferritin 2 Light Chain Homolog (Fer2LCH are further stabilized by disulfide-bridge in the 24-subunit complex. We addressed ferritin assembly and iron loading in vivo using novel transgenic strains of Drosophila melanogaster. We concentrated on the intestine, where the ferritin induction process can be controlled experimentally by dietary iron manipulation. We showed that the expression pattern of Fer2LCH-Gal4 lines recapitulated iron-dependent endogenous expression of the ferritin subunits and used these lines to drive expression from UAS-mCherry-Fer2LCH transgenes. We found that the Gal4-mediated induction of mCherry-Fer2LCH subunits was too slow to effectively introduce them into newly formed ferritin complexes. Endogenous Fer2LCH and Fer1HCH assembled and stored excess dietary iron, instead. In contrast, when flies were genetically manipulated to co-express Fer2LCH and mCherry-Fer2LCH simultaneously, both subunits were incorporated with Fer1HCH in iron-loaded ferritin complexes. Our study provides fresh evidence that, in insects, ferritin assembly and iron loading in vivo are tightly regulated.

  10. Erythrocyte indices and serum ferritin in newborns Indices de eritrócitos e ferritina sérica em recém-nascidos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria de Fatima Pussick Nunes

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Hematological values for newborn babies differ depending on the gestational age and intrauterine growth. However, information in published studies about hematological values for cord blood according to weight-for-gestational-age categories is limited and inconsistent, especially regarding small-for-gestational-age (SGA newborns. With the aim of describing hematological values for umbilical cord blood, we conducted a cross-sectional study in two government maternity hospitals in Salvador, Brazil. Eighty-eight healthy, term, appropriate-for-gestational-age (AGA, 23 term, small-for-gestational-age (SGA, and 13 preterm, AGA newborns were studied. Means and standard deviation, and maximum and minimum values were used to describe the level of hemoglobin (Hb, red blood cells (RBC, hematocrit (HCT, mean corpuscular volume (MCV, mean corpuscular hemoglobin (MCH, red cell distribution width (RDW and serum ferritin. The highest values of RBC, Hb, HCT and serum ferritin were recorded for term SGA newborns and the lowest values were recorded for preterm AGA newborns. Term AGA newborns had intermediate values for all these parameters. In this study we observed the highest hematological values in SGA newborns. Because, these infants are at the highest risk of iron deficiency, the use of more detailed screening tests for iron deficiency in these newborns at birth, using a combination of biomarkers, should be considered.Valores hematológicos dos recém-nascidos (RN diferenciam-se em função da idade gestacional e do crescimento intrauterino. Na literatura, as informações sobre valores hematológicos de acordo com categorias de peso para a idade gestacional em RN são escassas e inconsistentes, especialmente referindo-se a RN pequenos para a idade gestacional (PIG. Para descrever os valores hematológicos do cordão umbilical foi realizado um estudo transversal, em duas maternidades públicas de Salvador, Brasil, envolvendo 88 RN a termo adequados para a

  11. Diagnostic values of serum tumor markers Cyfra21-1, SCCAg, ferritin, CEA, CA19-9, and AFP in oral/oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Chuanshu; Yang, Kai; Tang, Hong; Chen, Dan

    2016-01-01

    At present, the research on serum tumor markers in the early diagnosis of malignant tumors has aroused widespread concern. The aim of this study was to investigate the diagnostic values of serum tumor markers cytokeratin 19 fragment (Cyfra21-1), squamous cell carcinoma antigen (SCCAg), ferritin, carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), carbohydrate antigen 19-9 (CA19-9), and α-fetoprotein (AFP) for patients with oral/oropharyngeal squamous carcinoma (OSCC/OPSCC). One hundred and sixty-nine cases of patients with OSCC/OPSCC as the experimental group, 86 cases of oral benign tumor patients as the control group, and 30 cases of healthy people as the normal control group were studied. The levels of serum Cyfra21-1, SCCAg, ferritin, CEA, CA19-9, and AFP were measured using electrochemiluminescence immunoassay. The levels of serum Cyfra21-1, SCCAg, ferritin, and CEA in patients with OSCC/OPSCC were significantly higher than those of benign tumor and healthy control group (Ptumor, and healthy group (P>0.05). The level of serum Cyfra21-1 in patients with early OSCC/OPSCC (stage I + II) was significantly higher than that of benign tumor and healthy control group (PCEA, CA19-9, and AFP showed no significant difference between patients with early OSCC/OPSCC, benign tumor, and healthy control group (P>0.05). The levels of serum Cyfra21-1, SCCAg, ferritin, and CEA in the middle-late stage of patients with OSCC/OPSCC (stage III + IV) were significantly higher than those of patients with the early OSCC/OPSCC, benign tumor, and healthy control group (PCEA were 2.17, 0.72, 109.95, and 1.99 ng/mL, respectively. The sensitivities were 60.36%, 73.37%, 81.66%, and 66.27%, respectively. The specificities were 81.03%, 68.10%, 40.52%, and 61.21%, respectively. Cyfra21-1, SCCAg, ferritin, and CEA had diagnostic values for patients with OSCC/OPSCC. Meanwhile, Cyfra21-1 had better early diagnostic value for patients with OSCC/OPSCC.

  12. Accuracy of various iron parameters in the prediction of iron deficiency in an acute care hospital

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ong, K. H.; Tan, H. L.; Lai, H. C.; Kuperan, P.

    2005-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Iron parameters like serum ferritin and iron saturation are routinely used in diagnosing iron deficiency. However, these tests are influenced by many factors. We aimed to review the accuracy of iron parameters among inpatients in an acute care hospital. MATERIALS AND METHODS: From

  13. Effect of minimally invasive intracranial hematoma drainage on inflammatory factors, serum ferritin and serum P substance in patients with hypertensive cerebral hemorrhage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheng-De Nong

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To study the effect of minimally invasive intracranial hematoma drainage on inflammatory factors, serum ferritin and serum P substance in patients with hypertensive cerebral hemorrhage. Methods: 92 cases of hypertensive cerebral hemorrhage patients in our hospital were selected and randomly divided into 2 groups: minimally invasive group (51 cases and routine group (41 cases. Minimally invasive intracranial hematoma drainage was performed on the minimally invasive group. Bone flap decompression or small bone window craniotomy were used in the routine group. Tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α, interleukin-6 (IL-6, high sensitive C reactive protein (hs-CRP and serum protein (SF, serum substance P (SP in the 2 groups were detected before treatment and 2 weeks after treatment. Results: The comparison of TNF-α, IL-6, hs-CRP, SP, and SF in the two groups before treatment was not statistically significant (P>0.05. TNF-α, IL-6, hs-CRP and SF in both groups after treatment significantly decreased, compared with that before treatment (P<0.01, P<0.05. TNF-α, IL-6, and SF in minimally invasive group decreased more significantly than that in routine group (P<0.01; The comparison of SP in the two groups after treatment significantly increased compared with that before treatment (P<0.01, P<0.05. SP in minimally invasive group increased more significantly than that in routine group (P<0.05. Conclusions: Compared with bone flap decompression or small bone window craniotomy, minimally invasive intracranial hematoma drainage can inhibit inflammatory reaction, reduce the degree of nerve damage and alleviate clinical symptoms more effectively

  14. Diagnostic values of serum tumor markers Cyfra21-1, SCCAg, ferritin, CEA, CA19-9, and AFP in oral/oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan CS

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Chuanshu Yuan, Kai Yang, Hong Tang, Dan Chen Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, the First Affiliated Hospital of Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing, People’s Republic of China Background: At present, the research on serum tumor markers in the early diagnosis of malignant tumors has aroused widespread concern. The aim of this study was to investigate the diagnostic values of serum tumor markers cytokeratin 19 fragment (Cyfra21-1, squamous cell carcinoma antigen (SCCAg, ferritin, carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA, carbohydrate antigen 19-9 (CA19-9, and α-fetoprotein (AFP for patients with oral/oropharyngeal squamous carcinoma (OSCC/OPSCC. Methods: One hundred and sixty-nine cases of patients with OSCC/OPSCC as the experimental group, 86 cases of oral benign tumor patients as the control group, and 30 cases of healthy people as the normal control group were studied. The levels of serum Cyfra21-1, SCCAg, ferritin, CEA, CA19-9, and AFP were measured using electrochemiluminescence immunoassay. Results: The levels of serum Cyfra21-1, SCCAg, ferritin, and CEA in patients with OSCC/OPSCC were significantly higher than those of benign tumor and healthy control group (P<0.05. The levels of CA19-9 and AFP showed no significant difference between patients with OSCC/OPSCC, benign tumor, and healthy group (P>0.05. The level of serum Cyfra21-1 in patients with early OSCC/OPSCC (stage I + II was significantly higher than that of benign tumor and healthy control group (P<0.05. However, the levels of serum SCCAg, ferritin, CEA, CA19-9, and AFP showed no significant difference between patients with early OSCC/OPSCC, benign tumor, and healthy control group (P>0.05. The levels of serum Cyfra21-1, SCCAg, ferritin, and CEA in the middle-late stage of patients with OSCC/OPSCC (stage III + IV were significantly higher than those of patients with the early OSCC/OPSCC, benign tumor, and healthy control group (P<0.05. The diagnostic cutoff levels of Cyfra21

  15. Relationship between Serum Ferritin Levels and Sarcopenia in Korean Females Aged 60 Years and Older Using the Fourth Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (KNHANES IV-2, 3), 2008–2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Tae Ho; Hwang, Hee-Jin; Kim, Sang-Hwan

    2014-01-01

    Context It has been suggested that elevated serum ferritin is associated with several metabolic disorders. However, there is no reported study assessing any association between serum ferritin and sarcopenia despite the close relationship between sarcopenia and metabolic disorders. Objective We investigated whether serum ferritin was associated with sarcopenia in older Koreans. Design and Setting We conducted a cross-sectional study based on data acquired in the second and third years (2008–9) of the fourth Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. Participants In total, 952 men (mean age 69.0 years) and 1,380 women (mean age 69.3 years) aged 60 years and older completed a body composition study using dual energy X-ray absorptiometry. Measurements Serum ferritin levels were measured. Sarcopenia was defined as an appendicular skeletal mass as a percentage of body weight that was less than two standard deviations below the gender-specific mean for young adults. Results Serum ferritin levels were lower in women than in men. Women with sarcopenia showed a higher level of serum ferritin than women without sarcopenia (men: without sarcopenia 115.7 ng/mL and with sarcopenia 134.4 ng/mL vs. women: without sarcopenia 70.7 ng/mL and with sarcopenia 85.4 ng/mL). The prevalence of sarcopenia increased as the tertile of serum ferritin increased. However, statistical significance was only seen in elderly women (1st tertile 6.3%, 2nd tertile 8.0%, 3rd tertile 12.0%; p = 0.008). Without adjustment, compared with those in the lowest tertile of serum ferritin level, participants in the highest tertile had an odds ratio of 2.02 (95% confidence interval = 1.26–3.23) for sarcopenia in women. After adjusting for known risk factors, the OR for sarcopenia was 1.74 (95% CI = 1.02–2.97) in women. There was no statistically significant association between sarcopenia and serum ferritin tertiles in men. Conclusions Elevated serum ferritin levels were associated

  16. Relationship between serum ferritin levels and sarcopenia in Korean females aged 60 years and older using the fourth Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (KNHANES IV-2, 3, 2008-2009.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tae Ho Kim

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: It has been suggested that elevated serum ferritin is associated with several metabolic disorders. However, there is no reported study assessing any association between serum ferritin and sarcopenia despite the close relationship between sarcopenia and metabolic disorders. OBJECTIVE: We investigated whether serum ferritin was associated with sarcopenia in older Koreans. DESIGN AND SETTING: We conducted a cross-sectional study based on data acquired in the second and third years (2008-9 of the fourth Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. PARTICIPANTS: In total, 952 men (mean age 69.0 years and 1,380 women (mean age 69.3 years aged 60 years and older completed a body composition study using dual energy X-ray absorptiometry. MEASUREMENTS: Serum ferritin levels were measured. Sarcopenia was defined as an appendicular skeletal mass as a percentage of body weight that was less than two standard deviations below the gender-specific mean for young adults. RESULTS: Serum ferritin levels were lower in women than in men. Women with sarcopenia showed a higher level of serum ferritin than women without sarcopenia (men: without sarcopenia 115.7 ng/mL and with sarcopenia 134.4 ng/mL vs. women: without sarcopenia 70.7 ng/mL and with sarcopenia 85.4 ng/mL. The prevalence of sarcopenia increased as the tertile of serum ferritin increased. However, statistical significance was only seen in elderly women (1(st tertile 6.3%, 2(nd tertile 8.0%, 3(rd tertile 12.0%; p = 0.008. Without adjustment, compared with those in the lowest tertile of serum ferritin level, participants in the highest tertile had an odds ratio of 2.02 (95% confidence interval = 1.26-3.23 for sarcopenia in women. After adjusting for known risk factors, the OR for sarcopenia was 1.74 (95% CI = 1.02-2.97 in women. There was no statistically significant association between sarcopenia and serum ferritin tertiles in men. CONCLUSIONS: Elevated serum ferritin levels were

  17. Relationship between serum ferritin levels and sarcopenia in Korean females aged 60 years and older using the fourth Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (KNHANES IV-2, 3), 2008-2009.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Tae Ho; Hwang, Hee-Jin; Kim, Sang-Hwan

    2014-01-01

    It has been suggested that elevated serum ferritin is associated with several metabolic disorders. However, there is no reported study assessing any association between serum ferritin and sarcopenia despite the close relationship between sarcopenia and metabolic disorders. We investigated whether serum ferritin was associated with sarcopenia in older Koreans. We conducted a cross-sectional study based on data acquired in the second and third years (2008-9) of the fourth Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. In total, 952 men (mean age 69.0 years) and 1,380 women (mean age 69.3 years) aged 60 years and older completed a body composition study using dual energy X-ray absorptiometry. Serum ferritin levels were measured. Sarcopenia was defined as an appendicular skeletal mass as a percentage of body weight that was less than two standard deviations below the gender-specific mean for young adults. Serum ferritin levels were lower in women than in men. Women with sarcopenia showed a higher level of serum ferritin than women without sarcopenia (men: without sarcopenia 115.7 ng/mL and with sarcopenia 134.4 ng/mL vs. women: without sarcopenia 70.7 ng/mL and with sarcopenia 85.4 ng/mL). The prevalence of sarcopenia increased as the tertile of serum ferritin increased. However, statistical significance was only seen in elderly women (1(st) tertile 6.3%, 2(nd) tertile 8.0%, 3(rd) tertile 12.0%; p = 0.008). Without adjustment, compared with those in the lowest tertile of serum ferritin level, participants in the highest tertile had an odds ratio of 2.02 (95% confidence interval = 1.26-3.23) for sarcopenia in women. After adjusting for known risk factors, the OR for sarcopenia was 1.74 (95% CI = 1.02-2.97) in women. There was no statistically significant association between sarcopenia and serum ferritin tertiles in men. Elevated serum ferritin levels were associated with an increased prevalence of sarcopenia in women but not in men from a representative sample

  18. A RhABF2/Ferritin module affects rose (Rosa hybrida) petal dehydration tolerance and senescence by modulating iron levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jitao; Fan, Youwei; Zou, Jing; Fang, Yiqun; Wang, Linghao; Wang, Meng; Jiang, Xinqiang; Liu, Yiqing; Gao, Junping; Zhang, Changqing

    2017-12-01

    Plants often develop the capacity to tolerate moderate and reversible environmental stresses, such as drought, and to re-establish normal development once the stress has been removed. An example of this phenomenon is provided by cut rose (Rosa hybrida) flowers, which experience typical reversible dehydration stresses during post-harvest handling after harvesting at the bud stages. The molecular mechanisms involved in rose flower dehydration tolerance are not known, however. Here, we characterized a dehydration- and abscisic acid (ABA)-induced ferritin gene (RhFer1). Dehydration-induced free ferrous iron (Fe 2+ ) is preferentially sequestered by RhFer1 and not transported outside of the petal cells, to restrict oxidative stresses during dehydration. Free Fe 2+ accumulation resulted in more serious oxidative stresses and the induction of genes encoding antioxidant enzyme in RhFer1-silenced petals, and poorer dehydration tolerance was observed compared with tobacco rattle virus (TRV) controls. We also determined that RhABF2, an AREB/ABF transcription factor involved in the ABA signaling pathway, can activate RhFer1 expression by directly binding to its promoter. The silencing of RhABF2 decreased dehydration tolerance and disrupted Fe homeostasis in rose petals during dehydration, as did the silencing of RhFer1. Although both RhFer1 and Fe transporter genes are induced during flower natural senescence in plants, the silencing of RhABF2 or RhFer1 accelerates the petal senescence processes. These results suggest that the regulatory module RhABF2/RhFer1 contributes to the maintenance of Fe levels and enhances dehydration tolerance through the action of RhFer1 locally sequestering free Fe 2+ under dehydration conditions, and plays synergistic roles with transporter genes during flower senescence. © 2017 The Authors The Plant Journal © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Body iron is a contributor to oxidative damage of DNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tuomainen, T.P.; Loft, Steffen Huitfeldt; Nyyssonen, K.

    2007-01-01

    The transition metal iron is catalytically highly active in vitro, and not surprisingly, body iron has been suggested to promote oxidative stress in vivo. In the current analysis we studied the association of serum ferritin concentration and serum soluble transferrin receptor concentration...... with daily urinary 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine excretion, a marker of oxidative stress, in 48 mildly dyslipidemic men in East Finland. In multivariate linear regression analyses allowing for age, smoking, body mass index and physical exercise, serum ferritin concentration predicted the excretion rate at B = 0.......17 (95% CI 0.08-0.26, P = 0.001), and serum soluble transferrin receptor to ferritin concentration ratio (TfR/ferritin) predicted the excretion rate at B = - 0.13 (95% CI - 0.21 to - 0.05, P = 0.002). Our data suggest that body iron contributes to excess oxidative stress already at non-iron overload...

  20. Iron status in Danish women, 1984-1994: a cohort comparison of changes in iron stores and the prevalence of iron deficiency and iron overload

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Milman, N.; Byg, K.E.; Ovesen, Lars

    2003-01-01

    Background and objectives: From 1954 to 1986, flour in Denmark was fortified with 30 mg carbonyl iron per kilogram. This mandatory enrichment of cereal products was abolished in 1987. The aim was to evaluate iron status in the Danish female population before and after abolishment of iron...... fortification. Methods: Iron status, serum ferritin and haemoglobin, was assessed in population surveys in 1983-1984 comprising 1221 Caucasian women (1089 non-blood-donors, 130 donors) and in 1993-1994 comprising 1261 women (1155 non-blood-donors, 104 donors) equally distributed in age cohorts of 40, 50, 60......, postmenopausal women had median ferritin of 75 mug/L and in 1994 of 93 mug/L (P iron stores (ferritin iron stores (ferritin less...

  1. New insights into iron deficiency and iron deficiency anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camaschella, Clara

    2017-07-01

    Recent advances in iron metabolism have stimulated new interest in iron deficiency (ID) and its anemia (IDA), common conditions worldwide. Absolute ID/IDA, i.e. the decrease of total body iron, is easily diagnosed based on decreased levels of serum ferritin and transferrin saturation. Relative lack of iron in specific organs/tissues, and IDA in the context of inflammatory disorders, are diagnosed based on arbitrary cut offs of ferritin and transferrin saturation and/or marker combination (as the soluble transferrin receptor/ferritin index) in an appropriate clinical context. Most ID patients are candidate to traditional treatment with oral iron salts, while high hepcidin levels block their absorption in inflammatory disorders. New iron preparations and new treatment modalities are available: high-dose intravenous iron compounds are becoming popular and indications to their use are increasing, although long-term side effects remain to be evaluated. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Serum Iron and Haemoglobin Estimation in Oral Submucous Fibrosis and Iron Deficiency Anaemia: A Diagnostic Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhardwaj, Divya; Dinkar, Ajit D; Satoskar, Sujata K; Desai, Sapna Raut

    2016-12-01

    Oral Submucous Fibrosis (OSMF) is a premalignant condition with potential malignant behaviour characterized by juxta-epithelial fibrosis of the oral cavity. In the process of collagen synthesis, iron gets utilized, by the hydroxylation of proline and lysine, leading to decreased serum iron levels. The trace element like iron is receiving much attention in the detection of oral cancer and precancerous condition like OSMF as it was found to be significantly altered in these conditions. The aim of this study was to compare the haemoglobin and serum iron values of OSMF subjects with that of iron deficiency anaemia subjects. Total of 120 subjects were included, 40 subjects with the OSMF, 40 with the iron deficiency anemia without tobacco chewing habit, 40 healthy control subjects without OSMF and iron deficiency anaemia. A total of 5ml of venous blood was withdrawn from all the subjects and serum iron and haemoglobin levels were estimated for all the subjects. Estimation of iron was done using Ferrozine method and haemoglobin by Sahli's method. The statistical method applied were Kruskal Wallis, Mann Whitney and Pearson correlation coefficient test. There was a statistically significant difference in serum iron and haemoglobin level in all three groups (pauxillary test in assessment of prognosis of the disease.

  3. Iron absorption in relation to iron status

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magnusson, B.; Bjoern-Rasmussen, E.; Hallberg, L.; Rossander, L.

    1981-01-01

    The absorption from a 3 mg dose of ferrous iron was measured in 250 male subjects. The absorption was related to the log concentration of serum ferritin in 186 subjects of whom 99 were regular blood donors (r= -0.76), and to bone marrow haemosiderin grading in 52 subjects with varying iron status. The purpose was to try and establish a percentage absorption from such a dose that is representative of subjects who are borderline iron deficient. This information is necessary for food iron absorption studies in order (1) to calculate the absorption of iron from the diet at a given iron status and (2) compare the absorption of iron from different meals studied in different groups of subjects by different investigarors. The results suggest that an absorption of about 40% of a 3 mg reference dose of ferrous iron is given in a fasting state, roughly corresponds to the absorption in borderline-iron-deficient subjects. The results indicate that this 40% absorption value corresponds to a serum ferritin level of 30 μg/l and that food iron absorption in a group of subjects should be expressed preferably as the absorption corresponding to a reference-dose absorption of 45%, or possibly a serum ferritin level of 30 μg/l. (author)

  4. Electron-beam-induced reduction of Fe3+ in iron phosphate dihydrate, ferrihydrite, haemosiderin and ferritin as revealed by electron energy-loss spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pan, Ying-Hsi; Vaughan, Gareth; Brydson, Rik; Bleloch, Andrew; Gass, Mhairi; Sader, Kasim; Brown, Andy

    2010-01-01

    The effect of high-energy electron irradiation on ferritin/haemosiderin cores (in an iron-overloaded human liver biopsy), its mineral analogue; six-line ferrihydrite (6LFh), and iron phosphate dihydrate (which has similar octahedral ferric iron to oxygen coordination to that in ferrihydrite and ferritin/haemosiderin cores) has been investigated using electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS). Fe L 2,3 -ionisation edges were recorded on two types of electron microscope: a 200 keV transmission electron microscope (TEM) and a 100 keV scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM), in order to investigate the damage mechanisms in operation and to establish a methodology for minimum specimen alteration during analytical electron microscopic characterisation. A specimen damage mechanism dominated by radiolysis that results in the preferential loss of iron co-ordinating ligands (O, OH and H 2 O) is discussed. The net result of irradiation is structural re-organisation and reduction of iron within the iron hydroxides. At sufficiently low electron fluence and particularly in the lower incident energy, finer probe diameter STEM, the alteration is shown to be minimal. All the materials examined exhibit damage which as a function of cumulative fluence is best fitted by an inverse power-law, implying that several chemical and structural changes occur in response to the electron beam and we suggest that these are governed by secondary processes arising from the primary ionisation event. This work affirms that electron fluence and current density should be considered when measuring mixed valence ratios with EELS.

  5. Electron-beam-induced reduction of Fe{sup 3+} in iron phosphate dihydrate, ferrihydrite, haemosiderin and ferritin as revealed by electron energy-loss spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pan, Ying-Hsi; Vaughan, Gareth; Brydson, Rik [Institute for Materials Research, SPEME, University of Leeds, Leeds LS2 9JT (United Kingdom); Bleloch, Andrew; Gass, Mhairi [SuperSTEM, Daresbury Laboratories, Warrington WA4 4AD (United Kingdom); Sader, Kasim [Institute for Materials Research, SPEME, University of Leeds, Leeds LS2 9JT (United Kingdom); SuperSTEM, Daresbury Laboratories, Warrington WA4 4AD (United Kingdom); Brown, Andy, E-mail: a.p.brown@leeds.ac.uk [Institute for Materials Research, SPEME, University of Leeds, Leeds LS2 9JT (United Kingdom)

    2010-07-15

    The effect of high-energy electron irradiation on ferritin/haemosiderin cores (in an iron-overloaded human liver biopsy), its mineral analogue; six-line ferrihydrite (6LFh), and iron phosphate dihydrate (which has similar octahedral ferric iron to oxygen coordination to that in ferrihydrite and ferritin/haemosiderin cores) has been investigated using electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS). Fe L{sub 2,3}-ionisation edges were recorded on two types of electron microscope: a 200 keV transmission electron microscope (TEM) and a 100 keV scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM), in order to investigate the damage mechanisms in operation and to establish a methodology for minimum specimen alteration during analytical electron microscopic characterisation. A specimen damage mechanism dominated by radiolysis that results in the preferential loss of iron co-ordinating ligands (O, OH and H{sub 2}O) is discussed. The net result of irradiation is structural re-organisation and reduction of iron within the iron hydroxides. At sufficiently low electron fluence and particularly in the lower incident energy, finer probe diameter STEM, the alteration is shown to be minimal. All the materials examined exhibit damage which as a function of cumulative fluence is best fitted by an inverse power-law, implying that several chemical and structural changes occur in response to the electron beam and we suggest that these are governed by secondary processes arising from the primary ionisation event. This work affirms that electron fluence and current density should be considered when measuring mixed valence ratios with EELS.

  6. ESR spectroscopy of blood serum in thalassemia: discrimination of iron overload severity in deferoxamine-cured patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Preoteasa, E.A.; Schianchi, G.; Giori, D.C.; Pedrazzi, G.

    1997-01-01

    Iron impairments in homozygous β-thalassemia include iron overload syndrome, partially prevented by deferoxamine (DF) and methemalbumin (MHA) in serum. The latter has been studied by electron spin resonance ESR before the clinical use of DF and recently in DF cured subjects. We monitored by X-band ESR at 163 K, the Fe (III) bound in MHA and transferrin (Tf) in serum from transfused, DF-cured patients. Plotting MHA/Tf versus individual DF dose divided the patients into two subgroups, A and B; A with the two variables correlated linearly and B presenting no correlation. The patients in B presented a higher incidence and severity of clinical complications and lower therapy responsiveness as compared to subjects in A. The ratio MHA/Tf evidenced a quadratic dependence on the mass of transfused erythrocytes (TE) in A, and no regularity in B. Similar patterns appeared in plots of ferritin (FT) and hemoglobin (Hb) vs. DF and TE, but all correlation become visible only after A vs. B discrimination by ESR. The results point to a heavier iron overload in B than in A patients, suggesting different Hb degradation pathways in the two subgroups with more toxic 'free' iron produced in B than in A. Therefore, ESR of serum might serve for improving the precision of diagnosis, for prognosis of dissimilar therapeutic efficiency of DF in patients and for monitoring the long-term efficiency of therapy in homozygous β-thalassemia. (authors)

  7. Iron and Vitamin C Co-Supplementation Increased Serum Vitamin C Without Adverse Effect on Zinc Level in Iron Deficient Female Youth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Reza Khoshfetrat

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Iron supplementation can decrease the absorption of zinc and influence other antioxidants levels such as vitamin C. This study aimed to investigate the effect of iron supplements alone and in combination with vitamin C on zinc and vitamin C status in iron deficient female students. Methods: In a double-blind randomized clinical trail, 60 iron deficient students were selected from 289 volunteers residing in dormitory. After matching, subjects were randomly assigned into two groups: Group I (50 mg elemental iron supplements and Group II (50 mg elemental iron + 500 mg ascorbic acid. Serum ferritin, iron, serum zinc, and plasma vitamin C concentrations were measured by using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, spectrophotometer, atomic absorption spectrometer, and colorimeter, respectively after 6 and 12 weeks supplementation. Student′s t-test and repeated measures analysis of variance were applied to analyze the data using SPSS software. Results: Serum zinc levels had no significant differences between 2 groups at the baseline; however, its concentration decreased from 80.9 ± 4.2-68.9 ± 2.7 μg/dl to 81.2 ± 4.5-66.1 ± 2.9 μg/dl (P < 0.001 in Groups I and II, respectively after 6 weeks of supplementation. Continuous supplementation increased serum zinc concentration to baseline levels (79.0 ± 2.9 μg/dl; P < 0.01 in Group I and 70.5 ± 3.1 μg/dl in Group II following 12 weeks of supplementation. Plasma vitamin C increased from 3 ± 0/1-3.3 ± 0.2 mg/dl to 2.7 ± 0. 1-4.2 ± 0.2 mg/dl (P < 0.01 in Groups I and II, respectively. At the end of study, plasma vitamin C significantly increased from 3.3 ± 0.3-4.7 ± 0.3 (P < 0.01 to 4.2 ± 0.2-7.1 ± 0.2 (P < 0.001 in Groups I and II, respectively. Conclusions: Iron supplementation with and without vitamin C led to reduction in serum Zn in iron-deficient female students after 6 weeks. However, the decreasing trend stops after repletion of iron stores and Zn levels returned to the

  8. Iron nutrition in Indian women at different ages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MacPhail, A.P.; Bothwell, T.H.; Torrance, J.D.; Derman, D.P.; Bezwoda, W.R.; Charlton, R.W.; Mayet, F.G.H.

    1981-01-01

    The iron status of 320 Indian women living in Chatsworth, Durban, who had volunteered for iron absorption studies, was assessed using a number of measurements. These included radio-iron absorption, the transferrin saturation, the serum ferritin concentration and the haemoglobin concentration. In the sample as a whole, the prevalence of iron deficiency anaemia (haemoglobin concentration smaller than 12 g/dl, with two or more abnormal measurements of iron status) was 14,4%. A further 26% had depleted iron stores (serum ferritin smaller than 12μg/l) and 8,4% also had evidence of iron-deficient erythropoiesis (serum ferritin smaller than 12μg/l and transferrin saturation below 16%). A profile of iron status based on the cumulative frequency distribution of iron stores showed that the sample with calculated median iron stores of 150 mg and lower and upper 10 percentiles of -355 mg and 655 mg respectively, was significantly more iron deficient than a sample of women studied in Washington State, USA. Of interest was the observation that all measurements of iron status were better in the older age groups, presumably as a result of the cessation of menstruation. In addition, there was evidence that the duration of menstruation, as volunteered in a brief history, had a significant effect on several measurements of iron status. This was particularly true of the serum ferritin concentration and radio-iron absorption, both of which reflect the size of the iron stores

  9. CORRELATION OF GALLSTONE FORMATION WITH SERUM IRON LEVELS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rohini Bipin Bhadre

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION Gallstones are one of the most common problem associated with the gallbladder, affecting millions of people throughout the world. Bile is excreted from liver and gallbladder into Duodenum for digestion. After digestion, if the gallbladder is not emptied out completely, the Bile Juice that remains in the gallbladder can become too concentrated with cholesterol leading to gallstone formation. Cholesterol and calcium bilirubinate are the two main substances involved in gallstone formation. Gallstones derived from bile consists of mixture of cholesterol, bilirubin with or without calcium. Based on their chemical composition, gallstones found in the gallbladder are classified as cholesterol, pigmented or mixed stones. Iron deficiency has been shown to alter the activity of several hepatic enzymes, leading to increased gallbladder bile cholesterol saturation and promotion of cholesterol crystal formation. AIMS & OBJECTIVE Attempt to establish a correlation with gallstones and decreased serum iron levels. MATERIAL & METHODS This study was a prospective cohort study which included 100 consecutive patients with imaging studies suggestive of Cholelithiasis. The Gallstone surgically removed was crushed with mortar and pestle and then analysed for cholesterol, calcium, phosphate and bilirubin (pigment. Serum samples were analysed for Cholesterol, iron and iron binding capacity. RESULTS 86% patients had increased cholesterol levels (p=0.04 and 93% had decreased serum Iron levels (p=0.96. The most common type of gallstone was found to be Cholesterol type of gallstone followed by Mixed and Pigment gallstones. CONCLUSION Serum cholesterol levels were found to be raised in majority of the patients and serum iron was found to be low in these majority of the patients indicating iron deficiency may play a role in gallstone formation.

  10. Ferritin associates with marginal band microtubules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Infante, Anthony A.; Infante, Dzintra; Chan, M.-C.; How, P.-C.; Kutschera, Waltraud; Linhartova, Irena; Muellner, Ernst W.; Wiche, Gerhard; Propst, Friedrich

    2007-01-01

    We characterized chicken erythrocyte and human platelet ferritin by biochemical studies and immunofluorescence. Erythrocyte ferritin was found to be a homopolymer of H-ferritin subunits, resistant to proteinase K digestion, heat stable, and contained iron. In mature chicken erythrocytes and human platelets, ferritin was localized at the marginal band, a ring-shaped peripheral microtubule bundle, and displayed properties of bona fide microtubule-associated proteins such as tau. Red blood cell ferritin association with the marginal band was confirmed by temperature-induced disassembly-reassembly of microtubules. During erythrocyte differentiation, ferritin co-localized with coalescing microtubules during marginal band formation. In addition, ferritin was found in the nuclei of mature erythrocytes, but was not detectable in those of bone marrow erythrocyte precursors. These results suggest that ferritin has a function in marginal band formation and possibly in protection of the marginal band from damaging effects of reactive oxygen species by sequestering iron in the mature erythrocyte. Moreover, our data suggest that ferritin and syncolin, a previously identified erythrocyte microtubule-associated protein, are identical. Nuclear ferritin might contribute to transcriptional silencing or, alternatively, constitute a ferritin reservoir

  11. Second international round robin for the quantification of serum non-transferrin-bound iron and labile plasma iron in patients with iron-overload disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Swart, Louise; Hendriks, Jan C. M.; van der Vorm, Lisa N.; Cabantchik, Z. Ioav; Evans, Patricia J.; Hod, Eldad A.; Brittenham, Gary M.; Furman, Yael; Wojczyk, Boguslaw; Janssen, Mirian C. H.; Porter, John B.; Mattijssen, Vera E. J. M.; Biemond, Bart J.; MacKenzie, Marius A.; Origa, Raffaella; Galanello, Renzo; Hider, Robert C.; Swinkels, Dorine W.

    2016-01-01

    Non-transferrin-bound iron and its labile (redox active) plasma iron component are thought to be potentially toxic forms of iron originally identified in the serum of patients with iron overload. We compared ten worldwide leading assays (6 for non-transferrin-bound iron and 4 for labile plasma iron)

  12. Iron status and systemic inflammation, but not gut inflammation, strongly predict gender-specific concentrations of serum hepcidin in infants in rural Kenya.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanja Jaeggi

    Full Text Available Hepcidin regulation by competing stimuli such as infection and iron deficiency has not been studied in infants and it's yet unknown whether hepcidin regulatory pathways are fully functional in infants. In this cross-sectional study including 339 Kenyan infants aged 6.0±1.1 months (mean±SD, we assessed serum hepcidin-25, biomarkers of iron status and inflammation, and fecal calprotectin. Prevalence of inflammation, anemia, and iron deficiency was 31%, 71%, 26%, respectively. Geometric mean (±SD serum hepcidin was 6.0 (±3.4 ng/mL, and was significantly lower in males than females. Inflammation (C-reactive protein and interleukin-6 and iron status (serum ferritin, zinc protoporphyrin and soluble transferrin receptor were significant predictors of serum hepcidin, explaining nearly 60% of its variance. There were small, but significant differences in serum hepcidin comparing iron deficient anemic (IDA infants without inflammation to iron-deficient anemic infants with inflammation (1.2 (±4.9 vs. 3.4 (±4.9 ng/mL; P<0.001. Fecal calprotectin correlated with blood/mucus in the stool but not with hepcidin. Similarly, the gut-linked cytokines IL-12 and IL-17 did not correlate with hepcidin. We conclude that hepcidin regulatory pathways are already functional in infancy, but serum hepcidin alone may not clearly discriminate between iron-deficient anemic infants with and without infection. We propose gender-specific reference values for serum hepcidin in iron-replete infants without inflammation.

  13. Clinical value of combined measurement of serum alpha-fetoprotein, alpha-L-fucosidase and ferritin levels in the diagnosis of primary liver cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Aimin; Chai Xiaohong; Jin Ying; Dong Xuemei

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the clinical value of combined measurement of serum alpha-fetoprotein (AFP), alpha-L-fucosidase (AFU) and ferritin (SF) levels in the diagnosis of primary liver cancer. Methods: Serum AFP, AFU (with RIA) and SF (with biochemical method) were determined in 52 patients with primary liver cancer and 40 controls. Results: The positive rates of AFP, AFU and SF in patient with liver cancer were 82.7%, 86.6% and 76.9%, respectively. Positive rates with combined measurement of AFP plus AFU, AFP plus SF, and AFP plus AFU, SF were 94.2%, 90.4% and 98.1% respectively. Conclusion: Combined measurement of AFP, AFU and SF can significantly increase the positive rate in the diagnosis of primary liver cancer. (authors)

  14. Radioisotope binding capacity of serum for folic acid, vitamin B12 and ferritin in hematologic and rheumatologic patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ringelhann, B.; Revicky, A.; Arvai, I.; Megyeri, A.; Goemoer, B.; Josfay, L.; Csak, E.

    1980-01-01

    Folic acid, vitamin B 12 and ferritin levels were determined by radioimmunoassay in patients suffering from hemic and rheumatic diseases, resp. Compared to the controls the folic acid levels were lower in some cases, the deficiency of folic acid absorption and distribution possibly being caused by the disease. Vitamin B 12 was only slightly decreased. In ankylosing spondylitis the transferrin level was similar to that of the controls, but in rheumatoid arthritis and in patients suffering from various diseases it was increased

  15. Evaluation of Serum Iron Status of Lactating Mothers on Exclusive ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Evaluation of Serum Iron Status of Lactating Mothers on Exclusive Breastfeeding in Enugu, South East Nigeria. F.F Ejezie, U.I Nwagha, J.E Ikekpeazu, I.C Maduka, E Neboh, D.C Nwachukwu, T.U Nwagha ...

  16. Disruptive chemical doping in a ferritin-based iron oxide nanoparticle to decrease r2 and enhance detection with T1-weighted MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clavijo Jordan, M Veronica; Beeman, Scott C; Baldelomar, Edwin J; Bennett, Kevin M

    2014-01-01

    Inorganic doping was used to create flexible, paramagnetic nanoparticle contrast agents for in vivo molecular magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with low transverse relaxivity (r2). Most nanoparticle contrast agents formed from superparamagnetic metal oxides are developed with high r2. While sensitive, they can have limited in vivo detection due to a number of constraints with T2 or T2*-weighted imaging. T1-weighted imaging is often preferred for molecular MRI, but most T1-shortening agents are small chelates with low metal payload or are nanoparticles that also shorten T2 and limit the range of concentrations detectable with T1-weighting. Here we used tungsten and iron deposition to form doped iron oxide crystals inside the apoferritin cavity to form a WFe nanoparticle with a disordered crystal and un-coupled atomic magnetic moments. The atomic magnetic moments were thus localized, resulting in a principally paramagnetic nanoparticle. The WFe nanoparticles had no coercivity or saturation magnetization at 5 K and sweeping up to ± 20,000 Oe, while native ferritin had a coercivity of 3000 Oe and saturation at ± 20,000 Oe. This tungsten-iron crystal paramagnetism resulted in an increased WFe particle longitudinal relaxivity (r1) of 4870 mm(-1) s(-1) and a reduced transverse relaxivity (r2) of 9076 mm(-1) s(-1) compared with native ferritin. The accumulation of the particles was detected with T1-weighted MRI in concentrations from 20 to 400 nm in vivo, both injected in the rat brain and targeted to the rat kidney glomerulus. The WFe apoferritin nanoparticles were not cytotoxic up to 700 nm particle concentrations, making them potentially important for targeted molecular MRI. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  17. Iron status and chronic kidney disease predict restless legs syndrome in an older hospital population.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Quinn, Colin

    2011-03-01

    Iron deficiency is important in the pathogenesis of restless legs syndrome (RLS), and serum ferritin measurement, using a cutoff of 45-50ng\\/ml, is widely recommended as the optimal screening test for iron deficiency in RLS. Serum ferritin often increases with inflammation, and a higher cutoff may be better in those with acute and chronic inflammatory conditions, including those with chronic kidney disease (CKD).

  18. Iron, Anemia, and Iron Deficiency Anemia among Young Children in the United States

    OpenAIRE

    Gupta, Priya M.; Perrine, Cria G.; Mei, Zuguo; Scanlon, Kelley S.

    2016-01-01

    Iron deficiency and anemia are associated with impaired neurocognitive development and immune function in young children. Total body iron, calculated from serum ferritin and soluble transferrin receptor concentrations, and hemoglobin allow for monitoring of the iron and anemia status of children in the United States. The purpose of this analysis is to describe the prevalence of iron deficiency (ID), anemia, and iron deficiency anemia (IDA) among children 1–5 years using data from the 2007–201...

  19. Study of ferritin nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lancok, A.; Kohout, J.; Volfova, L.; Miglierini, M.

    2015-01-01

    Moessbauer spectrometry confirms the presence of hematite, ferrihydrite and maghemite/magnetite in ferritin derived from human spleen tissues. The minerals are present in a form of small (about 4-5 nm in size) grains with highly disordered structure. Consequently, at room temperature all agglomerates of ferritin nanoparticles show non-magnetic behaviour. Magnetic states are revealed at low enough temperatures below the so-called blocking temperature. Employing Moessbauer effect measurements, the latter was determined to be of 16 K for the human spleen. Structural features of these tissues were studied by TEM technique. Employing 57 Fe nuclei as local probes both structural and magnetic features of the biological materials were investigated by Moessbauer spectrometry. It was possible to identify iron atoms and their neighbours. (authors)

  20. Kinetic Studies of Iron Deposition Catalyzed by Recombinant Human Liver Heavy, and Light Ferritins and Azotobacter Vinelandii Bacterioferritin Using O2 and H2O2 as Oxidants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunker, Jared; Lowry, Thomas; Davis, Garrett; Zhang, Bo; Brosnahan, David; Lindsay, Stuart; Costen, Robert; Choi, Sang; Arosio, Paolo; Watt, Gerald D.

    2005-01-01

    The discrepancy between predicted and measured H2O2 formation during iron deposition with recombinant heavy human liver ferritin (rHF) was attributed to reaction with the iron protein complex [Biochemistry 40 (2001) 10832-10838]. This proposal was examined by stopped-flow kinetic studies and analysis for H2O2 production using (1) rHF, and Azotobacter vinelandii bacterial ferritin (AvBF), each containing 24 identical subunits with ferroxidase centers; (2) site-altered rHF mutants with functional and dysfunctional ferroxidase centers; and (3) rccombinant human liver light ferritin (rLF), containing 110 ferroxidase center. For rHF, nearly identical pseudo-first-order rate constants of 0.18 per second at pH 7.5 were measured for Fe(2+) oxidation by both O2 and H2O2, but for rLF, the rate with O2 was 200-fold slower than that for H2O2 (k-0.22 per second). A Fe(2+)/O2 stoichiometry near 2.4 was measured for rHF and its site altered forms, suggesting formation of H2O2. Direct measurements revealed no H2O2 free in solution 0.5-10 min after all Fe(2+) was oxidized at pH 6.5 or 7.5. These results are consistent with initial H2O2 formation, which rapidly reacts in a secondary reaction with unidentified solution components. Using measured rate constants for rHF, simulations showed that steady-state H2O2 concentrations peaked at 14 pM at approx. 600 ms and decreased to zero at 10-30 s. rLF did not produce measurable H2O2 but apparently conducted the secondary reaction with H2O2. Fe(2+)/O2 values of 4.0 were measured for AvBF. Stopped-flow measurements with AvBF showed that both H2O2 and O2 react at the same rate (k=0.34 per second), that is faster than the reactions with rHF. Simulations suggest that AvBF reduces O2 directly to H2O without intermediate H2O2 formation.

  1. Magnetism in plant and mammalian ferritin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bauminger, E.R.; Nowik, I.

    1989-01-01

    A rich variety of magnetic phenomena is observed in Moessbauer studies of ferritin. Depending on the amount of iron in the horse spleen ferritin core, a paramagnetic relaxation spectrum, or quadrupole split doublet or a magnetically split sextet showing superparamagnetism, are obtained at 4.1 K. Moessbauer studies of the recently prepared iron loaded concanavalin A yield hyperfine parameters identical to those found previously in mammalian ferritin, yet show the existence of larger iron aggregates. Due to the larger particle size it is possible to follow the magnetic hyperfine field and to obtain the magnetic ordering temperature as 240 K. This is exactly the Neel temperature of ferrihydrite, thus establishing that this is indeed the iron compound in the ferritin core. (orig.)

  2. Relationship between Plasma Ferritin Level and Siderocyte Number in Splenectomized β-Thalassemia/HbE Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Tripatara

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. In iron overload status, excess iron deposits in reticuloendothelial cells and tissues and can be detected using Prussian blue staining. The aim of this paper was to investigate the relationship between siderocyte numbers and plasma ferritin levels (a practically standard marker of iron overload in the blood of the splenectomized and nonsplenectomized β-thalassemia/HbE patients, who are at risk of iron overload. Methods. EDTA blood samples from 64 patients with 35 splenectomized and 29 nonsplenectomized β-thalassemia/HbE patients, who received regular blood transfusions, and 20 normal individuals were investigated for siderocyte numbers, plasma ferritin levels, and complete blood counts. Results. The average percent siderocytes in splenectomized and nonsplenectomized β-thalassemia/HbE patients were 11.5% and 0.08%, respectively, and plasma ferritin levels of 2,332 μg/L and 1,279 μg/L, respectively. Percent siderocytes showed a good correlation with plasma ferritin levels only in splenectomized patients (r=0.69, P<0.001. A receiver operating curve analysis from splenectomized patients’ data indicated that siderocytes at 3% cut-off are the best predictor for plasma ferritin level ≥1,000 μg/L with 92.9% sensitivity and 42.9% specificity. Conclusion. Circulating siderocyte numbers can be used as a screening test for the assessment of the iron overload in splenectomized β-thalassemia/HbE patients in the place where serum ferritin is not available.

  3. Distinguishing ferritin from apoferritin using magnetic force microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nocera, Tanya M; Zeng, Yuzhi; Agarwal, Gunjan

    2014-01-01

    Estimating the amount of iron-replete ferritin versus iron-deficient apoferritin proteins is important in biomedical and nanotechnology applications. This work introduces a simple and novel approach to quantify ferritin by using magnetic force microscopy (MFM). We demonstrate how high magnetic moment probes enhance the magnitude of MFM signal, thus enabling accurate quantitative estimation of ferritin content in ferritin/apoferritin mixtures in vitro. We envisage MFM could be adapted to accurately determine ferritin content in protein mixtures or in small aliquots of clinical samples. (fast track communication)

  4. Distinguishing ferritin from apoferritin using magnetic force microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nocera, Tanya M.; Zeng, Yuzhi; Agarwal, Gunjan

    2014-11-01

    Estimating the amount of iron-replete ferritin versus iron-deficient apoferritin proteins is important in biomedical and nanotechnology applications. This work introduces a simple and novel approach to quantify ferritin by using magnetic force microscopy (MFM). We demonstrate how high magnetic moment probes enhance the magnitude of MFM signal, thus enabling accurate quantitative estimation of ferritin content in ferritin/apoferritin mixtures in vitro. We envisage MFM could be adapted to accurately determine ferritin content in protein mixtures or in small aliquots of clinical samples.

  5. Improved differential diagnosis of anemia of chronic disease and iron deficiency anemia: a prospective multicenter evaluation of soluble transferrin receptor and the sTfR/log ferritin index.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skikne, Barry S; Punnonen, Kari; Caldron, Paul H; Bennett, Michael T; Rehu, Mari; Gasior, Gail H; Chamberlin, Janna S; Sullivan, Linda A; Bray, Kurtis R; Southwick, Paula C

    2011-11-01

    Anemia of chronic disease (ACD) and iron deficiency anemia (IDA) are the most prevalent forms of anemia and often occur concurrently. Standard tests of iron status used in differential diagnosis are affected by inflammation, hindering clinical interpretation. In contrast, soluble transferrin receptor (sTfR) indicates iron deficiency and is unaffected by inflammation. Objectives of this prospective multicenter clinical trial were to evaluate and compare the diagnostic accuracy of sTfR and the sTfR/log ferritin index (sTfR Index) for differential diagnosis using the automated Access(®) sTfR assay (Beckman Coulter) and sTfR Index. We consecutively enrolled 145 anemic patients with common disorders associated with IDA and ACD. Subjects with IDA or ACD + IDA had significantly higher sTfR and sTfR Index values than subjects with ACD (P < 0.0001). ROC curves produced the following cutoffs for sTfR: 21 nmol/L (or 1.55 mg/L), and the sTfR Index: 14 (using nmol/L) (or 1.03 using mg/L). The sTfR Index was superior to sTfR (AUC 0.87 vs. 0.74, P < 0.0001). Use of all three parameters in combination more than doubled the detection of IDA, from 41% (ferritin alone) to 92% (ferritin, sTfR, sTfR Index). Use of sTfR and the sTfR Index improves detection of IDA, particularly in situations where routine markers provide equivocal results. Findings demonstrate a significant advantage in the simultaneous determination of ferritin, sTfR and sTfR Index. Obtaining a ferritin level alone may delay diagnosis of combined IDA and ACD. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  6. Iron status of some pregnant women in Orlu town-Eastern Nigeria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    BACKGROUND: High prevalence of anaemia has been reported among pregnant women especially in developing nations. This paper considers maternal haemoglobin (Hb) level, serum total iron, iron binding capacity, and serum ferritin in antenatal women in Orlu- Imo State Nigeria. PATIENTS AND METHODS: ...

  7. Serum B/sub 12/ levels in iron definiency anemia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sagan, L A; Ohki, Keiichi

    1964-04-23

    As part of its research program to study the late effects of radiation in survivors of the atomic bombs, the Atomic Bomb Casualty Commission (ABCC) in conjunction with the Japanese National Institute of Health (JNIH), conducts biennial medical examinations on the selected population which comprises the ABCC-JHIN Adult Health Study sample. The patients herein described as Groups 1 and 2 were selected from among those examined in Nagasaki who had had a hemoglobin value of less than 11.0 g/100 ml at examination 2 years previously and who had responded to iron therapy sufficiently to justify a diagnosis of iron deficiency anemia. Almost all were women of child bearing age. The effect of iron therapy on the level of serum B/sub 12/ was investigated. Of 58 patients so studied, 46 showed some rise in post-treatment levels of B/sub 12/. This is evaluated as indicating that gastric secretion of intrinsic factor is depressed in the majority of iron deficient patients.

  8. Ferritin Blood Test: MedlinePlus Lab Test Information

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... K. Brunner & Suddarth's Handbook of Laboratory and Diagnostic Tests. 2nd Ed, Kindle. Philadelphia: Wolters Kluwer Health, Lippincott Williams & Wilkins; c2014. Ferritin, Serum; 296 p. Lab Tests ...

  9. Evaluation of Serum CEA, CA19-9, CA72-4, CA125 and Ferritin as Diagnostic Markers and Factors of Clinical Parameters for Colorectal Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Yanfeng; Wang, Jinping; Zhou, Yue; Sheng, Sen; Qian, Steven Y; Huo, Xiongwei

    2018-02-09

    Blood-based protein biomarkers have recently shown as simpler diagnostic modalities for colorectal cancer, while their association with clinical pathological characteristics is largely unknown. In this study, we not only examined the sensitivity and reliability of single/multiple serum markers for diagnosis, but also assessed their connection with pathological parameters from a total of 279 colorectal cancer patients. Our study shown that glycoprotein carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) owns the highest sensitivity among single marker in the order of CEA > cancer antigen 72-4 (CA72-4) > cancer antigen 19-9 9 (CA19-9) > ferritin > cancer antigen 125 (CA125), while the most sensitive combined-markers for two to five were: CEA + CA72-4; CEA + CA72-4 + CA125; CEA + CA19-9 + CA72-4 + CA125; and CEA + CA19-9 + CA72-4 + CA125 + ferritin, respectively. We also demonstrated that patients who had positive preoperative serum CEA, CA19-9, or CA72-4 were more likely with lymph node invasion, positive CA125 were prone to have vascular invasion, and positive CEA or CA125 were correlated with perineural invasion. In addition, positive CA19-9, CA72-4, or CA125 was associated with poorly differentiated tumor, while CEA, CA19-9, CA72-4, CA125 levels were positively correlated with pathological tumor-node-metastasis stages. We here conclude that combined serum markers can be used to not only diagnose colorectal cancer, but also appraise the tumor status for guiding treatment, evaluation of curative effect, and prognosis of patients.

  10. Ferritin Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... normal" values. By comparing your test results with reference values, you and your healthcare provider can see if ... along with other iron tests , when a routine complete blood count (CBC) shows that a person's hemoglobin and hematocrit ...

  11. Tertiary structural changes and iron release from human serum transferrin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mecklenburg, S L; Donohoe, R J; Olah, G A

    1997-08-01

    Iron release from human serum transferrin was investigated by comparison of the extent of bound iron, measured by charge transfer absorption band intensity (465 nm), with changes observed by small-angle solution X-ray scattering (SAXS) for a series of equilibrated samples between pH 5.69 and 7.77. The phosphate buffers used in this study promote iron release at relatively high pH values, with an empirical pK of 6.9 for the convolved release from the two sites. The spectral data reveal that the N-lobe release is nearly complete by pH 7.0, while the C-lobe remains primarily metal-laden. Conversely, the radius of gyration, Rg, determined from the SAXS data remains constant between pH 7.77 and 7.05, and the evolution of Rg between its value observed for the diferric protein at pH 7.77 (31.2+/-0.2 A) and that of the apo protein at pH 5.69 (33.9+/-0.4 A) exhibits an empirical pK of 6.6. While Rg is effectively constant in the pH range associated with iron release from the N-lobe, the radius of gyration of cross-section, Rc, increases from 16.9+/-0.2 A to 17.6+/-0.2 A. Model simulations suggest that two different rotations of the NII domain relative to the NI domain about a hinge deep in the iron-binding cleft of the N-lobe, one parallel with and one perpendicular to the plane of the iron-binding site, can be significantly advanced relative to their holo protein positions while yielding constant Rg and increased Rc values consistent with the scattering data. Rotation of the CII domain parallel with the C-lobe iron-binding site plane can partially account for the increased Rg values measured at low pH; however, no reasonable combined repositioning of the NII and CII domains yields the experimentally observed increase in Rg.

  12. Impact of multi parity on iron content in multiparous women

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farooq, A.; Rauf, S.; Hassan, U.; Sadiq, N.

    2011-01-01

    The effect of multiple pregnancies, a very common pattern in reproductive lifestyle of Pakistani women, needs to be addressed to see if it affects the iron content and hence cause iron deficiency. Recognising this deficiency prior to development of anaemia can prevent disastrous consequences that can complicate the life of the mother and foetus especially in developing countries. The objective of this study was to assess the effect that the stress of multiple pregnancies has on the iron status of the body. Methods: This comparative study was conducted in a focus group of female population. Two hundred subjects were selected by convenient sampling and grouped depending on their parity status. Data regarding diet, and socioeconomic history was collected on pre-designed questionnaire. Serum Ferritin was used to assess iron deficiency using the Electro chemiluminescence Immunoassay (ECLIA). Data was statistically analysed using SPSS-17. Results: Mean value of serum Ferritin in the nulliparous group was 76.52 +- 4.92 eta g/mL with 16% of nulliparous subjects showing lower than normal values. Thirty-six percent of uniparous subjects showed low serum Ferritin values, mean value being 45.74 +- 4.51 eta g/mL. Seventy-two percent of the multiparous subjects showed iron deficiency with Ferritin levels of <20 eta g/mL. Mean serum Ferritin in this group was 25.21+- 2.75 g/mL. The differences between the Ferritin levels of the study groups were highly significant (p<0.01). Conclusions: Multiparous women had lower serum Ferritin levels than the control group suggesting that the stress of multiple pregnancies takes its toll on the iron content of the body. (author)

  13. Alternative expression of vacuolar iron transporter and ferritin genes leads to blue/purple coloration of flowers in tulip cv. 'Murasakizuisho'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoji, Kazuaki; Momonoi, Kazumi; Tsuji, Tosiaki

    2010-02-01

    Flowers of tulip cv. 'Murasakizuisho' have a purple perianth except for the bottom region, which is blue in color even though it has the same anthocyanin, delphinidin 3-O-rutinoside, as the entire perianth. The development of the blue coloration in the perianth bottom is due to complexation by anthocyanin, flavonol and iron (Fe), as well as a vacuolar iron transporter, TgVit1. Although transient expression of TgVit1 in the purple cells led to a color change to light blue, the coloration of the transformed cells did not coincide with the dark blue color of the cells of the perianth bottom. We thought that another factor is required for the blue coloration of the cells of perianth bottom. To examine the effect of ferritin (FER), an Fe storage protein, on blue color development, we cloned an FER gene (TgFER1) and performed expression analyses. TgFER1 transcripts were found in the cells located in the upper region of the petals along with purple color development by anthocyanin and were not found in the blue cells of the perianth bottom. This gene expression is in contrast to that of TgVit1, expressed only in the cells of the perianth bottom. Co-expression of TgVIT1 and TgFER-RNAi, constructed for suppressing endogenous TgFER1 by RNA interference (RNAi), changed the purple petal cells to a dark blue color similar to that of the natural perianth bottom. These results strongly suggest that TgVit1 expression and TgFER1 suppression are critical for the development of blue color in the perianth bottom.

  14. Clinical outcomes of transfusion-associated iron overload in patients with refractory chronic anemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gao C

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Chong Gao, Li Li, Baoan Chen, Huihui Song, Jian Cheng, Xiaoping Zhang, Yunyu SunDepartment of Hematology and Oncology, Key Department of Jiangsu Medicine, Zhongda Hospital, Medical School, Southeast University, Nanjing, Jiangsu Province, People’s Republic of ChinaBackground: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the clinical outcomes of transfusion-associated iron overload in patients with chronic refractory anemia.Methods: Clinical manifestations, main organ function, results of computed tomography (CT, endocrine evaluation, and serum ferritin levels were analyzed retrospectively in 13 patients who were transfusion-dependent for more than 1 year (receiving >50 units of red blood cells to determine the degree of iron overload and efficacy of iron-chelating therapy.Results: Serum ferritin levels increased to 1,830–5,740 ng/mL in all patients. Ten patients had abnormal liver function. The CT Hounsfield units in the liver increased significantly in eleven patients, and were proportional to their serum ferritin levels. Skin pigmentation, liver dysfunction, and endocrine dysfunction were observed in nine patients with serum ferritin >3,500 ng/mL, eight of whom have since died. Interestingly, serum ferritin levels did not decrease significantly in nine transfusion-dependent patients who had received 15–60 days of iron-chelating therapy.Conclusion: Transfusion-dependent patients may progress to secondary iron overload with organ impairment, which may be fatal in those who are heavily iron-overloaded. The CT Hounsfield unit is a sensitive indicator of iron overload in the liver. Iron chelation therapy should be initiated when serum ferritin is >1,000 ng/mL and continued until it is <1,000 ng/mL in transfusional iron-overloaded patients.Keywords: anemia, aplastic, iron overload, myelodysplastic syndromes

  15. Serum hepcidin levels, iron status, and HFE gene alterations during the first year of life in healthy Spanish infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aranda, Nuria; Bedmar, Cristina; Arija, Victoria; Jardí, Cristina; Jimenez-Feijoo, Rosa; Ferré, Natalia; Tous, Monica

    2018-06-01

    The aims of this study were to describe hepcidin levels and to assess their associations with iron status and the main variants in the HFE gene in healthy and full-term newborns during the first year of life, as a longitudinal study conducted on 140 infants. Anthropometric and biochemical parameters, hepcidin, hemoglobin (Hb), serum ferritin (SF), transferrin saturation (TS), mean corpuscular volume (MCV), and C-reactive protein (CRP), were assessed in 6- and 12-month-olds. Infants were genotyped for the three main HFE variants: C282Y, H63D, and S65C. Hepcidin levels increased from 6 to 12 months of age (43.7 ± 1.5 to 52.0 ± 1.5 ng/mL; p HFE gene (p = 0.046 and p = 0.048 in 6- and 12-month-olds, respectively). However, this association was not found in HFE-alteration-carrying infants. Hepcidin levels increased in healthy infants during the first year of life and were positively associated with iron levels only in infants with wild-type HFE gene, a situation that requires further investigation.

  16. Iron status determination in pregnancy using the Thomas plot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weyers, R; Coetzee, M J; Nel, M

    2016-04-01

    Physiological changes during pregnancy affect routine tests for iron deficiency. The reticulocyte haemoglobin equivalent (RET-He) and serum-soluble transferrin receptor (sTfR) assay are newer diagnostic parameters for the detection of iron deficiency, combined in the Thomas diagnostic plot. We used this plot to determine the iron status of pregnant women presenting for their first visit to an antenatal clinic in Bloemfontein, South Africa. Routine laboratory tests (serum ferritin, full blood count and C-reactive protein) and RET-He and sTfR were performed. The iron status was determined using the Thomas plot. For this study, 103 pregnant women were recruited. According to the Thomas plot, 72.8% of the participants had normal iron stores and erythropoiesis. Iron-deficient erythropoiesis was detected in 12.6%. A third of participants were anaemic. Serum ferritin showed excellent sensitivity but poor specificity for detecting depleted iron stores. HIV status had no influence on the iron status of the participants. Our findings reiterate that causes other than iron deficiency should be considered in anaemic individuals. When compared with the Thomas plot, a low serum ferritin is a sensitive but nonspecific indicator of iron deficiency. The Thomas plot may provide useful information to identify pregnant individuals in whom haematologic parameters indicate limited iron availability for erythropoiesis. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Purification and characterisation of ferritin from the Baltic blue mussel Mytilus trossulus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Potrykus Joanna

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Baltic blue mussels Mytilus trossulus were collected from the Gulf of Gdańsk (southern Baltic Sea in order to isolate ferritin from its soft tissues, as well as to purify and characterise this protein.     Proteins were isolated from the inner organs of M. trossulus (hepatopancreas, gills and soft tissue residue by thermal denaturation(70°C and acidification (pH 4.5 of the homogenates, followed by ammonium sulphate ((NH42SO4 fractionation.The ferritin was then separated by ultracentrifugation (100 000 × g, 120 min.. The protein content in thepurified homogenates was determined by the Lowry method using bovine serum albumin(BSA and horse spleen ferritin (HSF as standards. PAGE-SDS and Western blotting analysis permitted identification of ferritinin the purified preparations. Additionally, the purified homogenates and mussel soft tissue were analysed for their heavy metal contents(especially cadmium and iron in a Video 11 E atomic absorption spectrophotometer, following wet digestion of the samples (HNO3/HClO4.     The electrophoregrams showed that the inner organs of M. trossulus contained ferritin, which, like plant ferritin, is characterised by thepresence of subunits in the electrophoregram in the 26.6-28.0 kDa range. The highest ferritin content was recorded in the hepatopancreas,followed by the gills and the soft tissue residue. With regard to the sampling stations, the highest content of ferritin wasnoted in the animals sampled off Sopot (station D3, and in those collected by a diver off Jastarnia (W1 and Gdynia (W4. Ferritinisolated from the inner organs of mussels collected from these stations also contained the largest quantities of heavy metals(Cd and Fe. Ferritin isolated from the inner organs of mussels collected by a diver from wrecks - sites where the concentrationsof iron and other trace metals in the sea water are high - contained higher quantities of heavy metals (Cd and Fe than the ferritinisolated from the inner organs

  18. Iron status in 358 apparently healthy 80-year-old Danish men and women: relation to food composition and dietary and supplemental iron intake

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Milman, Nils; Pedersen, Agnes Nadelmann; Ovesen, Lars

    2004-01-01

    of age from a 1914 cohort study. Blood samples included serum ferritin and hemoglobin (Hb). A dietary survey was performed in 232 subjects (120 men, 112 women) using a dietary history method. Median serum ferritin was 100 mug/l in men and 78 mug/l in women (p300 mug/l (i.e., iron overload) were found......In Denmark, the intake of dietary iron has decreased since 1987, when the mandatory iron fortification of flour (30 mg carbonyl iron/kg) was stopped. Since there have been no studies of iron status in elderly Danes after the abolishment of iron fortification, there is a need to assess actual iron...... status in the elderly population. The objective was to evaluate iron status and the relationship with food composition and dietary and supplemental iron intake in an elderly population in Copenhagen County. Participants in this health examination survey were 358 subjects (171 men, 187 women) 80 years...

  19. The effects of fat loss after bariatric surgery on inflammation, serum hepcidin, and iron absorption

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cepeda-Lopez, Ana C.; Allende-Labastida, Javier; Melse-Boonstra, Alida; Osendarp, Saskia J.M.; Herter-Aeberli, Isabelle; Moretti, Diego; Rodriguez-Lastra, Ramiro; Gonzalez-Salazar, Francisco; Villalpando, Salvador; Zimmermann, Michael B.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Iron deficiency is common in obese subjects. This may be due to an increase in serum hepcidin and a decrease in iron absorption from adiposity-related inflammation. Objective: We evaluated whether weight and fat loss in obese subjects would decrease inflammation and serum hepcidin and

  20. Serum Zinc, Iron and Copper Concentrations in Dogs Infected with Hepatozoon canis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamil Seyrek

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available In Turkey, canine hepatozoonosis is an emerging infection with a large number of cases detected during the past five years. In the present study, serum zinc, copper and iron concentrations of dogs infected with Hepatozoon canis were measured for the first time. Compared to the controls (n = 10, serum zinc and iron concentrations in infected animals (n = 14 decreased significantly (p p p Hepatozoon canis infection may cause alterations in serum zinc iron and copper concentrations. Furthermore, in the treatment of infected animals addition of zinc and iron to the ration of infected animals should be taken into consideration.

  1. Hydroxyurea could be a good clinically relevant iron chelator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Italia, Khushnooma; Colah, Roshan; Ghosh, Kanjaksha

    2013-01-01

    Our previous study showed a reduction in serum ferritin of β-thalassemia patients on hydroxyurea therapy. Here we aimed to evaluate the efficacy of hydroxyurea alone and in combination with most widely used iron chelators like deferiprone and deferasirox for reducing iron from experimentally iron overloaded mice. 70 BALB/c mice received intraperitonial injections of iron-sucrose. The mice were then divided into 8 groups and were orally given hydroxyurea, deferiprone or deferasirox alone and their combinations for 4 months. CBC, serum-ferritin, TBARS, sTfr and hepcidin were evaluated before and after iron overload and subsequently after 4 months of drug therapy. All animals were then killed. Iron staining of the heart and liver tissue was done using Perl's Prussian Blue stain. Dry weight of iron in the heart and liver was determined by atomic absorption spectrometry. Increased serum-ferritin, TBARS, hepcidin and dry weight of iron in the liver and heart showed a significant reduction in groups treated with iron chelators with maximum reduction in the group treated with a combination of deferiprone, deferasirox and hydroxyurea. Thus hydroxyurea proves its role in reducing iron from iron overloaded mice. The iron chelating effect of these drugs can also be increased if given in combination.

  2. Hydroxyurea could be a good clinically relevant iron chelator.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khushnooma Italia

    Full Text Available Our previous study showed a reduction in serum ferritin of β-thalassemia patients on hydroxyurea therapy. Here we aimed to evaluate the efficacy of hydroxyurea alone and in combination with most widely used iron chelators like deferiprone and deferasirox for reducing iron from experimentally iron overloaded mice. 70 BALB/c mice received intraperitonial injections of iron-sucrose. The mice were then divided into 8 groups and were orally given hydroxyurea, deferiprone or deferasirox alone and their combinations for 4 months. CBC, serum-ferritin, TBARS, sTfr and hepcidin were evaluated before and after iron overload and subsequently after 4 months of drug therapy. All animals were then killed. Iron staining of the heart and liver tissue was done using Perl's Prussian Blue stain. Dry weight of iron in the heart and liver was determined by atomic absorption spectrometry. Increased serum-ferritin, TBARS, hepcidin and dry weight of iron in the liver and heart showed a significant reduction in groups treated with iron chelators with maximum reduction in the group treated with a combination of deferiprone, deferasirox and hydroxyurea. Thus hydroxyurea proves its role in reducing iron from iron overloaded mice. The iron chelating effect of these drugs can also be increased if given in combination.

  3. Changes in serum markers of iron metabolism and their clinical significance in patients with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    OU Qiang

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available ObjectiveTo investigate the changes in the serum markers of iron metabolism and their clinical significance in patients with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD. MethodsA total of 68 NAFLD patients who were admitted to The Eighth People′s Hospital of Shanghai from July 2014 to April 2016 were enrolled as NAFLD group, and 70 healthy persons who underwent physical examination were enrolled as healthy control group. Among the 68 patients in the NAFLD group, 24 had NAFLD alone and 44 were complicated by abnormal alanine aminotransferase (ALT level. The levels of aspartate aminotransferase (AST, ALT, total cholesterol (TC, triglyceride (TG, and serum markers of iron metabolism [serum iron (SI, serum ferritin (SF, and serum hepcidin (HEPC] were measured for all patients, and the correlations between abnormal ALT level and serum markers of iron metabolism were analyzed. The independent samples t-test was used for comparison of continuous data between groups, the chi-square test was used for comparison of categorical data between groups, and the Pearson correlation coefficient was used to investigate the correlation between two variables. ResultsThe NAFLD group had significantly higher body mass index and serum levels of ALT, AST, TC, and TG than the healthy control group (t=9.8, 8.6, 8.5, 9.2, and 2.7, all P<0.05. Compared with the healthy control group, the NAFLD group had significantly higher levels of SI (21.7±7.1 μmol/L vs 187±6.9 μmol/L, t=2.3, P=0.02 and SF (340.2±257.6 μg/L vs 119.1±81.2 μg/L, t=6.7, P<0.01 and a significantly lower level of HEPC (12.2±5.3 μg/L vs 22.2±6.5 μg/L, t=9.9, P<0.01. Compared with those with NAFLD alone, the patients complicated by abnormal ALT level had significantly higher serum levels of ALT (89±58 U/L vs 26±8 U/L, t=7.1, P<0.01, SI (23.4±6.2 μmol/L vs 19.6±7.9 μmol/L, t=2.2, P=0.03, and SF (406.2±290.0 μg/L vs 219.4±112.0 μg/L, t=3.7, P<0.01, as well as a significantly

  4. Iron Status of Vegetarian Children: A Review of Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawlak, Roman; Bell, Kami

    2017-01-01

    Iron is considered a nutrient of concern for vegetarians. In children, inadequate iron status may lead to anemia and poor growth. Thirteen original manuscripts met the inclusion criteria. Various biochemical markers of iron status, such as hemoglobin (Hb) and serum ferritin, were used. Seven of the 13 studies reported the prevalence of iron deficiency separately for vegetarians and non-vegetarians. Five out of 7 showed a higher prevalence of iron deficiency among the vegetarian participants, while the other 2 showed a higher prevalence of iron deficiency among non-vegetarians. A wide range of iron deficiency prevalence, from 4.3% of vegetarian participants in one study to 73% having ferritin vegetarian children varies considerably from one study to another. The wide variation in the prevalence of inadequate iron status was consistent for studies from industrial and developing countries. The physiological significance of low iron status among vegetarians reported in some studies is unknown. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  5. Reticulocyte hemoglobin content (MCHr) in the detection of iron deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urrechaga Igartua, Eloísa; Hoffmann, Johannes J M L; Izquierdo-Álvarez, Silvia; Escanero, Jesús F

    2017-09-01

    Blood hemoglobin (Hb) concentration within the reference interval does not exclude iron deficiency (ID): individuals with normal stores lose iron during a long period before their Hb falls below of the level that is defined as anemia. The process entails a decrease of storage iron, shown by serum ferritin below reference range, followed by iron depletion, eventually leading to iron restricted erythropoiesis; consequence of an imbalance between erythropoietic iron requirements and too low supply is a reduction of Hb synthesis in reticulocytes. We study the potential utility of mean reticulocyte hemoglobin content (MCHr), reported by CELL-DYN Sapphire (Abbott Diagnostics) analyzer, in the detection of ID in non-anemic adults. 207 patients with Hb within the reference range were enrolled. ID was defined as Hb>120g/L (women), >130g/L (men) and serum ferritin iron deficient adults. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  6. Low iron stores are related to higher blood concentrations of manganese, cobalt and cadmium in non-smoking, Norwegian women in the HUNT 2 study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Margrete Meltzer, Helle, E-mail: helle.margrete.meltzer@fhi.no [Division of Environmental Medicine, Department of Food Safety and Nutrition, Norwegian Institute of Public Health, PO Box 4404 Nydalen, N-0403 Oslo (Norway); Lise Brantsaeter, Anne [Division of Environmental Medicine, Department of Food Safety and Nutrition, Norwegian Institute of Public Health, PO Box 4404 Nydalen, N-0403 Oslo (Norway); Borch-Iohnsen, Berit [Institute of Basic Medical Sciences, Department of Nutrition, University of Oslo, PO Box 1046 Blindern, N-0316 Oslo (Norway); Ellingsen, Dag G. [National Institute of Occupational Health, PO Box 8149 Dep, N-0033 Oslo (Norway); Alexander, Jan [Division of Environmental Medicine, Department of Food Safety and Nutrition, Norwegian Institute of Public Health, PO Box 4404 Nydalen, N-0403 Oslo (Norway); Thomassen, Yngvar [National Institute of Occupational Health, PO Box 8149 Dep, N-0033 Oslo (Norway); Stigum, Hein [Division of Epidemiology, Department of Chronic Diseases, Norwegian Institute of Public Health, PO Box 4404 Nydalen, N-0403 Oslo (Norway); Ydersbond, Trond A. [Statistics Norway, P.Box 8131 Dep, N-0033 Oslo (Norway)

    2010-07-15

    Low iron (Fe) stores may influence absorption or transport of divalent metals in blood. To obtain more knowledge about such associations, the divalent metal ions cadmium (Cd), manganese (Mn), cobalt (Co), copper (Cu), zinc (Zn) and lead (Pb) and parameters of Fe metabolism (serum ferritin, haemoglobin (Hb) and transferrin) were investigated in 448 healthy, menstruating non-smoking women, age 20-55 years (mean 38 years), participating in the Norwegian HUNT 2 study. The study population was stratified for serum ferritin: 257 were iron-depleted (serum ferritin <12 {mu}g/L) and 84 had iron deficiency anaemia (serum ferritin <12 {mu}g/L and Hb<120 g/L). The low ferritin group had increased blood concentrations of Mn, Co and Cd but normal concentrations of Cu, Zn and Pb. In multiple regression models, ferritin emerged as the main determinant of Mn, Co and Cd (p<0.001), while no significant associations with Cu, Zn and Pb were found. Adjusted r{sup 2} for the models were 0.28, 0.48 and 0.34, respectively. Strong positive associations between blood concentrations of Mn, Co and Cd were observed, also when controlled for their common association with ferritin. Apart from these associations, the models showed no significant interactions between the six divalent metals studied. Very mild anaemia (110{<=}Hb<120 g/L) did not seem to have any effect independent of low ferritin. Approximately 26% of the women with iron deficiency anaemia had high concentrations of all of Mn, Co and Cd as opposed to 2.3% of iron-replete subjects. The results confirm that low serum ferritin may have an impact on body kinetics of certain divalent metal ions, but not all. Only a fraction of women with low iron status exhibited an increased blood concentration of divalent metals, providing indication of complexities in the body's handling of these metals.

  7. Iron deficiency and anemia are associated with low retinol levels in children aged 1 to 5 years

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bárbara C.A. Saraiva

    2014-11-01

    Conclusions: Anemia and iron deficiency were associated with low levels of serum retinol in children aged 1 to 5 years, and a positive correlation was verified between serum retinol and serum ferritin and hemoglobin levels. These results indicate the importance of initiatives encouraging the development of new treatments and further research regarding retinol deficiency.

  8. Iron chelation therapy with deferasirox in patients with aplastic anemia: a subgroup analysis of 116 patients from the EPIC trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lee, Jong Wook; Yoon, Sung-Soo; Shen, Zhi Xiang

    2010-01-01

    adjustments and ongoing iron intake. Baseline labile plasma iron levels were within normal range despite high serum ferritin levels. The most common drug-related adverse events were nausea (22%) and diarrhea (16%). Serum creatinine increases more than 33% above baseline and the upper limit of normal occurred...... in 29 patients (25%), but there were no progressive increases; concomitant use of cyclosporine had a significant impact on serum creatinine levels. The decrease in mean alanine aminotransferase levels at 1 year correlated significantly with reduction in serum ferritin (r = 0.40, P

  9. The effect of nutrition knowledge and dietary iron intake on iron status in young women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonard, Alecia J; Chalmers, Kerry A; Collins, Clare E; Patterson, Amanda J

    2014-10-01

    Previous research on the relationships between general nutrition knowledge and dietary intake, and dietary iron intake and iron status has produced inconsistent results. Currently, no study has focused on knowledge of dietary iron and its effect on dietary iron intake. This study aimed to determine whether nutrition knowledge of iron is related to dietary iron intake in young women, and subsequently whether greater knowledge and intake translates into better iron status. A cross-sectional assessment of nutrition knowledge of iron, dietary iron intake and iron status was conducted in women aged 18-35 years living in Newcastle, NSW, Australia. Iron status was assessed by serum ferritin, haemoglobin, soluble transferrin receptor and alpha-1-glycoprotein. One hundred and seven women (27.8 ± 4.7 years) completed the nutrition knowledge questionnaire and FFQ. Of these, 74 (70%) also had biomarkers of iron status measured. Mean iron intake was 11.2 ± 3.8 mg/day. There was no association between nutrition knowledge score and whether the women met the RDI for iron (F (1, 102) = .40, P = .53). A positive correlation was shown between nutrition knowledge score and iron intake (mg/day) (r = 0.25, P = .01). Serum ferritin was positively associated with the frequency of flesh food intake (r = .27 P = .02). Vegetarians (including partial vegetarians) had significantly lower serum ferritin levels than non-vegetarians (F (1, 71) = 7.44, P = .01). Significant positive correlations found between higher flesh food intake and biomarkers of iron status suggest that educating non-vegetarians about the benefits of increased flesh food consumption and vegetarians about dietary iron enhancers and inhibitors may have potential for addressing the high rates of iron deficiency among young women. Crown Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Associations between Dietary Iron and Zinc Intakes, and between Biochemical Iron and Zinc Status in Women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen Lim

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Iron and zinc are found in similar foods and absorption of both may be affected by food compounds, thus biochemical iron and zinc status may be related. This cross-sectional study aimed to: (1 describe dietary intakes and biochemical status of iron and zinc; (2 investigate associations between dietary iron and zinc intakes; and (3 investigate associations between biochemical iron and zinc status in a sample of premenopausal women aged 18–50 years who were recruited in Melbourne and Sydney, Australia. Usual dietary intakes were assessed using a 154-item food frequency questionnaire (n = 379. Iron status was assessed using serum ferritin and hemoglobin, zinc status using serum zinc (standardized to 08:00 collection, and presence of infection/inflammation using C-reactive protein (n = 326. Associations were explored using multiple regression and logistic regression. Mean (SD iron and zinc intakes were 10.5 (3.5 mg/day and 9.3 (3.8 mg/day, respectively. Median (interquartile range serum ferritin was 22 (12–38 μg/L and mean serum zinc concentrations (SD were 12.6 (1.7 μmol/L in fasting samples and 11.8 (2.0 μmol/L in nonfasting samples. For each 1 mg/day increase in dietary iron intake, zinc intake increased by 0.4 mg/day. Each 1 μmol/L increase in serum zinc corresponded to a 6% increase in serum ferritin, however women with low serum zinc concentration (AM fasting < 10.7 μmol/L; AM nonfasting < 10.1 μmol/L were not at increased risk of depleted iron stores (serum ferritin <15 μg/L; p = 0.340. Positive associations were observed between dietary iron and zinc intakes, and between iron and zinc status, however interpreting serum ferritin concentrations was not a useful proxy for estimating the likelihood of low serum zinc concentrations and women with depleted iron stores were not at increased risk of impaired zinc status in this cohort.

  11. Relationship between indices of iron status and metabolic syndrome in an Iranian population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niloofar Tavakoli-Hoseini

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Iron overload may contribute to the pathogenesis of metabolic syndrome (MS. A growing body of evidence indicates that the oxidative stress that results from excess tissue iron can leads to insulin resistance, tissue damage, and other complications observed in MS. The objective of this study was to investigate indices of iron status including serum ferritin, iron, total iron binding capacity (TIBC levels, and full blood cell count, together with demographic and anthropometric characteristics, lipid profile components, and other biochemical parameters in subjects with and with-out MS. Methods: A total of, 385 individuals (176 with and 209 subjects without MS according to the International Diabetes Federation’s (IDF criteria were recruited. Indices of iron status and other clinical and biochemical parameters were determined in MS patients and healthy controls using standard methods. Results: Higher serum iron and ferritin values were observed in subjects with MS in compared to healthy controls (P 0.050. Among the other indices, only red blood cell (RBC was associated considerably with the presence of MS (P < 0.050. Conclusion: Our data indicate that even in a country with a comparatively high prevalence of iron deficiency, serum iron and ferritin values in MS patients are higher than healthy controls. The reason why ferritin and iron are higher in MS patient may be related to dietary factors.

  12. Feasibility Study of NMR Based Serum Metabolomic Profiling to Animal Health Monitoring: A Case Study on Iron Storage Disease in Captive Sumatran Rhinoceros (Dicerorhinus sumatrensis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Miki; Roth, Terri L; Bauer, Stuart J; Lane, Adam; Romick-Rosendale, Lindsey E

    2016-01-01

    A variety of wildlife species maintained in captivity are susceptible to iron storage disease (ISD), or hemochromatosis, a disease resulting from the deposition of excess iron into insoluble iron clusters in soft tissue. Sumatran rhinoceros (Dicerorhinus sumatrensis) is one of the rhinoceros species that has evolutionarily adapted to a low-iron diet and is susceptible to iron overload. Hemosiderosis is reported at necropsy in many African black and Sumatran rhinoceroses but only a small number of animals reportedly die from hemochromatosis. The underlying cause and reasons for differences in susceptibility to hemochromatosis within the taxon remains unclear. Although serum ferritin concentrations have been useful in monitoring the progression of ISD in many species, there is some question regarding their value in diagnosing hemochromatosis in the Sumatran rhino. To investigate the metabolic changes during the development of hemochromatosis and possibly increase our understanding of its progression and individual susceptibility differences, the serum metabolome from a Sumatran rhinoceros was investigated by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR)-based metabolomics. The study involved samples from female rhinoceros at the Cincinnati Zoo (n = 3), including two animals that died from liver failure caused by ISD, and the Sungai Dusun Rhinoceros Conservation Centre in Peninsular Malaysia (n = 4). Principal component analysis was performed to visually and statistically compare the metabolic profiles of the healthy animals. The results indicated that significant differences were present between the animals at the zoo and the animals in the conservation center. A comparison of the 43 serum metabolomes of three zoo rhinoceros showed two distinct groupings, healthy (n = 30) and unhealthy (n = 13). A total of eighteen altered metabolites were identified in healthy versus unhealthy samples. Results strongly suggest that NMR-based metabolomics is a valuable tool for animal health

  13. Feasibility Study of NMR Based Serum Metabolomic Profiling to Animal Health Monitoring: A Case Study on Iron Storage Disease in Captive Sumatran Rhinoceros (Dicerorhinus sumatrensis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miki Watanabe

    Full Text Available A variety of wildlife species maintained in captivity are susceptible to iron storage disease (ISD, or hemochromatosis, a disease resulting from the deposition of excess iron into insoluble iron clusters in soft tissue. Sumatran rhinoceros (Dicerorhinus sumatrensis is one of the rhinoceros species that has evolutionarily adapted to a low-iron diet and is susceptible to iron overload. Hemosiderosis is reported at necropsy in many African black and Sumatran rhinoceroses but only a small number of animals reportedly die from hemochromatosis. The underlying cause and reasons for differences in susceptibility to hemochromatosis within the taxon remains unclear. Although serum ferritin concentrations have been useful in monitoring the progression of ISD in many species, there is some question regarding their value in diagnosing hemochromatosis in the Sumatran rhino. To investigate the metabolic changes during the development of hemochromatosis and possibly increase our understanding of its progression and individual susceptibility differences, the serum metabolome from a Sumatran rhinoceros was investigated by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR-based metabolomics. The study involved samples from female rhinoceros at the Cincinnati Zoo (n = 3, including two animals that died from liver failure caused by ISD, and the Sungai Dusun Rhinoceros Conservation Centre in Peninsular Malaysia (n = 4. Principal component analysis was performed to visually and statistically compare the metabolic profiles of the healthy animals. The results indicated that significant differences were present between the animals at the zoo and the animals in the conservation center. A comparison of the 43 serum metabolomes of three zoo rhinoceros showed two distinct groupings, healthy (n = 30 and unhealthy (n = 13. A total of eighteen altered metabolites were identified in healthy versus unhealthy samples. Results strongly suggest that NMR-based metabolomics is a valuable tool for

  14. Isotope - aided studies of the bioavailability of iron and zinc from human diets consumed in Poland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rafalski, H.

    1992-01-01

    The main aims of the study were: 1) the evaluation of iron and zinc status in women of Lodz aged 18-45 years, 2) adaptation of the whole body counter to in vivo measurements absorption of iron given to the gastro-intestinal tract of volunteers and 3) in rat model estimation iron bioavailability from fortified wheat flour combined with products usually consumed in Poland. During five months investigations thirty seven women were examined each one twice in two months interval. Following variables were measured: iron and zinc in blood serum, in public and scalp hair and in food, taste acuity score, serum ferritin, hemoglobin, total iron binding capacity, red blood cells, mean corpuscular concentration and corpuscular volume. Prevalence of iron deficiency and iron deficient anemia were assessed by two models in terms of the depression of serum ferritin and hemoglobin concentrations. 64 refs, 6 figs, 23 tabs

  15. Oxidative modification of ferritin induced by methylglyoxal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sung Ho An

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Methylglyoxal (MG was identified as an intermediate innon-enzymatic glycation and increased levels were reported inpatients with diabetes. In this study, we evaluated the effects ofMG on the modification of ferritin. When ferritin wasincubated with MG, covalent crosslinking of the proteinincreased in a time- and MG dose-dependent manner.Reactive oxygen species (ROS scavengers, N-acetyl-L-cysteineand thiourea suppressed the MG-mediated ferritinmodification. The formation of dityrosine was observed inMG-mediated ferritin aggregates and ROS scavengers inhibitedthe formation of dityrosine. During the reaction betweenferritin and MG, the generation of ROS was increased as afunction of incubation time. These results suggest that ROSmay play a role in the modification of ferritin by MG. Thereaction between ferritin and MG led to the release of ironions from the protein. Ferritin exposure to MG resulted in aloss of arginine, histidine and lysine residues. It was assumedthat oxidative damage to ferritin caused by MG may induce anincrease in the iron content in cells, which is deleterious tocells. This mechanism, in part, may provide an explanation orthe deterioration of organs under diabetic conditions. [BMBreports 2012; 45(3: 147-152

  16. The evaluation of iron deficiency and anemia in male blood donors with other related factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yousefinejad Vahid

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims and Background: Iron deficiency is one of the most common nutritional disorders worldwide and blood donation may cause iron depletion. Limited studies with large sample size have been done on male donors. The aim of this study is to determine the prevalence of iron deficiency and iron deficiency anemia among male donors in the Kurdistan Organization of Blood Transfusion in Iran. Materials and Methods: This was a cross-sectional study. Sample size was 1184 blood donors selected by systematic random sampling. Hemoglobin, serum iron, serum ferritin, total iron banding capacity (TIBC and transferin saturation were measured in donors. Iron depletion, lack of iron stores, iron deficiency, iron deficiency anemia and anemia were evaluated among them. Data was analyzed with SPSS software and X΂, one-way ANOVA, and LSD test. Results: Iron deficiency, anemia, iron deficiency anemia, iron depletion and lack of iron resources were seen in 2.3, 4.08, 2.14, 22.76 and 4.66 percent respectively. There was a significant relationship of iron deficiency and iron deficiency anemia with instances of donation and interval from last donation (P < 0.05. A significant relationship was seen between iron deficiency and iron deficiency anemia among blood donors with more than ten times blood donation (P < 0.05. Conclusions: This study showed regular male donors require especial attention. Therefore, serum ferritin is recommended as a more adequate index to use for iron deficiency screening and planning purposes for iron supplementation among them.

  17. The natural history of serum iron indices for HFE C282Y homozygosity associated with hereditary hemochromatosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurrin, Lyle C; Osborne, Nicholas J; Constantine, Clare C; McLaren, Christine E; English, Dallas R; Gertig, Dorota M; Delatycki, Martin B; Southey, Melissa C; Hopper, John L; Giles, Graham G; Anderson, Gregory J; Olynyk, John K; Powell, Laurie W; Allen, Katrina J

    2008-12-01

    There are few longitudinal studies of serum ferritin (SF) and transferrin saturation (TS) levels in individuals homozygous for the C282Y mutation. We characterized the development of elevated iron measures in C282Y homozygotes followed for 12 years. From 31,192 people aged 40-69 years at baseline, we identified 203 C282Y homozygotes (95 males), of whom 116 had SF and fasting TS levels measured at baseline (mean age, 55 years) and 86 were untreated and had iron measures at follow-up (mean, 12 years later). The probabilities of SF at follow-up exceeding clinical thresholds were predicted from baseline SF and TS under a multivariate normal model. For C282Y homozygotes, at baseline, 84% of males and 65% of females had elevated SF and 37% of males and 3% of females had SF >1000 microg/L. For males with SF 300-1000 microg/L at baseline, the predicted probability of progressing to SF >1000 microg/L at follow-up was between 13% and 35% and, for females, between 16% and 22%. For C282Y homozygotes with normal baseline SF, 1000 microg/L if left untreated. The majority of C282Y homozygotes who are likely to develop SF levels sufficient to place them at risk of iron overload-related disease will have done so by mean age 55 years. TS >95% at mean age 55 years in males increases the likelihood that SF levels will be elevated at mean age 65 years, but this effect is absent in females, most likely because of physiologic blood loss associated with menstruation.

  18. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... iron in your body is low. For this reason, other iron tests are also done. Ferritin measure ... iron is needed, such as childhood and pregnancy. Good sources of iron are meat, poultry, fish, and ...

  19. Low iron stores are related to higher blood concentrations of manganese, cobalt and cadmium in non-smoking, Norwegian women in the HUNT 2 study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Margrete Meltzer, Helle; Lise Brantsaeter, Anne; Borch-Iohnsen, Berit; Ellingsen, Dag G.; Alexander, Jan; Thomassen, Yngvar; Stigum, Hein; Ydersbond, Trond A.

    2010-01-01

    Low iron (Fe) stores may influence absorption or transport of divalent metals in blood. To obtain more knowledge about such associations, the divalent metal ions cadmium (Cd), manganese (Mn), cobalt (Co), copper (Cu), zinc (Zn) and lead (Pb) and parameters of Fe metabolism (serum ferritin, haemoglobin (Hb) and transferrin) were investigated in 448 healthy, menstruating non-smoking women, age 20-55 years (mean 38 years), participating in the Norwegian HUNT 2 study. The study population was stratified for serum ferritin: 257 were iron-depleted (serum ferritin 2 for the models were 0.28, 0.48 and 0.34, respectively. Strong positive associations between blood concentrations of Mn, Co and Cd were observed, also when controlled for their common association with ferritin. Apart from these associations, the models showed no significant interactions between the six divalent metals studied. Very mild anaemia (110≤Hb<120 g/L) did not seem to have any effect independent of low ferritin. Approximately 26% of the women with iron deficiency anaemia had high concentrations of all of Mn, Co and Cd as opposed to 2.3% of iron-replete subjects. The results confirm that low serum ferritin may have an impact on body kinetics of certain divalent metal ions, but not all. Only a fraction of women with low iron status exhibited an increased blood concentration of divalent metals, providing indication of complexities in the body's handling of these metals.

  20. NCOA4 Deficiency Impairs Systemic Iron Homeostasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Bellelli

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The cargo receptor NCOA4 mediates autophagic ferritin degradation. Here we show that NCOA4 deficiency in a knockout mouse model causes iron accumulation in the liver and spleen, increased levels of transferrin saturation, serum ferritin, and liver hepcidin, and decreased levels of duodenal ferroportin. Despite signs of iron overload, NCOA4-null mice had mild microcytic hypochromic anemia. Under an iron-deprived diet (2–3 mg/kg, mice failed to release iron from ferritin storage and developed severe microcytic hypochromic anemia and ineffective erythropoiesis associated with increased erythropoietin levels. When fed an iron-enriched diet (2 g/kg, mice died prematurely and showed signs of liver damage. Ferritin accumulated in primary embryonic fibroblasts from NCOA4-null mice consequent to impaired autophagic targeting. Adoptive expression of the NCOA4 COOH terminus (aa 239–614 restored this function. In conclusion, NCOA4 prevents iron accumulation and ensures efficient erythropoiesis, playing a central role in balancing iron levels in vivo.

  1. Effect Of Joint Iron And Zinc Supplementation On Malarial Infection ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Adjusted geometric mean serum ferritin concentration in the Iron-zinc Group was significantly higher than in the Control Group (22.9 fg/L versus 16.9 fg/L), F (1, 156) = 6.336, p = 0.013. Conclusions: Joint iron and zinc supplementation appears to be a better option than iron-only supplementation in malaria-endemic areas.

  2. Biosynthesis, isolation and characterization of {sup 57}Fe-enriched Phaseolus vulgaris ferritin after heterologous expression in Escherichia coli

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoppler, Matthias [ETH Zurich, Laboratory of Human Nutrition, Zurich (Switzerland); Meile, Leo [ETH Zurich, Laboratory of Food Biotechnology, Zurich (Switzerland); Walczyk, Thomas [National University of Singapore, Department of Chemistry and Department of Biochemistry, Singapore (Singapore)

    2008-01-15

    Ferritin is the major iron storage protein in the biosphere. Iron stores of an organism are commonly assessed by measuring the concentration of the protein shell of the molecule in fluids and tissues. The amount of ferritin-bound iron, the more desirable information, still remains inaccessible owing to the lack of suitable techniques. Iron saturation of ferritin is highly variable, with a maximum capacity of 4,500 iron atoms per molecule. This study describes the direct isotopic labeling of a complex metalloprotein in vivo by biosynthesis, in order to measure ferritin-bound iron by isotope dilution mass spectrometry. [{sup 57}Fe]ferritin was produced by cloning and overexpressing the Phaseolus vulgaris ferritin gene pfe in Escherichia coli in the presence of {sup 57}FeCl{sub 2}. Recombinant ferritin was purified in a fully assembled form and contained approximately 1,000 iron atoms per molecule at an isotopic enrichment of more than 95% {sup 57}Fe. We did not find any evidence of species conversion of the isotopic label for at least 5 months of storage at -20 C. Transfer efficiency of enriched iron into [{sup 57}Fe]ferritin of 20% was sufficient to be economically feasible. Negligible amounts of non-ferritin-bound iron in the purified [{sup 57}Fe]ferritin solution allows for use of this spike for quantification of ferritin-bound iron by isotope dilution mass spectrometry. (orig.)

  3. Maxi- and mini-ferritins: minerals and protein nanocages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bevers, Loes E; Theil, Elizabeth C

    2011-01-01

    Ferritins synthesize ferric oxide biominerals and are central to all life for concentrating iron and protection against oxidative stress from the ferrous and oxidant chemistry. The ferritin protein nanocages and biomineral synthesis are discussed in terms of wide biological distribution of the maxi-ferritins (24 subunit ± heme) and mini-ferritins (Dps) (12 subunit), conservations of the iron/oxygen catalytic sites in the protein cages, mineral formation (step i. Fe(II) entry and binding, step ii. O(2) or H(2)O(2) binding and formation of transition intermediates, step iii. release of differric oxo mineral precursors from active sites, step iv. nucleation and mineralization) properties of the minerals, and protein control of mineral dissolution and release of Fe(II). Pores in ferritin protein cages control iron entry for mineralization and iron exit after mineral dissolution. The relationship between phosphate or the presence of catalytically inactive subunits (animal L subunits) and ferritin iron mineral disorder is developed based on new information about contributions of ferritin protein cage structure to nucleation in protein cage subunit channels that exit close enough to those of other subunits and exiting mineral nuclei to facilitate bulk mineral formation. How and where protons move in and out of the protein during mineral synthesis and dissolution, how ferritin cage assembly with 12 or 24 subunits is encoded in the widely divergent ferritin amino acid sequences, and what is the role of the protein in synthesis of the bulk mineral are all described as problems requiring new approaches in future investigations of ferritin biominerals.

  4. Evaluation of cardiac and hepatic iron overload in thalassemia major patients with T2* magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahidiyat, Pustika Amalia; Liauw, Felix; Sekarsari, Damayanti; Putriasih, Siti Ayu; Berdoukas, Vasili; Pennell, Dudley J

    2017-09-01

    Recent advancements have promoted the use of T2* magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the non-invasive detection of iron overload in various organs for thalassemia major patients. This study aims to determine the iron load in the heart and liver of patients with thalassemia major using T2* MRI and to evaluate its correlation with serum ferritin level and iron chelation therapy. This cross-sectional study included 162 subjects diagnosed with thalassemia major, who were classified into acceptable, mild, moderate, or severe cardiac and hepatic iron overload following their T2* MRI results, respectively, and these were correlated to their serum ferritin levels and iron chelation therapy. The study found that 85.2% of the subjects had normal cardiac iron stores. In contrast, 70.4% of the subjects had severe liver iron overload. A significant but weak correlation (r = -0.28) was found between cardiac T2* MRI and serum ferritin, and a slightly more significant correlation (r = 0.37) was found between liver iron concentration (LIC) and serum ferritin. The findings of this study are consistent with several other studies, which show that patients generally manifest with liver iron overload prior to cardiac iron overload. Moreover, iron accumulation demonstrated by T2* MRI results also show a significant correlation to serum ferritin levels. This is the first study of its kind conducted in Indonesia, which supports the fact that T2* MRI is undoubtedly valuable in the early detection of cardiac and hepatic iron overload in thalassemia major patients.

  5. The impact of a meat- versus a vegetable-based diet on iron status in women of childbearing age with small iron stores

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tetens, Inge; Bendtsen, K.M.; Henriksen, M.

    2007-01-01

    about dietary intake before and during intervention, meat/fish intake, menstruation and contraceptive methods were recorded. Results: The women who consumed the meat-based diet had a significantly (P ... on iron status of women of childbearing age. Methods: For 20 weeks, 57 women aged 19-39 years with low iron stores (serum ferritin = 120 g/l) consumed either a meat-based or a vegetable-based diet. Haemoglobin and serum ferritin concentrations were measured at baseline, after 10 and 20 weeks. Information...

  6. Serum hepcidin is significantly associated with iron absorption from food and supplemental sources in healthy young woman

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hepcidin is a key regulator of iron homeostasis, but to date no studies have examined the effect of hepcidin on iron absorption in humans. Our objective was to assess relations between both serum hepcidin and serum prohepcidin with nonheme-iron absorption in the presence and absence of food with the...

  7. Serum Albumin Alters the Expression of Pseudomonas Aeruginosa Iron Controlled Genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    The objectives of this study were to examine the effect serum on global transcription within P. aeruginosa at different phases of growth and the role of iron in this regulation. Results presented in this study suggest a novel mechanism through which serum regulates the expression of different P. ae...

  8. Increased serum iron associated with coronary heart disease among nigerian adults

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orimadegun, B.E.; Taylor, G.O.; Onuegbu, J.A.; Olisekodiaka, J.M.

    2007-01-01

    To examine the concentrations of serum iron and some risk factors of coronary heart disease in Nigerians with evidence of Coronary Heart Disease. The concentration of serum iron, the plasma cholesterol level, the hip-waist ratio and body mass index of 70 patients with evidence of CHD seen at a Cardiology Unit of a Specialist Hospital in Ibadan and 70 healthy subjects selected randomly were determined. Subjects were grouped into four age categories and three socioeconomic classes (high, middle and low). The age of the subjects ranged from 31-70 years with the mean of 53.6+-11.0 years and 50.1+-10.5 years for patients and controls respectively. The mean serum iron and plasma cholesterol levels were significantly higher among patients than controls irrespective of age and sex (p<0.05). No correlation was found between serum iron and the variables; plasma cholesterol level, age, body mass index (BMI) and hip-waist ratio. Significantly higher serum iron levels found in patients with evidence of CHD appears to support the hypothesis that there is a potential association between iron status and CHD. (author)

  9. Diagnosis of Iron-Deficiency Anemia in Chronic Kidney Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahrainwala, Jehan; Berns, Jeffrey S

    2016-03-01

    Anemia is a common and clinically important consequence of chronic kidney disease (CKD). It is most commonly a result of decreased erythropoietin production by the kidneys and/or iron deficiency. Deciding on the appropriate treatment for anemia associated with CKD with iron replacement and erythropoietic-stimulating agents requires an ability to accurately diagnose iron-deficiency anemia. However, the diagnosis of iron-deficiency anemia in CKD patients is complicated by the relatively poor predictive ability of easily obtained routine serum iron indices (eg, ferritin and transferrin saturation) and more invasive gold standard measures of iron deficiency (eg, bone marrow iron stores) or erythropoietic response to supplemental iron. In this review, we discuss the diagnostic utility of currently used serum iron indices and emerging alternative markers of iron stores. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. The distribution of iron between the metal-binding sites of transferrin human serum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, J; Moreton, K

    1980-02-01

    The Makey & Seal [(1976) Biochim. Biophys. Acta 453, 250--256] method of polyacrylamide-gel electrophoresis in buffer containing 6 M-urea was used to determine the distribution of iron between the N-terminal and C-terminal iron-binding sites of transferrin in human serum. In fresh serum the two sites are unequally occupied; there is preferential occupation of the N-terminal site. On incubation of the serum at 37 degrees C the preference of iron for the N-terminal site becomes more marked. On storage of serum at -15 degrees C the iron distribution changes so that there is a marked preference for the C-terminal site. Dialysis of serum against buffer at pH 7.4 also causes iron to be bound much more strongly by the C-terminal than by the N-terminal site. The original preference for the N-terminal site can be resroted to the dialysed serum by addition of the diffusible fraction.

  11. Serum iron levels and the risk of Parkinson disease: a Mendelian randomization study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irene Pichler

    Full Text Available Although levels of iron are known to be increased in the brains of patients with Parkinson disease (PD, epidemiological evidence on a possible effect of iron blood levels on PD risk is inconclusive, with effects reported in opposite directions. Epidemiological studies suffer from problems of confounding and reverse causation, and mendelian randomization (MR represents an alternative approach to provide unconfounded estimates of the effects of biomarkers on disease. We performed a MR study where genes known to modify iron levels were used as instruments to estimate the effect of iron on PD risk, based on estimates of the genetic effects on both iron and PD obtained from the largest sample meta-analyzed to date.We used as instrumental variables three genetic variants influencing iron levels, HFE rs1800562, HFE rs1799945, and TMPRSS6 rs855791. Estimates of their effect on serum iron were based on a recent genome-wide meta-analysis of 21,567 individuals, while estimates of their effect on PD risk were obtained through meta-analysis of genome-wide and candidate gene studies with 20,809 PD cases and 88,892 controls. Separate MR estimates of the effect of iron on PD were obtained for each variant and pooled by meta-analysis. We investigated heterogeneity across the three estimates as an indication of possible pleiotropy and found no evidence of it. The combined MR estimate showed a statistically significant protective effect of iron, with a relative risk reduction for PD of 3% (95% CI 1%-6%; p = 0.001 per 10 µg/dl increase in serum iron.Our study suggests that increased iron levels are causally associated with a decreased risk of developing PD. Further studies are needed to understand the pathophysiological mechanism of action of serum iron on PD risk before recommendations can be made.

  12. Multiple post-transcriptional regulatory mechanisms in ferritin gene expression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mattia, E.; Den Blaauwen, J.; Van Renswoude, J.; Ashwell, G.

    1989-01-01

    The authors have investigated the mechanisms involved in the regulation of ferritin biosynthesis in K562 human erythroleukemia cells during prolonged exposure to iron. They show that, upon addition of hemin (an efficient iron donor) to the cell culture, the rate of ferritin biosynthesis reaches a maximum after a few hours and then decreases. During a 24-hr incubation with the iron donor the concentrations of total ferritin heavy (H) and light (L) subunit mRNAs rise 2- to 5-fold and 2- to 3-fold, respectively, over the control values, while the amount of the protein increases 10- to 30-fold. The hemin-induced increment in ferritin subunit mRNA is not prevented by deferoxamine, suggesting that it is not directly mediated by chelatable iron. In vitro nuclear transcription analyses performed on nuclei isolated from control cells and cells grown in the presence of hemin indicate that the rates of synthesis of H- and L-subunit mRNAs remain constant. They conclude that iron-induced ferritin biosynthesis is governed by multiple post-transcriptional regulatory mechanisms. They propose that exposure of cells to iron leads to stabilization of ferritin mRNAs, in addition to activation and translation of stored H-and L-subunit mRNAs

  13. Role of androgen-mediated enhancement of erythropoiesis in the increased body iron stores of patients with polycystic ovary syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escobar-Morreale, Héctor F; Luque-Ramírez, Manuel

    2011-04-01

    To determine whether androgen excess contributes to the increased body iron stores of polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) by stimulating erythropoietic activity, by measuring serum soluble transferrin receptor (sTfR) concentrations and its ratio to ferritin levels in patients with PCOS, as surrogate markers of erythropoietic activity and of the appropriateness of cellular iron demands for the total body iron contents, respectively. Case-control study. Academic hospital. One hundred-four patients with PCOS and 100 controls without androgen excess. Blood sampling and oral glucose tolerance test. Serum sTfR and ferritin concentrations, as well as indexes of androgen excess, inflammation, obesity, and insulin and glucose metabolism. Serum ferritin levels increased in women presenting with PCOS, obesity, and/or abnormal glucose tolerance, but these disorders did not influence sTfR concentrations. The sTfR/ferritin ratio decreased with obesity and abnormal glucose tolerance, and its logarithm correlated inversely with body mass index, free T, and C-reactive protein levels and directly with the insulin sensitivity and disposition indexes. A stepwise multiple regression analysis indicated that the changes in the insulin sensitivity index explained 7% of the variability of the logarithm of sTfR/ferritin ratio. Increased serum ferritin levels in patients with PCOS are associated with a reduction in insulin sensitivity but do not result from a putative enhancement of erythropoiesis by androgen excess. Copyright © 2011 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Optimizing individual iron deficiency prevention strategies in physiological pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kramarskiy V.A.

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Sideropenia by the end of pregnancy takes place in all mothers without exception. Moreover, the selective administration of iron preparations, in contrast to the routine, makes it possible to avoid hemochromatosis, frequency of which in the general population makes from 0.5 to 13 %. The aim of the study was to optimize the individual strategy for the prevention of iron deficiency in physiological pregnancy. A prospective pre-experimental study was conducted, the criterion of inclusion in which was the mother’s extragenital and obstetrical pathology during the first half of pregnancy, a burdened obstetric and gynecological anamnesis. The study group of 98 women with a physiological pregnancy in the period of 20 to 24 weeks was recruited by simple ran- dom selection. Serum ferritin, hemoglobin, and serum iron were used to estimate iron deficiency. In the latent stage of iron deficiency against a background of monthly correction with Fenules ® in a dose of 90 mg of elemental iron per day, there was a significant increase in ferritin and iron in the blood rotor. In healthy mothers, during the gestational period of 20–24 weeks, a regularity arises in the replenishment of iron status, especially in the case of repeated pregnancy, which is successfully satisfied during the month of Fenules ® intake in doses of 45 mg or 90 mg per day with a serum ferritin level of, respectively, 30 up to 70 μg/l or less than 30 μg/l.

  15. The FIND-CKD study--a randomized controlled trial of intravenous iron versus oral iron in non-dialysis chronic kidney disease patients: background and rationale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macdougall, Iain C; Bock, Andreas; Carrera, Fernando; Eckardt, Kai-Uwe; Gaillard, Carlo; Van Wyck, David; Roubert, Bernard; Cushway, Timothy; Roger, Simon D

    2014-04-01

    Rigorous data are sparse concerning the optimal route of administration and dosing strategy for iron therapy with or without concomitant erythropoiesis-stimulating agent (ESA) therapy for the management of iron deficiency anaemia in patients with non-dialysis dependent chronic kidney disease (ND-CKD). FIND-CKD was a 56-week, open-label, multicentre, prospective, randomized three-arm study (NCT00994318) of 626 patients with ND-CKD and iron deficiency anaemia randomized to (i) intravenous (IV) ferric carboxymaltose (FCM) at an initial dose of 1000 mg iron with subsequent dosing as necessary to target a serum ferritin level of 400-600 µg/L (ii) IV FCM at an initial dose of 200 mg with subsequent dosing as necessary to target serum ferritin 100-200 µg/L or (iii) oral ferrous sulphate 200 mg iron/day. The primary end point was time to initiation of other anaemia management (ESA therapy, iron therapy other than study drug or blood transfusion) or a haemoglobin (Hb) trigger (two consecutive Hb values FIND-CKD was the longest randomized trial of IV iron therapy to date. Its findings will address several unanswered questions regarding iron therapy to treat iron deficiency anaemia in patients with ND-CKD. It was also the first randomized trial to utilize both a high and low serum ferritin target range to adjust IV iron dosing, and the first not to employ Hb response as its primary end point.

  16. Influence of diurnal variation and fasting on serum iron concentrations in a community-based population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Leonard T; Buse, Joshua D; Baskin, Leland; Sadrzadeh, S M Hossein; Naugler, Christopher

    2017-12-01

    Serum iron is an important clinical test to help identify cases of iron deficiency or overload. Fluctuations caused by diurnal variation and diet are thought to influence test results, which may affect clinical patient management. We examined the impact of these preanalytical factors on iron concentrations in a large community-based cohort. Serum iron concentration, blood collection time, fasting duration, patient age and sex were obtained for community-based clinical testing from the Laboratory Information Service at Calgary Laboratory Services for the period of January 2011 to December 2015. A total of 276,307 individual test results were obtained. Iron levels were relatively high over a long period from 8:00 to 15:00. Mean concentrations were highest at blood collection times of 11:00 for adult men and 12:00 for adult women and children, however iron levels peaked as late as 15:00 in teenagers. With regard to fasting, iron levels required approximately 5h post-prandial time to return to a baseline, except for children and teenage females where no significant variation was seen until after 11h fasting. After 10h fasting, iron concentrations in all patient groups gradually increased to higher levels compared to earlier fasting times. Serum iron concentrations remain reasonably stable during most daytime hours for testing purposes. In adults, blood collection after 5 to 9h fasting provides a representative estimate of a patient's iron levels. For patients who have fasted overnight, i.e. ≥12h fasting, clinicians should be aware that iron concentrations may be elevated beyond otherwise usual levels. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  17. Evaluation of the Efficiency of the Reticulocyte Hemoglobin Content on Diagnosis for Iron Deficiency Anemia in Chinese Adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Cai

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Our aim was to evaluate the cut-off value and efficiency of using reticulocyte hemoglobin content as a marker to diagnose iron deficiency anemia in Chinese adults. 140 adults who needed bone marrow aspiration for diagnosis at the hematology department of the Peking Union Medical College Hospital were enrolled according to the inclusive and exclusive criteria. Venous blood samples were collected to detect complete blood count, including hemoglobin, reticulocyte hemoglobin content, hematocrit, mean cellular volume, corpuscular hemoglobin concentration, hemoglobin content, free erythrocyte protoporphyrin; iron indexes of serum ferritin, serum transferrin receptor, and unsaturated iron-binding capacity; and inflammation markers of C-reactive protein and α-acid glycoprotein. Bone marrow samples were obtained for the bone marrow iron staining, which was used as the standard for the evaluation of iron status in this study. Subjects were divided into three groups according to hemoglobin levels and bone marrow iron staining results: the IDA (iron deficiency anemia group, the NIDA (non-iron deficiency anemia group, and the control group. The differences of the above-mentioned indexes were compared among the three groups and the effect of inflammation was also considered. The cut-off value of reticulocyte hemoglobin content was determined by receiver operation curves. The IDA group (n = 56 had significantly lower reticulocyte hemoglobin content, mean cellular volume, corpuscular hemoglobin concentration, hemoglobin content, and serum ferritin; and higher free erythrocyte protoporphyrin, unsaturated iron-binding capacity, and serum transferrin receptor (p < 0.05 compared with the NIDA group (n = 38 and control group (n = 46. Hematocrit, serum ferritin, and unsaturated iron-binding capacity were significantly affected by inflammation while reticulocyte hemoglobin content and other parameters were not. The cut-off value of reticulocyte hemoglobin content for

  18. Iron status markers in 224 indigenous Greenlanders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Milman, N; Byg, K E; Mulvad, G

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate iron status in indigenous Greenlanders and its relationship to gender, age and intake of traditional Greenlandic foods. Methods: Serum ferritin, serum transferrin saturation and haemoglobin were evaluated in a population survey in 1993-1994 comprising 224 Greenlandic...... of living. Consumption of traditional foods was assessed by questionnaire. RESULTS: Intake of traditional foods was more prevalent among elderly than among young individuals and more frequent in Uummannaq than in Ilulissat and Nuuk. Ferritin levels were higher in men than in women (p....06; women, r(s)=0.73, ptraditional foods was correlated with ferritin in men (r(s)=0.29, p=0.01) and women (r(s)=0.40, p

  19. Iron Therapy in Patients with Heart Failure and Iron Deficiency: Review of Iron Preparations for Practitioners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drozd, Marcin; Jankowska, Ewa A; Banasiak, Waldemar; Ponikowski, Piotr

    2017-06-01

    In patients with heart failure (HF), iron deficiency (ID) correlates with decreased exercise capacity and poor health-related quality of life, and predicts worse outcomes. Both absolute (depleted iron stores) and functional (where iron is unavailable for dedicated tissues) ID can be easily evaluated in patients with HF using standard laboratory tests (assessment of serum ferritin and transferrin saturation). Intravenous iron therapy in iron-deficient patients with HF and reduced ejection fraction has been shown to alleviate HF symptoms and improve exercise capacity and quality of life. In this paper, we provide information on how to diagnose ID in HF. Further we discuss pros and cons of different iron preparations and discuss the results of major trials implementing iron supplementation in HF patients, in order to provide practical guidance for clinicians on how to manage ID in patients with HF.

  20. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... red meat, salmon, iron-fortified breads and cereals, peas, tofu, dried fruits, and dark green leafy vegetables. ... stored iron has been used. Ferritin is a protein that helps store iron in your body. Reticulocyte ...

  1. The association of markers of oxidative-inflammatory status with malnutrition in hemodialysis patients with serum ferritin lower than 500 ng/mL Associação dos marcadores do estado oxidativo e inflamatório com a desnutrição em pacientes hemodialisados com ferritina menor do que 500 ng/mL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simone Gonçalves de Almeida

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Enhanced inflammatory-oxidative status is well established in chronic kidney disease. OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study was to evaluate the oxidative- inflammatory status and iron indices in patients undergoing maintenance hemodialysis (HD with serum ferritin lower than 500ng/mL, and to correlate them with nutritional status. METHOD: In a cross-sectional survey 35 HD patients (23 with normal nutritional status, 12 with Protein-Energy-Wasting syndrome, PEW, and healthy volunteers (n = 35 were studied. Serum concentration of iron, ferritin, transferrin saturation, malondialdehyde (MDA, protein carbonyl (PC, high-sensitive serum C -reactive protein (hs-CRP and blood counts were determined. The nutritional status was determined by anthropometric and biochemical criteria. RESULTS: HD patients showed low values of hemoglobin and higher values of ferritin, MDA and PC when compared with healthy volunteers. HD subjects with PEW had higher values of PC and hs-PCR as compared to HD patients with normal nutritional status. A multiple logistic regression analysis showed that the independent variables PC (Wald Statistic 4.25, p = 0.039 and hs-CRP (Wald Statistic 4.83, p = 0.028 where related with the patients' nutritional condition. CONCLUSION: In HD patients with serum ferritin below 500 ng/mL was observed one association of the markers of oxidative stress and inflammation with poor nutritional status independently of serum ferritin, gender and age.INTRODUÇÃO: Na doença renal crônica, a presença de um estado inflamatório-oxidativo aumentado está bem estabelecida. OBJETIVO: O objetivo do presente estudo foi avaliar o estado oxidativo e inflamatório e o perfil do ferro em pacientes submetidos à hemodiálise crônica de manutenção, com ferritina menor do que 500 ng/mL, e correlacioná-los com o estado nutricional. MÉTODO: Em estudo transversal, em 35 pacientes sob hemodiálise (23 com estado nutricional normal, 12 com desnutri

  2. Combined segregation and linkage analysis of genetic hemochromatosis using affection status, serum iron, and HLA.

    OpenAIRE

    Borecki, I B; Lathrop, G M; Bonney, G E; Yaouanq, J; Rao, D C

    1990-01-01

    Characterizing the distribution of parameters of iron metabolism by hemochromatosis genotype remains an important goal vis-à-vis potential screening strategies to identify individuals at genetic risk, since a specific marker to detect the abnormal gene has not been identified as yet. In the present investigation, we analyze serum iron values in ascertained families using a method which incorporates both segregation of the clinical affection status and the HLA linkage information to identify t...

  3. The Role of Serum Copper and Iron in Oral Submucous Fibrosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Master Luquman

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Oral submucous fibrosis (OSMF is a chronic insidious disease of multifactorial etiology. The habit of chewing arecanut is thought to be one of the most important etiologic factors. Copper and iron are elements in the human body that form part of important enzymes. We estimated the serum copper and iron in patients with OSMF as well as normal controls and discuss the role of these elements in the etiology of OSMF.

  4. Mechanisms of an increased level of serum iron in gamma-irradiated mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xie, Li-hua; Zhang, Xiao-hong; Hu, Xiao-dan; Min, Xuan-yu; Zhou, Qi-fu; Zhang, Hai-qian

    2016-01-01

    The potential mechanisms underlying the increase in serum iron concentration in gamma-irradiated mice were studied. The gamma irradiation dose used was 4 Gy, and cobalt-60 ( 60 Co) source was used for the irradiation. The dose rate was 0.25 Gy/min. In the serum of irradiated mice, the concentration of ferrous ions decreased, whereas the serum iron concentration increased. The concentration of ferrous ions in irradiated mice returned to normal at 21 day post-exposure. The concentration of reactive oxygen species in irradiated mice increased immediately following irradiation but returned to normal at 7 day post-exposure. Serum iron concentration in gamma-irradiated mice that were pretreated with reduced glutathione was significant lower (p < 0.01) than that in mice exposed to gamma radiation only. However, the serum iron concentration was still higher than that in normal mice (p < 0.01). This change was biphasic, characterized by a maximal decrease phase occurring immediately after gamma irradiation (relative to the irradiated mice) and a recovery plateau observed during the 7th and 21st day post-irradiation, but serum iron recovery was still less than that in the gamma-irradiated mice (4 Gy). In gamma-irradiated mice, ceruloplasmin activity increased and serum copper concentration decreased immediately after irradiation, and both of them were constant during the 7th and 21st day post-irradiation. It was concluded that ferrous ions in irradiated mice were oxidized to ferric ions by ionizing radiation. Free radicals induced by gamma radiation and ceruloplasmin mutually participated in this oxidation process. The ferroxidase effect of ceruloplasmin was achieved by transfer of electrons from ferrous ions to cupric ions. (orig.)

  5. Role of Serum Iron in the Activation of Lipid Peroxidation in Critical Conditions

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    Yu. P. Orlov

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Twenty-four critically ill patients due to generalized purulent peritonitis, pancreatonecrosis, thermal skin injuries, and severe poisoning by acetic acid were examined. The general regularities of the effect of high serum iron concentrations on the health status of patients, on the activity of antioxidative enzymes, and on the initiation of lipid peroxidation (LPO processes, as supported by the values of Fe2+-induced chemiluminescence, were revealed. In critically ill patients, iron metabolism occurs with the overload of a transport protein, such as transferrin, which is caused by intravascular hemolysis and hemoglobin metabolism to ionized iron. The overload of proteins responsible for iron transport leads to the tissue accumulation of free (ferrous and ferric iron that is actively involved in the processes of LPO initiation with excess synthesis of cytotoxic radicals, which in turn accounts for the severity of endotoxicosis.

  6. Reduction of body iron in HFE-related haemochromatosis and moderate iron overload (Mi-Iron): a multicentre, participant-blinded, randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ong, Sim Y; Gurrin, Lyle C; Dolling, Lara; Dixon, Jeanette; Nicoll, Amanda J; Wolthuizen, Michelle; Wood, Erica M; Anderson, Gregory J; Ramm, Grant A; Allen, Katrina J; Olynyk, John K; Crawford, Darrell; Ramm, Louise E; Gow, Paul; Durrant, Simon; Powell, Lawrie W; Delatycki, Martin B

    2017-12-01

    The iron overload disorder hereditary haemochromatosis is most commonly caused by HFE p.Cys282Tyr homozygosity. In the absence of results from any randomised trials, current evidence is insufficient to determine whether individuals with hereditary haemochromatosis and moderately elevated serum ferritin, should undergo iron reduction treatment. This trial aimed to establish whether serum ferritin normalisation in this population improved symptoms and surrogate biomarkers. This study was a multicentre, participant-blinded, randomised controlled trial done at three centres in Australia. We enrolled people who were homozygous for HFE p.Cys282Tyr, aged between 18 and 70 years, with moderately elevated serum ferritin, defined as 300-1000 μg/L, and raised transferrin saturation. Participants were randomly assigned, via a computer-generated random number, to undergo either iron reduction by erythrocytapheresis (treatment group) or sham treatment by plasmapheresis (control group). Randomisation was stratified by baseline serum ferritin (cognitive subcomponent (-3·6, -5·9 to -1·3, p=0·0030), but not in the physical (-1·90 -4·5 to 0·63, p=0·14) and psychosocial (-0·54, -1·2 to 0·11, p=0·10) subcomponents. No serious adverse events occurred in either group. One participant in the control group had a vasovagal event and 17 participants (14 in the treatment group and three in the control group) had transient symptoms assessed as related to hypovolaemia. Mild citrate reactions were more common in the treatment group (32 events [25%] in 129 procedures) compared with the control group (one event [1%] in 93 procedures). To our knowledge, this study is the first to objectively assess the consequences of iron removal in individuals with hereditary haemochromatosis and moderately elevated serum ferritin. Our results suggest that serum ferritin normalisation by iron depletion could be of benefit for all individuals with hereditary haemochromatosis and elevated serum

  7. IRON DEFICIENCY AS A RISK FACTOR FOR FIRST FEBRILE SEIZURE

    OpenAIRE

    Rahul; Haricharan; Venkatamurthy

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVES: Estimation of Iron status in children with first f ebrile seizure (FFS). Iron status was evaluated by including Hemoglobin, Mean Corpuscular Volume (MCV), Mean Corpuscular Haemoglobin (MCH), Serum ferritin. MATERIALS AND METHODS : Study was conducted all children with first febrile seizures and febrile illnesses (FI) in Pediatrics Intensive Care Unit and Pediatrics Wards of Sri Adichunchanag iri Institute of Medical Sciences, B.G. Nagara ...

  8. ESA Hyporesponsiveness Is Associated with Adverse Events in Maintenance Hemodialysis (MHD Patients, But Not with Iron Storage.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takahiro Kuragano

    Full Text Available It has been reported that hyporesponsiveness to erythropoiesis-stimulating agent (ESA is associated with adverse events in patients on maintenance hemodialysis (MHD. However, it has not been determined whether higher iron storage is associated with an improved response, including better survival, to ESA.We measured serum ferritin, hemoglobin (Hb, and transferrin saturation (TSAT levels every three months for two years in 1,095 MHD patients. The weekly dose of ESA to Hb ratio was also calculated as an index of ESA responsiveness (ERI.A significant correlation (p280; however, serum ferritin and TSAT levels did not predict a higher ERI. In the time-dependent Cox hazard model, the risk for a composite event in the patients with a high ERI (≥280 and a high ferritin level (≥100 ng/mL was significantly greater (hazard ratio [HR], 2.09, P = 0.033 than that for patients with a high ERI and a low ferritin (<100 ng/mL level.Hb was dependent upon ferritin levels in patients with ferritin levels <50 ng/mL but not in patients with ferritin levels ≥50 ng/mL. Patients with hyporesponsiveness to ESA had a greater risk of composite events, but ERI was unrelated to iron storage.

  9. Iron Dextran treatment does not induce serum protein carbonyls in the newborn pig

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oxidation of serum proteins can lead to carbonyl formation which alters their function and is often associated with stress-related diseases. Since it is recommended that all pigs reared in modern production facilities be given supplemental iron at birth to prevent anemia, and metals can catalyze th...

  10. Crystallographic study of the inorganic part of the ferritin molecule

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lawrence, J.J.

    1969-01-01

    Diffraction data given by ferritin core, essentially made up of an iron hydroxide, let us propose, for hypothesis, a hexagonal unit cell (a = 11.79 Angstrom c = 9.90 Angstrom). This product cannot be identified with any known iron hydroxide but its diffraction diagram shows some similarities with that δ FeOOH. (author) [fr

  11. Assessment of iron deficiency in pregnant women by determining iron status

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raza, N.; Munazza, B.; Ayub, M.; Sarwar, I

    2011-01-01

    Background: Pregnant women constitute a high risk group for iron deficiency. Maternal iron deficiency and particularly iron deficiency anaemia may be associated with detrimental effects on maternal and infant function and particularly with a higher risk of preterm delivery and delivery of low birth weight neonates. Objective of this study was to assess and compare the iron status of normal healthy non-pregnant women with that of pregnant women of Hazara Division. Methods: This study was conducted at Faculty of Health Sciences, Hazara University, and Ayub Medical College, Abbottabad from first March to /31 August 2006. Altogether 120 women, 90 pregnant at various stages of pregnancy and 30 non-pregnant women as control group were included in this study by convenience sampling. Their iron status was assessed by determination of haemoglobin (Hb), Serum ferritin, Serum-iron, Total Iron Binding Capacity (TIBC), Unsaturated Iron Binding Capacity (UIBC), and Percentage saturation of transferrin. Data generated on these variables were subjected to ANOVA and correlation analysis. Results: The salient finding of this study is a significant decrease in Hb, Serum ferritin, Serum iron, percentage saturation of transferrin and a significant increase in values of TIBC and a pronounced increase in UIBC in second and third trimester compared to first trimester in iron deficient pregnant women. The mean values of Hb, SF, and Fe/TIBC% were significantly lower in the cases than in the control and significantly higher values of TIBC and UIBC were observed in the cases compared to controls. Significant correlations were observed for TIBC, UIBC and Fe/TIBC% against serum iron in different trimesters of pregnancy. Conclusion: A high percentage of the pregnant women are iron deficient due to factors such as high parity, poor dietary habits and socioeconomic status. (author)

  12. Iron deficiency and anemia: a common problem in female elite soccer players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landahl, Göran; Adolfsson, Peter; Börjesson, Mats; Mannheimer, Clas; Rödjer, Stig

    2005-12-01

    The objective of the study was to determine the prevalence of iron deficiency and iron deficiency anemia among elite women soccer players. Hemoglobin, serum iron, serum total iron binding capacity, and ferritin were determined in 28 female soccer players called up for the national team. Of the investigated female soccer players, 57% had iron deficiency and 29% iron deficiency anemia 6 months before the FIFA Women's World Cup. It is concluded that iron deficiency and iron deficiency anemia is common in female soccer players at the top international level. Some might suffer from relative anemia and measurement of hemoglobin alone is not sufficient to reveal relative anemia. Regular monitoring of hemoglobin concentration and iron status is necessary to institute iron supplementation when indicated.

  13. Correlations between abnormal iron metabolism and non-motor symptoms in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Wu; Zhi, Yan; Yuan, Yongsheng; Zhang, Bingfeng; Shen, Yuting; Zhang, Hui; Zhang, Kezhong; Xu, Yun

    2018-07-01

    Despite a growing body of evidence suggests that abnormal iron metabolism plays an important role in the pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease (PD), few studies explored its role in non-motor symptoms (NMS) of PD. The present study aimed to investigate the relationship between abnormal iron metabolism and NMS of PD. Seventy PD patients and 64 healthy controls were consecutively recruited to compare serum iron, ceruloplasmin, ferritin, and transferrin levels. We evaluated five classic NMS, including depression, anxiety, pain, sleep disorder, and autonomic dysfunction in PD patients using the Hamilton Depression Scale (HAMD), the Hamilton Anxiety Scale (HAMA), the short form of the McGill Pain Questionnaire, the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index and the Scale for Outcomes in Parkinson's disease for Autonomic Symptoms, respectively. Hierarchical multiple regression analysis was used to investigate the correlations between abnormal iron metabolism and NMS. No differences in serum ceruloplasmin and ferritin levels were examined between PD patients and healthy controls, but we observed significantly decreased serum iron levels and increased serum transferrin levels in PD patients in comparison with healthy controls. After eliminating confounding factors, HAMD scores and HAMA scores were both negatively correlated with serum iron levels and positively correlated with serum transferrin levels. In summary, abnormal iron metabolism might play a crucial role in the pathogenesis of depression and anxiety in PD. Serums levels of iron and transferrin could be peripheral markers for depression and anxiety in PD.

  14. Oscillations in serum ferritin associated with antiviral therapy in chronic hepatitis C Oscilaciones de la ferritina sérica asociadas al tratamiento antiviral en la hepatitis crónica por virus C

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. M. Ladero

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: hyperferritinemia is often found in patients with chronic hepatitis C (CHC and is predictive of poorer response to antiviral therapy. Objective: to investigate changes in ferritinemia during and after antiviral therapy. Patients and methods: serum ferritin levels were measured in 262 CHC patients (163 males, mean age 48.5 years ± 10.1 before and during antiviral therapy, and six months post-treatment in all 154 patients whit undetectable serum HCV-RNA after therapy completion. Results: baseline serum ferritin was higher in patients with primary therapeutic failure than in those reaching sustained viral response (330 ± 291 ng/mL vs. 211 ± 192 ng/mL, p = 0.002. Serum ferritin transiently increased during therapy from baseline (257 ± 242 ng/mL vs. 875 ± 630 ng/mL, p Antecedentes: la hiperferritinemia es frecuente en los enfermos con hepatitis crónica C (HCC y reduce las probabilidades de respuesta al tratamiento antiviral. Objetivo: investigar las variaciones de la ferritina sérica durante y después del tratamiento y su relación con la respuesta al mismo. Pacientes y métodos: la ferritina sérica se ha medido en 262 enfermos con HCC (163 hombres, edad media 48,5 años ± 10,1 antes y durante el tratamiento antiviral, y a los 6 meses de finalizado en los 154 enfermos con viremia indetectable al final del tratamiento. Resultados: la ferritina sérica basal era más alta en enfermos con fracaso terapéutico primario que en los que consiguieron respuesta viral sostenida (RVS (330 ± 291 ng/ml vs. 211 ± 192 ng/ml, p = 0,002. La ferritina sérica aumentó transitoriamente durante el tratamiento (257 ± 242 ng/ml vs. 875 ± 630 ng/ml, p < 0,001. La ferritina sérica descendió a valores inferiores a los basales seis meses después de finalizado el tratamiento en los pacientes con RVS (117 ± 102 ng/ml vs. 211± 192 ng/ml, p < 0,001 y, en menor grado, en los que sufrieron recidiva viral (217 ± 174 ng/ml vs. 257 ± 221 ng/m, p = 0

  15. [Effectiveness of iron amino acid chelate versus ferrous sulfate as part of a food complement in preschool children with iron deficiency, Medellín, 2011].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojas, Maylen Liseth; Sánchez, Juliana; Villada, Óscar; Montoya, Liliana; Díaz, Alejandro; Vargas, Cristian; Chica, Javier; Herrera, Ana Milena

    2013-01-01

    Iron depleted deposits are the first link in the chain of events leading to iron deficiency which is the most prevalent nutritional shortage and main cause of anemia worldwide. This situation can be prevented through food fortification. To compare the efficacy of amino acid chelate iron with ferrous sulfate as fortifier of a dietary complement in preschoolers with iron deficiency. This study was a blinded clinical trial with randomized groups. We analyzed 56 preschoolers with iron deficiency (ferritin children had respiratory tract infection, without statistical differences. Both compounds increased serum ferritin concentration, with a higher increase in those who were given milk with iron amino acid chelate. There were no differences in the adverse reactions and infections incidences between the groups.

  16. Iron status in obese women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stankowiak-Kulpa, Hanna; Kargulewicz, Angelika; Styszyński, Arkadiusz; Swora-Cwynar, Ewelina; Grzymisławski, Marian

    2017-12-23

    A decreased concentration of iron, and consecutively haemoglobin, ferritin and decreased level of saturated transferrin, were observed in obese individuals more often than in healthy subjects. The purpose of this study was to determine whether iron, ferritin, transferrin saturation are significantly diminished in obese female patients compared to non-obese counterparts, and whether excess adiposity and inflammation were associated with depleted iron. Female patients (n=48) diagnosed with obesity (BMI > 30 kg/m2), aged 18-40 were accepted for the study. A control group (n=30) encompassed normal weight women, aged 18-30. All obese women obtained an individually adjusted dietary plan with an energy content of 1,500 kcal. Blood glucose, insulin, lipids, ferritin, TIBC and iron concentrations were assayed in serum twice, initially and after 8 weeks of dieting. The obese women at the initial evaluation, in comparison to non-obese control women, were characterized by a significantly lower mean red blood cell volume (MCV; 84.2±12.4 vs. 91.3±9.3 fL; piron level (92.6±42.4 vs. 119.8±44.0 μg/dL; piron homeostasis. Weight loss leads to decrease in the CRP level, but it does not change haematologic parameters in the period of 8 weeks.

  17. [The efficacy of phlebotomy with a low iron diet in the management of pulmonary iron overload].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuda, Tomoko; Kimura, Fumiaki; Watanabe, Yoichi; Yoshino, Tadasi; Kimura, Ikuro

    2003-05-01

    Numerous studies have shown that workers in ferriferous industries have an elevated risk of respiratory tract neoplasia and other airway diseases. Evidence is presented that iron is a carcinogenic and tissue toxic hazard as regarding the inhalation of ferriferous substances. Elimination of the inhaled iron and prevention from accumulation of iron in the lung seems to be very important. A 26-year-old man was admitted to our hospital complaining of right chest pain. He had worked as an arc welder for two years without a mask. A chest CT showed diffuse ground glass opacity in the bilateral lung fields. A transbronchial lung biopsy specimen showed numerous alveolar and interstitial iron-laden macrophages. A 200 ml phlebotomy was carried out biweekly in combination with a low iron diet (8 mg/day). When serum ferritin reached 20 ng/ml, phlebotomy was stopped. After that, serum ferritin level was kept at around 20 ng/ml with the low iron diet alone. A transbronchial lung biopsy was carried out again 7 months later and the specimen showed remarkable reduction in the number of iron-laden alveolar and interstitial macrophages. Phlebotomy in combination with a low iron diet might become a useful strategy in the management of pulmonary conditions associated with iron loading.

  18. Effect of short-term intravenous ascorbic acid on reducing ferritin in hemodialysis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jalalzadeh, M; Shekari, E; Mirzamohammadi, F; Ghadiani, M H

    2012-05-01

    Resistance to recombinant erythropoietin (rEPO) in hemodialysis patients may be due to inadequate iron recruitment and defect in iron use. In this cross over randomized clinical trial, 30 hemodialysis patients with serum ferritin levels of ≥500 ng/ml, hemoglobin ≤11.0 g/dl, and transferrin saturation (TSAT) of 20% or less were administrated intravenous iron (50-100 mg/wk) and rEPO (120-360 U/kg/wk) for 6 months. Patients were excluded if there was a clear explanation for rEPO hyporesponsiveness. Patients were divided into two groups. Group1 received standard care and 500 mg of intravenous ascorbic acid (IVAA) with each dialysis session in the first week of each month for a total of 3 months. Group 2 received standard care only. After 2 month washout period, groups were crossed over. Each month hemoglobin (Hb) was assessed. Iron, TIBC (transferrin iron binding capacity), TSAT, iPTH (intact parathyroid hormone), liver enzymes, albumin and cholesterol levels were measured every 3 months. After 3 months of intervention, Hb significantly increased from 10.11 to 12.19 g/dl (P <0 0.001; 95% confidence interval [CI] 2.7-1.4) and TSAT increased from 18.9 to 28.1% (P = 0.008; 95% CI 0.09-3), while ferritin and serum iron declined significantly from 1391 to 938 ng/ml (P = 0.001; 95% CI 216-689), 97.2 to 64.6 (P = 0.001; 95% CI 14.8-50.4) in the study group. Change of Hb over time in IVAA group was significant (P < 0.0005). There were significant differences between two groups in change of Hb level over time (P < 0.0005) and treatment effect (P = 0.002). Baseline laboratory tests were similar in the two groups and there was no carry over effect at phase 2. We showed that low amount of IVAA could reduce ferritin level and enhance Hb and TSAT, suggesting improved iron utilization.

  19. Ferritin-Templated Quantum-Dots for Quantum Logic Gates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Sang H.; Kim, Jae-Woo; Chu, Sang-Hyon; Park, Yeonjoon; King, Glen C.; Lillehei, Peter T.; Kim, Seon-Jeong; Elliott, James R.

    2005-01-01

    Quantum logic gates (QLGs) or other logic systems are based on quantum-dots (QD) with a stringent requirement of size uniformity. The QD are widely known building units for QLGs. The size control of QD is a critical issue in quantum-dot fabrication. The work presented here offers a new method to develop quantum-dots using a bio-template, called ferritin, that ensures QD production in uniform size of nano-scale proportion. The bio-template for uniform yield of QD is based on a ferritin protein that allows reconstitution of core material through the reduction and chelation processes. One of the biggest challenges for developing QLG is the requirement of ordered and uniform size of QD for arrays on a substrate with nanometer precision. The QD development by bio-template includes the electrochemical/chemical reconsitution of ferritins with different core materials, such as iron, cobalt, manganese, platinum, and nickel. The other bio-template method used in our laboratory is dendrimers, precisely defined chemical structures. With ferritin-templated QD, we fabricated the heptagonshaped patterned array via direct nano manipulation of the ferritin molecules with a tip of atomic force microscope (AFM). We also designed various nanofabrication methods of QD arrays using a wide range manipulation techniques. The precise control of the ferritin-templated QD for a patterned arrangement are offered by various methods, such as a site-specific immobilization of thiolated ferritins through local oxidation using the AFM tip, ferritin arrays induced by gold nanoparticle manipulation, thiolated ferritin positioning by shaving method, etc. In the signal measurements, the current-voltage curve is obtained by measuring the current through the ferritin, between the tip and the substrate for potential sweeping or at constant potential. The measured resistance near zero bias was 1.8 teraohm for single holoferritin and 5.7 teraohm for single apoferritin, respectively.

  20. Reduced ferritin levels in individuals with non-O blood group

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rigas, Andreas S; Berkfors, Adam A; Pedersen, Ole B

    2017-01-01

    stores expressed as ferritin levels. STUDY DESIGN AND METHODS: Ferritin levels were measured at least once for 30,595 Danish Blood Donor Study participants. Linear regression analyses were performed with the ABO blood group as explanatory variable and adjusted for age, number of donations 3 years before......BACKGROUND: Genomewide association studies have reported alleles in the ABO locus to be associated with ferritin levels. These studies warrant the investigation of a possible association between the ABO blood group and ferritin levels. We aimed to explore if ABO blood group is associated with iron...... blood group was associated with a ferritin level of less than 15 ng/mL. RESULTS: Non-O blood group donors had lower ferritin levels than blood group O donors, regardless of sex. Accordingly, risk of ferritin level of less than 15 ng/mL was increased for individuals with non-O blood group compared with O...

  1. Evaluation of the Efficiency of the Reticulocyte Hemoglobin Content on Diagnosis for Iron Deficiency Anemia in Chinese Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Jie; Wu, Meng; Ren, Jie; Du, Yali; Long, Zhangbiao; Li, Guoxun; Han, Bing; Yang, Lichen

    2017-05-02

    Our aim was to evaluate the cut-off value and efficiency of using reticulocyte hemoglobin content as a marker to diagnose iron deficiency anemia in Chinese adults. 140 adults who needed bone marrow aspiration for diagnosis at the hematology department of the Peking Union Medical College Hospital were enrolled according to the inclusive and exclusive criteria. Venous blood samples were collected to detect complete blood count, including hemoglobin, reticulocyte hemoglobin content, hematocrit, mean cellular volume, corpuscular hemoglobin concentration, hemoglobin content, free erythrocyte protoporphyrin; iron indexes of serum ferritin, serum transferrin receptor, and unsaturated iron-binding capacity; and inflammation markers of C-reactive protein and α-acid glycoprotein. Bone marrow samples were obtained for the bone marrow iron staining, which was used as the standard for the evaluation of iron status in this study. Subjects were divided into three groups according to hemoglobin levels and bone marrow iron staining results: the IDA (iron deficiency anemia) group, the NIDA (non-iron deficiency anemia) group, and the control group. The differences of the above-mentioned indexes were compared among the three groups and the effect of inflammation was also considered. The cut-off value of reticulocyte hemoglobin content was determined by receiver operation curves. The IDA group ( n = 56) had significantly lower reticulocyte hemoglobin content, mean cellular volume, corpuscular hemoglobin concentration, hemoglobin content, and serum ferritin; and higher free erythrocyte protoporphyrin, unsaturated iron-binding capacity, and serum transferrin receptor ( p iron-binding capacity were significantly affected by inflammation while reticulocyte hemoglobin content and other parameters were not. The cut-off value of reticulocyte hemoglobin content for diagnosing iron deficiency anemia was 27.2 pg, with a sensitivity of 87.5% and a specificity of 92.9%. The cut-off values for

  2. Ferritin gene organization: differences between plants and animals suggest possible kingdom-specific selective constraints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proudhon, D; Wei, J; Briat, J; Theil, E C

    1996-03-01

    Ferritin, a protein widespread in nature, concentrates iron approximately 10(11)-10(12)-fold above the solubility within a spherical shell of 24 subunits; it derives in plants and animals from a common ancestor (based on sequence) but displays a cytoplasmic location in animals compared to the plastid in contemporary plants. Ferritin gene regulation in plants and animals is altered by development, hormones, and excess iron; iron signals target DNA in plants but mRNA in animals. Evolution has thus conserved the two end points of ferritin gene expression, the physiological signals and the protein structure, while allowing some divergence of the genetic mechanisms. Comparison of ferritin gene organization in plants and animals, made possible by the cloning of a dicot (soybean) ferritin gene presented here and the recent cloning of two monocot (maize) ferritin genes, shows evolutionary divergence in ferritin gene organization between plants and animals but conservation among plants or among animals; divergence in the genetic mechanism for iron regulation is reflected by the absence in all three plant genes of the IRE, a highly conserved, noncoding sequence in vertebrate animal ferritin mRNA. In plant ferritin genes, the number of introns (n = 7) is higher than in animals (n = 3). Second, no intron positions are conserved when ferritin genes of plants and animals are compared, although all ferritin gene introns are in the coding region; within kingdoms, the intron positions in ferritin genes are conserved. Finally, secondary protein structure has no apparent relationship to intron/exon boundaries in plant ferritin genes, whereas in animal ferritin genes the correspondence is high. The structural differences in introns/exons among phylogenetically related ferritin coding sequences and the high conservation of the gene structure within plant or animal kingdoms of the gene structure within plant or animal kingdoms suggest that kingdom-specific functional constraints may

  3. Diagnosis and treatment of iron-deficiency anaemia in pregnancy and postpartum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breymann, C; Honegger, C; Hösli, I; Surbek, D

    2017-12-01

    Iron deficiency occurs frequently in pregnancy and can be diagnosed by serum ferritin-level measurement (threshold value iron-deficiency anemia is recommended in every pregnant women, and should be done by serum ferritin-level screening in the first trimester and regular hemoglobin checks at least once per trimester. In the case of iron deficiency with or without anaemia in pregnancy, oral iron therapy should be given as first-line treatment. In the case of severe iron-deficiency anemia, intolerance of oral iron, lack of response to oral iron, or in the case of a clinical need for rapid and efficient treatment of anaemia (e.g., advanced pregnancy), intravenous iron therapy should be administered. In the postpartum period, oral iron therapy should be administered for mild iron-deficiency anemia (haemorrhagic anemia), and intravenous iron therapy for moderately severe-to-severe anemia (Hb iron therapy in pregnancy or postpartum, iron-containing drugs which have been studied in well-controlled clinical trials in pregnancy and postpartum such as ferric carboxymaltose must be preferred for safety reasons. While anaphylactic reactions are extremely are with non-dextrane products, close surveillance during administration is recommended for all intravenous iron products.

  4. A composite mouse model of aplastic anemia complicated with iron overload.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Dijiong; Wen, Xiaowen; Liu, Wenbin; Xu, Linlong; Ye, Baodong; Zhou, Yuhong

    2018-02-01

    Iron overload is commonly encountered during the course of aplastic anemia (AA), but no composite animal model has been developed yet, which hinders drug research. In the present study, the optimal dosage and duration of intraperitoneal iron dextran injection for the development of an iron overload model in mice were explored. A composite model of AA was successfully established on the principle of immune-mediated bone marrow failure. Liver volume, peripheral hemogram, bone marrow pathology, serum iron, serum ferritin, pathological iron deposition in multiple organs (liver, bone marrow, spleen), liver hepcidin, and bone morphogenetic protein 6 (BMP6), SMAD family member 4 (SMAD4) and transferrin receptor 2 (TfR2) mRNA expression levels were compared among the normal control, AA, iron overload and composite model groups to validate the composite model, and explore the pathogenesis and features of iron overload in this model. The results indicated marked increases in iron deposits, with significantly increased liver/body weight ratios as well as serum iron and ferritin in the iron overload and composite model groups as compared with the normal control and AA groups (Poverload and AA was successfully established, and AA was indicated to possibly have a critical role in abnormal iron metabolism, which promoted the development of iron deposits.

  5. Comparison of Deferoxamine, Activated Charcoal, and Vitamin C in Changing the Serum Level of Fe in Iron Overloaded Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reza Ghafari

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Iron is an essential mineral for normal cellular physiology but its overload can lead to cell injury. For many years, deferoxamine injection has been used as an iron chelator for treatment of iron overload. The aim of this study is to compare oral deferoxamine, activated charcoal, and vitamin C, as an absorbent factor of Fe, in changing the serum level of iron in iron overload rats. Methods: In this experimental study, all groups were administered 150 mg iron dextran orally by gavage. After eight hours, rats in the first group received oral deferoxamine while those in the second and third groups received oral activated charcoal 1 mg/kg and oral vitamin C 150 mg, respectively. Then, serum levels of iron ware measured in all rats. Results: The mean serum level of iron in rats that received oral deferoxamine was 258.11±10.49 µg/dl, whereas mean levels of iron in charcoal and vitamin C groups were 380.88±11.21 µg/dl and 401.22±13.28 µg/dl, respectively. None of the measurements were within safety limits of serum iron. Conclusion: It seems that oral deferoxamine per se may not help physicians in the management of cases presented with iron toxicity. Activated charcoal did not reduce serum iron significantly in this study and further investigations may be warranted to assess the potential clinical utility of its mixture with oral deferoxamine as an adjunct in the clinical management of iron ingestions.

  6. Study of the effects of the nutritional and socio-economic factors on the prevalance of iron deficiency anaemia among pregnant women

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elobeid, Tahra Eltayeb

    1998-12-01

    This Study was conducted with the following objectives: 1.determine the prevalance of iron deficiency anaemia among pregnant women. 2. Determine the factors that affect the iron status of pregnant women (nutritional, social etc...). For the assessment of iron status during pregnancy, 30 healthy pregnant women were included in a longitudinal study from the first to the third trimester. One blood sample was taken in the first trimester and a second blood sample was taken in the third trimester. All subjects were given ten iron supplement tablets at the beginning of the study by the researcher. However, they did not receive any other iron supplements throughout their pregnancy. Ten healthy non-pregnant women were included in the study to serve as controls. The iron status was assessed using the following parameters: haemoglobin and serum ferritin levels which was measured using ImmunoRadiometric Assay (IRMA). The nutritional status was assessed from a nutritional/socio-economic questionnaire that was answered by the study and control groups. Both the study and the control groups had haemoglobin level below the WHO cut-off points ( 0.05) between the level of haemoglobin of control and the study groups in the first and third trimester. There was significant difference (p<0.01) in the level of serum ferritin between the study and control group. The study group had a higher level of serum ferritin than the control. there was also high significant difference (p<0.01) in the level of serum ferritin between the first and third trimester in which a large decrease in the level of serum ferritin was apparent. The results of this study also showed that 16.5% had IDA (Iron Defeciency Anaemia) in the first trimester whereas 27.6% had depleted iron stores without frank defeciency. The prevalance of IDA increased to 26.4% in the third trimester while those who had depleted iron stores increased to 46.6%. Almost 50% of pregnant women started their pregnancy with adequate iron stores

  7. Study of the effects of the nutritional and socio-economic factors on the prevalance of iron deficiency anaemia among pregnant women

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elobeid, Tahra Eltayeb [Department of Food Science and technology, Faculty of Agriculture, University of Khartoum, Khartoum (Sudan)

    1998-12-01

    This Study was conducted with the following objectives: 1.determine the prevalance of iron deficiency anaemia among pregnant women. 2. Determine the factors that affect the iron status of pregnant women (nutritional, social etc...). For the assessment of iron status during pregnancy, 30 healthy pregnant women were included in a longitudinal study from the first to the third trimester. One blood sample was taken in the first trimester and a second blood sample was taken in the third trimester. All subjects were given ten iron supplement tablets at the beginning of the study by the researcher. However, they did not receive any other iron supplements throughout their pregnancy. Ten healthy non-pregnant women were included in the study to serve as controls. The iron status was assessed using the following parameters: haemoglobin and serum ferritin levels which was measured using ImmunoRadiometric Assay (IRMA). The nutritional status was assessed from a nutritional/socio-economic questionnaire that was answered by the study and control groups. Both the study and the control groups had haemoglobin level below the WHO cut-off points (<12g/di for non-pregnant women and <11g/di for pregnant women). However, there was no significant difference (p>0.05) between the level of haemoglobin of control and the study groups in the first and third trimester. There was significant difference (p<0.01) in the level of serum ferritin between the study and control group. The study group had a higher level of serum ferritin than the control. there was also high significant difference (p<0.01) in the level of serum ferritin between the first and third trimester in which a large decrease in the level of serum ferritin was apparent. The results of this study also showed that 16.5% had IDA (Iron Defeciency Anaemia) in the first trimester whereas 27.6% had depleted iron stores without frank defeciency. The prevalance of IDA increased to 26.4% in the third trimester while those who had depleted

  8. Association between iron deficiency anemia and blood level in egyptian children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nassar, E.M.; Moawad, A.T.; Abd Alla, A.M.

    2003-01-01

    The relationship between iron deficiency and blood lead levels was investigated in a cross-sectional study of 200 children of both sexes, aged 6-12 years with mean of 7.8 +- 2.6 years. They were randomly selected from governmental primary school located near a highly contaminated industrial area. Blood samples were collected for measuring blood lead levels, serum iron serum ferritin, hemoglobin, mean corpuscular volume (MCV) and total iron binding capacity (TIBC) and other hematological indices. According to iron status, children were classified into non-anemic healthy controls(n=37),iron depleted children(n=58)and children with iron deficiency anemia (n=105).Iron deficiency is defined when MCV 10 / dl were significantly lower than those for children with blood lead levels < 10 /dl. Comparison of blood lead concentrations between boys and girls revealed highly significant increase in blood lead level in boys than girls. A strong negative correlation was detected between blood lead levels and serum iron in all subjects. However, such correlation vanished between blood lead concentration and serum ferritin,so, it could be concluded from the present study that the blood lead levels were changed according to changes in iron status. Improving iron status, along with reducing exposure to environmental contamination with lead, may help in reducing blood lead levels among most children especially those living in contaminated environment

  9. Post-transfusion changes in serum hepcidin and iron parameters in preterm infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stripeli, Fotini; Kapetanakis, John; Gourgiotis, Dimitris; Drakatos, Antonis; Tsolia, Maria; Kossiva, Lydia

    2018-02-01

    Packed red blood cell transfusion is common in preterm neonates. Hepcidin acts as a negative feedback iron regulator. Iron parameters such as immature reticulocyte fraction (IRF) and high-light-scatter reticulocytes (HLR) are used to clarify iron metabolism. Very little is known about the regulation of hepcidin in preterm infants because most reports have evaluated prohepcidin. The aim of this study was therefore to evaluate serum hepcidin and establish hematological parameters in preterm infants after transfusion. The subjects consisted of 19 newborns (10 boys) with mean gestational age 29.1 ± 2.0 weeks, who had been transfused at the chronological age of 44.84 ± 19.61 days. Blood sample was collected before the transfusion and thereafter at 5 days and at 1 month. Serum hepcidin and other iron parameters were evaluated. Mean serum hepcidin before and 5 days after transfusion was significantly different (5.5 ± 5.1 vs 10 ± 7.9 ng/mL respectively, P = 0.005). IRF and % HLR were also decreased significantly, 5 days after transfusion (0.4 ± 0.2 vs 0.2 ± 0.1, P = 0.009; 1.4 ± 1.5% vs 0.5 ± 0.4%, P = 0.012, respectively). Changes in hepcidin 5 days after transfusion were correlated significantly with changes in mean corpuscular hemoglobin (β, 0.13; SE, 0.05; P = 0.017), total iron binding capacity (β, 3.74; SE, 1.56; P = 0.016) and transferrin (β, 2.9, SE, 1.4; P = 0.039). Serum hepcidin concentration, along with IRF and HLR, are potentially useful in estimating pre- and post-transfusion iron status. Larger studies are needed to evaluate the sensitivity and specificity of hepcidin compared with ordinary iron parameters in premature infants. © 2017 Japan Pediatric Society.

  10. Serum levels of iron in Sør-Varanger northern Norway - An iron mining municipality

    OpenAIRE

    Broderstad, Ann R.; Smith-Sivertsen, Tone; Dahl, Inger Marie S.; Ingebretsen, Ole Christian; Lund, Elliv

    2006-01-01

    Objectives. The purpose of this study was to investigate iron status in a population with a high proportion of miners in the northernmost part of Norway. Study Design. Cross-sectional, population-based study performed in order to investigate possible health effects of pollution in the population living on both sides of the Norwegian-Russian border. Methods. All individuals living in the community of Sør-Varanger were invited for screening in 1994. In 2000, blood samples from 2949 participants...

  11. Iron overload following bone marrow transplantation in children: MR findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kornreich, L.; Horev, G.; Grunebaum, M.; Yaniv, I.; Stein, J.; Zaizov, R.

    1997-01-01

    Objective. The purpose of this study was to determine the incidence of post-transfusional iron overload in children after bone marrow transplantation by reviewing their magnetic resonance imaging (MR) findings. Materials and methods. We reviewed the abdominal MR studies of 13 children after autologous bone marrow transplantation. Nine of the children had also undergone MR prior to transplantation. Iron deposition in the liver, spleen and bone marrow was graded semi-quantitatively on both T1- and T2-weighted images. Serum ferritin levels and number of blood units given after bone marrow transplantation were recorded. Results. None of the pre-transplantation MR studies revealed iron overload. After bone marrow transplantation, three children showed normal liver and spleen. Iron overload in the liver was noted in ten patients (77 %), six of whom also showed iron overload in the spleen (46 %) and five in the bone marrow (38.5 %). The degree of hepatic iron overload was correlated significantly and splenic iron overload was correlated weakly with the number of blood transfusions (P 0.01 and P > 0.01, respectively), but neither was correlated with the serum ferritin level. Conclusion. Iron overload commonly accompanies bone marrow transplantation. The observed pattern of iron deposition, in which the spleen was uninvolved in 40 % of patients demonstrating iron overload, is not typical of post-transfusional hemochromatosis. (orig.)

  12. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... may be diagnosed with iron-deficiency anemia if you have low iron or ferritin levels in your blood. More testing may be needed to rule out other types of anemia. Tests for gastrointestinal ...

  13. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... have less hemoglobin than normal. Hemoglobin is a protein inside red blood cells that carries oxygen from ... stored iron has been used. Ferritin is a protein that helps store iron in your body. Reticulocyte ...

  14. Analysis of serum copper and iron levels in oral submucous fibrosis patients: A case–control study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harshal Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Oral submucous fibrosis (OSF is a chronic debilitating disease and a potentially malignant disorder of the oral cavity. The pathogenesis of the disease is not well established. Trace elements such as copper and iron play an important role in the pathogenesis of OSF. Estimation of these elements in serum of the patients may be helpful in understanding the pathologic mechanism. Therefore, a study was carried out to analyze the level of serum copper and iron in the population of Central India. Materials and Methods: A case–control study was carried out on 35 patients with clinically diagnosed of OSF and 35 healthy controls. OSF patients were categorized by clinical staging. Serum copper and iron concentrations were measured by atomic absorption spectrophotometry. Results: Results of the study shows that the mean serum copper concentration was greater in study group (133.3 ± 19.2 compared to control group (113.9 ± 22.1 and the mean serum iron was lower in study group (116.0 ± 24.1 compared to control group (128.2 ± 23.4. The result obtained was statistically significant. The serum copper level increases as the clinical staging of OSF progresses, whereas serum iron level decreases as clinical staging progresses. Conclusion: There was an increase in copper level and decrease in iron level in study group compared to control group; this suggests that there is an increase in copper level with the advancement of clinical staging of OSF.

  15. Iron deficiency is associated with increased levels of blood cadmium in the Korean general population: Analysis of 2008–2009 Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Byung-Kook; Kim, Yangho

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: We present data from the Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2008–2009 on the distribution of blood cadmium levels and their association with iron deficiency in a representative sample of the adult Korean population. Methods: Serum ferritin was categorized into three levels: low (serum ferritin <15.0 μg/L), low normal (15.0–30.0 μg/L for women and 15.0–50.0 for men), and normal (≥30.0 μg/L for women and ≥50.0 for men), and its association with blood cadmium level was assessed after adjustment for various demographic and lifestyle factors. Results: Geometric means of blood cadmium in the low serum ferritin group in women, men, and all participants were significantly higher than in the normal group. Additionally, multiple regression analysis after adjusting for various covariates showed that blood cadmium was significantly higher in the low-ferritin group in women, men, and all participants compared with the normal group. We also found an association between serum ferritin and blood cadmium among never-smoking participants. Discussion: We found, similar to other recent population-based studies, an association between iron deficiency and increased blood cadmium in men and women, independent of smoking status. The results of the present study show that iron deficiency is associated with increased levels of blood cadmium in the general population.

  16. Dietary iron intake and iron status of German female vegans: results of the German vegan study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldmann, Annika; Koschizke, Jochen W; Leitzmann, Claus; Hahn, Andreas

    2004-01-01

    As shown in previous studies vegetarians and especially vegans are at risk for iron deficiency. Our study evaluated the iron status of German female vegans. In this cross-sectional study, the dietary intakes of 75 vegan women were assessed by two 9-day food frequency questionnaires. The iron status was analyzed on the basis of blood parameters. Mean daily iron intake was higher than recommended by the German Nutrition Society. Still 42% of the female vegans or = 50 years (old women, OW). In all, 40% (tri-index model (TIM) 20%) of the YW and 12% (TIM 12%) of the OW were considered iron-deficient based on either serum ferritin levels of vegan diet should have their iron status monitored and should consider taking iron supplements in case of a marginal status. Copyright 2004 S. Karger AG, Basel

  17. Deferasirox in iron-overloaded patients with transfusion-dependent myelodysplastic syndromes: Results from the large 1-year EPIC study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gattermann, Norbert; Finelli, Carlo; Porta, Matteo Della

    2010-01-01

    The prospective 1-year EPIC study enrolled 341 patients with myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS); although baseline iron burden was >2500ng/mL, approximately 50% were chelation-naïve. Overall median serum ferritin decreased significantly at 1 year (p=0.002). Decreases occurred irrespective of whether...

  18. Iron status and the acute post-exercise hepcidin response in athletes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Peeling

    Full Text Available This study explored the relationship between serum ferritin and hepcidin in athletes. Baseline serum ferritin levels of 54 athletes from the control trial of five investigations conducted in our laboratory were considered; athletes were grouped according to values 100 μg/L (SF>100. Data pooling resulted in each athlete completing one of five running sessions: (1 8 × 3 min at 85% vVO2peak; (2 5 × 4 min at 90% vVO2peak; (3 90 min continuous at 75% vVO2peak; (4 40 min continuous at 75% vVO2peak; (5 40 min continuous at 65% vVO2peak. Athletes from each running session were represented amongst all four groups; hence, the mean exercise duration and intensity were not different (p>0.05. Venous blood samples were collected pre-, post- and 3 h post-exercise, and were analysed for serum ferritin, iron, interleukin-6 (IL-6 and hepcidin-25. Baseline and post-exercise serum ferritin levels were different between groups (p0.05. Post-exercise IL-6 was significantly elevated compared to baseline within each group (p100; p<0.05. An athlete's iron stores may dictate the baseline hepcidin levels and the magnitude of post-exercise hepcidin response. Low iron stores suppressed post-exercise hepcidin, seemingly overriding any inflammatory-driven increases.

  19. Evaluation of Serum CEA, CA19-9, CA72-4, CA125 and Ferritin as Diagnostic Markers and Factors of Clinical Parameters for Colorectal Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Gao, Yanfeng; Wang, Jinping; Zhou, Yue; Sheng, Sen; Qian, Steven Y.; Huo, Xiongwei

    2018-01-01

    Blood-based protein biomarkers have recently shown as simpler diagnostic modalities for colorectal cancer, while their association with clinical pathological characteristics is largely unknown. In this study, we not only examined the sensitivity and reliability of single/multiple serum markers for diagnosis, but also assessed their connection with pathological parameters from a total of 279 colorectal cancer patients. Our study shown that glycoprotein carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) owns the h...

  20. Vitamin D and ferritin correlation with chronic neck pain using standard statistics and a novel artificial neural network prediction model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eloqayli, Haytham; Al-Yousef, Ali; Jaradat, Raid

    2018-02-15

    Despite the high prevalence of chronic neck pain, there is limited consensus about the primary etiology, risk factors, diagnostic criteria and therapeutic outcome. Here, we aimed to determine if Ferritin and Vitamin D are modifiable risk factors with chronic neck pain using slandered statistics and artificial intelligence neural network (ANN). Fifty-four patients with chronic neck pain treated between February 2016 and August 2016 in King Abdullah University Hospital and 54 patients age matched controls undergoing outpatient or minor procedures were enrolled. Patients and control demographic parameters, height, weight and single measurement of serum vitamin D, Vitamin B12, ferritin, calcium, phosphorus, zinc were obtained. An ANN prediction model was developed. The statistical analysis reveals that patients with chronic neck pain have significantly lower serum Vitamin D and Ferritin (p-value artificial neural network can be of future benefit in classification and prediction models for chronic neck pain. We hope this initial work will encourage a future larger cohort study addressing vitamin D and iron correction as modifiable factors and the application of artificial intelligence models in clinical practice.

  1. Iron, Oxidative Stress and Gestational Diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taifeng Zhuang

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Both iron deficiency and hyperglycemia are highly prevalent globally for pregnant women. Iron supplementation is recommended during pregnancy to control iron deficiency. The purposes of the review are to assess the oxidative effects of iron supplementation and the potential relationship between iron nutrition and gestational diabetes. High doses of iron (~relative to 60 mg or more daily for adult humans can induce lipid peroxidation in vitro and in animal studies. Pharmaceutical doses of iron supplements (e.g., 10× RDA or more for oral supplements or direct iron supplementation via injection or addition to the cell culture medium for a short or long duration will induce DNA damage. Higher heme-iron intake or iron status measured by various biomarkers, especially serum ferritin, might contribute to greater risk of gestational diabetes, which may be mediated by iron oxidative stress though lipid oxidation and/or DNA damage. However, information is lacking about the effect of low dose iron supplementation (≤60 mg daily on lipid peroxidation, DNA damage and gestational diabetes. Randomized trials of low-dose iron supplementation (≤60 mg daily for pregnant women are warranted to test the relationship between iron oxidative stress and insulin resistance/gestational diabetes, especially for iron-replete women.

  2. Determination of Non-Transferrin Bound Iron, Transferrin Bound Iron, Drug Bound Iron and Total Iron in Serum in a Rats after IV Administration of Sodium Ferric Gluconate Complex by Simple Ultrafiltration Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometric Detection

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    Murali K. Matta

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available A rapid, sensitive and specific ultrafiltration inductively-coupled plasma mass spectrometry method was developed and validated for the quantification of non-transferrin bound iron (NTBI, transferrin bound iron (TBI, drug bound iron (DI and total iron (TI in the same rat serum sample after intravenous (IV administration of iron gluconate nanoparticles in sucrose solution (Ferrlecit®. Ultrafiltration with a 30 kDa molecular cut-off filter was used for sample cleanup. Different elution solvents were used to separate each form of iron from sample serum. Isolated fractions were subjected to inductively-coupled mass spectrometric analysis after microwave digestion in 4% nitric acid. The reproducibility of the method was evaluated by precision and accuracy. The calibration curve demonstrated linearity from 5–500 ng/mL with a regression (r2 of more than 0.998. This method was effectively implemented to quantify rat pharmacokinetic study samples after intravenous administration of Ferrlecit®. The method was successfully applied to a pharmacokinetic (PK study of Ferrlecit in rats. The colloidal iron followed first order kinetics with half-life of 2.2 h and reached background or pre-dose levels after 12 h post-dosing. The drug shown a clearance of 0.31 mL/min/kg and volume of distribution of 0.05 L/kg. 19.4 ± 2.4 mL/h/kg.

  3. Iron overload patients with unknown etiology from national survey in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikuta, Katsuya; Hatayama, Mayumi; Addo, Lynda; Toki, Yasumichi; Sasaki, Katsunori; Tatsumi, Yasuaki; Hattori, Ai; Kato, Ayako; Kato, Koichi; Hayashi, Hisao; Suzuki, Takahiro; Kobune, Masayoshi; Tsutsui, Miyuki; Gotoh, Akihiko; Aota, Yasuo; Matsuura, Motoo; Hamada, Yuzuru; Tokuda, Takahiro; Komatsu, Norio; Kohgo, Yutaka

    2017-03-01

    Transfusion is believed to be the main cause of iron overload in Japan. A nationwide survey on post-transfusional iron overload subsequently led to the establishment of guidelines for iron chelation therapy in this country. To date, however, detailed clinical information on the entire iron overload population in Japan has not been fully investigated. In the present study, we obtained and studied detailed clinical information on the iron overload patient population in Japan. Of 1109 iron overload cases, 93.1% were considered to have occurred post-transfusion. There were, however, 76 cases of iron overload of unknown origin, which suggest that many clinicians in Japan may encounter some difficulty in correctly diagnosing and treating iron overload. Further clinical data were obtained for 32 cases of iron overload of unknown origin; median of serum ferritin was 1860.5 ng/mL. As occurs in post-transfusional iron overload, liver dysfunction was found to be as high as 95.7% when serum ferritin levels exceeded 1000 ng/mL in these patients. Gene mutation analysis of the iron metabolism-related genes in 27 cases of iron overload with unknown etiology revealed mutations in the gene coding hemojuvelin, transferrin receptor 2, and ferroportin; this indicates that although rare, hereditary hemochromatosis does occur in Japan.

  4. Prevalence of thalassaemia, iron-deficiency anaemia and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency among Arab migrating nomad children, southern Islamic Republic of Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasalar, M; Mehrabani, D; Afrasiabi, A; Mehravar, Z; Reyhani, I; Hamidi, R; Karimi, M

    2014-12-17

    This study investigated the prevalence of iron-deficiency anaemia, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency and β-thalassaemia trait among Arab migrating nomad children in southern Islamic Republic of Iran. Blood samples were analysed from 134 schoolchildren aged child had G6PD deficiency. A total of 9.7% of children had HbA2 ≥ 3.5 g/dL, indicating β-thalassaemia trait (10.8% in females and 7.8% in males). Mean serum iron, serum ferritin and total iron binding capacity were similar in males and females. Serum ferritin index was as accurate as Hb index in the diagnosis of iron-deficiency anaemia. A high prevalence of β-thalassaemia trait was the major potential risk factor in this population.

  5. Effect of Iron Enriched Bread Intake on the Oxidative Stress Indices in Male Wistar Rats

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    Sharareh Heidari

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Background Contrary to the proven benefits of iron, few concerns in producing the oxidative stress is remained problematic. Objectives The aim of the study was to evaluate the oxidative stress in the male Wistar rats fed bread supplemented with iron in different doses i.e., 35 (basic, 70 (two fold, 140 (four fold, and 210 mg/kg (six fold with or without NaHCO3 (250 mg/kg. Methods In this experimental study Iron, ceruloplasmin, ferritin, total iron binding capacity (TIBC, albumin, total protein, uric acid and plasma superoxide dismutase (SOD, glutathione peroxidase (GPX, catalase (CAT, malondialdehyde (MDA, and total antioxidant capacity (TAC, were evaluated in 30 rats at the first and last day of the experiment (day 30. In addition, phytic acid levels were detected in all baked breads. The data were analyzed by ANOVA and t test procedure though SPSS statistical software version 20. Results Serum iron level in rats that received basic level of iron plus NaHCO3 decreased significantly in the last day of the trial. Higher level of serum iron was seen in rats that received iron twofold, fourfold and sixfold and rats that received iron fourfold plus NaHCO3. Serum ceruloplasmin and ferritin in groups of rats that received fourfold level of iron plus NaHCO3 and rats that received iron sixfold showed a significant increase (P ≤ 0.05. Serum total protein and uric acid in rats that received basic level of iron plus NaHCO3 and rats that received twofold level of iron showed a significant decrease. Serum total protein levels in rats that received fourfold level of iron showed a significant decrease. Bread with NaHCO3 showed higher phytic acid levels than other groups. Conclusions These results indicate that oxidative stress was not induced, whereas some antioxidant activities were significantly changed in rats that received iron-enriched bread.

  6. Ferrimagnetic ferritin cage nanoparticles used as MRI contrast agent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Y.; Cao, C.; Zhang, T.; Xu, H.; Pan, Y.

    2017-12-01

    The nano-sized ferrimagnetic ferritin cage nanoparticles are ideal materials for understanding of superparamagnetism, biomimetic synthesis of ultrafine magnetic particles and their application in biomedicine. Ferrimagnetic M-HFn nanoparticles with size of magnetite cores in a mean size ranges from 2.7 nm to 5.3 nm were synthesized through loading different amount of iron into recombinant human H chain ferritin (HFn) shells. Both the saturation magnetization (Ms) and blocking temperature (Tb) were increased with the size of ferrimagnetic cores. In essence, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) analysis showed that the synthesized M-HFn nanoparticles (5.3 nm magnetite core) has extremely high transverse relaxivity (r2) values up to 320.9 mM-1S-1, which indicate that M-HFn nanoparticles are promising negative contrast agent in early detection of tumors. In addition, the longitudinal relaxivity (r1) (10.4 mM-1S-1) and r2/r1 ratio ( 2.2) of M-HFn nanoparticles ( 2.7 nm magnetite core in diameter) will make it a considerable potential as a positive contrast agent in MRI. This means the M-HFn nanoparticles can be used as dual functional MR contrast agent. Acute toxicity study of M-HFn in rats showed that a dosage of 20 mg Fe/kg makes no abnormalities by serum biochemical and hematological analysis as well as histopathological examination. Compared with a similar commercial contrast agent, combidex (with a clinical dosage of 2.7 mg Fe/kg), it indicates that M-HFn nanoparticle is of a relative safe ferrimagnetic nanoparticle when used in vivo.

  7. Assessment of serum copper, iron and immune complexes in potentially malignant disorders and oral cancer

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    Ritu TIWARI

    Full Text Available Abstract Potentially malignant disorders (PMDs of oral cavity and oral cancer remain a cause of serious concern despite intensive research and development. Diet and immunity have been identified to play a crucial role as modifying factors in these diseases. Our study intended to explore this relationship by estimating and comparing the serum levels of copper, iron and circulating immune complexes (CICs in patients diagnosed with PMDs and oral cancer and normal healthy individuals. In this study, 40 histopathologically diagnosed cases of PMDs and oral cancer were included along with 30 healthy controls and 5 ml of venous blood was drawn using venipuncture. Serum estimation of copper, iron and CIC then followed using the colorimetric and spectrophotometric methods. The data obtained was subjected to statistical analysis using one way ANOVA and Pearson’s Product-Moment Correlation Test. The mean serum copper level was measured as 138.98 ± 10.13µg/100ml in the PMD group and 141.99 ± 21.44 µg/100ml in the oral cancer as compared to 105.5 + 18.81µ/100ml in the controls. The mean serum CIC levels was highest in the oral cancer (9.65 ± 0.16OD470 followed by the PMD group (0.18 + 0.21 OD470 and least in the control group (0.048 ± 0.02OD470. Whereas, the serum levels of iron showed a significant decrease in the PMD group (110.9 ± 10.54 µg/100ml and the oral cancer group (114.29 ± 25.83 µg/100ml as compared with the control group (136.85 ± 14.48 µg/100ml. There was no positive correlation obtained between the three groups with respect to the chosen parameters indicating that the variables were independent of each other. It can be thus be ascertained that trace elements like copper and iron as well as humoral responses (CICs have a close relationship with PMDs and oral cancers.

  8. Association between iron level, glucose impairment and increased DNA damage during pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zein, Salam; Rachidi, Samar; Shami, Nadine; Sharara, Iman; Cheikh-Ali, Khawla; Gauchez, Anne-Sophie; Moulis, Jean-Marc; Ayoubi, Jean-Marc; Salameh, Pascale; Hininger-Favier, Isabelle

    2017-09-01

    Elevated circulating ferritin has been reported to increase the risk of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM). When high ferritin translates into high iron stores, iron excess is also a condition leading to free radical damage. We aimed to evaluate the relationship between oxidative stress (OS) induced by iron status and GDM risk in non iron-supplemented pregnant women. This was a pilot observational study conducted on 93 non-anemic pregnant women. Iron status was assessed at the first trimester of gestation. Blood sampling was done at 24-28 weeks' gestation for oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT), insulin and biological markers of oxidative damage tests. A significant increase in DNA damage was found in patients who developed GDM. Women with elevated DNA damage had a six-fold increased risk of developing GDM (Exp (B)=6.851, P=0.038; 95% CI [1.108-42.375]). The serum ferritin levels at first trimester were significantly correlated to lipid peroxidation (rho=0.24, p=0.012). The stratified analysis suggests that ferritin is a modifying factor for the correlation of oxidative stress (OS) and glucose intolerance. Moderate ferritin levels due to iron intake without iron-supplement, at early pregnancy is a modifying factor for the correlation of oxidative damage and glucose intolerance in pregnant women. Larger studies to evaluate the risk of food iron intake induced increased oxidative damage in offspring are warranted to propose nutrition advice regarding iron intake in women with a high risk of GDM. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  9. A Protein-Based Ferritin Bio-Nanobattery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerald D. Watt

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Nanostructured materials are increasingly important for the construction of electrochemical energy storage devices that will meet the needs of portable nanodevices. Here we describe the development of a nanoenergy storage system based on inorganic mineral phases contained in ferritin proteins. The electrochemical cell consists of an anode containing ~2000 iron atoms as Fe(OH2 in the hollow protein interior of ferritin and a cathode containing ~2000 of Co(OH3 in a separate ferritin molecule. The achieved initial voltage output from a combination of Fe2+- and Co3+-ferritins adsorbed on gold electrodes was ~500 mV, while a combination of Fe2+- and Co3+-ferritins immobilized on gold produced a voltage of 350–405 mV. When fully discharged, Fe(OH3 and Co(OH2 are the products of a single electron transfer per metal atom from anode to cathode. The spent components can be regenerated by chemical or electrochemical methods restoring battery function. The properties of ferritins are presented and their unique characteristics are described, which have led to the development of a functional bio-nanobattery.

  10. Association between ferritin and hepcidin levels and inflammatory status in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus and obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, Mónica; Soto, Néstor; Arredondo-Olguín, Miguel

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the association between iron parameters and inflammation in obese individuals with and without type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). We studied 132 obese individuals (OB), 60 individuals with T2DM, 106 obese individuals with T2DM (T2DOB), and 146 controls (C). All of were men aged >30 y. Biochemical, iron nutrition, and oxidative stress parameters were determined. Peripheral mononuclear cells were isolated and total RNA was extracted to quantify tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, nuclear factor (NF)-κB, interleukin (IL)-6, toll-like receptor (TLR)-2/4 and hepcidin by quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. OB, T2DM, and T2DOB individuals had higher ferritin, retinol-binding protein 4, and thiobarbituric acid reactive substance (TBAR) levels than controls. T2DOB and T2DM individuals showed high high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP) levels and OB with and without T2DM had elevated levels of serum hepcidin. Heme oxygenase activity was high in OB and T2DM and there were no differences observed in superoxide dismutase and glutathione parameters. A correlation between TBARS and ferritin in T2DOB was observed (r = 0.31; P diabetes and obesity with ferritin, TBARS, and hsCRP levels. The upper quartiles of ferritin, TBARS and hepcidin showed an adjusted odd ratio for T2DM of 1.782, 2.250, and 4.370, respectively. TNF-α, IL-6, hepcidin, NF-κB, TLR-2/4 mRNA abundances were increased in T2DM and T2DOB. Elevated hsCRP and hepcidin levels, and increased gene expression of TNF-α, IL-6, NF-κB, and TLR-2/4 in patients with diabetes, obesity, or both exacerbate and perpetuate the insulin resistance and inflammatory state. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Experimental oral iron administration: Histological investigations and expressions of iron handling proteins in rat retina with aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Pankaj; Nag, Tapas Chandra; Jha, Kumar Abhiram; Dey, Sanjay Kumar; Kathpalia, Poorti; Maurya, Meenakshi; Gupta, Chandan Lal; Bhatia, Jagriti; Roy, Tara Sankar; Wadhwa, Shashi

    2017-12-01

    Iron is implicated in age-related macular degeneration (AMD). The aim of this study was to see if long-term, experimental iron administration with aging modifies retinal and choroidal structures and expressions of iron handling proteins, to understand some aspects of iron homeostasis. Male Wistar rats were fed with ferrous sulphate heptahydrate (500mg/kg body weight/week, oral; elemental iron availability: 20%) from 2 months of age onward until they were 19.5 month-old. At 8, 14 and 20 months of age, they were sacrificed and serum and retinal iron levels were detected by HPLC. Oxidative stress was analyzed by TBARS method. The retinas were examined for cell death (TUNEL), histology (electron microscopy) and the expressions of transferrin, transferrin receptor-1 [TFR-1], H- and L-ferritin. In control animals, at any age, there was no difference in the serum and retinal iron levels, but the latter increased significantly in 14- and 20 month-old iron-fed rats, indicating that retinal iron accumulation proceeds with progression of aging (>14 months). The serum and retinal TBARS levels increased significantly with progression of aging in experimental but not in control rats. There was significant damage to choriocapillaris, accumulation of phagosomes in retinal pigment epithelium and increased incidence of TUNEL+ cells in outer nuclear layer and vacuolation in inner nuclear layer (INL) of 20 month-aged experimental rats, compared to those in age-matched controls. Vacuolations in INL could indicate a long-term effect of iron accumulation in the inner retina. These events paralleled the increased expression of ferritins and transferrin and a decrease in the expression of TFR-1 in iron-fed rats with aging, thereby maintaining iron homeostasis in the retina. As some of these changes mimic with those happening in eyes with AMD, this model can be utilized to understand iron-induced pathophysiological changes in AMD. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. The prevalence of anemia and iron deficiency is more common in breastfed infants than their mothers in Bhaktapur, Nepal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandyo, R K; Henjum, S; Ulak, M; Thorne-Lyman, A L; Ulvik, R J; Shrestha, P S; Locks, L; Fawzi, W; Strand, T A

    2016-04-01

    Iron deficiency anemia is a widespread public health problem, particularly in low- and middle-income countries. Maternal iron status around and during pregnancy may influence infant iron status. We examined multiple biomarkers to determine the prevalence of iron deficiency and anemia among breastfed infants and explored its relationship with maternal and infant characteristics in Bhaktapur, Nepal. In a cross-sectional survey, we randomly selected 500 mother-infant pairs from Bhaktapur municipality. Blood was analyzed for hemoglobin, ferritin, total iron-binding capacity, transferrin receptors and C-reactive protein. The altitude-adjusted prevalence of anemia was 49% among infants 2-6-month-old (hemaglobin (Hb) Iron deficiency anemia, defined as anemia and serum ferritin anemia (Hb iron stores. Significant predictors of infant iron status and anemia were infant age, sex and duration of exclusive breastfeeding and maternal ferritin concentrations. Our findings suggest that iron supplementation in pregnancy is likely to have resulted in a low prevalence of postpartum anemia. The higher prevalence of anemia and iron deficiency among breastfed infants compared with their mothers suggests calls for intervention targeting newborns and infants.

  13. Ferrokinetic Parameters and Regulation of Iron Metabolism in Patients with Chronic Inflammatory Bowel Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T.Y. Boiko

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Article presents parameters of iron metabolism and cytokines (IL-6 and TNF-α in patients with chronic inflammatory bowel diseases (CIBD. The material for the study was the blood of 69 patients with CIBD and anemia and 26 — without anemia. We have studied the features of main ferrokinetic parameters — iron, total iron-binding capacity of serum, transferrin saturation, ferritin, transferrin receptor, erythropoietin, hepcidin depending on hemoglobin level and the type of anemia. The relationship of iron metabolism disorders with the level of proinflammatory cytokines (IL-6 and TNF-α is shown.

  14. Multilayer Ferritin Array for Bionanobattery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Sang-Hyon (Inventor); Choi, Sang H. (Inventor); Kim, Jae-Woo (Inventor); Lillehei, Peter T. (Inventor); Park, Yeonjoon (Inventor); King, Glen C. (Inventor); Elliott, James R., Jr. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    A thin-film electrode for a bio-nanobattery is produced by consecutively depositing arrays of a ferritin protein on a substrate, employing a spin self-assembly procedure. By this procedure, a first ferritin layer is first formed on the substrate, followed by building a second, oppositely-charged ferritin layer on the top of the first ferritin layer to form a bilayer structure. Oppositely-charged ferritin layers are subsequently deposited on top of each other until a desired number of bilayer structures is produced. An ordered, uniform, stable and robust, thin-film electrode material of enhanced packing density is presented, which provides optimal charge density for the bio-nanobattery.

  15. Iron status and its relations with oxidative damage and bone loss during long-duration space flight on the International Space Station.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwart, Sara R; Morgan, Jennifer L L; Smith, Scott M

    2013-07-01

    Increases in stored iron and dietary intake of iron during space flight have raised concern about the risk of excess iron and oxidative damage, particularly in bone. The objectives of this study were to perform a comprehensive assessment of iron status in men and women before, during, and after long-duration space flight and to quantify the association of iron status with oxidative damage and bone loss. Fasting blood and 24-h urine samples were collected from 23 crew members before, during, and after missions lasting 50 to 247 d to the International Space Station. Serum ferritin and body iron increased early in flight, and transferrin and transferrin receptors decreased later, which indicated that early increases in body iron stores occurred through the mobilization of iron to storage tissues. Acute phase proteins indicated no evidence of an inflammatory response during flight. Serum ferritin was positively correlated with the oxidative damage markers 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine (r = 0.53, P < 0.001) and prostaglandin F2α (r = 0.26, P < 0.001), and the greater the area under the curve for ferritin during flight, the greater the decrease in bone mineral density in the total hip (P = 0.031), trochanter (P = 0.006), hip neck (P = 0.044), and pelvis (P = 0.049) after flight. Increased iron stores may be a risk factor for oxidative damage and bone resorption.

  16. Study of gonadal hormones in Egyptian female children with sickle cell anemia in correlation with iron overload: Single center study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagag, Adel A; El-Farargy, Mohamed S; Elrefaey, Shaymaa; Abo El-enein, Amany M

    2016-03-01

    Sickle cell disease is a hereditary hemoglobinopathy characterized by abnormal hemoglobin production, hemolytic anemia, and intermittent occlusion of small blood vessels, leading to tissue ischemia, chronic organ damage, and organ dysfunction including endocrine organs. The aim of this work was to evaluate some gonadal hormones in female children with sickle cell anemia (SCA) in correlation with iron overload. This study was conducted on 40 female children with SCA with a serum ferritin of > 1000ng/mL, who were attendants at the Hematology Unit, Pediatric Department, Tanta University, Tanta, Egypt in the period from May 2012 to April 2014. Their ages ranged from 11 years to 15years and the mean age value was 12.63±1.36 years (Group I). Forty female children with SCA of matched age with no iron overload served as a control Group (Group II). For all patients in Groups I and II the following were performed/assessed: complete blood count, hemoglobin electrophoresis, serum iron status, serum estrogen, luteinizing hormone (LH), and follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH). There were significantly higher serum ferritin and serum iron levels and significantly lower total iron binding capacity, FSH, LH, and estrogen levels in Group I compared with Group II (mean serum ferritin was 2635.1±918.9 in Group I vs. 292.55±107.2 in Group II with a p value of .001; mean serum iron was 196.3±55.6 in Group I vs. 120±16.57 in Group II with a p value of .001 and mean serum total iron binding capacity was 247.3±28.6 in Group I vs. 327.8.7±21.96 in Group II with a p value of .001; mean FSH level was 1.36±0.22mIU/mL in Group I vs. 2.64±0.81mIU/mL in Group II with a p value of .021; mean LH level was 0.11±0.006mIU/mL in Group I vs. 1.78±1.12mIU/mL in Group II with a p value of .003; mean estrogen level was 21.45±10.23pg/mL in Group I vs. 42.36±15.44pg/mL in Group II with a p value of 0.001) with significant negative correlation between serum gonadal hormones and serum ferritin (r

  17. Ameliorating role of rutin on oxidative stress induced by iron overload in hepatic tissue of rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aziza, Samy Ali Hussein; Azab, Mohammed El-Said; El-Shall, Soheir Kamal

    2014-08-01

    Iron is an essential element that participates in several metabolic activities of cells; however, excess iron is a major cause of iron-induced oxidative stress and several human diseases. Natural flavonoids, as rutin, are well-known antioxidants and could be efficient protective agents. Therefore, the present study was undertaken to evaluate the protective influence of rutin supplementation to improve rat antioxidant systems against IOL-induced hepatic oxidative stress. Sixty male albino rats were randomly divided to three equal groups. The first group, the control, the second group, iron overload group, the third group was used as iron overload+rutin group. Rats received six doses of ferric hydroxide polymaltose (100 mg kg(-1) b.wt.) as one dose every two days, by intraperitoneal injections (IP) and administrated rutin (50 mg kg(-1) b.wt.) as one daily oral dose until the sacrificed day. Blood samples for serum separation and liver tissue specimens were collected three times, after three, four and five weeks from the onset of the experiment. Serum iron profiles total iron, Total Iron Binding Capacity (TIBC), Unsaturated Iron Binding Capacity (UIBC), transferrin (Tf) and Transferrin Saturation% (TS%)}, ferritin, albumin, total Protein, total cholesterol, triacylglycerols levels and aspartate aminotransferase (AST) and alanine aminotransferase (ALT) activities were determined. Moreover, total iron in the liver, L-malondialdehyde (L-MDA), glutathione (GSH), Nitric Oxide (NO) and Total Nucleic Acid (TNA) levels and glutathione peroxidase (GPx), catalase (CAT) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activities were also determined. The obtained results revealed that, iron overload (IOL) resulted in significant increase in serum iron, TIBC, Tf, TS% and ferritin levels and AST and ALT activities and also increased liver iron, L-MDA and NO levels. Meanwhile, it decreased serum UIBC, total cholesterol, triacylglycerols, albumin, total protein and liver GSH, TNA levels and Gpx, CAT

  18. Effects of various anesthesia maintenance on serum levels of selenium, copper, zinc, iron and antioxidant capacity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet Akin

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: In this study, we aimed to investigate the effects of sevoflurane, desflurane and propofol maintenances on serum levels of selenium, copper, zinc, iron, malondialdehyde, and glutathion peroxidase measurements, and antioxidant capacity. METHODS: 60 patients scheduled for unilateral lower extremity surgery which would be performed with tourniquet under general anesthesia were divided into three groups. Blood samples were collected to determine the baseline serum levels of selenium, copper, zinc, iron, malondialdehyde and glutathion peroxidase. Anesthesia was induced using 2-2.5 mg kg-1 propofol, 1 mg kg-1 lidocaine and 0.6 mg kg-1 rocuronium. In the maintenance of anesthesia, under carrier gas of 50:50% O2:N2O 4 L min-1, 1 MAC sevoflorane was administered to Group S and 1 MAC desflurane to Group D; and under carrier gas of 50:50% O2:air 4 L min-1 6 mg kg h-1 propofol and 1 µg kg h-1 fentanyl infusion were administered to Group P. At postoperative blood specimens were collected again. RESULTS: It was observed that only in Group S and P, levels of MDA decreased at postoperative 48th hour; levels of glutathion peroxidase increased in comparison to the baseline values. Selenium levels decreased in Group S and Group P, zinc levels decreased in Group P, and iron levels decreased in all three groups, and copper levels did not change in any groups in the postoperative period. CONCLUSION: According to the markers of malondialdehyde and glutathion peroxidase, it was concluded that maintenance of general anesthesia using propofol and sevoflurane activated the antioxidant system against oxidative stress and using desflurane had no effects on oxidative stress and antioxidant system.

  19. Serum albumin forms a lactoferrin-like soluble iron-binding complex in presence of hydrogen carbonate ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueno, Hiroshi M; Urazono, Hiroshi; Kobayashi, Toshiya

    2014-02-15

    The iron-lactoferrin complex is a common food ingredient because of its iron-solubilizing capability in the presence of hydrogen carbonate ions. However, it is unclear whether the formation of a stable iron-binding complex is limited to lactoferrin. In this study, we investigated the effects of bovine serum albumin (BSA) on iron solubility and iron-catalyzed lipid oxidation in the presence of hydrogen carbonate ions. BSA could solubilize >100-fold molar equivalents of iron at neutral pH, exceeding the specific metal-binding property of BSA. This iron-solubilizing capability of BSA was impaired by thermally denaturing BSA at ≥ 70 °C for 10 min at pH 8.5. The resulting iron-BSA complex inhibited iron-catalyzed oxidation of soybean oil in a water-in-oil emulsion measured using the Rancimat test. Our study is the first to show that BSA, like lactoferrin, forms a soluble iron-binding complex in the presence of hydrogen carbonate ions. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. HFE gene mutation is a risk factor for tissue iron accumulation in hemodialysis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turkmen, Ercan; Yildirim, Tolga; Yilmaz, Rahmi; Hazirolan, Tuncay; Eldem, Gonca; Yilmaz, Engin; Aybal Kutlugun, Aysun; Altindal, Mahmut; Altun, Bulent

    2017-07-01

    HFE gene mutations are responsible from iron overload in general population. Studies in hemodialysis patients investigated the effect of presence of HFE gene mutations on serum ferritin and transferrin saturation (TSAT) with conflicting results. However effect of HFE mutations on iron overload in hemodialysis patients was not previously extensively studied. 36 hemodialysis patients (age 51.3 ± 15.6, (18/18) male/female) and 44 healthy control subjects included in this cross sectional study. Hemoglobin, ferritin, TSAT in the preceding 2 years were recorded. Iron and erythropoietin (EPO) administered during this period were calculated. Iron accumulation in heart and liver was detected by MRI. Relationship between HFE gene mutation, hemoglobin, iron parameters and EPO doses, and tissue iron accumulation were determined. Iron overload was detected in nine (25%) patients. Hemoglobin, iron parameters, weekly EPO doses, and monthly iron doses of patients with and without iron overload were similar. There was no difference between control group and hemodialysis patients with respect to the prevalence of HFE gene mutations. Iron overload was detected in five of eight patients who had HFE gene mutations, but iron overload was present in 4 of 28 patients who had no mutations (P = 0.01). Hemoglobin, iron parameters, erythropoietin, and iron doses were similar in patients with and without gene mutations. HFE gene mutations remained the main determinant of iron overload after multivariate logistic regression analysis (P = 0.02; OR, 11.6). Serum iron parameters were not adequate to detect iron overload and HFE gene mutation was found to be an important risk factor for iron accumulation. © 2017 International Society for Hemodialysis.

  1. Prevalence of Iron Deficiency and Iron Deficiency Anemia in High-School Girl Students of Yazd

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    M Noori Shadkam

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: It is generally assumed that 50% of the cases of anemia are due to iron deficiency. The most severe consequence of iron depletion is iron deficiency anemia (IDA, and it is still considered the most common nutrition deficiency worldwide. The main risk factors for IDA include: inadequate iron intake, impaired absorption or transport, physiologic losses associated with chronological or reproductive age, or acute or chronic blood loss, parasite infections such as hookworms, acute and chronic infections, including malaria, cancer, tuberculosis, HIV and other micronutrient deficiencies, including vitamins A and B12, folate, riboflavin, and copper deficiency. Methods: This work as a cross-sectional study was done in 2007-2008 in Yazd. Two hundred girls who participated in the study were selected randomly from eight girl high schools. Five ml venous blood was collected for determination of serum ferritin and cell blood count (CBC. Serum ferritin was determined by using ECLIA method and CBC by cell counter SYSMEX KX21N. Iron deficiency was defined as having serum ferritin values below 12 μ/l. Anemia was defined as having Hemoglobin levels below12 g/dl. Iron-deficiency anemia was considered to be the combination of both. Results: The3 mean ageyears and body mass index (kg/m2 were 15.19±0.7years and 21.5±4.2, respectively. Distribution in the 14, 15 and 16 years and more age groups were 13, 58.5 and 28.5 percent, respectively. Mean of Hemoglobin(g/dl, Hematocrit(%, MCV (fl, MCH (pg, MCHC (g/dl and ferritin(μ/l were 12.8±0.9, 38.9±3.0, 80.7±4.3, 26.6±1.8, 33.2±3.6 and 23±18.2, respectively. Of the total, 13.5% were anemic, 68% of which had Iron Deficiency Anemia (9.3% of the total. Iron deficiency was present in 34.7% of the population under study. Conclusion: According to world health organization criteria, anemia is a mild public health problem in this region, but iron deficiency is a significant problem and suitable measures for

  2. Cellular location of rat muscle ferritins and their preferential loss during cell isolation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linder, M C; Roboz, M; McKown, M J; Pardridge, W M; Zak, R

    1984-04-10

    Heart and other muscles of the rat contain two forms of ferritin separable in polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The cellular location of the fast- and slow-migrating ferritins was investigated using primary cultures of hindlimb skeletal muscle, and isolated myocardial cell populations. Muscle and non-muscle cells were isolated in good yield from hearts of adult rats pretreated with large doses of iron to increase their ferritin content. In virtually all cases, the isolated muscle cells contained traces only of the fast-migrating species and the non-muscle cells contained small amounts of the slow-migrating ferritin. During cell isolation, 90-100% of both ferritins was lost and could be recovered in the perfusates and solutions employed, while one third of the total tissue protein, and a larger percentage of creatine phosphokinase, was recovered in the isolated cells. Primary cultures of thigh muscle from adult rats which had differentiated into multi-nucleated myotubes, were incubated for 1-3 days with chelated iron. These cells contained substantial amounts of the electrophoretically fast migrating ferritin, with its characteristic larger Stokes' radius (determined by quantitative polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis). None of the slow-migrating ferritin species was detected, although hindlimb muscle from iron-treated rats contained both forms. It is concluded that the fast-migrating ferritin of muscle, which is much larger and more asymmetric than other ferritins, is confined to the muscle cell population, while the other form is predominantly or exclusively in the non-muscle cells. Both ferritins are lost preferentially over other proteins during procedures which injure muscle tissue.

  3. Consuming Iron Biofortified Beans Increases Iron Status in Rwandan Women after 128 Days in a Randomized Controlled Feeding Trial.

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    Haas, Jere D; Luna, Sarah V; Lung'aho, Mercy G; Wenger, Michael J; Murray-Kolb, Laura E; Beebe, Stephen; Gahutu, Jean-Bosco; Egli, Ines M

    2016-08-01

    Food-based strategies to reduce nutritional iron deficiency have not been universally successful. Biofortification has the potential to become a sustainable, inexpensive, and effective solution. This randomized controlled trial was conducted to determine the efficacy of iron-biofortified beans (Fe-Beans) to improve iron status in Rwandan women. A total of 195 women (aged 18-27 y) with serum ferritin Beans, with 86 mg Fe/kg, or standard unfortified beans (Control-Beans), with 50 mg Fe/kg, 2 times/d for 128 d in Huye, Rwanda. Iron status was assessed by hemoglobin, serum ferritin, soluble transferrin receptor (sTfR), and body iron (BI); inflammation was assessed by serum C-reactive protein (CRP) and serum α1-acid glycoprotein (AGP). Anthropometric measurements were performed at baseline and at end line. Random weekly serial sampling was used to collect blood during the middle 8 wk of the feeding trial. Mixed-effects regression analysis with repeated measurements was used to evaluate the effect of Fe-Beans compared with Control-Beans on iron biomarkers throughout the course of the study. At baseline, 86% of subjects were iron-deficient (serum ferritin beans/d. The Fe-Beans group consumed 14.5 ± 1.6 mg Fe/d from biofortified beans, whereas the Control-Beans group consumed 8.6 ± 0.8 mg Fe/d from standard beans (P Beans group had significantly greater increases in hemoglobin (3.8 g/L), log serum ferritin (0.1 log μg/L), and BI (0.5 mg/kg) than did controls after 128 d. For every 1 g Fe consumed from beans over the 128 study days, there was a significant 4.2-g/L increase in hemoglobin (P beans significantly improved iron status in Rwandan women. This trial was registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT01594359. © 2016 American Society for Nutrition.

  4. Protective effects of Mangifera indica L extract (Vimang), and its major component mangiferin, on iron-induced oxidative damage to rat serum and liver.

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    Pardo-Andreu, Gilberto L; Barrios, Mariela Forrellat; Curti, Carlos; Hernández, Ivones; Merino, Nelson; Lemus, Yeny; Martínez, Ioanna; Riaño, Annia; Delgado, René

    2008-01-01

    In vivo preventive effects of a Mangifera indica L extract (Vimang) or its major component mangiferin on iron overload injury have been studied in rats given respectively, 50, 100, 250 mg kg(-1) body weight of Vimang, or 40 mg kg(-1) body weight of mangiferin, for 7 days prior to, and for 7 days following the administration of toxic amounts of iron-dextran. Both Vimang or mangiferin treatment prevented iron overload in serum as well as liver oxidative stress, decreased serum and liver lipid peroxidation, serum GPx activity, and increased serum and liver GSH, serum SOD and the animals overall antioxidant condition. Serum iron concentration was decreased although at higher doses, Vimang tended to increase it; percent tranferrin saturation, liver weight/body mass ratios, liver iron content was decreased. Treatment increased serum iron-binding capacity and decreased serum levels of aspartate-amine transferase (ASAT) and alanine-amine transferase (ALAT), as well as the number of abnormal Kupffer cells in iron-loaded livers. It is suggested that besides acting as antioxidants, Vimang extract or its mangiferin component decrease liver iron by increasing its excretion. Complementing earlier in vitro results from our group, it appears possible to support the hypothesis that Vimang and mangiferin present therapeutically useful effects in iron overload related diseases.

  5. Associations between single nucleotide polymorphisms in iron-related genes and iron status in multiethnic populations.

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    Christine E McLaren

    Full Text Available The existence of multiple inherited disorders of iron metabolism suggests genetic contributions to iron deficiency. We previously performed a genome-wide association study of iron-related single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs using DNA from white men aged ≥ 25 y and women ≥ 50 y in the Hemochromatosis and Iron Overload Screening (HEIRS Study with serum ferritin (SF ≤ 12 µg/L (cases and controls (SF >100 µg/L in men, SF >50 µg/L in women. We report a follow-up study of white, African-American, Hispanic, and Asian HEIRS participants, analyzed for association between SNPs and eight iron-related outcomes. Three chromosomal regions showed association across multiple populations, including SNPs in the TF and TMPRSS6 genes, and on chromosome 18q21. A novel SNP rs1421312 in TMPRSS6 was associated with serum iron in whites (p = 3.7 × 10(-6 and replicated in African Americans (p = 0.0012.Twenty SNPs in the TF gene region were associated with total iron-binding capacity in whites (p<4.4 × 10(-5; six SNPs replicated in other ethnicities (p<0.01. SNP rs10904850 in the CUBN gene on 10p13 was associated with serum iron in African Americans (P = 1.0 × 10(-5. These results confirm known associations with iron measures and give unique evidence of their role in different ethnicities, suggesting origins in a common founder.

  6. The treatment of iron deficiency without anaemia (in otherwise healthy persons).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clénin, German E

    2017-06-21

    Iron deficiency is the most widespread and frequent nutritional disorder in the world. It affects a high proportion of children and women in developing countries and is also significantly prevalent in the industrialised world, with a clear predominance in adolescents and menstruating females. Iron is essential for optimal cognitive function and physical performance, not only as a binding site of oxygen but also as a critical constituent of many enzymes. Therefore iron deficiency at all its levels - nonanaemic iron deficiency, iron deficiency with microcytosis or hypochromia and iron deficiency anaemia - should be treated. In the presence of normal stores, however, preventative iron administration is inefficient, has side effects and seems to be harmful. In symptomatic patients with fatigue or in a population at risk for iron deficiency (adolescence, heavy or prolonged menstruation, high performance sport, vegetarian or vegan diet, eating disorder, underweight), a baseline set of blood tests including haemoglobin concentration, haematocrit, mean cellular volume, mean cellular haemoglobin, percentage of hypochromic erythrocytes and serum ferritin levels are important to monitor iron deficiency. To avoid false negative results (high ferritin levels in spite of iron deficiency), an acute phase reaction should be excluded by history and measurement of C-reactive protein. An algorithm leads through this diagnostic process and the decision making for a possible treatment. For healthy males and females aged >15 years, a ferritin cut-off of 30 µg/l is appropriate. For children from 6-12 years and younger adolescents from 12-15 years, cut-offs of 15 and 20 µg/l, respectively, are recommended. As a first step in treatment, counselling and oral iron therapy are usually combined. Integrating haem and free iron regularly into the diet, looking for enhancers and avoiding inhibitors of iron uptake is beneficial. In order to prevent reduced compliance, mainly as a result of

  7. Iron Homeostasis in Mycobacterium tuberculosis: Mechanistic Insights into Siderophore-Mediated Iron Uptake

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis requires iron for normal growth but faces a limitation of the metal ion due to its low solubility at biological pH and the withholding of iron by the mammalian host. The pathogen expresses the Fe3+-specific siderophores mycobactin and carboxymycobactin to chelate the metal ion from insoluble iron and the host proteins transferrin, lactoferrin, and ferritin. Siderophore-mediated iron uptake is essential for the survival of M. tuberculosis, as knockout mutants, which were defective in siderophore synthesis or uptake, failed to survive in low-iron medium and inside macrophages. But as excess iron is toxic due to its catalytic role in the generation of free radicals, regulation of iron uptake is necessary to maintain optimal levels of intracellular iron. The focus of this review is to present a comprehensive overview of iron homeostasis in M. tuberculosis that is discussed in the context of mycobactin biosynthesis, transport of iron across the mycobacterial cell envelope, and storage of excess iron. The clinical significance of the serum iron status and the expression of the iron-regulated protein HupB in tuberculosis (TB) patients is presented here, highlighting the potential of HupB as a marker, notably in extrapulmonary TB cases. PMID:27402628

  8. Homocysteine and vitamin B 12 status and iron deficiency anemia in female university students from Gaza Strip, Palestine

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    Mahmoud Mohammed Sirdah

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Nutritional deficiencies are very significant to the overall health of humans at all ages and for both genders, yet in infants, children and women of childbearing age these deficiencies can seriously affect growth and development. The present work is aimed to assess homocysteine and vitamin B12 status in females with iron deficiency anemia from the Gaza Strip.METHODS: Venous blood samples were randomly collected from 240 female university students (18-22 years old and parameters of the complete blood count, serum ferritin, homocysteine and vitamin B12 were measured. Statistical analysis included the t-test and analysis of variance (ANOVA using the IBM SPSS software (version 18. Statistical significance was set for p-values <0.05.RESULTS: The results revealed that 20.4% of the students have iron deficiency anemia. The mean serum vitamin B12 level in females with iron deficiency anemia (212.9 ± 62.8 pg/mL was significantly lower than in normal controls (286.9 ± 57.1 pg/mL and subjects with microcytic anemia and normal ferritin (256.7 ± 71.1 pg/mL. Significantly higher serum homocysteine levels were reported in the iron deficiency anemia group (27.0 ± 4.6 µmol/L compared to normal controls (15.5 ± 2.9 µmol/L and in subjects with microcytic anemia and normal ferritin (18.1 ± 2.7 µmol/L. Statistically significant negative correlations were reported for serum homocysteine with serum ferritin, vitamin B12, hemoglobin, and hematocrit levels.CONCLUSION: Important associations were found between serum homocysteine and markers of iron deficiency. Monitoring homocysteine levels might be essential to understand the development of different clinical conditions including anemia. It seems necessary to conduct prospective trials to determine whether treating anemia ameliorates homocysteine levels.

  9. Serum and tissue contents of copper, calcium, iron and magnesium elements in cases of acne vulgaris after zinc therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Said, S.M.; El-Bedewi, A.F.

    2002-01-01

    The effect of zinc therapy on some trace elements contents in serum and skin was studied in normal group (forty) and patients group with acne vulgaris (26 males and 14 females) with age ranged between 14-30 year. They were under medical treatment with 330 mg oral zinc sulfate for 12 weeks. Highly significant decreases in both serum and tissue contents of copper and calcium were detected, as well as, highly significant decrease in the serum content of magnesium was recorded. The serum content of iron was highly significantly increased and that for tissue content was slightly significantly increased. It could be concluded that zinc therapy could be valuable through modulation of copper. calcium, iron and magnesium in acne patients

  10. STUDY OF WOMEN'S IRON-DEFICIENCY ANAEMIA IN REPRODUCTIVE AGE REFERRED TO OBSTETRIC AND GYNECOLOGY CENTER OF HOSPITAL

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    H. R. Sadeghipour Roudsari

    1996-07-01

    Full Text Available We studied the prevalence of iron-deficiency anaemia in women of reproductive age, between 15 to 49, with a mean age of 31-56±1.34 years, attending Mirzakoochak khan Hospital OB. GYN. Center for routine gynecological and obstetrical examination. We compa'tred mean values for the serum tests and haematological data and investigated etiological factors such as age, marital status, education, spouse's education, occupation, spouse's occuption, number of days of menstrual bleeding, severity of menstrual bleeding, pregnancy status, number of pregnancies, number of deliveries, intervals between successive pregnancies, ami smoking status, as probable causes of iron-deficiency anaemia in women. Moreover the relevance between occurance of iron-deficiency anaemia or ferritin serum level to etiological factors and diagnostic laboratory tests arc analyzed. A serum diagnosis of iron-deficiency was accepted on the basis of one or more of the following test results: serum ferritin levels below 12 figf with or without transferrin saturation below 16%. For the purpose of this study anaemia was difind as haemoglobin (Hb below 12 gdf . Women have been classified into two groups of anaemic Vs normal according to the diagnosis. Prevalence of anaemia among 41 subjects with complete laboratory results was 36.58%. Moreover, the probability of occurance of iron-deficiency anaemia, in general population was fount! to be 33.3%. As a result a significant relationship was observed between occurance of iron-deficiency anaemia and diagnostic laboratory tests including serum ferritin, serum iron, total iron-binding capacity (TIBC, transferring saturation (%, Hb, haematocrit (Hct, mean corpuscular haemoglobin (MCH, mean corpuscular volume (MCV, mean corpuscular haemoglobin concentration (MCHC, and etiological factors such as number of days of menstrual bleeding, severity of menstrual bleeding. Same relationship was observed between serum ferritin levels and

  11. Iron-biofortified rice improves the iron stores of nonanemic Filipino women.

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    Haas, Jere D; Beard, John L; Murray-Kolb, Laura E; del Mundo, Angelita M; Felix, Angelina; Gregorio, Glenn B

    2005-12-01

    Iron deficiency is endemic in much of the world, and food system-based approaches to eradication may be viable with new plant breeding approaches to increase the micronutrient content in staple crops. It is thought that conventional plant breeding approaches provide varieties of rice that have 400-500% higher iron contents than varieties commonly consumed in much of Asia. The efficacy of consuming high-iron rice was tested during a 9-mo feeding trial with a double-blind dietary intervention in 192 religious sisters living in 10 convents around metro Manila, the Philippines. Subjects were randomly assigned to consume either high-iron rice (3.21 mg/kg Fe) or a local variety of control rice (0.57 mg/kg Fe), and daily food consumption was monitored. The high-iron rice contributed 1.79 mg Fe/d to the diet in contrast to 0.37 mg Fe/d from the control rice. The 17% difference in total dietary iron consumption compared with controls (10.16 +/- 1.06 vs. 8.44 +/- 1.82 mg/d) resulted in a modest increase in serum ferritin (P = 0.10) and total body iron (P = 0.06) and no increase in hemoglobin (P = 0.59). However, the response was greater in nonanemic subjects for ferritin (P = 0.02) and body iron (P = 0.05), representing a 20% increase after controlling for baseline values and daily rice consumption. The greatest improvements in iron status were seen in those nonanemic women who had the lowest baseline iron status and in those who consumed the most iron from rice. Consumption of biofortified rice, without any other changes in diet, is efficacious in improving iron stores of women with iron-poor diets in the developing world.

  12. Iron deficiency in chronic systolic heart failure(indic study

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    Sunil Verma

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Chronic systolic heart failure (HF is characterized by the left ventricular dysfunction, exercise intolerance and is associated with neurohormonal activation that affects several organs such as kidney and skeletal muscle. Anemia is common in HF and may worsen symptoms. Iron deficiency (ID is also common in HF patients with or without anemia. Iron is the key cofactor in oxidative metabolism in skeletal muscle and the Krebs cycle. There is a paucity of data regarding iron metabolism in chronic systolic HF in India. Methods: IroN Deficiency In CHF study (INDIC is an observational study that investigated forty chronic heart failure patients for the presence of ID. Serum ferritin (micrograms per liter, serum iron (micrograms per liter, total iron binding capacity (micrograms per liter, transferring (milligrams per deciliter, and transferrin saturation were measured to assess iron status. Results: There were 67.5% (27/40 patients who had ID with a mean serum ferritin level of 76.4 μg/L. Of the 27 iron deficient patients, 22 (55% had an absolute ID, and 5 had a functional ID. Eight out of 27 of the iron deficient patients were anemic (20% of the total cohort, 30% of the iron deficient patients. Anemia was seen in 6 other patients, which was possibly anemia of chronic disease. There was a trend for more advanced New York Heart Association (NYHA class (NYHA III and NYHA IV patients with ID (37.4% vs. 30.77%, P = 0.697. Conclusion: In our study, ID was very common, affecting more than half of the patients with systolic HF. Absolute ID was the most common cause of ID and patients with ID had a tendency to have advanced NYHA class. Our study also demonstrated that ID can occur in the absence of anemia (iron depletion.

  13. Reference limits and behaviour of serum transferrin receptor in children 6-10 years of age.

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    Danise, P; Maconi, M; Morelli, G; Di Palma, A; Rescigno, G; Esposito, C; Avino, D; Talento, B

    2008-08-01

    Serum transferrin receptor (sTfR) originates mostly from erythroblasts and lesser from reticulocytes. The usefulness of sTfR has been implicated in several clinical situations, mainly as a marker of accelerated erythropoiesis or iron deficiency. The assessment of sTfR may be useful in the period of rapid growth during infancy, childhood and adolescence. We evaluated sTfR and the other quantitative and qualitative parameters of the erythropoiesis (Hb, MCV, CHr, Ret-He) and of the iron storage (serum ferritin, sTfR/ferritin index) in a total of 916 children aged 6-10 years. Children were divided into three groups: (A) healthy children, (B) with storage iron deficiency (serum ferritin 3.3). We determined reference intervals by sex and by age in healthy children. sTfR showed a slight but statistically significant age related increase but did not show significant sex differences. We compared sTfR and the other parameters investigated in the three groups of children. sTfR is not a decisive parameter that can be utilized alone in discriminating the border-line situations between normal and pathologic ones but can help in completing the panel of tests in iron deficiency and in thalassaemia Beta trait carriers.

  14. Effect of Combined versus Monotherapy with Deferoxamine and Deferiprone in Iron Overloaded Thalassemia Patients: a Randomized Clinical Trial

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    Sasan Hejazi

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Patients with transfusional iron overload have depended on iron chelation therapy and improving chelation regimens have been of the highest priority. The aim of this study was to compare effect of combined versus monotherapy with Deferoxamine (DFO and Deferiprone (DFP in iron overloaded beta thalassemia (BT major patients Materials and Methods We studied 36 BT major patients (mean age 7.6±4.6; range 3–16 years attending the Ormieh Motahari hospital for regular transfusional support. Patients were randomly allocated to receive one of the following two treatments: DFO in combination with DFP (n=12, DFO alone (n=12 and DFP alone (n=12. Serum ferritin level, liver enzymes, blood urea nitrogen, and creatinine and side effects were monitored over a 12 months period. Results: After one year, serum ferritin decreased more significantly in patients on DFO+DFP therapy compared to patients who only received DFO or DFP alone (P

  15. Effect of a nutrition education program and diet modification in Beninese adolescent girls suffering from mild iron deficiency anemia.

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    Alaofé, Halimatou; Zee, John; Dossa, Romain; O'Brien, Huguette Turgeon

    2009-01-01

    A 26-week nutrition intervention, including 4 weeks of nutrition education, combined with an increase in the content and bioavailability of dietary iron for 22 weeks was carried out in 34 intervention and 34 control adolescent girls suffering from mild iron deficiency anemia (IDA). In post-intervention, hemoglobin and serum ferritin were significantly higher in the intervention group, whereas the incidence of IDA was significantly lower in the intervention group compared to the control group. Nutrition knowledge scores were significantly higher in intervention girls compared to control girls. Dietary changes to improve available dietary iron can reduce iron deficiency anemia.

  16. Mechanism of Dimercaptosuccinic Acid Coated Superparamagnetic Iron Oxide Nanoparticles with Human Serum Albumin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Lining; Song, Wei; Wang, Jing; Yan, Yunxing; Chen, Jiangwei; Liu, Rutao

    2015-12-01

    To research the mechanism of dimercaptosuccinic acid coated-superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPION) with human serum albumin (HSA), the methods of spectroscopy, molecular modeling calculation, and calorimetry were used in this paper. The inner filter effect of the fluorescence intensity was corrected to obtain the accurate results. Ultraviolet-visible absorption and circular dichroism spectra reflect that SPION changed the secondary structure with a loss of α-helix and loosened the protein skeleton of HSA; the activity of the protein was also affected by the increasing exposure of SPION. Fluorescence lifetime measurement indicates that the quenching mechanism type of this system was static quenching. The isothermal titration calorimetry measurement and molecular docking calculations prove that the predominant force of this system was the combination of Van der Waals' force and hydrogen bonds. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Serum Hydroxyl Radical Scavenging Capacity as Quantified with Iron-Free Hydroxyl Radical Source

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    Endo, Nobuyuki; Oowada, Shigeru; Sueishi, Yoshimi; Shimmei, Masashi; Makino, Keisuke; Fujii, Hirotada; Kotake, Yashige

    2009-01-01

    We have developed a simple ESR spin trapping based method for hydroxyl (OH) radical scavenging-capacity determination, using iron-free OH radical source. Instead of the widely used Fenton reaction, a short (typically 5 seconds) in situ UV-photolysis of a dilute hydrogen peroxide aqueous solution was employed to generate reproducible amounts of OH radicals. ESR spin trapping was applied to quantify OH radicals; the decrease in the OH radical level due to the specimen’s scavenging activity was converted into the OH radical scavenging capacity (rate). The validity of the method was confirmed in pure antioxidants, and the agreement with the previous data was satisfactory. In the second half of this work, the new method was applied to the sera of chronic renal failure (CRF) patients. We show for the first time that after hemodialysis, OH radical scavenging capacity of the CRF serum was restored to the level of healthy control. This method is simple and rapid, and the low concentration hydrogen peroxide is the only chemical added to the system, that could eliminate the complexity of iron-involved Fenton reactions or the use of the pulse-radiolysis system. PMID:19794928

  18. Effect of short-term food restriction on iron metabolism, relative well-being and depression symptoms in healthy women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wojciak, Rafal W

    2014-01-01

    The idea that iron deficiency anemia can be recognized in depressive patients has been around for a few years, as well as negative association between ferritin levels and depression. Iron deficiency anemia, associated with low iron intake, has been observed in women using restriction diets, for example in vegetarians or anorexics. There are no data on the influence of the short-term food restrictions, observed for example in slimming women, on iron management and its connection with behavior expressed via changes in the subject's emotional state. This study describes the effect of one- and two-day food restrictions (every 8 days for a period of 48 days) on selected iron management parameters in the serum and blood of 46 healthy volunteer women (23 in each group), aged 25.5 ± 3.0 years, in association with the subjects' self-described emotional status and depression symptoms. The association between iron parameters and depression was also analyzed. Results show that short-term (2 days) fasting significantly decreases iron concentrations in serum and hair, as well as levels of ferritin, hemoglobin, hematocrit, red blood cells, and total iron binding capacity, but the short-term fasting did not influence the other iron management parameters. Each model of food restrictions also increased negative feelings towards depression. A significant negative correlation between serum ferritin levels and depression was found in women who starved for 2 days. The study shows that, through an impact on mineral levels, even short-term food restrictions, as observed in many slimming women and girls, can be a reason for iron deficiency and also can alter the emotional status of healthy women. Maybe depression symptoms in anorexia or other eating disorders patients can be associated with iron deficiencies.

  19. Quantitative T2* magnetic resonance imaging for evaluation of iron deposition in the brain of β-thalassemia patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhlaghpoor, S; Ghahari, A; Morteza, A; Khalilzadeh, O; Shakourirad, A; Alinaghizadeh, M R

    2012-09-01

    Iron overload is a common clinical problem in patients with β-thalassemia major. The purpose of this study was to assess the presence of excess iron in certain areas of the brain (thalamus, midbrain, adenohypophysis and basal ganglia) in patients with β-thalassemia major and evaluate the association with serum ferritin and liver iron content. A cross-sectional study on 53 patients with β-thalassemia major and 40 healthy controls was carried out. All patients and healthy controls underwent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) examinations of the brain and liver. Multiecho fast gradient echo sequence was used and T2* values were calculated based on the Brompton protocol. Correlations between T2* values in the brain with T2* values in the liver as well as serum ferritin levels were investigated. There were no significant differences between patients and healthy controls with respect to age and sex. Patients had significantly lower T2* values in basal ganglia (striatum), thalamus and adenohypophysis compared to controls while there were no differences in the midbrain (red nucleus). There were no significant correlations between liver T2* values or serum ferritin with T2* values of basal ganglia (striatum), thalamus and adenohypophysis in patients or healthy controls. There were no significant correlations between T2* values of adenohypophysis and thalamus or basal ganglia (striatum) while these variables were significantly correlated in healthy controls. Serum ferritin and liver iron content may not be good indicators of brain iron deposition in patients with β thalassemia major. Nevertheless, the quantitative T2* MRI technique is useful for evaluation of brain iron overload in β thalassemia major patients.

  20. Oral Iron Prophylaxis in Pregnancy: Not Too Little and Not Too Much!

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    Nils Milman

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available An adequate supply of iron is essential for normal development of the fetus and newborn child. Iron deficiency and iron deficiency anemia (IDA during pregnancy increase the risk of preterm birth and low birth weight. Iron is important for development of the fetal brain and cognitive abilities of the newborn. Children born to iron-deficient mothers will start their lives suffering from iron deficiency or even IDA. Oral iron prophylaxis to pregnant women improves iron status and prevents development of IDA. The Danish National Board of Health has since 1992 recommended prophylactic oral iron supplements to all pregnant women and the currently advocated dose is 40–50 mg ferrous iron taken between meals from 10 weeks gestation to delivery. However, 30–40 mg ferrous iron is probably an adequate dose in most affluent societies. In developed countries, individual iron prophylaxis guided by iron status (serum ferritin has physiological advantages compared to general iron prophylaxis. In contrast, in most developing countries, general iron prophylaxis is indicated, and higher doses of oral iron, for example, 60 mg ferrous iron or even more should be recommended, according to the present iron status situation in the specific populations of women of fertile age and pregnant women.

  1. THE EFFECT OF HAEMOCHROMATOSIS MUTATION ON IRON OVERLOAD IN THALASSAEMIA MAJOR PATIENTS

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    Tapas Ranjan Behera

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Haemochromatosis is a genetic form of iron overload due to a defective HFE gene. Secondary iron overload is the main complication in transfusion-dependent thalassaemia major patients. This study aims at evaluating the degree of iron overload in β-thalassaemia major patients with and without HFE mutations (C282Y, H63D and S65C. MATERIALS AND METHODS A descriptive observational study was conducted including fifty diagnosed -thalassaemia major cases. Detailed clinical history and iron profile was estimated. DNA analysis by PCR-RFLP method for HFE gene mutations was performed. RESULTS After DNA analysis of all the thalassaemia major cases, two groups were identified, one with HFE gene mutation and other without HFE gene mutation. Iron profile of both the groups (with and without HFE gene mutation was estimated and compared. Only H63D mutation (out of three HFE gene mutations was detected in 16% cases (8 out of 50 cases, which comprised the group with mutation. Comparison of iron parameters between two groups (with and without HFE gene mutation showed significant difference in percent transferrin saturation (p=0.02, while other iron parameters (serum iron and serum ferritin did not show significant difference. CONCLUSION No significant difference between serum ferritin values (a marker of iron overload of groups with and without mutation (mean ferritin level 4641±2166 ng/mL and 4170±2461 ng/mL, respectively was found (p=0.61, in a patient population in whom transfusion protocol and proper chelation regimen was followed.

  2. Anemia and iron homeostasis in a cohort of HIV-infected patients in Indonesia

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    Jusuf Hadi

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Anemia is a common clinical finding in HIV-infected patients and iron deficiency or redistribution may contribute to the development of low hemoglobin levels. Iron overload is associated with a poor prognosis in HIV and Hepatitis C virus infections. Iron redistribution may be caused by inflammation but possibly also by hepatitis C co-infection. We examined the prevalence of anemia and its relation to mortality in a cohort of HIV patients in a setting where injecting drug use (IDU is a main mode of HIV transmission, and measured serum ferritin and sTfR, in relation to anemia, inflammation, stage of HIV disease, ART and HCV infection. Methods Patient characteristics, ART history and iron parameters were recorded from adult HIV patients presenting between September 2007 and August 2009 in the referral hospital for West Java, Indonesia. Kaplan-Meier estimates and Cox's regression were used to assess factors affecting survival. Logistic regression was used to identity parameters associated with high ferritin concentrations. Results Anemia was found in 49.6% of 611 ART-naïve patients, with mild (Hb 10.5 - 12.99 g/dL for men; and 10.5 - 11.99 g/dL for women anemia in 62.0%, and moderate to severe anemia (Hb Conclusion HIV-associated anemia is common among HIV-infected patients in Indonesia and strongly related to mortality. High ferritin with low sTfR levels suggest that iron redistribution and low erythropoietic activity, rather than iron deficiency, contribute to anemia. Serum ferritin and sTfR should be used cautiously to assess iron status in patients with advanced HIV infection.

  3. Assessment of iron status among preschool children (6 to 59 months) with and without malaria in Western Province, Kenya

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kisiangani, Isaac; Mbakaya, Charles; Makokha, Anzelimo; Magu, Dennis

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Iron deficiency is a major public health concern. Globally, iron deficiency ranks number 9 and is responsible for about 60% of all anemia cases among preschool children. In Africa iron deficiency is 43-52% while in Kenya, children under 5 years constitute the largest burden with 69% of them being deficient. There is limited iron deficiency data in Kenya. This study determined haemoglobin levels, serum ferritin levels, nutritional status and P.falciparum malaria infection in preschool children. Methods A household cross sectional study was undertaken among 125 preschoolers in Western province, drawn from 37 clusters. Systematic random sampling was used for sample selection. Data was collected using pretested structured questionnaires, entered in Microsoft package. Data analysis was done in Statistical package for social science (SPSS) version 20 using bivariate and multivariate logistic regression and differences were considered significant at P iron deficiency (Serum ferritin iron deficiency and anaemia (OR = 3.43, 95% CI: 1.33-8.84, p = 0.008). A preschool child with anaemia was 3.43 times likely to be iron deficient compared to a preschool child who was not anaemic. Conclusion Iron deficiency, anaemia and plasmodium falciparum malaria was prevalent among preschool children. The findings revealed a significant association between iron deficiency and anaemia. Therefore effective interventions to improve iron status will have large health benefits by greatly reducing anaemia in preschool children. PMID:26405498

  4. Dietary Determinants of and Possible Solutions to Iron Deficiency for Young Women Living in Industrialized Countries: A Review

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    Kathryn L. Beck

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Iron deficiency is a concern in both developing and developed (industrialized countries; and young women are particularly vulnerable. This review investigates dietary determinants of and possible solutions to iron deficiency in young women living in industrialized countries. Dietary factors including ascorbic acid and an elusive factor in animal protein foods (meat; fish and poultry enhance iron absorption; while phytic acid; soy protein; calcium and polyphenols inhibit iron absorption. However; the effects of these dietary factors on iron absorption do not necessarily translate into an association with iron status and iron stores (serum ferritin concentration. In cross-sectional studies; only meat intake has consistently (positively been associated with higher serum ferritin concentrations. The enhancing effects of ascorbic acid and meat on iron absorption may be negated by the simultaneous consumption of foods and nutrients which are inhibitory. Recent cross-sectional studies have considered the combination and timing of foods consumed; with mixed results. Dietary interventions using a range of focused dietary measures to improve iron status appear to be more effective than dietary approaches that focus on single nutrients or foods. Further research is needed to determine optimal dietary recommendations for both the prevention and treatment of iron deficiency.

  5. Efficacy of iron fortification compared to iron supplementation among Vietnamese schoolchildren.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thi Le, Huong; Brouwer, Inge D; Burema, Jan; Nguyen, Khan Cong; Kok, Frans J

    2006-12-05

    The effect of iron fortification is generally assumed to be less than iron supplementation; however, the magnitude of difference in effects is not known. The present study aims to compare the efficacy of these two strategies on anaemia and iron status. After screening on low Hb, 425 anaemic children in six primary schools in Tam Nong district of Phu Tho province were included in a randomized, placebo-controlled trial comparing two groups receiving iron fortified instant noodles or iron supplementation for 6 months and a control group, with children in all groups having been dewormed. Blood samples were collected before and after intervention for haemoglobin, serum ferritin (SF), serum transferrin receptor (TfR), C-reactive protein (CRP), and haemoglobinopathies analysis. Regression analysis was used to assess the effect of iron fortification and iron supplementation on haemoglobin concentration, SF, TfR, body iron, and anaemic status as outcome variables. The improvement of haemoglobin, SF, and body iron level in the group receiving iron fortification was 42% (2.6 g/L versus 6.2 g/L), 20% (23.5 microg/L versus 117.3 microg/L), and 31.3% (1.4 mg/kg versus 4.4 mg/kg) of that in the iron supplementation group. The prevalence of anaemia dropped to 15.1% in the control group, with an additional reduction of anaemia of 8.5% in the iron supplementation group. The additional reduction due to iron fortification was 5.4%, which amounts to well over 50% of the impact of supplementation. In conclusion, the efficacy of iron fortification based on reduction of prevalence of anaemia, and on the change in haemoglobin level, is about half of the maximum impact of supplementation in case of optimal compliance. Thus, in a population of anaemic children with mild iron deficiency, iron fortification should be the preferred strategy to combat anaemia.

  6. Efficacy of iron fortification compared to iron supplementation among Vietnamese schoolchildren

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    Nguyen Khan

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The effect of iron fortification is generally assumed to be less than iron supplementation; however, the magnitude of difference in effects is not known. The present study aims to compare the efficacy of these two strategies on anaemia and iron status. After screening on low Hb, 425 anaemic children in six primary schools in Tam Nong district of Phu Tho province were included in a randomized, placebo-controlled trial comparing two groups receiving iron fortified instant noodles or iron supplementation for 6 months and a control group, with children in all groups having been dewormed. Blood samples were collected before and after intervention for haemoglobin, serum ferritin (SF, serum transferrin receptor (TfR, C-reactive protein (CRP, and haemoglobinopathies analysis. Regression analysis was used to assess the effect of iron fortification and iron supplementation on haemoglobin concentration, SF, TfR, body iron, and anaemic status as outcome variables. The improvement of haemoglobin, SF, and body iron level in the group receiving iron fortification was 42% (2.6 g/L versus 6.2 g/L, 20% (23.5 μg/L versus 117.3 μg/L, and 31.3% (1.4 mg/kg versus 4.4 mg/kg of that in the iron supplementation group. The prevalence of anaemia dropped to 15.1% in the control group, with an additional reduction of anaemia of 8.5% in the iron supplementation group. The additional reduction due to iron fortification was 5.4%, which amounts to well over 50% of the impact of supplementation. In conclusion, the efficacy of iron fortification based on reduction of prevalence of anaemia, and on the change in haemoglobin level, is about half of the maximum impact of supplementation in case of optimal compliance. Thus, in a population of anaemic children with mild iron deficiency, iron fortification should be the preferred strategy to combat anaemia.

  7. Definition of Iron Deficiency Based on the Gold Standard of Bone Marrow Iron Staining in Heart Failure Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grote Beverborg, Niels; Klip, IJsbrand T; Meijers, Wouter C; Voors, Adriaan A; Vegter, Eline L; van der Wal, Haye H; Swinkels, Dorine W; van Pelt, Joost; Mulder, Andre B; Bulstra, Sjoerd K; Vellenga, Edo; Mariani, Massimo A; de Boer, Rudolf A; van Veldhuisen, Dirk J; van der Meer, Peter

    2018-02-01

    The most commonly used definition of iron deficiency (ID; ferritin the biomarker-based definition of ID in HF, using bone marrow iron staining as the gold standard. Second, we aimed to assess the prognostic value of the optimized definition. Bone marrow aspiration with iron staining was performed in 42 patients with HF and a reduced left ventricular ejection fraction (≤45%) undergoing median sternotomy for coronary artery bypass grafting. Patients were mostly male (76%) with mild-to-moderate HF and a mean age of 68±10 years. Bone marrow ID was found in 17 (40%) of the HF patients. The most commonly used definition of ID had a sensitivity of 82% and a specificity of 72%. A definition solely based on TSAT ≤19.8% or serum iron ≤13 µmol/L had a sensitivity of 94% and specificity of 84% and 88%, respectively ( P the former definition). Subsequently, we assessed the incidence of all-cause mortality in 387 consecutive outpatient HF patients (left ventricular ejection fraction ≤45%). In these patients, TSAT ≤19.8% and serum iron ≤13 µmol/L, and not ferritin, were independently associated with mortality. A TSAT ≤19.8% or a serum iron ≤13 µmol/L shows the best performance in selecting patients with ID and identifies HF patients at the highest risk of death. Our findings validate the currently used TSAT cutoff of the identification of ID in HF patients, but question the diagnostic value of ferritin. © 2018 American Heart Association, Inc.

  8. Magnetic model for a horse-spleen ferritin with a three-phase core structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, J.H.; Eom, T.W. [Quantum Photonic Science Research Center, Department of Physics and Research Institute for Natural Sciences, Hanyang University, Seoul 133-791 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Y.P., E-mail: yplee@hanyang.ac.kr [Quantum Photonic Science Research Center, Department of Physics and Research Institute for Natural Sciences, Hanyang University, Seoul 133-791 (Korea, Republic of); Rhee, J.Y. [Department of Physics, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon (Korea, Republic of); Choi, E.H. [Kwangwoon University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-12-15

    The increasing interests in magnetic nanoparticles has prompted research on ferritin, which is naturally a well-defined iron-storage protein in most living organisms. However, the exact magnetic behavior of ferritin is not well understood, because the crystal structures of ferritin and ferrihydrite, its major component, are not fully understood. Briefly, we discuss the previous magnetization models of ferritin and ferrihydrite and we present a new model ({Sigma}3L) of the initial magnetization of ferritin, considering its different phases. The new model includes three Langevin-function terms, which represent three different magnetic moments provided by the likely hydroxide and oxide mineral phases in ferritin. Compared to previous models, our simple model fits the experimental data 12 times better in terms of the sum of least squares. The magnetic independence of each component supports the multi-phase compositional model of the mineral core of horse-spleen ferritin. This {Sigma}3L model gives a quantization of the amounts of the different phases within horse-spleen ferritins that matches other published experimental data: 60-80% ferrihydrite, 15-25% maghemite/magnetite, and 1-10% hematite. - Highlights: > We present a new model ({Sigma}3L) of the initial magnetization of ferritin, considering its different phases. > New model includes three Langevin-function terms, which represent three different magnetic moments provided by ferritin phases. > Compared to previous models, our simple model fits the experimental data 12 times better in terms of the sum of least square. > The magnetic independence of each component supports that ferritin and ferrihydrite are composed of different phases.

  9. The influence of iron status and genetic polymorphisms in the HFE gene on the risk for postoperative complications after bariatric surgery: a prospective cohort study in 1,064 patients

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    Freedman-Weiss Mollie

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gastric bypass surgery is a highly effective therapy for long-term weight loss in severely obese patients, but carries significant perioperative risks including infection, wound dehiscence, and leaks from staple breakdown. Iron status can affect immune function and wound healing, thus may influence peri-operative complications. Common mutations in the HFE gene, the gene responsible for the iron overload disorder hereditary hemochromatosis, may impact iron status. Methods We analyzed 1064 extremely obese Caucasian individuals who underwent open and laparoscopic Roux-n-Y gastric bypass surgery at the Geisinger Clinic. Serum iron, ferritin, transferrin, and iron binding capacity were measured pre-operatively. All patients had intra-operative liver biopsies and were genotyped for the C282Y and H63D mutations in the HFE gene. Associations between surgical complications and serum iron measures, HFE gene status, and liver iron histology were determined. Results We found that increased serum iron and transferrin saturation were present in patients with any post-operative complication, and that increased serum ferritin was also increased in patients with major complications. Increased serum transferrin saturation was also associated with wound complications in open RYGB, and transferrin saturation and ferritin with prolonged lengths of stay. The presence of 2 or more HFE mutations was associated with overall complications as well as wound complications in open RYGB. No differences were found in complication rates between those with stainable liver iron and those without. Conclusion Serum iron status and HFE genotype may be associated with complications following RYGB surgery in the extremely obese.

  10. Ferritin Elevation and Improved Responsiveness to Erythropoiesis-Stimulating Agents in Patients on Ferric Citrate Hydrate

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    Keitaro Yokoyama

    2017-05-01

    Discussion: It is suggested that not only iron load but also the erythropoiesis-stimulating agent dose reduction may be involved in ferritin elevation during ferric citrate hydrate treatment, resulting in a decrease of erythropoietin resistance index.

  11. MRI of the liver and the pituitary gland in patients with {beta}-thalassemia major: Does hepatic siderosis predict pituitary iron deposition?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Argyropoulou, Maria I.; Efremidis, Stavros C. [Department of Radiology, Medical School, University of Ioannina, 45110 Ioannina (Greece); Kiortsis, Dimitrios N. [Laboratory of Physiology, Medical School, University of Ioannina, 45110 Ioannina (Greece)

    2003-01-01

    Our objective was to study, in thalassemic patients, if hepatic siderosis evaluated by MRI could predict the pituitary iron overload. In 36 thalassemic patients (age range 6-44 years, mean age 21.7 years) the liver/fat ratio (L/F), the pituitary/fat ratio (P/F), the liver and pituitary T2 relaxation times were evaluated, by using a multiecho spin-echo sequence. Serum ferritin levels were measured and an extensive endocrine evaluation was performed. The L/F, the P/F and pituitary T2 showed a good correlation with serum ferritin (r=-0.55, r=-0.55 and r=-0.53, respectively; p<0.01). Liver T2 did not show significant correlation with serum ferritin. The variability of L/F explained only the 10.8% of the variability of pituitary T2 and of the P/F. When ferritin was added to the model it predicted only the 26.85% and the 30.8% of the variability of pituitary T2 and of the P/F, respectively. The P/F and pituitary T2 were lower in patients with hypogonadotropic hypogonadism (group 1) compared with those without pituitary dysfunction (group 2). No significant differences of L/F were found between the two groups. Hepatic iron overload evaluated by MR is a poor predictor of pituitary siderosis. The MR studies of the pituitary gland might be necessary to evaluate the pituitary iron overload. (orig.)

  12. Iron and Your Child

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... deficiency isn't corrected, it can lead to iron-deficiency anemia (a decrease in the number of red blood ... Parents Kids Teens Anemia Blood Test: Ferritin (Iron) Iron-Deficiency Anemia Vegetarianism Menstrual Problems Pregnant or Breastfeeding? Nutrients You ...

  13. Red blood cell distribution width and iron deficiency anemia among pregnant Sudanese women

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    Abdelrahman Esam G

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Iron deficiency anemia (IDA is a major health problem during pregnancy and it has adverse effects on the mother and the newborn. Red cell distribution width (RDW, which is a quantitative measure for red cell size variation (anisocytosis, is a predictor of IDA. Little is known regarding RDW and IDA during pregnancy. Methods A cross sectional study was conducted at the antenatal clinic of Khartoum Hospital, Sudan, to determine the performance of RDW in the diagnosis of IDA using serum ferritin as a gold standard. Results Among 194 pregnant women with a gestational period of 21.4 ± 6.5 weeks, 57 (29.4% had IDA according to serum ferritin levels (14.5. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value of RDW where serum ferritin was the gold standard were 43.8% (95% CI: 31.4–57.0%, 73.7% (95% CI: 65.8–80.5%, 41.0% (95% CI: 29.2–53.6%, and 76.0% (95% CI: 68.1–82.6%, respectively. Conclusions In this study, we found that RDW has a poor performance in diagnosing IDA among pregnant women compared with serum ferritin as the gold standard. Virtual slides The virtual slides for this article can be found here: http://www.diagnosticpathology.diagnomx.eu/vs/1721072967826303

  14. Simple educational intervention will improve the efficacy of routine antenatal iron supplementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senanayake, Hemantha M; Premaratne, Samanthi P; Palihawadana, Thilina; Wijeratne, Sumeda

    2010-06-01

    Sri Lanka has a policy of free provision of iron supplements to pregnant women. However, iron deficiency anemia remains common in pregnancy. We tested the hypothesis that educating women regarding improving bioavailability could improve the efficacy of iron supplementation. The education focused on how best supplements could be taken and on how they should be stored. We carried out a study using a quasi-experimental design on a group of women attending for antenatal care at a suburban University Obstetric Unit in Sri Lanka. The control group had care free of charge including iron supplementation and antihelminthic therapy. In addition, the study group received an education in small groups regarding maximizing bioavailability of iron. Hemoglobin and iron status of the women were compared between the groups at recruitment and at 34 weeks of gestation. The two groups were equally matched in demographic data, and hemoglobin and iron status. There were significant differences between the two groups at 34 weeks in the hemoglobin levels, serum ferritin levels, anemia rates and the number with low ferritin (P tablets in ways that improved their bioavailability. A simple health education improved the efficacy of iron supplementation in this population. Such interventions should be an integral part of iron supplementation programs, especially in populations whose habits tend to reduce the bioavailability of iron.

  15. Actinide uptake by transferrin and ferritin metalloproteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Den Auwer, C.; Llorens, I.; Moisy, Ph.; Vidaud, C.; Goudard, F.; Barbot, C.; Solari, P.L.; Funke, H.

    2005-01-01

    In order to better understand the mechanisms of actinide uptake by specific biomolecules, it is essential to explore the intramolecular interactions between the cation and the protein binding site. Although this has long been done for widely investigated transition metals, very few studies have been devoted to complexation mechanisms of actinides by active chelation sites of metalloproteins. In this field, X-ray absorption spectroscopy has been extensively used as a structural and electronic metal cation probe. The two examples that are presented here are related to two metalloproteins in charge of iron transport and storage in eukaryote cells: transferrin and ferritin. U(VI)O 2 2+ , Np(IV) and Pu(IV) have been selected because of their possible role as contaminant from the geosphere. (orig.)

  16. Expression and structural and functional properties of human ferritin L-chain from Escherichia coli

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levi, S.; Salfeld, J.; Franceschinelli, F.; Cozzi, A.; Dorner, M.H.; Arosio, P.

    1989-01-01

    The human ferritin L-chain cDNA was cloned into a vector for overproduction in Escherichia coli, under the regulation of a λ promoter. The plasmid obtained contains the full L-chain coding region modified at the first two codons. It is able to direct the synthesis of the L-chain which can constitute up to 15% of the total soluble protein of bacterial extract. The L-chains assemble to form a ferritin homopolymer with electrophoretic mobility, molecular weight, thermal stability, spectroscopic, and immunological properties analogous to natural ferritin from human liver (95% L-chain). This recombinant L-ferritin is able to incorporate and retain iron in solution at physiological pH values. At variance with the H-ferritin, the L form does not uptake iron at acidic pH values and does not show detectable ferroxidase activity. It is concluded that ferritin L-chain lacks the ferroxidase site present in the H-chain and that the two chains may have specialized functions in intracellular iron metabolism

  17. Iron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iron is a mineral that our bodies need for many functions. For example, iron is part of hemoglobin, a protein which carries ... It helps our muscles store and use oxygen. Iron is also part of many other proteins and ...

  18. Nutrient intake, serum lipids and iron status of colligiate rugby players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imamura, Hiroyuki; Iide, Kazuhide; Yoshimura, Yoshitaka; Kumagai, Kenya; Oshikata, Reika; Miyahara, Keiko; Oda, Kazuto; Miyamoto, Noriko; Nakazawa, Anthony

    2013-02-13

    There are two main playing positions in rugby (backs and forwards), which demonstrate different exercise patterns, roles, and physical characteristics. The purpose of this study was: 1) to collect baseline data on nutrient intake in order to advise the athletes about nutrition practices that might enhance performance, and 2) to compare serum lipids, lipoproteins, apolipoproteins (apo), lecithin:cholesterol acyltransferase (LCAT) activity, and iron status of forwards and backs. The sporting group was divided into 18 forwards and 16 backs and were compared with 26 sedentary controls. Dietary information was obtained with a food frequency questionnaire. There were significant differences among the three groups. The forwards had the highest body weight, body mass index, percentage of body fat (calculated by sum of four skinfold thicknesses), as well as the highest lean body mass, followed by the backs and the control group. The mean carbohydrate intake was marginal and protein intake was lower than the respective recommended targets in all three groups. The mean intakes of calcium, magnesium, and vitamins A, B1, B2, and C were lower than the respective Japanese recommended dietary allowances or adequate dietary intakes for the rugby players. The forwards had significantly lower high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) and HDL2-C than the backs and had significantly higher apo B and LCAT activity than the controls. The backs showed significantly higher HDL-C, HDL3-C, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and apo A-I, and LCAT activity than the controls. Four forwards (22%), five backs (31%), and three controls (12%) had hemolysis. None of the rugby players had anemia or iron depletion. The findings of our study indicate that as the athletes increased their carbohydrate and protein intake, their performance and lean body mass increased. Further, to increase mineral and vitamin intakes, we recommended athletes increase their consumption of green and other vegetables

  19. Iron Status and Inflammation in Early Stages of Chronic Kidney Disease

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    Ewelina Łukaszyk

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: One of the most common causes of anemia of chronic disease (ACD is chronic kidney disease. The main pathomechanism responsible for ACD is subclinical inflammation. The key element involved in iron metabolism is hepcidin, however, studies on new indices of iron status are in progress.The aim of the study was to assess the iron status in patients in early stages of chronic kidney disease, iron correlation with inflammation parameters and novel biomarkers of iron metabolism. Methods: The study included 69 patients. Standard laboratory measurements were used to measure the iron status, complete blood count, fibrinogen, prothrombin index, C-reactive protein concentration (CRP, creatinine, urea, uric acid. Commercially available kits were used to measure high-sensitivity CRP, interleukin 6 (IL-6, hepcidin-25, hemojuvelin, soluble transferrin receptor (sTfR, growth differentiation factor-15 (GDF-15 and zonulin. Results: Absolute iron deficiency was present in 17% of the patients, functional iron deficiency was present in 12% of the patients. Functional iron deficiency was associated with significantly higher serum levels of fibrinogen, ferritin, transferrin saturation, total iron binding capacity, hepcidin and older age relative to patients with absolute iron deficiency. In comparison with patients without iron deficiency, patients with functional iron deficiency were older, with lower prothrombin index, higher fibrinogen, CRP, hsCRP, sTfR, GDF-15, urea and lower eGFR. Hepcidin was predicted by markers of inflammation:ferritin, fibrinogen and IL-6. Conclusion: Inflammation is correlated with iron status. Novel biomarkers of iron metabolism might be useful to distinguish iron deficiency anemia connected with inflammation and absolute iron deficiency.

  20. Hepcidin Response to Iron Therapy in Patients with Non-Dialysis Dependent CKD: An Analysis of the FIND-CKD Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaillard, Carlo A; Bock, Andreas H; Carrera, Fernando; Eckardt, Kai-Uwe; Van Wyck, David B; Bansal, Sukhvinder S; Cronin, Maureen; Meier, Yvonne; Larroque, Sylvain; Roger, Simon D; Macdougall, Iain C

    2016-01-01

    Hepcidin is the key regulator of iron homeostasis but data are limited regarding its temporal response to iron therapy, and response to intravenous versus oral iron. In the 56-week, open-label, multicenter, prospective, randomized FIND-CKD study, 626 anemic patients with non-dialysis dependent chronic kidney disease (ND-CKD) and iron deficiency not receiving an erythropoiesis stimulating agent were randomized (1:1:2) to intravenous ferric carboxymaltose (FCM), targeting higher (400-600μg/L) or lower (100-200μg/L) ferritin, or to oral iron. Serum hepcidin levels were measured centrally in a subset of 61 patients. Mean (SD) baseline hepcidin level was 4.0(3.5), 7.3(6.4) and 6.5(5.6) ng/mL in the high ferritin FCM (n = 17), low ferritin FCM (n = 16) and oral iron group (n = 28). The mean (SD) endpoint value (i.e. the last post-baseline value) was 26.0(9.1),15.7(7.7) and 16.3(11.0) ng/mL, respectively. The increase in hepcidin from baseline was significantly smaller with low ferritin FCM or oral iron vs high ferritin FCM at all time points up to week 52. Significant correlations were found between absolute hepcidin and ferritin values (r = 0.65, p<0.001) and between final post-baseline increases in both parameters (r = 0.70, p<0.001). The increase in hepcidin levels over the 12-month study generally mirrored the cumulative iron dose in each group. Hepcidin and transferrin saturation (TSAT) absolute values showed no correlation, although there was an association between final post-baseline increases (r = 0.42, p<0.001). Absolute values (r = 0.36, p = 0.004) and final post-baseline increases of hepcidin and hemoglobin (p = 0.30, p = 0.030) correlated weakly. Baseline hepcidin levels were not predictive of a hematopoietic response to iron therapy. In conclusion, hepcidin levels rose in response to either intravenous or oral iron therapy, but the speed and extent of the rise was greatest with intravenous iron targeting a higher ferritin level. However neither the

  1. Pancreatic iron stores assessed by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in beta thalassemic patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feitosa de Assis, Reijâne Alves; Ribeiro, Andreza Alice; Kay, Fernando Uliana; Rosemberg, Laércio Alberto; Nomura, Cesar Higa; Loggetto, Sandra Regina; Araujo, Aderson S.; Fabron Junior, Antonio; Pinheiro de Almeida Veríssimo, Mônica; Baldanzi, Giorgio Roberto; Espósito, Breno Pannia; Baroni, Ronaldo Hueb; Wood, John C.; Hamerschlak, Nelson

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the correlation between MRI findings of the pancreas with those of the heart and liver in patients with beta thalassemia; to compare the pancreas T2* MRI results with glucose and ferritin levels and labile plasma iron (LPI). Materials and methods: We retrospectively evaluated chronically transfused patients, testing glucose with enzymatic tests, serum ferritin with chemiluminescence, LPI with cellular fluorescence, and T2* MRI to assess iron content in the heart, liver, and pancreas. MRI results were compared with one another and with serum glucose, ferritin, and LPI. Liver iron concentration (LIC) was determined in 11 patients’ liver biopsies by atomic absorption spectrometry. Results: 289 MRI studies were available from 115 patients during the period studied. 9.4% of patients had overt diabetes and an additional 16% of patients had impaired fasting glucose. Both pancreatic and cardiac R2* had predictive power (p 2 = 0.20, p 2 = 0.09, p 2 = 0.14, p 2 = 0.03, p 2 of 0.91. Conclusions: Pancreatic iron overload can be assessed by MRI, but siderosis in other organs did not correlate significantly with pancreatic hemosiderosis.

  2. Development of a primary method for the determination of iron in serum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palos, Marie; Del Castillo Busto, Maria Estela; Fisicaro, Paola; Vaslin-Reimann, Sophie; Hattchouel, Jean-Marc; Pannier, Florence

    2015-01-01

    This work presents the development of a reference method by ICP-MS for the determination of iron in serum. To ensure the metrological traceability of the results, isotope dilution associated with ICP-MS (ID-ICP-MS) has been applied, which has the potential to be a primary measurement procedure. Method validation has been demonstrated through the use of a certified reference material (SRM 1598a) and the participation in an international comparison between National Metrology Institutes (BIPM-CCQM K107). The validated method is now available to support clinical laboratories in the evaluation of their measurement capabilities and for quality assurance and quality control programs. In fact, this ID-ICP-MS method can be used to certify reference materials or to assign reference values to samples used in proficiency testing schemes. The feasibility has been tested on two unknown samples, i.e. BCR"R -637, IRMM sample and an ANSM B17 sample (a material distributed during a National Quality Control program). (authors)

  3. Comparison of response between food supplemented with powdered iron and iron in syrup form for iron deficiency anemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmed, P.

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate and compare the response between food supplemented with iron in powdered and iron in syrup forms for the treatment of iron deficiency anemia in children aged 1-5 years. Results: Over half (51 %) of the patients were between 1-2 years of age. One hundred thirty-two were males and 68 females. Most of the patients belonged to poor socioeconomic class. The iron in powder form was better tolerated than iron syrup as this group witnessed fewer episodes of gastrointestinal disturbances. The rise in mean Hb level after 6 weeks of treatment in group A and B was 1.6 g/dl and 1.9 g/dl respectively. Hemoglobin rise in group B was more than group A but this was statistically non-significant (p>0.05). There was small but significant (p<0.05) rise in serum ferritin in both the groups. There was no significant difference between the two groups for response to the two forms of iron administration. Conclusion: The powdered form of iron is a cost-effective and better tolerated method of iron administration in children and can be considered as an alternate option for the treatment of iron deficiency anemia in children. (author)

  4. The relationship between body iron stores and blood and urine cadmium concentrations in US never-smoking, non-pregnant women aged 20-49 years

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gallagher, Carolyn M.; Chen, John J.; Kovach, John S.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Cadmium is a ubiquitous environmental pollutant associated with increased risk of leading causes of mortality and morbidity in women, including breast cancer and osteoporosis. Iron deficiency increases absorption of dietary cadmium, rendering women, who tend to have lower iron stores than men, more susceptible to cadmium uptake. We used body iron, a measure that incorporates both serum ferritin and soluble transferrin receptor, as recommended by the World Health Organization, to evaluate the relationships between iron status and urine and blood cadmium. Methods: Serum ferritin, soluble transferrin receptor, urine and blood cadmium values in never-smoking, non-pregnant, non-lactating, non-menopausal women aged 20-49 years (n=599) were obtained from the 2003-2008 National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys. Body iron was calculated from serum ferritin and soluble transferrin receptor, and iron deficiency defined as body iron <0 mg/kg. Robust linear regression was used to evaluate the relationships between body iron and blood and urine cadmium, adjusted for age, race, poverty, body mass index, and parity. Results: Per incremental (mg/kg) increase in body iron, urine cadmium decreased by 0.003 μg/g creatinine and blood cadmium decreased by 0.014 μg/L. Iron deficiency was associated with 0.044 μg/g creatinine greater urine cadmium (95% CI=0.020, 0.069) and 0.162 μg/L greater blood cadmium (95% CI=0.132, 0.193). Conclusions: Iron deficiency is a risk factor for increased blood and urine cadmium among never-smoking, pre-menopausal, non-pregnant US women, independent of age, race, poverty, body mass index and parity. Expanding programs to detect and correct iron deficiency among non-pregnant women merits consideration as a potential means to reduce the risk of cadmium associated diseases. - Highlights: → Body iron was calculated from serum ferritin and soluble transferrin receptor. → Body iron was inversely associated with blood and urine cadmium

  5. The relationship between body iron stores and blood and urine cadmium concentrations in US never-smoking, non-pregnant women aged 20-49 years

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gallagher, Carolyn M., E-mail: 2crgallagher@optonline.net [PhD Program in Population Health and Clinical Outcomes Research, Stony Brook University, NY (United States) and Department of Preventive Medicine, Stony Brook University, Z-8036, Level 3, HSC, Stony Brook, NY 11794-8036 (United States); Chen, John J.; Kovach, John S. [Department of Preventive Medicine, Stony Brook University, Z-8036, Level 3, HSC, Stony Brook, NY 11794-8036 (United States)

    2011-07-15

    Background: Cadmium is a ubiquitous environmental pollutant associated with increased risk of leading causes of mortality and morbidity in women, including breast cancer and osteoporosis. Iron deficiency increases absorption of dietary cadmium, rendering women, who tend to have lower iron stores than men, more susceptible to cadmium uptake. We used body iron, a measure that incorporates both serum ferritin and soluble transferrin receptor, as recommended by the World Health Organization, to evaluate the relationships between iron status and urine and blood cadmium. Methods: Serum ferritin, soluble transferrin receptor, urine and blood cadmium values in never-smoking, non-pregnant, non-lactating, non-menopausal women aged 20-49 years (n=599) were obtained from the 2003-2008 National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys. Body iron was calculated from serum ferritin and soluble transferrin receptor, and iron deficiency defined as body iron <0 mg/kg. Robust linear regression was used to evaluate the relationships between body iron and blood and urine cadmium, adjusted for age, race, poverty, body mass index, and parity. Results: Per incremental (mg/kg) increase in body iron, urine cadmium decreased by 0.003 {mu}g/g creatinine and blood cadmium decreased by 0.014 {mu}g/L. Iron deficiency was associated with 0.044 {mu}g/g creatinine greater urine cadmium (95% CI=0.020, 0.069) and 0.162 {mu}g/L greater blood cadmium (95% CI=0.132, 0.193). Conclusions: Iron deficiency is a risk factor for increased blood and urine cadmium among never-smoking, pre-menopausal, non-pregnant US women, independent of age, race, poverty, body mass index and parity. Expanding programs to detect and correct iron deficiency among non-pregnant women merits consideration as a potential means to reduce the risk of cadmium associated diseases. - Highlights: {yields} Body iron was calculated from serum ferritin and soluble transferrin receptor. {yields} Body iron was inversely associated with blood

  6. New Insights on Iron Study in Myelodysplasia

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    Noha M. El Husseiny

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Hepcidin plays a pivotal role in iron homeostasis. It is predominantly produced by hepatocytes and inhibits iron release from macrophages and iron uptake by intestinal epithelial cells. Competitive ELISA is the current method of choice for the quantification of serum hepcidin because of its lower detection limit, low costs, and high throughput. This study aims to discuss the role of hepcidin in the pathogenesis of iron overload in recently diagnosed myelodysplasia (MDS cases. METHODS: The study included 21 recently diagnosed MDS patients and 13 healthy controls. Ferritin, hepcidin, and soluble transferrin receptor (sTFR were measured in all subjects. RESULTS: There were 7 cases of hypocellular MDS, 8 cases of refractory cytopenia with multilineage dysplasia, and 6 cases of refractory anemia with excess blasts. No difference was observed among the 3 MDS subtypes in terms of hepcidin, sTFR, and ferritin levels (p>0.05. Mean hepcidin levels in the MDS and control groups were 55.8±21.5 ng/mL and 19.9±2.6 ng/ mL, respectively. Mean sTFR was 45.7±8.8 nmol/L in MDS patients and 31.1±5.6 nmol/L in the controls. Mean ferritin levels were significantly higher in MDS patients than in controls (539.14±83.5 ng/mL vs. 104.6±42.9 ng/mL, p0.05. CONCLUSION: Hepcidin may not be the main cause of iron overload in MDS. Further studies are required to test failure of production or peripheral unresponsiveness to hepcidin in MDS cases.

  7. Urinary Hepcidin Levels in Iron-Deficient and Iron-Supplemented Piglets Correlate with Hepcidin Hepatic mRNA and Serum Levels and with Body Iron Status.

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    Robert Staroń

    Full Text Available Among livestock, domestic pig (Sus scrofa is a species, in which iron metabolism has been most intensively examined during last decade. The obvious reason for studying the regulation of iron homeostasis especially in young pigs is neonatal iron deficiency anemia commonly occurring in these animals. Moreover, supplementation of essentially all commercially reared piglets with iron entails a need for monitoring the efficacy of this routine practice followed in the swine industry for several decades. Since the discovery of hepcidin many studies confirmed its role as key regulator of iron metabolism and pointed out the assessment of its concentrations in biological fluids as diagnostic tool for iron-related disorder. Here we demonstrate that urine hepcidin-25 levels measured by a combination of weak cation exchange chromatography and time-of-flight mass spectrometry (WCX-TOF MS are highly correlated with mRNA hepcidin expression in the liver and plasma hepcidin-25 concentrations in anemic and iron-supplemented 28-day old piglets. We also found a high correlation between urine hepcidin level and hepatic non-heme iron content. Our results show that similarly to previously described transgenic mouse models of iron disorders, young pigs constitute a convenient animal model to explore accuracy and relationship between indicators for assessing systemic iron status.

  8. The Iron Status of Sickle Cell Anaemia Patients in Ilorin, North Central Nigeria

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    Musa A. Sani

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. Sickle cell anaemia (SCA is one of the commonest genetic disorders in the world. It is characterized by anaemia, periodic attacks of thrombotic pain, and chronic systemic organ damage. Recent studies have suggested that individuals with SCA especially from developing countries are more likely to be iron deficient rather than have iron overload. The study aims to determine the iron status of SCA patients in Ilorin, Nigeria. Methods. A cross-sectional study of 45 SCA patients in steady state and 45 non-SCA controls was undertaken. FBC, blood film, sFC, sTfR, and sTfR/log sFC index were done on all subjects. Results. The mean patients’ serum ferritin (589.33 ± 427.61 ng/mL was significantly higher than the mean serum ferritin of the controls (184.53 ± 119.74 ng/mL. The mean serum transferrin receptor of the patients (4.24 ± 0.17 μg/mL was higher than that of the controls (3.96 ± 0.17 μg/mL (p=0.290. The mean serum transferrin receptor (sTfR/log serum ferritin index of the patients (1.65 ± 0.27 μg/mL was significantly lower than that of the control (1.82 ± 0.18 μg/mL (p=0.031. Conclusion. Iron deficiency is uncommon in SCA patients and periodic monitoring of the haematological, biochemical, and clinical features for iron status in SCA patients is advised.

  9. Heme oxygenase activity correlates with serum indices of iron homeostasis in healthy nonsmokers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heme oxygenase (HO) catalyzes the breakdown of heme to carbon monoxide, iron, and biliverdin. While the use of genetically altered animal models in investigation has established distinct associations between HO activity and systemic iron availability, studies have not yet confirm...

  10. Iron chelation therapy: clinical effectiveness, economic burden and quality of life in patients with iron overload.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payne, Krista A; Rofail, Diana; Baladi, Jean-François; Viala, Muriel; Abetz, Linda; Desrosiers, Marie-Pierre; Lordan, Noreen; Ishak, Khajak; Proskorovsky, Irina

    2008-08-01

    This study of UK patients examines clinical, health-related quality of life (HRQOL) and economic outcomes associated with iron chelation therapy (ICT). Desferrioxamine (DFO) (Desferal; Novartis, Switzerland) and Deferiprone (Ferriprox; Apotex, Canada) are ICTs used to treat iron overload. DFO requires 8-to 12-hour infusions a minimum of five times per week. Deferiprone is administered in an oral daily regimen. Although pharmacologically efficacious, clinical effectiveness of ICT within the real-world setting is yet to be fully elucidated. A naturalistic cohort study of 60 patients (beta-thalassaemia, n=40; sickle cell disease, n=14; myelodysplastic syndromes, n=6; 63% female) receiving ICT in four UK treatment centres was conducted. Serum ferritin level data were abstracted from medical charts. Compliance, HRQOL, satisfaction and resource utilisation data were collected from interviews. Maximum ICT costs were estimated using the resource utilisation data associated with DFO. Mean serum ferritin levels, generally, remained elevated despite ICT. Compliance was suboptimal and HRQOL scores were lower than population norms. The total estimated mean weighted annual per-patient cost of DFO treatment was approximately pound19,000. DFO-related equipment, DFO drug, and home healthcare were estimated to account for 43%, 19% and 24% of costs, respectively. Other more minor components of total annual costs were for in-patient infusions, ICT home delivery services and monitoring costs. Generally, patients are not achieving target serum ferritin thresholds despite chronic treatment for iron overload. ICT appears to negatively impact HRQOL; compliance with ICT is poor; and, in the case of DFO, treatment costs well exceed the cost of DFO alone. These results suggest that current ICT in the real-world setting is suboptimal with respect to various clinical, HRQOL and economic outcomes.

  11. Anemia e marcadores séricos da deficiência de ferro em grávidas atendidas na rede pública municipal de Manaus, Amazonas, Brasil Anemia and serum markers of iron deficiency in pregnant women attended by Public Health Service in Manaus, Amazonas, Brazil

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    Carolina Marinho da Costa

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available O presente estudo teve como objetivo avaliar a anemia em grávidas, associando os resultados da dosagem de hemoglobina e hematócrito com a análise de marcadores do perfil sérico do ferro. Participaram do estudo 92 grávidas que estavam realizando pré-natal em unidades de atendimento à saúde no Município de Manaus, Amazonas, Brasil. Foi aplicado um formulário para obtenção dos dados antropométricos e informações sobre estilo de vida, além de serem realizadas dosagens dos níveis séricos de ferro, capacidade latente de ligação do ferro (CLLF, capacidade total de ligação do ferro (CTLF, índice de saturação da transferrina (IST, transferrina, ferritina e níveis sanguíneos de hemoglobina e hematócrito por metodologia automatizada utilizando kits comerciais disponíveis. Foram encontradas 26,1% de grávidas com níveis de hemoglobina abaixo de 11 g/dL. Observou-se que 17,4% das grávidas com níveis normais de hemoglobina apresentavam níveis inadequados de ferro sérico e 9,8% apresentavam níveis baixos de ferritina sérica. Os níveis de ferritina e de hemoglobina apresentaram diferença significativa entre os trimestres de gestação (p This study aimed to evaluate anemia in pregnant women, comparing results of hemoglobin and hemotocrit dosages with analysis of iron serum status markers. 92 pregnant women, in pre-natal attendance in Public Health Service of Manaus, Amazonas, Brazil, participated in this study. A questionnaire was used to access anthropometric data and life style information. Serum levels of iron, latent iron binding capacity (LIBC, total iron binding capacity (TIBC, transferrin saturation (TS, transferrin, ferritin, and blood levels of hemoglobin and hematocrit were measured by automated methods, using commercially available kits. The study showed that 26.1% of the pregnant women had hemoglobin levels below 11 g/dL. Also, of the pregnant women with normal levels of hemoglobin, 17.4% showed inadequate iron

  12. Laboratory methodologies for indicators of iron status: strengths, limitations, and analytical challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfeiffer, Christine M; Looker, Anne C

    2017-12-01

    Biochemical assessment of iron status relies on serum-based indicators, such as serum ferritin (SF), transferrin saturation, and soluble transferrin receptor (sTfR), as well as erythrocyte protoporphyrin. These indicators present challenges for clinical practice and national nutrition surveys, and often iron status interpretation is based on the combination of several indicators. The diagnosis of iron deficiency (ID) through SF concentration, the most commonly used indicator, is complicated by concomitant inflammation. sTfR concentration is an indicator of functional ID that is not an acute-phase reactant, but challenges in its interpretation arise because of the lack of assay standardization, common reference ranges, and common cutoffs. It is unclear which indicators are best suited to assess excess iron status. The value of hepcidin, non-transferrin-bound iron, and reticulocyte indexes is being explored in research settings. Serum-based indicators are generally measured on fully automated clinical analyzers available in most hospitals. Although international reference materials have been available for years, the standardization of immunoassays is complicated by the heterogeneity of antibodies used and the absence of physicochemical reference methods to establish "true" concentrations. From 1988 to 2006, the assessment of iron status in NHANES was based on the multi-indicator ferritin model. However, the model did not indicate the severity of ID and produced categorical estimates. More recently, iron status assessment in NHANES has used the total body iron stores (TBI) model, in which the log ratio of sTfR to SF is assessed. Together, sTfR and SF concentrations cover the full range of iron status. The TBI model better predicts the absence of bone marrow iron than SF concentration alone, and TBI can be analyzed as a continuous variable. Additional consideration of methodologies, interpretation of indicators, and analytic standardization is important for further

  13. The Crystal Structure of a Maxi/Mini-Ferritin Chimera Reveals Guiding Principles for the Assembly of Protein Cages

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cornell, Thomas A. [Department; Division; Srivastava, Yogesh [Genome; Jauch, Ralf [Genome Institute of Singapore, Singapore; Genome; Fan, Rongli [Division; Orner, Brendan P. [Department; Division

    2017-07-19

    Cage proteins assemble into nanoscale structures with large central cavities. They play roles, including those as virus capsids and chaperones, and have been applied to drug delivery and nanomaterials. Furthermore, protein cages have been used as model systems to understand and design protein quaternary structure. Ferritins are ubiquitous protein cages that manage iron homeostasis and oxidative damage. Two ferritin subfamilies have strongly similar tertiary structure yet distinct quaternary structure: maxi-ferritins normally assemble into 24-meric, octahedral cages with C-terminal E-helices centered around 4-fold symmetry axes, and mini-ferritins are 12-meric, tetrahedral cages with 3-fold axes defined by C-termini lacking E-domains. To understand the role E-domains play in ferritin quaternary structure, we previously designed a chimera of a maxi-ferritin E-domain fused to the C-terminus of a mini-ferritin. The chimera is a 12-mer cage midway in size between those of the maxi- and mini-ferritin. The research described herein sets out to understand (a) whether the increase in size over a typical mini-ferritin is due to a frozen state where the E-domain is flipped out of the cage and (b) whether the symmetrical preference of the E-domain in the maxi-ferritin (4-fold axis) overrules the C-terminal preference in the mini-ferritin (3-fold axis). With a 1.99 Å resolution crystal structure, we determined that the chimera assembles into a tetrahedral cage that can be nearly superimposed with the parent mini-ferritin, and that the E-domains are flipped external to the cage at the 3-fold symmetry axes.

  14. Iron deficiency and anemia are associated with low retinol levels in children aged 1 to 5 years

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    Bárbara C.A. Saraiva

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To analyze the occurrence of anemia and iron deficiency in children aged 1 to 5 years and the association of these events and retinol deficiency. METHODS: This was an observational analytic cross-sectional study conducted in Vitoria, ES, Brazil, between April and August of 2008, with healthy children aged 1 to 5 years (n = 692 that lived in areas covered by primary healthcare services. Sociodemographic and economic conditions, dietary intake (energy, protein, iron, and vitamin A ingestion, anthropometric data (body mass index-for-age and height-for-age, and biochemical parameters (ferritin, hemoglobin, and retinol serum were collected. RESULTS: The prevalence of anemia, iron deficiency, and retinol deficiency was 15.7%, 28.1%, and 24.7%, respectively. Univariate analysis showed a higher prevalence of anemia (PR: 4.62, 95% CI: 3.36, 6.34, p < 0.001 and iron deficiency (PR: 4.51, 95% CI: 3.30, 6.17, p < 0.001 among children with retinol deficiency. The same results were obtained after adjusting for socioeconomic and demographic conditions, dietary intake, and anthropometric variables. There was a positive association between ferritin vs. retinol serum (r = 0.597; p < 0.001 and hemoglobin vs. retinol serum (r = 0.770; p < 0.001. CONCLUSIONS: Anemia and iron deficiency were associated with low levels of serum retinol in children aged 1 to 5 years, and a positive correlation was verified between serum retinol and serum ferritin and hemoglobin levels. These results indicate the importance of initiatives encouraging the development of new treatments and further research regarding retinol deficiency.

  15. Effectiveness of nutrition education, iron supplementation or both on iron status in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapur, D; Sharma, S; Agarwal, K N

    2003-12-01

    A community-based, randomized trial was designed to compare the effect of nutrition education and/or iron supplementation (weekly) on iron status of children in an urban slum in Delhi. Four hundred and fifty one children, 9-36 months of age and their caretakers (mothers), assigned to one of the following groups were included in the cohort. Group 1, nutrition education. Group 2, supplementation (with 20 mg elemental iron). Group 3, nutrition education with supplementation (with 20 mg elemental iron) and Group 4, control given placebo. The intervention program was of four months duration, with a treatment phase of 8 wk followed by 8 wk of no treatment. Post intervention, at 8 wk and at 16 wk, the hemoglobin change in the nutrition education, supplementation, nutrition education with supplementation and control groups was 2.9, 1.9, 3.8 and -5.9%, respectively and 2.1, -1.9, 0 and -9.3%, respectively (as compared to initial values). There was no significant effect of any of the intervention at 8 weeks. At 16 wk, there was significant positive effect of nutrition education group (p less than 0.05). The percent change in serum ferritin value at 16 wk in the nutrition education, supplementation, nutrition education with supplementation and control groups was 5.7, -2.3, -3.4 and -40%, respectively. Serum ferritin values were significantly higher for the nutrition education group (p nutrition education group mothers showed significantly higher nutrition knowledge and the dietary iron intake of children was significantly higher than their control group counterparts (p nutrition education did have a positive effect on the iron status possibly by improving the dietary iron intake.

  16. Concentration differences between serum and plasma of the elements cobalt, iron, mercury, rubidium, selenium and zinc determined by neutron activation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kasperek, K.; Kiem, J.; Iyengar, G.V.; Feinendegen, L.E.

    1981-01-01

    The differences in concentrations of cesium, cobalt, iron, mercury, rubidium, selenium and zinc between serum and plasma were examined with the aid of instrumental neutron activation analysis. Eighty serum and plasma samples obtained from 13 donors were compared. Serum was prepared in plastic tubes immediately after clotting, and plasma was separated with heparin as anticoagulant. No significant differences in the concentrations of cesium, cobalt, mercury and selenium were observed. However, the concentrations of iron, rubidium and zinc were significantly higher in serum than in plasma. The average differences were 322, 12 and 20 ng/ml for iron, rubidium and zinc, respectively. The average differences found for cesium, rubidium and zinc were far below that which can be expected from a complete, or considerable release of these elements from platelets which aggregate or disintegrate during the clotting process in preparing serum. (orig.)

  17. Iron status of young children in Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Merwe, Liandré F; Eussen, Simone R

    2017-12-01

    Iron deficiency (ID) is common in young children aged 6-36 mo. Although the hazards associated with iron deficiency anemia (IDA) are well known, concerns about risks associated with excess iron intake in young children are emerging. To characterize iron status in Europe, we describe the prevalence of ID, IDA, iron repletion, and excess stores with the use of published data from a systematic review on iron intake and deficiency rates, combined with other selected iron status data in young European children. Various definitions for ID and IDA were applied across studies. ID prevalence varied depending on socioeconomic status and type of milk fed (i.e., human or cow milk or formula). Without regard to these factors, ID was reported in 3-48% of children aged ≥12 mo across the countries. For 6- to 12-mo-old infants, based on studies that did not differentiate these factors, ID prevalence was 4-18%. IDA was iron status data from a sample of healthy Western European children aged 12-36 mo, 69% were iron replete, and the 97.5th percentile for serum ferritin (SF) was 64.3 μg/L. In another sample, 79% of 24-mo-old children were iron replete, and the 97.5th percentile for SF was 57.3 μg/L. Average iron intake in most countries studied was close to or below the UK's Recommended Dietary Allowance. In conclusion, even in healthy European children aged 6-36 mo, ID is still common. In Western European populations for whom data were available, approximately three-quarters of children were found to be iron replete, and excess iron stores (SF >100 μg/L) did not appear to be a concern. Consensus on the definitions of iron repletion and excess stores, as well as on ID and IDA, is needed. © 2017 American Society for Nutrition.

  18. Iron stores in regular blood donors in Lagos, Nigeria

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    Adediran A

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Adewumi Adediran,1 Ebele I Uche,2 Titilope A Adeyemo,1 Dapus O Damulak,3 Akinsegun A Akinbami,4 Alani S Akanmu1 1Department of Hematology and Blood Transfusion, University of Lagos, Lagos, Nigeria; 2Department of Hematology and Blood Transfusion, Lagos University Teaching Hospital, Lagos, Nigeria; 3Department of Hematology and Blood Transfusion, Jos University Teaching Hospital, Jos, Nigeria; 4Department of Hematology and Blood Transfusion, Lagos State University, Ikeja, Nigeria Background: Apart from challenging the bone marrow to increase its red cell production, thereby producing more blood for the donor, regular blood donation has been shown to have several benefits, one of which is preventing accumulation of body iron which can cause free radical formation in the body. This study was carried out to assess body iron stores in regular blood donors. Methods: A total of 52 regular (study and 30 first-time (control volunteer blood donors were studied prospectively. Twenty milliliters of venous blood was drawn from each subject, 5 mL of which was put into sodium ethylenediamine tetra-acetic acid specimen bottles for a full blood count, including red blood cell indices. The remaining sample was allowed to clot in a plain container, and the serum was then retrieved for serum ferritin, serum iron, and serum transferrin receptor measurement by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Results: Mean hemoglobin and packed cell volume in the study group (13.47 ± 2.36 g/dL and 42.00 ± 7.10, respectively, P = 0.303 were not significantly higher than in the control group (12.98 ± 1.30 g/dL and 39.76 ± 4.41, respectively, P = 0.119. Mean serum ferritin was 102.46 ± 80.26 ng/mL in the control group and 41.46 ± 40.33 ng/mL in the study group (P = 0.001. Mean serum ferritin for women in the study group (28.02 ± 25.00 ng/mL was significantly lower than for women in the control group (56.35 ± 34.03 ng/mL, P = 0.014. Similarly, men in the study group had a lower

  19. Iron deficiency in blood donors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodolfo Delfini Cançado

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: Blood donation results in a substantial loss of iron (200 to 250 mg at each bleeding procedure (425 to 475 ml and subsequent mobilization of iron from body stores. Recent reports have shown that body iron reserves generally are small and iron depletion is more frequent in blood donors than in non-donors. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to evaluate the frequency of iron deficiency in blood donors and to establish the frequency of iron deficiency in blood donors according to sex, whether they were first-time or multi-time donors, and the frequency of donations per year. DESIGN: From September 20 to October 5, 1999, three hundred blood donors from Santa Casa Hemocenter of São Paulo were studied. DIAGNOSTIC TESTS: Using a combination of biochemical measurements of iron status: serum iron, total iron-binding capacity, transferrin saturation index, serum ferritin and the erythrocyte indices. RESULTS: The frequency of iron deficiency in blood donors was 11.0%, of whom 5.5% (13/237 were male and 31.7% (20/63 female donors. The frequency of iron deficiency was higher in multi-time blood donors than in first-time blood donors, for male blood donors (7.6% versus 0.0%, P < 0.05 and female ones (41.5% versus 18.5%, P < 0.05. The frequency of iron deficiency found was higher among the male blood donors with three or more donations per year (P < 0.05 and among the female blood donors with two or more donations per year (P < 0.05. CONCLUSIONS: We conclude that blood donation is a very important factor for iron deficiency in blood donors, particularly in multi-time donors and especially in female donors. The high frequency of blood donors with iron deficiency found in this study suggests a need for a more accurate laboratory trial, as hemoglobin or hematocrit measurement alone is not sufficient for detecting and excluding blood donors with iron deficiency without anemia.

  20. Evaluation of blood and serum markers in spinal cord injured patients with pressure sores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurcay, Eda; Bal, Ajda; Gurcay, Ahmet G; Cakci, Aytul

    2009-03-01

    To evaluate blood and serum markers in traumatic spinal cord injured (SCI) patients, with and without pressure sores. This cross-sectional study was performed at the Ministry of Health Diskapi Yildirim Beyazit, and Numune Education and Research Hospitals, Ankara, Turkey, from 2006-2008. A total of 23 SCI patients with pressure sores (group I) and a control group of 25 SCI patients without pressure sores (group II) were evaluated. Characteristics of sores were examined with respect to duration, location, grade, tissue types, surface area, and exudate amount. Recorded laboratory parameters included erythrocyte sedimentation rates (ESR), C-reactive protein (CRP), hemoglobin (Hb), hematocrit (Htc), lymphocytes, white blood cells (WBC), red blood cells (RBC), serum iron, transferrin, total iron-binding capacity (TIBC), ferritin, total protein, albumin, vitamin B12, and zinc. The most common pressure sore location was the sacrum (38%). Compared to the control group, the patients with pressure sores showed anemia with reduced serum iron, transferrin, TIBC, and increased ferritin. They also had increased ESR, CRP, and WBC and reduced lymphocytes, total protein, albumin and zinc. Statistically significant correlations were found between CRP, Hb, Htc, lymphocytes, RBC, WBC, and serum protein levels, and grade of pressure sores. Clinicians should regularly screen patients with respect to blood and serum markers, in order to determine any risks for pressure sores, and they should perform immediate preventive measures based on the patient's condition.

  1. Obesity Promotes Alterations in Iron Recycling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Citelli

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Hepcidin is a key hormone that induces the degradation of ferroportin (FPN, a protein that exports iron from reticuloendothelial macrophages and enterocytes. The aim of the present study was to experimentally evaluate if the obesity induced by a high-fat diet (HFD modifies the expression of FPN in macrophages and enterocytes, thus altering the iron bioavailability. In order to directly examine changes associated with iron metabolism in vivo, C57BL/6J mice were fed either a control or a HFD. Serum leptin levels were evaluated. The hepcidin, divalent metal transporter-1 (DMT1, FPN and ferritin genes were analyzed by real-time polymerase chain reaction. The amount of iron present in both the liver and spleen was determined by flame atomic absorption spectrometry. Ferroportin localization within reticuloendothelial macrophages was observed by immunofluorescence microscopy. Obese animals were found to exhibit increased hepcidin gene expression, while iron accumulated in the spleen and liver. They also exhibited changes in the sublocation of splenic cellular FPN and a reduction in the FPN expression in the liver and the spleen, while no changes were observed in enterocytes. Possible explanations for the increased hepcidin expression observed in HFD animals may include: increased leptin levels, the liver iron accumulation or endoplasmic reticulum (ER stress. Together, the results indicated that obesity promotes changes in iron bioavailability, since it altered the iron recycling function.

  2. Serum Prohepcidin Levels in Children with Thalassemia Major and Intermedia

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    Celil Yılmaz

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To determine the role of hepcidin hormone levels in iron accumulation in patients with thalassemia major (TM and thalassemia intermedia (TI. Materials and Methods: Serum prohepcidin and ferritin levels were determined in 34 patient with TM, 10 patient with TI, who attended the Department of Pediatric Hematology Adnan Menderes University Medical Faculty and the Department of Pediatrics at Aydın Atatürk State Hospital between 1 September 2006 and 30 September 2007 and 40 control patients without infection/inflammation, hepatitis or liver failure. Serum prohepcidin levels were measured using a commercial enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay kit (DRG International, Inc. Marburg, Germany; ferritin was studied with chemiluminescence method (Immulite 2000 DPC. Results: Mean serum ferritin levels in TM, TI and control groups were 2347.97±1724.81 ng/mL (range: 144-8015 ng/mL, 1352.40±918.94 ng/mL (range: 311-3109 ng/mL, and 33.35±12.03 ng/mL (range: 20-69.1 ng/mL, respectively. Serum prohepcidin levels in the same groups were 221.78±74.38 ng/mL (range: 7l.14-446.57 ng/mL, 173.31±52.14 ng/mL (range: 100.83-267.69 ng/mL, and 218.20±50.37 ng/mL (range: 116.18-330.43 ng/mL, respectively. There was a statistically significant difference in prohepcidin levels between patients with TI and control group only (p=0.016. No correlation was found between prohepcidin and ferritin levels in all groups (r=-0.023, p=0.839. Conclusion: Low levels of prohepcidin in patients with TI may be related to increased erythropoietic activity. Prohepcidin can be an indicator of active erythropoiesis.

  3. Sustainability of the effects of medicinal iron and iron rich food supplementation on haemoglobin, intelligence quotient and growth of school aged girls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monika Jain

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Anaemia in school aged girls is an important but neglected issue. Since iron supplementation programmes have had little reported success in reducing anaemia, interest is turning to food based approaches that have higher potential for achieving far reaching benefits. The purpose of the study was to observe sustainability of the effect of iron and food supplementation on haemoglobin (Hb, intelligence quotient (IQ and growth of the subjects. At baseline, estimation of haemoglobin (Hb, red cell indices, serum iron, total iron binding capacity, serum transferrin saturation and serum ferritin was done. IQ, weight and height were measured using standard procedures. Anaemic subjectswere divided into three groups, viz., (i twice weekly supplementation of iron folic acid syrup (53 mg iron/week; (ii daily supplementation of 4 niger seed and defatted soyaflour biscuits plus 2 lemons (45 mg iron/week and (iii control. Non anaemic group(NAC was not intervened. Endline data was collected after 120 days. Follow up for Hb, IQ, weight and height was done 4 months after cessation of supplementation. The prevalence of anaemia was 77% in the study population; 46% subjects had mild anaemia and 32% had moderate anaemia. Iron status was lower in anaemic subjects (p<0.001.Iron supplementation was more effective in raising Hb and building iron stores than iron rich food supplementation. Iron supplementation improved IQ but did not bring about catch up of anaemics to non anaemics. Iron rich food supplementation was better than medicinal iron in promoting growth in anaemic girls. The impact of iron rich food supplementation on Hb, IQ and growth sustained for 4 months while that of medicinal iron did not. Effects of food supplementation are sustainable for 4 months, therefore, this strategy holds more potential to control anaemia, in school aged girls.

  4. Hemorrhage-adjusted iron requirements, hematinics and hepcidin define hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia as a model of hemorrhagic iron deficiency.

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    Helen Finnamore

    Full Text Available Iron deficiency anemia remains a major global health problem. Higher iron demands provide the potential for a targeted preventative approach before anemia develops. The primary study objective was to develop and validate a metric that stratifies recommended dietary iron intake to compensate for patient-specific non-menstrual hemorrhagic losses. The secondary objective was to examine whether iron deficiency can be attributed to under-replacement of epistaxis (nosebleed hemorrhagic iron losses in hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT.The hemorrhage adjusted iron requirement (HAIR sums the recommended dietary allowance, and iron required to replace additional quantified hemorrhagic losses, based on the pre-menopausal increment to compensate for menstrual losses (formula provided. In a study population of 50 HHT patients completing concurrent dietary and nosebleed questionnaires, 43/50 (86% met their recommended dietary allowance, but only 10/50 (20% met their HAIR. Higher HAIR was a powerful predictor of lower hemoglobin (p = 0.009, lower mean corpuscular hemoglobin content (p<0.001, lower log-transformed serum iron (p = 0.009, and higher log-transformed red cell distribution width (p<0.001. There was no evidence of generalised abnormalities in iron handling Ferritin and ferritin(2 explained 60% of the hepcidin variance (p<0.001, and the mean hepcidinferritin ratio was similar to reported controls. Iron supplement use increased the proportion of individuals meeting their HAIR, and blunted associations between HAIR and hematinic indices. Once adjusted for supplement use however, reciprocal relationships between HAIR and hemoglobin/serum iron persisted. Of 568 individuals using iron tablets, most reported problems completing the course. For patients with hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia, persistent anemia was reported three-times more frequently if iron tablets caused diarrhea or needed to be stopped.HAIR values, providing an indication of

  5. Serum heavy metals and hemoglobin related compounds in Saudi Arabia firefighters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Al-Malki Abdulrahman L

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Firefighters are frequently exposed to significant concentrations of hazardous materials including heavy metals, aldehydes, hydrogen chloride, dichlorofluoromethane and some particulates. Many of these materials have been implicated in the triggering of several diseases. The aim of the present study is to investigate the effect of fire smoke exposure on serum heavy metals and possible affection on iron functions compounds (total iron binding capacity, transferrin saturation percent, ferritin, unsaturated iron-binding capacity blood hemoglobin and carboxyhemoglobin,. Subjects and methods Two groups of male firefighter volunteers were included; the first included 28 firefighters from Jeddah city, while the second included 21 firefighters from Yanbu city with an overall age rang of 20–48 years. An additional group of 23 male non-firefighters volunteered from both cities as normal control subjects. Blood samples were collected from all volunteer subjects and investigated for relevant parameters. Results The results obtained showed that there were no statistically significant changes in the levels of serum heavy metals in firefighters as compared to normal control subjects. Blood carboxyhemoglobin and serum ferritin were statistically increased in Jeddah firefighters, (p Conclusion Such results might point to the need for more health protective and prophylactic measures to avoid such hazardous health effects (elevated Blood carboxyhemoglobin and serum ferritin and decreased serum TIBC and UIBC that might endanger firefighters working under dangerous conditions. Firefighters must be under regular medical follow-up through standard timetabled medical laboratory investigations to allow for early detection of any serum biochemical or blood hematological changes.

  6. Effect of Consuming Zinc-fortified Bread on Serum Zinc and Iron Status of Zinc-deficient Women: A Double Blind, Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badii, Akbar; Nekouei, Niloufar; Fazilati, Mohammad; Shahedi, Mohammad; Badiei, Sajad

    2012-03-01

    After iron deficiency, zinc deficiency is the major micronutrient deficiency in developing countries, and staple food fortification is an effective strategy to prevent and improve it among at-risk-populations. No action has been taken to reduce zinc deficiency via flour fortification so far in Iran, and little is known about the influence of zinc fortification of flour on serum zinc and the iron status, and also about the optimum and effective amount of zinc compound that is used in food fortification. The objective of this study is to evaluate the influence of consuming zinc-fortified breads on the zinc and iron status in the blood serum. In this study, three types of bread were prepared from non-fortified and fortified flours, with 50 and 100 ppm elemental zinc in the form of sulfate. Eighty zinc-deficient women aged 19 to 49 years were randomly assigned to three groups; The volunteers received, daily, (1) a non-fortified bread, (2) a high-zinc bread, and (3) a low-zinc bread for one month. Serum zinc and iron were measured by Atomic Absorption before and after the study. Results showed a significant increase in serum zinc and iron levels in all groups (p 0.05). Absorption of zinc and iron in the group that consumed high-zinc bread was significantly greater than that in the group that received low-zinc bread (p bread improved iron absorption.

  7. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... have less hemoglobin than normal. Hemoglobin is a protein inside red blood cells that carries oxygen from the lungs to tissues ... stored iron has been used. Ferritin is a protein that helps store iron in your ... very young red blood cells. Peripheral smear to see if your red blood ...

  8. Iron deficiency in children

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    cell and excess iron is stored as ferritin to protect the cell from oxidative ... iron deficiency has negative effects during pregnancy and in the postpartum period, which affects maternal health ... use of undiluted cow's milk and a predominant cow's milk intake in .... on bone marrow smear or biopsy for the definitive diagnosis of.

  9. Comparative analysis of iron homeostasis in sub-Saharan African children with sickle cell disease and their unaffected siblings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selma eGomez

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Iron is an essential trace element subject to tight regulation to ensure adequate running of biological processes. In sub-Saharan Africa where hemoglobinopathies are common, iron homeostasis is likely to be impaired by these conditions. Here we assessed and compared key serum proteins associated with iron metabolism between sub-Saharan African children with sickle cell disease (SCD and their unaffected siblings. Complete blood counts and serum concentrations of four key proteins involved in iron regulation (ferritin, transferrin, sTfR and hepcidin were measured for 73 children with SCD and 68 healthy siblings in Benin, West Africa. We found significant differences in concentration of transferrin, sTfR and ferritin between the two groups. Hepcidin concentrations were found at unusually high concentrations but did not differ among the two groups. We found a significant negative correlation between hepcidin levels and both MCH and MCV in the SCD group and report that sTfR concentrations show a correlation with MCV and MHC in opposite directions in the two groups. These results highlight the unusually high levels of hepcidin in the Beninese population and the patterns of differential iron homeostasis taking place under sickle cell disease status. These results lay the foundation for a systematic evaluation of the underlying mechanisms deregulating iron homeostasis in populations with SCD or high prevalence of iron deficiency.

  10. H Ferritin Gene Silencing in a Human Metastatic Melanoma Cell Line: A Proteomic Analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Di Sanzo, Maddalena; Gaspari, Marco; Misaggi, Roberta

    2011-01-01

    Ferritin, the major intracellular iron-storage protein, is made of 24 subunits of two types, H and L. Besides regulating intracellular iron homeostasis, it has been found that ferritin, in particular the H subunit (FHC), is involved in different biological events such as cell differentiation...... and pathologic states (i.e., neurodegeneration and cancer). This study is aimed at investigating the whole-cell proteome of FHC-expressing and sh-RNA-silenced human metastatic melanoma cells (MM07(m)) in the attempt to identify and classify the highest number of proteins directly or indirectly controlled...... of H ferritin signaling pathways and lend support to the hypothesis that specific targeting of this gene might be an attractive and potentially effective strategy for the management of metastatic melanoma....

  11. Genetic/metabolic effect of iron metabolism and rare anemias

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clara Camaschella

    2013-03-01

    -linked sideroblastic anemia/ataxia, likely impairing the activity of ferrochelatase, which is an iron/sulfur-cluster- dependent enzyme. A recessive form affects GLRX5, a protein involved in the iron/sulfur cluster biogenesis. Aceruloplasminemia is a rare recessive syndrome characterized by anemia, diabetes, retinal degeneration, ataxia and other neurological symptoms, low serum iron but high serum ferritin, due to decreased iron recycling from macrophages and other cells. The study of these rare conditions has greatly contributed to our understanding of iron transport, utilization and recycling. Their distinction is clinically essential in order to plan the best treatment.

  12. Comparison of food habits, iron intake and iron status in adolescents before and after the withdrawal of the general iron fortification in Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sjöberg, A; Hulthén, L

    2015-04-01

    Sifted flour was fortified with carbonyl iron for 50 years in Sweden. This study evaluates changes in food habits, intake of iron, factors affecting iron absorption and iron status after the discontinuation of the general iron fortification in adolescents with the highest requirements. A total of 2285 15- to 16-year-old students in 1994 (634 girls and 611 boys) and in 2000 (534 girls and 486 boys) in 13 schools in Gothenburg, Sweden, were included in two cross-sectional surveys assessing food habits with diet history interviews and iron deficiency defined with serum ferritin stores ⩽ 15 μg/l and no preceding infection. In girls, iron deficiency increased from 37 to 45%, while in boys, it was stable at 23%. Total iron intake decreased from 15.7 to 9.5 mg/day and 22.5 to 13.9 mg/day in girls and boys, respectively. Cereals were the main iron source. Among girls, the increase of fish and decrease of calcium intake may not counteract the effect of decreased intake of fortification iron. Among boys, more meat, less calcium and more vitamin C may have favoured the bioavailability of iron. The discontinuation of the general iron fortification resulted in a 39% decrease in total iron intake and iron deficiency increased substantially in girls. However, in boys no change in iron deficiency was observed. Whether this was a result of changed bioavailability of dietary iron or simultaneous changes of non-dietary factors remains to be explored.

  13. Metabolomic profiling identifies potential pathways involved in the interaction of iron homeostasis with glucose metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lars Stechemesser

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Elevated serum ferritin has been linked to type 2 diabetes (T2D and adverse health outcomes in subjects with the Metabolic Syndrome (MetS. As the mechanisms underlying the negative impact of excess iron have so far remained elusive, we aimed to identify potential links between iron homeostasis and metabolic pathways. Methods: In a cross-sectional study, data were obtained from 163 patients, allocated to one of three groups: (1 lean, healthy controls (n = 53, (2 MetS without hyperferritinemia (n = 54 and (3 MetS with hyperferritinemia (n = 56. An additional phlebotomy study included 29 patients with biopsy-proven iron overload before and after iron removal. A detailed clinical and biochemical characterization was obtained and metabolomic profiling was performed via a targeted metabolomics approach. Results: Subjects with MetS and elevated ferritin had higher fasting glucose (p < 0.001, HbA1c (p = 0.035 and 1 h glucose in oral glucose tolerance test (p = 0.002 compared to MetS subjects without iron overload, whereas other clinical and biochemical features of the MetS were not different. The metabolomic study revealed significant differences between MetS with high and low ferritin in the serum concentrations of sarcosine, citrulline and particularly long-chain phosphatidylcholines. Methionine, glutamate, and long-chain phosphatidylcholines were significantly different before and after phlebotomy (p < 0.05 for all metabolites. Conclusions: Our data suggest that high serum ferritin concentrations are linked to impaired glucose homeostasis in subjects with the MetS. Iron excess is associated to distinct changes in the serum concentrations of phosphatidylcholine subsets. A pathway involving sarcosine and citrulline also may be involved in iron-induced impairment of glucose metabolism. Author Video: Author Video Watch what authors say about their articles Keywords: Metabolomics, Hyperferritinemia, Iron overload, Metabolic

  14. Microglial dystrophy in the aged and Alzheimer's disease brain is associated with ferritin immunoreactivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, Kryslaine O; Sparks, D Larry; Streit, Wolfgang J

    2008-08-01

    Degeneration of microglial cells may be important for understanding the pathogenesis of aging-related neurodegeneration and neurodegenerative diseases. In this study, we analyzed the morphological characteristics of microglial cells in the nondemented and Alzheimer's disease (AD) human brain using ferritin immunohistochemistry. The central hypothesis was that expression of the iron storage protein ferritin increases the susceptibility of microglia to degeneration, particularly in the aged brain since senescent microglia might become less efficient in maintaining iron homeostasis and free iron can promote oxidative damage. In a primary set of 24 subjects (age range 34-97 years) examined, microglial cells immunoreactive for ferritin were found to constitute a subpopulation of the larger microglial pool labeled with an antibody for HLA-DR antigens. The majority of these ferritin-positive microglia exhibited aberrant morphological (dystrophic) changes in the aged and particularly in the AD brain. No spatial correlation was found between ferritin-positive dystrophic microglia and senile plaques in AD tissues. Analysis of a secondary set of human postmortem brain tissues with a wide range of postmortem intervals (PMI, average 10.94 +/- 5.69 h) showed that the occurrence of microglial dystrophy was independent of PMI and consequently not a product of tissue autolysis. Collectively, these results suggest that microglial involvement in iron storage and metabolism contributes to their degeneration, possibly through increased exposure of the cells to oxidative stress. We conclude that ferritin immunohistochemistry may be a useful method for detecting degenerating microglia in the human brain. (c) 2008 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  15. A natural antioxidant, tannic acid mitigates iron-overload induced hepatotoxicity in Swiss albino mice through ROS regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basu, Tapasree; Panja, Sourav; Shendge, Anil Khushalrao; Das, Abhishek; Mandal, Nripendranath

    2018-05-01

    Tannic acid (TA), a water soluble natural polyphenol with 8 gallic acids groups, is abundantly present in various medicinal plants. Previously TA has been investigated for its antimicrobial and antifungal properties. Being a large polyphenol, TA chelates more than 1 metal. Hence TA has been explored for potent antioxidant activities against reactive oxygen species (ROS), reactive nitrogen species (RNS) and as iron chelator in vitro thereby mitigating iron-overload induced hepatotoxicity in vivo. Iron dextran was injected intraperitoneally in Swiss albino mice to induce iron-overload triggered hepatotoxicity, followed by oral administration of TA for remediation. After treatment, liver, spleen, and blood samples were processed from sacrificed animals. The liver iron, serum ferritin, serum markers, ROS, liver antioxidant status, and liver damage parameters were assessed, followed by histopathology and protein expression studies. Our results show that TA is a prominent ROS and RNS scavenger as well as iron chelator in vitro. It also reversed the ROS levels in vivo and restricted the liver damage parameters as compared to the standard drug, desirox. Moreover, this natural polyphenol exclusively ameliorates the histopathological and fibrotic changes in liver sections reducing the iron-overload, along with chelation of liver iron and normalization of serum ferritin. The protective role of TA against iron-overload induced apoptosis in liver was further supported by changed levels of caspase 3, PARP as well as Bax/BCl-2 ratio. Thus, TA can be envisaged as a better orally administrable iron chelator to reduce iron-overload induced hepatotoxicity through ROS regulation. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Revelation of endogenously bound Fe{sup 2+} ions in the crystal structure of ferritin from Escherichia coli

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thiruselvam, Viswanathan [Centre of Advanced Study in Crystallography and Biophysics, University of Madras, Guindy Campus, Chennai 600 025 (India); Sivaraman, Padavattan [RIKEN SPring-8 Center, Harima Institute, 1-1-1 Kouto, Sayo, Hyogo 679-5148 (Japan); Kumarevel, Thirumananseri, E-mail: kumarevel.thirumananseri@riken.jp [RIKEN SPring-8 Center, Harima Institute, 1-1-1 Kouto, Sayo, Hyogo 679-5148 (Japan); Structural Biology Laboratory, RIKEN Yokohama Institute, RIKEN, 1-7-22 Suehiro-cho, Tsurumi, Yokohama 230-0045 (Japan); Ponnuswamy, Mondikalipudur Nanjappagounder, E-mail: mnpsy2004@yahoo.com [Centre of Advanced Study in Crystallography and Biophysics, University of Madras, Guindy Campus, Chennai 600 025 (India)

    2014-10-24

    Highlights: • Crystal structure of ferritin was determined. • Endogenously expressed iron’s were identified. • Binuclear iron sites were observed at A and B active sites. - Abstract: Ferritin is an iron regulatory protein. It is responsible for storage and detoxification of excess iron thereby it regulates iron level in the body. Here we report the crystal structure of ferritin with two endogenously expressed Fe atoms binding in both the sites. The protein was purified and characterized by MALDI-TOF and N-terminal amino acid sequencing. The crystal belongs to I4 space group and it diffracted up to 2.5 Å. The structural analysis suggested that it crystallizes as hexamer and confirmed that it happened to be the first report of endogenously expressed Fe ions incorporated in both the A and B sites, situated in between the helices.

  17. Ferritin nanoparticles for improved self-renewal and differentiation of human neural stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jung Seung; Yang, Kisuk; Cho, Ann-Na; Cho, Seung-Woo

    2018-01-01

    Biomaterials that promote the self-renewal ability and differentiation capacity of neural stem cells (NSCs) are desirable for improving stem cell therapy to treat neurodegenerative diseases. Incorporation of micro- and nanoparticles into stem cell culture has gained great attention for the control of stem cell behaviors, including proliferation and differentiation. In this study, ferritin, an iron-containing natural protein nanoparticle, was applied as a biomaterial to improve the self-renewal and differentiation of NSCs and neural progenitor cells (NPCs). Ferritin nanoparticles were added to NSC or NPC culture during cell growth, allowing for incorporation of ferritin nanoparticles during neurosphere formation. Compared to neurospheres without ferritin treatment, neurospheres with ferritin nanoparticles showed significantly promoted self-renewal and cell-cell interactions. When spontaneous differentiation of neurospheres was induced during culture without mitogenic factors, neuronal differentiation was enhanced in the ferritin-treated neurospheres. In conclusion, we found that natural nanoparticles can be used to improve the self-renewal ability and differentiation potential of NSCs and NPCs, which can be applied in neural tissue engineering and cell therapy for neurodegenerative diseases.

  18. The presence of serum alters the properties of iron oxide nanoparticles and lowers their accumulation by cultured brain astrocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geppert, Mark; Petters, Charlotte; Thiel, Karsten; Dringen, Ralf

    2013-01-01

    Iron oxide nanoparticles (IONPs) are considered for various diagnostic and therapeutic applications. Such particles are able to cross the blood–brain barrier and are taken up into brain cells. To test whether serum components affect the properties of IONPs and/or their uptake into brain cells, we have incubated dimercaptosuccinate-coated magnetic IONPs without and with fetal calf serum (FCS) and have exposed cultured brain astrocytes with IONPs in the absence or presence of FCS. Incubation with FCS caused a concentration-dependent increase in the average hydrodynamic diameter of the particles and of their zeta-potential. In the presence of 10 % FCS, the diameter of the IONPs increased from 57 ± 2 to 107 ± 6 nm and the zeta-potential of the particles from −22 ± 5 to −9 ± 1 mV. FCS affected also strongly the uptake of IONPs by cultured astrocytes. The efficient time- and temperature-dependent cellular accumulation of IONPs was lowered with increasing concentration of FCS by up to 90 %. In addition, in the absence of serum, endocytosis inhibitors did not alter the IONP accumulation by astrocytes, while chlorpromazine or wortmannin lowered significantly the accumulation of IONPs in the presence of FCS, suggesting that clathrin-mediated endocytosis and macropinocytosis are involved in astrocytic IONP uptake from serum-containing medium. These data demonstrate that the presence of FCS strongly affects the properties of IONPs as well as their accumulation by cultured brain cells.

  19. Molecular cloning, expression and isolation of ferritins from two tick species - Ornithodoros moubata and Ixodes ricinus

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kopáček, Petr; Ždychová, J.; Yoshiga, T.; Weise, C.; Rudenko, Natalia; Law, J. H.

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 33, č. 1 (2003), s. 103-113 ISSN 0965-1748 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA206/00/0266 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z6022909; CEZ:MSM 123100003 Keywords : ferritin * iron metabolism * tick Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 2.358, year: 2003

  20. [Iron status and serum retinol levels among children and adolescents attended by a Family Health Strategy team in Itajaí, Santa Catarina State].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariath, Aline Brandão; Giachini, Rubia Mara; Lauda, Laíz Guedes; Grillo, Luciane Peter

    2010-03-01

    The objective of this article is to determine prevalence of iron and vitamin A deficiencies among children and adolescents attended by a Family Health Strategy team in Itajaí, Santa Catarina State, and to assess relations between iron status and serum retinol. A nutritional census of the families was carried out. Socioeconomic and demographic data were collected. Hemoglobin concentration, hematocrite, serum iron and retinal were determined. Thirty-one out of the 156 enrolled families participated in the study. Only 39.1% of the children and 62.0% of the adolescents had their blood samples collected. Mean per capita income was 1.68+/-1.00 minimum wages. None of the parents was illiterate and most families (80.6%) owned their homes. All homes had public sewage and water supply, and 87.1% were made of brickwork. Iron deficiency was diagnosed in 16.7% of the children and 19.3% of the adolescents. Only one child had vitamin A deficiency. Significant correlations were found between serum iron and retinol among children, and among adolescents between serum retinol and hemoglobin concentration and hematocrite. We found mild prevalences of iron and vitamin A deficiencies, possibly due to the socioeconomic and demographic characteristics.

  1. Helicobacter pylori infection and iron deficiency in teenage females in New Zealand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraser, Alan G; Scragg, Robert; Schaaf, David; Metcalf, Patricia; Grant, Cameron C

    2010-04-30

    Iron deficiency is an important problem in New Zealand children and young adults. Iron deficiency and Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection are each more common in Māori and Pacific Island ethnic groups. This study seeks to determine if H. pylori infection is associated with iron deficiency. 792 female students from 7 Auckland high schools (median age 16 years) had H. pylori serology and tests for iron deficiency assessed by a combination of serum ferritin, iron saturation and mean cell volume. The prevalence of positive H. pylori serology was highest for Pacific Island students (49.0%; CI 38.0-60.0), intermediate for Māori (26.7%; CI 16.9-36.4) and Asian (24.7%; CI 12.6-36.7) and lowest for European (13.7%; 6.0-21.4) piron saturation (p=0.013), but not of ferritin (p=0.068), haemoglobin (p=0.08) or mean cell volume (p=0.16), compared to those with negative serology. Positive H. pylori serology was associated with increased risk of iron deficiency (RR 1.20; CI 1.08-1.34), but not anaemia (RR 1.01; CI 0.87-1.18), after adjusting for age, ethnicity and school SES decile. This study indicates that H. pylori infection is associated with iron deficiency in adolescent females. There are significant differences in H. pylori serology amongst different ethnic groups in New Zealand.

  2. The contribution of diet and genotype to iron status in women: a classical twin study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fairweather-Tait, Susan J; Guile, Geoffrey R; Valdes, Ana M; Wawer, Anna A; Hurst, Rachel; Skinner, Jane; Macgregor, Alexander J

    2013-01-01

    This is the first published report examining the combined effect of diet and genotype on body iron content using a classical twin study design. The aim of this study was to determine the relative contribution of genetic and environmental factors in determining iron status. The population was comprised of 200 BMI- and age-matched pairs of MZ and DZ healthy twins, characterised for habitual diet and 15 iron-related candidate genetic markers. Variance components analysis demonstrated that the heritability of serum ferritin (SF) and soluble transferrin receptor was 44% and 54% respectively. Measured single nucleotide polymorphisms explained 5% and selected dietary factors 6% of the variance in iron status; there was a negative association between calcium intake and body iron (p = 0.02) and SF (p = 0.04).

  3. Iron concentrations in breast milk and selected maternal factors of human milk bank donors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mello-Neto, Julio; Rondó, Patrícia H C; Morgano, Marcelo A; Oshiiwa, Marie; Santos, Mariana L; Oliveira, Julicristie M

    2010-05-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the relationship between iron concentration in mature breast milk and characteristics of 136 donors of a Brazilian milk bank. Iron, vitamin A, zinc, and copper concentrations were assessed in human milk and maternal blood. Data were collected on maternal anthropometrics, obstetric, socioeconomic, demographic, and lifestyle factors. Iron, zinc, and copper in milk and zinc and copper in blood were detected by spectrophotometry. Vitamin A in milk and blood was determined by high-performance liquid chromatography. Hemoglobin was measured by electronic counting and serum iron and ferritin by colorimetry and chemoluminescence, respectively. Transferrin and ceruloplasmin were determined by nephelometry. According to multivariate linear regression analysis, iron in milk was positively associated with vitamin A in milk and with smoking but negatively associated with timing of breast milk donation (P milk of Brazilian donors may be influenced by nutritional factors and smoking.

  4. Frequency of Hereditary Hemochromatosis (HFE) Gene Mutations in Egyptian Beta Thalassemia Patients and its Relation to Iron Overload.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enein, Azza Aboul; El Dessouky, Nermine A; Mohamed, Khalda S; Botros, Shahira K A; Abd El Gawad, Mona F; Hamdy, Mona; Dyaa, Nehal

    2016-06-15

    This study aimed to detect the most common HFE gene mutations (C282Y, H63D, and S56C) in Egyptian beta thalassemia major patients and its relation to their iron status. The study included 50 beta thalassemia major patients and 30 age and sex matched healthy persons as a control group. Serum ferritin, serum iron and TIBC level were measured. Detection of the three HFE gene mutations (C282Y, H63D and S65C) was done by PCR-RFLP analysis. Confirmation of positive cases for the mutations was done by sequencing. Neither homozygote nor carrier status for the C282Y or S65C alleles was found. The H63D heterozygous state was detected in 5/50 (10%) thalassemic patients and in 1/30 (3.3%) controls with no statistically significant difference between patients and control groups (p = 0.22). Significantly higher levels of the serum ferritin and serum iron in patients with this mutation (p = 001). Our results suggest that there is an association between H63D mutation and the severity of iron overload in thalassemic patients.

  5. Immunological Evaluation of -Thalassemia Major Patients Receiving Oral Iron Chelator Deferasirox

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aleem, A.; Alsaleh, K.; Algahtani, F.; Momen, A. A.; Shakoor, Z.; Iqbal, Z.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To determine the immune abnormalities and occurrence of infections in transfusion-dependent -thalassemia major patients receiving oral iron chelator deferasirox (DFX). Study Design: An observational study. Place and Duration of Study: Hematology Clinics, King Khalid University Hospital, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, from July to December 2010. Methodology: Seventeen patients with -thalassemia major (12 females, median age 26 years) receiving deferasirox (DFX) for a median duration of 27 months were observed for any infections and had their immune status determined. Immune parameters studied included serum immunoglobulins and IgG subclasses, serum complement (C3 and C4) and anti-nuclear antibody (ANA) level, total B and T-lymphocytes, CD4+ and CD8+ counts, CD4+/CD8+ ratio, and natural killer (NK) cells. Immunological parameters of the patients were compared with age, gender, serum ferritin level and splenectomy status. Lymphocyte subsets were also compared with age and gender matched normal controls. Results: A considerable reduction in serum ferritin was achieved by DFX from a median level of 2528 to 1875 mol/l. Serum IgG levels were increased in 7 patients. Low C4 levels were found in 9 patients. Total B and T-lymphocytes were increased in 14 patients each, while CD4+, CD8+ and NK cells were increased in 13, 12 and 11 patients respectively. Absolute counts for all lymphocyte subsets were significantly higher compared to the normal controls (p=0.05 for all parameters). Raised levels of IgG were associated with older age, female gender, splenectomized status and higher serum ferritin levels but this did not reach statistical significance except for the higher ferritin levels (p=0.044). Increased tendency to infections was not observed. Conclusion: Patients with -thalassemia major receiving DFX exhibited significant immune abnormalities. Changes observed have been described previously, but could be related to DFX. The immune abnormalities were not associated with

  6. Heme-coordinated histidine residues form non-specific functional "ferritin-heme" peroxidase system: Possible and partial mechanistic relevance to oxidative stress-mediated pathology in neurodegenerative diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esmaeili, Sajjad; Kooshk, Mohammad Reza Ashrafi; Asghari, Seyyed Mohsen; Khodarahmi, Reza

    2016-10-01

    Ferritin is a giant protein composed of 24 subunits which is able to sequester up to 4500 atoms of iron. We proposed two kinds of heme binding sites in mammalian ferritins and provided direct evidence for peroxidase activity of heme-ferritin, since there is the possibility that "ferritin-heme" systems display unexpected catalytic behavior like heme-containing enzymes. In the current study, peroxidase activity of heme-bound ferritin was studied using TMB(1), l-DOPA, serotonin, and dopamine, in the presence of H2O2, as oxidant substrate. The catalytic oxidation of TMB was consistent with first-order kinetics with respect to ferritin concentration. Perturbation of the binding affinity and catalytic behavior of heme-bound His-modified ferritin were also documented. We also discuss the importance of the peroxidase-/nitrative-mediated oxidation of vital molecules as well as ferritin-induced catalase inhibition using in vitro experimental system. Uncontrollable "heme-ferritin"-based enzyme activity as well as up-regulation of heme and ferritin may inspire that some oxidative stress-mediated cytotoxic effects in AD-affected cells could be correlated to ferritin-heme interaction and/or ferritin-induced catalase inhibition and describe its contribution as an important causative pathogenesis mechanism in some neurodegenerative disorders. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Randomized controlled trial assessing the efficacy of a reusable fish-shaped iron ingot to increase hemoglobin concentration in anemic, rural Cambodian women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rappaport, Aviva I; Whitfield, Kyly C; Chapman, Gwen E; Yada, Rickey Y; Kheang, Khin Meng; Louise, Jennie; Summerlee, Alastair J; Armstrong, Gavin R; Green, Timothy J

    2017-08-01

    Background: Anemia affects 45% of women of childbearing age in Cambodia. Iron supplementation is recommended in populations in which anemia prevalence is high. However, there are issues of cost, distribution, and adherence. A potential alternative is a reusable fish-shaped iron ingot, which, when added to the cooking pot, leaches iron into the fluid in which it is prepared. Objective: We sought to determine whether there was a difference in hemoglobin concentrations in rural Cambodian anemic women (aged 18-49 y) who cooked with the iron ingot or consumed a daily iron supplement compared with a control after 1 y. Design: In Preah Vihear, 340 women with mild or moderate anemia were randomly assigned to 1 ) an iron-ingot group, 2 ) an iron-supplement (18 mg/d) group, or 3 ) a nonplacebo control group. A venous blood sample was taken at baseline and at 6 and 12 mo. Blood was analyzed for hemoglobin, serum ferritin, and serum transferrin receptor. Hemoglobin electrophoresis was used to detect structural hemoglobin variants. Results: Anemia prevalence was 44% with the use of a portable hemoglobinometer during screening. At baseline, prevalence of iron deficiency was 9% on the basis of a low serum ferritin concentration. There was no significant difference in mean hemoglobin concentrations between the iron-ingot group (115 g/L; 95% CI: 113, 118 g/L; P = 0.850) or iron-supplement group (115 g/L; 95% CI: 113, 117 g/L; P = 0.998) compared with the control group (115 g/L; 95% CI: 113, 117 g/L) at 12 mo. Serum ferritin was significantly higher in the iron-supplement group (73 μg/L; 95% CI: 64, 82 μg/L; P = 0.002) than in the control group at 6 mo; however, this significance was not maintained at 12 mo (73 μg/L; 95% CI: 58, 91 μg/L; P = 0.176). Conclusions: Neither the iron ingot nor iron supplements increased hemoglobin concentrations in this population at 6 or 12 mo. We do not recommend the use of the fish-shaped iron ingot in Cambodia or in countries where the prevalence

  8. Influence of artistic gymnastics on iron nutritional status and exercise-induced hemolysis in female athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sureira, Thaiz Mattos; Amancio, Olga Silverio; Pellegrini Braga, Josefina Aparecida

    2012-08-01

    This study evaluates the relationship between body iron losses and gains in artistic gymnastics female athletes. It shows that despite the low iron intake and exercise-induced hemolysis, iron deficiency or iron-deficiency anemia does not occur, but partial changes in the hematological profile do. The hypothesis that gymnasts' nutritional behavior contributes to anemia, which may be aggravated by exercise-induced hemolysis, led to this cross-sectional study, conducted with 43 female artistic gymnasts 6-16 yr old. The control group was formed by 40 nontraining girls, paired by age. Hemogram, serum iron, ferritin, soluble transferrin receptor, haptoglobin, total and fractional bilirubin, Type I urine, and parasitologic and occult fecal blood tests were evaluated. The athletes presented mean hematimetric and serum iron values (p = .020) higher than those of the control group. The bilirubin result discarded any hemolytic alteration in both groups. The haptoglobin results were lower in the athlete group (p = .002), confirming the incidence of exercise-induced hemolysis. Both groups presented low iron intake. The results suggest that artistic gymnastics practice leads to exercise-induced hemolysis and partially changes the hematological profile, although not causing iron deficiency or iron-deficiency anemia, even in the presence of low iron intake.

  9. Iron Overload and Chelation Therapy in Non-Transfusion Dependent Thalassemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bou-Fakhredin, Rayan; Bazarbachi, Abdul-Hamid; Chaya, Bachar; Sleiman, Joseph; Cappellini, Maria Domenica; Taher, Ali T

    2017-12-20

    Iron overload (IOL) due to increased intestinal iron absorption constitutes a major clinical problem in patients with non-transfusion-dependent thalassemia (NTDT), which is a cumulative process with advancing age. Current models for iron metabolism in patients with NTDT suggest that suppression of serum hepcidin leads to an increase in iron absorption and subsequent release of iron from the reticuloendothelial system, leading to depletion of macrophage iron, relatively low levels of serum ferritin, and liver iron loading. The consequences of IOL in patients with NTDT are multiple and multifactorial. Accurate and reliable methods of diagnosis and monitoring of body iron levels are essential, and the method of choice for measuring iron accumulation will depend on the patient's needs and on the available facilities. Iron chelation therapy (ICT) remains the backbone of NTDT management and is one of the most effective and practical ways of decreasing morbidity and mortality. The aim of this review is to describe the mechanism of IOL in NTDT, and the clinical complications that can develop as a result, in addition to the current and future therapeutic options available for the management of IOL in NTDT.

  10. Iron Overload and Chelation Therapy in Non-Transfusion Dependent Thalassemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rayan Bou-Fakhredin

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Iron overload (IOL due to increased intestinal iron absorption constitutes a major clinical problem in patients with non-transfusion-dependent thalassemia (NTDT, which is a cumulative process with advancing age. Current models for iron metabolism in patients with NTDT suggest that suppression of serum hepcidin leads to an increase in iron absorption and subsequent release of iron from the reticuloendothelial system, leading to depletion of macrophage iron, relatively low levels of serum ferritin, and liver iron loading. The consequences of IOL in patients with NTDT are multiple and multifactorial. Accurate and reliable methods of diagnosis and monitoring of body iron levels are essential, and the method of choice for measuring iron accumulation will depend on the patient’s needs and on the available facilities. Iron chelation therapy (ICT remains the backbone of NTDT management and is one of the most effective and practical ways of decreasing morbidity and mortality. The aim of this review is to describe the mechanism of IOL in NTDT, and the clinical complications that can develop as a result, in addition to the current and future therapeutic options available for the management of IOL in NTDT.

  11. Development and Evaluation of a Manganese and Iron Food Frequency Questionnaire for Pediatrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zipkin, Frida B; Falciglia, Grace A; Kuhnell, Pierce; Haynes, Erin N

    2017-09-14

    Manganese (Mn) is an essential nutrient, but overexposure can lead to neurotoxicity. Given the essentiality of Mn in the diet, particularly during children's growth and development, it is imperative to quantify dietary Mn intake in populations that may be exposed to industrial sources of Mn. Dietary absorption of Mn is inversely associated with iron (Fe) stores, yet there is currently no food frequency questionnaire (FFQ) to assess dietary Mn and Fe intake. The study objective was to develop and evaluate the validity of a FFQ to measure dietary Mn and Fe intake in pediatrics by comparing the estimated intakes of Mn and Fe with biomarkers: Mn in blood and hair and Fe in serum. This study utilized a subset of the Communities Actively Researching Exposure Study (CARES) population residing in Guernsey County, Ohio. Dietary Mn was not correlated with either blood or hair Mn; however, dietary Mn and serum ferritin were significantly correlated, with a correlation coefficient of 0.51, p < 0.01. Moreover, dietary Fe and serum ferritin were also significantly correlated, with a correlation coefficient of 0.51, p < 0.01. This FFQ is a valid measurement tool for Fe intake as measured by serum ferritin