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Sample records for serratia marcescens polyribosome

  1. [Efflux systems in Serratia marcescens].

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    Mardanova, A M; Bogomol'naia, L M; Romanova, Iu D; Sharipova, M R

    2014-01-01

    A widespread bacterium Serratia marcescens (family Enterobacteriaceae) is an opportunistic and exhibits multiple drug resistance. Active removal of antibiotics and other antimicrobials from pathogen and exhibits multiple drug resistance. Active removal of antibiotics and other antimicrobials from the cells by efflux systems is one of the mechanisms responsible for microbial resistance to these compounds. Among enterobacteria, efflux systems of Escherichia coli and Salmonella enterica var. Typhimurium have been studied most extensively. Few efflux systems that belong to different families have been reported for S. marcescens. In this review, we analyzed available literature about S. marcescens efflux systems and carried out the comparative analysis of the genes encoding the RND type systems in different Serratia species and in other enterobacteria. Bioinformatical analysis of the S. marcescens genome allowed us to identify the previously unknown efflux systems based on their homology with the relevant E. coli genes. Identification of additional efflux systems in S. marcescens genome will promote our understanding of physiology of these bacteria, will detect new molecular mechanisms of resistance and will reveal their resistance potential.

  2. Sepse por Serratia marcescens KPC Serratia marcescens KPC sepsis

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    Pedro Fernandez Del Peloso; Matheus Felipe Leal de Barros; Fernanda Abreu dos Santos

    2010-01-01

    A resistência aos carbapenems entre as bactérias não fermentadoras de glicose é comumente descrita. Porém, os relatos de resistência aos carbapenems em enterobactérias ainda são fatos isolados. Neste relato de caso, descrevemos um caso de infecção generalizada por Serratia marcescens carreadora de gene blaKPC. No Brasil, já foram relatados casos de isolados de Klebsiella pneumoniae e Escherichia coli carreando gene blaKPC, ficando evidente a emergência desse tipo de carbapenemase e sua dissem...

  3. Chitinase Production by Serratia marcescens GG5

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    Singh, Gursharan; SHARMA, Joginder Ram; HOONDAL, Gurinder Singh

    2014-01-01

    Swollen chitin, flake chitin, powder chitin, and mushroom paste were used as substrates for chitinase production by Serratia marcescens GG5 in submerged fermentation. Enzyme production was 0.3 U/ml when the organism was grown in M9 medium supplemented with 0.5% swollen chitin and 0.5% soluble starch. Scanning electron microscopy revealed that Serratia marcescens GG5 digested the chitin flakes by producing chitinase.

  4. Killing of Serratia marcescens biofilms with chloramphenicol.

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    Ray, Christopher; Shenoy, Anukul T; Orihuela, Carlos J; González-Juarbe, Norberto

    2017-03-29

    Serratia marcescens is a Gram-negative bacterium with proven resistance to multiple antibiotics and causative of catheter-associated infections. Bacterial colonization of catheters mainly involves the formation of biofilm. The objectives of this study were to explore the susceptibility of S. marcescens biofilms to high doses of common antibiotics and non-antimicrobial agents. Biofilms formed by a clinical isolate of S. marcescens were treated with ceftriaxone, kanamycin, gentamicin, and chloramphenicol at doses corresponding to 10, 100 and 1000 times their planktonic minimum inhibitory concentration. In addition, biofilms were also treated with chemical compounds such as polysorbate-80 and ursolic acid. S. marcescens demonstrated susceptibility to ceftriaxone, kanamycin, gentamicin, and chloramphenicol in its planktonic form, however, only chloramphenicol reduced both biofilm biomass and biofilm viability. Polysorbate-80 and ursolic acid had minimal to no effect on either planktonic and biofilm grown S. marcescens. Our results suggest that supratherapeutic doses of chloramphenicol can be used effectively against established S. marcescens biofilms.

  5. Pink Breast Milk: Serratia marcescens Colonization

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    Cipatli Ayuzo del Valle; Emilio Treviño Salinas

    2014-01-01

    Background - Breast milk can turn pink with Serratia marcescens colonization, this bacterium has been associated with several diseases and even death. It is seen most commonly in the intensive care settings. Discoloration of the breast milk can lead to premature termination of nursing. We describe two cases of pink-colored breast milk in which S. marsescens was isolated from both the expressed breast milk. Antimicrobial treatment was administered to the mothers. Return to breastfeeding was su...

  6. Antibiotic susceptibility of Serratia marcescens and Serratia liquefaciens.

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    Traub, W H

    2000-01-01

    Over a period of 20 years, a total of 1,603 Serratia isolates were recovered from clinical specimens and examined for susceptibility to 29 antimicrobial drugs using the Bauer-Kirby agar disk diffusion test. Serratia marcescens was recovered most frequently (n = 1,409), followed by S. liquefaciens (n = 172); other Serratia species were scarce. During the 2-decade observation period there occurred 35 putative episodes/clusters of nosocomial cross-infection and 1 pseudo-outbreak due to S. marcescens, but none due to S. liquefaciens. The antimicrobial susceptibility data for S. marcescens and S. liquefaciens were subdivided into two observation periods: I = 1980-1993, and II = 1993-1999. The crude data (series A) obtained for S. marcescens were corrected in two ways: by the omission of repetitive patient isolates (series B) and the additional removal of outbreak isolates except for index case isolates (series C). Comparison of data obtained in series IC and IIC disclosed an increase in the susceptibility of S. marcescens to ampicillin + sulbactam, cefotaxime, chloramphenicol, doxycycline, fosfomycin, gentamicin, piperacillin, piperacillin + tazobactam, timentin and tobramycin during observation period II. Conversely, there was a decrease in susceptibility to ciprofloxacin, nalidixic acid and trovafloxacin, and slightly diminished susceptibility to norfloxacin and ofloxacin during observation period II as compared with the previous period. The crude data obtained for S. liquefaciens required no correction, as there were only a few repeat isolates. There was an increase in susceptibility to ampicillin, ampicillin + sulbactam, cefuroxime, doxycycline, fosfomycin, nitrofurantoin and polymyxin B (clear inhibition zones). However, there was an inexplicable decrease in susceptibility to piperacillin + tazobactam. Cocarde growth around polymyxin B disks was noted with 55.8% of the S. marcescens isolates as compared with 6.8% of the S. liquefaciens isolates. Slime around

  7. Biological activity of Serratia marcescens cytotoxin

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    G.V. Carbonell

    2003-03-01

    Full Text Available Serratia marcescens cytotoxin was purified to homogeneity by ion-exchange chromatography on a DEAE Sepharose Fast Flow column, followed by gel filtration chromatography on a Sephadex G100 column. The molecular mass of the cytotoxin was estimated to be about 50 kDa. Some biological properties of the cytotoxin were analyzed and compared with well-characterized toxins, such as VT1, VT2 and CNF from Escherichia coli and hemolysin produced by S. marcescens. The sensitivity of the cell lines CHO, HeLa, HEp-2, Vero, BHK-21, MA 104 and J774 to the cytotoxin was determined by the cell viability assay using neutral red. CHO and HEp-2 were highly sensitive, with massive cellular death after 1 h of treatment, followed by BHK-21, HeLa, Vero and J774 cells, while MA 104 was insensitive to the toxin. Cytotoxin induced morphological changes such as cell rounding with cytoplasmic retraction and nuclear compactation which were evident 15 min after the addition of cytotoxin. The cytotoxic assays show that 15 min of treatment with the cytotoxin induced irreversible intoxication of the cells, determined by loss of cell viability. Concentrations of 2 CD50 (0.56 µg/ml of purified cytotoxin did not present any hemolytic activity, showing that the cytotoxin is distinct from S. marcescens hemolysin. Antisera prepared against S. marcescens cytotoxin did not neutralize the cytotoxic activity of VT1, VT2 or CNF toxin, indicating that these toxins do not share antigenic determinants with cytotoxin. Moreover, we did not detect gene sequences for any of these toxins in S. marcescens by PCR assay. These results suggest that S. marcescens cytotoxin is not related to any of these toxins from E. coli.

  8. Pink Breast Milk: Serratia marcescens Colonization

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    Cipatli Ayuzo del Valle

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Background - Breast milk can turn pink with Serratia marcescens colonization, this bacterium has been associated with several diseases and even death. It is seen most commonly in the intensive care settings. Discoloration of the breast milk can lead to premature termination of nursing. We describe two cases of pink-colored breast milk in which S. marsescens was isolated from both the expressed breast milk. Antimicrobial treatment was administered to the mothers. Return to breastfeeding was successful in both the cases. Conclusions - Pink breast milk is caused by S. marsescens colonization. In such cases,early recognition and treatment before the development of infection is recommended to return to breastfeeding.

  9. Pink Breast Milk: Serratia marcescens Colonization.

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    Valle, Cipatli Ayuzo Del; Salinas, Emilio Treviño

    2014-11-01

    Background Breast milk can turn pink with Serratia marcescens colonization, this bacterium has been associated with several diseases and even death. It is seen most commonly in the intensive care settings. Discoloration of the breast milk can lead to premature termination of nursing. We describe two cases of pink-colored breast milk in which S. marsescens was isolated from both the expressed breast milk. Antimicrobial treatment was administered to the mothers. Return to breastfeeding was successful in both the cases. Conclusions Pink breast milk is caused by S. marsescens colonization. In such cases,early recognition and treatment before the development of infection is recommended to return to breastfeeding.

  10. Cysteine Biosynthesis Controls Serratia marcescens Phospholipase Activity.

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    Anderson, Mark T; Mitchell, Lindsay A; Mobley, Harry L T

    2017-08-15

    Serratia marcescens causes health care-associated opportunistic infections that can be difficult to treat due to a high incidence of antibiotic resistance. One of the many secreted proteins of S. marcescens is the PhlA phospholipase enzyme. Genes involved in the production and secretion of PhlA were identified by screening a transposon insertion library for phospholipase-deficient mutants on phosphatidylcholine-containing medium. Mutations were identified in four genes (cyaA, crp, fliJ, and fliP) that are involved in the flagellum-dependent PhlA secretion pathway. An additional phospholipase-deficient isolate harbored a transposon insertion in the cysE gene encoding a predicted serine O-acetyltransferase required for cysteine biosynthesis. The cysE requirement for extracellular phospholipase activity was confirmed using a fluorogenic phospholipase substrate. Phospholipase activity was restored to the cysE mutant by the addition of exogenous l-cysteine or O-acetylserine to the culture medium and by genetic complementation. Additionally, phlA transcript levels were decreased 6-fold in bacteria lacking cysE and were restored with added cysteine, indicating a role for cysteine-dependent transcriptional regulation of S. marcescens phospholipase activity. S. marcescenscysE mutants also exhibited a defect in swarming motility that was correlated with reduced levels of flhD and fliA flagellar regulator gene transcription. Together, these findings suggest a model in which cysteine is required for the regulation of both extracellular phospholipase activity and surface motility in S. marcescensIMPORTANCESerratia marcescens is known to secrete multiple extracellular enzymes, but PhlA is unusual in that this protein is thought to be exported by the flagellar transport apparatus. In this study, we demonstrate that both extracellular phospholipase activity and flagellar function are dependent on the cysteine biosynthesis pathway. Furthermore, a disruption of cysteine biosynthesis

  11. Serratia marcescens harboring SME-4 in Brazil: A silent threat.

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    Cayô, Rodrigo; Leme, Rodrigo Cuiabano Paes; Streling, Ana Paula; Matos, Adriana Pereira; Nodari, Carolina Silva; Chaves, Jessica Reis Esteves; Brandão, Jorge Luiz Ferreira; de Almeida, Maíra Fernandes; Carrareto, Valério; de Castro Pereira, Marco Aurélio; de Almeida, Jean Pierre Aquino; Ferreira, Demian Candido; Gales, Ana Cristina

    2017-04-01

    The intrinsic polymyxin resistance displayed by Serratia marcescens makes the acquisition of carbapenemase encoding genes a worrisome event. This study report a SME-4-producing S. marcescens isolate causing septic shock in Brazil. The insertion of novel resistance determinants and their consequent spread in our territory is noteworthy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Intracranial complications of Serratia marcescens infection in neonates.

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    Madide, Ayanda; Smith, Johan

    2016-03-15

    Even though Serratia marcescens is not one of the most common causes of infection in neonates, it is associated with grave morbidity and mortality. We describe the evolution of brain parenchymal affectation observed in association with S. marcescens infection in neonates. This retrospective case series details brain ultrasound findings of five neonates with hospital-acquired S. marcescens infection. Neonatal S. marcescens infection with or without associated meningitis can be complicated by brain parenchymal affectation, leading to cerebral abscess formation. It is recommended that all neonates with this infection should undergo neuro-imaging more than once before discharge from hospital; this can be achieved using bedside ultrasonography.

  13. Endemic Serratia marcescens in a neonatal intensive care unit.

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    Dhiraputra, Chertsak; Tribuddharat, Chanwit; Pongpech, Pintip; Chokephaibulkit, Kulkunya; Danchaivijitr, Somwang

    2005-12-01

    To study the endemicity of Serratia marcescens in a neonatal intensive care unit (N.I.C.U). During the first 4 months of 2001, neonates in the N.I.C.U. in a teaching hospital were screened for S. marcescens by serial throat swabs and collections of other appropriate clinical specimens. Environmental cultures were also done in the same period. Isolated S. marcescens were tested for antimicrobial susceptibility and for genotyping by pulsed field gel electrophoresis. During the period, 104 neonates were studied. S. marcescens were isolated in 34.6% of the cases. Environmental cultures were positive for S. marcescens in 1.4%. There were 10 patterns of antibiogram of the 190 strains isolated. All strains belonged to pulsotype A. The study confirmed that S. marcescens was endemic in the N.I.C.U. and belonged to one genotype.

  14. Serratia marcescens is injurious to intestinal epithelial cells.

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    Ochieng, John B; Boisen, Nadia; Lindsay, Brianna; Santiago, Araceli; Ouma, Collins; Ombok, Maurice; Fields, Barry; Stine, O Colin; Nataro, James P

    2014-01-01

    Diarrhea causes substantial morbidity and mortality in children in low-income countries. Although numerous pathogens cause diarrhea, the etiology of many episodes remains unknown. Serratia marcescens is incriminated in hospital-associated infections, and HIV/AIDS associated diarrhea. We have recently found that Serratia spp. may be found more commonly in the stools of patients with diarrhea than in asymptomatic control children. We therefore investigated the possible enteric pathogenicity of S. marcescens in vitro employing a polarized human colonic epithelial cell (T84) monolayer. Infected monolayers were assayed for bacterial invasion, transepithelial electrical resistance (TEER), cytotoxicity, interleukin-8 (IL-8) release and morphological changes by scanning electron microscopy. We observed significantly greater epithelial cell invasion by S. marcescens compared to Escherichia coli strain HS (p = 0.0038 respectively). Cell invasion was accompanied by reduction in TEER and secretion of IL-8. Lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) extracellular concentration rapidly increased within a few hours of exposure of the monolayer to S. marcescens. Scanning electron microscopy of S. marcescens-infected monolayers demonstrated destruction of microvilli and vacuolization. Our results suggest that S. marcescens interacts with intestinal epithelial cells in culture and induces dramatic alterations similar to those produced by known enteric pathogens.

  15. USE OF A NATURAL DYE FROM SERRATIA MARCESCENS SUBSPECIES MARCESCENS IN DYEING OF TEXTILE FABRICS

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    Ravindra Adivarekar; Jyoti Vaidyanathan; Madhura Nerurkar

    2013-01-01

    A strain of Serratia marcescens subspecies marcescens capable of producing a novel rose red pigment with a mass of 112 Da has been isolated from Mahim Mangroove soil. Studies regarding the growth conditions of bacteria, partial characterization of the produced pigment and use of this rose red pigment to dye natural fabrics has been studied and described. Dyeing of wool, cotton and silk fabrics with this rose red microbial pigment as natural dye indicated that the colour strength values and t...

  16. Draft Genome Sequence of Serratia marcescens Strain LCT-SM213

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Yajuan; Yuan, Yanting; Zhou, Lisha; Su, Qingqing; Fang, Xiangqun; Li, Tianzhi; Wang, Junfeng; Chang, De; Su, Longxiang; Xu, Guogang; Guo, Yinghua; Yang, Ruifu; Liu, Changting

    2012-01-01

    Serratia marcescens is a species of Gram-negative, rod-shaped bacterium of the family Enterobacteriaceae. S. marcescens can cause nosocomial infections, particularly catheter-associated bacteremia, urinary tract infections, and wound infections. Here, we present the draft genome sequence of Serratia marcescens strain LCT-SM213, which was isolated from CGMCC 1.1857.

  17. Non-contiguous multifocal vertebral osteomyelitis caused by Serratia marcescens.

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    Lau, Jen Xin; Li, Jordan Yuanzhi; Yong, Tuck Yean

    2015-03-01

    Serratia marcescens is a common nosocomial infection but a rare cause of osteomyelitis and more so of vertebral osteomyelitis. Vertebral osteomyelitis caused by this organism has been reported in few studies. We report a case of S. marcescens vertebral discitis and osteomyelitis affecting multiple non-contiguous vertebras. Although Staphylococcus aureus is the most common cause of vertebral osteomyelitis, rare causes, such as S. marcescens, need to be considered, especially when risk factors such as intravenous heroin use, post-spinal surgery and immunosuppression are present. Therefore, blood culture and where necessary biopsy of the infected region should be undertaken to establish the causative organism and determine appropriate antibiotic susceptibility. Prompt diagnosis of S. marcescens vertebral osteomyelitis followed by the appropriate treatment can achieve successful outcomes.

  18. Risk factors for mortality in patients with Serratia marcescens bacteremia.

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    Kim, Sun Bean; Jeon, Yong Duk; Kim, Jung Ho; Kim, Jae Kyoung; Ann, Hea Won; Choi, Heun; Kim, Min Hyung; Song, Je Eun; Ahn, Jin Young; Jeong, Su Jin; Ku, Nam Su; Han, Sang Hoon; Choi, Jun Yong; Song, Young Goo; Kim, June Myung

    2015-03-01

    Over the last 30 years, Serratia marcescens (S. marcescens) has emerged as an important pathogen, and a common cause of nosocomial infections. The aim of this study was to identify risk factors associated with mortality in patients with S. marcescens bacteremia. We performed a retrospective cohort study of 98 patients who had one or more blood cultures positive for S. marcescens between January 2006 and December 2012 in a tertiary care hospital in Seoul, South Korea. Multiple risk factors were compared with association with 28-day all-cause mortality. The 28-day mortality was 22.4% (22/98 episodes). In a univariate analysis, the onset of bacteremia during the intensive care unit stay (p=0.020), serum albumin level (p=0.011), serum C-reactive protein level (p=0.041), presence of indwelling urinary catheter (p=0.023), and Sequential Oran Failure Assessment (SOFA) score at the onset of bacteremia (pmarcescens bacteremia.

  19. A rare pathogen for subacute osteomyelitis in adolescent: Serratia marcescens.

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    Turgut, Necmettin; Akgul, Turgut; Arzu, Ufuk; Batıbay, Sefa Giray; Ekinci, Mehmet; Şen, Cengiz; Korkmaz, Murat

    2015-01-01

    There are various pathogens reported for osteomyelitis. Osteomyelitis is bone infection which produces pain and fever, also threatens bone instability. It can lead to nonunion. The purpose of this report was to describe a case with union delay of the tibia due to serratia marcescens osteomyelitis. Serratia marcescens is an unexpected pathogen for subacute osteomyelitis in adolescence. Because of difficulty of diagnosis, treatment can be delayed or the situation can cause complications like nonunion or loss of function. Serratia marcescens is an unexpected pathogen for subacute osteomyelitis in adolescence. Because of difficulty of diagnosis, treatment can be delayed or cause complications like nonunion or loss of function. We present a meningomyelocele female adolescent operated with distal tibia varus osteotomy for correcting ankle valgus deformity. Insufficient healing was determined at osteotomy side on radiographs. The patient's erythrocyte sedimentation rate and CRP level was slightly higher with minimal clinical inflammation. MRI examination showed abscess formation at T2 imaging. Debridement, grafting and circular external fixation was performed. Sulperazon was started for drug therapy. Union was achieved after compression and distraction osteogenesis by circular external fixator. Orthopedic surgeons should be aware of opportunistic infections like serratia and keep in mind as a probable cause of disease. Osteomyelitis is one of our main problems in orthopedics. Serratia does not come to mind as a causative factor when we learn the patient has osteomyelitis. We give treatment for the most expected pathogens like staphylococcus species firstly. This shows us the importance of bone biopsies and wound culture tests. Presented case is diagnosed as serratia osteomyelitis after culture results and given treatment with antibiotics and debridement. Orthopedic surgeons should be aware of opportunistic infections like serratia and keep in mind when diagnosing the

  20. STRUCTURAL AND PHYSICOCHEMICAL SURFACE-PROPERTIES OF SERRATIA-MARCESCENS STRAINS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VANDERMEI, HC; COWAN, MM; GENET, MJ; ROUXHET, PG; BUSSCHER, HJ

    1992-01-01

    Serratia marcescens is an important pathogen with noteworthy hydrophobicity characteristics as assessed by microbial adhesion to hydrocarbons. However, the present knowledge on the surface characteristics of S. marcescens strains does not include physicochemical properties relevant for adhesion such

  1. Fatal Serratia marcescens meningitis and myocarditis in a patient with an indwelling urinary catheter.

    OpenAIRE

    Johnson, J S; Croall, J; Power, J S; Armstrong, G. R.

    1998-01-01

    Serratia marcescens is commonly isolated from the urine of patients with an indwelling urinary catheter and in the absence of symptoms is often regarded as a contaminant. A case of fatal Serratia marcescens septicaemia with meningitis, brain abscesses, and myocarditis discovered at necropsy is described. The patient was an 83 year old man with an indwelling urinary catheter who suffered from several chronic medical conditions and from whose urine Serratia marcescens was isolated at the time o...

  2. Cerebral abscess caused by Serratia marcescens in a premature neonate Abscesso cerebral causado por Serratia marcescens em prematuro

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    Tatiana Mattos Hirooka

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cerebral abscesses are extremely rare in neonates. Serratia marcescens is an unusual cause of sepsis and neurological spread is especially ominous. PURPOSE: To report the case of a 34-week neonate who developed this rare condition and to discuss diagnostic and therapeutic measures. CASE REPRT: A 34-week male neonate sequentially developed respiratory distress syndrome, early sepsis and necrotizing enterocolitis; later cultures revealed S. marcescens. After deterioration, a cerebral abscess became evident, which revealed S. marcescens. Clinical improvement ensued after high-dose amikacin and meropenem. CONCLUSION: Clinical signs are often non-specific. Proper diagnostic measures, neurosurgical consultation and aggressive antibiotic therapy are essential for these high-risk neonates.INTRODUÇÃO: Abscessos cerebrais são extremamente raros em neonatos. Serratia marcescens é causadora incomum de sepse nestes pacientes e a disseminação no sistema nervoso central é grave. OBJETIVO: Relatar um prematuro de 34 semanas que desenvolveu esta condição e discutir as medidas diagnósticas e terapêuticas. RELATO DE CASO: Prematuro masculino de 34 semanas desenvolveu síndrome do desconforto respiratório, sepse neonatal e enterocolite necrotizante; hemoculturas revelaram S. marcescens. Após deterioração clínica, evidenciou-se um abscesso cerebral cuja drenagem revelou S. marcescens. Houve melhora após introdução de amicacina e meropenem. CONCLUSÃO: Os sinais clínicos são inespecíficos. Passos diagnósticos apropriados, avaliação neurocirúrgica precoce e antibioticoterapia agressiva são essenciais para estes prematuros.

  3. Identification of a Csr system in Serratia marcescens 2170.

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    Ito, Manabu; Nomura, Kazuki; Sugimoto, Hayuki; Watanabe, Takeshi; Suzuki, Kazushi

    2014-01-01

    The carbon storage regulator (Csr) global regulatory system is conserved in many eubacteria and coordinates the expression of various genes that facilitate adaptation during the major physiological growth phase. The Csr system in Escherichia coli comprises an RNA-binding protein, CsrA; small non-coding RNAs, CsrB and CsrC; and a decay factor for small RNAs, CsrD. In this study, we identified the Csr system in Serratia marcescens 2170. S. marcescens CsrA was 97% identical to E. coli CsrA. CsrB and CsrC RNAs had typical stem-loop structures, including a GGA motif that is the CsrA binding site. CsrD was composed of N-terminal two times transmembrane region and HAMP-like, GGDEF, and EAL domains. Overexpression of S. marcescens csr genes complemented the phenotype of E. coli csr mutants. S. marcescens CsrD affected the decay of CsrB and CsrC RNAs in E. coli. These results suggest that the Csr system in S. marcescens is composed of an RNA-binding protein, two Csr small RNAs, and a decay factor for Csr small RNAs.

  4. Analytical modeling and experimental characterization of chemotaxis in Serratia marcescens

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    Zhuang, Jiang; Wei, Guopeng; Wright Carlsen, Rika; Edwards, Matthew R.; Marculescu, Radu; Bogdan, Paul; Sitti, Metin

    2014-05-01

    This paper presents a modeling and experimental framework to characterize the chemotaxis of Serratia marcescens (S. marcescens) relying on two-dimensional and three-dimensional tracking of individual bacteria. Previous studies mainly characterized bacterial chemotaxis based on population density analysis. Instead, this study focuses on single-cell tracking and measuring the chemotactic drift velocity VC from the biased tumble rate of individual bacteria on exposure to a concentration gradient of l-aspartate. The chemotactic response of S. marcescens is quantified over a range of concentration gradients (10-3 to 5 mM/mm) and average concentrations (0.5×10-3 to 2.5 mM). Through the analysis of a large number of bacterial swimming trajectories, the tumble rate is found to have a significant bias with respect to the swimming direction. We also verify the relative gradient sensing mechanism in the chemotaxis of S. marcescens by measuring the change of VC with the average concentration and the gradient. The applied full pathway model with fitted parameters matches the experimental data. Finally, we show that our measurements based on individual bacteria lead to the determination of the motility coefficient μ (7.25×10-6 cm2/s) of a population. The experimental characterization and simulation results for the chemotaxis of this bacterial species contribute towards using S. marcescens in chemically controlled biohybrid systems.

  5. Serratia marcescens meningitis: epidemiology, prognostic factors and treatment outcomes.

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    Wu, Yen-Mu; Hsu, Po-Chang; Yang, Chien-Chang; Chang, Hong-Jyun; Ye, Jung-Jr; Huang, Ching-Tai; Lee, Ming-Hsun

    2013-08-01

    Serratia marcescens is a rare pathogen of central nervous system infections. This study was to investigate the epidemiology, prognostic factors, and treatment outcomes of S. marcescens meningitis. This retrospective analysis included 33 patients with culture-proven S. marcescens meningitis hospitalized between January 2000 and June 2011. Of the 33 patients enrolled, only one did not receive neurosurgery before the onset of S. marcescens meningitis. Patients with S. marcescens meningitis had higher ratios of brain solid tumors (54.5%) and neurosurgery (97.0%) with a mortality rate of 15.2%. The mean interval between the first neurosurgical procedure and the diagnosis of meningitis was 17.1 days (range, 4-51 days). Only one third-generation cephalosporin-resistant S. marcescens isolate was recovered from the patients' cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) specimens. Compared with the favorable outcome group (n = 20), the unfavorable outcome group (n = 13) had a higher percentage of brain solid tumors, more intensive care unit stays, and higher Sequential Organ Failure Assessment score, CSF lactate and serum C-reactive protein concentrations at diagnosis of meningitis. Under the multiple regression analysis, CSF lactate concentration ≥2-fold the upper limit of normal (ULN) was independently associated with unfavorable outcomes (odds ratio, 7.20; 95% confidence interval, 1.08-47.96; p = 0.041). S. marcescens meningitis is highly associated with neurosurgical procedures for brain solid tumors. CSF lactate concentration ≥2x ULN may predict an unfavorable outcome. Its mortality is not high and empiric treatment with parenteral third-generation cephalosporins may have a satisfactory clinical response. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  6. ISOLATION AND CHARACTERIZATION OF A NOVEL BENZOATE- UTILIZING Serratia marcescens

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    ANTONIUS SUWANTO

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available A new benzoate-utilizing strain, Serratia marcescens DS-8, isolated from the environment was characterized. The strain was enterobacilli, Gram negative, mesophilic, non ha lophilic, and aerobic bacterium that showed motile ovale-rod shaped cells. The isolate produced extracellular chitinase, protease, and prodigiosin (a red pigment pr oduced by several Serratia strains yielding bright red or pink colonies. A physiological assay using Microbact* test showed that the strain was closely related to Klebsiella ozaenae (49.85% and Serratia liquefaciens (24.42%, respectively. However, 16S rRNA sequence analysis indicated that the strain was closely related to S. marcescens DSM 30121 with similarity level of 98%. DS-8 strain was able to synthesize its own vitamins. Optimum growth in benzoate was obtained at pH between 7-8.5 and NaCl concentration of 1- 1.5% (w/v. The isolate could grow in benzoate-containing medium up to 10 mM. Other carbon sources that could support the growth of DS-8 were casamino acid, glutamate, glucose, acetate, potato star ch, and ethanol.

  7. Marvelous but Morbid: Infective endocarditis due to Serratia marcescens

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    Phadke, Varun K.; Jacob, Jesse T.

    2016-01-01

    A 46-year-old man with HIV infection and active intravenous drug use presented with approximately two weeks of fevers and body aches. On physical examination he was somnolent, had a new systolic murmur, bilateral conjunctival hemorrhages, diffuse petechiae, and left-sided arm weakness. Echocardiography revealed a large mitral valve vegetation and brain imaging demonstrated numerous embolic infarctions. Blood cultures grew Serratia marcescens. Despite aggressive treatment with meropenem the patient died due to intracranial hemorrhage complicated by herniation. Serratia marcescens is an uncommon cause of infective endocarditis. While this disease has historically been associated with intravenous drug use, more recent reports suggest that it is now largely a consequence of opportunistic infections of the chronically ill. Our case highlights several characteristic features of this infection, including isolation of a non-pigmented strain of the organism, an antibiotic susceptibility profile suggestive of AmpC β-lactamase production, and rapid clinical deterioration with multiple embolic complications resulting in death. In this review we discuss the history, epidemiology, and management of endovascular infections due to Serratia spp., emphasizing the continued importance of considering this organism in the differential diagnosis of endocarditis among intravenous drug users and as a potential indication for surgical therapy. PMID:27346925

  8. Prolonged outbreak of Serratia marcescens in Tartu University Hospital: a case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamson, Vivika; Mitt, Piret; Pisarev, Heti; Metsvaht, Tuuli; Telling, Kaidi; Naaber, Paul; Maimets, Matti

    2012-10-31

    The aim of our study was to investigate and control an outbreak and identify risk factors for colonization and infection with Serratia marcescens in two departments in Tartu University Hospital. The retrospective case-control study was conducted from July 2005 to December 2006. Molecular typing by pulsed field gel electrophoresis was used to confirm the relatedness of Serratia marcescens strains. Samples from the environment and from the hands of personnel were cultured. The outbreak involved 210 patients, 61 (29%) developed an infection, among them 16 were invasive infections. Multivariate analysis identified gestational age, arterial catheter use and antibiotic treatment as independent risk factors for colonization and infection with Serratia marcescens. Molecular typing was performed on 83 Serratia marcescens strains, 81 of them were identical and 2 strains were different. Given the occasionally severe consequences of Serratia marcescens in infants, early implementation of aggressive infection control measures involving patients and mothers as well as the personnel is of utmost importance.

  9. Serratia marcescens endogenous endophthalmitis in an immunocompetent host.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Memon, Muhammad; Raman, Vasant

    2016-01-20

    A systemically well 66-year-old white Caucasian man presented to the urgent care department with a short history of progressive pain and blurring of vision in his left eye. He denied a history of trauma, intraocular surgery or use of illicit drugs. He was diagnosed with endogenous endophthalmitis. Vitreous biopsy grew Serratia marcescens, a Gram negative bacteria. In spite of extensive investigation, there was no obvious source of infection. He had an indwelling urine catheter for prostate hypertrophy, but urine culture was negative. There was no evidence of immunocompromise. He was treated with systemic as well as intravitreal antibiotics. In spite of appropriate treatment, the patient lost vision. S. marcescens endophthalmitis, seen even in immunocompetent people, carries a poor visual prognosis. 2016 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  10. Pink hypopyon in a patient with Serratia marcescens corneal ulceration

    OpenAIRE

    Stefater, James A; Borkar, Durga S.; Chodosh, James

    2015-01-01

    A 65-year-old woman presented to the emergency ward at the Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary with 2 days of redness, irritation, photophobia, and diminished vision in her left eye. She was found to have a large central corneal ulcer with a small hypopyon. On the following day, after initiation of broad-spectrum antibiotics, the patient had improved symptoms but now had a 2-mm hypopyon that was distinctly pink in color. Cultures were positive for Serratia marcescens. A pink hypopyon, a rare ...

  11. Ocorrência de Serratia marcescens bizio sobre lagartas de Heliothis virescens (Fabr. Occurrence of Serratia marcescens bizio on Heliothis virescens (Fabr.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margarida Fumiko Ito

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available Observou-se, em laboratório, grande número de lagartas mortas em uma criação de Heliothis virescens (Fabr.. Dessas lagartas, isolou-se uma bactéria, posteriormente identificada como Serratia marcescens Bizio. O presente trabalho registra sua ocorrência e comprova-lhe a patogenicidade sobre aquelas lagartas.A large quantity of dead worms was observed in rearing of Heliothis virescens. A bacteria, later identified as Serratia marcescens Bizio, was isolated from the dead worms. The present work registers the occurrence and confirms the pathogenicity of S. marcescens on H. virescens.

  12. Batch growth kinetic studies of locally isolated cyanide-degrading Serratia marcescens strain AQ07

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Karamba, Kabiru Ibrahim; Ahmad, Siti Aqlima; Zulkharnain, Azham; Yasid, Nur Adeela; Ibrahim, Salihu; Shukor, Mohd Yunus

    2018-01-01

    The evaluation of degradation and growth kinetics of Serratia marcescens strain AQ07 was carried out using three half-order models at all the initial concentrations of cyanide with the values of regression exceeding 0.97...

  13. Rapid evolutionary adaptation to elevated salt concentrations in pathogenic freshwater bacteria Serratia marcescens

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ketola, Tarmo; Hiltunen, Teppo

    2014-01-01

    .... We tested this hypothesis with a 133‐day‐long evolutionary experiment studying the evolution of the pathogenic Serratia marcescens bacterium at salinity niche boundary and in fluctuating conditions. We found...

  14. [Serratia marcescens outbreak in Neonatal Intensive Care Unit: Guayaquil, Ecuador].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soria, Claudia; Nieto, Nelson; Villacís, José E; Lainez, Sara; Cartelle, Mónica

    2016-12-01

    We report a Serratia marcescens outbreak occurred in the NICU of a pediatric hospital in Guayaquil, Ecuador. Nine cases of infection were detected, from which septicemia was developed in 55.5%. The index case was a newborn derived from another institution with septic arthritis caused by the outbreak strain. The infection rate was 17.6% and mortality rate was 33.3%. All isolates were resistant to aminoglycosides and susceptible to third generation cephalosporins and carbapenems. Clonality analysis by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) revealed the presence of two closely related clones confirming the horizontal spread. Measures were taken by the committee such as: strengthening the hand hygiene, patient hygiene and cohort studies of gastrointestinal colonization, which allowed the control of the outbreak.

  15. Genomic, Physiologic, and Symbiotic Characterization of Serratia marcescens Strains Isolated from the Mosquito Anopheles stephensi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shicheng; Blom, Jochen; Walker, Edward D

    2017-01-01

    Strains of Serratia marcescens, originally isolated from the gut lumen of adult female Anopheles stephensi mosquitoes, established persistent infection at high rates in adult A. stephensi whether fed to larvae or in the sugar meal to adults. By contrast, the congener S. fonticola originating from Aedes triseriatus had lower infection in A. stephensi, suggesting co-adaptation of Serratia strains in different species of host mosquitoes. Coinfection at high infection rate in adult A. stephensi resulted after feeding S. marcescens and Elizabethkingia anophelis in the sugar meal, but when fed together to larvae, infection rates with E. anophelis were much higher than were S. marcescens in adult A. stephensi, suggesting a suppression effect of coinfection across life stages. A primary isolate of S. marcescens was resistant to all tested antibiotics, showed high survival in the mosquito gut, and produced alpha-hemolysins which contributed to lysis of erythrocytes ingested with the blood meal. Genomes of two primary isolates from A. stephensi, designated S. marcescens ano1 and ano2, were sequenced and compared to other Serratia symbionts associated with insects, nematodes and plants. Serratia marcescens ano1 and ano2 had predicted virulence factors possibly involved in attacking parasites and/or causing opportunistic infection in mosquito hosts. S. marcescens ano1 and ano2 possessed multiple mechanisms for antagonism against other microorganisms, including production of bacteriocins and multi-antibiotic resistance determinants. These genes contributing to potential anti-malaria activity including serralysins, hemolysins and chitinases are only found in some Serratia species. It is interesting that genome sequences in S. marcescens ano1 and ano2 are distinctly different from those in Serratia sp. Ag1 and Ag2 which were isolated from Anopheles gambiae. Compared to Serratia sp. Ag1 and Ag2, S. marcescens ano1 and ano2 have more rRNAs and many important genes involved in

  16. Severe Osteomyelitis and Septic Arthritis due to Serratia marcescens in an Immunocompetent Patient

    OpenAIRE

    Hiba Hadid; Muhammad Usman; Sudeep Thapa

    2015-01-01

    Septic arthritis and osteomyelitis due to Serratia marcescens in immunocompetent patients without risk factors are extremely rare. Here, we report a case of septic arthritis and severe adjacent osteomyelitis of the tibia due to Serratia marcescens in a diabetic community-dweller patient. The patient had no contact with healthcare workers or facilities and had no chronic disease except for poorly controlled diabetes. Without predisposing risk factors, this type of infection is extremely rare, ...

  17. Severe Osteomyelitis and Septic Arthritis due to Serratia marcescens in an Immunocompetent Patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadid, Hiba; Usman, Muhammad; Thapa, Sudeep

    2015-01-01

    Septic arthritis and osteomyelitis due to Serratia marcescens in immunocompetent patients without risk factors are extremely rare. Here, we report a case of septic arthritis and severe adjacent osteomyelitis of the tibia due to Serratia marcescens in a diabetic community-dweller patient. The patient had no contact with healthcare workers or facilities and had no chronic disease except for poorly controlled diabetes. Without predisposing risk factors, this type of infection is extremely rare, even in diabetics.

  18. Severe Osteomyelitis and Septic Arthritis due to Serratia marcescens in an Immunocompetent Patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiba Hadid

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Septic arthritis and osteomyelitis due to Serratia marcescens in immunocompetent patients without risk factors are extremely rare. Here, we report a case of septic arthritis and severe adjacent osteomyelitis of the tibia due to Serratia marcescens in a diabetic community-dweller patient. The patient had no contact with healthcare workers or facilities and had no chronic disease except for poorly controlled diabetes. Without predisposing risk factors, this type of infection is extremely rare, even in diabetics.

  19. Pathogenicity of Isolates of Serratia Marcescens towards Larvae of the Scarab Phyllophaga Blanchardi (Coleoptera)

    OpenAIRE

    Mónica L. Pineda-Castellanos; Zitlhally Rodríguez-Segura; Villalobos, Francisco J.; Luciano Hernández; Laura Lina; M. Eugenia Nuñez-Valdez

    2015-01-01

    Serratia marcescens is a Gram negative bacterium (Enterobacteriaceae) often associated with infection of insects. In order to find pathogenic bacteria with the potential to control scarab larvae, several bacterial strains were isolated from the hemocoel of diseased Phyllophaga spp (Coleoptera:Scarabaeidae) larvae collected from cornfields in Mexico. Five isolates were identified as Serratia marcescens by 16S rRNA gene sequencing and biochemical tests. Oral and injection bioassays using health...

  20. Serratamolide is a hemolytic factor produced by Serratia marcescens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert M Q Shanks

    Full Text Available Serratia marcescens is a common contaminant of contact lens cases and lenses. Hemolytic factors of S. marcescens contribute to the virulence of this opportunistic bacterial pathogen. We took advantage of an observed hyper-hemolytic phenotype of crp mutants to investigate mechanisms of hemolysis. A genetic screen revealed that swrW is necessary for the hyper-hemolysis phenotype of crp mutants. The swrW gene is required for biosynthesis of the biosurfactant serratamolide, previously shown to be a broad-spectrum antibiotic and to contribute to swarming motility. Multicopy expression of swrW or mutation of the hexS transcription factor gene, a known inhibitor of swrW expression, led to an increase in hemolysis. Surfactant zones and expression from an swrW-transcriptional reporter were elevated in a crp mutant compared to the wild type. Purified serratamolide was hemolytic to sheep and murine red blood cells and cytotoxic to human airway and corneal limbal epithelial cells in vitro. The swrW gene was found in the majority of contact lens isolates tested. Genetic and biochemical analysis implicate the biosurfactant serratamolide as a hemolysin. This novel hemolysin may contribute to irritation and infections associated with contact lens use.

  1. Power generation by flagella-propelled Serratia Marcescens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Trung-Hieu; Kim, Min Jun; Byun, Doyoung

    2010-11-01

    In this study, we present electrical power generation by using swimming Serratia marcescens which is a rod shaped bacterium species and has about 10 um long and about 20 nm thin helical filaments. Flow in micro channel is driven by bacteria attached on the wall, which is around 25 to 50 μm/sec. The driven electrolyte solution flow (buffer solution containing high concentration of S. marcescens) may be considered as movement of conductor. If we place permanent magnets on the top and bottom of the micro channel and electrodes on side walls in the micro channel, electrical current could be generated by the principle of Lorentz force acting on the moving charges. The potential between the two electrodes was measured to be up to 10mV and the electrical current was about 10pA with external load 50 Ohm. Even if the energy generated by bacteria swimming is small, it demonstrated the possible generation of power, which requires in-depth further research.

  2. Relapse of Serratia marcescens sternal osteitis 15 years after the first episode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paquin, Axelle; Lepelletier, Didier; Leprince, Céline; Chamoux, Catherine; Treilhaud, Michèle; Despins, Philippe; Reynaud, Alain; Corvec, Stéphane

    2012-01-01

    Sternal osteitis, a potential consequence of cardiac surgery, remains rare. The bacteria involved belong mostly to the genus Staphylococcus. Sternal infections caused by Serratia marcescens are exceptional. We report an unusual recurrence of sternal infection with S. marcescens, 15 years after the initial episode. The identities of the isolates were determined by genomic analysis.

  3. CHITINASE-B FROM SERRATIA-MARCESCENS-BJL200 IS EXPORTED TO THE PERIPLASM WITHOUT PROCESSING

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    BRURBERG, MB; EIJSINK, VGH; HAANDRIKMAN, AJ; VENEMA, G; NES, IF

    A gene encoding a chitinase from Serratia marcescens BJL200 was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli and S. marcescens. Nucleotide sequencing revealed an open reading frame encoding a 55.5 kDa protein of 499 amino acids without a typical signal peptide for export. The cellular localization of

  4. Relapse of Serratia marcescens Sternal Osteitis 15 Years after the First Episode

    OpenAIRE

    Paquin, Axelle; Lepelletier, Didier; Leprince, Céline; Chamoux, Catherine; Treilhaud, Michèle; Despins, Philippe; Alain REYNAUD; Corvec, Stéphane

    2012-01-01

    Sternal osteitis, a potential consequence of cardiac surgery, remains rare. The bacteria involved belong mostly to the genus Staphylococcus. Sternal infections caused by Serratia marcescens are exceptional. We report an unusual recurrence of sternal infection with S. marcescens, 15 years after the initial episode. The identities of the isolates were determined by genomic analysis.

  5. Serratia marcescens Bullous Cellulitis in a Splenectomized Patient: A Case Report and Review of the Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fournier, John B; Dabiri, Ganary; Thomas, Vinod; Skowron, Gail; Carson, Polly; Falanga, Vincent

    2016-06-01

    Serratia marcescens is a Gram-negative bacillus belonging to the Enterobacteriaceae family. Cutaneous infection with Serratia is rare, and usually occurs in immunocompromised individuals. Primary cutaneous infections are uncommon, but they are typically severe and are associated with significant morbidity and mortality. The pathogenetic factors leading to S. marcescens infection are not fully understood, but contributing virulence factors include proteases, secreted exotoxins, and the formation of biofilm. We report a case of cellulitis occurring in a splenectomized patient, which led to multiple wound debridements and a transmetatarsal amputation. This dramatic case led us to review the published literature on soft tissue infections caused by S. marcescens. © The Author(s) 2016.

  6. Skin ulcers caused by Serratia marcescens: three cases and a review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veraldi, Stefano; Nazzaro, Gianluca

    2016-08-01

    Serratia marcescens is a Gram-negative, encapsulated, motile, anaerobic, non-sporulating bacillus that belongs to the Enterobacteriaceae family. It is found in water, soil, plants, food, and garbage. S. marcescens is an opportunistic pathogen. It usually causes nosocomial infections, such as lung and genitourinary infections, sinusitis, otitis, endocarditis, and sepsis. Skin infections caused by S. marcescens are rare. To describe three new cases of skin ulcers of the leg caused by S. marcescens and review the relevant literature. We investigated three patients admitted for ulcers on the leg. In two patients, post-traumatic aetiology was concluded. The modality of infection was not identified for the other patient. One patient was diabetic. All patients recovered with specific antibiotic therapy (ciprofloxacin, ceftriaxone and levofloxacin, respectively). Skin ulcers due to S. marcescens are very rare. The three cases presented here add to the limited literature of skin infections caused by S. marcescens.

  7. A case of pulmonary Serratia marcescens granuloma radiologically mimicking metastatic malignancy and tuberculosis infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Joyutpal; Layton, Benjamin; Lamb, Harriet; Sinnott, Nicola; Leahy, Bernard C

    2015-11-01

    Serratia marcescens is a saprophytic gram-negative bacillus capable of causing a wide range of infections. A 57-year-old female was admitted to our hospital for four weeks with community acquired pneumonia. A chest x-ray, six weeks after discharge, demonstrated multiple, bilateral 'cannon ball'-like opacities and mediastinal lymphadenopathy which were highly suspicious of disseminated malignancy or tuberculosis. The only symptom that this patient had was a productive cough. She had multiple commodities, but no specific immunodeficiency disorder. Interestingly, her sputum and bronchial washing samples grew S. marcescens. The computed tomography-guided lung biopsy demonstrated necrotic granulomatous changes. There was no pathological evidence of tuberculosis or fungal infection, malignancy or vasculitis. There are only a handful of reported cases of Serratia granulomas. Thus, we are reporting a rare instance of pulmonary Serratia marcescens granuloma radiologically mimicking metastatic malignancy and tuberculosis infection. © The Author(s) 2015.

  8. Identification of a methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus inhibitory compound isolated from Serratia marcescens

    OpenAIRE

    Kadouri, Daniel E.; Shanks, Robert M. Q.

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we identified an antimicrobial compound produced by the Gram-negative bacterium Serratia marcescens. Colonies of S. marcescens inhibited the growth of nine different methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) isolates and several other tested Gram-positive bacterial species, but not Gram-negative bacteria. Genetic analysis revealed the requirement for the swrW gene which codes for a non-ribosomal peptide synthetase that generates the cyclodepsipeptide antibiotic serrata...

  9. Rapid evolutionary adaptation to elevated salt concentrations in pathogenic freshwater bacteria Serratia marcescens

    OpenAIRE

    Ketola, Tarmo; Hiltunen, Teppo

    2014-01-01

    Rapid evolutionary adaptions to new and previously detrimental environmental conditions can increase the risk of invasion by novel pathogens. We tested this hypothesis with a 133-day-long evolutionary experiment studying the evolution of the pathogenic Serratia marcescens bacterium at salinity niche boundary and in fluctuating conditions. We found that S. marcescens evolved at harsh (80 g/L) and extreme (100 g/L) salt conditions had clearly improved salt tolerance than those evolved in the ot...

  10. Severe Acute Infection Due to Serratia marcescens Causing Respiratory Distress in An Immunocompetent Adult.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-Sada, Pablo; Escalante, Mikel; Lizarralde, Eva

    2016-01-01

    The role of Serratia marcescens changed from a harmless saprophytic microorganism to an important opportunistic human pathogen. It often causes nosocomial device-associated outbreaks and rarely serious invasive community acquired infections. We present a case of a community-acquired Serratia marcescens bacteremia leading to Respiratory Distress Syndrome in a previously healthy 51-year-old man without identifiable risk factors. Full recovery was achieved with solely medical treatment and observation in ICU during three days. To our knowledge it is an extremely uncommon presentation and just few cases have been previously reported in the literature.

  11. Characterization of putative virulence factors of Serratia marcescens strain SEN for pathogenesis in Spodoptera litura.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aggarwal, Chetana; Paul, Sangeeta; Tripathi, Vishwas; Paul, Bishwajeet; Khan, Md Aslam

    2017-02-01

    Two Serratia marcescens strains, SEN and ICC-4, isolated from diseased insect cadavers were observed to differ considerably in their virulence towards Spodoptera litura. The present study was aimed to characterize the possible virulence factors present in the virulent Serratia marcescens strain SEN. Both the S. marcescens strains were evaluated for the presence of various lytic enzymes such as chitinase, lipase, protease and phospholipase. The virulent S. marcescens strain SEN was observed to possess considerably higher activity of chitinase and protease enzymes; activity of phospholipase enzyme was also higher. Although, all the three toxin genes shlA, phlA and swr could be detected in both the S. marcescens strains, there was a higher expression of these genes in the virulent strain SEN. S. marcescens strain ICC-4 showed greater reduction in overall growth yield in the post-exponential phase in the presence of midgut juice and hemolymph of S. litura larvae, as compared to S. marcescens strain SEN. Proliferation of the S. marcescens strain SEN was also considerably higher in foregut, midgut and hemolymph of S. litura larvae, as compared to strain ICC-4. Peritrophic membrane treated with broth culture of the S. marcescens strain SEN showed higher damage as compared to strain ICC-4. The peritrophic membrane of larvae fed on diet treated with the virulent strain showed considerable damage while the peritrophic membrane of larvae fed on diet treated with the non-virulent strain showed no damage. This is the first report documenting the fate of ingested S. marcescens in S. litura gut and the relative expression of toxin genes from two S. marcescens strains differing in their virulence towards S. litura. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Aromatic-Mediated Carbohydrate Recognition in Processive Serratia marcescens Chitinases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jana, Suvamay; Hamre, Anne Grethe; Wildberger, Patricia; Holen, Matilde Mengkrog; Eijsink, Vincent G H; Beckham, Gregg T; Sørlie, Morten; Payne, Christina M

    2016-02-25

    Microorganisms use a host of enzymes, including processive glycoside hydrolases, to deconstruct recalcitrant polysaccharides to sugars. Processive glycoside hydrolases closely associate with polymer chains and repeatedly cleave glycosidic linkages without dissociating from the crystalline surface after each hydrolytic step; they are typically the most abundant enzymes in both natural secretomes and industrial cocktails by virtue of their significant hydrolytic potential. The ubiquity of aromatic residues lining the enzyme catalytic tunnels and clefts is a notable feature of processive glycoside hydrolases. We hypothesized that these aromatic residues have uniquely defined roles, such as substrate chain acquisition and binding in the catalytic tunnel, that are defined by their local environment and position relative to the substrate and the catalytic center. Here, we investigated this hypothesis with variants of Serratia marcescens family 18 processive chitinases ChiA and ChiB. We applied molecular simulation and free energy calculations to assess active site dynamics and ligand binding free energies. Isothermal titration calorimetry provided further insight into enthalpic and entropic contributions to ligand binding free energy. Thus, the roles of six aromatic residues, Trp-167, Trp-275, and Phe-396 in ChiA, and Trp-97, Trp-220, and Phe-190 in ChiB, have been examined. We observed that point mutation of the tryptophan residues to alanine results in unfavorable changes in the free energy of binding relative to wild-type. The most drastic effects were observed for residues positioned at the "entrances" of the deep substrate-binding clefts and known to be important for processivity. Interestingly, phenylalanine mutations in ChiA and ChiB had little to no effect on chito-oligomer binding, in accordance with the limited effects of their removal on chitinase functionality.

  13. Necrotizing Fasciitis of the Lower Extremity Caused by Serratia marcescens A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heigh, Evelyn G; Maletta-Bailey, April; Haight, John; Landis, Gregg S

    2016-03-01

    Necrotizing fasciitis is a rare and potentially fatal infection, with mortality of up to 30%. This case report describes a patient recovering from a laryngectomy for laryngeal squamous cell cancer who developed nosocomial necrotizing fasciitis of the lower extremity due to Serratia marcescens . Only eight cases of necrotizing fasciitis exclusive to the lower extremity due to S marcescens have been previously reported. Patients with S marcescens necrotizing fasciitis of the lower extremity often have multiple comorbidities, are frequently immunosuppressed, and have a strikingly high mortality rate.

  14. The red pigment prodigiosin is not an essential virulence factor in entomopathogenic Serratia marcescens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Wei; Li, JingHua; Chen, Jie; Liu, XiaoYuan; Xiang, TingTing; Zhang, Lin; Wan, YongJi

    2016-05-01

    Although pigments produced by pathogenic microbes are generally hypothesized as essential virulence factors, the role of red pigment prodigiosin in the pathogenesis of entomopathogenic Serratia marcescens is not clear. In this study, we analyzed the pathogenicity of different pigmented S. marcescens strains and their non-pigmented mutants in silkworms. Each pigmented strain and the corresponding non-pigmented mutants showed very similar LD50 value (statistically no difference), but caused very different symptom (color of the dead larva). Our results clearly indicated that the red pigment prodigiosin is not an essential virulence factor in entomopathogenic S. marcescens. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Necrotizing fasciitis due to Serratia marcescens: case report and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majumdar, Rohit; Crum-Cianflone, Nancy F

    2016-06-01

    Necrotizing fasciitis is a severe, life-threatening infection.  Serratia marcescens, a Gram-negative bacterium, is an extremely rare cause of necrotizing fasciitis. A case of S. marcescens necrotizing fasciitis is described, and a comprehensive review of the literature (1966-2015) of monomicrobial cases due to this organism performed. We report the first case of S. marcescens necrotizing fasciitis in the setting of calciphylaxis associated with end-stage renal disease.  A comprehensive review of the literature of S. marcescens necrotizing fasciitis is provided to enhance the awareness of this increasingly recognized infection, and to provide a concise summary of risk factors, treatment, and outcome. Our case and review highlight the potential risk factors for S. marcescens necrotizing fasciitis, including underlying renal disease and open wounds, and demonstrate the emergence of this organism as a cause of severe, life-threatening soft tissue infections.

  16. Ozone Sensitivity and Catalase Activity in Pigmented and Non-Pigmented Strains of Serratia Marcescens

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Ondarza, José

    2017-01-01

    Background: Ozone exposure rapidly leads to bacterial death, making ozone an effective disinfectant in food industry and health care arena. However, microbial defenses may moderate this effect and play a role in the effective use of oxidizing agents for disinfection. Serratia marcescens is an opportunistic pathogen, expressing genes differentially during infection of a human host. A better understanding of regulatory systems that control expression of Serratia’s virulence genes and defenses is therefore valuable. Objective: Here, we investigated the role of pigmentation and catalase in Serratia marcescens on survival to ozone exposure. Method: Pigmented and non-pigmented strains of Serratia marcescens were cultured to exponential or stationary phase and exposed to 5 ppm of gaseous ozone for 2.5 – 10 minutes. Survival was calculated via plate counts. Catalase activity was measured photometrically and tolerance to hydrogen peroxide was assayed by disk-diffusion. Results: Exposure of S. marcescens to 5 ppm gaseous ozone kills > 90% of cells within 10 minutes in a time and concentration-dependent manner. Although pigmented Serratia (grown at 28°C) survived ozonation better than unpigmented Serratia (grown at 35°C), non-pigmented mutant strains of Serratia had similar ozone survival rates, catalase activity and H2O2 tolerance as wild type strains. Rather, ozone survival and catalase activity were elevated in 6 hour cultures compared to 48 hour cultures. Conclusion: Our studies did not bear out a role for prodigiosin in ozone survival. Rather, induction of oxidative stress responses during exponential growth increased both catalase activity and ozone survival in both pigmented and unpigmented S. marcescens. PMID:28567147

  17. The Use of Crude Shrimp Shell Powder for Chitinase Production by Serratia marcescens WF

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesús E. Mejía-Saulés

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available From 102 Serratia marcescens strains screened, 57 strains showed chitinase activity and Serratia marcescens WF showed the highest chitinolytic activity so this strain was selected for further study on the use of crude shrimp waste for chitinase production. The concentration of crude shrimp shell content at 10–70 g/L, incubation temperature of 28–37 °C, pH=6–9, and time 24–96 h on kinetics of chitinase production by S. marcescens WF were evaluated. The maximal chitinase production related to process variables was obtained with the second order polynomial model: dry shrimp shell powder at 6 %, pH=6.5, temperature of 28 °C during fermentation for up to 72 h.

  18. Necrotizing cellulitis with multiple abscesses on the leg caused by Serratia marcescens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hau, Estelle; Bouaziz, Jean-David; Lafaurie, Matthieu; Saussine, Anne; Masson, Vincent; Rausky, Jonathan; Bagot, Martine; Guibal, Fabien

    2016-03-01

    Serratia marcescens is an unusual cause of severe skin infection initially described in immunocompromised patients. We report a case of necrotizing cellulitis of the leg caused by S marcescens in a 68-year-old woman with diabetes mellitus and a history of chronic lymphoedema of the leg. We reviewed the literature and found 49 cases of severe skin infections from S marcescens that included 20 cases of necrotizing fasciitis (NF) as well as 29 cases of severe skin infections without NF (non-NF cases). Patients were immunocompromised in 59% to 70% of cases. The mortality rate was high in NF cases (60%) versus non-NF cases (3%). Surgery was required in 95% of NF cases and in 24% of non-NF cases. The other clinical manifestations of S marcescens skin infection reported in the literature included disseminated papular eruptions in patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus with folliculitis on the trunk. Serratia marcescens is naturally resistant to amoxicillin alone and amoxicillin associated with clavulanic acid. Broad-spectrum antibiotics are indicated to treat S marcescens skin infections, and surgery should be promptly considered in cases of severe skin infections if appropriate antibiotic therapy does not lead to rapid improvement.

  19. Premature termination of nursing secondary to Serratia marcescens breast pump contamination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faro, Jonathan; Katz, Allan; Berens, Pamela; Ross, Patti Jayne

    2011-02-01

    Serratia marcescens, a known pathogen associated with postpartum mastitis, may be identified by its characteristic pigmentation. A 36-year-old P0102 woman presented postpartum and said that her breast pump tubing had turned bright pink. S marcescens was isolated, indicating colonization. She was started on antibiotics. After viewing an Internet report in which a patient nearly died from a Serratia infection, she immediately stopped breastfeeding. Serratia colonization may be noted before the development of overt infection. Because this pathogen can be associated with mastitis, physicians should be ready to treat and should encourage patients to continue nursing after clearance of the organism. Exposure to sensational Internet reports may make treatment recommendations difficult.

  20. Mechanisms of Bacterial (Serratia marcescens) Attachment to, Migration along, and Killing of Fungal Hyphae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hover, Tal; Maya, Tal; Ron, Sapir; Sandovsky, Hani; Shadkchan, Yana; Kijner, Nitzan; Mitiagin, Yulia; Fichtman, Boris; Harel, Amnon; Shanks, Robert M Q; Bruna, Roberto E; García-Véscovi, Eleonora; Osherov, Nir

    2016-05-01

    We have found a remarkable capacity for the ubiquitous Gram-negative rod bacterium Serratia marcescens to migrate along and kill the mycelia of zygomycete molds. This migration was restricted to zygomycete molds and several basidiomycete species. No migration was seen on any molds of the phylum Ascomycota. S. marcescens migration did not require fungal viability or surrounding growth medium, as bacteria migrated along aerial hyphae as well.S. marcescens did not exhibit growth tropism toward zygomycete mycelium. Bacterial migration along hyphae proceeded only when the hyphae grew into the bacterial colony. S. marcescens cells initially migrated along the hyphae, forming attached microcolonies that grew and coalesced to generate a biofilm that covered and killed the mycelium. Flagellum-defective strains of S. marcescens were able to migrate along zygomycete hyphae, although they were significantly slower than the wild-type strain and were delayed in fungal killing. Bacterial attachment to the mycelium does not necessitate type 1 fimbrial adhesion, since mutants defective in this adhesin migrated equally well as or faster than the wild-type strain. Killing does not depend on the secretion of S. marcescens chitinases, as mutants in which all three chitinase genes were deleted retained wild-type killing abilities. A better understanding of the mechanisms by which S. marcescens binds to, spreads on, and kills fungal hyphae might serve as an excellent model system for such interactions in general; fungal killing could be employed in agricultural fungal biocontrol. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  1. Anti-biofilm activity of Pseudoalteromonas flavipulchra SktPp1 against Serratia marcescens SMJ-11

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iqbal, Faiq; Usup, Gires; Ahmad, Asmat

    2015-09-01

    This study aimed to examine the anti-biofilm activity of Pseudoalteromonas flavipulchra SktPp1 crude extract against the biofilm producer, Serratia marcescens. The crude extract of P. flavipulchra SktPp1 was extracted with ethyl acetate. The sub-minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC), 0.1 mg/ml, has been used in this study. The anti-biofilm activity of P. flavipulchra SktPp1 crude extract was assessed against the biofilm of S. marcescens using the crystal violet assay. The growth curve has been used as the indicator of the effect of crude extracts to bacterial growth. The sub-MIC crude extract was tested against two of S. marcescens virulence factors, including the swarming ability and production of prodigiosin using the swarming assay and prodigiosin assay. The growth curves of S. marcescens indicated that the sub-MIC concentration of crude extract did not affect the growth of S. marcescens. The production of prodigiosin was reduced by 44%. The diameter of the swarming area was reduced from 8.7 cm to 0.8 cm. The sub-MIC crude extract inhibits 26.9% of the biofilm production in S. marcescens. This crude extract lost its activity at 50°C and above. In conclusion, crude extract of P. flavipulchra SktPp1 has the ability to inhibit S. marcescens SMJ-11 biofilm formation.

  2. ManA is regulated by RssAB signaling and promotes motility in Serratia marcescens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soo, Po-Chi; Horng, Yu-Tze; Chang, Yung-Lin; Tsai, Wei-Wen; Jeng, Wen-Yih; Lu, Chia-Chen; Lai, Hsin-Chih

    2014-01-01

    Serratia marcescens swarms on 0.8% LB agar at 30 °C but not at 37 °C. To understand the molecular mechanism regulating Serratia swarming, transposon mutagenesis was performed to screen for mutants that swarmed at 37 °C. In one mutant, S. marcescens WW100, the transposon was inserted in the upstream region of manA, which encodes mannose-6-phosphate isomerase, a type I phosphomannose isomerase. The transcriptional and translational levels of manA were higher in S. marcescens WW100 than in the wild-type strain. S. marcescens WW100 produced more serrawettin W1 (biosurfactant) than the wild-type, as detected by thin-layer chromatography, to promote surface motility by reducing surface tension. Serratia swarming was previously shown to be negatively regulated by the RssA-RssB two-component system. An electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA) indicated that phosphorylated RssB (the response regulator) binds upstream of the transposon insertion site and manA in S. marcescens WW100. Analysis by real-time RT-PCR (qRT-PCR) revealed that, compared to the wild-type level, manA mRNA was increased in the rssA deletion mutant. The results indicated that RssA-RssB signaling directly represses the expression of manA and that overexpression of manA increases the production of serrawettin for Serratia swarming at 37 °C. Copyright © 2013 Institut Pasteur. All rights reserved.

  3. Pathogenicity of Isolates of Serratia Marcescens towards Larvae of the Scarab Phyllophaga Blanchardi (Coleoptera)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pineda-Castellanos, Mónica L.; Rodríguez-Segura, Zitlhally; Villalobos, Francisco J.; Hernández, Luciano; Lina, Laura; Nuñez-Valdez, M. Eugenia

    2015-01-01

    Serratia marcescens is a Gram negative bacterium (Enterobacteriaceae) often associated with infection of insects. In order to find pathogenic bacteria with the potential to control scarab larvae, several bacterial strains were isolated from the hemocoel of diseased Phyllophaga spp (Coleoptera:Scarabaeidae) larvae collected from cornfields in Mexico. Five isolates were identified as Serratia marcescens by 16S rRNA gene sequencing and biochemical tests. Oral and injection bioassays using healthy Phyllophaga blanchardi larvae fed with the S. marcescens isolates showed different degrees of antifeeding effect and mortality. No insecticidal activity was observed for Spodoptera frugiperda larvae (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) by oral inoculation. S. marcescens (Sm81) cell-free culture supernatant caused significant antifeeding effect and mortality to P. blanchardi larvae by oral bioassay and also mortality by injection bioassay. Heat treated culture broths lost the ability to cause disease symptoms, suggesting the involvement of proteins in the toxic activity. A protein of 50.2 kDa was purified from the cell-free broth and showed insecticidal activity by injection bioassay towards P. blanchardi. Analysis of the insecticidal protein by tandem- mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) showed similarity to a Serralysin-like protein from S. marcescens spp. This insecticidal protein could have applications in agricultural biotechnology. PMID:25984910

  4. Pathogenicity of Isolates of Serratia Marcescens towards Larvae of the Scarab Phyllophaga Blanchardi (Coleoptera

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mónica L. Pineda-Castellanos

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Serratia marcescens is a Gram negative bacterium (Enterobacteriaceae often associated with infection of insects. In order to find pathogenic bacteria with the potential to control scarab larvae, several bacterial strains were isolated from the hemocoel of diseased Phyllophaga spp (Coleoptera:Scarabaeidae larvae collected from cornfields in Mexico. Five isolates were identified as Serratia marcescens by 16S rRNA gene sequencing and biochemical tests. Oral and injection bioassays using healthy Phyllophaga blanchardi larvae fed with the S. marcescens isolates showed different degrees of antifeeding effect and mortality. No insecticidal activity was observed for Spodoptera frugiperda larvae (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae by oral inoculation. S. marcescens (Sm81 cell-free culture supernatant caused significant antifeeding effect and mortality to P. blanchardi larvae by oral bioassay and also mortality by injection bioassay. Heat treated culture broths lost the ability to cause disease symptoms, suggesting the involvement of proteins in the toxic activity. A protein of 50.2 kDa was purified from the cell-free broth and showed insecticidal activity by injection bioassay towards P. blanchardi. Analysis of the insecticidal protein by tandem- mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS showed similarity to a Serralysin-like protein from S. marcescens spp. This insecticidal protein could have applications in agricultural biotechnology.

  5. Draft Whole-Genome Sequence of Serratia marcescens Strain RM66262, Isolated from a Patient with a Urinary Tract Infection

    OpenAIRE

    Bruna, Roberto E.; Revale, Santiago; Garc?a V?scovi, Eleonora; Mariscotti, Javier F.

    2015-01-01

    Serratia marcescens strains are ubiquitous bacteria isolated from environmental niches and also constitute emergent nosocomial opportunistic pathogens. Here, we report on the draft genome sequence of S.?marcescens strain RM66262, which was isolated from a patient with urinary tract infection in the Bacteriology Service of the Rosario National University, Rosario, Argentina.

  6. Three-Year Follow-up of an Outbreak of Serratia marcescens Bacteriuria in a Neurosurgical Intensive Care Unit

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Baek-Nam; Choi, Soon-Im; Ryoo, Nam-Hee

    2006-01-01

    We report on the investigations and interventions conducted to contain an extended outbreak of Serratia marcescens bacteriuria that lasted for years in a neurosurgical intensive care unit (NSICU). A case-control study was performed to identify the risk factors for S. marcescens acquisition in urine. In case patients, urine sampling for tests and central venous catheterization were performed more frequently before the isolation of S. marcescens. Case patients were more frequently prescribed th...

  7. The role of outer membrane in Serratia marcescens intrinsic resistance to antibiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez, L; Ruiz, N; Leranoz, S; Viñas, M; Puig, M

    1997-09-01

    Three different porins from Serratia marcescens were described. They were named Omp1, Omp2 and Omp3 and their molecular weights were 42, 40 and 39 kDa respectively. Omp2 and Omp3 showed osmoregulation and thermoregulation in a similar way to OmpC and OmpF of Escherichia coli. Permeability coefficients of the outer membrane of this species were calculated following the Zimmermann and Rosselet method. P values were similar to those obtained in Escherichia coli, which suggests that the chromosomal beta-lactamase would play a major role in the resistance of Serratia marcescens to beta-lactam antibiotics. Both MIC values and permeabilities were modified by salycilates and acetylsalycilate. Synergism between the outer membrane and the beta-lactamase was also evaluated. When bacteria grew in the presence of a beta-lactam in the medium, the beta-lactamase accounted for most of the resistance.

  8. Intra-specific diversity of Serratia marcescens in Anopheles mosquito midgut defines Plasmodium transmission capacity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bando, Hironori; Okado, Kiyoshi; Guelbeogo, Wamdaogo M.; Badolo, Athanase; Aonuma, Hiroka; Nelson, Bryce; Fukumoto, Shinya; Xuan, Xuenan; Sagnon, N'Fale; Kanuka, Hirotaka

    2013-01-01

    A critical stage in malaria transmission occurs in the Anopheles mosquito midgut, when the malaria parasite, Plasmodium, ingested with blood, first makes contact with the gut epithelial surface. To understand the response mechanisms within the midgut environment, including those influenced by resident microbiota against Plasmodium, we focus on a midgut bacteria species' intra-specific variation that confers diversity to the mosquito's competency for malaria transmission. Serratia marcescens isolated from either laboratory-reared mosquitoes or wild populations in Burkina Faso shows great phenotypic variation in its cellular and structural features. Importantly, this variation is directly correlated with its ability to inhibit Plasmodium development within the mosquito midgut. Furthermore, this anti-Plasmodium function conferred by Serratia marcescens requires increased expression of the flagellum biosynthetic pathway that is modulated by the motility master regulatory operon, flhDC. These findings point to new strategies for controlling malaria through genetic manipulation of midgut bacteria within the mosquito. PMID:23571408

  9. Antimicrobial effect and membrane-active mechanism of tea polyphenols against Serratia marcescens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Shumin; Wang, Wei; Bai, Fengling; Zhu, Junli; Li, Jianrong; Li, Xuepeng; Xu, Yongxia; Sun, Tong; He, Yutang

    2014-02-01

    In this study, we investigated the antimicrobial effect of tea polyphenols (TP) against Serratia marcescens and examined the related mechanism. Morphology changes of S. marcescens were first observed by transmission electron microscopy after treatment with TP, which indicated that the primary inhibition action of TP was to damage the bacterial cell membranes. The permeability of the outer and inner membrane of S. marcescens dramatically increased after TP treatment, which caused severe disruption of cell membrane, followed by the release of small cellular molecules. Furthermore, a proteomics approach based on two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and MALDI-TOF/TOF MS analysis was used to study the difference of membrane protein expression in the control and TP treatment S. marcescens. The results showed that the expression of some metabolism enzymes and chaperones in TP-treated S. marcescens significantly increased compared to the untreated group, which might result in the metabolic disorder of this bacteria. Taken together, our results first demonstrated that TP had a significant growth inhibition effect on S. marcescens through cell membrane damage.

  10. Response Mechanisms in Serratia marcescens IBBPo15 During Organic Solvents Exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stancu, Mihaela Marilena

    2016-12-01

    Serratia marcescens strain IBBPo15 (KT315653) which possesses serratiopeptidase (ser) gene (KT894207) exhibited good solvent tolerance. During the exposure of S. marcescens IBBPo15 cells to 5 % organic solvents, n-decane was less toxic for this bacterium, compared with n-hexane, cyclohexane, ethylbenzene, toluene, and styrene. The exposure of the S. marcescens IBBPo15 cells to n-hexane, cyclohexane, ethylbenzene, toluene, and styrene induced the formation of large clusters, while in control and n-decane-exposed cells, only organization into small clusters was observed. The data obtained suggested that S. marcescens IBBPo15 cells produced some secondary metabolites (i.e., surfactant serrawettin, red pigment prodigiosin) which are well known as valuable molecules due to their large applications. The exposure of the bacterial cells to organic solvents induced secondary metabolites profile modifications. However, S. marcescens IBBPo15 possesses only alkB1, todM, rhlAB, pswP, mpr, and ser genes, the unspecific amplification of other fragments being acquired also when the primers for alkM1, xylM, ndoM, and C23DO genes were used. Modifications of DNA patterns were not depicted in S. marcescens IBBPo15 cells exposed to organic solvents.

  11. Outbreak of Serratia marcescens postsurgical bloodstream infection due to contaminated intravenous pain control fluids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiang, Ping-Cherng; Wu, Tsu-Lan; Kuo, An-Jing; Huang, Yhu-Chering; Chung, Ting-Ying; Lin, Chun-Sui; Leu, Hsieh-Shong; Su, Lin-Hui

    2013-09-01

    Serratia marcescens is an important nosocomial pathogen causing significant outbreaks. Here we report an outbreak of bloodstream infection caused by S. marcescens at a 3500-bed hospital in Taiwan. The effective cooperative efforts of both laboratory personnel and infection control practitioners (ICPs) jointly contributed to the total control of the outbreak. A sudden increase in the isolation of S. marcescens from blood cultures was noted in the Clinical Microbiology Laboratory. The information was passed to the ICPs and an investigation was initiated. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis was used to study the relationships among the isolates. Pulsotype A was identified in 43 (82.7%) of the 52 blood isolates studied. They were isolated from 52 patients distributed across 22 wards that were surveyed by seven ICPs. All patients had undergone surgery before the infection, and fentanyl-containing intravenous fluids were used for pain control in 43 of them. Isolates from 42 belonged to pulsotype A. Three S. marcescens isolates, all from fentanyl-containing fluids and demonstrating pulsotype A, were identified from 251 environmental cultures. All fentanyl-containing fluids that were in use were withdrawn and the outbreak was stopped. The outbreak of S. marcescens bloodstream infection apparently occurred through the use of fentanyl-containing fluids contaminated by a pulsotype A S. marcescens. Copyright © 2013 International Society for Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Capsule Production and Glucose Metabolism Dictate Fitness during Serratia marcescens Bacteremia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark T. Anderson

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Serratia marcescens is an opportunistic pathogen that causes a range of human infections, including bacteremia, keratitis, wound infections, and urinary tract infections. Compared to other members of the Enterobacteriaceae family, the genetic factors that facilitate Serratia proliferation within the mammalian host are less well defined. An in vivo screen of transposon insertion mutants identified 212 S. marcescens fitness genes that contribute to bacterial survival in a murine model of bloodstream infection. Among those identified, 11 genes were located within an 18-gene cluster encoding predicted extracellular polysaccharide biosynthesis proteins. A mutation in the wzx gene contained within this locus conferred a loss of fitness in competition infections with the wild-type strain and a reduction in extracellular uronic acids correlating with capsule loss. A second gene, pgm, encoding a phosphoglucomutase exhibited similar capsule-deficient phenotypes, linking central glucose metabolism with capsule production and fitness of Serratia during mammalian infection. Further evidence of the importance of central metabolism was obtained with a pfkA glycolytic mutant that demonstrated reduced replication in human serum and during murine infection. An MgtB magnesium transporter homolog was also among the fitness factors identified, and an S. marcescens mgtB mutant exhibited decreased growth in defined medium containing low concentrations of magnesium and was outcompeted ~10-fold by wild-type bacteria in mice. Together, these newly identified genes provide a more complete understanding of the specific requirements for S. marcescens survival in the mammalian host and provide a framework for further investigation of the means by which S. marcescens causes opportunistic infections.

  13. Capsule Production and Glucose Metabolism Dictate Fitness during Serratia marcescens Bacteremia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Mark T.; Mitchell, Lindsay A.; Zhao, Lili

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Serratia marcescens is an opportunistic pathogen that causes a range of human infections, including bacteremia, keratitis, wound infections, and urinary tract infections. Compared to other members of the Enterobacteriaceae family, the genetic factors that facilitate Serratia proliferation within the mammalian host are less well defined. An in vivo screen of transposon insertion mutants identified 212 S. marcescens fitness genes that contribute to bacterial survival in a murine model of bloodstream infection. Among those identified, 11 genes were located within an 18-gene cluster encoding predicted extracellular polysaccharide biosynthesis proteins. A mutation in the wzx gene contained within this locus conferred a loss of fitness in competition infections with the wild-type strain and a reduction in extracellular uronic acids correlating with capsule loss. A second gene, pgm, encoding a phosphoglucomutase exhibited similar capsule-deficient phenotypes, linking central glucose metabolism with capsule production and fitness of Serratia during mammalian infection. Further evidence of the importance of central metabolism was obtained with a pfkA glycolytic mutant that demonstrated reduced replication in human serum and during murine infection. An MgtB magnesium transporter homolog was also among the fitness factors identified, and an S. marcescens mgtB mutant exhibited decreased growth in defined medium containing low concentrations of magnesium and was outcompeted ~10-fold by wild-type bacteria in mice. Together, these newly identified genes provide a more complete understanding of the specific requirements for S. marcescens survival in the mammalian host and provide a framework for further investigation of the means by which S. marcescens causes opportunistic infections. PMID:28536292

  14. The role of Serratia marcescens in soft contact lens associated ocular infections. A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parment, P A

    1997-02-01

    Serratia marcescens is a Gram negative rod which for a century and a half was considered a harmless saphrophyte. However, medical technology and the use of antibacterial agents have created ecological niches for this bacterium, which is now a medical problem. The bacterium is encountered in connection with contact lens keratitis, often associated with contaminated contact lens solutions. The concentrations of chlorhexidin and thiomersal required in contact lens solution to suppress the bacterium have been proved toxic to the eye. Modern contact lens solutions with biguanids have rapid killing kinetics, while in solutions with polyquaternium S. marcescens can survive in reduced numbers for up to 72 hours. The adherence of a specific isolate of Serratia to hydrogel lenses increased with decreased water content of the lenses. However, there has been no correlation between hydrophobicity markers or hemagglutinins and adherence to contact lenses or urinary tract epithelium. When handling medical plastic devices, such as contact lenses, strictly enforced hygiene remains the most important method to combat environmental bacteria such as Serratia marcescens.

  15. Phylogeny of bacteria isolated from Rhabditis sp. (Nematoda) and identification of novel entomopathogenic Serratia marcescens strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tambong, James T

    2013-02-01

    Twenty-five bacterial strains isolated from entomopathogenic nematodes were characterized to the genus level by 16S rRNA phylogeny and BLAST analyses. Bacteria strains isolated could be affiliated with seven genera. Microbacterium-like isolates phylogenetically affiliated with M. oxydans while those of Serratia were highly similar to S. marcescens. 16S rRNA sequences of Bacillus isolates matched those of both B. mycoides and B. weihenstephanesis. One isolate each matched Pseudomonas mosselii, Rheinheimera aquimaris, Achromobacter marplatensis, or Staphylococcus hominis. Serratia isolates were examined further for their pathogenicity to Galleria mellonella larvae. All the Serratia isolates exhibited potent pathogenicity toward G. mellonella larvae and possessed a metalloprotease gene encoding for a novel serralysin-like protein. The nucleotide sequence of the metalloprotease gene had 60 synonymous and 8 nonsynonymous substitutions when compared to the closest genBank entry, S. marcescens E-15, with an insertion of a new aspartic acid residue. Tajima's test for equality of evolutionary rate was significant between the metalloprotease gene sequence of S. marcescens strain DOAB 216-82 (this study) and strain E-15. This new insecticidal metalloprotease gene and/or its product could have applications in agricultural biotechnology.

  16. Sepsis and Hemocyte Loss in Honey Bees (Apis mellifera) Infected with Serratia marcescens Strain Sicaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burritt, Nancy L; Foss, Nicole J; Neeno-Eckwall, Eric C; Church, James O; Hilger, Anna M; Hildebrand, Jacob A; Warshauer, David M; Perna, Nicole T; Burritt, James B

    2016-01-01

    Global loss of honey bee colonies is threatening the human food supply. Diverse pathogens reduce honey bee hardiness needed to sustain colonies, especially in winter. We isolated a free-living Gram negative bacillus from hemolymph of worker honey bees (Apis mellifera) found separated from winter clusters. In some hives, greater than 90% of the dying bees detached from the winter cluster were found to contain this bacterium in their hemolymph. Throughout the year, the same organism was rarely found in bees engaged in normal hive activities, but was detected in about half of Varroa destructor mites obtained from colonies that housed the septic bees. Flow cytometry of hemolymph from septic bees showed a significant reduction of plasmatocytes and other types of hemocytes. Interpretation of the16S rRNA sequence of the bacterium indicated that it belongs to the Serratia genus of Gram-negative Gammaproteobacteria, which has not previously been implicated as a pathogen of adult honey bees. Complete genome sequence analysis of the bacterium supported its classification as a novel strain of Serratia marcescens, which was designated as S. marcescens strain sicaria (Ss1). When compared with other strains of S. marcescens, Ss1 demonstrated several phenotypic and genetic differences, including 65 genes not previously found in other Serratia genomes. Some of the unique genes we identified in Ss1 were related to those from bacterial insect pathogens and commensals. Recovery of this organism extends a complex pathosphere of agents which may contribute to failure of honey bee colonies.

  17. Optimization of prodigiosin production by Serratia marcescens using crude glycerol and enhancing production using gamma radiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nora M. Elkenawy

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Prodigiosin is a red pigment produced by Serratia marcescens. Prodigiosin is regarded as a promising drug owing to its reported characteristics of possessing anti-microbial, anti-cancer, and immunosuppressive activity. A factorial design was applied to generate a set of 32 experimental combinations to study the optimal conditions for pigment production using crude glycerol obtained from local biodiesel facility as carbon source for the growth of Serratia marcescens. The maximum production (870 unit/cell was achieved at 22 °C, at pH 9 with the addition of 1% (w/v peptone and 109 cell/ml inoculum size after 6 days of incubation. Gamma radiation at dose 200 Gy was capable of doubling the production of the pigment using the optimized conditions and manipulating production temperature. Our results indicate that we have designed an economic medium supporting enhanced Serratia marcescens MN5 prodigiosin production giving an added value for crude glycerol obtained from biodiesel industry.

  18. Sepsis and Hemocyte Loss in Honey Bees (Apis mellifera Infected with Serratia marcescens Strain Sicaria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nancy L Burritt

    Full Text Available Global loss of honey bee colonies is threatening the human food supply. Diverse pathogens reduce honey bee hardiness needed to sustain colonies, especially in winter. We isolated a free-living Gram negative bacillus from hemolymph of worker honey bees (Apis mellifera found separated from winter clusters. In some hives, greater than 90% of the dying bees detached from the winter cluster were found to contain this bacterium in their hemolymph. Throughout the year, the same organism was rarely found in bees engaged in normal hive activities, but was detected in about half of Varroa destructor mites obtained from colonies that housed the septic bees. Flow cytometry of hemolymph from septic bees showed a significant reduction of plasmatocytes and other types of hemocytes. Interpretation of the16S rRNA sequence of the bacterium indicated that it belongs to the Serratia genus of Gram-negative Gammaproteobacteria, which has not previously been implicated as a pathogen of adult honey bees. Complete genome sequence analysis of the bacterium supported its classification as a novel strain of Serratia marcescens, which was designated as S. marcescens strain sicaria (Ss1. When compared with other strains of S. marcescens, Ss1 demonstrated several phenotypic and genetic differences, including 65 genes not previously found in other Serratia genomes. Some of the unique genes we identified in Ss1 were related to those from bacterial insect pathogens and commensals. Recovery of this organism extends a complex pathosphere of agents which may contribute to failure of honey bee colonies.

  19. Quorum Sensing Regulation of Adhesion in Serratia Marcescens MG1 is surface dependent

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Labbate, M.; Zhu, H.; Thung, L.

    2007-01-01

    not able to identify a single QS-regulated adhesin essential for attachment to the abiotic surface, four AHL-regulated genes involved in adhesion to the abiotic surface were identified. Interestingly, two of these genes, bsmA and bsmB, were also shown to be involved in adhesion to the biotic surface...... in a non-QS-controlled fashion. Therefore, the expression of these two genes appears to be cocontrolled by regulators other than the QS system for mediation of attachment to HCE cells. We also found that QS in S. marcescens regulates other potential cell surface adhesins, including exopolysaccharide......Serratia marcescens is an opportunistic pathogen and a major cause of ocular infections. In previous studies of S. marcescens MG1, we showed that biofilm maturation and sloughing were regulated by N-acyl homoserine lactone (AHL)-based quorum sensing (QS). Because of the importance of adhesion...

  20. Emergence of Serratia marcescens isolates possessing carbapenem-hydrolysing β-lactamase KPC-2 from China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, X; Hu, Q; Zhang, R; Hu, Y; Xu, X; Lv, H

    2016-09-01

    Eighty-three carbapenem-resistant Serratia marcescens isolates were recovered from Zhejiang Provincial People's Hospital, China. The minimum inhibitory concentrations of imipenem, meropenem, and ertapenem for all isolates were 2 to >128 μg/mL. Polymerase chain reaction indicated that 63 S. marcescens isolates produced Klebsiella pneumoniae carbapenemase (KPC)-2. Clone A (15 isolates) and clone B (41 isolates) were the two dominant clones and clone A strains were gradually replaced by clone B strains between 2011 and 2014. The results indicate that blaKPC-2-positive S. marcescens emerged in our hospital as the major mechanism of carbapenem resistance. Copyright © 2016 The Healthcare Infection Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Oxidation of dibenzothiophene (DBT by Serratia marcescens UCP 1549 formed biphenyl as final product

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de Araújo Hélvia W

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The desulphurization of dibenzothiophene (DBT, a recalcitrant thiophenic fossil fuel component by Serratia marcescens (UCP 1549 in order for reducing the Sulphur content was investigated. The Study was carried out establishing the growth profile using Luria Bertani medium to different concentrations of DBT during 120 hours at 28°C, and orbital Shaker at 150 rpm. Results The results indicated that concentrations of DBT 0.5, 1.0 and 2.0 mM do not affected the growth of the bacterium. The DBT showed similar Minimum Inhibitory Concentration (MIC and Minimum Bactericidal Concentration (MCB (3.68 mM. The desulphurization of DBT by S. marcescens was used with 96 hours of growth on 2 mM of DBT, and was determined by gas chromatography (GC and GC-mass spectrometry. In order to study the desulphurization process by S. marcescens was observed the presence of a sulfur-free product at 16 hours of cultivation. Conclusions The data suggests the use of metabolic pathway “4S” by S. marcescens (UCP 1549 and formed biphenyl. The microbial desulphurization process by Serratia can be suggest significant reducing sulphur content in DBT, and showed promising potential for reduction of the sulfur content in diesel oil.

  2. In vitro synergistic effects of fisetin and norfloxacin against aquatic isolates of Serratia marcescens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Jing; Ruan, Jing; Xu, Ning; Yang, Yibin; Ai, Xiaohui

    2016-01-01

    Serratia marcescens is a common pathogenic bacterium that can cause infections in both humans and animals. It can cause a range of diseases, from slight wound infections to life-threatening bacteraemia and pneumonia. The emergence of antimicrobial resistance has limited the treatment of the diseases caused by the bacterium to a great extent. Consequently, there is an urgent need to develop novel antimicrobial strategies against this pathogen. Synergistic strategy is a new approach to treat the infections caused by drug-resistant bacteria. In this paper, we isolated and identified the first multi-resistant pathogenic Serratia marcescens strain from diseased soft-shelled turtles (Pelodiscus sinensis) in China. We then performed a checkerboard assay; the results showed that out of 10 tested natural products fisetin had synergistic effects against S. marcescens when combined with norfloxacin. The time-kill curve assay further confirmed the results of the checkerboard assay. We found that this novel synergistic effect could significantly reduce the dosage of norfloxacin against S. marcescens. © FEMS 2015. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  3. Innate immune regulation of Serratia marcescens-induced corneal inflammation and infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Rong; Zhang, Rui; Sun, Yan; Platt, Sean; Szczotka-Flynn, Loretta; Pearlman, Eric

    2012-10-25

    Serratia marcescens is frequently isolated from lenses of patients with contact lens-associated corneal infiltrates. In the current study, we examined the role of toll-like receptors (TLRs) and interleukin-1 receptor type 1 (IL-1R1) in S. marcescens-induced corneal inflammation and infection. The central corneal epithelium of C57BL/6 and gene knockout mice was abraded, and 1 × 10(7) S. marcescens were added in the presence of a silicone hydrogel contact lens, and we examined corneal inflammation by confocal microscopy and neutrophil enumeration. Viable bacteria were quantified by colony-forming units (CFU). S. marcescens induced neutrophil recruitment to the corneal stroma, and increased corneal thickness and haze in C57BL/6 mice. Conversely, CFU was significantly lower by 48 hours post infection. In contrast, MyD88(-/-), IL-1R(-/-), TLR4(-/-), and TLR4/5(-/-) corneas infected with S. marcescens had significantly increased CFU, indicating impaired clearance. However, there was no significant difference in CFU among C57BL/6, TIRAP(-/-), and TRIF(-/-) mice. Tobramycin-killed S. marcescens induced corneal inflammation in C57BL/6 mice, which was impaired significantly in MD-2(-/-) mice and in C57BL/6 mice pretreated topically with the MD-2 antagonist eritoran tetrasodium. S. marcescens induces corneal inflammation by activation of TLR4/MD-2/MyD88 and the IL-1R1/MyD88 pathways, which are potential therapeutic targets for inhibition of S. marcescens-induced corneal inflammation.

  4. The Opportunistic Pathogen Serratia marcescens Utilizes Type VI Secretion To Target Bacterial Competitors ▿†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murdoch, Sarah L.; Trunk, Katharina; English, Grant; Fritsch, Maximilian J.; Pourkarimi, Ehsan; Coulthurst, Sarah J.

    2011-01-01

    The type VI secretion system (T6SS) is the most recently described and least understood of the protein secretion systems of Gram-negative bacteria. It is widely distributed and has been implicated in the virulence of various pathogens, but its mechanism and exact mode of action remain to be defined. Additionally there have been several very recent reports that some T6SSs can target bacteria rather than eukaryotic cells. Serratia marcescens is an opportunistic enteric pathogen, a class of bacteria responsible for a significant proportion of hospital-acquired infections. We describe the identification of a functional T6SS in S. marcescens strain Db10, the first report of type VI secretion by an opportunist enteric bacterium. The T6SS of S. marcescens Db10 is active, with secretion of Hcp to the culture medium readily detected, and is expressed constitutively under normal growth conditions from a large transcriptional unit. Expression of the T6SS genes did not appear to be dependent on the integrity of the T6SS. The S. marcescens Db10 T6SS is not required for virulence in three nonmammalian virulence models. It does, however, exhibit dramatic antibacterial killing activity against several other bacterial species and is required for S. marcescens to persist in a mixed culture with another opportunist pathogen, Enterobacter cloacae. Importantly, this antibacterial killing activity is highly strain specific, with the S. marcescens Db10 T6SS being highly effective against another strain of S. marcescens with a very similar and active T6SS. We conclude that type VI secretion plays a crucial role in the competitiveness, and thus indirectly the virulence, of S. marcescens and other opportunistic bacterial pathogens. PMID:21890705

  5. Optimized production of Serratia marcescens B742 mutants for preparing chitin from shrimp shells powders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hongcai; Fang, Jiyang; Deng, Yun; Zhao, Yanyun

    2014-08-01

    To improve the deproteinization (DP) efficacy of shrimp shell powders (SSP) for preparing chitin, Serratia marcescens B742 mutants were prepared using 2% diethyl sulfate (DES), UV-irradiation, and/or microwave heating treatments. Both single-stage and multi-stage mutations were investigated for optimizing S. marcescens B742 mutation conditions. Under the optimized mutation conditions (2% DES treatment for 30min plus successive 20min UV-irradiation), the protease and chitosanase activity produced by mutant S. marcescens B742 was 240.15 and 170.6mU/mL, respectively, as compared with 212.58±1.51 and 83.75±6.51mU/mL, respectively, by wild S. marcescens B742. DP efficacy of SSP by mutant S. marcescens B742 reached 91.4±4.6% after 3d of submerged fermentation instead of 83.4±4.7% from the wild S. marcescens B742 after 4d of submerged fermentation. Molecular mass of chitosanase and protease was 41.20 and 47.10kDa, respectively, and both enzymes were verified by mass spectrometry analysis. The chitosanase from both wild and mutant S. marcescens B742 was activated by sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), Tween 20, Tween 40, and Triton-100, and the protease and chitosanase were strongly inhibited by ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA). These results suggested that S. marcescens B742 mutants can be used in the biological production of chitin through deproteinization of SSP. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Production of Methioninase from Serratia Marcescens Isolated from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To evaluate the anticancer activity of an enzyme, methioninase, obtained from a soil isolate, Serratia marcesens, against Dalton's lymphoma ascitic (DLA) and Ehrlich ascitic carcinoma (EAC) in Swiss albino mice. Methods: Cancer was induced using DLA and EAC cells in Swiss albino mice by intraperitoneal ...

  7. Community-Acquired Serratia Marcescens Spinal Epidural Abscess in a Patient Without Risk Factors: Case Report and Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael D Parkins

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Serratia marcescens has rarely been reported as an agent of invasive disease in patients presenting from the community. Furthermore, S marcescens is frequently opportunistic, affecting individuals with serious medical comorbidities including immune suppression and diabetes. A case of a community-acquired S marcescens spontaneous lumbar epidural abscess presenting as cauda equina syndrome is reported in a previously well 36-year-old man with no identifiable risk factors. To the authors’ knowledge, this is the first report of invasive S marcescens causing disease in a patient with no medical comorbidities.

  8. Application of the BIOLOG system for characterization of Serratia marcescens ss marcescens isolated from onsite wastewater technology (OSWT).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chojniak, Joanna; Jałowiecki, Łukasz; Dorgeloh, Elmar; Hegedusova, Berta; Ejhed, Helene; Magnér, Jörgen; Płaza, Grażyna

    2015-01-01

    The scope of this study was to apply the Biolog system to identify and characterize a Serratia strain isolated from the surface of black plastic pieces which constitute the fluidized bed filter (onsite wastewater technology, OSWT). The preliminary isolation of the strain was done in the medium with tetracycline at a 16 mg/l concentration. To characterize the isolated strain, the following Biolog methods were applied: (1) EcoPlates microplates for evaluation of physiological profiling, (2) GEN III OmniLog® ID System for identification of the isolate, and (3) phenotypic microarrays (PM) technology for evaluation of sensitivity to antibiotics (PM11 and PM12). Results were recorded using the original OmniLog® software. The Serratia strain was identified as Serratia marcescens ss marcescens with similarity index 0.569. The same identification was obtained by the 16S rDNA analysis. PM analysis showed an enhancement of phenotype (resistance or growth) of this strain to 35 antibiotics. The loss of phenotype (sensitivity or non-growth) was observed only for 5 antibiotics: lomefloxacin (0.4 µg/ml), enoxacin (0.9 µg/ml), nalidixic acid (18.0 µg/ml), paromomycin (25.0 µg/ml) and novobiocin (1100 µg/ml). This study acknowledges that the methods proposed by the Biolog system allow correct and complete identification and characterization of the microbes isolated from different environments. Phenotypic microarrays could be successfully used as a new tool for identification of the multi-antibiotic resistance of bacteria and for determination of the minimal inhibition concentrations (MIC).

  9. Serratia marcescens resistance profile and its susceptibility to photodynamic antimicrobial chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parente, Ticiana Mont Alverne Lopes; Rebouças, Emanuela de Lima; Santos, Vitor Coutinho Vieira Dos; Barbosa, Francisco Cesar Barroso; Zanin, Iriana Carla Junqueira

    2016-06-01

    Some authors have reported the antimicrobial action of photodynamic antimicrobial chemotherapy (PACT) on bacteria related to nosocomial infections but there are few studies evaluating PACT on Serratia marcescens grown as planktonic cultures or as biofilms. The purpose of this study was to analyze the S. marcescens resistance profile and its susceptibility to PACT. Initially, 55 S. marcescens strains isolated from environmental, oral and extra-oral infections were tested by antimicrobial resistance to cefotaxime (CTX), imipenem (IPM), ciprofloxacin (CIP), tobramycin (TOB) and doxycycline (DOX) using E-test(®). Following, isolates grown as planktonic cultures or biofilms were submitted to PACT using the association of a light-emitting diode and toluidine blue (TBO). The E-test(®) results demonstrated intermediated sensitive strains to CTX, IMP, TOB, and DOX; and resistant strains to CTX, TOB, DOX and CIP. Also, CTX and IMP demonstrated variation when CLSI 2007 and CLSI 2015 were compared. Planktonic cultures and biofilms submitted to PACT demonstrated counts varying from 10(11) to 10(7) for planktonic cultures and 10(10) to 10(7) for biofilms. There were no statistical differences in the results when planktonic cultures and biofilms were compared. Increase in the profile of S. marcescens resistance was observed when CLSI 2007 and CLSI 2015 were compared. Also, IMP remains as the drug with lower rate of resistance. Additionally, both S. marcescens planktonic cultures and early biofilms are susceptible to PACT under tested conditions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Corneal Ring Infiltrates Caused by Serratia marcescens in a Patient with Human Immunodeficiency Virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Winai Chaidaroon

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To describe corneal ring infiltrates caused by Serratia marcescens in a patient with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1 who wore contact lenses. Methods: A case study of a patient with keratitis due to an infection caused by S. marcescens and exhibiting corneal ring infiltrates was reviewed for history, clinical manifestation, microscopic study, and management. Results: A 29-year-old man who had a history of contact lens wear and HIV-1 infection was admitted to hospital because of blurred vision, redness, and corneal infiltrates in the shape of a ring in the left eye. The visual acuity (VA in both eyes was hand movement (uncorrected. Corneal scrapings were performed. The culture results of the corneal specimens revealed S. marcescens. The culture results of the contact lens disclosed the same organism. The corneal ulcer responded well to treatment with topical gentamycin sulfate 14 mg/ml. The final VA remained hand movement. Conclusions: S. marcescens can cause ring infiltrates in a HIV-1 patient who wears contact lenses. The treatment result for S. marcescens keratitis in a HIV-1 patient who wore contact lenses was favorable after intensive use of fortified topical antibiotics.

  11. Multiple skin ulcers due to Serratia marcescens in a immunocompetent patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlesimo, M; Pennica, A; Muscianese, M; Bottoni, U; Abruzzese, C; Giubettini, M; Pranteda, G; Pranteda, G

    2014-06-01

    Serratia marcescens is a species of gram negative bacillus, classified as a member of the Enterobacteriaceae, mainly involved in opportunistic infections, particulary in the hospital environment. Cutaneous infections have rarely reported in literature and are predominantly observed in elderly or in immunocompromised patients. The clinical manifestations of skin infections include granulomatous lesions, necrotizing fasciitis, nodules, cellulitis, ulcers, dermal abscesses. Infections caused by S. marcescens may be difficult to treat because of resistance to a variety of antibiotics, including ampicillin and first and second generation cephalosporins. Aminoglycosides have good activity against S. marcescens, but resistant strains have also been described. We report a very intriguing case of S. marcescens infection, in an immunocompetent 18-year-old man, causing multiple rounded ulcers of varying sizes, along with few pustular lesions that both clinically and histopathologically mimic a pyoderma gangrenosum (PG). This is a non infectious neutrophilic skin disorder, characterized by painful and rapidly progressing skin ulceration. According to our experience, we would strongly recommend to perform cultures of multiple skin ulcers resembling PG, even in young healthy patients, to ensure correct diagnosis and treatment, since resistant to conventional antibiotics bacteria such as S. marcescens may be the cause of these lesions, like in the case here reported.

  12. Requirement for Serratia marcescens cytolysin in a murine model of hemorrhagic pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Juarbe, Norberto; Mares, Chris A; Hinojosa, Cecilia A; Medina, Jorge L; Cantwell, Angelene; Dube, Peter H; Orihuela, Carlos J; Bergman, Molly A

    2015-02-01

    Serratia marcescens, a member of the carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae, is an important emerging pathogen that causes a wide variety of nosocomial infections, spreads rapidly within hospitals, and has a systemic mortality rate of ≤41%. Despite multiple clinical descriptions of S. marcescens nosocomial pneumonia, little is known regarding the mechanisms of bacterial pathogenesis and the host immune response. To address this gap, we developed an oropharyngeal aspiration model of lethal and sublethal S. marcescens pneumonia in BALB/c mice and extensively characterized the latter. Lethal challenge (>4.0 × 10(6) CFU) was characterized by fulminate hemorrhagic pneumonia with rapid loss of lung function and death. Mice challenged with a sublethal dose (marcescens strains that failed to cause profound weight loss, extended illness, hemorrhage, and prolonged lung pathology in mice. This study describes a model of S. marcescens pneumonia that mimics known clinical features of human illness, identifies neutrophils and the toxin ShlA as a key factors important for defense and infection, respectively, and provides a solid foundation for future studies of novel therapeutics for this important opportunistic pathogen. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  13. Consecutive Serratia marcescens multiclone outbreaks in a neonatal intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maltezou, Helena C; Tryfinopoulou, Kyriaki; Katerelos, Panos; Ftika, Lemonia; Pappa, Olga; Tseroni, Maria; Kostis, Evangelos; Kostalos, Christos; Prifti, Helen; Tzanetou, Konstantina; Vatopoulos, Alkiviadis

    2012-09-01

    This report describes 3 consecutive outbreaks caused by genetically unrelated Serratia marcescens clones that occurred in a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) over a 35-month period. Carriage testing in neonates and health care workers and environmental investigation were performed. An unmatched case-control study was conducted to identify risk factors for S marcescens isolation. During the 35-month period, there were 57 neonates with S marcescens isolation in the NICU, including 37 carriers and 20 infected neonates. The prevalence rate of S marcescens isolation was 12.3% in outbreak 1, 47.4% in outbreak 2, and 42% in outbreak 3. Nine of the 20 infected neonates died (45% case fatality rate). A total of 10 pulsed field gel electrophoresis types were introduced in the NICU in various times; 4 of these types accounted for the 9 fatal cases. During outbreak 3, a type VIII S marcescens strain, the prevalent clinical clone during this period, was detected in the milk kitchen sink drain. Multiple logistic regression revealed that the only statistically significant factor for S marcencens isolation was the administration of total parenteral nutrition. Total parenteral nutrition solution might constitute a possible route for the introduction of microorganisms in the NICU. Gaps in infection control should be identified and strict measures implemented to ensure patient safety. Copyright © 2012 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Pathogenicity of pan-drug-resistant Serratia marcescens harbouring blaNDM-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruber, Teresa M; Göttig, Stephan; Mark, Laura; Christ, Sara; Kempf, Volkhard A J; Wichelhaus, Thomas A; Hamprecht, Axel

    2015-04-01

    To characterize a pan-drug-resistant Serratia marcescens clinical isolate carrying the New Delhi metallo-β-lactamase (NDM)-1. The presence of β-lactamase genes was examined by PCR and sequencing. Antibiotic susceptibility was determined by antibiotic gradient test. Transformation assays, transconjugation assays, PFGE and PCR-based replicon typing were used for plasmid analysis. Horizontal gene transfer was evaluated by liquid mating using Escherichia coli J53 as a recipient. Pathogenicity of NDM-1 expressing S. marcescens was analysed using the Galleria mellonella infection model. S. marcescens isolate SM1890 was non-susceptible to all tested antibiotics, with minocycline retaining intermediate activity. blaNDM-1 was located on a 140 kb IncA/C-type plasmid which was transferable to E. coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae by conjugation. The LD50 of the NDM-positive, SM1890 isolate was higher than that of other, NDM-1 negative, S. marcescens strains. The presence of a blaNDM-1-harbouring IncA/C plasmid resulted in marked resistance to β-lactam antibiotics, but had no significant effect on virulence of isogenic strains. Because of the intrinsic resistance of S. marcescens to colistin and reduced susceptibility to tigecycline, treatment options for infections by NDM-1-positive isolates are extremely limited in this species. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Antimicrobial Chemotherapy. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. Necrotizing soft tissue infection caused by Serratia marcescens: A case report and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagiya, Hideharu; Ojima, Masahiro; Yoshida, Takeshi; Matsui, Takahiro; Morii, Eiichi; Sato, Kazuaki; Tahara, Shinichiro; Yoshida, Hisao; Tomono, Kazunori

    2016-05-01

    A 64-year-old man with advanced liver cirrhosis was transferred to an emergency center due to septic shock and markedly inflamed left leg. Under a clinical diagnosis of necrotizing soft tissue infection (NSTI), the patient undertook intensive therapy but died 25 h after arrival. The pathogenic organism, Serratia marcescens, was later isolated from blood and soft tissue cultures. NSTI is very rarely associated with S. marcescens. A literature review showed that only 16 such cases, including our case, have been reported to date. Our case is the first evidence of an S. marcescens NSTI in a patient with liver cirrhosis. S. marcescens NSTI has an extremely high mortality rate; total mortality and mortality in cases involving the extremities were 75% (12 of 16 cases) and 83.3% (10 of 12 cases), respectively. Physicians need to be aware that S. marcescens can induce fatal infections in community patients. Copyright © 2015 Japanese Society of Chemotherapy and The Japanese Association for Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Outbreak of Serratia marcescens postoperative infection traced to barbers and razors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leng, P; Huang, W L; He, T; Wang, Y Z; Zhang, H N

    2015-01-01

    Fourteen postoperative infections caused by Serratia marcescens were detected in patients on the neurosurgical wards and spinal surgery ward of a 2640-bed hospital between 26th December 2012 and 5th June 2013. To investigate the source of the outbreak, identify risk factors and implement infection control measures. Cultures were collected from healthcare workers and potential environmental sources. S. marcescens isolates were characterized by antibiotic susceptibility testing and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). A retrospective case-control study was performed to identify the risk factors. The outbreak involved 14 patients, five of whom required more than one surgical procedure. S. marcescens was isolated from cerebrospinal fluid, brain tissue, sputum and other secretions. S. marcescens was also cultured from samples taken from the hands of two barbers and their razors. Exposure to the two barbers [odds ratio (OR) 78.0, P marcescens from patients, barbers and razors were indistinguishable by PFGE and antibiotic susceptibility pattern. The outbreak ended after removal of the implicated barbers, extensive re-inforcement of infection control procedures and re-education. These results underscore the risk of postoperative infection associated with pre-operative wet shaving. Copyright © 2014 The Healthcare Infection Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. A Serratia marcescens outbreak in a neonatal intensive care unit was successfully managed by rapid hospital hygiene interventions and screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Åttman, Emilia; Korhonen, Päivi; Tammela, Outi; Vuento, Risto; Aittoniemi, Janne; Syrjänen, Jaana; Mattila, Erja; Österblad, Monica; Huttunen, Reetta

    2017-10-25

    Serratia marcescens is a rare, but important, pathogen in hospital-acquired infections, especially in neonatal units. Outbreaks may cause significant mortality among neonates. This paper describes how an outbreak of Serratia marcescens was handled in a neonatal intensive care unit in Finland in June 2015. Tampere University Hospital is the only hospital that offers intensive care for preterm neonates in the Pirkanmaa health district area in Finland. Between 9 June to 29 June 2015 seven neonates were screened positive for Serratia marcescens in the hospital. We examined the management and outcomes, including environmental sampling. Two of the seven neonates developed a blood stream infection and one with Serratia marcescens sepsis died after six days of antibiotic treatment. The outbreak was rapidly managed with active hospital hygiene interventions, including strict hand hygiene, cleaning, patient screening, contact precautions and education. Environmental sampling was limited to one water tap and a ventilator and the results were negative. The outbreak was contained within three weeks and no further cases appeared. The screening of healthcare workers was not necessary. A Serratia marcescens outbreak caused significant morbidity in neonates and one death. Rapid hospital hygiene interventions and patient screening effectively contained the outbreak. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  18. Serratia marcescens outbreak in a neonatal intensive care unit: crucial role of implementing hand hygiene among external consultants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montagnani, Carlotta; Cocchi, Priscilla; Lega, Laura; Campana, Silvia; Biermann, Klaus Peter; Braggion, Cesare; Pecile, Patrizia; Chiappini, Elena; de Martino, Maurizio; Galli, Luisa

    2015-01-13

    Serratia marcescens represents an important pathogen involved in hospital acquired infections. Outbreaks are frequently reported and are difficult to eradicate. The aim of this study is to describe an outbreak of Serratia marcescens occurred from May to November 2012 in a neonatal intensive care unit, to discuss the control measures adopted, addressing the role of molecular biology in routine investigations during the outbreak. After an outbreak of Serratia marcescens involving 14 neonates, all admitted patients were screened for rectal and ocular carriage every two weeks. Extensive environmental sampling procedure and hand sampling of the staff were performed. Antimicrobial susceptibility pattern and molecular analysis of isolates were carried out. Effective hand hygiene measures involving all the external consultants has been implemented. Colonized and infected babies were cohorted. Dedicated staff was established to care for the colonized or infected babies. During the surveillance, 65 newborns were sampled obtaining 297 ocular and rectal swabs in five times. Thirty-four Serratia marcescens isolates were collected: 11 out of 34 strains were isolated from eyes, being the remaining 23 isolated from rectal swabs. Two patients presented symptomatic conjunctivitis. Environmental and hand sampling resulted negative. During the fifth sampling procedure no colonized or infected patients have been identified. Two different clones have been identified. Ocular and rectal colonization played an important role in spread of infections. Implementation of infection control measures, involving also external specialists, allowed to control a serious Serratia marcescens outbreak in a neonatal intensive care unit.

  19. The PhoP/PhoQ System and Its Role in Serratia marcescens Pathogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barchiesi, Julieta; Castelli, María Eugenia; Di Venanzio, Gisela; Colombo, María Isabel

    2012-01-01

    Serratia marcescens is able to invade, persist, and multiply inside nonphagocytic cells, residing in nonacidic, nondegradative, autophagosome-like vacuoles. In this work, we have examined the physiological role of the PhoP/PhoQ system and its function in the control of critical virulence phenotypes in S. marcescens. We have demonstrated the involvement of the PhoP/PhoQ system in the adaptation of this bacterium to growth on scarce environmental Mg2+, at acidic pH, and in the presence of polymyxin B. We have also shown that these environmental conditions constitute signals that activate the PhoP/PhoQ system. We have found that the two S. marcescens mgtE orthologs present a conserved PhoP-binding motif and demonstrated that mgtE1 expression is PhoP dependent, reinforcing the importance of PhoP control in magnesium homeostasis. Finally, we have demonstrated that phoP expression is activated intracellularly and that a phoP mutant strain is defective in survival inside epithelial cells. We have shown that the Serratia PhoP/PhoQ system is involved in prevention of the delivery to degradative/acidic compartments. PMID:22467788

  20. Comparative Genome Analyses of Serratia marcescens FS14 Reveals Its High Antagonistic Potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Pengpeng; Kwok, Amy H. Y.; Jiang, Jingwei; Ran, Tingting; Xu, Dongqing; Wang, Weiwu; Leung, Frederick C.

    2015-01-01

    S. marcescens FS14 was isolated from an Atractylodes macrocephala Koidz plant that was infected by Fusarium oxysporum and showed symptoms of root rot. With the completion of the genome sequence of FS14, the first comprehensive comparative-genomic analysis of the Serratia genus was performed. Pan-genome and COG analyses showed that the majority of the conserved core genes are involved in basic cellular functions, while genomic factors such as prophages contribute considerably to genome diversity. Additionally, a Type I restriction-modification system, a Type III secretion system and tellurium resistance genes are found in only some Serratia species. Comparative analysis further identified that S. marcescens FS14 possesses multiple mechanisms for antagonism against other microorganisms, including the production of prodigiosin, bacteriocins, and multi-antibiotic resistant determinants as well as chitinases. The presence of two evolutionarily distinct Type VI secretion systems (T6SSs) in FS14 may provide further competitive advantages for FS14 against other microbes. To our knowledge, this is the first report of comparative analysis on T6SSs in the genus, which identifies four types of T6SSs in Serratia spp.. Competition bioassays of FS14 against the vital plant pathogenic bacterium Ralstonia solanacearum and fungi Fusarium oxysporum and Sclerotinia sclerotiorum were performed to support our genomic analyses, in which FS14 demonstrated high antagonistic activities against both bacterial and fungal phytopathogens. PMID:25856195

  1. Comparative genome analyses of Serratia marcescens FS14 reveals its high antagonistic potential.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pengpeng Li

    Full Text Available S. marcescens FS14 was isolated from an Atractylodes macrocephala Koidz plant that was infected by Fusarium oxysporum and showed symptoms of root rot. With the completion of the genome sequence of FS14, the first comprehensive comparative-genomic analysis of the Serratia genus was performed. Pan-genome and COG analyses showed that the majority of the conserved core genes are involved in basic cellular functions, while genomic factors such as prophages contribute considerably to genome diversity. Additionally, a Type I restriction-modification system, a Type III secretion system and tellurium resistance genes are found in only some Serratia species. Comparative analysis further identified that S. marcescens FS14 possesses multiple mechanisms for antagonism against other microorganisms, including the production of prodigiosin, bacteriocins, and multi-antibiotic resistant determinants as well as chitinases. The presence of two evolutionarily distinct Type VI secretion systems (T6SSs in FS14 may provide further competitive advantages for FS14 against other microbes. To our knowledge, this is the first report of comparative analysis on T6SSs in the genus, which identifies four types of T6SSs in Serratia spp.. Competition bioassays of FS14 against the vital plant pathogenic bacterium Ralstonia solanacearum and fungi Fusarium oxysporum and Sclerotinia sclerotiorum were performed to support our genomic analyses, in which FS14 demonstrated high antagonistic activities against both bacterial and fungal phytopathogens.

  2. Inhibition of Serratia marcescens Smj-11 biofilm formation by Alcaligenes faecalis STN17 crude extract

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lutfi, Zainal; Ahmad, Asmat [School of Biosciences and Biotechnology, Faculty of Science and Technology, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia (UKM), 43600 Bangi, Selangor (Malaysia); Usup, Gires [School of Environmental and Natural Resources Sciences, Faculty of Science and Technology, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia (UKM), 43600 Bangi, Selangor (Malaysia)

    2014-09-03

    Serratia marcescens biofilms are formed when they are bound to surfaces in aqueous environments. S. marcescens utilizes N-acylhomoserine lactone (AHL) as its quorum sensing signal molecule. The accumulation of AHL indicates the bacteria to produce matrices to form biofilms. Prodigiosin (2-methyl-3-pentyl-6-methoxyprodigiosin), which causes red pigmentation in the colonies, are also produced when the AHL reaches a certain threshold. The Alcaligenes faecalis STN17 crude extract is believed to inhibit quorum sensing in the S. marcescens Smj-11 and, thus, impedes its biofilm formation ability. A. faecalis STN17 was grown in marine broth, and ethyl acetate extraction was carried out. The crude compound of A. faecalis STN17 was diluted at high concentration (0.2-6.4 mg/mL) and was taken to confirm anti-biofilm activity through the crystal violet method in 96-wells plate. Then, the crude extract underwent purification using simple solvents partitioning test to discern the respective compounds that had the anti-biofilm activity under the crystal violet method. The crystal violet test showed that the crude did have anti-biofilm activity on S. marcescens Smj-11, but did not kill the cells. This finding signifies that the suppression of biofilm formation in S. marcescens by A. faecalis STN17 has a strong correlation. The partitioning test showed that A. faecalis STN17 crude extract has several compounds and only the compound(s) in chloroform showed activities. In conclusion, the crude extract of A. faecalis STN17 has the ability to inhibit S. marcescens Smj-11 biofilm formation.

  3. Phosphate limitation induces the intergeneric inhibition of Pseudomonas aeruginosa by Serratia marcescens isolated from paper machines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Pei-An; Kuo, Chih-Horng; Lai, Yiu-Kay; Graumann, Peter L; Tu, Jenn

    2013-06-01

    Phosphate is an essential nutrient for heterotrophic bacteria, affecting bacterioplankton in aquatic ecosystems and bacteria in biofilms. However, the influence of phosphate limitation on bacterial competition and biofilm development in multispecies populations has received limited attention in existing studies. To address this issue, we isolated 13 adhesive bacteria from paper machine aggregates. Intergeneric inhibition of Pseudomonas aeruginosa WW5 by Serratia marcescens WW4 was identified under phosphate-limited conditions, but not in Luria-Bertani medium or M9 minimal medium. The viable numbers of the pure S. marcescens WW4 culture decreased over 3 days in the phosphate-limited medium; however, the mortality of S. marcescens WW4 was significantly reduced when it was co-cultured with P. aeruginosa WW5, which appeared to sustain the S. marcescens WW4 biofilm. In contrast, viable P. aeruginosa WW5 cells immediately declined in the phosphate-limited co-culture. To identify the genetic/inhibitory element(s) involved in this process, we inserted a mini-Tn5 mutant of S. marcescens WW4 that lacked inhibitory effect. The results showed that an endonuclease bacteriocin was involved in this intergeneric inhibition by S. marcescens WW4 under phosphate limitation. In conclusion, this study highlights the importance of nutrient limitation in bacterial interactions and provides a strong candidate gene for future functional characterisation. © 2013 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by Blackwell Publishing Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Inhibition of Serratia marcescens Smj-11 biofilm formation by Alcaligenes faecalis STN17 crude extract

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lutfi, Zainal; Usup, Gires; Ahmad, Asmat

    2014-09-01

    Serratia marcescens biofilms are formed when they are bound to surfaces in aqueous environments. S. marcescens utilizes N-acylhomoserine lactone (AHL) as its quorum sensing signal molecule. The accumulation of AHL indicates the bacteria to produce matrices to form biofilms. Prodigiosin (2-methyl-3-pentyl-6-methoxyprodigiosin), which causes red pigmentation in the colonies, are also produced when the AHL reaches a certain threshold. The Alcaligenes faecalis STN17 crude extract is believed to inhibit quorum sensing in the S. marcescens Smj-11 and, thus, impedes its biofilm formation ability. A. faecalis STN17 was grown in marine broth, and ethyl acetate extraction was carried out. The crude compound of A. faecalis STN17 was diluted at high concentration (0.2-6.4 mg/mL) and was taken to confirm anti-biofilm activity through the crystal violet method in 96-wells plate. Then, the crude extract underwent purification using simple solvents partitioning test to discern the respective compounds that had the anti-biofilm activity under the crystal violet method. The crystal violet test showed that the crude did have anti-biofilm activity on S. marcescens Smj-11, but did not kill the cells. This finding signifies that the suppression of biofilm formation in S. marcescens by A. faecalis STN17 has a strong correlation. The partitioning test showed that A. faecalis STN17 crude extract has several compounds and only the compound(s) in chloroform showed activities. In conclusion, the crude extract of A. faecalis STN17 has the ability to inhibit S. marcescens Smj-11 biofilm formation.

  5. A multicenter surveillance of antimicrobial resistance in Serratia marcescens in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liou, Bo-Huang; Duh, Ruay-Wang; Lin, Yi-Tsung; Lauderdale, Tsai-Ling Yang; Fung, Chang-Phone

    2014-10-01

    Serratia marcescens is an important nosocomial pathogen and the characteristic property of resistance conferred by extended-spectrum beta-lactamase or a novel AmpC cephalosporinase was not unusual in Taiwan. This study investigated the trends in antimicrobial resistance in S. marcescens from a nationwide surveillance in Taiwan. S. marcescens isolates were collected biennially between 2002 and 2010 from medical centers and regional hospitals throughout Taiwan, as part of the Taiwan Surveillance of Antimicrobial Resistance program. Minimal inhibitory concentrations were determined by the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute reference broth microdilution method. A total of 403 nonduplicate S. marcescens isolates were collected, mostly from respiratory samples (157, 39.0%), followed by the urinary tract samples (90, 22.3%). Overall, 99.3% isolates were susceptible to imipenem, 93.8% to ceftazidime, 89.2% to minocycline, 87.8% to amikacin, 86.8% to cefepime, 82.9% to aztreonam, 73.2% to ceftriaxone, 72.7% to levofloxacin, 63.8% to ciprofloxacin, 60.8% to trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole (TMP/SMX), and 59.6% to gentamicin. A significantly increased susceptibility rate after 2004 was observed for the following antibiotics: amikacin (73.8% vs. 97.1%), gentamicin (40.0% vs. 72.4%), ciprofloxacin (53.8% vs. 70.4%), ceftriaxone (53.8% vs. 86.0%), cefepime (74.4% vs. 95.1%), aztreonam (72.5% vs. 89.7%), and TMP/SMX (41.3% vs. 73.7%). In this 8-year study, the susceptibility of S. marcescens to ceftazidime and imipenem remained consistently high in Taiwan. S. marcescens isolates demonstrated relatively higher resistance to ciprofloxacin and levofloxacin, and therefore continued surveillance of antimicrobial resistance, especially for fluoroquinolone, is warranted. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  6. Prodigiosin production by Serratia marcescens UCP 1549 using renewable-resources as a low cost substrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Araújo, Helvia W Casullo; Fukushima, K; Takaki, Galba M Campos

    2010-10-08

    A new strain of Serratia marcescens UCP1459 isolated from a semi-arid soil produced the natural red pigment prodigiosin, characterized by an uncommon pyrrolylpyrromethane skeleton. Prodigiosin is a promising drug due to its reported antifungal, immunosuppressive and anti-proliferative activities. The objective of this work was to indentify a suitable medium to simultaneously enhance S. marcescens growth and pigment production using renewable resources obtained from industrial wastes. S. marcescens produced the highest level of prodigiosin (49.5 g/L) at 48 h of cultivation using 6% "manipueira" (cassava wastewater) supplemented with mannitol (2%) at pH 7 and 28 °C. Carbohydrates in "manipueira" and mannitol play a role in the enhanced cell growth and prodigiosin production. The purified pigment extracted from the biomass was analyzed by mass spectrophotometry and showed the expected molecular weight of 324 Da corresponding to prodigiosin. In conclusion, we have successfully designed a new, economically feasible medium supporting enhanced S. marcescens growth and a high yield production of prodigiosin.

  7. Toxicity evaluation of prodigiosin from Serratia marcescens in a Caenorhabditis elegans model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seah, Siew-Wei; Nathan, Sheila; Wan, Kiew-Lian

    2016-11-01

    Serratia marcescens produces several secondary metabolites, including a red antimicrobial pigment, prodigiosin. There is considerable interest in prodigiosin and its derivatives due to their anticancer and immunosuppressive properties. Prodigiosin has also become the main choice of red dye in textiles. As prodigiosin has potentially high commercial value, there is a demand to develop high-throughput and cost-effective bioprocesses for prodigiosin production. However little is still known about its toxicity. This study was carried out to investigate the toxicity effect of prodigiosin. To determine if prodigiosin was potentially toxic to eukaryotic systems, the S. marcescens ATCC 274 wild type (Sma 274) and the non-prodigiosin producer S. marcescens Bizio WF mutant ATCC 29635 (WF mutant) were grown under the optimised conditions for prodigiosin production and fed to the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. The mean time to death (TDmean) for Sma 274-infected worms assayed on agar was 112.6 hours while the WF mutant culture had a TDmean of 104.4 hours. However, the nematode killing kinetics were not significantly different between the prodigiosin-producing and non-producing S. marcescens strains (p>0.05). In lieu of its non-toxic property, prodigiosin has the potential to be developed for safe therapeutic applications and as a safe environmental friendly bio-dye.

  8. Enhanced production of prodigiosin by Serratia marcescens MO-1 using ram horn peptone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esabi Basaran Kurbanoglu

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This work addresses the production of prodigiosin from ram horn peptone (RHP using MO-1, a local isolate in submerged culture. First, a novel gram-negative and rod-shaped bacterial strain, MO-1, was isolated from the body of the grasshopper (Poecilemon tauricola Ramme 1951, which was collected from pesticide-contaminated fields. Sequence analysis of 16S rDNA classified the microbe as Serratia marcescens. The substrate utilization potential (BIOLOG and fatty acid methyl ester profile (FAME of S. marcescens were also determined. The effect of RHP on the production of prodigiosin by S. marcescens MO-1 was investigated, and the results showed that RHP supplementation promoted the growth of MO-1 and increased the production of prodigiosin. A concentration of 0.4% (w/v RHP resulted in the greatest yield of prodigiosin (277.74 mg/L after 48 h when mannitol was used as the sole source of carbon. The pigment yield was also influenced by the types of carbon sources and peptones. As a result, RHP was demonstrated to be a suitable substrate for prodigiosin production. These results revealed that prodigiosin could be produced efficiently by S. marcescens using RHP.

  9. CdTe quantum dots as a novel biosensor for Serratia marcescens and Lipopolysaccharide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebrahim, Sh; Reda, M; Hussien, A; Zayed, D

    2015-01-01

    The main objective of this work is to synthesize CdTe quantum dots (QDs) conjugated with Concanavalin A (Con A) as a novel biosensor to be selective and specific for the detection of Lipopolysaccharide (LPS). In addition, the conjugated CdTe QDs-Con A was used as fluorescence labels to capture Serratia marcescens bacteria through the recognition between CdTe QDs-Con A and LPS of S. marcescens. The appearance of the lattice plans in the high resolution transmission electron photograph indicated a high crystalline with an average size of 4-5 nm for the CdTe QDs. The results showed that the relative fluorescence intensity of CdTe QDs-Con A decreased linearly with LPS concentration in the range from 10 to 90 fg/mL and with correlation coefficient (R(2)) equal to 0.9713. LPS surrounding the S. marcescens bacteria was bound to the CdTe QDs-Con A and leads to quenching of PL intensity. It was found that a good linear relationship between the relative PL intensity and the logarithmic of cell population of S. marcescens in range from 1×10 to 1×10(6) CFU/mL at pH 7 with R(2) of 0.952 was established. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Identification of pigmented Serratia marcescens symbiotically associated with Rhynchophorus ferrugineus Olivier (Coleoptera: Curculionidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scrascia, Maria; Pazzani, Carlo; Valentini, Franco; Oliva, Marta; Russo, Valentina; D'Addabbo, Pietro; Porcelli, Francesco

    2016-10-01

    To characterize red pigment-producing bacteria (RPPB) regularly released during oviposition by red palm weevil (RPW), RPPB were recovered from eggs deposited in apples supplied as substrate for oviposition. The presence of RPPB was also detected from gut, the reproductive apparatus of dissected adult and virgin insects and from pupal cases collected within infested palms. RPPB were also identified all along the tissue of these palms. Analysis of the 16S rDNA, gyrB, rpoB, recA, and groEL sequences assigned RPPB to the species Serratia marcescens. RPPB exhibited an antimicrobial activity assessed by the agar well diffusion method against a number of gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria. In this study, we first report the identification of a red pigment-producing S. marcescens as extracellular symbiont of RPW. Route of transmission, detection within different organs, and a wide spread along the infested palm tissue, suggested S. marcescens is present as extracellular symbiont in different developmental stages of the RPW. Additionally, the antimicrobial activity exhibited versus Bacillus spp., Paenibacillus spp., and Lysinibacillus spp., reported as insect pathogens and potential candidates for biocontrol agents, could ascribe for S. marcescens a potential protective role. © 2016 The Authors. MicrobiologyOpen published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. The response of Serratia marcescens JG to environmental changes by quorum sensing system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Shu-Jing; Liu, Hui-Jun; Weng, Cai-Hong; Lai, Chun-Fen; Ai, Liu-Ying; Liu, Yu-Chen; Zhu, Hu

    2016-08-01

    Many bacterial cells are known to regulate their cooperative behaviors and physiological processes through a molecular mechanism called quorum sensing. Quorum sensing in Serratia marcescens JG is mediated by the synthesis of autoinducer 2 (AI-2) which is a furanosyl borate diester. In this study, the response of quorum sensing in S. marcescens JG to environment changes such as the initial pH, carbon sources and boracic acid was investigated by a bioreporter and real-time PCR analysis. The results show that glucose can affect AI-2 synthesis to the greatest extent, and 2.0 % glucose can stimulate S. marcescens JG to produce more AI-2, with a 3.5-fold increase in activity compared with control culture. Furthermore, the response of quorum sensing to changes in glucose concentration was performed by changing the amount of luxS RNA transcripts. A maximum of luxS transcription appeared during the exponential growth phase when the glucose concentration was 20.0 g/L. AI-2 production was also slightly impacted by the low initial pH. It is significant for us that the addition of boracic acid at microdosage (0.1-0.2 g/L) can also induce AI-2 synthesis, which probably demonstrated the feasible fact that the 4,5-dihydroxy-2, 3-pentanedione cyclizes by the addition of borate and the loss of water, is hydrated and is converted to the final AI-2 in S. marcescens JG.

  12. Enhanced production of prodigiosin by Serratia marcescens MO-1 using ram horn peptone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurbanoglu, Esabi Basaran; Ozdal, Murat; Ozdal, Ozlem Gur; Algur, Omer Faruk

    2015-06-01

    This work addresses the production of prodigiosin from ram horn peptone (RHP) using MO-1, a local isolate in submerged culture. First, a novel gram-negative and rod-shaped bacterial strain, MO-1, was isolated from the body of the grasshopper (Poecilemon tauricola Ramme 1951), which was collected from pesticide-contaminated fields. Sequence analysis of 16S rDNA classified the microbe as Serratia marcescens. The substrate utilization potential (BIOLOG) and fatty acid methyl ester profile (FAME) of S. marcescens were also determined. The effect of RHP on the production of prodigiosin by S. marcescens MO-1 was investigated, and the results showed that RHP supplementation promoted the growth of MO-1 and increased the production of prodigiosin. A concentration of 0.4% (w/v) RHP resulted in the greatest yield of prodigiosin (277.74 mg/L) after 48 h when mannitol was used as the sole source of carbon. The pigment yield was also influenced by the types of carbon sources and peptones. As a result, RHP was demonstrated to be a suitable substrate for prodigiosin production. These results revealed that prodigiosin could be produced efficiently by S. marcescens using RHP.

  13. Acquired Aplastic Anemia After Nosocomial Serratia marcescens Bone Marrow Infection in an Elderly Patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsiao-Wei Wang

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available A 76-year-old female patient with a multiple medical history developed refractory pancytopenia during treatment for peptic ulcer, bacteremia, pneumonia, and respiratory failure. Bone marrow biopsy revealed hypocellularity with few hematopoietic cells, which was indicative of aplastic anemia. Common causes including viral infection, mycobacterial infection, environmental exposure, congenital bone marrow disorder, and hematologic malignancy were primarily excluded. Identical Serratia marcescens cultures were isolated from the central venous catheter tip and bone marrow, and the pancytopenia improved gradually with proper antibiotics treatment. This case indicates that nosocomial S. marcescens infection may cause potentially fatal acquired aplastic anemia. Crucial issues in avoiding aplastic anemia include confronting increasing mortality and morbidity caused by nosocomial infection, improving environmental hygiene, early diagnosis of proper etiology, and adequate antibiotics treatment.

  14. Epidemiological markers of Serratia marcescens isolates causing nosocomial infections in Spain (1981-1991).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boquete, T; Vindel, A; Martin-Bourgon, C; Azañedo, L; Sáez-Nieto, J A

    1996-12-01

    The distribution of epidemiological markers (serotyping and phage-typing) of Serratia marcescens isolates from nosocomial episodes (63 nosocomial cutbreaks with 475 isolates, and 1208 sporadic cases) received in our laboratory during the period 1981-1991 was studied. The records for 1683 isolates from Spanish hospitals have been analyzed. In relation with the sporadic cases, the predominant types were serotype O6 (13.4%) and serotype O14 (11.4%); polyagglutinable strains accounted for 15.6%; in outbreaks, type O14 is clearly predominant (27.4%). Phage-typing was a good secondary marker, with a 87.9% of typability; the number of lytic patterns was very high, extended patterns (six or more phages) being the most frequent. We have studied the characteristics of S. marcescens isolates causing infections in the nosocomial environment in Spain.

  15. KPC-PRODUCING Serratia marcescens IN A HOME-CARE PATIENT FROM RECIFE, BRAZIL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margate, Emmily; Magalhães, Vera; Fehlberg, Lorena Cristina Corrêa; Gales, Ana Cristina; Lopes, Ana Catarina Souza

    2015-01-01

    In this brief communication we describe the occurrence of a KPC-producing Serratia marcescens isolate in a home-care patient from Recife, Brazil. The blaKPC, blaSPM, blaIMP, blaVIM, blaOXA, blaCTX-M, blaSHV, blaTEM and blaGES genes were investigated by Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) and DNA sequencing. The isolate was positive for blaKPC-2 and blaTEM-1 and was resistant to aztreonam, cefepime, cefotaxime, imipenem, meropenem, gentamicin, ciprofloxacin and cefazidime, and susceptible only to amikacin, tigecycline and gatifloxacin. This is the first report in Brazil of KPC-producing S. marcescens clinical isolate outside of a hospital environment. Caregivers should be alert for the presence of this isolate in the community setting.

  16. Outbreak of Serratia marcescens bloodstream infections in patients receiving parenteral nutrition prepared by a compounding pharmacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Neil; Hocevar, Susan N; Moulton-Meissner, Heather A; Stevens, Kelly M; McIntyre, Mary G; Jensen, Bette; Kuhar, David T; Noble-Wang, Judith A; Schnatz, Rick G; Becker, Shawn C; Kastango, Eric S; Shehab, Nadine; Kallen, Alexander J

    2014-07-01

    Compounding pharmacies often prepare parenteral nutrition (PN) and must adhere to rigorous standards to avoid contamination of the sterile preparation. In March 2011, Serratia marcescens bloodstream infections (BSIs) were identified in 5 patients receiving PN from a single compounding pharmacy. An investigation was conducted to identify potential sources of contamination and prevent further infections. Cases were defined as S. marcescens BSIs in patients receiving PN from the pharmacy between January and March 2011. We reviewed case patients' clinical records, evaluated pharmacy compounding practices, and obtained epidemiologically directed environmental cultures. Molecular relatedness of available Serratia isolates was determined by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). Nineteen case patients were identified; 9 died. The attack rate for patients receiving PN in March was 35%. No case patients were younger than 18 years. In October 2010, the pharmacy began compounding and filter-sterilizing amino acid solution for adult PN using nonsterile amino acids due to a national manufacturer shortage. Review of this process identified breaches in mixing, filtration, and sterility testing practices. S. marcescens was identified from a pharmacy water faucet, mixing container, and opened amino acid powder. These isolates were indistinguishable from the outbreak strain by PFGE. Compounding of nonsterile amino acid components of PN was initiated due to a manufacturer shortage. Failure to follow recommended compounding standards contributed to an outbreak of S. marcescens BSIs. Improved adherence to sterile compounding standards, critical examination of standards for sterile compounding from nonsterile ingredients, and more rigorous oversight of compounding pharmacies is needed to prevent future outbreaks. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Infectious Diseases Society of America 2014. This work is written by (a) US Government employee(s) and is in the public

  17. Genome evolution and plasticity of Serratia marcescens, an important multidrug-resistant nosocomial pathogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iguchi, Atsushi; Nagaya, Yutaka; Pradel, Elizabeth; Ooka, Tadasuke; Ogura, Yoshitoshi; Katsura, Keisuke; Kurokawa, Ken; Oshima, Kenshiro; Hattori, Masahira; Parkhill, Julian; Sebaihia, Mohamed; Coulthurst, Sarah J; Gotoh, Naomasa; Thomson, Nicholas R; Ewbank, Jonathan J; Hayashi, Tetsuya

    2014-08-01

    Serratia marcescens is an important nosocomial pathogen that can cause an array of infections, most notably of the urinary tract and bloodstream. Naturally, it is found in many environmental niches, and is capable of infecting plants and animals. The emergence and spread of multidrug-resistant strains producing extended-spectrum or metallo beta-lactamases now pose a threat to public health worldwide. Here we report the complete genome sequences of two carefully selected S. marcescens strains, a multidrug-resistant clinical isolate (strain SM39) and an insect isolate (strain Db11). Our comparative analyses reveal the core genome of S. marcescens and define the potential metabolic capacity, virulence, and multidrug resistance of this species. We show a remarkable intraspecies genetic diversity, both at the sequence level and with regards genome flexibility, which may reflect the diversity of niches inhabited by members of this species. A broader analysis with other Serratia species identifies a set of approximately 3,000 genes that characterize the genus. Within this apparent genetic diversity, we identified many genes implicated in the high virulence potential and antibiotic resistance of SM39, including the metallo beta-lactamase and multiple other drug resistance determinants carried on plasmid pSMC1. We further show that pSMC1 is most closely related to plasmids circulating in Pseudomonas species. Our data will provide a valuable basis for future studies on S. marcescens and new insights into the genetic mechanisms that underlie the emergence of pathogens highly resistant to multiple antimicrobial agents. © The Author(s) 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution.

  18. Brain abscesses after Serratia marcescens infection on a neonatal intensive care unit: differences on serial imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Messerschmidt, A.; Olischar, M.; Pollak, A.; Birnbacher, R. [Division of Neonatology and Intensive Care, Department of Paediatrics, University of Vienna, Wahringer Guertel 18-20, 1090, Vienna (Austria); Prayer, D. [Division of Radiology, University of Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, 1090, Vienna (Austria)

    2004-02-01

    Serratia are known to be a possible cause of severe cerebral infections in neonates. We describe imaging of three premature infants infected with Serratia marcescens. Born in the 31{sup st}, 25{sup th} and 28{sup th} weeks of gestation, they presented with signs of septicaemia on postnatal days 9, 24 and 32. Initial sonography showed cysts in the first child, two areas with anechoic centre and echogenic rim in the second, and several echogenic areas in the third. Lesions were seen on CT, of low density in two cases and minimally increased density in the third. MRI in the first patient showed cysts with incomplete contrast enhancement of the lesions, while patient 2 showed five ring-enhancing fluid-containing lesions with thick walls. In the third patient two abscesses with contrast enhancement and several high-signal spots were seen. We discuss the pathophysiology of the lesions and the impact of the various imaging methods. (orig.)

  19. Genetic dissection of Anopheles gambiae gut epithelial responses to Serratia marcescens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stavros Stathopoulos

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Genetic variation in the mosquito Anopheles gambiae profoundly influences its ability to transmit malaria. Mosquito gut bacteria are shown to influence the outcome of infections with Plasmodium parasites and are also thought to exert a strong drive on genetic variation through natural selection; however, a link between antibacterial effects and genetic variation is yet to emerge. Here, we combined SNP genotyping and expression profiling with phenotypic analyses of candidate genes by RNAi-mediated silencing and 454 pyrosequencing to investigate this intricate biological system. We identified 138 An. gambiae genes to be genetically associated with the outcome of Serratia marcescens infection, including the peptidoglycan recognition receptor PGRPLC that triggers activation of the antibacterial IMD/REL2 pathway and the epidermal growth factor receptor EGFR. Silencing of three genes encoding type III fibronectin domain proteins (FN3Ds increased the Serratia load and altered the gut microbiota composition in favor of Enterobacteriaceae. These data suggest that natural genetic variation in immune-related genes can shape the bacterial population structure of the mosquito gut with high specificity. Importantly, FN3D2 encodes a homolog of the hypervariable pattern recognition receptor Dscam, suggesting that pathogen-specific recognition may involve a broader family of immune factors. Additionally, we showed that silencing the gene encoding the gustatory receptor Gr9 that is also associated with the Serratia infection phenotype drastically increased Serratia levels. The Gr9 antibacterial activity appears to be related to mosquito feeding behavior and to mostly rely on changes of neuropeptide F expression, together suggesting a behavioral immune response following Serratia infection. Our findings reveal that the mosquito response to oral Serratia infection comprises both an epithelial and a behavioral immune component.

  20. Genetic Dissection of Anopheles gambiae Gut Epithelial Responses to Serratia marcescens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stathopoulos, Stavros; Neafsey, Daniel E.; Lawniczak, Mara K. N.; Muskavitch, Marc A. T.; Christophides, George K.

    2014-01-01

    Genetic variation in the mosquito Anopheles gambiae profoundly influences its ability to transmit malaria. Mosquito gut bacteria are shown to influence the outcome of infections with Plasmodium parasites and are also thought to exert a strong drive on genetic variation through natural selection; however, a link between antibacterial effects and genetic variation is yet to emerge. Here, we combined SNP genotyping and expression profiling with phenotypic analyses of candidate genes by RNAi-mediated silencing and 454 pyrosequencing to investigate this intricate biological system. We identified 138 An. gambiae genes to be genetically associated with the outcome of Serratia marcescens infection, including the peptidoglycan recognition receptor PGRPLC that triggers activation of the antibacterial IMD/REL2 pathway and the epidermal growth factor receptor EGFR. Silencing of three genes encoding type III fibronectin domain proteins (FN3Ds) increased the Serratia load and altered the gut microbiota composition in favor of Enterobacteriaceae. These data suggest that natural genetic variation in immune-related genes can shape the bacterial population structure of the mosquito gut with high specificity. Importantly, FN3D2 encodes a homolog of the hypervariable pattern recognition receptor Dscam, suggesting that pathogen-specific recognition may involve a broader family of immune factors. Additionally, we showed that silencing the gene encoding the gustatory receptor Gr9 that is also associated with the Serratia infection phenotype drastically increased Serratia levels. The Gr9 antibacterial activity appears to be related to mosquito feeding behavior and to mostly rely on changes of neuropeptide F expression, together suggesting a behavioral immune response following Serratia infection. Our findings reveal that the mosquito response to oral Serratia infection comprises both an epithelial and a behavioral immune component. PMID:24603764

  1. Application of Serratia marcescens RZ-21 significantly enhances peanut yield and remediates continuously cropped peanut soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Hai-Yan; Yang, Bo; Wang, Hong-Wei; Yang, Qi-Yin; Dai, Chuan-Chao

    2016-01-15

    Continuous cropping practices cause a severe decline in peanut yield. The aim of this study was to investigate the remediation effect of Serratia marcescens on continuously cropped peanut soil. A pot experiment was conducted under natural conditions to determine peanut agronomic indices, soil microorganism characteristics, soil enzyme activities and antagonism ability to typical pathogens at different growth stages. Four treatments were applied to red soil as follows: an active fermentation liquor of S. marcescens (RZ-21), an equivalent sterilized fermentation liquor (M), an equivalent fermentation medium (P) and distilled water (CK). S. marcescens significantly inhibited the two typical plant pathogens Fusarium oxysporum A1 and Ralstonia solanacearum B1 and reduced their populations in rhizosphere soil. The RZ-21 treatment significantly increased peanut yield, vine dry weight, root nodules and taproot length by 62.3, 33, 72 and 61.4% respectively, followed by the M treatment. The P treatment also increased root nodules and root length slightly. RZ-21 also enhanced the activities of soil urease, sucrase and hydrogen peroxidase at various stages. In addition, RZ-21 and M treatments increased the average population of soil bacteria and decreased the average population of fungi in the three critical peanut growth stages, except for M in the case of the fungal population at flowering, thus balancing the structure of the soil microorganism community. This is the first report of S. marcescens being applied to continuously cropped peanut soil. The results suggest that S. marcescens RZ-21 has the potential to improve the soil environment and agricultural products and thus allow the development of sustainable management practices. © 2015 Society of Chemical Industry.

  2. Carbon-Starvation Induces Cross-Resistance to Thermal, Acid, and Oxidative Stress in Serratia marcescens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pittman, Joseph R.; Kline, La’Kesha C.; Kenyon, William J.

    2015-01-01

    The broad host-range pathogen Serratia marcescens survives in diverse host and non-host environments, often enduring conditions in which the concentration of essential nutrients is growth-limiting. In such environments, carbon and energy source starvation (carbon-starvation) is one of the most common forms of stress encountered by S. marcescens. Related members of the family Enterobacteriaceae are known to undergo substantial changes in gene expression and physiology in response to the specific stress of carbon-starvation, enabling non-spore-forming cells to survive periods of prolonged starvation and exposure to other forms of stress (i.e., starvation-induced cross-resistance). To determine if carbon-starvation also results in elevated levels of cross-resistance in S. marcescens, both log-phase and carbon-starved cultures, depleted of glucose before the onset of high cell-density stationary-phase, were grown in minimal media at either 30 °C or 37 °C and were then challenged for resistance to high temperature (50 °C), low pH (pH 2.8), and oxidative stress (15 mM H2O2). In general, carbon-starved cells exhibited a higher level of resistance to thermal stress, acid stress, and oxidative stress compared to log-phase cells. The extent of carbon-starvation-induced cross-resistance was dependent on incubation temperature and on the particular strain of S. marcescens. In addition, strain- and temperature-dependent variations in long-term starvation survival were also observed. The enhanced stress-resistance of starved S. marcescens cells could be an important factor in their survival and persistence in many non-host environments and within certain host microenvironments where the availability of carbon sources is suboptimal for growth. PMID:27682115

  3. Interference of quorum sensing in urinary pathogen Serratia marcescens by Anethum graveolens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salini, Ramesh; Pandian, Shunmugiah Karutha

    2015-08-01

    Serratia marcescens is an opportunistic turned obligate pathogen frequently associated with urinary tract infections (UTI) and are multidrug resistant at most instances. Quorum sensing (QS) system, a population-dependent global regulatory system, controls the pathogenesis machinery of S. marcescens as it does in other pathogens. In the present study, methanol extract of a common herb and spice, Anethum graveolens (AGME) was assessed for its anti-QS potential against the clinical isolate of S. marcescens. AGME notably reduced the biofilm formation and QS-dependent virulence factors production in a concentration-dependent manner (64-1024 μg mL(-1)). The light and confocal microscopic images clearly evidenced the antibiofilm activity of AGME (256 μg mL(-1)) at its minimal biofilm inhibitory concentration. Besides, in support of biochemical assays, the expression analysis of QS-regulated genes fimC, bsmA and flhD which are crucial for initial adhesion and motility confirmed their downregulation upon exposure to AGME. LC-MS analysis of AGME revealed 3-O-methyl ellagic acid (3-O-ME) as one of its active principles having nearly similar antibiofilm activity and a reduced inhibition of prodigiosin (27%) and protease (15%) compared to AGME [prodigiosin (47%) and protease (50%)]. UFLC analysis revealed that 0.355 mg g(-1) of 3-O-ME was present in the AGME. AGME and the 3-O-ME significantly interfered the QS system of a QS model strain S. marcescens MG1 and its mutant S. marcescens MG44 which in turn corroborates the anti-QS mechanism of AGME. © FEMS 2015. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. Media optimization studies for Serratiopeptidase production from Serratia marcescens ATCC 13880.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badhe, Ravindra V; Nanda, Rabindra K; Kulkarni, Manasi B; Bhujbal, Mayur N; Patil, Pradeep S; Badhe, Sonali R

    2009-01-01

    Production of an anti-inflammatory enzyme serratiopeptidase by fermentation with Serratia marcescens ATCC 13880 was studied to ascertain optimal nutritional conditions for large scale production. To study biosynthesis and production of serratiopeptidase by Serratia marcescens ATCC 13880, different physicochemical parameters were studied and optimized. The optimized medium contain, (g/l) glycerine 10.0, maltose 10.0 as carbon source, peptone 10.0 as organic nitrogen source, ammonium sulphate 10.0 as inorganic nitrogen source, dihydrogen phosphate 10.0, sodium bicarbonate 10.0, sodium acetate 10.0 as inorganic salt source, ascorbic acid 10.0 as stabilizer, distilled water 1000 ml and the optimized fermentation conditions were pH 7.0, temperature 37 degrees C and duration 24 hr. The modified fermentation medium produced 27.36 IU/ml of serratiopeptidase compared to 17.97 IU/ml in basal medium and the molecular weight of the purified serratiopeptidase was found to be 52 kD.

  5. Genomic, proteomic and biochemical analysis of the chitinolytic machinery of Serratia marcescens BJL200.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuveng, Tina R; Hagen, Live Heldal; Mekasha, Sophanit; Frank, Jeremy; Arntzen, Magnus Øverlie; Vaaje-Kolstad, Gustav; Eijsink, Vincent G H

    2017-04-01

    The chitinolytic machinery of Serratia marcescens BJL200 has been studied in detail over the last couple of decades, however, the proteome secreted by this Gram-negative bacterium during growth on chitin has not been studied in depth. In addition, the genome of this most studied chitinolytic Serratia strain has until now, not been sequenced. We report a draft genome sequence for S. marcescens BJL200. Using label-free quantification (LFQ) proteomics and a recently developed plate-method for assessing secretomes during growth on solid substrates, we find that, as expected, the chitin-active enzymes (ChiA, B, C, and CBP21) are produced in high amounts when the bacterium grows on chitin. Other proteins produced in high amounts after bacterial growth on chitin provide interesting targets for further exploration of the proteins involved in degradation of chitin-rich biomasses. The genome encodes a fourth chitinase (ChiD), which is produced in low amounts during growth on chitin. Studies of chitin degradation with mixtures of recombinantly produced chitin-degrading enzymes showed that ChiD does not contribute to the overall efficiency of the process. ChiD is capable of converting N,N'-diacetyl chitobiose to N-acetyl glucosamine, but is less efficient than another enzyme produced for this purpose, the Chitobiase. Thus, the role of ChiD in chitin degradation, if any, remains unclear. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Remoção de Serratia marcescens (Enterobacteriaceae das mãos pelo uso de diferentes agentes degermantes Removal of Serratia marcescens (Enterobacteriaceae from hands contaminated with different degermants

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    Heloisa Nakai Kwabara

    2002-04-01

    Full Text Available Foi investigado o efeito imediato do sabão, álcool etílico 70%, polivinilpirrolidona-iodo 10% (PVP-I e clorhexidina 4% na remoção de uma amostra de Serratia marcescens aplicada nas mãos de cinco voluntários. Utilizou-se como modelo experimental um quadrado latino contendo dois blocos aleatorizados 5 x 4. No primeiro bloco (baixa contaminação, a taxa de remoção de Serratia marcescens (Enterobacteriaceae das mãos, expressa pelo fator de redução logarítmica (FRL, foi de 2,77 para o PVP-I e o álcool, 2,38 para a clorhexidina e de 1,88 para o sabão. Não houve diferença entre os tratamentos (P > 0,05. No segundo bloco (alta contaminação, o PVP-I (FRL = 5,71 e o álcool (FRL = 5,08 foram mais eficientes do que a clorhexidina (FRL = 2,80 e o sabão (FRL = 2,48 (P > 0,05. Os resultados sugerem que o PVP-I e o álcool podem ser mais eficazes na remoção de Serratia marcescens das mãos altamente contaminadasThe effectiveness of soap, 70% ethyl alcohol, 10% povidone-iodine (PVP-I, 4% chlorhexidine gluconate in removing a strain of Serratia marcescens (Enterobacteriaceae from contaminated hands of five volunteers was studied. The experiments were performed using a Latin square statistical design with two 5 x 4 randomized blocks. The removal rates of Serratia marcescens were estimated by analysis of variance. In the first block (lightly-contamination hand, the use of hand-cleansing agents resulted in 2.77 (PVP-I and alcohol, 2.38 (chlorhexidine, and 1.88 (soap log10 reduction factors (RF in counts of Serratia marcescens applied to the fingertips. There were no significant differences between treatments (P > .05. In the second block (heavily-contamination hand, PVP-I (RF, 5.71 and alcohol (RF, 5.08 were significantly more effective than chlorhexidine (RF, 2.80 and soap (RF, 2.48 (P > .05. The results suggest that PVP-I and 70% ethyl alcohol may be the most effective for removing this Serratia marcescens strain from heavily contaminated

  7. Serratia marcescens: Biochemical, Serological, and Epidemiological Characteristics and Antibiotic Susceptibility of Strains Isolated at Boston City Hospital

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilfert, James N.; Barrett, Fred F.; Ewing, W. H.; Finland, Maxwell; Kass, Edward H.

    1970-01-01

    The biochemical, serological, and epidemiological characteristics of 95 strains of Serratia marcescens isolated at the Boston City Hospital were examined. Several strains were shown to be endemic, and the majority of isolates were cultured from urine or respiratory secretions. Serratia species were highly resistant to polymyxin B and the cephalosporins, and various proportions were also resistant to other antibiotics including kanamycin, but all of the isolates were sensitive to gentamicin. The appearance of resistance to kanamycin and nalidixic acid among endemic strains was demonstrated. The nosocomial nature of Serratia infections, particularly those involving the urinary tract, was confirmed. Many clinical bacteriology laboratories currently fail to identify the nonpigmented strains. PMID:4314379

  8. A mobile genetic element in Serratia marcescens, a causative agent of onion disease

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    Reva O. N.

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To screen mobile genetic elements (MGE in the bacterium which caused decay of field-grown onion bulb and to study an integron and gene cassettes associated. Methods. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR and PCR products sequencing were used for both the bacterium and MGE identification. Terminally-labeled Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism (TRFLP analysis was performed for detection of any bacterium in the onion bulb tissue. Results. The bacterium, which caused field-grown onion decay, was identified by nucleotide sequence analysis of the 16S rRNA genes to be S. marcescens known as phytopathogen. However, this isolate did not respond to specific primers designed for pathogenic strains. Inoculation of onion (Allium cepa L., Arabidopsis thaliana (L. Heyhn, and lettuce (Lactuca sativa seeds resulted in biomass promotion of symptomless plants. PCR revealed the presence of a class 1 integron in S. marcescens IMBG291 which represents the first isolation of this integron in phytopathogenic Serratia species. The gene cassettes harbored by the integron have been represented with the promoterless genes encoded formimino-glutamate deiminase and ascorbate-specific phosphotransferase system enzyme IIC, and with additional three senseless sequences flanked by a 59-bp element. Conclusion. S. marcescens IMBG291 exhibited plant growth promotion or pathogenicity, depending on the environmental situation, due to horizontally acquired new gene cassettes located in the integron.

  9. Failed Reverse Total Shoulder Arthroplasty Caused by Recurrent Candida glabrata Infection with Prior Serratia marcescens Coinfection

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    John G. Skedros

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This report describes a 58-year-old insulin-dependent diabetic male patient who initially sustained a proximal humerus fracture from a fall. The fracture fixation failed and then was converted to a humeral hemiarthroplasty, which became infected with Candida glabrata and Serratia marcescens. After these infections were believed to be cured with antibacterial and antifungal treatments and two-stage irrigation and debridement, he underwent conversion to a reverse total shoulder arthroplasty. Unfortunately, the C. glabrata infection recurred and, nearly 1.5 years after implantation of the reverse total shoulder, he had a resection arthroplasty (removal of all implants and cement. His surgical and pharmacologic treatment concluded with (1 placement of a tobramycin-impregnated cement spacer also loaded with amphotericin B, with no plan for revision arthroplasty (i.e., the spacer was chronically retained, and (2 chronic use of daily oral fluconazole. We located only three reported cases of Candida species causing infection in shoulder arthroplasties (two C. albicans, one C. parapsilosis. To our knowledge, a total shoulder arthroplasty infected with C. glabrata has not been reported, nor has a case of a C. glabrata and S. marcescens periprosthetic coinfection in any joint. In addition, it is well known that S. marcescens infections are uncommon in periprosthetic joint infections.

  10. EXPRESSION OF A CHITINASE GENE FROM SERRATIA-MARCESCENS IN LACTOCOCCUS-LACTIS AND LACTOBACILLUS-PLANTARUM

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    BRURBERG, MB; HAANDRIKMAN, AJ; LEENHOUTS, KJ; VENEMA, G; NES, IF

    1994-01-01

    A chitinase gene from the Gram-negative bacterium Serratia marcescens BJL200 was cloned in Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis MG1363 and in the silage inoculum strain Lactobacillus plantarum E19b. The chitinase gene was expressed as an active enzyme at a low level in Lactococcus lactis, when cloned in

  11. Outbreak of Serratia marcescens colonization and infection traced to a Healthcare worker with long-term carriage on the hands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vries, Jutte J. C.; Baas, Willy H.; van der Ploeg, Kees; Heesink, Albert; Degener, John E.; Arends, Jan P.

    2006-01-01

    objective. To reveal the source of a nosocomial outbreak of colonization and infection with a strain of Serratia marcescens positive for Guiana extended-spectrum beta-lactamase 1 (GES-1) that occurred among patients in a neurosurgical intensive care unit (ICU) in a Dutch university medical center

  12. Three-year follow-up of an outbreak of Serratia marcescens bacteriuria in a neurosurgical intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Baek-Nam; Choi, Soon-Im; Ryoo, Nam-Hee

    2006-12-01

    We report on the investigations and interventions conducted to contain an extended outbreak of Serratia marcescens bacteriuria that lasted for years in a neurosurgical intensive care unit (NSICU). A case-control study was performed to identify the risk factors for S. marcescens acquisition in urine. In case patients, urine sampling for tests and central venous catheterization were performed more frequently before the isolation of S. marcescens. Case patients were more frequently prescribed third-generation cephalosporins. Adherence to hand antisepsis was encouraged through in-service educational meetings and infection control measures, especially concerning the manipulation of indwelling urinary catheters, were intensified. The outbreak persisted despite the reinforcement of infection control measures. However, no patient has newly acquired the organism in the NSICU since December 2004. Multiple factors, including inadequate infection control practices and inappropriate antimicrobial usage, possibly contributed to the persistence of this S. marcescens outbreak. Healthcare workers should consistently follow infection control policies to ensure quality care.

  13. Molecular detection and analysis of a novel metalloprotease gene of entomopathogenic Serratia marcescens strains in infected Galleria mellonella.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tambong, J T; Xu, R; Sadiku, A; Chen, Q; Badiss, A; Yu, Q

    2014-04-01

    Serratia marcescens strains isolated from entomopathogenic nematodes (Rhabditis sp.) were examined for their pathogenicity and establishment in wax moth (Galleria mellonella) larvae. All the Serratia strains were potently pathogenic to G. mellonella larvae, leading to death within 48 h. The strains were shown to possess a metalloprotease gene encoding for a novel serralysin-like protein. Rapid establishment of the bacteria in infected larvae was confirmed by specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR) detection of a DNA fragment encoding for this protein. Detection of the viable Serratia strains in infected larvae was validated using the SYBR Green reverse transcriptase real-time PCR assay targeting the metalloprotease gene. Nucleotide sequences of the metalloprotease gene obtained in our study showed 72 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) and 3 insertions compared with the metalloprotease gene of S. marcescens E-15. The metalloprotease gene had 60 synonymous and 8 nonsynonymous substitutions relative to the closest GenBank entry, S. marcescens E-15. A comparison of the amino acid composition of the new serralysin-like protein with that of the serralysin protein of S. marcescens E-15 revealed differences at 11 positions and a new aspartic acid residue. Analysis of the effect of protein variation suggests that a new aspartic acid residue resulting from nonsynonymous nucleotide mutations in the protein structure could have the most significant effect on its biological function. The new metalloprotease gene and (or) its product could have applications in plant agricultural biotechnology.

  14. [Isolation and physico-chemical properties of homogenous nuclease from Serratia marcescens].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filimonova, M N; Balaban, N P; Sharipova, F P; Leshchinskaia, I B

    1980-11-01

    A simplified procedure for purification of nuclease from Serratia marcescens, including chromatography on DEAE- and phosphocellulose in a stationary regime has been developed. The method described results in a physically homogenous enzyme, which does not contain phosphatase, phosphodiesterase or proteinase admixtures. The molecular weight of the enzyme as determined by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis is 33 000 +/- 10%. p-Chloromercurybenzoate (10(-2) M) completely inactivates the enzyme, while beta-mercaptoethanol (0,64 M) in the presence of 2 M urea causes only partial inactivation of the enzyme. Urea (4 or 7 M), when added to the reaction mixture, increases the enzyme activity 2,2-, 1,7- and 1,4-fold as compared to native, denaturated DNA and RNA, respectively.

  15. Mutant breeding of Serratia marcescens strain for enhancing prodigiosin production and application to textiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaoxia; Wang, Yujie; Sun, Shiqing; Zhu, Changjun; Xu, Wei; Park, Yongdoo; Zhou, Haimeng

    2013-01-01

    Microwaves have been used as a mutant agent to select mutant strains with high-yield and high-purity pigment. Mass spectrometry and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopic techniques were used to elucidate the structures of the pigment. High-performance liquid chromatography was used to measure pigment purity. The analysis of the mutant strain showed that pigment yield increased by 109% and was 98% pure. Prodigiosin in ethanol solution had good stability under ambient temperature and natural indoor light. However, prodigiosin rapidly decomposed under intense sunlight. Prodigiosin is an ecological colorant to dye fabrics, including synthetic and natural fibers. Synthetic fabrics dyed with prodigiosin, such as polyamide and acrylic, have high colorfastness to washing (≥4th grade) and antimicrobial properties (>90%) against Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus. Antimicrobial properties were significantly different between synthetic and natural fabrics. The mutant strain Serratia marcescens jx1-1, with high prodigiosin yield and purity, has promising prospects in food, cosmetic, and textile industries.

  16. Different restriction profiles of kappa prophage in Serratia marcescens K and HY.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steiger, H; Kimpel, E; Mohasseb-Karimlou, B

    1996-01-01

    Temperate phage kappa originated from the defectively lysogenic Serratia marcescens strain K, from where it was liberated after uv irradiation with low efficiency. The phage is usually indicated on strain HY that can be easily lysogenized by it and rather efficiently uv-induced. Comparing the Eco RI restriction profiles of the kappa prophage in HY revealed a DNA rearrangement, by which the precursor structure in K is converted into the non-defective form. Apparently the fragment containing the pac sequence is concerned since a phage DNA probe prepared from the assumed initiation fragments of the first particles of the packaging series gave two signals instead of one with genomic K DNA. Since several independent new kappa isolates showed the same Eco RI restriction pattern as the original phage of ELLMAUER and KAPLAN (1959), the generation of kappa is a reproducible event.

  17. Possibility of using strain F9 ( Serratia marcescens) as a bio-collector for hematite flotation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hui-fen; Li, Tian; Chang, Yan-hong; Luo, Hui; Tang, Qiong-yao

    2014-03-01

    In this study, we characterized strain F9 and evaluated the interaction between strain F9 and hematite by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Fourier transform infrared spectrophotometry (FTIR), zeta potential, flotation, and other methods. The results showed that strain F9 belongs to Serratia marcescens. This brevibacterium had CH2, CH3, and hydroxyl groups on its cell wall, which imparted a strong hydrophobic and negative charge. Adsorption of strain F9 reduced the zeta potential of the hematite surface and increased the hydrophobicity of the hematite surface, thereby generating hydrophobic hematite agglomerates. At least four groups on strain F9 interacted with the hematite surface, which contributed to chemical interactions of carboxylic groups and hydrophobic association among hydrophobic hematite particles. The possible use of strain F9 as a bio-collector for hematite flotation was proved.

  18. Serratia marcescens Is Able to Survive and Proliferate in Autophagic-Like Vacuoles inside Non-Phagocytic Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colombo, María Isabel; García Véscovi, Eleonora

    2011-01-01

    Serratia marcescens is an opportunistic human pathogen that represents a growing problem for public health, particularly in hospitalized or immunocompromised patients. However, little is known about factors and mechanisms that contribute to S. marcescens pathogenesis within its host. In this work, we explore the invasion process of this opportunistic pathogen to epithelial cells. We demonstrate that once internalized, Serratia is able not only to persist but also to multiply inside a large membrane-bound compartment. This structure displays autophagic-like features, acquiring LC3 and Rab7, markers described to be recruited throughout the progression of antibacterial autophagy. The majority of the autophagic-like vacuoles in which Serratia resides and proliferates are non-acidic and have no degradative properties, indicating that the bacteria are capable to either delay or prevent fusion with lysosomal compartments, altering the expected progression of autophagosome maturation. In addition, our results demonstrate that Serratia triggers a non-canonical autophagic process before internalization. These findings reveal that S. marcescens is able to manipulate the autophagic traffic, generating a suitable niche for survival and proliferation inside the host cell. PMID:21901159

  19. Effect of the bacterium Serratia marcescens SCBI on the longevity and reproduction of the nematode Caenorhabditis briggsae KT0001.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lancaster, Jeremiah D; Mohammad, Budour; Abebe, Eyualem

    2012-12-20

    Extensive research effort has advanced our understanding of Caenorhabditis as a model system, but its natural association with bacteria remains to be explored in an ecological context. Explored associations vary vastly from mutualistic to parasitic. Serratia marcescens has been shown to be pathogenic to Caenorhabditis with a fitness cost. The recent isolation of an entomopathogenic Caenorhabditis briggsae KT0001/S. marcescens SCBI association from the wild has allowed us to examine under laboratory conditions whether such an association poses a serious cost to Caenorhabditis as previously surmised for other Serratia. A fecundity table of Caenorhabditis briggsae KT0001 fed on S. marcescens SCBI and the control fed on E. coli OP50 is presented. We found no significant difference in survivorship or total fecundity between the S. marcescens SCBI fed and E. coli OP50 fed Caenorhabditis briggsae KT0001. Only the mean onset of reproduction was significantly different between the two groups with E. coli fed C. briggsae maturing earlier (2.12 days) than those fed on Serratia (2.42 days). S. marcescens SCBI is not highly pathogenic to C. briggsae KT0001 indicating that the entomopathogenicity reported for this association may be beneficial for both the nematode and bacteria. In light of the fact that hitherto conducted experimental tests conform to widely held view that Serratia are highly pathogenic to Caenorhabditis, the absence of a high fitness cost for C. briggsae we report here may indicate that this entomopathogenic association is non-transient suggesting nematode/bacterial associations in the wild may vary greatly. Consequently, broad generalizations about nematode/bacterial associations should be interpreted with care.

  20. Effect of the bacterium Serratia marcescens SCBI on the longevity and reproduction of the nematode Caenorhabditis briggsae KT0001

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    Lancaster Jeremiah D

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Extensive research effort has advanced our understanding of Caenorhabditis as a model system, but its natural association with bacteria remains to be explored in an ecological context. Explored associations vary vastly from mutualistic to parasitic. Serratia marcescens has been shown to be pathogenic to Caenorhabditis with a fitness cost. The recent isolation of an entomopathogenic Caenorhabditis briggsae KT0001/S. marcescens SCBI association from the wild has allowed us to examine under laboratory conditions whether such an association poses a serious cost to Caenorhabditis as previously surmised for other Serratia. Results A fecundity table of Caenorhabditis briggsae KT0001 fed on S. marcescens SCBI and the control fed on E. coli OP50 is presented. We found no significant difference in survivorship or total fecundity between the S. marcescens SCBI fed and E. coli OP50 fed Caenorhabditis briggsae KT0001. Only the mean onset of reproduction was significantly different between the two groups with E. coli fed C. briggsae maturing earlier (2.12 days than those fed on Serratia (2.42 days. Conclusion S. marcescens SCBI is not highly pathogenic to C. briggsae KT0001 indicating that the entomopathogenicity reported for this association may be beneficial for both the nematode and bacteria. In light of the fact that hitherto conducted experimental tests conform to widely held view that Serratia are highly pathogenic to Caenorhabditis, the absence of a high fitness cost for C. briggsae we report here may indicate that this entomopathogenic association is non-transient suggesting nematode/bacterial associations in the wild may vary greatly. Consequently, broad generalizations about nematode/bacterial associations should be interpreted with care.

  1. Serratia marcescens arn, a PhoP-Regulated Locus Necessary for Polymyxin B Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Quei Yen; Tsai, Yi-Lin; Liu, Ming-Che; Lin, Wei-Cheng; Hsueh, Po-Ren

    2014-01-01

    Polymyxins, which are increasingly being used to treat infections caused by multidrug-resistant bacteria, perform poorly against Serratia marcescens. To investigate the underlying mechanisms, Tn5 mutagenesis was performed and two mutants exhibiting increased polymyxin B (PB) susceptibility were isolated. The mutants were found to have Tn5 inserted into the arnB and arnC genes. In other bacteria, arnB and arnC belong to the seven-gene arn operon, which is involved in lipopolysaccharide (LPS) modification. LPSs of arn mutants had greater PB-binding abilities than that of wild-type LPS. Further, we identified PhoP, a bacterial two-component response regulator, as a regulator of PB susceptibility in S. marcescens. By the reporter assay, we found PB- and low-Mg2+-induced expression of phoP and arn in the wild-type strain but not in the phoP mutant. Complementation of the phoP mutant with the full-length phoP gene restored the PB MIC and induction by PB and low Mg2+ levels, as in the wild type. An electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA) further demonstrated that PhoP bound directly to the arn promoter. The PB challenge test confirmed that pretreatment with PB and low Mg2+ levels protected S. marcescens from a PB challenge in the wild-type strain but not in the phoP mutant. Real-time reverse transcriptase-PCR also indicated that PB serves as a signal to regulate expression of ugd, a gene required for LPS modification, in S. marcescens through a PhoP-dependent pathway. Finally, we found that PB-resistant clinical isolates displayed greater expression of arnA upon exposure to PB than did susceptible isolates. This is the first report to describe the role of S. marcescens arn in PB resistance and its modulation by PB and Mg2+ through the PhoP protein. PMID:24957827

  2. Use of quantitative real-time PCR for direct detection of serratia marcescens in marine and other aquatic environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joyner, Jessica; Wanless, David; Sinigalliano, Christopher D; Lipp, Erin K

    2014-03-01

    Serratia marcescens is the etiological agent of acroporid serratiosis, a distinct form of white pox disease in the threatened coral Acropora palmata. The pathogen is commonly found in untreated human waste in the Florida Keys, which may contaminate both nearshore and offshore waters. Currently there is no direct method for detection of this bacterium in the aquatic or reef environment, and culture-based techniques may underestimate its abundance in marine waters. A quantitative real-time PCR assay was developed to detect S. marcescens directly from environmental samples, including marine water, coral mucus, sponge tissue, and wastewater. The assay targeted the luxS gene and was able to distinguish S. marcescens from other Serratia species with a reliable quantitative limit of detection of 10 cell equivalents (CE) per reaction. The method could routinely discern the presence of S. marcescens for as few as 3 CE per reaction, but it could not be reliably quantified at this level. The assay detected environmental S. marcescens in complex sewage influent samples at up to 761 CE ml(-1) and in septic system-impacted residential canals in the Florida Keys at up to 4.1 CE ml(-1). This detection assay provided rapid quantitative abilities and good sensitivity and specificity, which should offer an important tool for monitoring this ubiquitous pathogen that can potentially impact both human health and coral health.

  3. Diversity and specificity in the interaction between Caenorhabditis elegans and the pathogen Serratia marcescens

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    Ewbank Jonathan J

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Co-evolutionary arms races between parasites and hosts are considered to be of immense importance in the evolution of living organisms, potentially leading to highly dynamic life-history changes. The outcome of such arms races is in many cases thought to be determined by frequency dependent selection, which relies on genetic variation in host susceptibility and parasite virulence, and also genotype-specific interactions between host and parasite. Empirical evidence for these two prerequisites is scarce, however, especially for invertebrate hosts. We addressed this topic by analysing the interaction between natural isolates of the soil nematode Caenorhabditis elegans and the pathogenic soil bacterium Serratia marcescens. Results Our analysis reveals the presence of i significant variation in host susceptibility, ii significant variation in pathogen virulence, and iii significant strain- and genotype-specific interactions between the two species. Conclusions The results obtained support the previous notion that highly specific interactions between parasites and animal hosts are generally widespread. At least for C. elegans, the high specificity is observed among isolates from the same population, such that it may provide a basis for and/or represent the outcome of co-evolutionary adaptations under natural conditions. Since both C. elegans and S. marcescens permit comprehensive molecular analyses, these two species provide a promising model system for inference of the molecular basis of such highly specific interactions, which are as yet unexplored in invertebrate hosts.

  4. Apoptosis of Epithelial Cells and Macrophages due to Nonpigmented Serratia marcescens Strains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krzymińska, Sylwia; Ochocka, Katarzyna; Kaznowski, Adam

    2012-01-01

    Serratia marcescens strains are opportunistic pathogens that are increasingly recognized as a cause of severe nosocomial infections. In this study we observed interactions between nonpigmented strains with human epithelial and macrophage-like cells. The strains revealed hemolytic activity only after the contact of the cells with erythrocytes. The contact of the bacteria with the host cells was also essential to their cytotoxicity. Moreover, all strains revealed adherence ability and were invasive to epithelial cells. Analyses of cellular morphology and DNA fragmentation of the HEp-2 and J774 cells exhibited typical features of cells undergoing apoptosis. We observed morphological changes, including condensation of nuclear chromatin and formation of membrane-bound apoptotic bodies. The lowest apoptotic index in HEp-2 cells did not exceed 25%, whereas the highest reached 59% at 24 h and 72% at 48 h after infection. Most of the strains (60%) induced fragmentation of nuclear DNA. The process depended on the activation of caspases, and was completely blocked by the pan-caspase inhibitor z-VAD-fmk. This study provided new insights into the mechanisms of nonpigmented S. marcescens pathogenesis. The results revealed that the strains produce cell-contact toxins that facilitate bacterial invasion, induce hemolysis, cytotoxicity, and apoptosis of host cells. PMID:22649305

  5. Apoptosis of Epithelial Cells and Macrophages due to Nonpigmented Serratia marcescens Strains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sylwia Krzymińska

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Serratia marcescens strains are opportunistic pathogens that are increasingly recognized as a cause of severe nosocomial infections. In this study we observed interactions between nonpigmented strains with human epithelial and macrophage-like cells. The strains revealed hemolytic activity only after the contact of the cells with erythrocytes. The contact of the bacteria with the host cells was also essential to their cytotoxicity. Moreover, all strains revealed adherence ability and were invasive to epithelial cells. Analyses of cellular morphology and DNA fragmentation of the HEp-2 and J774 cells exhibited typical features of cells undergoing apoptosis. We observed morphological changes, including condensation of nuclear chromatin and formation of membrane-bound apoptotic bodies. The lowest apoptotic index in HEp-2 cells did not exceed 25%, whereas the highest reached 59% at 24 h and 72% at 48 h after infection. Most of the strains (60% induced fragmentation of nuclear DNA. The process depended on the activation of caspases, and was completely blocked by the pan-caspase inhibitor z-VAD-fmk. This study provided new insights into the mechanisms of nonpigmented S. marcescens pathogenesis. The results revealed that the strains produce cell-contact toxins that facilitate bacterial invasion, induce hemolysis, cytotoxicity, and apoptosis of host cells.

  6. Novel tetracycline resistance determinant isolated from an environmental strain of Serratia marcescens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Stuart A; Maani, Elizabeth V; Lindell, Angela H; King, Catherine J; McArthur, J Vaun

    2007-04-01

    Resistances to tetracycline and mercury were identified in an environmental strain of Serratia marcescens isolated from a stream highly contaminated with heavy metals. As a step toward addressing the mechanisms of coselection of heavy metal and antibiotic resistances, the tetracycline resistance determinant was cloned in Escherichia coli. Within the cloned 13-kb segment, the tetracycline resistance locus was localized by deletion analysis and transposon mutagenesis. DNA sequence analysis of an 8.0-kb region revealed a novel gene [tetA(41)] that was predicted to encode a tetracycline efflux pump. Phylogenetic analysis showed that the TetA(41) protein was most closely related to the Tet(39) efflux protein of Acinetobacter spp. yet had less than 80% amino acid identity with known tetracycline efflux pumps. Adjacent to the tetA(41) gene was a divergently transcribed gene [tetR(41)] predicted to encode a tetracycline-responsive repressor protein. The tetA(41)-tetR(41) intergenic region contained putative operators for TetR(41) binding. The tetA(41) and tetR(41) promoters were analyzed using lacZ fusions, which showed that the expression of both the tetA(41) and tetR(41) genes exhibited TetR(41)-dependent regulation by subinhibitory concentrations of tetracycline. The apparent lack of plasmids in this S. marcescens strain, as well as the presence of metabolic genes adjacent to the tetracycline resistance locus, suggested that the genes were located on the S. marcescens chromosome and may have been acquired by transduction. The cloned Tet 41 determinant did not confer mercury resistance to E. coli, confirming that Tet 41 is a tetracycline-specific efflux pump rather than a multidrug transporter.

  7. Spaceflight Causes Increased Virulence of Serratia Marcescens on a Drosophila Melanogaster Host

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharya, Sharmila; Wade, William; Clemens-Grisham, Rachel; Hosamani, Ravikumar; Bhardwaj, Shilpa R.; Lera, Matthew P.; Gresser, Amy L.

    2015-01-01

    Drosophila melanogaster, or the fruit fly, has long been an important organism for Earth-based research, and is now increasingly utilized as a model system to understand the biological effects of spaceflight. Studies in Drosophila melanogaster have shown altered immune responses in 3rd instar larvae and adult males following spaceflight, changes similar to those observed in astronauts. In addition, spaceflight has also been shown to affect bacterial physiology, as evidenced by studies describing altered virulence of Salmonella typhimurium following spaceflight and variation in biofilm growth patterns for the opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa during flight. We recently sent Serratia marcescens Db11, a Drosophila pathogen and an opportunistic human pathogen, to the ISS on SpaceX-5 (Fruit Fly Lab-01). S. marcescens samples were stored at 4degC for 24 days on-orbit and then allowed to grow for 120 hours at ambient station temperature before being returned to Earth. Upon return, bacteria were isolated and preserved in 50% glycerol or RNAlater. Storage, growth, and isolation for ground control samples were performed using the same procedures. Spaceflight and ground samples stored in 50% glycerol were diluted and injected into 5-7-day-old ground-born adult D. melanogaster. Lethality was significantly greater in flies injected with the spaceflight samples compared to those injected with ground bacterial samples. These results indicate a shift in the virulence profile of the spaceflight S. marcescens Db11 and will be further assessed with molecular biological analyses. Our findings strengthen the conclusion that spaceflight impacts the virulence of bacterial pathogens on model host organisms such as the fruit fly. This research was supported by NASA's ISS Program Office (ISSPO) and Space Life and Physical Sciences Research and Applications (SLPSRA).

  8. Cutaneous Serratia marcescens infections in Korea: A retrospective analysis of 13 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Jimyung; Shin, Dongyun; Oh, Sang Ho; Lee, Ju Hee; Chung, Kee Yang; Lee, Min-Geol; Kim, Dae Suk

    2016-02-01

    Serratia marcescens is a Gram-negative bacillus belonging to the Enterobacteriaceae family. Because of increasing reports of antimicrobial resistance, this bacterium has received considerable attention and has emerged as an important pathogen. In order to reveal clinical and microbiological characteristics of S. marcescens cutaneous infection and to suggest appropriate antibiotic treatment, we retrospectively analyzed 17 strains isolated from wound swabs of Korean patients between November 2005 and March 2014. A total of 13 patients (five men and eight women) were included in our study, with a mean age of 46.3 years (range, 21-82). Based on medical history, seven patients were classified as immunocompromised. Prior predisposing factors for infections were noted in 12 patients, including pre-existing leg ulcers or dermatitis (5/13), preceding cancer surgeries (2/13), plastic surgeries and filler injection (2/13), traumas (2/13) and medical procedures following cutaneous abscess (1/13). Cutaneous infections showed various clinical presentations, including spontaneous dermal abscess, fingernail change, painful nodules and papular erosions. We found that third- and fourth-generation cephalosporins, gentamicin, levofloxacin and meropenem appeared active against all 17 strains in vitro. Clinically, all patients treated with empirical first-generation cephalosporin showed treatment resistance, and oral quinolone monotherapy was the most preferred antibiotic regimen without treatment failure, with an average treatment duration of 25 days (range, 14-42). This study demonstrates the various clinical presentations and treatment responses for cutaneous S. marcescens infection. Moreover, we suggest that initial antibiotic coverage should be broad enough to account for multidrug resistance in this rare pathogen. © 2015 Japanese Dermatological Association.

  9. Identification of SlpB, a Cytotoxic Protease from Serratia marcescens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanks, Robert M Q; Stella, Nicholas A; Hunt, Kristin M; Brothers, Kimberly M; Zhang, Liang; Thibodeau, Patrick H

    2015-07-01

    The Gram-negative bacterium and opportunistic pathogen Serratia marcescens causes ocular infections in healthy individuals. Secreted protease activity was characterized from 44 ocular clinical isolates, and a higher frequency of protease-positive strains was observed among keratitis isolates than among conjunctivitis isolates. A positive correlation between protease activity and cytotoxicity to human corneal epithelial cells in vitro was determined. Deletion of prtS in clinical keratitis isolate K904 reduced, but did not eliminate, cytotoxicity and secreted protease production. This indicated that PrtS is necessary for full cytotoxicity to ocular cells and implied the existence of another secreted protease(s) and cytotoxic factors. Bioinformatic analysis of the S. marcescens Db11 genome revealed three additional open reading frames predicted to code for serralysin-like proteases noted here as slpB, slpC, and slpD. Induced expression of prtS and slpB, but not slpC and slpD, in strain PIC3611 rendered the strain cytotoxic to a lung carcinoma cell line; however, only prtS induction was sufficient for cytotoxicity to a corneal cell line. Strain K904 with deletion of both prtS and slpB genes was defective in secreted protease activity and cytotoxicity to human cell lines. PAGE analysis suggests that SlpB is produced at lower levels than PrtS. Purified SlpB demonstrated calcium-dependent and AprI-inhibited protease activity and cytotoxicity to airway and ocular cell lines in vitro. Lastly, genetic analysis indicated that the type I secretion system gene, lipD, is required for SlpB secretion. These genetic data introduce SlpB as a new cytotoxic protease from S. marcescens. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  10. Protracted Regional Dissemination of GIM-1-Producing Serratia marcescens in Western Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wendel, Andreas F; Kaase, Martin; Autenrieth, Ingo B; Peter, Silke; Oberhettinger, Philipp; Rieber, Heime; Pfeffer, Klaus; MacKenzie, Colin R; Willmann, Matthias

    2017-03-01

    The metallo-beta-lactamase GIM-1 has been found in various bacterial host species nearly exclusively in western Germany. However, not much is known about the epidemiology of GIM-1-positive Serratia marcescens Here we report on a surprisingly protracted regional dissemination. In-hospital transmission was investigated by using conventional epidemiological tools to identify spatiotemporal links. Strain typing was performed using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and whole-genome sequencing (WGS). Bayesian phylogeny was used to infer the time axis of the observed occurrence. Thirteen S. marcescens strains from 10 patients from 6 different German hospitals were investigated. Suspected in-hospital transmissions were confirmed by molecular typing at a higher resolution by WGS than by PFGE. A detailed sequence analysis demonstrated the spread of one predominant strain variant but also provided evidence for transfer of the blaGIM-1 gene cassette between different strains. A Bayesian phylogenetic analysis showed that the most recent common ancestor of the identified clonal cluster could be dated back to April 1993 (95% highest posterior density interval, January 1973 to March 2003) and that this strain might have already harbored the blaGIM-1 at that time and, therewith, years before the first detection of this resistance gene in clinical specimens. This study shows a long-standing clonal and plasmid-mediated expansion of GIM-1-producing S. marcescens that might have gone unnoticed in the absence of a standardized and effective molecular screening for carbapenemases. The systematic and early detection of resistance is thus highly advisable, especially for the prevention of potentially long-term dissemination that may progress beyond control. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  11. Draft Whole-Genome Sequence of Serratia marcescens Strain MCB, Associated with Oscheius sp. MCB (Nematoda: Rhabditidae) Isolated from South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serepa, Mahloro H; Gray, Vincent M

    2014-09-18

    Here we report on the draft genome sequence of Serratia marcescens strain MCB associated with Oscheius sp. MCB (Nematoda: Rhabditidae) isolated from South African soil. S. marcescens strain MCB has 5,304,212-bp genome size with 4,877 genes and a G+C content of 59.1%. Copyright © 2014 Serepa and Gray.

  12. Draft Whole-Genome Sequence of Serratia marcescens Strain MCB, Associated with Oscheius sp. MCB (Nematoda: Rhabditidae) Isolated from South Africa

    OpenAIRE

    Serepa, Mahloro H.; Vincent M. Gray

    2014-01-01

    Here we report on the draft genome sequence of Serratia marcescens strain MCB associated with Oscheius sp. MCB (Nematoda: Rhabditidae) isolated from South African soil. S. marcescens strain MCB has 5,304,212-bp genome size with 4,877 genes and a G+C content of 59.1%.

  13. Risk Assessment for the Spread of Serratia marcescens Within Dental-Unit Waterline Systems Using Vermamoeba vermiformis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lal, Sham; Singhrao, Sim K; Achilles-Day, Undine E M; Morton, L H Glyn; Pearce, Mark; Crean, StJohn

    2015-10-01

    Vermamoeba vermiformis is associated with the biofilm ecology of dental-unit waterlines (DUWLs). This study investigated whether V. vermiformis is able to act as a vector for potentially pathogenic bacteria and so aid their dispersal within DUWL systems. Clinical dental water was initially examined for Legionella species by inoculating it onto Legionella selective-medium plates. The molecular identity/profile of the glassy colonies obtained indicated none of these isolates were Legionella species. During this work bacterial colonies were identified as a non-pigmented Serratia marcescens. As the water was from a clinical DUWL which had been treated with Alpron™, this prompted the question as to whether S. marcescens had developed resistance to the biocide. Exposure to Alpron™ indicated that this dental biocide was effective, under laboratory conditions, against S. marcescens at up to 1 × 10(8) colony forming units/millilitre (cfu/ml). V. vermiformis was cultured for 8 weeks on cells of S. marcescens and Escherichia coli. Subsequent electron microscopy showed that V. vermiformis grew equally well on S. marcescens and E. coli (P = 0.0001). Failure to detect the presence of S. marcescens within the encysted amoebae suggests that V. vermiformis is unlikely to act as a vector supporting the growth of this newly isolated, nosocomial bacterium.

  14. Proteomic Identification of Novel Secreted Antibacterial Toxins of the Serratia marcescens Type VI Secretion System*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fritsch, Maximilian J.; Trunk, Katharina; Diniz, Juliana Alcoforado; Guo, Manman; Trost, Matthias; Coulthurst, Sarah J.

    2013-01-01

    It has recently become apparent that the Type VI secretion system (T6SS) is a complex macromolecular machine used by many bacterial species to inject effector proteins into eukaryotic or bacterial cells, with significant implications for virulence and interbacterial competition. “Antibacterial” T6SSs, such as the one elaborated by the opportunistic human pathogen, Serratia marcescens, confer on the secreting bacterium the ability to rapidly and efficiently kill rival bacteria. Identification of secreted substrates of the T6SS is critical to understanding its role and ability to kill other cells, but only a limited number of effectors have been reported so far. Here we report the successful use of label-free quantitative mass spectrometry to identify at least eleven substrates of the S. marcescens T6SS, including four novel effector proteins which are distinct from other T6SS-secreted proteins reported to date. These new effectors were confirmed as antibacterial toxins and self-protecting immunity proteins able to neutralize their cognate toxins were identified. The global secretomic study also unexpectedly revealed that protein phosphorylation-based post-translational regulation of the S. marcescens T6SS differs from that of the paradigm, H1-T6SS of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Combined phosphoproteomic and genetic analyses demonstrated that conserved PpkA-dependent threonine phosphorylation of the T6SS structural component Fha is required for T6SS activation in S. marcescens and that the phosphatase PppA can reverse this modification. However, the signal and mechanism of PpkA activation is distinct from that observed previously and does not appear to require cell–cell contact. Hence this study has not only demonstrated that new and species-specific portfolios of antibacterial effectors are secreted by the T6SS, but also shown for the first time that PpkA-dependent post-translational regulation of the T6SS is tailored to fit the needs of different bacterial

  15. Serratia marcescens Suppresses Host Cellular Immunity via the Production of an Adhesion-inhibitory Factor against Immunosurveillance Cells*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishii, Kenichi; Adachi, Tatsuo; Hamamoto, Hiroshi; Sekimizu, Kazuhisa

    2014-01-01

    Injection of a culture supernatant of Serratia marcescens into the bloodstream of the silkworm Bombyx mori increased the number of freely circulating immunosurveillance cells (hemocytes). Using a bioassay with live silkworms, serralysin metalloprotease was purified from the culture supernatant and identified as the factor responsible for this activity. Serralysin inhibited the in vitro attachment of both silkworm hemocytes and murine peritoneal macrophages. Incubation of silkworm hemocytes or murine macrophages with serralysin resulted in degradation of the cellular immune factor BmSPH-1 or calreticulin, respectively. Furthermore, serralysin suppressed in vitro phagocytosis of bacteria by hemocytes and in vivo bacterial clearance in silkworms. Disruption of the ser gene in S. marcescens attenuated its host killing ability in silkworms and mice. These findings suggest that serralysin metalloprotease secreted by S. marcescens suppresses cellular immunity by decreasing the adhesive properties of immunosurveillance cells, thereby contributing to bacterial pathogenesis. PMID:24398686

  16. Serratia marcescens suppresses host cellular immunity via the production of an adhesion-inhibitory factor against immunosurveillance cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishii, Kenichi; Adachi, Tatsuo; Hamamoto, Hiroshi; Sekimizu, Kazuhisa

    2014-02-28

    Injection of a culture supernatant of Serratia marcescens into the bloodstream of the silkworm Bombyx mori increased the number of freely circulating immunosurveillance cells (hemocytes). Using a bioassay with live silkworms, serralysin metalloprotease was purified from the culture supernatant and identified as the factor responsible for this activity. Serralysin inhibited the in vitro attachment of both silkworm hemocytes and murine peritoneal macrophages. Incubation of silkworm hemocytes or murine macrophages with serralysin resulted in degradation of the cellular immune factor BmSPH-1 or calreticulin, respectively. Furthermore, serralysin suppressed in vitro phagocytosis of bacteria by hemocytes and in vivo bacterial clearance in silkworms. Disruption of the ser gene in S. marcescens attenuated its host killing ability in silkworms and mice. These findings suggest that serralysin metalloprotease secreted by S. marcescens suppresses cellular immunity by decreasing the adhesive properties of immunosurveillance cells, thereby contributing to bacterial pathogenesis.

  17. A Novel 6'-N-Aminoglycoside Acetyltransferase, AAC(6')-Ial, from a Clinical Isolate of Serratia marcescens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tada, Tatsuya; Miyoshi-Akiyama, Tohru; Shimada, Kayo; Dahal, Rajan K; Mishra, Shyam K; Ohara, Hiroshi; Kirikae, Teruo; Pokhrel, Bharat M

    2016-03-01

    Serratia marcescens IOMTU115 has a novel 6'-N-aminoglycoside acetyltransferase-encoding gene, aac(6')-Ial. The encoded protein AAC(6')-Ial has 146 amino acids, with 91.8% identity to the amino acid sequence of AAC(6')-Ic in S. marcescens SM16 and 97.3% identity to the amino acid sequence of AAC(6')-Iap in S. marcescens WW4. The minimum inhibitory concentrations of aminoglycosides for Escherichia coli expressing AAC(6')-Ial were similar to those for E. coli expressing AAC(6')-Ic or AAC(6')-Iap. Thin-layer chromatography showed that AAC(6')-Ial, AAC(6')-Ic, or AAC(6')-Iap acetylated all the aminoglycosides tested, except for apramycin, gentamicin, and lividomycin. Kinetics assays revealed that AAC(6')-Ial is a functional acetyltransferase against aminoglycosides. The aac(6')-Ial gene was located on chromosomal DNA.

  18. High-level soluble expression of Serratia marcescens H30 lipase in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Erzheng; Xu, Jingjing; Wu, Xiangping

    2015-01-01

    Serratia marcescens lipase (SmL) is an important biocatalyst used to enantioselectively hydrolyze (±)-trans-3-(4-methoxyphynyl) glycidic acid methyl ester. However, the economically justified level recombinant soluble expression of SmL in Escherichia coli has not been established. Thus, fusion genes of lipase from S. marcescens H30 with different fusion tags were constructed and expressed in E. coli. The effects of fusion tags were revealed. A significant increase in recombinant lipase solubility showed that E. coli BL21 (DE3)/pET32a-SmL was a suitable choice for SmL production. To optimize the performance of recombinant SmL production, changes in culture medium compositions and induction conditions were systematically tested. Finally, the recombinant SmL activity and productivity reached approximately 23,000 U/L and 1,278 U/L/H in shake flasks, respectively. This value is the highest SmL activity attained by heterogeneous recombinant expression in E. coli. Lipase activity and productivity reached 19,650 U/L and 1,228 U/L/H, respectively, by scaling up SmL production in a 7.0 L fermenter. The existence of the Trx tag did not influence the chiral selectivity of recombinant SmL. These findings indicate a possibility for soluble and economical SmL expression in E. coli to meet industrial needs. © 2014 International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  19. ENDOPHTHALMITIS CAUSED BY SERRATIA MARCESCENS: Clinical Features, Antibiotic Susceptibilities, and Treatment Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sridhar, Jayanth; Kuriyan, Ajay E; Flynn, Harry W; Smiddy, William E; Venincasa, Vincent D; Miller, Darlene

    2015-06-01

    To report the clinical features, antibiotic sensitivities, and visual outcomes associated with endophthalmitis caused by Serratia marcescens. A consecutive case series of patients with vitreous culture-positive endophthalmitis caused by S. marcescens from July 1, 1993, to June 30, 2012, at a large university referral center. Findings from this study were compared with those of a previous study (January 1980-June 1993) from our institution. Of the 10 study patients who were identified, clinical settings included trabeculectomy bleb-associated (n = 3), post-cataract surgery (n = 2), post-penetrating keratoplasty (n = 2), post-scleral buckle (n = 1), glaucoma drainage implant-associated (n = 1), and post-keratoprosthesis (n = 1). Clinical features included pain (n = 10) and hypopyon (n = 5). Presenting visual acuity was hand motions or worse in seven cases. All isolates were sensitive to gentamicin, ceftazidime, imipenem, and levofloxacin. The MIC 90s of isolates for antibiotics tested in the current period compared with isolates from January 1980 to June 1993 were unchanged. All isolates were resistant to vancomycin. Initial treatment strategies were vitreous tap and intravitreal antibiotic injection (n = 8), pars plana vitrectomy with intravitreal antibiotic injection (n = 1), and evisceration (n = 1). When repeat vitreous fluid was obtained, persistent positive cultures were present in 1 (10%) of 10 patients in this study, compared with 5 (50%) of 10 patients in the previous study. Final visual acuity was no light perception in 6 of 10 patients (60%). Outcomes were generally poor with a high rate of complete visual loss in the affected eye.

  20. Serratia marcescens in a neonatal intensive care unit: two long-term multiclone outbreaks in a 10-year observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casolari, Chiara; Pecorari, Monica; Della Casa, Elisa; Cattani, Silvia; Venturelli, Claudia; Fabio, Giuliana; Tagliazucchi, Sara; Serpini, Giulia Fregni; Migaldi, Mario; Marchegiano, Patrizia; Rumpianesi, Fabio; Ferrari, Fabrizio

    2013-10-01

    We investigated two consecutive Serratia marcescens (S. marcescens) outbreaks which occurred in a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) of a tertiary level hospital in North Italy in a period of 10 years (January 2003-December 2012). Risk factors associated with S. marcescens acquisition were evaluated by a retrospective case-control study. A total of 21,011 clinical samples was examined: S. marcescens occurred in 127 neonates: 43 developed infection and 3 died. Seven clusters were recorded due to 12 unrelated clones which persisted for years in the ward, although no environmental source was found. The main epidemic clone A sustaining the first cluster in 2003 reappeared in 2010 as an extended spectrum ?-lactamase (ESBL)-producing strain and supporting the second epidemic. Birth weight, gestational age, use of invasive devices and length of stay in the ward were significantly related to S. marcescens acquisition. The opening of a new ward for non-intensive care-requiring neonates, strict adherence to alcoholic hand disinfection, the timely identification and isolation of infected and colonized neonates assisted in containing the epidemics. Genotyping was effective in tracing the evolution and dynamics of the clones demonstrating their long-term persistence in the ward.

  1. Recent independent emergence of multiple multidrug-resistant Serratia marcescens clones within the United Kingdom and Ireland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moradigaravand, Danesh; Boinett, Christine J; Martin, Veronique; Peacock, Sharon J; Parkhill, Julian

    2016-08-01

    Serratia marcescens, a member of the Enterobacteriaceae family, is a Gram-negative bacterium responsible for a wide range of nosocomial infections. The emergence of multidrug-resistant strains is an increasing danger to public health. To design effective means to control the dissemination of S. marcescens, an in-depth analysis of the population structure and variation is required. Utilizing whole-genome sequencing, we characterized the population structure and variation, as well as the antimicrobial resistance determinants, of a systematic collection of antimicrobial-resistant S. marcescens associated with bloodstream infections in hospitals across the United Kingdom and Ireland between 2001 and 2011. Our results show that S. marcescens is a diverse species with a high level of genomic variation. However, the collection was largely composed of a limited number of clones that emerged from this diverse background within the past few decades. We identified potential recent transmissions of these clones, within and between hospitals, and showed that they have acquired antimicrobial resistance determinants for different beta-lactams, ciprofloxacin, and tetracyclines on multiple occasions. The expansion of these multidrug-resistant clones suggests that the treatment of S. marcescens infections will become increasingly difficult in the future. © 2016 Moradigaravand et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  2. Outbreak of a cluster with epidemic behavior due to Serratia marcescens after colistin administration in a hospital setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merkier, Andrea Karina; Rodríguez, María Cecilia; Togneri, Ana; Brengi, Silvina; Osuna, Carolina; Pichel, Mariana; Cassini, Marcelo H; Centrón, Daniela

    2013-07-01

    Serratia marcescens causes health care-associated infections with important morbidity and mortality. Particularly, outbreaks produced by multidrug-resistant isolates of this species, which is already naturally resistant to several antibiotics, including colistin, are usually described with high rates of fatal outcomes throughout the world. Thus, it is important to survey factors associated with increasing frequency and/or emergence of multidrug-resistant S. marcescens nosocomial infections. We report the investigation and control of an outbreak with 40% mortality due to multidrug-resistant S. marcescens infections that happened from November 2007 to April 2008 after treatment with colistin for Acinetobacter baumannii meningitis was started at hospital H1 in 2005. Since that year, the epidemiological pattern of frequently recovered species has changed, with an increase of S. marcescens and Proteus mirabilis infections in 2006 in concordance with a significant decrease of the numbers of P. aeruginosa and A. baumannii isolates. A single pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) cluster of S. marcescens isolates was identified during the outbreak. When this cluster was compared with S. marcescens strains (n = 21) from 10 other hospitals (1997 to 2010), it was also identified in both sporadic and outbreak isolates circulating in 4 hospitals in Argentina. In132::ISCR1::blaCTX-M-2 was associated with the multidrug-resistant cluster with epidemic behavior when isolated from outbreaks. Standard infection control interventions interrupted transmission of this cluster even when treatment with colistin continued in several wards of hospital H1 until now. Optimizing use of colistin should be achieved simultaneously with improved infection control to prevent the emergence of species naturally resistant to colistin, such as S. marcescens and P. mirabilis.

  3. Late-onset neonatal sepsis, risk factors and interventions: an analysis of recurrent outbreaks of Serratia marcescens, 2006-2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuelsson, A; Isaksson, B; Hanberger, H; Olhager, E

    2014-01-01

    Between 2006 and 2011, 11 patients with Serratia marcescens sepsis and 47 patients colonized due to the spread of various clones were observed. These recurrent clusters brought about interventions to reduce spread between patients. To evaluate the effect of stepwise interventions to prevent S. marcescens colonization/sepsis and to analyse risk factors for late-onset sepsis (LOS). An open retrospective observational study was performed to evaluate the interventions. A retrospective case-control study was performed to analyse the risk factors for LOS. S. marcescens sepsis and colonization decreased after the stepwise adoption of hygiene interventions. Low gestational age, low birth weight, indwelling central venous or umbilical catheter, and ventilator treatment were identified as risk factors for LOS. Compliance with basic hygiene guidelines was the only intervention monitored continuously from late 2007. Compliance increased gradually to a steady high level in early 2009. There was a decrease in S. marcescens LOS, clustering after the second quarter of 2008. After the first quarter of 2009, S. marcescens colonization decreased. It was not possible to identify the specific effects of each intervention, but it is likely that an update of the hospital's antibiotic policy affected the occurrence of S. marcescens LOS. The delayed effect of interventions on S. marcescens colonization was probably due to the time it takes for new routines to have an effect, illustrated by the gradual increase in compliance with basic hygiene guidelines. Copyright © 2013 The Healthcare Infection Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Biosynthesis of bismuth nanoparticles using Serratia marcescens isolated from the Caspian Sea and their characterisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazari, P; Faramarzi, M A; Sepehrizadeh, Z; Mofid, M R; Bazaz, R D; Shahverdi, A R

    2012-06-01

    Today, synthesis of nanoparticles (NPs) using micro-organisms has been receiving increasing attention. In this investigation, a bismuth-reducing bacterium was isolated from the Caspian Sea in Northern Iran and was used for intracellular biosynthesis of elemental bismuth NPs. This isolate was identified as non-pigmented Serratia marcescens using conventional identification assays and the 16s rDNA fragment amplification method and used to prepare bismuth NPs. The biogenic bismuth NPs were released by liquid nitrogen and highly purified using an n-octanol water two-phase extraction system. Different characterisations of the purified NPs such as particle shapes, size and purity were carried out with different instruments. The energy-dispersive X-ray and X-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns demonstrated that the purified NPs consisted of only bismuth and are amorphous. In addition, the transmission electron micrograph showed that the small NPs formed larger aggregated NPs around <150 nm. Although the chemical syntheses of elemental bismuth NPs have been reported in the literature, the biological synthesis of elemental bismuth NPs has not been published yet. This is the first report to demonstrate a biological method for synthesising bismuth NPs and their purification with a simple solvent partitioning method.

  5. Characterization and regulation of the 2,3-butanediol pathway in Serratia marcescens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Ben; Zhang, Liao Yuan; Sun, Jian'an; Su, Gang; Wei, Dongzhi; Chu, Ju; Zhu, Jiawen; Shen, Yaling

    2012-03-01

    Serratia marcescens has been proved to be a potential strain for industrial 2,3-butanediol production for its high yield, productivity, and other advantages. In this study, the genes slaA, slaB, slaC, and slaR were successfully cloned which were further confirmed to be encoding acetolactate decarboxylase, acetolactate synthase, 2,3-butanediol dehydrogenase, and a LysR-like regulator, respectively. Unlike in Klebsiella sp. or Klebsiella pneumonie and Vibrio sp. or Vibrio cholerae, the gene slaC is separated from other genes. Then it showed that two regulators, SwrR and SlaR, are in charge of this process by exerting effect on the transcription of genes slaA and slaB. By contrast, the expression of gene slaC is unaffected by the two regulators. It means that these two regulators affect the production of 2,3-butanediol by regulating the production of acetoin. Based on these findings, we successfully accelerated the 2,3-butanediol production by inactivation of gene swrR. The obtained results and further investigations should lead to a more suitable fermentation strategy and strain improvement which would be applicable to the industrial production of 2,3-butanediol.

  6. Influence of incubation temperature on biofilm formation and corrosion of carbon steel by Serratia marcescens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harimawan, Ardiyan; Devianto, Hary; Kurniawan, Ignatius Chandra; Utomo, Josephine Christine

    2017-01-01

    Microbial induced corrosion (MIC) or biocorrosion is one type of corrosion, directly or indirectly influenced by microbial activities, by forming biofilm and adhering on the metal surface. When forming biofilm, the microorganisms can produce extracellular products which influence the cathodic and anodic reactions on metal surfaces. This will result in electrochemical changes in the interface between the biofilm and the metal surface, leading to corrosion and deterioration of the metal. MIC might be caused by various types of microorganism which leads to different corrosion mechanism and reaction kinetics. Furthermore, this process will also be influenced by various environmental conditions, such as pH and temperature. This research is aimed to determine the effect of incubation temperature on corrosion of carbon steel caused by Serratia marcescens in a mixture solution of synthetic seawater with Luria Bertani medium with a ratio of 4:1. The incubation was performed for 19 days with incubation temperature of 30, 37, and 50°C. The analyses of biofilm were conducted by total plate count (TPC), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). Biofilm was found to be evenly growth on the surface and increasing with increasing incubation temperature. It consists of functional group of alcohol, alkane, amine, nitro, sulfate, carboxylic acid, and polysulfide. The analyses of the corrosion were conducted by gravimetric and X-ray diffraction (XRD). Higher incubation temperature was found to increase the corrosion rate. However, the corrosion products were not detected by XRD analysis.

  7. Mechanisms involved in Escherichia coli and Serratia marcescens removal during activated sludge wastewater treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orruño, Maite; Garaizabal, Idoia; Bravo, Zaloa; Parada, Claudia; Barcina, Isabel; Arana, Inés

    2014-01-01

    Wastewater treatment reduces environmental contamination by removing gross solids and mitigating the effects of pollution. Treatment also reduces the number of indicator organisms and pathogens. In this work, the fates of two coliform bacteria, Escherichia coli and Serratia marcescens, were analyzed in an activated sludge process to determine the main mechanisms involved in the reduction of pathogenic microorganisms during wastewater treatment. These bacteria, modified to express green fluorescent protein, were inoculated in an activated sludge unit and in batch systems containing wastewater. The results suggested that, among the different biological factors implied in bacterial removal, bacterivorous protozoa play a key role. Moreover, a representative number of bacteria persisted in the system as free-living or embedded cells, but their distribution into liquid or solid fractions varied depending on the bacterium tested, questioning the real value of bacterial indicators for the control of wastewater treatment process. Additionally, viable but nonculturable cells constituted an important part of the bacterial population adhered to solid fractions, what can be derived from the competition relationships with native bacteria, present in high densities in this environment. These facts, taken together, emphasize the need for reliable quantitative and qualitative analysis tools for the evaluation of pathogenic microbial composition in sludge, which could represent an undefined risk to public health and ecosystem functions when considering its recycling. PMID:25044599

  8. RssAB signaling coordinates early development of surface multicellularity in Serratia marcescens.

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    Yu-Huan Tsai

    Full Text Available Bacteria can coordinate several multicellular behaviors in response to environmental changes. Among these, swarming and biofilm formation have attracted significant attention for their correlation with bacterial pathogenicity. However, little is known about when and where the signaling occurs to trigger either swarming or biofilm formation. We have previously identified an RssAB two-component system involved in the regulation of swarming motility and biofilm formation in Serratia marcescens. Here we monitored the RssAB signaling status within single cells by tracing the location of the translational fusion protein EGFP-RssB following development of swarming or biofilm formation. RssAB signaling is specifically activated before surface migration in swarming development and during the early stage of biofilm formation. The activation results in the release of RssB from its cognate inner membrane sensor kinase, RssA, to the cytoplasm where the downstream gene promoters are located. Such dynamic localization of RssB requires phosphorylation of this regulator. By revealing the temporal activation of RssAB signaling following development of surface multicellular behavior, our findings contribute to an improved understanding of how bacteria coordinate their lifestyle on a surface.

  9. Molecular cloning and purification of an endochitinase from Serratia marcescens (Nima).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-Sanchez, Alejandro; Cruz-Camarillo, Ramon; Salcedo-Hernandez, Ruben; Ibarra, Jorge E; Barboza-Corona, Jose Eleazar

    2005-10-01

    An endochitinase gene from the Serratia marcescens Nima strain (chiA Nima) was cloned, sequenced, and expressed in Escherichia coli DH5alphaF', and the recombinant protein (ChiA Nima) was purified by hydrophobic interaction chromatography. chiA Nima contains an open reading frame (ORF) that encodes an endochitinase with a deduced molecular weight and an isoelectric point of 61 kDa and 6.84, respectively. A sequence at the 5'-end was identified as a signal peptide, recognized by Gram-negative bacteria transport mechanism. Comparison of ChiA Nima with other chitinases revealed a modular structure formed by the catalytic domain and a putative chitin-binding domain. The purified chitinase was able to hydrolyze both trimeric and tetrameric fluorogenic substrates, but not a chitobiose analog substrate. ChiA Nima showed high enzymatic activity within a broad pH range (pH 4.0-10.0), with a peak activity at pH 5.5. The optimal temperature for enzymatic activity was detected at 55 degrees C.

  10. Systematic Analysis of White Pox Disease in Acropora palmata of the Florida Keys and Role of Serratia marcescens.

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    Joyner, Jessica L; Sutherland, Kathryn P; Kemp, Dustin W; Berry, Brett; Griffin, Ashton; Porter, James W; Amador, Molly H B; Noren, Hunter K G; Lipp, Erin K

    2015-07-01

    White pox disease (WPD) affects the threatened elkhorn coral, Acropora palmata. Owing in part to the lack of a rapid and simple diagnostic test, there have been few systematic assessments of the prevalence of acroporid serratiosis (caused specifically by Serratia marcescens) versus general WPD signs. Six reefs in the Florida Keys were surveyed between 2011 and 2013 to determine the disease status of A. palmata and the prevalence of S. marcescens. WPD was noted at four of the six reefs, with WPD lesions found on 8 to 40% of the colonies surveyed. S. marcescens was detected in 26.9% (7/26) of the WPD lesions and in mucus from apparently healthy colonies both during and outside of disease events (9%; 18/201). S. marcescens was detected with greater frequency in A. palmata than in the overlying water column, regardless of disease status (P = 0.0177). S. marcescens could not be cultured from A. palmata but was isolated from healthy colonies of other coral species and was identified as pathogenic pulsed-field gel electrophoresis type PDR60. WPD lesions were frequently observed on the reef, but unlike in prior outbreaks, no whole-colony death was observed. Pathogenic S. marcescens was circulating on the reef but did not appear to be the primary pathogen in these recent WPD episodes, suggesting that other pathogens or stressors may contribute to signs of WPD. Results highlight the critical importance of diagnostics in coral disease investigations, especially given that field manifestation of disease may be similar, regardless of the etiological agent. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  11. The dependence of quorum sensing in Serratia marcescens JG on the transcription of luxS gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Shu-Jing; Liu, Yu-Chen; Sun, Jiao; Zhu, Hu

    2015-06-01

    Bacteria communicate with one another using chemical signal molecules. This phenomenon termed quorum sensing enables the bacteria to monitor the environment for other bacteria and to alter behavior on a population-wide scale in response to cell density. Serratia marcescens JG, a quorum sensing bacterium, can secrete a furanosyl borate diester autoinducer (AI-2) in the exponential phase of growth. In this study, to further investigate the regulation of AI-2 production in S. marcescens JG, the pfs and luxS promoter fusions to an operon luxCDABE reporter were constructed in a low-copy-number vector pBR322K, which allows an examination of transcription of the genes in the pathway for signal synthesis. The results show that the luxS expression is constitutive, and the transcription of luxS is tightly correlated with AI-2 production in S. marcescens JG because the peaks of AI-2 production and transcriptional level of luxS appear at the same time point. The close relation of the profiles of luxS transcription and AI-2 production was also confirmed with real-time PCR technology. These results support the hypothesis that the quorum sensing in S. marcescens JG is luxS dependent.

  12. Serratia marcescens Induces Apoptotic Cell Death in Host Immune Cells via a Lipopolysaccharide- and Flagella-dependent Mechanism*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishii, Kenichi; Adachi, Tatsuo; Imamura, Katsutoshi; Takano, Shinya; Usui, Kimihito; Suzuki, Kazushi; Hamamoto, Hiroshi; Watanabe, Takeshi; Sekimizu, Kazuhisa

    2012-01-01

    Injection of Serratia marcescens into the blood (hemolymph) of the silkworm, Bombyx mori, induced the activation of c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase (JNK), followed by caspase activation and apoptosis of blood cells (hemocytes). This process impaired the innate immune response in which pathogen cell wall components, such as glucan, stimulate hemocytes, leading to the activation of insect cytokine paralytic peptide. S. marcescens induced apoptotic cell death of silkworm hemocytes and mouse peritoneal macrophages in vitro. We searched for S. marcescens transposon mutants with attenuated ability to induce apoptosis of silkworm hemocytes. Among the genes identified, disruption mutants of wecA (a gene involved in lipopolysaccharide O-antigen synthesis), and flhD and fliR (essential genes in flagella synthesis) showed reduced motility and impaired induction of mouse macrophage cell death. These findings suggest that S. marcescens induces apoptosis of host immune cells via lipopolysaccharide- and flagella-dependent motility, leading to the suppression of host innate immunity. PMID:22859304

  13. Serratia marcescens-contaminated baby shampoo causing an outbreak among newborns at King Abdulaziz University Hospital, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madani, T A; Alsaedi, S; James, L; Eldeek, B S; Jiman-Fatani, A A; Alawi, M M; Marwan, D; Cudal, M; Macapagal, M; Bahlas, R; Farouq, M

    2011-05-01

    During November 2008 to January 2009, 11 babies in the neonatal intensive care (NICU) and three babies in the nursery were infected with Serratia marcescens at King Abdulaziz University Hospital in Saudi Arabia. Overall, fifteen infections were identified among 11 newborns in the NICU: septicaemia (five cases), purulent conjunctivitis (three), urinary tract infection (two), meningitis (two) and cellulitis (one). Three newborns in the nursery had three infections: purulent conjunctivitis (two cases) and omphalitis (one). Thirteen of 14 babies recovered fully but one died from S. marcescens meningitis and septicaemia. All infections were traced to intrinsically contaminated baby shampoo introduced to the units five days before the first reported case. The outbreak terminated following withdrawal of the shampoo product. Copyright © 2011 The Healthcare Infection Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Multi-fractal characterization of bacterial swimming dynamics: a case study on real and simulated Serratia marcescens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koorehdavoudi, Hana; Bogdan, Paul; Wei, Guopeng; Marculescu, Radu; Zhuang, Jiang; Carlsen, Rika Wright; Sitti, Metin

    2017-07-01

    To add to the current state of knowledge about bacterial swimming dynamics, in this paper, we study the fractal swimming dynamics of populations of Serratia marcescens bacteria both in vitro and in silico, while accounting for realistic conditions like volume exclusion, chemical interactions, obstacles and distribution of chemoattractant in the environment. While previous research has shown that bacterial motion is non-ergodic, we demonstrate that, besides the non-ergodicity, the bacterial swimming dynamics is multi-fractal in nature. Finally, we demonstrate that the multi-fractal characteristic of bacterial dynamics is strongly affected by bacterial density and chemoattractant concentration.

  15. Multi-fractal characterization of bacterial swimming dynamics: a case study on real and simulated Serratia marcescens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koorehdavoudi, Hana; Bogdan, Paul; Wei, Guopeng; Marculescu, Radu; Zhuang, Jiang; Carlsen, Rika Wright; Sitti, Metin

    2017-07-01

    To add to the current state of knowledge about bacterial swimming dynamics, in this paper, we study the fractal swimming dynamics of populations of Serratia marcescens bacteria both in vitro and in silico, while accounting for realistic conditions like volume exclusion, chemical interactions, obstacles and distribution of chemoattractant in the environment. While previous research has shown that bacterial motion is non-ergodic, we demonstrate that, besides the non-ergodicity, the bacterial swimming dynamics is multi-fractal in nature. Finally, we demonstrate that the multi-fractal characteristic of bacterial dynamics is strongly affected by bacterial density and chemoattractant concentration.

  16. Biodegradation of diazinon by Serratia marcescens DI101 and its use in bioremediation of contaminated environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abo-Amer, Aly

    2011-01-01

    Four diazinon-degrading bacteria were isolated from agricultural soil by using an enrichment technique. The biochemical analysis and molecular method including RFLP indicated that these isolates were identical, and one strain designated DI101 was selected for further study. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rDNA sequencing indicated that the strain DI101 clearly belongs to the Serratia marcescens group. The ability of the strain to utilize diazinon as a source of carbon and phosphorus was investigated under different culture conditions. The DI101 strain was able to completely degrade 50 mg/l diazinon in MSM within 11 days with a degradation rate of 0.226 day-1. The inoculation of sterilized soil treated with 100 mg/kg of diazinon with 10(6) CFU/g DI101 resulted in a faster degradation rate than was recorded in non-sterilized soil. The diazinon degradation rate by DI101 was efficient at temperatures from 25 to 30degrees C and at pHs from 7.0 to 8.0. The degradation rate of diazinon was not affected by the absence of a phosphorus supplement, and addition of other carbon sources (glucose or succinate) resulted in the slowing down of the degradation rate. The maximum degradation rate (Vmax) of diazinon was 0.292 day-1 and its saturation constant (Ks) was 11 mg/l, as determined by a Michaelis-Menten curve. The strain was able to degrade diethylthiophosphate-containing organophosphates such as chlorpyrifos, coumaphos, parathion, and isazofos when provided as a source of carbon and phosphorus, but not ethoprophos, cadusafos, and fenamiphos. These results propose useful information for the potential application of the DI101 strain in bioremediation of pesticide-contaminated environments.

  17. Tetrameric structure of the flagellar cap protein FliD from Serratia marcescens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, So Yeon; Song, Wan Seok; Hong, Ho Jeong; Lee, Geun-Shik; Kang, Seung Goo; Ko, Hyun-Jeong; Kim, Pyeung-Hyeun; Yoon, Sung-Il

    2017-07-15

    Bacterial motility is provided by the flagellum. FliD is located at the distal end of the flagellum and plays a key role in the insertion of each flagellin protein at the growing tip of the flagellar filament. Because FliD functions as an oligomer, the determination of the oligomeric state of FliD is critical to understanding the molecular mechanism of FliD-mediated flagellar growth. FliD has been shown to adopt a pentameric or a hexameric structure depending on the bacterial species. Here, we report another distinct oligomeric form of FliD based on structural and biochemical studies. The crystal structures of the D2 and D3 domains of Serratia marcescens FliD (smFliD) were determined in two crystal forms and together revealed that smFliD assembles into a tetrameric architecture that resembles a four-pointed star plate. smFliD tetramerization was also confirmed in solution by cross-linking experiments. Although smFliD oligomerizes in a head-to-tail orientation using a common primary binding interface between the D2 and D3' domains (the prime denotes the second subunit in the oligomer) similarly to other FliD orthologs, the smFliD tetramer diverges to present a unique secondary D2-D2' binding interface. Our structure-based comparative analysis of FliD suggests that bacteria have developed diverse species-specific oligomeric forms of FliD that range from tetramers to hexamers for flagellar growth. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Enhancing activity and thermostability of lipase A from Serratia marcescens by site-directed mutagenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadi, Mohsen; Sepehrizadeh, Zargham; Ebrahim-Habibi, Azadeh; Shahverdi, Ahmad Reza; Faramarzi, Mohammad Ali; Setayesh, Neda

    2016-11-01

    Lipases as significant biocatalysts had been widely employed to catalyze various chemical reactions such as ester hydrolysis, ester synthesis, and transesterification. Improving the activity and thermostability of enzymes is desirable for industrial applications. The lipase of Serratia marcescens belonging to family I.3 lipase has a very important pharmaceutical application in production of chiral precursors. In the present study, to achieve improved lipase activity and thermostability, using computational predictions of protein, four mutant lipases of SML (MutG2P, MutG59P, Mut H279K and MutL613WA614P) were constructed by site-directed mutagenesis. The recombinant mutant proteins were over-expressed in E. coli and purified by affinity chromatography on the Ni-NTA system. Circular dichroism spectroscopy, differential scanning calorimetry and kinetic parameters (Km and kcat) were determined. Our results have shown that the secondary structure of all lipases was approximately similar to one another. The MutG2P and MutG59P were more stable than wild type by approximately 2.3 and 2.9 in T1/2, respectively. The catalytic efficiency (kcat/Km) of MutH279K was enhanced by 2-fold as compared with the wild type (p<0.05). These results indicate that using protein modeling program and creating mutation, can enhance lipase activity and/or thermostability of SML and it also could be used for improving other properties of enzyme to the desired requirements as well as further mutations. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Secretion and activation of the Serratia marcescens hemolysin by structurally defined ShlB mutants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pramanik, Avijit; Könninger, Ulrich; Selvam, Arun; Braun, Volkmar

    2014-05-01

    The ShlA hemolysin of Serratia marcescens is secreted across the outer membrane by the ShlB protein; ShlB belongs to the two-partner secretion system (type Vb), a subfamily of the Omp85 outer membrane protein assembly and secretion superfamily. During secretion, ShlA is converted from an inactive non-hemolytic form into an active hemolytic form. The structure of ShlB is predicted to consist of the N-terminal α-helix H1, followed by the two polypeptide-transport-associated domains POTRA P1 and P2, and the β-barrel of 16 β-strands. H1 is inserted into the pore of the β-barrel in the outer membrane; P1 and P2 are located in the periplasm. To obtain insights into the secretion and activation of ShlA by ShlB, we isolated ShlB mutants impaired in secretion and/or activation. The triple H1 P1 P2 mutant did not secrete ShlA. The P1 and P2 deletion derivatives secreted reduced amounts of ShlA, of which P1 showed some hemolysis, whereas P2 was inactive. Deletion of loop 6 (L6), which is conserved among exporters of the Omp85 family, compromised activation but retained low secretion. Secretion-negative mutants generated by random mutagenesis were located in loop 6. The inactive secreted ShlA derivatives were complemented in vitro to active ShlA by an N-terminal ShlA fragment (ShlA242) secreted by ShlB. Deletion of H1 did not impair secretion of hemolytic ShlA. The study defines domains of ShlB which are important for ShlA secretion and activation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  20. Antagonism of Serratia marcescens towards Phytophthora parasitica and its effects in promoting the growth of citrus Antagonismo de Serratia marcescens contra Phytophthora parasitica e seu efeito na promoção do crescimentos de citros

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brigida Pimentel Villar de Queiroz

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Phytophthora parasitica causes serious widespread, and difficult-to-control root rots in warmer regions. This oomycete is one of the most important pathogen of citrus. This paper reports the biological control of the pathogen by a strain of Serratia marcescens R-35, isolated from citrus rhizosphere. In greenhouse trials, the bacterium suppressed more than 50% of the disease and promoted the plant growth.Phytophthora parasitica é um oomiceto que causa sérios problemas fitossanitários em diferentes espécies de plantas em regiões tropicais e o controle tem sido difícil. Este patógeno é um dos mais importante à citricultura. Este trabalho relata o controle biológico do patógeno por uma linhagem de Serratia marcescens R-35, isolada da rizosfera de citros. Em condições de casa-de-vegetação, a bactéria reduziu em mais de 50% a incidência da doença, ao mesmo tempo que promoveu o crescimento de plantas.

  1. Signaling-mediated cross-talk modulates swarming and biofilm formation in a coral pathogen Serratia marcescens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alagely, Ali; Krediet, Cory J; Ritchie, Kim B; Teplitski, Max

    2011-01-01

    Interactions within microbial communities associated with marine holobionts contribute importantly to the health of these symbiotic organisms formed by invertebrates, dinoflagellates and bacteria. However, mechanisms that control invertebrate-associated microbiota are not yet fully understood. Hydrophobic compounds that were isolated from surfaces of asymptomatic corals inhibited biofilm formation by the white pox pathogen Serratia marcescens PDL100, indicating that signals capable of affecting the associated microbiota are produced in situ. However, neither the origin nor structures of these signals are currently known. A functional survey of bacteria recovered from coral mucus and from cultures of the dinoflagellate Symbiodinium spp. revealed that they could alter swarming and biofilm formation in S. marcescens. As swarming and biofilm formation are inversely regulated, the ability of some native α-proteobacteria to affect both behaviors suggests that the α-proteobacterial signal(s) target a global regulatory switch controlling the behaviors in the pathogen. Isolates of Marinobacter sp. inhibited both biofilm formation and swarming in S. marcescens PDL100, without affecting growth of the coral pathogen, indicative of the production of multiple inhibitors, likely targeting lower level regulatory genes or functions. A multi-species cocktail containing these strains inhibited progression of a disease caused by S. marcescens in a model polyp Aiptasia pallida. An α-proteobacterial isolate 44B9 had a similar effect. Even though ∼4% of native holobiont-associated bacteria produced compounds capable of triggering responses in well-characterized N-acyl homoserine lactone (AHL) biosensors, there was no strong correlation between the production of AHL-like signals and disruption of biofilms or swarming in S. marcescens. PMID:21509042

  2. Purification, characterization, and properties of an alkaline protease produced by Serratia marcescens S3-R1 inhabiting Korean ginseng rhizosphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nam, Myoung Soo; Whang, Kyung Sook; Choi, Seong Hyun; Bae, Hyoung Churl; Kim, Yoo Kyeong; Park, Young W

    2013-12-01

    An alkaline protease produced by the Serratia marcescens S3-R1 which inhabits in the Korean ginseng rhizosphere was investigated. The purposes of this study were to characterize and purify the bacterial enzyme by four different purification steps: precipitation of enzyme fraction by ammonium sulfate, loading the enzyme pellets on a DEAE-Sepharose anion-exchange chromatograph, separation of the fraction containing enzyme activity by fast protein liquid Mono Q chromatography and identification of the single-band fraction by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, and then quantification of the single-band fraction by reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography. The molecular weight of the purified protease was estimated as 50 308 Da by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight analysis. The N-terminal amino acid sequence of the protease was identified as Ala-Val-Thr-Ile-Glu-Asp-Ala-Val-Asp-Asp, and the enzyme belongs to the metalloprotease family. The optimal activities of the protease occurred at pH 7-9 and a temperature 40 °C. The ranges of pH and thermal stability of the enzyme were at 7-10 and 30-40 °C, respectively. The alkaline protease was successfully purified and characterized from the bacterium Serratia marcescens S3-R1, which has potential for industrial application, including milk protein hydrolysates. © 2013 Society of Chemical Industry.

  3. Role of the phosphopantetheinyltransferase enzyme, PswP, in the biosynthesis of antimicrobial secondary metabolites by Serratia marcescens Db10.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerc, Amy J; Stanley-Wall, Nicola R; Coulthurst, Sarah J

    2014-08-01

    Phosphopantetheinyltransferase (PPTase) enzymes fulfil essential roles in primary and secondary metabolism in prokaryotes, archaea and eukaryotes. PPTase enzymes catalyse the essential modification of the carrier protein domain of fatty acid synthases, polyketide synthases (PKSs) and non-ribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPSs). In bacteria and fungi, NRPS and PKS enzymes are often responsible for the biosynthesis of secondary metabolites with clinically relevant properties; these secondary metabolites include a variety of antimicrobial peptides. We have previously shown that in the Gram-negative bacterium Serratia marcescens Db10, the PPTase enzyme PswP is essential for the biosynthesis of an NRPS-PKS dependent antibiotic called althiomycin. In this work we utilize bioinformatic analyses to classify PswP as belonging to the F/KES subfamily of Sfp type PPTases and to putatively identify additional NRPS substrates of PswP, in addition to the althiomycin NRPS-PKS, in Ser. marcescens Db10. We show that PswP is required for the production of three diffusible metabolites by this organism, each possessing antimicrobial activity against Staphylococcus aureus. Genetic analyses identify the three metabolites as althiomycin, serrawettin W2 and an as-yet-uncharacterized siderophore, which may be related to enterobactin. Our results highlight the use of an individual PPTase enzyme in multiple biosynthetic pathways, each contributing to the ability of Ser. marcescens to inhibit competitor bacteria by the production of antimicrobial secondary metabolites. © 2014 The Authors.

  4. Serratia marcescens strains implicated in adverse transfusion reactions form biofilms in platelet concentrates and demonstrate reduced detection by automated culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greco-Stewart, V S; Brown, E E; Parr, C; Kalab, M; Jacobs, M R; Yomtovian, R A; Ramírez-Arcos, S M

    2012-04-01

    Serratia marcescens is a gram-negative bacterium that has been implicated in adverse transfusion reactions associated with contaminated platelet concentrates. The aim of this study was to investigate whether the ability of S. marcescens to form surface-attached aggregates (biofilms) could account for contaminated platelet units being missed during screening by the BacT/ALERT automated culture system. Seven S. marcescens strains, including biofilm-positive and biofilm-negative control strains and five isolates recovered from contaminated platelet concentrates, were grown in enriched Luria-Bertani medium and in platelets. Biofilm formation was examined by staining assay, dislodging experiments and scanning electron microscopy. Clinical strains were also analysed for their ability to evade detection by the BacT/ALERT system. All strains exhibited similar growth in medium and platelets. While only the biofilm-positive control strain formed biofilms in medium, this strain and three clinical isolates associated with transfusion reactions formed biofilms in platelet concentrates. The other two clinical strains, which had been captured during platelet screening by BacT/ALERT, failed to form biofilms in platelets. Biofilm-forming clinical isolates were approximately three times (Pmarcescens strains associated with transfusion reactions form biofilms under platelet storage conditions, and initial biofilm formation correlates with missed detection of contaminated platelet concentrates by the BacT/ALERT system. © 2011 The Author(s). Vox Sanguinis © 2011 International Society of Blood Transfusion.

  5. Seed treatment with ethanol extract of Serratia marcescens is compatible with Trichoderma isolates for control of damping-off of cucumber caused by Pythium ultimum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Environmentally friendly control measures for soil-borne plant pathogens are needed that are effective in different soils when applied alone or as components of an integrated disease control strategy. Ethanol extracts of Serratia marcescens N4-5 when applied as a cucumber seed treatment effectively ...

  6. Enantioselective synthesis of (R)-phenylephrine by Serratia marcescens BCRC10948 cells that homologously express SM_SDR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuan, Yi-Chia; Xu, Yue-Bin; Wang, Wen-Ching; Yang, Ming-Te

    2018-03-01

    A short-chain dehydrogenase/reductase from Serratia marcescens BCRC10948, SM_SDR, has been cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli for the bioconversion of 1-(3-hydroxyphenyl)-2-(methylamino) ethanone (HPMAE) to (R)-phenylephrine[(R)-PE]. However, only 5.11mM (R)-PE was obtained from 10mM HPMAE after a 9h conversion in the previous report. To improve the biocatalytic efficiency, the homologous expression of the SM_SDR in S. marcescens BCRC10948 was achieved using the T5 promoter for expression. By using 2% glycerol as carbon source, we found that 8.00±0.15mM of (R)-PE with more than 99% enantiomeric excess was produced from 10mM HPMAE after 12h conversion at 30°C and pH 7.0. More importantly, by using 50mM HPMAE as the substrate, 23.78±0.84mM of (R)-PE was produced after a 12h conversion with the productivity and the conversion yield of 1.98mmol (R)-PE/lh and 47.50%, respectively. The recombinant S. marcescens cells could be recycled 6 times for the production of (R)-PE, and the bioconversion efficiency remained at 85% when compared to that at the first cycle. Our data indicated that a high conversion efficiency of HPMAE to (R)-PE could be achieved using S. marcescens BCRC10948 cells that homologously express the SM_SDR. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Biodegradation and bioremediation potential of diazinon-degrading Serratia marcescens to remove other organophosphorus pesticides from soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cycoń, Mariusz; Żmijowska, Agnieszka; Wójcik, Marcin; Piotrowska-Seget, Zofia

    2013-03-15

    The ability of diazinon-degrading Serratia marcescens to remove organophosphorus pesticides (OPPs), i.e. chlorpyrifos (CP), fenitrothion (FT), and parathion (PT) was studied in a mineral salt medium (MSM) and in three soils of different characteristics. This strain was capable of using all insecticides at concentration of 50 mg/l as the only carbon source when grown in MSM, and 58.9%, 70.5%, and 82.5% of the initial dosage of CP, FT, and PT, respectively was degraded within 14 days. The biodegradation experiment showed that autochthonous microflora in all soils was characterized by a degradation potential of all tested OPPs; however, the initial lag phases for degradation of CP and FT, especially in sandy soil, were observed. During the 42-day experiment, 45.3%, 61.4% and 72.5% of the initial dose of CP, FT, and PT, respectively, was removed in sandy soil whereas the degradation of CP, FT, and PT in the same period, in sandy loam and silty soils reached 61.4%, 79.7% and 64.2%, and 68.9%, 81.0% and 63.6%, respectively. S. marcescens introduced into sterile soils showed a higher degradation potential (5-13%) for OPPs removal than those observed in non-sterile soil with naturally occurring attenuation. Inoculation of non-sterile soils with S. marcescens enhanced the disappearance rates of all insecticides, and DT50 for CP, FT, and PT was reduced by 20.7, 11.3 and 13.0 days, and 11.9, 7.0 and 8.1 days, and 9.7, 14.5 and 12.6 days in sandy, sandy loam, and silty soils, respectively, in comparison with non-sterile soils with only indigenous microflora. This ability of S. marcescens makes it a suitable strain for bioremediation of soils contaminated with OPPs. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Cefepime shows good efficacy and no antibiotic resistance in pneumonia caused by Serratia marcescens and Proteus mirabilis - an observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yayan, Josef; Ghebremedhin, Beniam; Rasche, Kurt

    2016-03-23

    Many antibiotics have no effect on Gram-positive and Gram-negative microbes, which necessitates the prescription of broad-spectrum antimicrobial agents that can lead to increased risk of antibiotic resistance. These pathogens constitute a further threat because they are also resistant to numerous beta-lactam antibiotics, as well as other antibiotic groups. This study retrospectively investigates antimicrobial resistance in hospitalized patients suffering from pneumonia triggered by Gram-negative Serratia marcescens or Proteus mirabilis. The demographic and clinical data analyzed in this study were obtained from the clinical databank of the HELIOS Clinic, Witten/Herdecke University, Wuppertal, Germany, for inpatients presenting with pneumonia triggered by S. marcescens or P. mirabilis from 2004 to 2014. An antibiogram was conducted for the antibiotics utilized as part of the management of patients with pneumonia triggered by these two pathogens. Pneumonia was caused by Gram-negative bacteria in 115 patients during the study period from January 1, 2004, to August 12, 2014. Of these, 43 (37.4 %) hospitalized patients [26 males (60.5 %, 95 % CI 45.9 %-75.1 %) and 17 females (39.5 %, 95 % CI 24.9 %-54.1 %)] with mean age of 66.2 ± 13.4 years had pneumonia triggered by S. marcescens, while 20 (17.4 %) patients [14 males (70 %, 95 % CI 49.9 %-90.1 %) and 6 females (30 %, 95 % CI 9.9 %-50.1 %)] with a mean age of 64.6 ± 12.8 years had pneumonia caused by P. mirabilis. S. marcescens showed an increased antibiotic resistance to ampicillin (100 %), ampicillin-sulbactam (100 %), and cefuroxime (100 %). P. mirabilis had a high resistance to tetracycline (100 %) and ampicillin (55 %). S. marcescens (P marcescens and P. mirabilis were resistant to several commonly used antimicrobial agents, but showed no resistance to cefepime.

  9. Effect of Endotoxin from Serratia marcescens on the Permeability of Vessels in Hepatomas and Carrageenin Granulomas of Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oswald, N. T. A.; Cater, D. B.

    1969-01-01

    Serratia marcescens polysaccharide (endotoxin) was injected i.v. into rats bearing carrageenin-induced granulomas and transplanted hepatomas, and the vascular-permeability changes were studied by injecting Pelikan ink i.v. at various times after the endotoxin (or saline in the controls). When the ink was given at 0 or 1 hr. there was little difference between the treated rats and the controls. But when the ink was given 2 or more hr. after the endotoxin there was a marked increase of the carbon-lined capillaries and venules, compared with controls, in tumour, granuloma, glomeruli, adrenal cortex, lung, lymph-nodes and sometimes heart. The significance of these changes is discussed in relation to the Shwartzman phenomenon, Arthus reaction, and adrenaline-induced vascular spasm producing anoxia. ImagesFigs. 2-5Figs. 6-9 PMID:4304259

  10. Engineered Serratia marcescens for efficient (3R)-acetoin and (2R,3R)-2,3-butanediol production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Fangmin; Dai, Lu; Fan, Jiying; Truong, Ngoctu; Rao, Ben; Zhang, Liaoyuan; Shen, Yaling

    2015-05-01

    (3R)-Acetoin and (2R,3R)-2,3-butanediol are important pharmaceutical intermediates. However, until now, the quantity of natural microorganisms with the ability to produce single configuration of optically pure (3R)-acetoin and (2R,3R)-2,3-butanediol is rare. In this study, a meso-2,3-butanediol dehydrogenase encoded by the slaC gene from Serratia marcescens MG1 was identified for meso-2,3-butanediol and (2S,3S)-2,3-butanediol biosynthesis. Inactivation of the slaC gene could significantly decrease meso-2,3-butanediol and (2S,3S)-2,3-butanediol and result in a large quantity of (3R)-acetoin accumulation. Furthermore, a (2R,3R)-2,3-butanediol dehydrogenase encoded by the bdhA gene from Bacillus subtilis 168 was introduced into the slaC mutant strain of Serratia marcescens MG1. Excess (2R,3R)-2,3-butanediol dehydrogenase could accelerate the reaction from (3R)-acetoin to (2R,3R)-2,3-butanediol and lead to (2R,3R)-2,3-butanediol accumulation. In fed-batch fermentation, the excess (2R,3R)-2,3-butanediol dehydrogenase expression strain could produce 89.81 g/l (2R,3R)-2,3-butanediol with a productivity of 1.91 g/l/h at 48 h. These results provided potential applications for (3R)-acetoin and (2R,3R)-2,3-butanediol production.

  11. Laboratory replication of filtration procedures associated with Serratia marcescens bloodstream infections in patients receiving compounded amino acid solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moulton-Meissner, Heather; Noble-Wang, Judith; Gupta, Neil; Hocevar, Susan; Kallen, Alex; Arduino, Matthew

    2015-08-01

    Specific deviations from United States Pharmacopeia standards were analyzed to investigate the factors allowing an outbreak of Serratia marcescens bloodstream infections in patients receiving compounded amino acid solutions. Filter challenge experiments using the outbreak strain of S. marcescens were compared with those that used the filter challenge organism recommended by ASTM International (Brevundimonas diminuta ATCC 19162) to determine the frequency and degree of organism breakthrough. Disk and capsule filters (0.22- and 0.2-μm nominal pore size, respectively) were challenged with either the outbreak strain of S. marcescens or B. diminuta ATCC 19162. The following variables were compared: culture conditions in which organisms were grown overnight or cultured in sterile water (starved), solution type (15% amino acid solution or sterile water), and filtration with or without a 0.5-μm prefilter. Small-scale, syringe-driven, disk-filtration experiments of starved bacterial cultures indicated that approximately 1 in every 1,000 starved S. marcescens cells (0.12%) was able to pass through a 0.22-μm nominal pore-size filter, and about 1 in every 1,000,000 cells was able to pass through a 0.1-μm nominal pore-size filter. No passage of the B. diminuta ATCC 19162 cells was observed with either filter. In full-scale experiments, breakthrough was observed only when 0.2-μm capsule filters were challenged with starved S. marcescens in 15% amino acid solution without a 0.5-μm prefiltration step. Laboratory simulation testing revealed that under certain conditions, bacteria can pass through 0.22- and 0.2-μm filters intended for sterilization of an amino acid solution. Bacteria did not pass through 0.2-μm filters when a 0.5-μm prefilter was used. Copyright © 2015 by the American Society of Health-System Pharmacists, Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Assessing the stereoselectivity of Serratia marcescens CECT 977 2,3-butanediol dehydrogenase

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Medici, R.; Stammes, J.K.; Otten, L.G.; Hanefeld, U.; Kwakernaak, Stender

    2017-01-01

    α-Hydroxy ketones and vicinal diols constitute well-known building blocks in organic synthesis. Here we describe one enzyme that enables the enantioselective synthesis of both building blocks starting from diketones. The enzyme 2,3-butanediol dehydrogenase (BudC) from S. marcescens CECT 977 belongs

  13. Chitinase from a Novel Strain of Serratia marcescens JPP1 for Biocontrol of Aflatoxin: Molecular Characterization and Production Optimization Using Response Surface Methodology

    OpenAIRE

    Kai Wang; Pei-sheng Yan; Li-xin Cao

    2014-01-01

    Chitinase is one of the most important mycolytic enzymes with industrial significance, and produced by a number of organisms. A chitinase producing isolate Serratia marcescens JPP1 was obtained from peanut hulls in Jiangsu Province, China, and exhibited antagonistic activity against aflatoxins. In this study, we describe the optimization of medium composition with increased production of chitinase for the selected bacteria using statistical methods: Plackett-Burman design was applied to find ...

  14. Chorioamnionitis caused by Serratia marcescens in a healthy pregnant woman with preterm premature rupture of membranes: A rare case report and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erenberg, Miriam; Yagel, Yael; Press, Fernanda; Weintraub, Adi Y

    2017-04-01

    The incidence of chorioamnionitis varies widely. The highest incidence is reported in preterm deliveries. Among preterm deliveries, chorioamnionitis usually occurs after preterm premature rupture of membranes (PPROM). To date, only five cases of chorioamnionitis due to Serratia marcescens were reported. Here we present a case of a pregnant woman with chorioamnionitis due to Serratia marcescens who delivered a premature neonate at 28 weeks and four days of gestation. We also conducted a review of the literature in order to identify and characterize the clinical presentation and outcomes of this rare infection. A 36 year old female (gravida 9, para 6) was admitted with cervical effacement of 16mm and intact membranes at gestational age of 25 weeks and five days. One week following her admission PPROM was noticed. Treatment with the standard antibiotic regimen for PPROM was initiated. Thirteen days after the diagnosis of PPROM (28 weeks and four days) she developed chills, abdominal pain, sub febrile fever, tachycardia, leukocytosis and fetal tachycardia, and a clinical diagnosis of chorioamnionitis was made. An urgent CS was performed. In the first post-operative day the patient developed surgical sight infection. Cultures obtained from the purulent discharge of the wound, as well as cultures from the placenta and uterine cavity that were obtained during surgery grew Serratia marcescens. The patient was treated with Meropenem for six days, with a good clinical response. We present a rare case of nosocomialy acquired Serratia marcescens chorioamnionitis in a patient with PPROM. This case emphasizes the need for good infection control measures. Our favorable outcome together with the scares reports in the literature, add insight into this type of rare infection. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Use of an AC electric field in galvanotactic on/off switching of the motion of a microstructure blotted by Serratia marcescens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Trung-Hieu; Hyung Kim, Dal; Kim, Jihoon; Jun Kim, Min; Byun, Doyoung

    2011-08-01

    In this study, we manipulated the swimming direction of bacteria and controlled the switching off movement by using dc and ac galvanotaxis. The microstructures blotted by Serratia marcescens could be spontaneously manipulated and switched off at the desired position. The optimum ac frequency for switching off the microstructural motion was 7 Hz. We built a mathematical model to analyze and understand the oscillating motion of microstructure.

  16. Coproduction of KPC-2 and IMP-10 in Carbapenem-Resistant Serratia marcescens Isolates from an Outbreak in a Brazilian Teaching Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Kesia Esther; Cayô, Rodrigo; Carvalhaes, Cecilia Godoy; Patussi Correia Sacchi, Flávia; Rodrigues-Costa, Fernanda; Ramos da Silva, Ana Carolina; Croda, Julio; Gales, Ana Cristina; Simionatto, Simone

    2015-07-01

    We describe an outbreak caused by KPC-2- and IMP-10-producing Serratia marcescens isolates in a Brazilian teaching hospital. Tigecycline was the only active antimicrobial agent tested. The blaIMP-10 gene was located in a new class 1 integron, named In990, carried by a nonconjugative plasmid, in contrast to blaKPC-2. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  17. A Serratia marcescens PigP Homolog Controls Prodigiosin Biosynthesis, Swarming Motility and Hemolysis and Is Regulated by cAMP-CRP and HexS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanks, Robert M. Q.; Lahr, Roni M.; Stella, Nicholas A.; Arena, Kristin E.; Brothers, Kimberly M.; Kwak, Daniel H.; Liu, Xinyu; Kalivoda, Eric J.

    2013-01-01

    Swarming motility and hemolysis are virulence-associated determinants for a wide array of pathogenic bacteria. The broad host-range opportunistic pathogen Serratia marcescens produces serratamolide, a small cyclic amino-lipid, that promotes swarming motility and hemolysis. Serratamolide is negatively regulated by the transcription factors HexS and CRP. Positive regulators of serratamolide production are unknown. Similar to serratamolide, the antibiotic pigment, prodigiosin, is regulated by temperature, growth phase, HexS, and CRP. Because of this co-regulation, we tested the hypothesis that a homolog of the PigP transcription factor of the atypical Serratia species ATCC 39006, which positively regulates prodigiosin biosynthesis, is also a positive regulator of serratamolide production in S. marcescens. Mutation of pigP in clinical, environmental, and laboratory strains of S. marcescens conferred pleiotropic phenotypes including the loss of swarming motility, hemolysis, and severely reduced prodigiosin and serratamolide synthesis. Transcriptional analysis and electrophoretic mobility shift assays place PigP in a regulatory pathway with upstream regulators CRP and HexS. The data from this study identifies a positive regulator of serratamolide production, describes novel roles for the PigP transcription factor, shows for the first time that PigP directly regulates the pigment biosynthetic operon, and identifies upstream regulators of pigP. This study suggests that PigP is important for the ability of S. marcescens to compete in the environment. PMID:23469212

  18. Is there a role for Serratia marcescens in male infertility: An experimental study?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rana, Kalpana; Thaper, Deepali; Prabha, Vijay

    2017-04-01

    Establishment of a male BALB/c mouse model to study the role of sperm impairing S. marcescens on mouse reproductive potential. The current study can add to use of reliable animal models to provide a noteworthy evidence for the microbial cause of infertility. The mice in the test groups II, III, IV were intraperitoneally administered with different doses (10(4), 10(6) or 10(8) cfu) of S. marcescens whereas, group I serving as control, received PBS, for 10 consecutive days. The groups were evaluated for any change in body weight, tissue somatic index (%), seminal parameters and histology. Confirmation of S. marcescens from reproductive organs was done by reisolating the same by cultural characteristics and biochemical tests. The results showed that weight gain was evident only in mice receiving PBS (group I), whereas a decrease was recorded in the test groups (group II, III and IV). Only testes of test groups showed significant changes in TSI values whereas, no change in TSI was observed in any reproductive organ of any test group. Seminal parameters viz. sperm count, motility and viability were found to decrease in test groups II, III and IV as compared to control group I. Interestingly, the number of pus cells and percent decapitation was more prominent in test groups which received higher doses (i.e. group III and group IV). The histopathological examination revealed mild to dense inflammation in vas deferens and caudal epididymis in all test groups except hypospermatogenesis which was observed only in test group III and IV. However, in group I, neither adverse changes nor any sign of inflammation were observed. Intraperitoneal inoculation of S. marcescens could lead to alteration of semen parameters, induction of decapitation in spermatozoa and histopathological changes, thereby decreasing the reproductive potential of male mice. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. The Multifarious PGPR Serratia marcescens CDP-13 Augments Induced Systemic Resistance and Enhanced Salinity Tolerance of Wheat (Triticum aestivum L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Rajnish Prakash; Jha, Prabhat Nath

    2016-01-01

    The present study demonstrates the plant growth promoting (PGP) potential of a bacterial isolate CDP-13 isolated from 'Capparis decidua' plant, and its ability to protect plants from the deleterious effect of biotic and abiotic stressors. Based on 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis, the isolate was identified as Serratia marcescens. Among the PGP traits, the isolate was found to be positive for ACC deaminase activity, phosphate solubilization, production of siderophore, indole acetic acid production, nitrogen fixation, and ammonia production. CDP-13 showed growth at an increased salt (NaCl) concentration of up to 6%, indicating its potential to survive and associate with plants growing in saline soil. The inoculation of S. marcescens enhanced the growth of wheat plant under salinity stress (150-200 mM). It significantly reduced inhibition of plant growth (15 to 85%) caused by salt stressors. Application of CDP-13 also modulated concentration (20 to 75%) of different osmoprotectants (proline, malondialdehyde, total soluble sugar, total protein content, and indole acetic acid) in plants suggesting its role in enabling plants to tolerate salt stressors. In addition, bacterial inoculation also reduced the disease severity caused by fungal infection, which illustrated its ability to confer induced systemic resistance (ISR) in host plants. Treatment of wheat plants with the test organism caused alteration in anti-oxidative enzymes activities (Superoxide dismutase, Catalase, and Peroxidase) under various salinity levels, and therefore minimizes the salinity-induced oxidative damages to the plants. Colonization efficiency of strain CDP-13 was confirmed by CFU count, epi-fluorescence microscopy, and ERIC-PCR-based DNA fingerprinting approach. Hence, the study indicates that bacterium CDP-13 enhances plant growth, and has potential for the amelioration of salinity stress in wheat plants. Likewise, the results also provide insights into biotechnological approaches to using PGPR

  20. The structure of Serratia marcescens Lip, a membrane-bound component of the type VI secretion system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rao, Vincenzo A.; Shepherd, Sharon M.; English, Grant; Coulthurst, Sarah J.; Hunter, William N., E-mail: w.n.hunter@dundee.ac.uk [College of Life Sciences, University of Dundee, Dundee DD1 5EH, Scotland (United Kingdom)

    2011-12-01

    The high-resolution crystal structure of S. marcescens Lip reveals a new member of the transthyretin family of proteins. Lip, a core component of the type VI secretion apparatus, is localized to the outer membrane and is positioned to interact with other proteins forming this complex system. Lip is a membrane-bound lipoprotein and a core component of the type VI secretion system found in Gram-negative bacteria. The structure of a Lip construct (residues 29–176) from Serratia marcescens (SmLip) has been determined at 1.92 Å resolution. Experimental phases were derived using a single-wavelength anomalous dispersion approach on a sample cocrystallized with iodide. The membrane localization of the native protein was confirmed. The structure is that of the globular domain lacking only the lipoprotein signal peptide and the lipidated N-terminus of the mature protein. The protein fold is dominated by an eight-stranded β-sandwich and identifies SmLip as a new member of the transthyretin family of proteins. Transthyretin and the only other member of the family fold, 5-hydroxyisourate hydrolase, form homotetramers important for their function. The asymmetric unit of SmLip is a tetramer with 222 symmetry, but the assembly is distinct from that previously noted for the transthyretin protein family. However, structural comparisons and bacterial two-hybrid data suggest that the SmLip tetramer is not relevant to its role as a core component of the type VI secretion system, but rather reflects a propensity for SmLip to participate in protein–protein interactions. A relatively low level of sequence conservation amongst Lip homologues is noted and is restricted to parts of the structure that might be involved in interactions with physiological partners.

  1. The Multifarious PGPR Serratia marcescens CDP-13 Augments Induced Systemic Resistance and Enhanced Salinity Tolerance of Wheat (Triticum aestivum L..

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajnish Prakash Singh

    Full Text Available The present study demonstrates the plant growth promoting (PGP potential of a bacterial isolate CDP-13 isolated from 'Capparis decidua' plant, and its ability to protect plants from the deleterious effect of biotic and abiotic stressors. Based on 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis, the isolate was identified as Serratia marcescens. Among the PGP traits, the isolate was found to be positive for ACC deaminase activity, phosphate solubilization, production of siderophore, indole acetic acid production, nitrogen fixation, and ammonia production. CDP-13 showed growth at an increased salt (NaCl concentration of up to 6%, indicating its potential to survive and associate with plants growing in saline soil. The inoculation of S. marcescens enhanced the growth of wheat plant under salinity stress (150-200 mM. It significantly reduced inhibition of plant growth (15 to 85% caused by salt stressors. Application of CDP-13 also modulated concentration (20 to 75% of different osmoprotectants (proline, malondialdehyde, total soluble sugar, total protein content, and indole acetic acid in plants suggesting its role in enabling plants to tolerate salt stressors. In addition, bacterial inoculation also reduced the disease severity caused by fungal infection, which illustrated its ability to confer induced systemic resistance (ISR in host plants. Treatment of wheat plants with the test organism caused alteration in anti-oxidative enzymes activities (Superoxide dismutase, Catalase, and Peroxidase under various salinity levels, and therefore minimizes the salinity-induced oxidative damages to the plants. Colonization efficiency of strain CDP-13 was confirmed by CFU count, epi-fluorescence microscopy, and ERIC-PCR-based DNA fingerprinting approach. Hence, the study indicates that bacterium CDP-13 enhances plant growth, and has potential for the amelioration of salinity stress in wheat plants. Likewise, the results also provide insights into biotechnological approaches to

  2. Intensified colonisation screening according to the recommendations of the German Commission for Hospital Hygiene and Infectious Diseases Prevention (KRINKO): identification and containment of a Serratia marcescens outbreak in the neonatal intensive care unit, Jena, Germany, 2013-2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawczynski, Kristin; Proquitté, Hans; Roedel, Jürgen; Edel, Brigit; Pfeifer, Yvonne; Hoyer, Heike; Dobermann, Helke; Hagel, Stefan; Pletz, Mathias W

    2016-12-01

    In 2013, the German Commission for Hospital Hygiene and Infectious Disease Prevention (KRINKO) stated that extending weekly colonisation screening from very low birth weight (VLBW) infants (Serratia marcescens. Strains were typed by Pulsed Field Gel Electrophoresis (PFGE). Over 6 months, 19 out of 159 infants acquired S. marcescens. Twelve of the nineteen patients with S. marcescens were non-VLBW infants, and they were colonised significantly earlier than were VLBW infants (median 17 vs. 28 days; p marcescens.

  3. Mitochondrial dysfunction in Trypanosoma cruzi: the role of Serratia marcescens prodigiosin in the alternative treatment of Chagas disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Triana Omar

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chagas disease is a health threat for many people, mostly those living in Latin America. One of the most important problems in treatment is the limitation of existing drugs. Prodigiosin, produced by Serratia marcescens (Rhodnius prolixus endosymbiont, belongs to the red-pigmented bacterial prodiginine family, which displays numerous biological activities, including antibacterial, antifungal, antiprotozoal, antimalarial, immunosuppressive, and anticancer properties. Here we describe its effects on Trypanosoma cruzi mitochondria belonging to Tc I and Tc II. Results Parasites exposed to prodigiosin altered the mitochondrial function and oxidative phosphorylation could not have a normal course, probably by inhibition of complex III. Prodigiosin did not produce cytotoxic effects in lymphocytes and Vero cells and has better effects than benznidazole. Our data suggest that the action of prodigiosin on the parasites is mediated by mitochondrial structural and functional disruptions that could lead the parasites to an apoptotic-like cell death process. Conclusions Here, we propose a potentially useful trypanocidal agent derived from knowledge of an important aspect of the natural life cycle of the parasite: the vector-parasite interaction. Our results indicate that prodigiosin could be a good candidate for the treatment of Chagas disease.

  4. Application of Statistical Design to the Optimization of Culture Medium for Prodigiosin Production by Serratia marcescens SWML08

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Venil, C. K.

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Combination of Plackett – Burman design (PBD and Box – Behnken design (BBD were applied for optimization of different factors for prodigiosin production by Serratia marcescens SWML08. Among 11 factors, incubation temperature, and supplement of (NH42PO4 and trace salts into the culture medium were selected due to significant positive effect on prodigiosin yield. Box - Behnken design, a response surface methodology, was used for further optimization of these selected factors for better prodigiosin output. Data were analyzed step wise and a second order polynomial model was established to identify the relationship between the prodigiosin output and the selected factors. The media formulations were optimized having the factors such as incubation temperature 30 °C, (NH42PO4 6 g/L and trace salts 0.6 g/L. The maximum experimental response for prodigiosin production was 1397.96 mg/L whereas the predicted value was 1394.26 mg/L. The high correlation between the predicted and observed values indicated the validity of the statistical design.

  5. Enhancement of prodigiosin production by Serratia marcescens TKU011 and its insecticidal activity relative to food colorants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Tzu-Wen; Chen, Shin-Yi; Chen, Yen-Chern; Chen, Chia-Hung; Yen, Yue-Horng; Wang, San-Lang

    2013-11-01

    Prodigiosin (PG) has been reported to have various biological activities. With the aim of increasing Serratia marcescens TKU011 PG production on squid pen powder (SPP)-containing medium, the effects of phosphate and ferrous ion supplementation, autoclave treatment, and aeration were studied. Autoclave treatment showed positive results for PG productivity (2.48 mg/mL), which increased 2.5-fold when the organism was incubated in 50 mL of 40-min autoclaved medium in a baffle-based flask (250 mL) containing 1.5% SPP at 30 °C for 1 day and then at 25 °C for 2 additional days. Furthermore, the use of pigments including PG and the food colorants Allura Red AC (R40) and Tartrazine (Y4) as insecticides was also investigated. The lethal concentrations causing 50% Drosophila larval mortality (LC50) of PG, Y4, and R40 using a 5-d exposure period were 230, 449, and 30000 ppm, respectively. The results indicated that the biopigment PG and the food colorant Y4 were potentially toxic to Drosophila larvae. © 2013 Institute of Food Technologists®

  6. Transcriptomic and proteomic responses of Serratia marcescens to spaceflight conditions involve large-scale changes in metabolic pathways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yajuan; Yuan, Yanting; Liu, Jinwen; Su, Longxiang; Chang, De; Guo, Yinghua; Chen, Zhenhong; Fang, Xiangqun; Wang, Junfeng; Li, Tianzhi; Zhou, Lisha; Fang, Chengxiang; Yang, Ruifu; Liu, Changting

    2014-04-01

    The microgravity environment of spaceflight expeditions has been associated with altered microbial responses. This study explores the characterization of Serratia marcescensis grown in a spaceflight environment at the phenotypic, transcriptomic and proteomic levels. From November 1, 2011 to November 17, 2011, a strain of S. marcescensis was sent into space for 398 h on the Shenzhou VIII spacecraft, and ground simulation was performed as a control (LCT-SM213). After the flight, two mutant strains (LCT-SM166 and LCT-SM262) were selected for further analysis. Although no changes in the morphology, post-culture growth kinetics, hemolysis or antibiotic sensitivity were observed, the two mutant strains exhibited significant changes in their metabolic profiles after exposure to spaceflight. Enrichment analysis of the transcriptome showed that the differentially expressed genes of the two spaceflight strains and the ground control strain mainly included those involved in metabolism and degradation. The proteome revealed that changes at the protein level were also associated with metabolic functions, such as glycolysis/gluconeogenesis, pyruvate metabolism, arginine and proline metabolism and the degradation of valine, leucine and isoleucine. In summary S. marcescens showed alterations primarily in genes and proteins that were associated with metabolism under spaceflight conditions, which gave us valuable clues for future research.

  7. Regulation of the chitin degradation and utilization system by the ChiX small RNA in Serratia marcescens 2170.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Kazushi; Shimizu, Mari; Sasaki, Naomi; Ogawa, Chisana; Minami, Haruka; Sugimoto, Hayuki; Watanabe, Takeshi

    2016-01-01

    Serratia marcescens 2170 produces three different types of chitinases and chitin-binding protein CBP21. We found that transposon insertion into the 5' untranslated region (5' UTR) of chiPQ-ctb led to defective chitinase and CBP21 production. ChiX small RNA possessed the complementary sequence of the 5' UTRs of the chiPQ-ctb and chiR and repressed the expression of chiP and chiR. ChiX was detected in a medium containing glucose, glycerol, GlcNAc, and (GlcNAc)2, but the expression of both chiP and chiR was only observed in a medium containing (GlcNAc)2. ∆chiX mutant produced chitinases, CBP21, and chitobiase without induction. chiP transcripts were more abundant than those of chiR or chiX in a medium containing (GlcNAc)2. These results suggest that the constitutively expressed ChiX binds to the highly abundant chiP 5' UTR, thereby leading to the induction of chiR mRNA translation and the subsequent expression of chitinases and CBP21.

  8. Evolution of Caenorhabditis elegans host defense under selection by the bacterial parasite Serratia marcescens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penley, McKenna J; Ha, Giang T; Morran, Levi T

    2017-01-01

    Parasites can impose strong selection on hosts. In response, some host populations have adapted via the evolution of defenses that prevent or impede infection by parasites. However, host populations have also evolved life history shifts that maximize host fitness despite infection. Outcrossing and self-fertilization can have contrasting effects on evolutionary trajectories of host populations. While selfing and outcrossing are known to affect the rate at which host populations adapt in response to parasites, these mating systems may also influence the specific traits that underlie adaptation to parasites. Here, we determined the role of evolved host defense versus altered life history,in mixed mating (selfing and outcrossing) and obligately outcrossing C. elegans host populations after experimental evolution with the bacterial parasite, S. marcescens. Similar to previous studies, we found that both mixed mating and obligately outcrossing host populations adapted to S. marcescens exposure, and that the obligately outcrossing populations exhibited the greatest rates of adaptation. Regardless of the host population mating system, exposure to parasites did not significantly alter reproductive timing or total fecundity over the course of experimental evolution. However, both mixed mating and obligately outcrossing host populations exhibited significantly reduced mortality rates in the presence of the parasite after experimental evolution. Therefore, adaptation in both the mixed mating and obligately outcrossing populations was driven, at least in part, by the evolution of increased host defense and not changes in host life history. Thus, the host mating system altered the rate of adaptation, but not the nature of adaptive change in the host populations.

  9. Epidemiology and molecular characterization of extended-spectrum beta-lactamase-producing Enterobacter spp., Pantoea agglomerans, and Serratia marcescens isolates from a Bulgarian hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markovska, Rumyana Donkova; Stoeva, Temenuga Jekova; Bojkova, Kalina Dineva; Mitov, Ivan Gergov

    2014-04-01

    Forty-two extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL)-producing isolates of Enterobacter aerogenes, Enterobacter cloacae, Pantoea agglomerans, and Serratia marcescens, collected consecutively during the period January-November 2011 from the University Hospital in Varna, Bulgaria, were studied to characterize their ESBLs by isoelectric focusing, group-specific PCR, and sequencing. The epidemiological relationship was evaluated by random amplified polymorphic DNA analysis (RAPD). Transferability of ESBL genes was determined by conjugation experiments. Plasmid analysis was done by replicon typing and PstI fingerprinting. The overall rate of ESBL production was 20%. The most widespread enzyme was CTX-M-3, found in 64%. It was dominant in E. aerogenes (100%) and S. marcescens (83%). SHV-12, CTX-M-3, and CTX-M-15 were found among E. cloacae isolates in 50%, 35%, and 45%, respectively. Three main CTX-M-3-producing epidemic clones of E. aerogenes and S. marcescens have been detected. Among E. cloacae isolates, six different RAPD profiles were discerned. The plasmids harboring blaCTX-M-3 belonged to IncL/M type and demonstrated similar PstI fingerprinting profiles. IncFII plasmids were detected in two CTX-M-15-producing E. cloacae isolates. Our results demonstrate wide intrahospital dissemination of clonal E. aerogenes and S. marcescens isolates, carrying IncL/M conjugative plasmids.

  10. Biodegradation of 1,1,1-trichloro-2,2-bis(4-chlorophenyl) ethane (DDT) by using Serratia marcescens NCIM 2919.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grewal, Jasneet; Bhattacharya, Amrik; Kumar, Sumit; Singh, Dileep K; Khare, Sunil K

    2016-12-01

    A solvent tolerant bacterium Serratia marcescens NCIM 2919 has been evaluated for degradation of DDT (1,1,1-trichloro-2,2-bis (4-chlorophenyl) ethane). The bacterium was able to degrade up to 42% of initial 50 mg L(-1) of DDT within 10 days of incubation. The highlight of the work was the elucidation of DDT degradation pathway in S. marcescens. A total of four intermediates metabolites viz. 2,2-bis (chlorophenyl)-1,1-dichloroethane (DDD), 2,2-bis (chlorophenyl)-1,1-dichloroethylene (DDE), 2,2-bis (chlorophenyl)-1-chloroethylene (DDMU), and 4-chlorobenzoic acid (4-CBA) were identified by GC-Mass and FTIR. 4-CBA was found to be the stable product of DDT degradation. Metabolites preceding 4-CBA were not toxic to strain as reveled through luxuriant growth in presence of varying concentrations of exogenous DDD and DDE. However, 4-CBA was observed to inhibit the growth of bacterium. The DDT degrading efficiency of S. marcescens NCIM 2919 hence could be used in combination with 4-CBA utilizing strains either as binary culture or consortia for mineralization of DDT. Application of S. marcescens NCIM 2919 to DDT contaminated soil, showed 74.7% reduction of initial 12.0 mg kg(-1) of DDT after 18-days of treatment.

  11. Identification by real-time PCR with SYBR Green of Leishmania spp. and Serratia marcescens in canine 'sterile' cutaneous nodular lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornegliani, Luisa; Corona, Antonio; Vercelli, Antonella; Roccabianca, Paola

    2015-06-01

    Noninfectious, non-neoplastic, nodular to diffuse, so-called 'sterile' granulomatous/pyogranulomatous skin lesions (SGPSLs) are infrequently identified in dogs and may represent a diagnostic challenge. Their correct identification is based on history, histopathology and absence of intralesional foreign bodies and micro-organisms. The aim of this study was to investigate the presence of Leishmania spp., Mycobacterium spp., Serratia marcescens and Nocardia spp. by real-time PCR in canine nodular skin lesions histologically diagnosed as putatively sterile. Formalin-fixed skin biopsies were collected from 40 dogs. All samples were associated with an SGPSL diagnosis characterized by multifocal, nodular to diffuse, periadnexal and perifollicular pyogranulomas/granulomas. Neither micro-organisms nor foreign bodies were detected with haematoxylin and eosin staining, under polarized light. Further analyses included periodic acid Schiff, Ziehl-Neelsen, Fite Faraco, Giemsa and Gram histochemical stains; anti-Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) and Leishmania spp. immunohistochemistry; and real-time PCR analysis for Leishmania spp., Mycobacterium spp., S. marcescens and Nocardia spp. Special stains and BCG/immunohistochemistry were negative in all samples. Real-time PCR was positive for Leishmania spp. in four of 40 biopsies and for S. marcescens in two of 40 samples. Real-time PCR for Mycobacterium spp. and Nocardia spp. was negative. No correlation between real-time PCR positivity and a specific histological pattern was identified. Leishmania spp. have been previously identified as possible agents of certain SGPSLs, while the involvement of S. marcescens has not been investigated previously. According to our findings, Serratia spp. should be included in the list of agents possibly associated with a subgroup of granulomatous/pyogranulomatous skin lesions in dogs. © 2015 ESVD and ACVD.

  12. Biochemical Characterization of RssA-RssB, a Two-Component Signal Transduction System Regulating Swarming Behavior in Serratia marcescens

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    Wei, Jun-Rong; Tsai, Yu-Huan; Soo, Po-Chi; Horng, Yu-Tze; Hsieh, Shang-Chen; Ho, Shen-Wu; Lai, Hsin-Chih

    2005-01-01

    Our previous study had identified a pair of potential two-component signal transduction proteins, RssA-RssB, involved in the regulation of Serratia marcescens swarming. When mutated, both rssA and rssB mutants showed precocious swarming phenotypes on LB swarming agar, whereby swarming not only occurred at 37°C but also initiated on a surface of higher agar concentration and more rapidly than did the parent strain at 30°C. In this study, we further show that the predicted sensor kinase RssA an...

  13. [Transforming activity of plasmid R6K DNA on Serratia marcescens strain 20-10. The behavior of the plasmid in the transformants].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gnedoĭ, S N; Levashev, V S; Babushkina, L M

    1978-09-01

    The authors described transformation of S. marcescens, strain 20-10, of the isolated R6K plasmide DNA. As demonstrated by centrifugation in cesium chloride gradient and electrophoresis in agarose, the plasmide was present in the transformants in the form identical to R6K in E. coli K12. Analysis of the transforming activity of R6K plasmide from Serratia and E. coli K12 strains with a complete and defective restriction system showed S. marsescens, strain 20-10, to possess specific system of restriction and modification. In studying beta-lactamase activity and Serratia and E. coli strains ampicillin and streptomycin resistance revealed differences in the phenotypical expression of the plasmide signs in the heterologous and homologous host.

  14. Kinetic analysis of growth rate, ATP, and pigmentation suggests an energy-spilling function for the pigment prodigiosin of Serratia marcescens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haddix, Pryce L; Jones, Sarah; Patel, Pratik; Burnham, Sarah; Knights, Kaori; Powell, Joan N; LaForm, Amber

    2008-11-01

    Serratia marcescens is a gram-negative environmental bacterium and opportunistic pathogen. S. marcescens expresses prodigiosin, a bright red and cell-associated pigment which has no known biological function for producing cells. We present here a kinetic model relating cell, ATP, and prodigiosin concentration changes for S. marcescens during cultivation in batch culture. Cells were grown in a variety of complex broth media at temperatures which either promoted or essentially prevented pigmentation. High growth rates were accompanied by large decreases in cellular prodigiosin concentration; low growth rates were associated with rapid pigmentation. Prodigiosin was induced most strongly during limited growth as the population transitioned to stationary phase, suggesting a negative effect of this pigment on biomass production. Mathematically, the combined rate of formation of biomass and bioenergy (as ATP) was shown to be equivalent to the rate of prodigiosin production. Studies with cyanide inhibition of both oxidative phosphorylation and pigment production indicated that rates of biomass and net ATP synthesis were actually higher in the presence of cyanide, further suggesting a negative regulatory role for prodigiosin in cell and energy production under aerobic growth conditions. Considered in the context of the literature, these results suggest that prodigiosin reduces ATP production by a process termed energy spilling. This process may protect the cell by limiting production of reactive oxygen compounds. Other possible functions for prodigiosin as a mediator of cell death at population stationary phase are discussed.

  15. Effects of temperature, pH and NaCl content on in vitro putrescine and cadaverine production through the growth of Serratia marcescens CCM 303.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bubelová, Zuzana; Buňka, František; Taťáková, Monika; Štajnochová, Kateřina; Purevdorj, Khatantuul; Buňková, Leona

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the combined effect of temperature (10, 20 and 37°C), pH (4, 5, 6, 7 and 8), and NaCl content (0, 1, 3, 4, 5 and 6% w/v) on the growth and putrescine and cadaverine production of Serratia marcescens CCM 303 under model conditions. The decarboxylase activity of S. marcescens was monitored in broth after cultivation. The cultivation medium was enriched with selected amino acids (ornithine, arginine and lysine; 0.2% w/v each) serving as precursors of biogenic amines. Levels of putrescine and cadaverine in broth were analysed by high-performance liquid chromatography after pre-column derivatisation with o-phthalaldehyde reagent. S. marcescens produced higher amounts of putrescine (up to 2096.8 mg L(-1)) compared to cadaverine content (up to 343.3 mg L(-1)) in all cultivation media. The highest putrescine and cadaverine concentrations were reached during cultivation at 10-20°C, pH 5-7 and NaCl content 1-3% w/v. On the other hand, the highest BAs production of individual cell (recalculated based on a cell; so called "yield factor") was observed at 10°C, pH 4 and salt concentration 3-5% w/v as a response to environmental stress.

  16. Culture-dependent and culture-independent analyses reveal no prokaryotic community shifts or recovery of Serratia marcescens in Acropora palmata with white pox disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lesser, Michael P; Jarett, Jessica K

    2014-06-01

    Recently, the etiological agent of white pox (WP) disease, also known as acroporid serratiosis, in the endangered coral Acropora palmata is the enteric bacterium Serratia marcescens with the source being localized sewage release onto coastal coral reef communities. Here, we show that both culture-dependent and culture-independent approaches could not recover this bacterium from samples of tissue and mucus from A. palmata colonies affected by WP disease in the Bahamas, or seawater collected adjacent to A. palmata colonies. Additionally, a metagenetic 16S rRNA pyrosequencing study shows no significant difference in the bacterial communities of coral tissues with and without WP lesions. As recent studies have shown for other coral diseases, S. marcescens cannot be identified in all cases of WP disease in several geographically separated populations of A. palmata with the same set of signs. As a result, its identification as the etiological agent of WP disease, and cause of a reverse zoonosis, cannot be broadly supported. However, the prevalence of WP disease associated with S. marcescens does appear to be associated with proximity to population centers, and research efforts should be broadened to examine this association, and to identify other causes of this syndrome. © 2014 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Evidence for an Opportunistic and Endophytic Lifestyle of the Bursaphelenchus xylophilus-Associated Bacteria Serratia marcescens PWN146 Isolated from Wilting Pinus pinaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vicente, Cláudia S L; Nascimento, Francisco X; Barbosa, Pedro; Ke, Huei-Mien; Tsai, Isheng J; Hirao, Tomonori; Cock, Peter J A; Kikuchi, Taisei; Hasegawa, Koichi; Mota, Manuel

    2016-10-01

    Pine wilt disease (PWD) results from the interaction of three elements: the pathogenic nematode, Bursaphelenchus xylophilus; the insect-vector, Monochamus sp.; and the host tree, mostly Pinus species. Bacteria isolated from B. xylophilus may be a fourth element in this complex disease. However, the precise role of bacteria in this interaction is unclear as both plant-beneficial and as plant-pathogenic bacteria may be associated with PWD. Using whole genome sequencing and phenotypic characterization, we were able to investigate in more detail the genetic repertoire of Serratia marcescens PWN146, a bacterium associated with B. xylophilus. We show clear evidence that S. marcescens PWN146 is able to withstand and colonize the plant environment, without having any deleterious effects towards a susceptible host (Pinus thunbergii), B. xylophilus nor to the nematode model C. elegans. This bacterium is able to tolerate growth in presence of xenobiotic/organic compounds, and use phenylacetic acid as carbon source. Furthermore, we present a detailed list of S. marcescens PWN146 potentials to interfere with plant metabolism via hormonal pathways and/or nutritional acquisition, and to be competitive against other bacteria and/or fungi in terms of resource acquisition or production of antimicrobial compounds. Further investigation is required to understand the role of bacteria in PWD. We have now reinforced the theory that B. xylophilus-associated bacteria may have a plant origin.

  18. Detection of the IncX3 plasmid carrying blaKPC-3 in a Serratia marcescens strain isolated from a kidney-liver transplanted patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gona, Floriana; Caio, Carla; Iannolo, Gioacchin; Monaco, Francesco; Di Mento, Giuseppina; Cuscino, Nicola; Fontana, Ignazio; Panarello, Giovanna; Maugeri, Gaetano; Mezzatesta, Maria Lina; Stefani, Stefania; Conaldi, Pier Giulio

    2017-10-01

    Dissemination of resistance to carbapenems among Enterobacteriaceae through plasmids is an increasingly important concern in health care worldwide. Here we report the first description of an IncX3 plasmid carrying the blaKPC-3 gene in a strain of Serratia marcescens isolated from a kidney-liver transplanted patient at the transplantation centre ISMETT (Istituto Mediterraneo per i Trapianti e Terapie ad Alta Specializzazione, Palermo, Italy). To localize the transposable element containing the resistance-associated gene Next-Generation Sequencing of the bacterial DNA was performed. S. marcescens was positive for blaKPC-3 and blaSHV-11 genes. The molecular analysis demonstrated that the blaKPC-3 gene of this bacterial strain was located in one copy of the Tn-3-like element Tn4401-a carried in a plasmid that is 53 392 bp in size and showed the typical IncX3 scaffold. Our data demonstrated the presence of a new blaKPC-3 harbouring the IncX3 plasmid in S. marcescens. The possible dissemination among Enterobacteriaceae of this type of plasmid should be monitored and evaluated in terms of clinical risk.

  19. Complete genome analysis of Serratia marcescens RSC-14: A plant growth-promoting bacterium that alleviates cadmium stress in host plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Abdur Rahim; Park, Gun-Seok; Asaf, Sajjad; Hong, Sung-Jun; Jung, Byung Kwon; Shin, Jae-Ho

    2017-01-01

    Serratia marcescens RSC-14 is a Gram-negative bacterium that was previously isolated from the surface-sterilized roots of the Cd-hyperaccumulator Solanum nigrum. The strain stimulates plant growth and alleviates Cd stress in host plants. To investigate the genetic basis for these traits, the complete genome of RSC-14 was obtained by single-molecule real-time sequencing. The genome of S. marcescens RSC-14 comprised a 5.12-Mbp-long circular chromosome containing 4,593 predicted protein-coding genes, 22 rRNA genes, 88 tRNA genes, and 41 pseudogenes. It contained genes with potential functions in plant growth promotion, including genes involved in indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) biosynthesis, acetoin synthesis, and phosphate solubilization. Moreover, annotation using NCBI and Rapid Annotation using Subsystem Technology identified several genes that encode antioxidant enzymes as well as genes involved in antioxidant production, supporting the observed resistance towards heavy metals, such as Cd. The presence of IAA pathway-related genes and oxidative stress-responsive enzyme genes may explain the plant growth-promoting potential and Cd tolerance, respectively. This is the first report of a complete genome sequence of Cd-tolerant S. marcescens and its plant growth promotion pathway. The whole-genome analysis of this strain clarified the genetic basis underlying its phenotypic and biochemical characteristics, underpinning the beneficial interactions between RSC-14 and plants.

  20. Serratia marcescens ShlA pore-forming toxin is responsible for early induction of autophagy in host cells and is transcriptionally regulated by RcsB.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Venanzio, Gisela; Stepanenko, Tatiana M; García Véscovi, Eleonora

    2014-09-01

    Serratia marcescens is a Gram-negative bacterium that thrives in a wide variety of ambient niches and interacts with an ample range of hosts. As an opportunistic human pathogen, it has increased its clinical incidence in recent years, being responsible for life-threatening nosocomial infections. S. marcescens produces numerous exoproteins with toxic effects, including the ShlA pore-forming toxin, which has been catalogued as its most potent cytotoxin. However, the regulatory mechanisms that govern ShlA expression, as well as its action toward the host, have remained unclear. We have shown that S. marcescens elicits an autophagic response in host nonphagocytic cells. In this work, we determine that the expression of ShlA is responsible for the autophagic response that is promoted prior to bacterial internalization in epithelial cells. We show that a strain unable to express ShlA is no longer able to induce this autophagic mechanism, while heterologous expression of ShlA/ShlB suffices to confer on noninvasive Escherichia coli the capacity to trigger autophagy. We also demonstrate that shlBA harbors a binding motif for the RcsB regulator in its promoter region. RcsB-dependent control of shlBA constitutes a feed-forward regulatory mechanism that allows interplay with flagellar-biogenesis regulation. At the top of the circuit, activated RcsB downregulates expression of flagella by binding to the flhDC promoter region, preventing FliA-activated transcription of shlBA. Simultaneously, RcsB interaction within the shlBA promoter represses ShlA expression. This circuit offers multiple access points to fine-tune ShlA production. These findings also strengthen the case for an RcsB role in orchestrating the expression of Serratia virulence factors. Copyright © 2014, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  1. Evaluation of the biocontrol efficacy of a Serratia marcescens strain indigenous to tea rhizosphere for the management of root rot disease in tea.

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    Gargee Dhar Purkayastha

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study is to evaluate plant growth promoting and biocontrol efficacy of a Serratia marcescens strain ETR17 isolated from tea rhizosphere for the effective management of root rot disease in tea. Isolated bacterial culture ETR17 showed significant level of in vitro antagonism against nine different foliar and root pathogens of tea. The phenotypic and molecular characterization of ETR17 revealed the identity of the bacterium as Serratia marcescens. The bacterium was found to produce several hydrolytic enzymes like chitinase, protease, lipase, cellulase and plant growth promoting metabolites like IAA and siderophore. Scanning electron microscopic studies on the interaction zone between pathogen and antagonistic bacterial isolate revealed severe deformities in the fungal mycelia. Spectral analyses (LC-ESI-MS, UV-VIS spectrophotometry and HPLC and TLC indicated the presence of the antibiotics pyrrolnitrin and prodigiosin in the extracellular bacterial culture extracts. Biofilm formation by ETR17 on polystyrene surface was also observed. In vivo application of talc-based formulations prepared with the isolate ETR17 in tea plantlets under green house conditions revealed effective reduction of root-rot disease as well as plant growth promotion to a considerable extent. Viability studies with the ETR17 talc formulation showed the survivability of the isolate up to six months at room temperature. The sustenance of ETR17 (concentration of 8-9x108 cfu g-1 in the soil after the application of talc formulation was recorded by ELISA. Safety studies revealed that ETR17 did not produce hemolysin as observed in pathogenic Serratia strains. The biocontrol strain reported in this study can be used for field application in order to minimize the use of chemical fungicides for disease control in tea gardens.

  2. Structural basis for type VI secreted peptidoglycan dl-endopeptidase function, specificity and neutralization in Serratia marcescens

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    Srikannathasan, Velupillai; English, Grant [University of Dundee, Dundee DD1 5EH, Scotland (United Kingdom); Bui, Nhat Khai [Newcastle University, Newcastle upon Tyne NE2 4HH (United Kingdom); Trunk, Katharina; O’Rourke, Patrick E. F.; Rao, Vincenzo A. [University of Dundee, Dundee DD1 5EH, Scotland (United Kingdom); Vollmer, Waldemar [Newcastle University, Newcastle upon Tyne NE2 4HH (United Kingdom); Coulthurst, Sarah J., E-mail: s.j.coulthurst@dundee.ac.uk; Hunter, William N., E-mail: s.j.coulthurst@dundee.ac.uk [University of Dundee, Dundee DD1 5EH, Scotland (United Kingdom)

    2013-12-01

    Crystal structures of type VI secretion system-associated immunity proteins, a peptidoglycan endopeptidase and a complex of the endopeptidase and its cognate immunity protein are reported together with assays of endopeptidase activity and functional assessment. Some Gram-negative bacteria target their competitors by exploiting the type VI secretion system to extrude toxic effector proteins. To prevent self-harm, these bacteria also produce highly specific immunity proteins that neutralize these antagonistic effectors. Here, the peptidoglycan endopeptidase specificity of two type VI secretion-system-associated effectors from Serratia marcescens is characterized. These small secreted proteins, Ssp1 and Ssp2, cleave between γ-d-glutamic acid and l-meso-diaminopimelic acid with different specificities. Ssp2 degrades the acceptor part of cross-linked tetratetrapeptides. Ssp1 displays greater promiscuity and cleaves monomeric tripeptides, tetrapeptides and pentapeptides and dimeric tetratetra and tetrapenta muropeptides on both the acceptor and donor strands. Functional assays confirm the identity of a catalytic cysteine in these endopeptidases and crystal structures provide information on the structure–activity relationships of Ssp1 and, by comparison, of related effectors. Functional assays also reveal that neutralization of these effectors by their cognate immunity proteins, which are called resistance-associated proteins (Raps), contributes an essential role to cell fitness. The structures of two immunity proteins, Rap1a and Rap2a, responsible for the neutralization of Ssp1 and Ssp2-like endopeptidases, respectively, revealed two distinct folds, with that of Rap1a not having previously been observed. The structure of the Ssp1–Rap1a complex revealed a tightly bound heteromeric assembly with two effector molecules flanking a Rap1a dimer. A highly effective steric block of the Ssp1 active site forms the basis of effector neutralization. Comparisons with Ssp2–Rap2

  3. The insect pathogen Serratia marcescens Db10 uses a hybrid non-ribosomal peptide synthetase-polyketide synthase to produce the antibiotic althiomycin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amy J Gerc

    Full Text Available There is a continuing need to discover new bioactive natural products, such as antibiotics, in genetically-amenable micro-organisms. We observed that the enteric insect pathogen, Serratia marcescens Db10, produced a diffusible compound that inhibited the growth of Bacillis subtilis and Staphyloccocus aureus. Mapping the genetic locus required for this activity revealed a putative natural product biosynthetic gene cluster, further defined to a six-gene operon named alb1-alb6. Bioinformatic analysis of the proteins encoded by alb1-6 predicted a hybrid non-ribosomal peptide synthetase-polyketide synthase (NRPS-PKS assembly line (Alb4/5/6, tailoring enzymes (Alb2/3 and an export/resistance protein (Alb1, and suggested that the machinery assembled althiomycin or a related molecule. Althiomycin is a ribosome-inhibiting antibiotic whose biosynthetic machinery had been elusive for decades. Chromatographic and spectroscopic analyses confirmed that wild type S. marcescens produced althiomycin and that production was eliminated on disruption of the alb gene cluster. Construction of mutants with in-frame deletions of specific alb genes demonstrated that Alb2-Alb5 were essential for althiomycin production, whereas Alb6 was required for maximal production of the antibiotic. A phosphopantetheinyl transferase enzyme required for althiomycin biosynthesis was also identified. Expression of Alb1, a predicted major facilitator superfamily efflux pump, conferred althiomycin resistance on another, sensitive, strain of S. marcescens. This is the first report of althiomycin production outside of the Myxobacteria or Streptomyces and paves the way for future exploitation of the biosynthetic machinery, since S. marcescens represents a convenient and tractable producing organism.

  4. The Insect Pathogen Serratia marcescens Db10 Uses a Hybrid Non-Ribosomal Peptide Synthetase-Polyketide Synthase to Produce the Antibiotic Althiomycin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Challis, Gregory L.; Stanley-Wall, Nicola R.; Coulthurst, Sarah J.

    2012-01-01

    There is a continuing need to discover new bioactive natural products, such as antibiotics, in genetically-amenable micro-organisms. We observed that the enteric insect pathogen, Serratia marcescens Db10, produced a diffusible compound that inhibited the growth of Bacillis subtilis and Staphyloccocus aureus. Mapping the genetic locus required for this activity revealed a putative natural product biosynthetic gene cluster, further defined to a six-gene operon named alb1–alb6. Bioinformatic analysis of the proteins encoded by alb1–6 predicted a hybrid non-ribosomal peptide synthetase-polyketide synthase (NRPS-PKS) assembly line (Alb4/5/6), tailoring enzymes (Alb2/3) and an export/resistance protein (Alb1), and suggested that the machinery assembled althiomycin or a related molecule. Althiomycin is a ribosome-inhibiting antibiotic whose biosynthetic machinery had been elusive for decades. Chromatographic and spectroscopic analyses confirmed that wild type S. marcescens produced althiomycin and that production was eliminated on disruption of the alb gene cluster. Construction of mutants with in-frame deletions of specific alb genes demonstrated that Alb2–Alb5 were essential for althiomycin production, whereas Alb6 was required for maximal production of the antibiotic. A phosphopantetheinyl transferase enzyme required for althiomycin biosynthesis was also identified. Expression of Alb1, a predicted major facilitator superfamily efflux pump, conferred althiomycin resistance on another, sensitive, strain of S. marcescens. This is the first report of althiomycin production outside of the Myxobacteria or Streptomyces and paves the way for future exploitation of the biosynthetic machinery, since S. marcescens represents a convenient and tractable producing organism. PMID:23028578

  5. Piper betle and its bioactive metabolite phytol mitigates quorum sensing mediated virulence factors and biofilm of nosocomial pathogen Serratia marcescens in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivasan, Ramanathan; Devi, Kannan Rama; Kannappan, Arunachalam; Pandian, Shunmugiah Karutha; Ravi, Arumugam Veera

    2016-12-04

    Piper betle, a tropical creeper plant belongs to the family Piperaceae. The leaves of this plant have been well known for their therapeutic, religious and ceremonial value in South and Southeast Asia. It has also been reported to possess several biological activities including antimicrobial, antioxidant, antinociceptive, antidiabetic, insecticidal and gastroprotective activities and used as a common ingredient in indigenous medicines. In Indian system of ayurvedic medicine, P. betle has been well recognized for its antiseptic properties and is commonly applied on wounds and lesions for its healing effects. To evaluate the anti-quorum sensing (anti-QS) and antibiofilm efficacy of P. betle and its bioactive metabolite phytol against Serratia marcescens. The P. betle ethyl acetate extract (PBE) was evaluated for its anti-QS efficacy against S. marcescens by assessing the prodigiosin and lipase production at 400 and 500µgml(-1) concentrations. In addition, the biofilm biomass quantification assay was performed to evaluate the antibiofilm activity of PBE against S. marcescens. Besides, the influence of PBE on bacterial biofilm formation was assessed through microscopic techniques. The biofilm related phenomenons like exopolysaccharides (EPS) production, hydrophobicity and swarming motility were also examined to support the antibiofilm activity of PBE. Transcriptional analysis of QS regulated genes in S. marcescens was also done. Characterization of PBE was done by separation through column chromatography and identification of active metabolites by gas chromatography -mass spectrometry. The major compounds of active fractions such as hexadecanoic acid, eugenol and phytol were assessed for their anti-QS activity against S. marcescens. Further, the in vitro bioassays such as protease, biofilm and HI quantification were also carried out to confirm the anti-QS and antibiofilm potential of phytol in PBE. PBE inhibits QS mediated prodigiosin pigment production in S

  6. Improving extracellular production of Serratia marcescens lytic polysaccharide monooxygenase CBP21 and Aeromonas veronii B565 chitinase Chi92 in Escherichia coli and their synergism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yalin; Li, Juan; Liu, Xuewei; Pan, Xingliang; Hou, Junxiu; Ran, Chao; Zhou, Zhigang

    2017-09-07

    Lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases (LPMOs) can oxidize recalcitrant polysaccharides and boost the conversion of the second most abundant polysaccharide chitin by chitinase. In this study, we aimed to achieve the efficient extracellular production of Serratia marcescens LPMO CBP21 and Aeromonas veronii B565 chitinase Chi92 by Escherichia coli. Twelve signal peptides reported with high secretion efficiency were screened to assess the extracellular production efficiency of CBP21 and Chi92, with glycine used as a medium supplement. The results showed that PelB was the most productive signal peptide for the extracellular production of CBP21 and Chi92 in E. coli. Furthermore, CBP21 facilitated the degradation of the three chitin substrates (colloidal chitin, β-chitin, and α-chitin) by Chi92. This study will be valuable for the industrial production and application of the two enzymes for chitin degradation.

  7. Modulation of Quorum Sensing in Acylhomoserine Lactone-Producing or -Degrading Tobacco Plants Leads to Alteration of Induced Systemic Resistance Elicited by the Rhizobacterium Serratia marcescens 90-166

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    Choong-Min Ryu

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Numerous root-associated bacteria (rhizobacteria are known to elicit induced systemic resistance (ISR in plants. Bacterial cell-density-dependent quorum sensing (QS is thought to be important for ISR. Here, we investigated the role of QS in the ISR elicited by the rhizobacterium, Serratia marcescens strain 90–166, in tobacco. Since S. marcescens 90–166 produces at least three QS signals, QS-mediated ISR in strain 90–166 has been difficult to understand. Therefore, we investigated the ISR capacity of two transgenic tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum plants that contained either bacterial acylhomoserine lactone-producing (AHL or -degrading (AiiA genes in conjunction with S. marcescens 90–166 to induce resistance against bacterial and viral pathogens. Root application of S. marcescens 90–166 increased ISR to the bacterial pathogens, Pectobacterium carotovorum subsp. carotovorum and Pseudomonas syringae pv. tabaci, in AHL plants and decreased ISR in AiiA plants. In contrast, ISR to Cucumber mosaic virus was reduced in AHL plants treated with S. marcescens 90–166 but enhanced in AiiA plants. Taken together, these data indicate that QS-dependent ISR is elicited by S. marcescens 90–166 in a pathogen-dependent manner. This study provides insight into QS-dependent ISR in tobacco elicited by S. marcescens 90–166.

  8. The role of the Serratia marcescens SdeAB multidrug efflux pump and TolC homologue in fluoroquinolone resistance studied via gene-knockout mutagenesis.

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    Begic, Sanela; Worobec, Elizabeth A

    2008-02-01

    Serratia marcescens is a prominent opportunistic nosocomial pathogen resistant to several classes of antibiotics. The major mechanism for fluoroquinolone resistance in various Gram-negative pathogens is active efflux. Our group previously identified SdeAB, a resistance-nodulation-cell division (RND) efflux pump complex, and a TolC-like outer-membrane protein (HasF), which together mediate energy-dependent fluoroquinolone efflux. In addition, a regulatory protein-encoding gene in the upstream region of sdeAB was identified (sdeR) and found to be 40 % homologous to MarA, an Escherichia coli transcriptional regulator. To provide conclusive evidence as to the role of these components in S. marcescens, sdeB, hasF and sdeR deletion mutants were constructed. Suicide vectors were created and introduced via triparental mating into S. marcescens UOC-67 (wild-type) and, for sdeB and hasF, T-861 (clinical isolate). We have analysed these genetically altered strains using minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) assays for a wide range of compounds (fluoroquinolones, SDS, novobiocin, ethidium bromide and chloramphenicol). Intracellular accumulation of a variety of fluoroquinolones was measured fluorospectroscopically. The sdeB, hasF and sdeR knockout strains were consistently more susceptible to antibiotics than the parent strains, with the sdeB/hasF double knockout strain showing the highest susceptibility. A marked increase in fluoroquinolone (ciprofloxacin) accumulation was observed for strains deficient in either the sdeB or hasF genes when compared to the parental strains, with the highest ciprofloxacin accumulation observed for the sdeB/hasF double knockout. Antibiotic accumulation assays for the sdeB knockout mutant strains performed in the presence of carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone (CCCP), a proton-motive-force inhibitor, demonstrated that SdeAB-mediated efflux is proton-motive-force dependent. Due to the comparable susceptibility of the sdeB and the has

  9. Outbreak of Serratia marcescens Coproducing ArmA and CTX-M-15 Mediated High Levels of Resistance to Aminoglycoside and Extended-Spectrum Beta-Lactamases, Algeria.

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    Batah, Rima; Loucif, Lotfi; Olaitan, Abiola Olumuyiwa; Boutefnouchet, Nafissa; Allag, Hamoudi; Rolain, Jean-Marc

    2015-08-01

    Serratia marcescens is one of the most important pathogens responsible for nosocomial infections worldwide. Here, we have investigated the molecular support of antibiotic resistance and genetic relationships in a series of 54 S. marcescens clinical isolates collected from Eastern Algeria between December 2011 and July 2013. The 54 isolates were identified by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectrometry (MS). Antibiotic susceptibility testing was performed by disc diffusion and E-test methods. Antibiotic resistance genes were detected by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The genetic transfer of antibiotic resistance was performed by conjugation using azide-resistant Escherichia coli J53 as the recipient strain, and plasmid analysis was done by PCR-based replicon typing. The relatedness of our isolates was determined by phylogenetic analysis based on partial sequences of four protein-encoding genes (gyrB, rpoB, infB, and atpD) and then compared to MALDI-TOF MS clustering. Thirty-five out of 54 isolates yielded an extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL) phenotype and carried bla(CTX-M-15) (n=32), bla(TEM-1) (n=26), bla(TEM-71) (n=1), bla(SHV-1a) (n=1), and bla(PER-2) (n=12). Among these isolates, we identified a cluster of 15 isolates from a urology unit that coharbored ESBL and the 16S rRNA methyltransferase armA. Conjugation was successful for five selected strains, demonstrating the transferability of a conjugative plasmid of incompatibility group incL/M type. Phylogenetic analysis along with MALDI-TOF clustering likely suggested an outbreak of such isolates in the urology unit. In this study, we report for the first time the co-occurrence of armA methyltransferase with ESBL in S. marcescens clinical isolates in Eastern Algeria.

  10. Eikosanoid biyosentezi inhibitörleri Serratia marcescens bakterisi ile birlikte Spodoptera littoralis larvalarına uygulandığında larvalar üzerindeki ölüm etksi

    OpenAIRE

    TUNAZ,HASAN; KÜSEK, Mustafa

    2015-01-01

    The first step of the cellular defense reactions to bacterial, fungal and some viral infections in insects is nodulation. We posed the hypothesis that Spodoptera littoralis, expresses melanoic nodulation reactions to bacterial challenge and that injecting S. littoralis larvae with eicosanoid biosnthesis inhibitors (EBIs) plus bacteria would increase larval mortality. Injecting larvae with EBIs, immediately before intrahemocoelic injections of the bacterium, Serratia marcescens, sharply reduce...

  11. Chromate Reduction in Serratia marcescens Isolated from Tannery Effluent and Potential Application for Bioremediation of Chromate Pollution

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    M.A. Mondaca

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Pollution of aquatic systems by heavy metals has resulted in increasing environmental concern because they cannot be biodegraded. One metal that gives reason for concern due to its toxicity is chromium. Cr(VI and Cr(III are the principal forms of chromium found in natural waters. A chromate-resistant strain of the bacterium S. marcescens was isolated from tannery effluent. The strain was able to reduce Cr(VI to Cr(III, and about 80% of chromate was removed from the medium. The reduction seems to occur on the cell surface. Transmission electron microscopic examination of cells revealed that particles were deposited on the outside of bacterial cells. A stable biofilm was formed in less than 10 h, reaching around 1010 cfu attached per milligram of activated carbon. These findings demonstrate that immobilized S. marcescens might be used in industrial waste treatment processes.

  12. Ceftazidime-avibactam activity when tested against ceftazidime-nonsusceptible Citrobacter spp., Enterobacter spp., Serratia marcescens, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa from Unites States medical centers (2011-2014).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sader, Helio S; Castanheira, Mariana; Farrell, David J; Flamm, Robert K; Jones, Ronald N

    2015-12-01

    A total of 6910 Enterobacteriaceae with inducible AmpC β-lactamases and 5328 Pseudomonas aeruginosa were collected from 71 US hospitals in 2011-2014 and were susceptibility tested using the reference broth microdilution method. Ceftazidime-avibactam demonstrated potent in vitro activity against all 3 Enterobacteriaceae genus groups evaluated, with MIC(50)/MIC(90) values of 0.12/0.5 μg/mL for Enterobacter spp. and Serratia marcescens and 0.12/0.25 μg/mL for Citrobacter spp. (99.8-99.9% susceptibility rates at ≤8 μg/mL). Furthermore, 99.3% of ceftazidime-nonsusceptible Enterobacteriaceae isolates (1015 of 1022) were susceptible to ceftazidime-avibactam (MIC(50)/MIC(90) of 0.25-0.5/1-2 μg/mL), whereas susceptibility rates for cefepime ranged from 45.9% (Citrobacter spp.) to 80.0% (S. marcescens). Ceftazidime-avibactam was also very active against P. aeruginosa (MIC(50)/MIC(90), 2/4 μg/mL; 96.8% inhibited at ≤8 μg/mL). P. aeruginosa susceptibility rates to other antipseudomonal β-lactams ranged from 79.6% for piperacillin-tazobactam to 84.5% for cefepime. Ceftazidime-avibactam inhibited 67.4% of isolates at ≤8 μg/mL (MIC(50)/MIC(90), 8/32 μg/mL) that were nonsusceptible to ceftazidime, cefepime, piperacillin-tazobactam, and meropenem. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. New plasmid-mediated aminoglycoside 6'-N-acetyltransferase, AAC(6')-Ian, and ESBL, TLA-3, from a Serratia marcescens clinical isolate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Wanchun; Wachino, Jun-Ichi; Kimura, Kouji; Yamada, Keiko; Arakawa, Yoshichika

    2015-05-01

    Enterobacteriaceae clinical isolates showing amikacin resistance (MIC 64 to >256 mg/L) in the absence of 16S rRNA methyltransferase (MTase) genes were found. The aim of this study was to clarify the molecular mechanisms underlying amikacin resistance in Enterobacteriaceae clinical isolates that do not produce 16S rRNA MTases. PCR was performed to detect already-known amikacin resistance determinants. Cloning experiments and sequence analyses were performed to characterize unknown amikacin resistance determinants. Transfer of amikacin resistance determinants was performed by conjugation and transformation. The complete nucleotide sequence of the plasmids was determined by next-generation sequencing technology. Amikacin resistance enzymes were purified with a column chromatography system. The enzymatic function of the purified protein was investigated by thin-layer chromatography (TLC) and HPLC. Among the 14 isolates, 9 were found to carry already-known amikacin resistance determinants such as aac(6')-Ia and aac(6')-Ib. Genetic analyses revealed the presence of a new amikacin acetyltransferase gene, named aac(6')-Ian, located on a 169 829 bp transferable plasmid (p11663) of the Serratia marcescens strain NUBL-11663, one of the five strains negative for known aac(6') genes by PCR. Plasmid p11663 also carried a novel ESBL gene, named blaTLA-3. HPLC and TLC analyses demonstrated that AAC(6')-Ian catalysed the transfer of an acetyl group from acetyl coenzyme A onto an amine at the 6'-position of various aminoglycosides. We identified aac(6')-Ian as a novel amikacin resistance determinant together with a new ESBL gene, blaTLA-3, on a transferable plasmid of a S. marcescens clinical isolate. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Antimicrobial Chemotherapy. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. Intraspecies Competition in Serratia marcescens Is Mediated by Type VI-Secreted Rhs Effectors and a Conserved Effector-Associated Accessory Protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcoforado Diniz, Juliana; Coulthurst, Sarah J

    2015-07-01

    The type VI secretion system (T6SS) is widespread in Gram-negative bacteria and can deliver toxic effector proteins into eukaryotic cells or competitor bacteria. Antibacterial T6SSs are increasingly recognized as key mediators of interbacterial competition and may contribute to the outcome of many polymicrobial infections. Multiple antibacterial effectors can be delivered by these systems, with diverse activities against target cells and distinct modes of secretion. Polymorphic toxins containing Rhs repeat domains represent a recently identified and as-yet poorly characterized class of T6SS-dependent effectors. Previous work had revealed that the potent antibacterial T6SS of the opportunistic pathogen Serratia marcescens promotes intraspecies as well as interspecies competition (S. L. Murdoch, K. Trunk, G. English, M. J. Fritsch, E. Pourkarimi, and S. J. Coulthurst, J Bacteriol 193:6057-6069, 2011, http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/JB.05671-11). In this study, two new Rhs family antibacterial effectors delivered by this T6SS have been identified. One of these was shown to act as a DNase toxin, while the other contains a novel, cytoplasmic-acting toxin domain. Importantly, using S. marcescens, it has been demonstrated for the first time that Rhs proteins, rather than other T6SS-secreted effectors, can be the primary determinant of intraspecies competition. Furthermore, a new family of accessory proteins associated with T6SS effectors has been identified, exemplified by S. marcescens EagR1, which is specifically required for deployment of its associated Rhs effector. Together, these findings provide new insight into how bacteria can use the T6SS to deploy Rhs-family effectors and mediate different types of interbacterial interactions. Infectious diseases caused by bacterial pathogens represent a continuing threat to health and economic prosperity. To counter this threat, we must understand how such organisms survive and prosper. The type VI secretion system is a weapon that

  15. The Integral Role of Genetic Variation in the Evolution of Outcrossing in the Caenorhabditis elegans-Serratia marcescens Host-Parasite System.

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    Raymond C Parrish

    Full Text Available Outcrossing is predicted to facilitate more rapid adaptation than self-fertilization as a result of genetic exchange between genetically variable individuals. Such genetic exchange may increase the efficacy of selection by breaking down Hill-Robertson interference, as well as promoting the maintenance of within-lineage genetic diversity. Experimental studies have demonstrated the selective advantage of outcrossing in novel environments. Here, we assess the specific role of genetic variation in the evolution of outcrossing. We experimentally evolved genetically variable and inbred populations of mixed mating (outcrossing and self-fertilizing Caenorhabditis elegans nematodes under novel ecological conditions-specifically the presence of the virulent parasite Serratia marcescens. Outcrossing rates increased in genetically variable host populations evolved in the presence of the parasite, whereas parasite exposure in inbred populations resulted in reduced rates of host outcrossing. The host populations with genetic variation also exhibited increased fitness in the presence of the parasite over eight generations, whereas inbred populations did not. This increase in fitness was primarily the result of adaptation to the parasite, rather than recovery from initial inbreeding depression. Therefore, the benefits of outcrossing were only manifested in the presence of genetic variation, and outcrossing was favored over self-fertilization as a result. As predicted, the benefits of outcrossing under novel ecological conditions are a product of genetic exchange between genetically diverse lineages.

  16. Chitinase from a Novel Strain of Serratia marcescens JPP1 for Biocontrol of Aflatoxin: Molecular Characterization and Production Optimization Using Response Surface Methodology

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    Kai Wang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Chitinase is one of the most important mycolytic enzymes with industrial significance, and produced by a number of organisms. A chitinase producing isolate Serratia marcescens JPP1 was obtained from peanut hulls in Jiangsu Province, China, and exhibited antagonistic activity against aflatoxins. In this study, we describe the optimization of medium composition with increased production of chitinase for the selected bacteria using statistical methods: Plackett-Burman design was applied to find the key ingredients, and central composite design of response surface methodology was used to optimize the levels of key ingredients for the best yield of chitinase. Maximum chitinase production was predicted to be 23.09 U/mL for a 2.1-fold increase in medium containing 12.70 g/L colloidal chitin, 7.34 g/L glucose, 5.00 g/L peptone, 1.32 g/L (NH42SO4, 0.7 g/L K2HPO4, and 0.5 g/L MgSO4·7H2O. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR amplification of the JPP1 chitinase gene was performed and obtained a 1,789 bp nucleotide sequence; its open reading frame encoded a protein of 499 amino acids named as ChiBjp.

  17. Complete Sequence of Four Multidrug-Resistant MOBQ1 Plasmids Harboring blaGES-5 Isolated from Escherichia coli and Serratia marcescens Persisting in a Hospital in Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyd, David; Taylor, Geoffrey; Fuller, Jeff; Bryce, Elizabeth; Embree, Joanne; Gravel, Denise; Katz, Kevin; Kibsey, Pamela; Kuhn, Magdalena; Langley, Joanne; Mataseje, Laura; Mitchell, Robyn; Roscoe, Diane; Simor, Andrew; Thomas, Eva; Turgeon, Nathalie; Mulvey, Michael

    2015-06-01

    The usefulness of carbapenems for gram-negative infections is becoming compromised by organisms harboring carbapenemases, enzymes which can hydrolyze the drug. Currently KPC (class A), NDM (class B), and OXA-48 types (class D) are the most globally widespread carbapenemases. However, among the GES-type class A extended-spectrum β-lactamases (ESBLs) there are variants that hydrolyze carbapenems, with blaGES-5 being the most common. Two Escherichia coli and two Serratia marcescens harboring blaGES-5 on plasmids were isolated by the Canadian Nosocomial Infection Surveillance Program (CNISP) from four different patients in a single hospital over a 2-year period. Complete sequencing of the blaGES-5 plasmids indicated that all four had nearly identical backbones consisting of genes for replication, partitioning, and stability, but contained variant accessory regions consisting of mobile elements and antimicrobial resistance genes. The plasmids were of a novel replicon type, but belonged to the MOBQ1 group based on relaxase sequences, and appeared to be mobilizable, but not self-transmissible. Considering the time periods of bacterial isolation, it would appear the blaGES-5 plasmid has persisted in an environmental niche for at least 2 years in the hospital. This has implications for infection control and clinical care when it is transferred to clinically relevant gram-negative organisms.

  18. Stereoselective synthesis of (R)-phenylephrine using recombinant Escherichia coli cells expressing a novel short-chain dehydrogenase/reductase gene from Serratia marcescens BCRC 10948.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Guan-Jhih; Kuan, Yi-Chia; Chou, Hsiao-Yi; Fu, Tze-Kai; Lin, Jia-Shin; Hsu, Wen-Hwei; Yang, Ming-Te

    2014-01-20

    (R)-Phenylephrine [(R)-PE] is an α1-adrenergic receptor agonist and is widely used as a nasal decongestant to treat the common cold without the side effects of other ephedrine adrenergic drugs. We identified a short-chain dehydrogenase/reductase (SM_SDR) from Serratia marcescens BCRC 10948 that was able to convert 1-(3-hydroxyphenyl)-2-(methylamino) ethanone (HPMAE) into (R)-PE. The SM_SDR used NADPH and NADH as cofactors with specific activities of 17.35±0.71 and 5.57±0.07mU/mg protein, respectively, at 30°C and pH 7.0, thereby indicating that this enzyme could be categorized as an NADPH-preferring short-chain dehydrogenase/reductase. Escherichia coli strain BL21 (DE3) expressing SM_SDR could convert HPMAE into (R)-PE with more than 99% enantiomeric excess. The productivity and conversion yield were 0.57mmolPE/lh and 51.06%, respectively, using 10mM HPMAE. Fructose was the most effective carbon source for the conversion of HPMAE to (R)-PE. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Cloning, expression and characterization of glycerol dehydrogenase involved in 2,3-butanediol formation in Serratia marcescens H30.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Liaoyuan; Xu, Quanming; Peng, Xiaoqian; Xu, Boheng; Wu, Yuehao; Yang, Yulong; Sun, Shujing; Hu, Kaihui; Shen, Yaling

    2014-09-01

    The meso-2,3-butanediol dehydrogenase (meso-BDH) from S. marcescens H30 is responsible for converting acetoin into 2,3-butanediol during sugar fermentation. Inactivation of the meso-BDH encoded by budC gene does not completely abolish 2,3-butanediol production, which suggests that another similar enzyme involved in 2,3-butanediol formation exists in S. marcescens H30. In the present study, a glycerol dehydrogenase (GDH) encoded by gldA gene from S. marcescens H30 was expressed in Escherichia coli BL21(DE3), purified and characterized for its properties. In vitro conversion indicated that the purified GDH could catalyze the interconversion of (3S)-acetoin/meso-2,3-butanediol and (3R)-acetoin/(2R,3R)-2,3-butanediol. (2S,3S)-2,3-Butanediol was not a substrate for the GDH at all. Kinetic parameters of the GDH enzyme showed lower K m value and higher catalytic efficiency for (3S/3R)-acetoin in comparison to those for (2R,3R)-2,3-butanediol and meso-2,3-butanediol, implying its physiological role in favor of 2,3-butanediol formation. Maximum activity for reduction of (3S/3R)-acetoin and oxidations of meso-2,3-butanediol and glycerol was observed at pH 8.0, while it was pH 7.0 for diacetyl reduction. The enzyme exhibited relative high thermotolerance with optimum temperature of 60 °C in the oxidation-reduction reactions. Over 60 % of maximum activity was retained at 70 °C. Additionally, the GDH activity was significantly enhanced for meso-2,3-BD oxidation in the presence of Fe(2+) and for (3S/3R)-acetoin reduction in the presence of Mn(2+), while several cations inhibited its activity, particularly Fe(2+) and Fe(3+) for (3S/3R)-acetoin reduction. The properties provided potential application for single configuration production of acetoin and 2,3-butanediol .

  20. Nosocomial outbreak of Serratia marcescens in a Neonatal Intensive Care Unit: what to do not to close the unit when cohorting is not enough

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    Lorenza Pugni

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Background. Serratia marcescens, a Gram-negative organism, is a well-recognized nosocomial pathogen, especially in Neonatal Intensive Care Units (NICUs. Even if multiple point sources have been identified, the source of an outbreak often remains unknown. Because an outbreak of S. marcescens can spread rapidly, closing the Unit sometimes is necessary. Here, we report on an outbreak of S. marcescens occurred in our NICU and describe the control measures taken to stop the epidemic without closing the Unit. Material and Methods. Our Unit is a 56-bed Unit composed of two areas: a 23-bed (4 rooms intensive-care and a 33-bed (6 rooms intermediate-care area. After some cases of S. marcescens infection were identified during a 3-month period, a prospective epidemiological study was performed in both areas during a period of 8 months. Surveillance cultures were obtained from all neonates (pharynx, rectum, eyes, ears at admission, at room-changing and twice weekly, from medical and nursing staff (pharynx, rectum and from the environment (sinks, ventilators, incubators, soap dispensers, disinfectants, breast pumps, work surfaces. The following control measures were also taken: universal precautions were intensified (handwashing, gloves, masks, education of the staff was stressed, a survey was instituted to check the observance of the control measures, admissions to the NICU were limited and infected/colonized babies were strictly cohorted. Because the outbreak continued despite these control measures, we separated new admissions from hospitalized babies by using two ways in the Unit: a clean way (green and a dirty way (red with nurses, rooms and everything different between the green and the red babies. Results. During the study period, 589 neonates underwent surveillance cultures (14.156 samples; 32/589 (5% infants had positive swabs. Four (12.5% of the 32 colonized infants had clinical signs of infection: sepsis-like symptoms (2 cases and conjunctivitis

  1. An outbreak of Serratia marcescens infection in a special-care baby unit of a community hospital in United Arab Emirates: the importance of the air conditioner duct as a nosocomial reservoir.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uduman, S A; Farrukh, A S; Nath, K N R; Zuhair, M Y H; Ifrah, A; Khawla, A D; Sunita, P

    2002-11-01

    We report an outbreak of Serratia marcescens infection in a special-care baby unit (SCBU) of a university-affiliated community hospital in the United Arab Emirates. The outbreak involved 36 infants and lasted for 20 weeks. Seven of the colonized infants developed invasive illnesses in the form of bacteraemia (four cases), bacteraemic meningitis (two) and clinical sepsis (one). Three other term infants had purulent conjunctivitis. There were five deaths with an overall mortality of 14%. S. marcescens was cultured from airflow samples from the air conditioning (AC) which was the reservoir of infection in this outbreak. Elimination of the nosocomial source and outbreak containment were eventually achieved by specialized robotic cleaning of the entire AC duct system of the SCBU. Strict adherence to the infection control policies was reinforced to prevent transmission of cross-infection. Copyright 2002 The Hospital Infection Society

  2. Assessment of process parameters influencing the enhanced production of prodigiosin from Serratia marcescens and evaluation of its antimicrobial, antioxidant and dyeing potentials

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    Gulani, C.

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Aims: Prodigiosin is a bright red pigment produced by certain strains of Serratia marcescens, characterized by a common pyrrolylpyrromethane skeleton. This pigment is found to possess antibacterial, antifungal, immunosuppressive and antiproliferative activity. The present study aimed at designing process parameters for the enhanced production of this pigment.Methodology and Results: Peptone glycerol broth was selected as the best synthetic medium. The effects of various media components and process parameters like carbon and nitrogen sources, temperature, pH, incubation period and other supplements were investigated. Maximal amount of prodigiosin was produced at temperature 25 °C, pH 7.0 andincubation period of 48 h. Supplementation of media with maltose and peptone yielded maximal amount of prodigiosin. Incorporation of minimal amount of supplements like silica gel, iron salts, inorganic phosphate also showed promising results. Chromatographic separations suggested that prodigiosin is made up of three different fractions (purple, orange and red. Further investigation of antimicrobial properties of prodigiosin revealed that it is a potent inhibitor against gram positive bacteria like Staphylococcus aureus and Bacillus cereus and fungal pathogens like Candida albicans, C.parapsilosis and Cryptococcus sp. This antimicrobial potency remained stable under a wide range of temperature and pH. The antioxidant capacity of prodigiosin was found to be 22.05 Bg ascorbic acid equivalents/ml of extract. When applied to textiles, prodigiosin resisted the action of acid, alkali and detergent. Conclusion, Significance and Impact of study: Besides combating gram positive bacterial pathogens and some pathogenic yeasts, prodigiosin with strong dyeing and antioxidant activity may find broad applications in textile and therapeutic industries.

  3. Serratia Infections: from Military Experiments to Current Practice

    OpenAIRE

    Mahlen, Steven D.

    2011-01-01

    Summary: Serratia species, in particular Serratia marcescens, are significant human pathogens. S. marcescens has a long and interesting taxonomic, medical experimentation, military experimentation, and human clinical infection history. The organisms in this genus, particularly S. marcescens, were long thought to be nonpathogenic. Because S. marcescens was thought to be a nonpathogen and is usually red pigmented, the U.S. military conducted experiments that attempted to ascertain the spread of...

  4. Resistance to cefepime and cefpirome due to a 4-amino-acid deletion in the chromosome-encoded AmpC beta-lactamase of a Serratia marcescens clinical isolate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mammeri, Hedi; Poirel, Laurent; Bemer, Pascal; Drugeon, Henri; Nordmann, Patrice

    2004-03-01

    A multiresistant Serratia marcescens strain, HD, isolated from a patient with a urinary tract infection, was resistant to amino-, carboxy-, and ureidopenicillins, ceftazidime, and cefepime and was susceptible to cefotaxime and ceftriaxone, according to the guidelines of the NCCLS. No synergy was found between expanded-spectrum cephalosporins and clavulanic acid, according to the double-disk synergy test. The bla(AmpC) gene of the strain was amplified by PCR and cloned into Escherichia coli DH10B, giving rise to high-level resistance to ceftazidime, cefepime, and cefpirome. Sequencing analysis revealed that the bla(AmpC) gene from S. marcescens HD had a 12-nucleotide deletion compared to the bla(AmpC) gene from reference strain S. marcescens S3, leading to a 4-amino-acid deletion located in the H-10 helix of the beta-lactamase. Kinetic analysis showed that this enzyme significantly hydrolyzed ceftazidime, cefepime, and cefpirome. This work underlined that resistance to the latest expanded-spectrum cephalosporins may be mediated by structurally modified AmpC-type beta-lactamases.

  5. Resistance to Cefepime and Cefpirome Due to a 4-Amino-Acid Deletion in the Chromosome-Encoded AmpC β-Lactamase of a Serratia marcescens Clinical Isolate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mammeri, Hedi; Poirel, Laurent; Bemer, Pascal; Drugeon, Henri; Nordmann, Patrice

    2004-01-01

    A multiresistant Serratia marcescens strain, HD, isolated from a patient with a urinary tract infection, was resistant to amino-, carboxy-, and ureidopenicillins, ceftazidime, and cefepime and was susceptible to cefotaxime and ceftriaxone, according to the guidelines of the NCCLS. No synergy was found between expanded-spectrum cephalosporins and clavulanic acid, according to the double-disk synergy test. The blaAmpC gene of the strain was amplified by PCR and cloned into Escherichia coli DH10B, giving rise to high-level resistance to ceftazidime, cefepime, and cefpirome. Sequencing analysis revealed that the blaAmpC gene from S. marcescens HD had a 12-nucleotide deletion compared to the blaAmpC gene from reference strain S. marcescens S3, leading to a 4-amino-acid deletion located in the H-10 helix of the β-lactamase. Kinetic analysis showed that this enzyme significantly hydrolyzed ceftazidime, cefepime, and cefpirome. This work underlined that resistance to the latest expanded-spectrum cephalosporins may be mediated by structurally modified AmpC-type β-lactamases. PMID:14982755

  6. Serratia marcescens harbouring SME-type class A carbapenemases in Canada and the presence of blaSME on a novel genomic island, SmarGI1-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mataseje, L F; Boyd, D A; Delport, J; Hoang, L; Imperial, M; Lefebvre, B; Kuhn, M; Van Caeseele, P; Willey, B M; Mulvey, M R

    2014-07-01

    An increasing prevalence since 2010 of Serratia marcescens harbouring the Ambler class A carbapenemase SME prompted us to further characterize these isolates. Isolates harbouring bla(SME) were identified by PCR and sequencing. Phenotypic analysis for carbapenemase activity was carried out by a modified Hodge test and a modified Carba NP test. Antimicrobial susceptibilities were determined by Etest and Vitek 2. Typing was by PFGE of macrorestriction digests. Whole-genome sequencing of three isolates was carried out to characterize the genomic region harbouring the bla(SME)-type genes. All S. marcescens harbouring SME-type enzymes could be detected using a modified Carba NP test. Isolates harbouring bla(SME) were resistant to penicillins and carbapenems, but remained susceptible to third-generation cephalosporins, as well as fluoroquinolones and trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole. Isolates exhibited diverse genetic backgrounds, though 57% of isolates were found in three clusters. Analysis of whole-genome sequence data from three isolates revealed that the bla(SME) gene occurred in a novel cryptic prophage genomic island, SmarGI1-1. There has been an increasing occurrence of S. marcescens harbouring bla(SME) in Canada since 2010. The bla(SME) gene was found on a genomic island, SmarGI1-1, that can be excised and circularized, which probably contributes to its dissemination amongst S. marcescens. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Antimicrobial Chemotherapy. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  7. Multifarious beneficial traits and plant growth promoting potential of Serratia marcescens KiSII and Enterobacter sp. RNF 267 isolated from the rhizosphere of coconut palms (Cocos nucifera L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Priya; Gupta, Alka; Gopal, Murali; Thomas, Litty; Thomas, George V

    2013-01-01

    Two plant growth promoting bacteria designated as KiSII and RNF 267 isolated from the rhizosphere of coconut palms were identified as Serratia marcescens and Enterobacter sp. based on their phenotypic features, BIOLOG studies and 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis. Both bacteria exhibited phosphate solubilization, ammonification, and production of indole acetic acid, β-1, 3 glucanase activities and 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate-deaminase activity. They could also tolerate a range of pH conditions, low temperature and salinity (NaCl). In addition, S. marcescens KiSII exhibited N- fixation potential, chitinase activity, siderophore production and antibiotics production. Seed bacterization with these bacteria increased the growth parameters of test plants such as paddy and cowpea over uninoculated control in green house assay. In coconut seedlings, significant increase in growth and nutrient uptake accompanied with higher populations of plant beneficial microorganisms in their rhizospheres were recorded on inoculation with both the PGPRs. The present study clearly revealed that PGPRs can aid in production of healthy and vigorous seedlings of coconut palm which are hardy perennial crops. They offer a scope to be developed into novel PGPR based bioinoculants for production of elite seedlings that can benefit the coconut farming community and the coconut based ecology.

  8. Inhibition of primary roots and stimulation of lateral root development in Arabidopsis thaliana by the rhizobacterium Serratia marcescens 90-166 is through both auxin-dependent and -independent signaling pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Chun-Lin; Park, Hyo-Bee; Lee, Jong Suk; Ryu, Sangryeol; Ryu, Choong-Min

    2010-03-01

    The rhizobacterium Serratia marcescens strain 90-166 was previously reported to promote plant growth and induce resistance in Arabidopsis thaliana. In this study, the influence of strain 90-166 on root development was studied in vitro. We observed inhibition of primary root elongation, enhanced lateral root emergence, and early emergence of second order lateral roots after inoculation with strain 90-166 at a certain distance from the root. Using the DR5::GUS transgenic A. thaliana plant and an auxin transport inhibitor, N-1-naphthylphthalamic acid, the altered root development was still elicited by strain 90-166, indicating that this was not a result of changes in plant auxin levels. Intriguingly, indole-3-acetic acid, a major auxin chemical, was only identified just above the detection limit in liquid culture of strain 90-166 using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. Focusing on bacterial determinants of the root alterations, we found that primary root elongation was inhibited in seedlings treated with cell supernatant (secreted compounds), while lateral root formation was induced in seedlings treated with lysate supernatant (intracellular compounds). Further study revealed that the alteration of root development elicited by strain 90-166 involved the jasmonate, ethylene, and salicylic acid signaling pathways. Collectively, our results suggest that strain 90-166 can contribute to plant root development via multiple signaling pathways.

  9. Potentiation of the synergistic activities of chitinases ChiA, ChiB and ChiC from Serratia marcescens CFFSUR-B2 by chitobiase (Chb) and chitin binding protein (CBP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutiérrez-Román, Martha Ingrid; Dunn, Michael F; Tinoco-Valencia, Raunel; Holguín-Meléndez, Francisco; Huerta-Palacios, Graciela; Guillén-Navarro, Karina

    2014-01-01

    With the goal of understanding the chitinolytic mechanism of the potential biological control strain Serratia marcescens CFFSUR-B2, genes encoding chitinases ChiA, ChiB and ChiC, chitobiase (Chb) and chitin binding protein (CBP) were cloned, the protein products overexpressed in Escherichia coli as 6His-Sumo fusion proteins and purified by affinity chromatography. Following affinity tag removal, the chitinolytic activity of the recombinant proteins was evaluated individually and in combination using colloidal chitin as substrate. ChiB and ChiC were highly active while ChiA was inactive. Reactions containing both ChiB and ChiC showed significantly increased N-acetylglucosamine trimer and dimer formation, but decreased monomer formation, compared to reactions with either enzyme alone. This suggests that while both ChiB and ChiC have a general affinity for the same substrate, they attack different sites and together degrade chitin more efficiently than either enzyme separately. Chb and CBP in combination with ChiB and ChiC (individually or together) increased their chitinase activity. We report for the first time the potentiating effect of Chb on the activity of the chitinases and the synergistic activity of a mixture of all five proteins (the three chitinases, Chb and CBP). These results contribute to our understanding of the mechanism of action of the chitinases produced by strain CFFSUR-B2 and provide a molecular basis for its high potential as a biocontrol agent against fungal pathogens.

  10. The Serratia gene cluster encoding biosynthesis of the red antibiotic, prodigiosin, shows species- and strain-dependent genome context variation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harris, Abigail K P; Williamson, Neil R; Slater, Holly

    2004-01-01

    The prodigiosin biosynthesis gene cluster (pig cluster) from two strains of Serratia (S. marcescens ATCC 274 and Serratia sp. ATCC 39006) has been cloned, sequenced and expressed in heterologous hosts. Sequence analysis of the respective pig clusters revealed 14 ORFs in S. marcescens ATCC 274 and...

  11. Serratia Infections: from Military Experiments to Current Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahlen, Steven D.

    2011-01-01

    Summary: Serratia species, in particular Serratia marcescens, are significant human pathogens. S. marcescens has a long and interesting taxonomic, medical experimentation, military experimentation, and human clinical infection history. The organisms in this genus, particularly S. marcescens, were long thought to be nonpathogenic. Because S. marcescens was thought to be a nonpathogen and is usually red pigmented, the U.S. military conducted experiments that attempted to ascertain the spread of this organism released over large areas. In the process, members of both the public and the military were exposed to S. marcescens, and this was uncovered by the press in the 1970s, leading to U.S. congressional hearings. S. marcescens was found to be a certain human pathogen by the mid-1960s. S. marcescens and S. liquefaciens have been isolated as causative agents of numerous outbreaks and opportunistic infections, and the association of these organisms with point sources such as medical devices and various solutions given to hospitalized patients is striking. Serratia species appear to be common environmental organisms, and this helps to explain the large number of nosocomial infections due to these bacteria. Since many nosocomial infections are caused by multiply antibiotic-resistant strains of S. marcescens, this increases the danger to hospitalized patients, and hospital personnel should be vigilant in preventing nosocomial outbreaks due to this organism. S. marcescens, and probably other species in the genus, carries several antibiotic resistance determinants and is also capable of acquiring resistance genes. S. marcescens and S. liquefaciens are usually identified well in the clinical laboratory, but the other species are rare enough that laboratory technologists may not recognize them. 16S rRNA gene sequencing may enable better identification of some of the less common Serratia species. PMID:21976608

  12. Influence of Temperature on the Physiology and Virulence of the Insect Pathogen Serratia sp. Strain SCBI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, Lauren M.

    2012-01-01

    The physiology of a newly recognized Serratia species, termed South African Caenorhabditis briggsae Isolate (SCBI), which is both a nematode mutualist and an insect pathogen, was investigated and compared to that of Serratia marcescens Db11, a broad-host-range pathogen. The two Serratia strains had comparable levels of virulence for Manduca sexta and similar cytotoxic activity patterns, but motility and lipase and hemolytic activities differed significantly between them. PMID:23042169

  13. Brote de bacteriemia por Serratia marcescens en pacientes portadores de catéteres tunelizados en hemodiálisis secundario a colonización de la solución antiséptica. Experiencia en 4 centros

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José L. Merino

    2016-11-01

    Conclusiones: Las bacteriemias por gérmenes no convencionales deben ponernos sobre aviso para investigar posibles brotes. La aplicación de una solución contaminada por S. marcescens en los catéteres en hemodiálisis fue la vía de bacteriemia. El tratamiento antibiótico intravenoso y el sellado de los catéteres permitió una excelente supervivencia tanto de los pacientes como de los catéteres.

  14. Устойчивость яблонной (Aphis pomi Deg. ) и вишнёвой (Myzus cerasi F. ) тлей к энтомопатогенной бактерии Serratia marcescens

    OpenAIRE

    ПЕТЕРСОН А.М.; МАЛЫШИНА М.С.; ГЛИНСКАЯ Е.В.; МАМЕДОВА Г.Д.

    2014-01-01

    Изучена устойчивость яблонной (Aphis pomi Deg.) и вишнёвой (Myzus cerasi F.) тлей к энтомопатогенной бактерии Serratia marcescens. Доказана способность S. marcescens сохранять жизнеспособность на поверхности кормовых растений в течение 5 дней. Обработка колоний тлей взвесями в концентрации 109 м.к./мл приводила к попаданию S. marcescens только в организмы вишнёвой тли. Смертность насекомых на 7-й день после обработки бактериальной взвесью составила 6,2% у яблонной и 12,8% у вишнёвой тлей....

  15. Infective endocarditis of a rare etiology: Serratia marcescens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Đokić Milomir

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Infective endocarditis (IE is a unique diagnostic and therapeutic challenge. It is a severe disease, fatal before penicillin discovery. Atypical presentations frequently led to delayed diagnosis and poor outcome. There was little information about the natural history of the vegetations during medical treatment or the relation of morphologic changes in vegetation to late complications. Application of a new diagnostic criteria and echocardiography, increased the number of definite diagnosis. Trans-thoracic and trans-esophageal echocardiography had an established role in the management of patients with IE. The evolution of vegetation size, its mobility, and consistency, the extent of the disease, and the severity of valvular regurgutation were related to late complications. With therapeutic options including modern antibiotic treatment and early surgical intervention IE turned out to be a curable disease. Reduction in mortality also depended on prevention. Antibiotic prophylaxis of IE was important, but low mortality was also the result of early treatment, especially in the event of early recognition of symptoms and signs of the disease.

  16. Production of Methioninase from Serratia Marcescens Isolated from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    HP

    enzymes and lipid profile, as well as increase in life span by up to 77 %, increase in body weight (p < 0.01), decrease in cancer cell count from (2.70 ± 0.40) × 106 to (1.86 ± 0.30) × 106 cells/ml compared to (2.70 ±. 0.40) × 106 to (1.42 ± 0.25) x 106 cells/ml for the group treated with 5-FU. Solid tumor volume decreased from.

  17. Fibronectin-synthesizing activity of free and membrane-bound polyribosomes from human embryonic fibroblasts and chick embryos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belkin, V.M.; Volodarskaya, S.M.

    1986-06-20

    The fibronectin-synthesizing activity of membrane-bound and free polyribosomes in a cell-free system was studied using immunochemical methods. It was found that fibronectin biosynthesis on membrane-bound polyribosomes from human embryonic fibroblasts accounts for 4.9% and those from 10-day-old chick embryos for 1.1% of the total amount of newly synthesized proteins, whereas on free polyribosomes it is 1.0 and 0.3%, respectively. Fibronectin monomers with a molecular weight of 220,000 were found only in the material of the cell-free system containing heavy fractions of membrane-bound polyribosomes newly synthesized in the presence of spermidine. Thus, it was shown that fibronectin is synthesized primarily on membrane-bound polyribosomes.

  18. Innate Immune Regulation of Serratia marcescens–Induced Corneal Inflammation and Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Rong; Zhang, Rui; Sun, Yan; Platt, Sean; Szczotka-Flynn, Loretta; Pearlman, Eric

    2012-01-01

    Purpose. Serratia marcescens is frequently isolated from lenses of patients with contact lens-associated corneal infiltrates. In the current study, we examined the role of toll-like receptors (TLRs) and interleukin-1 receptor type 1 (IL-1R1) in S. marcescens–induced corneal inflammation and infection. Methods. The central corneal epithelium of C57BL/6 and gene knockout mice was abraded, and 1 × 107 S. marcescens were added in the presence of a silicone hydrogel contact lens, and we examined corneal inflammation by confocal microscopy and neutrophil enumeration. Viable bacteria were quantified by colony-forming units (CFU). Results. S. marcescens induced neutrophil recruitment to the corneal stroma, and increased corneal thickness and haze in C57BL/6 mice. Conversely, CFU was significantly lower by 48 hours post infection. In contrast, MyD88−/−, IL-1R−/−, TLR4−/−, and TLR4/5−/− corneas infected with S. marcescens had significantly increased CFU, indicating impaired clearance. However, there was no significant difference in CFU among C57BL/6, TIRAP−/−, and TRIF−/− mice. Tobramycin-killed S. marcescens induced corneal inflammation in C57BL/6 mice, which was impaired significantly in MD-2−/− mice and in C57BL/6 mice pretreated topically with the MD-2 antagonist eritoran tetrasodium. Conclusions. S. marcescens induces corneal inflammation by activation of TLR4/MD-2/MyD88 and the IL-1R1/MyD88 pathways, which are potential therapeutic targets for inhibition of S. marcescens-induced corneal inflammation. PMID:23033384

  19. Биосинтез эндонуклеазы Serratia marcescens в присутствии пуринов и ингибитора их биосинтеза

    OpenAIRE

    高木, 勉; タカギ, ツトム

    2010-01-01

    Проведен сравнительный анализ субстратов РНК и ДНК, выделенных из разных источников разными фирмами изготовителями, и активности нуклеазы бактерий Serratia marcescens в отношении этих субстратов. Показано, что препараты РНК, выделенные из одного и того же источника разными фирмами, незначительно отличаются друг от друга по степени полимерности и величине нуклеотидных фрагментов. Напротив, препараты ДНК, выделенные одной и той же фирмой из разных источников, существенно различались по величине...

  20. Genome Sequence of Serratia plymuthica V4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cleto, S; Van der Auwera, G; Almeida, C; Vieira, M J; Vlamakis, H; Kolter, R

    2014-05-15

    Serratia spp. are gammaproteobacteria and members of the family Enterobacteriaceae. Here, we announce the genome sequence of Serratia plymuthica strain V4, which produces the siderophore serratiochelin and antimicrobial compounds. Copyright © 2014 Cleto et al.

  1. Genome sequence and comparative analysis of a putative entomopathogenic Serratia isolated from Caenorhabditis briggsae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abebe-Akele, Feseha; Tisa, Louis S; Cooper, Vaughn S; Hatcher, Philip J; Abebe, Eyualem; Thomas, W Kelley

    2015-07-18

    Entomopathogenic associations between nematodes in the genera Steinernema and Heterorhabdus with their cognate bacteria from the bacterial genera Xenorhabdus and Photorhabdus, respectively, are extensively studied for their potential as biological control agents against invasive insect species. These two highly coevolved associations were results of convergent evolution. Given the natural abundance of bacteria, nematodes and insects, it is surprising that only these two associations with no intermediate forms are widely studied in the entomopathogenic context. Discovering analogous systems involving novel bacterial and nematode species would shed light on the evolutionary processes involved in the transition from free living organisms to obligatory partners in entomopathogenicity. We report the complete genome sequence of a new member of the enterobacterial genus Serratia that forms a putative entomopathogenic complex with Caenorhabditis briggsae. Analysis of the 5.04 MB chromosomal genome predicts 4599 protein coding genes, seven sets of ribosomal RNA genes, 84 tRNA genes and a 64.8 KB plasmid encoding 74 genes. Comparative genomic analysis with three of the previously sequenced Serratia species, S. marcescens DB11 and S. proteamaculans 568, and Serratia sp. AS12, revealed that these four representatives of the genus share a core set of ~3100 genes and extensive structural conservation. The newly identified species shares a more recent common ancestor with S. marcescens with 99% sequence identity in rDNA sequence and orthology across 85.6% of predicted genes. Of the 39 genes/operons implicated in the virulence, symbiosis, recolonization, immune evasion and bioconversion, 21 (53.8%) were present in Serratia while 33 (84.6%) and 35 (89%) were present in Xenorhabdus and Photorhabdus EPN bacteria respectively. The majority of unique sequences in Serratia sp. SCBI (South African Caenorhabditis briggsae Isolate) are found in ~29 genomic islands of 5 to 65 genes and are

  2. Characterization of Poly(A)-Protein Complexes Isolated from Free and Membrane-Bound Polyribosomes of Ehrlich Ascites Tumor Cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen, Dick B.; Counotte-Potman, Anda D.; Venrooij, Walther J. van

    1976-01-01

    Proteins present in messenger ribonucleoprotein particles were labeled with [35S]-methionine in Ehrlich ascites tumor cells in which synthesis of new ribosomes was inhibited. Poly(A)-protein complexes were isolated from free and membrane-bound polyribosomes by sucrose gradient centrifugation and

  3. Fear learning increases the number of polyribosomes associated with excitatory and inhibitory synapses in the barrel cortex.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malgorzata Jasinska

    Full Text Available Associative fear learning, resulting from whisker stimulation paired with application of a mild electric shock to the tail in a classical conditioning paradigm, changes the motor behavior of mice and modifies the cortical functional representation of sensory receptors involved in the conditioning. It also induces the formation of new inhibitory synapses on double-synapse spines of the cognate barrel hollows. We studied density and distribution of polyribosomes, the putative structural markers of enhanced synaptic activation, following conditioning. By analyzing serial sections of the barrel cortex by electron microscopy and stereology, we found that the density of polyribosomes was significantly increased in dendrites of the barrel activated during conditioning. The results revealed fear learning-induced increase in the density of polyribosomes associated with both excitatory and inhibitory synapses located on dendritic spines (in both single- and double-synapse spines and only with the inhibitory synapses located on dendritic shafts. This effect was accompanied by a significant increase in the postsynaptic density area of the excitatory synapses on single-synapse spines and of the inhibitory synapses on double-synapse spines containing polyribosomes. The present results show that associative fear learning not only induces inhibitory synaptogenesis, as demonstrated in the previous studies, but also stimulates local protein synthesis and produces modifications of the synapses that indicate their potentiation.

  4. [Bartolomeo Bizio and the phenomenon of "purpurine polenta": unknown history of Serratia marcescens infections].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aragona, F

    1999-03-01

    The present article describes the observations and experiments of Bartolomeo Bizio on a typical food of northern Italy known as "polenta", corn flour boiled in water and salt, on which purpurine stains would appear at high temperature and moisture. Due to these experiments and investigative work, Bizio is considered to be the father of modern bacteriology and bacterial biochemistry.

  5. Phenotypic Diversification and Adaptation of Serratia marcescens MG1 Biofilm-Derived Morphotypes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koh, Kai Shyang; Lam, Kin Wai; Alhede, Morten

    2007-01-01

    colonies were observed in flow cell biofilms after 3 to 4 days, at least six different morphological colony variants were consistently isolated from the biofilm effluent. The timing and pattern of variant formation were found to follow a predictable sequence, where some variants, such as a smooth variant...

  6. Enhanced alkaline catalase production by Serratia marcescens FZSF01: Enzyme purification, characterization, and recombinant expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xianbo Jia

    2017-11-01

    Conclusions: To our knowledge, these results represent one of the highest fermentation levels reported among current catalase-producing strains. This FZSF01 catalase may be suitable for several industrial applications that comprise exposure to alkaline conditions and under a wide range of temperatures.

  7. Identification of a toxic serralysin family protease with unique thermostable property from S. marcescens FS14.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Dongxia; Li, Pengpeng; Zhou, Jiale; Gao, Meijing; Lou, Xiangdi; Ran, Tingting; Wu, Shuwen; Wang, Weiwu; Xu, Dongqing

    2016-12-01

    A serralysin family protease (Serralysin-like protease B, SPB) with unique V-shaped thermostable property was isolated and identified from the Serratia marcescens FS14 by biochemical and molecular biological methods. It is the first time to report the isolation of a native serralysin family protease directly from Serratia species except the well-studied serralysin. SPB has an optimum pH at 8.0 and an optimum temperature at 37°C. It shows high proteolytic activities after pretreated at 4-50°C for 10min respectively and almost no detectable activity after pretreated at 60°C. Surprisingly, increasing activities were observed after pretreated at 70-90°C respectively. Further study revealed that the reason behind this phenomenon may be the self-digestion property of SPB with an optimum temperature around 60°C. This self-digestion property may expand the SPB future application in industry. The bioassay using the healthy cotton bollworm Helicoverpa armigera larvae demonstrated that the serralysin and SPB from FS14 are toxic to the H. armigera larvae. This result implied that FS14 strain and/or the SPB and serralysin in FS14 might have a potential application in insect control. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. A case of necrotising fasciitis caused by Serratia marsescens: extreme age as functional immunosuppression?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cope, Thomas Edmund; Cope, Wei; Beaumont, David Martin

    2013-03-01

    We report the case of a 97-year-old woman who had a prolonged hospital admission for the treatment of right-sided heart failure. During her stay she experienced a rapid deterioration, characterised by shortness of breath, cardiovascular compromise and a hot, red, swollen calf. Post-mortem examination demonstrated that this was caused by necrotising fasciitis due to Serratia marcescens as a single pathogen. This is only the second reported case of this condition in the absence of diabetes or immunosuppression, and clinical deterioration was much more rapid. The case underlines the importance of circumspection and regular review in the diagnosis of the elderly patient. It reminds us that these patients should be viewed as functionally immunosuppressed, and that some or all of the haematological markers of infection can be absent even in severe disease.

  9. Isomaltulose production using free and immobilized Serratia ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Isomaltulose is a low cariogenic sweetener used as a substitute for sucrose in the food industry. In this study, isomaltulose production by Serratia plymuthica ATCC 15928 was performed using free and immobilized cells. Response Surface Methodology was employed to evaluate the influence of temperature, wet cell mass ...

  10. Nosocomial septicemia caused by Serratia plymuthica.

    OpenAIRE

    Domingo, D.; Limia, A; Alarcón, T.; Sanz, J.C.; Del Rey, M C; López-Brea, M

    1994-01-01

    We report a case of nosocomial septicemia in a 79-year-old patient caused by Serratia plymuthica with no evident focus of infection. The patient was treated with gentamicin (40 mg every 8 h) during 10 days; clinical resolution of the infection was obtained after the 10-day treatment period.

  11. Visualization of the Serratia Type VI Secretion System Reveals Unprovoked Attacks and Dynamic Assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerc, Amy J; Diepold, Andreas; Trunk, Katharina; Porter, Michael; Rickman, Colin; Armitage, Judith P; Stanley-Wall, Nicola R; Coulthurst, Sarah J

    2015-09-29

    The Type VI secretion system (T6SS) is a bacterial nanomachine that fires toxic proteins into target cells. Deployment of the T6SS represents an efficient and widespread means by which bacteria attack competitors or interact with host organisms and may be triggered by contact from an attacking neighbor cell as a defensive strategy. Here, we use the opportunist pathogen Serratia marcescens and functional fluorescent fusions of key components of the T6SS to observe different subassemblies of the machinery simultaneously and on multiple timescales in vivo. We report that the localization and dynamic behavior of each of the components examined is distinct, revealing a multi-stage and dynamic assembly process for the T6SS machinery. We also show that the T6SS can assemble and fire without needing a cell contact trigger, defining an aggressive strategy that broadens target range and suggesting that activation of the T6SS is tailored to survival in specific niches. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Visualization of the Serratia Type VI Secretion System Reveals Unprovoked Attacks and Dynamic Assembly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amy J. Gerc

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The Type VI secretion system (T6SS is a bacterial nanomachine that fires toxic proteins into target cells. Deployment of the T6SS represents an efficient and widespread means by which bacteria attack competitors or interact with host organisms and may be triggered by contact from an attacking neighbor cell as a defensive strategy. Here, we use the opportunist pathogen Serratia marcescens and functional fluorescent fusions of key components of the T6SS to observe different subassemblies of the machinery simultaneously and on multiple timescales in vivo. We report that the localization and dynamic behavior of each of the components examined is distinct, revealing a multi-stage and dynamic assembly process for the T6SS machinery. We also show that the T6SS can assemble and fire without needing a cell contact trigger, defining an aggressive strategy that broadens target range and suggesting that activation of the T6SS is tailored to survival in specific niches.

  13. Isolation and molecular identification of a Serratia strain from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ONOS

    2010-04-05

    Apr 5, 2010 ... Grohskopf LA, Roth VR, Feikin DR, Feikin DR, Arduino MJ, Carson LA,. Tokars JI, Holt SC, Jensen BJ, Hoffman RE, Jarvis WR (2001). Serratia liquefaciens bloodstream infections from contamination of epoetin alfa at a hemodialysis center. N.Engl. J. Med. 344: 1491-. 1497. Kampf G, Kramer A (2004).

  14. In maize, glutelin-2 and low molecular weight zeins are synthesized by membrane-bound polyribosomes and translocated into microsomal membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torrent, M; Poca, E; Campos, N; Ludevid, M D; Palau, J

    1986-09-01

    Experiments to establish the site of biosynthesis and the possible translocation into microsomes of glutelins-2 (28 kD G2) and low molecular weight zeins (10, 14, 15 kD Z2) have been carried out. Free and membrane-bound polyribosomes as well as microsomal membranes were isolated from immature endosperms of W64A Zea mays L. In vitro translation studies were carried out in the presence and in the absence of membranes using [(35)S]-methionine or [(35)S]-cysteine as precursors. Cell-free translation products were characterized by electrophoretic mobility, solubility and antigenic properties. The results obtained indicate that 28 kD G2 and low molecular weight zeins are primarily synthesized on membrane-bound polysomes. From experiments using proteinase K as a probe, we also conclude that these proteins are translocated into microsomes where they accumulate. The translocated and pre-28 kD G2 proteins do not present changes in the apparent molecular weight. However we show that there are differences in their isoelectric points, a fact that indicates the existence of 28 kD G2 processing.

  15. Biosynthesis of the red antibiotic, prodigiosin, in Serratia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Williamson, Neil R; Simonsen, Henrik Toft; Ahmed, Raef A A

    2005-01-01

    The biosynthetic pathway of the red-pigmented antibiotic, prodigiosin, produced by Serratia sp. is known to involve separate pathways for the production of the monopyrrole, 2-methyl-3-n-amyl-pyrrole (MAP) and the bipyrrole, 4-methoxy-2,2'-bipyrrole-5-carbaldehyde (MBC) which are then coupled...... the significance of the results for the biosynthesis of undecylprodigiosin by the Red cluster in Streptomyces coelicolor A3(2)....

  16. Genome sequencing and annotation of Serratia sp. strain TEL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lephoto, Tiisetso E; Gray, Vincent M

    2015-12-01

    We present the annotation of the draft genome sequence of Serratia sp. strain TEL (GenBank accession number KP711410). This organism was isolated from entomopathogenic nematode Oscheius sp. strain TEL (GenBank accession number KM492926) collected from grassland soil and has a genome size of 5,000,541 bp and 542 subsystems. The genome sequence can be accessed at DDBJ/EMBL/GenBank under the accession number LDEG00000000.

  17. Analysis of the Genome and Chromium Metabolism-Related Genes of Serratia sp. S2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Lanlan; Zhou, Simin; He, Yuan; Jia, Yan; Bai, Qunhua; Deng, Peng; Gao, Jieying; Li, Yingli; Xiao, Hong

    2017-11-02

    This study is to investigate the genome sequence of Serratia sp. S2. The genomic DNA of Serratia sp. S2 was extracted and the sequencing library was constructed. The sequencing was carried out by Illumina 2000 and complete genomic sequences were obtained. Gene function annotation and bioinformatics analysis were performed by comparing with the known databases. The genome size of Serratia sp. S2 was 5,604,115 bp and the G+C content was 57.61%. There were 5373 protein coding genes, and 3732, 3614, and 3942 genes were respectively annotated into the GO, KEGG, and COG databases. There were 12 genes related to chromium metabolism in the Serratia sp. S2 genome. The whole genome sequence of Serratia sp. S2 is submitted to the GenBank database with gene accession number of LNRP00000000. Our findings may provide theoretical basis for the subsequent development of new biotechnology to repair environmental chromium pollution.

  18. Comparative genomics of Serratia spp.: two paths towards endosymbiotic life.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandro Manzano-Marín

    Full Text Available Symbiosis is a widespread phenomenon in nature, in which insects show a great number of these associations. Buchnera aphidicola, the obligate endosymbiont of aphids, coexists in some species with another intracellular bacterium, Serratia symbiotica. Of particular interest is the case of the cedar aphid Cinara cedri, where B. aphidicola BCc and S. symbiotica SCc need each other to fulfil their symbiotic role with the insect. Moreover, various features seem to indicate that S. symbiotica SCc is closer to an obligate endosymbiont than to other facultative S. symbiotica, such as the one described for the aphid Acirthosyphon pisum (S. symbiotica SAp. This work is based on the comparative genomics of five strains of Serratia, three free-living and two endosymbiotic ones (one facultative and one obligate which should allow us to dissect the genome reduction taking place in the adaptive process to an intracellular life-style. Using a pan-genome approach, we have identified shared and strain-specific genes from both endosymbiotic strains and gained insight into the different genetic reduction both S. symbiotica have undergone. We have identified both retained and reduced functional categories in S. symbiotica compared to the Free-Living Serratia (FLS that seem to be related with its endosymbiotic role in their specific host-symbiont systems. By means of a phylogenomic reconstruction we have solved the position of both endosymbionts with confidence, established the probable insect-pathogen origin of the symbiotic clade as well as the high amino-acid substitution rate in S. symbiotica SCc. Finally, we were able to quantify the minimal number of rearrangements suffered in the endosymbiotic lineages and reconstruct a minimal rearrangement phylogeny. All these findings provide important evidence for the existence of at least two distinctive S. symbiotica lineages that are characterized by different rearrangements, gene content, genome size and branch lengths.

  19. Complete genome sequence of Serratia plymuthica strain AS12

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neupane, Saraswoti [Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden; Finlay, Roger D. [Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden; Alstrom, Sadhna [Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden; Goodwin, Lynne A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Kyrpides, Nikos C [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Lucas, Susan [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Lapidus, Alla L. [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Bruce, David [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Pitluck, Sam [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Peters, Lin [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Ovchinnikova, Galina [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Chertkov, Olga [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Han, James [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Han, Cliff [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Tapia, Roxanne [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Detter, J. Chris [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Land, Miriam L [ORNL; Hauser, Loren John [ORNL; Cheng, Jan-Fang [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Ivanova, N [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Pagani, Ioanna [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Klenk, Hans-Peter [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Woyke, Tanja [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Hogberg, Nils [Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden

    2012-01-01

    A plant associated member of the family Enterobacteriaceae, Serratia plymuthica strain AS12 was isolated from rapeseed roots. It is of scientific interest due to its plant growth promoting and plant pathogen inhibiting ability. The genome of S. plymuthica AS12 comprises a 5,443,009 bp long circular chromosome, which consists of 4,952 protein-coding genes, 87 tRNA genes and 7 rRNA operons. This genome was sequenced within the 2010 DOE-JGI Community Sequencing Program (CSP2010) as part of the project entitled 'Genomics of four rapeseed plant growth promoting bacteria with antagonistic effect on plant pathogens'.

  20. Chitinase from a novel strain of Serratia marcescens JPP1 for biocontrol of aflatoxin: molecular characterization and production optimization using response surface methodology

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wang, Kai; Yan, Pei-sheng; Cao, Li-xin

    2014-01-01

    ...: Plackett-Burman design was applied to find the key ingredients, and central composite design of response surface methodology was used to optimize the levels of key ingredients for the best yield of chitinase...

  1. Chitinase from a Novel Strain of Serratia marcescens JPP1 for Biocontrol of Aflatoxin: Molecular Characterization and Production Optimization Using Response Surface Methodology

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wang, Kai; Yan, Pei-sheng; Cao, Li-xin

    2014-01-01

    ...: Plackett-Burman design was applied to find the key ingredients, and central composite design of response surface methodology was used to optimize the levels of key ingredients for the best yield of chitinase...

  2. Estudio de la bioadsorción de cadmio y plomo con biomasa de serratia marcescens m8a-2t, a nivel de laboratorio

    OpenAIRE

    Gutiérrez Moreno, Susana Mónica

    2015-01-01

    Las fuentes más comunes de contaminación ambiental son las refinerías de petróleo, plantas de generación de energía eléctrica, los procesos metalúrgicos y las plantas de tratamiento de efluentes cuyos desechos ingresan indirectamente a las aguas de los ríos, lagunas, océanos y suelos. Frente a este problema la biotecnología está tratando de presentar alternativas de bajo costo y fáciles de implementar, como la biodegradación de hidrocarburos, la remoción de metales pesados empleando desechos ...

  3. Quantitative Effects of Medium Hardness and Nutrient Availability on the Swarming Motility of Serratia liquefaciens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bees, Martin Alan; Andresen, Peter Ragnar; Mosekilde, Erik

    2002-01-01

    We report the first controlled measurements of expansion rates for swarming colonies of Serratia liquefaciens under different growth conditions, combined with qualitative observations of the organization of the colony into regions of differentiated cell types. Significantly, the results reveal th...

  4. The PhoBR two-component system regulates antibiotic biosynthesis in Serratia in response to phosphate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Everson Lee

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Secondary metabolism in Serratia sp. ATCC 39006 (Serratia 39006 is controlled via a complex network of regulators, including a LuxIR-type (SmaIR quorum sensing (QS system. Here we investigate the molecular mechanism by which phosphate limitation controls biosynthesis of two antibiotic secondary metabolites, prodigiosin and carbapenem, in Serratia 39006. Results We demonstrate that a mutation in the high affinity phosphate transporter pstSCAB-phoU, believed to mimic low phosphate conditions, causes upregulation of secondary metabolism and QS in Serratia 39006, via the PhoBR two-component system. Phosphate limitation also activated secondary metabolism and QS in Serratia 39006. In addition, a pstS mutation resulted in upregulation of rap. Rap, a putative SlyA/MarR-family transcriptional regulator, shares similarity with the global regulator RovA (regulator of virulence from Yersina spp. and is an activator of secondary metabolism in Serratia 39006. We demonstrate that expression of rap, pigA-O (encoding the prodigiosin biosynthetic operon and smaI are controlled via PhoBR in Serratia 39006. Conclusion Phosphate limitation regulates secondary metabolism in Serratia 39006 via multiple inter-linked pathways, incorporating transcriptional control mediated by three important global regulators, PhoB, SmaR and Rap.

  5. Draft Genome Sequence of a Chitinase-producing Biocontrol Bacterium Serratia sp. C-1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seur Kee Park

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The chitinase-producing bacterial strain C-1 is one of the key chitinase-producing biocontrol agents used for effective bioformulations for biological control. These bioformulations are mixed cultures of various chitinolytic bacteria. However, the precise identification, biocontrol activity, and the underlying mechanisms of the strain C-1 have not been investigated so far. Therefore, we evaluated in planta biocontrol efficacies of C-1 and determined the draft genome sequence of the strain in this study. The bacterial C-1 strain was identified as a novel Serratia sp. by a phylogenic analysis of its 16S rRNA sequence. The Serratia sp. C-1 bacterial cultures showed strong in planta biocontrol efficacies against some major phytopathogenic fungal diseases. The draft genome sequence of Serratia sp. C-1 indicated that the C-1 strain is a novel strain harboring a subset of genes that may be involved in its biocontrol activities.

  6. Complete genome sequence of Serratia sp. YD25 (KCTC 42987) presenting strong antagonistic activities to various pathogenic fungi and bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Chun; Liu, Yibo; Sun, Yan; Li, Zhi

    2017-03-10

    Serratia sp. YD25 (KCTC 42987) was originally isolated from rhizosphere soil in a continuous cropping tobacco-planting farm. Here, we show that its metabolites efficiently suppress the growth of various important pathogenic fungi and bacteria, causing infection in both plants and humans. In addition, Serratia sp. YD25 has a special trait of simultaneous production of both serrawettin W2 and prodigiosin, two important bioactive secondary metabolites produced by Serratia strains. Such co-production has not been reported in other Serratia strains. The complete genome sequence of Serratia sp. YD25 is presented, which is valuable for further exploration of its biotechnological applications in agriculture and medicine. The genome sequence reported here is also useful for understanding the unique regulatory mechanisms underlying biosynthesis of active compounds. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Influence of volatile organic compounds emitted by Pseudomonas and Serratia strains on Agrobacterium tumefaciens biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plyuta, Vladimir; Lipasova, Valentina; Popova, Alexandra; Koksharova, Olga; Kuznetsov, Alexander; Szegedi, Erno; Chernin, Leonid; Khmel, Inessa

    2016-07-01

    The ability to form biofilms plays an important role in bacteria-host interactions, including plant pathogenicity. In this work, we investigated the action of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) produced by rhizospheric strains of Pseudomonas chlororaphis 449, Pseudomonas fluorescens B-4117, Serratia plymuthica IC1270, as well as Serratia proteamaculans strain 94, isolated from spoiled meat, on biofilms formation by three strains of Agrobacterium tumefaciens which are causative agents of crown-gall disease in a wide range of plants. In dual culture assays, the pool of volatiles emitted by the tested Pseudomonas and Serratia strains suppressed the formation of biofilms of A. tumefaciens strains grown on polycarbonate membrane filters and killed Agrobacterium cells in mature biofilms. The individual VOCs produced by the tested Pseudomonas strains, that is, ketones (2-nonanone, 2-heptanone, 2-undecanone), and dimethyl disulfide (DMDS) produced by Serratia strains, were shown to kill A. tumefaciens cells in mature biofilms and suppress their formation. The data obtained in this study suggest an additional potential of some ketones and DMDS as protectors of plants against A. tumefaciens strains, whose virulence is associated with the formation of biofilms on the infected plants. © 2016 APMIS. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. First report of Serratia plymuthica causing onion bulb rot in Poland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowalska, Beata; Smolińska, Urszula; Oskiera, Michał

    2011-01-01

    Specific bacterial disease symptoms were observed on onion bulbs in almost all regions in Poland. For the purpose of identification of agents causing disease, bacteria were isolated from the symptomatic plants. Their pathogenicity was confirmed by using pathogenicity test on onion scales. These bacteria were identified biochemically and molecularly as Serratia plymuthica.

  9. Control of exoenzyme production, motility and cell differentiation in Serratia liquefaciens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Givskov, Michael Christian; Eberl, Leo; Molin, Søren

    1997-01-01

    Serratia liquefaciens secretes a broad spectrum of hydrolytic enzymes to the surrounding medium and possesses the ability to differentiate into specialized swarmer cells capable of rapid surface motility. Control of exoenzyme production and swarming motility is governed by similar regulatory...... components, including a quorum-sensing mechanism and the flagellar master operon flhDC....

  10. How Delisea pulchra furanones affect quorum sensing and swarming motility in Serratia liquefaciens MG1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, T B; Manefield, M; Andersen, Jens Bo

    2000-01-01

    Halogenated furanones produced by the benthic marine macroalga Delisea pulchra inhibit swarming motility of Serratia liquefaciens MG1. This study demonstrates that exogenously added furanones control transcription of the quorum sensing regulated gene swrA in competition with the cognate signal mo...

  11. Effects of Au/Fe and Fe nanoparticles on Serratia bacterial growth and production of biosurfactant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Jia; Vipulanandan, Cumaraswamy, E-mail: cvipulanandan@uh.edu

    2013-10-15

    The overall objective of this study was to compare the effects of Au/Fe and Fe nanoparticles on the growth and performance of Serratia Jl0300. The nanoparticle effect was quantified not only by the bacterial growth on agar plate after 1 hour interaction with the nanoparticles, but also by its production of a biosurfactant from used vegetable oil. The nanoparticles were prepared using the foam method. The concentrations of the nanoparticles used for the bacterial interaction study were varied from 1 mg/L to 1 g/L. The test results showed that the effect of nanoparticles on the bacterial growth and biosurfactant production varied with nanoparticle type, concentrations, and interaction time with the bacteria. Au/Fe nanoparticles didn't show toxicity to Serratia after short time (1 h) exposure, while during 8 days fermentation Au/Fe nanoparticles inhibited the growth of Serratia as well as the biosurfactant production when the concentration of the nanoparticles was higher than 10 mg/L. Fe nanoparticles showed inhibition effects to bacterial growth both after short time and long time interaction with Serratia, as well as to biosurfactant production when its concentration was higher than 100 mg/L. Based on the trends observed in this study, analytical models have been developed to predict the bacterial growth and biosurfactant production with varying concentrations of nanoparticles. - Highlights: • Modeled the effect of nanoparticles on the bacterial growth and biosurfactant production. • Effects of Au/Fe nonoparticles on Serratia Bacterial Growth and Production of Biosurfactant. • Scanning Electron Micrograph of bacteria-nanoparticles interaction.

  12. Preliminary Observations on the Rapid Differentiation of the Klebsiella-Enterobacter-Serratia Group on Bile-Esculin-Agar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasilauskas, Benedict L.

    1971-01-01

    A total of 232 isolates of Enterobacteriaceae and 19 Pseudomonas species were tested on bile-esculin-agar. Only the Klebsiella-Enterobacter-Serratia group produced blackening of the medium. PMID:5540671

  13. Complete genome sequence of the rapeseed plant-growth promoting Serratia plymuthica strain AS9

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neupane, Saraswoti [Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden; Hogberg, Nils [Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden; Alstrom, Sadhna [Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden; Lucas, Susan [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Han, James [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Lapidus, Alla L. [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Cheng, Jan-Fang [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Bruce, David [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Goodwin, Lynne A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Pitluck, Sam [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Peters, Lin [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Ovchinnikova, Galina [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Lu, Megan [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Han, Cliff [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Detter, J. Chris [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Tapia, Roxanne [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Fiebig, Anne [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Land, Miriam L [ORNL; Hauser, Loren John [ORNL; Kyrpides, Nikos C [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Ivanova, N [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Pagani, Ioanna [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Klenk, Hans-Peter [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Woyke, Tanja [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Finlay, Roger D. [Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden

    2012-01-01

    Serratia plymuthica are plant-associated, plant beneficial species belonging to the family Enterobacteriaceae. The members of the genus Serratia are ubiquitous in nature and their life style varies from endophytic to free-living. S. plymuthica AS9 is of special interest for its ability to inhibit fungal pathogens of rapeseed and to promote plant growth. The genome of S. plymuthica AS9 comprises a 5,442,880 bp long circular chromosome that consists of 4,952 protein-coding genes, 87 tRNA genes and 7 rRNA operons. This genome is part of the project entitled Genomics of four rapeseed plant growth promoting bacteria with antagonistic effect on plant pathogens awarded through the 2010 DOE-JGI Community Sequencing Program (CSP2010).

  14. Isolation and characterization of a plant growth-promoting rhizobacterium, Serratia sp. SY5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koo, So-Yeon; Cho, Kyung-Suk

    2009-11-01

    The role of plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) in the phytoremediation of heavy-metal-contaminated soils is important in overcoming its limitations for field application. A plant growth-promoting rhizobacterium, Serratia sp. SY5, was isolated from the rhizoplane of barnyard grass (Echinochloa crus-galli) grown in petroleum and heavy-metal-contaminated soil. This isolate has shown capacities for indole acetic acid production and siderophores synthesis. Compared with a non-inoculated control, the radicular root growth of Zea mays seedlings inoculated with SY5 can be increased by 27- or 15.4-fold in the presence of 15 mg-Cd/l or 15 mg-Cu/l, respectively. The results from hydroponic cultures showed that inoculation of Serratia sp. SY5 had a favorable influence on the initial shoot growth and biomass of Zea mays under noncontaminated conditions. However, under Cd-contaminated conditions, the inoculation of SY5 significantly increased the root biomass of Zea mays. These results indicate that Serratia sp. SY5 can serve as a promising microbial inoculant for increased plant growth in heavy-metal-contaminated soils to improve the phytoremediation efficiency.

  15. Spaceflight and Simulated Microgravity Increases Virulence of the Known Bacterial Pathogen S. Marcescens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clemens-Grisham, Rachel Andrea; Bhattacharya, Sharmila; Wade, William

    2016-01-01

    After spaceflight, the number of immune cells is reduced in humans. In other research models, including Drosophila, not only is there a reduction in the number of plasmatocytes, but expression of immune-related genes is also changed after spaceflight. These observations suggest that the immune system is compromised after exposure to microgravity. It has also been reported that there is a change in virulence of some bacterial pathogens after spaceflight. We recently observed that samples of gram-negative S. marcescens retrieved from spaceflight is more virulent than ground controls, as determined by reduced survival and increased bacterial growth in the host. We were able to repeat this finding of increased virulence after exposure to simulated microgravity using the rotating wall vessel, a ground based analog to microgravity. With the ground and spaceflight samples, we looked at involvement of the Toll and Imd pathways in the Drosophila host in fighting infection by ground and spaceflight samples. We observed that Imd-pathway mutants were more susceptible to infection by the ground bacterial samples, which aligns with the known role of this pathway in fighting infections by gram-negative bacteria. When the Imd-pathway mutants were infected with the spaceflight sample, however, they exhibited the same susceptibility as seen with the ground control bacteria. Interestingly, all mutant flies show the same susceptibility to the spaceflight bacterial sample as do wild type flies. This suggests that neither humoral immunity pathway is effectively able to counter the increased pathogenicity of the space-flown S. marcescens bacteria.

  16. Quantitative and specific detection of the biocontrol agent, Serratia plymuthica, in plant extracts using a real-time TaqMan® assay

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Czajkowski, R.L.; Wolf, van der J.M.

    2012-01-01

    A Serratia plymuthica-specific TaqMan® assay was designed based on the consensus nucleotide sequence from the 3'- end of the luxS gene present in all S. plymuthica strains tested. The specificity of the assay was demonstrated by testing 21 Serratia spp. strains and 30 isolates belonging to various

  17. Molecular identification and pathogenicity of Citrobacter and Serratia species isolated from cultured Oreochromis niloticus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manal I. El-Barbary

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to isolate and characterize some pathogenic bacterial strains belonging to the family Enterobacteriaceae. They had been isolated from gills, liver, kidney and skin of naturally infected Oreochromis niloticus and had been identified by biochemical test and 16S rRNA gene using four universal primers. Additionally, the isolates were tested for antimicrobial susceptibility, histopathological alterations of liver, kidney and gills and the pathogenicity of the identified isolates for O. niloticus. The results of phylogenetic analysis placed the isolates in the family Enterobacteriaceae (genera Serratia and Citrobacter based on 99% homology. The primer pair (17F and 1390R is the most appropriate pair of universal primers employed for the identification of 16S rRNA gene as it covers as much as possible of the variable regions (Vs. V1 and V2 regions of 16S rRNA gene presented weak evidence of the diversity of the genera Serratia. The mortality rate was 40–60% after challenging O. niloticus by identified isolates, which revealed its sensitivity to ciprofloxacin and norfloxacin. Histological changes showed dilation in sinusoids with severe vacuolar degeneration in the liver, tubular degeneration and hemorrhage between renal tubules with pyknotic nuclei in the kidney, epithelial hyperplasia, aneurism and evident epithelium interstitial edema in gills of O. niloticus. This study concluded that these isolates should be considered as an opportunistic pathogen of O. niloticus. The study also states that the sequencing of 16S rRNA is an important tool for the identification of unknown bacterial species of fish pathogen. Keywords: Citrobacter sp., Serratia sp., Phylogenetic analysis, Histology, Antibiotic sensitivity, Oreochromis niloticus

  18. Effects of Psychrotrophic Bacteria, Serratia liquefaciens and Acinetobacter genomospecies 10 on Yogurt Quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Yong Kook; Oh, Nam Su; Lee, Hyun Ah; Choi, Jong-Woo

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of proteolytic (Serratia liquefaciens, match %: 99.39) or lipolytic (Acinetobacter genomospecies 10, match %: 99.90) psychrotrophic bacteria (bacterial counts, analysis of free fatty acids (FFA) and analysis of free amino acids) on the microbial and chemical properties (yogurt composition), and sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) of yogurt during storage. Yogurts were prepared with raw milk preinoculated with each psychrotrophic bacteria. The total solid, fat, and protein content were not affected by preinoculation, but the pH of yogurt preinoculated with psychrotrophic bacteria was higher than in control. There was a dramatic increase in short chain free fatty acids among FFA in yogurt with Acinetobacter genomospecies 10. For 14 d of cold storage condition, SCFFA was 25.3 mg/kg to 34.4 mg/kg (1.36 times increased), MCFFA was 20.4 mg/kg to 25.7 mg/kg (1.26 times increased), and LCFFA was 240.2 mg/kg to 322.8 mg/kg (1.34 times increased). Serratia liquefaciens (match %: 99.39) in yogurt caused a greater accumulation of free amino acids (FAA), especially bitter peptides such as leucine, valine, arginine, and tyrosine, but SDS-PAGE showed that the inoculation of Serratia liquefaciens did not affect the degree of casein degradation during storage. Taken together, the excessive peptides and FFA in yogurt generated from psychrotrophic bacteria could develop off-flavors that degrade the quality of commercial yogurt products. PMID:26761293

  19. Complete genome sequence of the plant-associated Serratia plymuthica strain AS13

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neupane, Saraswoti [Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden; Finlay, Roger D. [Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden; Kyrpides, Nikos C [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Goodwin, Lynne A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Alstrom, Sadhna [Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden; Lucas, Susan [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Land, Miriam L [ORNL; Han, James [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Lapidus, Alla L. [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Cheng, Jan-Fang [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Bruce, David [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Pitluck, Sam [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Peters, Lin [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Ovchinnikova, Galina [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Held, Brittany [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Han, Cliff [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Detter, J C [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Tapia, Roxanne [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Hauser, Loren John [ORNL; Ivanova, N [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Pagani, Ioanna [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Woyke, Tanja [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Klenk, Hans-Peter [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Hogberg, Nils [Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden

    2012-01-01

    Serratia plymuthica AS13 is a plant-associated Gammaproteobacteria, isolated from rapeseed roots. It is of special interest because of its ability to inhibit fungal pathogens of rapeseed and to promote plant growth. The complete genome of S. plymuthica AS13 consists of a 5,442,549 bp circular chromosome. The chromosome contains 4,951 protein-coding genes, 87 tRNA genes and 7 rRNA operons. This genome was sequenced as part of the project enti- tled Genomics of four rapeseed plant growth promoting bacteria with antagonistic effect on plant pathogens within the 2010 DOE-JGI Community Sequencing Program (CSP2010).

  20. Childhood delayed septic arthritis of the knee caused by Serratia fonticola.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorret, Julie; Julie, Gorret; Chevalier, Julie; Julie, Chevalier; Gaschet, Anne; Anne, Gaschet; Fraisse, Bernard; Bernard, Fraisse; Violas, Philippe; Philippe, Violas; Chapuis, Madeleine; Madeleine, Chapuis; Jolivet-Gougeon, Anne

    2009-12-01

    We report a first documented case of Serratia fonticola infection in a child with septic arthritis, after falling off his bicycle and an infection with hawthorn thorns. The aetiologic agent was found to be a S. fonticola strain which was first isolated from two synovial fluid samples, only after culture enrichment, with failure of DNA amplification. Accurate diagnostic was done, despite S. fonticola is often considered as an opportunistic pathogenic bacterium. Alone ciprofloxacin treatment was not sufficient to counteract the infection, which was eradicated only after surgical drainage performed twice successively, with secondary removal of a remaining thorn, and treatment with third generation cephalosporin combined with ciprofloxacin for another three months.

  1. First complete genome sequence of a virulent bacteriophage infecting the opportunistic pathogen Serratia rubidaea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Shaozhen; Ma, Taping; Zhang, Xianglilan; Huang, Yong; Mi, Zhiqiang; Sun, Qiang; An, Xiaoping; Fan, Hang; Wu, Shuhui; Wei, Lin; Tong, Yigang

    2017-07-01

    A Serratia rubidaea phage, vB_Sru IME250, was isolated from hospital sewage. The morphology suggested that phage vB_Sru IME250 should be classified as a member of the family Myoviridae. High-throughput sequencing revealed that the phage genome has 154,938 nucleotides and consists of 193 coding DNA sequences, 90 of which have putative functions. The genome of vB_Sru IME250 is a linear, double-stranded DNA with an average GC content of 40.04%. The phage has a relatively high similarity to Klebsiella phage 0507-KN2-1, with a genome coverage of 84%.

  2. Nucleotide sequencing of the Proteus mirabilis calcium-independent hemolysin genes (hpmA and hpmB) reveals sequence similarity with the Serratia marcescens hemolysin genes (shlA and shlB).

    OpenAIRE

    Uphoff, T. S.; Welch, R. A.

    1990-01-01

    We cloned a 13.5-kilobase EcoRI fragment containing the calcium-independent hemolysin determinant (pWPM110) from a clinical isolate of Proteus mirabilis (477-12). The DNA sequence of a 7,191-base-pair region of pWPM110 was determined. Two polypeptides are encoded in this region, HpmB and HpmA (in that transcriptional order), with predicted molecular masses of 63,204 and 165,868 daltons, respectively. A putative Fur-binding site was identified upstream of hpmB overlapping the -35 region of the...

  3. Proteomic analysis of carbon concentrating chemolithotrophic bacteria Serratia sp. for sequestration of carbon dioxide.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Randhir K Bharti

    Full Text Available A chemolithotrophic bacterium enriched in the chemostat in presence of sodium bicarbonate as sole carbon source was identified as Serratia sp. by 16S rRNA sequencing. Carbon dioxide sequestering capacity of bacterium was detected by carbonic anhydrase enzyme and ribulose-1, 5- bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RuBisCO. The purified carbonic anhydrase showed molecular weight of 29 kDa. Molecular weight of RuBisCO was 550 kDa as determined by fast protein liquid chromatography (FPLC, however, sodium dodecyl sulphate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE showed presence of two subunits whose molecular weights were 56 and 14 kDa. The Western blot analysis of the crude protein and purified sample cross reacted with RuBisCO large-subunit polypeptides antibodies showed strong band pattern at molecular weight around 56 kDa regions. Whole cell soluble proteins of Serratia sp. grown under autotrophic and heterotrophic conditions were resolved by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and MALDI-TOF/MS for differential expression of proteins. In proteomic analysis of 63 protein spots, 48 spots were significantly up-regulated in the autotrophically grown cells; seven enzymes showed its utilization in autotrophic carbon fixation pathways and other metabolic activities of bacterium including lipid metabolisms indicated sequestration potency of carbon dioxide and production of biomaterials.

  4. Assessment of flhDC mRNA levels in Serratia liquefaciens swarm cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tolker-Nielsen, Tim; Christensen, Allan Beck; Holmstrøm, K.

    2000-01-01

    We reported previously that artificial overexpression of the flhDC operon in liquid-grown Serratia liquefaciens resulted in the formation of filamentous, multinucleated, and hyperflagellated cells that were indistinguishable from surface-induced swarm cells (L. Eberl, G. Christiansen, S. Molin, a......, vegetative cells. This suggests that surface-induced S. liquefaciens swarm cell differentiation, although dependent on flhDC gene expression, does not occur through elevated flhDC mRNA levels.......We reported previously that artificial overexpression of the flhDC operon in liquid-grown Serratia liquefaciens resulted in the formation of filamentous, multinucleated, and hyperflagellated cells that were indistinguishable from surface-induced swarm cells (L. Eberl, G. Christiansen, S. Molin......, and M. Givskov, J. Bacteriol. 178:554-559, 1996). In the present report we show by means of reporter gene measurements, Northern analysis, and in situ reverse transcription-PCR that the amount of flhDC mRNA in surface-grown swarm cells does not exceed the maximum level found in nondifferentiated...

  5. Proteomic Analysis of Carbon Concentrating Chemolithotrophic Bacteria Serratia sp. for Sequestration of Carbon Dioxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bharti, Randhir K.; Srivastava, Shaili; Thakur, Indu Shekhar

    2014-01-01

    A chemolithotrophic bacterium enriched in the chemostat in presence of sodium bicarbonate as sole carbon source was identified as Serratia sp. by 16S rRNA sequencing. Carbon dioxide sequestering capacity of bacterium was detected by carbonic anhydrase enzyme and ribulose-1, 5- bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RuBisCO). The purified carbonic anhydrase showed molecular weight of 29 kDa. Molecular weight of RuBisCO was 550 kDa as determined by fast protein liquid chromatography (FPLC), however, sodium dodecyl sulphate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) showed presence of two subunits whose molecular weights were 56 and 14 kDa. The Western blot analysis of the crude protein and purified sample cross reacted with RuBisCO large-subunit polypeptides antibodies showed strong band pattern at molecular weight around 56 kDa regions. Whole cell soluble proteins of Serratia sp. grown under autotrophic and heterotrophic conditions were resolved by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and MALDI-TOF/MS for differential expression of proteins. In proteomic analysis of 63 protein spots, 48 spots were significantly up-regulated in the autotrophically grown cells; seven enzymes showed its utilization in autotrophic carbon fixation pathways and other metabolic activities of bacterium including lipid metabolisms indicated sequestration potency of carbon dioxide and production of biomaterials. PMID:24619032

  6. Quorum-sensing-directed protein expression in Serratia proteamaculans B5a

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Allan Beck; Riedel, Kathrin; Eberl, Leo

    2003-01-01

    marcescens. Proteome analysis suggested that the presence of at least 39 intracellular proteins was affected by the 3-oxo-C6-HSL-based quorum sensing system. The lipB-encoded secretion system was identified as one target gene of the quorum sensing system. LipB was required for the production of extracellular...... lipolytic and proteolytic activities, thus rendering the production of food-deterioration-relevant exoenzymes indirectly under the control of quorum sensing. Strain B5a caused quorum-sensing-controlled spoilage of milk. Furthermore, chitinolytic activity was controlled by quorum sensing. This control...... appeared to be direct and not mediated via LipB. The data presented here demonstrate that quorum-sensing-controlled exoenzymic activities affect food quality....

  7. N-acyl-L-homoserine lactone-mediated regulation of the Lip secretion system in Serratia liquefaciens MG1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riedel, K.; Ohnesorg, T.; Krogfelt, K.A.

    2001-01-01

    The analysis of Serratia liquefaciens MG1 'luxAB insertion mutants that are responsive to N-butanoyl-L-homoserine lactone revealed that expression of lipB is controlled by the swr quorum-sensing system. LipB is part of the Lip exporter, a type I secretion system, which is responsible for the secr...

  8. Serendipitous crystallization and structure determination of cyanase (CynS) from Serratia proteamaculans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butryn, Agata; Stoehr, Gabriele; Linke-Winnebeck, Christian; Hopfner, Karl Peter

    2015-04-01

    Cyanate hydratase (CynS) catalyzes the decomposition of cyanate and bicarbonate into ammonia and carbon dioxide. Here, the serendipitous crystallization of CynS from Serratia proteamaculans (SpCynS) is reported. SpCynS was crystallized as an impurity and its identity was determined using mass-spectrometric analysis. The crystals belonged to space group P1 and diffracted to 2.1 Å resolution. The overall structure of SpCynS is very similar to a previously determined structure of CynS from Escherichia coli. Density for a ligand bound to the SpCynS active site was observed, but could not be unambiguously identified. Additionally, glycerol molecules bound at the entry to the active site of the enzyme indicate conserved residues that might be important for the trafficking of substrates and products.

  9. Differentiation of Serratia liquefaciens into swarm cells is controlled by the expression of the flhD master operon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eberl, L; Winson, MK; Sternberg, C

    1996-01-01

    The velocity with which a swarming colony of Serratia liquefaciens colonizes the surface of a suitable solid substratum was controlled by modulating the expression of the flhD master operon. In liquid medium, the stimulation of flhD expression resulted in filamentous, multinucleate, and hyperflag......The velocity with which a swarming colony of Serratia liquefaciens colonizes the surface of a suitable solid substratum was controlled by modulating the expression of the flhD master operon. In liquid medium, the stimulation of flhD expression resulted in filamentous, multinucleate......, and hyperflagellated cells that were indistinguishable from swarm cells isolated from the edge of a swarm colony. Thus, expression of the flhD master operon appears to play a central role in the process of swarm cell differentiation....

  10. Whole-Genome Sequence of Serratia liquefaciens HUMV-21, a Cytotoxic, Quorum-Sensing, and Biofilm-Producing Clinical Isolate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lázaro-Díez, María; Acosta, Felix; Remuzgo-Martínez, Sara; Ocampo-Sosa, Alain; Ocejo-Vinyals, Javier Gonzalo; Bravo, Jimena; El Aamri, Fátima; Escuela, Oliver; Martínez-Martínez, Luis; Ramos-Vivas, José

    2015-05-28

    A clinical isolate of Serratia liquefaciens (strain HUMV-21) was obtained from a skin ulcer of an adult patient. We report here its complete genome assembly using PacBio single-molecule real-time (SMRT) sequencing, which resulted in a single circular chromosome with 5.3 Mb. About 5,844 protein-coding genes are predicted from this assembly. Copyright © 2015 Lázaro-Díez et al.

  11. Isolation and characterization of a chromium-resistant bacterium Serratia sp. Cr-10 from a chromate-contaminated site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Kundi; Li, Fuli [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Qingdao (China). Qingdao Inst. of Bioenergy and Bioprocess Technology

    2011-05-15

    A novel bacterium, Cr-10, was isolated from a chromium-contaminated site and capable of removing toxic chromium species from solution by reducing hexavalent chromium to an insoluble precipitate. Sequence analysis of 16S rRNA gene of strain Cr-10 showed that it was most closely related to Serratia rubidaea JCM 1240{sup T} (97.68%). Physiological and chemotaxonomic data also supported that strain Cr-10 was identified as Serratia sp., a genus which was never specially reported chromate-resistant before. Serratia sp., Cr-10 was tolerant to a concentration of 1,500 mg Cr(VI) L{sup -1}, which was the highest level reported until now. The optimum pH and temperature for reduction of Cr(VI) by Serratia sp. Cr-10 were found to be 7.0 and 37 C, respectively. The Cr(VI) reduction was significantly influenced by additional carbon sources, and among them fructose and lactose offered maximum reduction, with a rate of 0.28 and 0.25 mg Cr(VI) L{sup -1} h{sup -1}, respectively. The cell-free extracts and filtrate of the culture were able to reduce Cr(VI) while concentration of total chromium remained stable in the process, indicating that the enzyme-catalyzed mechanism was applied in Cr(VI) reduction by the isolate. Additionally, it was found that there was hardly any chromium on the cell surface of the strain, further supporting that reduction, rather than bioadsorption, plays a major role in the Cr(VI) removal. (orig.)

  12. Biodegradation of cyanide using Serratia sp. isolated from contaminated soil of gold mine in Takab

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mojtaba Mohseni

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available   Introduction : Cyanide is a toxic and hazardous compound for all organisms which is produced enormously by human being and causes the environment pollution. Biodegradation is the best method for cyanide elimination in industrial wastewater. The aims of this study were isolation of cyanide degrading bacteria from contaminated soil and investigation of their ability for cyanide degradation.   Materials and methods: After soil samples collection, enrichment of cyanide degrading bacteria was performed in a minimal medium containing 0.5 mM potassium cyanide. The ability of isolated bacterium to utilize the cyanide as sole carbon and nitrogen source was investigated. Cyanide degradation and ammonium production was determined in growth medium using picric acid and Nessler’s regent methods. Toxicity effect of different cyanide compounds on bacterial growth was determined using minimum inhibitory concentration. In addition, the ability of the isolated bacterium to utilize different cyanide compounds was investigated . Identification of the isolate was undertaken using morphological, physiological and biochemical characteristics and molecular analysis .   Results : A bacterium with ability to degrade cyanide as sole carbon and nitrogen source was isolated from soil. This bacterium named as isolate MF1. MF1 degraded cyanide in growth medium in alkaline condition after 40 hours. Moreover this isolate tolerated more than 7 mM potassium cyanide. The results showed that there was a direct relation between decreasing of cyanide concentration, increasing of ammonia concentration and growth of MF1. In addition, the isolated bacterium demonstrated the ability to utilize different cyanide compounds as sole carbon and nitrogen source. The results of morphological and physiological characteristics showed that this bacterium belonged to the Serratia sp. Moreover, 16S rDNA sequencing and phylogenetic analyses exhibited that MF1 strain was similar to Serratia

  13. Mixing and matching siderophore clusters: structure and biosynthesis of serratiochelins from Serratia sp. V4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seyedsayamdost, Mohammad R; Cleto, Sara; Carr, Gavin; Vlamakis, Hera; João Vieira, Maria; Kolter, Roberto; Clardy, Jon

    2012-08-22

    Interrogation of the evolutionary history underlying the remarkable structures and biological activities of natural products has been complicated by not knowing the functions they have evolved to fulfill. Siderophores-soluble, low molecular weight compounds-have an easily understood and measured function: acquiring iron from the environment. Bacteria engage in a fierce competition to acquire iron, which rewards the production of siderophores that bind iron tightly and cannot be used or pirated by competitors. The structures and biosyntheses of "odd" siderophores can reveal the evolutionary strategy that led to their creation. We report a new Serratia strain that produces serratiochelin and an analog of serratiochelin. A genetic approach located the serratiochelin gene cluster, and targeted mutations in several genes implicated in serratiochelin biosynthesis were generated. Bioinformatic analyses and mutagenesis results demonstrate that genes from two well-known siderophore clusters, the Escherichia coli enterobactin cluster and the Vibrio cholera vibriobactin cluster, were shuffled to produce a new siderophore biosynthetic pathway. These results highlight how modular siderophore gene clusters can be mixed and matched during evolution to generate structural diversity in siderophores.

  14. Decarboxylase gene expression and cadaverine and putrescine production by Serratia proteamaculans in vitro and in beef.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Filippis, Francesca; Pennacchia, Carmela; Di Pasqua, Rosangela; Fiore, Alberto; Fogliano, Vincenzo; Villani, Francesco; Ercolini, Danilo

    2013-08-01

    Studies of the molecular basis of microbial metabolic activities that are important for the changes in food quality are valuable in order to help in understanding the behavior of spoiling bacteria in food. The growth of a psychrotrophic Serratia proteamaculans strain was monitored in vitro and in artificially inoculated raw beef. Two growth temperatures (25°C and 4°C) were tested in vitro, while growth at 15°C and 4°C was monitored in beef. During growth, the expression of inducible lysine and ornithine-decarboxylase genes was evaluated by quantitative reverse transcription-PCR (qRT-PCR), while the presence of cadaverine and putrescine was quantified by LC-ESI-MS/MS. The expression of the decarboxylase genes, and the consequent production of cadaverine and putrescine were shown to be influenced by the temperature, as well as by the complexity of the growth medium. Generally, the maximum gene expression and amine production took place during the exponential and early stationary phase, respectively. In addition, lower temperatures caused slower growth and gene downregulation. Higher amounts of cadaverine compared to putrescine were found during growth in beef with the highest concentrations corresponding to microbial loads of ca. 9CFU/g. The differences found in gene expression evaluated in vitro and in beef suggested that such activities are more reliably investigated in situ in specific food matrices. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Serratia symbiotica from the aphid Cinara cedri: a missing link from facultative to obligate insect endosymbiont.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Araceli Lamelas

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The genome sequencing of Buchnera aphidicola BCc from the aphid Cinara cedri, which is the smallest known Buchnera genome, revealed that this bacterium had lost its symbiotic role, as it was not able to synthesize tryptophan and riboflavin. Moreover, the biosynthesis of tryptophan is shared with the endosymbiont Serratia symbiotica SCc, which coexists with B. aphidicola in this aphid. The whole-genome sequencing of S. symbiotica SCc reveals an endosymbiont in a stage of genome reduction that is closer to an obligate endosymbiont, such as B. aphidicola from Acyrthosiphon pisum, than to another S. symbiotica, which is a facultative endosymbiont in this aphid, and presents much less gene decay. The comparison between both S. symbiotica enables us to propose an evolutionary scenario of the transition from facultative to obligate endosymbiont. Metabolic inferences of B. aphidicola BCc and S. symbiotica SCc reveal that most of the functions carried out by B. aphidicola in A. pisum are now either conserved in B. aphidicola BCc or taken over by S. symbiotica. In addition, there are several cases of metabolic complementation giving functional stability to the whole consortium and evolutionary preservation of the actors involved.

  16. Evaluation of bioremediation potentiality of ligninolytic Serratia liquefaciens for detoxification of pulp and paper mill effluent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haq, Izharul; Kumar, Sharad; Kumari, Vineeta; Singh, Sudheer Kumar; Raj, Abhay

    2016-03-15

    Due to high pollution load and colour contributing substances, pulp and paper mill effluents cause serious aquatic and soil pollution. A lignin-degrading bacterial strain capable of decolourising Azure-B dye was identified as lignin peroxidase (LiP) producing strain LD-5. The strain was isolated from pulp and paper mill effluent contaminated site. Biochemical and 16S rDNA gene sequence analysis suggested that strain LD-5 belonged to the Serratia liquefaciens. The strain LD-5 effectively reduced pollution parameters (colour 72%, lignin 58%, COD 85% and phenol 95%) of real effluent after 144h of treatment at 30°C, pH 7.6 and 120rpm. Extracellular LiP produced by S. liquefaciens during effluent decolourisation was purified to homogeneity using ammonium sulfate (AMS) precipitation and DEAE cellulose column chromatography. The molecular weight of the purified lignin peroxidase was estimated to be ∼28kDa. Optimum pH and temperature for purified lignin peroxidase activity were determined as pH 6.0 and 40°C, respectively. Detoxified effluent was evaluated for residual toxicity by alkaline single cell (comet) gel electrophoresis (SCGE) assay using Saccharomyces cerevisiae MTCC 36 as model organism. The toxicity reduction to treated effluent was 49.4%. These findings suggest significant potential of S. liquefaciens for bioremediation of pulp and paper mill effluent. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Rhizostabilization of metals in soils using Lupinus luteus inoculated with the metal resistant rhizobacterium Serratia sp. MSMC541.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Aafi, N; Brhada, F; Dary, M; Maltouf, A Filali; Pajuelo, E

    2012-03-01

    The aim of this work was to test Lupinus luteus plants, inoculated with metal resistant rhizobacteria, in order to phytostabilise metals in contaminated soils. The resistance to heavy metals of strains isolated from nodules of Lupinus plants was evaluated. The strain MSMC541 showed multi-resistance to several metals (up to 13.3 mM As, 2.2 mM Cd, 2.3 mM Cu, 9 mM Pb and 30 mM Zn), and it was selected for further characterization. Furthermore, this strain was able to biosorb great amounts of metals in cell biomass. 16S rDNA sequencing positioned this strain within the genus Serratia. The presence of arsenic resistance genes was confirmed by southern blot and PCR amplification. A rhizoremediation pot experiment was conducted using Lupinus luteus grown on sand supplemented with heavy metals and inoculated with MSMC541. Plant growth parameters and metal accumulation were determined in inoculated vs. non-inoculated Lupinus luteus plants. The results showed that inoculation with MSMC541 improved the plant tolerance to metals. At the same time, metal translocation to the shoot was significantly reduced upon inoculation. These results suggest that Lupinus luteus plants, inoculated with the metal resistant strain Serratia sp. MSMC541, have a great potential for phytostabilization of metal contaminated soils.

  18. A terpene synthase is involved in the synthesis of the volatile organic compound sodorifen of Serratia plymuthica 4Rx13

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dajana eDomik

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Bacteria release a plethora of volatile organic compounds (VOCs, including compounds with extraordinary structures. Sodorifen (IUPAC name: 1,2,4,5,6,7,8-heptamethyl-3-methylenebicyclo[3.2.1]oct-6-ene is a recently identified and unusual volatile hydrocarbon that is emitted by the rhizobacterium Serratia plymuthica 4Rx13. Sodorifen comprises a bicyclic ring structure solely consisting of carbon and hydrogen atoms, where every carbon atom of the skeleton is substituted with either a methyl or a methylene group. This unusual feature of sodorifen made a prediction of its biosynthetic origin very difficult and so far its biosynthesis was unknown. To unravel the biosynthetic pathway we performed genome and transcriptome analyses to identify candidate genes. One knockout mutant (SOD_c20750 showed the desired negative sodorifen phenotype. Here it was shown for the first time that this gene is indispensable for the synthesis of sodorifen and strongly supports the hypothesis that sodorifen descends from the terpene metabolism. SOD_c20750 is the first bacterial terpene cyclase isolated from Serratia spp. and Enterobacteriales. Homology modeling revealed a 3D structure, which indicated a functional role of amino acids for intermediate cation stabilization (W325 and putative proton acceptance (Y331. Moreover, the size and hydrophobicity of the active site strongly indicated that indeed the enzyme may catalyze the unusual compound sodorifen.

  19. Effects of simulated Mars conditions on the survival and growth of Escherichia coli and Serratia liquefaciens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, Bonnie J; Jenkins, David G; Schuerger, Andrew C

    2010-04-01

    Escherichia coli and Serratia liquefaciens, two bacterial spacecraft contaminants known to replicate under low atmospheric pressures of 2.5 kPa, were tested for growth and survival under simulated Mars conditions. Environmental stresses of high salinity, low temperature, and low pressure were screened alone and in combination for effects on bacterial survival and replication, and then cells were tested in Mars analog soils under simulated Mars conditions. Survival and replication of E. coli and S. liquefaciens cells in liquid medium were evaluated for 7 days under low temperatures (5, 10, 20, or 30 degrees C) with increasing concentrations (0, 5, 10, or 20%) of three salts (MgCl(2), MgSO(4), NaCl) reported to be present on the surface of Mars. Moderate to high growth rates were observed for E. coli and S. liquefaciens at 30 or 20 degrees C and in solutions with 0 or 5% salts. In contrast, cell densities of both species generally did not increase above initial inoculum levels under the highest salt concentrations (10 and 20%) and the four temperatures tested, with the exception that moderately higher cell densities were observed for both species at 10% MgSO(4) maintained at 20 or 30 degrees C. Growth rates of E. coli and S. liquefaciens in low salt concentrations were robust under all pressures (2.5, 10, or 101.3 kPa), exhibiting a general increase of up to 2.5 orders of magnitude above the initial inoculum levels of the assays. Vegetative E. coli cells were maintained in a Mars analog soil for 7 days under simulated Mars conditions that included temperatures between 20 and -50 degrees C for a day/night diurnal period, UVC irradiation (200 to 280 nm) at 3.6 W m(-2) for daytime operations (8 h), pressures held at a constant 0.71 kPa, and a gas composition that included the top five gases found in the martian atmosphere. Cell densities of E. coli failed to increase under simulated Mars conditions, and survival was reduced 1 to 2 orders of magnitude by the interactive

  20. N-Acyl-L-homoserine lactone autoinducers control production of an extracellular lipopeptide biosurfactant required for swarming motility of Serratia liquefaciens MG1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindum, Peter Wurtz; Anthoni, U; Christophersen, Carsten

    1998-01-01

    A nonswarming Serratia liquefaciens mutant deficient in serrawettin W2 production was constructed by transposon mutagenesis. Sequence homology indicated that insertion had occurred in gene swrA, which encodes a putative peptide synthetase. Expression of swrA is controlled by quorum sensing....

  1. Studies on the interaction between the biocontrol agent, Serratia plymuthica A30, and blackleg-causing Dickeya sp. (biovar 3) in potato (Solanum tuberosum)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Czajkowski, R.L.; Boer, de W.J.; Veen, van J.A.; Wolf, van der J.M.

    2012-01-01

    Interactions between Serratia plymuthica A30 and a blackleg-causing biovar 3 Dickeya sp. were examined. In a potato slice assay, S. plymuthica A30 inhibited tissue maceration caused by Dickeya sp. IPO2222 when co-inoculated at a density at least 10 times greater than that of the pathogen. In

  2. Studies on the interaction between the biocontrol agent, Serratia plymuthica A30, and blackleg-causing Dickeya sp (biovar 3) in potato (Solanum tuberosum)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Czajkowski, R.L.; De Boer, W.J.; Van Veen, J.A.; Van der Wolf, J.M.

    2012-01-01

    Interactions between Serratia plymuthica A30 and a blackleg-causing biovar 3 Dickeya sp. were examined. In a potato slice assay, S. plymuthica A30 inhibited tissue maceration caused by Dickeya sp. IPO2222 when co-inoculated at a density at least 10 times greater than that of the pathogen. In

  3. Isolation of Serratia rubidaea from a mixed infection after a horse bite Aislamiento de Serratia rubidaea de una infección mixta posterior a la mordedura de un caballo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirta R Litterio

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Horse bite infections are very rarely reported in the medical literature. Here we present a case of a severe facial infection in a 2-year-old boy after a horse bite, from which Serratia rubidaea and Enterobacter cloacae were isolated. Some pieces of grass were found inside the wound and were removed before performing a surgical toilet. The presence of these two gram-negative bacteria associated with a horse bite infection, as well as other organisms such as anaerobes, Pseudomonas, gram-positive cocci, Actinobacillus spp., previously described in other works, should be taken into account when selecting the antibiotics for prophylactic treatment of farm animal bites.Los casos de infecciones por mordedura de caballo son muy infrecuentemente comunicados en la literatura. Aquí se presenta un caso de infección facial grave posterior a la mordedura de un caballo en un nino de 2 anos. De esa herida se aislaron Serratia rubidaea y Enterobacter cloacae. Algunos trozos de pasto se encontraron dentro de la herida y se extrajeron antes de realizar la limpieza quirúrgica. La presencia de esos dos bacilos gram negativos como microorganismos asociados a una infección posterior a una mordedura de caballo, del mismo modo que la de otros microorganismos descritos en la literatura (anaerobios, Pseudomonas, cocos gram positivos, Actinobacillus spp., debe tomarse en cuenta a la hora de elegir antibióticos para realizar un tratamiento profiláctico de pacientes que sufran una mordedura por animales de granja.

  4. Carbon Catabolite Repression Regulates the Production of the Unique Volatile Sodorifen of Serratia plymuthica 4Rx13

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nancy Magnus

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Microorganisms are capable of synthesizing a plethora of secondary metabolites including the long-overlooked volatile organic compounds. Little knowledge has been accumulated regarding the regulation of the biosynthesis of such mVOCs. The emission of the unique compound sodorifen of Serratia plymuthica isolates was significantly reduced in minimal medium with glucose, while succinate elevated sodorifen release. The hypothesis of carbon catabolite repression (CCR acting as a major control entity on the synthesis of mVOCs was proven by genetic evidence. Central components of the typical CCR of Gram-negative bacteria such as the adenylate cyclase (CYA, the cAMP binding receptor protein (CRP, and the catabolite responsive element (CRE were removed by insertional mutagenesis. CYA, CRP, CRE1 mutants revealed a lower sodorifen release. Moreover, the emission potential of other S. plymuthica isolates was also evaluated.

  5. Ser2 from Serratia liquefaciens L53: A new heat stable protease able to destabilize UHT milk during its storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baglinière, François; Tanguy, Gaëlle; Salgado, Rafael Locatelli; Jardin, Julien; Rousseau, Florence; Robert, Benoît; Harel-Oger, Marielle; Vanetti, Maria Cristina Dantas; Gaucheron, Frédéric

    2017-08-15

    The heat-stable protease Ser2 is secreted by the species Serratia liquefaciens, a psychrotrophic bacteria frequently found in raw milk. To understand the physicochemical modifications of casein micelles induced by Ser2 and to confirm its implication in UHT milk destabilization, the enzyme was purified and added to microfiltered raw milk before UHT treatment. UHT milk destabilization was investigated during 90days of storage. A visual destabilization appeared after 8days of storage with the presence of sediment. Zeta potential increase and formation of aggregates were observed during the storage. Using tandem mass spectrometry, numerous released peptides from the four caseins were identified at the end of storage. Caseins were hydrolyzed in the preferential order β->α s1 ->κ->α s2 . No specific peptidic hydrolysed bond was detected. The present study confirmed that the presence of the protease Ser2 in raw milk can be one of the main causes of UHT milk destabilization. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Optimization of physicochemical parameters influencing the production of prodigiosin from Serratia nematodiphila RL2 and exploring its antibacterial activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gondil, Vijay Singh; Asif, Mohammad; Bhalla, Tek Chand

    2017-10-01

    In the present study, role of various physicochemical parameters influencing the production of antimicrobial pigment prodigiosin from Serratia nematodiphila RL2 was determined and optimized. The pigment-producing strain was isolated and based on molecular characterization (16S rRNA sequencing), was identified as S. nematodiphila RL2. The pigment produced by S. nematodiphila RL2 was characterized by thin layer chromatography (Rf 0.94), spectrophotometrically (λmax 535 nm) and identified as prodigiosin. Optimization of production parameters of prodigiosin revealed, nutrient broth medium supplemented with lactose and yeast extract at 1% concentration each, have a positive effect on the bacterial growth (10.25-4.6 mg/ml DCW) as well as pigment production (0.46-0.6 mg/ml). Prodigiosin production (0.64 mg/ml) increases optimally after 46-48 h of incubation, at 35 °C at pH between 6 and 7 with addition of metal ions such as Uranyl acetate. An increase of 65% in prodigiosin production (0.46-0.76 mg/ml) was observed after optimizing the various production parameters than unoptimized conditions. Antimicrobial activity of the prodigiosin was also evaluated and found to be effective antimicrobial agent against bacterial pathogens including Listeria sp., Pseudomonas sp., Yersinia sp. and Shigella sp. Present study indicate that S. nematodiphila RL2 is a potent source of pigment prodigiosin which can be further explored for production of prodigiosin.

  7. Ammonia-Oligotrophic and Diazotrophic Heavy Metal-Resistant Serratia liquefaciens Strains from Pioneer Plants and Mine Tailings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zelaya-Molina, Lily X; Hernández-Soto, Luis M; Guerra-Camacho, Jairo E; Monterrubio-López, Ricardo; Patiño-Siciliano, Alfredo; Villa-Tanaca, Lourdes; Hernández-Rodríguez, César

    2016-08-01

    Mine tailings are man-made environments characterized by low levels of organic carbon and assimilable nitrogen, as well as moderate concentrations of heavy metals. For the introduction of nitrogen into these environments, a key role is played by ammonia-oligotrophic/diazotrophic heavy metal-resistant guilds. In mine tailings from Zacatecas, Mexico, Serratia liquefaciens was the dominant heterotrophic culturable species isolated in N-free media from bulk mine tailings as well as the rhizosphere, roots, and aerial parts of pioneer plants. S. liquefaciens strains proved to be a meta-population with high intraspecific genetic diversity and a potential to respond to these extreme conditions. The phenotypic and genotypic features of these strains reveal the potential adaptation of S. liquefaciens to oligotrophic and nitrogen-limited mine tailings with high concentrations of heavy metals. These features include ammonia-oligotrophic growth, nitrogen fixation, siderophore and indoleacetic acid production, phosphate solubilization, biofilm formation, moderate tolerance to heavy metals under conditions of diverse nitrogen availability, and the presence of zntA, amtB, and nifH genes. The acetylene reduction assay suggests low nitrogen-fixing activity. The nifH gene was harbored in a plasmid of ∼60 kb and probably was acquired by a horizontal gene transfer event from Klebsiella variicola.

  8. Bioaugmentation for treatment of full-scale diethylene glycol monobutyl ether (DGBE) wastewater by Serratia sp. BDG-2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Maoxia; Fan, Rong; Zou, Wenhui; Zhou, Houzhen [Key Laboratory of Environmental and Applied Microbiology, Chengdu Institute of Biology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Chengdu 610041 (China); Chengdu Institute of Biology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Chengdu 610041 (China); Tan, Zhouliang, E-mail: tanzhl@cib.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Environmental and Applied Microbiology, Chengdu Institute of Biology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Chengdu 610041 (China); Chengdu Institute of Biology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Chengdu 610041 (China); Li, Xudong [Key Laboratory of Environmental and Applied Microbiology, Chengdu Institute of Biology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Chengdu 610041 (China); Chengdu Institute of Biology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Chengdu 610041 (China)

    2016-05-15

    Highlights: • BDG-2 grew well at 30 °C, pH 9 and 2000 mg L{sup −1} of initial DGBE concentration. • It could obtain 96.92% of COD (generated by DGBE) removal efficiency in 39.9 h. • The technological matching was made based on the characteristics of DGBE wastewater and BDG-2. • Stable operation of bio-augmentation treatment facilities was finally accomplished. - Abstract: A novel bacterial strain BDG-2 was isolated and used to augment the treatment of silicon plate manufacturing wastewater that primarily contains diethylene glycol monobutyl ether (DGBE). BDG-2 was identified as a Serratia sp. Under the optimal conditions of 30 °C, pH 9 and DGBE concentration of 2000 mg L{sup −1}, the bioaugmented system achieved 96.92% COD removal after 39.9 h. Laboratory-scale technological matching results indicated that, in a biofilm process with the addition of 100 mg L{sup −1} ammonia and 5 mg L{sup −1} total phosphorus (TP), 70.61% COD removal efficiency could be obtained in 46 h. Addition of polyaluminium chloride (PAC) to the reactors during the suspension process enhanced the settleability of the BDG-2 culture. Subsequently, successful start-up and stable operation of a full-scale bioaugmented treatment facilities were accomplished, and the volumetric organic load in the plug-flow aeration tank was 2.17 ± 0.81 kg m{sup −3} d{sup −1}. The effluent COD of the facilities was stable and always below 100 mg L{sup −1}.

  9. Induction of phospholipase- and flagellar synthesis in Serratia liquefaciens is controlled by expression of the flagellar master operon flhD

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Givskov, M; Eberl, L; Christiansen, Gunna

    1995-01-01

    . Expression of flagella is demonstrated to follow a growth-phase-dependent pattern. Cloning, complementation studies and DNA-sequencing analysis has identified a genetic region in Serratia liquefaciens which exhibits extensive homology to the Escherichia coli flhD flagellar master operon. Interruption...... of the chromosomal flhD operon in S. liquefaciens results in non-flagellated and phospholipase-negative cells, but the synthesis of other exoenzymes is not affected. By placing the flhD operon under the control of a foreign inducible promoter we have shown that increased transcription through the flhD operon leads...

  10. Disease: H01422 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available osides [DG:DG01447] Carbapenems [DG:DG01458] Fosfomycin [DG:DG00633] ... ICD-10: A49.8...aeruginosa Escherichia coli Serratia marcescens ... Colistin [DG:DG00087] Tigecycline [DR:D01079] Aminoglyc

  11. Identification of an Endophytic Antifungal Bacterial Strain Isolated from the Rubber Tree and Its Application in the Biological Control of Banana Fusarium Wilt: e0131974

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Deguan Tan; Lili Fu; Bingyin Han; Xuepiao Sun; Peng Zheng; Jiaming Zhang

    2015-01-01

    .... Effective control methods are still under exploring. The endophytic bacterial strain ITBB B5-1 was isolated from the rubber tree, and identified as Serratia marcescens by morphological, biochemical, and phylogenetic analyses...

  12. Chemical composition, antimicrobial activity, proximate analysis and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The extract showed significant antibacterial activity against Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Micrococcus kristinae, Streptococcus faecalis, Shigella flexneri, Klebsiella pneumonia, Serratia marcescens and antifungal activity against Aspergillus flavus, Aspergillus niger and Penicillium notatum.

  13. Bronchiectasis: a bacteriological profile | Bopaka | Pan African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... pneumonia in 11 cases; Pseudomonas aeruginosa in 10 cases, Klebsiella pneumonia and Mycobacterium tuberculosis in 3 cases each; Moraxella catarrhalis, Haemophilus influenzae, Escherichia coli, Citrobacter spp, Serratia marcescens, Mycoplasma pneumoniae, Acinetobacter baumannii and Staphylococcus aureus ...

  14. The Pathogenesis and Therapy of Combined Radiation Injury

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Boudagov, R. S; Oulianova, L. P; Tsyb, A. F

    2006-01-01

    .... Single injection of extract from Serratia marcescens (Imuvert) or synthetic trehalose dicorynomy-colate improved hematological status, enhanced the serum IL-6 levels, but did not promote survival in mice...

  15. Inhibitory and toxic effects of volatiles emitted by strains of Pseudomonas and Serratia on growth and survival of selected microorganisms, Caenorhabditis elegans, and Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popova, Alexandra A; Koksharova, Olga A; Lipasova, Valentina A; Zaitseva, Julia V; Katkova-Zhukotskaya, Olga A; Eremina, Svetlana Iu; Mironov, Alexander S; Chernin, Leonid S; Khmel, Inessa A

    2014-01-01

    In previous research, volatile organic compounds (VOCs) emitted by various bacteria into the chemosphere were suggested to play a significant role in the antagonistic interactions between microorganisms occupying the same ecological niche and between bacteria and target eukaryotes. Moreover, a number of volatiles released by bacteria were reported to suppress quorum-sensing cell-to-cell communication in bacteria, and to stimulate plant growth. Here, volatiles produced by Pseudomonas and Serratia strains isolated mainly from the soil or rhizosphere exhibited bacteriostatic action on phytopathogenic Agrobacterium tumefaciens and fungi and demonstrated a killing effect on cyanobacteria, flies (Drosophila melanogaster), and nematodes (Caenorhabditis elegans). VOCs emitted by the rhizospheric Pseudomonas chlororaphis strain 449 and by Serratia proteamaculans strain 94 isolated from spoiled meat were identified using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis, and the effects of the main headspace compounds--ketones (2-nonanone, 2-heptanone, 2-undecanone) and dimethyl disulfide--were inhibitory toward the tested microorganisms, nematodes, and flies. The data confirmed the role of bacterial volatiles as important compounds involved in interactions between organisms under natural ecological conditions.

  16. Inhibitory and Toxic Effects of Volatiles Emitted by Strains of Pseudomonas and Serratia on Growth and Survival of Selected Microorganisms, Caenorhabditis elegans, and Drosophila melanogaster

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra A. Popova

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In previous research, volatile organic compounds (VOCs emitted by various bacteria into the chemosphere were suggested to play a significant role in the antagonistic interactions between microorganisms occupying the same ecological niche and between bacteria and target eukaryotes. Moreover, a number of volatiles released by bacteria were reported to suppress quorum-sensing cell-to-cell communication in bacteria, and to stimulate plant growth. Here, volatiles produced by Pseudomonas and Serratia strains isolated mainly from the soil or rhizosphere exhibited bacteriostatic action on phytopathogenic Agrobacterium tumefaciens and fungi and demonstrated a killing effect on cyanobacteria, flies (Drosophila melanogaster, and nematodes (Caenorhabditis elegans. VOCs emitted by the rhizospheric Pseudomonas chlororaphis strain 449 and by Serratia proteamaculans strain 94 isolated from spoiled meat were identified using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis, and the effects of the main headspace compounds—ketones (2-nonanone, 2-heptanone, 2-undecanone and dimethyl disulfide—were inhibitory toward the tested microorganisms, nematodes, and flies. The data confirmed the role of bacterial volatiles as important compounds involved in interactions between organisms under natural ecological conditions.

  17. Computational analysis of difenoconazole interaction with soil chitinases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlǎdoiu, D. L.; Filimon, M. N.; Ostafe, V.; Isvoran, A.

    2015-01-01

    This study focusses on the investigation of the potential binding of the fungicide difenoconazole to soil chitinases using a computational approach. Computational characterization of the substrate binding sites of Serratia marcescens and Bacillus cereus chitinases using Fpocket tool reflects the role of hydrophobic residues for the substrate binding and the high local hydrophobic density of both sites. Molecular docking study reveals that difenoconazole is able to bind to Serratia marcescens and Bacillus cereus chitinases active sites, the binding energies being comparable.

  18. Differential effectiveness of Serratia plymuthica IC1270-induced systemic resistance against hemibiotrophic and necrotrophic leaf pathogens in rice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Höfte Monica M

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Induced resistance is a state of enhanced defensive capacity developed by a plant reacting to specific biotic or chemical stimuli. Over the years, several forms of induced resistance have been characterized, including systemic acquired resistance, which is induced upon localized infection by an avirulent necrotizing pathogen, and induced systemic resistance (ISR, which is elicited by selected strains of nonpathogenic rhizobacteria. However, contrary to the relative wealth of information on inducible defense responses in dicotyledoneous plants, our understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying induced resistance phenomena in cereal crops is still in its infancy. Using a combined cytomolecular and pharmacological approach, we analyzed the host defense mechanisms associated with the establishment of ISR in rice by the rhizobacterium Serratia plymuthica IC1270. Results In a standardized soil-based assay, root treatment with IC1270 rendered foliar tissues more resistant to the hemibiotrophic pathogen Magnaporthe oryzae, causal agent of the devastating rice blast disease. Analysis of the cytological and biochemical alterations associated with restriction of fungal growth in IC1270-induced plants revealed that IC1270 primes rice for enhanced attacker-induced accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS and autofluorescent phenolic compounds in and near epidermal cells displaying dense cytoplasmic granulation. Similar, yet more abundant, phenotypes of hypersensitively dying cells in the vicinity of fungal hyphae were evident in a gene-for-gene interaction with an avirulent M. oryzae strain, suggesting that IC1270-inducible ISR and R protein conditioned effector-triggered immunity (ETI target similar defense mechanisms. Yet, this IC1270-inducible ISR response seems to act as a double-edged sword within the rice defense network as induced plants displayed an increased vulnerability to the necrotrophic pathogens Rhizoctonia

  19. Phosphate solubilization and acid phosphatase activity of Serratia sp. isolated from mangrove soil of Mahanadi river delta, Odisha, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B.C. Behera

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Phosphorus is an essential element for all life forms. Phosphate solubilizing bacteria are capable of converting phosphate into a bioavailable form through solubilization and mineralization processes. Hence in the present study a phosphate solubilizing bacterium, PSB-37, was isolated from mangrove soil of the Mahanadi river delta using NBRIP-agar and NBRIP-BPB broth containing tricalcium phosphate as the phosphate source. Based on phenotypic and molecular characterization, the strain was identified as Serratia sp. The maximum phosphate solubilizing activity of the strain was determined to be 44.84 μg/ml, accompanied by a decrease in pH of the growth medium from 7.0 to 3.15. During phosphate solubilization, various organic acids, such as malic acid (237 mg/l, lactic acid (599.5 mg/l and acetic acid (5.0 mg/l were also detected in the broth culture through HPLC analysis. Acid phosphatase activity was determined by performing p-nitrophenyl phosphate assay (pNPP of the bacterial broth culture. Optimum acid phosphatase activity was observed at 48 h of incubation (76.808 U/ml, temperature of 45 °C (77.87 U/ml, an agitation rate of 100 rpm (80.40 U/ml, pH 5.0 (80.66 U/ml and with glucose as a original carbon source (80.6 U/ml and ammonium sulphate as a original nitrogen source (80.92 U/ml. Characterization of the partially purified acid phosphatase showed maximum activity at pH 5.0 (85.6 U/ml, temperature of 45 °C (97.87 U/ml and substrate concentration of 2.5 mg/ml (92.7 U/ml. Hence the present phosphate solubilizing and acid phosphatase production activity of the bacterium may have probable use for future industrial, agricultural and biotechnological application.

  20. RESISTENCIA A LOS ANTIBIÓTICOS EN CEPAS DE KLEBSIELLA PNEUMONIAE, SERRATIA SPP. Y ACINETOBACTER SPP.AISLADAS DE PACIENTES CON INFECCIÓN DEL TRACTO URINARIO - LIMA, PERU

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luján Roca DA

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available INFECTION - LIMA, PERU Introduction: Urinary tract infection (UTI is one of the most common infections in clinical practice. Gram negative bacteria as Klebsiella pneumoniae, Serratia spp. and Acinetobacter spp. can cause UTI. Objective: To study antibiotic resistance in K. pneumoniae, Serratia spp. and Acinetobacter spp. strains isolated from UTI Material and methods: Urine cultures were collected from January 2003 to December 2003. Identification of isolated bacteria included biochemical characteristics. Bauer-Kirby disc diffusion test was performed. Results: A total of 106 strains were evaluated (41 of K. pneumoniae, 28 of Serratia spp. and 37 of Acinetobacter spp.. Among K. pneumoniae isolates resistance to ampicillin (83% was remarkable. The Serratia spp. isolates displayed a high level of resistance to nalidixic acid (79% and gentamicin (75%. In Acinetobacter spp. isolates high resistance rates were observed against amikacin (81%, gentamicin (67% and trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole(71%. Conclusions: In general, antibiotic resistance patterns were high. Acinetobacter spp. showed elevated resistance rates (>50% against antibiotics included.

  1. CORRESPONDENCE

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    in neonates: Is magnetic resonance imaging a problem-solving tool? To the Editor: We read with great interest the retrospective case series by A Madide and J Smith,[1] describing brain ultrasound (US) findings of neonates with Serratia marcescens hospital-acquired infections. S. marcescens is a Gram-negative organism ...

  2. Production of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) by Serratia sp.1 using wastewater sludge as raw material and flocculation activity of the EPS produced.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bezawada, J; Hoang, N V; More, T T; Yan, S; Tyagi, N; Tyagi, R D; Surampalli, R Y

    2013-10-15

    Growth profile and extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) production of Serratia sp.1 was studied in shake flask fermentation for 72 h using wastewater sludge as raw material. Maximum cell concentration of 6.7 × 10(9) cfu/mL was obtained at 48 h fermentation time. EPS dry weight, flocculation activity and dewaterability of different EPS (tightly bound or TB-EPS, loosely bound or LB-EPS and broth-EPS or B-EPS) were also measured. The highest concentration of LB-EPS (2.45 g/L) and TB-EPS (0.99 g/L) were attained at 48 h of fermentation. Maximum flocculation activity and dewaterability (ΔCST) of TB-EPS (76.4%, 14.5s and 76.5%, 15.5s), LB-EPS (67.8%, 8.1s and 64.7%, 7.6s) and broth EPS (61%, 6.1s and 70.4%, 6.8s) were obtained at 36 and 48 h of growth. Higher flocculation activity and dewaterability were achieved with TB-EPS than with the two other EPS. Characterization of TB-EPS and LB-EPS was done in terms of their protein and carbohydrate content. Protein content was much higher in TB-EPS where as carbohydrate content was only slightly higher in TB-EPS than LB-EPS. Morphology of the Serratia strain after fermentation in sludge and TSB was observed under a scanning electron microscope and the cell size was found to be bigger in the sludge medium than the TSB medium. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Magnesium Sulfate Salt Solutions and Ices Fail to Protect Serratia liquefaciens from the Biocidal Effects of UV Irradiation under Martian Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mickol, Rebecca L.; Page, Jessica L.; Schuerger, Andrew C.

    2017-05-01

    The growth of Serratia liquefaciens has been demonstrated under martian conditions of 0.7 kPa (7 mbar), 0°C, and CO2-enriched anoxic atmospheres (Schuerger et al., 2013, Astrobiology 13:115-131), but studies into the survivability of cells under hypersaline conditions that are likely to be encountered on Mars are lacking. Serratia liquefaciens cells were suspended in aqueous MgSO4 solutions, or frozen brines, and exposed to terrestrial (i.e., 101.3 kPa, 24°C, O2/N2-normal atmosphere) or martian (i.e., 0.7 kPa, -25°C, CO2-anoxic atmosphere) conditions to assess the roles of MgSO4 and UV irradiation on the survival of S. liquefaciens. Four solutions were tested for their capability to attenuate martian UV irradiation in both liquid and frozen forms: sterile deionized water (SDIW), 10 mM PO4 buffer, 5% MgSO4, and 10% MgSO4. None of the solutions in either liquid or frozen forms provided enhanced protection against martian UV irradiation. Sixty minutes of UV irradiation reduced cell densities from 2.0 × 106 cells/mL to less than 10 cells/mL for both liquid and frozen solutions. In contrast, 3-4 mm of a Mars analog soil were sufficient to attenuate 100% of UV irradiation. Results suggest that terrestrial microorganisms may not survive on Sun-exposed surfaces on Mars, even if the cells are embedded in frozen martian brines composed of MgSO4. However, if dispersed microorganisms can be covered by only a few millimeters of dust or regolith, long-term survival is probable.

  4. Bacteriophage ϕMAM1, a viunalikevirus, is a broad-host-range, high-efficiency generalized transducer that infects environmental and clinical isolates of the enterobacterial genera Serratia and Kluyvera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matilla, Miguel A; Salmond, George P C

    2014-10-01

    Members of the enterobacterial genus Serratia are ecologically widespread, and some strains are opportunistic human pathogens. Bacteriophage ϕMAM1 was isolated on Serratia plymuthica A153, a biocontrol rhizosphere strain that produces the potently bioactive antifungal and anticancer haterumalide oocydin A. The ϕMAM1 phage is a generalized transducing phage that infects multiple environmental and clinical isolates of Serratia spp. and a rhizosphere strain of Kluyvera cryocrescens. Electron microscopy allowed classification of ϕMAM1 in the family Myoviridae. Bacteriophage ϕMAM1 is virulent, uses capsular polysaccharides as a receptor, and can transduce chromosomal markers at frequencies of up to 7 × 10(-6) transductants per PFU. We also demonstrated transduction of the complete 77-kb oocydin A gene cluster and heterogeneric transduction of a plasmid carrying a type III toxin-antitoxin system. These results support the notion of the potential ecological importance of transducing phages in the acquisition of genes by horizontal gene transfer. Phylogenetic analyses grouped ϕMAM1 within the ViI-like bacteriophages, and genomic analyses revealed that the major differences between ϕMAM1 and other ViI-like phages arise in a region encoding the host recognition determinants. Our results predict that the wider genus of ViI-like phages could be efficient transducing phages, and this possibility has obvious implications for the ecology of horizontal gene transfer, bacterial functional genomics, and synthetic biology. Copyright © 2014, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  5. Low nitrogen stress stimulating the indole-3-acetic acid biosynthesis of Serratia sp. ZM is vital for the survival of the bacterium and its plant growth-promoting characteristic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouyang, Liming; Pei, Haiyan; Xu, Zhaohui

    2017-04-01

    Serratia sp. ZM is a plant growth-promoting (PGP) bacterial strain isolated from the rhizospheric soil of Populus euphratica in northwestern China. In this study, low nitrogen supply significantly stimulated the production of indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) in Serratia sp.ZM. The inoculation of the bacterium to wheat seedlings improved plant growth compared with the uninoculated group, and the stimulating effect was more prominent under low nitrogen stress. Inactivation of the predicted key gene in the IAA biosynthesis pathway impaired IAA production and significantly hampered mutant growth in poor medium. Furthermore, the IAA-deficient mutant lost the PGP effect under either normal or low nitrogen conditions in plant experiments. This study revealed the significant impact of environmental nitrogen levels on IAA production in the PGP strain and the vital effect of IAA on resistance physiology of both the bacterium and host plant. The characteristics of Serratia sp. ZM also indicated its application potential as a biofertilizer for plants, especially those suffering from poor nitrogen soil.

  6. Production and characterization of rhamnolipids produced by Serratia rubidaea SNAU02 under solid-state fermentation and its application as biocontrol agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nalini, S; Parthasarathi, R

    2014-12-01

    The present study aimed at exploring mahua (Madhuca indica) oil cake as a novel substrate for the production of biosurfactant by Serratia rubidaea SNAU02 under solid-state fermentation (SSF). Response surface methodology showed followings as the optimal conditions for the production of biosurfactant: mahua oil cake 7.48 g, 2.5 ml inoculum size (1×10(8) cells/ml), and pH 7.22 and 31 °C temperature. The characterization of the biosurfactant by TLC, FT-IR and GC-MS revealed the presence of rhamnolipid. The presence of rhamnosyl transferase gene responsible for biosynthesis of rhamnolipid was identified. The strain SNAU02 exhibited antifungal activity and demonstrated no toxicity against the seeds of Brassica oleracea and Artemia salina employed as a bio-indicator. The present findings indicated the potential of mahua oil cake as suitable substrate for the production of rhamnolipids in SSF by S. rubidaea SNAU02 and application potential of the biosurfactant produced as biocontrol agent against plant pathogens. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Kinetics of biofilm formation and desiccation survival of Listeria monocytogenes in single and dual species biofilms with Pseudomonas fluorescens, Serratia proteamaculans or Shewanella baltica on food-grade stainless steel surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daneshvar Alavi, Hessam Edin; Truelstrup Hansen, Lisbeth

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated the dynamics of static biofilm formation (100% RH, 15 °C, 48-72 h) and desiccation survival (43% RH, 15 °C, 21 days) of Listeria monocytogenes, in dual species biofilms with the common spoilage bacteria, Pseudomonas fluorescens, Serratia proteamaculans and Shewanella baltica, on the surface of food grade stainless steel. The Gram-negative bacteria reduced the maximum biofilm population of L. monocytogenes in dual species biofilms and increased its inactivation during desiccation. However, due to the higher desiccation resistance of Listeria relative to P. fluorescens and S. baltica, the pathogen survived in greater final numbers. In contrast, S. proteamaculans outcompeted the pathogen during the biofilm formation and exhibited similar desiccation survival, causing the N21 days of Serratia to be ca 3 Log10(CFU cm(-2)) greater than that of Listeria in the dual species biofilm. Microscopy revealed biofilm morphologies with variable amounts of exopolymeric substance and the presence of separate microcolonies. Under these simulated food plant conditions, the fate of L. monocytogenes during formation of mixed biofilms and desiccation depended on the implicit characteristics of the co-cultured bacterium.

  8. The LacI–Family Transcription Factor, RbsR, Is a Pleiotropic Regulator of Motility, Virulence, Siderophore and Antibiotic Production, Gas Vesicle Morphogenesis and Flotation in Serratia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chin M. Lee

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Gas vesicles (GVs are proteinaceous, gas-filled organelles used by some bacteria to enable upward movement into favorable air/liquid interfaces in aquatic environments. Serratia sp. ATCC39006 (S39006 was the first enterobacterium discovered to produce GVs naturally. The regulation of GV assembly in this host is complex and part of a wider regulatory network affecting various phenotypes, including antibiotic biosynthesis. To identify new regulators of GVs, a comprehensive mutant library containing 71,000 insertion mutants was generated by random transposon mutagenesis and 311 putative GV-defective mutants identified. Three of these mutants were found to have a transposon inserted in a LacI family transcription regulator gene (rbsR of the putative ribose operon. Each of these rbsR mutants was GV-defective; no GVs were visible by phase contrast microscopy (PCM or transmission electron microscopy (TEM. GV deficiency was caused by the reduction of gvpA1 and gvrA transcription (the first genes of the two contiguous operons in the GV gene locus. Our results also showed that a mutation in rbsR was highly pleiotropic; the production of two secondary metabolites (carbapenem and prodigiosin antibiotics was abolished. Interestingly, the intrinsic resistance to the carbapenem antibiotic was not affected by the rbsR mutation. In addition, the production of a siderophore, cellulase and plant virulence was reduced in the mutant, whereas it exhibited increased swimming and swarming motility. The RbsR protein was predicted to bind to regions upstream of at least 18 genes in S39006 including rbsD (the first gene of the ribose operon and gvrA. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSA confirmed that RbsR bound to DNA sequences upstream of rbsD, but not gvrA. The results of this study indicate that RbsR is a global regulator that affects the modulation of GV biogenesis, but also with complex pleiotropic physiological impacts in S39006.

  9. Proteomic analysis of polyribosomes identifies splicing factors as potential regulators of translation during mitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aviner, Ranen; Hofmann, Sarah; Elman, Tamar; Shenoy, Anjana; Geiger, Tamar; Elkon, Ran; Ehrlich, Marcelo; Elroy-Stein, Orna

    2017-06-02

    Precise regulation of mRNA translation is critical for proper cell division, but little is known about the factors that mediate it. To identify mRNA-binding proteins that regulate translation during mitosis, we analyzed the composition of polysomes from interphase and mitotic cells using unbiased quantitative mass-spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). We found that mitotic polysomes are enriched with a subset of proteins involved in RNA processing, including alternative splicing and RNA export. To demonstrate that these may indeed be regulators of translation, we focused on heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein C (hnRNP C) as a test case and confirmed that it is recruited to elongating ribosomes during mitosis. Then, using a combination of pulsed SILAC, metabolic labeling and ribosome profiling, we showed that knockdown of hnRNP C affects both global and transcript-specific translation rates and found that hnRNP C is specifically important for translation of mRNAs that encode ribosomal proteins and translation factors. Taken together, our results demonstrate how proteomic analysis of polysomes can provide insight into translation regulation under various cellular conditions of interest and suggest that hnRNP C facilitates production of translation machinery components during mitosis to provide daughter cells with the ability to efficiently synthesize proteins as they enter G1 phase. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  10. [Endophytic bacterial community in the symptoms and symptomless tissues of HLB-affected citrus plant].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fang; Yin, Youping; Sun, Liqin; Wu, Xiaofang; Wang, Zhongkang

    2014-08-04

    To analyze the endophytic bacteria in symptoms and symptomless tissues, reveal dominant bacterial population which may interact with Ca. Las. The population structure and diversity of endophytic bacteria in symptoms and symptomless tissues of single HLB-affected citrus plant were studied based on 16S rDNA sequences analyzed by PCR-DGGE (PCR-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis). Quantitative analysis of Ca. Las, dominant bacteria and total amount of bacterial population in symptoms and symptomless tissues of branches, leaves and fruits was done by quantitative PCR. The amount of Ca. Las is significantly different in symptoms and symptomless tissues; bacterial population in symptoms citrus tissues was significantly higher than in symptomless tissues. PCR-DGGE analysis result shows that endophytic bacterial structures are basically the same in symptoms and symptomless tissues. Extraction, cloning and sequencing of 17 obvious bands in DGGE electrophoretogram reveal that 8 of 17 bands belonged to the genus Serratia, which accounted for 47.06%. Sequence alignment shows that they belonged to different strains of Serratia marcescens with the 99.63% similarity. Quantitative analysis of the total bacteria and Serratia marcescens shows that there is no significant difference in total bacterial count between symptoms and symptomless tissues whereas the amount of Serratia marcescens was negatively correlated with the amount of Las. The Ca. Las is heterogeneously distributed among various tissues of HLB-affected citrus plant. The amount of Ca. Las was negatively correlated with Serratia marcescens and total amount of endophytic bacteria have no relevance with symptom of HLB disease. How the interaction of Serratia marcescens and Ca. Las in tissue of citrus needs further study.

  11. Determination of alkylation of bacterial DNA as a rapid test for toxicological evaluation of alkylating xenobiotic agents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Botzenhart, K.; Waldner-Sander, S.; Schweinsberg, F.

    1986-05-01

    Alkylated purine bases from hydrolized DNA can be separated by HPLC and quantified with a fluorescence detector. We applied this method to bacterial DNA. 7-methylguanine was detected after treatment of Serratia marcescens with iodoacetamide, dimethyl sulfate and with polluted air.

  12. The Physiological Bases for Microbial Barotolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-03-31

    E. coli, 10- Serratia marcescens, 1 - S. faecalis lOCI, 12 - S. mutans C-5, 13 - Lactobacillus casei , 14 - Lyt coccus, 15 - S mutans SL-l, 16...cerevisiae, 4 - Lactobacillus plantarum, 5 - Bacillus licheniformis, 6 - Bacillus _ a- teriumKM, 7 - Streptococcus mutans LM-7, 8 - Streptococcus sannuis, 9

  13. A NEW DISCOLORATION OF RICOTTA CHEESE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Alberghini

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available A new alteration of ricotta cheese is here described. The discoloration which has been noted was red. The responsible bacteria has been identified as Serratia marcescens. This is probably the first report of this rare type of spoilage identified in Italy.

  14. Sequence analysis of putative swrW gene required for surfactant ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Serratia marcescens produces biosurfactant serrawettin, essential for its population migration behavior. Serrawettin W1 was revealed to be an antibiotic serratamolide that makes it significant for deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) and protein sequence analysis. Four nucleotide and amino-acid sequences from local strains ...

  15. Antibacterial and antifungal activities of different parts of Tribulus terrestris L. growing in Iraq

    OpenAIRE

    AL-BAYATI, Firas A.; Al-Mola, Hassan F.

    2008-01-01

    Antimicrobial activity of organic and aqueous extracts from fruits, leaves and roots of Tribulus terrestris L., an Iraqi medicinal plant used as urinary anti-infective in folk medicine, was examined against 11 species of pathogenic and non-pathogenic microorganisms: Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus subtilis, Bacillus cereus, Corynebacterium diphtheriae, Escherichia coli, Proteus vulgaris, Serratia marcescens, Salmonella typhimurium, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Candida alb...

  16. Antibacterial, antifungal and antioxidant activity of the roots and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PRECIOUS

    2009-11-16

    Nov 16, 2009 ... sed by bacteria living in the intestine (Wheeler, 2003). Alcohol consumption can lead to increased ... species (ROS), which can damage liver cells. Endotoxin activates kupffer cells by .... Salmonella pooni, Serratia marcescens, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Klebsiella pneumonia). Each organism was ...

  17. Bacterial Adhesion Forces to Ag-Impregnated Contact Lens Cases and Transmission to Contact Lenses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Qu, Wenwen; Busscher, Henk J.; van der Mei, Henny C.; Hooymans, Johanna M. M.

    Purpose: To measure adhesion forces of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus, and Serratia marcescens to a rigid contact lens (CL), standard polypropylene, and Ag-impregnated lens cases using atomic force microscopy and determine bacterial transmission from lens case to CL. Methods: Adhesion

  18. Determination of cephalosporin acylase activity by biological and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PRECIOUS

    2009-12-01

    Dec 1, 2009 ... microorganisms with cephalosporin acylase activity was developed. The core part of cephalosporin was replaced by 6-amino penicillinic acid (6-APA) to generate new substrates glutaryl-6-APA and adipoyl-6-APA for screen- ing. Serratia marcescens that is sensitive to 6-APA and resistant to penicillin G, ...

  19. Antibacterial activity of root and leaf extracts of Jatropha zeyheri ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Acetone extract of the root exhibited minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) of 0.39 mg/ml against Salmonella spp. followed by methanol and acetone extracts of the root (0.78 mg/ml) against Serratia marcescens. Methanol extract of the leaf exhibited MIC of 3.13 mg/ml against Staphylococcus aureus. This study validates the ...

  20. Phytochemical Analysis and Antimicrobial Activity of the Bark ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Phytochemical analysis and antimicrobial activity hot water, hot and cold ethanolic extracts of the bark of Vocanga Africana stapt. on Escherichia coli, Serratia marcescen, Staphyloccus aureus, Alternaria solani , Aspergellius niger and Penicillium notatum were investigated using paper disc diffusion technique. Results ...

  1. Phytochemical Analysis and Antimicrobial Activity of the Bark ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    BSN

    Abstract. Phytochemical analysis and antimicrobial activity hot water, hot and cold ethanolic extracts of the bark of Vocanga Africana stapt. on Escherichia coli, Serratia marcescen, Staphyloccus aureus, Alternaria solani , Aspergellius niger and Penicillium notatum were investigated using paper disc diffusion technique.

  2. Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    abp

    2012-07-28

    Jul 28, 2012 ... wound infection with Pseudomonas aeruginosa or Serratia marcescens [3]. In the study carried out by Maki and his colleagues [4] in trying to assess the relationship between organism on environmental surface and nosocomial infection, they virtually ruled out the environment as a significant vector for ...

  3. Enhanced Recovery and Identification of a Tryptamine-Related ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    campestris pv campestris, Escherichia coli and Serratia marcescens. Pseudomonas fluorescens (MIC = 0.0625 μg/ml) and Xanthomonas campestris pv campestris (MIC = 0.0026 μg/ml) represent the two plant pathogenic genera that are notoriously difficult to contain in the field. Conclusions: Since the antibiotic isolated ...

  4. Production of extracellular lipase by a new strain Staphylococcus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SAM

    2014-07-09

    Jul 9, 2014 ... alkaline lipase from a newly isolated thermophilic Bacillus, strain A30-. 1 (ATCC 53841). J. Ferment. Bioeng. 5: 33-438. Winkler UK, Struckman M (1979). Glycogen, Hyaluronate and some other polysaccharides greatly enhance the formation of Exolipase by serratia marcescens. J. Bacteriol.138:663-670.

  5. A chitosanase purified from the snail of Achatina fulica

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ovie

    2012-05-31

    May 31, 2012 ... chitosanase from a nattokinase producing strain Bacillus subtilis. TKU007. Process Biochem. 43: 132-138. Wang SL, Peng JH, Liang TW, Liu KC (2008). Purification and characterization of a chitosanase from Serratia marcescens TKUO11. Carbohydr. Res. 343: 1316-1323. Yoon HG, Kim HY, Kim HK, ...

  6. Detection of Extended-Spectrum Β-Lactamases among Gram ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... Morganella moganii (32), Shigella Spp. (14), Citrobacter freundii (14), Serratia marcescens (10), Salmonella paratyphi A (10), Yersinia enterocolitica (8), Proteus vulgaris (4), Salmonella typhi (2) and Pseudomonas aeruginosa (16). Of the 300 Gram-negative isolates subjected to screening using Cefpodoxime (CPX 10μg, ...

  7. Fulltext PDF

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2016-06-29

    Jun 29, 2016 ... fish pathogens and human pathogens such as Aeromonas hydrophila, Klebsiella pneumoniae, E. coli, Serratia marcescens,. Enterobacter spp. and Shigella spp. Overall the prevalence of class 1 integrons, class 2 integrons, extended-spectrum beta- lactamases (ESBLs) blaCTX-M, blaSHV and aac(6')-Ib-cr ...

  8. Comparison of 3 alcohol gels and 70% ethyl alcohol for hand hygiene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarpellon, Mirian Nicéa; Soares, Vanessa Sarto; Albrecht, Natal Rodrigo; Bergamasco, Douglas Ricardo da Silva; Garcia, Lourdes Botelho; Cardoso, Celso Luíz

    2008-10-01

    In a laboratory study, we demonstrated that 3 alcohol-based hand gels, commercially available in Brazil, were as effective as the traditional 70% ethyl alcohol (by weight) in removing clinical isolates of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, Serratia marcescens, and Candida albicans from heavily contaminated hands of human volunteers.

  9. An iron detection system determines bacterial swarming initiation and biofilm formation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lin, Chuan-Sheng; Tsai, Yu-Huan; Chang, Chih-Jung; Tseng, Shun-Fu; Wu, Tsung-Ru; Lu, Chia-Chen; Wu, Ting-Shu; Lu, Jang-Jih; Horng, Jim-Tong; Martel, Jan; Ojcius, David M.; Lai, Hsin-Chih; Young, John D.; Andrews, S. C.; Robinson, A. K.; Rodriguez-Quinones, F.; Touati, D.; Yeom, J.; Imlay, J. A.; Park, W.; Marx, J. J.; Braun, V.; Hantke, K.; Cornelis, P.; Wei, Q.; Vinckx, T.; Troxell, B.; Hassan, H. M.; Verstraeten, N.; Lewis, K.; Hall-Stoodley, L.; Costerton, J. W.; Stoodley, P.; Kearns, D. B.; Losick, R.; Butler, M. T.; Wang, Q.; Harshey, R. M.; Lai, S.; Tremblay, J.; Deziel, E.; Overhage, J.; Bains, M.; Brazas, M. D.; Hancock, R. E.; Partridge, J. D.; Kim, W.; Surette, M. G.; Givskov, M.; Rather, P. N.; Houdt, R. Van; Michiels, C. W.; Mukherjee, S.; Inoue, T.; Frye, J. G.; McClelland, M.; McCarter, L.; Silverman, M.; Matilla, M. A.; Wu, Y.; Outten, F. W.; Singh, P. K.; Parsek, M. R.; Greenberg, E. P.; Welsh, M. J.; Banin, E.; Vasil, M. L.; Wosten, M. M.; Kox, L. F.; Chamnongpol, S.; Soncini, F. C.; Groisman, E. A.; Laub, M. T.; Goulian, M.; Krell, T.; Lai, H. C.; Lin, C. S.; Soo, P. C.; Tsai, Y. H.; Wei, J. R.; Wyckoff, E. E.; Mey, A. R.; Leimbach, A.; Fisher, C. F.; Payne, S. M.; Livak, K. J.; Schmittgen, T. D.; Clarke, M. B.; Hughes, D. T.; Zhu, C.; Boedeker, E. C.; Sperandio, V.; Stintzi, A.; Clarke-Pearson, M. F.; Brady, S. F.; Drake, E. J.; Gulick, A. M.; Qaisar, U.; Rowland, M. A.; Deeds, E. J.; Garcia, C. A.; Alcaraz, E. S.; Franco, M. A.; Rossi, B. N. Passerini de; Mehi, O.; Skaar, E. P.; Visaggio, D.; Nishino, K.; Dietz, P.; Gerlach, G.; Beier, D.; Bustin, S. A.; Schwyn, B.; Neilands, J. B.

    2016-01-01

    Iron availability affects swarming and biofilm formation in various bacterial species. However, how bacteria sense iron and coordinate swarming and biofilm formation remains unclear. Using Serratia marcescens as a model organism, we identify here a stage-specific iron-regulatory machinery comprising

  10. Health Implications of Biofilms in Drinking Water Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-05-19

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Listeria monocytogenes, Salmonella typhimurium, Serratia marcescens, and Escherichia coli 0157:H7. Experiments were conducted where...wetland plant rhizospheres and agricultural soils. These environments are genetically much more complex and therefore more challenging to analyze...rotation, fertilizer regime, tillage, etc.) and that rather drastic disturbances (e.g., compaction and total removal of plant cover) are required in

  11. Lawal et al., Afr J Tradit Complement Altern Med. (2015) 12(1):23-27 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    cadewumi

    Background: Clausena anisata Hook also known as Iperepesi in Xhosa language is a medicinal plant used traditionally for the treatment of various ailments and .... 10702, Enterococus faecalis ATCC 29212, Listeria monocytogenes, Salmonella typhimurium ATCC 13311, Serratia marcescens ATCC 9986,. Streptococus ...

  12. Download this PDF file

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2007-02-01

    Feb 1, 2007 ... Background: An outbreak of urinary tract infection in a rural maternity hospital near Enugu, Nigeria led to bacteriological ... traced for purpose of effective control. of nosocomial infections of various severities, such. Serratia marcescens ... lockers, delivery room floor and the corridor railings. Charts of patients ...

  13. Cloning, sequencing, expression, and characterization of protealysin, a novel neutral proteinase from Serratia proteamaculans representing a new group of thermolysin-like proteases with short N-terminal region of precursor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demidyuk, Ilya V; Kalashnikov, Alexander E; Gromova, Tatiana Yu; Gasanov, Eugene V; Safina, Dina R; Zabolotskaya, Maria V; Rudenskaya, Galina N; Kostrov, Sergey V

    2006-06-01

    The gene of Serratia proteamaculans proteinase, protealysin, was cloned, sequenced, and expressed in Escherichia coli. The gene encoded a precursor of 341 amino acids (AAs) with a significant homology to thermolysin-like proteinases (TLPs). The molecular weight of the purified mature active recombinant protein was 32 kDa, the N-terminal amino acid sequence was AKTSTGGEVI. The optimum pH for azocasein hydrolysis by protealysin was seven and it was completely inhibited by o-phenanthroline. The enzyme hydrolyzed 3-(2-furyl)acryloyl-glycyl-L-leucine amide, the standard substrate for TLPs, with k(cat)/K(m) ratio of (2.52 +/- 0.02) x 10(2) M(-1) s(-1). Protealysin maturation removes 50 AA from the N-terminus of the precursor. The removed region had no similarity with the preprosequence of thermolysin (232 AA) but was homologous to some other TLPs. These proteins shared a conserved 7-AA motif near the initial methionine. Such motif was also found in some nonproteolytic putative proteins; two of them were eukaryotic.

  14. Investigating the compatibility of the biocontrol agent Clonostachys rosea IK726 with prodigiosin-producing Serratia rubidaea S55 and phenazine-producing Pseudomonas chlororaphis ToZa7.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamou, Nathalie N; Dubey, Mukesh; Tzelepis, Georgios; Menexes, Georgios; Papadakis, Emmanouil N; Karlsson, Magnus; Lagopodi, Anastasia L; Jensen, Dan Funck

    2016-05-01

    This study was carried out to assess the compatibility of the biocontrol fungus Clonostachys rosea IK726 with the phenazine-producing Pseudomonas chlororaphis ToZa7 or with the prodigiosin-producing Serratia rubidaea S55 against Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. radicis-lycopersici. The pathogen was inhibited by both strains in vitro, whereas C. rosea displayed high tolerance to S. rubidaea but not to P. chlororaphis. We hypothesized that this could be attributed to the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) proteins. The results of the reverse transcription quantitative PCR showed an induction of seven genes (abcB1, abcB20, abcB26, abcC12, abcC12, abcG8 and abcG25) from subfamilies B, C and G. In planta experiments showed a significant reduction in foot and root rot on tomato plants inoculated with C. rosea and P. chlororaphis. This study demonstrates the potential for combining different biocontrol agents and suggests an involvement of ABC transporters in secondary metabolite tolerance in C. rosea.

  15. Influence of growth media and temperature on bacterial adhesion to polystyrene surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Eliza Zeraik

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial adhesion to inert surfaces is a complex process influenced by environmental conditions. In this work, the influence of growth medium and temperature on the adhesion of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Serratia marcescens, Staphylococcus aureus, Micrococcus luteus and Listeria monocytogenes to polystyrene surfaces was studied. Most bacteria demonstrated the highest adhesion when cultured in TSYEA, except S. marcescens, which showed to be positively influenced by the pigment production, favored in poor nutrient media (lactose and peptone agar. P. aeruginosa adhesion to polystyrene increased at low temperatures whatever the medium used. The culture medium influenced the surface properties of the bacteria as assessed by the MATS test.

  16. RiboAbacus: a model trained on polyribosome images predicts ribosome density and translational efficiency from mammalian transcriptomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauria, Fabio; Tebaldi, Toma; Lunelli, Lorenzo; Struffi, Paolo; Gatto, Pamela; Pugliese, Andrea; Brigotti, Maurizio; Montanaro, Lorenzo; Ciribilli, Yari; Inga, Alberto; Quattrone, Alessandro; Sanguinetti, Guido; Viero, Gabriella

    2015-01-01

    Fluctuations in mRNA levels only partially contribute to determine variations in mRNA availability for translation, producing the well-known poor correlation between transcriptome and proteome data. Recent advances in microscopy now enable researchers to obtain high resolution images of ribosomes on transcripts, providing precious snapshots of translation in vivo. Here we propose RiboAbacus, a mathematical model that for the first time incorporates imaging data in a predictive model of transcript-specific ribosome densities and translational efficiencies. RiboAbacus uses a mechanistic model of ribosome dynamics, enabling the quantification of the relative importance of different features (such as codon usage and the 5′ ramp effect) in determining the accuracy of predictions. The model has been optimized in the human Hek-293 cell line to fit thousands of images of human polysomes obtained by atomic force microscopy, from which we could get a reference distribution of the number of ribosomes per mRNA with unmatched resolution. After validation, we applied RiboAbacus to three case studies of known transcriptome-proteome datasets for estimating the translational efficiencies, resulting in an increased correlation with corresponding proteomes. RiboAbacus is an intuitive tool that allows an immediate estimation of crucial translation properties for entire transcriptomes, based on easily obtainable transcript expression levels. PMID:26240374

  17. Isomaltulose production using free and immobilized Serratia ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    André

    2016-05-18

    May 18, 2016 ... UNICAMP, Avenida Monteiro Lobato 80, CEP 13083-862, C.P.6121, Campinas, São Paulo, Brazil. Received 2 February, 2016,Accepted 20 April, ... isomaltulose (85.23%) was obtained with a temperature of 25ºC, wet cell mass of 20% (w/v) and sucrose solution of 25% (w/v). The free cells were reused ...

  18. Degradation of 2,4-D herbicide by microorganisms isolated from Brazilian contaminated soil Degradação do herbicida 2,4-D por microrganismos isolados de solo contaminado do Brasil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiane M. Silva

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work was to isolate microorganisms from Brazilian soil contaminated with 2,4-D herbicide, and analyze the efficiency for 2,4D degradation, using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC. Serratia marcescens and Penicillium sp had never been reported as able to degrade 2,4-D. The isolated strains represent a great potential for bioremediation.O objetivo deste trabalho foi isolar microrganismos de solo brasileiro contaminado com o herbicida 2,4-D, e analisar a eficiência da degradação por cromatografia líquida de alta eficiência (HPLC. Serratia marcescens e Penicillium sp jamais haviam sido relatadas como degradadoras de 2,4-D. As linhagens isoladas representam um grande potencial em biorremediação.

  19. Biotransformations of Substituted Phenylethanols and Acetophenones by Environmental Bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edna Kagohara

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Whole cells of hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria, isolated from polluted sediments in the Santos Estuary (Baixada Santista, São Paulo, Brazil, were able to catalyse oxidoreduction reactions with various substituted phenylethanols and acetophenones as substrates. A number of substituted phenylethanols were formed with high (>99 % enantiomeric excess. The results of microbial oxidation of phenylethanols 2, 3, 5–7 by Acinetobacter sp. 6.4T and the reduction of acetophenones 1a–6a by Serratia marcescens 5.4T showed that the bacteria used as biocatalysts in this study present significant potential for exploitation in biotechnological processes. The reduction of prochiral acetophenones by Serratia marcescens 3.5T yielded optically active alcohols with 90–99 % enantiomeric excess, and Acinetobacter sp. 6.4T is a potential biocatalyst for the oxidation of alcohols.

  20. Effects of Bacillus Serine Proteases on the Bacterial Biofilms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga Mitrofanova

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Serratia marcescens is an emerging opportunistic pathogen responsible for many hospital-acquired infections including catheter-associated bacteremia and urinary tract and respiratory tract infections. Biofilm formation is one of the mechanisms employed by S. marcescens to increase its virulence and pathogenicity. Here, we have investigated the main steps of the biofilm formation by S. marcescens SR 41-8000. It was found that the biofilm growth is stimulated by the nutrient-rich environment. The time-course experiments showed that S. marcescens cells adhere to the surface of the catheter and start to produce extracellular polymeric substances (EPS within the first 2 days of growth. After 7 days, S. marcescens biofilms maturate and consist of bacterial cells embedded in a self-produced matrix of hydrated EPS. In this study, the effect of Bacillus pumilus 3-19 proteolytic enzymes on the structure of 7-day-old S. marcescens biofilms was examined. Using quantitative methods and scanning electron microscopy for the detection of biofilm, we demonstrated a high efficacy of subtilisin-like protease and glutamyl endopeptidase in biofilm removal. Enzymatic treatment resulted in the degradation of the EPS components and significant eradication of the biofilms.

  1. Effects ofBacillusSerine Proteases on the Bacterial Biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitrofanova, Olga; Mardanova, Ayslu; Evtugyn, Vladimir; Bogomolnaya, Lydia; Sharipova, Margarita

    2017-01-01

    Serratia marcescens is an emerging opportunistic pathogen responsible for many hospital-acquired infections including catheter-associated bacteremia and urinary tract and respiratory tract infections. Biofilm formation is one of the mechanisms employed by S. marcescens to increase its virulence and pathogenicity. Here, we have investigated the main steps of the biofilm formation by S. marcescens SR 41-8000. It was found that the biofilm growth is stimulated by the nutrient-rich environment. The time-course experiments showed that S. marcescens cells adhere to the surface of the catheter and start to produce extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) within the first 2 days of growth. After 7 days, S. marcescens biofilms maturate and consist of bacterial cells embedded in a self-produced matrix of hydrated EPS. In this study, the effect of Bacillus pumilus 3-19 proteolytic enzymes on the structure of 7-day-old S. marcescens biofilms was examined. Using quantitative methods and scanning electron microscopy for the detection of biofilm, we demonstrated a high efficacy of subtilisin-like protease and glutamyl endopeptidase in biofilm removal. Enzymatic treatment resulted in the degradation of the EPS components and significant eradication of the biofilms.

  2. The Story of : Pathologic Risk Factors in Breast Implant Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline A Yao

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Serratia marcescens (S. marcescens emerged as an opportunist in the setting of immunodeficiency in the 1970s, when serious infections occurred in San Francisco hospitals after USA. Navy experiments had aerosolized the bacteria to study biologic warfare. We investigate the risks of S. marcescens in San Franciscans who undergo mastectomy with implant reconstruction. From 2007 to 2011, the senior author took breast capsule cultures for all patients at the time of tissue expander exchange/explant. Of the 142 women who had reconstruction, 23 had positive cultures. Only the two patients who were positive for S. marcescens developed clinical infections that required explantation. Both had postoperative chemotherapy with transient neutropenia, and both had close ties to San Francisco. Clinical signs of infection emerged for both patients months after initial surgery, despite having previously well healed incisions. Other patients were culture positive for Pseudomonas, Proteus, Enterococcus and MRSA and did not develop require explant. While the link between San Francisco and S. marcescens is controversial, a patient's geography is a simple screening tool when considering postoperative risks, especially in the immunocompromised. Closer monitoring for neutropenia during chemotherapy, and a lower threshold to administer S. marcescens targeted antibiotics may be warranted in these patients.

  3. Correlation of American Burn Association Sepsis Criteria With the Presence of Bacteremia in Burned Patients Admitted to the Intensive Care Unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-01

    complex 29 Klebsiella spp . 15 Pseudomonas aeruginosa 13 Enterobacter spp . 7 Serratia marcescens 5 Other 9 Gram-positive 20 Staphylococcus aureus...14 Streptococcus spp . 6 Enterococcus spp . 4 Coagulase-negative Staphylococcus 3 Other 2 Mixed (Gram-positive and Gram-negative) 5 Candida spp ...organisms known to be common skin contaminants (ie, diphtheroids, Bacillus spp ., Propionibacterium spp ., coagulase-negative Staphy- lococcus species, or

  4. Effectiveness of disinfection with alcohol 70% (w/v) of contaminated surfaces not previously cleaned

    OpenAIRE

    Graziano, Maurício Uchikawa; Graziano, Kazuko Uchikawa; Pinto, Flávia Morais Gomes; Bruna, Camila Quartim de Moraes; Souza, Rafael Queiroz de; Lascala, Cesar Angelo

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the disinfectant effectiveness of alcohol 70% (w/v) using friction, without previous cleaning, on work surfaces, as a concurrent disinfecting procedure in Health Services. METHOD: An experimental, randomized and single-blinded laboratory study was undertaken. The samples were enamelled surfaces, intentionally contaminated with Serratia marcescens microorganisms ATCC 14756 106 CFU/mL with 10% of human saliva added, and were submitted to the procedure of disinfection W...

  5. Antibacterial activity of the Antarctic bacterium Janthinobacterium sp. SMN 33.6 against multi-resistant Gram-negative bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geraldine Asencio

    2014-01-01

    Conclusions: The ethanolic extract of Janthinobacterium sp. SMN 33.6 possesses antibacterial activity against a chromosomal AmpC beta-lactamase-producing strain of Serratia marcescens, an extended-spectrum beta-lactamase-producing Escherichia coli and also against carbapenemase-producing strains of Acinetobacter baumannii and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. This becomes a potential and interesting biotechnological tool for the control of bacteria with multi-resistance to commonly used antibiotics.

  6. Effects of lipid emulsion and multivitamins on the growth of microorganisms in peripheral parenteral nutrition solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuwahara, Takashi; Kaneda, Shinya; Shimono, Kazuyuki; Inoue, Yoshifumi

    2013-01-01

    Blood stream infections caused by Bacillus cereus or Serratia marcescens in patients receiving peripheral parenteral nutrition (PPN) have occasionally been reported in Japan, but these microorganisms are not major causes of blood stream infections in patients receiving total parenteral nutrition via a central venous catheter. In Japan, commercially available PPN solutions contain amino acids, glucose, and electrolytes, but not contain lipid emulsion (LE) and multivitamins (MV). In this study, the effects of LE and MV on the growth of microorganisms such as Bacillus cereus, Serratia marcescens, Staphylococcus aureus, and Candida albicans in PPN solutions were investigated. A commercial 3% amino acid and 7.5% glucose solution with electrolytes (AF) was used as the base solution to prepare test solutions (LAF, AFV, and LAFV) containing LE, MV, or both. Specifically, 20% LE was added to AF in a ratio of 1:9 to prepare LAF. MV was added to AF and LAF to prepare AFV and LAFV, respectively. A specified number of each microorganism was added to each 100 mL of AF, LAF, AFV, and LAFV in sterile plastic flasks, and all flasks were allowed to stand at room temperature. The number of colony forming units per mL of each microorganism was counted at 0, 24, and 48 hours after the addition of each microorganism. Both Bacillus cereus and Serratia marcescens increased rapidly in AF as well as in LAF, AFV, and LAFV. Staphylococcus aureus did not increased in AF, but increased slightly in LAF and increased rapidly in AFV and LAFV. Candida albicans increased slightly in AF and increased rapidly in LAF, AFV, and LAFV. The results suggest the followings: if microbial contamination occurs, 1) Bacillus cereus and Serratia marcescens can grow rapidly in PPN solutions consisting of amino acids, glucose and electrolytes; 2) Staphylococcus aureus cannot grow without LE and MV, but can grow rapidly with MV; 3) Candida albicans can grow slowly without LE and MV, and the addition of LE or MV

  7. Avaliação microbiológica das diferentes formulações anti-sépticas, polivinilpirrolidona-iodo e clorexidina, após contaminação intencional das almotolias

    OpenAIRE

    PADOVANI, Christiane Moreira; GRAZIANO, Kazuko Uchikawa; GOVEIA, Vânia Regina

    2008-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the survival rate of microorganisms within different antiseptic formulations - povidone-iodine (PVP-I) and chlorhexidine (CHX) - after intentional contamination, and to establish the minimum care necessary to ensure sterilization of non-disposable antiseptic solution containers. A laboratory study was performed with 180 antiseptic containers, which were contaminated with Serratia marcescens [1 x 105 UFC/mL]. The containers were closed and stored, at room temperatu...

  8. Antibacterial activity of extracts of six macroalgae from the northeastern brazilian coast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lima-Filho José Vitor M.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Hexane, chloroform and ethanol extracts of six marine macroalgae (Rhodophyta and Chlorophyta from North Ceará coast (Northeast Brazil were evaluated for antibacterial activity by the single disk method. Best results were shown by the hexane extracts of Amansia multifida against enteric Gram-negative strains such as Enterobacter aerogenes, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Salmonella typhi, S. cholerae-suis, Serratia marcescens, Vibrio cholerae and the Gram-positive bacteria Bacillus subtilis and Staphylococcus aureus.

  9. Supporting data for identification of biosurfactant-producing bacteria isolated from agro-food industrial effluent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamad Ali Fulazzaky

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The goal of this study was to identify the biosurfactant-producing bacteria isolated from agro-food industrial effluet. The identification of the potential bacterial strain using a polymerase chain reaction of the 16S rRNA gene analysis was closely related to Serratia marcescens with its recorded strain of SA30 “Fundamentals of mass transfer and kinetics for biosorption of oil and grease from agro-food industrial effluent by Serratia marcescens SA30” (Fulazzaky et al., 2015 [1]; however, many biochemical tests have not been published yet. The biochemical tests of biosurfactant production, haemolytic assay and cell surface hydrophobicity were performed to investigate the beneficial strain of biosurfactant-producing bacteria. Here we do share data collected from the biochemical tests to get a better understanding of the use of Serratia marcescens SA30 to degrade oil, which contributes the technical features of strengthening the biological treatment of oil-contaminated wastewater in tropical environments.

  10. Resource availability and competition shape the evolution of survival and growth ability in a bacterial community.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minna Pekkonen

    Full Text Available Resource availability is one of the main factors determining the ecological dynamics of populations or species. Fluctuations in resource availability can increase or decrease the intensity of resource competition. Resource availability and competition can also cause evolutionary changes in life-history traits. We studied how community structure and resource fluctuations affect the evolution of fitness related traits using a two-species bacterial model system. Replicated populations of Serratia marcescens (copiotroph and Novosphingobium capsulatum (oligotroph were reared alone or together in environments with intergenerational, pulsed resource renewal. The comparison of ancestral and evolved bacterial clones with 1 or 13 weeks history in pulsed resource environment revealed species-specific changes in life-history traits. Co-evolution with S. marcescens caused N. capsulatum clones to grow faster. The evolved S. marcescens clones had higher survival and slower growth rate then their ancestor. The survival increased in all treatments after one week, and thereafter continued to increase only in the S. marcescens monocultures that experienced large resource pulses. Though adaptive radiation is often reported in evolution studies with bacteria, clonal variation increased only in N. capsulatum growth rate. Our results suggest that S. marcescens adapted to the resource renewal cycle whereas N. capsulatum was more affected by the interspecific competition. Our results exemplify species-specific evolutionary response to both competition and environmental variation.

  11. Infection dynamic of symbiotic bacteria in the pea aphid Acyrthosiphon pisum gut and host immune response at the early steps in the infection process.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    François Renoz

    Full Text Available In addition to its obligatory symbiont Buchnera aphidicola, the pea aphid Acyrthosiphon pisum can harbor several facultative bacterial symbionts which can be mutualistic in the context of various ecological interactions. Belonging to a genus where many members have been described as pathogen in invertebrates, Serratia symbiotica is one of the most common facultative partners found in aphids. The recent discovery of strains able to grow outside their host allowed us to simulate environmental acquisition of symbiotic bacteria by aphids. Here, we performed an experiment to characterize the A. pisum response to the ingestion of the free-living S. symbiotica CWBI-2.3T in comparison to the ingestion of the pathogenic Serratia marcescens Db11 at the early steps in the infection process. We found that, while S. marcescens Db11 killed the aphids within a few days, S. symbiotica CWBI-2.3T did not affect host survival and colonized the whole digestive tract within a few days. Gene expression analysis of immune genes suggests that S. symbiotica CWBI-2.3T did not trigger an immune reaction, while S. marcescens Db11 did, and supports the hypothesis of a fine-tuning of the host immune response set-up for fighting pathogens while maintaining mutualistic partners. Our results also suggest that the lysosomal system and the JNK pathway are possibly involved in the regulation of invasive bacteria in aphids and that the activation of the JNK pathway is IMD-independent in the pea aphid.

  12. Infection dynamic of symbiotic bacteria in the pea aphid Acyrthosiphon pisum gut and host immune response at the early steps in the infection process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renoz, François; Noël, Christine; Errachid, Abdelmounaim; Foray, Vincent; Hance, Thierry

    2015-01-01

    In addition to its obligatory symbiont Buchnera aphidicola, the pea aphid Acyrthosiphon pisum can harbor several facultative bacterial symbionts which can be mutualistic in the context of various ecological interactions. Belonging to a genus where many members have been described as pathogen in invertebrates, Serratia symbiotica is one of the most common facultative partners found in aphids. The recent discovery of strains able to grow outside their host allowed us to simulate environmental acquisition of symbiotic bacteria by aphids. Here, we performed an experiment to characterize the A. pisum response to the ingestion of the free-living S. symbiotica CWBI-2.3T in comparison to the ingestion of the pathogenic Serratia marcescens Db11 at the early steps in the infection process. We found that, while S. marcescens Db11 killed the aphids within a few days, S. symbiotica CWBI-2.3T did not affect host survival and colonized the whole digestive tract within a few days. Gene expression analysis of immune genes suggests that S. symbiotica CWBI-2.3T did not trigger an immune reaction, while S. marcescens Db11 did, and supports the hypothesis of a fine-tuning of the host immune response set-up for fighting pathogens while maintaining mutualistic partners. Our results also suggest that the lysosomal system and the JNK pathway are possibly involved in the regulation of invasive bacteria in aphids and that the activation of the JNK pathway is IMD-independent in the pea aphid.

  13. Water-soluble Moringa oleifera lectin interferes with growth, survival and cell permeability of corrosive and pathogenic bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moura, M C; Napoleão, T H; Coriolano, M C; Paiva, P M G; Figueiredo, R C B Q; Coelho, L C B B

    2015-09-01

    This work evaluated the antibacterial activity of a water-soluble Moringa oleifera seed lectin (WSMoL) by evaluating its effect on growth, survival and cell permeability of Bacillus sp., Bacillus cereus, Bacillus pumillus, Bacillus megaterium, Micrococcus sp., Pseudomonas sp., Pseudomonas fluorescens, Pseudomonas stutzeri and Serratia marcescens. In addition, the effect of lectin on membrane integrity of most sensitive species was also evaluated. All the tested bacteria are able to cause biocorrosion and some are also responsible for human infections. WSMoL inhibited the bacterial growth, induced agglutination and promoted the leakage of proteins from cells of all strains. Bactericidal effect was detected against Bacillus sp., B. pumillus, B. megaterium, Ps. fluorescens and Ser. marcescens. The bacteriostatic effect of lectin was evident with only 6 h of incubation. Fluorescence microscopy of Ser. marcescens showed that WSMoL caused loss of cell integrity and indicated an anti-biofilm activity of the lectin. WSMoL was active against the bacteria by inhibiting growth and affecting cell permeability. The lectin also interfered with membrane integrity of Ser. marcescens, the most sensitive species. The study indicates that WSMoL was active against bacteria that cause serious problems in both industrial and health sectors. Also, the study contributes for the 'state-of-art' on antibacterial mechanisms of lectins. © 2015 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  14. Maternal Exposure of a Beetle to Pathogens Protects Offspring against Fungal Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Joanna J; Hajek, Ann E

    2015-01-01

    Maternal exposure to an immune challenge can convey enhanced immunity to invertebrate offspring in the next generation. We investigated whether maternal exposure of the Asian longhorned beetle, Anoplophora glabripennis, to two species of the fungus Metarhizium or the bacterium Serratia marcescens elicited transgenerational immune priming (TGIP). We tested specificity of this protection and whether occurrence of TGIP was dependent on maternal exposure to living versus dead pathogens. Our results show that TGIP occurred and protected offspring against Metarhizium brunneum. Maternal exposure to S. marcescens provided non-specific protection to offspring against a fungal pathogen, but TGIP in response to Metarhizium only occurred when offspring were exposed to the same fungal species that was used to prime mothers. Moreover, TGIP in response to M. brunneum occurred only after maternal exposure to living rather than dead fungus. Our findings suggest that occurrence of TGIP could be both specific and dependent on whether the pathogen was alive.

  15. Maternal Exposure of a Beetle to Pathogens Protects Offspring against Fungal Disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanna J Fisher

    Full Text Available Maternal exposure to an immune challenge can convey enhanced immunity to invertebrate offspring in the next generation. We investigated whether maternal exposure of the Asian longhorned beetle, Anoplophora glabripennis, to two species of the fungus Metarhizium or the bacterium Serratia marcescens elicited transgenerational immune priming (TGIP. We tested specificity of this protection and whether occurrence of TGIP was dependent on maternal exposure to living versus dead pathogens. Our results show that TGIP occurred and protected offspring against Metarhizium brunneum. Maternal exposure to S. marcescens provided non-specific protection to offspring against a fungal pathogen, but TGIP in response to Metarhizium only occurred when offspring were exposed to the same fungal species that was used to prime mothers. Moreover, TGIP in response to M. brunneum occurred only after maternal exposure to living rather than dead fungus. Our findings suggest that occurrence of TGIP could be both specific and dependent on whether the pathogen was alive.

  16. Isolation and identification of phosphate solubilizing bacteria able to enhance the growth and aloin-A biosynthesis of Aloe barbadensis Miller.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Mamta; Kiran, Shashi; Gulati, Arvind; Singh, Bikram; Tewari, Rupinder

    2012-06-20

    The effect of four phosphate solubilizing bacteria (PSB) was studied on growth and aloin-A content of Aloe barbadensis in soil containing tricalcium phosphate (TCP). PSB were identified based on 16S rRNA gene sequencing as Pseudomonas synxantha, Burkholderia gladioli, Enterobacter hormaechei and Serratia marcescens. These PSB solubilized 25-340 μg ml(-1) of TCP into the liquid phase. The treatment of plants with individual PSB or mixture of these increased soil available P, P uptake in plants and plant growth. The increase in aloin-A content due to higher plant biomass and unit biomass production was 673%, 294%, 276%, 119% and 108% in plants treated with a PSB consortium, P. synxantha, S. marcescens, B. gladioli, and E. hormaechei in TCP amended soil, respectively. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  17. Seleção de bactérias endofíticas de tomateiro como potenciais agentes de biocontrole e de promoção de crescimento Screening of endophytic bacteria isolated from tomato plants as potencial biocontrol agents and growth promotion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrícia Baston Barretti

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Quarenta isolados bacterianos endofíticos de plantas sadias de tomateiro foram avaliados quanto à sua potencialidade como agentes de biocontrole de doenças do tomateiro. Foi realizada, em casa de vegetação, uma seleção massal utilizando-se Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato e Alternaria solani, como patógenos desafiantes. Com base na média do número de lesões por planta, quatro isolados foram selecionados como potenciais agentes de biocontrole dessas enfermidades fúngica e bacteriana do tomateiro. Esses isolados foram identificados, por meio do sequenciamento do gene 16S do DNA ribossômico, como Acinetobacter johnsonii (UFV-E05, Serratia marcescens (UFV-E13, Sinorhizobium sp. (UFV-E25 e Bacillus megaterium (UFV-E26. Os mesmos isolados selecionados para o biocontrole também foram avaliados quanto à sua capacidade de promover o crescimento em plantas e somente S. marcescens (UFV-E13 proporcionou aumento na altura das plantas.Forty isolates of endophytic bacteria obtained from healthy tomato plants were tested for their potential as biocontrol agents of tomato diseases. A massal screening was performed at greenhouse using Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato and Alternaria solani as challenging pathogens. Based on the average number of lesions per plant, four isolates were selected as potential agents of biocontrol of these tomato diseases caused by fungi and bacteria. These isolates were identified by 16S ribosomal DNA sequence analysis as Acinetobacter johnsonii (UFV-E05, Serratia marcescens (UFV-E13, Sinorhizobium sp. (UFV-E25 and Bacillus megaterium (UFV-E26. The four endophytes selected for biocontrol were also evaluated for their ability of promoting plant growth and only S. marcescens (UFV-E13 presented increase in the height of the plants.

  18. Isolation and molecular identification of a Serratia strain from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ONOS

    2010-04-05

    Apr 5, 2010 ... suitable agar dishes and used in further experiments. Biochemical tests were selectively done according to the standards in Bergey's. Manual of Systematic Bacteriology (second ed) and The Prokaryotes: A Handbook on the Biology of Bacteria (third ed). The isolated colonies were differentiated by colonial ...

  19. Field efficacy of inorganic carrier based formulations of Serratia ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In the present study, an attempt was taken to reduce the use of chemical pesticide and fertilizer by using two inorganic carriers (talcum powder and vermiculite) based formulation of S. entomophila in sesame. From the experimental results it was evident that the vermiculite based formulation of S. entomophila AB2 proved a ...

  20. New butenolides from the photoconductivity screening of Streptomyces antibioticus (Waksman and Woodruff) Waksman and Henrici 1948.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun, D; Pauli, N; Séquin, U; Zähner, H

    1995-02-01

    Streptomyces antibioticus strain TU 99, from which a wide variety of active compounds had been isolated previously, was reinvestigated using an HPLC photoconductivity screening system. Four new compounds were isolated, characterized and their constitutions determined. All four were alpha, beta-unsaturated gamma-lactones; the most abundant compound 3 (C10H16O4), as well as compound 1 (C9H14O4) had a hydroxy group at C(5) of the lactone ring. The four lactones showed antibiotic activity against Pseudomonas aeruginosa and also a weak inhibition of the chitinase from Serratia marcescens.

  1. Running with the Red Queen: host-parasite coevolution selects for biparental sex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morran, Levi T; Schmidt, Olivia G; Gelarden, Ian A; Parrish, Raymond C; Lively, Curtis M

    2011-07-08

    Most organisms reproduce through outcrossing, even though it comes with substantial costs. The Red Queen hypothesis proposes that selection from coevolving pathogens facilitates the persistence of outcrossing despite these costs. We used experimental coevolution to test the Red Queen hypothesis and found that coevolution with a bacterial pathogen (Serratia marcescens) resulted in significantly more outcrossing in mixed mating experimental populations of the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. Furthermore, we found that coevolution with the pathogen rapidly drove obligately selfing populations to extinction, whereas outcrossing populations persisted through reciprocal coevolution. Thus, consistent with the Red Queen hypothesis, coevolving pathogens can select for biparental sex.

  2. Culturable Aerobic and Facultative Anaerobic Intestinal Bacterial Flora of Black Cobra (Naja naja karachiensis) in Southern Pakistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iqbal, Junaid; Sagheer, Mehwish; Tabassum, Nazneen; Siddiqui, Ruqaiyyah; Khan, Naveed Ahmed

    2014-01-01

    Using morphological analysis and biochemical testing, here for the first time, we determined the culturable gut bacterial flora (aerobes and facultative anaerobes) in the venomous Black Cobra (Naja naja karachiensis) from South Asia. The findings revealed that these snakes inhabit potentially pathogenic bacteria including Serratia marcescens, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Shewanella putrefaciens, Aeromonas hydrophila, Salmonella sp., Moraxella sp., Bacillus sp., Ochrobactrum anthropi, and Providencia rettgeri. These findings are of concern, as injury from snake bite can result in wound infections and tissue necrosis leading to sepsis/necrotizing fasciitis and/or expose consumers of snake meat/medicine in the community to infections.

  3. Augmentation of a Microbial Consortium for Enhanced Polylactide (PLA) Degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nair, Nimisha R; Sekhar, Vini C; Nampoothiri, K Madhavan

    2016-03-01

    Bioplastics are eco-friendly and derived from renewable biomass sources. Innovation in recycling methods will tackle some of the critical issues facing the acceptance of bioplastics. Polylactic acid (PLA) is the commonly used and well-studied bioplastic that is presumed to be biodegradable. Considering their demand and use in near future, exploration for microbes capable of bioplastic degradation has high potential. Four PLA degrading strains were isolated and identified as Penicillium chrysogenum, Cladosporium sphaerospermum, Serratia marcescens and Rhodotorula mucilaginosa. A consortium of above strains degraded 44 % (w/w) PLA in 30 days time in laboratory conditions. Subsequently, the microbial consortium employed effectively for PLA composting.

  4. Kinetics of chitinase production. II. Relationship between bacterial growth, chitin hydrolysis and enzyme synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, M E; Bell, R L; Carroad, P A

    1985-06-01

    A comprehensive model for chitinase production during growth of Serratia marcescens QMB 1466 on chitin was developed taking into account the rate of chitin hydrolysis in order to estimate the rate of bacterial growth. In relating growth with enzyme synthesis the total enzyme concentration was used as the sum of the enzyme present in the bulk of the fermentation broth and the enzyme adsorbed on the chitin particles. The equations constituting the proposed model were fitted to the experimental results from both continuous and batch fermentation to obtain parameters describing substrate yield, metabolic maintenance, and enzyme yields.

  5. A case report of pink breast milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Jenny; Crete, Joan; Neumeier, Robin

    2014-01-01

    A woman presented for her postpartum examination alarmed about pink stains on her breast pads and on her infant's burp pads and diapers. The stains were also found in her breast pump and the infant's bottles. Out of concern, she stopped breastfeeding. The diagnosis was colonization of mother and infant with Serratia marcescens. They were managed conservatively without antibiotics. The mother was guided to restart breastfeeding. The infant resumed nursing and continued to thrive. © 2014 AWHONN, the Association of Women's Health, Obstetric and Neonatal Nurses.

  6. PRODUKSI ANTIBIOTIKA OLEH Bacillus subtilis M10 DALAM MEDIA UREA-SORBITOL

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    Supartono Supartono

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available PRODUCTION OF ANTIBIOTICS BY Bacillus subtilis M10 IN UREA-SORBITOL MEDIUM. Infection diseases still become the main health problems that suffered by people in Indonesia. Besides, there were many pathogen bacteria found to be resistant to the some antibiotics. Therefore, the efforts to get a new antibiotic require to be done continuously. A new local strain of Bacillus subtilis BAC4 has been known producing an antibiotic that inhibit Serratia marcescens ATCC 27117 growth. To make efficient the local strain, mutation on Bacillus subtilis BAC4 was done by using acridine orange and a mutant cell of Bacillus subtilis M10 that overproduction for producing antibiotic was obtained. Nevertheless, the production kinetics of antibiotic by this mutant has not been reported. The objective of this research was to study the production kinetics of antibiotic by Bacillus subtilis M10 mutant. The production of antibiotic was conducted using batch fermentation and antibiotic assay was performed with agar absorption method using Serratia marcescens ATCC 27117 as bacteria assay. Research result provided that Bacillus subtilis M10 mutant with overproduction of antibiotic produced an antibiotic since 8th hour’s fermentation and optimum of it production was at 14th hours after inoculation.  Penyakit infeksi masih menjadi masalah yang utama diderita oleh masyarakat Indonesia. Di samping itu, banyak bakteri patogen yang ditemukan resisten terhadap beberapa antibiotika. Oleh karena itu, upaya-upaya untuk mendapatkan antibiotika baru perlu dilakukan secara terus-menerus. Suatu galur lokal baru Bacillus subtilis BAC4 teridentifikasi memproduksi senyawa antibiotika yang menghambat pertumbuhan Serratia marcescens ATCC27117. Untuk memberdayakan galur tersebut, terhadap Bacillus subtilis BAC4 dilakukan mutasi dengan larutan akridin oranye dan diperoleh mutan Bacillus subtilis M10 yang memproduksi antibiotika berlebihan. Namun, kinetika produksi antibiotika oleh Bacillus

  7. Diagnóstico microbiológico e histopatológico de mortalidade em avestruzes (Struthio camelus Microbiological and histological diagnosis in mortality of ostrich (Struthio camelus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Vieira-da-Motta

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Several young ostrich, including nestlings, with lassitude and inappetence followed by death or victim of sudden death were immediately brought to diagnosis at an Animal Health Laboratory. At necropsy, animals presented hemorrhage and altered content of the vitelline sac, and necrotic foci in the small intestine; one animal showed necrotic pleuropneumonia with psammomatosus bodies in the lung parenchyma. The cultures from different samples revealed Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Serratia marcescens, Enterobacter aglomerans, and Pseudomonas mendocina. It was suggested one case of septicemia in an animal with exclusive growth of K. pneumoniae isolated from samples of small intestine, lung, and liver.

  8. Near and far-wall effects on the three-dimensional motion of bacteria-driven microbeads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Matthew R.; Wright Carlsen, Rika; Sitti, Metin

    2013-04-01

    Bio-hybrid microrobots have been heavily studied due to their potential applications as minimally invasive medical microdevices. Though most researchers have focused on two-dimensional and near-wall motion, this letter uses a defocused optical tracking method to quantify the three-dimensional motion of 5 μm diameter polystyrene beads driven by attached Serratia marcescens bacteria. Away from walls the beads trace out helical trajectories, demonstrating kinematics produced by near-constant forces and torques. Near-wall motion is observed to be more stochastic. The motion of beads driven by single bacteria is analyzed in detail, providing an understanding of the forces and torques on the beads.

  9. Dynamic clustering in suspension of motile bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiao; Yang, Xiang; Yang, Mingcheng; Zhang, H. P.

    2015-09-01

    Bacteria suspension exhibits a wide range of collective phenomena, arising from interactions between individual cells. Here we show Serratia marcescens cells near an air-liquid interface spontaneously aggregate into dynamic clusters through surface-mediated hydrodynamic interactions. These long-lived clusters translate randomly and rotate in the counterclockwise direction; they continuously evolve, merge with others and split into smaller ones. Measurements indicate that long-ranged hydrodynamic interactions have strong influences on cluster properties. Bacterial clusters change material and fluid transport near the interface and hence may have environmental and biological consequences.

  10. Microbiología alimentaria y fenómenos "paranormales" en la historia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Miguel Soriano del Castillo

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available A lo largo de la historia han existido fenómenos aparentemente inexplicables cuyos resultados han originado muertes, milagros, juicios por brujería e incluso ganancias y pérdidas de batallas militares. En este artículo se realiza una inspección microbiológica-histórica en donde algunos microorganismos (Claviceps purpurea, Fusarium sporotrichioides, Serratia marcescens y Stachybotrys chartarum, pueden ser los hipotéticos causantes de algunos de estos fenómenos.

  11. Antimicrobial activity of essential oil from Schinus molle Linn.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gundidza, M

    1993-11-01

    The essential oil from the fresh leaves of Schinus molle isolated by hydrodistillation was tested for antibacterial activity using the hole plate diffusion method and for antifungal activity using the mycelium or single cell growth inhibition method. Results obtained showed that the volatile oil exhibited significant activity against the following bacterial species: Klebsiella pneumoniae, Alcaligenes faecalis, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Leuconostoc cremoris, Enterobacter aerogenes, Proteus vulgaris, Clostridium sporogenes, Acinetobacter calcoacetica, Escherichia coli, Beneckea natriegens, Citrobacter freundii, Serratia marcescens, Bacillus subtilis and Brochothrix thermosphacata. The fungal species Aspergillus ochraceus, Aspergillus parasiticus, Fusarium culmorum and Alternaria alternata exhibited significant sensitivity to the volatile oil.

  12. AcEST: BP916375 [AcEST

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available tein E6 OS=Human papillomavirus type 43 G... 30 7.5 sp|P08664|MERB_SERMA Alkylmercury... lyase OS=Serratia marcescens G... 30 9.8 sp|Q91UN2|MERB_RHIME Alkylmercury lyase OS=Rhizobium meliloti ...GN... 30 9.8 sp|P62225|MERB_KLEPN Alkylmercury lyase OS=Klebsiella pneumoniae... 30 9.8 sp|P77072|MERB_ECOLX Alkylmercury...GYCLHCWKSCMEKRRRSET 153 >sp|P08664|MERB_SERMA Alkylmercury lyase OS=Serratia marc...PAGM Sbjct: 103 FPALIGRTARVSSHCAATGAPVSLTVSPSEIQAVEPAGM 141 >sp|Q91UN2|MERB_RHIME Alkylmercury lyase OS=Rhiz

  13. ANTAGONISTIC BACTERIA AGAINST SCHIZOPHYLLUM COMMUNE FR. IN PENINSULAR MALAYSIA

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    ANTARJO DIKIN

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Schizophyllum commune Fr., is one of the important fungi, causes brown germ and seed rot of oil palm. Biodiversity of antagonistic bacteria from oil palm plantations in Peninsular Malaysia is expected to support in development of biopesticide. Isolation with liquid assay and screening antagonistic bacteria using dual culture assay were carried out in the bioexploration. A total of 265 bacterial isolates from plant parts of oil palm screened 52 antagonistic bacterial isolates against 5. commune. Bacterial isolates were identified by using Biolog* Identification System i.e. Bacillus macroccanus, B. thermoglucosidasius, Burkholderia cepacia, B. gladioli, B. multivorans, B pyrrocinia, B. spinosa, Corynebacterium agropyri, C. misitidis, Enterobacter aerogenes, Microbacterium testaceum, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, P. citronellolis, Rhodococcus rhodochrous, Serratia ficaria, Serratia sp., S. marcescens, Staphylococcus sciuri, Sternotrophomonas maltophilia.

  14. Enterobacteriaceae in gut of honey bee (Apis mellifera and the antibiotic resistance of the isolates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaroslav Gasper

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial species of Enterobacteriaceae and the antimicrobial resistance of the isolates were detected in Apis mellifera L. bees gut. Gut content was cultivated on Meat peptone and McConkey agars at 30 and 37 °C, then, the isolates were identified with MALDI TOF MS Biotyper. Isolated strains were tested for antibiotic resistance to penicillins, cephalosporins, carbapenems, fluoroquinolones and aminoglycosides. Altogether, 12 species representing Enterobacteriaceae family were isolated. Firmicutes and Candida  were represented by Bacillus megaterium and Issatchenkia orientalis  . Isolated Enterobacteriaceae  species were  Enterobacter cloacae, Hafnia alvei, Klebsiella oxytoca, Morganella morganii, Serratia marcescens, Ser. liquefaciens, Raoultella ornithinolytica, R. planticola, R. terrigena, Pantoea ananatis, P. agglomerans, Rahnella aquatilis. Enterobacter cloacae, Hafnia alvei, Klebsiella oxytoca, Morganella morganii, Serratia marcescens, Ser. liquefaciens isolates exhibited the antimicrobial resistance more frequently than Raoultella ornithinolytica, R. planticola, R. terrigena, Pantoea ananatis, P. agglomerans, Rahnella aquatilis. Microflora of gut of bees could serve as a source of resistant microorganisms.

  15. Infectious Risk Assessment of Unsafe Handling Practices and Management of Clinical Solid Waste

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hossain, Md. Sohrab; Rahman, Nik Norulaini Nik Ab; Balakrishnan, Venugopal; Puvanesuaran, Vignesh R.; Sarker, Md. Zaidul Islam; Kadir, Mohd Omar Ab

    2013-01-01

    The present study was undertaken to determine the bacterial agents present in various clinical solid wastes, general waste and clinical sharp waste. The waste was collected from different wards/units in a healthcare facility in Penang Island, Malaysia. The presence of bacterial agents in clinical and general waste was determined using the conventional bacteria identification methods. Several pathogenic bacteria including opportunistic bacterial agent such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Salmonella spp., Klebsiella pneumoniae, Serratia marcescens, Acinetobacter baumannii, Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Enterococcus faecalis, Streptococcus pyogenes were detected in clinical solid wastes. The presence of specific pathogenic bacterial strains in clinical sharp waste was determined using 16s rDNA analysis. In this study, several nosocomial pathogenic bacteria strains of Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Proteus mirabilis, Lysinibacillus sphaericus, Serratia marcescens, and Staphylococcus aureus were detected in clinical sharp waste. The present study suggests that waste generated from healthcare facilities should be sterilized at the point of generation in order to eliminate nosocomial infections from the general waste or either of the clinical wastes. PMID:23435587

  16. A Management Dilemma: Infectious Keratitis Associated with Soft Contact Lens Use and Dubious Treatment Compliance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konstantinos T. Tsaousis

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To present a case of infectious keratitis caused by the microorganism Serratia marcescens in a contact lens user and further to confer on the most advantageous management of comparable situations. Case. After altering the routine that she used for contact lens disinfection, a 24-year-old patient presented with pain and conjunctival redness in both eyes. Slit-lamp examination revealed two infiltrates in the inferior part of the cornea in the right eye and five smaller infiltrates in the superior half of the left cornea. Appropriate treatment, after hospitalization, improved the symptoms while culture of the contact lens material revealed Serratia marcescens as the responsible infectious factor. Conclusion. Enhancing the availability of information with respect to contact lens users and customized analysis regarding treatment for a particular complication could be beneficial in order to reduce the frequency of admission to the eye clinic due to infectious keratitis. In addition, rapid laboratory testing of the infected materials should be a priority for selection of the optimal treatment regimen.

  17. Modulation of the Epithelial Sodium Channel (ENaC) by Bacterial Metalloproteases and Protease Inhibitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butterworth, Michael B.; Zhang, Liang; Liu, Xiaoning; Shanks, Robert M.; Thibodeau, Patrick H.

    2014-01-01

    The serralysin family of metalloproteases is associated with the virulence of multiple gram-negative human pathogens, including Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Serratia marcescens. The serralysin proteases share highly conserved catalytic domains and show evolutionary similarity to the mammalian matrix metalloproteases. Our previous studies demonstrated that alkaline protease (AP) from Pseudomonas aeruginosa is capable of activating the epithelial sodium channel (ENaC), leading to an increase in sodium absorption in airway epithelia. The serralysin proteases are often co-expressed with endogenous, intracellular or periplasmic inhibitors, which putatively protect the bacterium from unwanted or unregulated protease activities. To evaluate the potential use of these small protein inhibitors in regulating the serralysin induced activation of ENaC, proteases from Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Serratia marcescens were purified for characterization along with a high affinity inhibitor from Pseudomonas. Both proteases showed activity against in vitro substrates and could be blocked by near stoichiometric concentrations of the inhibitor. In addition, both proteases were capable of activating ENaC when added to the apical surfaces of multiple epithelial cells with similar slow activation kinetics. The high-affinity periplasmic inhibitor from Pseudomonas effectively blocked this activation. These data suggest that multiple metalloproteases are capable of activating ENaC. Further, the endogenous, periplasmic bacterial inhibitors may be useful for modulating the downstream effects of the serralysin virulence factors under physiological conditions. PMID:24963801

  18. Investigations of Antibacterial Activity of Methanol and Aqueous Ex-tracts of the Body Wall of Sea Cucumber Holothuria leucospilota on some Human Pathogenic Bacteria

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    M. Nazemi

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction & Objective: Holothuria leucospilota, sea cucumber, is a species of the Phylum Echinodermata. Sea cucumbers have the most natural products with biological activity. In this study we investigated the antibacterial activity of aqueous and methanol extract of H. leucospilota used against gram positive and gram negative human pathogenic bacteria. Materials & Methods: 9 Samples of H. leucospilota were harvested from the Hengam Island,. The methanol extract was prepared from the powder of sea cucumber. The antibacterial activity of the extracts was determined by broth dilution methods against clinical Gram-negative bacteria to identify MIC and MBC. Results: Aqueous extract of H. leucospilota was inactive on the bacteria. Methanol extract was active on Gram-negetive bacteria; E. coli, Salmonella typhi and Serratia marcescens. But it killed only Salmonella typhi and Serratia marcescens. The MBC of H. leucospilota methanol extract was 10 mg/ml. Methanol extract was active on all Gram-positive bacteria; B. pumilus, B. cereus and S. aureus but it killed only S. aureus. The MBC of H. leucospilota methanol extract was 40 mg/ml. Conclusion: Based on our results, H. leucospilota methanol extract. can be considered as a source of novel antibiotic. Contrary to many marine organisms, sea cucumbers are active against gram-negative bacteria. (Sci J Hamadan Univ Med Sci 2016; 23 (1:75-82

  19. Modulation of the epithelial sodium channel (ENaC by bacterial metalloproteases and protease inhibitors.

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    Michael B Butterworth

    Full Text Available The serralysin family of metalloproteases is associated with the virulence of multiple gram-negative human pathogens, including Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Serratia marcescens. The serralysin proteases share highly conserved catalytic domains and show evolutionary similarity to the mammalian matrix metalloproteases. Our previous studies demonstrated that alkaline protease (AP from Pseudomonas aeruginosa is capable of activating the epithelial sodium channel (ENaC, leading to an increase in sodium absorption in airway epithelia. The serralysin proteases are often co-expressed with endogenous, intracellular or periplasmic inhibitors, which putatively protect the bacterium from unwanted or unregulated protease activities. To evaluate the potential use of these small protein inhibitors in regulating the serralysin induced activation of ENaC, proteases from Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Serratia marcescens were purified for characterization along with a high affinity inhibitor from Pseudomonas. Both proteases showed activity against in vitro substrates and could be blocked by near stoichiometric concentrations of the inhibitor. In addition, both proteases were capable of activating ENaC when added to the apical surfaces of multiple epithelial cells with similar slow activation kinetics. The high-affinity periplasmic inhibitor from Pseudomonas effectively blocked this activation. These data suggest that multiple metalloproteases are capable of activating ENaC. Further, the endogenous, periplasmic bacterial inhibitors may be useful for modulating the downstream effects of the serralysin virulence factors under physiological conditions.

  20. Facilitation as Attenuating of Environmental Stress among Structured Microbial Populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, Suzana Cláudia Silveira; Santaella, Sandra Tédde; Martins, Claudia Miranda; Martins, Rogério Parentoni

    2016-01-01

    There is currently an intense debate in microbial societies on whether evolution in complex communities is driven by competition or cooperation. Since Darwin, competition for scarce food resources has been considered the main ecological interaction shaping population dynamics and community structure both in vivo and in vitro. However, facilitation may be widespread across several animal and plant species. This could also be true in microbial strains growing under environmental stress. Pure and mixed strains of Serratia marcescens and Candida rugosa were grown in mineral culture media containing phenol. Growth rates were estimated as the angular coefficients computed from linearized growth curves. Fitness index was estimated as the quotient between growth rates computed for lineages grown in isolation and in mixed cultures. The growth rates were significantly higher in associated cultures than in pure cultures and fitness index was greater than 1 for both microbial species showing that the interaction between Serratia marcescens and Candida rugosa yielded more efficient phenol utilization by both lineages. This result corroborates the hypothesis that facilitation between microbial strains can increase their fitness and performance in environmental bioremediation.

  1. Facilitation as Attenuating of Environmental Stress among Structured Microbial Populations

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    Suzana Cláudia Silveira Martins

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available There is currently an intense debate in microbial societies on whether evolution in complex communities is driven by competition or cooperation. Since Darwin, competition for scarce food resources has been considered the main ecological interaction shaping population dynamics and community structure both in vivo and in vitro. However, facilitation may be widespread across several animal and plant species. This could also be true in microbial strains growing under environmental stress. Pure and mixed strains of Serratia marcescens and Candida rugosa were grown in mineral culture media containing phenol. Growth rates were estimated as the angular coefficients computed from linearized growth curves. Fitness index was estimated as the quotient between growth rates computed for lineages grown in isolation and in mixed cultures. The growth rates were significantly higher in associated cultures than in pure cultures and fitness index was greater than 1 for both microbial species showing that the interaction between Serratia marcescens and Candida rugosa yielded more efficient phenol utilization by both lineages. This result corroborates the hypothesis that facilitation between microbial strains can increase their fitness and performance in environmental bioremediation.

  2. Infectious Risk Assessment of Unsafe Handling Practices and Management of Clinical Solid Waste

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    Md. Zaidul Islam Sarker

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study was undertaken to determine the bacterial agents present in various clinical solid wastes, general waste and clinical sharp waste. The waste was collected from different wards/units in a healthcare facility in Penang Island, Malaysia. The presence of bacterial agents in clinical and general waste was determined using the conventional bacteria identification methods. Several pathogenic bacteria including opportunistic bacterial agent such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Salmonella spp., Klebsiella pneumoniae, Serratia marcescens, Acinetobacter baumannii, Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Enterococcus faecalis, Streptococcus pyogenes were detected in clinical solid wastes. The presence of specific pathogenic bacterial strains in clinical sharp waste was determined using 16s rDNA analysis. In this study, several nosocomial pathogenic bacteria strains of Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Proteus mirabilis, Lysinibacillus sphaericus, Serratia marcescens, and Staphylococcus aureus were detected in clinical sharp waste. The present study suggests that waste generated from healthcare facilities should be sterilized at the point of generation in order to eliminate nosocomial infections from the general waste or either of the clinical wastes.

  3. A Transcriptional Regulatory Mechanism Finely Tunes the Firing of Type VI Secretion System in Response to Bacterial Enemies

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    Lazzaro, Martina; Feldman, Mario F.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT The ability to detect and measure danger from an environmental signal is paramount for bacteria to respond accordingly, deploying strategies that halt or counteract potential cellular injury and maximize survival chances. Type VI secretion systems (T6SSs) are complex bacterial contractile nanomachines able to target toxic effectors into neighboring bacteria competing for the same colonization niche. Previous studies support the concept that either T6SSs are constitutively active or they fire effectors in response to various stimuli, such as high bacterial density, cell-cell contact, nutrient depletion, or components from dead sibling cells. For Serratia marcescens, it has been proposed that its T6SS is stochastically expressed, with no distinction between harmless or aggressive competitors. In contrast, we demonstrate that the Rcs regulatory system is responsible for finely tuning Serratia T6SS expression levels, behaving as a transcriptional rheostat. When confronted with harmless bacteria, basal T6SS expression levels suffice for Serratia to eliminate the competitor. A moderate T6SS upregulation is triggered when, according to the aggressor-prey ratio, an unbalanced interplay between homologous and heterologous effectors and immunity proteins takes place. Higher T6SS expression levels are achieved when Serratia is challenged by a contender like Acinetobacter, which indiscriminately fires heterologous effectors able to exert lethal cellular harm, threatening the survival of the Serratia population. We also demonstrate that Serratia’s RcsB-dependent T6SS regulatory mechanism responds not to general stress signals but to the action of specific effectors from competitors, displaying an exquisite strategy to weigh risks and keep the balance between energy expenditure and fitness costs. PMID:28830939

  4. Transport behavior of surrogate biological warfare agents in a simulated landfill: Effect of leachate recirculation and water infiltration

    KAUST Repository

    Saikaly, Pascal

    2010-11-15

    An understanding of the transport behavior of biological warfare (BW) agents in landfills is required to evaluate the suitability of landfills for the disposal of building decontamination residue (BDR) following a bioterrorist attack on a building. Surrogate BW agents, Bacillus atrophaeus spores and Serratia marcescens, were spiked into simulated landfill reactors that were filled with synthetic building debris (SBD) and operated for 4 months with leachate recirculation or water infiltration. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction (Q-PCR) was used to monitor surrogate transport. In the leachate recirculation reactors, <10% of spiked surrogates were eluted in leachate over 4 months. In contrast, 45% and 31% of spiked S. marcescens and B. atrophaeus spores were eluted in leachate in the water infiltration reactors. At the termination of the experiment, the number of retained cells and spores in SBD was measured over the depth of the reactor. Less than 3% of the total spiked S. marcescens cells and no B. atrophaeus spores were detected in SBD. These results suggest that significant fractions of the spiked surrogates were strongly attached to SBD. © 2010 American Chemical Society.

  5. A model of bacterial intestinal infections in Drosophila melanogaster.

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    Nadine T Nehme

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Serratia marcescens is an entomopathogenic bacterium that opportunistically infects a wide range of hosts, including humans. In a model of septic injury, if directly introduced into the body cavity of Drosophila, this pathogen is insensitive to the host's systemic immune response and kills flies in a day. We find that S. marcescens resistance to the Drosophila immune deficiency (imd-mediated humoral response requires the bacterial lipopolysaccharide O-antigen. If ingested by Drosophila, bacteria cross the gut and penetrate the body cavity. During this passage, the bacteria can be observed within the cells of the intestinal epithelium. In such an oral infection model, the flies succumb to infection only after 6 days. We demonstrate that two complementary host defense mechanisms act together against such food-borne infection: an antimicrobial response in the intestine that is regulated by the imd pathway and phagocytosis by hemocytes of bacteria that have escaped into the hemolymph. Interestingly, bacteria present in the hemolymph elicit a systemic immune response only when phagocytosis is blocked. Our observations support a model wherein peptidoglycan fragments released during bacterial growth activate the imd pathway and do not back a proposed role for phagocytosis in the immune activation of the fat body. Thanks to the genetic tools available in both host and pathogen, the molecular dissection of the interactions between S. marcescens and Drosophila will provide a useful paradigm for deciphering intestinal pathogenesis.

  6. Efficient recombinant production of prodigiosin in Pseudomonas putida

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    Andreas eDomröse

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Serratia marcescens and several other bacteria produce the red-colored pigment prodigiosin which possesses bioactivities as an antimicrobial, anticancer and immunosuppressive agent. Therefore, there is a great interest to produce this natural compound. Efforts aiming at its biotechnological production have so far largely focused on the original producer and opportunistic human pathogen S. marcescens. Here, we demonstrate efficient prodigiosin production in the heterologous host Pseudomonas putida. Random chromosomal integration of the 21 kb prodigiosin biosynthesis gene cluster of S. marcescens in P. putida KT2440 was employed to construct constitutive prodigiosin production strains. Standard cultivation parameters were optimized such that titers of 94 mg/L culture were obtained upon growth of P. putida at 20 °C using rich medium under high aeration conditions. Subsequently, a novel, fast and effective protocol for prodigiosin extraction and purification was established enabling the straightforward isolation of prodigiosin from P. putida growth medium. In summary, we describe here a highly efficient method for the heterologous biosynthetic production of prodigiosin which may serve as a basis to produce large amounts of this bioactive natural compound and may provide a platform for further in-depth studies of prodiginine biosynthesis.

  7. Sepsis from the gut: the enteric habitat of bacteria that cause late-onset neonatal bloodstream infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carl, Mike A; Ndao, I Malick; Springman, A Cody; Manning, Shannon D; Johnson, James R; Johnston, Brian D; Burnham, Carey-Ann D; Weinstock, Erica Sodergren; Weinstock, George M; Wylie, Todd N; Mitreva, Makedonka; Abubucker, Sahar; Zhou, Yanjiao; Stevens, Harold J; Hall-Moore, Carla; Julian, Samuel; Shaikh, Nurmohammad; Warner, Barbara B; Tarr, Phillip I

    2014-05-01

    Late-onset sepsis is a major problem in neonatology, but the habitat of the pathogens before bloodstream invasion occurs is not well established. We examined prospectively collected stools from premature infants with sepsis to find pathogens that subsequently invaded their bloodstreams, and sought the same organisms in stools of infants without sepsis. Culture-based techniques were used to isolate stool bacteria that provisionally matched the bloodstream organisms, which were then genome sequenced to confirm or refute commonality. Of 11 children with late-onset neonatal bloodstream infections, 7 produced at least 1 stool that contained group B Streptococcus (GBS), Serratia marcescens, or Escherichia coli before their sepsis episode with provisionally matching organisms. Of 96 overlap comparison subjects without sepsis temporally associated with these cases, 4 were colonized with provisionally matching GBS or S. marcescens. Of 175 comparisons of stools from randomly selected infants without sepsis, 1 contained a GBS (this infant had also served as an overlap comparison subject and both specimens contained provisionally matching GBS). Genome sequencing confirmed common origin of provisionally matching fecal and blood isolates. The invasive E. coli were present in all presepticemic stools since birth, but gut colonization with GBS and S. marcescens occurred closer to time of bloodstream infection. The neonatal gut harbors sepsis-causing pathogens, but such organisms are not inevitable members of the normal microbiota. Surveillance microbiology, decolonization, and augmented hygiene might prevent dissemination of invasive bacteria between and within premature infants.

  8. ACTIVIDAD lIPOlíTICA DE MICROORGANISMOS AISlADOS DE AGUAS RESIDUAlES CONTAMINADAS CON GRASAS

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    Carmen Julia Pedroza Padilla

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Lipases are one of the groups of enzymes with the highest number of industrial and biotechnological applications, processing of dairy foods and oils, detergents, cosmetics, leather, pharmaceuticals, paper, production of surfactants, biodiesel and recently as a promising alternative for the treatment of wastewater contaminated with lipids. In this study, microorganisms were isolated from wastewater samples containing fats and extracellular lipase production was determined using p-nitrophenylpalmitate. From the 149 isolates obtained, 37 showed lipolytic activity and strain CCEI-1, identified as Serratia marcescens, had the highest activity at alkaline pH and at 30°C. Also degraded lipids and produced pigmentation on solid medium at pH 8,0 and 50°C. The culture supernatants of S. marcescens used to determine thermal stability at 50°C indicate that the enzyme is stable at this temperature and at alkaline pH. The enzyme was partially purified and electrophoresed (SDS-PAGE where bands between 40 and 116 kDa were detected. The results obtained in this study indicate that the strain CCEI-1 of S. marcescens can be a possible source of thermostable lipases with industrial and biotechnological applications.

  9. Human pathogen shown to cause disease in the threatened eklhorn coral Acropora palmata.

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    Kathryn Patterson Sutherland

    Full Text Available Coral reefs are in severe decline. Infections by the human pathogen Serratia marcescens have contributed to precipitous losses in the common Caribbean elkhorn coral, Acropora palmata, culminating in its listing under the United States Endangered Species Act. During a 2003 outbreak of this coral disease, called acroporid serratiosis (APS, a unique strain of the pathogen, Serratia marcescens strain PDR60, was identified from diseased A. palmata, human wastewater, the non-host coral Siderastrea siderea and the corallivorous snail Coralliophila abbreviata. In order to examine humans as a source and other marine invertebrates as vectors and/or reservoirs of the APS pathogen, challenge experiments were conducted with A. palmata maintained in closed aquaria to determine infectivity of strain PDR60 from reef and wastewater sources. Strain PDR60 from wastewater and diseased A. palmata caused disease signs in elkhorn coral in as little as four and five days, respectively, demonstrating that wastewater is a definitive source of APS and identifying human strain PDR60 as a coral pathogen through fulfillment of Koch's postulates. A. palmata inoculated with strain PDR60 from C. abbreviata showed limited virulence, with one of three inoculated fragments developing APS signs within 13 days. Strain PDR60 from non-host coral S. siderea showed a delayed pathogenic effect, with disease signs developing within an average of 20 days. These results suggest that C. abbreviata and non-host corals may function as reservoirs or vectors of the APS pathogen. Our results provide the first example of a marine "reverse zoonosis" involving the transmission of a human pathogen (S. marcescens to a marine invertebrate (A. palmata. These findings underscore the interaction between public health practices and environmental health indices such as coral reef survival.

  10. Prevalence of enterobacteriaceae in Tupinambis merianae (Squamata: Teiidae from a captive facility in Central Brazil, with a profile of antimicrobial drug resistance in Salmonella enterica

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    Andréa de Moraes Carvalho

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The present study reports the presence of enterobacteriaceae in Tegu Lizards (Tupinambis merianaefrom a captive facility in central Brazil. From a total of 30 animals, 10 juveniles and 20 adults (10 males, 10 females, 60 samples were collected, in two periods separated by 15 days. The samples were cultivated in Xylose-lysine-deoxycholate agar (XLT4 and MacConkey agar. The Salmonella enterica were tested for antimicrobial susceptibility. A total of 78 bacteria was isolated, of wich 27 were from juveniles of T. merianae, 30 from adult males and 21 from adult females. Salmonella enterica was the most frequent bacteria followed by Citrobacter freundii, Escherichia coli, Enterobacter sakasakii, Kluivera sp., Citrobacter amalonaticus, Serratia marcescens, Citrobacter diversus, Yersinia frederiksenii, Serratia odorifera, and Serratia liquefaciens. Salmonella enterica subsp. diarizonae and houtenae showed resistance to cotrimoxazole, and serum Salmonella enterica Worthington showed resistance to tetracycline and gentamicin. Salmonella enterica Panama and S. enterica subsp. diarizonae showed intermediate sensitivity to cotrimoxazole. In addition to Enterobacteriaceae in the Tegu lizard, pathogenic serotypes of S. enterica also occur, and their antimicrobial resistance was confirmed.

  11. Pore-Forming Toxins Induce Macrophage Necroptosis during Acute Bacterial Pneumonia.

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    Norberto González-Juarbe

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Necroptosis is a highly pro-inflammatory mode of cell death regulated by RIP (or RIPK1 and RIP3 kinases and mediated by the effector MLKL. We report that diverse bacterial pathogens that produce a pore-forming toxin (PFT induce necroptosis of macrophages and this can be blocked for protection against Serratia marcescens hemorrhagic pneumonia. Following challenge with S. marcescens, Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus pneumoniae, Listeria monocytogenes, uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC, and purified recombinant pneumolysin, macrophages pretreated with inhibitors of RIP1, RIP3, and MLKL were protected against death. Alveolar macrophages in MLKL KO mice were also protected during S. marcescens pneumonia. Inhibition of caspases had no impact on macrophage death and caspase-1 and -3/7 were determined to be inactive following challenge despite the detection of IL-1β in supernatants. Bone marrow-derived macrophages from RIP3 KO, but not caspase-1/11 KO or caspase-3 KO mice, were resistant to PFT-induced death. We explored the mechanisms for PFT-induced necroptosis and determined that loss of ion homeostasis at the plasma membrane, mitochondrial damage, ATP depletion, and the generation of reactive oxygen species were together responsible. Treatment of mice with necrostatin-5, an inhibitor of RIP1; GW806742X, an inhibitor of MLKL; and necrostatin-5 along with co-enzyme Q10 (N5/C10, which enhances ATP production; reduced the severity of S. marcescens pneumonia in a mouse intratracheal challenge model. N5/C10 protected alveolar macrophages, reduced bacterial burden, and lessened hemorrhage in the lungs. We conclude that necroptosis is the major cell death pathway evoked by PFTs in macrophages and the necroptosis pathway can be targeted for disease intervention.

  12. The antimicrobial activity in vitro of chlorhexidine, a mixture of isothiazolinones ('Kathon' CG) and cetyl trimethyl ammonium bromide (CTAB).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicoletti, G; Boghossian, V; Gurevitch, F; Borland, R; Morgenroth, P

    1993-02-01

    Chlorehexidine, two 4% chlorhexidine antiseptic handwashes ('Bioprep' and 'Hibiclens'), cetyl trimethyl ammonium bromide (CTAB) and isothiazolinones ('Kathon') were tested against Staphylococcus aureus, Micrococcus luteus, Escherichia coli, Serratia marcescens, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Proteus vulgaris and Candida albicans. The activities measured were the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC), minimum microbicidal concentration (MMC), rate of kill in water and broth, effect of organic soil, the development of microbial resistance on continuous exposure and agent bioavailability in media and formulation. 'Kathon' was the most active microbistatic agent showing maximal activity at low concentration, least inactivation by organic soil and media components and the lowest level of development of bacterial resistance. It was synergistic with chlorhexidine against S. marcescens and P. aeruginosa. Media, formulation components and organic soil affected the performance of chlorhexidine and CTAB. Chlorhexidine was more broadly active than CTAB but showed a greater reduction in activity in the presence of soil and engendered a greater level of bacterial resistance. It was more rapidly bactericidal to P. aeruginosa and S. marcescens than to S. aureus. Stable resistance to chlorhexidine and CTAB was developed by P. aeruginosa and S. marcescens, the latter showing the higher level of resistance. Chlorhexidine-resistant strains were also resistant to CTAB. The antiseptic formulations were more rapidly bactericidal than chlorhexidine alone but were otherwise of comparable activity. Mixtures of disinfectants, in particular a combination of chlorhexidine and a preservative level of 'Kathon', were more active than single disinfectants. The importance of standardization of media and test conditions and the use of chemically defined media for accurate and reproducible in-vitro testing of disinfectant activity is emphasized. Disinfection kinetics, expressed as time-kill curves, log

  13. Bacteriome and Mycobiome Interactions Underscore Microbial Dysbiosis in Familial Crohn’s Disease

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    G. Hoarau

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Crohn’s disease (CD results from a complex interplay between host genetic factors and endogenous microbial communities. In the current study, we used Ion Torrent sequencing to characterize the gut bacterial microbiota (bacteriome and fungal community (mycobiome in patients with CD and their nondiseased first-degree relatives (NCDR in 9 familial clusters living in northern France-Belgium and in healthy individuals from 4 families living in the same area (non-CD unrelated [NCDU]. Principal component, diversity, and abundance analyses were conducted, and CD-associated inter- and intrakingdom microbial correlations were determined. Significant microbial interactions were identified and validated using single- and mixed-species biofilms. CD and NCDR groups clustered together in the mycobiome but not in the bacteriome. Microbiotas of familial (CD and NCDR samples were distinct from those of nonfamilial (NCDU samples. The abundance of Serratia marcescens and Escherichia coli was elevated in CD patients, while that of beneficial bacteria was decreased. The abundance of the fungus Candida tropicalis was significantly higher in CD than in NCDR (P = 0.003 samples and positively correlated with levels of anti-Saccharomyces cerevisiae antibodies (ASCA. The abundance of C. tropicalis was positively correlated with S. marcescens and E. coli, suggesting that these organisms interact in the gut. The mass and thickness of triple-species (C. tropicalis plus S. marcescens plus E. coli biofilm were significantly greater than those of single- and double-species biofilms. C. tropicalis biofilms comprised blastospores, while double- and triple-species biofilms were enriched in hyphae. S. marcescens used fimbriae to coaggregate or attach with C. tropicalis/E. coli, while E. coli was closely apposed with C. tropicalis. Specific interkingdom microbial interactions may be key determinants in CD.

  14. The mTORC1-Signaling Pathway and Hepatic Polyribosome Profile Are Enhanced after the Recovery of a Protein Restricted Diet by a Combination of Soy or Black Bean with Corn Protein

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    Claudia C. Márquez-Mota

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Between 6% and 11% of the world’s population suffers from malnutrition or undernutrition associated with poverty, aging or long-term hospitalization. The present work examined the effect of different types of proteins on the mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTORC1-signaling pathway in: (1 healthy; and (2 protein restricted rats. (1 In total, 200 rats were divided into eight groups and fed one of the following diets: 20% casein (C, soy (S, black bean (B, B + Corn (BCr, Pea (P, spirulina (Sp, sesame (Se or Corn (Cr. Rats fed C or BCr had the highest body weight gain; rats fed BCr had the highest pS6K1/S6K1 ratio; rats fed B, BCr or P had the highest eIF4G expression; (2 In total, 84 rats were fed 0.5% C for 21 day and protein rehabilitated with different proteins. The S, soy + Corn (SCr and BCr groups had the highest body weight gain. Rats fed SCr and BCr had the highest eIF4G expression and liver polysome formation. These findings suggest that the quality of the dietary proteins modulate the mTORC1-signaling pathway. In conclusion, the combination of BCr or SCr are the best proteins for dietary protein rehabilitation due to the significant increase in body weight, activation of the mTORC1-signaling pathway in liver and muscle, and liver polysome formation.

  15. Prodigiosin, Violacein, and Volatile Organic Compounds Produced by Widespread Cutaneous Bacteria of Amphibians Can Inhibit Two Batrachochytrium Fungal Pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodhams, Douglas C; LaBumbard, Brandon C; Barnhart, Kelly L; Becker, Matthew H; Bletz, Molly C; Escobar, Laura A; Flechas, Sandra V; Forman, Megan E; Iannetta, Anthony A; Joyce, Maureen D; Rabemananjara, Falitiana; Gratwicke, Brian; Vences, Miguel; Minbiole, Kevin P C

    2017-11-09

    Symbiotic bacteria can produce secondary metabolites and volatile compounds that contribute to amphibian skin defense. Some of these symbionts have been used as probiotics to treat or prevent the emerging disease chytridiomycosis. We examined 20 amphibian cutaneous bacteria for the production of prodigiosin or violacein, brightly colored defense compounds that pigment the bacteria and have characteristic spectroscopic properties making them readily detectable, and evaluated the antifungal activity of these compounds. We detected violacein from all six isolates of Janthinobacterium lividum on frogs from the USA, Switzerland, and on captive frogs originally from Panama. We detected prodigiosin from five isolates of Serratia plymuthica or S. marcescens, but not from four isolates of S. fonticola or S. liquefaciens. All J. lividum isolates produced violacein when visibly purple, while prodigiosin was only detected on visibly red Serratia isolates. When applied to cultures of chytrid fungi Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd) and B. salamandrivorans (Bsal), prodigiosin caused significant growth inhibition, with minimal inhibitory concentrations (MIC) of 10 and 50 μM, respectively. Violacein showed a MIC of 15 μM against both fungi and was slightly more active against Bsal than Bd at lower concentrations. Although neither violacein nor prodigiosin showed aerosol activity and is not considered a volatile organic compound (VOC), J. lividum and several Serratia isolates did produce antifungal VOCs. White Serratia isolates with undetectable prodigiosin levels could still inhibit Bd growth indicating additional antifungal compounds in their chemical arsenals. Similarly, J. lividum can produce antifungal compounds such as indole-3-carboxaldehyde in addition to violacein, and isolates are not always purple, or turn purple under certain growth conditions. When Serratia isolates were grown in the presence of cell-free supernatant (CFS) from the fungi, CFS from Bd inhibited

  16. Bovine mastitis caused by gram negative bacteria in Mosul

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    S. Y. A. Al-Dabbagh

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A total of 90 milk samples were collected from cows with clinical and subclinical mastitis from different areas in Mosul city, in a period from October 2009 to June 2010, for the detection of gram negative bacteriological causative agents. The bacteria were identified using morphological, cultural and biochemical characteristics. thirty tow (35.3% gram negative bacterial isolates were obtained from the total count which included 14 isolates (15.5% for Escherichia coli, 7 isolates (7.7% for Klebsiella spp, 4 isolates (4.4% for Pseudomonas aeruginosa, 3 isolates (3.3% for Enterobacter aerogenes ,2 isolates for Serratia marcescens and one isolates (1.1% for each of Aeromonas hydrophila and Pasteurella multocida. Results of antibiotic sensitivity test indicated that most of these isolates were sensitive to Ciprofloxacin following by Gentamycin and Cotrimoxazole, while most of these organisms were resistant to Ampicillin, the isolates showed different percentages of sensitivity to Doxycycline, Tetracycline, Neomycin and Chloramphenicol.

  17. Brine shrimp lethality and antibacterial activity of extracts from the bark of Schleichera oleosa

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    Laxman Pokhrel

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To determine the antibacterial efficacy and brine shrimp toxicity of extracts (hexane, dichloromethane, ethyl acetate, methanol and water obtained from the bark of Schleichera oleosa. Methods: The powdered bark sample was Soxhlet extracted sequentially in hexanes, dichloromethane, ethyl acetate, methanol and water. Antibacterial evaluation was carried out by following the agar diffusion method and amoxicillin disc was used as a reference. Slightly modified Meyer’s method was used to determine the toxicity of the extracts in brine shrimps. Results: Among the nine bacterial strains tested, the methanolic and aqueous extracts showed promising antibacterial efficacy against Serratia marcescens, Escherarichia coli, Bacillus subtilis and Micrococcus luteus. None of the extracts were found significantly toxic to brine shrimps. Conclusions: Strong antibacterial activity and low brine shrimp toxicity of methanolic and aqueous extracts can provide new antibacterial compounds.

  18. Insecticidal bacteria isolated from predatory larvae of the antlion species Myrmeleon bore (Neuroptera: Myrmeleontidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishiwaki, Hisashi; Ito, Katsuhiko; Shimomura, Masaru; Nakashima, Kenta; Matsuda, Kazuhiko

    2007-09-01

    Various bacterial species were isolated from the crop (digestive organ) of the antlion species Myrmeleon bore and tested for their insecticidal activity against caterpillars by injection. Sixty-eight isolates from the antlion crop were grouped into twenty-four species based on homologies of 16S rRNA gene sequences and biochemical properties. Isolated Bacillus cereus, Bacillus sphaericus, Morganella morganii, Serratia marcescens and a Klebsiella species killed 80% or more cutworms when injected at a dose of 5x10(5)cells per insect. In addition, cutworms killed by these isolates resembled observations made of caterpillars attacked by antlions. A culture-independent analysis showed that the isolated bacterial species are likely to be frequently present in the antlion crop. These results suggest that insecticidal microorganisms associate with antlions, and may promote the death of prey.

  19. Sterility maintenance assessment of moist/wet material after steam sterilization and 30-day storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moriya, Giovana Abrahão de Araújo; Graziano, Kazuko Uchikawa

    2010-01-01

    Moist/wet materials stored after autoclaving are considered contaminated and not recommended for use. This study evaluates the maintenance of sterility in moist/wet material after being submitted to steam sterilization and stored for a period of 30 days. Aiming to support decision-making in emergency situations, 40 surgical boxes packed in nonwoven cloth covering Spunbound, Metblouwn, Spunbound (SMS): half (the experimental group) were placed in an autoclave but the drying phase was interrupted, yielding moist/wet materials and the other half (the negative control group) underwent the complete cycle. The external parts of each surgical box were deliberately contaminated with Serratia marcescens and subsequently stored for 30 days. After this period, the boxes' contents were submitted to sterility tests and no growth was observed. The presence of moisture inside the surgical boxes did not interfere with maintaining their sterility.

  20. Contact lens hygiene compliance and lens case contamination: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yvonne Tzu-Ying; Willcox, Mark; Zhu, Hua; Stapleton, Fiona

    2015-10-01

    A contaminated contact lens case can act as a reservoir for microorganisms that could potentially compromise contact lens wear and lead to sight threatening adverse events. The rate, level and profile of microbial contamination in lens cases, compliance and other risk factors associated with lens case contamination, and the challenges currently faced in this field are discussed. The rate of lens case contamination is commonly over 50%. Coagulase-negative Staphylococcus, Bacillus spp., Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Serratia marcescens are frequently recovered from lens cases. In addition, we provide suggestions regarding how to clean contact lens cases and improve lens wearers' compliance as well as future lens case design for reducing lens case contamination. This review highlights the challenges in reducing the level of microbial contamination which require an industry wide approach. Copyright © 2015 British Contact Lens Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Differentiation of bacterial colonies and temporal growth patterns using hyperspectral imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehrübeoglu, Mehrube; Buck, Gregory W.; Livingston, Daniel W.

    2014-09-01

    Detection and identification of bacteria are important for health and safety. Hyperspectral imaging offers the potential to capture unique spectral patterns and spatial information from bacteria which can then be used to detect and differentiate bacterial species. Here, hyperspectral imaging has been used to characterize different bacterial colonies and investigate their growth over time. Six bacterial species (Pseudomonas fluorescens, Escherichia coli, Serratia marcescens, Salmonella enterica, Staphylococcus aureus, Enterobacter aerogenes) were grown on tryptic soy agar plates. Hyperspectral data were acquired immediately after, 24 hours after, and 96 hours after incubation. Spectral signatures from bacterial colonies demonstrated repeatable measurements for five out of six species. Spatial variations as well as changes in spectral signatures were observed across temporal measurements within and among species at multiple wavelengths due to strengthening or weakening reflectance signals from growing bacterial colonies based on their pigmentation. Between-class differences and within-class similarities were the most prominent in hyperspectral data collected 96 hours after incubation.

  2. Conjugation is necessary for a bacterial plasmid to survive under protozoan predation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cairns, Johannes; Jalasvuori, Matti; Ojala, Ville; Brockhurst, Michael; Hiltunen, Teppo

    2016-02-01

    Horizontal gene transfer by conjugative plasmids plays a critical role in the evolution of antibiotic resistance. Interactions between bacteria and other organisms can affect the persistence and spread of conjugative plasmids. Here we show that protozoan predation increased the persistence and spread of the antibiotic resistance plasmid RP4 in populations of the opportunist bacterial pathogen Serratia marcescens. A conjugation-defective mutant plasmid was unable to survive under predation, suggesting that conjugative transfer is required for plasmid persistence under the realistic condition of predation. These results indicate that multi-trophic interactions can affect the maintenance of conjugative plasmids with implications for bacterial evolution and the spread of antibiotic resistance genes. © 2016 The Author(s).

  3. Synthesis and antimicrobial activity of α-aminophosphonates containing chitosan moiety

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    El-Refaie S. Kenawy

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available A novel series of α-aminophosphonates containing chitosan moiety was obtained in high yields from reactions of chitosan with aromatic aldehydes and triphenylphosphite in the presence of lithium perchlorate as a catalyst. The structures of the synthesized compounds were confirmed by IR and 1H NMR spectral data. Compounds (1–4 showed high antimicrobial activities against Escherichia coli (NCIM2065, Serratia marcescens, Enterobacter cloacae, Shigella dysenteriae, Salmonella enterica and Proteus vulgaris as Gram-negative bacteria, Bacillus subtilis (PC1219 and Staphylococcus aureus (ATCC25292 as Gram-positive bacteria and Candida albicans as a fungus, at low concentrations (2.5–10 mg/mL.

  4. Ballast water as a vector of coral pathogens in the Gulf of Mexico: the case of the Cayo Arcas coral reef.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguirre-Macedo, M Leopoldina; Vidal-Martinez, Victor M; Herrera-Silveira, Jorge A; Valdés-Lozano, David S; Herrera-Rodríguez, Miguel; Olvera-Novoa, Miguel A

    2008-09-01

    The discharge of nutrients, phytoplankton and pathogenic bacteria through ballast water may threaten the Cayo Arcas reef system. To assess this threat, the quality of ballast water and presence of coral reef pathogenic bacteria in 30 oil tankers loaded at the PEMEX Cayo Arcas crude oil terminal were determined. The water transported in the ships originated from coastal, oceanic or riverine regions. Statistical associations among quality parameters and bacteria were tested using redundancy analysis (RDA). In contrast with coastal or oceanic water, the riverine water had high concentrations of coliforms, including Vibrio cholerae 01 and, Serratia marcescens and Sphingomona spp., which are frequently associated with "white pox" and "white plague type II" coral diseases. There were also high nutrient concentrations and low water quality index values (WQI and TRIX). The presence of V. cholerae 01 highlights the need for testing ballast water coming from endemic regions into Mexican ports.

  5. Effect of microorganisms on the plutonium oxidation states

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luksiene, Benedikta, E-mail: bena@ar.fi.lt [Center for Physical Sciences and Technology, Savanoriu ave 231, LT-02300 Vilnius (Lithuania); Druteikiene, Ruta [Center for Physical Sciences and Technology, Savanoriu ave 231, LT-02300 Vilnius (Lithuania); Peciulyte, Dalia [Nature Research Centre, Akademijos street 2, LT-08412 Vilnius (Lithuania); Baltrunas, Dalis; Remeikis, Vidmantas [Center for Physical Sciences and Technology, Savanoriu ave 231, LT-02300 Vilnius (Lithuania); Paskevicius, Algimantas [Nature Research Centre, Akademijos street 2, LT-08412 Vilnius (Lithuania)

    2012-03-15

    Particular microbes from substrates at the low-level radioactive waste repository in the Ignalina NPP territory were exposed to {sup 239}Pu (IV) at low pH under aerobic conditions. Pu(III) and Pu(IV) were separated and quantitatively evaluated using the modified anion exchange method and alpha spectrometry. Tested bacteria Bacillus mycoides and Serratia marcescens were more effective in Pu reduction than Rhodococcus fascians. Fungi Paecillomyces lilacinus and Absidia spinosa var. spinosa as well as bacterium Rhodococcus fascians did not alter the plutonium oxidation state. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Particular microbes from low-level radioactive waste repository were exposed to Pu (IV). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Some tested bacteria induced slight Pu (IV) reduction at low pH under aerobic conditions. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Tested fungi did not show peculiarities to alter Pu oxidation state. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The modified radiochemical method was applied to differentiate Pu oxidation states.

  6. Using microorganisms to aid in hydrocarbon degradation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Black, W.; Zamora, J. (Middle Tennessee State Univ., Murfreesboro (United States))

    1993-04-01

    Aliphatic hydrocarbons are threatening the potable water supply and the aquatic ecosystem. Given the right microbial inhabitant(s), a large portion of these aliphatic hydrocarbons could be biodegraded before reaching the water supply. The authors' purpose is to isolate possible oil-degrading organisms. Soil samples were taken from hydrocarbon-laden soils at petroleum terminals, a petroleum refinery waste-treatment facility, a sewage-treatment plant grease collector, a site of previous bioremediation, and various other places. Some isolates known to be good degraders were obtained from culture collection services. These samples were plated on a 10w-30 multigrade motor oil solid medium to screen for aliphatic hydrocarbon degraders. The degrading organisms were isolated, identified, and tested (CO[sub 2] evolution, BOD, and COD) to determine the most efficient degrader(s). Thirty-seven organisms were tested, and the most efficient degraders were Serratia marcescens, Escherichia coli, and Enterobacter agglomerans.

  7. Desensitization of anaphylactic hypersensitivity specific for the penicilloate minor determinant of penicillin and carbenicillin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorevic, P D; Levine, B B

    1981-10-01

    A 68-yr-old man with a history of a morbilliform rash caused by intravenous penicillin required carbenicillin (CB) therapy for refractory Serratia marcescens septicemia. Skin testing showed a positive immediate skin test to the penicilloate minor determinant in the presence of negative tests to benzylpenicilloylpolylysine (BPL) and penicillin G (PG), as well as cross-reactivity between the penicilloate derivatives of PG and CB. True densensitization was accomplished by gradual administration of CB intravenously and was accompanied by a diffuse flush reaction. There was specific loss of wheal-and-flare reactivity as well as of specific serum reaginic antibody activity during the procedure, and there was no evidence of activation of serum complement. This case illustrates the usefulness of skin tests in the prediction and management of penicillin allergy and presents data pertaining to immunologic mechanisms involved in true desensitization.

  8. Bioactive Components of the Traditionally used Mushroom Podaxis pistillaris

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. A. A. Al-Fatimi

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available In the course of an ethnobotanical study on fungi used in Yemeni ethnomedicine the fungus Podaxis pistillaris (Podaxales, Podaxaceae, Basidiomycetes was found to exhibit antibacterial activity against Staphylococcus aureus, Micrococcus flavus, Bacillus subtilis, Proteus mirabilis, Serratia marcescens and Escherichia coli. In the culture medium of P. pistillaris three epidithiodiketopiperazines were identified by activity-guided isolation. Based on spectral data (NMR, ESI-MS and DCI-MS their identity was established as epicorazine A (1, epicorazine B (2 and epicorazine C (3, antibiotic F 3822, which have not been reported as constituents of P. pistillaris previously. It is assumed that the identified compounds contribute to the antibacterial activity of the extract.

  9. Detection of multiple potentially pathogenic bacteria in Matang mangrove estuaries, Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghaderpour, Aziz; Mohd Nasori, Khairul Nazrin; Chew, Li Lee; Chong, Ving Ching; Thong, Kwai Lin; Chai, Lay Ching

    2014-06-15

    The deltaic estuarine system of the Matang Mangrove Forest Reserve of Malaysia is a site where several human settlements and brackish water aquaculture have been established. Here, we evaluated the level of fecal indicator bacteria (FIB) and the presence of potentially pathogenic bacteria in the surface water and sediments. Higher levels of FIB were detected at downstream sampling sites from the fishing village, indicating it as a possible source of anthropogenic pollution to the estuary. Enterococci levels in the estuarine sediments were higher than in the surface water, while total coliforms and E. coli in the estuarine sediments were not detected in all samples. Also, various types of potentially pathogenic bacteria, including Klebsiella pneumoniae, Serratia marcescens and Enterobacter cloacae were isolated. The results indicate that the Matang estuarine system is contaminated with various types of potential human bacterial pathogens which might pose a health risk to the public. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Wavelet-based tracking of bacteria in unreconstructed off-axis holograms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marin, Zach; Wallace, J Kent; Nadeau, Jay; Khalil, Andre

    2017-09-13

    We propose an automated wavelet-based method of tracking particles in unreconstructed off-axis holograms to provide rough estimates of the presence of motion and particle trajectories in digital holographic microscopy (DHM) time series. The wavelet transform modulus maxima segmentation method is adapted and tailored to extract Airy-like diffraction disks, which represent bacteria, from DHM time series. In this exploratory analysis, the method shows potential for estimating bacterial tracks in low-particle-density time series, based on a preliminary analysis of both living and dead Serratia marcescens, and for rapidly providing a single-bit answer to whether a sample chamber contains living or dead microbes or is empty. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Lipopolysaccharide profile typing as a technique for comparative typing of gram-negative bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aucken, H M; Pitt, T L

    1993-05-01

    We have applied the technique of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) profiling in sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis to the typing of 124 isolates of 12 gram-negative species from suspected outbreaks of infection. LPS was prepared by proteinase K digestion or micro-phenol-water extraction. A total of 11 of the 12 species gave clear ladder band profiles, the exception being Acinetobacter baumannii. When compared with conventional typing for Enterobacter cloacae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Serratia marcescens, LPS profile type alone was sufficient to allow relatedness or distinguishability of isolates to be established, and this was corroborated by serotype and phage type data. Serologically nontypeable isolates invariably lacked O repeating units and thus could not be classified by their silver stain profile. We conclude that LPS profiling is useful for the epidemiological investigation of small clusters of isolates in order to determine whether or not cross-infection between patients has occurred.

  12. Designing a new chitinase with more chitin binding and antifungal activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matroodi, Soheila; Motallebi, Mostafa; Zamani, Mohammadreza; Moradyar, Mehdi

    2013-08-01

    Chitinases have the ability of chitin digestion that constitutes a main compound of the cell wall in many of the phytopathogens such as fungi. Chitinase Chit42 from Trichoderma atroviride PTCC5220 is considered to play an important role in the biocontrol activity of this fungus against plant pathogens. Chit42 lacks a chitin binding domain (ChBD). We have produced a chimeric chitinase with stronger chitin-binding capacity by fusing to Chit42 a ChBD from Serratia marcescens Chitinase B. The fusion of ChBD improved the affinity to crystalline and colloidal chitin and also the enzyme activity of the chimeric chitinase when compared with the native Chit42. The chimeric chitinase showed higher antifungal activity toward phytopathogenic fungi.

  13. ANTIBACTERIAL POTENTIAL OF HONEY FROM DIFFERENT ORIGINS: A COMPARSION WITH MANUKA HONEY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khalid Al'Abri

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The antibacterial activity of honey is well documented, this activity is mainly due to its low pH, osmolarity and hydrogen peroxide accumulation. Recently, more attention has been given to the importance of a unique extra antimicrobial activity, termed as a non-peroxide activity. The aim of this work was to investigate the antimicrobial activity of selected honeys from different origins; specifically to evaluate their non-hydrogen peroxide derived activity, against Staphylococcus epidermidis, Bacillus sphaericus, Bacillus subtilis, Serratia marcescens, Escherichia coli and S. epidermidis; manuka honey was used as the control. Antibacterial activity of the honeys was assayed using standard well diffusion methods. noticeable variations in the antibacterial activity of the different honey samples were observed. Most of tested honeys had broad-spectrum antibacterial activity, particularly Greek Pine, Scottish Heather, Chilean Ulmo, New Zealand Beech and Jarrah Honey. Unfortunately, none of the tested honey had a detectable non-peroxide activity.

  14. Melioidosis Presenting with Isolated Splenic Abscesses: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chun-Yu Lin

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Splenic abscesses caused by Burkholderia pseudomallei are rarely reported in Taiwan. Here we report a middle-aged man who presented with fever, chills, and general malaise for several days. Abdominal echo revealed isolated splenic abscesses and he received antibiotics treatment according to the initial blood culture result, Serratia marcescens. However, fever did not subside. Then he was referred to our hospital and meropenem was prescribed. Fever subsided 5 days after the beginning of meropenem administration. Repeated fine-needle aspiration of splenic abscesses drained out the pus, which was cultured as B. pseudomallei. He was finally diagnosed as a case of melioidosis based on microbiological evidence. Physicians must take melioidosis into consideration when splenic abscesses are encountered clinically.

  15. Synthesis, characterization, antibacterial activity, SOD mimic and interaction with DNA of drug based copper(II) complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Mohan N.; Dosi, Promise A.; Bhatt, Bhupesh S.; Thakkar, Vasudev R.

    2011-02-01

    Novel metal complexes of the second-generation quinolone antibacterial agent enrofloxacin with copper(II) and neutral bidentate ligands have been prepared and characterized with elemental analysis reflectance, IR and mass spectroscopy. Complexes have been screened for their in-vitro antibacterial activity against two Gram (+ve)Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus subtilis, and three Gram (-ve)Serratia marcescens, Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa organisms using the double dilution technique. The binding of this complex with CT-DNA has been investigated by absorption titration, salt effect and viscosity measurements. Binding constant is ranging from 1.3 × 10 4-3.7 × 10 4. The cleavage ability of complexes has been assessed by gel electrophoresis using pUC19 DNA. The catalytic activity of the copper(II) complexes towards the superoxide anion (O 2rad -) dismutation was assayed by their ability to inhibit the reduction of nitroblue tetrazolium (NBT).

  16. Electrokinetic and optical control of bacterial microrobots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steager, Edward B.; Selman Sakar, Mahmut; Kim, Dal Hyung; Kumar, Vijay; Pappas, George J.; Kim, Min Jun

    2011-03-01

    One of the great challenges in microscale science and engineering is the independent manipulation of cells and man-made objects on the micron scale. For such work, motile microorganisms are integrated with engineered systems to construct microbiorobots (MBRs). MBRs are negative photosensitive epoxy (SU-8) microfabricated structures with typical feature sizes ranging from 1 to 100 µm coated with a monolayer of swarmer cells of the bacterium Serratia marcescens. The adherent cells naturally coordinate to propel the microstructures in fluidic environments. In this study, ultraviolet light is used to control rotational motion and direct current electric fields are used to control the two-dimensional movement of MBRs. They are steered in a fully automated fashion using computer-controlled visual servoing, used to transport and manipulate micron-sized objects, and employed as cell-based biosensors. This work is a step toward in vitro mechanical or chemical manipulation of cells as well as controlled assembly of microcomponents.

  17. Co-inoculation of an antibiotic-producing bacterium and a lytic enzyme-producing bacterium for the biocontrol of tomato wilt caused by Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Someya, Nobutaka; Tsuchiya, Kenichi; Yoshida, Takanobu; Noguchi, Masako T; Akutsu, Katsumi; Sawada, Hiroyuki

    2007-03-01

    The antifungal compound 2,4-diacetylphloroglucinol-producing bacterium, Pseudomonas fluorescens strain LRB3W1, inhibits the growth of Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici, and controls Fusarium wilt of tomato caused by F. oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici. On the other hand, Serratia marcescens strain B2, which produces cell wall-degrading enzyme chitinases, did not inhibit fungal growth and the suppressive effect of strain B2 against tomato Fusarium wilt was less than that of strain LRB3W1. Combined inoculation of strain LRB3W1 with strain B2 was more effective than treatment with strain LRB3W1 alone. When 2,4-diacetylphloroglucinol and the chitinolytic enzymes were applied in combination, a synergistic inhibitory effect against the pathogen was observed. It was possible that bacteria which produce cell wall-degrading enzymes enhanced the biocontrol effect of the antibiotic-producing bacterium against tomato Fusarium wilt.

  18. Gram-negative folliculitis. A rare problem or is it underdiagnosed? Case report and literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sierra-Téllez Daniela, Ponce-Olivera Rosa María, Tirado-Sánchez Andrés

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available AbstractGram-negative folliculitis may be the result of prolonged antibacterial treatments in patients with acne and rosacea. It is caused by alteration of facial skin flora and the nasal mucous, a decrease of Gram-positive bacteria and a proliferation of Gram-negative bacteria (for example Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Serratia marcescens, Klebsiella sp. and Proteus mirabilis. It should be considered in patients with acne who have not had a clinical improvement after 3-6 months of treatment with tetracyclines. The disease is underestimated, probably because bacteriological studies are rarely requested and the increased use of oral isotretinoin for acne management. One of the most effective treatments for Gram-negative folliculitis is oral isotretinoin (0.5-1 mg / kg / day for 4-5 months. We report the case of Gram negative folliculitis successfully treated with oral isotretinoin.

  19. Bioremediation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH compounds: (acenaphthene and fluorene in water using indigenous bacterial species isolated from the Diep and Plankenburg rivers, Western Cape, South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oluwadara Oluwaseun Alegbeleye

    Full Text Available Abstract This study was conducted to investigate the occurrence of PAH degrading microorganisms in two river systems in the Western Cape, South Africa and their ability to degrade two PAH compounds: acenaphthene and fluorene. A total of 19 bacterial isolates were obtained from the Diep and Plankenburg rivers among which four were identified as acenaphthene and fluorene degrading isolates. In simulated batch scale experiments, the optimum temperature for efficient degradation of both compounds was determined in a shaking incubator after 14 days, testing at 25 °C, 30 °C, 35 °C, 37 °C, 38 °C, 40 °C and 45 °C followed by experiments in a Stirred Tank Bioreactor using optimum temperature profiles from the batch experiment results. All experiments were run without the addition of supplements, bulking agents, biosurfactants or any other form of biostimulants. Results showed that Raoultella ornithinolytica, Serratia marcescens, Bacillus megaterium and Aeromonas hydrophila efficiently degraded both compounds at 37 °C, 37 °C, 30 °C and 35 °C respectively. The degradation of fluorene was more efficient and rapid compared to that of acenaphthene and degradation at Stirred Tank Bioreactor scale was more efficient for all treatments. Raoultella ornithinolytica, Serratia marcescens, Bacillus megaterium and Aeromonas hydrophila degraded a mean total of 98.60%, 95.70%, 90.20% and 99.90% acenaphthene, respectively and 99.90%, 97.90%, 98.40% and 99.50% fluorene, respectively. The PAH degrading microorganisms isolated during this study significantly reduced the concentrations of acenaphthene and fluorene and may be used on a larger, commercial scale to bioremediate PAH contaminated river systems.

  20. Efficacy of fresh leaf extracts of Spondias mombin against some clinical bacterial isolates from typhoid patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olukemi Aromolaran

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate the phytochemical properties and antibacterial activity of methanol, acetone, ethanol and aqueous extracts of fresh leaves of Spondias mombin (S. mombin on some clinical bacterial isolates. Methods: Clean and fresh leaves of S. mombin were collected in Ondo, Southwestern Nigeria. The leaves were blended, extracted with methanol, acetone, ethanol and water. The extracts were evaporated to dryness using rotary evaporator and tested for the presence of saponins, tannins, cardiac glycoside, terpenoids, flavonoids, reducing sugars, volatile oils, alkaloids and glycoside. The extract were tested against Gram-negative bacteria Klebsiella pneumonia, Serratia marcescens, Salmonella typhi and Enterobacter aerogens; Gram-positive bacteria Staphylococcus aureus by observing the zones of inhibition using agar well diffusion assay. Results: The study showed that the leaves contained saponins, tannins, flavonoids, alkaloids and glycoside. All the solvent extracts showed activity against all the test bacteria. The methanol extract also showed the highest activity against Enterobacter aerogens, zone of diameter (15.00 依1.89 mm, while the ethanol extract showed the highest activity against Staphylococcus aureus with zone of diameter (12.50依1.50 mm. The acetone extract showed the highest activity against Salmonella typhi, zone of diameter (17.50依0.29 mm followed by methanol extract showing zone of diameter (15.67依1.01 mm. The acetone extract showed the highest activity against Klebsiella pneumonia (15.17依0.67 mm, while the aqueous extract shows the highest activity against Serratia marcescens (14.67依2.68 mm. The minimum inhibitory concentration of the leaf extracts ranged between 10-90 mg/mL. Conclusions: This study showed that the aqueous and organic solvents extract of fresh leaves of S. mombin has anti-microbial activity against all the tested organisms.

  1. Comparative bacterial degradation and detoxification of model and kraft lignin from pulp paper wastewater and its metabolites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abhishek, Amar; Dwivedi, Ashish; Tandan, Neeraj; Kumar, Urwashi

    2017-05-01

    Continuous discharge of lignin containing colored wastewater from pulp paper mill into the environment has resulted in building up their high level in various aquatic systems. In this study, the chemical texture of kraft lignin in terms of pollution parameters (COD, TOC, BOD, etc.) was quite different and approximately twofold higher as compared to model lignin at same optical density (OD 3.7 at 465 nm) and lignin content (2000 mg/L). For comparative bacterial degradation and detoxification of model and kraft lignin two bacteria Citrobacter freundii and Serratia marcescens were isolated, screened and applied in axenic and mixed condition. Bacterial mixed culture was found to decolorize 87 and 70 % model and kraft lignin (2000 mg/L), respectively; whereas, axenic culture Citrobacter freundii and Serratia marcescens decolorized 64, 60 % model and 50, 55 % kraft lignin, respectively, at optimized condition (34 °C, pH 8.2, 140 rpm). In addition, the mixed bacterial culture also showed the removal of 76, 61 % TOC; 80, 67 % COD and 87, 65 % lignin from model and kraft lignin, respectively. High pollution parameters (like TOC, COD, BOD, sulphate) and toxic chemicals slow down the degradation of kraft lignin as compared to model lignin. The comparative GC-MS analysis has suggested that the interspecies collaboration, i.e., each bacterial strain in culture medium has cumulative enhancing effect on growth, and degradation of lignin rather than inhibition. Furthermore, toxicity evaluation on human keratinocyte cell line after bacterial treatment has supported the degradation and detoxification of model and kraft lignin.

  2. Switch of SpnR function from activating to inhibiting quorum sensing by its exogenous addition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takayama, Yuriko [Department of Innovation Systems Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Utsunomiya University, 7-1-2 Yoto, Utsunomiya, Tochigi 321-8585 (Japan); CREST, Japan Science and Technology Agency, 7-1-2 Yoto, Utsunomiya, Tochigi 321-8585 (Japan); Kato, Norihiro, E-mail: katon@cc.utsunomiya-u.ac.jp [CREST, Japan Science and Technology Agency, 7-1-2 Yoto, Utsunomiya, Tochigi 321-8585 (Japan); Department of Material and Environmental Chemistry, Graduate School of Engineering, Utsunomiya University, 7-1-2 Yoto, Utsunomiya, Tochigi 321-8585 (Japan)

    2016-09-02

    The opportunistic human pathogen Serratia marcescens AS-1 produces the N-hexanoylhomoserine lactone (C6HSL) receptor SpnR, a homologue of LuxR from Vibrio fischeri, which activates pig clusters to produce the antibacterial prodigiosin. In this study, we attempted to artificially regulate quorum sensing (QS) by changing the role of SpnR in N-acylhomoserine lactone (AHL)-mediated QS. SpnR was obtained as a fusion protein tagged with maltose-binding protein (MBP) from overexpression in Escherichia coli, and its specific affinity to C6HSL was demonstrated by quartz crystal microbalance analysis and AHL-bioassay with Chromobacterium violaceum CV026. Prodigiosin production was effectively inhibited by externally added MBP-SpnR in both wild-type AS-1 and the AHL synthase-defective mutant AS-1(ΔspnI). For the mutant, the induced amount of prodigiosin was drastically reduced to approximately 4% with the addition of 18 μM MBP-SpnR to the liquid medium, indicating 81% trapping of C6HSL. A system for inhibiting QS can be constructed by adding exogenous AHL receptor to the culture broth to keep the concentration of free AHL low, whereas intracellular SpnR naturally functions as the activator in response to QS. - Highlights: • Quorum sensing (QS) regulates the expression of some bacterial genes. • We added an AHL receptor to culture media to inhibit QS in Serratia marcescens AS-1. • The exogenous receptor effectively bound C6HSL and inhibited QS. • This approach can be used to artificially regulate AHL-mediated QS.

  3. Peanut plant growth and yield as influenced by co-inoculation with Bradyrhizobium and some rhizo-microorganisms under sandy loam soil conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F.Sh.F. Badawi

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The ability of tested rhizomicrobial isolates (Serratia marcescens and Trichoderma harzianum along with a strain of root nodule bacteria (Bradyrhizobium spp. to exhibit some PGP-properties was evaluated in vitro conditions. The main PGP-properties, namely the ability to solubilize-P and production of IAA, as well as production of siderophores and HCN were examined. Additionally, field trials were conducted on sandy loam soil at El-Tahrir Province during two successive summer seasons to study the effect of co-inoculation with Bradyrhizobium either individually or together with S. marcescens and/or T. harzianum on nodulation, some plant growth characters, peanut yield and its yield components. The in vitro experiment revealed that all of the tested microorganisms were apparently able to trigger PGP-properties. Phosphate solubilization was the common feature of the employed microorganisms. However, T. harzianum appeared to be superior to other microorganisms, and Bradyrhizobium displayed the lowest capacity. The ability of the microorganisms to produce indole compounds showed that S. marcescens was more effective in IAA production and followed by Bradyrhizobium. Capacity of S. marcescens and T. harzianum to excrete ferric-specific ligands (siderophores and HCN was detected, while Bradyrhizobium failed to produce such compounds. Results of field trials showed that the uninoculated peanut had the least nodulation status, N2-ase activity and all vegetative growth characters in both studied seasons. Bacterization of peanut seeds with bradyrhizobia exerted considerable improvement in number and mass of root nodules, increased the rate of acetylene reduction and all growth characters in comparison to the uninoculated control. The synergy inoculation between bradyrhizobia and any of the tested microorganisms led to further increases of all mentioned characters and strengthened the stimulating effect of the bacterial inoculation. However, the promotive

  4. Isolation, characterization, and evaluation of multi-trait plant growth promoting rhizobacteria for their growth promoting and disease suppressing effects on ginger.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinesh, Raghavan; Anandaraj, Muthuswamy; Kumar, Aundy; Bini, Yogiyar Kundil; Subila, Kizhakke Purayil; Aravind, Ravindran

    2015-04-01

    In this study, 100 PGPR strains isolated from different varieties of ginger (Zingiber officinale Rosc.) were first characterized for their morphological, biochemical, and nutrient mobilization traits in vitro. The PGPR were also screened in vitro for inhibition of Pythium myriotylum causing soft rot in ginger. Results revealed that only five PGPR showed >70% suppression of P. myriotylum. These 5 PGPR viz., GRB (Ginger rhizobacteria) 25--Burkholderia cepacia, GRB35--Bacillus amyloliquefaciens; GRB58--Serratia marcescens; GRB68--S. marcescens; GRB91--Pseudomonas aeruginosa were used for further growth promotion and biocontrol studies in the green house and field. The green house study revealed that GRB35 (B. amyloliquefaciens) and GRB68 (S. marcescens) registered markedly higher sprouting (96.3%) and lower disease incidence (48.1%) and greater rhizome yield (365.6 g pot(-1) and 384.4 g pot(-1), respectively), while control registered the lowest sprouting (66%), maximum soft rot incidence (100%) and lowest rhizome yield (134.4 g pot(-1)). In the field experiments also, GRB68 (S. marcescens) and GRB35 (B. amyloliquefaciens) registered the greatest sprouting (80% each), markedly lower soft rot incidence (5.2% and 7.3%, respectively) and higher yield (5.0 and 4.3 kg(3)m(-2), respectively) compared to chemicals like Streptomycin sulphate (73.0%, 18.5% and 2.3 kg(3)m(-2), respectively), Metalaxyl-Mancozeb (73.0%, 14.0% and 3.8 kg(3)m(-2), respectively) and control (73.0%, 25.1% and 2.2 kg 3m(-2), respectively). Overall, the results suggested that for growth promotion and management of soft rot disease in ginger, GRB35 B. amyloliquefaciens and GRB68 S. marcescens could be good alternatives to chemical measures. Since, the latter has been reported to be an opportunistic human pathogen, we recommend the use of B. amyloliquefaciens for integration into nutrient and disease management schedules for ginger cultivation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  5. Sulfhydryl variable-5 extended spectrum β-lactamase in nosocomial enteric bacteria causing sepsis in mexican children

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    Angélica Flores-Pérez

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Enteric bacteria causing nosocomial infections are often resistant to third-generation cephalosporins due to the production of extended-spectrum β-lactamases (ESBLs. Objective: To describe and characterize the ESBLs pattern present in Klebsiella pneumoniae and Serratia marcescens strains, isolated as causative of nosocomial sepsis in pediatric patients at Instituto Nacional de Pediatría (National Institute of Pediatrics. Material and methods: We analyzed 94 strains of K. pneumoniae and 7 of S. marcescens isolated from clinical specimens from 2002-2005, causative of sepsis in a children’s hospital. We evaluated antibiotic susceptibility and detection of ESBL phenotypes by disk diffusion methods; ceftazidime-resistant isolates were further characterized by pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE; and ESBLs were phenotypically and genotypically characterized by isoelectric focusing, polymerase chain reaction (PCR and sequencing. We also assed for presence of conjugative plasmids bearing the ESBL gene. Results: 51/94 (54% of K. pneumoniae isolates, and 5/7 (71% of S. marcescens isolates were resistant to ceftazidime; all carried a blaSHV-5 gene. All K. pneumoniae isolates had a distinct PFGE profile, yet all carried a ~48-Kb plasmid, that was conjugatively transferable to an Escherichia coli receptor, which expressed the resistance phenotype. On the other hand, all S. marcescens isolates had a similar PFGE profile, were unable to transfer the ceftazidime-resistance phenotype, and were isolated from the same ward in a short time-span suggesting an outbreak. Conclusions: The overall prevalence of ESBL-producing enteric bacteria in this hospital is high but similar to other Latin American reports. The sulfhydryl variable-5 (SHV-5 ESBL gene appears to reside in a highly mobile plasmid, capable of spreading among different K. pneumoniae clones and perhaps even to S. marcescens.

  6. Characterization of corrosive bacterial consortia isolated from petroleum-product-transporting pipelines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rajasekar, Aruliah; Ting, Yen-Peng [National Univ. of Singapore (Singapore). Dept. of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering; Anandkumar, Balakrishnan [Sourashtra Coll., Madurai (India). Dept. of Biotechnology; Maruthamuthu, Sundaram [Central Electrochemical Research Inst., Karaikudi (India). Biocorrosion Group; Rahman, Pattanathu K.S.M. [Teesside Univ., Tees Valley (United Kingdom). Chemical and Bioprocess Engineering Group

    2010-01-15

    Microbiologically influenced corrosion is a problem commonly encountered in facilities in the oil and gas industries. The present study describes bacterial enumeration and identification in diesel and naphtha pipelines located in the northwest and southwest region in India, using traditional cultivation technique and 16S rDNA gene sequencing. Phylogenetic analysis of 16S rRNA sequences of the isolates was carried out, and the samples obtained from the diesel and naphtha-transporting pipelines showed the occurrence of 11 bacterial species namely Serratia marcescens ACE2, Bacillus subtilis AR12, Bacillus cereus ACE4, Pseudomonas aeruginosa AI1, Klebsiella oxytoca ACP, Pseudomonas stutzeri AP2, Bacillus litoralis AN1, Bacillus sp., Bacillus pumilus AR2, Bacillus carboniphilus AR3, and Bacillus megaterium AR4. Sulfate-reducing bacteria were not detected in samples from both pipelines. The dominant bacterial species identified in the petroleum pipeline samples were B. cereus and S. marcescens in the diesel and naphtha pipelines, respectively. Therefore, several types of bacteria may be involved in biocorrosion arising from natural biofilms that develop in industrial facilities. In addition, localized (pitting) corrosion of the pipeline steel in the presence of the consortia was observed by scanning electron microscopy analysis. The potential role of each species in biofilm formation and steel corrosion is discussed. (orig.)

  7. Using phenotype microarrays in the assessment of the antibiotic susceptibility profile of bacteria isolated from wastewater in on-site treatment facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jałowiecki, Łukasz; Chojniak, Joanna; Dorgeloh, Elmar; Hegedusova, Berta; Ejhed, Helene; Magnér, Jörgen; Płaza, Grażyna

    2017-04-27

    The scope of the study was to apply Phenotype Biolog MicroArray (PM) technology to test the antibiotic sensitivity of the bacterial strains isolated from on-site wastewater treatment facilities. In the first step of the study, the percentage values of resistant bacteria from total heterotrophic bacteria growing on solid media supplemented with various antibiotics were determined. In the untreated wastewater, the average shares of kanamycin-, streptomycin-, and tetracycline-resistant bacteria were 53, 56, and 42%, respectively. Meanwhile, the shares of kanamycin-, streptomycin-, and tetracycline-resistant bacteria in the treated wastewater were 39, 33, and 29%, respectively. To evaluate the antibiotic susceptibility of the bacteria present in the wastewater, using the phenotype microarrays (PMs), the most common isolates from the treated wastewater were chosen: Serratia marcescens ss marcescens, Pseudomonas fluorescens, Stenotrophomonas maltophilia, Stenotrophomonas rhizophila, Microbacterium flavescens, Alcaligenes faecalis ss faecalis, Flavobacterium hydatis, Variovorax paradoxus, Acinetobacter johnsonii, and Aeromonas bestiarum. The strains were classified as multi-antibiotic-resistant bacteria. Most of them were resistant to more than 30 antibiotics from various chemical classes. Phenotype microarrays could be successfully used as an additional tool for evaluation of the multi-antibiotic resistance of environmental bacteria and in preliminary determination of the range of inhibition concentration.

  8. Characterization of Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis Inhibiting Bacteria from Amphibian Populations in Costa Rica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madison, Joseph D; Berg, Elizabeth A; Abarca, Juan G; Whitfield, Steven M; Gorbatenko, Oxana; Pinto, Adrian; Kerby, Jacob L

    2017-01-01

    Global amphibian declines and extinction events are occurring at an unprecedented rate. While several factors are responsible for declines and extinction, the fungal pathogen Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd) has been cited as a major constituent in these events. While the effects of this chytrid fungus have been shown to cause broad scale population declines and extinctions, certain individuals and relict populations have shown resistance. This resistance has been attributed in part to the cutaneous bacterial microbiome. Here, we present the first study characterizing anti-Bd bacterial isolates from amphibian populations in Costa Rica, including the characterization of two strains of Serratia marcescens presenting strong anti-Bd activity. Transcriptome sequencing was utilized for delineation of shifts in gene expression of the two previously uncharacterized strains of S. marcescens grown in three different treatments comprising Bd, heat-killed Bd, and a no Bd control. These results revealed up- and down-regulation of key genes associated with different metabolic and regulatory pathways. This information will be valuable in continued efforts to develop a bacterial-based approach for amphibian protection as well as providing direction for continued mechanistic inquiries of the bacterial anti-Bd response.

  9. Microbial biofilm development on neonatal enteral feeding tubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juma, Noha A; Forsythe, Stephen J

    2015-01-01

    Neonates in intensive care units often require supporting medical devices and antibiotic treatment. The intensive care treatment combined with their immature immune system, the increased permeability of mucosa, and the undeveloped microflora of the gut may render the neonates highly vulnerable to colonisation and subsequent infections when exposed to opportunistic pathogens. These infections may not only be local gastrointestinal infections, but also systematic following translocation from the gastrointestinal system. This could be particularly alarming considering that common antibiotics may not be effective if the causative strain is multi-drug resistant.This chapter reviews our information on the microbial colonization of neonatal feeding tubes. The range of organisms which have been recovered are wide, and while primarily bacterial, fungi such as Candida have also been found. The bacteria are principally Staphylococcus spp. and Enterobacteriaceae. The Enterobacteriaceae isolates are predominantly Enterobacter cancerogenus, Serratia marcescens, Enterobacter hormaechei, Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae. Many of these isolates encode for antibiotic resistance; E. hormaechei (ceftazidine and cefotaxime) and S. marcescens strains (amoxicillin and co-amoxiclav).

  10. In vitro antibacterial activity and mechanism of action of J-111,225, a novel 1beta-methylcarbapenem, against transferable IMP-1 metallo-beta-lactamase producers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagano, R; Adachi, Y; Hashizume, T; Morishima, H

    2000-03-01

    IMP-1 beta-lactamase, a class B zinc metallo-enzyme encoded by the transferable bla(IMP) gene, is known to confer high-level resistance to carbapenems as well as to penicillins and cephalosporins. J-111, 225 is a novel 1beta-methylcarbapenem with a structurally unique side chain comprising a trans-3,5-disubstituted pyrrolidinylthio moiety at the C2 position. It inhibited 17 Serratia marcescens and two Pseudomonas aeruginosa IMP-1-producing clinical isolates at a concentration of 32 mg/L (range 4-32 mg/L). It showed synergy with imipenem against IMP-1-producing S. marcescens BB5886 and P. aeruginosa GN17203 with minimal FIC indices of 0.38 and 0.5, respectively. J-111,225 was more resistant than imipenem to hydrolysis by class B metallo-beta-lactamases. In kinetic studies, J-111,225 inhibited the IMP-I enzyme with a K(i) of 0.18 microM when imipenem was used as a substrate. In contrast, J-111,225 was the substrate for hydrolysis by other class B beta-lactamases such as Bacteroides fragilis CcrA, Stenotrophomonas maltophilia L1 and Bacillus cereus type II enzyme with respective K(m) values of 11, 10 and 148 microM. The greater antibacterial activity of J-111,225 against IMP-1-producing bacteria may result from its unique interaction with the beta-lactamase.

  11. In vitro activity of colistin sulfate against Enterobacteriaceae producing extended-spectrum β-lactamases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ku, Yee-Huang; Lee, Mei-Feng; Chuang, Yin-Ching; Chen, Chi-Chung; Yu, Wen-Liang

    2015-12-01

    The widespread multidrug-resistant Enterobacteriaceae pose a serious therapeutic challenge. Colistin and tigecycline are potential antimicrobial agents for treating infections caused by extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL)-producing Enterobacteriaceae. We evaluated the in-vitro activity of colistin sulfate against 253 ESBL producers isolated from patients admitted to a medical center in southern Taiwan (Escherichia coli, n = 82; Klebsiella pneumoniae, n = 102; Enterobacter cloacae, n = 34; and Serratia marcescens, n = 35). Colistin showed promising in-vitro activity against E. coli, K. pneumoniae, and E. cloacae, but not S. marcescens. One ESBL-producing K. pneumoniae strain with resistance to carbapenems (ertapenem, imipenem, and meropenem) was selected for time-killing studies. A combination of colistin and tigecycline showed synergism, but there was an inoculum effect. In conclusion, colistin was active against most ESBL-producing Enterobacteriaceae, and a combination of colistin with tigecycline was synergistic against some highly resistant strains, even those with carbapenem resistance. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  12. Virulence of entomopathogenic bacteria in the bed bug, Cimex lectularius.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pietri, Jose E; Liang, Dangsheng

    2017-10-24

    Due in part to the development of insecticide resistance, the common bed bug, Cimex lectularius, has overcome human intervention efforts to make a global resurgence. The failure of chemical pesticides has created a need for novel strategies to combat bed bugs. While a number of insect pests are susceptible to the use of entomopathogenic microbes or microbial-derived toxins, biological control methods have not been thoroughly explored in bed bugs. Here, we tested the virulence of three entomopathogenic bacterial species in C. lectularius to determine their potential for bed bug control. We examined bed bug survival after inoculation with live or heat-killed Serratia marcescens, Pseudomonas fluorescens, and Bacillus thuringiensis israelensis at varying temperatures. We also analyzed the viability and growth of the same bacteria in infected bed bugs. All three bacterial species were pathogenic to bed bugs. However, the effects of S. marcescens and P. fluorescens were temperature-dependent while the lethality of B. thuringiensis israelensis was not. In addition, bacterial virulence was partly dependent on the route of infection but was not strongly associated with proliferation. Thus, our results suggest multiple possible mechanisms of microbial pathogenicity in the bed bug and indicate that entomopathogenic bacteria, or products derived from them, may have useful applications for bed bug control. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Current State of Resistance to Antibiotics of Last-Resort in South Africa: A Review from a Public Health Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osei Sekyere, John

    2016-01-01

    A review of the literature was undertaken to delineate the current level and mechanisms of resistance to carbapenems, colistin, and tigecycline in South Africa. Thirty-two English publications and 32 National Institute of Communicable Diseases communiqués identified between early January 2000 and 20 May, 2016 showed substantial reports of NDM ( n  = 860), OXA-48 ( n  = 584), VIM ( n  = 131), and IMP ( n  = 45) carbapenemases within this period, mainly in Klebsiella pneumoniae ( n  = 1138), Acinetobacter baumannii ( n  = 332), Enterobacter cloacae ( n  = 201), and Serratia marcescens ( n  = 108). Colistin and tigecycline resistance was prevalent among K. pneumoniae, A. baumannii, S. marcescens , and E. cloacae . The first mcr-1 colistin resistance gene to be detected in South Africa was reported in Escherichia coli from livestock as well as from hospitalized and outpatients. There are increasing reports of NDM and OXA-48 carbapenemases among Enterobacteriaceae and A. baumannii in South Africa. Mcr-1 is now present in South African patients and livestock. Resistance to carbapenems, colistin, and tigecycline restricts infection management options for clinicians.

  14. Isolation and characterisation of rhizosphere bacteria active against Meloidogyne incognita, Phytophthora nicotianae and the root knot-black shank complex in tobacco.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ying; Ma, Li; Fang, Dun Huang; Xi, Jia Qin; Zhu, Ming Liang; Mo, Ming He; Zhang, Ke Qin; Ji, Yan Ping

    2015-03-01

    The use of dually antagonistic bacteria (DAB) as alternatives to chemicals for biological control of disease complexes has received little attention. In this study targeting the Meloidogyne incognita-Phytophthora nicotianae complex, DAB from the tobacco rhizosphere were identified and screened against the diseases caused by one or both pathogens in tobacco. From 450 soil tobacco rhizosphere samples, 26 DAB were identified and had in vitro nematicidal and antifungal efficacies of 37.2-100% and 32.9-73.4% respectively. These DAB were classified into 19 species of 11 genera. In pot experiments, Streptomyces flavofungini SNA26, Pseudomonas putida SNB53 and Serratia marcescens subsp. sakuensis SNB54 effectively suppressed black shank (control effect 72.0-80.2%), root knot (70.0-81.7) and the disease complex (58.7-68.5%) caused by P. nicotianae, M. incognita and both pathogens in tobacco respectively. Nineteen DAB species were demonstrated to be antagonists against the M. incognita-P. nicotianae complex. Because S. flavofungini SNA26, P. putida SNB53 and S. marcescens subsp. sakuensis SNB54 significantly suppressed the infection of M. incognita and P. nicotianae in tobacco, these species have potential for development as biocontrol agents against the diseases and complex caused by these two pathogens. © 2014 Society of Chemical Industry.

  15. Anti-quorum sensing activity of phenolic extract from Eugenia brasiliensis (Brazilian cherry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adeline Conceição RODRIGUES

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The aim of this study was to assess the anti-quorum sensing activity of phenolic extracts from grumixama (Eugenia brasiliensis, also known as Brazilian cherry, in concentrations that did not interfere with bacterial growth. The pulp phenolic compounds were extracted by using solid phage extraction in a mini-collumn C18 and quantified by spectrophotometry. The anti-quorum sensing activity was evaluated by testing the inhibition of violacein production in Chromobacterium violaceum and by evaluating the swarming motility in Aeromonas hydrophila and Serratia marcescens, both phenotypes regulated by quorum sensing. The phenolic extract strongly inhibited the production of violacein in C. violaceum, reducing its production in comparison with a control with no extract. No inhibition of growth was observed at the concentrations tested for quorum sensing inhibition. Confirming the quorum sensing inhibition phenotype, the extract was also able to inhibit swarming motility in S. marcescens and in A. hydrophila, although in the later the effect was marginal. Overall, these results indicate that phenolic extract from E. brasiliensis presents quorum sensing inhibitory activity most likely due to the presence of fruit phenolics which have been implicated as quorum sensing inhibitors in Gram negative bacteria.

  16. [Biodiversity of mesophilic microbial community BYND-8 capability of lignocellulose degradation and its effect on biogas production].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei-Dong; Song, Ya-Bin; Wang, Yan-Jie; Gao, Ya-Mei; Jing, Rui-Yong; Cui, Zong-Jun

    2011-01-01

    The biodiversity of a mesophilic microbial community BYND-8 capable of degrading lignocellulose at 30 degrees C was detected using denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) and the isolation of pure cultures, and the effect of the liquid of rice straw degradation by BYND-8 on biogas production was measured. Six bacterial strains were isolated using peptone cellulose solution medium, and the highest similarities of their 16S rDNA gene sequences to Serratia sp. PSGB 13, S. marcescens strain UFLA-25LS, S. marcescens strain DAP33, Alcaligenes sp. YcX-20, Stenotrophomonas maltophilia strain C6, Bacillus cereus isolate BRL02-71 were 99%, 100%, 96%, 100%, 100% and 99%, respectively. In addition, one band was detected besides six bands of cultured isolates on the DGGE gel, and it showed 100% sequence similarity to uncultured bacterium clone ATB-KS-1446. The cumulative biogas and methane productions of biogas fermentation system added with the liquid of rice straw degraded by BYND-8 were 13 167 mL and 7 248 mL, 44.5% and 95.3% higher than those of the control, respectively, in the early 15 days of fermentation. The results showed that the biodiversity of microbial community BYND-8 was very high, and the time of producing biogas was put forward and biogas production was increased with application of microbial community for rice straw pretreatment during the biogas fermentation.

  17. MUTATION ON Bacillus subtilis BAC4 USING ACRIDINE ORANGE AS AN EFFORT FOR INCREASING ANTIBIOTIC PRODUCTION

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    Supartono Supartono

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The efforts to get a new antibiotic require to be done continuously, because infection diseases still become the main health problems in Indonesia. A new local strain of Bacillus subtilis BAC4 has been known producing an antibiotic that inhibites Serratia marcescens ATCC 27117 growth. Nevertheless, the optimum conditions have not been studied seriously. The objective of this research was to conduct mutation on B. subtilis BAC4 in order to obtain a mutant cell that overproduct in producing antibiotic. The mutation process was performed by using acridine orange of 1 g.L-1 randomly at various volumes. The production of antibiotic was conducted using batch fermentation and antibiotic assay was performed with agar absorption method using S.  marcescens ATCC 27117 as bacteria assay. Research result provided a B. subtilis M10 mutant with overproduction of antibiotic. Characterization of B. subtilis M10 mutant showed that the mutant cell has size of (0.5-1.0 µm x (1.85-2.5 µm; spore has the form of ellipse with thick wavy wall, positive reaction for catalase, and forming acid from glucose and xylose.   Keywords: mutant, Bacillus, acridin, and antibiotics

  18. Bacteria associated with Amblyomma cajennense tick eggs

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    Erik Machado-Ferreira

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available AbstractTicks represent a large group of pathogen vectors that blood feed on a diversity of hosts. In the Americas, the Ixodidae ticks Amblyomma cajennense are responsible for severe impact on livestock and public health. In the present work, we present the isolation and molecular identification of a group of culturable bacteria associated with A. cajennense eggs from females sampled in distinct geographical sites in southeastern Brazil. Additional comparative analysis of the culturable bacteria from Anocentor nitens, Rhipicephalus sanguineus and Ixodes scapularis tick eggs were also performed. 16S rRNA gene sequence analyses identified 17 different bacterial types identified as Serratia marcescens, Stenotrophomonas maltophilia, Pseudomonas fluorescens, Enterobacter spp., Micrococcus luteus, Ochrobactrum anthropi, Bacillus cereus and Staphylococcus spp., distributed in 12 phylogroups. Staphylococcus spp., especially S. sciuri,was the most prevalent bacteria associated with A. cajennenseeggs, occurring in 65% of the samples and also frequently observed infecting A. nitens eggs. S. maltophilia, S. marcescens and B. cereus occurred infecting eggs derived from specific sampling sites, but in all cases rising almost as pure cultures from infected A. cajennense eggs. The potential role of these bacterial associations is discussed and they possibly represent new targets for biological control strategies of ticks and tick borne diseases.

  19. Evaluation of coral pathogen growth rates after exposure to atmospheric African dust samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lisle, John T.; Garrison, Virginia H.; Gray, Michael A.

    2014-01-01

    Laboratory experiments were conducted to assess if exposure to atmospheric African dust stimulates or inhibits the growth of four putative bacterial coral pathogens. Atmospheric dust was collected from a dust-source region (Mali, West Africa) and from Saharan Air Layer masses over downwind sites in the Caribbean [Trinidad and Tobago and St. Croix, U.S. Virgin Islands (USVI)]. Extracts of dust samples were used to dose laboratory-grown cultures of four putative coral pathogens: Aurantimonas coralicida (white plague type II), Serratia marcescens (white pox), Vibrio coralliilyticus, and V. shiloi (bacteria-induced bleaching). Growth of A. coralicida and V. shiloi was slightly stimulated by dust extracts from Mali and USVI, respectively, but unaffected by extracts from the other dust sources. Lag time to the start of log-growth phase was significantly shortened for A. coralicida when dosed with dust extracts from Mali and USVI. Growth of S. marcescens and V. coralliilyticus was neither stimulated nor inhibited by any of the dust extracts. This study demonstrates that constituents from atmospheric dust can alter growth of recognized coral disease pathogens under laboratory conditions.

  20. Widespread Fosfomycin Resistance in Gram-Negative Bacteria Attributable to the Chromosomal fosA Gene

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    Ryota Ito

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Fosfomycin is a decades-old antibiotic which is being revisited because of its perceived activity against many extensively drug-resistant Gram-negative pathogens. FosA proteins are Mn2+ and K+-dependent glutathione S-transferases which confer fosfomycin resistance in Gram-negative bacteria by conjugation of glutathione to the antibiotic. Plasmid-borne fosA variants have been reported in fosfomycin-resistant Escherichia coli strains. However, the prevalence and distribution of fosA in other Gram-negative bacteria are not known. We systematically surveyed the presence of fosA in Gram-negative bacteria in over 18,000 published genomes from 18 Gram-negative species and investigated their contribution to fosfomycin resistance. We show that FosA homologues are present in the majority of genomes in some species (e.g., Klebsiella spp., Enterobacter spp., Serratia marcescens, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, whereas they are largely absent in others (e.g., E. coli, Acinetobacter baumannii, and Burkholderia cepacia. FosA proteins in different bacterial pathogens are highly divergent, but key amino acid residues in the active site are conserved. Chromosomal fosA genes conferred high-level fosfomycin resistance when expressed in E. coli, and deletion of chromosomal fosA in S. marcescens eliminated fosfomycin resistance. Our results indicate that FosA is encoded by clinically relevant Gram-negative species and contributes to intrinsic fosfomycin resistance.

  1. CURRENT STATE OF RESISTANCE TO ANTIBIOTICS OF LAST-RESORT IN SOUTH AFRICA: A REVIEW FROM A PUBLIC HEALTH PERSPECTIVE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JOHN OSEI SEKYERE

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available A review of the literature was undertaken to delineate the current level and mechanisms of resistance to carbapenems, colistin and tigecycline in South Africa. Thirty-two English publications and 32 National Institute of Communicable Diseases (NICD communiqués identified between early January 2000 and 20th May, 2016 showed substantial reports of NDM (n=860, OXA-48 (n=584, VIM (n=131 and IMP (n=45 carbapenemases within this period, mainly in Klebsiella pneumoniae (n=1138, Acinetobacter baumannii (n=332, Enterobacter cloacae (n=201 and Serratia marcescens (n=108. Colistin and tigecycline resistance was prevalent among K. pneumoniae, A. baumannii, S. marcescens and E. cloacae. The first mcr-1 colistin resistance gene to be detected in South Africa was reported in E. coli from livestock as well as from hospitalized and out patients. There are increasing reports of NDM and OXA-48 carbapenemases among Enterobacteriaceae and A. baumannii in South Africa. Mcr-1 is now present in South African patients and livestock. Resistance to carbapenems, colistin and tigecycline restricts infection management options for clinicians.

  2. Microbial deproteinization of shrimp shell penaeus merguiensis for chitin extraction

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    Fatemeh Sedaghat

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: After cellulose, Chitin is the most abundant biopolymer in nature. The most important derivative of chitin is chitosan, obtained by deacetylation of chitin. Major sources of chitin are the exoskeleton of marine crustaceans such as crab, shrimp, and krill. Chitin extraction from shrimp shells can be carried out chemically or using biological methods. Microbial fermentation as an eco-friendly procedure is a suitable alternative for the chemical and enzymatic processes. In this study, the effect of three protease-producing bacteria species (Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Serratia marcescens, and Bacillus pumilus on the efficiency of microbial demineralization (DM and deproteinization (DP of the shrimp shell penaeus merguiensis, was investigated. Furthermore, the antioxidant activity of hydrolysate obtained during the fermentation process was measured. Materials and methods: Demineralization and deproteinization was carried out by incubating shrimp waste inoculated with bacteria at 30°C and 100 rpm for 6 days. Results: Statistical analysis of data showed a significant difference between the percentage of demineralization and deproteinization in different bacteria species (p<0.05. The highest deproteinization (74.76% and demineralization rate (78.46% were obtained with P. aeruginosa, while the lowest was observed for S. marcescens. Antioxidant activity of hydrolysate also showed a significant difference. The highest reducing power and total antioxidant capacity were observed in volumes of 400 µl hydrolysate of S.marcescens and 100 µl hydrolysate of B. pumilus, respectively. Discussion and conclusion: The results indicated that P. aeruginosa in comparison with other bacterial strains, had a higher ability to remove proteins and minerals from shrimp shell waste. Therefore, the use of this bacterium is suitable for protein and minerals removal from marine crustaceans.

  3. The Risk of Cardiac Device-Related Infection in Bacteremic Patients Is Species Specific: Results of a 12-Year Prospective Cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maskarinec, Stacey A; Thaden, Joshua T; Cyr, Derek D; Ruffin, Felicia; Souli, Maria; Fowler, Vance G

    2017-01-01

    The species-specific risk of cardiac device-related infection (CDRI) among bacteremic patients is incompletely understood. We conducted a prospective cohort study of hospitalized patients from October 2002 to December 2014 with a cardiac device (CD) and either Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia (SAB) or Gram-negative bacteremia (GNB). Cardiac devices were defined as either prosthetic heart valves (PHVs), including valvular support rings, permanent pacemakers (PPMs)/automatic implantable cardioverter defibrillators (AICDs), or left ventricular assist devices (LVADs). During the study period, a total of 284 patients with ≥1 CD developed either SAB (n = 152 patients) or GNB (n = 132 patients). Among the 284 patients, 150 (52.8%) had PPMs/AICDs, 72 (25.4%) had PHVs, 4 (1.4%) had LVADs, and 58 (20.4%) had >1 device present. Overall, 54.6% of patients with SAB and 16.7% of patients with GNB met criteria for definite CDRI (P < .0001). Multivariable logistic regression analysis revealed that 3 bacterial species were associated with an increased risk for CDRI: Staphylococcus aureus (odds ratio [OR] = 5.57; 95% confidence interval [CI], 2.16-14.36), Pseudomonas aeruginosa (OR = 50.28; 95% CI, 4.16-606.93), and Serratia marcescens (OR = 7.75; 95% CI, 1.48-40.48). Risk of CDRI among patients with bacteremia varies by species. Cardiac device-related infection risk is highest in patients with bacteremia due to S aureus, P aeruginosa, or S marcescens. By contrast, it is lower in patients with bacteremia due to other species of Gram-negative bacilli. Patients with a CD who develop bacteremia due to either P aeruginosa or S marcescens should be considered for diagnostic imaging to evaluate for the presence of CDRI.

  4. Active surveillance scheme in three Romanian hospitals reveals a high prevalence and variety of carbapenamase-producing Gram-negative bacteria: a pilot study, December 2014 to May 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timofte, Dorina; Panzaru, Carmen Valentina; Maciuca, Iuliana Elena; Dan, Maria; Mare, Anca Delia; Man, Adrian; Toma, Felicia

    2016-06-23

    We report the findings of an active surveillance scheme for detection of asymptomatic carriers with carbapenemase-producing Gram-negative bacteria (CP-GNB) in Romanian hospitals. During a pilot study from December 2014 to May 2015, faecal cultures were screened in three hospitals (two large, one medium-size) for patients newly admitted to selected wards or inpatients transferred from other wards to an intensive-care unit. The study revealed a high prevalence of CP-GNB detected in 22/27 and 28/38 of the carbapenem non-susceptible isolates from Hospitals 1 and 3, respectively. CP-GNB identified through faecal screening included NDM-1-producing Serratia marcescens and Klebsiella pneumoniae, OXA-48-producing K. pneumoniae and OXA-23-producing Acinetobacter baumannii. The distribution of the CP-GNB varied between the hospitals, with NDM-1-producing S. marcescens and K. pneumoniae being prevalent in the north-central part of the country and OXA-23/24-producing A. baumannii, OXA-48-producing K.pneumoniae, Morganella morganii and VIM-2-producing Escherichia coli/Pseudomonas aeruginosa detected in the north-east of the country. Conjugation studies showed that carbapenem resistance was transferable and PCR-based replicon typing identified blaNDM-1 on IncFIIs in S. marcescens and K. pneumoniae from Hospital 1 and blaOXA-48 on IncL plasmids in all Klebsiella spp. isolates from Hospitals 1 and 3. Our findings underline the importance of active surveillance for detection of CP-GNB asymptomatic faecal carriers and suggest a likely endemic spread of CP-GNB in Romania. This article is copyright of The Authors, 2016.

  5. Antimicrobial activity of Serratia sp isolated from the coralline red algae Amphiroa anceps

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Karthick, P.; Mohanraju, R.; Murthy, K.N.; Ramesh, Ch.; Mohandass, C.; Rajasabapathy, R.; Vellai, K.S.

    of a single red pigmented strain AA1 was found to show activity against (12) bacterial pathogens and (1) fungi Higher range of antibacterial activity was observed against Staphylococcus aureus and antifungal activity against Rhizopus sp, while moderate...

  6. Study on the Total Coliforms Count and Coli Titter in the Waters of Kardzhali Reservoir, Bulgaria

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    Oliver Y. Todorov

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to examine TC (total coliforms and coli titter from two sampling stations in the aquatory of Kardzhali Dam Lake and one station in River Arda, in August, 2011. The values of the TC index in the reservoir vary from 1900±674 cfu/100ml in station I, to 1293±194 cfu/100ml in station II, while the TC value of River Arda reaches 1698±134 cfu/100ml. In Reservoir Kardzhali, the smallest volume of water in which Escherichia coli cells were found, varies between 5 and 15 ml, while for the River Arda the value of coli titter is equal to 1. With highest percentage, regarding the presence of microbiological species in the reservoir waters, is the genus Klebsiella (70%, followed by Citrobacter (15%, Enterobacter (10% and Serratia (5%, respectively represented by the species Klebsiella oxytoca, Citrobacter freundii, Enterobacter cloacae and Serattia marcescens. In the river Arda two genuses were found - Serratia (50% and Salmonella (50%.

  7. Prevention of clinical coliform mastitis in dairy cows by a mutant Escherichia coli vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, R N; Cullor, J S; Jasper, D E; Farver, T B; Bushnell, R B; Oliver, M N

    1989-01-01

    A prospective cohort study was undertaken in two commercial California dairies. The treatment group, 246 cows, received three doses of a whole cell bacterin of J5 Escherichia coli (mutant of E. coli O111:B4) plus Freund's incomplete adjuvant vaccine (two in the dry period and one after calving) while 240 unvaccinated cows served as controls. Thirty-five cases of clinical coliform mastitis were diagnosed, six in vaccinated cows and 29 in unvaccinated cows. Bacteria isolated from the clinical cases included 15 E. coli five Klebsiella pneumoniae, three K. oxytoca, three K. ozaenae, five Enterobacter aerogenes, three Serratia marcescens and one Serratia spp. Four control cows were culled, three of them because of chronic coliform mastitis and one because of postcoliform infection agalactia. Incidence rate of clinical gram-negative mastitis was 2.57% in vaccinated cows and 12.77% in unvaccinated cows. The estimated risk ratio, the measure of risk of having clinical gram-negative mastitis for vaccinated cows to unvaccinated cows, was 0.20 (p less than 0.005), indicating a strong relationship between vaccination and lack of clinical gram-negative mastitis. The results of this trial indicate that the administration of the E. coli J5 vaccine is protective against natural challenge to gram-negative bacteria, and reduces the incidence of clinical gram-negative mastitis in dairy cows during the first three months of lactation. PMID:2670166

  8. The emulsifying effect of biosurfactants produced by food spoilage organisms in Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christianah O. Ogunmola

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Food spoilage organisms were isolated using standard procedures on Nutrient Agar, Cetrimide Agar and Pseudomonas Agar Base (supplemented with CFC. The samples were categorized as animal products (raw fish, egg, raw chicken, corned beef, pasteurized milk and plant products (vegetable salad, water leaf (Talinium triangulare, boiled rice, tomatoes and pumpkin leaf (Teifairia occidentalis.They were characterised as Pseudomonas putida, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Pseudomonas stutzeri, Burkholderia pseudomallei, Serratia rubidaea, Corynebacterium pilosum, Bacillus subtilis, Bacillus mycoides, Bacillus laterosporus, Bacillus laterosporus, Serratia marcescens, Bacillus cereus, Bacillus macerans, Alcaligenes faecalis and Alcaligenes eutrophus. Preliminary screening for biosurfactant production was done using red blood haemolysis test and confirmed by slide test, drop collapse and oil spreading assay. The biosurfactant produced was purified using acetone and the composition determined initially using Molisch’s test, thin layer chromatography and gas chromatography mass spectrometry. The components were found to be ethanol, amino acids, butoxyacetic acid, hexadecanoic acid, oleic acid, lauryl peroxide, octadecanoic acid and phthalic acid. The producing organisms grew readily on several hydrocarbons such as crude oil, diesel oil and aviation fuel when used as sole carbon sources.  The purified biosurfactants produced were able to cause emulsification of kerosene (19.71-27.14% as well as vegetable oil (16.91-28.12% based on the emulsification index. This result suggests that the isolates can be an asset and further work can exploit their optimal potential in industries.

  9. Identification of Apis mellifera gut microbiota with MALDI TOF MS Biotyper

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    Jaroslav Gasper

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The honey bee, Apis mellifera, is critically important for the pollination of many economically important crops. Continued colony losses have called for a deeper understanding of both symbiotic and pathogenic microbial interactions, particularly as they relate to food storage and the pollination environment. Therefore, the aim of this study was to explore and characterize the bacteria colonizing the alimentary tract of the native honey bees using MALDI TOF MS Biotyper. Content of the intestinal tract was cultured for isolation of Gram-negative, Gram-positive microorganisms and yeasts. Then, the identification of isolates with MALDI-TOF MS Biotyper was done. Results showed that the most abundant genera in bees’ samples were Lactobacillus, Pseudomonas and Serratia. Altogether, 12 genera with 21 bacterial species and one yeast genus with two species were isolated. Bacteria were represented with Acidovorax facilis, Lactobacillus gasseri, L. amylovorus, L. kunkeei, L. fructivorans, Pseudomonas oryzihabitans, Ps. brenneri, Ps. indica, Micrococcus luteus, Serratia fonticola, Ser. marcescens, Ser. ureilytica, Hafnia alvei, Candida magnolia, Bacillus oleronius, B. horneckiae, Issatchenkia orientalis, Pantoea agglomerans, Enterobacter cloacae, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Staph. pasteuri, Shewanella profunda.  The results of the study shows that the microflora of the bees gut is heterogenic and depend of locality and resources of environment for bees.

  10. Characterization of Potential Plant Growth Promoting Rhizobacteria Isolated from Maize (Zea mays L. in Central and Northern Benin (West Africa

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    Nadège A. Agbodjato

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Our study aims to characterize Plant Growth Promoting Rhizobacteria (PGPR isolated from maize roots in five agroecological zones of central and northern Benin. Sixty samples were collected at the rate of four samples per village and three villages per agroecological zone. Rhizobacteria strains were isolated from these samples and biochemically characterized. These strains were analyzed for some of their PGPR traits like ammonia production and hydrogen cyanide following conventional methods. Microbiological investigation of these samples has shown that maize rhizospheres in central and northern Benin contain a high diversity of microorganisms. A total of nine species of maize Plant Growth Promoting Rhizobacteria were identified. Those PGPR include five Bacillus species (B. polymyxa, B. pantothenticus, B. anthracis, B. thuringiensis, and B. circulans, three Pseudomonas species (P. cichorii, P. putida, and P. syringae, and Serratia marcescens. The microbial diversity does not depend on the soil types. The microbial density, generally high, varies according to both soil types and agroecological zones. All Serratia strains (100% have produced ammonia, whereas 80% of Bacillus and 77.77% of Pseudomonas produced this metabolite. The hydrogen cyanide was produced by all isolates (100% independent of their genus. These results suggest the possibility to use these rhizobacteria as biological fertilizers to increase maize production.

  11. Identification and antimicrobial resistance of microflora colonizing feral pig (Sus scrofa of Brazilian Pantanal

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    SS Lessa

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Antimicrobial resistance of bacteria is a worldwide problem affecting wild life by living with resistant bacteria in the environment. This study presents a discussion of outside factors environment on microflora of feral pigs (Sus scrofa from Brazilian Pantanal. Animals had samples collected from six different body sites coming from two separated geographic areas, Nhecolandia and Rio Negro regions. With routine biochemical tests and commercial kits 516 bacteria were identified, with 240 Gram-positive, predominantly staphylococci (36 and enterococci (186 strains. Among Gram-negative (GN bacteria the predominant specimens of Enterobacteriaceae (247 mainly represented by Serratia spp. (105, Escherichia coli (50, and Enterobacter spp. (40 and specimens not identified (7. Antimicrobial susceptibility was tested against 17 drugs by agar diffusion method. Staphylococci were negative to production of enterotoxins and TSST-1, with all strains sensitive towards four drugs and highest resistance toward ampicillin (17%. Enterococci presented the highest sensitivity against vancomycin (98%, ampicillin (94% and tetracycline (90%, and highest resistance pattern toward oxacillin (99%, clindamycin (83%, and cotrimoxazole (54%. In GN the highest resistance was observed with Serratia marcescens against CFL (98%, AMC (66% and AMP (60% and all drugs was most effective against E. coli SUT, TET (100%, AMP, TOB (98%, GEN, CLO (95%, CFO, CIP (93%. The results show a new profile of oxacillin-resistant enterococci from Brazilian feral pigs and suggest a limited residue and spreading of antimicrobials in the environment, possibly because of low anthropogenic impact reflected by the drug susceptibility profile of bacteria isolated.

  12. Identification and antimicrobial resistance of microflora colonizing feral pig (Sus scrofa) of Brazilian Pantanal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lessa, SS; Paes, RCS; Santoro, PN; Mauro, RA; Vieira-da-Motta, O

    2011-01-01

    Antimicrobial resistance of bacteria is a worldwide problem affecting wild life by living with resistant bacteria in the environment. This study presents a discussion of outside factors environment on microflora of feral pigs (Sus scrofa) from Brazilian Pantanal. Animals had samples collected from six different body sites coming from two separated geographic areas, Nhecolandia and Rio Negro regions. With routine biochemical tests and commercial kits 516 bacteria were identified, with 240 Gram-positive, predominantly staphylococci (36) and enterococci (186) strains. Among Gram-negative (GN) bacteria the predominant specimens of Enterobacteriaceae (247) mainly represented by Serratia spp. (105), Escherichia coli (50), and Enterobacter spp. (40) and specimens not identified (7). Antimicrobial susceptibility was tested against 17 drugs by agar diffusion method. Staphylococci were negative to production of enterotoxins and TSST-1, with all strains sensitive towards four drugs and highest resistance toward ampicillin (17%). Enterococci presented the highest sensitivity against vancomycin (98%), ampicillin (94%) and tetracycline (90%), and highest resistance pattern toward oxacillin (99%), clindamycin (83%), and cotrimoxazole (54%). In GN the highest resistance was observed with Serratia marcescens against CFL (98%), AMC (66%) and AMP (60%) and all drugs was most effective against E. coli SUT, TET (100%), AMP, TOB (98%), GEN, CLO (95%), CFO, CIP (93%). The results show a new profile of oxacillin-resistant enterococci from Brazilian feral pigs and suggest a limited residue and spreading of antimicrobials in the environment, possibly because of low anthropogenic impact reflected by the drug susceptibility profile of bacteria isolated. PMID:24031689

  13. Effectiveness of disinfection with alcohol 70% (w/v of contaminated surfaces not previously cleaned Eficacia de la desinfección con alcohol al 70% (p/v de superficies contaminadas sin limpieza previa Eficácia da desinfecção com álcool 70% (p/v de superfícies contaminadas sem limpeza prévia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maurício Uchikawa Graziano

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the disinfectant effectiveness of alcohol 70% (w/v using friction, without previous cleaning, on work surfaces, as a concurrent disinfecting procedure in Health Services. METHOD: An experimental, randomized and single-blinded laboratory study was undertaken. The samples were enamelled surfaces, intentionally contaminated with Serratia marcescens microorganisms ATCC 14756 106 CFU/mL with 10% of human saliva added, and were submitted to the procedure of disinfection WITHOUT previous cleaning. The results were compared to disinfection preceded by cleaning. RESULTS: There was a reduction of six logarithms of the initial microbial population, equal in the groups WITH and WITHOUT previous cleaning (p=0.440 and a residual microbial load ≤ 102 CFU. CONCLUSION: The research demonstrated the acceptability of the practice evaluated, bringing an important response to the area of health, in particular to Nursing, which most undertakes procedures of concurrent cleaning /disinfecting of these work surfaces. OBJETIVO: Evaluar la eficacia desinfectante de alcohol al 70% (p/v por fricción, sin limpieza previa, en las superficies de trabajo, como procedimiento de desinfección cotidiana o de rutina en Servicios de Salud. MÉTODO: Fue desarrollado un estudio experimental de laboratorio, aleatorio y uni-ciego. Las muestras fueron obtenidas de superficies esmaltadas, intencionalmente contaminadas con microorganismos Serratia marcescens ATCC 14756 106 UFC/mL acrecido con 10% de saliva humana, sometidas al procedimiento de desinfección SIN limpieza previa. Los resultados fueron comparados a la desinfección después de limpieza. RESULTADOS: Hubo una reducción de seis logaritmos de la población microbiana inicial, igualmente en los grupos COM y SIN limpieza previa (p=0,440 y una carga microbiana residual ≤ 102 UFC. CONCLUSIÓN: La investigación demostró que es aceptable la práctica evaluada ofreciendo así una importante respuesta para

  14. Sterility Maintenance Assessment of Moist/Wet Material After Steam Sterilization and 30-day Storage Evaluación de la manutención de la esterilidad de materiales húmedos/mojados después de esterilizados con vapor y almacenados por 30 días Avaliação da manutenção da esterilidade de materiais úmidos/molhados após a esterilização por vapor e armazenamento por 30 dias

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    Giovana Abrahão de Araújo Moriya

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Moist/wet materials stored after autoclaving are considered contaminated and not recommended for use. This study evaluates the maintenance of sterility in moist/wet material after being submitted to steam sterilization and stored for a period of 30 days. Aiming to support decision-making in emergency situations, 40 surgical boxes packed in nonwoven cloth covering Spunbound, Metblouwn, Spunbound (SMS: half (the experimental group were placed in an autoclave but the drying phase was interrupted, yielding moist/wet materials and the other half (the negative control group underwent the complete cycle. The external parts of each surgical box were deliberately contaminated with Serratia marcescens and subsequently stored for 30 days. After this period, the boxes' contents were submitted to sterility tests and no growth was observed. The presence of moisture inside the surgical boxes did not interfere with maintaining their sterility.Se consideran como contaminados los objetos mojados/húmedos almacenados después de ser esterilizados en autoclave, no siendo recomendados para uso. El objetivo del estudio fue evaluar la manutención de la esterilidad de los materiales mojados/húmedos después de sometidos al proceso de esterilización por vapor y almacenados por un intervalo de 30 días. Con la finalidad de auxiliar en la toma de decisiones en situaciones de emergencia, fueron preparadas 40 cajas quirúrgicas embaladas en SMS, siendo la mitad (experimental sometidas a un proceso de esterilización en autoclave, con fase de secado interrumpida, liberando material mojado/húmedo y otras 20 (control con el ciclo completo. Las partes externas de cada caja fueron intencionalmente contaminadas con Serratia marcescens y posteriormente almacenadas por 30 días. Después ese período, los contenidos de las cajas fueron sometidos a pruebas de esterilidad, acusando ausencia total de crecimiento. La presencia de humedad dentro de las cajas no interfirió en la

  15. Avaliação da contaminação bacteriana em desinfetantes de uso domiciliar Evaluation of bacterial contamination in disinfectants for domestic use

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    Fumie Miyagi

    2000-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Avaliar desinfetantes de uso domiciliar, identificando a presença de bactérias contaminantes, e conhecer o nível de tolerância dessas bactérias ao cloreto de benzalcônio. MÉTODOS: Foram adquiridas aleatoriamente no comércio da região metropolitana de São Paulo, SP, Brasil, 52 amostras de desinfetantes de uso domiciliar para análise quanto à presença de bactérias contaminantes. O nível de tolerância dessas bactérias ao cloreto de benzalcônio foi determinado pelo método da macrodiluição em caldo. RESULTADOS: De 52 amostras, 16 (30,77% estavam contaminadas por bactérias Gram negativas, com contagens variando entre 10(4 e 10(6 UFC/ml. Esses contaminantes foram identificados como Alcaligenes xylosoxidans, Burkholderia cepacia e Serratia marcescens. As Concentrações Inibitórias Mínimas (CIM: mg/ml do cloreto de benzalcônio para S. marcescens, A. xylosoxidans e B. cepacia foram: 2,48, 1,23 e 0,30, respectivamente. CONCLUSÕES Os desinfetantes de uso domiciliar à base de compostos de amônio quaternário são passíveis de contaminação por bactérias. As CIM do cloreto de benzalcônio para as bactérias contaminantes estavam abaixo das concentrações do princípio ativo presente nos desinfetantes, indicando que a tolerância ao biocida não é estável, podendo ser perdida com o cultivo das bactérias em meios de cultura sem o biocida.OBJECTIVE: To evaluate disinfectants for domestic use for the presence of bacteria, identify them, and determine their tolerance level to benzalkonium chloride. METHODS: Fifty-two samples of commercially available disinfectants for domestic use were acquired at random in the metropolitan area of São Paulo, Brazil, and analyzed to detect the presence of bacterial contaminants. The isolated organisms were identified and their tolerance level to benzalkonium chloride was determined by broth macrodilution method. RESULTS: Sixteen (30.77% of fifty-two disinfectants sampled were

  16. Microbiological evaluation of different antiseptic povidone-iodine and chlorhexidine formulations after intentional contamination of containers Evaluación microbiológica de las diferentes formulaciones antisépticas, polivinil-pirrolidona-yodo y clorexidina, después de la contaminación intencional de los recipientes Avaliação microbiológica das diferentes formulações anti-sépticas, polivinilpirrolidona-iodo e clorexidina, após contaminação intencional das almotolias

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christiane Moreira Padovani

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to evaluate the survival rate of microorganisms within different antiseptic formulations - povidone-iodine (PVP-I and chlorhexidine (CHX - after intentional contamination, and to establish the minimum care necessary to ensure sterilization of non-disposable antiseptic solution containers. A laboratory study was performed with 180 antiseptic containers, which were contaminated with Serratia marcescens [1 x 105 UFC/mL]. The containers were closed and stored, at room temperature, during seven days and shaken daily. The antiseptic cultures were evaluated to be 100% negative to Serratia marcescens in all of the non-disposable containers. These results suggested that antiseptic solutions inactivate microorganisms [1 x 105 UFC/mL]. Since cleaned antiseptic containers have around 102 UFC coming from tap water, it can be inferred that cleansing is a safe minimum procedure to ensure reuse of containers for distribution of CHX and PVP-I solutions in aqueous, detergent and alcoholic formulations.Los objetivos de este estudio fueron evaluar la sobre vivencia de los micro organismos en las diferentes formulaciones de los antisépticos clorexidina (CHX y polivinil-pirrolidona-yodo (PVP-Y, después de una contaminación intencional de los recipientes y extrapolar los resultados de los laboratorios para el cuidado mínimo a ser dispensado a los recipientes de múltiple uso para el envase de los antisépticos probados. Para esto, fue desarrollado un estudio de laboratorio, en que 180 recipientes fueron contaminados con 1 x 105 UFC/mL de suspensión conteniendo S.marcescens. Después de la contaminación, seis diferentes formulaciones de antisépticos (clorexidina y PVP-Y en los vehículos alcohólico, detergente y acuoso fueron distribuidos y sometidos a la cultura diaria durante siete días, a fin de verificar se hubo crecimiento del microorganismo. Los resultados de esta investigación permiten recomendar la limpieza como el procedimiento m

  17. Antiquorum sensing and antibiofilm potential of Capparis spinosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Issac Abraham, Sybiya Vasantha Packiavathy; Palani, Agilandeswari; Ramaswamy, Babu Rajendran; Shunmugiah, Karutha Pandian; Arumugam, Veera Ravi

    2011-11-01

    Emergence of antibiotic resistance among bacterial pathogens often leads to the failure of existing antibiotics to treat bacterial infections; thus, there is a need to seek alternative treatment measures. The aim of this study was to evaluate the anti-quorum sensing (anti-QS) and antibiofilm potential of Capparis spinosa to prevent the onset of bacterial infections as an alternate to antibiotics. The methanolic extract of the dried fruits of C. spinosa was assessed for its activity in inhibiting QS-depedent phenomenon such as violacein pigment production in Chromobacterium violaceum, biosurfactant production in Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1, swimming and swarming motility, exopolysaccharide production (EPS) and biofilm formation in Escherichia coli, Proteus mirabilis, Serratia marcescens and PAO1. Extract of C. spinosa showed a higher degree of anti-QS activity in a dose dependent manner without affecting the bacterial growth. At 2 mg/mL, this extract significantly (p ≤0.005) inhibited the biofilm formation to 79, 75, 73, 70% and EPS production to 58, 46, 66 and 67% in S. marcescens, PAO1, E. coli and P. mirabilis, respectively. It also exhibited inhibition in swimming and swarming motility of bacterial pathogens. The non-enzymatic nature of the anti-QS compound in C. spinosa was confirmed by proteinase K and heat treatment. Because the methanolic extract of C. spinosa demonstrated anti-QS and antibiofilm activity at 0.5-2 mg/mL, it could be further exploited for novel molecules to treat the emerging infections of antibiotic resistant bacterial pathogens. Copyright © 2011 IMSS. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. System wide analysis of the evolution of innate immunity in the nematode model species Caenorhabditis elegans and Pristionchus pacificus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, Amit; Rae, Robbie; Iatsenko, Igor; Sommer, Ralf J

    2012-01-01

    The evolution of genetic mechanisms used to combat bacterial infections is critical for the survival of animals and plants, yet how these genes evolved to produce a robust defense system is poorly understood. Studies of the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans have uncovered a plethora of genetic regulators and effectors responsible for surviving pathogens. However, comparative studies utilizing other free-living nematodes and therefore providing an insight into the evolution of innate immunity have been lacking. Here, we take a systems biology approach and use whole genome microarrays to profile the transcriptional response of C. elegans and the necromenic nematode Pristionchus pacificus after exposure to the four different pathogens Serratia marcescens, Xenorhabdus nematophila, Staphylococcus aureus and Bacillus thuringiensis DB27. C. elegans is susceptible to all four pathogens whilst P. pacificus is only susceptible to S. marcescens and X. nematophila. We show an unexpected level of specificity in host responses to distinct pathogens within and across species, revealing an enormous complexity of effectors of innate immunity. Functional domains enriched in the transcriptomes on different pathogens are similar within a nematode species but different across them, suggesting differences in pathogen sensing and response networks. We find translation inhibition to be a potentially conserved response to gram-negative pathogens in both the nematodes. Further computational analysis indicates that both nematodes when fed on pathogens up-regulate genes known to be involved in other stress responses like heat shock, oxidative and osmotic stress, and genes regulated by DAF-16/FOXO and TGF-beta pathways. This study presents a platform for comparative systems analysis of two nematode model species, and a catalog of genes involved in the evolution of nematode immunity and identifies both pathogen specific and pan-pathogen responses. We discuss the potential effects of ecology on

  19. System wide analysis of the evolution of innate immunity in the nematode model species Caenorhabditis elegans and Pristionchus pacificus.

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    Amit Sinha

    Full Text Available The evolution of genetic mechanisms used to combat bacterial infections is critical for the survival of animals and plants, yet how these genes evolved to produce a robust defense system is poorly understood. Studies of the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans have uncovered a plethora of genetic regulators and effectors responsible for surviving pathogens. However, comparative studies utilizing other free-living nematodes and therefore providing an insight into the evolution of innate immunity have been lacking. Here, we take a systems biology approach and use whole genome microarrays to profile the transcriptional response of C. elegans and the necromenic nematode Pristionchus pacificus after exposure to the four different pathogens Serratia marcescens, Xenorhabdus nematophila, Staphylococcus aureus and Bacillus thuringiensis DB27. C. elegans is susceptible to all four pathogens whilst P. pacificus is only susceptible to S. marcescens and X. nematophila. We show an unexpected level of specificity in host responses to distinct pathogens within and across species, revealing an enormous complexity of effectors of innate immunity. Functional domains enriched in the transcriptomes on different pathogens are similar within a nematode species but different across them, suggesting differences in pathogen sensing and response networks. We find translation inhibition to be a potentially conserved response to gram-negative pathogens in both the nematodes. Further computational analysis indicates that both nematodes when fed on pathogens up-regulate genes known to be involved in other stress responses like heat shock, oxidative and osmotic stress, and genes regulated by DAF-16/FOXO and TGF-beta pathways. This study presents a platform for comparative systems analysis of two nematode model species, and a catalog of genes involved in the evolution of nematode immunity and identifies both pathogen specific and pan-pathogen responses. We discuss the potential

  20. Effects of Simulated Microgravity on a Host-Pathogen System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, Rachel; Lo, Rachel; Bhattacharya, Sharmila

    2017-01-01

    While it has been shown that decades of astronauts and cosmonauts can suffer from illnesses both during and after spaceflight, the underlying causes are still poorly understood, due in part to the fact that there are so many variables to consider when investigating the human immune system in a complex environment. Invertebrates have become popular models for studying human disease because they are cheap, highly amenable to experimental manipulation, and have innate immune systems with a high genetic similarity to humans. Fruit flies (Drosophila melanogaster) have been shown to experience a dramatic shift in immune gene expression following spaceflight, but are still able to fight off infections when exposed to bacteria. However, the common bacterial pathogen Serratia marcescens was shown to become more lethal to fruit flies after being cultured in space, suggesting that not only do we need to consider host changes in susceptibility, but also changes in the pathogen itself after spaceflight conditions. Being able to simulate spaceflight conditions in a controlled environment on the ground gives us the ability to not only evaluate the effects of microgravity on the host immune system, but also how the microorganisms that cause immune disorders are being affected by these drastic environmental shifts. In this study, I use a ground-based simulated microgravity environment to examine the genetic changes associated with increased S. marcescens virulence in order to understand how microgravity is affecting this pathogen, as well as how these genetic changes influence and interact with the host immune system. This study will provide us with more directed approaches to studying the effects of spaceflight on human beings, with the ultimate goal of being able to counteract immune dysfunction in future space exploration.