WorldWideScience

Sample records for serial digit learning

  1. Learning of serial digits leads to frontal activation in functional MR imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karakaş, Hakki Muammer; Karakaş, Sirel

    2006-03-01

    Clinical studies have shown that performance on the serial digit learning test (SDLT) is dependent upon the mesial temporal lobes, which are responsible for learning and its consolidation. However, an effective SDLT performance is also dependent upon sequencing, temporal ordering, and the utilization of mnemonic strategies. All of these processes are among the functions of the frontal lobes; in spite of this, the relationship between SDLT performance and the frontal lobes has not been demonstrated with previously used mapping techniques. The aim of this study was to investigate the areas of the brain that are activated by SDLT performance. Ten healthy, right handed volunteers (mean age, 20.1 years; SD: 3.3) who had 12 years of education were studied with a 1.0 T MR imaging scanner. BOLD (blood oxygen level dependent) contrast and a modified SDLT were used. Activated loci were automatically mapped using a proportional grid. In learning, the most consistent activation was observed in B-a-7 of the right (80%) and the left hemispheres (50%). In recall, the most consistent activation was observed in B-a-7 of the right hemisphere (60%). Activations were observed in 2.5+/-0.97 Talairach volumes in learning, whereas they encompassed 1.7+/-0.95 volumes in recall. The difference between both phases (learning and recall) regarding total activated volume was significant (p SDLT performance was not related to learning or to recall, but to a function that is common to both of these cognitive processes. A candidate for this common factor may be the executive functions, which also include serial position processing and temporal ordering.

  2. Serial position learning in honeybees.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Randolf Menzel

    Full Text Available Learning of stimulus sequences is considered as a characteristic feature of episodic memory since it contains not only a particular item but also the experience of preceding and following events. In sensorimotor tasks resembling navigational performance, the serial order of objects is intimately connected with spatial order. Mammals and birds develop episodic(-like memory in serial spatio-temporal tasks, and the honeybee learns spatio-temporal order when navigating between the nest and a food source. Here I examine the structure of the bees' memory for a combined spatio-temporal task. I ask whether discrimination and generalization are based solely on simple forms of stimulus-reward learning or whether they require sequential configurations. Animals were trained to fly either left or right in a continuous T-maze. The correct choice was signaled by the sequence of colors (blue, yellow at four positions in the access arm. If only one of the possible 4 signals is shown (either blue or yellow, the rank order of position salience is 1, 2 and 3 (numbered from T-junction. No learning is found if the signal appears at position 4. If two signals are shown, differences at positions 1 and 2 are learned best, those at position 3 at a low level, and those at position 4 not at all. If three or more signals are shown these results are corroborated. This salience rank order again appeared in transfer tests, but additional configural phenomena emerged. Most of the results can be explained with a simple model based on the assumption that the four positions are equipped with different salience scores and that these add up independently. However, deviations from the model are interpreted by assuming stimulus configuration of sequential patterns. It is concluded that, under the conditions chosen, bees rely most strongly on memories developed during simple forms of associative reward learning, but memories of configural serial patterns contribute, too.

  3. Serial killers with military experience: applying learning theory to serial murder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castle, Tammy; Hensley, Christopher

    2002-08-01

    Scholars have endeavored to study the motivation and causality behind serial murder by researching biological, psychological, and sociological variables. Some of these studies have provided support for the relationship between these variables and serial murder. However, the study of serial murder continues to be an exploratory rather than explanatory research topic. This article examines the possible link between serial killers and military service. Citing previous research using social learning theory for the study of murder, this article explores how potential serial killers learn to reinforce violence, aggression, and murder in military boot camps. As with other variables considered in serial killer research, military experience alone cannot account for all cases of serial murder. Future research should continue to examine this possible link.

  4. Handbook of serial communications interfaces a comprehensive compendium of serial digital input/output (I/O) standards

    CERN Document Server

    Frenzel, Louis

    2015-01-01

    This book catalogs the most popular and commonly used serial-port interfaces and provides details on the specifications and the latest standards, enabling you to select an interface for a new design or verify that an interface is working correctly. Each chapter is based on a different interface and is written in an easy to follow, standard format. With this book you will learn: The most widely used serial interfacesHow to select the best serial interface for a specific application or designThe trade-offs between data rate and distance (length or range)The operation and benefits of serial

  5. Serial Entrepreneurship, Learning by Doing and Self-selection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rocha, Vera; Carneiro, Anabela; Varum, Celeste

    2015-01-01

    of the person-specific effect, using information on individuals’ past histories in paid employment, confirm that serial entrepreneurs exhibit, on average, a larger person-specific effect than non-serial business owners. Moreover, ignoring serial entrepreneurs’ self-selection overestimates learning by doing......It remains a question whether serial entrepreneurs typically perform better than their novice counterparts owing to learning by doing effects or mostly because they are a selected sample of higher-than-average ability entrepreneurs. This paper tries to unravel these two effects by exploring a novel...... empirical strategy based on continuous time duration models with selection. We use a large longitudinal matched employer-employee dataset that allows us to identify about 220,000 individuals who have left their first entrepreneurial experience, out of which over 35,000 became serial entrepreneurs. We...

  6. Asymmetrical learning between a tactile and visual serial RT task

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abrahamse, E.L.; van der Lubbe, Robert Henricus Johannes; Verwey, Willem B.

    2007-01-01

    According to many researchers, implicit learning in the serial reaction-time task is predominantly motor based and therefore should be independent of stimulus modality. Previous research on the task, however, has focused almost completely on the visual domain. Here we investigated sequence learning

  7. IEEE 1394/firewire a low cost, high speed, digital serial bus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaunt, R.

    1997-05-01

    Does the world need yet another 1/0 bus standard? If you need fast and cheap serial video communication, then the answer is yes. As technology advances, so too must data transport mechanisms advance. You can`t expect RS-232 to support real-time digital video, and if you can`t afford expensive professional serial video interfaces, (such as Sony`s Serial Digital Interface), Firewire may be a good solution. IEEE 1394, or commonly known as Firewire, is a general purpose serial bus that meets many of the 1/0 needs of today`s video and multimedia developers. For those of you who only read the first paragraph, here`s Firewire in a nutshell: It provides a guaranteed transfer rate of 10OMbps or 20OMbps of digital data (such as video direct from camera to computer), over an inexpensive, non-proprietary serial bus. Here is a list of its features.

  8. Serial Position Effects in the Identification of Letters, Digits, and Symbols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tydgat, Ilse; Grainger, Jonathan

    2009-01-01

    In 6 experiments, the authors investigated the form of serial position functions for identification of letters, digits, and symbols presented in strings. The results replicated findings obtained with the target search paradigm, showing an interaction between the effects of serial position and type of stimulus, with symbols generating a distinct…

  9. Serial Learning Process: Test of Chaining, Position, and Dual-Process Hypotheses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giurintano, S. L.

    1973-01-01

    The chaining, position, and dual-process hypotheses of serial learning (SL) as well as serial recall, reordering, and relearning of paired-associate learning were examined to establish learning patterns. Results provide evidence for dual-process hypothesis. (DS)

  10. Students’ digital learning environments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Caviglia, Francesco; Dalsgaard, Christian; Davidsen, Jacob

    2018-01-01

    The objective of the paper is to examine the nature of students’ digital learning environments to understand the interplay of institutional systems and tools that are managed by the students themselves. The paper is based on a study of 128 students’ digital learning environments. The objectives...... used tools in the students’ digital learning environments are Facebook, Google Drive, tools for taking notes, and institutional systems. Additionally, the study shows that the tools meet some very basic demands of the students in relation to collaboration, communication, and feedback. Finally...... of the study are 1) to provide an overview of tools for students’ study activities, 2) to identify the most used and most important tools for students and 3) to discover which activities the tools are used for. The empirical study reveals that the students have a varied use of digital media. Some of the most...

  11. Students’ digital learning environments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Caviglia, Francesco; Dalsgaard, Christian; Davidsen, Jacob

    2018-01-01

    of the study are 1) to provide an overview of tools for students’ study activities, 2) to identify the most used and most important tools for students and 3) to discover which activities the tools are used for. The empirical study reveals that the students have a varied use of digital media. Some of the most......, the study shows that most of the important tools are not related to the systems provided by the educational institutions. Based on the study, the paper concludes with a discussion of how institutional systems connect to the other tools in the students’ practices, and how we can qualify students’ digital......The objective of the paper is to examine the nature of students’ digital learning environments to understand the interplay of institutional systems and tools that are managed by the students themselves. The paper is based on a study of 128 students’ digital learning environments. The objectives...

  12. Students’ digital learning environments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Caviglia, Francesco; Dalsgaard, Christian; Davidsen, Jacob

    2018-01-01

    used tools in the students’ digital learning environments are Facebook, Google Drive, tools for taking notes, and institutional systems. Additionally, the study shows that the tools meet some very basic demands of the students in relation to collaboration, communication, and feedback. Finally...

  13. Using Serial and Discrete Digit Naming to Unravel Word Reading Processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altani, Angeliki; Protopapas, Athanassios; Georgiou, George K

    2018-01-01

    During reading acquisition, word recognition is assumed to undergo a developmental shift from slow serial/sublexical processing of letter strings to fast parallel processing of whole word forms. This shift has been proposed to be detected by examining the size of the relationship between serial- and discrete-trial versions of word reading and rapid naming tasks. Specifically, a strong association between serial naming of symbols and single word reading suggests that words are processed serially, whereas a strong association between discrete naming of symbols and single word reading suggests that words are processed in parallel as wholes. In this study, 429 Grade 1, 3, and 5 English-speaking Canadian children were tested on serial and discrete digit naming and word reading. Across grades, single word reading was more strongly associated with discrete naming than with serial naming of digits, indicating that short high-frequency words are processed as whole units early in the development of reading ability in English. In contrast, serial naming was not a unique predictor of single word reading across grades, suggesting that within-word sequential processing was not required for the successful recognition for this set of words. Factor mixture analysis revealed that our participants could be clustered into two classes, namely beginning and more advanced readers. Serial naming uniquely predicted single word reading only among the first class of readers, indicating that novice readers rely on a serial strategy to decode words. Yet, a considerable proportion of Grade 1 students were assigned to the second class, evidently being able to process short high-frequency words as unitized symbols. We consider these findings together with those from previous studies to challenge the hypothesis of a binary distinction between serial/sublexical and parallel/lexical processing in word reading. We argue instead that sequential processing in word reading operates on a continuum

  14. Mismatch-Shaping Serial Digital-to-Analog Converter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steensgaard-Madsen, Jesper; Moon, Un-Ku; Temes, Gabor C.

    1999-01-01

    A simple but accurate pseudo-passive mismatch-shaping D/A converter is described. A digital state machine is used to control the switching sequence of a symmetric two-capacitor network that performs the D/A conversion. The error caused by capacitor mismatch is uncorrelated with the input signal...

  15. Digitizing high frequency signals using serial analog memories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coonrod, J.W.

    1975-10-01

    An online computer system has been developed as a replacement for oscilloscopes and cameras on the Tormac project. Up to 32 simultaneous waveforms are recorded at up to 2 MHz in analog shift registers, then digitized sequentially after the event into a small PDP-11 computer. Data and functions of data may be displayed or plotted locally, and then forwarded for storage at a larger, remote computer via a network arrangement. Advantages over scopes have been lower incremental cost (approximately $200/channel), less noise pickup, better resolution (less than 1%), and immediate presentation of data

  16. 8-bit serial-parallel analog-to-digital converter for fast transient recorder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kulka, Z.; Nadachowski, M.; Zimek, Z.

    1990-08-01

    An 8-bit serial-parallel analog-to-digital converter with a sampling frequency 5 MHz is described. The most important circuits of the device are described and parameters are given. The converter is a central part of a transient recorder type TR-1 designed for recording pulse waveforms in measurements of the kinetics of chemical reactions which are radiation-induced using an electron linear accelerator. 9 refs., 9 figs. (author)

  17. Can Digital Learning Transform Education?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finn, Chester E., Jr.; Horn, Michael B.

    2013-01-01

    The enthusiasm for digital learning is contagious. More than 2 million K-12 students are enrolled in online courses today, and research firm Ambient Insight projects that figure will hit 10 million by 2014. Will today's wave of technology inexorably change the face of schooling, or must school administrators first alter policy? This article…

  18. Serial superficial digital flexor tendon biopsies for diagnosing and monitoring collagenase-induced tendonitis in horses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José C. de Lacerda Neto

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this investigation was to demonstrate the feasibility of a biopsy technique by performing serial evaluations of tissue samples of the forelimb superficial digital flexor tendon (SDFT in healthy horses and in horses subjected to superficial digital flexor tendonitis induction. Eight adult horses were evaluated in two different phases (P, control (P1 and tendonitis-induced (P2. At P1, the horses were subjected to five SDFT biopsies of the left forelimb, with 24 hours (h of interval. Clinical and ultrasonographic (US examinations were performed immediately before the tendonitis induction, 24 and 48 h after the procedure. The biopsied tendon tissues were analyzed through histology. P2 evaluations were carried out three months later, when the same horses were subjected to tendonitis induction by injection of bacterial collagenase into the right forelimb SDFT. P2 clinical and US evaluations, and SDFT biopsies were performed before, and after injury induction at the following time intervals: after 24, 48, 72 and 96 h, and after 15, 30, 60, 90, 120 and 150 days. The biopsy technique has proven to be easy and quick to perform and yielded good tendon samples for histological evaluation. At P1 the horses did not show signs of localised inflammation, pain or lameness, neither SDFT US alterations after biopsies, showing that the biopsy procedure per se did not risk tendon integrity. Therefore, this procedure is feasible for routine tendon histological evaluations. The P2 findings demonstrate a relation between the US and histology evaluations concerning induced tendonitis evolution. However, the clinical signs of tendonitis poorly reflected the microscopic tissue condition, indicating that clinical presentation is not a reliable parameter for monitoring injury development. The presented method of biopsying SDFT tissue in horses enables the serial collection of material for histological analysis causing no clinical signs and tendon damage seen

  19. Digital Games, Design, and Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Douglas B.; Tanner-Smith, Emily E.; Killingsworth, Stephen S.

    2016-01-01

    In this meta-analysis, we systematically reviewed research on digital games and learning for K–16 students. We synthesized comparisons of game versus nongame conditions (i.e., media comparisons) and comparisons of augmented games versus standard game designs (i.e., value-added comparisons). We used random-effects meta-regression models with robust variance estimates to summarize overall effects and explore potential moderator effects. Results from media comparisons indicated that digital games significantly enhanced student learning relative to nongame conditions (g¯ = 0.33, 95% confidence interval [0.19, 0.48], k = 57, n = 209). Results from value-added comparisons indicated significant learning benefits associated with augmented game designs (g¯ = 0.34, 95% confidence interval [0.17, 0.51], k = 20, n = 40). Moderator analyses demonstrated that effects varied across various game mechanics characteristics, visual and narrative characteristics, and research quality characteristics. Taken together, the results highlight the affordances of games for learning as well as the key role of design beyond medium. PMID:26937054

  20. Improved Software to Browse the Serial Medical Images for Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Koojoo; Chung, Min Suk; Park, Jin Seo; Shin, Byeong Seok; Chung, Beom Sun

    2017-07-01

    The thousands of serial images used for medical pedagogy cannot be included in a printed book; they also cannot be efficiently handled by ordinary image viewer software. The purpose of this study was to provide browsing software to grasp serial medical images efficiently. The primary function of the newly programmed software was to select images using 3 types of interfaces: buttons or a horizontal scroll bar, a vertical scroll bar, and a checkbox. The secondary function was to show the names of the structures that had been outlined on the images. To confirm the functions of the software, 3 different types of image data of cadavers (sectioned and outlined images, volume models of the stomach, and photos of the dissected knees) were inputted. The browsing software was downloadable for free from the homepage (anatomy.co.kr) and available off-line. The data sets provided could be replaced by any developers for their educational achievements. We anticipate that the software will contribute to medical education by allowing users to browse a variety of images. © 2017 The Korean Academy of Medical Sciences.

  1. Digital Radiology Image Learning Library

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arenson, R.L.; Greenes, R.; Allman, R.; Swett, H.

    1989-01-01

    The Digital Radiology Image Learning Library (DRILL) is designed as an interactive teaching tool targeted to the radiologic community. The DRILL pilot comprises a comprehensive mammographic information base consisting of factual data in a relational database, an extensive knowledge base in semantic nets and high-resolution images. A flexible query module permits the user to browse and retrieve examination data, case discussions, and related images. Other applications, including expert systems, instructional programs, and skill building exercises, can be accessed through well-defined software constructs

  2. [Landmark-based automatic registration of serial cross-sectional images of Chinese digital human using Photoshop and Matlab software].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Xiu-yun; Pei, Guo-xian; Yu, Bin; Hu, Yan-ling; Li, Jin; Huang, Qian; Li, Xu; Zhang, Yuan-zhi

    2007-12-01

    This paper describes automatic registration of the serial cross-sectional images of Chinese digital human by projective registration method based on the landmarks using the commercially available software Photoshop and Matlab. During cadaver embedment for acquisition of the Chinese digital human images, 4 rods were placed parallel to the vertical axis of the frozen cadaver to allow orientation. Projective distortion of the rod positions on the cross-sectional images was inevitable due to even slight changes of the relative position of the camera. The original cross-sectional images were first processed using Photoshop software firstly to obtain the images of the orientation rods, and the centroid coordinate of every rod image was acquired with Matlab software. With the average coordinate value of the rods as the fiducial point, two-dimensional projective transformation coefficient of each image was determined. Projective transformation was then carried out and projective distortion from each original serial image was eliminated. The rectified cross-sectional images were again processed using Photoshop to obtain the image of the first orientation rod, the coordinate value of first rod image was calculated using Matlab software, and the cross-sectional images were cut into images of the same size according to the first rod spatial coordinate, to achieve automatic registration of the serial cross-sectional images. sing Photoshop and Matlab softwares, projective transformation can accurately accomplish the image registration for the serial images with simpler calculation processes and easier computer processing.

  3. Cerebral activation related to implicit sequence learning in a Double Serial Reaction Time task

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Graaf, FHCE; Maguire, RP; Leenders, KL; de Jong, BM

    2006-01-01

    Using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), we examined the distribution of cerebral activations related to implicitly learning a series of fixed stimulus-response combinations. In a novel - bimanual - variant of the Serial Reaction Time task (SRT), simultaneous finger movements of the two

  4. Medical student use of digital learning resources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Karen; Morris, Anne; Marais, Ben

    2018-02-01

    University students expect to use technology as part of their studies, yet health professional teachers can struggle with the change in student learning habits fuelled by technology. Our research aimed to document the learning habits of contemporary medical students during a clinical rotation by exploring the use of locally and externally developed digital and print self-directed learning resources, and study groups. We investigated the learning habits of final-stage medical students during their clinical paediatric rotation using mixed methods, involving learning analytics and a student questionnaire. Learning analytics tracked aggregate student usage statistics of locally produced e-learning resources on two learning management systems and mobile learning resources. The questionnaire recorded student-reported use of digital and print learning resources and study groups. The students made extensive use of digital self-directed learning resources, especially in the 2 weeks before the examination, which peaked the day before the written examination. All students used locally produced digital formative assessment, and most (74/98; 76%) also used digital resources developed by other institutions. Most reported finding locally produced e-learning resources beneficial for learning. In terms of traditional forms of self-directed learning, one-third (28/94; 30%) indicated that they never read the course textbook, and few students used face-to-face 39/98 (40%) or online 6/98 (6%) study groups. Learning analytics and student questionnaire data confirmed the extensive use of digital resources for self-directed learning. Through clarification of learning habits and experiences, we think teachers can help students to optimise effective learning strategies; however, the impact of contemporary learning habits on learning efficacy requires further evaluation. Health professional teachers can struggle with the change in student learning habits fuelled by technology. © 2017 John

  5. Digital interactive learning of oral radiographic anatomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vuchkova, J; Maybury, T; Farah, C S

    2012-02-01

    Studies reporting high number of diagnostic errors made from radiographs suggest the need to improve the learning of radiographic interpretation in the dental curriculum. Given studies that show student preference for computer-assisted or digital technologies, the purpose of this study was to develop an interactive digital tool and to determine whether it was more successful than a conventional radiology textbook in assisting dental students with the learning of radiographic anatomy. Eighty-eight dental students underwent a learning phase of radiographic anatomy using an interactive digital tool alongside a conventional radiology textbook. The success of the digital tool, when compared to the textbook, was assessed by quantitative means using a radiographic interpretation test and by qualitative means using a structured Likert scale survey, asking students to evaluate their own learning outcomes from the digital tool. Student evaluations of the digital tool showed that almost all participants (95%) indicated that the tool positively enhanced their learning of radiographic anatomy and interpretation. The success of the digital tool in assisting the learning of radiographic interpretation is discussed in the broader context of learning and teaching curricula, and preference (by students) for the use of this digital form when compared to the conventional literate form of the textbook. Whilst traditional textbooks are still valued in the dental curriculum, it is evident that the preference for computer-assisted learning of oral radiographic anatomy enhances the learning experience by enabling students to interact and better engage with the course material. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  6. Digital Competence Model of Distance Learning Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Ketia Kellen A.; Behar, Patricia A.

    2017-01-01

    This article presents the development of a digital competency model of Distance Learning (DL) students in Brazil called CompDigAl_EAD. The following topics were addressed in this study: Educational Competences, Digital Competences, and Distance Learning students. The model was developed between 2015 and 2016 and is being validated in 2017. It was…

  7. Digital Production and Students as Learning Designers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Birgitte Holm; Levinsen, Karin

    2014-01-01

    Today’s digitalization allows users to interact, collaborate, communicate and create user-generated content. The technology is intuitive and easy to use even for young children, and new learning opportunities emerge. Particularly, students’ production as a learning form benefits from digitalization...

  8. Theoretical Perspectives of How Digital Natives Learn

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kivunja, Charles

    2014-01-01

    Marck Prensky, an authority on teaching and learning especially with the aid of Information and Communication Technologies, has referred to 21st century children born after 1980 as "Digital Natives". This paper reviews literature of leaders in the field to shed some light on theoretical perspectives of how Digital Natives learn and how…

  9. University Libraries and Digital Learning Environments

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    University libraries around the world have embraced the possibilities of the digital learning environment, facilitating its use and proactively seeking to develop the provision of electronic resources and services. The digital environment offers opportunities and challenges for librarians in all aspects of their work – in information literacy, virtual reference, institutional repositories, e-learning, managing digital resources and social media. The authors in this timely book are leading exp...

  10. Webseries, Orginal Series and Digital Series: The Forms of Serial Fiction on the Web

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirko Lino

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available lo scopo di questo saggio è quello di fornire attraverso una prospettiva storico formale un’analisi della morfologia della serialità nel web, dalle origini ai più recenti sviluppi linguistico-formali. Oggetto del saggio in questione è la webserie: un tipo di fiction webnativa che seppur trova diverse corrispondenze formali con il modello delle serie Tv al tempo stesso se ne differenzia notevolmente. Partendo dall’appropriazione dei modelli e delle forme della serialità televisiva, la webserie si trova oggi al centro delle trasformazioni che attraversano il modo di comunicare, raccontare e fruire le storie nell’epoca della convergenza (Jenkins, 2007, di una condizione postmediale (Eugeni, 2015, di una cultura che appare sempre retta sulla produzione di forme ibride (Arcagni, 2016. Non si tratta dunque di un semplice modello per il racconto seriale, quanto di un formato che ibrida luoghi dell’intrattenimento rendendo la differenza tra serie offline e online sempre più sfumata, come si evince nei prodotti seriali di player come Amazon e Netflix, e diventa uno dei formati con cui sperimentare i linguaggi e le forme narrative legate ai media immersivi di ultimissima generazione. Nel saggio si proveranno a tracciare le nuove forme della webserialità in relazione allo sviluppo comunicativo dei social network e tecnologico di wereable media come i visori per la Realtà Virtuale al fine di tracciare delle possibili direttive per comprendere l’orizzonte prossimo dello storytelling digitale. Per farlo, si proverà a compiere una sostituzione terminologica-concettuale, ovvero adottare il termine digital series al posto di quello ormai tradizionale e insufficiente di webserie, o di original series.

  11. Serial-order learning impairment and hypersensitivity-to-interference in dyscalculia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Visscher, Alice; Szmalec, Arnaud; Van Der Linden, Lize; Noël, Marie-Pascale

    2015-11-01

    In the context of heterogeneity, the different profiles of dyscalculia are still hypothetical. This study aims to link features of mathematical difficulties to certain potential etiologies. First, we wanted to test the hypothesis of a serial-order learning deficit in adults with dyscalculia. For this purpose we used a Hebb repetition learning task. Second, we wanted to explore a recent hypothesis according to which hypersensitivity-to-interference hampers the storage of arithmetic facts and leads to a particular profile of dyscalculia. We therefore used interfering and non-interfering repeated sequences in the Hebb paradigm. A final test was used to assess the memory trace of the non-interfering sequence and the capacity to manipulate it. In line with our predictions, we observed that people with dyscalculia who show good conceptual knowledge in mathematics but impaired arithmetic fluency suffer from increased sensitivity-to-interference compared to controls. Secondly, people with dyscalculia who show a deficit in a global mathematical test suffer from a serial-order learning deficit characterized by a slow learning and a quick degradation of the memory trace of the repeated sequence. A serial-order learning impairment could be one of the explanations for a basic numerical deficit, since it is necessary for the number-word sequence acquisition. Among the different profiles of dyscalculia, this study provides new evidence and refinement for two particular profiles. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Digital Literacy and Subject Matter Learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Levinsen, Karin; Sørensen, Birgitte Holm

    2015-01-01

    It is generally agreed that learners need to acquire digital literacy in order to be able to act as citizens, employees and entrepreneurs in an increasingly digitalized environment. It is also generally agreed that the educational system has to be responsible for educating towards digital literacy....... However, there is no shared conception of the scope and meaning of digital literacy. The overall picture shows two main approaches: The first aims at digital literacy in the sense of Buildung (general education) while the second addresses a wide range of specific skills and competences: From basic...... computer skills over multimodal analysis to social conventions for behavior in online environments. Consequently designs for teaching and learning that aim at learners acquiring digital literacy and the related learning objectives appear as weak defined. According to the Danish Ministry of Education Shared...

  13. Digital media Experiences for Visual Learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buhl, Mie

    2013-01-01

    for new tools and new theoretical approaches with which to understand them. the article argues that the current phase of social practices and technological development makes it difficult to disitnguish between experience with digital media and mediated experiences, because of the use of renegotiation og......Visual learning is a topic for didactic studies in all levels of educaion, brought about by an increasing use of digital meida- digital media give rise to discussions of how learning expereienes come about from various media ressources that generate new learning situations. new situations call...... about by the nature of diverse digital artefacts, 3. the learning potentials in using mobils devices for integrating the body in visual perception processes....

  14. Young Children's Learning with Digital Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lieberman, Debra A.; Bates, Cynthia H.; So, Jiyeon

    2009-01-01

    This article reviews a selection of studies on digital media and learning for young children ages 3 to 6. The range of digital media for this age group is growing and includes computer-delivered and online activities; console video games; handheld media, occasionally with GPS or an accelerometer, in cell phones and other wireless mobile devices;…

  15. Teaching & Learning Across Collaborative Digital contexts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sorensen, Elsebeth Korsgaard

    This paper addresses the challenge of teaching and learning in a blended, collaborative Digital Context. It reports on a case study in which the promotion of learners empowerment and meta-learning are key objectives. The findings of the case study suggest the presence of a promising potential...... in a marriage between theory-led designs, digital technology, and dialogic collaborative knowledge building for cultivating and enhancing student empowerment....

  16. Digit-color synaesthesia only enhances memory for colors in a specific context: A new method of duration thresholds to measure serial recall.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teichmann, A Lina; Nieuwenstein, Mark R; Rich, Anina N

    2017-08-01

    For digit-color synaesthetes, digits elicit vivid experiences of color that are highly consistent for each individual. The conscious experience of synaesthesia is typically unidirectional: Digits evoke colors but not vice versa. There is an ongoing debate about whether synaesthetes have a memory advantage over non-synaesthetes. One key question in this debate is whether synaesthetes have a general superiority or whether any benefit is specific to a certain type of material. Here, we focus on immediate serial recall and ask digit-color synaesthetes and controls to memorize digit and color sequences. We developed a sensitive staircase method manipulating presentation duration to measure participants' serial recall of both overlearned and novel sequences. Our results show that synaesthetes can activate digit information to enhance serial memory for color sequences. When color sequences corresponded to ascending or descending digit sequences, synaesthetes encoded these sequences at a faster rate than their non-synaesthetes counterparts and faster than non-structured color sequences. However, encoding color sequences is approximately 200 ms slower than encoding digit sequences directly, independent of group and condition, which shows that the translation process is time consuming. These results suggest memory advantages in synaesthesia require a modified dual-coding account, in which secondary (synaesthetically linked) information is useful only if it is more memorable than the primary information to be recalled. Our study further shows that duration thresholds are a sensitive method to measure subtle differences in serial recall performance. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  17. Using GIS and digital aerial photography to assist in the conviction of a serial killer

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Schmitz, Peter MU

    2000-12-01

    Full Text Available A desktop geographical information system (GIS) was used to pin-map the 86 cases associated with the Wemmerpan serial killer, representing crimes committed between 17 September 1995 and 19 December 1997 in central, western and southern Johannesburg...

  18. Intentional Vocabulary Learning Using Digital Flashcards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Hsiu-Ting

    2015-01-01

    As an attempt to follow through on the claims made by proponents of intentional vocabulary learning, the present study set out to examine whether and how digital flashcards can be incorporated into a university course to promote the vocabulary learning of English language learners. The overall research findings underscore the value of learning…

  19. Learning and memory for sequences of pictures, words, and spatial locations: an exploration of serial position effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonk, William J; Healy, Alice F

    2010-01-01

    A serial reproduction of order with distractors task was developed to make it possible to observe successive snapshots of the learning process at each serial position. The new task was used to explore the effect of several variables on serial memory performance: stimulus content (words, blanks, and pictures), presentation condition (spatial information vs. none), semantically categorized item clustering (grouped vs. ungrouped), and number of distractors relative to targets (none, equal, double). These encoding and retrieval variables, along with learning attempt number, affected both overall performance levels and the shape of the serial position function, although a large and extensive primacy advantage and a small 1-item recency advantage were found in each case. These results were explained well by a version of the scale-independent memory, perception, and learning model that accounted for improved performance by increasing the value of only a single parameter that reflects reduced interference from distant items.

  20. Unobtrusive Observation of Team Learning Attributes in Digital Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David C. Gibson

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available This article presents a new framework for unobtrusive observation analytics of knowledge and skills-in-action through continuous collection of data from individuals while they interact with digital assets either as individuals or on problem-solving teams. The framework includes measures of the skill and knowledge areas of collaboration, creativity, personal learning, problem solving, and global sustainability, which are observed during natural production and use of communications, intentional artifacts, and resources in a digital learning space designed for self-directed and team-based learning challenges. The article describes the digital context for data collection and shows some example data and analyses.

  1. Self and other in digital learning spaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schraube, Ernst

    expanding human activities, they are also powerful socio-political “forms of life” (Langdon Winner) constituting the relationship between self and the other and transforming fundamentally the practices of teaching and learning and the processes of generating knowledge. This paper explores the meaning......The teaching and learning spaces at universities are in transformation. With the incorporation of electronic technologies like ipads, smart boards and electronic platforms like “moodle” new digital spaces are emerging in educational practices. These technological spaces are not only useful tools...... of digital learning spaces at universities focusing on their implications for the learning processes of students. Usually studies of technology and learning identify teaching with learning and conceptualize research from an external, third-person standpoint. Starting with a discussion of the paradoxes...

  2. Engaging Digital Natives through Social Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nina Sarkar

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Digital natives account for a substantial portion of the total enrollment in higher education. This calls for significant educational reforms because traditional education systems do not cater to the needs and interests of digital natives. The most effective way that both students and instructors can benefit from this paradigm shift is to integrate technology that is appropriate to the cognitive learning patterns of the digital natives into the curriculum. This paper builds upon previous research in technology/personality theory and specifically attempts to provide examples of technology that will address the instructional needs of digital natives. Further this paper provides empirical evidence of the impact of technology integration on the learning outcomes of digital natives. In this study, the authors explored the impact of targeted technology on academic performance in three businesses courses. Three functional technologies were used by the authors to build engaging course content, efficiently manage course content, and to interact with digital native students. This study found that these technologies can assist digital natives in the learning process and lead to better academic performance.

  3. Neural correlates of skill acquisition: decreased cortical activity during a serial interception sequence learning task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gobel, Eric W; Parrish, Todd B; Reber, Paul J

    2011-10-15

    Learning of complex motor skills requires learning of component movements as well as the sequential structure of their order and timing. Using a Serial Interception Sequence Learning (SISL) task, participants learned a sequence of precisely timed interception responses through training with a repeating sequence. Following initial implicit learning of the repeating sequence, functional MRI data were collected during performance of that known sequence and compared with activity evoked during novel sequences of actions, novel timing patterns, or both. Reduced activity was observed during the practiced sequence in a distributed bilateral network including extrastriate occipital, parietal, and premotor cortical regions. These reductions in evoked activity likely reflect improved efficiency in visuospatial processing, spatio-motor integration, motor planning, and motor execution for the trained sequence, which is likely supported by nondeclarative skill learning. In addition, the practiced sequence evoked increased activity in the left ventral striatum and medial prefrontal cortex, while the posterior cingulate was more active during periods of better performance. Many prior studies of perceptual-motor skill learning have found increased activity in motor areas of the frontal cortex (e.g., motor and premotor cortex, SMA) and striatal areas (e.g., the putamen). The change in activity observed here (i.e., decreased activity across a cortical network) may reflect skill learning that is predominantly expressed through more accurate performance rather than decreased reaction time. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Digital game-based learning in secondary education

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huizenga, J.C.

    2017-01-01

    This PhD thesis presents research on digital game-based learning in secondary education. The main research question is: How do digital games contribute to learning, engagement and motivation to learn? The thesis contains seven chapters. Chapter one is an introduction to digital game-based learning

  5. Lexical Learning in Bilingual Adults: The Relative Importance of Short-Term Memory for Serial Order and Phonological Knowledge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majerus, Steve; Poncelet, Martine; Van der Linden, Martial; Weekes, Brendan S.

    2008-01-01

    Studies of monolingual speakers have shown a strong association between lexical learning and short-term memory (STM) capacity, especially STM for serial order information. At the same time, studies of bilingual speakers suggest that phonological knowledge is the main factor that drives lexical learning. This study tested these two hypotheses…

  6. Supporting Collocation Learning with a Digital Library

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Shaoqun; Franken, Margaret; Witten, Ian H.

    2010-01-01

    Extensive knowledge of collocations is a key factor that distinguishes learners from fluent native speakers. Such knowledge is difficult to acquire simply because there is so much of it. This paper describes a system that exploits the facilities offered by digital libraries to provide a rich collocation-learning environment. The design is based on…

  7. Domesticating Digital Game-based Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helga Dís Sigurdardottir

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper analyses the use of digital game-based learning (DGBL in schools in Norway. It investigates the types of games used in Norwegian schools and how pupils experience that practice. Digital game-based learning is being widely employed throughout Norway as a result of the increased focus on digital skills in Norwegian education. This paper analyses that development by way of focus group interviews with a total of sixty-four pupils at four schools. Drawing upon domestication and actor-network theory, the paper provides a novel approach to the study of DGBL. The broad empirical investigation into DGBL practices furthermore provides a contribution to scholarly literature on the subject. A noteworthy finding of this study is the diversity of games employed in schools—around 30 different titles— indicating that the choice of games lies at the discretion of individual teachers. Findings from this research show that the domestication of digital game-based learning occurs through the construction of complex game-based learning assemblages. This includes the classroom and home as gaming sites, group work and individual assignments as practices, and PCs and iPads as platforms.

  8. Powerful Practices in Digital Learning Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sørensen, Birgitte Holm; Levinsen, Karin Tweddell

    2015-01-01

    The present paper is based on two empirical research studies. The "Netbook 1:1" project (2009-2012), funded by the municipality of Gentofte and Microsoft Denmark, is complete, while "Students' digital production and students as learning designers" (2013-2015), funded by the Danish Ministry of Education, is ongoing. Both…

  9. Serial position learning effects in patients with aneurysms of the anterior communicating artery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefanova, Elka; Kostic, Vladimir S; Ziropadja, Ljubomir; Markovic, Milan; Ocic, Gordana

    2002-08-01

    Ruptured and repaired Anterior Communicating Artery (ACoA) aneurysm can result in devastating impairments involving memory, executive function, confabulation, and personality changes. This study tested serial position learning effects (SPEs) in patients following repaired and ruptured ACoA aneurysm, using results on the Rey Auditory Verbal Learning Test (RAVLT). Thirty patients with ruptured aneurysms of the ACoA and 31 matched controls were included in the study. The primacy-recency effects were maintained during five learning trials in ACoA group, albeit at an overall lower level than in the controls. There was no difference in primacy-recency relation across five learning trials in ACoA group. On the delayed recall trial the patient group demonstrated neither a primacy, nor a recency phenomenon, reflecting a lack of recall of any parts of the word list. This kind of primacy-recency profile across learning trials in ACoA group has no similarity with SPE results in frontal lesion groups, or with SPE distributions in other amnesic disorders, despite the fact that memory and executive deficits were evident in our ACoA group.

  10. Adjustment to subtle time constraints and power law learning in rapid serial visual presentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacqueline Chakyung Shin

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available We investigated whether attention could be modulated through the implicit learning of temporal information in a rapid serial visual presentation (RSVP task. Participants identified two target letters among numeral distractors. The stimulus-onset asynchrony immediately following the first target (SOA1 varied at three levels (70, 98, and 126 ms randomly between trials or fixed within blocks of trials. Practice over three consecutive days resulted in a continuous improvement in the identification rate for both targets and attenuation of the attentional blink (AB, a decrement in target (T2 identification when presented 200-400 ms after another target (T1. Blocked SOA1s led to a faster rate of improvement in RSVP performance and more target order reversals relative to random SOA1s, suggesting that the implicit learning of SOA1 positively affected performance. The results also reveal power law learning curves for individual target identification as well as the reduction in the AB decrement. These learning curves reflect the spontaneous emergence of skill through subtle attentional modulations rather than general attentional distribution. Together, the results indicate that implicit temporal learning could improve high level and rapid cognitive processing and highlights the sensitivity and adaptability of the attentional system to subtle constraints in stimulus timing.

  11. Construction of a Digital Learning Environment Based on Cloud Computing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Jihong; Xiong, Caiping; Liu, Huazhong

    2015-01-01

    Constructing the digital learning environment for ubiquitous learning and asynchronous distributed learning has opened up immense amounts of concrete research. However, current digital learning environments do not fully fulfill the expectations on supporting interactive group learning, shared understanding and social construction of knowledge.…

  12. Learning Digital Test and Diagnostics via Internet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heinz-Dietrich Wuttke

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available An environment targeted to e-learning is presented for teaching design and test of electronic systems. The environment consists of a set of Java applets, and of web based access to the hardware equipments, which can be used in the classroom, for learning at home, in laboratory research and training, or for carrying out testing of students during exams. The tools support university courses on digital electronics, computer hardware, testing and design for testability to learn by hands-on exercises how to design digital systems, how to make them testable, how to build self-testing systems, how to generate test patterns, how to analyze the quality of tests, and how to localize faults in hardware. The tasks chosen for hands-on training represent simultaneously research problems, which allow to fostering in students critical thinking, problem solving skills and creativity.

  13. Learning by Playing with Digital Technology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benjaminsen, Nana

    2006-01-01

    This paper presupposes the notion that there is potential for the integration of play into primary and secondary school activities, because it can stimulate and support the formal as well as informal learning that takes place in school. Digital technology could be a driver for this integration...... Construction Games in Schools. The project is an exploration of how elements of play can be integrated in a technology-based learning environment. I will use examples of empirical data gathered during spring 2006 to demonstrate that play can function as a useful learning strategy, and also point out barriers......, because many of children's play activities already takes place on, and through, digital platforms. The focus for this paper is on how playorientated environmental qualities can be used and might change the current school structure. The background for the paper is the PhD project entitled Computer based...

  14. Inquiry and Digital Learning Centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pappas, Marjorie L.

    2005-01-01

    "Inquiry is an investigative process that engages students in answering questions, solving real world problems, confronting issues, or exploring personal interests" (Pappas and Tepe 2002, 27). Students who engage in inquiry learning need tools and resources that enable them to independently gather and use information. Scaffolding is important for…

  15. Protocol converter for serial communication between digital rectifier controllers and a power plant SCADA system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vukić Vladimir Đ.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper describes the protocol converter INT-485-MBRTU, developed for serial communication between the thyristor rectifier (based on the proprietary protocol "INT-CPD-05", according to standard RS-485 and the SCADA system (based on protocol "Modbus RTU", of the same standard in the thermal power plant "Nikola Tesla B1". Elementary data on industrial communication protocols and communication gateways were provided. The basic technical characteristics of the "Omron" programmable logic controller CJ series were described, as well as the developed device INT-485-MBRTU. Protocol converters with two versions of communication software were tested, differing only in one control word, intended for a forced successive change of communication sequences, in opposite to automatic sequence relieve. The device iNT-485-MBRTU, with the program for forced successive change of communication sequences, demonstrated the reliability of data transfer of 100 %, in a sample of approximately 480 messages. For nearly the same sample, the same protocol converter, with a version of the program without any type of message identifiers, transferred less than 60 % of the foreseen data. During multiple sixty-hour tests, the reliability of data transfer of at least 99.9979% was recorded, in 100% of the analysed cases, and for a sample of nearly 96,000 pairs of the send and receive messages. We analysed the results and estimated the additional possibilities for application of the INT-485-MBRTU protocol converter.

  16. Digital Learning Environments: New possibilities and opportunities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Otto Peters

    2000-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with the general problem whether and, if so, how far the impact of the digitised learning environment on our traditional distance education will change the way in which teachers teach and learners learn. Are the dramatic innovations a menace to established ways of learning and teaching or are they the panacea to overcome some of the difficulties of our system of higher learning and to solve some of our educational problems caused by the big and far-reaching educational paradigm shift? This paper will not deal with technical or technological achievements in the field of information and communication which are, of course, revolutionary and to be acknowledged and admired. Rather, the digital learning environment will be analysed from a pedagogical point of view in order to find out what exactly are the didactic possibilities and opportunities and what are its foreseeable disadvantages.

  17. New learning following reactivation in the human brain: targeting emotional memories through rapid serial visual presentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wirkner, Janine; Löw, Andreas; Hamm, Alfons O; Weymar, Mathias

    2015-03-01

    Once reactivated, previously consolidated memories destabilize and have to be reconsolidated to persist, a process that might be altered non-invasively by interfering learning immediately after reactivation. Here, we investigated the influence of interference on brain correlates of reactivated episodic memories for emotional and neutral scenes using event-related potentials (ERPs). To selectively target emotional memories we applied a new reactivation method: rapid serial visual presentation (RSVP). RSVP leads to enhanced implicit processing (pop out) of the most salient memories making them vulnerable to disruption. In line, interference after reactivation of previously encoded pictures disrupted recollection particularly for emotional events. Furthermore, memory impairments were reflected in a reduced centro-parietal ERP old/new difference during retrieval of emotional pictures. These results provide neural evidence that emotional episodic memories in humans can be selectively altered through behavioral interference after reactivation, a finding with further clinical implications for the treatment of anxiety disorders. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. The Digital Learning Imperative: How Technology and Teaching Meet Today's Education Challenges. Digital Learning Series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartzbeck, Terri Duggan; Wolf, Mary Ann

    2012-01-01

    This report outlines how digital learning can connect middle and high school students with better teaching and learning experiences while also addressing three major challenges facing the nation's education system--access to good teaching, tight budgets, and boosting student achievement. But simply slapping a netbook on top of a textbook will not…

  19. Understanding Digital Learning and Its Variable Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Means, B.

    2016-12-01

    An increasing proportion of undergraduate courses use an online or blended learning format. This trend signals major changes in the kind of instruction students receive in their STEM courses, yet evidence about the effectiveness of these new approaches is sparse. Existing syntheses and meta-analyses summarize outcomes from experimental or quasi-experimental studies of online and blended courses and document how few studies incorporate proper controls for differences in student characteristics, instructor behaviors, and other course conditions. The evidence that is available suggests that on average blended courses are equal to or better than traditional face-to-face courses and that online courses are equivalent in terms of learning outcomes. But these averages conceal a tremendous underlying variability. Results vary markedly from course to course, even when the same technology is used in both. Some research suggests that online instruction puts lower-achieving students at a disadvantage. It is clear that introducing digital learning per se is no guarantee that student engagement and learning will be enhanced. Getting more consistently positive impacts out of learning technologies is going to require systematic characterization of the features of learning technologies and associated instructional practices as well as attention to context and student characteristics. This presentation will present a framework for characterizing essential features of digital learning resources, implementation practices, and conditions. It will also summarize the research evidence with respect to the learning impacts of specific technology features including spaced practice, immediate feedback, mastery learning based pacing, visualizations and simulations, gaming features, prompts for explanations and reflection, and tools for online collaboration.

  20. LEARNING GEOMETRY THROUGH MIMESIS AND DIGITAL CONSTRUCT

    OpenAIRE

    Maria Mion POP; Mihaela GIURGIULESCU

    2015-01-01

    The theme proposed by us is useful to teachers and students for mathematics in the compulsory school cycle. The issues faced by school teachers/parents are the difficulty with which students read and understand the lessons/examples/synthesis in order to assimilate technical terms. The echoic and iconic memory facilitates the learning of the specific curriculum of linear, spatial and analytical geometry by the students using digital platform designed by us; it facilitates the acquiring of the ...

  1. Factors enhancing learning possibilities in digital workshops

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Kobbernagel

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available This article presents a study of processes supporting student learning possibilities in digital workshops planned and held at art museums in Denmark. The investigation aims to provide insights into factors enhancing learning possibilities, including the educator’s dialogic performance, experiences of art, and perceived qualities of digital content creation processes in art museum education workshops. To address the research question of what conditional and processual factors can be said to support learning possibilities, a model was developed on the basis of fieldwork and theories of media education, art pedagogy and motivation. The model was then analyzed using structural equation modelling (SEM on data collected (N= 502 after workshops in two museums. The results suggest that the dialogic performance of museum educators, a positive art experience and positive perceptions of working with digital media are factors that strongly support student participation and reflection – although to various degrees. The findings also show that, in cases in which students are disinterested and see little value in participating during the workshop, this amotivation is likely to be lower when their art experiences and their perceptions of the media production process are positive. 

  2. Factors enhancing learning possibilities in digital workshops

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Kobbernagel

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This article presents a study of processes supporting student learning possibilities in digital workshops planned and held at art museums in Denmark. The investigation aims to provide insights into factors enhancing learning possibilities, including the educator’s dialogic performance, experiences of art, and perceived qualities of digital content creation processes in art museum education workshops. To address the research question of what conditional and processual factors can be said to support learning possibilities, a model was developed on the basis of fieldwork and theories of media education, art pedagogy and motivation. The model was then analyzed using structural equation modelling (SEM on data collected (N= 502 after workshops in two museums. The results suggest that the dialogic performance of museum educators, a positive art experience and positive perceptions of working with digital media are factors that strongly support student participation and reflection – although to various degrees. The findings also show that, in cases in which students are disinterested and see little value in participating during the workshop, this amotivation is likely to be lower when their art experiences and their perceptions of the media production process are positive.

  3. SCAFFOLDINGAND REINFORCEMENT: USING DIGITAL LOGBOOKS IN LEARNING VOCABULARY

    OpenAIRE

    Khalifa, Salma Hasan Almabrouk; Shabdin, Ahmad Affendi

    2016-01-01

    Reinforcement and scaffolding are tested approaches to enhance learning achievements. Keeping a record of the learning process as well as the new learned words functions as scaffolding to help learners build a comprehensive vocabulary. Similarly, repetitive learning of new words reinforces permanent learning for long-term memory. Paper-based logbooks may prove to be good records of the learning process, but if learners use digital logbooks, the results may be even better. Digital logbooks wit...

  4. Empowering Palestinian girls through digital learning innovations in ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Girls in particular face barriers to accessing quality education, leading to significant ... engineering, and mathematics (STEM) and digital skills can open new routes to ... locally relevant digital learning innovations, especially in the STEM fields.

  5. Digital Literacy Learning in Higher Education through Digital Storytelling Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Banny S. K.; Churchill, Daniel; Chiu, Thomas K. F.

    2017-01-01

    It is necessary to develop digital literacy skills with which students can communicate and express their ideas effectively using digital media. The educational sectors around the world are beginning to incorporate digital literacy into the curriculum. Digital storytelling, one of the possible classroom activities, is an approach which may help…

  6. Improved Neural Signal Classification in a Rapid Serial Visual Presentation Task Using Active Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marathe, Amar R; Lawhern, Vernon J; Wu, Dongrui; Slayback, David; Lance, Brent J

    2016-03-01

    The application space for brain-computer interface (BCI) technologies is rapidly expanding with improvements in technology. However, most real-time BCIs require extensive individualized calibration prior to use, and systems often have to be recalibrated to account for changes in the neural signals due to a variety of factors including changes in human state, the surrounding environment, and task conditions. Novel approaches to reduce calibration time or effort will dramatically improve the usability of BCI systems. Active Learning (AL) is an iterative semi-supervised learning technique for learning in situations in which data may be abundant, but labels for the data are difficult or expensive to obtain. In this paper, we apply AL to a simulated BCI system for target identification using data from a rapid serial visual presentation (RSVP) paradigm to minimize the amount of training samples needed to initially calibrate a neural classifier. Our results show AL can produce similar overall classification accuracy with significantly less labeled data (in some cases less than 20%) when compared to alternative calibration approaches. In fact, AL classification performance matches performance of 10-fold cross-validation (CV) in over 70% of subjects when training with less than 50% of the data. To our knowledge, this is the first work to demonstrate the use of AL for offline electroencephalography (EEG) calibration in a simulated BCI paradigm. While AL itself is not often amenable for use in real-time systems, this work opens the door to alternative AL-like systems that are more amenable for BCI applications and thus enables future efforts for developing highly adaptive BCI systems.

  7. Learning in the Digital Age: Control or Connection?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Galen, Jane

    2013-01-01

    In October 2011, 200 state school officers and legislators gathered at a hotel in San Francisco to learn how to "revolutionize" learning by "personalizing" instruction. The occasion was former Florida Gov. Jeb Bush's second annual National Summit on Education Reform. The topic was digital learning. The vision of digitally managed curriculum and…

  8. Digital control for nuclear reactors - lessons learned

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernard, J.A.; Aviles, B.N.; Lanning, D.D.

    1992-01-01

    Lessons learned during the course of the now decade-old MIT program on the digital control of nuclear reactors are enumerated. Relative to controller structure, these include the importance of a separate safety system, the need for signal validation, the role of supervisory algorithms, the significance of command validation, and the relevance of automated reasoning. Relative to controller implementation, these include the value of nodal methods to the creation of real-time reactor physics and thermal hydraulic models, the advantages to be gained from the use of real-time system models, and the importance of a multi-tiered structure to the simultaneous achievement of supervisory, global, and local control. Block diagrams are presented of proposed controllers and selected experimental and simulation-study results are shown. In addition, a history is given of the MIT program on reactor digital control

  9. The fluidities of digital learning environments and resources

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansbøl, Mikala

    2012-01-01

    The research project “Educational cultures and serious games on a global market place” (2009-2011) dealt with the challenge of the digital learning environment and hence it’s educational development space always existing outside the present space and hence scope of activities. With a reference...... and establishments of the virtual universe called Mingoville.com, the research shows a need to include in researchers’ conceptualizations of digital learning environments and resources, their shifting materialities and platformations and hence emerging (often unpredictable) agencies and educational development...... spaces. Keywords: Fluidity, digital learning environment, digital learning resource, educational development space...

  10. Digital Literacy: A Prerequisite for Effective Learning in a Blended Learning Environment?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Chun Meng; Chaw, Lee Yen

    2016-01-01

    Blended learning has propelled into mainstream education in recent years with the help of digital technology. Commonly available digital devices and the Internet have made access to learning resources such as learning management systems, online libraries, digital media, etc. convenient and flexible for both lecturers and students. Beyond the…

  11. Lessons learned on digital systems safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sivertsen, Terje

    2005-06-01

    A decade ago, in 1994, lessons learned from Halden research activities on digital systems safety were summarized in the reports HWR-374 and HWR-375, under the title 'A Lessons Learned Report on Software Dependability'. The reports reviewed all activities made at the Halden Project in this field since 1977. As such, the reports provide a wealth of information on Halden research. At the same time, the lessons learned from the different activities are made more accessible to the reader by being summarized in terms of results, conclusions and recommendations. The present report provides a new lessons learned report, covering the Halden Project research activities in this area from 1994 to medio 2005. As before, the emphasis is on the results, conclusions and recommendations made from these activities, in particular how they can be utilized by different types of organisations, such as licensing authorities, safety assessors, power companies, and software developers. The contents of the report have been edited on the basis of input from a large number of Halden work reports, involving many different authors. Brief summaries of these reports are included in the last part of the report. (Author)

  12. Awareness for Contextualized Digital Contents in Ubiquitous Learning Environments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Börner, Dirk

    2010-01-01

    Börner, D. (2009). Awareness for Contextualized Digital Contents in Ubiquitous Learning Environments. Presented at the Doctoral Consortium of the Fourth European Conference on Technology Enhanced Learning (EC-TEL 2009). September, 29-October, 2, 2009, Nice, France.

  13. Procedural learning is impaired in dyslexia: Evidence from a meta-analysis of serial reaction time studies☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lum, Jarrad A.G.; Ullman, Michael T.; Conti-Ramsden, Gina

    2013-01-01

    A number of studies have investigated procedural learning in dyslexia using serial reaction time (SRT) tasks. Overall, the results have been mixed, with evidence of both impaired and intact learning reported. We undertook a systematic search of studies that examined procedural learning using SRT tasks, and synthesized the data using meta-analysis. A total of 14 studies were identified, representing data from 314 individuals with dyslexia and 317 typically developing control participants. The results indicate that, on average, individuals with dyslexia have worse procedural learning abilities than controls, as indexed by sequence learning on the SRT task. The average weighted standardized mean difference (the effect size) was found to be 0.449 (CI95: .204, .693), and was significant (p dyslexia. PMID:23920029

  14. Using Digital Photography to Supplement Learning of Biotechnology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norflus, Fran

    2012-01-01

    The author used digital photography to supplement learning of biotechnology by students with a variety of learning styles and educational backgrounds. Because one approach would not be sufficient to reach all the students, digital photography was used to explain the techniques and results to the class instead of having to teach each student…

  15. Digital Learning in California's K-12 Schools. Just the Facts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Niu

    2015-01-01

    This fact page briefly discusses the following facts on digital learning in California's K-12: (1) As California implements new tests in its K-12 schools, technology infrastructure is a key concern; (2) Many districts are confident that they had enough bandwidth for online field tests; (3) Digital learning will require significantly greater…

  16. Enhancing Digital Literacy and Learning among Adults with Blogs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharp, Laurie A.

    2017-01-01

    Digital literacy and learning among adults has been identified as an area requiring research. The purpose of the present study was to explore technology acceptance and digital collaborative learning experiences with blogs among adult learners. This analysis employed a quasi-experimental mixed-methods approach guided by a sociocultural theoretical…

  17. A Professional Learning Model Supporting Teachers to Integrate Digital Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheffield, Rachel; Blackley, Susan; Moro, Paul

    2018-01-01

    Contemporary teachers have an obligation to support and scaffold students' learning in digital technologies and to do this in authentic contexts. In order for teachers to be successful in this, their own competency in digital technologies needs to be high, and their own 21st century learning skills of communication, collaboration, creativity and…

  18. Handling multiple metadata streams regarding digital learning material

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roes, J.B.M.; Vuuren, J. van; Verbeij, N.; Nijstad, H.

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents the outcome of a study performed in the Netherlands on handling multiple metadata streams regarding digital learning material. The paper describes the present metadata architecture in the Netherlands, the present suppliers and users of metadata and digital learning materials. It

  19. Digital Games and Learning: Identifying Pathways of Influence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subrahmanyam, Kaveri; Renukarya, Bhavya

    2015-01-01

    Digital games and gamelike contexts have become an integral part of young people's lives, and scholars have speculated about their potential to engage and enhance children's learning. Given that digital games are complex systems, we propose that different aspects of game features and game play might influence learning in different ways. Drawing on…

  20. Supporting Digital Natives to Learn Effectively with Technology Tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keengwe, Jared; Georgina, David

    2013-01-01

    Majority of learners in our classrooms are digital natives or Millennials--a category of learners who tend toward independence and autonomy in their learning styles. The primary challenges then facing instructors include: How do digital natives learn and how do you teach them? The answers to these questions will help instructors to: (a) identify…

  1. Learning and digital inclusion: the ELAMP project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kate D'Arcy

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The Electronic Learning and Mobility Project (ELAMP was a nationally funded project by the Department for Children, Schools and Families, which ran from 2004 to 2010. The main aim of ELAMP was to improve the education of Traveller children, particularly highly mobile learners. ELAMP focussed upon the use of mobile technology and distance learning to support, enhance and extend young Travellers’ educational and vocational opportunities. This article will reflect upon the learning and technological experiences and opportunities that the ELAMP project provided for Traveller children, young people and their families. In doing so it will critically consider the value of information technology in working with Traveller communities and advancing their educational opportunities. Reviewing ELAMP work will also demonstrate how the use of mobile technology can improve educational outcomes and Traveller families’ digital inclusion. Now that the project has ended, this article will question why we are not using what we learnt from ELAMP to move forward. The author was a tutor on the project who also evaluated the Strand B, Wider Key Skills element of ELAMP for The University of Sheffield between 2008 and 2010, which is the main focus of this particular article.

  2. Six Strategies for Digital Learning Success. White Paper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Samir; Downs, Holly

    2016-01-01

    Technology has revolutionized corporate learning and leadership development. The number of organizations that use learning management systems is higher than ever before, and thanks to massive open online courses (MOOCs), small private online courses (SPOCS), microlearning, nanolearning, and other new media learning platforms, digital learning and…

  3. Design of digital learning material for bioprocess-engineering-education

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schaaf, van der H.

    2007-01-01

    With the advance of computers and the internet, new types of learning material can be developed: web-based digital learning material. Because many complex learning objectives in the food- and bioprocess technology domain are difficult to achieve in a traditional learning environment, a project was

  4. Using Digital Games to Learn Mathematics – What students think?

    OpenAIRE

    Su Ting Yong; Ian Harrison; Peter Gates

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to explore how university foundation students perceive the use of digital games in learning mathematics. Data was collected using an online questionnaire and 209 foundation university students participated in this study.  The questionnaire was used to explore students’ gaming experience and students’ attitude towards mathematics learning with digital games.  It was found that most of the university foundation students liked to play different types of digital games.  ...

  5. Collaborative learning model inquiring based on digital game

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Jiugen; Xing, Ruonan

    2012-04-01

    With the development of computer education software, digital educational game has become an important part in our life, entertainment and education. Therefore how to make full use of digital game's teaching functions and educate through entertainment has become the focus of current research. The thesis make a connection between educational game and collaborative learning, the current popular teaching model, and concludes digital game-based collaborative learning model combined with teaching practice.

  6. Digital Immigrants and Digital Natives: Learning Business Informatics at Higher Educational Level

    OpenAIRE

    Suša, Dalia

    2014-01-01

    Background: The term digital natives refer to those born since the 1980s and have been growing up surrounded by technology. On the other hand, digital immigrants are born before 1980s and learned how to use technology later in life. Objectives: Goal of the paper is to explore attitudes of digital native students on the course of Business Informatics at higher educational institutions (HEIs), and to compare them with attitudes of digital immigrants. Methods/Approach: The survey was conducted i...

  7. LEARNING GEOMETRY THROUGH MIMESIS AND DIGITAL CONSTRUCT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Mion POP

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The theme proposed by us is useful to teachers and students for mathematics in the compulsory school cycle. The issues faced by school teachers/parents are the difficulty with which students read and understand the lessons/examples/synthesis in order to assimilate technical terms. The echoic and iconic memory facilitates the learning of the specific curriculum of linear, spatial and analytical geometry by the students using digital platform designed by us; it facilitates the acquiring of the theoretical elements of applied geometry by encoding-decoding, so that the teacher's role becomes the one of the advisor and not only a person who transmits the information. The utility of the program extends from mainstream schools to special schools.

  8. Incidental learning during rapid information processing on the symbol-digit modalities test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denney, Douglas R; Hughes, Abbey J; Elliott, Jacquelyn K; Roth, Alexandra K; Lynch, Sharon G

    2015-06-01

    The Symbol--Digit Modalities Test (SDMT) is widely used to assess processing speed in MS patients. We developed a computerized version of the SDMT (c-SDMT) that scored participants' performance during subintervals over the course of the usual 90-s time period and also added an incidental learning test (c-ILT) to assess how well participants learned the symbol-digit associations while completing the c-SDMT. Patients with MS (n = 65) achieved lower scores than healthy controls (n = 38) on both the c-SDMT and c-ILT, and the scores on the two tests were correlated. However, no increase in the rate of item completion occurred for either group over the course of the c-SDMT, and the difference between groups was the same during each subinterval. Therefore, it seems implausible that controls completed more items on the c-SDMT because they were more adept at learning the symbol-digit associations as the test ensued. Instead, MS patients' poorer incidental learning performance appears to reflect the greater attentional burden that tasks requiring rapid serial processing of information impose upon them. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. Can New Digital Technologies Support Parasitology Teaching and Learning?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jabbar, Abdul; Gasser, Robin B; Lodge, Jason

    2016-07-01

    Traditionally, parasitology courses have mostly been taught face-to-face on campus, but now digital technologies offer opportunities for teaching and learning. Here, we give a perspective on how new technologies might be used through student-centred teaching approaches. First, a snapshot of recent trends in the higher education is provided; then, a brief account is given of how digital technologies [e.g., massive open online courses (MOOCs), flipped classroom (FC), games, quizzes, dedicated Facebook, and digital badges] might promote parasitology teaching and learning in digital learning environments. In our opinion, some of these digital technologies might be useful for competency-based, self-regulated, learner-centred teaching and learning in an online or blended teaching environment. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. West Virginia Digital Learning: Report to the Governor, Legislature, and West Virginia Board of Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alliance for Excellent Education, 2014

    2014-01-01

    Accomplishing personalized, deeper learning through anywhere, anytime digital learning requires a redesign of the K-12 education system. This report looks at readiness for digital learning at two levels in West Virginia: the district capacity building to ready the system for digital learning and school implementation of digital learning. The…

  11. Digital case-based learning system in school.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Peipei; Guo, Jiayang

    2017-01-01

    With the continuing growth of multi-media learning resources, it is important to offer methods helping learners to explore and acquire relevant learning information effectively. As services that organize multi-media learning materials together to support programming learning, the digital case-based learning system is needed. In order to create a case-oriented e-learning system, this paper concentrates on the digital case study of multi-media resources and learning processes with an integrated framework. An integration of multi-media resources, testing and learning strategies recommendation as the learning unit is proposed in the digital case-based learning framework. The learning mechanism of learning guidance, multi-media materials learning and testing feedback is supported in our project. An improved personalized genetic algorithm which incorporates preference information and usage degree into the crossover and mutation process is proposed to assemble the personalized test sheet for each learner. A learning strategies recommendation solution is proposed to recommend learning strategies for learners to help them to learn. The experiments are conducted to prove that the proposed approaches are capable of constructing personalized sheets and the effectiveness of the framework.

  12. Digital case-based learning system in school.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peipei Gu

    Full Text Available With the continuing growth of multi-media learning resources, it is important to offer methods helping learners to explore and acquire relevant learning information effectively. As services that organize multi-media learning materials together to support programming learning, the digital case-based learning system is needed. In order to create a case-oriented e-learning system, this paper concentrates on the digital case study of multi-media resources and learning processes with an integrated framework. An integration of multi-media resources, testing and learning strategies recommendation as the learning unit is proposed in the digital case-based learning framework. The learning mechanism of learning guidance, multi-media materials learning and testing feedback is supported in our project. An improved personalized genetic algorithm which incorporates preference information and usage degree into the crossover and mutation process is proposed to assemble the personalized test sheet for each learner. A learning strategies recommendation solution is proposed to recommend learning strategies for learners to help them to learn. The experiments are conducted to prove that the proposed approaches are capable of constructing personalized sheets and the effectiveness of the framework.

  13. A Study of the Effects of Digital Learning on Learning Motivation and Learning Outcome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Ming-Hung; Chen, Huang-Cheng; Liu, Kuang-Sheng

    2017-01-01

    In the modern society when intelligent mobile devices become popular, the Internet breaks through the restrictions on time and space and becomes a ubiquitous learning tool. Designing teaching activity for digital learning and flexibly applying technology tools are the key issues for current information technology integrated education. In this…

  14. Motivated Learning with Digital Learning Tasks: What about Autonomy and Structure?

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Loon, Anne-Marieke; Ros, Anje; Martens, Rob

    2012-01-01

    In the present study, the ways in which digital learning tasks contribute to students' intrinsic motivation and learning outcomes were examined. In particular, this study explored the relative contributions of autonomy support and the provision of structure in digital learning tasks. Participants were 320 fifth- and sixth-grade students from eight…

  15. Lessons learned in digital upgrade projects digital control system implementation at US nuclear power stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelley, S.; Bolian, T. W.

    2006-01-01

    AREVA NP has gained significant experience during the past five years in digital upgrades at operating nuclear power stations in the US. Plants are seeking modernization with digital technology to address obsolescence, spare parts availability, vendor support, increasing age-related failures and diminished reliability. New systems offer improved reliability and functionality, and decreased maintenance requirements. Significant lessons learned have been identified relating to the areas of licensing, equipment qualification, software quality assurance and other topics specific to digital controls. Digital control systems have been installed in non safety-related control applications at many utilities within the last 15 years. There have also been a few replacements of small safety-related systems with digital technology. Digital control systems are proving to be reliable, accurate, and easy to maintain. Digital technology is gaining acceptance and momentum with both utilities and regulatory agencies based upon the successes of these installations. Also, new plants are being designed with integrated digital control systems. To support plant life extension and address obsolescence of critical components, utilities are beginning to install digital technology for primary safety-system replacement. AREVA NP analyzed operating experience and lessons learned from its own digital upgrade projects as well as industry-wide experience to identify key issues that should be considered when implementing digital controls in nuclear power stations

  16. Autofocusing in digital holography using deep learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Zhenbo; Xu, Zhimin; Lam, Edmund Y.

    2018-02-01

    In digital holography, it is critical to know the distance in order to reconstruct the multi-sectional object. This autofocusing is traditionally solved by reconstructing a stack of in-focus and out-of-focus images and using some focus metric, such as entropy or variance, to calculate the sharpness of each reconstructed image. Then the distance corresponding to the sharpest image is determined as the focal position. This method is effective but computationally demanding and time-consuming. To get an accurate estimation, one has to reconstruct many images. Sometimes after a coarse search, a refinement is needed. To overcome this problem in autofocusing, we propose to use deep learning, i.e., a convolutional neural network (CNN), to solve this problem. Autofocusing is viewed as a classification problem, in which the true distance is transferred as a label. To estimate the distance is equated to labeling a hologram correctly. To train such an algorithm, totally 1000 holograms are captured under the same environment, i.e., exposure time, incident angle, object, except the distance. There are 5 labels corresponding to 5 distances. These data are randomly split into three datasets to train, validate and test a CNN network. Experimental results show that the trained network is capable of predicting the distance without reconstructing or knowing any physical parameters about the setup. The prediction time using this method is far less than traditional autofocusing methods.

  17. Learning to Teach in the Digital Age: New Materialities and Maker Paradigms in Schools. New Literacies and Digital Epistemologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Justice, Sean

    2016-01-01

    "Learning to Teach in the Digital Age" tells the story of a group of K-12 teachers as they began to connect with digital making and learning pedagogies. Guiding questions at the heart of this qualitative case study asked how teaching practices engaged with and responded to the maker movement and digital making and learning tools and…

  18. Digital Education: Opportunities for Social Collaboration. Digital Education and Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Michael, Ed.

    2011-01-01

    This timely collection of theoretical and applied studies examines the pedagogical potential and realities of digital technologies in a wide range of disciplinary contexts across the educational spectrum. By mixing content-based chapters with a theoretical perspective with case studies detailing actual teaching approaches utilizing digital…

  19. Enriching Critical Thinking and Language Learning with Educational Digital Libraries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Hsin-lin

    2012-01-01

    As the amount of information available in online digital libraries increases exponentially, questions arise concerning the most productive way to use that information to advance learning. Applying the earlier information seeking theories advocated by Kelly (1963), Taylor (1968), and Belkin (1980) to the digital libraries experience, Carol Kuhlthau…

  20. Identifying Different Registers of Digital Literacy in Virtual Learning Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knutsson, Ola; Blasjo, Mona.; Hallsten, Stina; Karlstrom, Petter

    2012-01-01

    In this paper social semiotics, and systemic functional linguistics in particular, are used in order to identify registers of digital literacy in the use of virtual learning environments. The framework of social semiotics provides means to systemize and discuss digital literacy as a linguistic and semiotic issue. The following research question…

  1. Design-based learning in classrooms using playful digital toolkits

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scheltenaar, K.J.; van der Poel, J.E.C.; Bekker, Tilde

    2015-01-01

    The goal of this paper is to explore how to implement Design Based Learning (DBL) with digital toolkits to teach 21st century skills in (Dutch) schools. It describes the outcomes of a literature study and two design case studies in which such a DBL approach with digital toolkits was iteratively

  2. Distributed Leadership and Digital Collaborative Learning: A Synergistic Relationship?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Alma; Jones, Michelle; Baba, Suria

    2013-01-01

    This paper explores the synergy between distributed leadership and digital collaborative learning. It argues that distributed leadership offers an important theoretical lens for understanding and explaining how digital collaboration is best supported and led. Drawing upon evidence from two online educational platforms, the paper explores the…

  3. Interactive Digital Textbooks and Engagement: A Learning Strategies Framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bikowski, Dawn; Casal, J. Elliott

    2018-01-01

    This mixed-methods study explored non-native English speaking students' learning processes and engagement as they used a customized interactive digital textbook housed on a mobile device. Think aloud protocols, surveys of anticipated and actual engagement with the digital textbook, reflective journals, and member checking constituted data…

  4. Digital games and learning mathematics: Student, teacher and parent perspectives

    OpenAIRE

    Su Ting Yong; Peter Gates; Ian Harrison

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the potential use of digital games in learning mathematics at secondary school level in Malaysia. Three secondary school students, three mathematics teachers and three parents were interviewed in this study. All the participants were asked for their views and experiences in mathematics, technology usage and the use of digital games in learning mathematics. The results suggested that students were supportive and positive towards the use of computer game...

  5. Effect of lesion site on serial position during list learning: a study with the CVLT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albuquerque, Luisa; Loureiro, Clara; Martins, Isabel Pavao

    2008-07-01

    Successful learning of supraspan word lists such as the California Verbal Learning Test (CVLT) relies more on clustering strategies than rote learning, subserved by the frontal and temporal lobes. The authors studied the effect of word sequence in CVLT learning, in 15 patients with frontal (FLL) and 15 temporal (TLL) lesions, and 33 controls. Experimental measures were: number of clusters, number of first (FI), middle (MI) and last items (LI), in learning trials and in total immediate recall. FLL disclosed significantly lower FI along learning. Clusters were similar among groups. This difficulty is discussed according to the role of frontal lobes in learning and memory.

  6. Autism: Too eager to learn? Event related potential findings of increased dependency on intentional learning in a serial reaction time task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwart, Fenny S; Vissers, Constance Th W M; van der Meij, Roemer; Kessels, Roy P C; Maes, Joseph H R

    2017-09-01

    It has been suggested that people with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) have an increased tendency to use explicit (or intentional) learning strategies. This altered learning may play a role in the development of the social communication difficulties characterizing ASD. In the current study, we investigated incidental and intentional sequence learning using a Serial Reaction Time (SRT) task in an adult ASD population. Response times and event related potentials (ERP) components (N2b and P3) were assessed as indicators of learning and knowledge. Findings showed that behaviorally, sequence learning and ensuing explicit knowledge were similar in ASD and typically developing (TD) controls. However, ERP findings showed that learning in the TD group was characterized by an enhanced N2b, while learning in the ASD group was characterized by an enhanced P3. These findings suggest that learning in the TD group might be more incidental in nature, whereas learning in the ASD group is more intentional or effortful. Increased intentional learning might serve as a strategy for individuals with ASD to control an overwhelming environment. Although this led to similar behavioral performances on the SRT task, it is very plausible that this intentional learning has adverse effects in more complex social situations, and hence contributes to the social impairments found in ASD. Autism Res 2017, 10: 1533-1543. © 2017 International Society for Autism Research, Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 International Society for Autism Research, Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Digital Games and Language Teaching and Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sykes, Julie M.

    2018-01-01

    The digital gaming industry has captured the public's attention worldwide and in the United States alone, the video game industry is predicted to increase by 30% from 2010 to 2019, reaching $19.6 billion in revenue (Takahashi, 2015, n.p.). Not surprisingly, digital gameplay is also rapidly expanding in educational domains. Although researchers…

  8. Educating for Digital Futures: What the Learning Strategies of Digital Media Professionals Can Teach Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bridgstock, Ruth

    2016-01-01

    This article explores how universities might engage more effectively with the imperative to develop students' twenty-first century skills for the information society, by examining learning challenges and professional learning strategies of successful digital media professionals. The findings of qualitative interviews with professionals from…

  9. CSU Digital Ambassadors: An Empowering and Impactful Faculty Learning Community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soodjinda, Daniel; Parker, Jessica K.; Ross, Donna L.; Meyer, Elizabeth J.

    2014-01-01

    This article chronicles the work of the California State University Digital Ambassador Program (DA), a Faculty Learning Community (FLC), which brought together 13 faculty members across the state to create ongoing, targeted spaces of support for colleagues and educational partners to learn about innovative technological and pedagogical practices…

  10. Digital Game Building: Learning in a Participatory Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qing

    2010-01-01

    Background: The emergence of a participatory culture, brought about mainly by the use of Web2.0 technology, is challenging us to reconsider aspects of teaching and learning. Adapting the learning-as-digital-game-building approach, this paper explores how new educational practices can help students build skills for the 21st century. Purpose: This…

  11. Composing with New Technology: Teacher Reflections on Learning Digital Video

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruce, David L.; Chiu, Ming Ming

    2015-01-01

    This study explores teachers' reflections on their learning to compose with new technologies in the context of teacher education and/or teacher professional development. English language arts (ELA) teachers (n = 240) in 15 courses learned to use digital video (DV), completed at least one DV group project, and responded to open-ended survey…

  12. Beyond Access: Effective Digital Learning for a Globalized World

    Science.gov (United States)

    Best, Jane; Dunlap, Allison

    2012-01-01

    Digital learning, supporters say, has the power to help prepare students for the workforce, improve student learning and educator effectiveness, and bring high-quality education to those who can't otherwise access it. However, great variability exists among schools and districts in terms of level of development and needs. This policy brief serves…

  13. Embedding Diagnostic Mechanisms in a Digital Game for Learning Mathematics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yueh-Min; Huang, Shu-Hsien; Wu, Ting-Ting

    2014-01-01

    Mathematics is closely related to daily life, but it is also one of the lessons which often cause anxiety to primary school students. Digital game-based learning (DGBL) has been regarded as a sound learning strategy in raising learner willingness and interest in many disciplines. Thus, ways of designing a DGBL system to mitigate anxiety are well…

  14. Awareness for Contextualized Digital Contents in Ubiquitous Learning Environments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Börner, Dirk; Specht, Marcus

    2010-01-01

    Börner, D., & Specht, M. (2009). Awareness for Contextualized Digital Contents in Ubiquitous Learning Environments. Proceedings of the Doctoral Consortium of the Fourth European Conference on Technology Enhanced Learning (EC-TEL 2009). September, 29-October, 2, 2009, Nice, France. [unpublished

  15. Digital Communication Applications in the Online Learning Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambeth, Krista Jill

    2011-01-01

    Scope and method of study. The purpose of this study was for the researcher to obtain a better understanding of the online learning environment, to explore the various ways online class instructors have incorporated digital communication applications to try and provide learner-centered online learning environments, and to examine students'…

  16. Digital Learning As Enhanced Learning Processing? Cognitive Evidence for New insight of Smart Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Giacomo, Dina; Ranieri, Jessica; Lacasa, Pilar

    2017-01-01

    Large use of technology improved quality of life across aging and favoring the development of digital skills. Digital skills can be considered an enhancing to human cognitive activities. New research trend is about the impact of the technology in the elaboration information processing of the children. We wanted to analyze the influence of technology in early age evaluating the impact on cognition. We investigated the performance of a sample composed of n. 191 children in school age distributed in two groups as users: high digital users and low digital users. We measured the verbal and visuoperceptual cognitive performance of children by n. 8 standardized psychological tests and ad hoc self-report questionnaire. Results have evidenced the influence of digital exposition on cognitive development: the cognitive performance is looked enhanced and better developed: high digital users performed better in naming, semantic, visual memory and logical reasoning tasks. Our finding confirms the data present in literature and suggests the strong impact of the technology using not only in the social, educational and quality of life of the people, but also it outlines the functionality and the effect of the digital exposition in early age; increased cognitive abilities of the children tailor digital skilled generation with enhanced cognitive processing toward to smart learning.

  17. Evaluation as a Powerful Practices in Digital Learning Processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Birgitte Holm; Levinsen, Karin

    2015-01-01

    for and empowers students⠒ agency as learning designers. Moreover, the positive impact increases when students as learning designers participate in formative evaluation practices. Traditionally, the Danish school has worked hard to teach students to verbalise their own academic competencies. However, as our...... everyday environment becomes increasingly comple x with digital and multimodal technologies, formative evaluation as a learning practice becomes central, requiring the students to develop a digital and multimodal literacy beyond the traditional, language‑centred type. In order to clarify these practices...... , we address the various understandings of evaluation and assessment that may blur our arguments. Students⠒ digital production and students as learning designers is a large‑scale project that follows up on the findings of Netbook 1:1. It experiments fur ther with various evaluation practices...

  18. Social Phenomenon of Community on Online Learning: Digital Interaction and Collaborative Learning Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aleksic-Maslac, Karmela; Magzan, Masha; Juric, Visnja

    2009-01-01

    Digital interaction in e-learning offers great opportunities for education quality improvement in both--the classical teaching combined with e-learning, and distance learning. Zagreb School of Economics & Management (ZSEM) is one of the few higher education institutions in Croatia that systematically uses e-learning in teaching. Systematically…

  19. Organisational Learning as an Emerging Process: The Generative Role of Digital Tools in Informal Learning Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Za, Stefano; Spagnoletti, Paolo; North-Samardzic, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    Increasing attention is paid to organisational learning, with the success of contemporary organisations strongly contingent on their ability to learn and grow. Importantly, informal learning is argued to be even more significant than formal learning initiatives. Given the widespread use of digital technologies in the workplace, what requires…

  20. Learning Tools for Knowledge Nomads: Using Personal Digital Assistants (PDAs) in Web-based Learning Environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loh, Christian Sebastian

    2001-01-01

    Examines how mobile computers, or personal digital assistants (PDAs), can be used in a Web-based learning environment. Topics include wireless networks on college campuses; online learning; Web-based learning technologies; synchronous and asynchronous communication via the Web; content resources; Web connections; and collaborative learning. (LRW)

  1. Towards Ways to Promote Interaction in Digital Learning Spaces

    OpenAIRE

    Olsson , Hanna ,

    2012-01-01

    Part 7: Doctoral Student Papers; International audience; Social learning is dependent on social interactions. I am exploring ways to promote interaction in Digital Learning Spaces. As theoretical framework I use the types of interaction between learner, instructor and content. That learners feel isolated and lonely in DLSs is a problem which comes at high cost for social learning. My aim is to promote social interaction by offering the edentity: a system for making participants visible to eac...

  2. Evaluation as a powerful practice in digital learning processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Birgitte Holm; Levinsen, Karin

    2014-01-01

    The present paper is based on two empirical research studies. The Netbook 1:1 project (2009–2012), funded by the municipality of Gentofte and Microsoft Denmark, is complete, while Students’ digital production and students as learning designers (2013–2015), funded by the Danish Ministry of Educati...... as a learning practice in a digitalised learning context focuses on students as actors, adressing their self‐reflections, responses to feedback from peers and feedforward processes....

  3. Using Digital Games to Learn Mathematics – What students think?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Su Ting Yong

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to explore how university foundation students perceive the use of digital games in learning mathematics. Data was collected using an online questionnaire and 209 foundation university students participated in this study.  The questionnaire was used to explore students’ gaming experience and students’ attitude towards mathematics learning with digital games.  It was found that most of the university foundation students liked to play different types of digital games.  Males preferred playing digital games in more traditional male genres namely sport, racing, shooter, action adventure, role play and strategy games.  As for females, they generally preferred playing puzzle and simulation games.  Astonishingly, the foundation students were not very positive towards the use of digital games in learning mathematics, and their attitude was essentially influenced by their mathematics interest.  Students with greater interest in mathematics were more likely to support the use of digital games in learning

  4. Learning "in" or "with" Games? Quality Criteria for Digital Learning Games from the Perspectives of Learning, Emotion, and Motivation Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hense, Jan; Mandl, Heinz

    2012-01-01

    This conceptual paper aims to clarify the theoretical underpinnings of game based learning (GBL) and learning with digital learning games (DLGs). To do so, it analyses learning of game related skills and contents, which occurs constantly during playing conventional entertainment games, from three perspectives: learning theory, emotion theory, and…

  5. Digital Learning in the Wild: Re-Imagining New Ruralism, Digital Equity, and Deficit Discourses through the Thirdspace

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cirell, Anna Montana

    2017-01-01

    Digital media is becoming increasingly important to learning in today's changing times. At the same time, digital technologies and related digital skills are unevenly distributed. Further, deficit-based notions of this digital divide define the public's educational paradigm. Against this backdrop, I forayed into the social reality of one rural…

  6. Digital Immigrants and Digital Natives: Learning Business Informatics at Higher Educational Level

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suša Dalia

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: The term digital natives refer to those born since the 1980s and have been growing up surrounded by technology. On the other hand, digital immigrants are born before 1980s and learned how to use technology later in life. Objectives: Goal of the paper is to explore attitudes of digital native students on the course of Business Informatics at higher educational institutions (HEIs, and to compare them with attitudes of digital immigrants. Methods/Approach: The survey was conducted in 2014 using the sample of first-year Business Informatics students from the Faculty of Economics and Business in Zagreb, Croatia. Results were compared with a research conducted in 1998. Results: In comparison to an earlier research, digital natives perceive their level of competency in the subject of Business Informatics before teaching practices much higher compared to digital immigrants. However, there is still an increase in digital native students’ level of competency in the subject before and after teaching practices. Conclusions: The research confirms a shift from digital immigrants to digital natives who show high level of interest for Business Informatics course topics and find its utility very high. However, constant improvement of delivering knowledge is needed in order to keep these high levels.

  7. The Power of Digital Storytelling to Support Teaching and Learning

    OpenAIRE

    Robin, Bernard

    2016-01-01

    Although the term “digital storytelling” may not be familiar to all readers, over the last twenty years, an increasing number of educators and students around the world have incorporated this technology into classroom instruction and educational projects. For more than twelve years, faculty members and graduate students in the Learning, Design and Technology Program at the University of Houston College of Education have been exploring the use of digital storytelling to support both tea...

  8. Nonlinear machine learning and design of reconfigurable digital colloids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Andrew W; Phillips, Carolyn L; Jankowksi, Eric; Ferguson, Andrew L

    2016-09-14

    Digital colloids, a cluster of freely rotating "halo" particles tethered to the surface of a central particle, were recently proposed as ultra-high density memory elements for information storage. Rational design of these digital colloids for memory storage applications requires a quantitative understanding of the thermodynamic and kinetic stability of the configurational states within which information is stored. We apply nonlinear machine learning to Brownian dynamics simulations of these digital colloids to extract the low-dimensional intrinsic manifold governing digital colloid morphology, thermodynamics, and kinetics. By modulating the relative size ratio between halo particles and central particles, we investigate the size-dependent configurational stability and transition kinetics for the 2-state tetrahedral (N = 4) and 30-state octahedral (N = 6) digital colloids. We demonstrate the use of this framework to guide the rational design of a memory storage element to hold a block of text that trades off the competing design criteria of memory addressability and volatility.

  9. Digital Analytics in Professional Work and Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Richard; Fenwick, Tara

    2016-01-01

    In a wide range of fields, professional practice is being transformed by the increasing influence of digital analytics: the massive volumes of big data, and software algorithms that are collecting, comparing and calculating that data to make predictions and even decisions. Researchers in a number of social sciences have been calling attention to…

  10. Using Digital Storytelling to Engage Student Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suwardy, Themin; Pan, Gary; Seow, Poh-Sun

    2013-01-01

    No one really knows what the first story ever told in human history was, but storytelling is an art that spans many civilizations and cultures, and continues to be a major part of our modern lives. More recently, storytelling has gone digital with advances in technology and connectivity. Educators have also rediscovered how storytelling can be an…

  11. Therapeutic modulation of the natural history of coronary atherosclerosis: lessons learned from serial imaging studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, Jordan; Puri, Rishi; Kataoka, Yu; Nicholls, Stephen J; Psaltis, Peter J

    2016-08-01

    Despite advances in risk prediction, preventive and therapeutic strategies, atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease remains a major public health challenge worldwide, carrying considerable morbidity, mortality and health economic burden. There continues to be a need to better understand the natural history of this disease to guide the development of more effective treatment, integral to which is the rapidly evolving field of coronary artery imaging. Various imaging modalities have been refined to enable detailed visualization of the pathological substrate of atherosclerosis, providing accurate and reproducible measures of coronary plaque burden and composition, including the presence of high-risk characteristics. The serial application of such techniques, including coronary computed tomography angiography (CTA), intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) and optical coherence tomography (OCT) have uncovered important insights into the progression of coronary plaque over time in patients with stable and unstable coronary artery disease (CAD), and its responsiveness to therapeutic interventions. Here we review the use of different imaging modalities for the surveillance of coronary atherosclerosis and the lessons they have provided about the modulation of CAD by both traditional and experimental therapies.

  12. Six to Ten Digits Multiplication Fun Learning Using Puppet Prototype

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islamiah Rosli, D.'oria; Ali, Azita; Peng, Lim Soo; Sujardi, Imam; Usodo, Budi; Adie Perdana, Fengky

    2017-01-01

    Logic and technical subjects require students to understand basic knowledge in mathematic. For instance, addition, minus, division and multiplication operations need to be mastered by students due to mathematic complexity as the learning mathematic grows higher. Weak foundation in mathematic also contribute to high failure rate in mathematic subjects in schools. In fact, students in primary schools are struggling to learn mathematic because they need to memorize formulas, multiplication or division operations. To date, this study will develop a puppet prototyping for learning mathematic for six to ten digits multiplication. Ten participants involved in the process of developing the prototype in this study. Students involved in the study were those from the intermediate class students whilst teachers were selected based on their vast knowledge and experiences and have more than five years of experience in teaching mathematic. Close participatory analysis will be used in the prototyping process as to fulfil the requirements of the students and teachers whom will use the puppet in learning six to ten digit multiplication in mathematic. Findings showed that, the students had a great time and fun learning experience in learning multiplication and they able to understand the concept of multiplication using puppet. Colour and materials of the puppet also help to attract student attention during learning. Additionally, students able to visualized and able to calculate accurate multiplication value and the puppet help them to recall in multiplying and adding the digits accordingly.

  13. Kinespell: Kinesthetic Learning Activity and Assessment in a Digital Game-Based Learning Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cariaga, Ada Angeli; Salvador, Jay Andrae; Solamo, Ma. Rowena; Feria, Rommel

    Various approaches in learning are commonly classified into visual, auditory and kinesthetic (VAK) learning styles. One way of addressing the VAK learning styles is through game-based learning which motivates learners pursue knowledge holistically. The paper presents Kinespell, an unconventional method of learning through digital game-based learning. Kinespell is geared towards enhancing not only the learner’s spelling abilities but also the motor skills through utilizing wireless controllers. It monitors player’s performance through integrated assessment scheme. Results show that Kinespell may accommodate the VAK learning styles and is a promising alternative to established methods in learning and assessing students’ performance in Spelling.

  14. Developing a digital learning version of a mentorship training programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casey, Debbie; Clark, Liz; Gould, Kathryn

    2018-01-25

    This article describes the experience of one university team in developing, delivering and evaluating an online Nursing and Midwifery Council-approved mentorship programme for nurses and midwives who support pre-registration students in practice. Although the authors are confident of the quality of the educational provision, this article does not discuss this programme as an exemplar of best practice, but aims to share the learning gained from the experience of introducing a digital learning version of a mentorship course.

  15. Selection and Serial Entrepreneurs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Jing

    2013-01-01

    There is substantial evidence that serial entrepreneurs outperform de novo entrepreneurs. But is this positive association between prior experience and performance the result of learning by doing or of selection on ability? This paper proposes a strategy that combines the fixed-effects model and IV...... when the analysis focuses on founding new startups in sectors closely related to entrepreneurs' previous ventures....

  16. Selection and Serial Entrepreneurs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Jing

    2011-01-01

    Although it has been broadly evidenced that entrepreneurial experience plays a substantial role in the emergence of serial entrepreneurship, the debate is still going on about whether this relationship should be attributed to learning by doing or instead be explained by selection on ability. This...

  17. Digital learning programs - competition for the classical microscope?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Peter

    2013-01-01

    The development of digital media has been impressive in recent years which is also among the reason for their increasing use in academic teaching. This is especially true for teaching Anatomy and Histology in the first two years in medical and dental curricula. Modern digital technologies allow for efficient, affordable and easily accessible distribution of histological images in high quality. Microscopy depends almost exclusively on such images. Since 20 years numerous digital teaching systems have been developed for this purpose. Respective developments have changed the ways students acquire knowledge and prepare for exams. Teaching staff should adapt lectures, seminars and labs accordingly. As a first step, a collection of high resolution digital microscopic slides was made available for students at the Friedrich-Schiller-University in Jena. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the importance of conventional light microscopy and related technologies in current and future medical and dental education aswell. A survey was done among 172 medical and dental students at the Friedrich-Schiller-University Jena. 51% of students use now frequently new digital media for learning histology in contrast to 5% in the year 2000 [1]. Digital media including Internet, CD- based learning combined with social networks successfully compete with classical light microscopy.

  18. Digital Board Game: Is there a need for it in language learning among tertiary level students?

    OpenAIRE

    Ali Zuraina; Mohamad Ghazali Mohd Amir Izzudin; Ismail Rosnani; Muhammad Nurul Nadia; Zainal Abidin Noor Azlinda; Abdul Malek Nabila

    2018-01-01

    The concept of learning while playing to learn language is a pedagogy that can enhance students’ learning interest. In this digital era, the use of board games, for instance, has provided a solution to learning a language. A considerable literature has grown up around the theme of digital board in language learning. Therefore, this paper aims at finding the significance of developing a digital board game for the purpose of vocabulary learning. Fifty-seven (57) students from Universiti Malaysi...

  19. Teaching children digital literacy through design-based learning with digital toolkits in schools

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bekker, T.; Bakker, S.; Douma, I.; van der Poel, J.E.C.; Scheltenaar, K.J.

    2015-01-01

    The paper presents our work on how to teach digital literacy and design thinking to children at primary and secondary schools, with a particular focus on exploring the tools that may support children’s learning in these domains. We have conducted design explorations with input from diverse

  20. Digital Game-Based Learning in Accounting and Business Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carenys, Jordi; Moya, Soledad

    2016-01-01

    This article presents a review of the accounting and business literature on digital game-based learning (DGBL). The article classifies what is already settled in the literature about the theoretical foundations of DGBL's effectiveness and its practical use into three categories. The first comprises what is known about the evaluation of digital…

  1. Digital Gaming and Language Learning: Autonomy and Community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chik, Alice

    2014-01-01

    The relationship between digital game play and second language (L2) learning is a particularly tricky issue in East Asia. Though there is an emerging presence of Chinese online games, many more young people are playing the English- or Japanese-language versions of the most popular commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) video games. In other words, most…

  2. Achieving Digital Literacy through Game Development: An Authentic Learning Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frydenberg, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: This paper aims to argue that the process of making an original game develops digital literacy skills and provides an authentic learning experience as students create, publish and deploy interactive games. Teaching students to create computer games has become common in both K-12 and tertiary education to introducing programming concepts,…

  3. Digital Learning Resources and Ubiquitous Technologies in Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camilleri, Mark Anthony; Camilleri, Adriana Caterina

    2017-01-01

    This research explores the educators' attitudes and perceptions about their utilisation of digital learning technologies. The methodology integrates measures from "the pace of technological innovativeness" and the "technology acceptance model" to understand the rationale for further ICT investment in compulsory education. A…

  4. Experiential Learning of Digital Communication Using LabVIEW

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhan, Wei; Porter, Jay R.; Morgan, Joseph A.

    2014-01-01

    This paper discusses the design and implementation of laboratories and course projects using LabVIEW in an instrumentation course. The pedagogical challenge is to enhance students' learning of digital communication using LabVIEW. LabVIEW was extensively used in the laboratory sessions, which better prepared students for the course projects. Two…

  5. A Critical Review of Digital Storyline-Enhanced Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novak, Elena

    2015-01-01

    Storyline is one of the major motivators that lead people to play video games. However, little empirical evidence exists on the instructional effectiveness of integrating a storyline into digital learning materials. This systematic literature review presents current empirical findings on the effects of a storyline game design element for human…

  6. Designing Digital Problem Based Learning Tasks that Motivate Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Loon, Anne-Marieke; Ros, Anje; Martens, Rob

    2013-01-01

    This study examines whether teachers are able to apply the principles of autonomy support and structure support in designing digital problem based learning (PBL) tasks. We examine whether these tasks are more autonomy- and structure-supportive and whether primary and secondary school students experience greater autonomy, competence, and motivation…

  7. [Managing digital medical imaging projects in healthcare services: lessons learned].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojas de la Escalera, D

    2013-01-01

    Medical imaging is one of the most important diagnostic instruments in clinical practice. The technological development of digital medical imaging has enabled healthcare services to undertake large scale projects that require the participation and collaboration of many professionals of varied backgrounds and interests as well as substantial investments in infrastructures. Rather than focusing on systems for dealing with digital medical images, this article deals with the management of projects for implementing these systems, reviewing various organizational, technological, and human factors that are critical to ensure the success of these projects and to guarantee the compatibility and integration of digital medical imaging systems with other health information systems. To this end, the author relates several lessons learned from a review of the literature and the author's own experience in the technical coordination of digital medical imaging projects. Copyright © 2012 SERAM. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  8. From eLearning to Digital Transformation: A Framework and Implications for L&D

    OpenAIRE

    Seufert, Sabine; Meier, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    How can the learning function (L&D) support learning and innovation ability of the entire organization in times of digital transformation? The core challenges for the learning function are twofold. Competence clarification: What are relevant “digital competences” in terms of knowledge, skills and attitudes that employees need in order to cope with digital transformation? Competence development: How to organize, design and support learning processes contributing to digital competences and digi...

  9. Multiple Intelligence and Digital Learning Awareness of Prospective B.Ed Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gracious, F. L. Antony; Shyla, F. L. Jasmine Anne

    2012-01-01

    The present study Multiple Intelligence and Digital Learning Awareness of prospective B.Ed teachers was probed to find the relationship between Multiple Intelligence and Digital Learning Awareness of Prospective B.Ed Teachers. Data for the study were collected using self made Multiple Intelligence Inventory and Digital Learning Awareness Scale.…

  10. Literacy Learning in a Digitally Rich Humanities Classroom: Embracing Multiple, Collaborative, and Simultaneous Texts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckley-Marudas, Mary Frances

    2016-01-01

    Understanding what happens when teachers embrace digital media for literacy learning is critical to realizing the potential of learning in the digital era. This article examines some of the ways that a high school teacher and his students leverage digital technologies for literacy learning in their humanities classrooms. The author introduces the…

  11. Empowering vocational math teachers by using digital learning material (DLM) with workplace assignments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zwart, D.P.; van Luit, J.E.H.; Goei, S. L.

    2016-01-01

    Digital Learning Material (DLM) are fast becoming a key instrument in teaching. The focus on E-learning systems with Digital Learning Material (DLM) is mostly on the medium and resources, instead of on the role of teachers. But like students, teachers also need to professionalize their digital

  12. Digital games and learning mathematics: Student, teacher and parent perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Su Ting Yong

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to explore the potential use of digital games in learning mathematics at secondary school level in Malaysia. Three secondary school students, three mathematics teachers and three parents were interviewed in this study. All the participants were asked for their views and experiences in mathematics, technology usage and the use of digital games in learning mathematics. The results suggested that students were supportive and positive towards the use of computer games in learning mathematics. Nevertheless, parents preferred conventional teaching approach, in which they recognized personal communication and socialization as a significant component in learning. Although the teachers did not go on to oppose the idea of using computer games for teaching mathematics, they still perceived the use of discursive approaches as the best teaching approach for learning mathematics with digital technologies at best a possible additional complementary feature. In view of that, the combination of classroom teaching and computer games might the best mathematics pedagogy. 

  13. There Is More to Digital Learning than Counting on Your Fingers: Transforming Learning and Teaching with Digital Pedagogy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smirnova, Lyudmila; Lazarevic , Bojan; Malloy, Veronica

    2018-01-01

    This paper explores how pedagogy is being influenced by fast developing digital technologies. Results are presented from exploratory research conducted in 2016. The findings are addressed in terms of the transformation of learning and education, including the move from the measured to the engaged classroom. Emerging technology creates a natural…

  14. Cocaine impairs serial-feature negative learning and blood-brain barrier integrity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidson, Terry L; Hargrave, Sara L; Kearns, David N; Clasen, Matthew M; Jones, Sabrina; Wakeford, Alison G P; Sample, Camille H; Riley, Anthony L

    2018-05-10

    Previous research has shown that diets high in fat and sugar [a.k.a., Western diets (WD)] can impair performance of rats on hippocampal-dependent learning and memory problems, an effect that is accompanied by selective increases in hippocampal blood brain barrier (BBB) permeability. Based on these types of findings, it has been proposed that overeating of a WD (and its resulting obesity) may be, in part, a consequence of impairments in these anatomical substrates and cognitive processes. Given that drug use (and addiction) represents another behavioral excess, the present experiments assessed if similar outcomes might occur with drug exposure by evaluating the effects of cocaine administration on hippocampal-dependent memory and on the integrity of the BBB. Experiment 1 of the present series of studies found that systemic cocaine administration in rats also appears to have disruptive effects on the same hippocampal-dependent learning and memory mechanism that has been proposed to underlie the inhibition of food intake. Experiment 2 demonstrated that the same regimen of cocaine exposure that produced disruptions in learning and memory in Experiment 1 also produced increased BBB permeability in the hippocampus, but not in the striatum. Although the predominant focus of previous research investigating the etiologies of substance use and abuse has been on the brain circuits that underlie the motivational properties of drugs, the current investigation implicates the possible involvement of hippocampal memory systems in such behaviors. It is important to note that these positions are not mutually exclusive and that neuroadaptations in these two circuits might occur in parallel that generate dysregulated drug use in a manner similar to that of excessive eating. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Digital games and Blended Learning in language learning: a case study with high school students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elaine Teixeira da Silva

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Contemporary language teaching can turn to a tool provided by the development of digital technologies - digital games. This resource is used by the vast majority of students, and its attractive features allow for meaningful learning. This method can be classified as Blended Learning since students use games to learn without the physical presence of the teacher, but still favor face-to-face learning. To verify digital games as a tool for teaching languages and for Blended Learning, a questionnaire created in Google Forms was shared with 67 interviewees with four questions related to the theme. It is a quantitative research supported by the contributions of Kenski (2007, Mattar (2011, Mendes (2011, Prensky (2012, and Tori (2010. among others.

  16. Practice effects and test-re-test reliability of the Five Digit Test in patients with stroke over four serial assessments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, En-Chi; Koh, Chia-Lin; Tsai, Chia-Yin; Lu, Wen-Shian; Sheu, Ching-Fan; Hsueh, I-Ping; Hsieh, Ching-Lin

    2014-01-01

    To investigate practice effect and test-re-test reliability of the Five Digit Test (FDT) over four serial assessments in patients with stroke. Single-group repeated measures design. Twenty-five patients with stroke were administered the FDT in four consecutive assessments every 2 weeks. The FDT contains four parts with five indices: 'basic measures of attention and processing speed', 'selective attention', 'alternating attention', 'ability of inhibition' and 'ability of switching'. The five indices of the FDT showed trivial-to-small practice effects (Cohen's d = 0.03-0.47) and moderate-to-excellent test-re-test reliability (intra-class correlation coefficient = 0.59-0.97). Practice effects of the five indices all appeared cumulative, but one index, 'basic measures of attention and processing speed', reached a plateau after the second assessment. The minimum and maximum values of the 90% confidence interval (CI) of reliable change index modified for practice (RCIp) for this index were [-17.6, 11.2]. One of five indices of the FDT reached a plateau, whose minimum and maximum values of the 90% CI RCIp are useful to determine whether the change in an individual's score is real. However, clinicians and researchers should be cautious when interpreting the test results of these four indices over repeated assessments.

  17. Creative Digital Worksheet Base on Mobile Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wibawa, S. C.; Cholifah, R.; Utami, A. W.; Nurhidayat, A. I.

    2018-01-01

    The student is required to understand and act in the classroom and it is very important for selecting the media learning to determine the learning outcome. An instructional media is needed to help students achieve the best learning outcome. The objectives of this study are (1) to make Android-based student worksheet, (2) to know the students’ response on Android-based student worksheet in multimedia subject, (3) to determine the student result using Android-based student worksheet. The method used was Research and Development (R&D) using post-test-only in controlled quasi-experimental group design. The subjects of the study were 2 classes, a control class and an experimental class. The results showed (1) Android-based student worksheet was categorized very good as percentage of 85%; (2) the students’ responses was categorized very good as percentage of 86.42%; (3) the experimental class results were better than control class. The average result on cognitive tests on the experimental class was 89.97 and on control class was 78.31; whether the average result on psychomotor test on the experimental class was 89.90 and on the control class was 79.83. In conclusion, student result using Android-based student worksheet was better than those without it.

  18. Games for learning: vast wasteland or a digital promise?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, Michael H; Vaala, Sarah E

    2013-01-01

    Research about emerging best practices in the learning sciences points to the potential of deploying digital games as one possible solution to the twin challenges of weak student engagement and the need for more robust achievement in literacy, science, technology, and math. This chapter reviews key cross-cutting themes in this special volume, drawing perspective from the context of the current United States program and policy reform. The authors conclude that digital games have some unique potential to address pressing educational challenges, but that new mechanisms for advancing purposeful research and development must be adopted by both policymakers and industry leaders. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc., A Wiley Company.

  19. Evaluating a Personal Learning Environment for Digital Storytelling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolaos Marianos

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The evaluation of flexible and personal learning environments is extremely challenging. It should not be limited to the assessment of products, but should address the quality of educative experience with close monitoring. The evaluation of a PLE using digital storytelling is even more complicated, due to the unpredictability of the usage scenarios. This paper presents an evaluation methodology for PLEs using digital storytelling, using a participatory design approach. The results from an open validation trial indicate that this methodology is able to incorporate all necessary factors and that the selected evaluation tools are appropriate for addressing the quality of educative experience.

  20. The transformation of Teacher Work through digital learning platforms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, René Boyer; Andreasen, Lars Birch

    four transformation tendencies in the educational system regarding teacher work and discuss these in relation to a recent research project which aims at looking at the organizational and didactical implications for teachers working with digital platforms in the Danish primary school.......This paper examines a new mandatory initiative in the Danish primary school regarding digital learning platforms for students, teachers and parents and regards this as a part of a global process that leads to a transformation of teacher work and thus everyday life for teachers in schools. We list...

  1. Implementing digital technology to enhance student learning of pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farah, C S; Maybury, T

    2009-08-01

    The introduction of digital technologies into the dental curriculum is an ongoing feature of broader changes going on in tertiary education. This report examines the introduction of digital virtual microscopy technology into the curriculum of the School of Dentistry at the University of Queensland (UQ) in Brisbane, Australia. Sixty students studying a course in pathology in 2005 were introduced to virtual microscopy technology alongside the more traditional light microscope and then asked to evaluate their own learning outcomes from this technology via a structured 5-point LIKART survey. A wide variety of questions dealing the pedagogic implications of the introduction of virtual microscopy into pathology were asked of students with the overall result being that it positively enhanced their learning of pathology via digital microscopic means. The success of virtual microscopy in dentistry at UQ is then discussed in the larger context of changes going on in tertiary education. In particular, the change from the print-literate tradition to the electronic one, that is from 'literacy to electracy'. Virtual microscopy is designated as a component of this transformation to electracy. Whilst traditional microscopic skills may still be valued in dental curricula, the move to virtual microscopy and computer-assisted, student-centred learning of pathology appears to enhance the learning experience in relation to its effectiveness in helping students engage and interact with the course material.

  2. Effects of stimulus salience on touchscreen serial reversal learning in a mouse model of fragile X syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickson, Price E.; Corkill, Beau; McKimm, Eric; Miller, Mellessa M.; Calton, Michele A.; Goldowitz, Daniel; Blaha, Charles D.; Mittleman, Guy

    2013-01-01

    Fragile X syndrome (FXS) is the most common inherited form of intellectual disability in males and the most common genetic cause of autism. Although executive dysfunction is consistently found in humans with FXS, evidence of executive dysfunction in Fmr1 KO mice, a mouse model of FXS, has been inconsistent. One possible explanation for this is that executive dysfunction in Fmr1 KO mice, similar to humans with FXS, is only evident when cognitive demands are high. Using touchscreen operant conditioning chambers, male Fmr1 KO mice and their male wildtype littermates were tested on the acquisition of a pairwise visual discrimination followed by four serial reversals of the response rule. We assessed reversal learning performance under two different conditions. In the first, the correct stimulus was salient and the incorrect stimulus was non-salient. In the second and more challenging condition, the incorrect stimulus was salient and the correct stimulus was non-salient; this increased cognitive load by introducing conflict between sensory-driven (i.e., bottom-up) and task-dependent (i.e., top-down) signals. Fmr1 KOs displayed two distinct impairments relative to wildtype littermates. First, Fmr1 KOs committed significantly more learning-type errors during the second reversal stage, but only under high cognitive load. Second, during the first reversal stage, Fmr1 KOs committed significantly more attempts to collect a reward during the timeout following an incorrect response. These findings indicate that Fmr1 KO mice display executive dysfunction that, in some cases, is only evident under high cognitive load. PMID:23747611

  3. Classroom Habit(us): Digital Learning Tools in a Blended Learning Program

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borsotti, Valeria; Møllenbach, Emilie

    2016-01-01

    In this exploratory case study we map the educational practice of teachers and students in a professional master of Interaction Design. Through a grounded analysis of the context we describe and reflect on: 1) the use of digital learning tools in a blended learning environment, 2) co...

  4. The Effects of Digital Learning Material on Students' Mathematics Learning in Vocational Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwart, Diana P.; Van Luit, Johannes E. H.; Noroozi, Omid; Goei, Sui Lin

    2017-01-01

    This study investigates the effects of Digital Learning Material (DLM) including instructional clips, online guidance, structuring of content, and a collaboration tool on students' mathematics learning in Dutch vocational education. A pretest-posttest design was used. Apprenticeship students were asked to complete assignments and to discuss them…

  5. Assessment of Learning in Digital Interactive Social Networks: A Learning Analytics Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Mark; Gochyyev, Perman; Scalise, Kathleen

    2016-01-01

    This paper summarizes initial field-test results from data analytics used in the work of the Assessment and Teaching of 21st Century Skills (ATC21S) project, on the "ICT Literacy--Learning in digital networks" learning progression. This project, sponsored by Cisco, Intel and Microsoft, aims to help educators around the world enable…

  6. Cultivating Critical Game Makers in Digital Game-Based Learning: Learning from the Arts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denham, André R.; Guyotte, Kelly W.

    2018-01-01

    Digital games have the potential of being a transformative tool for applying constructionist principles to learning within formal and informal learning settings. Unfortunately, most recent attention has focused on instructionist games. Connected gaming provides a tantalizing alternative approach by calling for the development of games that are…

  7. Digital portfolio for learning: A new communication channel for education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Judit Coromina

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The Catalonian Government has the intention of introducing the digital portfolio before 2017, an initiative related to new approaches for learning. Taking in consideration the increasing interest for digital portfolio as a new communication channel for education, the article aims are: on the one hand to describe how the digital portfolio works and on the other hand, to identify a list of criteria that should be useful for educative centers to select the best application to create the digital portfolio according to their needs.Design/methodology/approach: Firstly, a theoretical framework for portfolio functioning is described. After, applications to support the digital portfolio are classified. Next, a requirement analysis on an ideal application to support the portfolio is made, according to those phases for the portfolio creation identified in the theoretical framework. Lastly, a list of criteria is established to select the application for creating the digital portfolio.Findings and Originality/value: The article contributes to structure the portfolio creation process in some stages and phases in a wider way that it is described in the literature. In addition, a list of criteria is defined to help educative centers to select the application for managing the portfolio that fits better with their objectives. These criteria have been obtained with an exhaustive methodology.Research limitations/implications: In order to put in practice the identified criteria it is proposed to complete the multi-criteria decision model in a new study. It should include processes to weigh criteria and define normalizations. Afterwards it would be able to analyze the value of the model studying the satisfaction for using it by a sample of educative centers.Practical implications: The list of criteria identified should facilitate the selection of the more adequate application to create the learning portfolio to the educative centers, according to their

  8. DIGITAL COMPETENCIES – COLLABORATING, WORKING AND LEARNING ACROSS CAMPUSES

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tellerup, Susanne

    2014-01-01

    of the project • Leadership - providing visions, direction, concrete support and resources • External consultants – providing professional guidance, structure, and expertise • Collaborative reflection, documentation, sharing and development of concrete teaching and learning designs • Access to digital platforms......A Design-Based Project The project Digital Competencies for Collaboration– across Campuses is a project, which illustrates how faculty through design-based research can improve and transform communication and learning. In the project the Social Education Program (SEP) at University College Zealand...... (UCZ) works with faculty’s competencies - developing new ways of using technology to empower faculty collaboration across campuses, to create new designs for teaching and to enable new methods of knowledge sharing. Faculty, in the case presented, is located on four different campuses and the use...

  9. PROBLEM-BASED LEARNING IN THE DIGITAL AGE

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kolbæk, Ditte

    Problem-based and project-organized learning (PBL) was originally developed to facilitate collaboration between physically present students; however, due to digitalization, collaboration, dialogues, and other PBL activities should take place online as well. With a theoretical point of departure...... from Dewey and a methodological point of departure from netnography, this study focused on a blended learning module at Aalborg University, where teaching is based on PBL. A primary research question was investigated: “How can IT support collaborative learning among learner communities in a PBL Master......’s program at Aalborg University?” The ways teachers and groups of students could benefit from utilizing IT as a platform for learning were examined. Netnography was the chosen methodology, and the data consisted of the course materials, the reflections, and the dialogues available online. The study showed...

  10. DIGITAL SIMULATIONS FOR IMPROVING EDUCATION: Learning Through Artificial Teaching Environments

    OpenAIRE

    Reviewed by Özlem OZAN

    2009-01-01

    DIGITAL SIMULATIONS FOR IMPROVING EDUCATION:Learning Through Artificial Teaching EnvironmentsGibson, David, Ed.D.; Information Science Reference, Hershey, PA,SBN-10: 1605663239, ISBN-13: 9781605663234, p.514 Jan 2009Reviewed byÖzlem OZANFaculty of Education, Eskişehir Osmangazi University,Eskisehir-TURKEYSimulations in education, both for children and adults,become popular with the development of computer technology, because they are fun and engaging and allow learners to internalize knowledg...

  11. Moving Teaching and Learning into the Digital Era

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramlee Mustapha

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Digital learners, who are now entering schools and universities, have learning expectations, styles, and needs different from past students. Today’s Gen-Z communicates in a language that older generation may not fully understand; the aforementioned learners have a vernacular of their own. It’s an ever-evolving language of interpretation and expression, an interactive approach to learning, creating and responding to information through a complex montage of images, sound, and communication. Students are pushing learning into a new dimension. It’s a mistake to continue to try to teach these learners in time-worn ways. Their choices of communication need to be diversified to encompass visual interpretations of texts and historical figures. Vast challenges have arisen and the impact of technology on the socio-economic landscape is becoming more significant. Gen-Z takes advantage of the enormous resources of the Web, transforming what they find there by using digital technologies to create something new and expressive. More advanced and specialized courses could also be converted, although some level of face-to-face contact is necessary to master such material. Unless teachers are trained to expect and accept content gathered through social networks with emphasis on teaching students how to check validity and reliability of the web, the full power of the digital natives cannot be released or expanded. Educators have to adjust their teaching styles to accommodate a new generation of Gen-Z. This paper, which is a predominantly theoretical one, maintains that creative thinking and a firm commitment are needed to move teaching and learning into the digital age.

  12. University students’ self-regulated learning using digital technologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen Yot-Domínguez

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Analysing the process by which students—whether at university or not—manage and facilitate their own learning has been a recurrent educational research problem. Recently, the question arises about how the development of strategies taking place during the aforementioned process could be made easier by using technologies. In an effort to know whether university students really use digital technologies to plan, organize and facilitate their own learning, we have proposed three research questions. Which technologies do university students use to self-regulate their learning? What self-regulated learning strategies do they develop using technologies? What profiles could be identified among students based on their use of self-regulation strategies with technology? To answer these questions, the “Survey of Self-regulated Learning with Technology at the University” was designed. Information from a sample group with 711 students from various universities located in the region of Andalusia (Spain was collected with this survey. The results indicate that university students, even when they are frequent users of digital technology, they tend not to use these technologies to regulate their own learning process. Of all technologies analysed, Internet information search and instant communication tools are used continually. In turn, the most generalised self-regulation learning strategies are those relative to social support. Nevertheless, students differ from each other regarding their use and frequency. There are groups of students who make use of self-regulation strategies when learning with technologies. In this regard, two distinctive groups of students have been identified, who show differentiated self-regulated levels.

  13. The Learning Impact of a 4-Dimensional Digital Construction Learning Environment

    OpenAIRE

    Chris Landorf; Stephen Ward

    2017-01-01

    This paper addresses a virtual environment approach to work integrated learning for students in construction-related disciplines. The virtual approach provides a safe and pedagogically rigorous environment where students can apply theoretical knowledge in a simulated real-world context. The paper describes the development of a 4-dimensional digital construction environment and associated learning activities funded by the Australian Office for Learning and Teaching. The environment was trialle...

  14. Learning and Motivational Processes When Students Design Curriculum‐Based Digital Learning Games

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weitze, Charlotte Lærke

    2016-01-01

    This design‐based research (DBR) project has developed an overall gamified learning design (big Game) to facilitate the learning process for adult students by inviting them to be their own learning designers through designing digital learning games (small games) in cross‐disciplinary subject...... matters. The DBR project has investigated and experimented with which elements, methods, and processes are important when aiming at creating a cognitive complex (Anderson and Krathwohl, 2001) and motivating learning process within a reusable game‐based learning design. This project took place in a co......, or programming provide a rich context for learning, since the construction of artefacts, in this case learning games, enables reflection and new ways of thinking. The students learned from reflection and interaction with the tools alone as well as in collaboration with peers. After analysing the students...

  15. Learning and Motivational Processes When Students Design Curriculum-Based Digital Learning Games

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weitze, Charlotte Lærke

    2015-01-01

    This design-based research (DBR) project has developed an overall gamified learning design (big Game) to facilitate the learning process for adult students by inviting them to be their own learning designers through designing digital learning games (small games) in cross-disciplinary subject...... matters. The DBR project has investigated and experimented with which elements, methods, and processes are important when aiming at creating a cognitive complex (Anderson and Krathwohl, 2001) and motivating learning process within a reusable game-based learning design. This project took place in a co......, or programming provide a rich context for learning, since the construction of artefacts, in this case learning games, enables reflection and new ways of thinking. The students learned from reflection and interaction with the tools alone as well as in collaboration with peers. After analysing the students...

  16. Learning Commons: Konsep Pengembangan Perpustakaan Perguruan Tinggi Menghadapi Generasi Digital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Choironi Yusuf

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available n the digital age, when information can be accessed without any  limits  of  space  and  time,  has  given  the  considerable  impact  of the  library. During  this  period,  the  existence  of  library  started  to  be questioned. Information search behavior changes and the changing needs of the library makes a librarian sued to be able to keep abreast of the latest developments  in managing a  library. To answer  this need,  the  idea of learning commons appears, by changing the concept of management of libraries that are adapted to the character of the digital generation. The concept of learning commons present  in an efort to ofset any change in  behavior  of  the  digital  generation  in utilizing  community  library. Creating  Library  learning  commons-based  does  not mean  having  to pay, but the most important is how to change the mindset of librarian.

  17. Examining the Characteristics of Digital Learning Games Designed by In-Service Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Yun-Jo; Cao, Li

    2017-01-01

    In order to better understand teachers' perspectives on the design and development of digital game-based learning environments, this study examined the characteristics of digital learning games designed by teachers. In addition, this study explored how game design and peer critique activities influenced their perceptions of digital game-based…

  18. Predicting Digital Informal Learning: An Empirical Study among Chinese University Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Tao; Zhu, Chang; Questier, Frederik

    2018-01-01

    Although the adoption of digital technology has gained considerable attention in higher education, currently research mainly focuses on implementation in formal learning contexts. Investigating what factors influence students' digital informal learning is still unclear and limited. To understand better university students' digital informal…

  19. Serial personal digital assistant data capture of health-related quality of life: A randomized controlled trial in a prostate cancer clinic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ritvo Paul

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In clinical and research practice linked to prostate cancer treatment, frequent monitoring of patient health-related quality of life (HRQOL is essential. Practical and analytic limitations of paper questionnaire data capture may be overcome with the use of self-administered personal digital assistant (PDA data collection. The objective of this study was to assess the reliability, validity, and feasibility of using PDA in place of paper versions of the International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS, the Patient Oriented Prostate Cancer Utility Survey (PORPUS, and the International Index of Erectile Function-5 (IIEF-5 in a prostate cancer clinic setting. Methods 152 participants were randomly assigned to one of three conditions: 1 paper followed by PDA survey; 2 PDA followed by paper survey; or 3 PDA followed by PDA survey. Evaluation included an assessment of data quality (internal consistency, test-retest reliability, response correlation, completeness of data, and feasibility (participation rates, time to completion, preference and difficultly/ease of using PDA. Results Internal consistency was similar for both PDA and paper applications. Test-retest reliability was confirmed for PDA repeated administration. Data from paper and PDA questionnaires were strongly correlated. Lower missed item rates were found in PDA administration. 82.8% of participants preferred using the PDA or had no preference. Mean difficulty/ease ratings indicated that participants found the PDA easy to use. Age did not significantly correlate with preference or difficulty. Conclusion The results confirm the adaptability of the IPSS, IIEF-5, and the PORPUS to PDA administration. Similarly, the findings of this study support the feasibility of using PDA technology for HRQOL serial data capture in the prostate cancer patient population.

  20. New Models of Learning for New Media: Observations of Young People Learning Digital Design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebekah Willett

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available There are numerous discourses that seek to define the relationships between young people and digital media. These discourses have different and sometimes contradictory ways of constructing learners and the learning environment (Facer et al. 2001. On the one hand there are panics around new media which position children and young people as being at risk from the dangers of digital technology. In this view children are in need of careful teaching and controlling, as they are unable to learn the correct and safe way to use digital technology on their own. In complete contrast, there are discourses around new technologies which position children as ready learners and technology as offering endless easy-to-use resources for worthwhile learning. This latter view of children as „natural cyberkids’ overlooks many aspects of learning and digital technology, not least the socio-cultural aspects of learning or the possibility that there might be a developmental progression of skills related to learning new technologies.

  1. [Digital learning and teaching in medical education : Already there or still at the beginning?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhn, Sebastian; Frankenhauser, Susanne; Tolks, Daniel

    2018-02-01

    The current choice of digital teaching and learning formats in medicine is very heterogeneous. In addition to the widely used classical static formats, social communication tools, audio/video-based media, interactive formats, and electronic testing systems enrich the learning environment.For medical students, the private use of digital media is not necessarily linked to their meaningful use in the study. Many gain their experience of digital learning in the sense of "assessment drives learning", especially by taking online exams in a passive, consuming role. About half of all medical students can be referred to as "e-examinees" whose handling of digital learning is primarily focused on online exam preparation. Essentially, they do not actively influence their digital environment. Only a quarter can be identified as a "digital all-rounder", who compiles their individual learning portfolio from the broad range of digital media.At present, the use of digital media is not yet an integral and comprehensive component of the teaching framework of medical studies in Germany, but is rather used in the sense of a punctual teaching enrichment. Current trends in digital teaching and learning offerings are mobile, interactive, and personalized platforms as well as increasing the relevance of learning platforms. Furthermore, didactical concepts targeting the changed learning habits of the students are more successful regarding the acceptance and learning outcomes. In addition, digitalization is currently gaining importance as a component in the medical school curricula.

  2. Questioning short-term memory and its measurement: Why digit span measures long-term associative learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Gary; Macken, Bill

    2015-11-01

    Traditional accounts of verbal short-term memory explain differences in performance for different types of verbal material by reference to inherent characteristics of the verbal items making up memory sequences. The role of previous experience with sequences of different types is ostensibly controlled for either by deliberate exclusion or by presenting multiple trials constructed from different random permutations. We cast doubt on this general approach in a detailed analysis of the basis for the robust finding that short-term memory for digit sequences is superior to that for other sequences of verbal material. Specifically, we show across four experiments that this advantage is not due to inherent characteristics of digits as verbal items, nor are individual digits within sequences better remembered than other types of individual verbal items. Rather, the advantage for digit sequences stems from the increased frequency, compared to other verbal material, with which digits appear in random sequences in natural language, and furthermore, relatively frequent digit sequences support better short-term serial recall than less frequent ones. We also provide corpus-based computational support for the argument that performance in a short-term memory setting is a function of basic associative learning processes operating on the linguistic experience of the rememberer. The experimental and computational results raise questions not only about the role played by measurement of digit span in cognition generally, but also about the way in which long-term memory processes impact on short-term memory functioning. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Digital media and aesthetical learning in day care education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Søren

    from a aesthetic view wherein the digital media can be used as a resource for the child to learn about body awareness and better understanding and remembrance of their own subjectivity, while still gaining the knowledge education the Danish system demands. In this paper I will use an existential...... that the child should no longer be seen as a user with an ipad, but instead should the ipad while in use be seen as an extension of the users subject. The importance comes in how the pedagog helps the user not to lose awareness of the body while this takes place, but instead let the user experience both the body......Digital media and aesthetical learning in day care education. The digital media is one of the major subjects that are to be included in everyday life in the Danish day care. This is a strategy from the Danish government, who view it as a necessary step in educating children for the future. In 2013...

  4. THE BENEFITS OF THE E-LEARNING AGRICULTURAL PROJECT KISSANKERALA TO DIGITAL IMMIGRANTS AND DIGITAL NATIVES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manoj ROY. V.

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available In recent times Information and Communication Technology (ICT has been able to make inroads into the ways information is disseminated among those involved in direct farming and farming related enterprises. This paper arose from a two-year study of the KissanKerala, the e-learning project underway in Kerala, a small state in India. It is more conspicuous when we learn that the KissanKerala project is able to disseminate agricultural information also among digital immigrants. Since 2003, the KissanKerala has been providing advisory services to the farming community in Kerala using a combination of technologies. Salient features of the project are discussed. Noteworthy are its interactive web portal and the online agri-video channel that uses the video sharing platform of YouTube. In this paper, we look at the e-learning strategies adopted; virtual learning environments created and also discuss participative tools used for communication. We have also made an impact-study of the project with a large number of beneficiaries. We learn that the Kissan Kerala is one of the most successful learning projects undertaken in distance mode in India.

  5. Digital Technology, Schools and Teachers' Workplace Learning: Policy, Practice and Identity. Digital Education and Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Michael

    2016-01-01

    This book advances an alternative reading of the social, political and cultural issues surrounding schools and technology and develops a comprehensive overview of the interplay between policy, practice and identity in school workplaces. It explores how digital technologies have become an integral element of the politics and socially negotiated…

  6. Investigating digital native female learners’ attitudes towards paperless language learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsoghik Grigoryan

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available This study is an investigation of paperless language learning in the context of the United Arab Emirates. The purpose of this study was to examine Emirati level 1 English language learners’ attitudes towards the iPad use as a means of language learning. It was done through a cross-sectional survey questionnaire, wholly composed of fixed-choice questions, and through weekly reflective journals that were written by the teachers teaching the groups. The survey collected data through a questionnaire from 80 students who had been exposed to paperless language learning for a duration of 80 teaching periods. The data collected showed positive student attitudes towards iPad implementation as a language learning tool in terms of learner satisfaction, motivation, perceived tool usefulness and learning effectiveness. Reflective journal analysis showed that the digital world presents the students with a direct link between the effort taken and the reward received, whereas the feedback or the reward given by the teachers in the traditional classroom was either too nebulous or too slow to motivate students to keep the pace of progressive learning.

  7. Health professional learner attitudes and use of digital learning resources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maloney, Stephen; Chamberlain, Michael; Morrison, Shane; Kotsanas, George; Keating, Jennifer L; Ilic, Dragan

    2013-01-16

    Web-based digital repositories allow educational resources to be accessed efficiently and conveniently from diverse geographic locations, hold a variety of resource formats, enable interactive learning, and facilitate targeted access for the user. Unlike some other learning management systems (LMS), resources can be retrieved through search engines and meta-tagged labels, and content can be streamed, which is particularly useful for multimedia resources. The aim of this study was to examine usage and user experiences of an online learning repository (Physeek) in a population of physiotherapy students. The secondary aim of this project was to examine how students prefer to access resources and which resources they find most helpful. The following data were examined using an audit of the repository server: (1) number of online resources accessed per day in 2010, (2) number of each type of resource accessed, (3) number of resources accessed during business hours (9 am to 5 pm) and outside business hours (years 1-4), (4) session length of each log-on (years 1-4), and (5) video quality (bit rate) of each video accessed. An online questionnaire and 3 focus groups assessed student feedback and self-reported experiences of Physeek. Students preferred the support provided by Physeek to other sources of educational material primarily because of its efficiency. Peak usage commonly occurred at times of increased academic need (ie, examination times). Students perceived online repositories as a potential tool to support lifelong learning and health care delivery. The results of this study indicate that today's health professional students welcome the benefits of online learning resources because of their convenience and usability. This represents a transition away from traditional learning styles and toward technological learning support and may indicate a growing link between social immersions in Internet-based connections and learning styles. The true potential for Web

  8. Learning Behavior and Achievement Analysis of a Digital Game-Based Learning Approach Integrating Mastery Learning Theory and Different Feedback Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Kai-Hsiang

    2017-01-01

    It is widely accepted that the digital game-based learning approach has the advantage of stimulating students' learning motivation, but simply using digital games in the classroom does not guarantee satisfactory learning achievement, especially in the case of the absence of a teacher. Integrating appropriate learning strategies into a game can…

  9. Automated Categorization Scheme for Digital Libraries in Distance Learning: A Pattern Recognition Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunal, Serkan

    2008-01-01

    Digital libraries play a crucial role in distance learning. Nowadays, they are one of the fundamental information sources for the students enrolled in this learning system. These libraries contain huge amount of instructional data (text, audio and video) offered by the distance learning program. Organization of the digital libraries is…

  10. The Strategic Role of Digital Libraries: Issues in E-Learning Environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Mei-Yu

    2003-01-01

    Describes research aimed at providing educational organizations with practical strategies for implementing electronic learning (e-learning), based on focus group discussions at an elementary school in Taiwan. Considers the strategic role of digital libraries in electronic learning environments, library collections, digital technology, human…

  11. Teaching in a Digital Age: How Educators Use Technology to Improve Student Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKnight, Katherine; O'Malley, Kimberly; Ruzic, Roxanne; Horsley, Maria Kelly; Franey, John J.; Bassett, Katherine

    2016-01-01

    A successful digital conversion for classrooms, districts, and states is not determined by the technology, but by how technology enables teaching and learning. The purpose of our multisite case study was to document digital instructional strategies teachers use to enhance and transform student learning, and align that use with learning research.…

  12. The Inclusion Potential of Student Production of Digital Learning Objects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Levinsen, Karin Tweddell; Sørensen, Birgitte Holm

    2016-01-01

    This account of the inclusion potential of students’ digital production is based on the large-scale research and development project Students’ Digital Production and Students as Learning Designers (2013–2015), funded by the Danish Ministry of Education. The target groups were primary and lower......-designed framework that accommodates and empowers students’ agency. The Danish parliament passed the Law of Inclusion In 2012 with the objective that by 2015, 96% of all students would be included in normal classes. Inclusion was not part of the initial research agenda, but this changed unexpectedly during...... the project. Specifically, students who did not participate or participated only sporadically in everyday school activities at the beginning of the project adopted new positions as participants and agents. We understand these changes as inclusive processes initiated by the combination of teacher...

  13. Searching for the Hebb effect in Down syndrome: evidence for a dissociation between verbal short-term memory and domain-general learning of serial order.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosse, E K; Jarrold, C

    2010-04-01

    The Hebb effect is a form of repetition-driven long-term learning that is thought to provide an analogue for the processes involved in new word learning. Other evidence suggests that verbal short-term memory also constrains now vocabulary acquisition, but if the Hebb effect is independent of short-term memory, then it may be possible to demonstrate its preservation in a sample of individuals with Down syndrome, who typically show a verbal short-term memory deficit alongside surprising relative strengths in vocabulary. In two experiments, individuals both with and without Down syndrome (matched for receptive vocabulary) completed immediate serial recall tasks incorporating a Hebb repetition paradigm in either verbal or visuospatial conditions. Both groups demonstrated equivalent benefit from Hebb repetition, despite individuals with Down syndrome showing significantly lower verbal short-term memory spans. The resultant Hebb effect was equivalent across verbal and visuospatial domains. These studies suggest that the Hebb effect is essentially preserved within Down syndrome, implying that explicit verbal short-term memory is dissociable from potentially more implicit Hebb learning. The relative strength in receptive vocabulary observed in Down syndrome may therefore be supported by largely intact long-term as opposed to short-term serial order learning. This in turn may have implications for teaching methods and interventions that present new phonological material to individuals with Down syndrome.

  14. The Role of Digital Libraries to Support of E-learning

    OpenAIRE

    Akbar Majidi

    2012-01-01

    E-learning is the new pattern of teaching and learning process. The main characteristic of e-learning is delivery of content and learning activity within learning management systems (LMS). E-learning for its success requires that access to resources and information services. Digital libraries can offer different resources and information services on the Internet. Therefore, it will be very useful to support e-learning in this article, after expression of definitions of e-learning and ...

  15. Connectivism: A knowledge learning theory for the digital age?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldie, John Gerard Scott

    2016-10-01

    The emergence of the internet, particularly Web 2.0 has provided access to the views and opinions of a wide range of individuals opening up opportunities for new forms of communication and knowledge formation. Previous ways of navigating and filtering available information are likely to prove ineffective in these new contexts. Connectivism is one of the most prominent of the network learning theories which have been developed for e-learning environments. It is beginning to be recognized by medical educators. This article aims to examine connectivism and its potential application. The conceptual framework and application of connectivism are presented along with an outline of the main criticisms. Its potential application in medical education is then considered. While connectivism provides a useful lens through which teaching and learning using digital technologies can be better understood and managed, further development and testing is required. There is unlikely to be a single theory that will explain learning in technological enabled networks. Educators have an important role to play in online network learning.

  16. Create, compose, connect! reading, writing, and learning with digital tools

    CERN Document Server

    Hyler, Jeremy

    2014-01-01

    Find out how to incorporate digital tools into your English language arts class to improve students' reading, writing, listening, and speaking skills. Authors Jeremy Hyler and Troy Hicks show you that technology is not just about making a lesson engaging; it's about helping students become effective creators and consumers of information in today's fast-paced world. You'll learn how to use mobile technologies to teach narrative, informational, and argument writing as well as visual literacy and multimodal research. Each chapter is filled with exciting lesson plans and tech tool suggestions that you can take back to your own classroom immediately.

  17. Contextual Markup and Mining in Digital Games for Science Learning: Connecting Player Behaviors to Learning Goals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinnebrew John S.; Killingsworth, Stephen S.; Clark, Douglas B.; Biswas, Gautam; Sengupta, Pratim; Minstrell, James; Martinez-Garza, Mario; Krinks, Kara

    2017-01-01

    Digital games can make unique and powerful contributions to K-12 science education, but much of that potential remains unrealized. Research evaluating games for learning still relies primarily on pre- and post-test data, which limits possible insights into more complex interactions between game design features, gameplay, and formal assessment.…

  18. End-to-end learning for digital hologram reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Zhimin; Zuo, Si; Lam, Edmund Y.

    2018-02-01

    Digital holography is a well-known method to perform three-dimensional imaging by recording the light wavefront information originating from the object. Not only the intensity, but also the phase distribution of the wavefront can then be computed from the recorded hologram in the numerical reconstruction process. However, the reconstructions via the traditional methods suffer from various artifacts caused by twin-image, zero-order term, and noise from image sensors. Here we demonstrate that an end-to-end deep neural network (DNN) can learn to perform both intensity and phase recovery directly from an intensity-only hologram. We experimentally show that the artifacts can be effectively suppressed. Meanwhile, our network doesn't need any preprocessing for initialization, and is comparably fast to train and test, in comparison with the recently published learning-based method. In addition, we validate that the performance improvement can be achieved by introducing a prior on sparsity.

  19. Learning Effectiveness of the NASA Digital Learning Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hix, Billy

    2005-01-01

    Student participation in actual investigations which develop inquiry and intellectual skills has long been regarded as an essential component of science instructions (Schwab, 1962; White, 1999). Such investigations give students an opportunity to appreciate the spirit of science and promote an understanding of the nature of science. However, classroom research conducted over the past 20 years describes science teaching as primarily teacher centered. Typical instruction consists of whole class, noninteractive activities in which individual seatwork has constituted the bulk of classroom interactions (Tobin and Gallagher, 1997). Students typically learn science from textbooks and lectures. Their main motivation is to do reasonably well on tests and examinations (Layman, 1999). During the past five years, infrastructure constraints have reduced to the point that many schools systems can now afford low cost, high quality video conferencing equipment (International Society for Technology in Education, 2003). This study investigates the use of interactive video conferencing vs. face to face interaction with hands-on, inquiry based activities. Some basic questions to be addressed are: How does the delivery method impact the students understanding of the goals of the experiment? Are students explanation of the strategies of experimentation different based on the method of instruction that was provided. Do students engaged in a workshop with the instructor in the room vs. an instructor over video conferencing have different perception of the understanding of the subject materials?

  20. Digital Board Game: Is there a need for it in language learning among tertiary level students?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Zuraina

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The concept of learning while playing to learn language is a pedagogy that can enhance students’ learning interest. In this digital era, the use of board games, for instance, has provided a solution to learning a language. A considerable literature has grown up around the theme of digital board in language learning. Therefore, this paper aims at finding the significance of developing a digital board game for the purpose of vocabulary learning. Fifty-seven (57 students from Universiti Malaysia Pahang (UMP were selected as samples using purposive random sampling to collect data for the current study. A questionnaire was employed to explore their needs of a digital board game to learn vocabulary. The findings revealed that digital board game has significant needs among students to learn vocabulary, and further support the idea of using digital board game in language classroom. Majority of them believed that digital board game may provide a significant impact on vocabulary learning. Overall, the current study proves to be particularly valuable to language teachers to incorporate digital board game into their instructional activity. Also, these findings suggest a role for interactive learning in motivating language learner to enrich their vocabulary size.

  1. A Call to Action for Research in Digital Learning: Learning without Limits of Time, Place, Path, Pace…or Evidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavanaugh, Cathy; Sessums, Christopher; Drexler, Wendy

    2015-01-01

    This essay is a call for rethinking our approach to research in digital learning. It plots a path founded in social trends and advances in education. A brief review of these trends and advances is followed by discussion of what flattened research might look like at scale. Scaling research in digital learning is crucial to advancing understanding…

  2. Digital Tools and Challenges to Institutional Traditions of Learning: Technologies, Social Memory and the Performative Nature of Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saljo, R.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to offer some reflections on the relationships between digital technologies and learning. It is argued that activities of learning, as they have been practised within institutionalized schooling, are coming under increasing pressure from the developments of digital technologies and the capacities to store, access and…

  3. Digital Storytelling in a Flipped Classroom for Effective Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clemens Bechter

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Conclusive empirical evidence on whether virtual classrooms result in higher performance, satisfaction, or an improvement in problem solving skills when compared with traditional face-to-face lecturing does not exist. Various studies point in different directions. However, blended learning outperforms the traditional classroom in student performance and satisfaction. A flipped classroom is one type of blended learning. For more than 20 years, this approach has been used at a European executive MBA (EMBA program delivering online content combined with six residential weeks where students collaborate and reflect upon their online learning. Our research examined the overall setup of this program, and assessed one course in depth. As part of the course—International Management—an intercultural negotiation project was chosen to highlight the integration of online and offline activities. The flipped classroom is a demonstration of the reform-based teaching approach. The power of reform-based learning in executive education is the engaging combination of practice and theory, which improves the performance of executives. The participants considered the flipped approach exciting, dynamic, and insightful. The emphasis on a negotiation process involving classmates from around the world increased their global understanding. Beginning with a negotiation experience in the digital story project gave them a better appreciation of the relevant theories, techniques, and applications. Focusing on the practice of international negotiation and a cross-cultural analysis with reflection on cultural intelligence improved the competencies of the participants both during the course and after it.

  4. A digital peer-to-peer learning platform for clinical skills development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesse Paul Basnak

    2017-02-01

    Conclusion: Students found the practice OSCEs and digital platform effective for learning clinical skills. Thus, peer-to-peer learning and computer automation can be useful adjuncts to traditional medical curricula.

  5. Effect of digital problem-based learning cases on student learning outcomes in ophthalmology courses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Jun; Li, Xiaoyan; Wang, Youdong; Sun, Wei; Zhang, Jinsong

    2009-09-01

    To assess the impact of digital problem-based learning (PBL) cases on student learning in ophthalmology courses. Ninety students were randomly divided into 3 classes (30 students per class). The first class studied under a didactic model. The other 2 classes were divided into 6 groups (10 students per group) and received PBL teaching; 3 groups studied via cases presented in digital form and the others studied via paper-form cases. The results of theoretical and case analysis examinations were analyzed using the chi(2) test. Student performance on the interval practice was analyzed using the Kruskal-Wallis test. Questionnaires were used to evaluate student and facilitator perceptions. Students in the digital groups exhibited better performance in the practice procedures according to tutorial evaluations compared with the other groups (P digital groups (vs 73% in the paper groups) noted that the cases greatly stimulated their interest. Introducing PBL into ophthalmology could improve educational quality and effectiveness. Digital PBL cases stimulate interest and motivate students to further improve diagnosis and problem-handling skills.

  6. Generative Learning Strategy Use and Self-Regulatory Prompting in Digital Text

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, Alan J.; Morrison, Gary M.

    2014-01-01

    The digital revolution is shifting print-based textbooks to digital text, and it has afforded the opportunity to incorporate meaningful learning strategies and otherwise separate metacognitive activities directly into these texts as embedded support. A sample of 89 undergraduates read a digital, expository text on the basics of photography. The…

  7. Quality Control in K-12 Digital Learning: Three (Imperfect) Approaches. Creating Healthy Policy for Digital Learning. A Working Paper Series from the Thomas B. Fordham Institute

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hess, Frederick M.

    2011-01-01

    Digital learning makes possible the "unbundling" of school provisions--that is, it allows children to be served by providers from almost anywhere, in new and more customized ways. At the same time, because it destandardizes and decentralizes educational delivery, digital education is far harder to bring under the yoke of the…

  8. Digital game based learning: A new method in teaching and learning mathematics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain, Sayed Yusoff bin Syed; Hoe, Tan Wee; Idris, Muhammad Zaffwan bin

    2017-05-01

    Digital game-based learning (DGBL) had been regarded as a sound learning strategy in raising pupils' willingness and interest in many disciplines. Normally, video and digital games are used in the teaching and learning mathematics. based on literature, digital games have proven its capability in making pupils motivated and are more likely to contribute to effective learning mathematics. Hence this research aims to construct a DGBL in the teaching of Mathematics for Year 1 pupils. Then, a quasi-experimental study was carried out in a school located in Gua Musang, Kelantan, involving 39 pupils. Specifically, this article tests the effectiveness of the use of DGBL in the teaching of the topic Addition of Less than 100 on pupil's achievement. This research employed a quasi-experiment, Pre and Post Test of Non-equivalent Control Group design. The data were analysed using the Nonparametric test namely the Mann-Whitney U. The research finding shows the use of the DGBL could increase the pupils' achievement in the topic of Addition of Less than 100. In practice, this research indicates that the DBGL can utilized as an alternative reference strategy for Mathematics teacher.

  9. Information Activities and Appropriation in Teacher Trainees' Digital, Group-Based Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanell, Fredrik

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: This paper reports results from an ethnographic study of teacher trainees' information activities in digital, group-based learning and their relation to the interplay between use and appropriation of digital tools and the learning environment. Method: The participants in the present study are 249 pre-school teacher trainees in…

  10. Agriscience Teachers' Implementation of Digital Game-Based Learning in an Introductory Animal Science Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, Angela W.; Bunch, J. C.; Wallace, Maria F.

    2015-01-01

    In today's technological age, visions for technology integration in the classroom continue to be explored and examined. Digital game-based learning is one way to purposefully integrate technology while maintaining a focus on learning objectives. This case study sought to understand agriscience teachers' experiences implementing digital game-based…

  11. The Digital Learning Transition MOOC for Educators: Exploring a Scalable Approach to Professional Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleiman, Glenn M.; Wolf, Mary Ann; Frye, David

    2013-01-01

    In conjunction with the relaunch of the Digital Learning Transition (DLT) Massive Open Online Course for Educatos (MOOC-Ed) in September 2013, the Alliance and the Friday Institute released "The Digital Learning Transition MOOC for Educators: Exploring a Scalable Approach to Professional Development", a new paper that describes the…

  12. Enhancing Writing Achievement through a Digital Learning Environment: Case Studies of Three Struggling Adolescent Male Writers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pruden, Manning; Kerkhoff, Shea N.; Spires, Hiller A.; Lester, James

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to explore how "Narrative Theatre," a narrative-centered digital learning environment, supported the writing processes of 3 struggling adolescent male writers. We utilized a multicase study approach to capture 3 sixth-grade participants' experiences with the digital learning environment before, during, and after…

  13. Doing What We Teach: Promoting Digital Literacies for Professional Development through Personal Learning Environments and Participation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laakkonen, Ilona

    2015-01-01

    Despite the proliferation of social media, few learners make effective use of digital technology to support their learning or graduate with the skills necessary for developing and communicating their expertise in the knowledge-driven networked society of the digital age. This article makes use of the concept of Personal Learning Environments (PLE)…

  14. A Computer-Assisted Learning Model Based on the Digital Game Exponential Reward System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Man-Ki; Jahng, Surng-Gahb; Kim, Tae-Yong

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this research was to construct a motivational model which would stimulate voluntary and proactive learning using digital game methods offering players more freedom and control. The theoretical framework of this research lays the foundation for a pedagogical learning model based on digital games. We analyzed the game reward system, which…

  15. Digit-colour synaesthesia only enhances memory for colours in a specific context : A new method of duration thresholds to measure serial recall

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Teichmann, A. Lina; Nieuwenstein, Mark R.; Rich, Anina N.

    For digit-color synaesthetes, digits elicit vivid experiences of color that are highly consistent for each individual. The conscious experience of synaesthesia is typically unidirectional: Digits evoke colors but not vice versa. There is an ongoing debate about whether synaesthetes have a memory

  16. MACHINE LEARNING METHODS IN DIGITAL AGRICULTURE: ALGORITHMS AND CASES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksandr Vasilyevich Koshkarov

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Ensuring food security is a major challenge in many countries. With a growing global population, the issues of improving the efficiency of agriculture have become most relevant. Farmers are looking for new ways to increase yields, and governments of different countries are developing new programs to support agriculture. This contributes to a more active implementation of digital technologies in agriculture, helping farmers to make better decisions, increase yields and take care of the environment. The central point is the collection and analysis of data. In the industry of agriculture, data can be collected from different sources and may contain useful patterns that identify potential problems or opportunities. Data should be analyzed using machine learning algorithms to extract useful insights. Such methods of precision farming allow the farmer to monitor individual parts of the field, optimize the consumption of water and chemicals, and identify problems quickly. Purpose: to make an overview of the machine learning algorithms used for data analysis in agriculture. Methodology: an overview of the relevant literature; a survey of farmers. Results: relevant algorithms of machine learning for the analysis of data in agriculture at various levels were identified: soil analysis (soil assessment, soil classification, soil fertility predictions, weather forecast (simulation of climate change, temperature and precipitation prediction, and analysis of vegetation (weed identification, vegetation classification, plant disease identification, crop forecasting. Practical implications: agriculture, crop production.

  17. Situating Student Learning in Rich Contexts: A Constructionist Approach to Digital Archives Education

    OpenAIRE

    Anthony Cocciolo

    2011-01-01

    Objective - This paper sought to determine whether a constructionist pedagogical approach to digital archives education could positively influence student perceptions of their learning. Constructionism is a learning theory that places students in the role of designers and emphasizes creating tangible artifacts in a social environment. This theory was used in the instructional design of the Digital Archive Creation Project (DACP), a major component of a digital archives course offered to stude...

  18. Storytelling in the digital world: achieving higher-level learning objectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Melissa R

    2012-01-01

    Nursing students are not passive media consumers but instead live in a technology ecosystem where digital is the language they speak. To prepare the next generation of nurses, educators must incorporate multiple technologies to improve higher-order learning. The author discusses the evolution and use of storytelling as part of the digital world and how digital stories can be aligned with Bloom's Taxonomy so that students achieve higher-level learning objectives.

  19. Gamification Experience in Secondary Education on Learning of Digital Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesús Carlos DÍEZ RIOJA

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Games have always been used in order to motivate learning at early ages. Nevertheless, during teen years, playing games have often been stigmatized as a waste of time. Thus, the phenomenon of gamification has become recently a methodological trend with a relevant presence in the classroom. In this paper, an analysis of previous work in gamification is performed in primary and secondary education. Next, the experience carried out at a secondary school in Barcelona is described where a program has been implemented ad hoc to teach, in a playful way, contents of digital systems in the context of the Industrial Technology course in secondary school. The results of the experience and the students’ opinion that have been positive are summarized in this paper.

  20. Semantic Web, Reusable Learning Objects, Personal Learning Networks in Health: Key Pieces for Digital Health Literacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konstantinidis, Stathis Th; Wharrad, Heather; Windle, Richard; Bamidis, Panagiotis D

    2017-01-01

    The knowledge existing in the World Wide Web is exponentially expanding, while continuous advancements in health sciences contribute to the creation of new knowledge. There are a lot of efforts trying to identify how the social connectivity can endorse patients' empowerment, while other studies look at the identification and the quality of online materials. However, emphasis has not been put on the big picture of connecting the existing resources with the patients "new habits" of learning through their own Personal Learning Networks. In this paper we propose a framework for empowering patients' digital health literacy adjusted to patients' currents needs by utilizing the contemporary way of learning through Personal Learning Networks, existing high quality learning resources and semantics technologies for interconnecting knowledge pieces. The framework based on the concept of knowledge maps for health as defined in this paper. Health Digital Literacy needs definitely further enhancement and the use of the proposed concept might lead to useful tools which enable use of understandable health trusted resources tailored to each person needs.

  1. Modelling Digital Knowledge Transfer: Nurse Supervisors Transforming Learning at Point of Care to Advance Nursing Practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carey Mather

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Limited adoption of mobile technology for informal learning and continuing professional development within Australian healthcare environments has been explained primarily as an issue of insufficient digital and ehealth literacy of healthcare professionals. This study explores nurse supervisors’ use of mobile technology for informal learning and continuing professional development both for their own professional practice, and in their role in modelling digital knowledge transfer, by facilitating the learning and teaching of nursing students in the workplace. A convenience sample of 27 nurse supervisors involved with guiding and supporting undergraduate nurses participated in one of six focus groups held in two states of Australia. Expanding knowledge emerged as the key theme of importance to this group of clinicians. Although nurse supervisors regularly browsed Internet sources for learning and teaching purposes, a mixed understanding of the mobile learning activities that could be included as informal learning or part of formal continuing professional development was detected. Participants need educational preparation and access to mobile learning opportunities to improve and maintain their digital and ehealth literacy to appropriately model digital professionalism with students. Implementation of mobile learning at point of care to enable digital knowledge transfer, augment informal learning for students and patients, and support continuing professional development opportunities is necessary. Embedding digital and ehealth literacy within nursing curricula will promote mobile learning as a legitimate nursing function and advance nursing practice.

  2. Digital Repositories of Learning Material as a Support Tool for Knowledge Management and Capacity Building

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marmonti, E.

    2016-01-01

    Full text: For some years, digital repositories are emerging as a de facto standard service for storing, preserving and disseminate knowledge: academic, scientific information and, more recently, primary research data of institutions. Some of the digital repositories host also collections of material classified as learning objects; some others are created to manage only learning objects (LO), as the Learning Objects Digital Repositories, or were built to function as learning objects aggregators. The term “learning object” itself is involving different types of structures, organization and complexity. This paper will show how digital repositories, metadata standards and semantic web technologies can be valuable tools for managing educational content, which can contribute to build a learning and knowledge driven organization. (author

  3. Empirical Study on the Effect of Digital Game-Based Instruction on Students' Learning Motivation and Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yen-Chun

    2017-01-01

    As pupils are largely increased the opportunities to contact digital games, the effect of digital games has been broadly discussed and studied. Digital games no longer play the function of entertainment, but could assist students in more active learning and deeper and broader learning, when being applied to instruction. It is limited to learn in…

  4. Digit-colour synaesthesia only enhances memory for colours in a specific context: A new method of duration thresholds to measure serial recall

    OpenAIRE

    Teichmann, A. Lina; Nieuwenstein, Mark R.; Rich, Anina N.

    2017-01-01

    For digit-color synaesthetes, digits elicit vivid experiences of color that are highly consistent for each individual. The conscious experience of synaesthesia is typically unidirectional: Digits evoke colors but not vice versa. There is an ongoing debate about whether synaesthetes have a memory advantage over non-synaesthetes. One key question in this debate is whether synaesthetes have a general superiority or whether any benefit is specific to a certain type of material. Here, we focus on ...

  5. Teaching and learning English through digital game projects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan deHaan

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Digital games are receiving increasing attention by researchers and practitioners in education; however, most of the theory and pedagogy focus on general education or language and literacy development of native speakers. There are very few investigations of game play or game culture and second language development. Language teachers and institutions must know more about games to use the media effectively. Two completed extracurricular projects, based on constructionist learning and media literacy theories and practices, are described in this paper: game design and game magazine creation. The action research projects aimed to guide students towards a better understanding of games’ formal features and technologies through their active creation of games and game-related media, and to improve their spoken and written English language skills. In general, students learned and practised a variety of language and technology skills with the design projects. The projects motivated the students, challenged the students, and provided many opportunities for authentic discussions in the foreign language. Various suggestions, based on the teacher and student experiences of these projects, are made for other language teachers interested in conducting creative game-based projects with their students.

  6. PBL, Hands-On/ Digital resources in Geology, (Teaching/ Learning)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares, Rosa; Santos, Cátia; Carvalho, Sara

    2015-04-01

    several instruments such as small questionnaires (Hot Potatoes), Gowin V, scientific report, a grid to evaluate group work and a grid to evaluate the development of competencies. This study intended to evaluate the success of a PBL intervention program when trying to improve students' outcomes. The positive impact obtained allowed us to advance some conclusions and instructional implications regarding teaching Rock Cycle through PBL and different digital and hands-on resources, obtained, especially in the students' questionnaires and Gowin V, allowed us to verify that students did learn about Rock Cycle and developed collaborative work skills.

  7. The 3D Digital Story-telling Media on Batik Learning in Vocational High Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widiaty, I.; Achdiani, Y.; Kuntadi, I.; Mubaroq, S. R.; Zakaria, D.

    2018-02-01

    The aim of this research is to make 3D digital Story-telling Media on Batik Learning in Vocational High School. The digital story-telling developed in this research is focused on 3D-based story-telling. In contrast to the digital story-telling that has been developed in existing learning, this research is expected to be able to improve understanding of vocational students about the value of local wisdom batik more meaningful and “live”. The process of making 3D digital story-telling media consists of two processes, namely the creation of 3D objects and the creation of 3D object viewer.

  8. A Digital Coach That Provides Affective and Social Learning Support to Low-Literate Learners

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schouten, D.G.M.; Venneker, F.; Bosse, T.; Neerincx, M.; Cremer, A.H.M.

    In this study, we investigate if a digital coach for low-literate learners that provides cognitive learning support based on scaffolding can be improved by adding affective learning support based on motivational interviewing, and social learning support based on small talk. Several knowledge gaps

  9. A Digital Coach That Provides Affective and Social Learning Support to Low-Literate Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schouten, Dylan G. M.; Venneker, Fleur; Bosse, Tibor; Neerincx, Mark A.; Cremers, Anita H. M.

    2018-01-01

    In this study, we investigate if a digital coach for low-literate learners that provides cognitive learning support based on scaffolding can be improved by adding affective learning support based on motivational interviewing, and social learning support based on small talk. Several knowledge gaps are identified: motivational interviewing and small…

  10. Digital Game-Based Learning Supports Student Motivation, Cognitive Success, and Performance Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woo, Jeng-Chung

    2014-01-01

    Traditional multimedia learning is primarily based on the cognitive load concept of information processing theory. Recent digital game-based learning (DGBL) studies have focused on exploring content support for learning motivation and related game characteristics. Motivation, volition, and performance (MVP) theory indicates that cognitive load and…

  11. The Need for a Strategic Foundation for Digital Learning and Knowledge Management Solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asgarkhani, Mehdi

    2004-01-01

    This paper elaborates on the importance of a strategic foundation when digital learning or knowledge management (KM) solutions are planned and developed. It looks at some key issues of e-Learning and knowledge management (KM) through discussing the various stages (technologies) and potential benefits of e-Learning; the state of the e-Learning…

  12. Digital Badges for STEM Learning in Secondary Contexts: A Mixed Methods Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elkordy, Angela

    The deficit in STEM skills is a matter of concern for national economies and a major focus for educational policy makers. The development of Information and Communications Technologies (ICT) has resulted in a rapidly changing workforce of global scale. In addition, ICT have fostered the growth of digital and mobile technologies which have been the learning context, formal and informal, for a generation of youth. The purpose of this study was to design an intervention based upon a competency-based, digitally-mediated, learning intervention: digital badges for learning STEM habits of mind and practices. Designed purposefully, digital badge learning trajectories and criteria can be flexible tools for scaffolding, measuring, and communicating the acquisition of knowledge, skills, or competencies. One of the most often discussed attributes of digital badges, is the ability of badges to motivate learners. However, the research base to support this claim is in its infancy; there is little empirical evidence. A skills-based digital badge intervention was designed to demonstrate mastery learning in key, age-appropriate, STEM competencies aligned with Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS) and other educational standards. A mixed methods approach was used to study the impact of a digital badge intervention in the sample middle and high school population. Among the findings were statistically significant measures which substantiate that in this student population, the digital badges increased perceived competence and motivated learners to persist at task.

  13. Collaboration between student art teachers and communication and digital media students promoting subject specific didactics in digital visual learning design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skov, Kirsten; Buhl, Mie

    into account. Our discussion of the potential for developing digital learning application from a collaborative approach is based on the visual design products, interviews and written reports, as well as shared experiences from the stakeholders in the project. Results: The project revealed three digital visual......=pdf Dunleavy, M. & Dede, C. (2014). Augmented reality teaching and learning. in. J.M. Spector, M.D. Merrill, J. Elen & M.J. Bishop (eds), The handbook og research for educational communications and technology New York: Springer http://isites.harvard.edu/fs/docs/icb.topic1116077.files....../DunleavyDedeARfinal.pdf Rasmussen, H. (2015). Digital Picture Production and Picture aesthetic Competency in It-didactic Design. Risk and opportunities for visual arts education in Europe. Proceedings, InSEA conferene, Lisbon, Portugal...

  14. Collaboration Between Art Teacher Students and Communication and Digital Media Students Promoting Subject Specific Didactics in Digital Visual Learning Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buhl, Mie; Skov, Kirsten

    . Student art teachers and teacher trainers took part in the design process performed by communication students. The project took its point of the departure in the act of Danish teacher education where student teachers must be educated in the practical use of digital visual media for art practices aiming......, drawing or video. Thus, the project suggested the development of a visual learning design for achieving augmented reality (AR) experiences in urban environments and sharing them on social media. The purpose was to explore adequate approaches to work with digital media in visual arts education based...... on practices and reflective processes. The theoretical framework for our discussion of the empirical project draws on current discussions of learning designs and digital media in visual arts education (Peppler 2010, Rasmussen 2015, Buhl & Ejsing-Duun, 2015; Buhl, 2016). Methodology The choice of empirical...

  15. Digital Transformation of Words in Learning Processes: A Critical View.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saga, Hiroo

    1999-01-01

    Presents some negative aspects of society's dependence on digital transformation of words by referring to works by Walter Ong and Martin Heidegger. Discusses orality, literacy and digital literacy and describes three aspects of the digital transformation of words. Compares/contrasts art with technology and discusses implications for education.…

  16. Designing learning apparatus to promote twelfth grade students’ understanding of digital technology concept: A preliminary studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marlius; Kaniawati, I.; Feranie, S.

    2018-05-01

    A preliminary learning design using relay to promote twelfth grade student’s understanding of logic gates concept is implemented to see how well it’s to adopted by six high school students, three male students and three female students of twelfth grade. This learning design is considered for next learning of digital technology concept i.e. data digital transmition and analog. This work is a preliminary study to design the learning for large class. So far just a few researches designing learning design related to digital technology with relay. It may due to this concept inserted in Indonesian twelfth grade curriculum recently. This analysis is focus on student difficulties trough video analysis to learn the concept. Based on our analysis, the recommended thing for redesigning learning is: students understand first about symbols and electrical circuits; the Student Worksheet is made in more detail on the assembly steps to the project board; mark with symbols at points in certain places in the circuit for easy assembly; assembly using relays by students is enough until is the NOT’s logic gates and the others that have been assembled so that effective time. The design of learning using relays can make the relay a liaison between the abstract on the digital with the real thing of it, especially in the circuit of symbols and real circuits. Besides it is expected to also enrich the ability of teachers in classroom learning about digital technology.

  17. Theory of Digital Natives in the Light of Current and Future E-Learning Concepts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bodo von der Heiden

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The digital generation has many names: Net Generation, Generation@ or Digital Natives. The meaning behind these terms is, that the current generation of students is digitally and media literate, technology-savvy and are able to use other learning approaches than former generations. But these topics are discussed controversial and even the cause-effect-relationship is not as clear as it seems. Did the digital generation really have other learning approaches, or do they have only the possibility to live other learning modes? Against this background this article tries to shed some light on this debate. Therefore we use current and future projects performed at RWTH Aachen University to illustrate the relevance, value and significance due to the theory of the digital natives.

  18. Digital and traditional slides for teaching cellular morphology: a comparative analysis of learning outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solberg, Brooke L

    2012-01-01

    Recent advances in technology have brought forth an intriguing new tool for teaching hematopoietic cellular identification skills: the digital slide. Although digitized slides offer a number of appealing options for educators, little research has been done to examine how their utilization would impact learning outcomes. To fill that void, this study was designed to examine student performance, skill retention and transferability, and self-efficacy beliefs amongst undergraduate MLS students learning cellular morphology with digital versus traditional slides. Results showed that students learning with digital slides performed better on assessments containing only traditional slide specimens than students learning with traditional slides, both immediately following the learning activity and after a considerable duration of time. Students learning with digital slides also reported slightly higher levels of self-efficacy related to cellular identification. The findings of this study suggest that students learning cellular identification skills with digital slides are able to transfer that skill directly to traditional slides, and that their ability to identify cells is not negatively affected in present or future settings.

  19. Developments in Serials: 1977

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, John R.

    1978-01-01

    Discusses issues and developments relating to several aspects of serials, including economics and acquisitions; bibliographic control; automation; education; serials literature and bibliographies; and copyrights. A bibliography is included. (Author/MBR)

  20. Decreasing Serial Cost Sharing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hougaard, Jens Leth; Østerdal, Lars Peter

    The increasing serial cost sharing rule of Moulin and Shenker [Econometrica 60 (1992) 1009] and the decreasing serial rule of de Frutos [Journal of Economic Theory 79 (1998) 245] have attracted attention due to their intuitive appeal and striking incentive properties. An axiomatic characterization...... of the increasing serial rule was provided by Moulin and Shenker [Journal of Economic Theory 64 (1994) 178]. This paper gives an axiomatic characterization of the decreasing serial rule...

  1. Decreasing serial cost sharing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hougaard, Jens Leth; Østerdal, Lars Peter Raahave

    2009-01-01

    The increasing serial cost sharing rule of Moulin and Shenker (Econometrica 60:1009-1037, 1992) and the decreasing serial rule of de Frutos (J Econ Theory 79:245-275, 1998) are known by their intuitive appeal and striking incentive properties. An axiomatic characterization of the increasing serial...... rule was provided by Moulin and Shenker (J Econ Theory 64:178-201, 1994). This paper gives an axiomatic characterization of the decreasing serial rule....

  2. English Digital Dictionaries as Valuable Blended Learning Tools for Palestinian College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwaik, Raghad A. A.

    2015-01-01

    Digital technology has become an indispensable aspect of foreign language learning around the globe especially in the case of college students who are often required to finish extensive reading assignments within a limited time period. Such pressure calls for the use of efficient tools such as digital dictionaries to help them achieve their…

  3. Digital Learning in Schools: Conceptualizing the Challenges and Influences on Teacher Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blundell, Christopher; Lee, Kar-Tin; Nykvist, Shaun

    2016-01-01

    Digital technologies are an important requirement for curriculum expectations, including general ICT capability and STEM education. These technologies are also positioned as mechanisms for educational reform via transformation of teacher practice. It seems, however, that wide-scale transformation of teacher practice and digital learning remain…

  4. Examining Digital Literacy Competences and Learning Habits of Open and Distance Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozdamar-Keskin, Nilgun; Ozata, Fatma Zeynep; Banar, Kerim; Royle, Karl

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of the study is to examine digital literacy competences and learning habits of learners enrolled in the open and distance education system of Anadolu University in Turkey. Data were gathered from 20.172 open and distance learners through a survey which included four parts: demographic information, abilities to use digital technologies,…

  5. Learner-Controlled Scaffolding Linked to Open-Ended Problems in a Digital Learning Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edson, Alden Jack

    2017-01-01

    This exploratory study reports on how students activated learner-controlled scaffolding and navigated through sequences of connected problems in a digital learning environment. A design experiment was completed to (re)design, iteratively develop, test, and evaluate a digital version of an instructional unit focusing on binomial distributions and…

  6. Applying the Quadratic Usage Framework to Research on K-12 STEM Digital Learning Resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luetkemeyer, Jennifer R.

    2016-01-01

    Numerous policymakers have called for K-12 educators to increase their effectiveness by transforming science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) learning and teaching with digital resources and tools. In this study we outline the significance of studying pressing issues related to use of digital resources in the K-12 environment and…

  7. Digital Game-Based Learning for K-12 Mathematics Education: A Meta-Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byun, JaeHwan; Joung, Eunmi

    2018-01-01

    Digital games (e.g., video games or computer games) have been reported as an effective educational method that can improve students' motivation and performance in mathematics education. This meta-analysis study (a) investigates the current trend of digital game-based learning (DGBL) by reviewing the research studies on the use of DGBL for…

  8. How Digital Technologies, Blended Learning and MOOCs Will Impact the Future of Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Neil P.

    2014-01-01

    Digital technologies are revolutionizing all parts of society, including higher education. Universities are rapidly adapting to the prevalence of staff and student mobile devices, digital tools and services on campus, and are developing strategies to harness these technologies to enhance student learning. In this paper, I explore the use of…

  9. The Effect of Digital Video Games on EFL Students' Language Learning Motivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebrahimzadeh, Mohsen; Alavi, Sepideh

    2017-01-01

    The study examined the effect of a commercial digital video game on high school students' language learning motivation. Participants were 241 male students randomly assigned to one of the following three treatments: Readers, who intensively read the game's story; Players, who played the digital video game; and Watchers, who watched two classmates…

  10. The Digital Natives as Learners: Technology Use Patterns and Approaches to Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Penny

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated the claims made in the popular press about the "digital native" generation as learners. Because students' lives today are saturated with digital media at a time when their brains are still developing, many popular press authors claim that this generation of students thinks and learns differently than any generation that has…

  11. DIGITAL GAME-BASED LANGUAGE LEARNING IN FOREIGN LANGUAGE TEACHER EDUCATION

    OpenAIRE

    ALYAZ, Yunus; GENC, Zubeyde Sinem

    2016-01-01

    New technologies including digital game-based language learning have increasingly received attention. However, their implementation is far from expected and desired levels due to technical, instructional, financial and sociological barriers. Previous studies suggest that there is a strong need to establish courses in order to support adaptation of game-based learning pedagogy through helping teachers experience digital games themselves before they are expected to use them in teaching. This st...

  12. The Personal Digital Library (PDL)-based e-learning: Using the PDL as an e-learning support tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Xiaozhao; Ruan, Jianhai

    The paper describes a support tool for learners engaged in e-learning, the Personal Digital Library (PDL). The characteristics and functionality of the PDL are presented. Suggested steps for constructing and managing a PDL are outlined and discussed briefly. The authors believe that the PDL as a support tool of e-learning will be important and essential in the future.

  13. Motivating EFL Students: E-Learning Enjoyment as a Predictor of Vocabulary Learning through Digital Video Games

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebrahimzadeh, Mohsen; Alavi, Sepideh

    2016-01-01

    The present study examined e-learning enjoyment to see if it could predict high school students' vocabulary learning through a digital video game. Furthermore, the difference between those who played and those who watched the game was assessed. Participants of the study were male, high school, EFL students (N = 136, age 12-18) randomly assigned to…

  14. Automated quantification of cerebral edema following hemispheric infarction: Application of a machine-learning algorithm to evaluate CSF shifts on serial head CTs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasheng Chen

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Although cerebral edema is a major cause of death and deterioration following hemispheric stroke, there remains no validated biomarker that captures the full spectrum of this critical complication. We recently demonstrated that reduction in intracranial cerebrospinal fluid (CSF volume (∆CSF on serial computed tomography (CT scans provides an accurate measure of cerebral edema severity, which may aid in early triaging of stroke patients for craniectomy. However, application of such a volumetric approach would be too cumbersome to perform manually on serial scans in a real-world setting. We developed and validated an automated technique for CSF segmentation via integration of random forest (RF based machine learning with geodesic active contour (GAC segmentation. The proposed RF + GAC approach was compared to conventional Hounsfield Unit (HU thresholding and RF segmentation methods using Dice similarity coefficient (DSC and the correlation of volumetric measurements, with manual delineation serving as the ground truth. CSF spaces were outlined on scans performed at baseline (<6 h after stroke onset and early follow-up (FU (closest to 24 h in 38 acute ischemic stroke patients. RF performed significantly better than optimized HU thresholding (p < 10−4 in baseline and p < 10−5 in FU and RF + GAC performed significantly better than RF (p < 10−3 in baseline and p < 10−5 in FU. Pearson correlation coefficients between the automatically detected ∆CSF and the ground truth were r = 0.178 (p = 0.285, r = 0.876 (p < 10−6 and r = 0.879 (p < 10−6 for thresholding, RF and RF + GAC, respectively, with a slope closer to the line of identity in RF + GAC. When we applied the algorithm trained from images of one stroke center to segment CTs from another center, similar findings held. In conclusion, we have developed and validated an accurate automated approach to segment CSF and calculate its shifts on serial CT scans

  15. A Survey of Electronic Serials Managers Reveals Diversity in Practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Costello

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available A Review of: Branscome, B. A. (2013. Management of electronic serials in academic libraries: The results of an online survey. Serials Review, 39(4, 216-226. http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.serrev.2013.10.004 Abstract Objective – To examine industry standards for the management of electronic serials and measure the adoption of electronic serials over print. Design – Survey questionnaire. Setting – Email lists aimed at academic librarians working in serials management. Subjects – 195 self-selected subscribers to serials email lists. Methods – The author created a 20 question survey that consisted primarily of closed-ended questions pertaining to the collection demographics, staff, budget, and tools of serials management groups in academic libraries. The survey was conducted via Survey Monkey and examined using the analytical features of the tool. Participants remained anonymous and the survey questions did not ask them to reveal identifiable information about their libraries. Main Results – Collection demographics questions revealed that 78% of surveyed librarians estimated that print-only collections represented 40% or fewer of their serials holdings. The author observed diversity in the factors that influence print to digital transitions in academic libraries. However 71.5% of participants indicated that publisher technology support like IP authentication was required before adopting digital subscriptions. A lack of standardization also marked serials workflows, department responsibilities, and department titles. The author did not find a correlation between serials budget and the enrollment size of the institution. Participants reported that they used tools from popular serials management vendors like Serials Solutions, Innovative Interfaces, EBSCO, and Ex Libris, but most indicated that they used more than one tool for serials management. Participants specified 52 unique serials management products used in their libraries. Conclusion

  16. The development of learning material using learning goal orientation approach in digital electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puspitaningayu, P.; Anifah, L.; Kholis, N.

    2018-01-01

    Mastery of digital electronics principles is essential for future engineers in the digital era. This article describes the use of simulations in an undergraduate electrical engineering course to promote the adoption of a learning-goal orientation. This study used experimental method. This was done by providing students with a simulation environment which students freely use to experiment with various circuit models. Students were then invited to reflect on how the simulation results compare with results from lab experiments. The module got 82% of positive rating from 28 students and all of them passed in the examination with 81.8 as the average score. Those majority students were motivated by the combination of two learning goals written in the module. Moreover, they also gain the ability to design more complex systems because of their combined experience. Additionally, the module also has been validated and got 83% of reliability. The final product of this research hereafter can be recommended to be used as teaching material.

  17. Digital Games in Language Learnıng and Teachıng

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Buse Pekdemir

    2017-02-01

    Except these criticism, the book is quite useful to get some terms related to digital game- based language learning and teaching. Besides, its language pretty understandable to read even though they have lots of terminological information. So it doesn’t take a lot of time to read it. With all of these contents, the book can be considered as a good resource for investigating digital game-based language learning and teaching and it can be used for teaching some certain materials to the learners who are seeking for a good structured language teaching digital games.

  18. Digital technology use in ELT classrooms and self-directed learning

    OpenAIRE

    Nehir Sert; Ebru Boynueğri

    2016-01-01

    The digital era is a new challenge for teachers. While children get acquainted with digital technology before the age of six, teachers, who have encountered the digital world at a later time in their lives, struggle with it. Self-directed learning, which is crucial for lifelong learning, can be enhanced by the use of technology within and beyond classroom settings. The aim of this study was to examine the difference between the perceptions of students in low- and high-income groups about thei...

  19. Confronting the challenges of digital media and learning: Advancing the debate on education, youth and citizenship

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wellington de Oliveira

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Our discussion in this paper is focused on digital media and education as powerful means for creating more opportunities for more youth to engage in learning that is relevant to their lives and prepares them for success and good life in school, the workplace, and their community. We will discuss how new media builds up a new social reality at school and how new media influences the configuration of the subjectivity of students and the implications of learning and development in newer forms of digital environments for issues like democracy, citizenship and ethics as debated in the DIGIT-M-ED Project.

  20. Transitioning towards the Digital Native: Examining Digital Technologies, Video Games, and Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salomon, John

    2010-01-01

    Although digital technologies have become commonplace among people who grew up around them, little is known about the effect that such technology will have on learners or its impact on traditional methods of educational delivery. This dissertation examines how certain technologies affect digital natives and seeks to understand specific…

  1. Digital Soil Mapping – A platform for enhancing soil learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    The expansion of digital infrastructure and tools has generated massive data and information as well as a need for reliable processing and accurate interpretations. Digital Soil Mapping is no exception in that it has provided opportunities for professionals and the public to interact at field and tr...

  2. Digital Instructional Strategies and Their Role in Classroom Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yarbro, Jessica; McKnight, Katherine; Elliott, Stephen; Kurz, Alexander; Wardlow, Liane

    2016-01-01

    Research that examines technology use in the context of daily classroom practices is needed to support the effective digital conversion of classrooms. In this study, 65 seventh- through 10th-grade Mathematics and English Language Arts teachers from six districts across six states logged information about digital strategies they incorporated into…

  3. USING WIKIS AS A SUPPORT AND ASSESSMENT TOOL IN COLLABORATIVE DIGITAL GAME-BASED LEARNING ENVIRONMENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yavuz SAMUR

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available In computer-supported collaborative learning (CSCL environments, there are many researches done on collaborative learning activities; however, in game-based learning environments, more research and literature on collaborative learning activities are required. Actually, both game-based learning environments and wikis enable us to use new chances for learning, especially in collaborative learning activities. Therefore, in this paper, related literature on wikis and how game & instructional designers can leverage from wikis in game-based learning settings for enhancing students’ collaborative learning activities are examined. Based on the reviewed literature, two main suggestions are given in this paper with their underlying reasons. First, using wikis as a support tool for enhancing collaboration in digital game-based learning (DGBL environments, and second using wikis as an assessment tool in DGBL are suggested.

  4. Digital Badges for Staff Training: Motivate Employees to Learn with Micro-Credentials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Copenhaver, Kimberly; Pritchard, Liz

    2017-01-01

    Integrating micro-credentialing into employee training programs offers libraries an innovative and individualized way to recognize and certify learning and achievement. Digital badges provide a low-cost initiative to support learning benefiting both the individual and institution, offering evidence of skill development that transcends the library…

  5. Disruptive Technology Enhanced Learning: The Use and Misuse of Digital Technologies in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flavin, Michael

    2017-01-01

    This book is about how technologies are used in practice to support learning and teaching in higher education. Despite digitization and e-learning becoming ever-increasingly popular in university teaching settings, this book convincingly argues instead in favour of simple and convenient technologies, thus disrupting traditional patterns of…

  6. Toward User Interfaces and Data Visualization Criteria for Learning Design of Digital Textbooks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Railean, Elena

    2014-01-01

    User interface and data visualisation criteria are central issues in digital textbooks design. However, when applying mathematical modelling of learning process to the analysis of the possible solutions, it could be observed that results differ. Mathematical learning views cognition in on the base on statistics and probability theory, graph…

  7. Establishment of a Digital Knowledge Conversion Architecture Design Learning with High User Acceptance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yun-Wu; Weng, Apollo; Weng, Kuo-Hua

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to design a knowledge conversion and management digital learning system for architecture design learning, helping students to share, extract, use and create their design knowledge through web-based interactive activities based on socialization, internalization, combination and externalization process in addition to…

  8. A Multi-Modal Digital Game-Based Learning Environment for Hospitalized Children with Chronic Illnesses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chin, Jui-Chih; Tsuei, Mengping

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the digital game-based learning for children with chronic illnesses in the hospital settings. The design-based research and qualitative methods were applied. Three eight-year-old children with leukemia participated in this study. In the first phase, the multi-user game-based learning system was developed and…

  9. Digital Game's Impacts on Students' Learning Effectiveness of Correct Medication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiue, Ya-Ming; Hsu, Yu-Chiung

    2017-01-01

    In recent years, considerable concern has arisen over the use of digital games as instructional tools in educational research. However, game-based learning not only enhances students' learning motivation and effectiveness, but also fosters knowledge transfer. Taiwanese people living in rural areas often receive health-related information through…

  10. Effects of Digital Story on Academic Achievement, Learning Motivation and Retention among University Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aktas, Elif; Yurt, Serap Uzuner

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effect of the learning environment where digital stories are used as a learning material on the motivation, academic success, retention, and students' opinions. The study was carried out with mixed method which is a combination of quantitative and qualitative research approach. The study was implemented…

  11. Building Virtual Cities, Inspiring Intelligent Citizens: Digital Games for Developing Students' Problem Solving and Learning Motivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ya-Ting Carolyn

    2012-01-01

    This study investigates the effectiveness digital game-based learning (DGBL) on students' problem solving, learning motivation, and academic achievement. In order to provide substantive empirical evidence, a quasi-experimental design was implemented over the course of a full semester (23 weeks). Two ninth-grade Civics and Society classes, with a…

  12. Crossing the Digital Divide Safely and Trustingly: How Ecologies of Learning Scaffold the Journey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henning, Elizabeth; Van der Westhuizen, Duan

    2004-01-01

    The article addresses the issue of "learning to elearn" in borderless programs in a globalised learning landscape and the associated problems of scaffolding the journey across the digital divide. The authors argue that the assumption underlying such courses is that cross-cultural programs are viable because they are conceived and…

  13. Practical Measurement and Productive Persistence: Strategies for Using Digital Learning System Data to Drive Improvement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krumm, Andrew E.; Beattie, Rachel; Takahashi, Sola; D'Angelo, Cynthia; Feng, Mingyu; Cheng, Britte

    2016-01-01

    This paper outlines the development of practical measures of productive persistence using digital learning system data. Practical measurement refers to data collection and analysis approaches originating from improvement science; productive persistence refers to the combination of academic and social mindsets as well as learning behaviours that…

  14. The Effect of Implementing Instructional Coaching with Digital Learning on High School Math and Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKaveney, Edward W.

    2017-01-01

    A number of national directives and successful case studies, focus on the need for change in teaching and learning, particularly emphasizing increasingly rigorous STEM learning tied to the use of ICT and digital tools for technological literacy and future workforce development. This action research study investigated the role of instructional…

  15. Keeping Pace with K-12 Digital Learning: An Annual Review of Policy and Practice. Eleventh Edition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, John; Pape, Larry; Murin, Amy; Gemin, Butch; Vashaw, Lauren

    2014-01-01

    "Keeping Pace with K-12 Digital Learning" (2014) is the 11th in a series of annual reports that began in 2004 that examine the status of K-12 online education across the country. The report provides an overview of the latest policies, practices, and trends affecting online learning programs across all 50 states. It summarizes that at a…

  16. Contradictory Explorative Assessment. Multimodal Teacher/Student Interaction in Scandinavian Digital Learning Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kjällander, Susanne

    2018-01-01

    Assessment in the much-discussed digital divide in Scandinavian technologically advanced schools, is the study object of this article. Interaction is studied to understand assessment; and to see how assessment can be didactically designed to recognise students' learning. With a multimodal, design theoretical perspective on learning teachers' and…

  17. Children Learning to Use Technologies through Play: A Digital Play Framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bird, Jo; Edwards, Susan

    2015-01-01

    Digital technologies are increasingly acknowledged as an important aspect of early childhood education. A significant problem for early childhood education has been how to understand the pedagogical use of technologies in a sector that values play-based learning. This paper presents a new framework to understand how children learn to use…

  18. Agriscience Teachers' Implementation of Digital Game-based Learning in an Introductory Animal Science Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, Angela W.; Bunch, J. C.; Wallace, Maria F. G.

    2015-12-01

    In today's technological age, visions for technology integration in the classroom continue to be explored and examined. Digital game-based learning is one way to purposefully integrate technology while maintaining a focus on learning objectives. This case study sought to understand agriscience teachers' experiences implementing digital game-based learning in an introductory animal science course. From interviews with agriscience teachers on their experiences with the game, three themes emerged: (1) the constraints of inadequate and inappropriate technologies, and time to game implementation; (2) the shift in teacher and student roles necessitated by implementing the game; and (3) the inherent competitive nature of learning through the game. Based on these findings, we recommend that pre-service and in-service professional development opportunities be developed for teachers to learn how to implement digital game-based learning effectively. Additionally, with the potential for simulations that address cross-cutting concepts in the next generation science standards, digital game-based learning should be explored in various science teaching and learning contexts.

  19. 5 Myths about Classroom Technology: How Do We Integrate Digital Tools to Truly Enhance Learning?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renwick, Matt

    2015-01-01

    What's keeping your school behind the technology curve? Is it a fear of the unfamiliar? Expenses? Or some other myth? Have you considered how students with special needs or students learning a second language may benefit from using digital tools? If you've fallen for the perception that technology is too expensive, unnecessary for real learning,…

  20. Secondary Students Learning Mathematics through Digital Game Building: A Study of the Effects and Students' Perceptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qing; Vandermeiden, Elise; Lemieux, Collette; Nathoo, Shahista

    2016-01-01

    This study explored secondary students' learning experiences in mathematics through digital game building. In this study, students were asked to become designers and builders in order to coauthor their own mathematics learning. Grounded in enactivism, this study examined the impact of game building on students' achievement. In addition, it…

  1. Designing Interactions for Learning: Physicality, Interactivity, and Interface Effects in Digital Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Daniel L.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of the study is to better understand the role of physicality, interactivity, and interface effects in learning with digital content. Drawing on work in cognitive science, human-computer interaction, and multimedia learning, the study argues that interfaces that promote physical interaction can provide "conceptual leverage"…

  2. Digital technologies, participatory learning and the transformation of students’ conduct of everyday life

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schraube, Ernst

    expanding human activities, they are also powerful socio-political “forms of life” (Langdon Winner) transforming fundamentally the practice of teaching and learning as well as the students’ conduct of everyday life. The paper explores the meaning of digital learning spaces at universities (especially...

  3. Affect and Willingness to Communicate in Digital Game-Based Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinders, Hayo; Wattana, Sorada

    2015-01-01

    The possible benefits of digital games for language learning and teaching have received increasing interest in recent years. Games are said, amongst others, to be motivating, to lower affective barriers in learning, and to encourage foreign or second language (L2) interaction. But how do learners actually experience the use of games? What impact…

  4. Online discussion compensates for suboptimal timing of supportive information presentation in a digitally supported learning environment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Noroozi, O.; Busstra, M.C.; Mulder, M.; Biemans, H.J.A.; Tobi, H.; Geelen, A.; Veer, van 't P.; Chizari, M.

    2012-01-01

    This study used a sequential set-up to investigate the consecutive effects of timing of supportive information presentation (information before vs. information during the learning task clusters) in interactive digital learning materials (IDLMs) and type of collaboration (personal discussion vs.

  5. An adaptive deep Q-learning strategy for handwritten digit recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiao, Junfei; Wang, Gongming; Li, Wenjing; Chen, Min

    2018-02-22

    Handwritten digits recognition is a challenging problem in recent years. Although many deep learning-based classification algorithms are studied for handwritten digits recognition, the recognition accuracy and running time still need to be further improved. In this paper, an adaptive deep Q-learning strategy is proposed to improve accuracy and shorten running time for handwritten digit recognition. The adaptive deep Q-learning strategy combines the feature-extracting capability of deep learning and the decision-making of reinforcement learning to form an adaptive Q-learning deep belief network (Q-ADBN). First, Q-ADBN extracts the features of original images using an adaptive deep auto-encoder (ADAE), and the extracted features are considered as the current states of Q-learning algorithm. Second, Q-ADBN receives Q-function (reward signal) during recognition of the current states, and the final handwritten digits recognition is implemented by maximizing the Q-function using Q-learning algorithm. Finally, experimental results from the well-known MNIST dataset show that the proposed Q-ADBN has a superiority to other similar methods in terms of accuracy and running time. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Investigating the ICT Use and Needs of "Digital Natives" in Learning English at a Taiwanese University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Chao-Jung; Thang, Siew Ming; Ou, Shu-chen

    2014-01-01

    This article reports key findings of a study which investigated the use of technology by 569 "digital natives" students for English Language learning and recreational purposes. Their views on the applicability of technological tools such as Facebook, blogging and Skype for English Language teaching and learning were also investigated.…

  7. IdeMatch – a digital tool for innovative, social and transdisciplinary learning designs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Gitte Riis

    This paper presents IdeMatch which is a digital tool implemented in University College Zealand (UCZ) in spring 2015. IdeMatch is based on educational policies and educational structural intentions and needs, and this paper examines and offers an outline for the learning perspective and the impact...... that IdeMatch has got concerning teaching and learning designs....

  8. Digital Game-Based Learning: What's Literacy Got to Do With It?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spires, Hiller A.

    2015-01-01

    Just as literacy practices are contextualized in social situations and relationships, game players establish shared language and understandings within a game; in essence, they gain fluency in specialized languages. This commentary explores the importance of digital game-based learning for schooling, the relationship between game-based learning,…

  9. How teacher education institutions cope with challenges of teaching and learning in the digital age

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voogt, J.; Schols, M.; Bottema, J.; van Bergen, H.; van der Stap, N.; Tomson, A.; Nieweg, M.; Doornenbal, J.W.; Bakker, B.; Smits, A.; Thompson, A.; Searson, M.; Ochoa, M.

    2014-01-01

    The assumption underlying the symposium is that teacher education institutions have a dual challenge. At the one hand they need to prepare pre-service students for teaching and facilitating learning in the digital age, including the use of technology in teaching and learning. At the other hand

  10. Digitization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Finnemann, Niels Ole

    2014-01-01

    what a concept of digital media might add to the understanding of processes of mediatization and what the concept of mediatization might add to the understanding of digital media. It is argued that digital media open an array of new trajectories in human communication, trajectories which were...

  11. Multi-scale learning based segmentation of glands in digital colonrectal pathology images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Yi; Liu, William; Arjun, Shipra; Zhu, Liangjia; Ratner, Vadim; Kurc, Tahsin; Saltz, Joel; Tannenbaum, Allen

    2016-02-01

    Digital histopathological images provide detailed spatial information of the tissue at micrometer resolution. Among the available contents in the pathology images, meso-scale information, such as the gland morphology, texture, and distribution, are useful diagnostic features. In this work, focusing on the colon-rectal cancer tissue samples, we propose a multi-scale learning based segmentation scheme for the glands in the colon-rectal digital pathology slides. The algorithm learns the gland and non-gland textures from a set of training images in various scales through a sparse dictionary representation. After the learning step, the dictionaries are used collectively to perform the classification and segmentation for the new image.

  12. CMOS serial link for fully duplexed data communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kyeongho; Kim, Sungjoon; Ahn, Gijung; Jeong, Deog-Kyoon

    1995-04-01

    This paper describes a CMOS serial link allowing fully duplexed 500 Mbaud serial data communication. The CMOS serial link is a robust and low-cost solution to high data rate requirements. A central charge pump PLL for generating multiphase clocks for oversampling is shared by several serial link channels. Fully duplexed serial data communication is realized in the bidirectional bridge by separating incoming data from the mixed signal on the cable end. The digital PLL accomplishes process-independent data recovery by using a low-ratio oversampling, a majority voting, and a parallel data recovery scheme. Mostly, digital approach could extend its bandwidth further with scaled CMOS technology. A single channel serial link and a charge pump PLL are integrated in a test chip using 1.2 micron CMOS process technology. The test chip confirms upto 500 Mbaud unidirectional mode operation and 320 Mbaud fully duplexed mode operation with pseudo random data patterns.

  13. Empowering the digitally excluded: learning initiatives for (invisible groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jane Seale

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available There is growing evidence that some digitally excluded groups of learners are receiving more attention than others. Discussions regarding why some digitally excluded learners are more visible than others and therefore worthy of more committed digital inclusion interventions raises important questions about how we define and conceptualise digital inclusion and digital inclusion practice; particularly in relation to empowerment. In this article, we draw on a range of research, practice and policy literature to examine two important questions: what is empowerment and in whose hands does empowerment lie? We argue that empowerment involves making informed choices about technology use, but that learners often require support- human intervention- to make these choices. However, current digital inclusion research has failed to produce a detailed critique of what constitutes empowering support from educational institutions and their staff. A lack of open and reflexive accounts of practice means that we are no closer to identifying and understanding the kinds of empowering practices that are required to challenge the kinds of prejudices, stereotypes, risk-aversiveness and low aspirations associated with the most invisible of digitally excluded learners.

  14. [Digital learning object for diagnostic reasoning in nursing applied to the integumentary system].

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Costa, Cecília Passos Vaz; Luz, Maria Helena Barros Araújo

    2015-12-01

    To describe the creation of a digital learning object for diagnostic reasoning in nursing applied to the integumentary system at a public university of Piaui. A methodological study applied to technological production based on the pedagogical framework of problem-based learning. The methodology for creating the learning object observed the stages of analysis, design, development, implementation and evaluation recommended for contextualized instructional design. The revised taxonomy of Bloom was used to list the educational goals. The four modules of the developed learning object were inserted into the educational platform Moodle. The theoretical assumptions allowed the design of an important online resource that promotes effective learning in the scope of nursing education. This study should add value to nursing teaching practices through the use of digital learning objects for teaching diagnostic reasoning applied to skin and skin appendages.

  15. Digital learning objects in nursing consultation: technology assessment by undergraduate students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silveira, DeniseTolfo; Catalan, Vanessa Menezes; Neutzling, Agnes Ludwig; Martinato, Luísa Helena Machado

    2010-01-01

    This study followed the teaching-learning process about the nursing consultation, based on digital learning objects developed through the active Problem Based Learning method. The goals were to evaluate the digital learning objects about nursing consultation, develop cognitive skills on the subject using problem based learning and identify the students' opinions on the use of technology. This is an exploratory and descriptive study with a quantitative approach. The sample consisted of 71 students in the sixth period of the nursing program at the Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul. The data was collected through a questionnaire to evaluate the learning objects. The results showed positive agreement (58%) on the content, usability and didactics of the proposed computer-mediated activity regarding the nursing consultation. The application of materials to the students is considered positive.

  16. Digital learning object for diagnostic reasoning in nursing applied to the integumentary system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cecília Passos Vaz da Costa

    Full Text Available Objective: To describe the creation of a digital learning object for diagnostic reasoning in nursing applied to the integumentary system at a public university of Piaui. Method: A methodological study applied to technological production based on the pedagogical framework of problem-based learning. The methodology for creating the learning object observed the stages of analysis, design, development, implementation and evaluation recommended for contextualized instructional design. The revised taxonomy of Bloom was used to list the educational goals. Results: The four modules of the developed learning object were inserted into the educational platform Moodle. The theoretical assumptions allowed the design of an important online resource that promotes effective learning in the scope of nursing education. Conclusion: This study should add value to nursing teaching practices through the use of digital learning objects for teaching diagnostic reasoning applied to skin and skin appendages.

  17. Digital Game-Based Learning: A Didactic Experience in the Pre-Degree Nursing Career.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solís de Ovando, A; Rodríguez, A; Hullin, C

    2018-01-01

    Nowadays we are faced with a society immersed in globalization and native technology, causing a great challenge in the university teaching staff. The gamification, as teaching-learning didactic methodology, gathers the characteristics that allow to motivate and achieve an active and significant learning. The objective of this work is to show the experience of the nursing career, which combines the learning based on games and the use of digital applications.

  18. The Dilemmas of Digital Methodologies:Learning from Work on Young Digital

    OpenAIRE

    Elsley, Susan; Gallagher, Michael; Tisdall, E Kay M

    2014-01-01

    This article explores common dilemmas facing researchers and practitioners who wish to use digital media in research with children and young people. The article explores both cultural-social-economic and material approaches to digital media. These draw attention to five areas, explored in the article, which raise particular dilemmas and opportunities: networked mobility; interoperability and convergence; corporate involvement; confidentiality, anonymity and privacy; and intellectual property ...

  19. Digital learning for development in Asia (DL4D) | IDRC ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    The project will support an international research network to assess how digital ... network will also examine conditions that promote the successful integration of ... will showcase critical work on adaptation and resilience in hot spot regions.

  20. Digital lectures for learning gross anatomy: a study of their efficacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Anudeep; Min, Aung Ko Ko

    2017-03-01

    The current study investigates the level of students' learning and attitudes towards the teaching and learning process when using digital lectures to teach gross anatomy to year 1 medical students. The study sampled year 1 medical students of cohorts 2013 and 2014. The year 1 medical students in 2013 were taught gross anatomy of the heart by didactic classroom lectures while those in 2014 were taught with digital lectures using the same content. A review session was conducted for the 2014 cohort. A 19-item survey was distributed amongst students to investigate their attitudes and feedback. The data were analysed using SPSS software. The 2014 cohort had a mean score of 47.65 for short essay questions and 51.19 for multiple choice questions, while the 2013 cohort scored an average of 36.80 for short essay questions and 49.22 for multiple choice questions. The difference in scores for each type of question was found to be significant. Using a 5-point Likert scale, students gave an average of 4.11 when asked if they liked the teaching and learning process and would like it to be applied further. The results of the study provide strong evidence that the digital teaching and learning process was well received by students and could also lead to improved performance. Digital lectures can provide a satisfactory substitute for classroom lectures to teach gross anatomy, thus providing flexibility in learning and efficient learning, whilst also freeing lecture slots to promote mastery learning.

  1. Boundary crossing and learning identities – digital storytelling in primary schools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Mette Bjørgen

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available This article contributes to academic discussions on how digital storytelling in an educational setting may have potential to build and develop learning identities, agency and digital competences. With a socio-cultural framework on learning and identity as a point of departure, the article sets out to study these issues approached as boundary crossing between the intersecting contexts of leisure time and school. The analysis draws on three examples of digital storytelling among 5th - 7th graders in three Norwegian primary school classes. My findings suggest that digital storytelling might represent a boundary crossing enabling pupils to adopt new roles as producers of creative content, as mentors or guides, to explore new technology and software in a context different from that of outside school and to learn and develop competences related to production processes and multimodal resources. I argue that digital storytelling has a potential to contribute to learning, learning identity and agency, provided it is based on a more fully developed pedagogical strategy of carefully linking school and leisure time.

  2. Proposing an Optimal Learning Architecture for the Digital Enterprise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Driscoll, Tony

    2003-01-01

    Discusses the strategic role of learning in information age organizations; analyzes parallels between the application of technology to business and the application of technology to learning; and proposes a learning architecture that aligns with the knowledge-based view of the firm and optimizes the application of technology to achieve proficiency…

  3. The impact of specially designed digital games-based learning in undergraduate pathology and medical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanthan, Rani; Senger, Jenna-Lynn

    2011-01-01

    The rapid advances of computer technologies have created a new e-learner generation of "Homo-zappien" students that think and learn differently. Digital gaming is an effective, fun, active, and encouraging way of learning, providing immediate feedback and measurable process. Within the context of ongoing reforms in medical education, specially designed digital games, a form of active learning, are effective, complementary e-teaching/learning resources. To examine the effectiveness of the use of specially designed digital games for student satisfaction and for measurable academic improvement. One hundred fourteen students registered in first-year pathology Medicine 102 had 8 of 16 lecture sessions reviewed in specially designed content-relevant digital games. Performance scores to relevant content sessions were analyzed at midterm and final examinations. Seventy-one students who registered in second-year pathology Medicine 202 were exposed to the games only during the final examination, with the midterm examination serving as an internal matched-control group. Outcome measures included performance at midterm and final examinations. Paired 2-tailed t test statistics compared means. A satisfaction survey questionnaire of yes or no responses analyzed student engagement and their perceptions to digital game-based learning. Questions relevant to the game-play sessions had the highest success rate in both examinations among 114 first-year students. In the 71 second-year students, the examination scores at the end of the final examination were significantly higher than the scores on the midterm examination. Positive satisfaction survey noted increased student engagement, enhanced personal learning, and reduced student stress. Specially constructed digital games-based learning in undergraduate pathology courses showed improved academic performance as measured by examination test scores with increased student satisfaction and engagement.

  4. Aprendizagem de uma habilidade motora seriada em diferentes estágios de desenvolvimento Learning of a motor serial skill in different stages of development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ariane Brito Diniz

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Este estudo investigou a aprendizagem de uma tarefa motora seriada em diferentes estágios de desenvolvimento. Quinze crianças, 14 adultos e 13 idosos praticaram a tarefa de rastrear uma sequência de seis estímulos luminosos durante 10 blocos de tentativas ou até descobrir a sequência, constituindo a fase de estabilização e mais dois blocos de tentativas, referentes as fases de adaptação I e II. O desempenho foi mensurado por meio das respostas funcionais e não-funcionais e das sequências funcionais. Os resultados indicaram que os adultos foram superiores aos demais participantes, e idosos apresentaram melhor desempenho que crianças apenas no início da prática, sugerindo que o estágio de desenvolvimento interage com o processo de aprendizagem motora.This study investigated the learning of a serial tracking task in different developmental stages. Fifteen children, fourteen adults and thirteen elderly practiced the task of tracking a sequence of six light stimuli for ten blocks of trial or until discover the sequence, during the stabilization phase, and two blocks of trial at the adaptation tests I and II. Performance was measured by the functional and non-functional responses and functional sequences. The results showed that adults were superior to the other participants, and elderly participants performed better than children only in the early practice, suggesting that the development stage interacts with the process of motor learning.

  5. eLearning and eMaking: 3D Printing Blurring the Digital and the Physical

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer Loy

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available This article considers the potential of 3D printing as an eLearning tool for design education and the role of eMaking in bringing together the virtual and the physical in the design studio. eLearning has matured from the basics of lecture capture into sophisticated, interactive learning activities for students. At the same time, laptops and internet enabled phones have made computer-based learning mobile, invading classroom learning, changing communication between students, enabling on the spot research, and making the recording of ideas and activities easier. The barriers between online and offline are becoming blurred in a combined digital and physical learning environment. Three-dimensional printing is part of this unification and can be an empowering learning tool for students, changing their relationship with the virtual and the physical, allowing them to take ideas and thinking from screen to reality and back again in an iterative, connected process, however, from an eLearning point of view it is, more importantly, a transformative technology with the potential to change the relationship of the learner to their learning and the scope and nature of their work. Examples from Griffith Product Design student learning illustrate the potential of eMaking to enhance combined learning in a digital age.

  6. Iterative learning-based decentralized adaptive tracker for large-scale systems: a digital redesign approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Jason Sheng-Hong; Du, Yan-Yi; Huang, Pei-Hsiang; Guo, Shu-Mei; Shieh, Leang-San; Chen, Yuhua

    2011-07-01

    In this paper, a digital redesign methodology of the iterative learning-based decentralized adaptive tracker is proposed to improve the dynamic performance of sampled-data linear large-scale control systems consisting of N interconnected multi-input multi-output subsystems, so that the system output will follow any trajectory which may not be presented by the analytic reference model initially. To overcome the interference of each sub-system and simplify the controller design, the proposed model reference decentralized adaptive control scheme constructs a decoupled well-designed reference model first. Then, according to the well-designed model, this paper develops a digital decentralized adaptive tracker based on the optimal analog control and prediction-based digital redesign technique for the sampled-data large-scale coupling system. In order to enhance the tracking performance of the digital tracker at specified sampling instants, we apply the iterative learning control (ILC) to train the control input via continual learning. As a result, the proposed iterative learning-based decentralized adaptive tracker not only has robust closed-loop decoupled property but also possesses good tracking performance at both transient and steady state. Besides, evolutionary programming is applied to search for a good learning gain to speed up the learning process of ILC. Copyright © 2011 ISA. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. From animal cruelty to serial murder: applying the graduation hypothesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Jeremy; Hensley, Christopher

    2003-02-01

    Although serial murder has been recorded for centuries, limited academic attention has been given to this important topic. Scholars have attempted to examine the causality and motivations behind the rare phenomenon of serial murder. However, scant research exists which delves into the childhood characteristics of serial murderers. Using social learning theory, some of these studies present supporting evidence for a link between childhood animal cruelty and adult aggression toward humans. Based on five case studies of serial murderers, we contribute to the existing literature by exploring the possible link between childhood cruelty toward animals and serial murder with the application of the graduation hypothesis.

  8. Evaluation of a digital learning object (DLO) to support the learning process in radiographic dental diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busanello, F H; da Silveira, P F; Liedke, G S; Arús, N A; Vizzotto, M B; Silveira, H E D; Silveira, H L D

    2015-11-01

    Studies have shown that inappropriate therapeutic strategies may be adopted if crown and root changes are misdiagnosed, potentially leading to undesirable consequences. Therefore, the aim of this study was to evaluate a digital learning object, developed to improve skills in diagnosing radiographic dental changes. The object was developed using the Visual Basic Application (VBA) software and evaluated by 62 undergraduate students (male: 24 and female: 38) taking an imaging diagnosis course. Participants were divided in two groups: test group, which used the object and control group, which attended conventional classes. After 3 weeks, students answered a 10-question test and took a practice test to diagnose 20 changes in periapical radiographs. The results show that test group performed better that control group in both tests, with statistically significant difference (P = 0.004 and 0.003, respectively). In overall, female students were better than male students. Specific aspects of object usability were assessed using a structured questionnaire based on the System Usability Scale (SUS), with a score of 90.5 and 81.6 by male and female students, respectively. The results obtained in this study suggest that students who used the DLO performed better than those who used conventional methods. This suggests that the DLO may be a useful teaching tool for dentistry undergraduates, on distance learning courses and as a complementary tool in face-to-face teaching. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Introduction: digital games as a context for cognitive development, learning, and developmental research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blumberg, Fran C; Fisch, Shalom M

    2013-01-01

    The authors present reasons why developmental psychologists should care about children's and adolescents' digital game play. These reasons may be identified as: a) digital game play is an integral aspect of children's and adolescents' lives; b) digital game play contributes to learning and cognitive development; and c) developmental research has the potential to contribute to effective educational game design. The authors expand on these reasons with the goal of introducing or reintroducing to developmental psychologists a rich and very relevant context in which to examine children's and adolescents' applied cognitive development. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc., A Wiley Company.

  10. Do pre-trained deep learning models improve computer-aided classification of digital mammograms?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aboutalib, Sarah S.; Mohamed, Aly A.; Zuley, Margarita L.; Berg, Wendie A.; Luo, Yahong; Wu, Shandong

    2018-02-01

    Digital mammography screening is an important exam for the early detection of breast cancer and reduction in mortality. False positives leading to high recall rates, however, results in unnecessary negative consequences to patients and health care systems. In order to better aid radiologists, computer-aided tools can be utilized to improve distinction between image classifications and thus potentially reduce false recalls. The emergence of deep learning has shown promising results in the area of biomedical imaging data analysis. This study aimed to investigate deep learning and transfer learning methods that can improve digital mammography classification performance. In particular, we evaluated the effect of pre-training deep learning models with other imaging datasets in order to boost classification performance on a digital mammography dataset. Two types of datasets were used for pre-training: (1) a digitized film mammography dataset, and (2) a very large non-medical imaging dataset. By using either of these datasets to pre-train the network initially, and then fine-tuning with the digital mammography dataset, we found an increase in overall classification performance in comparison to a model without pre-training, with the very large non-medical dataset performing the best in improving the classification accuracy.

  11. Assessment of the usability of a digital learning technology prototype for monitoring intracranial pressure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lilian Regina de Carvalho

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective: to assess the usability of a digital learning technology prototype as a new method for minimally invasive monitoring of intracranial pressure. Method: descriptive study using a quantitative approach on assessing the usability of a prototype based on Nielsen's ten heuristics. Four experts in the area of Human-Computer interaction participated in the study. Results: the evaluation delivered eight violated heuristics and 31 usability problems in the 32 screens of the prototype. Conclusion: the suggestions of the evaluators were critical for developing an intuitive, user-friendly interface and will be included in the final version of the digital learning technology.

  12. Design and development of a digital farmer field school. Experiences with a digital learning environment for cocoa production and certification in Sierra Leone

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Witteveen, Loes; Lie, Rico; Goris, Margriet; Ingram, Verina

    2017-01-01

    This article reports on the design and development of the Digital Farmer Field School (DFFS). The DFFS offers a tablet-based digital learning environment for farmers and extension agents for knowledge sharing and knowledge co-creation. It provides an alternative to conventional agricultural

  13. The Future of Digital Working: Knowledge Migration and Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malcolm, Irene

    2014-01-01

    Against the backdrop of intensified migration linked to globalisation, this article considers the implications of knowledge migration for future digital workers. It draws empirically on a socio-material analysis of the international software localisation industry. Localisers' work requires linguistic, cultural and software engineering skills to…

  14. Digital doorway computer literacy through unassisted learning in South Africa

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Smith, R

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available The Digital Doorway is a joint project between the Department of Science and Technology (DST) and the Meraka Institute, with a vision of making a fundamental difference to computer literacy and associated skills in Africa. Underpinning this project...

  15. The Power of Digital Storytelling to Support Teaching and Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robin, Bernard R.

    2016-01-01

    Although the term "digital storytelling" may not be familiar to all readers, over the last twenty years, an increasing number of educators, students and others around the world have created short movies by combining computer-based images, text, recorded audio narration, video clips and music in order to present information on various…

  16. The Digital Culture and Communication: More than just Classroom Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristen Snyder

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a conceptual model of the digital culture that reflects the multi-dimensionality of ICT in education: pedagogy, communication, technology and organizational systems. The model grew out of a three-year study of an online professional development program for educators in seven countries. The focus of the paper is to explore the relationship between human dynamics and technological systems for advancing the school as an organization. Considering the digital culture of schools from an organizational communication culture perspective awakens us to the importance of looking at the subculture that emerges through human exchange reflecting core values and beliefs. When we consider the digital world in which students already live, and match it against the challenge of schools for human citizen development, we begin to see that a digital culture is more than technological. It is organizational, it is communicative, and it is cultural. Through the creation of cultural webs, motivated by humans, and assisted by technology, online communication has the possibility to shape a collective space for cross cultural connections that support a shared democracy.

  17. What Learners "Know" through Digital Media Production: Learning by Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, Kathy A.

    2010-01-01

    The power to influence others in ever expanding social networks in the new knowledge economy is tied to capabilities with digital media production that require increased technological knowledge. This article draws on research in primary classrooms to examine the repertoires of cross-disciplinary knowledge that literacy learners need to produce…

  18. Let's Scrum! Learning Digital Media Collaboratively

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Daniel G.; Brown, Joshua; Burke, Adam A.

    2013-01-01

    The changing landscape of digital media and software development has immense impact on society, not only through consumer use of the products, but also in the way these technologies are developed. Modern software and media-development companies are using collaborative methods to develop innovative and useful products. Technology and engineering…

  19. Documents at hand: learning from paper to improve digital technologies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bondarenko, O.; Janssen, Ruud; Veer, van der G.C.; Gayle, C.

    2005-01-01

    In this paper the results of a two-year ethnographic study of the personal document management of 28 information workers is described. Both the paper and digital domain were taken into account during the study. The results reaffirmed that document management is strongly related to task management.

  20. "Digital Natives": An Asian Perspective for Using Learning Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, David M.; Fox, Bob

    2013-01-01

    Students entering universities in the 21st century have been described variously as digital natives, the millennial generation or the net generation. Considerable study has occurred around the world to determine the knowledge, skills, understanding and the purposes to which this group of individuals makes technology work for them. A number of…

  1. Learning "Number Sense" through Digital Games with Intrinsic Feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laurillard, Diana

    2016-01-01

    The paper proposes a new interdisciplinary approach to helping low attaining learners in basic mathematics. It reports on the research-informed design and user testing of an adaptive digital game based on constructionist tasks with intrinsic feedback. The approach uses findings from the neuroscience of dyscalculia, cognitive science research on…

  2. incorporating digital technology in the teaching and learning

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Incorporating the latest digital technology into traditional language teaching systems has opened up a wealth of multimedia and interactive applications available to bring teaching methods into the 21st century. In the last 10 years, the world has experienced a sudden increase of technology, and this has had a lot of impact ...

  3. Developing 21st Century Chemistry Learning through Designing Digital Games

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lay, Ah-Nam; Osman, Kamisah

    2018-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the effect of Malaysian "Kimia" (Chemistry) Digital Games (MyKimDG) module on students' achievement and motivation in chemistry as well as 21st century skills. Chemistry education in Malaysia should put greater emphasis on combination of cognitive, sociocultural and motivational aspects to…

  4. Critically Evaluating Prensky in a Language Learning Context: The "Digital Natives/Immigrants Debate" and Its Implications for CALL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benini, Silvia; Murray, Liam

    2013-01-01

    More than 10 years have passed since the first introduction of the term "digital natives" in Prensky's (2001a, 2001b) two seminal articles. Prensky argues that students today, having grown up in the Digital Age, learn differently from their predecessors, or "digital immigrants". As such, the pedagogical tools and methods used…

  5. Exploring the Use of Interactive Digital Storytelling Video: Promoting Student Engagement and Learning in a University Hybrid Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shelton, Catharyn C.; Warren, Annie E.; Archambault, Leanna M.

    2016-01-01

    This study explores interactive digital storytelling in a university hybrid course. Digital stories leverage imagery and narrative-based content to explore concepts, while appealing to millennials. When digital storytelling is used as the main source of course content, tensions arise regarding how to engage and support student learning while…

  6. Combining Digital Archives Content with Serious Game Approach to Create a Gamified Learning Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D.-T. Shih

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an interdisciplinary to develop content-aware application that combines game with learning on specific categories of digital archives. The employment of content-oriented game enhances the gamification and efficacy of learning in culture education on architectures and history of Hsinchu County, Taiwan. The gamified form of the application is used as a backbone to support and provide a strong stimulation to engage users in learning art and culture, therefore this research is implementing under the goal of “The Digital ARt/ARchitecture Project”. The purpose of the abovementioned project is to develop interactive serious game approaches and applications for Hsinchu County historical archives and architectures. Therefore, we present two applications, “3D AR for Hukou Old ” and “Hsinchu County History Museum AR Tour” which are in form of augmented reality (AR. By using AR imaging techniques to blend real object and virtual content, the users can immerse in virtual exhibitions of Hukou Old Street and Hsinchu County History Museum, and to learn in ubiquitous computing environment. This paper proposes a content system that includes tools and materials used to create representations of digitized cultural archives including historical artifacts, documents, customs, religion, and architectures. The Digital ARt / ARchitecture Project is based on the concept of serious game and consists of three aspects: content creation, target management, and AR presentation. The project focuses on developing a proper approach to serve as an interactive game, and to offer a learning opportunity for appreciating historic architectures by playing AR cards. Furthermore, the card game aims to provide multi-faceted understanding and learning experience to help user learning through 3D objects, hyperlinked web data, and the manipulation of learning mode, and then effectively developing their learning levels on cultural and historical archives in

  7. Combining Digital Archives Content with Serious Game Approach to Create a Gamified Learning Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shih, D.-T.; Lin, C. L.; Tseng, C.-Y.

    2015-08-01

    This paper presents an interdisciplinary to develop content-aware application that combines game with learning on specific categories of digital archives. The employment of content-oriented game enhances the gamification and efficacy of learning in culture education on architectures and history of Hsinchu County, Taiwan. The gamified form of the application is used as a backbone to support and provide a strong stimulation to engage users in learning art and culture, therefore this research is implementing under the goal of "The Digital ARt/ARchitecture Project". The purpose of the abovementioned project is to develop interactive serious game approaches and applications for Hsinchu County historical archives and architectures. Therefore, we present two applications, "3D AR for Hukou Old " and "Hsinchu County History Museum AR Tour" which are in form of augmented reality (AR). By using AR imaging techniques to blend real object and virtual content, the users can immerse in virtual exhibitions of Hukou Old Street and Hsinchu County History Museum, and to learn in ubiquitous computing environment. This paper proposes a content system that includes tools and materials used to create representations of digitized cultural archives including historical artifacts, documents, customs, religion, and architectures. The Digital ARt / ARchitecture Project is based on the concept of serious game and consists of three aspects: content creation, target management, and AR presentation. The project focuses on developing a proper approach to serve as an interactive game, and to offer a learning opportunity for appreciating historic architectures by playing AR cards. Furthermore, the card game aims to provide multi-faceted understanding and learning experience to help user learning through 3D objects, hyperlinked web data, and the manipulation of learning mode, and then effectively developing their learning levels on cultural and historical archives in Hsinchu County.

  8. a digital lego a digital lego-based learning environment for fraction

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    eobe

    new wave of research and the findings have been so promising. The use of ... because of hands-on practical experience. The ... everyday-life situations. ... Cognitive and developmental psychologists viewed learning .... connection to their current conceptual framework. ... behavioural learning theory (BLT) treats the mind as.

  9. Clinical case in digital technology for nursing students' learning: An integrative review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hara, Cristina Yuri Nakata; Aredes, Natália Del Angelo; Fonseca, Luciana Mara Monti; Silveira, Renata Cristina de Campos Pereira; Camargo, Rosangela Andrade Aukar; de Goes, Fernanda Santos Nogueira

    2016-03-01

    This review aimed to analyze the available evidences in literature about clinical case studies inserted in digital technologies for nursing education, characterizing the technology resources and cognitive, procedural and attitudinal learnings. Integrative review of literature with the following steps: development of the research problem, data collection, data extraction and critic evaluation, data analysis and interpretation and presentation of results. The research question was: how does the clinical case study inserted in educational digital technology collaborate for cognitive, attitudinal and procedural learning of nursing students? data bases LILACS, PUBMED, CINAHL and Scopus. the search resulted in 437 studies: 136 from LILACS, 122 from PUBMED, 104 from Scopus and 75 from CINAHL. Of these, 143 did not meet the including criteria, 93 were duplicated and four studies were unavailable. After analyzing all abstracts based on inclusion and exclusion criteria, there were selected 197 studies and after full text analysis the final sample resulted in 21 primary studies. Case study use in educational digital technologies allowed the students to build different types of learning: cognitive learning (n 16 studies), attitudinal learning (n=12 studies) and procedural learning (n=8 studies). It is possible to conclude that case studies can collaborate with the students to develop different learnings which can be built integrate, continuous, informative and formative, aiming integral formation and aligned to policies of formation in nursing, both national and international. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Digital recording as a teaching and learning method in the skills laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strand, Ingebjørg; Gulbrandsen, Lise; Slettebø, Åshild; Nåden, Dagfinn

    2017-09-01

    To obtain information on how nursing students react to, think about and learn from digital recording as a learning and teaching method over time. Based on the teaching and learning philosophy of the university college, we used digital recording as a tool in our daily sessions in skills laboratory. However, most of the studies referred to in the background review had a duration of from only a few hours to a number of days. We found it valuable to design a study with a duration of two academic semesters. A descriptive and interpretative design was used. First-year bachelor-level students at the department of nursing participated in the study. Data collection was carried out by employing an 'online questionnaire'. The students answered five written, open-ended questions after each of three practical skill sessions. Kvale and Brinkmann's three levels of understanding were employed in the analysis. The students reported that digital recording affected factors such as feeling safe, secure and confident and that video recording was essential in learning and training practical skills. The use of cameras proved to be useful, as an expressive tool for peer learning because video recording enhances self-assessment, reflection, sensing, psychomotor performance and discovery learning. Digital recording enhances the student's awareness when acquiring new knowledge because it activates cognitive and emotional learning. The connection between tutoring, feedback and technology was clear. The digital recorder gives students direct and immediate feedback on their performance from the various practical procedures, and may aid in the transition from theory to practice. Students experienced more self-confidence and a feeling of safety in their performances. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Developing Autonomous Learning for Oral Proficiency Using Digital Storytelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, SoHee

    2014-01-01

    Since online educational technology can support a ubiquitous language learning environment, there are many ways to develop English learners' autonomy through self-access learning. This study investigates whether English as a second language (ESL) learners can improve their oral proficiency through independent study by using online self-study…

  12. Leisure, Digital Games and Learning: Perspectives for School Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arruda, Eucidio Pimenta; Arruda, Durcelina Pimenta

    2014-01-01

    This text discusses the relationship between leisure and education in contemporary society from the perspective of day-to-day use of videogames by young people and its relationship to learning, and specifically school learning. We intend to analyze, in the light of current academic production, the following question: what possible relations are…

  13. Situating Student Learning in Rich Contexts: A Constructionist Approach to Digital Archives Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony Cocciolo

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective - This paper sought to determine whether a constructionist pedagogical approach to digital archives education could positively influence student perceptions of their learning. Constructionism is a learning theory that places students in the role of designers and emphasizes creating tangible artifacts in a social environment. This theory was used in the instructional design of the Digital Archive Creation Project (DACP, a major component of a digital archives course offered to students enrolled in a Master’s program in library science at Pratt Institute School of Library and Information Science.Methods - Participants were the 31 students enrolled in the DACP during the fall and spring semesters of 2010. They were surveyed as to their perceived learning outcomes as a result of their engagement with the DACP. Results - Results indicated that students perceived strong increases in their learning following their engagement in the DACP, particularly in terms of their skills, confidence, understanding of topics covered in other courses, and overall understanding. Factors that influenced these increases include the collaborative teamwork, the role of the facilitator or instructor, and individual effort.Conclusion - The project demonstrated that a constructionist pedagogical approach to digital archives education positively impacted students’ perceptions of their learning.

  14. 3D interactive augmented reality-enhanced digital learning systems for mobile devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Kai-Ten; Tseng, Po-Hsuan; Chiu, Pei-Shuan; Yang, Jia-Lin; Chiu, Chun-Jie

    2013-03-01

    With enhanced processing capability of mobile platforms, augmented reality (AR) has been considered a promising technology for achieving enhanced user experiences (UX). Augmented reality is to impose virtual information, e.g., videos and images, onto a live-view digital display. UX on real-world environment via the display can be e ectively enhanced with the adoption of interactive AR technology. Enhancement on UX can be bene cial for digital learning systems. There are existing research works based on AR targeting for the design of e-learning systems. However, none of these work focuses on providing three-dimensional (3-D) object modeling for en- hanced UX based on interactive AR techniques. In this paper, the 3-D interactive augmented reality-enhanced learning (IARL) systems will be proposed to provide enhanced UX for digital learning. The proposed IARL systems consist of two major components, including the markerless pattern recognition (MPR) for 3-D models and velocity-based object tracking (VOT) algorithms. Realistic implementation of proposed IARL system is conducted on Android-based mobile platforms. UX on digital learning can be greatly improved with the adoption of proposed IARL systems.

  15. Ethical implications of digital images for teaching and learning purposes: an integrative review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kornhaber, Rachel; Betihavas, Vasiliki; Baber, Rodney J

    2015-01-01

    Digital photography has simplified the process of capturing and utilizing medical images. The process of taking high-quality digital photographs has been recognized as efficient, timely, and cost-effective. In particular, the evolution of smartphone and comparable technologies has become a vital component in teaching and learning of health care professionals. However, ethical standards in relation to digital photography for teaching and learning have not always been of the highest standard. The inappropriate utilization of digital images within the health care setting has the capacity to compromise patient confidentiality and increase the risk of litigation. Therefore, the aim of this review was to investigate the literature concerning the ethical implications for health professionals utilizing digital photography for teaching and learning. A literature search was conducted utilizing five electronic databases, PubMed, Embase (Excerpta Medica Database), Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature, Educational Resources Information Center, and Scopus, limited to English language. Studies that endeavored to evaluate the ethical implications of digital photography for teaching and learning purposes in the health care setting were included. The search strategy identified 514 papers of which nine were retrieved for full review. Four papers were excluded based on the inclusion criteria, leaving five papers for final analysis. Three key themes were developed: knowledge deficit, consent and beyond, and standards driving scope of practice. The assimilation of evidence in this review suggests that there is value for health professionals utilizing digital photography for teaching purposes in health education. However, there is limited understanding of the process of obtaining and storage and use of such mediums for teaching purposes. Disparity was also highlighted related to policy and guideline identification and development in clinical practice. Therefore, the

  16. LEARNING ONE-DIGIT DECIMAL NUMBERS BY MEASUREMENT AND GAME PREDICTING LENGTH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Puji Astuti

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims to describe how students develop understanding of one-digit decimals. To achieve the aim, Local Instruction Theory (LIT about the process of learning decimals and the means designed to support that learning are developed. Along with this idea, the framework of Realistic Mathematics Education (RME is proposed. Based on the aim, design research methodology is used. This paper discusses learning activities of three meetings from teaching experiment of the focus group students of the fourth grade elementary school in Surabaya: SDIT Al Ghilmani. The data indicated that the learning activities promoted the students’ understanding of one-digit decimal numbers.Keyword: measurement, decimal numbers, number line DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.22342/jme.5.1.1447.35-46

  17. Visual Literacy Skills of Students in College-Level Biology: Learning Outcomes Following Digital or Hand-Drawing Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Justine C.

    2014-01-01

    To test the claim that digital learning tools enhance the acquisition of visual literacy in this generation of biology students, a learning intervention was carried out with 33 students enrolled in an introductory college biology course. This study compared learning outcomes following two types of learning tools: a traditional drawing activity, or…

  18. Enterprise Digital Asset Management System Pilot: Lessons Learned

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong-Mi Kim

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Enterprise digital asset management (DAM systems are beginning to be explored in higher education, but little information about their implementation issues is available. This article describes the University of Michigan’s investigation of managing and retrieving rich media assets in an enterprise DAM system. It includes the background of the pilot project and descriptions of its infrastructure and metadata schema. Two case studies are summarized—one in healthcare education, and one in teacher education and research. Experiences with five significant issues are summarized: privacy, intellectual ownership, digital rights management, uncataloged materials backlog, and user interface and integration with other systems.

  19. Learning Science Through Digital Video: Views on Watching and Creating Videos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wade, P.; Courtney, A. R.

    2013-12-01

    In science, the use of digital video to document phenomena, experiments and demonstrations has rapidly increased during the last decade. The use of digital video for science education also has become common with the wide availability of video over the internet. However, as with using any technology as a teaching tool, some questions should be asked: What science is being learned from watching a YouTube clip of a volcanic eruption or an informational video on hydroelectric power generation? What are student preferences (e.g. multimedia versus traditional mode of delivery) with regard to their learning? This study describes 1) the efficacy of watching digital video in the science classroom to enhance student learning, 2) student preferences of instruction with regard to multimedia versus traditional delivery modes, and 3) the use of creating digital video as a project-based educational strategy to enhance learning. Undergraduate non-science majors were the primary focus group in this study. Students were asked to view video segments and respond to a survey focused on what they learned from the segments. Additionally, they were asked about their preference for instruction (e.g. text only, lecture-PowerPoint style delivery, or multimedia-video). A majority of students indicated that well-made video, accompanied with scientific explanations or demonstration of the phenomena was most useful and preferred over text-only or lecture instruction for learning scientific information while video-only delivery with little or no explanation was deemed not very useful in learning science concepts. The use of student generated video projects as learning vehicles for the creators and other class members as viewers also will be discussed.

  20. DIGITAL

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — The Digital Flood Insurance Rate Map (DFIRM) Database depicts flood risk information and supporting data used to develop the risk data. The primary risk...

  1. CRNL library serials list

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alburger, T.P.

    1982-04-01

    A list of 1900 serial publications (periodicals, society transactions and proceedings, annuals and directories, indexes, newspapers, etc.) is presented with volumes and years held by the Main Library. This library is the largest in AECL as well as one of the largest scientific and technical libraries in North America, and functions as a Canadian resource for nuclear information. A main alphabetical list is followed by broad subject field lists representing research interests, and lists of abstract and index serials, general bibliographic serials, conference indexes, press releases, English translations, and original language journals

  2. Digital Skill Training Research: Preliminary Guidelines for Distributed Learning

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Childs, Jerry

    2001-01-01

    This task was aimed at the development of guidelines for distributed learning (DL). A matrix was generated to evaluate the effectiveness of various DL media for training representative knowledge/skill types...

  3. Multimodal approaches to use mobile, digital devices in learning practies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buhl, Mie

    , anthropology, psychology and sociology) and outlines the prospect of a trans-disciplinary learning mode. The learning mode reflects the current society where knowledge production is social collaborative process and is produced in formal as well as informal and non-formal contexts. My discussion’s theoretical......In this paper, I discuss the potential of multimodal approaches to enhance learning processes. I draw on a case based on Danish Master Courses in ICT and didactic designs where multimodal approaches are in the center of students’ practical design experience as well as in generation of theoretical...... knowledge. The design of the master courses takes its starting point in the assumption that theoretical knowledge generates from practical experiences. Thus, the organization of the students’ learning processes revolves around practical multimodal experiences followed by iterative reflexive sessions...

  4. Digital heritage gamification: An augmented-virtual walkthrough to learn and explore historical places

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Kian Lam; Lim, Chen Kim

    2017-10-01

    In the last decade, cultural heritage including historical sites are reconstructed into digital heritage. Based on UNESCO, digital heritage defines as "cultural, educational, scientific and administrative resources, as well as technical, legal, medical and other kinds of information created digitally, or converted into digital form from existing analogue resources". In addition, the digital heritage is doubling in size every two years and expected will grow tenfold between 2013 and 2020. In order to attract and stir the interest of younger generations about digital heritage, gamification has been widely promoted. In this research, a virtual walkthrough combine with gamifications are proposed for learning and exploring historical places in Malaysia by using mobile device. In conjunction with Visit Perak 2017 Campaign, this virtual walkthrough is proposed for Kellie's Castle at Perak. The objectives of this research is two folds 1) modelling and design of innovative mobile game for virtual walkthrough application, and 2) to attract tourist to explore and learn historical places by using sophisticated graphics from Augmented Reality. The efficiency and effectiveness of the mobile virtual walkthrough will be accessed by the International and local tourists. In conclusion, this research is speculated to be pervasively improve the cultural and historical knowledge of the learners.

  5. An analysis of a digital variant of the Trail Making Test using machine learning techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahmen, Jessamyn; Cook, Diane; Fellows, Robert; Schmitter-Edgecombe, Maureen

    2017-01-01

    The goal of this work is to develop a digital version of a standard cognitive assessment, the Trail Making Test (TMT), and assess its utility. This paper introduces a novel digital version of the TMT and introduces a machine learning based approach to assess its capabilities. Using digital Trail Making Test (dTMT) data collected from (N = 54) older adult participants as feature sets, we use machine learning techniques to analyze the utility of the dTMT and evaluate the insights provided by the digital features. Predicted TMT scores correlate well with clinical digital test scores (r = 0.98) and paper time to completion scores (r = 0.65). Predicted TICS exhibited a small correlation with clinically derived TICS scores (r = 0.12 Part A, r = 0.10 Part B). Predicted FAB scores exhibited a small correlation with clinically derived FAB scores (r = 0.13 Part A, r = 0.29 for Part B). Digitally derived features were also used to predict diagnosis (AUC of 0.65). Our findings indicate that the dTMT is capable of measuring the same aspects of cognition as the paper-based TMT. Furthermore, the dTMT's additional data may be able to help monitor other cognitive processes not captured by the paper-based TMT alone.

  6. Games-to-teach or games-to-learn unlocking the power of digital game-based learning through performance

    CERN Document Server

    Chee, Yam San

    2016-01-01

    The book presents a critical evaluation of current approaches related to the use of digital games in education. The author identifies two competing paradigms: that of games-to-teach and games-to-learn. Arguing in favor of the latter, the author advances the case for approaching game-based learning through the theoretical lens of performance, rooted in play and dialog, to unlock the power of digital games for 21st century learning. Drawing upon the author’s research, three concrete exemplars of game-based learning curricula are described and discussed. The challenge of advancing game-based learning in education is addressed in the context of school reform. Finally, future prospects of and educational opportunities for game-based learning are articulated. Readers of the book will find the explication of performance theory applied to game-based learning especially interesting. This work constitutes the author’s original theorization. Readers will derive four main benefits: (1) an explication of the differenc...

  7. Investigating the Learning Challenges Presented by Digital Technologies to the College of Education in Kuwait University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldhafeeri, Fayiz; Male, Trevor

    2016-01-01

    There is now widespread recognition that digital technologies, particularly portable hand held devices capable of Internet connection, present opportunities and challenges to the way in which student learning is organized in schools, colleges and institutions of higher education in the 21st Century. Traxler, "Journal of the Research Centre…

  8. Effect of Using Smartphones as Clickers and Tablets as Digital Whiteboards on Students' Engagement and Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remón, Javier; Sebastián, Víctor; Romero, Enrique; Arauzo, Jesús

    2017-01-01

    This work addresses the use of tablets and smartphones to enhance both student learning and engagement. Tablets were tested as potential substitutes for digital whiteboards, while smartphones were tested as potential survey media in the classroom using a question and answer method. Two teaching strategies were evaluated and compared: (1)…

  9. In search of design principles for developing digital learning & performance support for a student design task

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bollen, Lars; van der Meij, Hans; Leemkuil, Hendrik H.; McKenney, Susan

    2015-01-01

    A digital learning and performance support environment for university student design tasks was developed. This paper describes on the design rationale, process, and the usage results to arrive at a core set of design principles for the construction of such an environment. We present a collection of

  10. Impact of E-Learning and Digitalization in Primary and Secondary Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tunmibi, Sunday; Aregbesola, Ayooluwa; Adejobi, Pascal; Ibrahim, Olaniyi

    2015-01-01

    This study examines into the impact of e-learning and digitalization in primary and secondary schools, using Greensprings School in Lagos State, Nigeria as a case study. Questionnaire was used as a data collection instrument, and descriptive statistical method was adopted for analysis. Responses from students and teachers reveal that application…

  11. Beyond the Glow: Children's Broadband Access, Digital Learning Initiatives, and Academic Achievement in Rural Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mardis, Marcia

    2016-01-01

    Approximately 26 million Americans have no access to broadband's social and economic benefits. A persistent level of non-adoption stems from adults' lack of perceived need or benefit. Florida's unique move to all digital instructional materials and required online learning by 2015 may make home broadband essential for maintaining a learning…

  12. Digital Learning: Reforming Teacher Education to Promote Access, Equity and Quality in Sub-Saharan Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Bob; Villet, Charmaine

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to provide an overview of the present and future impact of digital learning on teacher education in Sub-Saharan Africa. The focus of the report is student-teachers and teachers, and its central argument is that existing institutional structures will be insufficient to meet the scale of demand for well-prepared,…

  13. A digital peer-to-peer learning platform for clinical skills development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basnak, Jesse; Ortynski, Jennifer; Chow, Meghan; Nzekwu, Emeka

    2017-02-01

    Due to constraints in time and resources, medical curricula may not provide adequate opportunities for pre-clerkship students to practice clinical skills. To address this, medical students at the University of Alberta developed a digital peer-to-peer learning initiative. The initiative assessed if students can learn clinical skills from their peers in co-curricular practice objective structured clinical exams (OSCEs). A total of 144 first-year medical students participated. Students wrote case scenarios that were reviewed by physicians. Students enacted the cases in practice OSCEs, acting as the patient, physician, and evaluator. Verbal and electronic evaluations were completed. A digital platform was used to automate the process. Surveys were disseminated to assess student perceptions of their experience. Seventy-five percent of participants said they needed opportunities to practice patient histories and physical exams in addition to those provided in the medical school curriculum. All participants agreed that the co-curricular practice OSCEs met this need. The majority of participants also agreed that the digital platform was efficient and easy to use. Students found the practice OSCEs and digital platform effective for learning clinical skills. Thus, peer-to-peer learning and computer automation can be useful adjuncts to traditional medical curricula.

  14. Digital Dome versus Desktop Display: Learning Outcome Assessments by Domain Experts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobson, Jeffery

    2013-01-01

    In previous publications, the author reported that students learned about Egyptian architecture and society by playing an educational game based on a virtual representation of a temple. Students played the game in a digital dome or on a standard desktop computer, and (each) then recorded a video tour of the temple. Those who had used the dome…

  15. Re-Imagining the Nature of (Student-Focused) Learning through Digital Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hood, Nina

    2018-01-01

    Digital technology is frequently positioned as being central to the establishment of a 'future focused' education system that provides high quality student-focused learning opportunities and re-envisioned educational outcomes. While recognising the potential of technology, this paper explores some of the questions about its role in education and…

  16. Assessing Impact of Technology Based Digital Equalizer Programme on Improving Student Learning Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkar, Subrata; Mohapatra, Sanjay; Sundarakrishnan, J.

    2017-01-01

    The objective of this research was to assess the impact of the Digital Equalizer program (DE Program) in terms of student learning outcomes of students in subjects like science, mathematics and geography after 8 months of implementing the DE program in 283 schools across 30 districts of Odisha, India. This study was a inter group and intra group…

  17. On design-oriented research and digital learning materials in higher education

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hartog, R.J.M.

    2012-01-01

    The context of the research described in this thesis is formed by a number of research projects that were aimed at the design, development, implementation, use and evaluation of innovative digital learning materials. Most of these projects were carried out mainly within Wageningen University. In

  18. Student Teachers' Discourse about Digital Technologies and Transitions between Formal and Informal Learning Contexts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pöntinen, Susanna; Dillon, Patrick; Väisänen, Pertti

    2017-01-01

    This research is a contribution to issues of digital technology use at the interface of formal and informal learning contexts. The research was conducted in the discourse tradition and investigates Finnish teacher training students' 'manners of speaking' as resources for, and obstacles to, making pedagogical changes in response to the potential of…

  19. In search of design principles for developing digital learning & performance support for a student design task

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bollen, Lars; Van der Meij, Hans; Leemkuil, Henny; McKenney, Susan

    2016-01-01

    A digital learning and performance support environment for university student design tasks was developed. This paper describes on the design rationale, process, and the usage results to arrive at a core set of design principles for the construction of such an environment. We present a collection of

  20. Digital Game-Based Language Learning in Foreign Language Teacher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alyaz, Yunus; Genc, Zubeyde Sinem

    2016-01-01

    New technologies including digital game-based language learning have increasingly received attention. However, their implementation is far from expected and desired levels due to technical, instructional, financial and sociological barriers. Previous studies suggest that there is a strong need to establish courses in order to support adaptation of…

  1. Barriers to Blended Digital Distance Vocational Learning for Non-Traditional Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safford, Kimberly; Stinton, Julia

    2016-01-01

    This research identifies and examines the challenges of blending digital distance and vocational learning for non-traditional and low-socio-economic status students who are new to university education. A survey of students in vocational primary education and early years qualifications in a distance university is illuminated by interviews with…

  2. Digital Devices, Distraction, and Student Performance: Does In-Class Cell Phone Use Reduce Learning?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan, Douglas K.; Hoekstra, Angel R.; Wilcox, Bethany R.

    2012-01-01

    The recent increase in use of digital devices such as laptop computers, iPads, and web-enabled cell phones has generated concern about how technologies affect student performance. Combining observation, survey, and interview data, this research assesses the effects of technology use on student attitudes and learning. Data were gathered in eight…

  3. Digital Citizenship with Social Media: Participatory Practices of Teaching and Learning in Secondary Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gleason, Benjamin; von Gillern, Sam

    2018-01-01

    This article explores how social media use in formal and informal learning spaces can support the development of digital citizenship for secondary school students. As students increasingly spend large amounts of time online (e.g., an average of six hours of screen time per day, excluding school and homework), it is critical that they are…

  4. Mathematics Achievement with Digital Game-Based Learning in High School Algebra 1 Classes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, Terri Lynn Kurley

    2014-01-01

    This study examined the impact of digital game-based learning (DGBL) on mathematics achievement in a rural high school setting in North Carolina. A causal comparative research design was used in this study to collect data to determine the effectiveness of DGBL in high school Algebra 1 classes. Data were collected from the North Carolina…

  5. Virtual Worlds and the Learner Hero: How Today's Video Games Can Inform Tomorrow's Digital Learning Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigby, C. Scott; Przybylski, Andrew K.

    2009-01-01

    Participation in expansive video games called "virtual worlds" has become a mainstream leisure activity for tens of millions of people around the world. The growth of this industry and the strong motivational appeal of these digital worlds invite a closer examination as to how educators can learn from today's virtual worlds in the development of…

  6. Relation between Academic Performance and Students' Engagement in Digital Learning Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertheussen, Bernt Arne; Myrland, Øystein

    2016-01-01

    This study reports on the effect of student engagement in digital learning activities on academic performance for 120 students enrolled in an undergraduate finance course. Interactive practice and exam problem files were available to each student, and individual download activity was automatically recorded during the first 50 days of the course.…

  7. Improvization and Strategic Risk-Taking in Informal Learning with Digital Media Literacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hobbs, Renee

    2013-01-01

    The city provides a rich array of learning opportunities for young children. However, in many urban schools, often it can be logistically difficult to get young children out of the building. But when elementary children are encouraged to view the city as a classroom and use digital media to explore and represent their neighborhoods, they can be…

  8. Designing a Deeply Digital Science Curriculum: Supporting Teacher Learning and Implementation with Organizing Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leary, Heather; Severance, Samuel; Penuel, William R.; Quigley, David; Sumner, Tamara; Devaul, Holly

    2016-01-01

    This paper examines the impacts of technology (e.g., Chromebooks, Google Drive) on teacher learning and student activity in the development and implementation of a deeply digital high school biology unit. Using design-based implementation research, teachers co-designed with researchers and curriculum specialists a student-centered unit aligned to…

  9. Perceptions and Uses of Digital Badges for Professional Learning Development in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyjur, Patti; Lindstrom, Gabrielle

    2017-01-01

    Few instructors in higher education have completed a formal teaching program and, therefore, rely on informal professional development opportunities to enhance their teaching practice. Micro-credentialing in the form of digital badges is one way in which instructors can document their non-credit learning and accomplishments. This mixed methods…

  10. The Use of Digital Technologies in the Classroom: A Teaching and Learning Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buzzard, Christopher; Crittenden, Victoria L.; Crittenden, William F.; McCarty, Paulette

    2011-01-01

    Today's college students, often referred to as the "digital generation," use an impressive assortment of technological tools in a wide variety of ways. However, the findings reported here suggest that students prefer more traditional instructional technology for effective engagement and learning. Faculty members, however, prefer the use of…

  11. State Digital Learning Exemplars: Highlights from States Leading Change through Policies and Funding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acree, Lauren; Fox, Christine

    2015-01-01

    States are striving to support the expansion of technology tools and resources in K-12 education through state policies, programs, and funding in order to provide digital learning opportunities for all students. This paper highlights examples of states with policies in support of five key areas: (1) innovative funding streams and policy; (2)…

  12. Digital learning for development in Asia (DL4D) | CRDI - Centre de ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Digital learning for development in Asia (DL4D). Education is a pillar of development. The Sustainable Development Goals identify it as a global development priority with a commitment to ensuring inclusive and equitable quality education for all by 2030. The benefits of education are wide-ranging. Asia's strong economic ...

  13. Game-Based Learning in Teacher Education: A Strategy to Integrate Digital Games into Secondary Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charlier, Nathalie; De Fraine, Biecke

    2012-01-01

    As educational technology is rapidly changing, greater emphasis has been placed on preparing the next generation of teachers for effective technology integration into the classrooms. In this article, the authors describe the design, implementation, and evaluation of a course on digital game-based learning (DGBL) developed for the preservice…

  14. Fluidity in the Networked Society--Self-Initiated learning as a Digital Literacy Competence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levinsen, Karin Tweddell

    2011-01-01

    In the globalized economies e-permeation has become a basic condition in our everyday lives. ICT can no longer be understood solely as artefacts and tools and computer-related literacy are no longer restricted to the ability to operate digital tools for specific purposes. The network society, and therefore also eLearning are characterized by…

  15. Learning Analytics and Digital Badges: Potential Impact on Student Retention in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mah, Dana-Kristin

    2016-01-01

    Learning analytics and digital badges are emerging research fields in educational science. They both show promise for enhancing student retention in higher education, where withdrawals prior to degree completion remain at about 30% in Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development member countries. This integrative review provides an…

  16. Digital Games, Design, and Learning: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Douglas B.; Tanner-Smith, Emily E.; Killingsworth, Stephen S.

    2016-01-01

    In this meta-analysis, we systematically reviewed research on digital games and learning for K-16 students. We synthesized comparisons of game versus nongame conditions (i.e., media comparisons) and comparisons of augmented games versus standard game designs (i.e., value-added comparisons). We used random-effects meta-regression models with robust…

  17. A Generalizable Framework for Multi-Scale Auditing of Digital Learning Provision in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Samuel R. P-J.; Volz, Veronica; Lancaster, Matthew K.; Divan, Aysha

    2018-01-01

    It is increasingly important that higher education institutions be able to audit and evaluate the scope and efficacy of their digital learning resources across various scales. To date there has been little effort to address this need for a validated, appropriate, and simple-to-execute method that will facilitate such an audit, whether it be at the…

  18. Does Transformational Leadership Encourage Teacher’s Use of Digital Learning Materials?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vermeulen, Marjan; Van Acker, Frederik; Kreijns, Karel; Van Buuren, Hans

    2018-01-01

    To gain insight into how to promote teachers’ use of digital learning materials (DLMs) in their pedagogical practices we adopted the Integrated Model of Behavior Prediction to investigate the relationships between organizational and teacher related variables. A representative sample of 772 teachers

  19. Teaching Introduction to Psychology: Promoting Student Learning Using Digital Storytelling and Community Engagement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grange, Christina; Miller, Antoinette

    2018-01-01

    This paper demonstrates how partnering with digital storytelling initiatives, like the StoryCorps project, can yield fruitful service-learning opportunities, while also supporting innovative approaches for teaching students from a range of disciplines who are enrolled in Introduction to Psychology (PSYC 1101). While various pedagogical tools for…

  20. Playing at Serial Acquisitions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.T.J. Smit (Han); T. Moraitis (Thras)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractBehavioral biases can result in suboptimal acquisition decisions-with the potential for errors exacerbated in consolidating industries, where consolidators design serial acquisition strategies and fight escalating takeover battles for platform companies that may determine their future

  1. Classifying serial killers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Promish, D I; Lester, D

    1999-11-08

    We attempted to match the appearance and demeanor of 27 serial killers to the postmortem 'signatures' found on their victims' bodies. Our results suggest that a link may exist between postmortem signatures and two complementary appearance-demeanor types.

  2. The digital Dalton Plan: Progressive education as integral part of web-based learning environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georg Weichhart

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available e-Learning systems increasingly support learning management and self-organized learning processes. Since the latter have been studied in the field of progressive education extensively, it is worthwhile to consider them for developing digital learning environments to support self-regulated learning processes. In this paper we aim at transforming one of the most prominent and sustainable approaches to self-organized learning, the “Dalton Plan” as proposed by Helen Parkhurst. Its assignment structure supports learners when managing their learning tasks, thus triggering self-organized acquisition of knowledge, and its feedback graphs enable transparent learning processes. Since e-learning environments have become common use, rather than creating another system, we propose a modular approach that can be used for extending existing e-learning environments. In order to design a respective component, we interviewed experts in self-organized e-learning. Their input facilitated integrating the Dalton Plan with existing features of e-learning environments. After representing each interview in concept maps, we were able to aggregate them for deriving e-learning requirements conform to the Dalton Plan instruments. In the course of implementing them, particular attention had to be paid to the asynchrony of interaction during runtime. Java Server Faces technology enable the Dalton Plan component to be migrated into existing web 2.0 e-learning platforms. The result was evaluated based on the acquired concept maps, as they also captured the transformation process of the Dalton Plan to e-learning features. The findings encourage embodying further progressive education approaches in this way, since the structured (concept mapping of the Dalton Plan to e-learning features turned out to be accurate. The experts were able to recognize the potential of the approach both in terms of structuring the knowledge acquisition process, and in terms of developing

  3. Digital lectures for learning gross anatomy: a study of their efficacy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anudeep Singh

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Purpose The current study investigates the level of students’ learning and attitudes towards the teaching and learning process when using digital lectures to teach gross anatomy to year 1 medical students. Methods The study sampled year 1 medical students of cohorts 2013 and 2014. The year 1 medical students in 2013 were taught gross anatomy of the heart by didactic classroom lectures while those in 2014 were taught with digital lectures using the same content. A review session was conducted for the 2014 cohort. A 19-item survey was distributed amongst students to investigate their attitudes and feedback. The data were analysed using SPSS software. Results The 2014 cohort had a mean score of 47.65 for short essay questions and 51.19 for multiple choice questions, while the 2013 cohort scored an average of 36.80 for short essay questions and 49.22 for multiple choice questions. The difference in scores for each type of question was found to be significant. Using a 5-point Likert scale, students gave an average of 4.11 when asked if they liked the teaching and learning process and would like it to be applied further. Conclusion The results of the study provide strong evidence that the digital teaching and learning process was well received by students and could also lead to improved performance. Digital lectures can provide a satisfactory substitute for classroom lectures to teach gross anatomy, thus providing flexibility in learning and efficient learning, whilst also freeing lecture slots to promote mastery learning.

  4. Trabajo colaborativo, espacio digital y e-learning

    OpenAIRE

    Redondo Casado, Félix

    2009-01-01

    El EEES exige a los profesores el trabajo con las nuevas tecnologías de la información y la comunicación, que posibilitan la informática y las redes. La hipótesis principal del estudio es que el trabajo colaborativo se configura como un procedimiento atractivo y fructífero para crear el conocimiento entre profesor y alumnos. El siguiente trabajo, tras una introducción a este fenómeno hace una conceptualización del significado de lo colaborativo, así como de espacio digital (preferible a espac...

  5. Digitized Educational Technology: A Learning Tool Using Remotely Sensed Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Love, Gloria Carter

    1999-01-01

    Digitized Educational software for different levels of instruction were developed and placed on the web (geocities). Students attending the Pre-Engineering Summer 1998 Camp at Dillard University explored the use of the software which included presentations, applications, and special exercises. Student comments were received and considered for adjustments. The second outreach program included students from Colton Junior High School and Natural Science Majors at Dillard University. The Natural Majors completed a second survey concerning reasons why students selected majors in the Sciences and Mathematics. Two student research assistants (DU) and faculty members/parents of Colton Junior High assisted.

  6. Designing Inclusive Reflective Learning with Digital Democratic Dialogue Across Boundaries and Diversities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sorensen, Elsebeth Korsgaard; Brooks, Eva Irene

    2018-01-01

    and structuring the “walls” of a digital learning architecture condusive to the establishment of a social, inclusive, empowering and interactive learning climate online. It makes a plea for using an approach of dialogic design with meta-structures in the communicative fora in order to promote inclusiveness......This paper deals with the challenge of designing online learning architectures for master students. From different theoretical concepts and with a netnographic methodological research approach, the paper discusses theoretical concepts, challenges and mechanisms significant to designing...

  7. Quantized Iterative Learning Consensus Tracking of Digital Networks With Limited Information Communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Wenjun; Yu, Xinghuo; Chen, Yao; Gao, Jie

    2017-06-01

    This brief investigates the quantized iterative learning problem for digital networks with time-varying topologies. The information is first encoded as symbolic data and then transmitted. After the data are received, a decoder is used by the receiver to get an estimate of the sender's state. Iterative learning quantized communication is considered in the process of encoding and decoding. A sufficient condition is then presented to achieve the consensus tracking problem in a finite interval using the quantized iterative learning controllers. Finally, simulation results are given to illustrate the usefulness of the developed criterion.

  8. The Benefits of the E-Learning Agricultural Project Kissankerala to Digital Immigrants and Digital Natives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy V., Manoj; Ghosh, Chimoy Kumar

    2013-01-01

    In recent times Information and Communication Technology (ICT) has been able to make inroads into the ways information is disseminated among those involved in direct farming and farming related enterprises. This paper arose from a two-year study of the KissanKerala, the e-learning project underway in Kerala, a small state in India. It is more…

  9. From Digital Natives to Digital Wisdom: Hopeful Essays for 21st Century Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prensky, Marc

    2012-01-01

    What can you learn on a cell phone? Almost anything! How does that concept fit with our traditional system of education? It doesn't. Best-selling author and futurist Marc Prensky's book of essays challenges educators to "reboot" and make the changes necessary to prepare students for 21st century careers. His "bottom-up" vision is based on…

  10. Spatial Learning and Wayfinding in an Immersive Environment: The Digital Fulldome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedge, Craig; Weaver, Ruth; Schnall, Simone

    2017-05-01

    Previous work has examined whether immersive technologies can benefit learning in virtual environments, but the potential benefits of technology in this context are confounded by individual differences such as spatial ability. We assessed spatial knowledge acquisition in male and female participants using a technology not previously examined empirically: the digital fulldome. Our primary aim was to examine whether performance on a test of survey knowledge was better in a fulldome (N = 28, 12 males) relative to a large, flat screen display (N = 27, 13 males). Regression analysis showed that, compared to a flat screen display, males showed higher levels of performance on a test of survey knowledge after learning in the fulldome, but no benefit occurred for females. Furthermore, performance correlated with spatial visualization ability in male participants, but not in female participants. Thus, the digital fulldome is a potentially useful learning aid, capable of accommodating multiple users, but individual differences and use of strategy need to be considered.

  11. Digital game elements, user experience and learning : A conceptual framework

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Alexiou (Andreas); M.C. Schippers (Michaéla)

    2018-01-01

    textabstractThe primary aim of this paper is to identify and theoretically validate the relationships between core game design elements and mechanics, user motivation and engagement and consequently learning. Additionally, it tries to highlight the moderating role of player personality traits on

  12. Digital Performance Learning: Utilizing a Course Weblog for Mediating Communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novakovich, Jeanette; Long, Erin Cramer

    2013-01-01

    Two sections of university-level technical writing courses were given an authentic task to write an article for publication for an outside stakeholder. A quasi-experimental study was conducted to determine the differences in learning outcomes between students using traditional writing methods and those using social media to generate articles. One…

  13. Information Resources Usage in Project Management Digital Learning System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidovitch, Nitza; Belichenko, Margarita; Kravchenko, Yurii

    2017-01-01

    The article combines a theoretical approach to structuring knowledge that is based on the integrated use of fuzzy semantic network theory predicates, Boolean functions, theory of complexity of network structures and some practical aspects to be considered in the distance learning at the university. The paper proposes a methodological approach that…

  14. Space as a Tool for Analysis: Examining Digital Learning Spaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Michelle

    2018-01-01

    Over the past decade we have seen a rise in the adoption and proliferation of social technologies, and along with these a move to build on the capacity to embrace new pedagogies and practices that can open our boundaries for both teaching and learning. How do we determine what we mean by space specifically in online environments and how can we…

  15. Adaptive Learning in Psychology: Wayfinding in the Digital Age

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dziuban, Charles D.; Moskal, Patsy D.; Cassisi, Jeffrey; Fawcett, Alexis

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents the results of a pilot study investigating the use of the Realizeit adaptive learning platform to deliver a fully online General Psychology course across two semesters. Through mutual cooperation, UCF and vendor (CCKF) researchers examined students' affective, behavioral, and cognitive reactions to the system. Student survey…

  16. Scaling digital learning in Kenya | CRDI - Centre de recherches pour ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    The current project applies interactive multimedia software coupled with extensive professional development for teachers to enhance teaching and to improve the learning of children in Kenya. Prior projects explored the feasibility and measured the effectiveness of using ABRACADABRA (ABRA) early literacy software with ...

  17. Teaching and Learning: Using Digital Tools for Progressive Assessment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kastbjerg, Rita B.; Petersson, Eva; Lewis Brooks, Anthony

    2008-01-01

      Non-biased assessment becomes a reality when Information and Communication Technology (ICT) is implemented as a pedagogical tool to augment teacher practice and student learning. This paper details a study that was undertaken at a secondary school in Lithuania involving four educators and 200...... in education to address future augmented teacher - students' liaisons....

  18. Designing a Programmatic Digital Learning Environment: Lessons from Prototyping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gal, Diane; Lewis, Mark

    2018-01-01

    Promoted as a way to enhance learning and improve efficiencies, the steady rise of technology adoption across higher education has created both new opportunities and new challenges. Borrowing principles of design thinking and related user- or learner-centered design practices, this descriptive case study offers an example of how institutions of…

  19. Contradictory directionalities of digital learning technology and its implications for the scope of imaginable possibilities for collaborating

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chimirri, Niklas Alexander

    Contradictory learning directionalities are immanent to digital learning technology: Any technology suggests a limited multiplicity of situated uses in a learning practice, of understandings of how to learn and of what learning should be about. Herewith any technology offers a scope of imaginable...... possibilities for acting through it. Sociomaterially maintained learning directionalities – among others through the intended uses of learning technology in educational arrangements – afford the enactment of a delimited ensemble of experiential modes, sensualities, epistemologies, knowledges, and future hopes....... Next to offering opportunities to expand the learners’ scope of possibilities for transforming these learning directionalities together, digital learning technology thus also promotes the taken for grantedness of particular understandings of (most often instrumental) learning. They may consequently...

  20. Digital Learning in Schools: Conceptualizing the Challenges and Influences on Teacher Practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher N Blundell

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Digital technologies are an important requirement for curriculum expectations, including general ICT capability and STEM education. These technologies are also positioned as mechanisms for educational reform via transformation of teacher practice. It seems, however, that wide-scale transformation of teacher practice and digital learning remain unrealized. This is commonly attributed to a range of challenges associated with extrinsic and intrinsic influences, which while acknowledged, are not well conceptualized. Using evidence from a case study of teachers working to transform their practice with digital technologies, this paper presents a tri-theory framework that was used to conceptualize these challenges. Activity Theory provided a mechanism for teachers to identify extrinsic influences in activity systems then contextualize and reduce the perceived significance of challenging contradictions. System 1 and System 2 Thinking Theory was used by the teachers to explore the role of routine, attitudes, and beliefs in their practice and con-ceptualize discomfort associated with changes in practice. Transformative Learning Theory is presented as a mechanism to explain the interaction between extrinsic and intrinsic influences during the teachers’ collaborative attempts to consciously transform their practice. As a common language for discourse, the tri-theory framework allowed the teachers to collaboratively contextualize challenges of realizing digital learning.

  1. Digital Game-Based Language Learning in Foreign Language Teacher Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunus ALYAZ

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available New technologies including digital game-based language learning have increasingly received attention. However, their implementation is far from expected and desired levels due to technical, instructional, financial and sociological barriers. Previous studies suggest that there is a strong need to establish courses in order to support adaptation of game-based learning pedagogy through helping teachers experience digital games themselves before they are expected to use them in teaching. This study was conducted to investigate educational digital games in foreign language teaching, to identify the determining reasons behind the pittfalls in applications and to explore the contribution of a serious game to the development of professional language skills of pre-service teachers. Pre- and post-tests were applied to measure the contribution of the game to the development of their language skills. In addition, a game diary and semi-structured interviews were used to elicit information about the problems pre-service teachers had and their perceptions on the whole process. The analysis of the data illustrated that there was great improvement in pre-service teachers’ professional language skills and attitudes towards using these games while teaching in the future. This is important in foreign language teacher education in terms of enhancing digital game-based language learning pedagogy for teachers.

  2. Successful Teaching, Learning, and Use of Digital Mapping Technology in Mazvihwa, Rural Zimbabwe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eitzel Solera, M. V.; Madzoro, S.; Solera, J.; Mhike Hove, E.; Changarara, A.; Ndlovu, D.; Chirindira, A.; Ndlovu, A.; Gwatipedza, S.; Mhizha, M.; Ndlovu, M.

    2016-12-01

    Participatory mapping is now a staple of community-based work around the world. Particularly for indigenous and rural peoples, it can represent a new avenue for environmental justice and can be a tool for culturally appropriate management of local ecosystems. We present a successful example of teaching and learning digital mapping technology in rural Zimbabwe. Our digital mapping project is part of the long-term community-based participatory research of The Muonde Trust in Mazvihwa, Zimbabwe. By gathering and distributing local knowledge and also bringing in visitors to share knowledge, Muonde has been able to spread relevant information among rural farmers. The authors were all members of Muonde or were Muonde's visitors, and were mentors and learners of digital mapping technologies at different times. Key successful characteristics of participants included patience, compassion, openness, perseverance, respect, and humility. Important mentoring strategies included: 1) instruction in Shona and in English, 2) locally relevant examples, assignments, and analogies motivated by real needs, 3) using a variety of teaching methods for different learning modalities, 4) building on and modifying familiar teaching methods, and 5) paying attention to the social and relational aspects of teaching and learning. The Muonde mapping team has used their new skills for a wide variety of purposes, including: identifying, discussing, and acting on emerging needs; using digital mapping for land-use and agropastoral planning; and using mapping as a tool for recording and telling important historical and cultural stories. Digital mapping has built self-confidence as well as providing employable skills and giving Muonde more visibility to other local and national non-governmental organizations, utility companies, and educational institutions. Digital mapping, as taught in a bottom-up, collaborative way, has proven to be both accessible and of enormous practical use to rural Zimbabweans.

  3. The Windows serial port programming handbook

    CERN Document Server

    Bai, Ying

    2004-01-01

    The fundamentals of serial port communications. Serial port programming in ANSI C and Assembly languages for MS-DOS. Serial ports interface developed in VC++ 6.0. Serial port programming in Visual Basic. Serial port programming in LabVIEW. Serial port programming in MATLAB. Serial port programming in Smalltalk. Serial port programming in Java.

  4. A Digital Learning Experience in Tertiary Design Education

    OpenAIRE

    Meakin, Kerry; Knott, Neville

    2013-01-01

    This paper documents the results of a study of trialing an innovative teaching method to first year students while studying for a BA in Visual Merchandising and Display in an Institute of Technology in Dublin. Due to lower staff levels it was perceived this student cohort were not attaining the practical skills necessary in their future careers therefore it was hoped that an innovative method of delivering practical tuition would be beneficial to students and lecturers from both learning and ...

  5. Ethical implications of digital images for teaching and learning purposes: an integrative review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kornhaber R

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Rachel Kornhaber,1–3 Vasiliki Betihavas,4 Rodney J Baber,5 1School of Health Sciences, Faculty of Health, University of Tasmania, Rozelle, NSW, 2School of Nursing, The University of Adelaide, Adelaide, SA, 3Severe Burns Injury Unit, Royal North Shore Hospital, St Leonards, NSW, 4School of Nursing, University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW, 5Discipline of Obstetrics, Gynaecology and Neonatology, Sydney Medical School, University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW, Australia Background: Digital photography has simplified the process of capturing and utilizing medical images. The process of taking high-quality digital photographs has been recognized as efficient, timely, and cost-effective. In particular, the evolution of smartphone and comparable technologies has become a vital component in teaching and learning of health care professionals. However, ethical standards in relation to digital photography for teaching and learning have not always been of the highest standard. The inappropriate utilization of digital images within the health care setting has the capacity to compromise patient confidentiality and increase the risk of litigation. Therefore, the aim of this review was to investigate the literature concerning the ethical implications for health professionals utilizing digital photography for teaching and learning. Methods: A literature search was conducted utilizing five electronic databases, PubMed, Embase (Excerpta Medica Database, Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature, Educational Resources Information Center, and Scopus, limited to English language. Studies that endeavored to evaluate the ethical implications of digital photography for teaching and learning purposes in the health care setting were included. Results: The search strategy identified 514 papers of which nine were retrieved for full review. Four papers were excluded based on the inclusion criteria, leaving five papers for final analysis. Three key themes were developed

  6. AN ACTION RESEARCH IN ENGLISH LANGUAGE TEACHING AND LEARNING FOR CHILDREN WITH USE OF DIGITAL TECHNOLOGIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Carolina Coelho Chimenti

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The present article is based on a field research that aimed to provide educational subsidies for the use of digital technologies in teaching and learning process of English language, in two classes of the fifth grade from the elementary school, at the public school located in Campinas, São Paulo, Brazil. Based on the perspective of childhood pedagogy, which conceives the child as the protagonist and also (reproductive of knowledge, activities were carried with YouTube videos, online games, music, and many other learning objects. Likewise, observations, interviews and questionnaires were made with teachers and students involved in the research. Based on the action research, we analyzed aspects related to the contribution of some digital resources in teaching and learning of English at elementary school and we obtained many elements that allowed us to know the importance of learning a foreign language in the childhood nowadays, mainly English, and how new technologies can make learning more contextualized, meaningful, motivating children for language learning in a context in which they can be (criative.

  7. How the Young Generation Uses Digital Textbooks via Mobile Learning Terminals: Measurement of Elementary School Students in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Zhong; Jiang, Yuzhen

    2015-01-01

    Digital textbooks that offer multimedia features, interactive controls, e-annotation and learning process tracking are gaining increasing attention in today's mobile learning era, particularly with the rapid development of mobile learning terminals such as Apple's iPad series and Android-based models. Accordingly, this study explores how…

  8. Preserved learning during the Symbol Digit Substitution Test in patients with schizophrenia, age-matched controls and elderly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia eCornelis

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Speed of processing, one of the main cognitive deficits in schizophrenia is most frequently measured with a digit symbol-coding test. Performance on this test is additionally affected by writing speed and the rate at which symbol-digit relationships are learned, two factors that may be impaired in schizophrenia. This study aims to investigate the effects of sensorimotor speed, short-term learning and long-term learning on task performance in schizophrenia. In addition the study aims to explore differences in learning effects between patients with schizophrenia and elderly individuals. Methods: Patients with schizophrenia (N=30 were compared with age-matched healthy controls (N=30 and healthy elderly volunteers (N=30 during the Symbol Digit Subsstitution Test (SDST. The task was administered on a digitizing tablet, allowing precise measurements of the time taken to write each digit (writing time and the time to decode symbols into their corresponding digits (matching time. The SDST was administered on three separate days (day 1, day 2, day 7. Symbol-digit repetitions during the task represented short-term learning and repeating the task on different days represented long-term learning.Results: The repetition of the same symbol-digit combinations within one test and the repetition of the test over days resulted in significant decreases in matching time. Interestingly, these short-term and long-term learning effects were about equal among the three groups. Individual participants showed a large variation in the rate of short-term learning. In general, patients with schizophrenia had the longest matching time whereas the elderly had the longest writing time. Writing time remained the same over repeated testing.Conclusion: The rate of learning and sensorimotor speed were found to have a substantial influence on the SDST score. However, large individual variation in learning rate should be taken into account in the interpretation of task

  9. Self-Directed Digital Learning: When Do Dental Students Study?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Tate H; Zhong, James; Phillips, Ceib; Koroluk, Lorne D

    2018-04-01

    The Growth and Development (G&D) curriculum at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Dentistry uses self-directed web-based learning modules in the place of lectures and includes scheduled self-study times during the 8 am-5 pm school hours. The aim of this study was to use direct observation to evaluate dental students' access patterns with the self-directed, web-based learning modules in relation to planned self-study time allocated across the curriculum, proximity to course examinations, and course performance. Module access for all 80 students in the DDS Class of 2014 was recorded for date and time across the four G&D courses. Module access data were used to determine likelihood of usage during scheduled time and frequency of usage in three timeframes: >7, 3 to 7, and 0 to 2 days before the final exam. The results showed a statistically significant difference in the likelihood of module access during scheduled time across the curriculum (pstudents, 64% accessed modules at least once during scheduled time in G&D1, but only 10%, 19%, and 18% in G&D2, G&D3, and G&D4, respectively. For all courses, the proportion of module accesses was significantly higher 0-2 days before an exam compared to the other two timeframes. Module access also differed significantly within each timeframe across all four courses (pstudents rarely accessed learning modules during syllabus-budgeted self-study time and accessed modules more frequently as course exams approached.

  10. E-Learning Content Design Standards Based on Interactive Digital Concepts Maps in the Light of Meaningful and Constructivist Learning Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afify, Mohammed Kamal

    2018-01-01

    The present study aims to identify standards of interactive digital concepts maps design and their measurement indicators as a tool to develop, organize and administer e-learning content in the light of Meaningful Learning Theory and Constructivist Learning Theory. To achieve the objective of the research, the author prepared a list of E-learning…

  11. Digital control systems training on a distance learning platform

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan PIECHA

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with new training technologies development based on approach to distance learning website, implemented in the laboratory of a Traffic Engineering study branch at Faculty of Transport. The discussed computing interface allows students complete knowledge of traffic controllers’ architecture and machine language programming fundamentals. These training facilities are available at home; at their remote terminal. The training resources consist of electronic / computer based training; guidebooks and software units. The laboratory provides the students with an interface entering into simulation packages and programming interfaces, supporting the web training facilities. The courseware complexity selection is one of the most difficult factors in intelligent training unit’s development. The dynamically configured application provides the user with his individually set structure of the training resources. The trainee controls the application structure and complexity, from the time he started. For simplifying the training process and studying activities, several unifications were provided. The introduced ideas need various standardisations, simplifying the e-learning units’ development and application control processes [8], [9]. Further training facilities development concerns virtual laboratory environment organisation in laboratories of Transport Faculty.

  12. Learning Physics with Digital Game Simulations in Middle School Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Janice L.; Barnett, Mike

    2013-12-01

    The purpose of this work is to share our findings in using video gaming technology to facilitate the understanding of basic electromagnetism with middle school students. To this end, we explored the impact of using a game called Supercharged! on middle school students' understanding of electromagnetic concepts compared to students who conducted a more traditional inquiry-oriented investigation of the same concepts. This study was a part of a larger design experiment examining the pedagogical potential of Supercharged! The control group learned through a series of guided inquiry methods while the experimental group played Supercharged! during the laboratory sections of the science course. There was significant difference, F(2,91) = 3.6, p hands-on activities are integrated, with each activity informing the other, could be a very powerful technique for supporting student scientific understanding. Further, our findings suggest that game designers should embed meta-cognitive activities such as reflective opportunities into educational video games in order to provide scaffolds for students and to reinforce that they are engaged in an educational learning experience.

  13. Serial interprocessor communications system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Labiak, W.; Siemens, P.; Bailey, C.

    1980-01-01

    A serial communications system based on the EIA RS232-C standard with modem control lines has been developed. The DLV11-E interface is used for this purpose. All handshaking is done with the modem control lines. This allows totally independent full duplex communication. The message format consists of eight bit data with odd parity and a sixteen bit checksum on the whole message. All communications are fully interrupt driven. A program was written to load a program into a remote LSI-11 using the serial line without bootstrap ROM

  14. Digital imaging biomarkers feed machine learning for melanoma screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gareau, Daniel S; Correa da Rosa, Joel; Yagerman, Sarah; Carucci, John A; Gulati, Nicholas; Hueto, Ferran; DeFazio, Jennifer L; Suárez-Fariñas, Mayte; Marghoob, Ashfaq; Krueger, James G

    2017-07-01

    We developed an automated approach for generating quantitative image analysis metrics (imaging biomarkers) that are then analysed with a set of 13 machine learning algorithms to generate an overall risk score that is called a Q-score. These methods were applied to a set of 120 "difficult" dermoscopy images of dysplastic nevi and melanomas that were subsequently excised/classified. This approach yielded 98% sensitivity and 36% specificity for melanoma detection, approaching sensitivity/specificity of expert lesion evaluation. Importantly, we found strong spectral dependence of many imaging biomarkers in blue or red colour channels, suggesting the need to optimize spectral evaluation of pigmented lesions. © 2016 The Authors. Experimental Dermatology Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Digital technology use in ELT classrooms and self-directed learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nehir Sert

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The digital era is a new challenge for teachers. While children get acquainted with digital technology before the age of six, teachers, who have encountered the digital world at a later time in their lives, struggle with it. Self-directed learning, which is crucial for lifelong learning, can be enhanced by the use of technology within and beyond classroom settings. The aim of this study was to examine the difference between the perceptions of students in low- and high-income groups about their use of technology in a general sense and their teachers’ use of technology in ELT classrooms. It also tested the correlation between the perceptions of their self-directed learning behaviours and their own/their teachers’ technology use. The population of the study consisted of 75 students from high- and 70 students from low-income groups. Causal comparative and correlational research methods were adopted in the study. The surveys to measure the students’ perceptions about technology use were developed by the researchers. A scale, established by Demirtas and Sert (2010, was used to identify the level of self-directed learning views of the students. The data were collected at the beginning of the first term of the 2015-2016 school year. The results indicated that there was no significant difference between perceptions of the low- and high-income students regarding their own technology use. Likewise, perceptions of the low- and high-income students did not differ regarding their teachers’ technology use. There was no correlation between the perceptions of the low-/high-income mixed group regarding their use of technology and their teachers’ use of technology. Lastly, self-directed learning perceptions of the low-/high-income mixed group did not correlate with their perceptions on any aspects of technology use. The educational implications of these results were discussed and suggestions were put forward in order to produce more effective learning

  16. A Digital Liquid State Machine With Biologically Inspired Learning and Its Application to Speech Recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yong; Li, Peng; Jin, Yingyezhe; Choe, Yoonsuck

    2015-11-01

    This paper presents a bioinspired digital liquid-state machine (LSM) for low-power very-large-scale-integration (VLSI)-based machine learning applications. To the best of the authors' knowledge, this is the first work that employs a bioinspired spike-based learning algorithm for the LSM. With the proposed online learning, the LSM extracts information from input patterns on the fly without needing intermediate data storage as required in offline learning methods such as ridge regression. The proposed learning rule is local such that each synaptic weight update is based only upon the firing activities of the corresponding presynaptic and postsynaptic neurons without incurring global communications across the neural network. Compared with the backpropagation-based learning, the locality of computation in the proposed approach lends itself to efficient parallel VLSI implementation. We use subsets of the TI46 speech corpus to benchmark the bioinspired digital LSM. To reduce the complexity of the spiking neural network model without performance degradation for speech recognition, we study the impacts of synaptic models on the fading memory of the reservoir and hence the network performance. Moreover, we examine the tradeoffs between synaptic weight resolution, reservoir size, and recognition performance and present techniques to further reduce the overhead of hardware implementation. Our simulation results show that in terms of isolated word recognition evaluated using the TI46 speech corpus, the proposed digital LSM rivals the state-of-the-art hidden Markov-model-based recognizer Sphinx-4 and outperforms all other reported recognizers including the ones that are based upon the LSM or neural networks.

  17. Experimental Learning of Digital Power Controller for Photovoltaic Module Using Proteus VSM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abhijit V. Padgavhankar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The electric power supplied by photovoltaic module depends on light intensity and temperature. It is necessary to control the operating point to draw the maximum power of photovoltaic module. This paper presents the design and implementation of digital power converters using Proteus software. Its aim is to enhance student’s learning for virtual system modeling and to simulate in software for PIC microcontroller along with the hardware design. The buck and boost converters are designed to interface with the renewable energy source that is PV module. PIC microcontroller is used as a digital controller, which senses the PV electric signal for maximum power using sensors and output voltage of the dc-dc converter and according to that switching pulse is generated for the switching of MOSFET. The implementation of proposed system is based on learning platform of Proteus virtual system modeling (VSM and the experimental results are presented.

  18. Teacher Practice and Pedagogical Competence Building in a Digitally Permeated Learning Environment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Levinsen, Karin Tweddell

    2017-01-01

    Teachers in Danish primary schools face new professional challenges because digital learning environments are changing the professional practices regarding pedagogy, classroom management and the agency, roles and relationships between students and teachers. This paper presents the results from...... a qualitative research and development study conducted as an action research-based case study. The study aimed to explore the impact on teachers’ practice in a digitally permeated learning environment and to identify areas for their competence building. The research questions were as follows: 1) What options...... research, the researcher and the teachers collaboratively discussed the emerging challenges regarding the students' ability to take on responsibility and agence, and explored new practices and methods. The anthropological data collection methods included observation and thick description, informal...

  19. IntuiScript a new digital notebook for learning writing in elementary schools: 1st observations

    OpenAIRE

    Girard , Nathalie; Simonnet , Damien; Anquetil , Eric

    2017-01-01

    International audience; IntuiScript is an innovative project that aims for designing a digital notebook dedicated to handwriting learning at primary schools. One of the main goals is to provide children real-time feedback to make them more autonomous. These feedbacks are produced by automatically analysing their drawing, and this online analysis makes possible an adaptation of the pedagogical scenario to each child according to his own difficulties. The IntruiScript project complies with a us...

  20. Formal Learning Sequences and Progression in the Studio: A Framework for Digital Design Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pontus Wärnestål

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines how to leverage the design studio learning environment throughout long-term Digital Design education in order to support students to progress from tactical, well-defined, device-centric routine design, to confidently design sustainable solutions for strategic, complex, problems for a wide range of devices and platforms in the digital space. We present a framework derived from literature on design, creativity, and theories on learning that: (a implements a theory of formal learning sequences as a user-centered design process in the studio; and (b describes design challenge progressions in the design studio environment modeled in seven dimensions. The framework can be used as a tool for designing, evaluating, and communicating course progressions within – and between series of – design studio courses. This approach is evaluated by implementing a formal learning sequence framework in a series of design studio courses that progress in an undergraduate design-oriented Informatics program. Reflections from students, teachers, and external clients indicate high student motivation and learning goal achievement, high teacher satisfaction and skill development, and high satisfaction among external clients.

  1. Time to learn: the outlook for renewal of patient-centred education in the digital age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glick, T H; Moore, G T

    2001-05-01

    Major forces in society and within health systems are fragmenting patient care and clinical learning. The distancing of physician and trainee from the patient undermines learning about the patient-doctor relationship. The disconnection of care and learning from one successive venue to another impedes the ability of trainees to learn about illness longitudinally. As a conceptual piece, our methods have been those of witnessing the experiences of patients, practitioners, and students over time and observing the impact of fragmented systems and changing expectations on care and learning. We have reflected on the opportunities created by digital information systems and interactive telemedicine to help renew essential relationships. Although there is, as yet, little in the literature on educational or health outcomes of this kind of technological enablement, we anticipate opportunities for a renewed focus on the patient in that patient's own space and time. Multimedia applications can achieve not only real-time connections, but can help construct a "virtual patient" as a platform for supervision and assessment, permitting preceptors to evaluate trainee-patient interactions, utilization of Web-based data and human resources, and on-line professionalism. Just as diverse elements in society are capitalizing upon digital technology to create advantageous relationships, all of the elements in the complex systems of health care and medical training can be better connected, so as to put the patient back in the centre of care and the trainee's ongoing relationship to the patient back in the centre of education.

  2. Part Two: Learning Science Through Digital Video: Student Views on Watching and Creating Videos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wade, P.; Courtney, A. R.

    2014-12-01

    The use of digital video for science education has become common with the wide availability of video imagery. This study continues research into aspects of using digital video as a primary teaching tool to enhance student learning in undergraduate science courses. Two survey instruments were administered to undergraduate non-science majors. Survey One focused on: a) What science is being learned from watching science videos such as a "YouTube" clip of a volcanic eruption or an informational video on geologic time and b) What are student preferences with regard to their learning (e.g. using video versus traditional modes of delivery)? Survey Two addressed students' perspectives on the storytelling aspect of the video with respect to: a) sustaining interest, b) providing science information, c) style of video and d) quality of the video. Undergraduate non-science majors were the primary focus group in this study. Students were asked to view video segments and respond to a survey focused on what they learned from the segments. The storytelling aspect of each video was also addressed by students. Students watched 15-20 shorter (3-15 minute science videos) created within the last four years. Initial results of this research support that shorter video segments were preferred and the storytelling quality of each video related to student learning.

  3. The use of mobile learning application to the fundament of digital electronics course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rakhmawati, L.; Firdha, A.

    2018-01-01

    A new trend in e-learning is known as Mobile Learning. Learning through mobile phones have become part of the educative process. Thus, the purposes of this study are to develop a mobile application for the Fundament of Digital Electronics course that consists of number systems operation, logic gates, and Boolean Algebra, and to assess the readiness, perceptions, and effectiveness of students in the use of mobile devices for learning in the classroom. This research uses Research and Development (R&D) method. The design used in this research, by doing treatment in one class and observing by using Android-based mobile application instructional media. The result obtained from this research shows that the test has 80 % validity aspect, 82 % of the user from senior high school students gives a positive response in using the application of mobile learning, and based on the result of post-test, 90, 90% students passed the exam. At last, it can be concluded that the use of the mobile learning application makes the learning process more effective when it is used in the teaching-learning process.

  4. Storytelling and professional learning: a phenomenographic study of students' experience of patient digital stories in nurse education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christiansen, Angela

    2011-04-01

    This paper reports the findings of a phenomenographic study which sought to identify the different ways in which patient digital stories influence students' professional learning. Patient digital stories are short multimedia presentations that combine personal narratives, images and music to create a unique and often emotional story of a patients' experience of health care. While these are increasingly used in professional education little is known about how and what students learn through engagement with patient digital stories. Drawing upon interviews with 20 students within a pre-registration nursing programme in the UK, the study identifies four qualitatively different ways in which students approach and make sense of patient digital stories with implications for learning and professional identity development. Through an identification of the critical aspects of this variation valuable insights are generated into the pedagogic principles likely to engender transformational learning and patient centred practice. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Serial private infrastructures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Berg, V.A.C.

    2013-01-01

    This paper investigates private supply of two congestible infrastructures that are serial, where the consumer has to use both in order to consume. Four market structures are analysed: a monopoly and 3 duopolies that differ in how firms interact. It is well known that private supply leads too high

  6. Stress in Harmonic Serialism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pruitt, Kathryn Ringler

    2012-01-01

    This dissertation proposes a model of word stress in a derivational version of Optimality Theory (OT) called Harmonic Serialism (HS; Prince and Smolensky 1993/2004, McCarthy 2000, 2006, 2010a). In this model, the metrical structure of a word is derived through a series of optimizations in which the "best" metrical foot is chosen…

  7. Suicide in serial killers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lester, David; White, John

    2010-02-01

    In a sample of 248 killers of two victims in America from 1900 to 2005, obtained from an encyclopedia of serial killers by Newton (2006), those completing suicide did not differ in sex, race, or the motive for the killing from those who were arrested.

  8. "Digit anatomy": a new technique for learning anatomy using motor memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Chang-Seok; Won, Hyung-Sun; Kim, Kyong-Jee; Jang, Dong-Su

    2011-01-01

    Gestural motions of the hands and fingers are powerful tools for expressing meanings and concepts, and the nervous system has the capacity to retain multiple long-term motor memories, especially including movements of the hands. We developed many sets of successive movements of both hands, referred to as "digit anatomy," and made students practice the movements which express (1) the aortic arch, subclavian, and thoracoacromial arteries and their branches, (2) the celiac trunk, superior mesenteric artery and their branches, and formation of the portal vein, (3) the heart and the coronary arteries, and (4) the brachial, lumbar, and sacral plexuses. A feedback survey showed that digit anatomy was helpful for the students not only in memorizing anatomical structures but also in understanding their functions. Out of 40 students, 34 of them who learned anatomy with the help of digit anatomy were "very satisfied" or "generally satisfied" with this new teaching method. Digit anatomy that was used to express the aortic arch, subclavian, and thoracoacromial arteries and their branches was more helpful than those representing other structures. Although the movements of digit anatomy are expected to be remembered longer than the exact meaning of each movement, invoking the motor memory of the movement may help to make relearning of the same information easier and faster in the future. Copyright © 2011 American Association of Anatomists.

  9. Automated business process management – in times of digital transformation using machine learning or artificial intelligence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paschek Daniel

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The continuous optimization of business processes is still a challenge for companies. In times of digital transformation, faster changing internal and external framework conditions and new customer expectations for fastest delivery and best quality of goods and many more, companies should set up their internal process at the best way. But what to do if framework conditions changed unexpectedly? The purpose of the paper is to analyse how the digital transformation will impact the Business Process Management (BPM while using methods like machine learning or artificial intelligence. Therefore, the core components will be explained, compared and set up in relation. To identify application areas interviews and analysis will be held up with digital companies. The finding of the paper will be recommendation for action in the field of BPM and process optimization through machine learning and artificial intelligence. The Approach of optimizing and management processes via machine learning and artificial intelligence will support companies to decide which tool will be the best for automated BPM.

  10. A Deep Learning Approach to Digitally Stain Optical Coherence Tomography Images of the Optic Nerve Head.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devalla, Sripad Krishna; Chin, Khai Sing; Mari, Jean-Martial; Tun, Tin A; Strouthidis, Nicholas G; Aung, Tin; Thiéry, Alexandre H; Girard, Michaël J A

    2018-01-01

    To develop a deep learning approach to digitally stain optical coherence tomography (OCT) images of the optic nerve head (ONH). A horizontal B-scan was acquired through the center of the ONH using OCT (Spectralis) for one eye of each of 100 subjects (40 healthy and 60 glaucoma). All images were enhanced using adaptive compensation. A custom deep learning network was then designed and trained with the compensated images to digitally stain (i.e., highlight) six tissue layers of the ONH. The accuracy of our algorithm was assessed (against manual segmentations) using the dice coefficient, sensitivity, specificity, intersection over union (IU), and accuracy. We studied the effect of compensation, number of training images, and performance comparison between glaucoma and healthy subjects. For images it had not yet assessed, our algorithm was able to digitally stain the retinal nerve fiber layer + prelamina, the RPE, all other retinal layers, the choroid, and the peripapillary sclera and lamina cribrosa. For all tissues, the dice coefficient, sensitivity, specificity, IU, and accuracy (mean) were 0.84 ± 0.03, 0.92 ± 0.03, 0.99 ± 0.00, 0.89 ± 0.03, and 0.94 ± 0.02, respectively. Our algorithm performed significantly better when compensated images were used for training (P deep learning algorithm can simultaneously stain the neural and connective tissues of the ONH, offering a framework to automatically measure multiple key structural parameters of the ONH that may be critical to improve glaucoma management.

  11. Aggregate-then-Curate: how digital learning champions help communities nurture online content

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Whitworth

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Informational resources are essential for communities, rooting them in their own history, helping them learn and solve problems, giving them a voice in decision-making and so on. For digital inclusion – and inclusion in the informational and democratic processes of society more generally – it is essential that communities retain the skills, awareness and motivation to create and manage their own informational resources.This article explores a model for the creation of online content that incorporates the different ways in which the quality and relevance of information can be assured. This model, “Aggregate-then-Curate” (A/C, was developed from earlier work concerning digital inclusion in UK online centres, models of informal e-learning and ecologies of resources. A/C shows how creating online content can be viewed as a 7-step process, initiated by individuals but bringing in “digital learning champions”, other community members and formal educational institutions at different stages. A/C can be used to design training to help build the capacity to manage community informational resources in an inclusive way. The article then discusses and evaluates MOSI-ALONG, a Joint Information Systems Committee (JISC funded project founded on these ideas, which illustrates how A/C can be used to design training to help build the capacity to manage community informational resources in an inclusive way. This conclusion is supported by evaluations of the work done so far in MOSI-ALONG.

  12. Using Information and Communication Technology (ICT) to the Maximum: Learning and Teaching Biology with Limited Digital Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Rooy, Wilhelmina S.

    2012-01-01

    Background: The ubiquity, availability and exponential growth of digital information and communication technology (ICT) creates unique opportunities for learning and teaching in the senior secondary school biology curriculum. Digital technologies make it possible for emerging disciplinary knowledge and understanding of biological processes…

  13. Does Digital Video Enhance Student Learning in Field-Based Experiments and Develop Graduate Attributes beyond the Classroom?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuller, Ian C.; France, Derek

    2016-01-01

    The connection between fieldwork and development of graduate attributes is explored in this paper. Digital technologies present opportunities to potentially enhance the learning experience of students undertaking fieldwork, and develop core digital attributes and competencies required by Higher Education Institutions (HEIs) and employers. This…

  14. Design, Implementation, and Lessons Learned from a Digital Storytelling Project in an Undergraduate Health Promotion Theory Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rimando, Marylen; Smalley, K. Bryant; Warren, Jacob C.

    2015-01-01

    This article describes the design, implementation and lessons learned from a digital storytelling project in a health promotion theory course. From 2011-2012, 195 health promotion majors completed a digital storytelling project at a Midwestern university. The instructor observed students' understanding of theories and models. This article adds to…

  15. Educating Through Exploration: Emerging Evidence for Improved Learning Outcomes Using a New Theory of Digital Learning Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anbar, Ariel; Center for Education Through eXploration

    2018-01-01

    Advances in scientific visualization and public access to data have transformed science outreach and communication, but have yet to realize their potential impacts in the realm of education. Computer-based learning is a clear bridge between visualization and education that benefits students through adaptative personalization and enhanced access. Building this bridge requires close partnerships among scientists, technologists, and educators.The Infiniscope project fosters such partnerships to produce exploration-driven online learning experiences that teach basic science concepts using a combination of authentic space science narratives, data, and images, and a personalized guided inquiry approach. Infiniscope includes a web portal to host these digital learning experiences, as well as a teaching network of educators using and modifying these experiences. Infiniscope experiences are built around a new theory of digital learning design that we call “education through exploration” (ETX) developed during the creation of successful online, interactive science courses offered at ASU and other institutions. ETX builds on the research-based practices of active learning and guided inquiry to provide a set of design principles that aim to develop higher order thinking skills in addition to understanding of content. It is employed in these experiences by asking students to solve problems and actively discover relationships, supported by an intelligent tutoring system which provides immediate, personalized feedback and scaffolds scientific thinking and methods. The project is led by ASU’s School of Earth and Space Exploration working with learning designers in the Center for Education Through eXploration, with support from NASA’s Science Mission Directorate as part of the NASA Exploration Connection program.We will present an overview of ETX design, the Infinscope project, and emerging evidence of effectiveness.

  16. Automated quantification of cerebral edema following hemispheric infarction: Application of a machine-learning algorithm to evaluate CSF shifts on serial head CTs

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Yasheng; Dhar, Rajat; Heitsch, Laura; Ford, Andria; Fernandez-Cadenas, Israel; Carrera, Caty; Montaner, Joan; Lin, Weili; Shen, Dinggang; An, Hongyu; Lee, Jin-Moo

    2016-01-01

    Although cerebral edema is a major cause of death and deterioration following hemispheric stroke, there remains no validated biomarker that captures the full spectrum of this critical complication. We recently demonstrated that reduction in intracranial cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) volume (??CSF) on serial computed tomography (CT) scans provides an accurate measure of cerebral edema severity, which may aid in early triaging of stroke patients for craniectomy. However, application of such a volum...

  17. Learning and Motivational Processes When Students Design Curriculum-Based Digital Learning Games

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weitze, Charlotte Lærke

    2015-01-01

    , or programming provide a rich context for learning, since the construction of artefacts, in this case learning games, enables reflection and new ways of thinking. The students learned from reflection and interaction with the tools alone as well as in collaboration with peers. After analysing the students...... another. The study found that the students benefitted from this way of learning as a valid variation to more conventional teaching approaches, and teachers found that the students learned at least the same amount or more compared to traditional teaching processes. The students were able to think outside...

  18. Towards machine learned quality control: A benchmark for sharpness quantification in digital pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campanella, Gabriele; Rajanna, Arjun R; Corsale, Lorraine; Schüffler, Peter J; Yagi, Yukako; Fuchs, Thomas J

    2018-04-01

    Pathology is on the verge of a profound change from an analog and qualitative to a digital and quantitative discipline. This change is mostly driven by the high-throughput scanning of microscope slides in modern pathology departments, reaching tens of thousands of digital slides per month. The resulting vast digital archives form the basis of clinical use in digital pathology and allow large scale machine learning in computational pathology. One of the most crucial bottlenecks of high-throughput scanning is quality control (QC). Currently, digital slides are screened manually to detected out-of-focus regions, to compensate for the limitations of scanner software. We present a solution to this problem by introducing a benchmark dataset for blur detection, an in-depth comparison of state-of-the art sharpness descriptors and their prediction performance within a random forest framework. Furthermore, we show that convolution neural networks, like residual networks, can be used to train blur detectors from scratch. We thoroughly evaluate the accuracy of feature based and deep learning based approaches for sharpness classification (99.74% accuracy) and regression (MSE 0.004) and additionally compare them to domain experts in a comprehensive human perception study. Our pipeline outputs spacial heatmaps enabling to quantify and localize blurred areas on a slide. Finally, we tested the proposed framework in the clinical setting and demonstrate superior performance over the state-of-the-art QC pipeline comprising commercial software and human expert inspection by reducing the error rate from 17% to 4.7%. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  19. Digital Games, Design, and Learning: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Douglas B; Tanner-Smith, Emily E; Killingsworth, Stephen S

    2016-03-01

    In this meta-analysis, we systematically reviewed research on digital games and learning for K-16 students. We synthesized comparisons of game versus nongame conditions (i.e., media comparisons) and comparisons of augmented games versus standard game designs (i.e., value-added comparisons). We used random-effects meta-regression models with robust variance estimates to summarize overall effects and explore potential moderator effects. Results from media comparisons indicated that digital games significantly enhanced student learning relative to nongame conditions ([Formula: see text] = 0.33, 95% confidence interval [0.19, 0.48], k = 57, n = 209). Results from value-added comparisons indicated significant learning benefits associated with augmented game designs ([Formula: see text] = 0.34, 95% confidence interval [0.17, 0.51], k = 20, n = 40). Moderator analyses demonstrated that effects varied across various game mechanics characteristics, visual and narrative characteristics, and research quality characteristics. Taken together, the results highlight the affordances of games for learning as well as the key role of design beyond medium.

  20. Is there a digital generation gap for e-learning in plastic surgery?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, Roger J G; Hamilton, Neil M

    2012-01-01

    Some authors have claimed that those plastic surgeons born between 1965 and 1979 (generation X, or Gen-X) are more technologically able than those born between 1946 and 1964 (Baby Boomers, or BB). Those born after 1980, which comprise generation Y (Gen-Y), might be the most technologically able and most demanding for electronic learning (e-learning) to support their education and training in plastic surgery. These differences might represent a "digital generation gap" and would have practical and financial implications for the development of e-learning. The aim of this study was to survey plastic surgeons on their experience and preferences in e-learning in plastic surgery and to establish whether there was a difference between different generations. Online survey (e-survey) of plastic surgeons within the UK and Ireland was used for this study. In all, 624 plastic surgeons were invited by e-mail to complete an e-survey anonymously for their experience of e-learning in plastic surgery, whether they would like access to e-learning and, if so, whether this should this be provided nationally, locally, or not at all. By stratifying plastic surgeons into three generations (BB, Gen-X, and Gen-Y), the responses between generations were compared using the χ(2)-test for linear trend. A p value learning. These findings refute the claim that there are differences in the experience of e-learning of plastic surgeons by generation. Furthermore, there is no evidence that there are differences in whether there should be access to e-learning and how e-learning should be provided for different generations of plastic surgeons. Copyright © 2012 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Malaysian Serials: Issues and Problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahri, Che Norma

    This paper analyzes the issues and problems while looking at the trends and developments of serials publishing in Malaysia. The first section provides background; topics addressed include the country and people of Malaysia, the history of serials publishing in Malaysia, categories and formats of serials publishing, academic publications,…

  2. A framework to evaluate the educational potential of a digital artefact for math learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiappini Giampaolo

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This article provides a methodology with two potential applications: to prove useful to maths teachers for analysing and evaluating the educational potential of different digital artefacts and to help designers of maths learning artefacts to evaluate their design during the implementation phase. The educational potential of an artefact is considered as an entity determined by actions and representations structure available within the artefact, the interpretation and behaviour of who uses it and the features of the activity in which it is used. The proposed methodology is based on the notions of affordance, narrative and cycle of expansive learning. The methodology has been applied on AlNuSet, a system designed for supporting the teaching and learning of algebra by means of modalities of interaction that are of visual, spatial and motor nature.

  3. Rasch family models in e-learning: analyzing architectural sketching with a digital pen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scalise, Kathleen; Cheng, Nancy Yen-Wen; Oskui, Nargas

    2009-01-01

    Since architecture students studying design drawing are usually assessed qualitatively on the basis of their final products, the challenges and stages of their learning have remained masked. To clarify the challenges in design drawing, we have been using the BEAR Assessment System and Rasch family models to measure levels of understanding for individuals and groups, in order to correct pedagogical assumptions and tune teaching materials. This chapter discusses the analysis of 81 drawings created by architectural students to solve a space layout problem, collected and analyzed with digital pen-and-paper technology. The approach allows us to map developmental performance criteria and perceive achievement overlaps in learning domains assumed separate, and then re-conceptualize a three-part framework to represent learning in architectural drawing. Results and measurement evidence from the assessment and Rasch modeling are discussed.

  4. Exploratory Study of Rural Physicians' Self-Directed Learning Experiences in a Digital Age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curran, Vernon; Fleet, Lisa; Simmons, Karla; Ravalia, Mohamed; Snow, Pamela

    2016-01-01

    The nature and characteristics of self-directed learning (SDL) by physicians has been transformed with the growth in digital, social, and mobile technologies (DSMTs). Although these technologies present opportunities for greater "just-in-time" information seeking, there are issues for ensuring effective and efficient usage to compliment one's repertoire for continuous learning. The purpose of this study was to explore the SDL experiences of rural physicians and the potential of DSMTs for supporting their continuing professional development (CPD). Semistructured interviews were conducted with a purposive sample of rural physicians. Interview data were transcribed verbatim and analyzed using NVivo analytical software and thematic analysis. Fourteen (N = 14) interviews were conducted and key thematic categories that emerged included key triggers, methods of undertaking SDL, barriers, and supports. Methods and resources for undertaking SDL have evolved considerably, and rural physicians report greater usage of mobile phones, tablets, and laptop computers for updating their knowledge and skills and in responding to patient questions/problems. Mobile technologies, and some social media, can serve as "triggers" in instigating SDL and a greater usage of DSMTs, particularly at "point of care," may result in higher levels of SDL. Social media is met with some scrutiny and ambivalence, mainly because of the "credibility" of information and risks associated with digital professionalism. DSMTs are growing in popularity as a key resource to support SDL for rural physicians. Mobile technologies are enabling greater "point-of-care" learning and more efficient information seeking. Effective use of DSMTs for SDL has implications for enhancing just-in-time learning and quality of care. Increasing use of DSMTs and their new effect on SDL raises the need for reflection on conceptualizations of the SDL process. The "digital age" has implications for our CPD credit systems and the roles

  5. Teaching pathology via online digital microscopy: positive learning outcomes for rurally based medical students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivamalai, Sundram; Murthy, Shashidhar Venkatesh; Gupta, Tarun Sen; Woolley, Torres

    2011-02-01

    Technology has revolutionised teaching. Teaching pathology via digital microscopy (DM) is needed to overcome increasing student numbers, a shortage of pathology academics in regional medical schools, and difficulties with teaching students on rural clinical placement. To identify whether an online DM approach, combining digital pathology software, Web-based slides and classroom management software, delivers effective, practical pathology teaching sessions to medical students located both on campus and on rural placement. An online survey collected feedback from fourth and fifth year undergraduate James Cook University medical students on the importance of 16 listed benefits and challenges of using online DM to teach pathology, via a structured five-point Likert survey. Fifty-three students returned the survey (response rate = 33%). Benefits of online DM to teach pathology rated as 'very important' or 'extremely important' by over 50% of students included: higher quality images; faster learning; more convenient; better technology; everyone sees the same image; greater accessibility; helpful annotations on slides; cost savings; and more opportunity for self-paced learning out-of-hours and for collaborative learning in class. Challenges of online DM rated as 'very important' or 'extremely important' by over 50% of students included: Internet availability in more remote locations and potential problems using online technology during class. Nearly all medical students welcomed learning pathology via online digital technology. DM should improve the quantity, quality, cost and accessibility of pathology teaching by regional medical schools, and has significant implications for the growing emphasis in Australia for decentralised medical education and rural clinical placements. © 2011 The Authors. Australian Journal of Rural Health © National Rural Health Alliance Inc.

  6. Digital Cadavers: Online 2D Learning Resources Enhance Student Learning in Practical Head and Neck Anatomy within Dental Programs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmoud M. Bakr

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Head and neck anatomy provides core concepts within preclinical dental curricula. Increased student numbers, reduced curricula time, and restricted access to laboratory-based human resources have increased technology enhanced learning approaches to support student learning. Potential advantages include cost-effectiveness, off-campus access, and self-directed review or mastery opportunities for students. This study investigated successful student learning within a first-year head and neck anatomy course at the School of Dentistry and Oral Health, Griffith University, Australia, taught by the same teaching team, between 2010 and 2015. Student learning success was compared, for cohorts before and after implementation of a supplementary, purpose-designed online digital library and quiz bank. Success of these online resources was confirmed using overall students’ performance within the course assessment tasks and Student Evaluation of Course surveys and online access data. Engagement with these supplementary 2D online resources, targeted at improving laboratory study, was positively evaluated by students (mean 85% and significantly increased their laboratory grades (mean difference 6%, P<0.027, despite being assessed using cadaveric resources. Written assessments in final exams were not significantly improved. Expanded use of supplementary online resources is planned to support student learning and success in head and neck anatomy, given the success of this intervention.

  7. Delaware's first serial killer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inguito, G B; Sekula-Perlman, A; Lynch, M J; Callery, R T

    2000-11-01

    The violent murder of Shirley Ellis on November 29, 1987, marked the beginning of the strange and terrible tale of Steven Bryan Pennell's reign as the state of Delaware's first convicted serial killer. Three more bodies followed the first victim, and all had been brutally beaten and sadistically tortured. The body of a fifth woman has never been found. State and county police collaborated with the FBI to identify and hunt down their suspect, forming a task force of over 100 officers and spending about one million dollars. Through their knowledge and experience with other serial killers, the FBI was able to make an amazingly accurate psychological profile of Delaware's serial killer. After months of around-the-clock surveillance, Steven Pennell was arrested on November 29, 1988, one year to the day after the first victim was found. Pennell was found guilty in the deaths of the first two victims on November 29, 1989, and plead no contest to the murder of two others on October 30, 1991. Still maintaining his innocence, he asked for the death penalty so that he could spare his family further agony. Steven Pennell was executed by lethal injection on March 15, 1992.

  8. Learning Clinical Procedures Through Internet Digital Objects: Experience of Undergraduate Students Across Clinical Faculties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Tse Yan; Gao, Xiaoli; Wong, Kin; Tse, Christine Shuk Kwan; Chan, Ying Yee

    2015-04-14

    Various digital learning objects (DLOs) are available via the World Wide Web, showing the flow of clinical procedures. It is unclear to what extent these freely accessible Internet DLOs facilitate or hamper students' acquisition of clinical competence. This study aimed to understand the experience of undergraduate students across clinical disciplines-medicine, dentistry, and nursing-in using openly accessible Internet DLOs, and to investigate the role of Internet DLOs in facilitating their clinical learning. Mid-year and final-year groups were selected from each undergraduate clinical degree program of the University of Hong Kong-Bachelor of Medicine and Bachelor of Surgery (MBBS), Bachelor of Dental Surgery (BDS), and Bachelor of Nursing (BNurs). All students were invited to complete a questionnaire on their personal and educational backgrounds, and their experiences and views on using Internet DLOs in learning clinical procedures. The questionnaire design was informed by the findings of six focus groups. Among 439 respondents, 97.5% (428/439) learned a variety of clinical procedures through Internet DLOs. Most nursing students (107/122, 87.7%) learned preventive measures through Internet DLOs, with a lower percentage of medical students (99/215, 46.0%) and dental students (43/96, 45%) having learned them this way (both Plearning in the planned curriculum. This trend calls for a transformation of the educator's role from dispensing knowledge to guidance and support.

  9. Digital Storytelling for Enhancing Student Academic Achievement, Critical Thinking, and Learning Motivation: A Year-Long Experimental Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ya-Ting C.; Wu, Wan-Chi I.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the impact of Digital storytelling (DST) on the academic achievement, critical thinking, and learning motivation of senior high school students learning English as a foreign language. The one-year study adopted a pretest and posttest quasi-experimental design involving 110 10th grade students in two English…

  10. Video Games and Learning: Teaching and Participatory Culture in the Digital Age. Technology, Education--Connections (the TEC Series)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Squire, Kurt

    2011-01-01

    Can we learn socially and academically valuable concepts and skills from video games? How can we best teach the "gamer generation?" This accessible book describes how educators and curriculum designers can harness the participatory nature of digital media and play. The author presents a comprehensive model of games and learning that integrates…

  11. Exploring Learners' Perceptions of the Use of Digital Letter Games for Language Learning: The Case of Magic Word

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loiseau, Mathieu; Cervini, Cristiana; Ceccherelli, Andrea; Masperi, Monica; Salomoni, Paola; Roccetti, Marco; Valva, Antonella; Bianco, Francesca

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we present two versions of a learning game developed respectively at the Grenoble Alpes and Bologna University. This research focuses on a digital game aimed at favouring the learners' "playful attitude" and harnessing it towards "accuracy" aspects of language learning (lexicon and morphology, here). The game,…

  12. Strengthening Leadership Preparation to Meet the Challenge of Leading for Learning in the Digital Age: Recommendations from Alumni

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Christine A.; Fisher-Adams, Grace

    2015-01-01

    This study surveys graduates of a west-coast university regarding their perception of how well their graduate degree programs prepared them to meet the challenge of leading for learning in the digital age, particularly in the areas of visionary leadership, student learning, organizational management, working with diverse families, ethics, and the…

  13. Instructional Suggestions Supporting Science Learning in Digital Environments Based on a Review of Eye-Tracking Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Fang-Ying; Tsai, Meng-Jung; Chiou, Guo-Li; Lee, Silvia Wen-Yu; Chang, Cheng-Chieh; Chen, Li-Ling

    2018-01-01

    The main purpose of this study was to provide instructional suggestions for supporting science learning in digital environments based on a review of eye tracking studies in e-learning related areas. Thirty-three eye-tracking studies from 2005 to 2014 were selected from the Social Science Citation Index (SSCI) database for review. Through a…

  14. Informal Learning on "YouTube": Exploring Digital Literacy in Independent Online Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Elaine

    2013-01-01

    The focus of this paper is a project conducted in 2011, exploring the use of "YouTube" in the classroom. The project conducted a number of focus groups for which highlighted a number of issues surrounding independent informal learning environments. The questions posed by this research are concerned with what constitutes learning in these…

  15. Image analysis and machine learning in digital pathology: Challenges and opportunities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madabhushi, Anant; Lee, George

    2016-10-01

    With the rise in whole slide scanner technology, large numbers of tissue slides are being scanned and represented and archived digitally. While digital pathology has substantial implications for telepathology, second opinions, and education there are also huge research opportunities in image computing with this new source of "big data". It is well known that there is fundamental prognostic data embedded in pathology images. The ability to mine "sub-visual" image features from digital pathology slide images, features that may not be visually discernible by a pathologist, offers the opportunity for better quantitative modeling of disease appearance and hence possibly improved prediction of disease aggressiveness and patient outcome. However the compelling opportunities in precision medicine offered by big digital pathology data come with their own set of computational challenges. Image analysis and computer assisted detection and diagnosis tools previously developed in the context of radiographic images are woefully inadequate to deal with the data density in high resolution digitized whole slide images. Additionally there has been recent substantial interest in combining and fusing radiologic imaging and proteomics and genomics based measurements with features extracted from digital pathology images for better prognostic prediction of disease aggressiveness and patient outcome. Again there is a paucity of powerful tools for combining disease specific features that manifest across multiple different length scales. The purpose of this review is to discuss developments in computational image analysis tools for predictive modeling of digital pathology images from a detection, segmentation, feature extraction, and tissue classification perspective. We discuss the emergence of new handcrafted feature approaches for improved predictive modeling of tissue appearance and also review the emergence of deep learning schemes for both object detection and tissue classification

  16. Using information and communication technology (ICT) to the maximum: learning and teaching biology with limited digital technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Rooy, Wilhelmina S.

    2012-04-01

    Background: The ubiquity, availability and exponential growth of digital information and communication technology (ICT) creates unique opportunities for learning and teaching in the senior secondary school biology curriculum. Digital technologies make it possible for emerging disciplinary knowledge and understanding of biological processes previously too small, large, slow or fast to be taught. Indeed, much of bioscience can now be effectively taught via digital technology, since its representational and symbolic forms are in digital formats. Purpose: This paper is part of a larger Australian study dealing with the technologies and modalities of learning biology in secondary schools. Sample: The classroom practices of three experienced biology teachers, working in a range of NSW secondary schools, are compared and contrasted to illustrate how the challenges of limited technologies are confronted to seamlessly integrate what is available into a number of molecular genetics lessons to enhance student learning. Design and method: The data are qualitative and the analysis is based on video classroom observations and semi-structured teacher interviews. Results: Findings indicate that if professional development opportunities are provided where the pedagogy of learning and teaching of both the relevant biology and its digital representations are available, then teachers see the immediate pedagogic benefit to student learning. In particular, teachers use ICT for challenging genetic concepts despite limited computer hardware and software availability. Conclusion: Experienced teachers incorporate ICT, however limited, in order to improve the quality of student learning.

  17. Learning Trajectory for Transforming Teachers' Knowledge for Teaching Mathematics and Science with Digital Image and Video Technologies in an Online Learning Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niess, Margaret L.; Gillow-Wiles, Henry

    2014-01-01

    This qualitative cross-case study explores the influence of a designed learning trajectory on transforming teachers' technological pedagogical content knowledge (TPACK) for teaching with digital image and video technologies. The TPACK Learning Trajectory embeds tasks with specific instructional strategies within a social metacognitive…

  18. Teaching and Learning to Read Images and Movies in the Digital Age

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michaël Bourgatte

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available With digital technologies and Internet, pictures, movies and videos are increasingly present in our daily lives. Images are an excellent way to be informed, to communicate and, obviously, to learn. This phenomenon questions the educational stakeholders (public authorities, teachers, researchers, etc. who are seeking solutions to better train and support learners to understand the meaning of images and to be able to analyze them. In this context, we have set up educational activities with a film analysis software to promote the discovery of cinema. Two questions were asked at the beginning of the project. The first one relates to building competencies about film language with the help of digital technologies. The second question relates to the effects produced by the use of this very software in the classroom. To answer these questions, one must refer Gregory Bateson’s notion of double bind.

  19. T-Learning: limites e possibilidades em televisão digital interativa

    OpenAIRE

    Caram, Nirave Reigota [UNESP

    2012-01-01

    A presente dissertação tem como objetivo investigar os limites e possibilidades do T-learning em Televisão Digital Interativa. O foco é o ensino a distância (EaD) para obtenção de educação formal, ou seja, cursos EaD resultem em certificação reconhecida. O trabalho recupera algumas iniciativas que enfrentam esse desafio e discute as novas possibilidades que se abrem com a Televisão Digital, a partir da interatividade. Neste cenário, é necessário pensar como os cursos já existentes podem migra...

  20. Preserved Learning during the Symbol-Digit Substitution Test in Patients with Schizophrenia, Age-Matched Controls, and Elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornelis, Claudia; De Picker, Livia J; Hulstijn, Wouter; Dumont, Glenn; Timmers, Maarten; Janssens, Luc; Sabbe, Bernard G C; Morrens, Manuel

    2014-01-01

    Speed of processing, one of the main cognitive deficits in schizophrenia is most frequently measured with a digit-symbol-coding test. Performance on this test is additionally affected by writing speed and the rate at which symbol-digit relationships are learned, two factors that may be impaired in schizophrenia. This study aims to investigate the effects of sensorimotor speed, short-term learning, and long-term learning on task performance in schizophrenia. In addition, the study aims to explore differences in learning effects between patients with schizophrenia and elderly individuals. Patients with schizophrenia (N = 30) were compared with age-matched healthy controls (N = 30) and healthy elderly volunteers (N = 30) during the Symbol-Digit Substitution Test (SDST). The task was administered on a digitizing tablet, allowing precise measurements of the time taken to write each digit (writing time) and the time to decode symbols into their corresponding digits (matching time). The SDST was administered on three separate days (day 1, day 2, day 7). Symbol-digit repetitions during the task represented short-term learning and repeating the task on different days represented long-term learning. The repetition of the same symbol-digit combinations within one test and the repetition of the test over days resulted in significant decreases in matching time. Interestingly, these short-term and long-term learning effects were about equal among the three groups. Individual participants showed a large variation in the rate of short-term learning. In general, patients with schizophrenia had the longest matching time whereas the elderly had the longest writing time. Writing time remained the same over repeated testing. The rate of learning and sensorimotor speed was found to have a substantial influence on the SDST score. However, a large individual variation in learning rate should be taken into account in the interpretation of task scores for processing speed. Equal

  1. Empowering Teachers and their Practices of Inclusion through Digital Dialogic Negotiation of Meaning in Learning Communities of Practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Voldborg, Hanne; Sorensen, Elsebeth Korsgaard

    2016-01-01

    framework was developed. Through collaborative knowledge building and an Educational Design Research (EDR) method this study reports on a collaborative attempt to improve inclusive teaching/learning in ways that install ownership, reflection, and awareness of eLearning-to-Learn (eL2L). In the current study......The purpose of this paper is to develop and further refine a digital dialogic concept for the establishment of an including educational practice for teachers. The concept is inherently based on the view of teachers as co-researchers and with a view on inclusion as an endeavour best supported...... by digital dialogic negotiation of meaning in learning communities of practice (CoPs). The study is a continuation of an earlier study on establishing a digital dialogic architecture to fostering shared understanding and sustainable competence development in teacher practices of inclusion. A theoretical...

  2. Assessment of the usability of a digital learning technology prototype for monitoring intracranial pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Lilian Regina de; Évora, Yolanda Dora Martinez; Zem-Mascarenhas, Silvia Helena

    2016-08-29

    to assess the usability of a digital learning technology prototype as a new method for minimally invasive monitoring of intracranial pressure. descriptive study using a quantitative approach on assessing the usability of a prototype based on Nielsen's ten heuristics. Four experts in the area of Human-Computer interaction participated in the study. the evaluation delivered eight violated heuristics and 31 usability problems in the 32 screens of the prototype. the suggestions of the evaluators were critical for developing an intuitive, user-friendly interface and will be included in the final version of the digital learning technology. avaliar a usabilidade de um protótipo educacional digital sobre um novo método para monitoração da pressão intracraniana de forma minimamente invasivo para enfermeiros e médicos. estudo descritivo com abordagem quantitativa sobre a avaliação de usabilidade de um protótipo com base nas dez Heurísticas de Nielsen. Participaram quatro especialistas da área de Interação Humano Computador. a avaliação resultou em oito heurísticas violadas e 31 problemas de usabilidade nas 32 telas do protótipo. as sugestões dos avaliadores foram cruciais para o desenvolvimento de uma interface amigável e intuitiva e serão consideradas na versão final da tecnologia educacional digital. evaluar la usabilidad de un prototipo educacional digital sobre un nuevo método para monitorización de la presión intracraneal, de manera mínimamente invasiva. estudio descriptivo con abordaje cuantitativo sobre la evaluación de usabilidad de un prototipo con base en las diez reglas Heurísticas de Nielsen. Participaron cuatro especialistas del área de Interacción Humana Computador. la evaluación resultó en ocho reglas heurísticas violadas y 31 problemas de usabilidad en las 32 pantallas del prototipo. las sugestiones de los evaluadores fueron cruciales para el desarrollo de una interfaz amigable e intuitiva y éstas serán consideradas en la

  3. Sensory experiences of digital photo-sharing—“mundane frictions” and emerging learning strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vaike Fors

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Digital technologies are increasingly ubiquitous in everyday life forming part of the way we live and experience the world. This article will specifically scrutinise how mobile phone cameras, digital photographing and the use of web-based photo-sharing sites and communities become part of the meaning-making practices through which the everyday is lived and understood. In doing so, I advance the concept of “mundane friction” through which to discuss the experience, meaning-making and pedagogy generated through operating screen-based technologies. Indeed, media participates in everyday worlds beyond its role as a provider of content and for communication. The question that will be addressed here is how this media presence can be understood from an embodied and sensory perspective, and is based in a study of sensory aspects of teenagers use of web-based photo-diaries. Further, this discussion leads to questions of how an appreciation of digital visuality as more than representational acknowledges the meaning of mundane friction caused by habitually touching, rubbing, clicking, pinching through media technologies as part of the sensory emplacement process that establish people as situated learners. In turn, problematising this tangible friction as pivotal for understanding digital visuality gives reason to argue for research methods that acknowledge digital visual material as more-than-visual and theory that moves toward the unspoken, tacit and sensory elements of learning in everyday practices. Thus, the aim of this article is to elaborate on the embodied, the methodological and the pedagogical dimensions of “mundane friction” in meaning-making activities, and its pedagogical implications.

  4. A Study on the Relationships between Digital Game Preference and Game Preference Reason with Gender, Class Level and Learning Styles

    OpenAIRE

    Ferhat Kadir PALA; Mukaddes ERDEM

    2011-01-01

    This study examined for to determine the relationships between digital game preferences and the game preferences reasons with gender, class levels and learning styles of university students. Study group consisted of students of Computer Education and Instructional Technology Department. Game preferences and preference reasons data were gathered by an open ended 16 items questionnaire. Kolb’s Learning Style Inventory was used for collecting learning styles data. As a result, significant relati...

  5. Facebook levels the playing field: Dyslexic students learning through digital literacies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Owen Barden

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Dyslexia has an ambivalent relationship with learning technology. Any potential gains may be nullified if the technology is perceived to exacerbate stigma. This paper examines the use of an ‘everyday’ technology, Facebook, by a small group of sixth form students labelled as dyslexic. ‘Levelling the playing field’ is a phrase the participants used often when discussing what they wanted from learning technology. Because dyslexia usually is defined in terms of significant difficulties with literacy, we might reasonably anticipate that the participants would see Facebook as stigmatising rather than levelling the playing field, because of the very public literacy events that it demands. However, the data indicate that far from shying away from Facebook because of fear of their difficulties with literacy being exposed, the participants enthusiastically embraced it. The students saw Facebook as a desirable presence in their education, one that supported inclusion. For them, levelling the playing field with Facebook had five dimensions: keeping up to date and meeting deadlines; increased control over learning; developing metacognitive awareness; greater control over literacy process and demands; and being experts and helpers. The findings perhaps challenge some assumptions about dyslexia, literacy and learning, and may be of interest to teachers working with dyslexic students, or researchers studying learning in digitally mediated social networks.

  6. Teaching in a digital age guidelines for designing teaching and learning

    CERN Document Server

    Bates, Anthony William

    2015-01-01

    The book examines the underlying principles that guide effective teaching in an age when all of us, and in particular the students we are teaching, are using technology. A framework for making decisions about your teaching is provided, while understanding that every subject is different, and every instructor has something unique and special to bring to their teaching.The book enables teachers and instructors to help students develop the knowledge and skills they will need in a digital age: not so much the IT skills, but the thinking and attitudes to learning that will bring them success.

  7. Training needs assessment of andalusian teachers in educational digital resources authoring for virtual learning environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Javier Romero Díaz de la Guardia

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This research work has been conducted within the teacher training plan known as “Escuela TIC 2.0”, implemented by the Spanish Junta de Andalucía. The main aim is to obtain objective data regarding training needs for teachers in the autonomous region of Andalusia in terms of educational digital content authoring. To that end, we carried out a descriptive survey study on Andalusian teachers participating in teacher training courses on e-learning strategies that took place during the 2011- 2012 academic year.

  8. Digital curation and online resources: digital scanning of surgical tools at the royal college of physicians and surgeons of Glasgow for an open university learning resource.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Earley, Kirsty; Livingstone, Daniel; Rea, Paul M

    2017-01-01

    Collection preservation is essential for the cultural status of any city. However, presenting a collection publicly risks damage. Recently this drawback has been overcome by digital curation. Described here is a method of digitisation using photogrammetry and virtual reality software. Items were selected from the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Glasgow archives, and implemented into an online learning module for the Open University. Images were processed via Agisoft Photoscan, Autodesk Memento, and Garden Gnome Object 2VR. Although problems arose due to specularity, 2VR digital models were developed for online viewing. Future research must minimise the difficulty of digitising specular objects.

  9. Cyber Dating Abuse: Investigating Digital Monitoring Behaviors Among Adolescents From a Social Learning Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Ouytsel, Joris; Ponnet, Koen; Walrave, Michel

    2017-07-01

    Just as with other forms of abuse such as bullying, dating violence is no longer limited to physical spaces. Several forms of dating violence can also be perpetrated by means of technology. Few studies have used a theoretical perspective to investigate cyber dating abuse. This study addresses this gap in the literature by focusing on the perpetration of digital monitoring behaviors-a form of cyber dating abuse-from a social learning perspective. We investigate the extent to which perceived social norms about cyber dating abuse, witnessing controlling behaviors among parents, and endorsing gender stereotypes are linked with adolescents' engagement in digital monitoring behaviors. The study draws on data from 466 secondary school students (71.0% girls, n = 331) aged between 16 and 22 years ( M = 17.99 years, SD = 0.92) in Flanders, Belgium, who were in a romantic relationship. Linear regression analysis indicates that being female, being older, the perceived social norms of peers, the endorsement of gender stereotypes, and having observed intrusive controlling behaviors by the father are significantly and positively related to adolescents' perpetration of digital monitoring behaviors. The findings have implications for practice and underscore the need for prevention efforts to address and lower the influence of these perceived social norms. Further implications include the need for prevention efforts to focus on diminishing the impact of gender stereotypical attitudes and the influence of witnessing controlling behaviors within the family context on cyber dating abuse perpetration.

  10. Education, corporeality and the evolution towards digital learning. A «Stieglerian» perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joris VLIEGHE

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available In this article we explore some philosophical perspectives on the current shift from traditional forms of class and group teaching to learning activities in digital environments. Our interest goes more precisely to the corporeal dimensions of this evolution. Showing that as a rule the issue at hand is discussed about in terms of the absence or obsoleteness of the body, we argue for the introduction of a new approach, that draws from the insights of the French philosopher Bernard Stiegler. He has developed a fully technology-centred approach that analyzes subject-formation in relation to a contingent history of material tools and related embodied practices (which function as a kind of external memory support in an original sense. This particular approach allows for concrete analyses that show the school to be a material dispositive of attention related to concrete practices such as writing or exercising. Although Stiegler is in the end not entirely consistent in following his own «materialist » assumptions, we will argue for a «Stieglerian» line of research that allows to fathom the meaning of today’s (traditional and tomorrow’s (digital educational reality, omitting a normative perspective (i.e. Refraining from directly denouncing or acclaiming the digital [r]evolution at hand.

  11. Socio-Demographic Effects on Digital Libraries Preference and Use: A Case Study at Higher Learning Institutions

    OpenAIRE

    A. K. Razilan; A. B. Amzari; B. Ap-azli; A. R. Safawi

    2013-01-01

    Explosion in information management and information system technology has brought dramatic changes in learning and library system environments. The use of academic digital libraries does witness the spectacular impact on academic societies’ way of performing their study in Malaysia, a country with a multi-racial people. This paper highlights a research on examining the socio-demographic differences on the preference and use of academic digital libraries as compared to physical libraries at hi...

  12. Understanding digital natives' learning experiences Conhecendo as experiências de aprendizagem de nativos digitais

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudio de Paiva Franco

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims to provide a better understanding of digital natives' perspectives on English learning. The present case study analyzes data from a group of Brazilian learners of English who study at a federal, public high school in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Data collection includes: (a a questionnaire to examine the profile of the participants and (b learner narratives. This study privileges an interpretive approach based on Complexity Theory in an attempt to understand participants' learning experiences from a more holistic, whole-systems approach. Results indicate that the complex adaptive learning system of digital natives is self-organizing and chaotic. Moreover, the final remarks stress a pressing concern regarding English teaching in Brazil and suggest that the current pedagogical practices no longer serve the needs of the digital generation.Este trabalho tem por objetivo fornecer uma melhor compreensão das perspectivas de nativos digitais sobre a aprendizagem de inglês. O presente estudo de caso analisa dados de um grupo de aprendizes brasileiros de inglês que estudam em uma escola federal de Ensino Médio, localizada no Rio de Janeiro, Brasil. A coleta de dados é feita por meio de (a um questionário para traçar o perfil dos participantes, e (b as narrativas dos alunos. Este estudo privilegia uma abordagem interpretativa com base na teoria da complexidade, de modo a tentar entender as experiências de aprendizagem dos participantes a partir de uma forma mais holística, de sistemas. Os resultados indicam que o sistema adaptativo complexo de aprendizagem de nativos digitais é auto-organizante e caótico. Além disso, as considerações finais destacam uma preocupação séria com o ensino de inglês no Brasil e sugerem que as atuais práticas pedagógicas já não atendem às necessidades da geração digital.

  13. Analog Tools in Digital History Classrooms: An Activity-Theory Case Study of Learning Opportunities in Digital Humanities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craig, Kalani

    2017-01-01

    Digital humanities is often presented as classroom savior, a narrative that competes against the idea that technology virtually guarantees student distraction. However, these arguments are often based on advocacy and anecdote, so we lack systematic research that explores the effect of digital-humanities tools and techniques such as text mining,…

  14. Medication calculation: the potential role of digital game-based learning in nurse education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foss, Brynjar; Mordt Ba, Petter; Oftedal, Bjørg F; Løkken, Atle

    2013-12-01

    Medication dose calculation is one of several medication-related activities that are conducted by nurses daily. However, medication calculation skills appear to be an area of global concern, possibly because of low numeracy skills, test anxiety, low self-confidence, and low self-efficacy among student nurses. Various didactic strategies have been developed for student nurses who still lack basic mathematical competence. However, we suggest that the critical nature of these skills demands the investigation of alternative and/or supplementary didactic approaches to improve medication calculation skills and to reduce failure rates. Digital game-based learning is a possible solution because of the following reasons. First, mathematical drills may improve medication calculation skills. Second, games are known to be useful during nursing education. Finally, mathematical drill games appear to improve the attitudes of students toward mathematics. The aim of this article was to discuss common challenges of medication calculation skills in nurse education, and we highlight the potential role of digital game-based learning in this area.

  15. Mass detection in digital breast tomosynthesis data using convolutional neural networks and multiple instance learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yousefi, Mina; Krzyżak, Adam; Suen, Ching Y

    2018-05-01

    Digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) was developed in the field of breast cancer screening as a new tomographic technique to minimize the limitations of conventional digital mammography breast screening methods. A computer-aided detection (CAD) framework for mass detection in DBT has been developed and is described in this paper. The proposed framework operates on a set of two-dimensional (2D) slices. With plane-to-plane analysis on corresponding 2D slices from each DBT, it automatically learns complex patterns of 2D slices through a deep convolutional neural network (DCNN). It then applies multiple instance learning (MIL) with a randomized trees approach to classify DBT images based on extracted information from 2D slices. This CAD framework was developed and evaluated using 5040 2D image slices derived from 87 DBT volumes. The empirical results demonstrate that this proposed CAD framework achieves much better performance than CAD systems that use hand-crafted features and deep cardinality-restricted Bolzmann machines to detect masses in DBTs. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Learning Mechanics and Game Mechanics Under the Perspective of Self-Determination Theory to Foster Motivation in Digital Game Based Learning

    OpenAIRE

    Proulx, Jean-Nicolas; Romero, Margarida; Arnab, Sylvester

    2018-01-01

    Background: Using digital games for educational purposes has been associated with higher levels of motivation among learners of different educational levels. However, the underlying psychological factors involved in digital game based learning (DGBL) have been rarely analyzed considering self-determination theory (SDT, Ryan \\& Deci, 2000b); the relation of SDT with the flow experience (Csikszentmihalyi, 1990) has neither been evaluated in the context of DGBL.

  17. Searching for the Hebb Effect in down Syndrome: Evidence for a Dissociation between Verbal Short-Term Memory and Domain-General Learning of Serial Order

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosse, E. K.; Jarrold, C.

    2010-01-01

    Background: The Hebb effect is a form of repetition-driven long-term learning that is thought to provide an analogue for the processes involved in new word learning. Other evidence suggests that verbal short-term memory also constrains now vocabulary acquisition, but if the Hebb effect is independent of short-term memory, then it may be possible…

  18. Effects of Embodied Learning and Digital Platform on the Retention of Physics Content: Centripetal Force

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson-Glenberg, Mina C.; Megowan-Romanowicz, Colleen; Birchfield, David A.; Savio-Ramos, Caroline

    2016-01-01

    Embodiment theory proposes that knowledge is grounded in sensorimotor systems, and that learning can be facilitated to the extent that lessons can be mapped to these systems. This study with 109 college-age participants addresses two overarching questions: (a) how are immediate and delayed learning gains affected by the degree to which a lesson is embodied, and (b) how do the affordances of three different educational platforms affect immediate and delayed learning? Six 50 min-long lessons on centripetal force were created. The first factor was the degree of embodiment with two levels: (1) low and (2) high. The second factor was platform with three levels: (1) a large scale “mixed reality” immersive environment containing both digital and hands-on components called SMALLab, (2) an interactive whiteboard system, and (3) a mouse-driven desktop computer. Pre-tests, post-tests, and 1-week follow-up (retention or delayed learning gains) tests were administered resulting in a 2 × 3 × 3 design. Two knowledge subtests were analyzed, one that relied on more declarative knowledge and one that relied on more generative knowledge, e.g., hand-drawing vectors. Regardless of condition, participants made significant immediate learning gains from pre-test to post-test. There were no significant main effects or interactions due to platform or embodiment on immediate learning. However, from post-test to follow-up the level of embodiment interacted significantly with time, such that participants in the high embodiment conditions performed better on the subtest devoted to generative knowledge questions. We posit that better retention of certain types of knowledge can be seen over time when more embodiment is present during the encoding phase. This sort of retention may not appear on more traditional factual/declarative tests. Educational technology designers should consider using more sensorimotor feedback and gestural congruency when designing and opportunities for instructor

  19. Effects of Embodied Learning and Digital Platform on the Retention of Physics Content: Centripetal Force.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson-Glenberg, Mina C; Megowan-Romanowicz, Colleen; Birchfield, David A; Savio-Ramos, Caroline

    2016-01-01

    Embodiment theory proposes that knowledge is grounded in sensorimotor systems, and that learning can be facilitated to the extent that lessons can be mapped to these systems. This study with 109 college-age participants addresses two overarching questions: (a) how are immediate and delayed learning gains affected by the degree to which a lesson is embodied, and (b) how do the affordances of three different educational platforms affect immediate and delayed learning? Six 50 min-long lessons on centripetal force were created. The first factor was the degree of embodiment with two levels: (1) low and (2) high. The second factor was platform with three levels: (1) a large scale "mixed reality" immersive environment containing both digital and hands-on components called SMALLab , (2) an interactive whiteboard system, and (3) a mouse-driven desktop computer. Pre-tests, post-tests, and 1-week follow-up (retention or delayed learning gains) tests were administered resulting in a 2 × 3 × 3 design. Two knowledge subtests were analyzed, one that relied on more declarative knowledge and one that relied on more generative knowledge, e.g., hand-drawing vectors. Regardless of condition, participants made significant immediate learning gains from pre-test to post-test. There were no significant main effects or interactions due to platform or embodiment on immediate learning. However, from post-test to follow-up the level of embodiment interacted significantly with time, such that participants in the high embodiment conditions performed better on the subtest devoted to generative knowledge questions. We posit that better retention of certain types of knowledge can be seen over time when more embodiment is present during the encoding phase. This sort of retention may not appear on more traditional factual/declarative tests. Educational technology designers should consider using more sensorimotor feedback and gestural congruency when designing and opportunities for instructor

  20. Student movement in Chile, situated learning and digital activism. Commitment, social change and technological uses in teenagers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia Peña

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available From the student movement emerged in Chile in 2011, the article reflects on the school as a learning space of audiovisual digital technologies and how this process can impact on the political communication dimension of a social movement. To do this, it is described and analyzed the case of a school where formal education in languages and digital technologies is overlapping with the use of applications and resources of the social web and so-called "social media" (youtube, blogs, social networks by high school students who become student leaders. Data are generated through key informant interviews and a selection of videos created for the students and uploaded to the Internet. The content of the interviews is approached from the concept of situated learning (Lave & Wenger, 1991 and videos from the concept of video activism (Askanius, 2013; Mateos & Rajas, 2014. The results show that concrete use of digital tools obtained in formal educational spaces in a context of mobilization processes, generates new experiences of non-formal learning, which allow both students and teachers to reflect on their communicative practices and improve them. They also show an uncritical use of digital tools, which is a wake-up call on the need to incorporate privacy and self-care topics in internet within the contents to be developed by the school as space for digital learning.

  1. Comparison of three problem-based learning conditions (real patients, digital and paper) with lecture-based learning in a dermatology course: a prospective randomized study from China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jie; Li, Qing Ling; Li, Ji; Chen, Ming Liang; Xie, Hong Fu; Li, Ya Ping; Chen, Xiang

    2013-01-01

    The precise effect and the quality of different cases used in dermatology problem-based learning (PBL) curricula are yet unclear. To prospectively compare the impact of real patients, digital, paper PBL (PPBL) and traditional lecture-based learning (LBL) on academic results and student perceptions. A total of 120 students were randomly allocated into either real-patients PBL (RPBL) group studied via real-patient cases, digital PBL (DPBL) group studied via digital-form cases, PPBL group studied via paper-form cases, or conventional group who received didactic lectures. Academic results were assessed through review of written examination, objective structured clinical examination and student performance scores. A five-point Likert scale questionnaire was used to evaluate student perceptions. Compared to those receiving lectures only, all PBL participants had better results for written examination, clinical examination and overall performance. Students in RPBL group exhibited better overall performance than those in the other two PBL groups. Real-patient cases were more effective in helping develop students' self-directed learning skills, improving their confidence in future patient encounters and encouraging them to learn more about the discussed condition, compared to digital and paper cases. Both real patient and digital triggers are helpful in improving students' clinical problem-handling skills. However, real patients provide greater benefits to students.

  2. Malingering, coaching, and the serial position effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suhr, Julie A

    2002-01-01

    The normal pattern of performance on list-learning tasks is to recall more words from the beginning (primacy) and end (recency) of the list. This pattern is also seen in patients with closed head injury, but malingerers tend to recall less words from the beginning of word lists, leading to a suppressed primacy effect. The present study examined this pattern on both learning trials and delayed recall of the Auditory Verbal Learning Test (AVLT) in 34 persons performing with normal effort, 38 naive malingerers, 33 warned malingerers, and 29 head-injured patients. Both malingering groups had lower scores on the primacy portion of the list during learning trials, while normals and head-injured patients had normal serial position curves. During delayed recall, normals and head-injured patients did better than the two malingering groups on middle and recency portions of the list. Findings suggest that the serial position effect during learning trials may be a useful pattern of performance to watch for when suspicious of malingering.

  3. The Role of Motive Objects in Early Childhood Teacher Development Concerning Children's Digital Play and Play-Based Learning in Early Childhood Curricula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuttall, Joce; Edwards, Susan; Mantilla, Ana; Grieshaber, Sue; Wood, Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    Digital technologies are increasingly accepted as a viable aspect of early childhood curriculum. However, teacher uptake of digital technologies in early childhood education and their use with young children in play-based approaches to learning have not been strong. Traditional approaches to the problem of teacher uptake of digital technologies in…

  4. Gamification: An Innovative Teaching-Learning Strategy for the Digital Nursing Students in a Community Health Nursing Course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Day-Black, Crystal; Merrill, Earline B; Konzelman, Lois; Williams, Tammie T; Hart, Natalie

    2015-01-01

    Serious games have "re-emerged" as innovative teaching-learning strategies that researchers have shown to be effective in improving student learning outcomes. "Serious games" refer to games that are driven by educational goals, not entertainment. The use of serious games as part of the teaching-learning experience in nursing education fits into the philosophy and strategies of active learning. The "digital" nursing student needs engagement, stimulation, realism, and entertainment not more readings and Powerpoint supplements in the classroom to support learning. Nursing faculty at a mid-Atlantic Historical Black College and University introduced "serious gaming" technology into a Community Health Nursing course by using two web-based gamed simulations, Outbreak at WatersEdge: A Public Health Discovery Game, and EnviroRisk. This innovation proved to be effective in reinforcing learning and improving student learning outcomes.

  5. The Interaction Effects of Working Memory Capacity, Gaming Expertise, and Scaffolding Design on Attention and Comprehension in Digital Game Based Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yu-Hao

    2013-01-01

    Educational digital games are often complex problem-solving experiences that can facilitate systematic comprehension. However, empirical studies of digital game based learning (DGBL) have found mixed results regarding DGBL's effect in improving comprehension. While learners generally enjoyed the DGBL learning experience, they often failed to…

  6. Innovation Online Teaching Module Plus Digital Engineering Kit with Proteus Software through Hybrid Learning Method to Improve Student Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kholis, Nur; Syariffuddien Zuhrie, Muhamad; Rahmadian, Reza

    2018-04-01

    Demands the competence (competence) needs of the industry today is a competent workforce to the field of work. However, during this lecture material Digital Engineering (Especially Digital Electronics Basics and Digital Circuit Basics) is limited to the delivery of verbal form of lectures (classical method) is dominated by the Lecturer (Teacher Centered). Though the subject of Digital Engineering requires learning tools and is required understanding of electronic circuits, digital electronics and high logic circuits so that learners can apply in the world of work. One effort to make it happen is by creating an online teaching module and educational aids (Kit) with the help of Proteus software that can improve the skills of learners. This study aims to innovate online teaching modules plus kits in Proteus-assisted digital engineering courses through hybrid learning approaches to improve the skills of learners. The process of innovation is done by considering the skills and mastery of the technology of students (students) Department of Electrical Engineering - Faculty of Engineering – Universitas Negeri Surabaya to produce quality graduates Use of online module plus Proteus software assisted kit through hybrid learning approach. In general, aims to obtain adequate results with affordable cost of investment, user friendly, attractive and interactive (easily adapted to the development of Information and Communication Technology). With the right design, implementation and operation, both in the form of software both in the form of Online Teaching Module, offline teaching module, Kit (Educational Viewer), and e-learning learning content (both online and off line), the use of the three tools of the expenditure will be able to adjust the standard needs of Information and Communication Technology world, both nationally and internationally.

  7. Effectiveness of Adaptive Contextual Learning Model of Integrated Science by Integrating Digital Age Literacy on Grade VIII Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asrizal, A.; Amran, A.; Ananda, A.; Festiyed, F.

    2018-04-01

    Educational graduates should have good competencies to compete in the 21st century. Integrated learning is a good way to develop competence of students in this century. Besides that, literacy skills are very important for students to get success in their learning and daily life. For this reason, integrated science learning and literacy skills are important in 2013 curriculum. However, integrated science learning and integration of literacy in learning can’t be implemented well. Solution of this problem is to develop adaptive contextual learning model by integrating digital age literacy. The purpose of the research is to determine the effectiveness of adaptive contextual learning model to improve competence of grade VIII students in junior high school. This research is a part of the research and development or R&D. Research design which used in limited field testing was before and after treatment. The research instruments consist of three parts namely test sheet of learning outcome for assessing knowledge competence, observation sheet for assessing attitudes, and performance sheet for assessing skills of students. Data of student’s competence were analyzed by three kinds of analysis, namely descriptive statistics, normality test and homogeneity test, and paired comparison test. From the data analysis result, it can be stated that the implementation of adaptive contextual learning model of integrated science by integrating digital age literacy is effective to improve the knowledge, attitude, and literacy skills competences of grade VIII students in junior high school at 95% confidence level.

  8. Teaching medical humanities in the digital world: affordances of technology-enhanced learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemp, Sandra Joy; Day, Giskin

    2014-12-01

    Medical humanities courses are typically taught in face-to-face teaching environments, but now medical humanities educators, alongside educators from other disciplines, are facing shifts in higher education towards online (and sometimes open) courses. For the medical humanities educator, there is limited guidance regarding how technology-enhanced learning design can support the learning outcomes associated with medical humanities. This article aims to provide useful direction for such educators on how digital technologies can be used through learner-focused pedagogies. Specific examples are provided as to how the affordances of Web 2.0 and other tools can be realised in innovative ways to help achieve skills development within the medical humanities. The guidance, alongside the practical suggestions for implementation, can provide important conceptual background for medical humanities educators who wish to embrace technology-enhanced learning, and reconceptualise or redesign medical humanities for an online or blended teaching environment. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  9. Digital mammographic tumor classification using transfer learning from deep convolutional neural networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huynh, Benjamin Q; Li, Hui; Giger, Maryellen L

    2016-07-01

    Convolutional neural networks (CNNs) show potential for computer-aided diagnosis (CADx) by learning features directly from the image data instead of using analytically extracted features. However, CNNs are difficult to train from scratch for medical images due to small sample sizes and variations in tumor presentations. Instead, transfer learning can be used to extract tumor information from medical images via CNNs originally pretrained for nonmedical tasks, alleviating the need for large datasets. Our database includes 219 breast lesions (607 full-field digital mammographic images). We compared support vector machine classifiers based on the CNN-extracted image features and our prior computer-extracted tumor features in the task of distinguishing between benign and malignant breast lesions. Five-fold cross validation (by lesion) was conducted with the area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve as the performance metric. Results show that classifiers based on CNN-extracted features (with transfer learning) perform comparably to those using analytically extracted features [area under the ROC curve [Formula: see text

  10. Automatic phase aberration compensation for digital holographic microscopy based on deep learning background detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Thanh; Bui, Vy; Lam, Van; Raub, Christopher B; Chang, Lin-Ching; Nehmetallah, George

    2017-06-26

    We propose a fully automatic technique to obtain aberration free quantitative phase imaging in digital holographic microscopy (DHM) based on deep learning. The traditional DHM solves the phase aberration compensation problem by manually detecting the background for quantitative measurement. This would be a drawback in real time implementation and for dynamic processes such as cell migration phenomena. A recent automatic aberration compensation approach using principle component analysis (PCA) in DHM avoids human intervention regardless of the cells' motion. However, it corrects spherical/elliptical aberration only and disregards the higher order aberrations. Traditional image segmentation techniques can be employed to spatially detect cell locations. Ideally, automatic image segmentation techniques make real time measurement possible. However, existing automatic unsupervised segmentation techniques have poor performance when applied to DHM phase images because of aberrations and speckle noise. In this paper, we propose a novel method that combines a supervised deep learning technique with convolutional neural network (CNN) and Zernike polynomial fitting (ZPF). The deep learning CNN is implemented to perform automatic background region detection that allows for ZPF to compute the self-conjugated phase to compensate for most aberrations.

  11. Spiking neural networks for handwritten digit recognition-Supervised learning and network optimization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulkarni, Shruti R; Rajendran, Bipin

    2018-07-01

    We demonstrate supervised learning in Spiking Neural Networks (SNNs) for the problem of handwritten digit recognition using the spike triggered Normalized Approximate Descent (NormAD) algorithm. Our network that employs neurons operating at sparse biological spike rates below 300Hz achieves a classification accuracy of 98.17% on the MNIST test database with four times fewer parameters compared to the state-of-the-art. We present several insights from extensive numerical experiments regarding optimization of learning parameters and network configuration to improve its accuracy. We also describe a number of strategies to optimize the SNN for implementation in memory and energy constrained hardware, including approximations in computing the neuronal dynamics and reduced precision in storing the synaptic weights. Experiments reveal that even with 3-bit synaptic weights, the classification accuracy of the designed SNN does not degrade beyond 1% as compared to the floating-point baseline. Further, the proposed SNN, which is trained based on the precise spike timing information outperforms an equivalent non-spiking artificial neural network (ANN) trained using back propagation, especially at low bit precision. Thus, our study shows the potential for realizing efficient neuromorphic systems that use spike based information encoding and learning for real-world applications. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Teaching Dental Students to Understand the Temporomandibular Joint Using MRI: Comparison of Conventional and Digital Learning Methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arús, Nádia A; da Silva, Átila M; Duarte, Rogério; da Silveira, Priscila F; Vizzotto, Mariana B; da Silveira, Heraldo L D; da Silveira, Heloisa E D

    2017-06-01

    The aims of this study were to evaluate and compare the performance of dental students in interpreting the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans using two learning methods (conventional and digital interactive learning) and to examine the usability of the digital learning object (DLO). The DLO consisted of tutorials about MRI and anatomic and functional aspects of the TMJ. In 2014, dental students in their final year of study who were enrolled in the elective "MRI Interpretation of the TMJ" course comprised the study sample. After exclusions for nonattendance and other reasons, 29 of the initial 37 students participated in the study, for a participation rate of 78%. The participants were divided into two groups: a digital interactive learning group (n=14) and a conventional learning group (n=15). Both methods were assessed by an objective test applied before and after training and classes. Aspects such as support and training requirements, complexity, and consistency of the DLO were also evaluated using the System Usability Scale (SUS). A significant between-group difference in the posttest results was found, with the conventional learning group scoring better than the DLO group, indicated by mean scores of 9.20 and 8.11, respectively, out of 10. However, when the pretest and posttest results were compared, both groups showed significantly improved performance. The SUS score was 89, which represented a high acceptance of the DLO by the users. The students who used the conventional method of learning showed superior performance in interpreting the TMJ using MRI compared to the group that used digital interactive learning.

  13. The Effectiveness of Digital Game-Based Vocabulary Learning: A Framework-Based View of Meta-Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Meng-Hua; Tseng, Wen-Ta; Hsiao, Tsung-Yuan

    2018-01-01

    This study presents the results of a meta-analytic study about the effects of digital game-based learning (DGBL) on vocabulary. The results of the study showed that the effects of DGBL on vocabulary learning may vary with game design features (Q = 5.857, df = 1, p = 0.016), but not with learners' age (Q = 0.906, df = 1, p = 0.341) or linguistic…

  14. Learning Clinical Procedures Through Internet Digital Objects: Experience of Undergraduate Students Across Clinical Faculties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Tse Yan; Wong, Kin; Tse, Christine Shuk Kwan; Chan, Ying Yee

    2015-01-01

    Background Various digital learning objects (DLOs) are available via the World Wide Web, showing the flow of clinical procedures. It is unclear to what extent these freely accessible Internet DLOs facilitate or hamper students’ acquisition of clinical competence. Objective This study aimed to understand the experience of undergraduate students across clinical disciplines—medicine, dentistry, and nursing—in using openly accessible Internet DLOs, and to investigate the role of Internet DLOs in facilitating their clinical learning. Methods Mid-year and final-year groups were selected from each undergraduate clinical degree program of the University of Hong Kong—Bachelor of Medicine and Bachelor of Surgery (MBBS), Bachelor of Dental Surgery (BDS), and Bachelor of Nursing (BNurs). All students were invited to complete a questionnaire on their personal and educational backgrounds, and their experiences and views on using Internet DLOs in learning clinical procedures. The questionnaire design was informed by the findings of six focus groups. Results Among 439 respondents, 97.5% (428/439) learned a variety of clinical procedures through Internet DLOs. Most nursing students (107/122, 87.7%) learned preventive measures through Internet DLOs, with a lower percentage of medical students (99/215, 46.0%) and dental students (43/96, 45%) having learned them this way (both Pstudents accessed DLOs through public search engines, whereas 93.2% (409/439) accessed them by watching YouTube videos. Students often shared DLOs with classmates (277/435, 63.7%), but rarely discussed them with teachers (54/436, 12.4%). The accuracy, usefulness, and importance of Internet DLOs were rated as 6.85 (SD 1.48), 7.27 (SD 1.53), and 7.13 (SD 1.72), respectively, out of a high score of 10. Conclusions Self-exploration of DLOs in the unrestricted Internet environment is extremely common among current e-generation learners and was regarded by students across clinical faculties as an important

  15. Digital Learning Network Education Events for the Desert Research and Technology Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Heather L.; Guillory, Erika R.

    2007-01-01

    NASA s Digital Learning Network (DLN) reaches out to thousands of students each year through video conferencing and webcasting. As part of NASA s Strategic Plan to reach the next generation of space explorers, the DLN develops and delivers educational programs that reinforce principles in the areas of science, technology, engineering and mathematics. The DLN has created a series of live education videoconferences connecting the Desert Research and Technology Studies (RATS) field test to students across the United States. The programs are also extended to students around the world via live webcasting. The primary focus of the events is the Vision for Space Exploration. During the programs, Desert RATS engineers and scientists inform and inspire students about the importance of exploration and share the importance of the field test as it correlates with plans to return to the Moon and explore Mars. This paper describes the events that took place in September 2006.

  16. State-wide provision of a digital mammography physics service : challenges and learning experiences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diffey, J.L.; Cartwright, L.E.; Collins, L.T.; Grewal, R.K.

    2010-01-01

    Full text: Breast Screen NSW is a fully digital screening programme with 70 mammographic units from eight vendors. We present the challenges and learning experiences associated with providing the physics service to this extensive screening programme. The EPA requires an annual check of Mean Glandular Dose and registration renewal every 2 years. Additionally, BreastScreen NSW requires annual compliance testing to RANZCR standards. To ensure that testing is carried out to a consistently high level, the contract specifies that only five physicists in the state are eligible to test the equipment. An equipment database has been developed to enable us to meet these deadlines. We have also created a radiog rapher QC manual. Two physicists take responsibility for the overall co-ordination of the service, reviewing reports and test methodology of other physics providers. The database has greatly improved the system for meeting deadlines; visits to all sites revealed that many were overdue. The radiographer QC manual has been accompanied by practical tutorials and has been successful in improving understanding of digital mam mography and ensuring consistency in testing. This has been a particular challenge because equipment has been supplied by a number of vendors, with a range of detector technology. The number of mammography units, combined with the range of vendor technology and frequency of testing has presented a challenge to both physicists and radiographers. It has been extremely beneficial to have two dedicated physicists in place to co-ordinate the service and ensure that the demands of the contract are met.

  17. Digi Island: A Serious Game for Teaching and Learning Digital Circuit Optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harper, Michael; Miller, Joseph; Shen, Yuzhong

    2011-01-01

    Karnaugh maps, also known as K-maps, are a tool used to optimize or simplify digital logic circuits. A K-map is a graphical display of a logic circuit. K-map optimization is essentially the process of finding a minimum number of maximal aggregations of K-map cells. with values of 1 according to a set of rules. The Digi Island is a serious game designed for aiding students to learn K-map optimization. The game takes place on an exotic island (called Digi Island) in the Pacific Ocean . The player is an adventurer to the Digi Island and will transform it into a tourist attraction by developing real estates, such as amusement parks.and hotels. The Digi Island game elegantly converts boring 1s and Os in digital circuits into usable and unusable spaces on a beautiful island and transforms K-map optimization into real estate development, an activity with which many students are familiar and also interested in. This paper discusses the design, development, and some preliminary results of the Digi Island game.

  18. Science Notebooks for the 21st Century. Going Digital Provides Opportunities to Learn "with" Technology Rather than "from" Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fulton, Lori; Paek, Seungoh; Taoka, Mari

    2017-01-01

    Students of today are digital natives who for the most part come to school with experiences that may surpass those of their teachers. They use tablet computers and other devices in their personal lives and are eager to use them in the classroom. For teachers, this means they must integrate technology in ways that allow their students to learn with…

  19. An Agent-Based Approach for Delivering Educational Contents through Interactive Digital TV in the Context of T-Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendes Neto, Francisco Milton; de Carvalho Muniz, Raphael; Filgueira Burlamaqui, Aquiles Medeiros; Castro de Souza, Rafael

    2015-01-01

    The support of technological resources in teaching and learning has contributed to make them more efficient and enjoyable. Through this support has become quite common to use media resources before explored only for entertainment for educational purposes, among them the TV. The interactive Digital TV (iDTV) provides resources that make possible…

  20. Digital Video as a Personalized Learning Assignment: A Qualitative Study of Student Authored Video Using the ICSDR Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Laurie O.; Cox, Thomas D.

    2018-01-01

    Students within this study followed the ICSDR (Identify, Conceptualize/Connect, Storyboard, Develop, Review/Reflect/Revise) development model to create digital video, as a personalized and active learning assignment. The participants, graduate students in education, indicated that following the ICSDR framework for student-authored video guided…