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Sample records for sensory channel complex

  1. Regulation of ASIC channels by a stomatin/STOML3 complex located in a mobile vesicle pool in sensory neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapatsina, Liudmila; Jira, Julia A; Smith, Ewan St J; Poole, Kate; Kozlenkov, Alexey; Bilbao, Daniel; Lewin, Gary R; Heppenstall, Paul A

    2012-06-01

    A complex of stomatin-family proteins and acid-sensing (proton-gated) ion channel (ASIC) family members participate in sensory transduction in invertebrates and vertebrates. Here, we have examined the role of the stomatin-family protein stomatin-like protein-3 (STOML3) in this process. We demonstrate that STOML3 interacts with stomatin and ASIC subunits and that this occurs in a highly mobile vesicle pool in dorsal root ganglia (DRG) neurons and Chinese hamster ovary cells. We identify a hydrophobic region in the N-terminus of STOML3 that is required for vesicular localization of STOML3 and regulates physical and functional interaction with ASICs. We further characterize STOML3-containing vesicles in DRG neurons and show that they are Rab11-positive, but not part of the early-endosomal, lysosomal or Rab14-dependent biosynthetic compartment. Moreover, uncoupling of vesicles from microtubules leads to incorporation of STOML3 into the plasma membrane and increased acid-gated currents. Thus, STOML3 defines a vesicle pool in which it associates with molecules that have critical roles in sensory transduction. We suggest that the molecular features of this vesicular pool may be characteristic of a 'transducosome' in sensory neurons.

  2. ASIC3 channels in multimodal sensory perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wei-Guang; Xu, Tian-Le

    2011-01-19

    Acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs), which are members of the sodium-selective cation channels belonging to the epithelial sodium channel/degenerin (ENaC/DEG) family, act as membrane-bound receptors for extracellular protons as well as nonproton ligands. At least five ASIC subunits have been identified in mammalian neurons, which form both homotrimeric and heterotrimeric channels. The highly proton sensitive ASIC3 channels are predominantly distributed in peripheral sensory neurons, correlating with their roles in multimodal sensory perception, including nociception, mechanosensation, and chemosensation. Different from other ASIC subunit composing ion channels, ASIC3 channels can mediate a sustained window current in response to mild extracellular acidosis (pH 7.3-6.7), which often occurs accompanied by many sensory stimuli. Furthermore, recent evidence indicates that the sustained component of ASIC3 currents can be enhanced by nonproton ligands including the endogenous metabolite agmatine. In this review, we first summarize the growing body of evidence for the involvement of ASIC3 channels in multimodal sensory perception and then discuss the potential mechanisms underlying ASIC3 activation and mediation of sensory perception, with a special emphasis on its role in nociception. We conclude that ASIC3 activation and modulation by diverse sensory stimuli represent a new avenue for understanding the role of ASIC3 channels in sensory perception. Furthermore, the emerging implications of ASIC3 channels in multiple sensory dysfunctions including nociception allow the development of new pharmacotherapy.

  3. Sodium channels and mammalian sensory mechanotransduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raouf, Ramin; Rugiero, Francois; Kiesewetter, Hannes; Hatch, Rachel; Hummler, Edith; Nassar, Mohammed A; Wang, Fan; Wood, John N

    2012-03-26

    Members of the degenerin/epithelial (DEG/ENaC) sodium channel family are mechanosensors in C elegans, and Nav1.7 and Nav1.8 voltage-gated sodium channel knockout mice have major deficits in mechanosensation. β and γENaC sodium channel subunits are present with acid sensing ion channels (ASICs) in mammalian sensory neurons of the dorsal root ganglia (DRG). The extent to which epithelial or voltage-gated sodium channels are involved in transduction of mechanical stimuli is unclear. Here we show that deleting β and γENaC sodium channels in sensory neurons does not result in mechanosensory behavioural deficits. We had shown previously that Nav1.7/Nav1.8 double knockout mice have major deficits in behavioural responses to noxious mechanical pressure. However, all classes of mechanically activated currents in DRG neurons are unaffected by deletion of the two sodium channels. In contrast, the ability of Nav1.7/Nav1.8 knockout DRG neurons to generate action potentials is compromised with 50% of the small diameter sensory neurons unable to respond to electrical stimulation in vitro. Behavioural deficits in Nav1.7/Nav1.8 knockout mice reflects a failure of action potential propagation in a mechanosensitive set of sensory neurons rather than a loss of primary transduction currents. DEG/ENaC sodium channels are not mechanosensors in mouse sensory neurons.

  4. Sodium channels and mammalian sensory mechanotransduction.

    OpenAIRE

    Raouf, R.; Rugiero, F.; Kiesewetter, H.; Hatch, R.; Hummler, E; Nassar, M. A.; Wang, F.; Wood, J.N.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Members of the degenerin/epithelial (DEG/ENaC) sodium channel family are mechanosensors in C elegans, and Nav1.7 and Nav1.8 voltage-gated sodium channel knockout mice have major deficits in mechanosensation. β and γENaC sodium channel subunits are present with acid sensing ion channels (ASICs) in mammalian sensory neurons of the dorsal root ganglia (DRG). The extent to which epithelial or voltage-gated sodium channels are involved in transduction of mechanical stimuli is u...

  5. Transient receptor potential channels on sensory nerves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eid, S R; Cortright, D N

    2009-01-01

    The somatosensory effects of natural products such as capsaicin, mustard oil, and menthol have been long recognized. Over the last decade, the identification of transient receptor potential (TRP) channels in primary sensory neurons as the targets for these agents has led to an explosion of research into the roles of "thermoTRPs" TRPV1, TRPV2, TRPV3, TRPV4, TRPA1, and TRPM8 in nociception. In concert, through the efforts of many industrial and academic teams, a number of agonists and antagonists of these channels have been discovered, paving the way for a better understanding of sensory biology and, potentially, for novel treatments for diseases.

  6. Optimal Channel Efficiency in a Sensory Network

    CERN Document Server

    Mosqueiro, Thiago S

    2012-01-01

    We show that the entropy of the distribution of avalanche lifetimes in the Kinouchi-Copelli model always achieves a maximum jointly with the dynamic range. This is noteworthy and nontrivial because while the dynamic range is an equilibrium average measure of the sensibility of a sensory system to a stimulus, the entropy of relaxation times is a purely dynamical quantity, independent of the stimulus rate, that can be interpreted as the efficiency of the network seen as a communication channel. The newly found optimization occurs for all topologies we tested, even when the distribution of avalanche lifetimes itself is not a power-law and when the entropy of the size distribution of avalanches is not concomitantly maximized, strongly suggesting that dynamical rules allowing a proper temporal matching of the states of the interacting neurons is the key for achieving good performance in information processing, rather than increasing the number of available units.

  7. Lipids as central modulators of sensory TRP channels.

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    Ciardo, Maria Grazia; Ferrer-Montiel, Antonio

    2017-09-01

    The transient receptor potential (TRP) ion channel family is involved in a diversity of physiological processes including sensory and homeostatic functions, as well as muscle contraction and vasomotor control. Their dysfunction contributes to the etiology of several diseases, being validated as therapeutic targets. These ion channels may be activated by physical or chemical stimuli and their function is highly influenced by signaling molecules activated by extracellular signals. Notably, as integral membrane proteins, lipid molecules also modulate their membrane location and function either by direct interaction with the channel structure or by modulating the physico-chemical properties of the cellular membrane. This lipid-based modulatory effect is being considered an alternative and promising approach to regulate TRP channel dysfunction in diseases. Here, we review the current progress in this exciting field highlighting a complex channel regulation by a large diversity of lipid molecules and suggesting some diseases that may benefit from a membrane lipid therapy. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Membrane Lipid Therapy: Drugs Targeting Biomembranes edited by Pablo V. Escribá. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Optimal channel efficiency in a sensory network

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    Mosqueiro, Thiago S.; Maia, Leonardo P.

    2013-07-01

    Spontaneous neural activity has been increasingly recognized as a subject of key relevance in neuroscience. It exhibits nontrivial spatiotemporal structure reflecting the organization of the underlying neural network and has proved to be closely intertwined with stimulus-induced activity patterns. As an additional contribution in this regard, we report computational studies that strongly suggest that a stimulus-free feature rules the behavior of an important psychophysical measure of the sensibility of a sensory system to a stimulus, the so-called dynamic range. Indeed in this paper we show that the entropy of the distribution of avalanche lifetimes (information efficiency, since it can be interpreted as the efficiency of the network seen as a communication channel) always accompanies the dynamic range in the benchmark model for sensory systems. Specifically, by simulating the Kinouchi-Copelli (KC) model on two broad families of model networks, we generically observed that both quantities always increase or decrease together as functions of the average branching ratio (the control parameter of the KC model) and that the information efficiency typically exhibits critical optimization jointly with the dynamic range (i.e., both quantities are optimized at the same value of that control parameter, that turns out to be the critical point of a nonequilibrium phase transition). In contrast with the practice of taking power laws to identify critical points in most studies describing measured neuronal avalanches, we rely on data collapses as more robust signatures of criticality to claim that critical optimization may happen even when the distribution of avalanche lifetimes is not a power law, as suggested by a recent experiment. Finally, we note that the entropy of the size distribution of avalanches (information capacity) does not always follow the dynamic range and the information efficiency when they are critically optimized, despite being more widely used than the

  9. Methodological considerations to understand the sensory function of TRP channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meseguer, Víctor M; Denlinger, Bristol L; Talavera, Karel

    2011-01-01

    Transient Receptor Potential channels are exquisite molecular transducers of multiple physical and chemical stimuli, hence the raising interest to study their relevance to Sensory Biology. Here we discuss a number of aspects of the biophysical and pharmacological properties of TRP channels, which we consider essential for a clear understanding of their sensory function in vivo. By examining concrete examples extracted from recent literature we illustrate that TRP channel research is a field in motion, and that many established dogmas on biophysical properties, drug specificity and physiological role are continuously reshaped, and sometimes even dismantled.

  10. KCNQ potassium channels in sensory system and neural circuits.

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    Wang, Jing-jing; Li, Yang

    2016-01-01

    M channels, an important regulator of neural excitability, are composed of four subunits of the Kv7 (KCNQ) K(+) channel family. M channels were named as such because their activity was suppressed by stimulation of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors. These channels are of particular interest because they are activated at the subthreshold membrane potentials. Furthermore, neural KCNQ channels are drug targets for the treatments of epilepsy and a variety of neurological disorders, including chronic and neuropathic pain, deafness, and mental illness. This review will update readers on the roles of KCNQ channels in the sensory system and neural circuits as well as discuss their respective mechanisms and the implications for physiology and medicine. We will also consider future perspectives and the development of additional pharmacological models, such as seizure, stroke, pain and mental illness, which work in combination with drug-design targeting of KCNQ channels. These models will hopefully deepen our understanding of KCNQ channels and provide general therapeutic prospects of related channelopathies.

  11. Regulation/modulation of sensory neuron sodium channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chahine, Mohamed; O'Leary, Michael E

    2014-01-01

    The pseudounipolar sensory neurons of the dorsal root ganglia (DRG) give rise to peripheral branches that convert thermal, mechanical, and chemical stimuli into electrical signals that are transmitted via central branches to the spinal cord. These neurons express unique combinations of tetrodotoxin-sensitive (TTX-S) and tetrodotoxin-resistant (TTX-R) Na(+) channels that contribute to the resting membrane potential, action potential threshold, and regulate neuronal firing frequency. The small-diameter neurons (35 μm) are typically low-threshold A-fibers that predominately express TTX-S Na(+) currents. Peripheral nerve damage, inflammation, and metabolic diseases alter the expression and function of these Na(+) channels leading to increases in neuronal excitability and pain. The Na(+) channels expressed in these neurons are the target of intracellular signaling cascades that regulate the trafficking, cell surface expression, and gating properties of these channels. Post-translational regulation of Na(+) channels by protein kinases (PKA, PKC, MAPK) alter the expression and function of the channels. Injury-induced changes in these signaling pathways have been linked to sensory neuron hyperexcitability and pain. This review examines the signaling pathways and regulatory mechanisms that modulate the voltage-gated Na(+) channels of sensory neurons.

  12. [Molecular mechanisms of TRP channels in mechano-sensory transduction].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Wen-juan; Huang, Gui-fang; Kang, Li-jun

    2012-03-01

    Channels from the TRP superfamily have essential roles in a wide variety of sensory transductions, especially in mechano-sensation, such as hearing, touch and mechanical pain. TRP channels are also implicated in major channelopathies, including deafness, chronic pain, autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) and ventricular hypertrophy. As the leading candidates for mechano-sensitive channels, some TRP channels appear to be mechano-receptor, which can be activated by mechanical forces directly, such as C. elegans TRPN homolog TRP-4; whereas others may act as signal modulators, receiving and amplifying signals indirectly. This review is to introduce the function of TRPs in mechano-sensory transduction and to discuss the underlying molecular mechanisms.

  13. Are Sensory TRP Channels Biological Alarms for Lipid Peroxidation?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seung-In Choi

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Oxidative stress induces numerous biological problems. Lipid oxidation and peroxidation appear to be important steps by which exposure to oxidative stress leads the body to a disease state. For its protection, the body has evolved to respond to and eliminate peroxidation products through the acquisition of binding proteins, reducing and conjugating enzymes, and excretion systems. During the past decade, researchers have identified a group of ion channel molecules that are activated by oxidized lipids: transient receptor potential (TRP channels expressed in sensory neurons. These ion channels are fundamentally detectors and signal converters for body-damaging environments such as heat and cold temperatures, mechanical attacks, and potentially toxic substances. When messages initiated by TRP activation arrive at the brain, we perceive pain, which results in our preparing defensive responses. Excessive activation of the sensory neuronal TRP channels upon prolonged stimulations sometimes deteriorates the inflammatory state of damaged tissues by promoting neuropeptide release from expresser neurons. These same paradigms may also work for pathologic changes in the internal lipid environment upon exposure to oxidative stress. Here, we provide an overview of the role of TRP channels and oxidized lipid connections during abnormally increased oxidative signaling, and consider the sensory mechanism of TRP detection as an alert system.

  14. Are sensory TRP channels biological alarms for lipid peroxidation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Seung-In; Yoo, Sungjae; Lim, Ji Yeon; Hwang, Sun Wook

    2014-09-17

    Oxidative stress induces numerous biological problems. Lipid oxidation and peroxidation appear to be important steps by which exposure to oxidative stress leads the body to a disease state. For its protection, the body has evolved to respond to and eliminate peroxidation products through the acquisition of binding proteins, reducing and conjugating enzymes, and excretion systems. During the past decade, researchers have identified a group of ion channel molecules that are activated by oxidized lipids: transient receptor potential (TRP) channels expressed in sensory neurons. These ion channels are fundamentally detectors and signal converters for body-damaging environments such as heat and cold temperatures, mechanical attacks, and potentially toxic substances. When messages initiated by TRP activation arrive at the brain, we perceive pain, which results in our preparing defensive responses. Excessive activation of the sensory neuronal TRP channels upon prolonged stimulations sometimes deteriorates the inflammatory state of damaged tissues by promoting neuropeptide release from expresser neurons. These same paradigms may also work for pathologic changes in the internal lipid environment upon exposure to oxidative stress. Here, we provide an overview of the role of TRP channels and oxidized lipid connections during abnormally increased oxidative signaling, and consider the sensory mechanism of TRP detection as an alert system.

  15. Nocistatin sensitizes TRPA1 channels in peripheral sensory neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avenali, Luca; Abate Fulas, Oli; Sondermann, Julia; Narayanan, Pratibha; Gomez-Varela, David; Schmidt, Manuela

    2017-01-02

    The ability of sensory neurons to detect potentially harmful stimuli relies on specialized molecular signal detectors such as transient receptor potential (TRP) A1 ion channels. TRPA1 is critically implicated in vertebrate nociception and different pain states. Furthermore, TRPA1 channels are subject to extensive modulation and regulation - processes which consequently affect nociceptive signaling. Here we show that the neuropeptide Nocistatin sensitizes TRPA1-dependent calcium influx upon application of the TRPA1 agonist mustard oil (MO) in cultured sensory neurons of dorsal root ganglia (DRG). Interestingly, TRPV1-mediated cellular calcium responses are unaffected by Nocistatin. Furthermore, Nocistatin-induced TRPA1-sensitization is likely independent of the Nocistatin binding partner 4-Nitrophenylphosphatase domain and non-neuronal SNAP25-like protein homolog 1 (NIPSNAP1) as assessed by siRNA-mediated knockdown in DRG cultures. In conclusion, we uncovered the sensitization of TRPA1 by Nocistatin, which may represent a novel mechanism how Nocistatin can modulate pain.

  16. Nociceptive TRP Channels: Sensory Detectors and Transducers in Multiple Pain Pathologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mickle, Aaron D; Shepherd, Andrew J; Mohapatra, Durga P

    2016-11-14

    Specialized receptors belonging to the transient receptor potential (TRP) family of ligand-gated ion channels constitute the critical detectors and transducers of pain-causing stimuli. Nociceptive TRP channels are predominantly expressed by distinct subsets of sensory neurons of the peripheral nervous system. Several of these TRP channels are also expressed in neurons of the central nervous system, and in non-neuronal cells that communicate with sensory nerves. Nociceptive TRPs are activated by specific physico-chemical stimuli to provide the excitatory trigger in neurons. In addition, decades of research has identified a large number of immune and neuromodulators as mediators of nociceptive TRP channel activation during injury, inflammatory and other pathological conditions. These findings have led to aggressive targeting of TRP channels for the development of new-generation analgesics. This review summarizes the complex activation and/or modulation of nociceptive TRP channels under pathophysiological conditions, and how these changes underlie acute and chronic pain conditions. Furthermore, development of small-molecule antagonists for several TRP channels as analgesics, and the positive and negative outcomes of these drugs in clinical trials are discussed. Understanding the diverse functional and modulatory properties of nociceptive TRP channels is critical to function-based drug targeting for the development of evidence-based and efficacious new generation analgesics.

  17. Nociceptive TRP Channels: Sensory Detectors and Transducers in Multiple Pain Pathologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aaron D. Mickle

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Specialized receptors belonging to the transient receptor potential (TRP family of ligand-gated ion channels constitute the critical detectors and transducers of pain-causing stimuli. Nociceptive TRP channels are predominantly expressed by distinct subsets of sensory neurons of the peripheral nervous system. Several of these TRP channels are also expressed in neurons of the central nervous system, and in non-neuronal cells that communicate with sensory nerves. Nociceptive TRPs are activated by specific physico-chemical stimuli to provide the excitatory trigger in neurons. In addition, decades of research has identified a large number of immune and neuromodulators as mediators of nociceptive TRP channel activation during injury, inflammatory and other pathological conditions. These findings have led to aggressive targeting of TRP channels for the development of new-generation analgesics. This review summarizes the complex activation and/or modulation of nociceptive TRP channels under pathophysiological conditions, and how these changes underlie acute and chronic pain conditions. Furthermore, development of small-molecule antagonists for several TRP channels as analgesics, and the positive and negative outcomes of these drugs in clinical trials are discussed. Understanding the diverse functional and modulatory properties of nociceptive TRP channels is critical to function-based drug targeting for the development of evidence-based and efficacious new generation analgesics.

  18. Opening of pannexin- and connexin-based channels increases the excitability of nodose ganglion sensory neurons.

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    Retamal, Mauricio A; Alcayaga, Julio; Verdugo, Christian A; Bultynck, Geert; Leybaert, Luc; Sáez, Pablo J; Fernández, Ricardo; León, Luis E; Sáez, Juan C

    2014-01-01

    Satellite glial cells (SGCs) are the main glia in sensory ganglia. They surround neuronal bodies and form a cap that prevents the formation of chemical or electrical synapses between neighboring neurons. SGCs have been suggested to establish bidirectional paracrine communication with sensory neurons. However, the molecular mechanism involved in this cellular communication is unknown. In the central nervous system (CNS), astrocytes present connexin43 (Cx43) hemichannels and pannexin1 (Panx1) channels, and the opening of these channels allows the release of signal molecules, such as ATP and glutamate. We propose that these channels could play a role in glia-neuron communication in sensory ganglia. Therefore, we studied the expression and function of Cx43 and Panx1 in rat and mouse nodose-petrosal-jugular complexes (NPJcs) using confocal immunofluorescence, molecular and electrophysiological techniques. Cx43 and Panx1 were detected in SGCs and in sensory neurons, respectively. In the rat and mouse, the electrical activity of vagal nerve increased significantly after nodose neurons were exposed to a Ca(2+)/Mg(2+)-free solution, a condition that increases the open probability of Cx hemichannels. This response was partially mimicked by a cell-permeable peptide corresponding to the last 10 amino acids of Cx43 (TAT-Cx43CT). Enhanced neuronal activity was reduced by Cx hemichannel, Panx1 channel and P2X7 receptor blockers. Moreover, the role of Panx1 was confirmed in NPJc, because in those from Panx1 knockout mice showed a reduced increase of neuronal activity induced by Ca(2+)/Mg(2+)-free extracellular conditions. The data suggest that Cx hemichannels and Panx channels serve as paracrine communication pathways between SGCs and neurons by modulating the excitability of sensory neurons.

  19. Trafficking regulates the subcellular distribution of voltage-gated sodium channels in primary sensory neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Lan

    2015-09-30

    Voltage-gated sodium channels (Navs) comprise at least nine pore-forming α subunits. Of these, Nav1.6, Nav1.7, Nav1.8 and Nav1.9 are the most frequently studied in primary sensory neurons located in the dorsal root ganglion and are mainly localized to the cytoplasm. A large pool of intracellular Navs raises the possibility that changes in Nav trafficking could alter channel function. The molecular mediators of Nav trafficking mainly consist of signals within the Navs themselves, interacting proteins and extracellular factors. The surface expression of Navs is achieved by escape from the endoplasmic reticulum and proteasome degradation, forward trafficking and plasma membrane anchoring, and it is also regulated by channel phosphorylation and ubiquitination in primary sensory neurons. Axonal transport and localization of Navs in afferent fibers involves the motor protein KIF5B and scaffold proteins, including contactin and PDZ domain containing 2. Localization of Nav1.6 to the nodes of Ranvier in myelinated fibers of primary sensory neurons requires node formation and the submembrane cytoskeletal protein complex. These findings inform our understanding of the molecular and cellular mechanisms underlying Nav trafficking in primary sensory neurons.

  20. Redox and Nitric Oxide-Mediated Regulation of Sensory Neuron Ion Channel Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (ROS and RNS, respectively) can intimately control neuronal excitability and synaptic strength by regulating the function of many ion channels. In peripheral sensory neurons, such regulation contributes towards the control of somatosensory processing; therefore, understanding the mechanisms of such regulation is necessary for the development of new therapeutic strategies and for the treatment of sensory dysfunctions, such as chronic pain. Recent Advances: Tremendous progress in deciphering nitric oxide (NO) and ROS signaling in the nervous system has been made in recent decades. This includes the recognition of these molecules as important second messengers and the elucidation of their metabolic pathways and cellular targets. Mounting evidence suggests that these targets include many ion channels which can be directly or indirectly modulated by ROS and NO. However, the mechanisms specific to sensory neurons are still poorly understood. This review will therefore summarize recent findings that highlight the complex nature of the signaling pathways involved in redox/NO regulation of sensory neuron ion channels and excitability; references to redox mechanisms described in other neuron types will be made where necessary. Critical Issues: The complexity and interplay within the redox, NO, and other gasotransmitter modulation of protein function are still largely unresolved. Issues of specificity and intracellular localization of these signaling cascades will also be addressed. Future Directions: Since our understanding of ROS and RNS signaling in sensory neurons is limited, there is a multitude of future directions; one of the most important issues for further study is the establishment of the exact roles that these signaling pathways play in pain processing and the translation of this understanding into new therapeutics. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 22, 486–504. PMID:24735331

  1. Transient receptor potential cation channels in visceral sensory pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackshaw, L Ashley

    2014-05-01

    The extensive literature on this subject is in direct contrast to the limited range of clinical uses for ligands of the transient receptor potential cation channels (TRPs) in diseases of the viscera. TRPV1 is the most spectacular example of this imbalance, as it is in other systems, but it is nonetheless the only TRP target that is currently targeted clinically in bladder sensory dysfunction. It is not clear why this discrepancy exists, but a likely answer is in the promiscuity of TRPs as sensors and transducers for environmental mechanical and chemical stimuli. This review first describes the different sensory pathways from the viscera, and on which nociceptive and non-nociceptive neurones within these pathways TRPs are expressed. They not only fulfil roles as both mechano- and chemo-sensors on visceral afferents, but also form an effector mechanism for cell activation after activation of GPCR and cytokine receptors. Their role may be markedly changed in diseased states, including chronic pain and inflammation. Pain presents the most obvious potential for further development of therapeutic interventions targeted at TRPs, but forms of inflammation are emerging as likely to benefit also. However, despite much basic research, we are still at the beginning of exploring such potential in visceral sensory pathways. © 2014 The British Pharmacological Society.

  2. Patterned electrical activity modulates sodium channel expression in sensory neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Joshua P; Tendi, Elisabetta A; Dib-Hajj, Sulayman D; Fields, R Douglas; Waxman, Stephen G

    2003-10-15

    Peripheral nerve injury induces changes in the level of gene expression for sodium channels Nav1.3, Nav1.8, and Nav1.9 within dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons, which may contribute to the development of hyperexcitability, ectopic neuronal discharge, and neuropathic pain. The mechanism of this change in sodium channel expression is unclear. Decreased availability of neurotrophic factors following axotomy contributes to these changes in gene transcription, but the question of whether changes in intrinsic neuronal activity levels alone can trigger changes in the expression of these sodium channels has not been addressed. We examined the effect of electrical stimulation on the expression of Nav1.3, Nav1.8, and Nav1.9 by using cultured embryonic mouse sensory neurons under conditions in which nerve growth factor (NGF) was not limiting. Expression of Nav1.3 was not significantly changed following stimulation. In contrast, we observed activity-dependent down-regulation of Nav1.8 and Nav1.9 mRNA and protein levels after stimulation, as demonstrated by quantitative polymerase chain reaction and immunocytochemistry. These results show that a change in neuronal activity can alter the expression of sodium channel genes in a subtype-specific manner, via a mechanism independent of NGF withdrawal. Copyright 2003 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  3. The pharmacology of voltage-gated sodium channels in sensory neurones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Docherty, Reginald J; Farmer, Clare E

    2009-01-01

    Voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSCs) are vital for the normal functioning of most excitable cells. At least nine distinct functional subtypes of VGSCs are recognized, corresponding to nine genes for their pore-forming alpha-subunits. These have different developmental expression patterns, different tissue distributions in the adult and are differentially regulated at the cellular level by receptor-coupled cell signalling systems. Unsurprisingly, VGSC blockers are found to be useful as drugs in diverse clinical applications where excessive excitability of tissue leads to pathological dysfunction, e.g. epilepsy or cardiac tachyarrhythmias. The effects of most clinically useful VGSC blockers are use-dependent, i.e. their efficacy depends on channel activity. In addition, many natural toxins have been discovered that interact with VGSCs in complex ways and they have been used as experimental probes to study the structure and function of the channels and to better understand how drugs interact with the channels. Here we have attempted to summarize the properties of VGSCs in sensory neurones, discuss how they are regulated by cell signalling systems and we have considered briefly current concepts of their physiological function. We discuss in detail how drugs and toxins interact with archetypal VGSCs and where possible consider how they act on VGSCs in peripheral sensory neurones. Increasingly, drugs that block VGSCs are being used as systemic analgesic agents in chronic pain syndromes, but the full potential for VGSC blockers in this indication is yet to be realized and other applications in sensory dysfunction are also possible. Drugs targeting VGSC subtypes in sensory neurones are likely to provide novel systemic analgesics that are tissue-specific and perhaps even disease-specific, providing much-needed novel therapeutic approaches for the relief of chronic pain.

  4. Sensory nerve terminal mitochondrial dysfunction activates airway sensory nerves via transient receptor potential (TRP) channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nesuashvili, Lika; Hadley, Stephen H; Bahia, Parmvir K; Taylor-Clark, Thomas E

    2013-05-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction and subsequent oxidative stress has been reported for a variety of cell types in inflammatory diseases. Given the abundance of mitochondria at the peripheral terminals of sensory nerves and the sensitivity of transient receptor potential (TRP) ankyrin 1 (A1) and TRP vanilloid 1 (V1) to reactive oxygen species (ROS) and their downstream products of lipid peroxidation, we investigated the effect of nerve terminal mitochondrial dysfunction on airway sensory nerve excitability. Here we show that mitochondrial dysfunction evoked by acute treatment with antimycin A (mitochondrial complex III Qi site inhibitor) preferentially activated TRPA1-expressing "nociceptor-like" mouse bronchopulmonary C-fibers. Action potential discharge was reduced by the TRPA1 antagonist HC-030031. Inhibition of TRPV1 further reduced C-fiber activation. In mouse dissociated vagal neurons, antimycin A induced Ca(2+) influx that was significantly reduced by pharmacological inhibition or genetic knockout of either TRPA1 or TRPV1. Inhibition of both TRPA1 and TRPV1 was required to abolish antimycin A-induced Ca(2+) influx in vagal neurons. Using an HEK293 cell expression system, antimycin A induced concentration-dependent activation of both hTRPA1 and hTRPV1 but failed to activate nontransfected cells. Myxothiazol (complex III Qo site inhibitor) inhibited antimycin A-induced TRPA1 activation, as did the reducing agent dithiothreitol. Scavenging of both superoxide and hydrogen peroxide inhibited TRPA1 activation following mitochondrial modulation. In conclusion, we present evidence that acute mitochondrial dysfunction activates airway sensory nerves preferentially via TRPA1 through the actions of mitochondrially-derived ROS. This represents a novel mechanism by which inflammation may be transduced into nociceptive electrical signaling.

  5. Endogenous lipid-derived ligands for sensory TRP ion channels and their pain modulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bang, Sangsu; Yoo, Sungjae; Oh, Uhtaek; Hwang, Sun Wook

    2010-10-01

    Environmental or internal noxious stimuli excite the primary sensory nerves in our body. The sensory nerves relay these signals by electrical discharges to the brain, leading to pain perception. Six transient receptor potential (TRP) ion channels are expressed in the sensory nerve terminals and play a crucial role in sensing diverse noxious stimuli. Cation influx through activated TRP ion channels depolarizes the plasma membrane, resulting in neuronal excitation and pain. Natural and synthetic compounds have been found to act on these sensory TRP channels to alter the nociception. Evidence is growing that lipidergic substances are also cable of modifying TRP ion channel activity by direct binding. Here, we focus on endogenously generated lipids that modulate the sensory TRP activities. Unsaturated fatty acids or their metabolites via lipoxygenase, cyclooxygenase or epoxygenase are able to modulate (activate, inhibit or potentiate) the function of specific TRPs. Isoprene lipids, diacylglycerol, resolvin, and lysophospholipids also show distinct activities on sensory TRP channels. Outcomes caused by the interactions between sensory TRPs and lipid ligands are also discussed. The knowledge we collected here implicates that information on lipidergic ligands may contribute to our understanding of peripheral pain mechanism and provide an opportunity to design novel therapeutic strategies.

  6. Receptors, channels, and signalling in the urothelial sensory system in the bladder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merrill, Liana; Gonzalez, Eric J; Girard, Beatrice M; Vizzard, Margaret A

    2016-04-01

    The storage and periodic elimination of urine, termed micturition, requires a complex neural control system to coordinate the activities of the urinary bladder, urethra, and urethral sphincters. At the level of the lumbosacral spinal cord, lower urinary tract reflex mechanisms are modulated by supraspinal controls with mechanosensory input from the urothelium, resulting in regulation of bladder contractile activity. The specific identity of the mechanical sensor is not yet known, but considerable interest exists in the contribution of transient receptor potential (TRP) channels to the mechanosensory functions of the urothelium. The sensory, transduction, and signalling properties of the urothelium can influence adjacent urinary bladder tissues including the suburothelial nerve plexus, interstitial cells of Cajal, and detrusor smooth muscle cells. Diverse stimuli, including those that activate TRP channels expressed by the urothelium, can influence urothelial release of chemical mediators (such as ATP). Changes to the urothelium are associated with a number of bladder pathologies that underlie urinary bladder dysfunction. Urothelial receptor and/or ion channel expression and the release of signalling molecules (such as ATP and nitric oxide) can be altered with bladder disease, neural injury, target organ inflammation, or psychogenic stress. Urothelial receptors and channels represent novel targets for potential therapies that are intended to modulate micturition function or bladder sensation.

  7. Receptors, channels, and signalling in the urothelial sensory system in the bladder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merrill, Liana; Gonzalez, Eric J.; Girard, Beatrice M.; Vizzard, Margaret A.

    2017-01-01

    The storage and periodic elimination of urine, termed micturition, requires a complex neural control system to coordinate the activities of the urinary bladder, urethra, and urethral sphincters. At the level of the lumbosacral spinal cord, lower urinary tract reflex mechanisms are modulated by supraspinal controls with mechanosensory input from the urothelium, resulting in regulation of bladder contractile activity. The specific identity of the mechanical sensor is not yet known, but considerable interest exists in the contribution of transient receptor potential (TRP) channels to the mechanosensory functions of the urothelium. The sensory, transduction, and signalling properties of the urothelium can influence adjacent urinary bladder tissues including the suburothelial nerve plexus, interstitial cells of Cajal, and detrusor smooth muscle cells. Diverse stimuli, including those that activate TRP channels expressed by the urothelium, can influence urothelial release of chemical mediators (such as ATP). Changes to the urothelium are associated with a number of bladder pathologies that underlie urinary bladder dysfunction. Urothelial receptor and/or ion channel expression and the release of signalling molecules (such as ATP and nitric oxide) can be altered with bladder disease, neural injury, target organ inflammation, or psychogenic stress. Urothelial receptors and channels represent novel targets for potential therapies that are intended to modulate micturition function or bladder sensation. PMID:26926246

  8. BKCa channels expressed in sensory neurons modulate inflammatory pain in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Ruirui; Lukowski, Robert; Sausbier, Matthias; Zhang, Dong Dong; Sisignano, Marco; Schuh, Claus-Dieter; Kuner, Rohini; Ruth, Peter; Geisslinger, Gerd; Schmidtko, Achim

    2014-03-01

    Large conductance calcium-activated potassium (BKCa) channels are important regulators of neuronal excitability. Although there is electrophysiological evidence for BKCa channel expression in sensory neurons, their in vivo functions in pain processing have not been fully defined. Using a specific antibody, we demonstrate here that BKCa channels are expressed in subpopulations of peptidergic and nonpeptidergic nociceptors. To test a functional association of BKCa channel activity in sensory neurons with particular pain modalities, we generated mice in which BKCa channels are ablated specifically from sensory neurons and analyzed their behavior in various models of pain. Mutant mice showed increased nociceptive behavior in models of persistent inflammatory pain. However, their behavior in models of neuropathic or acute nociceptive pain was normal. Moreover, systemic administration of the BKCa channel opener, NS1619, inhibited persistent inflammatory pain. Our investigations provide in vivo evidence that BKCa channels expressed in sensory neurons exert inhibitory control on sensory input in inflammatory pain states. Copyright © 2013 International Association for the Study of Pain. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. A transient receptor potential ion channel in Chlamydomonas shares key features with sensory transduction-associated TRP channels in mammals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arias-Darraz, Luis; Cabezas, Deny; Colenso, Charlotte K; Alegría-Arcos, Melissa; Bravo-Moraga, Felipe; Varas-Concha, Ignacio; Almonacid, Daniel E; Madrid, Rodolfo; Brauchi, Sebastian

    2015-01-01

    Sensory modalities are essential for navigating through an ever-changing environment. From insects to mammals, transient receptor potential (TRP) channels are known mediators for cellular sensing. Chlamydomonas reinhardtii is a motile single-celled freshwater green alga that is guided by photosensory, mechanosensory, and chemosensory cues. In this type of alga, sensory input is first detected by membrane receptors located in the cell body and then transduced to the beating cilia by membrane depolarization. Although TRP channels seem to be absent in plants, C. reinhardtii possesses genomic sequences encoding TRP proteins. Here, we describe the cloning and characterization of a C. reinhardtii version of a TRP channel sharing key features present in mammalian TRP channels associated with sensory transduction. In silico sequence-structure analysis unveiled the modular design of TRP channels, and electrophysiological experiments conducted on Human Embryonic Kidney-293T cells expressing the Cr-TRP1 clone showed that many of the core functional features of metazoan TRP channels are present in Cr-TRP1, suggesting that basic TRP channel gating characteristics evolved early in the history of eukaryotes. © 2015 American Society of Plant Biologists. All rights reserved.

  10. Dynamic expression of the TRPM subgroup of ion channels in developing mouse sensory neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staaf, Susanne; Franck, Marina C M; Marmigère, Frédéric; Mattsson, Jan P; Ernfors, Patrik

    2010-01-01

    Despite the significance of transient receptor potential (TRP) channels in sensory physiology, little is known of the expression and developmental regulation of the TRPM (melastatin) subgroup in sensory neurons. In order to find out if the eight TRPM subgroup members (TRPM1-TRPM8) have a possible role in the sensory nervous system, we characterized the developmental regulation of their expression in mouse dorsal root ganglion (DRG) from embryonic (E) day 12 to adulthood. Transcripts for all channels except for TRPM1 were detected in lumbar and thoracic DRG and in nodose ganglion (NG) with distinguishable expression patterns from E12 until adult. For most channels, the expression increased from E14 to adult with the exception of TRPM5, which displayed transient high levels during embryonic and early postnatal stages. Cellular localization of TRPM8 mRNA was found only in a limited subset of very small diameter neurons distinct in size from other populations. These neurons did not bind isolectin B4 (IB4) and expressed neither the neuropeptide calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) nor neurofilament (NF)200. This suggests that TRPM8(+) thermoreceptive sensory neurons fall into a separate group of very small sized neurons distinct from peptidergic and IB4(+) subtypes of sensory neurons. Our results, showing the expression and dynamic regulation of TRPM channels during development, indicate that many TRPM subfamily members could participate during nervous system development and in the adult by determining distinct physiological properties of sensory neurons.

  11. The complex channel networks of bone structure

    CERN Document Server

    Costa, Luciano da Fontoura; Beletti, Marcelo E

    2006-01-01

    Bone structure in mammals involves a complex network of channels (Havers and Volkmann channels) required to nourish the bone marrow cells. This work describes how three-dimensional reconstructions of such systems can be obtained and represented in terms of complex networks. Three important findings are reported: (i) the fact that the channel branching density resembles a power law implies the existence of distribution hubs; (ii) the conditional node degree density indicates a clear tendency of connection between nodes with degrees 2 and 4; and (iii) the application of the recently introduced concept of hierarchical clustering coefficient allows the identification of typical scales of channel redistribution. A series of important biological insights is drawn and discussed

  12. The neural circuits and sensory channels mediating harsh touch sensation in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wei; Kang, Lijun; Piggott, Beverly J; Feng, Zhaoyang; Xu, X Z Shawn

    2011-01-01

    Most animals can distinguish two distinct types of touch stimuli: gentle (innocuous) and harsh (noxious/painful) touch, however, the underlying mechanisms are not well understood. Caenorhabditis elegans is a useful model for the study of gentle touch sensation. However, little is known about harsh touch sensation in this organism. Here we characterize harsh touch sensation in C. elegans. We show that C. elegans exhibits differential behavioural responses to harsh touch and gentle touch. Laser ablations identify distinct sets of sensory neurons and interneurons required for harsh touch sensation at different body segments. Optogenetic stimulation of the circuitry can drive behaviour. Patch-clamp recordings reveal that TRP family and amiloride-sensitive Na(+) channels mediate touch-evoked currents in different sensory neurons. Our work identifies the neural circuits and characterizes the sensory channels mediating harsh touch sensation in C. elegans, establishing it as a genetic model for studying this sensory modality.

  13. Sensory functions for degenerin/epithelial sodium channels (DEG/ENaC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Shahar, Yehuda

    2011-01-01

    All animals use a sophisticated array of receptor proteins to sense their external and internal environments. Major advances have been made in recent years in understanding the molecular and genetic bases for sensory transduction in diverse modalities, indicating that both metabotropic and ionotropic pathways are important in sensory functions. Here, I review the historical background and recent advances in understanding the roles of a relatively newly discovered family of receptors, the degenerin/epithelial sodium channels (DEG/ENaC). These animal-specific cation channels show a remarkable sequence and functional diversity in different species and seem to exert their functions in diverse sensory modalities. Functions for DEG/ENaC channels have been implicated in mechanosensation as well as chemosensory transduction pathways. In spite of overall sequence diversity, all family members share a unique protein topology that includes just two transmembrane domains and an unusually large and highly structured extracellular domain, that seem to be essential for both their mechanical and chemical sensory functions. This review will discuss many of the recent discoveries and controversies associated with sensory function of DEG/ENaC channels in both vertebrate and invertebrate model systems, covering the role of family members in taste, mechanosensation, and pain. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Oxidation of a potassium channel causes progressive sensory function loss during aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Shi-Qing; Sesti, Federico

    2009-05-01

    Potassium channels are key regulators of neuronal excitability. Here we show that oxidation of the K(+) channel KVS-1 during aging causes sensory function loss in Caenorhabditis elegans and that protection of this channel from oxidation preserves neuronal function. Chemotaxis, a function controlled by KVS-1, was significantly impaired in worms exposed to oxidizing agents, but only moderately affected in worms harboring an oxidation-resistant KVS-1 mutant (C113S). In aging C113S transgenic worms, the effects of free radical accumulation were significantly attenuated compared to those in wild type. Electrophysiological analyses showed that both reactive oxygen species (ROS) accumulation during aging and acute exposure to oxidizing agents acted primarily to alter the excitability of the neurons that mediate chemotaxis. Together, these findings establish a pivotal role for ROS-mediated oxidation of voltage-gated K(+) channels in sensorial decline during aging in invertebrates.

  15. Pyrethroids inhibit K2P channels and activate sensory neurons: basis of insecticide-induced paraesthesias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castellanos, Aida; Andres, Alba; Bernal, Laura; Callejo, Gerard; Comes, Nuria; Gual, Arcadi; Giblin, Jonathan P; Roza, Carolina; Gasull, Xavier

    2017-09-25

    Pyrethroid insecticides are widely used for pest control in agriculture or in human public health commonly as a topical treatment for scabies and head lice. Exposure to pyrethroids such as permethrin or tetramethrin (TM) causes sensory alterations such as transient pain, burning, stinging sensations, and paraesthesias. Despite the well-known effects of pyrethroids on sodium channels, actions on other channels that control sensory neuron excitability are less studied. Given the role of 2-pore domain potassium (K2P) channels in modulating sensory neuron excitability and firing, both in physiological and pathological conditions, we examined the effect of pyrethroids on K2P channels mainly expressed in sensory neurons. Through electrophysiological and calcium imaging experiments, we show that a high percentage of TM-responding neurons were nociceptors, which were also activated by TRPA1 and/or TRPV1 agonists. This pyrethroid also activated and enhanced the excitability of peripheral saphenous nerve fibers. Pyrethroids produced a significant inhibition of native TRESK, TRAAK, TREK-1, and TREK-2 currents. Similar effects were found in transfected HEK293 cells. At the behavioral level, intradermal TM injection in the mouse paw produced nocifensive responses and caused mechanical allodynia, demonstrating that the effects seen on nociceptors in culture lead to pain-associated behaviors in vivo. In TRESK knockout mice, pain-associated behaviors elicited by TM were enhanced, providing further evidence for a role of this channel in preventing excessive neuronal activation. Our results indicate that inhibition of K2P channels facilitates sensory neuron activation and increases their excitability. These effects contribute to the generation of paraesthesias and pain after pyrethroid exposure.This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-Non Commercial-No Derivatives License 4.0 (CCBY-NC-ND), where it is permissible to download and

  16. Pungent products from garlic activate the sensory ion channel TRPA1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bautista, Diana M.; Movahed, Pouya; Hinman, Andrew; Axelsson, Helena E.; Sterner, Olov; Högestätt, Edward D.; Julius, David; Jordt, Sven-Eric; Zygmunt, Peter M.

    2005-01-01

    Garlic belongs to the Allium family of plants that produce organosulfur compounds, such as allicin and diallyl disulfide (DADS), which account for their pungency and spicy aroma. Many health benefits have been ascribed to Allium extracts, including hypotensive and vasorelaxant activities. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying these effects remain unknown. Intriguingly, allicin and DADS share structural similarities with allyl isothiocyanate, the pungent ingredient in wasabi and other mustard plants that induces pain and inflammation by activating TRPA1, an excitatory ion channel on primary sensory neurons of the pain pathway. Here we show that allicin and DADS excite an allyl isothiocyanate-sensitive subpopulation of sensory neurons and induce vasodilation by activating capsaicin-sensitive perivascular sensory nerve endings. Moreover, allicin and DADS activate the cloned TRPA1 channel when expressed in heterologous systems. These and other results suggest that garlic excites sensory neurons primarily through activation of TRPA1. Thus different plant genera, including Allium and Brassica, have developed evolutionary convergent strategies that target TRPA1 channels on sensory nerve endings to achieve chemical deterrence. PMID:16103371

  17. Identification of specific sensory neuron populations for study of expressed ion channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramachandra, Renuka; McGrew, Stephanie; Elmslie, Keith

    2013-12-24

    Sensory neurons transmit signals from various parts of the body to the central nervous system. The soma for these neurons are located in the dorsal root ganglia that line the spinal column. Understanding the receptors and channels expressed by these sensory afferent neurons could lead to novel therapies for disease. The initial step is to identify the specific subset of sensory neurons of interest. Here we describe a method to identify afferent neurons innervating the muscles by retrograde labeling using a fluorescent dye DiI (1,1'-dioctadecyl-3,3,3',3'-tetramethylindocarbocyanine perchlorate). Understanding the contribution of ion channels to excitation of muscle afferents could help to better control excessive excitability induced by certain disease states such as peripheral vascular disease or heart failure. We used two approaches to identify the voltage dependent ion channels expressed by these neurons, patch clamp electrophysiology and immunocytochemistry. While electrophysiology plus pharmacological blockers can identify functional ion channel types, we used immunocytochemistry to identify channels for which specific blockers were unavailable and to better understand the ion channel distribution pattern in the cell population. These techniques can be applied to other areas of the nervous system to study specific neuronal groups.

  18. Transient receptor potential ion channels in primary sensory neurons as targets for novel analgesics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sousa-Valente, J; Andreou, A P; Urban, L; Nagy, I

    2014-01-01

    The last decade has witnessed an explosion in novel findings relating to the molecules involved in mediating the sensation of pain in humans. Transient receptor potential (TRP) ion channels emerged as the greatest group of molecules involved in the transduction of various physical stimuli into neuronal signals in primary sensory neurons, as well as, in the development of pain. Here, we review the role of TRP ion channels in primary sensory neurons in the development of pain associated with peripheral pathologies and possible strategies to translate preclinical data into the development of effective new analgesics. Based on available evidence, we argue that nociception-related TRP channels on primary sensory neurons provide highly valuable targets for the development of novel analgesics and that, in order to reduce possible undesirable side effects, novel analgesics should prevent the translocation from the cytoplasm to the cell membrane and the sensitization of the channels rather than blocking the channel pore or binding sites for exogenous or endogenous activators. LINKED ARTICLES This article is part of a themed section on the pharmacology of TRP channels. To view the other articles in this section visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2014.171.issue-10 PMID:24283624

  19. Slack channels expressed in sensory neurons control neuropathic pain in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Ruirui; Bausch, Anne E; Kallenborn-Gerhardt, Wiebke; Stoetzer, Carsten; Debruin, Natasja; Ruth, Peter; Geisslinger, Gerd; Leffler, Andreas; Lukowski, Robert; Schmidtko, Achim

    2015-01-21

    Slack (Slo2.2) is a sodium-activated potassium channel that regulates neuronal firing activities and patterns. Previous studies identified Slack in sensory neurons, but its contribution to acute and chronic pain in vivo remains elusive. Here we generated global and sensory neuron-specific Slack mutant mice and analyzed their behavior in various animal models of pain. Global ablation of Slack led to increased hypersensitivity in models of neuropathic pain, whereas the behavior in models of inflammatory and acute nociceptive pain was normal. Neuropathic pain behaviors were also exaggerated after ablation of Slack selectively in sensory neurons. Notably, the Slack opener loxapine ameliorated persisting neuropathic pain behaviors. In conclusion, Slack selectively controls the sensory input in neuropathic pain states, suggesting that modulating its activity might represent a novel strategy for management of neuropathic pain. Copyright © 2015 the authors 0270-6474/15/351125-11$15.00/0.

  20. Transient receptor potential ion channels in primary sensory neurons as targets for novel analgesics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sousa-Valente, J; Andreou, A P; Urban, L; Nagy, I

    2014-05-01

    The last decade has witnessed an explosion in novel findings relating to the molecules involved in mediating the sensation of pain in humans. Transient receptor potential (TRP) ion channels emerged as the greatest group of molecules involved in the transduction of various physical stimuli into neuronal signals in primary sensory neurons, as well as, in the development of pain. Here, we review the role of TRP ion channels in primary sensory neurons in the development of pain associated with peripheral pathologies and possible strategies to translate preclinical data into the development of effective new analgesics. Based on available evidence, we argue that nociception-related TRP channels on primary sensory neurons provide highly valuable targets for the development of novel analgesics and that, in order to reduce possible undesirable side effects, novel analgesics should prevent the translocation from the cytoplasm to the cell membrane and the sensitization of the channels rather than blocking the channel pore or binding sites for exogenous or endogenous activators. © 2013 The British Pharmacological Society.

  1. Store-operated calcium entry in vagal sensory nerves is independent of Orai channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooper, Justin Shane; Hadley, Stephen H; Mathews, Adithya; Taylor-Clark, Thomas E

    2013-03-29

    Vagal sensory nerves innervate the majority of visceral organs (e.g., heart, lungs, GI tract, etc) and their activation is critical for defensive and regulatory reflexes. Intracellular Ca(2+) is a key regulator of neuronal excitability and is largely controlled by the Ca(2+) stores of the endoplasmic reticulum. In other cell types store-operated channels (SOC) have been shown to contribute to the homeostatic control of intracellular Ca(2+). Here, using Ca(2+) imaging, we have shown that ER depletion in vagal sensory neurons (using thapsigargin or caffeine) in the absence of extracellular Ca(2+) evoked Ca(2+) influx upon re-introduction of Ca(2+) into the extracellular buffer. This store-operated Ca(2+) entry (SOCE) was observed in approximately 25-40% of vagal neurons, equally distributed among nociceptive and non-nociceptive sensory subtypes. SOCE was blocked by Gd(3+) but not by the Orai channel blocker SKF96365. We found Orai channel mRNA in extracts from whole vagal ganglia, but when using single cell RT-PCR analysis we found only 3 out of 34 neurons expressed Orai channel mRNA, indicating that Orai channel expression in the vagal ganglia was likely derived from non-neuronal cell types. Confocal microscopy of vagal neurons in 3 day cultures demonstrated rich ER tracker fluorescence throughout axonal and neurite structures and ER store depletion (thapsigargin) evoked Ca(2+) transients from these structures. However, no SOCE could be detected in the axonal/neurite structures of vagal neurons. We conclude that SOCE occurs in vagal sensory neuronal cell bodies through non-Orai mechanisms but is absent at nerve terminals. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Calcium-activated chloride channels in the apical region of mouse vomeronasal sensory neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dibattista, Michele; Amjad, Asma; Maurya, Devendra Kumar; Sagheddu, Claudia; Montani, Giorgia; Tirindelli, Roberto; Menini, Anna

    2012-07-01

    The rodent vomeronasal organ plays a crucial role in several social behaviors. Detection of pheromones or other emitted signaling molecules occurs in the dendritic microvilli of vomeronasal sensory neurons, where the binding of molecules to vomeronasal receptors leads to the influx of sodium and calcium ions mainly through the transient receptor potential canonical 2 (TRPC2) channel. To investigate the physiological role played by the increase in intracellular calcium concentration in the apical region of these neurons, we produced localized, rapid, and reproducible increases in calcium concentration with flash photolysis of caged calcium and measured calcium-activated currents with the whole cell voltage-clamp technique. On average, a large inward calcium-activated current of -261 pA was measured at -50 mV, rising with a time constant of 13 ms. Ion substitution experiments showed that this current is anion selective. Moreover, the chloride channel blockers niflumic acid and 4,4'-diisothiocyanatostilbene-2,2'-disulfonic acid partially inhibited the calcium-activated current. These results directly demonstrate that a large chloride current can be activated by calcium in the apical region of mouse vomeronasal sensory neurons. Furthermore, we showed by immunohistochemistry that the calcium-activated chloride channels TMEM16A/anoctamin1 and TMEM16B/anoctamin2 are present in the apical layer of the vomeronasal epithelium, where they largely colocalize with the TRPC2 transduction channel. Immunocytochemistry on isolated vomeronasal sensory neurons showed that TMEM16A and TMEM16B coexpress in the neuronal microvilli. Therefore, we conclude that microvilli of mouse vomeronasal sensory neurons have a high density of calcium-activated chloride channels that may play an important role in vomeronasal transduction.

  3. Peripheral KV7 channels regulate visceral sensory function in mouse and human colon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peiris, Madusha; Hockley, James Rf; Reed, David E; Smith, Ewan St John; Bulmer, David C; Blackshaw, L Ashley

    2017-01-01

    Background Chronic visceral pain is a defining symptom of many gastrointestinal disorders. The KV7 family (KV7.1-KV7.5) of voltage-gated potassium channels mediates the M current that regulates excitability in peripheral sensory nociceptors and central pain pathways. Here, we use a combination of immunohistochemistry, gut-nerve electrophysiological recordings in both mouse and human tissues, and single-cell qualitative real-time polymerase chain reaction of gut-projecting sensory neurons, to investigate the contribution of peripheral KV7 channels to visceral nociception. Results Immunohistochemical staining of mouse colon revealed labelling of KV7 subtypes (KV7.3 and KV7.5) with CGRP around intrinsic enteric neurons of the myenteric plexuses and within extrinsic sensory fibres along mesenteric blood vessels. Treatment with the KV7 opener retigabine almost completely abolished visceral afferent firing evoked by the algogen bradykinin, in agreement with significant co-expression of mRNA transcripts by single-cell qualitative real-time polymerase chain reaction for KCNQ subtypes and the B2 bradykinin receptor in retrogradely labelled extrinsic sensory neurons from the colon. Retigabine also attenuated responses to mechanical stimulation of the bowel following noxious distension (0-80 mmHg) in a concentration-dependent manner, whereas the KV7 blocker XE991 potentiated such responses. In human bowel tissues, KV7.3 and KV7.5 were expressed in neuronal varicosities co-labelled with synaptophysin and CGRP, and retigabine inhibited bradykinin-induced afferent activation in afferent recordings from human colon. Conclusions We show that KV7 channels contribute to the sensitivity of visceral sensory neurons to noxious chemical and mechanical stimuli in both mouse and human gut tissues. As such, peripherally restricted KV7 openers may represent a viable therapeutic modality for the treatment of gastrointestinal pathologies.

  4. TRPV4 channels mediate the infrared laser-evoked response in sensory neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albert, E S; Bec, J M; Desmadryl, G; Chekroud, K; Travo, C; Gaboyard, S; Bardin, F; Marc, I; Dumas, M; Lenaers, G; Hamel, C; Muller, A; Chabbert, C

    2012-06-01

    Infrared laser irradiation has been established as an appropriate stimulus for primary sensory neurons under conditions where sensory receptor cells are impaired or lost. Yet, development of clinical applications has been impeded by lack of information about the molecular mechanisms underlying the laser-induced neural response. Here, we directly address this question through pharmacological characterization of the biological response evoked by midinfrared irradiation of isolated retinal and vestibular ganglion cells from rodents. Whole cell patch-clamp recordings reveal that both voltage-gated calcium and sodium channels contribute to the laser-evoked neuronal voltage variations (LEVV). In addition, selective blockade of the LEVV by micromolar concentrations of ruthenium red and RN 1734 identifies thermosensitive transient receptor potential vanilloid channels as the primary effectors of the chain reaction triggered by midinfrared laser irradiation. These results have the potential to facilitate greatly the design of future prosthetic devices aimed at restoring neurosensory capacities in disabled patients.

  5. Rate and timing of cortical responses driven by separate sensory channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saal, Hannes P; Harvey, Michael A; Bensmaia, Sliman J

    2015-12-09

    The sense of touch comprises multiple sensory channels that each conveys characteristic signals during interactions with objects. These neural signals must then be integrated in such a way that behaviorally relevant information about the objects is preserved. To understand the process of integration, we implement a simple computational model that describes how the responses of neurons in somatosensory cortex-recorded from awake, behaving monkeys-are shaped by the peripheral input, reconstructed using simulations of neuronal populations that reproduce natural spiking responses in the nerve with millisecond precision. First, we find that the strength of cortical responses is driven by one population of nerve fibers (rapidly adapting) whereas the timing of cortical responses is shaped by the other (Pacinian). Second, we show that input from these sensory channels is integrated in an optimal fashion that exploits the disparate response behaviors of different fiber types.

  6. Effect of a chloride channel activator, lubiprostone, on colonic sensory and motor functions in healthy subjects

    OpenAIRE

    Sweetser, Seth; Busciglio, Irene A.; Camilleri, Michael; Bharucha, Adil E.; Szarka, Lawrence A.; Papathanasopoulos, Athanasios; Burton, Duane D.; Eckert, Deborah J.; Zinsmeister, Alan R

    2008-01-01

    Lubiprostone, a bicyclic fatty acid chloride channel activator, is efficacious in treatment of chronic constipation and constipation-predominant irritable bowel syndrome. The study aim was to compare effects of lubiprostone and placebo on colonic sensory and motor functions in humans. In double-blind, randomized fashion, 60 healthy adults received three oral doses of placebo or 24 μg lubiprostone per day in a parallel-group, placebo-controlled trial. A barostat-manometry tube was placed in th...

  7. Sensory nerves and transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 channels in CO(2) regulation of cerebrovascular tone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, SeongHun; Zuccarello, Mario; Rapoport, Robert M

    2014-05-01

    This study investigated the involvement of sensory nerves and, in particular, neuronal transient receptor potential vanilloid (TRPV) 1 channels, in the CO(2)-mediated regulation of cerebrovascular tone. Basilar artery diameter and blood flow velocity in the ventral midbrain were determined in a rat cranial window preparation by digital imaging and laser-Doppler flowmetry, respectively. Superfusion of the basilar artery with capsaicin, a selective TRPV1 receptor agonist, caused a transient relaxation, consistent with acute desensitization of neuronal TRPV1 channels. Constriction to respiratory hypocapnia remained unaffected following capsaicin superfusion. Denervation of sensory nerves by repeated capsaicin injection of neonates also did not reduce the respiratory hypocapnia constriction of the basilar artery as well as the decreased flow velocity in the ventral midbrain in adults. These findings suggest that sensory nerves and, in particular, neuronal TRPV1 channels, do not play a role in respiratory hypocapnia constriction and decreased flow, at least in rat basilar artery and ventral midbrain. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  8. Direct action and modulating effect of (+)- and (-)-nicotine on ion channels expressed in trigeminal sensory neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreiner, Benjamin S P; Lehmann, Ramona; Thiel, Ulrike; Ziemba, Paul M; Beltrán, Leopoldo R; Sherkheli, Muhammad A; Jeanbourquin, Philippe; Hugi, Alain; Werner, Markus; Gisselmann, Günter; Hatt, Hanns

    2014-04-05

    Nicotine sensory perception is generally thought to be mediated by nicotinic acetylcholine (nACh) receptors. However, recent data strongly support the idea that other receptors (e.g., transient receptor potential A1 channel, TRPA1) and other pathways contribute to the detection mechanisms underlying the olfactory and trigeminal cell response to nicotine flavor. This is in accordance with the reported ability of humans to discriminate between (+)- and (-)- nicotine enantiomers. To get a more detailed understanding of the molecular and cellular basis underlying the sensory perception of nicotine, we studied the activity of (+)- and (-)-nicotine on cultured murine trigeminal sensory neurons and on a range of heterologously expressed receptors. The human TRPA1 channel is activated by (-)-nicotine. In this work, we show that (+)-nicotine is also an activator of this channel. Pharmacological experiments using nicotinic acetylcholine receptors and transient receptor potential blockers revealed that trigeminal neurons express one or more unidentified receptors that are sensitive to (+)- and/or (-)-nicotine. Results also indicate that the presence of extracellular calcium ions is required to elicit trigeminal neuron responses to (+)- and (-)-nicotine. Results also show that both (+)-nicotine and (-)-nicotine can block 5-hydroxytryptamine type 3 (5-HT3) receptor-mediated responses in recombinant expression systems and in cultured trigeminal neurons expressing 5-HT3 receptors. Our investigations broaden the spectra of receptors that are targets for nicotine enantiomers and give new insights into the physiological role of nicotine. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. TRESK channel contribution to nociceptive sensory neurons excitability: modulation by nerve injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serra Jordi

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Neuronal hyperexcitability is a crucial phenomenon underlying spontaneous and evoked pain. In invertebrate nociceptors, the S-type leak K+ channel (analogous to TREK-1 in mammals plays a critical role of in determining neuronal excitability following nerve injury. Few data are available on the role of leak K2P channels after peripheral axotomy in mammals. Results Here we describe that rat sciatic nerve axotomy induces hyperexcitability of L4-L5 DRG sensory neurons and decreases TRESK (K2P18.1 expression, a channel with a major contribution to total leak current in DRGs. While the expression of other channels from the same family did not significantly change, injury markers ATF3 and Cacna2d1 were highly upregulated. Similarly, acute sensory neuron dissociation (in vitro axotomy produced marked hyperexcitability and similar total background currents compared with neurons injured in vivo. In addition, the sanshool derivative IBA, which blocked TRESK currents in transfected HEK293 cells and DRGs, increased intracellular calcium in 49% of DRG neurons in culture. Most IBA-responding neurons (71% also responded to the TRPV1 agonist capsaicin, indicating that they were nociceptors. Additional evidence of a biological role of TRESK channels was provided by behavioral evidence of pain (flinching and licking, in vivo electrophysiological evidence of C-nociceptor activation following IBA injection in the rat hindpaw, and increased sensitivity to painful pressure after TRESK knockdown in vivo. Conclusions In summary, our results clearly support an important role of TRESK channels in determining neuronal excitability in specific DRG neurons subpopulations, and show that axonal injury down-regulates TRESK channels, therefore contributing to neuronal hyperexcitability.

  10. Oxidation of a potassium channel causes progressive sensory function loss during ageing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Shi-Qing; Sesti, Federico

    2009-01-01

    A central question is whether potassium (K+) channels, which are key regulators of neuronal excitability, are targets of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and whether these interactions have a role in the mechanisms underlying neurodegeneration. Here, we show that oxidation of K+ channel KVS-1 during ageing causes sensory function loss in Caenorhabditis elegans, and that protection of this channel from oxidation preserves neuronal function. Chemotaxis, a function controlled by KVS-1, was significantly impaired in worms exposed to oxidizing agents, but only moderately affected in worms harboring an oxidation-resistant KVS-1 mutant (C113S). In ageing C113S transgenic worms, the effects of free radical accumulation were significantly attenuated compared to wild type. Electrophysiological analyses showed that both ROS accumulation during ageing, or acute exposure to oxidizing agents, acted primarily to alter the excitability of the neurons that mediate chemotaxis. Together, these findings establish a pivotal role for ROS-mediated oxidation of voltage-gated K+ channels in sensorial decline during ageing in invertebrates. PMID:19330004

  11. Turbulent channel flows over complex walls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosti, Marco Edoardo; Brandt, Luca

    2017-11-01

    We perform numerical simulations of turbulent channel flows over porous walls and deformable hyper-elastic walls. The flow over porous walls is simulated using volume-averaged Navier ``Stokes equations within the porous layers, while the multiphase flow over deformable walls is solved with a one-continuum formulation which allows the use of a fully Eulerian formulation. New insights on the effect of these complex walls on the turbulent flows in terms of friction, statistics and flow structures are discussed using a number of post-processing techniques. The turbulent flow in the channel is affected by the porous and moving walls in a similar manner even at low values of porosity and elasticity due to the non-zero fluctuations of vertical velocity at the interface that influence the flow dynamics. The near-wall streaks and the associated quasi-streamwise vortices are strongly reduced near porous and deformable isotropic wall while the flow becomes more correlated in the spanwise direction. On the contrary, an opposite behavior is noticed in the case of anisotropic porous layers, with an increase of streamwise correlation due to a strengthening of the low- and high-speed streaks.

  12. Functional significance of M-type potassium channels in nociceptive cutaneous sensory endings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gayle M. Passmore

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available M-channels carry slowly activating potassium currents that regulate excitability in a variety of central and peripheral neurons. Functional M-channels and their Kv7 channel correlates are expressed throughout the somatosensory nervous system where they may play an important role in controlling sensory nerve activity. Here we show that Kv7.2 immunoreactivity is expressed in the peripheral terminals of nociceptive primary afferents. Electrophysiological recordings from single afferents in vitro showed that block of M-channels by 3 µM XE991 sensitised Adelta- but not C-fibres to noxious heat stimulation and induced spontaneous, ongoing activity at 32ºC in many Adelta-fibres. These observations were extended in vivo: intraplantar injection of XE991 selectively enhanced the response of deep dorsal horn neurons to peripheral mid-range mechanical and higher range thermal stimuli, consistent with a selective effect on Adelta-fibre peripheral terminals. These results demonstrate an important physiological role of M-channels in controlling nociceptive Adelta-fibre responses and provide a rationale for the nocifensive behaviours that arise following intraplantar injection of the M-channel blocker XE991.

  13. ASIC3, an acid-sensing ion channel, is expressed in metaboreceptive sensory neurons

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    Fierro Leonardo

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background ASIC3, the most sensitive of the acid-sensing ion channels, depolarizes certain rat sensory neurons when lactic acid appears in the extracellular medium. Two functions have been proposed for it: 1 ASIC3 might trigger ischemic pain in heart and muscle; 2 it might contribute to some forms of touch mechanosensation. Here, we used immunocytochemistry, retrograde labelling, and electrophysiology to ask whether the distribution of ASIC3 in rat sensory neurons is consistent with either of these hypotheses. Results Less than half (40% of dorsal root ganglion sensory neurons react with anti-ASIC3, and the population is heterogeneous. They vary widely in cell diameter and express different growth factor receptors: 68% express TrkA, the receptor for nerve growth factor, and 25% express TrkC, the NT3 growth factor receptor. Consistent with a role in muscle nociception, small ( Conclusion Our data indicates that: 1 ASIC3 is expressed in a restricted population of nociceptors and probably in some non-nociceptors; 2 co-expression of ASIC3 and CGRP, and the absence of P2X3, are distinguishing properties of a class of sensory neurons, some of which innervate blood vessels. We suggest that these latter afferents may be muscle metaboreceptors, neurons that sense the metabolic state of muscle and can trigger pain when there is insufficient oxygen.

  14. Expression of K2P channels in sensory and motor neurons of the autonomic nervous system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cadaveira-Mosquera, Alba; Pérez, Montse; Reboreda, Antonio; Rivas-Ramírez, Paula; Fernández-Fernández, Diego; Lamas, J Antonio

    2012-09-01

    Several types of neurons within the central and peripheral somatic nervous system express two-pore-domain potassium (K2P) channels, providing them with resting potassium conductances. We demonstrate that these channels are also expressed in the autonomic nervous system where they might be important modulators of neuronal excitability. We observed strong mRNA expression of members of the TRESK and TREK subfamilies in both the mouse superior cervical ganglion (mSCG) and the mouse nodose ganglion (mNG). Motor mSCG neurons strongly expressed mRNA transcripts for TRESK and TREK-2 subunits, whereas TASK-1 and TASK-2 subunits were only moderately expressed, with only few or very few transcripts for TREK-1 and TRAAK (TRESK ≈ TREK-2 > TASK-2 ≈ TASK-1 > TREK-1 > TRAAK). Similarly, the TRESK and TREK-1 subunits were the most strongly expressed in sensorial mNG neurons, while TASK-1 and TASK-2 mRNAs were moderately expressed, and fewer TREK-2 and TRAAK transcripts were detected (TRESK ≈ TREK-1 > TASK-1 ≈ TASK-2 > TREK-2 > TRAAK). Moreover, cell-attached single-channel recordings showed a major contribution of TRESK and TREK-1 channels in mNG. As the level of TRESK mRNA expression was not statistically different between the ganglia analysed, the distinct expression of TREK-1 and TREK-2 subunits was the main difference observed between these structures. Our results strongly suggest that TRESK and TREK channels are important modulators of the sensorial and motor information flowing through the autonomic nervous system, probably exerting a strong influence on vagal reflexes.

  15. Regulatory role of voltage-gated sodium channel β subunits in sensory neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed eChahine

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Voltage-gated Na+ channels are transmembrane-bound proteins incorporating aqueous conduction pores that are highly selective for Na+. The opening of these channels results in the rapid influx of Na+ ions that depolarize the cell and drive the rapid upstroke of nerve and muscle action potentials. While the concept of a Na+-selective ion channel had been formulated in the 1940s, it was not until the 1980s that the biochemical properties of the 260-kDa and 36-kDa auxiliary β subunits (β1, β2 were first described. Subsequent cloning and heterologous expression studies revealed that the  subunit forms the core of the channel and is responsible for both voltage-dependent gating and ionic selectivity. To date, ten isoforms of the Na+ channel α subunit have been identified that vary in their primary structures, tissue distribution, biophysical properties, and sensitivity to neurotoxins. Four β subunits (β1-β4 and two splice variants (β1A, β1B have been identified that modulate the subcellular distribution, cell surface expression, and functional properties of the α subunits. The purpose of this review is to provide a broad overview of β subunit expression and function in peripheral sensory neurons and examine their contributions to neuropathic pain.

  16. HCN channels are not required for mechanotransduction in sensory hair cells of the mouse inner ear.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geoffrey C Horwitz

    Full Text Available The molecular composition of the hair cell transduction channel has not been identified. Here we explore the novel hypothesis that hair cell transduction channels include HCN subunits. The HCN family of ion channels includes four members, HCN1-4. They were originally identified as the molecular correlates of the hyperpolarization-activated, cyclic nucleotide gated ion channels that carry currents known as If, IQ or Ih. However, based on recent evidence it has been suggested that HCN subunits may also be components of the elusive hair cell transduction channel. To investigate this hypothesis we examined expression of mRNA that encodes HCN1-4 in sensory epithelia of the mouse inner ear, immunolocalization of HCN subunits 1, 2 and 4, uptake of the transduction channel permeable dye, FM1-43 and electrophysiological measurement of mechanotransduction current. Dye uptake and transduction current were assayed in cochlear and vestibular hair cells of wildtype mice exposed to HCN channel blockers or a dominant-negative form of HCN2 that contained a pore mutation and in mutant mice that lacked HCN1, HCN2 or both. We found robust expression of HCNs 1, 2 and 4 but little evidence that localized HCN subunits in hair bundles, the site of mechanotransduction. Although high concentrations of the HCN antagonist, ZD7288, blocked 50-70% of the transduction current, we found no reduction of transduction current in either cochlear or vestibular hair cells of HCN1- or HCN2- deficient mice relative to wild-type mice. Furthermore, mice that lacked both HCN1 and HCN2 also had normal transduction currents. Lastly, we found that mice exposed to the dominant-negative mutant form of HCN2 had normal transduction currents as well. Taken together, the evidence suggests that HCN subunits are not required for mechanotransduction in hair cells of the mouse inner ear.

  17. Sensory TRP channels contribute differentially to skin inflammation and persistent itch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Jing; Yang, Pu; Mack, Madison R; Dryn, Dariia; Luo, Jialie; Gong, Xuan; Liu, Shenbin; Oetjen, Landon K; Zholos, Alexander V; Mei, Zhinan; Yin, Shijin; Kim, Brian S; Hu, Hongzhen

    2017-10-30

    Although both persistent itch and inflammation are commonly associated with allergic contact dermatitis (ACD), it is not known if they are mediated by shared or distinct signaling pathways. Here we show that both TRPA1 and TRPV1 channels are required for generating spontaneous scratching in a mouse model of ACD induced by squaric acid dibutylester (SADBE), a small molecule hapten, through directly promoting the excitability of pruriceptors. TRPV1 but not TRPA1 channels protect the skin inflammation, as genetic ablation of TRPV1 function or pharmacological ablation of TRPV1-positive sensory nerves promotes cutaneous inflammation in the SADBE-induced ACD. Our results demonstrate that persistent itch and inflammation are mediated by distinct cellular and molecular mechanisms in a mouse model of ACD. Identification of distinct roles of TRPA1 and TRPV1 in regulating itch and inflammation may provide new insights into the pathophysiology and treatment of chronic itch and inflammation in ACD patients.

  18. Activation and desensitization of TRPV1 channels in sensory neurons by the PPARα agonist palmitoylethanolamide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambrosino, Paolo; Soldovieri, Maria Virginia; Russo, Claudio; Taglialatela, Maurizio

    2013-03-01

    Palmitoylethanolamide (PEA) is an endogenous fatty acid amide displaying anti-inflammatory and analgesic actions. To investigate the molecular mechanism responsible for these effects, the ability of PEA and of pain-inducing stimuli such as capsaicin (CAP) or bradykinin (BK) to influence intracellular calcium concentrations ([Ca²⁺](i)) in peripheral sensory neurons, has been assessed in the present study. The potential involvement of the transcription factor PPARα and of TRPV1 channels in PEA-induced effects was also studied. [Ca²⁺](i) was evaluated by single-cell microfluorimetry in differentiated F11 cells. Activation of TRPV1 channels was assessed by imaging and patch-clamp techniques in CHO cells transiently-transfected with rat TRPV1 cDNA. In F11 cells, PEA (1-30 μM) dose-dependently increased [Ca²⁺](i). The TRPV1 antagonists capsazepine (1 μM) and SB-366791 (1 μM), as well as the PPARα antagonist GW-6471 (10 μM), inhibited PEA-induced [Ca²⁺](i) increase; blockers of cannabinoid receptors were ineffective. PEA activated TRPV1 channels heterologously expressed in CHO cells; this effect appeared to be mediated at least in part by PPARα. When compared with CAP, PEA showed similar potency and lower efficacy, and caused stronger TRPV1 currents desensitization. Sub-effective PEA concentrations, closer to those found in vivo, counteracted CAP- and BK-induced [Ca²⁺](i) transients, as well as CAP-induced TRPV1 activation. Activation of PPARα and TRPV1 channels, rather than of cannabinoid receptors, largely mediate PEA-induced [Ca²⁺](i) transients in sensory neurons. Differential TRPV1 activation and desensitization by CAP and PEA might contribute to their distinct pharmacological profile, possibly translating into potentially relevant clinical differences. © 2012 The Authors. British Journal of Pharmacology © 2012 The British Pharmacological Society.

  19. Sensory TRP Channel Interactions with Endogenous Lipids and Their Biological Outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sungjae Yoo

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Lipids have long been studied as constituents of the cellular architecture and energy stores in the body. Evidence is now rapidly growing that particular lipid species are also important for molecular and cellular signaling. Here we review the current information on interactions between lipids and transient receptor potential (TRP ion channels in nociceptive sensory afferents that mediate pain signaling. Sensory neuronal TRP channels play a crucial role in the detection of a variety of external and internal changes, particularly with damaging or pain-eliciting potentials that include noxiously high or low temperatures, stretching, and harmful substances. In addition, recent findings suggest that TRPs also contribute to altering synaptic plasticity that deteriorates chronic pain states. In both of these processes, specific lipids are often generated and have been found to strongly modulate TRP activities, resulting primarily in pain exacerbation. This review summarizes three standpoints viewing those lipid functions for TRP modulations as second messengers, intercellular transmitters, or bilayer building blocks. Based on these hypotheses, we discuss perspectives that account for how the TRP-lipid interaction contributes to the peripheral pain mechanism. Still a number of blurred aspects remain to be examined, which will be answered by future efforts and may help to better control pain states.

  20. Communication complexity of channels in general probabilistic theories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montina, A; Pfaffhauser, M; Wolf, S

    2013-10-18

    The communication complexity of a quantum channel is the minimal amount of classical communication required for classically simulating the process of preparation, transmission through the channel, and subsequent measurement of a quantum state. At present, only little is known about this quantity. In this Letter, we present a procedure for systematically evaluating the communication complexity of channels in any general probabilistic theory, in particular, quantum theory. The procedure is constructive and provides the most efficient classical protocols. We illustrate this procedure by evaluating the communication complexity of a quantum depolarizing channel with some finite sets of quantum states and measurements.

  1. The complex tibial organ of the New Zealand ground weta: sensory adaptations for vibrational signal detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strauß, Johannes; Lomas, Kathryn; Field, Laurence H

    2017-05-17

    In orthopteran insects, a complex tibial organ has evolved to detect substrate vibrations and/or airborne sound. Species of New Zealand weta (Anostostomatidae) with tympanal ears on the foreleg tibia use this organ to communicate by sound, while in atympanate species (which communicate by substrate drumming) the organ is unstudied. We investigated the complex tibial organ of the atympanate ground weta, Hemiandrus pallitarsis, for vibration detection adaptations. This system contains four sensory components (subgenual organ, intermediate organ, crista acustica homolog, accessory organ) in all legs, together with up to 90 scolopidial sensilla. Microcomputed tomography shows that the subgenual organ spans the hemolymph channel, with attachments suggesting that hemolymph oscillations displace the organ in a hinged-plate fashion. Subgenual sensilla are likely excited by substrate oscillations transmitted within the leg. Instead of the usual suspension within the middle of the tibial cavity, we show that the intermediate organ and crista acustica homolog comprise a cellular mass broadly attached to the anterior tibial wall. They likely detect cuticular vibrations, and not airborne sound. This atympanate complex tibial organ shows elaborate structural changes suggesting detection of vibrational stimuli by parallel input pathways, thus correlating well with the burrowing lifestyle and communication by substrate-transmitted vibration.

  2. Distribution of voltage-gated potassium and hyperpolarization-activated channels in sensory afferent fibers in the rat carotid body.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buniel, Maria; Glazebrook, Patricia A; Ramirez-Navarro, Angelina; Kunze, Diana L

    2008-10-01

    The chemosensory glomus cells of the carotid body (CB) detect changes in O2 tension. Carotid sinus nerve fibers, which originate from peripheral sensory neurons located within the petrosal ganglion, innervate the CB. Release of transmitter from glomus cells activates the sensory afferent fibers to transmit information to the nucleus of the solitary tract in the brainstem. The ion channels expressed within the sensory nerve terminals play an essential role in the ability of the terminal to initiate action potentials in response to transmitter-evoked depolarization. However, with a few exceptions, the identity of ion channels expressed in these peripheral nerve fibers is unknown. This study addresses the expression of voltage-gated channels in the sensory fibers with a focus on channels that set the resting membrane potential and regulate discharge patterns. By using immunohistochemistry and fluorescence confocal microscopy, potassium channel subunits and HCN (hyperpolarization-activated) family members were localized both in petrosal neurons that expressed tyrosine hydroxylase and in the CSN axons within the carotid body. Channels contributing to resting membrane potential, including HCN2 responsible in part for I(h) current and the KCNQ2 and KCNQ5 subunits thought to underlie the neuronal "M current," were identified in the sensory neurons and their axons innervating the carotid body. In addition, the results presented here demonstrate expression of several potassium channels that shape the action potential and the frequency of discharge, including Kv1.4, Kv1.5, Kv4.3, and K(Ca) (BK). The role of these channels should be considered in interpretation of the fiber discharge in response to perturbation of the carotid body environment.

  3. Complex Sensory Corpuscles in the Upper Jaw of Horsfield’s Tortoise (Testudo horsfieldii

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcela Buchtová

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The sensory corpuscles of Testudo horsfieldii in the skin of the upper lip and face were studied with light and electron microscopy. The sensory corpuscles were situated under epidermis; in the corium and also between the upper jaw bone tissues in the rostral part of oral cavity. The skin sensory corpuscles with a ramified inner core were grouped in clusters. Within the corpuscle there were several simple inner cores embedded within a common superficial capsule. The complex corpuscles have a novel structure in comparison to what has been described for sensory nerve endings in turtle. The complex sensory corpuscles probably function as mechanoreceptors important for monitoring the movement of the keratinized ridges and the most rostral part of the upper jaw, the rhamphotheci.

  4. Highly Sensitive and Patchable Pressure Sensors Mimicking Ion-Channel-Engaged Sensory Organs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chun, Kyoung-Yong; Son, Young Jun; Han, Chang-Soo

    2016-04-26

    Biological ion channels have led to much inspiration because of their unique and exquisite operational functions in living cells. Specifically, their extreme and dynamic sensing abilities can be realized by the combination of receptors and nanopores coupled together to construct an ion channel system. In the current study, we demonstrated that artificial ion channel pressure sensors inspired by nature for detecting pressure are highly sensitive and patchable. Our ion channel pressure sensors basically consisted of receptors and nanopore membranes, enabling dynamic current responses to external forces for multiple applications. The ion channel pressure sensors had a sensitivity of ∼5.6 kPa(-1) and a response time of ∼12 ms at a frequency of 1 Hz. The power consumption was recorded as less than a few μW. Moreover, a reliability test showed stability over 10 000 loading-unloading cycles. Additionally, linear regression was performed in terms of temperature, which showed no significant variations, and there were no significant current variations with humidity. The patchable ion channel pressure sensors were then used to detect blood pressure/pulse in humans, and different signals were clearly observed for each person. Additionally, modified ion channel pressure sensors detected complex motions including pressing and folding in a high-pressure range (10-20 kPa).

  5. Mobile radio channel as a complex medium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Matic, Dusan; Prasad, Ramjee; Kalluri, Dikshitulu K.

    2001-01-01

    Optical fibres have almost unlimited capacity, but can not the address the users desire for mobility and ubiquitous access. The synergy of these two worlds can be seen in the direction of the Radio-over-Fibre. This paper presents to the reader an introduction for the mobile radio channel - basic...... physical phenomena, their implications on the transmitted signal, and how the radio channels are modelled. Special attention is given to the small-scale effects, such as multipath, and Rayleigh and Rice distributions of received signal, as these dominate in the case of indoor communication systems....

  6. G protein βγ subunits inhibit TRPM3 ion channels in sensory neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quallo, Talisia; Alkhatib, Omar; Gentry, Clive; Andersson, David A; Bevan, Stuart

    2017-08-15

    Transient receptor potential (TRP) ion channels in peripheral sensory neurons are functionally regulated by hydrolysis of the phosphoinositide PI(4,5)P2 and changes in the level of protein kinase mediated phosphorylation following activation of various G protein coupled receptors. We now show that the activity of TRPM3 expressed in mouse dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons is inhibited by agonists of the Gi-coupled µ opioid, GABA-B and NPY receptors. These agonist effects are mediated by direct inhibition of TRPM3 by Gβγ subunits, rather than by a canonical cAMP mediated mechanism. The activity of TRPM3 in DRG neurons is also negatively modulated by tonic, constitutive GPCR activity as TRPM3 responses can be potentiated by GPCR inverse agonists. GPCR regulation of TRPM3 is also seen in vivo where Gi/o GPCRs agonists inhibited and inverse agonists potentiated TRPM3 mediated nociceptive behavioural responses.

  7. Effect of a chloride channel activator, lubiprostone, on colonic sensory and motor functions in healthy subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweetser, Seth; Busciglio, Irene A; Camilleri, Michael; Bharucha, Adil E; Szarka, Lawrence A; Papathanasopoulos, Athanasios; Burton, Duane D; Eckert, Deborah J; Zinsmeister, Alan R

    2009-02-01

    Lubiprostone, a bicyclic fatty acid chloride channel activator, is efficacious in treatment of chronic constipation and constipation-predominant irritable bowel syndrome. The study aim was to compare effects of lubiprostone and placebo on colonic sensory and motor functions in humans. In double-blind, randomized fashion, 60 healthy adults received three oral doses of placebo or 24 microg lubiprostone per day in a parallel-group, placebo-controlled trial. A barostat-manometry tube was placed in the left colon by flexible sigmoidoscopy and fluoroscopy. We measured treatment effects on colonic sensation and motility with validated methods, with the following end points: colonic compliance, fasting and postprandial tone and motility indexes, pain thresholds, and sensory ratings to distensions. Among participants receiving lubiprostone or placebo, 26 of 30 and 28 of 30, respectively, completed the study. There were no overall effects of lubiprostone on compliance, fasting tone, motility indexes, or sensation. However, there was a treatment-by-sex interaction effect for compliance (P = 0.02), with lubiprostone inducing decreased fasting compliance in women (P = 0.06) and an overall decreased colonic tone contraction after a standard meal relative to fasting tone (P = 0.014), with greater effect in women (P lubiprostone 24 microg does not increase colonic motor function. The findings of decreased colonic compliance and decreased postprandial colonic tone in women suggest that motor effects are unlikely to cause accelerated colonic transit with lubiprostone, although they may facilitate laxation. Effects of lubiprostone on sensitivity deserve further study.

  8. Sensory transduction channel subunits, tax-4 and tax-2, modify presynaptic molecular architecture in C. elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellman, Andrew B; Shen, Kang

    2011-01-01

    During development, neural activity is important for forming proper connections in neural networks. The effect of activity on the gross morphology and synaptic strength of neurons has been well documented, but little is known about how activity affects different molecular components during development. Here, we examine the localization of four fluorescently-tagged presynaptic proteins, RAB-3, SNG-1/synaptogyrin, SYD-2/Liprin-α, and SAD-1/SAD kinase, in the C. elegans thermosensory neuron AFD. We show that tax-4 and tax-2, two genes that encode the cyclic nucleotide-gated channel necessary for sensory transduction in AFD, disrupt the localization of all four proteins. In wild-type animals, the synaptic vesicle (SV) markers RAB-3 and SNG-1 and the active zone markers SYD-2 and SAD-1 localize in a stereotyped, punctate pattern in the AFD axon. In tax-4 and tax-2 mutants, SV and SYD-2 puncta are more numerous and less intense. Interestingly, SAD-1 puncta are also less intense but do not increase in number. The change in puncta number can be rescued cell-autonomously in AFD. These results suggest that sensory transduction genes tax-4 and tax-2 are necessary for the proper assembly of presynapses.

  9. Sensory transduction channel subunits, tax-4 and tax-2, modify presynaptic molecular architecture in C. elegans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew B Hellman

    Full Text Available During development, neural activity is important for forming proper connections in neural networks. The effect of activity on the gross morphology and synaptic strength of neurons has been well documented, but little is known about how activity affects different molecular components during development. Here, we examine the localization of four fluorescently-tagged presynaptic proteins, RAB-3, SNG-1/synaptogyrin, SYD-2/Liprin-α, and SAD-1/SAD kinase, in the C. elegans thermosensory neuron AFD. We show that tax-4 and tax-2, two genes that encode the cyclic nucleotide-gated channel necessary for sensory transduction in AFD, disrupt the localization of all four proteins. In wild-type animals, the synaptic vesicle (SV markers RAB-3 and SNG-1 and the active zone markers SYD-2 and SAD-1 localize in a stereotyped, punctate pattern in the AFD axon. In tax-4 and tax-2 mutants, SV and SYD-2 puncta are more numerous and less intense. Interestingly, SAD-1 puncta are also less intense but do not increase in number. The change in puncta number can be rescued cell-autonomously in AFD. These results suggest that sensory transduction genes tax-4 and tax-2 are necessary for the proper assembly of presynapses.

  10. Low-Complexity Adaptive Channel Estimation over Multipath Rayleigh Fading Non-Stationary Channels Under CFO

    CERN Document Server

    Hadei, Sayed A

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we propose novel low-complexity adaptive channel estimation techniques for mob ile wireless chan- n els in presence of Rayleigh fading, carrier frequency offsets (CFO) and random channel variations. We show that the selective p artial update of the estimated channel tap-weight vector offers a better trade-off between the performance and computational complexity, compared to the full update of the estimated channel tap-weight vector. We evaluate the mean-square weight error of th e proposed methods and demonstrate the usefulness of its via simulation studies.

  11. Gastrodin inhibits the activity of acid-sensing ion channels in rat primary sensory neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Fang; Liu, Ting-Ting; Qu, Zu-Wei; Qiu, Chun-Yu; Yang, Zhifan; Hu, Wang-Ping

    2014-05-15

    Acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs), a family of proton-gated cation channels, are believed to mediate pain caused by extracellular acidification. Gastrodin is a main bioactive constituent of the traditional herbal Gastrodia elata Blume, which has been widely used in Oriental countries for centuries. As an analgesic, gastrodin has been used clinically to treat pain such as migraine and headache. However, the mechanisms underlying analgesic action of gastrodin are still poorly understood. Here, we have found that gastrodin inhibited the activity of native ASICs in rat dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons. Gastrodin dose-dependently inhibited proton-gated currents mediated by ASICs. Gastrodin shifted the proton concentration-response curve downwards, with a decrease of 36.92 ± 6.23% in the maximum current response but with no significant change in the pH0.5 value. Moreover, gastrodin altered acid-evoked membrane excitability of rat DRG neurons and caused a significant decrease in the amplitude of the depolarization and the number of action potentials induced by acid stimuli. Finally, peripheral applied gastrodin relieved pain evoked by intraplantar injection of acetic acid in rats. Our results indicate that gastrodin can inhibit the activity of ASICs in the primary sensory neurons, which provided a novel mechanism underlying analgesic action of gastrodin. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Ipsilateral sensory disturbances in Complex Regional Pain Syndrome (CRPS)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Lone

    a disturbance in central nociceptive pathways processing input from hemilateral body sites. However, it may also be consistent with referred pain and cortical reorganization. Thus, it is important to assess whether sensory disturbances spread to ipsilateral body sites other than the forehead. The aim...... hyperalgesia to sharpness were not related to age, pain intensity, or pain duration. 2 Conclusions: The findings suggest the presence of heightened excitability in nociceptive pathways in CRPS, particularly those that provide hemilateral input, perhaps due to disturbances in pain control from thalamus...

  13. Inflammatory mediator bradykinin increases population of sensory neurons expressing functional T-type Ca(2+) channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Dongyang; Liang, Ce; Zhang, Fan; Men, Hongchao; Du, Xiaona; Gamper, Nikita; Zhang, Hailin

    2016-04-29

    T-type Ca(2+) channels are important regulators of peripheral sensory neuron excitability. Accordingly, T-type Ca(2+) currents are often increased in various pathological pain conditions, such as inflammation or nerve injury. Here we investigated effects of inflammation on functional expression of T-type Ca(2+) channels in small-diameter cultured dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons. We found that overnight treatment of DRG cultures with a cocktail of inflammatory mediators bradykinin (BK), adenosine triphosphate (ATP), norepinephrine (NE) and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) strongly increased the population size of the small-diameter neurons displaying low-voltage activated (LVA, T-type) Ca(2+) currents while having no effect on the peak LVA current amplitude. When applied individually, BK and ATP also increased the population size of LVA-positive neurons while NE and PGE2 had no effect. The PLC inhibitor U-73122 and B2 receptor antagonist, Hoe-140, both abolished the increase of the population of LVA-positive DRG neurons. Inflammatory treatment did not affect CaV3.2 mRNA or protein levels in DRG cultures. Furthermore, an ubiquitination inhibitor, MG132, did not increase the population of LVA-positive neurons. Our data suggest that inflammatory mediators BK and ATP increase the abundance of LVA-positive DRG neurons in total neuronal population by stimulating the recruitment of a 'reserve pool' of CaV3.2 channels, particularly in neurons that do not display measurable LVA currents under control conditions. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Heart failure induces changes in acid-sensing ion channels in sensory neurons innervating skeletal muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibbons, David D; Kutschke, William J; Weiss, Robert M; Benson, Christopher J

    2015-10-15

    Heart failure is associated with diminished exercise capacity, which is driven, in part, by alterations in exercise-induced autonomic reflexes triggered by skeletal muscle sensory neurons (afferents). These overactive reflexes may also contribute to the chronic state of sympathetic excitation, which is a major contributor to the morbidity and mortality of heart failure. Acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs) are highly expressed in muscle afferents where they sense metabolic changes associated with ischaemia and exercise, and contribute to the metabolic component of these reflexes. Therefore, we tested if ASICs within muscle afferents are altered in heart failure. We used whole-cell patch clamp to study the electrophysiological properties of acid-evoked currents in isolated, labelled muscle afferent neurons from control and heart failure (induced by myocardial infarction) mice. We found that the percentage of muscle afferents that displayed ASIC-like currents, the current amplitudes, and the pH dose-response relationships were not altered in mice with heart failure. On the other hand, the biophysical properties of ASIC-like currents were significantly different in a subpopulation of cells (40%) from heart failure mice. This population displayed diminished pH sensitivity, altered desensitization kinetics, and very fast recovery from desensitization. These unique properties define these channels within this subpopulation of muscle afferents as being heteromeric channels composed of ASIC2a and -3 subunits. Heart failure induced a shift in the subunit composition of ASICs within muscle afferents, which significantly altered their pH sensing characteristics. These results might, in part, contribute to the changes in exercise-mediated reflexes that are associated with heart failure. © 2015 The Authors. The Journal of Physiology © 2015 The Physiological Society.

  15. Low-Complexity Bayesian Estimation of Cluster-Sparse Channels

    KAUST Repository

    Ballal, Tarig

    2015-09-18

    This paper addresses the problem of channel impulse response estimation for cluster-sparse channels under the Bayesian estimation framework. We develop a novel low-complexity minimum mean squared error (MMSE) estimator by exploiting the sparsity of the received signal profile and the structure of the measurement matrix. It is shown that due to the banded Toeplitz/circulant structure of the measurement matrix, a channel impulse response, such as underwater acoustic channel impulse responses, can be partitioned into a number of orthogonal or approximately orthogonal clusters. The orthogonal clusters, the sparsity of the channel impulse response and the structure of the measurement matrix, all combined, result in a computationally superior realization of the MMSE channel estimator. The MMSE estimator calculations boil down to simpler in-cluster calculations that can be reused in different clusters. The reduction in computational complexity allows for a more accurate implementation of the MMSE estimator. The proposed approach is tested using synthetic Gaussian channels, as well as simulated underwater acoustic channels. Symbol-error-rate performance and computation time confirm the superiority of the proposed method compared to selected benchmark methods in systems with preamble-based training signals transmitted over clustersparse channels.

  16. STIM and calcium channel complexes in cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jardin, Isaac; Rosado, Juan A

    2016-06-01

    The ion Ca(2+) is a ubiquitous second messenger that mediates a variety of cellular functions. Dysfunction of the mechanisms involved in Ca(2+) homeostasis underlies a number of pathological processes, including cancer. Store-operated Ca(2+) entry (SOCE) is a major mechanism for Ca(2+) entry modulated by the intracellular Ca(2+) stores. The Ca(2+)-selective store-operated current (ICRAC) is mediated by the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) Ca(2+) sensor STIM1 and the store-operated Ca(2+) (SOC) channel Orai1, while other non-selective cation currents (ISOC) involves the participation of members of the canonical transient receptor potential (TRPC) channel family, including TRPC1. Distinct isoforms of the key components of SOCE have been described in mammalian cells, STIM1 and 2, Orai1-3 and TRPC1-7. In cancer cells, SOCE has been reported to play an important role in cell cycle progression and proliferation, migration, metastasis and evasion of apoptosis. Changes in the expression of the key elements of SOCE and Ca(2+) homeostasis remodeling have been account to play important roles in the phenotypic changes observed in transformed cells. Despite there are differences in the expression level of the molecular components of SOCE, as well as in the relevance of the STIM, Orai and TRPC isoforms in SOCE and tumorigenesis among cancer cell types, there is a body of evidence supporting an important role for SOCE underlying the phenotypic modifications of cancer cells that propose STIM and the SOC channels as suitable candidate targets for future prognostic or therapeutic strategies. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Calcium and Cell Fate. Guest Editors: Jacques Haiech, Claus Heizmann, Joachim Krebs, Thierry Capiod and Olivier Mignen. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Low-Complexity Geometry-Based MIMO Channel Simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christoph W. Ueberhuber

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The simulation of electromagnetic wave propagation in time-variant wideband multiple-input multiple-output mobile radio channels using a geometry-based channel model (GCM is computationally expensive. Due to multipath propagation, a large number of complex exponentials must be evaluated and summed up. We present a low-complexity algorithm for the implementation of a GCM on a hardware channel simulator. Our algorithm takes advantage of the limited numerical precision of the channel simulator by using a truncated subspace representation of the channel transfer function based on multidimensional discrete prolate spheroidal (DPS sequences. The DPS subspace representation offers two advantages. Firstly, only a small subspace dimension is required to achieve the numerical accuracy of the hardware channel simulator. Secondly, the computational complexity of the subspace representation is independent of the number of multipath components (MPCs. Moreover, we present an algorithm for the projection of each MPC onto the DPS subspace in 𝒪(1 operations. Thus the computational complexity of the DPS subspace algorithm compared to a conventional implementation is reduced by more than one order of magnitude on a hardware channel simulator with 14-bit precision.

  18. IGDB-2, an Ig/FNIII protein, binds the ion channel LGC-34 and controls sensory compartment morphogenesis in C. elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wendy; Perens, Elliot A; Oikonomou, Grigorios; Wallace, Sean W; Lu, Yun; Shaham, Shai

    2017-10-01

    Sensory organ glia surround neuronal receptive endings (NREs), forming a specialized compartment important for neuronal activity, and reminiscent of glia-ensheathed synapses in the central nervous system. We previously showed that DAF-6, a Patched-related protein, is required in glia of the C. elegans amphid sensory organ to restrict sensory compartment size. LIT-1, a Nemo-like kinase, and SNX-1, a retromer component, antagonize DAF-6 and promote compartment expansion. To further explore the machinery underlying compartment size control, we sought genes whose inactivation restores normal compartment size to daf-6 mutants. We found that mutations in igdb-2, encoding a single-pass transmembrane protein containing Ig-like and fibronectin type III domains, suppress daf-6 mutant defects. IGDB-2 acts in glia, where it localizes to glial membranes surrounding NREs, and, together with LIT-1 and SNX-1, regulates compartment morphogenesis. Immunoprecipitation followed by mass spectrometry demonstrates that IGDB-2 binds to LGC-34, a predicted ligand-gated ion channel, and lgc-34 mutations inhibit igdb-2 suppression of daf-6. Our findings reveal a novel membrane protein complex and suggest possible mechanisms for how sensory compartment size is controlled. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Hypotension induced by activation of the transient receptor potential vanilloid 4 channels: role of Ca2+-activated K+ channels and sensory nerves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Feng; Wang, Donna H

    2010-01-01

    To examine the mechanisms involved in hypotension induced by transient receptor potential vanilloid 4 (TRPV4) activation. Wistar rats were given 50 mg/kg capsaicin subcutaneously 1-2 days postnatally to cause degeneration of capsaicin-sensitive sensory nerves. Vehicle was given to the corresponding newborn rats that formed the control group. After being weaned, male rats were picked for further investigation. At the age of 8 weeks, mean arterial pressure and its response to 4alpha-phorbol 12,13-didecanoate [4alpha-PDD, a selective TRPV4 activator, 2.5 mg/kg, intravenous(ly) or i.v.] with or without CGRP8-37 (1 mg/kg per min, i.v.), an antagonist of calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP, a potent vasodilator released from sensory nerves), in vehicle or capsaicin-pretreated rats anesthetized with sodium pentobarbital [50 mg/kg, intraperitoneal(ly)] were monitored to observe the contributions of neuropeptides released from sensory nerves to the 4alpha-PDD-induced hypotension. To detect the roles of various vasodilating factors released by vascular endothelium in the hypotensive effect induced by TRPV4 activation, the corresponding inhibitors/blockers, including indomethacin (a cyclooxygenase inhibitor, 10 mg/kg, i.v.), Nomega-nitro-L-arginine (L-NA, a nitric oxide synthase inhibitor, 20 mg/kg, i.v.), apamin [a blocker of small conductance Ca2+-activated K+ (MaxiK) channels, 50 microg/kg, i.v.] combined with charybdotoxin (a blocker of intermediate and large conductance MaxiK channels, 50 microg/kg, i.v.), were used at various time before 4alpha-PDD injection. Plasma CGRP and substance P levels of rats before or after administration were measured using the corresponding radioimmunoassays. At last, immunohistochemistry stainings were performed to observe expression of TRPV4/CGRP/MaxiK in mesenteric resistance arteries and sensory neurons/nerve fibers. Intravenous administration of 4alpha-PDD produced remarkable hypotension in vehicle-pretreated rats. The depressor

  20. Influx-Operated Ca2+ Entry via PKD2-L1 and PKD1-L3 Channels Facilitates Sensory Responses to Polymodal Transient Stimuli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mingfeng Hu

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The polycystic TRP subfamily member PKD2-L1, in complex with PKD1-L3, is involved in physiological responses to diverse stimuli. A major challenge to understanding whether and how PKD2-L1/PKD1-L3 acts as a bona fide molecular transducer is that recombinant channels usually respond with small or undetectable currents. Here, we discover a type of Ca2+ influx-operated Ca2+ entry (ICE that generates pronounced Ca2+ spikes. Triggered by rapid onset/offset of Ca2+, voltage, or acid stimuli, Ca2+-dependent activation amplifies a small Ca2+ influx via the channel. Ca2+ concurrently drives a self-limiting negative feedback (Ca2+-dependent inactivation that is regulated by the Ca2+-binding EF hands of PKD2-L1. Our results suggest a biphasic ICE with opposite Ca2+ feedback regulation that facilitates sensory responses to multimodal transient stimuli. We suggest that such a mechanism may also occur for other sensory modalities and other Ca2+ channels.

  1. Influx-Operated Ca(2+) Entry via PKD2-L1 and PKD1-L3 Channels Facilitates Sensory Responses to Polymodal Transient Stimuli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Mingfeng; Liu, Yuxia; Wu, Jinzhi; Liu, Xiaodong

    2015-10-27

    The polycystic TRP subfamily member PKD2-L1, in complex with PKD1-L3, is involved in physiological responses to diverse stimuli. A major challenge to understanding whether and how PKD2-L1/PKD1-L3 acts as a bona fide molecular transducer is that recombinant channels usually respond with small or undetectable currents. Here, we discover a type of Ca(2+) influx-operated Ca(2+) entry (ICE) that generates pronounced Ca(2+) spikes. Triggered by rapid onset/offset of Ca(2+), voltage, or acid stimuli, Ca(2+)-dependent activation amplifies a small Ca(2+) influx via the channel. Ca(2+) concurrently drives a self-limiting negative feedback (Ca(2+)-dependent inactivation) that is regulated by the Ca(2+)-binding EF hands of PKD2-L1. Our results suggest a biphasic ICE with opposite Ca(2+) feedback regulation that facilitates sensory responses to multimodal transient stimuli. We suggest that such a mechanism may also occur for other sensory modalities and other Ca(2+) channels. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Low Complexity Bayesian Single Channel Source Separation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beierholm, Thomas; Pedersen, Brian Dam; Winther, Ole

    2004-01-01

    . Simulations with separation of a male and a female speaker using priors trained on the same speakers show comparable performance with the blind separation approach of G.-J. Jang and T.-W. Lee (see NIPS, vol.15, 2003) with a SNR improvement of 4.9 dB for both the male and female speaker. Mixing coefficients...... keeping the complexity low using machine learning and CASA (computational auditory scene analysis) approaches (Jang and Lee, 2003; Roweis, S.T., 2001; Wang, D.L. and Brown, G.J., 1999; Hu, G. and Wang, D., 2003)....

  3. High frequency repetitive sensory stimulation as intervention to improve sensory loss in patients with complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS I

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marianne eDavid

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Achieving perceptual gains in healthy individuals, or facilitating rehabilitation in patients is generally considered to require intense training to engage neuronal plasticity mechanisms. Recent work, however, suggested that beneficial outcome similar to training can be effectively acquired by a complementary approach in which the learning occurs in response to mere exposure to repetitive sensory stimulation (rSS. For example, high-frequency repetitive sensory stimulation (HF-rSS enhances tactile performance and induces cortical reorganization in healthy subjects and patients after stroke. Patients with complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS show impaired tactile performance associated with shrinkage of cortical maps. We here investigated the feasibility and efficacy of HF-rSS, and low-frequency rSS (LF-rSS to enhance tactile performance and reduce pain intensity in 20 patients with CRPS type I. Intermittent high or low frequency electrical stimuli were applied for 45min/day to all fingertips of the affected hand for 5 days. Main outcome measures were spatial 2-point-discrimination thresholds and mechanical detection thresholds measured on the tip of the index finger bilaterally. Secondary endpoint was current pain intensity. All measures were assessed before and on day 5 after the last stimulation session. HF-rSS applied in 16 patients improved tactile discrimination on the affected hand significantly without changes contralaterally. Current pain intensity remained unchanged on average, but decreased in 4 patients by 30%. This limited pain relief might be due to the short stimulation period of 5 days only. In contrast, after LF-rSS, tactile discrimination was impaired in all 4 patients, while detection thresholds and pain were not affected. Our data suggest that HF-rSS could be used as a novel approach in CRPS treatment to improve sensory loss. Longer treatment periods might be required to induce consistent pain relief.

  4. Distribution of TTX-sensitive voltage-gated sodium channels in primary sensory endings of mammalian muscle spindles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrasco, Dario I; Vincent, Jacob A; Cope, Timothy C

    2017-04-01

    Knowledge of the molecular mechanisms underlying signaling of mechanical stimuli by muscle spindles remains incomplete. In particular, the ionic conductances that sustain tonic firing during static muscle stretch are unknown. We hypothesized that tonic firing by spindle afferents depends on sodium persistent inward current (INaP) and tested for the necessary presence of the appropriate voltage-gated sodium (NaV) channels in primary sensory endings. The NaV 1.6 isoform was selected for both its capacity to produce INaP and for its presence in other mechanosensors that fire tonically. The present study shows that NaV 1.6 immunoreactivity (IR) is concentrated in heminodes, presumably where tonic firing is generated, and we were surprised to find NaV 1.6 IR strongly expressed also in the sensory terminals, where mechanotransduction occurs. This spatial pattern of NaV 1.6 IR distribution was consistent for three mammalian species (rat, cat, and mouse), as was tonic firing by primary spindle afferents. These findings meet some of the conditions needed to establish participation of INaP in tonic firing by primary sensory endings. The study was extended to two additional NaV isoforms, selected for their sensitivity to TTX, excluding TTX-resistant NaV channels, which alone are insufficient to support firing by primary spindle endings. Positive immunoreactivity was found for NaV 1.1 , predominantly in sensory terminals together with NaV 1.6 and for NaV 1.7 , mainly in preterminal axons. Differential distribution in primary sensory endings suggests specialized roles for these three NaV isoforms in the process of mechanosensory signaling by muscle spindles. NEW & NOTEWORTHY The molecular mechanisms underlying mechanosensory signaling responsible for proprioceptive functions are not completely elucidated. This study provides the first evidence that voltage-gated sodium channels (NaVs) are expressed in the spindle primary sensory ending, where NaVs are found at every site

  5. Using an engineered glutamate-gated chloride channel to silence sensory neurons and treat neuropathic pain at the source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weir, Greg A; Middleton, Steven J; Clark, Alex J; Daniel, Tarun; Khovanov, Nikita; McMahon, Stephen B; Bennett, David L

    2017-10-01

    See Basbaum (doi:10.1093/brain/awx227) for a scientific commentary on this article. Peripheral neuropathic pain arises as a consequence of injury to sensory neurons; the development of ectopic activity in these neurons is thought to be critical for the induction and maintenance of such pain. Local anaesthetics and anti-epileptic drugs can suppress hyperexcitability; however, these drugs are complicated by unwanted effects on motor, central nervous system and cardiac function, and alternative more selective treatments to suppress hyperexcitability are therefore required. Here we show that a glutamate-gated chloride channel modified to be activated by low doses of ivermectin (but not glutamate) is highly effective in silencing sensory neurons and reversing neuropathic pain-related hypersensitivity. Activation of the glutamate-gated chloride channel expressed in either rodent or human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived sensory neurons in vitro potently inhibited their response to both electrical and algogenic stimuli. We have shown that silencing is achieved both at nerve terminals and the soma and is independent of membrane hyperpolarization and instead likely mediated by lowering of the membrane resistance. Using intrathecal adeno-associated virus serotype 9-based delivery, the glutamate-gated chloride channel was successfully targeted to mouse sensory neurons in vivo, resulting in high level and long-lasting expression of the channel selectively in sensory neurons. This enabled reproducible and reversible modulation of thermal and mechanical pain thresholds in vivo; analgesia was observed for 3 days after a single systemic dose of ivermectin. We did not observe any motor or proprioceptive deficits and noted no reduction in cutaneous afferent innervation or upregulation of the injury marker ATF3 following prolonged glutamate-gated chloride channel expression. Established mechanical and cold pain-related hypersensitivity generated by the spared nerve injury model

  6. Complex interaction of sensory and motor signs and symptoms in chronic CRPS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huge, Volker; Lauchart, Meike; Magerl, Walter; Beyer, Antje; Moehnle, Patrick; Kaufhold, Wibke; Schelling, Gustav; Azad, Shahnaz Christina

    2011-04-29

    Spontaneous pain, hyperalgesia as well as sensory abnormalities, autonomic, trophic, and motor disturbances are key features of Complex Regional Pain Syndrome (CRPS). This study was conceived to comprehensively characterize the interaction of these symptoms in 118 patients with chronic upper limb CRPS (duration of disease: 43±23 months). Disease-related stress, depression, and the degree of accompanying motor disability were likewise assessed. Stress and depression were measured by Posttraumatic Stress Symptoms Score and Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression Test. Motor disability of the affected hand was determined by Sequential Occupational Dexterity Assessment and Michigan Hand Questionnaire. Sensory changes were assessed by Quantitative Sensory Testing according to the standards of the German Research Network on Neuropathic Pain. Almost two-thirds of all patients exhibited spontaneous pain at rest. Hand force as well as hand motor function were found to be substantially impaired. Results of Quantitative Sensory Testing revealed a distinct pattern of generalized bilateral sensory loss and hyperalgesia, most prominently to blunt pressure. Patients reported substantial motor complaints confirmed by the objective motor disability testings. Interestingly, patients displayed clinically relevant levels of stress and depression. We conclude that chronic CRPS is characterized by a combination of ongoing pain, pain-related disability, stress and depression, potentially triggered by peripheral nerve/tissue damage and ensuing sensory loss. In order to consolidate the different dimensions of disturbances in chronic CRPS, we developed a model based on interaction analysis suggesting a complex hierarchical interaction of peripheral (injury/sensory loss) and central factors (pain/disability/stress/depression) predicting motor dysfunction and hyperalgesia.

  7. Complex interaction of sensory and motor signs and symptoms in chronic CRPS.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Volker Huge

    Full Text Available Spontaneous pain, hyperalgesia as well as sensory abnormalities, autonomic, trophic, and motor disturbances are key features of Complex Regional Pain Syndrome (CRPS. This study was conceived to comprehensively characterize the interaction of these symptoms in 118 patients with chronic upper limb CRPS (duration of disease: 43±23 months. Disease-related stress, depression, and the degree of accompanying motor disability were likewise assessed. Stress and depression were measured by Posttraumatic Stress Symptoms Score and Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression Test. Motor disability of the affected hand was determined by Sequential Occupational Dexterity Assessment and Michigan Hand Questionnaire. Sensory changes were assessed by Quantitative Sensory Testing according to the standards of the German Research Network on Neuropathic Pain. Almost two-thirds of all patients exhibited spontaneous pain at rest. Hand force as well as hand motor function were found to be substantially impaired. Results of Quantitative Sensory Testing revealed a distinct pattern of generalized bilateral sensory loss and hyperalgesia, most prominently to blunt pressure. Patients reported substantial motor complaints confirmed by the objective motor disability testings. Interestingly, patients displayed clinically relevant levels of stress and depression. We conclude that chronic CRPS is characterized by a combination of ongoing pain, pain-related disability, stress and depression, potentially triggered by peripheral nerve/tissue damage and ensuing sensory loss. In order to consolidate the different dimensions of disturbances in chronic CRPS, we developed a model based on interaction analysis suggesting a complex hierarchical interaction of peripheral (injury/sensory loss and central factors (pain/disability/stress/depression predicting motor dysfunction and hyperalgesia.

  8. NaV1.8 channels are expressed in large, as well as small, diameter sensory afferent neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramachandra, Renuka; McGrew, Stephanie Y; Baxter, James C; Howard, Jason R; Elmslie, Keith S

    2013-01-01

    Sensory neurons in the dorsal root ganglia (DRG) express a subset of voltage dependent sodium channels (NaV) including NaV1.1, 1.6, 1.7, 1.8 and 1.9. Previous work supported preferential localization of NaV1.8 channels to small-medium diameter, nociceptive afferent neurons. However, we recently published evidence that NaV1.8 was the dominant NaV channel expressed in the somas of small, medium and large diameter muscle afferent neurons, which is consistent with other reports. Here, we extend those results to show that NaV1.8 expression is not correlated with afferent neuron diameter. Using immunocytochemistry, we found NaV1.8 expression in ~50% of sensory afferent neurons with diameters ranging from 20 to 70 µm. In addition, electrophysiological analysis shows that the kinetic and inactivation properties of NaV1.8 current are invariant with neuron size. These data add further support to the idea that NaV1.8 contributes to the electrical excitability of both nociceptive and non-nociceptive sensory neurons.

  9. Sensory and sensorimotor gating in children with multiple complex developmental disorders (MCDD) and autism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oranje, Bob; Lahuis, Bertine; van Engeland, Herman

    2013-01-01

    Multiple Complex Developmental Disorder (MCDD) is a well-defined and validated behavioral subtype of autism with a proposed elevated risk of developing a schizophrenic spectrum disorder. The current study investigated whether children with MCDD show the same deficits in sensory gating...

  10. Changes of voltage-gated sodium channels in sensory nerve regeneration and neuropathic pain models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casals-Díaz, Laura; Casas, Caty; Navarro, Xavier

    2015-01-01

    The present study was conducted to determine changes in the expression of voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSCs) α-subunits after nerve injury and their relation with development of neuropathic pain. We used the crush injury model of regeneration of the sciatic nerve (Crush) and the spared nerve injury (SNI) model of neuropathic pain in the rat. Measurements of thermal and mechanical pain thresholds were performed until 3 months after injury. Real-time PCR and immunohistochemistry of VGSC α-subunits were used to evaluate the mRNA and protein expression in the DRG. Both nerve injuries induced similar alterations in the VGSCs expression at 7 dpi, with upregulation of Nav1.3, and downregulation of Nav1.7, Nav1.8 and Nav1.9. These changes persisted until 28 days, when hyperalgesia was still present in SNI but not in Crush rats. At 90 days, mRNA expression of all analyzed α-subunits returned to basal levels in the Crush group. However, SNI rats still showed altered expression of VGSCs, and neuropathic pain responses. Immunohistochemical staining revealed that Nav1.8 and Nav1.9 were widely expressed in IB4-positive neurons of the DRG, relevant in pain processing. The population of neurons coexpressing each α-subunit and IB4 was also affected by the injury, more markedly after the Crush. Shifts in VGSCs expression occur in parallel to neuropathic pain behavior in rats early after injury, while at later times they appear to be more related to sensory nerve degeneration and regeneration processes.

  11. Caenorhabditis elegans TRPV channels function in a modality-specific pathway to regulate response to aberrant sensory signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ezak, Meredith J; Hong, Elizabeth; Chaparro-Garcia, Angela; Ferkey, Denise M

    2010-05-01

    Olfaction and some forms of taste (including bitter) are mediated by G protein-coupled signal transduction pathways. Olfactory and gustatory ligands bind to chemosensory G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) in specialized sensory cells to activate intracellular signal transduction cascades. G protein-coupled receptor kinases (GRKs) are negative regulators of signaling that specifically phosphorylate activated GPCRs to terminate signaling. Although loss of GRK function usually results in enhanced cellular signaling, Caenorhabditis elegans lacking GRK-2 function are not hypersensitive to chemosensory stimuli. Instead, grk-2 mutant animals do not chemotax toward attractive olfactory stimuli or avoid aversive tastes and smells. We show here that loss-of-function mutations in the transient receptor potential vanilloid (TRPV) channels OSM-9 and OCR-2 selectively restore grk-2 behavioral avoidance of bitter tastants, revealing modality-specific mechanisms for TRPV channel function in the regulation of C. elegans chemosensation. Additionally, a single amino acid point mutation in OCR-2 that disrupts TRPV channel-mediated gene expression, but does not decrease channel function in chemosensory primary signal transduction, also restores grk-2 bitter taste avoidance. Thus, loss of GRK-2 function may lead to changes in gene expression, via OSM-9/OCR-2, to selectively alter the levels of signaling components that transduce or regulate bitter taste responses. Our results suggest a novel mechanism and multiple modality-specific pathways that sensory cells employ in response to aberrant signal transduction.

  12. Gating and modulation of presumptive NaV1.9 channels in enteric and spinal sensory neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coste, Bertrand; Osorio, Nancy; Padilla, Françoise; Crest, Marcel; Delmas, Patrick

    2004-05-01

    The NaV1.9 subunit is expressed in nociceptive dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons and sensory myenteric neurons in which it generates 'persistent' tetrodotoxin-resistant (TTX-R) Na+ currents of yet unknown physiological functions. Here, we have analyzed these currents in details by combining single-channel and whole-cell recordings from cultured rat DRG and myenteric neurons. Comparison of single-channel with whole-cell data indicates that recording using internal CsCl best reflects the basic electrical features of NaV1.9 currents. Inclusion of fluoride in the pipette solution caused a negative shift in the activation and inactivation gates of NaV1.9 but not NaV1.8. Fluoride acts by promoting entry of NaV1.9 channels into a preopen closed state, which causes a strong bias towards opening and enhances the ability of sensory neurons to sustain spiking. Thus, the modulation of the resting-closed states of NaV1.9 channels strongly influences nociceptor excitability and may provide a mechanism by which inflammatory mediators alter pain threshold.

  13. Block of sensory neuronal Na+ channels by the secreolytic ambroxol is associated with an interaction with local anesthetic binding sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leffler, Andreas; Reckzeh, Jennifer; Nau, Carla

    2010-03-25

    Voltage-gated Na(+) channels (Na(v)) regulate the excitability of sensory neurons and are potential targets for novel analgesics. The secreolytic ambroxol reduces pain-related behavior in rodents and alleviates pain in humans. With properties resembling those of local anesthetics, ambroxol has been reported to block Na(+) currents in sensory neurons with a preference for tetrodotoxin-resistant (TTXr) Na(+) currents encoded by Na(v)1.8. However, the molecular determinants for ambroxol-induced block of Na(+) channels and a preferential block of Na(v)1.8 opposed to tetrodotoxin-sensitive (TTXs) Na(v) alpha-subunits have not been studied in detail. By means of whole-cell voltage clamp recordings, we studied the effects of ambroxol and local anesthetics on the recombinant TTXr subunit Na(v)1.8, on TTXs Na(v) alpha-subunits and on mutants of Na(v)1.4 that are insensitive to local anesthetics. Tonic and use-dependent block by ambroxol was strongly alleviated in local anesthetic-insensitive Na(v)1.4 mutants. Use-dependent block, but not tonic block was significantly stronger on Na(v)1.8 than on TTXs channels. The TTXs subunit Na(v)1.3 displayed the least degree of use-dependent block by ambroxol. The local anesthetics mepivacaine and S(-)-bupivacaine also blocked Na(v)1.8 and TTXs channels differentially. While mepivacaine displayed a preferential use-dependent block of Na(v)1.8, S(-)-bupivacaine displayed a preference for TTXs Na(+) channels. Our data show that ambroxol acts as a typical local anesthetic on Na(+) channels interacting with specific residues in the S6 segments. This property probably meditates the analgesic effect of ambroxol. Ambroxol preferentially blocks Na(v)1.8, however shares this property with established local anesthetics like mepivacaine.

  14. Resolvin D1 attenuates activation of sensory transient receptor potential channels leading to multiple anti-nociception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bang, S; Yoo, S; Yang, T J; Cho, H; Kim, Y G; Hwang, S W

    2010-10-01

    Temperature-sensitive transient receptor potential ion channels (thermoTRPs) expressed in primary sensory neurons and skin keratinocytes play a crucial role as peripheral pain detectors. Many natural and synthetic ligands have been found to act on thermoTRPs, but little is known about endogenous compounds that inhibit these TRPs. Here, we asked whether resolvin D1 (RvD1), a naturally occurring anti-inflammatory and pro-resolving lipid molecule is able to affect the TRP channel activation. We examined the effect of RvD1 on the six thermoTRPs using Ca(2+) imaging and whole cell electrophysiology experiments using the HEK cell heterologous expression system, cultured sensory neurons and HaCaT keratinocytes. We also checked changes in agonist-specific acute licking/flicking or flinching behaviours and TRP-related mechanical and thermal pain behaviours using Hargreaves, Randall-Selitto and von Frey assay systems with or without inflammation. RvD1 inhibited the activities of TRPA1, TRPV3 and TRPV4 at nanomolar and micromolar levels. Consistent attenuations in agonist-specific acute pain behaviours by immediate peripheral administration with RvD1 were also observed. Furthermore, local pretreatment with RvD1 significantly reversed mechanical and thermal hypersensitivity in inflamed tissues. RvD1 was a novel endogenous inhibitor for several sensory TRPs. The results of our behavioural studies suggest that RvD1 has an analgesic potential via these TRP-related mechanisms.

  15. Role of calcium ions in the positive interaction between TRPA1 and TRPV1 channels in bronchopulmonary sensory neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Chun-Chun; Lee, Lu-Yuan

    2015-06-15

    Both transient receptor potential ankyrin 1 (TRPA1) and vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) receptors are abundantly expressed in bronchopulmonary C-fiber sensory nerves and can be activated by a number of endogenous inflammatory mediators. A recent study has reported a synergistic effect of simultaneous TRPA1 and TRPV1 activations in vagal pulmonary C-fiber afferents in anesthetized rats, but its underlying mechanism was not known. This study aimed to characterize a possible interaction between these two TRP channels and to investigate the potential role of Ca(2+) as a mediator of this interaction in isolated rat vagal pulmonary sensory neurons. Using the perforated patch-clamp recording technique, our study demonstrated a distinct positive interaction occurring abruptly between TRPA1 and TRPV1 when they were activated simultaneously by their respective agonists, capsaicin (Cap) and allyl isothiocyanate (AITC), at near-threshold concentrations in these neurons. AITC at this low concentration evoked only minimal or undetectable responses, but it markedly amplified the Cap-evoked current in the same neurons. This potentiating effect was eliminated when either AITC or Cap was replaced by non-TRPA1 and non-TRPV1 chemical activators of these neurons, demonstrating the selectivity of the interaction between these two TRP channels. Furthermore, when Ca(2+) was removed from the extracellular solution, the synergistic effect of Cap and AITC on pulmonary sensory neurons was completely abrogated, clearly indicating a critical role of Ca(2+) in mediating the action. These results suggest that this TRPA1-TRPV1 interaction may play a part in regulating the sensitivity of pulmonary sensory neurons during airway inflammatory reaction. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  16. Hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated channels in olfactory sensory neurons regulate axon extension and glomerular formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mobley, Arie S; Miller, Alexandra M; Araneda, Ricardo C; Maurer, Lydia R; Müller, Frank; Greer, Charles A

    2010-12-08

    Mechanisms influencing the development of olfactory bulb glomeruli are poorly understood. While odor receptors (ORs) play an important role in olfactory sensory neuron (OSN) axon targeting/coalescence (Mombaerts et al., 1996; Wang et al., 1998; Feinstein and Mombaerts, 2004), recent work showed that G protein activation alone is sufficient to induce OSN axon coalescence (Imai et al., 2006; Chesler et al., 2007), suggesting an activity-dependent mechanism in glomerular development. Consistent with these data, OSN axon projections and convergence are perturbed in mice deficient for adenylyl cyclase III, which is downstream from the OR and catalyzes the conversion of ATP to cAMP. However, in cyclic nucleotide-gated (CNG) channel knock-out mice OSN axons are only transiently perturbed (Lin et al., 2000), suggesting that the CNG channel may not be the sole target of cAMP. This prompted us to investigate an alternative channel, the hyperpolarization-activated, cyclic nucleotide-gated cation channel (HCN), as a potential developmental target of cAMP in OSNs. Here, we demonstrate that HCN channels are developmentally precocious in OSNs and therefore are plausible candidates for affecting OSN axon development. Inhibition of HCN channels in dissociated OSNs significantly reduced neurite outgrowth. Moreover, in HCN1 knock-out mice the formation of glomeruli was delayed in parallel with perturbations of axon organization in the olfactory nerve. These data support the hypothesis that the outgrowth and coalescence of OSN axons is, at least in part, subject to activity-dependent mechanisms mediated via HCN channels.

  17. Interfacing sensory input with motor output: does the control architecture converge to a serial process along a single channel?

    Science.gov (United States)

    van de Kamp, Cornelis; Gawthrop, Peter J; Gollee, Henrik; Lakie, Martin; Loram, Ian D

    2013-01-01

    Modular organization in control architecture may underlie the versatility of human motor control; but the nature of the interface relating sensory input through task-selection in the space of performance variables to control actions in the space of the elemental variables is currently unknown. Our central question is whether the control architecture converges to a serial process along a single channel? In discrete reaction time experiments, psychologists have firmly associated a serial single channel hypothesis with refractoriness and response selection [psychological refractory period (PRP)]. Recently, we developed a methodology and evidence identifying refractoriness in sustained control of an external single degree-of-freedom system. We hypothesize that multi-segmental whole-body control also shows refractoriness. Eight participants controlled their whole body to ensure a head marker tracked a target as fast and accurately as possible. Analysis showed enhanced delays in response to stimuli with close temporal proximity to the preceding stimulus. Consistent with our preceding work, this evidence is incompatible with control as a linear time invariant process. This evidence is consistent with a single-channel serial ballistic process within the intermittent control paradigm with an intermittent interval of around 0.5 s. A control architecture reproducing intentional human movement control must reproduce refractoriness. Intermittent control is designed to provide computational time for an online optimization process and is appropriate for flexible adaptive control. For human motor control we suggest that parallel sensory input converges to a serial, single channel process involving planning, selection, and temporal inhibition of alternative responses prior to low dimensional motor output. Such design could aid robots to reproduce the flexibility of human control.

  18. Upregulation of T-type Ca2+ channels in primary sensory neurons in spinal nerve injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Jing; Liu, Lieju; Liu, Zhiguo; Shu, Bin; Zhang, Yi

    2013-03-15

    Painful behavior testing, whole-cell patch clamp recordings, and PCR analysis were served to test the influence of T-type Ca channels in spinal nerve-injured rats. To determine the changes of T-type Ca channels in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons of different sizes and the contribution to neuronal firing and painful behavior in neuropathic pain induced by nerve injury. T-type and high-voltage-activated Ca channels play an important role in the transmission of nociceptive signals, especially in neuronal hyperexcitability in neuropathic pain. However, little is known about how nerve injury affects T-type Ca channels in DRG neurons of different sizes. The effect of intrathecal administration of mibefradil in nerve-ligated rats was examined by painful behavior testing and current clamp. The changes of T-type Ca channels in DRG neurons caused by spinal nerve ligation were determined by RT-PCR analysis and voltage clamp. Spinal nerve injury significantly increased current density of T-type Ca channels in small DRG neurons. In addition, nerve injury significantly increased the percentage of T-type Ca channels in medium and large DRG neurons. Nerve injury significantly increased the mRNA levels of Cav3.2 and Cav3.3 in DRGs. Block of T-type Ca channels on mibefradil administration significantly normalized painful behavior and hyperexcitability in neuronal firing in spinal nerve-injured rats. Our study first indicated the upregulation of functional T-type Ca channels in DRG neurons of different sizes and the changes in different subtypes of T-type Ca channels by spinal nerve injury. Considering the effect of blocking T-type Ca channels in painful behavior and abnormal neuronal firing in rats with nerve injury, our results suggest that T-type Ca channels are potential therapeutic targets for the treatment of spinal nerve ligation-induced neuropathic pain.

  19. Voltage-gated sodium channels in nociceptive versus non-nociceptive nodose vagal sensory neurons innervating guinea pig lungs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwong, Kevin; Carr, Michael J; Gibbard, Anna; Savage, Tony J; Singh, Kuljit; Jing, Junping; Meeker, Sonya; Undem, Bradley J

    2008-01-01

    Lung vagal sensory fibres are broadly categorized as C fibres (nociceptors) and A fibres (non-nociceptive; rapidly and slowly adapting low-threshold stretch receptors). These afferent fibre types differ in degree of myelination, conduction velocity, neuropeptide content, sensitivity to chemical and mechanical stimuli, as well as evoked reflex responses. Recent studies in nociceptive fibres of the somatosensory system indicated that the tetrodotoxin-resistant (TTX-R) voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSC) are preferentially expressed in the nociceptive fibres of the somatosensory system (dorsal root ganglia). Whereas TTX-R sodium currents have been documented in lung vagal sensory nerves fibres, a rigorous comparison of their expression in nociceptive versus non-nociceptive vagal sensory neurons has not been carried out. Using multiple approaches including patch clamp electrophysiology, immunohistochemistry, and single-cell gene expression analysis in the guinea pig, we obtained data supporting the hypothesis that the TTX-R sodium currents are similarly distributed between nodose ganglion A-fibres and C-fibres innervating the lung. Moreover, mRNA and immunoreactivity for the TTX-R VGSC molecules NaV1.8 and NaV1.9 were present in nearly all neurons. We conclude that contrary to findings in the somatosensory neurons, TTX-R VGSCs are not preferentially expressed in the nociceptive C-fibre population innervating the lungs. PMID:18187475

  20. Associations of Volatile Compounds with Sensory Aroma and Flavor: The Complex Nature of Flavor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edgar Chambers IV

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Attempts to relate sensory analysis data to specific chemicals such as volatile compounds have been frequent. Often these associations are difficult to interpret or are weak in nature. Although some difficulties may relate to the methods used, the difficulties also result from the complex nature of flavor. For example, there are multiple volatiles responsible for a flavor sensation, combinations of volatiles yield different flavors than those expected from individual compounds, and the differences in perception of volatiles in different matrices. This review identifies some of the reasons sensory analysis and instrumental measurements result in poor associations and suggests issues that need to be addressed in future research for better understanding of the relationships of flavor/aroma phenomena and chemical composition.

  1. Intended and unintended (sensory-)motor coupling between the affected and unaffected upper limb in Complex Regional Pain Syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bank, P.J.M.; Peper, C.E.; Marinus, J.; Van Hilten, J.J.; Beek, P.J.

    2015-01-01

    Background Motor dysfunction in complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) has been associated with bilateral malfunction of sensory and motor circuits, which hints at abnormal coupling between the affected and the contralateral unaffected limb. In addition, clinical observations suggest that motor

  2. Calcium-dependent inhibition of T-type calcium channels by TRPV1 activation in rat sensory neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comunanza, Valentina; Carbone, Emilio; Marcantoni, Andrea; Sher, Emanuele; Ursu, Daniel

    2011-11-01

    We studied the inhibitory effects of transient receptor potential vanilloid-1 (TRPV1) activation by capsaicin on low-voltage-activated (LVA, T-type) Ca(2+) channel and high-voltage-activated (HVA; L, N, P/Q, R) currents in rat DRG sensory neurons, as a potential mechanism underlying capsaicin-induced analgesia. T-type and HVA currents were elicited in whole-cell clamped DRG neurons using ramp commands applied before and after 30-s exposures to 1 μM capsaicin. T-type currents were estimated at the first peak of the I-V characteristics and HVA at the second peak, occurring at more positive potentials. Small and medium-sized DRG neurons responded to capsaicin producing transient inward currents of variable amplitudes, mainly carried by Ca(2+). In those cells responding to capsaicin with a large Ca(2+) influx (59% of the total), a marked inhibition of both T-type and HVA Ca(2+) currents was observed. The percentage of T-type and HVA channel inhibition was prevented by replacing Ca(2+) with Ba(2+) during capsaicin application or applying high doses of intracellular BAPTA (20 mM), suggesting that TRPV1-mediated inhibition of T-type and HVA channels is Ca(2+)-dependent and likely confined to membrane nano-microdomains. Our data are consistent with the idea that TRPV1-induced analgesia may derive from indirect inhibition of both T-type and HVA channels which, in turn, would reduce the threshold of nociceptive signals generation (T-type channel inhibition) and nociceptive synaptic transmission (HVA-channels inhibition).

  3. Targeting A-type K(+) channels in primary sensory neurons for bone cancer pain in a rat model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Kai-Zheng; Xu, Qian; Zhang, Xiao-Meng; Zhao, Zhi-Qi; Mei, Yan-Ai; Zhang, Yu-Qiu

    2012-03-01

    Cancer pain is one of the most severe types of chronic pain, and the most common cancer pain is bone cancer pain. The treatment of bone cancer pain remains a clinical challenge. Here, we report firstly that A-type K(+) channels in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) are involved in the neuropathy of rat bone cancer pain and are a new target for diclofenac, a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug that can be used for therapy for this distinct pain. There are dynamically functional changes of the A-type K(+) channels in DRG neurons during bone cancer pain. The A-type K(+) currents that mainly express in isolectin B4-positive small DRG neurons are increased on post-tumor day 14 (PTD 14), then faded but still remained at a higher level on PTD 21. Correspondingly, the expression levels of A-type K(+) channel Kv1.4, Kv3.4, and Kv4.3 showed time-dependent changes during bone cancer pain. Diclofenac enhances A-type K(+) currents in the DRG neurons and attenuates bone cancer pain in a dose-dependent manner. The analgesic effect of diclofenac can be reversed or prevented by A-type K(+) channel blocker 4-AP or pandinotoxin-Kα, also by siRNA targeted against rat Kv1.4 or Kv4.3. Repeated diclofenac administration decreased soft tissue swelling adjacent to the tumor and attenuated bone destruction. These results indicate that peripheral A-type K(+) channels were involved in the neuropathy of rat bone cancer pain. Targeting A-type K(+) channels in primary sensory neurons may provide a novel mechanism-based therapeutic strategy for bone cancer pain. Copyright © 2011 International Association for the Study of Pain. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Sensory neuron voltage-gated sodium channels as analgesic drug targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Momin, Aliakmal; Wood, John N

    2008-08-01

    Voltage-gated sodium channels are crucial determinants of neuronal excitability and signalling; some specific channel subtypes have been implicated in a number of chronic pain conditions. Human genetic studies show gain-of-function or loss-of-function mutations in Na(V)1.7 lead to an enhancement or lack of pain, respectively, whilst transgenic mouse and knockdown studies have implicated Na(V)1.3, Na(V)1.8 and Na(V)1.9 in peripheral pain pathways. The development of subtype-specific sodium channel blockers, though clearly desirable, has been technically challenging. Recent advances exploiting both natural products and small molecule selective channel blockers have demonstrated that this approach to pain control is feasible. These observations provide a rationale for the development of new analgesics without the side effect profile of broad spectrum sodium channel blockers.

  5. The answer is blowing in the wind: free-flying honeybees can integrate visual and mechano-sensory inputs for making complex foraging decisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravi, Sridhar; Garcia, Jair E; Wang, Chun; Dyer, Adrian G

    2016-11-01

    Bees navigate in complex environments using visual, olfactory and mechano-sensorial cues. In the lowest region of the atmosphere, the wind environment can be highly unsteady and bees employ fine motor-skills to enhance flight control. Recent work reveals sophisticated multi-modal processing of visual and olfactory channels by the bee brain to enhance foraging efficiency, but it currently remains unclear whether wind-induced mechano-sensory inputs are also integrated with visual information to facilitate decision making. Individual honeybees were trained in a linear flight arena with appetitive-aversive differential conditioning to use a context-setting cue of 3 m s(-1) cross-wind direction to enable decisions about either a 'blue' or 'yellow' star stimulus being the correct alternative. Colour stimuli properties were mapped in bee-specific opponent-colour spaces to validate saliency, and to thus enable rapid reverse learning. Bees were able to integrate mechano-sensory and visual information to facilitate decisions that were significantly different to chance expectation after 35 learning trials. An independent group of bees were trained to find a single rewarding colour that was unrelated to the wind direction. In these trials, wind was not used as a context-setting cue and served only as a potential distracter in identifying the relevant rewarding visual stimuli. Comparison between respective groups shows that bees can learn to integrate visual and mechano-sensory information in a non-elemental fashion, revealing an unsuspected level of sensory processing in honeybees, and adding to the growing body of knowledge on the capacity of insect brains to use multi-modal sensory inputs in mediating foraging behaviour. © 2016. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  6. Comprehensive RNA-Seq expression analysis of sensory ganglia with a focus on ion channels and GPCRs in Trigeminal ganglia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manteniotis, Stavros; Lehmann, Ramona; Flegel, Caroline; Vogel, Felix; Hofreuter, Adrian; Schreiner, Benjamin S P; Altmüller, Janine; Becker, Christian; Schöbel, Nicole; Hatt, Hanns; Gisselmann, Günter

    2013-01-01

    The specific functions of sensory systems depend on the tissue-specific expression of genes that code for molecular sensor proteins that are necessary for stimulus detection and membrane signaling. Using the Next Generation Sequencing technique (RNA-Seq), we analyzed the complete transcriptome of the trigeminal ganglia (TG) and dorsal root ganglia (DRG) of adult mice. Focusing on genes with an expression level higher than 1 FPKM (fragments per kilobase of transcript per million mapped reads), we detected the expression of 12984 genes in the TG and 13195 in the DRG. To analyze the specific gene expression patterns of the peripheral neuronal tissues, we compared their gene expression profiles with that of the liver, brain, olfactory epithelium, and skeletal muscle. The transcriptome data of the TG and DRG were scanned for virtually all known G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) as well as for ion channels. The expression profile was ranked with regard to the level and specificity for the TG. In total, we detected 106 non-olfactory GPCRs and 33 ion channels that had not been previously described as expressed in the TG. To validate the RNA-Seq data, in situ hybridization experiments were performed for several of the newly detected transcripts. To identify differences in expression profiles between the sensory ganglia, the RNA-Seq data of the TG and DRG were compared. Among the differentially expressed genes (> 1 FPKM), 65 and 117 were expressed at least 10-fold higher in the TG and DRG, respectively. Our transcriptome analysis allows a comprehensive overview of all ion channels and G protein-coupled receptors that are expressed in trigeminal ganglia and provides additional approaches for the investigation of trigeminal sensing as well as for the physiological and pathophysiological mechanisms of pain.

  7. Possible involvement of transient receptor potential ankyrin 1 in Ca2+signaling via T-type Ca2+channel in mouse sensory neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishizawa, Yuki; Takahashi, Kenji; Oguma, Naoko; Tominaga, Makoto; Ohta, Toshio

    2017-12-28

    T-type Ca 2+ channels and TRPA1 are expressed in sensory neurons and both are associated with pain transmission, but their functional interaction is unclear. Here we demonstrate that pharmacological evidence of the functional relation between T-type Ca 2+ channels and TRPA1 in mouse sensory neurons. Low concentration of KCl at 15 mM (15K) evoked increases of intracellular Ca 2+ concentration ([Ca 2+ ] i ), which were suppressed by selective T-type Ca 2+ channel blockers. RT-PCR showed that mouse sensory neurons expressed all subtypes of T-type Ca 2+ channel. The magnitude of 15K-induced [Ca 2+ ] i increase was significantly larger in neurons sensitive to allylisothiocyanate (AITC, a TRPA1 agonist) than in those insensitive to it, and in TRPA1 -/- mouse sensory neurons. TRPA1 blockers diminished the [Ca 2+ ] i responses to 15K in neurons sensitive to AITC, but failed to inhibit 40 mM KCl-induced [Ca 2+ ] i increases even in AITC-sensitive neurons. TRPV1 blockers did not inhibit the 15K-induced [Ca 2+ ] i increase regardless of the sensitivity to capsaicin. [Ca 2+ ] i responses to TRPA1 agonist were enhanced by co-application with 15K. These pharmacological data suggest the possibility of functional interaction between T-type Ca 2+ channels and TRPA1 in sensory neurons. Since TRPA1 channel is activated by intracellular Ca 2+ , we hypothesize that Ca 2+ entered via T-type Ca 2+ channel activation may further stimulate TRPA1, resulting in an enhancement of nociceptive signaling. Thus, T-type Ca 2+ channel may be a potential target for TRPA1-related pain. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. TRP2: A candidate transduction channel for mammalian pheromone sensory signaling

    OpenAIRE

    Liman, Emily R.; Corey, David P.; Dulac, Catherine

    1999-01-01

    The vomeronasal organ (VNO) of terrestrial vertebrates plays a key role in the detection of pheromones, chemicals released by animals that elicit stereotyped sexual and aggressive behaviors among conspecifics. Sensory transduction in the VNO appears unrelated to that in the vertebrate olfactory and visual systems: the putative pheromone receptors of the VNO are evolutionarily independent from the odorant receptors and, in contrast to vertebrate visual and olfactory transduction, vomeronasal t...

  9. EXPRESS: Voltage-dependent sodium (NaV) channels in group IV sensory afferents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramachandra, Renuka; Elmslie, Keith S

    2016-01-01

    Patients with intermittent claudication suffer from both muscle pain and an exacerbated exercise pressor reflex. Excitability of the group III and group IV afferent fibers mediating these functions is controlled in part by voltage-dependent sodium (NaV) channels. We previously found tetrodotoxin-resistant NaV1.8 channels to be the primary type in muscle afferent somata. However, action potentials in group III and IV afferent axons are blocked by TTX, supporting a minimal role of NaV1.8 channels. To address these apparent differences in NaV channel expression between axon and soma, we used immunohistochemistry to identify the NaV channels expressed in group IV axons within the gastrocnemius muscle and the dorsal root ganglia sections. Positive labeling by an antibody against the neurofilament protein peripherin was used to identify group IV neurons and axons. We show that >67% of group IV fibers express NaV1.8, NaV1.6, or NaV1.7. Interestingly, expression of NaV1.8 channels in group IV somata was significantly higher than in the fibers, whereas there were no significant differences for either NaV1.6 or NaV1.7. When combined with previous work, our results suggest that NaV1.8 channels are expressed in most group IV axons, but that, under normal conditions, NaV1.6 and/or NaV1.7 play a more important role in action potential generation to signal muscle pain and the exercise pressor reflex.

  10. The sensory channel of presentation alters subjective ratings and autonomic responses toward disgusting stimuli-Blood pressure, heart rate and skin conductance in response to visual, auditory, haptic and olfactory presented disgusting stimuli

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Croy, Ilona; Laqua, Kerstin; Süß, Frank; Joraschky, Peter; Ziemssen, Tjalf; Hummel, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    .... Therefore, disgust experience evoked by four different sensory channels was compared. A total of 119 participants received 3 different disgusting and one control stimulus, each presented through the visual, auditory, tactile, and olfactory channel...

  11. Reduced Complexity Channel Models for IMT-Advanced Evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Zhang

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Accuracy and complexity are two crucial aspects of the applicability of a channel model for wideband multiple input multiple output (MIMO systems. For small number of antenna element pairs, correlation-based models have lower computational complexity while the geometry-based stochastic models (GBSMs can provide more accurate modeling of real radio propagation. This paper investigates several potential simplifications of the GBSM to reduce the complexity with minimal impact on accuracy. In addition, we develop a set of broadband metrics which enable a thorough investigation of the differences between the GBSMs and the simplified models. The impact of various random variables which are employed by the original GBSM on the system level simulation are also studied. Both simulation results and a measurement campaign show that complexity can be reduced significantly with a negligible loss of accuracy in the proposed metrics. As an example, in the presented scenarios, the computational time can be reduced by up to 57% while keeping the relative deviation of 5% outage capacity within 5%.

  12. Minimum Time Search in Uncertain Dynamic Domains with Complex Sensorial Platforms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanillos, Pablo; Besada-Portas, Eva; Lopez-Orozco, Jose Antonio; de la Cruz, Jesus Manuel

    2014-01-01

    The minimum time search in uncertain domains is a searching task, which appears in real world problems such as natural disasters and sea rescue operations, where a target has to be found, as soon as possible, by a set of sensor-equipped searchers. The automation of this task, where the time to detect the target is critical, can be achieved by new probabilistic techniques that directly minimize the Expected Time (ET) to detect a dynamic target using the observation probability models and actual observations collected by the sensors on board the searchers. The selected technique, described in algorithmic form in this paper for completeness, has only been previously partially tested with an ideal binary detection model, in spite of being designed to deal with complex non-linear/non-differential sensorial models. This paper covers the gap, testing its performance and applicability over different searching tasks with searchers equipped with different complex sensors. The sensorial models under test vary from stepped detection probabilities to continuous/discontinuous differentiable/non-differentiable detection probabilities dependent on distance, orientation, and structured maps. The analysis of the simulated results of several static and dynamic scenarios performed in this paper validates the applicability of the technique with different types of sensor models. PMID:25093345

  13. Minimum Time Search in Uncertain Dynamic Domains with Complex Sensorial Platforms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pablo Lanillos

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The minimum time search in uncertain domains is a searching task, which appears in real world problems such as natural disasters and sea rescue operations, where a target has to be found, as soon as possible, by a set of sensor-equipped searchers. The automation of this task, where the time to detect the target is critical, can be achieved by new probabilistic techniques that directly minimize the Expected Time (ET to detect a dynamic target using the observation probability models and actual observations collected by the sensors on board the searchers. The selected technique, described in algorithmic form in this paper for completeness, has only been previously partially tested with an ideal binary detection model, in spite of being designed to deal with complex non-linear/non-differential sensorial models. This paper covers the gap, testing its performance and applicability over different searching tasks with searchers equipped with different complex sensors. The sensorial models under test vary from stepped detection probabilities to continuous/discontinuous differentiable/non-differentiable detection probabilities dependent on distance, orientation, and structured maps. The analysis of the simulated results of several static and dynamic scenarios performed in this paper validates the applicability of the technique with different types of sensor models.

  14. Hydrogen sulfide mediated inhibitory neurotransmission to the pig bladder neck: role of KATP channels, sensory nerves and calcium signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Vítor S; Ribeiro, Ana S F; Barahona, María Victoria; Orensanz, Luis M; Martínez-Sáenz, Ana; Recio, Paz; Martínez, Ana Cristina; Bustamante, Salvador; Carballido, Joaquín; García-Sacristán, Albino; Prieto, Dolores; Hernández, Medardo

    2013-08-01

    Because neuronal released endogenous H2S has a key role in relaxation of the bladder outflow region, we investigated the mechanisms involved in H2S dependent inhibitory neurotransmission to the pig bladder neck. Bladder neck strips were mounted in myographs for isometric force recording and simultaneous measurement of intracellular Ca(2+) and tension. On phenylephrine contracted preparations electrical field stimulation and the H2S donor GYY4137 evoked frequency and concentration dependent relaxation, which was reduced by desensitizing capsaicin sensitive primary afferents with capsaicin, and the blockade of adenosine 5'-triphosphate dependent K(+) channels, cyclooxygenase and cyclooxygenase-1 with glibenclamide, indomethacin and SC560, respectively. Inhibition of vanilloid, transient receptor potential A1, transient receptor potential vanilloid 1, vasoactive intestinal peptide/pituitary adenylyl cyclase-activating polypeptide and calcitonin gene-related peptide receptors with capsazepine, HC030031, AMG9810, PACAP6-38 and CGRP8-37, respectively, also decreased electrical field stimulation and GYY4137 responses. H2S relaxation was not changed by guanylyl cyclase, protein kinase A, or Ca(2+) activated or voltage gated K(+) channel inhibitors. GYY4137 inhibited the contractions induced by phenylephrine and by K(+) enriched (80 mM) physiological saline solution. To a lesser extent it decreased the phenylephrine and K(+) induced increases in intracellular Ca(2+). H2S produces pig bladder neck relaxation via activation of adenosine 5'-triphosphate dependent K(+) channel and by smooth muscle intracellular Ca(2+) desensitization dependent mechanisms. H2S also promotes the release of sensory neuropeptides and cyclooxygenase-1 pathway derived prostanoids from capsaicin sensitive primary afferents via transient receptor potential A1, transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 and/or related ion channel activation. Copyright © 2013 American Urological Association Education and

  15. Ligand- and voltage-gated Ca2+ channels differentially regulate the mode of vesicular neuropeptide release in mammalian sensory neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yeshi; Wu, Qihui; Hu, Meiqin; Liu, Bin; Chai, Zuying; Huang, Rong; Wang, Yuan; Xu, Huadong; Zhou, Li; Zheng, Lianghong; Wang, Changhe; Zhou, Zhuan

    2017-06-20

    Neuropeptides released from dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons play essential roles in the neurotransmission of sensory inputs, including those underlying nociception and pathological pain. Neuropeptides are released from intracellular vesicles through two modes: a partial release mode called "kiss-and-run" (KAR) and a full release mode called "full fusion-like" (FFL). Using total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy, we traced the release of pH-sensitive green fluorescent protein-tagged neuropeptide Y (pHluorin-NPY) from individual dense-core vesicles in the soma and axon of single DRG neurons after Ca2+ influx through either voltage-gated Ca2+ channels (VGCCs) or ligand-gated transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) channels. We found that Ca2+ influx through VGCCs stimulated FFL and a greater single release of neuropeptides. In contrast, Ca2+ influx through TRPV1 channels stimulated KAR and a pulsed but prolonged release of neuropeptides that was partially mediated by Dynamin 1, which limits fusion pore expansion. Suppressing the Ca2+ gradient to an extent similar to that seen after TRPV1 activation abolished the VGCC preference for FFL. The findings suggest that by generating a steeper Ca2+ gradient, VGCCs promote a more robust fusion pore opening that facilitates FFL. Thus, KAR and FFL release modes are differentially regulated by the two principal types of Ca2+-permeable channels in DRG neurons. Copyright © 2017 The Authors, some rights reserved; exclusive licensee American Association for the Advancement of Science. No claim to original U.S. Government Works.

  16. Interaction of hyperalgesia and sensory loss in complex regional pain syndrome type I (CRPS I).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huge, Volker; Lauchart, Meike; Förderreuther, Stefanie; Kaufhold, Wibke; Valet, Michael; Azad, Shahnaz Christina; Beyer, Antje; Magerl, Walter

    2008-07-23

    Sensory abnormalities are a key feature of Complex Regional Pain Syndrome (CRPS). In order to characterise these changes in patients suffering from acute or chronic CRPS I, we used Quantitative Sensory Testing (QST) in comparison to an age and gender matched control group. 61 patients presenting with CRPS I of the upper extremity and 56 healthy subjects were prospectively assessed using QST. The patients' warm and cold detection thresholds (WDT; CDT), the heat and cold pain thresholds (HPT; CPT) and the occurrence of paradoxical heat sensation (PHS) were observed. In acute CRPS I, patients showed warm and cold hyperalgesia, indicated by significant changes in HPT and CPT. WDT and CDT were significantly increased as well, indicating warm and cold hypoaesthesia. In chronic CRPS, thermal hyperalgesia declined, but CDT as well as WDT further deteriorated. Solely patients with acute CRPS displayed PHS. To a minor degree, all QST changes were also present on the contralateral limb. We propose three pathomechanisms of CRPS I, which follow a distinct time course: Thermal hyperalgesia, observed in acute CRPS, indicates an ongoing aseptic peripheral inflammation. Thermal hypoaesthesia, as detected in acute and chronic CRPS, signals a degeneration of A-delta and C-fibres, which further deteriorates in chronic CRPS. PHS in acute CRPS I indicates that both inflammation and degeneration are present, whilst in chronic CRPS I, the pathomechanism of degeneration dominates, signalled by the absence of PHS. The contralateral changes observed strongly suggest the involvement of the central nervous system.

  17. Interaction of hyperalgesia and sensory loss in complex regional pain syndrome type I (CRPS I.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Volker Huge

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Sensory abnormalities are a key feature of Complex Regional Pain Syndrome (CRPS. In order to characterise these changes in patients suffering from acute or chronic CRPS I, we used Quantitative Sensory Testing (QST in comparison to an age and gender matched control group. METHODS: 61 patients presenting with CRPS I of the upper extremity and 56 healthy subjects were prospectively assessed using QST. The patients' warm and cold detection thresholds (WDT; CDT, the heat and cold pain thresholds (HPT; CPT and the occurrence of paradoxical heat sensation (PHS were observed. RESULTS: In acute CRPS I, patients showed warm and cold hyperalgesia, indicated by significant changes in HPT and CPT. WDT and CDT were significantly increased as well, indicating warm and cold hypoaesthesia. In chronic CRPS, thermal hyperalgesia declined, but CDT as well as WDT further deteriorated. Solely patients with acute CRPS displayed PHS. To a minor degree, all QST changes were also present on the contralateral limb. CONCLUSIONS: We propose three pathomechanisms of CRPS I, which follow a distinct time course: Thermal hyperalgesia, observed in acute CRPS, indicates an ongoing aseptic peripheral inflammation. Thermal hypoaesthesia, as detected in acute and chronic CRPS, signals a degeneration of A-delta and C-fibres, which further deteriorates in chronic CRPS. PHS in acute CRPS I indicates that both inflammation and degeneration are present, whilst in chronic CRPS I, the pathomechanism of degeneration dominates, signalled by the absence of PHS. The contralateral changes observed strongly suggest the involvement of the central nervous system.

  18. FM1-43 is a permeant blocker of mechanosensitive ion channels in sensory neurons and inhibits behavioural responses to mechanical stimuli

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    Drew Liam J

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The molecular identity and pharmacological properties of mechanically gated ion channels in sensory neurons are poorly understood. We show that FM1-43, a styryl dye used to fluorescently label cell membranes, permeates mechanosensitive ion channels in cultured dorsal root ganglion neurons, resulting in blockade of three previously defined subtypes of mechanically activated currents. Blockade and dye uptake is voltage dependent and regulated by external Ca2+. The structurally related larger dye FM3-25 inhibited mechanically activated currents to a lesser degree and did not permeate the channels. In vivo, FMI-43 decreases pain sensitivity in the Randall-Selitto test and increases the withdrawal threshold from von Frey hairs, together suggesting that the channels expressed at the cell body in culture mediate mechanosensation in the intact animal. These data give further insight into the mechanosensitive ion channels expressed by somatosensory neurons and suggest FM dyes are an interesting tool for studying them.

  19. Colonic inflammation up-regulates voltage-gated sodium channels in bladder sensory neurons via activation of peripheral transient potential vanilloid 1 receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Q; Malykhina, A P

    2012-06-01

    Primary sensory neurons express several types of ion channels including transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) and voltage-gated Na(+) channels. Our previous studies showed an increased excitability of bladder primary sensory and spinal neurons triggered by inflammation in the distal colon as a result of pelvic organ cross-sensitization. The goal of this work was to determine the effects of TRPV1 receptor activation by potent agonists and/or colonic inflammation on voltage-gated Na(+) channels expressed in bladder sensory neurons. Sprague-Dawley rats were treated with intracolonic saline (control), resiniferatoxin (RTX, 10(-7 ) mol L(-1)), TNBS (colonic irritant) or double treatment (RTX followed by TNBS). TNBS-induced colitis increased the amplitude of total Na(+) current by two-fold and of tetrodotoxin resistant (TTX-R) Na(+) current by 78% (P ≤ 0.05 to control) in lumbosacral bladder neurons during acute phase (3 days post-TNBS). Instillation of RTX in the distal colon caused an enhancement in the amplitude of total Na(+) current at -20 mV from -112.1 ± 18.7 pA/pF (control) to -183.6 ± 27.8 pA/pF (3 days post-RTX, P ≤ 0.05) without changes in TTX resistant component. The amplitude of net Na(+) current was also increased by 119% at day 3 in the group with double treatment (RTX followed by TNBS, P ≤ 0.05 to control) which was significantly higher than in either group with a single treatment. These results provide evidence that colonic inflammation activates TRPV1 receptors at the peripheral sensory terminals leading to an up-regulation of voltage gated Na(+) channels on the cell soma of bladder sensory neurons. This mechanism may underlie the occurrence of peripheral cross-sensitization in the pelvis and functional chronic pelvic pain. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  20. Ca2+-activated Cl- channels of the ClCa family express in the cilia of a subset of rat olfactory sensory neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Silva, Carolina; Vera, Jorge; Bono, María Rosa; González-Billault, Christian; Baxter, Brooke; Hansen, Anne; Lopez, Robert; Gibson, Emily A; Restrepo, Diego; Bacigalupo, Juan

    2013-01-01

    The Ca(2+)-activated Cl(-) channel is considered a key constituent of odor transduction. Odorant binding to a specific receptor in the cilia of olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs) triggers a cAMP cascade that mediates the opening of a cationic cyclic nucleotide-gated channel (CNG), allowing Ca(2+) influx. Ca(2+) ions activate Cl(-) channels, generating a significant Cl(-) efflux, with a large contribution to the receptor potential. The Anoctamin 2 channel (ANO2) is a major constituent of the Cl(-) conductance, but its knock-out has no impairment of behavior and only slightly reduces field potential odorant responses of the olfactory epithelium. Likely, an additional Ca(2+)-activated Cl(-) channel of unknown molecular identity is also involved. In addition to ANO2, we detected two members of the ClCa family of Ca(2+)-activated Cl(-) channels in the rat olfactory epithelium, ClCa4l and ClCa2. These channels, also expressed in the central nervous system, may correspond to odorant transduction channels. Whole Sprague Dawley olfactory epithelium nested RT-PCR and single OSNs established that the mRNAs of both channels are expressed in OSNs. Real time RT-PCR and full length sequencing of amplified ClCa expressed in rat olfactory epithelium indicated that ClCa4l is the most abundant. Immunoblotting with an antibody recognizing both channels revealed immunoreactivity in the ciliary membrane. Immunochemistry of olfactory epithelium and OSNs confirmed their ciliary presence in a subset of olfactory sensory neurons. The evidence suggests that ClCa4l and ClCa2 might play a role in odorant transduction in rat olfactory cilia.

  1. T-type calcium channels, but not Cav3.2, in the peripheral sensory afferents are involved in acute itch in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Si-Fang; Wang, Bing; Zhang, Feng-Ming; Fei, Yuan-Hui; Gu, Jia-Hui; Li, Jie; Bi, Ling-Bo; Liu, Xing-Jun

    2017-06-10

    T-type calcium channels are prominently expressed in primary nociceptive fibers and well characterized in pain processes. Although itch and pain share many similarities including primary sensory fibers, the function of T-type calcium channels on acute itch has not been explored. We investigated whether T-type calcium channels expressed within primary sensory fibers of mouse skin, especially Cav3.2 subtype, involve in chloroquine-, endothelin-1- and histamine-evoked acute itch using pharmacological, neuronal imaging and behavioral analyses. We found that pre-locally blocking three subtypes of T-type calcium channels in the peripheral afferents of skins, yielded an inhibition in acute itch or pain behaviors, while selectively blocking the Cav3.2 channel in the skin peripheral afferents only inhibited acute pain but not acute itch. These results suggest that T-type Cav3.1 or Cav3.3, but not Cav3.2 channel, have an important role in acute itch processing, and their distinctive roles in modulating acute itch are worthy of further investigation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Human centromedian-parafascicular complex signals sensory cues for goal-oriented behavior selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schepers, Inga M; Beck, Anne-Kathrin; Bräuer, Susann; Schwabe, Kerstin; Abdallat, Mahmoud; Sandmann, Pascale; Dengler, Reinhard; Rieger, Jochem W; Krauss, Joachim K

    2017-05-15

    Experimental research has shown that the centromedian-parafascicular complex (CM-Pf) of the intralaminar thalamus is activated in attentional orienting and processing of behaviorally relevant stimuli. These observations resulted in the hypothesis that the CM-Pf plays a pivotal role in goal-oriented behavior selection. We here set out to test this hypothesis with electrophysiological recordings from patients with electrodes implanted in CM-Pf for deep brain stimulation (DBS) treatment of chronic neuropathic pain. Six patients participated in (1) an auditory three-class oddball experiment, which required a button press to target tones, but not to standard and deviant tones and in (2) a multi-speaker experiment with a target word that required attention selection and a target image that required response selection. Subjects showed transient neural responses (8-15Hz) to the target tone and the target word. Two subjects additionally showed transient neural responses (15-25Hz) to the target image. All sensory target stimuli were related to an internal goal and required a behavior selection (attention selection, response selection). In group analyses, neural responses were greater to target tones than deviant and standard tones and to target words than other task-relevant words that did not require attention selection. The transient neural responses occurred after the target stimuli but prior to the overt behavioral response. Our results demonstrate that in human subjects the CM-Pf is involved in signaling sensory inputs related to goal-oriented selection of behavior. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Association between tetrodotoxin resistant channels and lipid rafts regulates sensory neuron excitability.

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    Alessandro Pristerà

    Full Text Available Voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSCs play a key role in the initiation and propagation of action potentials in neurons. Na(V1.8 is a tetrodotoxin (TTX resistant VGSC expressed in nociceptors, peripheral small-diameter neurons able to detect noxious stimuli. Na(V1.8 underlies the vast majority of sodium currents during action potentials. Many studies have highlighted a key role for Na(V1.8 in inflammatory and chronic pain models. Lipid rafts are microdomains of the plasma membrane highly enriched in cholesterol and sphingolipids. Lipid rafts tune the spatial and temporal organisation of proteins and lipids on the plasma membrane. They are thought to act as platforms on the membrane where proteins and lipids can be trafficked, compartmentalised and functionally clustered. In the present study we investigated Na(V1.8 sub-cellular localisation and explored the idea that it is associated with lipid rafts in nociceptors. We found that Na(V1.8 is distributed in clusters along the axons of DRG neurons in vitro and ex vivo. We also demonstrated, by biochemical and imaging studies, that Na(V1.8 is associated with lipid rafts along the sciatic nerve ex vivo and in DRG neurons in vitro. Moreover, treatments with methyl-β-cyclodextrin (MβCD and 7-ketocholesterol (7KC led to the dissociation between rafts and Na(V1.8. By calcium imaging we demonstrated that the lack of association between rafts and Na(V1.8 correlated with impaired neuronal excitability, highlighted by a reduction in the number of neurons able to conduct mechanically- and chemically-evoked depolarisations. These findings reveal the sub-cellular localisation of Na(V1.8 in nociceptors and highlight the importance of the association between Na(V1.8 and lipid rafts in the control of nociceptor excitability.

  4. Prolactin potentiates the activity of acid-sensing ion channels in female rat primary sensory neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ting-Ting; Qu, Zu-Wei; Ren, Cuixia; Gan, Xiong; Qiu, Chun-Yu; Hu, Wang-Ping

    2016-04-01

    Prolactin (PRL) is a polypeptide hormone produced and released from the pituitary and extrapituitary tissues. It regulates activity of nociceptors and causes hyperalgesia in pain conditions, but little is known the molecular mechanism. We report here that PRL can exert a potentiating effect on the functional activity of acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs), key sensors for extracellular protons. First, PRL dose-dependently increased the amplitude of ASIC currents with an EC50 of (5.89 ± 0.28) × 10(-8) M. PRL potentiation of ASIC currents was also pH dependent. Second, PRL potentiation of ASIC currents was blocked by Δ1-9-G129R-hPRL, a PRL receptor antagonist, and removed by intracellular dialysis of either protein kinase C inhibitor GF109203X, protein interacting with C-kinase 1(PICK1) inhibitor FSC-231, or PI3K inhibitor AS605240. Third, PRL altered acidosis-evoked membrane excitability of DRG neurons and caused a significant increase in the amplitude of the depolarization and the number of spikes induced by acid stimuli. Four, PRL exacerbated nociceptive responses to injection of acetic acid in female rats. Finally, PRL displayed a stronger effect on ASIC mediated-currents and nociceptive behavior in intact female rats than OVX female and male rats and thus modulation of PRL may be gender-dependent. These results suggest that PRL up-regulates the activity of ASICs and enhances ASIC mediated nociceptive responses in female rats, which reveal a novel peripheral mechanism underlying PRL involvement in hyperalgesia. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Quantitative sensory studies in complex regional pain syndrome type 1/RSD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tahmoush, A J; Schwartzman, R J; Hopp, J L; Grothusen, J R

    2000-12-01

    Patients with complex regional pain syndrome type I (CRPSD1) may have thermal allodynia after application of a non-noxious thermal stimulus to the affected limb. We measured the warm, cold, heat-evoked pain threshold and the cold-evoked pain threshold in the affected area of 16 control patients and patients with complex regional pain syndrome type 1/RSD to test the hypothesis that allodynia results from an abnormality in sensory physiology. A contact thermode was used to apply a constant 1 degrees C/second increasing (warm and heat-evoked pain) or decreasing (cold and cold-evoked pain) thermal stimulus until the patient pressed the response button to show that a temperature change was felt by the patient. Student t test was used to compare thresholds in patients and control patients. The cold-evoked pain threshold in patients with CRPSD1/RSD (p RSD than in control patients). The heat-evoked pain threshold in patients with CRPS1/RSD was (p RSD were similar to the thresholds in control patients. This study suggests that thermal allodynia in patients with CRPS1/RSD results from decreased cold-evoked and heat-evoked pain thresholds. The thermal pain thresholds are reset (decreased) so that non-noxious thermal stimuli are perceived to be pain (allodynia).

  6. Putamen neurons process both sensory and motor information during a complex task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vicente, Ana F; Bermudez, Maria A; Romero, Maria Del Carmen; Perez, Rogelio; Gonzalez, Francisco

    2012-07-23

    The putamen has classically been considered to be primarily a motor structure. It is involved in a broad range of roles and its neurons have been postulated to function as pattern classifiers of behaviourally significant events. However, its specific role in motor and sensory processing is still unclear. For the purpose of better categorizing putamen neurons, we trained two rhesus monkeys to perform multisensory operant tasks by using complex stimuli such as short videoclips. Trials involved image or soundtrack or both. Some stimuli required a motor response associated to reward, whereas others did not require response and produced no reward. We found that neurons in the putamen showed pure visual responses, action-related activity, and reward responses. Insofar as action-related activity, preparation of movement, movement execution, and withholding of movement involved three different putamen neuron populations. Moreover, our data suggest an involvement of putamen neurons in processing primary rewards and visual events in a complex task, which may contribute to reinforcement learning through stimulus-reward association. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Mutated CaV2.1 channels dysregulate CASK/P2X3 signaling in mouse trigeminal sensory neurons of R192Q Cacna1a knock-in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gnanasekaran, Aswini; Bele, Tanja; Hullugundi, Swathi; Simonetti, Manuela; Ferrari, Michael D; van den Maagdenberg, Arn M J M; Nistri, Andrea; Fabbretti, Elsa

    2013-12-02

    ATP-gated P2X3 receptors of sensory ganglion neurons are important transducers of pain as they adapt their expression and function in response to acute and chronic nociceptive signals. The present study investigated the role of calcium/calmodulin-dependent serine protein kinase (CASK) in controlling P2X3 receptor expression and function in trigeminal ganglia from Cacna1a R192Q-mutated knock-in (KI) mice, a genetic model for familial hemiplegic migraine type-1. KI ganglion neurons showed more abundant CASK/P2X3 receptor complex at membrane level, a result that likely originated from gain-of-function effects of R192Q-mutated CaV2.1 channels and downstream enhanced CaMKII activity. The selective CaV2.1 channel blocker ω-Agatoxin IVA and the CaMKII inhibitor KN-93 were sufficient to return CASK/P2X3 co-expression to WT levels. After CASK silencing, P2X3 receptor expression was decreased in both WT and KI ganglia, supporting the role of CASK in P2X3 receptor stabilization. This process was functionally observed as reduced P2X3 receptor currents. We propose that, in trigeminal sensory neurons, the CASK/P2X3 complex has a dynamic nature depending on intracellular calcium and related signaling, that are enhanced in a transgenic mouse model of genetic hemiplegic migraine.

  8. Effects of receptor modification and temperature on dynamics of sensory complexes in Escherichia coli chemotaxis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grosse Karin

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Extracellular stimuli in chemotaxis of Escherichia coli and other bacteria are processed by large clusters of sensory complexes. The stable core of these clusters is formed by transmembrane receptors, a kinase CheA, and an adaptor CheW, whereas adaptation enzymes CheR and CheB dynamically associate with the clusters via interactions with receptors and/or CheA. Several biochemical studies have indicated the dependence of the sensory complex stability on the adaptive modification state of receptors and/or on temperature, which may potentially allow environment-dependent tuning of its signalling properties. However, the extent of such regulation in vivo and its significance for chemotaxis remained unclear. Results Here we used fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP to confirm in vivo that the exchange of CheA and CheW shows a modest dependency on the level of receptor modification/activity. An even more dramatic effect was observed for the exchange kinetics of CheR and CheB, indicating that their association with clusters may depend on the ability to bind substrate sites on receptors and on the regulatory phosphorylation of CheB. In contrast, environmental temperature did not have a discernible effect on stability of the cluster core. Strain-specific loss of E. coli chemotaxis at high temperature could instead be explained by a heat-induced reduction in the chemotaxis protein levels. Nevertheless, high basal levels of chemotaxis and flagellar proteins in common wild type strains MG1655 and W3110 enabled these strains to maintain their chemotactic ability up to 42°C. Conclusions Our results confirmed that clusters formed by less modified receptors are more dynamic, which can explain the previously observed adjustment of the chemotaxis response sensitivity according to the level of background stimulation. We further propose that the dependency of CheR exchange on the availability of unmethylated sites on receptors is

  9. Unravelling the complexities of vascular smooth muscle ion channels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jepps, Thomas A

    2017-01-01

    Which ion channel is the most important for regulating vascular tone? Which one is responsible for controlling the resting membrane potential or repolarization? Which channels are recruited by different intracellular signalling pathways or change in certain vascular diseases? Many different ion...... to off-target effects. As cardiovascular diseases are expected to increase worldwide to epidemic proportions, ion channel research and the hunt for the next major therapeutic target to treat different vascular diseases has never been more important. However, I believe that the question we should now...

  10. Motor dysfunction in complex regional pain syndrome : the role of sensory processing and sensory-motor integration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bank, Paulina Johanna Maria

    2014-01-01

    In the chronic stage of Complex Regional Pain Syndrome (CRPS), motor disturbances are common and cause significant disability. The motor dysfunction of CRPS is a poorly understood phenomenon that is characterized predominantly by a decrease or loss of voluntary muscle control. This thesis aims to

  11. A re-evaluation of 9-HODE activity at TRPV1 channels in comparison with anandamide: enantioselectivity and effects at other TRP channels and in sensory neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Petrocellis, Luciano; Schiano Moriello, Aniello; Imperatore, Roberta; Cristino, Luigia; Starowicz, Katarzyna; Di Marzo, Vincenzo

    2012-12-01

    Two oxidation products of linoleic acid, 9- and 13-hydroxy-octadecadienoic acids (HODEs), have recently been suggested to act as endovanilloids, that is, endogenous agonists of transient receptor potential vanilloid-1 (TRPV1) channels, thereby contributing to inflammatory hyperalgesia in rats. However, HODE activity at rat TRPV1 in comparison with the best established endovanilloid, anandamide, and its enantioselectivity and selectivity towards other TRP channels that are also abundant in sensory neurons have never been investigated. We studied the effect of 9(R)-HODE, 9(S)-HODE, (+/-)13-HODE, 15(S)-hydroxyanandamide and anandamide on [Ca(2+) ](i) in HEK-293 cells stably expressing the rat or human recombinant TRPV1, or rat recombinant TRPV2, TRPA1 or TRPM8, and also the effect of 9(S)-HODE in rat dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons by calcium imaging. Anandamide and 15(S)-hydroxyanandamide were the most potent endovanilloids at human TRPV1, whereas 9(S)-HODE was approximately threefold less efficacious and 75- and 3-fold less potent, respectively, and did not perform much better at rat TRPV1. The 9(R)-HODE and (+/-)13-HODE were almost inactive at TRPV1. Unlike anandamide and 15(S)-hydroxyanandamide, all HODEs were very weak at desensitizing TRPV1 to the action of capsaicin, but activated rat TRPV2 [only (+/-)13-HODE] and rat TRPA1, and antagonized rat TRPM8, at concentrations higher than those required to activate TRPV1. Finally, 9(S)-HODE elevated [Ca(2+) ](i) in DRG neurons almost exclusively in capsaicin-sensitive cells but only at concentrations between 25 and 100 μM. The present data suggest that HODEs are less important endovanilloids than anandamide. This article is part of a themed section on Cannabinoids. To view the other articles in this section visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2012.167.issue-8. © 2012 The Authors. British Journal of Pharmacology © 2012 The British Pharmacological Society.

  12. Environmental enrichment of young adult rats (Rattus norvegicus) in different sensory modalities has long-lasting effects on their ability to learn via specific sensory channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolivo, Vassilissa; Taborsky, Michael

    2017-05-01

    Sensory modalities individuals use to obtain information from the environment differ among conspecifics. The relative contributions of genetic divergence and environmental plasticity to this variance remain yet unclear. Numerous studies have shown that specific sensory enrichments or impoverishments at the postnatal stage can shape neural development, with potential lifelong effects. For species capable of adjusting to novel environments, specific sensory stimulation at a later life stage could also induce specific long-lasting behavioral effects. To test this possibility, we enriched young adult Norway rats with either visual, auditory, or olfactory cues. Four to 8 months after the enrichment period we tested each rat for their learning ability in 3 two-choice discrimination tasks, involving either visual, auditory, or olfactory stimulus discrimination, in a full factorial design. No sensory modality was more relevant than others for the proposed task per se, but rats performed better when tested in the modality for which they had been enriched. This shows that specific environmental conditions encountered during early adulthood have specific long-lasting effects on the learning abilities of rats. Furthermore, we disentangled the relative contributions of genetic and environmental causes of the response. The reaction norms of learning abilities in relation to the stimulus modality did not differ between families, so interindividual divergence was mainly driven by environmental rather than genetic factors. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  13. Contribution of the tetrodotoxin-resistant voltage-gated sodium channel NaV1.9 to sensory transmission and nociceptive behavior

    OpenAIRE

    Priest, Birgit T.; Murphy, Beth A.; Lindia, Jill A.; Diaz, Carmen; Abbadie, Catherine; Ritter, Amy M.; Liberator, Paul; Iyer, Leslie M.; Kash, Shera F.; Kohler, Martin G.; Kaczorowski, Gregory J.; MacIntyre, D. Euan; Martin, William J.

    2005-01-01

    The transmission of pain signals after injury or inflammation depends in part on increased excitability of primary sensory neurons. Nociceptive neurons express multiple subtypes of voltage-gated sodium channels (NaV1s), each of which possesses unique features that may influence primary afferent excitability. Here, we examined the contribution of NaV1.9 to nociceptive signaling by studying the electrophysiological and behavioral phenotypes of mice with a disruption of the SCN11A gene, which en...

  14. Acid solution is a suitable medium for introducing QX-314 into nociceptors through TRPV1 channels to produce sensory-specific analgesic effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, He; Zhang, Hong-Xing; Hou, Hui-Yan; Lu, Xian-Fu; Wei, Jing-Qiu; Wang, Chun-Guang; Zhang, Li-Cai; Zeng, Yin-Ming; Wu, Yong-Ping; Cao, Jun-Li

    2011-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that QX-314, an intracellular sodium channel blocker, can enter into nociceptors through capsaicin-activated TRPV1 or permeation of the membrane by chemical enhancers to produce a sensory-selective blockade. However, the obvious side effects of these combinations limit the application of QX-314. A new strategy for targeting delivery of QX-314 into nociceptors needs further investigation. The aim of this study is to test whether acidic QX-314, when dissolves in acidic solution directly, can enter into nociceptors through acid-activated TRPV1 and block sodium channels from the intracellular side to produce a sensory-specific analgesic effect. Acidic solution or noradrenaline was injected intraplantarly to induce acute pain behavior in mice. A chronic constrictive injury model was performed to induce chronic neuropathic pain. A sciatic nerve blockade model was used to evaluate the sensory-specific analgesic effects of acidic QX-314. Thermal and mechanical hyperalgesia were measured by using radiant heat and electronic von Frey filaments test. Spinal Fos protein expression was determined by immunohistochemistry. The expression of p-ERK was detected by western blot assay. Whole cell clamp recording was performed to measure action potentials and total sodium current in rats DRG neurons. We found that pH 5.0 PBS solution induced behavioral hyperalgesia accompanied with the increased expression of spinal Fos protein and p-ERK. Pretreatment with pH 5.0 QX-314, and not pH 7.4 QX-314, alleviated pain behavior, inhibited the increased spinal Fos protein and p-ERK expression induced by pH 5.0 PBS or norepinephrine, blocked sodium currents and abolished the production of action potentials evoked by current injection. The above effects were prevented by TRPV1 channel inhibitor SB366791, but not by ASIC channel inhibitor amiloride. Furthermore, acidic QX-314 employed adjacent to the sciatic nerve selectively blocked the sensory but not the motor

  15. T-type calcium channels cause bursts of spikes in motor but not sensory thalamic neurons during mimicry of natural patterns of synaptic input.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Haram R; Hong, Su Z; Fiorillo, Christopher D

    2015-01-01

    Although neurons within intact nervous systems can be classified as 'sensory' or 'motor,' it is not known whether there is any general distinction between sensory and motor neurons at the cellular or molecular levels. Here, we extend and test a theory according to which activation of certain subtypes of voltage-gated ion channel (VGC) generate patterns of spikes in neurons of motor systems, whereas VGC are proposed to counteract patterns in sensory neurons. We previously reported experimental evidence for the theory from visual thalamus, where we found that T-type calcium channels (TtCCs) did not cause bursts of spikes but instead served the function of 'predictive homeostasis' to maximize the causal and informational link between retinogeniculate excitation and spike output. Here, we have recorded neurons in brain slices from eight sensory and motor regions of rat thalamus while mimicking key features of natural excitatory and inhibitory post-synaptic potentials. As predicted by theory, TtCC did cause bursts of spikes in motor thalamus. TtCC-mediated responses in motor thalamus were activated at more hyperpolarized potentials and caused larger depolarizations with more spikes than in visual and auditory thalamus. Somatosensory thalamus is known to be more closely connected to motor regions relative to auditory and visual thalamus, and likewise the strength of its TtCC responses was intermediate between these regions and motor thalamus. We also observed lower input resistance, as well as limited evidence of stronger hyperpolarization-induced ('H-type') depolarization, in nuclei closer to motor output. These findings support our theory of a specific difference between sensory and motor neurons at the cellular level.

  16. The molecular and cellular mechanisms of itch and the involvement of TRP channels in the peripheral sensory nervous system and skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kittaka, Hiroki; Tominaga, Makoto

    2017-01-01

    Itch is an unpleasant cutaneous sensation that can arise following insect bites, exposure to plant ingredients, and some diseases. Itch can also have idiopathic causes. Itch sensations are thought to protect against external insults and toxic substances. Although itch is not directly lethal, chronic and long lasting itch in certain diseases can worsen quality of life. Therefore, the mechanisms responsible for chronic itch require careful investigation. There is a significant amount of basic research concerning itch, and the effect of various itch mediators on primary sensory neurons have been studied. Interestingly, many mediators of itch involve signaling related to transient receptor potential (TRP) channels. TRP channels, especially thermosensitive TRP channels, are expressed by primary sensory neurons and skin keratinocytes, which receive multimodal stimuli, including those that cause itch sensations. Here we review the molecular and cellular mechanisms of itch and the involvement of TRP channels in mediating itch sensations. Copyright © 2017 Japanese Society of Allergology. Production and hosting by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Compressive Sensing Based Bayesian Sparse Channel Estimation for OFDM Communication Systems: High Performance and Low Complexity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Li; Shan, Lin; Adachi, Fumiyuki

    2014-01-01

    In orthogonal frequency division modulation (OFDM) communication systems, channel state information (CSI) is required at receiver due to the fact that frequency-selective fading channel leads to disgusting intersymbol interference (ISI) over data transmission. Broadband channel model is often described by very few dominant channel taps and they can be probed by compressive sensing based sparse channel estimation (SCE) methods, for example, orthogonal matching pursuit algorithm, which can take the advantage of sparse structure effectively in the channel as for prior information. However, these developed methods are vulnerable to both noise interference and column coherence of training signal matrix. In other words, the primary objective of these conventional methods is to catch the dominant channel taps without a report of posterior channel uncertainty. To improve the estimation performance, we proposed a compressive sensing based Bayesian sparse channel estimation (BSCE) method which cannot only exploit the channel sparsity but also mitigate the unexpected channel uncertainty without scarifying any computational complexity. The proposed method can reveal potential ambiguity among multiple channel estimators that are ambiguous due to observation noise or correlation interference among columns in the training matrix. Computer simulations show that proposed method can improve the estimation performance when comparing with conventional SCE methods. PMID:24983012

  18. Compressive Sensing Based Bayesian Sparse Channel Estimation for OFDM Communication Systems: High Performance and Low Complexity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guan Gui

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In orthogonal frequency division modulation (OFDM communication systems, channel state information (CSI is required at receiver due to the fact that frequency-selective fading channel leads to disgusting intersymbol interference (ISI over data transmission. Broadband channel model is often described by very few dominant channel taps and they can be probed by compressive sensing based sparse channel estimation (SCE methods, for example, orthogonal matching pursuit algorithm, which can take the advantage of sparse structure effectively in the channel as for prior information. However, these developed methods are vulnerable to both noise interference and column coherence of training signal matrix. In other words, the primary objective of these conventional methods is to catch the dominant channel taps without a report of posterior channel uncertainty. To improve the estimation performance, we proposed a compressive sensing based Bayesian sparse channel estimation (BSCE method which cannot only exploit the channel sparsity but also mitigate the unexpected channel uncertainty without scarifying any computational complexity. The proposed method can reveal potential ambiguity among multiple channel estimators that are ambiguous due to observation noise or correlation interference among columns in the training matrix. Computer simulations show that proposed method can improve the estimation performance when comparing with conventional SCE methods.

  19. Compressive sensing based Bayesian sparse channel estimation for OFDM communication systems: high performance and low complexity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gui, Guan; Xu, Li; Shan, Lin; Adachi, Fumiyuki

    2014-01-01

    In orthogonal frequency division modulation (OFDM) communication systems, channel state information (CSI) is required at receiver due to the fact that frequency-selective fading channel leads to disgusting intersymbol interference (ISI) over data transmission. Broadband channel model is often described by very few dominant channel taps and they can be probed by compressive sensing based sparse channel estimation (SCE) methods, for example, orthogonal matching pursuit algorithm, which can take the advantage of sparse structure effectively in the channel as for prior information. However, these developed methods are vulnerable to both noise interference and column coherence of training signal matrix. In other words, the primary objective of these conventional methods is to catch the dominant channel taps without a report of posterior channel uncertainty. To improve the estimation performance, we proposed a compressive sensing based Bayesian sparse channel estimation (BSCE) method which cannot only exploit the channel sparsity but also mitigate the unexpected channel uncertainty without scarifying any computational complexity. The proposed method can reveal potential ambiguity among multiple channel estimators that are ambiguous due to observation noise or correlation interference among columns in the training matrix. Computer simulations show that proposed method can improve the estimation performance when comparing with conventional SCE methods.

  20. Message-Passing Receiver Architecture With Reduced-Complexity Channel Estimation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Badiu, Mihai Alin; Manchón, Carles Navarro; Fleury, Bernard Henri

    2013-01-01

    We propose an iterative receiver architecture which allows for adjusting the complexity of estimating the channel frequency response in OFDM systems. This is achieved by approximating the exact Gaussian channel model assumed in the system with a Markov model whose state-space dimension is a design...... parameter. We apply an inference framework combining belief propagation and the mean field approximation to a probabilistic model of the system which includes the approximate channel model. By doing so, we obtain a receiver algorithm with adjustable complexity which jointly performs channel and noise...... precision estimation, equalization and decoding. Simulation results show that low-complexity versions of the algorithm - obtained by selecting low state-space dimensions – can closely attain the performance of a receiver devised based on the exact channel model....

  1. Lattice Sequential Decoder for Coded MIMO Channel: Performance and Complexity Analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Abediseid, Walid

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, the performance limit of lattice sequential decoder for lattice space-time coded MIMO channel is analysed. We determine the rates achievable by lattice coding and sequential decoding applied to such channel. The diversity-multiplexing tradeoff (DMT) under lattice sequential decoding is derived as a function of its parameter---the bias term. The bias parameter is critical for controlling the amount of computations required at the decoding stage. Achieving low decoding complexity requires increasing the value of the bias term. However, this is done at the expense of losing the optimal tradeoff of the channel. We show how such a decoder can bridge the gap between lattice decoder and low complexity decoders. Moreover, the computational complexity of lattice sequential decoder is analysed. Specifically, we derive the tail distribution of the decoder's computational complexity in the high signal-to-noise ratio regime. Similar to the conventional sequential decoder used in discrete memoryless channel,...

  2. Low complexity source and channel coding for mm-wave hybrid fiber-wireless links

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lebedev, Alexander; Vegas Olmos, Juan José; Pang, Xiaodan

    2014-01-01

    performance of several encoded high-definition video sequences constrained by the channel bitrate and the packet size. We argue that light video compression and low complexity channel coding for the W-band fiber-wireless link enable low-delay multiple channel 1080p wireless HD video transmission.......We report on the performance of channel and source coding applied for an experimentally realized hybrid fiber-wireless W-band link. Error control coding performance is presented for a wireless propagation distance of 3 m and 20 km fiber transmission. We report on peak signal-to-noise ratio...

  3. T-type calcium channels cause bursts of spikes in motor but not sensory thalamic neurons during mimicry of natural patterns of synaptic input

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Haram R.; Hong, Su Z.; Fiorillo, Christopher D.

    2015-01-01

    Although neurons within intact nervous systems can be classified as ‘sensory’ or ‘motor,’ it is not known whether there is any general distinction between sensory and motor neurons at the cellular or molecular levels. Here, we extend and test a theory according to which activation of certain subtypes of voltage-gated ion channel (VGC) generate patterns of spikes in neurons of motor systems, whereas VGC are proposed to counteract patterns in sensory neurons. We previously reported experimental evidence for the theory from visual thalamus, where we found that T-type calcium channels (TtCCs) did not cause bursts of spikes but instead served the function of ‘predictive homeostasis’ to maximize the causal and informational link between retinogeniculate excitation and spike output. Here, we have recorded neurons in brain slices from eight sensory and motor regions of rat thalamus while mimicking key features of natural excitatory and inhibitory post-synaptic potentials. As predicted by theory, TtCC did cause bursts of spikes in motor thalamus. TtCC-mediated responses in motor thalamus were activated at more hyperpolarized potentials and caused larger depolarizations with more spikes than in visual and auditory thalamus. Somatosensory thalamus is known to be more closely connected to motor regions relative to auditory and visual thalamus, and likewise the strength of its TtCC responses was intermediate between these regions and motor thalamus. We also observed lower input resistance, as well as limited evidence of stronger hyperpolarization-induced (‘H-type’) depolarization, in nuclei closer to motor output. These findings support our theory of a specific difference between sensory and motor neurons at the cellular level. PMID:26582654

  4. Odontoblasts as sensory receptors: transient receptor potential channels, pannexin-1, and ionotropic ATP receptors mediate intercellular odontoblast-neuron signal transduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibukawa, Yoshiyuki; Sato, Masaki; Kimura, Maki; Sobhan, Ubaidus; Shimada, Miyuki; Nishiyama, Akihiro; Kawaguchi, Aya; Soya, Manabu; Kuroda, Hidetaka; Katakura, Akira; Ichinohe, Tatsuya; Tazaki, Masakazu

    2015-04-01

    Various stimuli induce pain when applied to the surface of exposed dentin. However, the mechanisms underlying dentinal pain remain unclear. We investigated intercellular signal transduction between odontoblasts and trigeminal ganglion (TG) neurons following direct mechanical stimulation of odontoblasts. Mechanical stimulation of single odontoblasts increased the intracellular free calcium concentration ([Ca(2+)]i) by activating the mechanosensitive-transient receptor potential (TRP) channels TRPV1, TRPV2, TRPV4, and TRPA1, but not TRPM8 channels. In cocultures of odontoblasts and TG neurons, increases in [Ca(2+)]i were observed not only in mechanically stimulated odontoblasts, but also in neighboring odontoblasts and TG neurons. These increases in [Ca(2+)]i were abolished in the absence of extracellular Ca(2+) and in the presence of mechanosensitive TRP channel antagonists. A pannexin-1 (ATP-permeable channel) inhibitor and ATP-degrading enzyme abolished the increases in [Ca(2+)]i in neighboring odontoblasts and TG neurons, but not in the stimulated odontoblasts. G-protein-coupled P2Y nucleotide receptor antagonists also inhibited the increases in [Ca(2+)]i. An ionotropic ATP (P2X3) receptor antagonist inhibited the increase in [Ca(2+)]i in neighboring TG neurons, but not in stimulated or neighboring odontoblasts. During mechanical stimulation of single odontoblasts, a connexin-43 blocker did not have any effects on the [Ca(2+)]i responses observed in any of the cells. These results indicate that ATP, released from mechanically stimulated odontoblasts via pannexin-1 in response to TRP channel activation, transmits a signal to P2X3 receptors on TG neurons. We suggest that odontoblasts are sensory receptor cells and that ATP released from odontoblasts functions as a neurotransmitter in the sensory transduction sequence for dentinal pain.

  5. Low-Complexity Interference-Free Downlink Channel Assignment with Improved Performance in Coordinated Small Cells

    KAUST Repository

    Radaydeh, Redha M.

    2015-05-01

    This paper proposes a low-complexity interference-free channel assignment scheme with improved desired downlink performance in coordinated multi-antenna small-coverage access points (APs) that employ the open-access control strategy. The adopted system treats the case when each user can be granted an access to one of the available channels at a time. Moreover, each receive terminal can suppress a limited number of resolvable interfering sources via its highly-correlated receive array. On the other hand, the operation of the deployed APs can be coordinated to serve active users, and the availability of multiple physical channels and the use of uncorrelated transmit antennas at each AP are exploited to improve the performance of supported users. The analysis provides new approaches to use the transmit antenna array at each AP, the multiple physical channels, the receive antenna array at each user in order to identify interference-free channels per each user, and then to select a downlink channel that provides the best possible improved performance. The event of concurrent interference-free channel identification by different users is also treated to further improve the desired link associated with the scheduled user. The analysis considers the practical scenario of imperfect identification of interference-free channel by an active user and/or the imperfectness in scheduling concurrent users requests on the same channel. The developed formulations can be used to study any performance metric and they are applicable for any statistical and geometric channel models. © 2015 IEEE.

  6. The pH sensor of the plant K+-uptake channel KAT1 is built from a sensory cloud rather than from single key amino acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, Wendy; Riedelsberger, Janin; Morales-Navarro, Samuel E; Caballero, Julio; Alzate-Morales, Jans H; González-Nilo, Fernando D; Dreyer, Ingo

    2012-02-15

    The uptake of potassium ions (K+) accompanied by an acidification of the apoplasm is a prerequisite for stomatal opening. The acidification (approximately 2-2.5 pH units) is perceived by voltage-gated inward potassium channels (K(in)) that then can open their pores with lower energy cost. The sensory units for extracellular pH in stomatal K(in) channels are proposed to be histidines exposed to the apoplasm. However, in the Arabidopsis thaliana stomatal K(in) channel KAT1, mutations in the unique histidine exposed to the solvent (His267) do not affect the pH dependency. We demonstrate in the present study that His267 of the KAT1 channel cannot sense pH changes since the neighbouring residue Phe266 shifts its pKa to undetectable values through a cation-π interaction. Instead, we show that Glu240 placed in the extracellular loop between transmembrane segments S5 and S6 is involved in the extracellular acid activation mechanism. Based on structural models we propose that this region may serve as a molecular link between the pH- and the voltage-sensor. Like Glu240, several other titratable residues could contribute to the pH-sensor of KAT1, interact with each other and even connect such residues far away from the voltage-sensor with the gating machinery of the channel.

  7. Redox-Dependent Modulation of T-Type Ca2+ Channels in Sensory Neurons Contributes to Acute Anti-Nociceptive Effect of Substance P

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Dongyang; Huang, Sha; Gao, Haixia; Liu, Yani; Qi, Jinlong; Chen, Pingping; Wang, Caixue; Scragg, Jason L.; Vakurov, Alexander; Peers, Chris; Du, Xiaona

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Aims: Neuropeptide substance P (SP) is produced and released by a subset of peripheral sensory neurons that respond to tissue damage (nociceptors). SP exerts excitatory effects in the central nervous system, but peripheral SP actions are still poorly understood; therefore, here, we aimed at investigating these peripheral mechanisms. Results: SP acutely inhibited T-type voltage-gated Ca2+ channels in nociceptors. The effect was mediated by neurokinin 1 (NK1) receptor-induced stimulation of intracellular release of reactive oxygen species (ROS), as it can be prevented or reversed by the reducing agent dithiothreitol and mimicked by exogenous or endogenous ROS. This redox-mediated T-type Ca2+ channel inhibition operated through the modulation of CaV3.2 channel sensitivity to ambient zinc, as it can be prevented or reversed by zinc chelation and mimicked by exogenous zinc. Elimination of the zinc-binding site in CaV3.2 rendered the channel insensitive to SP-mediated inhibition. Importantly, peripherally applied SP significantly reduced bradykinin-induced nociception in rats in vivo; knock-down of CaV3.2 significantly reduced this anti-nociceptive effect. This atypical signaling cascade shared the initial steps with the SP-mediated augmentation of M-type K+ channels described earlier. Innovation: Our study established a mechanism underlying the peripheral anti-nociceptive effect of SP whereby this neuropeptide produces ROS-dependent inhibition of pro-algesic T-type Ca2+ current and concurrent enhancement of anti-algesic M-type K+ current. These findings will lead to a better understanding of mechanisms of endogenous analgesia. Conclusion: SP modulates T-type channel activity in nociceptors by a redox-dependent tuning of channel sensitivity to zinc; this novel modulatory pathway contributes to the peripheral anti-nociceptive effect of SP. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 25, 233–251. PMID:27306612

  8. Redox-Dependent Modulation of T-Type Ca(2+) Channels in Sensory Neurons Contributes to Acute Anti-Nociceptive Effect of Substance P.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Dongyang; Huang, Sha; Gao, Haixia; Liu, Yani; Qi, Jinlong; Chen, Pingping; Wang, Caixue; Scragg, Jason L; Vakurov, Alexander; Peers, Chris; Du, Xiaona; Zhang, Hailin; Gamper, Nikita

    2016-08-10

    Neuropeptide substance P (SP) is produced and released by a subset of peripheral sensory neurons that respond to tissue damage (nociceptors). SP exerts excitatory effects in the central nervous system, but peripheral SP actions are still poorly understood; therefore, here, we aimed at investigating these peripheral mechanisms. SP acutely inhibited T-type voltage-gated Ca(2+) channels in nociceptors. The effect was mediated by neurokinin 1 (NK1) receptor-induced stimulation of intracellular release of reactive oxygen species (ROS), as it can be prevented or reversed by the reducing agent dithiothreitol and mimicked by exogenous or endogenous ROS. This redox-mediated T-type Ca(2+) channel inhibition operated through the modulation of CaV3.2 channel sensitivity to ambient zinc, as it can be prevented or reversed by zinc chelation and mimicked by exogenous zinc. Elimination of the zinc-binding site in CaV3.2 rendered the channel insensitive to SP-mediated inhibition. Importantly, peripherally applied SP significantly reduced bradykinin-induced nociception in rats in vivo; knock-down of CaV3.2 significantly reduced this anti-nociceptive effect. This atypical signaling cascade shared the initial steps with the SP-mediated augmentation of M-type K(+) channels described earlier. Our study established a mechanism underlying the peripheral anti-nociceptive effect of SP whereby this neuropeptide produces ROS-dependent inhibition of pro-algesic T-type Ca(2+) current and concurrent enhancement of anti-algesic M-type K(+) current. These findings will lead to a better understanding of mechanisms of endogenous analgesia. SP modulates T-type channel activity in nociceptors by a redox-dependent tuning of channel sensitivity to zinc; this novel modulatory pathway contributes to the peripheral anti-nociceptive effect of SP. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 25, 233-251.

  9. Trans-complex formation by proteolipid channels in the terminal phase of membrane fusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peters, C; Bayer, M J; Bühler, S

    2001-01-01

    -complex formation occurs downstream from trans-SNARE pairing, and depends on both the Rab-GTPase Ypt7 and calmodulin. The maintenance of existing complexes and completion of fusion are independent of trans-SNARE pairs. Reconstituted proteolipids form sealed channels, which can expand to form aqueous pores in a Ca2......+/calmodulin-dependent fashion. V0 trans-complexes may therefore form a continuous, proteolipid-lined channel at the fusion site. We propose that radial expansion of such a protein pore may be a mechanism for intracellular membrane fusion....

  10. On Complexity, Energy- and Implementation-Efficiency of Channel Decoders

    CERN Document Server

    Kienle, Frank; Meyr, Heinrich

    2010-01-01

    Future wireless communication systems require efficient and flexible baseband receivers. Meaningful efficiency metrics are key for design space exploration to quantify the algorithmic and the implementation complexity of a receiver. Most of the current established efficiency metrics are based on counting operations, thus neglecting important issues like data and storage complexity. In this paper we introduce suitable energy and area efficiency metrics which resolve the afore-mentioned disadvantages. These are decoded information bit per energy and throughput per area unit. Efficiency metrics are assessed by various implementations of turbo decoders, LDPC decoders and convolutional decoders. New exploration methodologies are presented, which permit an appropriate benchmarking of implementation efficiency, communications performance, and flexibility trade-offs. These exploration methodologies are based on efficiency trajectories rather than a single snapshot metric as done in state-of-the-art approaches.

  11. Low-Complexity Iterative Receiver for Space-Time Coded Signals over Frequency Selective Channels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Siala

    2002-05-01

    Full Text Available We propose a low-complexity turbo-detector scheme for frequency selective multiple-input multiple-output channels. The detection part of the receiver is based on a List-type MAP equalizer which is a state-reduction algorithm of the MAP algorithm using per-survivor technique. This alternative achieves a good tradeoff between performance and complexity provided a small amount of the channel is neglected. In order to induce the good performance of this equalizer, we propose to use a whitened matched filter (WMF which leads to a white-noise “minimum phase” channel model. Simulation results show that the use of the WMF yields significant improvement, particularly over severe channels. Thanks to the iterative turbo processing (detection and decoding are iterated several times, the performance loss due to the use of the suboptimum List-type equalizer is recovered.

  12. Sensory renal innervation: a kidney-specific firing activity due to a unique expression pattern of voltage-gated sodium channels?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freisinger, Wolfgang; Schatz, Johannes; Ditting, Tilmann; Lampert, Angelika; Heinlein, Sonja; Lale, Nena; Schmieder, Roland; Veelken, Roland

    2013-03-01

    Sensory neurons with afferent axons from the kidney are extraordinary in their response to electrical stimulation. More than 50% exhibit a tonic firing pattern, i.e., sustained action potential firing throughout depolarizing, pointing to an increased excitability, whereas nonrenal neurons show mainly a phasic response, i.e., less than five action potentials. Here we investigated whether these peculiar firing characteristics of renal afferent neurons are due to differences in the expression of voltage-gated sodium channels (Navs). Dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons from rats (Th11-L2) were recorded by the current-clamp technique and distinguished as "tonic" or "phasic." In voltage-clamp recordings, Navs were characterized by their tetrodotoxoxin (TTX) sensitivity, and their molecular identity was revealed by RT-PCR. The firing pattern of 66 DRG neurons (41 renal and 25 nonrenal) was investigated. Renal neurons exhibited more often a tonic firing pattern (56.1 vs. 12%). Tonic neurons showed a more positive threshold (-21.75 ± 1.43 vs.-29.33 ± 1.63 mV; P sodium currents. Interestingly, mRNA expression of TTX-resistant sodium channels was significantly increased in renal, predominantly tonic, DRG neurons. Hence, under physiological conditions, renal sensory neurons exhibit predominantly a firing pattern associated with higher excitability. Our findings support that this is due to an increased expression and activation of TTX-resistant Navs.

  13. Amitriptyline and carbamazepine utilize voltage-gated ion channel suppression to impair excitability of sensory dorsal horn neurons in thin tissue slice: An in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolff, Matthias; Czorlich, Patrick; Nagaraj, Chandran; Schnöbel-Ehehalt, Rose; Li, Yingji; Kwapiszewska, Grazyna; Olschewski, Horst; Heschl, Stefan; Olschewski, Andrea

    2016-08-01

    Amitriptyline, carbamazepine and gabapentin are often used for the treatment of neuropathic pain. However, their analgesic action on central sensory neurons is still not fully understood. Moreover, the expression pattern of their target ion channels is poorly elucidated in the dorsal horn of the spinal cord. Thus, we performed patch-clamp investigations in visualized neurons of lamina I-III of the spinal cord. The expression of the different voltage-gated ion channels, as the targets of these drugs, was detected by RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry. Neurons of the lamina I-III express the TTX-sensitive voltage-gated Na(+) as well as voltage-gated K(+) subunits assembling the fast inactivating (A-type) currents and the delayed rectifier K(+) currents. Our pharmacological studies show that tonically-firing, adapting-firing and single spike neurons responded dose-dependently to amitriptyline and carbamazepine. The ion channel inhibition consecutively reduced the firing rate of tonically-firing and adapting-firing neurons. This study provides evidence for the distribution of voltage-gated Na(+) and K(+) subunits in lamina I-III of the spinal cord and for the action of drugs used for the treatment of neuropathic pain. Our work confirms that modulation of voltage-gated ion channels in the central nervous system contributes to the antinociceptive effects of these drugs. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd and Japan Neuroscience Society. All rights reserved.

  14. The involvement of TRP channels in sensory irritation: a mechanistic approach toward a better understanding of the biological effects of local irritants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehmann, Ramona; Schöbel, Nicole; Hatt, Hanns; van Thriel, Christoph

    2016-06-01

    Peripheral nerves innervating the mucosae of the nose, mouth, and throat protect the organism against chemical hazards. Upon their stimulation, characteristic perceptions (e.g., stinging and burning) and various reflexes are triggered (e.g., sneezing and cough). The potency of a chemical to cause sensory irritation can be estimated by a mouse bioassay assessing the concentration-dependent decrease in the respiratory rate (50 % decrease: RD50). The involvement of the N. trigeminus and its sensory neurons in the irritant-induced decrease in respiratory rates are not well understood to date. In calcium imaging experiments, we tested which of eight different irritants (RD50 5-730 ppm) could induce responses in primary mouse trigeminal ganglion neurons. The tested irritants acetophenone, 2-ethylhexanol, hexyl isocyanate, isophorone, and trimethylcyclohexanol stimulated responses in trigeminal neurons. Most of these responses depended on functional TRPA1 or TRPV1 channels. For crotyl alcohol, 3-methyl-1-butanol, and sodium metabisulfite, no activation could be observed. 2-ethylhexanol can activate both TRPA1 and TRPV1, and at low contractions (100 µM) G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) seem to be involved. GPCRs might also be involved in the mediation of the responses to trimethylcyclohexanol. By using neurobiological tools, we showed that sensory irritation in vivo could be based on the direct activation of TRP channels but also on yet unknown interactions with GPCRs present in trigeminal neurons. Our results showed that the potency suggested by the RD50 values was not reflected by direct nerve-compound interaction.

  15. Imaging and structural studies of DNA–protein complexes and membrane ion channels

    KAUST Repository

    Marini, Monica

    2017-01-17

    In bio-imaging by electron microscopy, damage of the sample and limited contrast are the two main hurdles for reaching high image quality. We extend a new preparation method based on nanofabrication and super-hydrophobicity to the imaging and structural studies of nucleic acids, nucleic acid-protein complexes (DNA/Rad51 repair protein complex) and neuronal ion channels (gap-junction, K+ and GABA(A) channels) as paradigms of biological significance and increasing complexity. The preparation method is based on the liquid phase and is compatible with physiological conditions. Only in the very last stage, samples are dried for TEM analysis. Conventional TEM and high-resolution TEM (HRTEM) were used to achieve a resolution of 3.3 and 1.5 angstrom, respectively. The EM dataset quality allows the determination of relevant structural and metrological information on the DNA structure, DNA-protein interactions and ion channels, allowing the identification of specific macromolecules and their structure.

  16. Numerical and experimental study on the motion characteristics of single bubble in a complex channel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Tao; Li, Weizhong; Dong, Bo

    2015-07-01

    This paper is an extended study from previous work. In this study, the focus is paid to the dynamics of bubble rising and deformation in a complex channel, while the previous work is in straight channel. For this purpose, a three-dimensional lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) is employed to simulate the dynamics behaviour of a bubble rising in a complex channel consisting of three half-round throats. To validate the numerical method, a visual experiment was carried out by means of a high-speed digital camera and computer image processing technology. The behaviour of the rising bubble through glycerine solution in a complex channel was recorded. Some physical parameters such as rising velocities, trajectory and shapes of the bubble were calculated and processed based on the experimental data. In the same conditions, the trajectory, shapes and rising velocities of the bubble were simulated during its rising process by the proposed LBM. The numerical results are in good agreement with the experimental results. It demonstrates that LBM used in this work is feasible for simulating two-phase flow in such a complex channel.

  17. The multivalent PDZ domain-containing protein CIPP is a partner of acid-sensing ion channel 3 in sensory neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anzai, Naohiko; Deval, Emmanuel; Schaefer, Lionel; Friend, Valerie; Lazdunski, Michel; Lingueglia, Eric

    2002-05-10

    Acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs) are cationic channels activated by extracellular pH. They are present in the brain, where they are thought to participate in signal transduction associated with local pH variations, and in sensory neurons, where they have been involved in pain perception associated with tissue acidosis and in mechanoperception. The ASIC3 subunit is mainly expressed in dorsal root ganglion neurons. Its expression is associated with a rapidly inactivating current followed by a slowly activating sustained current thought to be required for the tonic sensation of pain caused by acids. We report here the interaction of this channel subunit with the multivalent PDZ (PSD-95 Drosophila discs-large protein, Zonula occludens protein 1) domain-containing protein CIPP. This interaction requires the C-terminal region of ASIC3 and the fourth PDZ domain of CIPP. Co-expression of CIPP and ASIC3 in COS cells increases the maximal ASIC3 peak current density by a factor of 5 and slightly shifts the pH(0.5) for activation from pH 6.2 to pH 6.4. CIPP mRNA is found at a significant level in the same dorsal root ganglion neuronal cell population that expresses the ASIC3 subunit, i.e. mainly in the small nociceptive neurons. CIPP is thus a scaffolding protein that could both enhance the surface expression of ASIC3 and bring together ASIC3 and functionally related proteins in the membrane of sensory neurons.

  18. TRP channels in schistosomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swarna Bais

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Praziquantel (PZQ is effectively the only drug currently available for treatment and control of schistosomiasis, a disease affecting hundreds of millions of people worldwide. Many anthelmintics, likely including PZQ, target ion channels, membrane protein complexes essential for normal functioning of the neuromusculature and other tissues. Despite this fact, only a few classes of parasitic helminth ion channels have been assessed for their pharmacological properties or for their roles in parasite physiology. One such overlooked group of ion channels is the transient receptor potential (TRP channel superfamily. TRP channels share a common core structure, but are widely diverse in their activation mechanisms and ion selectivity. They are critical to transducing sensory signals, responding to a wide range of external stimuli. They are also involved in other functions, such as regulating intracellular calcium and organellar ion homeostasis and trafficking. Here, we review current literature on parasitic helminth TRP channels, focusing on those in schistosomes. We discuss the likely roles of these channels in sensory and locomotor activity, including the possible significance of a class of TRP channels (TRPV that is absent in schistosomes. We also focus on evidence indicating that at least one schistosome TRP channel (SmTRPA has atypical, TRPV1-like pharmacological sensitivities that could potentially be exploited for future therapeutic targeting.

  19. On the Computational Complexity of Sphere Decoder for Lattice Space-Time Coded MIMO Channel

    CERN Document Server

    Abediseid, Walid

    2011-01-01

    The exact complexity analysis of the basic sphere decoder for general space-time codes applied to multi-input multi-output (MIMO) wireless channel is known to be difficult. In this work, we shed the light on the computational complexity of sphere decoding for the quasi-static, LAttice Space-Time (LAST) coded MIMO channel. Specifically, we derive the asymptotic tail distribution of the decoder's computational complexity in the high signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) regime. For the uncoded $M\\times N$ MIMO channel (e.g., V-BLAST), the analysis in [6] revealed that the tail distribution of such a decoder is of a Pareto-type with tail exponent that is equivalent to $N-M+1$. In our analysis, we show that the tail exponent of the sphere decoder's complexity distribution is equivalent to the diversity-multiplexing tradeoff achieved by LAST coding and lattice decoding schemes. This leads to extend the channel's tradeoff to include the decoding complexity. Moreover, we show analytically how minimum-mean square-error decisio...

  20. Increased nerve fiber expression of sensory sodium channels Nav1.7, Nav1.8, And Nav1.9 in rhinitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keh, Siew M; Facer, Paul; Simpson, Karen D; Sandhu, Guri; Saleh, Hesham A; Anand, Praveen

    2008-04-01

    Voltage-gated sodium channels Nav1.7, Nav1.8, and Nav1.9 are involved in nerve action potentials and have been proposed to underlie neuronal hypersensitivity. We have therefore studied their levels in allergic and nonallergic rhinitis. Inferior turbinate biopsies from 50 patients (n = 18 controls, n = 20 allergic, and n = 12 nonallergic rhinitis) were studied by immunohistology using antibodies to Nav1.7, Nav1.8, and Nav1.9, the structural nerve marker (protein gene product [PGP]9.5), nerve growth factor (NGF), mast cells (c-kit), macrophages (CD68), and T cells (CD3). Sodium channel-positive nerve fibers were counted per millimeter length of subepithelium, and immunoreactivity for inflammatory cell markers PGP9.5 and NGF were image analyzed. All three sodium channel-immunoreactive nerve fiber numbers were significantly increased in allergic (Nav1.7, P = .0004; Nav1.8, P = .028; Nav1.9, P = .02) and nonallergic (Nav1.7, P = .006; Nav1.8, P = .019; Nav1.9, P = .0037) rhinitis. There was a significant increase of subepithelial innervation (PGP9.5, P = .01) and epithelial NGF immunoreactivity (P = .03) in nonallergic rhinitis, comparable with our previous report in allergic rhinitis. Inflammatory cell markers were significantly increased in allergic (mast cells, P = .06; macrophages, P = .044; T cells, P = .007) but not nonallergic rhinitis. The increased levels of sensory sodium channels in allergic and nonallergic rhinitis may contribute to the hypersensitive state, irrespective of the degree of active inflammation. Selective blockers of these sodium channels, administered topically, may have therapeutic potential in rhinitis.

  1. Cardiac ATP-sensitive K+ channel associates with the glycolytic enzyme complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Miyoun; Kefaloyianni, Eirini; Bao, Li; Malester, Brian; Delaroche, Diane; Neubert, Thomas A.; Coetzee, William A.

    2011-01-01

    Being gated by high-energy nucleotides, cardiac ATP-sensitive potassium (KATP) channels are exquisitely sensitive to changes in cellular energy metabolism. An emerging view is that proteins associated with the KATP channel provide an additional layer of regulation. Using putative sulfonylurea receptor (SUR) coiled-coil domains as baits in a 2-hybrid screen against a rat cardiac cDNA library, we identified glycolytic enzymes (GAPDH and aldolase A) as putative interacting proteins. Interaction between aldolase and SUR was confirmed using GST pulldown assays and coimmunoprecipitation assays. Mass spectrometry of proteins from KATP channel immunoprecipitates of rat cardiac membranes identified glycolysis as the most enriched biological process. Coimmunoprecipitation assays confirmed interaction for several glycolytic enzymes throughout the glycolytic pathway. Immunocytochemistry colocalized many of these enzymes with KATP channel subunits in rat cardiac myocytes. The catalytic activities of aldolase and pyruvate kinase functionally modulate KATP channels in patch-clamp experiments, whereas d-glucose was without effect. Overall, our data demonstrate close physical association and functional interaction of the glycolytic process (particularly the distal ATP-generating steps) with cardiac KATP channels.—Hong, M., Kefaloyianni, E., Bao, L., Malester, B., Delaroche, D., Neubert, T. A., Coetzee, W. A. Cardiac ATP-sensitive K+ channel associates with the glycolytic enzyme complex. PMID:21482559

  2. Performance-complexity tradeoff in sequential decoding for the unconstrained AWGN channel

    KAUST Repository

    Abediseid, Walid

    2013-06-01

    In this paper, the performance limits and the computational complexity of the lattice sequential decoder are analyzed for the unconstrained additive white Gaussian noise channel. The performance analysis available in the literature for such a channel has been studied only under the use of the minimum Euclidean distance decoder that is commonly referred to as the lattice decoder. Lattice decoders based on solutions to the NP-hard closest vector problem are very complex to implement, and the search for low complexity receivers for the detection of lattice codes is considered a challenging problem. However, the low computational complexity advantage that sequential decoding promises, makes it an alternative solution to the lattice decoder. In this work, we characterize the performance and complexity tradeoff via the error exponent and the decoding complexity, respectively, of such a decoder as a function of the decoding parameter - the bias term. For the above channel, we derive the cut-off volume-to-noise ratio that is required to achieve a good error performance with low decoding complexity. © 2013 IEEE.

  3. Downregulation of the sodium channel Nav1.6 by potential transcriptomic deregulation may explain sensory deficits in critical illness neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Nan; Liu, Zhongmin; Wang, Guang; Wang, Shiji

    2015-12-15

    Sepsis patients and other patients in the critical care settings are at very high risk of mortality due to the primary illness. However, a fraction of patients, even after showing initial clinical improvement, deteriorates relentlessly at later stages. Increasingly, it is being identified that this is mostly due to dysfunction of the neurological system. We obtained peripheral nerve biopsies from the sural nerve from ICU patients. Nav1.6 expression was significantly diminished. The expression of cellular membrane anchoring protein for Nav1.6, ankyrin, remained unaffected, suggesting that genomic repression may be responsible for the diminished expression of the sodium channels. We examined the expression of two regulatory transcription factors: (a) a positive regulator YY1 that binds to the promoter region of sodium channels and (b) an upstream negative neuronal regulator REST. REST expression was significantly elevated, while YY1 expression was diminished. Finally, we also observed that the cholinergic synthetic enzyme acyltransferase was also significantly diminished in sensory nerve lysates. Finally, circulating antibodies was detected in the peripheral blood against all the major sodium channels Nav1.6, 1.8 and 1.9, which contribute to the development and propagation of action potentials. This may potentially explain why its dysfunction affects neurological functions across all systems of the body during critical illness. The underlying mechanism of why the expression of the REST transcriptional factor is affected in critical illnesses remains our future goals of investigation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Targeting of CaV3.2 T-type calcium channels in peripheral sensory neurons for the treatment of painful diabetic neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todorovic, Slobodan M; Jevtovic-Todorovic, Vesna

    2014-04-01

    Pain-sensing sensory neurons (nociceptors) of the dorsal root ganglion (DRG) can become sensitized (hyperexcitable) in response to pathological conditions such as diabetes, which in turn may lead to the development of painful peripheral diabetic neuropathy (PDN). Because of insufficient knowledge about the mechanisms for this hypersensitization, current treatment for painful PDN has been limited to somewhat nonspecific systemic drugs having significant side effects or potential for abuse. Recent studies have established that the CaV3.2 isoform of T-channels makes a previously unrecognized contribution to sensitization of pain responses by enhancing excitability of nociceptors in animal models of type 1 and type 2 PDN. Furthermore, it has been reported that the glycosylation inhibitor neuraminidase can inhibit the native and recombinant CaV3.2 T-currents in vitro and completely reverse mechanical and thermal hyperalgesia in diabetic animals with PDN in vivo. Understanding details of posttranslational regulation of nociceptive channel activity via glycosylation may facilitate development of novel therapies for treatment of painful PDN. Pharmacological targeting the specific pathogenic mechanism rather than the channel per se may cause fewer side effects and reduce the potential for drug abuse in patients with diabetes.

  5. Presynaptic CaV1.3 channels regulate synaptic ribbon size and are required for synaptic maintenance in sensory hair cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheets, Lavinia; Kindt, Katie S; Nicolson, Teresa

    2012-11-28

    L-type calcium channels (Ca(V)1) are involved in diverse processes, such as neurotransmission, hormone secretion, muscle contraction, and gene expression. In this study, we uncover a role for Ca(V)1.3a in regulating the architecture of a cellular structure, the ribbon synapse, in developing zebrafish sensory hair cells. By combining in vivo calcium imaging with confocal and super-resolution structured illumination microscopy, we found that genetic disruption or acute block of Ca(V)1.3a channels led to enlargement of synaptic ribbons in hair cells. Conversely, activating channels reduced both synaptic-ribbon size and the number of intact synapses. Along with enlarged presynaptic ribbons in ca(V)1.3a mutants, we observed a profound loss of juxtaposition between presynaptic and postsynaptic components. These synaptic defects are not attributable to loss of neurotransmission, because vglut3 mutants lacking neurotransmitter release develop relatively normal hair-cell synapses. Moreover, regulation of synaptic-ribbon size by Ca(2+) influx may be used by other cell types, because we observed similar pharmacological effects on pinealocyte synaptic ribbons. Our results indicate that Ca(2+) influx through Ca(V)1.3 fine tunes synaptic ribbon size during hair-cell maturation and that Ca(V)1.3 is required for synaptic maintenance.

  6. Evidence for the role of lipid rafts and sphingomyelin in Ca2+-gating of Transient Receptor Potential channels in trigeminal sensory neurons and peripheral nerve terminals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sághy, Éva; Szőke, Éva; Payrits, Maja; Helyes, Zsuzsanna; Börzsei, Rita; Erostyák, János; Jánosi, Tibor Zoltán; Sétáló, György; Szolcsányi, János

    2015-10-01

    Transient Receptor Potential (TRP) cation channels, such as TRP Vanilloid 1 and TRP Ankyrin repeat domain 1 (TRPV1 and TRPA1) are nocisensors playing important role to signal pain. Two "melastatin" TRP receptors, like TRPM8 and TRPM3 are also expressed in a subgroup of primary sensory neurons. These channels serve as thermosensors with unique thermal sensitivity ranges and are activated also by several exogenous and endogenous chemical ligands inducing conformational changes from various allosteric ("multisteric") sites. We analysed the role of plasma membrane microdomains of lipid rafts on isolated trigeminal (TRG) neurons and TRPV1-expressing CHO cell line by measuring agonist-induced Ca2+ transients with ratiometric technique. Stimulation-evoked calcitonin gene related peptide (CGRP) release from sensory nerve endings of the isolated rat trachea by radioimmunoassay was also measured. Lipid rafts were disrupted by cleaving sphingomyelin (SM) with sphingomyelinase (SMase), cholesterol depletion with methyl β-cyclodextrin (MCD) and ganglioside breakdown with myriocin. It has been revealed that intracellular Ca2+ increase responses evoked by the TRPV1 agonist capsaicin, the TRPA1 agonsits allyl isothiocyanate (AITC) and formaldehyde as well as the TRPM8 activator icilin were inhibited after SMase, MCD and myriocin incubation but the response to the TRPM3 agonist pregnenolon sulphate was not altered. Extracellular SMase treatment did not influence the thapsigargin-evoked Ca2+-release from intracellular stores. Besides the cell bodies, SMase also inhibited capsaicin- or AITC-evoked CGRP release from peripheral sensory nerve terminals, this provides the first evidence for the importance of lipid raft integrity in TRPV1 and TRPA1 gating on capsaicin-sensitive nerve terminals. SM metabolites, ceramide and sphingosine, did not influence TRPA1 and TRPV1 activation on TRG neurons, TRPV1-expressing CHO cell line, and nerve terminals. We suggest, that the hydrophobic

  7. Mathematical modeling of fluid flow in complex multi-channel structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shashkin, V. Y.

    2017-10-01

    The work is focused on a numerical hydraulic model, which allows one to simulate fluid flow in a complex, arbitrarily configured multi-channel system with a capability of automatic visualization of its structure. The main elements of a system are channels which are united in the system by means of a particular set of coupling elements (local resistance, knots). The processes models in channels are based on the equation of continuity, momentum conservation. The system structure is made by forming matrices of regional and internal boundary conditions according to the developed algorithm. By the model the algorithm is created, on the basis of which the application program is developed. The application program enables one to determine parameters of a steady state of fluid flow in the complex multichannel structures. The calculation structure is shown.

  8. Low Complexity Iterative Joint Channel Estimation and Multiuser Detection for DS-CDMA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Søren Skovgård; Kocian, Alexander; Fleury, Bernard Henri

    2004-01-01

    Previously the SAGE algorithm was applied to sub-optimal yet efficient Joint data Detection and channel Estimation (JDE) for DS-CDMA of moderate time complexity. Modifying the expectation and maximization steps of the SAGE-JDE scheme, it is possible to obtain an efficient receiver architecture...

  9. Low-Complexity Block Turbo Equalization for OFDM Systems in Time-Varying Channels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fang, K.; Rugini, L.; Leus, G.

    2008-01-01

    We propose low-complexity block turbo equalizers for orthogonal frequency-division multiplexing (OFDM) systems in time-varying channels. The presented work is based on a soft minimum mean-squared error (MMSE) block linear equalizer (BLE) that exploits the banded structure of the frequency-domain

  10. Control of sensory neuron excitability by serotonin involves 5HT2C receptors and Ca(2+)-activated chloride channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salzer, Isabella; Gantumur, Enkhbileg; Yousuf, Arsalan; Boehm, Stefan

    2016-11-01

    Serotonin (5HT) is a constituent of the so-called "inflammatory soup" that sensitizes nociceptors during inflammation. Nevertheless, receptors and signaling mechanisms that mediate an excitation of dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons by 5HT remained controversial. Therefore, capsaicin-sensitive nociceptive neurons dissociated from rat DRGs were used to investigate effects of 5HT on membrane excitability and currents through ligand- as well as voltage-gated ion channels. In 58% of the neurons tested, 5HT increased action potential firing, an effect that was abolished by the 5HT2 receptor antagonist ritanserin, but not by the 5HT3 antagonist tropisetron. Unlike other algogenic mediators, such as PGE2 and bradykinin, 5HT did not affect currents through TTX-resistant Na(+) channels or Kv7 K(+) channels. In all neurons investigated, 5HT potentiated capsaicin-evoked currents through TRPV1 channels, an effect that was attenuated by antagonists at 5HT2A (4 F 4 PP), 5HT2B (SB 204741), as well as 5HT2C (RS 102221) receptors. 5HT triggered slowly arising inward Cl(-) currents in 53% of the neurons. This effect was antagonized by the 5HT2C receptor blocker only, and the current was prevented by an inhibitor of Ca(2+)-activated chloride channels (CaCC). The 5HT-induced increase in action potential firing was also abolished by this CaCC blocker and by the TRPV1 inhibitor capsazepine. Amongst the subtype selective 5HT2 antagonists, only RS 102221 (5HT2C-selectively) counteracted the rise in action potential firing elicited by 5HT. These results show that 5HT excites DRG neurons mainly via 5HT2C receptors which concomitantly mediate a sensitization of TRPV1 channels and an opening of CaCCs. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  11. Melatonin-mediated inhibition of Cav3.2 T-type Ca2+channels induces sensory neuronal hypoexcitability through the novel protein kinase C-eta isoform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yuan; Ji, Heyi; Wang, Jiangong; Sun, Yufang; Qian, Zhiyuan; Jiang, Xinghong; Snutch, Terrance P; Sun, Yangang; Tao, Jin

    2018-02-13

    Recent studies implicate melatonin in the anti-nociceptive activity of sensory neurons. However, the underlying mechanisms are still largely unknown. Here, we identify a critical role of melatonin in functionally regulating Cav3.2 T-type Ca 2+ channels (T-type channel) in trigeminal ganglion (TG) neurons. Melatonin inhibited T-type channels in small TG neurons via the melatonin receptor 2 (MT 2 receptor) and a pertussis toxin-sensitive G-protein pathway. Immunoprecipitation analyses revealed that the intracellular subunit of the MT 2 receptor coprecipitated with Gα o . Both shRNA-mediated knockdown of Gα o and intracellular application of QEHA peptide abolished the inhibitory effects of melatonin. Protein kinase C (PKC) antagonists abolished the melatonin-induced T-type channel response whereas inhibition of conventional PKC isoforms elicited no effect. Further, application of melatonin increased membrane abundance of PKC-eta (PKC η ) while antagonism of PKC η or shRNA targeting PKC η prevented the melatonin-mediated effects. In a heterologous expression system, activation of MT 2 receptor strongly inhibited Cav3.2 T-type channel currents but had no effect on Cav3.1 and Cav3.3 current amplitudes. The selective Cav3.2 response was PKC η dependent and was accompanied by a negative shift in the steady-state inactivation curve. Further, melatonin decreased the action potential firing rate of small TG neurons and attenuated the mechanical hypersensitivity in a mouse model of Complete Freund's adjuvant-induced inflammatory pain. These actions were inhibited by T-type channel blockade. Together, our results demonstrated that melatonin inhibits Cav3.2 T-type channel activity through the MT 2 receptor coupled to novel G βγ -mediated PKC η signaling, subsequently decreasing the membrane excitability of TG neurons and pain hypersensitivity in mice. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  12. Activation of MrgC receptor inhibits N-type calcium channels in small-diameter primary sensory neurons in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhe; He, Shao-Qiu; Xu, Qian; Yang, Fei; Tiwari, Vinod; Liu, Qin; Tang, Zongxiang; Han, Liang; Chu, Yu-Xia; Wang, Yun; Hin, Niyada; Tsukamoto, Takashi; Slusher, Barbara; Guan, Xiaowei; Wei, Feng; Raja, Srinivasa N; Dong, Xinzhong; Guan, Yun

    2014-08-01

    Mas-related G-protein-coupled receptor subtype C (mouse MrgC11 and rat rMrgC), expressed specifically in small-diameter primary sensory neurons, may constitute a novel pain inhibitory mechanism. We have shown previously that intrathecal administration of MrgC-selective agonists can strongly attenuate persistent pain in various animal models. However, the underlying mechanisms for MrgC agonist-induced analgesia remain elusive. Here, we conducted patch-clamp recordings to test the effect of MrgC agonists on high-voltage-activated (HVA) calcium current in small-diameter dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons. Using pharmacological approaches, we show for the first time that an MrgC agonist (JHU58) selectively and dose-dependently inhibits N-type, but not L- or P/Q-type, HVA calcium channels in mouse DRG neurons. Activation of HVA calcium channels is important to neurotransmitter release and synaptic transmission. Patch-clamp recordings in spinal cord slices showed that JHU58 attenuated the evoked excitatory postsynaptic currents in substantia gelatinosa (SG) neurons in wild-type mice, but not in Mrg knockout mice, after peripheral nerve injury. These findings indicate that activation of endogenously expressed MrgC receptors at central terminals of primary sensory fibers may decrease peripheral excitatory inputs onto SG neurons. Together, these results suggest potential cellular and molecular mechanisms that may contribute to intrathecal MrgC agonist-induced analgesia. Because MrgC shares substantial genetic homogeneity with human MrgX1, our findings may suggest a rationale for developing intrathecally delivered MrgX1 receptor agonists to treat pathological pain in humans and provide critical insight regarding potential mechanisms that may underlie its analgesic effects. Copyright © 2014 International Association for the Study of Pain. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Loss of NR1 subunit of NMDARs in primary sensory neurons leads to hyperexcitability and pain hypersensitivity: involvement of Ca(2+)-activated small conductance potassium channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagadala, Promila; Park, Chul-Kyu; Bang, Sangsu; Xu, Zheng-Zhong; Xie, Rou-Gang; Liu, Tong; Han, Bao-Xia; Tracey, W Daniel; Wang, Fan; Ji, Ru-Rong

    2013-08-14

    It is well established that activation of NMDARs plays an essential role in spinal cord synaptic plasticity (i.e., central sensitization) and pain hypersensitivity after tissue injury. Despite prominent expression of NMDARs in DRG primary sensory neurons, the unique role of peripheral NMDARs in regulating intrinsic neuronal excitability and pain sensitivity is not well understood, in part due to the lack of selective molecular tools. To address this problem, we used Advillin-Cre driver to delete the NR1 subunit of NMDARs selectively in DRG neurons. In NR1 conditional knock-out (NR1-cKO) mice, NR1 expression is absent in DRG neurons but remains normal in spinal cord neurons; NMDA-induced currents are also eliminated in DRG neurons of these mice. Surprisingly, NR1-cKO mice displayed mechanical and thermal hypersensitivity compared with wild-type littermates. NR1-deficient DRG neurons show increased excitability, as indicated by increased frequency of action potentials, and enhanced excitatory synaptic transmission in spinal cord slices, as indicated by increased frequency of miniature EPSCs. This hyperexcitability can be reproduced by the NMDAR antagonist APV and by Ca(2+)-activated slow conductance K(+) (SK) channel blocker apamin. Furthermore, NR1-positive DRG neurons coexpress SK1/SK2 and apamin-sensitive afterhyperpolarization currents are elevated by NMDA and suppressed by APV in these neurons. Our findings reveal the hitherto unsuspected role of NMDARs in controlling the intrinsic excitability of primary sensory neurons possibly via Ca(2+)-activated SK channels. Our results also call attention to potential opposing effects of NMDAR antagonists as a treatment for pain and other neurological disorders.

  14. Developmental expression of the TTX-resistant voltage-gated sodium channels Nav1.8 (SNS) and Nav1.9 (SNS2) in primary sensory neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benn, S C; Costigan, M; Tate, S; Fitzgerald, M; Woolf, C J

    2001-08-15

    The development of neuronal excitability involves the coordinated expression of different voltage-gated ion channels. We have characterized the expression of two sensory neuron-specific tetrodotoxin-resistant sodium channel alpha subunits, Na(v)1. (SNS/PN3) and Na(v)1.9 (SNS2/NaN), in developing rat lumbar dorsal root ganglia (DRGs). Expression of both Na(v)1.8 and Na(v)1.9 increases with age, beginning at embryonic day (E) 15 and E17, respectively, and reaching adult levels by postnatal day 7. Their distribution is restricted mainly to those subpopulations of primary sensory neurons in developing and adult DRGs that give rise to unmyelinated C-fibers (neurofilament 200 negative). Na(v)1.8 is expressed in a higher proportion of neuronal profiles than Na(v)1.9 at all stages during development, as in the adult. At E17, almost all Na(v)1.8-expressing neurons also express the high-affinity NGF receptor TrkA, and only a small proportion bind to IB4, a marker for c-ret-expressing (glial-derived neurotrophic factor-responsive) neurons. Because IB4 binding neurons differentiate from TrkA neurons in the postnatal period, the proportion of Na(v)1.8 cells that bind to IB4 increases, in parallel with a decrease in the proportion of Na(v)1.8-TrkA co-expressing cells. In contrast, an equal number of Na(v)1.9 cells bind IB4 and TrkA in embryonic life. The differential expression of Na(v)1.8 and Na(v)1.9 in late embryonic development, with their distinctive kinetic properties, may contribute to the development of spontaneous and stimulus-evoked excitability in small diameter primary sensory neurons in the perinatal period and the activity-dependent changes in differentiation they produce.

  15. Bodily Sensory Inputs and Anomalous Bodily Experiences in Complex Regional Pain Syndrome: Evaluation of the Potential Effects of Sound Feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tajadura-Jiménez, Ana; Cohen, Helen; Bianchi-Berthouze, Nadia

    2017-01-01

    Neuroscientific studies have shown that human's mental body representations are not fixed but are constantly updated through sensory feedback, including sound feedback. This suggests potential new therapeutic sensory approaches for patients experiencing body-perception disturbances (BPD). BPD can occur in association with chronic pain, for example in Complex Regional Pain Syndrome (CRPS). BPD often impacts on emotional, social, and motor functioning. Here we present the results from a proof-of-principle pilot study investigating the potential value of using sound feedback for altering BPD and its related emotional state and motor behavior in those with CRPS. We build on previous findings that real-time alteration of the sounds produced by walking can alter healthy people's perception of their own body size, while also resulting in more active gait patterns and a more positive emotional state. In the present study we quantified the emotional state, BPD, pain levels and gait of twelve people with CRPS Type 1, who were exposed to real-time alteration of their walking sounds. Results confirm previous reports of the complexity of the BPD linked to CRPS, as participants could be classified into four BPD subgroups according to how they mentally visualize their body. Further, results suggest that sound feedback may affect the perceived size of the CRPS affected limb and the pain experienced, but that the effects may differ according to the type of BPD. Sound feedback affected CRPS descriptors and other bodily feelings and emotions including feelings of emotional dominance, limb detachment, position awareness, attention and negative feelings toward the limb. Gait also varied with sound feedback, affecting the foot contact time with the ground in a way consistent with experienced changes in body weight. Although, findings from this small pilot study should be interpreted with caution, they suggest potential applications for regenerating BDP and its related bodily feelings in

  16. Bodily Sensory Inputs and Anomalous Bodily Experiences in Complex Regional Pain Syndrome: Evaluation of the Potential Effects of Sound Feedback

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Tajadura-Jiménez

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Neuroscientific studies have shown that human's mental body representations are not fixed but are constantly updated through sensory feedback, including sound feedback. This suggests potential new therapeutic sensory approaches for patients experiencing body-perception disturbances (BPD. BPD can occur in association with chronic pain, for example in Complex Regional Pain Syndrome (CRPS. BPD often impacts on emotional, social, and motor functioning. Here we present the results from a proof-of-principle pilot study investigating the potential value of using sound feedback for altering BPD and its related emotional state and motor behavior in those with CRPS. We build on previous findings that real-time alteration of the sounds produced by walking can alter healthy people's perception of their own body size, while also resulting in more active gait patterns and a more positive emotional state. In the present study we quantified the emotional state, BPD, pain levels and gait of twelve people with CRPS Type 1, who were exposed to real-time alteration of their walking sounds. Results confirm previous reports of the complexity of the BPD linked to CRPS, as participants could be classified into four BPD subgroups according to how they mentally visualize their body. Further, results suggest that sound feedback may affect the perceived size of the CRPS affected limb and the pain experienced, but that the effects may differ according to the type of BPD. Sound feedback affected CRPS descriptors and other bodily feelings and emotions including feelings of emotional dominance, limb detachment, position awareness, attention and negative feelings toward the limb. Gait also varied with sound feedback, affecting the foot contact time with the ground in a way consistent with experienced changes in body weight. Although, findings from this small pilot study should be interpreted with caution, they suggest potential applications for regenerating BDP and its related

  17. Fractal auditory-nerve firing patterns may derive from fractal switching in sensory hair-cell ion channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowen, S. B.; Teich, M. C.

    1993-08-01

    Hair-cell ion channels, which provide a crucial link in the transformation of incoming acoustic information to neural action-potential trains, switch between open and closed states with power-law-distributed (fractal) dwell times. Trains of action potentials recorded from auditory nerves in mammals always exhibit fractal behavior, including a 1/f-type spectrum, for long time scales. We provide a mathematical model linking these two fractal behaviors within a common framework.

  18. Mutual Information of IID Complex Gaussian Signals on Block Rayleigh-faded Channels

    CERN Document Server

    Rusek, Fredrik; Jindal, Nihar

    2010-01-01

    We present a method to compute, quickly and efficiently, the mutual information achieved by an IID (independent identically distributed) complex Gaussian input on a block Rayleigh-faded channel without side information at the receiver. The method accommodates both scalar and MIMO (multiple-input multiple-output) settings. Operationally, the mutual information thus computed represents the highest spectral efficiency that can be attained using standard Gaussian codebooks. Examples are provided that illustrate the loss in spectral efficiency caused by fast fading and how that loss is amplified by the use of multiple transmit antennas. These examples are further enriched by comparisons with the channel capacity under perfect channel-state information at the receiver, and with the spectral efficiency attained by pilot-based transmission.

  19. Myosin Va and Endoplasmic Reticulum Calcium Channel Complex Regulates Membrane Export during Axon Guidance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fumitaka Wada

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available During axon guidance, growth cones navigate toward attractive cues by inserting new membrane on the cue side. This process depends on Ca2+ release from endoplasmic reticulum (ER Ca2+ channels, but the Ca2+ sensor and effector governing this asymmetric vesicle export remain unknown. We identified a protein complex that controls asymmetric ER Ca2+-dependent membrane vesicle export. The Ca2+-dependent motor protein myosin Va (MyoVa tethers membrane vesicles to the ER via a common binding site on the two major ER Ca2+ channels, inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate and ryanodine receptors. In response to attractive cues, micromolar Ca2+ from ER channels triggers MyoVa-channel dissociation and the movement of freed vesicles to the cue side, enabling growth cone turning. MyoVa-Ca2+ channel interactions are required for proper long-range axon growth in developing spinal cord in vivo. These findings reveal a peri-ER membrane export pathway for Ca2+-dependent attraction in axon guidance.

  20. A Low-Complexity KL Expansion-Based Channel Estimator for OFDM Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Şenol Habib

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper first proposes a computationally efficient, pilot-aided linear minimum mean square error (MMSE batch channel estimation algorithm for OFDM systems in unknown wireless fading channels. The proposed approach employs a convenient representation of the discrete multipath fading channel based on the Karhunen-Loeve (KL orthogonal expansion and finds MMSE estimates of the uncorrelated KL series expansion coefficients. Based on such an expansion, no matrix inversion is required in the proposed MMSE estimator. Moreover, optimal rank reduction is achieved by exploiting the optimal truncation property of the KL expansion resulting in a smaller computational load on the estimation algorithm. The performance of the proposed approach is studied through analytical and experimental results. We then consider the stochastic Cramér-Rao bound and derive the closed-form expression for the random KL coefficients and consequently exploit the performance of the MMSE channel estimator based on the evaluation of minimum Bayesian MSE. We also analyze the effect of a modelling mismatch on the estimator performance. To further reduce the complexity, we extend the batch linear MMSE to the sequential linear MMSE estimator. With the fast convergence property and the simple structure, the sequential linear MMSE estimator provides an attractive alternative to the implementation of channel estimator.

  1. Object-Action Complexes: Grounded Abstractions of Sensori-motor Processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krüger, Norbert; Geib, Christopher; Piater, Justus

    2011-01-01

    This paper formalises Object-Action Complexes (OACs) as a basis for symbolic representations of sensorimotor experience and behaviours. OACs are designed to capture the interaction between objects and associated actions in articial cognitive systems. This paper gives a formal denition of OACs, pr...

  2. The Narrow Abdomen Ion Channel Complex Is Highly Stable and Persists from Development into Adult Stages to Promote Behavioral Rhythmicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Devon L. Moose

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The sodium leak channel NARROW ABDOMEN (NA/ NALCN is an important component of circadian pacemaker neuronal output. In Drosophila, rhythmic expression of the NA channel regulator Nlf-1 in a subset of adult pacemaker neurons has been proposed to contribute to circadian regulation of channel localization or activity. Here we have restricted expression of Drosophila NA channel subunits or the Nlf-1 regulator to either development or adulthood using the temperature-inducible tubulin-GAL80ts system. Surprisingly, we find that developmental expression of endogenous channel subunits and Nlf-1 is sufficient to promote robust rhythmic behavior in adults. Moreover, we find that channel complex proteins produced during development persist in the Drosophila head with little decay for at least 5–7 days in adults. In contrast, restricting either endogenous or transgenic gene expression to adult stages produces only limited amounts of the functional channel complex. These data indicate that much of the NA channel complex that functions in adult circadian neurons is normally produced during development, and that the channel complex is very stable in most neurons in the Drosophila brain. Based on these findings, we propose that circadian regulation of NA channel function in adult pacemaker neurons is mediated primarily by post-translational mechanisms that are independent of Nlf-1.

  3. The Effects of Sequential Environmental and Harvest Stressors on the Sensory Characteristics of Cultured Channel Catfish (Ictalurus Punctatus) Fillets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciaramella, Michael A; Kim, Taejo; Avery, Jimmy L; Allen, Peter J; Schilling, M Wes

    2016-08-01

    Stress during fish culture alters physiological homeostasis and affects fillet quality. Maintenance of high-quality seafood is important to ensure the production of a marketable product. This study assessed how sequential stressors affect the sensory and quality characteristics of catfish (Ictalurus punctatus) fillets. Three stress trials were conducted where temperature (25 or 33 °C) and dissolved oxygen (DO, approximately 2.5 or >5 mg/L) were manipulated followed by socking and transport stress. After each stage of harvest (environmental stress, socking, and transport), fillet yield, consumer acceptability, descriptive evaluation, cook loss, tenderness, and pH were evaluated. Fillet yield decreased with increasing severity of environmental stress. Fillets from the severe stress treatment (33 °C, approximately 2.5 mg/L) received the highest acceptability scores (P Control fillets (25 °C, >5 mg/L) were the least acceptable (P 6 on a 9 point scale). Socking and transport were identified to positively affect textural characteristics of catfish fillets. Although the effects observed were not likely to negatively impact consumer acceptance, a strict management plan should be followed to maintain consistency in the product and avoid changes in stressors that might alter quality more drastically. © 2016 Institute of Food Technologists®

  4. Effect of a selective chloride channel activator, lubiprostone, on gastrointestinal transit, gastric sensory, and motor functions in healthy volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camilleri, Michael; Bharucha, Adil E; Ueno, Ryuji; Burton, Duane; Thomforde, George M; Baxter, Kari; McKinzie, Sanna; Zinsmeister, Alan R

    2006-05-01

    Chloride channels modulate gastrointestinal neuromuscular functions in vitro. Lubiprostone, a selective type 2 chloride channel (ClC-2) activator, induces intestinal secretion and has been shown to relieve constipation in clinical trials; however, the effects of lubiprostone on gastric function and whole gut transit in humans are unclear. Our aim was to compare the effects of the selective ClC-2 activator lubiprostone on maximum tolerated volume (MTV) of a meal, postprandial symptoms, gastric volumes, and gastrointestinal and colonic transit in humans. We performed a randomized, parallel-group, double-blind, placebo-controlled study evaluating the effects of lubiprostone (24 microg bid) in 30 healthy volunteers. Validated methods were used: scintigraphic gastrointestinal and colonic transit, SPECT to measure gastric volumes, and the nutrient drink ("satiation") test to measure MTV and postprandial symptoms. Lubiprostone accelerated small bowel and colonic transit, increased fasting gastric volume, and retarded gastric emptying. MTV values were reduced compared with placebo; however, the MTV was within the normal range for healthy adults in 13 of 14 participants, and there was no significant change compared with baseline measurements. Lubiprostone had no significant effect on postprandial gastric volume or aggregate symptoms but did decrease fullness 30 min after the fully satiating meal. Thus the ClC-2 activator lubiprostone accelerates small intestinal and colonic transit, which confers potential in the treatment of constipation.

  5. Oxytocin inhibits the activity of acid-sensing ion channels through the vasopressin, V1A receptor in primary sensory neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Fang; Qiu, Chun-Yu; Cai, Huilan; Liu, Ting-Ting; Qu, Zu-Wei; Yang, Zhifan; Li, Jia-Da; Zhou, Qun-Yong; Hu, Wang-Ping

    2014-06-01

    A growing number of studies have demonstrated that oxytocin (OT) plays an analgesic role in modulation of nociception and pain. Most work to date has focused on the central mechanisms of OT analgesia, but little is known about whether peripheral mechanisms are also involved. Acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs) are distributed in peripheral sensory neurons and participate in nociception. Here, we investigated the effects of OT on the activity of ASICs in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons. Electrophysiological experiments were performed on neurons from rat DRG. Nociceptive behaviour was induced by acetic acid in rats and mice lacking vasopressin, V1A receptors. OT inhibited the functional activity of native ASICs. Firstly, OT dose-dependently decreased the amplitude of ASIC currents in DRG neurons. Secondly, OT inhibition of ASIC currents was mimicked by arginine vasopressin (AVP) and completely blocked by the V1A receptor antagonist SR49059, but not by the OT receptor antagonist L-368899. Thirdly, OT altered acidosis-evoked membrane excitability of DRG neurons and significantly decreased the amplitude of the depolarization and number of action potentials induced by acid stimuli. Finally, peripherally administered OT or AVP inhibited nociceptive responses to intraplantar injection of acetic acid in rats. Both OT and AVP also induced an analgesic effect on acidosis-evoked pain in wild-type mice, but not in V1A receptor knockout mice. These results reveal a novel peripheral mechanism for the analgesic effect of OT involving the modulation of native ASICs in primary sensory neurons mediated by V1A receptors. © 2014 The British Pharmacological Society.

  6. Physiological consequences of complex II inhibition for aging, disease, and the mKATP channel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wojtovich, Andrew P; Smith, C Owen; Haynes, Cole M; Nehrke, Keith W; Brookes, Paul S

    2013-05-01

    In recent years, it has become apparent that there exist several roles for respiratory complex II beyond metabolism. These include: (i) succinate signaling, (ii) reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, (iii) ischemic preconditioning, (iv) various disease states and aging, and (v) a role in the function of the mitochondrial ATP-sensitive K(+) (mKATP) channel. This review will address the involvement of complex II in each of these areas, with a focus on how complex II regulates or may be involved in the assembly of the mKATP. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Respiratory complex II: Role in cellular physiology and disease. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  7. Coogoon Valles, western Arabia Terra: Hydrological evolution of a complex Martian channel system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molina, Antonio; López, Iván; Prieto-Ballesteros, Olga; Fernández-Remolar, David; de Pablo, Miguel Ángel; Gómez, Felipe

    2017-09-01

    Coogoon Valles is an intricate fluvial system, and its main channel was formed during the Noachian period through the erosion of the clay-bearing basement of the Western Arabia Terra. This region is characterized by a thinner crust compared to the rest of the highlands and by the occurrence of massive phyllosilicate-bearing materials. The origin of this region is still under discussion. Its surface has been exposed to a large-scale volcanism, and several episodes of extensive denudation were primarily controlled by fluvial activity. In this regard, the study of the oldest channels in Arabia Terra is crucial for understanding the global geological evolution of early Mars. The reactivation of the hydrological system by sapping followed by aeolian erosion had reshaped the channel, as well as exposed ancient materials and landforms. The examination of the bed deposits suggests an old episode of detrital sedimentation covering the Noachian basement followed by an erosive event that formed the current Coogoon Valles configuration. A complex system of deltas and alluvial fans is situated at the termination of this channel, which has been proposed as a landing site for the upcoming ExoMars and Mars 2020 missions.

  8. Structural plasticity and dynamic selectivity of acid-sensing ion channel-spider toxin complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baconguis, Isabelle; Gouaux, Eric [Oregon HSU

    2012-07-29

    Acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs) are voltage-independent, amiloride-sensitive channels involved in diverse physiological processes ranging from nociception to taste. Despite the importance of ASICs in physiology, we know little about the mechanism of channel activation. Here we show that psalmotoxin activates non-selective and Na+-selective currents in chicken ASIC1a at pH7.25 and 5.5, respectively. Crystal structures of ASIC1a–psalmotoxin complexes map the toxin binding site to the extracellular domain and show how toxin binding triggers an expansion of the extracellular vestibule and stabilization of the open channel pore. At pH7.25 the pore is approximately 10Å in diameter, whereas at pH5.5 the pore is largely hydrophobic and elliptical in cross-section with dimensions of approximately 5 by 7Å, consistent with a barrier mechanism for ion selectivity. These studies define mechanisms for activation of ASICs, illuminate the basis for dynamic ion selectivity and provide the blueprints for new therapeutic agents.

  9. Ultra-fast secure communication with complex systems in classical channels (Conference Presentation)

    KAUST Repository

    Mazzone, Valerio

    2017-04-28

    Developing secure communications is a research area of growing interest. During the past years, several cryptographic schemes have been developed, with Quantum cryptography being a promising scheme due to the use of quantum effects, which make very difficult for an eavesdropper to intercept the communication. However, practical quantum key distribution methods have encountered several limitations; current experimental realizations, in fact, fail to scale up on long distances, as well as in providing unconditional security and speed comparable to classical optical communications channels. Here we propose a new, low cost and ultra-fast cryptographic system based on a fully classical optical channel. Our cryptographic scheme exploits the complex synchronization of two different random systems (one on the side of the sender and another on the side of the receiver) to realize a “physical” one paid system. The random medium is created by an optical chip fabricated through electron beam lithography on a Silicon On Insulator (SOI) substrate. We present experiments with ps lasers and commercial fibers, showing the ultrafast distribution of a random key between two users (Alice and Bob), with absolute no possibility for a passive/active eavesdropper to intercept the communication. Remarkably, this system enables the same security of quantum cryptography, but with the use of a classical communication channel. Our system exploits a unique synchronization that exists between two different random systems, and at such is extremely versatile and can enable safe communications among different users in standards telecommunications channels.

  10. Low-Complexity Full-Diversity Detection in Two-User MIMO X Channels

    KAUST Repository

    Ismail, Amr

    2014-01-26

    Several interference cancellation (IC) schemes have been recently proposed to suppress multi-user interference for various network configurations (e.g., multiple access and X channels). However, most of these schemes trade-off diversity for implementation complexity or vice-versa. In this paper, we propose a full-diversity interference cancellation scheme in a multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO) X channel with two sources and two destinations while maintaining low decoding complexity. We provide sufficient conditions for a wide range of space-time block codes (STBCs) to achieve full-diversity gain under the so-called partial interference cancellation group decoding (PICGD) in the configuration of interest. A systematic construction is then proposed to achieve full-diversity. The constructed scheme is compared to recently proposed IC scheme in terms of performance and decoding complexity. Our IC scheme outperforms the recently proposed scheme in the case it provides higher transmission rate, while it loses slightly in the case of equal rates. In terms of decoding complexity, both schemes are equivalent.

  11. Low-Complexity User Selection for Rate Maximization in MIMO Broadcast Channels with Downlink Beamforming

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Castañeda

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We present in this work a low-complexity algorithm to solve the sum rate maximization problem in multiuser MIMO broadcast channels with downlink beamforming. Our approach decouples the user selection problem from the resource allocation problem and its main goal is to create a set of quasiorthogonal users. The proposed algorithm exploits physical metrics of the wireless channels that can be easily computed in such a way that a null space projection power can be approximated efficiently. Based on the derived metrics we present a mathematical model that describes the dynamics of the user selection process which renders the user selection problem into an integer linear program. Numerical results show that our approach is highly efficient to form groups of quasiorthogonal users when compared to previously proposed algorithms in the literature. Our user selection algorithm achieves a large portion of the optimum user selection sum rate (90% for a moderate number of active users.

  12. muO-conotoxin MrVIB selectively blocks Nav1.8 sensory neuron specific sodium channels and chronic pain behavior without motor deficits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekberg, J; Jayamanne, A; Vaughan, C W; Aslan, S; Thomas, L; Mould, J; Drinkwater, R; Baker, M D; Abrahamsen, B; Wood, J N; Adams, D J; Christie, M J; Lewis, R J

    2006-11-07

    The tetrodotoxin-resistant voltage-gated sodium channel (VGSC) Na(v)1.8 is expressed predominantly by damage-sensing primary afferent nerves and is important for the development and maintenance of persistent pain states. Here we demonstrate that muO-conotoxin MrVIB from Conus marmoreus displays substantial selectivity for Na(v)1.8 and inhibits pain behavior in models of persistent pain. In rat sensory neurons, submicromolar concentrations of MrVIB blocked tetrodotoxin-resistant current characteristic of Na(v)1.8 but not Na(v)1.9 or tetrodotoxin-sensitive VGSC currents. MrVIB blocked human Na(v)1.8 expressed in Xenopus oocytes with selectivity at least 10-fold greater than other VGSCs. In neuropathic and chronic inflammatory pain models, allodynia and hyperalgesia were both reduced by intrathecal infusion of MrVIB (0.03-3 nmol), whereas motor side effects occurred only at 30-fold higher doses. In contrast, the nonselective VGSC blocker lignocaine displayed no selectivity for allodynia and hyperalgesia versus motor side effects. The actions of MrVIB reveal that VGSC antagonists displaying selectivity toward Na(v)1.8 can alleviate chronic pain behavior with a greater therapeutic index than nonselective antagonists.

  13. Contribution of the tetrodotoxin-resistant voltage-gated sodium channel NaV1.9 to sensory transmission and nociceptive behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Priest, Birgit T; Murphy, Beth A; Lindia, Jill A; Diaz, Carmen; Abbadie, Catherine; Ritter, Amy M; Liberator, Paul; Iyer, Leslie M; Kash, Shera F; Kohler, Martin G; Kaczorowski, Gregory J; MacIntyre, D Euan; Martin, William J

    2005-06-28

    The transmission of pain signals after injury or inflammation depends in part on increased excitability of primary sensory neurons. Nociceptive neurons express multiple subtypes of voltage-gated sodium channels (NaV1s), each of which possesses unique features that may influence primary afferent excitability. Here, we examined the contribution of NaV1.9 to nociceptive signaling by studying the electrophysiological and behavioral phenotypes of mice with a disruption of the SCN11A gene, which encodes NaV1.9. Our results confirm that NaV1.9 underlies the persistent tetrodotoxin-resistant current in small-diameter dorsal root ganglion neurons but suggest that this current contributes little to mechanical thermal responsiveness in the absence of injury or to mechanical hypersensitivity after nerve injury or inflammation. However, the expression of NaV1.9 contributes to the persistent thermal hypersensitivity and spontaneous pain behavior after peripheral inflammation. These results suggest that inflammatory mediators modify the function of NaV1.9 to maintain inflammation-induced hyperalgesia.

  14. Expression and localization of the Nav1.9 sodium channel in enteric neurons and in trigeminal sensory endings: implication for intestinal reflex function and orofacial pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padilla, Françoise; Couble, Marie-Lise; Coste, Bertrand; Maingret, François; Clerc, Nadine; Crest, Marcel; Ritter, Amy M; Magloire, Henry; Delmas, Patrick

    2007-05-01

    The Nav1.9 sodium channel is expressed in nociceptive DRG neurons where it contributes to spontaneous pain behavior after peripheral inflammation. Here, we used a newly developed antibody to investigate the distribution of Nav1.9 in rat and mouse trigeminal ganglion (TG) nerve endings and in enteric nervous system (ENS). In TGs, Nav1.9 was expressed in the soma of small- and medium-sized, peripherin-positive neurons. Nav1.9 was present along trigeminal afferent fibers and at terminals in lip skin and dental pulp. In the ENS, Nav1.9 was detected within the soma and proximal axons of sensory, Dogiel type II, myenteric and submucosal neurons. Immunological data were correlated with the detection of persistent TTX-resistant Na(+) currents sharing similar properties in DRG, TG and myenteric neurons. Collectively, our data support a potential role of Nav1.9 in the transmission of trigeminal pain and the regulation of intestinal reflexes. Nav1.9 might therefore constitute a molecular target for therapeutic treatments of orofacial pain and gastrointestinal syndromes.

  15. A CRPS-IgG-transfer-trauma model reproducing inflammatory and positive sensory signs associated with complex regional pain syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tékus, Valéria; Hajna, Zsófia; Borbély, Éva; Markovics, Adrienn; Bagoly, Teréz; Szolcsányi, János; Thompson, Victoria; Kemény, Ágnes; Helyes, Zsuzsanna; Goebel, Andreas

    2014-02-01

    The aetiology of complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS), a highly painful, usually post-traumatic condition affecting the limbs, is unknown, but recent results have suggested an autoimmune contribution. To confirm a role for pathogenic autoantibodies, we established a passive-transfer trauma model. Prior to undergoing incision of hind limb plantar skin and muscle, mice were injected either with serum IgG obtained from chronic CRPS patients or matched healthy volunteers, or with saline. Unilateral hind limb plantar skin and muscle incision was performed to induce typical, mild tissue injury. Mechanical hyperalgesia, paw swelling, heat and cold sensitivity, weight-bearing ability, locomotor activity, motor coordination, paw temperature, and body weight were investigated for 8days. After sacrifice, proinflammatory sensory neuropeptides and cytokines were measured in paw tissues. CRPS patient IgG treatment significantly increased hind limb mechanical hyperalgesia and oedema in the incised paw compared with IgG from healthy subjects or saline. Plantar incision induced a remarkable elevation of substance P immunoreactivity on day 8, which was significantly increased by CRPS-IgG. In this IgG-transfer-trauma model for CRPS, serum IgG from chronic CRPS patients induced clinical and laboratory features resembling the human disease. These results support the hypothesis that autoantibodies may contribute to the pathophysiology of CRPS, and that autoantibody-removing therapies may be effective treatments for long-standing CRPS. Copyright © 2013 International Association for the Study of Pain. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. A disturbance in sensory processing on the affected side of the body increases limb pain in complex regional pain syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drummond, Peter D; Finch, Philip M

    2014-04-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether a central disturbance in somatosensory processing contributes to limb pain in complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS). In 37 patients with CRPS, the effect of cooling the ipsilateral forehead on pain in the affected limb was compared with the effect of cooling the contralateral forehead. In addition, symptoms associated with cold-evoked limb pain were explored. Limb pain generally increased when the ipsilateral side of the forehead was cooled but did not change when the contralateral side of the forehead was cooled. Increases were greatest in patients with heightened sensitivity to cold, brushing, and pressure-pain in the ipsilateral forehead, in patients with heightened sensitivity to pressure-pain in the limbs, and in patients with chronic symptoms. In contrast, sensitivity to light touch was diminished in the CRPS-affected limb of patients whose limb pain remained unchanged or decreased during ipsilateral forehead cooling. These preliminary findings suggest that a central disturbance in sensory processing and pain modulation, which extends beyond the affected limb to the ipsilateral forehead, contributes to symptoms in a subgroup of patients with CRPS.

  17. Low complexity non-iterative coordinated beamforming in 2-user broadcast channels

    KAUST Repository

    Park, Kihong

    2010-10-01

    We propose a new non-iterative coordinated beamforming scheme to obtain full multiplexing gain in 2-user MIMO systems. In order to find the beamforming and combining matrices, we solve a generalized eigenvector problem and describe how to find generalized eigenvectors according to the Gaussian broadcast channels. Selected simulation results show that the proposed method yields the same sum-rate performance as the iterative coordinated beamforming method, while maintaining lower complexity by non-iterative computation of the beamforming and combining matrices. We also show that the proposed method can easily exploit selective gain by choosing the best combination of generalized eigenvectors. © 2006 IEEE.

  18. A study of the expression of small conductance calcium-activated potassium channels (SK1-3) in sensory endings of muscle spindles and lanceolate endings of hair follicles in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shenton, Fiona; Bewick, Guy S; Banks, Robert W

    2014-01-01

    Processes underlying mechanotransduction and its regulation are poorly understood. Inhibitors of Ca2+-activated K+ channels cause a dramatic increase in afferent output from stretched muscle spindles. We used immunocytochemistry to test for the presence and location of small conductance Ca2+-activated K+ channels (SK1-3) in primary endings of muscle spindles and lanceolate endings of hair follicles in the rat. Tissue sections were double immunolabelled with antibodies to one of the SK channel isoforms and to either synaptophysin (SYN, as a marker of synaptic like vesicles (SLV), present in many mechanosensitive endings) or S100 (a Ca2+-binding protein present in glial cells). SK channel immunoreactivity was also compared to immunolabelling for the Na+ ion channel ASIC2, previously reported in both spindle primary and lanceolate endings. SK1 was not detected in sensory terminals of either muscle spindles or lanceolate endings. SK2 was found in the terminals of both muscle spindles and lanceolate endings, where it colocalised with the SLV marker SYN (spindles and lanceolates) and the satellite glial cell (SGC) marker S100 (lanceolates). SK3 was not detected in muscle spindles; by contrast it was present in hair follicle endings, expressed predominantly in SGCs but perhaps also in the SGC: terminal interface, as judged by colocalisation statistical analysis of SYN and S100 immunoreactivity. The possibility that all three isoforms might be expressed in pre-terminal axons, especially at heminodes, cannot be ruled out. Differential distribution of SK channels is likely to be important in their function of responding to changes in intracellular [Ca2+] thereby modulating mechanosensory transduction by regulating the excitability of the sensory terminals. In particular, the presence of SK2 throughout the sensory terminals of both kinds of mechanoreceptor indicates an important role for an outward Ca2+-activated K+ current in the formation of the receptor potential in both

  19. K2P channel gating mechanisms revealed by structures of TREK-2 and a complex with Prozac.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Yin Yao; Pike, Ashley C W; Mackenzie, Alexandra; McClenaghan, Conor; Aryal, Prafulla; Dong, Liang; Quigley, Andrew; Grieben, Mariana; Goubin, Solenne; Mukhopadhyay, Shubhashish; Ruda, Gian Filippo; Clausen, Michael V; Cao, Lishuang; Brennan, Paul E; Burgess-Brown, Nicola A; Sansom, Mark S P; Tucker, Stephen J; Carpenter, Elisabeth P

    2015-03-13

    TREK-2 (KCNK10/K2P10), a two-pore domain potassium (K2P) channel, is gated by multiple stimuli such as stretch, fatty acids, and pH and by several drugs. However, the mechanisms that control channel gating are unclear. Here we present crystal structures of the human TREK-2 channel (up to 3.4 angstrom resolution) in two conformations and in complex with norfluoxetine, the active metabolite of fluoxetine (Prozac) and a state-dependent blocker of TREK channels. Norfluoxetine binds within intramembrane fenestrations found in only one of these two conformations. Channel activation by arachidonic acid and mechanical stretch involves conversion between these states through movement of the pore-lining helices. These results provide an explanation for TREK channel mechanosensitivity, regulation by diverse stimuli, and possible off-target effects of the serotonin reuptake inhibitor Prozac. Copyright © 2015, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  20. Multi-enzyme complexes on DNA scaffolds capable of substrate channelling with an artificial swinging arm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Jinglin; Yang, Yuhe Renee; Johnson-Buck, Alexander; Liu, Minghui; Liu, Yan; Walter, Nils G.; Woodbury, Neal W.; Yan, Hao

    2014-07-01

    Swinging arms are a key functional component of multistep catalytic transformations in many naturally occurring multi-enzyme complexes. This arm is typically a prosthetic chemical group that is covalently attached to the enzyme complex via a flexible linker, allowing the direct transfer of substrate molecules between multiple active sites within the complex. Mimicking this method of substrate channelling outside the cellular environment requires precise control over the spatial parameters of the individual components within the assembled complex. DNA nanostructures can be used to organize functional molecules with nanoscale precision and can also provide nanomechanical control. Until now, protein-DNA assemblies have been used to organize cascades of enzymatic reactions by controlling the relative distance and orientation of enzymatic components or by facilitating the interface between enzymes/cofactors and electrode surfaces. Here, we show that a DNA nanostructure can be used to create a multi-enzyme complex in which an artificial swinging arm facilitates hydride transfer between two coupled dehydrogenases. By exploiting the programmability of DNA nanostructures, key parameters including position, stoichiometry and inter-enzyme distance can be manipulated for optimal activity.

  1. A novel reduced-complexity group detection structure in MIMO frequency selective fading channels

    KAUST Repository

    Qaraqe, Khalid A.

    2010-09-01

    In this paper a novel reduced complexity detection method named modified symbol flipping method is introduced and its advantages on reducing the burden of the calculations at the receiver compared to the optimum maximum likelihood detection method on multiple input- multiple output frequency selective fading channels are explained. The initial concept of the symbol flipping method is derived from a preliminary detection scheme named bit flipping which was introduced in [1]. The detection structure employed in this paper is ing, detection, and cancellation. On the detection stage, the proposed method is employed and the results are compared to the group maximum likelihood detection scheme proposed in [2]. Simulation results show that a 6 dB performance gain can be achieved at the expense of a slight increase in complexity in comparison with the conventional symbol flipping scheme. © 2010 Crown.

  2. Combination of emission channeling, photoluminescence and Mossbauer spectroscopy to identify rare earth defect complexes in semiconductors

    CERN Document Server

    Dalmer, M; Restle, M; Stötzler, A; Hofsäss, H C; Ronning, C R; Moodley, M K; Bharuth-Ram, K

    1999-01-01

    Implanted radioactive /sup 167/Tm//sup 167/Er and /sup 169/Yb//sup 169/Tm impurities in Si and GaN were studied with emission channeling and photoluminescence spectroscopy. The effect of co-doping with oxygen on the rare earth (RE) lattice sites and their luminescence behavior was investigated. Tm and Yb occupy near-tetrahedral sites in Si and substitutional sites in GaN after room temperature implantation and annealing. O-RE complexes are formed upon co-doping with O resulting in modified luminescence signals. RE impurities remain substitutional in O-doped GaN, but are displaced from tetrahedral sites in O-doped Si. We discuss the feasibility of Mossbauer studies using /sup 151/Eu, /sup 169/Tm and /sup 161/Dy to determine the RE valence state and to identify RE defect complexes. (25 refs).

  3. Research on the Complexity of Dual-Channel Supply Chain Model in Competitive Retailing Service Market

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Junhai; Li, Ting; Ren, Wenbo

    2017-06-01

    This paper examines the optimal decisions of dual-channel game model considering the inputs of retailing service. We analyze how adjustment speed of service inputs affect the system complexity and market performance, and explore the stability of the equilibrium points by parameter basin diagrams. And chaos control is realized by variable feedback method. The numerical simulation shows that complex behavior would trigger the system to become unstable, such as double period bifurcation and chaos. We measure the performances of the model in different periods by analyzing the variation of average profit index. The theoretical results show that the percentage share of the demand and cross-service coefficients have important influence on the stability of the system and its feasible basin of attraction.

  4. Complexity of Multi-Channel Electroencephalogram Signal Analysis in Childhood Absence Epilepsy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-Chin Weng

    Full Text Available Absence epilepsy is an important epileptic syndrome in children. Multiscale entropy (MSE, an entropy-based method to measure dynamic complexity at multiple temporal scales, is helpful to disclose the information of brain connectivity. This study investigated the complexity of electroencephalogram (EEG signals using MSE in children with absence epilepsy. In this research, EEG signals from 19 channels of the entire brain in 21 children aged 5-12 years with absence epilepsy were analyzed. The EEG signals of pre-ictal (before seizure and ictal states (during seizure were analyzed by sample entropy (SamEn and MSE methods. Variations of complexity index (CI, which was calculated from MSE, from the pre-ictal to the ictal states were also analyzed. The entropy values in the pre-ictal state were significantly higher than those in the ictal state. The MSE revealed more differences in analysis compared to the SamEn. The occurrence of absence seizures decreased the CI in all channels. Changes in CI were also significantly greater in the frontal and central parts of the brain, indicating fronto-central cortical involvement of "cortico-thalamo-cortical network" in the occurrence of generalized spike and wave discharges during absence seizures. Moreover, higher sampling frequency was more sensitive in detecting functional changes in the ictal state. There was significantly higher correlation in ictal states in the same patient in different seizures but there were great differences in CI among different patients, indicating that CI changes were consistent in different absence seizures in the same patient but not from patient to patient. This implies that the brain stays in a homogeneous activation state during the absence seizures. In conclusion, MSE analysis is better than SamEn analysis to analyze complexity of EEG, and CI can be used to investigate the functional brain changes during absence seizures.

  5. Complexity of Multi-Channel Electroencephalogram Signal Analysis in Childhood Absence Epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weng, Wen-Chin; Jiang, George J A; Chang, Chi-Feng; Lu, Wen-Yu; Lin, Chun-Yen; Lee, Wang-Tso; Shieh, Jiann-Shing

    2015-01-01

    Absence epilepsy is an important epileptic syndrome in children. Multiscale entropy (MSE), an entropy-based method to measure dynamic complexity at multiple temporal scales, is helpful to disclose the information of brain connectivity. This study investigated the complexity of electroencephalogram (EEG) signals using MSE in children with absence epilepsy. In this research, EEG signals from 19 channels of the entire brain in 21 children aged 5-12 years with absence epilepsy were analyzed. The EEG signals of pre-ictal (before seizure) and ictal states (during seizure) were analyzed by sample entropy (SamEn) and MSE methods. Variations of complexity index (CI), which was calculated from MSE, from the pre-ictal to the ictal states were also analyzed. The entropy values in the pre-ictal state were significantly higher than those in the ictal state. The MSE revealed more differences in analysis compared to the SamEn. The occurrence of absence seizures decreased the CI in all channels. Changes in CI were also significantly greater in the frontal and central parts of the brain, indicating fronto-central cortical involvement of "cortico-thalamo-cortical network" in the occurrence of generalized spike and wave discharges during absence seizures. Moreover, higher sampling frequency was more sensitive in detecting functional changes in the ictal state. There was significantly higher correlation in ictal states in the same patient in different seizures but there were great differences in CI among different patients, indicating that CI changes were consistent in different absence seizures in the same patient but not from patient to patient. This implies that the brain stays in a homogeneous activation state during the absence seizures. In conclusion, MSE analysis is better than SamEn analysis to analyze complexity of EEG, and CI can be used to investigate the functional brain changes during absence seizures.

  6. Crystallization of the Large Membrane Protein Complex Photosystem I in a Microfluidic Channel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdallah, Bahige G.; Kupitz, Christopher; Fromme, Petra; Ros, Alexandra

    2014-01-01

    Traditional macroscale protein crystallization is accomplished non-trivially by exploring a range of protein concentrations and buffers in solution until a suitable combination is attained. This methodology is time consuming and resource intensive, hindering protein structure determination. Even more difficulties arise when crystallizing large membrane protein complexes such as photosystem I (PSI) due to their large unit cells dominated by solvent and complex characteristics that call for even stricter buffer requirements. Structure determination techniques tailored for these ‘difficult to crystallize’ proteins such as femtosecond nanocrystallography are being developed, yet still need specific crystal characteristics. Here, we demonstrate a simple and robust method to screen protein crystallization conditions at low ionic strength in a microfluidic device. This is realized in one microfluidic experiment using low sample amounts, unlike traditional methods where each solution condition is set up separately. Second harmonic generation microscopy via Second Order Nonlinear Imaging of Chiral Crystals (SONICC) was applied for the detection of nanometer and micrometer sized PSI crystals within microchannels. To develop a crystallization phase diagram, crystals imaged with SONICC at specific channel locations were correlated to protein and salt concentrations determined by numerical simulations of the time-dependent diffusion process along the channel. Our method demonstrated that a portion of the PSI crystallization phase diagram could be reconstructed in excellent agreement with crystallization conditions determined by traditional methods. We postulate that this approach could be utilized to efficiently study and optimize crystallization conditions for a wide range of proteins that are poorly understood to date. PMID:24191698

  7. A Low-Complexity Approach to Space-Time Coding for Multipath Fading Channels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kobayashi Mari

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available We consider a single-carrier multiple-input single-output (MISO wireless system where the transmitter is equipped with multiple antennas and the receiver has a single antenna. For this setting, we propose a space-time coding scheme based on the concatenation of trellis-coded modulation (TCM with time-reversal orthogonal space-time block coding (TR-STBC. The decoder is based on reduced-state joint equalization and decoding, where a minimum mean-square-error decision-feedback equalizer is combined with a Viterbi decoder operating on the TCM trellis without trellis state expansion. In this way, the decoder complexity is independent of the channel memory and of the constellation size. We show that, in the limit of large block length, the TCM-TR-STBC scheme with reduced-state joint equalization and decoding can achieve the full diversity offered by the MISO multipath channel. Remarkably, simulations show that the proposed scheme achieves full diversity for short (practical block length and simple TCM codes. The proposed TCM-TR-STBC scheme offers similar/superior performance with respect to the best previously proposed schemes at significantly lower complexity and represents an attractive solution to implement transmit diversity in high-speed TDM-based downlink of third-generation systems, such as EDGE and UMTS.

  8. Low-Complexity Banded Equalizers for OFDM Systems in Doppler Spread Channels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leus Geert

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Recently, several approaches have been proposed for the equalization of orthogonal frequency-division multiplexing (OFDM signals in challenging high-mobility scenarios. Among them, a minimum mean-squared error (MMSE block linear equalizer (BLE, based on a band LDL factorization, is particularly attractive for its good tradeoff between performance and complexity. This paper extends this approach towards two directions. First, we boost the BER performance of the BLE by designing a receiver window specially tailored to the band LDL factorization. Second, we design an MMSE block decision-feedback equalizer (BDFE that can be modified to support receiver windowing. All the proposed banded equalizers share a similar computational complexity, which is linear in the number of subcarriers. Simulation results show that the proposed receiver architectures are effective in reducing the BER performance degradation caused by the intercarrier interference (ICI generated by time-varying channels. We also consider a basis expansion model (BEM channel estimation approach, to establish its impact on the BER performance of the proposed banded equalizers.

  9. A reduced-complexity model for river delta formation - Part 1: Modeling deltas with channel dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, M.; Voller, V. R.; Paola, C.

    2015-01-01

    In this work we develop a reduced-complexity model (RCM) for river delta formation (referred to as DeltaRCM in the following). It is a rule-based cellular morphodynamic model, in contrast to reductionist models based on detailed computational fluid dynamics. The basic framework of this model (DeltaRCM) consists of stochastic parcel-based cellular routing schemes for water and sediment and a set of phenomenological rules for sediment deposition and erosion. The outputs of the model include a depth-averaged flow field, water surface elevation and bed topography that evolve in time. Results show that DeltaRCM is able (1) to resolve a wide range of channel dynamics - including elongation, bifurcation, avulsion and migration - and (2) to produce a variety of deltas such as alluvial fan deltas and deltas with multiple orders of bifurcations. We also demonstrate a simple stratigraphy recording component which tracks the distribution of coarse and fine materials and the age of the deposits. Essential processes that must be included in reduced-complexity delta models include a depth-averaged flow field that guides sediment transport a nontrivial water surface profile that accounts for backwater effects at least in the main channels, both bedload and suspended sediment transport, and topographic steering of sediment transport.

  10. Diabetic neuropathy enhances voltage-activated Ca2+ channel activity and its control by M4 muscarinic receptors in primary sensory neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Xue-Hong; Byun, Hee Sun; Chen, Shao-Rui; Pan, Hui-Lin

    2011-11-01

    Painful neuropathy is one of the most serious complications of diabetes and remains difficult to treat. The muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (mAChR) agonists have a profound analgesic effect on painful diabetic neuropathy. Here we determined changes in T-type and high voltage-activated Ca(2+) channels (HVACCs) and their regulation by mAChRs in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons in a rat model of diabetic neuropathy. The HVACC currents in large neurons, T-type currents in medium and large neurons, the percentage of small DRG neurons with T-type currents, and the Cav3.2 mRNA level were significantly increased in diabetic rats compared with those in control rats. The mAChR agonist oxotremorine-M significantly inhibited HVACCs in a greater proportion of DRG neurons with and without T-type currents in diabetic than in control rats. In contrast, oxotremorine-M had no effect on HVACCs in small and large neurons with T-type currents and in most medium neurons with T-type currents from control rats. The M(2) and M(4) antagonist himbacine abolished the effect of oxotremorine-M on HVACCs in both groups. The selective M(4) antagonist muscarinic toxin-3 caused a greater attenuation of the effect of oxotremorine-M on HVACCs in small and medium DRG neurons in diabetic than in control rats. Additionally, the mRNA and protein levels of M(4), but not M(2), in the DRG were significantly greater in diabetic than in control rats. Our findings suggest that diabetic neuropathy potentiates the activity of T-type and HVACCs in primary sensory neurons. M(4) mAChRs are up-regulated in DRG neurons and probably account for increased muscarinic analgesic effects in diabetic neuropathic pain. © 2011 The Authors. Journal of Neurochemistry © 2011 International Society for Neurochemistry.

  11. Cisplatin alters the function and expression of N-type voltage-gated calcium channels in the absence of morphological damage of sensory neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leo, Markus; Schmitt, Linda-Isabell; Jastrow, Holger; Thomale, Jürgen; Kleinschnitz, Christoph; Hagenacker, Tim

    2017-01-01

    Platinum-based chemotherapeutic agents, such as cisplatin, are still frequently used for treating various types of cancer. Besides its high effectiveness, cisplatin has several serious side effects. One of the most common side effects is dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurotoxicity. However, the mechanisms underlying this neurotoxicity are still unclear and controversially discussed. Cisplatin-mediated modulation of voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCCs) in the DRG neurons has been shown to alter intracellular calcium homeostasis, a process critical for the induction of neurotoxicity. Using the whole-cell patch-clamp technique, immunostaining, behavioural experiments and electron microscopy (EM) of rat DRGs, we here demonstrate that cisplatin-induced neurotoxicity is due to functional alteration of VGCC, but not due to morphological damage. In vitro application of cisplatin (0.5 µM) increased N-type VGCC currents ( ICa(V)) in small DRG neurons. Repetitive in vivo administration of cisplatin (1.5 mg/kg, cumulative 12 mg/kg) increased the protein level of N-type VGCC over 26 days, with the protein level being increased for at least 14 days after the final cisplatin administration. Behavioural studies revealed that N-type VGCCs are crucial for inducing symptoms of cisplatin-related neuropathic pain, such as thermal and mechanical hyperalgesia. EM and histology showed no evidence of any structural damage, apoptosis or necrosis in DRG cells after cisplatin exposure for 26 days. Furthermore, no nuclear DNA damage in sensory neurons was observed. Here, we provide evidence for a mainly functionally driven induction of neuropathic pain by cisplatin.

  12. Joint Channel-Network Coding Strategies for Networks with Low Complexity Relays

    CERN Document Server

    Johnson, Sarah J; Kellett, Christopher M

    2011-01-01

    We investigate joint network and channel coding schemes for networks when relay nodes are not capable of performing channel coding operations. Rather, channel encoding is performed at the source node while channel decoding is done only at the destination nodes. We examine three different decoding strategies: independent network-then-channel decoding, serial network and channel decoding, and joint network and channel decoding. Furthermore, we describe how to implement such joint network and channel decoding using iteratively decodable error correction codes. Using simple networks as a model, we derive achievable rate regions and use simulations to demonstrate the effectiveness of the three decoders.

  13. Characterizing Human Stem Cell–derived Sensory Neurons at the Single-cell Level Reveals Their Ion Channel Expression and Utility in Pain Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Gareth T; Gutteridge, Alex; Fox, Heather DE; Wilbrey, Anna L; Cao, Lishuang; Cho, Lily T; Brown, Adam R; Benn, Caroline L; Kammonen, Laura R; Friedman, Julia H; Bictash, Magda; Whiting, Paul; Bilsland, James G; Stevens, Edward B

    2014-01-01

    The generation of human sensory neurons by directed differentiation of pluripotent stem cells opens new opportunities for investigating the biology of pain. The inability to generate this cell type has meant that up until now their study has been reliant on the use of rodent models. Here, we use a combination of population and single-cell techniques to perform a detailed molecular, electrophysiological, and pharmacological phenotyping of sensory neurons derived from human embryonic stem cells. We describe the evolution of cell populations over 6 weeks of directed differentiation; a process that results in the generation of a largely homogeneous population of neurons that are both molecularly and functionally comparable to human sensory neurons derived from mature dorsal root ganglia. This work opens the prospect of using pluripotent stem-cell–derived sensory neurons to study human neuronal physiology and as in vitro models for drug discovery in pain and sensory disorders. PMID:24832007

  14. Activity and Ca²⁺ regulate the mobility of TRPV1 channels in the plasma membrane of sensory neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senning, Eric N; Gordon, Sharona E

    2015-01-08

    TRPV1 channels are gated by a variety of thermal, chemical, and mechanical stimuli. We used optical recording of Ca(2+) influx through TRPV1 to measure activity and mobility of single TRPV1 molecules in isolated dorsal root ganglion neurons and cell lines. The opening of single TRPV1 channels produced sparklets, representing localized regions of elevated Ca(2+). Unlike sparklets reported for L-type Ca(2+) channels, TRPV4 channels, and AchR channels, TRPV1 channels diffused laterally in the plasma membrane as they gated. Mobility was highly variable from channel-to-channel and, to a smaller extent, from cell to cell. Most surprisingly, we found that mobility decreased upon channel activation by capsaicin, but only in the presence of extracellular Ca(2+). We propose that decreased mobility of open TRPV1 could act as a diffusion trap to concentrate channels in cell regions with high activity.

  15. On the average complexity of sphere decoding in lattice space-time coded multiple-input multiple-output channel

    KAUST Repository

    Abediseid, Walid

    2012-12-21

    The exact average complexity analysis of the basic sphere decoder for general space-time codes applied to multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO) wireless channel is known to be difficult. In this work, we shed the light on the computational complexity of sphere decoding for the quasi- static, lattice space-time (LAST) coded MIMO channel. Specifically, we drive an upper bound of the tail distribution of the decoder\\'s computational complexity. We show that when the computational complexity exceeds a certain limit, this upper bound becomes dominated by the outage probability achieved by LAST coding and sphere decoding schemes. We then calculate the minimum average computational complexity that is required by the decoder to achieve near optimal performance in terms of the system parameters. Our results indicate that there exists a cut-off rate (multiplexing gain) for which the average complexity remains bounded. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  16. Low Complexity Encoder of High Rate Irregular QC-LDPC Codes for Partial Response Channels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    IMTAWIL, V.

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available High rate irregular QC-LDPC codes based on circulant permutation matrices, for efficient encoder implementation, are proposed in this article. The structure of the code is an approximate lower triangular matrix. In addition, we present two novel efficient encoding techniques for generating redundant bits. The complexity of the encoder implementation depends on the number of parity bits of the code for the one-stage encoding and the length of the code for the two-stage encoding. The advantage of both encoding techniques is that few XOR-gates are used in the encoder implementation. Simulation results on partial response channels also show that the BER performance of the proposed code has gain over other QC-LDPC codes.

  17. Limited proteolysis of myoglobin opens channel in ferrochelatase-globin complex for iron to zinc transmetallation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paganelli, Marcella O; Grossi, Alberto B; Dores-Silva, Paulo R; Borges, Julio C; Cardoso, Daniel R; Skibsted, Leif H

    2016-11-01

    Recombinant ferrochelatase (BsFECH) from Bacillus subtilis expressed in Escherichia coli BL21(DE3) was found by UV-visible spectroscopy to bind the model substrate tetraphenylporphyrin-sulfonate, TPPS, with Ka=3.8 10(5)mol/L in aqueous phosphate buffer pH 5.7 at 30°C, and to interact with metmyoglobin with Ka=1.07±0.13 10(5)mol/L at 30°C. The iron/zinc exchange in myoglobin occurring during maturation of Parma hams seems to depend on such substrate binding to BsFECH and was facilitated by limited pepsin proteolysis of myoglobin to open a reaction channel for metal exchange still with BsFECH associated to globin. BsFECH increased rate of zinc insertion in TPPS significantly and showed saturation kinetics with an apparent binding constant of Zn(II) to the [enzyme-TPPS] complex of 1.3 10(4)mol/L and a first-order rate constant of 6.6 10(-1)s(-1) for dissociation of the tertiary complex, a similar pattern was found for zinc/iron transmetallation in myoglobin. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. A THEORY OF MAXIMIZING SENSORY INFORMATION

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hateren, J.H. van

    1992-01-01

    A theory is developed on the assumption that early sensory processing aims at maximizing the information rate in the channels connecting the sensory system to more central parts of the brain, where it is assumed that these channels are noisy and have a limited dynamic range. Given a stimulus power

  19. Environmental enrichment causes a global potentiation of neuronal responses across stimulus complexity and lamina of sensory cortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dasuni Sathsara Alwis

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Enriched social and physical housing produces many molecular, anatomical, electrophysiological and behaviour benefits even in adult animals. Much less is known of its effects on cortical electrophysiology, especially in how sensory cortex encodes the altered environment, and extant studies have generally been restricted to neurons in input laminae in sensory cortex. To extend the understanding of how an enriched environment alters the way in which cortex views the world, we investigated enrichment-induced changes in neuronal encoding of sensory stimuli across all laminae of the rat barrel cortex receiving input from the face whisker tactile system. Animals were housed in Enriched (n=13 or Isolated housing (n=13 conditions for 8 weeks before extracellular recordings were obtained from barrel cortex in response to simple whisker deflections and whisker motions modelling movements seen in awake animals undertaking a variety of different tasks. Enrichment resulted in increases in neuronal responses to all stimuli, ranging from those modelling exploratory behaviour through to discrimination behaviours. These increases were seen throughout the cortex from supragranular layers through to input Layer 4 and for some stimuli, in infragranular Layer 5. The observed enrichment-induced effect is consistent with the postulate that enrichment causes shift in cortical excitatory/inhibitory balance, and we demonstrate this is greatest in supragranular layers. However we also report that the effects are non-selective for stimulus parameters across a range of stimuli except for one modelling the likely use of whiskers by the rats in the enriched housing.

  20. Significance of the Centrally Expressed TRP Channel "Painless" in "Drosophila" Courtship Memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakai, Takaomi; Sato, Shoma; Ishimoto, Hiroshi; Kitamoto, Toshihiro

    2013-01-01

    Considerable evidence has demonstrated that transient receptor potential (TRP) channels play vital roles in sensory neurons, mediating responses to various environmental stimuli. In contrast, relatively little is known about how TRP channels exert their effects in the central nervous system to control complex behaviors. This is also true for the…

  1. Crystal Structure of 12-Lipoxygenase Catalytic-Domain-Inhibitor Complex Identifies a Substrate-Binding Channel for Catalysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Shu; Mueser, Timothy C.; Marnett, Lawrence J.; Funk, Jr., Max O. (Toledo); (Vanderbilt)

    2014-10-02

    Lipoxygenases are critical enzymes in the biosynthesis of families of bioactive lipids including compounds with important roles in the initiation and resolution of inflammation and in associated diseases such as diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and cancer. Crystals diffracting to high resolution (1.9 {angstrom}) were obtained for a complex between the catalytic domain of leukocyte 12-lipoxygenase and the isoform-specific inhibitor, 4-(2-oxapentadeca-4-yne)phenylpropanoic acid (OPP). In the three-dimensional structure of the complex, the inhibitor occupied a new U-shaped channel open at one end to the surface of the protein and extending past the redox-active iron site that is essential for catalysis. In models, the channel accommodated arachidonic acid, defining the binding site for the substrate of the catalyzed reaction. There was a void adjacent to the OPP binding site connecting to the surface of the enzyme and providing a plausible access channel for the other substrate, oxygen.

  2. Sensory modalities in cichlid fish behavior

    OpenAIRE

    Escobar-Camacho, Daniel; Carleton, Karen L.

    2015-01-01

    Among teleosts, cichlids are a great model for studies of evolution, behavior, diversity and speciation. Studies of cichlid sensory systems have revealed diverse sensory capabilities that vary among species. Hence, sensory systems are important for understanding cichlid behavior from proximate and ultimate points of view. Cichlids primarily rely on five sensory channels: hearing, mechanosensation, taste, vision, and olfaction, to receive information from the environment and respond accordingl...

  3. Fibroblast growth factor type 1 receptor stimulation of T-type Ca2+channels in sensory neurons requires the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase and protein kinase A pathways, independently of Akt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Si, Weibing; Zhang, Yuan; Chen, Kun; Hu, Dan; Qian, Zhiyuan; Gong, Shan; Li, Hua; Hao, Yuefeng; Tao, Jin

    2018-01-31

    Fibroblast growth factor-23 (FGF-23) secreted by osteocytes is known as a circulating factor that is essential for phosphate homeostasis. Recent studies have implicated FGF-23 in the nociceptive signalling of peripheral sensory neurons. However, the relevant mechanisms underlying this effect are not known. In this study, we determine the role of FGF-23 in regulating T-type Ca 2+ channels (T-type channels) in small-diameter dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons in mice. Our results show that FGF-23 increases T-type channel currents in a concentration-dependent manner. This FGF-23-induced response was dependent on FGF type 1 receptor (FGFR1) and was accompanied by a depolarizing shift in the steady-state inactivation curve. Pretreatment of neurons with the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) inhibitor LY294002 prevented the FGF-23-mediated T-type channel response. Analysis of phospho-Akt (p-Akt) revealed that FGF-23 significantly activated Akt, but Akt inhibition did not affect the FGF-23-induced T-type channel current increase. The cell-permeable protein kinase A (PKA) inhibitor KT-5720 pretreatment and intracellular application of PKI 6-22 both abolished the stimulatory effects of FGF-23 on T-type channels, but inhibition of PKC had no effect. In summary, these findings indicate that FGF-23 stimulates T-type channel activity via activation of FGFR1, which is coupled to the PI3K-dependent PKA signalling cascade in small DRG neurons. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Microfluidic Bypass Manometry: Parallelized measurement of flow resistance of complex channel geometries and trapped droplets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanapalli, Siva; Suteria, Naureen; Nekouei, Mehdi

    2017-11-01

    We report a technique referred to as ``microfluidic bypass manometry'' for measurement of pressure drop versus flow rate (ΔP-Q) relations in a parallelized manner. It involves introducing co-flowing laminar streams into a microfluidic network that contains a series of loops, where each loop contains a test geometry and a bypass channel as a flow rate sensing element. To demonstrate the technique, we measure ΔP-Q relations simultaneously for forty test geometries ranging from linear to contraction-expansion to serpentine to pillar-laden microchannels. The measured Newtonian flow resistance of these different geometries is in excellent agreement with CFD simulations. To expand the capabilities of the method, we measured ΔP-Q relations for similar-sized oil droplets trapped in microcavities where the cavity geometry spans from prisms of 3 - 10 sides to cylinders. We find in all cases, ΔP-Q relation is nonlinear and the flow resistance is sensitive to drop confinement and weakly dependent on cavity geometry. We anticipate that microfluidic bypass manometry may find broad application in several areas including design of lab-on-chip devices, laminar drag reduction, rheology of complex fluids and mechanics of deformable particles.

  5. Supratentorial white matter blurring associated with voltage-gated potassium channel-complex limbic encephalitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Urbach, H.; Mader, I. [University Medical Center Freiburg, Department of Neuroradiology, Freiburg (Germany); Rauer, S.; Baumgartner, A. [University Medical Center Freiburg, Department of Neurology, Freiburg (Germany); Paus, S. [University Medical Center, Department of Neurology, Bonn (Germany); Wagner, J. [University Medical Center, Department of Epileptology, Bonn (Germany); Malter, M.P. [University of Cologne, Department of Neurology, Cologne (Germany); Pruess, H. [Charite - Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Department of Neurology, Berlin (Germany); Lewerenz, J.; Kassubek, J. [Ulm University, Department of Neurology, Ulm (Germany); Hegen, H.; Auer, M.; Deisenhammer, F. [University Innsbruck, Department of Neurology, Innsbruck (Austria); Ufer, F. [University Medical Center, Department of Neurology, Hamburg (Germany); Bien, C.G. [Epilepsy Centre Bethel, Bielefeld-Bethel (Germany)

    2015-12-15

    Limbic encephalitis (LE) associated with voltage-gated potassium channel-complex antibodies (VGKC-LE) is frequently non-paraneoplastic and associated with marked improvement following corticosteroid therapy. Mesial temporal lobe abnormalities are present in around 80 % of patients. If associated or preceded by faciobrachial dystonic seizures, basal ganglia signal changes may occur. In some patients, blurring of the supratentorial white matter on T2-weighted images (SWMB) may be seen. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the incidence of SWMB and whether it is specific for VGKC-LE. Two experienced neuroradiologists independently evaluated signal abnormalities on FLAIR MRI in 79 patients with LE while unaware on the antibody type. SWMB was independently assessed as present in 10 of 36 (28 %) compared to 2 (5 %) of 43 non-VGKC patients (p = 0.009). It was not related to the presence of LGI1 or CASPR2 proteins of VGKC antibodies. MRI showed increased temporomesial FLAIR signal in 22 (61 %) VGKC compared to 14 (33 %) non-VGKC patients (p = 0.013), and extratemporomesial structures were affected in one VGKC (3 %) compared to 11 (26 %) non-VGKC patients (p = 0.005). SWMB is a newly described MRI sign rather specific for VGKC-LE. (orig.)

  6. Structural basis of slow activation gating in the cardiac IKs channel complex

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Strutz-Seebohm, Nathalie; Pusch, Michael; Wolf, Steffen

    2011-01-01

    Accessory ß-subunits of the KCNE gene family modulate the function of various cation channel a-subunits by the formation of heteromultimers. Among the most dramatic changes of biophysical properties of a voltage-gated channel by KCNEs are the effects of KCNE1 on KCNQ1 channels. KCNQ1 and KCNE1...... are believed to form nativeI(Ks) channels. Here, we characterize molecular determinants of KCNE1 interaction with KCNQ1 channels by scanning mutagenesis, double mutant cycle analysis, and molecular dynamics simulations. Our findings suggest that KCNE1 binds to the outer face of the KCNQ1 channel pore domain...... of the voltage sensor domain S4 of KCNQ1 in a putative pre-open channel state. Formation of this state may induce slow activation gating, the pivotal characteristic of native cardiac I(Ks) channels. This new KCNQ1-KCNE1 model may become useful for dynamic modeling of disease-associated mutant I(Ks) channels....

  7. FLOODPLAIN-CHANNEL COMPLEX OF SMALL RIVER: ASSESSMENT OF CURRENT STATE, OPTIMIZATION MEASURES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kovalchuk I.

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The article describes main methodological principles of geoecological assessment of riverbed-floodplain complex condition of one of the small rivers in Ukrainian Carpathians. According to our long-term field, cartographic, laboratory and remote sensing research, division of riverbed into homogeneous geoecological segments was made, as well as their standardization in accordance to the trends of unfavorable processes. Main reasons for deterioration of quality characteristics of channel-floodplain river complex were outlined; the role of natural and anthropogenic factors in deterioration of geoecological condition of the river and its floodplain complex was analyzed. Based on the assessment results it is possible to state that the condition of study segments of the Berezhnytsya river flood-plain and stream-way complex was marked as “excellent”, “good” and “satisfactory”. “Unsatisfactory” and “catastrophic” river and flood-plain condition has not been detected yet, although within Dashava urban settlement the river area condition is close to the “satisfactory” grade. The best situation is at the river head as human impact is minimized here and natural vegetation is preserved. Downstream we trace the tendency of condition worsening as anthropogenic load on the basin system and flood-plain and stream-way complex increases. Its negative impact is balanced by large forests, thus in segments limited by Banya Lysovytska village and Lotatnyky village the river and flood-plain condition is rated as “good”. So, downstream from the named village the value of such an important natural barrier as forest is reducing and anthropogenic load on the river significantly increases. The latter manifests in an intensive agricultural reclamation and housing development of flood-plains. Since degradation processes are rapidly developing over a considerable part of the Berezhnytsya river, negative changes are visible and only the study area

  8. Clinical spectrum and diagnostic value of antibodies against the potassium channel related protein complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montojo, M T; Petit-Pedrol, M; Graus, F; Dalmau, J

    2015-06-01

    Antibodies against a protein complex that includes voltage-gated potassium channels (VGKC) have been reported in patients with limbic encephalitis, peripheral nerve hyperexcitability, Morvan's syndrome, and a large variety of neurological syndromes. In this article, a review is presented of the syndromes associated with antibodies against VGKC-related proteins and the main antigens of this protein complex, the proteins LGI1 (leucine rich glioma inactivated protein 1) and Caspr2 (contactin-associated protein-like 2). The conceptual problems and clinical implications of the description of antibodies against VGKC-related proteins other than LGI1 and Caspr2 are also discussed. Although initial studies indicated the occurrence of antibodies against VGKC, recent investigations have shown that the main antigens are a neuronal secreted protein known as LGI1 which modulates synaptic excitability, and a protein called Caspr2 located on the cell surface and processes of neurons of different brain regions, and at the juxtaparanodal region of myelinated axons. While antibodies against LGI1 preferentially associate with classical limbic encephalitis, antibodies against Caspr2 associate with a wider spectrum of symptoms, including Morvan's syndrome, peripheral nerve hyperexcitability or neuromyotonia, and limbic or more extensive encephalitis. In addition there are reports of patients with antibodies against VGKC-related proteins that are different from LGI1 or Caspr2. In these cases, the identity and location of the antigens are unknown, the syndrome association is not specific, and the response to treatment uncertain. The discovery of antigens such as LGI1 and Caspr2 has resulted in a clinical and molecular definition of the broad group of diseases previously attributed to antibodies against VGKC. Considering the literature that describes the presence of antibodies against VGKC other than LGI1 and Caspr2 proteins, we propose a practical algorithm for the diagnosis and treatment

  9. New Channels for Old Businesses: Examining the Drivers and Obstacles of Mobile Commerce Adoption for Complex Products

    OpenAIRE

    Heinze, Jörg

    2016-01-01

    Although revenues in mobile retail are continuously growing, mobile commerce for complex products such as insurance lags far behind. A basic reason is consumers’ perceived misfit of product and channel characteristics. However, scholars and practitioners have only vague ideas of the causes for this misfit. This prevents the development of adequate means to overcome consumer resistance. The present thesis confronts this shortcoming by systematically investigating the psychological mechanisms w...

  10. The effects of copper-glycine complexes on chemical composition and sensory attributes of raw, cooked and grilled chicken meat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winiarska-Mieczan, Anna; Kwiecień, Małgorzata

    2015-07-01

    To determine the influence of glycine-Cu chelates (Gly-Cu) on chemical composition and sensory characteristic of chickens meat, two hundred of Ross 308 broilers were fed diets containing 16 mg kg(-1) of copper sulfate (S-Cu; control group) or 16, 8 and 4 mg/kg of Cu-glycine chelate (Gly-Cu). The chemical composition was determined in crude and prepared (cooked and grilled) breast and thigh samples. No significant influence of Gly-Cu on the content of the protein, fat and ash in the breast meat was found. Substituting S-Cu with Gly-Cu at different doses in feed did not significantly modify the fatty acids profile of the meat. The breast meat from chickens administered with Gly-Cu contained significantly less cholesterol than that in S-Cu. No different effect of the experimental agent was observed regarding the content of Cu, Zn and Ca in the breast meat, while in chickens from all the groups administered Gly-Cu there was more significantly Fe (P meat revealed significantly (P meat was observed.

  11. Synthesis and infrared characterization of Br-HBr and Br-DBr entrance channel complexes in solid parahydrogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kettwich, Sharon C; Pinelo, Laura F; Anderson, David T

    2008-09-28

    We report high resolution vibrational spectra in the HBr (2560 cm(-1)) and DBr (1840 cm(-1)) stretching regions for Br-HBr and Br-DBr entrance channel complexes isolated in solid parahydrogen (pH2). The Br-HBr complexes are generated by synthesizing solid pH2 crystals doped with trace amounts of HBr/Br2 mixtures followed by 355 nm in situ photodissociation of Br2 to form Br atoms. After photolysis is complete, the solid is warmed from 2 to 4.3 K resulting in the irreversible formation of Br-HBr complexes. The large 36.63 cm(-1) HBr monomer-to-complex induced vibrational shift to lower energy measured in these studies is consistent with the linear Br-HBr hydrogen bonded structure predicted from theory. The 0.02 cm(-1) Br-HBr absorption linewidths indicate a 1 ns vibrational excited state lifetime for these entrance channel complexes in solid pH2.

  12. Assessment of the effect of etomidate on voltage-gated sodium channels and action potentials in rat primary sensory cortex pyramidal neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yu; He, Jiong-ce; Liu, Xing-kui; Zhang, Yi; Wang, Yuan; Yu, Tian

    2014-08-05

    Although it is known that general anesthetics can suppress cortical neurons׳ activity, the underlying mechanisms are still poorly understood, especially the kinetic changes of voltage-gated Na(+) channels, which are mostly related to neuronal excitability. Some general anesthetics have been reported to affect the voltage-gated Na(+) channels in cell culture derived from humans and animals. However no one has ever investigated the effects of etomidate on voltage-gated Na(+) channels in pyramidal neurons using a brain slice. The present study uses a whole cell patch-clamp technique to investigate the changes of voltage-gated Na(+) channels on primary somatosensory cortex pyramidal neurons under the influence of etomidate. We found that etomidate dose-dependently inhibited Na(+) currents of primary somatosensory cortex pyramidal neurons, while shifted the steady-state inactivation curve towards the left and prolonged the recovery time from inactivation. Conversely, etomidate has no effects on the steady-state activation curve. We demonstrated the detailed suppression process of neural voltage-gated Na(+) channels by etomidate on slice condition. This may offer new insights into the mechanical explanation for the etomidate anesthesia. Finding the effects of anesthetics on primary somatosensory cortex also provides evidence to help elucidate the potential mechanism by which tactile information integrates during general anesthesia. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Sedimentological analysis and bed thickness statistics from a Carboniferous deep-water channel-levee complex: Myall Trough, SE Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palozzi, Jason; Pantopoulos, George; Maravelis, Angelos G.; Nordsvan, Adam; Zelilidis, Avraam

    2018-02-01

    This investigation presents an outcrop-based integrated study of internal division analysis and statistical treatment of turbidite bed thickness applied to a Carboniferous deep-water channel-levee complex in the Myall Trough, southeast Australia. Turbidite beds of the studied succession are characterized by a range of sedimentary structures grouped into two main associations, a thick-bedded and a thin-bedded one, that reflect channel-fill and overbank/levee deposits, respectively. Three vertically stacked channel-levee cycles have been identified. Results of statistical analysis of bed thickness, grain-size and internal division patterns applied on the studied channel-levee succession, indicate that turbidite bed thickness data seem to be well characterized by a bimodal lognormal distribution, which is possibly reflecting the difference between deposition from lower-density flows (in a levee/overbank setting) and very high-density flows (in a channel fill setting). Power law and exponential distributions were observed to hold only for the thick-bedded parts of the succession and cannot characterize the whole bed thickness range of the studied sediments. The succession also exhibits non-random clustering of bed thickness and grain-size measurements. The studied sediments are also characterized by the presence of statistically detected fining-upward sandstone packets. A novel quantitative approach (change-point analysis) is proposed for the detection of those packets. Markov permutation statistics also revealed the existence of order in the alternation of internal divisions in the succession expressed by an optimal internal division cycle reflecting two main types of gravity flow events deposited within both thick-bedded conglomeratic and thin-bedded sandstone associations. The analytical methods presented in this study can be used as additional tools for quantitative analysis and recognition of depositional environments in hydrocarbon-bearing research of ancient

  14. Danger- and pathogen-associated molecular patterns recognition by pattern-recognition receptors and ion channels of the transient receptor potential family triggers the inflammasome activation in immune cells and sensory neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santoni, Giorgio; Cardinali, Claudio; Morelli, Maria Beatrice; Santoni, Matteo; Nabissi, Massimo; Amantini, Consuelo

    2015-02-03

    An increasing number of studies show that the activation of the innate immune system and inflammatory mechanisms play an important role in the pathogenesis of numerous diseases. The innate immune system is present in almost all multicellular organisms and its activation occurs in response to pathogens or tissue injury via pattern-recognition receptors (PRRs) that recognize pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) or danger-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs). Intracellular pathways, linking immune and inflammatory response to ion channel expression and function, have been recently identified. Among ion channels, the transient receptor potential (TRP) channels are a major family of non-selective cation-permeable channels that function as polymodal cellular sensors involved in many physiological and pathological processes. In this review, we summarize current knowledge of interactions between immune cells and PRRs and ion channels of TRP families with PAMPs and DAMPs to provide new insights into the pathogenesis of inflammatory diseases. TRP channels have been found to interfere with innate immunity via both nuclear factor-kB and procaspase-1 activation to generate the mature caspase-1 that cleaves pro-interleukin-1β cytokine into the mature interleukin-1β.Sensory neurons are also adapted to recognize dangers by virtue of their sensitivity to intense mechanical, thermal and irritant chemical stimuli. As immune cells, they possess many of the same molecular recognition pathways for danger. Thus, they express PRRs including Toll-like receptors 3, 4, 7, and 9, and stimulation by Toll-like receptor ligands leads to induction of inward currents and sensitization in TRPs. In addition, the expression of inflammasomes in neurons and the involvement of TRPs in central nervous system diseases strongly support a role of TRPs in inflammasome-mediated neurodegenerative pathologies. This field is still at its beginning and further studies may be required.Overall, these

  15. Pharmacological consequence of the A118G μ opioid receptor polymorphism on morphine- and fentanyl-mediated modulation of Ca²⁺ channels in humanized mouse sensory neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmoud, Saifeldin; Thorsell, Annika; Sommer, Wolfgang H; Heilig, Markus; Holgate, Joan K; Bartlett, Selena E; Ruiz-Velasco, Victor

    2011-11-01

    The most common functional single nucleotide polymorphism of the human OPRM1 gene, A118G, has been shown to be associated with interindividual differences in opioid analgesic requirements, particularly with morphine, in patients with acute postoperative pain. The purpose of this study was to examine whether this polymorphism would modulate the morphine and fentanyl pharmacological profile of sensory neurons isolated from a humanized mouse model homozygous for either the 118A or 118G allele. The coupling of wild-type and mutant μ opioid receptors to voltage-gated Ca channels after exposure to either ligand was examined by employing the whole cell variant of the patch-clamp technique in acutely dissociated trigeminal ganglion neurons. Morphine-mediated antinociception was measured in mice carrying either the 118AA or 118GG allele. The biophysical parameters (cell size, current density, and peak current amplitude potential) measured from both groups of sensory neurons were not significantly different. In 118GG neurons, morphine was approximately fivefold less potent and 26% less efficacious than that observed in 118AA neurons. On the other hand, the potency and efficacy of fentanyl were similar for both groups of neurons. Morphine-mediated analgesia in 118GG mice was significantly reduced compared with the 118AA mice. This study provides evidence to suggest that the diminished clinical effect observed with morphine in 118G carriers results from an alteration of the receptor's pharmacology in sensory neurons. In addition, the impaired analgesic response with morphine may explain why carriers of this receptor variant have an increased susceptibility to become addicted to opioids.

  16. Reduced-complexity adaptive multi-channel assignment for shared access points in over-loaded small-cell networks

    KAUST Repository

    Radaydeh, Redha Mahmoud

    2013-06-01

    This paper proposes a reduced-complexity downlink multi-channel assignment scheme when feedback links are capacity-limited. The system model treats the case when multiple access points are allocated to serve scheduled users in over-loaded (i.e. dense) pico/femtocell networks. It assumes that the deployed access points can be shared simultaneously and employ isotropic antenna arrays of arbitrary sizes. Moreover, they transmit their data on a common physical channel and can not coordinate their transmissions. On the other hand, each scheduled user can be served by single transmit channel from each active access point at a time, and it lacks coordination with concurrent active users. The scheme operates according to the occupancy of available transmit channels, wherein extensively occupied access points are avoided adaptively, while reducing the load of processing. The operation is linked to a target performance via controlling the observed aggregate interference from the projected set of serving points. Through the analysis, results for the scheduled user outage performance, and the average number of active access points are presented. Numerical and simulations studies clarify the gains of the proposed scheme for different operating conditions. © 2013 IEEE.

  17. A Low-Complexity Decision Feedforward Equalizer Architecture for High-Speed Receivers on Highly Dispersive Channels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ariel L. Pola

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an improved decision feedforward equalizer (DFFE for high speed receivers in the presence of highly dispersive channels. This decision-aided equalizer technique has been recently proposed for multigigabit communication receivers, where the use of parallel processing is mandatory. Well-known parallel architectures for the typical decision feedback equalizer (DFE have a complexity that grows exponentially with the channel memory. Instead, the new DFFE avoids that exponential increase in complexity by using tentative decisions to cancel iteratively the intersymbol interference (ISI. Here, we demostrate that the DFFE not only allows to obtain a similar performance to the typical DFE but it also reduces the compelxity in channels with large memory. Additionally, we propose a theoretical approximation for the error probability in each iteration. In fact, when the number of iteration increases, the error probability in the DFFE tends to approach the DFE. These benefits make the DFFE an excellent choice for the next generation of high-speed receivers.

  18. Complex Locomotion Behavior Changes Are Induced in Caenorhabditis elegans by the Lack of the Regulatory Leak K+ Channel TWK-7

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lüersen, Kai; Gottschling, Dieter-Christian; Döring, Frank

    2016-01-01

    The change of locomotion activity in response to external cues is a considerable achievement of animals and is required for escape responses, foraging, and other complex behaviors. Little is known about the molecular regulators of such an adaptive locomotion. The conserved eukaryotic two-pore domain potassium (K2P) channels have been recognized as regulatory K+ channels that modify the membrane potential of cells, thereby affecting, e.g., rhythmic muscle activity. By using the Caenorhabditis elegans system combined with cell-type-specific approaches and locomotion in-depth analyses, here, we found that the loss of K2P channel TWK-7 increases the locomotor activity of worms during swimming and crawling in a coordinated mode. Moreover, loss of TWK-7 function results in a hyperactive state that (although less pronounced) resembles the fast, persistent, and directed forward locomotion behavior of stimulated C. elegans. TWK-7 is expressed in several head neurons as well as in cholinergic excitatory and GABAergic inhibitory motor neurons. Remarkably, the abundance of TWK-7 in excitatory B-type and inhibitory D-type motor neurons affected five central aspects of adaptive locomotion behavior: velocity/frequency, wavelength/amplitude, direction, duration, and straightness. Hence, we suggest that TWK-7 activity might represent a means to modulate a complex locomotion behavior at the level of certain types of motor neurons. PMID:27535928

  19. Inhibition of CaV3.2 T-type calcium channels in peripheral sensory neurons contributes to analgesic properties of epipregnanolone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayoola, Christine; Hwang, Sung Mi; Hong, Sung Jun; Rose, Kirstin E; Boyd, Christopher; Bozic, Neda; Park, Ji-Yong; Osuru, Hari Prasad; DiGruccio, Michael R; Covey, Douglas F; Jevtovic-Todorovic, Vesna; Todorovic, Slobodan M

    2014-09-01

    T-type calcium channels (T-channels) play an important role in controlling excitability of nociceptors. We have previously shown that a synthetic series of 5β-reduced steroids induce a voltage-dependent blockade of T-currents in rat dorsal root ganglia (DRG) cells in vitro and induce potent analgesia to thermal stimuli in rats in vivo (Mol Pharmacol 66:1223-1235, 2004). Here, we investigated the effects of the endogenous 5β-reduced neuroactive steroid molecule, epipregnanolone [(3β,5β)-3-hydroxypregnan-20-one], on peripheral nociception. We used acutely dissociated DRG cells in vitro from adult rats as well as in vivo pain studies in mice and rats to investigate the effects of epipregnanolone on DRG T-channels. We found that epipregnanolone reversibly blocked DRG T-currents with a half-maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) of 2 μM and stabilized the channel in the inactive state. However, sodium, potassium, and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-gated ionic currents were not sensitive to the blocking effects of epipregnanolone even at 10 μM. In ensuing in vivo studies, we found that intraplantar (i.pl.) injections of epipregnanolone directly into peripheral receptive fields reduced responses to nociceptive heat stimuli in rats in a dose-dependent fashion. Furthermore, i.pl. epipregnanolone injections effectively reduced responses to peripheral nociceptive thermal and mechanical stimuli in wild-type mice but had no effect on the responses of CaV3.2 knockout mice. We conclude that the inhibition of peripheral CaV3.2 T-channels contributes to the potent analgesic effect of the endogenous steroid epipregnanolone.

  20. Multi-channel hardware and software complex for monitoring and analysing vibrosignals

    OpenAIRE

    Grenke, V. V.; Shakirov, I. V.; Samoylov, А. М.

    2007-01-01

    The description of complex construction and operation principles for vibrosignal analysis is presented. The distinguishing feature of the complex is application of the wavelet analysis method. Peculiarities of wavelet transformation when solving the problems of mechanical system vibrodiagnostics in comparison with the Fourier analysis are shown. Hardware and software model of measuring complex has been created; its tests have been carries out.

  1. The Sarcoglycan complex is expressed in the cerebrovascular system and is specifically regulated by astroglial Cx30 channels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne-Cécile eBoulay

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Astrocytes, the most prominent glial cell type in the brain, send specialized processes called endfeet, around blood vessels and express a large molecular repertoire regulating the cerebrovascular system physiology. One of the most striking properties of astrocyte endfeet is their enrichment in gap junction protein Connexin 43 and 30 (Cx43 and Cx30 allowing in particular for direct intercellular trafficking of ions and small signaling molecules through perivascular astroglial networks. In this study, we addressed the specific role of Cx30 at the gliovascular interface. Using an inactivation mouse model for Cx30 (Cx30Δ/Δ, we showed that absence of Cx30 does not affect blood-brain barrier (BBB organization and permeability. However, it results in the cerebrovascular fraction, in a strong upregulation of Sgcg encoding γ-Sarcoglycan (SG, a member of the Dystrophin-associated protein complex (DAPC connecting cytoskeleton and the extracellular matrix. The same molecular event occurs in Cx30T5M/T5M mutated mice, where Cx30 channels are closed, demonstrating that Sgcg regulation relied on Cx30 channel functions. We further characterized the expression of other Sarcoglycan complex (SGC molecules in the cerebrovascular system and showed the presence of α-, β-, δ-, γ-, ε- and ζ- SG, as well as Sarcospan. Their expression was however not modified in Cx30Δ/Δ. These results suggest that a full SGC might be present in the cerebrovascular system, and that expression of one of its member, γ-Sarcoglycan, depends on Cx30 channels. As described in skeletal muscles, the SGC may contribute to membrane stabilization and signal transduction in the cerebrovascular system, which may therefore be regulated by Cx30 channel-mediated functions.

  2. Bimodal concentration-response of nicotine involves the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor, transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1, and transient receptor potential ankyrin 1 channels in mouse trachea and sensory neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kichko, Tatjana I; Lennerz, Jochen; Eberhardt, Mirjam; Babes, Ramona M; Neuhuber, Winfried; Kobal, Gerd; Reeh, Peter W

    2013-11-01

    High concentrations of nicotine, as in the saliva of oral tobacco consumers or in smoking cessation aids, have been shown to sensitize/activate recombinant transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 (rTRPV1) and mouse TRPA1 (mTRPA1) channels. By measuring stimulated calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) release from the isolated mouse trachea, we established a bimodal concentration-response relationship with a threshold below 10 µM (-)-nicotine, a maximum at 100 µM, an apparent nadir between 0.5 and 10 mM, and a renewed increase at 20 mM. The first peak was unchanged in TRPV1/A1 double-null mutants as compared with wild-types and was abolished by specific nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) inhibitors and by camphor, discovered to act as nicotinic antagonist. The nicotine response at 20 mM was strongly pHe-dependent, - five times greater at pH 9.0 than 7.4, indicating that intracellular permeation of the (uncharged) alkaloid was required to reach the TRPV1/A1 binding sites. The response was strongly reduced in both null mutants, and more so in double-null mutants. Upon measuring calcium transients in nodose/jugular and dorsal root ganglion neurons in response to 100 µM nicotine, 48% of the vagal (but only 14% of the somatic) sensory neurons were activated, the latter very weakly. However, nicotine 20 mM at pH 9.0 repeatedly activated almost every single cultured neuron, partly by releasing intracellular calcium and independent of TRPV1/A1 and nAChRs. In conclusion, in mouse tracheal sensory nerves nAChRs are 200-fold more sensitive to nicotine than TRPV1/A1; they are widely coexpressed with the capsaicin receptor among vagal sensory neurons and twice as abundant as TRPA1. Nicotine is the major stimulant in tobacco, and its sensory impact through nAChRs should not be disregarded.

  3. Activation of tetrodotoxin-resistant sodium channel NaV1.9 in rat primary sensory neurons contributes to melittin-induced pain behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yao-Qing; Zhao, Zhen-Yu; Chen, Xue-Feng; Xie, Fang; Yang, Yan; Chen, Jun

    2013-03-01

    Tetrodotoxin-resistant (TTX-R) sodium channels NaV1.8 and NaV1.9 in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons play important roles in pathological pain. We recently reported that melittin, the major toxin of whole bee venom, induced action potential firings in DRG neurons even in the presence of a high concentration (500 nM) of TTX, indicating the contribution of TTX-R sodium channels. This hypothesis is fully investigated in the present study. After subcutaneous injection of melittin, NaV1.8 and NaV1.9 significantly upregulate mRNA and protein expressions, and related sodium currents also increase. Double immunohistochemical results show that NaV1.8-positive neurons are mainly medium- and small-sized, whereas NaV1.9-positive ones are only small-sized. Antisense oligodeoxynucleotides (AS ODNs) targeting NaV1.8 and NaV1.9 are used to evaluate functional significance of the increased expressions of TTX-R sodium channels. Behavioral tests demonstrate that AS ODN targeting NaV1.9, but not NaV1.8, reverses melittin-induced heat hypersensitivity. Neither NaV1.8 AS ODN nor NaV1.9 AS ODN affects melittin-induced mechanical hypersensitivity. These results provide previously unknown evidence that upregulation of NaV1.9, but not NaV1.8, in small-sized DRG neurons contributes to melittin-induced heat hypersensitivity. Furthermore, melittin-induced biological effect indicates a potential strategy to study properties of TTX-R sodium channels.

  4. On Low-Complexity Full-diversity Detection In Multi-User MIMO Multiple-Access Channels

    KAUST Repository

    Ismail, Amr

    2014-01-28

    Multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO) techniques are becoming commonplace in recent wireless communication standards. This newly introduced dimension (i.e., space) can be efficiently used to mitigate the interference in the multi-user MIMO context. In this paper, we focus on the uplink of a MIMO multiple access channel (MAC) where perfect channel state information (CSI) is only available at the destination. We provide new sufficient conditions for a wide range of space-time block codes (STBC)s to achieve full-diversity under partial interference cancellation group decoding (PICGD) with or without successive interference cancellation (SIC) for completely blind users. Interference cancellation (IC) schemes for two and three users are then provided and shown to satisfy the full-diversity criteria. Beside the complexity reduction due to the fact that PICGD enables separate decoding of distinct users without sacrificing the diversity gain, further reduction of the decoding complexity may be obtained. In fact, thanks to the structure of the proposed schemes, the real and imaginary parts of each user\\'s symbols may be decoupled without any loss of performance. Our new IC scheme is shown to outperform recently proposed two-user IC scheme especially for high spectral efficiency while requiring significantly less decoding complexity.

  5. Enhanced excitability of primary sensory neurons and altered gene expression of neuronal ion channels in dorsal root ganglion in paclitaxel-induced peripheral neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Haijun; Dougherty, Patrick M

    2014-06-01

    The mechanism of chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy after paclitaxel treatment is not well understood. Given the poor penetration of paclitaxel into central nervous system, peripheral nervous system is most at risk. Intrinsic membrane properties of dorsal root ganglion neurons were studied by intracellular recordings. Multiple-gene real-time polymerase chain reaction array was used to investigate gene expression of dorsal root ganglion neuronal ion channels. Paclitaxel increased the incidence of spontaneous activity from 4.8 to 27.1% in large-sized and from 0 to 33.3% in medium-sized neurons. Paclitaxel decreased the rheobase (nA) from 1.6 ± 0.1 to 0.8 ± 0.1 in large-sized, from 1.5 ± 0.2 to 0.6 ± 0.1 in medium-sized, and from 1.6 ± 0.2 to 1.0 ± 0.1 in small-sized neurons. After paclitaxel treatment, other characteristics of membrane properties in each group remained the same except that Aδ neurons showed shorter action potential fall time (ms) (1.0 ± 0.2, n = 10 vs. 1.8 ± 0.3, n = 9, paclitaxel vs. vehicle). Meanwhile, real-time polymerase chain reaction array revealed an alteration in expression of some neuronal ion channel genes including up-regulation of hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated channel 1 (fold change 1.76 ± 0.06) and Nav1.7 (1.26 ± 0.02) and down-regulation of Kir channels (Kir1.1, 0.73 ± 0.05, Kir3.4, 0.66 ± 0.06) in paclitaxel-treated animals. The increased neuronal excitability and the changes in gene expression of some neuronal ion channels in dorsal root ganglion may provide insight into the molecular and cellular basis of paclitaxel-induced neuropathy, which may lead to novel therapeutic strategies.

  6. Sensitization of sodium channels by cystathionine β-synthetase activation in colon sensory neurons in adult rats with neonatal maternal deprivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Shufen; Xu, Weiyuan; Miao, Xiuhua; Gao, Yanping; Zhu, Liyan; Zhou, Youlang; Xiao, Ying; Xu, Guang-Yin

    2013-10-01

    The pathogenesis of pain in irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is poorly understood and treatment remains difficult. We have previously reported that TTX-resistant (TTX-R) sodium channels in colon-specific dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons were sensitized and the expression of the endogenous hydrogen sulfide producing enzyme cystathionine β-synthetase (CBS) was upregulated in a rat model of visceral hypersensitivity induced by neonatal maternal deprivation (NMD). However, the detailed molecular mechanism for activation of sodium channels remains unknown. This study was designed to examine roles for CBS-H₂S signaling in sensitization of sodium channels in a previously validated rat model of IBS. Neonatal male rats (postnatal days 2-15) were exposed to a 3 hour period of daily maternal separation with temperature maintained at ~33 °C. Colon-specific dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons were labeled with DiI and acutely dissociated for measuring excitability and sodium channel current under whole-cell patch clamp configurations. The expression of Na(V)1.8 was analyzed by Western blot and Immunofluorescence study. The endogenous H₂S producing enzyme CBS antagonist was injected intraperitoneally. We showed that CBS was colocalized with Na(V)1.8 in colon-specific DRG neurons pre-labeled with DiI. Pretreatment of O-(Carboxymethyl) hydroxylamine hemihydrochloride (AOAA), an inhibitor of CBS, significantly reduced expression of Na(V)1.8 in NMD rats. AOAA treatment also inhibited the TTX-R sodium current density, right-shifted the V₁/₂ of activation curve, and reversed hyperexcitability of colon-specific DRG neurons in NMD rats. Conversely, addition of NaHS, a donor of H₂S, greatly enhanced TTX-R sodium current density, left shifted the activation curve and enhanced excitability of colon DRG neurons in age-matched healthy rats. Furthermore, application of H-89, an inhibitor of protein kinase A, markedly attenuated the potentiation of TTX-R sodium current density by Na

  7. Generic design methodology for the development of three-dimensional structured-light sensory systems for measuring complex objects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marin, Veronica E.; Chang, Wei Hao Wayne; Nejat, Goldie

    2014-11-01

    Structured-light (SL) techniques are emerging as popular noncontact approaches for obtaining three-dimensional (3-D) measurements of complex objects for real-time applications in manufacturing, bioengineering, and robotics. The performance of SL systems is determined by the emitting (i.e., projector) and capturing (i.e., camera) hardware components and the triangulation configuration between them and an object of interest. A generic design methodology is presented to determine optimal triangulation configurations for SL systems. These optimal configurations are determined with respect to a set of performance metrics: (1) minimizing the 3-D reconstruction errors, (2) maximizing the pixel-to-pixel correspondence between the projector and camera, and (3) maximizing the dispersion of the measured 3-D points within a measurement volume, while satisfying design constraints based on hardware and user-defined specifications. The proposed methodology utilizes a 3-D geometric triangulation model based on ray-tracing geometry and pin-hole models for the projector and camera. Using the methodology, a set of optimal system configurations can be determined for a given set of hardware components. The design methodology was applied to a real-time SL system for surface profiling of complex objects. Experiments were conducted with an optimal sensor configuration and its performance verified with respect to a nonoptimal hardware configuration.

  8. Low Complexity Sparse Bayesian Learning for Channel Estimation Using Generalized Mean Field

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Niels Lovmand; Manchón, Carles Navarro; Fleury, Bernard Henri

    2014-01-01

    constrain the auxiliary function approximating the posterior probability density function of the unknown variables to factorize over disjoint groups of contiguous entries in the sparse vector - the size of these groups dictates the degree of complexity reduction. The original high-complexity algorithms...

  9. Long-term post-stroke changes include myelin loss, specific deficits in sensory and motor behaviors and complex cognitive impairment detected using active place avoidance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin Zhou

    Full Text Available Persistent neurobehavioral deficits and brain changes need validation for brain restoration. Two hours middle cerebral artery occlusion (tMCAO or sham surgery was performed in male Sprague-Dawley rats. Neurobehavioral and cognitive deficits were measured over 10 weeks included: (1 sensory, motor, beam balance, reflex/abnormal responses, hindlimb placement, forepaw foot fault and cylinder placement tests, and (2 complex active place avoidance learning (APA and simple passive avoidance retention (PA. Electroretinogram (ERG, hemispheric loss (infarction, hippocampus CA1 neuronal loss and myelin (Luxol Fast Blue staining in several fiber tracts were also measured. In comparison to Sham surgery, tMCAO surgery produced significant deficits in all behavioral tests except reflex/abnormal responses. Acute, short lived deficits following tMCAO were observed for forelimb foot fault and forelimb cylinder placement. Persistent, sustained deficits for the whole 10 weeks were exhibited for motor (p<0.001, sensory (p<0.001, beam balance performance (p<0.01 and hindlimb placement behavior (p<0.01. tMCAO produced much greater and prolonged cognitive deficits in APA learning (maximum on last trial of 604±83% change, p<0.05 but only a small, comparative effect on PA retention. Hemispheric loss/atrophy was measured 10 weeks after tMCAO and cross-validated by two methods (e.g., almost identical % ischemic hemispheric loss of 33.4±3.5% for H&E and of 34.2±3.5% for TTC staining. No visual dysfunction by ERG and no hippocampus neuronal loss were detected after tMCAO. Fiber tract damage measured by Luxol Fast Blue myelin staining intensity was significant (p<0.01 in the external capsule and striatum but not in corpus callosum and anterior commissure. In summary, persistent neurobehavioral deficits were validated as important endpoints for stroke restorative research in the future. Fiber myelin loss appears to contribute to these long term behavioral dysfunctions and

  10. Temporal and Spatial Changes in Grain Size on a Macro-Tidal Channel-Flat Complex: Results from Kingsport, Nova Scotia, Bay of Fundy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Law, B. A.; Milligan, T. G.; Hill, P. S.; Garwood, J. C.; Zions, V. A.

    2016-02-01

    In April 2012, a study was initiated to examine the seasonal change in grain size on a muddy macro-tidal flat and channel complex in Kingsport, N.S. Surficial sediment samples were collected for disaggregated inorganic grain size (DIGS) analysis every month for 1 year from a tidal flat and from a tidal channel and its banks. The monthly sampling was completed in March 2013. Sediment grain size on the tidal flat correlates with distance to the nearest channel, and flocculation plays a major role in sediment deposition. These results differ from those from Willapa Bay, Washington, USA, which a meso-tidal channel-flat complex that showed no relationship between sediment grain size, floc fraction and distance to the nearest channel. Findings from this study are discussed in terms of the ability of ecosystems to maintain a stable state and with regards to the development of tidal power in the Minas Passage.

  11. Interaction of methanol with the oxygen-evolving complex: atomistic models, channel identification, species dependence, and mechanistic implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Retegan, Marius; Pantazis, Dimitrios A

    2016-10-01

    Methanol has long being used as a substrate analogue to probe access pathways and investigate water delivery at the oxygen-evolving complex (OEC) of photosystem-II. In this contribution we study the interaction of methanol with the OEC by assembling available spectroscopic data into a quantum mechanical treatment that takes into account the local channel architecture of the active site. The effect on the magnetic energy levels of the Mn4Ca cluster in the S2 state of the catalytic cycle can be explained equally well by two models that involve either methanol binding to the calcium ion of the cluster, or a second-sphere interaction in the vicinity of the "dangler" Mn4 ion. However, consideration of the latest 13C hyperfine interaction data shows that only one model is fully consistent with experiment. In contrast to previous hypotheses, methanol is not a direct ligand to the OEC, but is situated at the end-point of a water channel associated with the O4 bridge. Its effect on magnetic properties of plant PS-II results from disruption of hydrogen bonding between O4 and proximal channel water molecules, thus enhancing superexchange (antiferromagnetic coupling) between the Mn3 and Mn4 ions. The same interaction mode applies to the dark-stable S1 state and possibly to all other states of the complex. Comparison of protein sequences from cyanobacteria and plants reveals a channel-altering substitution (D1-Asn87 versus D1-Ala87) in the proximity of the methanol binding pocket, explaining the species-dependence of the methanol effect. The water channel established as the methanol access pathway is the same that delivers ammonia to the Mn4 ion, supporting the notion that this is the only directly solvent-accessible manganese site of the OEC. The results support the pivot mechanism for water binding at a component of the S3 state and would be consistent with partial inhibition of water delivery by methanol. Mechanistic implications for enzymatic regulation and catalytic

  12. The effect of native-language experience on the sensory-obligatory components, the P1-N1-P2 and the T-complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Monica; Shafer, Valerie L; Martin, Brett; Steinschneider, Mitchell

    2013-07-19

    The influence of native-language experience on sensory-obligatory auditory-evoked potentials (AEPs) was investigated in native-English and native-Polish listeners. AEPs were recorded to the first word in nonsense word pairs, while participants performed a syllable identification task to the second word in the pairs. Nonsense words contained phoneme sequence onsets (i.e., /pt/, /pət/, /st/ and /sət/) that occur in the Polish and English languages, with the exception that /pt/ at syllable onset is an illegal phonotactic form in English. P1-N1-P2 waveforms from fronto-central electrode sites were comparable in English and Polish listeners, even though, these same English participants were unable to distinguish the nonsense words having /pt/ and /pət/ onsets. The P1-N1-P2 complex indexed the temporal characteristics of the word stimuli in the same manner for both language groups. Taken together, these findings suggest that the fronto-central P1-N1-P2 complex reflects acoustic feature processing of speech and is not significantly influenced by exposure to the phoneme sequences of the native-language. In contrast, the T-complex from bilateral posterior temporal sites was found to index phonological as well as acoustic feature processing to the nonsense word stimuli. An enhanced negativity for the /pt/ cluster relative to its contrast sequence (i.e., /pət/) occurred only for the Polish listeners, suggesting that neural networks within non-primary auditory cortex may be involved in early cortical phonological processing. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Monte Carlo simulations of channeling spectra recorded for samples containing complex defects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jagielski, Jacek [Institute for Electronic Materials Technology; Turos, Prof. Andrzej [Institute for Electronic Materials Technology; Nowicki, Lech [Soltan Institute for Nuclear Studies, Swierk, Poland; Jozwik, P. [Institute for Electronic Materials Technology; Shutthanandan, Vaithiyalingam [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Zhang, Yanwen [ORNL; Sathish, N. [Institute for Electronic Materials Technology; Thome, Lionel [Universite Paris Sud, Orsay, France; Stonert, A. [Soltan Institute for Nuclear Studies, Swierk, Poland; Jozwik-Biala, Iwona [Institute for Electronic Materials Technology

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the present paper is to describe the current status of the development of McChasy, a Monte Carlo simulation code, to make it suitable for the analysis of dislocations and dislocation loops in crystals. Such factors like the shape of the bent channel and geometrical distortions of the crystalline structure in the vicinity of dislocation has been discussed. The results obtained demonstrate that the new procedure applied to the spectra recorded on crystals containing dislocation yields damage profiles which are independent of the energy of the analyzing beam.

  14. Cyclic steps and superimposed antidune deposits: important elements of coarse-grained deepwater channel-levée complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Joerg; Brandes, Christian; Winsemann, Jutta

    2017-04-01

    The facies distribution and architecture of submarine fans can be strongly impacted by erosion and deposition by supercritical density flows. We present field examples from the Sandino Forearc Basin (southern Central America), where cyclic-step and antidune deposits represent important sedimentary facies of coarse-grained channel-levée complexes. These bedforms occur in all sub-environments of the depositional systems and relate to the different stages of avulsion, bypass, levée construction and channel backfilling. Large-scale scours (18 to 29 m deep, 18 to 25 m wide, 60 to >120 m long) with an amalgamated infill, comprising massive, normally coarse-tail graded or spaced subhorizontally stratified conglomerates and pebbly sandstones, are interpreted as deposits of the hydraulic-jump zone of cyclic steps. These cyclic steps probably formed during avulsion, when high-density flows were routed into the evolving channel. The large-scale scour fills can be distinguished from small-scale channel fills based on the preservation of a steep upper margin and a coarse-grained infill comprising mainly amalgamated hydraulic-jump deposits. Channel fills include repetitive successions deposited by cyclic steps with superimposed antidunes. The hydraulic-jump zone of cyclic-step deposits comprises regularly spaced scours (0.2 to 2.6 m deep, 0.8 to 23 m wide), which are infilled by intraclast-rich conglomerates or pebbly sandstones and display normal coarse-tail grading or backsets. Laterally and vertically these deposits are associated with subhorizontally stratified, low-angle cross-stratified or sinusoidal stratified pebbly sandstones and sandstones (wavelength 0.5 to 18 m), interpreted as representing antidune deposits formed on the stoss-side of the cyclic steps during flow re-acceleration. The field examples indicate that so-called crudely or spaced stratified deposits may commonly represent antidune deposits with varying stratification styles controlled by the aggradation

  15. Evolutionary genomics reveals lineage-specific gene loss and rapid evolution of a sperm-specific ion channel complex: CatSpers and CatSperbeta.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinjiang Cai

    Full Text Available The mammalian CatSper ion channel family consists of four sperm-specific voltage-gated Ca2+ channels that are crucial for sperm hyperactivation and male fertility. All four CatSper subunits are believed to assemble into a heteromultimeric channel complex, together with an auxiliary subunit, CatSperbeta. Here, we report a comprehensive comparative genomics study and evolutionary analysis of CatSpers and CatSperbeta, with important correlation to physiological significance of molecular evolution of the CatSper channel complex. The development of the CatSper channel complex with four CatSpers and CatSperbeta originated as early as primitive metazoans such as the Cnidarian Nematostella vectensis. Comparative genomics revealed extensive lineage-specific gene loss of all four CatSpers and CatSperbeta through metazoan evolution, especially in vertebrates. The CatSper channel complex underwent rapid evolution and functional divergence, while distinct evolutionary constraints appear to have acted on different domains and specific sites of the four CatSper genes. These results reveal unique evolutionary characteristics of sperm-specific Ca2+ channels and their adaptation to sperm biology through metazoan evolution.

  16. Sensory gating in primary insomnia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hairston, Ilana S; Talbot, Lisa S; Eidelman, Polina; Gruber, June; Harvey, Allison G

    2010-06-01

    Although previous research indicates that sleep architecture is largely intact in primary insomnia (PI), the spectral content of the sleeping electroencephalographic trace and measures of brain metabolism suggest that individuals with PI are physiologically more aroused than good sleepers. Such observations imply that individuals with PI may not experience the full deactivation of sensory and cognitive processing, resulting in reduced filtering of external sensory information during sleep. To test this hypothesis, gating of sensory information during sleep was tested in participants with primary insomnia (n = 18) and good sleepers (n = 20). Sensory gating was operationally defined as (i) the difference in magnitude of evoked response potentials elicited by pairs of clicks presented during Wake and Stage II sleep, and (ii) the number of K complexes evoked by the same auditory stimulus. During wake the groups did not differ in magnitude of sensory gating. During sleep, sensory gating of the N350 component was attenuated and completely diminished in participants with insomnia. P450, which occurred only during sleep, was strongly gated in good sleepers, and less so in participants with insomnia. Additionally, participants with insomnia showed no stimulus-related increase in K complexes. Thus, PI is potentially associated with impaired capacity to filter out external sensory information, especially during sleep. The potential of using stimulus-evoked K complexes as a biomarker for primary insomnia is discussed.

  17. The pentameric channel of COMPcc in complex with different fatty acids.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ainsley McFarlane

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: COMPcc forms a pentameric left-handed coiled coil that is known to bind hydrophilic signaling molecules such as vitamin D(3, and vitamin A. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In an integrated approach we reveal the unique binding properties of COMPcc for saturated and unsaturated fatty acids. Our observations suggest that residues Met33 (gating pore, Thr40/Asn41 (water chamber and Gln54 (electrostatic trap are key elements for the binding of fatty acids by COMPcc. In addition, this work characterizes the binding of various fatty acids to COMPcc using fluorescence spectroscopy. Our findings reveal a binding trend within the hydrophobic channel of COMPcc, namely, that is driven by length of the methylene tail and incorporation of unsaturation. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: The unique binding properties imply that COMPcc may be involved in signalling functions in which hydrophilic ligands are involved. The pentameric channel is a unique carrier for lipophilic compounds. This opens the exciting possibility that COMPcc could be developed as a targeted drug delivery system.

  18. Interactions of Marine Hydrokinetic Devices in Complex Bathymetries: Numerical Simulations in the Chacao Channel in Southern Chile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soto, K. A.; Escauriaza, C. R.; Richter, D. H.

    2015-12-01

    Many coastal areas in the South Pacific Ocean can provide significant marine energy resources in the near future. The installation of marine hydrokinetic (MHK) devices in these regions will require new approaches to understand physical and environmental processes that are relevant for the installation of turbine arrays, which are also specific of each site. The coastal morphology of the Chacao channel in southern Chile, which separates the Chiloé island from the main continent (41º47'S, 73º31'W) stands out as an important energy resource that can potentially contribute a significant power capacity. This coastal area not only sustains delicate ecosystems with limited anthropic intervention, but it is characterized by a complex bathymetry that can have important effects on the performance of MHK devices and their local impacts. To understand the interactions of the local bathymetry and ambient turbulence with turbine arrays, we carry out a series of numerical simulations with a coherent-structure resolving turbulence model using the actuator disk parameterization. The main objective of this study is to further our understanding on the physical processes associated with the installation of the turbine arrays. We perform simulations with different geometries and inlet boundary conditions, from simple cases in a rectangular channel, to more complex cases that include the high-resolution bathymetry of an extensive area of the Chacao channel. The results show how the interactions between the MHK devices, the local flow, and the bed can affect the energy flux and potential generation in specific sites. The results also provide new insights of local impacts of MHK devices and they can also help to optimize turbine arrays in natural environments. This work has been supported by Fondecyt project 1130940, and the Marine Energy Research & Innovation Center (MERIC) financed by Corfo and based in Santiago, Chile.

  19. The fibroblast growth factor 14·voltage-gated sodium channel complex is a new target of glycogen synthase kinase 3 (GSK3).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shavkunov, Alexander S; Wildburger, Norelle C; Nenov, Miroslav N; James, Thomas F; Buzhdygan, Tetyana P; Panova-Elektronova, Neli I; Green, Thomas A; Veselenak, Ronald L; Bourne, Nigel; Laezza, Fernanda

    2013-07-05

    The FGF14 protein controls biophysical properties and subcellular distribution of neuronal voltage-gated Na(+) (Nav) channels through direct binding to the channel C terminus. To gain insights into the dynamic regulation of this protein/protein interaction complex, we employed the split luciferase complementation assay to screen a small molecule library of kinase inhibitors against the FGF14·Nav1.6 channel complex and identified inhibitors of GSK3 as hits. Through a combination of a luminescence-based counter-screening, co-immunoprecipitation, patch clamp electrophysiology, and quantitative confocal immunofluorescence, we demonstrate that inhibition of GSK3 reduces the assembly of the FGF14·Nav channel complex, modifies FGF14-dependent regulation of Na(+) currents, and induces dissociation and subcellular redistribution of the native FGF14·Nav channel complex in hippocampal neurons. These results further emphasize the role of FGF14 as a critical component of the Nav channel macromolecular complex, providing evidence for a novel GSK3-dependent signaling pathway that might control excitability through specific protein/protein interactions.

  20. Complex N-Glycans Influence the Spatial Arrangement of Voltage Gated Potassium Channels in Membranes of Neuronal-Derived Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Kristen Hall

    Full Text Available The intrinsic electrical properties of a neuron depend on expression of voltage gated potassium (Kv channel isoforms, as well as their distribution and density in the plasma membrane. Recently, we showed that N-glycosylation site occupancy of Kv3.1b modulated its placement in the cell body and neurites of a neuronal-derived cell line, B35 neuroblastoma cells. To extrapolate this mechanism to other N-glycosylated Kv channels, we evaluated the impact of N-glycosylation occupancy of Kv3.1a and Kv1.1 channels. Western blots revealed that wild type Kv3.1a and Kv1.1 α-subunits had complex and oligomannose N-glycans, respectively, and that abolishment of the N-glycosylation site(s generated Kv proteins without N-glycans. Total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy images revealed that N-glycans of Kv3.1a contributed to its placement in the cell membrane while N-glycans had no effect on the distribution of Kv1.1. Based on particle analysis of EGFP-Kv proteins in the adhered membrane, glycosylated forms of Kv3.1a, Kv1.1, and Kv3.1b had differences in the number, size or density of Kv protein clusters in the cell membrane of neurites and cell body of B35 cells. Differences were also observed between the unglycosylated forms of the Kv proteins. Cell dissociation assays revealed that cell-cell adhesion was increased by the presence of complex N-glycans of Kv3.1a, like Kv3.1b, whereas cell adhesion was similar in the oligomannose and unglycosylated Kv1.1 subunit containing B35 cells. Our findings provide direct evidence that N-glycans of Kv3.1 splice variants contribute to the placement of these glycoproteins in the plasma membrane of neuronal-derived cells while those of Kv1.1 were absent. Further when the cell membrane distribution of the Kv channel was modified by N-glycans then the cell-cell adhesion properties were altered. Our study demonstrates that N-glycosylation of Kv3.1a, like Kv3.1b, provides a mechanism for the distribution of these

  1. Complex N-Glycans Influence the Spatial Arrangement of Voltage Gated Potassium Channels in Membranes of Neuronal-Derived Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, M Kristen; Weidner, Douglas A; Edwards, Michael A J; Schwalbe, Ruth A

    2015-01-01

    The intrinsic electrical properties of a neuron depend on expression of voltage gated potassium (Kv) channel isoforms, as well as their distribution and density in the plasma membrane. Recently, we showed that N-glycosylation site occupancy of Kv3.1b modulated its placement in the cell body and neurites of a neuronal-derived cell line, B35 neuroblastoma cells. To extrapolate this mechanism to other N-glycosylated Kv channels, we evaluated the impact of N-glycosylation occupancy of Kv3.1a and Kv1.1 channels. Western blots revealed that wild type Kv3.1a and Kv1.1 α-subunits had complex and oligomannose N-glycans, respectively, and that abolishment of the N-glycosylation site(s) generated Kv proteins without N-glycans. Total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy images revealed that N-glycans of Kv3.1a contributed to its placement in the cell membrane while N-glycans had no effect on the distribution of Kv1.1. Based on particle analysis of EGFP-Kv proteins in the adhered membrane, glycosylated forms of Kv3.1a, Kv1.1, and Kv3.1b had differences in the number, size or density of Kv protein clusters in the cell membrane of neurites and cell body of B35 cells. Differences were also observed between the unglycosylated forms of the Kv proteins. Cell dissociation assays revealed that cell-cell adhesion was increased by the presence of complex N-glycans of Kv3.1a, like Kv3.1b, whereas cell adhesion was similar in the oligomannose and unglycosylated Kv1.1 subunit containing B35 cells. Our findings provide direct evidence that N-glycans of Kv3.1 splice variants contribute to the placement of these glycoproteins in the plasma membrane of neuronal-derived cells while those of Kv1.1 were absent. Further when the cell membrane distribution of the Kv channel was modified by N-glycans then the cell-cell adhesion properties were altered. Our study demonstrates that N-glycosylation of Kv3.1a, like Kv3.1b, provides a mechanism for the distribution of these proteins to the cell

  2. Energy variational analysis of ions in water and channels: Field theory for primitive models of complex ionic fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisenberg, Bob; Hyon, YunKyong; Liu, Chun

    2010-01-01

    Ionic solutions are mixtures of interacting anions and cations. They hardly resemble dilute gases of uncharged noninteracting point particles described in elementary textbooks. Biological and electrochemical solutions have many components that interact strongly as they flow in concentrated environments near electrodes, ion channels, or active sites of enzymes. Interactions in concentrated environments help determine the characteristic properties of electrodes, enzymes, and ion channels. Flows are driven by a combination of electrical and chemical potentials that depend on the charges, concentrations, and sizes of all ions, not just the same type of ion. We use a variational method EnVarA (energy variational analysis) that combines Hamilton’s least action and Rayleigh’s dissipation principles to create a variational field theory that includes flow, friction, and complex structure with physical boundary conditions. EnVarA optimizes both the action integral functional of classical mechanics and the dissipation functional. These functionals can include entropy and dissipation as well as potential energy. The stationary point of the action is determined with respect to the trajectory of particles. The stationary point of the dissipation is determined with respect to rate functions (such as velocity). Both variations are written in one Eulerian (laboratory) framework. In variational analysis, an “extra layer” of mathematics is used to derive partial differential equations. Energies and dissipations of different components are combined in EnVarA and Euler–Lagrange equations are then derived. These partial differential equations are the unique consequence of the contributions of individual components. The form and parameters of the partial differential equations are determined by algebra without additional physical content or assumptions. The partial differential equations of mixtures automatically combine physical properties of individual (unmixed) components

  3. Low complexity iterative MLSE equalization in highly spread underwater acoustic channels

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Myburgh, HC

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available -inherent Doppler shifts, resulting in inter-carrier interference (ICI) which will inevitably lead to degraded system performance [2]. Evidently there are a number of challenges to overcome in order to design an equalizer for a spectrally efficient underwater... iterative MLSE equalizer is pro- posed to equalize single carrier 4-QAM modulated signals in a highly spread UAC. The proposed equalizer has computational complexity linear in the data block length and approximately independent from the CIR length...

  4. Contribution of large-sized primary sensory neuronal sensitization to mechanical allodynia by upregulation of hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide gated channels via cyclooxygenase 1 cascade.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Wei; Yang, Fei; Wang, Yan; Fu, Han; Yang, Yan; Li, Chun-Li; Wang, Xiao-Liang; Lin, Qing; Chen, Jun

    2017-02-01

    Under physiological state, small- and medium-sized dorsal root ganglia (DRG) neurons are believed to mediate nociceptive behavioral responses to painful stimuli. However, recently it has been found that a number of large-sized neurons are also involved in nociceptive transmission under neuropathic conditions. Nonetheless, the underlying mechanisms that large-sized DRG neurons mediate nociception are poorly understood. In the present study, the role of large-sized neurons in bee venom (BV)-induced mechanical allodynia and the underlying mechanisms were investigated. Behaviorally, it was found that mechanical allodynia was still evoked by BV injection in rats in which the transient receptor potential vanilloid 1-positive DRG neurons were chemically deleted. Electrophysiologically, in vitro patch clamp recordings of large-sized neurons showed hyperexcitability in these neurons. Interestingly, the firing pattern of these neurons was changed from phasic to tonic under BV-inflamed state. It has been suggested that hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide gated channels (HCN) expressed in large-sized DRG neurons contribute importantly to repeatedly firing. So we examined the roles of HCNs in BV-induced mechanical allodynia. Consistent with the overexpression of HCN1/2 detected by immunofluorescence, HCNs-mediated hyperpolarization activated cation current (Ih) was significantly increased in the BV treated samples. Pharmacological experiments demonstrated that the hyperexcitability and upregulation of Ih in large-sized neurons were mediated by cyclooxygenase-1 (COX-1)-prostaglandin E2 pathway. This is evident by the fact that the COX-1 inhibitor significantly attenuated the BV-induced mechanical allodynia. These results suggest that BV can excite the large-sized DRG neurons at least in part by increasing Ih through activation of COX-1. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Stability and Complexity Analysis of a Dual-Channel Closed-Loop Supply Chain with Delayed Decision under Government Intervention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daoming Dai

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper constructs a continuous dual-channel closed-loop supply chain (DCLSC model with delayed decision under government intervention. The existence conditions of the local stability of the equilibrium point are discussed. We analyze the influence of delay parameters, the adjustment speed of wholesale price, recovery rate of waste products, direct price, carbon quota subsidy, and carbon tax on the stability and complexity of model by using bifurcation diagram, entropy diagram, attractor, and time series diagram and so on. Besides, the delay feedback control method is adopted to control the unstable or chaotic system effectively. The main conclusions of this paper show that the variables mentioned above must be within a reasonable range. Otherwise, the model will lose stability or enter chaos. The government can effectively adjust manufacturers' profit through carbon tax and carbon quota subsidy, and encourage manufacturers to reduce carbon emissions and increase the remanufacturing of waste products.

  6. Complexity Uncertainty Analysis of Dynamic in a Dual-Channel Energy Supply Chain Model with Heterogeneous Retailers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ting Li

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper analyses the dynamics of dual-channel energy supply chain model with heterogeneous retailers (as regards the type of expectations’ formation. On the basis of analyzing the stabilities of four fixed points in the three-dimensional dynamic system, local stable regions of Nash equilibrium are obtained. Effects of S on the stable regions and profit are studied. Simulation results show that the adjustment of price speed has an obvious impact on the complexity of competition. The performances of the model in different period are measured by using the index of average profit. The results show that unstable behavior in economic system is often an unfavorable outcome. So this paper discusses the application of parameters control method when the model is in chaos and then allows the oligarchs to eliminate the negative effects.

  7. Design of complete software GPS signal simulator with low complexity and precise multipath channel model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Arul Elango

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The need for GPS data simulators have become important due to the tremendous growth in the design of versatile GPS receivers. Commercial hardware and software based GPS simulators are expensive and time consuming. In this work, a low cost simple novel GPS L1 signal simulator is designed for testing and evaluating the performance of software GPS receiver in a laboratory environment. A typical real time paradigm, similar to actual satellite derived GPS signal is created on a computer generated scenario. In this paper, a GPS software simulator is proposed that may offer a lot of analysis and testing flexibility to the researchers and developers as it is totally software based primarily running on a laptop/personal computer without the requirement of any hardware. The proposed GPS simulator allows provision for re-configurability and test repeatability and is developed in VC++ platform to minimize the simulation time. It also incorporates Rayleigh multipath channel fading model under non-line of sight (NLOS conditions. In this work, to efficiently design the simulator, several Rayleigh fading models viz. Inverse Discrete Fourier Transform (IDFT, Filtering White Gaussian Noise (FWFN and modified Sum of Sinusoidal (SOS simulators are tested and compared in terms of accuracy of its first and second order statistical metrics, execution time and the later one is found to be as the best appropriate Rayleigh multipath model suitable for incorporating with GPS simulator. The fading model written in ‘MATLAB’ engine has been linked with software GPS simulator module enable to test GPS receiver’s functionality in different fading environments.

  8. Neuronal intrinsic properties shape naturally evoked sensory inputs in the dorsal horn of the spinal cord.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reali, Cecilia; Russo, Raúl E

    2013-01-01

    Intrinsic electrophysiological properties arising from specific combinations of voltage-gated channels are fundamental for the performance of small neural networks in invertebrates, but their role in large-scale vertebrate circuits remains controversial. Although spinal neurons have complex intrinsic properties, some tasks produce high-conductance states that override intrinsic conductances, minimizing their contribution to network function. Because the detection and coding of somato-sensory information at early stages probably involves a relatively small number of neurons, we speculated that intrinsic electrophysiological properties are likely involved in the processing of sensory inputs by dorsal horn neurons (DHN). To test this idea, we took advantage of an integrated spinal cord-hindlimbs preparation from turtles allowing the combination of patch-clamp recordings of DHN embedded in an intact network, with accurate control of the extracellular milieu. We found that plateau potentials and low threshold spikes (LTS) -mediated by L- and T-type Ca(2+)channels, respectively- generated complex dynamics by interacting with naturally evoked synaptic potentials. Inhibitory receptive fields could be changed in sign by activation of the LTS. On the other hand, the plateau potential transformed sensory signals in the time domain by generating persistent activity triggered on and off by brief sensory inputs and windup of the response to repetitive sensory stimulation. Our findings suggest that intrinsic properties dynamically shape sensory inputs and thus represent a major building block for sensory processing by DHN. Intrinsic conductances in DHN appear to provide a mechanism for plastic phenomena such as dynamic receptive fields and sensitization to pain.

  9. Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease-Like Periodic Sharp Wave Complexes in Voltage-Gated Potassium Channel-Complex Antibodies Encephalitis: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savard, Martin; Irani, Sarosh R; Guillemette, Annie; Gosselin-Lefebvre, Stéphanie; Geschwind, Michael; Jansen, Gerard H; Gould, Peter V; Laforce, Robert

    2016-02-01

    Voltage-gated potassium channel-complex antibodies (VGKC-cAbs) encephalitis, a treatable autoantibody encephalopathy, has been previously reported to clinically mimic sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease. Among available clinical clues to distinguish them, periodic sharp wave complexes, a typical finding in sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, have never been reported in association with VGKC-cAbs encephalitis. A 76-year-old man was transferred to a tertiary neurology center with a clinical history of 6-month weight loss, cognitive disturbance, and nonspecific generalized weakness. He had two seizures the month before transfer and then evolved to severe encephalopathy, requiring mechanical ventilation. Periodic sharp wave complexes every 1 to 2 seconds over slowed background were found on EEG, and MRI showed cerebellar and bifrontal cortical T2/FLAIR/DWI hypersignal without restricted diffusion on ADC mapping. Pancorporal positron emission tomography scan was negative. An immunotherapy trial did not improve the patient condition. Therefore, he died after life support withdrawal. Brain autopsy revealed mononuclear neocortex infiltrate without significant spongiosis, and the anti-VGKC test showed a seropositivity of 336 pmol/L (normal, 0-31), 3 month after the patient deceased. This is the first reported case of VGKC-cAbs encephalitis associated with periodic sharp wave complexes on EEG, which further confuse the differential diagnosis with sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease. However, the cortical DWI hypersignal without restriction seems to remain a way to discriminate these two entities appropriately, when present. These clues are of paramount importance because VGKC-cAbs encephalitis is a treatable disease.

  10. Seismic geomorphological analysis of multi-story submarine channel-belt complexes in the Pliocene succession of the Levant Basin, offshore central Israel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niyazi, Yakufu; Eruteya, Ovie Emmanuel; Waldmann, Nicolas

    2017-04-01

    In this study we combine the analysis of a high-resolution three-dimensional seismic reflection dataset and well-logs to characterize a distinct succession characterized by moderate to high-amplitude discontinuous to continuous seismic facies. This interval was deposited during ca. Middle - Late Pliocene, and sandwiched between continuous basin series and mass transport deposit (MTD). Our dataset, located at the foot of the continental slope, offshore central Israel reveal this interval is characterized by multi-storey submarine channel-belt complexes spatio-temporally located in the western part of the study area and restricted to the east by the emplacement of a MTD. We further subdivide the channel-belt complexes into a lower and upper system. The channels in both systems trend N-NW and have a width ranging between 150 m to 350 m , while incising up 50 m within the Pliocene sediments at both levels. Greater populations of well-developed and more sinuous channels are identified in the upper part of the channel complex, suggesting that the interplay between the sedimentary processes and the evolution of channels in the studied interval are heterogeneous. In particular, this may emphasize remarkable changes in spatio-temporal variations in flow volume. Yet, the effect of salt tectonics inflicted by the Messinian evaporites substratum on the morphology of the channel-belt complexes can be downplayed since its associated deformation postdates the evolution of the channels. Considering the available chronology obtained from well-logs and through further comparison with other regional and global climate proxies, we suggest the presence of an apparent periodicity in the evolution of the channels through time. We propose the evolution of these channels during the Pliocene is Nile-related. Furthermore, the channel systems described here for the Pliocene interval may extend the current understanding of the development of slope channels under the influence of juvenile

  11. Sensory-evoked perturbations of locomotor activity by sparse sensory input: a computational study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brownstone, Robert M.

    2015-01-01

    Sensory inputs from muscle, cutaneous, and joint afferents project to the spinal cord, where they are able to affect ongoing locomotor activity. Activation of sensory input can initiate or prolong bouts of locomotor activity depending on the identity of the sensory afferent activated and the timing of the activation within the locomotor cycle. However, the mechanisms by which afferent activity modifies locomotor rhythm and the distribution of sensory afferents to the spinal locomotor networks have not been determined. Considering the many sources of sensory inputs to the spinal cord, determining this distribution would provide insights into how sensory inputs are integrated to adjust ongoing locomotor activity. We asked whether a sparsely distributed set of sensory inputs could modify ongoing locomotor activity. To address this question, several computational models of locomotor central pattern generators (CPGs) that were mechanistically diverse and generated locomotor-like rhythmic activity were developed. We show that sensory inputs restricted to a small subset of the network neurons can perturb locomotor activity in the same manner as seen experimentally. Furthermore, we show that an architecture with sparse sensory input improves the capacity to gate sensory information by selectively modulating sensory channels. These data demonstrate that sensory input to rhythm-generating networks need not be extensively distributed. PMID:25673740

  12. Sensory-evoked perturbations of locomotor activity by sparse sensory input: a computational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bui, Tuan V; Brownstone, Robert M

    2015-04-01

    Sensory inputs from muscle, cutaneous, and joint afferents project to the spinal cord, where they are able to affect ongoing locomotor activity. Activation of sensory input can initiate or prolong bouts of locomotor activity depending on the identity of the sensory afferent activated and the timing of the activation within the locomotor cycle. However, the mechanisms by which afferent activity modifies locomotor rhythm and the distribution of sensory afferents to the spinal locomotor networks have not been determined. Considering the many sources of sensory inputs to the spinal cord, determining this distribution would provide insights into how sensory inputs are integrated to adjust ongoing locomotor activity. We asked whether a sparsely distributed set of sensory inputs could modify ongoing locomotor activity. To address this question, several computational models of locomotor central pattern generators (CPGs) that were mechanistically diverse and generated locomotor-like rhythmic activity were developed. We show that sensory inputs restricted to a small subset of the network neurons can perturb locomotor activity in the same manner as seen experimentally. Furthermore, we show that an architecture with sparse sensory input improves the capacity to gate sensory information by selectively modulating sensory channels. These data demonstrate that sensory input to rhythm-generating networks need not be extensively distributed. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  13. Low complexity iterative MLSE equalization of M-QAM signals in extremely long rayleigh fading channels

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Myburgh, HC

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available in Section 2 while the the multilevel neuron is discussed in section 3, followed by a discussion on optimization techniques in Section 4. Section 5 presents a computational complexity analysis of the proposed equalizer and the Viterbi MLSE equalizer... of the respective vectors. B. Iterative MLSE Equalization It was shown in [10] that (3) is a Lyapunov function in the high gain limit, where the neuron threshold function approaches a sgn-function, for the dynamic system given by ITsuu ++−= τdt d...

  14. Impact of Gram-negative bacteria in interaction with a complex microbial consortium on biogenic amine content and sensory characteristics of an uncooked pressed cheese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delbès-Paus, Céline; Pochet, Sylvie; Helinck, Sandra; Veisseire, Philippe; Bord, Cécile; Lebecque, Annick; Coton, Monika; Desmasures, Nathalie; Coton, Emmanuel; Irlinger, Françoise; Montel, Marie-Christine

    2012-05-01

    The impact of Gram-negative bacteria on sensory characteristics and production of volatile compounds as well as biogenic amines (BA) in the core of an uncooked pressed type model cheese was investigated in the presence of a defined complex microbial consortium. Eleven strains of Gram-negative bacteria, selected on the basis of their biodiversity and in vitro BA-production ability, were individually tested in a model cheese. Four out of 6 strains of Enterobacteriaceae (Citrobacter freundii UCMA 4217, Klebsiella oxytoca 927, Hafnia alvei B16 and Proteus vulgaris UCMA 3780) reached counts close to 6 log CFU g⁻¹ in the model cheese. In core of cheeses inoculated with Gram-negative bacteria, only slight differences were observed for microbial counts (Enterococcus faecalis or Lactobacillus plantarum count differences below 1 log CFU g⁻¹), acetate concentration (differences below 200 mg kg⁻¹) and texture (greater firmness) in comparison to control cheeses. Cheese core colour, odour and volatile compound composition were not modified. Although ornithine, the precursor of putrescine, was present in all cheeses, putrescine was only detected in cheeses inoculated with H. alvei B16 and never exceeded 2.18 mmol kg⁻¹ cheese dry matter. Cadaverine was only detected in cheeses inoculated with H. alvei B16, K. oxytoca 927, Halomonas venusta 4C1A or Morganella morganii 3A2A but at lower concentrations (<1.05 mmol kg⁻¹ cheese dry matter), although lysine was available. Only insignificant amounts of the detrimental BA histamine and tyramine, as well as isopentylamine, tryptamine or phenylethylamine, were produced in the cheese model by any of the Gram-negative strains, including those which produced these BA at high levels in vitro. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. A Low-Complexity LMMSE Channel Estimation Method for OFDM-Based Cooperative Diversity Systems with Multiple Amplify-and-Forward Relays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Kai

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Orthogonal frequency division multiplexing- (OFDM- based amplify-and-forward (AF cooperative communication is an effective way for single-antenna systems to exploit the spatial diversity gains in frequency-selective fading channels, but the receiver usually requires the knowledge of the channel state information to recover the transmitted signals. In this paper, a training-sequences-aided linear minimum mean square error (LMMSE channel estimation method is proposed for OFDM-based cooperative diversity systems with multiple AF relays over frequency-selective fading channels. The mean square error (MSE bound on the proposed method is derived and the optimal training scheme with respect to this bound is also given. By exploiting the optimal training scheme, an optimal low-rank LMMSE channel estimator is introduced to reduce the computational complexity of the proposed method via singular value decomposition. Furthermore, the Chu sequence is employed as the training sequence to implement the optimal training scheme with easy realization at the source terminal and reduced computational complexity at the relay terminals. The performance of the proposed low-complexity channel estimation method and the superiority of the derived optimal training scheme are verified through simulation results.

  16. A Low-Complexity LMMSE Channel Estimation Method for OFDM-Based Cooperative Diversity Systems with Multiple Amplify-and-Forward Relays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haitao Liu

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Orthogonal frequency division multiplexing- (OFDM- based amplify-and-forward (AF cooperative communication is an effective way for single-antenna systems to exploit the spatial diversity gains in frequency-selective fading channels, but the receiver usually requires the knowledge of the channel state information to recover the transmitted signals. In this paper, a training-sequences-aided linear minimum mean square error (LMMSE channel estimation method is proposed for OFDM-based cooperative diversity systems with multiple AF relays over frequency-selective fading channels. The mean square error (MSE bound on the proposed method is derived and the optimal training scheme with respect to this bound is also given. By exploiting the optimal training scheme, an optimal low-rank LMMSE channel estimator is introduced to reduce the computational complexity of the proposed method via singular value decomposition. Furthermore, the Chu sequence is employed as the training sequence to implement the optimal training scheme with easy realization at the source terminal and reduced computational complexity at the relay terminals. The performance of the proposed low-complexity channel estimation method and the superiority of the derived optimal training scheme are verified through simulation results.

  17. Yeast Mitochondrial Interactosome Model: Metabolon Membrane Proteins Complex Involved in the Channeling of ADP/ATP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin Clémençon

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The existence of a mitochondrial interactosome (MI has been currently well established in mammalian cells but the exact composition of this super-complex is not precisely known, and its organization seems to be different from that in yeast. One major difference is the absence of mitochondrial creatine kinase (MtCK in yeast, unlike that described in the organization model of MI, especially in cardiac, skeletal muscle and brain cells. The aim of this review is to provide a detailed description of different partner proteins involved in the synergistic ADP/ATP transport across the mitochondrial membranes in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and to propose a new mitochondrial interactosome model. The ADP/ATP (Aacp and inorganic phosphate (PiC carriers as well as the VDAC (or mitochondrial porin catalyze the import and export of ADP, ATP and Pi across the mitochondrial membranes. Aacp and PiC, which appear to be associated with the ATP synthase, consist of two nanomotors (F0, F1 under specific conditions and form ATP synthasome. Identification and characterization of such a complex were described for the first time by Pedersen and co-workers in 2003.

  18. [Changes in the expression of large-conductance calcium-activated potassium channels in dorsal root ganglion neurons after electrical injury in rats' sciatic nerves and its influence on sensory conduction function].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Guangning; Li, Xueyong; Xu, Xiaoli; Ren, Pan

    2016-06-01

    To study the changes in the expression of large-conductance calcium-activated potassium (BKCa) channels in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons after electrical injury in rats' sciatic nerves and its influence on sensory conduction function. One-hundred and thirty-six adult SD rats were divided into normal control group, sham electrical injury group, and 75, 100, 125 V electrical injury groups according to the random number table, with 8 rats in normal control group and 32 rats in each of the rest 4 groups. Rats in normal control group were routinely fed without any treatment. Blunt dissection of the sciatic nerves of left hind leg of rats was performed in sham electrical injury group, while sciatic nerves of left hind leg of rats in electrical injury groups were electrically injured with corresponding voltage. Eight rats of normal control group fed for one week, and 8 rats from each of the rest four groups on post injury day (PID) 3 and in post injury week (PIW) 1, 2, 3 respectively were collected to detect the paw withdrawal mechanical threshold (PWMT). In addition, rats of 100 V electrical injury group in PIW 1 were collected and intrathecally injected with NS1619 after former PWMT detection, and PWMT was detected per 30 minutes within three hours post injection. The rats in each group at each time point were sacrificed after PWMT detection. The DRG of L4 to L6 segments of spinal cord was sampled to observe the BKCa channels distribution with immunohistochemical staining and to detect the protein and mRNA expressions of BKCa channels with Western blotting and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction respectively. Data were processed with one-way analysis of variance, analysis of variance of factorial design, and SNK test. (1) The PWMT values of rats in 75 and 100 V electrical injury groups on PID 3 and in PIW 1, 2, 3 were (5.8±0.6), (5.0±0.8), (4.2±0.3), (5.9±1.1) g; (5.3±1.3), (5.9±2.0), (4.5±2.7), (4.3±1.3) g, respectively, which were

  19. Probing the proton channels in subunit N of Complex I from Escherichia coli through intra-subunit cross-linking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tursun, Ablat; Zhu, Shaotong; Vik, Steven B

    2016-12-01

    Respiratory Complex I appears to have 4 sites for proton translocation, which are coupled to the oxidation of NADH and reduction of coenzyme Q. The proton pathways are thought to be made of offset half-channels that connect to the membrane surfaces, and are connected by a horizontal path through the center of the membrane. In this study of the enzyme from Escherichia coli, subunit N, containing one of the sites, was targeted. Pairs of cysteine residues were introduced into neighboring α-helices along the proposed proton pathways. In an effort to constrain conformational changes that might occur during proton translocation, we attempted to form disulfide bonds or methanethiosulfonate bridges between two engineered cysteine residues. Cysteine modification was inferred by the inability of PEG-maleimide to shift the electrophoretic mobility of subunit N, which will occur upon reaction with free sulfhydryl groups. After the cross-linking treatment, NADH oxidase and NADH-driven proton translocation were measured. Ten different pairs of cysteine residues showed evidence of cross-linking. The most significant loss of enzyme activity was seen for residues near the essential Lys 395. This residue is positioned between the proposed proton half-channel to the periplasm and the horizontal connection through subunit N, and is also near the essential Glu 144 of subunit M. The results suggest important conformational changes in this region for the delivery of protons to the periplasm, or for coupling the actions of subunit N to subunit M. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Structures and microfabrics of the Franciscan Complex (California): Inferences on the rheology and kinematics of a subduction channel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krohe, A.; Wassmann, S.; Trepmann, C.; Stoeckhert, B.

    2009-12-01

    The characteristic feature of the Franciscan Subduction Complex (FSC) is a chaotic mélange structure with centimeter- to about one kilometer-sized tectonic blocks composed of metabasalts, floating in a matrix of oceanic meta-sediments or, locally, serpentinites. Investigating map scale structures, microfabrics, and P-T-histories of the FSC, we try to gain information on the mechanical properties of rocks and their influence on the kinematics of material transport in a subduction channel. Structures and microfabrics indicate that metabasalts from the oceanic crust as well as mantle-derived ultramafic rocks (i) underwent fragmentation and sealing under high pore fluid pressure, (ii) remaining internally undeformed, or (iii) deform by dissolution precipitation creep. Importantly, microfabrics which would indicate crystal plastic deformation or dislocation creep are systematically absent. This means that, during the entire P-T history, differential stresses generally remained too low to activate crystal plastic deformation or dislocation creep. Hence the material in the subduction channel is characterized by a low strength, being either limited by brittle failure at high pore fluid pressure, or a Newton viscosity, which is expected for dissolution precipitation creep. We interpret the characteristic mélange structure as to reflect this mechanical state of the system: Brittle failure at quasi-lithostatic fluid pressures down to great depths is recorded in the tectonic blocks by the widespread occurrence of aragonite-bearing veins. This leads to fragmentation into the blocks of variable size and moderate aspect ratios, which behave as rigid inclusions in a flowing matrix with distributed deformation by dissolution precipitation creep. In contrast, a power law rheology characteristic for dislocation creep, would favor strain localization into shear zones at sites of stress concentration. However, such shear zones formed at high-P metamorphic conditions are not

  1. Communication: Determining the structure of the N₂Ar van der Waals complex with laser-based channel-selected Coulomb explosion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chengyin; Wu, Cong; Song, Di; Su, Hongmei; Xie, Xiguo; Li, Min; Deng, Yongkai; Liu, Yunquan; Gong, Qihuang

    2014-04-14

    We experimentally reconstructed the structure of the N2Ar van der Waals complex with the technique of laser-based channel-selected Coulomb explosion imaging. The internuclear distance between the N2 center of mass and the Ar atom, i.e., the length of the van der Waals bond, was determined to be 3.88 Å from the two-body explosion channels. The angle between the van der Waals bond and the N2 principal axis was determined to be 90° from the three-body explosion channels. The reconstructed structure was contrasted with our high level ab initio calculations. The agreement demonstrated the potential application of laser-based Coulomb explosion in imaging transient molecular structure, particularly for floppy van der Waals complexes, whose structures remain difficult to be determined by conventional spectroscopic methods.

  2. Sensory Science Education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Otrel-Cass, Kathrin

    2018-01-01

    little note of the body-mind interactions we have with the material world. Utilizing examples from primary schools, it is argued that a sensory pedagogy in science requires a deliberate sensitization and validation of the senses’ presence and that a sensor pedagogy approach may reveal the unique ways...... in how we all experience the world. Troubling science education pedagogy is therefore also a reconceptualization of who we are and how we make sense of the world and the acceptance that the body-mind is present, imbalanced and complex....

  3. Complex, multilayered azimuthal anisotropy beneath Tibet: evidence for co-existing channel flow and pure-shear crustal thickening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agius, Matthew R.; Lebedev, Sergei

    2017-09-01

    Of the two debated, end-member models for the late-Cenozoic thickening of Tibetan crust, one invokes 'channel flow' (rapid viscous flow of the mid-lower crust, driven by topography-induced pressure gradients and transporting crustal rocks eastward) and the other 'pure shear' (faulting and folding in the upper crust, with viscous shortening in the mid-lower crust). Deep-crustal deformation implied by each model is different and would produce different anisotropic rock fabric. Observations of seismic anisotropy can thus offer a discriminant. We use broad-band phase-velocity curves-each a robust average of tens to hundreds of measurements-to determine azimuthal anisotropy in the entire lithosphere-asthenosphere depth range and constrain its amplitude. Inversions of the differential dispersion from path pairs, region-average inversions and phase-velocity tomography yield mutually consistent results, defining two highly anisotropic layers with different fast-propagation directions within each: the middle crust and the asthenosphere. In the asthenosphere beneath central and eastern Tibet, anisotropy is 2-4 per cent and has an NNE-SSW fast-propagation azimuth, indicating flow probably driven by the NNE-ward, shallow-angle subduction of India. The distribution and complexity of published shear wave splitting measurements can be accounted for by the different anisotropy in the mid-lower crust and asthenosphere. The estimated splitting times that would be accumulated in the crust alone are 0.25-0.8 s; in the upper mantle-0.5-1.2 s, depending on location. In the middle crust (20-45 km depth) beneath southern and central Tibet, azimuthal anisotropy is 3-5 and 4-6 per cent, respectively, and its E-W fast-propagation directions are parallel to the current extension at the surface. The rate of the extension is relatively low, however, whereas the large radial anisotropy observed in the middle crust requires strong alignment of mica crystals, implying large finite strain and

  4. Displaced/re-worked rhodolith deposits infilling parts of a complex Miocene multistorey submarine channel: A case history from the Sassari area (Sardinia, Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murru, Marco; Bassi, Davide; Simone, Lucia

    2015-08-01

    In the Sassari area (north-western Sardinia, Italy), the Miocene Porto Torres sub-basin sequences represent the complex multistorey mixed carbonate-siliciclastic submarine feature called the Sassari Channel. During the late Burdigalian-early Serravallian, repeated terrigenous supplies from uplifted Paleozoic crystalline substrata fed the Sassari Channel system by means of turbidity and locally hyper-concentrated turbidity flows. Shelfal areas were the source of terrigenous clasts, but open shelf rhodalgal/foramol carbonate areas were very productive and largely also contributed to the channel infilling. Re-worked sands and skeletal debris were discontinuously re-sedimented offshore as pure terrigenous, mixed and/or carbonate deposits. Major sediment supply was introduced between the latest Burdigalian and the start of the middle Langhian, during which a large amount of carbonate, mixed and siliciclastic sediments reached the Porto Torres Basin (Sassari Channel I). Contributions from shallow proximal source areas typify the lower intervals (Unit A) in marginal sectors of the channel. Upward, these evolve into autochthonous rhodolith deposits, winnowed by strong currents in relatively shallow well lit settings within a complex network of narrow tidally-controlled channels (Unit D) locally bearing coral assemblages. Conversely, re-sedimented rhodoliths from the Units B and C accumulated under conditions of higher turbidity. In deeper parts of the channel taxonomically diversified rhodoliths point to the mixing of re-deposited skeletal components from different relatively deep bathmetric settings. In the latest early Langhian, major re-sedimentation episodes, resulting in large prograding bodies (Unit D), triggered by repeated regression pulses in a frame of persistent still stand. During these episodes photophile assemblages dwelled in the elevated margin sectors of the channel. A significant latest early Langhian drop in relative sea-level resulted in impressive mass

  5. Channel Nucleoporins Recruit PLK-1 to Nuclear Pore Complexes to Direct Nuclear Envelope Breakdown in C. elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martino, Lisa; Morchoisne-Bolhy, Stéphanie; Cheerambathur, Dhanya K; Van Hove, Lucie; Dumont, Julien; Joly, Nicolas; Desai, Arshad; Doye, Valérie; Pintard, Lionel

    2017-10-23

    In animal cells, nuclear envelope breakdown (NEBD) is required for proper chromosome segregation. Whereas mitotic kinases have been implicated in NEBD, how they coordinate their activity to trigger this event is unclear. Here, we show that both in human cells and Caenorhabditis elegans, the Polo-like kinase 1 (PLK-1) is recruited to the nuclear pore complexes, just prior to NEBD, through its Polo-box domain (PBD). We provide evidence that PLK-1 localization to the nuclear envelope (NE) is required for efficient NEBD. We identify the central channel nucleoporins NPP-1/Nup58, NPP-4/Nup54, and NPP-11/Nup62 as the critical factors anchoring PLK-1 to the NE in C. elegans. In particular, NPP-1, NPP-4, and NPP-11 primed at multiple Polo-docking sites by Cdk1 and PLK-1 itself physically interact with the PLK-1 PBD. We conclude that nucleoporins play an unanticipated regulatory role in NEBD, by recruiting PLK-1 to the NE thereby facilitating phosphorylation of critical downstream targets. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Stimulation of Slack K+ Channels Alters Mass at the Plasma Membrane by Triggering Dissociation of a Phosphatase-Regulatory Complex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew R. Fleming

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Human mutations in the cytoplasmic C-terminal domain of Slack sodium-activated potassium (KNa channels result in childhood epilepsy with severe intellectual disability. Slack currents can be increased by pharmacological activators or by phosphorylation of a Slack C-terminal residue by protein kinase C. Using an optical biosensor assay, we find that Slack channel stimulation in neurons or transfected cells produces loss of mass near the plasma membrane. Slack mutants associated with intellectual disability fail to trigger any change in mass. The loss of mass results from the dissociation of the protein phosphatase 1 (PP1 targeting protein, Phactr-1, from the channel. Phactr1 dissociation is specific to wild-type Slack channels and is not observed when related potassium channels are stimulated. Our findings suggest that Slack channels are coupled to cytoplasmic signaling pathways and that dysregulation of this coupling may trigger the aberrant intellectual development associated with specific childhood epilepsies.

  7. N-terminal arginines modulate plasma-membrane localization of Kv7.1/KCNE1 channel complexes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zenawit Girmatsion

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: The slow delayed rectifier current (I(Ks is important for cardiac action potential termination. The underlying channel is composed of Kv7.1 α-subunits and KCNE1 β-subunits. While most evidence suggests a role of KCNE1 transmembrane domain and C-terminus for the interaction, the N-terminal KCNE1 polymorphism 38G is associated with reduced I(Ks and atrial fibrillation (a human arrhythmia. Structure-function relationship of the KCNE1 N-terminus for I(Ks modulation is poorly understood and was subject of this study. METHODS: We studied N-terminal KCNE1 constructs disrupting structurally important positively charged amino-acids (arginines at positions 32, 33, 36 as well as KCNE1 constructs that modify position 38 including an N-terminal truncation mutation. Experimental procedures included molecular cloning, patch-clamp recording, protein biochemistry, real-time-PCR and confocal microscopy. RESULTS: All KCNE1 constructs physically interacted with Kv7.1. I(Ks resulting from co-expression of Kv7.1 with non-atrial fibrillation '38S' was greater than with any other construct. Ionic currents resulting from co-transfection of a KCNE1 mutant with arginine substitutions ('38G-3xA' were comparable to currents evoked from cells transfected with an N-terminally truncated KCNE1-construct ('Δ1-38'. Western-blots from plasma-membrane preparations and confocal images consistently showed a greater amount of Kv7.1 protein at the plasma-membrane in cells co-transfected with the non-atrial fibrillation KCNE1-38S than with any other construct. CONCLUSIONS: The results of our study indicate that N-terminal arginines in positions 32, 33, 36 of KCNE1 are important for reconstitution of I(Ks. Furthermore, our results hint towards a role of these N-terminal amino-acids in membrane representation of the delayed rectifier channel complex.

  8. Erosion and deposition by supercritical density flows during channel avulsion and backfilling: Field examples from coarse-grained deepwater channel-levée complexes (Sandino Forearc Basin, southern Central America)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Jörg; Brandes, Christian; Winsemann, Jutta

    2017-03-01

    Erosion and deposition by supercritical density flows can strongly impact the facies distribution and architecture of submarine fans. Field examples from coarse-grained channel-levée complexes from the Sandino Forearc Basin (southern Central America) show that cyclic-step and antidune deposits represent common sedimentary facies of these depositional systems and relate to the different stages of avulsion, bypass, levée construction and channel backfilling. During channel avulsion, large-scale scour-fill complexes (18 to 29 m deep, 18 to 25 m wide, 60 to > 120 m long) were incised by supercritical density flows. The multi-storey infill of the large-scale scour-fill complexes comprises amalgamated massive, normally coarse-tail graded or widely spaced subhorizontally stratified conglomerates and pebbly sandstones, interpreted as deposits of the hydraulic-jump zone of cyclic steps. The large-scale scour-fill complexes can be distinguished from small-scale channel fills based on the preservation of a steep upper margin and a coarse-grained infill comprising mainly amalgamated hydraulic-jump zone deposits. Channel fills include repeated successions deposited by cyclic steps with superimposed antidunes. The deposits of the hydraulic-jump zone of cyclic steps comprise regularly spaced scours (0.2 to 2.6 m deep, 0.8 to 23 m long) infilled by intraclast-rich conglomerates or pebbly sandstones, displaying normal coarse-tail grading or backsets. These deposits are laterally and vertically associated with subhorizontally stratified, low-angle cross-stratified or sinusoidally stratified sandstones and pebbly sandstones, which were deposited by antidunes on the stoss side of the cyclic steps during flow re-acceleration. The field examples indicate that so-called spaced stratified deposits may commonly represent antidune deposits with varying stratification styles controlled by the aggradation rate, grain-size distribution and amalgamation. The deposits of small-scale cyclic

  9. Sensing with Ion Channels

    CERN Document Server

    Martinac, Boris

    2008-01-01

    All living cells are able to detect and translate environmental stimuli into biologically meaningful signals. Sensations of touch, hearing, sight, taste, smell or pain are essential to the survival of all living organisms. The importance of sensory input for the existence of life thus justifies the effort made to understand its molecular origins. Sensing with Ion Channels focuses on ion channels as key molecules enabling biological systems to sense and process the physical and chemical stimuli that act upon cells in their living environment. Its aim is to serve as a reference to ion channel specialists and as a source of new information to non specialists who want to learn about the structural and functional diversity of ion channels and their role in sensory physiology.

  10. Performance and Complexity Analysis of Blind FIR Channel Identification Algorithms Based on Deterministic Maximum Likelihood in SIMO Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    De Carvalho, Elisabeth; Omar, Samir; Slock, Dirk

    2013-01-01

    We analyze two algorithms that have been introduced previously for Deterministic Maximum Likelihood (DML) blind estimation of multiple FIR channels. The first one is a modification of the Iterative Quadratic ML (IQML) algorithm. IQML gives biased estimates of the channel and performs poorly at lo...

  11. Ageing and Gastrointestinal Sensory Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keating, Christopher; Grundy, David

    Over the past few decades a combination of electrophysiological, morphological and molecular approaches has enabled the different populations of vagal and spinal afferents that innervate the bowel to be characterized. The sensitivity of these afferents is determined by their location in the gut wall, their relationship with other cells and structures and the receptors and ion channels that they express on their nerve terminals. An important feature of this innervation is that it is upregulated during injury, inflammation and ischaemia through changes in receptors and ion channels that determine excitability and sensitivity. In recent studies we have sought to identify how sensory mechanisms are influenced as part of the normal ageing process. Attenuated signaling was evident in different gastrointestinal afferent subpopulations conveying low and high threshold mechanosensory information and there was impairment in the ability of sensory neurons to sensitize in response to chemical mediators such as 5-HT. These sensory deficits may contribute to altered bowel habits with age and the prevalence of incontinence in the elderly.

  12. Malaria Parasite CLAG3, a Protein Linked to Nutrient Channels, Participates in High Molecular Weight Membrane-Associated Complexes in the Infected Erythrocyte.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kayvan Zainabadi

    Full Text Available Malaria infected erythrocytes show increased permeability to a number of solutes important for parasite growth as mediated by the Plasmodial Surface Anion Channel (PSAC. The P. falciparum clag3 genes have recently been identified as key determinants of PSAC, though exactly how they contribute to channel function and whether additional host/parasite proteins are required remain unknown. To begin to answer these questions, I have taken a biochemical approach. Here I have used an epitope-tagged CLAG3 parasite to perform co-immunoprecipitation experiments using membrane fractions of infected erythrocytes. Native PAGE and mass spectrometry studies reveal that CLAG3 participate in at least three different high molecular weight complexes: a ~720kDa complex consisting of CLAG3, RHOPH2 and RHOPH3; a ~620kDa complex consisting of CLAG3 and RHOPH2; and a ~480kDa complex composed solely of CLAG3. Importantly, these complexes can be found throughout the parasite lifecycle but are absent in untransfected controls. Extracellular biotin labeling and protease susceptibility studies localize the 480kDa complex to the erythrocyte membrane. This complex, likely composed of a homo-oligomer of 160kDa CLAG3, may represent a functional subunit, possibly the pore, of PSAC.

  13. Sub-cellular distribution and translocation of TRP channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toro, Carlos A; Arias, Luis A; Brauchi, Sebastian

    2011-01-01

    Cellular electrical activity is the result of a highly complex processes that involve the activation of ion channel proteins. Ion channels make pores on cell membranes that rapidly transit between conductive and non-conductive states, allowing different ions to flow down their electrochemical gradients across cell membranes. In the case of neuronal cells, ion channel activity orchestrates action potentials traveling through axons, enabling electrical communication between cells in distant parts of the body. Somatic sensation -our ability to feel touch, temperature and noxious stimuli- require ion channels able to sense and respond to our peripheral environment. Sensory integration involves the summing of various environmental cues and their conversion into electrical signals. Members of the Transient Receptor Potential (TRP) family of ion channels have emerged as important mediators of both cellular sensing and sensory integration. The regulation of the spatial and temporal distribution of membrane receptors is recognized as an important mechanism for controlling the magnitude of the cellular response and the time scale on which cellular signaling occurs. Several studies have shown that this mechanism is also used by TRP channels to modulate cellular response and ultimately fulfill their physiological function as sensors. However, the inner-working of this mode of control for TRP channels remains poorly understood. The question of whether TRPs intrinsically regulate their own vesicular trafficking or weather the dynamic regulation of TRP channel residence on the cell surface is caused by extrinsic changes in the rates of vesicle insertion or retrieval remain open. This review will examine the evidence that sub-cellular redistribution of TRP channels plays an important role in regulating their activity and explore the mechanisms that control the trafficking of vesicles containing TRP channels.

  14. Complexes of Peptide Blockers with Kv1.6 Pore Domain: Molecular Modeling and Studies with KcsA-Kv1.6 Channel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nekrasova, O V; Volyntseva, A D; Kudryashova, K S; Novoseletsky, V N; Lyapina, E A; Illarionova, A V; Yakimov, S A; Korolkova, Yu V; Shaitan, K V; Kirpichnikov, M P; Feofanov, A V

    2017-06-01

    Potassium voltage-gated Kv1.6 channel, which is distributed primarily in neurons of central and peripheral nervous systems, is of significant physiological importance. To date, several high-affinity Kv1.6-channel blockers are known, but the lack of selective ones among them hampers the studies of tissue localization and functioning of Kv1.6 channels. Here we present an approach to advanced understanding of interactions of peptide toxin blockers with a Kv1.6 pore. It combines molecular modeling studies and an application of a new bioengineering system based on a KcsA-Kv1.6 hybrid channel for the quantitative fluorescent analysis of blocker-channel interactions. Using this system we demonstrate that peptide toxins agitoxin 2, kaliotoxin1 and OSK1 have similar high affinity to the extracellular vestibule of the K+-conducting pore of Kv1.6, hetlaxin is a low-affinity ligand, whereas margatoxin and scyllatoxin do not bind to Kv1.6 pore. Binding of toxins to Kv1.6 pore has considerable inverse dependence on the ionic strength. Model structures of KcsA-Kv1.6 and Kv1.6 complexes with agitoxin 2, kaliotoxin 1 and OSK1 were obtained using homology modeling and molecular dynamics simulation. Interaction interfaces, which are formed by 15-19 toxin residues and 10 channel residues, are described and compared. Specific sites of Kv1.6 pore recognition are identified for targeting of peptide blockers. Analysis of interactions between agitoxin 2 derivatives with point mutations (S7K, S11G, L19S, R31G) and KcsA-Kv1.6 confirms reliability of the calculated complex structure.

  15. Hierarchical sparse coding in the sensory system of Caenorhabditis elegans

    OpenAIRE

    Zaslaver, Alon; Liani, Idan; Shtangel, Oshrat; Ginzburg, Shira; Yee, Lisa; Sternberg, Paul W.

    2015-01-01

    Animals with compact sensory systems face an encoding problem where a small number of sensory neurons are required to encode information about its surrounding complex environment. Using Caenorhabditis elegans worms as a model, we ask how chemical stimuli are encoded by a small and highly connected sensory system. We first generated a comprehensive library of transgenic worms where each animal expresses a genetically encoded calcium indicator in individual sensory neurons....

  16. Complex interactive effects of ripening degree, malaxation duration and temperature on Oblica cv. virgin olive oil phenols, volatiles and sensory quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukić, Igor; Žanetić, Mirella; Jukić Špika, Maja; Lukić, Marina; Koprivnjak, Olivera; Brkić Bubola, Karolina

    2017-10-01

    The interactive effects of ripening degree, malaxation duration and temperature on Oblica cv. (Olea europaea L.) virgin olive oil phenols, volatiles, and sensory quality were investigated. Olives were picked at three ripening degrees with International Olive Council indices of 0.68, 2.48 and 4.10, and processed by malaxation at 22 and 30°C, and at both temperatures for 30 and 60min. Ripening exhibited the strongest effect, and malaxation duration the weakest. Phenols were generally found to decrease during ripening; however 3,4-DHPEA-EDA and p-HPEA-EDA increased. Similar behaviour was observed for (E)-2-hexenal. Higher malaxation temperature induced an increase in particular important phenols and C6 alcohols, while C6 aldehydes mostly decreased. Interactions between the factors were established, mostly between ripening degree and malaxation temperature: the effect of the latter was most pronounced for ripe olives, especially for 3,4-DHPEA-EDA, p-HPEA-EDA and C6 volatiles. Sensory attributes were generally in agreement with the chemical composition. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Defining specificity determinants of cGMP mediated gustatory sensory transduction in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Heidi K; Luo, Linjiao; O'Halloran, Damien; Guo, Dagang; Huang, Xin-Yun; Samuel, Aravinthan D T; Hobert, Oliver

    2013-08-01

    Cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) is a key secondary messenger used in signal transduction in various types of sensory neurons. The importance of cGMP in the ASE gustatory receptor neurons of the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans was deduced by the observation that multiple receptor-type guanylyl cyclases (rGCs), encoded by the gcy genes, and two presently known cyclic nucleotide-gated ion channel subunits, encoded by the tax-2 and tax-4 genes, are essential for ASE-mediated gustatory behavior. We describe here specific mechanistic features of cGMP-mediated signal transduction in the ASE neurons. First, we assess the specificity of the sensory functions of individual rGC proteins. We have previously shown that multiple rGC proteins are expressed in a left/right asymmetric manner in the functionally lateralized ASE neurons and are required to sense distinct salt cues. Through domain swap experiments among three different rGC proteins, we show here that the specificity of individual rGC proteins lies in their extracellular domains and not in their intracellular, signal-transducing domains. Furthermore, we find that rGC proteins are also sufficient to confer salt sensory responses to other neurons. Both findings support the hypothesis that rGC proteins are salt receptor proteins. Second, we identify a novel, likely downstream effector of the rGC proteins in gustatory signal transduction, a previously uncharacterized cyclic nucleotide-gated (CNG) ion channel, encoded by the che-6 locus. che-6 mutants show defects in gustatory sensory transduction that are similar to defects observed in animals lacking the tax-2 and tax-4 CNG channels. In contrast, thermosensory signal transduction, which also requires tax-2 and tax-4, does not require che-6, but requires another CNG, cng-3. We propose that CHE-6 may form together with two other CNG subunits, TAX-2 and TAX-4, a gustatory neuron-specific heteromeric CNG channel complex.

  18. A Low-Complexity Time-Domain MMSE Channel Estimator for Space-Time/Frequency Block-Coded OFDM Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Çırpan HakanAli

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Focusing on transmit diversity orthogonal frequency-division multiplexing (OFDM transmission through frequency-selective channels, this paper pursues a channel estimation approach in time domain for both space-frequency OFDM (SF-OFDM and space-time OFDM (ST-OFDM systems based on AR channel modelling. The paper proposes a computationally efficient, pilot-aided linear minimum mean-square-error (MMSE time-domain channel estimation algorithm for OFDM systems with transmitter diversity in unknown wireless fading channels. The proposed approach employs a convenient representation of the channel impulse responses based on the Karhunen-Loeve (KL orthogonal expansion and finds MMSE estimates of the uncorrelated KL series expansion coefficients. Based on such an expansion, no matrix inversion is required in the proposed MMSE estimator. Subsequently, optimal rank reduction is applied to obtain significant taps resulting in a smaller computational load on the proposed estimation algorithm. The performance of the proposed approach is studied through the analytical results and computer simulations. In order to explore the performance, the closed-form expression for the average symbol error rate (SER probability is derived for the maximum ratio receive combiner (MRRC. We then consider the stochastic Cramer-Rao lower bound(CRLB and derive the closed-form expression for the random KL coefficients, and consequently exploit the performance of the MMSE channel estimator based on the evaluation of minimum Bayesian MSE. We also analyze the effect of a modelling mismatch on the estimator performance. Simulation results confirm our theoretical analysis and illustrate that the proposed algorithms are capable of tracking fast fading and improving overall performance.

  19. Study on Complex Advertising and Price Competition Dual-Channel Supply Chain Models Considering the Overconfidence Manufacturer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junhai Ma

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to explore how the manufacturers make decisions when two manufacturers compete for local advertising investment, we examine two noncooperative models (Stackelberg and Nash game and propose a cost sharing contract to investigate channel competition of dual-channel supply chain. The dominant power between manufacturer and retailer and the effect of channel competition strategy on price are mainly discussed. In addition, dynamic system concepts are integrated into Stackelberg game model based on bounded rational mechanism. We analyze the local stability and find that the stability level of the dual-channel supply chains depends crucially on the price adjustment speed, the level of demand uncertainty, and the risk preference. The outcome shows that, under the master-slave game model, the profits of manufacturers are greater than that under decentralized decision-making mode, and the profits of retailers under master-slave game model are less than that under decentralized decision-making mode. The profits of manufacturers and retailers in the stable region are greater than that in unstable region. Finally, the delay feedback control method is utilized and effectively controls the chaotic behavior of dual-channel supply chain model. The results have theoretical and practical significance for the game models in terms of advertising and price competition.

  20. Report sensory analyses veal

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veldman, M.; Schelvis-Smit, A.A.M.

    2005-01-01

    On behalf of a client of Animal Sciences Group, different varieties of veal were analyzed by both instrumental and sensory analyses. The sensory evaluation was performed with a sensory analytical panel in the period of 13th of May and 31st of May, 2005. The three varieties of veal were: young bull,

  1. Stimuli of sensory-motor nerves terminate arterial contractile effects of endothelin-1 by CGRP and dissociation of ET-1/ET(A)-receptor complexes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meens, Merlijn J P M T; Compeer, Matthijs G; Hackeng, Tilman M

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Endothelin-1 (ET-1), a long-acting paracrine mediator, is implicated in cardiovascular diseases but clinical trials with ET-receptor antagonists were not successful in some areas. We tested whether the quasi-irreversible receptor-binding of ET-1 (i) limits reversing effects of the ant...... at an antagonist-insensitive site of the receptor and (ii) are selectively terminated by endogenously released CGRP. Hence, natural stimuli of sensory-motor nerves that stimulate release of endogenous CGRP can be considered for therapy of diseases involving ET-1.......BACKGROUND: Endothelin-1 (ET-1), a long-acting paracrine mediator, is implicated in cardiovascular diseases but clinical trials with ET-receptor antagonists were not successful in some areas. We tested whether the quasi-irreversible receptor-binding of ET-1 (i) limits reversing effects...

  2. The Chemical Background for Sensory Quality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Shujuan

    ; detecting changes of volatiles as a result of production errors in chocolate production, and monitoring aroma release provide useful information to food sensory quality control. For each application, both techniques were faced with challenges that need to be handled in different ways. Due to the complex......In the food industry, high sensory quality and stability of products are crucial factors for consumer satisfaction and market shares. Sensory quality is normally being evaluated by two major approaches: instrumental (volatile and nonvolatile compounds) approach and sensory approach by trained...... or consumer panels. Sensory evaluation is a primary measurement for providing immediate information of human perception on the products. Instrumental methods give objective analysis of compounds that potentially contribute to food flavour. These two kinds of analysis, basically, give different types...

  3. Sensory percepts induced by microwire array and DBS microstimulation in human sensory thalamus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swan, Brandon D; Gasperson, Lynne B; Krucoff, Max O; Grill, Warren M; Turner, Dennis A

    2017-10-27

    Microstimulation in human sensory thalamus (ventrocaudal, VC) results in focal sensory percepts in the hand and arm which may provide an alternative target site (to somatosensory cortex) for the input of prosthetic sensory information. Sensory feedback to facilitate motor function may require simultaneous or timed responses across separate digits to recreate perceptions of slip as well as encoding of intensity variations in pressure or touch. To determine the feasibility of evoking sensory percepts on separate digits with variable intensity through either a microwire array or deep brain stimulation (DBS) electrode, recreating "natural" and scalable percepts relating to the arm and hand. We compared microstimulation within ventrocaudal sensory thalamus through either a 16-channel microwire array (∼400 kΩ per channel) or a 4-channel DBS electrode (∼1.2 kΩ per contact) for percept location, size, intensity, and quality sensation, during thalamic DBS electrode placement in patients with essential tremor. Percepts in small hand or finger regions were evoked by microstimulation through individual microwires and in 5/6 patients sensation on different digits could be perceived from stimulation through separate microwires. Microstimulation through DBS electrode contacts evoked sensations over larger areas in 5/5 patients, and the apparent intensity of the perceived response could be modulated with stimulation amplitude. The perceived naturalness of the sensation depended both on the pattern of stimulation as well as intensity of the stimulation. Producing consistent evoked perceptions across separate digits within sensory thalamus is a feasible concept and a compact alternative to somatosensory cortex microstimulation for prosthetic sensory feedback. This approach will require a multi-element low impedance electrode with a sufficient stimulation range to evoke variable intensities of perception and a predictable spread of contacts to engage separate digits

  4. N-type calcium channel/syntaxin/SNAP-25 complex probed by antibodies to II-III intracellular loop of the {alpha}{sub 1B} subunit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vance, C.L.; Begg, C.M.; Lee, W.-L.; Dubel, S.J. [Department of Physiology and Biophysics, Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine, 10900 Euclid Avenue Cleveland, OH (United States); Copeland, T.D. [ABL-Basic Research Program, NCI-Frederick Cancer Research and Development Center, Frederick, MD (United States); Soennichsen, F.D.; McEnery, M.W. [Department of Physiology and Biophysics, Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine, 10900 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, OH (United States)

    1999-02-22

    Neuronal voltage-dependent calcium channels are integral components of cellular excitation and neurosecretion. In addition to mediating the entry of calcium across the plasma membrane, both N-type and P/Q-type voltage-dependent calcium channels have been shown to form stable complexes with synaptic vesicle and presynaptic membrane proteins, indicating a structural role for the voltage-dependent calcium channels in secretion. Recently, detailed structural analyses of N-type calcium channels have identified residues amino acids 718-963 as the site in the rat {alpha}{sub 1B} subunit that mediates binding to syntaxin, synaptosome-associated protein of 25andpuncsp; omitted000 mol. wt and synaptotagmin [Sheng et al. (1996) Nature 379, 451-454]. The purpose of this study was to employ site-directed antibodies to target domains within and outside of the interaction site on the rat {alpha}{sub 1B} to probe potential binding sites for syntaxin/SNAP-25/synaptotagmin.Our results demonstrate that both antibodies employed in this study have access to their epitopes on the {alpha}{sub 1B} as evidenced by equivalent immunoprecipitation of native [{sup 125}I]omega-conotoxin GVIA-labeled {alpha}{sub 1B} protein from CHAPS-solubilized preparations. The N-type voltage-dependent calcium channel immunoprecipitated by Ab CW14, the antibody directed to a domain outside of the synprint site, is associated with syntaxin and SNAP-25 with the recovery of these proteins, increasing in parallel to the recovery of {alpha}{sub 1B}. However, when we used the antibody raised to an epitope within the synprint site (Ab CW8) to immunoprecipitate N-type calcium channels, the {alpha}{sub 1B} was depleted of more than 65% of syntaxin and 80% of SNAP-25 when compared to the recovery of these proteins using Ab CW14. This is the first report of a defined epitope on the {alpha}{sub 1B} subunit II-III loop (amino acids 863-875) whose perturbation by a site-directed antibody influences the dissociation of SNAP

  5. Crocodylians evolved scattered multi-sensory micro-organs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di-Poï, Nicolas; Milinkovitch, Michel C

    2013-07-02

    During their evolution towards a complete life cycle on land, stem reptiles developed both an impermeable multi-layered keratinized epidermis and skin appendages (scales) providing mechanical, thermal, and chemical protection. Previous studies have demonstrated that, despite the presence of a particularly armored skin, crocodylians have exquisite mechanosensory abilities thanks to the presence of small integumentary sensory organs (ISOs) distributed on postcranial and/or cranial scales. Here, we analyze and compare the structure, innervation, embryonic morphogenesis and sensory functions of postcranial, cranial, and lingual sensory organs of the Nile crocodile (Crocodylus niloticus) and the spectacled caiman (Caiman crocodilus). Our molecular analyses indicate that sensory neurons of crocodylian ISOs express a large repertoire of transduction channels involved in mechano-, thermo-, and chemosensory functions, and our electrophysiological analyses confirm that each ISO exhibits a combined sensitivity to mechanical, thermal and pH stimuli (but not hyper-osmotic salinity), making them remarkable multi-sensorial micro-organs with no equivalent in the sensory systems of other vertebrate lineages. We also show that ISOs all exhibit similar morphologies and modes of development, despite forming at different stages of scale morphogenesis across the body. The ancestral vertebrate diffused sensory system of the skin was transformed in the crocodylian lineages into an array of discrete multi-sensory micro-organs innervated by multiple pools of sensory neurons. This discretization of skin sensory expression sites is unique among vertebrates and allowed crocodylians to develop a highly-armored, but very sensitive, skin.

  6. Comparative Performance of Complex-Valued B-Spline and Polynomial Models Applied to Iterative Frequency-Domain Decision Feedback Equalization of Hammerstein Channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Sheng; Hong, Xia; Khalaf, Emad F; Alsaadi, Fuad E; Harris, Chris J

    2017-12-01

    Complex-valued (CV) B-spline neural network approach offers a highly effective means for identifying and inverting practical Hammerstein systems. Compared with its conventional CV polynomial-based counterpart, a CV B-spline neural network has superior performance in identifying and inverting CV Hammerstein systems, while imposing a similar complexity. This paper reviews the optimality of the CV B-spline neural network approach. Advantages of B-spline neural network approach as compared with the polynomial based modeling approach are extensively discussed, and the effectiveness of the CV neural network-based approach is demonstrated in a real-world application. More specifically, we evaluate the comparative performance of the CV B-spline and polynomial-based approaches for the nonlinear iterative frequency-domain decision feedback equalization (NIFDDFE) of single-carrier Hammerstein channels. Our results confirm the superior performance of the CV B-spline-based NIFDDFE over its CV polynomial-based counterpart.

  7. Sensory cortical response to uncertainty and low salience during recognition of affective cues in musical intervals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cross, Ian; Stamatakis, Emmanuel Andreas; Rohrmeier, Martin

    2017-01-01

    Previous neuroimaging studies have shown an increased sensory cortical response (i.e., heightened weight on sensory evidence) under higher levels of predictive uncertainty. The signal enhancement theory proposes that attention improves the quality of the stimulus representation, and therefore reduces uncertainty by increasing the gain of the sensory signal. The present study employed functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to investigate the neural correlates for ambiguous valence inferences signaled by auditory information within an emotion recognition paradigm. Participants categorized sound stimuli of three distinct levels of consonance/dissonance controlled by interval content. Separate behavioural and neuroscientific experiments were conducted. Behavioural results revealed that, compared with the consonance condition (perfect fourths, fifths and octaves) and the strong dissonance condition (minor/major seconds and tritones), the intermediate dissonance condition (minor thirds) was the most ambiguous, least salient and more cognitively demanding category (slowest reaction times). The neuroscientific findings were consistent with a heightened weight on sensory evidence whilst participants were evaluating intermediate dissonances, which was reflected in an increased neural response of the right Heschl’s gyrus. The results support previous studies that have observed enhanced precision of sensory evidence whilst participants attempted to represent and respond to higher degrees of uncertainty, and converge with evidence showing preferential processing of complex spectral information in the right primary auditory cortex. These findings are discussed with respect to music-theoretical concepts and recent Bayesian models of perception, which have proposed that attention may heighten the weight of information coming from sensory channels to stimulate learning about unknown predictive relationships. PMID:28422990

  8. Sensory cortical response to uncertainty and low salience during recognition of affective cues in musical intervals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Bravo

    Full Text Available Previous neuroimaging studies have shown an increased sensory cortical response (i.e., heightened weight on sensory evidence under higher levels of predictive uncertainty. The signal enhancement theory proposes that attention improves the quality of the stimulus representation, and therefore reduces uncertainty by increasing the gain of the sensory signal. The present study employed functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI to investigate the neural correlates for ambiguous valence inferences signaled by auditory information within an emotion recognition paradigm. Participants categorized sound stimuli of three distinct levels of consonance/dissonance controlled by interval content. Separate behavioural and neuroscientific experiments were conducted. Behavioural results revealed that, compared with the consonance condition (perfect fourths, fifths and octaves and the strong dissonance condition (minor/major seconds and tritones, the intermediate dissonance condition (minor thirds was the most ambiguous, least salient and more cognitively demanding category (slowest reaction times. The neuroscientific findings were consistent with a heightened weight on sensory evidence whilst participants were evaluating intermediate dissonances, which was reflected in an increased neural response of the right Heschl's gyrus. The results support previous studies that have observed enhanced precision of sensory evidence whilst participants attempted to represent and respond to higher degrees of uncertainty, and converge with evidence showing preferential processing of complex spectral information in the right primary auditory cortex. These findings are discussed with respect to music-theoretical concepts and recent Bayesian models of perception, which have proposed that attention may heighten the weight of information coming from sensory channels to stimulate learning about unknown predictive relationships.

  9. Mechanosensory hair cells express two molecularly distinct mechanotransduction channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Zizhen; Grillet, Nicolas; Zhao, Bo; Cunningham, Christopher; Harkins-Perry, Sarah; Coste, Bertrand; Ranade, Sanjeev; Zebarjadi, Navid; Beurg, Maryline; Fettiplace, Robert; Patapoutian, Ardem; Mueller, Ulrich

    2017-01-01

    Auditory hair cells contain mechanotransduction channels that rapidly open in response to sound-induced vibrations. We report here that auditory hair cells contain two molecularly distinct mechanotransduction channels. One ion channel is activated by sound and is responsible for sensory transduction. This sensory transduction channel is expressed in hair cell stereocilia, and previous studies show that its activity is affected by mutations in the genes encoding the transmembrane proteins TMHS, TMIE, TMC1 and TMC2. We show here that the second ion channel is expressed at the apical surface of hair cells and that it contains the Piezo2 protein. The activity of the Piezo2-dependent channel is controlled by the intracellular Ca(2+) concentration and can be recorded following disruption of the sensory transduction machinery or more generally by disruption of the sensory epithelium. We thus conclude that hair cells express two molecularly and functionally distinct mechanotransduction channels with different subcellular distributions.

  10. Integration of sensory force feedback is disturbed in CRPS-related dystonia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Winfred Mugge

    Full Text Available Complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS is characterized by pain and disturbed blood flow, temperature regulation and motor control. Approximately 25% of cases develop fixed dystonia. The origin of this movement disorder is poorly understood, although recent insights suggest involvement of disturbed force feedback. Assessment of sensorimotor integration may provide insight into the pathophysiology of fixed dystonia. Sensory weighting is the process of integrating and weighting sensory feedback channels in the central nervous system to improve the state estimate. It was hypothesized that patients with CRPS-related dystonia bias sensory weighting of force and position toward position due to the unreliability of force feedback. The current study provides experimental evidence for dysfunctional sensory integration in fixed dystonia, showing that CRPS-patients with fixed dystonia weight force and position feedback differently than controls do. The study shows reduced force feedback weights in CRPS-patients with fixed dystonia, making it the first to demonstrate disturbed integration of force feedback in fixed dystonia, an important step towards understanding the pathophysiology of fixed dystonia.

  11. Integration of sensory force feedback is disturbed in CRPS-related dystonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mugge, Winfred; van der Helm, Frans C T; Schouten, Alfred C

    2013-01-01

    Complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) is characterized by pain and disturbed blood flow, temperature regulation and motor control. Approximately 25% of cases develop fixed dystonia. The origin of this movement disorder is poorly understood, although recent insights suggest involvement of disturbed force feedback. Assessment of sensorimotor integration may provide insight into the pathophysiology of fixed dystonia. Sensory weighting is the process of integrating and weighting sensory feedback channels in the central nervous system to improve the state estimate. It was hypothesized that patients with CRPS-related dystonia bias sensory weighting of force and position toward position due to the unreliability of force feedback. The current study provides experimental evidence for dysfunctional sensory integration in fixed dystonia, showing that CRPS-patients with fixed dystonia weight force and position feedback differently than controls do. The study shows reduced force feedback weights in CRPS-patients with fixed dystonia, making it the first to demonstrate disturbed integration of force feedback in fixed dystonia, an important step towards understanding the pathophysiology of fixed dystonia.

  12. UNCOMMON SENSORY METHODOLOGIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimír Vietoris

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Sensory science is the young but the rapidly developing field of the food industry. Actually, the great emphasis is given to the production of rapid techniques of data collection, the difference between consumers and trained panel is obscured and the role of sensory methodologists is to prepare the ways for evaluation, by which a lay panel (consumers can achieve identical results as a trained panel. Currently, there are several conventional methods of sensory evaluation of food (ISO standards, but more sensory laboratories are developing methodologies that are not strict enough in the selection of evaluators, their mechanism is easily understandable and the results are easily interpretable. This paper deals with mapping of marginal methods used in sensory evaluation of food (new types of profiles, CATA, TDS, napping.

  13. Sensory correlations in autism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kern, Janet K; Trivedi, Madhukar H; Grannemann, Bruce D; Garver, Carolyn R; Johnson, Danny G; Andrews, Alonzo A; Savla, Jayshree S; Mehta, Jyutika A; Schroeder, Jennifer L

    2007-03-01

    This study examined the relationship between auditory, visual, touch, and oral sensory dysfunction in autism and their relationship to multisensory dysfunction and severity of autism. The Sensory Profile was completed on 104 persons with a diagnosis of autism, 3 to 56 years of age. Analysis showed a significant correlation between the different processing modalities using total scores. Analysis also showed a significant correlation between processing modalities for both high and low thresholds, with the exception that auditory high threshold processing did not correlate with oral low threshold or touch low threshold processing. Examination of the different age groups suggests that sensory disturbance correlates with severity of autism in children, but not in adolescents and adults. Evidence from this study suggests that: all the main modalities and multisensory processing appear to be affected; sensory processing dysfunction in autism is global in nature; and sensory processing problems need to be considered part of the disorder.

  14. Accessibility and sensory experiences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ryhl, Camilla

    2010-01-01

    This article introduces a new design concept; sensory accessibility. While acknowledging the importance of sensory experiences in architectural quality, as well as the importance of accommodating user needs the concept combines three equally important factors; architecture, the senses...... and accessibility. Sensory accessibility accommodates aspects of a sensory disability and describes architectural design requirements needed to ensure access to architectural experiences. In the context of architecture accessibility has become a design concept of its own. It is generally described as ensuring...... physical access to the built environment by accommodating physical disabilities. While the existing concept of accessibility ensures the physical access of everyone to a given space, sensory accessibility ensures the choice of everyone to stay and be able to participate and experience....

  15. Preparation and preliminary biological evaluation of radiogallium-labeled DTPA-amlodipine complex for possible L-type calcium channel imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Firuzyar, Tahereh; Shafiee-Ardestani, Mehdi; Khalaj, Ali [Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of). Faculty of Pharmacy; Jalilian, Amir R.; Fazaeli, Yousef; Aboudzadeh, Mohammad Reza [Nuclear Science and Technology Research Institute (NSTRI), Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of). Radiopharmacy Research Group

    2014-07-01

    A DTPA-conjugated amlodipine analog (DTPA-AMLO) 3, was prepared for possible voltage gated calcium channel imaging after radiolabeling with Ga-67. [{sup 67}Ga]-DTPA-AMLO complex was prepared starting [{sup 67}Ga]gallium chloride and DTPA-AMLO in 60-90 min at 50-60 C in phosphate buffer. The partition co-efficient and stability of the tracer was determined in final solution (25 C) and presence of human serum (37 C) up to 24 h. The biodistribution of the labeled compound in wild-type rats were determined up to 72 h using organ counting and SPECT. The radiolabled complex was prepared in high radiochemical purity (>96%, RTLC and >98% HPLC) and significant specific activity (7-10 GBq/mmol). The log P for the complex was calculated as -0.594, consistent with a water soluble complex. The tracer is mostly washed out through kidneys which were in full compliance with the amlodipine metabolism and imaging studies demonstrated the same behavior. The tracer uptake in organs with smooth muscles was observed in stomach, colon as well as intestine.

  16. Dual-channel polarization holography: a technique for recording two complex amplitude components of a vector wave.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barada, Daisuke; Ochiai, Takanori; Fukuda, Takashi; Kawata, Shigeo; Kuroda, Kazuo; Yatagai, Toyohiko

    2012-11-01

    In this Letter, the principle of polarization holography for recording an arbitrary vector wave on a thin polarization-sensitive recording medium is proposed. It is analytically shown that the complex amplitudes of p- and s-polarization components are simultaneously recorded and independently reconstructed by using an s-polarized reference beam. The characteristics are experimentally verified.

  17. Nontraditional π Gelators Based on β-Iminoenolate and Their Difluoroboron Complexes: Effect of Halogens on Gelation and Their Fluorescent Sensory Properties Towards Acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Zhu; Sun, Jingbo; Zhang, Zhenqi; Yang, Hao; Xue, Pengchong; Lu, Ran

    2017-02-03

    We have synthesized a series of new β-iminoenolates and their corresponding difluoroboron complexes without any traditional gelation moieties, and some of them were able to gelatinize organic solvents. It was found that the presence of halogen atoms as substituents had a significant effect on gelation ability. In particular, bromo-containing compounds 4 A and 4 B exhibited excellent gelation abilities compared with other halogen-substituted gelators. By analyses of the single-crystal structure, the PXRD pattern of the xerogel, and electronic spectral changes during gelation, we deemed that π-π, C-H⋅⋅⋅F, and C-H⋅⋅⋅Br interactions were the driving forces for the gelation of 4 B. Interestingly, (Z)-1-(4-bromophenyl)-2-(3-methylpyrazin-2-yl)ethen-1-ol (8 A), prepared in this work, is the lowest-molecular-weight organogelator to have been reported. It should be noted that although β-iminoenolates 3 A-5 A are nonemissive in solution, they emit strong yellow light in organogels, which suggests aggregation-induced emissive activity, whereas the difluoroboron complexes 3 B-5 B show strong fluorescence in solutions, organogels, and xerogel-based films. Moreover, we found that the emission of 4 B in a nanofiber-based film could be quenched significantly upon exposure to gaseous trifluoroacetic acid and that the decay time and detection limit were 0.5 s and 0.17 ppm, respectively. Thus, through this work we have provided a new strategy for the design of nontraditional π gelators by introducing halogen atoms into π-conjugated systems with moderate polarities. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Altered expression of the voltage-gated calcium channel subunit alpha(2)delta-1: A comparison between two experimental models of epilepsy and a sensory nerve ligation model of neuropathic pain

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Nieto-Rostro, M.; Sandhu, G.; Bauer, C. S.; Jiruška, Přemysl; Jefferys, J. G. R.; Dolphin, A. C.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 283, Dec (2014), s. 124-137 ISSN 0306-4522 R&D Projects: GA MZd(CZ) NT14489 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : calcium channel * dorsal root ganglion (DRG) * alpha2delta subunit * epilepsy * neuropathic pain * reactive gliosis Subject RIV: FH - Neurology Impact factor: 3.357, year: 2014

  19. Single-channel electrophysiology reveals a distinct and uniform pore complex formed by α-synuclein oligomers in lipid membranes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felix Schmidt

    Full Text Available Synucleinopathies such as Parkinson's disease, multiple system atrophy and dementia with Lewy bodies are characterized by deposition of aggregated α-synuclein. Recent findings indicate that pathological oligomers rather than fibrillar aggregates may represent the main toxic protein species. It has been shown that α-synuclein oligomers can increase the conductance of lipid bilayers and, in cell-culture, lead to calcium dyshomeostasis and cell death. In this study, employing a setup for single-channel electrophysiology, we found that addition of iron-induced α-synuclein oligomers resulted in quantized and stepwise increases in bilayer conductance indicating insertion of distinct transmembrane pores. These pores switched between open and closed states depending on clamped voltage revealing a single-pore conductance comparable to that of bacterial porins. Pore conductance was dependent on transmembrane potential and the available cation. The pores stably inserted into the bilayer and could not be removed by buffer exchange. Pore formation could be inhibited by co-incubation with the aggregation inhibitor baicalein. Our findings indicate that iron-induced α-synuclein oligomers can form a uniform and distinct pore species with characteristic electrophysiological properties. Pore formation could be a critical event in the pathogenesis of synucleinopathies and provide a novel structural target for disease-modifying therapy.

  20. Controlling Initial and Final Radii to Achieve a Low-Complexity Sphere Decoding Technique in MIMO Channels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatemeh Eshagh Hosseini

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to apply sphere decoding algorithm in multiple-input multiple-output communication systems and to make it feasible for real-time applications, its computational complexity should be decreased. To achieve this goal, this paper provides some useful insights into the effect of initial and the final sphere radii and estimating them effortlessly. It also discusses practical ways of initiating the algorithm properly and terminating it before the normal end of the process as well as the cost of these methods. Besides, a novel algorithm is introduced which utilizes the presented techniques according to a threshold factor which is defined in terms of the number of transmit antennas and the noise variance. Simulation results show that the proposed algorithm offers a desirable performance and reasonable complexity satisfying practical constraints.

  1. CaV3.2 T-type calcium channels in peripheral sensory neurons are important for mibefradil-induced reversal of hyperalgesia and allodynia in rats with painful diabetic neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obradovic, Aleksandar Lj; Hwang, Sung Mi; Scarpa, Joseph; Hong, Sung Jun; Todorovic, Slobodan M; Jevtovic-Todorovic, Vesna

    2014-01-01

    We recently showed that streptozotocin (STZ) injections in rats lead to the development of painful peripheral diabetic neuropathy (PDN) accompanied by enhancement of CaV3.2 T-type calcium currents (T-currents) and hyperexcitability in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons. Here we used the classical peripherally acting T-channel blocker mibefradil to examine the role of CaV3.2 T-channels as pharmacological targets for treatment of painful PDN. When administered intraperitoneally (i.p.), at clinically relevant doses, mibefradil effectively alleviated heat, cold and mechanical hypersensitivities in STZ-treated diabetic rats in a dose-dependent manner. We also found that CaV3.2 antisense (AS)-treated diabetic rats exhibit a significant decrease in painful PDN compared with mismatch antisense (MIS)-treated diabetic rats. Co-treatment with mibefradil (9 mg/kg i.p.) resulted in reversal of heat, cold and mechanical hypersensitivity in MIS-treated but not in AS-treated diabetic rats, suggesting that mibefradil and CaV3.2 AS share the same cellular target. Using patch-clamp recordings from acutely dissociated DRG neurons, we demonstrated that mibefradil similarly blocked T-currents in diabetic and healthy rats in a voltage-dependent manner by stabilizing inactive states of T-channels. We conclude that antihyperalgesic and antiallodynic effects of mibefradil in PDN are at least partly mediated by inhibition of CaV3.2 channels in peripheral nociceptors. Hence, peripherally acting voltage-dependent T-channel blockers could be very useful in the treatment of painful symptoms of PDN.

  2. Unnatural amino acid photo-crosslinking of the IKs channel complex demonstrates a KCNE1:KCNQ1 stoichiometry of up to 4:4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Christopher I; Westhoff, Maartje; Eldstrom, Jodene; Thompson, Emely; Emes, Robert; Fedida, David

    2016-01-23

    Cardiac repolarization is determined in part by the slow delayed rectifier current (IKs), through the tetrameric voltage-gated ion channel, KCNQ1, and its β-subunit, KCNE1. The stoichiometry between α and β-subunits has been controversial with studies reporting either a strict 2 KCNE1:4 KCNQ1 or a variable ratio up to 4:4. We used IKs fusion proteins linking KCNE1 to one (EQ), two (EQQ) or four (EQQQQ) KCNQ1 subunits, to reproduce compulsory 4:4, 2:4 or 1:4 stoichiometries. Whole cell and single-channel recordings showed EQQ and EQQQQ to have increasingly hyperpolarized activation, reduced conductance, and shorter first latency of opening compared to EQ - all abolished by the addition of KCNE1. As well, using a UV-crosslinking unnatural amino acid in KCNE1, we found EQQQQ and EQQ crosslinking rates to be progressively slowed compared to KCNQ1, which demonstrates that no intrinsic mechanism limits the association of up to four β-subunits within the IKs complex.

  3. The Sorting Nexin 3 Retromer Pathway Regulates the Cell Surface Localization and Activity of a Wnt-Activated Polycystin Channel Complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Shuang; Streets, Andrew J; Nesin, Vasyl; Tran, Uyen; Nie, Hongguang; Onopiuk, Marta; Wessely, Oliver; Tsiokas, Leonidas; Ong, Albert C M

    2017-10-01

    Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is caused by inactivating mutations in PKD1 (85%) or PKD2 (15%). The ADPKD proteins encoded by these genes, polycystin-1 (PC1) and polycystin-2 (PC2), form a plasma membrane receptor-ion channel complex. However, the mechanisms controlling the subcellular localization of PC1 and PC2 are poorly understood. Here, we investigated the involvement of the retromer complex, an ancient protein module initially discovered in yeast that regulates the retrieval, sorting, and retrograde transport of membrane receptors. Using yeast two-hybrid, biochemical, and cellular assays, we determined that PC2 binds two isoforms of the retromer-associated protein sorting nexin 3 (SNX3), including a novel isoform that binds PC2 in a direct manner. Knockdown of SNX3 or the core retromer protein VPS35 increased the surface expression of endogenous PC1 and PC2 in vitro and in vivo and increased Wnt-activated PC2-dependent whole-cell currents. These findings indicate that an SNX3-retromer complex regulates the surface expression and function of PC1 and PC2. Molecular targeting of proteins involved in the endosomal sorting of PC1 and PC2 could lead to new therapeutic approaches in ADPKD. Copyright © 2017 by the American Society of Nephrology.

  4. TRPV4 in the sensory organs of adult zebrafish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amato, V; Viña, E; Calavia, M G; Guerrera, M C; Laurà, R; Navarro, M; De Carlos, F; Cobo, J; Germanà, A; Vega, J A

    2012-01-01

    TRPV4 is a nonselective cation channel that belongs to the vanilloid (V) subfamily of transient receptor potential (TRP) ion channels. While TRP channels have been found to be involved in sensing temperature, light, pressure, and chemical stimuli, TPRV4 is believed to be primarily a mechanosensor although it can also respond to warm temperatures, acidic pH, and several chemical compounds. In zebrafish, the expression of trpv4 has been studied during embryonic development, whereas its pattern of TPRV4 expression during the adult life has not been thoroughly analyzed. In this study, the occurrence of TRPV4 was addressed in the zebrafish sensory organs at the mRNA (RT-PCR) and protein (Westernblot) levels. Once the occurrence of TRPV4 was demonstrated, the TRPV4 positive cells were identified by using immunohistochemistry. TPRV4 was detected in mantle and sensory cells of neuromasts, in a subpopulation of hair sensory cells in the macula and in the cristae ampullaris of the inner ear, in sensory cells in the taste buds, in crypt neurons and ciliated sensory neurons of the olfactory epithelium, and in cells of the retina. These results demonstrate the presence of TRPV4 in all sensory organs of adult zebrafish and are consistent with the multiple physiological functions suspected for TRPV4 in mammals (mechanosensation, hearing, and temperature sensing), but furthermore suggest potential roles in olfaction and vision in zebrafish. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Sensory evaluation techniques

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Meilgaard, Morten; Civille, Gail Vance; Carr, B. Thomas

    1991-01-01

    ..., #2 as a textbook for courses at the academic level, it aims to provide just enough theoretical background to enable the student to understand which sensory methods are best suited to particular...

  6. Complexity

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Rahul Pandit

    2008-10-31

    Oct 31, 2008 ... ”The more complex a thing is, the more you can talk about it.” - attributed to Giorgio Parisi. ▻ ”C'est magnifique, mais ce n'est pas de la science.” (It is magnificent, but not all of it is science.) - attributed ... Earliest examples: theoretical computer science, algorithmic complexity, etc. ▻ Rapid progress after the ...

  7. Cell-cell channels, viruses, and evolution: via infection, parasitism, and symbiosis toward higher levels of biological complexity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baluska, Frantisek

    2009-10-01

    Between prokaryotic cells and eukaryotic cells there is dramatic difference in complexity which represents a problem for the current version of the cell theory, as well as for the current version of evolution theory. In the past few decades, the serial endosymbiotic theory of Lynn Margulis has been confirmed. This results in a radical departure from our understanding of living systems: the eukaryotic cell represents de facto"cells-within-cell." Higher order "cells-within-cell" situations are obvious at the eukaryotic cell level in the form of secondary and tertiary endosymbiosis, or in the male and female gametophytes of higher plants. The next challenge of the current version of the cell theory is represented by the fact that the multicellular fungi and plants are, in fact, supracellular assemblies as their cells are not physically separated from each other. Moreover, there are also examples of alliances and mergings between multicellular organisms. Infection, especially the viral one, but also bacterial and fungal infections, followed by symbiosis, is proposed to act as the major force that drives the biological evolution toward higher complexity.

  8. Automatic sleep stage classification of single-channel EEG by using complex-valued convolutional neural network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Junming; Wu, Yan

    2017-02-21

    Many systems are developed for automatic sleep stage classification. However, nearly all models are based on handcrafted features. Because of the large feature space, there are so many features that feature selection should be used. Meanwhile, designing handcrafted features is a difficult and time-consuming task because the feature designing needs domain knowledge of experienced experts. Results vary when different sets of features are chosen to identify sleep stages. Additionally, many features that we may be unaware of exist. However, these features may be important for sleep stage classification. Therefore, a new sleep stage classification system, which is based on the complex-valued convolutional neural network (CCNN), is proposed in this study. Unlike the existing sleep stage methods, our method can automatically extract features from raw electroencephalography data and then classify sleep stage based on the learned features. Additionally, we also prove that the decision boundaries for the real and imaginary parts of a complex-valued convolutional neuron intersect orthogonally. The classification performances of handcrafted features are compared with those of learned features via CCNN. Experimental results show that the proposed method is comparable to the existing methods. CCNN obtains a better classification performance and considerably faster convergence speed than convolutional neural network. Experimental results also show that the proposed method is a useful decision-support tool for automatic sleep stage classification.

  9. Sensory Neuron-Specific Deletion of TRPA1 Results in Mechanical Cutaneous Sensory Deficits

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Abstract The nonselective cation channel transient receptor potential ankyrin 1 (TRPA1) is known to be a key contributor to both somatosensation and pain. Recent studies have implicated TRPA1 in additional physiologic functions and have also suggested that TRPA1 is expressed in nonneuronal tissues. Thus, it has become necessary to resolve the importance of TRPA1 expressed in primary sensory neurons, particularly since previous research has largely used global knock-out animals and chemical TRPA1 antagonists. We therefore sought to isolate the physiological relevance of TRPA1 specifically within sensory neurons. To accomplish this, we used Advillin-Cre mice, in which the promoter for Advillin is used to drive expression of Cre recombinase specifically within sensory neurons. These Advillin-Cre mice were crossed with Trpa1fl/fl mice to generate sensory neuron-specific Trpa1 knock-out mice. Here, we show that tissue-specific deletion of TRPA1 from sensory neurons produced strong deficits in behavioral sensitivity to mechanical stimulation, while sensitivity to cold and heat stimuli remained intact. The mechanical sensory deficit was incomplete compared to the mechanosensory impairment of TRPA1 global knock-out mice, in line with the incomplete (∼80%) elimination of TRPA1 from sensory neurons in the tissue-specific Advillin-Cre knock-out mice. Equivalent findings were observed in tissue-specific knock-out animals originating from two independently-generated Advillin-Cre lines. As such, our results show that sensory neuron TRPA1 is required for mechanical, but not cold, responsiveness in noninjured skin. PMID:28303259

  10. Compliant support surfaces affect sensory reweighting during balance control

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schut, I.M.; Engelhart, Denise; Pasma, Jantsje; Pasma, J.H.; Aarts, Ronald G.K.M.; Schouten, Alfred Christiaan

    2017-01-01

    To maintain upright posture and prevent falling, balance control involves the complex interaction between nervous, muscular and sensory systems, such as sensory reweighting. When balance is impaired, compliant foam mats are used in training methods to improve balance control. However, the effect of

  11. Morphology, structure, composition and build-up processes of the active channel-mouth lobe complex of the Congo deep-sea fan with inputs from remotely operated underwater vehicle (ROV) multibeam and video surveys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dennielou, Bernard; Droz, Laurence; Babonneau, Nathalie; Jacq, Céline; Bonnel, Cédric; Picot, Marie; Le Saout, Morgane; Saout, Yohan; Bez, Martine; Savoye, Bruno; Olu, Karine; Rabouille, Christophe

    2017-08-01

    The detailed structure and composition of turbiditic channel-mouth lobes is still largely unknown because they commonly lie at abyssal water depths, are very thin and are therefore beyond the resolution of hull-mound acoustic tools. The morphology, structure and composition of the Congo turbiditic channel-mouth lobe complex (90×40 km; 2525 km2) were investigated with hull-mounted swath bathymetry, air gun seismics, 3.5 kHz sub-bottom profiler, sediment piston cores and also with high-resolution multibeam bathymetry and video acquired with a Remote Operating Vehicle (ROV). The lobe complex lies 760 km off the Congo River mouth in the Angola abyssal plain between 4740 and 5030 m deep. It is active and is fed by turbidity currents that deposit several centimetres of sediment per century. The lobe complex is subdivided into five lobes that have prograded. The lobes are dominantly muddy. Sand represents ca. 13% of the deposits and is restricted to the feeding channel and distributaries. The overall lobe body is composed of thin muddy to silty turbidites. The whole lobe complex is characterized by in situ mass wasting (slumps, debrites). The 1-m-resolution bathymetry shows pervasive slidings and block avalanches on the edges of the feeding channel and the channel mouth indicating that sliding occurs early and continuously in the lobe build-up. Mass wasting is interpreted as a consequence of very-high accumulation rates, over-steepening and erosion along the channels and is therefore an intrinsic process of lobe building. The bifurcation of feeding channels is probably triggered when the gradient in the distributaries at the top of a lobe becomes flat and when turbidity currents find their way on the higher gradient on the lobe side. It may also be triggered by mass wasting on the lobe side. When a new lobe develops, the abandoned lobes continue to collect significant turbiditic deposits from the feeding channel spillover, so that the whole lobe complex remains active. A

  12. Sensory Neurons in the Human Geniculate Ganglion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Tadasu; Yamaguma, Yu; Sasaki, Yu; Kanda, Noriyuki; Sasahara, Nobuyuki; Kokubun, Souichi; Yajima, Takehiro; Ichikawa, Hiroyuki

    2017-01-01

    The geniculate ganglion (GG) contains visceral and somatic sensory neurons of the facial nerve. In this study, the number and cell size of sensory neurons in the human GG were investigated. The estimated number of GG neurons ranged from 1,580 to 2,561 (mean ± SD = 1,960 ± 364.6). The cell size of GG neurons ranged from 393.0 to 2,485.4 μm2 (mean ± SD = 1,067.4 ± 99.5 μm2). Sensory neurons in the GG were significantly smaller in size than those in the dorsal root (range = 326.6-5343.4 μm2, mean ± SD = 1,683.2 ± 203.8 μm2) or trigeminal ganglia (range = 349.6-4,889.28 μm2, mean ± SD = 1,529.0 ± 198.48 μm2). Sensory neurons had similar cell body sizes in the GG and nodose ganglion (range = 357.2-3,488.33 μm2, mean ± SD = 1,160.4 ± 156.61 μm2). These findings suggest that viscerosensory neurons have smaller cell bodies than somatosensory neurons. In addition, immunohistochemistry for several neurochemical substances was performed on the human GG. In the ganglion, sensory neurons were mostly immunoreactive for secreted protein, acidic and rich in cysteine-like 1 (94.3%). One third of GG neurons showed vesicular glutamate transporter 2 immunoreactivity (31.3%). Only 7.3% of GG neurons were immunoreactive for transient receptor potential cation channel subfamily V member 1. Sensory neurons in the human GG may respond to gustatory, nociceptive, and/or mechanoreceptive stimuli from tongues, soft palates, and external auditory canals. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  13. High affinity complexes of pannexin channels and L-type calcium channel splice-variants in human lung: Possible role in clevidipine-induced dyspnea relief in acute heart failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerhard P. Dahl

    2016-08-01

    Research in Context: Clevidipine lowers blood pressure by inhibiting calcium channels in vascular smooth muscle. In patients with acute heart failure, clevidipine was shown to relieve breathing problems. This was only partially related to the blood pressure lowering actions of clevidipine and not conferred by another calcium channel inhibitor. We here found calcium channel variants in human lung that are more selectively inhibited by clevidipine, especially when associated with pannexin channels. This study gives a possible mechanism for clevidipine's relief of breathing problems and supports future clinical trials testing the role of clevidipine in the treatment of acute heart failure.

  14. Super-resolution imaging visualizes the eightfold symmetry of gp210 proteins around the nuclear pore complex and resolves the central channel with nanometer resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Löschberger, Anna; van de Linde, Sebastian; Dabauvalle, Marie-Christine; Rieger, Bernd; Heilemann, Mike; Krohne, Georg; Sauer, Markus

    2012-02-01

    One of the most complex molecular machines of cells is the nuclear pore complex (NPC), which controls all trafficking of molecules in and out of the nucleus. Because of their importance for cellular processes such as gene expression and cytoskeleton organization, the structure of NPCs has been studied extensively during the last few decades, mainly by electron microscopy. We have used super-resolution imaging by direct stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy (dSTORM) to investigate the structure of NPCs in isolated Xenopus laevis oocyte nuclear envelopes, with a lateral resolution of ~15 nm. By generating accumulated super-resolved images of hundreds of NPCs we determined the diameter of the central NPC channel to be 41 ± 7 nm and demonstrate that the integral membrane protein gp210 is distributed in an eightfold radial symmetry. Two-color dSTORM experiments emphasize the highly symmetric NPCs as ideal model structures to control the quality of corrections to chromatic aberration and to test the capability and reliability of super-resolution imaging methods.

  15. Measurement in Sensory Modulation: The Sensory Processing Scale Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Lucy J.; Sullivan, Jillian C.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE. Sensory modulation issues have a significant impact on participation in daily life. Moreover, understanding phenotypic variation in sensory modulation dysfunction is crucial for research related to defining homogeneous groups and for clinical work in guiding treatment planning. We thus evaluated the new Sensory Processing Scale (SPS) Assessment. METHOD. Research included item development, behavioral scoring system development, test administration, and item analyses to evaluate reliability and validity across sensory domains. RESULTS. Items with adequate reliability (internal reliability >.4) and discriminant validity (p sensory modulation (scale reliability >.90; discrimination between group effect sizes >1.00). This scale has the potential to aid in differential diagnosis of sensory modulation issues. PMID:25184464

  16. Altered potassium channel distribution and composition in myelinated axons suppresses hyperexcitability following injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvo, Margarita; Richards, Natalie; Schmid, Annina B; Barroso, Alejandro; Zhu, Lan; Ivulic, Dinka; Zhu, Ning; Anwandter, Philipp; Bhat, Manzoor A; Court, Felipe A; McMahon, Stephen B; Bennett, David L H

    2016-04-19

    Neuropathic pain following peripheral nerve injury is associated with hyperexcitability in damaged myelinated sensory axons, which begins to normalise over time. We investigated the composition and distribution of shaker-type-potassium channels (Kv1 channels) within the nodal complex of myelinated axons following injury. At the neuroma that forms after damage, expression of Kv1.1 and 1.2 (normally localised to the juxtaparanode) was markedly decreased. In contrast Kv1.4 and 1.6, which were hardly detectable in the naïve state, showed increased expression within juxtaparanodes and paranodes following injury, both in rats and humans. Within the dorsal root (a site remote from injury) we noted a redistribution of Kv1-channels towards the paranode. Blockade of Kv1 channels with α-DTX after injury reinstated hyperexcitability of A-fibre axons and enhanced mechanosensitivity. Changes in the molecular composition and distribution of axonal Kv1 channels, therefore represents a protective mechanism to suppress the hyperexcitability of myelinated sensory axons that follows nerve injury.

  17. Sensory integration in mouse insular cortex reflects GABA circuit maturation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gogolla, Nadine; Takesian, Anne E; Feng, Guoping; Fagiolini, Michela; Hensch, Takao K

    2014-01-01

    Insular cortex (IC) contributes to a variety of complex brain functions, such as communication, social behavior, and self-awareness through the integration of sensory, emotional, and cognitive content...

  18. Paramecium BBS genes are key to presence of channels in Cilia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentine Megan

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Changes in genes coding for ciliary proteins contribute to complex human syndromes called ciliopathies, such as Bardet-Biedl Syndrome (BBS. We used the model organism Paramecium to focus on ciliary ion channels that affect the beat form and sensory function of motile cilia and evaluate the effects of perturbing BBS proteins on these channels. Methods We used immunoprecipitations and mass spectrometry to explore whether Paramecium proteins interact as in mammalian cells. We used RNA interference (RNAi and swimming behavior assays to examine the effects of BBS depletion on ciliary ion channels that control ciliary beating. Combining RNA interference and epitope tagging, we examined the effects of BBS depletion of BBS 7, 8 and 9 on the location of three channels and a chemoreceptor in cilia. Results We found 10 orthologs of 8 BBS genes in P. tetraurelia. BBS1, 2, 4, 5, 7, 8 and 9 co-immunoprecipitate. While RNAi reduction of BBS 7 and 9 gene products caused loss and shortening of cilia, RNAi for all BBS genes except BBS2 affected patterns of ciliary motility that are governed by ciliary ion channels. Swimming behavior assays pointed to loss of ciliary K+ channel function. Combining RNAi and epitope tagged ciliary proteins we demonstrated that a calcium activated K+ channel was no longer located in the cilia upon depletion of BBS 7, 8 or 9, consistent with the cells’ swimming behavior. The TRPP channel PKD2 was also lost from the cilia. In contrast, the ciliary voltage gated calcium channel was unaffected by BBS depletion, consistent with behavioral assays. The ciliary location of a chemoreceptor for folate was similarly unperturbed by the depletion of BBS 7, 8 or 9. Conclusions The co-immunoprecipitation of BBS 1,2,4,5,7,8, and 9 suggests a complex of BBS proteins. RNAi for BBS 7, 8 or 9 gene products causes the selective loss of K+ and PKD2 channels from the cilia while the critical voltage gated calcium channel and a

  19. Well-Defined Microapertures for Ion Channel Biosensors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Halza, Erik; Bro, Tobias Hedegaard; Bilenberg, Brian; Kocer, Armagan

    2013-01-01

    Gated ion channels are excitable nanopores in biological membranes. They sense and respond to different triggers in nature. The sensory characteristics of these channels can be modified by protein engineering tools and the channels can be functionally reconstituted into synthetic lipid bilayer

  20. Neurosensory mechanotransduction through acid-sensing ion channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chih-Cheng; Wong, Chia-Wen

    2013-03-01

    Acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs) are voltage-insensitive cation channels responding to extracellular acidification. ASIC proteins have two transmembrane domains and a large extracellular domain. The molecular topology of ASICs is similar to that of the mechanosensory abnormality 4- or 10-proteins expressed in touch receptor neurons and involved in neurosensory mechanotransduction in nematodes. The ASIC proteins are involved in neurosensory mechanotransduction in mammals. The ASIC isoforms are expressed in Merkel cell-neurite complexes, periodontal Ruffini endings and specialized nerve terminals of skin and muscle spindles, so they might participate in mechanosensation. In knockout mouse models, lacking an ASIC isoform produces defects in neurosensory mechanotransduction of tissue such as skin, stomach, colon, aortic arch, venoatrial junction and cochlea. The ASICs are thus implicated in touch, pain, digestive function, baroreception, blood volume control and hearing. However, the role of ASICs in mechanotransduction is still controversial, because we lack evidence that the channels are mechanically sensitive when expressed in heterologous cells. Thus, ASIC channels alone are not sufficient to reconstruct the path of transducing molecules of mechanically activated channels. The mechanotransducers associated with ASICs need further elucidation. In this review, we discuss the expression of ASICs in sensory afferents of mechanoreceptors, findings of knockout studies, technical issues concerning studies of neurosensory mechanotransduction and possible missing links. Also we propose a molecular model and a new approach to disclose the molecular mechanism underlying the neurosensory mechanotransduction. © 2013 The Authors. Published by Foundation for Cellular and Molecular Medicine/Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  1. Adaptation in human somatosensory cortex as a model of sensory memory construction: a study using high-density EEG.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, Claire; Joyce, Niamh; Garcia-Larrea, Luis

    2016-01-01

    Adaptation in sensory cortices has been seen as a mechanism allowing the creation of transient memory representations. Here we tested the adapting properties of early responses in human somatosensory areas SI and SII by analysing somatosensory-evoked potentials over the very first repetitions of a stimulus. SI and SII generators were identified by well-defined scalp potentials and source localisation from high-density 128-channel EEG. Earliest responses (~20 ms) from area 3b in the depth of the post-central gyrus did not show significant adaptation to stimuli repeated at 300 ms intervals. In contrast, responses around 45 ms from the crown of the gyrus (areas 1 and 2) rapidly lessened to a plateau and abated at the 20th stimulation, and activities from SII in the parietal operculum at ~100 ms displayed strong adaptation with a steady amplitude decrease from the first repetition. Although responses in both SI (1-2) and SII areas showed adapting properties and hence sensory memory capacities, evidence of sensory mismatch detection has been demonstrated only for responses reflecting SII activation. This may index the passage from an early form of sensory storage in SI to more operational memory codes in SII, allowing the prediction of forthcoming input and the triggering of a specific signal when such input differs from the previous sequence. This is consistent with a model whereby the length of temporal receptive windows increases with progression in the cortical hierarchy, in parallel with the complexity and abstraction of neural representations.

  2. Postural Control Deficits in Autism Spectrum Disorder: The Role of Sensory Integration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doumas, Michail; McKenna, Roisin; Murphy, Blain

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the nature of sensory integration deficits in postural control of young adults with ASD. Postural control was assessed in a fixed environment, and in three environments in which sensory information about body sway from visual, proprioceptive or both channels was inaccurate. Furthermore, two levels of inaccurate information were…

  3. Characterization of cutaneous and articular sensory neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva Serra, Ines; Husson, Zoé; Bartlett, Jonathan D; Smith, Ewan St John

    2016-01-01

    A wide range of stimuli can activate sensory neurons and neurons innervating specific tissues often have distinct properties. Here, we used retrograde tracing to identify sensory neurons innervating the hind paw skin (cutaneous) and ankle/knee joints (articular), and combined immunohistochemistry and electrophysiology analysis to determine the neurochemical phenotype of cutaneous and articular neurons, as well as their electrical and chemical excitability. Immunohistochemistry analysis using RetroBeads as a retrograde tracer confirmed previous data that cutaneous and articular neurons are a mixture of myelinated and unmyelinated neurons, and the majority of both populations are peptidergic. In whole-cell patch-clamp recordings from cultured dorsal root ganglion neurons, voltage-gated inward currents and action potential parameters were largely similar between articular and cutaneous neurons, although cutaneous neuron action potentials had a longer half-peak duration (HPD). An assessment of chemical sensitivity showed that all neurons responded to a pH 5.0 solution, but that acid-sensing ion channel (ASIC) currents, determined by inhibition with the nonselective acid-sensing ion channel antagonist benzamil, were of a greater magnitude in cutaneous compared to articular neurons. Forty to fifty percent of cutaneous and articular neurons responded to capsaicin, cinnamaldehyde, and menthol, indicating similar expression levels of transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1), transient receptor potential ankyrin 1 (TRPA1), and transient receptor potential melastatin 8 (TRPM8), respectively. By contrast, significantly more articular neurons responded to ATP than cutaneous neurons. This work makes a detailed characterization of cutaneous and articular sensory neurons and highlights the importance of making recordings from identified neuronal populations: sensory neurons innervating different tissues have subtly different properties, possibly reflecting different

  4. Application of protein A-modified capillary-channeled polymer polypropylene fibers to the quantitation of IgG in complex matrices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trang, Hung K; Marcus, R Kenneth

    2017-08-05

    Polypropylene (PP) capillary-channeled polymer (C-CP) fibers loaded with recombinant Staphyloccocus aureus protein A (rSPA) were used as an affinity chromatography stationary phase for the quantitation of immunoglobulin G (IgG) in complex biological matrices. Optimization of the chromatographic method regarding mobile phase components and load/elution conditions was performed. The six-minute analysis, including a load step with 12mM phosphate at pH 7.4, an elution step with 0.025% phosphoric acid and a re-equilibration step, was employed for quantitation of IgG1 from 0.075 to 3.00mgmL -1 in an IgG-free CHO cell supernatant matrix. Quantification of IgG1 content in a different CHO cell line was accomplished using the external calibration curve as well as using a standard addition approach. The high level of agreement between the two approaches suggests that the protein A-modified C-CP fiber phase is immune from matrix effects due to concomitant species such as host cell proteins (HCPs), host cell DNA, media components and other leachables and extractables. The inter-day and intra-day precision of the method were 3.1 and 3.5%RSD respectively for a single column. Column-to-column variability was 1.31 and 6.62%RSD for elution time and peak area, respectively, across columns prepared in different batches. The method reported here is well-suited for IgG analysis in complex harvest cell culture media in both the development and production environments. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Our Sensory World.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liesman, C.; Barringer, M. D.

    The booklet explores the role of sensory experiences in the severely developmentally disabled child. Developmental theory is addressed, followed by specific activity suggestions (broken down into developmental levels) for developing tactile sense, auditory sense, gustatory (taste) sense, olfactory sense, visual sense, and kinesthetic sense.…

  6. Fourier transform spectroscopy and coupled-channel deperturbation treatment of the A1Sigma+ ~ b3Pi complex of KCs molecule

    CERN Document Server

    Kruzins, A; Nikolayeva, O; Tamanis, M; Ferber, R; Pazyuk, E A; Stolyarov, A V

    2009-01-01

    The laser induced fluorescence (LIF) spectra A1Sigma ~ b3Pi --> X1Sigma+ of KCs dimer were recorded in near infrared region by Fourier Transform Spectrometer with a resolution of 0.03 cm-1. Overall more than 200 LIF spectra were rotationally assigned to 39K133Cs and 41K133Cs isotopomers yielding with the uncertainty of 0.003-0.01 cm-1 more than 3400 rovibronic term values of the strongly mixed singlet A1Sigma+ and triplet b3Pi states. Experimental data massive starts from the lowest vibrational level v_A=0 of the singlet and nonuniformly cover the energy range from 10040 to 13250 cm-1 with rotational quantum numbers J from 7 to 225. Besides of the dominating regular A1Sigma+ ~ b3P Omega=0 interactions the weak and local heterogenous A1S+ ~ b3P Omega=1 perturbations have been discovered and analyzed. Coupled-channel deperturbation analysis of the experimental 39K133Cs e-parity termvalues of the A1S+ ~ b3P complex was accomplished in the framework of the phenomenological 4 x 4 Hamiltonian accounting implicitly ...

  7. Identification of an Isothiocyanate on the HypEF Complex Suggests a Route for Efficient Cyanyl-Group Channeling during [NiFe]-Hydrogenase Cofactor Generation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sven T Stripp

    Full Text Available [NiFe]-hydrogenases catalyze uptake and evolution of H2 in a wide range of microorganisms. The enzyme is characterized by an inorganic nickel/ iron cofactor, the latter of which carries carbon monoxide and cyanide ligands. In vivo generation of these ligands requires a number of auxiliary proteins, the so-called Hyp family. Initially, HypF binds and activates the precursor metabolite carbamoyl phosphate. HypF catalyzes removal of phosphate and transfers the carbamate group to HypE. In an ATP-dependent condensation reaction, the C-terminal cysteinyl residue of HypE is modified to what has been interpreted as thiocyanate. This group is the direct precursor of the cyanide ligands of the [NiFe]-hydrogenase active site cofactor. We present a FT-IR analysis of HypE and HypF as isolated from E. coli. We follow the HypF-catalyzed cyanation of HypE in vitro and screen for the influence of carbamoyl phosphate and ATP. To elucidate on the differences between HypE and the HypEF complex, spectro-electrochemistry was used to map the vibrational Stark effect of naturally cyanated HypE. The IR signature of HypE could ultimately be assigned to isothiocyanate (-N=C=S rather than thiocyanate (-S-C≡N. This has important implications for cyanyl-group channeling during [NiFe]-hydrogenase cofactor generation.

  8. Sensory analysis of lipstick.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yap, K C S; Aminah, A

    2011-06-01

    Sensory analysis of lipstick product by trained panellists started with recruiting female panels who are lipstick users, in good health condition and willing to be a part of sensory members. This group of people was further scrutinized with duo-trio method using commercial lipstick samples that are commonly used among them. About 40% of the 15 panels recruited were unable to differentiate the lipstick samples they usually use better than chance. The balance of nine panels that were corrected at least with 65% across all trials in panels screening process was formed a working group to develop sensory languages as a means of describing product similarities and differences and a scoring system. Five sessions with each session took about 90 min were carried out using 10 types of lipsticks with different waxes mixture ratio in the formulation together with six commercial lipsticks that are the most common to the panels. First session was focus on listing out the panels' perception towards the characteristic of the lipstick samples after normal application on their lips. Second session was focus on the refining and categorizing the responses gathered from the first session and translated into sensory attributes with its definition. Third session was focus on the scoring system. Fourth and fifth sessions were repetition of the third session to ensure consistency. In a collective effort of the panels, sensory attributes developed for lipstick were Spreadability, Off flavour, Hardness, Smoothness, Moist, Not messy, Glossy and Greasy. Analysis of variance was able to provide ample evidence on gauging the panel performance. A proper panels selecting and training was able to produce a reliable and sensitive trained panel for evaluating the product based on the procedures being trained. © 2011 The Authors. ICS © 2011 Society of Cosmetic Scientists and the Société Française de Cosmétologie.

  9. Navigating sensory conflict in dynamic environments using adaptive state estimation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Theresa J; Jeka, John; Kiemel, Tim; Lewis, M Anthony

    2011-12-01

    Most conventional robots rely on controlling the location of the center of pressure to maintain balance, relying mainly on foot pressure sensors for information. By contrast,humans rely on sensory data from multiple sources, including proprioceptive, visual, and vestibular sources. Several models have been developed to explain how humans reconcile information from disparate sources to form a stable sense of balance. These models may be useful for developing robots that are able to maintain dynamic balance more readily using multiple sensory sources. Since these information sources may conflict, reliance by the nervous system on any one channel can lead to ambiguity in the system state. In humans, experiments that create conflicts between different sensory channels by moving the visual field or the support surface indicate that sensory information is adaptively reweighted. Unreliable information is rapidly down-weighted,then gradually up-weighted when it becomes valid again.Human balance can also be studied by building robots that model features of human bodies and testing them under similar experimental conditions. We implement a sensory reweighting model based on an adaptive Kalman filter in abipedal robot, and subject it to sensory tests similar to those used on human subjects. Unlike other implementations of sensory reweighting in robots, our implementation includes vision, by using optic flow to calculate forward rotation using a camera (visual modality), as well as a three-axis gyro to represent the vestibular system (non-visual modality), and foot pressure sensors (proprioceptive modality). Our model estimates measurement noise in real time, which is then used to recompute the Kalman gain on each iteration, improving the ability of the robot to dynamically balance. We observe that we can duplicate many important features of postural sw ay in humans, including automatic sensory reweighting,effects, constant phase with respect to amplitude, and a temporal

  10. Understanding Sensory Integration. ERIC Digest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiMatties, Marie E.; Sammons, Jennifer H.

    This brief paper summarizes what is known about sensory integration and sensory integration dysfunction (DSI). It outlines evaluation of DSI, treatment approaches, and implications for parents and teachers, including compensatory strategies for minimizing the impact of DSI on a child's life. Review of origins of sensory integration theory in the…

  11. The pattern of expression of the voltage-gated sodium channels Na(v)1.8 and Na(v)1.9 does not change in uninjured primary sensory neurons in experimental neuropathic pain models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decosterd, Isabelle; Ji, Ru-Rong; Abdi, Salahadin; Tate, Simon; Woolf, Clifford J

    2002-04-01

    A spared nerve injury of the sciatic nerve (SNI) or a segmental lesion of the L5 and L6 spinal nerves (SNL) lead to behavioral signs of neuropathic pain in the territory innervated by adjacent uninjured nerve fibers, while a chronic constriction injury (CCI) results in pain sensitivity in the affected area. While alterations in voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSCs) have been shown to contribute to the generation of ectopic activity in the injured neurons, little is known about changes in VGSCs in the neighboring intact dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons, even though these cells begin to fire spontaneously. We have now investigated changes in the expression of the TTX-resistant VGSCs, Nav1.8 (SNS/PN3) and Nav1.9 (SNS2/NaN) by immunohistochemistry in rat models of neuropathic pain both with an intermingling of intact and degenerated axons in the nerve stump (SNL and CCI) and with a co-mingling in the same DRG of neurons with injured and uninjured axons (sciatic axotomy and SNI). The expression of Nav1.8 and Nav1.9 protein was abolished in all injured DRG neurons, in all models. In intact DRGs and in neighboring non-injured neurons, the expression and the distribution among the A- and C-fiber neuronal populations of Nav1.8 and Nav1.9 was, however, unchanged. While it is unlikely, therefore, that a change in the expression of TTX-resistant VGSCs in non-injured neurons contributes to neuropathic pain, it is essential that molecular alterations in both injured and non-injured neurons in neuropathic pain models are investigated.

  12. Transient Receptor Potential Channels in the Vasculature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Earley, Scott; Brayden, Joseph E.

    2015-01-01

    The mammalian genome encodes 28 distinct members of the transient receptor potential (TRP) superfamily of cation channels, which exhibit varying degrees of selectivity for different ionic species. Multiple TRP channels are present in all cells and are involved in diverse aspects of cellular function, including sensory perception and signal transduction. Notably, TRP channels are involved in regulating vascular function and pathophysiology, the focus of this review. TRP channels in vascular smooth muscle cells participate in regulating contractility and proliferation, whereas endothelial TRP channel activity is an important contributor to endothelium-dependent vasodilation, vascular wall permeability, and angiogenesis. TRP channels are also present in perivascular sensory neurons and astrocytic endfeet proximal to cerebral arterioles, where they participate in the regulation of vascular tone. Almost all of these functions are mediated by changes in global intracellular Ca2+ levels or subcellular Ca2+ signaling events. In addition to directly mediating Ca2+ entry, TRP channels influence intracellular Ca2+ dynamics through membrane depolarization associated with the influx of cations or through receptor- or store-operated mechanisms. Dysregulation of TRP channels is associated with vascular-related pathologies, including hypertension, neointimal injury, ischemia-reperfusion injury, pulmonary edema, and neurogenic inflammation. In this review, we briefly consider general aspects of TRP channel biology and provide an in-depth discussion of the functions of TRP channels in vascular smooth muscle cells, endothelial cells, and perivascular cells under normal and pathophysiological conditions. PMID:25834234

  13. (/sup 3/H)MK-801 labels a site on the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor channel complex in rat brain membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wong, E.H.; Knight, A.R.; Woodruff, G.N.

    1988-01-01

    The potent noncompetitive N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonist (/sup 3/H)MK-801 bound with nanomolar affinity to rat brain membranes in a reversible, saturable, and stereospecific manner. The affinity of (/sup 3/H)MK-801 was considerably higher in 5 mM Tris-HCl (pH 7.4) than in previous studies using Krebs-Henseleit buffer. (/sup 3/H)MK-801 labels a homogeneous population of sites in rat cerebral cortical membranes with KD of 6.3 nM and Bmax of 2.37 pmol/mg of protein. This binding was unevenly distributed among brain regions, with hippocampus greater than cortex greater than olfactory bulb = striatum greater than medulla-pons, and the cerebellum failing to show significant binding. Detailed pharmacological characterization indicated (/sup 3/H)MK-801 binding to a site which was competitively and potently inhibited by known noncompetitive NMDA receptor antagonists, such as phencyclidine, thienylcyclohexylpiperidine (TCP), ketamine, N-allylnormetazocine (SKF 10,047), cyclazocine, and etoxadrol, a specificity similar to sites labelled by (/sup 3/H)TCP. These sites were distinct from the high-affinity sites labelled by the sigma receptor ligand (+)-(/sup 3/H)SKF 10,047. (/sup 3/H)MK-801 binding was allosterically modulated by the endogenous NMDA receptor antagonist Mg2+ and by other active divalent cations. These data suggest that (/sup 3/H)MK-801 labels a high-affinity site on the NMDA receptor channel complex, distinct from the NMDA recognition site, which is responsible for the blocking action of MK-801 and other noncompetitive NMDA receptor antagonists.

  14. Sensory Perception: Lessons from Synesthesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, Joshua Paul

    2013-01-01

    Synesthesia, the conscious, idiosyncratic, repeatable, and involuntary sensation of one sensory modality in response to another, is a condition that has puzzled both researchers and philosophers for centuries. Much time has been spent proving the condition’s existence as well as investigating its etiology, but what can be learned from synesthesia remains a poorly discussed topic. Here, synaesthesia is presented as a possible answer rather than a question to the current gaps in our understanding of sensory perception. By first appreciating the similarities between normal sensory perception and synesthesia, one can use what is known about synaesthesia, from behavioral and imaging studies, to inform our understanding of “normal” sensory perception. In particular, in considering synesthesia, one can better understand how and where the different sensory modalities interact in the brain, how different sensory modalities can interact without confusion ― the binding problem ― as well as how sensory perception develops. PMID:23766741

  15. Why are sensory axons more vulnerable for ischemia than motor axons?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeannette Hofmeijer

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: In common peripheral neuropathies, sensory symptoms usually prevail over motor symptoms. This predominance of sensory symptoms may result from higher sensitivity of sensory axons to ischemia. METHODS: We measured median nerve compound sensory action potentials (CSAPs, compound muscle action potentials (CMAPs, and excitability indices in five healthy subjects during forearm ischemia lasting up to disappearance of both CSAPs and CMAPs. RESULTS: ISCHEMIA INDUCED: (1 earlier disappearance of CSAPs than CMAPs (mean ± standard deviation 30±5 vs. 46±6 minutes, (2 initial changes compatible with axonal depolarization on excitability testing (decrease in threshold, increase in strength duration time constant (SDTC and refractory period, and decrease in absolute superexcitability which were all more prominent in sensory than in motor axons, and (3 a subsequent decrease of SDTC reflecting a decrease in persistent Na(+ conductance during continuing depolarisation. INTERPRETATION: Our study shows that peripheral sensory axons are more vulnerable for ischemia than motor axons, with faster inexcitability during ischemia. Excitability studies during ischemia showed that this was associated with faster depolarization and faster persistent Na(+ channel inactivation in sensory than in motor axons. These findings might be attributed to differences in ion channel composition between sensory and motor axons and may contribute to the predominance of sensory over motor symptoms in common peripheral neuropathies.

  16. DEG/ENaC but not TRP channels are the major mechanoelectrical transduction channels in a C. elegans nociceptor.

    OpenAIRE

    Geffeney, Shana L.; Cueva, Juan G.; Glauser, Dominique A.; Doll, Joseph C.; Lee, Tim Hau-Chen; Montoya, Misty; Karania, Snetu; Garakani, Arman M.; Pruitt, Beth L.; Goodman, Miriam B.

    2011-01-01

    Many nociceptors detect mechanical cues, but the ion channels responsible for mechanotransduction in these sensory neurons remain obscure. Using in vivo recordings and genetic dissection, we identified the DEG/ENaC protein, DEG-1, as the major mechanotransduction channel in ASH, a polymodal nociceptor in Caenorhabditis elegans. But, DEG-1 is not the only mechanotransduction channel in ASH: loss of deg-1 revealed a minor current whose properties differ from those expected of DEG/ENaC channels....

  17. Sensory Integration with Articulated Motion on a Humanoid Robot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Rojas

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the integration of articulated motion with auditory and visual sensory information that enables a humanoid robot to achieve certain reflex actions that mimic those of people. Reflexes such as reach-and-grasp behavior enables the robot to learn, through experience, its own state and that of the world. A humanoid robot with binaural audio input, stereo vision, and pneumatic arms and hands exhibited tightly coupled sensory-motor behaviors in four different demonstrations. The complexity of successive demonstrations was increased to show that the reflexive sensory-motor behaviors combine to perform increasingly complex tasks. The humanoid robot executed these tasks effectively and established the groundwork for the further development of hardware and software systems, sensory-motor vector-space representations, and coupling with higher-level cognition.

  18. Sensory determinants of the autonomous sensory meridian response (ASMR: understanding the triggers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emma L. Barratt

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The autonomous sensory meridian response (ASMR is an atypical sensory phenomenon involving electrostatic-like tingling sensations in response to certain sensory, primarily audio-visual, stimuli. The current study used an online questionnaire, completed by 130 people who self-reported experiencing ASMR. We aimed to extend preliminary investigations into the experience, and establish key multisensory factors contributing to the successful induction of ASMR through online media. Aspects such as timing and trigger load, atmosphere, and characteristics of ASMR content, ideal spatial distance from various types of stimuli, visual characteristics, context and use of ASMR triggers, and audio preferences are explored. Lower-pitched, complex sounds were found to be especially effective triggers, as were slow-paced, detail-focused videos. Conversely, background music inhibited the sensation for many respondents. These results will help in designing media for ASMR induction.

  19. Sensory determinants of the autonomous sensory meridian response (ASMR): understanding the triggers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barratt, Emma L; Spence, Charles; Davis, Nick J

    2017-01-01

    The autonomous sensory meridian response (ASMR) is an atypical sensory phenomenon involving electrostatic-like tingling sensations in response to certain sensory, primarily audio-visual, stimuli. The current study used an online questionnaire, completed by 130 people who self-reported experiencing ASMR. We aimed to extend preliminary investigations into the experience, and establish key multisensory factors contributing to the successful induction of ASMR through online media. Aspects such as timing and trigger load, atmosphere, and characteristics of ASMR content, ideal spatial distance from various types of stimuli, visual characteristics, context and use of ASMR triggers, and audio preferences are explored. Lower-pitched, complex sounds were found to be especially effective triggers, as were slow-paced, detail-focused videos. Conversely, background music inhibited the sensation for many respondents. These results will help in designing media for ASMR induction.

  20. A Ca(v)3.2/Stac1 molecular complex controls T-type channel expression at the plasma membrane

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Rzhepetskyy, Yuriy; Lazniewska, Joanna; Proft, Juliane; Campiglio, M.; Flucher, B. E.; Weiss, Norbert

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 10, č. 5 (2016), s. 346-354 ISSN 1933-6950 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA15-13556S; GA MŠk 7AMB15FR015 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : Ca(v)3 * 2 channel * Stac adaptor protein * trafficking * T-type calcium channel Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 2.042, year: 2016

  1. Drosophila TRP channels and animal behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fowler, Melissa A.; Montell, Craig

    2012-01-01

    Multiple classes of cell surface receptors and ion channels participate in the detection of changes in environmental stimuli, and thereby influence animal behavior. Among the many classes of ion channels, Transient Receptor Potential (TRP) cation channels are notable in contributing to virtually every sensory modality, and in controlling a daunting array of behaviors. TRP channels appear to be conserved in all metazoan organisms including worms, insects and humans. Flies encode 13 TRPs, most of which are expressed and function in sensory neurons, and impact behaviors ranging from phototaxis to thermotaxis, gravitaxis, the avoidance of noxious tastants and smells and proprioception. Multiple diseases result from defects in TRPs, and flies provide an excellent animal model for dissecting the mechanisms underlying “TRPopathies.” Drosophila TRPs also function in the sensation of botanically derived insect repellents, and related TRPs in insect pests are potential targets for the development of improved repellents to combat insect-borne diseases. PMID:22877650

  2. Transcendence and Sensoriness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Protestant theology and culture are known for a reserved, at times skeptical, attitude to the use of art and aesthetic forms of expression in a religious context. In Transcendence and Sensoriness, this attitude is analysed and discussed both theoretically and through case studies considered...... in a broad theological and philosophical framework of religious aesthetics. Nordic scholars of theology, philosophy, art, music, and architecture, discuss questions of transcendence, the human senses, and the arts in order to challenge established perspectives within the aesthetics of religion and theology....

  3. Feeling force: physical and physiological principles enabling sensory mechanotransduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katta, Samata; Krieg, Michael; Goodman, Miriam B

    2015-01-01

    Organisms as diverse as microbes, roundworms, insects, and mammals detect and respond to applied force. In animals, this ability depends on ionotropic force receptors, known as mechanoelectrical transduction (MeT) channels, that are expressed by specialized mechanoreceptor cells embedded in diverse tissues and distributed throughout the body. These cells mediate hearing, touch, and proprioception and play a crucial role in regulating organ function. Here, we attempt to integrate knowledge about the architecture of mechanoreceptor cells and their sensory organs with principles of cell mechanics, and we consider how engulfing tissues contribute to mechanical filtering. We address progress in the quest to identify the proteins that form MeT channels and to understand how these channels are gated. For clarity and convenience, we focus on sensory mechanobiology in nematodes, fruit flies, and mice. These themes are emphasized: asymmetric responses to applied forces, which may reflect anisotropy of the structure and mechanics of sensory mechanoreceptor cells, and proteins that function as MeT channels, which appear to have emerged many times through evolution.

  4. Kontinuirana senzorna analgezija olajša diferencialno diagnozo in zdravljenje kompleksnega regionalnega bolečinskega sindroma (CRPS/Sudeck): Continuous sensory analgesia helps the differential diagnosis and the treatment of complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS/RSD):

    OpenAIRE

    MARGIĆ, Krunoslav; Pirc, Jelka

    2001-01-01

    Background. CRPS/RSD still offers more questions then answers. The initial events and pathophysiology are unknown; the treatment is unsuccessful and the results are poor The authors have transmitted their experiences with continuous sensory analgesia of brachial plexus in the treatment of heavy injured hands to the treatment of CRPS. Efficient analgesia, control of vegetative nerve system and painless exercises are of outmost importance in the treatment of CRPS. Patients and methods. From 199...

  5. Modulation of innate and learned sexual behaviors by the TRP channel Painless expressed in the fruit fly brain: behavioral genetic analysis and its implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shoma eSato

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Transient receptor potential (TRP channels have attracted considerable attention because of their vital roles in primary sensory neurons, mediating responses to a wide variety of external environmental stimuli. However, much less is known about how TRP channels in the brain respond to intrinsic signals and are involved in neurophysiological processes that control complex behaviors. Painless (Pain is the Drosophila TRP channel that was initially identified as a molecular sensor responsible for detecting noxious thermal and mechanical stimuli. Here, we review recent behavioral genetic studies demonstrating that Pain expressed in the brain plays a critical role in both innate and learned aspects of sexual behaviors. Several members of the TRP channel superfamily play evolutionarily conserved roles in sensory neurons as well as in other peripheral tissues. It is thus expected that brain TRP channels in vertebrates and invertebrates would have some common physiological functions. Studies of Pain in the Drosophila brain using a unique combination of genetics and physiological techniques should provide valuable insights into the fundamental principles concerning TRP channels expressed in the vertebrate and invertebrate brains.

  6. SENSORY AND CONSUMER TESTING LABORATORY

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — These laboratories conduct a wide range of studies to characterize the sensory properties of and consumer responses to foods, beverages, and other consumer products....

  7. A role for K2P channels in the operation of somatosensory nociceptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leigh Daniel Plant

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The ability to sense mechanical, thermal and chemical stimuli is critical to normal physiology and the perception of pain. Contact with noxious stimuli triggers a complex series of events that initiate innate protective mechanisms designed to minimize or avoid injury. Extreme temperatures, mechanical stress and chemical irritants are detected by specific ion channels and receptors clustered on the terminals of nociceptive sensory nerve fibers and transduced into electrical information. Propagation of these signals, from distant sites in the body to the spinal cord and the higher processing centers of the brain, is also orchestrated by distinct groups of ion channels. Since their identification in 1995, evidence has emerged to support roles for K2P channels at each step along this pathway, as receptors for physiological and noxious stimuli, and as determinants of nociceptor excitability and conductivity. In addition, the many subtypes of K2P channels expressed in somatosensory neurons are also implicated in mediating the effects of volatile, general anesthetics on the central and peripheral nervous systems. Here, I offer a critical review of the existing data supporting these attributes of K2P channel function and discuss how diverse regulatory mechanisms that control the activity of K2P channels act to govern the operation of nociceptors.

  8. Assay for calcium channels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glossmann, H.; Ferry, D.R.

    1985-01-01

    This chapter focuses on biochemical assays for Ca/sup 2 +/-selective channels in electrically excitable membranes which are blocked in electrophysiological and pharmacological experiments by verapamil, 1,4-dihydropyridines, diltiazen (and various other drugs), as well as inorganic di- or trivalent cations. The strategy employed is to use radiolabeled 1,4-dihydropyridine derivatives which block calcium channels with ED/sub 50/ values in the nanomolar range. Although tritiated d-cis-diltiazem and verapamil can be used to label calcium channels, the 1,4-dihydropyridines offer numerous advantages. The various sections cover tissue specificity of channel labeling, the complex interactions of divalent cations with the (/sup 3/H)nimodipine-labeled calcium channels, and the allosteric regulation of (/sup 3/H)nimodipine binding by the optically pure enantiomers of phenylalkylamine and benzothiazepine calcium channel blockers. A comparison of the properties of different tritiated 1,4-dihydropyridine radioligands and the iodinated channel probe (/sup 125/I)iodipine is given.

  9. Worms with a single functional sensory cilium generate proper neuron-specific behavioral output.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senti, Gabriele; Ezcurra, Marina; Löbner, Jana; Schafer, William R; Swoboda, Peter

    2009-10-01

    Studying the development and mechanisms of sensory perception is challenging in organisms with complex neuronal networks. The worm Caenorhabditis elegans possesses a simple neuronal network of 302 neurons that includes 60 ciliated sensory neurons (CSNs) for detecting external sensory input. C. elegans is thus an excellent model in which to study sensory neuron development, function, and behavior. We have generated a genetic rescue system that allows in vivo analyses of isolated CSNs at both cellular and systemic levels. We used the RFX transcription factor DAF-19, a key regulator of ciliogenesis. Mutations in daf-19 result in the complete absence of all sensory cilia and thus of external sensory input. In daf-19 mutants, we used cell-specific rescue of DAF-19 function in selected neurons, thereby generating animals with single, fully functional CSNs. Otherwise and elsewhere these animals are completely devoid of any environmental input through cilia. We demonstrated the rescue of fully functional, single cilia using fluorescent markers, sensory behavioral assays, and calcium imaging. Our technique, functional rescue in single sensory cilia (FRISSC), can thus cell-autonomously and cell-specifically restore the function of single sensory neurons and their ability to respond to sensory input. FRISSC can be adapted to many different CSNs and thus constitutes an excellent tool for studying sensory behaviors, both in single animals and in populations of worms. FRISSC will be very useful for the molecular dissection of sensory perception in CSNs and for the analysis of the developmental aspects of ciliogenesis.

  10. Multi-scaled normal mode analysis method for dynamics simulation of protein-membrane complexes: A case study of potassium channel gating motion correlations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Xiaokun; Han, Min; Ming, Dengming, E-mail: dming@fudan.edu.cn [Department of Physiology and Biophysics, School of Life Sciences, Fudan University, Shanghai (China)

    2015-10-07

    Membrane proteins play critically important roles in many cellular activities such as ions and small molecule transportation, signal recognition, and transduction. In order to fulfill their functions, these proteins must be placed in different membrane environments and a variety of protein-lipid interactions may affect the behavior of these proteins. One of the key effects of protein-lipid interactions is their ability to change the dynamics status of membrane proteins, thus adjusting their functions. Here, we present a multi-scaled normal mode analysis (mNMA) method to study the dynamics perturbation to the membrane proteins imposed by lipid bi-layer membrane fluctuations. In mNMA, channel proteins are simulated at all-atom level while the membrane is described with a coarse-grained model. mNMA calculations clearly show that channel gating motion can tightly couple with a variety of membrane deformations, including bending and twisting. We then examined bi-channel systems where two channels were separated with different distances. From mNMA calculations, we observed both positive and negative gating correlations between two neighboring channels, and the correlation has a maximum as the channel center-to-center distance is close to 2.5 times of their diameter. This distance is larger than recently found maximum attraction distance between two proteins embedded in membrane which is 1.5 times of the protein size, indicating that membrane fluctuation might impose collective motions among proteins within a larger area. The hybrid resolution feature in mNMA provides atomic dynamics information for key components in the system without costing much computer resource. We expect it to be a conventional simulation tool for ordinary laboratories to study the dynamics of very complicated biological assemblies. The source code is available upon request to the authors.

  11. A Characeae Cells Plasma Membrane as a Model for Selection of Bioactive Compounds and Drugs: Interaction of HAMLET-Like Complexes with Ion Channels of Chara corallina Cells Plasmalemma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kataev, Anatoly; Zherelova, Olga; Grishchenko, Valery

    2016-12-01

    Interaction of a HAMLET-like La-OA cytotoxic complex (human α-lactalbumin-oleic acid) and its constituents with the excitable plasmalemma of giant Chara corallina cells was investigated. The voltage-clamp technique was used to study Ca(2+) and Cl(-) transient currents in the plasmalemma of intact cells. The action of the complex and OA on the target cell membrane has a dose-dependent character. It was found that the La-OA complex has an inhibiting effect on Ca(2+) current across the plasmalemma, while α-lactalbumin alone does not affect the electrophysiological characteristics of the cellular membrane. However, oleic acid blocks Ca(2+) current across the plasmalemma. This is accompanied by the induction of a non-selective conductivity in the cellular membrane, a decrease in the resting potential and plasma membrane resistance of algal cells. We propose that the cytotoxicity of La-OA and other HAMLET-like complexes is determined by oleic acid acting as a blocker of potential-dependent Ca(2+) channels in the plasma membrane of target cells. The presented results show that the study model of green algae C. corallina cells plasmalemma is a convenient tool for the investigation of ion channels in many animal cells.

  12. Sensory Dominance in Product Experience

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fenko, A.B.

    2010-01-01

    People perceive the material world around them with their five senses. Information from different sensory modalities is integrated in the brain to create a stable and meaningful experience of objects, including industrial products that accompany us in our everyday life. Some of the sensory systems

  13. Sensory aspects of movement disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Neepa; Jankovic, Joseph; Hallett, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Movement disorders, which include disorders such as Parkinson’s disease, dystonia, Tourette’s syndrome, restless legs syndrome, and akathisia, have traditionally been considered to be disorders of impaired motor control resulting predominantly from dysfunction of the basal ganglia. This notion has been revised largely because of increasing recognition of associated behavioural, psychiatric, autonomic, and other non-motor symptoms. The sensory aspects of movement disorders include intrinsic sensory abnormalities and the effects of external sensory input on the underlying motor abnormality. The basal ganglia, cerebellum, thalamus, and their connections, coupled with altered sensory input, seem to play a key part in abnormal sensorimotor integration. However, more investigation into the phenomenology and physiological basis of sensory abnormalities, and about the role of the basal ganglia, cerebellum, and related structures in somatosensory processing, and its effect on motor control, is needed. PMID:24331796

  14. Sensory analysis of pet foods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koppel, Kadri

    2014-08-01

    Pet food palatability depends first and foremost on the pet and is related to the pet food sensory properties such as aroma, texture and flavor. Sensory analysis of pet foods may be conducted by humans via descriptive or hedonic analysis, pets via acceptance or preference tests, and through a number of instrumental analysis methods. Sensory analysis of pet foods provides additional information on reasons behind palatable and unpalatable foods as pets lack linguistic capabilities. Furthermore, sensory analysis may be combined with other types of information such as personality and environment factors to increase understanding of acceptable pet foods. Most pet food flavor research is proprietary and, thus, there are a limited number of publications available. Funding opportunities for pet food studies would increase research and publications and this would help raise public awareness of pet food related issues. This mini-review addresses current pet food sensory analysis literature and discusses future challenges and possibilities. © 2014 Society of Chemical Industry.

  15. Tic modulation using sensory tricks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, Rebecca Wolf

    2013-01-01

    A sensory trick, or geste antagoniste, is defined as a physical gesture (such as a touch on a particular body part) that mitigates the production of an involuntary movement. This phenomenon is most commonly described as a feature of dystonia. Here we present a case of successful modulation of tics using sensory tricks. A case report and video are presented. The case and video demonstrate a 19-year-old male who successfully controlled his tics with various sensory tricks. It is underappreciated by movement disorder physicians that sensory tricks can play a role in tics. Introducing this concept to patients could potentially help in tic control. In addition, understanding the pathophysiological underpinnings of sensory tricks could help in the understanding of the pathophysiology of tics.

  16. Speciation through sensory drive in cichlid fish

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Seehausen, Ole; Terai, Yohey; Magalhaes, Isabel S.; Carleton, Karen L.; Mrosso, Hillary D. J.; Miyagi, Ryutaro; van der Sluijs, Inke; Schneider, Maria V.; Maan, Martine E.; Tachida, Hidenori; Imai, Hiroo; Okada, Norihiro

    2008-01-01

    Theoretically, divergent selection on sensory systems can cause speciation through sensory drive. However, empirical evidence is rare and incomplete. Here we demonstrate sensory drive speciation within island populations of cichlid fish. We identify the ecological and molecular basis of divergent

  17. Functional modulation of cerebral gamma-aminobutyric acidA receptor/benzodiazepine receptor/chloride ion channel complex with ethyl beta-carboline-3-carboxylate: Presence of independent binding site for ethyl beta-carboline-3-carboxylate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taguchi, J.; Kuriyama, K. (Kyoto Prefectural Univ. of Medicine (Japan))

    1990-05-01

    Effect of ethyl beta-carboline-3-carboxylate (beta-CCE) on the function of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)A receptor/benzodiazepine receptor/chloride ion channel complex was studied. Beta-CCE noncompetitively and competitively inhibited (3H)flunitrazepam binding to benzodiazepine receptor, but not (3H)muscimol binding to GABAA receptor as well as t-(3H)butylbicycloorthobenzoate (( 3H) TBOB) binding to chloride ion channel, in particulate fraction of the mouse brain. Ro15-1788 also inhibited competitively (3H) flunitrazepam binding. On the other hand, the binding of beta-(3H)CCE was inhibited noncompetitively and competitively by clonazepam and competitively by Ro15-1788. In agreement with these results, benzodiazepines-stimulated (3H)muscimol binding was antagonized by beta-CCE and Ro15-1788. Gel column chromatography for the solubilized fraction from cerebral particulate fraction by 0.2% sodium deoxycholate (DOC-Na) in the presence of 1 M KCl indicated that beta-(3H)CCE binding site was eluted in the same fraction (molecular weight, 250,000) as the binding sites for (3H)flunitrazepam, (3H)muscimol and (3H)TBOB. GABA-stimulated 36Cl- influx into membrane vesicles prepared from the bovine cerebral cortex was stimulated and attenuated by flunitrazepam and beta-CCE, respectively. These effects of flunitrazepam and beta-CCE on the GABA-stimulated 36Cl- influx were antagonized by Ro15-1788. The present results suggest that the binding site for beta-CCE, which resides on GABAA receptor/benzodiazepine receptor/chloride ion channel complex, may be different from that for benzodiazepine. Possible roles of beta-CCE binding site in the allosteric inhibitions on benzodiazepine binding site as well as on the functional coupling between chloride ion channel and GABAA receptor are also suggested.

  18. MEMS in microfluidic channels.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ashby, Carol Iris Hill; Okandan, Murat; Michalske, Terry A.; Sounart, Thomas L.; Matzke, Carolyn M.

    2004-03-01

    Microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) comprise a new class of devices that include various forms of sensors and actuators. Recent studies have shown that microscale cantilever structures are able to detect a wide range of chemicals, biomolecules or even single bacterial cells. In this approach, cantilever deflection replaces optical fluorescence detection thereby eliminating complex chemical tagging steps that are difficult to achieve with chip-based architectures. A key challenge to utilizing this new detection scheme is the incorporation of functionalized MEMS structures within complex microfluidic channel architectures. The ability to accomplish this integration is currently limited by the processing approaches used to seal lids on pre-etched microfluidic channels. This report describes Sandia's first construction of MEMS instrumented microfluidic chips, which were fabricated by combining our leading capabilities in MEMS processing with our low-temperature photolithographic method for fabricating microfluidic channels. We have explored in-situ cantilevers and other similar passive MEMS devices as a new approach to directly sense fluid transport, and have successfully monitored local flow rates and viscosities within microfluidic channels. Actuated MEMS structures have also been incorporated into microfluidic channels, and the electrical requirements for actuation in liquids have been quantified with an elegant theory. Electrostatic actuation in water has been accomplished, and a novel technique for monitoring local electrical conductivities has been invented.

  19. Complex Membrane Channel Blockade: A Unifying Hypothesis for the Prodromal and Acute Neuropsychiatric Sequelae Resulting from Exposure to the Antimalarial Drug Mefloquine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jane C. Quinn

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The alkaloid toxin quinine and its derivative compounds have been used for many centuries as effective medications for the prevention and treatment of malaria. More recently, synthetic derivatives, such as the quinoline derivative mefloquine (bis(trifluoromethyl-(2-piperidyl-4-quinolinemethanol, have been widely used to combat disease caused by chloroquine-resistant strains of the malaria parasite, Plasmodium falciparum. However, the parent compound quinine, as well as its more recent counterparts, suffers from an incidence of adverse neuropsychiatric side effects ranging from mild mood disturbances and anxiety to hallucinations, seizures, and psychosis. This review considers how the pharmacology, cellular neurobiology, and membrane channel kinetics of mefloquine could lead to the significant and sometimes life-threatening neurotoxicity associated with mefloquine exposure. A key role for mefloquine blockade of ATP-sensitive potassium channels and connexins in the substantia nigra is considered as a unifying hypothesis for the pathogenesis of severe neuropsychiatric events after mefloquine exposure in humans.

  20. Are TMCs the Mechanotransduction Channels of Vertebrate Hair Cells?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corey, David P; Holt, Jeffrey R

    2016-10-26

    Sensory transduction in vertebrate hair cells and the molecules that mediate it have long been of great interest. Some components of the mechanotransduction apparatus have been identified, most as deafness gene products. Although prior candidates for the mechanotransduction channel have been proposed, each has faded with new evidence. Now, two strong candidates, TMC1 and TMC2 (transmembrane channel-like), have emerged from discovery of deafness genes in humans and mice. They are expressed at the right time during development: exactly at the onset of mechanosensitivity. They are expressed in the right place: in hair cells but not surrounding cells. Fluorescently tagged TMCs localize to the tips of stereocilia, the site of the transduction channels. TMCs bind other proteins essential for mechanosensation, suggesting a larger transduction complex. Although TMC1 and TMC2 can substitute for each other, genetic deletion of both renders mouse hair cells mechanically insensitive. Finally, the conductance and Ca(2+) selectivity of the transduction channels depend on the TMC proteins, differing when hair cells express one or the other TMC, and differing if TMC1 harbors a point mutation. Some contrary evidence has emerged: a current activated in hair cells by negative pressure, with some similarity to the transduction current, persists in TMC knock-outs. But it is not clear that this anomalous current is carried by the same proteins. Further evidence is desired, such as production of a mechanically gated conductance by pure TMCs. But the great majority of evidence is consistent with these TMCs as pore-forming subunits of the long-sought hair-cell transduction channel. Copyright © 2016 the authors 0270-6474/16/3610921-06$15.00/0.

  1. Modulation of TRESK background K+ channel by membrane stretch.

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    Gerard Callejo

    Full Text Available The two-pore domain K(+ channel TRESK is expressed in dorsal root ganglion and trigeminal sensory neurons where it is a major contributor to background K(+ current. TRESK acts as a break to prevent excessive sensory neuron activation and decreases in its expression or function have been involved in neuronal hyperexcitability after injury/inflammation, migraine or altered sensory perception (tingling, cooling and pungent burning sensations. All these effects have implicated this channel in nociception and mechanotransduction. To determine the role of TRESK in sensory transduction, we studied its sensitivity to changes in membrane tension (stretch in heterologous systems, F-11 cells and trigeminal neurons. Laminar shear stress increased TRESK currents by 22-30%. An increase in membrane tension induced by cell swelling (hypotonic medium produced a reversible elevation of TRESK currents (39.9%. In contrast, cell shrinkage (hypertonic solution produced the opposite effect. Membrane crenators or cup-formers produced equivalent effects. In trigeminal sensory neurons, TRESK channels were mechanically stimulated by negative pressure, which led to a 1.51-fold increase in channel open probability. TRESK-like currents in trigeminal neurons were additively inhibited by arachidonic acid, acidic pH and hypertonic stimulation, conditions usually found after tissue inflammation. Our results show that TRESK is modulated by changes in cell membrane tension and/or cell volume. Several key players released during inflammation or tissue injury could modulate sensory neuron activation through small changes in membrane tension.

  2. Interplay between TRP channels and the cytoskeleton in health and disease.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Clark, K.; Middelbeek, J.; Leeuwen, F.N. van

    2008-01-01

    Transient receptor potential (TRP) channels are a family of cation channels that play a key role in ion homeostasis and cell volume regulation. In addition, TRP channels are considered universal integrators of sensory information required for taste, vision, hearing, touch, temperature, and the

  3. Function and regulation of the channel-kinase TRPM7 in health and disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, D.; Middelbeek, J.; Leeuwen, F.N. van; Jalink, K.

    2014-01-01

    Transient receptor potential (TRP) cation channels represent a large and diverse family of ion channels that act as important transducers of sensory information. The Melastatin subfamily member TRPM7 has garnered much interest due to its functional kinase domain; a unique feature among ion channels.

  4. What is the evidence for the role of TRP channels in inflammatory and immune cells?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parenti, A; De Logu, F; Benemei, S

    2016-01-01

    A complex network of many interacting mechanisms orchestrates immune and inflammatory responses. Among these, the cation channels of the transient receptor potential (TRP) family expressed by resident tissue cells, inflammatory and immune cells and distinct subsets of primary sensory neurons, have emerged as a novel and interrelated system to detect and respond to harmful agents. TRP channels, by means of their direct effect on the intracellular levels of cations and/or through the indirect modulation of a large series of intracellular pathways, orchestrate a range of cellular processes, such as cytokine production, cell differentiation and cytotoxicity. The contribution of TRP channels to the transition of inflammation and immune responses from a defensive early response to a chronic and pathological condition is also emerging as a possible underlying mechanism in various diseases. This review discusses the roles of TRP channels in inflammatory and immune cell function and provides an overview of the effects of inflammatory and immune TRP channels on the pathogenesis of human diseases. PMID:26603538

  5. Super-resolution imaging visualizes the eightfold symmetry of gp210 proteins around the nuclear pore complex and resolves the central channel with nanometer resolution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Löschberger, A.; Van de Linde, S.; Debauvalle, M.C.; Rieger, B.; Heilemann, M.; Krohne, G.; Sauer, M.

    2012-01-01

    One of the most complex molecular machines of cells is the nuclear pore complex (NPC), which controls all trafficking of molecules in and out of the nucleus. Because of their importance for cellular processes such as gene expression and cytoskeleton organization, the structure of NPCs has been

  6. Multi-sensory Sculpting (MSS)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    von Wallpach, Sylvia; Kreuzer, Maria

    2013-01-01

    This article approaches brand knowledge retrieval from an embodied cognition perspective, assuming that brand-related cognitive representations result from conscious and non-conscious brand experiences involving multiple senses. Consumers store embodied brand knowledge on a predominantly non......-conscious and modality-specific level and use multi-sensory metaphors to express embodied knowledge. Retrieving embodied brand knowledge requires methods that (a) stimulate various senses that have been involved in brand knowledge formation and (b) give consumers the opportunity to express themselves metaphorically...... in a format similar to their cognitive representations. This article introduces multi-sensory sculpting (MSS) as a method that allows retrieving embodied brand knowledge via multi-sensory metaphors and proposes a multi-layered metaphor analysis procedure to interpret these multi-sensory data. The paper...

  7. Information on infraorbital nerve damage from multitesting of sensory function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vriens, J P; van der Glas, H W; Bosman, F; Koole, R; Moos, K F

    1998-02-01

    Sensory disturbance following orbitozygomatic complex fractures was studied in 65 patients from 4 treatment groups which represented potentially varying degrees of sensory disturbance. The fracture-type-dependent treatments were: no surgical intervention (n = 20), closed reduction with or without wire fixation (n = 17), open reduction with miniplate fixation (n = 15) and/or reconstruction of the orbital floor (n = 13). In order to assess the sensory function of different classes of afferent fibres, several methods of sensory testing were applied. On average 6.3 months after treatment, the patient's report was obtained, and tests regarding touch, two methods of two-point discrimination, and cold were applied on the cheek and upper lip. The degree of sensory disturbance was method-dependent. In patients who underwent closed reduction, pronounced levels of positive correlation occurred between results from different tests or from both test sites. The levels of these correlations were, in general, low for all other treatments. These findings suggest that afferent fibres of both large and small diameter tended to be permanently damaged in the patient group with closed reduction. In contrast, the types of sensory afferent fibres that were involved in the trauma and/or their recovery were highly variable within patients and sites for all other treatment groups.

  8. Analyzing sensory data with R

    CERN Document Server

    Le, Sebastien

    2014-01-01

    Quantitative Descriptive Approaches When panelists rate products according to one single list of attributes Data, sensory issues, notations In practice For experienced users: Measuring the impact of the experimental design on the perception of the products? When products are rated according to one single list of attributesData, sensory issues, notations In practice For experienced users: Adding supplementary information to the product space When products are rated according to several lists

  9. Sensory Dissonance Using Memory Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Karl Kristoffer

    2015-01-01

    Music may occur concurrently or in temporal sequences. Current machine-based methods for the estimation of qualities of the music are unable to take into account the influence of temporal context. A method for calculating dissonance from audio, called sensory dissonance is improved by the use...... of a memory model. This approach is validated here by the comparison of the sensory dissonance using memory model to data obtained using human subjects....

  10. Two-point versus multiple-point geostatistics: the ability of geostatistical methods to capture complex geobodies and their facies associations—an application to a channelized carbonate reservoir, southwest Iran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashemi, Seyyedhossein; Javaherian, Abdolrahim; Ataee-pour, Majid; Khoshdel, Hossein

    2014-12-01

    Facies models try to explain facies architectures which have a primary control on the subsurface heterogeneities and the fluid flow characteristics of a given reservoir. In the process of facies modeling, geostatistical methods are implemented to integrate different sources of data into a consistent model. The facies models should describe facies interactions; the shape and geometry of the geobodies as they occur in reality. Two distinct categories of geostatistical techniques are two-point and multiple-point (geo) statistics (MPS). In this study, both of the aforementioned categories were applied to generate facies models. A sequential indicator simulation (SIS) and a truncated Gaussian simulation (TGS) represented two-point geostatistical methods, and a single normal equation simulation (SNESIM) selected as an MPS simulation representative. The dataset from an extremely channelized carbonate reservoir located in southwest Iran was applied to these algorithms to analyze their performance in reproducing complex curvilinear geobodies. The SNESIM algorithm needs consistent training images (TI) in which all possible facies architectures that are present in the area are included. The TI model was founded on the data acquired from modern occurrences. These analogies delivered vital information about the possible channel geometries and facies classes that are typically present in those similar environments. The MPS results were conditioned to both soft and hard data. Soft facies probabilities were acquired from a neural network workflow. In this workflow, seismic-derived attributes were implemented as the input data. Furthermore, MPS realizations were conditioned to hard data to guarantee the exact positioning and continuity of the channel bodies. A geobody extraction workflow was implemented to extract the most certain parts of the channel bodies from the seismic data. These extracted parts of the channel bodies were applied to the simulation workflow as hard data. This

  11. Therapeutic approaches to ion channel diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camerino, Diana Conte; Desaphy, Jean-François; Tricarico, Domenico; Pierno, Sabata; Liantonio, Antonella

    2008-01-01

    More than 400 genes are known that encode ion channel subunits. In addition, alternative splicing and heteromeric assembly of different subunits increase tremendously the variety of ion channels. Such many channels are needed to accomplish very complex cellular functions, whereas dysfunction of ion channels are key events in many pathological processes. The recent discovery of ion channelopathies, which, in its more stringent definition, encloses monogenic disorders due to mutations in ion channel genes, has largely contributed to our understanding of the function of the various channel subtypes and of the role of ion channels in multigenic or acquired diseases. Last but not least, ion channels are the main targets of many drugs already used in the clinics. Most of these drugs were introduced in therapy based on the experience acquired quite empirically, and many were discovered afterward to target ion channels. Now, intense research is being conducted to develop new drugs acting selectively on ion channel subtypes and aimed at the understanding of the intimate drug-channel interaction. In this review, we first focus on the pharmacotherapy of ion channel diseases, which includes many drugs targeting ion channels. Then, we describe the molecular pharmacology of ion channels, including the more recent advancement in drug development. Among the newest aspect of ion channel pharmacology, we draw attention to how polymorphisms or mutations in ion channel genes may modify sensitivity to drugs, opening the way toward the development of pharmacogenetics.

  12. MARKETING CHANNELS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ljiljana Stošić Mihajlović

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Marketing channel is a set of entities and institutions, completion of distribution and marketing activities, attend the efficient and effective networking of producers and consumers. Marketing channels include the total flows of goods, money and information taking place between the institutions in the system of marketing, establishing a connection between them. The functions of the exchange, the physical supply and service activities, inherent in the system of marketing and trade. They represent paths which products and services are moving after the production, which will ultimately end up buying and eating by the user.

  13. The expression of Toll-like receptor 4, 7 and co-receptors in neurochemical sub-populations of rat trigeminal ganglion sensory neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helley, M P; Abate, W; Jackson, S K; Bennett, J H; Thompson, S W N

    2015-12-03

    The recent discovery that mammalian nociceptors express Toll-like receptors (TLRs) has raised the possibility that these cells directly detect and respond to pathogens with implications for either direct nociceptor activation or sensitization. A range of neuronal TLRs have been identified, however a detailed description regarding the distribution of expression of these receptors within sub-populations of sensory neurons is lacking. There is also some debate as to the composition of the TLR4 receptor complex on sensory neurons. Here we use a range of techniques to quantify the expression of TLR4, TLR7 and some associated molecules within neurochemically-identified sub-populations of trigeminal (TG) and dorsal root (DRG) ganglion sensory neurons. We also detail the pattern of expression and co-expression of two isoforms of lysophosphatidylcholine acyltransferase (LPCAT), a phospholipid remodeling enzyme previously shown to be involved in the lipopolysaccharide-dependent TLR4 response in monocytes, within sensory ganglia. Immunohistochemistry shows that both TLR4 and TLR7 preferentially co-localize with transient receptor potential vallinoid 1 (TRPV1) and purinergic receptor P2X ligand-gated ion channel 3 (P2X3), markers of nociceptor populations, within both TG and DRG. A gene expression profile shows that TG sensory neurons express a range of TLR-associated molecules. LPCAT1 is expressed by a proportion of both nociceptors and non-nociceptive neurons. LPCAT2 immunostaining is absent from neuronal profiles within both TG and DRG and is confined to non-neuronal cell types under naïve conditions. Together, our results show that nociceptors express the molecular machinery required to directly respond to pathogenic challenge independently from the innate immune system. Copyright © 2015 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Mechano- and Chemo-Sensory Polycystins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Amanda; Delmas, Patrick; Honoré, Eric

    Polycystins belong to the superfamily of transient receptor potential (TRP) channels and comprise five PKD1-like and three PKD2-like (TRPP) subunits. In this chapter, we review the general properties of polycystins and discuss their specific role in both mechanotransduction and chemoreception. The heteromer PKD1/PKD2 expressed at the membrane of the primary cilium of kidney epithelial cells is proposed to form a mechano-sensitive calcium channel that is opened by physiological fluid flow. Dysfunction or loss of PKD1 or PKD2 polycystin genes may be responsible for the inability of epithelial cells to sense mechanical cues, thus provoking autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD), one of the most prevalent genetic kidney disorders. pkd1 and pkd2 knock-out mice recapitulate the human disease. Similarly, PKD2 may function as a mechanosensory calcium channel in the immotile monocilia of the developing node transducing leftward flow into an increase in calcium and specifying the left-right axis. pkd2, unlike pkd1 knock-out embryos are characterized by right lung isomerism (situs inversus). Mechanical stimuli also induce cleavage and nuclear translocation of the PKD1 C-terminal tail, which enters the nucleus and initiates signaling processes involving the AP-1, STAT6 and P100 pathways. This intraproteolytic mechanism is implicated in the transduction of a change in renal fluid flow to a transcriptional long-term response. The heteromer PKD1L3/PKD2L1 is the basis for acid sensing in specialised sensory cells including the taste bud cells responsible for sour taste. Moreover, PKD1L3/PKD2L1 may be implicated in the chemosensitivity of neurons surrounding the spinal cord canal, sensing protons in the cerebrospinal fluid. These recent results demonstrate that polycystins fulfill a major sensory role in a variety of cells including kidney epithelial cells, taste buds cells and spinal cord neurons. Such mechanisms are involved in short- and long-term physiological

  15. Sensorimotor integration in dyslexic children under different sensory stimulations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André R Viana

    Full Text Available Dyslexic children, besides difficulties in mastering literacy, also show poor postural control that might be related to how sensory cues coming from different sensory channels are integrated into proper motor activity. Therefore, the aim of this study was to examine the relationship between sensory information and body sway, with visual and somatosensory information manipulated independent and concurrently, in dyslexic children. Thirty dyslexic and 30 non-dyslexic children were asked to stand as still as possible inside of a moving room either with eyes closed or open and either lightly touching a moveable surface or not for 60 seconds under five experimental conditions: (1 no vision and no touch; (2 moving room; (3 moving bar; (4 moving room and stationary touch; and (5 stationary room and moving bar. Body sway magnitude and the relationship between room/bar movement and body sway were examined. Results showed that dyslexic children swayed more than non-dyslexic children in all sensory condition. Moreover, in those trials with conflicting vision and touch manipulation, dyslexic children swayed less coherent with the stimulus manipulation compared to non-dyslexic children. Finally, dyslexic children showed higher body sway variability and applied higher force while touching the bar compared to non-dyslexic children. Based upon these results, we can suggest that dyslexic children are able to use visual and somatosensory information to control their posture and use the same underlying neural control processes as non-dyslexic children. However, dyslexic children show poorer performance and more variability while relating visual and somatosensory information and motor action even during a task that does not require an active cognitive and motor involvement. Further, in sensory conflict conditions, dyslexic children showed less coherent and more variable body sway. These results suggest that dyslexic children have difficulties in multisensory

  16. Sensory Topography of Oral Structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bearelly, Shethal; Cheung, Steven W

    2017-01-01

    Sensory function in the oral cavity and oropharynx is integral to effective deglutition and speech production. The main hurdle to evaluation of tactile consequences of upper aerodigestive tract diseases and treatments is access to a reliable clinical tool. We propose a rapid and reliable procedure to determine tactile thresholds using buckling monofilaments to advance care. To develop novel sensory testing monofilaments and map tactile thresholds of oral cavity and oropharyngeal structures. A prospective cross-sectional study of 37 healthy adults (12 men, 25 women), specifically without a medical history of head and neck surgery, radiation, or chemotherapy, was carried out in an academic tertiary medical center to capture normative data on tactile sensory function in oral structures. Cheung-Bearelly monofilaments were constructed by securing nylon monofilament sutures (2-0 through 9-0) in the lumen of 5-French ureteral catheters, exposing 20 mm for tapping action. Buckling force consistency was evaluated for 3 lots of each suture size. Sensory thresholds of 4 oral cavity and 2 oropharyngeal subsites in healthy participants (n = 37) were determined by classical signal detection methodology (d-prime ≥1). In 21 participants, test-retest reliability of sensory thresholds was evaluated. Separately in 16 participants, sensory thresholds determined by a modified staircase method were cross-validated with those obtained by classical signal detection. Buckling forces of successive suture sizes were distinct (P 0.7). The lower lip, anterior tongue, and buccal mucosa were more sensitive than the soft palate, posterior tongue, and posterior pharyngeal wall (P oral cavity and oropharyngeal tactile sensation is organized in accordance to decreasing sensitivity along the anteroposterior trajectory and growth of perceptual intensity at all subsites is log-linear. Cheung-Bearelly monofilaments are accessible, disposable, and consistent esthesiometers. This novel clinical

  17. Optical stimulation in mice lacking the TRPV1 channel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suh, Eul; Izzo Matic, Agnella; Otting, Margarete; Walsh, Joseph T., Jr.; Richter, Claus-Peter

    2009-02-01

    Lasers can be used to stimulate neural tissue, including the sciatic nerve or auditory neurons. Wells and coworkers suggested that neural tissue is likely stimulated by heat.[1,2] Ion channels that can be activated by heat are the TRPV channels, a subfamily of the Transient Receptor Potential (TRP) ion channels. TRPV channels are nonselective cation channels found in sensory neurons involved in nociception. In addition to various chemicals, TRPV channels can also be thermally stimulated. The activation temperature for the different TRPV channels varies and is 43°C for TRPV1 and 39°C for TRPV3. By performing an immunohistochemical staining procedure on frozen 20 μm cochlear slices using a primary TRPV1 antibody, we observed specific immunostaining of the spiral ganglion cells. Here we show that in mice that lack the gene for the TRPV1 channel optical radiation cannot evoke action potentials on the auditory nerve.

  18. Ca2+-binding protein-1 facilitates and forms a postsynaptic complex with Cav1.2 (L-type) Ca2+ channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Hong; Kim, Seong-Ah; Kirk, Elizabeth A; Tippens, Alyssa L; Sun, Hong; Haeseleer, Françoise; Lee, Amy

    2004-05-12

    Ca2+-binding protein-1 (CaBP1) is a Ca2+-binding protein that is closely related to calmodulin (CaM) and localized in somatodendritic regions of principal neurons throughout the brain, but how CaBP1 participates in postsynaptic Ca2+ signaling is not known. Here, we describe a novel role for CaBP1 in the regulation of Ca2+ influx through Ca(v)1.2 (L-type) Ca2+ channels. CaBP1 interacts directly with the alpha1 subunit of Ca(v)1.2 at sites that also bind CaM. CaBP1 binding to one of these sites, the IQ domain, is Ca2+ dependent and competitive with CaM binding. The physiological significance of this interaction is supported by the association of Ca(v)1.2 and CaBP1 in postsynaptic density fractions purified from rat brain. Moreover, in double-label immunofluorescence experiments, CaBP1 and Ca(v)1.2 colocalize in numerous cell bodies and dendrites of neurons, particularly in pyramidal cells in the CA3 region of the hippocampus and in the dorsal cortex. In electrophysiological recordings of cells transfected with Ca(v)1.2, CaBP1 greatly prolonged Ca2+ currents, prevented Ca2+-dependent inactivation, and caused Ca2+-dependent facilitation of currents evoked by step depolarizations and repetitive stimuli. These effects contrast with those of CaM, which promoted strong Ca2+-dependent inactivation of Ca(v)1.2 with these same voltage protocols. Our findings reveal how Ca2+-binding proteins, such as CaM and CaBP1, differentially adjust Ca2+ influx through Ca(v)1.2 channels, which may specify diverse modes of Ca2+ signaling in neurons.

  19. Organizing sensory information for postural control in altered sensory environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCollum, G; Shupert, C L; Nashner, L M

    1996-06-07

    Healthy human subjects can maintain adequate balance despite distorted somatosensory or visual feedback or vestibular feedback distorted by a peripheral vestibular disorder. Although it is not precisely known how this sensorimotor integration task is achieved, the nervous system coordinates information from multiple sensory systems to produce motor commands differently in different sensory environments. These different ways of coordinating sensory information and motor commands can be thought of as "sensorimotor states". The way the nervous system distributes the monitoring of postural sway among states is analysed in this paper as a logical structure of transitions between states. The form of the transition structure is specified and distinguished from a finite state machine. The hypothesis that the nervous system could use a transition structure to maintain balance is tested by developing transition structures which are consistent with a set of experimental observations of postural control in healthy subjects and three groups of patients with peripheral vestibular disease.

  20. Gravitational sensory transduction chain in flagellates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Häder, D.-P.; Richter, P.; Ntefidou, M.; Lebert, M.

    Earlier hypotheses have assumed that gravitactic orientation in flagellates, such as the photosynthetic unicell Euglena gracilis, is brought about by passive alignment of the cells in the water column by being tail heavy. A recent experiment on a sounding rocket (TEXUS 40) comparing immobilized cells with mobile cells demonstrated that the passive buoy effect can account for approximately 20% of the orientation of the cells in a gravity field. The cells show either positive or negative gravitaxis depending on other external or internal factors. Shortly after inoculation, the tendency of young cells to swim downward in the water column can be readily reverted by adding micromolar concentrations of some heavy metal ions including copper, cadmium or lead. The negative gravitaxis of older cells is converted into a positive one by stress factors such as increasing salinity or exposure to excessive visible or UV radiation. The mechanism for this switch seems to involve reactive oxygen species since the gravitactic sign change was suppressed when oxygen was removed by flushing the cell suspension with nitrogen. Also, the addition of radical scavengers (Trolox, ascorbic acid or potassium cyanide) abolished or reduced the gravitactic sign change. Addition of hydrogen peroxide induced a gravitactic sign change in the absence of external stress factors. The primary reception for the gravity vector seems to involve mechanosensitive ion channels which specifically gate calcium ions inward. We have identified several gene sequences for putative mechanosensory channels in Euglena and have applied RNAi to identify which of these channels are involved in graviperception. The influx of Ca 2+ activates calmodulin (CaM) which has been shown to be involved in the sensory transduction chain of graviorientation. It is known that an adenylyl cyclase is bound to the flagellar membrane in Euglena which is activated by CaM. This enzyme produces cAMP which has also been shown to be the key

  1. Potassium transport in developing fleshy fruits: the grapevine inward K(+) channel VvK1.2 is activated by CIPK-CBL complexes and induced in ripening berry flesh cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuéllar, Teresa; Azeem, Farrukh; Andrianteranagna, Mamy; Pascaud, François; Verdeil, Jean-Luc; Sentenac, Hervé; Zimmermann, Sabine; Gaillard, Isabelle

    2013-03-01

    The grape berry provides a model for investigating the physiology of non-climacteric fruits. Increased K(+) accumulation in the berry has a strong negative impact on fruit acidity (and quality). In maturing berries, we identified a K(+) channel from the Shaker family, VvK1.2, and two CBL-interacting protein kinase (CIPK)/calcineurin B-like calcium sensor (CBL) pairs, VvCIPK04-VvCBL01 and VvCIPK03-VvCBL02, that may control the activity of this channel. VvCBL01 and VvCIPK04 are homologues of Arabidopsis AtCBL1 and AtCIPK23, respectively, which form a complex that controls the activity of the Shaker K(+) channel AKT1 in Arabidopsis roots. VvK1.2 remained electrically silent when expressed alone in Xenopus oocytes, but gave rise to K(+) currents when co-expressed with the pairs VvCIPK03-VvCBL02 or VvCIPK04-VvCBL01, the second pair inducing much larger currents than the first one. Other tested CIPK-CBL pairs expressed in maturing berries were found to be unable to activate VvK1.2. When activated by its CIPK-CBL partners, VvK1.2 acts as a voltage-gated inwardly rectifying K(+) channel that is activated at voltages more negative than -100 mV and is stimulated upon external acidification. This channel is specifically expressed in the berry, where it displays a very strong induction at veraison (the inception of ripening) in flesh cells, phloem tissues and perivascular cells surrounding vascular bundles. Its expression in these tissues is further greatly increased upon mild drought stress. VvK1.2 is thus likely to mediate rapid K(+) transport in the berry and to contribute to the extensive re-organization of the translocation pathways and transport mechanisms that occurs at veraison. © 2012 The Authors The Plant Journal © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  2. Ryanodine channel complex stabilizer compound S48168/ARM210 as a disease modifier in dystrophin-deficient mdx mice: proof-of-concept study and independent validation of efficacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capogrosso, Roberta Francesca; Mantuano, Paola; Uaesoontrachoon, Kitipong; Cozzoli, Anna; Giustino, Arcangela; Dow, Todd; Srinivassane, Sadish; Filipovic, Marina; Bell, Christina; Vandermeulen, Jack; Massari, Ada Maria; De Bellis, Michela; Conte, Elena; Pierno, Sabata; Camerino, Giulia Maria; Liantonio, Antonella; Nagaraju, Kanneboyina; De Luca, Annamaria

    2017-11-02

    Muscle fibers lacking dystrophin undergo a long-term alteration of Ca2+ homeostasis, partially caused by a leaky Ca2+ release ryanodine (RyR) channel. S48168/ARM210, an RyR calcium release channel stabilizer (a Rycal compound), is expected to enhance the rebinding of calstabin to the RyR channel complex and possibly alleviate the pathologic Ca2+ leakage in dystrophin-deficient skeletal and cardiac muscle. This study systematically investigated the effect of S48168/ARM210 on the phenotype of mdx mice by means of a first proof-of-concept, short (4 wk), phase 1 treatment, followed by a 12 wk treatment (phase 2) performed in parallel by 2 independent laboratories. The mdx mice were treated with S48168/ARM210 at two different concentrations (50 or 10 mg/kg/d) in their drinking water for 4 and 12 wk, respectively. The mice were subjected to treadmill sessions twice per week (12 m/min for 30 min) to unmask the mild disease. This testing was followed by in vivo forelimb and hindlimb grip strength and fatigability measurement, ex vivo extensor digitorum longus (EDL) and diaphragm (DIA) force contraction measurement and histologic and biochemical analysis. The treatments resulted in functional (grip strength, ex vivo force production in DIA and EDL muscles) as well as histologic improvement after 4 and 12 wk, with no adverse effects. Furthermore, levels of cellular biomarkers of calcium homeostasis increased. Therefore, these data suggest that S48168/ARM210 may be a safe therapeutic option, at the dose levels tested, for the treatment of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD).-Capogrosso, R. F., Mantuano, P., Uaesoontrachoon, K., Cozzoli, A., Giustino, A., Dow, T., Srinivassane, S., Filipovic, M., Bell, C., Vandermeulen, J., Massari, A. M., De Bellis, M., Conte, E., Pierno, S., Camerino, G. M., Liantonio, A., Nagaraju, K., De Luca, A. Ryanodine channel complex stabilizer compound S48168/ARM210 as a disease modifier in dystrophin-deficient mdx mice: proof-of-concept study and

  3. Swelling-activated Ca2+ channels trigger Ca2+ signals in Merkel cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henry Haeberle

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Merkel cell-neurite complexes are highly sensitive touch receptors comprising epidermal Merkel cells and sensory afferents. Based on morphological and molecular studies, Merkel cells are proposed to be mechanosensory cells that signal afferents via neurotransmission; however, functional studies testing this hypothesis in intact skin have produced conflicting results. To test this model in a simplified system, we asked whether purified Merkel cells are directly activated by mechanical stimulation. Cell shape was manipulated with anisotonic solution changes and responses were monitored by Ca2+ imaging with fura-2. We found that hypotonic-induced cell swelling, but not hypertonic solutions, triggered cytoplasmic Ca2+ transients. Several lines of evidence indicate that these signals arise from swelling-activated Ca2+-permeable ion channels. First, transients were reversibly abolished by chelating extracellular Ca2+, demonstrating a requirement for Ca2+ influx across the plasma membrane. Second, Ca2+ transients were initially observed near the plasma membrane in cytoplasmic processes. Third, voltage-activated Ca2+ channel (VACC antagonists reduced transients by half, suggesting that swelling-activated channels depolarize plasma membranes to activate VACCs. Finally, emptying internal Ca2+ stores attenuated transients by 80%, suggesting Ca2+ release from stores augments swelling-activated Ca2+ signals. To identify candidate mechanotransduction channels, we used RT-PCR to amplify ion-channel transcripts whose pharmacological profiles matched those of hypotonic-evoked Ca2+ signals in Merkel cells. We found 11 amplicons, including PKD1, PKD2, and TRPC1, channels previously implicated in mechanotransduction in other cells. Collectively, these results directly demonstrate that Merkel cells are activated by hypotonic-evoked swelling, identify cellular signaling mechanisms that mediate these responses, and support the hypothesis that Merkel cells contribute

  4. Channel Power in Multi-Channel Environments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.G. Dekimpe (Marnik); B. Skiera (Bernd)

    2004-01-01

    textabstractIn the literature, little attention has been paid to instances where companies add an Internet channel to their direct channel portfolio. However, actively managing multiple sales channels requires knowing the customers’ channel preferences and the resulting channel power. Two key

  5. The beauty of sensory ecology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otálora-Luna, Fernando; Aldana, Elis

    2017-08-10

    Sensory ecology is a discipline that focuses on how living creatures use information to survive, but not to live. By trans-defining the orthodox concept of sensory ecology, a serious heterodox question arises: how do organisms use their senses to live, i.e. to enjoy or suffer life? To respond to such a query the objective (time-independent) and emotional (non-rational) meaning of symbols must be revealed. Our program is distinct from both the neo-Darwinian and the classical ecological perspective because it does not focus on survival values of phenotypes and their functions, but asks for the aesthetic effect of biological structures and their symbolism. Our message recognizes that sensing apart from having a survival value also has a beauty value. Thus, we offer a provoking and inspiring new view on the sensory relations of 'living things' and their surroundings, where the innovating power of feelings have more weight than the privative power of reason.

  6. Sensory analysis in grapes benitaka

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santillo, Amanda G.; Rodrigues, Flavio T.; Arthur, Paula B.; Villavicencio, Ana Lucia C.H. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    Abstract Sensory analysis is considered one of the main techniques when you want to know the organoleptic qualities of foods. Marketing strategies, showing that some foods produced organically is more nutritious, flavorful than conventional ones are affecting some consumers. The advantages of using radiation in sensory analysis are not the formation of waste, the less nutritional loss and little change in taste of food. The possibility that the fruit is harvested at more advanced maturity, when all characteristics of flavor and external appearance are fully developed is another advantage. The possibility of fruits being packed irradiated prevents contamination after processing. This type of study, ionizing radiation associated with sensory evaluation scarce, making it necessary for future discoveries. The objective this paper was to evaluate the quality of grapes Benitaka after the irradiation process with doses 0,5; 1; 1,5 e 2 kGy. (author)

  7. Impacts of Ocean Acidification on Sensory Function in Marine Organisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashur, Molly M; Johnston, Nicole K; Dixson, Danielle L

    2017-07-01

    Ocean acidification has been identified as a major contributor to ocean ecosystem decline, impacting the calcification, survival, and behavior of marine organisms. Numerous studies have observed altered sensory perception of chemical, auditory, and visual cues after exposure to elevated CO2. Sensory systems enable the observation of the external environment and therefore play a critical role in survival, communication, and behavior of marine organisms. This review seeks to (1) summarize the current knowledge of sensory impairment caused by ocean acidification, (2) discuss potential mechanisms behind this disruption, and (3) analyze the expected taxa differences in sensitivities to elevated CO2 conditions. Although a lack of standardized methodology makes cross-study comparisons challenging, trends and biases arise from this synthesis including a substantial focus on vertebrates, larvae or juveniles, the reef ecosystem, and chemosensory perception. Future studies must broaden the scope of the field by diversifying the taxa and ecosystems studied, incorporating ontogenetic comparisons, and focusing on cryptic sensory systems such as electroreception, magnetic sense, and the lateral line system. A discussion of possible mechanisms reveals GABAA receptor reversal as the conspicuous physiological mechanism. However, the potential remains for alternative disruption through structure or cue changes. Finally, a taxonomic comparison of physiological complexity reveals few trends in sensory sensitivities to lowered pH, but we hypothesize potential correlations relating to habitat, life history or relative use of sensory systems. Elevated CO2, in concordance with other global and local stressors, has the potential to drastically shift community composition and structure. Therefore research addressing the extent of sensory impairment, the underlying mechanisms, and the differences between taxa is vital for improved predictions of organismal response to ocean acidification.

  8. Synthesis and evaluation of new {sup 18}F-labelled thienylcyclohexylpiperidine (TCP) analogues as radioligands for the NMDA receptor-channel complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shibayama, Yoshihiko; Sasaki, Shigeki; Maeda, Minoru [Kyushu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan). Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences; Tomita, Urara; Nishikawa, Toru [National Inst. of Neuroscience, Tokyo (Japan). National Center of Neurology and Psychiatry

    1996-01-01

    We have synthesized new fluorine-18 labelled derivatives of thienylcyclohexylpiperidine (TCP), a non-competitive antagonist of NMDA receptor, which binds to the phencyclidine (PCP) binding site located within the receptor-associated ion channel. The mesylate precursors for (1S*,2R*)-2-(hydroxymethyl)- and (1S* ,2R*)-2-(methoxymethoxy-methyl)-1-(N-piperidyl)-1-[2-(2`-[{sup 18}F]fl uoroethyl)thiophenyl]cyclohexane, [{sup 18}F]4 and [{sup 18}F]19, respectively, were prepared from 2-hydroxycyclo-hexanone. Radiochemical syntheses were done by displacement of the mesylates by [{sup 18}F]fluoride ion with no carrier-added [K/2.2.2]{sup +18}F in 4-4.5% radiochemical yields with specific activity of >31 GBq/mol. In the biodistribution studies with [{sup 18}F]4 and [{sup 18}F]19, no selective accumulation of radioactivity was observed. Low affinities of these ligands to the NMDA receptor were also shown in in vitro binding experiments. (Author).

  9. How previous experience shapes perception in different sensory modalities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joel eSnyder

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available What has transpired immediately before has a strong influence on how sensory stimuli are processed and perceived. In particular, temporal context can have contrastive effects, repelling perception away from the interpretation of the context stimulus, and attractive effects, whereby perception repeats upon successive presentations of the same stimulus. For decades, scientists have documented contrastive and attractive temporal context effects mostly in low-level vision. But both types of effects also occur in other modalities, e.g., audition and touch, and for stimuli of varying complexity, raising the possibility that context effects reflect general computational principles of sensory systems. Neuroimaging shows that contrastive and attractive context effects arise from neural processes in different areas of the cerebral cortex, suggesting two separate operations with distinct functional roles. Bayesian models can provide a functional account of both context effects, whereby prior experience adjusts sensory systems to optimize perception of future stimuli.

  10. Textiles Objective and Sensory Evaluation in Rapid Prototyping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eugenija STRAZDIENE

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Most consumer purchases nowadays are driven by sensory attraction and good feeling. From this standpoint textile and fashion industries need new methods to evaluate fabric quality and to respond to consumer expectations. Recently the implementation of sensory analysis in the process of material characterization has drawn much international attention. So, the aim of the research was to find dependencies between the results of sensory analysis and objective fabric behaviour evaluation performed using KES-F and Griff-Tester devices. The later method was developed at Kaunas University of Technology and is based on fabric extraction through a rounded hole, thus describing the behaviour of textile materials and their tactile properties by one complex criterion.http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.17.4.778

  11. Behavioural effects of long-term multi-sensory stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, N T; Gaffan, E A; Williams, T

    1998-02-01

    Regular access to a multi-sensory environment (MSE or Snoezelen room) was compared with a non-complex sensory environment for individuals with learning disabilities. We also tested the prediction that those individuals whose challenging behaviour was maintained by sensory consequences would benefit most from exposure to the MSE. The conditions were compared over 16-week periods using a double crossover design, and were matched for social contact and attention from the enabler. Participants were randomly assigned to orders of treatments. Participants were 27 adults with severe/profound learning disabilities who exhibited challenging behaviour. Behaviour was assessed before and after each treatment phase using both direct observation and standardized assessments (the Functional Performance Record and the Problem Behaviour Inventory). The behavioural observations formed the basis of a functional analysis of each individual's challenging behaviour. Some participants became more calm and relaxed while in the MSE, however, the objective measures of behaviour outside the treatment settings revealed no difference between the MSE and control conditions. Challenging behaviour maintained by sensory consequences showed no greater responsivity to the MSE than to the control condition. The multi-sensory environment had no effects beyond those that could be ascribed to the social interaction between participant and enabler. Anecdotal evidence of favourable responses within the MSE itself could not be confirmed outside the environment.

  12. Biology of the KCNQ1 Potassium Channel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geoffrey W. Abbott

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Ion channels are essential for basic cellular function and for processes including sensory perception and intercellular communication in multicellular organisms. Voltage-gated potassium (Kv channels facilitate dynamic cellular repolarization during an action potential, opening in response to membrane depolarization to facilitate K+ efflux. In both excitable and nonexcitable cells other, constitutively active, K+ channels provide a relatively constant repolarizing force to control membrane potential, ion homeostasis, and secretory processes. Of the forty known human Kv channel pore-forming α subunits that coassemble in various combinations to form the fundamental tetrameric channel pore and voltage sensor module, KCNQ1 is unique. KCNQ1 stands alone in having the capacity to form either channels that are voltage-dependent and require membrane depolarization for activation, or constitutively active channels. In mammals, KCNQ1 regulates processes including gastric acid secretion, thyroid hormone biosynthesis, salt and glucose homeostasis, and cell volume and in some species is required for rhythmic beating of the heart. In this review, the author discusses the unique functional properties, regulation, cell biology, diverse physiological roles, and involvement in human disease states of this chameleonic K+ channel.

  13. On Shor's Channel Extension and Constrained Channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holevo, A. S.; Shirokov, M. E.

    Several equivalent formulations of the additivity conjecture for constrained channels, which formally is substantially stronger than the unconstrained additivity, are given. To this end a characteristic property of the optimal ensemble for such a channel is derived, generalizing the maximal distance property. It is shown that the additivity conjecture for constrained channels holds true for certain nontrivial classes of channels. After giving an algebraic formulation for Shor's channel extension, its main asymptotic property is proved. It is then used to show that additivity for two constrained channels can be reduced to the same problem for unconstrained channels, and hence, ``global'' additivity for channels with arbitrary constraints is equivalent to additivity without constraints.

  14. Segregating complex sound sources through temporal coherence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lakshmi Krishnan

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available A new approach for the segregation of monaural sound mixtures is presented based on the principle of temporal coherence and using auditory cortical representations. Temporal coherence is the notion that perceived sources emit coherently modulated features that evoke highly-coincident neural response patterns. By clustering the feature channels with coincident responses and reconstructing their input, one may segregate the underlying source from the simultaneously interfering signals that are uncorrelated with it. The proposed algorithm requires no prior information or training on the sources. It can, however, gracefully incorporate cognitive functions and influences such as memories of a target source or attention to a specific set of its attributes so as to segregate it from its background. Aside from its unusual structure and computational innovations, the proposed model provides testable hypotheses of the physiological mechanisms of this ubiquitous and remarkable perceptual ability, and of its psychophysical manifestations in navigating complex sensory environments.

  15. Relationships among Sensory Responsiveness, Anxiety, and Ritual Behaviors in Children with and without Atypical Sensory Responsiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bart, Orit; Bar-Shalita, Tami; Mansour, Hanin; Dar, Reuven

    2017-08-01

    To explore relationships between sensory responsiveness, anxiety, and ritual behaviors in boys with typical and atypical sensory responsiveness. Forty-eight boys, ages 5-9 participated in the study (28 boys with atypical sensory responsiveness and 20 controls). Atypical sensory responsiveness was defined as a score of ≤154 on the Short Sensory Profile. Parents completed the Sensory Profile, the Screen for Child Anxiety Related Emotional Disorders, and the Childhood Routines Inventory. Children with atypical sensory responsiveness had significantly higher levels of anxiety and a higher frequency of ritual behaviors than controls. Atypical sensory responsiveness was significantly related to both anxiety and ritual behaviors, with anxiety mediating the relationship between sensory modulation and ritual behaviors. The findings elucidate the potential consequences of atypical sensory responsiveness and could support the notion that ritual behaviors develop as a coping mechanism in response to anxiety stemming from primary difficulty in modulating sensory input.

  16. Genetic architecture of variation in the lateral line sensory system of threespine sticklebacks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wark, Abigail R; Mills, Margaret G; Dang, Lam-Ha; Chan, Yingguang Frank; Jones, Felicity C; Brady, Shannon D; Absher, Devin M; Grimwood, Jane; Schmutz, Jeremy; Myers, Richard M; Kingsley, David M; Peichel, Catherine L

    2012-09-01

    Vertebrate sensory systems have evolved remarkable diversity, but little is known about the underlying genetic mechanisms. The lateral line sensory system of aquatic vertebrates is a promising model for genetic investigations of sensory evolution because there is extensive variation within and between species, and this variation is easily quantified. In the present study, we compare the lateral line sensory system of threespine sticklebacks (Gasterosteus aculeatus) from an ancestral marine and a derived benthic lake population. We show that lab-raised individuals from these populations display differences in sensory neuromast number, neuromast patterning, and groove morphology. Using genetic linkage mapping, we identify regions of the genome that influence different aspects of lateral line morphology. Distinct loci independently affect neuromast number on different body regions, suggesting that a modular genetic structure underlies the evolution of peripheral receptor number in this sensory system. Pleiotropy and/or tight linkage are also important, as we identify a region on linkage group 21 that affects multiple aspects of lateral line morphology. Finally, we detect epistasis between a locus on linkage group 4 and a locus on linkage group 21; interactions between these loci contribute to variation in neuromast pattern. Our results reveal a complex genetic architecture underlying the evolution of the stickleback lateral line sensory system. This study further uncovers a genetic relationship between sensory morphology and non-neural traits (bony lateral plates), creating an opportunity to investigate morphological constraints on sensory evolution in a vertebrate model system.

  17. Surface-Modified Gold Nanoparticles Possessing Two-Channel Responsive Eu(III) /Tb(III) Cyclen Complexes as Luminescent Logic Gate Mimics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truman, Laura K; Bradberry, Samuel J; Comby, Steve; Kotova, Oxana; Gunnlaugsson, Thorfinnur

    2017-07-05

    The development of material-supported molecular logic gate mimics (MGLMs) for contained application and device fabrication has become of increasing interest. Herein, we present the formation of ≈5 nm gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) that have been surface-modified (via a thiol linkage) with heptadentate cyclen-based complexes of europium and terbium for sensing applications using delayed lanthanide luminescence and as integrated logic gate mimics within competitive media. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Transcortical sensory aphasia in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, S; Benson, D F

    1987-01-01

    Three cases of transcortical sensory aphasia in Chinese speakers were associated with left parieto-temporal junction strokes. The possibility that this relatively rare aphasia syndrome is more common in the Chinese is raised and a theoretical explanation based on differences in Oriental written language is presented.

  19. Sensory imagination and narrative perspective

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grünbaum, Thor

    2013-01-01

    I argue that we can clarify and explain an important form of focalization or narrative perspective by the structure of perspective in sensory imagination. Understanding focalization in this way enables us to see why one particular form of focalization has to do with the representation of perceptu...

  20. Sensory Substitution for Wounded Servicemembers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-10-28

    Rehabilitation The IHMC Mobility Assist Exoskeleton (Figure 12) has great potential for gait rehabilitation because of its high fidelity impedance control...mobility assist exoskeleton technologies. Through sensory substitution device demonstrations, we solicited subjective situation awareness feedback...with TBI also evaluated the passive mobility assist exoskeleton , which enabled him to walk at a normal gait, unassisted, for the first time since

  1. Sustained Perceptual Deficits from Transient Sensory Deprivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanes, Dan H.

    2015-01-01

    Sensory pathways display heightened plasticity during development, yet the perceptual consequences of early experience are generally assessed in adulthood. This approach does not allow one to identify transient perceptual changes that may be linked to the central plasticity observed in juvenile animals. Here, we determined whether a brief period of bilateral auditory deprivation affects sound perception in developing and adult gerbils. Animals were reared with bilateral earplugs, either from postnatal day 11 (P11) to postnatal day 23 (P23) (a manipulation previously found to disrupt gerbil cortical properties), or from P23-P35. Fifteen days after earplug removal and restoration of normal thresholds, animals were tested on their ability to detect the presence of amplitude modulation (AM), a temporal cue that supports vocal communication. Animals reared with earplugs from P11-P23 displayed elevated AM detection thresholds, compared with age-matched controls. In contrast, an identical period of earplug rearing at a later age (P23-P35) did not impair auditory perception. Although the AM thresholds of earplug-reared juveniles improved during a week of repeated testing, a subset of juveniles continued to display a perceptual deficit. Furthermore, although the perceptual deficits induced by transient earplug rearing had resolved for most animals by adulthood, a subset of adults displayed impaired performance. Control experiments indicated that earplugging did not disrupt the integrity of the auditory periphery. Together, our results suggest that P11-P23 encompasses a critical period during which sensory deprivation disrupts central mechanisms that support auditory perceptual skills. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Sensory systems are particularly malleable during development. This heightened degree of plasticity is beneficial because it enables the acquisition of complex skills, such as music or language. However, this plasticity comes with a cost: nervous system development

  2. [Olfactory sensory perception].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuentes, Aler; Fresno, María Javiera; Santander, Hugo; Valenzuela, Saúl; Gutiérrez, Mario Felipe; Miralles, Rodolfo

    2011-03-01

    The five senses have had a fundamental importance for survival and socialization of human beings. From an evolutionary point of view the sense of smell is the oldest. This sense has a strong representation within the genome, allowing the existence of many types of receptors that allow us to capture multiple volatile odor producing molecules, sending electrical signals to higher centers to report the outside world. Several cortical areas are activated in the brain, which are interconnected to form an extensive and complex neural network, linking for example, areas involved with memory and emotions, thus giving this sense of perceptual richness. While the concept of flavor is largely related to the sense of taste, smell provides the necessary integration with the rest of the senses and higher functions. Fully understanding the sense of smell is relevant to health professionals. Knowing the characteristics of the receptors, the transduction processes and convergence of information in the higher centers involved, we can properly detect olfactory disorders in our patients.

  3. The Staphylococcus aureus alpha-toxin channel complex and the effect of Ca2+ ions on its interaction with lipid layers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, R J; Leonard, K

    1992-01-01

    Using the techniques of two-dimensional crystallization on supported lipid bilayers together with computer image processing, two distinct two-dimensional crystal types of staphylococcal alpha-toxin complex are formed depending on the presence or absence of Ca2+ ions. Without Ca2+, these are hexagonally packed (in A, a = b = 89.5 +/- 2.5 A; theta = 119.7 degrees) With Ca2+ present, rectangular crystal packing is seen (in A, a = 114.8 +/- 1.6 A, b = 140.2 +/- 0.7 A; theta = 89.1 degrees). A third, banded crystal type is also seen which is interpreted as a side-to-side packing of regular tubules. We use these tubular crystals for cross-correlation searches with top and side-on views of the complex from single particle reconstructions, and with the repeating units from the two-dimensional crystal types. The results lead us to propose a model in which the different two-dimensional crystal types are formed as a result of alpha-toxin hexamers packing in different orientations. In the hexagonal crystals the hexamers lie end-on with a 6-fold axis in projection. On the addition of Ca2+, the hexamers reorient to lie tilted with respect to the support, thus giving rise to a rectangular projection.

  4. A review on intelligent sensory modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tham, H. J.; Tang, S. Y.; Teo, K. T. K.; Loh, S. P.

    2016-06-01

    Sensory evaluation plays an important role in the quality control of food productions. Sensory data obtained through sensory evaluation are generally subjective, vague and uncertain. Classically, factorial multivariate methods such as Principle Component Analysis (PCA), Partial Least Square (PLS) method, Multiple Regression (MLR) method and Response Surface Method (RSM) are the common tools used to analyse sensory data. These methods can model some of the sensory data but may not be robust enough to analyse nonlinear data. In these situations, intelligent modelling techniques such as Fuzzy Logic and Artificial neural network (ANNs) emerged to solve the vagueness and uncertainty of sensory data. This paper outlines literature of intelligent sensory modelling on sensory data analysis.

  5. TRPV1 channels in cardiovascular system: A double edged sword?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randhawa, Puneet Kaur; Jaggi, Amteshwar Singh

    2017-02-01

    Apart from modulating nociception, there is vital role of TRPV1 channels in modulating atherosclerosis, congestive heart failure, systemic hypertension, pulmonary hypertension, hemorrhagic shock and vascular remodeling. TRPV1 channel activation has shielding effect against the development of atherosclerosis and systemic hypertension. TRPV1 channel activation alleviates the formation of atherosclerotic lesions via increasing the expression of cholesterol efflux regulatory protein, UCP 2 and enhancing autophagy. Furthermore, activation of these channels enhances Na+ excretion and NO release to reduce the blood pressure. TRPV1 channel activation in the cardiac sensory neurons and subsequent CGRP release reduces ischemia-reperfusion injury. Activation of these channels during conditioning enhances CGRP and SP release from the sensory nerve fibers innervating the heart to induce cardioprotection. However, activation of these channels may elicit detrimental effects in pulmonary hypertension, hemorrhage and vascular remodeling. Activation of TRPV1 channels enhances smooth muscle cell proliferation to promote pulmonary hypertension. Moreover, TRPV1 channel inhibition reduces massive catecholamine release, improves survival during hemorrhage. Activation of these channels enhances vascular remodeling via enhancing NO release. Furthermore, dual role of TRPV1 channels has been reported in the perpetuation of congestive heart failure. On one hand, TRPV1 channel activation increases the expression of UCP2, PPAR- δ and mitochondrial sirtuin 3 to decrease oxidative stress and reduce heart injury. On the other hand, activation of these channels may enhance the expression of hypertrophic fibrotic proteins viz. GATA4, MMP to promote cardiac fibrosis. The present review discusses the dual role of activation of TRPV1 channels in diseases associated with cardiovascular system. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Connexin43 Hemichannels in Satellite Glial Cells, Can They Influence Sensory Neuron Activity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Retamal, Mauricio A.; Riquelme, Manuel A.; Stehberg, Jimmy; Alcayaga, Julio

    2017-01-01

    In this review article, we summarize the current insight on the role of Connexin- and Pannexin-based channels as modulators of sensory neurons. The somas of sensory neurons are located in sensory ganglia (i.e., trigeminal and nodose ganglia). It is well known that within sensory ganglia, sensory neurons do not form neither electrical nor chemical synapses. One of the reasons for this is that each soma is surrounded by glial cells, known as satellite glial cells (SGCs). Recent evidence shows that connexin43 (Cx43) hemichannels and probably pannexons located at SGCs have an important role in paracrine communication between glial cells and sensory neurons. This communication may be exerted via the release of bioactive molecules from SGCs and their subsequent action on receptors located at the soma of sensory neurons. The glio-neuronal communication seems to be relevant for the establishment of chronic pain, hyperalgesia and pathologies associated with tissue inflammation. Based on the current literature, it is possible to propose that Cx43 hemichannels expressed in SGCs could be a novel pharmacological target for treating chronic pain, which need to be directly evaluated in future studies. PMID:29200997

  7. The Glutamatergic System in Primary Somatosensory Neurons and Its Involvement in Sensory Input-Dependent Plasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Montoya, Julia; Avendaño, Carlos; Negredo, Pilar

    2017-12-27

    Glutamate is the most common neurotransmitter in both the central and the peripheral nervous system. Glutamate is present in all types of neurons in sensory ganglia, and is released not only from their peripheral and central axon terminals but also from their cell bodies. Consistently, these neurons express ionotropic and metabotropic receptors, as well as other molecules involved in the synthesis, transport and release of the neurotransmitter. Primary sensory neurons are the first neurons in the sensory channels, which receive information from the periphery, and are thus key players in the sensory transduction and in the transmission of this information to higher centers in the pathway. These neurons are tightly enclosed by satellite glial cells, which also express several ionotropic and metabotropic glutamate receptors, and display increases in intracellular calcium accompanying the release of glutamate. One of the main interests in our group has been the study of the implication of the peripheral nervous system in sensory-dependent plasticity. Recently, we have provided novel evidence in favor of morphological changes in first- and second-order neurons of the trigeminal system after sustained alterations of the sensory input. Moreover, these anatomical changes are paralleled by several molecular changes, among which those related to glutamatergic neurotransmission are particularly relevant. In this review, we will describe the state of the art of the glutamatergic system in sensory ganglia and its involvement in input-dependent plasticity, a fundamental ground for advancing our knowledge of the neural mechanisms of learning and adaptation, reaction to injury, and chronic pain.

  8. Morphology and intrinsic excitability of regenerating sensory and motor neurons grown on a line micropattern.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ouafa Benzina

    Full Text Available Axonal regeneration is one of the greatest challenges in severe injuries of peripheral nerve. To provide the bridge needed for regeneration, biological or synthetic tubular nerve constructs with aligned architecture have been developed. A key point for improving axonal regeneration is assessing the effects of substrate geometry on neuronal behavior. In the present study, we used an extracellular matrix-micropatterned substrate comprising 3 µm wide lines aimed to physically mimic the in vivo longitudinal axonal growth of mice peripheral sensory and motor neurons. Adult sensory neurons or embryonic motoneurons were seeded and processed for morphological and electrical activity analyses after two days in vitro. We show that micropattern-guided sensory neurons grow one or two axons without secondary branching. Motoneurons polarity was kept on micropattern with a long axon and small dendrites. The micro-patterned substrate maintains the growth promoting effects of conditioning injury and demonstrates, for the first time, that neurite initiation and extension could be differentially regulated by conditioning injury among DRG sensory neuron subpopulations. The micro-patterned substrate impacts the excitability of sensory neurons and promotes the apparition of firing action potentials characteristic for a subclass of mechanosensitive neurons. The line pattern is quite relevant for assessing the regenerative and developmental growth of sensory and motoneurons and offers a unique model for the analysis of the impact of geometry on the expression and the activity of mechanosensitive channels in DRG sensory neurons.

  9. Morphology and intrinsic excitability of regenerating sensory and motor neurons grown on a line micropattern.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benzina, Ouafa; Cloitre, Thierry; Martin, Marta; Raoul, Cédric; Gergely, Csilla; Scamps, Frédérique

    2014-01-01

    Axonal regeneration is one of the greatest challenges in severe injuries of peripheral nerve. To provide the bridge needed for regeneration, biological or synthetic tubular nerve constructs with aligned architecture have been developed. A key point for improving axonal regeneration is assessing the effects of substrate geometry on neuronal behavior. In the present study, we used an extracellular matrix-micropatterned substrate comprising 3 µm wide lines aimed to physically mimic the in vivo longitudinal axonal growth of mice peripheral sensory and motor neurons. Adult sensory neurons or embryonic motoneurons were seeded and processed for morphological and electrical activity analyses after two days in vitro. We show that micropattern-guided sensory neurons grow one or two axons without secondary branching. Motoneurons polarity was kept on micropattern with a long axon and small dendrites. The micro-patterned substrate maintains the growth promoting effects of conditioning injury and demonstrates, for the first time, that neurite initiation and extension could be differentially regulated by conditioning injury among DRG sensory neuron subpopulations. The micro-patterned substrate impacts the excitability of sensory neurons and promotes the apparition of firing action potentials characteristic for a subclass of mechanosensitive neurons. The line pattern is quite relevant for assessing the regenerative and developmental growth of sensory and motoneurons and offers a unique model for the analysis of the impact of geometry on the expression and the activity of mechanosensitive channels in DRG sensory neurons.

  10. Multi-Sensory Intervention Observational Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Carla J.

    2011-01-01

    An observational research study based on sensory integration theory was conducted to examine the observed impact of student selected multi-sensory experiences within a multi-sensory intervention center relative to the sustained focus levels of students with special needs. A stratified random sample of 50 students with severe developmental…

  11. Hyperpolarization-activated cyclic-nucleotide-gated channels potentially modulate axonal excitability at different thresholds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weerasinghe, Dinushi; Menon, Parvathi; Vucic, Steve

    2017-12-01

    Hyperpolarization-activated cyclic-nucleotide-gated (HCN) channels mediate differences in sensory and motor axonal excitability at different thresholds in animal models. Importantly, HCN channels are responsible for voltage-gated inward rectifying (Ih) currents activated during hyperpolarization. The Ih currents exert a crucial role in determining the resting membrane potential and have been implicated in a variety of neurological disorders, including neuropathic pain. In humans, differences in biophysical properties of motor and sensory axons at different thresholds remain to be elucidated and could provide crucial pathophysiological insights in peripheral neurological diseases. Consequently, the aim of this study was to characterize sensory and motor axonal function at different threshold. Median nerve motor and sensory axonal excitability studies were undertaken in 15 healthy subjects (45 studies in total). Tracking targets were set to 20, 40, and 60% of maximum for sensory and motor axons. Hyperpolarizing threshold electrotonus (TEh) at 90-100 ms was significantly increased in lower threshold sensory axons times (F = 11.195, P sensory axons. In conclusion, variation in the kinetics of HCN isoforms could account for the findings in motor and sensory axons. Importantly, assessing the function of HCN channels in sensory and motor axons of different thresholds may provide insights into the pathophysiological processes underlying peripheral neurological diseases in humans, particularly focusing on the role of HCN channels with the potential of identifying novel treatment targets.NEW & NOTEWORTHY Hyperpolarization-activated cyclic-nucleotide-gated (HCN) channels, which underlie inward rectifying currents (Ih), appear to mediate differences in sensory and motor axonal properties. Inward rectifying currents are increased in lower threshold motor and sensory axons, although different HCN channel isoforms appear to underlie these changes. While faster activating HCN

  12. Improvements of sensorimotor processes during action cascading associated with changes in sensory processing architecture-insights from sensory deprivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gohil, Krutika; Hahne, Anja; Beste, Christian

    2016-06-20

    In most everyday situations sensorimotor processes are quite complex because situations often require to carry out several actions in a specific temporal order; i.e. one has to cascade different actions. While it is known that changes to stimuli affect action cascading mechanisms, it is unknown whether action cascading changes when sensory stimuli are not manipulated, but the neural architecture to process these stimuli is altered. In the current study we test this hypothesis using prelingually deaf subjects as a model to answer this question. We use a system neurophysiological approach using event-related potentials (ERPs) and source localization techniques. We show that prelingually deaf subjects show improvements in action cascading. However, this improvement is most likely not due to changes at the perceptual (P1-ERP) and attentional processing level (N1-ERP), but due to changes at the response selection level (P3-ERP). It seems that the temporo-parietal junction (TPJ) is important for these effects to occur, because the TPJ comprises overlapping networks important for the processing of sensory information and the selection of responses. Sensory deprivation thus affects cognitive processes downstream of sensory processing and only these seem to be important for behavioral improvements in situations requiring complex sensorimotor processes and action cascading.

  13. Direct coupled-channels deperturbation analysis of the A{sup 1}Σ{sup +} ∼ b{sup 3}Π complex in LiCs with experimental accuracy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kowalczyk, P., E-mail: Pawel.Kowalczyk@fuw.edu.pl [Institute of Experimental Physics, Faculty of Physics, University of Warsaw, ul. Pasteura 5, 02-093 Warsaw (Poland); Jastrzebski, W.; Szczepkowski, J. [Institute of Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, Al. Lotników 32/46, 02-668 Warsaw (Poland); Pazyuk, E. A.; Stolyarov, A. V., E-mail: avstol@phys.chem.msu.ru [Department of Chemistry, Lomonosov Moscow State University, Leninskie Gory 1/3, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation)

    2015-06-21

    We have carried out the direct deperturbation analysis of about 780 rovibronic term values of the strongly spin-orbit (SO) coupled A{sup 1}Σ{sup +} and b{sup 3}Π states of the {sup 7}Li{sup 133}Cs molecule recorded by polarization labelling spectroscopy technique. The explicit A{sup 1}Σ{sup +} ∼ b{sup 3}Π{sub Ω=0,1,2} coupled-channels treatment allowed us to reproduce 95% experimental term values with a standard deviation of 0.05 cm{sup −1} which is close to the accuracy of the present experiment. The initial potential energy curves (PECs) of the mutually perturbed states and SO matrix elements were ab initio evaluated in the basis of the spin-averaged wave functions. The empirically refined PECs and SO functions, along with the theoretical transition dipole moments, were used to predict energy and radiative properties of the A ∼ b complex for low J levels of both {sup 7}Li{sup 133}Cs and {sup 6}Li{sup 133}Cs isotopologues. The reasonable candidates for the stimulated Raman transitions between initial Feshbach resonance states, the mixed levels of the A ∼ b complex, and absolute ground X{sup 1}Σ{sup +} (v = 0 and J = 0) state were identified.

  14. Stabilization of diastolic calcium signal via calcium pump regulation of complex local calcium releases and transient decay in a computational model of cardiac pacemaker cell with individual release channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maltsev, Alexander V; Maltsev, Victor A; Stern, Michael D

    2017-08-01

    Intracellular Local Ca releases (LCRs) from sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) regulate cardiac pacemaker cell function by activation of electrogenic Na/Ca exchanger (NCX) during diastole. Prior studies demonstrated the existence of powerful compensatory mechanisms of LCR regulation via a complex local cross-talk of Ca pump, release and NCX. One major obstacle to study these mechanisms is that LCR exhibit complex Ca release propagation patterns (including merges and separations) that have not been characterized. Here we developed new terminology, classification, and computer algorithms for automatic detection of numerically simulated LCRs and examined LCR regulation by SR Ca pumping rate (Pup) that provides a major contribution to fight-or-flight response. In our simulations the faster SR Ca pumping accelerates action potential-induced Ca transient decay and quickly clears Ca under the cell membrane in diastole, preventing premature releases. Then the SR generates an earlier, more synchronized, and stronger diastolic LCR signal activating an earlier and larger inward NCX current. LCRs at higher Pup exhibit larger amplitudes and faster propagation with more collisions to each other. The LCRs overlap with Ca transient decay, causing an elevation of the average diastolic [Ca] nadir to ~200 nM (at Pup = 24 mM/s). Background Ca (in locations lacking LCRs) quickly decays to resting Ca levels (pump and release channels regulates LCRs and Ca transient decay to insure fail-safe pacemaker cell operation within a wide range of rates.

  15. Sensory modulation disorders in childhood epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Campen, Jolien S; Jansen, Floor E; Kleinrensink, Nienke J; Joëls, Marian; Braun, Kees Pj; Bruining, Hilgo

    2015-01-01

    Altered sensory sensitivity is generally linked to seizure-susceptibility in childhood epilepsy but may also be associated to the highly prevalent problems in behavioral adaptation. This association is further suggested by the frequent overlap of childhood epilepsy with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), conditions in which altered behavioral responses to sensory stimuli have been firmly established. A continuum of sensory processing defects due to imbalanced neuronal inhibition and excitation across these disorders has been hypothesizedthat may lead to common symptoms of inadequate modulation of behavioral responses to sensory stimuli. Here, we investigated the prevalence of sensory modulation disorders among children with epilepsy and their relation with symptomatology of neurodevelopmental disorders. We used the Sensory Profile questionnaire to assess behavioral responses to sensory stimuli and categorize sensory modulation disorders in children with active epilepsy (aged 4-17 years). We related these outcomes to epilepsy characteristics and tested their association with comorbid symptoms of ASD (Social Responsiveness Scale) and ADHD (Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire). Sensory modulation disorders were reported in 49 % of the 158 children. Children with epilepsy reported increased behavioral responses associated with sensory "sensitivity," "sensory avoidance," and "poor registration" but not "sensory seeking." Comorbidity of ASD and ADHD was associated with more severe sensory modulation problems, although 27 % of typically developing children with epilepsy also reported a sensory modulation disorder. Sensory modulation disorders are an under-recognized problem in children with epilepsy. The extent of the modulation difficulties indicates a substantial burden on daily functioning and may explain an important part of the behavioral distress associated with childhood epilepsy.

  16. Voltage-Gated Calcium Channels in Nociception

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasuda, Takahiro; Adams, David J.

    Voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCCs) are a large and functionally diverse group of membrane ion channels ubiquitously expressed throughout the central and peripheral nervous systems. VGCCs contribute to various physiological processes and transduce electrical activity into other cellular functions. This chapter provides an overview of biophysical properties of VGCCs, including regulation by auxiliary subunits, and their physiological role in neuronal functions. Subsequently, then we focus on N-type calcium (Cav2.2) channels, in particular their diversity and specific antagonists. We also discuss the role of N-type calcium channels in nociception and pain transmission through primary sensory dorsal root ganglion neurons (nociceptors). It has been shown that these channels are expressed predominantly in nerve terminals of the nociceptors and that they control neurotransmitter release. To date, important roles of N-type calcium channels in pain sensation have been elucidated genetically and pharmacologically, indicating that specific N-type calcium channel antagonists or modulators are particularly useful as therapeutic drugs targeting chronic and neuropathic pain.

  17. Holocene History of the Mediterranean Inflow and Its Influence on Formation of the Channel Network Complex and Redox Conditions in the Istanbul Strait Outlet Area of the Black Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdem, Z.; Çaǧatay, M. N.; Damci, E.; Ülgen, B. U.; Holtappels, M.; Lichtschlag, A.

    2012-04-01

    İstanbul Strait (Bosphorus) is the only connection of Black Sea to the world ocean via the Sea of Marmara and Çanakkale (Dardannelles) Strait. The İstanbul Strait outlet area of the Black Sea (ISBS) includes the shelf and upper slope areas, and is characterized by the Mediterranean inflow that is responsible for the ventilation and sluggish deep circulation of the anoxic Black Sea basin. Presently, a two-way current system occurs in the Bosphorus channel, with the Black Sea water forming the upper current and the warm and saline Mediterranean Water (MW) the undercurrent. Shallow sill depth of the Istanbul Strait together with the oxygen consumption by organic matter mineralization is responsible for the establishment of a permanent oxic-anoxic boundary (chemocline). The oxic-anoxic boundary is presently at 100-150 m depth, but may have varied in the past as result of the changes in the amounts of the MW, of riverine water input, circulation dynamics and global sea level. High resolution seismic profiling and sediment coring along depth transects from -75 m to -307 m on the shelf and upper slope areas showing the evidence of two unconformities: a post-Younger Dryas shelf-crossing unconformity (α) and a younger unconformity (α1) that form the base of the channel leveé complex that is dated at ca. 7 ka BP. The α1 unconformity was formed by the latest saline Mediterranean incursion that deposited the fan-delta complex under mainly submarine conditions and initiated the anoxia development. The oxic/anoxic boundary and changes in the bottom water conditions in the slope area are detectable by Mn, S and Fe anomalies in the cores, which show the rise of the redox boundary to depths between -120 m and -150 m by ca. 6.8 ka BP. Mediterranean inflow initially used the main channel trending NW, transporting oxygenated waters to the western side of the ISBS area. This NW-directed transport slowed down considerably at 5.3 ka BP, with an eastwards shift, resulting in anoxic

  18. Sensory augmentation for the blind

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silke Manuela Kärcher

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Enacted theories of consciousness conjecture that perception and cognition arise from an active experience of the regular relations that are tying together the sensory stimulation of different modalities and associated motor actions. Previous experiments investigated this concept by employing the technique of sensory substitution. Building on these studies, here we test a set of hypotheses derived from this framework and investigate the utility of sensory augmentation in handicapped people. We provide a late blind subject with a new set of sensorimotor laws: A vibro-tactile belt continually signals the direction of magnetic north. The subject completed a set of behavioral tests before and after an extended training period. The tests were complemented by questionnaires and interviews. This newly supplied information improved performance on different time scales. In a pointing task we demonstrate an instant improvement of performance based on the signal provided by the device. Furthermore, the signal was helpful in relevant daily tasks, often complicated for the blind, such as keeping a direction over longer distances or taking shortcuts in familiar environments. A homing task with an additional attentional load demonstrated a significant improvement after training. The subject found the directional information highly expedient for the adjustment of his inner maps of familiar environments and describes an increase in his feeling of security when exploring unfamiliar environments with the belt. The results give evidence for a firm integration of the newly supplied signals into the behavior of this late blind subject with better navigational performance and more courageous behavior in unfamiliar environments. Most importantly, the complementary information provided by the belt lead to a positive emotional impact with enhanced feeling of security. This experimental approach demonstrates the potential of sensory augmentation devices for the help of

  19. Sensory evaluation of buffalo butter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.C.S. Carneiro

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Butter obtained from buffalo milk was compared with commercial products obtained from cow milk. One buffalo butter and two cow butters were subjected to sensory analysis using non-trained panelists. The acceptance related to sensorial characteristics (color, flavor, and firmness was evaluated through a 9 point structured hedonic scale varying from “I displeased extremely” to “I liked extremely”. Analysis of variance (ANOVA was performed to evaluate the sensory characteristics and the means were compared by Tukey’s Test at 5% of significance. The buffalo butter received lower scores than the others for all attributes. The greatest difference was observed for color, as the buffalo butter exhibited a white color contrasting with the yellow color of commercial butters, which is the pattern expected by the consumers. For flavor and firmness attributes, the buffalo butter received scores similar to the commercial products. These results show. These results shows that the buffalo’s butter has a good acceptance on local market, and this could be improved through the correction of product’s color, what can be obtained by adding a dye.

  20. Sensory impacts of food-packaging interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan, Susan E; Webster, Janet B

    2009-01-01

    Sensory changes in food products result from intentional or unintentional interactions with packaging materials and from failure of materials to protect product integrity or quality. Resolving sensory issues related to plastic food packaging involves knowledge provided by sensory scientists, materials scientists, packaging manufacturers, food processors, and consumers. Effective communication among scientists and engineers from different disciplines and industries can help scientists understand package-product interactions. Very limited published literature describes sensory perceptions associated with food-package interactions. This article discusses sensory impacts, with emphasis on oxidation reactions, associated with the interaction of food and materials, including taints, scalping, changes in food quality as a function of packaging, and examples of material innovations for smart packaging that can improve sensory quality of foods and beverages. Sensory evaluation is an important tool for improved package selection and development of new materials.

  1. Cooperative modulation of [3H]MK-801 binding to the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor-ion channel complex by L-glutamate, glycine, and polyamines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ransom, R W; Stec, N L

    1988-09-01

    In extensively washed rat cortical membranes [3H](+)-5-methyl-10,11-dihydro-5 H-dibenzo [a,d]cyclohepten-5,10-imine ([3H]MK-801) labeled a homogeneous set of sites (Bmax = 1.86 pmol/mg protein) with relatively low affinity (KD = 45 nM). L-Glutamate, glycine, and spermidine produced concentration-dependent increases in specific [3H]MK-801 binding due to a reduction in the KD of the radioligand. In the presence of high concentrations of L-glutamate, glycine, or spermidine, the KD values for [3H]MK-801 were reduced to 11 nM, 18 nM, and 15 nM, respectively. Maximally effective concentrations of combinations of the three compounds further increased [3H]MK-801 binding affinity as follows: L-glutamate + glycine, KD = 6.2 nM; L-glutamate + spermidine, KD = 2.2 nM; glycine + spermidine, KD = 8.3 nM. High concentrations of spermidine did not inhibit either [3H]glycine orf [3H]3-(2-carboxypiperazin-4-yl)propyl-1-phosphonic acid binding to the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor complex. The concentration of L-glutamate required to produce half-maximal enhancement (EC50) of [3H]MK-801 binding was reduced from 218 nM to 52 nM in the presence of 30 microM glycine and to 41 nM in the presence of 50 microM spermidine. The EC50 value for glycine enhancement of [3H]MK-801 binding was 184 nM. This was lowered to 47 nM in the presence of L-glutamate and to 59 nM in the presence of spermidine. Spermidine enhanced [3H]MK-801 binding with an EC50 value of 19.4 microM which was significantly reduced by high concentrations of L-glutamate (EC50 = 3.9 microM) or glycine (EC50 = 6.2 microM).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  2. PLCγ-activated signalling is essential for TrkB mediated sensory neuron structural plasticity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rocha-Sanchez Sonia M

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The vestibular system provides the primary input of our sense of balance and spatial orientation. Dysfunction of the vestibular system can severely affect a person's quality of life. Therefore, understanding the molecular basis of vestibular neuron survival, maintenance, and innervation of the target sensory epithelia is fundamental. Results Here we report that a point mutation at the phospholipase Cγ (PLCγ docking site in the mouse neurotrophin tyrosine kinase receptor TrkB (Ntrk2 specifically impairs fiber guidance inside the vestibular sensory epithelia, but has limited effects on the survival of vestibular sensory neurons and growth of afferent processes toward the sensory epithelia. We also show that expression of the TRPC3 cation calcium channel, whose activity is known to be required for nerve-growth cone guidance induced by brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF, is altered in these animals. In addition, we find that absence of the PLCγ mediated TrkB signalling interferes with the transformation of bouton type afferent terminals of vestibular dendrites into calyces (the largest synaptic contact of dendrites known in the mammalian nervous system on type I vestibular hair cells; the latter are normally distributed in these mutants as revealed by an unaltered expression pattern of the potassium channel KCNQ4 in these cells. Conclusions These results demonstrate a crucial involvement of the TrkB/PLCγ-mediated intracellular signalling in structural aspects of sensory neuron plasticity.

  3. Substrate Channelling

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Admin

    indole-glycerol-phosphate, the β subunit ca- talyses the irreversible condensation of in- dole with L-serine to form tryptophan and water in a pyridoxal phosphate (PLP) catalysed reaction (see Figure 1). In bacteria such as. Salmonella typhimurium, the a and β sub- units combine to form a stable multienzyme complex (aβ). 2.

  4. Channel function reconstitution and re-animation: a single-channel strategy in the postcrystal age

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oiki, Shigetoshi

    2015-01-01

    The most essential properties of ion channels for their physiologically relevant functions are ion-selective permeation and gating. Among the channel species, the potassium channel is primordial and the most ubiquitous in the biological world, and knowledge of this channel underlies the understanding of features of other ion channels. The strategy applied to studying channels changed dramatically after the crystal structure of the potassium channel was resolved. Given the abundant structural information available, we exploited the bacterial KcsA potassium channel as a simple model channel. In the postcrystal age, there are two effective frameworks with which to decipher the functional codes present in the channel structure, namely reconstitution and re-animation. Complex channel proteins are decomposed into essential functional components, and well-examined parts are rebuilt for integrating channel function in the membrane (reconstitution). Permeation and gating are dynamic operations, and one imagines the active channel by breathing life into the ‘frozen’ crystal (re-animation). Capturing the motion of channels at the single-molecule level is necessary to characterize the behaviour of functioning channels. Advanced techniques, including diffracted X-ray tracking, lipid bilayer methods and high-speed atomic force microscopy, have been used. Here, I present dynamic pictures of the KcsA potassium channel from the submolecular conformational changes to the supramolecular collective behaviour of channels in the membrane. These results form an integrated picture of the active channel and offer insights into the processes underlying the physiological function of the channel in the cell membrane. PMID:25833254

  5. Pharmaceutical Distribution Market Channels in Poland

    OpenAIRE

    Agnieszka Woś

    2009-01-01

    Distribution on the pharmaceutical market in Poland is interesting and the most difficult sphere to manage. Numerous varied and specialized companies operating on the market cause that the processes of choosing middlemen in distribution channels are very complex. The hereby article presents the role and location of the companies operating within distribution channels on the pharmaceutical market. It draws attention to the development of non-pharmacy and non-wholesale sales channels.

  6. Photostimulation of sensory neurons of the rat vagus nerve

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhee, Albert Y.; Li, Gong; Wells, Jonathon; Kao, Joseph P. Y.

    2008-02-01

    We studied the effect of infrared (IR) stimulation on rat sensory neurons. Primary sensory neurons were prepared by enzymatic dissociation of the inferior (or "nodose") ganglia from the vagus nerves of rats. The 1.85-μm output of a diode laser, delivered through a 200-μm silica fiber, was used for photostimulation. Nodose neurons express the vanilloid receptor, TRPV1, which is a non-selective cation channel that opens in response to significant temperature jumps above 37 C. Opening TRPV1 channels allows entry of cations, including calcium (Ca 2+), into the cell to cause membrane depolarization. Therefore, to monitor TRPV1 activation consequent to photostimulation, we used fura-2, a fluorescent Ca 2+ indicator, to monitor the rise in intracellular Ca 2+ concentration ([Ca 2+]i). Brief trains of 2-msec IR pulses activated TRPV1 rapidly and reversibly, as evidenced by transient rises in [Ca 2+]i (referred to as Ca 2+ transients). Consistent with the Ca 2+ transients arising from influx of Ca 2+, identical photostimulation failed to evoke Ca 2+ responses in the absence of extracellular Ca 2+. Furthermore, the photo-induced Ca 2+ signals were abolished by capsazepine, a specific blocker of TRPV1, indicating that the responses were indeed mediated by TRPV1. We discuss the feasibility of using focal IR stimulation to probe neuronal circuit properties in intact neural tissue, and compare IR stimulation with another photostimulation technique-focal photolytic release of "caged" molecules.

  7. Sodium channels in normal and pathological pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dib-Hajj, Sulayman D; Cummins, Theodore R; Black, Joel A; Waxman, Stephen G

    2010-01-01

    Nociception is essential for survival whereas pathological pain is maladaptive and often unresponsive to pharmacotherapy. Voltage-gated sodium channels, Na(v)1.1-Na(v)1.9, are essential for generation and conduction of electrical impulses in excitable cells. Human and animal studies have identified several channels as pivotal for signal transmission along the pain axis, including Na(v)1.3, Na(v)1.7, Na(v)1.8, and Na(v)1.9, with the latter three preferentially expressed in peripheral sensory neurons and Na(v)1.3 being upregulated along pain-signaling pathways after nervous system injuries. Na(v)1.7 is of special interest because it has been linked to a spectrum of inherited human pain disorders. Here we review the contribution of these sodium channel isoforms to pain.

  8. Mechanosensor Channels in Mammalian Somatosensory Neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick Delmas

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Mechanoreceptive sensory neurons innervating the skin, skeletal muscles andviscera signal both innocuous and noxious information necessary for proprioception, touchand pain. These neurons are responsible for the transduction of mechanical stimuli intoaction potentials that propagate to the central nervous system. The ability of these cells todetect mechanical stimuli impinging on them relies on the presence of mechanosensitivechannels that transduce the external mechanical forces into electrical and chemical signals.Although a great deal of information regarding the molecular and biophysical properties ofmechanosensitive channels in prokaryotes has been accumulated over the past two decades,less is known about the mechanosensitive channels necessary for proprioception and thesenses of touch and pain. This review summarizes the most pertinent data onmechanosensitive channels of mammalian somatosensory neurons, focusing on theirproperties, pharmacology and putative identity.

  9. Neurobiology of KB220Z-Glutaminergic-Dopaminergic Optimization Complex [GDOC] as a Liquid Nano: Clinical Activation of Brain in a Highly Functional Clinician Improving Focus, Motivation and Overall Sensory Input Following Chronic Intake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duquette, Lucien L; Mattiace, Frank; Blum, Kenneth; Waite, Roger L; Boland, Teresa; McLaughlin, Thomas; Dushaj, Kristina; Febo, Marcelo; Badgaiyan, Rajendra D

    2016-01-01

    With neurogenetic and epigenetic tools utilized in research and neuroimaging, we are unraveling the mysteries of brain function, especially as it relates to Reward Deficiency (RDS). We encourage the development of pharmaceuticals or nutraceuticals that promote a reduction in dopamine resistance and balance brain neurochemistry, leading to dopamine homeostasis. We disclose self-assessment of a highly functional professional under work-related stress following KB220Z use, a liquid (aqua) nano glutaminergic-dopaminergic optimization complex (GDOC). Subject took GDOC for one month. Subject self-administered GDOC using one-half-ounce twice a day. During first three days, unique brain activation occurred; resembling white noise after 30 minutes and sensation was strong for 45 minutes and then dissipated. He described effect as if his eyesight improved slightly and pointed out that his sense of smell and sleep greatly improved. Subject experienced a calming effect similar to meditation that could be linked to dopamine release. He also reported control of going over the edge after a hard day's work, which was coupled with a slight increase in energy, increased motivation to work, increased focus and multi-tasking, with clearer purpose of task at hand. Subject felt less inhibited in a social setting and suggested Syndrome that GDOC increased his Behavior Activating System (reward), while having a decrease in the Behavior Inhibition System (caution). These results and other related studies reveal an improved mood, work-related focus, and sleep. These effects as a subjective feeling of brain activation maybe due to direct or indirect dopaminergic interaction. While this case is encouraging, we must await more research in a larger randomized placebo-controlled study to map the role of GDOC, especially in a nano-sized product, to determine the possible effects on circuit inhibitory control and memory banks and the induction of dopamine homeostasis independent of either hypo- or

  10. Bladder sensory physiology: neuroactive compounds and receptors, sensory transducers, and target-derived growth factors as targets to improve function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, Eric J.; Merrill, Liana

    2014-01-01

    Urinary bladder dysfunction presents a major problem in the clinical management of patients suffering from pathological conditions and neurological injuries or disorders. Currently, the etiology underlying altered visceral sensations from the urinary bladder that accompany the chronic pain syndrome, bladder pain syndrome (BPS)/interstitial cystitis (IC), is not known. Bladder irritation and inflammation are histopathological features that may underlie BPS/IC that can change the properties of lower urinary tract sensory pathways (e.g., peripheral and central sensitization, neurochemical plasticity) and contribute to exaggerated responses of peripheral bladder sensory pathways. Among the potential mediators of peripheral nociceptor sensitization and urinary bladder dysfunction are neuroactive compounds (e.g., purinergic and neuropeptide and receptor pathways), sensory transducers (e.g., transient receptor potential channels) and target-derived growth factors (e.g., nerve growth factor). We review studies related to the organization of the afferent limb of the micturition reflex and discuss neuroplasticity in an animal model of urinary bladder inflammation to increase the understanding of functional bladder disorders and to identify potential novel targets for development of therapeutic interventions. Given the heterogeneity of BPS/IC and the lack of consistent treatment benefits, it is unlikely that a single treatment directed at a single target in micturition reflex pathways will have a mass benefit. Thus, the identification of multiple targets is a prudent approach, and use of cocktail treatments directed at multiple targets should be considered. PMID:24760999

  11. Improvements of sensorimotor processes during action cascading associated with changes in sensory processing architecture?insights from sensory deprivation

    OpenAIRE

    Gohil, Krutika; Hahne, Anja; Beste, Christian

    2016-01-01

    In most everyday situations sensorimotor processes are quite complex because situations often require to carry out several actions in a specific temporal order; i.e. one has to cascade different actions. While it is known that changes to stimuli affect action cascading mechanisms, it is unknown whether action cascading changes when sensory stimuli are not manipulated, but the neural architecture to process these stimuli is altered. In the current study we test this hypothesis using prelingual...

  12. Biophysical and Pharmacological Characterization of Nav1.9 Voltage Dependent Sodium Channels Stably Expressed in HEK-293 Cells

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lin, Zhixin; Santos, Sonia; Padilla, Karen; Printzenhoff, David; Castle, Neil A

    2016-01-01

    The voltage dependent sodium channel Nav1.9, is expressed preferentially in peripheral sensory neurons and has been linked to human genetic pain disorders, which makes it target of interest for the development of new pain therapeutics...

  13. Octopamine selectively modifies the slow component of sensory adaptation in an insect mechanoreceptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, B G; Torkkeli, P H; French, A S

    1992-09-25

    The effects of octopamine were studied on the dynamic behavior of the sensory neuron in the cockroach femoral tactile spine. The neuron is a rapidly adapting mechanoreceptor in which adaptation occurs by elevation of the threshold for action potential encoding. The threshold follows increases or decreases of membrane potential, with a delay that involves two separate exponential components. Previous evidence has associated the slow component with sodium pumping and the fast component with sodium channel inactivation. Octopamine reversibly raised the resting threshold and increased but slowed the slow component. These data indicate that octopamine has specific effects on membrane-ionic processes in insect sensory neurons.

  14. Route 66: Passively Breaking All GSM Channels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vejre, Philip S.; Bogdanov, Andrey

    2014-01-01

    impact in the field, only a small selection of its channels have been analyzed. In this paper, we perform a complete practical-complexity, ciphertext-only cryptanalysis of all 66 encoded GSM channels. Moreover, we present a new passive attack which recovers the encryption key by exploiting the location...

  15. CaV2.2 Gates Calcium-Independent but Voltage-Dependent Secretion in Mammalian Sensory Neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chai, Zuying; Wang, Changhe; Huang, Rong; Wang, Yuan; Zhang, Xiaoyu; Wu, Qihui; Wang, Yeshi; Wu, Xi; Zheng, Lianghong; Zhang, Chen; Guo, Wei; Xiong, Wei; Ding, Jiuping; Zhu, Feipeng; Zhou, Zhuan

    2017-12-20

    Action potential induces membrane depolarization and triggers intracellular free Ca 2+ concentration (Ca 2+ )-dependent secretion (CDS) via Ca 2+ influx through voltage-gated Ca 2+ channels. We report a new type of somatic exocytosis triggered by the action potential per se-Ca 2+ -independent but voltage-dependent secretion (CiVDS)-in dorsal root ganglion neurons. Here we uncovered the molecular mechanism of CiVDS, comprising a voltage sensor, fusion machinery, and their linker. Specifically, the voltage-gated N-type Ca 2+ channel (Ca V 2.2) is the voltage sensor triggering CiVDS, the SNARE complex functions as the vesicle fusion machinery, the "synprint" of Ca V 2.2 serves as a linker between the voltage sensor and the fusion machinery, and ATP is a cargo of CiVDS vesicles. Thus, CiVDS releases ATP from the soma while CDS releases glutamate from presynaptic terminals, establishing the Ca V 2.2-SNARE "voltage-gating fusion pore" as a novel pathway co-existing with the canonical "Ca 2+ -gating fusion pore" pathway for neurotransmitter release following action potentials in primary sensory neurons. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Targeting dorsal root ganglia and primary sensory neurons for the treatment of chronic pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berta, Temugin; Qadri, Yawar; Tan, Ping-Heng; Ji, Ru-Rong

    2017-07-01

    Currently the treatment of chronic pain is inadequate and compromised by debilitating central nervous system side effects. Here we discuss new therapeutic strategies that target dorsal root ganglia (DRGs) in the peripheral nervous system for a better and safer treatment of chronic pain. Areas covered: The DRGs contain the cell bodies of primary sensory neurons including nociceptive neurons. After painful injuries, primary sensory neurons demonstrate maladaptive molecular changes in DRG cell bodies and in their axons. These changes result in hypersensitivity and hyperexcitability of sensory neurons (peripheral sensitization) and are crucial for the onset and maintenance of chronic pain. We discuss the following new strategies to target DRGs and primary sensory neurons as a means of alleviating chronic pain and minimizing side effects: inhibition of sensory neuron-expressing ion channels such as TRPA1, TRPV1, and Nav1.7, selective blockade of C- and Aβ-afferent fibers, gene therapy, and implantation of bone marrow stem cells. Expert opinion: These peripheral pharmacological treatments, as well as gene and cell therapies, aimed at DRG tissues and primary sensory neurons can offer better and safer treatments for inflammatory, neuropathic, cancer, and other chronic pain states.

  17. Stabilization of diastolic calcium signal via calcium pump regulation of complex local calcium releases and transient decay in a computational model of cardiac pacemaker cell with individual release channels.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander V Maltsev

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Intracellular Local Ca releases (LCRs from sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR regulate cardiac pacemaker cell function by activation of electrogenic Na/Ca exchanger (NCX during diastole. Prior studies demonstrated the existence of powerful compensatory mechanisms of LCR regulation via a complex local cross-talk of Ca pump, release and NCX. One major obstacle to study these mechanisms is that LCR exhibit complex Ca release propagation patterns (including merges and separations that have not been characterized. Here we developed new terminology, classification, and computer algorithms for automatic detection of numerically simulated LCRs and examined LCR regulation by SR Ca pumping rate (Pup that provides a major contribution to fight-or-flight response. In our simulations the faster SR Ca pumping accelerates action potential-induced Ca transient decay and quickly clears Ca under the cell membrane in diastole, preventing premature releases. Then the SR generates an earlier, more synchronized, and stronger diastolic LCR signal activating an earlier and larger inward NCX current. LCRs at higher Pup exhibit larger amplitudes and faster propagation with more collisions to each other. The LCRs overlap with Ca transient decay, causing an elevation of the average diastolic [Ca] nadir to ~200 nM (at Pup = 24 mM/s. Background Ca (in locations lacking LCRs quickly decays to resting Ca levels (<100 nM at high Pup, but remained elevated during slower decay at low Pup. Release propagation is facilitated at higher Pup by a larger LCR amplitude, whereas at low Pup by higher background Ca. While at low Pup LCRs show smaller amplitudes, their larger durations and sizes combined with longer transient decay stabilize integrals of diastolic Ca and NCX current signals. Thus, the local interplay of SR Ca pump and release channels regulates LCRs and Ca transient decay to insure fail-safe pacemaker cell operation within a wide range of rates.

  18. Sensory Motor Coordination in Robonaut

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Richard Alan, II

    2003-01-01

    As a participant of the year 2000 NASA Summer Faculty Fellowship Program, I worked with the engineers of the Dexterous Robotics Laboratory at NASA Johnson Space Center on the Robonaut project. The Robonaut is an articulated torso with two dexterous arms, left and right five-fingered hands, and a head with cameras mounted on an articulated neck. This advanced space robot, now driven only teleoperatively using VR gloves, sensors and helmets, is to be upgraded to a thinking system that can find, interact with and assist humans autonomously, allowing the Crew to work with Robonaut as a (junior) member of their team. Thus, the work performed this summer was toward the goal of enabling Robonaut to operate autonomously as an intelligent assistant to astronauts. Our underlying hypothesis is that a robot can develop intelligence if it learns a set of basic behaviors (i.e., reflexes - actions tightly coupled to sensing) and through experience learns how to sequence these to solve problems or to accomplish higher-level tasks. We describe our approach to the automatic acquisition of basic behaviors as learning sensory-motor coordination (SMC). Although research in the ontogenesis of animals development from the time of conception) supports the approach of learning SMC as the foundation for intelligent, autonomous behavior, we do not know whether it will prove viable for the development of autonomy in robots. The first step in testing the hypothesis is to determine if SMC can be learned by the robot. To do this, we have taken advantage of Robonaut's teleoperated control system. When a person teleoperates Robonaut, the person's own SMC causes the robot to act purposefully. If the sensory signals that the robot detects during teleoperation are recorded over several repetitions of the same task, it should be possible through signal analysis to identify the sensory-motor couplings that accompany purposeful motion. In this report, reasons for suspecting SMC as the basis for

  19. Hereditary sensory neuropathy type I

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auer-Grumbach, Michaela

    2008-01-01

    Hereditary sensory neuropathy type I (HSN I) is a slowly progressive neurological disorder characterised by prominent predominantly distal sensory loss, autonomic disturbances, autosomal dominant inheritance, and juvenile or adulthood disease onset. The exact prevalence is unknown, but is estimated as very low. Disease onset varies between the 2nd and 5th decade of life. The main clinical feature of HSN I is the reduction of sensation sense mainly distributed to the distal parts of the upper and lower limbs. Variable distal muscle weakness and wasting, and chronic skin ulcers are characteristic. Autonomic features (usually sweating disturbances) are invariably observed. Serious and common complications are spontaneous fractures, osteomyelitis and necrosis, as well as neuropathic arthropathy which may even necessitate amputations. Some patients suffer from severe pain attacks. Hypacusis or deafness, or cough and gastrooesophageal reflux have been observed in rare cases. HSN I is a genetically heterogenous condition with three loci and mutations in two genes (SPTLC1 and RAB7) identified so far. Diagnosis is based on the clinical observation and is supported by a family history. Nerve conduction studies confirm a sensory and motor neuropathy predominantly affecting the lower limbs. Radiological studies, including magnetic resonance imaging, are useful when bone infections or necrosis are suspected. Definitive diagnosis is based on the detection of mutations by direct sequencing of the SPTLC1 and RAB7 genes. Correct clinical assessment and genetic confirmation of the diagnosis are important for appropriate genetic counselling and prognosis. Differential diagnosis includes the other hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathies (HSAN), especially HSAN II, as well as diabetic foot syndrome, alcoholic neuropathy, neuropathies caused by other neurotoxins/drugs, immune mediated neuropathy, amyloidosis, spinal cord diseases, tabes dorsalis, lepra neuropathy, or decaying skin

  20. Hereditary sensory neuropathy type I

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Auer-Grumbach Michaela

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Hereditary sensory neuropathy type I (HSN I is a slowly progressive neurological disorder characterised by prominent predominantly distal sensory loss, autonomic disturbances, autosomal dominant inheritance, and juvenile or adulthood disease onset. The exact prevalence is unknown, but is estimated as very low. Disease onset varies between the 2nd and 5th decade of life. The main clinical feature of HSN I is the reduction of sensation sense mainly distributed to the distal parts of the upper and lower limbs. Variable distal muscle weakness and wasting, and chronic skin ulcers are characteristic. Autonomic features (usually sweating disturbances are invariably observed. Serious and common complications are spontaneous fractures, osteomyelitis and necrosis, as well as neuropathic arthropathy which may even necessitate amputations. Some patients suffer from severe pain attacks. Hypacusis or deafness, or cough and gastrooesophageal reflux have been observed in rare cases. HSN I is a genetically heterogenous condition with three loci and mutations in two genes (SPTLC1 and RAB7 identified so far. Diagnosis is based on the clinical observation and is supported by a family history. Nerve conduction studies confirm a sensory and motor neuropathy predominantly affecting the lower limbs. Radiological studies, including magnetic resonance imaging, are useful when bone infections or necrosis are suspected. Definitive diagnosis is based on the detection of mutations by direct sequencing of the SPTLC1 and RAB7 genes. Correct clinical assessment and genetic confirmation of the diagnosis are important for appropriate genetic counselling and prognosis. Differential diagnosis includes the other hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathies (HSAN, especially HSAN II, as well as diabetic foot syndrome, alcoholic neuropathy, neuropathies caused by other neurotoxins/drugs, immune mediated neuropathy, amyloidosis, spinal cord diseases, tabes dorsalis, lepra

  1. The vanilloid receptor TRPV1 is activated and sensitized by local anesthetics in rodent sensory neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leffler, Andreas; Fischer, Michael J.; Rehner, Dietlinde; Kienel, Stephanie; Kistner, Katrin; Sauer, Susanne K.; Gavva, Narender R.; Reeh, Peter W.; Nau, Carla

    2008-01-01

    Local anesthetics (LAs) block the generation and propagation of action potentials by interacting with specific sites of voltage-gated Na+ channels. LAs can also excite sensory neurons and be neurotoxic through mechanisms that are as yet undefined. Nonspecific cation channels of the transient receptor potential (TRP) channel family that are predominantly expressed by nociceptive sensory neurons render these neurons sensitive to a variety of insults. Here we demonstrated that the LA lidocaine activated TRP channel family receptors TRPV1 and, to a lesser extent, TRPA1 in rodent dorsal root ganglion sensory neurons as well as in HEK293t cells expressing TRPV1 or TRPA1. Lidocaine also induced a TRPV1-dependent release of calcitonin gene–related peptide (CGRP) from isolated skin and peripheral nerve. Lidocaine sensitivity of TRPV1 required segments of the putative vanilloid-binding domain within and adjacent to transmembrane domain 3, was diminished under phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate depletion, and was abrogated by a point mutation at residue R701 in the proximal C-terminal TRP domain. These data identify TRPV1 and TRPA1 as putative key elements of LA-induced nociceptor excitation. This effect is sufficient to release CGRP, a key component of neurogenic inflammation, and warrants investigation into the role of TRPV1 and TRPA1 in LA-induced neurotoxicity. PMID:18172555

  2. Sensory deprivation regulates the development of the hyperpolarization-activated current in auditory brainstem neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassfurth, Benjamin; Magnusson, Anna K; Grothe, Benedikt; Koch, Ursula

    2009-10-01

    Hyperpolarization-activated and cyclic nucleotide-gated (HCN) channels are highly expressed in the superior olivary complex, the primary locus for binaural information processing. This hyperpolarization-activated current (I(h)) regulates the excitability of neurons and enhances the temporally precise analysis of the binaural acoustic cues. By using the whole-cell patch-clamp technique, we examined the properties of I(h) current in neurons of the lateral superior olive (LSO) and the medial nucleus of the trapezoid body (MNTB) before and after hearing onset. Moreover, we tested the hypothesis that I(h) currents are actively regulated by sensory input activity by performing bilateral and unilateral cochlear ablations before hearing onset, resulting in a chronic auditory deprivation. The results show that after hearing onset, I(h) currents are rapidly upregulated in LSO neurons, but change only marginally in neurons of the MNTB. We also found a striking difference in maximal current density, voltage dependence and activation time constant between the LSO and the MNTB in mature-like animals. Following bilateral cochlear ablations before hearing onset, the I(h) currents were scaled up in the LSO and scaled down in the MNTB. Consequently, in the LSO this resulted in a depolarized resting membrane potential and a lower input resistance of these neurons. This type of activity-dependent homeostatic change could thus result in an augmented response to the remaining inputs.

  3. Developmental broadening of inhibitory sensory maps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quast, Kathleen B; Ung, Kevin; Froudarakis, Emmanouil; Huang, Longwen; Herman, Isabella; Addison, Angela P; Ortiz-Guzman, Joshua; Cordiner, Keith; Saggau, Peter; Tolias, Andreas S; Arenkiel, Benjamin R

    2017-01-01

    Sensory maps are created by networks of neuronal responses that vary with their anatomical position, such that representations of the external world are systematically and topographically organized in the brain. Current understanding from studying excitatory maps is that maps are sculpted and refined throughout development and/or through sensory experience. Investigating the mouse olfactory bulb, where ongoing neurogenesis continually supplies new inhibitory granule cells into existing circuitry, we isolated the development of sensory maps formed by inhibitory networks. Using in vivo calcium imaging of odor responses, we compared functional responses of both maturing and established granule cells. We found that, in contrast to the refinement observed for excitatory maps, inhibitory sensory maps became broader with maturation. However, like excitatory maps, inhibitory sensory maps are sensitive to experience. These data describe the development of an inhibitory sensory map as a network, highlighting the differences from previously described excitatory maps. PMID:28024159

  4. Sensory characteristics of different cod products

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sveinsdottir, K.; Martinsdottir, E.; Hyldig, Grethe

    2010-01-01

    Sensory characteristics of cod products available to consumers were analyzed, and different ways to analyze sensory results were viewed. Ten cod samples of different origin (wild and farmed cod), storage time (short and extended) and storage method (stored fresh, frozen or packed in modified...... atmosphere) were evaluated with quantitative descriptive analysis by a trained sensory panel. Signal-to-noise analysis, p*MSE (discrimination and repeatability) and line plots proved to be very useful in studying panelists' performance. Most sensory attributes described significant differences between...... the products, and principal component analysis provided an overview of the differences and similarities between the products with regard to sensory characteristics. Farmed cod had different sensory characteristics compared with wild cod, such as more meat flavor, and rubbery and meaty texture. Different...

  5. Developmental broadening of inhibitory sensory maps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quast, Kathleen B; Ung, Kevin; Froudarakis, Emmanouil; Huang, Longwen; Herman, Isabella; Addison, Angela P; Ortiz-Guzman, Joshua; Cordiner, Keith; Saggau, Peter; Tolias, Andreas S; Arenkiel, Benjamin R

    2017-02-01

    Sensory maps are created by networks of neuronal responses that vary with their anatomical position, such that representations of the external world are systematically and topographically organized in the brain. Current understanding from studying excitatory maps is that maps are sculpted and refined throughout development and/or through sensory experience. Investigating the mouse olfactory bulb, where ongoing neurogenesis continually supplies new inhibitory granule cells into existing circuitry, we isolated the development of sensory maps formed by inhibitory networks. Using in vivo calcium imaging of odor responses, we compared functional responses of both maturing and established granule cells. We found that, in contrast to the refinement observed for excitatory maps, inhibitory sensory maps became broader with maturation. However, like excitatory maps, inhibitory sensory maps are sensitive to experience. These data describe the development of an inhibitory sensory map as a network, highlighting the differences from previously described excitatory maps.

  6. Multivariate analysis of data in sensory science

    CERN Document Server

    Naes, T; Risvik, E

    1996-01-01

    The state-of-the-art of multivariate analysis in sensory science is described in this volume. Both methods for aggregated and individual sensory profiles are discussed. Processes and results are presented in such a way that they can be understood not only by statisticians but also by experienced sensory panel leaders and users of sensory an