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Sample records for senile dementia post-menopausaul

  1. Acid rain may cause senile dementia

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    Pearce, F

    1985-04-25

    Aluminium, released from the soil by acid rain, may be a cause of several forms of senile dementia including Parkinson's disease and Alzheimer's disease. Many upland reservoirs, fed by acid rain, supply homes with water laced with significant amounts of aluminium. Studies in the Pacific have shown that communities living on soils that are extremely rich in bauxite, the rock containing aluminium, have a very high incidence of Alzheimer's disease.

  2. Senile Dementia from Neuroscientific and Islamic Perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tumiran, Mohd Amzari; Abdul Rahman, Noor Naemah; Mohd Saat, Rohaida; Ismail, Ahmad Zuhdi; Ruzali, Wan Adriyani Wan; Bashar, Nurul Kabir Nurul; Hasan Adli, Durriyyah Sharifah

    2018-02-01

    Diseases involving the nervous system drastically change lives of victims and commonly increase dependency on others. This paper focuses on senile dementia from both the neuroscientific and Islamic perspectives, with special emphasis on the integration of ideas between the two different disciplines. This would enable effective implementation of strategies to address issues involving this disease across different cultures, especially among the world-wide Muslim communities. In addition, certain incongruence ideas on similar issues can be understood better. The former perspective is molded according to conventional modern science, while the latter on the analysis of various texts including the holy Qur'an, sunnah [sayings and actions of the Islamic prophet, Muhammad (pbuh)] and writings of Islamic scholars. Emphasis is particularly given on causes, symptoms, treatments and prevention of dementia.

  3. Computed tomography in presenile, senile dementia

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    Tanabe, N [Jikei Univ., Tokyo (Japan). School of Medicine

    1981-05-01

    The author investigated the relations of brain atrophy demonstrated by computerized tomography, dementia and electroencephalogram (EEG) in presenile and senile diseases. The result revealed that the correlation of brain atrophy, when demonstrated on the basis of ventricular ratio, is more definite and higher with dementia than that when demonstrated on the ventricular width. It was also revealed that in the control group, the ventricle gets enlarged due to aging, but no such tendency was observed in the patient group. In the case of septugenarians, no significant difference was observed between the two, and the ventricular-brain ratio or the criteria of brain atrophy is 8 -- 9% in patients in their forties to fifties; 12% for those in their sixties, and more than 15% among those in their seventies. In the relation of the brain atrophy to EEG, it was revealed that EEG is closely related to dementia than is the ventricular ratio. Upon following the progress of patients with Alzheimer, it was found that dementia and brain atrophy do not progress parallel to each other, but in stages.

  4. Computed tomography in presenile, senile dementia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanabe, Norimitsu

    1981-01-01

    The author investigated the relations of brain atrophy demonstrated by computerized tomography, dementia and electroencephalogram (EEG) in presenile and senile diseases. The result revealed that the correlation of brain atrophy, when demonstrated on the basis of ventricular ratio, is more definite and higher with dementia than that when demonstrated on the ventricular width. It was also revealed that in the control group, the ventricle gets enlarged due to aging, but no such tendency was observed in the patient group. In the case of septugenarians, no significant difference was observed between the two, and the ventricular-brain ratio or the criteria of brain atrophy is 8 -- 9% in patients in their forties to fifties; 12% for those in their sixties, and more than 15% among those in their seventies. In the relation of the brain atrophy to EEG, it was revealed that EEG is closely related to dementia than is the ventricular ratio. Upon following the progress of patients with Alzheimer, it was found that dementia and brain atrophy do not progress parallel to each other, but in stages. (author)

  5. Traditional Chinese Medicine for Senile Dementia

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    Zhihong Lin

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM has a 3000 years' history of human use. A literature survey addressing traditional evidence from human studies was done, with key result that top 10 TCM herb ingredients including Poria cocos, Radix polygalae, Radix glycyrrhizae, Radix angelica sinensis, and Radix rehmanniae were prioritized for highest potential benefit to dementia intervention, related to the highest frequency of use in 236 formulae collected from 29 ancient Pharmacopoeias, ancient formula books, or historical archives on ancient renowned TCM doctors, over the past 10 centuries. Based on the history of use, there was strong clinical support that Radix polygalae is memory improving. Pharmacological investigation also indicated that all the five ingredients mentioned above can elicit memory-improving effects in vivo and in vitro via multiple mechanisms of action, covering estrogen-like, cholinergic, antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, antiapoptotic, neurogenetic, and anti-Aβ activities. Furthermore, 11 active principles were identified, including sinapic acid, tenuifolin, isoliquiritigenin, liquiritigenin, glabridin, ferulic acid, Z-ligustilide, N-methyl-beta-carboline-3-carboxamide, coniferyl ferulate and 11-angeloylsenkyunolide F, and catalpol. It can be concluded that TCM has a potential for complementary and alternative role in treating senile dementia. The scientific evidence is being continuously mined to back up the traditional medical wisdom.

  6. Operational criteria for senile dementia of Lewy body type (SDLT).

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKeith, I G; Perry, R H; Fairbairn, A F; Jabeen, S; Perry, E K

    1992-11-01

    Recent reports have suggested that brain stem and cortical Lewy body formation may identify a neurodegenerative disorder in elderly demented individuals which accounts for up to 20% of cases of senile dementia coming to autopsy. Retrospective analysis of case notes of 21 autopsy patients with neuropathologically proven senile dementia of Lewy body type (SDLT) and 37 cases with neuropathologically proven Alzheimer's disease (AD) identified a characteristic clinical syndrome in SDLT. Fluctuating cognitive impairment; psychotic features including visual and auditory hallucinations, and paranoid delusions; depressive symptoms; falling and unexplained losses of consciousness were all seen significantly more often than in AD. Over half of the SDLT patients in this series who were given neuroleptics in standard dose showed acute and often irreversible adverse reactions indicative of a neuroleptic sensitivity syndrome. The survival time of drug treated patients was reduced by 50%. Operational criteria to aid in the clinical distinction between SDLT and AD patients are proposed and hypotheses regarding possible aetiology and treatment discussed.

  7. A survey of senile dementia in the high background radiation areas in Yangjiang, China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Jia; Su Gasaki, H.; Yang Yuhua

    1997-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the effects of long-term low dose and low dose-rate ionizing radiation exposure on the prevalence rate of senile dementia, further assess the effects of low-dose radiation exposure on central nervous system and study the pathogen of senile dementia, and provide direct observational data of human beings. Methods: A cross-sectional study of the prevalence of senile dementia was carried out in high background radiation areas in Yangjiang, Guangdong Province, China. The survey was conducted in two stages. For the initial screening, Hasegawa Dementia Scale (HDS) was used for all subjects. In the second stage, the stage of diagnosis, special questionnaires of healthy state of old people were sued. The final diagnoses were made according to the third revised edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM III-R) of American Psychiatric Association. Results: 1018 inhabitants aged 65 years and over, including 513 persons in HBRA and 505 in CA were observed. According to DSM III-R, 61 cases (31 cases in HBRA and 30 cases in CA) of senile dementia were diagnosed. The prevalence rates of senile dementia are 6.04% in HBRA and 5.94% in CA, the total prevalence rate being 5.99%. Conclusion: No significant statistical difference in the prevalence rate of senile dementia between the two areas was found, suggesting that the prevalence rate of senile dementia in these areas is not associated with the high background radiation exposure

  8. Cognitive decline in patients with Alzheimer's disease, vascular dementia and senile dementia of Lewy body type.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballard, C; Patel, A; Oyebode, F; Wilcock, G

    1996-05-01

    One hundred and twenty-four patients with DSM-III-R dementia were assessed with a standardized battery which included the Geriatric Mental State Schedule, the History and Aetiology Schedule, the Secondary Dementia Schedule and the CAMCOG. Patients with Alzheimer's disease, vascular dementia and senile dementia of Lewy body type (SDLT) all had a similar degree of cognitive impairment at the time of the baseline interview. Patients with Alzheimer's disease and vascular dementia each experienced a mean decline of 27 points in patients with SDLT. Patients with SDLT had a significantly greater decline of verbal fluency than both the other groups. Women were significantly more impaired than men at the time of the baseline assessment but experienced a similar decline during the year of follow-up.

  9. Senile dementia of the Binswanger type: a vascular form of dementia in the elderly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roman, G.C.

    1987-01-01

    Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging in the elderly have demonstrated the common occurrence of deep white-matter lesions in the aging brain. These radiologic lesions (leukoaraiosis) may represent an early marker of dementia. At autopsy, an ischemic periventricular leukoencephalopathy (Binswanger's disease) has been found in most cases. The clinical spectrum of Binswanger's disease appears to range from asymptomatic radiologic lesions to dementia with focal deficits, frontal signs, pseudobulbar palsy, gait difficulties, and urinary incontinence. The name senile dementia of the Binswanger type (SDBT) is proposed for this poorly recognized, vascular form of subcortical dementia. The SDBT probably results from cortical disconnections most likely caused by hypoperfusion. In contrast, multi-infarct dementia is correlated with multiple large and small strokes that cause a loss of over 50 to 100 mL of brain volume. The periventricular white matter is a watershed area irrigated by long, penetrating medullary arteries. Risk factors for SDBT are small-artery diseases, such as hypertension and amyloid angiopathy, impaired autoregulation of cerebral blood flow in the elderly, and periventricular hypoperfusion due to cardiac failure, arrhythmias, and hypotension. The SDBT may be a potentially preventable and treatable form of dementia

  10. CT study in senile dementia of Alzheimer type

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    Yoshida, Ryoichi; Otomo, Eiichi [Yokufukai Geriatric Hospital, Tokyo (Japan)

    1989-10-01

    In order to evaluate the utility of cranial CT in diagnosis of senile dementia of Alzheimer type (SDAT), various CT findings were studied. CT scans of 62 cases of SDAT (83{plus minus}6 years old) were compared with those of 357 aged cases (means 78{plus minus}8 years old) without psychiatric and/or neurological illness (NC). To evaluate CT findings linear measurements of the ventricle, observation of sulci, brain atrophy ranking of microscopic observation were compared along with presence of periventricular lucency. When SDAT were compared with NC, the cases were divided into two groups by the age (the eighth decade, 80 years old or over) to avoid the influence of physiological brain atrophy. In SDAT there was a positive correlation between the volume of the lateral ventricle in autopsy brain and each index which demonstrates the size of the lateral ventricle on CT. In SDAT the incidence of cases with degree III or more was significantly higher than that in NC. It was 82.6% in SDAT, 15.7% in NC in the eighth decade and 92.3% in SDAT, 32.1% in NC in 80 years or over. The mean values of indexes of lateral ventricle enlargement in SDAT increased more than those in NC. In the eighth decade the mean lateral body ratio was 33.8% in SDAT, and 27.0% in NC and in 80 years or over, it was 33.1% in SDAT, 28.1% in NC. The differences between SDAT and NC were statistically significant. In SDAT the incidence of PVL was significantly higher than in NC. The mean maximum width of Sylvian fissure in SDAT was significantly larger than those in NC. However, the width of cingulate sulcus and central sulcus in SDAT were similar to those of NC. Brain atrophy ranking tended to increase with aging in SDAT, but this tendency was less clear than that in NC. In SDAT temporal atrophy was more significant than the other areas. Overall, CT revealed that brain atrophy in stage III patients was more remarkable than that in stage II patients.

  11. CT study in senile dementia of Alzheimer type

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, Ryoichi; Otomo, Eiichi

    1989-01-01

    In order to evaluate the utility of cranial CT in diagnosis of senile dementia of Alzheimer type (SDAT), various CT findings were studied. CT scans of 62 cases of SDAT (83±6 years old) were compared with those of 357 aged cases (means 78±8 years old) without psychiatric and/or neurological illness (normal control NC). The methods of evaluating CT findings were linear measurements of the ventricle, observation of sulci, brain atrophy ranking of microscopic observation, and presence of periventricular lucency. When SDAT were compared with NC, the cases were divided into two groups by the age (the eighth decade, 80 years old or over) to avoid the influence of physiological brain atrophy. In SDAT there was a positive correlation between the volume of the lateral ventricle in autopsy brain and each index which demonstrates the size of the lateral ventricle on CT. In SDAT the incidence of cases with degree III or more was significantly higher than that in NC. It was 82.6% in SDAT, 15.7% in NC in the eighth decade and 92.3% in SDAT, 32.1% in NC in 80 years or over. The mean values of indexes of lateral ventricle enlargement in SDAT increased more than those in NC significantly. In the eighth decade the mean lateral body ratio was 33.8% in SDAT, and 27.0% in NC and in 80 years or over, it was 33.1% in SDAT, 28.1% in NC. The differences between SDAT and NC were statistically significant. In SDAT the incidence of PVL was significantly higher than in NC. The mean maximum width of Sylvian fissure in SDAT was significantly larger than those in NC. However, the width of cingulate sulcus and central sulcus in SDAT were similar to those of NC. Brain atrophy ranking tended to increase with aging in SDAT, but this tendency was less clear than that in NC. In SDAT temporal atrophy was significantly remarkable than the other areas. Overall, CT revealed that brain atrophy in stage III patients was more remarkable than that in stage II patients. (J.P.N.)

  12. Effects of TimeSlips on Cornell Scale for Depression in Dementia scores of senile dementia patients

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    Hui-Ying Chen

    2016-03-01

    Conclusion: TimeSlips is beneficial to relieve depressive symptoms and ameliorate the emotions of mild or moderate senile dementia patients, thus improving their life quality and reducing the burden of their caregivers. A large-scale experimental research on TimeSlips with rigorous design is proposed for further studies.

  13. Analysis of computed X-ray tomography of the brain in incontinence patients with senile dementia

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    Suzuki, Yasuyuki; Machida, Toyohei; Oishi, Yukihiko [Jikei Univ., Tokyo (Japan). School of Medicine; Kamachi, Chikahumi; Okabe, Tsutomu; Akazawa, Kouhei; Takasaka, Satoshi

    1994-02-01

    To evaluate the condition of incontinence in patients with senile dementia, we performed computed tomography X-rays to the brain and analyzed the relationship among the circulatory defect of the brain, the brain atrophy and the degree of incontinence. There were 92 patients subjected to this study who were hospitalised due to senile dementia; 74 patients had vascular dementia, 10 patients had senile dementia of Alzheimer type, and 8 patients had the mixed type. (age range: 54-95 years; mean: 80.3 years). The degree of incontinence in these patients varied as follows: 18 patients with continence, 16 patients with moderate incontinence, 58 patients with total incontinence. The diagnosis of circulatory defect of the brain was based on computed tomography observation of periventricular lucency (P.V.L.), and the degree of brain atrophy was evaluated based on 4 criteria: the Lateral body ratio, the Huckman number, the Evans ratio, and the enlargement of the subarachnoid space. Among the 92 patients, P.V.L. was present in 31 patients, among them 27 patients suffered from incontinence. There was a significant correlation between P.V.L. and incontinence (p<0.001). As the incontinence progressively worsened (Continence, Moderate incontinence, Total incontinence), the lateral body ratio increased to 24.8, 27.8, 28.6, (p<0.05). The Huckman number also increased to 18.3, 19.3, 21.3, (p<0.01), and the evans ratio likewise 29.9, 32.3, 33.7 (p<0.01). The enlargement of the subarachnoid space was also correlated with the severity of incontinence. We conclude that urinary incontinence originating from senile dememtia is connected to brain atrophy and is strongly influenced by the circulatory disorders of the brain. (author).

  14. Role of brain imaging for diagnosis of senile dementia

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    Nishino, Hideo

    1988-12-01

    X-ray computed tomography (CT) was performed in a total of 239 patients, consisting of 100 with dementia and 139 normal volunteers. In the normal group, small infarcted areas were observed in 20%, and dilatation of the lateral ventricle, cerebral sulci and Sylvian fissure was associated with aging. In the dementia group, the incidence of periventricular lucency was closely related to cerebrovascular disorder, and also increased with aging for Alzheimer type dimentia; dilatation of the lateral ventricle, cerebral sulci, Sylvian fissure, and third ventricle was unrelated to aging; the incidence of dilated lateral ventricle and Sylvian fissure was frequently observed when cerebrovascular disorder was associated; an atrophied medial temporal lobe was observed in patients with presenile dementia under the age of 60. Radionuclide cisternography for 145 patients with various diseases and 56 normal subjects revealed: ventricular reflux was observed in 50% of the total cases; it occurred in 50% in each group with either cerebrovascular disorder or non-cerebrovascular disorder; persistent ventricular reflux with Sylvian block was observed in 40% of cases of subarachnoid hemorrhage; and ventricular reflux in the elderly was considered attributable to pseudo-normal pressure hydrocephalus. Single photon emission computed tomography with I-123 IMP, performed in 11 dementia and 5 non-dementia patients, revealed a decreased uptake in the temporo-parietal region only in cases of Alzheimer type dementia, although there was no abnormal X-ray CT finding. (Namekawa, K) 51 refs.

  15. The role of brain imaging for diagnosis of senile dementia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishino, Hideo

    1988-01-01

    X-ray computed tomography (CT) was performed in a total of 239 patients, consisting of 100 with dementia and 139 normal volunteers. In the normal group, small infarcted areas were observed in 20%, and dilatation of the lateral ventricle, cerebral sulci and Sylvian fissure was associated with aging. In the dementia group, the incidence of periventricular lucency was closely related to cerebrovascular disorder, and also increased with aging for Alzheimer type dimentia; dilatation of the lateral ventricle, cerebral sulci, Sylvian fissure, and third ventricle was unrelated to aging; the incidence of dilated lateral ventricle and Sylvian fissure was frequently observed when cerebrovascular disorder was associated; an atrophied medial temporal lobe was observed in patients with presenile dementia under the age of 60. Radionuclide cisternography for 145 patients with various diseases and 56 normal subjects revealed: ventricular reflux was observed in 50% of the total cases; it occurred in 50% in each group with either cerebrovascular disorder or non-cerebrovascular disorder; persistent ventricular reflux with Sylvian block was observed in 40% of cases of subarachnoid hemorrhage; and ventricular reflux in the elderly was considered attributable to pseudo-normal pressure hydrocephalus. Single photon emission computed tomography with I-123 IMP, performed in 11 dementia and 5 non-dementia patients, revealed a decreased uptake in the temporo-parietal region only in cases of Alzheimer type dementia, although there was no abnormal X-ray CT finding. (Namekawa, K) 51 refs

  16. [Aspects of senile dementia in ancient Rome: literary fiction and factual reality].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moog, Ferdinand Peter; Schäfer, Daniel

    2007-01-01

    Old people and their pecularities have been the object of writers since the beginning of Western literature. The aim of this study is to verify the social and juridical significance of senile dementia in ancient Rome. Among the few relevant sources the 10th satire of Juvenal attracts attention. It describes a demented patient who revises his succession in favour of a lady with bad reputation. Logically, we wonder whether such dispositions were possible and after all legally binding. Or did Juvenal exaggerate? A look at the Roman legislation shows: Since the Twelve Tablet Law there were instruments to control or to help demented people. This meant care in the sense of the today's curatorship or guardianship. These measures were supposed to prevent extravagancy or doing business and legal acts like marriages or last wills in the state of diminished responsibility. Nevertheless, it must be assumed that there was a considerable discrepancy between juridical theory and daily practice, because the position of the "pater familias" was virtually untouchable, the individual freedom of the full citizen was firmly underlined and the Roman civil law allowed only little executive interferences. Juvenal's bizarre example should not only be taken as good literary fiction. It might reflect the sad, but nevertheless probable reality of the people directly concerned. Apart from that it has to be said that senile dementia played only a minor role in Roman legislation. Mainly because there were considerably less very old people--and in particular people with senile dementia--than today.

  17. Investigation of elemental models in senile dementia and depressives using neutron activation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akanle, O.A.; Spyrou, N.M.; Damyanova, A.A.; Ali, L.

    1987-01-01

    Instrumental neutron activation analysis was used to determine the concentration of a range of elements in hair and blood samples, separated into erythrocytes and plasma, obtained from women, senile demented (9) and depressives (16), and their controls (17 and 9). The results suggest that the senile dementia group has significantly higher Al concentrations in erythrocytes and hair. Zn concentrations determined in the erythrocytes and plasma of these subjects were lower compared to the control values. Vanadium levels above detection limit for the element were found in seven cases out of a total of sixteen in the depressive group. Vanadium was also found to be at higher concentrations in the hair of the depressive group compared to the controls. Again no significant correlation was found to exist between the concentration of vanadium in hair and in erythrocyte sample for these seven subjects. (author) 17 refs.; 4 tables

  18. Differential alterations of cortical glutamatergic binding sites in senile dementia of the Alzheimer type

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chalmers, D.T.; Dewar, D.; Graham, D.I.; Brooks, D.N.; McCulloch, J.

    1990-01-01

    Involvement of cortical glutamatergic mechanisms in senile dementia of the Alzheimer type (SDAT) has been investigated with quantitative ligand-binding autoradiography. The distribution and density of Na(+)-dependent glutamate uptake sites and glutamate receptor subtypes--kainate, quisqualate, and N-methyl-D-aspartate--were measured in adjacent sections of frontal cortex obtained postmortem from six patients with SDAT and six age-matched controls. The number of senile plaques was determined in the same brain region. Binding of D-[3H]aspartate to Na(+)-dependent uptake sites was reduced by approximately 40% throughout SDAT frontal cortex relative to controls, indicating a general loss of glutamatergic presynaptic terminals. [3H]Kainate receptor binding was significantly increased by approximately 70% in deep layers of SDAT frontal cortex compared with controls, whereas this binding was unaltered in superficial laminae. There was a positive correlation (r = 0.914) between kainate binding and senile plaque number in deep cortical layers. Quisqualate receptors, as assessed by 2-amino-3-hydroxy-5-[3H]methylisoxazole-4-propionic acid binding, were unaltered in SDAT frontal cortex compared with controls. There was a small reduction (25%) in N-methyl-D-aspartate-sensitive [3H]glutamate binding only in superficial cortical layers of SDAT brains relative to control subjects. [3H]Glutamate binding in SDAT subjects was unrelated to senile plaque number in superficial cortical layers (r = 0.104). These results indicate that in the presence of cortical glutamatergic terminal loss in SDAT plastic alterations occur in some glutamate receptor subtypes but not in others

  19. The clinical diagnosis and misdiagnosis of senile dementia of Lewy body type (SDLT).

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKeith, I G; Fairbairn, A F; Perry, R H; Thompson, P

    1994-09-01

    Current clinical classifications do not contain specific diagnostic categories for patients with senile dementia of the Lewy body type (SDLT), recently proposed as the second commonest neuropathological cause of dementia in the elderly. This study determines how existing clinical diagnosis systems label SDLT patients and suggests how such patients may be identified. A range of clinical diagnostic criteria for dementia were applied to case notes of autopsy-confirmed SDLT (n = 20), dementia of Alzheimer type (DAT; n = 21) and multi-infarct dementia (MID; n = 9) patients who had received psychogeriatric assessment. The predictive validity of each set of clinical criteria was calculated against the external criterion of neuropathological diagnosis. Many SDLT patients erroneously met criteria for MID (35% with Hachinski scores > or = 7) or for DAT (15% by NINCDS 'probable AD', 35% by DSM-III-R DAT and 50% by NINCDS 'possible AD'). Up to 85% of SDLT cases could be correctly identified using recently published specific criteria. SDLT usually has a discernible clinical syndrome and existing clinical classifications may need revision to diagnose correctly such patients.

  20. Cholinergic and dopaminergic activities in senile dementia of Lewy body type.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, E K; Marshall, E; Perry, R H; Irving, D; Smith, C J; Blessed, G; Fairbairn, A F

    1990-01-01

    Analyses of brain tissue in a recently identified group of elderly demented patients suggest a neurochemical basis for some of the clinical features. Senile dementia of the Lewy body type (SDLT) can be distinguished from classical Alzheimer disease (AD) clinically by its acute presentation with confusion frequently accompanied by visual hallucinations, and neuropathologically by the presence of Lewy bodies and senile plaques (but not generally neurofibrillary tangles) in the cerebral cortex. Reductions in the cortical cholinergic enzyme choline acetyltransferase were more pronounced in individuals with (80%) compared to those without (50%) hallucinations and correlated strongly with mental test scores in the group as a whole. In the caudate nucleus, dopamine levels were related to the number of neurons in the substantia nigra, there being a 40-60% loss of both in SDLT--probably accounting for mild extrapyramidal features in some of these cases--compared with an 80% loss in Parkinson disease and no change in AD. The cholinergic correlates of mental impairment in SDLT together with the relative absence of cortical neurofibrillary tangles and evidence for postsynaptic cholinergic receptor compensation raise the question of whether this type of dementia may be more amenable to cholinotherapy than classical AD.

  1. The venous manifestations of pulse wave encephalopathy: windkessel dysfunction in normal aging and senile dementia

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    Bateman, Grant A. [Locked Bag 1, Newcastle Region Mail Center, Department of Medical Imaging, John Hunter Hospital, Newcastle (Australia); Levi, Christopher R.; Wang, Yang; Lovett, Elizabeth C. [Hunter Medical Research Institute, Clinical Neurosciences Program, Newcastle (Australia); Schofield, Peter [James Fletcher Hospital, Neuropsychiatry Unit, Newcastle (Australia)

    2008-06-15

    Cerebral arterial, venous and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) pulsations are closely coupled and this produces pulsation dampening or the windkessel effect. Normal pressure hydrocephalus is a manifestation of the breakdown of this windkessel effect with altered CSF and venous pulsations being noted. The aim of this study was to show that dysfunction of the windkessel mechanism is also a component of normal aging and senile dementia. The study group comprised 24 patients classified as either early senile dementia of Alzheimer's type (SDAT) or vascular dementia (VaD). The patients with dementia were compared with 12 age-matched non-cognitively impaired subjects, and 12 normal young individuals were compared with the normal aging group. MRI flow quantification was used to measure the nonpulsatile and pulsatile components of blood flow as well as the pulsation at the tentorial incisura. With normal aging blood flow decreased but arterial pulsations increased in volume by 49% (P = 0.003). The CSF vented via the tentorial incisura does not change significantly with age and therefore increased venous pulsation is necessary. In patients with VaD the arterial pulse volume was higher by 24% and the straight sinus pulsation was higher by 57% than in normal aging subjects (P = 0.05 and P = 0.03, respectively). In patients with SDAT the total venous pulsation volumes were similar to those in normal aging subjects but there was less basal sinus pulsation. Normal aging, SDAT and VaD are associated with alterations in venous pulsation due to a breakdown of the windkessel effect. (orig.)

  2. Synapsin I (Protein I) in different brain regions in senile dementia of Alzheimer type and in multiinfarct dementia. [Radioimmunoassay

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    Adolfsson, R; Alafuzoff, I; Winblad, B [Umeaa Univ. (Sweden); Perdahl, E; Albert, K A; Nestler, E J; Greengard, P [Rockefeller Univ., New York (USA)

    1984-01-01

    Synapsin I (Protein I), a neuron-specfic phosphoprotein enriched in presynaptic nerve terminals, has been used as a quantitative marker for the density of nerve terminals in five brain regions (caudate nucleus, cingulate gyrus, hippocampus, mesencephalon and putamen) from patients who had suffered from Alzheimer disease/senile dementia of Alzheimer type (AD/SDAT), from patients with multi-infarct dementia (MID), and from agematched controls. Samples were obtained at autopsy. Lower levels of Synapsin I were observed in the hippocampus of patients with AD/SDAT but not with MID. There were no significant differences in Synapsin I levels between patients and controls in any of the other four brain regions examined.

  3. Synapsin I (protein I) in different brain regions in senile dementia of Alzheimer type and in multiinfarct dementia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adolfsson, R.; Alafuzoff, I.; Winblad, B.; Perdahl, E.; Albert, K.A.; Nestler, E.J.; Greengard, P.

    1984-01-01

    Synapsin I (Protein I), a neuron-specfic phosphoprotein enriched in presynaptic nerve terminals, has been used as a quantitative marker for the density of nerve terminals in five brain regions (caudate nucleus, cingulate gyrus, hippocampus, mesencephalon and putamen) from patients who had suffered from Alzheimer disease/senile dementia of Alzheimer type (AD/SDAT), from patients with multi-infarct dementia (MID), and from agematched controls. Samples were obtained at autopsy. Lower levels of Synapsin I were observed in the hippocampus of patients with AD/SDAT but not with MID. There were no significant differences in Synapsin I levels between patients and controls in any of the other four brain regions examined. (Author)

  4. Regional cerebral blood flow and brain atrophy in senile dementia of Alzheimer type (SDAT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okada, Kazunori; Kobayashi, Shoutai; Yamaguchi, Shuhei; Kitani, Mituhiro; Tsunematsu, Tokugoro

    1987-01-01

    To investigate the relationship between the reduction of cerebal blood flow and brain atrophy in SDAT, these were measured in 13 cases of senile dementia of Alzheimer type, and compared to 15 cases of multi-infarct Dementia, 39 cases of lacunar infarction without dementia (non-demented CVD group) and 69 cases of aged normal control. Brain atrophy was evaluated by two-dimensional method on CT film by digitizer and regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) was measured by 133 Xe inhalation method. The degree of brain atrophy in SDAT was almost similar of that of MID. But it was more severe than that of non-demented group. MID showed the lowest rCBF among these groups. SDAT showed significantly lower rCBF than that of aged control, but rCBF in SDAT was equal to that of lacunar stroke without dementia. Focal reduction of cerebral blood flow in bilateral fronto-parietal and left occipital regions were observed in SDAT. Verbal intelligence score (Hasegawa's score) correlated with rCBF and brain atrophy index in MID, and a tendency of correlation between rCBF and brain atrophy in MID was also observed. However, there was no correlation among those indices in SDAT. These findings suggest that the loss of brain substance dose not correspond to the reduction of rCBF in SDAT and simultaneous measurement of rCBF and brain atrophy was useful to differ SDAT from MID. (author)

  5. Relationships between automated EEG and cranial CT in patients with senile dementia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mori, Katsumi; Miyasaka, Mutue; Nakano, Takashi; Ohtaka, Tadashi

    1988-01-01

    The degree of dementia was examined in relation to findings of automated EEG and cranial CT in 50 demented old patients aged 51 - 86. Slow waves on EEC, and dilated ventricle and atrophied cortex on cranial CT were frequently associated with poor psychological scores. As the degree of dilated ventricle increased, the frequency and amplitude of slow waves increased and the frequency and continuity of α waves decreased. Dilated ventricle was more strongly correlated with abnormal EEG findings than atrophied cortex. This was more marked in cases of severer patients. Abnormal EEC findings associated with poor psychological scores were more frequently observed in the group of patients with vascular dementia (VD, n = 30) than the group of patients with senile dementia of Alzheimer type (SDAT, n = 20). Abnormal EEG findings were correlated with poor scores on Hasegawa test in the VD group and with those on Bender Gestalt test in the SDAT group. The degree of dilated ventricle was more correlated with abnormal EEG findings in the SDAT group than the VD group. (Namekawa, K.)

  6. Relationships between automated EEG and cranial CT in patients with senile dementia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mori, Katsumi; Miyasaka, Mutue; Nakano, Takashi; Ohtaka, Tadashi

    1988-08-01

    The degree of dementia was examined in relation to findings of automated EEG and cranial CT in 50 demented old patients aged 51 - 86. Slow waves on EEC, and dilated ventricle and atrophied cortex on cranial CT were frequently associated with poor psychological scores. As the degree of dilated ventricle increased, the frequency and amplitude of slow waves increased and the frequency and continuity of ..cap alpha.. waves decreased. Dilated ventricle was more strongly correlated with abnormal EEG findings than atrophied cortex. This was more marked in cases of severer patients. Abnormal EEC findings associated with poor psychological scores were more frequently observed in the group of patients with vascular dementia (VD, n = 30) than the group of patients with senile dementia of Alzheimer type (SDAT, n = 20). Abnormal EEG findings were correlated with poor scores on Hasegawa test in the VD group and with those on Bender Gestalt test in the SDAT group. The degree of dilated ventricle was more correlated with abnormal EEG findings in the SDAT group than the VD group. (Namekawa, K.).

  7. Clinical significance of white matter hyperintensities in MRI in senile dementia of the Alzheimer type

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takita, Masashi

    1996-01-01

    To elucidate clinical significance of white matter hyperintensities (WMH) in MRI, fifty patients with senile dementia of the Alzheimer type (SDAT) and twenty normal controls were studied. Twenty nine patients with SDAT (58.0%) had periventricular hyperintensities (PVH) and twenty three patients with SDAT (46.0%) had deep white matter hyperintensities (DWMH). Eight controls (40.0%) had PVH and ten controls (50.0%) had DWMH. There were no significant differences in frequency of WMH between patients with SDAT and normal controls. Past history of hypertension was more frequent in patients with PVH or DWMH than in patients without them. Serum cholesterol level was higher in patients with DWMH than in patients without them. However there were no significant differences in the other clinical features between patients with WMH and patients without them. The results of present study suggest that DWMH in patients with SDAT is associated with cerebrovascular risk factors such as hypertension and hyperlipidemia. (author)

  8. Cerebral blood flow and oxygen metabolism in senile dementia of Alzheimer's type and vascular dementia with deep white matter changes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tohgi, H.; Yonezawa, H.; Takahashi, S.; Sato, N.; Kato, E.; Kudo, M.; Hatano, K.; Sasaki, T.

    1998-01-01

    Regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF), cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen (rCMRO 2 ), oxygen extraction fraction (rOEF), and cerebral blood volume (rCBV) were investigated using positron emission tomography (PET) in 16 patients with senile dementia of Alzheimer's type (SDAT), and compared with those of 6 nondemented and 3 demented patients with deep white matter high signal (DWMH) on T2-weighted MRI and 6 controls. rCBF, rCMRO 2 and rCBV were determined using C 15 O 2 , 15 O 2 and C 15 O, respectively. rCBF and CMRO 2 were significantly decreased in the frontal, parietal and temporal cortex (P 2 was significantly reduced in only the frontal and temporal cortex of demented patients (P < 0.05). rOEF was significantly increased in the parietal cortex of patients with SDAT and in the white matter of patients with SDAT or DWMH (P < 0.05), and the increase in the frontal white matter significantly paralleled the progression of dementia in patients with SDAT (P < 0.05). rCBV was significantly decreased in the parietal and temporal cortex of patients with SDAT (P < 0.05), but not in any areas of those with DWMH. (orig.)

  9. Abnormally phosphorylated tau protein in senile dementia of Lewy body type and Alzheimer disease: evidence that the disorders are distinct.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strong, C; Anderton, B H; Perry, R H; Perry, E K; Ince, P G; Lovestone, S

    1995-01-01

    The relationship between Alzheimer disease (AD) and dementia with Lewy bodies (senile dementia Lewy body type, or SDLT) and dementia in Parkinson's disease is unclear. AD pathology is characterised by both amyloid deposition and abnormal phosphorylation of tau in paired helical filaments (PHF-tau). In AD, abnormally phosphorylated PHF-tau is present in neurofibrillary tangles, in neuritic processes of senile plaques, and also in neuropil threads dispersed throughout the cerebral cortex. Cortical homogenates from 12 cases each of AD and SDLT, 13 cases of Parkinson's disease, and 11 normal controls were examined by Western blot analysis with antibodies that detect PHF-tau. No PHF-tau was found in Parkinson's disease or control cortex. No PHF-tau was found in SDLT cases without histological evidence of tangles. PHF-tau was detectable in SDLT cases with a low density of tangles, and large amounts of PHF-tau were present in AD cases. This study demonstrates that abnormally phosphorylated PHF-tau is only present where tangles are found and not in SDLT cases without tangles or with only occasional tangles. It is concluded that Lewy body dementias are distinct at a molecular level from AD.

  10. Comparison of Apraxia between Patients with Senile Dementia of Alzheimer Type and Normal Aged People

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    Fariba Yadegari

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective: In addition to memory deficits and aphasia, many patients with Alzheimer’s disease (AD are apraxic which may bring about disturbances in their daily living. The purpose of present study was investigating the presence of any apraxic disorder in patients with senile dementia of Alzheimer type (SDAT and comparison with normal aged people. Materials & Methods: In this case–control and analytical study 14 SDAT patients were compared with 20 normal ageing people that they were matched with patients according to age and education. Patients were selected from Iranian Alzheimer Association clients with psychiatrist diagnostic confirmation and MMSE scores between 15-27 and compared with controls with MMSE scores between 25-30. Apraxia Test was administered on both groups. The Test included 4 subtests: conceptual movements gestured conceptual movements, oral and respiratory movements & pantomime of movements of object manipulations. Data was analyzed by using Kolmogoroff – Smirnoff test, Man – Witney, T-test for independent groups and pearsonian correlation coefficient. Results: Findings showed that apraxia scores were significantly (P<0/001 different between groups so that (SDAT patients were diagnosed as apraxic and controls were not. Besides, comparison of subtests scores of (SDAT patients revealed that conceptual movements scores were significantly (P<0/001 less than the other subtests (more apraxic and oral and respiratory movements scores were significantly (P<0/001 higher than the other subtests (less apraxic. Conclusion: Apraxia could be considered as one of the neuropsychological signs early in the disease development. It can be applied complementarily for differential diagnosis. Also apraxia subgroup scoring could be used for apraxia categorization, understanding observed disorders and determining possible rehabilitation ways.

  11. Quantitative neuropathological study of Alzheimer-type pathology in the hippocampus: comparison of senile dementia of Alzheimer type, senile dementia of Lewy body type, Parkinson's disease and non-demented elderly control patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ince, P; Irving, D; MacArthur, F; Perry, R H

    1991-12-01

    A Lewy body dementing syndrome in the elderly has been recently described and designated senile dementia of Lewy body type (SDLT) on the basis of a distinct clinicopathological profile. The pathological changes seen in SDLT include the presence of cortical Lewy bodies (LB) frequently, but not invariably, associated with senile plaque (SP) formation. Whilst neocortical neurofibrillary tangles (NFT) are sparse or absent, a proportion of these cases show involvement of the temporal archicortex by lesions comprising Alzheimer-type pathology (ATP, i.e. NFT, SP and granulovacuolar degeneration [GVD]). Thus the relationship between SDLT and senile dementia of Alzheimer type (SDAT) is complex and controversial. In this study quantitative neuropathology was used to compare the intensity and distribution of ATP in the hippocampus and entorhinal cortex of 53 patients from 3 disease groups (SDLT, SDAT, Parkinson's disease (PD)) and a group of neurologically and mentally normal elderly control patients. For most brain areas examined the extent of ATP between the patient groups followed the trend SDAT greater than SDLT greater than PD greater than control. Statistical comparison of these groups revealed significant differences between the mean densities of NFT, SP and GVD although individual cases showed considerable variability. These results confirm additional pathological differences between SDAT and SDLT regarding the intensity of involvement of the temporal archicortex by ATP. Many patients with Lewy body disorders (LBdis) show a predisposition to develop ATP albeit in a more restricted distribution (e.g. low or absent neocortical NFT) and at lower densities than is found in SDAT. Some cases of SDLT show minimal SP and NFT formation in both neocortex and archicortex supporting previously published data distinguishing this group from Alzheimer's disease.

  12. Influence of apolipoprotein E genotype on senile dementia of the Alzheimer and Lewy body types. Significance for etiological theories of Alzheimer's disease.

    OpenAIRE

    Harrington, C. R.; Louwagie, J.; Rossau, R.; Vanmechelen, E.; Perry, R. H.; Perry, E. K.; Xuereb, J. H.; Roth, M.; Wischik, C. M.

    1994-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is associated with an increased frequency of the apolipoprotein E type epsilon 4 allele. To address both the disease and the allele specificity of this association, we have examined the apolipoprotein E allele distribution in 255 elderly persons including those with autopsy-confirmed AD, senile dementia of the Lewy body type (SDLT), vascular dementia, Parkinson's disease (PD) or Huntington's disease and in nondemented controls either with or without coronary complicat...

  13. Xenon contrast CT-CBF scanning of the brain differentiates normal age-related changes from multi-infarct dementia and senile dementia of Alzheimer type

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tachibana, H.; Meyer, J.S.; Okayasu, H.; Shaw, T.G.; Kandula, P.; Rogers, R.L.

    1984-01-01

    Local cerebral blood flow (LCBF) and partition coefficients (L lambda) were measured during inhalation of stable xenon gas with serial CT scanning among normal volunteers (N . 15), individuals with multi-infarct dementia (MID, N . 10), and persons with senile dementia of Alzheimer type (SDAT, N . 8). Mean gray matter flow values were reduced in both MID and SDAT. Age-related declines in LCBF values in normals were marked in frontal cortex and basal ganglia. LCBF values were decreased beyond normals in frontal and temporal cortices and thalamus in MID and SDAT, in basal ganglia only in MID. Unlike SDAT and age-matched normals, L lambda values were reduced in fronto-temporal cortex and thalamus in MID. Multifocal nature of lesions in MID was apparent. Coefficients of variation for LCBFs were greater in MID compared with SDAT and/or age-matched normals

  14. Effects of apolipoprotein E genotype on cortical neuropathology in senile dementia of the Lewy body and Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benjamin, R; Leake, A; Ince, P G; Perry, R H; McKeith, I G; Edwardson, J A; Morris, C M

    1995-12-01

    Apolipoprotein E (APO E) genotypes were determined in a UK population of neuropathologically confirmed control cases, and in cases of Lewy body dementia (SDLT) and late onset Alzheimer's disease (AD). APO E epsilon 4 allele frequency was significantly elevated in both SDLT and AD groups with a concomitant reduction in the APO E epsilon 3 allele frequency. The epsilon 2 allele frequency in the AD group was only 25% of the control population, though because of the relatively small sample size this reduction was not significant; the epsilon 2 allele frequency in the SDLT group was normal. No significant association was found between senile plaque density and neurofibrillary tangle density in the neocortex and APO E allele dose in either SDLT or AD. Although the possession of APO E epsilon 4 is associated with an increased risk of developing SDLT and AD, actual APO E genotype does not appear to affect the burden of pathology.

  15. Regional cerebral blood flow and brain atrophy in senile dementia of Alzheimer type (SDAT). Comparing with multi-infarct dementia (MID), and aged control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okada, K; Kobayashi, S; Yamaguchi, S; Kitani, M; Tsunematsu, T

    1987-05-01

    To investigate the relationship between the reduction of cerebal blood flow and brain atrophy in SDAT, these were measured in 13 cases of senile dementia of Alzheimer type, and compared to 15 cases of multi-infarct Dementia, 39 cases of lacunar infarction without dementia (non-demented CVD group) and 69 cases of aged normal control. Brain atrophy was evaluated by two-dimensional method on CT film by digitizer and regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) was measured by /sup 133/Xe inhalation method. The degree of brain atrophy in SDAT was almost similar of that of MID. But it was more severe than that of non-demented group. MID showed the lowest rCBF among these groups. SDAT showed significantly lower rCBF than that of aged control, but rCBF in SDAT was equal to that of lacunar stroke without dementia. Focal reduction of cerebral blood flow in bilateral fronto-parietal and left occipital regions were observed in SDAT. Verbal intelligence score (Hasegawa's score) correlated with rCBF and brain atrophy index in MID, and a tendency of correlation between rCBF and brain atrophy in MID was also observed. However, there was no correlation among those indices in SDAT. These findings suggest that the loss of brain substance dose not correspond to the reduction of rCBF in SDAT and simultaneous measurement of rCBF and brain atrophy was useful to differ SDAT from MID.

  16. A quantitative comparison of plaque types in Alzheimer's disease and senile dementia of the Lewy body type.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenzie, J E; Edwards, R J; Gentleman, S M; Ince, P G; Perry, R H; Royston, M C; Roberts, G W

    1996-01-01

    In a previous study we reported no difference in the overall beta-amyloid protein (beta AP) load between Alzheimer's disease (AD) and senile dementia of the Lewy body type (SDLT). However, it is possible that differences in the morphology of beta AP plaque types exist, analogous to the differences in cytoskeletal pathology found in these two disorders. We have carried out a quantitative image analysis of plaque subtypes in the temporal lobe of AD (n = 8), SDLT (n = 9) and control (n = 11) cases. Measurements of beta AP load and plaque density were consistently higher in AD and SDLT than in controls. When AD and SDLT cases were compared no differences were seen in either the density or relative proportions of classic and diffuse plaques. Based on these results we suggest that the variation in the clinical course of these diseases reflects differences in the cytoskeletal pathology, whereas the final stages of profound dementia common to both disorders is associated with the deposition of beta AP.

  17. Quantitative cerebral blood flow assessment in senile dementia of Alzheimer type and multi-infarct dementia using sup 123 I-IMP SPECT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arai, Hisayuki; Hanyu, Haruo; Kobayashi, Yasutaka; Uno, Masanobu; Hatano, Nobuyoshi; Shin, Kouichi; Katsunuma, Hideyo; Suzuki, Takanari; Murayama, Hiroyasu [Tokyo Medical Coll. (Japan)

    1990-06-01

    In order to compare senile dementia of Alzheimer type (SDAT) with multi-infarct dementia (MID) from the standpoint of cerebral blood flow, a study was carried out by using single photon emission CT (SPECT) with N-isopropyl-p-({sup 123}I) iodoamphetamine on 14 healthy aged subjects, 12 patients with SDAT, 8 patients with MID and 7 patients with multiple infarction (MI). The diagnosis of SDAT, MID and MI was based on a clinical history, X-ray CT findings and Hachinski's ischemic score. Venous blood sampling method of Matsuda et al. was used as quantitative cerebral blood flow measurements. The mean cerebral blood flow (mCBF) values in controls was 52.1{plus minus}5.5 ml/100 g/min, while the corresponding values in SDAT, MI and MID were 36.9{plus minus}5.0, 41.0{plus minus}6.2, and 37.7{plus minus}4.3 ml/100 g/min. The regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) was decreased mainly at bilateral frontal lobes in MID and at temporal and parietal lobes in SDAT. Verbal intelligence score (Hasegawa's dementia score) correlated with rCBF at frontal lobes in MID. These findings suggest that quantitative rCBF measurement by {sup 123}I-IMP SPECT is useful to differentiate MID from SDAT. (author).

  18. Neocortical concentrations of neuropeptides in senile dementia of the Alzheimer and Lewy body type: comparison with Parkinson's disease and severity correlations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leake, A; Perry, E K; Perry, R H; Jabeen, S; Fairbairn, A F; McKeith, I G; Ferrier, I N

    1991-02-15

    Corticotropin releasing hormone (CRH), somatostatin (SRIF), and arginine vasopressin (AVP) concentrations were estimated using radioimmunoassay in the temporal and occipital cortices in postmortem brain from patients clinically and neuropathologically diagnosed as senile dementia of the Lewy body type (SDLT), senile dementia of the Alzheimer type (SDAT), and Parkinson's disease (PD) and from neurologically normal controls. The concentration of temporal and occipital neocortical CRH was diminished in both SDAT and SDLT compared to control values, whereas SRIF was reduced only in temporal cortex in both these conditions. In contrast, the concentrations of both CRH and SRIF were unaltered in PD. The concentrations of AVP in SDLT, SDAT, and PD were similar to those found in the control groups. The decrement in SRIF, but not CRH, was found to be correlated with some indices of severity of illness in SDAT; a similar but nonsignificant trend for SRIF was observed in SDLT.

  19. Regional cerebral blood flow and its correlation with clinical assessment in senile dementia of Alzheimer type and multi-infarct dementia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shinohara, Masao; Kawakatsu, Shinobu; Morinobu, Shigeru; Oiji, Arata; Sagawa, Katsuo; Yazaki, Mitsuyasu; Totsuka, Shirou; Komatani, Akio; Yamaguchi, Koichi

    1989-01-01

    Twenty-one patients with senile dementia of Alzheimer type (SDAT), 11 patients with multi-infarct dementia (MID), and 6 healthy volunteers were examined by SPECT using Xe-inhalation method. These patients also underwent an intelligence test according to the Gottfries-Brane-Steen (GBS) scale. Patients with mild SDAT did not have a significantly decreased regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF). In moderate or severe cases, however, a significantly decreased rCBF was bilaterally observed in all regions, except for the basal ganglia. This was marked in the temporoparietal region. A group of moderate or severe MID patients had a significantly decreased rCBF especially in the basal ganglia. It was also observed in the temporoparietal region, but not in the frontal region. Among the SDAT patients, there was a good correlation between rCBF and GBS scale in all the regions, except for the basal ganglia. In the case of MID patients, correlations were observed both between rCBF in the left side of the brain and clinical findings according to the method of Hasegawa and between rCBF in the right side of the frontal region and the motor function on the GBS scale. These findings may have implications for the different pathophysiology between SDAT and MID. (N.K.)

  20. Asymmetry of cerebral blood flow in patients with senile dementia of Alzheimer type by SPECT using I-123 IMP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arai, Hisayuki; Hanyu, Haruo; Kobayashi, Yasutaka; Hatano, Nobuyoshi; Katsunuma, Hideyo; Suzuki, Takanari; Amino, Saburo [Tokyo Medical Coll. (Japan)

    1990-12-01

    Regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) was determined by single photon emission CT (SPECT) with N-isopropyl-p-({sup 123}I)iodoamphetamine in 22 patients with clinically diagnosed senile dementia of Alzheimer type (SDAT) and in 18 age matched controls. We calculated asymmetry indices (AIs) of rCBF for matched right-left regions of interest. rCBF of parietal lobe in SDAT patients was significantly most laterally asymmetrycal, but the least in occipital lobe. Lateral asymmetry of rCBF in SDAT patients correlated with asymmetry of language and visuospatial functions; decreased rCBF in the left parietal lobe was associated with language dysfunction, and that in the right parietal lobe, with viduospatial dysfunction. Furthermore cerebellar AIs correlated negatively with those of the cerebral hemisphere and lower frontal region in SDAT patients. The results demonstrate that rCBF measurement by {sup 123}I-IMP SPECT is useful to detect lateral asymmetry in reduction of rCBF in SDAT. (author).

  1. Asymmetry of cerebral blood flow in patients with senile dementia of Alzheimer type by SPECT using I-123 IMP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arai, Hisayuki; Hanyu, Haruo; Kobayashi, Yasutaka; Hatano, Nobuyoshi; Katsunuma, Hideyo; Suzuki, Takanari; Amino, Saburo

    1990-01-01

    Regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) was determined by single photon emission CT (SPECT) with N-isopropyl-p-[ 123 I]iodoamphetamine in 22 patients with clinically diagnosed senile dementia of Alzheimer type (SDAT) and in 18 age matched controls. We calculated asymmetry indices (AIs) of rCBF for matched right-left regions of interest. rCBF of parietal lobe in SDAT patients was significantly most laterally asymmetrycal, but the least in occipital lobe. Lateral asymmetry of rCBF in SDAT patients correlated with asymmetry of language and visuospatial functions; decreased rCBF in the left parietal lobe was associated with language dysfunction, and that in the right parietal lobe, with viduospatial dysfunction. Furthermore cerebellar AIs correlated negatively with those of the cerebral hemisphere and lower frontal region in SDAT patients. The results demonstrate that rCBF measurement by 123 I-IMP SPECT is useful to detect lateral asymmetry in reduction of rCBF in SDAT. (author)

  2. Irregular Distortion of The Erythrocytes (Acanthocytes, Spur Cells in Senile Dementia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. B. Goodall

    1994-01-01

    Full Text Available An excess of irregularly di storted red cells with spiked forms (acanthocytes. spur cells has been found in a substantial minority of patient s with seni le dementia of Alzheimer type (7 of 50 patients, 3 of 21 men and 4 of 29 women. Of 100 control patients, 42 men and 58 women, 5 (men and 2 women showed comparable distortion, but, of these, one man may well have incipient dementia and the others had serious organic di seases which may be associated with comparable erythrocytic changes. The cause of the distortion is not yet clear, but the presence of occasional giant erythrocytes in the absence of general macrocytosis suggests a possible abnormality of cell membrane synthes is. This distortion may be a useful marker in patients with loss of memory. Whether it is a manifestation of a haemopoietic clone or a constitutional anomaly associated with Alzheimer’s disease remains to be seen.

  3. Quantification of microangiopathic lesions in brain parenchyma and age-adjusted mean scores for the diagnostic separation of normal from pathological values in senile dementia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hentschel, F.; Kreis, M.; Damian, M.; Krumm, B.; Froelich, F.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: to quantify microangiopathic lesions in the cerebral white matter and to develop age-corrected cut-off values for separating normal from dementia-related pathological lesions. Materials and methods: in a memory clinic, 338 patients were investigated neuropsychiatrically by a psychological test battery and by MRI. Using a FLAIR sequence and a newly developed rating scale, white matter lesions (WMLs) were quantified with respect to localization, number and intensity, and these ratings were condensed into a score. The WML scores were correlated with the mini-mental state examination (MMSE) and clinical dementia rating (CDR) score in dementia patients. A non-linear smoothing procedure was used to calculate age-related mean values and confidence intervals, separate for cognitively intact subjects and dementia patients. Results: the WML scores correlated highly significantly with age in cognitively intact subjects and with psychometric scores in dementia patients. Age-adjusted WML scores of cognitively intact subjects were significantly different from those of dementia patients with respect to the whole brain as well as to the frontal lobe. Mean value and confidence intervals adjusted for age significantly separated dementia patients from cognitively intact subjects over an age range of 54 through 84 years. Conclusion: a rating scale for the quantification of WML was validated and age-adjusted mean values with their confidence intervals for a diagnostically relevant age range were developed. This allows an easy to handle, fast and reliable diagnosis of the vascular component in senile dementia. (orig.)

  4. Acute parietal lobe infarction presenting as Gerstmann’s syndrome and cognitive decline mimicking senile dementia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen TY

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Tien-Yu Chen,1 Chun-Yen Chen,1,3 Che-Hung Yen,2,3 Shin-Chang Kuo,1,3 Yi-Wei Yeh,1,3 Serena Chang,1 San-Yuan Huang1,31Department of Psychiatry, 2Department of Neurology, Tri-Service General Hospital, School of Medicine, National Defense Medical Center, 3Graduate Institute of Medical Sciences, National Defense Medical Center, Taipei, Taiwan, Republic of ChinaAbstract: Gerstmann’s syndrome encompasses the tetrad of finger agnosia, agraphia, acalculia, and right-left confusion. An elderly man with a history of several cardiovascular diseases was initially brought to the psychiatric outpatient department by his family because of worsening of recent memory, executive function, and mixed anxious-depressive mood. Gerstmann’s syndrome without obvious motor function impairment and dementia-like features could be observed at first. Emergent brain computed tomography scan revealed new left-middle cerebral artery infarction over the left posterior parietal lobe. This case reminds us that acute cerebral infarction involving the parietal lobe may present as Gerstmann’s syndrome accompanied by cognitive decline mimicking dementia. As a result, emergent organic workups should be arranged, especially for elderly patients at high risk for cerebral vascular accident.Keywords: Gerstmann’s syndrome, dementia, parietal lobe infarction

  5. Survival in the pre-senile dementia frontotemporal lobar degeneration with TDP-43 proteinopathy: effects of genetic, demographic and neuropathological variables

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard A. Armstrong

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Factors associated with survival were studied in 84 neuropathologically documented cases of the pre-senile dementia frontotemporal dementia lobar degeneration (FTLD with transactive response (TAR DNA-binding protein of 43 kDa (TDP-43 proteinopathy (FTLD-TDP. Kaplan-Meier survival analysis estimated mean survival as 7.9 years (range: 1-19 years, SD = 4.64. Familial and sporadic cases exhibited similar survival, including progranulin (GRN gene mutation cases. No significant differences in survival were associated with sex, disease onset, Braak disease stage, or disease subtype, but higher survival was associated with lower post-mortem brain weight. Survival was significantly reduced in cases with associated motor neuron disease (FTLD-MND but increased with Alzheimer’s disease (AD or hippocampal sclerosis (HS co-morbidity. Cox regression analysis suggested that reduced survival was associated with increased densities of neuronal cytoplasmic inclusions (NCI while increased survival was associated with greater densities of enlarged neurons (EN in the frontal and temporal lobes. The data suggest that: (1 survival in FTLD-TDP is more prolonged than typical in pre-senile dementia but shorter than some clinical subtypes such as the semantic variant of primary progressive aphasia (svPPA, (2 MND co-morbidity predicts poor survival, and (3 NCI may develop early and EN later in the disease. The data have implications for both neuropathological characterization and subtyping of FTLD-TDP.

  6. 99mTc-HMPAO-SPECT in the diagnosis of senile dementia of Alzheimer's type - a study under clinical routine conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stoppe, G.; Staedt, J.; Schuetze, R.; Kunert, H.J.; Ruether, E.; Koegler, A.; Sandrock, D.; Emrich, D.

    1995-01-01

    This study was designed to evaluate whether investigations of cerebral blood flow can be a helpful diagnostic tool in the differential diagnosis between (senile) dementia of Alzheimer's type [(S)DAT] and geriatric depression with cognitive impairment. Under clinical routine conditions we performed Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT) using 99m Tc-Hexamethylpropyleneamine Oxime (HMPAO) in 23 patients with (S)DAT (14 f, 9 m; mean age 68.9 y), 17 patients with geriatric depression (9 f, 8 m; mean age 66.4 y) and 12 age-matched controls (9 f, 3 m; mean age 69.2 y). Semiquantitative analysis (corticocerebellar ratios) of eight different regions of interest (ROI) revealed a significantly ( p 99m Tc-HMPAO SPECT is a valuable additional tool in the differential diagnosis of depression and dementia in the elderly. (author)

  7. An evaluation of the predictive validity and inter-rater reliability of clinical diagnostic criteria for senile dementia of Lewy body type.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKeith, I G; Fairbairn, A F; Bothwell, R A; Moore, P B; Ferrier, I N; Thompson, P; Perry, R H

    1994-05-01

    Several recent autopsy studies suggest that senile dementia of Lewy body type (SDLT) may be the second most common neuropathologic cause of dementia in the elderly, accounting for 7 to 30% of all cases. Operational criteria for the antemortem clinical diagnosis of SDLT have already been proposed by our group. The performance of these is now examined by randomizing the case notes from a new series of SDLT, Alzheimer, and multi-infarct dementia patients for psychiatric assessment by four raters of varying clinical experience and blind to pathologic diagnosis. Using the SDLT criteria, the two most experienced raters agreed in 94% of cases (kappa = 0.87), with the least experienced rater agreeing in 78% (kappa = 0.50). Diagnostic specificity for SDLT was uniformly high (90.0 to 97.0%), with a mean sensitivity of detection of 74%, and was greater by the experienced (90.0%) than the least experienced (55%) clinician. The antemortem identification of SDLT patients can therefore be achieved with a high degree of diagnostic specificity using such operationalized criteria, although there remains a minority of patients who present with either "typical" Alzheimer-type symptoms or with paranoid or delusional symptoms in the absence of substantial cognitive impairment. Sensitivity to neuroleptics may be a useful diagnostic pointer in these patients.

  8. Quantification of beta A4 protein deposition in the medial temporal lobe: a comparison of Alzheimer's disease and senile dementia of the Lewy body type.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gentleman, S M; Williams, B; Royston, M C; Jagoe, R; Clinton, J; Perry, R H; Ince, P G; Allsop, D; Polak, J M; Roberts, G W

    1992-08-03

    The distribution of beta-amyloid protein (beta A4) was examined in the medial temporal lobes from cases of Alzheimer's disease (AD) (n = 13), senile dementia of Lewy body type (SDLT) (n = 12) and age matched controls (n = 9). Using a previously described image analysis technique the extent of beta A4 pathology was determined in ten distinct anatomical sites within the medial temporal lobe. AD and SDLT cases contained very similar amounts of beta A4 in the areas sampled and both contained significantly more beta A4 than the age matched controls, particularly in the dentate and parahippocampal gyri. The similarity of the beta A4 load in the two conditions is in contrast to reported differences in the number of neurofibrillary tangles which can be observed. It is suggested that AD and SDLT represent a spectrum of pathology which centres around the aberrant processing of the beta A4 precursor protein.

  9. Influence of apolipoprotein E genotype on senile dementia of the Alzheimer and Lewy body types. Significance for etiological theories of Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrington, C R; Louwagie, J; Rossau, R; Vanmechelen, E; Perry, R H; Perry, E K; Xuereb, J H; Roth, M; Wischik, C M

    1994-12-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is associated with an increased frequency of the apolipoprotein E type epsilon 4 allele. To address both the disease and the allele specificity of this association, we have examined the apolipoprotein E allele distribution in 255 elderly persons including those with autopsy-confirmed AD, senile dementia of the Lewy body type (SDLT), vascular dementia, Parkinson's disease (PD) or Huntington's disease and in nondemented controls either with or without coronary complications. The epsilon 4 allele frequency was increased in SDLT (0.365) and AD (0.328) as compared with controls (0.147), PD (0.098), or Huntington's chorea (0.171). Coronary disease and vascular dementia were associated with marginally higher epsilon 4 allele frequencies than in controls. In PD, amyloid beta-protein accumulated to a greater extent in those cases possessing an epsilon 4 allele than in those without. Those PD cases with dementia were not distinguished from either controls or PD cases without dementia, whether tested biochemically or by apolipoprotein E genotype. It is the comparison of the results in AD and SDLT that yielded the most significant findings. There was a 1.8-fold excess of amyloid beta-protein in AD as compared with controls, and the levels in SDLT were intermediate between those in AD and controls. In contrast, AD was discriminated from both controls and SDLT by the substantial accumulation of paired helical filament tau and phosphorylated tau (both increased more than 20-fold as compared with controls). SDLT was nevertheless characterized by an increased epsilon 4 allele frequency in the absence of significant tau pathology (at least 10-fold less than that in AD). These findings indicate that tau processing is more specifically associated with AD than is amyloid beta-protein accumulation and that presence of the epsilon 4 allele is not an etiological factor that accounts for tau pathology.

  10. Studies of cerebral blood flow and metabolism in patients with senile dementia of the Alzheimer's type and diagnostic evaluation of the dementing illnesses by positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakamoto, Shizuki

    1990-01-01

    This study was designed to determine cerebral dysfunction in senile dementia of the Alzheimer's type (SDAT). Regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF), oxygen extraction fraction and cerebral oxygen consumption (rCMRO 2 ) were studied in SDAT patients (n=16) and age-matched normal elderly people (n=5) by positron emission tomography (PET) using the O-15 labeled CO 2 and O 2 inhalation technique. The SDAT group had a significantly lower values in both rCBF and rCMRO 2 than the normal control. During the early stage of SDAT, rCMRO 2 was restricted to the temporal cortex; and it extended to the parietal and frontal cortices associated with a decreased rCBF as the disease progressed. Posterior temporal and posterior parietal association cortices were considered to be the most damageable part during the early stage. Bilateral differences in oxygen metabolism of the temporal and parietal cortices tended to be in accordance with clinical symptoms for disturbed speech and visuospatial function, suggesting the correlation between rCMRO 2 and rCBF in SDAT. Findings of PET in SDAT differed from those obtained in each patient with multi-infarct dementia or Pick disease, in that both rCBF and rCMRO 2 were inhomogeneously decreased over the whole cerebral cortex for multi-infarct dementia and in that homogeneously decreased rCBF and rCMRO 2 were restricted to the frontal and temporal cortices for Pick disease. PET may have a potential for differentiating various types of dementia. (N.K.)

  11. Senile dementia of Lewy body type and Alzheimer type are biochemically distinct in terms of paired helical filaments and hyperphosphorylated tau protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrington, C R; Perry, R H; Perry, E K; Hurt, J; McKeith, I G; Roth, M; Wischik, C M

    1994-01-01

    We have used biochemical assays to examine cingulate and occipital cortices from age-matched cases of Alzheimer's disease (AD; n = 12), senile dementia of the Lewy body type (SDLT; n = 13), Parkinson's disease (PD; 5 non-demented cases and 7 cognitively impaired cases) and controls (n = 11) for paired helical filaments (PHFs), phosphorylated and normal tau protein and beta/A4-protein. Whereas cingulate cortex is characterised by relatively high densities of cortical Lewy bodies in the SDLT cases and lower numbers in PD, these inclusion bodies were absent in the cingulate cortex from AD and control cases. Protease-resistant PHFs and hyperphosphorylated tau protein were found in AD and, at low levels, in a minority of SDLT cases. Qualitatively, both of these preparations were indistinguishable in SDLT from those found in AD but levels of both parameters in SDLT were less than 5% of those in AD. SDLT, PD and control groups did not differ from each other in terms of the quantity of protease-resistant PHFs or the level of hyperphosphorylated tau. Furthermore, PHF accumulation did not distinguish between PD cases with or without dementia. The levels of normal tau protein did not differ between the four groups. beta/A4 protein levels did not distinguish between PD and control groups, between AD and SDLT groups, or between SDLT and control groups for either cingulate or occipital cortices. Thus extensive accumulation of PHFs in either neurofibrillary tangles or dystrophic neurites is not a feature of either SDLT or PD. Our findings provide molecular support for the neuropathological and clinical separation of SDLT as a form of dementia that is distinct from AD.

  12. 心理干预对老年期痴呆患者亲属心理健康状况的影响%The effects of psychological intervention on mental healthy status in relatives of patients with senile dementia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    于相芬

    2011-01-01

    目的 探讨心理干预对老年期痴呆患者亲属心理健康状况的影响.方法 应用症状自评量表(SCL-90)和自制的老年期痴呆健康知识调查表对80名老年期痴呆患者亲属进行调查,并对其进行为期6周的心理干预.结果 老年期痴呆患者亲属心理干预前SCL-90总分及各因子分均高于常模,差异有显著性(P<0.05或0.01);心理干预后患者亲属的SCL-90总分及各因子分较心理干预前有显著降低(P<0.01);心理干预后亲属对患者疾病相关知识的知晓度明显提高(P<0.01).结论 心理干预可有效改善老年期痴呆患者亲属的心理健康状况.%Objective To explore the effects of psychological intervention on mental healthy status in relatives of patients with senile dementia. Methods Psychological intervention was conducted for 6 weeks in 80 relatives of patients with senile dementia. Symptom checklist 90 (SCL- 90) and self- designed health knowledge questionnaire were used to assess the effects of intervention. Results Total score and factor scores of SCL - 90 in relatives of patients with senile dementia were significantly higher than those of norm ( P < 0.05 or 0. 01 ) before the intervention, and decreased significantly after psychological intervention (P <0.01 ). Health knowledge in relatives of patients with senile dementia was improved significantly after intervention ( P < 0.01 ). Conclusion Psychological intervention can improve the mental healthy status of relatives of patients with senile dementia.

  13. Do differences in visuospatial ability between senile dementias of the Alzheimer and Lewy body types reflect differences solely in mnemonic function?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahgal, A; McKeith, I G; Galloway, P H; Tasker, N; Steckler, T

    1995-02-01

    Visuospatial memory was investigated in two groups of patients suffering from senile dementias of the Alzheimer (SDAT) or Lewy body (SDLT) types; a, third, age-matched, healthy control group was also included. The two patient groups were mildly demented and could not be distinguished from each other by traditional tests of cognitive function. A different pattern of performance emerged in the two groups on a computerised test of spatial working memory, which is a self-ordered pointing task requiring the subject to search for hidden tokens. An analysis of the pattern of errors revealed that the SDLT group made more of both possible types of error ("Within Search" and "Between Search") than the SDAT group. Neither patient groups' performance differed from each other when assessed on a computerised Corsi spatial span task. A measure of planning ability was obtained by examining search strategies. Although an index previously developed to measure the subject's use of a particular strategy in the spatial working memory task failed to detect any differences between the three groups, a novel index was calculated which focuses on performance within a search, and this revealed deficits in both demented groups. Since the two patient groups differed from each other in the spatial working memory, but not the Corsi spatial span, task, it is suggested that the differences between the two demented groups are not due to a specific mnemonic impairment, but reflect dysfunctions in non-mnemonic processes mediated by fronto-subcortical circuits, which are more severely damaged in SDLT.

  14. Regional cerebral blood flow and its correlation with clinical assessment in senile dementia of Alzheimer type and multi-infarct dementia. A study with SPECT using sup 133 Xe inhalation method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shinohara, Masao; Kawakatsu, Shinobu; Morinobu, Shigeru; Oiji, Arata; Sagawa, Katsuo; Yazaki, Mitsuyasu; Totsuka, Shirou; Komatani, Akio; Yamaguchi, Koichi [Yamagata Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Medicine

    1989-09-01

    Twenty-one patients with senile dementia of Alzheimer type (SDAT), 11 patients with multi-infarct dementia (MID), and 6 healthy volunteers were examined by SPECT using Xe-inhalation method. These patients also underwent an intelligence test according to the Gottfries-Brane-Steen (GBS) scale. Patients with mild SDAT did not have a significantly decreased regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF). In moderate or severe cases, however, a significantly decreased rCBF was bilaterally observed in all regions, except for the basal ganglia. This was marked in the temporoparietal region. A group of moderate or severe MID patients had a significantly decreased rCBF especially in the basal ganglia. It was also observed in the temporoparietal region, but not in the frontal region. Among the SDAT patients, there was a good correlation between rCBF and GBS scale in all the regions, except for the basal ganglia. In the case of MID patients, correlations were observed both between rCBF in the left side of the brain and clinical findings according to the method of Hasegawa and between rCBF in the right side of the frontal region and the motor function on the GBS scale. These findings may have implications for the different pathophysiology between SDAT and MID. (N.K.).

  15. [Biography and dementia. Origin of challenging behavior in patients with multi-infarct dementia or senile dementia of the Alzheimer type in long term care with reference the biographical level].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Höwler, Elisabeth

    2011-10-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the connection between the nature of agitated behaviour and meaningful biographical experiences within two types of dementia in a moderate stadium. The two dementia types included Alzheimer Disease (SDAT) and Multi-infarction aphrenia (MID). Biographical narrative interviews with 26 nursing home residents suffering from dementia have been concluded. Topics were their first thirty years of life (based on a foreign anamnesis). The challenging behaviour has been observed systematically in nursing situations. The data has been evaluated with the comparative casuistics method (Jüttemann, 1990). The behaviour has been measured with the CMAI-scale before and also after having moved to a nursing home. Residents behaviour patterns can be divided into three biographical central characters: Life as finding, life as emotional disorder and life as struggle. Institutional characteristics: Loss of near rhythms of life, losing control over the personal area, experience of social isolation and certain characteristics from nurses: staff detractions and the exercise of nursing actions which appears threats contribute to the phenomena. A disparity is shown between the types of dementia in terms of patterns of demonstrated behaviour. In addition gender differences could be shown. The recognition of the phenomena by means of the CMAI-scale elucidate that the phenomena appears for the first time or is stronger after the resettlement to a nursing home. These findings can improve nurses' understanding of the phenomena within long-term care.

  16. The senile kidney

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denisova Т.Р.

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The given work summarizes external data and self-obtained results on development and diagnostic of kidney involution modifications. Article discusses definition of "senile kidney" as a clinical and pathomorphological term. Major statements on pathophysiological causes of age-associated renal disorders and their prognosis, specifics of chronic kidney disease in elderly and senile patients have been reviewed. Phenomenon of renal "multimorbidity" in eldely maximizes worsening risk of unmodifiable kidney function.

  17. Prevalence of presenile dementia in a tertiary outpatient clinic Prevalência de demência pré-senil num ambulatório terciário

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satomi Fujihara

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available There are very few reports about prevalence of presenile dementia in Brazil. We reviewed files of patients evaluated with early onset of cognitive impairment in our institution. Among 141 patients (61% males there was no difference between gender by age at onset or at first evaluation. We have observed an increasing number of patients after 50 years. The most frequent causes were: vascular dementia (36.9%, Alzheimer's disease (20.3% and traumatic brain injury (9.2%. There was difference among dementia type by age of onset and first evaluation, educational level and length of dementia. These results may be compared with those from other neurologic services in order to replicate or confirm these results.Em nosso meio há raros estudos que verifiquem quais as causas mais prevalentes de demência pré-senil. Avaliamos retrospectivamente os prontuários de pacientes com início precoce de alterações cognitivas, ambulatório de Neurologia da Cognição do Hospital Santa Marcelina. Entre os 141 sujeitos (61% de homens não houve diferença quanto às idades de início e à primeira consulta e escolaridade entre os sexos. Observamos aumento no número de demência após os 50 anos. A causa mais freqüente foi vascular (36,9%, seguida por doença de Alzheimer (20,3% e secundária a trauma cranio encefálico (9,2%. Houve diferença entre os tipos de demência quanto à idade na primeira consulta e idade de início, escolaridade e duração do quadro. Ao contrário de outros estudos o diagnóstico mais freqüente foi demência vascular. Novos estudos em nosso meio deverão ser realizados para avaliar este achado nas demências de início precoce.

  18. Dementia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... aging. Many different diseases can cause dementia, including Alzheimer's disease and stroke. Drugs are available to treat some of these diseases. While these drugs cannot cure dementia or repair brain damage, they may improve ...

  19. Dementia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... continue to look for new genes that may be responsible for the development of Alzheimer’s disease and other forms of dementia. Several research projects hope to identify dementia biomarkers (measurable biological signs ...

  20. Computerized tomography of the brain in senile depression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshimura, Yoshitaka

    1995-01-01

    Brain CT was performed on 33 senile depression patients. Sixteen healthy volunteers served as controls. The correlation between changes of brain CT findings and mental symtoms was also studied. The CT findings were assessed by visual, linear, and two-dimensional methods, and mental symptoms were assessed according to Hamilton's Psychiatric Rating Scale for Depression. Arophic changes were observed in the bilateral frontal lobe and left basal ganglia areas. The correlation between severity of atrophy and mental symptom profile of depression was suggested. Depression patients, especially with marked atrophy in the frontal lobe, were prone to be indifferent to their job and hobby, to depress psychomotor, and to show marked physical symptoms. The atrophic sites observed in depression patients were also common in dementia, suggesting the correlation between senile depression and dementia. (S.Y.)

  1. Senile dementia of the Alzheimer type

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hutton, J.T.; Kenny, A.D.

    1985-01-01

    This book contains papers on Alzheimer's Disease. They are divided into several topics. The topic headings are: Clinical Evaluation, Management, and Treatment; Related Clinical Disorders; Epidemiology and Genetics; Basic Science; and National Perspectives and Future Directions.

  2. Dementia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Poor judgment and loss of ability to recognize danger Using the wrong word, not pronouncing words correctly, ... disease and other dementias. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Goldman-Cecil Medicine . 25th ed. Philadelphia, PA: ...

  3. Dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nardone, Raffaele; Golaszewski, Stefan; Trinka, Eugen

    2013-01-01

    Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) has been used extensively to characterize motor system pathophysiology in Alzheimer's disease (AD) and other forms of dementia, as well to monitor the effects of certain pharmacological agents. Among the studies focusing on motor cortical excitability measures, the most consistent finding is a significant reduction of short-latency afferent inhibition (SAI) in AD and other forms of dementia in which the cholinergic system is affected, such as dementia with Lewy bodies. SAI evaluation may thus provide a reliable biomarker of cortical cholinergic dysfunction in dementias. Moreover, most TMS studies have demonstrated cortical hyperexcitability and asymptomatic motor cortex functional reorganization in the early stages of the disease. Integrated approaches utilizing TMS together with high-density EEG have indicated impaired cortical plasticity and functional connectivity across different neural networks in AD. Paired associative stimulation-induced plasticity has also been found to be abnormal in patients with AD. The development of novel noninvasive methods of brain stimulation, in particular repetitive TMS (rTMS) and transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS), has increased the interest in neuromodulatory techniques as potential therapeutic tools for cognitive rehabilitation in AD. Preliminary studies have revealed that rTMS and tDCS can induce beneficial effects on specific cognitive functions in AD. Future studies are warranted to replicate and extend the initial findings. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Rob; Radhakrishnan, Raghavakurup

    2012-09-10

    Dementia is characterised by chronic, global, non-reversible deterioration in memory, executive function, and personality. Speech and motor function may also be impaired. We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical questions: What are the effects of treatments on cognitive symptoms of dementia (Alzheimer's, Lewy body, or vascular)? What are the effects of treatments on behavioural and psychological symptoms of dementia (Alzheimer's, Lewy body, or vascular)? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to July 2011 (Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically; please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). We found 49 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. In this systematic review, we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: acetylcholinesterase inhibitors (donepezil, galantamine, rivastigmine), antidepressants (clomipramine, fluoxetine, imipramine, sertraline), antipsychotics (haloperidol, olanzapine, quetiapine, risperidone), aromatherapy, benzodiazepines (diazepam, lorazepam), cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT), cognitive stimulation, exercise, ginkgo biloba, memantine, mood stabilisers (carbamazepine, sodium valproate/valproic acid), music therapy, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), omega 3 (fish oil), reminiscence therapy, and statins.

  5. Occurrence of silent cerebral infarction in pre-senile, senile subjects with depressive states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujikawa, Tokumi; Yamawaki, Shigeto; Touhouda, Yoshikuni.

    1993-01-01

    We examined the relationship between pre-senile, senile depressive states and silent cerebral infarction (SCI) using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The diagnostic criteria of major depression according to DSM-3-R was used to diagnose. Patients in whom stroke had occurred or who had local neurologic symptoms were not included. About half of the patients with depressive states of pre-senile onset and most of the patients with those of senile onset had SCI, were considered to be organic-depressive states complicated with SCI. Because patients with depressive states with SCI are at high risk of occurrence of stroke, we designated this condition 'pre-stroke depression', and classified it with endogenous depression. At this time, it is important to begin therapy for cerebrovascular disease. (author)

  6. A study of 99mTc-HM-PAO brain SPECT in the senile parkinson's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Wenxin; Lin Xiangtong; Song Wenzhong; Liu Yongchang

    1996-01-01

    Thirty-three cases of senile Parkinson's disease (PD) imaged by 99m Tc-HM-PAO brain SPECT were reported. 66.7% of the patients had cortical hypoperfusion and 18.2% showed asymmetrical hypoperfusion in the basal ganglia. Such a finding was not related with the Hoehn-Yahr stage and the laterality of motor symptoms. If complicated with dementia, the SPECT brain imaging showed similar pattern in Alzheimer's disease with diffuse hypoperfusion in cortical area reflecting widespread pathological changes in tremor paralysis

  7. Clinical study of correlation of pre-senile and senile depressive stage with silent cerebral infarction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujikawa, Tokumi; Yamawaki, Shigeto; Fujita, Yasunobu; Shibata, Youko; Touhouda, Yoshikuni.

    1992-01-01

    The relationship between the pre-senile/senile depressive state and silent cerebral infarction was examined by MRI. Consecutive 56 depressive patients aged 50 years or older underwnt MRI. MRI revealed silent cerebral infarction in 60.3% of patients in whom depression occurred at the age of less than 65 years. The complication rate was significantly higher in these patients than the younger patients (60.9% vs 20%). Complications of silent cerebral infarction were found in 53.6% for patients in whom depression occurred at the age of less than 65 years and symptoms were deteriorated at the age of 65 years or older and in 100% for patients in whom it occurred at the age of 65 years or older and hospitalization was simultaneously required. These figures were remarkably higher than the age-related complication rate of silent cerebral infarction in non-depressive normal persons. This suggested that approximately half of depressive patients of pre-senile onset and majority of depressive patients of senile onset might have parenchymal involvement due to silent cerebral infarction. Both perforating-type and cortical-type infarcts were found. This has a implication for the involvement of multiple infarct-related foci in depressive state. For cortical-type infarcts, partial lesions were predominant, followed by frontal and temporal lesions. The incidence of left frontal infarcts was significanly higher than that of right frontal infarcts. Infarcts in both the parietal and left frontal lobes may be responsible for depressive state. (N.K.)

  8. Prevalence and etiology of dementia in a Japanese community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueda, K; Kawano, H; Hasuo, Y; Fujishima, M

    1992-06-01

    We sought to determine the type-specific prevalence of dementia and its risk factors in elderly persons from the Japanese community of Hisayama. We studied the prevalence of dementia in 887 Hisayama residents (353 men and 534 women) aged 65 years or older (screening rate, 94.6%) using various items of clinical information, neurological examination, and dementia scales. We also studied brain morphology in 50 of 59 determined to have dementia by computed tomography or autopsy during the subsequent 54-month period. Factors relevant to dementia were compared between 27 patients with vascular dementia and 789 control subjects without dementia in a retrospective fashion. The prevalence rate of dementia among Hisayama residents aged 65 or older was estimated at 6.7%, with a females to males ratio of 1:2. Among 50 cases of dementia in which brain morphology was examined, the frequency of vascular dementia was 56%; this rate was 2.2 times higher than that for senile dementia of the Alzheimer type. Aging, hypertension, electrocardiographic abnormalities, and high hematocrit were significantly (p less than 0.05) and independently associated with the occurrence of vascular dementia. Prevalence of dementia among the Hisayama residents was relatively identical to that previously reported, but vascular dementia was more predominant. Risk factors for vascular dementia were similar to those for lacunar infarcts. Control of hypertension may be a key to reducing dementia among the Japanese population.

  9. Adult dementia: history, biopsy, pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torack, R M

    1979-05-01

    The historical events in the evolution of Alzheimer's disease are reviewed, including the initial description by Alois Alzheimer and the subsequent controversy regarding the nosological specificity of this entity. The similarity of senile dementia and Alzheimer's disease is emphasized. The basis for the modern concept of Alzheimer's disease as premature or accelerated aging is included in the review. The pathological correlates of the major categories of adult dementia have been described. The traditional criteria of neurofibrillary tangles and senile plaques have been re-evaluated using the current insight into these changes afforded by electron microscopy and biochemistry. The significance of amyloid has been described because it occurs within the senile plaque and also as the essential component of congophilic angiopathy. The new information regarding neuronal cell counts and the loss of choline acetyltransferase has been evaluated in terms of an indication of a pathogenic mechanism of Alzheimer's disease. The current understanding of normal pressure hydrocephalus, Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, and multi-infarct dementia has been described. Brain biopsy in dementia has been described as having diagnostic, research, pathogenic, and prognostic value. The precautions involving the performance and handling of the biopsy have been stressed, particularly because these procedures involve conditions of possible slow virus etiology. The polemic for Alzheimer's disease as aging or slow virus infection has been summarized. At this time a consideration seems justified that Alzheimer's disease is an age-related, slow virus disease due to a hitherto unknown immune defect. Aging as an etiological agent must be clarified before Alzheimer's disease, in any form, can be considered to be an inevitable consequence of longevity.

  10. The Alzheimer myth and biomarker research in dementia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Richard, E.; Schmand, B.; Eikelenboom, P.; Westendorp, R.G.; van Gool, W.A.

    2012-01-01

    The focus of most of the research on Alzheimer's disease in the last decades has been on senile plaques and neurofibrillary tangles. The vast majority of patients with Alzheimer's disease are over 75 years of age, whereas most of the research focuses on younger subjects. To consider old-age dementia

  11. The Alzheimer Myth and Biomarker Research in Dementia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Richard, Edo; Schmand, Ben; Eikelenboom, Piet; Westendorp, Rudi G.; van Gool, Willem A.

    2012-01-01

    The focus of most of the research on Alzheimer's disease in the last decades has been on senile plaques and neurofibrillary tangles. The vast majority of patients with Alzheimer's disease are over 75 years of age, whereas most of the research focuses on younger subjects. To consider old-age dementia

  12. Occurrence of silent cerebral infarction in pre-senile, senile subjects with depressive states; MRI findings and its distribution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujikawa, Tokumi; Yamawaki, Shigeto (Hiroshima Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine); Touhouda, Yoshikuni

    1993-02-01

    We examined the relationship between pre-senile, senile depressive states and silent cerebral infarction (SCI) using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The diagnostic criteria of major depression according to DSM-3-R was used to diagnose. Patients in whom stroke had occurred or who had local neurologic symptoms were not included. About half of the patients with depressive states of pre-senile onset and most of the patients with those of senile onset had SCI, were considered to be organic-depressive states complicated with SCI. Because patients with depressive states with SCI are at high risk of occurrence of stroke, we designated this condition 'pre-stroke depression', and classified it with endogenous depression. At this time, it is important to begin therapy for cerebrovascular disease. (author).

  13. Dementia with non-hereditary cystatin C angiopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benedikz, Eirikur; Blöndal, H; Jóhannesson, G

    1989-01-01

    Brain biopsies from two patients with non-hereditary cerebral hemorrhages and eighty autopsied cases with the clinical diagnosis of dementia are presented. The biopsied cases, both males aged 64 and 59, had a sudden onset of cerebral hemorrhage, mild progressive dementia and cystatin C cerebral...... amyloid angiopathy. Of the autopsied cases 59 had senile plaques and cerebral amyloid angiopathy was also found in 36 of them. Both senile plaques and the blood vessel amyloid stained positively with beta-protein antibodies, and five of them also showed a positive reaction to cystatin C antibodies....... These cystatin C positive cases were three males aged 76, 80 and 83, and one female 93 years old and the fifth case was a female aged 47 with Down's syndrome....

  14. Computed tomography in patients with senile mental disorders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugai, Yuuichi; Nakayama, Hirosi; Tatemichi, Nobuhiro

    1987-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) was employed to follow up 28 patients with senile mental disorders (52 to 84 years of age) over a period of one to six and a half years after the first presentation. The first CT scans showed ventricular enlargement in many instances, which made it difficult to distinguish functional from degenerative diseases. The yearly rate of ventricular enlargement was, therefore, obtained on sequential CT scannings. The yearly rate of ventricular enlargement was high, which was associated with progression of the disease in the group with Alzheimer's disease. In the group with functional diseases, however, ventricular enlargement and progression were independent of each other. Both the yearly rate of ventricular enlargement and mental function significantly correlated with decreased adaptation of daily life. Periodical CT scanning and clinical observation over a certain period may offer useful information on the differential diagnosis and prognosis of senile mental disorders. (Namekawa, K.)

  15. The Anesthetic Effect of Dexmedetomidine on ERCP of Senile Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang Feng

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to discuss the effectiveness and security of Dexmedetomidine’s conscious-sedation application in ERCP of senile patients. Method: selecting 80 senile patients performed with ERCP and randomly dividing them into Dexmedetomidine group (group D and normal saline group (group C with 40 cases in each group. Pumping 0.5 ~ 0.8 ug/kg Dexmedetomidine through the vein 15 min after surgery while pumping isodose NS to group C at the same time. Results: both the two groups completed the ERCP treatment. The tolerance of group C is poorer with more adverse reactions; the operating time of group D is shorter, but the difference has no statistical significance. During the operation, compared with group D, the MBP and HR value of group C rose obviously with significant difference (P < 0.05 while the MBP has no obvious change within the group; HR declined sharply after pump injection (P < 0.05, but the value is within the normal range. The contrast of SPO2 and RR within and between the two groups have no significant difference. Conclusion: applying Dexmedetomidine for conscioussedation in senile patients’ ERCP leads to hemodynamic stability and no respiratory depression with less adverse reactions. The application during the perioperative period is effective, safe and comfortable, worthy of popularization and application in clinic.

  16. Risk factors which cause senile cataract evolvement: outline

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.V. Bragin

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Examination of natural ageing processes including those caused by multiple external factors has been attracting re-searchers' attention over the last years. Senile cataract is a multi-factor disease. Expenditure on cataract surgery remain one of the greatest expenses items in public health care. Age is a basic factor which causes senile cataract. Morbidity with cataract doubles each 10 years of life. This outline considers some literature sources which describe research results on influence exerted on cataract evolvement by such risk factors as age, sex, race, smoking, alcohol intake, pancreatic diabetes, intake of certain medications, a number of environmental factors including ultraviolet and ionizing radiation. mane of these factors are shown to increase or reduce senile cataract risk; there are conflicting data on certain factors. The outline also contains quantitative characteristics of cataract risks which are given via odds relation and evolve due to age parameters impacts, alcohol intake, ionizing radiation, etc. The authors also state that still there is no answer to the question whether dose-effect relationship for cataract evolvement is a threshold or non-threshold.

  17. Epidemiology of early-onset dementia: a review of the literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieira, Renata Teles; Caixeta, Leonardo; Machado, Sergio; Silva, Adriana Cardoso; Nardi, Antonio Egidio; Arias-Carrión, Oscar; Carta, Mauro Giovanni

    2013-01-01

    Presenile Dementia or Early Onset Dementia (EOD) is a public health problem, it differs from Senile Dementia, and encloses a significant number of cases; nevertheless, it is still poorly understood and underdiagnosed. This study aims to review the prevalence and etiology of EOD, comparing EOD with Senile Dementia, as well as to show the main causes of EOD and their prevalence in population and non-population based studies. The computer-supported search used the following databases: Pubmed/Medline, ISI Web of Knowledge and Scielo. The search terms were alcohol-associated dementia, Alzheimer’s disease, dementia, Creutzfeldt-jakob disease, dementia with lewy bodies, early onset dementia, frontotemporal lobar degeneration, Huntington’s disease, mixed dementia, neurodegenerative disorders, Parkinson’s disease dementia, presenile dementia, traumatic brain injury, vascular dementia. Only papers published in English and conducted from 1985 up to 2012 were preferentially reviewed. Neurodegenerative diseases are the most common etiologies seen in EOD. Among the general population, the prevalence of EOD was found to range between 0 to 700 per 100.000 habitants in groups of 25-64 years old, with an increasing incidence with age. The progression of EOD was found to range between 8.3 to 22.8 new cases per 100.000 in those aged under 65 years. Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the major etiology, followed by Vascular Dementia (VaD) and Frontotemporal Lobar Degeneration (FTLD). A larger number of epidemiological studies to elucidate how environmental issues contribute to EOD are necessary, thus, we can collaborate in the planning and prevention of services toward dementia patients. PMID:23878613

  18. Assessment of regional glucose metabolism in aging brain and dementia with positron-emission tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reivich, M.; Alavi, A.; Ferris, S.; Christman, D.; Fowler, J.; MacGregor, R.; Farkas, T.; Greenberg, J.; Dann, R.; Wolf, A.

    1981-01-01

    This paper explores the alterations in regional glucose metabolism that occur in elderly subjects and those with senile dementia compared to normal young volunteers. Results showed a tendency for the frontal regions to have a lower metabolic rate in patients with dementia although this did not reach the level of significance when compared to the elderly control subjects. The changes in glucose metabolism were symmetrical in both the left and right hemispheres. There was a lack of correlation between the mean cortical metabolic rates for glucose and the global mental function in the patients with senile dementia. This is at variance with most of the regional cerebral blood flow data that has been collected. This may be partly related to the use of substrates other than glucose by the brain in elderly and demented subjects. (PSB)

  19. Variations in the Reported Age of a Patient: A Source of Bias in the Diagnosis of Depression and Dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perlick, Deborah; Atkins, Alvin

    1984-01-01

    Varied the reported age of patients (N=36) presented to clinicians for diagnosis. Results indicated the presence of a bias, with a greater attributon of organic symptoms reflective of senile dementia and fewer judgments of depression when a patient is described as elderly as opposed to middle-aged. (LLL)

  20. Identification and analysis of senile plaques using nuclear microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Landsberg, J P; Roberts, J M; Grime, G W; Watt, F [Nuclear Physics Lab., Oxford (UK); McDonald, B [Dept. of Neuropathology, Radcliffe Infirmary, Oxford (UK) Nuffield Dept. of Pathology, John Radcliffe Hospital, Oxford (UK) MRC Neuroanatomical Unit, Dept. of Pharmacology, Oxford (UK)

    1991-03-01

    The senile plaques and neuro-fibrillary tangles which form part of the pathology of Alzheimer's disease have come under increasing scrutiny over the last decade. In particular, much work has been done investigating their elemental composition. The suggestion that 75-100% of tensile plaques with mature cores contain aluminium and silicon, probably in the form of alumino-silicates, has led to increasing speculation about the role of these elements in the disease. SPM preliminary studies suggest that aluminium and silicon are not present in as great a proportion of senile plaques as presented in the literature. The situation is complicated by the fact that airborn and solubilised salts of aluminium and silicon may be encountered as contamination. They have been found, for example, in granular or crystalline form in the Aristar grade organic laboratory reagents used for staining the tissue, and in the pure pioloform used to back the samples. The latest results from scans of stained and unstained Alzheimer tissue are presented. (orig.).

  1. Identification and analysis of senile plaques using nuclear microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Landsberg, J.P.; Roberts, J.M.; Grime, G.W.; Watt, F.; McDonald, B.

    1991-01-01

    The senile plaques and neuro-fibrillary tangles which form part of the pathology of Alzheimer's disease have come under increasing scrutiny over the last decade. In particular, much work has been done investigating their elemental composition. The suggestion that 75-100% of tensile plaques with mature cores contain aluminium and silicon, probably in the form of alumino-silicates, has led to increasing speculation about the role of these elements in the disease. SPM preliminary studies suggest that aluminium and silicon are not present in as great a proportion of senile plaques as presented in the literature. The situation is complicated by the fact that airborn and solubilised salts of aluminium and silicon may be encountered as contamination. They have been found, for example, in granular or crystalline form in the Aristar grade organic laboratory reagents used for staining the tissue, and in the pure pioloform used to back the samples. The latest results from scans of stained and unstained Alzheimer tissue are presented. (orig.)

  2. Cataratas senil bilateral psicológico pre y posoperatorio Bilateral senile cataract: a pre- and postoperavitve psychological study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Armando Rodríguez Romero

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Se realizó un estudio psicológico comparativo en 50 pacientes con catarata senil bilateral antes y después de la operación, en el período comprendido de enero a diciembre de1999 según las variables de edad, escolaridad y estado civil. Predominó el grupo etáreo de 70 a 79 años, nivel escolar primario y estado civil casado. Los síntomas psicopatológicos y la distribución según trastornos psiquiátricos disminuyeron después de restablecida su visión una vez operados de cataratas, en los de ansiedad y tristeza de 42 a7 pacientes respectivamente.A psychological comparative study was conducted among 50 patients with senile bilareral cataract before and after the operation from January to December, 1999, according to the following variables: age, educational level and marital status. The age group 70-79, the elementary educational level and the married patients predominated. The psychopathological symptoms and the distribution according to psychiatric disorders decreased among those with anxiety and sadness from 42 to 7 patients, respectively, once they were operated on of cataract and their vision was reestablished.

  3. Lewy Body Dementia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewy body dementia Overview Lewy body dementia, also known as dementia with Lewy bodies, is the second most common type of progressive dementia after Alzheimer's disease dementia. Protein deposits, ...

  4. Counseling Patients with Senile Dementia of the Alzheimer Type and Their Families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaBarge, Emily

    1981-01-01

    Discusses symptoms of Alzheimer Disease and suggests client-centered counseling techniques to use with patients and family. Considers the disease's effect on family relationships relative to stage of family development. Examines the adjustment of the caregiving spouse. Offers practical suggestions for coping. (RC)

  5. Cognitive Change in Elderly Populations: "Normal" Aging, Senile Dementia and Depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bach, Paul J.

    Cognitive change in the elderly can be due to several etiological factors which are empirically difficult to separate and clinically problematic to differentiate. Normal aging is accompanied by behavioral slowing. The slowing down of psycho-motor processes results in a lowered intelligence quotient, but cannot be taken as unequivocal evidence for…

  6. Serum zinc, senile plaques, and neurofibrillary tangles: findings from the Nun Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tully, C L; Snowdon, D A; Markesbery, W R

    1995-11-13

    Zinc appears to have a role in binding amyloid precursor protein in vitro, but it is not known whether zinc plays a role in senile plaque formation in vivo in humans. Serum zinc concentrations were available from 12 sisters who died in the Nun Study, a longitudinal study of aging and Alzheimer's disease. Fasting serum zinc concentrations, determined approximately 1 year before death, showed moderate to strong negative correlations with senile plaque counts in seven brain regions. In all brain regions combined, the age-adjusted negative correlations with serum zinc were statistically significant for total senile plaques and diffuse plaques, and suggestive for neuritic plaques. Thus serum zinc in the normal range may be associated with low senile plaque counts in the elderly.

  7. Senile anorexia in different geriatric settings in Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donini, L M; Dominguez, L J; Barbagallo, M; Savina, C; Castellaneta, E; Cucinotta, D; Fiorito, A; Inelmen, E M; Sergi, G; Enzi, G; Cannella, C

    2011-11-01

    Anorexia is the most frequent modification of eating habits in old age, which may lead to malnutrition and consequent morbidity and mortality in older adults. We aimed to estimate the prevalence and factors associated to anorexia in a sample of Italian older persons living in different settings. Our secondary aim was to evaluate the impact of senile anorexia on nutritional status and on eating habits, as well as on functional status. Observational study in nursing homes, in rehabilitation and acute geriatric wards, and in the community in four Italian regions (Lazio, Sicily, Emilia-Romagna, and Veneto). 526 over 65 years old participants were recruited; 218 free-living subjects, 213 from nursing homes, and 96 patients from rehabilitation and acute geriatric wards in the context of a National Research Project (PRIN) from the Italian Ministry of Instruction, University and Research (2005-067913 "Cause e Prevalenza dell'Anoressia senile"). Anthropometric and nutritional evaluation, olfactory, chewing, and swallowing capacity, food preferences, cognitive function, functional status, depression, quality of life, social aspects, prescribed drugs, and evaluation of gastrointestinal symptoms and pain. Laboratory parameters included prealbumin, albumin, transferrin, C-reactive protein, mucoprotein, lymphocyte count, as well as neurotransmitters leptin, and ghrelin. Anorexia was considered as ≥50% reduction in food intake vs. a standard meal (using 3-day "Club Francophone de Gériatrie et Nutrition" form), in absence of oral disorders preventing mastication. The overall prevalence of anorexia was 21.2% with higher values among hospitalized patients (34.1% women and 27.2% men in long-term facilities; 33.3% women and 26.7% men in rehabilitation and geriatric wards; 3.3% women and 11.3% men living in the community) and in the oldest persons. Anorexic subjects were significantly less self-sufficient and presented more often a compromised nutritional and cognitive status. Diet

  8. Types of Dementia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Kids For Teens For Parents & Teachers Resolving Family Conflicts The Holidays and Alzheimer's Glossary Virtual Library Online ... Use Map Selector Search Alzheimer’s Association Alzheimer's & Dementia Types of Dementia Types of Dementia Types of Dementia ...

  9. Imaging dementias

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Savoiardo, M.; Grisoli, M. [Dept. of Neuroradiology, Istituto Nazionale Neurologico, Milan (Italy)

    2001-03-01

    Dementia is the progressive loss of intellectual functions due to involvement of cortical or subcortical areas. Specific involvement of certain brain areas in the different diseases leads to impairment of different functions, e. g., memory, language, visuospatial abilities, and behavior. Magnetic resonance imaging and other neuroradiological studies may indicate which structures are mainly or selectively involved in a demented patient, thus allowing clinical-radiological correlations. Clinical presentation and evolution of the disease, supported by imaging studies, may lead to a highly probable diagnosis. The most common disorders, or the most relevant from the neuroradiological point of view, such as Alzheimer's disease, frontotemporal dementia, vascular dementias, dementia associated with parkinsonism, Huntington's disease, Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, and normal-pressure hydrocephalus, are briefly discussed. (orig.)

  10. Vascular dementia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... poor judgment and loss of ability to recognize danger Using the wrong word, not pronouncing words correctly, ... disease and other dementias. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Goldman's Cecil Medicine . 25th ed. Philadelphia, PA: ...

  11. Neurodegenerative Dementia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allard, Michelle

    2006-01-01

    Full text: With increasing life expectancy across the world, the number of elderly people at risk of developing dementia is growing rapidly. Thus, progressive neurodegenerative disorders such as dementia represent a growing public health concern. These diseases are characterized by a progressive loss in most of the cognitive functions. The promise, possibly in a near future, of disease-modifying therapies has made the characterization of the early stages of dementia a topic of major interest. The assessment of these early stages is a challenge for neuroimaging studies. In order to conceive prevention trials; it is of major outcome to fully understand the mechanisms of the cognitive system impairment and its evolution, with a particular reference to the symptomatic pre-dementia stage, when subjects just begin to depart from normality. In this article we review recent progress in neuroimaging, and their potentiality for increasing a diagnostic accuracy. (author)

  12. Imaging dementias

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Savoiardo, M.; Grisoli, M.

    2001-01-01

    Dementia is the progressive loss of intellectual functions due to involvement of cortical or subcortical areas. Specific involvement of certain brain areas in the different diseases leads to impairment of different functions, e. g., memory, language, visuospatial abilities, and behavior. Magnetic resonance imaging and other neuroradiological studies may indicate which structures are mainly or selectively involved in a demented patient, thus allowing clinical-radiological correlations. Clinical presentation and evolution of the disease, supported by imaging studies, may lead to a highly probable diagnosis. The most common disorders, or the most relevant from the neuroradiological point of view, such as Alzheimer's disease, frontotemporal dementia, vascular dementias, dementia associated with parkinsonism, Huntington's disease, Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, and normal-pressure hydrocephalus, are briefly discussed. (orig.)

  13. Lewy body dementia--clinical, pathological and neurochemical interconnections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, R; McKeith, I; Perry, E

    1997-01-01

    Senile dementia of Lewy body type or Lewy body dementia (SDLT or LBD) is defined as a Lewy body associated disease presenting in the elderly primarily with dementia with variable extrapyramidal disorder. Characteristic clinical symptoms include fluctuating cognitive impairment, psychotic features such as hallucinations and a particular sensitivity to neuroleptic medication. Although apolipoprotein e4 allele is increased 2-3 fold in SDLT (as in Alzheimer's disease) and beta-amyloidosis occurs in most cases, the most robust neurobiological correlate of the dementia so far identified appears to be extensive cholinergic deficits in the neocortex. This is consistent with previously reported correlations between cortical cholinergic activity and dementia in Parkinson's disease (PD) and Alzheimer's disease. There is also a significant interaction between the density of limbic cortical Lewy bodies and dementia in both SDLT and PD, although the cortical neuronal population affected remains to be identified. Cortical Lewy body density is positively correlated with the age of disease onset in PD and SDLT. This may account for the increased incidence of psychiatric syndromes, as opposed to extrapyramidal disorder in Lewy body disease with advancing age as may age-related loss of cholinergic activity in cortical areas such as the hippocampus.

  14. Sortilin Fragments Deposit at Senile Plaques in Human Cerebrum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xia Hu

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Genetic variations in the vacuolar protein sorting 10 protein (Vps10p family have been linked to Alzheimer’s disease (AD. Here we demonstrate deposition of fragments from the Vps10p member sortilin at senile plaques (SPs in aged and AD human cerebrum. Sortilin changes were characterized in postmortem brains with antibodies against the extracellular and intracellular C-terminal domains. The two antibodies exhibited identical labeling in normal human cerebrum, occurring in the somata and dendrites of cortical and hippocampal neurons. The C-terminal antibody also marked extracellular lesions in some aged and all AD cases, appearing as isolated fibrils, mini-plaques, dense-packing or circular mature-looking plaques. Sortilin and β-amyloid (Aβ deposition were correlated overtly in a region/lamina- and case-dependent manner as analyzed in the temporal lobe structures, with co-localized immunofluorescence seen at individual SPs. However, sortilin deposition rarely occurred around the pia, at vascular wall or in areas with typical diffuse Aβ deposition, with the labeling not enhanced by section pretreatment with heating or formic acid. Levels of a major sortilin fragment ~15 kDa, predicted to derive from the C-terminal region, were dramatically elevated in AD relative to control cortical lysates. Thus, sortilin fragments are a prominent constituent of the extracellularly deposited protein products at SPs in human cerebrum.

  15. The pathological basis of dementia in the aged and reliability of computed tomograms in the diagnosis of dementia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tohgi, Hideo

    1981-01-01

    Pathological findings of demented (89 cases) and non-demented, control subjects (74 cases) in the aged were compared. The reliability of CT in the diagnosis was also studied. 1) Brain weight and the degree of ventricular dilatation were related to dementia, but the degree of convolutional atrophy showed no correlation with dementia. 2) Among various types of cerebrovascular lesions, only diffuse white matter lesions can be the cause of dementia. 3) Cases with dementia were classified into 4 groups as regards to which of cerebrovascular lesions and senile plaques was more prominent histologically. 4) CT evaluations coincided with pathological findings in only 17.9% in the degree of ventricular dilatation and 57.1% in the degree of convolutional atrophy. Ninty-three percent of cases without periventricular lucency did not show diffuse white matter lesions at autopsy, while only 50% of cases with periventricular lucency were confirmed to have diffuse white matter lesions. 5) The degree of ventricular dilatation, conventional atrophy, periventricular lucency, and subarachnoid free space in the cerebral convexity were studied in relation to dementia. The sum of the evaluations of these indices had a significant correlation with dementia. (J.P.N.)

  16. Diagnosis related group grouping study of senile cataract patients based on E-CHAID algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Ai-Jing; Chang, Wei-Fu; Xin, Zi-Rui; Ling, Hao; Li, Jun-Jie; Dai, Ping-Ping; Deng, Xuan-Tong; Zhang, Lei; Li, Shao-Gang

    2018-01-01

    AIM To figure out the contributed factors of the hospitalization expenses of senile cataract patients (HECP) and build up an area-specified senile cataract diagnosis related group (DRG) of Shanghai thereby formulating the reference range of HECP and providing scientific basis for the fair use and supervision of the health care insurance fund. METHODS The data was collected from the first page of the medical records of 22 097 hospitalized patients from tertiary hospitals in Shanghai from 2010 to 2012 whose major diagnosis were senile cataract. Firstly, we analyzed the influence factors of HECP using univariate and multivariate analysis. DRG grouping was conducted according to the exhaustive Chi-squared automatic interaction detector (E-CHAID) model, using HECP as target variable. Finally we evaluated the grouping results using non-parametric test such as Kruskal-Wallis H test, RIV, CV, etc. RESULTS The 6 DRGs were established as well as criterion of HECP, using age, sex, type of surgery and whether complications/comorbidities occurred as the key variables of classification node of senile cataract cases. CONCLUSION The grouping of senile cataract cases based on E-CHAID algorithm is reasonable. And the criterion of HECP based on DRG can provide a feasible way of management in the fair use and supervision of medical insurance fund. PMID:29487824

  17. Diagnosis related group grouping study of senile cataract patients based on E-CHAID algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Ai-Jing; Chang, Wei-Fu; Xin, Zi-Rui; Ling, Hao; Li, Jun-Jie; Dai, Ping-Ping; Deng, Xuan-Tong; Zhang, Lei; Li, Shao-Gang

    2018-01-01

    To figure out the contributed factors of the hospitalization expenses of senile cataract patients (HECP) and build up an area-specified senile cataract diagnosis related group (DRG) of Shanghai thereby formulating the reference range of HECP and providing scientific basis for the fair use and supervision of the health care insurance fund. The data was collected from the first page of the medical records of 22 097 hospitalized patients from tertiary hospitals in Shanghai from 2010 to 2012 whose major diagnosis were senile cataract. Firstly, we analyzed the influence factors of HECP using univariate and multivariate analysis. DRG grouping was conducted according to the exhaustive Chi-squared automatic interaction detector (E-CHAID) model, using HECP as target variable. Finally we evaluated the grouping results using non-parametric test such as Kruskal-Wallis H test, RIV, CV, etc. The 6 DRGs were established as well as criterion of HECP, using age, sex, type of surgery and whether complications/comorbidities occurred as the key variables of classification node of senile cataract cases. The grouping of senile cataract cases based on E-CHAID algorithm is reasonable. And the criterion of HECP based on DRG can provide a feasible way of management in the fair use and supervision of medical insurance fund.

  18. Diagnosis related group grouping study of senile cataract patients based on E-CHAID algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ai-Jing Luo

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To figure out the contributed factors of the hospitalization expenses of senile cataract patients (HECP and build up an area-specified senile cataract diagnosis related group (DRG of Shanghai thereby formulating the reference range of HECP and providing scientific basis for the fair use and supervision of the health care insurance fund. METHODS: The data was collected from the first page of the medical records of 22 097 hospitalized patients from tertiary hospitals in Shanghai from 2010 to 2012 whose major diagnosis were senile cataract. Firstly, we analyzed the influence factors of HECP using univariate and multivariate analysis. DRG grouping was conducted according to the exhaustive Chi-squared automatic interaction detector (E-CHAID model, using HECP as target variable. Finally we evaluated the grouping results using non-parametric test such as Kruskal-Wallis H test, RIV, CV, etc. RESULTS: The 6 DRGs were established as well as criterion of HECP, using age, sex, type of surgery and whether complications/comorbidities occurred as the key variables of classification node of senile cataract cases. CONCLUSION: The grouping of senile cataract cases based on E-CHAID algorithm is reasonable. And the criterion of HECP based on DRG can provide a feasible way of management in the fair use and supervision of medical insurance fund.

  19. MR spectroscopy in dementia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hauser, T.; Gerigk, L.; Giesel, F.; Schuster, L.; Essig, M.

    2010-01-01

    With an increasingly aging population we are faced with the problem of an increasing number of dementia patients. In addition to clinical, neuropsychological and laboratory procedures, MRI plays an important role in the early diagnosis of dementia. In addition to various morphological changes functional changes can also help in the diagnosis and differential diagnosis of dementia. Overall the diagnosis of dementia can be improved by using parameters from MR spectroscopy. This article focuses on MR spectroscopic changes in the physiological aging process as well as on changes in mild cognitive impairment a precursor of Alzheimer's dementia, in Alzheimer's dementia, frontotemporal dementia, vascular dementia and Lewy body dementia. (orig.) [de

  20. Recognizing Dementia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gjødsbøl, Iben Mundbjerg; Svendsen, Mette Nordahl

    2018-01-01

    narratives; yet during memory testing, patients are not allowed any substitution to clearly expose cognitive shortcomings. In combining works of theorists Ian Hacking and Paul Ricoeur, we argue that the clinical identification of dementia unmakes the knowing subject, a deconstruction that threatens...

  1. Senile anorexia in acute-ward and rehabilitations settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donini, L M; Savina, C; Piredda, M; Cucinotta, D; Fiorito, A; Inelmen, E M; Sergi, G; Domiguez, L J; Barbagallo, M; Cannella, C

    2008-10-01

    The most common pathological change in eating behaviour among older persons is anorexia, which accounts for a large percent of undernutrition in older adults. The main research aims are to determine, in a sample of acute and rehabilitation elderly subjects, the prevalence of anorexia of aging and the causes most impacting on senile anorexia. four different Units cooperated to this research study. Patients were recruited from geriatric acute and rehabilitation wards in Italy. Each Research Unit, for the estimation of the prevalence of anorexia in elderly subjects evaluated all the patients aged over 65 recruited from April 2006 to June 2007. Nutritional status, depression, social, functional and cognitive status, quality of life, health status, chewing, swallowing, sensorial functions were evaluated in anorexic patients and in a sample of "normal eating" elderly subjects. 96 anorexic subjects were selected in acute and rehabilitation wards (66 women; 81.5 +/- 7 years; 30 men: 81.8 +/- 8 years. The prevalence of anorexia in the sample was 33.3% in women and 26.7% in men. Anorexic subjects were older and more frequently needed help for shopping and cooking. A higher (although not statistically significant) level of comorbidity was present in anorexic subjects. These subjects reported constipation and epigastrium pain more frequently. Nutritional status parameters (MNA, anthropometry, blood parameters) were significantly worst in anorexic subjects whereas CRP was higher. Chewing and swallowing efficiencies were significantly impaired and eating patterns were different for anorexic subjects with a significant reduction of protein rich foods. consequences of anorexia can be extremely serious and deeply affect both patient's mobility, mortality and quality of life. Therefore, it is of utmost importance to perform a special evaluation of the nutritional risk, to constantly evaluate the nutritional status and feeding intake of older patients, to identify and treat the

  2. Lewy body dementias

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Løkkegaard, Annemette; Korbo, Lise

    2017-01-01

    Dementia with Lewy bodies and Parkinson disease dementia share the same pathophysiology. Together they are called Lewy body dementias and are the second most common type of dementia. Lewy body dementias receive little attention, and patients are often misdiagnosed, leading to less than ideal...

  3. Parkinson's Disease Dementia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Find your local chapter Join our online community Parkinson's Disease Dementia Parkinson's disease dementia is an impairment ... disease. About Symptoms Diagnosis Causes & risks Treatments About Parkinson's disease dementia The brain changes caused by Parkinson's ...

  4. Lewy Body Dementia Diagnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... provide an experienced diagnostic team skilled in Lewy body dementia. A thorough dementia diagnostic evaluation includes physical ... a good way to benefit others with Lewy body dementia. Medications Medications are one of the most ...

  5. Central venous catheter-related thrombosis in senile male patients: New risk factors and predictors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Gao; Fu, Zhi-Qing; Zhu, Ping; Li, Shi-Jun

    2015-06-01

    Central venous catheterization (CVC)-related venous thrombosis is a common but serious clinical complication, thus prevention and treatment on this problem should be extensively investigated. In this research, we aimed to investigate the incidence rate of CVC-related venous thrombosis in senile patients and give a further discussion on the related risk factors and predictors. A total of 324 hospitalized senile male patients subjected to CVC were selected. Retrospective investigation and analysis were conducted on age, underlying diseases, clinical medications, catheterization position and side, catheter retention time, and incidence of CVC-related venous thrombosis complications. Basic laboratory test results during catheterization and thrombogenesis were also collected and analyzed. Among the 324 patients, 20 cases (6.17%) of CVC-related venous thrombosis were diagnoseds. The incidence rate of CVC-related venous thrombosis in subclavian vein catheterization was significantly lower than that in femoral vein catheterization (Pcatheterization (Pcatheterization and internal jugular vein catheterization (Pvenous thrombosis history (Pvenous thrombosis in senile male patients. Subclavian vein catheterization was the most appropriate choice among senile patients to decrease the incidence of CVC-related venous thrombosis. Previous venous thrombosis history, high lactate dehydrogenase level, low HDL level, and low albumin level were important risk factors in predicting CVC-related venous thrombosis.

  6. Evaluation of the Costs of Caring for the Senile Demented Elderly: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Teh-wei; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Evaluated economic costs for nursing home patients and elderly living in their own homes. Using time records compiled by nurses or family members, the costs incurred annually in caring for a senile demented elderly person at home were estimated to average $11,735, and in a nursing home, $22,458. (Author/BL)

  7. Topical Human Epidermal Growth Factor in the Treatment of Senile Purpura and the Prevention of Dermatoporosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKnight, Braden; Seidel, Rachel; Moy, Ron

    2015-10-01

    Senile purpura presents itself as a largely unexplored challenge as it has been long thought of as a benign condition without long-term health sequelae. It is becoming increasingly accepted that skin aging not only results in cosmetic disturbances, but as a functional ones. With modern increases in lifespan, skin atrophy associated with solar damage is presenting as a clinically significant inability to mechanically protect patients. This chronic cutaneous insufficiency/fragility syndrome was recently termed dermatoporosis and senile purpura appears to be a visible marker of early stage dysfunction. To examine the effects of topically human epidermal growth factor on the clinical presence of senile purpura and its effect on skin thickness as measured via cutaneous ultrasound. Six subjects applied human epidermal growth factor morning and night for six weeks. Clinical outcomes were evaluated by comparing initial clinical photos to 6-week photos and performing a blinded investigator's global assessment (IGA). Skin thickness was evaluated via cutaneous ultrasound measurement. Ultrasound measurements indicated a mean skin thickening of 195.2 ± 35.7 um (SEM) over 6 weeks. The average number of purpuric lesions decreased from 15 ± 4.6 (SEM) to 2.3 ± 0.7 (SEM) over that same period. Senile purpura presents itself as a cosmetic disturbance posing significant psychological distress and serves as a marker of the severity of skin thinning. In this study, we demonstrate that topical h-EGF diminishes the appearance of senile purpura by thickening skin and may help prevent the development of late stage dermatoporosis.

  8. Effects of Simulated Heat Waves on Cardiovascular Functions in Senile Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiakun Zhang

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The mechanism of the effects of simulated heat waves on cardiovascular disease in senile mice was investigated. Heat waves were simulated in a TEM1880 meteorological environment simulation chamber, according to a heat wave that occurred in July 2001 in Nanjing, China. Eighteen senile mice were divided into control, heat wave, and heat wave BH4 groups, respectively. Mice in the heat wave and heat wave BH4 groups were exposed to simulated heat waves in the simulation chamber. The levels of ET-1, NO, HSP60, SOD, TNF, sICAM-1, and HIF-1α in each group of mice were measured after heat wave simulation. Results show that heat waves decreased SOD activity in the myocardial tissue of senile mice, increased NO, HSP60, TNF, sICAM-1, and HIF-1α levels, and slightly decreased ET-1 levels, BH4 can relieve the effects of heat waves on various biological indicators. After a comprehensive analysis of the experiments above, we draw the followings conclusions regarding the influence of heat waves on senile mice: excess HSP60 activated immune cells, and induced endothelial cells and macrophages to secrete large amounts of ICAM-1, TNF-α, and other inflammatory cytokines, it also activated the inflammation response in the body and damaged the coronary endothelial cell structure, which increased the permeability of blood vessel intima and decreased SOD activity in cardiac tissues. The oxidation of lipoproteins in the blood increased, and large amounts of cholesterol were generated. Cholesterol penetrated the intima and deposited on the blood vessel wall, forming atherosclerosis and leading to the occurrence of cardiovascular disease in senile mice. These results maybe are useful for studying the effects of heat waves on elderly humans, which we discussed in the discussion chapter.

  9. Application of iodine-123-labeled isopropylamphetamine imaging to the study of dementia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharp, P.; Gemmell, H.; Cherryman, G.; Besson, J.; Crawford, J.; Smith, F.

    1986-01-01

    Forty-seven patients diagnosed as clinically demented were imaged with 123I isopropylamphetamine (IMP). All of these patients also had a nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) study. In those patients diagnosed as having senile dementia of the Alzheimer type a bilateral reduction in IMP uptake in the temporo-parieto-occipital region was always seen. The NMR appearances were normal in 64% of these sites. The IMP images of patients with multi-infarct dementia varied from normal to marked focal deficits. There was, however, a much closer agreement between the abnormalities seen on the IMP and NMR images. In alcoholic dementia no focal areas of reduced IMP uptake were seen, although the uptake was generally irregular. In both Korsakoff's psychosis and Huntington's chorea the IMP uptake pattern and the NMR study were normal

  10. Cortical serotonin-S2 receptor binding in Lewy body dementia, Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, A V; Ferrier, I N; Morris, C M; Jabeen, S; Sahgal, A; McKeith, I G; Edwardson, J A; Perry, R H; Perry, E K

    1991-11-01

    The binding of the selective 5-HT2 antagonist [3H]ketanserin has been investigated in the temporal cortex of patients with Alzheimer's disease (SDAT), Parkinson's disease (PD), senile dementia of Lewy body type (SDLT) and neuropathologically normal subjects (control). 5-HT2 binding was reduced in SDAT, PD with dementia and SDLT. SDAT showed a 5-HT2 receptor deficit across most of the cortical layers. A significant decrease in 5-HT2 binding in the deep cortical layers was found in those SDLT cases without hallucinations. SDLT cases with hallucinations only showed a deficit in one upper layer. There was a significant difference in cortical layers III and V between SDLT without hallucinations and SDLT with hallucinations. The results confirm an abnormality of serotonin binding in various forms of dementia and suggest that preservation of 5-HT2 receptor in the temporal cortex may differentiate hallucinating from non-hallucinating cases of SDLT.

  11. Functional Neuroimaging in Dementia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.M. Papma (Janne)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractDementia refers to a clinical syndrome of cognitive deterioration and difficulty in the performance of activities of daily living. The most common cause of dementia is Alzheimer’s disease (AD), followed by vascular dementia (VaD) at old age and frontotemporal dementia (FTD) at young

  12. Scalp and Body Acupuncture for Treatment of Senile Insomnia-A Report of 83 Cases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    卢泽强

    2002-01-01

    @@ The author has in recent years treated 83 cases of senile insomnia with scalp and body acupuncture. Meanwhile, 35 cases in the control group were treated with western and Chinese drugs. The therapeutic results in the treatment group were superior to that of nitrazapam and An Shen Bu Nao Ye (安神补脑液Sedative and Brain-invigorating Fluid) used in the control group. A report of the treatment follows.

  13. FDG PET imaging dementia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahn, Byeong Cheol [Kyungpook National University Medical School and Kyungpook National University Hospital, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-04-15

    Dementia is a major burden for many countries including South Korea, where life expectancy is continuously growing and the proportion of aged people is rapidly growing. Neurodegenerative disorders, such as, Alzheimer disease, dementia with Lewy bodies, frontotemporal dementia. Parkinson disease, progressive supranuclear palsy, corticobasal degeneration, Huntington disease, can cause dementia, and cerebrovascular disease also can cause dementia. Depression or hypothyroidism also can cause cognitive deficits, but they are reversible by management of underlying cause unlike the forementioned dementias. Therefore these are called pseudodementia. We are entering an era of dementia care that will be based upon the identification of potentially modifiable risk factors and early disease markers, and the application of new drugs postpone progression of dementias or target specific proteins that cause dementia. Efficient pharmacologic treatment of dementia needs not only to distinguish underlying causes of dementia but also to be installed as soon as possible. Therefore, differential diagnosis and early diagnosis of dementia are utmost importance. F-18 FDG PET is useful for clarifying dementing diseases and is also useful for early detection of the disease. Purpose of this article is to review the current value of FDG PET for dementing diseases including differential diagnosis of dementia and prediction of evolving dementia.

  14. FDG PET imaging dementia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahn, Byeong Cheol

    2007-01-01

    Dementia is a major burden for many countries including South Korea, where life expectancy is continuously growing and the proportion of aged people is rapidly growing. Neurodegenerative disorders, such as, Alzheimer disease, dementia with Lewy bodies, frontotemporal dementia. Parkinson disease, progressive supranuclear palsy, corticobasal degeneration, Huntington disease, can cause dementia, and cerebrovascular disease also can cause dementia. Depression or hypothyroidism also can cause cognitive deficits, but they are reversible by management of underlying cause unlike the forementioned dementias. Therefore these are called pseudodementia. We are entering an era of dementia care that will be based upon the identification of potentially modifiable risk factors and early disease markers, and the application of new drugs postpone progression of dementias or target specific proteins that cause dementia. Efficient pharmacologic treatment of dementia needs not only to distinguish underlying causes of dementia but also to be installed as soon as possible. Therefore, differential diagnosis and early diagnosis of dementia are utmost importance. F-18 FDG PET is useful for clarifying dementing diseases and is also useful for early detection of the disease. Purpose of this article is to review the current value of FDG PET for dementing diseases including differential diagnosis of dementia and prediction of evolving dementia

  15. Clinical study of a retinoic acid-loaded microneedle patch for seborrheic keratosis or senile lentigo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirobe, Sachiko; Otsuka, Risa; Iioka, Hiroshi; Quan, Ying-Shu; Kamiyama, Fumio; Asada, Hideo; Okada, Naoki; Nakagawa, Shinsaku

    2017-01-01

    Pigmented lesions such as of seborrheic keratosis and senile lentigo, which are commonly seen on skin of people>50years of age, are considered unattractive and disfiguring because of their negative psychological impact. Drug therapy using all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) is an attractive option for self-treatment at home. We have developed an ATRA-loaded microneedle patch (ATRA-MN) and confirmed the pharmacological effects of ATRA-MN application in mice. Here, we describe a clinical study to evaluate the safety and efficacy of ATRA-MN in subjects with seborrheic keratosis or senile lentigo. ATRA-MN was applied to the lesion site of each subject for 6h once per week for 4weeks. The skin irritation reaction was scored to assess adverse reactions and blood tests were performed to evaluate the presence of systemic adverse reactions. To assess the treatment effect using ATRA-MN, the desquamation and whitening ability of the investigational skin was observed. Desquamation of the stratum corneum was observed following four ATRA-MN applications at 1-week intervals, but ATRA-MN applications did not induce severe local or systemic adverse effects. These results showed that ATRA-MN treatment is promising as a safe and effective therapy for seborrheic keratosis and senile lentigo. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Dementia: Diagnosis and Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... our e-newsletter! Aging & Health A to Z Dementia Diagnosis & Tests If you or someone you care ... To determine whether an older adult might have dementia, a healthcare professional will: Ask about the person’s ...

  17. Dementia and driving

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000028.htm Dementia and driving To use the sharing features on ... please enable JavaScript. If your loved one has dementia , deciding when they can no longer drive may ...

  18. Analysis of Regional Cerebral Blood Flow Using 99mTc-HMPAO Brain SPECT in Senile Dementia of Alzheimer Type

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Myung Hae; Lee, Myung Chul; Koh, Chang Soon; Roh, Jae Kyu; Woo, Chong In

    1988-01-01

    99m Tc-HMPAO brain SPECT studies were performed in 11 patients with Alzheimer's disease, 7 patients with psychological depression and 12 normal controls. Changes of regional cerebral blood flow was semiquantitatively analyzed and the results were as follows. 1) In 11 patients with Alzheimer's disease, significant reduction of regional cerebral blood flow was found In both temporoparietal areas. 2) Relative perfusion between cerebral hemispheres was rather symmetrical in patient with Alzheimer's disease. 3) All patients with depression showed normal SPECT findings. As for conclusion, 99m Tc-HMPAO brain SPECT seemed to be a valuable method for clinical assessment and management of patients with Alzheimer's disease.

  19. Clinical significance of detection of plasma β-amyloid protein (β-AP) levels in patients with senile dementia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu Binwei; Xu Shangao; Lu Zhifeng; Wang Weihua; Mao Xiaohua; Zhou Chaohua

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To explore the value of determination of plasma β-AP levels in the diagnosis and monitoring of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Methods: Plasma β-AP levels were weasured with RIA in 43 patients with AD and 58 controls, as well as in 8 AD patients after a course of cerebrolysin treatment. Results: The plasma β-AP levels in the AD patients were significance higher those in controls (P<0.01). The plasma β-AP levels were especially higher in the severe eases, however, the plasma β-AP levels in some late AD patients dropped again, even lower than those in the controls. The plasma β-AP levels in the 8 AD patients decreased significantly after treatment with cerebrolysin. Conclusion: The plasma β-AP is a biochemical maker of AD. Dynamic examnation of plasma β-AP levels is valuable in assessing the progression and prognosis of the disease. (authors)

  20. Cognitive impairment of dementias

    OpenAIRE

    Medina, L. D.; Rodríguez-Agudelo, Yaneth

    2012-01-01

    Dementia is a clinical syndrome characterized by a loss of cognitive and emotional abilities of sufficient severity to infer with social or occupational functioning, or both. Although the causes of dementia and characteristics are not always fully understood, it is understood that it is not a natural part of aging. Definitive diagnosis of dementia is made only through the autopsy and although the diagnosis of probable or possible dementia is complex is achieved by the intervention of several ...

  1. Differential Features of Cerebral Perfusion in Dementia with Lewy Bodies Compared to Alzheimer's Dementia using SPM Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Do Young; Park, Kyung Won; Kim, Jae Woo [College of Medicine, Univ. of Donga, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2003-07-01

    Alzheimer's dementia (AD) and dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB) are most common cause of dementia in elderly people. Clinical distinction in some cases of DLB from AD may be difficult as symptom profiles overlap. Some neuropathologic overlap is also seen as beta-amyloidosis and senile plaques can be found in both disease. Both disease also share severe acetylcholine depletion. We evaluated the differences of brain perfusion between DLB and AD using statistical parametric mapping analysis. Twelve DLB (mean age ; 68.8{+-}8.3 years, K-MMSE ; 17.3{+-}6.1) and 51 AD patients (mean age ; 71.4{+-}7.2 years, K-MMSE ; 16.7{+-}4.5), which were matched for age and severity of dementia, participated in this study. Tc-99m HMPAO SPECT was performed for measuring regional cerebral blood flow. Statistical parametric mapping (SPM99) software was used for automatic and objective approach to analyze SPECT image data. The SPECT data of the patients with DLB were compared to patients with AD. Comparison of the two dementia groups (uncorrected p<0.01) revealed significant hypoperfusion in both occipital (both middle occipital gyrus, Rt B no. 18 and Lt cuneus), both parietal (Lt parietal precuneus, Lt B no. 39, Lt inferior parietal lobule and Rt supramarginal gyrus) lobes in DLB compared with AD. Significant hyperperfusion was noted in Rt frontal (sup. frontal gyrus, B no.10, middle frontal gyrus, B no. 9, B no. 11, inf. frontal gyrus), Rt putamen, Lt ant. cingulate gyrus (B no. 24), both cerebellar post. lobe (Lt tuber, Lt declive, Lt tonsil, Rt declive) in DLB compared with AD. We found a significant differences in the cerebral perfusion pattern between DLB and AD. Differential feature of cerebral perfusion in DLB was both occipital hypoperfusion and preserved Rt frontal perfusion compared to AD. Therefore in difficult case of clinical an neuro pathologic diagnosis, brain perfusion SPECT with SPM analysis may be helpful to differentiate DLB from AD.

  2. Lewy body dementias

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Løkkegaard, Annemette; Korbo, Lise

    2017-01-01

    Dementia with Lewy bodies and Parkinson disease dementia share the same pathophysiology. Together they are called Lewy body dementias and are the second most common type of dementia. Lewy body dementias receive little attention, and patients are often misdiagnosed, leading to less than ideal...... management. In this article, diagnostic criteria combined with imaging and other biomarkers as well as current treatment recommendations are summarized, and some of the challenges for the future are outlined. Refinement of diagnosis and clarification of the pathogenesis are required in search for disease...

  3. Antioxidant status in diabetic and non-diabetic senile patients, with cataract or cardiovascular complications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gul, A.; Rahman, Muhammad A.

    2008-01-01

    Objective was to assess the total antioxidant status in diabetic and non-diabetic senile patients, with cataract or cardiovascular complications, and without complications. A comparative study on 186 senile patients and control subjects was carried from March 2004 to November 2006 on patients from Ziauddin University Hospital, Karachi, Pakistan. Among them 33 were diabetic patients without any clinical evidence of chronic diabetic complications, 32 with cardiovascular complications, 30 non-diabetic patients with cardiovascular complications, 30 diabetic patients with cataract and 31 apparently normal, age, gender and weight matched control subjects were investigated. All patients were selected on clinical grounds. Total antioxidant status was significantly decreased (p<0.001) in all diabetic patients with and without complications and non-diabetic patients with same complications (155 patients) as compared with control subjects (31 subjects). Fasting plasma glucose was increased (p<0.001) in all diabetic patients with and without complications (95 patients), and correlated significantly with glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) and serum fructosamine concentrations. Fasting plasma glucose, HbA1c, and serum fructosamine were not different in diabetic patients with and without complications. Fasting plasma glucose, HbA1c, serum fructosamine and total serum protein were not different in non-diabetic patients with the same complications as compared with control subjects. Total antioxidant status is decreased in diabetic and non-diabetic senile patients with the same complication as compared with same complication as compared with control subjects. Some other factors may be responsible for decease antioxidant status. (author)

  4. [Clinical study of medicinal-cake-separated moxibustion for senile osteoporosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Yuqing; Bi, Dingyan; Yi, Zhan; Lu, Jianwei; Zhong, Fuhua; Jiang, Binfeng

    2017-05-12

    To explore the clinical efficacy and partial mechanism of medicinal-cake-separated moxibustion for senile osteoporosis. Sixty cases of senile osteoporosis were randomly divided into an observation group and a control group according to the random digits table, 30 cases in each one. The two groups were both treated with basic treatment of western medicine. The acupoints included four groups:① Dazhui (GV 14), Dazhu (BL 11) and Ganshu (BL 18); ② Zhongwan (CV 12), Danzhong (CV 17) and Zusanli (ST 36); ③ Pishu (BL 20), Shenshu (BL 23) and Mingmen (GV 4); ④ Shenque (CV 8) and Guanyuan (CV 4). Each group of acupoints was selected for one treatment. The observation group was treated with medicinal-cake-separated moxibustion, and the medicinal cake was consisted of fructus psoraleae (30 g), prepared rehmannia root (30 g), atractylodes (30 g), codonopsis pilosula (30 g), epimedium herb (20 g), rhizoma curculiginis (20 g), syzygium aromaticum (5 g) and cinnamon (5 g). The control group was treated with wheat-flour-cake moxibustion. Each acupoint was treated with 5 moxa cones in the two groups. The treatment was given once every other day for six months. The symptom score, lumbar and hip bone mineral density (BMD), serum type Ⅰ procollagen amino-terminal propeptide (PINP) and serum β-type Ⅰ collagen carboxy-terminal peptide (β-CTX) were observed before and after treatment. After treatment, the symptom score and serum β-CTX were significantly lowered (all P cake-separated moxibustion has significant efficacy for senile osteoporosis, which is superior to wheat-cake-se-parated moxibustion.

  5. Health Policy and Dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, Tia

    2018-02-01

    The anticipated number of persons with dementia continues to grow, and the US has insufficiently planned to provide and pay for care for this large population. A number of significant clinical trials aiming to prevent or cure dementia, including Alzheimer's disease, have not demonstrated success. Because of the lack of efficacious treatments, and the fact that brain changes associated with dementia may begin decades before symptoms, we can predict that efforts to cure or prevent dementia will not succeed in time for millions of people in the baby boomer generation. Because of the anticipated increase in people suffering with dementia in the coming years, US health policy must address major gaps in how to provide and pay for dementia care. Reliance on Medicaid and Medicare as currently structured will not sustain the necessary care, nor can families alone provide all necessary dementia care. Innovative forms of providing long-term care and paying for it are crucially needed.

  6. [Estimation of nutrition of elderly and senile patients with surgical diseases at home].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malikov, D I

    2005-01-01

    Analysis of estimation of nutrition 500 of elderly and senile patients with surgical disease at home. The diets of patients are characterised by foods rich of animal protein and carbohydrate. But a dificienny of meat, fish, dairy products frent, berries is marhed. The diets thas dificiency in rations of patients are characterized by irrational set basic food products, cannot provide daily needs for nutrients: animal protein, vitamins C, A, vitamins B group, beta-carotene and mineral element--Ca, Mg, P, Zn, Se. Entering of nutrional substance, such as vitamins, and mineral elements with a food is reduced in dietary restrictions, deficiency means, residence in country-side.

  7. Shugan Jieyu Yin for Treatment of Senile Depression--A Clinical Report of 84 Cases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    @@ TCM holds that depression is, in most cases,resulted from injuries of the seven emotions and/or from stagnation of qi. The principle of treatment should be mainly to relieve the depressed liver and to regulate the flow of qi, supplemented by nourishing the blood and the liver, eliminating heat and irritability, promoting blood circulation by removing blood stasis, tranquilizing the mind, and dredging the collaterals to stop pain. Since 1995, we have treated 84 cases of senile depression with the prescription of Shugan Jieyu Yin (舒肝解郁饮Decoction for Relieving the Depressed Liver), and obtained satisfactory therapeutic results. A report follows.

  8. I-123 IMP SPECT in Parkinson's disease; In relation to the presence or absence of dementia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawabata, Keita; Tachibana, Kyudai; Sugita, Minoru [Hyogo Medical Coll., Nishinomiya (Japan)

    1990-12-01

    To examine semiquantitatively regional cerebral blood flow, SPECT with N-isopropyl-p-(I-123)iodoamphetamine (I-123 IMP) was undertaken in 17 patients with Parkinson's disease. Seven patients with Alzheimer's disease and 9 senile control subjects were also imaged for comparison. Both the Parkinson's disease group and the Alzheimer's disease group had a decreased uptake of I-123 IMP in the frontal lobe, in comparison with the control group. A remarkably decreased uptake was seen in the lateral and parietal lobes in the group of Parkinson's disease associated with dementia, as well as in the Alzheimer's disease group. A significantly decreased uptake was observed in the frontal lobe, lateral lobe, thalamus, and basal ganglia in the Parkinson's disease group, irrespective of the presence or absence of dementia. For Parkinson's disease associated with dementia, there was much more significant decrease in I-123 IMP uptake. The pattern of regional cerebral blood flow in the Alzheimer's disease group was analogous to that in the Parkinson's disease group associated with dementia. This supports the hypothesis that Alzheimer's disease may be somewhat involved in the occurrence of dementia for Parkinson's disease. (N.K.).

  9. Neurocognitive differential diagnosis of dementing diseases: Alzheimer's Dementia, Vascular Dementia, Frontotemporal Dementia, and Major Depressive Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braaten, Alyssa J; Parsons, Thomas D; McCue, Robert; Sellers, Alfred; Burns, William J

    2006-11-01

    Similarities in presentation of Dementia of Alzheimer's Type, Vascular Dementia, Frontotemporal Dementia, and Major Depressive Disorder, pose differential diagnosis challenges. The current study identifies specific neuropsychological patterns of scores for Dementia of Alzheimer's Type, Vascular Dementia, Frontotemporal Dementia, and Major Depressive Disorder. Neuropsychological domains directly assessed in the study included: immediate memory, delayed memory, confrontational naming, verbal fluency, attention, concentration, and executive functioning. The results reveal specific neuropsychological comparative profiles for Dementia of Alzheimer's Type, Vascular Dementia, Frontotemporal Dementia, and Major Depressive Disorder. The identification of these profiles will assist in the differential diagnosis of these disorders and aid in patient treatment.

  10. Dementia: role of MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Georgieva-Kozarova, G.

    2012-01-01

    Full text: This presentation will focus on the role of MRI in the diagnosis of dementia and related diseases. We will discuss the following subjects: 1. Systematic assessment of MR in dementia 2. MR protocol for dementia 3. Typical findings in the most common dementia syndrome Alzheimer's disease (AD), Vascular Dementia (VaD), Frontotemporal lobe dementia (FTLD) 4. Short overview of neurodegenerative disorders which may be associated with dementia. The role of neuroimaging in dementia nowadays extends to support the diagnosis of specific neurodegenerative disorders. It is a challenge to the early diagnosis of neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease. Early diagnosis includes recognition of predementia conditions, such as mild cognitive impairment (MCI). Neuroimaging may also be used to assess disease progression and is adopted in current trials investigating MCI and AD. An MR-study of a patient suspected of having dementia must be assessed in a standardized way. First of all, treatable diseases like subdural hematomas, tumors and hydrocephalus need to be excluded. Next we should look for signs of specific dementias such as: Alzheimer's disease (AD): medial temporal lobe atrophy (MTA) and parietal atrophy. Frontotemporal Lobar Degeneration (FTLD): (asymmetric) frontal lobe atrophy and atrophy of the temporal pole. Vascular Dementia (VaD): global atrophy, diffuse white matter lesions, lacunas and 'strategic infarcts' (infarcts in regions that are involved in cognitive function). Dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB): in contrast to other forms of dementia usually no specific abnormalities. So when we study the MR images we should score in a systematic way for global atrophy, focal atrophy and for vascular disease (i.e. infarcts, white matter lesions, lacunas)

  11. Spots before the eyes: A prevalence and clinicoradiological study of senile scleral plaques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moseley, I.

    2000-01-01

    AIMS: To investigate the prevalence and clinical associations of senile scleral plaques. METHODS: Unselected, consecutive computed tomographic (CT) images of elderly people were reviewed for the presence of calcification indicating senile scleral plaques. RESULTS: No definite calcification was seen in 100 men or 100 women aged 60-69 years; equivocal changes were seen in one woman. There were three definite examples and one equivocal case of calcification in 100 women and four definite cases in 100 men aged 70-79 years. However, in a group of 71 men and women patients aged 80 years or more, 16 definite cases were seen, indicating a prevalence of 22%. CONCLUSIONS: Apart from advanced age, and a mild association with the extent of calcification of the carotid siphon, no clinical or radiological features were identified which consistently characterized a total of 28 patients with this form of ocular calcification; an association with cataract probably reflected simply the recruitment base. Scleral plaques would appear to be a degenerative phenomenon without clinical significance, most likely to be detected in patients presenting with unrelated ophthalmological complaints. Moseley, I. (2000)

  12. Association SOD2 Polymorphism(-9C/T and Senile Cataract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.R. Nakhaee

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: One of the most common causes of blindness around the world is cataract, which is a multifactorial eye disease and a major cause the loss lens transparency in the aging population. Oxidative stress is a major factor that often leads to cataract formation. Oxidative stress is defined as a disturbance in the balance of reactive oxygen species (ROS production  and antioxidant defenses, including enzymatic and non-enzymatic systems. One of the defense systems against free radicals is superoxide dismutase II (Mn SOD enzyme. SOD enzyme catalyses the dismutation of superoxide anion to O2 and H2O2. Several polymorphism  have been found associated with SOD2 gene. Present study has been done to evaluaet effects of genetic polymorphism, including SOD2 C/T polymorphism in the -9 position in senile cataract patiens and normal individuals. Material and methods: in this case- control study, there are 120 patients with senile cataract and 104 healthy people. We collected 2ml of whole blood in tubes containing EDTA, and then DNA extraction was performed. Polymorphisms were detected by PCR–RFLP technique. Findings: The distribution of CC, CT, TT genotypes of SOD2 gene were 28.3%, 43.3% and 28.3% in the patient group and 24%, 48.1% and 27.9% in the healthy group, respectively. Conclusion: No significant difference in the distribution SOD2 C/T polymorphism was observed between cases and controls. 

  13. Probability of developing severe sepsis in patients of elderly and senile age with necrotic erysipelas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shapkin Yu.G.

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: the probable determination of severe sepsis in patients of elderly and senile age with necrotic erysipelas based on a comprehensive assessment (clinical examination using systems — scales and determination of the level markers of SIRS. Material and methods. The analysis of peculiarities of necrotic erysipelas clinical course in 59 patients. The first group consisted of 17 patients with severe sepsis, the second — 18 patients with sepsis without multiple organ failure, in the comparison group —22 patients with local infection. We determined albumin, urea, creatinine, pro-calcitonin of plasma. The scale SAPS III was used to quantify SIRS, scale SOFA —to determine the extent of damage to organs and systems. Results. The most sensitive marker of developing sepsis in patients with necrotic erysipelas was procalcitonin. The second important indicator of SIRS severity in patients with necrotic erysipelas was the blood albumin. Scale SAPS III also allows to select a group of patients with high risk of developing severe sepsis. Use of the SOFA to predict the scale has been found out to be less important. Conclusion. A comprehensive assessment of the severity of the condition by scale SAPS III in combination with determining the levels of procalcitonin and plasma albumin is advisable to apply for prediction the probability of developing severe sepsis in patients of elderly and senile age with necrotic erysipelas. For the last indicator it is important to assess of absolute values and the decrease of its concentration.

  14. [Clinical observation on auricular point magnetotherapy for treatment of senile low back pain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Gui-Ping

    2007-02-01

    To compare the therapeutic effects of auricular point magnetotherapy and auricular point sticking of Vaccaria seed on senile low back pain. Sixty cases, aged 60 or over 60 years with back pain, were randomly divided into 2 groups, a control group and a test group. The control group were treated with auricular sticking of Vaccaria seed with no pressing, and the test group with sticking magnetic bead of 66 gauss each piece with no pressing. Auricular points, Shenmen, Kidney, Bladder, Yaodizhui, Gluteus, Liver and Spleen were selected. Three weeks constituted one course. The effects before, during and after the course were assessed by questionnaire about back pain. Compared with the control group, in the test group the back pain was more effectively improved, including reducing pain and numbness in the back and the legs, decreasing the disorder of physical strength induced by this disease, and improving daily life quality of the patient. Follow-up survey for 2-4 weeks showed the effects still were kept. Auricular magnetotherapy can effectively improve senile back pain.

  15. Quantitative measurement of bone mineral contents in patients with senile osteoporosis and chronic renal failure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukuda, Teruo

    1985-01-01

    Computed tomography using X-ray (XCT) and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) using sup(99m)Tc-MDP of the skull were performed in patients with ''senile osteoporosis'' and with chronic renal failure, in order to quantitatively determine bone mineral contents. XCT: In females with postmenopausal osteoporosis (6th decade), the EMI number of frontal bone was significantly low compared with that of control group, of the same age. The EMI number in ''senile osteoporosis'' correlated with the value of serum 25 (OH) D and 1 α - 25 (OH) 2 D. The EMI number in hemodialyzed patients was significantly low compared with that in the control group. On the other hand, the EMI number in non-hemodialyzed chronic renal failure patients showed no significant difference compared with findings in the control group. The EMI number of the frontal bone in patients with partial parathyroidectomy showed a slight rise compared with findings before surgery. Bone scintigram, Bone scan SPECT: Positive scan was seen in patients with long term hemodialysis and increased values of serum Alk-Pase and PTH were often apparent. Scintigraphic improvement in patients with renal osteodystrophy treated with vitamin D 3 showed a good correlation with improvement in serum Alk-Pase values. On SPECT, frontal bone activity in patients with renal osteodystrophy was significantly high compared with that in the control group. In case of renal osteodystrophy treated with partial parathyroidectomy, the frontal bone activity was markedly decreased compared with findings before surgery. (J.P.N.)

  16. Depression associated with dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutzmann, H; Qazi, A

    2015-06-01

    Depression and cognitive disorders, including dementia and mild cognitive impairment, are common disorders in old age. Depression is frequent in dementia, causing distress, reducing the quality of life, exacerbating cognitive and functional impairment and increasing caregiver stress. Even mild levels of depression can significantly add to the functional impairment of dementia patients and the severity of psychopathological and neurological impairments increases with increasing severity of depression. Depressive symptoms may be both a risk factor for, as well as a prodrome of dementia. Major depressive syndrome of Alzheimer's disease may be among the most common mood disorders of older adults. Treating depression is therefore a key clinical priority to improve the quality of life both of people with dementia as well as their carergivers. Nonpharmacological approaches and watchful waiting should be attempted first in patients who present with mild to moderate depression and dementia. In cases of severe depression or depression not able to be managed through nonpharmacological means, antidepressant therapy should be considered.

  17. Dementia in Qatar

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamad, Ahmad I.; Ibrahim, Mohammed A.; Sulaiti, Essa M.

    2004-01-01

    Dementia is the major public health problem among the elderly in developed countries and a growing problem in the underdeveloped countries. There are no published data on dementia in any of the Arab countries. The aim of this study was to determine the different subtypes of dementia among Qataris. A retrospective and prospective ongoing hospital based study in which all medical records of the patients with diagnosis of dementia seen at the Hamad General Hospital, Doha, Qatar, between June 1997 and June 2003, whether inpatient and outpatient were reviewed. Dementia was defined according to diagnostic and statistical manual (DSM) IV criteria. Those who had dementia were evaluated by a psychologist, psychiatrist, neurologist and a geriatrician. All had brain computerized tomography, magnetic resonance imaging or both and routine blood test. Finally, they were classified into sub-types according to the cause of dementia. One of 300 patients, 134 fulfilled the inclusion criteria, most of them were illiterate, married and non-smokers. Among those dementia sub-types were: Alzheimer disease (AD) 39 (29%), vascular dementia (VaD) 30 (22%), mixed AD and VaD 20 (15%) and Parkinson's disease with dementia due to other medical conditions. Our stidy showed that AD is more prevalent than VaD. It also showed that patients and their families seek medical help late due to to the general belief among the public that forgetfulness and other associated cognitive impairment are part of normal aging process. The emergence of new drugs and advancement in prevention of cerebrovascular diseases make early diagnosis of dementia sub-type important. A community based study to show the real prevalence and incidence of sub-types of dementia is highly indicated. These data are necessory for planning and setting up community services and health care programs for demented patients. (author)

  18. Cerebral imaging and dementia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rascol, A.; Celsis, P.; Berry, I.

    1989-01-01

    Modern imaging techniques undoubtedly are of value when applied to the study of dementia. This value, however, varies with the technique utilized, and one must distinguish between acquired and potential knowledge. Morphological imaging with computerized tomography or magnetic resonance detects or confirms certain causes of dementia (tumours, lacunae, hydrocephalus with normal CSF pressure), but it is still not sensitive and specific enough to be very useful in primary dementias. Functional imaging (essentially with emission tomography) has already provided interesting data in the study of degenerative dementia (correlations with neuropsychology, subtyping), but what is most promising is its possibilities in the physiopathological approach of the disease [fr

  19. Cerebral imaging and dementia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rascol, A.; Celsis, P.; Berry, I.

    1989-02-01

    Modern imaging techniques undoubtedly are of value when applied to the study of dementia. This value, however, varies with the technique utilized, and one must distinguish between acquired and potential knowledge. Morphological imaging with computerized tomography or magnetic resonance detects or confirms certain causes of dementia (tumours, lacunae, hydrocephalus with normal CSF pressure), but it is still not sensitive and specific enough to be very useful in primary dementias. Functional imaging (essentially with emission tomography) has already provided interesting data in the study of degenerative dementia (correlations with neuropsychology, subtyping), but what is most promising is its possibilities in the physiopathological approach of the disease.

  20. Prognosis of dementia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Vorst, IE

    2016-01-01

    Background: In this thesis, we focused on the prognosis of patients with dementia who visited a hospital (inpatient or day clinic care) in the Netherlands. So far, absolute mortality risks for dementia were lacking in the Netherlands, whereas these risks have been available for years for cancer or

  1. [Efficiency of rehabilitation of elderly and senile patients after an ischemic stroke].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miakotnykh, V S; Borovkova, T A; Miakotnykh, K V; Lespukh, N I

    2011-01-01

    Productivity of a wide medical rehabilitation in 296 patients who have had an ischemic stroke was studied. In the period of rehabilitation treatment 186 patients of 70-84 years composed the basic group, 110 in the control group were of 33-60 years. Clinical, social, psychological indicators in dynamics were compared; results of variety of tool and laboratory researches were estimated. Possibility of high efficiency of medical rehabilitation in elderly and senile age is stated. This efficiency depends on expressiveness of impellent defect, the period of a stroke, somatic diseases and on depressive infringements. Positive shifts in character of bioelectric activity of a brain and also activation of non-vascular link of a cerebral metabolism in comparison with vascular one can serve as prognosis criteria of success of rehabilitation of the elderly.

  2. Evaluation of radioimmunoassay for renal functions in senile patients with cor pulmonale without respiratory failure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fu Benqi; Chen Mingxi; Zhou Gangyi; Zhang Zhengzhong

    1995-01-01

    The results of RIA about serum β 2 -MG and urine β 2 -MG, Alb, IgG in the senile patients with cor pulmonale are reported. The contents of sβ 2 -MG, uβ 2 -MG, uAlb in non-respiratory failure group are higher than that of the control group. The contents of sβ 2 -MG, uβ 2 -MG, uAlb and uIgG in the respiratory failure group are higher than that of the non-respiratory failure group. The results show that the renal glamorous and renal tubules functions are slightly damaged in non-respiratory failure group, while functions of the respiratory failure group become worse

  3. Systemic aspirin and systemic vitamin E in senile cataracts : cataract V

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharma Y

    1989-01-01

    Full Text Available We undertook a prospective study in senile cataract patients using systemic aspirin and systemic vitamin E. Vitamin E treated eyes did show less progression of PSC opacities extent and less new nuclear opacities during the follow-up, but overall vitamin E treated eyes did no better than the control group eyes. More eyes in systemic aspirin treated group maintained the initial vision and loss of vision in the aspirin group was also less marked. Aspirin also caused a significant less mean increase in cortical opacity extent, nuclear/opacity and density and PSC opacity extent and density as well as in ophthalmoscopically graded opacity extent and density. We suggest that aspirin is a potential drug which should be further evaluated in large double blind photodocumentated studies. The present data does not justify the recommendation that aspirin be prescribed for slowing down cataract progression. This must await large studies and confirmation.

  4. Use of placental extract for the treatment of myopic and senile chorio-retinal dystrophies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girotto, G; Malinverni, W

    1982-01-01

    After an examination of the literature, the authors evaluate the activity of placenta extract in 34 subjects suffering from chorio-retinal dystrophy of different types (myopic and senile) and of different degrees of anatomo-functional alteration. The parameters used for this study were visual acuity, the luminous sense, the visual field and the electrophysiological activity of the retina. The aqueous solution was administered by intramuscular route at a daily dose of 3 ml (equivalent to 1,80 g of fresh organ) during 20 days; the parameters were tested before and at the end of the treatment. The results obtained during this study show that the parameters were improved, in different degrees, by the administration of the placenta extract. This is clearly demonstrated by the significant improvement in the luminous sense.

  5. Stereoselective determination of amino acids in beta-amyloid peptides and senile plaques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorsén, G; Bergquist, J; Westlind-Danielsson, A; Josefsson, B

    2001-06-01

    A novel method for the determination of the enantiomeric composition of peptides is presented. In this paper, the focus has been on beta-amyloid peptides from deceased Alzheimer's disease patients. The peptides are hydrolyzed using mineral acid. The free amino acids are derivatized with the chiral reagent (+)- or (-)-1-(9-anthryl)-2-propyl chloroformate and subsequently separated using micellar electrokinetic chromatography (MEKC) and detected using laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) detection. The high separation efficiency of the MEKC-LIF system, yielding approximately 1 million theoretical plates/m for most amino acids, facilitates the simultaneous chiral determination of nine amino acids. The samples that have been analyzed were standard 1-40 beta-amyloid peptides, in vitro precipitated beta-amyloid fibrils, and human senile plaque samples.

  6. Clinical implications of brain atrophy by computed tomography in patients with age-related dementia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imai, Yukimitsu; Honma, Akira; Ashida, Hiroshi; Hasegawa, Kazuo

    1981-01-01

    The purpose of the present study is to clarify the clinical significance of brain atrophy by computed tomography in age-related dementia. Eighty elderly patients with clinical diagnosis of presenile or senile dementia whose mental states were assessed clinically and by several psychometric test were studied by computed tomography. Patients with suspected cerebrovascular disorders and normal pressure hydrocephalus were excluded. Three tomographic sections through anterior and posterior horns and cella media of lateral ventricles and cortex with intracranial space of 60 - 80 cm 2 were evaluated. CSF spaces (%) were measured as an index of brain atrophy. The measurement of CSF spaces (%) was carried out by the computerized planimetric method to avoid visual definition of ventricular borders. In this study, CSF spaces comprised ventricular and subarachnoid spaces. Hasegawa's dementia scale, Bender-Gestalt test and Kohs' block design test were employed for the cognitive assessment of the subjects. In two sections through lateral ventricles, significant correlations were obtained between CSF spaces (%) and scores of Hasegawa's dementia scale and Kohs' block design test. Scores of Bender-Gestalt test did not correlate with CSF spaces (%) in these two sections. In the section through cortex, no correlation were found between CSF spaces (%) and scores of any psychometric test. Also, no positive correlations were obtained between age and CSF spaces (%) in the three sections. (author)

  7. Evaluations of CSF flow dynamics in elderly with dementia by metrizamide CT cisternography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nokura, Kazuya; Kabasawa, Hidehiro; Matsubara, Mitsutaka; Yamamoto, Masahiko; Nagai, Hajime

    1988-01-01

    We have investigated Metrizamide CT-cisternography in multi-infarct dementia (MID): 29 cases, senile dementia of the Alzheimer type (SDAT): 7 cases, normal pressure hydrocephalus (NPH): 8 cases and spinocerebellar degeneration (SCD): 3 cases. By quantitative manner the differences of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) flowdynamics in each group have been evaluated. In comparison with SCD which show normal CSF flow, MID show tendency to ventricular reflux and convexity stasis. No difference was seen between MID and SDAT. Though NPH shows stronger ventricular reflux than that or MID, the stasis in MID is more severe than that of NPH. In MID group subject of older than 70 years show more severe SCF flow disturbances. When divided into two groups by ADL (Activities of daily living) scale (full of 15 points) the group of less than 6 points show slight disturbances in comparison with that of more than 6 points. And the same is true in Hasegawas dementia rating scales, namely the group of less than 21 points (full of 32.5) shows slight disturbances in comparison with that of more than 21 points. The flow dynamics pattern of slight ventricular reflux in 24 hours and stasis in convexity from 24 to 48 hours seems to be typical in either MID or SDAT. But such a pattern has never been reported in SCF flow dynamics studies. These findings may suggest that CSF flow disturbances have a close relation with aging and dementia. (author)

  8. Evaluations of CSF flow dynamics in elderly with dementia by metrizamide CT cisternography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nokura, Kazuya; Kabasawa, Hidehiro; Matsubara, Mitsutaka; Yamamoto, Masahiko; Nagai, Hajime

    1988-06-01

    We have investigated Metrizamide CT-cisternography in multi-infarct dementia (MID): 29 cases, senile dementia of the Alzheimer type (SDAT): 7 cases, normal pressure hydrocephalus (NPH): 8 cases and spinocerebellar degeneration (SCD): 3 cases. By quantitative manner the differences of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) flowdynamics in each group have been evaluated. In comparison with SCD which show normal CSF flow, MID show tendency to ventricular reflux and convexity stasis. No difference was seen between MID and SDAT. Though NPH shows stronger ventricular reflux than that or MID, the stasis in MID is more severe than that of NPH. In MID group subject of older than 70 years show more severe SCF flow disturbances. When divided into two groups by ADL (Activities of daily living) scale (full of 15 points) the group of less than 6 points show slight disturbances in comparison with that of more than 6 points. And the same is true in Hasegawas dementia rating scales, namely the group of less than 21 points (full of 32.5) shows slight disturbances in comparison with that of more than 21 points. The flow dynamics pattern of slight ventricular reflux in 24 hours and stasis in convexity from 24 to 48 hours seems to be typical in either MID or SDAT. But such a pattern has never been reported in SCF flow dynamics studies. These findings may suggest that CSF flow disturbances have a close relation with aging and dementia.

  9. ASSOCIATION BETWEEN REFRACTIVE ERRORS AND SENILE CATARACT IN RURAL AREA OF WESTERN MAHARASHTRA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chaudhari Sagar V, Shelke Sanjay T, BangalSurekha V, Bhandari Akshay J, Kulkarni Ameya A

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To study the association between refractive errors and senile cataract in rural area of western MaharashtraMaterials & Methods: It is a prospective cross sectional study carried out on 420 eyes of 210 patients with senile cataract was included in the study. The age and sex of the patient, grade and the refractive status of the cataract of the eyes were recorded. The grade of the cataract was recorded by the LOCS III (Lens Opacities Classification System, version III. Refractive status was measured subjectively using retinoscope and refractive error for each eye was converted into spherical equivalent units. Results: The age variation in the study was between 60-85 years.The maximum number of patients was in the age group of 60-65 years.The spherical equivalent ranged between -3.0 D to +4.25D.45.95% of the study population had a spherical equivalent between -2 to -1.73.81 % of the study population had a myopic refraction.20% had a hypermetropic refraction. Percentage of patients with a score of nuclear opalescence and colour between 1.0-2.0 was 41.90%, between 2.1-3.0 was 26.67% and above 3.0 was 31.43%.Percentage of patients with a score of cortical cataract between 0.1-1.0 was 69.76% and with a grade between 2.1-3.0 was 26.91 %. Percentage of patients with a score of posterior subcapsular cataract between 0.1-1.0 was 53.57% and with a grade between 2.1-3.0 was 39.05%. Conclusion: The myopic refraction was associated with nuclear, cortical and posterior subcapsular cataract and this refractive error was stastically significant with nuclear, cortical and posterior subcapsular cataract.

  10. Early-Onset Dementia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Konijnenberg, Elles; Fereshtehnejad, Seyed-Mohammad; Kate, Mara Ten

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Early-onset dementia (EOD) is a rare condition, with an often atypical clinical presentation, and it may therefore be challenging to diagnose. Specialized memory clinics vary in the type of patients seen, diagnostic procedures applied, and the pharmacological treatment given. The aim...... of this study was to investigate quality-of-care indicators in subjects with EOD from 3 tertiary memory clinics in 3 European countries. METHODS: We included 1325 newly diagnosed EOD patients, ages 65 years or younger, between January 1, 2007 and December 31, 2013, from the Danish Dementia Registry...... (Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen), the Swedish Dementia Registry ("SveDem", Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm), and the Amsterdam Dementia Cohort (VU University Medical Center). RESULTS: The frequency of EOD among all dementia patients was significantly lower in Copenhagen (410, 20%) and Stockholm (284, 21...

  11. Antidepressants and dementia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kessing, Lars Vedel; Søndergård, Lars; Forman, Julie Lyng

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: It has been suggested that antidepressants may have neuroprotective abilities but it has newer been investigated lately whether treatment with antidepressants reduces the risk of dementia. METHOD: Linkage of registers of all prescribed antidepressants and diagnoses of dementia...... in Denmark during a period from 1995 to 2005. RESULTS: Persons who purchased antidepressants once (N=687,552) had an increased rate of dementia compared to persons unexposed to antidepressants (N=779,831). Nevertheless, the rate of dementia changed over time; thus during the initial prescription periods...... the rate increased with the number of prescriptions but continued long-term antidepressants treatment was associated with a reduction in the rate of dementia, however, not to the same level as the rate for the general population. This pattern was found for all classes of antidepressants (SSRIs, newer non...

  12. Music and dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baird, Amee; Samson, Séverine

    2015-01-01

    There is an increasing incidence of dementia in our aging population, and consequently an urgent need to develop treatments and activities that may alleviate the symptoms of dementia. Accumulating evidence shows that persons with dementia enjoy music, and their ability to respond to music is potentially preserved even in the late or severe stages of dementia when verbal communication may have ceased. Media interest in this topic has contributed to the public perception that music abilities are an "island of preservation" in an otherwise cognitively impaired person with dementia. In this chapter, we review the current literature on music cognition in dementia and show that there has been very scarce rigorous scientific investigation of this issue, and that various types of music memory exist and are differentially impaired in the different types of dementia. Furthermore, we discuss the recent development of music activities as a nonpharmacological treatment for dementia and highlight the methodological limitations of the current literature on this topic. While it has been reported that music activities can improve behavior, (particularly agitation), mood, and cognition in persons with dementia, recent large-scale randomized control studies have questioned the specificity of the effect of music and found that it is no more beneficial than other pleasant activities. Nevertheless, music is unique in its powerful ability to elicit both memories and emotions. This can provide an important link to individual's past and a means of nonverbal communication with carers, which make it an ideal stimulus for persons with dementia. © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Depression, Dementia, and Social Supports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esser, Sally R.; Vitaliano, Peter P.

    1988-01-01

    Reviews recent literature on the relationships among dementia, depression, and social support, emphasizing the diagnostic differentiation of dementia and depression, and the role of these three entities in elderly with cognitive impairment. Discusses dementia-like symptoms arising in depression and the coexistence of dementia and depression.…

  14. The genetics of dementias. Part 1: Molecular basis of frontotemporal dementia and parkinsonism linked to chromosome 17 (FTDP-17

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Kowalska

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Frontotemporal dementia (FTD, characterized by neurodegeneration mainly in the frontal and temporal lobes, accounts for ca. 10–15�0of all dementias. In 1892 the Czech-German neuropsychiatrist Arnold Pick reported the first case of FTD in a 71-year-old patient suffering from progressive dementia, memory disturbances, and aphasia associated with frontal and temporal lobe atrophy and the presence of neuronal inclusions. Later the inclusions were named Pick bodies. The neuropathological hallmark of FTD is very differentiated. In contrast to Alzheimer’s disease (AD, there are neither senile plaques nor neurofibrillary tangles in the brains of FTD patients. Frontotemporal dementias are tauopathies, a group of disorders caused by aberrant metabolism of tau protein, a family of proteins associated with microtubules (MAPT: macrotubule-associated tau protein. In the nervous system the protein stabilizes microtubules in neuronal axons and is thus responsible for crucial processes in neuron metabolism, such as signal transduction, plasticity, and intracellular transport. In the human brain, six isoforms are produced from the MAPT gene (chromosome 17 q21.2 by alternative mRNA splicing. The isoforms differ in the number of amino acids in the protein chain, the presence of three (3R tau type or four (4R tau type domains responsible for binding to microtubules, and one or two inserts containing from 29 to 58 amino acids. The isoforms are modified posttranslationally by hyperphosphorylation, glycation, or oxidation, which can change the protein’s properties and disturb its normal function. Altered metabolism of tau protein changes its interactions with tubulin, leading to destabilization of the microtubule structure and initiating the generation of toxic tau aggregates. The first mutations in the MAPT gene responsible for frontotemporal dementia and parkinsonism linked to chromosome 17 (FTDP-17 were found in 1998. So far over 40 mutations in the MAPT

  15. Clinical significance of periventricular high intensity lesions on magnetic resonance imaging in dementia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaieda, Makoto

    1991-01-01

    In this study, vascular dementia (VD, 31 cases), senile dementia of Alzheimer type (DAT, 36 cases) and mixed type dementia (14 cases) were studied by means of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Diagnosis of dementia was made according to DSM-III and Hachinski's ischemic score. The areas of periventricular high intensity lesions (PVH) and those of brain parenchyma were measured by digitizer which was connected to a computer. The PVH score was obtained by dividing the areas of PVH by those of brain parenchyma at the level of the body of the lateral ventricle. A multiple variable analysis was applied to the PVH scores and risk factors for dementia using Hayashi's quantification method I. The multiple correlation coefficient between the PVH and the risk factors was 0.685. The most significant correlation was found between Hachinski's ischemic score and the PVH score (partial correlation coefficient: 0.58). Significant correlations were also found between ADL and the PVH score (0.25), as well as between the Hasegawa dementia score and the PVH score (0.24). Using the student T test, it was shown that the large PVH group was significantly correlated to poor ADL, whereas the small PVH group was not. The large PVH group in VD showed lower Hasegawa score than the small PVH group. On the other hand, there was no such correlation in DAT. PVH with prolongation of T2 could exist in various pathological states irrespective of their causes. Diffuse PVH tended to be frequently observed in VD together with poor ADL. It was therefore thought that brain ischemia was the main cause of PVH. (author)

  16. Clinical significance of periventricular high intensity lesions on magnetic resonance imaging in dementia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaieda, Makoto [Nippon Medical School, Tokyo (Japan)

    1991-04-01

    In this study, vascular dementia (VD, 31 cases), senile dementia of Alzheimer type (DAT, 36 cases) and mixed type dementia (14 cases) were studied by means of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Diagnosis of dementia was made according to DSM-III and Hachinski's ischemic score. The areas of periventricular high intensity lesions (PVH) and those of brain parenchyma were measured by digitizer which was connected to a computer. The PVH score was obtained by dividing the areas of PVH by those of brain parenchyma at the level of the body of the lateral ventricle. A multiple variable analysis was applied to the PVH scores and risk factors for dementia using Hayashi's quantification method I. The multiple correlation coefficient between the PVH and the risk factors was 0.685. The most significant correlation was found between Hachinski's ischemic score and the PVH score (partial correlation coefficient: 0.58). Significant correlations were also found between ADL and the PVH score (0.25), as well as between the Hasegawa dementia score and the PVH score (0.24). Using the student T test, it was shown that the large PVH group was significantly correlated to poor ADL, whereas the small PVH group was not. The large PVH group in VD showed lower Hasegawa score than the small PVH group. On the other hand, there was no such correlation in DAT. PVH with prolongation of T2 could exist in various pathological states irrespective of their causes. Diffuse PVH tended to be frequently observed in VD together with poor ADL. It was therefore thought that brain ischemia was the main cause of PVH. (author).

  17. Effect of catalpol on senile plaques and spatial learning and memory ability in amyloid-β protein precursor/presenilin 1 double transgenic mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    宋冲

    2013-01-01

    Objective To investigate whether catalpol affects senile plaque formation and spatial learning and memory ability in the amyloid-βprotein precursor/presenilin 1(APP/PS1)double transgenic mice.Methods

  18. Lewy Body Dementia Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... notices changes in at least one area of cognition, such as memory or language. Daytime Sleepiness is ... the field of Lewy body dementias. Memantine Improves Attention and Episodic Memory in Mild to Moderate Lewy ...

  19. Lewy Body Dementia Association

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Now events There are no upcoming events. Lewy Body Digest September 2017 Lewy Digest Caregiving as a ... and research, we support those affected by Lewy body dementias, their families and caregivers. We are dedicated ...

  20. Dementia - home care

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... help improve communication skills and prevent wandering. Calming music may reduce wandering and restlessness, ease anxiety, and ... Budson AE, Solomon PR. Why diagnose and treat memory loss, Alzheimer's disease, and dementia? In: Budson AE, ...

  1. Differential Classification of Dementia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Mohr

    1995-01-01

    Full Text Available In the absence of biological markers, dementia classification remains complex both in terms of characterization as well as early detection of the presence or absence of dementing symptoms, particularly in diseases with possible secondary dementia. An empirical, statistical approach using neuropsychological measures was therefore developed to distinguish demented from non-demented patients and to identify differential patterns of cognitive dysfunction in neurodegenerative disease. Age-scaled neurobehavioral test results (Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale—Revised and Wechsler Memory Scale from Alzheimer's (AD and Huntington's (HD patients, matched for intellectual disability, as well as normal controls were used to derive a classification formula. Stepwise discriminant analysis accurately (99% correct distinguished controls from demented patients, and separated the two patient groups (79% correct. Variables discriminating between HD and AD patient groups consisted of complex psychomotor tasks, visuospatial function, attention and memory. The reliability of the classification formula was demonstrated with a new, independent sample of AD and HD patients which yielded virtually identical results (classification accuracy for dementia: 96%; AD versus HD: 78%. To validate the formula, the discriminant function was applied to Parkinson's (PD patients, 38% of whom were classified as demented. The validity of the classification was demonstrated by significant PD subgroup differences on measures of dementia not included in the discriminant function. Moreover, a majority of demented PD patients (65% were classified as having an HD-like pattern of cognitive deficits, in line with previous reports of the subcortical nature of PD dementia. This approach may thus be useful in classifying presence or absence of dementia and in discriminating between dementia subtypes in cases of secondary or coincidental dementia.

  2. Hypothalamic digoxin and hemispheric chemical dominance--relation to the pathogenesis of senile osteoporosis, degenerative osteoarthritis, and spondylosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurup, Ravi Kumar; Kurup, Parameswara Achutha

    2003-03-01

    The isoprenoid pathway produces three key metabolites: i) digoxin (a membrane sodium-potassium ATPase inhibitor which can regulate intracellular calcium/magnesium ratios), ii) dolichol (which regulates N-glycosylation of proteins), and iii) ubiquinone (a free radical scavenger), all of which are important in bone and joint metabolism. The pathway was assessed in senile osteoporosis, spondylosis, and osteoarthritis. Digoxin could possibly play a role in the genesis of cerebral dominance because it can regulate multiple neurotransmitter systems. The pathway was also assessed in individuals of differing hemispheric dominance for comparison and to find out the role of cerebral dominance in the pathogenesis of these diseases. The plasma/serum-activity of HMG CoA reductase, magnesium, digoxin, dolichol, ubiquinone, and tryptophan/tyrosine catabolic patterns, as well as RBC Na(+)-K+ ATPase activity, were measured in the above mentioned groups. The glycoconjugate metabolism, free radical metabolism, and membrane composition were also studied. The pathway was upregulated with increased digoxin synthesis in patients with spondylosis and osteoarthritis. In this group of patients, the glycoconjugate levels and dolichol levels were increased and lysosomal stability reduced. The ubiquinone levels were low and free radicals increased in spondylosis and osteoarthritis. On the other hand, in senile osteoporosis, the isoprenoid pathway was downregulated and digoxin synthesis reduced. The glycoconjugate and dolichol levels were low and lysosomal stability increased. The ubiquinone levels were increased and free radical production increased in senile osteoporosis. The significance of these changes in the pathogenesis of osteoarthritis, spondylosis, and osteoporosis is discussed. The hyperdigoxinemic state is seen in osteoarthritis and spondylosis and in right hemispheric dominance. The hypodigoxinemic state is seen in left hemispheric dominance and senile osteoporosis. Hemispheric

  3. Effect Of GAMMA Irradiated Thyme As Natural Antioxidant On Hypercholesterolemia Senile Rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Shahat, A.N.; Hamza, R.G.

    2011-01-01

    Hypercholesterolemia, high cholesterol diet and oxidative stress increase serum total cholesterol and LDL-cholesterol levels resulting in increased risk for development of atherosclerosis. Thyme (as antioxidant) has been commonly used in foods mainly for the flavour and preservation and also as herbal medicinal products. Antioxidants play an important role in inhibiting and scavenging free radicals, thus, providing protection to humans against infectious and degenerative diseases. This study was carried out to determine the effect of using thyme as supplement on serum levels of lipids, glucose and lipid peroxidation in hypercholesterolemia senile rats. GC-MS analysis of essential oil showed that the number of identified compounds was 12, especially thymol and carvacrol (natural antioxidants). Senile male rats were fed on hypercholesterolemia diet (HCD) containing cholesterol (1% w/w) and sodium cholate (0.2% w/w). Twenty eight male rats were equally and randomly categorized into four groups. Rats of group (1) fed on balanced commercial diet, group (2) fed on high cholesterol diet for 8 weeks, groups (3) and (4) fed on high cholesterol diet supplemented with either raw or irradiated thyme (1% w/w) for 8 weeks. The results obtained revealed that rats fed on high cholesterol diet significantly showed increase in serum total lipids, TG, TC, LDL-C, VLDL-C as well as ratio risk, associated with remarkable decrease in HDL-C. A significant increase was observed in the level of lipid peroxidation (TBARS) associated with significant decrease in hepatic antioxidant enzymes (glutathion reductase; GSH and catalase; CAT) and total antioxidant capacity. Also, high cholesterol diet induced significant elevation in the level of glucose and liver enzymes (AST, ALT, ALP). The results obtained revealed that feeding rats on HCD containing either raw or irradiated thyme (1% w/w) induced significant improvement in the mentioned parameters. Also, the thyme suppressed lipid peroxidation

  4. Early Dementia Screening

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter K. Panegyres

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available As the population of the world increases, there will be larger numbers of people with dementia and an emerging need for prompt diagnosis and treatment. Early dementia screening is the process by which a patient who might be in the prodromal phases of a dementing illness is determined as having, or not having, the hallmarks of a neurodegenerative condition. The concepts of mild cognitive impairment, or mild neurocognitive disorder, are useful in analyzing the patient in the prodromal phase of a dementing disease; however, the transformation to dementia may be as low as 10% per annum. The search for early dementia requires a comprehensive clinical evaluation, cognitive assessment, determination of functional status, corroborative history and imaging (including MRI, FDG-PET and maybe amyloid PET, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF examination assaying Aβ1–42, T-τ and P-τ might also be helpful. Primary care physicians are fundamental in the screening process and are vital in initiating specialist investigation and treatment. Early dementia screening is especially important in an age where there is a search for disease modifying therapies, where there is mounting evidence that treatment, if given early, might influence the natural history—hence the need for cost-effective screening measures for early dementia.

  5. Phytosterols and Dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shuang, Rong; Rui, Xu; Wenfang, Li

    2016-12-01

    As the aging of the world's population is becoming increasingly serious, dementia-related diseases have become a hot topic in public health research. In recent years, human epidemiological studies have focused on lipid metabolism disorders and dementia. The efficacy of phytosterol intake as a cholesterol-lowering agent has been demonstrated. Phytosterols directly serve as ligands of the nuclear receptors, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs), activating Sirtuin 1 (SIRT-1), which are involved in the regulation of lipid metabolism and the pathogenesis of dementia. Moreover, phytosterols mediate cell and membrane cholesterol efflux or beta amyloid (Aβ) metabolism, which have preventative and therapeutic effects on dementia. Additionally, incorporation of plant sterols in lipid rafts can effectively reduce dietary fat and alter the dietary composition of fiber, fat and cholesterol to regulate appetite and calories. Overall, the objectives of this review are to explore whether phytosterols are a potentially effective target for the prevention of dementia and to discuss a possible molecular mechanism by which phytosterols play a role in the pathogenesis of dementia via the PPARs-SIRT-1 pathway.

  6. Sexuality, aging, and dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benbow, Susan Mary; Beeston, Derek

    2012-07-01

    Sexuality in later life and its relationship to dementia is a neglected topic: greater understanding of the area has the potential to contribute to the quality of life of people with dementia, their family members, and formal carers. We review current knowledge about sexuality, aging, and dementia. We undertook a review of the recent literature to examine of the following areas: what is known about sexuality and aging, and about attitudes to sexuality and aging; what is known about the relevance of sexuality and aging to people living with dementia and their care; and the management of sexual behaviors causing concern to others. Sexual activity decreases in frequency with increasing age but many older people remain sexually active; there is no age limit to sexual responsiveness; and sexuality is becoming more important to successive cohorts of older people, including people living with dementia and gay, lesbian, bisexual, and transgendered elderly people. Attitudes and beliefs toward sexuality and aging are strongly influenced by stereotypes and myths, not only among the general public but also among those working in health and social care. Professional bodies should include sexuality, aging, and dementia in their training curricula. More work is needed on the impact of environmental issues, particularly in group living situations, on older adults' sexuality, and on consent issues. Ethical decision-making frameworks can be useful in practice. Organizations should investigate how to support staff in avoiding a problem-orientated approach and focus on providing holistic person-centered care.

  7. Computertomographic studies of dementia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kohlmeyer, K.

    1983-01-01

    It seems to be very complicated even for the experienced neurologist and psychiatrist to correlate the clinical syndrome of dementia to different causing cerebral processes such as a primarily degenerative brain atrophy, a chronic cerebrovascular insufficiency, or other rarer occurring brain diseases unless neurological signs and symptoms do indicate a focal brain lesion. Since computed tomography is able to show both focal and general changes of the brain tissue each patient presenting with a dementia clinically should be undergone such a neuroradiological investigation at least once, and if being negative even repeatedly. Computed tomography is able not only to detect unexpected treatable brain lesions as a cause of dementia for instance tumors, subdural hematomas, and communicating hydrocephalus to expect in about 6% of cases with the clinical diagnosis of dementia, but also it is able to help to make the differentialdiagnosis of the dementia of Alzheimer's and the multi-infarct-type in a high percentage. Nevertheless despite the use of computed tomography the pathogenesis of dementia even though being undoubtful clinically remains obscure in 15% of our material of 367 demented patients studied by computed tomography but presenting with a normal finding. (orig.) [de

  8. Diabetes and dementia links

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula Jankowska

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction The number of patients suffering from diabetes mellitus is growing globally. It is expected to observe 253.4 million sufferers in geriatric population in 2045. In this time, also 131.5 million of people is going to have dementia and other cognitive problems. In people aged over 65 these two diseases are concomitant quite often. What are the connections in the area of etiology and treatment? Aim The purpose of this study is to present links between dementia and diabetes are depicted in professional literature. Results Diabetes and dementia are associated on many levels. These conditions have common risk factors. Diabetes may contribute to cognitive impairment in many ways, promoting development of atherosclerosis, brain vessel damage and vascular dementia. Alzheimer disease may be promoted by hyperglycemia and hyperinsulinemia. On contrary also hypoglycaemia, often met in elderly diabetic patients has negative impact on cognitive function. Dementia seriously affects treatment of diabetes. The main problems are not satisfying adherence and diabetes self-management. Conclusions Prevention of diabetes and dementia risk factors can be performed simultaneously as the are common for both diseases. Enhancing physical activity, reducing saturated fats consumption, levels of cholesterol and body mass are considered to be beneficial in the context of described conditions. Furthermore, treatment of diabetes is strongly affected by cognitive dysfunction. Management of dementive diabetics requires individualization and using long-acting drugs. It is crucial to reduce risk of life-threatening hypoglycaemias and to create wide team to take care of these patients.

  9. The effects of music intervention on the emotion, haemodynamics and endocrine hormone level of senile patients during the perianesthesia period

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang Feng

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: to explore the effects of music intervention on haemodynamics and endocrine hormone level of senile patients. Methods: choosing ASA II-III level and selecting 60 senile patients performed with intraspinal anesthesia; randomly dividing them into the intervention group and control group with 30 cases in each group. Both the two groups of patients completed the SAS before entering the operating room. When the patients of the intervention group entered the operating room, selected music would be played in a continuous loop immediately till the end of the operation while the doctors of the control group just told the patient to relax without music or other special treatment. Recording and comparing the SAS scores, SBP, HR and salivary cortisol concentration of the two groups before and after intervention. Results: the SAS scores, SBP, HR and salivary cortisol concentration of the intervention group were significantly decreased compared with the value before intervention and the differences within and between the groups were significant (P < 0.05. Conclusion: music intervention can effectively reduce the preoperative anxiety, ease intranperative tension and maintain the stability of hemodynamics, so it is beneficial for senile parents to live through the perianesthesia period.

  10. ALGORITHM OF DIAGNOSTICS AND TREATMENT OF ELDERLY AND SENILE PATIENTS WITH ACUTE CHOLECYSTITIS, CHOLEDOCHOLITHIASIS AND OBSTRUCTIVE JAUNDICE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. D. Dibirov

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We performed a retrospective analysis of treatment in 4,197 patients with acute cholecystitis. Destructive complicated cholecystitis was diagnosed in 658 (25.3% patients . There were 431 (65.5% patients of elderly and senile age. All patients had comorbidities. Cardiovascular insufficiency — 73.9%, respiratory diseases — 29.2%, diabetes — 26%. For urgent indications, 12 (2.8% patients were operated, 2 (16.6% of them died. In 419 (97.2% patients, mini-invasive treatment was performed. Endoscopically, jaundice wasn’t managed in 86 (20.5% cases. In 62 (14.8% cases, percutaneous transhepatic microcholangiography was performed under ultrasound guidance. Laparoscopic cholecystectomy was performed in 183 (43.6 % cases, traditional cholecystectomy was performed in 149 (35.6% cases, and in 38 of them (23.9% it was combined with Kerr’s drainage of choledoch. Mini-invasive cholecystectomy was performed in 87 (20.7% cases. Postoperative complications were revealed in 21 (5.0% patients, in 7 (2.9% of elderly age and 14 (7.9% of senile age. Postoperative mortality rate was 2.0%. The use of minimally invasive interventions in the complex treatment of this group of patients was the main goal and it was reasoned by the severity of the initial condition of elderly and senile patients.

  11. The level of T lymphocyte subpopulation and cytokines in senile patients with stable chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mu Xiaofen; Chen Sujuan; Cai Lili; Dong Ke

    2006-01-01

    To investigate the level of T-lymphocyte subsets(CD3 + , CD4 + , CD8 + )and serum IL-4, IL-8 and TNF-α in senile patients with stable chronic obstructive pulmonary disease(COPD) and provide basis in observing the inflammatory process of COPD, 50 senile patients with stable COPD and 40 senile healthy persons as control group were selected, and levels of IL-4, IL-8 and TNF-α in serum were detected by RIA method, the T-lymphocyte subset (CD3 + , CD4 + , CD8 + )of peripheral blood was measured by flow cytometry. The levels of CD3 + , CD4 + in COPD group were lower than in control group (P + IL-8 were also slightly higher in COPD group compared with that in control group, but the difference between them is not significant. CD3 + , CD4 + were lower and IL-4, TNF-α were higher in COPD group than those in control group, which means that abnormal cellular immunity function and inflammatory process still existed in the stable period of COPD. (authors)

  12. Differential Features of Cerebral Perfusion in Dementia with Lewy Bodies Compared to Alzheimer's Dementia using SPM Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Do Young; Park, Kyung Won; Kim, Jae Woo

    2003-01-01

    Alzheimer's dementia (AD) and dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB) are most common cause of dementia in elderly people. Clinical distinction in some cases of DLB from AD may be difficult as symptom profiles overlap. Some neuropathologic overlap is also seen as beta-amyloidosis and senile plaques can be found in both disease. Both disease also share severe acetylcholine depletion. We evaluated the differences of brain perfusion between DLB and AD using statistical parametric mapping analysis. Twelve DLB (mean age ; 68.8±8.3 years, K-MMSE ; 17.3±6.1) and 51 AD patients (mean age ; 71.4±7.2 years, K-MMSE ; 16.7±4.5), which were matched for age and severity of dementia, participated in this study. Tc-99m HMPAO SPECT was performed for measuring regional cerebral blood flow. Statistical parametric mapping (SPM99) software was used for automatic and objective approach to analyze SPECT image data. The SPECT data of the patients with DLB were compared to patients with AD. Comparison of the two dementia groups (uncorrected p<0.01) revealed significant hypoperfusion in both occipital (both middle occipital gyrus, Rt B no. 18 and Lt cuneus), both parietal (Lt parietal precuneus, Lt B no. 39, Lt inferior parietal lobule and Rt supramarginal gyrus) lobes in DLB compared with AD. Significant hyperperfusion was noted in Rt frontal (sup. frontal gyrus, B no.10, middle frontal gyrus, B no. 9, B no. 11, inf. frontal gyrus), Rt putamen, Lt ant. cingulate gyrus (B no. 24), both cerebellar post. lobe (Lt tuber, Lt declive, Lt tonsil, Rt declive) in DLB compared with AD. We found a significant differences in the cerebral perfusion pattern between DLB and AD. Differential feature of cerebral perfusion in DLB was both occipital hypoperfusion and preserved Rt frontal perfusion compared to AD. Therefore in difficult case of clinical an neuro pathologic diagnosis, brain perfusion SPECT with SPM analysis may be helpful to differentiate DLB from AD

  13. Pharmacotherapy of dementia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ajit Avasthi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This review aims to evaluate the existing evidence for pharmacotherapy for management of dementia. Data search strategies included electronic databases of relevant publications or cross-references. The searches were limited to acetyl cholinesterase inhibitors (AChEIs, memantine, antipsychotics, antidepressants, mood stabilizers, and benzodiazepines. Data in the form of meta-analysis and systemic reviews for treatment in five main types of dementia (Alzheimer′s, frontotemporal, Parkinson′s, Lewy body disease, and vascular type were extracted. If a meta-analysis or systemic review was not available, then the searches included evaluation of data in the form of double-blind, randomized controlled trials or open-label studies. Various studies suggest that compared to placebo, AChEIs and memantine are associated with better outcome in all domains of Alzheimer′s disease. In addition, combination therapy of AChEIs and memantine is superior to monotherapy with AChEIs in terms of behavioral disturbances, activities of daily living, and global assessment. In patients with dementia associated with Parkinson′s disease or Lewy body dementia, use of donepezil, rivastigmine, and memantine is associated with significant efficacy on the global outcome measures when compared with placebo. Compared to placebo, AChEIs, but not memantine, have also been shown to have better cognitive outcomes in patients with dementia associated with Parkinson′s disease or Lewy body dementia. Data are limited for the role of pharmacotherapy in management of frontotemporal dementia. In patients of vascular dementia, all AChEIs and memantine show some beneficial effects on cognition. Antidepressants and antipsychotics have been shown to be beneficial in management of behavioral symptoms and agitation. However, it is important to remember that there is black box warning for use of antipsychotics among patients with dementia. One of the major limitations of the research is

  14. Investigations on inorganic elements in human lenses of normal and senile cataractous character

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oerdoegh, M.; Racz, P.

    1977-01-01

    Some essential trace elements as copper, zinc, iron, cobalt, scandium and rubidium have been measured by neutron activation analysis in normal and different types of senile cataractous lenses. Normal lenses were obtained from eyes enucleated because of tumours of the posterior pole and removed from cadaver eyes in 4 hrs after death. The cataractous lenses with intact capsule were removed by cryoextraction and immediately analysed. The single lenses were dried at 100 deg C to constant weight and always weighed before (wet weight) and after drying (dry weight). Unfortunately, because of the nuclear properties of the analysed elements not all of them could be determined in a single lense, thus three lenses were needed for the determination of eight elements. For the determination of manganese a single lens was irradiated for 6 min, then destroyed in a mixture of conc. sulphuric acid and conc. nitric acid. This was followed by a two-step chemical separation. For the analysis of copper the samples were irradiated for 1 hr, then destroyed as above and the copper was separated in the form of copper-thiocyanate. The long-lived isotopes were measured after 115 hrs irradiation and a cooling for 10 days without destruction of the sample. Tabulated data are given and the results are compared with literature data. (T.G.)

  15. Mouse senile amyloid fibrils deposited in skeletal muscle exhibit amyloidosis-enhancing activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinze Qian

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Amyloidosis describes a group of protein folding diseases in which amyloid proteins are abnormally deposited in organs and/or tissues as fine fibrils. Mouse senile amyloidosis is a disorder in which apolipoprotein A-II (apoA-II deposits as amyloid fibrils (AApoAII and can be transmitted from one animal to another both by the feces and milk excreted by mice with amyloidosis. Thus, mouse AApoAII amyloidosis has been demonstrated to be a "transmissible disease". In this study, to further characterize the transmissibility of amyloidosis, AApoAII amyloid fibrils were injected into transgenic Apoa2(cTg(+/- and normal R1.P1-Apoa2(c mice to induce AApoAII systemic amyloidosis. Two months later, AApoAII amyloid deposits were found in the skeletal muscles of amyloid-affected mice, primarily in the blood vessels and in the interstitial tissues surrounding muscle fibers. When amyloid fibrils extracted from the skeletal muscles were subjected to Western blot analysis, apoA-II was detected. Amyloid fibril fractions isolated from the muscles not only demonstrated the structure of amyloid fibrils but could also induce amyloidosis in young mice depending on its fibril conformation. These findings present a possible pathogenesis of amyloidosis: transmission of amyloid fibril conformation through muscle, and shed new light on the etiology involved in amyloid disorders.

  16. Progressive senile scoliosis: Seven cases of increasing spinal curves in elderly patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gillespy, T. III; Gillespy, T. Jr.; Revak, C.S.

    1985-04-01

    An increasing scoliosis was documented in seven elderly women. The average curve at the most recent examination was 43/sup 0/ (range 26/sup 0/-78/sup 0/). Previous films, from 5 to 26 years before, demonstrated an average increase of 2.3/sup 0//year (range 1/sup 0/-4.8/sup 0//year). There were three lumbar and four thoracolumbar curves. Three curves were to the right and four were to the left. Only one patient had osteoporotic vertebral body crush fractures. The common underlying mechanism in the progression of senile scoliosis appears to be asymmetric loading of the spine which can be caused by a previously established scoliosis, spondylolysis/spondylolisthesis, lumbosacral anomalies, or leg length discrepancy. Subsequently, factors that can cause a curve to increase include degenerative disc disease with lateral disc space narrowing, soft tissue failure, and osteoporosis. Since even minor scoliosis can potentially progress in the older adult, increased monitoring of scoliosis in patients over age 50 years may be warranted.

  17. Progressive senile scoliosis: Seven cases of increasing spinal curves in elderly patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gillespy, T. III; Revak, C.S.

    1985-01-01

    An increasing scoliosis was documented in seven elderly women. The average curve at the most recent examination was 43 0 (range 26 0 -78 0 ). Previous films, from 5 to 26 years before, demonstrated an average increase of 2.3 0 /year (range 1 0 -4.8 0 /year). There were three lumbar and four thoracolumbar curves. Three curves were to the right and four were to the left. Only one patient had osteoporotic vertebral body crush fractures. The common underlying mechanism in the progression of senile scoliosis appears to be asymmetric loading of the spine which can be caused by a previously established scoliosis, spondylolysis/spondylolisthesis, lumbosacral anomalies, or leg length discrepancy. Subsequently, factors that can cause a curve to increase include degenerative disc disease with lateral disc space narrowing, soft tissue failure, and osteoporosis. Since even minor scoliosis can potentially progress in the older adult, increased monitoring of scoliosis in patients over age 50 years may be warranted. (orig.)

  18. Spectral analysis and comparison of mineral deposits forming in opacified intraocular lens and senile cataractous lens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Shan-Yang; Chen, Ko-Hwa; Lin, Chih-Cheng; Cheng, Wen-Ting; Li, Mei-Jane

    2010-10-01

    This preliminary report was attempted to compare the chemical components of mineral deposits on the surfaces of an opacified intraocular lens (IOL) and a calcified senile cataractous lens (SCL) by vibrational spectral diagnosis. An opacified intraocular lens (IOL) was obtained from a 65-year-old male patient who had a significant decrease in visual acuity 2-years after an ocular IOL implantation. Another SCL with grayish white calcified plaque on the subcapsular cortex was isolated from a 79-year-old male patient with complicated cataract after cataract surgery. Optical light microscope was used to observe both samples and gross pictures were taken. Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) and Raman microspectroscopic techniques were employed to analyze the calcified deposits. The curve-fitting algorithm using the Gaussian function was also used to quantitatively estimate the chemical components in each deposit. The preliminary results of spectral diagnosis indicate that the opacified IOL mainly consisted of the poorly crystalline, immature non-stoichiometric hydroxyapatite (HA) with higher content of type B carbonated apatites. However, the calcified plaque deposited on the SCL was comprised of a mature crystalline stoichiometric HA having higher contents of type A and type B carbonate apatites. More case studies should be examined in future.

  19. Symptoms of Lewy Body Dementia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the fight against LBD! Donate Symptoms Lewy body dementia (LBD) has variable presentations that include cognitive difficulties ... wake cycle alterations. Cognitive impairment in Lewy body dementia (LBD) is often misdiagnosed as Alzheimer’s disease (AD). ...

  20. Dementia - behavior and sleep problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000029.htm Dementia - behavior and sleep problems To use the sharing ... on this page, please enable JavaScript. People with dementia , often have certain problems when it gets dark ...

  1. Influence of dementia on pain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scherder, E

    2006-01-01

    In the next decades the number of older persons with dementia and with a painful condition will increase. This is an important conclusion since at this moment older persons with dementia and a painful condition receive less analgesic medication than older persons without dementia. One explanation

  2. Diagnostic criteria for vascular dementia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scheltens, P.; Hijdra, A. H.

    1998-01-01

    The term vascular dementia implies the presence of a clinical syndrome (dementia) caused by, or at least assumed to be caused by, a specific disorder (cerebrovascular disease). In this review, the various sets of criteria used to define vascular dementia are outlined. The various sets of criteria

  3. Language and Dementia: Neuropsychological Aspects

    OpenAIRE

    Kempler, Daniel; Goral, Mira

    2008-01-01

    This article reviews recent evidence for the relationship between extralinguistic cognitive and language abilities in dementia. A survey of data from investigations of three dementia syndromes (Alzheimer's disease, semantic dementia and progressive nonfluent aphasia) reveals that, more often than not, deterioration of conceptual organization appears associated with lexical impairments, whereas impairments in executive function are associated with sentence- and discourse-level deficits. These ...

  4. In-vivo measurements of regional acetylcholine esterase activity in degenerative dementia: comparison with blood flow and glucose metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herholz, K; Bauer, B; Wienhard, K; Kracht, L; Mielke, R; Lenz, M O; Strotmann, T; Heiss, W D

    2000-01-01

    Memory and attention are cognitive functions that depend heavily on the cholinergic system. Local activity of acetylcholine esterase (AChE) is an indicator of its integrity. Using a recently developed tracer for positron emission tomography (PET), C-11-labeled N-methyl-4-piperidyl-acetate (C11-MP4A), we measured regional AChE activity in 4 non-demented subjects, 4 patients with dementia of Alzheimer type (DAT) and 1 patient with senile dementia of Lewy body type (SDLT), and compared the findings with measurements of blood flow (CBF) and glucose metabolism (CMRGlc). Initial tracer extraction was closely related to CBF. AChE activity was reduced significantly in all brain regions in demented subjects, whereas reduction of CMRGlc and CBF was more limited to temporo-parietal association areas. AChE activity in SDLT was in the lower range of values in DAT. Our results indicate that, compared to non-demented controls, there is a global reduction of cortical AChE activity in dementia. Dementia, cholinergic system, acetylcholine esterase, positron emission tomography, cerebral blood flow, cerebral glucose metabolism.

  5. Dementia in affective disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kessing, L V; Olsen, E W; Mortensen, P B

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of the study was to investigate whether patients with affective disorder have increased risk of developing dementia compared to other groups of psychiatric patients and compared to the general population. METHOD: In the Danish psychiatric central register, 3363 patients...... with unipolar affective disorder, 518 patients with bipolar affective disorder, 1025 schizophrenic and 8946 neurotic patients were identified according to the diagnosis at the first ever discharge from psychiatric hospital during the period from 1970 to 1974. The rate of discharge diagnosis of dementia...... on readmission was estimated during 21 years of follow-up. In addition, the rates were compared with the rates for admission to psychiatric hospitals with a discharge diagnosis of dementia for the total Danish population. RESULTS: Patients with unipolar and with bipolar affective disorder had a greater risk...

  6. [Artistic creativity and dementia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sellal, François; Musacchio, Mariano

    2008-03-01

    Artistic creativity can be defined as the ability to produce both innovative and esthetic works. Though most dementias result in a loss of instrumental functions and a deterioration in artistic production, for some established artists, dementia, most often Alzheimer's disease, changed their style and technique but preserved their creativity and prolific artistic drive. Moreover, in some cases, mainly frontotemporal dementia, Parkinson's disease, and very occasionally strokes, the disease may favour the emergence of de novo artistic talent. This phenomenon has been conceptualized as a paradoxical facilitation, a disinhibition of brain areas devoted to visuospatial processing, greater freedom in a patient who becomes less bound by social conventions, enhancement of motivation and pleasure, etc. These neurological cases provide an opportunity to shed some light on the roots of artistic creation.

  7. Dementia-specific risks of scabies: Retrospective epidemiologic analysis of an unveiled nosocomial outbreak in Japan from 1989–90

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nishiura Hiroshi

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although senile dementia patients in long-term care facilities are at leading risk of scabies, the epidemiologic characteristics of this disease have yet to be fully clarified. This study documents the findings of a ward-scale nosocomial outbreak in western Japan from 1989–90, for which permission to publish was only recently obtained. Methods A retrospective epidemiologic study was performed to identify specific risk factors of scabies among patients with dementia. Analyses were based on a review of medical and nursing records. All inpatients in the affected ward at the time of the outbreak were included in the study. Observational and analytical approaches were employed to assess the findings. Results Twenty of 65 inpatients in the ward met the case definition of scabies. The outbreak lasted for almost 10 months and as a result, the spatial distribution of infections showed no localized patterns in the latter phase of the outbreak. The duration of illness significantly decreased after initiation of control measures (P = 0.0067. Movement without assistance (Odds Ratio [OR] = 11.3; 95% Confidence Interval [CI]: 2.9, 44.8 and moving beyond the room (but within the ward (OR = 4.1; 95% CI: 1.4, 12.5 were significantly associated with infection, while types of room (Western or Japanese and sleeping arrangement (on beds or futons laid directly on the floor appeared not to be risk factors. Conclusion Univariate analysis demonstrated the importance of patients' behaviours during daily activities in controlling scabies among senile dementia patients. The findings also support previous evidence that catching scabies from fomites is far less common. Moreover, since cognitive disorders make it difficult for individuals to communicate and understand the implications of risky contacts as well as treatment method, and given the non-specific nature of individual contacts that are often unpredictable, real-time observations might help

  8. Parkinson Disease and Dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Ptacek, Sara; Kramberger, Milica G

    2016-09-01

    Dementia is a frequent complication of Parkinson disease (PD) with a yearly incidence of around 10% of patients with PD. Lewy body pathology is the most important factor in the development of Parkinson disease dementia (PDD) and there is evidence for a synergistic effect with β-amyloid. The clinical phenotype in PDD extends beyond the dysexecutive syndrome that is often present in early PD and encompasses deficits in recognition memory, attention, and visual perception. Sleep disturbances, hallucinations, neuroleptic sensitivity, and fluctuations are often present. This review provides an update on current knowledge of PDD including aspects of epidemiology, pathology, clinical presentation, management, and prognosis. © The Author(s) 2016.

  9. [Preventive strategies for dementia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Patrick; Schmicker, Marlen; Müller, Notger G

    2017-05-01

    In the context of the demographically induced increase in the prevalence of dementia and the simultaneous lack of causal pharmacological therapies, preventive approaches are gaining in importance. By reducing risk factors and with measures which induce neuroplasticity successful aging can be supported. This article summarizes the current developments in preventing dementia by modification of life style factors. The main focus lies on the impact of cognitive and physical activity on neuroprotection. A promising approach combines both activities within a dance training program. Further studies that meet the demanding criteria of a randomized clinical trial are urgently needed.

  10. Memantine for dementia?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-10-01

    Memantine (Ebixa--Lundbeck Ltd), an oral medicine, is available in the UK for treating "patients with moderately severe to severe Alzheimer's disease". It differs from other licensed dementia medicines in that it is an N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonist. The company has claimed that, with memantine therapy, "improvements in activities of daily living help patients to maintain a degree of independence and be easier to care for, potentially avoiding the need for nursing home care". We assess the efficacy of memantine for dementia and discuss its place in the management of patients with Alzheimer's disease.

  11. Montessori-based dementia care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cline, Janet

    2006-10-01

    Montessori-based Dementia Care is an approach used in Alzheimer's care that does not involve chemical or physical restraints. This program works by giving the elder with Alzheimer/Dementia a purpose by getting them involved. When staff/families care for a confused Alzheimer/Dementia patient, who is having behaviors, the Montessori program teaches them to look at what is causing the behavior. When assessing the elder to determine what is causing the behavior, the goal is to find the answer, but the answer cannot be dementia. The goal of the program is to bring meaning to the life of an Alzheimer/Dementia elder.

  12. Apendicitis aguda en el paciente senil: Factores asociados a una mayor morbimortalidad post operatoria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Víctor Eduardo Chian Chang

    1996-04-01

    Full Text Available Objetivo: Definir los factores asociados a una mayor morbilidad y mortalidad en pacientes seniles con apendicitis aguda. Material y métodos: Se realizó un estudio retrospectivo con 100 pacientes intervenidos en el Hospital Nacional Arzobispo Loayza, durante el período comprendido entre 1984 a 1994. Resultados: Se asociaron a una mayor frecuencia de complicaciones postoperatorias: edad mayor o igual a 70 años, tiempo de enfermedad mayor de 48 horas, presencia de apendicitis perforada con peritonitis localizada o generalizada (p<0.05. Además la presencia de apendicitis perforada se asoció significativamente a la presencia de absceso residual y/o fístula estercorácea (p=0.027 y la presencia de AA gangrenosa o perforada a mayor frecuencia de infección de herida operatoria (p<0.05. El antecedente de patología cardiovascular previa se asoció a mayor frecuencia de complicaciones cardiovasculares (p<0.05. Se asociaron a mayor mortalidad en AA, pacientes con intervención quirúrgica adicional a la apendicetomía (p=0.016 y presencia de AA perforada (p=0.027. Conclusiones: Los estadios avanzados de AA, así como la presencia de problema cardiovascular al momento del diagnóstico se asociaron con una mayor frecuencia de complicaciones post-operatorias. La presencia de peritonitis se asocia con la mortalidad. (Rev Med Hered 1996; 7: 62-67.

  13. Characterization of Proteins Present in Isolated Senile Plaques from Alzheimer's Diseased Brains by MALDI-TOF MS with MS/MS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelley, Andrea R; Perry, George; Bach, Stephan B H

    2018-04-18

    The increase of insoluble senile plaques in the brain is a primary hallmark of Alzheimer's disease. The usefulness of matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) with tandem MS for the characterization of senile plaques from AD brains and the relevance of the components identified to furthering AD research using MS is discussed. Thirty-three components were reproducibly observed within tryptic aliquots of senile plaques from two different AD brains after sample preparation optimization. Additionally, this is one of the first accounts of LIFT being utilized for the direct sequencing of peptides from isolated senile plaques. While many of the species observed coisolated within senile plaques have been linked to AD etiology, if only speculatively, this is the first instance that many of them have been demonstrated to be a part of the plaques themselves. This work is the first step in determining the potential roles that the species may have in the aggregation or proliferation of the plaques.

  14. Aromatherapy for dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forrester, Lene Thorgrimsen; Maayan, Nicola; Orrell, Martin; Spector, Aimee E; Buchan, Louise D; Soares-Weiser, Karla

    2014-02-25

    Complementary therapy has received great interest within the field of dementia treatment and the use of aromatherapy and essential oils is increasing. In a growing population where the majority of patients are treated by US Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved drugs, the efficacy of treatment is short term and accompanied by negative side effects. Utilisation of complimentary therapies in dementia care settings presents as one of few options that are attractive to practitioners and families as patients often have reduced insight and ability to verbally communicate adverse reactions. Amongst the most distressing features of dementia are the behavioural and psychological symptoms. Addressing this facet has received particular interest in aromatherapy trials, with a shift in focus from reducing cognitive dysfunction to the reduction of behavioural and psychological symptoms in dementia. To assess the efficacy of aromatherapy as an intervention for people with dementia. ALOIS, the Cochrane Dementia and Cognitive Improvement Group Specialized Register, was searched on 26 November 2012 and 20 January 2013 using the terms: aromatherapy, lemon, lavender, rose, aroma, alternative therapies, complementary therapies, essential oils. All relevant randomised controlled trials were considered. A minimum length of a trial and requirements for follow-up were not included, and participants in included studies had a diagnosis of dementia of any type and severity. The review considered all trials using fragrance from plants defined as aromatherapy as an intervention with people with dementia and all relevant outcomes were considered. Titles and abstracts extracted by the searches were screened for their eligibility for potential inclusion in the review. For Burns 2011, continuous outcomes were estimated as the mean difference between groups and its 95% confidence interval using a fixed-effect model. For Ballard 2002, analysis of co-variance was used for all outcomes, with the

  15. Late onset myoclonic epilepsy in Down syndrome and dementia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annapia Verri

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Specific forms of epilepsy may be found at various ages in Down Syndrome (DS and a sharp increase in the incidence of epilepsy with age has been documented. A specific type of myoclonic epilepsy associated with cognitive decline has been reported as “senile myoclonic epilepsy” or “late onset myoclonic epilepsy in DS” (LOMEDS. We report a new case of LOMEDS, documented by clinical and neurophysiological evaluation and psychometric assessment (DSDS and DMR. MF, male, affected by DS, was referred in 2004 at 40 years of age; he had no personal or familial history of epilepsy. Since one year, the patient presented cognitive deterioration, characterized by regression of language abilities, loss of memory, and loss of sphincters control. A brain TC showed mild brainstem and sub-cortical atrophy. In 2006, myoclonic jerks involving upper limbs occurred mainly after awakening. EEG showed a low voltage 8 Hz background activity with diffuse slow activity, intermingled with spikes or polyspikes, persisting during NREM sleep. MF was initially treated with clonazepam and after with topiramate, resulting in partial seizures control. MRI (2008 demonstrated diffuse brain atrophy, associated with marked ventricular enlargement. At the psychometric evaluation, onset of dementia was evident late in 2004, with transition to the middle stage in 2006. Last assessment (2009 showed the clinical signs of a late stage of deterioration, with loss of verbal abilities and autonomous ambulation. Using levetiracetam till 2,000 mg/die, myoclonic jerks decreased but are still present every day after awakening. On the EEG slow and poorly organized background activity with bilateral polyspike-wave discharges was recorded. Therefore, we documented a parallel progression of dementia and myoclonic epilepsy in a DS subject.

  16. A study of cerebral circulation in elderly patients with dementia using sup 123 I-IMP SPECT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arai, Hisayuki [Tokyo Medical Coll. (Japan)

    1991-03-01

    In order to elucidate the pathogenesis of senile dementia of Alzheimer type (SDAT) and multi-infarct dementia (MID), 18 age-matched controls, 22 SDAT cases, 10 MID cases, and 15 multiple infarction without dementia (MI) cases, totaling 65 cases, were enrolled into a study of cerebral blood flow using single photon emission CT (SPECT) with N-isopropyl-p-({sup 123}I)iodoamphetamine (IMP). The diagnosis of dementia was made based on the clinical history, findings of brain CT, MRI, and Hachinski's ischemic score. Lateral asymmetric perfusion was evaluated by using the asymmetry index (AI). Quantitative cerebral blood flow was analyzed by using the venous blood sampling method with IMP SPECT. Cerebral infarction, ischemic changes, and brain atrophy were diagnosed by CT and MRI. mCBF values were significantly lower in SDAT and MID than in those of controls, while rCBF values were lowest at the frontal lobes in MID and at the parietal lobes in SDAT. Hasegawa's dementia score was correlated with the rCBF at the frontal lobes in MID. In MID, there was a greater number of infarction, and atrophic changes were significantly remarkable, while the rCBF values were significantly lower at the frontal lobes compared to the MI group. Multi-variate analysis suggested that among the factors contributing to MID, brain atrophy was most relevant to dementia. In SDAT, rCBF values showed the most lateral asymmetry at the parietal lobes, the least, at the occipital lobes. The lateral asymmetry of the cerebral blood flow at the parietal lobes showed an association with clinical symptoms. There was a negative coefficiency between the cerebellum and the cerebral hemisphere in the evaluation of lateral asymmetry. These results suggest that rCBF estimation by IMP SPECT is useful in the differential diagnosis between MID and SDAT, and may also contribute to the classification of these two diseases. (author).

  17. Neuroimaging in dementia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barkhof, Frederik [VU Univ. Medical Center, Amsterdam (NL). Dept. of Radiology and Image Analysis Center (IAC); Fox, Nick C. [UCL Institute of Neurology, London (United Kingdom). Dementia Research Centre; VU Univ. Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Bastos-Leite, Antonio J. [Porto Univ. (Portugal). Dept. of Medical Imaging; Scheltens, Philip [VU Univ. Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands). Dept. of Neurology and Alzheimer Center

    2011-07-01

    Against a background of an ever-increasing number of patients, new management options, and novel imaging modalities, neuroimaging is playing an increasingly important role in the diagnosis of dementia. This up-to-date, superbly illustrated book aims to provide a practical guide to the effective use of neuroimaging in the patient with cognitive decline. It sets out the key clinical and imaging features of the wide range of causes of dementia and directs the reader from clinical presentation to neuroimaging and on to an accurate diagnosis whenever possible. After an introductory chapter on the clinical background, the available ''toolbox'' of structural and functional neuroimaging techniques is reviewed in detail, including CT, MRI and advanced MR techniques, SPECT and PET, and image analysis methods. The imaging findings in normal ageing are then discussed, followed by a series of chapters that carefully present and analyze the key imaging findings in patients with dementias. A structured path of analysis follows the main presenting feature: disorders associated with primary gray matter loss, with white matter changes, with brain swelling, etc. Throughout, a practical approach is adopted, geared specifically to the needs of clinicians (neurologists, radiologists, psychiatrists, geriatricians) working in the field of dementia, for whom this book should prove an invaluable resource. (orig.)

  18. Radiologic diagnostics of dementia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Essig, M.; Schoenberg, S.O.

    2003-01-01

    Dementia is one of the most common diseases in the elderly population and is getting more and more important with the ageing of the population. A radiologic structural examination with CT or MRI is meanwhile a standard procedure in the diagnostic work up of patients with dementia syndrome. Radiology enables an early diagnosis and a differential diagnosis between different causes of dementia. Because structural changes occur only late in the disease process, a more detailed structural analysis using volumetric techniques or the use of functional imaging techniques is mandatory. These days, structural imaging uses MRI which enables to detect early atrophic changes at the medial temporal lobe with focus on the amygdala hippocampal complex. These changes are also present in the normal ageing process. In patients with Alzheimer's disease, however, they are more rapid and more pronounced. The use of functional imaging methods such as perfusion MRI, diffusion MRI or fMRI allow new insights into the pathophysiologic changes of dementia. The article gives an overview of the current status of structural imaging and an outlook into the potential of functional imaging methods. Detailed results of structural and functional imaging are presented in other articles of this issue. (orig.) [de

  19. Dementia and driving.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Neill, D; Neubauer, K; Boyle, M; Gerrard, J; Surmon, D; Wilcock, G K

    1992-04-01

    Many European countries test cars, but not their drivers, as they age. There is evidence to suggest that human factors are more important than vehicular factors as causes of motor crashes. The elderly also are involved in more accidents per distance travelled than middle-aged drivers. As the UK relies on self-certification of health by drivers over the age of 70 years, we examined the driving practices of patients with dementia attending a Memory Clinic. Nearly one-fifth of 329 patients with documented dementia continued to drive after the onset of dementia, and impaired driving ability was noted in two-thirds of these. Their families experienced great difficulty in persuading patients to stop driving, and had to invoke outside help in many cases. Neuropsychological tests did not help to identify those who drove badly while activity of daily living scores were related to driving ability. These findings suggest that many patients with dementia drive in an unsafe fashion after the onset of the illness. The present system of self-certification of health by the elderly for driver-licensing purposes needs to be reassessed.

  20. PET studies in dementia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herholz, K.

    2003-01-01

    Measurement of local cerebral glucose metabolism (lCMRGlc) by positron emission tomography (PET) and 18 F-2-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG) has become a standard technique during the past 20 years and is now available at many university hospitals in all highly developed countries. Many studies have documented a close relation between lCMRGlc and localized cognitive functions, such as language and visuoconstructive abilities. Alzheimer's disease (AD) is characterized by regional impairment of cerebral glucose metabolism in neocortical association areas (posterior cingulate, temporoparietal and frontal multimodal association cortex), whereas primary visual and sensorimotor cortex, basal ganglia, and cerebellum are relatively well preserved. In a multicenter study comprising 10 PET centers (Network for Efficiency and Standardization of Dementia Diagnosis, NEST-DD) that employed an automated voxel-based analysis of FDG PET images, the distinction between controls and AD patients was 93% sensitive and 93% specific, and even in very mild dementia (at Mini Mental Status Examination (MMSE) 24 or higher) sensitivity was still 84% at 93% specificity. Significantly abnormal metabolism in mild cognitive deficit (MCI) indicates a high risk to develop dementia within the next two years. Reduced neocortical glucose metabolism can probably be detected with FDG PET in AD on average one year before onset of subjective cognitive impairment. In addition to glucose metabolism, specific tracers for dopamine synthesis ( 18 F-F-DOPA) and for ( 11 C-MP4A) are of interest for differentiation among dementia subtypes. Cortical acetylcholine esterase activity (AChE) activity is significantly lower in patients with AD or with dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB) than in age-matched normal controls. In LBD there is also impairment of dopamine synthesis, similar to Parkinson disease. (author) 115 refs

  1. Music perception in dementia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholas, Jennifer M; Cohen, Miriam H; Slattery, Catherine F; Paterson, Ross W; Foulkes, Alexander J M; Schott, Jonathan M; Mummery, Catherine J; Crutch, Sebastian J; Warren, Jason D

    2017-01-01

    Despite much recent interest in music and dementia, music perception has not been widely studied across dementia syndromes using an information processing approach. Here we addressed this issue in a cohort of 30 patients representing major dementia syndromes of typical Alzheimer’s disease (AD, n=16), logopenic aphasia (LPA, an Alzheimer variant syndrome; n=5) and progressive nonfluent aphasia (PNFA; n=9) in relation to 19 healthy age-matched individuals. We designed a novel neuropsychological battery to assess perception of musical patterns in the dimensions of pitch and temporal information (requiring detection of notes that deviated from the established pattern based on local or global sequence features) and musical scene analysis (requiring detection of a familiar tune within polyphonic harmony). Performance on these tests was referenced to generic auditory (timbral) deviance detection and recognition of familiar tunes and adjusted for general auditory working memory performance. Relative to healthy controls, patients with AD and LPA had group-level deficits of global pitch (melody contour) processing while patients with PNFA as a group had deficits of local (interval) as well as global pitch processing. There was substantial individual variation within syndromic groups. No specific deficits of musical temporal processing, timbre processing, musical scene analysis or tune recognition were identified. The findings suggest that particular aspects of music perception such as pitch pattern analysis may open a window on the processing of information streams in major dementia syndromes. The potential selectivity of musical deficits for particular dementia syndromes and particular dimensions of processing warrants further systematic investigation. PMID:27802226

  2. PET studies in dementia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herholz, K. [Neurologische Universitaetsklinik and Max-Planck-Inst. fuer neurologische Forschung, Koeln (Germany)

    2003-04-01

    Measurement of local cerebral glucose metabolism (lCMRGlc) by positron emission tomography (PET) and {sup 18}F-2-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG) has become a standard technique during the past 20 years and is now available at many university hospitals in all highly developed countries. Many studies have documented a close relation between lCMRGlc and localized cognitive functions, such as language and visuoconstructive abilities. Alzheimer's disease (AD) is characterized by regional impairment of cerebral glucose metabolism in neocortical association areas (posterior cingulate, temporoparietal and frontal multimodal association cortex), whereas primary visual and sensorimotor cortex, basal ganglia, and cerebellum are relatively well preserved. In a multicenter study comprising 10 PET centers (Network for Efficiency and Standardization of Dementia Diagnosis, NEST-DD) that employed an automated voxel-based analysis of FDG PET images, the distinction between controls and AD patients was 93% sensitive and 93% specific, and even in very mild dementia (at Mini Mental Status Examination (MMSE) 24 or higher) sensitivity was still 84% at 93% specificity. Significantly abnormal metabolism in mild cognitive deficit (MCI) indicates a high risk to develop dementia within the next two years. Reduced neocortical glucose metabolism can probably be detected with FDG PET in AD on average one year before onset of subjective cognitive impairment. In addition to glucose metabolism, specific tracers for dopamine synthesis ({sup 18}F-F-DOPA) and for ({sup 11}C-MP4A) are of interest for differentiation among dementia subtypes. Cortical acetylcholine esterase activity (AChE) activity is significantly lower in patients with AD or with dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB) than in age-matched normal controls. In LBD there is also impairment of dopamine synthesis, similar to Parkinson disease. (author) 115 refs.

  3. Frontotemporal Dementias: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilkins Kirsten

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Dementia is a clinical state characterized by loss of function in multiple cognitive domains. It is a costly disease in terms of both personal suffering and economic loss. Frontotemporal dementia (FTD is the term now preferred over Picks disease to describe the spectrum of non-Alzheimers dementias characterized by focal atrophy of the frontal and anterior temporal regions of the brain. The prevalence of FTD is considerable, though specific figures vary among different studies. It occurs usually in an age range of 35–75 and it is more common in individuals with a positive family history of dementia. The risk factors associated with this disorder include head injury and family history of FTD. Although there is some controversy regarding the further syndromatic subdivision of the different types of FTD, the three major clinical presentations of FTD include: 1 a frontal or behavioral variant (FvFTD, 2 a temporal, aphasic variant, also called Semantic dementia (SD, and 3 a progressive aphasia (PA. These different variants differ in their clinical presentation, cognitive deficits, and affected brain regions. Patients with FTD should have a neuropsychiatric assessment, neuropsychological testing and neuroimaging studies to confirm and clarify the diagnosis. Treatment for this entity consists of behavioral and pharmacological approaches. Medications such as serotonin reuptake inhibitors, antipsychotics, mood stabilizer and other novel treatments have been used in FTD with different rates of success. Further research should be directed at understanding and developing new diagnostic and therapeutic modalities to improve the patients' prognosis and quality of life.

  4. Music Perception in Dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golden, Hannah L; Clark, Camilla N; Nicholas, Jennifer M; Cohen, Miriam H; Slattery, Catherine F; Paterson, Ross W; Foulkes, Alexander J M; Schott, Jonathan M; Mummery, Catherine J; Crutch, Sebastian J; Warren, Jason D

    2017-01-01

    Despite much recent interest in music and dementia, music perception has not been widely studied across dementia syndromes using an information processing approach. Here we addressed this issue in a cohort of 30 patients representing major dementia syndromes of typical Alzheimer's disease (AD, n = 16), logopenic aphasia (LPA, an Alzheimer variant syndrome; n = 5), and progressive nonfluent aphasia (PNFA; n = 9) in relation to 19 healthy age-matched individuals. We designed a novel neuropsychological battery to assess perception of musical patterns in the dimensions of pitch and temporal information (requiring detection of notes that deviated from the established pattern based on local or global sequence features) and musical scene analysis (requiring detection of a familiar tune within polyphonic harmony). Performance on these tests was referenced to generic auditory (timbral) deviance detection and recognition of familiar tunes and adjusted for general auditory working memory performance. Relative to healthy controls, patients with AD and LPA had group-level deficits of global pitch (melody contour) processing while patients with PNFA as a group had deficits of local (interval) as well as global pitch processing. There was substantial individual variation within syndromic groups. Taking working memory performance into account, no specific deficits of musical temporal processing, timbre processing, musical scene analysis, or tune recognition were identified. The findings suggest that particular aspects of music perception such as pitch pattern analysis may open a window on the processing of information streams in major dementia syndromes. The potential selectivity of musical deficits for particular dementia syndromes and particular dimensions of processing warrants further systematic investigation.

  5. Globular bodies: a primary cause of the opacity in senile and diabetic posterior cortical subcapsular cataracts?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creighton, M O; Trevithick, J R; Mousa, G Y; Percy, D H; McKinna, A J; Dyson, C; Maisel, H; Bradley, R

    1978-07-01

    We examined 9 cataracts from maturity onset diabetics and 4 senile posterior subcapsular cataracts by scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, immunofluorescence for crystallin proteins and actin, histochemical methods and x-ray diffraction. The cataractous regions contained spherical globules up to 20 mu in diameter, often in a fibrous matrix. Some were extracellular Morgagnian globules, apparently formed by blebbing from the cell surface; others appeared to have been formed intracellularly. The area of globular degeneration was usually 300 mu deep, but had deeper fusiform extensions. Morphological changes in the cell cytoplasm varied according to their depth in the cataract. Electron microscopy showed intracellular and extracellular globules, many of them were bounded by lipid bilayer membranes. Immunofluorescent staining showed that all the globules contained gamma-crystallin; some contained alpha- and beta-crystallins and actin. All the globules contained higher concentrations of cysteine or cystine than the surrounding lens tissue but they did not react to stains for carbohydrate or calcium. X-ray diffraction studies showed that crystalline calcium salts were absent. Globules and cavities averaged 45% of the total area in cross section. Assuming an area of cataract to be 300 micron thick and that globules 1 mu in diameter scattered, while 2--20 mu in diameter reflected light, we calculated that light passing through such a thickness would be reduced by 65%. Thus the globules could account for most of the opacity of the cataractous area. Presumably the fibrous degeneration of the cells causes enough light scattering to account for the remainder of the reduction. Cataract patients complain of decreased visual acuity, a golden halo around objects, and difficulties when driving while facing oncoming traffic at night. These probably result from light scattering. In our previous experiments, globular bodies containing gamma-crystallin were

  6. Dementia and legal competency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filaković, Pavo; Erić, Anamarija Petek; Mihanović, Mate; Glavina, Trpimir; Molnar, Sven

    2011-06-01

    The legal competency or capability to exercise rights is level of judgment and decision-making ability needed to manage one's own affairs and to sign official documents. With some exceptions, the person entitles this right in age of majority. It is acquired without legal procedures, however the annulment of legal capacity requires a juristic process. This resolution may not be final and could be revoked thorough the procedure of reverting legal capacity - fully or partially. Given the increasing number of persons with dementia, they are often subjects of legal expertise concerning their legal capacity. On the other part, emphasis on the civil rights of mentally ill also demands their maximal protection. Therefore such distinctive issue is approached with particular attention. The approach in determination of legal competency is more focused on gradation of it's particular aspects instead of existing dual concept: legally capable - legally incapable. The main assumption represents how person with dementia is legally capable and should enjoy all the rights, privileges and obligations as other citizens do. The aspects of legal competency for which person with dementia is going to be deprived, due to protection of one's rights and interests, are determined in legal procedure and then passed over to the guardian decided by court. Partial annulment of legal competency is measure applied when there is even one existing aspect of preserved legal capability (pension disposition, salary or pension disposition, ability of concluding contract, making testament, concluding marriage, divorce, choosing whereabouts, independent living, right to vote, right to decide course of treatment ect.). This measure is most often in favour of the patient and rarely for protection of other persons and their interests. Physicians are expected to precisely describe early dementia symptoms which may influence assessment of specific aspects involved in legal capacity (memory loss, impaired task

  7. Complement activation in chromosome 13 dementias

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rostagno, A.; Revesz, T.; Lashley, T.

    2002-01-01

    Chromosome 13 dementias, familial British dementia (FBD) and familial Danish dementia (FDD), are associated with neurodegeneration and cerebrovascular amyloidosis, with striking neuropathological similarities to Alzheimer's disease (AD). Despite the structural differences among the amyloid subunits...

  8. Snoezelen for dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, J C; Lai, C K; Chung, P M; French, H P

    2002-01-01

    Snoezelen, multi-sensory stimulation, provides sensory stimuli to stimulate the primary senses of sight, hearing, touch, taste and smell, through the use of lighting effects, tactile surfaces, meditative music and the odour of relaxing essential oils (Pinkney 1997). The clinical application of snoezelen has been extended from the field of learning disability to dementia care over the past decade. The rationale for its use lies in providing a sensory environment that places fewer demands on intellectual abilities but capitalizes on the residual sensorimotor abilities of people with dementia (e.g. Buettner 1999, Hope 1998). Practitioners are keen to use snoezelen in dementia care, and some encouraging results have been documented in the area of promoting adaptive behaviours (e.g. Baker, Long 1992, Spaull 1998). However, the clinical application of snoezelen often varies in form, nature, principles and procedures. Such variations not only make examination of the therapeutic values of Snoezelen difficult, but also impede the clinical development of snoezelen in dementia care. A systematic review of evidence for the efficacy of snoezelen in the care of people with dementia is therefore needed to inform future clinical applications and research directions. This review aims to examine the clinical efficacy of snoezelen for older people with dementia. "Snoezelen", "multi-sensory", "dement*", "Alzheimer*", "randomized control/single control/double control" were used as keywords to search seven electronic databases (e.g. MEDLINE, PsyLIT). The list of trials was compared with those identified from a search of the Specialized Register of the Cochrane Dementia and Cognitive Improvement Group. All RCTs in which Snoezelen or multi-sensory programmes were used as an intervention for people with dementia were included in the review. Trial data included in the review were restricted to those involving people aged over 60 years suffering from any type of dementia, except one subject

  9. Smart Homes Design for People with Dementia

    OpenAIRE

    Amiribesheli, Mohsen; Bouchachia, Abdelhamid

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we present a user-centred approach for designing and developing smart homes for people with dementia. In contrast to most of the existing literature related to dementia, the present approach aims at tailoring the system to the specific needs of dementia using a scenario-based methodology. Scenarios are based on typical dementia symptoms which are collected from research literatures and validated by dementia caregivers. They portray the common behaviour of people with dementia. ...

  10. Frontotemporal dementia: An updated overview

    OpenAIRE

    Mohandas, E.; Rajmohan, V.

    2009-01-01

    Frontotemporal dementia (FTD) is a progressive neurodegenerative syndrome occurring between 45 and 65 years. The syndrome is also called frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD). However, FTLD refers to a larger group of disorders FTD being one of its subgroups. The other subgroups of FTLD are progressive nonfluent aphasia (PFNA), and semantic dementia (SD). FTLD is characterized by atrophy of prefrontal and anterior temporal cortices. FTD occurs in 5-15% of patients with dementia and it is t...

  11. Dementia communication using empathic curiosity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McEvoy, Phil; Eden, John; Plant, Rachel

    Communication skills training materials in dementia care usually focus on reminiscence. This is important because talking about past events can help people with dementia to retain their sense of self. This article examines the use of an alternative set of communication skills known as empathic curiosity, which may help to promote meaningful communication in the here and now with people who are living with dementia.

  12. Early AIDS dementia complex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mountz, J.M.; Speed, N.M.; Adams, K.; Schwartz, J.A.; Gross, M.D.; Ostrow, D.G.

    1988-01-01

    A frequent complication of the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) is AIDS dementia complex (ADC). The authors evaluated seven patients with AIDS (aged 28-55 years, all male) for ADC by psychiatric evaluation, neuropsychological testing, CT scanning, and IMP-SPECT. Six of seven patients exhibited cognitive or behavioral abnormalities. Neuropsychological testing showed general deficits but no cases of explicit dementia. SPECT showed marked abnormalities in two cases: posterior temporal-parietal diminution of tracer uptake in one case (posterior/anterior=0.81) and marked right/left subcortical asymmetry (1.17) in the other. In three additional cases there was asymmetric tracer uptake in the subcortical and parietal regions. CT findings were normal in all seven cases. The authors conclude that functional imaging with the use of IMP-SPECT may be a useful method to follow ADC progression and response to therapy

  13. Dementia, Clinical Aspects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Docu Any Axelerad

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Disordered arousal leads to a confusional state with an incoherent line of thought, temporal disorientation, poor recall, visual illusions, hallucinations and disordered behavior. With the exception of dementia with Lewy bodies, which is characterized by fluctuating confusion, other disorders causing dementia persist and deteriorate over months or years, and are not characterized by fluctuations or confusional episodes, except when other medical or environmental perturbations disrupt the arousal systems of the brain (e.g. intercurrent infection, anoxia. Sometimes, their hallucinations are different, with a religious tendency, and maybe we must insist with anamnesis related to previous religious beliefs, to see if it is possible to correlate some damaged area than cause hallucinations, are reliable with our faith.

  14. Association between Frailty and Dementia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kulmala, J; Nykänen, I; Mänty, Minna Regina

    2014-01-01

    dementia with Lewy bodies and 8 persons (1%) had some other type of dementia. Multivariate logistic regression models showed that frail persons were almost 8 times more likely to have cognitive impairment (OR 7.8, 95% CI 4.0-15.0), 8 times more likely to have some kind of dementia (OR 8.0, 95% CI 4.0...... of the participants was assessed using the Cardiovascular Health Study criteria. Cognitive function was assessed with the Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE). Clinically diagnosed dementia was assessed by specialists using diagnostic criteria. The associations between frailty and cognition were investigated using...

  15. Language and Dementia: Neuropsychological Aspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kempler, Daniel; Goral, Mira

    2008-01-01

    This article reviews recent evidence for the relationship between extralinguistic cognitive and language abilities in dementia. A survey of data from investigations of three dementia syndromes (Alzheimer's disease, semantic dementia and progressive nonfluent aphasia) reveals that, more often than not, deterioration of conceptual organization appears associated with lexical impairments, whereas impairments in executive function are associated with sentence- and discourse-level deficits. These connections between extralinguistic functions and language ability also emerge from the literature on cognitive reserve and bilingualism that investigates factors that delay the onset and possibly the progression of neuropsychological manifestation of dementia.

  16. Insulin, cognition, and dementia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cholerton, Brenna; Baker, Laura D.; Craft, Suzanne

    2015-01-01

    Cognitive disorders of aging represent a serious threat to the social and economic welfare of current society. It is now widely recognized that pathology related to such conditions, particularly Alzheimer’s disease, likely begins years or decades prior to the onset of clinical dementia symptoms. This revelation has led researchers to consider candidate mechanisms precipitating the cascade of neuropathological events that eventually lead to clinical Alzheimer’s disease. Insulin, a hormone with potent effects in the brain, has recently received a great deal of attention for its potential beneficial and protective role in cognitive function. Insulin resistance, which refers to the reduced sensitivity of target tissues to the favorable effects of insulin, is related to multiple chronic conditions known to impact cognition and increase dementia risk. With insulin resistance-associated conditions reaching epidemic proportions, the prevalence of Alzheimer’s disease and other cognitive disorders will continue to rise exponentially. Fortunately, these chronic insulin-related conditions are amenable to pharmacological intervention. As a result, novel therapeutic strategies that focus on increasing insulin sensitivity in the brain may be an important target for protecting or treating cognitive decline. The following review will highlight our current understanding of the role of insulin in brain, potential mechanisms underlying the link between insulin resistance and dementia, and current experimental therapeutic strategies aimed at improving cognitive function via modifying the brain’s insulin sensitivity. PMID:24070815

  17. Does wine prevent dementia?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roger M Pinder

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Roger M PinderPharma Consultant, York, UKAbstract: There is substantial evidence that moderate consumption of alcohol reduces significantly the risks of coronary heart disease, stroke and type 2 diabetes. Furthermore, the incidence of dementia, both of the Alzheimer’s type (AD and the vascular variety (VaD, is lower in societies which consume a Mediterranean diet of mainly fish, fruit, vegetables, olive oil, and wine. In particular, extensive evidence from both population-based cohort and case control studies in different areas of the world and across genders and racial groups suggests that regular consumption of moderate amounts of alcohol, especially in the form of wine, is associated with a lower risk of developing AD and VaD compared with abstention and heavy drinking. Carriers of the APOE ε4 allele seem to gain less benefit. Age-related cognitive decline, particularly in women, is lower in regular drinkers, while older drinkers with Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI progress less frequently to AD than their abstaining counterparts. Plausible biological mechanisms for the neuroprotective effects of wine include its glucose-modifying, antioxidant and inflammatory properties, but it additionally seems to modify the neuropathology of AD, particularly the deposition of amyloid plaque. Indeed, some of these mechanisms are already targets for the development of new therapeutic agents for the treatment of dementia.Keywords: alcohol, Alzheimer’s disease, dementia, epidemiology, polyphenols, wine

  18. Cognitive training for dementia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konta, Brigitte

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the HTA report is to evaluate the effectiveness of cognitive training methods to treat cognitive disorders of dementia and other diseases with cognitive deficits. For this purpose, a systematic literature search was carried out first based on the DIMDI superbase retrieval. The identified publications were judged and selected by two independent, methodically competent experts. 33 publications were included in the report. Based on the studies for a normal cognitive development in old age a theory that healthy older people have a considerable capacity reserve for an improved performance in abstract abilities of thinking can be assumed. The first symptoms for older people at risk for dementia are a reduced cognitive capacity reserve. Cognitive training methods therefore focus abilities of abstract memory. Apart from types of dementia another two groups of diseases with cognitive deficits were included in the HTA report: cerebral lesions and schizophrenic psychoses. Studies with mild as well as forms of dementia heavy forms including the Alzheimer disease were included. The described training methods were very heterogeneous with regard to their contents, the temporal sequence and the outcome parameter. The studies were methodically partly contestable. Approximately a third of the studies of all publications could show improvements in the cognitive achievements by the training. Three studies concerning cognitive training methods in case of cerebral lesions were included. All three studies demonstrated a significant improvement in the training group in some outcome parameters. Special cognitive training methods were used for the treatment of cognitive deficits at schizophrenic psychoses. The neurocognitive training (NET, the "Cognitive Remediation Therapy" as well as the strategic training with coaching proved to be effective. The studies, however, were hardly comparable and very heterogeneous in detail. Summarising the cognitive training

  19. Studies on brain blood-flow with N-isopropyl-(I-123)p-iodoamphetamine in dementia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Akinori [Osaka Medical Coll., Takatsuki (Japan)

    1989-06-01

    A differentiation between patients with senile dementia of Alzheimer type (SDAT) and patients with multi-infarct dementia (MID) was attempted in this paper. Twenty normal subjects, 20 SDAT and 20 MID patients were studied with single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) using N-isopropyl-(I-123)p-iodoamphetamine ({sup 123}I-IMP). SPECT was started 10 minutes after the injection of 3.0 mCi {sup 123}I-IMP. Eight anatomical regions (region of interest, ROI) were examined at the level of the basal ganglia and ten at the level of the centrum semiovale. The count ratio of each ROI to the average was calculated and tested with Student's t-test of mean differences. The ratios of right inferior frontal region and superior frontal region were significantly lower in the SDAT patients than in the normal subjects. The left superior frontal region showed lower mean ratios in SDAT patients, but the difference was not statistically significant. This study supports the suggestion that there is frontal region hypofunction in SDAT patients. SPECT with {sup 123}I-IMP is a useful method in the non-invasive assessment of cerebral pathophysiology in dementia. (author).

  20. Studies on brain blood-flow with N-isopropyl-(I-123)p-iodoamphetamine in dementia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shin, Akinori

    1989-01-01

    A differentiation between patients with senile dementia of Alzheimer type (SDAT) and patients with multi-infarct dementia (MID) was attempted in this paper. Twenty normal subjects, 20 SDAT and 20 MID patients were studied with single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) using N-isopropyl-(I-123)p-iodoamphetamine ( 123 I-IMP). SPECT was started 10 minutes after the injection of 3.0 mCi 123 I-IMP. Eight anatomical regions (region of interest, ROI) were examined at the level of the basal ganglia and ten at the level of the centrum semiovale. The count ratio of each ROI to the average was calculated and tested with Student's t-test of mean differences. The ratios of right inferior frontal region and superior frontal region were significantly lower in the SDAT patients than in the normal subjects. The left superior frontal region showed lower mean ratios in SDAT patients, but the difference was not statistically significant. This study supports the suggestion that there is frontal region hypofunction in SDAT patients. SPECT with 123 I-IMP is a useful method in the non-invasive assessment of cerebral pathophysiology in dementia. (author)

  1. Cardiovascular risk factors and dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fillit, Howard; Nash, David T; Rundek, Tatjana; Zuckerman, Andrea

    2008-06-01

    Dementias, such as Alzheimer's disease (AD) and vascular dementia, are disorders of aging populations and represent a significant economic burden. Evidence is accumulating to suggest that cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors may be instrumental in the development of dementia. The goal of this review was to discuss the relationship between specific CVD risk factors and dementia and how current treatment strategies for dementia should focus on reducing CVD risks. We conducted a review of the literature for the simultaneous presence of 2 major topics, cardiovascular risk factors and dementia (eg, AD). Special emphasis was placed on clinical outcome studies examining the effects of treatments of pharmacologically modifiable CVD risk factors on dementia and cognitive impairment. Lifestyle risk factors for CVD, such as obesity, lack of exercise, smoking, and certain psychosocial factors, have been associated with an increased risk of cognitive decline and dementia. Some evidence suggests that effectively managing these factors may prevent cognitive decline/dementia. Randomized, placebo-controlled trials of antihypertensive medications have found that such therapy may reduce the risk of cognitive decline, and limited data suggest a benefit for patients with AD. Some small open-label and randomized clinical trials of statins have observed positive effects on cognitive function; larger studies of statins in patients with AD are ongoing. Although more research is needed, current evidence indicates an association between CVD risk factors--such as hypertension, dyslipidemia, and diabetes mellitus--and cognitive decline/dementia. From a clinical perspective, these data further support the rationale for physicians to provide effective management of CVD risk factors and for patients to be compliant with such recommendations to possibly prevent cognitive decline/dementia.

  2. Cholinergic nicotinic and muscarinic receptors in dementia of Alzheimer, Parkinson and Lewy body types.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, E K; Smith, C J; Court, J A; Perry, R H

    1990-01-01

    Cholinergic nicotinic and muscarinic receptor binding were measured in post mortem human brain tissue, using low (nM) concentrations of (3H)-nicotine to detect predominately the high affinity nicotinic site and (3H)-N-methylscopolamine in the presence and absence of 3 x 10(-4) M carbachol to measure both the low and high affinity agonist subtypes of the muscarinic receptor group. Consistent with most previous reports, the nicotinic but not muscarinic binding was reduced in the different forms of dementia associated with cortical cholinergic deficits, including Alzheimer's and Parkinson's disease, senile dementia of Lewy body type (SDLT) and Down's syndrome (over 50 years). Analysis of (3H)-nicotine binding displaced by a range of carbachol concentrations (10(-9)-10(-3) M) indicated 2 binding sites for nicotine and that the high affinity rather than low affinity site was reduced in Alzheimer's disease. In all 3 cortical areas investigated (temporal, parietal and occipital) there were increases in the low affinity muscarinic site in Parkinson's disease and SDLT but not Alzheimer's disease or middle-aged Down's syndrome. This observation raised the question of whether the presence of neurofibrillary tangles (evident in the latter but not former 2 disorders) is incompatible with denervation-induced muscarinic supersensitivity in cholinoceptive neurons which include cortical pyramids generally affeted by tangle formation.

  3. Is Apolipoprotein E4 an Important Risk Factor for Dementia in Persons with Down Syndrome?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohn, Troy T; McCarty, Katie L; Love, Julia E; Head, Elizabeth

    2014-12-08

    Down syndrome is one of the most common genetic causes of intellectual disability and is characterized by a number of behavioral as well as cognitive symptoms. Triplication of all or part of human chromosome 21 has been considered as the main cause of Down syndrome. Due to the location of the amyloid precursor protein on chromosome 21, many of the neuropathological features of early-onset Alzheimer's disease including senile plaques and neurofibrillary tangles are also present in Down syndrome patients who are either demented or nondemented. Significant advances in medical treatment have increased longevity in people with Down syndrome resulting in an increased population that may be subjected to many of the same risk factors as those with Alzheimer's disease. It is well established that harboring one or both apolipoprotein E4 alleles greatly increases the risk for Alzheimer's disease. However, whether apolipoprotein E4 contributes to an earlier onset of dementia or increased mortality in Down syndrome patients is still a matter of debate. The purpose of this mini review is to provide an updated assessment on apolipoprotein E4 status and risk potential of developing dementia and mortality associated with Down syndrome.

  4. 老年骨质疏松性骨折的康复治疗%Rehabilitative treatment of senile osteoporosis fracture

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王兵

    2003-01-01

    @@ When the senile patients with osteoporosis fracture are hospitalized,fracture is cured by surgical department of orthopedics and osteoporosis is cured by internal department of orthopedics,which is timely and appropriate.Even after union of fracture,the comprehensive treatment is essential for such patients.

  5. Analysis of Regional Cerebral Blood Flow Using {sup 99m}Tc-HMPAO Brain SPECT in Senile Dementia of Alzheimer Type

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Myung Hae; Lee, Myung Chul; Koh, Chang Soon; Roh, Jae Kyu; Woo, Chong In [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1988-03-15

    {sup 99m}Tc-HMPAO brain SPECT studies were performed in 11 patients with Alzheimer's disease, 7 patients with psychological depression and 12 normal controls. Changes of regional cerebral blood flow was semiquantitatively analyzed and the results were as follows. 1) In 11 patients with Alzheimer's disease, significant reduction of regional cerebral blood flow was found In both temporoparietal areas. 2) Relative perfusion between cerebral hemispheres was rather symmetrical in patient with Alzheimer's disease. 3) All patients with depression showed normal SPECT findings. As for conclusion, {sup 99m}Tc-HMPAO brain SPECT seemed to be a valuable method for clinical assessment and management of patients with Alzheimer's disease.

  6. A randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind study to evaluate the efficacy of a citrus bioflavanoid blend in the treatment of senile purpura.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berlin, Joshua M; Eisenberg, David P; Berlin, Mindy B; Sarro, Robert A; Leeman, Douglas R; Fein, Howard

    2011-07-01

    Senile purpura is a common, chronic skin condition affecting more than 10 percent of individuals over the age of 50. Despite being a benign condition, the continual development of purpura lesions in afflicted patients is frequently a source of significant visual and social concern. To date, there are no known effective treatments for this condition. To evaluate the efficacy of a novel nutraceutical citrus bioflavonoid blend in improving the skin's appearance in patients with senile purpura. A six-week, randomized, multicenter, placebo-controlled, double-blind study was conducted to determine whether a uniquely formulated, oral citrus bioflavonoid supplement could treat active lesions of senile purpura while preventing new lesions from arising. Seventy patients with senile purpura were enrolled and 67 completed the study. Subjects were randomized into two groups receiving either a citrus bioflavonoid blend or placebo medication, which was taken orally twice daily for six weeks. Clinical evaluations were performed by blinded investigators at two locations. A statistically significant reduction in the number of new purpura lesions in the skin area undergoing clinical study was documented. At the end of six weeks, the citrus bioflavonoid blend treated group showed a 50 percent reduction in purpura lesions from baseline. Patient self-assessment of the effectiveness of the medication echoed the results of an investigator global assessment with a statistically significant improvement in the skin's appearance noted by the patients receiving the active medication. No adverse effects were noted by either the patients or investigators. This new treatment appears to both safely and effectively diminish skin bruising in patients with senile purpura.

  7. [Dementia due to Endocrine Diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsunaga, Akiko; Yoneda, Makoto

    2016-04-01

    Endocrine diseases affecting various organs, such as the pituitary gland, the thyroid, the parathyroid, the adrenal glands and the pancreas, occasionally cause dementia. While Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the main cause of dementia in the elderly and is untreatable, dementia caused by endocrine diseases is treatable in most cases. However, patients with dementia associated with endocrine diseases show memory impairments similar to those found in AD, often leading to misdiagnoses. Patients with endocrine diseases often present with other characteristic systemic and neuropsychiatric symptoms caused by altered hormone levels. Such neuropsychiatric symptoms include involuntary movements, depression, seizures, and muscle weakness. In these cases, abnormalities in imaging and blood or urine tests are helpful in making a differential diagnosis. As delays in the diagnosis and treatment of these patients may cause irreversible brain damage, it is imperative for clinicians to carefully exclude the possibility of latent endocrine diseases when treating patients with dementia.

  8. [Association between metabolic syndrome and the 10 years mortality of cerebro-cardiovascular diseases in the senile population].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Meng-meng; Pan, Chang-Yu; Tian, Hui; Liu, Min; Su, Hai-yan

    2008-02-01

    To assess the prevalence of metabolic syndrome (MS) and its association with mortality of cerebro-cardiovascular diseases in senile population. Data were collected from 1926 people aged 60 and over, who took part in routine health examination in our hospital from 1996 to 1997. All subjects were followed up for 10 years. MS was diagnosed by using the definition recommended by Chinese Diabetic Society in 2004. Cox-proportional hazards models were used in survival analyses and to calculate the relative risk (RR) of cerebro-cardiovascular diseases mortality. The prevalence of MS was 25.03% (n = 482, Group 2) in this population. The 10 year mortality of cerebro-cardiovascular diseases was significantly higher (6.82/1000-person year vs. 2.55/1000-person year, P cerebro-cardiovascular diseases mortality was 2.52 (95% CI 1.367 - 4.661, P cerebro-cardiovascular diseases.

  9. Peculiarity of A-bomb cataract complicated by incipient senile cataract-report of 2 recent cases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sugimoto, S [Sugimoto Ophthalmic Clinic, Hiroshima (Japan)

    1980-03-01

    Two cases of typical cataract caused by atomic bomb radiation were observed. Both patients were male and had been exposed near the hypocenter (950m and 140m from the hypocenter) when they were young (12 years and 5 months, and 15 years and 3 months). Wounds at the exposure were not fatal, but their exposure doses were close to the lethal dose (570 and 609 rad). Their acute symptoms were severe. Nevertheless, their symptoms recovered by rest and good nutrition. Lenticular opacities (delayed ocular damage caused by atomic radiation) occurred in one patient 3 years and 7 months after the exposure and in the other patient 4 years after the exposure. It was 33 years and 10 month after the exposure when both patients aged 45 and 48 had senile cataract. Effects of aging on both patients exposed to large doses of radiation in young ages were suggested.

  10. A MULTIDISCIPLINARY APPROACH IN THE TREATMENT OF FRACTURES OF THE PROXIMAL FEMUR ON THE BACKGROUND OF SENILE OSTEOPOROSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. V. Zagorodniy

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The article presents a review of published data on the problem of osteoporosis in patients older than 75 years who have had fractures of the proximal femur. We used descriptive and analytical methods. Search publications have done in accessible to free search databases. Based on our analysis, it was found: the majority of researchers in Russia and abroad are united in the opinion that this issue requires a multidisciplinary approach; surgical treatment should be initiated as early as possible after the onset of fracture, before the complications from side of the internal organs; patients with fractures on the background of senile osteoporosis should receive drugs that affect to the quantitative and qualitative components of bone.

  11. THE USAGE OF ORIGINAL COMPUTER PROGRAM FOR SCREENING OF SENILE ASTHENIA IN PRE- AND POST GRADUATE MEDICAL EDUCATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svetlana G. Gorelik

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The results of introduction of information technologies in educational process of medical students and students of postgraduate education were shown in the article. The actuality of material, which was outlined in the article, was caused by problems, which prevailed in the system of high education and by necessity of cooperation between practical health care and theoretical knowledge. For this aim the original «Computer program of optimization of care in geriatrics in dependence from degree of senile asthenia” was proposed. This program solved not only problems of qualitative alteration of informative environment of educational system but it contributed to increasing of effectiveness of knowledge’s mastering for increasing the quality of medical and social help to population.

  12. Teaching Mands to Older Adults with Dementia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oleson, Chelsey R.; Baker, Jonathan C.

    2014-01-01

    Millions of Americans are diagnosed with dementia, and that number is only expected to rise. The diagnosis of dementia comes with impairments, especially in language. Furthermore, dementia-related functional declines appear to be moderated by environmental variables (Alzheimer's Association, "Alzheimer's & Dementia: The Journal of the…

  13. Beyond competence: advance directives in dementia research

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K.R. Jongsma (Karin); S. van de Vathorst (Suzanne)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractDementia is highly prevalent and incurable. The participation of dementia patients in clinical research is indispensable if we want to find an effective treatment for dementia. However, one of the primary challenges in dementia research is the patients’ gradual loss of the capacity to

  14. Animal models of dementia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsson, I. Anna S.; Sandøe, Peter

    2011-01-01

    This chapter aims to encourage scientists and others interested in the use of animal models of disease – specifically, in the study of dementia – to engage in ethical reflection. It opens with a general discussion of the moral acceptability of animal use in research. Three ethical approaches...... are here distinguished. These serve as points of orientation in the following discussion of four more specific ethical questions: Does animal species matter? How effective is disease modelling in delivering the benefits claimed for it? What can be done to minimize potential harm to animals in research? Who...... bears responsibility for the use of animals in disease models?...

  15. Coping with Dementia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Lisbeth Villemoes; Waldorff, Frans Boch; Waldemar, Gunhild

    2008-01-01

    -living with a spouse. The analysis revealed that the basic social psychological problem faced by patients with mild AD was their awareness of decline in personal dignity and value. Coping strategies used to meet these problems were adaptations to the altered situation in order to maintain a feeling of well......-being. The spouse appeared to be the most important social relation. The most significant worries of the patients were about communication in relation to their spouse, and about the reaction of the spouse to the consequences of the disease. Keywords coping; dementia; everyday life; patients’ perspective; social...

  16. Artistic creativity and dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Zachary A; Miller, Bruce L

    2013-01-01

    Artistic ability and creativity are defining characteristics of human behavior. Behavioral neurology, as a specialty, believes that even the most complex behaviors can be modeled and understood as the summation of smaller cognitive functions. Literature from individuals with specific brain lesions has helped to map out these smaller regions of cognitive abilities. More recently, models based on neurodegenerative conditions, especially from the frontotemporal dementias, have allowed for greater nuanced investigations into the various functional anatomies necessary for artistic behavior and possibly the underlying networks that promote creativity. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Studies of computed tomography as a contribution to differential diagnosis between dementia due to cerebrovascular disease (multi-infract type) and due to primarily degenerative cerebral atrophy (Alzheimers type)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kohlmeyer, K.

    1982-01-01

    Studies of computed tomography were performed in 367 patients diagnosed as dementia clinically. The mean age was 70.1 years. By the clinicians 240 were classified as senile dementia of Alzheimer's type, 79 as multiinfarct dementia, and 48 were not determined definitely. In 3%, the CT studies did detect treatable causes like tumors, subdural hematomas and communicating hydrocephalus. In about 57% was found by CT a diffuse brain atrophy without focal tissue changes as to expect if occurring a cerebrovascular disease. In 25% there were focal changes of the brain tissue in CT to define as residuals of infarctions in addition to the signs of cerebral atrophy. The results of the CT studies were normal in 15% despite of the evidence of dementia clinically. The analysis of the material did show that a cerebrovascular disease as a cause of dementia is suspected clinically in much more cases than CT studies are able to prove focal pathological changes of the brain tissue due to disorders of cerebral blood flow really. (orig.) [de

  18. Interrogating personhood and dementia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higgs, Paul; Gilleard, Chris

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objectives: To interrogate the concept of personhood and its application to care practices for people with dementia. Method: We outline the work of Tom Kitwood on personhood and relate this to conceptualisations of personhood in metaphysics and in moral philosophy. Results: The philosophical concept of personhood has a long history. The metaphysical tradition examines the necessary and sufficient qualities that make up personhood such as agency, consciousness, identity, rationality and second-order reflexivity. Alternative viewpoints treat personhood as a matter of degree rather than as a superordinate category. Within moral philosophy personhood is treated as a moral status applicable to some or to all human beings. Conclusion: In the light of the multiple meanings attached to the term in both metaphysics and moral philosophy, personhood is a relatively unhelpful concept to act as the foundation for developing models and standards of care for people with dementia. Care, we suggest, should concentrate less on ambiguous and somewhat abstract terms such as personhood and focus instead on supporting people's existing capabilities, while minimising the harmful consequences of their incapacities. PMID:26708149

  19. TREATMENT OUTCOMES IN ELDERLY AND SENILE PATIENTS WITH DEGENERATIVE DEFORMATIONS AND INSTABILITY OF THE SPINAL COLUMN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. A. Mikhaylov

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Degenerative  scoliosis  is  a  prevalent  issue  among  the  aging  population.  Controversy  remains   over  the  role of surgical intervention in patients with such disease. The authors  present  the results of 14-year experience in treatment of this pathology.  Various approaches  to the surgical treatment depending  on the stage of the disease and the degree of deformation, including  decompression, instrumental posterior spinal fusion, anterior spinal fusion, and osteotomy were examined. Above treatment options are based on the analysis of clinical aspects, mechanical  stability of deformation, the degree of imbalance in the body and causes of pain or neurological  deficit.The  risk of postoperative complications is extremely  high and seems to be outweighed by the  possible successful outcomes of surgical treatment. The results presented in the treatment of degenerative scoliosis mainly provide positive outcomes and can assist in the selection of treatment for this group of patients.The purpose of the  study  is to  evaluate  the  treatment outcomes  of elderly  and  senile patients with  degenerative deformations and instability of the spinal column using various surgical techniques.Material and methods. During  the present  retrospective study the authors  analyzed 437 patients (337 (77% women and  100  (23%  men  aged  60 years  and  older  who  underwent surgical  treatment at  Russian  Research  institute of traumatology and orthopaedics named  after  R.R.Vreden between  2000 and 2016. The  study  group  included  patients with  diseases and consequences  of injuries  in the  spine, leading  to its deformation and following spinal stenosis  with development of neurological  deficit in some cases.The  patients were subdivided into  four  groups  depending  on surgical  procedure.  Patients in group  I underwent decompression  of neural  structures at affected

  20. Reminiscence therapy for dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woods, Bob; O'Philbin, Laura; Farrell, Emma M; Spector, Aimee E; Orrell, Martin

    2018-03-01

    This updated Cochrane Review of reminiscence therapy (RT) for dementia was first published in 1998, and last updated in 2005. RT involves the discussion of memories and past experiences with other people using tangible prompts such as photographs or music to evoke memories and stimulate conversation. RT is implemented widely in a range of settings using a variety of formats. To assess the effects of RT on people living with dementia and their carers, taking into account differences in its implementation, including setting (care home, community) and modality (group, individual). We searched ALOIS (the Cochrane Dementia and Cognitive Improvement Group's Specialized Register) on 6 April 2017 using the search term 'reminiscence.' We included all randomised controlled trials of RT for dementia in which the duration of the intervention was at least four weeks (or six sessions) and that had a 'no treatment' or passive control group. Outcomes of interest were quality of life (QoL), cognition, communication, behaviour, mood and carer outcomes. Two authors (LOP and EF) independently extracted data and assessed risk of bias. Where necessary, we contacted study authors for additional information. We pooled data from all sufficiently similar studies reporting on each outcome. We undertook subgroup analysis by setting (community versus care home) and by modality (individual versus group). We used GRADE methods to assess the overall quality of evidence for each outcome. We included 22 studies involving 1972 people with dementia. Meta-analyses included data from 16 studies (1749 participants). Apart from six studies with risk of selection bias, the overall risk of bias in the studies was low.Overall, moderate quality evidence indicated RT did not have an important effect on QoL immediately after the intervention period compared with no treatment (standardised mean difference (SMD) 0.11, 95% confidence interval (CI) -0.12 to 0.33; I 2 = 59%; 8 studies; 1060 participants

  1. [Management of cerebral small vessel disease for the diagnosis and treatment of dementia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ihara, Masafumi

    2013-07-01

    With the demographic shift in life expectancy inexorably increasing in developed countries, dementia is set to become one of the most important health problems worldwide. In recent years, cerebral small vessel disease (SVD) has received much attention as an important cause of dementia. The reason for this is twofold: firstly, arteriosclerosis (type 1 SVD) is the leading cause of vascular cognitive impairment, and secondly, cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA; type 2 SVD) is an almost invariable accompaniment of Alzheimer's disease. SVD is known to induce a variety of pathological changes; for example, type 1 SVD results in lacunar infarction, deep microbleeds, and white matter damage, while type 2 SVD leads to cortical microinfarcts, lobar microbleeds, and white matter damage. SVD is considered a spectrum of abnormalities, with the majority of patients experiencing symptoms from both type 1 and type 2 SVD as the disease progresses. The discouraging results of immunotherapy clinical trials for Alzheimer's disease have shifted the scientific attention from the classical neuron-centric approach towards a novel neurovascular approach. As arteries stiffen with age or with other co-morbid factors such as life-related diseases, amyloid β (Aβ) synthesis becomes upregulated, resulting in the deposition of insoluble Aβ not only in the parenchyma as senile plaques but also in the perivascular drainage pathways as CAA. Therefore, therapeutic strategies such as vasoactive drugs that enhance the patency of this Aβ drainage pathway may facilitate Aβ removal and help prevent cognitive decline in the elderly. Based on this emerging paradigm, clinical trials are warranted to investigate whether a neurovascular therapeutic approach can effectively halt cognitive decline and act as a preemptive medicine for patients at risk of dementia.

  2. ["Atypical" method for understanding dementia. How can studying epigenetics contribute?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwata, Atsushi

    2011-11-01

    The pathological hallmark of neurodegeneration is presence of intra- and extra neuronal inclusion bodies such as Lewy bodies in Parkinson's disease, senile plaques and neurofibrillary tangles in Alzheimer's disease. These are consisted of aggregated conformationally abnormal proteins. The precise mechanism of aggregation remains unknown, but increased expression of aggregation-prone proteins can lead to their aggregation. For example, in Down syndrome, duplication of the 21(st) chromosome, which contains the amyloid beta precursor protein (APP) gene, leads to accumulation of amyloid beta and Alzheimer's disease pathology and multiplication of APP gene is shown to be the cause of familial Alzheimer's disease. Moreover, in rare cases of PD, duplication or triplication of SNCA gene leads to alpha-synuclein accumulation, with triplication producing a more severe phenotype than duplication, suggesting that SNCA expression level determines the severity of the pathology. Lastly, animal models of neurodegenerative disorders are generated by over-expression of causal genes, further supporting the conclusion that increased gene expression is related to pathogenesis. Additional evidence indicates that SNCA promoter polymorphisms increases alpha-synuclein expression and increases susceptibility to sporadic PD. In addition to promoter polymorphisms, epigenetic modification can alter downstream gene expression. Epigenetic regulation includes histone modification and DNA methylation, of which CpG island methylation can be gene-specific; in several different cancers, CpG methylation inhibits binding of the transcription machinery, causing silencing of a specific oncogene, which leads to carcinogenesis. In central nervous system disorders, CpG methylation has been associated with psychiatric disorders, such as autism and schizophrenia. We found several cases of Parkinson's disease with epigenetic abnormality in SNCA gene. Thus, we believe that studying epigenetics can provide

  3. Diagnosis and management of dementia

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2007-09-19

    Sep 19, 2007 ... Dementia is an acquired syndrome of memory decline with at least one other cognitive .... functions and memory retrieval are the .... behavioural problems.5 Cost-effectiveness of ... (For words not recalled, prompt with a cue.).

  4. The Italian Dementia National Plan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teresa Di Fiandra

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The Italian Dementia National Plan was formulated in October 2014 by the Italian Ministry of Health in close cooperation with the regions, the National Institute of Health and the three major national associations of patients and carers. The main purpose of this strategy was to provide directive indications for promoting and improving interventions in the dementia field, not limiting to specialist and therapeutic actions, but particularly focusing on the support of patients and families throughout the pathways of care. Four main objectives are indicated: 1 promote health- and social-care interventions and policies; 2 create/strengthen the integrated network of services for dementia based on an integrated approach; 3 implement strategies for promoting appropriateness and quality of care; and 4 improve the quality of life of persons with dementia and their families by supporting empowerment and stigma reduction. These objectives and the pertaining actions are described in the present paper.

  5. Dementia due to metabolic causes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Poor judgment and losing the ability to recognize danger Using the wrong word, not pronouncing words correctly, ... disease and other dementias. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Goldman's Cecil Medicine . 25th ed. Philadelphia, PA: ...

  6. Dementia, Caregiving, and Controlling Frustration

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to be calm can help you to gain cooperation. See FCA ʼ s fact sheet Caregiver’s Guide to ... cuidador para entender la conducta de los pacientes con demencia (Caregiver’s Guide to Understanding Dementia Behaviors) We ...

  7. Does lithium protect against dementia?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kessing, Lars Vedel; Forman, Julie Lyng; Andersen, Per Kragh

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate whether treatment with lithium in patients with mania or bipolar disorder is associated with a decreased rate of subsequent dementia. METHODS: Linkage of register data on prescribed lithium in all patients discharged from psychiatric health care service with a diagnosis...... exposed to lithium (50.4%), 1,781 to anticonvulsants (36.7%), 4,280 to antidepressants (88.1%), and 3,901 to antipsychotics (80.3%) during the study period. A total of 216 patients received a diagnosis of dementia during follow-up (103.6/10,000 person-years). During the period following the second...... prescription of lithium, the rate of dementia was decreased compared to the period following the first prescription. In contrast, the rates of dementia during multiple prescription periods with anticonvulsants, antidepressants, or antipsychotics, respectively, were not significantly decreased compared...

  8. Robotherapy with Dementia Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Martín

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Humanoids have increasingly become the focus of attention in robotics research in recent years, especially in service and personal assistance robotics. This paper presents the application developed for humanoid robots in the therapy of dementia patients as a cognitive stimulation tool. The behaviour of the robot during the therapy sessions is visually programmed in a session script that allows music to play, physical movements (dancing, exercises, etc., speech synthesis and interaction with the human monitor. The application includes the control software on board the robot and some tools like the visual script generator or a monitor to supervise the robot behaviour during the sessions. The robot application's impact on the patient's health has been studied. Experiments with real patients have been performed in collaboration with a centre of research in neurodegenerative diseases. Initial results show a slight or mild improvement in neuropsychiatric symptoms over other traditional therapy methods.

  9. Biomarkers of the Dementia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikio Shoji

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent advances in biomarker studies on dementia are summarized here. CSF Aβ40, Aβ42, total tau, and phosphorylated tau are the most sensitive biomarkers for diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease (AD and prediction of onset of AD from mild cognitive impairment (MCI. Based on this progress, new diagnostic criteria for AD, MCI, and preclinical AD were proposed by National Institute of Aging (NIA and Alzheimer's Association in August 2010. In these new criteria, progress in biomarker identification and amyloid imaging studies in the past 10 years have added critical information. Huge contributions of basic and clinical studies have established clinical evidence supporting these markers. Based on this progress, essential therapy for cure of AD is urgently expected.

  10. Music therapy in dementia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McDermott, Orii; Crellin, Nadia; Ridder, Hanne Mette Ochsner

    2013-01-01

    Objective Recent reviews on music therapy for people with dementia have been limited to attempting to evaluate whether it is effective, but there is a need for a critical assessment of the literature to provide insight into the possible mechanisms of actions of music therapy. This systematic review......, five studies investigated hormonal and physiological changes, and five studies focused on social and relational aspects of music therapy. The musical interventions in the studies were diverse, but singing featured as an important medium for change. Conclusions Evidence for short-term improvement...... in mood and reduction in behavioural disturbance was consistent, but there were no high-quality longitudinal studies that demonstrated long-term benefits of music therapy. Future music therapy studies need to define a theoretical model, include better-focused outcome measures, and discuss how the findings...

  11. A review of ethical issues in dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Rebecca A; Karlawish, Jason

    2015-10-01

    Dementia raises many ethical issues. The present review, taking note of the fact that the stages of dementia raise distinct ethical issues, focuses on three issues associated with stages of dementia's progression: (1) how the emergence of preclinical and asymptomatic but at-risk categories for dementia creates complex questions about preventive measures, risk disclosure, and protection from stigma and discrimination; (2) how despite efforts at dementia prevention, important research continues to investigate ways to alleviate clinical dementia's symptoms, and requires additional human subjects protections to ethically enroll persons with dementia; and (3) how in spite of research and prevention efforts, persons continue to need to live with dementia. This review highlights two major themes. First is how expanding the boundaries of dementias such as Alzheimer's to include asymptomatic but at-risk persons generate new ethical questions. One promising way to address these questions is to take an integrated approach to dementia ethics, which can include incorporating ethics-related data collection into the design of a dementia research study itself. Second is the interdisciplinary nature of ethical questions related to dementia, from health policy questions about insurance coverage for long-term care to political questions about voting, driving, and other civic rights and privileges to economic questions about balancing an employer's right to a safe and productive workforce with an employee's rights to avoid discrimination on the basis of their dementia risk. The review highlights these themes and emerging ethical issues in dementia.

  12. Trichotillomania in a dementia case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonardo Caixeta

    Full Text Available Abstract We report an 87-year-old male case of hair pulling associated with a white-matter vascular dementia (Binswanger's disease. Trichotillomania in our case did not resolve using mirtazapine or anticholinesterasic medication. Trichotillomania seems to be related to a form of perseveration associated with dementia. The findings in this case suggest the abnormality involving white matter in the pathogenesis of trichotillomania, may constitute a defect in connectivity in the right frontal-subcortical circuit.

  13. Trichotillomania in a dementia case

    OpenAIRE

    Caixeta, Leonardo; Lopes, Danielly Bandeira

    2011-01-01

    Abstract We report an 87-year-old male case of hair pulling associated with a white-matter vascular dementia (Binswanger's disease). Trichotillomania in our case did not resolve using mirtazapine or anticholinesterasic medication. Trichotillomania seems to be related to a form of perseveration associated with dementia. The findings in this case suggest the abnormality involving white matter in the pathogenesis of trichotillomania, may constitute a defect in connectivity in the right frontal-s...

  14. Dementia: sociological and philosophical constructions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Daniel H J

    2004-01-01

    This analysis presents a challenge to the biomedical view of dementia as a disease. This view is critiqued from two perspectives: those of sociology and philosophy. Because these domains inform the creation of the medical discourse, their analysis provides an important refinement to the apprehension of the phenomenon of dementia. From the work of Foucault, and in particular his analysis of the historical origins of modern medicine, the sociological construction of dementia is considered. Following this, the philosophical question of Being is discussed, considering particularly the positions of Heidegger and Merleau-Ponty. Lastly aspects of dementia nursing that are damaging to those relatives forced to take on the role of primary carer are isolated, in the context of Kitwood's view that it is possible to maintain personhood at the extremes of this condition. It is suggested that this critique of sociological and philosophical foundations of dementia might offer a way of approaching the dismantling of the self and revise current conceptions of dementia care for the better.

  15. Fouling community dominated by Metridium senile (Cnidaria: Anthozoa: Actiniaria in Bahía San Julián (southern Patagonia, Argentina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Pablo Martin

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study is to provide information about a harbour-fouling community dominated by Metridium senile in southern Patagonia. Several steel tubes from the wharf of Puerto San Julián were extracted to perform repair tasks, allowing the attached benthic community to be studied. Sampling was conducted at three levels: lower intertidal, 3-4 m depth and 6-7 m depth. In the lower intertidal, M. senile had a relative abundance of 43%, the most abundant accompanying species being Perumytilus purpuratus, Mytilus edulis platensis and Aulacomya atra atra. At subtidal level, the anemone showed relative abundances of 64% and 65%, and was accompanied by Monocorophium insidiosum at 3-4 m depth and by polychaetes of families Sabellidae and Syllidae at 6-7 m at depth. In the lower intertidal, epibiosis was more frequent on P. purpuratus, A. atra atra and M. edulis platensis, while in the subtidal, the richness of substrate-organisms increased significantly and the anemone was fixed to A. atra atra, M. edulis platensis, Paramolgula gregaria, Crepipatella dilatata, Austromegabalanus psittacus, Hiatella arctica, Polyzoa opuntia, Pyura sp. and Sabellidae tubes. The ability of M. senile to settle on many different organisms, along with other strategies, makes it a colonizer able to displace other species that could compete with it for substratum. Given the cosmopolitan nature of M. senile, the fact that this species has not been previously reported in the coastal zone of the region, and the results of our study, we discuss the possibility that this sea anemone is an invasive alien species in southern Patagonia, or at least a cryptogenic species.

  16. Profile of clinically-diagnosed dementias in a neuropsychiatric ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) and Vascular dementia (VaD) were the predominant phenotypes seen in 62 (57.4%) and 18 (16.7%) subjects respectively. Others include mixed dementia (4 cases), frontotemporal dementia (4 cases), Lewy body dementia (3 cases), alcohol-related dementia (3 cases), PD dementia (1 case) and ...

  17. LONG-TERM THERAPY WITH INDAPAMIDE IN ELDERLY AND SENILE PATIENTS WITH HYPERTENSION: CARDIORENOPROTECTIVE EFFECTS AND INFLUENCE ON QUALITY OF LIFE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. E. Statsenko

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To estimate cardiorenoprotective effect of 12-month therapy by indapamide in elderly and senile patients with arterial hypertension (HT and its influence on quality of life.Material and methods. 40 elderly and senile patients with HT were examined. 70% of patients received monotherapy by indapamide 2,5 mg once daily and 30% of patients were treated with indapamide and lisinopril combination. Duration of observation was 12 months. Ambulatory blood pressure (BP monitoring, echocardiography, plasma lipid profile, glycemia and uricemia levels and potassium serum level was evaluated initially and after 12 months of therapy. Glomerular filtration rate and albuminuria as well as patient quality of life also was evaluated.Results. Target BP level was reached in all patients during 12 month therapy. Reduction of average 24-hour, day and night BP, BP load, rate of morning BP rising was observed. Negative influence on BP variability was not found. Improvement of daily BP profile also was found. The indapamide reduced left ventricle mass, improved renal function, vessel resistance and quality of life. Negative influence of long-term therapy with indapamide on lipid, glucose, purine metabolism and serum potassium level was not observed.Conclusion. Indapamide is an effective antihypertensive drug for long-term treatment of elderly and senile patients with HT of 1-2 degree.

  18. Técnica de Blumenthal en el tratamiento de la catarata senil en el Centro Oftalmológico "Machala-Cuba" Ecuador

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bárbara Teresa Soler Quintana

    Full Text Available Objetivo: determinar los resultados de la aplicación de la técnica quirúrgica de Blumenthal en el tratamiento de la catarata senil. Métodos: se realizó un estudio descriptivo, longitudinal y prospectivo en el Centro Oftalmológico "Machala-Cuba", en Ecuador, durante el año 2010. El universo estuvo constituido por 800 ojos con diagnóstico de catarata senil. Se seleccionó una muestra de 200 ojos mediante muestreo aleatorio simple. En la recogida de los datos se expusieron todas las variables de interés de la investigación como edad y sexo, agudeza visual preoperatoria y posoperatoria, técnica anestésica empleada, percepción del dolor y complicaciones transoperatorias más frecuentes. Los datos fueron procesados y analizados mediante técnicas estadísticas descriptivas y porcentuales. Resultados: predominó el sexo femenino y el grupo de edad de 80 años o más. El mayor porcentaje de los pacientes refirió percepción leve del dolor con el uso de la anestesia epibulbar. Se observaron pocas complicaciones y una buena agudeza visual posquirúrgica. Conclusiones: la aplicación de la técnica de Blumenthal tiene buenos resultados en los pacientes operados de catarata senil.

  19. Comparative study on the 3H-thymidine index of dorsal epidermis, buccal mucosa, and seminal vesicles in senile male rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hornstein, O.P.; Schell, H.

    1975-01-01

    To supplement previous investigations on endogenous fluctuations of DNA synthesis in male rat dorsal epidermis, buccal mucosa and seminal vesicle epithelium from birth to sexual maturity, the labelling indices (L.I.) of these tissues in senile male rats from the same breed, studied under analogous experimental conditions, were evaluated as well as compared to the data obtained from rats in puberal and early mature age. In the dorsal epidermis and buccal mucosa of the old animals the medium L.I. were found to be at about the same level as those measured after puberty. In the aged seminal vesicle epithelium the medium L.I. was found to be decreased. The maintenance of epidermal and buccal DNA synthesis in senile rats as well as the results of previous studies with male rats subjected to castration or long-term administration of cyproteron acetate furnish evidence that a deficiency of testosteron does not diminish the rate of DNA synthesis in epidermis and buccal mucosa. However, from the decreased L.I. in seminal vesicle epithelium a reduced blood level or stimulating capacity, respectively, of testosteron in senile rats can be concluded. Furhtermore, withdrawal of testosteron by orchidectomy or administration of cyproteron acetate is appropriate to suppress significantly the proliferative activity of seminal vesicles epithelium. (orig.) [de

  20. Effect of milrinone on the cardiac function and N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide levels in patients with senile refractory heart failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiao-Na Wei1

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To study the effect of milrinone on the cardiac function and N-terminal probrain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP levels in patients with senile refractory heart failure. Methods: 90 patients with senile refractory heart failure who were treated in our hospital between August 2013 and August 2016 were collected and divided into control group (n=45 and observation group (n=45 according to the random number table. The control group received regular clinical treatment, and the observation group received regular + milrinone treatment. The cardiac function and serum NT-proBN contents were compared between two groups of patients before and after treatment. Results: Before treatment, the differences in ultrasound and serum cardiac function indexes and serum NT-proBN levels were not statistically significant between two groups of patients. After treatment, ultrasound serum cardiac function parameter LVEDD level in observation group was lower than that in control group while CI and SV levels were higher than those in control group; serum cardiac function indexes Cys-C, GDF-15, sST2 and H-FABP contents were lower than those in control group; serum NT-proBNP content was lower than that in control group. Conclusion: Milrinone therapy can optimize the cardiac function and reduce the serum NT-proBN levels in patients with senile refractory heart failure.

  1. The Cost of Dementia in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kronborg Andersen, C; Søgaard, Jes; Hansen, E

    1999-01-01

    In a population-based study of dementia, the cost of care for 245 demented elderly and 490 controls matched by age and gender was estimated. Dementia of Alzheimer's type was diagnosed according to the NINCDS-ADRDA criteria, and vascular dementia and other types of dementia were diagnosed accordin...... with dementia and the matched controls and amounts on average to DKK 77,000 per person per year. However, priority setting cannot be based on the cost of dementia per se, but only on the cost of a specific dementia intervention compared to its health benefit.......In a population-based study of dementia, the cost of care for 245 demented elderly and 490 controls matched by age and gender was estimated. Dementia of Alzheimer's type was diagnosed according to the NINCDS-ADRDA criteria, and vascular dementia and other types of dementia were diagnosed according...... to the DSM-IIIR criteria. Severity of dementia was determined by the Clinical Dementia Rating scale. The annual cost of medical care, domestic care, home help, nursing home and special equipment for nondemented patients was DKK 22,000 per person while the cost for very mildly, mildly, moderately and severely...

  2. Comparative cardiovascular safety of dementia medications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fosbøl, Emil L; Peterson, Eric D; Holm, Ellen

    2012-01-01

    To compare the cardiovascular safety of currently marketed dementia medications in new users in the United States and Denmark.......To compare the cardiovascular safety of currently marketed dementia medications in new users in the United States and Denmark....

  3. Dementia - keeping safe in the home

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000031.htm Dementia - keeping safe in the home To use the ... make sure the homes of people who have dementia are safe for them. Safety Tips for the ...

  4. Teaching Mands to Older Adults with Dementia

    OpenAIRE

    Oleson, Chelsey R.; Baker, Jonathan C.

    2014-01-01

    Millions of Americans are diagnosed with dementia, and that number is only expected to rise. The diagnosis of dementia comes with impairments, especially in language. Furthermore, dementia-related functional declines appear to be moderated by environmental variables (Alzheimer’s Association, Alzheimer’s & Dementia: The Journal of the Alzheimer’s Association 8:131–168 2012; American Psychiatric Association, 2000; Engelman et al., Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis 32:107–110, 1999; Engelman ...

  5. Recognition of dementia in hospitalized older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maslow, Katie; Mezey, Mathy

    2008-01-01

    Many hospital patients with dementia have no documented dementia diagnosis. In some cases, this is because they have never been diagnosed. Recognition of Dementia in Hospitalized Older Adults proposes several approaches that hospital nurses can use to increase recognition of dementia. This article describes the Try This approaches, how to implement them, and how to incorporate them into a hospital's current admission procedures. For a free online video demonstrating the use of these approaches, go to http://links.lww.com/A216.

  6. Cumulative Effect of Depression on Dementia Risk

    OpenAIRE

    Olazarán, J.; Trincado, R.; Bermejo-Pareja, F.

    2013-01-01

    Objective. To analyze a potential cumulative effect of life-time depression on dementia and Alzheimer's disease (AD), with control of vascular factors (VFs). Methods. This study was a subanalysis of the Neurological Disorders in Central Spain (NEDICES) study. Past and present depression, VFs, dementia status, and dementia due to AD were documented at study inception. Dementia status was also documented after three years. Four groups were created according to baseline data: never depression (n...

  7. Depression and the risk for dementia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kessing, Lars Vedel

    2012-01-01

    Depression is associated with increased risk of subsequent development of dementia; however, the nature of the association is still poorly understood. The purpose of the review was based on recent studies to discuss whether depression is a prodromal state of dementia or an independent risk factor...... for dementia, as well as to discuss how the type of depression, the type of dementia, and antidepressant treatment influence the association....

  8. Brain perfusion SPECT in dementia syndromes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Libus, P.; Stupalova, J.; Kuzelka, I.; Konrad, J.

    2002-01-01

    Aim: Brain perfusion SPECT is used in differential diagnostics of dementia syndromes. First of all the aim is to distinguish vascular dementia from degenerative dementia and to differentiate dementia from delirium, psychiatric syndromes, depression and secondary dementia, which is important in relation to therapy. The purpose of our study was to detect significance of BP SPECT and include it into the diagnostic process in dementia syndromes. Materials and methods: 51 women and 63 men aged 55 - 88 were evaluated in the study. The patients correspond to the general criteria of dementia diagnosis. They were sent to the examination by neurological, internal and psychiatric departments and out-patient departments. All patients were examined by 99mTc ECD SPECT using a double head camera PRISM 200 VP with LEHR collimator. The scintigraphic data were evaluated by the visual and semiquantitative analysis. Results: It was established that most patients in our group had vascular dementia, while Alzheimer's disease was second. In other groups we found out dementia at strategic infarct location, e.g. in gyrus angularis in the dominant hemisphere, frontal temporal lobe dementia and alcoholic dementia. Twenty-four patients had a normal diagnosis. Fifteen of them had a somatic reason of the delirious state and were re-classified into pseudodementia. Nine patients were not diagnostically included and the examination will repeated in four months time. Conclusion: We have found out a good applicability of brain perfusion SPECT in dementia syndromes diagnosis in our work. The best diagnosticable and most specific were the findings in multi-infarct dementia, Alzheimer's disease and frontal temporal lobe dementia. When vascular dementia is concerned we can even distinguish dementia at strategic infarction location, e.g. in thalamus, basal frontal telencefalon, in gyrus angularis of the dominant hemisphere, etc

  9. Dementia literacy in older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loi, Samantha M; Lautenschlager, Nicola T

    2015-09-01

    With the increasing aging population, it is predicted that there will also be a rise in the number of people with dementia. Although there is no definitive cure, early detection and access to treatment and services remains the cornerstone of management. Misinformation and poor knowledge about dementia may lead to delayed diagnosis. A study of dementia literacy was undertaken to explore current knowledge in a metropolitan city in Australia. A vignette describing an older person with symptoms of cognitive impairment was posted out to volunteers at the local hospital. The majority of participants surveyed correctly identified that the person in the vignette was suffering from symptoms of dementia or cognitive impairment. However, there was more variation with regard to types of treatment available and appropriate help-seeking behavior. Although people are able to identify symptoms of dementia when they are presented in a scenario, the reality is often not as clear. More education to improve knowledge with regard to this increasingly common disorder is required so that appropriate interventions can be made available. © 2014 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  10. Dementia and rural nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cowell, S.F.; Davison, A.; Logan-Sinclair, P.; Sturt University, Dubbo, NSW; Greenough, R.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: The rapid increase in dementia is directly related to the growing number of aged people in developed countries, such as Australia. This increase heightens the need for accurate dementia diagnosis to ensure treatment resources are appropriately allocated. However, current diagnostic methods are unable to determine specific dementia types limiting the effectiveness of many care plans. The lack of specialist resources in rural Australian communities presents nuclear medicine with an opportunity to make a significant impact on the management of this disease. This investigation aimed to identify how SPECT perfusion imaging could maximise its role in the management of dementia in a rural New South Wales setting. The study reviewed all Technetium 99m HMPAO SPECT brain studies over a three-year period. This included a medical record audit, review of all diagnostic imaging reports and an analysis of referral patterns. The results of this study provide compelling evidence that, even in a rural setting, brain SPECT, in conjunction with neuropsychological testing, offers high accuracy in determining the presence and type of dementia. In addition, the study found more than 30% of referrers had no training in SPECT, emphasising the importance of ensuring that brain SPECT reports, in a rural setting, educate and specify to referrers the significance and exact disease type found in the study. Copyright (2003) The Australian and New Zealand Society of Nuclear Medicine Inc

  11. First TV ad for dementia care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-12-10

    Last month, viewers saw the first-ever TV advertisement about providing care for people with dementia. Screened as part of Bupa's initiative, bringing the issue of dementia care 'out of the shadows,' the ad features Ernie visiting his sister June, who has dementia, in a Bupa care home and shows the personalised care being delivered by specially trained staff.

  12. Revisiting Regression in Autism: Heller's "Dementia Infantilis"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westphal, Alexander; Schelinski, Stefanie; Volkmar, Fred; Pelphrey, Kevin

    2013-01-01

    Theodor Heller first described a severe regression of adaptive function in normally developing children, something he termed dementia infantilis, over one 100 years ago. Dementia infantilis is most closely related to the modern diagnosis, childhood disintegrative disorder. We translate Heller's paper, Uber Dementia Infantilis, and discuss…

  13. Leisure activities, cognition and dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hui-Xin; Xu, Weili; Pei, Jin-Jing

    2012-03-01

    Accumulated evidence shows that leisure activities have a positive impact on cognitive function and dementia. This review aimed to systematically summarize the current evidence on this topic taking into account the limitations of the studies and biological plausibility for the underlying mechanisms linking cognition, dementia and leisure activities, with special attention on mental, physical and social activities. We included only longitudinal studies, with a follow-up time of at least 2 years, published in English from 1991 to March 2011 on leisure activities and cognition (n=29) or dementia (n=23) and provided some evidence from intervention studies on the topic. A protective effect of mental activity on cognitive function has been consistently reported in both observational and interventional studies. The association of mental activity with the risk of dementia was robust in observational studies but inconsistent in clinical trials. The protective effect of physical activity on the risk of cognitive decline and dementia has been reported in most observational studies, but has been less evident in interventional studies. Current evidence concerning the beneficial effect of other types of leisure activities on the risk of dementia is still limited and results are inconsistent. For future studies it is imperative that the assessment of leisure activities is standardized, for example, the frequency, intensity, duration and the type of activity; and also that the cognitive test batteries and the definition of cognitive decline are harmonized/standardized. Further, well designed studies with long follow-up times are necessary. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Imaging Brain Aging and Neurodegenerative disease. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Dance movement therapy for dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karkou, Vicky; Meekums, Bonnie

    2017-02-03

    Dementia is a collective name for different degenerative brain syndromes which, according to Alzheimer's Disease International, affects approximately 35.6 million people worldwide. The latest NICE guideline for dementia highlights the value of diverse treatment options for the different stages and symptoms of dementia including non-pharmacological treatments. Relevant literature also argues for the value of interventions that acknowledge the complexity of the condition and address the person as a whole, including their physical, emotional, social and cognitive processes. At the same time, there is growing literature that highlights the capacity of the arts and embodied practices to address this complexity. Dance movement therapy is an embodied psychological intervention that can address complexity and thus, may be useful for people with dementia, but its effectiveness remains unclear. To assess the effects of dance movement therapy on behavioural, social, cognitive and emotional symptoms of people with dementia in comparison to no treatment, standard care or any other treatment. Also, to compare different forms of dance movement therapy (e.g. Laban-based dance movement therapy, Chacian dance movement therapy or Authentic Movement). Searches took place up to March 2016 through ALOIS, Cochrane Dementia and Cognitive Improvement's Specialized Register, which covers CENTRAL, a number of major healthcare databases and trial registers, and grey literature sources. We checked bibliographies of relevant studies and reviews, and contacted professional associations, educational programmes and experts from around the world. We considered randomised controlled trials (RCTs) in any language, including cross-over design and cluster-RCTs for inclusion. Studies considered had to include people with dementia, in any age group and in any setting, with interventions delivered by a dance movement therapy practitioner who (i) had received formal training (ii) was a dance movement

  15. Spouse with schizophrenia and risk of dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohde, Christopher; Agerbo, Esben; Nielsen, Philip Rising

    2016-12-01

    Increased prevalence of lifestyle risk factors or shared etiology may underlie the association between schizophrenia and the subsequent risk of dementia. We explored the association between having a spouse with schizophrenia and the risk of dementia. We found a positive relationship between having a spouse with schizophrenia and vascular dementia in individuals without a mental disorder themselves but no association between having a spouse with schizophrenia and Alzheimer's dementia. As spouses share environmental risk factors and lifestyle, this might suggest that the excess risk of dementia in probands with schizophrenia could be ascribed to the unhealthy living environment among individuals with schizophrenia.

  16. Cobalamin deficiency, hyperhomocysteinemia, and dementia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven F Werder

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Steven F Werder1,21Kansas University School of Medicine – Wichita, Wichita, KS, USA; 2Community Health Center of Southeast Kansas, Pittsburg, KS, USAIntroduction: Although consensus guidelines recommend checking serum B12 in patients with dementia, clinicians are often faced with various questions: (1 Which patients should be tested? (2 What test should be ordered? (3 How are inferences made from such testing? (4 In addition to serum B12, should other tests be ordered? (5 Is B12 deficiency compatible with dementia of the Alzheimer’s type? (6 What is to be expected from treatment? (7 How is B12 deficiency treated?Methods: On January 31st, 2009, a Medline search was performed revealing 1,627 citations related to cobalamin deficiency, hyperhomocysteinemia, and dementia. After limiting the search terms, all abstracts and/or articles and other references were categorized into six major groups (general, biochemistry, manifestations, associations and risks, evaluation, and treatment and then reviewed in answering the above questions.Results: The six major groups above are described in detail. Seventy-five key studies, series, and clinical trials were identified. Evidence-based suggestions for patient management were developed.Discussion: Evidence is convincing that hyperhomocysteinemia, with or without hypovitaminosis B12, is a risk factor for dementia. In the absence of hyperhomocysteinemia, evidence is less convincing that hypovitaminosis B12 is a risk factor for dementia. B12 deficiency manifestations are variable and include abnormal psychiatric, neurological, gastrointestinal, and hematological findings. Radiological images of individuals with hyperhomocysteinemia frequently demonstrate leukoaraiosis. Assessing serum B12 and treatment of B12 deficiency is crucial for those cases in which pernicious anemia is suspected and may be useful for mild cognitive impairment and mild to moderate dementia. The serum B12 level is the standard initial test

  17. Etiologies and risk factors for dementia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandeep Grover

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Dementia is understood as a clinical syndrome characterized by impairment in memory impairment along with cognitive deficits in other domains. Over the years, understanding about the causes of dementias has improved. Broadly, dementias can be classified as irreversible degenerative dementias and reversible dementias. Alzheimer′s disease is the prototype of degenerative dementias and is characterized by the accumulation of beta-amyloid protein (called as amyloid plaques outside the neurons and accumulation of tau protein (called tau tangles inside the neurons. Vascular dementias are characterized by cerebrovascular insults which lead to pathological brain changes that impair cognition. The pathological hallmark of Lewy body dementia is the presence of α-synuclein neuronal inclusions, also known as Lewy bodies, accompanied by neuronal loss. Frontotemporal dementias are characterized by abnormal deposits of the microtubule-associated protein tau, the trans-activation response TAR DNA-binding protein with molecular weight 43 kDa (TDP-43, and the fused in sarcoma protein. Reversible dementias are characterized by the primary illness and may not present with characteristic brain deposits as seen with many degenerative dementias.

  18. Comparison of Hippocampal Volume in Dementia Subtypes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vijayakumar, Avinash; Vijayakumar, Abhishek

    2012-01-01

    Aims. To examine the relationship between different types of dementia and hippocampal volume. Methods. Hippocampal volume was measured using FL3D sequence magnetic resonance imaging in 26 Alzheimer's, vascular dementia, mixed dementia, and normal pressure hydrocephalus patients and 15 healthy controls and also hippocampal ratio, analyzed. Minimental scale was used to stratify patients on cognitive function impairments. Results. Hippocampal volume and ratio was reduced by 25% in Alzheimer's disease, 21% in mixed dementia, 11% in vascular dementia and 5% in normal pressure hydrocephalus in comparison to control. Also an asymmetrical decrease in volume of left hippocampus was noted. The severity of dementia increased in accordance to decreasing hippocampal volume. Conclusion. Measurement in hippocampal volume may facilitate in differentiating different types of dementia and in disease progression. There was a correlation between hippocampal volume and severity of cognitive impairment

  19. Efficacy and safety of short-term application of pranoprofen eye drops for senile patients with dry eyes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Chan Li

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available AIM:To investigate the efficacy and safety of short-term application of pranoprofen eye drops in the treatment of dry eyes in senile patients. METHODS: Totally 100 elderly patients with dry eyes treated in our hospital from June 2016 to May 2017 were randomly divided into 2 groups. All cases were bilateral onset, and the right eyes were marked as the observation eyes. The 50 eyes in the observation group were treated with 1g/L pranoprofen eye drops combined with 1g/L sodium hyaluronate eye drops, while 50 in the control group were treated with 1g/L sodium hyaluronate eye drops. The results of Schirmer Ⅰ, ocular surface disease index(OSDI, break-up time(BUT, ocular surface staining(OSS, human leukocyte antigen-DR(HLA-DRand CD11b in conjunctival epithelial cells before and at 2wk after treatment, and adverse reactions in 2 groups were observed. RESULTS: Before treatment, results of Schirmer I, OSDI, BUT, OSS, HLA-DR and CD11b in the two groups were similar, there were no statistically significant differences(P>0.05. After treatment, OSDI, OSS, HLA-DR, CD11b significantly decreased, BUT significantly increased in both groups, the differences were statistically significant(PPPCONCLUSION: Short term application of pranoprofen eye drops can effectively enhance the efficacy in treating elderly patients with dry eyes, release clinical symptoms, and the therapeutic mechanism may be related to the inhibitory effect on HLA-DR.

  20. Effect Of Using Black Cumin (Nigella Sativa) As Natural Antioxidant On Hyperlipidaemia And Antioxidant Activities In Senile Rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    HAMZA, R.G.; MAHMOUD, K.A.

    2009-01-01

    The black cumin (Nigella sativa) is one of the important herbal plants that used widely in most of human diseases and food preservation. Chemical composition of irradiated black cumin (10 kGy); moisture, ash, crude protein, crude lipid, total carbohydrate and crude fiber, were evaluated. The GC for analysis of fatty acids showed that the number of identified fatty acids was 9; the important one was linoleic (natural antioxidant). GC/MS used for analysis of essential oil showed that the number of identified compounds was 16; the important ones were thymoquinone, eugenol and linalool (natural antioxidants). Also, this study was performed to examine the efficacy of the black cumin to ameliorate the induced hyperlipidemia in senile rats. Twenty eight male rats were equally and randomly categorized into four groups. High fat diet (20g fat / 100g diet) was daily administered to rats for 6 weeks. Other animals where fed daily on either raw or irradiated black cumin diet (1% w/w) for 6 weeks. The results revealed that high fat diet fed to rats significantly induced an increase in serum phospholipids, TG, TC, LDL-C, atherogenic index and lipid peroxides (MDA). Significant decrease was observed in HDL-C, blood antioxidant enzymes activity (superoxide dismutase and catalase) and concentration of reduced glutathione (GSH). The results obtained revealed that feeding rats on diet containing either raw or irradiated black cumin (1% w/w) induced significant improvement in the above mentioned parameters. There was non- significant difference between non-irradiated and irradiated black cumin. Moreover, supplementation of black cumin in diet of rats can offer protection against free radicals generated through oxidative stress as a consequence of hyperlipidemic food.

  1. Effect Of Using Black Cumin (Nigella Sativa) As Natural Antioxidant On Hyperlipidaemia And Antioxidant Activities In Senile Rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    HAMZA, R G; MAHMOUD, K A [Food Irradiation Research Dept., National Centre for Radiation Research and Technology, Atomic Energy Authority, Cairo (Egypt)

    2009-07-01

    The black cumin (Nigella sativa) is one of the important herbal plants that used widely in most of human diseases and food preservation. Chemical composition of irradiated black cumin (10 kGy); moisture, ash, crude protein, crude lipid, total carbohydrate and crude fiber, were evaluated. The GC for analysis of fatty acids showed that the number of identified fatty acids was 9; the important one was linoleic (natural antioxidant). GC/MS used for analysis of essential oil showed that the number of identified compounds was 16; the important ones were thymoquinone, eugenol and linalool (natural antioxidants). Also, this study was performed to examine the efficacy of the black cumin to ameliorate the induced hyperlipidemia in senile rats. Twenty eight male rats were equally and randomly categorized into four groups. High fat diet (20g fat / 100g diet) was daily administered to rats for 6 weeks. Other animals where fed daily on either raw or irradiated black cumin diet (1% w/w) for 6 weeks. The results revealed that high fat diet fed to rats significantly induced an increase in serum phospholipids, TG, TC, LDL-C, atherogenic index and lipid peroxides (MDA). Significant decrease was observed in HDL-C, blood antioxidant enzymes activity (superoxide dismutase and catalase) and concentration of reduced glutathione (GSH). The results obtained revealed that feeding rats on diet containing either raw or irradiated black cumin (1% w/w) induced significant improvement in the above mentioned parameters. There was non- significant difference between non-irradiated and irradiated black cumin. Moreover, supplementation of black cumin in diet of rats can offer protection against free radicals generated through oxidative stress as a consequence of hyperlipidemic food.

  2. Clinical efficacy comparison of flabby skin excision combined orbicularis oculi muscle shortening surgery in patients with senile entropion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qing-Liang Xu

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To observe the clinical effect of slack skin excision combined with orbicularis oculi muscle shortening and orbicularis muscle shortening in the treatment of elderly patients with lower eyelid entropion, and provide the reference for the clinical treatment.METHODS: Eighty-two(126 eyesclinical diagnosis's elderly patients with lower eyelid entropion were collected from our department, then randomly divided into excised relaxing skin and orbicularis oculi muscle shortening treatment group and the orbicularis muscle shortening treatment group.The general data of the two groups, long term curative effect and short-term curative effect were compared. RESULTS: The age, sex, proportion of patients with the first time operation, course of disease were no statistical significance between the observation group and the control group(P>0.05. The short-term effective rate of the observation group was 95.2%, while the short-term effective rate of the control group was 77.8%, the short-term efficiency differences between the two groups was statistical significance(χ2=4.100, P=0.043. The long-term cure rate of the observation group was 82.5%(34 cases, 52 eyes, recurrence rate was 17.5%(7 cases, 11 eyes, while the cure rate of the control group was 60.3%(25 cases, 38 eyes, recurrence rate was 39.7%(16 cases, 25 eyes, the difference of long term cure rate was statistical significance between the two groups(PCONCLUSION: The clinical curative effect of slack skin excision combined with orbicularis oculi muscle shortening in the treatment of senile inferior entropion is better than orbicularis muscle shortening operation, recommending application in the clinical.

  3. NELL-1 Injection Maintains Long-Bone Quantity and Quality in an Ovariectomy-Induced Osteoporotic Senile Rat Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwak, Jinny; Zara, Janette N.; Chiang, Michael; Ngo, Richard; Shen, Jia; James, Aaron W.; Le, Khoi M.; Moon, Crystal; Zhang, Xinli; Gou, Zhongru; Ting, Kang

    2013-01-01

    Over 10 million Americans have osteoporosis, and is the predominant cause of fractures in the elderly. Treatment of fractures in the setting of osteoporosis is complicated by a suboptimal bone regenerative response due to a decline in the number of osteoblasts, their function, and survival. Consequently, an osteogenic therapeutic to prevent and treat fractures in patients with osteoporosis is needed. Nel-like molecule-1 (NELL-1), a novel osteoinductive growth factor, has been shown to promote bone regeneration. In this study, we aim to demonstrate the capacity of recombinant NELL-1 to prevent ovariectomy (OVX)-induced osteoporosis in a senile rat model. Ten-month-old female Sprague-Dawley rats underwent either sham surgery or OVX. Subsequently, 50 μL of 600 μg/mL NELL-1 lyophilized onto a 0–50-μm tricalcium phosphate (TCP) carrier was injected into the femoral bone marrow cavity while phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) control was injected into the contralateral femur. Our microcomputed tomography results showed that OVX+PBS/TCP control femurs showed a continuous decrease in the bone volume (BV) and bone mineral density (BMD) from 2 to 8 weeks post-OVX. In contrast, OVX+NELL-1/TCP femurs showed resistance to OVX-induced bone resorption showing BV and BMD levels similar to that of SHAM femurs at 8 weeks post-OVX. Histology showed increased endosteal-woven bone, as well as decreased adipocytes in the bone marrow of NELL-1-treated femurs compared to control. NELL-1-treated femurs also showed increased immunostaining for bone differentiation markers osteopontin and osteocalcin. These findings were validated in vitro, in which addition of NELL-1 in OVX bone marrow stem cells resulted in increased osteogenic differentiation. Thus, NELL-1 effectively enhances in situ osteogenesis in the bone marrow, making it potentially useful in the prevention and treatment of osteoporotic fractures. PMID:23083222

  4. COTARD SYNDROME IN SEMANTIC DEMENTIA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendez, Mario F.; Ramírez-Bermúdez, Jesús

    2011-01-01

    Background Semantic dementia is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by the loss of meaning of words or concepts. semantic dementia can offer potential insights into the mechanisms of content-specific delusions. Objective The authors present a rare case of semantic dementia with Cotard syndrome, a delusion characterized by nihilism or self-negation. Method The semantic deficits and other features of semantic dementia were evaluated in relation to the patient's Cotard syndrome. Results Mrs. A developed the delusional belief that she was wasting and dying. This occurred after she lost knowledge for her somatic discomforts and sensations and for the organs that were the source of these sensations. Her nihilistic beliefs appeared to emerge from her misunderstanding of her somatic sensations. Conclusion This unique patient suggests that a mechanism for Cotard syndrome is difficulty interpreting the nature and source of internal pains and sensations. We propose that loss of semantic knowledge about one's own body may lead to the delusion of nihilism or death. PMID:22054629

  5. Advanced dementia pain management protocols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montoro-Lorite, Mercedes; Canalias-Reverter, Montserrat

    Pain management in advanced dementia is complex because of neurological deficits present in these patients, and nurses are directly responsible for providing interventions for the evaluation, management and relief of pain for people suffering from this health problem. In order to facilitate and help decision-makers, pain experts recommend the use of standardized protocols to guide pain management, but in Spain, comprehensive pain management protocols have not yet been developed for advanced dementia. This article reflects the need for an integrated management of pain in advanced dementia. From the review and analysis of the most current and relevant studies in the literature, we performed an approximation of the scales for the determination of pain in these patients, with the observational scale PAINAD being the most recommended for the hospital setting. In addition, we provide an overview for comprehensive management of pain in advanced dementia through the conceptual framework «a hierarchy of pain assessment techniques by McCaffery and Pasero» for the development and implementation of standardized protocols, including a four-phase cyclical process (evaluation, planning/performance, revaluation and recording), which can facilitate the correct management of pain in these patients. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  6. AIDS dementia complex: a review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Portegies, P.

    1994-01-01

    AIDS dementia complex (ADC) is a constellation of cognitive, motor, and behavioral dysfunctions frequently observed in persons with AIDS. Estimates of its prevalence vary. ADC may occur at any stage of AIDS but is usually associated with later stages of disease. Its severity varies among patients

  7. Caffeine, Diabetes, Cognition, and Dementia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Biessels, Geert Jan

    2010-01-01

    People with diabetes mellitus are at increased risk of cognitive dysfunction. This review explores the relation between caffeine intake, diabetes, cognition and dementia, focusing on type 2 diabetes (T2DM). Epidemiological studies on caffeine/coffee intake and T2DM risk are reviewed. Next, the

  8. [Depression: A predictor of dementia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deví Bastida, Josep; Puig Pomés, Núria; Jofre Font, Susanna; Fetscher Eickhoff, Albert

    2016-01-01

    Many studies suggest that in 10-25% of cases of Alzheimer's, the most common dementia in our society, can be prevented with the elimination of some risk factors. Barnes and Yaffe found that one-third of Alzheimer's cases are attributable to depression, but in the scientific literature it is not clear if it has a real causal effect on the development of dementia. The purpose of this study is to analyse the scientific evidence on the hypothesis that depression increases the risk of developing dementia. A systematic review and a meta-analysis were performed on the scientific literature published up until the present day, searching articles that were published between 1990 and 2014. Ten of the studies found met the selection criteria -similar to a) size and characteristics of the sample (origin, age…), b) process of gathering data c) method of studying the relationship (within and/or between group comparison), and d) statistical analysis of the results- and the previously established quality. The value of odds ratio varied from 1.72 to 3.59, and the hazard ratio from 1,72 to 5.44. This indicates that the subjects with a history of depression have a higher risk of developing dementia than others who did not suffer depression. Copyright © 2015 SEGG. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  9. Frontotemporal dementia and its subtypes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ferrari, Raffaele; Hernandez, Dena G; Nalls, Michael A

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Frontotemporal dementia (FTD) is a complex disorder characterised by a broad range of clinical manifestations, differential pathological signatures, and genetic variability. Mutations in three genes-MAPT, GRN, and C9orf72-have been associated with FTD. We sought to identify novel gene...

  10. Dementia and the gender trouble?: Theorising dementia, gendered subjectivity and embodiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandberg, Linn J

    2018-06-01

    Despite person-centred approaches increasingly focusing on looking at the person in dementia instead of the pathology, the role of gender in dementia has been little explored. This article discusses how pervasive discourses on a loss of self and dementia as abject are interwoven with a de-gendering of persons with dementia. The cultural anxiety that dementia evokes in terms of loss of bodily and cognitive control could also be linked to a failure to normatively and intelligibly express gender when living with dementia. As a way to sustain personhood for people with dementia and challenge discourses on people with dementia as 'non-people', person-centred approaches have emphasised the collaborative work of carers, relatives and persons with dementia. Often implicitly, this also involves a 're-gendering' of persons with dementia where gendered biographies and pasts are upheld and gendered embodied selfhood is maintained through, for example, dress, hair and other aspects of appearance. This re-gendering could be of great significance for people with dementia to become intelligible as persons. Still, dementia studies must further consider non-normative expressions of gender and involve feminist theorising on gender as a power asymmetry since some embodiments and selves are more likely to be sustained in dementia than others. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Depression and the risk for dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kessing, Lars Vedel

    2012-11-01

    Depression is associated with increased risk of subsequent development of dementia; however, the nature of the association is still poorly understood. The purpose of the review was based on recent studies to discuss whether depression is a prodromal state of dementia or an independent risk factor for dementia, as well as to discuss how the type of depression, the type of dementia, and antidepressant treatment influence the association. Findings from recent studies suggest that some forms of depressive illness, for example early-onset depression before age 65 years and recurrent depression, may constitute long-term risk factors for development of dementia, whereas the onset of more recent depressive symptoms may reflect a prodromal phase of dementia. It is not clear whether specific subtypes of depression correspond to specific types of dementia. Recent studies suggest that long-term treatment with antidepressants may decrease the risk of developing some types of dementia, depending on the type of depressive disorder. This review has shown that the type of depression and dementia, as well as the effect of drug treatment, has to be considered to improve knowledge on the association between depression and dementia.

  12. Intracranial stenosis in cognitive impairment and dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilal, Saima; Xu, Xin; Ikram, M Kamran; Vrooman, Henri; Venketasubramanian, Narayanaswamy; Chen, Christopher

    2017-06-01

    Intracranial stenosis is a common vascular lesion observed in Asian and other non-Caucasian stroke populations. However, its role in cognitive impairment and dementia has been under-studied. We, therefore, examined the association of intracranial stenosis with cognitive impairment, dementia and their subtypes in a memory clinic case-control study, where all subjects underwent detailed neuropsychological assessment and 3 T neuroimaging including three-dimensional time-of-flight magnetic resonance angiography. Intracranial stenosis was defined as ≥50% narrowing in any of the intracranial arteries. A total of 424 subjects were recruited of whom 97 were classified as no cognitive impairment, 107 as cognitive impairment no dementia, 70 vascular cognitive impairment no dementia, 121 Alzheimer's Disease, and 30 vascular dementia. Intracranial stenosis was associated with dementia (age/gender/education - adjusted odds ratios (OR): 4.73, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.93-11.60) and vascular cognitive impairment no dementia (OR: 3.98, 95% CI: 1.59-9.93). These associations were independent of cardiovascular risk factors and MRI markers. However, the association with Alzheimer's Disease and vascular dementia became attenuated in the presence of white matter hyperintensities. Intracranial stenosis is associated with vascular cognitive impairment no dementia independent of MRI markers. In Alzheimer's Disease and vascular dementia, this association is mediated by cerebrovascular disease. Future studies focusing on perfusion and functional markers are needed to determine the pathophysiological mechanism(s) linking intracranial stenosis and cognition so as to identify treatment strategies.

  13. The accuracy of family physicians' dementia diagnoses at different stages of dementia: a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Dungen, Pim; van Marwijk, Harm W. M.; van der Horst, Henriëtte E.; Moll van Charante, Eric P.; Macneil Vroomen, Janet; van de Ven, Peter M.; van Hout, Hein P. J.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Optimising care for dementia patients and their informal carers is imperative in light of the impending dementia epidemic. An important aspect of care is accurate recognition and diagnosis of dementia. The aim of this review was to estimate family physicians' diagnostic accuracy at the

  14. The accuracy of family physicians' dementia diagnoses at different stages of dementia: a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Dungen, P.; van Marwijk, H.W.J.; van der Horst, H.E.; van Charante, E.P.M.; Vroomen, J.M.; van de Ven, P.M.; van Hout, H.P.J.

    2012-01-01

    Objective Optimising care for dementia patients and their informal carers is imperative in light of the impending dementia epidemic. An important aspect of care is accurate recognition and diagnosis of dementia. The aim of this review was to estimate family physicians' diagnostic accuracy at the

  15. Dementia quality of life instrument - construct and concurrent validity in patients with mild to moderate dementia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voigt-Radloff, S.; Leonhart, R.; Schutzwohl, M.; Jurjanz, L.; Reuster, T.; Gerner, A.; Marschner, K.; van Nes, F.A.; Graff, M.; Vernooij-Dassen, M.; Olde Rikkert, M.G.M.; Holthoff, V.; Hull, M.

    2012-01-01

    Background and purpose: To translate the Dementia quality of life instrument (DQoL) into German and assess its construct and concurrent validity in community-dwelling people with mild to moderate dementia. Methods: Dementia quality of life instrument data of two pooled samples (n=287) were analysed

  16. A Dementia Case Presenting with Psychotic Symptoms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Osman Ozdemir

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Dementia is a progressive clinical syndrome in which affected areas of brain function may be affected, such as memory, language, abstract thinking, problem solving and attention. Psychotic symptoms include auditory and visual hallucinations and delusions, which usually occur in the dementia. In this paper, a dementia case presenting with psychotic symptoms is presented. [Cukurova Med J 2013; 38(3.000: 482-486

  17. Depression and Risk of Developing Dementia

    OpenAIRE

    Byers, Amy L.; Yaffe, Kristine

    2011-01-01

    Depression is highly common throughout the life course and dementia is common in late life. The literature suggests an association between depression and dementia, and growing evidence implies that timing of depression may be important to defining the nature of the association. In particular, earlier-life depression or depressive symptoms consistently have been shown to be associated with a 2-fold or greater increase in risk of dementia. In contrast, studies of late-life depression have been ...

  18. Does Bilingualism Delay the Development of Dementia?

    OpenAIRE

    Amy L Atkinson

    2016-01-01

    It has been suggested that bilingualism (where individuals speak two languages) may delay the development of dementia. However, much of the research is inconclusive. Some researchers have reported that bilingualism delays the onset and diagnosis of dementia, whilst other studies have found weak or even detrimental effects. This paper reviews a series of nine empirical studies, published up until March 2016, which investigated whether bilingualism significantly delays the onset of dementia. Th...

  19. Dance for Individuals With Dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapum, Jennifer L; Bar, Rachel J

    2016-03-01

    The movement and music associated with dance plays an important role in many individuals' lives and can become imprinted upon the body and mind. Dance is thus closely associated with memory because of these deep connections. Without conscious thought, dance has the potential to be initiated as individuals age. In the current article, the authors share narrative reflections about their experiences with, and the potential of, dance as an intervention for aging populations diagnosed with dementia-related diseases. They draw upon their experiences in working with the aging population and a dance program currently being developed by Canada's National Ballet School and Baycrest Health Sciences for individuals with dementia-related diseases in long-term care. The current article is structured as dialogue between the authors because it mimics dance as a dialogical encounter between movement and music, and/or between individuals. Copyright 2016, SLACK Incorporated.

  20. Framing Confusion: Dementia, Society, and History.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballenger, Jesse F

    2017-07-01

    This essay will briefly sketch historical changes in the framing of dementia since the late nineteenth century. In broad terms, this period has seen a shift from viewing dementia as a pathological variant of normal aging to viewing it as a distinct disease. Although this broad reframing of dementia was clearly positive in raising awareness and funding for research, it had some negative aspects that should be considered. Caregiving came to seem less important than research aimed at a cure, and the stigma surrounding dementia has, if anything, increased. © 2017 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.

  1. Internet-based screening for dementia risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandt, Jason; Sullivan, Campbell; Burrell, Larry E; Rogerson, Mark; Anderson, Allan

    2013-01-01

    The Dementia Risk Assessment (DRA) is an online tool consisting of questions about known risk factors for dementia, a novel verbal memory test, and an informant report of cognitive decline. Its primary goal is to educate the public about dementia risk factors and encourage clinical evaluation where appropriate. In Study 1, more than 3,000 anonymous persons over age 50 completed the DRA about themselves; 1,000 people also completed proxy reports about another person. Advanced age, lower education, male sex, complaints of severe memory impairment, and histories of cerebrovascular disease, Parkinson's disease, and brain tumor all contributed significantly to poor memory performance. A high correlation was obtained between proxy-reported decline and actual memory test performance. In Study 2, 52 persons seeking first-time evaluation at dementia clinics completed the DRA prior to their visits. Their responses (and those of their proxy informants) were compared to the results of independent evaluation by geriatric neuropsychiatrists. The 30 patients found to meet criteria for probable Alzheimer's disease, vascular dementia, or frontotemporal dementia differed on the DRA from the 22 patients without dementia (most other neuropsychiatric conditions). Scoring below criterion on the DRA's memory test had moderately high predictive validity for clinically diagnosed dementia. Although additional studies of larger clinical samples are needed, the DRA holds promise for wide-scale screening for dementia risk.

  2. Social robots in advanced dementia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meritxell eValentí Soler

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Aims: Testing the effect of the experimental robot-based therapeutic sessions for patients with dementia in: a controlled study of parallel groups of nursing home patients comparing the effects of therapy sessions utilizing a humanoid robot (NAO, an animal-shaped robot (PARO, or a trained dog (DOG, with conventional therapy (CONTROL on symptoms of dementia; and an experience for patients who attend a day care center, comparing symptom prevalence and severity before and after sessions utilizing NAO and PARO. Methods: In the nursing home, patients were randomly assigned by blocks, based on dementia severity, to one of the 3 therapeutic groups to compare: CONTROL, PARO and NAO (phase 1 and CONTROL, PARO and DOG (phase 2. In the day care center, all patients received therapy with NAO (phase 1 and PARO (phase 2. Therapy sessions were held 2 days/week for 3 months. Evaluation at baseline and follow-up was carried out by blind raters using: the Global Deterioration Scale (GDS, the Severe Mini Mental State Examination (sMMSE, the Mini Mental State Examination (MMSE, the Neuropsychiatric Inventory (NPI, the Apathy Scale for Institutionalized Patients with Dementia Nursing Home version (APADEM-NH, the Apathy Inventory (AI and the Quality of Life Scale (QUALID. Statistical analysis included descriptive statistics and non parametric tests performed by a blinded investigator. Results: In the nursing home, 101 patients (phase 1 and 110 patients (phase 2 were included. There were no significant differences at baseline. The relevant changes at follow-up were: (phase 1 patients in the robot groups showed an improvement in apathy; patients in NAO group showed a decline in cognition as measured by the MMSE scores, but not the sMMSE; the robot groups showed no significant changes between them; (phase 2 QUALID scores increased in the PARO group. In the day care center, 20 patients (phase 1 and 17 patients (phase 2 were included. The main findings were: (phase 1 imp

  3. Dementia pugilistica 1a. parte

    OpenAIRE

    OTERO SILICEO, ENRIQUE; PADILLA RUBIO, JOEL

    2004-01-01

    Sports is considered a synonym for body and mind health. However, the so called contaet sports, the main example being boxing, more or less go beyond this definition. Contemporary boxing is a spetacle, who is a continuation of historical fights of gladiators. For many years, several complications and head alterations have been related to boxing involving both the face and the skull. And, because of their outcome, some of the most important alterations are neuropsychiatric such as dementia pug...

  4. Rights in mind: Thinking differently about dementia and disability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shakespeare, Tom; Zeilig, Hannah; Mittler, Peter

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to argue for the utility of a relational model of disability, as a way of conceptualizing dementia. We explore whether dementia should be considered as a disability, and whether people with dementia might consider themselves as disabled people. We review examples of, and issues raised by, the political activism of people with dementia. We consider how language constructs dementia negatively. We discuss how the environment influences the experience of dementia. In conclusion, we show that a relational model of dementia lays the basis for a human rights approach to the condition, based on collaborative partnerships between people with dementia and people from other disability communities.

  5. Effectiveness and safety of celecoxib combined with diacerein in the treatment of senile degenerative knee osteoarthritis: study protocol and preliminary results of a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guo-dong Wang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and objectives: The non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug celecoxib, used for the treatment of senile degenerative knee osteoarthritis, has a rapid onset of action and few side effects. However, it cannot prevent the occurrence and development of knee osteoarthritis. Celecoxib withdrawal is likely to induce a rebound increase in inflammation that may aggravate symptoms. Diacerein is a drug used to improve articular cartilage metabolism. It can delay the progression of senile degenerative knee osteoarthritis, but has a slow onset of action. Whether combined treatment with celecoxib and diacerein provides complimentary actions to achieve a better therapeutic effect on senile degenerative knee osteoarthritis remains unclear. >Design: A prospective, single-center, randomized controlled trial. Methods: Three hundred patients with senile degenerative knee osteoarthritis who receive treatment at the Department of Orthopedics, Second Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing Medical University, China will be randomly assigned to the celecoxib (200 mg, once a day, orally, diacerein (50 mg, twice a day, orally, and celecoxib + diacerein (celecoxib 200 mg, once a day, orally and diacerein 50 mg, twice a day, orally groups, with 100 patients in each group. Patients in each group will be treated for 12 successive weeks, and a 36-week follow-up will be performed. At 24 weeks after treatment, the VAS score for pain during the 20-meter walk test and osteoarthritis index were significantly decreased in the diacerein and celecoxib + diacerein groups compared to pre-treatment (P Outcome measures and preliminary results: The primary outcome measure of this study is the Visual Analogue Scale (VAS score for pain during the 20-meter walk test before and 1, 4, 12, 24, and 36 weeks after treatment. The secondary outcome measures of this study include osteoarthritis index and X-ray image findings of the knee before and 1, 4, 12, 24, and 36 weeks after treatment, as well

  6. Stereotypic behaviors in degenerative dementias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prioni, S; Fetoni, V; Barocco, F; Redaelli, V; Falcone, C; Soliveri, P; Tagliavini, F; Scaglioni, A; Caffarra, P; Concari, L; Gardini, S; Girotti, F

    2012-11-01

    Stereotypies are simple or complex involuntary/unvoluntary behaviors, common in fronto-temporal dementia (FTD), but not studied in other types of degenerative dementias. The aim was to investigate stereotypy frequency and type in patients with FTD, Alzheimer's disease (AD), progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) and Parkinson's disease with dementia (PDD) in a multicenter observational study; and to investigate the relation of stereotypies to cognitive, behavioral and motor impairment. One hundred fifty-five consecutive outpatients (45 AD, 40 FTD, 35 PSP and 35 PDD) were studied in four hospitals in northern Italy. Stereotypies were examined by the five-domain Stereotypy Rating Inventory. Cognition was examined by the Mini Mental State and Frontal Assessment Battery, neuropsychiatric symptoms by the Neuropsychiatric Inventory, and motor impairment and invalidity by the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale part III, and activities of daily living. Stereotypies were present in all groups. FTD and PDD had the greatest frequency of one-domain stereotypies; FTD also had the greatest frequency of two-or-more domain stereotypies; movement stereotypies were the most common stereotypies in all groups. AD patients had fewer stereotypies than the other groups. Stereotypies are not exclusive to FTD, but are also fairly common in PSP and PDD, though less so in AD. Stereotypies may be underpinned by dysfunctional striato-frontal circuits, known to be damaged in PSP and PDD, as well as FTD.

  7. Vascular risk factors, cognitve decline, and dementia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E Duron

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available E Duron, Olivier HanonBroca Hospital, Paris, FranceAbstract: Dementia is one of the most important neurological disorders in the elderly. Aging is associated with a large increase in the prevalence and incidence of degenerative (Alzheimer’s disease and vascular dementia, leading to a devastating loss of autonomy. In view of the increasing longevity of populations worldwide, prevention of dementia has turned into a major public health challenge. In the past decade, several vascular risk factors have been found to be associated with vascular dementia but also Alzheimer’s disease. Some longitudinal studies, have found significant associations between hypertension, diabetus mellitus, and metabolic syndrome, assessed at middle age, and dementia. Studies assessing the link between hypercholesterolemia, atrial fibrillation, smoking, and dementia have given more conflicting results. Furthermore, some studies have highlighted the possible protective effect of antihypertensive therapy on cognition and some trials are evaluating the effects of statins and treatments for insulin resistance. Vascular risk factors and their treatments are a promising avenue of research for prevention of dementia, and further long-term, placebo-controlled, randomized studies, need to be performed.Keywords: dementia, hypertension, diabetus mellitus, hypercholesterolemia, metabolic syndrome

  8. Alzheimer’s Disease and Dementia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ridder, Hanne Mette Ochsner

    2015-01-01

    people around the world. Alzheimer’s disease and related dementias affect neurocognition and associated functioning, including memory, thinking, behavior, and activities of daily living. Agitation in later stages of dementia is the most significant symptom contributing to patient distress and caregiver...

  9. Opening up the DNA methylome of dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delgado-Morales, R; Esteller, M

    2017-04-01

    Dementia is a complex clinical condition characterized by several cognitive impairments that interfere with patient independence in executing everyday tasks. Various neurodegenerative disorders have dementia in common among their clinical manifestations. In addition, these diseases, such as Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, dementia with Lewy bodies and frontotemporal dementia, share molecular alterations at the neuropathological level. In recent years, the field of neuroepigenetics has expanded massively and it is now clear that epigenetic processes, such as DNA methylation, are mechanisms involved in both normal and pathological brain function. Despite the persistent methodological and conceptual caveats, it has been reported that several genes fundamental to the development of neurodegenerative disorders are deregulated by aberrant methylation patterns of their promoters, and even common epigenetic signatures for some dementia-associated pathologies have been identified. Therefore, understanding the epigenetic mechanisms that are altered in dementia, especially those associated with the initial phases, will allow us not only to understand the etiopathology of dementia and its progression but also to design effective therapies to reduce this global public health problem. This review provides an in-depth summary of our current knowledge about DNA methylation in dementia, focusing exclusively on the analyses performed in human brain.

  10. Enteral Nutrition in Dementia: A Systematic Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanne Brooke

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this systematic review is to evaluate the role of enteral nutrition in dementia. The prevalence of dementia is predicted to rise worldwide partly due to an aging population. People with dementia may experience both cognitive and physical complications that impact on their nutritional intake. Malnutrition and weight loss in dementia correlates with cognitive decline and the progress of the disease. An intervention for long term eating difficulties is the provision of enteral nutrition through a Percutaneous Endoscopic Gastrostomy tube to improve both nutritional parameters and quality of life. Enteral nutrition in dementia has traditionally been discouraged, although further understanding of physical, nutritional and quality of life outcomes are required. The following electronic databases were searched: EBSCO Host, MEDLINE, PubMed, Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews and Google Scholar for publications from 1st January 2008 and up to and including 1st January 2014. Inclusion criteria included the following outcomes: mortality, aspiration pneumonia, pressure sores, nutritional parameters and quality of life. Each study included separate analysis for patients with a diagnosis of dementia and/or neurological disease. Retrospective and prospective observational studies were included. No differences in mortality were found for patients with dementia, without dementia or other neurological disorders. Risk factors for poor survival included decreased or decreasing serum albumin levels, increasing age or over 80 years and male gender. Evidence regarding pneumonia was limited, although did not impact on mortality. No studies explored pressure sores or quality of life.

  11. Role of BRI2 in Dementia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    del Campo, M.; Teunissen, C.E.

    2014-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD), the most common form of dementia, shares clinical and pathological similarities with familial British and Danish dementias (FBD and FDD). Whereas the etiology of sporadic AD remains unclear, familial AD is linked to mutations in amyloid-β protein precursor (AβPP),

  12. Dementia - what to ask your doctor

    Science.gov (United States)

    What to ask your doctor about dementia; Alzheimer disease - what to ask your doctor; Cognitive impairment - what to ask your doctor ... Alzheimer's Association. Dementia Care Practice Recommendations ... in a Home Setting. Updated 2009. Alz.org. www.alz.org/national/ ...

  13. Designing for Quality: The Understanding Dementia MOOC

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Carolyn; Kelder, Jo-Anne; Doherty, Kathleen; Phillips, Rob; McInerney, Fran; Walls, Justin; Robinson, Andrew; Vickers, James

    2014-01-01

    The introduction of Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs) as a vehicle for education delivery presents opportunities and challenges. In the context of the Wicking Dementia Research and Education Centre (Wicking Centre), the driver to develop a MOOC was the promise of addressing the international deficit in evidence-based dementia education, as well…

  14. Pharmacological management of Alzheimer's and related dementias ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Current treatment approaches in dementia lie on the use of cholinergic transmission enhancers. In recent times, herbal products have become popular in dementia and other chronic diseases treatment. Objective and Design: To review currently available (locally and internationally) herbal preparation and their ...

  15. Depression and Risk of Developing Dementia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byers, Amy L.; Yaffe, Kristine

    2012-01-01

    Depression is highly common throughout the life course and dementia is common in late life. The literature suggests an association between depression and dementia, and growing evidence implies that timing of depression may be important to defining the nature of the association. In particular, earlier-life depression or depressive symptoms consistently have been shown to be associated with a 2-fold or greater increase in risk of dementia. In contrast, studies of late-life depression have been more conflicting but the majority support an association; yet, the nature of this association is unclear (e.g., if depression is a prodrome or consequence or risk factor for dementia). The likely biological mechanisms linking depression to dementia include vascular disease, alterations in glucocorticoid steroids and hippocampal atrophy, increased deposition of β-amyloid plaques, inflammatory changes, and deficits of nerve growth factors. Treatment strategies for depression might intervene on these pathways and in turn may alter risk for dementia. Given the projected increase of dementia in the coming decades, it is critically important that we understand whether treatment for depression alone or combined with other regimens improves cognition. In this review, we summarize and analyze current evidence for late-life and earlier-life depression and their relationship to dementia, discuss the primary underlying mechanisms and implications for treatment. PMID:21537355

  16. Genetic Characterization of Movement Disorders and Dementias

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-04-27

    Ataxia; Dystonia; Parkinson's Disease; Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis; Corticobasal Degeneration; Multiple System Atrophy; Alzheimer's Disease; Lewy Body Dementia; Parkinson Disease-Dementia; Dentatorubral-pallidoluysian Atrophy; Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease and Fatal Familial Insomnia; Fragile X-associated Tremor/Ataxia Syndrome; Krabbe's Disease; Niemann-Pick Disease, Type C; Neuronal Ceroid Lipofuscinosis

  17. Cerebral emboli and depressive symptoms in dementia.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Purandare, N.; Oude Voshaar, R.C.; Hardicre, J.; Byrne, J.; McCollum, C.N.; Burns, A.

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The vascular depression hypothesis and our recent findings of increased frequency of spontaneous cerebral emboli in dementia suggest that such emboli may be involved in the causation of depressive symptoms in dementia. AIMS: To evaluate the association between spontaneous cerebral emboli

  18. Policies in Dementia, comparing Germany and Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerregaard, Lene Berit Skov

    2017-01-01

    In Short Germany as well as Denmark are focusing on the same issues regarding Dementia, as other European Countries are, too. The key issues in the national strategies are: timely diagnosis, self-determination for the person with dementia, unbroken “care chain”, better possibilities for the relief...

  19. Vascular dementia | Connor | African Journal of Psychiatry

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Vascular dementia (VaD) is a common but heterogeneous condition in which there is a clear temporal relationship between the dementia and vascular disease. It may result from multiple large or small vessel strokes or a single strategic stroke. Subcortical ischaemic VaD includes multiple lacunes and subcortical ...

  20. What do children need to know about dementia? The perspectives of children and people with personal experience of dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Jess R; Jeon, Yun-Hee; Goodenough, Belinda; Low, Lee-Fay; Bryden, Christine; Hutchinson, Karen; Richards, Laura

    2017-10-02

    The vision for dementia-friendly communities is challenged by limited public awareness and stigma about dementia. The study aim was to elicit stakeholder priorities for the message content of an education program to improve dementia awareness among youth; specifically, what do children need to know about dementia? A qualitative inquiry using interviews and focus groups was used. Purposive sampling achieved maximum variation in dementia experience and participant characteristics. Focus groups with Scouts in the community aged 9-12 years old (n = 22) used innovative techniques to explore children's attitudes towards people with dementia. Participants with personal experience of dementia were five people with early-stage dementia; 12 adult primary carers; four non-primary carers; and six grandchildren of a person with dementia. They were asked what is important for children to understand about dementia and what attitudes they may like an education program to confer. Content analysis was performed using NVivo10. Strong themes to emerge were that children need to know the whole truth about dementia; that individuals with dementia are "still people," that it is "not the fault" of the person with dementia; and that dementia is different and typically unpredictable for everyone. Discussions also indicated a need to educate children about ways to relate to a person with dementia, and to appreciate "positives" within a relationship. Children are our future citizens. Developing an education program for children with this message content may be fundamental to de-stigmatizing dementia and laying the foundation to dementia-friendly communities.

  1. Insights on dying, dementia and death certificates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandormael, Sofie; Meirschaert, Alexander; Steyaert, Jan; De Lepeleire, Jan

    2018-01-01

    For our master thesis in medicine, we aimed to determine how many deaths were caused by and with dementia in 2014 and we compared our results with figures from abroad. The mortality rates of 2014 in Flanders were used to determine the amount of deaths related to dementia. These figures are collected by Vlaams Agentschap Zorg & Gezondheid (VAZG) and coded per ICD-10 classification. Of all deaths in Flanders in 2014, 6.60% were caused by dementia and 4.29% were caused by another condition, while also suffering from dementia. Data from abroad are ambiguous. While working on our thesis about "death & dementia", we questioned the reliability of mortality statistics. Possible explanations could be; the complexity of completing death certificates correctly and the challenges involved in properly constructing a chain of causes of death. The accuracy of mortality data can be improved by training and redrafting death certificates.

  2. Recognition of dementia in ancient China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jia; Wang, Lu-Ning; Tian, Jin-Zhou

    2012-12-01

    A search of previous records in the literatures was done to summarize the opinions for dementia in ancient China. The earliest description of dementia was traced in the Yellow emperor's internal classic, a book written 2000 years ago. Hua Tuo (AD 140-208) in Han Dynasty first denominated "dementia" in the book, Hua Tuo Shen Yi Mi Zhuan. The pathogenesis of dementia could be generalized as the insufficiency of Qi, a flowing energy; the stagnation of phlegm, a harmful liquid substance in the body; and the blood stasis, which were also regarded as therapeutic targets. Therefore, we can conclude that dementia has been recognized and investigated in traditional Chinese medicine, which is definitely before the industrial civilization era. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Cumulative Effect of Depression on Dementia Risk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Olazarán

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To analyze a potential cumulative effect of life-time depression on dementia and Alzheimer’s disease (AD, with control of vascular factors (VFs. Methods. This study was a subanalysis of the Neurological Disorders in Central Spain (NEDICES study. Past and present depression, VFs, dementia status, and dementia due to AD were documented at study inception. Dementia status was also documented after three years. Four groups were created according to baseline data: never depression (nD, past depression (pD, present depression (prD, and present and past depression (prpD. Logistic regression was used. Results. Data of 1,807 subjects were investigated at baseline (mean age 74.3, 59.3% women, and 1,376 (81.6% subjects were evaluated after three years. The prevalence of dementia at baseline was 6.7%, and dementia incidence was 6.3%. An effect of depression was observed on dementia prevalence (OR [CI 95%] 1.84 [1.01–3.35] for prD and 2.73 [1.08–6.87] for prpD, and on dementia due to AD (OR 1.98 [0.98–3.99] for prD and OR 3.98 [1.48–10.71] for prpD (fully adjusted models, nD as reference. Depression did not influence dementia incidence. Conclusions. Present depression and, particularly, present and past depression are associated with dementia at old age. Multiple mechanisms, including toxic effect of depression on hippocampal neurons, plausibly explain these associations.

  4. Longitudinal Association of Dementia and Depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snowden, Mark B; Atkins, David C; Steinman, Lesley E; Bell, Janice F; Bryant, Lucinda L; Copeland, Catherine; Fitzpatrick, Annette L

    2015-09-01

    Depression is an important precursor to dementia, but less is known about the role dementia plays in altering the course of depression. We examined whether depression prevalence, incidence, and severity are higher in those with dementia versus those with mild cognitive impairment (MCI), or normal cognition. Prospective cohort study using the longitudinal Uniform Data Set of the National Alzheimer's Coordinating Center (2005-2013). 34 Alzheimer Disease research centers. 27,776 subjects with dementia, MCI, or normal cognition. Depression status was determined by a clinical diagnosis of depression within the prior 2 years and by a Geriatric Depression Scale-Short Form score >5. Rates of depression were significantly higher in subjects with MCI and dementia compared with those with normal cognition at index visit. Controlling for demographics and common chronic conditions, logistic regression analysis revealed elevated depression in those with MCI (OR: 2.40 [95% CI: 2.25, 2.56]) or dementia (OR: 2.64 [95% CI: 2.43, 2.86]) relative to those with normal cognition. In the subjects without depression at the index visit (N = 18,842), those with MCI and dementia had higher probabilities of depression diagnosis 2 years post index visit than those with normal cognition: MCI = 21.7%, dementia = 24.7%, normal cognition = 10.5%. MCI and dementia were associated with significantly higher rates of depression in concurrent as well as prospective analyses. These findings suggest that efforts to effectively engage and treat older adults with dementia will need also to address co-occurring depression. Copyright © 2015 American Association for Geriatric Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Vascular dementia: Facts and controversies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavlović Aleksandra

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Vascular dementia (VaD is the second most frequent dementia after Alzheimer’s disease, and is diagnosed during lifetime in 20% of demented patients. Five­year survival rate in VaD is 39%, while it is estimated to be 75% in healthy persons of the same age. It is therefore important to make correct diagnosis of VaD early in the course of the disease. Risk factors for VaD are identical to stroke risk factors, and there are significant possibilities for the prevention of vascular cognitive decline. Cognitive decline develops acutely or step­by­step within three months after stroke, but more gradual progression of intellectual decline is also possible. Neurological examination can reveal pyramidal and extrapyramidal signs, pseudobulbar palsy, gait disturbance and urinary incontinence. Neuropsychological profile comprises the loss of cognitive set shifting, decline in word fluency, verbal learning difficulties, perseverations, difficulties in complex figure copying, and in patients with cortically located lesions also problems with speech and praxia. The basis of the diagnosis is, besides history, neurological examination and neuropsychological assessment, computed tomography and/ or magnetic resonance brain imaging. Vascular risk factors control is the most important measure in VaD prevention. Modern guidelines for the treatment of cognitive decline in VaD emphasize that donepezil can be useful in the improvement of cognitive status at the level of Class IIa recommendation at the level of evidence A, while memantine may be useful in patients with mixed VaD and Alzheimer’s disease dementia. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 175022 i br. 175033

  6. [Visual art, creativity and dementia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serrano, C; Allegri, R F; Martelli, M; Taragano, F; Rinalli, P

    2005-01-01

    Visual art is an expression of neurological function and how it organizes and interprets perception. The art is predominantly in the right hemisphere, in contrast, the left side, have inhibitory effects on artistic expression. In normal subjects, inhibitory and excitatory mechanisms could interact in a complex harmony, reflecting a paradoxical functional facilitation. Brain diseases such as dementia could change this harmony and then, alter the artistic abilities. Evaluate the art expression in the degenerative diseases. Artistic abilities of 3 painters with degenerative diseases were assessment. Patient 1: A 83 - year old right handed female, diagnosis: Alzheimer's disease. Artistic description: low productivity, simplified versions of earlier and alteration of the visuospatial organization. Patient 2: A 78-year-old right handed female, diagnosis: Primary Progressive Aphasia (PPA); Artistic description: oversimplified drawings which maintaining overall spatial organization, without impair artistic skills. Patient 3: A 68 year-old right handed woman, diagnosis: Fronto-Temporal Dementia (FTD). Artistic description: Increased artistic activity, originality, freedom, utilization of intense colours with perseverative and repetitive copying of similar paintings of her own work. Visual art in Alzheimer's disease is a consequence of visuospatial and constructive disabilities. In contrast, the conservation of this cognitive functions and left asymmetrical involved, in FTD and PPA respectively, suggest artistic preservation, independently of the language injury. The disproportionate functional prevalence of the right over the left could lead to a release of novelty - seeking in art and can contribute to emergent creativity. These observations suggest an organization for art in the brain and proposed bases for further investigations in dementias.

  7. Prevalence and characteristics of dementia in Parkinson disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aarsland, Dag; Andersen, Kjeld; Larsen, Jan P

    2003-01-01

    Few longitudinal studies of dementia in Parkinson disease (PD) have been reported, and the proportion of patients with PD who eventually develop dementia is unknown.......Few longitudinal studies of dementia in Parkinson disease (PD) have been reported, and the proportion of patients with PD who eventually develop dementia is unknown....

  8. Reversible dementia: The imitation game

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Venugopalan Y Vishnu

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Rapidly progressive dementia (RPD is an emergency in behavioural or cognitive neurology. Many rare neuroinfections like Neurosyphilis may be missed, if they are not thoroughly evaluated. We report a patient with subacute onset and progressive cognitive decline, extrapyramidal involvement and myoclonic jerks who was initially suspected as probable autoimmune encephalitis or Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD. Investigations revealed positive serum and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF Venereal Disease Research Laboratory test (VDRL. On treatment with penicillin, he developed Jarisch-Herxheimer reaction and was treated symptomatically. After two weeks of penicillin, he improved significantly and except for mild short term memory recall, he is asymptomatic for last two years.

  9. Communicating with people with dementia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James McKillop

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available It can be very difficult to communicate with people with dementia. Each case requires its own unique handling. Not every scenario is covered, as many times your own judgment is what will work, best according to the circumstances. These can change from dawn to evening and from day to day. Never assume things will be the way they were the last time you communicated. Be on your guard. Be adaptable. The article will help get you started to think of your own ways to communicate.

  10. [Pathogenetic associations of periodontal diseases with somatic therapeutic pathology, comorbid conditions in patients of advanced and senile age: state-of-the-art review. Part 1. Associations of periodontal diseases with somatic therapeutic pathology in patients of advanced and senile age].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ar'eva, G T; Solov'ev, M M; Ar'ev, A L; Ryzhak, G A

    2014-01-01

    The state-of-the-art review of literature on existing views on the association of periodontal diseases with somatic therapeutic pathology (first part of the review) and comorbid conditions (second part of the review) is submitted. The conclusion about need of carrying out the further multicenter researches which purpose is development of new integrated indicators, in a complex and comprehensively characterizing not only the periodontal status, but also set of available somatic therapeutic pathology, especially at pa- tients of advanced and senile age is drawn.

  11. Prevalence of dementia and major dementia subtypes in Spanish populations: A reanalysis of dementia prevalence surveys, 1990-2008

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boix Raquel

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This study describes the prevalence of dementia and major dementia subtypes in Spanish elderly. Methods We identified screening surveys, both published and unpublished, in Spanish populations, which fulfilled specific quality criteria and targeted prevalence of dementia in populations aged 70 years and above. Surveys covering 13 geographically different populations were selected (prevalence period: 1990-2008. Authors of original surveys provided methodological details of their studies through a systematic questionnaire and also raw age-specific data. Prevalence data were compared using direct adjustment and logistic regression. Results The reanalyzed study population (aged 70 year and above was composed of Central and North-Eastern Spanish sub-populations obtained from 9 surveys and totaled 12,232 persons and 1,194 cases of dementia (707 of Alzheimer's disease, 238 of vascular dementia. Results showed high variation in age- and sex-specific prevalence across studies. The reanalyzed prevalence of dementia was significantly higher in women; increased with age, particularly for Alzheimer's disease; and displayed a significant geographical variation among men. Prevalence was lowest in surveys reporting participation below 85%, studies referred to urban-mixed populations and populations diagnosed by psychiatrists. Conclusion Prevalence of dementia and Alzheimer's disease in Central and North-Eastern Spain is higher in females, increases with age, and displays considerable geographic variation that may be method-related. People suffering from dementia and Alzheimer's disease in Spain may approach 600,000 and 400,000 respectively. However, existing studies may not be completely appropriate to infer prevalence of dementia and its subtypes in Spain until surveys in Southern Spain are conducted.

  12. Open dementia project: Empathic tools between magic and everyday life

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Yanki; Hendriks, Niels; Tsang, Albert

    2017-01-01

    In Chinese society like in many cultures, persons with dementia suffer some level of stigmatisation. For this reason a dementia research/care centre in Hong Kong (China) initiated the design of the “dementia experience tool”. Its main goal is to create public understanding through inviting the general public to experience dementia. The dementia research/care centre commissioned a social design research lab team (two of the authors are part of this) to create the tool, sta...

  13. Neuroradiological findings in vascular dementia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guermazi, Ali; Miaux, Yves; Suhy, Joyce; Pauls, Jon; Lopez, Ria [Synarc, Inc., Department of Radiology Services, San Francisco, CA (United States); Rovira-Canellas, Alex [Hospital General Universitari Vall d' Hebron, Unita de Resonancia Magnetica, Barcelona (Spain); Posner, Holly [Eisai, Inc., Teaneck, NJ (United States)

    2007-01-15

    There are multiple diagnostic criteria for vascular dementia (VaD) that may define different populations. Utilizing the criteria of the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke and Association Internationale pour la Recherche et l'Enseignement en Neurosciences (NINDS-AIREN) has provided improved consistency in the diagnosis of VaD. The criteria include a table listing brain imaging lesions associated with VaD. The different neuroradiological aspects of the criteria are reviewed based on the imaging data from an ongoing large-scale clinical trial testing a new treatment for VaD. The NINDS-AIREN criteria were applied by a centralized imaging rater to determine eligibility for enrollment in 1,202 patients using brain CT or MRI. Based on the above data set, the neuroradiological features that are associated with VaD and that can result from cerebral small-vessel disease with extensive leukoencephalopathy or lacunae (basal ganglia or frontal white matter), or may be the consequence of single strategically located infarcts or multiple infarcts in large-vessel territories, are illustrated. These features may also be the consequence of global cerebral hypoperfusion, intracerebral hemorrhage, or other mechanisms such as genetically determined arteriopathies. Neuroimaging confirmation of cerebrovascular disease in VaD provides information about the topography and severity of vascular lesions. Neuroimaging may also assist with the differential diagnosis of dementia associated with normal pressure hydrocephalus, chronic subdural hematoma, arteriovenous malformation or tumoral diseases. (orig.)

  14. Dementia, Decision Making, and Capacity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darby, R Ryan; Dickerson, Bradford C

    After participating in this activity, learners should be better able to:• Assess the neuropsychological literature on decision making and the medical and legal assessment of capacity in patients with dementia• Identify the limitations of integrating findings from decision-making research into capacity assessments for patients with dementia ABSTRACT: Medical and legal professionals face the challenge of assessing capacity and competency to make medical, legal, and financial decisions in dementia patients with impaired decision making. While such assessments have classically focused on the capacity for complex reasoning and executive functions, research in decision making has revealed that motivational and metacognitive processes are also important. We first briefly review the neuropsychological literature on decision making and on the medical and legal assessment of capacity. Next, we discuss the limitations of integrating findings from decision-making research into capacity assessments, including the group-to-individual inference problem, the unclear role of neuroimaging in capacity assessments, and the lack of capacity measures that integrate important facets of decision making. Finally, we present several case examples where we attempt to demonstrate the potential benefits and important limitations of using decision-making research to aid in capacity determinations.

  15. Cushing's Syndrome and Steroid Dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernini, Giampaolo; Tricò, Domenico

    2016-01-01

    Cushing's Syndrome (CS) is associated with a specific spectrum of dementia-like symptoms, including psychiatric disorders, such as major depression, anxiety and mania, and neurocognitive alterations, like impairment of memory and concentration. This pattern of clinical complications, which significantly impair the health-related quality of life of CS patients, is sometimes referred to as "steroid dementia syndrome" (SDS). The SDS is the result of anatomical and functional anomalies in brain areas involved in the processing of emotion and cognition, which are only partially restored after the biochemical remission of the disease. Therefore, periodical neuropsychiatric evaluations are recommended in all CS patients, and a long-term follow-up is required after normalization of hypercortisolism. Recent evidences demonstrate that three classes of drugs (glucocorticoid receptor antagonists, steroidogenesis inhibitors, and pituitary tumor-targeted drugs), which are used for medical treatment of CS, can rapidly relief neuropsychiatric symptoms of SDS. Furthermore, several psychoactive medications have demonstrated effectiveness in the treatment of symptoms induced by the acute or chronic glucocosteroid administration. In this paper, a review of the current and future patents for the treatment and prevention of CS and SDS will be presented.

  16. Origins of Montessori Programming for Dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camp, Cameron J

    2010-01-01

    The focus of this article is on the evolution of the use of Montessori educational methods as the basis for creating interventions for persons with dementia. The account of this evolution is autobiographical, as the development of Montessori Programming for Dementia (MPD) initially was through the efforts of myself and my research associates. My initial exposure to Maria Montessori's work came as a result of my involvement with my own children's education. This exposure influenced ongoing research on development of cognitive interventions for persons with dementia. A brief description of Montessori's work with children and the educational methods she developed is followed by a description of how this approach can be translated into development of activities for persons with dementia. Assessment tools to document effects of MPD were created, focusing on observational tools to measure engagement and affect during individual and group activities programming for persons with dementia. Examples of the use of MPD by researchers, staff members, and family members are given, as well as examples of how persons with dementia can provide MPD to other persons with dementia or to children. Finally, examples of MPD's dissemination internationally and future directions for research are presented.

  17. Everyday meal preparation for people with dementia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iversen, Mette Kathrine Friis; Nejsum, Hanne Lindberg; Bendtsen, Trine Vase

    When people are diagnosed with dementia everyday activities like meal preparation will gradually become more difficult. A recipe is a support for meal preparation but as dementia develops, it seems that following a recipe can be a challenge. In Denmark health professionals often use meal preparat......When people are diagnosed with dementia everyday activities like meal preparation will gradually become more difficult. A recipe is a support for meal preparation but as dementia develops, it seems that following a recipe can be a challenge. In Denmark health professionals often use meal...... preparation as an activity for people with dementia but they have no combined material to base the planning of the activity on. The thesis of this project is that when persons with dementia is involved in cooking his or her own meal meal preparation it will contribute to the feeling of content and meaning...... preparation. The guide includes ideas for constructing recipes, methods for planning and guiding the process and examples of utensils that can increase the ability to cook in the persons own home or in an institutionalized setting. This supports the person with dementia both nutritionally, cognitively...

  18. Characteristics of cerebral glucose utilization in dementia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsuzawa, Taiju; Matsui, Hiroshige; Meguro, Kenichi; Ueda, Masamichi; Yamada, Kenji; Yamaguchi, Tatsuo; Itoh, Masatoshi; Hatazawa, Jun; Kinomura, Shigeo (Tohoku Univ., Sendai (Japan). Research Inst. for Tuberculosis and Cancer)

    1990-12-01

    To make clear the characteristics of cerebral glucose utilization in dementia, PET studies with 18F-FDG were carried out. Taking the pattern of 18F-FDG utilization, dementia can be subdivided into two types. One type shows a simultaneous and symmetrical reduction glucose utilization in the posterior part of neocortex covering the temporal, parietal and occipital association cortices. This is referred to as type I. Although this type constitutes only about 1/5 of all dementia patients, it is considered the fundamental type of dementia. Aside from this, there is type wherein a simultaneous and symmetrical reduction in glucose utilization of the neocortex. This is type II. It constitutes about 4/5 of all dementia patients which is far more type I. There are no essential difference in the characteristics of cerebral glucose utilization in AD and MID. However, with regards the mean, AD is lower than MID. Various organic defect in neocortex do not correlate with the global reduction in glucose utilization in dementia patients. These results suggest that the reduction in glucose utilization in dementia may be functional disorder. (author).

  19. Dysfunctions associated with dementia and their treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roksana Malak

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available [u]International UnderstAID project shows[/u] the role of physiotherapist in patients with dementia as divided into two branches: helping to resolve the physical problems and solving the problems related to dementia. The role of physiotherapist in dementia treatment may be divided into two branches: helping to resolve the physical problems and solving the problems related to dementia. The physical problems consider such aspects as musculoskeletal disorders, mobility dysfunction and pain. Referring to musculoskeletal problems, the interventions of physical therapists should included whole-body progressive resistance exercise training, strengthening, “range-of-motion” and stretching exercises and transfer training. Mobility disorders are associated with physical symptoms such as: rigidity, balance problem, shuffling gait. Decreased mobility can be based on unrelieved pain. These are some crucial scales which are designed to detected the pain. For instance, The Pain Assessment in Advanced Dementia. Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation, massage or exercises can be provide to reduce the pain in patients with dementia. Physiotherapy in dementia treatment influences not only physical functions but also the maintenance or progression of cognitive abilities of demented elderly subjects

  20. Characteristics of cerebral glucose utilization in dementia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuzawa, Taiju; Matsui, Hiroshige; Meguro, Kenichi; Ueda, Masamichi; Yamada, Kenji; Yamaguchi, Tatsuo; Itoh, Masatoshi; Hatazawa, Jun; Kinomura, Shigeo

    1990-01-01

    To make clear the characteristics of cerebral glucose utilization in dementia, PET studies with 18F-FDG were carried out. Taking the pattern of 18F-FDG utilization, dementia can be subdivided into two types. One type shows a simultaneous and symmetrical reduction glucose utilization in the posterior part of neocortex covering the temporal, parietal and occipital association cortices. This is referred to as type I. Although this type constitutes only about 1/5 of all dementia patients, it is considered the fundamental type of dementia. Aside from this, there is type wherein a simultaneous and symmetrical reduction in glucose utilization of the neocortex. This is type II. It constitutes about 4/5 of all dementia patients which is far more type I. There are no essential difference in the characteristics of cerebral glucose utilization in AD and MID. However, with regards the mean, AD is lower than MID. Various organic defect in neocortex do not correlate with the global reduction in glucose utilization in dementia patients. These results suggest that the reduction in glucose utilization in dementia may be functional disorder. (author)

  1. Bilingualism, dementia, cognitive and neural reserve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perani, Daniela; Abutalebi, Jubin

    2015-12-01

    We discuss the role of bilingualism as a source of cognitive reserve and we propose the putative neural mechanisms through which lifelong bilingualism leads to a neural reserve that delays the onset of dementia. Recent findings highlight that the use of more than one language affects the human brain in terms of anatomo-structural changes. It is noteworthy that recent evidence from different places and cultures throughout the world points to a significant delay of dementia onset in bilingual/multilingual individuals. This delay has been reported not only for Alzheimer's dementia and its prodromal mild cognitive impairment phase, but also for other dementias such as vascular and fronto-temporal dementia, and was found to be independent of literacy, education and immigrant status. Lifelong bilingualism represents a powerful cognitive reserve delaying the onset of dementia by approximately 4 years. As to the causal mechanism, because speaking more than one language heavily relies upon executive control and attention, brain systems handling these functions are more developed in bilinguals resulting in increases of gray and white matter densities that may help protect from dementia onset. These neurocognitive benefits are even more prominent when second language proficiency and exposure are kept high throughout life.

  2. Functional disability in elderly with dementia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tainã Alves Fagundes

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Dementia represents one of the major causes of disability and dependence in old age and can affect functional capacity in all areas of occupational performance, including basic and instrumental activities of daily living (BADL and IADL, respectively, leisure, social participation and others. Objectives: To characterize the functional disability level in elderly people with dementia and verify the existence of correlation between functionality and the stage or type of dementia. Method: Quantitative, exploratory, cross-sectional study, with a sample of 25 caregivers of elderly with dementia. For the characterization of the participants were used structured questionnaires and to assess functional disability, the Disability Assessment Scale for Dementia - DAD was applied. Results: Greater incapacity was observed in the IADL sub item. This finding is compatible with the literature on the hierarchy in functional decline in the elderly: decline begins in IADL, while BADL remain unaffected for a longer period. There was no significant correlation between the type of dementia, age or gender and disability. It was verified through the Spearman coefficient (rho = 0.87, a significant correlation of high magnitude between functional disability and stage of dementia (p = 0.0001. Conclusion: Such findings reiterate the importance of giving priority to early detection and prevention of the functional decline, which is the manifestation of vulnerability among the elderly.

  3. Depression-dementia medius: between depression and the manifestation of dementia symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Toshiyuki; Kato, Satoshi

    2011-09-01

    Depression and dementia, among the most common conditions in clinical practice, sometimes coexist, sometimes succeed each other, and often confuse clinicians. In the present paper, the clinical concept of 'depression-dementia medius' (which includes pseudodementia and depression in Alzheimer's disease as exemplars) is proposed, in reference to Janet's concept of psychological tension. Because psychosomatically complex human lives are always in a state of dynamic equilibrium, it seems sensible to propose that pseudodementia and depression in Alzheimer's disease are located within a spectrum extending from depression without dementia symptoms to dementia without depression. From the Janetian viewpoint, pseudodementia is regarded as uncovered latent dementia as a result of reduced psychological tension. Dementia is more than a fixed progressive condition under this view, and is a manifestation of dynamic mental activities. Characterizing these entities through perspectives such as psychological tension may yield deep insights in clinical practice. © 2011 The Authors. Psychogeriatrics © 2011 Japanese Psychogeriatric Society.

  4. Dementia beyond 2025: Knowledge and uncertainties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenigsberg, Paul-Ariel; Aquino, Jean-Pierre; Bérard, Alain; Gzil, Fabrice; Andrieu, Sandrine; Banerjee, Sube; Brémond, François; Buée, Luc; Cohen-Mansfield, Jiska; Mangialasche, Francesca; Platel, Hervé; Salmon, Eric; Robert, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    Given that there may well be no significant advances in drug development before 2025, prevention of dementia-Alzheimer's disease through the management of vascular and lifestyle-related risk factors may be a more realistic goal than treatment. Level of education and cognitive reserve assessment in neuropsychological testing deserve attention, as well as cultural, social, and economic aspects of caregiving. Assistive technologies for dementia care remain complex. Serious games are emerging as virtual educational and pleasurable tools, designed for individual and cooperative skill building. Public policies are likely to pursue improving awareness and understanding of dementia; providing good quality early diagnosis and intervention for all; improving quality of care from diagnosis to the end of life, using clinical and economic end points; delivering dementia strategies quicker, with an impact on more people. Dementia should remain presented as a stand-alone concept, distinct from frailty or loss of autonomy. The basic science of sensory impairment and social engagement in people with dementia needs to be developed. E-learning and serious games programs may enhance public and professional education. Faced with funding shortage, new professional dynamics and economic models may emerge through coordinated, flexible research networks. Psychosocial research could be viewed as an investment in quality of care, rather than an academic achievement in a few centers of excellence. This would help provide a competitive advantage to the best operators. Stemming from care needs, a logical, systems approach to dementia care environment through organizational, architectural, and psychosocial interventions may be developed, to help reduce symptoms in people with dementia and enhance quality of life. Dementia-friendly environments, culture, and domesticity are key factors for such interventions. © The Author(s) 2015.

  5. Prevalence of Pain in Nursing Home Residents: The Role of Dementia Stage and Dementia Subtypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Kooten, Janine; Smalbrugge, Martin; van der Wouden, Johannes C; Stek, Max L; Hertogh, Cees M P M

    2017-06-01

    To study pain prevalence, pain type, and its pharmacological treatment in Dutch nursing home residents in relation to dementia subtype and dementia severity. Data were collected as part of the PAINdemiA study, an observational cross-sectional study conducted between May 2014 and December 2015. Ten nursing homes in the Netherlands. A total of 199 nursing home residents in various stages of dementia. We collected data on pain (by observation: MOBID-2 Pain Scale and by self-report scales), pain type, pain medication, dementia subtype, dementia severity (GDS), and demographic features. In the whole sample, the prevalence of pain was 43% (95% confidence interval 36%-50%) using the MOBID-2 Pain Scale. Regardless of regularly scheduled analgesics, approximately one-third of the residents with pain suffered from moderate to severe pain. Pain assessment with the MOBID-2 Pain Scale showed no difference in pain between dementia subtypes, but residents with more severe dementia experienced pain more often than those with less severe dementia (27% vs 15%). The prevalence of self-reported pain was significantly higher in residents with vascular dementia (VaD) (54%) compared with those with Alzheimer disease (18%) and other dementia subtypes (14%). Nociceptive pain was the predominant type of pain (72%) followed by mixed pain (25%). Acetaminophen was the most prescribed analgesic (80%). Most of the participating nursing home residents had no pain; however, pain was observed more often in residents with severe dementia, whereas residents in the early stages of VaD self-reported pain more often that those with other dementia subtypes. As one-third of the residents with clinically relevant pain had moderate to severe pain regardless of using pain medication, more focus should be on how pain management could use more tailored approaches and be regularly adjusted to individual needs. Copyright © 2017 AMDA – The Society for Post-Acute and Long-Term Care Medicine. Published by

  6. Social Relations at Work and Incident Dementia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ishtiak-Ahmed, Kazi; Hansen, Åse Marie; Garde, Anne Helene

    2018-01-01

    Objective: We investigated whether social relations at work were associated with incident dementia in old age. Methods: One thousand five hundred seventy-two occupationally active men from the Copenhagen Male Study Cohort were followed from 1986 to 2014. Participants underwent a clinical examinat......Objective: We investigated whether social relations at work were associated with incident dementia in old age. Methods: One thousand five hundred seventy-two occupationally active men from the Copenhagen Male Study Cohort were followed from 1986 to 2014. Participants underwent a clinical....... Conclusions: Our data partially support that social relations at work are associated with incident dementia....

  7. Dementia and assisted suicide and euthanasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Beaufort, Inez D; van de Vathorst, Suzanne

    2016-07-01

    The number of dementia patients requesting euthanasia in the Netherlands has increased over the past five years. The issue is highly controversial. In this contribution we discuss some of the main arguments: the nature of suffering, the voluntariness of the request and the role of the physician. We argue that society has a duty to care for patients who suffer from dementia and to make their lives as good and comfortable as possible. We also argue that it can be morally acceptable for those who do not want to continue their life with dementia to choose to die. The choice can be based on good reasons.

  8. Computed tomography in dementia of Alzheimer type

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsunoda, Masahiko; Fujii, Tsutomu; Tanii, Yasuyuki

    1990-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) examinations of 7 patients with dementia of Alzheimer type were reviewed and correlated with clinical stages. The findings of CT were also compared with those of single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). There was no positive correlation between the degree of cerebral atrophy on CT and clinical stage. Cerebral atrophy seemed to be influenced by aging, ill duration, and the degree of dementia. The cerebral/cerebellar uptake ratio of RI on SPECT was significantly decreased with the progression of clinical stage. SPECT seemed to reflect the degree of dementia, irrespective of ages and ill duration. (N.K.)

  9. Association between recognizing dementia as a mental illness and dementia knowledge among elderly Chinese Americans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Xin; Woo, Benjamin K P

    2016-06-22

    To investigate whether older Chinese Americans perceive dementia as a mental illness and the relationship between such perception and their general understanding of dementia remains unclear. Our study aims to understand this relationship and its future implication on improving dementia literacy among ethnic minorities. Elderly Chinese American participants from the Greater Los Angeles were asked to complete an 11-item dementia questionnaire, following a community health seminar. Cross-sectional survey data was analyzed using standard statistical methods. The questionnaire received an 88.3% response rate. Among 316 responders, only 28.8% (n = 91) of elderly Chinese Americans identified dementia as a mental illness, and 71.2% (n = 225) did not recognize its mental disease origin. Furthermore, in comparison between these two groups, the first group demonstrated significantly higher level of baseline knowledge of the disease. This study reveals that only approximately 1 out of 4 older Chinese Americans recognized dementia as a mental illness, consistent with previous studies on Asian Americans. Our study however showed that when dementia was being perceived as a mental illness, such perception was associated with a higher level of baseline dementia understanding. The current study suggested the potential of improving older Chinese Americans dementia literacy by increasing awareness of its mental illness origin.

  10. Impaired imitation of gestures in mild dementia: comparison of dementia with Lewy bodies, Alzheimer's disease and vascular dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagahama, Yasuhiro; Okina, Tomoko; Suzuki, Norio

    2015-11-01

    To examine whether imitation of gestures provided useful information to diagnose early dementia in elderly patients. Imitation of finger and hand gestures was evaluated in patients with mild dementia; 74 patients had dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB), 100 with Alzheimer's disease (AD) and 52 with subcortical vascular dementia (SVaD). Significantly, more patients with DLB (32.4%) compared with patients with AD (5%) or SVaD (11.5%) had an impaired ability to imitate finger gestures bilaterally. Also, significantly, more patients with DLB (36.5%) compared with patients with AD (5%) or SVaD (15.4%) had lower mean scores of both hands. In contrast, impairment of the imitation of bimanual gestures was comparable among the three patient groups (DLB 50%, AD 42%, SVaD 42.3%). Our study revealed that imitation of bimanual gestures was impaired non-specifically in about half of the patients with mild dementia, whereas imitation of finger gestures was significantly more impaired in patients with early DLB than in those with AD or SVaD. Although the sensitivity was not high, the imitation tasks may provide additional information for diagnosis of mild dementia, especially for DLB. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  11. Considering sex and gender in Alzheimer disease and other dementias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podcasy, Jessica L; Epperson, C Neill

    2016-12-01

    Suffering related to dementia is multifaceted because cognitive and physical functioning slowly deteriorates. Advanced age and sex, two of the most prominent risk factors for dementia, are not modifiable. Lifestyle factors such as smoking, excessive alcohol use, and poor diet modulate susceptibility to dementia in both males and females. The degree to which the resulting health conditions (eg, obesity, type 2 diabetes, and cardiovascular disease) impact dementia risk varies by sex. Depending on the subtype of dementia, the ratio of male to female prevalence differs. For example, females are at greater risk of developing Alzheimer disease dementia, whereas males are at greater risk of developing vascular dementia. This review examines sex and gender differences in the development of dementia with the goal of highlighting factors that require further investigation. Considering sex as a biological variable in dementia research promises to advance our understanding of the pathophysiology and treatment of these conditions.

  12. Considering sex and gender in Alzheimer disease and other dementias

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podcasy, Jessica L.; Epperson, C. Neill

    2016-01-01

    Suffering related to dementia is multifaceted because cognitive and physical functioning slowly deteriorates. Advanced age and sex, two of the most prominent risk factors for dementia, are not modifiable. Lifestyle factors such as smoking, excessive alcohol use, and poor diet modulate susceptibility to dementia in both males and females. The degree to which the resulting health conditions (eg, obesity, type 2 diabetes, and cardiovascular disease) impact dementia risk varies by sex. Depending on the subtype of dementia, the ratio of male to female prevalence differs. For example, females are at greater risk of developing Alzheimer disease dementia, whereas males are at greater risk of developing vascular dementia. This review examines sex and gender differences in the development of dementia with the goal of highlighting factors that require further investigation. Considering sex as a biological variable in dementia research promises to advance our understanding of the pathophysiology and treatment of these conditions. PMID:28179815

  13. Hospital-diagnosed dementia and suicide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Erlangsen, Annette; Zarit, Steven H; Conwell, Yeates

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The current study aims to examine the risk of suicide in persons diagnosed with dementia during a hospitalization and its relationship to mood disorders. DESIGN: Event-history analysis using time-varying covariates. SETTING: Population-based record linkage. PARTICIPANTS: All individuals...... who are aged 70 or older with dementia have a threefold higher risk than persons with no dementia. The time shortly after diagnosis is associated with an elevated suicide risk. The risk among persons with dementia remains significant when controlling for mood disorders. As many as 26% of the men...... aged 50+ living in Denmark (N=2,474,767) during January 1, 1990 through December 31, 2000. MEASUREMENTS: Outcome of interest is suicide. Relative risks are calculated based on person-days spent in each stratum. RESULTS: A total of 18,648,875 person-years were observed during the 11-year study period...

  14. Autobiographical Memory in Normal Ageing and Dementia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harvey J. Sagar

    1991-01-01

    Full Text Available Autobiographical memories in young and elderly normal subjects are drawn mostly from the recent past but elderly subjects relate a second peak of memories from early adulthood. Memory for remote past public events is relatively preserved in dementia, possibly reflecting integrity of semantic relative to episodic memory. We examined recall of specific, consistent autobiographical episodes in Alzheimer's disease (AD in response to cue words. Patients and control subjects drew most memories from the recent 20 years: episode age related to anterograde memory function but not subject age or dementia. Subjects also related a secondary peak of memories from early adulthood; episode age related to subject age and severity of dementia. The results suggest that preferential recall of memories from early adulthood is based on the salience of retrieval cues, altered by age and dementia, superimposed on a temporal gradient of semantic memory. Further, AD shows behavioural similarity to normal ageing.

  15. Dementia in hereditary cystatin C amyloidosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blöndal, H; Guomundsson, G; Benedikz, Eirikur

    1989-01-01

    in seventeen cases of whom two presented with dementia. At the last examination the majority had severe dementia and severely abnormal EEG. Anti-cystatin C positive amyloid vascular and perivascular infiltrates were found. The resulting damage to the microvasculature of the brain and secondary hemorrhages......Nineteen cases with verified Hereditary Cystatin C Amyloid Angiopathy are presented. All of the cases had one or more cerebrovascular insults starting at the age of 20-41 years and survived from 10 days to 23 years after the first insult. Progressive dementia was a prominent clinical feature...... and infarctions were considered to be an adequate explanation for the dementia in these cases. Skin biopsies can now probably be used to demonstrate cystatin C positive amyloid deposits conclusively in the tissues of these patients....

  16. Transforming dementia care in an NHS trust.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Jennifer; Longden, Jane; Murphy, Jayne

    2015-02-01

    Walsall Healthcare NHS Trust was one of nine trusts selected to take part in the RCN development programme transforming dementia care in hospitals during 2013. The programme aimed to improve the experience of care for people with dementia and their carers in hospital. This article outlines a two-day training programme delivered to staff on two pilot wards with a larger cohort of adults with dementia than other wards in Manor Hospital. A range of staff were trained including nurses, clinical support workers and allied health professionals and also, in a bespoke format, housekeepers, porters and security staff. The programme has led to a noticeable cultural change and significantly improved care and management of patients with cognitive impairment and/or dementia on the two pilot wards. As a result, the training programme has been implemented more widely across the hospital.

  17. Couples with dementia: Positioning the 'we'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hydén, Lars-Christer; Nilsson, Elin

    2015-11-01

    The aim of this article is to investigate how spouses in couples with dementia position themselves in relation to each other by analysing their use of pronouns, especially the we. The study uses joint interviews with 11 couples. Based on a quantitative analysis of pronoun use, it is argued that the pronoun we is used by all the spouses; however, it is used less frequently by the spouses with dementia in comparison with healthy spouses. A qualitative analysis of the use of the pronoun we shows that the spouses position, experience and consider themselves as a couple and that they position and experience themselves as individuals in relation to the couple. One of the challenges for couples with dementia is to be able to retain a we in face of the progression of the dementia disease. By positioning themselves in various ways, the spouses establish and negotiate quite a complex and emotionally charged web of relationships. © The Author(s) 2013.

  18. Physiological phenotyping of dementias using emotional sounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fletcher, Phillip D; Nicholas, Jennifer M; Shakespeare, Timothy J; Downey, Laura E; Golden, Hannah L; Agustus, Jennifer L; Clark, Camilla N; Mummery, Catherine J; Schott, Jonathan M; Crutch, Sebastian J; Warren, Jason D

    2015-06-01

    Emotional behavioral disturbances are hallmarks of many dementias but their pathophysiology is poorly understood. Here we addressed this issue using the paradigm of emotionally salient sounds. Pupil responses and affective valence ratings for nonverbal sounds of varying emotional salience were assessed in patients with behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD) (n = 14), semantic dementia (SD) (n = 10), progressive nonfluent aphasia (PNFA) (n = 12), and AD (n = 10) versus healthy age-matched individuals (n = 26). Referenced to healthy individuals, overall autonomic reactivity to sound was normal in Alzheimer's disease (AD) but reduced in other syndromes. Patients with bvFTD, SD, and AD showed altered coupling between pupillary and affective behavioral responses to emotionally salient sounds. Emotional sounds are a useful model system for analyzing how dementias affect the processing of salient environmental signals, with implications for defining pathophysiological mechanisms and novel biomarker development.

  19. Consensus statement on genetic research in dementia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rikkert, M.G. Olde; der, V van; Burns, A.

    2008-01-01

    In this article, the authors describe how the European Dementia Consensus Network developed a consensus on research ethics in dementia, taking into account the questions posed by the era of genetic research and its new research methods. The consensus process started with a Delphi procedure...... to analyze relevant stakeholders' positions by describing their statements on the possibilities and limitations of research into genetic determinants of Alzheimer disease and to describe and analyze the moral desirability of genetic research on Alzheimer disease. The conclusions drawn from the Delphi...... procedure fuelled the development of the consensus statement, which is presented in this paper. The consensus statement aims to stimulate ethically acceptable research in the field of dementia and the protection of vulnerable elderly patients with dementia from application of inadequate research methods...

  20. Functional network disruption in the degenerative dementias

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pievani, M.; de Haan, W.; Wu, T.; Seeley, W.W.; Frisoni, G. B.

    2011-01-01

    Despite advances towards understanding the molecular pathophysiology of the neurodegenerative dementias, the mechanisms linking molecular changes to neuropathology and neuropathological changes to clinical symptoms remain largely obscure. Connectivity is a distinctive feature of the brain and the

  1. Does Bilingualism Delay the Development of Dementia?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amy L Atkinson

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available It has been suggested that bilingualism (where individuals speak two languages may delay the development of dementia. However, much of the research is inconclusive. Some researchers have reported that bilingualism delays the onset and diagnosis of dementia, whilst other studies have found weak or even detrimental effects. This paper reviews a series of nine empirical studies, published up until March 2016, which investigated whether bilingualism significantly delays the onset of dementia. The article also explores whether the inconsistent findings can be attributed to differences in study designs or the definitions of bilingualism used between studies. Based on current evidence, it appears that lifelong bilingualism, where individuals frequently use both languages, may be protective against dementia. However, becoming bilingual in adulthood or using the second language infrequently is unlikely to substantially delay onset of the disease.

  2. Individual Music Therapy for Agitation in Dementia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ridder, Hanne Mette Ochsner; Stige, Brynjulf; Qvale, Liv Gunnhild

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: Agitation in nursing home residents with dementia leads to increase in psychotropic medication, decrease in quality of life, and to patient distress and caregiver burden. Music therapy has previously been found effective in treatment of agitation in dementia care but studies have been...... methodologically insufficient. The aim of this study was to examine the effect of individual music therapy on agitation in persons with moderate/severe dementia living in nursing homes, and to explore its effect on psychotropic medication and quality of life. Method: In a crossover trial, 42 participants...... with dementia were randomized to a sequence of six weeks of individual music therapy and six weeks of standard care. Outcome measures included agitation, quality of life and medication. Results: Agitation disruptiveness increased during standard care and decreased during music therapy. The difference at −6...

  3. Caregiving for Alzheimer's Disease or Other Dementia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... What's this? Submit Button Caregiving for Person with Alzheimer's Disease or a related Dementia Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir What is Alzheimer’s Disease? Alzheimer’s disease is the most common form ...

  4. [Electroencephalography in delirium superimposed on dementia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanemaaijer, Judith I; Wijnen, Viona J M; van Gool, W A

    2017-09-01

    Recognizing delirium superimposed on pre-existing cognitive impairment or dementia, 'delirium superimposed on dementia' (DSD), is challenging because signs of delirium might be interpreted as symptoms of pre-existing cognitive dysfunction.In this paper, we review the literature on the role of electrencephalography (EEG) in the differential diagnosis of delirium, dementia and DSD.Conventional EEG, applying twenty to thirty electrodes, taking thirty minutes registration, is not feasible in psychogeriatric patients. Recent studies suggest that it is possible to reliably detect delirium using only a limited number of EEG electrodes for a short period of time.With this, use of EEG in the detection of delirium in patients with cognitive impairment or clinically manifest dementia could be possible.

  5. Dementia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Kids and Teens Pregnancy and Childbirth Women Men Seniors Your Health Resources Healthcare Management End-of-Life Issues Insurance & Bills Self Care Working With Your Doctor Drugs, Procedures & Devices Over-the- ...

  6. Dural arteriovenous fistula as a treatable dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enofe, Ikponmwosa; Thacker, Ike; Shamim, Sadat

    2017-04-01

    Dementia is a chronic loss of neurocognitive function that is progressive and irreversible. Although rare, dural arteriovenous fistulas (DAVFs) could present with a rapid decline in neurocognitive function with or without Parkinson-like symptoms. DAVFs represent a potentially treatable and reversible cause of dementia. Here, we report the case of an elderly woman diagnosed with a DAVF after presenting with new-onset seizures, deteriorating neurocognitive function, and Parkinson-like symptoms.

  7. CAMCOG as a screening instrument for dementia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lolk, A; Nielsen, H; Andersen, K

    2000-01-01

    The Cambridge Cognitive Examination (CAMCOG) score is correlated with age and sociodemographic variables. The aim of the study was to determine an individualized CAMCOG cut-off score for dementia, taking such correlates into account.......The Cambridge Cognitive Examination (CAMCOG) score is correlated with age and sociodemographic variables. The aim of the study was to determine an individualized CAMCOG cut-off score for dementia, taking such correlates into account....

  8. Seminar: Music Therapy in Dementia Care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ridder, Hanne Mette Ochsner

    2009-01-01

    This seminar presents music therapy in person centered dementia care. In the first part focus is on research and documentation. How can short term music therapy document changes in symptoms of depression? Is Dementia Care Mapping a valid assessment tool for documenting group music therapy......? In the next part focus is on clinical music therapy – in group work as well as in individual work – and how the music therapist works in the interdisciplinary field....

  9. Is tube feeding futile in advanced dementia?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, Matthew C.

    2016-01-01

    It is controversial whether tube feeding in people with dementia improves nutritional status or prolongs survival. Guidelines published by several professional societies cite observational studies that have shown no benefit and conclude that tube feeding in patients with advanced dementia should be avoided. However, all studies on tube feeding in dementia have major methodological flaws that invalidate their findings. The present evidence is not sufficient to justify general guidelines. Patients with advanced dementia represent a very heterogeneous group, and evidence demonstrates that some patients with dementia benefit from tube feeding. However, presently available guidelines make a single recommendation against tube feeding for all patients. Clinicians, patients, and surrogates should be aware that the guidelines and prior commentary on this topic tend both to overestimate the strength of evidence for futility and to exaggerate the burdens of tube feeding. Shared decision making requires accurate information tailored to the individual patient's particular situation, not blanket guidelines based on flawed data. Lay Summary: Many doctors believe that tube feeding does not help people with advanced dementia. Scientific studies suggest that people with dementia who have feeding tubes do not live longer or gain weight compared with those who are carefully hand fed. However, these studies are not very helpful because of flaws in design, which are discussed in this article. Guidelines from professional societies make a blanket recommendation against feeding tubes for anyone with dementia, but an individual approach that takes each person's situation into account seems more appropriate. Patients and surrogates should be aware that the guidelines on this topic tend both to underestimate the benefit and exaggerate the burdens of tube feeding. PMID:27833208

  10. Clinical features and multidisciplinary approaches to dementia care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gr

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Jacob HG Grand¹, Sienna Caspar², Stuart WS MacDonald11Department of Psychology, University of Victoria, Victoria, BC, Canada; 2Interdisciplinary Graduate Studies, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, CanadaAbstract: Dementia is a clinical syndrome of widespread progressive deterioration of cognitive abilities and normal daily functioning. These cognitive and behavioral impairments pose considerable challenges to individuals with dementia, along with their family members and caregivers. Four primary dementia classifications have been defined according to clinical and research criteria: 1 Alzheimer’s disease; 2 vascular dementias; 3 frontotemporal dementias; and 4 dementia with Lewy bodies/Parkinson’s disease dementia. The cumulative efforts of multidisciplinary healthcare teams have advanced our understanding of dementia beyond basic descriptions, towards a more complete elucidation of risk factors, clinical symptoms, and neuropathological correlates. The characterization of disease subtypes has facilitated targeted management strategies, advanced treatments, and symptomatic care for individuals affected by dementia. This review briefly summarizes the current state of knowledge and directions of dementia research and clinical practice. We provide a description of the risk factors, clinical presentation, and differential diagnosis of dementia. A summary of multidisciplinary team approaches to dementia care is outlined, including management strategies for the treatment of cognitive impairments, functional deficits, and behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia. The needs of individuals with dementia are extensive, often requiring care beyond traditional bounds of medical practice, including pharmacologic and non-pharmacologic management interventions. Finally, advanced research on the early prodromal phase of dementia is reviewed, with a focus on change-point models, trajectories of cognitive change, and threshold models of

  11. Suicidal behavior and assisted suicide in dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Draper, Brian M

    2015-10-01

    Concerns about suicide risk in people with dementia have been increasing in recent years along with a discourse about rational suicide and assisted suicide. A systematic narrative literature review of suicidal behavior and assisted suicide in persons with dementia. Most studies that have examined the spectrum of suicidal ideation, attempted suicide and suicide in dementia have methodological limitations but the overall suicide risk does not appear to be increased. When suicidal behavior does occur, common themes include the presence of psychiatric comorbidity, mainly depression; occurrence early in the dementia course with preserved insight and capacity; and an increased risk in younger people. The emerging discourse on rational and assisted suicide has been spurred by early and pre-symptomatic diagnosis and poses a number of ethical challenges for clinicians including the role of proxy decision-makers. Although dementia might not confer a significant overall risk for suicidal behavior, clinicians still need to consider the potential for suicide in vulnerable individuals particularly early in the dementia course.

  12. Neuroimaging and functional assessment in dementia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Terashi, Akiro; Kitamura, Shin; Ujike, Takashi [Nippon Medical School, Tokyo (Japan)

    1990-05-01

    Recent progress in diagnostic imaging techniques has greatly contributed to the elucidation of pathophysiology, as well as differential diagnosis in dementia. In particular, X-ray computed tomography (CT) offers the ability to detect morphological changes of the brain, whereby making it possible to differentiate between cerebrovascular and degenerative dementias. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) allows three-dimensional visualization of gyrus atrophy, providing the ability to depict subcortical minor infarcts and white matter lesions. The advent of positron emission tomography (PET) and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) has led to a dramatic progression in the search for pathophysiology of dementia. The purpose of this paper is to outline the recent findings of diagnostic imaging modalities, such as X-ray CT, MRI, PET and SPECT, focusing on those in commonly observed cerebrovascular dementia and in degenerative dementias that are projected to increase. Degenerative dementias cover Alzheimer's disease, Pick's disease, Huntington's disease, progressive supranuclear palsy, Parkinson's disease, and normal pressure hydrocephalus. (N.K.) 90 refs.

  13. Depression and dementia: cause, consequence or coincidence?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Sophia; Thomas, Alan J

    2014-10-01

    The relationship between depression and dementia is complex and still not well understood. A number of different views exist regarding how the two conditions are linked as well as the underlying neurobiological mechanisms at work. This narrative review examined longitudinal and cross sectional studies in the existing literature and determined the evidence supporting depression being a risk factor, a prodrome, a consequence, or an independent comorbidity in dementia. Overall there is convincing evidence to support both the notion that early life depression can act as a risk factor for later life dementia, and that later life depression can be seen as a prodrome to dementia. There is also evidence to support both conditions showing similar neurobiological changes, particularly white matter disease, either indicating shared risk factors or a shared pattern of neuronal damage. These findings highlight the need to examine if effective treatment of depressive episodes has any effect in reducing the prevalence of dementia, as well as clinicians being vigilant for late life depression indicating the incipient development of dementia, and therefore carefully following up these individuals for future cognitive impairment. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Depression in dementia: epidemiology, mechanisms, and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enache, Daniela; Winblad, Bengt; Aarsland, Dag

    2011-11-01

    Depression in people with dementia has important implications, such as reduced quality of life of patients and carers, and is associated with increased costs and reduced cognition. Here, we review recent studies of the epidemiology, course, mechanisms and treatment of depression in people with dementia. Depression is both a risk factor and a prodrome of Alzheimer's disease. Depression is a common occurrence in all types of dementias and at all disease stages, including in mild cognitive impairment (MCI). Many studies have explored whether depression in MCI increased the conversion rate to dementia, but findings are inconsistent. Studies of the mechanisms are relatively few and findings inconsistent, but inflammatory, trophic and cerebrovascular factors may contribute, in addition to monoamine deficiency and severity of plaques and tangle pathology. Studies of antidepressants for depression in dementia are inconclusive, with several negative findings reported in recent large studies, suggesting that antidepressant may not confer benefit over placebo. Depression is a common risk factor, prodrome, and accompanying symptom of people with Alzheimer's dementia. The mechanisms are unknown, and there is little evidence of effective therapies.

  15. Gender Differences in Dementia Spousal Caregiving

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minna Maria Pöysti

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The proportion of male caregivers is rapidly increasing. However, there are few large scale studies exploring gender differences in the burden or coping with caregiving. We investigated this among caregivers of patients with dementia. The study cohort consisted of 335 dyads of wife-husband couples from two studies including dementia patients and their spousal caregivers. Baseline mini-mental state examination (MMSE, clinical dementia rating scale (CDR, neuropsychiatric inventory (NPI, cornell depression scale and charlson comorbidity index (CCI were used to describe patients with dementia, Zarit burden scale and geriatric depression scale were used to measure experienced burden and depression of caregivers. Mean age of caregivers was 78 years. There were no differences in depression, satisfaction with life, or loneliness according to caregivers' gender. Male caregivers had more comorbidities than females (CCI 1.9 versus 1.1, P<0.001, and the wives of male caregivers had a more severe stage of dementia than husbands of female caregivers (CDR, P=0.048; MMSE14.0 versus 17.7, P<0.001. However, the mean Zarit burden scale was significantly lower among male than female caregivers (31.5 versus 37.5; P<0.001. Lower education of male caregivers tended to be associated with less experienced burden. In conclusion, male caregivers of dementia experienced lower burden than female caregivers despite care recipients' more severe disease.

  16. Social class, dementia and the fourth age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Ian Rees

    2017-02-01

    Research addressing social class and dementia has largely focused on measures of socioeconomic status as causal risk factors for dementia and in observed differences in diagnosis, treatment and care. This large body of work has produced important insights but also contains numerous problems and weaknesses. Research needs to take account of the ways in which ageing and social class have been transformed in tandem with the economic, social and cultural coordinates of late modernity. These changes have particular consequences for individual identities and social relations. With this in mind this article adopts a critical gaze on research that considers interactions between dementia and social class in three key areas: (i) epidemiological approaches to inequalities in risk (ii) the role of social class in diagnosis and treatment and (iii) class in the framing of care and access to care. Following this, the article considers studies of dementia and social class that focus on lay understandings and biographical accounts. Sociological insights in this field come from the view that dementia and social class are embedded in social relations. Thus, forms of distinction based on class relations may still play an important role in the lived experience of dementia. © 2017 Foundation for the Sociology of Health & Illness.

  17. Trajectories of Behavioural Disturbances Across Dementia Types.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linds, Alexandra B; Kirstein, Alana B; Freedman, Morris; Verhoeff, Nicolaas P L G; Wolf, Uri; Chow, Tiffany W

    2015-11-01

    To replicate a previous finding that the trajectory of the Neuropsychiatric Inventory (NPI) shifts in the sixth year of behavioural variant frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD). We evaluated longitudinal tracking with both the Frontal Behavioural Inventory (FBI) and NPI, comparing bvFTD against other dementias. Chart reviews over two to five years for patients with bvFTD (n=30), primary progressive aphasia (PPA, n=13) and Alzheimer's disease (AD, n=118) at an urban Canadian tertiary clinic specializing in dementia. Linear regressions of the longitudinal data tested predictors of annualized rates of change (ROC) in NPI and FBI total and subscales for apathy and disinhibition among dementia groups. The mode of the overall sample for the most advanced duration of illness observed was 5 years, with the median at 7 years. We did not find a crescendo-decrescendo pattern in scores although, for bvFTD and AD, high initial scores correlated with ensuing downward ROCs on the NPI and FBI. Educational level showed an influence on disinhibition ROCs. The FBI was no more revealing than the NPI for apathy and disinhibition scores in these dementias. A cognitive reserve effect on behavioural disturbance was supported but it may take longer than our 4 years of observing the clinical sample to record inflection points in the behavioural and psychiatric symptoms seen in bvFTD. The current data only imply that both apathy and disinhibition will diminish over the course of dementia.

  18. Death in life or life in death? Dementia's ontological challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macdonald, Gaynor

    2018-01-01

    Is it possible to end one's life well with dementia? The perception of dementia as death brought into life flows from ideas about humanness embedded in medicine's Cartesian paradigm. Dementia as incurable brain disease exacerbates negativity. But the real impact of dementia is that it changes social relations: to live well with dementia requires a relational not Cartesian understanding of life. A relational ontology prioritizes social health: to live is to be held in connection. Negativity produces the disconnection that is death, with or without disease. When people with dementia are held in connection, they live a better life.

  19. A qualitative study of older and middle-aged adults' perception and attitudes towards dementia and dementia risk reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sarang; Sargent-Cox, Kerry A; Anstey, Kaarin J

    2015-07-01

    To investigate perceptions of dementia and dementia risk reduction held by people without dementia. Dementia does not only affect individuals with dementia, but also has an impact on family and friends, society and healthcare professionals. Recent research has identified modifiable risk and protective factors for dementia. However, it is unclear what knowledge people without dementia have about these risk factors and their attitudes towards addressing these risk factors to achieve dementia risk reduction are not known. Qualitative descriptive study using focus group methodology. A focus group study was conducted in February 2011 with 34 older adults aged between 52-90 years. The long-table approach was used to identify themes and categorize data on dementia knowledge, risk and attitudes. Participants correctly identified dementia risk factors as a group. Participants' responses about their perceived likelihood of developing dementia could be classified into three distinctive themes; fear, rational and cynical perceptions. Both fear of developing dementia and the need to improve dementia knowledge were considered major motivators towards adopting healthier lifestyle and health behaviours. Lack of knowledge on risk factors for dementia was identified as a major barrier for behavioural and lifestyle change. These findings can be used to develop effective and personalized interventions that increase motivators and reduce barriers by tailoring interventions to individual's dementia risk reduction literacy and motivations to change behaviours. Greater public-health promotion and education about risk and protective factors for dementia are also necessary to increase dementia health literacy and to reduce overall dementia prevalence. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Validation of the 10/66 Dementia Research Group Diagnostic Assessment for Dementia in Arabic

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Phung, Kieu T T; Chaaya, Monique; Waldemar, Gunhild

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: In the North Africa and Middle East region, the illiteracy rates among older people are high, posing a great challenge to cognitive assessment. Validated diagnostic instruments for dementia in Arabic are lacking, hampering the development of dementia research in the region. The study ...

  1. Progression to dementia in memory clinic patients without dementia: a latent profile analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kohler, S.; Hamel, R.; Sistermans, N.; Koene, T.; Pijnenburg, Y.A.L.; van der Flier, W.M.; Scheltens, P.; Visser, P.J.; Aalten, P.; Verhey, F. R. J.; Ramakers, I.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To identify the existence of discrete cognitive subtypes among memory clinic patients without dementia and test their prognostic values. Methods: In a retrospective cohort study of 635 patients without dementia visiting the Alzheimer centers in Maastricht or Amsterdam, latent profile

  2. Knowledge of Dementia: Do family members understand dementia as a terminal condition?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, Sharon; McInerney, Fran; Toye, Christine; Parkinson, Camillus-Anthony; Robinson, Andrew

    2017-07-01

    Current research identifies advanced dementia to be the terminal phase of this progressive and incurable condition. However, there has been relatively little investigation into how family members of people with advanced dementia understand their relative's condition. In this article, we report on semi-structured interviews with 10 family members of people with advanced dementia, in a residential aged care facility. Using a qualitative, descriptive design, we explored family members' understandings of dementia, whether they were aware that it was a terminal condition, and the ways they developed their understandings. Findings revealed that the majority of family members could not recognize the terminal nature of dementia. Relying on predominantly lay understandings, they had little access to formal information and most failed to conceptualize a connection between dementia and death. Moreover, family members engaged in limited dialogue with aged care staff about such issues, despite their relatives being in an advanced stage of the disease. Findings from our study suggest that how family members understand their relative's condition requires greater attention. The development of staff/family partnerships that promote shared communication about dementia and dying may enhance family members' understandings of the dementia trajectory and the types of decisions they may be faced with during the more advanced stages of the disease.

  3. Partners in Dementia Care: A Care Coordination Intervention for Individuals with Dementia and Their Family Caregivers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Judge, Katherine S.; Bass, David M.; Snow, A. Lynn; Wilson, Nancy L.; Morgan, Robert; Looman, Wendy J.; McCarthy, Catherine; Kunik, Mark E.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: This article provides a detailed description of a telephone-based care coordination intervention, Partners in Dementia Care (PDC), for veterans with dementia and their family caregivers. Essential features of PDC included (a) formal partnerships between Veterans Affairs (VA) medical centers and Alzheimer's Association Chapters; (b) a…

  4. What do people with dementia and their carers want to know about neuroimaging for dementia?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Featherstone, Hannah; Butler, Marie-Louise; Ciblis, Aurelia; Bokde, Arun L; Mullins, Paul G; McNulty, Jonathan P

    2017-05-01

    Neuroimaging forms an important part of dementia diagnosis. Provision of information on neuroimaging to people with dementia and their carers may aid understanding of the pathological, physiological and psychosocial changes of the disease, and increase understanding of symptoms. This qualitative study aimed to investigate participants' knowledge of the dementia diagnosis pathway, their understanding of neuroimaging and its use in diagnosis, and to determine content requirements for a website providing neuroimaging information. Structured interviews and a focus group were conducted with carers and people with dementia. The findings demonstrate an unmet need for information on neuroimaging both before and after the examination. Carers were keen to know about neuroimaging at a practical and technical level to help avoid diagnosis denial. People with dementia requested greater information, but with a caveat to avoid overwhelming detail, and were less likely to favour an Internet resource.

  5. Neuropsychiatric Symptoms in Alzheimer Disease, Vascular Dementia, and Mixed Dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anor, Cassandra J; O'Connor, Sean; Saund, Amardeep; Tang-Wai, David F; Keren, Ron; Tartaglia, Maria Carmela

    2017-01-01

    Neuropsychiatric symptoms (NPS) are common in Alzheimer disease (AD) and vascular dementia (VaD), and are distressful to patients and caregivers. NPS are likely related to the underlying pathology. Previous studies suggest that frontal lobe lesions and vascular changes such as white matter hyperintensities (WMH) have a significant association with specific NPS. The current study aimed to compare NPS in patients with AD, VaD, and mixed AD/VaD, and to evaluate the differences in the prevalence of NPS in relation to frontal WMH volume. In total, 180 patients with NPS and MRI data (92 probable AD, 51%; 34 probable VaD, 19%; and 54 probable mixed AD/VaD, 30%) were included in the study. Regression analyses were performed to determine the relationships between NPS prevalence and diagnosis, and between NPS and frontal WMH. VaD patients had significantly more agitation (p < 0.05; 40 vs. 14%) and sleep disturbances (p < 0.05; 57 vs. 32%) than AD patients, and significantly more depression (p < 0.05; 48 vs. 20%) and aberrant motor behaviors (p < 0.05; 31 vs. 13%) than mixed AD/VaD patients. AD patients with delusions had significantly greater right frontal WMH volumes than those without (p < 0.05; delusions 1/0 = 314.8/112.6 mm3). Differences in NPS prevalence are likely related to the underlying pathology and warrant further study as they have implications for treatment. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  6. Factors associated with dementia in Aboriginal Australians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Kate; Flicker, Leon; Dwyer, Anna; Atkinson, David; Almeida, Osvaldo P; Lautenschlager, Nicola T; LoGiudice, Dina

    2010-10-01

    Although the prevalence of dementia in remote living Aboriginal Australians is one of the highest in the world, the factors associated with dementia in this population are yet to be examined. This study was designed to determine the demographic, lifestyle and clinical factors associated with dementia in Aboriginal Australians living in the Kimberley region of Western Australia. A total of 363 Aboriginal Australians aged over 45 years from the Kimberley region were selected by semi-purposeful sampling. The factors analysed for association with dementia were age, sex, education, smoking, chewing tobacco, alcohol, head injury, heart disease, hypertension, diabetes, previous stroke, epilepsy, falls, mobility, incontinence, urinary problems, vision and hearing. This exposure data was collected from participants' and informants' reports using the Kimberley Indigenous Cognitive Assessment and specialist review, and medical records. Factors associated with dementia included older age, male gender (OR 3.1, 95%CI 1.4, 6.8) and no formal education (OR 2.7, 95%CI 1.1, 6.7) and after adjusting for age, sex and education, dementia was associated with current smoking (OR 4.5, 95%CI 1.1, 18.6), previous stroke (OR 17.9, 95%CI 5.9, 49.7), epilepsy (OR 33.5, 95%CI 4.8, 232.3), head injury (OR 4.0, 95%CI 1.7, 9.4), and poor mobility, incontinence and falls. Interventions aimed at better management or prevention of the modifiable factors identified could reduce dementia risk in Aboriginal populations.

  7. Music Therapy with Ethnic Music for Dementia Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuki Tanaka

    2012-12-01

    Conclusion: Our results revealed characteristic responses of dementia patients onto the Japanese music, and we expect our result provides an evidence for better music therapy for dementia patients with Japanese culture.

  8. Is postoperative cognitive dysfunction a risk factor for dementia?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steinmetz, J; Siersma, Volkert Dirk; Kessing, L V

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: /st>Postoperative cognitive dysfunction (POCD) is a common complication in elderly patients after major surgery. An association between POCD and the development of dementia has been suspected. In this study, we assessed if POCD was a risk factor for the occurrence of dementia. METHODS...... surgery, using a neuropsychological test battery. The time of (first) occurrence of dementia after surgery was assessed using the National Patient Register and the Psychiatric Central Research Register. Recorded dementia diagnoses (ICD-8 and ICD-10) were: Alzheimer's disease, vascular dementia......, frontotemporal dementia, or dementia without specification. The risk of dementia according to POCD was assessed in the Cox regression models. RESULTS: /st>A total of 686 patients with a median age of 67 [inter-quartile range (IQR) 61-74] yr were followed for a median of 11.1 (IQR 5.2-12.6) yr. Only 32 patients...

  9. Complement C4 phenotypes in dementia of the Alzheimer type

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eikelenboom, P.; Goetz, J.; Pronk, J. C.; Hauptmann, G.

    1988-01-01

    Complement C4 phenotype distribution was studied in 64 patients with dementia of the Alzheimer type. In contrast to reported findings we failed to find a significant association between C4B2 gene frequency and Alzheimer's dementia

  10. Evidence-based interven- tions for dementia in general practice

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    banzi

    This patient is suffering from dementia, which is a ... Common symptoms of dementia: • difficulty with .... activities, help patients to rid themselves of ... Avoid changes in daily routine.6. In addition ... Referral to a physiotherapist for an appropriate ...

  11. Validity of dementia diagnoses in the danish hospital registers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Phung, T.K.T.; Andersen, B.B.; Phung, T.K.T.

    2007-01-01

    .24-0.48). Conclusion: The validity of dementia syndrome in the Danish hospital registers was high and allows for epidemiological studies about dementia. Alzheimer's disease, although underregistered, also had a good validity once the diagnosis was registered. In general, other ICD-10 dementia subtypes in the registers......Background:The validity of dementia diagnoses in the Danish nationwide hospital registers was evaluated to determine the value of these registers in epidemiological research about dementia. Methods: Two hundred patients were randomly selected from 4,682 patients registered for the first time...... with a dementia diagnosis in the last 6 months of 2003. The patients' medical journals were reviewed to evaluate if they fulfilled ICD-10 and/or DSM-IV criteria for dementia and specific dementia subtypes. The patients who were still alive in 2006 were invited to an interview. Results: One hundred and ninety...

  12. The Determinants of Quality of Life of Nursing Home Residents with Young-Onset Dementia and the Differences between Dementia Subtypes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Appelhof, Britt; Bakker, C.; Van Duinen-van den Ijssel, Jeannette C L; Zwijsen, Sandra A; Smalbrugge, Martin; Verhey, Frans R. J.; de Vugt, Marjolein E; Zuidema, Sytse U.; Koopnnans, Raymond T. C. M.

    Aims: The aims of this study are to (1) explore the determinants of quality of life (QoL) in nursing home residents with young-onset dementia (YOD), (2) investigate whether there are differences between dementia subtypes (Alzheimer dementia, vascular/mixed dementia, frontotemporal dementia, other)

  13. Functional neuroimaging of Alzheimer's disease and other dementias

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Ruimin

    2001-01-01

    Dementing illnesses comprise Alzheimer's disease (AD), Pick's disease, Multi-infarct dementia (MID) and other neurological disorders. These diseases have different clinical characters respectively. Neuropsychological examinations can help to diagnose and differential diagnose dementias. The development of neuroimaging dementias is more and more rapid. 18 F-FDG PET method shows neo-cortical hypometabolism occurring in the biparietal-temporal lobes and left-right asymmetry of AD patients in the early stage. It can also differential diagnose Ad from other dementias

  14. Care pathways for dementia: current perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samsi K

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Kritika Samsi, Jill ManthorpeSocial Care Workforce Research Unit, King’s College London, London, UKAbstract: Uncertainty appears to typify the experience of living with dementia. With an uncertain illness trajectory and unpredictable levels of deterioration and stability in symptoms, people with a diagnosis of dementia may live with uncertainty and anxiety and find it hard to make plans or decisions for their future. People with memory problems and caregivers seeking a diagnosis of dementia may also potentially find themselves navigating a labyrinth-like maze of services, practitioners, assessments, and memory tests, with limited understanding of test scores and little information about what support is available. In this context of uncertainty, the apparent clarity and certainty of a “dementia care pathway” may be attractive. However, the term “dementia care pathway” has multiple and overlapping meanings, which can potentially give rise to further confusion if these are ill-defined or a false consensus is presumed. This review distinguishes four meanings: 1 a mechanism for the management and containment of uncertainty and confusion, useful for the professional as well as the person with dementia; 2 a manual for sequencing care activities; 3 a guide to consumers, indicating eligibility for care activities, or a guide to self-management for dementia dyads, indicating the appropriateness of care activities; and 4 a manual for “walking with” the person. Examples of these approaches are presented from UK dementia services with illustrations of existing care pathways and associated time points, specifically focusing on: 1 early symptom identification and first service encounters, 2 assessment process, 3 diagnostic disclosure, 4 postdiagnostic support, and 5 appropriate interventions. We review the evidence around these themes, as well as discuss service pathways and referral routes used by some services in England and internationally. We

  15. Awareness of financial skills in dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Wielingen, L E; Tuokko, H A; Cramer, K; Mateer, C A; Hultsch, D F

    2004-07-01

    The present study examined the relations among levels of cognitive functioning, executive dysfunction, and awareness of financial management capabilities among a sample of 42 community-dwelling persons with dementia. Financial tasks on the Measure of Awareness of Financial Skills (MAFS) were dichotomized as simple or complex based on Piaget's operational levels of childhood cognitive development. Severity of global cognitive impairment and executive dysfunction were significantly related to awareness of financial abilities as measured by informant-participant discrepancy scores on the MAFS. For persons with mild and moderate/severe dementia, and persons with and without executive dysfunction, proportions of awareness within simple and complex financial task categories were tabulated. Significantly less awareness of financial abilities occurred on complex compared with simple tasks. Individuals with mild dementia were significantly less aware of abilities on complex items, whereas persons with moderate/severe dementia were less aware of abilities, regardless of task complexity. Similar patterns of awareness were observed for individuals with and without executive dysfunction. These findings support literature suggesting that deficits associated with dementia first occur for complex cognitive tasks involving inductive reasoning or decision-making in novel situations, and identify where loss of function in the financial domain may first be expected. Copyright Taylor & Francis Ltd

  16. Systematic review of recent dementia practice guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngo, Jennifer; Holroyd-Leduc, Jayna M

    2015-01-01

    dementia is a highly prevalent acquired cognitive disorder that interferes with activities of daily living, relationships and quality of life. Recognition and effective management strategies are necessary to provide comprehensive care for these patients and their families. High-quality clinical practice guidelines can improve the quality and consistency of care in all aspects of dementia diagnosis and management by clarifying interventions supported by sound evidence and by alerting clinicians to interventions without proven benefit. we aimed to offer a synthesis of existing practice recommendations for the diagnosis and management of dementia, based upon moderate-to-high quality dementia guidelines. we performed a systematic search in EMBASE and MEDLINE as well as the grey literature for guidelines produced between 2008 and 2013. thirty-nine retrieved practice guidelines were included for quality appraisal by the Appraisal of Guidelines Research and Evaluation II (AGREE-II) tool, performed by two independent reviewers. From the 12 moderate-to-high quality guidelines included, specific practice recommendations for the diagnosis and/or management of any aspect of dementia were extracted for comparison based upon the level of evidence and strength of recommendation. there was a general agreement between guidelines for many practice recommendations. However, direct comparisons between guidelines were challenging due to variations in grading schemes. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Geriatrics Society. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. Costs of dementia in the Czech Republic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmerová, Iva; Hort, Jakub; Rusina, Robert; Wimo, Anders; Šteffl, Michal

    2017-11-01

    The aim of this study was to estimate the cost of dementia in the Czech Republic. One hundred and nineteen patient-caregiver dyads participated in our multicenter observational cost-of-illness study. The modified Resource Utilization in Dementia Questionnaire was used as the main tool to collect data from patients and caregivers. Medical specialists provided additional data from medical records. The average costs of dementia were calculated and patients were then divided by the level of cognitive impairment. A generalized linear model was used to determine if differences were present for selected cost variables. The mean (standard deviation) for direct cost per a patient in a month was estimated to be €243.0 (138.0), €1727.1 (1075.6) for the indirect cost, and €1970.0 (1090.3) for the total cost of dementia in the Czech Republic. All of the costs increased as dementia severity increased. Both the indirect and total costs significantly (p Republic. Both total and indirect care costs increased significantly the cognition declined.

  18. Dementia and functional cerebral imaging a reevaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steinling, M.; Lecouffe, P.; Pham, T.; Charpentier, P.; Delebvre, L.; Lavenu, I.; Pasquier, F.; Charpentier, P.; Duhamel, A.

    2000-01-01

    New concepts which concerned especially the nosologic classification of dementia as for example Dementia with Lewy Bodies (DLB) incite to revalue the main characteristics of the regional cerebral blood flow measurements studied by SPECT in several forms of dementia. SPECT analysis with 99m-Technetium HMPAO (555 MBq) was performed to 20 patients with probable DLB, 20 patients with probable Alzheimer's disease (AD) and 20 patients with Fronto-Temporal dementia (FTD). Ten pairs of regions of interest were analysed. Tracer uptake was expressed as a cortico-cerebellar activity ratio. Statistical analysis of index of fixation was performed using an univariate analysis of variance, and a selection of significative ROIs was performed using two cut-off values (80 and 82.5 %). In the FTD group, a decrease of HMPAO uptake in frontal cortical regions of interest (internal, lateral and posterior) was observed. In the DLB group the decrease of HMPAO uptake was widespread and concerned all the cortical regions of interest except the posterior frontal and occipital regions. Finally in the AD group there was a limited temporal and parietal hypoperfusion more marked on the left side without frontal hypoperfusion. This last result was obtained whatever the cognitive impairment. Consequently it seems that the frontal hypoperfusion previously reported in AD groups was induced by the fact that patients with DLB were also included because the diagnosis was not established. In conclusion we estimate that SPECT studies could be used more often in clinical research especially for a classification approach of dementia. (authors)

  19. Somatostatin-immunoreactive senile plaque-like structures in the frontal cortex and nucleus accumbens of aged tree shrews and Japanese macaques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamashita, Akiko; Fuchs, Eberhard; Taira, Masato; Yamamoto, Takamitsu; Hayashi, Motoharu

    2012-06-01

    Previously, we demonstrated decreased expression of somatostatin mRNA in aged macaque brain, particularly in the prefrontal cortex. To investigate whether or not this age-dependent decrease in mRNA is related to morphological changes, we analyzed somatostatin cells in the cerebra of aged Japanese macaques and compared them with those in rats and tree shrews, the latter of which are closely related to primates. Brains of aged macaques, tree shrews, and rats were investigated by immunohistochemistry with special emphasis on somatostatin. We observed degenerating somatostatin-immunoreactive cells in the cortices of aged macaques and tree shrews. Somatostatin-immunoreactive senile plaque-like structures were found in areas 6 and 8 and in the nucleus accumbens of macaques, as well as in the nucleus accumbens and the cortex of aged tree shrews, where amyloid accumulations were observed. Somatostatin degenerations may be related to amyloid accumulations and may play roles in impairments of cognitive functions during aging. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  20. Prevalence of very mild to severe dementia in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, K; Lolk, A; Nielsen, H

    1997-01-01

    The prevalence of dementia has been estimated in several countries and a meta-analysis has shown moderate and severe dementia in people aged 65 years and older to be between 4% and 6%. The Odense study is aiming to estimate the prevalence and incidence of dementia and to identify risk factors....

  1. Trajectories of cognitive decline in different types of dementia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smits, L.L.; van Harten, A.C.; Pijnenburg, Y.A.L.; Koedam, E.L.G.E.; Bouwman, F.H.; Sistermans, N.; Reuling, I.E.W.; Prins, N.D.; Lemstra, A.W.; Scheltens, P.; van der Flier, W.M.

    2015-01-01

    Background. To investigate trajectories of cognitive decline in patients with different types of dementia compared to controls in a longitudinal study. Method. In 199 patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD), 10 with vascular dementia (VaD), 26 with dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB), 20 with behavioural

  2. Association of diabetes mellitus and dementia : The Rotterdam study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ott, A; Stolk, RP; Hofman, A; vanHarskamp, F; Grobbee, DE; Breteler, MMB

    1996-01-01

    Dementia and non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM) are highly prevalent disorders in the elderly. Diabetes has repeatedly been reported to affect cognition, but its relation with dementia is uncertain. We therefore studied the association between diabetes and dementia in the Rotterdam

  3. Expanding Expectations for Narrative Styles in the Context of Dementia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guendouzi, Jackie; Davis, Boyd H.; Maclagan, Margaret

    2015-01-01

    This article uses discourse analyses to examine the narrative styles produced by 2 women with a diagnosis of dementia. Because of constrained cognitive resources, people with dementia (PWD) often use alternative strategies to weave their stories into conversations. People with dementia have difficulty in initiating and maintaining a canonical…

  4. Depression in dementia: development and testing of a nursing guideline.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verkaik, R.

    2009-01-01

    Guideline for pleasure in dementia care Depression in nursing home residents with dementia can be decreased by the introduction of a nursing guideline. This is the main conclusion of the PhD thesis on depression in dementia that was presented by researcher Renate Verkaik on April 20th at the

  5. The cost of dementia in Denmark: the Odense Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kronborg Andersen, C; Søgaard, J; Hansen, E; Kragh-Sørensen, A; Hastrup, L; Andersen, J; Andersen, K; Lolk, A; Nielsen, H; Kragh-Sørensen, P

    1999-01-01

    In a population-based study of dementia, the cost of care for 245 demented elderly and 490 controls matched by age and gender was estimated. Dementia of Alzheimer's type was diagnosed according to the NINCDS-ADRDA criteria, and vascular dementia and other types of dementia were diagnosed according to the DSM-IIIR criteria. Severity of dementia was determined by the Clinical Dementia Rating scale. The annual cost of medical care, domestic care, home help, nursing home and special equipment for nondemented patients was DKK 22,000 per person while the cost for very mildly, mildly, moderately and severely demented patients was DKK 49,000, DKK 93,000, DKK 138,000 and DKK 206,000, respectively. Except for very mild dementia the cost did not differ between elderly who suffer from Alzheimer's disease and those with other types of dementia. The net cost of dementia is the difference in cost between those with dementia and the matched controls and amounts on average to DKK 77,000 per person per year. However, priority setting cannot be based on the cost of dementia per se, but only on the cost of a specific dementia intervention compared to its health benefit.

  6. Advanced MR Neuroimaging in Early Stage Presenile Dementia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.M.E. Steketee (Rebecca)

    2016-01-01

    markdownabstractDementia is a syndrome affecting cognitive functions and behavior, with an overwhelming impact on both patients and caregivers. An estimated number of 35.6 million patients suffers from dementia, with a subset affected before the age of 65 years, i.e. presenile dementia. Establishing

  7. Dementia Population Risk Tool (DemPoRT): study protocol for a predictive algorithm assessing dementia risk in the community

    OpenAIRE

    Fisher, Stacey; Hsu, Amy; Mojaverian, Nassim; Taljaard, Monica; Huyer, Gregory; Manuel, Douglas G; Tanuseputro, Peter

    2017-01-01

    Introduction The burden of disease from dementia is a growing global concern as incidence increases dramatically with age, and average life expectancy has been increasing around the world. Planning for an ageing population requires reliable projections of dementia prevalence; however, existing population projections are simple and have poor predictive accuracy. The Dementia Population Risk Tool (DemPoRT) will predict incidence of dementia in the population setting using multivariable modellin...

  8. Prediction of dementia by hippocampal shape analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Achterberg, Hakim C.; van der Lijn, Fedde; den Heijer, Tom

    2010-01-01

    This work investigates the possibility of predicting future onset of dementia in subjects who are cognitively normal, using hippocampal shape and volume information extracted from MRI scans. A group of 47 subjects who were non-demented normal at the time of the MRI acquisition, but were diagnosed...... with dementia during a 9 year follow-up period, was selected from a large population based cohort study. 47 Age and gender matched subjects who stayed cognitively intact were selected from the same cohort study as a control group. The hippocampi were automatically segmented and all segmentations were inspected...... and, if necessary, manually corrected by a trained observer. From this data a statistical model of hippocampal shape was constructed, using an entropy-based particle system. This shape model provided the input for a Support Vector Machine classifier to predict dementia. Cross validation experiments...

  9. Dementia prevalence and care in assisted living.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmerman, Sheryl; Sloane, Philip D; Reed, David

    2014-04-01

    Assisted living residences have become prominent sites of long-term residential care for older adults with dementia. Estimates derived from national data indicate that seven out of ten residents in these residences have some form of cognitive impairment, with 29 percent having mild impairment, 23 percent moderate impairment, and 19 percent severe impairment. More than one-third of residents display behavioral symptoms, and of these, 57 percent have a medication prescribed for their symptoms. Only a minority of cognitively impaired residents reside in a dementia special care unit, where admission and discharge policies are more supportive of their needs. Policy-relevant recommendations from our study include the need to examine the use of psychotropic medications and cultures related to prescribing, better train assisted living staff to handle medications and provide nonpharmacological treatments, use best practices in caring for people with dementia, and promote consumer education regarding policies and practices in assisted living.

  10. [Montessori method applied to dementia - literature review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandão, Daniela Filipa Soares; Martín, José Ignacio

    2012-06-01

    The Montessori method was initially applied to children, but now it has also been applied to people with dementia. The purpose of this study is to systematically review the research on the effectiveness of this method using Medical Literature Analysis and Retrieval System Online (Medline) with the keywords dementia and Montessori method. We selected lo studies, in which there were significant improvements in participation and constructive engagement, and reduction of negative affects and passive engagement. Nevertheless, systematic reviews about this non-pharmacological intervention in dementia rate this method as weak in terms of effectiveness. This apparent discrepancy can be explained because the Montessori method may have, in fact, a small influence on dimensions such as behavioral problems, or because there is no research about this method with high levels of control, such as the presence of several control groups or a double-blind study.

  11. Optimising nutrition for older people with dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, Delwyn

    This article explores interventions that can be undertaken to establish and maintain adequate nutritional intake in older people with dementia. This is often a problem, particularly in the later stages of the disease. A literature review was conducted, which identified 12 articles for inclusion. Most of these articles described interventions to maintain adequate nutritional intake in older adults with dementia. Although no standardised intervention was reported, some approaches did appear to be more successful than others. Further research is required on how nurses and nursing assistants can help older people with dementia to maintain adequate nutrition. Staff need more time and training to improve nutritional intake in this group of patients. In addition, enhanced vigilance with respect to eating difficulties and food consumption is necessary.

  12. [Clinical Neuropsychology of Dementia with Lewy Bodies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagahama, Yasuhiro

    2016-02-01

    Dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB) shows lesser memory impairment and more severe visuospatial disability than Alzheimer disease (AD). Although deficits in both consolidation and retrieval underlie the memory impairment, retrieval deficit is predominant in DLB. Visuospatial dysfunctions in DLB are related to the impairments in both ventral and dorsal streams of higher visual information processing, and lower visual processing in V1/V2 may also be impaired. Attention and executive functions are more widely disturbed in DLB than in AD. Imitation of finger gestures is impaired more frequently in DLB than in other mild dementia, and provides additional information for diagnosis of mild dementia, especially for DLB. Pareidolia, which lies between hallucination and visual misperception, is found frequently in DLB, but its mechanism is still under investigation.

  13. Emergence of artistic talent in frontotemporal dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, B L; Cummings, J; Mishkin, F; Boone, K; Prince, F; Ponton, M; Cotman, C

    1998-10-01

    To describe the clinical, neuropsychological, and imaging features of five patients with frontotemporal dementia (FTD) who acquired new artistic skills in the setting of dementia. Creativity in the setting of dementia has recently been reported. We describe five patients who became visual artists in the setting of FTD. Sixty-nine FTD patients were interviewed regarding visual abilities. Five became artists in the early stages of FTD. Their history, artistic process, neuropsychology, and anatomy are described. On SPECT or pathology, four of the five patients had the temporal variant of FTD in which anterior temporal lobes are involved but the dorsolateral frontal cortex is spared. Visual skills were spared but language and social skills were devastated. Loss of function in the anterior temporal lobes may lead to the "facilitation" of artistic skills. Patients with the temporal lobe variant of FTD offer a window into creativity.

  14. New SPECT and PET dementia tracers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vergote, J.; Chalon, S.; Emond, P.; Vercouillie, J.; Guilloteau, D.; Vergote, J.; Guilloteau, D.; Pappata, J.S.

    2009-01-01

    Single photon emission tomography (SPECT) and positron emission tomography (PET) are techniques to study in vivo neurotransmitter systems, neuro inflammation and amyloid deposits in normal human brain and in dementia. These methods used to explore the integrity of dopaminergic, cholinergic and serotonergic systems in Alzheimer's disease and in other dementias allowed to understand how the neurotransmission was modified in these disorders. Progress in the understanding of pathophysiological and clinical signs of dementia requires an evolution of the radioligands used to carry out an increasingly early and differential diagnosis in addition to monitoring the progression of disease and the effects of therapies. New emerging radiotracers for neuro inflammation or amyloid deposits are essential. In this article, new SPECT and PET tracers are presented. (authors)

  15. Capgras' syndrome in dementia with Lewy bodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marantz, Andrew G; Verghese, Joe

    2002-01-01

    We report the occurrence of Capgras' syndrome, or the delusion of doubles, in a patient with dementia with Lewy bodies. The patient believed that several similar-looking impostors had replaced his wife of over 50 years. Uncharacteristically, he adopted a friendly attitude with these impostors. This unusual convivial reaction to the impostors may result from differential involvement of the dual visual pathways processing facial recognition and emotional responses to faces. The delusion resolved spontaneously, coincident with worsening of the dementia. In a retrospective chart review of 18 autopsy-confirmed cases of dementia with Lewy bodies, delusions were reported in 5 subjects (27.8%), of whom 1 had misidentification delusions much like Capgras' syndrome.

  16. Violent and criminal manifestations in dementia patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cipriani, Gabriele; Lucetti, Claudio; Danti, Sabrina; Carlesi, Cecilia; Nuti, Angelo

    2016-05-01

    Although the older adults have been studied as victims of violence, geriatric patients can display violent behavior. The purpose of the present review was to explore the phenomenon of criminal violations and violent acts in people with dementia. The authors used PubMed to search the MEDLINE database and other sources for original research and review articles on criminal and violent manifestation in demented patients combining the terms "criminal manifestation," "violence, aggressive behavior," "homicide," "suicide" and "homicide-suicide" together with "dementia". Possible biomarkers of violence are considered. The present review highlights the risk factors for violence in patients suffering from dementia, and reviews the literature about criminal violations and homicidal/suicidal behavior in this patient group. Geriatr Gerontol Int 2016; 16: 541-549. © 2015 Japan Geriatrics Society.

  17. Development of a dementia assessment quality database

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johannsen, P.; Jørgensen, Kasper; Korner, A.

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Increased focus on the quality of health care requires tools and information to address and improve quality. One tool to evaluate and report the quality of clinical health services is quality indicators based on a clinical database. METHOD: The Capital Region of Denmark runs a quality...... database for dementia evaluation in the secondary health system. One volume and seven process quality indicators on dementia evaluations are monitored. Indicators include frequency of demented patients, percentage of patients evaluated within three months, whether the work-up included blood tests, Mini...... for the data analyses. RESULTS: The database was constructed in 2005 and covers 30% of the Danish population. Data from all consecutive cases evaluated for dementia in the secondary health system in the Capital Region of Denmark are entered. The database has shown that the basic diagnostic work-up programme...

  18. Assistive technology for memory support in dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van der Roest, Henriëtte G; Wenborn, Jennifer; Pastink, Channah; Dröes, Rose-Marie; Orrell, Martin

    2017-06-11

    The sustained interest in electronic assistive technology in dementia care has been fuelled by the urgent need to develop useful approaches to help support people with dementia at home. Also the low costs and wide availability of electronic devices make it more feasible to use electronic devices for the benefit of disabled persons. Information Communication Technology (ICT) devices designed to support people with dementia are usually referred to as Assistive Technology (AT) or Electronic Assistive Technology (EAT). By using AT in this review we refer to electronic assistive devices. A range of AT devices has been developed to support people with dementia and their carers to manage their daily activities and to enhance safety, for example electronic pill boxes, picture phones, or mobile tracking devices. Many are commercially available. However, the usefulness and user-friendliness of these devices are often poorly evaluated. Although reviews of (electronic) memory aids do exist, a systematic review of studies focusing on the efficacy of AT for memory support in people with dementia is lacking. Such a review would guide people with dementia and their informal and professional carers in selecting appropriate AT devices. Primary objectiveTo assess the efficacy of AT for memory support in people with dementia in terms of daily performance of personal and instrumental activities of daily living (ADL), level of dependency, and admission to long-term care. Secondary objectiveTo assess the impact of AT on: users (autonomy, usefulness and user-friendliness, adoption of AT); cognitive function and neuropsychiatric symptoms; need for informal and formal care; perceived quality of life; informal carer burden, self-esteem and feelings of competence; formal carer work satisfaction, workload and feelings of competence; and adverse events. We searched ALOIS, the Specialised Register of the Cochrane Dementia and Cognitive Improvement Group (CDCIG), on 10 November 2016. ALOIS is

  19. Prevention of Dementia: Focus on Lifestyle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Cristina Polidori

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this paper is to summarize current knowledge on the possible advantages of lifestyle interventions, with particular attention to physical fitness, cognitive activity, leisure and social activity as well as nutrition. There is a large amount of published papers providing partial evidence and asserting the need for immediate, appropriate preventive lifestyle measures against dementia and AD development. Nevertheless, there are currently great difficulties in drafting effective guidelines in this field. This depends mainly upon lack of randomized controlled trials assessing benefits versus risks of particular lifestyle interventions strategies. However, due to the rapid increase of dementia burden, lifestyle factors and their amelioration should be already made part of decision making in light of their health-maintaining effects while awaiting for results of well-designed large prospective cohort studies in dementia.

  20. Experience of Dementia-related Anxiety in Middle-aged Female Caregivers for Family Members with Dementia: A Phenomenological Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeong Sun Kim, RN, PhD

    2016-06-01

    Conclusions: The study provides the essential structure of the experience on dementia-related anxiety that caregivers of a family member with dementia have. The findings could help healthcare providers and researchers have better understanding of dementia-related anxiety and give more attention to the caregivers to relieve their anxiety.

  1. Dementia care mapping to support staff in the care of people with intellectual disability and dementia: a feasibility study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schaap, Feija; Dijkstra, Geke; Fokkens, Andrea; Reijneveld, Sijmen; Finnema, Evelyn

    2018-01-01

    Background: The number of people with intellectual disability and dementia in-creases; this combination causes behavioural changes. Dementia Care Mapping (DCM) supports staff in dementia care in nursing homes and may be useful in intel-lectual disability-care. This qualitative study examines the

  2. Dementia quality of life instrument--construct and concurrent validity in patients with mild to moderate dementia.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voigt-Radloff, S.; Leonhart, R.; Schutzwohl, M.; Jurjanz, L.; Reuster, T.; Gerner, A.; Marschner, K.; Nes, F. van; Graff, M.J.; Vernooij-Dassen, M.J.F.J.; Olde Rikkert, M.G.; Holthoff, V.; Hull, M.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: To translate the Dementia quality of life instrument (DQoL) into German and assess its construct and concurrent validity in community-dwelling people with mild to moderate dementia. METHODS: Dementia quality of life instrument data of two pooled samples (n=287) were analysed

  3. Effect of Panax notoginseng saponins on the expression of beta-amyloid protein in the cortex of the parietal lobe and hippocampus, and spatial learning and memory in a mouse model of senile dementia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhenguo Zhong; Dengpan Wu; Liang Lü; Jinsheng Wang; Wenyan Zhang; Zeqiang Qu

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The pharmacological actions of Panax notoginseng saponins (PNS) lie in removing free radicals, anti-inflammation and anti-oxygenation. It can also improve memory and behavior in rat models of Alzheimer's disease.OBJECTIVE: Using the Morris water maze, immunohistochemistry, real-time PCR and RT-PCR, this study aimed to measure improvement in spatial learning, memory, expression of amyloid precursor protein (App) and β -amyloid (A β ), to investigate the mechanism of action of PNS in the treatment of AD in the senescence accelerated mouse-prone 8 (SAMP8) and compare the effects with huperzine A.DESIGN, TIME AND SETTING: A completely randomized grouping design, controlled animal experiment was performed in the Center for Research & Development of New Drugs, Guangxi Traditional Chinese Medical University from July 2005 to April 2007.MATERIALS: Sixty male SAMP8 mice, aged 3 months, purchased from Tianjin Chinese Traditional Medical University of China, were divided into four groups: PNS high-dosage group, PNS low-dosage group,huperzine A group and control group. PNS was provided by Weihe Pharmaceutical Co., Ltd. (batch No.:Z53021485, Yuxi, Yunan Province, China). Huperzine A was provided by Zhenyuan Pharmaceutical Co., Ltd.(batch No.: 20040801, Zhejiang. China).METHODS: The high-dosage group and low-dosage group were treated with 93.50 and 23.38 mg/kg PNS respectively per day and the huperzine A group was treated with 0.038 6 mg/kg huperzine A per day, all by intragastric administration, for 8 consecutive weeks. The same volume of double distilled water was given to the control group.MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: After drug administration, learning and memory abilities were assessed by place navigation and spatial probe tests. The recording indices consisted of escape latency (time-to-platform), and the percentage of swimming time spent in each quadrant. The number of A β1-40,A β1-42 and App immunopositive neurons in the brains of SAMP8 mice was analyzed by immunohistochemistry. The mRNA content of App, tau, acetylcholinesterase, and synaptophysin (Syp) was tested by real time PCR and RT-PCR.RESULTS: The PCR results show that PNS can downregulate the expression of the App gene and upregulate the expression of the Syp gene in the parietal cortex and hippocampus of SAMP8 mice. The therapeutic effects of the PNS high-dosage group were greater than those of the PNS low-dosage group and the huperzine A group (P < 0.05). The results of the Morris water maze and immunohistochemistry indicated that PNS can improve the capacity for spatial learning and memory in SAMP8 mice, and reduce the content of A β1-40,A β1-42 and expression of App in the brains of SAMP8 mice. The therapeutic effects of the PNS high-dosage group were greater than that of the PNS low-dosage group and the huperzine A group (P < 0.05).CONCLUSION: These results support the hypothesis that PNS plays a therapeutic and protective role on the pathological lesions and learning dysfunction of Alzheimer's disease. The therapeutic effects of PNS for Alzheimer's disease are possibly achieved through downregulating the expression of the App gene and upregulating the expression of the Syp gene. The therapeutic effects of PNS are dose-dependent and are greater than the effect of huperzine A.

  4. Pain management in patients with dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achterberg, Wilco P; Pieper, Marjoleine J C; van Dalen-Kok, Annelore H; de Waal, Margot W M; Husebo, Bettina S; Lautenbacher, Stefan; Kunz, Miriam; Scherder, Erik J A; Corbett, Anne

    2013-01-01

    There are an estimated 35 million people with dementia across the world, of whom 50% experience regular pain. Despite this, current assessment and treatment of pain in this patient group are inadequate. In addition to the discomfort and distress caused by pain, it is frequently the underlying cause of behavioral symptoms, which can lead to inappropriate treatment with antipsychotic medications. Pain also contributes to further complications in treatment and care. This review explores four key perspectives of pain management in dementia and makes recommendations for practice and research. The first perspective discussed is the considerable uncertainty within the literature on the impact of dementia neuropathology on pain perception and processing in Alzheimer's disease and other dementias, where white matter lesions and brain atrophy appear to influence the neurobiology of pain. The second perspective considers the assessment of pain in dementia. This is challenging, particularly because of the limited capacity of self-report by these individuals, which means that assessment relies in large part on observational methods. A number of tools are available but the psychometric quality and clinical utility of these are uncertain. The evidence for efficient treatment (the third perspective) with analgesics is also limited, with few statistically well-powered trials. The most promising evidence supports the use of stepped treatment approaches, and indicates the benefit of pain and behavioral interventions on both these important symptoms. The fourth perspective debates further difficulties in pain management due to the lack of sufficient training and education for health care professionals at all levels, where evidence-based guidance is urgently needed. To address the current inadequate management of pain in dementia, a comprehensive approach is needed. This would include an accurate, validated assessment tool that is sensitive to different types of pain and therapeutic

  5. Cholinergic imaging in dementia spectrum disorders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roy, Roman; Niccolini, Flavia; Pagano, Gennaro; Politis, Marios

    2016-01-01

    The multifaceted nature of the pathology of dementia spectrum disorders has complicated their management and the development of effective treatments. This is despite the fact that they are far from uncommon, with Alzheimer's disease (AD) alone affecting 35 million people worldwide. The cholinergic system has been found to be crucially involved in cognitive function, with cholinergic dysfunction playing a pivotal role in the pathophysiology of dementia. The use of molecular imaging such as SPECT and PET for tagging targets within the cholinergic system has shown promise for elucidating key aspects of underlying pathology in dementia spectrum disorders, including AD or parkinsonian dementias. SPECT and PET studies using selective radioligands for cholinergic markers, such as [ 11 C]MP4A and [ 11 C]PMP PET for acetylcholinesterase (AChE), [ 123 I]5IA SPECT for the α 4 β 2 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor and [ 123 I]IBVM SPECT for the vesicular acetylcholine transporter, have been developed in an attempt to clarify those aspects of the diseases that remain unclear. This has led to a variety of findings, such as cortical AChE being significantly reduced in Parkinson's disease (PD), PD with dementia (PDD) and AD, as well as correlating with certain aspects of cognitive function such as attention and working memory. Thalamic AChE is significantly reduced in progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) and multiple system atrophy, whilst it is not affected in PD. Some of these findings have brought about suggestions for the improvement of clinical practice, such as the use of a thalamic/cortical AChE ratio to differentiate between PD and PSP, two diseases that could overlap in terms of initial clinical presentation. Here, we review the findings from molecular imaging studies that have investigated the role of the cholinergic system in dementia spectrum disorders. (orig.)

  6. Cholinergic imaging in dementia spectrum disorders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roy, Roman; Niccolini, Flavia; Pagano, Gennaro; Politis, Marios [Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology and Neuroscience, King' s College London, Neurodegeneration Imaging Group, Department of Basic and Clinical Neuroscience, London (United Kingdom)

    2016-07-15

    The multifaceted nature of the pathology of dementia spectrum disorders has complicated their management and the development of effective treatments. This is despite the fact that they are far from uncommon, with Alzheimer's disease (AD) alone affecting 35 million people worldwide. The cholinergic system has been found to be crucially involved in cognitive function, with cholinergic dysfunction playing a pivotal role in the pathophysiology of dementia. The use of molecular imaging such as SPECT and PET for tagging targets within the cholinergic system has shown promise for elucidating key aspects of underlying pathology in dementia spectrum disorders, including AD or parkinsonian dementias. SPECT and PET studies using selective radioligands for cholinergic markers, such as [{sup 11}C]MP4A and [{sup 11}C]PMP PET for acetylcholinesterase (AChE), [{sup 123}I]5IA SPECT for the α{sub 4}β{sub 2} nicotinic acetylcholine receptor and [{sup 123}I]IBVM SPECT for the vesicular acetylcholine transporter, have been developed in an attempt to clarify those aspects of the diseases that remain unclear. This has led to a variety of findings, such as cortical AChE being significantly reduced in Parkinson's disease (PD), PD with dementia (PDD) and AD, as well as correlating with certain aspects of cognitive function such as attention and working memory. Thalamic AChE is significantly reduced in progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) and multiple system atrophy, whilst it is not affected in PD. Some of these findings have brought about suggestions for the improvement of clinical practice, such as the use of a thalamic/cortical AChE ratio to differentiate between PD and PSP, two diseases that could overlap in terms of initial clinical presentation. Here, we review the findings from molecular imaging studies that have investigated the role of the cholinergic system in dementia spectrum disorders. (orig.)

  7. Phonological learning in semantic dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jefferies, Elizabeth; Bott, Samantha; Ehsan, Sheeba; Lambon Ralph, Matthew A

    2011-04-01

    Patients with semantic dementia (SD) have anterior temporal lobe (ATL) atrophy that gives rise to a highly selective deterioration of semantic knowledge. Despite pronounced anomia and poor comprehension of words and pictures, SD patients have well-formed, fluent speech and normal digit span. Given the intimate connection between phonological STM and word learning revealed by both neuropsychological and developmental studies, SD patients might be expected to show good acquisition of new phonological forms, even though their ability to map these onto meanings is impaired. In contradiction of these predictions, a limited amount of previous research has found poor learning of new phonological forms in SD. In a series of experiments, we examined whether SD patient, GE, could learn novel phonological sequences and, if so, under which circumstances. GE showed normal benefits of phonological knowledge in STM (i.e., normal phonotactic frequency and phonological similarity effects) but reduced support from semantic memory (i.e., poor immediate serial recall for semantically degraded words, characterised by frequent item errors). Next, we demonstrated normal learning of serial order information for repeated lists of single-digit number words using the Hebb paradigm: these items were well-understood allowing them to be repeated without frequent item errors. In contrast, patient GE showed little learning of nonsense syllable sequences using the same Hebb paradigm. Detailed analysis revealed that both GE and the controls showed a tendency to learn their own errors as opposed to the target items. Finally, we showed normal learning of phonological sequences for GE when he was prevented from repeating his errors. These findings confirm that the ATL atrophy in SD disrupts phonological processing for semantically degraded words but leaves the phonological architecture intact. Consequently, when item errors are minimised, phonological STM can support the acquisition of new phoneme

  8. Molecular neuroimaging in degenerative dementias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez Bonilla, J F; Carril Carril, J M

    2013-01-01

    In the context of the limitations of structural imaging, brain perfusion and metabolism using SPECT and PET have provided relevant information for the study of cognitive decline. The introduction of the radiotracers for cerebral amyloid imaging has changed the diagnostic strategy regarding Alzheimer's disease, which is currently considered to be a "continuum." According to this new paradigm, the increasing amyloid load would be associated to the preclinical phase and mild cognitive impairment. It has been possible to observe "in vivo" images using 11C-PIB and PET scans. The characteristics of the 11C-PIB image include specific high brain cortical area retention in the positive cases with typical distribution pattern and no retention in the negative cases. This, in combination with 18F-FDG PET, is the basis of molecular neuroimaging as a biomarker. At present, its prognostic value is being evaluated in longitudinal studies. 11C-PIB-PET has become the reference radiotracer to evaluate the presence of cerebral amyloid. However, its availability is limited due to the need for a nearby cyclotron. Therefore, 18F labeled radiotracers are being introduced. Our experience in the last two years with 11C-PIB, first in the research phase and then as being clinically applied, has shown the utility of the technique in the clinical field, either alone or in combination with FDG. Thus, amyloid image is a useful tool for the differential diagnosis of dementia and it is a potentially useful method for early diagnosis and evaluation of future treatments. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. and SEMNIM. All rights reserved.

  9. Mentalising music in frontotemporal dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downey, Laura E; Blezat, Alice; Nicholas, Jennifer; Omar, Rohani; Golden, Hannah L; Mahoney, Colin J; Crutch, Sebastian J; Warren, Jason D

    2013-01-01

    Despite considerable recent interest, the biological basis and clinical diagnosis of behavioural variant frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD) pose unresolved problems. Mentalising (the cognitive capacity to interpret the behaviour of oneself and others in terms of mental states) is impaired as a prominent feature of bvFTD, consistent with involvement of brain regions including ventro-medial prefrontal cortex (PFC), orbitofrontal cortex and anterior temporal lobes. Here, we investigated mentalising ability in a cohort of patients with bvFTD using a novel modality: music. We constructed a novel neuropsychological battery requiring attribution of affective mental or non-mental associations to musical stimuli. Mentalising performance of patients with bvFTD (n = 20) was assessed in relation to matched healthy control subjects (n = 20); patients also had a comprehensive assessment of behaviour and general neuropsychological functions. Neuroanatomical correlates of performance on the experimental tasks were investigated using voxel-based morphometry of patients' brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans. Compared to healthy control subjects, patients showed impaired ability to attribute mental states but not non-mental characteristics to music, and this deficit correlated with performance on a standard test of social inference and with carer ratings of patients' empathic capacity, but not with other potentially relevant measures of general neuropsychological function. Mentalising performance in the bvFTD group was associated with grey matter changes in anterior temporal lobe and ventro-medial PFC. These findings suggest that music can represent surrogate mental states and the ability to construct such mental representations is impaired in bvFTD, with potential implications for our understanding of the biology of bvFTD and human social cognition more broadly. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Research progress of behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-hua GU

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available There is no epidemiological data of frontotemporal dementia (FTD in China. The application of updated diagnostic criteria, publishing of frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD consensus in China, development of multimodal imaging and biomarkers promote the clinical understanding on behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD. There is still no drugs treating FTD approved by U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA. Multidisciplinary intervention may delay the progression of bvFTD. DOI: 10.3969/j.issn.1672-6731.2015.07.006

  11. Depression and dementia in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinanović, Osman; Hudić, Josip; Zukić, Sanela; Kapidžić, Almasa; Zonić, Lejla; Vidović, Mirjana

    2015-03-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative disorder causing not only motor dysfunction but also cognitive, psychiatric, autonomic and sensory disturbances. Depression is the most common psychiatric disturbance identified in patients with PD and has been shown to be more common in PD than in other chronic and disabling disorders, occurring in approximately 40% of PD patients. However, the prevalence and clinical features associated with depression in PD remain controversial. Dementia is increasingly recognized as a symptom associated with idiopathic PD, and is found in up to 40% of all patients suffering from that condition. The aim of this study was to estimate the prevalence of depressive and dementia symptoms in PD patients. The study included 35 consecutive patients with PD, 13 (37.4%) male and 22 (62.6%) female (mean age 62.9 ± 11.0, range 36-85 years), mean duration of disease 4.7 ± 2.9 (range 1-10) years, hospitalized during one year at Clinical Department of Neurology, Tuzla University Clinical Center, Tuzla, Bosnia and Herzegovina. The Mini Mental State Examination (MMSE) was used for assessment of cognitive deterioration and Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) for depression. Computerized tomography was performed in all patients. According to BDI scale, depressive symptoms were present in all 35 PD patients: minimal in 4 (11.4%), low in 7 (20%), moderate in 8 (22.8%), severe in 9 (25.4%) and extreme in 7 (20%) patients. On MMSE scale, 9 (25.4%) patients were free from cognitive deterioration and 26 (74.6%) patients had moderate to severe deterioration, but 21 (60%) patients (7 (33.33%) male and 14 (66.66%) female) had symptoms of dementia (MMSE score ≤ 23). Using MMSE scale, 8 (22.8%) patients were free from dementia and 27 (77.2%) patients had some cognitive deterioration. Very mild symptoms of dementia were found in 6 (25.9%) and overt features of dementia in 21 (74.1%) PD patients. So, out of 35 PD study patients, 21 (60%) (7 (33.3%) male and 14

  12. Preserved musical semantic memory in semantic dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinstein, Jessica; Koenig, Phyllis; Gunawardena, Delani; McMillan, Corey; Bonner, Michael; Grossman, Murray

    2011-02-01

    To understand the scope of semantic impairment in semantic dementia. Case study. Academic medical center. A man with semantic dementia, as demonstrated by clinical, neuropsychological, and imaging studies. Music performance and magnetic resonance imaging results. Despite profoundly impaired semantic memory for words and objects due to left temporal lobe atrophy, this semiprofessional musician was creative and expressive in demonstrating preserved musical knowledge. Long-term representations of words and objects in semantic memory may be dissociated from meaningful knowledge in other domains, such as music.

  13. The development of the dementia concept in 19th century

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonardo Caixeta

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The dementia concept has been reformulated through its history and the 19th century was remarkable in the construction of this concept as we understand it today. Like other syndromes, much of the history of the dementia concept comes from the attempt to separate it from other nosological conditions, giving it a unique identity. The fundamental elements for the arising of the dementia modern concept were: a correlation of the observed syndrome with organic-cerebral lesions; b understanding of the irreversibility of the dementia evolution; c its relation with human ageing; and d the choice of the cognitive dysfunction as a clinical marker of the dementia concept.

  14. White matter alterations in neurodegenerative and vascular dementia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Supprian, T.; Kessler, H.; Falkai, P.; Retz, W.; Roesler, M.; Grunwald, I.; Reith, W.

    2003-01-01

    Due to a significant overlap of the two syndromes, differentiation of degenerative dementia of the Alzheimer-type from vascular dementia may be difficult even when imaging studies are available. White matter changes occur in many patients suffering from Alzheimer's disease. Little is known about the impact of white matter changes on the course and clinical presentation of Alzheimer's disease. High sensitivity of MRI in the detection of white matter alterations may account for over-diagnosing vascular dementia. The clinical significance of white matter alterations in dementia is still a matter of debate. The article reviews current concepts about the role of white matter alterations in dementia. (orig.) [de

  15. The importance of music for people with dementia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McDermott, Orii; Orrell, Martin; Ridder, Hanne Mette Ochsner

    2014-01-01

    with dementia and explore the meaning of music in their lives.Method: Separate focus groups and interviews with (1) care home residents with dementia and their families, (2) day hospital clients with dementia, (3) care home staff, and (4) music therapists, were conducted. The findings of the thematic analysis......, the importance of relationship-building through music making were particularly highlighted as valuable. The psychosocial model of music in dementia was developed. The model revealed the importance of music to support the personal psychology of people with dementia and the social psychology of the care home...

  16. Rethinking Psychosis in Dementia: An Analysis of Antecedents and Explanations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen-Mansfield, Jiska; Golander, Hava; Cohen, Rinat

    2017-08-01

    An in-depth analysis of qualitative data regarding antecedents, consequences, and descriptions of delusions of persons with dementia (PwD) provided by family caregivers is presented. Three broad classifications of reasons given behind types of delusions are included, namely environmental factors, personal factors, and dementia, with dementia being the most prominent factor. We observed an overlap between known cognitive symptoms of dementia and the characteristics of the reported "delusions" in dementia. It therefore appears that what is often classified as a delusion of a seemingly psychotic nature is in fact the PwD's disorientation combined with an attempt to fill in gaps caused by cognitive deficiencies.

  17. Awareness of dementia by family carers of nursing home residents dying with dementia: a post-death study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penders, Yolanda W H; Albers, Gwenda; Deliens, Luc; Vander Stichele, Robert; Van den Block, Lieve

    2015-01-01

    High-quality palliative care for people with dementia should be patient-centered, family-focused, and include well-informed and shared decision-making, as affirmed in a recent white paper on dementia from the European Association for Palliative Care. To describe how often family carers of nursing home residents who died with dementia are aware that their relative has dementia, and study resident, family carer, and care characteristics associated with awareness. Post-death study using random cluster sampling. Structured questionnaires were completed by family carers, nursing staff, and general practitioners of deceased nursing home residents with dementia in Flanders, Belgium (2010). Of 190 residents who died with dementia, 53.2% of family carers responded. In 28% of cases, family carers indicated they were unaware their relative had dementia. Awareness by family carers was related to more advanced stages of dementia 1 month before death (odds ratio = 5.4), with 48% of family carers being unaware when dementia was mild and 20% unaware when dementia was advanced. The longer the onset of dementia after admission to a nursing home, the less likely family carers were aware (odds ratio = 0.94). Family carers are often unaware that their relative has dementia, that is, in one-fourth of cases of dementia and one-fifth of advanced dementia, posing considerable challenges for optimal care provision and end-of-life decision-making. Considering that family carers of residents who develop dementia later after admission to a nursing home are less likely to be aware, there is room for improving communication strategies toward family carers of nursing home residents. © The Author(s) 2014.

  18. The neurologist facing pain in dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Álvaro González, Luis Carlos

    2015-01-01

    Ageing, a common background in dementia, is usually associated with painful disorders. Nevertheless, the use of analgesics is limited due to poor communication. On the other hand, dementia lesions are placed in the nociceptive pathways. For this reason, the painful experience becomes different and distinctive for every lesional type. The lateral nociceptive pathway (lateral thalamic nuclei and primary parietal cortex), which is in charge of the primary pain perception, is preserved in dementia. Thereafter, the shear painful perception, including pain intensity and threshold, remains unmodified. Distinctly, the medial pain pathways are affected by dementia lesions. In this pathway are included: the intralaminar thalamic nuclei, the pons (locus ceruleus:LC), the mesencephalon (periaacueductal grey substance: PGS), the hypothalamus (paraventricular nuclei, mamilary tuberculum) and different areas of the parietal (primary, secondary, operculum), temporal (amigdala, hypoccampus) and frontal (anterior cingular: ACC). As a consequence, the features of pain executed by these areas will be compromised: the cognitive assessment, the mood and emotion inherent to pain, the pain memory or the autonomic responses are modified in dementia. Specifically, in Alzheimer's disease (AD) there is a reduction in the anticipatory and avoidance responses and also a flattening of the autonomic responses. These are essentially secondary to the degenerative changes in the medial temporal (pain memory) and ACC (cognitive and mood aspects) areas. In vascular dementias, there is a cortico-subcortical deafferentation secondary to the white matter lesions. The consequence is the presence of hyperpathy and hyperalgesia. In the frontotemporal dementias, there is a reduction in pain expressivity. It is linked to the lesions in the orbitofrontal and anterior temporal areas, which are responsible of the emotional aspects of pain. In Parkinson's disease, painful conditions are a common characteristic

  19. A Diagnostic Model for Dementia in Clinical Practice-Case Methodology Assisting Dementia Diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Londos, Elisabet

    2015-04-02

    Dementia diagnosis is important for many different reasons. Firstly, to separate dementia, or major neurocognitive disorder, from MCI (mild cognitive impairment), mild neurocognitive disorder. Secondly, to define the specific underlying brain disorder to aid treatment, prognosis and decisions regarding care needs and assistance. The diagnostic method of dementias is a puzzle of different data pieces to be fitted together in the best possible way to reach a clinical diagnosis. Using a modified case methodology concept, risk factors affecting cognitive reserve and symptoms constituting the basis of the brain damage hypothesis, can be visualized, balanced and reflected against test results as well as structural and biochemical markers. The model's origin is the case method initially described in Harvard business school, here modified to serve dementia diagnostics.

  20. Living better with dementia: strengths-based social work practice and dementia care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGovern, Justine

    2015-01-01

    This article first argues that quality of life is possible despite the onset of dementia in late life. It also demonstrates how core concepts of social work practice, such as family systems theory, the strengths perspective, and use of self, can be applied to practice with dementia-affected persons. In addition, it provides practical suggestions for supporting care partners in nurturing "we-ness", focusing on what remains rather than was is lost, and remaining authentic. When strengths-based social work practice is integrated into dementia care protocols, wellbeing can increase. As a result, the more than 40 million persons worldwide who are affected by dementia do not have to resign themselves to the despair, devastation and inevitable demise of quality of life that dominate perception of the illness.

  1. Methodological challenges in designing dementia prevention trials - The European Dementia Prevention Initiative (EDPI)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Richard, Edo; Andrieu, Sandrine; Solomon, Alina; Mangialasche, Francesca; Ahtiluoto, Satu; Moll van Charante, Eric P.; Coley, Nicola; Fratiglioni, Laura; Neely, Anna Stigsdotter; Vellas, Bruno; van Gool, Willem A.; Kivipelto, Miia

    2012-01-01

    Recent epidemiological studies have indicated numerous associations between vascular and lifestyle related risk factors and incident dementia. However, evidence from randomised controlled trials (RCT) showing effectiveness of interventions aimed at these risk factors in preventing or postponing

  2. Dementia and the Deaf community: knowledge and service access.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson-Coleman, Emma; Keady, John; Young, Alys

    2014-01-01

    This study concerns culturally Deaf people in the United Kingdom who use British Sign Language (BSL). Its objective was to explore how Deaf people's knowledge about dementia and access to services is mediated by their minoritised cultural-linguistic status. Twenty-six members of the Deaf community participated in one of three Deaf-led focus groups in BSL corresponding with the sample of: Deaf people over the age of 60 without dementia; Deaf people aged 18-60 working professional roles unconnected with dementia services; ordinary members of the Deaf community aged 18-60. Data were subjected to a thematic content analysis. Participants' concerns about their poor levels of knowledge and understanding of dementia were augmented by their awareness that without sustained social contact in BSL opportunities for earlier recognition of dementia would be lost. Although primary care services were identified as the first port of call for dementia-related concerns, there was widespread mistrust of their effectiveness because of failures in communication and cultural competence. Confirmed diagnosis of dementia was not viewed as a gateway to services and support because Deaf organisations, dementia-related organisations and mainstream adult services were perceived to be ill-equipped to respond to the needs of Deaf people with dementia. Locating problems of late diagnosis within the Deaf community's poor awareness and knowledge of dementia fails to recognise the structural barriers Deaf people face in timely access to services and accurate recognition of dementia-related changes.

  3. A follow-up study of mortality of dementia patients in Guangzhou%广州市城乡老年期痴呆死亡率的随访研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄若燕; 唐牟尼; 林康广; 郁俊昌; 陈映梅; 郭伟坚; 肖頔; 王怀坤; 佘生林

    2014-01-01

    目的 了解广州市城乡年龄≥55周岁人群中痴呆患者的死亡率.方法 2003年和2008年,采用老年期痴呆初筛调查表、老年期痴呆诊断问卷和死亡患者调查表等调查工具,分别对从广州市城乡5 276名年龄≥55周岁的老年人进行的痴呆患病率(基线)调查中发现的183例痴呆患者进行随访,通过一对一面谈,收集相关资料,包括痴呆死亡人数及总人年数,用两者之比计算出痴呆死亡率.采用DSM-Ⅳ诊断痴呆,采用临床痴呆程度评定量表(CDR)评定痴呆严重程度.结果 (1)基线调查时被评定为痴呆的老年人,7年后随访时的死亡率为18.55/100人年;其中阿尔茨海默病(AD)、血管性痴呆(VD)和其他类型痴呆(OD)患者死亡率分别为17.69/100、19.05/100和32.93/100人年,年龄60~69、70 ~ 79、≥80岁女性的痴呆患者死亡率分别为17.14/100、13.67/100、19.87/100人年.Logistic回归分析显示,年龄[OR=1.05,95%可信区间(CI):1.03 ~ 1.08]和CDR(OR =2.56,95%CI:1.50 ~4.37),对患者死亡存在统计学意义.结论 OD患者死亡率最高,VD患者次之,AD最低.增加痴呆患者死亡危险性的因素有年龄和痴呆程度.低龄痴呆患者的死亡率高于中龄痴呆患者.%Objective To explore the mortality of dementia patients aged 55 years or over in Guangzhou.Methods From Sept 2001 to Feb 2002,5 276 persons aged 55 years or over living in urban and rural areas of Guangzhou were investigated by Senile Dementia Screening Questionnaire,Senile Dementia Diagnosis and Mortality Survey Questionnaire,in which 183 ones were diagnosed with dementia and followed up in 2003 and 2008.According to the information from interview,the dementia mortality was calculated by the ratio of the numbers of dementia deaths and total person-years.The clinical diagnosis of dementia and Alzheimer's disease (AD) were made according to the Diagnostic and Statistic Manual of Mental Disorder,fourth edition(DSM-Ⅳ) criteria

  4. Online Education Improves Dementia Knowledge: Evidence From an International Intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annear, Michael J

    2018-03-01

    Dementia education disseminated through massive open online courses (MOOCs) has the potential to improve knowledge and care provision among health professionals and lay people. The potential learning effects of a dementia MOOC were assessed using a reliable and valid measure with international volunteers ( N = 3,649) who completed the measure before and after online education. Evaluation of learning effects suggests that the MOOC significantly increased dementia knowledge by at least 17% across six cohorts. Knowledge was improved by the MOOC in three ways: it significantly improved overall understanding of dementia for diverse cohorts; it reduced knowledge disparity within occupational and lay cohorts; and it reduced knowledge disparity across occupational and lay cohorts. The capacity of a dementia MOOC to significantly improve knowledge and reach a wide audience may lead to population-level improvements in understanding about dementia. This may foster improvements in treatment and quality of care for people with dementia.

  5. Physical Activity Prevents Progression for Cognitive Impairment and Vascular Dementia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Verdelho, Ana; Madureira, Sofia; Ferro, José M

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: We aimed to study if physical activity could interfere with progression for cognitive impairment and dementia in older people with white matter changes living independently. METHODS: The LADIS (Leukoaraiosis and Disability) prospective multinational European study evaluates....... Physical activity was recorded during the clinical interview. MRI was performed at entry and at the end of the study. RESULTS: Six hundred thirty-nine subjects were included (74.1±5 years old, 55% women, 9.6±3.8 years of schooling, 64% physically active). At the end of follow-up, 90 patients had dementia...... (vascular dementia, 54; Alzheimer disease with vascular component, 34; frontotemporal dementia, 2), and 147 had cognitive impairment not dementia. Using Cox regression analysis, physical activity reduced the risk of cognitive impairment (dementia and not dementia: β=-0.45, P=0.002; hazard ratio, 0.64; 95...

  6. Validity of dementia diagnoses in the danish hospital registers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Phung, T.K.T.; Andersen, B.B.; Phung, T.K.T.

    2007-01-01

    Background:The validity of dementia diagnoses in the Danish nationwide hospital registers was evaluated to determine the value of these registers in epidemiological research about dementia. Methods: Two hundred patients were randomly selected from 4,682 patients registered for the first time...... with a dementia diagnosis in the last 6 months of 2003. The patients' medical journals were reviewed to evaluate if they fulfilled ICD-10 and/or DSM-IV criteria for dementia and specific dementia subtypes. The patients who were still alive in 2006 were invited to an interview. Results: One hundred and ninety......-seven journals were available for review and 51 patients were interviewed. A registered diagnosis of dementia was found to be correct in 169 (85.8%) cases. Regarding dementia subtypes, the degree of agreement between the registers and the results of the validating process was low with a kappa of 0.36 (95% CI 0...

  7. Dementia and Hospital Readmission Rates: A Systematic Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabrina Pickens

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Although community-dwelling persons with dementia have an increased risk of hospital readmission, no systematic review has examined the contribution of dementia to readmissions. Summary: We examined articles in English, with no restrictions on publication dates, from Medline, PubMed, PsycINFO, CINAHL, and EMBASE. Keywords used were dementia, Alzheimer disease, frontotemporal lobar degeneration, elderly, frontotemporal dementia, executive function, brain atrophy, frontal lobe atrophy, cognitive impairment, readmission, readmit, rehospitalization, patient discharge, and return visit. Of 404 abstracts identified, 77 articles were retrieved; 12 were included. Four of 5 cohort studies showed significantly increased readmission rates in patients with dementia. On average the absolute increase above the comparison groups was from 3 to 13%. Dementia was not associated with readmission in 7 included case-control studies. Key Message: Findings suggest a small increased risk of hospital readmission in individuals with dementia. More study is needed.

  8. Vitamin D, Homocysteine, and Folate in Subcortical Vascular Dementia and Alzheimer Dementia

    OpenAIRE

    Moretti, Rita; Caruso, Paola; Dal Ben, Matteo; Conti, Corrado; Gazzin, Silvia; Tiribelli, Claudio

    2017-01-01

    Dementia is a worldwide health problem which affects millions of patients; Alzheimer's disease (AD) and subcortical vascular dementia (sVAD) are the two most frequent forms of its presentation. As no definite therapeutic options have been discovered, different risk factors for cognitive impairment have been searched for potential therapies. This report focuses on the possible evidence that vitamin D deficiency and hyper-homocysteinemia can be considered as two important factors for the develo...

  9. Tools to Detect Delirium Superimposed on Dementia: A Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morandi, Alessandro; McCurley, Jessica; Vasilevskis, Eduard E.; Fick, Donna M.; Bellelli, Giuseppe; Lee, Patricia; Jackson, James C.; Shenkin, Susan D.; Trabucchi, Marco; Schnelle, John; Inouye, Sharon K.; Ely, Wesley E.; MacLullich, Alasdair

    2012-01-01

    Background Delirium commonly occurs in patients with dementia. Though several tools for detecting delirium exist, it is unclear which are valid in patients with delirium superimposed on dementia. Objectives Identify valid tools to diagnose delirium superimposed on dementia Design We performed a systematic review of studies of delirium tools, which explicitly included patients with dementia. Setting In-hospital patients Participants Studies were included if delirium assessment tools were validated against standard criteria, and the presence of dementia was assessed according to standard criteria that used validated instruments. Measurements PubMed, Embase, and Web of Science databases were searched for articles in English published between January 1960 and January 2012. Results Nine studies fulfilled the selection criteria. Of the total of 1569 patients, 401 had dementia, and 50 had delirium superimposed on dementia. Six delirium tools were evaluated. One studyusing the Confusion Assessment Method (CAM) with 85% patients with dementia showed a high specificity (96–100%) and moderate sensitivity (77%).Two intensive care unit studies that used the CAM for the Intensive Care Unit (CAM-ICU) ICU reported 100% sensitivity and specificity for delirium among 23 dementia patients. One study using electroencephalography reported a sensitivity of 67% and a specificity of 91% among a population with 100% prevalence of dementia. No studies examined potential effects of dementia severity or subtype upon diagnostic accuracy. Conclusions The evidence base on tools for detection of delirium superimposed on dementia is limited, although some existing tools show promise. Further studies of existing or refined tools with larger samples and more detailed characterization of dementia are now required to address the identification of delirium superimposed on dementia. PMID:23039270

  10. Predictors of dementia caregiver depressive symptoms in a population: the Cache County dementia progression study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piercy, Kathleen W; Fauth, Elizabeth B; Norton, Maria C; Pfister, Roxane; Corcoran, Chris D; Rabins, Peter V; Lyketsos, Constantine; Tschanz, JoAnn T

    2013-11-01

    Previous research has consistently reported elevated rates of depressive symptoms in dementia caregivers, but mostly with convenience samples. This study examined rates and correlates of depression at the baseline visit of a population sample of dementia caregivers (N = 256). Using a modified version of Williams (Williams, I. C. [2005]. Emotional health of black and white dementia caregivers: A contextual examination. The Journals of Gerontology, Series B: Psychological Sciences and Social Sciences, 60, P287-P295) ecological contextual model, we examined 5 contexts that have contributed to dementia caregiver depression. A series of linear regressions were performed to determine correlates of depression. Rates of depressive symptoms were lower than those reported in most convenience studies. We found fewer depressive symptoms in caregivers with higher levels of education and larger social support networks, fewer health problems, greater likelihood of using problem-focused coping, and less likelihood of wishful thinking and with fewer behavioral disturbances in the persons with dementia. These results suggest that depression may be less prevalent in populations of dementia caregivers than in clinic-based samples, but that the correlates of depression are similar for both population and convenience samples. Interventions targeting individuals with small support networks, emotion-focused coping styles, poorer health, low quality of life, and those caring for persons with higher numbers of behavioral problems need development and testing.

  11. Occult CSF flow disturbance of patients with Alzheimer type dementia and vascular dementia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kono, Kazuhiko; Sugita, Yasuko; Funaki, Chiaki

    1994-01-01

    We report results of Iotrolan CT-cisternography on 41 demented patients (13 males and 28 females) to find 'occult normal pressure hydrocephalus'. These patients were suspected to have CSF flow disturbance from clinical symptoms and simple brain CT scan findings. Their average age, duration of dementia, and score of Hasegawa's dementia scale (HDS) were 76.2 years, 5.9 years, 9.5/32.5,respectively. Before performing CT-cisternography, clinical diagnosis for their dementia were vascular dementia in 18 patients. Alzheimer type dementia in 12, suspect of NPH in 5, and other diagnoses in 6. From the results of cisternography, we found 13 patients with CSF flow disturbance (contrast material remained in the ventricle more than 48 hours after injection), and 17 patients with normal CSF flow. The former showed lower scores of HDS, higher urinary incontinence scores and smaller areas of the interhemispheric fissure on CT scan than the latter. But the former showed no significant difference from the latter in the average age, duration of dementia and width of the ventricles. (author)

  12. Forget Me Not: Dementia in Prison

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maschi, Tina; Kwak, Jung; Ko, Eunjeong; Morrissey, Mary B.

    2012-01-01

    The number of older adults with dementia in U.S. prisons is rapidly rising. Yet, the vast majority of this marginalized subgroup of the aging population is left neglected behind bars without access to adequate medical and mental health care services. We assert that proactive, interdisciplinary collaborative efforts to improve practice, policy, and…

  13. Dementia and assisted suicide and euthanasia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Beaufort, Inez D.; van de Vathorst, Suzanne

    2016-01-01

    The number of dementia patients requesting euthanasia in the Netherlands has increased over the past five years. The issue is highly controversial. In this contribution we discuss some of the main arguments: the nature of suffering, the voluntariness of the request and the role of the physician. We

  14. Genetics Home Reference: dementia with Lewy bodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... functions, including playing complex roles in thought (cognition), motivation, behavior, and control of movement. Over time, the loss of dopamine-producing neurons increasingly impairs intellectual and motor function and the regulation of emotions, resulting in the signs and symptoms of dementia ...

  15. A comprehensive approach to reablement in dementia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Poulos, Christopher J; Bayer, Antony; Beaupre, Lauren; Clare, Linda; Poulos, Roslyn G; Wang, Rosalie H; Zuidema, Sytse; McGilton, Katherine S

    As society grapples with an aging population and increasing prevalence of disability, "reablement" as a means of maximizing functional ability in older people is emerging as a potential strategy to help promote independence. Reablement offers an approach to mitigate the impact of dementia on

  16. Promote the health of dementia caregivers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mark, R.E.

    2016-01-01

    Caregivers of people with Alzheimer’s dementia (AD) will become increasingly important as governments across the world cut health care funding. The vast majority of the care for people with AD is and will be carried out by informal caregivers, in other words, their spouses, children, and friends,

  17. Pain management in patients with dementia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Achterberg, W.P.; Pieper, M.J.C.; van Dalen-Kok, A.H.; de Waal, M.W.M.; Husebo, B.S.; Lautenbacher, S.; Kunz, M.; Scherder, E.J.A.; Corbett, A.

    2013-01-01

    There are an estimated 35 million people with dementia across the world, of whom 50% experience regular pain. Despite this, current assessment and treatment of pain in this patient group are inadequate. In addition to the discomfort and distress caused by pain, it is frequently the underlying cause

  18. Old and dangerous: Prison and dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cipriani, Gabriele; Danti, Sabrina; Carlesi, Cecilia; Di Fiorino, Mario

    2017-10-01

    Older prisoners are the fastest growing group of prisoners in many countries. The purpose of this study is to explore the phenomenon of detention of persons suffering from dementia. Medline searches were conducted for relevant articles, chapters and books published until August 2016. Search terms included dementia, elderly, prison and criminal. Publications found through this indexed search were reviewed for further relevant references. As results, there is a lack of data about elderly with dementia in prisons. Given the rise in the average age, it is reasonable to hypothesize that the number of older prisoners is growing. Moreover, some elderly are imprisoned with a concomitant cognitive impairment or psychiatric disorder while others will develop such diseases once incarcerated. At the present time, legal and social systems seem unprepared to handle the phenomenon of dementia in prison. As proposal, health assessments for older first time offenders should become a practice inside the correctional facilities and include an evaluation for specific health issues, such as psychiatric comorbidity and cognitive impairment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd and Faculty of Forensic and Legal Medicine. All rights reserved.

  19. Rate of Forgetting in Dementia and Depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, Robert P.; And Others

    1987-01-01

    Examined patients (N=14) with mild Alzheimer's dementia (DAT), patients with major depression (N=10), and normal control subjects (N=14), for rate of forgetting. Suggests that some form of deficient consolidation contributes to memory loss in DAT but not in depression. Implicates the disruption of different psychobiological mechanisms in these…

  20. Auditory conflict and congruence in frontotemporal dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Camilla N; Nicholas, Jennifer M; Agustus, Jennifer L; Hardy, Christopher J D; Russell, Lucy L; Brotherhood, Emilie V; Dick, Katrina M; Marshall, Charles R; Mummery, Catherine J; Rohrer, Jonathan D; Warren, Jason D

    2017-09-01

    Impaired analysis of signal conflict and congruence may contribute to diverse socio-emotional symptoms in frontotemporal dementias, however the underlying mechanisms have not been defined. Here we addressed this issue in patients with behavioural variant frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD; n = 19) and semantic dementia (SD; n = 10) relative to healthy older individuals (n = 20). We created auditory scenes in which semantic and emotional congruity of constituent sounds were independently probed; associated tasks controlled for auditory perceptual similarity, scene parsing and semantic competence. Neuroanatomical correlates of auditory congruity processing were assessed using voxel-based morphometry. Relative to healthy controls, both the bvFTD and SD groups had impaired semantic and emotional congruity processing (after taking auditory control task performance into account) and reduced affective integration of sounds into scenes. Grey matter correlates of auditory semantic congruity processing were identified in distributed regions encompassing prefrontal, parieto-temporal and insular areas and correlates of auditory emotional congruity in partly overlapping temporal, insular and striatal regions. Our findings suggest that decoding of auditory signal relatedness may probe a generic cognitive mechanism and neural architecture underpinning frontotemporal dementia syndromes. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  1. Neuroimaging Biomarkers of Neurodegenerative Diseases and Dementia

    OpenAIRE

    Risacher, Shannon L.; Saykin, Andrew J.

    2013-01-01

    Neurodegenerative disorders leading to dementia are common diseases that affect many older and some young adults. Neuroimaging methods are important tools for assessing and monitoring pathological brain changes associated with progressive neurodegenerative conditions. In this review, the authors describe key findings from neuroimaging studies (magnetic resonance imaging and radionucleotide imaging) in neurodegenerative disorders, including Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and prodromal stages, famili...

  2. Anesthesia for the patient with dementia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Funder, Kamilia S; Steinmetz, Jacob; Rasmussen, Lars S

    2010-01-01

    With a growing aging population, more patients suffering from dementia are expected to undergo surgery, thus being exposed to either general or regional anesthesia. This calls for specific attention ranging from the legal aspects of obtaining informed consent in demented patients to deciding...

  3. Nonliteral language in Alzheimer dementia: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapp, Alexander M; Wild, Barbara

    2011-03-01

    The use of nonliteral language in clinical assessment, especially testing the patients' ability to interpret proverbs, has a long tradition in psychiatry. However, its diagnostic sensitivity and specificity in dementias is not yet clear. The aim of this review article is to examine the current evidence on nonliteral/figurative language (proverb, metaphor, metonymy, idiom, irony, sarcasm) comprehension in Alzheimer's disease and related disorders. A comprehensive literature search identified 25 studies (16 proverb, 3 metaphor, 0 metonymy, 5 idiom, 3 sarcasm) on nonliteral language comprehension in dementia. Studies predominantly indicate a deficit. Most studies investigated Alzheimer's dementia. Applied correctly, nonliteral language is a worthwhile diagnostic tool to evaluate language and abstract thinking in dementias. During assessment, familiarity testing (e.g., by asking "are you familiar with the proverb XY") is obligatory. Still, future research is needed in several areas: evidence on decline of nonliteral language over the course of the illness is limited. So far, almost no studies delineated proverb comprehension in high risk populations such as patients with mild cognitive impairment. Currently, there is a lack of studies addressing performance in direct comparison to relevant differential diagnosis like older-age depression, delirium, brain lesion, or other psychiatric conditions.

  4. Demência fronto-temporal: aspectos clínicos e terapêuticos Demencia frontotemporal: aspectos clínicos y terapéuticos Frontotemporal dementia: clinical and therapeutic features

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antônio Lúcio Teixeira-Jr

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available A demência fronto-temporal é uma importante causa de demência no período pré-senil. Caracteriza-se por significativas modificações do comportamento e da personalidade, enquanto o funcionamento cognitivo avaliado por testes psicométricos tradicionais encontra-se relativamente preservado. Muitos pacientes buscam o psiquiatra em virtude dos sintomas comportamentais proeminentes, como apatia, desinibição e comportamentos perseverativos ou estereotipados. O tratamento racional da demência fronto-temporal é atualmente limitado. Os sintomas comportamentais são controlados principalmente por inibidores seletivos da recaptação de serotonina.La demencia frontotemporal es una importante causa de demencia en el período presenil de la vida. Se caracteriza por alteraciones significativas en el comportamiento y en la personalidad, mientras la función cognitiva evaluada por pruebas psicométricas convencionales resulta relativamente preservada. Muchos pacientes recurren al psiquiatra en función de síntomas comportamentales sobresalientes como apatía, desinhibición y comportamientos perseverantes o estereotipados. El tratamiento racional de la demencia frontotemporal aún se encuentra bastante limitado. Los síntomas comportamentales se controlan principalmente con inhibidores selectivos de la recaptación de serotonina.Frontotemporal dementia is a major cause of dementia in the presenium. It is characterized by significant changes in behavior and personality, while cognitive functioning as assessed by traditional psychometric tests is relatively preserved. Thus, many patients present to the psychiatrist because of the prominence of behavioral symptoms, such as apathy, disinhibition, perseverative or stereotyped behaviors. Rational treatment for frontotemporal dementia is currently limited. The behavioral symptoms are controlled mainly with selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors.

  5. Epidemiological Characteristics of Dementia Treatment in Croatia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomasović, Sanja; Sremec, Josip; Košćak, Jelena; Klepac, Nataša; Draganić, Pero; Bielen, Ivan

    2016-06-01

    In spite of the increase in the number of patients with dementia in countries with older population, basic epidemiologic data are still scarce. The objective of this paper is to investigate pharmacoepidemiological characteristics of treatment of dementia in Croatia, and to present them in the context of certain epidemiological characteristics that illustrate the growing pressure this disease exerts on the healthcare system. Data on medication utilization were taken from Croatian Health Insurance Fund (HZZO) and Agency for Medicinal Products and Medical Devices of Croatia (HALMED). Data on the number of hospital stays were supplied by Croatian Institute of Public Health (HZJZ). Internal data on the number of outpatient examinations from the Clinical hospital "Sveti Duh" were used as well. In the observed period (2012-2014), 4568 patients were treated with anti-dementia medications, of which 1275 (32%) with donepezil, and 2753 (68%) with memantine. According to HALMED, the utilization of those medications is constantly increasing, and has increased manifold from 2005 to 2014. The estimate of the proportion of treated patients with dementia aged 60 years and over is around 9.2%. The number of dementia-related hospital stays is also increasing, and has increased by 9.6% in the last 5-year period, compared to the preceding 5-year period. The number of outpatient examinations in Clinical Hospital "Sveti Duh" grew from 351 in 2007 to 1151 in 2015 (January 1(st) - October 26(th)). The strain this condition exerts on the healthcare system is increasing yearly. In spite of the large increase in the medication utilization over the previous years, the proportion of treated patients is still small, and further increase in their use is to be expected. It is necessary to monitor this in the years ahead.

  6. Revealing gendered identity and agency in dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyle, Geraldine

    2017-11-01

    As identity and agency are central to the well-being of people with dementia, this paper explores whether their dialogue conveys a gendered sense of identity and agency. The author discusses whether they demonstrate not just a subjective sense of being but also an understanding of their relational selves. Findings are presented from a qualitative study in the North of England which examined the everyday decisions made by married couples when one partner had dementia. Ethnographic methods were used, including participant observation and interviews. While dialogical analysis usually centres on the subjective self, it was also used to examine intersubjectivity. Comparisons are made between the dialogue of women and men in order to draw conclusions about the gendered nature of identity and agency. The study found that the women and men defined themselves according to their social and gender identities. The literature had suggested that agency might be a gendered concept and the study confirmed that men were somewhat individualistic and rational in their concerns, whereas women were more relational and even spiritual. Yet, women and men demonstrated emotional reflexivity. As national and international health policy prioritises living well with dementia, more systematic attention should be given to the role of gender in influencing well-being in dementia. Health and social care staff should recognise and facilitate the gender identity and related social roles of people with dementia (e.g. parent, carer and worker) in order to enhance their quality of life. © 2017 The Author. Health and Social Care in the Community Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Observing conversational laughter in frontotemporal dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pressman, Peter S; Simpson, Michaela; Gola, Kelly; Shdo, Suzanne M; Spinelli, Edoardo G; Miller, Bruce L; Gorno-Tempini, Maria Luisa; Rankin, Katherine; Levenson, Robert W

    2017-05-01

    We performed an observational study of laughter during seminaturalistic conversations between patients with dementia and familial caregivers. Patients were diagnosed with (1) behavioural variant frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD), (2) right temporal variant frontotemporal dementia (rtFTD), (3) semantic variant of primary progressive aphasia (svPPA), (4) non-fluent variant primary progressive aphasia (nfvPPA) or (5) early onset Alzheimer's disease (eoAD). We hypothesised that those with bvFTD would laugh less in response to their own speech than other dementia groups or controls, while those with rtFTD would laugh less regardless of who was speaking. Patients with bvFTD (n=39), svPPA (n=19), rtFTD (n=14), nfvPPA (n=16), eoAD (n=17) and healthy controls (n=156) were recorded (video and audio) while discussing a problem in their relationship with a healthy control companion. Using the audio track only, laughs were identified by trained coders and then further classed by an automated algorithm as occurring during or shortly after the participant's own vocalisation ('self' context) or during or shortly after the partner's vocalisation ('partner' context). Individuals with bvFTD, eoAD or rtFTD laughed less across both contexts of self and partner than the other groups. Those with bvFTD laughed less relative to their own speech comparedwith healthy controls. Those with nfvPPA laughed more in the partner context compared with healthy controls. Laughter in response to one's own vocalisations or those of a conversational partner may be a clinically useful measure in dementia diagnosis. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  8. Behavioral and Psychological Symptoms of Dementia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joaquim eCerejeira

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia (BPSD, also known as neuropsychiatric symptoms, represent a heterogeneous group of non-cognitive symptoms and behaviors occurring in subjects with dementia. BPSD constitute a major component of the dementia syndrome irrespective of its subtype. They are as clinically relevant as cognitive symptoms as they strongly correlate with the degree of functional and cognitive impairment. BPSD include agitation, aberrant motor behavior, anxiety, elation, irritability, depression, apathy, disinhibition, delusions, hallucinations, and sleep or appetite changes. It is estimated that BPSD affect up to 90% of all dementia subjects over the course of their illness, and is independently associated with poor outcomes, including distress among patients and caregivers, long term hospitalization, misuse of medication and increased health care costs. Although these symptoms can be present individually it is more common that various psychopathological features co-occur simultaneously in the same patient. Thus, categorization of BPSD in clusters taking into account their natural course, prognosis and treatment response may be useful in the clinical practice. The pathogenesis of BPSD has not been clearly delineated but it is probably the result of a complex interplay of psychological, social and biological factors. Recent studies have emphasized the role of neurochemical, neuropathological and genetic factors underlying the clinical manifestations of BPSD. A high degree of clinical expertise is crucial to appropriately recognize and manage the neuropsychiatric symptoms in a patient with dementia. Combination of non-pharmacological and careful use of pharmacological interventions is the recommended therapeutic for managing BPSD. Given the modest efficacy of current strategies, there is an urgent need to identify novel pharmacological targets and develop new non-pharmacological approaches to improve the adverse outcomes

  9. Cardiovascular risk profile in women and dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dufouil, Carole; Seshadri, Sudha; Chêne, Geneviève

    2014-01-01

    There is growing evidence for the importance of cardiovascular risk factors in dementia development, including Alzheimer's disease. As cardiovascular risk profiles vary greatly by gender, with men suffering a greater burden of cardiovascular risk in midlife, this could lead to differences in dementia risk. To explore current evidence on the association between components of the cardiovascular risk profile and dementia risk in women and men, we reviewed all studies reporting the risk of dementia associated with cardiovascular risk factors stratified by gender and found 53 eligible articles out of over 4,000 published since the year 2000. Consistent results were found: 1) for exposures acting specifically in women: Overweight/obesity (harmful) and physical activity (protective), and 2) for exposures acting similarly in women and men: Moderate alcohol (protective) and hypertension, diabetes, and depression (harmful). A modified effect of tobacco or high cholesterol/statin use remained controversial. Available data do not allow us to assess whether selection of men with healthier cardiovascular profile (due to cardiovascular death in midlife) could lead in late life either to a difference in the distribution of risk factors or to a differential effect of these risk factors by gender. We recommend that results on dementia risk factors, especially cardiovascular ones, be reported systematically by gender in all future studies. More generally, as cardiovascular risk profiles evolve over time, more attention needs to be paid to the detection and correction of cardiovascular risk factors, as early as possible in the life course, and as actively in women as in men.

  10. Dementia in middle-aged patients with schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolas, Gaël; Beherec, Laurène; Hannequin, Didier; Opolczynski, Gaëlle; Rothärmel, Maud; Wallon, David; Véra, Pierre; Martinaud, Olivier; Guillin, Olivier; Campion, Dominique

    2014-01-01

    Although numerous studies have assessed cognitive dysfunction in patients with schizophrenia, very few have focused on the diagnosis of dementia. Our objectives were to accurately diagnose dementia in a cohort of middle-aged patients with schizophrenia and to assess the type of dementia. 96 patients with schizophrenia (46 inpatients and 50 outpatients), aged 50 to 70 years, underwent a psychiatric, neurological, and neuropsychological evaluation at baseline and after a 20-month follow-up. We established a 3-step procedure: 1) diagnose dementia according to the DSM-IV criteria, using the Mattis Dementia Rating and Activities of Daily Living scales; 2) characterize dementia using brain imaging, perfusion by 99mTc-ECD-SPECT and laboratory tests including Alzheimer's disease cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers; and 3) search for genetic determinants. Fourteen patients fulfilled the diagnostic criteria of dementia. Four were diagnosed with possible or probable behavioral-variant frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD), two with probable Alzheimer's disease, two with probable vascular dementia (including one due to CADASIL), one with CNS inflammatory disease, and six could not be fully characterized. The diagnosis of dementia in middle-aged patients with schizophrenia is challenging but possible, using a multistep procedure. The most frequent condition, bvFTD, could reflect the presence of an evolutive neurodegenerative process in some patients.

  11. Evaluating the Association between Diabetes, Cognitive Decline and Dementia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omorogieva Ojo

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this article is to review the association between diabetes mellitus, cognitive decline and dementia, including the effects of cognitive decline and dementia on self management of diabetes. This is a literature review of primary research articles. A number of contemporary research articles that met the inclusion criteria were selected for this review paper. These articles were selected using a number of search strategies and electronic databases, such as EBSCOhost Research and SwetsWise databases. The duration of diabetes, glycated haemoglobin levels and glycaemic fluctuations were associated with cognitive decline and dementia. Similarly, hypoglycaemia was significantly related to increased risk of developing cognitive decline and dementia. Furthermore, cognitive decline and dementia were associated with poorer diabetes management. There is evidence of the association between diabetes, cognitive decline and dementia including the shared pathogenesis between diabetes and Alzheimer’s disease. In addition, the self management of diabetes is affected by dementia and cognitive decline. It could be suggested that the association between diabetes and dementia is bidirectional with the potential to proceed to a vicious cycle. Further studies are needed in order to fully establish the relationship between diabetes, cognitive decline and dementia. Patients who have diabetes and dementia could benefit from structured education strategies, which should involve empowerment programmes and lifestyle changes. The detection of cognitive decline should highlight the need for education strategies.

  12. Dementia as a predictor of mortality in adult trauma patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Benjamin C; Brungardt, Joseph; Reyes, Jared; Helmer, Stephen D; Haan, James M

    2018-01-01

    The specific contribution of dementia towards mortality in trauma patients is not well defined. The purpose of the study was to evaluate dementia as a predictor of mortality in trauma patients when compared to case-matched controls. A 5-year retrospective review was conducted of adult trauma patients with a diagnosis of dementia at an American College of Surgeons-verified level I trauma center. Patients with dementia were matched with non-dementia patients and compared on mortality, ICU length of stay, and hospital length of stay. A total of 195 patients with dementia were matched to non-dementia controls. Comorbidities and complications (11.8% vs 12.4%) were comparable between both groups. Dementia patients spent fewer days on the ventilator (1 vs 4.5, P = 0.031). The length of ICU stay (2 days), hospital length of stay (3 days), and mortality (5.1%) were the same for both groups (P > 0.05). Dementia does not appear to increase the risk of mortality in trauma patients. Further studies should examine post-discharge outcomes in dementia patients. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. The Association between Hypertension and Dementia in the Elderly

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    Michiya Igase

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Hypertension (HT and dementia are common disorders in the elderly. HT in the elderly is associated with increased occurrence rates of dementia including Alzheimer's disease (AD and vascular dementia (VaD. In connection to this, some studies have suggested that HT in old age correlates with the pathogenesis of dementia. Since HT is potentially reversible, a number of randomized trials have examined whether antihypertensive treatment may help in preventing dementia occurrence. We review five studies, all using subjects 60 years or older, which investigated different antihypertensive pharmacological treatments. Data from two trials (Syst-Eur, PROGRESS open the way toward the prevention of dementia (AD or VaD by antihypertensive treatments. In the Syst-Eur study, with the dihydropyridine calcium antagonists, a reduction in both types of dementia was demonstrated (risk reduction 55%. The PROGRESS study showed that the use of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEIs, with or without diuretics, resulted in decrease incidence of stroke-related dementia (risk reduction 19%, but dementia without stroke was not reduced. In contrast, the SHEP trial, treatment with a chlorthalidone-based antihypertensive regimen, did not significantly reduced the incidence of dementia. The SCOPE study (candesartan or hydrochlorothiazide versus placebo and the HYVET-COG study (indapamide or perindopril versus placebo found no significant difference between the active treatment and placebo group on the incidence of dementia. We found conflicting results regarding treatment benefits in dementia prevention. Recent clinical trials and studies on animal models suggest that blockades of RAS system could have reduced cognitive decline seen in Alzheimer's disease and vascular dementia. Future trials primarily designed to investigate the effects of antihypertensive agents on impaired cognition are needed.

  14. Caregiver burden in atypical dementias: comparing frontotemporal dementia, Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, and Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uflacker, Alice; Edmondson, Mary C; Onyike, Chiadi U; Appleby, Brian S

    2016-02-01

    Caregiver burden is a significant issue in the treatment of dementia and a known contributor to institutionalization of patients with dementia. Published data have documented increased caregiver burden in behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD) compared to Alzheimer's disease (AD). Another atypical dementia with high-perceived caregiver burden is sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (sCJD), but no formal studies have assessed this perception. The aim of this study was to compare caregiver burden across atypical dementia etiologies. 76 adults with atypical dementia (young-onset AD [YOAD], bvFTD, language variant FTD [lvFTD], and sCJD) were administered an abbreviated version of the Zarit Burden Interview (ZBI), Neuropsychiatric Inventory (NPI-Q), and other assessment instruments during a five-year time period at Johns Hopkins Hospital (JHH). A Cox regression model examined differences between disease categories that impact mean ZBI scores. Mean ZBI scores were significantly different between dementia etiologies, with bvFTD and sCJD having the highest caregiver burden (p = 0.026). Mean NPI-Q caregiver distress scores were highest in bvFTD and sCJD (p = 0.002), with sCJD and bvFTD also having the highest number of endorsed symptom domains (p = 0.012). On regression analyses, an interactive variable combining final diagnosis category and NPI-Q total severity score demonstrated statistically significant differences in mean ZBI scores for sCJD and bvFTD. This study demonstrates that bvFTD and sCJD have increased levels of caregiver burden, NPI-Q caregiver distress, total severity scores, and number of endorsed symptom domains. These results suggest that higher caregiver burden in bvFTD and sCJD are disease specific and possibly related to neuropsychiatric symptoms.

  15. Forecasting the Incidence of Dementia and Dementia-Related Outpatient Visits With Google Trends: Evidence From Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ho-Wei; Chen, Duan-Rung; Yu, Hsiao-Wei; Chen, Ya-Mei

    2015-11-19

    Google Trends has demonstrated the capability to both monitor and predict epidemic outbreaks. The connection between Internet searches for dementia information and dementia incidence and dementia-related outpatient visits remains unknown. This study aimed to determine whether Google Trends could provide insight into trends in dementia incidence and related outpatient visits in Taiwan. We investigated and validated the local search terms that would be the best predictors of new dementia cases and outpatient visits. We further evaluated the nowcasting (ie, forecasting the present) and forecasting effects of Google Trends search trends for new dementia cases and outpatient visits. The long-term goal is to develop a surveillance system to help early detection and interventions for dementia in Taiwan. This study collected (1) dementia data from Taiwan's National Health Insurance Research Database and (2) local Internet search data from Google Trends, both from January 2009 to December 2011. We investigated and validated search terms that would be the best predictors of new dementia cases and outpatient visits. We then evaluated both the nowcasting and the forecasting effects of Google Trends search trends through cross-correlation analysis of the dementia incidence and outpatient visit data with the Google Trends data. The search term "dementia + Alzheimer's disease" demonstrated a 3-month lead effect for new dementia cases and a 6-month lead effect for outpatient visits (r=.503, P=.002; r=.431, P=.009, respectively). When gender was included in the analysis, the search term "dementia" showed 6-month predictive power for new female dementia cases (r=.520, P=.001), but only a nowcasting effect for male cases (r=.430, P=.009). The search term "neurology" demonstrated a 3-month leading effect for new dementia cases (r=.433, P=.008), for new male dementia cases (r=.434, P=.008), and for outpatient visits (r=.613, Pdata may allow the health care system in Taiwan to prepare

  16. The importance of music for people with dementia: the perspectives of people with dementia, family carers, staff and music therapists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDermott, Orii; Orrell, Martin; Ridder, Hanne Mette

    2014-01-01

    Despite the popularity of music-based interventions in dementia care, there is a limited knowledge of how and why people with dementia find music beneficial for their well-being. A qualitative study was conducted to develop further insights into the musical experiences of people with dementia and explore the meaning of music in their lives. Separate focus groups and interviews with (1) care home residents with dementia and their families, (2) day hospital clients with dementia, (3) care home staff, and (4) music therapists, were conducted. The findings of the thematic analysis were investigated further in the light of psychosocial factors with the aim of developing a theoretical model on music in dementia. Six key themes were identified. The accessibility of music for people at all stages of dementia, close links between music, personal identity and life events, the importance of relationship-building through music making were particularly highlighted as valuable. The psychosocial model of music in dementia was developed. The model revealed the importance of music to support the personal psychology of people with dementia and the social psychology of the care home environment. The effects of music go beyond the reduction of behavioural and psychological symptoms. Individual preference of music is preserved throughout the process of dementia. Sustaining musical and interpersonal connectedness would help value who the person is and maintain the quality of their life.

  17. The importance of music for people with dementia: the perspectives of people with dementia, family carers, staff and music therapists

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDermot, Orii; Orrell, Martin; Ridder, Hanne Mette

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Despite the popularity of music-based interventions in dementia care, there is a limited knowledge of how and why people with dementia find music beneficial for their well-being. A qualitative study was conducted to develop further insights into the musical experiences of people with dementia and explore the meaning of music in their lives. Method Separate focus groups and interviews with (1) care home residents with dementia and their families, (2) day hospital clients with dementia, (3) care home staff, and (4) music therapists, were conducted. The findings of the thematic analysis were investigated further in the light of psychosocial factors with the aim of developing a theoretical model on music in dementia. Results Six key themes were identified. The accessibility of music for people at all stages of dementia, close links between music, personal identity and life events, the importance of relationship-building through music making were particularly highlighted as valuable. The psychosocial model of music in dementia was developed. The model revealed the importance of music to support the personal psychology of people with dementia and the social psychology of the care home environment. Conclusion The effects of music go beyond the reduction of behavioural and psychological symptoms. Individual preference of music is preserved throughout the process of dementia. Sustaining musical and interpersonal connectedness would help value who the person is and maintain the quality of their life. PMID:24410398

  18. Leisure activities and the risk of dementia in the elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verghese, Joe; Lipton, Richard B; Katz, Mindy J; Hall, Charles B; Derby, Carol A; Kuslansky, Gail; Ambrose, Anne F; Sliwinski, Martin; Buschke, Herman

    2003-06-19

    Participation in leisure activities has been associated with a lower risk of dementia. It is unclear whether increased participation in leisure activities lowers the risk of dementia or participation in leisure activities declines during the preclinical phase of dementia. We examined the relation between leisure activities and the risk of dementia in a prospective cohort of 469 subjects older than 75 years of age who resided in the community and did not have dementia at base line. We examined the frequency of participation in leisure activities at enrollment and derived cognitive-activity and physical-activity scales in which the units of measure were activity-days per week. Cox proportional-hazards analysis was used to evaluate the risk of dementia according to the base-line level of participation in leisure activities, with adjustment for age, sex, educational level, presence or absence of chronic medical illnesses, and base-line cognitive status. Over a median follow-up period of 5.1 years, dementia developed in 124 subjects (Alzheimer's disease in 61 subjects, vascular dementia in 30, mixed dementia in 25, and other types of dementia in 8). Among leisure activities, reading, playing board games, playing musical instruments, and dancing were associated with a reduced risk of dementia. A one-point increment in the cognitive-activity score was significantly associated with a reduced risk of dementia (hazard ratio, 0.93 [95 percent confidence interval, 0.90 to 0.97]), but a one-point increment in the physical-activity score was not (hazard ratio, 1.00). The association with the cognitive-activity score persisted after the exclusion of the subjects with possible preclinical dementia at base line. Results were similar for Alzheimer's disease and vascular dementia. In linear mixed models, increased participation in cognitive activities at base line was associated with reduced rates of decline in memory. Participation in leisure activities is associated with a reduced

  19. Difference in MRI findings and risk factors between multiple infarction without dementia and multi-infarct dementia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yanagisawa, Masashi; Kaieda, Makoto; Nagatsumi, Atsushi; Terashi, Akiro

    1995-01-01

    MRI findings and risk factors for vascular dementia were evaluated with multi-variate analysis in 96 multi-infarct patients without dementia and 40 multi-infarct patients with dementia (MID). Only subjects with small infarcts in the territory of the perforator artery or deep white matter were studied. The diagnosis of MID was diagnosed according to DMS-III criteria and Hachinski's ischemia score. Location and area of patchy high-intensity areas including small infarcts, the degree of periventricular high intensity (PVH), and the degree of brain atrophy were examined with MR images. Independent variables were: history of hypertension, diabetes mellitus, other complications; systolic and diastolic blood pressure, atherosclerotic index, hematocrit, history of smoking, level of education, and activities of daily life (ADL). Hayashi's quantification method II was used to analyze the data. The most significant correlation was found between history of hypertension and dementia (partial correlation coefficient: 0.39). Significant correlations were also found between ADL and dementia (0.32), between thalamic infarction and dementia (0.31), and between PVH and dementia (0.27). Age, brain atrophy index, and history of diabetes mellitus contributed little to dementia. The contribution to dementia did not differ significantly between right and left patchy high-intensity areas on MR images. Location of infarcts, except for bilateral thalamic infarcts and large PVH, contributed little to dementia. Thus it would be difficult to base a prediction of the prevalence of vascular dementia on MRI findings. However, both hypertention and ADL contribute to vascular dementia and both are treatable, which may be significant for the prevention of dementia. (author)

  20. Pain management in patients with dementia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Achterberg WP

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Wilco P Achterberg,1 Marjoleine JC Pieper,2 Annelore H van Dalen-Kok,1 Margot WM de Waal,1 Bettina S Husebo,3 Stefan Lautenbacher,4 Miriam Kunz,4 Erik JA Scherder,5 Anne Corbett6 1Department of Public Health and Primary Care, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden, 2Department of General Practice and Elderly Care Medicine, VU University Medical Center Amsterdam, Amsterdam, The Netherlands; 3Department of Global Public Health and Primary Care, University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway; 4Physiological Psychology, Otto Friedrich University Bamberg, Bamberg, Germany; 5Department of Clinical Neuropsychology, VU University Amsterdam, Amsterdam, The Netherlands; 6Wolfson Centre for Age-Related Diseases, King's College London, London, UK Abstract: There are an estimated 35 million people with dementia across the world, of whom 50% experience regular pain. Despite this, current assessment and treatment of pain in this patient group are inadequate. In addition to the discomfort and distress caused by pain, it is frequently the underlying cause of behavioral symptoms, which can lead to inappropriate treatment with antipsychotic medications. Pain also contributes to further complications in treatment and care. This review explores four key perspectives of pain management in dementia and makes recommendations for practice and research. The first perspective discussed is the considerable uncertainty within the literature on the impact of dementia neuropathology on pain perception and processing in Alzheimer's disease and other dementias, where white matter lesions and brain atrophy appear to influence the neurobiology of pain. The second perspective considers the assessment of pain in dementia. This is challenging, particularly because of the limited capacity of self-report by these individuals, which means that assessment relies in large part on observational methods. A number of tools are available but the psychometric quality and clinical utility of these are

  1. Familial clustering and genetic risk for dementia in a genetically isolated Dutch population.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K. Sleegers (Kristel); F. Forey; J. Theuns (Jessie); Y.S. Aulchenko (Yurii); S. Rademakers (Suzanne); M. Cruts (Marc); W.A. van Gool (Willem); P. Heutink (Peter); B.A. Oostra (Ben); J.C. van Swieten (John); C.M. van Duijn (Cornelia); C. van Broeckhoven (Christine)

    2004-01-01

    textabstractDespite advances in elucidating the genetic epidemiology of Alzheimer's disease and frontotemporal dementia, the aetiology for most patients with dementia remains unclear. We examined the genetic epidemiology of dementia in a recent genetically isolated Dutch population founded around

  2. Familial clustering and genetic risk for dementia in a genetically isolated Dutch population

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sleegers, K.; Roks, G.; Theuns, J.; Aulchenko, Y. S.; Rademakers, R.; Cruts, M.; van Gool, W. A.; van Broeckhoven, C.; Heutink, P.; Oostra, B. A.; van Swieten, J. C.; van Duijn, C. M.

    2004-01-01

    Despite advances in elucidating the genetic epidemiology of Alzheimer's disease and frontotemporal dementia, the aetiology for most patients with dementia remains unclear. We examined the genetic epidemiology of dementia in a recent genetically isolated Dutch population founded around 1750. The

  3. The utility of neuroimaging in the management of dementia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uduak E Williams

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Dementia is a syndrome of progressive dysfunction of two or more cognitive domains associated with impairment of activities of daily living. An understanding of the pathophysiology of dementia and its early diagnosis is important in the pursuit of possible disease modifying therapy for dementia. Neuroimaging has greatly transformed this field of research as its function has changed from a mere tool for diagnosing treatable causes of dementia to an instrument for pre-symptomatic diagnosis of dementia. This review focuses on the diagnostic utility of neuroimaging in the management of progressive dementias. Structural imaging techniques like computerized tomography scan and magnetic resonance imaging highlights the anatomical, structural and volumetric details of the brain; while functional imaging techniques such as positron emission tomography, arterial spin labeling, single photon emission computerized tomography and blood oxygen level-dependent functional magnetic resonance imaging focuses on chemistry, circulatory status and physiology of the different brain structures and regions.

  4. Tooth loss, dementia and neuropathology in the Nun study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, Pamela Sparks; Desrosiers, Mark; Donegan, Sara Jean; Yepes, Juan F; Kryscio, Richard J

    2007-10-01

    Numerous studies have linked dementia to the subsequent deterioration of oral health. Few investigators, however, have examined oral disease as a potential risk factor in the development of dementia. The authors conducted a study to investigate a potential association between a history of oral disease and the development of dementia. Longitudinal dental records supplemented data collected from 10 annual cognitive assessments of 144 Milwaukee participants in the Nun Study, a longitudinal study of aging and Alzheimer disease, who were 75 to 98 years old. Neuropathologic findings at autopsy were available for 118 participants who died. A low number of teeth increased the risk of higher prevalence and incidence of dementia. Participants with the fewest teeth had the highest risk of prevalence and incidence of dementia. Edentulism or very few (one to nine) teeth may be predictors of dementia late in life.

  5. The use of socially assistive robots for dementia care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huschilt, Julie; Clune, Laurie

    2012-10-01

    Innovative solutions for dementia care are required to address the steady rise in adults living with dementia, lack of adequate staffing to provide high-quality dementia care, and the need for family caregivers to provide care for their loved ones in the home. This article provides an overview of the use of socially assistive robots (SARs) to offer support as therapists, companions, and educators for people living with dementia. Social, ethical, and legal challenges associated with the use of robotic technology in patient care and implications for the use of SARs by nurses are discussed. These items considered, the authors conclude that SARs should be considered as a viable way to assist people living with dementia to maintain their highest possible level of independence, enhance their quality of life, and provide support to overburdened family caregivers. Further research is needed to evaluate the merits of this technological approach in the care of adults with dementia. Copyright 2012, SLACK Incorporated.

  6. Dementia prevalence, care arrangement, and access to care in Lebanon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Phung, Kieu T T; Chaaya, Monique; Prince, Martin

    2017-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: In North Africa and the Middle East, studies about dementia prevalence are scarce. A pilot study was conducted in Lebanon to assess dementia prevalence, using the Arabic-validated 10/66 Dementia Research Group (DRG) diagnostic assessment for case ascertainment. The study also examined...... care arrangement and access to care. METHODS: A random sample of 502 persons older than 65 years and their informant were recruited from Beirut and Mount Lebanon governorates through multistage cluster sampling. RESULTS: The crude and age-standardized dementia prevalences were 7.4% and 9.......0%, respectively. People with dementia were mainly cared for by relatives at home. Access to formal care was very limited. DISCUSSION: Dementia prevalence in Lebanon ranks high within the global range of estimates. These first evidence-based data about disease burden and barriers to care serve to raise awareness...

  7. Electroencephalography Is a Good Complement to Currently Established Dementia Biomarkers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ferreira, Daniel; Jelic, Vesna; Cavallin, Lena

    2016-01-01

    , 135 Alzheimer's disease (AD), 15 dementia with Lewy bodies/Parkinson's disease with dementia (DLB/PDD), 32 other dementias]. The EEG data were recorded in a standardized way. Structural imaging data were visually rated using scales of atrophy in the medial temporal, frontal, and posterior cortex......BACKGROUND/AIMS: Dementia biomarkers that are accessible and easily applicable in nonspecialized clinical settings are urgently needed. Quantitative electroencephalography (qEEG) is a good candidate, and the statistical pattern recognition (SPR) method has recently provided promising results. We......EEG to the diagnostic workup substantially increases the detection of AD pathology even in pre-dementia stages and improves differential diagnosis. EEG could serve as a good complement to currently established dementia biomarkers since it is cheap, noninvasive, and extensively applied outside academic centers....

  8. Diagnostic evaluation of dementia in the secondary health care sector

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Phung, Thien Kieu Thi; Andersen, Birgitte Bo; Kessing, Lars Vedel

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: We conducted a nationwide registry-based study of the quality of diagnostic evaluation for dementia in the secondary health care sector. METHOD: Two hundred patients were randomly selected from the patient population (4,682 patients) registered for the first time with a dementia...... diagnosis in the nationwide hospital registries during the last 6 months of 2003. Through medical record review, we evaluated the completeness of the work-up on which the dementia diagnosis was based, using evidence-based dementia guidelines as reference standards. RESULTS: Satisfactory or acceptable...... completion of the basic dementia work-up was documented in 51.3% of the patients. Only 11.5% of those with unsatisfactory work-up were referred to follow-up investigations. Dementia syndrome was confirmed in 88.5% of the cases, but correct subtypes were diagnosed in only 35.1%. CONCLUSION: The adherence...

  9. Eating Behaviors and Dietary Changes in Patients With Dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cipriani, Gabriele; Carlesi, Cecilia; Lucetti, Claudio; Danti, Sabrina; Nuti, Angelo

    2016-12-01

    Eating problems and dietary changes have been reported in patients with dementia. The aim of this article is to explore the generalized problems with nutrition, diet, feeding, and eating reported among patients with dementia. Medline and Google Scholar searches were conducted for relevant articles, chapters, and books published before 2016. Search terms used included behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia, dementia, dietary changes, eating behavior. Publications found through this indexed search were reviewed for further relevant references. Abnormal eating behaviors, eating problems, and dietary changes are present in most people with dementia, especially in the later stages of the condition. Individuals with dementia frequently develop serious feeding difficulties and changes in eating and dietary habits. The changes may be secondary to cognitive impairment or apraxia, or the result of insufficient caregiving, or the consequence of metabolic or neurochemical abnormalities occurring as part of the dementing process.

  10. Cerebral blood flow changes in Parkinson's disease associated with dementia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Derejko, M.; Lass, P.; Slawek, J.; Nyka, W.M.

    2001-01-01

    Dementia is one of the main non-motor symptoms of Parkinson's disease (PD) and it is diagnosed in about 30% of cases. Its aetiology remains unclear and contributing factors are controversial. Dementia may be more common in old patients with severe motor symptoms and mild cognitive impairment. Clinico-pathological studies show the association between dementia in PD and the age-related group of dementias, such as AD and VaD. A valuable aid in the assessment of dementia in PD is cerebral blood flow (CBF) brain SPECT scanning. It shows three different patterns of rCBF reduction, including frontal lobe hypoperfusion, iu Alzheimer-likel type of hypoperfusion and multiple, vascular defects. The heterogeneity of rCBF reduction may reflect the multifactorial pathophysiology of dementia in PD. It may result from concomitant AD pathology, cerebrovascular disease, destruction of nigro-striato-frontal projection or may be a distinct disease of different aetiology. (author)

  11. Episodic Memory in Alzheimer Disease, Frontotemporal Dementia, and Dementia With Lewy Bodies/Parkinson Disease Dementia: Disentangling Retrieval From Consolidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Economou, Alexandra; Routsis, Christopher; Papageorgiou, Sokratis G

    2016-01-01

    Differences in episodic memory performance in patients with Alzheimer disease (AD), frontotemporal dementia (FTD), dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB)/Parkinson disease with dementia (PDD) are inconsistent and task dependent. The inconsistencies may be attributed to the different tasks drawing on different memory processes. Few studies have examined episodic memory impairment in the above groups using memory tests that facilitate encoding, to distinguish memory deficits due to impairment of specific processes. We examined the memory performance of 106 AD patients, 51 FTD patients, 26 DLB/PDD patients, and 37 controls using the Five-Words Test, a 5-item memory test that facilitates encoding. The patient groups did not differ in modified Mini Mental State Examination scores. AD patients scored lowest on the Five-Words Test overall, and showed the greatest reduction from immediate total recall to delayed free recall relative to the other 2 groups, consistent with a predominantly consolidation deficit. DLB/PDD patients showed the largest improvement from delayed free to delayed total recall relative to the other 2 groups, consistent with a predominantly retrieval deficit. Deficits in both consolidation and retrieval underlie the memory impairment of the patients, to different extents, and contribute to the theoretical understanding of the nature of the memory impairment of the patient groups.

  12. Dancing as an Intervention Tool for People with Dementia: A Mini-Review Dancing and Dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klimova, Blanka; Valis, Martin; Kuca, Kamil

    2017-01-01

    Research studies show a positive impact of physical activities such as dancing on the improvement of cognitive reserves of people with dementia. The purpose of this study is to explore dancing efficacy on people with dementia and list the key benefits and limitations of dancing therapy for these people. The methods used in this study include a method of literature review of available Englishwritten sources with respect to the dancing therapy and dementia in the acknowledged databases Pub- Med, Web of Science, Springer, and Scopus, and a method of comparison and evaluation of their findings. The findings of this mini review confirm positive efficacy of dancing therapy on cognitive, physical, emotional and social performance of people with dementia. More randomized controlled clinical trials should be conducted in this field, as well as other non-pharmacological therapies should be employed in order to holistically contribute to the prevention and treatment of dementia. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  13. Repercusión de la demencia en los cuidadores primordiales del policlínico "Ana Betancourt" Repercussion of dementia in the fundamental carers of "Ana Betancourt" Polyclinic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Víctor T. Pérez Martínez

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Introducción: la demencia senil es reconocida actualmente como una entidad mayor en el orden socioeconómico, geriátrico, psiquiátrico y epidemiológico. Su atención representa un elevado costo emocional y económico para el paciente, la familia y el cuidador primordial. Objetivos: describir la repercusión psicosocial del síndrome demencial en los cuidadores primordiales del policlínico "Ana Betancourt". Métodos: se realizó un estudio descriptivo de corte transversal, durante el primer cuatrimestre del año 2009, en el policlínico "Ana Betancourt" del municipio Playa. Incluyó a 36 cuidadores de igual número de pacientes diagnosticados con demencia y enfermedad de Alzheimer, escogidos mediante muestreo por criterios. Resultados: los cuidadores primordiales eran en su mayoría féminas, hijas del paciente, en la quinta década de la vida, amas de casa, divorciadas y con un nivel de escolaridad de preuniversitario. El principal motivo de consulta de los cuidadores fue solicitar ayuda profesional para controlar los síntomas no cognitivos de la enfermedad. El cuidador dedica alrededor de 13 h diarias al cuidado del paciente que sufre de demencia, la mayor parte en la supervisión y vigilancia. Se encontró marcada afectación psicológica en el 64 % de los cuidadores. El nivel de sobrecarga o estrés en la población de cuidadores estudiada resultó elevado. Conclusiones: el cuidado del paciente que sufre de demencia se asocia a una sobrecarga y estrés relevantes que se expresa en la elevada morbilidad psicológica constatada en los cuidadores primordiales. Se recomienda diseñar un plan de intervención educativa dirigido a estos cuidadores para reducir la sobrecarga o estrés crónico que sufren.Introduction: senile dementia is nowadays recognized as a major entity in socioeconomic, geriatric, psychiatric and epidemiologic order. Its care represents a high emotional and economic cost for patient, family and fundamental carer

  14. Evaluative Conditioning with Facial Stimuli in Dementia Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Blessing, Andreas; Zöllig, Jacqueline; Weierstall, Roland; Dammann, Gerhard; Martin, Mike

    2013-01-01

    We present results of a study investigating evaluative learning in dementia patients with a classic evaluative conditioning paradigm. Picture pairs of three unfamiliar faces with liked, disliked, or neutral faces, that were rated prior to the presentation, were presented 10 times each to a group of dementia patients (N = 15) and healthy controls (N = 14) in random order. Valence ratings of all faces were assessed before and after presentation. In contrast to controls, dementia patients chan...

  15. Social networks and their role in preventing dementia

    OpenAIRE

    Pillai, Jagan A.; Verghese, Joe

    2009-01-01

    Interest in the role of social networks as a protective factor in the development of dementia over the last decade has increased with a number of longitudinal studies being published on the possible association of different lifestyles with dementia. This review examines and provides a summary of the published longitudinal studies exploring the effect of social network on dementia, with particular focus on their relevance to the Indian society. Potential cognitive and biological mechanisms med...

  16. Societal and Family Lifetime Cost of Dementia: Implications for Policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jutkowitz, Eric; Kane, Robert L; Gaugler, Joseph E; MacLehose, Richard F; Dowd, Bryan; Kuntz, Karen M

    2017-10-01

    To estimate the cost of dementia and the extra cost of caring for someone with dementia over the cost of caring for someone without dementia. We developed an evidence-based mathematical model to simulate disease progression for newly diagnosed individuals with dementia. Data-driven trajectories of cognition, function, and behavioral and psychological symptoms were used to model disease progression and predict costs. Using modeling, we evaluated lifetime and annual costs of individuals with dementia, compared costs of those with and without clinical features of dementia, and evaluated the effect of reducing functional decline or behavioral and psychological symptoms by 10% for 12 months (implemented when Mini-Mental State Examination score ≤21). Mathematical model. Representative simulated U.S. incident dementia cases. Value of informal care, out-of-pocket expenditures, Medicaid expenditures, and Medicare expenditures. From time of diagnosis (mean age 83), discounted total lifetime cost of care for a person with dementia was $321,780 (2015 dollars). Families incurred 70% of the total cost burden ($225,140), Medicaid accounted for 14% ($44,090), and Medicare accounted for 16% ($52,540). Costs for a person with dementia over a lifetime were $184,500 greater (86% incurred by families) than for someone without dementia. Total annual cost peaked at $89,000, and net cost peaked at $72,400. Reducing functional decline or behavioral and psychological symptoms by 10% resulted in $3,880 and $680 lower lifetime costs than natural disease progression. Dementia substantially increases lifetime costs of care. Long-lasting, effective interventions are needed to support families because they incur the most dementia cost. © 2017, Copyright the Authors Journal compilation © 2017, The American Geriatrics Society.

  17. The utility of neuroimaging in the management of dementia

    OpenAIRE

    Uduak E Williams; Ekanem E Philip Ephraim; Sidney K Oparah

    2015-01-01

    Dementia is a syndrome of progressive dysfunction of two or more cognitive domains associated with impairment of activities of daily living. An understanding of the pathophysiology of dementia and its early diagnosis is important in the pursuit of possible disease modifying therapy for dementia. Neuroimaging has greatly transformed this field of research as its function has changed from a mere tool for diagnosing treatable causes of demen...

  18. IDENTIFYING DEMENTIA IN ELDERLY POPULATION : A CAMP APPROACH

    OpenAIRE

    Anand P; Chaukimath; Srikanth; Koli

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Dementia is an emerging medico social problem affecting elderly, and poses a challenge to clinician and caregivers. It is usually identified in late stage where management becomes difficult. AIM: The aim of camp was to identify dementia in elderly population participating in screening camp. MATERIAL AND METHODS : The geriatric clinic and department of psychiatry jointly organised screening camp to detect dementia in elderly for five days in Sept...

  19. Animal-assisted therapy for clients with dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buettner, Linda L; Fitzsimmons, Suzanne; Barba, Beth

    2011-05-01

    The purpose of this article is to increase nurses' awareness of animal-assisted therapy as a treatment option for older adults with dementia. We describe the differences between animal visitation programs and goal-directed therapy. We also address credentials of human-animal teams and provide an overview of possible therapeutic outcomes for older adults with dementia. Step-by-step methods are outlined for nurses to advocate for clients with dementia to receive these services. Copyright 2011, SLACK Incorporated.

  20. Health, social and economic consequences of dementias

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frahm-Falkenberg, S.; Ibsen, Rikke; Kjellberg, J.

    2016-01-01

    Background and purpose: Dementia causes morbidity, disability and mortality, and as the population ages the societal burden will grow. The direct health costs and indirect costs of lost productivity and social welfare of dementia were estimated compared with matched controls in a national register......, gender, geographical area and civil status. Direct health costs included primary and secondary sector contacts, medical procedures and medication. Indirect costs included the effect on labor supply. All cost data were extracted from national databases. The entire cohort was followed for the entire period...... – before and after diagnosis. Results: In all, 78 715 patients were identified and compared with 312 813 matched controls. Patients' partners were also identified and matched with a control group. Patients had lower income and higher mortality and morbidity rates and greater use of medication. Social...