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Sample records for semiconductor nanorod liquid

  1. Assessment of Anisotropic Semiconductor Nanorod and Nanoplatelet Heterostructures with Polarized Emission for Liquid Crystal Display Technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cunningham, Patrick D.; Souza, João B.; Fedin, Igor; She, Chunxing; Lee, Byeongdu; Talapin, Dmitri V.

    2016-06-28

    Semiconductor nanorods can emit linear-polarized light at efficiencies over 80%. Polarization of light in these systems, confirmed through single-rod spectroscopy, can be explained on the basis of the anisotropy of the transition dipole moment and dielectric confinement effects. Here we report emission polarization in macroscopic semiconductor polymer composite films containing CdSe/CdS nanorods and colloidal CdSe nanoplatelets. Anisotropic nanocrystals dispersed in polymer films of poly butyl-co-isobutyl methacrylate (PBiBMA) can be stretched mechanically in order to obtain unidirectionally aligned arrays. A high degree of alignment, corresponding to an orientation factor of 0.87, was achieved and large areas demonstrated polarized emission, with the contrast ratio I-parallel to/I-perpendicular to= 5.6, making these films viable candidates for use in liquid crystal display (LCD) devices. To some surprise, we observed significant optical anisotropy and emission polarization for 2D CdSe nanoplatelets with the electronic structure of quantum wells. The aligned nanorod arrays serve as optical funnels, absorbing unpolarized light and re-emitting light from deep-green to red with quantum efficiencies over 90% and high degree of linear polarization. Our results conclusively demonstrate the benefits of anisotropic nanostructures for LCD backlighting. The polymer films with aligned CdSe/CdS dot-in-rod and rod-in-rod nanostructures show more than 2-fold enhancement of brightness compared to the emitter layers with randomly oriented nanostructures. This effect can be explained as the combination of linearly polarized luminescence and directional emission from individual nanostructures.

  2. Graded core/shell semiconductor nanorods and nanorod barcodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alivisatos, A. Paul; Scher, Erik C.; Manna, Liberato

    2010-12-14

    Graded core/shell semiconductor nanorods and shaped nanorods are disclosed comprising Group II-VI, Group III-V and Group IV semiconductors and methods of making the same. Also disclosed are nanorod barcodes using core/shell nanorods where the core is a semiconductor or metal material, and with or without a shell. Methods of labeling analytes using the nanorod barcodes are also disclosed.

  3. Self-assembly of highly fluorescent semiconductor nanorods into large scale smectic liquid crystal structures by coffee stain evaporation dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nobile, Concetta; Carbone, Luigi; Fiore, Angela; Cingolani, Roberto; Manna, Liberato; Krahne, Roman

    2009-01-01

    We deposit droplets of nanorods dispersed in solvents on substrate surfaces and let the solvent evaporate. We find that strong contact line pinning leads to dense nanorod deposition inside coffee stain fringes, where we observe large scale lateral ordering of the nanorods with the long axis of the rods oriented parallel to the contact line. We observe birefringence of these coffee stain fringes by polarized microscopy and we find the direction of the extraordinary refractive index parallel to the long axis of the nanorods.

  4. Inorganic nanotubes and nanorods in liquid crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drevenšek-Olenik, Irena

    Research efforts that focus on possible improvement of the physical properties of thermotropic liquid crystals by addition of inorganic 1D nanoparticles (inorganic nanotubes, nanorods, etc.) are reviewed. The emphasis is on modification of electro-optic switching characteristics relevant for display-related applications. In most cases the dopants generate a decrease of the threshold voltage for electrooptic switching and also a decrease of the corresponding switching times. We discuss various possible reasons for the observed effects and point out specific characteristics related to 1D nature of the dopants. We also describe investigations of inclusion of 1D nanoparticles into photo-polymerizable nematic liquid crystalline materials. Photo-polymerization in the aligned nematic phase provides a convenient way to fabricate solid polymer films with strongly anisotropic angular distribution of the nanoparticles. Investigations of structural and optical properties of some selected systems are surveyed.

  5. Ionic liquids-mediated interactions between nanorods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Zhou; Zhang, Fei; Huang, Jingsong; Sumpter, Bobby G.; Qiao, Rui

    2017-10-01

    Surface forces mediated by room-temperature ionic liquids (RTILs) play an essential role in diverse applications including self-assembly, lubrication, and electrochemical energy storage. Therefore, their fundamental understanding is critical. Using molecular simulations, we study the interactions between two nanorods immersed in model RTILs at rod-rod separations where both structural and double layer forces are important. The interaction force between neutral rods oscillates as the two rods approach each other, similar to the classical structural forces. Such oscillatory force originates from the density oscillation of RTILs near each rod and is affected by the packing constraints imposed by the neighboring rods. The oscillation period and decay length of the oscillatory force are mainly dictated by the ion density distribution near isolated nanorods. When charges are introduced on the rods, the interaction force remains short-range and oscillatory, similar to the interactions between planar walls mediated by some protic RTILs reported earlier. Nevertheless, introducing net charges to the rods greatly changes the rod-rod interactions, e.g., by delaying the appearance of the first force trough and increasing the oscillation period and decay length of the interaction force. The oscillation period and decay length of the oscillatory force and free energy are commensurate with those of the space charge density near an isolated, charged rod. The free energy of rod-rod interactions reaches local minima (maxima) at rod-rod separations when the space charges near the two rods interfere constructively (destructively). The insight on the short-range interactions between nanorods in RTILs helps guide the design of novel materials, e.g., ionic composites based on rigid-rod polyanions and RTILs.

  6. Semiconductor nanorod-carbon nanotube biomimetic films for wire-free photostimulation of blind retinas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bareket, Lilach; Waiskopf, Nir; Rand, David; Lubin, Gur; David-Pur, Moshe; Ben-Dov, Jacob; Roy, Soumyendu; Eleftheriou, Cyril; Sernagor, Evelyne; Cheshnovsky, Ori; Banin, Uri; Hanein, Yael

    2014-11-12

    We report the development of a semiconductor nanorod-carbon nanotube based platform for wire-free, light induced retina stimulation. A plasma polymerized acrylic acid midlayer was used to achieve covalent conjugation of semiconductor nanorods directly onto neuro-adhesive, three-dimensional carbon nanotube surfaces. Photocurrent, photovoltage, and fluorescence lifetime measurements validate efficient charge transfer between the nanorods and the carbon nanotube films. Successful stimulation of a light-insensitive chick retina suggests the potential use of this novel platform in future artificial retina applications.

  7. Anisotropic formation and distribution of stacking faults in II-VI semiconductor nanorods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Steven M; Alivisatos, A Paul

    2013-01-09

    Nanocrystals of cadmium selenide exhibit a form of polytypism with stable forms in both the wurtzite and zinc blende crystal structures. As a result, wurtzite nanorods of cadmium selenide tend to form stacking faults of zinc blende along the c-axis. These faults were found to preferentially form during the growth of the (001) face, which accounts for 40% of the rod's total length. Since II-VI semiconductor nanorods lack inversion symmetry along the c-axis of the particle, the two ends of the nanorod may be identified by this anisotropic distribution of faults.

  8. Ionic liquid intercalated V2O5 nanorods: synthesis and ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    Abstract. In this work, ionic liquid (IL) intercalated V2O5 (IL-V2O5) nanorods have been synthesized through the IL-assisted hydrothermal method using imidazolium-based functionalized IL at 130°C for 3 days. The structure and morphology of the obtained product was characterized using various techniques. X-ray.

  9. Efficient solar photoelectrosynthesis of methanol from carbon dioxide using hybrid CuO-Cu2O semiconductor nanorod arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghadimkhani, Ghazaleh; de Tacconi, Norma R; Chanmanee, Wilaiwan; Janaky, Csaba; Rajeshwar, Krishnan

    2013-02-14

    Solar photoelectrosynthesis of methanol was driven on hybrid CuO-Cu(2)O semiconductor nanorod arrays for the first time at potentials ~800 mV below the thermodynamic threshold value and at Faradaic efficiencies up to ~95%. The CuO-Cu(2)O nanorod arrays were prepared on Cu substrates by a two-step approach consisting of the initial thermal growth of CuO nanorods followed by controlled electrodeposition of p-type Cu(2)O crystallites on their walls. No homogeneous co-catalysts (such as pyridine, imidazole or metal cyclam complexes) were used contrasting with earlier studies on this topic using p-type semiconductor photocathodes. The roles of the core-shell nanorod electrode geometry and the copper oxide composition were established by varying the time of electrodeposition of the Cu(2)O phase on the CuO nanorod core surface.

  10. Irreversible thermochromic behavior in gold and silver nanorod/polymeric ionic liquid nanocomposite films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tollan, Christopher M; Marcilla, Rebeca; Pomposo, Jose A; Rodriguez, Javier; Aizpurua, Javier; Molina, Jon; Mecerreyes, David

    2009-02-01

    The novel application of gold and silver nanorods as irreversible thermochromic dyes in polymeric ionic liquid (PIL) nanocomposites is proposed here. These materials have been synthesized by anion exchange of an imidazolium-based PIL in a solution that also contained gold nanorods. This resulted in the entrapment of the nanoobjects within a solid polymer precipitate. In this article, the effect of the temperature was studied in relation to the change of shape and, consequently, color of the gold or silver nanorods within the films. For the nanocomposites studied here, a maximum of two visual thermochromic transitions was observed for gold nanorods and up to three transitions were observed for silver nanorods.

  11. Tailoring copper oxide semiconductor nanorod arrays for photoelectrochemical reduction of carbon dioxide to methanol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajeshwar, Krishnan; de Tacconi, Norma R; Ghadimkhani, Ghazaleh; Chanmanee, Wilaiwan; Janáky, Csaba

    2013-07-22

    Solar photoelectrochemical reduction of carbon dioxide to methanol in aqueous media was driven on hybrid CuO/Cu2O semiconductor nanorod arrays for the first time. A two-step synthesis was designed and demonstrated for the preparation of these hybrid copper oxide one-dimensional nanostructures on copper substrates. The first step consisted in the growth of CuO nanorods by thermal oxidation of a copper foil at 400 °C. In the second step, controlled electrodeposition of p-type Cu2O crystallites on the CuO walls was performed. The resulting nanorod morphology with controllable wall thickness by adjusting the Cu2O electrodeposition time as well as their surface/bulk chemical composition were probed by scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy. Photoelectrosynthesis of methanol from carbon dioxide was demonstrated at -0.2 V vs SHE under simulated AM1.5 solar irradiation on optimized hybrid CuO/Cu2O nanorod electrodes and without assistance of any homogeneous catalyst (such as pyridine or imidazole) in the electrolyte. The hybrid composition, ensuring double pathway for photoelectron injection to CO2, along with high surface area were found to be crucial for efficient performance in methanol generation under solar illumination. Methanol formation, tracked by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry, indicated Faradaic efficiencies of ~95%. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Liquid Crystalline Semiconductors Materials, properties and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Kelly, Stephen; O'Neill, Mary

    2013-01-01

    This is an exciting stage in the development of organic electronics. It is no longer an area of purely academic interest as increasingly real applications are being developed, some of which are beginning to come on-stream. Areas that have already been commercially developed or which are under intensive development include organic light emitting diodes (for flat panel displays and solid state lighting), organic photovoltaic cells, organic thin film transistors (for smart tags and flat panel displays) and sensors. Within the family of organic electronic materials, liquid crystals are relative newcomers. The first electronically conducting liquid crystals were reported in 1988 but already a substantial literature has developed. The advantage of liquid crystalline semiconductors is that they have the easy processability of amorphous and polymeric semiconductors but they usually have higher charge carrier mobilities. Their mobilities do not reach the levels seen in crystalline organics but they circumvent all of t...

  13. PEG-nanotube liquid crystals as templates for construction of surfactant-free gold nanorods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kameta, Naohiro; Shiroishi, Hidenobu

    2018-04-23

    Lyotropic liquid crystals, in which nanotubes coated with polyethylene glycol were aligned side-by-side in aqueous dispersions, acted as templates for the construction of surfactant-free gold nanorods with controllable diameters, functionalizable surfaces, and tunable optical properties.

  14. Silicon doped boron carbide nanorod growth via a solid-liquid-solid process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Wei-Qiang

    2006-03-01

    Here we report the synthesis of silicon doped boron carbide (Si-doped B4C) nanorods via a solid reaction using activated carbon, boron, and silicon powder as reactants. These nanorods have been studied by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, electron energy loss spectroscopy, and energy-dispersive x-ray spectrometry. The diameter of Si-doped B4C nanorods ranges from 15to70nm. The length of Si-doped B4C nanorods is up to 30μm. NixCoyBz nanoparticles are used as catalysts for the growth of Si-doped B4C nanorods. A solid-liquid-solid growth mechanism is proposed.

  15. Asymmetric dumbbells from selective deposition of metals on seeded semiconductor nanorods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakrabortty, Sabyasachi; Yang, Jie An; Tan, Yee Min; Mishra, Nimai; Chan, Yinthai

    2010-04-06

    Sowing the seeds: the growth of Au and Ag(2)S nanoparticles at distinct positions on CdSe-seeded CdS heterostructured nanorods can be precisely controlled by variations in the concentration of the Au and Ag precursors, respectively. The ability to direct growth on the nanorods can lead to "Janus-type" structures where Au is located at the more reactive end of the nanorod, whilst Ag(2)S is located at the other (see picture; CdSe dark blue, CdS light blue, Au yellow, Ag(2)S gray). Copyright © 2010 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. An effective pair potential for liquid semiconductor, Se: Structure and ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    This model potential is then used to describe through low-order perturbation theory, the structure and related dynamical properties like self-diffusion coefficient and shear viscosity of this complex liquid over a wide range of temperatures. Keywords. Liquid semiconductor; pair potential; structure and dynamical properties.

  17. An effective pair potential for liquid semiconductor, Se: Structure and ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The effective pair potential of liquid semiconductor Se is extracted from its experimental structure factor data using an accurate liquid state theory and this shows important basic features. A model potential incorporating the basic features of the structure factor extracted potential is suggested. This model potential is then used ...

  18. Switching Plasmons: Gold Nanorod-Copper Chalcogenide Core-Shell Nanoparticle Clusters with Selectable Metal/Semiconductor NIR Plasmon Resonances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muhammed, Madathumpady Abubaker Habeeb; Döblinger, Markus; Rodríguez-Fernández, Jessica

    2015-09-16

    Exerting control over the near-infrared (NIR) plasmonic response of nanosized metals and semiconductors can facilitate access to unexplored phenomena and applications. Here we combine electrostatic self-assembly and Cd(2+)/Cu(+) cation exchange to obtain an anisotropic core-shell nanoparticle cluster (NPC) whose optical properties stem from two dissimilar plasmonic materials: a gold nanorod (AuNR) core and a copper selenide (Cu(2-x)Se, x ≥ 0) supraparticle shell. The spectral response of the AuNR@Cu2Se NPCs is governed by the transverse and longitudinal plasmon bands (LPB) of the anisotropic metallic core, since the Cu2Se shell is nonplasmonic. Under aerobic conditions the shell undergoes vacancy doping (x > 0), leading to the plasmon-rich NIR spectrum of the AuNR@Cu(2-x)Se NPCs. For low vacancy doping levels the NIR optical properties of the dually plasmonic NPCs are determined by the LPBs of the semiconductor shell (along its major longitudinal axis) and of the metal core. Conversely, for high vacancy doping levels their NIR optical response is dominated by the two most intense plasmon modes from the shell: the transverse (along the shortest transversal axis) and longitudinal (along the major longitudinal axis) modes. The optical properties of the NPCs can be reversibly switched back to a purely metallic plasmonic character upon reversible conversion of AuNR@Cu(2-x)Se into AuNR@Cu2Se. Such well-defined nanosized colloidal assemblies feature the unique ability of holding an all-metallic, a metallic/semiconductor, or an all-semiconductor plasmonic response in the NIR. Therefore, they can serve as an ideal platform to evaluate the crosstalk between plasmonic metals and plasmonic semiconductors at the nanoscale. Furthermore, their versatility to display plasmon modes in the first, second, or both NIR windows is particularly advantageous for bioapplications, especially considering their strong absorbing and near-field enhancing properties.

  19. Reflection and Transmission of Acoustic Waves at Semiconductor - Liquid Interface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. N. Sharma

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The study of reflection and transmission characteristics of acoustic waves at the interface of a semiconductor halfspace underlying an inviscid liquid has been carried out. The reflection and transmission coefficients of reflected and transmitted waves have been obtained for quasi-longitudinal (qP wave incident at the interface from fluid to semiconductor. The numerical computations of reflection and transmission coefficients have been carried out with the help of Gauss elimination method by using MATLAB programming for silicon (Si, germanium (Ge and silicon nitride (Si3N4 semiconductors. In order to interpret and compare, the computer simulated results are plotted graphically. The study may be useful in semiconductors, seismology and surface acoustic wave (SAW devices in addition to engines of the space shuttles.

  20. Floating growth of large-scale freestanding TiO2 nanorod films at the gas-liquid interface for additive-free Li-ion battery applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Hua-Rong; Li, Jia; Peng, Chen; Sun, Wen-Tao; Li, Long-Wei; Peng, Lian-Mao

    2014-10-22

    The floating growth process of large-scale freestanding TiO2 nanorod films at the gas-liquid interface was investigated. On the basis of the experiments, a self-templated growth scenario was developed to account for the self-assembly process. In the scenario, titanium complexes function not only as the Ti source for the growth of TiO2 but also as a soft template provider for the floating growth. According to the scenario, several new recipes of preparing freestanding TiO2 nanorod films at the gas-liquid interface were developed. The freestanding film was applied to a lithium ion battery as a binder-free and conducting agent-free anode, and good cyclability was obtained. This work may pave a new way to floating and freestanding TiO2 and other semiconductor materials, which has great potential not only in basic science but also in the applications such as materials engineering, Li-ion battery, photocatalyst, dye-sensitized solar cell, and flexible electronics.

  1. Use of ionic liquids in synthesis of nanocrystals, nanorods and ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    TECS

    2. Experimental. In order to prepare sulfur nanostructures, 0⋅025 g of sulfur powder was dispersed in 1⋅5 mL of polyethyleneglycol. (PEG-600) and 1 mL of ionic liquid, 1-butyl-3-methyl- imidazolium tetrafluoroborate, ([BMIM][BF4]). The mixture was heated in a 7 mL Teflon-lined stainless steel auto- clave at 180°C for 12 h.

  2. Electron Liquids in Semiconductor Quantum Structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pinczuk, Aron

    2009-01-01

    The groups led by Stormer and Pinczuk have focused this project on goals that seek the elucidation of novel many-particle effects that emerge in two-dimensional electron systems (2DES) as the result from fundamental quantum interactions. This experimental research is conducted under extreme conditions of temperature and magnetic field. From the materials point of view, the ultra-high mobility systems in GaAs/AlGaAs quantum structures continue to be at the forefront of this research. The newcomer materials are based on graphene, a single atomic layer of graphite. The graphene research is attracting enormous attention from many communities involved in condensed matter research. The investigated many-particle phenomena include the integer and fractional quantum Hall effect, composite fermions, and Dirac fermions, and a diverse group of electron solid and liquid crystal phases. The Stormer group performed magneto-transport experiments and far-infrared spectroscopy, while the Pinczuk group explores manifestations of such phases in optical spectra.

  3. Electron Liquids in Semiconductor Quantum Structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aron Pinczuk

    2009-05-25

    The groups led by Stormer and Pinczuk have focused this project on goals that seek the elucidation of novel many-particle effects that emerge in two-dimensional electron systems (2DES) as the result from fundamental quantum interactions. This experimental research is conducted under extreme conditions of temperature and magnetic field. From the materials point of view, the ultra-high mobility systems in GaAs/AlGaAs quantum structures continue to be at the forefront of this research. The newcomer materials are based on graphene, a single atomic layer of graphite. The graphene research is attracting enormous attention from many communities involved in condensed matter research. The investigated many-particle phenomena include the integer and fractional quantum Hall effect, composite fermions, and Dirac fermions, and a diverse group of electron solid and liquid crystal phases. The Stormer group performed magneto-transport experiments and far-infrared spectroscopy, while the Pinczuk group explores manifestations of such phases in optical spectra.

  4. Mechanisms of nanorod growth on focused-ion-beam-irradiated semiconductor surfaces: Role of redeposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, J. H.; Goldman, R. S.

    2012-01-01

    We have examined the formation and evolution of irradiation-induced nanorod (NR) growth through a comparison of focused-ion-beam irradiation of InSb wafers and InSb/GaAs heterostructures. Above a critical ion dose, cone-shaped NRs capped with In islands form on both InSb surfaces. For InSb wafers, the NR base diameter increases with ion energy. In the case of InSb/GaAs heterostructures, as the milled depth approaches the InSb/GaAs interface, the cone-shaped NRs transition to capless NRs with a truncated cone shape. These results suggest a growth mechanism in which both the NR cap and body are supplied by redeposition of atoms sputtered from InSb.

  5. Development of a high throughput single-particle screening for inorganic semiconductor nanorods as neural voltage sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Yung; Park, Kyoungwon; Li, Jack; Ingargiola, Antonino; Park, Joonhyuck; Shvadchak, Volodymyr; Weiss, Shimon

    2017-08-01

    Monitoring membrane potential in neurons requires sensors with minimal invasiveness, high spatial and temporal (sub-ms) resolution, and large sensitivity for enabling detection of sub-threshold activities. While organic dyes and fluorescent proteins have been developed to possess voltage-sensing properties, photobleaching, cytotoxicity, low sensitivity, and low spatial resolution have obstructed further studies. Semiconductor nanoparticles (NPs), as prospective voltage sensors, have shown excellent sensitivity based on Quantum confined Stark effect (QCSE) at room temperature and at single particle level. Both theory and experiment have shown their voltage sensitivity can be increased significantly via material, bandgap, and structural engineering. Based on theoretical calculations, we synthesized one of the optimal candidates for voltage sensors: 12 nm type-II ZnSe/CdS nanorods (NRs), with an asymmetrically located seed. The voltage sensitivity and spectral shift were characterized in vitro using spectrally-resolved microscopy using electrodes grown by thin film deposition, which "sandwich" the NRs. We characterized multiple batches of such NRs and iteratively modified the synthesis to achieve higher voltage sensitivity (ΔF/F> 10%), larger spectral shift (>5 nm), better homogeneity, and better colloidal stability. Using a high throughput screening method, we were able to compare the voltage sensitivity of our NRs with commercial spherical quantum dots (QDs) with single particle statistics. Our method of high throughput screening with spectrally-resolved microscope also provides a versatile tool for studying single particles spectroscopy under field modulation.

  6. Room-Temperature, Strain-Tunable Orientation of Magnetization in a Hybrid Ferromagnetic Co Nanorod-Liquid Crystalline Elastomer Nanocomposite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riou, Ophélie; Lonetti, Barbara; Tan, Reasmey P; Harmel, Justine; Soulantica, Katerina; Davidson, Patrick; Mingotaud, Anne-Françoise; Respaud, Marc; Chaudret, Bruno; Mauzac, Monique

    2015-09-07

    Hybrid nanocomposites based on magnetic nanoparticles dispersed in liquid crystalline elastomers are fascinating emerging materials. Their expected strong magneto-elastic coupling may open new applications as actuators, magnetic switches, and for reversible storage of magnetic information. We report here the synthesis of a novel hybrid ferromagnetic liquid crystalline elastomer. In this material, highly anisotropic Co nanorods are aligned through a cross-linking process performed in the presence of an external magnetic field. We obtain a highly anisotropic magnetic material which exhibits remarkable magneto-elastic coupling. The nanorod alignment can be switched at will at room temperature by weak mechanical stress, leading to a change of more than 50 % of the remnant magnetization ratio and of the coercive field. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Controlled growth of high-density CdS and CdSe nanorod arrays on selective facets of two-dimensional semiconductor nanoplates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xue-Jun; Chen, Junze; Tan, Chaoliang; Zhu, Yihan; Han, Yu; Zhang, Hua

    2016-05-01

    The rational synthesis of hierarchical three-dimensional nanostructures with specific compositions, morphologies and functionalities is important for applications in a variety of fields ranging from energy conversion and electronics to biotechnology. Here, we report a seeded growth approach for the controlled epitaxial growth of three types of hierarchical one-dimensional (1D)/two-dimensional (2D) nanostructures, where nanorod arrays of II-VI semiconductor CdS or CdSe are grown on the selective facets of hexagonal-shaped nanoplates, either on the two basal facets of the nanoplate, or on one basal facet, or on the two basal facets and six side facets. The seed engineering of 2D hexagonal-shaped nanoplates is the key factor for growth of the three resulting types of 1D/2D nanostructures. The wurtzite- and zinc-blende-type polymorphs of semiconductors are used to determine the facet-selective epitaxial growth of 1D nanorod arrays, resulting in the formation of different hierarchical three-dimensional (3D) nanostructures.

  8. Controlled growth of high-density CdS and CdSe nanorod arrays on selective facets of two-dimensional semiconductor nanoplates

    KAUST Repository

    Wu, Xue-Jun

    2016-03-14

    The rational synthesis of hierarchical three-dimensional nanostructures with specific compositions, morphologies and functionalities is important for applications in a variety of fields ranging from energy conversion and electronics to biotechnology. Here, we report a seeded growth approach for the controlled epitaxial growth of three types of hierarchical one-dimensional (1D)/two-dimensional (2D) nanostructures, where nanorod arrays of II-VI semiconductor CdS or CdSe are grown on the selective facets of hexagonal-shaped nanoplates, either on the two basal facets of the nanoplate, or on one basal facet, or on the two basal facets and six side facets. The seed engineering of 2D hexagonal-shaped nanoplates is the key factor for growth of the three resulting types of 1D/2D nanostructures. The wurtzite- and zinc-blende-type polymorphs of semiconductors are used to determine the facet-selective epitaxial growth of 1D nanorod arrays, resulting in the formation of different hierarchical three-dimensional (3D) nanostructures. © 2016 Macmillan Publishers Limited. All rights reserved.

  9. C-axis correlated pinning mechanism in vortex liquid and solid phases for Sm123 film with well-aligned BaHfO3 nanorods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awaji, Satoshi; Tsuchiya, Yuji; Miura, Shun; Ichino, Yusuke; Yoshida, Yutaka; Matsumoto, Kaname

    2017-11-01

    Nanorods, which are nano-scaled columnar-shape precipitates, have recently been used to improve critical current density J c in magnetic fields for REBa2Cu3O y (RE123, RE: rare earth element) high temperature superconducting tapes/films. However, the flux pinning mechanism of the nanorod is not clear yet. We investigated the J c and resistivity ρ properties in detail and discussed the flux pinning properties on the basis of the flux pinning state diagram for high-quality Sm123 films with well-aligned 5.6 vol% BaHfO3 nanorods. Plateaus were observed in the field dependence of J c and ρ at high temperatures above the delocalization temperature. This suggests that nanorod pinning becomes effective in the vortex liquid phase and it grows up when the temperature decreases toward the delocalization temperature. In the ‘many-nanorod’ state in the high temperature region above the delocalization temperature, double peaks in the F p curves appear due to the coexistence of nanorod pinning and random pinning. At low temperatures below 70 K, however, the well-scaled F p curves at low fields and temperature dependent (non-scaled) normalized F p curves are observed. From detailed analysis using the cooperation model of the random and the correlated pinning centers, we found that nanorod pinning is dominant below the matching field and the cooperation between nanorod pinning and random pinning determines the high field J c properties above the matching field.

  10. Efficient Solar-Induced Photoelectrochemical Response Using Coupling Semiconductor TiO2-ZnO Nanorod Film

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nur Azimah Abd Samad

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Efficient solar driven photoelectrochemical (PEC response by enhancing charge separation has attracted great interest in the hydrogen generation application. The formation of one-dimensional ZnO nanorod structure without bundling is essential for high efficiency in PEC response. In this present research work, ZnO nanorod with an average 500 nm in length and average diameter of about 75 nm was successfully formed via electrodeposition method in 0.05 mM ZnCl2 and 0.1 M KCl electrolyte at 1 V for 60 min under 70 °C condition. Continuous efforts have been exerted to further improve the solar driven PEC response by incorporating an optimum content of TiO2 into ZnO nanorod using dip-coating technique. It was found that 0.25 at % of TiO2 loaded on ZnO nanorod film demonstrated a maximum photocurrent density of 19.78 mA/cm2 (with V vs. Ag/AgCl under UV illumination and 14.75 mA/cm2 (with V vs. Ag/AgCl under solar illumination with photoconversion efficiency ~2.9% (UV illumination and ~4.3% (solar illumination. This performance was approximately 3–4 times higher than ZnO film itself. An enhancement of photocurrent density and photoconversion efficiency occurred due to the sufficient Ti element within TiO2-ZnO nanorod film, which acted as an effective mediator to trap the photo-induced electrons and minimize the recombination of charge carriers. Besides, phenomenon of charge-separation effect at type-II band alignment of Zn and Ti could further enhance the charge carrier transportation during illumination.

  11. Construction of adsorptive nanorods from polyoxometalates and ionic liquid and their adsorption properties for silver ion from AMD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Huixin; Zhang, Jie; Cui, Manli; Jin, Xiu-Hong; Han, Xu; Wang, Youchen

    A new structure of hybrid nanorods adsorbent ([n-BBIM]9PW9O34) was synthesized by a simple molecular assembly of polyoxometalates with ionic liquids (ILs). The nanocomposite was characterized by Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR), ultraviolet-visible (UV-Vis), scanning electron microscope, energy dispersive X-ray and X-ray diffractometer. Adsorption of silver from acid mine drainage (AMD) was studied using batch experiments. The impact of several parameters, like ion concentration, pH, adsorbent dosage, and temperature was elucidated and optimization was carried out by single-factor experiment and response surface methodology. Analysis of variance of the quadratic model suggested that experimental data were excellently fitted to the quadratic model. Optimum conditions for removal of Ag(+) from AMD were determined to be an initial concentration 143 mg/L, adsorbent dosage 2.69 g/L, temperature 35 °C to achieve the maximum adsorption of Ag(+) 99.03%, which was very close to the predicted value (100%). The adsorption was confirmed as oxidation-reduction mechanism following a complexation process, and has been verified according to results from FT-IR and UV-vis spectra. The selective experiment suggested that the nanorods adsorbent could adsorb silver ions in AMD well. Based on the adsorption/desorption study result, the adsorbent can be efficiently recovered.

  12. Material degradation of liquid organic semiconductors analyzed by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fukushima, Tatsuya; Yamamoto, Junichi; Fukuchi, Masashi; Kaji, Hironori, E-mail: kaji@scl.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Institute for Chemical Research, Kyoto University, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan); Hirata, Shuzo; Jung, Heo Hyo; Adachi, Chihaya [Center for Organic Photonics and Electronics Research (OPERA), Kyusyu University, 744 Motooka, Nishi, Fukuoka 819-0395 (Japan); Hirata, Osamu; Shibano, Yuki [Nissan Chemical Industries, LTD, 722-1 Tsuboi, Funabashi 274-8507 (Japan)

    2015-08-15

    Liquid organic light-emitting diodes (liquid OLEDs) are unique devices consisting only of liquid organic semiconductors in the active layer, and the device performances have been investigated recently. However, the device degradation, especially, the origin has been unknown. In this study, we show that material degradation occurs in liquid OLEDs, whose active layer is composed of carbazole with an ethylene glycol chain. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiments clearly exhibit that the dimerization reaction of carbazole moiety occurs in the liquid OLEDs during driving the devices. In contrast, cleavages of the ethylene glycol chain are not detected within experimental error. The dimerization reaction is considered to be related to the device degradation.

  13. Solution processing of polymer semiconductor: Insulator blends-Tailored optical properties through liquid-liquid phase separation control

    KAUST Repository

    Hellmann, Christoph

    2014-12-17

    © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. It has been demonstrated that the 0-0 absorption transition of poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) in blends with poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) could be rationally tuned through the control of the liquid-liquid phase separation process during solution deposition. Pronounced J-like aggregation behavior, characteristic for systems of a low exciton band width, was found for blends where the most pronounced liquid-liquid phase separation occurred in solution, leading to domains of P3HT and PEO of high phase purity. Since liquid-liquid phase separation could be readily manipulated either by the solution temperature, solute concentration, or deposition temperature, to name a few parameters, our findings promise the design from the out-set of semiconductor:insulator architectures of pre-defined properties by manipulation of the interaction parameter between the solutes as well as the respective solute:solvent system using classical polymer science principles.

  14. Direct electrochemistry and electrocatalysis of horseradish peroxidase with hyaluronic acid-ionic liquid-cadmium sulfide nanorod composite material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu Zhihong [Institute of Nano-Science and Technology Center, Huazhong Normal University, Wuhan 430079 (China); Li Xia; Wang Yan [College of Chemistry and Molecular Engineering, Qingdao University of Science and Technology, Qingdao 266042 (China); Zeng Yan [Institute of Nano-Science and Technology Center, Huazhong Normal University, Wuhan 430079 (China); Sun Wei, E-mail: sunwei@qust.edu.cn [College of Chemistry and Molecular Engineering, Qingdao University of Science and Technology, Qingdao 266042 (China); Huang Xintang [Institute of Nano-Science and Technology Center, Huazhong Normal University, Wuhan 430079 (China)

    2010-06-18

    A new composite material consisted of hyaluronic acid (HA), ionic liquid 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate ([BMIM]BF{sub 4}) and cadmium sulfide (CdS) nanorod was fabricated and used for the immobilization of horseradish peroxidase (HRP) on the surface of a carbon ionic liquid electrode (CILE), which was prepared with 1-ethyl-3-methyl-imidazolium ethylsulphate ([EMIM]EtOSO{sub 3}) as modifier. Spectroscopic results indicated that HRP remained its native structure in the composite film. Based on the synergistic effect of the materials used, an obvious promotion to the direct electron transfer efficient between HRP and CILE was achieved with a pair of well-defined redox peaks appeared in 0.1 mol L{sup -1} phosphate buffer solution, indicating the realization of the direct electrochemistry of HRP. The immobilized HRP showed good electrocatalytic activity towards the reduction of trichloroacetic acid and H{sub 2}O{sub 2} with the electrochemical parameters calculated. Based on the fabricated electrode, a new third-generation electrochemical biosensor was constructed with good stability and reproducibility.

  15. An effective pair potential for liquid semiconductor, Se: Structure and ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    experimental structure factor data using an accurate liquid state theory and this shows important basic features. A model potential incorporating the basic features of the struc- ture factor extracted potential is suggested. This model potential is then used to describe through low-order perturbation theory, the structure and ...

  16. Controlled fabrication of semiconductor-metal hybrid nano-heterostructures via site-selective metal photodeposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vela Becerra, Javier; Ruberu, T. Purnima A.

    2017-12-05

    A method of synthesizing colloidal semiconductor-metal hybrid heterostructures is disclosed. The method includes dissolving semiconductor nanorods in a solvent to form a nanorod solution, and adding a precursor solution to the nanorod solution. The precursor solution contains a metal. The method further includes illuminating the combined precursor and nanorod solutions with light of a specific wavelength. The illumination causes the deposition of the metal in the precursor solution onto the surface of the semiconductor nanorods.

  17. Induced Magnetic Anisotropy in Liquid Crystals Doped with Resonant Semiconductor Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vicente Marzal

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Currently, there are many efforts to improve the electrooptical properties of liquid crystals by means of doping them with different types of nanoparticles. In addition, liquid crystals may be used as active media to dynamically control other interesting phenomena, such as light scattering resonances. In this sense, mixtures of resonant nanoparticles hosted in a liquid crystal could be a potential metamaterial with interesting properties. In this work, the artificial magnetism induced in a mixture of semiconductor nanoparticles surrounded by a liquid crystal is analyzed. Effective magnetic permeability of mixtures has been obtained using the Maxwell-Garnett effective medium theory. Furthermore, permeability variations with nanoparticles size and their concentration in the liquid crystal, as well as the magnetic anisotropy, have been studied.

  18. Material degradation of liquid organic semiconductors analyzed by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatsuya Fukushima

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Liquid organic light-emitting diodes (liquid OLEDs are unique devices consisting only of liquid organic semiconductors in the active layer, and the device performances have been investigated recently. However, the device degradation, especially, the origin has been unknown. In this study, we show that material degradation occurs in liquid OLEDs, whose active layer is composed of carbazole with an ethylene glycol chain. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR experiments clearly exhibit that the dimerization reaction of carbazole moiety occurs in the liquid OLEDs during driving the devices. In contrast, cleavages of the ethylene glycol chain are not detected within experimental error. The dimerization reaction is considered to be related to the device degradation.

  19. Magnetic-field-induced synthesis of Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanorods by a gas–liquid interfacial process: Microstructure control, magnetic and photocatalytic properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Chun; Mo, Zunli, E-mail: mozlnwnu2011@163.com; Guo, Ruibin; Teng, Guixiang; Zhao, Guoping

    2014-05-01

    Highlights: • Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanorods were synthesized via a MFI gas–liquid interfacial route. • The morphology of the Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticle can be changed during its growth process. • MF render Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanorods higher degree of crystallinity and better magnetic property. - Abstract: In this paper, we designed a magnetic field (MF) induced gas–liquid interface route to synthesize magnetic Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanorods (NRs). The results showed that the MF can significantly affect the morphology of the particles. In this original method, only relatively inexpensive and environmental chemicals were used. The structure and morphology of the Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} NRs were characterized by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy and vibrating sample magnetometry technique. The crystal growth mechanisms in the magnetic field induced process were expounded in detail. The as-synthesized Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} NRs were successfully used as a catalytic carrier for the photo degradation of phenol.

  20. ZnO nanorods arrays with Ag nanoparticles on the (002) plane derived by liquid epitaxy growth and electrodeposition process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yin Xingtian; Que Wenxiu; Shen Fengyu

    2011-01-01

    Well-aligned ZnO nanorods (NRs) arrays with Ag nanoparticles (NPs) on the (002) plane are obtained by combining a liquid epitaxy technique with an electrodeposition process. Cyclic voltammetry study is employed to understand the electrochemical behaviors of the electrodeposition system, and potentiostatic method is employed to deposit silver NPs on the ZnO NRs in the electrolyte with an Ag + concentration of 1 mM. X-ray diffraction analysis is used to study the crystalline properties of the as-prepared samples, and energy dispersive X-ray is adopted to confirm the composition at the surface of the deposited samples. Results indicate only a small quantity of silver can be deposited on the surface of the samples. Effect of the deposition potential and time on the morphological properties of the resultant Ag NPs/ZnO NRs are investigated in detail. Scanning electron microscopy images and transmission electron microscopy images indicate that the Ag NPs deposited on the (002) plane of the ZnO NRs with a large dispersion in diameter can be obtained by a single potentiostatic deposition process, while dense Ag NPs with a much smaller diameter dispersion on the top of the ZnO NRs, most of which locate on the conical tip of the ZnO NRs, can be obtained by a two-potentiostatic deposition process, The mechanism of this deposition process is also suggested.

  1. Nanomanipulation, nanotribology and nanomechanics of Au nanorods in dry and liquid environments using an AFM and depth sensing nanoindenter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maharaj, Dave; Bhushan, Bharat

    2014-06-07

    Nano-objects in dry and liquid conditions have shown reductions in friction and wear on the macroscale. In this research, for the first time, Au nanorods were studied on the nanoscale under dry conditions and submerged in water for their effect on friction and wear reduction. The data were compared with spherical Au nanoparticles. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) experiments on the nanoscale were performed in single-nano-object contact with an AFM tip, where nano-objects were laterally manipulated, and multiple-nano-object contact with a tip attached to a glass sphere sliding over several nano-objects. Nanoscale and macroscale wear tests with an AFM and ball-on-flat tribometer were performed to relate friction and wear reduction on both scales. Results indicate that Au nano-objects contribute to friction and wear reduction due to the reduced contact area and possible rolling and sliding on the nanoscale. Compression tests (global deformation) using a nanoindenter with a flat punch were used to investigate the mechanical behavior under load and its relation to friction and wear reduction. Repeat compression tests of nano-objects were performed which showed a strain hardening effect and increased pop-ins during subsequent loads.

  2. Direct electron transfer of hemoglobin in a CdS nanorods and Nafion composite film on carbon ionic liquid electrode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun Wei; Wang Dandan; Li Guicun; Zhai Ziqin; Zhao Ruijun; Jiao Kui

    2008-01-01

    In this paper the direct electron transfer of hemoglobin (Hb) was carefully investigated by using a room temperature ionic liquid 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium hexafluorophosphate (BMIMPF 6 ) modified carbon paste electrode (CILE) as the basal working electrode. Hb was immobilized on the surface of CILE with the nanocomposite film composed of Nafion and CdS nanorods by a step-by-step method. UV-vis and FT-IR spectra showed that Hb in the composite film remained its native structure. The direct electrochemical behaviors of Hb in the composite film were further studied in a pH 7.0 phosphate buffer solution (PBS). A pair of well-defined and quasi-reversible cyclic voltammetric peaks of Hb was obtained with the formal potential (E 0 ') at -0.295 V (vs. SCE), which was the characteristic of heme Fe(III)/Fe(II) redox couples. The direct electrochemistry of Hb was achieved on the modified electrode and the apparent heterogeneous electron transfer rate constant (k s ) was calculated to be 0.291 s -1 . The formal potentials of Hb Fe(III)/Fe(II) couple shifted negatively with the increase of buffer pH and a slope value of -45.1 mV/pH was got, which indicated that one electron transfer accompanied with one proton transportation. The fabricated Hb sensor showed good electrocatalytic manner to the reduction of trichloroacetic acid (TCA)

  3. Asymmetric Semiconductor Nanorod/Oxide Nanoparticle Hybrid Materials: Model Nanomaterials for Light-Activated Formation of Fuels from Sunlight. Formal Progress Report -- Award DE-FG02-05ER15753

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Armstrong, Neal R. [Univ. of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States)

    2017-06-22

    Executive Summary on Project Accomplishments: We focused our efforts for this project on the synthesis and characterization of semiconductor nanomaterials composed of semiconductor nanorods (NRs - e.g., CdSe, CdSe@CdS, CdS) with metal (Au, Pt, Co) or metal oxide (CoxOy) nanoparticle (NP) “tips.” These systems are attractive model systems where control of spatial, energetic and compositional features of both NRs and NP tips potentially enhances the efficiency of photogeneration and directional transport of charges, and photoelectrochemical conversion of sunlight to fuels. Synthetic methods to control material dimensions (20-200 nm in length), topology (one vs. two NP tips) and NR/NP tip compositions have been developed in the current project period (Pyun). We also achieved, for the first time in heterostructured nanorod materials, estimates of both valence band energies (EVB) and conduction band energies (ECB), using unique combinations of in vacuuo ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy (UPS, Armstrong), and waveguide spectroelectrochemistry (Saavedra), respectively. The spectroelectrochemical measurements in particular provide a unique path to estimation of ECB, and the distribution in ECB brought about by modification of NR composition. The combination of both approaches promises to be universally applicable to the characterization of energetics in nanomaterials of interest both for photovoltaic and sunlight-to-fuel photoelectrochemical assemblies.

  4. Transport Properties of Polymer Semiconductor Controlled by Ionic Liquid as a Gate Dielectric and a Pressure Medium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shi, Wu; Ye, Jianting; Checkelsky, Joseph G.; Terakura, Chieko; Iwasa, Yoshihiro

    An effective way of using ionic liquid as a gate dielectric as well as a pressure medium to tune the transport of an exemplary polymer semiconductor, poly(2,5-bis(3-tetradecyl-thiophene-2-yl)thieno[3,2-b]thiophene) (pBTTT-C14) is presented. Working as gate dielectrics, the ionic liquids exhibit the

  5. Electrical contacts to nanorod networks at different length scales: From macroscale ensembles to single nanorod chains

    KAUST Repository

    Lavieville, Romain

    2013-11-01

    The nature of metal-semiconductor interfaces at the nanoscale is an important issue in micro- and nanoelectronic engineering. The study of charge transport through chains of CdSe semiconductor nanorods linked by Au particles represents an ideal model system for this matter, because the metal semiconductor interface is an intrinsic feature of the nanosystem. Here we show the controlled fabrication of all-inorganic hybrid metal-semiconductor networks with different size, in which the semiconductor nanorods are linked by Au domains at their tips. We demonstrate different approaches to selectively contact the networks and single nanorod chains with planar electrodes, and we investigate their charge transport at room temperature. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Operation of CdZnTe Semiconductor Detectors in Liquid Scintillator for the COBRA Experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oldorf, Christian

    2015-08-01

    COBRA, the Cadmium-Zinc-Telluride O-neutrino double-Beta Research Apparatus, is an experiment aiming for the measurement of the neutrinoless double beta decay with several isotopes, in particular 116 Cd, 106 Cd and 130 Te. A highly granular large scale experiment with about 400 kg of CdZnTe semiconductor detectors is currently under development. To provide evidence for the neutrinoless double beta decay of 116 Cd, a background rate in the order of 10 -3 counts/keV/kg/a is needed to achieve the required half-life sensitivity of at least 2 . 10 26 years. To reach this target, the detectors have to be operated in a highly pure environment, shielded from external radiation. Liquid scintillator is a promising candidate as a circum fluent replacement for the currently used lacquer. Next to the function as highly pure passivation material, liquid scintillator also acts as a neutron shield and active veto for external gammas. Within this thesis, the design, construction and assembly of a test set-up is described. The operation of four CdZnTe detectors after several years of storage in liquid scintillator is demonstrated. Next to extensive material compatibility tests prior to the assembly, the commissioning of the set-up and the characterization of the detectors are shown. Finally, results concerning the background reduction capability of liquid scintillator and the detection of cosmic muons are presented and compared to a Monte Carlo simulation.

  7. Optoelectronic characteristics of CuO nanorods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, De-Hua; Wang, Fei-Fei; Lü, Hao; Du, Min-Yong; Xu, Wen-Jie

    2013-05-01

    Optoelectronic characteristics of p-type CuO nanorods, synthesized by a simple hydrothermal method, were investigated at different atmospheres and oxygen pressures. The CuO nanorods have lower resistance in air than in a vacuum, unlike the n-type semiconductors. This is explained in terms of the surface accumulation conduction. Measurements at different oxygen pressures indicate that oxygen has an important effect on the optoelectronic properties of p-type nanomaterials.

  8. Surface Hydrogen Enables Subeutectic Vapor-Liquid-Solid Semiconductor Nanowire Growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivaram, Saujan V; Hui, Ho Yee; de la Mata, María; Arbiol, Jordi; Filler, Michael A

    2016-11-09

    Vapor-liquid-solid nanowire growth below the bulk metal-semiconductor eutectic temperature is known for several systems; however, the fundamental processes that govern this behavior are poorly understood. Here, we show that hydrogen atoms adsorbed on the Ge nanowire sidewall enable AuGe catalyst supercooling and control Au transport. Our approach combines in situ infrared spectroscopy to directly and quantitatively determine hydrogen atom coverage with a "regrowth" step that allows catalyst phase to be determined with ex situ electron microscopy. Maintenance of a supercooled catalyst with only hydrogen radical delivery confirms the centrality of sidewall chemistry. This work underscores the importance of the nanowire sidewall and its chemistry on catalyst state, identifies new methods to regulate catalyst composition, and provides synthetic strategies for subeutectic growth in other nanowire systems.

  9. Electrochemical flow-based solution-solid growth of the Cu2O nanorod array: potential application to lithium ion batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Jeong Ho; Park, Sun Hwa; Hyun, Seung Min; Kim, Jeong Won; Park, Hyun Min; Song, Jae Yong

    2014-09-14

    The catalyzed solution-liquid-solid (SLS) growth has been well developed to synthesize semiconductor nanowires with controlled diameters. The SLS growth occurs in the longitudinal direction of nanowires, due to the directional anisotropy driven by the metal catalysts where chemical precursors are introduced. In the present study, we report a selective, template-free, and environmentally-friendly electrochemical flow-based solution-solid (electrochemical flow-SS) growth of the Cu2O nanorod array. The anisotropy for directional growth without any catalysts is generated by the electrical field in a flowing electrolyte of ultra-dilute CuSO4. The filamentary anisotropy originates from electric field enhancement on pyramidal nanocrystals in the electrolyte of low ionic conductivity (13 μS cm(-1)). The Cu2O and Cu nanorods are able to be selectively synthesized by controlling the electrolyte pH and oxygen dissolution into the electrolyte. The synthesized Cu2O nanorod array shows excellent electrochemical properties as an anode material for lithium-ion batteries; the specific capacities increase from 323 to 1206 mA h g(-1) during 500 cycles. The capacity enhancement is due to the phase transformation from Cu2O to CuO, nano-restructuring of nanorods into fragmented nanoparticles, and the progressive generation of an electroactive polymeric gel-like layer on the surface of the nanoparticles. The electrochemical flow-SS growth of Cu2O nanorods is expected to contribute to further development of other functional nanorods.

  10. Flow-Solution-Liquid-Solid Growth of Semiconductor Nanowires: A Novel Approach for Controlled Synthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hollingsworth, Jennifer A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Palaniappan, Kumaranand [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Laocharoensuk, Rawiwan [National Science and Technology Center, Thailand; Smith, Nickolaus A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Dickerson, Robert M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Casson, Joanna L. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Baldwin, Jon K. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-06-07

    Semiconductor nanowires (SC-NWs) have potential applications in diverse technologies from nanoelectronics and photonics to energy harvesting and storage due to their quantum-confined opto-electronic properties coupled with their highly anisotropic shape. Here, we explore new approaches to an important solution-based growth method known as solution-liquid-solid (SLS) growth. In SLS, molecular precursors are reacted in the presence of low-melting metal nanoparticles that serve as molten fluxes to catalyze the growth of the SC-NWs. The mechanism of growth is assumed to be similar to that of vapor-liquid-solid (VLS) growth, with the clear distinctions of being conducted in solution in the presence of coordinating ligands and at relatively lower temperatures (<300 C). The resultant SC-NWs are soluble in common organic solvents and solution processable, offering advantages such as simplified processing, scale-up, ultra-small diameters for quantum-confinement effects, and flexible choice of materials from group III-V to groups II-VI, IV-VI, as well as truly ternary I-III-VI semiconductors as we recently demonstrates. Despite these advantages of SLS growth, VLS offers several clear opportunities not allowed by conventional SLS. Namely, VLS allows sequential addition of precursors for facile synthesis of complex axial heterostructures. In addition, growth proceeds relatively slowly compared to SLS, allowing clear assessments of growth kinetics. In order to retain the materials and processing flexibility afforded by SLS, but add the elements of controlled growth afforded by VLS, we transformed SLS into a flow based method by adapting it to synthesis in a microfluidic system. By this new method - so-called 'flow-SLS' (FSLS) - we have now demonstrated unprecedented fabrication of multi-segmented SC-NWs, e.g., 8-segmented CdSe/ZnSe defined by either compositionally abrupt or alloyed interfaces as a function of growth conditions. In addition, we have studied growth

  11. Liquid-crystalline ordering as a concept in materials science: from semiconductors to stimuli-responsive devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleischmann, Eva-Kristina; Zentel, Rudolf

    2013-08-19

    While the unique optical properties of liquid crystals (LCs) are already well exploited for flat-panel displays, their intrinsic ability to self-organize into ordered mesophases, which are intermediate states between crystal and liquid, gives rise to a broad variety of additional applications. The high degree of molecular order, the possibility for large scale orientation, and the structural motif of the aromatic subunits recommend liquid-crystalline materials as organic semiconductors, which are solvent-processable and can easily be deposited on a substrate. The anisotropy of liquid crystals can further cause a stimuli-responsive macroscopic shape change of cross-linked polymer networks, which act as reversibly contracting artificial muscles. After illustrating the concept of liquid-crystalline order in this Review, emphasis will be placed on synthetic strategies for novel classes of LC materials, and the design and fabrication of active devices. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Growth and characterization of iridium dioxide nanorods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, R.S.; Huang, Y.S.; Liang, Y.M.; Tsai, D.S.; Tiong, K.K.

    2004-01-01

    Conductive iridium dioxide (IrO 2 ) nanorods have been successfully grown on the Si(1 0 0) substrates via metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD). A wedge-shaped morphology and naturally formed sharp tips are observed for IrO 2 nanorods using field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM). High-resolution transmission electron microscopy (TEM) image and electron diffraction pattern show the growth of IrO 2 nanorods preferentially along c-axis. Structure and composition of IrO 2 nanorods have also been characterized using the techniques of Raman spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), respectively. It is noted that the IrO 2 nanorods are self-mediated instead of the conventional vapor-liquid-solid (VLS) approach or catalyst-mediated method

  13. Electron-hole liquid in semiconductors and low-dimensional structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sibeldin, N. N.

    2017-11-01

    The condensation of excitons into an electron-hole liquid (EHL) and the main EHL properties in bulk semiconductors and low-dimensional structures are considered. The EHL properties in bulk materials are discussed primarily in qualitative terms based on the experimental results obtained for germanium and silicon. Some of the experiments in which the main EHL thermodynamic parameters (density and binding energy) have been obtained are described and the basic factors that determine these parameters are considered. Topics covered include the effect of external perturbations (uniaxial strain and magnetic field) on EHL stability; phase diagrams for a nonequilibrium exciton-gas-EHL system; information on the size and concentration of electron-hole drops (EHDs) under various experimental conditions; the kinetics of exciton condensation and of recombination in the exciton-gas-EHD system; dynamic EHD properties and the motion of EHDs under the action of external forces; the properties of giant EHDs that form in potential wells produced by applying an inhomogeneous strain to the crystal; and effects associated with the drag of EHDs by nonequilibrium phonons (phonon wind), including the dynamics and formation of an anisotropic spatial structure of the EHD cloud. In discussing EHLs in low-dimensional structures, a number of studies are reviewed on the observation and experimental investigation of phenomena such as spatially indirect (dipolar) electron-hole and exciton (dielectric) liquids in GaAs/AlGaAs structures with double quantum wells (QWs), EHDs containing only a few electron-hole pairs (dropletons), EHLs in type-I silicon QWs, and spatially direct and dipolar EHLs in type-II silicon-germanium heterostructures.

  14. Thermal and Optical Modulation of the Carrier Mobility in OTFTs Based on an Azo-anthracene Liquid Crystal Organic Semiconductor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yantong; Li, Chao; Xu, Xiuru; Liu, Ming; He, Yaowu; Murtaza, Imran; Zhang, Dongwei; Yao, Chao; Wang, Yongfeng; Meng, Hong

    2017-03-01

    One of the most striking features of organic semiconductors compared with their corresponding inorganic counterparts is their molecular diversity. The major challenge in organic semiconductor material technology is creating molecular structural motifs to develop multifunctional materials in order to achieve the desired functionalities yet to optimize the specific device performance. Azo-compounds, because of their special photoresponsive property, have attracted extensive interest in photonic and optoelectronic applications; if incorporated wisely in the organic semiconductor groups, they can be innovatively utilized in advanced smart electronic applications, where thermal and photo modulation is applied to tune the electronic properties. On the basis of this aspiration, a novel azo-functionalized liquid crystal semiconductor material, (E)-1-(4-(anthracen-2-yl)phenyl)-2-(4-(decyloxy)phenyl)diazene (APDPD), is designed and synthesized for application in organic thin-film transistors (OTFTs). The UV-vis spectra of APDPD exhibit reversible photoisomerizaton upon photoexcitation, and the thin films of APDPD show a long-range orientational order based on its liquid crystal phase. The performance of OTFTs based on this material as well as the effects of thermal treatment and UV-irradiation on mobility are investigated. The molecular structure, stability of the material, and morphology of the thin films are characterized by thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA), polarizing optical microscopy (POM), (differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), UV-vis spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy (AFM), and scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). This study reveals that our new material has the potential to be applied in optical sensors, memories, logic circuits, and functional switches.

  15. Phosphorus and Fluorine Co-Doping Induced Enhancement of Oxygen Evolution Reaction in Bimetallic Nitride Nanorods Arrays: Ionic Liquid-Driven and Mechanism Clarification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Xue; Wang, Qin; Xu, Guangran; Ning, Yunkun; Huang, Keke; He, Feng; Wu, Zhi-Jian; Zhang, Jun

    2017-11-27

    Electrocatalytic splitting of water is becoming increasingly crucial for renewable energy and device technologies. As one of the most important half-reactions for water splitting reactions, the oxygen evolution reaction (OER) is a kinetically sluggish process that will greatly affect the energy conversion efficiency. Therefore, exploring a highly efficient and durable catalyst to boost the OER is of great urgency. In this work, we develop a facile strategy for the synthesis of well-defined phosphorus and fluorine co-doped Ni 1.5 Co 1.5 N hybrid nanorods (HNs) by using ionic liquids (ILs; 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium hexafluorophosphate). In comparison to the IrO 2 catalyst, the as-obtained PF/Ni 1.5 Co 1.5 N HNs manifests a low overpotential of 280 mV at 10 mA cm -2 , Tafel slope of 66.1 mV dec -1 , and excellent durability in 1.0 m KOH solution. Furthermore, the iR-corrected electrochemical results indicate it could achieve a current density of 100 mA cm -2 at an overpotential of 350 mV. The combination of cobalt and nickel elements, 1D mesoporous nanostructure, heteroatom incorporation, and ionic liquid-assisted nitridation, which result in faster charge transfer capability and more active surface sites, can facilitate the release of oxygen bubbles from the catalyst surface. Our findings confirm that surface heteroatom doping in bimetallic nitrides could serve as a new class of OER catalyst with excellent catalytic activity. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Designing solution-processable air-stable liquid crystalline crosslinkable semiconductors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McCulloch, I.; Bailey, C.; Genevicius, K.

    2006-01-01

    organic light emitting diode displays, low frequency radio frequency identification tag and other low performance electronics. Organic semiconductors that offer both electrical performance and stability with respect to storage and operation under ambient conditions are required. This work describes...... the development of reactive mesogen semiconductors, which form large crosslinked LC domains on polymerization within mesophases. These crosslinked domains offer mechanical stability and are inert to solvent exposure in further processing steps. Reactive mesogens containing conjugated aromatic cores, designed...

  17. Nanorods and nanotubes for solar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kislyuk, V V; Dimitriev, O P

    2008-01-01

    Nanorods and nanotubes as photoactive materials as well as electrodes in photovoltaic cells have been launched a few years ago, and the literature in this field started to appear only recently. The first steps have shown both advantages and disadvantages of their application, and the main expectation associated with their effective charge transport has not been realized completely. This article aims to review both the first and the recent tendencies in the development and application of nanorod and nanotube materials in photovoltaic cells. Two basic techniques of synthesis of crystalline nanorod structures are described, the top-down and bottom-up approaches, respectively. Design and photovoltaic performance of solar cells based on various semiconductor nanorod materials, such as TiO2, ZnO, CdS, CdSe, CdTe, CuO, Si are presented and compared with respective solar cells based on semiconductor nanoparticles. Specific of synthesis and application of carbon nanotubes in photovoltaic devices is also reviewed.

  18. Synthesis, characterization and self-assembly of liquid-crystalline ambipolar semi-conductors

    OpenAIRE

    Debever, Olivier

    2011-01-01

    These days, organic photovoltaic devices (OPV) have received a large interest from both academic and industrial researchers as alternative energy source to replace petroleum and nuclear fission. New organic semi-conductors (OSC) are actively researched since these materials can be purified and processed by solution techniques that are cheaper than those required for silicon. The current record efficiency is 8.3%. Further improvement of the OPV performances is desired in order to decrease both...

  19. Detection of liquid petroleum gas using mixed nanosized tungsten oxide-based thick-film semiconductor sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhari, G N; Bende, A M; Bodade, A B; Patil, S S; Manorama, S V

    2006-03-15

    The thick-film semiconductor sensor for liquid petroleum gas (LPG) detection was fabricated using a mixed WO(3)-based sensor. We present the characterization of both their structural properties by means of XRD measurements and the electrical characteristics by using gas-sensing properties. The sensing characteristics such as sensitivity, working range, cross-sensitivity and response time were studied by using nanosized WO(3)-based mixed with different metal oxides (SnO(2), TiO(2) and In(2)O(3)) and doped with noble metals (Au, Pd and Pt). The WO(3)-based mixed with 5 wt.% In(2)O(3) and 0.5 wt.% Pd showed the higher sensing characteristic at low concentration of LPG sensor at an operating temperature 225 degrees C.

  20. Liquid-solid transition in the bond particle model for elemental semiconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Badirkhan, Z.; Tosi, M.P.; Rovere, M.

    1991-07-01

    Freezing of Silicon and Germanium involves a reconstruction of covalent tetrahedral bonds from a metallic liquid having density and coordination then the solid. We first contrast the metallic liquid structure of Germanium with that of its semiconducting amorphous state, in order to emphasize the changes in the atomic structure factor that arise from reconstruction of the interatomic bonds. We then use the density wave theory of freezing to discuss the liquid-solid transition within a pseudoclassical model, which describes the liquid structure by means of partial structure factors giving the pair correlations between atoms and bond particles. The phase transition is viewed as a freezing of the bonds driven by tetrahedrally constrained attractions between ionic cores and valence electrons and accompanied by an opening of the structure to allow long-range connectivity of tetrahedral atomic units. Quantitative calculations on the bond particle model illustrate the relationship between the liquid structure and the microscopic Fourier components of the single-particle densities of atoms and bonds. In further support of this picture, we also present calculations for freezing of a liquid having the density and the atomic structure of compacted amorphous Germanium. (author). 25 refs, 2 figs, 2 tabs

  1. Aligned CuO nanorod arrays: fabrication and anisotropic ferromagnetism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Liqing; Hong, Kunquan; Ge, Xing; Xu, Mingxiang

    2014-06-01

    Copper oxide (CuO) is a p-type semiconductor with a band gap of 1.2 eV, which is well known in high-temperature superconductor and antiferromagnetic (AFM) materials through Cu-O-Cu super-exchange interaction. In this paper, we report the strong anisotropic ferromagnetism (FM) in aligned CuO nanorod arrays synthesized by a microwave-assisted hydrothermal method. The transmission electron microscopy (TEM) image shows that the CuO nanorod consists of a large number of smaller nanorods with almost the same growth direction. The X-ray diffraction (XRD) pattern indicates that the CuO nanorods are well crystallized with highly preferred orientation of the [020] direction. These CuO nanorod arrays show room-temperature ferromagnetism, with strong magnetic anisotropy when the magnetic field is applied perpendicular or parallel to the rod axis. This phenomenon of room-temperature ferromagnetism in those aligned CuO nanorods might originate from uncompensated surface spins and shape anisotropy of the nanorods.

  2. Chlorophenol's ultra-trace analysis in environmental samples by chitosan-zinc oxide nanorod composite as a novel coating for solid phase micro-extraction combined with high performance liquid chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alizadeh, Reza

    2016-01-01

    In this study, a simple, novel, and efficient preconcentration method has been developed for the determination of some chlorophenols (4-chlorophenol, 2,5-dichlorophenol, 2,3-dichlorophenol, and 2,4,6-trichlorophenol) using a direct solid phase microextraction (D-SPME) based on chitosan-ZnO nanorod composite combined with high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). A one step-novel hydrothermal method was demonstrated on the fabrication of ZnO nanorods arrayed on the fused silica fiber in the chitosan hydrogel solution (CZNC) as a new coating of SPME fiber. The coating was characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) instruments. The CZNC coating has combined the merits of both ZnO nanorods and chitosan hydrogel; it has several improvements such as increased extraction efficiency of chlorophenols and longer life time (over 80 cycles of D-SPME-HPLC operation). Experimental design method was used for optimization of extraction conditions and determination of four chlorophenols in water samples by SPME-HPLC-UV method. The calibration curves were linear from 5 to 1000 µg L(-1) for analytes, and the limits of detection were between 0.1 and 2 µg L(-1). Single fiber repeatability and fiber-to-fiber reproducibility were in the range of 5.8-10.2% and 8.8-14.5%, respectively. The spiked recoveries at 50 µg L(-1) for environmental water sample were in the range of 93-102%. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Semiconductor cleaning liquid delivery system and its filter; Handotaiyo seijo yakueki kyokyu system to filter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saito, T. [Kanto Chemical Co. Inc., Tokyo (Japan); Hayama, H.; Sakka, T. [Nitto Denko Corp., Osaka (Japan)

    1994-11-30

    Most of chemicals used for producing semiconductors are supplied automatically by a chemical delivery system to production devices. This paper explains the current status and the trends of the system. This system supplies the chemicals in the order of a tank lorry, a storage tank, a supply tank, a filter and a production device, and the transfer is performed receiving a supply signal from the supply tank and the production device. The transfer may be done through a dilution equipment. Filters currently used have membrane pore sizes of 0.2 to 0.1 microns as prefilters, and 0.1 to 0.05 microns as final filters. Chemicals used are diverse and can be divided into acid-, alkaline-, and solvent-based groups. Fluorine resin filters are used for acid- and alkaline-resistant applications, and SUS/fluorine resin filters for solvent-resistant applications. Use of large-sized filters of element construction with a membrane area of 1 m{sup 2} class is increasing recently in addition to selection from a performance viewpoint, including particle removing performance. 9 figs., 7 tabs.

  4. Synthesis of metal and semiconductor nanoparticles in a flow of immiscible liquids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matyushkin, L. B., E-mail: leva.matyushkin@gmail.com; Ryzhov, O. A.; Aleksandrova, O. A.; Moshnikov, V. A. [St. Petersburg State Electrotechnical University “LETI” (Russian Federation)

    2016-06-15

    Nanoparticles of silver and cadmium selenide are obtained by the method of synthesis in a flow of immiscible liquids (water/toluene, water/dodecane); these nanoparticles manifest, respectively, the effects of plasmon resonance and the spatial confinement of charge carriers. The reactor used is a polytetrafluoroethylene capillary with temperature-controlled sections for particle nucleation and growth with the supply of precursors using micropumps. The diameters of the particles are determined from absorbance spectra and are found to be 40 nm for Ag nanoparticles and 1–2 nm for CdSe nanoparticles (depending on the growth duration).

  5. Configuration interaction approach to Fermi liquid-Wigner crystal mixed phases in semiconductor nanodumbbells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballester, A.; Movilla, J. L.; Escartín, J. M.; Pi, M.; Planelles, J.

    2012-07-01

    Full configuration interaction calculations demonstrate the existence of mixed correlation phases in truly three-dimensional elongated nanocrystals subject to inhomogeneous spatial confining potentials. In such phases, the electron density behaves like a Fermi liquid in some regions, while, simultaneously, other more dilute regions display the typical quasi-classical Wigner distribution. The present results confirm and strengthen previous local spin-density functional theory predictions [Ballester et al., Phys. Rev. B 82, 115405 (2010)]. Additionally, simulation of the in-plane and z-polarized modes of the absorption spectra reveals the different correlation regimes occurring in these systems.

  6. Critical evaluation of dipolar, acid-base and charge interactions I. Electron displacement within and between molecules, liquids and semiconductors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenholm, Jarl B

    2017-09-01

    Specific dipolar, acid-base and charge interactions involve electron displacements. For atoms, single bonds and molecules electron displacement is characterized by electronic potential, absolute hardness, electronegativity and electron gap. In addition, dissociation, bonding, atomization, formation, ionization, affinity and lattice enthalpies are required to quantify the electron displacement in solids. Semiconductors are characterized by valence and conduction band energies, electron gaps and average Fermi energies which in turn determine Galvani potentials of the bulk, space charge layer and surface states. Electron displacement due to interaction between (probe) molecules, liquids and solids are characterized by parameters such as Hamaker constant, solubility parameter, exchange energy density, surface tension, work of adhesion and immersion. They are determined from permittivity, refractive index, enthalpy of vaporization, molar volume, surface pressure and contact angle. Moreover, acidic and basic probes may form adducts which are adsorbed on target substrates in order to establish an indirect measure of polarity, acidity, basicity or hydrogen bonding. Acidic acceptor numbers (AN), basic donor numbers (DN), acidic and basic "electrostatic" (E) and "covalent" (C) parameters determined by enthalpy of adduct formation are considered as general acid-base scales. However, the formal grounds for assignments as dispersive, Lifshitz-van der Waals, polar, acid, base and hydrogen bond interactions are inconsistent. Although correlations are found no of the parameters are mutually fully compatible and moreover the enthalpies of acid-base interaction do not correspond to free energies. In this review the foundations of different acid-base parameters relating to electron displacement within and between (probe) molecules, liquids and (semiconducting) solids are thoroughly investigated and their mutual relationships are evaluated. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights

  7. Liquid detection with InGaAsP semiconductor lasers having multiple short external cavities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, X; Cassidy, D T

    1996-08-20

    A liquid detection system consisting of a diode laser with multiple short external cavities (MSXC's) is reported. The MSXC diode laser operates single mode on one of 18 distinct modes that span a range of 72 nm. We selected the modes by setting the length of one of the external cavities using a piezoelectric positioner. One can measure the transmission through cells by modulating the injection current at audio frequencies and using phase-sensitive detection to reject the ambient light and reduce 1/f noise. A method to determine regions of single-mode operation by the rms of the output of the laser is described. The transmission data were processed by multivariate calibration techniques, i.e., partial least squares and principal component regression. Water concentration in acetone was used to demonstrate the performance of the system. A correlation coefficient of R(2) = 0.997 and 0.29% root-mean-square error of prediction are found for water concentration over the range of 2-19%.

  8. Liquid crystalline phthalocyanines as a self-assembling organic semiconductor for solution-processing thin film devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyake, Y.; Hori, T.; Yoshida, H.; Monobe, H.; Fujii, A.; Ozaki, M.; Shimizu, Y.

    2011-03-01

    A liquid crystalline phthalocyanine semiconductor, 1, 4, 8, 11, 15, 18, 22, 25-hexahexylphthalocyanine (C6PcH2) was studied on the drift mobility of charged carriers by a Time-Of-Flight (TOF) method. It was found that this compound exhibits an ambipolar nature for charge transport and the hole and electron mobilities were determined to be in the order of 10-1 cm2 V-1 s-1 for polydomain films of the hexagonal disordered columnar (Colhd) mesophase. This is comparable to that of the octyl homologue (C8PcH2) reported by Hanna et al. However, C6PcH2 did not show any tendency to form the homeotropic alignment between ITO-coated glass substrates, though C8PcH2 so clearly and easily does. Clear decay curves of the transient photocurrents could be obtained in TOF measurements even for polydomain films of the crystalline solid phase to give a strongly temperature-dependent mobility of holes which reaches to 1.1 cm2 V-1 s-1 at room temperature (RT) as the temperature goes down, whilst the electron mobility slightly increases to be 0.5 cm2 V-1 s-1at RT. This compound could easily form thin films by spin-coating technique with the toluene solution and a simple bulk-heterojunction thin film solar cell was fabricated to give a good performance such as 3.1 % of power conversion efficiency and > 70 % of external quantum efficiency.

  9. Microwave-assisted synthesis of anatase TiO2 nanorods with mesopores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jia Xingtao; He Wen; Zhang Xudong; Zhao Hongshi; Li Zhengmao; Feng Yingjun

    2007-01-01

    Pure anatase TiO 2 nanorods with mesopores were synthesized by a simple and low cost microwave-assisted method when tri-block copolymer was used as a structure stabilization agent and TiCl 4 as metal precursor. TEM investigation showed that larger nanorods were assembled by pearl-necklace-shaped nanorods following an oriented attachment mechanism in a specific direction. A proposed hypothetical scheme showed that the formation of lyotropic titania liquid crystal (TLC) serves a key role in the stabilization of nanorods, and the mesopores on nanorods are derived from the vacancy of inter-particles of nanorods and regions lacking inorganic precursors in the TLC structure. Control experiments showed that microwave treatment plays a key role in the maintenance of original morphologies and mesostructures free from destruction even under high temperature calcinations

  10. Microwave-assisted synthesis of anatase TiO{sub 2} nanorods with mesopores

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jia Xingtao [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Shandong Institute of Light Industry, Jinan, 250100 (China); He Wen [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Shandong Institute of Light Industry, Jinan, 250100 (China); Zhang Xudong [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Shandong Institute of Light Industry, Jinan, 250100 (China); Zhao Hongshi [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Shandong Institute of Light Industry, Jinan, 250100 (China); Li Zhengmao [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Shandong Institute of Light Industry, Jinan, 250100 (China); Feng Yingjun [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Shandong Institute of Light Industry, Jinan, 250100 (China)

    2007-02-21

    Pure anatase TiO{sub 2} nanorods with mesopores were synthesized by a simple and low cost microwave-assisted method when tri-block copolymer was used as a structure stabilization agent and TiCl{sub 4} as metal precursor. TEM investigation showed that larger nanorods were assembled by pearl-necklace-shaped nanorods following an oriented attachment mechanism in a specific direction. A proposed hypothetical scheme showed that the formation of lyotropic titania liquid crystal (TLC) serves a key role in the stabilization of nanorods, and the mesopores on nanorods are derived from the vacancy of inter-particles of nanorods and regions lacking inorganic precursors in the TLC structure. Control experiments showed that microwave treatment plays a key role in the maintenance of original morphologies and mesostructures free from destruction even under high temperature calcinations.

  11. Plasmon Modes Induced by Anisotropic Gap Opening in Au@Cu2 O Nanorods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shouren; Jiang, Ruibin; Guo, Yanzhen; Yang, Baocheng; Chen, Xiao-Lan; Wang, Jianfang; Zhao, Yufen

    2016-08-01

    Integration of semiconductors with noble metals to form heteronanostructures can give rise to many interesting plasmonic and electronic properties. A number of such heteronanostructures have been demonstrated comprising noble metals and n-type semiconductors, such as TiO2 , ZnO, SnO2 , Fe3 O4 , and CuO. In contrast, reports on heteronanostructures made of noble metals and p-type semiconductors are scarce. Cu2 O is an unintentional p-type semiconductor with unique properties. Here, the uniform coating of Cu2 O on two types of Au nanorods and systematic studies of the plasmonic properties of the resultant core-shell heteronanostructures are reported. One type of Au nanorods is prepared by seed-mediated growth, and the other is obtained by oxidation of the as-prepared Au nanorods. The (Au nanorod)@Cu2 O nanostructures produced from the as-prepared nanorods exhibit two transverse plasmon peaks, whereas those derived from the oxidized nanorods display only one transverse plasmon peak. Through electrodynamic simulations the additional transverse plasmon peak is found to originate from a discontinuous gap formed at the side of the as-prepared nanorods. The existence of the gap is verified and its formation mechanism is unraveled with additional experiments. The results will be useful for designing metal-semiconductor heteronanostructures with desired plasmonic properties and therefore also for exploring plasmon-enhanced applications in photocatalysis, solar-energy harvesting, and biotechnologies. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Photoluminescence study of CdSe nanorods embedded in a PVA matrix

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharma, Mamta [Centre of Advanced Study in Physics, Department of Physics, Panjab University, Chandigarh 160014 (India); Tripathi, S.K., E-mail: surya@pu.ac.in [Centre of Advanced Study in Physics, Department of Physics, Panjab University, Chandigarh 160014 (India)

    2013-03-15

    Nanometer-sized semiconductor CdSe nanorods have been successfully grown within polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) matrix by in situ technique. PVA:n-CdSe nanorods are characterized by X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, UV-vis spectrophotometer and photoluminescence spectroscopy. The photoluminescence spectra of PVA:n-CdSe nanorods are studied at different excitation wavelengths. PVA:n-CdSe nanorods have demonstrated to exhibit strong and well-defined green photoluminescence emission. The long-term stability of the PL properties of PVA:n-CdSe nanorods is also investigated in view of possible applications of polymer nanocomposites. The linear optical constants such as the extinction coefficient (k), real ({epsilon}{sub 1}) and imaginary ({epsilon}{sub 2}) dielectric constant, optical conductivity ({sigma}{sub opt}) are calculated for PVA:n-CdSe nanorods. The optical properties i.e. good photostability and larger stokes shift suggesting to apply PVA:n-CdSe nanorods in bioimaging applications. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer In situ synthesis of PVA:n-CdSe via chemical bath method at room temperature. {open_square} From TEM image, the three arm nanorods morphology of PVA:n-CdSe is obtained. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The optical constants i.e. n, k, {epsilon}{sub 1}, {epsilon}{sub 2} and {sigma}{sub opt} are calculated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Exhibiting green band photoemission peak at 540 nm.

  13. Growth of vertically aligned ZnO nanorods using textured ZnO films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meléndrez Manuel

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract A hydrothermal method to grow vertical-aligned ZnO nanorod arrays on ZnO films obtained by atomic layer deposition (ALD is presented. The growth of ZnO nanorods is studied as function of the crystallographic orientation of the ZnO films deposited on silicon (100 substrates. Different thicknesses of ZnO films around 40 to 180 nm were obtained and characterized before carrying out the growth process by hydrothermal methods. A textured ZnO layer with preferential direction in the normal c-axes is formed on substrates by the decomposition of diethylzinc to provide nucleation sites for vertical nanorod growth. Crystallographic orientation of the ZnO nanorods and ZnO-ALD films was determined by X-ray diffraction analysis. Composition, morphologies, length, size, and diameter of the nanorods were studied using a scanning electron microscope and energy dispersed x-ray spectroscopy analyses. In this work, it is demonstrated that crystallinity of the ZnO-ALD films plays an important role in the vertical-aligned ZnO nanorod growth. The nanorod arrays synthesized in solution had a diameter, length, density, and orientation desirable for a potential application as photosensitive materials in the manufacture of semiconductor-polymer solar cells. PACS 61.46.Hk, Nanocrystals; 61.46.Km, Structure of nanowires and nanorods; 81.07.Gf, Nanowires; 81.15.Gh, Chemical vapor deposition (including plasma-enhanced CVD, MOCVD, ALD, etc.

  14. Structural and Optical Properties of Eu Doped ZnO Nanorods prepared by Pulsed Laser Deposition

    KAUST Repository

    Alarawi, Abeer

    2014-06-23

    Nano structured wide band gap semiconductors have attracted attention of many researchers due to their potential electronic and optoelectronic applications. In this thesis, we report successful synthesis of well aligned Eu doped ZnO nano-rods prepared, for the first time to our knowledge, by pulsed laser deposition (PLD) without any catalyst. X-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns shows that these Eu doped ZnO nanorods are grown along the c-axis of ZnO wurtzite structure. We have studied the effect of the PLD growth conditions on forming vertically aligned Eu doped ZnO nanorods. The structural properties of the material are investigated using a -scanning electron microscope (SEM). The PLD parameters must be carefully controlled in order to obtain c-axis oriented ZnO nanorods on sapphire substrates, without the use of any catalyst. The experiments conducted in order to identify the optimal growth conditions confirmed that, by adjusting the target-substrate distance, substrate temperature, laser energy and deposition duration, the nanorod size could be successfully controlled. Most importantly, the results indicated that the photoluminescence (PL) properties reflect the quality of the ZnO nanorods. These parameters can change the material’s structure from one-dimensional to two-dimensional however the laser energy and frequency affect the size and the height of the nanorods; the xygen pressure changes the density of the nanorods.

  15. Large-scale syntheses of uniform ZnO nanorods and ethanol gas sensors application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Jin; Li Jin; Li Jiahui; Xiao Guoqing; Yang Xiaofeng

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: → The uniform ZnO nanorods could be synthesized by a low temperature, solution-based method. → The results showed that the sample had uniform rod-like morphology with a narrow size distribution and highly crystallinity. → Room-temperature photoluminescence spectra of these nanorods show an exciton emission around 382 nm and a weak deep level emission, indicating the nanorods have high quality. → The sensor exhibited high sensitivity and fast response to ethanol gas at a work temperature of 400 deg. C. - Abstract: Uniform ZnO nanorods with a gram scale were prepared by a low temperature and solution-based method. The samples are characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and photoluminescence (PL). The results showed that the sample had uniform rod-like morphology with a narrow size distribution and highly crystallinity. Room-temperature PL spectra of these nanorods show an exciton emission around 382 nm and a negligible deep level emission, indicating the nanorods have high quality. The gas-sensing properties of the materials have been investigated. The results indicate that the as-prepared nanorods show much better sensitivity and stability. The n-type semiconductor gas sensor exhibited high sensitivity and fast response to ethanol gas at a work temperature of 400 deg. C. ZnO nanorods are excellent potential candidates for highly sensitive gas sensors and ultraviolet laser.

  16. Tuning and synthesis of semiconductor nanostructures by mechanical compression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fan, Hongyou; Li, Binsong

    2015-11-17

    A mechanical compression method can be used to tune semiconductor nanoparticle lattice structure and synthesize new semiconductor nanostructures including nanorods, nanowires, nanosheets, and other three-dimensional interconnected structures. II-VI or IV-VI compound semiconductor nanoparticle assemblies can be used as starting materials, including CdSe, CdTe, ZnSe, ZnS, PbSe, and PbS.

  17. -core/CuO-shell heterostructure nanorod sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sunghoon; Kim, Soohyun; Sun, Gun-Joo; In Lee, Wan; Kim, Kyoung Kook; Lee, Chongmu

    2014-11-01

    TeO2-nanostructured sensors are seldom reported compared to other metal oxide semiconductor materials such as ZnO, In2O3, TiO2, Ga2O3, etc. TeO2/CuO core-shell nanorods were fabricated by thermal evaporation of Te powder followed by sputter deposition of CuO. Scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction showed that each nanorod consisted of a single crystal TeO2 core and a polycrystalline CuO shell with a thickness of approximately 7 nm. The TeO2/CuO core-shell one-dimensional (1D) nanostructures exhibited a bamboo leaf-like morphology. The core-shell nanorods were 100 to 300 nm in diameter and up to 30 μm in length. The multiple networked TeO2/CuO core-shell nanorod sensor showed responses of 142% to 425% to 0.5- to 10-ppm NO2 at 150°C. These responses were stronger than or comparable to those of many other metal oxide nanostructures, suggesting that TeO2 is also a promising sensor material. The responses of the core-shell nanorods were 1.2 to 2.1 times higher than those of pristine TeO2 nanorods over the same NO2 concentration range. The underlying mechanism for the enhanced NO2 sensing properties of the core-shell nanorod sensor can be explained by the potential barrier-controlled carrier transport mechanism.

  18. Freezing a water droplet on an aligned Si nanorod array substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, J.-G.; Zhao, Y.-P.

    2008-04-01

    When a water droplet is dried on a vertically aligned Si nanorod array surface, the nanorods are bundled together. To understand how bundles are formed, a water droplet is frozen rapidly on a Si nanorod array surface observed under a cryo-SEM (scanning electron microscope). The nanorods in the precursor film form similar bundles as those dried in air. But the nanorods under the apparent frozen water droplet are only slightly deformed. We propose that the bundling of nanorods is caused by non-uniform water-nanorod interaction, which could happen either during the water spreading or drying process. Therefore, controlling the liquid-nanostructure interaction could minimize the bundling. In addition, the rapid freezing process does not preserve the water inside the nanochannels, and almost all the water forms ice on top of the nanorod surface, either as a planar interface or as particles, depending on the locations. The separated ice-nanorod interface will have potential applications in chemical separation and crystal growth.

  19. Enhanced photocurrent and dynamic response in vertically aligned In₂S₃/Ag core/shell nanorod array photoconductive devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cansizoglu, Hilal; Cansizoglu, Mehmet F; Watanabe, Fumiya; Karabacak, Tansel

    2014-06-11

    Enhanced photocurrent values were achieved through a semiconductor-core/metal-shell nanorod array photoconductive device geometry. Vertically aligned indium sulfide (In2S3) nanorods were formed as the core by using glancing angle deposition technique (GLAD). A thin silver (Ag) layer is conformally coated around nanorods as the metallic shell through a high pressure sputter deposition method. This was followed by capping the nanorods with a metallic blanket layer of Ag film by utilizing a new small angle deposition technique combined with GLAD. Radial interface that was formed by the core/shell geometry provided an efficient charge carrier collection by shortening carrier transit times, which led to a superior photocurrent and gain. Thin metal shells around nanorods acted as a passivation layer to decrease surface states that cause prolonged carrier lifetimes and slow recovery of the photocurrent in nanorods. A combination of efficient carrier collection with surface passivation resulted in enhanced photocurrent and dynamic response at the same time in one device structure. In2S3 nanorod devices without the metal shell and with relatively thicker metal shell were also fabricated and characterized for comparison. In2S3 nanorods with thin metal shell showed the highest photosensitivity (photocurrent/dark current) response compared to two other designs. Microstructural, morphological, and electronic properties of the core/shell nanorods were used to explain the results observed.

  20. The orientation-enhancing effect of diphenyl aluminium phosphate nanorods in a liquid-crystalline epoxy matrix ordered by magnetic field

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mossety-Leszczak, B.; Strachota, Beata; Strachota, Adam; Steinhart, Miloš; Šlouf, Miroslav

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 72, November (2015), s. 238-255 ISSN 0014-3057 Institutional support: RVO:61389013 Keywords : liquid-crystalline epoxy resins * magnetic field orientation * nanocomposites Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry Impact factor: 3.485, year: 2015

  1. Spatial separation of electrons and holes for enhancing the gas-sensing property of a semiconductor: ZnO/ZnSnO3 nanorod arrays prepared by a hetero-epitaxial growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ying; Gao, Peng; Sha, Linna; Chi, Qianqian; Yang, Lei; Zhang, Jianjiao; Chen, Yujin; Zhang, Milin

    2018-04-01

    The construction of semiconductor composites is known as a powerful method used to realize the spatial separation of electrons and the holes in them, which can result in more electrons or holes and increase the dispersion of oxygen ions ({{{{O}}}2}- and O - ) (one of the most critical factors for their gas-sensing properties) on the surface of the semiconductor gas sensor. In this work, using 1D ZnO/ZnSnO3 nanoarrays as an example, which are prepared through a hetero-epitaxial growing process to construct a chemically bonded interface, the above strategy to attain a better semiconductor gas-sensing property has been realized. Compared with single ZnSnO3 nanotubes and no-matching ZnO/ZnSnO3 nanoarrays gas sensors, it has been proven by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and photoluminescence spectrum examination that the as-obtained ZnO/ZnSnO3 sensor showed a greatly increased quantity of active surface electrons with exceptional responses to trace target gases and much lower optimum working temperatures (less than about 170 °C). For example, the as-obtained ZnO/ZnSnO3 sensor exhibited an obvious response and short response/recovery time (less than 10 s) towards trace H2S gas (a detection limit down to 700 ppb). The high responses and dynamic repeatability observed in these sensors reveal that the strategy based on the as-presented electron and hole separation is reliable for improving the gas-sensing properties of semiconductors.

  2. Growth of vertically aligned ZnO nanorods using textured ZnO films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solís-Pomar, Francisco; Martínez, Eduardo; Meléndrez, Manuel F.; Pérez-Tijerina, Eduardo

    2011-09-01

    A hydrothermal method to grow vertical-aligned ZnO nanorod arrays on ZnO films obtained by atomic layer deposition (ALD) is presented. The growth of ZnO nanorods is studied as function of the crystallographic orientation of the ZnO films deposited on silicon (100) substrates. Different thicknesses of ZnO films around 40 to 180 nm were obtained and characterized before carrying out the growth process by hydrothermal methods. A textured ZnO layer with preferential direction in the normal c-axes is formed on substrates by the decomposition of diethylzinc to provide nucleation sites for vertical nanorod growth. Crystallographic orientation of the ZnO nanorods and ZnO-ALD films was determined by X-ray diffraction analysis. Composition, morphologies, length, size, and diameter of the nanorods were studied using a scanning electron microscope and energy dispersed x-ray spectroscopy analyses. In this work, it is demonstrated that crystallinity of the ZnO-ALD films plays an important role in the vertical-aligned ZnO nanorod growth. The nanorod arrays synthesized in solution had a diameter, length, density, and orientation desirable for a potential application as photosensitive materials in the manufacture of semiconductor-polymer solar cells.

  3. The structure of liquid semiconductors, superionic conductors and glasses by neutron scattering, X-ray diffraction and extended X-ray absorption fine structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buchanan, P.

    2001-09-01

    A study of the applicability of modern X-ray and neutron scattering techniques to the study of the structure of liquid semiconductors and glasses has been made. The results demonstrate how neutron scattering with isotopic substitution (NDIS), anomalous X-ray scattering and Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (EXAFS) can be successfully used to elucidate the structure of materials that cannot be studied by NDIS alone. The local coordination structure of Ag 2 Se in its room temperature, superionic and liquid phases has been determined using the EXAFS technique. This EXAFS data have been combined with previously available neutron diffraction data to provide a refinement of the structure obtained through neutron diffraction alone. The structure of GeO 2 has been determined to the full partial structure factor level using a combination of anomalous X-ray scattering and neutron diffraction measurements. The data are in good agreement with previously obtained results. The partial structure factors of P 40 Se 60 and P 50 Se 50 have been determined to the first order difference level using the anomalous X-ray diffraction technique. The structure of liquid Ga 2 Te 3 has been determined to the partial structure factor level using combined neutron diffraction with isotopic substitution (NDIS) and anomalous X-ray diffraction. The structure of liquid FeSe 2 has been determined to the first order difference level using the NDIS technique alone. The structure of liquid FeTe 2 was determined at the total structure factor level using neutron diffraction in order to estimate the effect of chalcogenide ion size on the structure. The results demonstrate the feasibility of the additional structural determination techniques for disordered materials made possible through the development of third generation X-ray synchrotron sources. (author)

  4. Observations of cavity polaritons in one-dimensional photonic crystals containing a liquid-crystalline semiconductor based on perylene bisimide units

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakata, T.; Suzuki, M.; Yamamoto, T.; Nakanishi, S.; Funahashi, M.; Tsurumachi, N.

    2017-10-01

    We investigated the optical transmission properties of one-dimensional photonic crystal (1D-PC) microcavity structures containing the liquid-crystalline (LC) perylene tetracarboxylic bisimide (PTCBI) derivative. We fabricated the microcavity structures for this study by two different methods and observed the cavity polaritons successfully in both samples. For one sample, since the PTCBI molecules were aligned in the cavity layer of the 1D-PC by utilizing a friction transfer method, vacuum Rabi splitting energy was strongly dependent on the polarization of the incident light produced by the peculiar optical features of the LC organic semiconductor. For the other sample, we did not utilize the friction transfer method and did not observe such polarization dependence. However, we did observe a relatively large Rabi splitting energy of 187 meV, probably due to the improvement of optical confinement effect.

  5. Organic Field-Effect Transistors Based on a Liquid-Crystalline Polymeric Semiconductor using SU-8 Gate Dielectrics onFlexible Substrates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kornelius Tetzner

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available In this work, the insulating properties of poly(4-vinylphenol (PVP and SU-8 (MicroChem, Westborough, MA, USA dielectrics are analyzed and compared with each other. We further investigate the performance behavior of organic field-effect transistors based on a semiconducting liquid-crystal polymer (LCP using both dielectric materials and evaluate the results regarding the processability. Due to the lower process temperature needed for the SU-8 deposition, the realization of organic transistors on flexible substrates is demonstrated showing comparable charge carrier mobilities to devices using PVP on glass. In addition, a µ-dispensing procedure of the LCP on SU-8 is presented, improving the switching behavior of the organic transistors, and the promising stability data of the SU-8/LCP stack are verified after storing the structures for 60 days in ambient air showing negligible irreversible degradation of the organic semiconductor.

  6. Quantum transport in semiconductor nanowires

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Dam, J.

    2006-01-01

    This thesis describes a series of experiments aimed at understanding the low-temperature electrical transport properties of semiconductor nanowires. The semiconductor nanowires (1-100 nm in diameter) are grown from nanoscale gold particles via a chemical process called vapor-liquid-solid (VLS)

  7. Reactive tunnel junctions in electrically driven plasmonic nanorod metamaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Pan; Krasavin, Alexey V.; Nasir, Mazhar E.; Dickson, Wayne; Zayats, Anatoly V.

    2018-02-01

    Non-equilibrium hot carriers formed near the interfaces of semiconductors or metals play a crucial role in chemical catalysis and optoelectronic processes. In addition to optical illumination, an efficient way to generate hot carriers is by excitation with tunnelling electrons. Here, we show that the generation of hot electrons makes the nanoscale tunnel junctions highly reactive and facilitates strongly confined chemical reactions that can, in turn, modulate the tunnelling processes. We designed a device containing an array of electrically driven plasmonic nanorods with up to 1011 tunnel junctions per square centimetre, which demonstrates hot-electron activation of oxidation and reduction reactions in the junctions, induced by the presence of O2 and H2 molecules, respectively. The kinetics of the reactions can be monitored in situ following the radiative decay of tunnelling-induced surface plasmons. This electrically driven plasmonic nanorod metamaterial platform can be useful for the development of nanoscale chemical and optoelectronic devices based on electron tunnelling.

  8. Semiconductor statistics

    CERN Document Server

    Blakemore, J S

    1987-01-01

    In-depth exploration of the implications of carrier populations and Fermi energies examines distribution of electrons in energy bands and impurity levels of semiconductors. Also: kinetics of semiconductors containing excess carriers, particularly in terms of trapping, excitation, and recombination.

  9. Magnetic-plasmonic multilayered nanorods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thumthan, Orathai

    Multilayered nanorods which consist of alternating magnetic layers separated by Au layers combine two distinctive properties, magnetic properties and surface plasmonic resonance (SPR) properties into one nano-entity. Their magnetic properties are tunable by changing the layer thickness, varying from single domain to superparamagnetic state. Superparamagnetic is a key requirement for magnetic nanoparticles for bioapplications. Superparamagnetic nanoparticles exhibit high magnetic moments at low applied magnetic field while retain no magnetic moments when magnetic field is removed preventing them from aggregation due to magnetic attraction. Au layers in the nanorods provide anchorage sites for functional group attachment. Also, Au nanodisks exhibit SPR properties. The SPR peak can be tuned from 540 nm to 820 nm by controlling the thickness of magnetic segments while keeping Au thickness constant. In this research, there are three types of multilayered nanorod have been fabricated: Au/NiFe nanorods, Au/Fe nanorods, and Au/Co nanorods. These magnetic nanorods were fabricated by templated electrodeposition into the channels in Anodic Aluminum Oxide (AAO) membrane. The setup for AAO fabrication was developed as a part of this research. Our fabricated AAO membrane has channels with a diameter ranging from 40nm to 80 nm and a thickness of 10um to 12um. Magnetic properties of nanorods such as saturation field, saturation moment, coercivity and remanence are able to manipulate through their shape anisotropy. The magnetization will be easier in long axis rather than short axis of particle. In addition, Au nanodisks in the nanorod structure are not only serving as anchorage sites for functional groups but also provide SPR properties. Under irradiation of light Au nanodisks strongly absorb light at SPR frequency which ranging from 540 nm to 820 nm by controlling the thickness of magnetic segments while keeping Au thickness constant. The SPR tunability of nanorods in near

  10. Semiconductor physics

    CERN Document Server

    Böer, Karl W

    2018-01-01

    This handbook gives a complete survey of the important topics and results in semiconductor physics. It addresses every fundamental principle and most research topics and areas of application in the field of semiconductor physics. Comprehensive information is provided on crystalline bulk and low-dimensional as well as amporphous semiconductors, including optical, transport, and dynamic properties.

  11. Thiourea-Modified TiO2 Nanorods with Enhanced Photocatalytic Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaofeng Wu

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Semiconductor TiO2 photocatalysis has attracted much attention due to its potential application in solving the problems of environmental pollution. In this paper, thiourea (CH4N2S modified anatase TiO2 nanorods were fabricated by calcination of the mixture of TiO2 nanorods and thiourea at 600 °C for 2 h. It was found that only N element was doped into the lattice of TiO2 nanorods. With increasing the weight ratio of thiourea to TiO2 (R from 0 to 8, the light-harvesting ability of the photocatalyst steady increases. Both the crystallization and photocatalytic activity of TiO2 nanorods increase first and then decrease with increase in R value, and R2 sample showed the highest crystallization and photocatalytic activity in degradation of Brilliant Red X3B (X3B and Rhodamine B (RhB dyes under visible light irradiation (λ > 420 nm. The increased visible-light photocatalytic activity of the prepared N-doped TiO2 nanorods is due to the synergistic effects of the enhanced crystallization, improved light-harvesting ability and reduced recombination rate of photo-generated electron-hole pairs. Note that the enhanced visible photocatalytic activity of N-doped nanorods is not based on the scarification of their UV photocatalytic activity.

  12. Thiourea-Modified TiO2 Nanorods with Enhanced Photocatalytic Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xiaofeng; Fang, Shun; Zheng, Yang; Sun, Jie; Lv, Kangle

    2016-02-01

    Semiconductor TiO2 photocatalysis has attracted much attention due to its potential application in solving the problems of environmental pollution. In this paper, thiourea (CH4N2S) modified anatase TiO2 nanorods were fabricated by calcination of the mixture of TiO2 nanorods and thiourea at 600 °C for 2 h. It was found that only N element was doped into the lattice of TiO2 nanorods. With increasing the weight ratio of thiourea to TiO2 (R) from 0 to 8, the light-harvesting ability of the photocatalyst steady increases. Both the crystallization and photocatalytic activity of TiO2 nanorods increase first and then decrease with increase in R value, and R2 sample showed the highest crystallization and photocatalytic activity in degradation of Brilliant Red X3B (X3B) and Rhodamine B (RhB) dyes under visible light irradiation (λ > 420 nm). The increased visible-light photocatalytic activity of the prepared N-doped TiO2 nanorods is due to the synergistic effects of the enhanced crystallization, improved light-harvesting ability and reduced recombination rate of photo-generated electron-hole pairs. Note that the enhanced visible photocatalytic activity of N-doped nanorods is not based on the scarification of their UV photocatalytic activity.

  13. Synthesis and characterization of metal oxide nanorod brushes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    WINTEC

    ducing chromium ions during the synthesis of alumina rods. Keywords. Metal oxide nanorods; nanorod brushes; alumina nanorods; MoO3 nanorods; ZnO nanorods; ruby nanorods. 1. Introduction. Synthesis of one-dimensional metal oxide nanostructures is getting enormous attention in recent years due to their potential ...

  14. Superior photoelectrochemical properties of ZnO nanorods/poly(3-hexylthiophene) hybrid photoanodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majumder, T.; Hmar, J. J. L.; Dhar, S.; Mondal, S. P.

    2017-06-01

    Photoelectrochemical properties of ZnO nanorods (ZnO NRs) and poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) polymer hybrid photoanodes have been studied. The hybrid photoanodes demonstrated higher photoconversion efficiency, incident photon to current conversion efficiency (IPCE) and lower interfacial resistance compared to pristine ZnO nanorods and P3HT based electrodes. The origin of superior photoelectrochemical properties of ZnO/P3HT photoanodes has been explained using carrier transport mechanism at semiconductor/electrolyte junction. The stability of ZnO NRs/P3HT photoanode has been demonstrated.

  15. Surface Chemistry of Gold Nanorods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burrows, Nathan D; Lin, Wayne; Hinman, Joshua G; Dennison, Jordan M; Vartanian, Ariane M; Abadeer, Nardine S; Grzincic, Elissa M; Jacob, Lisa M; Li, Ji; Murphy, Catherine J

    2016-10-04

    Gold nanorods have garnered a great deal of scientific interest because of their unique optical properties, and they have the potential to greatly impact many areas of science and technology. Understanding the structure and chemical makeup of their surfaces as well as how to tailor them is of paramount importance in the development of their successful applications. This Feature Article reviews the current understanding of the surface chemistry of as-synthesized gold nanorods, methods of tailoring the surface chemistry of gold nanorods with various inorganic and organic coatings/ligands, and the techniques employed to characterize ligands on the surface of gold nanorods as well as the associated measurement challenges. Specifically, we address the challenges of determining how thick the ligand shell is, how many ligands per nanorod are present on the surface, and where the ligands are located in regiospecific and mixed-ligand systems. We conclude with an outlook on the development of the surface chemistry of gold nanorods leading to the development of a synthetic nanoparticle surface chemistry toolbox analogous to that of synthetic organic chemistry and natural product synthesis.

  16. Nitride-based metal–insulator–semiconductor capacitors with liquid-phase deposition oxide and (NH4)2Sx pretreatment prepared on sapphire substrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lan, C H; Chang, S J; Hwang, J D; Lin, Y C; Cheng, Y C; Lin, W J; Lin, J C; Chang, K J

    2009-01-01

    Nitride-based metal–insulator–semiconductor (MIS) capacitors with liquid-phase deposition (LPD) oxide and (NH 4 ) 2 S x pretreatment were successfully prepared on sapphire substrates. It was found that we can significantly reduce the leakage current densities of the fabricated Al/LPD-SiO 2 /AlGaN MIS capacitors by using (NH 4 ) 2 S x treatment. Compared to the MIS capacitors without (NH 4 ) 2 S x treatment, the leakage current densities were remarkably reduced by two orders of magnitude in (NH 4 ) 2 S x -treated MIS capacitors. Capacitance–voltage measurement showed that the MIS capacitor without (NH 4 ) 2 S x treatment was rather leaky. In contrast, the flat-band voltage shift, fixed oxide charge density and interface trap density of the fabricated MIS capacitor with (NH 4 ) 2 S x treatment were much improved to be 2.01 V, 7.22 × 10 11 cm −2 and 7.19 × 10 11 cm −2 eV −1 , respectively. A related mechanism of (NH 4 ) 2 S x treatment was discussed by an x-ray photoelectron spectrometer

  17. Optical imaging and magnetophoresis of nanorods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim, Jit Kang; Tan, David X.; Lanni, Frederick; Tilton, Robert D.; Majetich, Sara A.

    2009-01-01

    Peclet number analysis is performed to probe the convective motion of nanospheres and nanorods under the influence of magnetophoresis and diffusion. Under most circumstances, magnetophoretic behaviour dominates diffusion for nanorods, as the magnetic field lines tend to align the magnetic moment along the rod axis. The synthesis and dispersion of fluorophore-tagged nanorods are described. Fluorescence microscopy is employed to image the nanorod motion in a magnetic field gradient. The preliminary experimental data are consistent with the Peclet number analysis.

  18. Properties of ZrN films as substrate masks in liquid phase epitaxial lateral overgrowth of compound semiconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dobosz, D.; Zytkiewicz, Z.R.; Jakiela, R.; Golaszewska, K.; Kaminska, E.; Piotrowska, A.; Piotrowski, T.T.; Barcz, A.

    2005-01-01

    The usefulness of ZrN films as masks for epitaxial lateral overgrowth of GaAs and GaSb by liquid phase epitaxy is studied. It was observed that during the growth process ZrN masks are mechanically stable, they adhere strongly to the substrate and do not show any signs of degradation even at the growth temperature as high as 750 C. Moreover, perfect selectivity of GaAs and GaSb epitaxy was obtained on ZrN masked substrates ensuring the growth wide and thin layers. To study the influence of growth conditions on electrical resistivity of the mask, ZrN films deposited on GaAs substrates were annealed in various atmospheres. It was found that at temperatures higher than about 580 C the ZrN masks become highly resistive when heat-treated in hydrogen flow employed during growth. Usually, LPE growth temperature for GaAs is higher. Thus, ELO growth of GaAs by LPE becomes more difficult, though still possible, if ZrN masks are to be applied as buried electrical contacts. For GaSb ELO layers however, typical LPE growth temperature is about 480 C. This allows us to grow high quality GaSb ELO layers by LPE still preserving high electrical conductivity of ZrN mask. (copyright 2005 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  19. Increasing the solar cell power output by coating with transition metal-oxide nanorods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuznetsov, I.A.; Greenfield, M.J.; Mehta, Y.U.; Merchan-Merchan, W.; Salkar, G.; Saveliev, A.V.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Nanoparticles enhance solar cell efficiency. → Solar cell power increase by nanorod coating. → Metal-oxide nanorods are prepared in flames. → Molybdenum oxide nanorods effectively scatter light on solar cell surface. → Scattering efficiency depends on coating density. -- Abstract: Photovoltaic cells produce electric current through interactions among photons from an ambient light source and electrons in the semiconductor layer of the cell. However, much of the light incident on the panel is reflected or absorbed without inducing the photovoltaic effect. Transition metal-oxide nanoparticles, an inexpensive product of a process called flame synthesis, can cause scattering of light. Scattering can redirect photon flux, increasing the fraction of light absorbed in the thin active layer of silicon solar cells. This research aims to demonstrate that the application of transition metal-oxide nanorods to the surface of silicon solar panels can enhance the power output of the panels. Several solar panels were coated with a nanoparticle-methanol suspension, and the power outputs of the panels before and after the treatment were compared. The results demonstrate an increase in power output of up to 5% after the treatment. The presence of metal-oxide nanorods on the surface of the coated solar cells is confirmed by electron microscopy.

  20. Semiconductor spintronics

    CERN Document Server

    Xia, Jianbai; Chang, Kai

    2012-01-01

    Semiconductor Spintronics, as an emerging research discipline and an important advanced field in physics, has developed quickly and obtained fruitful results in recent decades. This volume is the first monograph summarizing the physical foundation and the experimental results obtained in this field. With the culmination of the authors' extensive working experiences, this book presents the developing history of semiconductor spintronics, its basic concepts and theories, experimental results, and the prospected future development. This unique book intends to provide a systematic and modern foundation for semiconductor spintronics aimed at researchers, professors, post-doctorates, and graduate students, and to help them master the overall knowledge of spintronics.

  1. Controlled Defects of Zinc Oxide Nanorods for Efficient Visible Light Photocatalytic Degradation of Phenol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jamal Al-Sabahi

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Environmental pollution from human and industrial activities has received much attention as it adversely affects human health and bio-diversity. In this work we report efficient visible light photocatalytic degradation of phenol using supported zinc oxide (ZnO nanorods and explore the role of surface defects in ZnO on the visible light photocatalytic activity. ZnO nanorods were synthesized on glass substrates using a microwave-assisted hydrothermal process, while the surface defect states were controlled by annealing the nanorods at various temperatures and were characterized by photoluminescence and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. High performance liquid chromatography (HPLC was used for the evaluation of phenol photocatalytic degradation. ZnO nanorods with high surface defects exhibited maximum visible light photocatalytic activity, showing 50% degradation of 10 ppm phenol aqueous solution within 2.5 h, with a degradation rate almost four times higher than that of nanorods with lower surface defects. The mineralization process of phenol during degradation was also investigated, and it showed the evolution of different photocatalytic byproducts, such as benzoquinone, catechol, resorcinol and carboxylic acids, at different stages. The results from this study suggest that the presence of surface defects in ZnO nanorods is crucial for its efficient visible light photocatalytic activity, which is otherwise only active in the ultraviolet region.

  2. Survey of cryogenic semiconductor devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Talarico, L.J.; McKeever, J.W.

    1996-04-01

    Improved reliability and electronic performance can be achieved in a system operated at cryogenic temperatures because of the reduction in mechanical insult and in disruptive effects of thermal energy on electronic devices. Continuing discoveries of new superconductors with ever increasing values of T{sub c} above that of liquid nitrogen temperature (LNT) have provided incentive for developing semiconductor electronic systems that may also operate in the superconductor`s liquid nitrogen bath. Because of the interest in high-temperature superconductor (HTS) devices, liquid nitrogen is the cryogen of choice and LNT is the temperature on which this review is focused. The purpose of this survey is to locate and assemble published information comparing the room temperature (298 K), performance of commercially available conventional and hybrid semiconductor device with their performance at LNT (77K), to help establish their candidacy as cryogenic electronic devices specifically for use at LNT. The approach to gathering information for this survey included the following activities. Periodicals and proceedings were searched for information on the behavior of semiconductor devices at LNT. Telephone calls were made to representatives of semiconductor industries, to semiconductor subcontractors, to university faculty members prominent for their research in the area of cryogenic semiconductors, and to representatives of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and NASA subcontractors. The sources and contacts are listed with their responses in the introduction, and a list of references appears at the end of the survey.

  3. Tailored MoS2 nanorods: a simple microwave assisted synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reshmi, S.; Akshaya, M. V.; Satpati, Biswarup; Roy, Anupam; Basu, Palash Kumar; Bhattacharjee, K.

    2017-11-01

    We report here the synthesis of MoS2 nanostructures by a simple liquid phase exfoliation of MoS2 powder in organic solvents followed by microwave treatment. The probe sonication and the microwave treatment play an important role in rolling and curling of the MoS2 nanosheets to give rise to MoS2 spheres and rod/tube like-structures with diameter approximately 150-200 nm. The MoS2 nanorods formed in this fashion are hollow inside with a wall thickness of 15-20 nm and the length of the nanorods is found in the order of several micrometers. Synthesis of such tailored MoS2 nanorods by liquid phase exfoliation is not yet reported. Our observations suggest the 2H phase of bulk MoS2 remains preserved in the nanostructures with high crystalline quality.

  4. Schottky diodes between Bi2S3 nanorods and metal nanoparticles in a polymer matrix as hybrid bulk-heterojunction solar cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saha, Sudip K.; Pal, Amlan J.

    2015-01-01

    We report the use of metal-semiconductor Schottky junctions in a conjugated polymer matrix as solar cells. The Schottky diodes, which were formed between Bi 2 S 3 nanorods and gold nanoparticles, efficiently dissociated photogenerated excitons. The bulk-heterojunction (BHJ) devices based on such metal-semiconductor Schottky diodes in a polymer matrix therefore acted as an efficient solar cell as compared to the devices based on only the semiconductor nanorods in the polymer matrix or when gold nanoparticles were added separately to the BHJs. In the latter device, gold nanoparticles offered plasmonic enhancement due to an increased cross-section of optical absorption. We report growth and characteristics of the Schottky junctions formed through an intimate contact between Bi 2 S 3 nanorods and gold nanoparticles. We also report fabrication and characterization of BHJ solar cells based on such heterojunctions. We highlight the benefit of using metal-semiconductor Schottky diodes over only inorganic semiconductor nanorods or quantum dots in a polymer matrix in forming hybrid BHJ solar cells

  5. Macroporous Semiconductors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helmut Föll

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Pores in single crystalline semiconductors come in many forms (e.g., pore sizes from 2 nm to > 10 µm; morphologies from perfect pore crystal to fractal and exhibit many unique properties directly or as nanocompounds if the pores are filled. The various kinds of pores obtained in semiconductors like Ge, Si, III-V, and II-VI compound semiconductors are systematically reviewed, emphasizing macropores. Essentials of pore formation mechanisms will be discussed, focusing on differences and some open questions but in particular on common properties. Possible applications of porous semiconductors, including for example high explosives, high efficiency electrodes for Li ion batteries, drug delivery systems, solar cells, thermoelectric elements and many novel electronic, optical or sensor devices, will be introduced and discussed.

  6. Semiconductor heterojunctions

    CERN Document Server

    Sharma, B L

    1974-01-01

    Semiconductor Heterojunctions investigates various aspects of semiconductor heterojunctions. Topics covered include the theory of heterojunctions and their energy band profiles, electrical and optoelectronic properties, and methods of preparation. A number of heterojunction devices are also considered, from photovoltaic converters to photodiodes, transistors, and injection lasers.Comprised of eight chapters, this volume begins with an overview of the theory of heterojunctions and a discussion on abrupt isotype and anisotype heterojunctions, along with graded heterojunctions. The reader is then

  7. Growth and structure of carbide nanorods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lieber, C.M.; Wong, E.W.; Dai, H.; Maynor, B.W.; Burns, L.D.

    1996-01-01

    Recent research on the growth and structure of carbide nanorods is reviewed. Carbide nanorods have been prepared by reacting carbon nanotubes with volatile transition metal and main group oxides and halides. Using this approach it has been possible to obtain solid carbide nanorods of TiC, SiC, NbC, Fe 3 C, and BC x having diameters between 2 and 30 nm and lengths up to 20 microm. Structural studies of single crystal TiC nanorods obtained through reactions of TiO with carbon nanotubes show that the nanorods grow along both [110] and [111] directions, and that the rods can exhibit either smooth or saw-tooth morphologies. Crystalline SiC nanorods have been produced from reactions of carbon nanotubes with SiO and Si-iodine reactants. The preferred growth direction of these nanorods is [111], although at low reaction temperatures rods with [100] growth axes are also observed. The growth mechanisms leading to these novel nanomaterials have also been addressed. Temperature dependent growth studies of TiC nanorods produced using a Ti-iodine reactant have provided definitive proof for a template or topotactic growth mechanism, and furthermore, have yielded new TiC nanotube materials. Investigations of the growth of SiC nanorods show that in some cases a catalytic mechanism may also be operable. Future research directions and applications of these new carbide nanorod materials are discussed

  8. Physiological investigation of gold nanorods toward watermelon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Yujie; Li, Junli; Ren, Hongxuan; Huang, Jin; Yuan, Hong

    2014-08-01

    The objective of the present study was to evaluate the phytotoxicity and oxidant stress of the gold nanorods toward watermelon, and hence give a quantitative risk assessment of both seeds and plants phase. The seed germination, the activity of antioxidant enzymes, and the contents of soluble protein and malondialdehyde (MDA) have been measured while the plant roots were observed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). It was found that the gold nanorods significantly promoted the root elongation. Furthermore, the results on the enzymes activities of plant indicated that oxidative stress happened in the plant treated with gold nanorods. However, the gold nanorods resulted in the phytotoxicity toward plant especially at high concentration. The TEM images of the plant roots with and without the treatment of gold nanorods showed the significant different size of starch granules. In conclusion, significant physiological changes of plant occurred after treatment with the gold nanorods.

  9. Semiconductor electrochemistry

    CERN Document Server

    Memming, Rüdiger

    2015-01-01

    Providing both an introduction and an up-to-date survey of the entire field, this text captivates the reader with its clear style and inspiring, yet solid presentation. The significantly expanded second edition of this milestone work is supplemented by a completely new chapter on the hot topic of nanoparticles and includes the latest insights into the deposition of dye layers on semiconductor electrodes. In his monograph, the acknowledged expert Professor Memming primarily addresses physical and electrochemists, but materials scientists, physicists, and engineers dealing with semiconductor technology and its applications will also benefit greatly from the contents.

  10. Semiconductor statistics

    CERN Document Server

    Blakemore, J S

    1962-01-01

    Semiconductor Statistics presents statistics aimed at complementing existing books on the relationships between carrier densities and transport effects. The book is divided into two parts. Part I provides introductory material on the electron theory of solids, and then discusses carrier statistics for semiconductors in thermal equilibrium. Of course a solid cannot be in true thermodynamic equilibrium if any electrical current is passed; but when currents are reasonably small the distribution function is but little perturbed, and the carrier distribution for such a """"quasi-equilibrium"""" co

  11. Oxide semiconductors

    CERN Document Server

    Svensson, Bengt G; Jagadish, Chennupati

    2013-01-01

    Semiconductors and Semimetals has distinguished itself through the careful selection of well-known authors, editors, and contributors. Originally widely known as the ""Willardson and Beer"" Series, it has succeeded in publishing numerous landmark volumes and chapters. The series publishes timely, highly relevant volumes intended for long-term impact and reflecting the truly interdisciplinary nature of the field. The volumes in Semiconductors and Semimetals have been and will continue to be of great interest to physicists, chemists, materials scientists, and device engineers in academia, scient

  12. A self-powered nano-photodetector based on PFH/ZnO nanorods organic/inorganic heterojunction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoyun Li

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available PFH/ZnO nanorods heterojunctions were fabricated by spin-coating p-type Poly (9,9-dihexylfluorene (PFH on n-type vertically aligned ZnO nanorod arrays grown by a facile hydrothermal method on indium tin oxide (ITO transparent conductive glass. A typical p-n junction behavior was observed in the fabricated heterojunction. The current of heterojunction increases and decreases dramatically by switching the illumination on and off at zero bias, showing potential self-powered photodetector applications. The heterojunction were capable of generating negative current when illuminated under an appropriate wavelength. The photoresponse properties of the heterojunction can be tuned by the applied bias. In vacuum, the rectifying behavior disappeared, and show only simple semiconductor behavior. Band structure of the heterojunction was schematic drawn and explain the mechanism of the properties of PFH/ZnO nanorods heterojunctions.

  13. A self-powered nano-photodetector based on PFH/ZnO nanorods organic/inorganic heterojunction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaoyun; Liu, Wei; Li, Peigang; Song, Jia; An, Yuehua; Shen, Jingqin; Wang, Shunli; Guo, Daoyou

    2018-03-01

    PFH/ZnO nanorods heterojunctions were fabricated by spin-coating p-type Poly (9,9-dihexylfluorene) (PFH) on n-type vertically aligned ZnO nanorod arrays grown by a facile hydrothermal method on indium tin oxide (ITO) transparent conductive glass. A typical p-n junction behavior was observed in the fabricated heterojunction. The current of heterojunction increases and decreases dramatically by switching the illumination on and off at zero bias, showing potential self-powered photodetector applications. The heterojunction were capable of generating negative current when illuminated under an appropriate wavelength. The photoresponse properties of the heterojunction can be tuned by the applied bias. In vacuum, the rectifying behavior disappeared, and show only simple semiconductor behavior. Band structure of the heterojunction was schematic drawn and explain the mechanism of the properties of PFH/ZnO nanorods heterojunctions.

  14. Growth of High-Density Zinc Oxide Nanorods on Porous Silicon by Thermal Evaporation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nurul Izni Rusli

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The formation of high-density zinc oxide (ZnO nanorods on porous silicon (PS substrates at growth temperatures of 600–1000 °C by a simple thermal evaporation of zinc (Zn powder in the presence of oxygen (O2 gas was systematically investigated. The high-density growth of ZnO nanorods with (0002 orientation over a large area was attributed to the rough surface of PS, which provides appropriate planes to promote deposition of Zn or ZnOx seeds as nucleation sites for the subsequent growth of ZnO nanorods. The geometrical morphologies of ZnO nanorods are determined by the ZnOx seed structures, i.e., cluster or layer structures. The flower-like hexagonal-faceted ZnO nanorods grown at 600 °C seem to be generated from the sparsely distributed ZnOx nanoclusters. Vertically aligned hexagonal-faceted ZnO nanorods grown at 800 °C may be inferred from the formation of dense arrays of ZnOx clusters. The formation of disordered ZnO nanorods formed at 1000 °C may due to the formation of a ZnOx seed layer. The growth mechanism involved has been described by a combination of self-catalyzed vapor-liquid-solid (VLS and vapor-solid (VS mechanism. The results suggest that for a more precise study on the growth of ZnO nanostructures involving the introduction of seeds, the initial seed structures must be taken into account given their significant effects.

  15. Quantum dot–metallic nanorod sensors via exciton–plasmon interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hatef, Ali; Boulais, Étienne; Meunier, Michel; Sadeghi, Seyed M

    2013-01-01

    We investigate quantum nanosensors based on hybrid systems consisting of semiconductor quantum dots and metallic nanorods in the near-infrared regime. These sensors can detect biological and chemical substances based on their impact on the coherent exciton–plasmon coupling and molecular resonances supported by such systems when they interact with a laser field. We demonstrate that the ultrahigh sensitivity of such molecular resonances on environmental conditions allows dramatic and nearly instantaneous changes in the total field experienced by the semiconductor quantum dot via minuscule variations of the local refractive indices of the quantum dot or nanorod. The proposed nanosensors can utilize quantum effects to control the sense (or direction) of the changes in the quantum dot emission, allowing us to have bistable switching from dark to bright states or vice versa via adsorption (or detachment) of biomolecules. These sensors can also offer detection of ultra-small variations in the local dielectric constant of the quantum dots or metallic nanorods via coherent induction of time delays in the effective field experienced by the quantum dots when the hybrid systems interact with time-dependent laser fields. This leads to unprecedented bulk refractive index sensitivities. Our results show that one can utilize quantum phase to control the coherent exciton–plasmon dynamics in these sensors such that introduction of a biomolecule can increase or decrease the time delay. These results offer novel ways to detect single biomolecules via application of quantum coherence to convert their impact into spectacular optical events. (paper)

  16. Semiconductor Detectors; Detectores de Semiconductores

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cortina, E.

    2007-07-01

    Particle detectors based on semiconductor materials are among the few devices used for particle detection that are available to the public at large. In fact we are surrounded by them in our daily lives: they are used in photoelectric cells for opening doors, in digital photographic and video camera, and in bar code readers at supermarket cash registers. (Author)

  17. A general approach for the growth of metal oxide nanorod arrays on graphene sheets and their applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Rujia; Zhang, Zhenyu; Yu, Li; Tian, Qiwei; Chen, Zhigang; Hu, Junqing

    2011-12-02

    In the fabrication of flexible devices, highly ordered nanoscale texturing, such as semiconductor metal oxide nanorod arrays on flexible substrates, is critical for optimal performance. Use of transparent conducting films, metallic films, and polymer substrates is limited by mechanical brittleness, chemical and thermal instability, or low electrical conductivity, low melting point, and so on. A simple and general nanocrystal-seed-directed hydrothermal route has now been developed for large-scale growth of nanorod arrays of various semiconductor metal oxides (MO), including TiO(2), ZnO, MnO(2), CuO, and ZrO(2) on both sides of flexible graphene (G) sheets to form sandwichlike MO/G/MO heterostructures. The TiO(2)/G/TiO(2) heterostructures have much higher photocatalytic activity than TiO(2) nanorods, with a photocatalytic degradation rate of methylene blue that is four times faster than that of the TiO(2) nanorods, and are thus promising candidates for photocatalytic decontamination. Copyright © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Double Fano resonances in plasmon coupling nanorods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Fei; Jin, Jie

    2015-01-01

    Fano resonances are investigated in nanorods with symmetric lengths and side-by-side assembly. Single Fano resonance can be obtained by a nanorod dimer, and double Fano resonances are shown in nanorod trimers with side-by-side assembly. With transverse plasmon excitation, Fano resonances are caused by the destructive interference between a bright superradiant mode and dark subradiant modes. The bright mode originates from the electric plasmon resonance, and the dark modes originate from the magnetic resonances induced by near-field inter-rod coupling. Double Fano resonances result from double dark modes at different wavelengths, which are induced and tuned by the asymmetric gaps between the adjacent nanorods. Fano resonances show a high figure of merit and large light extinction in the periodic array of assembled nanorods, which can potentially be used in multiwavelength sensing in the visible and near-infrared regions. (paper)

  19. Fabrication and NO2 gas sensing performance of TeO2-core/CuO-shell heterostructure nanorod sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sunghoon; Kim, Soohyun; Sun, Gun-Joo; In Lee, Wan; Kim, Kyoung Kook; Lee, Chongmu

    2014-01-01

    TeO2-nanostructured sensors are seldom reported compared to other metal oxide semiconductor materials such as ZnO, In2O3, TiO2, Ga2O3, etc. TeO2/CuO core-shell nanorods were fabricated by thermal evaporation of Te powder followed by sputter deposition of CuO. Scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction showed that each nanorod consisted of a single crystal TeO2 core and a polycrystalline CuO shell with a thickness of approximately 7 nm. The TeO2/CuO core-shell one-dimensional (1D) nanostructures exhibited a bamboo leaf-like morphology. The core-shell nanorods were 100 to 300 nm in diameter and up to 30 μm in length. The multiple networked TeO2/CuO core-shell nanorod sensor showed responses of 142% to 425% to 0.5- to 10-ppm NO2 at 150°C. These responses were stronger than or comparable to those of many other metal oxide nanostructures, suggesting that TeO2 is also a promising sensor material. The responses of the core-shell nanorods were 1.2 to 2.1 times higher than those of pristine TeO2 nanorods over the same NO2 concentration range. The underlying mechanism for the enhanced NO2 sensing properties of the core-shell nanorod sensor can be explained by the potential barrier-controlled carrier transport mechanism. 61.46. + w; 07.07.Df; 73.22.-f.

  20. Semiconductor Optics

    CERN Document Server

    Klingshirn, Claus F

    2012-01-01

    This updated and enlarged new edition of Semiconductor Optics provides an introduction to and an overview of semiconductor optics from the IR through the visible to the UV, including linear and nonlinear optical properties, dynamics, magneto and electrooptics, high-excitation effects and laser processes, some applications, experimental techniques and group theory. The mathematics is kept as elementary as possible, sufficient for an intuitive understanding of the experimental results and techniques treated. The subjects covered extend from physics to materials science and optoelectronics. Significantly updated chapters add coverage of current topics such as electron hole plasma, Bose condensation of excitons and meta materials. Over 120 problems, chapter introductions and a detailed index make it the key textbook for graduate students in physics. The mathematics is kept as elementary as possible, sufficient for an intuitive understanding of the experimental results and techniques treated. The subjects covered ...

  1. Semiconductor sensors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hartmann, Frank

    2011-01-01

    Semiconductor sensors have been around since the 1950s and today, every high energy physics experiment has one in its repertoire. In Lepton as well as Hadron colliders, silicon vertex and tracking detectors led to the most amazing physics and will continue doing so in the future. This contribution tries to depict the history of these devices exemplarily without being able to honor all important developments and installations. The current understanding of radiation damage mechanisms and recent R and D topics demonstrating the future challenges and possible technical solutions for the SLHC detectors are presented. Consequently semiconductor sensor candidates for an LHC upgrade and a future linear collider are also briefly introduced. The work presented here is a collage of the work of many individual silicon experts spread over several collaborations across the world.

  2. Semiconductor annealing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Young, J.M.; Scovell, P.D.

    1982-01-01

    A process for annealing crystal damage in ion implanted semiconductor devices in which the device is rapidly heated to a temperature between 450 and 900 0 C and allowed to cool. It has been found that such heating of the device to these relatively low temperatures results in rapid annealing. In one application the device may be heated on a graphite element mounted between electrodes in an inert atmosphere in a chamber. (author)

  3. Preparation and characterization of semiconductor thin film cells of n-CdSe and CdSel-x Tex. Application in solar cells of liquid union

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gutierrez, M.A.

    1987-01-01

    The development of the new energy sources, constitutes one of the most active and changing investigation areas of nowday. Within this frame, the conservation of photovoltaic solar energy, has taken a particular importance, as these systems become directly the photovoltaic solar energy, which incises on a semiconductor, in electric energy. In spite of this advantage, the use of photovoltaic systems is limited, being the main reason for this, the still high cost of the devices. One of the objectives of this Memory is to contribute to the reduction of these photovoltaic devices by using available methods for the preparation of photosensitive material, and for the union formation. The chosen preparation method is the electrochemical one and the electric field is made up in the interphase semiconductor/electrolyte, dipping the semiconductor in a convenient electrolyte. Summarizing, it can be said that the Memory's objetive presented is to discover the experiences realized in the electrochemical preparation of the n-CdSel-x Tex and its characterization by chemical analysis, X-rays difraction, electronic microscope of swept, optical techniques and photoelectrochemical methods. From the data obtained with these techniques, a study of the physical parameters evolution which determine the photovoltaic properties of the semiconductor, is made, as: the concentration of minoritary carriers, ND, and the diffusion length of these carriers, LP. Finally, taking into account the results obtained by the characterization of n-CdSe and CdSel-x Tex, is made from the construction of the photoelectrochemical cell, using two kinds of electrolyte: sulfide- polysulfide ands ferro-ferricyanide. (Author)

  4. Low-temperature hydrothermal synthesis of ZnO nanorods: Effects of zinc salt concentration, various solvents and alkaline mineralizers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edalati, Khatereh, E-mail: kh_ed834@stu.um.ac.ir [Department of Metallurgical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Ferdowsi University of Mashhad (FUM) Campus, Azadi Sq., Mashhad, Khorasan Razavi (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Shakiba, Atefeh [Department of Material Science and Metallurgy, Amirkabir University of Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Vahdati-Khaki, Jalil; Zebarjad, Seyed Mojtaba [Department of Metallurgical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Ferdowsi University of Mashhad (FUM) Campus, Azadi Sq., Mashhad, Khorasan Razavi (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2016-02-15

    Highlights: • We synthesized ZnO nanorods by a simple hydrothermal process at 60 °C. • Effects of zinc salt concentration, solvent and alkaline mineralizer was studied. • Increasing concentration of zinc salt changed ZnO nucleation system. • NaOH yielded better results in the production of nanorods in both solvents. • Methanol performed better in the formation of nanorods using the two mineralizers. - Abstract: ZnO has been produced using various methods in the solid, gaseous, and liquid states, and the hydrothermal synthesis at low temperatures has been shown to be an environmentally-friendly one. The current work utilizes a low reaction temperature (60 °C) for the simple hydrothermal synthesis of ZnO nanorod morphologies. Furthermore, the effects of zinc salt concentration, solvent type and alkaline mineralizer type on ZnO nanorods synthesis at a low reaction temperature by hydrothermal processing was studied. Obtained samples were analyzed using X-ray powder diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Increasing the concentration of the starting zinc salt from 0.02 to 0.2 M changed ZnO nucleation system from the homogeneous to the heterogeneous state. The XRD results confirmed the production hexagonal ZnO nanostructures of with a crystallite size of 40.4 nm. Varying the experimental parameters (mineralizer and solvent) yielded ZnO nanorods with diameters ranging from 90–250 nm and lengths of 1–2 μm.

  5. Iron oxyhydroxide nanorods with high electrochemical reactivity as a sensitive and rapid determination platform for 4-chlorophenol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Yuanyuan [Key Laboratory for Material Chemistry of Energy Conversion and Storage, Ministry of Education, School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China); Britton Chance Center for Biomedical Photonics at Wuhan, National Laboratory for Optoelectronics-Hubei Bioinformatics & Molecular Imaging Key Laboratory, Systems Biology Theme, Department of Biomedical Engineering, College of Life Science and Technology, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China); Cheng, Qin; Zheng, Meng [Key Laboratory for Material Chemistry of Energy Conversion and Storage, Ministry of Education, School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China); Liu, Xin [Britton Chance Center for Biomedical Photonics at Wuhan, National Laboratory for Optoelectronics-Hubei Bioinformatics & Molecular Imaging Key Laboratory, Systems Biology Theme, Department of Biomedical Engineering, College of Life Science and Technology, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China); Wu, Kangbing, E-mail: kbwu@hust.edu.cn [Key Laboratory for Material Chemistry of Energy Conversion and Storage, Ministry of Education, School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China)

    2016-04-15

    Highlights: • Prepared FeOOH nanorods exhibited high reactivity toward the oxidation of 4-CP. • Response signals and detection sensitivity of 4-CP increased greatly by FeOOH. • Highly-sensitive and rapid determination platform was developed for 4-CP. • Practical application in water samples was studied, and the accuracy was good. - Abstract: Iron oxyhydroxide (FeOOH) nanorods were prepared through solvothermal reaction, and characterized using Raman spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. Thereafter, the prepared FeOOH nanorods were used as sensing material to construct a novel detection platform for 4-chlorophenol (4-CP). The electrochemical behaviors of 4-CP were studied, and the oxidation peak currents increased greatly on the surface of FeOOH nanorods. The signal enhancement mechanism was studied for 4-CP, and it was found that the prepared FeOOH nanorods remarkably improved the electron transfer ability and surface adsorption efficiency of 4-CP. The influences of pH value, amount of FeOOH nanorods and accumulation time were examined. As a result, a highly-sensitive electrochemical method was developed for the rapid determination of 4-CP. The linear range was from 10 to 500 nM, and the detection limit was 3.2 nM. It was used in different water samples, and the results consisted with the values that obtained by high-performance liquid chromatography.

  6. Low-dimensional II-VI oxide-based semiconductor nanostructure photodetectors for light sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Jae Su; Ko, Yeong Hwan; Nagaraju, Goli

    2015-01-01

    Low-dimensional II-VI oxide-based semiconductor nanostructure photodetectors for light sensing are described. Depending on the absorption edge and energy bandgap of the nanostructured materials, the detection wavelength range can be controlled. The physical properties of the fabricated nanostructures are investigated. The p-n junction property of n-ZnO and p-CuO nanostructures is obtained. This growth of the ZnO nanorod arrays on CuO nanostructures may be useful for photodetection applications. The NiO/ZnO nanostructures are also synthesized. Metal-semiconductor-metal (MSM) type photodetectors are fabricated by integrating the oxide-based (i.e., ZnO and CuO) semiconductor nanostructures. Using the solution-based ZnO seed layer, the UV MSM type photodetectors with the vertically-aligned ZnO nanorod arrays are also fabricated. Their photoresponse characteristics are evaluated in a specific spectral range.

  7. Semiconductor annealing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Young, J.M.; Scovell, P.D.

    1981-01-01

    A process for annealing crystal damage in ion implanted semiconductor devices is described in which the device is rapidly heated to a temperature between 450 and 600 0 C and allowed to cool. It has been found that such heating of the device to these relatively low temperatures results in rapid annealing. In one application the device may be heated on a graphite element mounted between electrodes in an inert atmosphere in a chamber. The process may be enhanced by the application of optical radiation from a Xenon lamp. (author)

  8. Magnetic semiconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bihler, Christoph

    2009-04-15

    In this thesis we investigated in detail the properties of Ga{sub 1-x}Mn{sub x}As, Ga{sub 1-x}Mn{sub x}P, and Ga{sub 1-x}Mn{sub x}N dilute magnetic semiconductor thin films with a focus on the magnetic anisotropy and the changes of their properties upon hydrogenation. We applied two complementary spectroscopic techniques to address the position of H in magnetic semiconductors: (i) Electron paramagnetic resonance, which provides direct information on the symmetry of the crystal field of the Mn{sup 2+} atoms and (ii) x-ray absorption fine structure analysis which allows to probe the local crystallographic neighborhood of the absorbing Mn atom via analysing the fine structure at the Mn K absorption edge. Finally, we discussed the obstacles that have to be overcome to achieve Curie temperatures above the current maximum in Ga{sub 1-x}Mn{sub x}As of 185 K. Here, we outlined in detail the generic problem of the formation of precipitates at the example of Ge:MN. (orig.)

  9. Power semiconductors

    CERN Document Server

    Kubát, M

    1984-01-01

    The book contains a summary of our knowledge of power semiconductor structures. It presents first a short historic introduction (Chap. I) as well as a brief selection of facts from solid state physics, in particular those related to power semiconductors (Chap. 2). The book deals with diode structures in Chap. 3. In addition to fundamental facts in pn-junction theory, the book covers mainly the important processes of power structures. It describes the emitter efficiency and function of microleaks (shunts). the p +p and n + n junctions, and in particular the recent theory of the pin, pvn and p1tn junctions, whose role appears to be decisive for the forward mode not only of diode structures but also of more complex ones. For power diode structures the reverse mode is the decisive factor in pn-junction breakdown theory. The presentation given here uses engineering features (the multiplication factor M and the experimentally detected laws for the volume and surface of crystals), which condenses the presentation an...

  10. Monodispersed fabrication and dielectric studies on ethylenediamine passivated α-manganese dioxide nanorods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joseph, A. Martin [Research and Development Centre, Bharathiar University, Coimbatore, Tamilnadu (India); Kumar, R. Thilak, E-mail: manojthilak@yahoo.com [Periyar Arts College, Cuddalore-607001, Tamilnadu (India)

    2016-09-15

    Highlights: • Monodispersed ethylenediamine (EDA) passivated α-MnO{sub 2} nanorods were fabricated by inexpensive wet chemical method. • FTIR analysis indicated that surface passivation is strongly influenced by the introduction of the organic ligand. • XRD and HR-SEM revealed the structure and morphology of the fabricated α-MnO{sub 2} nanorods with an average size of about 40 × 200 nm. • Dielectric studies pointed out that the fabricated α-MnO{sub 2} is semiconducting in nature with resistivity, ρ = 1.46 to 5.76 × 10{sup 3} Ωcm. • The optical energy gap for the fabricated α-MnO{sub 2} nanorods is found to be around 1.37 eV. - Abstract: In this present work, pure α-MnO{sub 2} nanorods were fabricated by the reduction of 0.2 m/L of KMnO{sub 4} with 0.2 m/L of Na{sub 2}S{sub 2}O{sub 3}·5H{sub 2}O and by passivating with the organic ligand Ethylenediamine (EDA). The structural, functional, morphological and chemical composition of the nanorods were investigated by X-Ray Diffractometer (XRD), Fourier Transform Infrared Spectrometer (FTIR), High Resolution Scanning Electron Microscope (HR-SEM) and Energy Dispersive X-Ray Spectrometry (EDX). The XRD analysis indicated high crystalline nature of the product and FTIR confirmed the contribution of the organic ligand in surface passivation. HR-SEM image revealed the morphology of the α-MnO{sub 2} nanorods with an average size of about 40 × 200 nm. EDX confirmed the presence of Mn and O in the material. UV–visible spectrophotometery was used to determine the absorption behavior of the nanorods and an indirect band gap of 1.37 eV was acquired by Taucplot. Dielectric studies were carried out using Broadband Dielectric Spectrometer(BDS) and the resistivity was found to be around the semiconductor range (ρ = 1.46 to 5.76 × 10{sup 3} Ωcm).

  11. Strain-induced optical absorption properties of semiconductor nanocrystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ai; Luo, Sheng; Ouyang, Gang; Yang, Guowei

    2013-06-28

    As comparable to the spherical nanocrystals, the nanocrystals with non-spherical shape have fascinating properties induced by a large fraction of under-coordinated atoms located at end parts, including edges, vertexes, and side facets. Herein, taking into account the shell-core configuration of semiconductor nanospheres, nanocubes, and nanorods, we investigate the self-equilibrium strain on optical absorption properties from the perspective of atomistic origin. It has been found that the band gap of nanocrystals exhibits a pronounced blueshift compared with that of the bulk counterpart, and further shown that the band gap of nanospheres is different from that of naoncubes and nanorods. Moreover, we demonstrate that the shape effects have weak influences on the absorption coefficient when the crystal size approaches to a threshold value that is much smaller than the exciton Bohr radius at short wavelengths. Remarkably, the nanocubes have the largest deformation potential compared to the nanorods and nanospheres at fixed strain. The physical origin can be ascribed to the self-equilibrium strain induced by end effects that changes the bonding identifies, which leads to the variations of cohesive energy and entire Hamiltonian of nanocrystals. Our theoretical predictions not only are consistent with the experimental measurements and simulations, but also indicate the possible method on tunable optical properties of semiconductor nanocrystals.

  12. Semiconductor Laser Measurements Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Semiconductor Laser Measurements Laboratory is equipped to investigate and characterize the lasing properties of semiconductor diode lasers. Lasing features such...

  13. Building Structural Complexity in Semiconductor Nanocrystals through Chemical Transformations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sadtler, Bryce F [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2009-05-01

    Methods are presented for synthesizing nanocrystal heterostructures comprised of two semiconductor materials epitaxially attached within individual nanostructures. The chemical transformation of cation exchange, where the cations within the lattice of an ionic nanocrystal are replaced with a different metal ion species, is used to alter the chemical composition at specific regions ofa nanocrystal. Partial cation exchange was performed in cadmium sulfide (CdS) nanorods of well-defined size and shape to examine the spatial organization of materials within the resulting nanocrystal heterostructures. The selectivity for cation exchange to take place at different facets of the nanocrystal plays an important role in determining the resulting morphology of the binary heterostructure. The exchange of copper (I) (Cu+) cations in CdS nanorods occurs preferentially at the ends of the nanorods. Theoretical modeling of epitaxial attachments between different facets of CdS and Cu2S indicate that the selectivity for cation exchange at the ends of the nanorods is a result of the low formation energy of the interfaces produced. During silver (I) (Ag+) cation exchange in CdS nanorods, non-selective nucleation of silver sulfide (Ag2S), followed by partial phase segregation leads to significant changes in the spatial arrangement of CdS and Ag2S regions at the exchange reaction proceeds through the nanocrystal. A well-ordered striped pattern of alternating CdS and Ag2S segments is found at intermediate fractions of exchange. The forces mediating this spontaneous process are a combination of Ostwald ripening to reduce the interfacial area along with a strain-induced repulsive interaction between Ag2S segments. To elucidate why Cu+ and Ag+ cation exchange with CdS nanorods produce different morphologies, models for epitaxial attachments between various facets of CdS with Cu2S or

  14. Controlled growth of semiconductor crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourret-Courchesne, Edith D.

    1992-01-01

    A method for growth of III-V, II-VI and related semiconductor single crystals that suppresses random nucleation and sticking of the semiconductor melt at the crucible walls. Small pieces of an oxide of boron B.sub.x O.sub.y are dispersed throughout the comminuted solid semiconductor charge in the crucible, with the oxide of boron preferably having water content of at least 600 ppm. The crucible temperature is first raised to a temperature greater than the melt temperature T.sub.m1 of the oxide of boron (T.sub.m1 =723.degree. K. for boron oxide B.sub.2 O.sub.3), and the oxide of boron is allowed to melt and form a reasonably uniform liquid layer between the crucible walls and bottom surfaces and the still-solid semiconductor charge. The temperature is then raised to approximately the melt temperature T.sub.m2 of the semiconductor charge material, and crystal growth proceeds by a liquid encapsulated, vertical gradient freeze process. About half of the crystals grown have a dislocation density of less than 1000/cm.sup.2. If the oxide of boron has water content less than 600 ppm, the crucible material should include boron nitride, a layer of the inner surface of the crucible should be oxidized before the oxide of boron in the crucible charge is melted, and the sum of thicknesses of the solid boron oxide layer and liquid boron oxide layer should be at least 50 .mu.m.

  15. Biaxially Oriented CdSe Nanorod

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Breiby, Dag W.; Chin, Patrick T.K.; Andreasen, Jens Wenzel

    2009-01-01

    The shape, structure, and orientation of rubbing-aligned cadmium selenide (CdSe) nanorods on polymer coated glass substrates have been studied using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and grazing incidence X-ray scattering combined with computer simulations. The nanorods are found to be of wu......The shape, structure, and orientation of rubbing-aligned cadmium selenide (CdSe) nanorods on polymer coated glass substrates have been studied using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and grazing incidence X-ray scattering combined with computer simulations. The nanorods are found...... of the sample. Some tendency of smectic-A ordering is observed. A quantitative model incorporating atomic structure, rod shape, and preferred orientation was developed for numerically simulating the diffraction peak positions, widths, and intensities, giving good correlation with the experimental observations....

  16. (Plasmonic Metal Core)/(Semiconductor Shell) Nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Caihong

    shape is maintained throughout the sulfidation process, with the edge length being increased gradually. TiO2 is one of the most important semiconductors that are employed in light-harvesting applications. It has been extensively studied for a variety of applications by virtue of its low toxicity, biological compatibility, chemical and thermal stability, resistance to photocorrosion, and relative abundance. However, the photocatalytic activity of TiO2 is limited to the UV region because of its wide band gap, which limits its applications in light harvesting. Although (Au core)/(TiO2 shell) nanostructures can improve the photocatalytic activities of TiO2 in visible light, it has only been demonstrated in a few experiments and has been limited with Au nanospheres. Compared with Au nanospheres, Au nanorods offer more attractive plasmonic features, including stronger electric field enhancements and synthetically tunable longitudinal plasmon wavelengths over the visible to near-infrared region. The coating of Au nanorod therefore can largely improve light harvesting capability of TiO2. In this thesis, I developed a facile and versatile method for the preparation of (Au nanocrystal core)/(TiO2 shell) nanostructures by using a Ti(III) compound as the titania precursor. By employing Au nanorods with different sizes and varying the shell thickness, the plasmonic bands of the core/shell nanostructures can be tailored. TiO2 can also be grown on other monometallic and bimetallic Pd, Pt, Au nanocrystals. As a proof-of-concept application, (Au nanorod core)/(TiO2 shell) nanostructures were utilized in dye-sensitized solar cells to function as a scattering layer. The resultant solar cells exhibited higher power conversion efficiencies with a thinner thickness compared to the traditional TiO 2 solar cells. In addition, I also examined the property of plasmon-enhanced reactive oxygen species generation. Moreover, the TiO2 shell with a high refractive index can efficiently couple with the

  17. Fibre-Optic Semiconductor Temperature Gage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, M.

    1982-01-01

    "Safe" temperature gage for explosive liquids is based on optical transmission. Semiconductor crystal inserted between input and output optical fibers is temperature-sensing element in a new approach to measuring temperature of cryogens. Since no electrical components are immersed in liquid, new sensor minimizes danger of electrically ignited explosions in hazardous cryogens such as oxygen and hydrogen. Gage also useful for handling noncryogenic liquids in aircraft, automobiles, boats and water tanks.

  18. Efficient Carrier Multiplication in Colloidal Silicon Nanorods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stolle, Carl Jackson; Lu, Xiaotang; Yu, Yixuan; Schaller, Richard D; Korgel, Brian A

    2017-09-13

    Auger recombination lifetimes, absorption cross sections, and the quantum yields of carrier multiplication (CM), or multiexciton generation (MEG), were determined for solvent-dispersed silicon (Si) nanorods using transient absorption spectroscopy (TAS). Nanorods with an average diameter of 7.5 nm and aspect ratios of 6.1, 19.3, and 33.2 were examined. Colloidal Si nanocrystals of similar diameters were also studied for comparison. The nanocrystals and nanorods were passivated with organic ligands by hydrosilylation to prevent surface oxidation and limit the effects of surface trapping of photoexcited carriers. All samples used in the study exhibited relatively efficient photoluminescence. The Auger lifetimes increased with nanorod length, and the nanorods exhibited higher CM quantum yield and efficiency than the nanocrystals with a similar band gap energy E g . Beyond a critical length, the CM quantum yield decreases. Nanorods with the aspect ratio of 19.3 had the highest CM quantum yield of 1.6 ± 0.2 at 2.9E g , which corresponded to a multiexciton yield that was twice as high as observed for the spherical nanocrystals.

  19. Nitrogen-monoxide gas-sensing properties of transparent p-type copper-oxide nanorod arrays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Soojeong; Kim, Hyojin; Kim, Dojin [Chungnam National University, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-01-15

    We report the nitrogen-monoxide (NO) gas-sensing properties of transparent p-type copper-oxide (CuO) nanorod arrays synthesized by using the hydrothermal method with a CuO nanoparticle seed layer deposited on a glass substrate via sputtering process. We synthesized polycrystalline CuO nanorods measuring 200 to 300 nm in length and 20 to 30 nm in diameter for three controlled molarity ratios of 1:1, 1:2 and 1:4 between copper nitrate trihydrate [Cu(NO{sub 2}){sub 2}·3H{sub 2}O] and hexamethylenetetramine (C{sub 6}H{sub 12}N{sub 4}). The crystal structures and morphologies of the synthesized CuO nanorod arrays were examined using grazing incidence X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy. The gas-sensing measurements for NO gas in dry air indicated that the CuO nanorodarray-based gas sensors synthesized under hydrothermal condition at a molarity ratio of 1:2 showed the best gas sensing response to NO gas. These CuO nanorod-array gas sensors exhibited a highly sensitive response to NO gas, with a maximum sensitivity of about 650% for 10 ppm NO in dry air at an operating temperature of 100 .deg. C. These transparent p-type CuO nanorod-array gas sensors have shown a reversible and reliable response to NO gas over a range of operating temperatures. These results indicate certain potential use of p-type oxide semiconductor CuO nanorods as sensing materials for several types of gas sensors, including p - n junction gas sensors.

  20. Methods of making functionalized nanorods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gur, Ilan [San Francisco, CA; Milliron, Delia [Berkeley, CA; Alivisatos, A Paul [Oakland, CA; Liu, Haitao [Berkeley, CA

    2012-01-10

    A process for forming functionalized nanorods. The process includes providing a substrate, modifying the substrate by depositing a self-assembled monolayer of a bi-functional molecule on the substrate, wherein the monolayer is chosen such that one side of the bi-functional molecule binds to the substrate surface and the other side shows an independent affinity for binding to a nanocrystal surface, so as to form a modified substrate. The process further includes contacting the modified substrate with a solution containing nanocrystal colloids, forming a bound monolayer of nanocrystals on the substrate surface, depositing a polymer layer over the monolayer of nanocrystals to partially cover the monolayer of nanocrystals, so as to leave a layer of exposed nanocrystals, functionalizing the exposed nanocrystals, to form functionalized nanocrystals, and then releasing the functionalized nanocrystals from the substrate.

  1. In vitro toxicity studies of polymer-coated gold nanorods

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rayavarapu, R.G.; Petersen, Wilhelmina; Hartsuiker, Liesbeth; Chin, Patrick; Janssen, Hans; van Leeuwen, F.W.B.; Otto, Cornelis; Manohar, Srirang; van Leeuwen, Ton

    2010-01-01

    We evaluated cellular responses to polymer-treated gold nanorods, which were synthesized using the standard wet-chemistry method that utilizes hexadecyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB). The nanorod dispersions were coated with either polystyrene sulfonate (PSS) or polyethylene glycol (PEG). Two

  2. In Situ Growth of In2S3 Nanorods in Poly(3-Hexylthiophene) Hybrid Films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cota-Leal, M.; Sotelo-Lerma, M.; Corona-Corona, I.; Quevedo-Lopez, M. A.

    2016-04-01

    A novel and efficient gas-liquid method for the in situ synthesis of In2S3 nanorods in a poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) matrix is demonstrated. The method involves a self-contained reaction between Na2S and HCl that produces H2S, which reacts with a P3HT/InCl3 solution resulting in hybrid P3HT/In2S3 films. The Na2S solution is regenerated for further use. The method yielded results in In2S3 nanoparticles and nanorods in a P3HT matrix, as observed by transmission electron microscopy. The In2S3 nanorods are 3 nm wide and ~30 nm long. The size of the nanorods is dependent on the P3HT concentration. The band gap (E g) of the resulting In2S3/P3HT is in the range of 2.97-3.71 eV, as measured by UV-visible spectroscopy (UV-Vis) Charge transfer in the In2S3/P3HT was demonstrated by the presence of quenching in the fluorescence spectra of the composite. Chemical composition was investigated by energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy analysis, as well as x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Both techniques demonstrated the formation of In2S3.

  3. Self-Healing Thermal Annealing: Surface Morphological Restructuring Control of GaN Nanorods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Conroy, Michele; Li, Haoning; Zubialevich, Vitaly Z.; Kusch, Gunnar; Schmidt, Michael; Collins, Timothy; Glynn, Colm; Martin, Robert W.; O’Dwyer, Colm; Morris, Michael D.; Holmes, Justin D.; Parbrook, Peter J.

    2016-12-07

    With advances in nanolithography and dry etching, top-down methods of nanostructuring have become a widely used tool for improving the efficiency of optoelectronics. These nano dimensions can offer various benefits to the device performance in terms of light extraction and efficiency, but often at the expense of emission color quality. Broadening of the target emission peak and unwanted yellow luminescence are characteristic defect-related effects due to the ion beam etching damage, particularly for III–N based materials. In this article we focus on GaN based nanorods, showing that through thermal annealing the surface roughness and deformities of the crystal structure can be “self-healed”. Correlative electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy show the change from spherical nanorods to faceted hexagonal structures, revealing the temperature-dependent surface morphology faceting evolution. The faceted nanorods were shown to be strain- and defect-free by cathodoluminescence hyperspectral imaging, micro-Raman, and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). In-situ TEM thermal annealing experiments allowed for real time observation of dislocation movements and surface restructuring observed in ex-situ annealing TEM sampling. This thermal annealing investigation gives new insight into the redistribution path of GaN material and dislocation movement post growth, allowing for improved understanding and in turn advances in optoelectronic device processing of compound semiconductors.

  4. New trend for synthesizing of magnetic nanorods with titanomaghemite structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saber, Osama, E-mail: osmohamed@kfu.edu.sa [Faculty of Science, King Faisal University, P.O. Box 400, Al-Hassa 31982 (Saudi Arabia); Egyptian Petroleum Research Institute, Nasr City, P.O. Box 11727, Cairo (Egypt)

    2016-07-15

    This research aims at developing magnetic and optical materials through fabrication of uniform nanorods by facile and novel technique. In this trend, titanium and iron were successfully combined together forming nanorods without template or high temperature by urea hydrolysis. TEM images showed uniform and homogeneous nanorods with dimensions; 10 nm in width and 50 nm in length. In the same time, fine nanoparticles were observed around the nanorods. With further treatment for the nanorods at high temperature and pressure, FESEM images revealed that the dimensions of the rods slightly increased to be 70 nm in length and 12 nm in width with a complete disappearance of the nanoparticles. Using X-ray diffraction, thermal analyses and infrared spectra in addition to the results of the electron microscopy, the oriented attachment mechanism was suggested for the formation of titanium iron oxides nanorods. The magnetic measurements revealed that the prepared nanorods possess ferromagnetic behavior and exhibit high saturation magnetization. Also, the optical properties showed that the nanorods have high absorption in the visible region and possess low band gap energy. Finally, we concluded that it is probably the first time to prepare nanorods by urea hydrolysis. The advanced optical and magnetic properties give the prepared nanorods relevance to use as building blocks in functional nanoscale devices. - Graphical abstract: The present study has a dual aim for developing new and facile method for fabrication of nanorods containing titanomaghemite structure and improving their optical and magnetic properties - Highlights: • Synthesis of titanium iron oxides nanorods with titanomaghemite structure. • Using urea hydrolysis for preparation of nanorods. • Studying of the effect of pressure and temperature on the nanorods. • Enhancement of the magnetic properties of the nanorods in comparison with the nanoparticles. • Improvement of the optical properties of the nanorods

  5. Sensing based on the motion of enzyme-modified nanorods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bunea, Ada-Ioana; Pavel, Ileana-Alexandra; David, Sorin

    2015-01-01

    of nanorods modified with the appropriate enzyme. Nanorods, with a Pt and a polypyrrole (PPy) segment, were fabricated. The PPy segment of such nanorods was then modified with glucose oxidase (GOx), glutamate oxidase (GluOx), or xanthine oxidase (XOD). Calibration curves, linking the diffusion coefficient...

  6. Plasmonic and Magnetically Responsive Gold ShellMagnetic Nanorod Hybrids

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-10

    ARL-TR-8182 ● OCT 2017 US Army Research Laboratory Plasmonic and Magnetically Responsive Gold Shell– Magnetic Nanorod Hybrids...Army Research Laboratory Plasmonic and Magnetically Responsive Gold Shell– Magnetic Nanorod Hybrids by Mackenzie G Williams, Devon A Boyne, and...TITLE AND SUBTITLE Plasmonic and Magnetically Responsive Gold Shell– Magnetic Nanorod Hybrids 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c

  7. Semiconductor nanostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marstein Erik Stensrud

    2003-07-01

    This thesis presents a study of two material systems containing semiconductor nanocrystals, namely porous silicon (PSi) films and germanium (Ge) nanocrystals embedded in silicon dioxide (SiO2) films. The PSi films were made by anodic etching of silicon (Si) substrates in an electrolyte containing hydrofluoric acid. The PSi films were doped with erbium (Er) using two different doping methods. electrochemical doping and doping by immersing the PSi films in a solution containing Er. The resulting Er concentration profiles were investigated using scanning electron microscopy (SEN1) combined with energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDS). The main subject of the work on PSi presented in this thesis was investigating and comparing these two doping methods. Ge nanocrystals were made by implanting Ge ions into Si02 films that were subsequently annealed. However. nanocrystal formation occurred only for certain sets of processing parameters. The dependence of the microstructure of the Ge implanted Si02 films on the processing parameters were therefore investigated. A range of methods were employed for these investigations, including transmission electron microscopy (TEM) combined with EDS, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS). The observed structures, ranging from Ge nanocrystals to voids with diameters of several tens of nanometers and Ge rich Si02 films without any nanocrystals is described. A model explaining the void formation is also presented. For certain sets of processing parameters. An accumulation of Ge at the Si-Si02 interface was observed. The effect of this accumulation on the electrical properties of MOS structures made from Ge implanted SiO2 films was investigated using CV-measurements. (Author)

  8. Growth process for gallium nitride porous nanorods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wildeson, Isaac Harshman; Sands, Timothy David

    2015-03-24

    A GaN nanorod and formation method. Formation includes providing a substrate having a GaN film, depositing SiN.sub.x on the GaN film, etching a growth opening through the SiN.sub.x and into the GaN film, growing a GaN nanorod through the growth opening, the nanorod having a nanopore running substantially through its centerline. Focused ion beam etching can be used. The growing can be done using organometallic vapor phase epitaxy. The nanopore diameter can be controlled using the growth opening diameter or the growing step duration. The GaN nanorods can be removed from the substrate. The SiN.sub.x layer can be removed after the growing step. A SiO.sub.x template can be formed on the GaN film and the GaN can be grown to cover the SiO.sub.x template before depositing SiN.sub.x on the GaN film. The SiO.sub.x template can be removed after growing the nanorods.

  9. Hydroquinone Based Synthesis of Gold Nanorods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picciolini, Silvia; Mehn, Dora; Ojea-Jiménez, Isaac; Gramatica, Furio; Morasso, Carlo

    2016-08-10

    Gold nanorods are an important kind of nanoparticles characterized by peculiar plasmonic properties. Despite their widespread use in nanotechnology, the synthetic methods for the preparation of gold nanorods are still not fully optimized. In this paper we describe a new, highly efficient, two-step protocol based on the use of hydroquinone as a mild reducing agent. Our approach allows the preparation of nanorods with a good control of size and aspect ratio (AR) simply by varying the amount of hexadecyl trimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) and silver ions (Ag(+)) present in the "growth solution". By using this method, it is possible to markedly reduce the amount of CTAB, an expensive and cytotoxic reagent, necessary to obtain the elongated shape. Gold nanorods with an aspect ratio of about 3 can be obtained in the presence of just 50 mM of CTAB (versus 100 mM used in the standard protocol based on the use of ascorbic acid), while shorter gold nanorods are obtained using a concentration as low as 10 mM.

  10. Polyaniline hybridized surface defective ZnO nanorods with long-term stable photoelectrochemical activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bera, Susanta; Khan, Hasmat; Biswas, Indranil; Jana, Sunirmal

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Polyaniline (PANI) hybridized ZnO nanorods was synthesized by solution method. • Surface defects were found in the nanorods. • The hybrid material exhibited an enhancement in visible light absorption. • A long-term stable photoelectrochemical activity of the material was found. • Advancement in the properties would be PANI hybridization and surface defects. - Abstract: We report surfactant/template free precursor solution based synthesis of polyaniline (PANI) hybridized surface defective ZnO nanorods by a two-step process. Initially, ZnO nanorods have been prepared at 95 °C, followed by hybridization (coating) of PANI onto the ZnO via in situ polymerization of aniline monomer, forming ZnO-PANI nanohybrid (ZP). The structural properties of ZP have been analyzed by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and transmission electron microscopic (TEM) studies. The presence of surface defects especially the oxygen vacancies in ZnO has been characterized by photoluminescence emission, high resolution TEM, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and micro-Raman spectral measurements. The chemical interaction of PANI with ZnO has been examined by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) and XPS analyses. A significant enhancement in visible absorption of ZP sample is found as evidenced from UV–vis diffused reflectance spectral study. BET nitrogen adsorption-desorption isotherm shows an improved textural property (pore size, pore volume) of ZP. Moreover, a long-term stable photoelectrochemical activity (PEC) of ZP is found compare to pristine ZnO. The synergic effect of PANI hybridization and the presence of surface defects in ZnO NRs can enhance the PEC by prolonging the recombination rate of photogenerated charge carriers. The effect can also provide large number of active sites to make electrolyte diffusion and mass transportation easier in the nanohybrid. This simple synthesis strategy can be adopted for PANI hybridization with different metal oxide semiconductors

  11. Polyaniline hybridized surface defective ZnO nanorods with long-term stable photoelectrochemical activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bera, Susanta; Khan, Hasmat [Sol-Gel Division, CSIR-Central Glass and Ceramic Research Institute (CSIR-CGCRI), 196 Raja S.C. Mullick Road, P.O. Jadavpur University, Kolkata 700 032, West Bengal (India); Biswas, Indranil [Materials Characterization and Instrumentation Division, CSIR-Central Glass and Ceramic Research Institute (CSIR-CGCRI), 196 Raja S.C. Mullick Road, P.O. Jadavpur University, Kolkata 700 032, West Bengal (India); Jana, Sunirmal, E-mail: sjana@cgcri.res.in [Sol-Gel Division, CSIR-Central Glass and Ceramic Research Institute (CSIR-CGCRI), 196 Raja S.C. Mullick Road, P.O. Jadavpur University, Kolkata 700 032, West Bengal (India)

    2016-10-15

    Highlights: • Polyaniline (PANI) hybridized ZnO nanorods was synthesized by solution method. • Surface defects were found in the nanorods. • The hybrid material exhibited an enhancement in visible light absorption. • A long-term stable photoelectrochemical activity of the material was found. • Advancement in the properties would be PANI hybridization and surface defects. - Abstract: We report surfactant/template free precursor solution based synthesis of polyaniline (PANI) hybridized surface defective ZnO nanorods by a two-step process. Initially, ZnO nanorods have been prepared at 95 °C, followed by hybridization (coating) of PANI onto the ZnO via in situ polymerization of aniline monomer, forming ZnO-PANI nanohybrid (ZP). The structural properties of ZP have been analyzed by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and transmission electron microscopic (TEM) studies. The presence of surface defects especially the oxygen vacancies in ZnO has been characterized by photoluminescence emission, high resolution TEM, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and micro-Raman spectral measurements. The chemical interaction of PANI with ZnO has been examined by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) and XPS analyses. A significant enhancement in visible absorption of ZP sample is found as evidenced from UV–vis diffused reflectance spectral study. BET nitrogen adsorption-desorption isotherm shows an improved textural property (pore size, pore volume) of ZP. Moreover, a long-term stable photoelectrochemical activity (PEC) of ZP is found compare to pristine ZnO. The synergic effect of PANI hybridization and the presence of surface defects in ZnO NRs can enhance the PEC by prolonging the recombination rate of photogenerated charge carriers. The effect can also provide large number of active sites to make electrolyte diffusion and mass transportation easier in the nanohybrid. This simple synthesis strategy can be adopted for PANI hybridization with different metal oxide semiconductors

  12. Effective PEGylation of gold nanorods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz, F.; Friedrich, W.; Hoppe, K.; Vossmeyer, T.; Weller, H.; Lange, H.

    2016-03-01

    Standard procedures to coat gold nanorods (AuNR) with poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG)-based ligands are not reliable and high PEG-grafting densities are not achieved. In this work, the ligand exchange of AuNR with PEGMUA, a tailored PEG-ligand bearing a C10 alkylene spacer, is studied. PEGMUA provides AuNR with very high stability against oxidative etching with cyanide. This etching reaction is utilized to study the ligand exchange in detail. Ligand exchange is faster, less ligand consuming and more reproducible with assisting chloroform extraction. Compared to PEG ligands commonly used, PEGMUA provides much higher colloidal and chemical stability. Further analyses based on NMR-, IR- and UV/Vis-spectroscopy reveal that significantly higher PEG-grafting densities, up to ~3 nm-2, are obtained with PEGMUA. This demonstrates how the molecular structure of the PEG ligand can be used to dramatically improve the ligand exchange and to synthesize PEGylated AuNR with high chemical and colloidal stability and high PEG grafting densities. Such AuNR are especially interesting for applications in nanomedicine.Standard procedures to coat gold nanorods (AuNR) with poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG)-based ligands are not reliable and high PEG-grafting densities are not achieved. In this work, the ligand exchange of AuNR with PEGMUA, a tailored PEG-ligand bearing a C10 alkylene spacer, is studied. PEGMUA provides AuNR with very high stability against oxidative etching with cyanide. This etching reaction is utilized to study the ligand exchange in detail. Ligand exchange is faster, less ligand consuming and more reproducible with assisting chloroform extraction. Compared to PEG ligands commonly used, PEGMUA provides much higher colloidal and chemical stability. Further analyses based on NMR-, IR- and UV/Vis-spectroscopy reveal that significantly higher PEG-grafting densities, up to ~3 nm-2, are obtained with PEGMUA. This demonstrates how the molecular structure of the PEG ligand can be used to

  13. Facile synthesis of CdS@TiO2 core–shell nanorods with controllable shell thickness and enhanced photocatalytic activity under visible light irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dong, Wenhao; Pan, Feng; Xu, Leilei; Zheng, Minrui; Sow, Chorng Haur; Wu, Kai; Xu, Guo Qin

    2015-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • CdS nanorods were coated with amorphous TiO 2 shells under a mild condition. • The TiO 2 shell thickness can be controlled from 3.5 to 40 nm. • CdS@TiO 2 nanorods exhibit enhanced photocatalytic activities under visible light. • Efficient charge carriers separation leads to the improved photocatalytic activity. - Abstract: Amorphous TiO 2 layers with a controllable thickness from 3.5 to 40 nm were coated on the one-dimensional CdS nanorods surface under mild conditions. Compared to the bare CdS nanorods, the as-prepared CdS@TiO 2 nanorods exhibit enhanced photocatalytic activities for phenol photodecomposition under visible light irradiation. The improved photoactivity is ascribed to the efficient separation of photogenerated electron and hole charge carriers between CdS cores and TiO 2 shells. This study promises a simple approach to fabricating CdS@TiO 2 core–shell structure nanocomposites, and can be applied for other semiconductor cores with TiO 2 shells

  14. Fundamentals of semiconductor devices

    CERN Document Server

    Lindmayer, Joseph

    1965-01-01

    Semiconductor properties ; semiconductor junctions or diodes ; transistor fundamentals ; inhomogeneous impurity distributions, drift or graded-base transistors ; high-frequency properties of transistors ; band structure of semiconductors ; high current densities and mechanisms of carrier transport ; transistor transient response and recombination processes ; surfaces, field-effect transistors, and composite junctions ; additional semiconductor characteristics ; additional semiconductor devices and microcircuits ; more metal, insulator, and semiconductor combinations for devices ; four-pole parameters and configuration rotation ; four-poles of combined networks and devices ; equivalent circuits ; the error function and its properties ; Fermi-Dirac statistics ; useful physical constants.

  15. Fermi level dependent native defect formation: Consequences for metal-semiconductor and semiconductor-semiconductor interfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walukiewicz, W.

    1988-02-01

    The amphoteric native defect model of the Schottky barrier formation is used to analyze the Fermi level pinning at metal/semiconductor interfaces for submonolayer metal coverages. It is assumed that the energy required for defect generation is released in the process of surface back-relaxation. Model calculations for metal/GaAs interfaces show a weak dependence of the Fermi level pinning on the thickness of metal deposited at room temperature. This weak dependence indicates a strong dependence of the defect formation energy on the Fermi level, a unique feature of amphoteric native defects. This result is in very good agreement with experimental data. It is shown that a very distinct asymmetry in the Fermi level pinning on p- and n-type GaAs observed at liquid nitrogen temperatures can be understood in terms of much different recombination rates for amphoteric native defects in those two types of materials. Also, it is demonstrated that the Fermi level stabilization energy, a central concept of the amphoteric defect system, plays a fundamental role in other phenomena in semiconductors such as semiconductor/semiconductor heterointerface intermixing and saturation of free carrier concentration. 33 refs., 6 figs

  16. Ionic liquid-assisted synthesis of Br-modified g-C3N4 semiconductors with high surface area and highly porous structure for photoredox water splitting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Shuo; Zhang, Yiwei; Wang, Yanyun; Zhou, Yuming; Qiu, Kaibo; Zhang, Chao; Fang, Jiasheng; Sheng, Xiaoli

    2017-12-01

    Coping with the gradually increasing worldwide energy and environmental issues, it is urgent to develop efficient, cheap and visible-light-driven photocatalysts for hydrogen production. Here, we present a facile way to synthesize bromine doped graphitic carbon nitride (CN-BrX) with highly porous structure by using ionic liquid (1-butyl-3-vinylimidazolium bromide) as the Br source and soft-template for the first time, which applied in hydrogen evolution under visible light irradiation. A systematic study is conducted on the optimization in the doping amount. The results find that the as-fabricated CN-BrX photocatalysts possess a uniform porous network with thin walls due to the release of volatile domains and decomposition of ionic liquids. The highly porous structure with the large surface area (≤150 m2/g) benefits the exposure of active sites. Moreover, the bromine modification and porous structure can narrow the band gap, enhance the transportation capability of photogenerated electrons, improve the optical and conductive properties of CN, thus contribute to an outstanding H2 evolution rate under visible light irradiation (120 μmol h-1), which is about 3.6 times higher than pure CN. This work provides a new insight for designing the novel g-C3N4 based photocatalysts for hydrogen production, CO2 conversion and environmental remediation.

  17. TOPICAL REVIEW: Zinc oxide nanorod based photonic devices: recent progress in growth, light emitting diodes and lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willander, M.; Nur, O.; Zhao, Q. X.; Yang, L. L.; Lorenz, M.; Cao, B. Q.; Zúñiga Pérez, J.; Czekalla, C.; Zimmermann, G.; Grundmann, M.; Bakin, A.; Behrends, A.; Al-Suleiman, M.; El-Shaer, A.; Che Mofor, A.; Postels, B.; Waag, A.; Boukos, N.; Travlos, A.; Kwack, H. S.; Guinard, J.; LeSi Dang, D.

    2009-08-01

    Zinc oxide (ZnO), with its excellent luminescent properties and the ease of growth of its nanostructures, holds promise for the development of photonic devices. The recent advances in growth of ZnO nanorods are discussed. Results from both low temperature and high temperature growth approaches are presented. The techniques which are presented include metal-organic chemical vapour deposition (MOCVD), vapour phase epitaxy (VPE), pulse laser deposition (PLD), vapour-liquid-solid (VLS), aqueous chemical growth (ACG) and finally the electrodeposition technique as an example of a selective growth approach. Results from structural as well as optical properties of a variety of ZnO nanorods are shown and analysed using different techniques, including high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HR-TEM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), photoluminescence (PL) and cathodoluminescence (CL), for both room temperature and for low temperature performance. These results indicate that the grown ZnO nanorods possess reproducible and interesting optical properties. Results on obtaining p-type doping in ZnO micro- and nanorods are also demonstrated using PLD. Three independent indications were found for p-type conducting, phosphorus-doped ZnO nanorods: first, acceptor-related CL peaks, second, opposite transfer characteristics of back-gate field effect transistors using undoped and phosphorus doped wire channels, and finally, rectifying I-V characteristics of ZnO:P nanowire/ZnO:Ga p-n junctions. Then light emitting diodes (LEDs) based on n-ZnO nanorods combined with different technologies (hybrid technologies) are suggested and the recent electrical, as well as electro-optical, characteristics of these LEDs are shown and discussed. The hybrid LEDs reviewed and discussed here are mainly presented for two groups: those based on n-ZnO nanorods and p-type crystalline substrates, and those based on n-ZnO nanorods and p-type amorphous substrates. Promising electroluminescence

  18. Shape separation of gold nanorods using centrifugation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Vivek; Park, Kyoungweon; Srinivasarao, Mohan

    2009-01-01

    We demonstrate the use of centrifugation for efficient separation of colloidal gold nanorods from a mixture of nanorods and nanospheres. We elucidate the hydrodynamic behavior of nanoparticles of various shapes and illustrate that the shape-dependent drag causes particles to have shape-dependent sedimentation behavior. During centrifugation, nanoparticles undergo Brownian motion under an external field and move with different sedimentation velocities dictated by their Svedberg coefficients. This effects a separation of particles of different shape and size. Our theoretical analysis and experiments demonstrate the viability of using centrifugation to shape-separate a mixture of colloidal particles. PMID:19255445

  19. Fabrication of Vertically Aligned Carbon Nanotube or Zinc Oxide Nanorod Arrays for Optical Diffraction Gratings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jeong; Kim, Sun Il; Cho, Seong-Ho; Hwang, Sungwoo; Lee, Young Hee; Hur, Jaehyun

    2015-11-01

    We report on new fabrication methods for a transparent, hierarchical, and patterned electrode comprised of either carbon nanotubes or zinc oxide nanorods. Vertically aligned carbon nanotubes or zinc oxide nanorod arrays were fabricated by either chemical vapor deposition or hydrothermal growth, in combination with photolithography. A transparent conductive graphene layer or zinc oxide seed layer was employed as the transparent electrode. On the patterned surface defined using photoresist, the vertically grown carbon nanotubes or zinc oxides could produce a concentrated electric field under applied DC voltage. This periodic electric field was used to align liquid crystal molecules in localized areas within the optical cell, effectively modulating the refractive index. Depending on the material and morphology of these patterned electrodes, the diffraction efficiency presented different behavior. From this study, we established the relationship between the hierarchical structure of the different electrodes and their efficiency for modulating the refractive index. We believe that this study will pave a new path for future optoelectronic applications.

  20. Carrier Mobility-Dominated Gas Sensing: A Room-Temperature Gas-Sensing Mode for SnO2 Nanorod Array Sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Shipu; Zhao, Huaping; Xu, Yang; Xu, Rui; Lei, Yong

    2018-04-16

    Adsorption-induced change of carrier density is presently dominating inorganic semiconductor gas sensing, which is usually operated at a high temperature. Besides carrier density, other carrier characteristics might also play a critical role in gas sensing. Here, we show that carrier mobility can be an efficient parameter to dominate gas sensing, by which room-temperature gas sensing of inorganic semiconductors is realized via a carrier mobility-dominated gas-sensing (CMDGS) mode. To demonstrate CMDGS, we design and prepare a gas sensor based on a regular array of SnO 2 nanorods on a bottom film. It is found that the key for determining the gas-sensing mode is adjusting the length of the arrayed nanorods. With the change in the nanorod length from 340 to 40 nm, the gas-sensing behavior changes from the conventional carrier-density mode to a complete carrier-mobility mode. Moreover, compared to the carrier density-dominating gas sensing, the proposed CMDGS mode enhances the sensor sensitivity. CMDGS proves to be an emerging gas-sensing mode for designing inorganic semiconductor gas sensors with high performances at room temperature.

  1. Defects in semiconductor nanostructures

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Impurities play a pivotal role in semiconductors. One part in a million of phosphorous in silicon alters the conductivity of the latter by several orders of magnitude. Indeed, the information age is possible only because of the unique role of shallow impurities in semiconductors. Although work in semiconductor nanostructures ...

  2. Solid spectroscopy: semiconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, C.E.T.G. da

    1983-01-01

    Photoemission as technique of study of the semiconductor electronic structure is shortly discussed. Homogeneous and heterogeneous semiconductors, where volume and surface electronic structure, core levels and O and H chemisorption in GaAs, Schottky barrier are treated, respectively. Amorphous semiconductors are also discussed. (L.C.) [pt

  3. Metal oxide nanorod arrays on monolithic substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao, Pu-Xian; Guo, Yanbing; Ren, Zheng

    2018-01-02

    A metal oxide nanorod array structure according to embodiments disclosed herein includes a monolithic substrate having a surface and multiple channels, an interface layer bonded to the surface of the substrate, and a metal oxide nanorod array coupled to the substrate surface via the interface layer. The metal oxide can include ceria, zinc oxide, tin oxide, alumina, zirconia, cobalt oxide, and gallium oxide. The substrate can include a glass substrate, a plastic substrate, a silicon substrate, a ceramic monolith, and a stainless steel monolith. The ceramic can include cordierite, alumina, tin oxide, and titania. The nanorod array structure can include a perovskite shell, such as a lanthanum-based transition metal oxide, or a metal oxide shell, such as ceria, zinc oxide, tin oxide, alumina, zirconia, cobalt oxide, and gallium oxide, or a coating of metal particles, such as platinum, gold, palladium, rhodium, and ruthenium, over each metal oxide nanorod. Structures can be bonded to the surface of a substrate and resist erosion if exposed to high velocity flow rates.

  4. GaN based nanorods for solid state lighting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shunfeng; Waag, Andreas

    2012-04-01

    In recent years, GaN nanorods are emerging as a very promising novel route toward devices for nano-optoelectronics and nano-photonics. In particular, core-shell light emitting devices are thought to be a breakthrough development in solid state lighting, nanorod based LEDs have many potential advantages as compared to their 2 D thin film counterparts. In this paper, we review the recent developments of GaN nanorod growth, characterization, and related device applications based on GaN nanorods. The initial work on GaN nanorod growth focused on catalyst-assisted and catalyst-free statistical growth. The growth condition and growth mechanisms were extensively investigated and discussed. Doping of GaN nanorods, especially p-doping, was found to significantly influence the morphology of GaN nanorods. The large surface of 3 D GaN nanorods induces new optical and electrical properties, which normally can be neglected in layered structures. Recently, more controlled selective area growth of GaN nanorods was realized using patterned substrates both by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) and by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE). Advanced structures, for example, photonic crystals and DBRs are meanwhile integrated in GaN nanorod structures. Based on the work of growth and characterization of GaN nanorods, GaN nanoLEDs were reported by several groups with different growth and processing methods. Core/shell nanoLED structures were also demonstrated, which could be potentially useful for future high efficient LED structures. In this paper, we will discuss recent developments in GaN nanorod technology, focusing on the potential advantages, but also discussing problems and open questions, which may impose obstacles during the future development of a GaN nanorod based LED technology.

  5. Halide perovskite solar cells using monocrystalline TiO2 nanorod arrays as electron transport layers: impact of nanorod morphology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thakur, Ujwal Kumar; Askar, Abdelrahman M.; Kisslinger, Ryan; Wiltshire, Benjamin D.; Kar, Piyush; Shankar, Karthik

    2017-07-01

    This is the first report of a 17.6% champion efficiency solar cell architecture comprising monocrystalline TiO2 nanorods (TNRs) coupled with perovskite, and formed using facile solution processing without non-routine surface conditioning. Vertically oriented TNR ensembles are desirable as electron transporting layers (ETLs) in halide perovskite solar cells (HPSCs) because of potential advantages such as vectorial electron percolation pathways to balance the longer hole diffusion lengths in certain halide perovskite semiconductors, ease of incorporating nanophotonic enhancements, and optimization between a high contact surface area for charge transfer (good) versus high interfacial recombination (bad). These advantages arise from the tunable morphology of hydrothermally grown rutile TNRs, which is a strong function of the growth conditions. Fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy of the HPSCs demonstrated a stronger quenching of the perovskite PL when using TNRs as compared to mesoporous/compact TiO2 thin films. Due to increased interfacial contact area between the ETL and perovskite with easier pore filling, charge separation efficiency is dramatically enhanced. Additionally, solid-state impedance spectroscopy results strongly suggested the suppression of interfacial charge recombination between TNRs and perovskite layer, compared to other ETLs. The optimal ETL morphology in this study was found to consist of an array of TNRs ∼300 nm in length and ∼40 nm in width. This work highlights the potential of TNR ETLs to achieve high performance solution-processed HPSCs.

  6. Zinc vanadate nanorods and their visible light photocatalytic activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pei, L.Z.; Lin, N.; Wei, T.; Liu, H.D.; Yu, H.Y.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Zinc vanadate nanorods have been synthesized by a facile hydrothermal process. • The size of zinc vanadate nanorods can be controlled by growth conditions. • Zinc vanadate nanorods show good photocatalytic activities of methylene blue under solar light. - Abstract: Zinc vanadate nanorods have been synthesized by a simple hydrothermal process using zinc acetate and sodium vanadate as the raw materials. The zinc vanadate nanorods have been characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), high-resolution TEM (HRTEM) and solid UV–vis diffuse reflectance spectrum. XRD pattern and HRTEM image show that the zinc vanadate nanorods are composed of single crystalline monoclinic Zn 2 V 2 O 7 phase. SEM and TEM observations show that the diameter and length of the zinc vanadate nanorods are 50–100 nm and about 5 μm, respectively. Sodium dodecyl sulfonate (SDS) has an essential role in the formation of zinc vanadate nanorods. The SDS-assisted nucleation and growth process have been proposed to explain the formation and growth of the zinc vanadate nanorods. Solid UV–vis diffuse reflectance spectrum shows that the zinc vanadate nanorods have a band gap of 2.76 eV. The photocatalytic activities of the zinc vanadate nanorods have been evaluated by the photocatalytic degradation of methylene blue (MB) under solar light irradiation. The MB with the concentration of 10 mg L −1 can be degraded totally under the solar light irradiation for 4 h. It is suggested that the zinc vanadate nanorods exhibit promising application potential for the degradation of organic pollutants under solar light irradiation

  7. Development of superhydrophilic and superhydrophobic polyester fabric by growing zinc oxide nanorods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashraf, Munir; Campagne, Christine; Perwuelz, Anne; Champagne, Philippe; Leriche, Anne; Courtois, Christian

    2013-03-15

    ZnO nanorods were grown on microfibers of Polyethylene terephthalate (PET) fabric by seeding method to develop hierarchical roughness structure. XRD and XPS analysis show the presence of crystalline ZnO and chemical Zn species at the fiber surface at each stage of the process. Five series of samples with different seed concentrations have been realized, and their surface morphology and topography were characterized by AFM and SEM. Increasing seed concentrations lead to samples with superhydrophilic properties. Not only the water contact angle at fabric surface tends to zero but also the water capillary diffusion inside fabric is faster. Nanostructuration affects the structure inside the fabric, and further experiments with decane liquid have been made to get a better understanding of this effect. To study the superhydrophobicity, nanorods treated samples were modified with octadecyltrimethoxysilane (ODS) by two method; solution deposition and vapor deposition. The superhydrophobicity was characterized by measuring the water contact angle and water sliding angle with 5 μl water droplet. The samples modified with ODS by vapor deposition showed higher water contact angles and low water sliding angle than the ones modified with solution method. The lotus effect has been well correlated with the surface morphology of the nanorods structured fibers. The application of the Cassie-Baxter equation is discussed. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Semiconductor Physical Electronics

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Sheng

    2006-01-01

    Semiconductor Physical Electronics, Second Edition, provides comprehensive coverage of fundamental semiconductor physics that is essential to an understanding of the physical and operational principles of a wide variety of semiconductor electronic and optoelectronic devices. This text presents a unified and balanced treatment of the physics, characterization, and applications of semiconductor materials and devices for physicists and material scientists who need further exposure to semiconductor and photonic devices, and for device engineers who need additional background on the underlying physical principles. This updated and revised second edition reflects advances in semicondutor technologies over the past decade, including many new semiconductor devices that have emerged and entered into the marketplace. It is suitable for graduate students in electrical engineering, materials science, physics, and chemical engineering, and as a general reference for processing and device engineers working in the semicondi...

  9. Semiconductor Modeling Techniques

    CERN Document Server

    Xavier, Marie

    2012-01-01

    This book describes the key theoretical techniques for semiconductor research to quantitatively calculate and simulate the properties. It presents particular techniques to study novel semiconductor materials, such as 2D heterostructures, quantum wires, quantum dots and nitrogen containing III-V alloys. The book is aimed primarily at newcomers working in the field of semiconductor physics to give guidance in theory and experiment. The theoretical techniques for electronic and optoelectronic devices are explained in detail.

  10. Contacts to semiconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tove, P.A.

    1975-08-01

    Contacts to semiconductors play an important role in most semiconductor devices. These devices range from microelectronics to power components, from high-sensitivity light or radiation detectors to light-emitting of microwave-generating components. Silicon is the dominating material but compound semiconductors are increasing in importance. The following survey is an attempt to classify contact properties and the physical mechanisms involved, as well as fabrication methods and methods of investigation. The main interest is in metal-semiconductor type contacts where a few basic concepts are dealt with in some detail. (Auth.)

  11. Semiconductor Electrical Measurements Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Semiconductor Electrical Measurements Laboratory is a research laboratory which complements the Optical Measurements Laboratory. The laboratory provides for Hall...

  12. Lateral etching of core-shell Au@Metal nanorods to metal-tipped au nanorods with improved catalytic activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Xia; Zhang, Qiao; Sun, Yanghui; Zhao, Qing; Yang, Jian

    2012-02-28

    Selective growth/etching of hybrid materials is very important for the rational synthesis of hierarchical structures and precise modulation of their physical properties. Here, the lateral etching of the core-shell Au@Ag nanorods is achieved by FeCl(3) at room temperature, producing a number of dumbbell-like Ag-tipped Au nanorods. This selective etching at the side of the core-shell nanorods is attributed to the increased reactivity of the side facets, due to less surface passivation of cetyltrimethylammonium bromide. The similar synthetic strategy has also been demonstrated to be successful for the Pd-tipped Au nanorods that have not been reported before, indicating the great potential of this selective etching. The Ag-tipped Au nanorods are examined as a catalyst for the reduction of p-nitrophenol at room temperature. The Ag-tipped Au nanorods exhibit a higher catalytic activity than Au nanorods and core-shell Au@Ag nanorods, which could be attributed to the electronic effect and the unique structure in the Ag-tipped Au nanorods.

  13. CuInS2 quantum dot-sensitized TiO2 nanorod array photoelectrodes: synthesis and performance optimization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Zhengji; Yuan, Shengjie; Fan, Junqi; Hou, Zeliang; Zhou, Wenhui; Du, Zuliang; Wu, Sixin

    2012-11-27

    CuInS2 quantum dots (QDs) were deposited onto TiO2 nanorod arrays for different cycles by using successive ionic layer adsorption and reaction (SILAR) method. The effect of SILAR cycles on the light absorption and photoelectrochemical properties of the sensitized photoelectrodes was studied. With optimization of CuInS2 SILAR cycles and introduction of In2S3 buffer layer, quantum dot-sensitized solar cells assembled with 3-μm thick TiO2 nanorod film exhibited a short-circuit current density (Isc) of 4.51 mA cm-2, an open-circuit voltage (Voc) of 0.56 V, a fill factor (FF) of 0.41, and a power conversion efficiency (η) of 1.06%, respectively. This study indicates that SILAR process is a very promising strategy for preparing directly anchored semiconductor QDs on TiO2 nanorod surface in a straightforward but controllable way without any complicated fabrication procedures and introduction of a linker molecule.

  14. Gasochromic performance of WO{sub 3}-nanorod thin films fabricated with an ArF excimer laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yaacob, M. H. [RMIT University, Melbourne (Australia); Universiti Putra Malaysia, Selangor (Malaysia); Ou, J. Z.; Wlodarski, W. [RMIT University, Melbourne (Australia); Kim, C. S.; Lee, J. Y. [KAIST, Daejon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Y. H. [KIST, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Oh, C. M.; Dhakal, K. P.; Kim, J. Y.; Kang, J. H. [University of Incheon, Incheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-02-15

    Thin films with tungsten trioxide (WO{sub 3}) nanorods were fabricated by using an ArF pulsed laser deposition system. Because the ArF excimer laser operates at a very short wavelength of 193 nm, short enough to expect strong absorption of the photons in the semiconductor oxide targets, and because the clusters incoming to the substrates have high momentum, we could build thin films with good surface morphology. Highly homogeneous arrays of nanorods with sizes mostly in the range of 30 - 40 nm were observed. The absorbance response towards hydrogen (H{sub 2}) gas was investigated for a WO{sub 3} film coated with 25-A-thick palladium (Pd). The Pd/WO{sub 3}-nanorod thin films exhibited excellent gasochromic response when measured in the visible-NIR range (400 - 1000 nm). As low as 0.06% H{sub 2} concentration was clearly sensed. A significant reversible absorbance change and fast recovery (<2 min) were observed when the films were exposed to H{sub 2} at different concentrations.

  15. A Framework of Growing Crystalline Nanorods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Hanchen

    2012-10-01

    The growth of crystalline nanorods has become a common practice in the absence of a solid framework, in either theoretical or conceptual form. This article presents such a framework and puts it in historical perspective of a broader field of crystal growth. This framework derives from three scientific advancements in crystal growth, with focus on multiple-layer surface steps: (I) the diffusion barrier of adatoms down multiple-layer surface steps, (II) the formation and stability of multiple-layer surface steps, and (III) the dimension of surface facets that are bounded by competing monolayer and multiple-layer surface steps. While this framework has only a partial foundation of theoretical formulation, it is more complete conceptually. As an example of impact, this framework predicts that growth of Al nanorods is not feasible using physical vapor deposition at ambient conditions; this prediction has not been proven wrong by any available experiments.

  16. Gold nanorod vaccine for respiratory syncytial virus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stone, John W; Thornburg, Natalie J; Blum, David L; Kuhn, Sam J; Crowe Jr, James E; Wright, David W

    2013-01-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is a major cause of pneumonia and wheezing in infants and the elderly, but to date there is no licensed vaccine. We developed a gold nanorod construct that displayed the major protective antigen of the virus, the fusion protein (F). Nanorods conjugated to RSV F were formulated as a candidate vaccine preparation by covalent attachment of viral protein using a layer-by-layer approach. In vitro studies using ELISA, electron microscopy and circular dichroism revealed that conformation-dependent epitopes were maintained during conjugation, and transmission electron microscopy studies showed that a dispersed population of particles could be achieved. Human dendritic cells treated with the vaccine induced immune responses in primary human T cells. These results suggest that this vaccine approach may be a potent method for immunizing against viruses such as RSV with surface glycoproteins that are targets for the human immune response. (paper)

  17. A novel fabrication methodology for sulfur-doped ZnO nanorods as an active photoanode for improved water oxidation in visible-light regime.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, A; Ahmed, M I; Adam, A; Azad, A-M; Qamar, M

    2017-02-03

    Incorporation of foreign moiety in the lattice of semiconductors significantly alters their optoelectronic behavior and opens a plethora of new applications. In this paper, we report the synthesis of sulfur-doped zinc oxide (S-doped ZnO) nanorods by reacting ZnO nanorods with diammonium sulfide in vapor phase. Microscopic investigation revealed that the morphological features, such as, the length (2-4 μm) and width (100-250 nm) of the original hexagonal ZnO nanorods remained intact post-sulfidation. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis of the sulfide sample confirmed the incorporation of sulfur into ZnO lattice. The optical measurements suggested the extension of absorption threshold into visible region upon sulfidation. Photoelectrochemical (PEC) activities of pure and S-doped ZnO nanorods were compared for water oxidation in visible light (λ > 420 nm), which showed several-fold increment in the performance of S-doped ZnO sample; the observed amelioration in the PEC activity was rationalized in terms of preferred visible light absorption and low resistance of sulfide sample, as evidenced by optical and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy.

  18. Gold Nanorods as Surface-Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy Substrates for Rapid and Sensitive Analysis of Allura Red and Sunset Yellow in Beverages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ou, Yiming; Wang, Xiaohui; Lai, Keqiang; Huang, Yiqun; Rasco, Barbara A; Fan, Yuxia

    2018-03-21

    Synthetic colorants in food can be a potential threat to human health. In this study, surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) coupled with gold nanorods as substrates is proposed to analyze allura red and sunset yellow in beverages. The gold nanorods with different aspect ratios were synthesized, and their long-term stability, SERS activity, and the effect of the different salts on the SERS signal were investigated. The results demonstrate that gold nanorods have a satisfactory stability (stored up to 28 days). SERS coupled with gold nanorods exhibit stronger sensitivity. MgSO 4 was chosen to improve the SERS signal of sunset yellow, and no salts could enhance the SERS signal of allura red. The lowest concentration was 0.10 mg/L for both colorant standard solutions. The successful prediction results using SERS were much closer to those obtained by high-performance liquid chromatography for the sample in beverages. SERS combined with gold nanorods shows potential for analyzing food colorants and other food additives as a rapid, convenient, and sensitive method.

  19. Resistive switching in individual ZnO nanorods: delineating the ionic current by photo-stimulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandopadhyay, K.; Prajapati, K. N.; Mitra, J.

    2018-03-01

    Resistive switching in nanostructured metal oxide semiconductors has been broadly understood to originate from the dynamics of its native point defects. Experimental results of switching observed in individual n-ZnO nanorods grown on a p-type polymer is presented along with an empirical model describing the underlying defect dynamics necessary to observe bi-polar switching. Selective photo excitation of electrons into the defect states delineates the incidence and role of an ionic current in the switching behavior. The understanding further extends to the observance of a negative differential resistance regime that is often coincident in such systems. The analysis not only unifies the underlying physics of the two phenomena but also offers further confidence in the proposed mechanism. We conclude by demonstrating that the effective memresistance of such devices is a strong function of the operating bias and identify parameters that optimize switching performance.

  20. Semiconductor Research Experimental Techniques

    CERN Document Server

    Balkan, Naci

    2012-01-01

    The book describes the fundamentals, latest developments and use of key experimental techniques for semiconductor research. It explains the application potential of various analytical methods and discusses the opportunities to apply particular analytical techniques to study novel semiconductor compounds, such as dilute nitride alloys. The emphasis is on the technique rather than on the particular system studied.

  1. Terahertz semiconductor nonlinear optics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Turchinovich, Dmitry; Hvam, Jørn Märcher; Hoffmann, Matthias

    2013-01-01

    In this proceedings we describe our recent results on semiconductor nonlinear optics, investigated using single-cycle THz pulses. We demonstrate the nonlinear absorption and self-phase modulation of strong-field THz pulses in doped semiconductors, using n-GaAs as a model system. The THz nonlinear...

  2. Semiconductors data handbook

    CERN Document Server

    Madelung, Otfried

    2004-01-01

    This volume Semiconductors: Data Handbook contains frequently used data from the corresponding larger Landolt-Börnstein handbooks in a low price book for the individual scientist working in the laboratory. The Handbook contain important information about a large number of semiconductors

  3. Semiconductor radiation detection systems

    CERN Document Server

    2010-01-01

    Covers research in semiconductor detector and integrated circuit design in the context of medical imaging using ionizing radiation. This book explores other applications of semiconductor radiation detection systems in security applications such as luggage scanning, dirty bomb detection and border control.

  4. Ionic liquid intercalated V2O5 nanorods: synthesis and ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    materials for lithium ion battery, catalyst for photocata- lytic degradation, microelectronic circuits, sensors, ... devices9,10 and electrode materials for lithium battery. Vanadium oxides exhibit a layered structure and ... After 4–5 days of reaction, a white solid was separated by filtration and washed with 1 : 1 mixture of diethyl ...

  5. Reactivity and resizing of gold nanorods in presence of Cu

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Wintec

    Reactivity of gold nanorods, in presence of cupric ions, was probed in an attempt to understand the chemistry of anisotropic particles. The reaction progresses through a series of intermediates. It can be arrested at any stage to get nanorods of desired dimension and therefore, can be .... among the low index planes of gold.

  6. Covalently stabilized self-assembled chlorophyll nanorods by olefin metathesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sengupta, Sanchita; Würthner, Frank

    2012-06-11

    A new chlorophyll derivative with peripheral olefinic chains has been synthesised and its self-assembly properties have been studied, revealing formation of well-defined nanorods. These nanorods were stabilized and rigidified by olefin metathesis reaction as confirmed by spectroscopic and microscopic methods.

  7. Compound Semiconductor Radiation Detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Owens, Alan

    2012-01-01

    Although elemental semiconductors such as silicon and germanium are standard for energy dispersive spectroscopy in the laboratory, their use for an increasing range of applications is becoming marginalized by their physical limitations, namely the need for ancillary cooling, their modest stopping powers, and radiation intolerance. Compound semiconductors, on the other hand, encompass such a wide range of physical and electronic properties that they have become viable competitors in a number of applications. Compound Semiconductor Radiation Detectors is a consolidated source of information on all aspects of the use of compound semiconductors for radiation detection and measurement. Serious Competitors to Germanium and Silicon Radiation Detectors Wide-gap compound semiconductors offer the ability to operate in a range of hostile thermal and radiation environments while still maintaining sub-keV spectral resolution at X-ray wavelengths. Narrow-gap materials offer the potential of exceeding the spectral resolutio...

  8. Organic semiconductor crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chengliang; Dong, Huanli; Jiang, Lang; Hu, Wenping

    2018-01-22

    Organic semiconductors have attracted a lot of attention since the discovery of highly doped conductive polymers, due to the potential application in field-effect transistors (OFETs), light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) and photovoltaic cells (OPVs). Single crystals of organic semiconductors are particularly intriguing because they are free of grain boundaries and have long-range periodic order as well as minimal traps and defects. Hence, organic semiconductor crystals provide a powerful tool for revealing the intrinsic properties, examining the structure-property relationships, demonstrating the important factors for high performance devices and uncovering fundamental physics in organic semiconductors. This review provides a comprehensive overview of the molecular packing, morphology and charge transport features of organic semiconductor crystals, the control of crystallization for achieving high quality crystals and the device physics in the three main applications. We hope that this comprehensive summary can give a clear picture of the state-of-art status and guide future work in this area.

  9. Novel α-Fe2O3/CdS cornlike nanorods with enhanced photocatalytic performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Ye; Li, Hanying; Wang, Ling; Shen, Wei; Chen, Hongzheng

    2012-09-26

    Various semiconductors have been studied as photocatalysts for photocatalytic degradation of pollutants in aqueous solutions. As one of the promising visible-light-driven semiconductor photocatalysts, α-Fe(2)O(3) has advantages of low cost and stability. However, its application is inhibited by the poor separation of photogenerated electron-hole pair. In this work, hybrid structures were prepared to improve the performance of α-Fe(2)O(3). CdS nanoparticles were overgrown on the preformed single-crystalline α-Fe(2)O(3) nanorods by a simple and mild one-step wet-chemical method, resulting in α-Fe(2)O(3)/CdS cornlike nanocomposites. X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and Raman spectroscopy showed the α-Fe(2)O(3)/CdS core/shell heterostructure of the nanocomposite with high crystallinity. Furthermore, the cornlike nanocomposites exhibited superior photocatalytic performances under visible light irradiation over the pure α-Fe(2)O(3) nanorods and CdS nanoparticles. The photocatalytic activity of the composites is superior to the previously-reported pure α-Fe(2)O(3) nanomaterials, and the performance is comparable to both the commercial TiO(2) (P25) which is used under UV irradiation and the newly developed α-Fe(2)O(3)/SnO(2) photocatalyst under visible light irradiation. The enhanced performance is associated with the larger surface area of the cornlike structure, the crystalline nature of the materials and the synergy in light absorption and charge separation between α-Fe(2)O(3) and CdS. As such, our α-Fe(2)O(3)/CdS cornlike nanocomposites may be promising to be used as visible-light-driven high-performance photocatalyst.

  10. Nanoscale Rheology and Anisotropic Diffusion Using Single Gold Nanorod Probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molaei, Mehdi; Atefi, Ehsan; Crocker, John C.

    2018-03-01

    The complex rotational and translational Brownian motion of anisotropic particles depends on their shape and the viscoelasticity of their surroundings. Because of their strong optical scattering and chemical versatility, gold nanorods would seem to provide the ultimate probes of rheology at the nanoscale, but the suitably accurate orientational tracking required to compute rheology has not been demonstrated. Here we image single gold nanorods with a laser-illuminated dark-field microscope and use optical polarization to determine their three-dimensional orientation to better than one degree. We convert the rotational diffusion of single nanorods in viscoelastic polyethylene glycol solutions to rheology and obtain excellent agreement with bulk measurements. Extensions of earlier models of anisotropic translational diffusion to three dimensions and viscoelastic fluids give excellent agreement with the observed motion of single nanorods. We find that nanorod tracking provides a uniquely capable approach to microrheology and provides a powerful tool for probing nanoscale dynamics and structure in a range of soft materials.

  11. Synthesis and thermoelectric properties of RuO2 nanorods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Music, Denis; Basse, Felix H.-U.; Schneider, Jochen M.; Hassdorf, Ralf

    2010-01-01

    We have explored the effect of the O/Ru ratio on the morphology and the Seebeck coefficient of RuO 2 nanorods (space group P4 2 /mnm) synthesized by reactive sputtering. At an O/Ru ratio of 1.69, a faceted surface is observed, while nanorod formation occurs at O/Ru ratios of 2.03 and 2.24. Using classical molecular dynamics with the potential parameters derived in this work, we show that volatile species enable nanorod formation. Based on ab initio calculations, two effects of the nanorod formation on the Seebeck coefficient are observed: (i) increase due to additional states in the vicinity of the Fermi level and (ii) decrease due to oxygen point defects (volatile species). These two competing effects give rise to a moderate increase in the Seebeck coefficient upon nanorod formation.

  12. Templated synthesis of metal nanorods in silica nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yin, Yadong; Gao, Chuanbo

    2018-04-10

    A method of preparing a metal nanorod. The method includes seeding a metal nanoparticle within the lumen of a nanotube, and growing a metal nanorod from the seeded metal nanoparticle to form a metal nanorod-nanotube composite. In some cases, the nanotube includes metal binding ligands attached to the inner surface. Growing of the metal nanorod includes incubating the seeded nanotube in a solution that includes: a metal source for the metal in the metal nanorod, the metal source including an ion of the metal; a coordinating ligand that forms a stable complex with the metal ion; a reducing agent for reducing the metal ion, and a capping agent that stabilizes atomic monomers of the metal. Compositions derived from the method are also provided.

  13. Hybrid artificial pinning centers of elongated-nanorods and segmented-nanorods in YBa2Cu3O7 films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horide, Tomoya; Sakamoto, Nobuhiro; Ichinose, Ataru; Otsubo, Koji; Kitamura, Takanori; Matsumoto, Kaname

    2016-10-01

    To control the anisotropy of critical current density (J c), hybrid artificial pinning centers (APCs) of elongated-nanorods and segmented-nanorods were incorporated into YBa2Cu3O7 films. The elongated-nanorods and segmented-nanorods were formed by fabricating multilayer films using YBa2Cu3O7+BaSnO3 targets with a different BaSnO3 content. According to the elastic calculation, the BaSnO3-free YBa2Cu3O7 regions between BaSnO3 segmented-nanorods were highly strained, resulting in their alignment along the c-axis. Pinning of the vortex kinks and straight vortices by the nanorod ends improved J c in a wide range around B//ab. The angular dependence of J c systematically varied with the multilayer structure of layer thickness and BSO content. J c depended on the layer thickness even with keeping the constant average BSO content, showing that the BaSnO3 distribution, as well as the average BaSnO3 content, affected the J c. The hybrid pinning effect of elongated-nanorods and nanorod ends improved the J c anisotropy although the effect was not so large in the present films. The control of strain and interface is expected to lead to further improvement of J c.

  14. Engineering Gold Nanorod-Based Plasmonic Nanocrystals for Optical Applications

    KAUST Repository

    Huang, Jianfeng

    2015-09-01

    Plasmonic nanocrystals have a unique ability to support localized surface plasmon resonances and exhibit rich and intriguing optical properties. Engineering plasmonic nanocrystals can maximize their potentials for specific applications. In this dissertation, we developed three unprecedented Au nanorod-based plasmonic nanocrystals through rational design of the crystal shape and/or composition, and successfully demonstrated their applications in light condensation, photothermal conversion, and surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS). The “Au nanorod-Au nanosphere dimer” nanocrystal was synthesized via the ligand-induced asymmetric growth of a Au nanosphere on a Au nanorod. This dimeric nanostructure features an extraordinary broadband optical absorption in the range of 400‒1400nm, and it proved to be an ideal black-body material for light condensation and an efficient solar-light harvester for photothermal conversion. The “Au nanorod (core) @ AuAg alloy (shell)” nanocrystal was built through the epitaxial growth of homogeneously alloyed AuAg shells on Au nanorods by precisely controlled synthesis. The resulting core-shell structured, bimetallic nanorods integrate the merits of the AuAg alloy with the advantages of anisotropic nanorods, exhibiting strong, stable and tunable surface plasmon resonances that are essential for SERS applications in a corrosive environment. The “high-index faceted Au nanorod (core) @ AuPd alloy (shell)” nanocrystal was produced via site-specific epitaxial growth of AuPd alloyed horns at the ends of Au nanorods. The AuPd alloyed horns are bound with high-index side facets, while the Au nanorod concentrates an intensive electric field at each end. This unique configuration unites highly active catalytic sites with strong SERS sites into a single entity and was demonstrated to be ideal for in situ monitoring of Pd-catalyzed reactions by SERS. The synthetic strategies developed here are promising towards the fabrication of

  15. Band Edge Energetics of Heterostructured Nanorods: Photoemission Spectroscopy and Waveguide Spectroelectrochemistry of Au-Tipped CdSe Nanorod Monolayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehamparam, Ramanan; Pavlopoulos, Nicholas G; Liao, Michael W; Hill, Lawrence J; Armstrong, Neal R; Pyun, Jeffrey; Saavedra, S Scott

    2015-09-22

    Conduction and valence band energies (ECB, EVB) for CdSe nanorods (NRs) functionalized with Au nanoparticle (NP) tips are reported here, referenced to the vacuum scale. We use (a) UV photoemission spectroscopy (UPS) to measure EVB for NR films, utilizing advanced approaches to secondary electron background correction, satellite removal to enhance spectral contrast, and correction for shifts in local vacuum levels; and (b) waveguide-based spectroelectrochemistry to measure ECB from onset potentials for electron injection into NR films tethered to ITO. For untipped CdSe NRs, both approaches show EVB = 5.9-6.1 eV and ECB = 4.1-4.3 eV. Addition of Au tips alters the NR band edge energies and introduces midgap states, in ways that are predicted to influence the efficiency of these nanomaterials as photoelectrocatalysts. UPS results show that Au tipping shifts EVB closer to vacuum by up to 0.4 eV, shifts the apparent Fermi energy toward the middle of the band gap, and introduces additional states above EVB. Spectroelectrochemical results confirm these trends: Au tipping shifts ECB closer to vacuum, by 0.4-0.6 eV, and introduces midgap states below ECB, which are assigned as metal-semiconductor interface (MSI) states. Characterization of these band edge energies and understanding the origins of MSI states is needed to design energy conversion systems with proper band alignment between the light absorbing NR, the NP catalyst, and solution electron donors and acceptors. The complementary characterization protocols presented here should be applicable to a wide variety of thin films of heterogeneous photoactive nanomaterials, aiding in the identification of the most promising material combinations for photoelectrochemical energy conversion.

  16. Metal-Semiconductor Contacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pugh, D. I.

    Metal-semiconductor contacts display a range of electrical characteristics from strongly rectifying to ohmic, each having its own applications. The rectifying properties of metal points on metallic sulphides were used extensively as detectors in early radio experiments, while during the second world war the rectifying point contact diode became important as a frequency detector and low level microwave radar detector [1]. Since 1945 the development of metal semiconductor contacts has been stimulated by the intense activity in the field of semiconductor physics and has remained vital in the ohmic connection of semiconductor devices with the outside world. The developments in surface science and the increased use of Schottky barriers in microelectronics has lead to much research with the aim of obtaining a full understanding of the physics of barrier formation and of current transport across the metal-semiconductor interface. Large gain spin electronic devices are possible with appropriate designs by incorporating ferromagnetic layers with semiconductors such as silicon [2]. This inevitably leads to metal-semiconductor contacts, and the impact of such junctions on the device must be considered. In this section we aim to look simply at the physical models that can be used to understand the electrical properties that can arise from these contacts, and then briefly discuss how deviations of these models can occur in practical junctions.

  17. Morphological and magnetic properties of the hydrothermally prepared α-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanorods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hadia, N.M.A., E-mail: nomery_abass@science.sohag.edu.eg [Departamentos de Química Física y Analítica y Química Orgánica e Inorgánica, Universidad de Oviedo, 33006 Oviedo (Spain); Physics Department, Faculty of Science, Sohag University, 82524 Sohag (Egypt); García-Granda, Santiago; García, José R. [Departamentos de Química Física y Analítica y Química Orgánica e Inorgánica, Universidad de Oviedo, 33006 Oviedo (Spain); Martínez-Blanco, D. [Servicios Científico-Técnicos, Universidad de Oviedo, 33006 Oviedo (Spain); Mohamed, S.H. [Physics Department, Faculty of Science, Sohag University, 82524 Sohag (Egypt)

    2014-10-15

    α-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanorods were synthesized via hydrothermal method. X-ray powder diffraction revealed the formation of rhombohedral α-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} single crystal phase with fiber texture. Scanning and transmission electron micrographs analyses showed that the rhombohedral α-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} has nanorods in shape with diameters of 40–85 nm and lengths of 150–45,000 nm. Isothermal magnetization vs. applied magnetic field curves measured at room and liquid nitrogen temperatures displayed a variation on magnetic ordering: from weak ferromagnetism at room temperature to not hysteretic behavior at liquid nitrogen temperature that is well described by a Langevin function. Moreover, the zero field cooling-field cooling curves under applied magnetic field of 100 Oe confirms the decreasing of Morin temperature transition due to nanometric size of the samples. - Highlights: • The structural and magnetic properties of α-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanorods are examined. • Rietveld and Harris texture indicated the [001] is preferentially oriented. • The magnetic characterization evidenced the presence of hematite α-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}.

  18. Coherent dynamics in semiconductors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvam, Jørn Märcher

    1998-01-01

    Ultrafast nonlinear optical spectroscopy is used to study the coherent dynamics of optically excited electron-hole pairs in semiconductors. Coulomb interaction implies that the optical inter-band transitions are dominated, at least at low temperatures, by excitonic effects. They are further...... and molecular systems are found and studied in the exciton-biexciton system of semiconductors. At densities where strong exciton interactions, or many-body effects, become dominant, the semiconductor Bloch equations present a more rigorous treatment of the phenomena Ultrafast degenerate four-wave mixing is used...

  19. Physics of semiconductor lasers

    CERN Document Server

    Mroziewicz, B; Nakwaski, W

    2013-01-01

    Written for readers who have some background in solid state physics but do not necessarily possess any knowledge of semiconductor lasers, this book provides a comprehensive and concise account of fundamental semiconductor laser physics, technology and properties. The principles of operation of these lasers are therefore discussed in detail with the interrelations between their design and optical, electrical and thermal properties. The relative merits of a large number of laser structures and their parameters are described to acquaint the reader with the various aspects of the semiconductor l

  20. Semiconductors bonds and bands

    CERN Document Server

    Ferry, David K

    2013-01-01

    As we settle into this second decade of the twenty-first century, it is evident that the advances in micro-electronics have truly revolutionized our day-to-day lifestyle. The technology is built upon semiconductors, materials in which the band gap has been engineered for special values suitable to the particular application. This book, written specifically for a one semester course for graduate students, provides a thorough understanding of the key solid state physics of semiconductors. It describes how quantum mechanics gives semiconductors unique properties that enabled the micro-electronics revolution, and sustain the ever-growing importance of this revolution.

  1. Spin physics in semiconductors

    CERN Document Server

    2017-01-01

    This book offers an extensive introduction to the extremely rich and intriguing field of spin-related phenomena in semiconductors. In this second edition, all chapters have been updated to include the latest experimental and theoretical research. Furthermore, it covers the entire field: bulk semiconductors, two-dimensional semiconductor structures, quantum dots, optical and electric effects, spin-related effects, electron-nuclei spin interactions, Spin Hall effect, spin torques, etc. Thanks to its self-contained style, the book is ideally suited for graduate students and researchers new to the field.

  2. Defects in semiconductors

    CERN Document Server

    Romano, Lucia; Jagadish, Chennupati

    2015-01-01

    This volume, number 91 in the Semiconductor and Semimetals series, focuses on defects in semiconductors. Defects in semiconductors help to explain several phenomena, from diffusion to getter, and to draw theories on materials' behavior in response to electrical or mechanical fields. The volume includes chapters focusing specifically on electron and proton irradiation of silicon, point defects in zinc oxide and gallium nitride, ion implantation defects and shallow junctions in silicon and germanium, and much more. It will help support students and scientists in their experimental and theoret

  3. Plasmonic Gold Nanorod Dispersions with Electrical and Optical Tunability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grabowski, Christopher; Mahoney, Clare; Park, Kyoungweon; Jawaid, Ali; White, Timothy; Vaia, Richard

    The transmissive, absorptive, electrical, and thermal properties of plasmonic gold nanorods (NRs) have led to their employment in a broad range of applications. These electro-optical properties - governed by their size, shape, and composition - are widely and precisely tunable during synthesis. Gold NRs show promise for large scale optical elements as they have been demonstrated to align faster than liquid crystal films (μs) at low fields (1 V/ μm). Successfully dispersing a high volume fraction of gold NRs requires a strategy to control particle-particle separation and thus avoid aggregation. Herein, we discuss the role of theta temperature and the ability to swell or collapse the chains of polymer-grafted gold NRs to alter the interaction potential between particles. UV-Vis spectroscopy, scattering, and electrical susceptibility characterization methods were employed to determine nanoparticle dispersion along with the degree of gold NR alignment. The development of new agile photonic materials, controllable with both light and electric fields, will help address emerging needs in laser hardening (agile filters) and variable transmission visors.

  4. Electrolysis of a molten semiconductor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Huayi; Chung, Brice; Sadoway, Donald R.

    2016-01-01

    Metals cannot be extracted by electrolysis of transition-metal sulfides because as liquids they are semiconductors, which exhibit high levels of electronic conduction and metal dissolution. Herein by introduction of a distinct secondary electrolyte, we reveal a high-throughput electro-desulfurization process that directly converts semiconducting molten stibnite (Sb2S3) into pure (99.9%) liquid antimony and sulfur vapour. At the bottom of the cell liquid antimony pools beneath cathodically polarized molten stibnite. At the top of the cell sulfur issues from a carbon anode immersed in an immiscible secondary molten salt electrolyte disposed above molten stibnite, thereby blocking electronic shorting across the cell. As opposed to conventional extraction practices, direct sulfide electrolysis completely avoids generation of problematic fugitive emissions (CO2, CO and SO2), significantly reduces energy consumption, increases productivity in a single-step process (lower capital and operating costs) and is broadly applicable to a host of electronically conductive transition-metal chalcogenides. PMID:27553525

  5. Photoelectrochemistry of Semiconductor Nanowire Arrays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mallouk, Thomas E; Redwing, Joan M

    2009-11-10

    This project supported research on the growth and photoelectrochemical characterization of semiconductor nanowire arrays, and on the development of catalytic materials for visible light water splitting to produce hydrogen and oxygen. Silicon nanowires were grown in the pores of anodic aluminum oxide films by the vapor-liquid-solid technique and were characterized electrochemically. Because adventitious doping from the membrane led to high dark currents, silicon nanowire arrays were then grown on silicon substrates. The dependence of the dark current and photovoltage on preparation techniques, wire diameter, and defect density was studied for both p-silicon and p-indium phosphide nanowire arrays. The open circuit photovoltage of liquid junction cells increased with increasing wire diameter, reaching 350 mV for micron-diameter silicon wires. Liquid junction and radial p-n junction solar cells were fabricated from silicon nano- and microwire arrays and tested. Iridium oxide cluster catalysts stabilized by bidentate malonate and succinate ligands were also made and studied for the water oxidation reaction. Highlights of this project included the first papers on silicon and indium phosphide nanowire solar cells, and a new procedure for making ligand-stabilized water oxidation catalysts that can be covalently linked to molecular photosensitizers or electrode surfaces.

  6. Porphyrin coordination polymer nanospheres and nanorods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhongchun; Shelnutt, John A.; Medforth, Craig J.

    2012-12-04

    A porphyrin coordination polymer nanostructure comprising a network of pyridyl porphyrin molecules and coordinating metal ions coordinatively bound through the pyridyl groups. In some embodiments, the porphyrins are metalloporphyrins. A variety of nanostructures are formed by the network polymer, including nanospheres, polygonal nanostructures, nanorods, and nanofibers, depending on a variety of factors including coordination metal ion, porphyrin type, metal of the metalloporphyrin, and degree of agitation during nanostructure formation. Reduction of coordinating metal ions may be used to form metal nanoparticles on the coordination polymer nanostructure.

  7. Silane decorated metallic nanorods for hydrophobic applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kannarpady, Ganesh K.; Sharma, Rajesh; Liu Bo; Trigwell, Steve; Ryerson, Charles; Biris, Alexandru S.

    2010-01-01

    A novel technique to modify a metallic surface for anti-icing applications is presented. An oblique angle deposition (OAD) technique has been used to fabricate metallic nanorods of Aluminum and Tungsten on a glass substrate. A conformal coating of a silane has been applied using a molecular vapor deposition technique. The resulting surface has shown a static contact angle of 134 deg. with the water droplet. SEM, AFM and XPS have been used to study the surface modification. This is a highly promising approach for anti-icing applications due to its scalability at a very low cost.

  8. Synthesis of lanthanum hydroxide nanorods by low-temperature aging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dodd, Aaron, E-mail: a.dodd@unsw.edu.au [Electron Microscope Unit, University of New South Wales, Chemical Sciences Building (F10), Kensington UNSW, Sydney NSW 2052 (Australia)

    2012-10-15

    This paper presents the results of an investigation into the synthesis of La(OH){sub 3} nanorods by low-temperature aging. It was found that formation of La(OH){sub 3} nanorods was suppressed at room temperature and also by the presence of precipitation by-products, such as NaCH{sub 3}COO and residual NaOH, during the aging process. Well formed nanorods were only achieved by washing the precipitated suspension prior to aging at an elevated temperature of 60 Degree-Sign C. Unlike previous studies that utilized hydrothermal processing at high temperature and pressure, the nanorods synthesised in this study were not single crystals but were instead composed of crystals viewed down the [12{sup Macron }10] and [11{sup Macron }00] zone axes with a common [0001] growth direction. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Investigated low temperature aging as a simple method for preparing La(OH){sub 3} nanorods. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nanorod formation favored by aging in pure water at slightly elevated temperature. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nanorod structure was different to that produced by hydrothermal processing.

  9. In vitro toxicity studies of polymer-coated gold nanorods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rayavarapu, Raja G.; Petersen, Wilma; Hartsuiker, Liesbeth; Chin, Patrick; Janssen, Hans; van Leeuwen, Fijs W. B.; Otto, Cees; Manohar, Srirang; van Leeuwen, Ton G.

    2010-04-01

    We evaluated cellular responses to polymer-treated gold nanorods, which were synthesized using the standard wet-chemistry method that utilizes hexadecyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB). The nanorod dispersions were coated with either polystyrene sulfonate (PSS) or polyethylene glycol (PEG). Two sizes of nanorods were tested, with optical responses peaking at 628 and 773 nm. The cells were from mammary adenocarcinoma (SKBR3), Chinese Hamster Ovary (CHO), mouse myoblast (C2C12) and Human Leukemia (HL60) cell lines. Their mitochondrial function following exposure to the nanorods were assessed using the MTS assay. We found PEGylated particles to have superior biocompatibility compared with PSS-coated nanorods, which showed substantial cytotoxicity. Electron microscopy showed no cellular uptake of PEGylated particles compared with their PSS counterparts. PEGylated gold nanorods also exhibited better dispersion stability in the presence of cell growth medium; PSS-coated rods tended to flocculate or cluster. In the case of the PSS particles, toxicity correlated with surface area across the two sizes of nanorods studied.

  10. In vitro toxicity studies of polymer-coated gold nanorods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rayavarapu, Raja G; Petersen, Wilma; Manohar, Srirang; Van Leeuwen, Ton G [Biomedical Photonic Imaging Group, MIRA Institute for Biomedical Technology and Technical Medicine, Faculty of Science and Technology, University of Twente, PO Box 217, 7500AE Enschede (Netherlands); Hartsuiker, Liesbeth; Otto, Cees [Medical Cell Biophysics, MIRA Institute for Biomedical Technology and Technical Medicine, Faculty of Science and Technology, University of Twente, PO Box 217, 7500AE Enschede (Netherlands); Chin, Patrick; Van Leeuwen, Fijs W B [Division of Diagnostic Oncology, Netherlands Cancer Institute, 1066 CX Amsterdam (Netherlands); Janssen, Hans, E-mail: S.Manohar@utwente.nl [Division of Cell Biology, The Netherlands Cancer Institute, 1066 CX Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2010-04-09

    We evaluated cellular responses to polymer-treated gold nanorods, which were synthesized using the standard wet-chemistry method that utilizes hexadecyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB). The nanorod dispersions were coated with either polystyrene sulfonate (PSS) or polyethylene glycol (PEG). Two sizes of nanorods were tested, with optical responses peaking at 628 and 773 nm. The cells were from mammary adenocarcinoma (SKBR3), Chinese Hamster Ovary (CHO), mouse myoblast (C2C12) and Human Leukemia (HL60) cell lines. Their mitochondrial function following exposure to the nanorods were assessed using the MTS assay. We found PEGylated particles to have superior biocompatibility compared with PSS-coated nanorods, which showed substantial cytotoxicity. Electron microscopy showed no cellular uptake of PEGylated particles compared with their PSS counterparts. PEGylated gold nanorods also exhibited better dispersion stability in the presence of cell growth medium; PSS-coated rods tended to flocculate or cluster. In the case of the PSS particles, toxicity correlated with surface area across the two sizes of nanorods studied.

  11. Biggest semiconductor installed

    CERN Multimedia

    2008-01-01

    Scientists and technicians at the European Laboratory for Particle Physics, commonly known by its French acronym CERN (Centre Europen pour la Recherche Nuclaire), have completed the installation of the largest semiconductor silicon detector.

  12. Isotopically controlled semiconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haller, E.E.

    2004-11-15

    A review of recent research involving isotopically controlled semiconductors is presented. Studies with isotopically enriched semiconductor structures experienced a dramatic expansion at the end of the Cold War when significant quantities of enriched isotopes of elements forming semiconductors became available for worldwide collaborations. Isotopes of an element differ in nuclear mass, may have different nuclear spins and undergo different nuclear reactions. Among the latter, the capture of thermal neutrons which can lead to neutron transmutation doping, can be considered the most important one for semiconductors. Experimental and theoretical research exploiting the differences in all the properties has been conducted and will be illustrated with selected examples. Manuel Cardona, the longtime editor-in-chief of Solid State Communications has been and continues to be one of the major contributors to this field of solid state physics and it is a great pleasure to dedicate this review to him.

  13. Semiconductor nuclear detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schaub, Bernard

    1976-01-01

    Three semiconductors are nowadays available for nuclear detection (germanium, mercury iodide, cadmium telluride). Their methods of elaboration are briefly described and, as a conclusion, a very close at-hand development of cadmium telluride is foreseen [fr

  14. Compact semiconductor lasers

    CERN Document Server

    Yu, Siyuan; Lourtioz, Jean-Michel

    2014-01-01

    This book brings together in a single volume a unique contribution by the top experts around the world in the field of compact semiconductor lasers to provide a comprehensive description and analysis of the current status as well as future directions in the field of micro- and nano-scale semiconductor lasers. It is organized according to the various forms of micro- or nano-laser cavity configurations with each chapter discussing key technical issues, including semiconductor carrier recombination processes and optical gain dynamics, photonic confinement behavior and output coupling mechanisms, carrier transport considerations relevant to the injection process, and emission mode control. Required reading for those working in and researching the area of semiconductors lasers and micro-electronics.

  15. Radiation effects in semiconductors

    CERN Document Server

    2011-01-01

    There is a need to understand and combat potential radiation damage problems in semiconductor devices and circuits. Written by international experts, this book explains the effects of radiation on semiconductor devices, radiation detectors, and electronic devices and components. These contributors explore emerging applications, detector technologies, circuit design techniques, new materials, and innovative system approaches. The text focuses on how the technology is being used rather than the mathematical foundations behind it. It covers CMOS radiation-tolerant circuit implementations, CMOS pr

  16. Market survey of semiconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mackintosh, I.M.; Diegel, D.; Brown, A.; Brinker, C.S. den

    1977-06-01

    Examination of technology and product trends over the range of current and future products in integrated circuits and optoelectronic displays. Analysis and forecast of major economic influences that affect the production costs of integrated circuits and optoelectronic displays. Forecast of the applications and markets for integrated circuits up to 1985 in West Europe, the USA and Japan. Historic development of the semiconductor industry and the prevailing tendencies - factors which influence success in the semiconductor industry. (orig.) [de

  17. Photonic nanorods with magnetic responsiveness regulated by lattice defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Huiru; Tang, Kai; Luo, Wei; Ma, Lin; Cui, Qian; Li, Wei; Guan, Jianguo

    2017-03-02

    Herein, we use experiments and numerical simulations to demonstrate a novel class of magnetically responsive photonic crystals (MRPCs) based on photonic nanorods which exhibit multiple optical properties in a magnetic field (H) due to their fixed photonic nanorods and H-tunable lattice defects. As an example, superparamagnetic Fe 3 O 4 @polyvinyl pyrrolidone (PVP)@SiO 2 photonic nanorods were fabricated through a polyacrylic acid-catalysed hydrolysis-condensation reaction of γ-mercaptopropyltrimethoxysilane around chain-like PC templates formed by monodispersed Fe 3 O 4 @PVP particles under H. For the as-proposed MRPCs, with increasing H, the photonic nanorods firstly experience in situ rotational orientation along the H direction, followed by alignment and connection into long parellel nanochains via the spaces between the ends of adjacent photonic nanorods (named lattice defects). As the number and size of the lattice defects changes with H, the MRPCs exhibit visible red-shifts and blue-shifts of their diffraction wavelengths in addition to monotonous enhancement of their diffraction peaks. These optical properties are very different from those of previously reported MRPCs. The diversity of the structural colors and brightness of these MRPCs with H is also closely dependent on the applied time of H, the concentration of the photonic nanorods, and the structural parameters of the nanorods, including nanorod length and interparticle distance. Due to the difficult duplication of their various optical properties as well as their easy fabrication and low cost, MRPCs based on photonic nanorods are suitable for wide applications in forgery protection and information encryption.

  18. Optoelectronic properties of semiconductor nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maher, Kristin Nicole

    Semiconductor nanostructures have unique optical and electronic properties that have inspired research into their technological applications and basic science. This thesis presents approaches to the fabrication and characterization of optoelectronic devices incorporating individual semiconductor nanostructures. Nanowires of the II-VI semiconductors CdSe and CdS were synthesized using nanoparticle-catalysed solution-liquid-solid growth. Single-component nanowires and heterostructure nanowires with axial compositional modulation were generated using this method. Individual nanowires and nanocrystals were then incorporated into devices with a three-terminal field-effect transistor geometry. An experimental platform was developed which allows for simultaneous electrical characterization of devices and measurement of their optical properties. This setup enables the measurement of spatially and spectrally resolved electroluminescence (EL) and photoluminescence (PL) from individual nanostructures and nanostructure devices. It also allows the measurement of photon coincidence histograms for emitted light and the acquisition of photocurrent images via laser scanning microscopy. Electroluminescence was observed from individual CdSe nanocrystals contacted by gold electrodes. Concomitant transport measurements at low temperature showed clear evidence of Coulomb blockade at low bias voltage, with light only emitted from devices exhibiting asymmetric tunnel couplings between the nanocrystal and electrodes. Combined analyses of the data indicate that the resistances of the tunnel barriers are bias voltage dependent and that light emission results from the inelastic scattering of tunneling electrons. Three-terminal devices incorporating individual CdSe nanoNvires exhibited EL localized near the positively-biased electrode. Characterization of these devices by scanning photocurrent microscopy (SPCM) and Kelvin probe microscopy (KPM) indicates that while there are n-type Schottky

  19. Preparation of ZnS nanorods by ultrasonic waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Behboudnia, M.; Majlesara, M.H.; Khanbabaee, B.

    2005-01-01

    ZnS nanorods of approximately 1 μm in length and 20 nm in diameter have been prepared by sonicating ethylenediamine solution of elemental S and zinc acetate in presence of 1-decanthiol under air. The nanorods were characterized using techniques such as X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscope (SEM), energy-dispersive X-ray analysis (EDAX) and UV-vis absorption spectroscopy. The as-prepared nanorods have regular shape, narrow size distribution and high purity, having band gap of 4.56 eV compared to 3.54 eV corresponding to its bulk single-crystal

  20. Facile Hydrogen Evolution Reaction on WO3Nanorods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajeswari Janarthanan

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available AbstractTungsten trioxide nanorods have been generated by the thermal decomposition (450 °C of tetrabutylammonium decatungstate. The synthesized tungsten trioxide (WO3 nanorods have been characterized by XRD, Raman, SEM, TEM, HRTEM and cyclic voltammetry. High resolution transmission electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction analysis showed that the synthesized WO3nanorods are crystalline in nature with monoclinic structure. The electrochemical experiments showed that they constitute a better electrocatalytic system for hydrogen evolution reaction in acid medium compared to their bulk counterpart.

  1. Laser cooling in semiconductors (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jun

    2017-06-01

    Laser cooling of semiconductor is very important topic in science researches and technological applications. Here we will report our progresses on laser cooling in semiconductors. By using of strong coupling between excitons and longitudinal optical phonons (LOPs), which allows the resonant annihilation of multiple LOPs in luminescence up-conversion processes, we observe a net cooling by about 40 K starting from 290 kelvin with 514-nm pumping and about 15 K starting from100 K with 532-nm pumping in a semiconductor using group-II-VI cadmium sulphide nanobelts. We also discuss the thickness dependence of laser cooing in CdS nanobelts, a concept porotype of semiconductor cryocooler and possibility of laser cooling in II-VI semiconductor family including CdSSe、CdSe, CdSe/ZnTe QDs and bulk CdS et al., Beyond II-VI semiconductor, we will present our recent progress in laser cooling of organic-inorganic perovskite materials, which show a very big cooling power and external quantum efficiency in 3D and 2D case. Further more, we demonstrate a resolved sideband Raman cooling of a specific LO phonon in ZnTe, in which only one specific phonon resonant with exciton can be cooled or heated. In the end, we will discuss the nonlinear anti-Stokes Raman and anti-Stokes photoluminescence upcoversion in very low temperature as low as down to liquid 4.2 K. In this case, the anti-Stokes resonance induces a quadratic power denpendece of anti-Stokes Raman and anti-Stokes PL. We proposed a CARS-like process to explain it. This nonlinear process also provides a possible physics picture of ultra-low temperatures phonon assisted photoluminescence and anti-Stokes Raman process.

  2. Tunable photovoltaic performance of preferentially oriented rutile TiO2 nanorod photoanodes based dye sensitized solar cells with quasi-state electrolyte.

    Science.gov (United States)

    T C, Sabari Girisun; C, Jeganathan; N, Pavithra; Anandan, Sambandam

    2017-12-20

    Photoanodes made of highly oriented TiO2 nanorod arrays with different aspect ratios were synthesized via one-step hydrothermal technique. Preferentially oriented single crystalline rutile TiO2 was confirmed by the single peak in XRD pattern (2θ=63o, (0 0 2)). FESEM image evidence the growth of an array of nanorods having different geometry with respect to reaction time and solution refreshment rate. The length, diameter and aspect ratio of the nanorods increased with reaction time as 4 hours (1.98 μm, 121 nm, 15.32), 8 hours (4 μm, 185 nm, 22.70), 12 hours (5.6 μm, 242 nm, 27.24) and 16 hours (8 μm, 254 nm, 38.02) respectively. Unlike conventional Dye-Sensitized Solar Cell (DSSC) with a liquid electrolyte, DSSC were fabricated here using 1D rutile TiO2 nanorods based photoanodes, N719 dye and quasi-state electrolyte. The charge transport properties were investigated from current-voltage curves and fitted using one-diode model. Interestingly photovoltaic performance of DSSCs increased exponentially with the length of the nanorod and is attributed to the higher surface to volume ratio, more dye anchoring, and channelized electron transport. Higher photovoltaic performance (Jsc=5.99 mA/cm2, Voc=750 mV, η=3.08%) was observed with photoanodes (16 hours) made of densely packed longest TiO2 nanorods (8 µm, 254 nm). © 2017 IOP Publishing Ltd.

  3. Superior wear resistance of aggregated diamond nanorods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubrovinskaia, Natalia; Dub, Sergey; Dubrovinsky, Leonid

    2006-04-01

    The hardness of single-crystal diamond is superior to all other known materials, but its performance as a superabrasive is limited because of its low wear resistance. This is the consequence of diamond's low thermal stability (it graphitizes at elevated temperature), low fracture toughness (it tends to cleave preferentially along the octahedral (111) crystal plains), and large directional effect in polishing (some directions appear to be "soft", i.e., easy to abrade, because diamond is anisotropic in many of its physical properties). Here we report the results of measurements of mechanical properties (hardness, fracture toughness, and Young's modulus) of aggregated diamond nanorods (ADNRs) synthesized as a bulk sample. Our investigation has shown that this nanocrystalline material has the fracture toughness 11.1 +/- 1.2 MPa.m(0.5), which exceeds that of natural and synthetic diamond (that varies from 3.4 to 5.0 MPa.m(0.5)) by 2-3 times. At the same time, having a hardness and Young's modulus comparable to that of natural diamond and suppressed because of the random orientation of nanorods "soft" directions, ADNR samples show the enhancement of wear resistance up to 300% in comparison with commercially available polycrystalline diamonds (PCDs). This makes ADNRs extremely prospective materials for applications as superabrasives.

  4. Strain-Driven Stacking Faults in CdSe/CdS Core/Shell Nanorods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demortière, Arnaud; Leonard, Donovan N; Petkov, Valeri; Chapman, Karena; Chattopadhyay, Soma; She, Chunxing; Cullen, David A; Shibata, Tomohiro; Pelton, Matthew; Shevchenko, Elena V

    2018-04-19

    Colloidal semiconductor nanocrystals are commonly grown with a shell of a second semiconductor material to obtain desired physical properties, such as increased photoluminescence quantum yield. However, the growth of a lattice-mismatched shell results in strain within the nanocrystal, and this strain has the potential to produce crystalline defects. Here, we study CdSe/CdS core/shell nanorods as a model system to investigate the influence of core size and shape on the formation of stacking faults in the nanocrystal. Using a combination of high-angle annular dark-field scanning transmission electron microscopy and pair-distribution-function analysis of synchrotron X-ray scattering, we show that growth of the CdS shell on smaller, spherical CdSe cores results in relatively small strain and few stacking faults. By contrast, growth of the shell on larger, prolate spheroidal cores leads to significant strain in the CdS lattice, resulting in a high density of stacking faults.

  5. Cytotoxicity of metal and semiconductor nanoparticles indicated by cellular micromotility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarantola, Marco; Schneider, David; Sunnick, Eva; Adam, Holger; Pierrat, Sebastien; Rosman, Christina; Breus, Vladimir; Sönnichsen, Carsten; Basché, Thomas; Wegener, Joachim; Janshoff, Andreas

    2009-01-27

    In the growing field of nanotechnology, there is an urgent need to sensitively determine the toxicity of nanoparticles since many technical and medical applications are based on controlled exposure to particles, that is, as contrast agents or for drug delivery. Before the in vivo implementation, in vitro cell experiments are required to achieve a detailed knowledge of toxicity and biodegradation as a function of the nanoparticles' physical and chemical properties. In this study, we show that the micromotility of animal cells as monitored by electrical cell-substrate impedance analysis (ECIS) is highly suitable to quantify in vitro cytotoxicity of semiconductor quantum dots and gold nanorods. The method is validated by conventional cytotoxicity testing and accompanied by fluorescence and dark-field microscopy to visualize changes in the cytoskeleton integrity and to determine the location of the particles within the cell.

  6. Growth and structure analysis of tungsten oxide nanorods using environmental TEM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokunaga, Tomoharu; Kawamoto, Tadashi; Tanaka, Kenta; Nakamura, Naohiro; Hayashi, Yasuhiko; Sasaki, Katsuhiro; Kuroda, Kotaro; Yamamoto, Takahisa

    2012-01-25

    WO3 nanorods targeted for applications in electric devices were grown from a tungsten wire heated in an oxygen atmosphere inside an environmental transmission electron microscope, which allowed the growth process to be observed to reveal the growth mechanism of the WO3 nanorods. The initial growth of the nanorods did not consist of tungsten oxide but rather crystal tungsten. The formed crystal tungsten nanorods were then oxidized, resulting in the formation of the tungsten oxide nanorods. Furthermore, it is expected that the nanorods grew through cracks in the natural surface oxide layer on the tungsten wire.

  7. Novel nanorods based on PANI / PEO polymers using electrospinning method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Hazeem, Nabeel Z.; Ahmed, Naser M.; Matjafri, M. Z.; Sabah, Fayroz A.; Rasheed, Hiba S.

    2016-01-01

    In this work, we fabricated nanorods by applying an electric potential on poly (ethylene oxide) (PEO) and polyaniline (PANI) as a polymeric solution by electrospinning method. Testing was conducted on the samples by field emission scanning Electron microscope (FE-SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Photoluminescence. And the results showed the emergence of nanorods in the sample within glass substrate. Diameters of nanorods have ranged between (52.78-122.40)nm And a length of between (1.15 – 1.32)μm. The emergence of so the results are for the first time, never before was the fabrication of nanorods for polymers using the same method used in this research.

  8. Novel nanorods based on PANI / PEO polymers using electrospinning method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-Hazeem, Nabeel Z., E-mail: nabeelnano333@gmail.com [Nano-Optoelectronics Research and Technology Laboratory, School of Physics, Universiti Sains Malaysia, 11800 USM, Penang (Malaysia); Ministry of Education, the General Directorate for Educational Anbar (Iraq); Ahmed, Naser M.; Matjafri, M. Z. [Nano-Optoelectronics Research and Technology Laboratory, School of Physics, Universiti Sains Malaysia, 11800 USM, Penang (Malaysia); Sabah, Fayroz A. [Nano-Optoelectronics Research and Technology Laboratory, School of Physics, Universiti Sains Malaysia, 11800 USM, Penang (Malaysia); Department of Electrical Engineering, College of Engineering, Al-Mustansiriya University, Baghdad (Iraq); Rasheed, Hiba S. [Nano-Optoelectronics Research and Technology Laboratory, School of Physics, Universiti Sains Malaysia, 11800 USM, Penang (Malaysia); Department of Physics, College of Education, Al-Mustansiriya University, Baghdad (Iraq)

    2016-07-06

    In this work, we fabricated nanorods by applying an electric potential on poly (ethylene oxide) (PEO) and polyaniline (PANI) as a polymeric solution by electrospinning method. Testing was conducted on the samples by field emission scanning Electron microscope (FE-SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Photoluminescence. And the results showed the emergence of nanorods in the sample within glass substrate. Diameters of nanorods have ranged between (52.78-122.40)nm And a length of between (1.15 – 1.32)μm. The emergence of so the results are for the first time, never before was the fabrication of nanorods for polymers using the same method used in this research.

  9. Porphyrin nanorods-polymer composites for solar radiation harvesting applications

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mongwaketsi, NP

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available , using latex technology and electrospinning which gave the possibility of investigating the orientation of nanorods in the polymer. Spectroscopic and microscopic studies were conducted to investigate the optical and morphological properties...

  10. Adsorption of Organophosphate Pesticide Dimethoate on Gold Nanospheres and Nanorods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatjana Momić

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Organophosphorus pesticide dimethoate was adsorbed onto gold nanospheres and nanorods in aqueous solution using batch technique. Adsorption of dimethoate onto gold nanoparticles was confirmed by UV-Vis spectrophotometry, TEM, AFM, and FTIR analysis. The adsorption of nanospheres resulted in aggregation which was not the case with nanorods. Nanoparticles adsorption features were characterized using Langmuir and Freundlich isotherm models. The Langmuir adsorption isotherm was found to have the best fit to the experimental data for both types of nanoparticles. Adsorption capacity detected for nanospheres is 456 mg/g and for nanorods is 57.1 mg/g. Also, nanoparticles were successfully used for dimethoate removal from spiked drinking water while nanospheres were shown to be more efficient than nanorods.

  11. Li-driven electrochemical properties of WO3 nanorods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Qiang; Wen Zhenhai; Jeong, Yeonseok; Choi, Jiyoung; Lee, Kwangyeol; Li, Jinghong

    2006-01-01

    The Li-driven electrochemical properties of monoclinic WO 3 nanorods, which are prepared by a solution-based colloidal approach, have been studied, and the relationship between the properties and the nanostructures of the material has been established. The electrochemical reactions towards lithium involved in WO 3 nanorods were investigated by means of a galvanostatic method and an impedance technique, and superior characteristics associated with one-dimensional nanostructures were observed. WO 3 nanorods with a high aspect ratio were found to yield an intercalation capacity up to 1.12 Li per formula unit, much higher than the value of 0.78 Li per formula unit for bulk WO 3 . This can be explained on the basis of the unique rod-like structure that effectively enhanced structure stability. The evolution of Li-driven reaction kinetics further illustrated benefits of WO 3 nanorods owing to the increased edge and corner effects

  12. Gold nanorods and nanospheroids for enhancing spontaneous emission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohammadi, A; Sandoghdar, V; Agio, M

    2008-01-01

    We compute the radiative decay rate and the quantum efficiency for an emitter coupled to gold nanorods and nanospheroids using the body-of-revolution finite-difference time-domain method. We study these quantities as a function of the nanoparticle aspect ratio and volume, showing that large enhancements can be achieved with realistic parameters. Moreover, we find that nanospheroids exhibit better performances than nanorods for applications in the visible and near-infrared spectral range.

  13. Gold nanorods and nanospheroids for enhancing spontaneous emission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohammadi, A [Department of Physics, Persian Gulf University, 75196 Bushehr (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Sandoghdar, V; Agio, M [Laboratory of Physical Chemistry, ETH Zurich, 8093 Zurich (Switzerland)], E-mail: mario.agio@phys.chem.ethz.ch

    2008-10-15

    We compute the radiative decay rate and the quantum efficiency for an emitter coupled to gold nanorods and nanospheroids using the body-of-revolution finite-difference time-domain method. We study these quantities as a function of the nanoparticle aspect ratio and volume, showing that large enhancements can be achieved with realistic parameters. Moreover, we find that nanospheroids exhibit better performances than nanorods for applications in the visible and near-infrared spectral range.

  14. Synthesis and Tribological Properties of WSe2Nanorods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Jinghai

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The WSe2nanorods were synthesized via solid-state reaction method and characterized by X-ray diffractometer, TEM, and HRTEM. The results indicated the WSe2compounds had rod-like structures with diameters of 10–50 nm and lengths of 100–400 nm, and the growth process of WSe2nanorods was discussed on the basis of the experimental facts. The tribological properties of WSe2nanorods as additives in HVI500 base oil were investigated by UMT-2 multispecimen tribotester. Under the determinate conditions, the friction coefficient of the base oil containing WSe2nanorods was lower than that of the base oil, and decreased with increasing mass fraction of WSe2nanorods when it was <7 wt.%. Moreover, the base oil with the additives was rather suited to high load and high rotating speed. A combination of rolling friction, sliding friction, and stable tribofilm on the rubbing surface could explain the good friction and wear properties of WSe2nanorods as additives.

  15. In vivo toxicity studies of europium hydroxide nanorods in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patra, Chitta Ranjan; Abdel Moneim, Soha S.; Wang, Enfeng; Dutta, Shamit; Patra, Sujata; Eshed, Michal; Mukherjee, Priyabrata; Gedanken, Aharon; Shah, Vijay H.; Mukhopadhyay, Debabrata

    2009-01-01

    Lanthanide nanoparticles and nanorods have been widely used for diagnostic and therapeutic applications in biomedical nanotechnology due to their fluorescence and pro-angiogenic properties to endothelial cells, respectively. Recently, we have demonstrated that europium (III) hydroxide [Eu III (OH) 3 ] nanorods, synthesized by the microwave technique and characterized by several physico-chemical techniques, can be used as pro-angiogenic agents which introduce future therapeutic treatment strategies for severe ischemic heart/limb disease, and peripheral ischemic disease. The toxicity of these inorganic nanorods to endothelial cells was supported by several in vitro assays. To determine the in vivo toxicity, these nanorods were administered to mice through intraperitoneal injection (IP) everyday over a period of seven days in a dose dependent (1.25 to 125 mg kg -1 day -1 ) and time dependent manner (8-60 days). Bio-distribution of europium elements in different organs was analyzed by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICPMS). Short-term (S-T) and long-term (L-T) toxicity studies (mice euthanized on days 8 and 60 for S-T and L-T, respectively) show normal blood hematology and serum clinical chemistry with the exception of a slight elevation of liver enzymes. Histological examination of nanorod-treated vital organs (liver, kidney, spleen and lungs) showed no or only mild histological changes that indicate mild toxicity at the higher dose of nanorods.

  16. Selective Facet Reactivity During Cation Exchange in Cadmium Sulfide Nanorods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sadtler, Bryce; Demchenko, Denis; Zheng, Haimei; Hughes, Steven; Merkle, Maxwell; Dahmen, Ulrich; Wang, Lin-Wang; Alivisatos, A. Paul

    2008-12-18

    The partial transformation of ionic nanocrystals through cation exchange has been used to synthesize nanocrystal heterostructures. We demonstrate that the selectivity for cation exchange to take place at different facets of the nanocrystal plays an important role in determining the resulting morphology of the binary heterostructure. In the case of copper I (Cu+) cation exchange in cadmium sulfide (CdS) nanorods, the reaction starts preferentially at the ends of the nanorods such that copper sulfide (Cu2S) grows inwards from either end. The resulting morphology is very different from the striped pattern obtained in our previous studies of silver I (Ag+) exchange in CdS nanorods where non-selective nucleation of silver sulfide (Ag2S) occurs. From interface formation energies calculated for several models of epitaxialconnections between CdS and Cu2S or Ag2S, we infer the relative stability of each interface during the nucleation and growth of Cu2S or Ag2S within the CdS nanorods. The epitaxial connections of Cu2S to the end facets of CdS nanorods minimize the formation energy, making these interfaces stable throughout the exchange reaction. However, as the two end facets of wurtzite CdS nanorods are crystallographically nonequivalent, asymmetric heterostructures can be produced.

  17. Coherent dynamics in semiconductors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvam, Jørn Märcher

    1998-01-01

    enhanced in quantum confined lower-dimensional systems, where exciton and biexciton effects dominate the spectra even at room temperature. The coherent dynamics of excitons are at modest densities well described by the optical Bloch equations and a number of the dynamical effects known from atomic......Ultrafast nonlinear optical spectroscopy is used to study the coherent dynamics of optically excited electron-hole pairs in semiconductors. Coulomb interaction implies that the optical inter-band transitions are dominated, at least at low temperatures, by excitonic effects. They are further...... and molecular systems are found and studied in the exciton-biexciton system of semiconductors. At densities where strong exciton interactions, or many-body effects, become dominant, the semiconductor Bloch equations present a more rigorous treatment of the phenomena Ultrafast degenerate four-wave mixing is used...

  18. Hydrogen in semiconductors II

    CERN Document Server

    Nickel, Norbert H; Weber, Eicke R; Nickel, Norbert H

    1999-01-01

    Since its inception in 1966, the series of numbered volumes known as Semiconductors and Semimetals has distinguished itself through the careful selection of well-known authors, editors, and contributors. The "Willardson and Beer" Series, as it is widely known, has succeeded in publishing numerous landmark volumes and chapters. Not only did many of these volumes make an impact at the time of their publication, but they continue to be well-cited years after their original release. Recently, Professor Eicke R. Weber of the University of California at Berkeley joined as a co-editor of the series. Professor Weber, a well-known expert in the field of semiconductor materials, will further contribute to continuing the series' tradition of publishing timely, highly relevant, and long-impacting volumes. Some of the recent volumes, such as Hydrogen in Semiconductors, Imperfections in III/V Materials, Epitaxial Microstructures, High-Speed Heterostructure Devices, Oxygen in Silicon, and others promise that this tradition ...

  19. Fundamentals of semiconductor lasers

    CERN Document Server

    Numai, Takahiro

    2015-01-01

    This book explains physics under the operating principles of semiconductor lasers in detail based on the experience of the author, dealing with the first manufacturing of phase-shifted DFB-LDs and recent research on transverse modes.   The book also bridges a wide gap between journal papers and textbooks, requiring only an undergraduate-level knowledge of electromagnetism and quantum mechanics, and helps readers to understand journal papers where definitions of some technical terms vary, depending on the paper. Two definitions of the photon density in the rate equations and two definitions of the phase-shift in the phase-shifted DFB-LD are explained, and differences in the calculated results are indicated, depending on the definitions.    Readers can understand the physics of semiconductor lasers and analytical tools for Fabry-Perot LDs, DFB-LDs, and VCSELs and will be stimulated to develop semiconductor lasers themselves.

  20. Basic Semiconductor Physics

    CERN Document Server

    Hamaguchi, Chihiro

    2010-01-01

    This book presents a detailed description of the basic semiconductor physics. The reader is assumed to have a basic command of mathematics and some elementary knowledge of solid state physics. The text covers a wide range of important phenomena in semiconductors, from the simple to the advanced. The reader can understand three different methods of energy band calculations, empirical pseudo-potential, k.p perturbation and tight-binding methods. The effective mass approximation and electron motion in a periodic potential, Boltzmann transport equation and deformation potentials used for full band Monte Carlo simulation are discussed. Experiments and theoretical analysis of cyclotron resonance are discussed in detail because the results are essential to the understanding of semiconductor physics. Optical and transport properties, magneto-transport, two dimensional electron gas transport (HEMT and MOSFET), and quantum transport are reviewed, explaining optical transition, electron phonon interactions, electron mob...

  1. Flux pinning properties of ErBa2Cu3Oy thin films with BaZrO3 nanorods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haruta, M; Fujiyoshi, T; Sueyoshi, T; Dezaki, K; Ichigosaki, D; Miyahara, K; Miyagawa, R; Mukaida, M; Matsumoto, K; Yoshida, Y; Ichinose, A; Horii, S

    2006-01-01

    ErBa 2 Cu 3 O y (ErBCO) thin films with BaZrO 3 (BZO) nanorods were prepared by a PLD method for an enhancement of the critical current density J c . The values of J c for the ErBCO thin film containing 1.5 wt% BZO (Er15) in magnetic fields are higher than those for the ErBCO thin film containing 0.5 wt% BZO (Er05). The peaks of J c have been observed in the angular dependence of J c in both the films when the magnetic field is applied parallel to the c-axis. It has been found that the peak is attributed to the flux pinning by BZO nanorods oriented parallel to the c-axis. The vortex glass-liquid transition temperature T g and the pinning parameter m were derived by fitting observed electric transport properties to the theoretical expression based on the percolation transition model. The value of T g of Er15 is higher than that of Er05. This result indicates that the vortex glass phase extends to a higher temperature region on increasing the fraction of BZO. The peak of m has been found in the magnetic field dependence. This fact is probably due to matching the density of BZO nanorods with that of fluxoids, which was confirmed by TEM observations

  2. Modeling of semiconductor nanostructures and semiconductor-electrolyte interfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Birner, Stefan

    2011-11-15

    The main objective of Part I is to give an overview of some of the methods that have been implemented into the nextnano{sup 3} software. Examples are discussed that give insight into doping, strain and mobility. Applications of the single-band Schroedinger equation include three-dimensional superlattices, and a qubit that is manipulated by a magnetic field. Results of the multi-band k.p method are presented for HgTe-CdTe and InAs-GaSb superlattices, and for a SiGe-Si quantum cascade structure. Particular focus is put on a detailed description of the contact block reduction (CBR) method that has been developed within our research group. By means of this approach, quantum transport in the ballistic limit in one, two and three dimensions can be calculated. I provide a very detailed description of the algorithm and present several well documented examples that highlight the key points of this method. Calculating quantum transport in three dimensions is a very challenging task where computationally efficient algorithms - apart from the CBR method - are not available yet. Part II describes the methods that I have implemented into the nextnano{sup 3} software for calculating systems that consist of a combination of semiconductor materials and liquids. These biosensors have a solid-electrolyte interface, and the charges in the solid and in the electrolyte are coupled to each other through the Poisson-Boltzmann equation. I apply this model to a silicon based protein sensor, where I solve the Schroedinger equation together with the Poisson-Boltzmann equation self-consistently, and compare theoretical results with experiment. Furthermore, I have developed a novel approach to model the charge density profiles at semiconductor-electrolyte interfaces that allows us to distinguish hydrophobic and hydrophilic interfaces. Our approach extends previous work where ion specific potentials of mean force describe the distribution of ion species at the interface. I apply this new model

  3. Modeling of semiconductor nanostructures and semiconductor-electrolyte interfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Birner, Stefan

    2011-01-01

    The main objective of Part I is to give an overview of some of the methods that have been implemented into the nextnano 3 software. Examples are discussed that give insight into doping, strain and mobility. Applications of the single-band Schroedinger equation include three-dimensional superlattices, and a qubit that is manipulated by a magnetic field. Results of the multi-band k.p method are presented for HgTe-CdTe and InAs-GaSb superlattices, and for a SiGe-Si quantum cascade structure. Particular focus is put on a detailed description of the contact block reduction (CBR) method that has been developed within our research group. By means of this approach, quantum transport in the ballistic limit in one, two and three dimensions can be calculated. I provide a very detailed description of the algorithm and present several well documented examples that highlight the key points of this method. Calculating quantum transport in three dimensions is a very challenging task where computationally efficient algorithms - apart from the CBR method - are not available yet. Part II describes the methods that I have implemented into the nextnano 3 software for calculating systems that consist of a combination of semiconductor materials and liquids. These biosensors have a solid-electrolyte interface, and the charges in the solid and in the electrolyte are coupled to each other through the Poisson-Boltzmann equation. I apply this model to a silicon based protein sensor, where I solve the Schroedinger equation together with the Poisson-Boltzmann equation self-consistently, and compare theoretical results with experiment. Furthermore, I have developed a novel approach to model the charge density profiles at semiconductor-electrolyte interfaces that allows us to distinguish hydrophobic and hydrophilic interfaces. Our approach extends previous work where ion specific potentials of mean force describe the distribution of ion species at the interface. I apply this new model to recently

  4. Semiconductor opto-electronics

    CERN Document Server

    Moss, TS; Ellis, B

    1972-01-01

    Semiconductor Opto-Electronics focuses on opto-electronics, covering the basic physical phenomena and device behavior that arise from the interaction between electromagnetic radiation and electrons in a solid. The first nine chapters of this book are devoted to theoretical topics, discussing the interaction of electromagnetic waves with solids, dispersion theory and absorption processes, magneto-optical effects, and non-linear phenomena. Theories of photo-effects and photo-detectors are treated in detail, including the theories of radiation generation and the behavior of semiconductor lasers a

  5. Advances in semiconductor lasers

    CERN Document Server

    Coleman, James J; Jagadish, Chennupati

    2012-01-01

    Semiconductors and Semimetals has distinguished itself through the careful selection of well-known authors, editors, and contributors. Originally widely known as the ""Willardson and Beer"" Series, it has succeeded in publishing numerous landmark volumes and chapters. The series publishes timely, highly relevant volumes intended for long-term impact and reflecting the truly interdisciplinary nature of the field. The volumes in Semiconductors and Semimetals have been and will continue to be of great interest to physicists, chemists, materials scientists, and device engineers in academia, scien

  6. Ternary chalcopyrite semiconductors

    CERN Document Server

    Shay, J L; Pamplin, B R

    2013-01-01

    Ternary Chalcopyrite Semiconductors: Growth, Electronic Properties, and Applications covers the developments of work in the I-III-VI2 and II-IV-V2 ternary chalcopyrite compounds. This book is composed of eight chapters that focus on the crystal growth, characterization, and applications of these compounds to optical communications systems. After briefly dealing with the status of ternary chalcopyrite compounds, this book goes on describing the crystal growth of II-IV-V2 and I-III-VI2 single crystals. Chapters 3 and 4 examine the energy band structure of these semiconductor compounds, illustrat

  7. Introductory semiconductor device physics

    CERN Document Server

    Parker, Greg

    2004-01-01

    ATOMS AND BONDINGThe Periodic TableIonic BondingCovalent BondingMetallic bondingvan der Waals BondingStart a DatabaseENERGY BANDS AND EFFECTIVE MASSSemiconductors, Insulators and MetalsSemiconductorsInsulatorsMetalsThe Concept of Effective MassCARRIER CONCENTRATIONS IN SEMICONDUCTORSDonors and AcceptorsFermi-LevelCarrier Concentration EquationsDonors and Acceptors Both PresentCONDUCTION IN SEMICONDUCTORSCarrier DriftCarrier MobilitySaturated Drift VelocityMobility Variation with TemperatureA Derivation of Ohm's LawDrift Current EquationsSemiconductor Band Diagrams with an Electric Field Presen

  8. Compound semiconductor device physics

    CERN Document Server

    Tiwari, Sandip

    2013-01-01

    This book provides one of the most rigorous treatments of compound semiconductor device physics yet published. A complete understanding of modern devices requires a working knowledge of low-dimensional physics, the use of statistical methods, and the use of one-, two-, and three-dimensional analytical and numerical analysis techniques. With its systematic and detailed**discussion of these topics, this book is ideal for both the researcher and the student. Although the emphasis of this text is on compound semiconductor devices, many of the principles discussed will also be useful to those inter

  9. Optical processes in semiconductors

    CERN Document Server

    Pankove, Jacques I

    1975-01-01

    Based on a series of lectures at Berkeley, 1968-1969, this is the first book to deal comprehensively with all of the phenomena involving light in semiconductors. The author has combined, for the graduate student and researcher, a great variety of source material, journal research, and many years of experimental research, adding new insights published for the first time in this book.Coverage includes energy states in semiconductors and their perturbation by external parameters, absorption, relationships between optical constants, spectroscopy, radiative transitions, nonradiative recombination

  10. In situ direct observation of photocorrosion in ZnO crystals in ionic liquid using a laser-equipped high-voltage electron microscope

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Ishioka

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available ZnO photocatalysts in water react with environmental water molecules and corrode under illumination. ZnO nanorods in water can also grow because of water splitting induced by UV irradiation. To investigate their morphological behavior caused by crystal growth and corrosion, here we developed a new laser-equipped high-voltage electron microscope and observed crystal ZnO nanorods immersed in ionic liquid. Exposing the specimen holder to a laser with a wavelength of 325 nm, we observed the photocorrosion in situ at the atomic scale for the first time. This experiment revealed that Zn and O atoms near the interface between the ZnO nanorods and the ionic liquid tended to dissolve into the liquid. The polarity and facet of the nanorods were strongly related to photocorrosion and crystal growth.

  11. Superdiffusive-like motion of colloidal nanorods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campos, Daniel; Méndez, Vicenç

    2009-04-07

    In recent experiments, the temporal average C(t) of the mean square displacement for nanorods moving through a chemical monolayer was explored. The results showed a scaling C(t) approximately t(1.6), which suggest the existence of superdiffusive motion for these particles. In this paper, we interpret these results by means of a continuous-time random walk (CTRW) model from which we can reproduce the exponent 1.6 and the curve C(t) versus time found in the experiments. We show that the behavior observed arises as a consequence of the superposition of different transport mechanisms: directional propulsion plus translational and rotational diffusion. Our model reveals that this superdiffusive-like scaling may also be found in other systems as in chemotactic biological motion, provided that the characteristic times for translational and rotational diffusions are very different.

  12. Catalyzed reactions at illuminated semiconductor interfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wrighton, M.S.

    1984-01-01

    Many desirable minority carrier chemical redox processes are too slow to compete with e - -h + recombination at illuminated semiconductor/liquid electrolyte junction interfaces. Reductions of H 2 O to H 2 or CO 2 to compounds having C--H bonds are too slow to compete with e - -h + recombination at illuminated p-type semiconductors, for example. Approaches to improve the rate of the desired processes involving surface modification techniques are described. Photoanodes are plagued by the additional problem of oxidative decomposition under illumination with > or =E/sub g/ illumination. The photo-oxidation of Cl - , Br - , and H 2 O is considered to illustrate the concepts involved. Proof of concept experiments establish that catalysis can be effective in dramatically improving direct solar fuel production; efficiencies of >10% have been demonstrated

  13. Bending flexibility, kinking, and buckling characterization of ZnO nanorods/nanowires grown on different substrates by high and low temperature methods

    OpenAIRE

    Muhammad, Riaz; Fulati, Alimujiang; Yang, Lili; Nour, Omer; Willander, Magnus; Klason , P

    2008-01-01

    Nanomechanical tests of bending flexibility, kinking, and buckling failure characterization of vertically aligned single crystal ZnO nanorods/nanowires were performed quantitatively by nanoindentation technique. These nanostructures were grown by the vapor liquid solid (VLS) method, a relatively high temperature approach, and the aqueous chemical growth (ACG) method, a relatively low temperature approach on different substrates, including SiC and Si. The first critical load at the inflection ...

  14. Metal semiconductor contacts and devices

    CERN Document Server

    Cohen, Simon S; Einspruch, Norman G

    1986-01-01

    VLSI Electronics Microstructure Science, Volume 13: Metal-Semiconductor Contacts and Devices presents the physics, technology, and applications of metal-semiconductor barriers in digital integrated circuits. The emphasis is placed on the interplay among the theory, processing, and characterization techniques in the development of practical metal-semiconductor contacts and devices.This volume contains chapters that are devoted to the discussion of the physics of metal-semiconductor interfaces and its basic phenomena; fabrication procedures; and interface characterization techniques, particularl

  15. Physical principles of semiconductor detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Micek, S.L.

    1979-01-01

    The general properties of semiconductors with respect to the possibilities of their use as the ionization radiation detectors are discussed. Some chosen types of semiconductor junctions and their characteristics are briefly presented. There are also discussed the physical phenomena connected with the formation of barriers in various types of semiconductor counters. Finally, the basic properties of three main types of semiconductor detectors are given. (author)

  16. Handbook of luminescent semiconductor materials

    CERN Document Server

    Bergman, Leah

    2011-01-01

    Photoluminescence spectroscopy is an important approach for examining the optical interactions in semiconductors and optical devices with the goal of gaining insight into material properties. With contributions from researchers at the forefront of this field, Handbook of Luminescent Semiconductor Materials explores the use of this technique to study semiconductor materials in a variety of applications, including solid-state lighting, solar energy conversion, optical devices, and biological imaging. After introducing basic semiconductor theory and photoluminescence principles, the book focuses

  17. Effects of three seeding methods on optimization of temperature, concentration and reaction time on optical properties during growth ZnO nanorods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taheri Ghahrizjani, Reza; Yousefi, Mohammad Hassan

    2017-12-01

    Today, use of zinc oxide nanorods is necessary in optoelectronic industry. Therefore, control of growth parameters are affected on zinc oxide nanostructures. In this paper, the effect of different seed methods such as spin coating, vapour liquid solid and spray coating on morphology of surface-crystal plates of zinc oxide nanorods has been investigated. Also, growth of zinc oxide nanorods has been done using new method by use of different concentrations of zinc chloride and ammonia at75, 97 and 110 °C. Finally, morphology of surface, crystal plates, structure purity and optical properties of zinc oxide nano rods have been examined by changes of reagent concentration, growth solution temperature and reaction time through SEM, XRD, EDAX and photoluminescence analyses. The different optical properties and surface morphology of zinc oxide nanorods were generated differ by change in concentration. By changes of concentration, pH of growth solution has been changed. Therefor influences defects of crystal structure in the visible and ultraviolet region were obtained. Finally, the ideal thermal annealing is 430 °C. Thermal annealing in vacuum for growth the zinc oxide nano rods at the range of 400-450 °C were showed that, the defects are decreased and or increased due this method for growth in the visible and ultraviolet region. The samples prepared by VLS, have visible and ultraviolet region emission. So there are useful for LED application. It is suitable for UV-laser diodes.

  18. Tailoring the optical and hydrophobic property of zinc oxide nanorod by coating with amorphous graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pahari, D.; Das, N. S.; Das, B.; Chattopadhyay, K. K.; Banerjee, D.

    2016-09-01

    Zinc oxide (ZnO) nanorods were synthesized at room temperature on potassium permanganate activated silicon and glass substrate by simple chemical method using zinc acetate as precursor. To modify the surface energy of the as prepared ZnO thin films the samples were coated with amorphous graphene (a-G) synthesized by un-zipping of chemically synthesized amorphous carbon nanotubes (a-CNTs). All the pure and coated samples were characterized by x-ray diffraction, field emission scanning electron microscope, Raman spectroscopy, and Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy. The roughness analysis of the as prepared samples was done by atomic force microscopic analysis. The detail optical properties of all the samples were studied with the help of a UV-Visible spectrophotometer. The surface energy of the as prepared pure and coated samples was calculated by measuring the contact angle of two different liquids. It is seen that the water repellence of ZnO nanorods got increased after they are being coated with a-Gs. Also even after UV irradiation the contact angle remain same unlike the case for the uncoated sample where the contact angle gets decreased significantly after UV irradiation. Existing Cassie-Wenzel model has been employed along with the Owen's approach to determine the different components of surface energy.

  19. Freezing of Coulomb liquids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tosi, M.P.

    1989-03-01

    Recent progress in the theory of liquid-solid coexistence as approached from the liquid phase in systems with Coulomb forces is reviewed. Main attention is given to (i) Wigner crystallization of the electron gas in the degenerate and classical limits, and (ii) localization of bond particles leading to freezing in a pseudoclassical liquid-state version of the bond-charge model for elemental semiconductors. These models serve to illustrate crystallization driven by pure Coulomb repulsions and crystallization resulting from the interplay of attraction and repulsions in multicomponent systems, respectively. (author). 29 refs, 4 figs

  20. Nonlinear Elasticity of Doped Semiconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-02-01

    AFRL-RY-WP-TR-2016-0206 NONLINEAR ELASTICITY OF DOPED SEMICONDUCTORS Mark Dykman and Kirill Moskovtsev Michigan State University...2016 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE NONLINEAR ELASTICITY OF DOPED SEMICONDUCTORS 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER FA8650-16-1-7600 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM...vibration amplitude. 15. SUBJECT TERMS semiconductors , microresonators, microelectromechanical 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF

  1. Intense terahertz excitation of semiconductors

    CERN Document Server

    Ganichev, S D

    2006-01-01

    This work presents the first comprehensive treatment of high-power terahertz applications to semiconductors and low-dimensional semiconductor structures. Terahertz properties of semiconductors are in the centre of scientific activities because of the need of high-speed electronics.

  2. Semiconductor radiation detectors device physics

    CERN Document Server

    Lutz, Gerhard

    1999-01-01

    Describes the field of modern semiconductor detectors used for energy and position measurement radiation. This book includes an introduction to semiconductor physics. It explains the principles of semiconductor radiation detectors, followed by formal quantitative analysis. It also covers electronic signal readout.

  3. Semiconductors for plasmonics and metamaterials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Naik, G.V.; Boltasseva, Alexandra

    2010-01-01

    with semiconductors can alleviate these problems if only semiconductors could exhibit negative real permittivity. Aluminum doped zinc oxide (AZO) is a low loss semiconductor that can show negative real permittivity in the NIR. A comparative assessment of AZO-based plasmonic devices such as superlens and hyperlens...

  4. Modifying nanoparticle shape by choice of synthetic method: Nanorods, spheres, mutipods, and gels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrestha, Khadga M.

    A series of nanoparticle synthesis methods were devised with the aim of controlling shape. CuO nanorods were synthesized by a hydrothermal treatment with different chemical combinations. Physical parameters: concentration, temperature, and aging time greatly affected the size, morphology and the composition of nanorods. These CuO nanomaterials were reduced to metallic copper at elevated temperature by 4% H2 diluted in helium while preserving the morphology. The CuO and Cu nanomaterials were employed for near infra-red (NIR) diffuse reflectance. Among them, CuO nanorods were found to be the best NIR diffuse reflectors, indicating potential application as NIR obscurants. Cu2O and its comoposite samples with different morphologies, some with unique morphologies, were synthesized by reducing Cu2+ precursors without using any surfactant. The effects of change of Cu-precursors, reducing agents, and other physical conditions such as temperature and pressure were investigated. Since Cu2O is a semiconductor (Eg ˜ 2.1 eV), these samples were used as photocatalyst for the degradation of methyl violet B solution under UV-vis light and as dark catalysts for decomposition of H2O2 to investigate the effect of morphology. The photocatalytic activity was found to be morphology dependent and the dark catalytic activity was found to be dependent on both surface area and morphology. Mixed oxides of MgO and TiO2 with different ratios, and pure TiO2 were synthesized by two methods---flame synthesis and aerogel. These mixed oxides were employed as photo-catalysts under UV-vis light to oxidize acetaldehyde. The mixed oxides with low content of MgO (˜ 2 mole %) were found to be more UV active photo-catalysts for the degradation of acetaldehyde than the degradation by TiO2. The mixed oxides prepared by the aerogel method were found to be superior photo-catalysts than the mixed oxides of equal ratio prepared by flame synthesis. Silica aerosol gels were prepared by two methods: detonation

  5. Influence of the contacting scheme in simulations of radial silicon nanorod solar cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Voigt, Felix; Stelzner, Thomas; Christiansen, Silke H.

    2012-01-01

    Silicon nanorod solar cells were simulated using the Silvaco Technical Computer Aided Design (TCAD) software suite. For reasons of speed optimization the simulations were performed in cylinder coordinates taking advantage of the model's symmetry. Symmetric doping was assumed with a dopant density of 10 18 cm −3 in the p-type core and in the n-type shell, and the location of the pn-junction was chosen such that the space charge region was located adjacent to the shell surface. Two contact configurations were explored. In configuration A the cathode contact was wrapped around the semiconductor nanorod, while in configuration B the cathode was assumed just on top of the nanorod. In both cases the anode was located at the bottom of the rod. Cell efficiency was optimized with regard to rod radius and rod length. Optimization was performed in a three-step procedure consisting in radius optimization, length optimization and again radius optimization. A maximum in efficiency with respect to rod length L was visible in configuration A, leading to an optimum value of L = 48 μm. This maximum is explained by the combination of an increase of short-circuit current density J sc and a decrease of open-circuit voltage U oc with L. In configuration B, J sc also increases with L, but U oc stays rather constant and the maximum in efficiency only appears at very large values of L ≈ 12 mm. We restricted the rod length to L ≤ 100 μm for further optimization, in order to stay in an experimentally feasible range. During the optimization of rod radius R in configuration A the open circuit voltage increased continuously, while short circuit current density stayed rather constant. This leads to an increase in efficiency with R, which only stops at very large radii, where R starts to be comparable with L. In configuration B efficiency is almost independent of R, provided that the radius is large enough to comprise a well-formed space charge region, here only a shallow maximum can be

  6. Influence of the contacting scheme in simulations of radial silicon nanorod solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Voigt, Felix, E-mail: felix.voigt@uni-oldenburg.de [Institute of Photonic Technology, Jena (Germany); Institute of Physics, University of Oldenburg (Germany); Stelzner, Thomas [Institute of Photonic Technology, Jena (Germany); Christiansen, Silke H. [Institute of Photonic Technology, Jena (Germany); Max Planck Institute for the Science of Light, Erlangen (Germany)

    2012-10-01

    Silicon nanorod solar cells were simulated using the Silvaco Technical Computer Aided Design (TCAD) software suite. For reasons of speed optimization the simulations were performed in cylinder coordinates taking advantage of the model's symmetry. Symmetric doping was assumed with a dopant density of 10{sup 18} cm{sup -3} in the p-type core and in the n-type shell, and the location of the pn-junction was chosen such that the space charge region was located adjacent to the shell surface. Two contact configurations were explored. In configuration A the cathode contact was wrapped around the semiconductor nanorod, while in configuration B the cathode was assumed just on top of the nanorod. In both cases the anode was located at the bottom of the rod. Cell efficiency was optimized with regard to rod radius and rod length. Optimization was performed in a three-step procedure consisting in radius optimization, length optimization and again radius optimization. A maximum in efficiency with respect to rod length L was visible in configuration A, leading to an optimum value of L = 48 {mu}m. This maximum is explained by the combination of an increase of short-circuit current density J{sub sc} and a decrease of open-circuit voltage U{sub oc} with L. In configuration B, J{sub sc} also increases with L, but U{sub oc} stays rather constant and the maximum in efficiency only appears at very large values of L Almost-Equal-To 12 mm. We restricted the rod length to L {<=} 100 {mu}m for further optimization, in order to stay in an experimentally feasible range. During the optimization of rod radius R in configuration A the open circuit voltage increased continuously, while short circuit current density stayed rather constant. This leads to an increase in efficiency with R, which only stops at very large radii, where R starts to be comparable with L. In configuration B efficiency is almost independent of R, provided that the radius is large enough to comprise a well-formed space

  7. Semiconductor detector physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Equer, B.

    1987-01-01

    Comprehension of semiconductor detectors follows comprehension of some elements of solid state physics. They are recalled here, limited to the necessary physical principles, that is to say the conductivity. P-n and MIS junctions are discussed in view of their use in detection. Material and structure (MOS, p-n, multilayer, ..) are also reviewed [fr

  8. Biexcitons in semiconductor microcavities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borri, P.; Langbein, W.; Woggon, U.

    2003-01-01

    In this paper, the present status of the experimental study of the optical properties of biexcitons in semiconductor microcavities is reviewed. In particular, a detailed investigation of a polariton-biexciton transition in a high-quality single quantum well GaAs/AlGaAs microcavity is reported...

  9. Microstructures, surface properties, and topotactic transitions of manganite nanorods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Tao; Krumeich, Frank; Nesper, Reinhard; Fjellvåg, Helmer; Norby, Poul

    2009-07-06

    Manganite (gamma-MnOOH) nanorods with typical diameters of 20-500 nm and lengths of several micrometers were prepared by reacting KMnO(4) and ethanol under hydrothermal conditions. Synchrotron X-ray diffraction (XRD) reveal that the gamma-MnOOH nanorods crystallize in the monoclinic space group P2(1)/c with unit cell dimensions a = 5.2983(3) A, b = 5.2782(2) A, c = 5.3067(3) A, and beta = 114.401(2) degrees . Transmission electron microscopy shows that the gamma-MnOOH nanorods are single crystalline and that lateral attachment occurs for primary rods elongated along 101. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy studies indicate that the surfaces of the gamma-MnOOH nanorods are hydrogen deficient and compensated by surface complexation. The Raman scattering spectrum features five main contributions at 360, 389, 530, 558, and 623 cm(-1) along with four weak ones at 266, 453, 492, and 734 cm(-1), attributed to Mn-O vibrations within MnO(6) octahedral frameworks. The structural stability of the gamma-MnOOH nanorods was discussed by means of in situ time-resolved synchrotron XRD. The monoclinic gamma-MnOOH nanorods transform into tetragonal beta-MnO(2) upon heating in air at about 200 degrees C. The reaction is topotactic and shows distinctive differences from those seen for bulk counterparts. A metastable, intermediate phase is observed, possibly connected with hydrogen release via the interstitial (1 x 1) tunnels of the gamma-MnOOH nanorods.

  10. Near Room Temperature, Fast-Response, and Highly Sensitive Triethylamine Sensor Assembled with Au-Loaded ZnO/SnO₂ Core-Shell Nanorods on Flat Alumina Substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ju, Dian-Xing; Xu, Hong-Yan; Qiu, Zhi-Wen; Zhang, Zi-Chao; Xu, Qi; Zhang, Jun; Wang, Jie-Qiang; Cao, Bing-Qiang

    2015-09-02

    Chemiresistive gas sensors with low power consumption, fast response, and reliable fabrication process for a specific target gas have been now created for many applications. They require both sensitive nanomaterials and an efficient substrate chip for heating and electrical addressing. Herein, a near room working temperature and fast response triethylamine (TEA) gas sensor has been fabricated successfully by designing gold (Au)-loaded ZnO/SnO2 core-shell nanorods. ZnO nanorods grew directly on Al2O3 flat electrodes with a cost-effective hydrothermal process. By employing pulsed laser deposition (PLD) and DC-sputtering methods, the construction of Au nanoparticle-loaded ZnO/SnO2 core/shell nanorod heterostructure is highly controllable and reproducible. In comparison with pristine ZnO, SnO2, and Au-loaded ZnO, SnO2 sensors, Au-ZnO/SnO2 nanorod sensors exhibit a remarkably high and fast response to TEA gas at working temperatures as low as 40 °C. The enhanced sensing property of the Au-ZnO/SnO2 sensor is also discussed with the semiconductor depletion layer model introduced by Au-SnO2 Schottky contact and ZnO/SnO2 N-N heterojunction.

  11. Fabrication and characterization of nanorod solar cells with an ultrathin a-Si:H absorber layer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuang, Y.; van der Werf, C.H.M.; Houweling, Z.S.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/251874486; Di Vece, M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/248753355; Schropp, R.E.I.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/072502584

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we present a three-dimensional nanorod solar cell design. As the backbone of the nanorod device, density-controlled zinc oxide (ZnO) nanorods were synthesized by a simple aqueous solution growth technique at 80 °C on ZnO thin film pre-coated glass substrate. The as-prepared ZnO

  12. Physical and chemical contributions of a plasma treatment in the growth of ZnO nanorods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jang, J.T. [Department of Nano Systems Engineering, Center for Nano Manufacturing, Inje University, Obang-dong, Gimhae, Gyeongnam 621-749 (Korea, Republic of); Ryu, H., E-mail: hhryu@inje.ac.kr [Department of Nano Systems Engineering, Center for Nano Manufacturing, Inje University, Obang-dong, Gimhae, Gyeongnam 621-749 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, W.J. [Department of Materials and Components Engineering, Dong-Eui University, 995 Eomgwangno, Busanjin-gu, Busan 614-714 (Korea, Republic of); Yun, J. [Department of Nano Science and Engineering, Kyungnam University, Changwon, Gyeongnam 631-701 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-11-15

    Highlights: •ZnO nanorods were grown by hydrothermal synthesis. •Oxygen plasma was done on the surface of seed ZnO nanorods. •The ZnO nanorods with and without plasma treatment were characterized. •The results showed that the optical and structural properties of ZnO nanorods with plasma treatment were enhanced. -- Abstract: We analyzed the enhancement of optical and structural properties of ZnO nanorods by using a plasma treatment. In this study, seed ZnO nanorods were grown by hydrothermal synthesis for 1 h on a ZnO buffered Si substrate. The seed ZnO nanorods were then treated with an oxygen plasma. Next, ZnO was grown for an additional 4 h by hydrothermal synthesis. The resultant ZnO nanorods were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM), electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and photoluminescence (PL). The measurements showed that the plasma treatment of the seed ZnO nanorods increased the roughness of the buffer layer and the concentration of oxygen ions on the surfaces of the seed ZnO nanorods and the buffer layer, leading to improved optical and structural properties. In this study, we found that the plasma treatment on the seed ZnO nanorods enhanced the optical and structural properties of the ZnO nanorods.

  13. 1D Bi2S3 nanorod/2D e-WS2 nanosheet heterojunction photocatalyst for enhanced photocatalytic activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vattikuti, S. V. Prabhakar; Shim, Jaesool; Byon, Chan

    2018-02-01

    The development of high-activity, long-life, precious-metal-free photocatalysts for redox reactions in photoelectrochemical cells and fuel cells remains challenging. The synthesis of high-activity heterostructured photocatalysts is crucial for efficient energy conversion strategies. Herein, a novel photocatalyst based on 1D Bi2S3 nanorods self-assembled on 2D exfoliated tungsten disulfide (e-WS2) nanosheets has been developed for the degradation of methyl orange (MO) dye in aqueous solution. We demonstrate a novel and facile hydrothermal method for the synthesis of a Bi2S3 nanorod/e-WS2 nanosheet heterostructure. The photocatalytic properties of the heterostructure under visible light were investigated. Enhanced photocatalytic activity was attributed to the presence of strong surface active sites, as well as the specific morphology of the composite. We also observed the fast transfer of electron-hole pairs at the material interface. This work demonstrates a non-noble semiconductor photocatalyst for the degradation of pollutants and evolution of H2.

  14. Voids, nanochannels and formation of nanotubes with mobile Sn fillings in Sn doped ZnO nanorods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ortega, Y; Dieker, Ch; Jaeger, W; Piqueras, J; Fernandez, P

    2010-01-01

    ZnO nanorods containing different hollow structures have been grown by a thermal evaporation-deposition method with a mixture of ZnS and SnO 2 powders as precursor. Transmission electron microscopy shows rods with rows of voids as well as rods with empty channels along the growth axis. The presence of Sn nanoprecipitates associated with the empty regions indicates, in addition, that these are generated by diffusion processes during growth, probably due to an inhomogeneous distribution of Sn. The mechanism of forming voids and precipitates appears to be based on diffusion processes similar to the Kirkendall effect, which can lead to void formation at interfaces of bulk materials or in core-shell nanostructures. In some cases the nanorods are ZnO tubes partially filled with Sn that has been found to melt and expand by heating the nanotubes under the microscope electron beam. Such metal-semiconductor nanostructures have potential applications as thermal nanosensors or as electrical nanocomponents.

  15. Magnetic and transport studies of core-shell nanorods based on metallic oxide ferromagnet SrRuO3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, M.; Li, X. Y.; Zhu, Q. X.; Li, H. R.; Shi, L.; Li, X. M.; Zheng, R. K.

    2016-01-01

    This study presents the synthesis of perovskite metal-semiconductor core-shell heterostructures by sputtering SrRuO3 (SRO) shell layer on vertically aligned hydrothermally produced ZnO nanorods. Compared to the two-dimensional SRO films, the magnetic behaviors of the SRO shells on ZnO nanorods are morphology and thickness dependent, as reflected by the magnetic isotropy effects and the appearance of double-step magnetic hysteresis loops caused by nanograin-induced disorder and uncompensated spin at the surface and interface. The appearance of low-temperature resistance minimum and the good fitting of the low-temperature resistance data to a theoretical model establish the emergence of weak localization effect in the SRO shells, whose strength can be reinforced by a magnetic field. In addition, an apparent low-resistance Ohmic contact was realized in the ZnO/SRO heterojunctions due to the lower work function of the SRO. This, together with the absence of the Schottky barrier at the interface, demonstrates that the ZnO/SRO nanostructures could hold great promise for applications in advanced electron field emitters.

  16. Plasmonic Gold Nanorods Coverage Influence on Enhancement of the Photoluminescence of Two-Dimensional MoS2 Monolayer

    KAUST Repository

    Lee, Kevin C. J.

    2015-11-17

    The 2-D transition metal dichalcogenide (TMD) semiconductors, has received great attention due to its excellent optical and electronic properties and potential applications in field-effect transistors, light emitting and sensing devices. Recently surface plasmon enhanced photoluminescence (PL) of the weak 2-D TMD atomic layers was developed to realize the potential optoelectronic devices. However, we noticed that the enhancement would not increase monotonically with increasing of metal plasmonic objects and the emission drop after the certain coverage. This study presents the optimized PL enhancement of a monolayer MoS2 in the presence of gold (Au) nanorods. A localized surface plasmon wave of Au nanorods that generated around the monolayer MoS2 can provide resonance wavelength overlapping with that of the MoS2 gain spectrum. These spatial and spectral overlapping between the localized surface plasmon polariton waves and that from MoS2 emission drastically enhanced the light emission from the MoS2 monolayer. We gave a simple model and physical interpretations to explain the phenomena. The plasmonic Au nanostructures approach provides a valuable avenue to enhancing the emitting efficiency of the 2-D nano-materials and their devices for the future optoelectronic devices and systems.

  17. Photocatalytically active colloidal platinum-decorated cadmium sulphide nanorods for hydrogen production; Photokatalytisch Aktive Kolloidale Platindekorierte Cadmiumsulfidnanostaebchen zur Wasserstoffproduktion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berr, Maximilian Josef

    2012-12-07

    This is the first study to have been successful in producing hydrogen by means of photocatalytically active colloidal semiconductor particles. Specifically, colloidal platinum-decorated cadmium sulphide nanorods were used to reduce water to hydrogen. Oxidation of water to oxygen was substituted by addition of a reducing agent (hole collector), e.g. sulphite, which itself is oxidised to sulphate by the photohole. During photochemical platinum decoration it was discovered that in addition to the expected platinum nanoparticles there had also formed platinum clusters in the subnanometer range. In spite of the small quantity of platinum deposited on the nanorods these clusters showed the same quantum efficiency as the intended product. [German] In dieser Arbeit wurde erstmals mit kolloidalen Halbleiternanopartikeln photokatalytische Wasserstoffproduktion erzielt. Im Detail wurde Wasser mit kolloidalen, platindekorierten Cadmiumsulfidnanostaebchen zu Wasserstoff reduziert. Die Oxidation des Wasser zu Sauerstoff wurde durch Zugabe eines Reduktionsmittels (Lochfaenger) substituiert, z.B. Sulfit, das durch das Photoloch zu Sulfat reduziert wird. Bei der photochemischen Platindekoration wurden neben den erwarteten Platinnanopartikeln mit 4 - 5 nm Durchmesser auch Subnanometer grosse Platincluster entdeckt, die trotz der geringeren Menge an deponierten Platin auf den Nanostaebchen die gleiche Quanteneffizienz demonstrieren.

  18. Parameters of the layer of semiconductor epitaxial A3B5 heterostructures depending on the conditions of liquid-phase epitaxy (In-Ga-As-Sb system taken as an example)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grebenyuk, A.M.; Litvak, A.M.; Popov, A.A.; Syavris, S.V.; Charykov, N.A.

    1991-01-01

    Growth parameter dependence on liquid phase epitaxy (LPE)-initially crystallized compositions of liquid (X l ) and solid phases (interconnected by phase equilibrium conditions) and temperature of epitaxial growth beginning - is studied by example of the In-Ga-As-Sb system. The results obtained do not change qualitatively by transfer to other A 3 B 5 systems. It is shown that application of maximum high synthesis temperatures, corresponding to the melt molecular composition, is most advantageous for obtaining A 3 B 5 qualitative epitaxial layers by liquid phase epitaxy method

  19. Electrical manipulation of the light emission of single CdSe/CdS nanorods; Elektrische Manipulation der Lichtemission von einzelnen CdSe/CdS Nanostaebchen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mueller, J.

    2005-09-14

    In the center of the present thesis lies the study and manipulation of the light emission of novel rod-shaped cadmium-selenide/cadmium-sulfide (CdSe/CdS) nanocrystals. These nanocrystals consist of a spherical CdSe nucleus, on which a CdS nanorod is grown monocrystallinely. By this grow spatially asymmetric semiconductor nanorods with an aspect ratio between 1.6 and 4.0. By the measurement of the radiation rate in this thesis it could be shown that the electron is delocalized over the whole nanorod, while the hole is localized in the CdSe nucleus. Therefore by the length of the cadmium-sulfide rod the wave-function overlap can be directly manipulated. The wave functions and by this the emission energies can be beside the geometry especially also controlled by external fields. Because the magnitude of the so-called ''Stark effect in quantum-bounded structures'' increases with the spatial extension of the nanostructure, in the nanorods an in comparison with spherical nanocrystals distinctly increased field effect could be observed. Experiments on single CdSe/CdS nanorods exhibit however not only a shift of the emission energy by the 50-fold of the line width, but simultaneously a field-induced decreasement of the emission intensity by one order of magnitude. The experimental results can be excellently compared with a theoretical model. For this the effective-mass model was supplemented by the Coulomb interaction and extended by a finite-element method for asymmetric geometries. By this it is possible to predict both the radiation rate, the Stark shift of the emission energy, and the intensity modulation by electric fields qualitatively and quantitatively and to describe the Stark effect in colloidal nanocrystal by a quantum-mechanical model. The emission characteristics is not only influenced by external fields, but also by fluctuations of local fields, which arise by diffunding surface charges. These local field changes induce also a Stark shift

  20. From covalent bonding to coalescence of metallic nanorods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee Soohwan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Growth of metallic nanorods by physical vapor deposition is a common practice, and the origin of their dimensions is a characteristic length scale that depends on the three-dimensional Ehrlich-Schwoebel (3D ES barrier. For most metals, the 3D ES barrier is large so the characteristic length scale is on the order of 200 nm. Using density functional theory-based ab initio calculations, this paper reports that the 3D ES barrier of Al is small, making it infeasible to grow Al nanorods. By analyzing electron density distributions, this paper shows that the small barrier is the result of covalent bonding in Al. Beyond the infeasibility of growing Al nanorods by physical vapor deposition, the results of this paper suggest a new mechanism of controlling the 3D ES barrier and thereby nanorod growth. The modification of local degree of covalent bonding, for example, via the introduction of surfactants, can increase the 3D ES barrier and promote nanorod growth, or decrease the 3D ES barrier and promote thin film growth.

  1. Nanorods of manganese oxides: Synthesis, characterization and catalytic application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zeheng; Zhang, Yuancheng; Zhang, Weixin; Wang, Xue; Qian, Yitai; Wen, Xiaogang; Yang, Shihe

    2006-03-01

    Single-crystalline nanorods of β-MnO 2, α-Mn 2O 3 and Mn 3O 4 were successfully synthesized via the heat-treatment of γ-MnOOH nanorods, which were prepared through a hydrothermal method in advance. The calcination process of γ-MnOOH nanorods was studied with the help of Thermogravimetric analysis and X-ray powder diffraction. When the calcinations were conducted in air from 250 to 1050 °C, the precursor γ-MnOOH was first changed to β-MnO 2, then to α-Mn 2O 3 and finally to Mn 3O 4. When calcined in N 2 atmosphere, γ-MnOOH was directly converted into Mn 3O 4 at as low as 500 °C. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and high-resolution TEM were also used to characterize the products. The obtained manganese oxides maintain the one-dimensional morphology similar to the precursor γ-MnOOH nanorods. Further experiments show that the as-prepared manganese oxide nanorods have catalytic effect on the oxidation and decomposition of the methylene blue (MB) dye with H 2O 2.

  2. Highly Uniform Epitaxial ZnO Nanorod Arrays for Nanopiezotronics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nagata T

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Highly uniform and c-axis-aligned ZnO nanorod arrays were fabricated in predefined patterns by a low temperature homoepitaxial aqueous chemical method. The nucleation seed patterns were realized in polymer and in metal thin films, resulting in, all-ZnO and bottom-contacted structures, respectively. Both of them show excellent geometrical uniformity: the cross-sectional uniformity according to the scanning electron micrographs across the array is lower than 2%. The diameter of the hexagonal prism-shaped nanorods can be set in the range of 90–170 nm while their typical length achievable is 0.5–2.3 μm. The effect of the surface polarity was also examined, however, no significant difference was found between the arrays grown on Zn-terminated and on O-terminated face of the ZnO single crystal. The transmission electron microscopy observation revealed the single crystalline nature of the nanorods. The current–voltage characteristics taken on an individual nanorod contacted by a Au-coated atomic force microscope tip reflected Schottky-type behavior. The geometrical uniformity, the designable pattern, and the electrical properties make the presented nanorod arrays ideal candidates to be used in ZnO-based DC nanogenerator and in next-generation integrated piezoelectric nano-electromechanical systems (NEMS.

  3. TiO2 nanorod arrays functionalized with In2S3 shell layer by a low-cost route for solar energy conversion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gan, Xiaoyan; Li, Xiaomin; Gao, Xiangdong; Qiu, Jijun; Zhuge, Fuwei

    2011-07-29

    We report the fabrication and characterization of a TiO(2)-In(2)S(3) core-shell nanorod array structure for application of semiconductor-sensitized solar cells. Hydrothermally synthesized TiO(2) nanorod arrays on FTO glass substrates are functionalized with a uniform In(2)S(3) shell layer by using the successive ion layer adsorption and reaction (SILAR) method. This low-cost technique promotes a uniform deposition of In(2)S(3) nanoshells on the surface of TiO(2) nanorods, thus forming an intact interface between the In(2)S(3) shell and TiO(2) core. Results show that the thickness of In(2)S(3) shell layers as well as the visible light absorption threshold can be effectively controlled by varying the coating cycles during the SILAR process. The best reproducible performance of the sandwich solar cell using the TiO(2)-In(2)S(3) core-shell nanorod arrays as photoelectrodes was obtained after 30 SILAR cycles, exhibiting a short-circuit current (I(sc)) of 2.40 mA cm(-2), an open-circuit voltage (V(oc)) of 0.56 V, a fill factor (ff) of 0.40 and a conversion efficiency (η) of 0.54%, respectively. These results demonstrate a feasible and controllable route towards In(2)S(3) coating on a highly structured substrate and a proof of concept that such TiO(2)-In(2)S(3) core-shell architectures are novel and promising photoelectrodes in nanostructured solar cells.

  4. Acetone sensing of multi-networked WO3-NiO core-shell nanorod sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Seungbok; Lee, Jae Kyung; Lee, Woo Seok; Lee, Chongmu; Lee, Wan In

    2017-10-01

    WO3-NiO core-shell nanorods were synthesized by thermal evaporation of a mixture of WO3 and graphite powders and immersion of the synthesized WO3 nanorods in an 20 mM of nickel(II) acetate tetrahydrate (Ni(OCOCH3)2·4H2O) solution followed by UV irradiation and annealing. Subsequently, multi-networked nanorod sensors were fabricated by connecting these nanostructures with electrodes. The sensing properties of pristine WO3 nanorod and WO3-NiO core-shell nanorod sensors toward acetone were examined. Subsequently, multi-networked nanorod sensors were fabricated by connecting these nanostructures with electrodes. The WO3-NiO core-shell nanorod sensor exhibited a stronger response to acetone gas and shorter response/recovery times than the pristine WO3 nanorod sensor. The pristine WO3 nanorods showed responses of approximately 1.36 to 200 ppm of CH3COCH3 at 300 °C. On the other hand, the WO3-NiO core-shell nanorods showed responses of 4.4 to the same concentration of CH3COCH3 at the same temperature. The core-shell nanorods exhibited response and recovery times of 51 s and 59 s, respectively for 200 ppm of CH3COCH3. On the other hand, the pristine WO3 nanorods exhibited response and recovery times of 51 s and 59 s, respectively, for the same concentration of CH3COCH3. NiO coating enhanced the selectivity of the WO3 nanorods for acetone as well as the sensitivity of the WO3 nanorods. The underlying mechanism of the enhanced response of the WO3-NiO core-shell nanorod sensor is also discussed in detail.

  5. AuNPs Hybrid Black ZnO Nanorods Made by a Sol-Gel Method for Highly Sensitive Humidity Sensing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongyan Zhang

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available A highly sensitive self-powered humidity sensor has been realized from AuNPs hybrid black zinc oxide (ZnO nanorods prepared through a sol-gel method. XRD pattern reveals that both ZnO and ZnO/AuNPs exhibit a wurtzite structure. ZnO/AuNPs nanorods grow in a vertical alignment, which possesses high uniformity and forms dense arrays with a smaller diameter than that of ZnO nanoparticles. All ZnO/AuNPs and pure black ZnO show lower band gap energy than the typically reported 3.34 eV of pure ZnO. Furthermore, the band gap of ZnO/AuNPs nanocomposites is effectively influenced by the amount of AuNPs. The humidity sensing tests clearly prove that all the ZnO/AuNPs humidity sensors exhibit much higher response than that of ZnO sensors, and the sensitivity of such ZnO/AuNPs nanorods (6 mL AuNPs display a change three orders higher than that of pure ZnO with relative humidity (RH ranging from 11% to 95% at room temperature. The response and recovery time of the ZnO/AuNPs are 5.6 s and 32.4 s, respectively. This study of the construction of semiconductor/noble metal sensors provides a rational way to control the morphology of semiconductor nanomaterials and to design a humidity sensor with high performance.

  6. Compound semiconductor device modelling

    CERN Document Server

    Miles, Robert

    1993-01-01

    Compound semiconductor devices form the foundation of solid-state microwave and optoelectronic technologies used in many modern communication systems. In common with their low frequency counterparts, these devices are often represented using equivalent circuit models, but it is often necessary to resort to physical models in order to gain insight into the detailed operation of compound semiconductor devices. Many of the earliest physical models were indeed developed to understand the 'unusual' phenomena which occur at high frequencies. Such was the case with the Gunn and IMPATI diodes, which led to an increased interest in using numerical simulation methods. Contemporary devices often have feature sizes so small that they no longer operate within the familiar traditional framework, and hot electron or even quantum­ mechanical models are required. The need for accurate and efficient models suitable for computer aided design has increased with the demand for a wider range of integrated devices for operation at...

  7. Semiconductor physics an introduction

    CERN Document Server

    Seeger, Karlheinz

    1999-01-01

    Semiconductor Physics - An Introduction - is suitable for the senior undergraduate or new graduate student majoring in electrical engineering or physics. It will also be useful to solid-state scientists and device engineers involved in semiconductor design and technology. The text provides a lucid account of charge transport, energy transport and optical processes, and a detailed description of many devices. It includes sections on superlattices and quantum well structures, the effects of deep-level impurities on transport, the quantum Hall effect and the calculation of the influence of a magnetic field on the carrier distribution function. This 6th edition has been revised and corrected, and new sections have been added to different chapters.

  8. Basic semiconductor physics

    CERN Document Server

    Hamaguchi, Chihiro

    2017-01-01

    This book presents a detailed description of basic semiconductor physics. The text covers a wide range of important phenomena in semiconductors, from the simple to the advanced. Four different methods of energy band calculations in the full band region are explained: local empirical pseudopotential, non-local pseudopotential, KP perturbation and tight-binding methods. The effective mass approximation and electron motion in a periodic potential, Boltzmann transport equation and deformation potentials used for analysis of transport properties are discussed. Further, the book examines experiments and theoretical analyses of cyclotron resonance in detail. Optical and transport properties, magneto-transport, two-dimensional electron gas transport (HEMT and MOSFET) and quantum transport are reviewed, while optical transition, electron-phonon interaction and electron mobility are also addressed. Energy and electronic structure of a quantum dot (artificial atom) are explained with the help of Slater determinants. The...

  9. Single frequency semiconductor lasers

    CERN Document Server

    Fang, Zujie; Chen, Gaoting; Qu, Ronghui

    2017-01-01

    This book systematically introduces the single frequency semiconductor laser, which is widely used in many vital advanced technologies, such as the laser cooling of atoms and atomic clock, high-precision measurements and spectroscopy, coherent optical communications, and advanced optical sensors. It presents both the fundamentals and characteristics of semiconductor lasers, including basic F-P structure and monolithic integrated structures; interprets laser noises and their measurements; and explains mechanisms and technologies relating to the main aspects of single frequency lasers, including external cavity lasers, frequency stabilization technologies, frequency sweeping, optical phase locked loops, and so on. It paints a clear, physical picture of related technologies and reviews new developments in the field as well. It will be a useful reference to graduate students, researchers, and engineers in the field.

  10. Tailored Au nanorods: optimizing functionality, controlling the aspect ratio and increasing biocompatibility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cai Xiaoqing; Wang, Cheng-Liang; Chen, Hsiang-Hsin; Chien, Chia-Chi; Lai Shengfeng; Chen Yiyun; Hua, Tzu-En; Kempson, Ivan M; Hwu, Y [Institute of Physics, Academia Sinica, Nankang, Taipei 115, Taiwan (China); Yang, C S [Center for Nanomedicine, National Health Research Institutes, Miaoli, Taiwan (China); Margaritondo, G, E-mail: phhwu@sinica.edu.tw [Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne (EPFL), CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland)

    2010-08-20

    Monodisperse gold nanorods with high aspect ratio were synthesized by x-ray irradiation. Irradiation was first used to stimulate the creation of seeds. Afterward, nanorod growth was stimulated either by chemical reduction or again by x-ray irradiation. In the last case, the entire process took place without reducing agents. The shape of the final products could be controlled by modulating the intensity of the x-ray irradiation during the seed synthesis. In turn, the nanorod aspect ratio determines the absorption wavelength of the nanorods that can thus be optimized for different applications. Likewise, the aspect ratio influences the uptake of the nanorods by HeLa cells.

  11. ZnO nanorod array solid phase micro-extraction fiber coating: fabrication and extraction capability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Dan; Zhang Zhuomin; Li Tiemei; Zhang Lan; Chen Guonan; Luo Lin

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, a ZnO nanorod array has been introduced as a coating to the headspace solid phase micro-extraction (HSSPME) field. The coating shows good extraction capability for volatile organic compounds (VOCs) by use of BTEX as a standard and can be considered suitable for sampling trace and small molecular VOC targets. In comparison with the randomly oriented ZnO nanorod HSSPME coating, ZnO nanorod array HSSPME fiber coating shows better extraction capability, which is attributed to the nanorod array structure of the coating. Also, this novel nanorod array coating shows good extraction selectivity to 1-propanethiol.

  12. Images through semiconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1986-01-01

    Improved image processing techniques are constantly being developed for television and for scanners using X-rays or other radiation for industrial or medical applications, etc. As Erik Heijne of CERN explains here, particle physics too has its own special requirements for image processing. The increasing use of semiconductor techniques for handling measurements down to the level of a few microns provides another example of the close interplay between scientific research and technological development. (orig.).

  13. Quantum Confined Semiconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-02-01

    RCR    , (5) which considers all elastic scattering events on the energy shell kk EEE   , which is appropriate for all scattering...fluctuations in semiconductor superlattices using a magneto -transport technique,” Superlattices and Microstructures 15, 225-228 (1994). 12. I. Dharssi and...εyy is consistently slightly tensile (≈ -1%), which agreed with theoretical calculations of εyy based on published values of elastic constants. An

  14. Muonium states in semiconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patterson, B.D.

    1987-01-01

    There is a brief summary of what is known about the muonium states isotropic, anisotropic and diamagnetic in diamond and zincblende semiconductors. The report deals with muonium spectroscopy, including the formation probabilities, hyperfine parameters and electronic g-factors of the states. The dynamics of the states is treated including a discussion of the transition from isotropic Mu to anisotropic Mu in diamond, temperature-dependent linewidthes in silicon and germanium and effects of daping and radiation damage

  15. Semiconductor projectile impact detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shriver, E. L. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    A semiconductor projectile impact detector is described for use in determining micrometeorite presence, as well as its flux and energy comprising a photovoltaic cell which generates a voltage according to the light and heat emitted by the micrometeorites upon impact. A counter and peak amplitude measuring device were used to indicate the number of particules which strike the surface of the cell as well as the kinetic energy of each of the particles.

  16. Nonradiative recombination in semiconductors

    CERN Document Server

    Abakumov, VN; Yassievich, IN

    1991-01-01

    In recent years, great progress has been made in the understandingof recombination processes controlling the number of excessfree carriers in semiconductors under nonequilibrium conditions. As a result, it is now possible to give a comprehensivetheoretical description of these processes. The authors haveselected a number of experimental results which elucidate theunderlying physical problems and enable a test of theoreticalmodels. The following topics are dealt with: phenomenological theory ofrecombination, theoretical models of shallow and deep localizedstates, cascade model of carrier captu

  17. Semiconductor detectors. Recent evolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siffert, P.

    1977-01-01

    The recent evolution as well as the problems appearing in the use of semiconductor counters in both X and γ-ray as well as heavy ions spectroscopy are reviewed. For the photon counters the discussion is limited to cadmium telluride and mercuric iodide room temperature diodes, whereas for heavy ions, identification by means of thin ΔE/Δx counters and some problems related to the pulse amplitude in E detectors are considered [fr

  18. Survey of semiconductor physics

    CERN Document Server

    Böer, Karl W

    1992-01-01

    Any book that covers a large variety of subjects and is written by one author lacks by necessity the depth provided by an expert in his or her own field of specialization. This book is no exception. It has been written with the encouragement of my students and colleagues, who felt that an extensive card file I had accumulated over the years of teaching solid state and semiconductor physics would be helpful to more than just a few of us. This file, updated from time to time, contained lecture notes and other entries that were useful in my research and permitted me to give to my students a broader spectrum of information than is available in typical textbooks. When assembling this material into a book, I divided the top­ ics into material dealing with the homogeneous semiconductor, the subject of the previously published Volume 1, and the inhomoge­ neous semiconductor, the subject of this Volume 2. In order to keep the book to a manageable size, sections of tutorial character which can be used as text for a g...

  19. Spin Transport in Semiconductor heterostructures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marinescu, Domnita Catalina

    2011-01-01

    The focus of the research performed under this grant has been the investigation of spin transport in magnetic semiconductor heterostructures. The interest in these systems is motivated both by their intriguing physical properties, as the physical embodiment of a spin-polarized Fermi liquid, as well as by their potential applications as spintronics devices. In our work we have analyzed several different problems that affect the spin dynamics in single and bi-layer spin-polarized two-dimensional (2D) systems. The topics of interests ranged from the fundamental aspects of the electron-electron interactions, to collective spin and charge density excitations and spin transport in the presence of the spin-orbit coupling. The common denominator of these subjects is the impact at the macroscopic scale of the spin-dependent electron-electron interaction, which plays a much more subtle role than in unpolarized electron systems. Our calculations of several measurable parameters, such as the excitation frequencies of magneto-plasma modes, the spin mass, and the spin transresistivity, propose realistic theoretical estimates of the opposite-spin many-body effects, in particular opposite-spin correlations, that can be directly connected with experimental measurements.

  20. Towards a Reproducible Synthesis of High Aspect Ratio Gold Nanorods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susanne Koeppl

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The seed-mediated method in presence of high concentrations of CTAB is frequently implemented in the preparation of high aspect ratio gold nanorods (i.e., nanorods with aspect ratios of 5 or more; however, the reproducibility has still been limited. We rendered the synthesis procedure simpler, decreased the susceptibility to impurities, and improved the reproducibility of the product distribution. As a result of the high aspect ratios, longitudinal plasmon absorptions were shifted up to very high absorption maxima of 1955 nm in UV-vis-NIR spectra (since this band is completely covered in aqueous solution by the strong absorption of water, the gold species were embedded in poly(vinyl alcohol films for UV-vis-NIR measurements. Finally, the directed particle growth in (110 direction leads to the conclusion that the adsorption of CTAB molecules at specific crystal faces accounts for nanorod growth and not cylindrical CTAB micelles, in agreement with other observations.

  1. Fourier Transform Surface Plasmon Resonance (FTSPR) with Gyromagnetic Plasmonic Nanorods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Insub; Yoo, Haneul; Jang, Hee-Jeong; Cho, Sanghyun; Lee, Kyungeun; Hong, Seunghun; Park, Sungho

    2018-02-12

    An unprecedented active and dynamic sensing platform based on a LSPR configuration that is modulated by using an external magnetic field is reported. Electrochemically synthesized Au/Fe/Au nanorods exhibited plasmonically active behavior through plasmonic coupling, and the middle ferromagnetic Fe block responded to a magnetic impetus, allowing the nanorods to be modulated. The shear force variation induced by the specific binding events between antigens and antibodies on the nanorod surface is used to enhance the sensitivity of detection of antigens in the plasmonics-based sensor application. As a proof-of-concept, influenza A virus (HA1) was used as a target protein. The limit of detection was enhanced by two orders of magnitude compared to that of traditional LSPR sensing. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Reflection of slow neutrons from powder of nanorods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ignatovich, V.K.; Nesvizhevsky, V.V.

    2013-01-01

    Two phenomena were recently observed: efficient diffuse reflection of very cold neutrons (VCN) from nanostructured matter for any angle of neutron incidence to the matter surface, and also quasispecular reflection of cold neutrons (CN) from nanostructured matter for small angles of neutron incidence to the matter surface. In both cases, powder of diamond nanoparticles was used as nanostructured matter, and the measured reflection probabilities by far exceeded the values known for alternative reflectors. Both these phenomena are already used in neutron experiments and for building neutron sources. In the present theoretical work, we consider an option of further increasing the efficiency of nanostructured reflectors due to replacing spherical nanoparticles by nanorods. We showed that VCN albedo from powder of randomly oriented nanorods is lower than their albedo from powder of nanospheres of equal diameter. However, albedo of VCN and quasispecular reflection of CN from powder of long nanorods oriented parallel to the powder surface exceed those for powder of nanospheres of equal diameter

  3. Fabrication and Photocatalytic Properties of ZnSe Nanorod Films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiajia Yin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available ZnSe nanorod films grown on fused quartz glass substrates via a simple two-step synthesis protocol were demonstrated to be environmentally safe and effective recyclable photocatalysts. These films showed greatly enhanced photocatalytic activity compared to pulsed laser deposition ZnSe films in the degradation of methyl orange dye solutions. The well-crystalized ZnSe nanorods had a length of 15 µm and a diameter of 200 nm and were densely grown on the substrate. The morphology, crystal structure, crystal phase, and photophysical properties of the ZnSe nanorod films were investigated using field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM, UV-Vis spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD, transmission electron microscopy (TEM, and high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM.

  4. Reconfigurable assemblies of shape-changing nanorods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Trung Dac; Glotzer, Sharon C

    2010-05-25

    Reconfigurable nanostructures represent an exciting new direction for materials. Applications of reversible transformations between nanostructures induced by molecular conformations under external fields can be found in a broad range of advanced technologies including smart materials, electromagnetic sensors, and drug delivery. With recent breakthroughs in synthesis and fabrication techniques, shape-changing nanoparticles are now possible. Such novel building blocks provide a conceptually new and exciting approach to self-assembly and phase transformations by providing tunable parameters fundamentally different from the usual thermodynamic parameters. Here we investigate via molecular simulation a transformation between two thermodynamically stable structures self-assembled by laterally tethered nanorods whose rod length is switched between two values. Building blocks with longer rods assemble into a square grid structure, while those with short rods form bilayer sheets with internal smectic A ordering at the same thermodynamic conditions. By shortening or lengthening the rods over a short time scale relative to the system equilibration time, we observe a transformation from the square grid structure into bilayer sheets, and vice versa. We also observe honeycomb grid and pentagonal grid structures for intermediate rod lengths. The reconfiguration between morphologically distinct nanostructures induced by dynamically switching the building block shape serves to motivate the fabrication of shape-changing nanoscale building blocks as a new approach to the self-assembly of reconfigurable materials.

  5. Cr2O3 nanoparticle-functionalized WO3 nanorods for ethanol gas sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Seungbok; Bonyani, Maryam; Sun, Gun-Joo; Lee, Jae Kyung; Hyun, Soong Keun; Lee, Chongmu

    2018-02-01

    Pristine WO3 nanorods and Cr2O3-functionalized WO3 nanorods were synthesized by the thermal evaporation of WO3 powder in an oxidizing atmosphere, followed by spin-coating of the nanowires with Cr2O3 nanoparticles and thermal annealing in an oxidizing atmosphere. Scanning electron microscopy was used to examine the morphological features and X-ray diffraction was used to study the crystallinity and phase formation of the synthesized nanorods. Gas sensing tests were performed at different temperatures in the presence of test gases (ethanol, acetone, CO, benzene and toluene). The Cr2O3-functionalized WO3 nanorods sensor showed a stronger response to these gases relative to the pristine WO3 nanorod sensor. In particular, the response of the Cr2O3-functionalized WO3 nanorods sensor to 200 ppm ethanol gas was 5.58, which is approximately 4.4 times higher that of the pristine WO3 nanorods sensor. Furthermore, the Cr2O3-functionalized WO3 nanorods sensor had a shorter response and recovery time. The pristine WO3 nanorods had no selectivity toward ethanol gas, whereas the Cr2O3-functionalized WO3 nanorods sensor showed good selectivity toward ethanol. The gas sensing mechanism of the Cr2O3-functionalized WO3 nanorods sensor toward ethanol is discussed in detail.

  6. Enhancement of Photoluminescence Lifetime of ZnO Nanorods Making Use of Thiourea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erdal Sönmez

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We have investigated correlation of photoluminescence lifetime between zinc oxide (ZnO nanorods and thiourea-doped ZnO nanorods (tu: CH4N2S. Aqueous solutions of ZnO nanorods were deposited on glass substrate by using pneumatic spray pyrolysis technique. The as-prepared specimens were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD, scanning electron microscopy (SEM, and time-resolved photoluminescence spectroscopy (TRPL. The photoluminescence lifetime of ZnO nanorods and ZnO nanorods containing thiourea was determined as =1.56±0.05 ns (2=0.9 and =2.12±0.03 ns (2=1.0, respectively. The calculated lifetime values of ZnO nanorods revealed that the presence of thiourea in ZnO nanorods resulted in increasing the exciton lifetime. In addition to the optical quality of ZnO nanorods, their exciton lifetime is comparable to the longest lifetimes reported for ZnO nanorods. The structural improvement of ZnO nanorods, containing thiourea, was also elucidated by taking their SEM images which show the thinner and longer ZnO nanorods compared to those without thiourea.

  7. III-nitride core-shell nanorod array on quartz substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Si-Young; Min, Jung-Wook; Hwang, Hyeong-Yong; Lekhal, Kaddour; Lee, Ho-Jun; Jho, Young-Dahl; Lee, Dong-Seon; Lee, Yong-Tak; Ikarashi, Nobuyuki; Honda, Yoshio; Amano, Hiroshi

    2017-03-01

    We report the fabrication of near-vertically elongated GaN nanorods on quartz substrates. To control the preferred orientation and length of individual GaN nanorods, we combined molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) with pulsed-mode metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD). The MBE-grown buffer layer was composed of GaN nanograins exhibiting an ordered surface and preferred orientation along the surface normal direction. Position-controlled growth of the GaN nanorods was achieved by selective-area growth using MOCVD. Simultaneously, the GaN nanorods were elongated by the pulsed-mode growth. The microstructural and optical properties of both GaN nanorods and InGaN/GaN core-shell nanorods were then investigated. The nanorods were highly crystalline and the core-shell structures exhibited optical emission properties, indicating the feasibility of fabricating III-nitride nano-optoelectronic devices on amorphous substrates.

  8. III-nitride core–shell nanorod array on quartz substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Si-Young; Min, Jung-Wook; Hwang, Hyeong-Yong; Lekhal, Kaddour; Lee, Ho-Jun; Jho, Young-Dahl; Lee, Dong-Seon; Lee, Yong-Tak; Ikarashi, Nobuyuki; Honda, Yoshio; Amano, Hiroshi

    2017-01-01

    We report the fabrication of near-vertically elongated GaN nanorods on quartz substrates. To control the preferred orientation and length of individual GaN nanorods, we combined molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) with pulsed-mode metal–organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD). The MBE-grown buffer layer was composed of GaN nanograins exhibiting an ordered surface and preferred orientation along the surface normal direction. Position-controlled growth of the GaN nanorods was achieved by selective-area growth using MOCVD. Simultaneously, the GaN nanorods were elongated by the pulsed-mode growth. The microstructural and optical properties of both GaN nanorods and InGaN/GaN core–shell nanorods were then investigated. The nanorods were highly crystalline and the core–shell structures exhibited optical emission properties, indicating the feasibility of fabricating III-nitride nano-optoelectronic devices on amorphous substrates. PMID:28345641

  9. Synthesis of binary bismuth-cadmium oxide nanorods with sensitive electrochemical sensing performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wen, Yong; Pei, Lizhai; Wei, Tian

    2017-01-01

    Binary bismuth-cadmium oxide nanorods have been synthesized by a simple hydrothermal process without templates and additives. X-ray diffraction and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy reveal that the nanorods possess single crystalline tetragonal Bi 2 CdO 4 phase. Scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy images show that the length and diameter of the nanorods are 20-300 nm and 5-10 μm, respectively. The formation of the binary bismuth-cadmium oxide nanorods is closely related to the hydrothermal parameters. The electrochemical sensing performance of the binary bismuth-cadmium oxide nanorods has been investigated using the nanorods as glassy carbon electrode modifiers. The detection limit is 0.19 μM with a linear range of 0.0005-2 mM. The nanorod-modified glassy carbon electrode exhibits good electrocatalytic activity toward L-cysteine and great application potential for electrochemical sensors.

  10. Fabrication and photovoltaic properties of ZnO nanorods/perovskite solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirahata, Yasuhiro; Tanaike, Kohei; Akiyama, Tsuyoshi; Fujimoto, Kazuya; Suzuki, Atsushi; Balachandran, Jeyadevan; Oku, Takeo

    2016-02-01

    ZnO nanorods/perovskite solar cells with different lengths of ZnO nanorods were fabricated. The ZnO nanorods were prepared by chemical bath deposition and directly confirmed to be hexagon-shaped nanorods. The lengths of the ZnO nanorads were controlled by deposition condition of ZnO seed layer. Photovoltaic properties of the ZnO nanorods/CH3NH3PbI3 solar cells were investigated by measuring current density-voltage characteristics and incident photon to current conversion efficiency. The highest conversion efficiency was obtained in ZnO nanorods/CH3NH3PbI3 with the longest ZnO nanorods.

  11. Fabrication and photovoltaic properties of ZnO nanorods/perovskite solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shirahata, Yasuhiro; Tanaike, Kohei; Akiyama, Tsuyoshi; Fujimoto, Kazuya; Suzuki, Atsushi; Balachandran, Jeyadevan; Oku, Takeo, E-mail: oku@mat.usp.ac.jp [Department of Materials Science, The University of Shiga Prefecture, 2500 Hassaka, Hikone, Shiga 522-8533 (Japan)

    2016-02-01

    ZnO nanorods/perovskite solar cells with different lengths of ZnO nanorods were fabricated. The ZnO nanorods were prepared by chemical bath deposition and directly confirmed to be hexagon-shaped nanorods. The lengths of the ZnO nanorads were controlled by deposition condition of ZnO seed layer. Photovoltaic properties of the ZnO nanorods/CH{sub 3}NH{sub 3}PbI{sub 3} solar cells were investigated by measuring current density-voltage characteristics and incident photon to current conversion efficiency. The highest conversion efficiency was obtained in ZnO nanorods/CH{sub 3}NH{sub 3}PbI{sub 3} with the longest ZnO nanorods.

  12. Synthesis of binary bismuth-cadmium oxide nanorods with sensitive electrochemical sensing performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wen, Yong [Xinjiang Univ., Xinjiang (China). School of Civil Engineering and Architecture; Pei, Lizhai; Wei, Tian [Anhui Univ. of Technology, Anhui (China). School of Materials Science and Engineering

    2017-07-15

    Binary bismuth-cadmium oxide nanorods have been synthesized by a simple hydrothermal process without templates and additives. X-ray diffraction and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy reveal that the nanorods possess single crystalline tetragonal Bi{sub 2}CdO{sub 4} phase. Scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy images show that the length and diameter of the nanorods are 20-300 nm and 5-10 μm, respectively. The formation of the binary bismuth-cadmium oxide nanorods is closely related to the hydrothermal parameters. The electrochemical sensing performance of the binary bismuth-cadmium oxide nanorods has been investigated using the nanorods as glassy carbon electrode modifiers. The detection limit is 0.19 μM with a linear range of 0.0005-2 mM. The nanorod-modified glassy carbon electrode exhibits good electrocatalytic activity toward L-cysteine and great application potential for electrochemical sensors.

  13. Modelling of Packed Co Nanorods for Hard Magnetic Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toson P.

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available We present a numerical algorithm based on the bullet physics library to generate densely packed (39% - 41% structures of high-aspect-ratio nanorods for finite element micromagnetic simulations. The coercivities µ0Hc of the corresponding Cobalt nanorod structures vary between 0.50T and 0.67T, depending on the overall orientation of nanorods, which is in good agreement with experimental results. The simulations make it possible to estimate the coercivity loss due to incoherent reversal processes (27% as well as the gain due to shape anisotropy (59%. Our calculations show permanent magnets consisting of packed Co nanorods with an energy density product (BHmax of 83kJ/m3. We estimate that this value can be increased to 103kJ/m3 by increasing the packing density from 40% to 45%. Another way to optimize (BHmax is the usage of novel materials. By varying the anisotropy constant K1 and the saturation polarisation JS we found lower limits for these parameters to reach a certain energy density product. To increase (BHmax to 160 kJ/m3, K1 and JS have to be in the order of 450kJ/m3 and 2.25T, respectively. The thermal stability of this approach was verified by elastic band calculations. Cobalt nanorods with a diameter of 10nm and a height of 50nm are thermally stable at room temperature, but problematic at 900K. Doubling the nanorods' height to 100nm increases that limit considerably.

  14. Synthesis of Mn{sub 0.04}Cu{sub 0.05}Zn{sub 0.91}O nanorod and its application in optoelectronic switching device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Layek, Animesh, E-mail: layekanimesh@gmail.com [Department of Physics, Bejoy Narayan Mahavidyalaya, Itachuna, Hooghly-712147 (India); Middya, Somnath [Department of Physics, Bankim Sardar College, Tangrakhali, South 24-paraganas, pin-743329 (India)

    2016-05-06

    The optical absorption of ZnO nanorod had been reduced by introducing Mn as doping element. In this present study the optical absorption of ZnO nanorod has been improved by simultaneous doping of the element Mn and Cu. The hydrothermal reaction was adopted for the synthesis. The electrical conductivity and the optical band gap of the Mn{sub 0.04}Cu{sub 0.05}Zn{sub 0.91}O were measured as 1.16 × 10{sup −3}Scm{sup −1} and 3.07eV respectively, assigned the semiconductor behavior. The light induced rectification in time dependent current response characteristic of Al/ Mn{sub 0.04}Cu{sub 0.05}Zn{sub 0.91}O/ITO was investigated to check the performance of the composite in opto-electronic switching device.

  15. Performance Improvement of GaN-Based Flip-Chip White Light-Emitting Diodes with Diffused Nanorod Reflector and with ZnO Nanorod Antireflection Layer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsin-Ying Lee

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The GaN-based flip-chip white light-emitting diodes (FCWLEDs with diffused ZnO nanorod reflector and with ZnO nanorod antireflection layer were fabricated. The ZnO nanorod array grown using an aqueous solution method was combined with Al metal to form the diffused ZnO nanorod reflector. It could avoid the blue light emitted out from the Mg-doped GaN layer of the FCWLEDs, which caused more blue light emitted out from the sapphire substrate to pump the phosphor. Moreover, the ZnO nanorod array was utilized as the antireflection layer of the FCWLEDs to reduce the total reflection loss. The light output power and the phosphor conversion efficiency of the FCWLEDs with diffused nanorod reflector and 250 nm long ZnO nanorod antireflection layer were improved from 21.15 mW to 23.90 mW and from 77.6% to 80.1% in comparison with the FCWLEDs with diffused nanorod reflector and without ZnO nanorod antireflection layer, respectively.

  16. Spontaneous Superlattice Formation in Nanorods through PartialCation Exchange

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robinson, Richard D.; Sadtler, Bryce; Demchenko, Denis O.; Erdonmez, Can K.; Wang, Lin-Wang; Alivisatos, A. Paul

    2007-03-14

    Lattice mismatch strains are widely known to controlnanoscale pattern formation in heteroepitaxy, but such effects have notbeen exploited in colloidal nanocrystal growth. We demonstrate acolloidal route to synthesizing CdS-Ag2S nanorod superlattices throughpartial cation exchange. Strain induces the spontaneous formation ofperiodic structures. Ab initio calculations of the interfacial energy andmodeling of strain energies show that these forces drive theself-organization. The nanorod superlattices exhibit high stabilityagainst ripening and phase mixing. These materials are tunablenear-infrared emitters with potential applications as nanometer-scaleoptoelectronic devices.

  17. Far-Infrared Absorption of PbSe Nanorods

    KAUST Repository

    Hyun, Byung-Ryool

    2011-07-13

    Measurements of the far-infrared absorption spectra of PbSe nanocrystals and nanorods are presented. As the aspect ratio of the nanorods increases, the Fröhlich sphere resonance splits into two peaks. We analyze this splitting with a classical electrostatic model, which is based on the dielectric function of bulk PbSe but without any free-carrier contribution. Good agreement between the measured and calculated spectra indicates that resonances in the local field factors underlie the measured spectra. © 2011 American Chemical Society.

  18. Synthesis of ZnO nanorods from aqueous solution

    OpenAIRE

    Lepot, N.; Van Bael, M.K.; Van den Rul, H.; D'Haen, J.; Peeters, R.; Franco, D.; Mullens, J.

    2007-01-01

    In the present work, crystalline one-dimensional ZnO nanorods were synthesized by a PVP (polyvinylpyrrolidone)-assisted hydrothermal process with zinc acetate as the precursor. The major advantage of this technique is the use of water as the solvent: cheaper and more environmentally ftiendly than alcohol. The as-synthesized ZnO nanorods have diameters of 50-200 nm and lengths up to 5 mu m. X-ray powder diffractometry (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and selected area electron dif...

  19. Uptake, translocation, and toxicity of gold nanorods in maize

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moradi Shahmansouri, Nastaran

    Nanomaterials are widely used in many different products, such as electronics, cosmetics, industrial goods, biomedical uses, and other material applications. The heavy emission of nanomaterials into the environment has motived increasing concern regarding the effects on ecosystems, food chains, and, human health. Plants can tolerate a certain amount of natural nanomaterials, but large amounts of ENMs released from a variety of industries could be toxic to plants and possibly threaten the ecosystem. Employing phytoremediation as a contamination treatment method may show promise. However a pre-requisite to successful treatment is a better understanding of the behavior and effects of nanomaterials within plant systems. This study is designed to investigate the uptake, translocation, bioavailability, and toxicity of gold nanorods in maize plants. Maize is an important food and feed crop that can be used to understand the potential hazardous effects of nanoparticle uptake and distribution in the food chain. The findings could be an important contribution to the fields of phytoremediation, agri-nanotechnology, and nanoparticle toxicity on plants. In the first experiment, hydroponically grown maize seedlings were exposed to similar doses of commercial non-coated gold nanorods in three sizes, 10x34 nm, 20x75 nm, and 40x96 nm. The three nanorod species were suspended in solutions at concentrations of 350 mg/l, 5.8 mg/l, and 14 mg/l, respectively. Maize plants were exposed to all three solutions resulting in considerably lower transpiration and wet biomass than control plants. Likewise, dry biomass was reduced, but the effect is less pronounced than that of transpiration and wet biomass. The reduced transpiration and water content, which eventually proved fatal to exposed plants, were most likely a result of toxic effect of gold nanorod, which appeared to physically hinder the root system. TEM images proved that maize plants can uptake gold particles and accumulate them in

  20. Preparation of single-crystal copper ferrite nanorods and nanodisks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Du Jimin; Liu Zhimin; Wu Weize; Li Zhonghao; Han Buxing; Huang Ying

    2005-01-01

    This article, for the first time, reports the preparation of single-crystal copper ferrite nanorods and nanodisks. Using amorphous copper ferrite nanoparticles synthesized by reverse micelle as reaction precursor, single-crystal copper ferrite nanorods were synthesized via hydrothermal method in the presence of surfactant polyethylene glycol (PEG), however, copper ferrite nanodisks were prepared through the same procedures except the surfactant PEG. The resulting nanomaterials have been characterized by powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), selected electron area diffraction (SEAD), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The bulk composition of the samples was determined by means of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS)

  1. Fabrication of Highly Ordered Gold Nanorods Film Using Alumina Nanopores

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Soltani

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available A simple method for fabrication of highly ordered gold nanorod film is introduced in this article. The procedure is based on thermal evaporation of gold into a porous anodic alumina film (PAA. The PPA film was fabricated by combining the hard and mild anodization. This combination effectively decreases the processing time of fabrication of highly ordered porous anodic alumina film with controlled pore diameter and length.  It was found that gold nanorods configuration affected by the porous anodic alumina film structure such as pore diameter and length. Furthermore the evaporation process change the rods diameter along the nanopores via the decreasing the pore mouth during the gold deposition.

  2. 75 FR 49526 - Freescale Semiconductor, Inc., Technical Information Center, Tempe, AZ; Freescale Semiconductor...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-13

    ... Semiconductor, Inc., Technical Information Center, Tempe, AZ; Freescale Semiconductor, Inc., Technical... October 1, 2009, applicable to workers of Freescale Semiconductor, Inc., Technical Information Center..., Massachusetts location of Freescale Semiconductor, Inc., Technical Information Center. The intent of the...

  3. New developments in power semiconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundberg, G. R.

    1983-06-01

    This paper represents an overview of some recent power semiconductor developments and spotlights new technologies that may have significant impact for aircraft electric secondary power. Primary emphasis will be on NASA-Lewis-supported developments in transistors, diodes, a new family of semiconductors, and solid-state remote power controllers. Several semiconductor companies that are moving into the power arena with devices rated at 400 V and 50 A and above are listed, with a brief look at a few devices.

  4. Shape-dependent dispersion and alignment of nonaggregating plasmonic gold nanoparticles in lyotropic and thermotropic liquid crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qingkun; Tang, Jianwei; Zhang, Yuan; Martinez, Angel; Wang, Shaowei; He, Sailing; White, Timothy J; Smalyukh, Ivan I

    2014-05-01

    We use both lyotropic liquid crystals composed of prolate micelles and thermotropic liquid crystals made of rod-like molecules to uniformly disperse and unidirectionally align relatively large gold nanorods and other complex-shaped nanoparticles at high concentrations. We show that some of these ensuing self-assembled orientationally ordered soft matter systems exhibit polarization-dependent plasmonic properties with strongly pronounced molar extinction exceeding that previously achieved in self-assembled composites. The long-range unidirectional alignment of gold nanorods is mediated mainly by anisotropic surface anchoring interactions at the surfaces of gold nanoparticles. Polarization-sensitive absorption, scattering, and extinction are used to characterize orientations of nanorods and other nanoparticles. The experimentally measured unique optical properties of these composites, which stem from the collective plasmonic effect of the gold nanorods with long-range order in a liquid crystal matrix, are reproduced in computer simulations. A simple phenomenological model based on anisotropic surface interaction explains the alignment of gold nanorods dispersed in liquid crystals and the physical underpinnings behind our observations.

  5. Contact light-emitting diodes based on vertical ZnO nanorods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Panin, G. N.; Cho, H. D.; Lee, S. W.; Kang, T. W.

    2014-01-01

    We report vertical contact light-emitting diodes (VCLEDs), that are based on heterojunctions formed by using the point contacts of n-ZnO nanorods (NRs) to the p-type semiconductor substrate and that are fabricated using a new approach to the formation of LEDs (Appl. Phys. Lett. 98, 093110 (2011)). A p-type GaN film grown on a sapphire substrate was used to form n-ZnO NRs/pGaN VCLEDs on a large area of about 4 cm 2 . The VCLEDs emitted a pure blue electroluminescence with high efficiency. Electroluminescence at 470 nm, which is visible to the naked eye, started at small current of about 50 μA and is attributed to the good optical properties of the structurally perfect heterojunctions in the point contacts. The VCLED configuration allows the creation of ZnO/p-GaN nano-LEDs of high density and high-quality with a greatly reduced concentration of nonradiative defects in the active regions. The VCLEDs showed the high brightness of light required for active matrix displays and general solid-state lighting.

  6. Band structure of semiconductors

    CERN Document Server

    Tsidilkovski, I M

    2013-01-01

    Band Structure of Semiconductors provides a review of the theoretical and experimental methods of investigating band structure and an analysis of the results of the developments in this field. The book presents the problems, methods, and applications in the study of band structure. Topics on the computational methods of band structure; band structures of important semiconducting materials; behavior of an electron in a perturbed periodic field; effective masses and g-factors for the most commonly encountered band structures; and the treatment of cyclotron resonance, Shubnikov-de Haas oscillatio

  7. Physics of Organic Semiconductors

    CERN Document Server

    Brütting, Wolfgang

    2005-01-01

    Filling the gap in the literature currently available, this book presents an overview of our knowledge of the physics behind organic semiconductor devices. Contributions from 18 international research groups cover various aspects of this field, ranging from the growth of organic layers and crystals, their electronic properties at interfaces, their photophysics and electrical transport properties to the application of these materials in such different devices as organic field-effect transistors, photovoltaic cells and organic light-emitting diodes. From the contents:. * Excitation Dynamics in O

  8. Semiconductor ionizino. radiation detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-01-01

    Spectrometric semiconductor detectors of ionizing radiation with the electron-hole junction, based on silicon and germanium are presented. The following parameters are given for the individual types of germanium detectors: energy range of detected radiation, energy resolution given as full width at half maximum (FWHM) and full width at one tenth of maximum (FWTM) for 57 Co and 60 Co, detection sensitivity, optimal voltage, and electric capacitance at optimal voltage. For silicon detectors the value of FWHM for 239 Pu is given, the sensitive area and the depth of the sensitive area. (E.S.)

  9. Semiconductor characterization for optoelectronics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miner, C.J. [Bell Northern Research Ltd., Ottawa, ON (Canada)

    1996-03-01

    Scanning reflectance spectroscopy, scanning photoluminescence, and double crystal x-ray diffraction mapping are all specialized non-destructive characterization tools which monitor the advanced materials used in the development of high speed optoelectronics. Each technology was described and their application in the assessment of III-V semiconductor composition, layer thickness and defect density was demonstrated. The new techniques have been optimized for speed, to make high spatial resolution mapping practical. Since the tests are non-destructive, frequent monitoring is possible. 11 refs., 7 figs.

  10. Basic properties of semiconductors

    CERN Document Server

    Landsberg, PT

    2013-01-01

    Since Volume 1 was published in 1982, the centres of interest in the basic physics of semiconductors have shifted. Volume 1 was called Band Theory and Transport Properties in the first edition, but the subject has broadened to such an extent that Basic Properties is now a more suitable title. Seven chapters have been rewritten by the original authors. However, twelve chapters are essentially new, with the bulk of this work being devoted to important current topics which give this volume an almost encyclopaedic form. The first three chapters discuss various aspects of modern band theory and the

  11. Layered semiconductor neutron detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Samuel S; Perry, Dale L

    2013-12-10

    Room temperature operating solid state hand held neutron detectors integrate one or more relatively thin layers of a high neutron interaction cross-section element or materials with semiconductor detectors. The high neutron interaction cross-section element (e.g., Gd, B or Li) or materials comprising at least one high neutron interaction cross-section element can be in the form of unstructured layers or micro- or nano-structured arrays. Such architecture provides high efficiency neutron detector devices by capturing substantially more carriers produced from high energy .alpha.-particles or .gamma.-photons generated by neutron interaction.

  12. Semiconductor Properties Near Interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-07-31

    Sputtered from Semiconductors", Proc. 13th Annual Conference of the Microbeam Analysis Society, 1978. 4. J. C. Potosky and D. B. Wittry, "The Secondary...Ion Optics of a Quadru- pole Ion Microprobe", Proc. 13th Annual Conference of the Microbeam Analysis Society, 1978. 5. F. Guo and D. B. Wittry, "Use...of Specimen Current Integration in SIMS", Proc. 13th Annual Conference of the Microbeam Analysis Society, 1978. 6. D. B. Wittry, ’. Y. Yin, and R. A

  13. Hydrogen in semiconductors

    CERN Document Server

    Pankove, Jacques I

    1991-01-01

    Hydrogen plays an important role in silicon technology, having a profound effect on a wide range of properties. Thus, the study of hydrogen in semiconductors has received much attention from an interdisciplinary assortment of researchers. This sixteen-chapter volume provides a comprehensive review of the field, including a discussion of hydrogenation methods, the use of hydrogen to passivate defects, the use of hydrogen to neutralize deep levels, shallow acceptors and shallow donors in silicon, vibrational spectroscopy, and hydrogen-induced defects in silicon. In addition to this detailed cove

  14. Storage of optical excitations in colloidal semiconductor nanocrystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kraus, Robert

    2009-01-01

    In the present theis it is described, how colloidal semiconductor nanocrystals can be used under influence of an electric field to store optical excitation energy at room temperature, to alter, and to supply controlledly. For this the photoluminescence emission of an ensemble of heterogeneous nanocrystals was manipulated and spectroscopically studied. The applied od-shaped particles consist of a spherical core of CdSe, on which an elongated shell of CdS is monocrystallinely be grown. The electron is in such an asymmetric geometry delocalized over the hole nanorod, whereas the hole because of the high potential barrier remains bound in the CdSe core. The wave-function overlap of the charge carriers can therefore be influenced both by the length of the nanorod and by an external electric field. In the regime of prompt fluorescence the manipulation of the charge-carrier separation by an electric field led to a suppression of the radiative recombination. As consequence a fluorescence suppression of about 40% could be observed. After the removal of the electric field the separation was reduced and the stored energy is in an fluorescence increasement directedly liberated again. The strength of the storage efficiency lies with the strength of the electric field in a linear connection. Furthermore in this time range a quantum-confined Stark effect of upt o 14 meV could be detected at room temperature, although the effect is complicated by the different orientations and sizes of the nanorods in the ensemble. Hereby it is of advance to can adress with the applied detection technique a subensemble of nanocrystals. Furthermore a significant storage of the ensmble emission by up to 100 μs conditioned by the electric electric fieldcould be demonstrated, which exceeds the fluorescence lifetime of these particles by the 10 5 fold. As also could be shown by experiments on CdSe/ZnS nanocrystals surface states play a relevent role for the emission dynamics of nanocrystals. The

  15. Liquids and liquid mixtures

    CERN Document Server

    Rowlinson, J S; Baldwin, J E; Buckingham, A D; Danishefsky, S

    2013-01-01

    Liquids and Liquid Mixtures, Third Edition explores the equilibrium properties of liquids and liquid mixtures and relates them to the properties of the constituent molecules using the methods of statistical thermodynamics. Topics covered include the critical state, fluid mixtures at high pressures, and the statistical thermodynamics of fluids and mixtures. This book consists of eight chapters and begins with an overview of the liquid state and the thermodynamic properties of liquids and liquid mixtures, including vapor pressure and heat capacities. The discussion then turns to the thermodynami

  16. Synthesis of non-aggregated nicotinic acid coated magnetite nanorods via hydrothermal technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Attallah, Olivia A.; Girgis, E.; Abdel-Mottaleb, Mohamed M.S.A.

    2016-01-01

    Non-aggregated magnetite nanorods with average diameters of 20–30 nm and lengths of up to 350 nm were synthesized via in situ, template free hydrothermal technique. These nanorods capped with different concentrations (1, 1.5, 2 and 2.5 g) of nicotinic acid (vitamin B3); possessed good magnetic properties and easy dispersion in aqueous solutions. Our new synthesis technique maintained the uniform shape of the nanorods even with increasing the coating material concentration. The effect of nicotinic acid on the shape, particle size, chemical structure and magnetic properties of the prepared nanorods was evaluated using different characterization methods. The length of nanorods increased from 270 nm to 350 nm in nicotinic acid coated nanorods. Goethite and magnetite phases with different ratios were the dominant phases in the coated samples while a pure magnetite phase was observed in the uncoated one. Nicotinic acid coated magnetic nanorods showed a significant decrease in saturation magnetization than uncoated samples (55 emu/g) reaching 4 emu/g in 2.5 g nicotinic acid coated sample. The novel synthesis technique proved its potentiality to prepare coated metal oxides with one dimensional nanostructure which can function effectively in different biological applications. - Highlights: • We synthesize nicotinic acid coated magnetite nanorods via hydrothermal technique • Effect of nicotinic acid concentration on the nanorods properties was significant • Nanorods maintained uniform shape with increased concentration of nicotinic acid • Alterations occurred in particle size, mineral phases and magnetics of coated samples.

  17. Pre-fabricated nanorods in RE–Ba–Cu–O superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khatri, N D; Majkic, G; Shi, T; Selvamanickam, V; Chen, Y

    2013-01-01

    Pre-fabrication of metallic nanorods on biaxially textured templates has been explored in this study to introduce flux pinning centers in RE–Ba–Cu–O (REBCO, RE =rare earth) based superconductors. Pt nanorods were deposited by an electron beam assisted deposition method on LaMnO 3 -capped biaxially textured IBAD-(ion beam assisted deposition) substrates. Well-controlled nanorods with varying diameter (50–120 nm), length (up to 1 μm), orientation and unit cell size were grown over an area of 120–150 μm 2 . The nanorod-decorated samples were then deposited with Gd–Y–Ba–Cu–O ((Gd, Y)BCO) by metal organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD). The Pt nanorods remain in their positions during MOCVD and become embedded in the (Gd, Y)BCO matrix, although they suffer creep-induced shape deformation due to exposure to elevated temperature. Higher unit cell size, longer nanorods, and nanorods oriented at an angle to the substrate normal adversely affect the epitaxy of the (Gd, Y)BCO film due to formation of a-axis grains. The observed current-carrying capacity of the Pt nanorod sample is lower than its corresponding reference sample without any nanorods and processed under identical conditions, but it decreases at a slower rate with increasing magnetic field. Potential routes to improve the performance while retaining the desirable characteristics of controlled nanorod direction and density are discussed. (paper)

  18. Synthesis and characterizations of Pt nanorods on electrospun polyamide-6 nanofibers templates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nirmala, R.; Navamathavan, R.; Won, Jeong Jin; Jeon, Kyung Soo; Yousef, Ayman; Kim, Hak Yong

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Electrospun polyamide-6 nanofibers were used as the templates for synthesis Pt nanorods. ► Polyamide-6 nanofibers surfaces were plasma treated to coat Pt. ► High quality Pt nanorods were obtained by calcinations process. ► Pt nanorods with a diameter of few hundred nanometers were obtained. ► Polyamide-6 nanofibers template based Pt nanorods synthesis are a feasible method. - Abstract: We report on the synthesis of platinum (Pt) nanorods by using ultrafine polyamide-6 nanofibers templates produced via electrospinning technique. These ultrafine polyamide-6 nanofibers can be utilized as the templates for growing Pt nanorods after modifying them optimally by plasma passivations. The morphological, structural, optical and electrical properties of the template assisted Pt nanorods were studied by field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM), high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HR-TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), photoluminescence (PL) and current–voltage (I–V) characteristics. The ability to fabricate the ultrafine size controlled Pt nanorods on polyamide-6 templates with optimized growth parameters in real time can be utilized for the variety of technological applications. Therefore, it is possible to obtain high quality with size control Pt nanorods. Once obtaining the high quality metal nanorods on polymer templates, the same can be adapted for the electronic device fabrication.

  19. Synthesis of non-aggregated nicotinic acid coated magnetite nanorods via hydrothermal technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Attallah, Olivia A., E-mail: olivia.adly@hu.edu.eg [Center of Nanotechnology, Nile University, 12677 Giza (Egypt); Pharmaceutical Chemistry Department, Heliopolis University, 11777 El Salam, Cairo (Egypt); Girgis, E. [Solid State Physics Department, National Research Center, 12622 Dokki, Giza (Egypt); Advanced Materials and Nanotechnology Lab, CEAS, National Research Center, 12622 Dokki, Giza (Egypt); Abdel-Mottaleb, Mohamed M.S.A. [Center of Nanotechnology, Nile University, 12677 Giza (Egypt)

    2016-02-01

    Non-aggregated magnetite nanorods with average diameters of 20–30 nm and lengths of up to 350 nm were synthesized via in situ, template free hydrothermal technique. These nanorods capped with different concentrations (1, 1.5, 2 and 2.5 g) of nicotinic acid (vitamin B3); possessed good magnetic properties and easy dispersion in aqueous solutions. Our new synthesis technique maintained the uniform shape of the nanorods even with increasing the coating material concentration. The effect of nicotinic acid on the shape, particle size, chemical structure and magnetic properties of the prepared nanorods was evaluated using different characterization methods. The length of nanorods increased from 270 nm to 350 nm in nicotinic acid coated nanorods. Goethite and magnetite phases with different ratios were the dominant phases in the coated samples while a pure magnetite phase was observed in the uncoated one. Nicotinic acid coated magnetic nanorods showed a significant decrease in saturation magnetization than uncoated samples (55 emu/g) reaching 4 emu/g in 2.5 g nicotinic acid coated sample. The novel synthesis technique proved its potentiality to prepare coated metal oxides with one dimensional nanostructure which can function effectively in different biological applications. - Highlights: • We synthesize nicotinic acid coated magnetite nanorods via hydrothermal technique • Effect of nicotinic acid concentration on the nanorods properties was significant • Nanorods maintained uniform shape with increased concentration of nicotinic acid • Alterations occurred in particle size, mineral phases and magnetics of coated samples.

  20. Co-catalyst free Titanate Nanorods for improved Hydrogen ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Herein, we report a simplified method for the preparation of photo-active titanate nanorods catalyst .... The TEM images were taken with Philips Technai G2 FEI F12 trans- mission electron microscope operating at 80-100 kV. Optical properties were measured in DRS ..... Chen X, Shen S, Guo L and Mao S S 2010 Chem. Rev ...

  1. Sodium titanate nanorods: Preparation, microstructure characterization and photocatalytic activity

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Štengl, Václav; Bakardjieva, Snejana; Šubrt, Jan; Večerníková, Eva; Szatmáry, Lórant; Klementová, Mariana; Balek, Vladimír

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 63, 1-2 (2006), s. 20-30 ISSN 0926-3373 R&D Projects: GA MŠk 1M0577 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40320502 Keywords : sodium titanate * nanorods * ethylene glycol Subject RIV: CA - Inorganic Chemistry Impact factor: 3.942, year: 2006

  2. Antimicrobial potentials of silver colloidal (nanorods) on clinical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Antimicrobial resistance in developing countries has long been an issue of major concern. Nanotechnology has become an eye opener for the intervention on multiple drug resistance organisms. In this study we investigated the antimicrobial potentials of Silver Nitrate (nanorods) solution used in managing infectious ...

  3. Luminescence properties of hydrothermally grown ZnO nanorods

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Yatskiv, Roman; Grym, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 99, 1November (2016), s. 214-220 ISSN 0749-6036 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LD14111; GA ČR GA15-17044S Institutional support: RVO:67985882 Keywords : Photoluminescence * Annealing * ZnO nanorods Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering Impact factor: 2.123, year: 2016

  4. Facile growth of Ag@Pt bimetallic nanorods on electrochemically ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. An efficient transducer was constructed by the direct growth of bimetallic Ag@Pt nanorods. (NRDs) on L−tryptophan functionalized electrochemically reduced graphene oxide (L−ERGO) modified elec- trode using galvanic displacement method for the electrooxidation of hydrazine. Initially, one dimensional.

  5. Graphite/ZnO nanorods junction for ultraviolet photodetectors

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Yatskiv, Roman; Grym, Jan; Verde, Maria

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 105, March 2015 (2015), s. 70-73 ISSN 0038-1101 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LD14111 Institutional support: RVO:67985882 Keywords : ZnO nanorods * Graphite based junction * UV photodetector Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering Impact factor: 1.345, year: 2015

  6. Synthesis of selenium nanorods with assistance of biomolecule

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. Nanorods of one-dimensional (1D) trigonal selenium (t-Se) are synthesized using biomolecule substances for five different aging times (1 h, 2 h, 3 h, 1 day and 4 days) by precipitation method. XRD analysis indicates a shift of the (1 0 1) plane towards higher diffraction angle for 1 day aging time. It is observed that ...

  7. Plasmonic-cavity model for radiating nano-rod antennas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peng, Liang; Mortensen, N. Asger

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we propose the analytical solution of nano-rod antennas utilizing a cylindrical harmonics expansion. By treating the metallic nano-rods as plasmonic cavities, we derive closed-form expressions for both the internal and the radiated fields, as well as the resonant condition and the ......In this paper, we propose the analytical solution of nano-rod antennas utilizing a cylindrical harmonics expansion. By treating the metallic nano-rods as plasmonic cavities, we derive closed-form expressions for both the internal and the radiated fields, as well as the resonant condition...... and the radiation efficiency. With our theoretical model, we show that besides the plasmonic resonances, efficient radiation takes advantage of (a) rendering a large value of the rods' radius and (b) a central-fed profile, through which the radiation efficiency can reach up to 70% and even higher in a wide...... frequency band. Our theoretical expressions and conclusions are general and pave the way for engineering and further optimization of optical antenna systems and their radiation patterns....

  8. Electrorheological properties of suspensions of polypyrrole coated titanate nanorods

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mrlík, M.; Pavlínek, V.; Saha, P.; Quadrat, Otakar

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 21, č. 5 (2011), 52365_1-52365_7 ISSN 1430-6395 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA202/09/1626 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40500505 Keywords : polypyrrole * nanorods * electrorheology Subject RIV: BK - Fluid Dynamics Impact factor: 1.000, year: 2011

  9. WO{sub 3} nanorods prepared by low-temperature seeded growth hydrothermal reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ng, Chai Yan [School of Materials and Mineral Resources Engineering, Universiti Sains Malaysia, 14300 Nibong Tebal, Penang (Malaysia); Abdul Razak, Khairunisak, E-mail: khairunisak@eng.usm.my [School of Materials and Mineral Resources Engineering, Universiti Sains Malaysia, 14300 Nibong Tebal, Penang (Malaysia); NanoBiotechnology Research and Innovation (NanoBRI), Institute for Research in Molecular Medicine (INFORMM), Universiti Sains Malaysia, 11800 USM, Penang (Malaysia); Lockman, Zainovia, E-mail: zainovia@eng.usm.my [School of Materials and Mineral Resources Engineering, Universiti Sains Malaysia, 14300 Nibong Tebal, Penang (Malaysia)

    2014-03-05

    Highlights: • WO{sub 3} nanorods with 5–10 nm diameter were grown directly on seeded tungsten foil. • WO{sub 3} nanorods were successfully grown at low temperature of 80 °C. • WO{sub 3} nanorods were grown on the entire surface of the seed layer after 24 h. • Annealed nanorods showed better electrochromic properties than as-made nanorods. -- Abstract: This work describes the first tungsten oxide (WO{sub 3}) nanorods hydrothermally grown on W foil. WO{sub 3} nanorods were successfully grown at low hydrothermal temperature of 80 °C by seeded growth hydrothermal reaction. The seed layer was prepared by thermally oxidized the W foil at 400 °C for 0.5 h. This work discusses the effect of hydrothermal reaction and annealing period on the morphological, structural, and electrochromic properties of WO{sub 3} nanorods. Various hydrothermal reaction periods (8–24 h) were studied. Monoclinic WO{sub 3} nanorods with 5–10 nm diameter were obtained after hydrothermal reaction for 24 h. These 24 h WO{sub 3} nanorods were also annealed at 400 °C with varying dwelling periods (0.5–4 h). Electrochromic properties of WO{sub 3} nanorods in an acidic electrolyte were analyzed using cyclic voltammetry and UV–vis spectrophotometry. WO{sub 3} nanorods annealed at 400 °C for 1 h showed the highest charge capacity and the largest optical contrast among the 24 h WO{sub 3} films. The sample also showed good cycling stability without significant degradation. Based on the results, the reaction mechanism of WO{sub 3} nanorod formation on W foil was proposed.

  10. Squeezed light in semiconductors

    CERN Document Server

    Ward, M B

    2001-01-01

    Experimental evidence is presented for the generation of photon-number squeezed states of light as a result of multi-photon absorption. Photon-number squeezing as a result of non-linear absorption has long been predicted and results have been obtained utilising two very different material systems: (i) an AIGaAs waveguide in which high optical intensities can be maintained over a relatively long interaction length of 2 mm; (ii) the organic polymer p-toluene sulphonate polydiacetylene that is essentially a one-dimensional semiconductor possessing a highly nonlinear optical susceptibility. The resulting nonlinear absorption is shown to leave the transmitted light in a state that is clearly nonclassical, exhibiting photon-number fluctuations below the shot-noise limit. Tuning the laser wavelength across the half-bandgap energy has enabled a comparison between two- and three-photon processes in the semiconductor waveguide. The correlations created between different spectral components of a pulsed beam of light as ...

  11. Single filament semiconductor laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Botez, D.

    1980-01-01

    A semiconductor laser comprising: a body of semiconductor material including a substrate having a surface and a pair of spaced, substantially parallel dove-tailed shaped grooves in said surface, said body having a pair of end surfaces between which said grooves extend, said end surfaces being reflective to light with at least one of said end surfaces being partially transparent to light a first epitaxial layer over said surface of the substrate and the surfaces of the grooves, said first epitaxial layer having a flat surface portion over the portion of the substrate surface between the grooves, a thin second epitaxial layer over said first epitaxial layer, a third epitaxial layer over said second epitaxial layer, said first and third epitaxial layers being of opposite conductivity types and the second epitaxial layer being the active recombination region of the laser with the light being generated therein in the vicinity of the portion which is over the flat surface portion of the first epitaxial layer, and a pair of contacts on said body with one contact being over said third epitaxial body and the other being on said substrate

  12. Doped semiconductor nanocrystal junctions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borowik, Ł.; Mélin, T., E-mail: thierry.melin@isen.iemn.univ-lille1.fr [Institut d’Electronique, de Microélectronique et de Nanotechnologie, CNRS-UMR8520, Avenue Poincaré, F-59652 Villeneuve d’Ascq (France); Nguyen-Tran, T.; Roca i Cabarrocas, P. [Laboratoire de Physique des Interfaces et des Couches Minces, CNRS-UMR7647, Ecole Polytechnique, F-91128 Palaiseau (France)

    2013-11-28

    Semiconductor junctions are the basis of electronic and photovoltaic devices. Here, we investigate junctions formed from highly doped (N{sub D}≈10{sup 20}−10{sup 21}cm{sup −3}) silicon nanocrystals (NCs) in the 2–50 nm size range, using Kelvin probe force microscopy experiments with single charge sensitivity. We show that the charge transfer from doped NCs towards a two-dimensional layer experimentally follows a simple phenomenological law, corresponding to formation of an interface dipole linearly increasing with the NC diameter. This feature leads to analytically predictable junction properties down to quantum size regimes: NC depletion width independent of the NC size and varying as N{sub D}{sup −1/3}, and depleted charge linearly increasing with the NC diameter and varying as N{sub D}{sup 1/3}. We thus establish a “nanocrystal counterpart” of conventional semiconductor planar junctions, here however valid in regimes of strong electrostatic and quantum confinements.

  13. Process for producing chalcogenide semiconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noufi, R.; Chen, Y.W.

    1985-04-30

    A process for producing chalcogenide semiconductor material is disclosed. The process includes forming a base metal layer and then contacting this layer with a solution having a low pH and containing ions from at least one chalcogen to chalcogenize the layer and form the chalcogenide semiconductor material.

  14. Progress in semiconductor drift detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rehak, P.; Walton, J.; Gatti, E.

    1985-01-01

    Progress in testing semiconductor drift detectors is reported. Generally better position and energy resolutions were obtained than resolutions published previously. The improvement is mostly due to new electronics better matched to different detectors. It is shown that semiconductor drift detectors are becoming versatile and reliable detectors for position and energy measurements

  15. Terahertz Nonlinear Optics in Semiconductors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Turchinovich, Dmitry; Hvam, Jørn Märcher; Hoffmann, Matthias C.

    2013-01-01

    We demonstrate the nonlinear optical effects – selfphase modulation and saturable absorption of a single-cycle THz pulse in a semiconductor. Resulting from THz-induced modulation of Drude plasma, these nonlinear optical effects, in particular, lead to self-shortening and nonlinear spectral...... breathing of a single-cycle THz pulse in a semiconductor....

  16. Optical coherent control in semiconductors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, John Erland; Vadim, Lyssenko; Hvam, Jørn Märcher

    2001-01-01

    of quantum control including the recent applications to semiconductors and nanostructures. We study the influence of inhomogeneous broadening in semiconductors on CC results. Photoluminescence (PL) and the coherent emission in four-wave mixing (FWM) is recorded after resonant excitation with phase...

  17. Electronic structure of semiconductor interfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herman, F.

    1983-01-01

    The study of semiconductor interfaces is one of the most active and exciting areas of current semiconductor research. Because interfaces play a vital role in modern semiconductor technology (integrated circuits, heterojunction lasers, solar cells, infrared detectors, etc.), there is a strong incentive to understand interface properties at a fundamental level and advance existing technology thereby. At the same time, technological advances such as molecular beam epitaxy have paved the way for the fabrication of semiconductor heterojunctions and superlattices of novel design which exhibit unusual electronic, optical, and magnetic properties and offer unique opportunities for fundamental scientific research. A general perspective on this subject is offered treating such topics as the atomic and electronic structure of semiconductor surfaces and interfaces; oxidation and oxide layers; semiconductor heterojunctions and superlattices; rectifying metal-semiconductor contacts; and interface reactions. Recent progress is emphasized and some future directions are indicated. In addition, the role that large-scale scientific computation has played in furthering our theoretical understanding of semiconductor surfaces and interfaces is discussed. Finally, the nature of theoretical models, and the role they play in describing the physical world is considered. (Author) [pt

  18. II-VI semiconductor compounds

    CERN Document Server

    1993-01-01

    For condensed matter physicists and electronic engineers, this volume deals with aspects of II-VI semiconductor compounds. Areas covered include devices and applications of II-VI compounds; Co-based II-IV semi-magnetic semiconductors; and electronic structure of strained II-VI superlattices.

  19. Semiconductor photocatalysis principles and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Kisch, Horst

    2014-01-01

    Focusing on the basic principles of semiconductor photocatalysis, this book also gives a brief introduction to photochemistry, photoelectrochemistry, and homogeneous photocatalysis. In addition, the author - one of the leading authorities in the field - presents important environmental and practical aspects. A valuable, one-stop source for all chemists, material scientists, and physicists working in this area, as well as novice researchers entering semiconductor photocatalysis.

  20. Electrostatic Doping in Semiconductor Devices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gupta, Gaurav; Rajasekharan, Bijoy; Hueting, Raymond J.E.

    2017-01-01

    To overcome the limitations of chemical doping in nanometer-scale semiconductor devices, electrostatic doping (ED) is emerging as a broadly investigated alternative to provide regions with a high electron or hole density in a semiconductor device. In this paper, we review various reported ED

  1. Luminescence studies of semiconductor electrodes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kelly, J.J.; Kooij, Ernst S.; Meulenkamp, E.A.

    1999-01-01

    In this paper we review our recent results of in-situ luminescence studies of semiconductor electrodes. Three classes of materials are considered: single crystal compound semiconductors, porous silicon and semiconducting oxides doped with luminescent ions. We show how photoluminescence (PL) and

  2. Organic semiconductors in a spin

    CERN Document Server

    Samuel, I

    2002-01-01

    A little palladium can go a long way in polymer-based light-emitting diodes. Inorganic semiconductors such as silicon and gallium arsenide are essential for countless applications in everyday life, ranging from PCs to CD players. However, while they offer unrivalled computational speed, inorganic semiconductors are also rigid and brittle, which means that they are less suited to applications such as displays and flexible electronics. A completely different class of materials - organic semiconductors - are being developed for these applications. Organic semiconductors have many attractive features: they are easy to make, they can emit visible light, and there is tremendous scope for tailoring their properties to specific applications by changing their chemical structure. Research groups and companies around the world have developed a wide range of organic-semiconductor devices, including transistors, light-emitting diodes (LEDs), solar cells and lasers. (U.K.)

  3. Efficient photoelectrochemical water splitting using CuO nanorod/Al2O3 heterostructure photoelectrodes with different Al layer thicknesses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha, Jin-wook; Ryu, Hyukhyun; Lee, Won-Jae; Bae, Jong-Seong

    2017-08-01

    In this study, an efficient water splitting technique was investigated with CuO nanorod/Al2O3 heterostructure photoelectrodes. Cupric oxide (CuO) nanorods were grown on a fluorine-doped tin oxide (FTO) glass substrate by using modified-chemical bath deposition. In addition, Al thin films were deposited on the CuO nanorods using thermal evaporation, and then, aluminum oxide (Al2O3) layers were formed in open air to create the CuO nanorod/Al2O3 structure. In this study, the morphological, optical and structural properties of CuO nanorod/Al2O3 photoelectrodes were analyzed according to the various thicknesses of the Al layers, and the effects of the thickness on the photoelectrochemical (PEC) properties were mainly discussed. We obtained a maximum photocurrent value of -2.26 mA/cm2 (-0.55 V vs. SCE) and a theoretical solar-to-hydrogen (STH) conversion efficiency of 1.61% using the Al 30-nm thick sample, which had the largest amount of the Al2O3 layer, as confirmed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS).

  4. Ion implantation for semiconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grey-Morgan, T.

    1995-01-01

    Full text: Over the past two decades, thousands of particle accelerators have been used to implant foreign atoms like boron, phosphorus and arsenic into silicon crystal wafers to produce special embedded layers for manufacturing semiconductor devices. Depending on the device required, the atomic species, the depth of implant and doping levels are the main parameters for the implantation process; the selection and parameter control is totally automated. The depth of the implant, usually less than 1 micron, is determined by the ion energy, which can be varied between 2 and 600 keV. The ion beam is extracted from a Freeman or Bernas type ion source and accelerated to 60 keV before mass analysis. For higher beam energies postacceleration is applied up to 200 keV and even higher energies can be achieved by mass selecting multiplycharged ions, but with a corresponding reduction in beam output. Depending on the device to be manufactured, doping levels can range from 10 10 to 10 15 atoms/cm 2 and are controlled by implanter beam currents in the range up to 30mA; continuous process monitoring ensures uniformity across the wafer of better than 1 % . As semiconductor devices get smaller, additional sophistication is required in the design of the implanter. The silicon wafers charge electrically during implantation and this charge must be dissipated continuously to reduce the electrical stress in the device and avoid destructive electrical breakdown. Electron flood guns produce low energy electrons (below 10 electronvolts) to neutralize positive charge buildup and implanter design must ensure minimum contamination by other isotopic species and ensure low internal sputter rates. The pace of technology in the semiconductor industry is such that implanters are being built now for 256 Megabit circuits but which are only likely to be widely available five years from now. Several specialist companies manufacture implanter systems, each costing around US$5 million, depending on the

  5. One-step synthesis of TiO₂ nanorod arrays on Ti foil for supercapacitor application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Zhi; Chen, Jiajun; Yoshida, Ryuji; Gao, Xiang; Tarr, Kayla; Ikuhara, Yumi H; Zhou, Weilie

    2014-10-31

    Titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanorod arrays grown directly on Ti metal foil were prepared by a facile one-step hydrothermal method, in which the Ti foil serves as both substrate and precursor. The nanorods are tetragonal rutile single crystal with growth orientation along the [001] direction. The electrochemical properties of the TiO2 nanorod arrays were systematically investigated by cyclic voltammetry, galvanostatic charge/discharge and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy using a three-electrode system. As a result, the TiO2 nanorod arrays exhibit good areal specific capacitance and excellent cyclic stability by retaining more than 98% of the initial specific capacitance after 1000 cycles. In addition, a good flexibility of the Ti foil with TiO2 nanorod arrays was demonstrated by the stable electrochemical performance under different bending angles, which indicates that TiO2 nanorod arrays grown on Ti foil could be a promising electrode material for flexible supercapacitor application.

  6. Dark-field microspectroscopic analysis of gold nanorods in spiral Ganglion neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yong, J.; Brown, W. G. A.; Needham, K.; Nayagam, B. A.; Yu, A.; McArthur, S. L.; Stoddart, P. R.

    2013-12-01

    Heterogeneous samples of spiral ganglion neuron primary cells were incubated with gold nanorods in order to investigate the photothermal processes induced by exposure to 780 nm laser light. Dark-field microspectroscopy was used to analyze the distribution and spectrum of nanorods in the neurons. The scattering data showed a typical gold nanorod spectrum, while a shift in the peak position suggested changes in the refractive index of the nanorod environment. The relationship between gold nanorods distribution and local temperature has also been examined with an open pipette microelectrode placed in the surrounding bath of the neurons. These temperature measurements confirm that the gold nanorods provide efficient localized heating under 780 nm laser exposure.

  7. Simple and polarization-independent Dammann grating based on all-dielectric nanorod array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Sen; Li, Chuang; Liu, Tongming; Da, Haixia; Feng, Rui; Tang, Donghua; Sun, Fangkui; Ding, Weiqiang

    2017-09-01

    In this work, we comprehensively investigate a Dammann grating (DG) that can generate a 5 × 5 diffraction spot array with an extending angle of 18^\\circ × 18^\\circ around the fiber communication wavelength of 1550 {nm}. The DG is a simple metasurface structure composed of a silicon cuboid nanorod array on a silica substrate, and only two different sizes of nanorods with square cross-sections and uniform spatial orientations are used. These simple units and this configuration are favorable in practice, and the C4 symmetry cross section of the nanorods ensures the polarization-independent operation of the DG. The phase modulation of the nanorods is achieved by the guiding mode propagating in them rather than electric or magnetic Mie-type resonance, which makes the design of the cuboid nanorods easy and robust. More importantly, the two-dimensional nanorod array is generated from a one-dimensional array, which further decreases the design and fabrication complexity.

  8. Growth of Au@Ag core-shell pentatwinned nanorods: tuning the end facets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Weiqing; Goh, Hao Ying Johnny; Firdoz, Shaik; Lu, Xianmao

    2013-09-16

    Au@Ag core-shell nanorods with tunable end facets are obtained by coating Au bipyramids (BPs) with Ag. The resultant nanorods exhibit a pentatwinned crystal structure with tips terminated with either {110} or {111} facets. The control over the end facets is achieved by varying the capping agents and tuning the reduction rate of Ag. Specifically, when Ag is reduced slowly, Au@Ag nanorods with flat {110} end facets are formed with cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) as the capping agent. If CTAB is replaced with cetyltrimethylammonium chloride (CTAC), Au@Ag nanorods with tips terminated with {111} facets are obtained. However, at a high Ag reduction rate, dumbbell-shaped Au@Ag nanorods are formed, with either CTAB or CTAC as the capping agent. The morphological evolution of the nanorods in each case is closely followed and a growth mechanism is proposed. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. In vivo fluorescence studies of whole blood after chitosan bio-functionalized gold nanorods administration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garabagiu, Sorina [National Institute for Research and Development of Isotopic and Molecular Technologies, 65-103 Donath, 400293 Cluj-Napoca (Romania); Pestean, Cosmin [University of Agricultural Science and Veterinary Medicine, Cluj-Napoca (Romania); Stefan, Razvan, E-mail: rstefan@usamvcluj.ro [University of Agricultural Science and Veterinary Medicine, Cluj-Napoca (Romania)

    2013-11-15

    Gold nanorods (GNR) have been prepared by a seed mediated method and then functionalized with chitosan, in order to increase their biocompatibility. The interaction of GNR with whole blood has been assessed by means of fluorescence spectroscopy. The whole blood gives rise to a fluorescence emission peak with the maximum centered at 475 nm when a 410 nm excitation wavelength has been used. In vivo assessment of the existence of nanorods in the bloodstream is proven by the increase of the whole blood fluorescence due to metal enhanced fluorescence phenomenon, which leads to an increase of fluorescence emission in the close vicinity of noble metal anisotropic nanostructures. -- Highlights: • Gold nanorods have been synthesized and bio-functionalized with chitosan. • Chitosan–gold nanorods interaction was studied by UV–vis and FTIR spectroscopy. • Bio-functionalized gold nanorods solution was injected to a rabbit. • Fluorescence studies of whole blood in the presence of gold nanorods were performed.

  10. Synthesis and Properties of Layered-Structured Mn5O8 Nanorods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gao, Tao; Norby, Poul; Krumeich, Frank

    2010-01-01

    Mn5O8 nanorods were prepared by a topotactic conversion of γ-MnOOH nanorod precursors in nitrogen at 400 °C. The as-prepared Mn5O8 nanorods crystallized in a monoclinic structure (space group C2/m) with unit cell dimensions a = 10.3784(2) Å, b = 5.7337(7) Å, c = 4.8668(6) Å, and β = 109.491(6)°, ......Mn5O8 nanorods were prepared by a topotactic conversion of γ-MnOOH nanorod precursors in nitrogen at 400 °C. The as-prepared Mn5O8 nanorods crystallized in a monoclinic structure (space group C2/m) with unit cell dimensions a = 10.3784(2) Å, b = 5.7337(7) Å, c = 4.8668(6) Å, and β = 109...

  11. Semiconductor testing method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, Stephen.

    1992-01-01

    In a method of avoiding use of nuclear radiation, eg gamma rays, X-rays, electron beams, for testing semiconductor components for resistance to hard radiation, which hard radiation causes data corruption in some memory devices and 'latch-up' in others, similar fault effects can be achieved using a xenon or other 'light' flash gun even though the penetration of light is significantly less than that of gamma rays. The method involves treating a device with gamma radiation, measuring a particular fault current at the onset of a fault event, repeating the test with light to confirm the occurrence of the fault event at the same measured fault current, and using the fault current value as a reference for future tests using light on similar devices. (author)

  12. Hydrogen in compound semiconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haller, E.E.

    1993-05-01

    Progress in the understanding of hydrogen and its interactions in III/V and II/VI compound semiconductors is reviewed. Donor, acceptor and deep level passivation is well established in III/V compounds based on electrical measurements and on spectroscopic studies. The hydrogen donor levels in GaAs and GaP are estimated to lie near E{sub v}+0.5 eV and E{sub v}+0.3 eV, respectively. Arsenic acceptors have been passivated by hydrogen in CdTe and the very first nitrogen-hydrogen local vibrational model spectra in ZnSe have been reported. This long awaited result may lead to an explanation for the poor activation of nitrogen acceptors in ZnSe grown by techniques which involve high concentrations of hydrogen.

  13. Solvothermal Synthesis of Well-Disperse ZnS Nanorods with Efficient Photocatalytic Properties

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Yun; Yin, Rong-hui; Wu, Qing-sheng

    2012-01-01

    Well-disperse short-range-ordered ZnS nanorods with efficient photocatalytic property for photodegradation of Rhodamin B have been successfully synthesized through a solvothermal method. Solvent used can be recovered and reused, which makes the route environment-friendly. Dodecylamine was found effective in organizing nanorods to ordered monolayer. Characterization showed that these nanorods were uniform with the diameter of about 3 nm and length of nearly 30 nm. And it is expected that these...

  14. Removal of Congo red dye molecules by MnO2 nanorods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Bosi; Zhang, Siwen; Jiao, Yang; Liu, Yang; Qu, Fengyu; Ma, Yajie; Wu, Xiang

    2014-09-01

    Uniform MnO2 nanorods were synthesized successfully via a facile and effective hydrothermal approach. Scanning electron microscope images showed that the average diameter of the as-synthesized nanorod is about 30 nm and the length of that is about 5 μm, respectively. Photocatalytic experimental results indicate that Congo red can be degraded nearly completely (over 97%) after visible light irradiation of 120 min, demonstrating potential applications of such nanorod structures for wastewater purification.

  15. Fabrication and spectroscopic studies on highly luminescent CdSe/CdS nanorod polymer composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jana Bomm

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Highly luminescent nanocomposites were prepared by incorporating CdSe/CdS core/shell nanorods into different polymer matrices. The resulting nanocomposites show high transparency of up to 93%. A photoluminescence quantum efficiency of 70% was obtained, with an optimum combination of nanorod (0.05 wt % and at a UV-initiator concentration of 0.1 wt % for poly(lauryl methacrylate. Nanorods tend to agglomerate in cellulose triacetate.

  16. Synthesis of Ag-In-Zn-S alloyed nanorods and their biological application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang, Xiaosheng; Wei, Wei; Zang, Zhigang; Deng, Ming; Zhu, Tao; Khng, Claudia Choon Chea; Xue, Junmin

    2014-01-01

    Monodisperse Ag-In-Zn-S (AIZS) nanorods with a length of 20 nm have been synthesized using a facile solution based route. These nanorods showed a wide range of fluorescence emissions from green to red, which was achieved by controlling the chemical composition. Moreover, the obtained AIZS nanorods showed high-quality photoluminescence, as well as attractive two-photon fluorescence properties, indicating their potential capability in biological tagging upon near-infrared excitation for deep tissue imaging. Furthermore, the AIZS nanorods presented in this report also show a promising perspective in applications such as solar cells and photocatalysts. (paper)

  17. Synthesis of Ag-In-Zn-S alloyed nanorods and their biological application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Xiaosheng; Wei, Wei; Khng, Claudia Choon Chea; Zang, Zhigang; Deng, Ming; Zhu, Tao; Xue, Junmin

    2014-12-05

    Monodisperse Ag-In-Zn-S (AIZS) nanorods with a length of 20 nm have been synthesized using a facile solution based route. These nanorods showed a wide range of fluorescence emissions from green to red, which was achieved by controlling the chemical composition. Moreover, the obtained AIZS nanorods showed high-quality photoluminescence, as well as attractive two-photon fluorescence properties, indicating their potential capability in biological tagging upon near-infrared excitation for deep tissue imaging. Furthermore, the AIZS nanorods presented in this report also show a promising perspective in applications such as solar cells and photocatalysts.

  18. Fabrications and Characterizations of ZnO/Zn1-xMgxO Nanorod Quantum Structures

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Yi, Gyu-Chul

    2007-01-01

    .... However, quantum confinement effects in nanowires/nanorod heterostructures have not been easily observed despite recent synthesis of compositionally modulated nanowire superlattices by the vapor...

  19. Fast Formation of Surface Oxidized Zn Nanorods and Urchin-Like Microclusters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. López

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Entangled Zn-ZnO nanorods and urchin-like microstructures were synthesized by the hot filament chemical vapor deposition technique at 825 and 1015°C, respectively. X-ray diffraction results showed a mixture of ZnO and Zn phases in both nanorods and urchin-like structures. The presence of Zn confirms the chemical dissociation of the ZnO solid source. The Z-ZnO nanorods with diameter of about 100 nm showed dispersed-like morphology. The urchin-like structures with micrometer diameters exhibited porous and rough morphology with epitaxial formation of nanorods.

  20. Solvothermal Synthesis of Well-Disperse ZnS Nanorods with Efficient Photocatalytic Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yun Chen

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Well-disperse short-range-ordered ZnS nanorods with efficient photocatalytic property for photodegradation of Rhodamin B have been successfully synthesized through a solvothermal method. Solvent used can be recovered and reused, which makes the route environment-friendly. Dodecylamine was found effective in organizing nanorods to ordered monolayer. Characterization showed that these nanorods were uniform with the diameter of about 3 nm and length of nearly 30 nm. And it is expected that these monodisperse ZnS nanorods have potential applications in electroluminescence materials.

  1. An Au/Si hetero-nanorod-based biosensor for Salmonella detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fu Junxue; Zhao Yiping; Park, Bosoon; Siragusa, Greg; Jones, Les; Tripp, Ralph; Cho, Yong-Jin

    2008-01-01

    We present a novel and effective food-borne bacteria detection method. A hetero-structured silicon/gold nanorod array fabricated by the glancing angle deposition method is functionalized with anti-Salmonella antibodies and organic dye molecules. Due to the high aspect ratio nature of the Si nanorods, dye molecules attached to the Si nanorods produce an enhanced fluorescence upon capture and detection of Salmonella. This bio-functional hetero-nanorod detection method has great potential in the food safety industry as well as in biomedical diagnostics

  2. Growth and investigation of antifungal properties of ZnO nanorod arrays on the glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eskandari, M.; Haghighi, N.; Ahmadi, V.; Haghighi, F.; Mohammadi, SH.R.

    2011-01-01

    In this study, we have investigated the antifungal activity of ZnO nanorods prepared by the chemical solution method against Candida albicans. In the study, Zinc oxide nanorods have been deposited on glass substrates using the chemical solution method. The as-grown samples are characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). X-ray diffraction (XRD) showed zinc oxide nanorods grown in (0 0 2) orientation. The antifungal results indicated that ZnO nanorod arrays exhibit stable properties after two months and play an important role in the growth inhibitory of Candida albicans.

  3. Patterned synthesis of ZnO nanorod arrays for nanoplasmonic waveguide applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamson, Thomas L.; Khan, Sahar; Wang, Zhifei; Zhang, Yun-Kai; Yu, Yong; Chen, Zhe-Sheng; Xu, Huizhong

    2018-03-01

    We report the patterned synthesis of ZnO nanorod arrays of diameters between 50 nm and 130 nm and various spacings. This was achieved by patterning hole arrays in a polymethyl methacrylate layer with electron beam lithography, followed by chemical synthesis of ZnO nanorods in the patterned holes using the hydrothermal method. The fabrication of ZnO nanorod waveguide arrays is also demonstrated by embedding the nanorods in a silver film using the electroplating process. Optical transmission measurement through the nanorod waveguide arrays is performed and strong resonant transmission of visible light is observed. We have found the resonance shifts to a longer wavelength with increasing nanorod diameter. Furthermore, the resonance wavelength is independent of the nanowaveguide array period, indicating the observed resonant transmission is the effect of a single ZnO nanorod waveguide. These nanorod waveguides may be used in single-molecule imaging and sensing as a result of the nanoscopic profile of the light transmitted through the nanorods and the controlled locations of these nanoscale light sources.

  4. Thermal Reshaping of Gold Nanorods in Micellar Solution of Water/Glycerol Mixtures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Al Sayed A. Al-Sherbini

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Gold nanorods (Nds with aspect ratios of 4, 3.5, and 2.8 were prepared by the electrochemical method. The nanorods were thermally studied in binary solvents of aqueous glycerol at different ratios (25%–75%. The results illustrated that the longitudinal surface plasmon resonance (SPL is strongly dependent on the dielectric constant. The maximum absorption is red shifted with increasing the glycerol/water ratio. This was attributed to the decreasing value of the dielectric constant of the binary solvents. Moreover, by increasing the temperatures, the results showed relative instability of the gold nanorods. This attributed to the relative instability of the micelle capping the nanorods.

  5. Facile Hydrothermal Approach to ZnO Nanorods at Mild Temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Jiao

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work, ZnO nanorods are obtained through a facile hydrothermal route. The structure and morphology of the resultant products are characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD and scanning electron microscope (SEM. The experimental results indicated that the as-synthesized ZnO nanorods have an average diameter of approximate 100 nm. A possible growth mechanism for ZnO nanorods was proposed based on the experimental results and found that Zn powder plays a critical role for the morphology of the products. Room temperature photoluminescence property of ZnO nanorods shows an ultraviolet emission peak at 390 nm.

  6. Directed assembly-based printing of homogeneous and hybrid nanorods using dielectrophoresis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chai, Zhimin; Yilmaz, Cihan; Busnaina, Ahmed A.; Lissandrello, Charles A.; Carter, David J. D.

    2017-11-01

    Printing nano and microscale three-dimensional (3D) structures using directed assembly of nanoparticles has many potential applications in electronics, photonics and biotechnology. This paper presents a reproducible and scalable 3D dielectrophoresis assembly process for printing homogeneous silica and hybrid silica/gold nanorods from silica and gold nanoparticles. The nanoparticles are assembled into patterned vias under a dielectrophoretic force generated by an alternating current (AC) field, and then completely fused in situ to form nanorods. The assembly process is governed by the applied AC voltage amplitude and frequency, pattern geometry, and assembly time. Here, we find out that complete assembly of nanorods is not possible without applying both dielectrophoresis and electrophoresis. Therefore, a direct current offset voltage is used to add an additional electrophoretic force to the assembly process. The assembly can be precisely controlled to print silica nanorods with diameters from 20–200 nm and spacing from 500 nm to 2 μm. The assembled nanorods have good uniformity in diameter and height over a millimeter scale. Besides homogeneous silica nanorods, hybrid silica/gold nanorods are also assembled by sequentially assembling silica and gold nanoparticles. The precision of the assembly process is further demonstrated by assembling a single particle on top of each nanorod to demonstrate an additional level of functionalization. The assembled hybrid silica/gold nanorods have potential to be used for metamaterial applications that require nanoscale structures as well as for plasmonic sensors for biosensing applications.

  7. An Au/Si hetero-nanorod-based biosensor for Salmonella detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fu Junxue; Zhao Yiping [Physics and Astronomy Department, University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602 (United States); Park, Bosoon; Siragusa, Greg [USDA, ARS, Russell Research Center, Athens, GA 30605 (United States); Jones, Les; Tripp, Ralph [Department of Infectious Diseases, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602 (United States); Cho, Yong-Jin [Korea Food Research Institute, Songnam (Korea, Republic of)], E-mail: zhaoy@physast.uga.edu

    2008-04-16

    We present a novel and effective food-borne bacteria detection method. A hetero-structured silicon/gold nanorod array fabricated by the glancing angle deposition method is functionalized with anti-Salmonella antibodies and organic dye molecules. Due to the high aspect ratio nature of the Si nanorods, dye molecules attached to the Si nanorods produce an enhanced fluorescence upon capture and detection of Salmonella. This bio-functional hetero-nanorod detection method has great potential in the food safety industry as well as in biomedical diagnostics.

  8. Theoretical analysis of bimetallic nanorod dimer biosensors for label-free molecule detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Avijit; Talukder, Muhammad Anisuzzaman

    2018-02-01

    In this work, we theoretically analyze a gold (Au) core within silver (Ag) shell (Au@Ag) nanorod dimer biosensor for label-free molecule detection. The incident light on an Au@Ag nanorod strongly couples to localized surface plasmon modes, especially around the tip region. The field enhancement around the tip of a nanorod or between the tips of two longitudinally aligned nanorods as in a dimer can be exploited for sensitive detection of biomolecules. We derive analytical expressions for the interactions of an Au@Ag nanorod dimer with the incident light. We also study the detail dynamics of an Au@Ag nanorod dimer with the incident light computationally using finite difference time domain (FDTD) technique when core-shell ratio, relative position of the nanorods, and angle of incidence of light change. We find that the results obtained using the developed analytical model match well with that obtained using FDTD simulations. Additionally, we investigate the sensitivity of the Au@Ag nanorod dimer, i.e., shift in the resonance wavelength, when a target biomolecule such as lysozyme (Lys), human serum albumin (HSA), anti-biotin (Abn), human catalase (CAT), and human fibrinogen (Fb) protein molecules are attached to the tips of the nanorods.

  9. Characterization of crystalline silica nanorods synthesized via a solvothermal route using polyvinylbutyral as a template

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Lin-Jer; Liao, Jiunn-Der; Chuang, Yu-Ju; Fu, Yaw-Shyan

    2011-01-01

    The preparation of crystalline silica nanorods is presented. Crystalline silica nanorods were synthesized via a simple solvothermal route using polyvinylbutyral (PVB) as a template in an autoclave with ethylenediamine as a solvent at 180 °C for 25 h. Silica nanorods with diameters in the range of 50–80 nm were obtained. The solvothermal route with a PVB template played affected the crystallization process and the growth of the silica nanorods. The as-synthesized products were characterized using X-ray diffraction, energy dispersive spectrometry, scanning electron microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy.

  10. Design and optimization of a nanoprobe comprising amphiphilic chitosan colloids and Au-nanorods: Sensitive detection of human serum albumin in simulated urine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jean, Ren-Der; Larsson, Mikael; Cheng, Wei-Da; Hsu, Yu-Yuan; Bow, Jong-Shing; Liu, Dean-Mo

    2016-12-01

    Metallic nanoparticles have been utilized as analytical tools to detect a wide range of organic analytes. In most reports, gold (Au)-based nanosensors have been modified with ligands to introduce selectivity towards a specific target molecule. However, in a recent study a new concept was presented where bare Au-nanorods on self-assembled carboxymethyl-hexanoyl chitosan (CHC) nanocarriers achieved sensitive and selective detection of human serum albumin (HSA) after manipulation of the solution pH. Here this concept was further advanced through optimization of the ratio between Au-nanorods and CHC nanocarriers to create a nanotechnology-based sensor (termed CHC-AuNR nanoprobe) with an outstanding lower detection limit (LDL) for HSA. The CHC-AuNR nanoprobe was evaluated in simulated urine solution and a LDL as low as 1.5 pM was achieved at an estimated AuNR/CHC ratio of 2. Elemental mapping and protein adsorption kinetics over three orders of magnitude in HSA concentration confirmed accumulation of HSA on the nanorods and revealed the adsorption to be completed within 15 min for all investigated concentrations. The results suggest that the CHC-AuNR nanoprobe has potential to be utilized for cost-effective detection of analytes in complex liquids.

  11. Semiconductor Nanocrystals for Biological Imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fu, Aihua; Gu, Weiwei; Larabell, Carolyn; Alivisatos, A. Paul

    2005-06-28

    Conventional organic fluorophores suffer from poor photo stability, narrow absorption spectra and broad emission feature. Semiconductor nanocrystals, on the other hand, are highly photo-stable with broad absorption spectra and narrow size-tunable emission spectra. Recent advances in the synthesis of these materials have resulted in bright, sensitive, extremely photo-stable and biocompatible semiconductor fluorophores. Commercial availability facilitates their application in a variety of unprecedented biological experiments, including multiplexed cellular imaging, long-term in vitro and in vivo labeling, deep tissue structure mapping and single particle investigation of dynamic cellular processes. Semiconductor nanocrystals are one of the first examples of nanotechnology enabling a new class of biomedical applications.

  12. State of the art in semiconductor detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rehak, P.; Gatti, E.

    1989-01-01

    The state of the art in semiconductor detectors for elementary particle physics and x-ray astronomy is briefly reviewed. Semiconductor detectors are divided into two groups; classical semiconductor diode detectors; and semiconductor memory detectors. Principles of signal formation for both groups of detectors are described and their performance is compared. New developments of silicon detectors are reported here. 13 refs., 8 figs

  13. Selective, electrochemical etching of a semiconductor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dahal, Rajendra P.; Bhat, Ishwara B.; Chow, Tat-Sing

    2018-03-20

    Methods for facilitating fabricating semiconductor structures are provided which include: providing a multilayer structure including a semiconductor layer, the semiconductor layer including a dopant and having an increased conductivity; selectively increasing, using electrochemical processing, porosity of the semiconductor layer, at least in part, the selectively increasing porosity utilizing the increased conductivity of the semiconductor layer; and removing, at least in part, the semiconductor layer with the selectively increased porosity from the multilayer structure. By way of example, the selectively increasing porosity may include selectively, anodically oxidizing, at least in part, the semiconductor layer of the multilayer structure.

  14. Carrier Multiplication Mechanisms and Competing Processes in Colloidal Semiconductor Nanostructures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen V. Kershaw

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Quantum confined semiconductor nanoparticles, such as colloidal quantum dots, nanorods and nanoplatelets have broad extended absorption spectra at energies above their bandgaps. This means that they can absorb light at high photon energies leading to the formation of hot excitons with finite excited state lifetimes. During their existence, the hot electron and hole that comprise the exciton may start to cool as they relax to the band edge by phonon mediated or Auger cooling processes or a combination of these. Alongside these cooling processes, there is the possibility that the hot exciton may split into two or more lower energy excitons in what is termed carrier multiplication (CM. The fission of the hot exciton to form lower energy multiexcitons is in direct competition with the cooling processes, with the timescales for multiplication and cooling often overlapping strongly in many materials. Once CM has been achieved, the next challenge is to preserve the multiexcitons long enough to make use of the bonus carriers in the face of another competing process, non-radiative Auger recombination. However, it has been found that Auger recombination and the several possible cooling processes can be manipulated and usefully suppressed or retarded by engineering the nanoparticle shape, size or composition and by the use of heterostructures, along with different choices of surface treatments. This review surveys some of the work that has led to an understanding of the rich carrier dynamics in semiconductor nanoparticles, and that has started to guide materials researchers to nanostructures that can tilt the balance in favour of efficient CM with sustained multiexciton lifetimes.

  15. Carrier Multiplication Mechanisms and Competing Processes in Colloidal Semiconductor Nanostructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kershaw, Stephen V; Rogach, Andrey L

    2017-09-18

    Quantum confined semiconductor nanoparticles, such as colloidal quantum dots, nanorods and nanoplatelets have broad extended absorption spectra at energies above their bandgaps. This means that they can absorb light at high photon energies leading to the formation of hot excitons with finite excited state lifetimes. During their existence, the hot electron and hole that comprise the exciton may start to cool as they relax to the band edge by phonon mediated or Auger cooling processes or a combination of these. Alongside these cooling processes, there is the possibility that the hot exciton may split into two or more lower energy excitons in what is termed carrier multiplication (CM). The fission of the hot exciton to form lower energy multiexcitons is in direct competition with the cooling processes, with the timescales for multiplication and cooling often overlapping strongly in many materials. Once CM has been achieved, the next challenge is to preserve the multiexcitons long enough to make use of the bonus carriers in the face of another competing process, non-radiative Auger recombination. However, it has been found that Auger recombination and the several possible cooling processes can be manipulated and usefully suppressed or retarded by engineering the nanoparticle shape, size or composition and by the use of heterostructures, along with different choices of surface treatments. This review surveys some of the work that has led to an understanding of the rich carrier dynamics in semiconductor nanoparticles, and that has started to guide materials researchers to nanostructures that can tilt the balance in favour of efficient CM with sustained multiexciton lifetimes.

  16. Semiconductor technology program. Progress briefs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bullis, W. M.

    1980-01-01

    Measurement technology for semiconductor materials, process control, and devices is reviewed. Activities include: optical linewidth and thermal resistance measurements; device modeling; dopant density profiles; resonance ionization spectroscopy; and deep level measurements. Standardized oxide charge terminology is also described.

  17. Rhombohedrel Hybrid Crystal Semiconductor Device

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Development of a new high speed and high efficiency hybrid crystal structure semiconductor device based on the the recent invention of rhombohedral hybrid crystal...

  18. Semiconductor radiation detectors. Device physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lutz, G. [Max-Planck-Institutes for Physics and Extraterrestrial Physics, Muenchen (Germany). Semiconductor Lab.

    2007-07-01

    Starting from basic principles, the author, whose own contributions to these developments have been significant, describes the rapidly growing field of modern semiconductor detectors used for energy and position measurement radiation. This development was stimulated by requirements in elementary particle physics where it has led to important scientific discoveries. It has now spread to many other fields of science and technology. The book is written in a didactic way and includes an introduction to semiconductor physics. The working principles of semiconductor radiation detectors are explained in an intuitive way, followed by formal quantitative analysis. Broad coverage is also given to electronic signal readout and to the subject of radiation damage. The book is the first to comprehensively cover the semiconductor radiation detectors currently in use. It is useful as a teaching guide and as a reference work for research and applications. (orig.)

  19. Metal-insulator-semiconductor photodetectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chu-Hsuan; Liu, Chee Wee

    2010-01-01

    The major radiation of the sun can be roughly divided into three regions: ultraviolet, visible, and infrared light. Detection in these three regions is important to human beings. The metal-insulator-semiconductor photodetector, with a simpler process than the pn-junction photodetector and a lower dark current than the MSM photodetector, has been developed for light detection in these three regions. Ideal UV photodetectors with high UV-to-visible rejection ratio could be demonstrated with III-V metal-insulator-semiconductor UV photodetectors. The visible-light detection and near-infrared optical communications have been implemented with Si and Ge metal-insulator-semiconductor photodetectors. For mid- and long-wavelength infrared detection, metal-insulator-semiconductor SiGe/Si quantum dot infrared photodetectors have been developed, and the detection spectrum covers atmospheric transmission windows.

  20. Metal-Insulator-Semiconductor Photodetectors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chu-Hsuan Lin

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The major radiation of the Sun can be roughly divided into three regions: ultraviolet, visible, and infrared light. Detection in these three regions is important to human beings. The metal-insulator-semiconductor photodetector, with a simpler process than the pn-junction photodetector and a lower dark current than the MSM photodetector, has been developed for light detection in these three regions. Ideal UV photodetectors with high UV-to-visible rejection ratio could be demonstrated with III-V metal-insulator-semiconductor UV photodetectors. The visible-light detection and near-infrared optical communications have been implemented with Si and Ge metal-insulator-semiconductor photodetectors. For mid- and long-wavelength infrared detection, metal-insulator-semiconductor SiGe/Si quantum dot infrared photodetectors have been developed, and the detection spectrum covers atmospheric transmission windows.

  1. Semiconductor nanocrystals or quantum dots

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 18; Issue 8. Various Quantum Mechanical Concepts for Confinements in Semiconductor Nanocrystals. Jayakrishna Khatei Karuna Kar Nanda. Classroom Volume 18 Issue 8 August 2013 pp 771-776 ...

  2. Atomic layer deposition for semiconductors

    CERN Document Server

    Hwang, Cheol Seong

    2014-01-01

    This edited volume discusses atomic layer deposition (ALD) for all modern semiconductor devices, moving from the basic chemistry of ALD and modeling of ALD processes to sections on ALD for memories, logic devices, and machines.

  3. Quantum optics with semiconductor nanostructures

    CERN Document Server

    Jahnke, Frank

    2012-01-01

    A guide to the theory, application and potential of semiconductor nanostructures in the exploration of quantum optics. It offers an overview of resonance fluorescence emission.$bAn understanding of the interaction between light and matter on a quantum level is of fundamental interest and has many applications in optical technologies. The quantum nature of the interaction has recently attracted great attention for applications of semiconductor nanostructures in quantum information processing. Quantum optics with semiconductor nanostructures is a key guide to the theory, experimental realisation, and future potential of semiconductor nanostructures in the exploration of quantum optics. Part one provides a comprehensive overview of single quantum dot systems, beginning with a look at resonance fluorescence emission. Quantum optics with single quantum dots in photonic crystal and micro cavities are explored in detail, before part two goes on to review nanolasers with quantum dot emitters. Light-matter interaction...

  4. Temperature controller of semiconductor laser

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Matoušek, Vít; Číp, Ondřej

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 73, č. 3 (2003), s. 10 - 12 ISSN 0928-5008 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z2065902 Keywords : temperature controller * semiconductor laser * laser diode Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers

  5. Synthesis, characterization and SERS activity of Au-Ag nanorods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philip, Daizy; Gopchandran, K. G.; Unni, C.; Nissamudeen, K. M.

    2008-09-01

    The formation mechanism and morphology of Au-Ag bimetallic colloidal nanoparticles depend on the composition. Ag coated Au colloidal nanoparticles have been prepared by deposition of Ag through chemical reduction on performed Au colloid. The composition of the Au 100- x-Ag x particles was varied from x = 0 to 50. The obtained colloids were characterized by UV-vis spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The Au 80-Ag 20 colloid consists of alloy nanorods with dimension of 25 nm × 100 nm. The activity of these nanorods in surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) was checked by using sodium salicylate as an adsorbate probe. Intense SERS bands are observed indicating its usefulness as a SERS substrate in near infrared (NIR) laser excitation.

  6. Laser-induced extreme magnetic field in nanorod targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lécz, Zsolt; Andreev, Alexander

    2018-03-01

    The application of nano-structured target surfaces in laser-solid interaction has attracted significant attention in the last few years. Their ability to absorb significantly more laser energy promises a possible route for advancing the currently established laser ion acceleration concepts. However, it is crucial to have a better understanding of field evolution and electron dynamics during laser-matter interactions before the employment of such exotic targets. This paper focuses on the magnetic field generation in nano-forest targets consisting of parallel nanorods grown on plane surfaces. A general scaling law for the self-generated quasi-static magnetic field amplitude is given and it is shown that amplitudes up to 1 MT field are achievable with current technology. Analytical results are supported by three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations. Non-parallel arrangements of nanorods has also been considered which result in the generation of donut-shaped azimuthal magnetic fields in a larger volume.

  7. Direct electrodeposition of aluminium nano-rods

    OpenAIRE

    Perre, Emilie; Nyholm, Leif; Gustafsson, Torbjörn; Taberna, Pierre-Louis; Simon, Patrice; Edström, Kristina

    2008-01-01

    Electrodeposition of aluminium within an alumina nano-structured template, for use as high surface area current collectors in Li-ion microbatteries, was investigated. The aluminium electrodeposition was carried out in the ionic liquid 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride:aluminium chloride (1:2 ratio). First the aluminium electrodeposition process was confirmed by combined cyclic voltammetry and electrochemical quartz crystal microbalance measurements. Then, aluminium was electrodeposit...

  8. Fabrication of modified g-C3N4 nanorod/Ag3PO4 nanocomposites for solar-driven photocatalytic oxygen evolution from water splitting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Lin; Xian, Xiaozhai; Cui, Xingkai; Tang, Hua; Yang, Xiaofei

    2018-02-01

    Semiconductor-based photocatalysis has been considered as one of the most effective techniques to achieve the conversion of clean and sustainable sunlight to solar fuel, in which the construction of novel solar-driven photocatalytic systems is the key point. Here, we report initially the synthesis of modified graphitic carbon nitride (g-C3N4) nanorods via the calcination of intermediates obtained from the co-polymerization of precursors, and the in-situ hybridization of Ag3PO4 with as-prepared modified g-C3N4 to produce g-C3N4 nanorod/Ag3PO4 composite materials. The diameter of modified rod-like g-C3N4 materials is determined to be around 1 μm. Subsequently the morphological features, crystal and chemical structures of the assembled g-C3N4 nanorod/Ag3PO4 composites were systematically investigated by SEM, XRD, XPS, UV-vis diffuse reflectance spectra (DRS). Furthermore, the use of as-prepared composite materials as the catalyst for photocatalytic oxygen evolution from water splitting was studied. The oxygen-generating results showed that the composite photocatalyst modified with 600 mg rod-like g-C3N4 demonstrates 2.5 times higher efficiency than that of bulk Ag3PO4. The mechanism behind the enhancement in the oxygen-evolving activity is proposed on the basis of in-situ electron spin resonance (ESR) measurement as well as theoretical analysis. The study provides new insights into the design and development of new photocatalytic composite materials for energy and environmental applications.

  9. Reducing leakage current in semiconductor devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Bin; Matioli, Elison de Nazareth; Palacios, Tomas Apostol

    2018-03-06

    A semiconductor device includes a first region having a first semiconductor material and a second region having a second semiconductor material. The second region is formed over the first region. The semiconductor device also includes a current blocking structure formed in the first region between first and second terminals of the semiconductor device. The current blocking structure is configured to reduce current flow in the first region between the first and second terminals.

  10. Fractal properties of nanostructured semiconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhanabaev, Z.Zh. [Al-Farabi Khazakh National University, Tole bi Street, 96, Almaty 050012 (Kazakhstan); Grevtseva, T.Yu. [Al-Farabi Khazakh National University, Tole bi Street, 96, Almaty 050012 (Kazakhstan)]. E-mail: kenwp@mail.ru

    2007-03-15

    A theory for the temperature and time dependence of current carrier concentration in semiconductors with different non-equilibrium nanocluster structure has been developed. It was shown that the scale-invariant fractal self-similar and self-affine laws can exist near by the transition point to the equilibrium state. Results of the theory have been compared to the experimental data from electrical properties of semiconductor films with nanoclusters.

  11. Wake fields in semiconductor plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berezhiani, V.I.; Mahajan, S.M.

    1994-05-01

    It is shown that an intense short laser pulse propagating through a semiconductor plasma will generated longitudinal Langmuir waves in its wake. The measurable wake field can be used as a diagnostic to study nonlinear optical phenomena. For narrow gap semiconductors (for examples InSb) with Kane-type dispersion relation, the system can simulate, at currently available laser powers, the physics underlying wake-field accelerators. (author). 9 refs, 1 fig

  12. Nanoscale semiconductor-insulator-metal core/shell heterostructures: facile synthesis and light emission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Gong Ping; Chen, Rui; Guo, Dong Lai; Wong, Lai Mun; Wang, Shi Jie; Sun, Han Dong; Wu, Tom

    2011-08-01

    Controllably constructing hierarchical nanostructures with distinct components and designed architectures is an important theme of research in nanoscience, entailing novel but reliable approaches of bottom-up synthesis. Here, we report a facile method to reproducibly create semiconductor-insulator-metal core/shell nanostructures, which involves first coating uniform MgO shells onto metal oxide nanostructures in solution and then decorating them with Au nanoparticles. The semiconductor nanowire core can be almost any material and, herein, ZnO, SnO(2) and In(2)O(3) are used as examples. We also show that linear chains of short ZnO nanorods embedded in MgO nanotubes and porous MgO nanotubes can be obtained by taking advantage of the reduced thermal stability of the ZnO core. Furthermore, after MgO shell-coating and the appropriate annealing treatment, the intensity of the ZnO near-band-edge UV emission becomes much stronger, showing a 25-fold enhancement. The intensity ratio of the UV/visible emission can be increased further by decorating the surface of the ZnO/MgO nanowires with high-density plasmonic Au nanoparticles. These heterostructured semiconductor-insulator-metal nanowires with tailored morphologies and enhanced functionalities have great potential for use as nanoscale building blocks in photonic and electronic applications. This journal is © The Royal Society of Chemistry 2011

  13. GaN nanostructure-based light emitting diodes and semiconductor lasers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viswanath, Annamraju Kasi

    2014-02-01

    GaN and related materials have received a lot of attention because of their applications in a number of semiconductor devices such as LEDs, laser diodes, field effect transistors, photodetectors etc. An introduction to optical phenomena in semiconductors, light emission in p-n junctions, evolution of LED technology, bandgaps of various semiconductors that are suitable for the development of LEDs are discussed first. The detailed discussion on photoluminescence of GaN nanostructures is made, since this is crucial to develop optical devices. Fabrication technology of many nanostructures of GaN such as nanowires, nanorods, nanodots, nanoparticles, nanofilms and their luminescence properties are given. Then the optical processes including ultrafast phenomena, radiative, non-radiative recombination, quantum efficiency, lifetimes of excitons in InGaN quantum well are described. The LED structures based on InGaN that give various important colors of red, blue, green, and their design considerations to optimize the output were highlighted. The recent efforts in GaN technology are updated. Finally the present challenges and future directions in this field are also pointed out.

  14. Carbon nanomaterials from pyrolysis of polydiacetylene-walled nanorods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rondeau-Gagné, Simon; Roméo Néabo, Jules; Daigle, Maxime; Levesque, Isabelle; Desroches, Maude; Morin, Jean-François

    2014-03-01

    Pyrolysis of polydiacetylene-walled nanorods obtained from a rigid and shape-persistent macrocyclic precursor was performed. The thermogravimetric analysis showed that pyrolysis caused a loss of aliphatic chains and structural changes of PDAs to produce carbon-rich nanoarchitectures, as confirmed by Raman and UV-visible spectroscopy. The transmission electron microscopy imaging performed on the resulting material showed the formation of an entangled nanofibrils network containing various types of nanostructures.

  15. Field emission properties of ZnO nanorod arrays by few seed layers assisted growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Yufang; Li, Chun; Wang, Jiesheng; Fan, Xiaoyan; Yuan, Guang; Xu, Shunfu; Xu, Mingchan; Zhang, Jing; Zhao, Yongjiao

    2015-01-01

    Graphical abstract: ZnO nanorod arrays growth on few seed layers was synthesized using a simple two-step process with sol–gel and hydrothermal methods. The effect of seed layers on structure, energy band, and field emission properties of ZnO nanorods has been studied. The ZnO nanorod arrays grown on the 4 layer shows larger density and better vertical orientation. The PL spectra of the ZnO nanorod arrays grown on different numbers of seed layer also were studied. The intensity ratios of the 4 seed layer and ZnO nanorod array grown on 4 seed layer show the largest values, which indicates that there are the most intrinsic defects in the sample. The defects may provide better conductivity. The ZnO nanorod array grown on the 4 layers possesses better field emission property. - Highlights: • ZnO nanorod arrays assisted growth on few seed layer was synthesized using a simple two-step process with sol–gel and hydrothermal methods. • The effect of seed layers on structure, energy band, and field emission properties of ZnO nanorods has been studied. • The ZnO nanorod array grown on the 4 layers possesses field emission property. - Abstract: ZnO nanorod arrays were grown on Si substrate by a simple two-step process with sol–gel and hydrothermal methods. To investigate the effect of seed layers on the growth of ZnO nanorods, different numbers of the seed layers have been spin-coated on the substrates. The morphologies of ZnO nanorods including diameter, density, length, and orientation have been studied. The crystallization and band structure have also been discussed. The correlation between the nanorod arrays grown on different seed layers and field emission (FE) properties has also been analyzed. The ZnO nanorod array grown on 4 seed layers possesses the best field emission properties, including a lowest turn-on electric field of 13.3 V/μm and largest field emission current. It can be attributed to the higher field enhancement factor, the vertical orientation

  16. Numerical investigation of radiative properties and surface plasmon resonance of silver nanorod dimers on a substrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An, Wei; Zhu, Tong; Zhu, QunZhi

    2014-01-01

    When the distance between two silver nanoparticles is small enough, interparticle surface plasmon coupling has a great impact on their radiative properties. It is becoming a promising technique to use in the sensing and imaging. A model based on finite difference time domain method is developed to investigate the effect of the assembled parameters on the radiative properties and the field-enhancement effect of silver nanorod dimer. The numerical results indicate that the radiative properties of silver nanorod dimer are very sensitive to the assembled angle and the polarization orientation of incident wave. There is great difference on the intensity and location of field-enhancement effect for the cases of different assembled angle and polarization. The most intensive field-enhancement effect occurs in the middle of two nanorods when two nanorods is assembled head to head and the polarization orientation parallels to the length axis of nanorods. Moreover, compared with the single nanorod, the wavelength of extinction peak of dimer has a red-shift, and the intensity of field-enhancement effect on the dimer is more intensive than that of single particle. With the increasing of particle length, extinction cross-section of silver nanorod dimer rises, while extinction efficiency and scattering efficiency firstly increase then drop down gradually. In addition, the extinction peaks of silver nanorod dimer on the substrate are smaller than that without the substrate, and their extinction peaks has a red-shift compared with that without the substrate. -- Highlights: ► Radiative properties of silver nanorod dimer are very sensitive to the assembled angle. ► The projective length of nanorod dimer on the polarization orientation is crucial. ► Compared with single nanorod, wavelength of extinction peak of dimer has a red-shift. ► Extinction peaks of dimer on the substrate are smaller than that without the substrate

  17. Single Nanorod Devices for Battery Diagnostics: A Case Study on LiMn 2 O 4

    KAUST Repository

    Yang, Yuan

    2009-12-09

    This paper presents single nanostructure devices as a powerful new diagnostic tool for batteries with LiMn2O4 nanorod materials as an example. LiMn2O4 and Al-doped LiMn2O4 nanorods were synthesized by a two-step method that combines hydrothermal synthesis of β-MnO2 nanorods and a solid state reaction to convert them to LiMn2O4 nanorods. λ-MnO2 nanorods were also prepared by acid treatment of LiMn2O4 nanorods. The effect of electrolyte etching on these LiMn2O 4-related nanorods is investigated by both SEM and single-nanorod transport measurement, and this is the first time that the transport properties of this material have been studied at the level of an individual singlecrystalline particle. Experiments show that Al dopants reduce the dissolution of Mn3+ ions significantly and make the LiAl 0.1Mn1.9O4 nanorods much more stable than LiMn2O4 against electrolyte etching, which is reflected by the magnification of both size shrinkage and conductance decrease. These results correlate well with the better cycling performance of Al-doped LiMn 2O4 in our Li-ion battery tests: LiAl0.1Mn 1.9O4 nanorods achieve 96% capacity retention after 100 cycles at 1C rate at room temperature, and 80% at 60 °C, whereas LiMn 2O4 shows worse retention of 91% at room temperature, and 69% at 60 °C. Moreover, temperature-dependent I - V measurements indicate that the sharp electronic resistance increase due to charge ordering transition at 290 K does not appear in our LiMn2O4 nanorod samples, suggesting good battery performance at low temperature. © 2009 American Chemical Society.

  18. Semiconductor integrated circuits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michel, A.E.; Schwenker, R.O.; Ziegler, J.F.

    1979-01-01

    An improved method involving ion implantation to form non-epitaxial semiconductor integrated circuits. These are made by forming a silicon substrate of one conductivity type with a recessed silicon dioxide region extending into the substrate and enclosing a portion of the silicon substrate. A beam of ions of opposite conductivity type impurity is directed at the substrate at an energy and dosage level sufficient to form a first region of opposite conductivity within the silicon dioxide region. This impurity having a concentration peak below the surface of the substrate forms a region of the one conductivity type which extends from the substrate surface into the first opposite type region to a depth between the concentration peak and the surface and forms a second region of opposite conductivity type. The method, materials and ion beam conditions are detailed. Vertical bipolar integrated circuits can be made this way when the first opposite type conductivity region will function as a collector. Also circuits with inverted bipolar devices when this first region functions as a 'buried'' emitter region. (U.K.)

  19. Amorphous Semiconductor Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madan, Arun

    1985-08-01

    Amorphous silicon (a-Si) based alloys have attracted a considerable amount of interest because of their applications in a wide variety of technologies. However, the major effort has concentrated on inexpensive photovoltaic device applications and has moved from a laboratory curiosity in the early 1970's to viable commercial applications in the 1980's. Impressive progress in this field has been made since the group at University of Dundee demonstrated that a low defect, device quality hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) 12 material could be produced using the radio frequency (r.f.) glow discharge in SiH4 gas ' and that the material could be doped n- and p-type.3 These results spurred a worldwide interest in a-Si based alloys, especially for photovoltaic devices which has resulted in a conversion efficiency approaching 12%. There is now a quest for even higher conversion efficiencies by using the multijunction cell approach. This necessitates the synthesis of new materials of differing bandgaps, which in principle amorphous semiconductors can achieve. In this article, we review some of this work and consider from a device and a materials point of view the hurdles which have to be overcome before this type of concept can be realized.

  20. Semiconductor film Cherenkov lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, John E.

    1994-12-01

    The technical achievements for the project 'Semiconductor Film Cherenkov Lasers' are summarized. Described in the fourteen appendices are the operation of a sapphire Cherenkov laser and various grating-coupled oscillators. These coherent radiation sources were operated over the spectral range extending from 3 mm down to 400 micrometers. The utility of various types of open, multi-grating resonators and mode-locked operation were also demonstrated. In addition to these experiments, which were carried out with a 10-100 kV pulse generator, a low-energy (3-3.6 MeV) Van de Graaff generator and a low-energy RF linac (2.8 MeV) were used to investigate the properties of continuum incoherent Smith-Purcell radiation. It was shown that levels of intensity comparable to the infrared beam lines on a synchrotron could be obtained and thus that grating-coupled sources are potentially an important new source for Fourier transform spectroscopy. Finally, a scanning electron microscope was adapted for investigating mu-electron-beam-driven far-infrared sources. At the close of the project, spontaneous emission over the 288-800 micrometers band had been observed. Intensity levels were in accord with expectations based on theory. One or more of the Appendices address these topics in detail.

  1. Voltammetry of Organic Pollutants on FeOOH Nanorods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Yuanyuan; Wan, Qijin; Yang, Nianjun

    2017-01-01

    FeOOH nanorods synthesized using a solvothermal approach have been employed to investigate the electrochemistry of organic pollutions, including ponceau 4R (PR), sunset yellow (SY), and tetrabromobisphenol A (TBBPA). The as-prepared FeOOH nanorods have been characterized using scanning electron microscopes (SEM), transmission electron microscope (TEM), X-ray photoelectron spectrometry, Brunauer-Emmett-Teller measurements, and electrochemical techniques. The modified electrode based on FeOOH nanorods exhibits a porous and net-like structure, resulting in a high surface area and many reactive/adsorption sites for soluble compounds. On this modified electrode, fast electron transfer processes of redox probes have been achieved. Electrochemistry of PR, SY, and TBBPA has been studied in detail using voltammetry, impedance, and chronocoulometry. The sensitive monitoring of both individual and total concentrations of three organic pollutions has been realized. The detection limits are 0.2, 1.0, and 0.55 nM for PR, SY, and TBBPA, respectively. Such an electrode is then promising for the electrochemical investigation and analysis of organic pollutions in different environments.

  2. EDITORIAL: Oxide semiconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawasaki, M.; Makino, T.

    2005-04-01

    Blue or ultraviolet semiconducting light-emitting diodes have the potential to revolutionize illumination systems in the near-future. Such industrial need has propelled the investigation of several wide-gap semiconducting materials in recent years. Commercial applications include blue lasers for DVD memory and laser printers, while military applications are also expected. Most of the material development has so far been focused on GaN (band gap 3.5 eV at 2 K), and ZnSe (2.9 eV) because these two representative direct transition semiconductors are known to be bright emitting sources. GaN and GaN-based alloys are emerging as the winners in this field because ZnSe is subject to defect formation under high current drive. On the other hand, another II-VI compound, ZnO, has also excited substantial interest in the optoelectronics-oriented research communities because it is the brightest emitter of all, owing to the fact that its excitons have a 60 meV binding energy. This is compared with 26 meV for GaN and 20 meV for ZnSe. The stable excitons could lead to laser action based on their recombination even at temperatures well above room temperature. ZnO has additional major properties that are more advantageous than other wide-gap materials: availability of large area substrates, higher energy radiation stability, environmentally-friendly ingredients, and amenability to wet chemical etching. However, ZnO is not new to the semiconductor field as exemplified by several studies made during the 1960s on structural, vibrational, optical and electrical properties (Mollwo E 1982 Landolt-Boernstein New Series vol 17 (Berlin: Springer) p 35). In terms of devices, the luminescence from light-emitting diode structures was demonstrated in which Cu2O was used as the p-type material (Drapak I T 1968 Semiconductors 2 624). The main obstacle to the development of ZnO has been the lack of reproducible p-type ZnO. The possibility of achieving epitaxial p-type layers with the aid of thermal

  3. Improvement of gas-sensing performance of ZnO nanorods by group-I elements doping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sáaedi, Abdolhossein; Yousefi, Ramin

    2017-12-01

    In the present work, a comparative study of gas sensor performance of group-I-doped (Na- and K-doped) ZnO nanorods to ethanol was carried out for the first time. The nanorods were grown on SiO2/Si substrates by a thermal evaporation method, using a tube furnace. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) results confirmed that the K and Na were doped in the ZnO nanorods. Furthermore, the XPS spectra indicated that the K-doped ZnO nanorods were grown by more oxygen vacancy compared with the Na-doped ZnO nanorods. Room temperature photoluminescence results confirmed the XPS results about oxygen vacancy level of the doped samples. The doped ZnO nanorods showed excellent gas-sensing performance against ethanol in comparison with the undoped ZnO nanorods. The K-doped ZnO nanorods revealed a high gas sensing at the operating temperature of 300 °C, while the operating temperature of the Na-doped was 280 °C. Moreover, the response and recovery time of the doped samples were shorter than those of the undoped sample. The enhanced gas-sensing performance of doped ZnO nanorods is attributed to the larger amount of oxygen vacancy in the doped ZnO nanorods. Furthermore, group-I-doped ZnO nanorods performed good selectivity compared with the undoped ZnO nanorods.

  4. Photoelectrochemical water splitting under visible light over anti-photocorrosive In2O3-coupling ZnO nanorod arrays photoanode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Yan; Zhang, Jinqiu; Nie, Mengyan; Sun, Kai; Li, Chunhu; Yu, Jianqiang

    2015-01-01

    In 2 O 3 quantum dots with a high crystallinity were deposited on the surface of ZnO nanorods through a chemistry bath method. The resulting In 2 O 3 -sensitizing ZnO nanorod arrays not only exhibited enhanced photoelectrochemical activity for water splitting under visible-light irradiation, but also possessed anti-photocorrosion property. The photo-induced charge-transfer property of In 2 O 3 could be improved greatly by coupling with ZnO. This observation demonstrated that the heterojunction at the interface between In 2 O 3 and ZnO could efficiently reduce the recombination of photo-induced electron–hole pairs and increase the lifetime of charge carriers and therefore enhance the photo-to-current efficiency of the In 2 O 3 –ZnO nanocrystalline arrays. It reveals that the heterojunction construction between two different semiconductors plays a very important role in determining the dynamic properties of their photogenerated charge carriers and their photo-to-current conversion efficiency

  5. Synthesis and enhanced ethanol sensing characteristics of alpha-Fe2O3/SnO2 core-shell nanorods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yu-Jin; Zhu, Chun-Ling; Wang, Li-Jiao; Gao, Peng; Cao, Mao-Sheng; Shi, Xiao-Ling

    2009-01-28

    Alpha-Fe(2)O(3)/SnO(2) core-shell nanorods are synthesized via a three-step process. X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analyses reveal that their diameters and lengths are respectively in the ranges 35-120 nm and 0.35-1.2 microm, and the thickness of the shell composed of 3.5 nm SnO(2) nanoparticles is about 10 nm. The core-shell nanostructures exhibit a dramatic improvement in ethanol sensing characteristics compared to pure alpha-Fe(2)O(3) nanorods. The sensor response is up to 19.6 under 10 ppm ethanol exposure at 220 degrees C. Both the response time and the recovery time of the core-shell structures are less than 30 s. Based on the space-charge layer model and semiconductor heterojunction theory, the small thickness of the SnO(2) shell and the formation of heterojunctions contribute to the enhanced ethanol sensing characteristics. Our results demonstrate that one-dimensional metal oxide core-shell nanostructures whose shell thickness is smaller than the Debye length are very promising materials for fabricating gas sensors with good performances.

  6. Synthesis and Optical Properties of Zn1-xMnxS Dilute Magnetic Semiconductors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    WU Mei-rong

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Diluted magnetic semiconductors Zn1-xMnxS with different consistency (x=0.00, 0.02, 0.05, 0.07 were synthesized by hydrothermal method, and the effects of doping concentration Mn2+ on the microstructure and optical properties of ZnS nanorods were investigated. The crystal microstructure,morphology and optical properties of the products were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM, corresponding selected-area electron diffraction (SAED, X-ray energy dispersive spectrometry (XEDS and ultraviolet-visible spectrophotometer(UV-vis.The results show that all samples synthesized by this method possess wurtzite structure with good crystallization, no other impurity phase appears and generates single-phase Zn1-xMnxS nanocrystalline. The morphology of the samples is nanorods and well disperses. The doping element of Mn enters into the ZnS nanocrystals, Mn2+ replaces Zn2+, and the lattice constant decreases with the increase of Mn content. Meanwhile, the optical band gap increases and the blue shift occurs for the sample in the UV-vis spectra.

  7. Synthesis and characterization of mixed monolayer protected gold nanorods and their Raman activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mlambo, Mbuso; Mdluli, Phumlani S.; Shumbula, Poslet; Mpelane, Siyasanga; Moloto, Nosipho; Skepu, Amanda; Tshikhudo, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Graphical abstract: Gold nanorods surface functionalization. - Highlights: • Mixed monolayer protected gold nanorods. • Surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy. • HS-(CH 2 ) 11 -NHCO-coumarin as a Raman active compound. - Abstract: The cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) gold nanorods (AuNRs) were prepared by seed-mediated route followed by the addition of a Raman active compound (HS-(CH 2 ) 11 -NHCO-coumarin) on the gold nanorods surfaces. Different stoichiometric mixtures of HS-(CH 2 ) 11 -NHCO-coumarin and HS-PEG-(CH 2 ) 11 COOH were evaluated for their Raman activities. The lowest stoichiometric ratio HS-(CH 2 ) 11 -NHCO-coumarin adsorbed on gold nanorods surface was detected and enhanced by Raman spectroscopy. The produced mixed monolayer protected gold nanorods were characterized by UV-vis spectrometer for optical properties, transmission electron microscope (TEM) for structural properties (shape and aspect ratio) and their zeta potentials (charges) were obtained from ZetaSizer to determine the stability of the produced mixed monolayer protected gold nanorods. The Raman results showed a surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) enhancement at the lowest stoichiometric ratio of 1% HS-(CH 2 ) 11 -NHCO-coumarin compared to high ratio of 50% HS-(CH 2 ) 11 -NHCO-coumarin on the surface of gold nanorods

  8. Solvothermally synthesized tungsten oxide nanowires/nanorods for NO2 gas sensor applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qin Yuxiang; Li Xiao; Wang Fei; Hu Ming

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Tungsten oxide nanowires and nanorods were solvothermally synthesized by changing reaction solvent. → The sensing characteristics of the tungsten oxide nanowires and nanorods sensors to NO 2 gas were evaluated in detail. → The response time and recovery time for the nanowires or nanorods sensors are much shorter than the oxide nanoparticles or sputtered films. → The nanowires sensor shows a much shorter response time and a relative higher response value to NO 2 gas than the nanorods one. → The NO 2 -sensing mechanism and the possible reason for the better gas sensing properties of the nanowires are analyzed. - Abstract: One-dimensional nanorods or nanowires of W 18 O 49 were synthesized by solvothermal method at 200 deg. C with tungsten hexachloride (WCl 6 ) as precursor and cyclohexanol or 1-propanol as reaction solvent. Their morphology and structure properties were systematically characterized. The NO 2 -sensing properties of the sensors based on nanowires and nanorods were investigated at 100 deg. C up to 250 deg. C over NO 2 concentration ranging from 1 ppm to 20 ppm. The results indicate that both nanowires and nanorods exhibit reversible response to different concentrations of NO 2 , and the highest gas response is achieved at 150 deg. C. In comparison with nanorods, nanowires showed a much quicker response characteristic and a relative higher response value to the same concentration of NO 2 gas due to the smaller diameter and larger specific surface area.

  9. Synthesis of 1-D ZnO nanorods and polypyrrole/1-D ZnO ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    pendent process variables viz., dye concentration (crystal violet), catalyst concentration (1-D ZnO nanorods) and the reaction time on the preferred ... shape and size controlled 1-D ZnO nanorod synthesis is quite. ∗. Author for correspondence ... too fast for the precursor to control the size. To overcome this difficulty, CTAB ...

  10. Reactivity and resizing of gold nanorods in presence of Cu 2

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Due to the inherent anisotropy of the system, gold nanorods behave differently in comparison to their spherical counterparts. Reactivity of gold nanorods, in presence of cupric ions, was probed in an attempt to understand the chemistry of anisotropic particles. The reaction progresses through a series of intermediates.

  11. Nanorod solar cell with an ultrathin a-Si:H absorber layer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuang, Y.; van der Werf, C.H.M.; Houweling, Z.S.; Schropp, R.E.I.

    2011-01-01

    We propose a nanostructured three-dimensional (nano-3D) solar cell design employing an ultrathin hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) n-i-p junction deposited on zinc oxide (ZnO) nanorod arrays. The ZnO nanorods were prepared by aqueous chemical growth at 80 °C. The photovoltaic performance of

  12. Incorporation of graphene in quantum dot sensitized solar cells based on ZnO nanorods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jing; Li, Chu; Eda, Goki; Zhang, Yan; Lei, Wei; Chhowalla, Manish; Milne, William I; Deng, Wei-Qiao

    2011-06-07

    We demonstrate a novel architecture of solar cell by incorporating graphene thin film in a quantum dot sensitized solar cell. Quantum dot sensitized nanorods with a graphene layer exhibited a 54.7% improvement comparing a quantum dot sensitized ZnO nanorods without graphene layer. A fill factor as high as ∼62% was also obtained.

  13. Catalytic growth of carbon nanorods on a high-T{sub c} substrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thien-Nga, L.; Hernadi, K.; Forro, L. [Ecole Polytechnique Federale, Lausanne (Switzerland). Dept. de Physique

    2001-01-16

    Copper particles generated during the reduction of a superconducting substrate are found to catalyze the formation of carbon nanorods from acetylene (see Figure). The nanorods consist of stacked graphite planes parallel to the substrate. While this technique will not suit large-scale production its study does provide insight into the decomposition and growth mechanisms when compared to similar reactions on other substrates. (orig.)

  14. Novel design of highly [110]-oriented barium titanate nanorod array and its application in nanocomposite capacitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Lingmin; Pan, Zhongbin; Zhai, Jiwei; Chen, Haydn H D

    2017-03-23

    Nanocomposites in capacitors combining highly aligned one dimension ferroelectric nanowires with polymer would be more desirable for achieving higher energy density. However, the synthesis of the well-isolated ferroelectric oxide nanorod arrays with a high orientation has been rather scant, especially using glass-made substrates. In this study, a novel design that is capable of fabricating a highly [110]-oriented BaTiO 3 (BT) nanorod array was proposed first, using a three-step hydrothermal reaction on glass-made substrates. The details for controlling the dispersion of the nanorod array, the orientation and the aspect ratio are also discussed. It is found that the alkaline treatment of the TiO 2 (TO) nanorod array, rather than the completing transformation into sodium titanate, favors the transformation of the TO into the BT nanorod array, as well as protecting the glass-made substrate. The dispersity of the nanorod array can be controlled by the introduction of a glycol ether-deionized water mixed solvent and soluble salts. Moreover, the orientation of the nanorod arrays could be tuned by the ionic strength of the solution. This novel BT nanorod array was used as a filler in a nanocomposite capacitor, demonstrating that a large energy density (11.82 J cm -3 ) can be achieved even at a low applied electric field (3200 kV cm -1 ), which opens us a new application in nanocomposite capacitors.

  15. Coating fabrics with gold nanorods for colouring, UV-protection, and antibacterial functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Yidan; Xiao, Manda; Jiang, Shouxiang; Ding, Feng; Wang, Jianfang

    2013-01-21

    Gold nanorods exhibit rich colours owing to the nearly linear dependence of the longitudinal plasmon resonance wavelength on the length-to-diameter aspect ratio. This property of Au nanorods has been utilized in this work for dyeing fabrics. Au nanorods of different aspect ratios were deposited on both cotton and silk fabrics by immersing them in Au nanorod solutions. The coating of Au nanorods makes the fabrics exhibit a broad range of colours varying from brownish red through green to purplish red, which are essentially determined by the longitudinal plasmon wavelength of the deposited Au nanorods. The colorimetric values of the coated fabrics were carefully measured for examining the colouring effects. The nanorod-coated cotton fabrics were found to be commercially acceptable in washing fastness to laundering tests and colour fastness to dry cleaning tests. Moreover, the nanorod-coated cotton and silk fabrics show significant improvements on both UV-protection and antibacterial functions. Our study therefore points out a promising approach for the use of noble metal nanocrystals as dyeing materials for textile applications on the basis of their inherent localized plasmon resonance properties.

  16. Rapid growth of nanotubes and nanorods of würtzite ZnO through ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    (TEM), and selected area electron diffraction (SAED). The ZnO nanorods and nanotubes are found by SAED to be single-crystalline. The growth process of ZnO nanorods and nanotubes has been investigated by varying the surfactant concentration and microwave irradiation time. Based on the various results obtained, ...

  17. Fabrication and spectroscopic studies on highly luminescent CdSe/CdS nanorod polymer composites

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bomm, J.; Büchtemann, A.; Fiore, Angela; Manna, L.; Nelson, J.H.; Hill, D.; van Sark, W.G.J.H.M.

    2010-01-01

    Highly luminescent nanocomposites were prepared by incorporating CdSe/CdS core/shell nanorods into different polymer matrices. The resulting nanocomposites show high transparency of up to 93%. A photoluminescence quantum efficiency of 70% was obtained, with an optimum combination of nanorod (0.05 wt

  18. Synthesis of 1-D ZnO nanorods and polypyrrole/1-D ZnO ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    1-D ZnO nanorods and PPy/1-D ZnO nanocomposites were prepared by the surfactant-assisted precipitation and in situ polymerization method, respectively. The synthesized nanorods and nanocomposites were characterized by UV–Vis spectrophotometer, Fourier transform-infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), X-ray diffraction ...

  19. Effect of ALD surface treatment on structural and optical properties of ZnO nanorods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jang, Jin-Tak [Department of Nano Systems Engineering, Center for Nano Manufacturing, Inje University, Obang-dong, Gimhae, Gyeongnam 621-749 (Korea, Republic of); Ryu, Hyukhyun, E-mail: hhryu@inje.ac.kr [Department of Nano Systems Engineering, Center for Nano Manufacturing, Inje University, Obang-dong, Gimhae, Gyeongnam 621-749 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Won-Jae [Department of Materials and Components Engineering, Dong-Eui University, 995 Eomgwangno, Busanjin-gu, Busan 614-714 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-07-01

    In this study, we report on the improvement of the optical and structural properties of ZnO nanorods using atomic layer deposition (ALD) on seed ZnO nanorods. After the initial growth of ZnO seed nanorods by hydrothermal synthesis for 1 h, a ZnO layer with a thickness of 10 nm was deposited on the initial ZnO seed nanorods using ALD. Then ZnO was further grown by hydrothermal synthesis for 4 h. The samples were characterized using room temperature photoluminescence (PL), field emission-scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). From this experiment, it was found that the ZnO nanorods with the ALD surface treatment show improved optical and structural properties when compared with the ZnO nanorods grown only by hydrothermal synthesis. The ZnO nanorods with the ALD surface treatment show about 2.7 times higher XRD (0 0 2) peak intensity, about 2.64 times higher PL NBE peak intensity, and about 3.1 times better NBE/DLE ratio than the ZnO nanorods without an ALD surface treatment.

  20. Synthesis of 1-D ZnO nanorods and polypyrrole/1-D ZnO

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    PPy/1-D ZnO nanocomposites with different 1-D ZnO nanorod weight ratios (15 and 25%) had better selectivity and sensitivity towards NH3 at room temperature. Keywords. 1-D ZnO nanorods; PPy/1-D ZnO nanocomposites; photocatalytic activity; sensitivity. 1. Introduction. The synthesis of zinc oxide (ZnO) nanostructures ...

  1. Semiconductor lasers stability, instability and chaos

    CERN Document Server

    Ohtsubo, Junji

    2017-01-01

    This book describes the fascinating recent advances made concerning the chaos, stability and instability of semiconductor lasers, and discusses their applications and future prospects in detail. It emphasizes the dynamics in semiconductor lasers by optical and electronic feedback, optical injection, and injection current modulation. Applications of semiconductor laser chaos, control and noise, and semiconductor lasers are also demonstrated. Semiconductor lasers with new structures, such as vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers and broad-area semiconductor lasers, are intriguing and promising devices. Current topics include fast physical number generation using chaotic semiconductor lasers for secure communication, development of chaos, quantum-dot semiconductor lasers and quantum-cascade semiconductor lasers, and vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers. This fourth edition has been significantly expanded to reflect the latest developments. The fundamental theory of laser chaos and the chaotic dynamics in se...

  2. Spin-dependent tunneling transport into CrO2 nanorod devices with nonmagnetic contacts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Yipu; Schmitt, Andrew L; Jin, Song

    2008-08-01

    Single-crystal nanorods of half-metallic chromium dioxide (CrO2) were synthesized and structurally characterized. Spin-dependent electrical transport was investigated in individual CrO2 nanorod devices contacted with nonmagnetic metallic electrodes. Negative magnetoresistance (MR) was observed at low temperatures due to the spin-dependent direct tunneling through the contact barrier and the high spin polarization in the half-metallic nanorods. The magnitude of this negative magnetoresistance decreases with increasing bias voltage and temperature due to spin-independent inelastic hopping through the barrier, and a small positive magnetoresistance was found at room temperature. It is believed that the contact barrier and the surface state of the nanorods have great influence on the spin-dependent transport limiting the magnitude of MR effect in this first attempt at spin filter devices of CrO2 nanorods with nonmagnetic contacts.

  3. Enhanced visible light photocatalysis through fast crystallization of zinc oxide nanorods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunandan Baruah

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Hydrothermally grown ZnO nanorods have inherent crystalline defects primarily due to oxygen vacancies that enhance optical absorption in the visible spectrum, opening up possibilities for visible light photocatalysis. Comparison of photocatalytic activity of ZnO nanorods and nanoparticle films on a test contaminant methylene blue with visible light irradiation at 72 kilolux (klx showed that ZnO nanorods are 12–24% more active than ZnO nanoparticulate films. This can be directly attributed to the increased effective surface area for adsorption of target contaminant molecules. Defects, in the form of interstitials and vacancies, were intentionally created by faster growth of the nanorods by microwave activation. Visible light photocatalytic activity was observed to improve by ≈8% attributed to the availability of more electron deficient sites on the nanorod surfaces. Engineered defect creation in nanostructured photocatalysts could be an attractive solution for visible light photocatalysis.

  4. Synthesis of uniform-sized bimetallic iron-nickel phosphide nanorods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoon, Ki Youl; Jang, Youngjin; Park, Jongnam; Hwang, Yosun; Koo, Bonil; Park, Je-Geun; Hyeon, Taeghwan

    2008-01-01

    We synthesized uniform-sized nanorods of iron-nickel phosphides from the thermal decomposition of metal-phosphine complexes. Uniform-sized (Fe x Ni 1-x ) 2 P nanorods (0≤x≤1) of various compositions were synthesized by thermal decomposition of Ni-trioctylphosphine (TOP) complex and Fe-TOP complex. By measuring magnetic properties, we found that blocking temperature and coercive field depend on Ni content in the nanorods. Both parameters were more sensitive to doping compared with bulk samples. - Graphical abstract: We synthesized uniform-sized nanorods of iron-nickel phosphides from thermal decomposition of metal-phosphine complexes. The magnetic studies showed that blocking temperature and coercive field depend on Ni content in the nanorods

  5. Study on structural, optical properties of solvothermally synthesized Ni doped CdS nanorods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaur, Kamaldeep; Verma, N. K.

    2015-01-01

    Undoped and alkali metal i.e Ni doped CdS nanorods (Cd x Ni 1-x S) with (x = 0.0, 0.3,) has been synthesized by using a convenient solvothermal technique. In order to confirm the structure of the synthesized nanorods X-ray diffraction (XRD) has been done which reveals the formation of hexagonal phase of the dilute magnetic semiconducting nanorods having size of undoped 27.79nm and doped 17.49nm. Energy dispersive X-ray analysis depicts the presence of elements Cd, Ni and S in their stoichiometric ratio. Optical behavior of undoped and doped nanorods has been investigated. UV-visible spectra show the blue shift in the band gap, as compared to the bulk CdS which may be due the quantum confinement occurs in the nanostructures. Morphological analysis has been done with the help of Transmission electron microscope which confirms the polycrystalline nature of the synthesized nanorods

  6. Characterization of individual barium titanate nanorods and their assessment as building blocks of new circuit architectures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zagar, Kristina; Hernandez-Ramirez, Francisco; Prades, Joan Daniel; Morante, Joan Ramon; Rečnik, Aleksander; Ceh, Miran

    2011-09-23

    In this work, we report on the integration of individual BaTiO(3) nanorods into simple circuit architectures. Polycrystalline BaTiO(3) nanorods were synthesized by electrophoretic deposition (EPD) of barium titanate sol into aluminium oxide (AAO) templates and subsequent annealing. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) observations revealed the presence of slabs of hexagonal polymorphs intergrown within cubic grains, resulting from the local reducing atmosphere during the thermal treatment. Electrical measurements performed on individual BaTiO(3) nanorods revealed resistivity values between 10 and 100 Ω cm, which is in good agreement with typical values reported in the past for oxygen-deficient barium titanate films. Consequently the presence of oxygen vacancies in their structure was indirectly validated. Some of these nanorods were tested as proof-of-concept humidity sensors. They showed reproducible responses towards different moisture concentrations, demonstrating that individual BaTiO(3) nanorods may be integrated in complex circuit architectures with functional capacities.

  7. Surface Recombination in ZnO Nanorods Grown by Aqueous Chemical Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Q. X.; Yang, L. L.; Willander, M.; Pozina, G.; Holtz, P. O.

    2010-01-01

    ZnO nanorods on Si substrates were prepared by either a two-steps chemical bath deposition (CBD) method or thermal evaporation technique. It was found that the effective decay time of the near bandgap recombinations strongly depends on the method, which was used to grow the ZnO nanorods. ZnO nanorods grown by the CBD exhibit characteriristic two-exponential decay curves, while ZnO nanorods grown by thermal evaporation technique show single exponential decays. The experimental results show that the fast exponential decay from the CBD grown ZnO nanorods is related to the surface recombination, while the slow decay is related to the "bulk" decay. The results also show that an annealing treatment around 500° C to 700° C significantly reduces the surface recombination rate.

  8. Fast vertical growth of ZnO nanorods using a modified chemical bath deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Tae-hyun; Ryu, Hyukhyun; Lee, Won-Jae

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • We grew vertical ZnO nanorods by a modified CBD process with a fast growth rate. • We studied the effects of the CBD process by varying growth temperature, time, and concentration. • The ZnO nanorods grown by the modified CBD showed good morphological and structural properties. - Abstract: In this study, we grew vertical ZnO nanorods on seeded Si (1 0 0) substrates using a modified chemical bath deposition (CBD). We investigated the effects of the growth temperature, growth time and concentration on the morphological and structural properties of the ZnO nanorods using field emission gun scanning electron microscopy (FEG-SEM) and X-ray diffraction. This modified CBD method shows improved results over conventional CBD. ZnO nanorods with good structural XRD properties were grown with a very fast growth rate in a wide range of growth conditions and did not require post-growth annealing

  9. Characterization of individual barium titanate nanorods and their assessment as building blocks of new circuit architectures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zagar, Kristina; Recnik, Aleksander; Ceh, Miran; Hernandez-Ramirez, Francisco; Morante, Joan Ramon; Prades, Joan Daniel

    2011-01-01

    In this work, we report on the integration of individual BaTiO 3 nanorods into simple circuit architectures. Polycrystalline BaTiO 3 nanorods were synthesized by electrophoretic deposition (EPD) of barium titanate sol into aluminium oxide (AAO) templates and subsequent annealing. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) observations revealed the presence of slabs of hexagonal polymorphs intergrown within cubic grains, resulting from the local reducing atmosphere during the thermal treatment. Electrical measurements performed on individual BaTiO 3 nanorods revealed resistivity values between 10 and 100 Ω cm, which is in good agreement with typical values reported in the past for oxygen-deficient barium titanate films. Consequently the presence of oxygen vacancies in their structure was indirectly validated. Some of these nanorods were tested as proof-of-concept humidity sensors. They showed reproducible responses towards different moisture concentrations, demonstrating that individual BaTiO 3 nanorods may be integrated in complex circuit architectures with functional capacities.

  10. Small Gold Nanorods: Recent Advances in Synthesis, Biological Imaging, and Cancer Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lu An

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Over the past few decades, the synthetic development of ultra-small nanoparticles has become an important strategy in nano-medicine, where smaller-sized nanoparticles are known to be more easily excreted from the body, greatly reducing the risk caused by introducing nano-theranostic agents. Gold nanorods are one of the most important nano-theranostic agents because of their special optical and electronic properties. However, the large size (diameter > 6 nm of most obtained gold nanorods limits their clinical application. In recent years, more and more researchers have begun to investigate the synthesis and application of small gold nanorods (diameter < 6 nm, which exhibit similar optical and electronic properties as larger gold nanorods. In this review, we summarize the recent advances of synthesis of the small gold nanorods and their application for near-infrared light-mediated bio-imaging and cancer therapy.

  11. Vapor phase growth and photoluminescence of oriented-attachment Zn2GeO4 nanorods array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Haiping; Zhu, Xingda; He, Haiping

    2016-10-01

    We carry out one-step vapor phase growth of high quality Zn2GeO4 nanorods array to provide insights into the growth mechanism of such ternary oxide nanostructures. The morphology and microstructure of these nanorods are investigated carefully. Under certain conditions, the nanorods follow the oriented-attachment growth which is unusual in vapor-based growth. Each nanorod consists of many nanocrystals aligned along the [110] direction. The nanorods show strong deep ultraviolet absorption around 260 nm and broad longlife green luminescence around 490 nm.

  12. Fabrication of TiN nanorods by electrospinning and their electrochemical properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun, Dongfei; Lang, Junwei; Yan, Xingbin; Hu, Litian; Xue, Qunji

    2011-01-01

    TiN nanorods were synthesized using electrospinning technique followed by thermolysis in different atmospheres. A dimethyl formamide-ethanol solution of poly-(vinyl pyrrolidone) and Ti (IV)-isopropoxide was used as the electrospinning precursor solution and as-spun nanofibers were calcined at 500 o C in air to generate TiO 2 nanofibers. Subsequently, a conversion from TiO 2 nanofibers to TiN nanorods was employed by the nitridation treatment at 600∼1400 o C in ammonia atmosphere. A typical characteristic of the final products was that the pristine nanofibers were cut into nanorods. The conversion from TiO 2 to TiN was realized when the nitridation temperature was above 800 o C. As-prepared nanorods were composed of TiN nano-crystallites and the average crystallite size gradually increased with the increase of the nitridation temperature. Electrochemical properties of TiN nanorods showed strong dependence on the nitridation temperature. The maximum value of the specific capacitance was obtained from the TiN nanorods prepared at 800 o C. -- Graphical Abstract: TiN nanorods were prepared using electrospinning followed by thermolysis under different atmospheres. Electrochemical properties of the TiN nanorods showed strong dependence on the nitridation temperature. Display Omitted Highlights: → TiN nanorods were synthesized by a combination of electrospinning and thermolysis. → Electrochemical properties showed strong dependence on the nitridation temperature. → The TiN nanorods prepared at 800 o C possessed the highest specific capacitance.

  13. Semiconductor optoelectronic infrared spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hollingworth, A.R.

    2001-08-01

    We use spectroscopy to study infrared optoelectronic inter and intraband semiconductor carrier dynamics. The overall aim of this thesis was to study both III-V and Pb chalcogenide material systems in order to show their future potential use in infrared emitters. The effects of bandstructure engineering have been studied in the output characteristics of mid-IR III-V laser diodes to show which processes (defects, radiative, Auger and phonon) dominate and whether non-radiative processes can be suppressed. A new three-beam pump probe experiment was used to investigate interband recombination directly in passive materials. Experiments on PbSe and theory for non-parabolic near-mirror bands and non-degenerate statistics were in good agreement. Comparisons with HgCdTe showed a reduction in the Auger coefficient of 1-2 orders of magnitude in the PbSe. Using Landau confinement to model spatial confinement in quantum dots (QDs) 'phonon bottlenecking' was studied. The results obtained from pump probe and cyclotron resonance saturation measurements showed a clear suppression in the cooling of carriers when Landau level separation was not resonant with LO phonon energy. When a bulk laser diode was placed in a magnetic field to produce a quasi quantum wire device the resulting enhanced differential gain and reduced Auger recombination lowered I th by 30%. This result showed many peaks in the light output which occurred when the LO phonon energy was a multiple of the Landau level separation. This showed for the first time evidence of the phonon bottleneck in a working laser device. A new technique called time resolved optically detected cyclotron resonance, was used as a precursor to finding the carrier dynamics within a spatially confined quantum dot. By moving to the case of a spatial QD using an optically detected intraband resonance it was possible to measure the energy separation interband levels and conduction and valence sublevels within the dot simultaneously. Furthermore

  14. Lyotropic Liquid Crystal Phases from Anisotropic Nanomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dierking, Ingo; Al-Zangana, Shakhawan

    2017-10-01

    Liquid crystals are an integral part of a mature display technology, also establishing themselves in other applications, such as spatial light modulators, telecommunication technology, photonics, or sensors, just to name a few of the non-display applications. In recent years, there has been an increasing trend to add various nanomaterials to liquid crystals, which is motivated by several aspects of materials development. (i) addition of nanomaterials can change and thus tune the properties of the liquid crystal; (ii) novel functionalities can be added to the liquid crystal; and (iii) the self-organization of the liquid crystalline state can be exploited to template ordered structures or to transfer order onto dispersed nanomaterials. Much of the research effort has been concentrated on thermotropic systems, which change order as a function of temperature. Here we review the other side of the medal, the formation and properties of ordered, anisotropic fluid phases, liquid crystals, by addition of shape-anisotropic nanomaterials to isotropic liquids. Several classes of materials will be discussed, inorganic and mineral liquid crystals, viruses, nanotubes and nanorods, as well as graphene oxide.

  15. Lyotropic Liquid Crystal Phases from Anisotropic Nanomaterials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ingo Dierking

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Liquid crystals are an integral part of a mature display technology, also establishing themselves in other applications, such as spatial light modulators, telecommunication technology, photonics, or sensors, just to name a few of the non-display applications. In recent years, there has been an increasing trend to add various nanomaterials to liquid crystals, which is motivated by several aspects of materials development. (i addition of nanomaterials can change and thus tune the properties of the liquid crystal; (ii novel functionalities can be added to the liquid crystal; and (iii the self-organization of the liquid crystalline state can be exploited to template ordered structures or to transfer order onto dispersed nanomaterials. Much of the research effort has been concentrated on thermotropic systems, which change order as a function of temperature. Here we review the other side of the medal, the formation and properties of ordered, anisotropic fluid phases, liquid crystals, by addition of shape-anisotropic nanomaterials to isotropic liquids. Several classes of materials will be discussed, inorganic and mineral liquid crystals, viruses, nanotubes and nanorods, as well as graphene oxide.

  16. Lyotropic Liquid Crystal Phases from Anisotropic Nanomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dierking, Ingo

    2017-01-01

    Liquid crystals are an integral part of a mature display technology, also establishing themselves in other applications, such as spatial light modulators, telecommunication technology, photonics, or sensors, just to name a few of the non-display applications. In recent years, there has been an increasing trend to add various nanomaterials to liquid crystals, which is motivated by several aspects of materials development. (i) addition of nanomaterials can change and thus tune the properties of the liquid crystal; (ii) novel functionalities can be added to the liquid crystal; and (iii) the self-organization of the liquid crystalline state can be exploited to template ordered structures or to transfer order onto dispersed nanomaterials. Much of the research effort has been concentrated on thermotropic systems, which change order as a function of temperature. Here we review the other side of the medal, the formation and properties of ordered, anisotropic fluid phases, liquid crystals, by addition of shape-anisotropic nanomaterials to isotropic liquids. Several classes of materials will be discussed, inorganic and mineral liquid crystals, viruses, nanotubes and nanorods, as well as graphene oxide. PMID:28974025

  17. Thiophene-Based Organic Semiconductors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turkoglu, Gulsen; Cinar, M Emin; Ozturk, Turan

    2017-10-24

    Thiophene-based π-conjugated organic small molecules and polymers are the research subject of significant current interest owing to their potential use as organic semiconductors in material chemistry. Despite simple and similar molecular structures, the hitherto reported properties of thiophene-based organic semiconductors are rather diverse. Design of high performance organic semiconducting materials requires a thorough understanding of inter- and intra-molecular interactions, solid-state packing, and the influence of both factors on the charge carrier transport. In this chapter, thiophene-based organic semiconductors, which are classified in terms of their chemical structures and their structure-property relationships, are addressed for the potential applications as organic photovoltaics (OPVs), organic field-effect transistors (OFETs) and organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs).

  18. Catalysts, Protection Layers, and Semiconductors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chorkendorff, Ib

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogen is the simplest solar fuel to produce and in this presentation we shall give a short overview of the pros and cons of various tandem devices [1]. The large band gap semiconductor needs to be in front, but apart from that we can chose to have either the anode in front or back using either...... acid or alkaline conditions. Since most relevant semiconductors are very prone to corrosion the advantage of using buried junctions and using protection layers offering shall be discussed [2-4]. Next we shall discuss the availability of various catalysts for being coupled to these protections layers...... and how their stability may be evaluated [5, 6]. Examples of half-cell reaction using protection layers for both cathode and anode will be discussed though some of recent examples under both alkaline and acidic conditions. Si is a very good low band gap semiconductor and by using TiO2 as a protection...

  19. High pressure semiconductor physics I

    CERN Document Server

    Willardson, R K; Paul, William; Suski, Tadeusz

    1998-01-01

    Since its inception in 1966, the series of numbered volumes known as Semiconductors and Semimetals has distinguished itself through the careful selection of well-known authors, editors, and contributors. The "Willardson and Beer" Series, as it is widely known, has succeeded in publishing numerous landmark volumes and chapters. Not only did many of these volumes make an impact at the time of their publication, but they continue to be well-cited years after their original release. Recently, Professor Eicke R. Weber of the University of California at Berkeley joined as a co-editor of the series. Professor Weber, a well-known expert in the field of semiconductor materials, will further contribute to continuing the series' tradition of publishing timely, highly relevant, and long-impacting volumes. Some of the recent volumes, such as Hydrogen in Semiconductors, Imperfections in III/V Materials, Epitaxial Microstructures, High-Speed Heterostructure Devices, Oxygen in Silicon, and others promise indeed that this tra...

  20. Selenium semiconductor core optical fibers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. W. Tang

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Phosphate glass-clad optical fibers containing selenium (Se semiconductor core were fabricated using a molten core method. The cores were found to be amorphous as evidenced by X-ray diffraction and corroborated by Micro-Raman spectrum. Elemental analysis across the core/clad interface suggests that there is some diffusion of about 3 wt % oxygen in the core region. Phosphate glass-clad crystalline selenium core optical fibers were obtained by a postdrawing annealing process. A two-cm-long crystalline selenium semiconductor core optical fibers, electrically contacted to external circuitry through the fiber end facets, exhibit a three times change in conductivity between dark and illuminated states. Such crystalline selenium semiconductor core optical fibers have promising utility in optical switch and photoconductivity of optical fiber array.

  1. Bending flexibility, kinking, and buckling characterization of ZnO nanorods/nanowires grown on different substrates by high and low temperature methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riaz, M.; Fulati, A.; Yang, L. L.; Nur, O.; Willander, M.; Klason, P.

    2008-11-01

    Nanomechanical tests of bending flexibility, kinking, and buckling failure characterization of vertically aligned single crystal ZnO nanorods/nanowires were performed quantitatively by nanoindentation technique. These nanostructures were grown by the vapor liquid solid (VLS) method, a relatively high temperature approach, and the aqueous chemical growth (ACG) method, a relatively low temperature approach on different substrates, including SiC and Si. The first critical load at the inflection point found for the ZnO nanorods/nanowires grown by ACG method was 105 μN on the SiC substrates and 114 μN on the Si substrates. The corresponding buckling energies calculated from the force-displacement curves were 3.15×10-12 and 2.337×10-12 J, respectively. Similarly, for the samples grown by the VLS method, the first critical load at the inflection point and the corresponding buckling energies were calculated from the force-displacement curves as 198 μN and 7.03×10-12 J on the SiC substrates, and 19 μN and 1.805×10-13 J on the Si substrates. Moreover, the critical buckling stress, strain, and strain energy were also calculated for all samples. The strain energy for all samples was much less than the corresponding buckling energy. This shows that our as-grown samples are elastic and flexible. The elasticity measurement was performed for all the samples before reaching the first critical and kinking inflection point, and we subsequently observed the bending flexibility, kinking, and buckling phenomena on the same nanorods/nanowires. We observed that the loading and unloading behaviors during the bending test of the as-grown samples were highly symmetrical, and also that the highest point on the bending curves and the first inflection and critical point were very close. ZnO nanorods/nanowires grown on SiC by the ACG method, and those grown by the VLS method on Si substrates, show a linear relation and high modulus of elasticity for the force and displacement up to the

  2. Semiconductor X-ray spectrometers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muggleton, A.H.F.

    1978-02-01

    An outline is given of recent developments in particle and photon induced x-ray fluorescence (XRF) analysis. Following a brief description of the basic mechanism of semiconductor detector operation a comparison is made between semiconductor detectors, scintillators and gas filled proportional devices. Detector fabrication and cryostat design are described in more detail and the effects of various device parameters on system performance, such as energy resolution, count rate capability, efficiency, microphony, etc. are discussed. The main applications of these detectors in x-ray fluorescence analysis, electron microprobe analysis, medical and pollution studies are reviewed

  3. Modeling of semiconductor optical amplifiers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mørk, Jesper; Bischoff, Svend; Berg, Tommy Winther

    We discuss the modelling of semiconductor optical amplifiers with emphasis on their high-speed properties. Applications in linear amplification as well as ultrafast optical signal processing are reviewed. Finally, the possible role of quantum-dot based optical amplifiers is discussed.......We discuss the modelling of semiconductor optical amplifiers with emphasis on their high-speed properties. Applications in linear amplification as well as ultrafast optical signal processing are reviewed. Finally, the possible role of quantum-dot based optical amplifiers is discussed....

  4. Semiconductors and semimetals epitaxial microstructures

    CERN Document Server

    Willardson, Robert K; Beer, Albert C; Gossard, Arthur C

    1994-01-01

    Newly developed semiconductor microstructures can now guide light and electrons resulting in important consequences for state-of-the-art electronic and photonic devices. This volume introduces a new generation of epitaxial microstructures. Special emphasis has been given to atomic control during growth and the interrelationship between the atomic arrangements and the properties of the structures.Key Features* Atomic-level control of semiconductor microstructures* Molecular beam epitaxy, metal-organic chemical vapor deposition* Quantum wells and quantum wires* Lasers, photon(IR)detectors, heterostructure transistors

  5. Semiconductor lasers and herterojunction leds

    CERN Document Server

    Kressel, Henry

    2012-01-01

    Semiconductor Lasers and Heterojunction LEDs presents an introduction to the subject of semiconductor lasers and heterojunction LEDs. The book reviews relevant basic solid-state and electromagnetic principles; the relevant concepts in solid state physics; and the p-n junctions and heterojunctions. The text also describes stimulated emission and gain; the relevant concepts in electromagnetic field theory; and the modes in laser structures. The relation between electrical and optical properties of laser diodes; epitaxial technology; binary III-V compounds; and diode fabrication are also consider

  6. Semiconductor device physics and simulation

    CERN Document Server

    Yuan, J S

    1998-01-01

    This volume provides thorough coverage of modern semiconductor devices -including hetero- and homo-junction devices-using a two-dimensional simulator (MEDICI) to perform the analysis and generate simulation results Each device is examined in terms of dc, ac, and transient simulator results; relevant device physics; and implications for design and analysis Two hundred forty-four useful figures illustrate the physical mechanisms and characteristics of the devices simulated Comprehensive and carefully organized, Semiconductor Device Physics and Simulation is the ideal bridge from device physics to practical device design

  7. Introduction to semiconductor manufacturing technology

    CERN Document Server

    2012-01-01

    IC chip manufacturing processes, such as photolithography, etch, CVD, PVD, CMP, ion implantation, RTP, inspection, and metrology, are complex methods that draw upon many disciplines. [i]Introduction to Semiconductor Manufacturing Technologies, Second Edition[/i] thoroughly describes the complicated processes with minimal mathematics, chemistry, and physics; it covers advanced concepts while keeping the contents accessible to readers without advanced degrees. Designed as a textbook for college students, this book provides a realistic picture of the semiconductor industry and an in-depth discuss

  8. Wide band gap semiconductor templates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arendt, Paul N. (Los Alamos, NM); Stan, Liliana (Los Alamos, NM); Jia, Quanxi (Los Alamos, NM); DePaula, Raymond F. (Santa Fe, NM); Usov, Igor O. (Los Alamos, NM)

    2010-12-14

    The present invention relates to a thin film structure based on an epitaxial (111)-oriented rare earth-Group IVB oxide on the cubic (001) MgO terminated surface and the ion-beam-assisted deposition ("IBAD") techniques that are amendable to be over coated by semiconductors with hexagonal crystal structures. The IBAD magnesium oxide ("MgO") technology, in conjunction with certain template materials, is used to fabricate the desired thin film array. Similarly, IBAD MgO with appropriate template layers can be used for semiconductors with cubic type crystal structures.

  9. Organic semiconductors in sensor applications

    CERN Document Server

    Malliaras, George; Owens, Róisín

    2008-01-01

    Organic semiconductors offer unique characteristics such as tunability of electronic properties via chemical synthesis, compatibility with mechanically flexible substrates, low-cost manufacturing, and facile integration with chemical and biological functionalities. These characteristics have prompted the application of organic semiconductors and their devices in physical, chemical, and biological sensors. This book covers this rapidly emerging field by discussing both optical and electrical sensor concepts. Novel transducers based on organic light-emitting diodes and organic thin-film transistors, as well as systems-on-a-chip architectures are presented. Functionalization techniques to enhance specificity are outlined, and models for the sensor response are described.

  10. Nanoparticle and nanorod films deposited by matrix assisted pulsed laser evaporation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caricato, A. P.; Cesaria, M.; Luches, A.; Martino, M.

    2012-07-01

    The promising results obtained with the MAPLE-deposition of nanostructured thin films, to be used in different fields, are reviewed. Nanoparticles (TiO2, SnO2, CdS) and nanorods (TiO2) with well defined dimensions were suspended in appropriate solvents (distilled water, toluene) with low concentration (1wt% or less). The solutions were flash frozen at the liquid nitrogen temperature to form the targets to be laser irradiated. The MAPLE process allowed a successful transfer from the target to rough and flat substrates, preserving the starting composition and crystalline phase of the nanostructures in a wide range of experimental conditions. In contrast, a careful choice of the laser fluence is mandatory to avoid shape modifications. Growth of metal nanoparticles with a low dispersion in size was also obtained by the MAPLE technique, starting from target solutions of a metallorganic element (AcPd) diluted in different solvents (acetone, diethyl ether). It seems that selecting the solvent with appropriate values of viscosity and boiling temperatures, it is possible to modulate the nanoparticles size. Most of the deposited nanostructured films were tested as sensing elements for gas sensors.

  11. Facile synthesis and photocatalytic activity of ZnO/zinc titanate core–shell nanorod arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Ding-Chao; Fu, Qiu-Ming; Ma, Zhi-Bin; Zhao, Hong-Yang; Tu, Ya-Fang; Tian, Yu; Zhou, Di; Zheng, Guang; Lu, Hong-Bing

    2018-02-01

    ZnO/zinc titanate core–shell nanorod arrays (CSNRs) were successfully prepared via a simple synthesis process by combining hydrothermal synthesis and liquid phase deposition (LPD). The surface morphologies, crystalline characteristics, optical properties and surface electronic states of the ZnO/zinc titanate CSNRs were characterized by scanning electron microscope, transmission electron microscope, x-ray diffractometer, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, PL and ultraviolet (UV)–visible absorption spectra. By controlling the reaction time of LPD, the shell thickness could vary with the reaction time. Furthermore, the impacts of the reaction time and post-annealing temperature on the crystalline structure and chemical composition of the CSNRs were also investigated. The studies of photocatalytic activity under UV light irradiation revealed that the ZnO/zinc titanate CSNRs annealed at 700 °C with 30 min deposition exhibited the best photocatalytic activity and good stability for degradation of methylene blue. It had been found that the effective separation of photogenerated electron–hole pairs in the CSNRs led to the enhanced photocatalytic activity. Moreover, the ZnO/zinc titanate CSNRs grown on quartz glass substrate could be easily recycled for reuse with almost unchanged photocatalytic activity.

  12. Semiconductor structure and recess formation etch technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Bin; Sun, Min; Palacios, Tomas Apostol

    2017-02-14

    A semiconductor structure has a first layer that includes a first semiconductor material and a second layer that includes a second semiconductor material. The first semiconductor material is selectively etchable over the second semiconductor material using a first etching process. The first layer is disposed over the second layer. A recess is disposed at least in the first layer. Also described is a method of forming a semiconductor structure that includes a recess. The method includes etching a region in a first layer using a first etching process. The first layer includes a first semiconductor material. The first etching process stops at a second layer beneath the first layer. The second layer includes a second semiconductor material.

  13. Waveguide based external cavity semiconductor lasers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oldenbeuving, Ruud; Klein, E.J.; Offerhaus, Herman L.; Lee, Christopher James; Verhaegen, M.; Boller, Klaus J.

    2012-01-01

    We report on progress of the project waveguide based external cavity semiconductor laser (WECSL) arrays. Here we present the latest results on our efforts to mode lock an array of tunable, external cavity semiconductor lasers.

  14. Fundamentals of semiconductors physics and materials properties

    CERN Document Server

    Yu, Peter Y

    2005-01-01

    Provides detailed explanations of the electronic, vibrational, transport, and optical properties of semiconductors. This textbook emphasizes understanding the physical properties of Si and similar tetrahedrally coordinated semiconductors and features an extensive collection of tables of material parameters, figures, and problems.

  15. Influence of phonons on semiconductor quantum emission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feldtmann, Thomas

    2009-07-06

    A microscopic theory of interacting charge carriers, lattice vibrations, and light modes in semiconductor systems is presented. The theory is applied to study quantum dots and phonon-assisted luminescence in bulk semiconductors and heterostructures. (orig.)

  16. Lyotropic liquid crystal directed synthesis of nanostructured materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cuiqing Wang, Dairong Chen and Xiuling Jiao

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available This review introduces and summarizes lyotropic liquid crystal (LLC directed syntheses of nanostructured materials consisting of porous nanostructures and zero-dimensional (0-D, one-dimensional (1-D and two-dimensional (2-D nanostructures. After a brief introduction to the liquid crystals, the LLCs used to prepare mesoporous materials are discussed; in particular, recent advances in controlling mesostructures are summarized. The LLC templates directing the syntheses of nanoparticles, nanorods, nanowires and nanoplates are also presented. Finally, future development in this field is discussed.

  17. Diode having trenches in a semiconductor region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palacios, Tomas Apostol; Lu, Bin; Matioli, Elison de Nazareth

    2016-03-22

    An electrode structure is described in which conductive regions are recessed into a semiconductor region. Trenches may be formed in a semiconductor region, such that conductive regions can be formed in the trenches. The electrode structure may be used in semiconductor devices such as field effect transistors or diodes. Nitride-based power semiconductor devices are described including such an electrode structure, which can reduce leakage current and otherwise improve performance.

  18. Anomalous lattice parameter of magnetic semiconductor alloys

    OpenAIRE

    CAETANO, Clovis; MARQUES, Marcelo; FERREIRA, Luiz G.; TELES, Lara K.

    2009-01-01

    The addition of transition metals (TM) to III-V semiconductors radically changes their electronic, magnetic and structural properties. In contrast to the conventional semiconductor alloys, the lattice parameter in magnetic semiconductor alloys, including the ones with diluted concentration (the diluted magnetic semiconductors - DMS), cannot be determined uniquely from the composition. By using first-principles calculations, we find a direct correlation between the magnetic moment and the anio...

  19. Trends in Metal Oxide Stability for Nanorods, Nanotubes, and Surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mowbray, Duncan; Martinez, Jose Ignacio; Vallejo, Federico Calle

    2011-01-01

    ,2) nanorods, (3,3) nanotubes, and the (110) and (100) surfaces. These formation energies can be described semiquantitatively (mean absolute error ≈ 0.12 eV) by the fraction of metal−oxygen bonds broken and the metal d-band and p-band centers in the bulk metal oxide.......The formation energies of nanostructures play an important role in determining their properties, including their catalytic activity. For the case of 15 different rutile and 8 different perovskite metal oxides, we used density functional theory (DFT) to calculate the formation energies of (2...

  20. Fabrication of diamond nanorods for gas sensing applications

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Davydova, Marina; Kromka, Alexander; Rezek, Bohuslav; Babchenko, Oleg; Stuchlík, M.; Hruška, Karel

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 256, č. 18 (2010), s. 5602-5605 ISSN 0169-4332 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KAN400100701; GA MŠk LC510; GA AV ČR KAN400100652; GA AV ČR(CZ) IAAX00100902; GA AV ČR(CZ) KAN400480701 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100521 Keywords : nanocrystalline diamond * diamond nanorods * surface conductivity * gas sensor * SEM Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 1.795, year: 2010

  1. MIL-68 (In) nano-rods for the removal of Congo red dye from aqueous solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Li-Na; Qian, Xin-Ye; Wang, Jian-Guo; Aslan, Hüsnü; Dong, Mingdong

    2015-09-01

    MIL-68 (In) nano-rods were prepared by a facile solvothermal synthesis using NaOAc as modulator agent at 100°C for 30 min. The BET test showed that the specific surface area and pore volume of MIL-68 (In) nanorods were 1252 m(2) g(-1) and 0.80 cm(3) g(-1), respectively. The as-prepared MIL-68 (In) nanorods showed excellent adsorption capacity and rapid adsorption rate for removal of Congo red (CR) dye from water. The maximum adsorption capacity of MIL-68 (In) nanorods toward CR reached 1204 mg g(-1), much higher than MIL-68 (In) microrods and most of the previously reported adsorbents. The adsorption process of CR by MIL-68 (In) nano-rods was investigated and found to be obeying the Langmuir adsorption model in addition to pseudo-second-order rate equation. Moreover, the MIL-68 (In) nanorods showed an acceptable reusability after regeneration with ethanol. All information gives an indication that the as-prepared MIL-68 (In) nanorods show their potential as the adsorbent for highly efficient removal of CR in wastewater. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Y-Doped ZnO Nanorods by Hydrothermal Method and Their Acetone Gas Sensitivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng Yu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Pure and yttrium- (Y- doped (1 at%, 3 at%, and 7 at% ZnO nanorods were synthesized using a hydrothermal process. The crystallography and microstructure of the synthesized samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD, scanning electron microscopy (SEM, and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX. Comparing with pure ZnO nanorods, Y-doped ZnO exhibited improved acetone sensing properties. The response of 1 at% Y-doped ZnO nanorods to 100 ppm acetone is larger than that of pure ZnO nanorods. The response and recovery times of 1 at% Y-doped ZnO nanorods to 100 ppm acetone are about 30 s and 90 s, respectively. The gas sensor based on Y-doped ZnO nanorods showed good selectivity to acetone in the interfere gases of ammonia, benzene, formaldehyde, toluene, and methanol. The formation mechanism of the ZnO nanorods was briefly analyzed.

  3. Role of nanorods insertion layer in ZnO-based electrochemical metallization memory cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangasa Simanjuntak, Firman; Singh, Pragya; Chandrasekaran, Sridhar; Juanda Lumbantoruan, Franky; Yang, Chih-Chieh; Huang, Chu-Jie; Lin, Chun-Chieh; Tseng, Tseung-Yuen

    2017-12-01

    An engineering nanorod array in a ZnO-based electrochemical metallization device for nonvolatile memory applications was investigated. A hydrothermally synthesized nanorod layer was inserted into a Cu/ZnO/ITO device structure. Another device was fabricated without nanorods for comparison, and this device demonstrated a diode-like behavior with no switching behavior at a low current compliance (CC). The switching became clear only when the CC was increased to 75 mA. The insertion of a nanorods layer induced switching characteristics at a low operation current and improve the endurance and retention performances. The morphology of the nanorods may control the switching characteristics. A forming-free electrochemical metallization memory device having long switching cycles (>104 cycles) with a sufficient memory window (103 times) for data storage application, good switching stability and sufficient retention was successfully fabricated by adjusting the morphology and defect concentration of the inserted nanorod layer. The nanorod layer not only contributed to inducing resistive switching characteristics but also acted as both a switching layer and a cation diffusion control layer.

  4. Size-dependent production of radicals in catalyzed reduction of Eosin Y using gold nanorods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weng, Guojun; Qi, Ying; Li, Jianjun; Zhao, Junwu

    2015-01-01

    Gold nanostructures have been widely used as catalysts for chemical processes, energy conversion, and pollution control. The size of gold nanocatalysts is thus paramount for their catalytic activity. In this paper, gold nanorods with different sizes were prepared by means of the improved seeding growth approach by adding aromatic additive. The sizes and aspect ratios of the obtained gold nanorods were calculated according to the TEM characterization. Then, we studied the catalytic activities of gold nanorods using a model reaction based on the reduction of Eosin Y by NaBH 4 . By monitoring the absorption intensities of the radicals induced by gold nanorods in real time, we observed the clear size-dependent activity in the conversion of EY 2− to EY 3− . The conversion efficiency indicated that the gold nanorods with the smallest size were catalytically the most active probably due to their high number of coordinatively unsaturated surface atoms. In addition, a compensation effect dominated by the surface area of nanorods was observed in this catalytic reduction, which could be primarily attributed to the configuration of Eosin Y absorbed onto the surfaces of gold nanorods

  5. Semiconductor technology program: Progress briefs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galloway, K. F.; Scace, R. I.; Walters, E. J.

    1981-01-01

    Measurement technology for semiconductor materials, process control, and devices, is discussed. Silicon and silicon based devices are emphasized. Highlighted activities include semiinsulating GaAs characterization, an automatic scanning spectroscopic ellipsometer, linewidth measurement and coherence, bandgap narrowing effects in silicon, the evaluation of electrical linewidth uniformity, and arsenicomplanted profiles in silicon.

  6. Towards filament free semiconductor lasers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McInerney, John; O'Brien, Peter; Skovgaard, Peter M. W.

    2000-01-01

    We outline physical models and simulations for suppression of self-focusing and filamentation in large aperture semiconductor lasers. The principal technical objective is to generate multi-watt CW or quasi-CW outputs with nearly diffraction limited beams, suitable for long distance free space...

  7. Ultrafast Spectroscopy of Semiconductor Devices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borri, Paola; Langbein, Wolfgang; Hvam, Jørn Marcher

    1999-01-01

    In this work we present an experimental technique for investigating ultrafast carrier dynamics in semiconductor optical amplifiers at room temperature. These dynamics, influenced by carrier heating, spectral hole-burning and two-photon absorption, are very important for device applications in inf...

  8. Semiconductor radiation detectors: device physics

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lutz, Gerhard

    1999-01-01

    ..., including nuclear physics, elementary particle physics, optical and x-ray astronomy, medicine, and materials testing - and the number of applications is growing continually. Closely related, and initiated by the application of semiconductors, is the development of low-noise low-power integrated electronics for signal readout. The success of semicond...

  9. Review of semiconductor drift detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gatti, Emilio; Rehak, Pavel

    2005-04-01

    A short review of semiconductor drift detectors is given. The emphasis is given to detectors intended for tracking of fast charged particles for experiments in particle physics and high energy heavy-ion physics. The use and performance of this kind of detector in past, present and future experiments is described together with the experience learned during the design, production and data taking phases.

  10. Atomistic Models of Amorphous Semiconductors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jarolimek, K.

    2011-01-01

    Crystalline silicon is probably the best studied material, widely used by the semiconductor industry. The subject of this thesis is an intriguing form of this element namely amorphous silicon. It can contain a varying amount of hydrogen and is denoted as a-Si:H. It completely lacks the neat long

  11. 2010 Defects in Semiconductors GRC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shengbai Zhang

    2011-01-06

    Continuing its tradition of excellence, this Gordon Conference will focus on research at the forefront of the field of defects in semiconductors. The conference will have a strong emphasis on the control of defects during growth and processing, as well as an emphasis on the development of novel defect detection methods and first-principles defect theories. Electronic, magnetic, and optical properties of bulk, thin film, and nanoscale semiconductors will be discussed in detail. In contrast to many conferences, which tend to focus on specific semiconductors, this conference will deal with point and extended defects in a broad range of electronic materials. This approach has proved to be extremely fruitful for advancing fundamental understanding in emerging materials such as wide-band-gap semiconductors, oxides, sp{sup 2} carbon based-materials, and photovoltaic/solar cell materials, and in understanding important defect phenomena such as doping bottleneck in nanostructures and the diffusion of defects and impurities. The program consists of about twenty invited talks and a number of contributed poster sessions. The emphasis should be on work which has yet to be published. The large amount of discussion time provides an ideal forum for dealing with topics that are new and/or controversial.

  12. Towards filament free semiconductor lasers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McInerney, John; O'Brien, Peter; Skovgaard, Peter M. W.

    2000-01-01

    We outline physical models and simulations for suppression of self-focusing and filamentation in large aperture semiconductor lasers. The principal technical objective is to generate multi-watt CW or quasi-CW outputs with nearly diffraction limited beams, suitable for long distance free space...... propagation structures in lasers and amplifiers which suppress lateral reflections....

  13. A Brief History of ... Semiconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, Tudor

    2005-01-01

    The development of studies in semiconductor materials is traced from its beginnings with Michael Faraday in 1833 to the production of the first silicon transistor in 1954, which heralded the age of silicon electronics and microelectronics. Prior to the advent of band theory, work was patchy and driven by needs of technology. However, the arrival…

  14. Fabrication and photoelectrochemical characteristics of In2S3 nano-flower films on TiO2 nanorods arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Minmin; Yu, Limin; Chen, Wenyuan; Wang, Wenzhen; Jia, Junhong

    2016-04-01

    The In2S3 nano-flower films on TiO2/FTO (Fluorine-doped tin oxide) substrates were synthesized via hydrothermal method and the photoelectrochemical performances of In2S3/TiO2 photoelectrodes were characterized. The roles of PSS (poly(sodium-p-styrenesul-fonate)) and PEG (polyethylene glycol) on the structure controlling of In2S3 films were also discussed. The results show that the In2S3 nano-flower films consisted of ultrathin nanoflakes with a thickness of 5 nm are successfully grew on the surface of TiO2 nanorod arrays. PEG could play a role as the morphology-directing agent by confining crystal growth in certain directions, while PSS could provide coordination sites with long chains and lead to the formation of spherical structure. The energy conversion efficiency of In2S3 nano-flower/TiO2 photoelectrodes enhances thrice compared with that of bare TiO2 photoelectrode. This research presents further insight for improving the efficiency of semiconductors by using the suitable electron transfer channels, which may be promising for rational construction of solar conversion and storage devices.

  15. Effect of phosphorus incorporation on morphology and optical properties of ZnO nanorods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fan, Donghua; Zhang, Rong; Wang, Xianghu

    2011-01-01

    Graphical abstract: XPS spectra of the P-doped ZnO nanorods: (a) Zn 2p, (b) O 1s, and (c) P 2p spectra. The red curve in c is the Gauss-fitting curve. (d) Raman spectra of P-doped (curve 1) and pure (curve 2) ZnO nanorods. Research highlights: → P-doped ZnO nanorods have been prepared on Si substrates without any catalyst. → The introduction of phosphorus leads to the growth of tapered tip in the nanorods. → The formation of tapered tip is attributed to the relaxation of the lattice strain along the radial direction. → The strong ultraviolet peak is connected with the phosphorus acceptor-related emissions. -- Abstract: Phosphorus-doped ZnO nanorods have been prepared on Si substrates by thermal evaporation process without any catalyst. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and Raman spectra indicate that phosphorus entering into ZnO nanorods mainly occupies Zn site rather than O one. The introduction of phosphorus leads to the morphological changes of nanorods from hexagonal tip to tapered one, which should be attributed to the relaxation of the lattice strain caused by phosphorus occupying Zn site along the radial direction. Transmission electron microscopy shows that phosphorus-doped ZnO nanorods still are single crystal and grow along [0 0 0 1] direction. The effect of phosphorous dopant on optical properties of ZnO nanorods also is studied by the temperature-dependent photoluminescence spectra, which indicates that the strong ultraviolet emission is connected with the phosphorus acceptor-related emissions.

  16. Aluminium bismuthate nanorods and the electrochemical performance for detection of tartaric acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pei, L.Z., E-mail: lzpei@ahut.edu.cn [Key Lab of Materials Science and Processing of Anhui Province, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Anhui University of Technology, Ma' anshan, Anhui 243002 (China); Wei, T.; Lin, N.; Fan, C.G. [Key Lab of Materials Science and Processing of Anhui Province, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Anhui University of Technology, Ma' anshan, Anhui 243002 (China); Yang, Zao, E-mail: yangzao888@tom.com [National Engineering Research Center for Biomaterials, Sichuan University, Chengdu, Sichuan 610064 (China)

    2016-09-15

    Aluminium bismuthate nanorods had been synthesized by a facile hydrothemral method. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) observations showed that the lengh and diameter were 2–10 μm and 50–200 nm, respectively. X-ray diffraction (XRD) and high-resolution TEM (HRTEM) showed that the nanorods were composed of single crystalline orthorhombic Al{sub 4}Bi{sub 2}O{sub 9} phase. The aluminium bismuthate nanorods could be explained by the nucleation and crystalline growth process based on the products obtained from different hydrothermal conditions. Aluminium bismuthate nanorods modified glassy carbon electrode (GCE) was fabricated for the electrochemical detection of tartaric acid (TA) in neutral solution. A pair of semi-reversible redox peaks located at −0.08 V and −0.53 V, respectively were observed. The current intensity of the cyclic voltammogram (CV) peak increased linearly obviously with increasing the scan rate and TA concentration. The detection limit and linear range were 0.64 μM and 0.001–2 mM, respectively with the correlation coefficient of 0.995. The aluminium bismuthate nanorods modified GCE had good reproducibility and stability for the detection of TA. - Highlights: • Aluminium bismuthate nanorods were synthesized by a facile hydrothermal process. • The size of aluminium bismuthate nanorods could be controlled by growth conditions. • Aluminium bismuthate nanorods showed good electrochemical performance for the detection of tartaric acid. • Aluminium bismuthate nanorods modified GCE had good reproducibility and stability.

  17. ZnO Nano-Rod Devices for Intradermal Delivery and Immunization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayak, Tapas R; Wang, Hao; Pant, Aakansha; Zheng, Minrui; Junginger, Hans; Goh, Wei Jiang; Lee, Choon Keong; Zou, Shui; Alonso, Sylvie; Czarny, Bertrand; Storm, Gert; Sow, Chorng Haur; Lee, Chengkuo; Pastorin, Giorgia

    2017-06-15

    Intradermal delivery of antigens for vaccination is a very attractive approach since the skin provides a rich network of antigen presenting cells, which aid in stimulating an immune response. Numerous intradermal techniques have been developed to enhance penetration across the skin. However, these methods are invasive and/or affect the skin integrity. Hence, our group has devised zinc oxide (ZnO) nano-rods for non-destructive drug delivery. Chemical vapour deposition was used to fabricate aligned nano-rods on ZnO pre-coated silicon chips. The nano-rods' length and diameter were found to depend on the temperature, time, quality of sputtered silicon chips, etc. Vertically aligned ZnO nano-rods with lengths of 30-35 µm and diameters of 200-300 nm were selected for in vitro human skin permeation studies using Franz cells with Albumin-fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) absorbed on the nano-rods. Fluorescence and confocal studies on the skin samples showed FITC penetration through the skin along the channels formed by the nano-rods. Bradford protein assay on the collected fluid samples indicated a significant quantity of Albumin-FITC in the first 12 h. Low antibody titres were observed with immunisation on Balb/c mice with ovalbumin (OVA) antigen coated on the nano-rod chips. Nonetheless, due to the reduced dimensions of the nano-rods, our device offers the additional advantage of excluding the simultaneous entrance of microbial pathogens. Taken together, these results showed that ZnO nano-rods hold the potential for a safe, non-invasive, and painless intradermal drug delivery.

  18. Enhanced polarization, magnetic response and pronounced antibacterial activity of bismuth ferrite nanorods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biswas, Kunal [Department of Biotechnology, Maulana Abul Kalam Azad University of Technology, West Bengal, Kolkata-64 (India); De, Debashis, E-mail: dr.debashis.de@ieee.org [Department of Computer Science and Engineering, Maulana Abul Kalam Azad University of Technology, West Bengal, Kolkata-64 (India); Bandyopadhyay, Jaya [Department of Biotechnology, Maulana Abul Kalam Azad University of Technology, West Bengal, Kolkata-64 (India); Dutta, Nabanita; Rana, Subhasis; Sen, Pintu [Variable Energy Cyclotron Centre, 1/AF, Bidhan Nagar, Kolkata, 700 064 (India); Bandyopadhyay, Sujit Kumar, E-mail: drsujitkumar@gmail.com [Meghnad Saha Institute of Technology, Nazirabad Rd, Uchhepota, Kolkata, West Bengal, 700150 (India); Chakraborty, P.K. [Department of Physics, Burdwan University, Burdwan, 713104 (India)

    2017-07-01

    The present work reports on the physical and biophysical characterization of bismuth ferrite (BFO) nanorods fabricated on porous anodized alumina (AAO) templates. The diameter of the nanorods was quite large, which vary in the range of 20–100 nm. The BFO nanorods exhibited enhanced polarization and significant magnetic susceptibility. Moreover, an enhanced magnetoelectric coupling was evident from magnetocapacitance measurements, which exhibited a power law. Upon analyzing through optical, petri-plate and electron microscopy imaging, we observed that, the asymmetric structure of the nanorods gave rise to augmented antibacterial response against the chosen bacteria (Staphylococcus aureus). The x-ray photoelectron spectra (XPS) data have exhibited significant peak shifts upon interaction with bacterial cells owing to a change of Bi oxidation state from one to another. Thus potential redox reaction, which might take place at the material-bio interface, is ascertained for bacterial death. Apart from physical insights, understanding the interaction between the bacteria and the nanorods of BFO could pave the way in exploring the antibacterial potentiality of such anisotropic nanoscale systems. - Highlights: • AAO supported BiFeO3 (BFO) nanorods have been investigated. • The polarization of BFO nanorods was observed to be remarkably high (∼0.04 μC/cm{sup 2}). • Strong antibacterial activity of nanorods was witnessed against Staphylococcus aureus. • The deskinned area on cytoskeletal parts as revealed through TEM imaging, suggest strong cidal activity of the nanorods. • XPS data justifies shifting of the peak due to biophysical interaction at the interface releasing reactive oxygen species.

  19. Calculation of the thermal mode in semiconductor devices in conditions of their operation in semiconductor apparatuses

    OpenAIRE

    Сосков, Анатолій Георгійович; Глєбова, Марина Леонідівна; Сабалаєва, Наталія Олегівна; Форкун, Яна Борисівна

    2014-01-01

    The study of the temperature field of power semiconductor devices, operating in semiconductor apparatuses, either non-contact or hybrid was carried out in the paper.It was also shown that the main mode of the current load of power semiconductor devices, operating in semiconductor apparatuses is a pulse mode.Analytical method for calculating the values of the temperature rise in the structure of power semiconductor devices when subjected to a current pulse of arbitrary shape based on a model t...

  20. Transient photoconductivity in amorphous semiconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mpawenayo, P.

    1997-07-01

    Localized states in amorphous semiconductors are divided in disorder induced shallow trap levels and dangling bonds deep states. Dangling bonds are assumed here to be either neutral or charged and their energy distribution is a single gaussian. Here, it is shown analytically that transient photocurrent in amorphous semiconductors is fully controlled by charge carriers transitions between localized states for one part and tunneling hopping carriers on the other. Localized dangling bonds deep states act as non radiative recombination centres, while hopping tunnelling is assisted by the Coulomb interaction between defects sites. The half-width of defects distribution is the disorder parameter that determines the carrier hopping time between defects sites. The macroscopic time that explains the long decay response times observed will all types of amorphous semiconductors is duly thought to be temperature dependent. Basic equations developed by Longeaud and Kleider are solved for the general case of a semiconductor after photo-generation. It turns out that the transient photoconductivity decay has two components; one with short response times from carriers trap-release transitions between shallow levels and extended states and a hopping component made of inter-dependent exponentials whose time constants span in larger ranges depending on disorder. The photoconductivity hopping component appears as an additional term to be added to photocurrents derived from existing models. The results of the present study explain and complete the power law decay derived in the multiple trapping models developed 20 years ago only in the approximation of the short response time regime. The long response time regime is described by the hopping macroscopic time. The present model is verified for all samples of amorphous semiconductors known so far. Finally, it is proposed to improved the modulated photoconductivity calculation techniques by including the long-lasting hopping dark documents