WorldWideScience

Sample records for semiconductor defect clustering

  1. Defects in semiconductors

    CERN Document Server

    Romano, Lucia; Jagadish, Chennupati

    2015-01-01

    This volume, number 91 in the Semiconductor and Semimetals series, focuses on defects in semiconductors. Defects in semiconductors help to explain several phenomena, from diffusion to getter, and to draw theories on materials' behavior in response to electrical or mechanical fields. The volume includes chapters focusing specifically on electron and proton irradiation of silicon, point defects in zinc oxide and gallium nitride, ion implantation defects and shallow junctions in silicon and germanium, and much more. It will help support students and scientists in their experimental and theoret

  2. Defects in semiconductor nanostructures

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Impurities play a pivotal role in semiconductors. One part in a million of phosphorous in silicon alters the conductivity of the latter by several orders of magnitude. Indeed, the information age is possible only because of the unique role of shallow impurities in semiconductors. Although work in semiconductor nanostructures ...

  3. 2010 Defects in Semiconductors GRC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shengbai Zhang

    2011-01-06

    Continuing its tradition of excellence, this Gordon Conference will focus on research at the forefront of the field of defects in semiconductors. The conference will have a strong emphasis on the control of defects during growth and processing, as well as an emphasis on the development of novel defect detection methods and first-principles defect theories. Electronic, magnetic, and optical properties of bulk, thin film, and nanoscale semiconductors will be discussed in detail. In contrast to many conferences, which tend to focus on specific semiconductors, this conference will deal with point and extended defects in a broad range of electronic materials. This approach has proved to be extremely fruitful for advancing fundamental understanding in emerging materials such as wide-band-gap semiconductors, oxides, sp{sup 2} carbon based-materials, and photovoltaic/solar cell materials, and in understanding important defect phenomena such as doping bottleneck in nanostructures and the diffusion of defects and impurities. The program consists of about twenty invited talks and a number of contributed poster sessions. The emphasis should be on work which has yet to be published. The large amount of discussion time provides an ideal forum for dealing with topics that are new and/or controversial.

  4. Defects in semiconductor nanostructures

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    sizes were less than 100 Si atoms due to computational limitations. An interesting parallel is that current first principles calculations alluded to in §5 are size ham- pered for similar reasons. These 'defect molecule' calculations were probably the first studies in SN. We believe that a perusal of this 'ancient' scientific literature.

  5. Semiconductor Nanowires: Defects Update

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kavanagh, Karen L.

    2008-05-01

    Structural defects commonly observed in semiconducting nanowires by electron microscopy will be reviewed and their origins discussed. Their effects on electrical and optical properties will be illustrated with examples from GaSb, InAs, and ZnSe nanowires grown by MOCVD and MBE.

  6. Defects in semiconductor nanostructures

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    These studies covered a wide canvas: electronic levels, structural relax- ation, migration pathways, vibrational modes, frequencies etc. The largest cluster sizes were less than 100 Si atoms due to computational limitations. An interesting parallel is that current first principles calculations alluded to in §5 are size ham-.

  7. Defects in semiconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tilly, L.

    1993-04-01

    In this thesis, experimental results of the transition metals Ti, V, Nb, Mo, and W as impurity centres in silicon are presented. Transition metal doping was accomplished by ion implantation. Emphasis is put on energy level position, electrical and optical properties of the encountered defect levels. Junction space charge methods (JSCM) such as DLTS, photocapacitance and photocurrent techniques are employed. Three energy levels are found for the 3d-transition metals Ti(E c -0.06eV, E c -0.30eV, E v +0.26) and V(E c -0.21eV, E c -0,48e, E v +0.36eV), and for the 4d-element Nb(E c -0.29eV, E c -0.58eV, E v +0.163eV) in Silicon, whereas only one transition metal induced level is found for Mo(E v +0.30eV) and W(E v +0.38eV) respectively. Electrical and optical characteristics of Si 1-x Ge x ,0.7 7 cm -2 . The solvent Bi, used in the LPE-process, is found to be the dominant impurity element. Furthermore, liquid phase epitaxy of high purity In 0.53 Ga 0.57 As on InP, together with the properties of the Cu-induced acceptor in this material are examined. Free electron concentrations of n=5x10 14 cm -3 and electron Hall-mobilities of μ 77K = 44000 cm 2 /Vs are achieved. The energy level position of the Cu-acceptor is found to be E v +0.025eV. Photoluminescence and Hall-effect measurements, together with JSCM are the main characterization methods used. The band linups of In 0.53 Ga 0.47 As with GaAs and with InP are determined according to the Cu-acceptor energy level position in these materials. Additionally, the hydrostatic pressure dependence of the Cu-acceptor energy level position in In 0.53 Ga 0.47 As is examined. (103 refs.)

  8. Dopants and defects in semiconductors

    CERN Document Server

    McCluskey, Matthew D

    2012-01-01

    "The book goes beyond the usual textbook in that it provides more specific examples of real-world defect physics … The book will be most useful for beginning graduate students in materials science. … an easy reading, broad introductory overview of the field …"-Materials Today, July-August 2012"… well written, with clear, lucid explanations …"-Chemistry World"The scientific development towards the method of controllable doping transformed the erratic and not reproducible family of semiconductor materials into the truly wonderful basis of modern microelectronics. This book tells the remarkable success story and I recommend it!"-Hans J. Queisser, Max-Planck-Institute, Stuttgart, Germany"McCluskey and Haller have written an outstanding modern guide to this field that will be useful to newcomers, and also to active researchers who want to broaden their horizons, as a means to learn the capabilities and limitations of the many techniques that are used in semiconductor-defect science."-Professor Michael J....

  9. Charged Semiconductor Defects Structure, Thermodynamics and Diffusion

    CERN Document Server

    Seebauer, Edmund G

    2009-01-01

    The technologically useful properties of a solid often depend upon the types and concentrations of the defects it contains. Not surprisingly, defects in semiconductors have been studied for many years, in many cases with a view towards controlling their behavior through various forms of "defect engineering." For example, in the bulk, charging significantly affects the total concentration of defects that are available to mediate phenomena such as solid-state diffusion. Surface defects play an important role in mediating surface mass transport during high temperature processing steps such as epitaxial film deposition, diffusional smoothing in reflow, and nanostructure formation in memory device fabrication. Charged Semiconductor Defects details the current state of knowledge regarding the properties of the ionized defects that can affect the behavior of advanced transistors, photo-active devices, catalysts, and sensors. Features: Group IV, III-V, and oxide semiconductors; Intrinsic and extrinsic defects; and, P...

  10. Multiple-scattering-cluster model of covalent semiconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leite, J.R.

    1983-01-01

    A review is presented of the multiple-scattering-cluster model proposed to study the electronic structure of defects and impurities in semiconductors. Applications of this method are discussed and results for the A center in silicon are shown. Recent results obtained for complex defects in silicon are also presented. The advantage of using a localized description of the electronic structure of solids instead of the conventional band structure description is emphasized. The promising agreement with experimental results leads to the conclusion that the cluster model discussed in this paper is a suitable technique for studying the electronic structure of locally perturbed semiconductors. Perspectives for future work are also analysed. (Author) [pt

  11. Identification of defects in semiconductors

    CERN Document Server

    Stavola, Michael; Weber, Eicke R; Stavola, Michael

    1998-01-01

    Since its inception in 1966, the series of numbered volumes known as Semiconductors and Semimetals has distinguished itself through the careful selection of well-known authors, editors, and contributors.The"Willardson and Beer"Series, as it is widely known, has succeeded in publishing numerous landmark volumes and chapters. Not only did many of these volumes make an impact at the time of their publication, but they continue to be well-cited years after their original release. Recently, Professor Eicke R. Weber of the University of California at Berkeley joined as a co-editor of the series. Professor Weber, a well-known expert in the field of semiconductor materials, will further contribute to continuing the series' tradition of publishing timely, highly relevant, and long-impacting volumes. Some of the recent volumes, such as Hydrogen in Semiconductors, Imperfections in III/V Materials, Epitaxial Microstructures, High-Speed Heterostructure Devices,Oxygen in Silicon, and others promise indeed that this traditi...

  12. Point defects in group IV semiconductors

    CERN Document Server

    Pizzini, S

    2017-01-01

    Aim of this book is to focus on the properties of defects in semiconductors of the fourth group under a physico-chemical approach, capable to demonstrate whether the full acknowledgement of their chemical nature could account for several problems encountered in practice or would suggest further experimental or theoretical accomplishments.

  13. Semiconductor color-center structure and excitation spectra: Equation-of-motion coupled-cluster description of vacancy and transition-metal defect photoluminescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lutz, Jesse J.; Duan, Xiaofeng F.; Burggraf, Larry W.

    2018-03-01

    Valence excitation spectra are computed for deep-center silicon-vacancy defects in 3C, 4H, and 6H silicon carbide (SiC), and comparisons are made with literature photoluminescence measurements. Optimizations of nuclear geometries surrounding the defect centers are performed within a Gaussian basis-set framework using many-body perturbation theory or density functional theory (DFT) methods, with computational expenses minimized by a QM/MM technique called SIMOMM. Vertical excitation energies are subsequently obtained by applying excitation-energy, electron-attached, and ionized equation-of-motion coupled-cluster (EOMCC) methods, where appropriate, as well as time-dependent (TD) DFT, to small models including only a few atoms adjacent to the defect center. We consider the relative quality of various EOMCC and TD-DFT methods for (i) energy-ordering potential ground states differing incrementally in charge and multiplicity, (ii) accurately reproducing experimentally measured photoluminescence peaks, and (iii) energy-ordering defects of different types occurring within a given polytype. The extensibility of this approach to transition-metal defects is also tested by applying it to silicon-substituted chromium defects in SiC and comparing with measurements. It is demonstrated that, when used in conjunction with SIMOMM-optimized geometries, EOMCC-based methods can provide a reliable prediction of the ground-state charge and multiplicity, while also giving a quantitative description of the photoluminescence spectra, accurate to within 0.1 eV of measurement for all cases considered.

  14. Defects and diffusion in semiconductors XIV

    CERN Document Server

    Fisher, David J

    2012-01-01

    This 14th volume in the series covers the latest results in the field of Defects and Diffusion in Semiconductor. The issue also includes some original papers: An Experimental Study of the Thermal Properties of Modified 9Cr-1Mo Steel; Physico-Mechanical Properties of Sintered Iron-Silica Sand Nanoparticle Composites: A Preliminary Study; Defect and Dislocation Density Parameters of 5251 Al Alloy Using Positron Annihilation Lifetime Technique; A Novel Computational Strategy to Enhance the Ability of Elaborate Search by Entire Swarm to Find the Best Solution in Optimization of AMCs; Synthesis and

  15. Electronic structure of point defects in semiconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruneval, Fabien

    2014-01-01

    This 'Habilitation a diriger des Recherches' memoir presents most of my scientific activities during the past 7 years, in the field of electronic structure calculations of defects in solids. Point defects (vacancies, interstitials, impurities) in functional materials are a key parameter to determine if these materials will actually fill the role they have been assigned or not. Indeed, the presence of defects cannot be avoided when the temperature is increased or when the material is subjected to external stresses, such as irradiation in the nuclear reactors and in artificial satellites with solar radiations. However, in many cases, defects are introduced in the materials on purpose to tune the electronic transport, optical or even magnetic properties. This procedure is called the doping of semiconductors, which is the foundation technique for transistors, diodes, or photovoltaic cells. However, doping is not always straightforward and unexpected features may occur, such as doping asymmetry or Fermi level pinning, which can only be explained by complex phenomena involving different types of defects or complexes of defects. In this context, the calculations of electronic structure ab initio is an ideal tool to complement the experimental observations, to gain the understanding of phenomena at the atomic level, and even to predict the properties of defects. The power of the ab initio calculations comes from their ability to describe any system of electrons and nuclei without any specific adjustment. But although there is a strong need for numerical simulations in this field, the ab initio calculations for defects are still under development as of today. The work presented in this memoir summarizes my contributions to methodological developments on this subject. These developments have followed two main tracks. The first topic is the better understanding of the unavoidable finite size effects. Indeed, defects in semiconductors or insulators are generally present in

  16. Electronic structure of defects in semiconductor heterojunctions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haussy, Bernard; Ganghoffer, Jean Francois

    2002-01-01

    Full text.heterojunctions and semiconductors and superlattices are well known and well used by people interested in optoelectronics communications. Components based on the use of heterojunctions are interesting for confinement of light and increase of quantum efficiency. An heterojunction is the contact zone between two different semiconductors, for example GaAs and Ga 1-x Al x As. Superlattices are a succession of heterojunctions (up to 10 or 20). These systems have been the subjects of many experiments ao analyse the contact between semiconductors. They also have been theoretically studied by different types of approach. The main result of those studies is the prediciton of band discontinuities. Defects in heterojunctions are real traps for charge carriers; they can affect the efficiency of the component decreasing the currents and the fluxes in it. the knowledge of their electronic structure is important, a great density of defects deeply modifies the electronic structure of the whole material creating real new bands of energy in the band structure of the component. in the first part of this work, we will describe the heterostructure and the defect in terms of quantum wells and discrete levels. This approach allows us to show the role of the width of the quantum well describing the structure but induces specific behaviours due to the one dimensional modelling. Then a perturbative treatment is proposed using the Green's functions formalism. We build atomic chains with different types of atoms featuring the heterostructure and the defect. Densities of states of a structure with a defect and levels associated to the defect are obtained. Results are comparable with the free electrons work, but the modelling do not induce problems due to a one dimensional approach. To extend our modelling, a three dimensions approach, based on a cavity model, is investigated. The influence of the defect, - of hydrogenoid type - introduced in the structure, is described by a cavity

  17. Fermi level dependent native defect formation: Consequences for metal-semiconductor and semiconductor-semiconductor interfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walukiewicz, W.

    1988-02-01

    The amphoteric native defect model of the Schottky barrier formation is used to analyze the Fermi level pinning at metal/semiconductor interfaces for submonolayer metal coverages. It is assumed that the energy required for defect generation is released in the process of surface back-relaxation. Model calculations for metal/GaAs interfaces show a weak dependence of the Fermi level pinning on the thickness of metal deposited at room temperature. This weak dependence indicates a strong dependence of the defect formation energy on the Fermi level, a unique feature of amphoteric native defects. This result is in very good agreement with experimental data. It is shown that a very distinct asymmetry in the Fermi level pinning on p- and n-type GaAs observed at liquid nitrogen temperatures can be understood in terms of much different recombination rates for amphoteric native defects in those two types of materials. Also, it is demonstrated that the Fermi level stabilization energy, a central concept of the amphoteric defect system, plays a fundamental role in other phenomena in semiconductors such as semiconductor/semiconductor heterointerface intermixing and saturation of free carrier concentration. 33 refs., 6 figs

  18. A review of defects and disorder in multinary tetrahedrally bonded semiconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baranowski, Lauryn L.; Zawadzki, Pawel; Lany, Stephan; Toberer, Eric S.; Zakutayev, Andriy

    2016-12-01

    Defects are critical to understanding the electronic properties of semiconducting compounds, for applications such as light-emitting diodes, transistors, photovoltaics, and thermoelectrics. In this review, we describe our work investigating defects in tetrahedrally bonded, multinary semiconductors, and discuss the place of our research within the context of publications by other groups. We applied experimental and theory techniques to understand point defects, structural disorder, and extended antisite defects in one semiconductor of interest for photovoltaic applications, Cu2SnS3. We contrast our findings on Cu2SnS3 with other chemically related Cu-Sn-S compounds, as well as structurally related compounds such as Cu2ZnSnS4 and Cu(In,Ga)Se2. We find that evaluation of point defects alone is not sufficient to understand defect behavior in multinary tetrahedrally bonded semiconductors. In the case of Cu2SnS3 and Cu2ZnSnS4, structural disorder and entropy-driven cation clustering can result in nanoscale compositional inhomogeneities which detrimentally impact the electronic transport. Therefore, it is not sufficient to assess only the point defect behavior of new multinary tetrahedrally bonded compounds; effects such as structural disorder and extended antisite defects must also be considered. Overall, this review provides a framework for evaluating tetrahedrally bonded semiconducting compounds with respect to their defect behavior for photovoltaic and other applications, and suggests new materials that may not be as prone to such imperfections.

  19. Defects and diffusion in semiconductors XII

    CERN Document Server

    Fisher, David J

    2010-01-01

    This twelfth volume in the series covering the latest results in the field includes abstracts of papers which have appeared since the publication of Annual Retrospective XI (Volume 282). As well as the 565 semiconductor-related abstracts, the issue includes - in line with the policy of including original papers on all of the major material groups: ""Study of Conduction Mechanism in Amorphous Se85-xTe15Bix Thin Films"" (A.Sharma and P.B.Barman), ""Structure and Optical Properties of Magnetron-Sputtered SiOx Layers with Silicon Nanoparticles"" (L.Khomenkova, N.Korsunska, T.Stara, Y.Goldstein, J.

  20. Determination of defect content and defect profile in semiconductor heterostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zubiaga, A [Laboratory of Physics, HUT, PO Box 1100, 02015 TKK, Espoo (Finland); Garcia, J A; Plazaola, F [Zientzia eta Teknologia Fakultatea, Euskal Herriko Unbertsitatea, P. K. 644, 48080, Bilbao (Spain); Zuniga-Perez, J; Munoz-Sanjose, V, E-mail: fernando.plazaola@ehu.es [Universitat de Valencia, Departamento de Fisica Aplicada i Electromagnetisme, Dr. Moliner 50, 46100 Burjassot, Valencia (Spain)

    2011-01-10

    In this article we present an overview of the technique to obtain the defects depth profile and width of a deposited layer and multilayer based on positron annihilation spectroscopy. In particular we apply the method to ZnO and ZnO/ZnCdO layers deposited on sapphire substrates. After introducing some terminology we first calculate the trend that the W/S parameters of the Doppler broadening measurements must follow, both in a qualitative and quantitative way. From this point we extend the results to calculate the width and defect profiles in deposited layer samples.

  1. Diffusive, Structural, Optical, and Electrical Properties of Defects in Semiconductors

    CERN Multimedia

    Wagner, F E

    2002-01-01

    Electronic properties of semiconductors are extremely sensitive to defects and impurities that have localized electronic states with energy levels in the band gap of the semiconductor. Spectroscopic techniques like photoluminescence (PL), deep level transient spectroscopy (DLTS), or Hall effect, that are able to detect and characterize band gap states do not reveal direct information about their microscopic origin. To overcome this chemical "blindness", the present approach is to use radioactive isotopes as a tracer. Moreover, the recoil energies involved in $\\beta$ and $\\gamma$-decays can be used to create intrinsic isolated point defects (interstitials, vacancies) in a controlled way. A microscopic insight into the structure and the thermodynamic properties of complexes formed by interacting defects can be gained by detecting the hyperfine interaction between the nuclear moments of radioactive dopants and the electromagnetic fields present at the site of the radioactive nucleus. The understanding and the co...

  2. Evolution of defect cluster distributions during irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiedersich, H.

    1991-05-01

    Defects produced by irradiation are often strongly spatially correlated. Energetic primary recoil atoms produce cascades with vacant lattice sites predominantly in the central regions, and interstitial atoms at the periphery. A fraction of the defects produced form clusters during cascade events. Because of their spatial distribution more mobile interstitial atoms than vacancies are released into the matrix following the cascade events. Populations of vacancy and interstitial clusters evolve towards quasi-steady-state distributions. As long as vacancy clusters are thermally moderately stable, i.e., at temperatures below rapid self diffusion, an excess interstitial flux persists in the matrix; as a consequence, vacancy clusters formed in cascades shrink, and interstitial clusters grow. We examine the evolution of these cluster distributions, and their effects on sink strength and radiation-enhanced diffusion, as function of dose for irradiations at moderate temperatures. At temperatures at which thermal evaporation from vacancy clusters, can be neglected, the evolution of the cluster densities is characteristic of the primary recoil spectrum, but is independent of temperature or dose rate. The sink strength, radiation-enhanced diffusion, as well as other consequences of the evolving distributions such as the imbalance of the interstitial and vacancy fluxes in the matrix, approach slowly-changing quasi-steady-state values in a fraction of one displacement per atom, although certain details of the cluster distributions, e.g., the development of large interstitial loops, require several dpa's to approach steady state values. 22 refs., 6 figs

  3. Defect characteristics by boron cluster ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aoki, Takaaki; Matsuo, Jiro; Takaoka, Gikan; Toyoda, Noriaki; Yamada, Isao

    2003-01-01

    Cluster ion implantation using decaborane (B 10 H 14 ) has been proposed as a shallow implantation technique for LSI devices with gate lengths of several-tens nanometers. Experiments and computer simulations of low-energy boron monomers and decaborane clusters implantation were performed. Molecular dynamics simulations of B 10 cluster implantation have shown similar implant depth but different damage density and damage structure compared to monomer (B 1 ) ion implantation with the same energy-per-atom. For monomer implantation, point-defects such as vacancy-interstitial pairs are mainly formed. On the other hand, B 10 generates large numbers of defects within a highly-amorphised region at the impact location. This difference in damage structure produced during implantation is expected to cause different annihilation processes

  4. Photoluminescence as a tool for characterizing point defects in semiconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reshchikov, Michael

    2012-02-01

    Photoluminescence is one of the most powerful tools used to study optically-active point defects in semiconductors, especially in wide-bandgap materials. Gallium nitride (GaN) and zinc oxide (ZnO) have attracted considerable attention in the last two decades due to their prospects in optoelectronics applications, including blue and ultraviolet light-emitting devices. However, in spite of many years of extensive studies and a great number of publications on photoluminescence from GaN and ZnO, only a few defect-related luminescence bands are reliably identified. Among them are the Zn-related blue band in GaN, Cu-related green band and Li-related orange band in ZnO. Numerous suggestions for the identification of other luminescence bands, such as the yellow band in GaN, or green and yellow bands in ZnO, do not stand up under scrutiny. In these conditions, it is important to classify the defect-related luminescence bands and find their unique characteristics. In this presentation, we will review the origin of the major luminescence bands in GaN and ZnO. Through simulations of the temperature and excitation intensity dependences of photoluminescence and by employing phenomenological models we are able to obtain important characteristics of point defects such as carrier capture cross-sections for defects, concentrations of defects, and their charge states. These models are also used to find the absolute internal quantum efficiency of photoluminescence and obtain information about nonradiative defects. Results from photoluminescence measurements will be compared with results of the first-principle calculations, as well as with the experimental data obtained by other techniques such as positron annihilation spectroscopy, deep-level transient spectroscopy, and secondary ion mass spectrometry.

  5. Compact Models for Defect Diffusivity in Semiconductor Alloys.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wright, Alan F. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Nanostructure Physics Department; Modine, Normand A. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Nanostructure Physics Department; Lee, Stephen R. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Advanced Materials Sciences Department; Foiles, Stephen M. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Computational Materials and Data Science Department

    2017-09-01

    Predicting transient effects caused by short - pulse neutron irradiation of electronic devices is an important part of Sandia's mission. For example , predicting the diffusion of radiation - induced point defects is needed with in Sandia's Qualification Alternative to the Sandia Pulsed Reactor (QASPR) pro gram since defect diffusion mediates transient gain recovery in QASPR electronic devices. Recently, the semiconductors used to fabricate radiation - hard electronic devices have begun to shift from silicon to III - V compounds such as GaAs, InAs , GaP and InP . An advantage of this shift is that it allows engineers to optimize the radiation hardness of electronic devices by using alloy s such as InGaAs and InGaP . However, the computer codes currently being used to simulate transient radiation effects in QASP R devices will need to be modified since they presume that defect properties (charge states, energy levels, and diffusivities) in these alloys do not change with time. This is not realistic since the energy and properties of a defect depend on the types of atoms near it and , therefore, on its location in the alloy. In particular, radiation - induced defects are created at nearly random locations in an alloy and the distribution of their local environments - and thus their energies and properties - evolves with time as the defects diffuse through the alloy . To incorporate these consequential effects into computer codes used to simulate transient radiation effects, we have developed procedures to accurately compute the time dependence of defect energies and properties and then formulate them within compact models that can be employed in these computer codes. In this document, we demonstrate these procedures for the case of the highly mobile P interstitial (I P ) in an InGaP alloy. Further dissemination only as authorized to U.S. Government agencies and their contractors; other requests shall be approved by the originating facility or higher DOE

  6. 2012 Gordon Research Conference on Defects in Semiconductors - Formal Schedule and Speaker/Poster Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glaser, Evan [Naval Research Lab. (NRL), Washington, DC (United States)

    2012-08-17

    The meeting shall strive to develop and further the fundamental understanding of defects and their roles in the structural, electronic, optical, and magnetic properties of bulk, thin film, and nanoscale semiconductors and device structures. Point and extended defects will be addressed in a broad range of electronic materials of particular current interest, including wide bandgap semiconductors, metal-oxides, carbon-based semiconductors (e.g., diamond, graphene, etc.), organic semiconductors, photovoltaic/solar cell materials, and others of similar interest. This interest includes novel defect detection/imaging techniques and advanced defect computational methods.

  7. Evolutionary fuzzy ARTMAP neural networks for classification of semiconductor defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Shing Chiang; Watada, Junzo; Ibrahim, Zuwairie; Khalid, Marzuki

    2015-05-01

    Wafer defect detection using an intelligent system is an approach of quality improvement in semiconductor manufacturing that aims to enhance its process stability, increase production capacity, and improve yields. Occasionally, only few records that indicate defective units are available and they are classified as a minority group in a large database. Such a situation leads to an imbalanced data set problem, wherein it engenders a great challenge to deal with by applying machine-learning techniques for obtaining effective solution. In addition, the database may comprise overlapping samples of different classes. This paper introduces two models of evolutionary fuzzy ARTMAP (FAM) neural networks to deal with the imbalanced data set problems in a semiconductor manufacturing operations. In particular, both the FAM models and hybrid genetic algorithms are integrated in the proposed evolutionary artificial neural networks (EANNs) to classify an imbalanced data set. In addition, one of the proposed EANNs incorporates a facility to learn overlapping samples of different classes from the imbalanced data environment. The classification results of the proposed evolutionary FAM neural networks are presented, compared, and analyzed using several classification metrics. The outcomes positively indicate the effectiveness of the proposed networks in handling classification problems with imbalanced data sets.

  8. Ion channeling study of defects in multicomponent semiconductor compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turos, A.; Nowicki, L.; Stonert, A.

    2002-01-01

    Compound semiconductor crystals are of great technological importance as basic materials for production of modern opto- and microelectronic devices. Ion implantation is one of the principal techniques for heterostructures processing. This paper reports the results of the study of defect formation and transformation in binary and ternary semiconductor compounds subjected to ion implantation with ions of different mass and energy. The principal analytical technique was He-ion channeling. The following materials were studied: GaN and InGaN epitaxial layers. First the semi empirical method of channeling spectra analysis for ion implanted multicomponent single crystal was developed. This method was later complemented by the more sophisticated method based on the Monte Carlo simulation of channeling spectra. Next, the damage buildup in different crystals and epitaxial layers as a function of the implantation dose was studied for N, Mg, Te, and Kr ions. The influence of the substrate temperature on the defect transformations was studied for GaN epitaxial layers implanted with Mg ions. Special attention was devoted to the study of growth conditions of InGaN/GaN/sapphire heterostructures, which are important component of the future blue laser diodes. In-atom segregation and tetragonal distortion of the epitaxial layer were observed and characterized. Next problem studied was the incorporation of hydrogen atoms in GaAs and GaN. Elastic recoil detection (ERDA) and nuclear reaction analysis (NRA) were applied for the purpose. (author)

  9. Native defects in oxide semiconductors: a density functional approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oba, Fumiyasu; Choi, Minseok; Togo, Atsushi; Seko, Atsuto; Tanaka, Isao

    2010-09-29

    We report a semilocal and hybrid Hartree-Fock density functional study of native defects in three oxide semiconductors: ZnO, SrTiO(3), and SnO. The defect that is responsible for the n-type conductivity of ZnO has been debated, in which the O vacancy, Zn interstitial, their complexes, and residual H impurity are considered candidates. Our results indicate that the O vacancy induces a deep and localized in-gap state, whereas the Zn interstitial is a shallow donor and hence can be a source of the carriers. In view of the formation energies, the O vacancy is likely to form with a substantial concentration under O-poor conditions, but the Zn interstitial is unlikely. We thus propose that the O vacancy is relevant to the nonstoichiometry of ZnO and that a source other than the native defects, such as the H impurity, needs to be considered for the n-type conductivity. For SrTiO(3), the O vacancy and its complexes have been regarded as the origins of some of the remarkable electrical and optical properties. We suggest significant roles of the Ti antisite for a new insight into the defect-induced properties. Two types of Ti antisite, both of which are off-centered from the Sr site but toward different directions, exhibit low formation energies under Ti-rich conditions as does the O vacancy. They can explain optical properties such as visible-light emission, deep-level absorption, and the ferroelectricity observed in reduced SrTiO(3). As an example of p-type conductors, SnO has been investigated with a focus on the acceptor-like native defects. Under O-rich conditions, the Sn vacancy and O interstitial are found to be energetically favorable. The Sn vacancy induces shallow acceptor levels and can therefore be a source of carriers. The O interstitial shows no in-gap levels and hence it is inactive in terms of the carrier generation and compensation. However, this defect is a key to the understanding of the structures of intermediate compounds between SnO and SnO(2).

  10. Implementation of density functional embedding theory within the projector-augmented-wave method and applications to semiconductor defect states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, Kuang; Libisch, Florian; Carter, Emily A.

    2015-01-01

    We report a new implementation of the density functional embedding theory (DFET) in the VASP code, using the projector-augmented-wave (PAW) formalism. Newly developed algorithms allow us to efficiently perform optimized effective potential optimizations within PAW. The new algorithm generates robust and physically correct embedding potentials, as we verified using several test systems including a covalently bound molecule, a metal surface, and bulk semiconductors. We show that with the resulting embedding potential, embedded cluster models can reproduce the electronic structure of point defects in bulk semiconductors, thereby demonstrating the validity of DFET in semiconductors for the first time. Compared to our previous version, the new implementation of DFET within VASP affords use of all features of VASP (e.g., a systematic PAW library, a wide selection of functionals, a more flexible choice of U correction formalisms, and faster computational speed) with DFET. Furthermore, our results are fairly robust with respect to both plane-wave and Gaussian type orbital basis sets in the embedded cluster calculations. This suggests that the density functional embedding method is potentially an accurate and efficient way to study properties of isolated defects in semiconductors

  11. Defect clustering in concentrated alloys during irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hashimoto, T.; Shigenaka, N.; Fuse, M.

    1992-01-01

    A rate theory based model is presented to investigate the kinetics of interstitial clustering processes in a face-centered cubic (fcc) binary alloy containing A- and B-atoms. Three types of interstitial dumbbells, AA-, BB- and AB-type dumbbells, are considered. Conversions between these interstitial dumbbells are explicitly introduced into the formulation, based on the consideration of dumbbell configurations and movements. A di- interstitial is assumed to be the nucleus of a dislocation loop. Reactions of point defect production by irradiation, mutual recombination of an interstitial and a vacancy, dislocation loop nucleation and their growth are included in the model. Parameter values are chosen based on the atom size of the alloy elements, and dislocation loop formation kinetics are investigated while varying alloy compositions. Two different types of kinetics are obtained in accordance with the dominant loop nucleus types. Conversions between interstitial dumbbells are important in the determination of the interstitial dumbbell concentration ratios, of the dominant nucleus types, and consequently, the loop formation kinetics. Dislocation loop concentration decreases with increasing undersized atom content, but dose rate and temperature dependence of loop concentration are insensitive to alloy compositions. (author)

  12. Topological defect clustering and plastic deformation mechanisms in functionalized graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunes, Ricardo; Araujo, Joice; Chacham, Helio

    2011-03-01

    We present ab initio results suggesting that strain plays a central role in the clustering of topological defects in strained and functionalized graphene models. We apply strain onto the topological-defect graphene networks from our previous work, and obtain topological-defect clustering patterns which are in excellent agreement with recent observations in samples of reduced graphene oxide. In our models, the graphene layer, containing an initial concentration of isolated topological defects, is covered by hydrogen or hydroxyl groups. Our results also suggest a rich variety of plastic deformation mechanism in functionalized graphene systems. We acknowledge support from the Brazilian agencies: CNPq, Fapemig, and INCT-Materiais de Carbono.

  13. The spatial evaluation of neighborhood clusters of birth defects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frisch, J.D.

    1990-04-16

    Spatial statistics have recently been applied in epidemiology to evaluate clusters of cancer and birth defects. Their use requires a comparison population, drawn from the population at risk for disease, that may not always be readily available. In this dissertation the plausibility of using data on all birth defects, available from birth defects registries, as a surrogate for the spatial distribution of all live births in the analysis of clusters is assessed. Three spatial statistics that have been applied in epidemiologic investigations of clusters, nearest neighbor distance, average interpoint distance, and average distance to a fixed point, were evaluated by computer simulation for their properties in a unit square, and in a zip code region. Comparison of spatial distributions of live births and birth defects was performed by drawing samples of live births and birth defects from Santa Clara County, determining the street address at birth, geocoding this address and evaluating the resultant maps using various statistical techniques. The proposed method was then demonstrated on a previously confirmed cluster of oral cleft cases. All live births for the neighborhood were geocoded, as were all birth defects. Evaluation of this cluster using the nearest neighbor and average interpoint distance statistics was performed using randomization techniques with both the live births population and the birth defect population as comparison groups. 113 refs., 36 figs., 16 tabs.

  14. The semiconductor doping with radiation defects via proton and alpha-particle irradiation. Review

    CERN Document Server

    Kozlov, V A

    2001-01-01

    Paper presents an analytical review devoted to semiconductor doping with radiation defects resulted from irradiation by light ions, in particular, by protons and alpha-particles. One studies formation of radiation defects in silicon, gallium arsenide and indium phosphide under light ion irradiation. One analyzes effect of proton and alpha-particle irradiation on electric conductivity of the above-listed semiconducting materials. Semiconductor doping with radiation defects under light ion irradiation enables to control their electrophysical properties and to design high-speed opto-, micro- and nanoelectronic devices on their basis

  15. Implications of defect clusters formed in cascades on free defect generation and microstructural development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiedersich, H.

    1992-12-01

    A large fraction of the defects produced by irradiation with energetic neutrons or heavy ions originates in cascades. Not only increased recombination of vacancy and interstitial defects but also significant clustering of like defects occur. Both processes reduce the number of point defects available for long range migration. Consequences of defect clustering in cascades will be discussed in a semi-quantitative form with the aid of calculations using a very simplified model: Quasi-steady-state distributions of immobile vacancy and/or interstitial clusters develop which, in turn, can become significant sinks for mobile defects, and, therefore reduce their lifetime. Although cluster sinks will cause segregation and, potentially, precipitation of second phases due to local changes of composition, the finite lifetime of clusters will not lead to lasting, local compositional changes. A transition from highly dense interstitial and vacancy cluster distributions to the void swelling regime occurs when the thermal evaporation of vacancies from small vacancy clusters becomes significant at higher temperatures. Unequal clustering of vacancies and interstitials leads to an imbalance of their fluxes of in the matrix and, hence, to unequal contributions to atom transport by interstitials and by vacancies even in the quasi-steady state approximation

  16. Physical limitations of semiconductor devices defects, reliability and esd protection

    CERN Document Server

    Vashchenko, V A

    2008-01-01

    Provides an important link between the theoretical knowledge in the field of non-linier physics and practical application problems in microelectronics. This title focuses on power semiconductor devices and self-triggering pulsed power devices for ESD protection clamps.

  17. Self-regulation of charged defect compensation and formation energy pinning in semiconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ji-Hui; Yin, Wan-Jian; Park, Ji-Sang; Wei, Su-Huai

    2015-11-01

    Current theoretical analyses of defect properties without solving the detailed balance equations often estimate Fermi-level pinning position by omitting free carriers and assume defect concentrations can be always tuned by atomic chemical potentials. This could be misleading in some circumstance. Here we clarify that: (1) Because the Fermi-level pinning is determined not only by defect states but also by free carriers from band-edge states, band-edge states should be treated explicitly in the same footing as the defect states in practice; (2) defect formation energy, thus defect density, could be pinned and independent on atomic chemical potentials due to the entanglement of atomic chemical potentials and Fermi energy, in contrast to the usual expectation that defect formation energy can always be tuned by varying the atomic chemical potentials; and (3) the charged defect compensation behavior, i.e., most of donors are compensated by acceptors or vice versa, is self-regulated when defect formation energies are pinned. The last two phenomena are more dominant in wide-gap semiconductors or when the defect formation energies are small. Using NaCl and CH3NH3PbI3 as examples, we illustrate these unexpected behaviors. Our analysis thus provides new insights that enrich the understanding of the defect physics in semiconductors and insulators.

  18. Effect of disorder and defects in ion-implanted semiconductors optical and photothermal characterization

    CERN Document Server

    Willardson, R K; Christofides, Constantinos; Ghibaudo, Gerard

    1997-01-01

    Defects in ion-implanted semiconductors are important and will likely gain increased importance as annealing temperatures are reduced with successive IC generations. Novel implant approaches, such as MdV implantation, create new types of defects whose origin and annealing characteristics will need to be addressed. Publications in this field mainly focus on the effects of ion implantation on the material and the modification in the implanted layer after high temperature annealing. The editors of this volume and Volume 45 focus on the physics of the annealing kinetics of the damaged layer. An overview of characterization tehniques and a critical comparison of the information on annealing kinetics is also presented. Key Features * Provides basic knowledge of ion implantation-induced defects * Focuses on physical mechanisms of defect annealing * Utilizes electrical, physical, and optical characterization tools for processed semiconductors * Provides the basis for understanding the problems caused by the defects g...

  19. Ordered structures of defect clusters in gadolinium-doped ceria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhi-Peng; Mori, Toshiyuki; Ye, Fei; Ou, Dingrong; Zou, Jin; Drennan, John

    2011-06-01

    The nano-domain, with short-range ordered structure, has been widely observed in rare-earth-doped ceria. Atomistic simulation has been employed to investigate the ordering structure of the nano-domain, as a result of aggregation and segregation of dopant cations and the associated oxygen vacancies in gadolinium-doped ceria. It is found that the binding energy of defect cluster increases as a function of cluster size, which provides the intrinsic driving force for the defect cluster growth. However, the ordered structures of the defect clusters are different from the chain model as previously reported. Adjacent oxygen vacancies prefer to locate along /2 lattice vector, which results in a unique stable structure (isosceles triangle) formation. Such isosceles triangle structure can act as the smallest unit of cluster growth to form a symmetric dumbbell structure. This unique dumbbell structure is hence considered as a building block for the development of larger defect clusters, leading to nano-domain formation in rare-earth-doped ceria.

  20. Analysis of the defect clusters in congruent lithium tantalate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vyalikh, Anastasia; Zschornak, Matthias; Köhler, Thomas; Nentwich, Melanie; Weigel, Tina; Hanzig, Juliane; Zaripov, Ruslan; Vavilova, Evgenia; Gemming, Sibylle; Brendler, Erica; Meyer, Dirk C.

    2018-01-01

    A wide range of technological applications of lithium tantalate (LT) is closely related to the defect chemistry. In literature, several intrinsic defect models have been proposed. Here, using a combinational approach based on DFT and solid-state NMR, we demonstrate that distribution of electric field gradients (EFGs) can be employed as a fingerprint of a specific defect configuration. Analyzing the distribution of 7Li EFGs, the FT-IR and electron spin resonance (ESR) spectra, and the 7Li spin-lattice relaxation behavior, we have found that the congruent LT samples provided by two manufacturers show rather different defect concentrations and distributions although both were grown by the Czochralski method. After thermal treatment hydrogen out-diffusion and homogeneous distribution of other defects have been observed by ESR, NMR, and FT-IR. The defect structure in one of two congruent LT crystals after annealing has been identified and proved by defect formation energy considerations, whereas the more complex defect configuration, including the presence of extrinsic defects, has been suggested for the other LT sample. The approach of searching the EFG fingerprints from DFT calculations in NMR spectra can be applied for identifying the defect clusters in other complex oxides.

  1. Structural defects in cubic semiconductors characterized by aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arroyo Rojas Dasilva, Yadira; Kozak, Roksolana; Erni, Rolf; Rossell, Marta D

    2017-05-01

    The development of new electro-optical devices and the realization of novel types of transistors require a profound understanding of the structural characteristics of new semiconductor heterostructures. This article provides a concise review about structural defects which occur in semiconductor heterostructures on the basis of micro-patterned Si substrates. In particular, one- and two-dimensional crystal defects are being discussed which are due to the plastic relaxation of epitaxial strain caused by the misfit of crystal lattices. Besides a few selected examples from literature, we treat in particular crystal defects occurring in GaAs/Si, Ge/Si and β-SiC/Si structures which are studied by high-resolution annular dark-field scanning transmission electron microscopy. The relevance of this article is twofold; firstly, it should provide a collection of data which are of help for the identification and characterization of defects in cubic semiconductors by means of atomic-resolution imaging, and secondly, the experimental data shall provide a basis for advancing the understanding of device characteristics with the aid of theoretical modelling by considering the defective nature of strained semiconductor heterostructures. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Discrimination of defects in III-V semiconductors by positron lifetime distribution

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Z Q; Wang, S J

    2000-01-01

    In this paper, the numerical Laplace inversion technique and maximum entropy method are utilized to extract continuous positron lifetime distribution in semiconductors. The result is used to discriminate the native vacancy-type defects in as-grown GaAs and In P with different conduction type. Direct evidence of shallow positron traps were also observed in ion-implanted p-In P. It is demonstrated that the lifetime distribution can give us more detailed information on the native defects.

  3. Clustering of cosmological defects at the time of formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leese, R.; Prokopec, T.

    1991-01-01

    A simple model for the formation of global monopoles is considered. It is shown that they naturally form in clusters, with monopoles adjacent to antimonopoles, and vice-versa. The strong attraction between pole and antipole causes the clusters to collapse very rapidly, leading to the annihilation of most (62% in our model) of the original defects within a time τ, where τ is of the order of the correlation length. (orig.)

  4. Defects and diffusion in semiconductors XIII an annual retrospective

    CERN Document Server

    Fisher, D J

    2011-01-01

    This thirteenth volume in the series covering the latest results in the field includes abstracts of papers which have appeared since the publication of Annual Retrospective XII (Volumes 303-304). As well as the over 300 semiconductor-related abstracts, the issue includes the original papers: ""Effect of KCl Addition upon the Photocatalytic Activity of Zinc Sulphide"" (D.Vaya, A.Jain, S.Lodha, V.K.Sharma, S.C.Ameta), ""Localized Vibrational Mode in Manganese-Doped Zinc Sulphide and Cadmium Sulphide Nanoparticles"" (M.Ragam, N.Sankar, K.Ramachandran), ""The Effect of a Light Impurity on the Elec

  5. Tutorial: Novel properties of defects in semiconductors revealed by their vibrational spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stavola, Michael; Fowler, W. Beall

    2018-04-01

    This is an introductory survey of the vibrational spectroscopy of defects in semiconductors that contain light-mass elements. The capabilities of vibrational spectroscopy for the identification of defects, the determination of their microscopic structures, and their dynamics are illustrated by a few examples. Several additional examples are discussed, with a focus on defects with properties not obviously accessible by vibrational spectroscopy, such as the diffusivity of an impurity, the negative U ordering of electronic levels, and the time constant for a nuclear-spin flip. These novel properties have, nonetheless, been revealed by vibrational spectra and their interpretation by theory.

  6. Kinetic model for electric-field induced point defect redistribution near semiconductor surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorai, Prashun; Seebauer, Edmund G.

    2014-07-01

    The spatial distribution of point defects near semiconductor surfaces affects the efficiency of devices. Near-surface band bending generates electric fields that influence the spatial redistribution of charged mobile defects that exchange infrequently with the lattice, as recently demonstrated for pile-up of isotopic oxygen near rutile TiO2 (110). The present work derives a mathematical model to describe such redistribution and establishes its temporal dependence on defect injection rate and band bending. The model shows that band bending of only a few meV induces significant redistribution, and that the direction of the electric field governs formation of either a valley or a pile-up.

  7. Kinetic model for electric-field induced point defect redistribution near semiconductor surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gorai, Prashun; Seebauer, Edmund G.

    2014-01-01

    The spatial distribution of point defects near semiconductor surfaces affects the efficiency of devices. Near-surface band bending generates electric fields that influence the spatial redistribution of charged mobile defects that exchange infrequently with the lattice, as recently demonstrated for pile-up of isotopic oxygen near rutile TiO 2 (110). The present work derives a mathematical model to describe such redistribution and establishes its temporal dependence on defect injection rate and band bending. The model shows that band bending of only a few meV induces significant redistribution, and that the direction of the electric field governs formation of either a valley or a pile-up.

  8. Preface of 16th International conference on Defects, Recognition, Imaging and Physics in Semiconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Deren; Xu, Ke

    2016-11-01

    The 16th International conference on Defects-Recognition, Imaging and Physics in Semiconductors (DRIP-XVI) was held at the Worldhotel Grand Dushulake in Suzhou, China from 6th to 10th September 2015, around the 30th anniversary of the first DRIP conference. It was hosted by the Suzhou Institute of Nano-tech and Nano-bionics (SINANO), Chinese Academy of Sciences. On this occasion, about one hundred participants from nineteen countries attended the event. And a wide range of subjects were addressed during the conference: physics of point and extended defects in semiconductors: origin, electrical, optical and magnetic properties of defects; diagnostics techniques of crystal growth and processing of semiconductor materials (in-situ and process control); device imaging and mapping to evaluate performance and reliability; defect analysis in degraded optoelectronic and electronic devices; imaging techniques and instruments (proximity probe, x-ray, electron beam, non-contact electrical, optical and thermal imaging techniques, etc.); new frontiers of atomic-scale-defect assessment (STM, AFM, SNOM, ballistic electron energy microscopy, TEM, etc.); new approaches for multi-physic-parameter characterization with Nano-scale space resolution. Within these subjects, there were 58 talks, of which 18 invited, and 50 posters.

  9. Tutorial: Junction spectroscopy techniques and deep-level defects in semiconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peaker, A. R.; Markevich, V. P.; Coutinho, J.

    2018-04-01

    The term junction spectroscopy embraces a wide range of techniques used to explore the properties of semiconductor materials and semiconductor devices. In this tutorial review, we describe the most widely used junction spectroscopy approaches for characterizing deep-level defects in semiconductors and present some of the early work on which the principles of today's methodology are based. We outline ab-initio calculations of defect properties and give examples of how density functional theory in conjunction with formation energy and marker methods can be used to guide the interpretation of experimental results. We review recombination, generation, and trapping of charge carriers associated with defects. We consider thermally driven emission and capture and describe the techniques of Deep Level Transient Spectroscopy (DLTS), high resolution Laplace DLTS, admittance spectroscopy, and scanning DLTS. For the study of minority carrier related processes and wide gap materials, we consider Minority Carrier Transient Spectroscopy (MCTS), Optical DLTS, and deep level optical transient spectroscopy together with some of their many variants. Capacitance, current, and conductance measurements enable carrier exchange processes associated with the defects to be detected. We explain how these methods are used in order to understand the behaviour of point defects and the determination of charge states and negative-U (Hubbard correlation energy) behaviour. We provide, or reference, examples from a wide range of materials including Si, SiGe, GaAs, GaP, GaN, InGaN, InAlN, and ZnO.

  10. Analysis of defects near the surface and the interface of semiconductors by monoenergetic positron beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uedono, Akira; Tanigawa, Shoichiro

    1989-01-01

    A monoenergetic low-speed positron beam line is constructed and a study is made on defects near the surface and the interface of semiconductors by using the beam line. Sodium-22 is used as beam source. Ion implantation, though being an essential technique for semiconductor integrated circuit production, can introduce lattice defects, affecting the yield and reliability of the resultant semiconductor devices. Some observations are made on the dependence of the Doppler broadening on the depth, and the ΔS-E relationship in P + -ion implanted SiO 2 (43nm)-Si. These observations demonstrate that monoenergetic positron beam is useful to detect hole-type defects resulting from ion implantation over a very wide range of defect density. Another study is made for the detection of defects near an interface. Positrons are expected to drift when left in an electric field with a gradient. Observations made here show that positrons can be concentrated at any desired interface by introducing an electric field intensity gradient in the oxide. This process also serves for accurate measurement of the electronic structure at the interface, and the effect of ion implantation and radiations on the interface. (N.K.)

  11. Pressure-controlled terahertz filter based on 1D photonic crystal with a defective semiconductor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qinwen, XUE; Xiaohua, WANG; Chenglin, LIU; Youwen, LIU

    2018-03-01

    The tunable terahertz (THz) filter has been designed and studied, which is composed of 1D photonic crystal (PC) containing a defect layer of semiconductor GaAs. The analytical solution of 1D defective PC (1DDPC) is deduced based on the transfer matrix method, and the electromagnetic plane wave numerical simulation of this 1DDPC is performed by using the finite element method. The calculated and simulated results have confirmed that the filtering transmittance of this 1DDPC in symmetric structure of air/(Si/SiO2) N /GaAs/(SiO2/Si) N /air is far higher than in asymmetric structure of air/(Si/SiO2) N /GaAs/(Si/SiO2) N /air, where the filtering frequency can be tuned by the external pressure. It can provide a feasible route to design the external pressure-controlled THz filter based on 1DPC with a defective semiconductor.

  12. Point defects in GaAs and other semiconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ehrhart, P.; Karsten, K.; Pillukat, A.

    1993-01-01

    In order to understand the properties of intrinsic point defects and their interactions at high defect concentrations GaAs wafers were irradiated at 4.5 K with 3 MeV electrons up to a dose of 4 · 10 19 e - /cm 2 . The irradiated samples were investigated by X-ray Diffraction and optical absorption spectroscopy. The defect production increases linearly with irradiation dose and characteristic differences are observed for the two sublattices. The Ga-Frenkel pairs are strongly correlated and are characterized by much larger lattice relaxations (V rel = 2--3 atomic volumes) as compared to the As-Frenkel pairs (V rel ∼1 at. vol.). The dominating annealing stage around 300 K is attributed to the mobility of the Ga interstitial atoms whereas the As-interstitial atoms can recombine with their vacancies only around 500 K. These results are compared to those for InP, ZnSe and Ge. Implications for the understanding of the damage after ion irradiation and implantation are discussed

  13. Point defects and defect clusters examined on the basis of some fundamental experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zuppiroli, L.

    1975-01-01

    On progressing from the centre of the defect to the surface the theoretical approach to a point defect passes from electronic theories to elastic theory. Experiments by which the point defect can be observed fall into two categories. Those which detect long-range effects: measurement of dimensional variations in the sample; measurement of the mean crystal parameter variation; elastic X-ray scattering near the nodes of the reciprocal lattice (Huang scattering). Those which detect more local effects: low-temperature resistivity measurement; positron capture and annihilation; local scattering far from the reciprocal lattice nodes. Experiments involving both short and long-range effects can always be found. This is the case for example with the dechanneling of α particles by defects. Certain of the experimental methods quoted above apply also to the study of point defect clusters. These methods are illustrated by some of their most striking results which over the last twenty years have refined our knowledge of point defects and defect clusters: length and crystal parameter measurements; diffuse X-ray scattering; low-temperature resistivity measurements; ion emission microscopy; electron microscopy; elastoresistivity [fr

  14. Study by positron annihilation of defects in metals, crystalline or amorphous alloys and in semiconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moumene, M.

    1984-07-01

    In this work lifetime of positron is used to study vacancies in different systems irradiated by electrons: pure metals (Fe, Zn), diluted (FeCo, FeAu) and concentrated (Cu 3 Au) alloys, semiconductors (CdTe, ZnTe) and amorphous alloys. Results on vacancy migration temperature and of the formation of two or three-dimensional vacancy clusters are given [fr

  15. Point Defects in Two-Dimensional Layered Semiconductors: Physics and Its Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suh, Joonki

    Recent advances in material science and semiconductor processing have been achieved largely based on in-depth understanding, efficient management and advanced application of point defects in host semiconductors, thus finding the relevant techniques such as doping and defect engineering as a traditional scientific and technological solution. Meanwhile, two- dimensional (2D) layered semiconductors currently draw tremendous attentions due to industrial needs and their rich physics at the nanoscale; as we approach the end of critical device dimensions in silicon-based technology, ultra-thin semiconductors have the potential as next- generation channel materials, and new physics also emerges at such reduced dimensions where confinement of electrons, phonons, and other quasi-particles is significant. It is therefore rewarding and interesting to understand and redefine the impact of lattice defects by investigating their interactions with energy/charge carriers of the host matter. Potentially, the established understanding will provide unprecedented opportunities for realizing new functionalities and enhancing the performance of energy harvesting and optoelectronic devices. In this thesis, multiple novel 2D layered semiconductors, such as bismuth and transition- metal chalcogenides, are explored. Following an introduction of conventional effects induced by point defects in semiconductors, the related physics of electronically active amphoteric defects is revisited in greater details. This can elucidate the complication of a two-dimensional electron gas coexisting with the topological states on the surface of bismuth chalcogenides, recently suggested as topological insulators. Therefore, native point defects are still one of the keys to understand and exploit topological insulators. In addition to from a fundamental science point of view, the effects of point defects on the integrated thermal-electrical transport, as well as the entropy-transporting process in

  16. Study of defects in radiation tolerant semiconductor SiC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Itoh, Hisayoshi; Kawasuso, Atsuo; Ohshima, Takeshi; Yoshikawa, Masahito; Nashiyama, Isamu [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Takasaki, Gunma (Japan). Takasaki Radiation Chemistry Research Establishment; Okumura, Hajime; Yoshida, Sadafumi

    1997-03-01

    Electron spin resonance (ESR) was used to study defects introduced in n-type 6H-SiC by 3 MeV electron irradiation. Two ESR signals labeled A and B related to radiation induced defects were observed. An ESR signal B can be explained by a fine interaction with an effective spin S=1. The g and D tensors of the signal B were found to be axially symmetric along the c-axis. The principal values of the g were obtained to be g parallel = 2.003 and g perpendicular = 2.008, and the absolute value of the D was 3.96x10{sup -2} cm{sup -1} at 100 K for this signal. It was also found that the value |D| decreased with increasing temperature. Isochronal annealing showed that the A and B centers have annealing stages of {approx_equal}200degC and {approx_equal}800degC, respectively. Tentative structural models are discussed for these ESR centers. (author)

  17. Vacancies and defect levels in III–V semiconductors

    KAUST Repository

    Tahini, H. A.

    2013-08-13

    Using electronic structure calculations, we systematically investigate the formation of vacancies in III-V semiconductors (III = Al, Ga, and In and V = P, As, and Sb), for a range of charges ( −3≤q≤3 ) as a function of the Fermi level and under different growth conditions. The formation energies were corrected using the scheme due to Freysoldt et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 102, 016402 (2009)] to account for finite size effects. Vacancy formation energies were found to decrease as the size of the group V atom increased. This trend was maintained for Al-V, Ga-V, and In-V compounds. The negative-U effect was only observed for the arsenic vacancy in GaAs, which makes a charge state transition from +1 to –1. It is also found that even under group III rich conditions, group III vacancies dominate in AlSb and GaSb. For InSb, group V vacancies are favoured even under group V rich conditions.

  18. Effect of disorder and defects in ion-implanted semiconductors electrical and physiochemical characterization

    CERN Document Server

    Willardson, Robert K; Christofides, Constantinos; Ghibaudo, Gerard

    2014-01-01

    Defects in ion-implanted semiconductors are important and will likely gain increased importance in the future as annealing temperatures are reduced with successive IC generations. Novel implant approaches, such as MdV implantation, create new types of defects whose origin and annealing characteristics will need to be addressed. Publications in this field mainly focus on the effects of ion implantation on the material and the modification in the implanted layer afterhigh temperature annealing.Electrical and Physicochemical Characterization focuses on the physics of the annealing kine

  19. Comprehensive Characterization of Extended Defects in Semiconductor Materials by a Scanning Electron Microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hieckmann, Ellen; Nacke, Markus; Allardt, Matthias; Bodrov, Yury; Chekhonin, Paul; Skrotzki, Werner; Weber, Jörg

    2016-05-28

    Extended defects such as dislocations and grain boundaries have a strong influence on the performance of microelectronic devices and on other applications of semiconductor materials. However, it is still under debate how the defect structure determines the band structure, and therefore, the recombination behavior of electron-hole pairs responsible for the optical and electrical properties of the extended defects. The present paper is a survey of procedures for the spatially resolved investigation of structural and of physical properties of extended defects in semiconductor materials with a scanning electron microscope (SEM). Representative examples are given for crystalline silicon. The luminescence behavior of extended defects can be investigated by cathodoluminescence (CL) measurements. They are particularly valuable because spectrally and spatially resolved information can be obtained simultaneously. For silicon, with an indirect electronic band structure, CL measurements should be carried out at low temperatures down to 5 K due to the low fraction of radiative recombination processes in comparison to non-radiative transitions at room temperature. For the study of the electrical properties of extended defects, the electron beam induced current (EBIC) technique can be applied. The EBIC image reflects the local distribution of defects due to the increased charge-carrier recombination in their vicinity. The procedure for EBIC investigations is described for measurements at room temperature and at low temperatures. Internal strain fields arising from extended defects can be determined quantitatively by cross-correlation electron backscatter diffraction (ccEBSD). This method is challenging because of the necessary preparation of the sample surface and because of the quality of the diffraction patterns which are recorded during the mapping of the sample. The spatial resolution of the three experimental techniques is compared.

  20. Influence of radiation induced defect clusters on silicon particle detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Junkes, Alexandra

    2011-10-15

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN) addresses some of today's most fundamental questions of particle physics, like the existence of the Higgs boson and supersymmetry. Two large general-purpose experiments (ATLAS, CMS) are installed to detect the products of high energy protonproton and nucleon-nucleon collisions. Silicon detectors are largely employed in the innermost region, the tracking area of the experiments. The proven technology and large scale availability make them the favorite choice. Within the framework of the LHC upgrade to the high-luminosity LHC, the luminosity will be increased to L=10{sup 35} cm{sup -2}s{sup -1}. In particular the pixel sensors in the innermost layers of the silicon trackers will be exposed to an extremely intense radiation field of mainly hadronic particles with fluences of up to {phi}{sub eq}=10{sup 16} cm{sup -2}. The radiation induced bulk damage in silicon sensors will lead to a severe degradation of the performance during their operational time. This work focusses on the improvement of the radiation tolerance of silicon materials (Float Zone, Magnetic Czochralski, epitaxial silicon) based on the evaluation of radiation induced defects in the silicon lattice using the Deep Level Transient Spectroscopy and the Thermally Stimulated Current methods. It reveals the outstanding role of extended defects (clusters) on the degradation of sensor properties after hadron irradiation in contrast to previous works that treated effects as caused by point defects. It has been found that two cluster related defects are responsible for the main generation of leakage current, the E5 defects with a level in the band gap at E{sub C}-0.460 eV and E205a at E{sub C}-0.395 eV where E{sub C} is the energy of the edge of the conduction band. The E5 defect can be assigned to the tri-vacancy (V{sub 3}) defect. Furthermore, isochronal annealing experiments have shown that the V{sub 3} defect

  1. Influence of radiation induced defect clusters on silicon particle detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Junkes, Alexandra

    2011-10-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN) addresses some of today's most fundamental questions of particle physics, like the existence of the Higgs boson and supersymmetry. Two large general-purpose experiments (ATLAS, CMS) are installed to detect the products of high energy protonproton and nucleon-nucleon collisions. Silicon detectors are largely employed in the innermost region, the tracking area of the experiments. The proven technology and large scale availability make them the favorite choice. Within the framework of the LHC upgrade to the high-luminosity LHC, the luminosity will be increased to L=10 35 cm -2 s -1 . In particular the pixel sensors in the innermost layers of the silicon trackers will be exposed to an extremely intense radiation field of mainly hadronic particles with fluences of up to Φ eq =10 16 cm -2 . The radiation induced bulk damage in silicon sensors will lead to a severe degradation of the performance during their operational time. This work focusses on the improvement of the radiation tolerance of silicon materials (Float Zone, Magnetic Czochralski, epitaxial silicon) based on the evaluation of radiation induced defects in the silicon lattice using the Deep Level Transient Spectroscopy and the Thermally Stimulated Current methods. It reveals the outstanding role of extended defects (clusters) on the degradation of sensor properties after hadron irradiation in contrast to previous works that treated effects as caused by point defects. It has been found that two cluster related defects are responsible for the main generation of leakage current, the E5 defects with a level in the band gap at E C -0.460 eV and E205a at E C -0.395 eV where E C is the energy of the edge of the conduction band. The E5 defect can be assigned to the tri-vacancy (V 3 ) defect. Furthermore, isochronal annealing experiments have shown that the V 3 defect exhibits a bistability, as does the leakage current. In oxygen

  2. Advanced defect detection algorithm using clustering in ultrasonic NDE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gongzhang, Rui; Gachagan, Anthony

    2016-02-01

    A range of materials used in industry exhibit scattering properties which limits ultrasonic NDE. Many algorithms have been proposed to enhance defect detection ability, such as the well-known Split Spectrum Processing (SSP) technique. Scattering noise usually cannot be fully removed and the remaining noise can be easily confused with real feature signals, hence becoming artefacts during the image interpretation stage. This paper presents an advanced algorithm to further reduce the influence of artefacts remaining in A-scan data after processing using a conventional defect detection algorithm. The raw A-scan data can be acquired from either traditional single transducer or phased array configurations. The proposed algorithm uses the concept of unsupervised machine learning to cluster segmental defect signals from pre-processed A-scans into different classes. The distinction and similarity between each class and the ensemble of randomly selected noise segments can be observed by applying a classification algorithm. Each class will then be labelled as `legitimate reflector' or `artefacts' based on this observation and the expected probability of defection (PoD) and probability of false alarm (PFA) determined. To facilitate data collection and validate the proposed algorithm, a 5MHz linear array transducer is used to collect A-scans from both austenitic steel and Inconel samples. Each pulse-echo A-scan is pre-processed using SSP and the subsequent application of the proposed clustering algorithm has provided an additional reduction to PFA while maintaining PoD for both samples compared with SSP results alone.

  3. Combined Electrical, Optical and Nuclear Investigations of Impurities and Defects in II-VI Semiconductors

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    % IS325 \\\\ \\\\ To achieve well controlled bipolar conductivity in II-VI semiconductors represents a fundamental problem in semiconductor physics. The doping problems are controversely discussed, either in terms of self compensation or of compensation and passivation by unintentionally introduced impurities. \\\\ \\\\It is the goal of our experiments at the new ISOLDE facility, to shed new light on these problems and to look for ways to circumvent it. For this aim the investigation of impurities and native defects and the interaction between each other shall be investigated. The use of radioactive ion beams opens the access to controlled site selective doping of only one sublattice via nuclear transmutation. The compensating and passivating mechanisms will be studied by combining nuclear, electrical and optical methods like Perturbed Angular Correlation~(PAC), Hall Effect~(HE), Deep Level Transient Spectroscopy~(DLTS), Photoluminescence Spectroscopy~(PL) and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR). \\\\ \\\\We intend to ...

  4. Electron-Ion Dynamics in Semiconductors with Defects under Ion Irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Cheng-Wei; Schleife, André

    Long-term stability is challenging for semiconductor devices under ion radiation such as solar panels in outer space. Exposure to ion radiation induces formation of defects that ultimately reduce solar cell efficiency. It is well-known in the literature that high-energy ion radiation transfers energy to the materials mostly via electronic excitation which is traditionally hard to model. Previously, we demonstrated that Ehrenfest molecular dynamics based on time-dependent density functional theory correctly describes electronic stopping of semiconductors. To better understand the effect of excited electrons on evolution of defects during ion irradiation, we further investigate the time-evolution of occupation number and found that it is correlated to long-term ion dynamics after passage of proton. Furthermore, we found that the presence of excited electrons significantly reduces the atomic diffusion barrier, indicating this effect is essential for the analysis of defect formation and ion dynamics under ion radiation conditions. An award of computer time was provided by the Innovative and Novel Computational Impact on Theory and Experiment (INCITE) program.

  5. Modelling of dielectric hysteresis loops in ferroelectric semiconductors with charged defects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morozovska, Anna N; Eliseev, Eugene A

    2004-01-01

    We have proposed the phenomenological description of dielectric hysteresis loops in ferroelectric semiconductors with charged defects and prevailing extrinsic conductivity. We have modified the Landau-Ginsburg approach and shown that the macroscopic state of the aforementioned inhomogeneous system can be described by three coupled equations for three order parameters. Both the experimentally observed coercive field values well below the thermodynamic values and the various hysteresis-loop deformations (constricted and double loops) have been obtained in the framework of our model. The obtained results quantitatively explain the ferroelectric switching in such ferroelectric materials as thick PZT films

  6. Point-Defect Mediated Bonding of Pt Clusters on (5,5) Carbon Nanotubes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, J. G.; Lv, Y. A.; Li, X. N.

    2009-01-01

    The adhesion of various sizes of Pt clusters on the metallic (5,5) carbon nanotubes (CNTs) with and without the point defect has been investigated by means of density functional theory (DFT). The calculations show that the binding energies of Pt-n (n = 1-6) clusters on the defect free CNTs are more......). The stronger orbital hybridization between the Pt atom and the carbon atom shows larger charge transfers on the defective CNTs than on the defect free CNTs, which allows the strong interaction between Pt clusters and CNTs. On the basis of DFT calculations, CNTs with point defect can be used as the catalyst...

  7. High energy ion irradiated III-N semiconductors (AlN, GaN, InN): study of point defect and extended defect creation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sall, Mamour

    2013-01-01

    Nitride semiconductors III N (AlN, GaN, InN) have interesting properties for micro-and opto-electronic applications. In use, they may be subjected to different types of radiation in a wide range of energy. In AlN, initially considered insensitive to electronic excitations (Se), we have demonstrated a novel type of synergy between Se and nuclear collisions (Sn) for the creation of defects absorbing at 4.7 eV. In addition, another effect of Se is highlighted in AlN: climb of screw dislocations under the influence of Se, at high fluence. In GaN, two mechanisms can explain the creation of defects absorbing at 2.8 eV: a synergy between Se and Sn, or a creation only due to Sn but with a strong effect of the size of displacement cascades. The study, by TEM, of the effects of Se in the three materials, exhibits behaviors highly dependent on the material while they all belong to the same family with the same atomic structure. Under monoatomic ion irradiations (velocity between 0.4 and 5 MeV/u), while discontinuous tracks are observed in GaN and InN, no track is observed in AlN with the highest electronic stopping power (33 keV/nm). Only fullerene clusters produce tracks in AlN. The inelastic thermal spike model was used to calculate the energies required to produce track in AlN, GaN and InN, they are 4.2 eV/atom, 1.5 eV/atom and 0.8 eV/atom, respectively. This sensitivity difference according to Se, also occurs at high fluence. (author)

  8. Computer simulations of small semiconductor and metal clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andreoni, W.

    1991-01-01

    A brief survey is presented of recent simulations of small clusters, made with both ab-initio and classical approaches, with particular emphasis on the application of the Car-Parrinello method. The discussion mainly focusses on the structural properties of a variety of materials and on the effects of temperature. (orig.)

  9. Energy efficiency enhancements for semiconductors, communications, sensors and software achieved in cool silicon cluster project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellinger, Frank; Mikolajick, Thomas; Fettweis, Gerhard; Hentschel, Dieter; Kolodinski, Sabine; Warnecke, Helmut; Reppe, Thomas; Tzschoppe, Christoph; Dohl, Jan; Carta, Corrado; Fritsche, David; Tretter, Gregor; Wiatr, Maciej; Detlef Kronholz, Stefan; Mikalo, Ricardo Pablo; Heinrich, Harald; Paulo, Robert; Wolf, Robert; Hübner, Johannes; Waltsgott, Johannes; Meißner, Klaus; Richter, Robert; Michler, Oliver; Bausinger, Markus; Mehlich, Heiko; Hahmann, Martin; Möller, Henning; Wiemer, Maik; Holland, Hans-Jürgen; Gärtner, Roberto; Schubert, Stefan; Richter, Alexander; Strobel, Axel; Fehske, Albrecht; Cech, Sebastian; Aßmann, Uwe; Pawlak, Andreas; Schröter, Michael; Finger, Wolfgang; Schumann, Stefan; Höppner, Sebastian; Walter, Dennis; Eisenreich, Holger; Schüffny, René

    2013-07-01

    An overview about the German cluster project Cool Silicon aiming at increasing the energy efficiency for semiconductors, communications, sensors and software is presented. Examples for achievements are: 1000 times reduced gate leakage in transistors using high-fc (HKMG) materials compared to conventional poly-gate (SiON) devices at the same technology node; 700 V transistors integrated in standard 0.35 μm CMOS; solar cell efficiencies above 19% at cars Contribution to the Topical Issue “International Semiconductor Conference Dresden-Grenoble - ISCDG 2012”, Edited by Gérard Ghibaudo, Francis Balestra and Simon Deleonibus.

  10. Effect of dose and size on defect engineering in carbon cluster implanted silicon wafers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okuyama, Ryosuke; Masada, Ayumi; Shigematsu, Satoshi; Kadono, Takeshi; Hirose, Ryo; Koga, Yoshihiro; Okuda, Hidehiko; Kurita, Kazunari

    2018-01-01

    Carbon-cluster-ion-implanted defects were investigated by high-resolution cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy toward achieving high-performance CMOS image sensors. We revealed that implantation damage formation in the silicon wafer bulk significantly differs between carbon-cluster and monomer ions after implantation. After epitaxial growth, small and large defects were observed in the implanted region of carbon clusters. The electron diffraction pattern of both small and large defects exhibits that from bulk crystalline silicon in the implanted region. On the one hand, we assumed that the silicon carbide structure was not formed in the implanted region, and small defects formed because of the complex of carbon and interstitial silicon. On the other hand, large defects were hypothesized to originate from the recrystallization of the amorphous layer formed by high-dose carbon-cluster implantation. These defects are considered to contribute to the powerful gettering capability required for high-performance CMOS image sensors.

  11. Detection of electrical defects with SEMVision in semiconductor production mode manufacturing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newell, Travis; Tillotson, Brock; Pearl, Haim; Miller, Andrei

    2016-03-01

    In the semiconductor manufacturing process, defects often occur due to a marginal process window that affects the lithography and etch processes. These defects can result in bridging patterns and overlay issues, which consequently cause electrical shorts and partially etched vias producing electrical opens. SEM tools are used to find electrical failures through voltage contrast techniques. Manufacturers who fabricate with older process technology nodes often need to use their tool set more efficiently. This paper demonstrates an application of conventional SEM review with image to golden reference image inspection capabilities in Automatic Process Inspection (API ) mode to perform electrical inspections of die features. This paper details how to use a SEM review tool to detect systematic electrical defects. This methodology can prove beneficial while monitoring and developing patterning techniques for a specific design rule by catching electrical shorts and opens that are more visible at a lower resolution inspection used in process monitoring. Outcomes of this effort show that conventional review SEM techniques, using known areas prone to process inconsistencies derived from features pushing the design rule, have the capability to effectively and efficiently monitor fabrication process while implemented in a production setting at process nodes between 100 to 200 nm. Using e-beam review tools offers several advantages and disadvantages. This paper demonstrates that by using a SEM review tool and selecting die locations for imaging that are more likely to fail electrically, manufacturers can use SEM automatic review capabilities more effectively and efficiently. The application developed may also be applied in fabrication facilities that have limited yield monitoring capacity. This paper is a result of collaboration between Applied Materials and Microchip Technology Inc.

  12. First principles predictions of magneto-optical data for semiconductor point defect identification: the case of divacancy defects in 4H–SiC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidsson, Joel; Ivády, Viktor; Armiento, Rickard; Son, N. T.; Gali, Adam; Abrikosov, Igor A.

    2018-02-01

    Study and design of magneto-optically active single point defects in semiconductors are rapidly growing fields due to their potential in quantum bit (qubit) and single photon emitter applications. Detailed understanding of the properties of candidate defects is essential for these applications, and requires the identification of the defects microscopic configuration and electronic structure. In multi-component semiconductors point defects often exhibit several non-equivalent configurations of similar but different characteristics. The most relevant example of such point defect is the divacancy in silicon carbide, where some of the non-equivalent configurations implement room temperature qubits. Here, we identify four different configurations of the divacancy in 4H–SiC via the comparison of experimental measurements and results of first-principle calculations. In order to accomplish this challenging task, we carry out an exhaustive numerical accuracy investigation of zero-phonon line and hyperfine coupling parameter calculations. Based on these results, we discuss the possibility of systematic quantum bit search.

  13. Government Support, FDI Clustering and Semiconductor Sustainability in China: Case Studies of Shanghai, Suzhou and Wuxi in the Yangtze Delta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsu-Lung Chou

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available With reference to the case studies of Shanghai, Suzhou, and Wuxi, in the Yangtze Delta, China, this paper demonstrates the local possibilities and various development paths for developing an indigenous semiconductor industry, using the government support within foreign direct investment (FDI-dominated clusters for the New Industrializing Countries (NICs. Two important policy lessons are identified. The first is that the government may attract FDI and develop high-tech clustering by using policy support, but it does not necessarily provide conducive and positive influences on the sustainable development of domestic semiconductors. The second lesson is that the sustainability of the domestic semiconductor industry in the FDI cluster may start from three connected elements: (1 a pragmatic goal of government support; (2 complementarities of the domestic semiconductors with international leading firms in the market, technology and equipment linkages; and (3 a sustainable capacity of technical learning to drive local developments.

  14. The effect of defect cluster size and interpolation on radiographic image quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Töpfer, Karin; Yip, Kwok L.

    2011-03-01

    For digital X-ray detectors, the need to control factory yield and cost invariably leads to the presence of some defective pixels. Recently, a standard procedure was developed to identify such pixels for industrial applications. However, no quality standards exist in medical or industrial imaging regarding the maximum allowable number and size of detector defects. While the answer may be application specific, the minimum requirement for any defect specification is that the diagnostic quality of the images be maintained. A more stringent criterion is to keep any changes in the images due to defects below the visual threshold. Two highly sensitive image simulation and evaluation methods were employed to specify the fraction of allowable defects as a function of defect cluster size in general radiography. First, the most critical situation of the defect being located in the center of the disease feature was explored using image simulation tools and a previously verified human observer model, incorporating a channelized Hotelling observer. Detectability index d' was obtained as a function of defect cluster size for three different disease features on clinical lung and extremity backgrounds. Second, four concentrations of defects of four different sizes were added to clinical images with subtle disease features and then interpolated. Twenty observers evaluated the images against the original on a single display using a 2-AFC method, which was highly sensitive to small changes in image detail. Based on a 50% just-noticeable difference, the fraction of allowed defects was specified vs. cluster size.

  15. Laser-induced cluster-ions from thin foils of metals and semiconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuerstenau, N.; Hillenkamp, F.

    1981-01-01

    Interaction of focused, very high-energy pulses of UV laser light of some 10 8 W cm -2 with thin foils of metals and semiconductors induces solid-gas phase-transitions and ionization of microvolumes of the target material. Mass-spectrometric analysis of the microplasma reveals singly ionized cluster-ions as final products of the interaction processes. Cluster-ion distributions are measured and compared with those obtained in thermal evaporation, high-frequency spark and SIMS experiments. The distributions are shown to be characteristic of the investigated material. While some of their features can be understood in terms of theories of cluster stability, other qualities, also observed in SIMS and evaporation experiments, are thought to be due to the partially non-equilibrium character of the solid-gas phase-transition. Furthermore, estimations concerning parameters of the laser-induced microplasma can be drawn from the distributions. (orig.)

  16. Positron annihilation lifetime study of extended defects in semiconductor glasses and polymers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boyko, Olha [Department of Pediatric Dentistry, Danylo Halytsky Lviv National Medical University, Pekarska str. 69, 79010 Lviv (Ukraine); Shpotyuk, Yaroslav [Department of Optoelectronics and Information Technologies, Ivan Franko National University of Lviv, Dragomanova str. 50, 79005 Lviv (Ukraine); Lviv Scientific Research Institute of Materials, Scientific Research Company ' ' Carat' ' , Stryjska str. 202, 79031 Lviv (Ukraine); Filipecki, Jacek [Institute of Physics, Jan Dlugosz University in Czestochowa, Armii Krajowej al. 13/15, 42200 Czestochowa (Poland)

    2013-01-15

    The processes of atomic shrinkage in network-forming solids initiated by external influences are tested using technique of positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy at the example of chalcogenide vitreous semiconductors of arsenic sulphide type and acrylic polymers for dental application. Two state positron trapping is shown to be responsible for atomic shrinkage in chalcogenide glasses, while mixed trapping and ortho-positronium decaying is character for volumetric densification and stress propagation in acrylic dental polymers. At the basis of the obtained results it is concluded that correct analysis of externally-induced shrinkage in polymer networks under consideration can be developed by using original positron lifetime data treatment algorithms to compensate defect-free bulk annihilation channel within two-state positron trapping model and account for an interbalance between simultaneously co-existing positron trapping and orth-positronium related decaying channels within mixed three-state positron annihilation model (copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  17. Electronic defects in the halide antiperovskite semiconductor Hg3Se2I2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Joon-Il; Peters, John A.; He, Yihui; Liu, Zhifu; Das, Sanjib; Kontsevoi, Oleg Y.; Kanatzidis, Mercouri G.; Wessels, Bruce W.

    2017-10-01

    Halide perovskites have emerged as a potential photoconducting material for photovoltaics and hard radiation detection. We investigate the nature of charge transport in the semi-insulating chalcohalide Hg3Se2I2 compound using the temperature dependence of dark current, thermally stimulated current (TSC) spectroscopy, and photoconductivity measurements as well as first-principles density functional theory (DFT) calculations. Dark conductivity measurements and TSC spectroscopy indicate the presence of multiple shallow and deep level traps that have relatively low concentrations of the order of 1013-1015c m-3 and capture cross sections of ˜10-16c m2 . A distinct persistent photoconductivity is observed at both low temperatures (230 K), with major implications for room-temperature compound semiconductor radiation detection. From preliminary DFT calculations, the origin of the traps is attributed to intrinsic vacancy defects (VHg, VSe, and VI) and interstitials (Seint) or other extrinsic impurities. The results point the way for future improvements in crystal quality and detector performance.

  18. Positron annihilation lifetime study of extended defects in semiconductor glasses and polymers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boyko, Olha; Shpotyuk, Yaroslav; Filipecki, Jacek

    2013-01-01

    The processes of atomic shrinkage in network-forming solids initiated by external influences are tested using technique of positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy at the example of chalcogenide vitreous semiconductors of arsenic sulphide type and acrylic polymers for dental application. Two state positron trapping is shown to be responsible for atomic shrinkage in chalcogenide glasses, while mixed trapping and ortho-positronium decaying is character for volumetric densification and stress propagation in acrylic dental polymers. At the basis of the obtained results it is concluded that correct analysis of externally-induced shrinkage in polymer networks under consideration can be developed by using original positron lifetime data treatment algorithms to compensate defect-free bulk annihilation channel within two-state positron trapping model and account for an interbalance between simultaneously co-existing positron trapping and orth-positronium related decaying channels within mixed three-state positron annihilation model (copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  19. Self-consistent tight-binding investigation of chemical trends for native defects in III-V semiconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuehn, W.; Strehlow, R.; Hanke, M.

    1987-01-01

    Using the recently developed charge self-consistent version of the empirical tight-binding method (ETBM) in conjunction with the Koster-Slater scattering-theoretic approach the electronic properties induced by the substitutional native point defects (anion and cation antisite defect, anion and cation vacancy) in the six III-V semiconductors GaP, GaAs, GaSb, InP, InAs, and InSb are investigated. The calculations include the neutral and possible charged states of the defects. Chemical trends in the energetic position of gap states, the orbital composition, and the localization of the defect wave function are discussed and compared with other theoretical and experimental findings. (author)

  20. Magnetic Properties and Oxygen Defects of Dilute Metal Doped Tin Oxide Based Semiconductor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kiyoshi Nomura

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Chemical and magnetic states of iron doped tin oxide (SnO2 as a diluted magnetic semiconductor (DMS at room temperature have been investigated using 57Fe Mössbauer spectrometry, XRD and magnetometery. The influence of the doping conditions of SnO2 with iron on the generation of oxygen defects was reviewed and discussed on the basis of ab initio calculations. The magnetic properties depended on preparation conditions, such as thermal decomposition and sol-gel processing as well as 57Fe and super-dilute 57Mn implantation. It was shown that Sb codoping in Fe doped SnO2 increases the saturation magnetization. Doping of Fe(Sb-SnO2 with nonmagnetic Zn ions up to 7 % also increases the magnetization although there is no precipitation of crystalline magnetic phases. The co-doping of two transition metal ions (Fe-Co, Fe-Mn, Fe-Ni and Fe-V in SnO2 matrix enhanced the magnetization as compared with that of single metal ion doped samples. It is suggested from different valence states of doped metal ions that double exchange interactions occur through or near the oxygen vacancies in SnO2. The SnO2 doped with dilute 57Fe may show the intrinsic and/or extrinsic DMS properties. Oxygen vacancies play an important role in the intrinsic DMS. The intrinsic nature of DMS is supported by both, experimental results and ab initio calculations. The long range interactions between diluted magnetic ions are considered to occur through electrons produced by oxygen vacancies or electrons induced by Sb5+ doping.

  1. Photo-induced transformation process at gold clusters-semiconductor interface: Implications for the complexity of gold clusters-based photocatalysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Siqi; Xu, Yi-Jun

    2016-01-01

    The recent thrust in utilizing atomically precise organic ligands protected gold clusters (Au clusters) as photosensitizer coupled with semiconductors for nano-catalysts has led to the claims of improved efficiency in photocatalysis. Nonetheless, the influence of photo-stability of organic ligands protected-Au clusters at the Au/semiconductor interface on the photocatalytic properties remains rather elusive. Taking Au clusters–TiO2 composites as a prototype, we for the first time demonstrate the photo-induced transformation of small molecular-like Au clusters to larger metallic Au nanoparticles under different illumination conditions, which leads to the diverse photocatalytic reaction mechanism. This transformation process undergoes a diffusion/aggregation mechanism accompanied with the onslaught of Au clusters by active oxygen species and holes resulting from photo-excited TiO2 and Au clusters. However, such Au clusters aggregation can be efficiently inhibited by tuning reaction conditions. This work would trigger rational structural design and fine condition control of organic ligands protected-metal clusters-semiconductor composites for diverse photocatalytic applications with long-term photo-stability. PMID:26947754

  2. Study of small carbon and semiconductor clusters using negative ion threshold photodetachment spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arnold, C.C.

    1994-08-01

    The bonding and electronics of several small carbon and semiconductor clusters containing less than ten atoms are probed using negative ion threshold photodetachment (zero electron kinetic energy, or ZEKE) spectroscopy. ZEKE spectroscopy is a particularly advantageous technique for small cluster study, as it combines mass selection with good spectroscopic resolution. The ground and low-lying electronic states of small clusters in general can be accessed by detaching an electron from the ground anion state. The clusters studied using this technique and described in this work are C 6 - /C 6 , Si n - /Si n (n = 2, 3, 4), Ge 2 - /Ge 2 , In 2 P - /In 2 P,InP 2 - /InP 2 , and Ga 2 As - . The total photodetachment cross sections of several other small carbon clusters and the ZEKE spectrum of the I - ·CH 3 I S N 2 reaction complex are also presented to illustrate the versatility of the experimental apparatus. Clusters with so few atoms do not exhibit bulk properties. However, each specie exhibits bonding properties that relate to the type of bonding found in the bulk. C 6 , as has been predicted, exhibits a linear cumulenic structure, where double bonds connect all six carbon atoms. This double bonding reflects how important π bonding is in certain phases of pure carbon (graphite and fullerenes). The symmetric stretch frequencies observed in the C 6 - spectra, however, are in poor agreement with the calculated values. Also observed as sharp structure in total photodetachment cross section scans was an excited anion state bound by only ∼40 cm -1 relative to the detachment continuum. This excited anion state appears to be a valence bound state, possible because of the high electron affinity of C 6 , and the open shell of the anion

  3. A local environment approach for deep-level defects in semiconductors: Application to the vacancy in silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Yongliang; Lindefelt, U.

    1987-04-01

    A local environment approach for calculation of the electronic structure of localized defects in semiconductors is described. The method starts out from a description of localized orbitals or tight-binding model for semiconductors and is based on the recursion method of Haydock. A repeated symmetrical supercell containing 686 atoms plus defects is formed, both the translational and point-group symmetry of the crystal are fully exploited. In this paper, we report an application of this approach to an undistorted isolated vacancy by using a self-consistent Hamiltonian. A bound state of T 2 symmetry at 0.87 eV above the valence-band edge and a number of band resonances within the valence-band were extracted using Lanczos algorithm and a continued-fraction representation of the local density of states. It was found that the T 2 symmetry gap state is mainly p-like and most of the wavefunction for one of the A 1 symmetry resonances is concentrated on the vacant site and another concentrated on the first neighbors of the vacancy. From the small shifts of the band edges of silicon with a vacancy, we can conclude that the supercell is big enough and the interaction between the defects of different supercells is negligible. (author). 37 refs, 12 figs

  4. Theory of inelastic multiphonon scattering and carrier capture by defects in semiconductors: Application to capture cross sections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barmparis, Georgios D.; Puzyrev, Yevgeniy S.; Zhang, X.-G.; Pantelides, Sokrates T.

    2015-12-01

    Inelastic scattering and carrier capture by defects in semiconductors are the primary causes of hot-electron-mediated degradation of power devices, which holds up their commercial development. At the same time, carrier capture is a major issue in the performance of solar cells and light-emitting diodes. A theory of nonradiative (multiphonon) inelastic scattering by defects, however, is nonexistent, while the theory for carrier capture by defects has had a long and arduous history. Here we report the construction of a comprehensive theory of inelastic scattering by defects, with carrier capture being a special case. We distinguish between capture under thermal equilibrium conditions and capture under nonequilibrium conditions, e.g., in the presence of an electrical current or hot carriers where carriers undergo scattering by defects and are described by a mean free path. In the thermal-equilibrium case, capture is mediated by a nonadiabatic perturbation Hamiltonian, originally identified by Huang and Rhys and by Kubo, which is equal to linear electron-phonon coupling to first order. In the nonequilibrium case, we demonstrate that the primary capture mechanism is within the Born-Oppenheimer approximation (adiabatic transitions), with coupling to the defect potential inducing Franck-Condon electronic transitions, followed by multiphonon dissipation of the transition energy, while the nonadiabatic terms are of secondary importance (they scale with the inverse of the mass of typical atoms in the defect complex). We report first-principles density-functional-theory calculations of the capture cross section for a prototype defect using the projector-augmented wave, which allows us to employ all-electron wave functions. We adopt a Monte Carlo scheme to sample multiphonon configurations and obtain converged results. The theory and the results represent a foundation upon which to build engineering-level models for hot-electron degradation of power devices and the performance

  5. Study of radiation defects by in-situ measurements of the Hall effect in narrow-gap semiconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Favre, J.

    1990-01-01

    Semiconducting compounds of II-VI, III-V and IV-VI groups were irradiated in liquid hydrogen by high energy (0.7 to 2.7 MeV) electrons. The Hall coefficient and resistivity variations were measured in situ during irradiation. The doping by irradiation induced defects is of p-type in III-V group compounds, while n-type doping occurs in II-VI and IV-VI group materials. A semiconductor to insulator or reverse transition was observed under irradiation when the chemical potential crossed the band edges. In IV-VI group compounds the two successive transitions take place in initially p-type samples. A metastable behaviour, characteristic to strong compensation, appears in the vicinity of those semiconductor - insulator transitions in IV-VI compounds. The slope of free carrier concentration vs. fluence variation was analyzed. It was compared to defect creation rates, calculated in the framework of a cascade model. The charge state of created defects was deduced in this way. - In IV-VI group compounds, the presence of localized levels degenerated with the conduction band and, in PbTe, of additional defect associated levels in the forbidden gap, was demonstrated. Those results are consistent with the saturation of electron concentration increase at high fluence as well as with the analysis of annealing experiments. - In Hg 1-x Cd x Te compounds, the analysis of electron concentration versus fluence increase indicates that only mercury Frenkel pairs are electrically active. The variation with cadmium content of the defect associated level energy was deduced from the saturation values of the electron concentration [fr

  6. Efficient Nitrogen Doping of Single-Layer Graphene Accompanied by Negligible Defect Generation for Integration into Hybrid Semiconductor Heterostructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarau, George; Heilmann, Martin; Bashouti, Muhammad; Latzel, Michael; Tessarek, Christian; Christiansen, Silke

    2017-03-22

    While doping enables application-specific tailoring of graphene properties, it can also produce high defect densities that degrade the beneficial features. In this work, we report efficient nitrogen doping of ∼11 atom % without virtually inducing new structural defects in the initial, large-area, low defect, and transferred single-layer graphene. To shed light on this remarkable high-doping-low-disorder relationship, a unique experimental strategy consisting of analyzing the changes in doping, strain, and defect density after each important step during the doping procedure was employed. Complementary micro-Raman mapping, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and optical microscopy revealed that effective cleaning of the graphene surface assists efficient nitrogen incorporation accompanied by mild compressive strain resulting in negligible defect formation in the doped graphene lattice. These original results are achieved by separating the growth of graphene from its doping. Moreover, the high doping level occurred simultaneously with the epitaxial growth of n-GaN micro- and nanorods on top of graphene, leading to the flow of higher currents through the graphene/n-GaN rod interface. Our approach can be extended toward integrating graphene into other technologically relevant hybrid semiconductor heterostructures and obtaining an ohmic contact at their interfaces by adjusting the doping level in graphene.

  7. The effects of self-interstitial clusters on cascade defect evolution beyond the primary damage state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heinisch, H.L.

    1997-01-01

    The intracascade evolution of the defect distributions of cascades in copper is investigated using stochastic annealing simulations applied to cascades generated with molecular dynamics (MD). The temperature and energy dependencies of annihilation, clustering and free defect production are determined for individual cascades. The annealing simulation results illustrate the strong influence on intracascade evolution of the defect configuration existing in the primary damage state. Another factor significantly affecting the evolution of the defect distribution is the rapid one-dimensional diffusion of small, glissile interstitial loops produced directly in cascades. This phenomenon introduces a cascade energy dependence of defect evolution that is apparent only beyond the primary damage state, amplifying the need for further study of the annealing phase of cascade evolution and for performing many more MD cascade simulations at higher energies

  8. Theoretical Study of Defect Signatures in III-V and II-VI Semiconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-03-01

    film during growth. Hydrogen is known to be amphoteric in most semiconductors, but is identified as an exclusive donor in ZnO and can passivate Fig 2...diffusivity inside semiconductors. Usually, H is an amphoteric impurity, namely, acting either as a donor or an acceptor depending on the Fermi level. However...sWiley, New York, 1983d. 16M. D. McCluskey and S. J. Jokela, in Proceedings of the NATO Advanced Research Workshop on Zinc Oxide , edited by N. Nickel

  9. Study of small carbon and semiconductor clusters using negative ion threshold photodetachment spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arnold, Caroline Chick [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1994-08-01

    The bonding and electronics of several small carbon and semiconductor clusters containing less than ten atoms are probed using negative ion threshold photodetachment (zero electron kinetic energy, or ZEKE) spectroscopy. ZEKE spectroscopy is a particularly advantageous technique for small cluster study, as it combines mass selection with good spectroscopic resolution. The ground and low-lying electronic states of small clusters in general can be accessed by detaching an electron from the ground anion state. The clusters studied using this technique and described in this work are C6-/C6, Sin-/Sin (n = 2, 3, 4), Ge2-/Ge2, In2P-/In2P,InP2-/InP2, and Ga2As-. The total photodetachment cross sections of several other small carbon clusters and the ZEKE spectrum of the I-•CH3I SN2 reaction complex are also presented to illustrate the versatility of the experimental apparatus. Clusters with so few atoms do not exhibit bulk properties. However, each specie exhibits bonding properties that relate to the type of bonding found in the bulk. C6, as has been predicted, exhibits a linear cumulenic structure, where double bonds connect all six carbon atoms. This double bonding reflects how important π bonding is in certain phases of pure carbon (graphite and fullerenes). The symmetric stretch frequencies observed in the C6- spectra, however, are in poor agreement with the calculated values. Also observed as sharp structure in total photodetachment cross section scans was an excited anion state bound by only ~40 cm-1 relative to the detachment continuum. This excited anion state appears to be a valence bound state, possible because of the high electron affinity of C6, and the open shell of the anion.

  10. Emerging Diluted Ferromagnetism in High‐T c Superconductors Driven by Point Defect Clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzman, Roger.; Mishra, Rohan; Bartolomé, Elena; Salafranca, Juan; Magén, Cesar; Varela, Maria; Coll, Mariona; Palau, Anna; Valvidares, S. Manuel; Gargiani, Pierluigi; Pellegrin, Eric; Herrero‐Martin, Javier.; Pennycook, Stephen J.; Pantelides, Sokrates T.; Puig, Teresa; Obradors, Xavier

    2016-01-01

    Defects in ceramic materials are generally seen as detrimental to their functionality and applicability. Yet, in some complex oxides, defects present an opportunity to enhance some of their properties or even lead to the discovery of exciting physics, particularly in the presence of strong correlations. A paradigmatic case is the high‐temperature superconductor YBa2Cu3O7‐δ (Y123), in which nanoscale defects play an important role as they can immobilize quantized magnetic flux vortices. Here previously unforeseen point defects buried in Y123 thin films that lead to the formation of ferromagnetic clusters embedded within the superconductor are unveiled. Aberration‐corrected scanning transmission microscopy has been used for exploring, on a single unit‐cell level, the structure and chemistry resulting from these complex point defects, along with density functional theory calculations, for providing new insights about their nature including an unexpected defect‐driven ferromagnetism, and X‐ray magnetic circular dichroism for bearing evidence of Cu magnetic moments that align ferromagnetically even below the superconducting critical temperature to form a dilute system of magnetic clusters associated with the point defects. PMID:27812469

  11. A study of defect cluster formation in vanadium by heavy ion irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sekimura, Naoto; Shirao, Yasuyuki; Morishita, Kazunori [Tokyo Univ. (Japan)

    1996-10-01

    Formation of defect clusters in thin foils of vanadium was investigated by heavy ion irradiation. In the very thin region of the specimens less than 20 nm, vacancy clusters were formed under gold ion irradiation, while very few clusters were detected in the specimens irradiated with 200 and 400 keV self-ions up to 1 x 10{sup 16} ions/m{sup 2}. The density of vacancy clusters were found to be strongly dependent on ion energy. Only above the critical value of kinetic energy transfer density in vanadium, vacancy clusters are considered to be formed in the cascade damage from which interstitials can escape to the specimen surface in the very thin region. (author)

  12. A study into the role of surface capping on energy transfer in metal cluster-semiconductor nanocomposites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bain, Dipankar; Paramanik, Bipattaran; Sadhu, Suparna; Patra, Amitava

    2015-12-28

    Metal cluster-semiconductor nanocomposite materials remain a frontier area of research for the development of optoelectronic, photovoltaic and light harvesting devices because metal nanoclusters and semiconductor QDs are promising candidates for photon harvesting. Here, we have designed well defined metal cluster-semiconductor nanostructures using different surface capped negatively charged Au25 nanoclusters (Au NCs) and positively charged cysteamine capped CdTe quantum dots using electrostatic interactions. The main focus of this article is to address the impact of surface capping agents on the photophysical properties of Au cluster-CdTe QD hybrid nanocomposites. Steady state and time resolved spectroscopic studies reveal that photoluminescence quenching, radiative and nonradiative rate, and energy transfer between Au nanoclusters and CdTe QDs have been influenced by the nature of the capping agent. We have calculated the energy transfer related parameters such as the overlap integral, distance between donor and acceptor, Förster distance, efficiency of energy transfer and rate of energy transfer from CdTe QDs to three different Au NCs. Photoluminescence quenching varies from 73% to 43% when changing the capping agents from bovine serum albumin (BSA) to glutathione (GSH). The efficiency of the energy transfer from CdTe QDs to BSA-capped Au NCs is found to be 83%, for Cys-capped Au NCs it was 46% and for GSH-capped Au NCs it was 35%. The efficiency depends on the number of Au clusters attached per QD. This reveals that the nature of capping ligands plays a crucial role in the energy transfer phenomena from CdTe QDs to Au NCs. Interesting findings reveal that the efficient energy transfer in metal cluster-semiconductor nanocomposites may open up new possibilities in designing artificial light harvesting systems for future applications.

  13. Defects with deep levels in a semiconductor structure of a photoelectric converter of solar energy with an antireflection film of porous silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tregulov, V. V.; Litvinov, V. G.; Ermachikhin, A. V.

    2017-11-01

    Defects in a semiconductor structure of a photoelectric converter of solar energy based on a p-n junction with an antireflection film of porous silicon on the front surface have been studied by current deeplevel transient spectroscopy. An explanation of the influence of thickness of a porous-silicon film formed by electrochemical etching on the character of transformation of defects with deep levels and efficiency of solarenergy conversion is proposed.

  14. The role of point defect clusters in reactor pressure vessel embrittlement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stoller, R.E.

    1993-01-01

    Radiation-induced point defect clusters (PDC) are a plausible source of matrix hardening in reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steels in addition to copper-rich precipitates. These PDCs can be of either interstitial or vacancy type, and could exist in either 2 or 3-D shapes, e.g. small loops, voids, or stacking fault tetrahedra. Formation and evolution of PDCs are primarily determined by displacement damage rate and irradiation temperature. There is experimental evidence that size distributions of these clusters are also influenced by impurities such as copper. A theoretical model has been developed to investigate potential role of PDCs in RPV embrittlement. The model includes a detailed description of interstitial cluster population; vacancy clusters are treated in a more approximate fashion. The model has been used to examine a broad range of irradiation and material parameters. Results indicate that magnitude of hardening increment due to these clusters can be comparable to that attributed to copper precipitates. Both interstitial and vacancy type defects contribute to this hardening, with their relative importance determined by the specific irradiation conditions

  15. Density Functional Theory Calculations of Activation Energies for Carrier Capture by Defects in Semiconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modine, N. A.; Wright, A. F.; Lee, S. R.

    The rate of defect-induced carrier recombination is determined by both defect levels and carrier capture cross-sections. Density functional theory (DFT) has been widely and successfully used to predict defect levels, but only recently has work begun to focus on using DFT to determine carrier capture cross-sections. Lang and Henry developed the theory of carrier-capture by multiphonon emission in the 1970s and showed that carrier-capture cross-sections differ between defects primarily due to differences in their carrier capture activation energies. We present an approach to using DFT to calculate carrier capture activation energies that does not depend on an assumed configuration coordinate and that fully accounts for anharmonic effects, which can substantially modify carrier activation energies. We demonstrate our approach for intrinisic defects in GaAs and GaN and discuss how our results depend on the choice of exchange-correlation functional and the treatment of spin polarization. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under Contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  16. Intrinsic electronic defects and multiple-atom processes in the oxidic semiconductor Ga2O3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmeißer, Dieter; Henkel, Karsten

    2018-04-01

    We report on the electronic structure of gallium oxide (Ga2O3) single crystals as studied by resonant photoelectron spectroscopy (resPES). We identify intrinsic electronic defects that are formed by mixed-atomic valence states. We differentiate three coexisting defect states that differ in their electronic correlation energy and their spatial localization lengths. Their relative abundance is described by a fractional ionicity with covalent and ionic bonding contributions. For Ga2O3, our analyses of the resPES data enable us to derive two main aspects: first, experimental access is given to determine the ionicity based on the original concepts of Pauling and Phillips. Second, we report on multi-atomic energy loss processes in the Ga2p core level and X-ray absorption data. The two experimental findings can be explained consistently in the same context of mixed-atomic valence states and intrinsic electronic defects.

  17. Photo-induced current transient spectroscopy of defect clusters in heavily irradiated silicon

    CERN Document Server

    Menichelli, D

    2002-01-01

    We report an experimental study on radiation-induced defects in silicon p sup + n junctions irradiated with 1 MeV neutrons up to a fluence of approx 2x10 sup 1 sup 5 cm sup - sup 2. Heavily irradiated silicon diodes have been studied by means of Photon-Induced Current Transient Spectroscopy (PICTS) technique using a variable filling time. A dominant broad and structured peak has been found in the temperature range 200-300 K. The behavior of this broad peak upon changing the filling time has been analyzed, and it is observed that spectral line-shape broadens toward lower temperature as the filling time is increased. The observed spectra shape modification cannot be explained in terms of isolated point defects being consistent with quasi-continuous distributions of deep levels inside the band gap. We suggest that the investigated broad peak is at least in part, generated by emission from defect clusters.

  18. Combining DFT, Cluster Expansions, and KMC to Model Point Defects in Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modine, N. A.; Wright, A. F.; Lee, S. R.; Foiles, S. M.; Battaile, C. C.; Thomas, J. C.; van der Ven, A.

    In an alloy, defect energies are sensitive to the occupations of nearby atomic sites, which leads to a distribution of defect properties. When radiation-induced defects diffuse from their initially non-equilibrium locations, this distribution becomes time-dependent. The defects can become trapped in energetically favorable regions of the alloy leading to a diffusion rate that slows dramatically with time. Density Functional Theory (DFT) allows the accurate determination of ground state and transition state energies for a defect in a particular alloy environment but requires thousands of processing hours for each such calculation. Kinetic Monte-Carlo (KMC) can be used to model defect diffusion and the changing distribution of defect properties but requires energy evaluations for millions of local environments. We have used the Cluster Expansion (CE) formalism to ``glue'' together these seemingly incompatible methods. The occupation of each alloy site is represented by an Ising-like variable, and products of these variables are used to expand quantities of interest. Once a CE is fit to a training set of DFT energies, it allows very rapid evaluation of the energy for an arbitrary configuration, while maintaining the accuracy of the underlying DFT calculations. These energy evaluations are then used to drive our KMC simulations. We will demonstrate the application of our DFT/MC/KMC approach to model thermal and carrier-induced diffusion of intrinsic point defects in III-V alloys. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under Contract DE.

  19. Defect production and formation of helium-vacancy clusters due to cascades in α-iron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, L.; Zu, X.T.; Xiao, H.Y.; Gao, F.; Heinisch, H.L.; Kurtz, R.J.

    2007-01-01

    Displacement cascades are simulated by molecular dynamics methods in α-Fe containing different concentrations of substitutional He atoms. Primary knock-on atom (PKA) energies, E p , from 0.5 to 5 keV are considered at the irradiation temperature of 100 K. The concentration of He in Fe varies from 1 to 5 at%, and the results are compared with the simulations performed in pure α-Fe. We find that the total number of point defects increases with increasing He concentration. The present studies reveal the formation and the configurations of He-vacancy clusters in the cascades of α-Fe. Furthermore, the production efficiency of He-vacancy clusters increases with increasing He concentration and PKA energy. The nucleation mechanisms of He-vacancy clusters in displacement cascades are discussed in detail

  20. Maximum field emission current density of CuO nanowires: theoretical study using a defect-related semiconductor field emission model and in situ measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Zufang; Zhao, Peng; Ye, Peng; Chen, Yicong; Gan, Haibo; She, Juncong; Deng, Shaozhi; Xu, Ningsheng; Chen, Jun

    2018-02-01

    In this study, we proposed a theoretical model for one-dimensional semiconductor nanowires (NWs), taking account of the defect-related electrical transport process. The maximum emission current density was calculated by considering the influence of Joule heating, using a one-dimensional heat equation. The field emission properties of individual CuO NWs with different electrical properties were studied using an in situ experimental technique. The experimental results for maximum emission current density agreed well with the theoretical predictions and suggested that multiple conduction mechanisms were active. These may be induced by the concentration of defects in the CuO NW. The concentration of defects and the transport mechanisms were found to be key factors influencing the maximum field emission current density of the semiconductor NW. As is limited by the change of resistivity with temperature, only thermal runaway can trigger breakdown in CuO NWs.

  1. Effects of Vacancy Cluster Defects on Electrical and Thermodynamic Properties of Silicon Crystals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pei-Hsing Huang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A first-principle plane-wave pseudopotential method based on the density function theory (DFT was employed to investigate the effects of vacancy cluster (VC defects on the band structure and thermoelectric properties of silicon (Si crystals. Simulation results showed that various VC defects changed the energy band and localized electron density distribution of Si crystals and caused the band gap to decrease with increasing VC size. The results can be ascribed to the formation of a defect level produced by the dangling bonds, floating bonds, or high-strain atoms surrounding the VC defects. The appearance of imaginary frequencies in the phonon spectrum of defective Si crystals indicates that the defect-region structure is dynamically unstable and demonstrates phase changes. The phonon dispersion relation and phonon density of state were also investigated using density functional perturbation theory. The obtained Debye temperature θD for a perfect Si crystal had a minimum value of 448 K at T = 42 K and a maximum value of 671 K at the high-temperature limit, which is consistent with the experimental results reported by Flubacher. Moreover, the Debye temperature decreased with increases in the VC size. VC defects had minimal effects on the heat capacity (Cv value when temperatures were below 150 K. As the temperature was higher than 150 K, the heat capacity gradually increased with increasing temperature until it achieved a constant value of 11.8 cal/cell·K. The heat capacity significantly decreased as the VC size increased. For a 2 × 2 × 2 superlattice Si crystal containing a hexagonal ring VC (HRVC10, the heat capacity decreased by approximately 17%.

  2. Emission Channeling Investigation of Implantation Defects and Impurities in II-VI-Semiconductors

    CERN Multimedia

    Trojahn, I; Malamud, G; Straver, J; Ronnqvist, C; Jahn, S-G; Restle, M

    2002-01-01

    Detailed knowledge on the behaviour of implantation damage and its influence on the lattice position and environment of implanted dopants in II-VI-compound semiconductors is necessary for a clear interpretation of results from other investigation methods and finally for technical utilization. Besides, a precise localization of impurities could help to clarify the discussion about the instability of the electrical properties of some dopants, called " aging ".\\\\ \\\\We intend to use the emission channeling method to investigate: \\\\ \\\\i) The behaviour of implantation damage which shall be probed by the lattice location of isoelectronic isotopes (Zn,Cd,Hg,Se,Te) directly after implantation at different temperatures, doses and vacancy densities and after annealing treatments, and ii) the precise lattice sites of the acceptor Ag and donor In under different conditions by implanting precursors Cd and In isotopes. \\\\ \\\\Further on we would like to test the application of a two-dimensional position and energy sensitive e...

  3. Kinetics of cluster-related defects in silicon sensors irradiated with monoenergetic electrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radu, R.; Pintilie, I.; Makarenko, L. F.; Fretwurst, E.; Lindstroem, G.

    2018-04-01

    This work focuses on the kinetic mechanisms responsible for the annealing behavior of radiation cluster-related defects with impact on the electrical performance of silicon sensors. Such sensors were manufactured on high resistivity n-type standard float-zone (STFZ) and oxygen enriched float-zone (DOFZ) material and had been irradiated with mono-energetic electrons of 3.5 MeV energy and fluences of 3 × 1014 cm-2 and 6 × 1014 cm-2. After irradiation, the samples were subjected either to isochronal or isothermal heat treatments in the temperature range from 80 °C to 300 °C. The specific investigated defects are a group of three deep acceptors [H(116 K), H(140 K), and H(152 K)] with energy levels in the lower half of the band gap and a shallow donor E(30 K) with a level at 0.1 eV below the conduction band. The stability and kinetics of these defects at high temperatures are discussed on the basis of the extracted activation energies and frequency factors. The annealing of the H defects takes place similarly in both types of materials, suggesting a migration rather than a dissociation mechanism. On the contrary, the E(30 K) defect shows a very different annealing behavior, being stable in STFZ even at 300 °C, but annealing-out quickly in DOFZ material at temperatures higher than 200 °C , with a high frequency factor of the order of 1013 s-1. Such a behavior rules out a dissociation process, and the different annealing behavior is suggested to be related to a bistable behavior of the defect.

  4. Modeling of Semiconductors and Correlated Oxides with Point Defects by First Principles Methods

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Hao

    2014-06-15

    Point defects in silicon, vanadium dioxide, and doped ceria are investigated by density functional theory. Defects involving vacancies and interstitial oxygen and carbon in silicon are after formed in outer space and significantly affect device performances. The screened hybrid functional by Heyd-Scuseria-Ernzerhof is used to calculate formation energies, binding energies, and electronic structures of the defective systems because standard density functional theory underestimates the bang gap of silicon. The results indicate for the A-center a −2 charge state. Tin is proposed to be an effective dopant to suppress the formation of A-centers. For the total energy difference between the A- and B-type carbon related G-centers we find close agreement with the experiment. The results indicate that the C-type G-center is more stable than both the A- and B-types. The electronic structures of the monoclinic and rutile phases of vanadium dioxide are also studied using the Heyd-Scuseria-Ernzerhof functional. The ground states of the pure phases obtained by calculations including spin polarization disagree with the experimental observations that the monoclinic phase should not be magnetic, the rutile phase should be metallic, and the monoclinic phase should have a lower total energy than the rutile phase. By tuning the Hartree-Fock fraction α to 10% the agreement with experiments is improved in terms of band gaps and relative energies of the phases. A calculation scheme is proposed to simulate the relationship between the transition temperature of the metal-insulator transition and the dopant concentration in tungsten doped vanadium dioxide. We achieve good agreement with the experimental situation. 18.75% and 25% yttrium, lanthanum, praseodymium, samarium, and gadolinium doped ceria supercells generated by the special quasirandom structure approach are employed to investigate the impact of doping on the O diffusion. The experimental behavior of the conductivity for the

  5. Switching Plasmons: Gold Nanorod-Copper Chalcogenide Core-Shell Nanoparticle Clusters with Selectable Metal/Semiconductor NIR Plasmon Resonances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muhammed, Madathumpady Abubaker Habeeb; Döblinger, Markus; Rodríguez-Fernández, Jessica

    2015-09-16

    Exerting control over the near-infrared (NIR) plasmonic response of nanosized metals and semiconductors can facilitate access to unexplored phenomena and applications. Here we combine electrostatic self-assembly and Cd(2+)/Cu(+) cation exchange to obtain an anisotropic core-shell nanoparticle cluster (NPC) whose optical properties stem from two dissimilar plasmonic materials: a gold nanorod (AuNR) core and a copper selenide (Cu(2-x)Se, x ≥ 0) supraparticle shell. The spectral response of the AuNR@Cu2Se NPCs is governed by the transverse and longitudinal plasmon bands (LPB) of the anisotropic metallic core, since the Cu2Se shell is nonplasmonic. Under aerobic conditions the shell undergoes vacancy doping (x > 0), leading to the plasmon-rich NIR spectrum of the AuNR@Cu(2-x)Se NPCs. For low vacancy doping levels the NIR optical properties of the dually plasmonic NPCs are determined by the LPBs of the semiconductor shell (along its major longitudinal axis) and of the metal core. Conversely, for high vacancy doping levels their NIR optical response is dominated by the two most intense plasmon modes from the shell: the transverse (along the shortest transversal axis) and longitudinal (along the major longitudinal axis) modes. The optical properties of the NPCs can be reversibly switched back to a purely metallic plasmonic character upon reversible conversion of AuNR@Cu(2-x)Se into AuNR@Cu2Se. Such well-defined nanosized colloidal assemblies feature the unique ability of holding an all-metallic, a metallic/semiconductor, or an all-semiconductor plasmonic response in the NIR. Therefore, they can serve as an ideal platform to evaluate the crosstalk between plasmonic metals and plasmonic semiconductors at the nanoscale. Furthermore, their versatility to display plasmon modes in the first, second, or both NIR windows is particularly advantageous for bioapplications, especially considering their strong absorbing and near-field enhancing properties.

  6. Automatic Clustering of Rolling Element Bearings Defects with Artificial Neural Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonini, M.; Faglia, R.; Pedersoli, M.; Tiboni, M.

    2006-06-01

    The paper presents the optimization of a methodology for automatic clustering based on Artificial Neural Networks to detect the presence of defects in rolling bearings. The research activity was developed in co-operation with an Italian company which is expert in the production of water pumps for automotive use (Industrie Saleri Italo). The final goal of the work is to develop a system for the automatic control of the pumps, at the end of the production line. In this viewpoint, we are gradually considering the main elements of the water pump, which can cause malfunctioning. The first elements we have considered are the rolling bearing, a very critic component for the system. The experimental activity is based on the vibration measuring of rolling bearings opportunely damaged; vibration signals are in the second phase elaborated; the third and last phase is an automatic clustering. Different signal elaboration techniques are compared to optimize the methodology.

  7. Spin and Optical Characterization of Defects in Group IV Semiconductors for Quantum Memory Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, Brendon Charles

    This thesis is focused on the characterization of highly coherent defects in both silicon and diamond, particularly in the context of quantum memory applications. The results are organized into three parts based on the spin system: phosphorus donor electron spins in silicon, negatively charged nitrogen vacancy color centers in diamond (NV-), and neutrally charged silicon vacancy color centers in diamond (SiV0). The first part on phosphorus donor electron spins presents the first realization of strong coupling with spins in silicon. To achieve this, the silicon crystal was made highly pure and highly isotopically enriched so that the ensemble dephasing time, T2*, was long (10 micros). Additionally, the use of a 3D resonator aided in realizing uniform coupling, allowing for high fidelity spin ensemble manipulation. These two properties have eluded past implementations of strongly coupled spin ensembles and have been the limiting factor in storing and retrieving quantum information. Second, we characterize the spin properties of the NV- color center in diamond in a large magnetic field. We observe that the electron spin echo envelope modulation originating from the central 14N nuclear spin is much stronger at large fields and that the optically induced spin polarization exhibits a strong orientation dependence that cannot be explained by the existing model for the NV- optical cycle, we develop a modification of the existing model that reproduces the data in a large magnetic field. In the third part we perform characterization and stabilization of a new color center in diamond, SiV0, and find that it has attractive, highly sought-after properties for use as a quantum memory in a quantum repeater scheme. We demonstrate a new approach to the rational design of new color centers by engineering the Fermi level of the host material. The spin properties were characterized in electron spin resonance, revealing long spin relaxation and spin coherence times at cryogenic

  8. Spectroscopic study of native defects in the semiconductor to metal phase transition in V2O5 nanostructure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basu, Raktima; Dhara, Sandip

    2018-04-01

    Vanadium is a transition metal with multiple oxidation states and V2O5 is the most stable form among them. Besides catalysis, chemical sensing, and photo-chromatic applications, V2O5 is also reported to exhibit a semiconductor to metal transition (SMT) at a temperature range of 530-560 K. Even though there are debates in using the term "SMT" for V2O5, the metallic behavior above the transition temperature and its origin are of great interest in the scientific community. In this study, V2O5 nanostructures were deposited on a SiO2/Si substrate by the vapour transport method using Au as a catalyst. Temperature dependent electrical measurement confirms the SMT in V2O5 without any structural change. Temperature dependent photoluminescence analysis proves the appearance of oxygen vacancy related peaks due to reduction of V2O5 above the transition temperature, as also inferred from temperature dependent Raman spectroscopic studies. The newly evolved defect levels in the V2O5 electronic structure with increasing temperature are also understood from the downward shift of the bottom most split-off conduction bands due to breakdown of pdπ bonds leading to metallic behavior in V2O5 above the transition temperature.

  9. Disproportionation, dopant incorporation, and defect clustering in Perovskite-structured NdCoO3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tealdi, Cristina; Malavasi, Lorenzo; Fisher, Craig A J; Islam, M Saiful

    2006-03-23

    Atomistic simulation techniques are used to examine the defect chemistry of perovskite-structured NdCoO(3), a material whose electrochemical properties make it attractive for use in heterogeneous oxidation catalysis, as well as in gas sensors and mixed ionic/electronic conductors. In practice, dopants are added to NdCoO(3) to obtain the desired properties, such as high electrical conductivity and rapid gas adsorption/desorption; thus, a wide range of dopants substituted on both Nd and Co sites are examined. Charge compensation for aliovalent dopants is predicted to occur via formation of oxide ion vacancies; these are understood to be key sites with respect to catalytic and sensor activity. Low activation energies calculated for oxide ion migration are consistent with high oxygen mobilities measured experimentally. Sr and Ca, which occupy Nd sites in the lattice, are found to be the most soluble of the alkaline earth metals, in agreement with experiment. These two dopant ions also have the weakest binding energies for dopant-vacancy cluster formation. Mechanisms of electronic defect formation, critical to the overall transport properties of the material, are also considered. The results suggest that disproportionation of the Co ion to form small polaron species is the most favorable intrinsic defect process. In doped compounds, formation of electronic holes via uptake of oxygen at vacant sites is found to be a low energy process.

  10. Multiple-scattering clusta model of covalent semiconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leite, J.R.

    1983-01-01

    A review is presented of the multiple-scattering-cluster model proposed to study the electronic structure of defects and impurities in semiconductors. Applications of this method are discussed and results for the A center in silicon are shown. Recent results obtained for complex defects in silicon are also presented. The advantage of using a localized description of the electronic structure of solids instead of the conventional band structure description is emphasized. The promising agreement with experimental results leads to the conclusion that the cluster model discussed in this paper is a suitable technique for studying the electronic structure of locally perturbed semiconductors. Perspectives for future work are also analysed. (author) [pt

  11. Si clusters/defective graphene composites as Li-ion batteries anode materials: A density functional study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Meng; Liu, Yue-Jie; Zhao, Jing-xiang; Wang, Xiao-guang

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • We study the interaction between Si clusters with pristine and defective graphene. • We find that the binding strength of Si clusters on graphene can be enhanced to different degrees after introducing various defects. • It is found that both graphene and Si cluster in the Si/graphene composites can preserve their Li uptake ability. - Abstract: Recently, the Si/graphene hybrid composites have attracted considerable attention due to their potential application for Li-ion batteries. How to effectively anchor Si clusters to graphene substrates to ensure their stability is an important factor to determine their performance for Li-ion batteries. In the present work, we have performed comprehensive density functional theory (DFT) calculations to investigate the geometric structures, stability, and electronic properties of the deposited Si clusters on defective graphenes as well as their potential applications for Li-ion batteries. The results indicate that the interfacial bonding between these Si clusters with the pristine graphene is quietly weak with a small adsorption energy (<−0.21 eV). Due to the presence of vacancy site, the binding strength of Si clusters on defective graphene is much stronger than that of pristine one, accompanying with a certain amount of charge transfer from Si clusters to graphene substrates. Moreover, the ability of Si/graphene hybrids for Li uptake is studied by calculating the adsorption of Li atoms. We find that both graphenes and Si clusters in the Si/graphene composites preserve their Li uptake ability, indicating that graphenes not only server as buffer materials for accommodating the expansion of Si cluster, but also provide additional intercalation sites for Li

  12. Characterization of Structural Defects in Wide Band-Gap Compound Materials for Semiconductor and Opto-Electronic Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goue, Ouloide Yannick

    Single crystals of binary and ternary compounds are touted to replace silicon for specialized applications in the semiconductor industry. However, the relative high density of structural defects in those crystals has hampered the performance of devices built on them. In order to enhance the performance of those devices, structurally perfect single crystals must be grown. The aim of this thesis is to investigate the interplay between crystal growth process and crystal quality as well as structural defect types and transport property. To this end, the thesis is divided into two parts. The first part provides a general review of the theory of crystal growth (chapter I), an introduction to the materials being investigated (chapter II and III) and the characterization techniques being used (chapter IV). • In chapter I, a brief description of the theory of crystal growth is provided with an eye towards the driving force behind crystal nucleation and growth along with the kinetic factors affecting crystal growth. The case of crystal growth of silicon carbide (SiC) by physical vapor transport (PVT) and chemical vapor deposition (CVD) is discussed. The Bridgman, travelling heater method (THM) and physical transport growth of cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) is also treated. In chapters II and III, we introduce the compound materials being investigated in this study. While a description of their crystal structure and properties is provided, the issues associated with their growth are discussed. In chapter IV, a description of the characterization techniques used in these studies is presented. These techniques are synchrotron X-ray topography (SXRT), transmission electron microscopy, transmission infrared microscopy (TIM), micro-Raman spectroscopy (muRS) and light microscopy. Extensive treatment of SXRT technique is also provided. In the second part, the experimental results obtained in the course of these studies are presented and discussed. These results are divided into

  13. Spiking Excitable Semiconductor Laser as Optical Neurons: Dynamics, Clustering and Global Emerging Behaviors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-06-28

    N. Rubido, J. Tiana-Alsina, M. C. Torrent , and C. Masoller, Distinguishing signatures of deter- minism and stochasticity in spiking complex systems...Cohen, A. Aragoneses, D. Rontani, M. C. Torrent , C. Masoller and D. J. Gauthier, Multidimensional subwavelength position sensing using a...semiconductor laser with optical feedback, Opt. Lett. 38, 4331 (2013). Download 10. A. Aragoneses, T. Sorrentino, S. Perrone, D. J. Gauthier, M. C. Torrent and C

  14. Combining in situ transmission electron microscopy irradiation experiments with cluster dynamics modeling to study nanoscale defect agglomeration in structural metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Donghua; Wirth, Brian D.; Li Meimei; Kirk, Marquis A.

    2012-01-01

    We present a combinatorial approach that integrates state-of-the-art transmission electron microscopy (TEM) in situ irradiation experiments and high-performance computing techniques to study irradiation defect dynamics in metals. Here, we have studied the evolution of visible defect clusters in nanometer-thick molybdenum foils under 1 MeV krypton ion irradiation at 80 °C through both cluster dynamics modeling and in situ TEM experiments. The experimental details are reported elsewhere; we focus here on the details of model construction and comparing the model with the experiments. The model incorporates continuous production of point defects and/or small clusters, and the accompanying interactions, which include clustering, recombination and loss to the surfaces that result from the diffusion of the mobile defects. To account for the strong surface effect in thin TEM foils, the model includes one-dimensional spatial dependence along the foil depth, and explicitly treats the surfaces as black sinks. The rich amount of data (cluster number density and size distribution at a variety of foil thickness, irradiation dose and dose rate) offered by the advanced in situ experiments has allowed close comparisons with computer modeling and permitted significant validation and optimization of the model in terms of both physical model construct (damage production mode, identities of mobile defects) and parameterization (diffusivities of mobile defects). The optimized model exhibits good qualitative and quantitative agreement with the in situ TEM experiments. The combinatorial approach is expected to bring a unique opportunity for the study of radiation damage in structural materials.

  15. Lattice dynamics of local defects in wide-gap semiconductors; Schwingungsverhalten lokaler Defekte in Breitband-Halbleitern

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaczmarczyk, G.

    2006-07-01

    The group III-nitrides and zinc oxide are in the focus of material research because of their high application potential. The presentation of the first UV laser diode as well as blue light emitting diodes were the preliminary highlights. Although of all technological progress many physical questions are still open. In this work some of these questions are examined experimentally with Raman-scattering and theoretically with valence-force calculations. Many physical properties such as strain and doping concentration affect the lattice dynamics. As a start the phonons of the center of the Brillouin-zone in GaN, AlN, InN and ZnO are studied with first-order Raman-scattering. These results are the basis for advanced investigations. The acoustical and optical modes at the zone boundary and their combinations and overtones are determinated from the second-order Raman-scattering. Using the valence-force calculations the experimental frequencies are assigned to particular phonon branches or points of the Brillouin zone. The second part of this work treats systematically the physics of local vibrational modes. They occur due to intrinsic defects or impurities in the semiconductors. They are investigated with respect to the vibrational properties of the unperturbed crystals. In order to assign new experimentally found structures, calculations of local vibrational modes in GaN:Mg, GaN:As and ZnO:N systems were carried out. Furthermore, the calculations in Si- and C-doped hexagonal GaN suggest the frequency range for local vibrational modes. In the last section the influence of external parameters such as temperature or strain on the phonon frequency is analyzed. It is shown, that the influence on the temperature dependence of host phonons and local vibrational modes are dominated through different effects. In case of the host phonons it is mainly due to the volume effect whereas the local modes are highly affected by the anharmonic decay. Moreover, the calculations verified

  16. Ferromagnetism and suppression of metallic clusters in Fe implanted ZnO -- a phenomenon related to defects?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arenholz, Elke; Zhou, S.; Potzger, K.; Talut, G.; Reuther, H.; Kuepper, K.; Grenzer, J.; Xu, Q.; Mucklich, A.; Helm, M.; Fassbender, J.; Arenholz, E.

    2008-03-12

    We investigated ZnO(0001) single crystals annealed in high vacuum with respect to their magnetic properties and cluster formation tendency after implant-doping with Fe. While metallic Fe cluster formation is suppressed, no evidence for the relevance of the Fe magnetic moment to the observed ferromagnetism was found. The latter along with the cluster suppression is discussed with respect to defects in the ZnO host matrix, since the crystalline quality of the substrates was lowered due to the preparation as observed by x-ray diffraction.

  17. Problems and progress in radiation physics of semiconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vinetskij, V.L.

    1982-01-01

    A survey of the current status of radiation physics of semiconductors comprises the analysis of some new problems and poses the statement of concern. The essential difference between the probability of interstitial-vacancy pair occurrence W(T) in elastic collisions and the generally accepted step distribution with a typical ''threshold'' energy Tsub(d) is indicated. The role of diffusion and reaction evolution of primary defects leading to specific properties of the cluster formation process is shown. Special features of defect formation in spatially inhomogeneous semiconductors, in particular for elastic stresses present, are described. Among most important advances in the radiation physics of semiconductors there are the discovery of non-activation motion of the ''extra'' atom in silicon, the observation of a low activation energy value for the vacancy diffusion, the understanding of subthreshold mechanism of defect formation and radiation-induced diffusion, the effects of laser annealing of defects and oriented crystallization

  18. Si clusters/defective graphene composites as Li-ion batteries anode materials: A density functional study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Meng; Liu, Yue-Jie; Zhao, Jing-xiang; Wang, Xiao-guang

    2015-08-01

    Recently, the Si/graphene hybrid composites have attracted considerable attention due to their potential application for Li-ion batteries. How to effectively anchor Si clusters to graphene substrates to ensure their stability is an important factor to determine their performance for Li-ion batteries. In the present work, we have performed comprehensive density functional theory (DFT) calculations to investigate the geometric structures, stability, and electronic properties of the deposited Si clusters on defective graphenes as well as their potential applications for Li-ion batteries. The results indicate that the interfacial bonding between these Si clusters with the pristine graphene is quietly weak with a small adsorption energy (clusters on defective graphene is much stronger than that of pristine one, accompanying with a certain amount of charge transfer from Si clusters to graphene substrates. Moreover, the ability of Si/graphene hybrids for Li uptake is studied by calculating the adsorption of Li atoms. We find that both graphenes and Si clusters in the Si/graphene composites preserve their Li uptake ability, indicating that graphenes not only server as buffer materials for accommodating the expansion of Si cluster, but also provide additional intercalation sites for Li.

  19. A New Method of Obtaining an n- p-Structure on the Basis of the Defective Semiconductor AgIn5S8

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guseinov, A. G.; Salmanov, V. M.; Mamedov, R. M.; Dzhabrailova, R.; Magomedov, A. Z.

    2018-02-01

    The type of electrical conductivity of A 1 B 3 5 C 6 8 semiconductor compounds with defective crystalline structure is modified by the influence of powerful laser radiation. It is shown that at certain power and wavelength of laser radiation acting on the single-crystal п-AgIn5S8, an area with the p-type of conductivity is formed in the irradiated region of the crystal. Current-voltage characteristics of homo-junctions created on the basis of n-AgIn5S8 are recorded.

  20. International Conference of Defects in Semiconductors (19th), ICDS, Held in Aveiro, Portugal on July 21-25, 1997, Pt. 3

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-01-23

    J. Zhong, H.A. Kitai, P. Mascher and W. Puff, J. Electrochem. Soc. 140, 3644 (1993). 15. R.M. de la Cruz, R. Pareja , R. Gonzalez, L.A. Boatner and Y...22. R. Pareja , R.M. de la Cruz and P. Moser, J. Phys.: Condens. Matter 4, 7153 (1992). 23. K. Terashima, E. Tokizaki, A. Uedono and S. Tanigawa...defect- related Auger excitation and de -excitation of erbium ions in semiconductor matrices assisted by multiphonon transitions. The results are

  1. K-mean clustering algorithm for processing signals from compound semiconductor detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tada, Tsutomu; Hitomi, Keitaro; Wu, Yan; Kim, Seong-Yun; Yamazaki, Hiromichi; Ishii, Keizo

    2011-01-01

    The K-mean clustering algorithm was employed for processing signal waveforms from TlBr detectors. The signal waveforms were classified based on its shape reflecting the charge collection process in the detector. The classified signal waveforms were processed individually to suppress the pulse height variation of signals due to the charge collection loss. The obtained energy resolution of a 137 Cs spectrum measured with a 0.5 mm thick TlBr detector was 1.3% FWHM by employing 500 clusters.

  2. Defective functional connectivity between posterior hypothalamus and regions of the diencephalic-mesencephalic junction in chronic cluster headache.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferraro, Stefania; Nigri, Anna; Bruzzone, Maria Grazia; Brivio, Luca; Proietti Cecchini, Alberto; Verri, Mattia; Chiapparini, Luisa; Leone, Massimo

    2018-01-01

    Objective We tested the hypothesis of a defective functional connectivity between the posterior hypothalamus and diencephalic-mesencephalic regions in chronic cluster headache based on: a) clinical and neuro-endocrinological findings in cluster headache patients; b) neuroimaging findings during cluster headache attacks; c) neuroimaging findings in drug-refractory chronic cluster headache patients improved after successful deep brain stimulation. Methods Resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging, associated with a seed-based approach, was employed to investigate the functional connectivity of the posterior hypothalamus in chronic cluster headache patients (n = 17) compared to age and sex-matched healthy subjects (n = 16). Random-effect analyses were performed to study differences between patients and controls in ipsilateral and contralateral-to-the-pain posterior hypothalamus functional connectivity. Results Cluster headache patients showed an increased functional connectivity between the ipsilateral posterior hypothalamus and a number of diencephalic-mesencephalic structures, comprising ventral tegmental area, dorsal nuclei of raphe, and bilateral substantia nigra, sub-thalamic nucleus, and red nucleus ( p cluster headache patients mainly involves structures that are part of (i.e. ventral tegmental area, substantia nigra) or modulate (dorsal nuclei of raphe, sub-thalamic nucleus) the midbrain dopaminergic systems. The midbrain dopaminergic systems could play a role in cluster headache pathophysiology and in particular in the chronicization process. Future studies are needed to better clarify if this finding is specific to cluster headache or if it represents an unspecific response to chronic pain.

  3. Defect Clustering and Nano-Phase Structure Characterization of Multi-Component Rare Earth Oxide Doped Zirconia-Yttria Thermal Barrier Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Dongming; Chen, Yuan L.; Miller, Robert A.

    2003-01-01

    Advanced oxide thermal barrier coatings have been developed by incorporating multi-component rare earth oxide dopants into zirconia-yttria to effectively promote the creation of the thermodynamically stable, immobile oxide defect clusters and/or nano-scale phases within the coating systems. The presence of these nano-sized defect clusters has found to significantly reduce the coating intrinsic thermal conductivity, improve sintering resistance, and maintain long-term high temperature stability. In this paper, the defect clusters and nano-structured phases, which were created by the addition of multi-component rare earth dopants to the plasma-sprayed and electron-beam physical vapor deposited thermal barrier coatings, were characterized by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The defect cluster size, distribution, crystallographic and compositional information were investigated using high-resolution TEM lattice imaging, selected area diffraction (SAD), electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS) and energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) analysis techniques. The results showed that substantial defect clusters were formed in the advanced multi-component rare earth oxide doped zirconia- yttria systems. The size of the oxide defect clusters and the cluster dopant segregation was typically ranging from 5 to 50 nm. These multi-component dopant induced defect clusters are an important factor for the coating long-term high temperature stability and excellent performance.

  4. Fen (n=1–6) clusters chemisorbed on vacancy defects in graphene: Stability, spin-dipole moment, and magnetic anisotropy

    KAUST Repository

    Haldar, Soumyajyoti

    2014-05-09

    In this work, we have studied the chemical and magnetic interactions of Fen (n=1–6) clusters with vacancy defects (monovacancy to correlated vacancies with six missing C atoms) in a graphene sheet by ab initio density functional calculations combined with Hubbard U corrections for correlated Fe-d electrons. It is found that the vacancy formation energies are lowered in the presence of Fe, indicating an easier destruction of the graphene sheet. Due to strong chemical interactions between Fe clusters and vacancies, a complex distribution of magnetic moments appear on the distorted Fe clusters which results in reduced averaged magnetic moments compared to the free clusters. In addition to that, we have calculated spin-dipole moments and magnetic anisotropy energies. The calculated spin-dipole moments arising from anisotropic spin density distributions vary between positive and negative values, yielding increased or decreased effective moments. Depending on the cluster geometry, the easy axis of magnetization of the Fe clusters shows in-plane or out-of-plane behavior.

  5. Three-photon excited PL spectroscopy and photo-generated Frenkel defects in wide-bandgap layered CdI{sub 2} semiconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miah, M. Idrish, E-mail: m.miah@griffith.edu.a [Qeensland Micro- and Nanotechnology Centre, Griffith University, Nathan, Brisbane, QLD 4111 (Australia)] [School of Biomolecular and Physical Sciences, Griffith University, Nathan, Brisbane, QLD 4111 (Australia)] [Department of Physics, University of Chittagong, Chittagong-4331 (Bangladesh)

    2009-12-14

    We performed a three-photon excitation nonlinear photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy in single crystals of wide-bandgap semiconductors (WBSs). The crystal temperature (T{sub L})-dependent PL emission intensity (I{sub PL}) excited with different excitation power density (P) was measured. The PL emissions showed characteristics I{sub PL} with their maxima at around 520 nm. The I{sub PL} might be due to the presence of the photo-generated Frenkel defects (FDs) in WBSs. A detailed analysis of the PL spectra showed a third-order power law dependence of the maximum I{sub PL} on P for all the crystal temperature T{sub L}. The I{sub PL} was found to increase with decreasing T{sub L}. The results demonstrated the existence of the self-trapped excitons resulting from the presence of the FDs in the crystals.

  6. First-principles study of defect formation in a photovoltaic semiconductor Cu2ZnGeSe4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishihara, Hironori; Maeda, Tsuyoshi; Wada, Takahiro

    2018-02-01

    The formation energies of neutral Cu, Zn, Ge, and Se vacancies in kesterite-type Cu2ZnGeSe4 were evaluated by first-principles pseudopotential calculations using plane-wave basis functions. The calculations were performed at typical points in Cu-(Zn1/2Ge1/2)-Se and Cu3Se2-ZnSe-GeSe2 pseudoternary phase diagrams for Cu2ZnGeSe4. The results were compared with those for Cu2ZnSnSe4, Cu2ZnGeS4, and Cu2ZnSnS4 calculated using the same version of the CASTEP program code. The results indicate that Cu vacancies are easily formed in Cu2ZnGeSe4 under the Cu-poor condition as in the above compounds and CuInSe2, suggesting that Cu2ZnGeSe4 is also a preferable p-type absorber material for thin-film solar cells. The formation energies of possible antisite defects, such as CuZn and CuGe, and of possible complex defects, such as CuZn+ZnCu, were also calculated and compared within the above materials. The antisite defect of CuZn, which has the smallest formation energy within the possible defects, is concluded to be the most hardly formed in Cu2ZnGeSe4 among the compounds.

  7. Electron irradiation effects and recovery of defect clusters in TiC through high voltage electron microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iseki, Michio; Kirihara, Tomoo; Ushijima, Susumu; Ohashi, Hideki.

    1984-01-01

    Titanium carbide(TiCsub(0.8)) prepared by plasma-jet melting was irradiated to an electron dose less than 6x10 26 e/m 2 from room temperature to 800 0 C. The number density and average size of the defect clusters formed at irradiation temperatures below 400 0 C were less than those formed above 600 0 C. Since TiCsub(0.8) has an order structure of carbon below around 600 0 C, the ordered phase is more resistant to radiation than the disordered one in higher temperatures. The clusters decrease in number density and develop to dislocation loops during post irradiation annealing above 1,000 0 C. The burgers vector of the loops was determined as a/2 . There were two temperature region for the recovery of the defect clusters. It is conceivable that the first one appeared in the temperature region around 600 0 C caused by migration of carbon vacancies, and the second one appeared above 1,000 0 C by migration of titanium vacancies. (author)

  8. Relationship between optical coherence tomography sector peripapillary angioflow-density and Octopus visual field cluster mean defect values.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gábor Holló

    Full Text Available To compare the relationship of Octopus perimeter cluster mean-defect (cluster MD values with the spatially corresponding optical coherence tomography (OCT sector peripapillary angioflow vessel-density (PAFD and sector retinal nerve fiber layer thickness (RNFLT values.High quality PAFD and RNFLT images acquired on the same day with the Angiovue/RTVue-XR Avanti OCT (Optovue Inc., Fremont, USA on 1 eye of 27 stable early-to-moderate glaucoma, 22 medically controlled ocular hypertensive and 13 healthy participants were analyzed. Octopus G2 normal visual field test was made within 3 months from the imaging.Total peripapillary PAFD and RNFLT showed similar strong positive correlation with global mean sensitivity (r-values: 0.6710 and 0.6088, P<0.0001, and similar (P = 0.9614 strong negative correlation (r-values: -0.4462 and -0.4412, P≤0.004 with global MD. Both inferotemporal and superotemporal sector PAFD were significantly (≤0.039 lower in glaucoma than in the other groups. No significant difference between the corresponding inferotemporal and superotemporal parameters was seen. The coefficient of determination (R2 calculated for the relationship between inferotemporal sector PAFD and superotemporal cluster MD (0.5141, P<0.0001 was significantly greater than that between inferotemporal sector RNFLT and superotemporal cluster MD (0.2546, P = 0.0001. The R2 values calculated for the relationships between superotemporal sector PAFD and RNFLT, and inferotemporal cluster MD were similar (0.3747 and 0.4037, respectively, P<0.0001.In the current population the relationship between inferotemporal sector PAFD and superotemporal cluster MD was strong. It was stronger than that between inferotemporal sector RNFLT and superotemporal cluster MD. Further investigations are necessary to clarify if our results are valid for other populations and can be usefully applied for glaucoma research.

  9. Proteomic-based detection of a protein cluster dysregulated during cardiovascular development identifies biomarkers of congenital heart defects.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anjali K Nath

    Full Text Available Cardiovascular development is vital for embryonic survival and growth. Early gestation embryo loss or malformation has been linked to yolk sac vasculopathy and congenital heart defects (CHDs. However, the molecular pathways that underlie these structural defects in humans remain largely unknown hindering the development of molecular-based diagnostic tools and novel therapies.Murine embryos were exposed to high glucose, a condition known to induce cardiovascular defects in both animal models and humans. We further employed a mass spectrometry-based proteomics approach to identify proteins differentially expressed in embryos with defects from those with normal cardiovascular development. The proteins detected by mass spectrometry (WNT16, ST14, Pcsk1, Jumonji, Morca2a, TRPC5, and others were validated by Western blotting and immunoflorescent staining of the yolk sac and heart. The proteins within the proteomic dataset clustered to adhesion/migration, differentiation, transport, and insulin signaling pathways. A functional role for several proteins (WNT16, ADAM15 and NOGO-A/B was demonstrated in an ex vivo model of heart development. Additionally, a successful application of a cluster of protein biomarkers (WNT16, ST14 and Pcsk1 as a prenatal screen for CHDs was confirmed in a study of human amniotic fluid (AF samples from women carrying normal fetuses and those with CHDs.The novel finding that WNT16, ST14 and Pcsk1 protein levels increase in fetuses with CHDs suggests that these proteins may play a role in the etiology of human CHDs. The information gained through this bed-side to bench translational approach contributes to a more complete understanding of the protein pathways dysregulated during cardiovascular development and provides novel avenues for diagnostic and therapeutic interventions, beneficial to fetuses at risk for CHDs.

  10. Proteomic-based detection of a protein cluster dysregulated during cardiovascular development identifies biomarkers of congenital heart defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nath, Anjali K; Krauthammer, Michael; Li, Puyao; Davidov, Eugene; Butler, Lucas C; Copel, Joshua; Katajamaa, Mikko; Oresic, Matej; Buhimschi, Irina; Buhimschi, Catalin; Snyder, Michael; Madri, Joseph A

    2009-01-01

    Cardiovascular development is vital for embryonic survival and growth. Early gestation embryo loss or malformation has been linked to yolk sac vasculopathy and congenital heart defects (CHDs). However, the molecular pathways that underlie these structural defects in humans remain largely unknown hindering the development of molecular-based diagnostic tools and novel therapies. Murine embryos were exposed to high glucose, a condition known to induce cardiovascular defects in both animal models and humans. We further employed a mass spectrometry-based proteomics approach to identify proteins differentially expressed in embryos with defects from those with normal cardiovascular development. The proteins detected by mass spectrometry (WNT16, ST14, Pcsk1, Jumonji, Morca2a, TRPC5, and others) were validated by Western blotting and immunoflorescent staining of the yolk sac and heart. The proteins within the proteomic dataset clustered to adhesion/migration, differentiation, transport, and insulin signaling pathways. A functional role for several proteins (WNT16, ADAM15 and NOGO-A/B) was demonstrated in an ex vivo model of heart development. Additionally, a successful application of a cluster of protein biomarkers (WNT16, ST14 and Pcsk1) as a prenatal screen for CHDs was confirmed in a study of human amniotic fluid (AF) samples from women carrying normal fetuses and those with CHDs. The novel finding that WNT16, ST14 and Pcsk1 protein levels increase in fetuses with CHDs suggests that these proteins may play a role in the etiology of human CHDs. The information gained through this bed-side to bench translational approach contributes to a more complete understanding of the protein pathways dysregulated during cardiovascular development and provides novel avenues for diagnostic and therapeutic interventions, beneficial to fetuses at risk for CHDs.

  11. Molecular dynamics study on the interaction of a dislocation and radiation induced defect clusters in Fcc crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hideo, Kaburaki; Tomoko, Kadoyoshi; Futoshi, Shimizu; Hajime; Kimizuka; Shiro, Jitsukawa

    2003-01-01

    Irradiation of high-energy neutrons and charged particles into solids is known to cause a significant change in mechanical properties, in particular, hardening of metals. Hardening of solids arises as a result of interactions of dislocations with irradiation induced defect clusters. Molecular dynamics method combined with the visualization method has been used to elucidate these complex pinning structures in details. In particular, we have successfully observed the transient process for the formation of a super-jog from an edge dislocation and interstitial and vacancy clusters under irradiation cascade conditions. Parallel molecular dynamics programs, called as Parallel Molecular Dynamics Stencil (PMDS), have been developed in order to perform these large scale simulations for materials simulations. The contents of the program and its parallel performance are also reported. (authors)

  12. Stability and mobility of defect clusters and dislocation loops in metals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Osetsky, Y.N.; Bacon, D.J.; Serra, A.

    2000-01-01

    about the structure and properties of glissile clusters of self-interstitial atoms that are formed directly in the cascade volume. It has been found that such clusters consist of sets of crowdions and are highly mobile in the crowdion direction. Very recently, one-dimensional glide of similar character...... loops are reviewed, and the dynamics of glissile clusters assessed. The relevance and importance of these results in establishing a better understanding of the observed differences in the damage accumulation behaviour between bcc and fee metals irradiated under cascade damage conditions are pointed out...

  13. Anisotropy: an estimable alloy in the study of point defect clustering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weinberg, C.; Quere, Y.

    1986-09-01

    Crystal anisotropy forces vacancies and interstitials, in irradiated uranium, to cluster into two distinct families of dislocation loops. A consequence of this fortunate circumstance, the irradiation ''growth'', is easily observed by length measurements performed under neutron irradiation at ≅ 30-40 K. These experiments are analysed in a way which allows to detect two distinct modes of clustering for interstitials and vacancies. The same analysis is applied to previous experiments performed at ≅ 4K [1-2

  14. Structural and chemical disorder in semiconductors under pressure: Evidence in II-VI’s, role of photoactive defects, material predictions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinstein, Bernard A.; Lindberg, George P.; Gross, Nelson

    2017-05-01

    Hydrostatic pressure can sometimes generate structural and chemical disorder within crystals. We review pressure-Raman experiments on ZnSe, ZnTe, and CdSe showing evidence for these phenomena. In ZnSe and ZnTe Raman spectra recorded with low laser flux show only pre-transition structural disorder on approaching the lowest pressure transition, as is typical for first-order phase changes. Spectra recorded with higher laser flux (sub-band-gap) observe precipitation of anion nanocrystals. This behavior is absent in CdSe. A model is developed that considers the role of crystal defects. The defects promote plastic deformation assisted by photoexcitation of Jahn-Teller distortions. Nanocrystals can precipitate on dislocations in deformed regions under energetically favorable conditions. Model calculations based on theories for precipitation in metals account for the influence of pressure on the nanocrystal formation in ZnSe and ZnTe, and explain its absence in CdSe. Material maps are constructed to predict the tendencies for similar precipitation in III-V, II-VI, I-VII, and chalcopyrite crystals.

  15. A nanoscale characterisation of extended defects in glassy-like As 2Se 3 semiconductors with PAL technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shpotyuk, O.; Kovalskiy, A.; Filipecki, J.; Hyla, M.; Kozdras, A.

    2003-12-01

    A meaningful interpretation of positron lifetime characteristics for glassy-like g-As2Se3 is developed taking into account calculations of Jensen et al. (J. Non-Cryst. Solids 170 (1994) 57) for positrons trapped by free-volume extended defects in orthorhombic As2Se3 and void volume distribution for 146-atoms layer-biased model of amorphous As2Se3 presented by Popescu (J. Non-Cryst. Solids 35-36 (1980) 549). The obtained results are compared for samples having different thermal pre-history. Two groups of experimental results with close lifetime characteristics are distinguished for each of the investigated samples. This feature is explained in terms of average positron lifetime by applying two-state positron trapping model for mathematical treatment of the obtained spectra.

  16. Generation of vacancy cluster-related defects during single MeV silicon ion implantation of silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pastuović, Ž., E-mail: zkp@ansto.gov.au [Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organization, Locked Bag 2001, Kirrawee DC NSW 2232 (Australia); Capan, I. [Ruđer Bošković Institute, Bijenička cesta 54, P.O. Box 180, 10002 Zagreb (Croatia); Siegele, R. [Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organization, Locked Bag 2001, Kirrawee DC NSW 2232 (Australia); Jačimović, R. [Jozef Stefan Institute, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Forneris, J. [Physics Department and NIS Excellence Centre, University of Torino, INFN – sez. Torino, CNISM – sez. Torino, via P. Giuria 1, 10125 Torino (Italy); Cohen, D.D. [Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organization, Locked Bag 2001, Kirrawee DC NSW 2232 (Australia); Vittone, E. [Physics Department and NIS Excellence Centre, University of Torino, INFN – sez. Torino, CNISM – sez. Torino, via P. Giuria 1, 10125 Torino (Italy)

    2014-08-01

    Deep Level Transient Spectroscopy (DLTS) has been used to study defects formed in bulk silicon after implantation of 8.3 MeV {sup 28}Si{sup 3+} ions at room temperature. For this study, Schottky diodes prepared from n-type Czohralski-grown silicon wafers have been implanted in the single ion regime up to fluence value of 1 × 10{sup 10} cm{sup −2} utilizing the scanning focused ion microbeam as implantation tool and the Ion Beam Induced Current (IBIC) technique for ion counting. Differential DLTS analysis of the vacancy-rich region in self-implanted silicon reveals a formation of the broad vacancy-related defect state(s) at E{sub c} −0.4 eV. Direct measurements of the electron capture kinetics associated with this trap at E{sub c} −0.4 eV, prior to any annealing do not show an exponential behaviour typical for the simple point-like defects. The logarithmic capture kinetics is in accordance with the theory of majority carrier capture at extended or cluster-related defects. We have detected formation of two deep electron traps at E{sub c} −0.56 eV and E{sub c} −0.61 eV in the interstitial-rich region of the self-implanted silicon, before any annealing. No DLTS signal originating from vacancy-oxygen trap at E{sub c} −0.17 eV, present in the sample irradiated with 0.8 MeV neutrons, has been recorded in the self-implanted sample.

  17. Study of defects in GaAs and Zn Te semiconductors by electron paramagnetic resonance and by optically detected magnetic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bittebierre, J.

    1987-04-01

    Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and optically detected magnetic resonance (ODMR) studied the compensation processes that produce a semi-insulating state for the semiconductors GaAs and ZnTe under certain crystal growth conditions. The LEC-pBN gallium arsenide crystals studied are grown for use as semi-insulating substrates. EPR identifies the antisite As Ga + as being the principal defect responsible for compensating the majority acceptor impurity C As - . The defect EL2 is identified as being an isolated As Ga antisite and, in carbon rich crystals, pairs associating As Ga + and C As - are formed. This introduces levels in the bandgap between EL2 and E c , which explains the paradoxically high position of the Fermi level in carbon rich samples. New centres appear in infrared irradiation. Three of these centres, at least one of which has its ESR transitions induced by the electric field, are identified as acceptors. Their study provided an understanding of the complex phenomena that occur during infrared irradiation at 1.2 eV and provide proof that the metastable state of EL2 lies in the valence band. ODMR identifies two low symmetry acceptors in ZnTe, which are zinc vacancy - donor impurity pairs (V Zn - D) having unquenched orbital momentum and intermediate depth. They contrast with the deep, strongly pseudo-Jahn-Teller distorted configurations observed for the same kind of V Zn - D pairs in ZnS and ZnSe. The difficulty of obtaining n-type ZnTe is explained by the formation of these complex acceptors [fr

  18. Motion control in double-walled carbon nanotube systems using a Stone-Thrower-Wales defect cluster

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Ping; Zhang Yongwei

    2010-01-01

    The ability to control the motion of a single molecule will have an important impact in nano-mechanical systems. Multi-walled carbon nanotube systems, which have extremely low intertube friction and strong motion confinement, can form the basis for mechanically based motion control. We devise two molecular motion control units based on double-walled carbon nanotubes embedded with a Stone-Thrower-Wales defect cluster, and perform molecular dynamics simulations to determine the characteristics of these two control units. We show that one of the molecular control units is able to perform a logic operation on one logic input and produce three logic outputs, while the other is able to produce two logic outputs. Potential applications of the motion control units include molecular switches, shuttles and mechanically based logic devices.

  19. Study of the interplay between N-graphene defects and small Pd clusters for enhanced hydrogen storage via a spill-over mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rangel, E; Sansores, E; Vallejo, E; Hernández-Hernández, A; López-Pérez, P A

    2016-12-07

    The hydrogen spill-over mechanism was studied by applying Density Functional Theory. We used small palladium clusters to act as the catalyst supported on the substrate (comprised of pyridinic and pyrrolic nitrogen doped graphene), in order to study hydrogen dissociation, migration and diffusion. Charge transfer and strong binding between the catalyst and the substrate lead to dissociated states of H 2 and prevent clusters from detaching and coalescing. In dissociated cases of H 2 on Pd clusters, energy barriers below 0.6 eV were found. Likewise, concerning hydrogen migration from the catalyst to the substrate, energy barrier values of 0.8 eV (pyridinic defect) and 0.5 eV (pyrrolic defect) were apparent in the case of the Pd 4 cluster at full hydrogen saturation. This indicates that hydrogen dissociation and migration may occur spontaneously at room temperature. This result shows that the interaction between the defects and the small metal clusters may explain the role that defects play in hydrogen migration from the catalyst to the substrate. Subsequently, it was found that thermal desorption does not limit chemisorbed hydrogen diffusion on the substrate. This work may thus help to determine experimental strategies with the capacity to enhance hydrogen storage.

  20. Defect Clustering and Nano-phase Structure Characterization of Multicomponent Rare Earth-Oxide-Doped Zirconia-Yttria Thermal Barrier Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Dongming; Chen, Yuan L.; Miller, Robert A.

    2004-01-01

    Advanced thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) have been developed by incorporating multicomponent rare earth oxide dopants into zirconia-based thermal barrier coatings to promote the creation of the thermodynamically stable, immobile oxide defect clusters and/or nanophases within the coating systems. In this paper, the defect clusters, induced by Nd, Gd, and Yb rare earth dopants in the zirconia-yttria thermal barrier coatings, were characterized by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The TEM lattice imaging, selected area diffraction (SAD), and electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS) analyses demonstrated that the extensive nanoscale rare earth dopant segregation exists in the plasma-sprayed and electron-physical-vapor-deposited (EB PVD) thermal barrier coatings. The nanoscale concentration heterogeneity and the resulting large lattice distortion promoted the formation of parallel and rotational defective lattice clusters in the coating systems. The presence of the 5-to 100-nm-sized defect clusters and nanophases is believed to be responsible for the significant reduction of thermal conductivity, improved sintering resistance, and long-term high temperature stability of the advanced thermal barrier coating systems.

  1. On the application of the weak-beam technique to the determination of the sizes of small point-defect clusters in ion-irradiated copper

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jenkins, M. L.

    1998-01-01

    We have made an analysis of the conditions necessary for the successful use of the weak-beam technique for identifying and characterizing small point-defect clusters in ion-irradiated copper. The visibility of small defects was found to depend only weakly on the magnitude of the beam-convergence. In general, the image sizes of small clusters were found to be most sensitive to the magnitude of Sa with the image sizes of some individual defects changing by large amounts with changes as small as 0.025 nm -1 . The most reliable information on the true defect size is likely to be obtained by taking a series of 5-9 micrographs with a systematic variation of deviation parameter from 0.2-0.3 nm -1 . This procedure allows size information to be obtained down to a resolution limit of about 0.5 nm for defects situated throughout a foil thickness of 60 nm. The technique has been applied to the determination of changes in the sizes of small defects produced by a low-temperature in-situ irradiation and annealing experiment

  2. Organic semiconductor crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chengliang; Dong, Huanli; Jiang, Lang; Hu, Wenping

    2018-01-22

    Organic semiconductors have attracted a lot of attention since the discovery of highly doped conductive polymers, due to the potential application in field-effect transistors (OFETs), light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) and photovoltaic cells (OPVs). Single crystals of organic semiconductors are particularly intriguing because they are free of grain boundaries and have long-range periodic order as well as minimal traps and defects. Hence, organic semiconductor crystals provide a powerful tool for revealing the intrinsic properties, examining the structure-property relationships, demonstrating the important factors for high performance devices and uncovering fundamental physics in organic semiconductors. This review provides a comprehensive overview of the molecular packing, morphology and charge transport features of organic semiconductor crystals, the control of crystallization for achieving high quality crystals and the device physics in the three main applications. We hope that this comprehensive summary can give a clear picture of the state-of-art status and guide future work in this area.

  3. Development of III-nitride semiconductors by molecular beam epitaxy and cluster beam epitaxy and fabrication of LEDs based on indium gallium nitride MQWs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Tai-Chou Papo

    The family of III-Nitrides (the binaries InN, GaN, AIN, and their alloys) is one of the most important classes of semiconductor materials. Of the three, Indium Nitride (InN) and Aluminum Nitride (AIN) have been investigated much less than Gallium Nitride (GaN). However, both of these materials are important for optoelectronic infrared and ultraviolet devices. In particular, since InN was found recently to be a narrow gap semiconductor (Eg=0.7eV), its development should extend the applications of nitride semiconductors to the spectral region appropriate to fiber optics communication and photovoltaic applications. Similarly, the development of AIN should lead to deep UV light emitting diodes (LEDs). The first part of this work addresses the evaluation of structural, optical and transport properties of InN films grown by two different deposition methods. In one method, active nitrogen was produced in the form of nitrogen radicals by a radio frequency (RF) plasma-assisted source. In an alternative method, active nitrogen was produced in the form of clusters containing approximately 2000 nitrogen molecules. These clusters were produced by adiabatic expansion from high stagnation pressure through a narrow nozzle into vacuum. The clusters were singly or doubly ionized with positive charge by electron impact and accelerated up to approximately 20 to 25 KV prior to their disintegration on the substrate. Due to the high local temperature produced during the impact of clusters with the substrate, this method is suitable for the deposition of InN at very low temperatures. The films are auto-doped n-type with carrier concentrations varying from 3 x 1018 to 1020 cm-3 and the electron effective mass of these films was determined to be 0.09m0. The majority of the AIN films was grown by the cluster beam epitaxy method and was doped n- and p- type by incorporating silicon (Si) and magnesium (Mg) during the film deposition. All films were grown under Al-rich conditions at relatively

  4. Repairing Nanoparticle Surface Defects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marino, Emanuele; Kodger, Thomas E.; Crisp, R.W.; Timmerman, Dolf; MacArthur, Katherine E.; Heggen, Marc; Schall, Peter

    2017-01-01

    Solar devices based on semiconductor nanoparticles require the use of conductive ligands; however, replacing the native, insulating ligands with conductive metal chalcogenide complexes introduces structural defects within the crystalline nanostructure that act as traps for charge carriers. We

  5. Si-semiconductor device failure mechanisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clauss, H.

    1976-12-01

    This report presents investigations on failure mechanisms that may cause defects during production and operation of silicon semiconductor devices. The failure analysis of aluminium metallization defects covers topics such as step coverage, dissolution pits and electromigration. Furthermore, the generation of process induced lattice defects was investigated. Improved processes avoiding those defects were developed. (orig.) [de

  6. clusters

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2017-09-27

    Sep 27, 2017 ... while CuCoNO, Co3NO, Cu3CoNO, Cu2Co3NO, Cu3Co3NO and Cu6CoNO clusters display stronger chemical stability. Magnetic and electronic properties are also discussed. The magnetic moment is affected by charge transfer and the spd hybridization. Keywords. CumConNO (m + n = 2–7) clusters; ...

  7. cluster

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    has been investigated electrochemically in positive and negative microenvironments, both in solution and in film. Charge nature around the active centre ... in plants, bacteria and also in mammals. This cluster is also an important constituent of a ..... selection of non-cysteine amino acid in the active centre of Rieske proteins.

  8. Semiconductor statistics

    CERN Document Server

    Blakemore, J S

    1987-01-01

    In-depth exploration of the implications of carrier populations and Fermi energies examines distribution of electrons in energy bands and impurity levels of semiconductors. Also: kinetics of semiconductors containing excess carriers, particularly in terms of trapping, excitation, and recombination.

  9. Semiconductor physics

    CERN Document Server

    Böer, Karl W

    2018-01-01

    This handbook gives a complete survey of the important topics and results in semiconductor physics. It addresses every fundamental principle and most research topics and areas of application in the field of semiconductor physics. Comprehensive information is provided on crystalline bulk and low-dimensional as well as amporphous semiconductors, including optical, transport, and dynamic properties.

  10. Hydrogen in semiconductors

    CERN Document Server

    Pankove, Jacques I

    1991-01-01

    Hydrogen plays an important role in silicon technology, having a profound effect on a wide range of properties. Thus, the study of hydrogen in semiconductors has received much attention from an interdisciplinary assortment of researchers. This sixteen-chapter volume provides a comprehensive review of the field, including a discussion of hydrogenation methods, the use of hydrogen to passivate defects, the use of hydrogen to neutralize deep levels, shallow acceptors and shallow donors in silicon, vibrational spectroscopy, and hydrogen-induced defects in silicon. In addition to this detailed cove

  11. Study of clustering point defects under irradiation in dilute iron alloys; Etude de la formation sous irradiation des amas de defauts ponctuels dans les alliages ferritiques faiblement allies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duong-Hardouin Duparc, T.H.A

    1998-12-31

    In low copper steels for nuclear reactor pressure vessel, point defect clustering plays an important role in hardening. These clusters are very small and invisible by transmission electron microscopy. In order to study the hardening component which results from the clustering of freely migrating point defects, we irradiated in a high voltage electron microscope Fe, the FeCu{sub 0.13%}, FeP{sub 0.015%} and FeN{sub 33ppm} alloys and the complex FeMn{sub 1.5%}Ni{sub 0.8%}Cu{sub 0.13%}P{sub 0.01%} alloy the composition of which is close to the matrix of pressure vessel steel. We studied the nucleation of dislocation loops and their growth velocity. The observations and the analyses have shown that in the complex model alloy, the interstitial dislocation loops are smaller and their density is more important than for the others alloys. The diffusion coefficients of interstitials and vacancies are obtained with the help of a simplified model. The densities of dislocation loops and their growth velocities obtained experimentally are reproduced by means of a cluster dynamics model we have developed. This is achieved self-consistently by using as a first trial the approximated coefficients obtained with the simplified model. The results of calculations have shown that the binding energy of di-interstitials must be very important in the binary iron alloys and only 0.95 eV in iron. Copper, nitrogen and phosphorus stabilize di-interstitials in iron. Finally the distribution of interstitial loops at 290 deg C and at 2.10{sup -9} dpa/s is calculated with the diffusion coefficient of point defects adjusted in FeCu. A distribution of small loops appears which gives an increase of hardening estimated to 10 Hv instead of 33 Hv experimentally observed. This low value can be improved by assuming in agreement with molecular dynamics simulations that a little fraction of di-interstitials is created at 2.5 MeV. (author) 111 refs.

  12. Effect of structural distortion and nature of bonding on the electronic properties of defect and Li-substituted CuInSe2 chalcopyrite semiconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mishra, S.; Ganguli, B.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► CuInSe 2 , CuIn 2 Se 4 and Cu 0.5 Li 0.5 InSe 2 are direct band gap semiconductors of band gap 0.79 eV, 1.50 eV and 1.08 eV, respectively. ► The reduction in band gaps due to Se p–Cu d hybridization is 59.57% and 23.61% for CuInSe 2 and CuIn 2 Se 4 , respectively. ► Though Li does not have any d orbital contribution but its doping (Cu 0.5 Li 0.5 InSe 2 ) reduces the band gap significantly. The reduction due to Se p–Cu d hybridization and Li doping in Cu 0.5 Li 0.5 InSe 2 is 48.82%. ► There is significant reduction in band gap by 16.85%, 9.10% and 0.92% due to structural distortion in all the compounds, respectively. ► Effect of bond nature on electronic properties is also discussed on the basis of electronegativity differences of the atoms in all three compounds. - Abstract: We report the structural and electronic properties of chalcopyrite semiconductors CuInSe 2 , CuIn 2 Se 4 and Cu 0.5 Li 0.5 InSe 2 . Our calculation is based on density functional theory within tight binding linear muffin-tin orbital (TB-LMTO) method. The calculated lattice constants, anion displacement parameter (u), tetragonal distortion parameter (η = c/2a) and bond lengths agree well with experimental values. Our result shows these compounds are direct band gap semiconductors. Our calculated band gaps, 0.79 eV and 1.08 eV of CuInSe 2 and Cu 0.5 Li 0.5 InSe 2 , respectively, agree well with the experimental values within the limitation of LDA. The band gap of CuIn 2 Se 4 is found to be 1.50 eV. The band gap is reduced by 59.57%, 23.61% and 48.82% due to p–d hybridization and reduced by 16.85%, 9.10% and 0.92% due to structural distortion for CuInSe 2 , CuIn 2 Se 4 and Cu 0.5 Li 0.5 InSe 2 , respectively. We also discuss the effect of bond nature on electronic properties of all three compounds.

  13. High temperature operation of n-AlGaN channel metal semiconductor field effect transistors on low-defect AlN templates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muhtadi, S.; Hwang, S.; Coleman, A.; Asif, F.; Lunev, A.; Chandrashekhar, M. V. S.; Khan, A.

    2017-05-01

    We report room-temperature to 200 °C operation of n-Al0.65Ga0.35N channel metal semiconductor field effect transistors (MESFET) grown over high-quality AlN/sapphire templates. For this temperature range, the source-drain currents, threshold voltages, and dc-transconductance values remain nearly unchanged with an estimated field-effect mobility of ˜90 cm2/V-s at 200 °C and currents of >100 mA/mm. The analysis of the temperature dependent current-voltage characteristics of the gate-source Schottky barrier diode reveals that the leakage currents arise from Frenkel-Poole emission. The capacitance-voltage data show no hysteresis, indicating a high quality Schottky barrier interface. These MESFET's have excellent potential for use as a high temperature power electronic or a solar-blind ultraviolet sensing device.

  14. Proceedings of the 20th International Conference on Defects in Semiconductors Held in Berkeley, CA, USA, 26-30 July 1999

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-07-30

    Tecnologia of Portugal, Programa PRAXIS XXI /BCC/10003/96. The authors would like to thank A.A. Stuk for supplying the samples and to A.V. Voevodova...Rehberg 705 Defect investigations in plastically deformed gallium arsenide H.S. Leipner, CG. Hübner, P. Grau and R. Krause-Rehberg 710 Contents xxi ...comes paramagnetic. Acknowledgements This work was supported in part by FCT under con- tracts PRAXIS/PCEX/FIS/0012/96, PRAXIS XXI /BD/ 18405/98 and

  15. Hybrid anode for semiconductor radiation detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ge; Bolotnikov, Aleksey E; Camarda, Guiseppe; Cui, Yonggang; Hossain, Anwar; Kim, Ki Hyun; James, Ralph B

    2013-11-19

    The present invention relates to a novel hybrid anode configuration for a radiation detector that effectively reduces the edge effect of surface defects on the internal electric field in compound semiconductor detectors by focusing the internal electric field of the detector and redirecting drifting carriers away from the side surfaces of the semiconductor toward the collection electrode(s).

  16. Photoelectrochemistry of Semiconductor Nanowire Arrays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mallouk, Thomas E; Redwing, Joan M

    2009-11-10

    This project supported research on the growth and photoelectrochemical characterization of semiconductor nanowire arrays, and on the development of catalytic materials for visible light water splitting to produce hydrogen and oxygen. Silicon nanowires were grown in the pores of anodic aluminum oxide films by the vapor-liquid-solid technique and were characterized electrochemically. Because adventitious doping from the membrane led to high dark currents, silicon nanowire arrays were then grown on silicon substrates. The dependence of the dark current and photovoltage on preparation techniques, wire diameter, and defect density was studied for both p-silicon and p-indium phosphide nanowire arrays. The open circuit photovoltage of liquid junction cells increased with increasing wire diameter, reaching 350 mV for micron-diameter silicon wires. Liquid junction and radial p-n junction solar cells were fabricated from silicon nano- and microwire arrays and tested. Iridium oxide cluster catalysts stabilized by bidentate malonate and succinate ligands were also made and studied for the water oxidation reaction. Highlights of this project included the first papers on silicon and indium phosphide nanowire solar cells, and a new procedure for making ligand-stabilized water oxidation catalysts that can be covalently linked to molecular photosensitizers or electrode surfaces.

  17. A nanoscale characterisation of extended defects in glassy-like As{sub 2}Se{sub 3} semiconductors with PAL technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shpotyuk, O.; Kovalskiy, A.; Filipecki, J.; Hyla, M.; Kozdras, A

    2003-12-31

    A meaningful interpretation of positron lifetime characteristics for glassy-like g-As{sub 2}Se{sub 3} is developed taking into account calculations of Jensen et al. (J. Non-Cryst. Solids 170 (1994) 57) for positrons trapped by free-volume extended defects in orthorhombic As{sub 2}Se{sub 3} and void volume distribution for 146-atoms layer-biased model of amorphous As{sub 2}Se{sub 3} presented by Popescu (J. Non-Cryst. Solids 35-36 (1980) 549). The obtained results are compared for samples having different thermal pre-history. Two groups of experimental results with close lifetime characteristics are distinguished for each of the investigated samples. This feature is explained in terms of average positron lifetime by applying two-state positron trapping model for mathematical treatment of the obtained spectra.

  18. Semiconductor spintronics

    CERN Document Server

    Xia, Jianbai; Chang, Kai

    2012-01-01

    Semiconductor Spintronics, as an emerging research discipline and an important advanced field in physics, has developed quickly and obtained fruitful results in recent decades. This volume is the first monograph summarizing the physical foundation and the experimental results obtained in this field. With the culmination of the authors' extensive working experiences, this book presents the developing history of semiconductor spintronics, its basic concepts and theories, experimental results, and the prospected future development. This unique book intends to provide a systematic and modern foundation for semiconductor spintronics aimed at researchers, professors, post-doctorates, and graduate students, and to help them master the overall knowledge of spintronics.

  19. Macroporous Semiconductors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helmut Föll

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Pores in single crystalline semiconductors come in many forms (e.g., pore sizes from 2 nm to > 10 µm; morphologies from perfect pore crystal to fractal and exhibit many unique properties directly or as nanocompounds if the pores are filled. The various kinds of pores obtained in semiconductors like Ge, Si, III-V, and II-VI compound semiconductors are systematically reviewed, emphasizing macropores. Essentials of pore formation mechanisms will be discussed, focusing on differences and some open questions but in particular on common properties. Possible applications of porous semiconductors, including for example high explosives, high efficiency electrodes for Li ion batteries, drug delivery systems, solar cells, thermoelectric elements and many novel electronic, optical or sensor devices, will be introduced and discussed.

  20. Semiconductor heterojunctions

    CERN Document Server

    Sharma, B L

    1974-01-01

    Semiconductor Heterojunctions investigates various aspects of semiconductor heterojunctions. Topics covered include the theory of heterojunctions and their energy band profiles, electrical and optoelectronic properties, and methods of preparation. A number of heterojunction devices are also considered, from photovoltaic converters to photodiodes, transistors, and injection lasers.Comprised of eight chapters, this volume begins with an overview of the theory of heterojunctions and a discussion on abrupt isotype and anisotype heterojunctions, along with graded heterojunctions. The reader is then

  1. A new silver metaniobate semiconductor of Ag0.5La0.5Nb2O6 with defect-perovskite structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mi, Longqing; Feng, Yongyi; Cao, Lei; Xue, Mingqiang; Huang, Yanlin; Qin, Lin; Seo, Hyo Jin

    2018-03-01

    Silver-containing lanthanum metaniobate Ag0.5La0.5Nb2O6 nanoparticles were synthesized by sol-gel polymerized complex method. A typical defect-perovskite structure was confirmed by XRD Rietveld refinements. The surface characteristics of the sample were tested by SEM, TEM and EDS measurements. SEM and TEM show that the sample presents ball-like particles with the diameters of 100 nm to 400 nm. The sample shows both self-activated luminescence and photocatalytic activities. Ag0.5La0.5Nb2O6 has a direct transition with band energy of 2.85 eV. The Ag4d-O2p hybridization in the valence band contributes to the narrowed band gap. The luminescence properties of Ag0.5La0.5Nb2O6 have been investigated for the first time. The luminescence is characterized by two emission centers with maximum wavelength near 460 and 530 nm. The emission and excitation spectra, decay curves and the thermal quenching mechanism were discussed. Ag0.5La0.5Nb2O6 shows the efficient photocatalytic activities and the photodegradation rate for methylene blue dye (MB) can reach about 95% under visible light (> 420 nm) irradiation in 5 h. The trapped experiments for the active species were tested and discussed, which verified that rad OH radicals could be the major active species in photocatalysis.

  2. Monitoring of stress relaxation and defect formation in metamorphic III-V semiconductor heterostructures for high-efficiency solar cells; Kontrolle von Spannungsrelaxation und Defektbildung in metamorphen III-V Halbleiterheterostrukturen fuer hocheffiziente Solarzellen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schoene, Jan

    2009-07-21

    The paper discusses the further development of monolithic III-V multiple solar cells with three pn transitions for applications in concentrating PV systems. These triple solar cells consist of a GaInP upper cell, a GaInAs middle cell and a germanium lower cell, which are connected via electrically conducting and optically transparent tunnel diodes. Efficiencies are higher than 40 % with concentrated light. Demands on materials for III-V high-efficiency solar cells are extremely high. Especially in the metamorphic triple solar cell, for which compound semiconductors with different interatomic distances are deposited epitactically on each other, crystal defects may occur that impair the performance of the solar cell. The use of appropriate layer growing concepts may manipulate the formation of crystal defects and minimize their influence on solar cell performance. Both conventional and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (TEM and HRTEM) as well as high-resolution X-ray diffraction (HRXRD) were applied successfully for investigating defect formation and layer stresses. In the investigations described, these methods were applied to develop a high-efficiency triple solar cell with a world first efficiency of 41.1 percent in concentrated light. [German] Diese Arbeit beschaeftigt sich mit der Weiterentwicklung von monolithischen III-V-Mehrfach-Solarzellen mit drei pn-Uebergaengen fuer die Anwendung in konzentrierenden Photovoltaiksystemen. Diese Tripelsolarzellen bestehen aus einer GaInP-Oberzelle, einer GaInAs-Mittelzelle und einer Germanium-Unterzelle, die mittels elektrisch leitender und optisch transparenter Tunneldioden verbunden sind. Derartige Solarzellen erzielen mittlerweile Rekordwirkungsgrade von mehr als 40 % unter konzentriertem Licht. Bei den III-V Hocheffizienzsolarzellen sind die Anforderungen an die Materialqualitaet ausserordentlich hoch. Insbesondere bei der metamorphen Tripelsolarzelle, bei der Verbindungshalbleiter mit unterschiedlichen

  3. Characterization of the structure and chemistry of defects in materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larson, B.C.; Ruehle, M.; Seidman, D.N.

    1988-01-01

    Research programs, presented at the materials research symposium, on defects in materials are presented. Major areas include: point defects, defect aggregates, and ordering; defects in non-metals and semiconductors; atomic resolution imaging of defects; and gain boundaries, interfaces, and layered materials. Individual projects are processed separately for the data bases

  4. Semiconductor characterization for optoelectronics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miner, C.J. [Bell Northern Research Ltd., Ottawa, ON (Canada)

    1996-03-01

    Scanning reflectance spectroscopy, scanning photoluminescence, and double crystal x-ray diffraction mapping are all specialized non-destructive characterization tools which monitor the advanced materials used in the development of high speed optoelectronics. Each technology was described and their application in the assessment of III-V semiconductor composition, layer thickness and defect density was demonstrated. The new techniques have been optimized for speed, to make high spatial resolution mapping practical. Since the tests are non-destructive, frequent monitoring is possible. 11 refs., 7 figs.

  5. Hot carrier degradation in semiconductor devices

    CERN Document Server

    2015-01-01

    This book provides readers with a variety of tools to address the challenges posed by hot carrier degradation, one of today’s most complicated reliability issues in semiconductor devices.  Coverage includes an explanation of carrier transport within devices and book-keeping of how they acquire energy (“become hot”), interaction of an ensemble of colder and hotter carriers with defect precursors, which eventually leads to the creation of a defect, and a description of how these defects interact with the device, degrading its performance. • Describes the intricacies of hot carrier degradation in modern semiconductor technologies; • Covers the entire hot carrier degradation phenomenon, including topics such as characterization, carrier transport, carrier-defect interaction, technological impact, circuit impact, etc.; • Enables detailed understanding of carrier transport, interaction of the carrier ensemble with the defect precursors, and an accurate assessment of how the newly created defects imp...

  6. Semiconductor electrochemistry

    CERN Document Server

    Memming, Rüdiger

    2015-01-01

    Providing both an introduction and an up-to-date survey of the entire field, this text captivates the reader with its clear style and inspiring, yet solid presentation. The significantly expanded second edition of this milestone work is supplemented by a completely new chapter on the hot topic of nanoparticles and includes the latest insights into the deposition of dye layers on semiconductor electrodes. In his monograph, the acknowledged expert Professor Memming primarily addresses physical and electrochemists, but materials scientists, physicists, and engineers dealing with semiconductor technology and its applications will also benefit greatly from the contents.

  7. Semiconductor statistics

    CERN Document Server

    Blakemore, J S

    1962-01-01

    Semiconductor Statistics presents statistics aimed at complementing existing books on the relationships between carrier densities and transport effects. The book is divided into two parts. Part I provides introductory material on the electron theory of solids, and then discusses carrier statistics for semiconductors in thermal equilibrium. Of course a solid cannot be in true thermodynamic equilibrium if any electrical current is passed; but when currents are reasonably small the distribution function is but little perturbed, and the carrier distribution for such a """"quasi-equilibrium"""" co

  8. Oxide semiconductors

    CERN Document Server

    Svensson, Bengt G; Jagadish, Chennupati

    2013-01-01

    Semiconductors and Semimetals has distinguished itself through the careful selection of well-known authors, editors, and contributors. Originally widely known as the ""Willardson and Beer"" Series, it has succeeded in publishing numerous landmark volumes and chapters. The series publishes timely, highly relevant volumes intended for long-term impact and reflecting the truly interdisciplinary nature of the field. The volumes in Semiconductors and Semimetals have been and will continue to be of great interest to physicists, chemists, materials scientists, and device engineers in academia, scient

  9. Radiation hardening: study of production velocity and post-irradiation recovery of defect clusters produced by neutron irradiation at 77 K

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez, Hector C.; Miralles, Monica T.

    1999-01-01

    This work includes three basic studies using radiation hardening of Cu single crystals irradiated at 77 K in the RA-1-reactor of CNEA: 1) The initial of a production curve of defect clusters originated during radiation until 5.2 x 10 20 n m 2 . The shape of the curve is compared with those obtained from measurement of resistivity increased (Δρ) with neutronic doses (φt) and the acceptance of the linear dependency of Δρ with Frenkel Pairs concentration (PFs); 2) The isochronal hardening recovery in the temperature interval of stage V (T > 450 K). The existence of the sub-stages Vb (∼ 550 K) and Vc (∼ 587 K), determined for the first time from hardening measurements, are shown and compared with results obtained by other techniques; 3) Isothermal recoveries performed in the temperature interval of the sub-stage Vc to determine phenomenologically the apparent activation energy of the sub-stage. The value obtained was in agreement with the energy for Cu vacancies auto diffusion. (author)

  10. Semiconductor Detectors; Detectores de Semiconductores

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cortina, E.

    2007-07-01

    Particle detectors based on semiconductor materials are among the few devices used for particle detection that are available to the public at large. In fact we are surrounded by them in our daily lives: they are used in photoelectric cells for opening doors, in digital photographic and video camera, and in bar code readers at supermarket cash registers. (Author)

  11. Transient photoconductivity in amorphous semiconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mpawenayo, P.

    1997-07-01

    Localized states in amorphous semiconductors are divided in disorder induced shallow trap levels and dangling bonds deep states. Dangling bonds are assumed here to be either neutral or charged and their energy distribution is a single gaussian. Here, it is shown analytically that transient photocurrent in amorphous semiconductors is fully controlled by charge carriers transitions between localized states for one part and tunneling hopping carriers on the other. Localized dangling bonds deep states act as non radiative recombination centres, while hopping tunnelling is assisted by the Coulomb interaction between defects sites. The half-width of defects distribution is the disorder parameter that determines the carrier hopping time between defects sites. The macroscopic time that explains the long decay response times observed will all types of amorphous semiconductors is duly thought to be temperature dependent. Basic equations developed by Longeaud and Kleider are solved for the general case of a semiconductor after photo-generation. It turns out that the transient photoconductivity decay has two components; one with short response times from carriers trap-release transitions between shallow levels and extended states and a hopping component made of inter-dependent exponentials whose time constants span in larger ranges depending on disorder. The photoconductivity hopping component appears as an additional term to be added to photocurrents derived from existing models. The results of the present study explain and complete the power law decay derived in the multiple trapping models developed 20 years ago only in the approximation of the short response time regime. The long response time regime is described by the hopping macroscopic time. The present model is verified for all samples of amorphous semiconductors known so far. Finally, it is proposed to improved the modulated photoconductivity calculation techniques by including the long-lasting hopping dark documents

  12. Semiconductor Optics

    CERN Document Server

    Klingshirn, Claus F

    2012-01-01

    This updated and enlarged new edition of Semiconductor Optics provides an introduction to and an overview of semiconductor optics from the IR through the visible to the UV, including linear and nonlinear optical properties, dynamics, magneto and electrooptics, high-excitation effects and laser processes, some applications, experimental techniques and group theory. The mathematics is kept as elementary as possible, sufficient for an intuitive understanding of the experimental results and techniques treated. The subjects covered extend from physics to materials science and optoelectronics. Significantly updated chapters add coverage of current topics such as electron hole plasma, Bose condensation of excitons and meta materials. Over 120 problems, chapter introductions and a detailed index make it the key textbook for graduate students in physics. The mathematics is kept as elementary as possible, sufficient for an intuitive understanding of the experimental results and techniques treated. The subjects covered ...

  13. Semiconductor sensors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hartmann, Frank

    2011-01-01

    Semiconductor sensors have been around since the 1950s and today, every high energy physics experiment has one in its repertoire. In Lepton as well as Hadron colliders, silicon vertex and tracking detectors led to the most amazing physics and will continue doing so in the future. This contribution tries to depict the history of these devices exemplarily without being able to honor all important developments and installations. The current understanding of radiation damage mechanisms and recent R and D topics demonstrating the future challenges and possible technical solutions for the SLHC detectors are presented. Consequently semiconductor sensor candidates for an LHC upgrade and a future linear collider are also briefly introduced. The work presented here is a collage of the work of many individual silicon experts spread over several collaborations across the world.

  14. Semiconductor annealing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Young, J.M.; Scovell, P.D.

    1982-01-01

    A process for annealing crystal damage in ion implanted semiconductor devices in which the device is rapidly heated to a temperature between 450 and 900 0 C and allowed to cool. It has been found that such heating of the device to these relatively low temperatures results in rapid annealing. In one application the device may be heated on a graphite element mounted between electrodes in an inert atmosphere in a chamber. (author)

  15. Semiconductor Radiation Physics: From Defects to Devices

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Witt, Gerald L

    2005-01-01

    Radiation effects have been a serious problem for electronics used in defense and space systems for decades and radiation-hardened devices, circuits, and systems have been developed to meet the needs of these systems...

  16. Theoretical Studies of Defects in Tetrahedral Semiconductors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-08-01

    contributions, -30 VSC which in this case make up about 20% of the wave- V . function (Table 1), can in principle be incorporated-4"% ,, , I in an EMT...two choices. 4. For recent reviews, see H.G. Grimmeiss, Ann . Rev. Material. Sci. 7, 341 (1977); G.L. Miller, D.V. Lang, and L.C. Kimerling, Ann . Rev

  17. Formation mechanism of solute clusters under neutron irradiation in ferritic model alloys and in a reactor pressure vessel steel: clusters of defects; Mecanismes de fragilisation sous irradiation aux neutrons d'alliages modeles ferritiques et d'un acier de cuve: amas de defauts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meslin-Chiffon, E

    2007-11-15

    The embrittlement of reactor pressure vessel (RPV) under irradiation is partly due to the formation of point defects (PD) and solute clusters. The aim of this work was to gain more insight into the formation mechanisms of solute clusters in low copper ([Cu] = 0.1 wt%) FeCu and FeCuMnNi model alloys, in a copper free FeMnNi model alloy and in a low copper French RPV steel (16MND5). These materials were neutron-irradiated around 300 C in a test reactor. Solute clusters were characterized by tomographic atom probe whereas PD clusters were simulated with a rate theory numerical code calibrated under cascade damage conditions using transmission electron microscopy analysis. The confrontation between experiments and simulation reveals that a heterogeneous irradiation-induced solute precipitation/segregation probably occurs on PD clusters. (author)

  18. Silicon metal-semiconductor-metal photodetector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brueck, Steven R. J.; Myers, David R.; Sharma, Ashwani K.

    1995-01-01

    Silicon MSM photodiodes sensitive to radiation in the visible to near infrared spectral range are produced by altering the absorption characteristics of crystalline Si by ion implantation. The implantation produces a defected region below the surface of the silicon with the highest concentration of defects at its base which acts to reduce the contribution of charge carriers formed below the defected layer. The charge carriers generated by the radiation in the upper regions of the defected layer are very quickly collected between biased Schottky barrier electrodes which form a metal-semiconductor-metal structure for the photodiode.

  19. Semiconductor annealing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Young, J.M.; Scovell, P.D.

    1981-01-01

    A process for annealing crystal damage in ion implanted semiconductor devices is described in which the device is rapidly heated to a temperature between 450 and 600 0 C and allowed to cool. It has been found that such heating of the device to these relatively low temperatures results in rapid annealing. In one application the device may be heated on a graphite element mounted between electrodes in an inert atmosphere in a chamber. The process may be enhanced by the application of optical radiation from a Xenon lamp. (author)

  20. Self-compensation in semiconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsur, Y.; Riess, I.

    1999-09-01

    The problem of self-compensation of charged dopants is analyzed. Special emphasis is given to dopants in binary oxides. It is shown that one can determine the degree of self-compensation from the properties of the host material and dopant concentration alone. It is further shown that for a native p-type semiconductor, donors are compensated, mostly, by native ionic defects. On the other hand, doping with acceptors allows us to increase significantly the hole concentration, i.e., self-compensation is low under high doping levels. For a native n-type semiconductor the opposite is true, namely, extrinsic acceptors are mainly compensated by native ionic defects. It is shown that the changes in concentration of all the charged defects are simply related by a single factor, the doping factor f, or its power fk where k depends solely on the defect's charge. Quantitative calculations of f and defect concentrations are presented for Cu2O, which was used as a model material. It is found that for p-type Cu2O doping with donors results in f within the range of 1-10, depending on the dopant concentration and P(O2). This means that the hole concentration decreases and the electron concentration increases at most by a factor of 10. Therefore one does not expect to obtain a changeover from p- to n-type cuprous oxide by doping, under equilibrium conditions. Most of the donors are compensated by negative ionic defects. Self-compensation in the presence of amphoteric defects and Fermi level stabilization are discussed, using the former formalism.

  1. Methods of producing free-standing semiconductors using sacrificial buffer layers and recyclable substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ptak, Aaron Joseph; Lin, Yong; Norman, Andrew; Alberi, Kirstin

    2015-05-26

    A method of producing semiconductor materials and devices that incorporate the semiconductor materials are provided. In particular, a method is provided of producing a semiconductor material, such as a III-V semiconductor, on a spinel substrate using a sacrificial buffer layer, and devices such as photovoltaic cells that incorporate the semiconductor materials. The sacrificial buffer material and semiconductor materials may be deposited using lattice-matching epitaxy or coincident site lattice-matching epitaxy, resulting in a close degree of lattice matching between the substrate material and deposited material for a wide variety of material compositions. The sacrificial buffer layer may be dissolved using an epitaxial liftoff technique in order to separate the semiconductor device from the spinel substrate, and the spinel substrate may be reused in the subsequent fabrication of other semiconductor devices. The low-defect density semiconductor materials produced using this method result in the enhanced performance of the semiconductor devices that incorporate the semiconductor materials.

  2. Magnetic semiconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bihler, Christoph

    2009-04-15

    In this thesis we investigated in detail the properties of Ga{sub 1-x}Mn{sub x}As, Ga{sub 1-x}Mn{sub x}P, and Ga{sub 1-x}Mn{sub x}N dilute magnetic semiconductor thin films with a focus on the magnetic anisotropy and the changes of their properties upon hydrogenation. We applied two complementary spectroscopic techniques to address the position of H in magnetic semiconductors: (i) Electron paramagnetic resonance, which provides direct information on the symmetry of the crystal field of the Mn{sup 2+} atoms and (ii) x-ray absorption fine structure analysis which allows to probe the local crystallographic neighborhood of the absorbing Mn atom via analysing the fine structure at the Mn K absorption edge. Finally, we discussed the obstacles that have to be overcome to achieve Curie temperatures above the current maximum in Ga{sub 1-x}Mn{sub x}As of 185 K. Here, we outlined in detail the generic problem of the formation of precipitates at the example of Ge:MN. (orig.)

  3. Power semiconductors

    CERN Document Server

    Kubát, M

    1984-01-01

    The book contains a summary of our knowledge of power semiconductor structures. It presents first a short historic introduction (Chap. I) as well as a brief selection of facts from solid state physics, in particular those related to power semiconductors (Chap. 2). The book deals with diode structures in Chap. 3. In addition to fundamental facts in pn-junction theory, the book covers mainly the important processes of power structures. It describes the emitter efficiency and function of microleaks (shunts). the p +p and n + n junctions, and in particular the recent theory of the pin, pvn and p1tn junctions, whose role appears to be decisive for the forward mode not only of diode structures but also of more complex ones. For power diode structures the reverse mode is the decisive factor in pn-junction breakdown theory. The presentation given here uses engineering features (the multiplication factor M and the experimentally detected laws for the volume and surface of crystals), which condenses the presentation an...

  4. InSb semiconductors and (In,Mn)Sb diluted magnetic semiconductors. Growth and properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tran, Lien

    2011-04-13

    This dissertation describes investigations of the growth by molecular beam epitaxy and the characterization of the semiconductor InSb as well as the diluted magnetic semiconductor (DMS) In{sub 1-x}Mn{sub x}Sb. The InSb films were grown on GaAs (001) substrate and Si (001) offcut by 4 toward (110) substrate up to a thickness of about 2 {mu}m, in spite of a large lattice mismatch between the epi-layer and substrate (14.6% between InSb and GaAs, and 19.3% between InSb and Si). After optimizing the growth conditions, the best InSb films grown directly on GaAs without any special technique results in a high crystal quality, low noise, and an electron mobility of 41100 cm{sup 2}/V s Vs with associated electron concentration of 2.9.10{sup 6} cm{sup -3} at 300 K. Such structures could be used, for example, for infrared detector structures. The growth of InSb on Si, however, is a challenge. In order to successfully grow InSb on Si, tilted substrates and the insertion of buffer layers were used, which helps to reduce the lattice mismatch as well as the formation of defects, and hence to improve the crystal quality. An electron mobility of 24000 cm{sup 2}/V s measured at 300 K, with an associated carrier concentration of 2.6.10{sup 1}6 cm{sup -3} is found for the best sample that was grown at 340 C with a 0.06 {mu}m-thick GaSb/AlSb superlattice buffer layer. The smaller value of electron mobility (compared to the best GaAsbased sample) is related to a higher density of microtwins and stacking faults as well as threading dislocations in the near-interface region as shown by transmission electron microscopy. Deep level noise spectra indicate the existence of deep levels in both GaAs and Si-based samples. The samples grown on Si exhibit the lowest Hooge factor at 300 K, lower than the samples grown on GaAs. Taking the optimized growth conditions of InSb/GaAs, the diluted magnetic semiconductor In{sub 1-x}Mn{sub x}Sb/GaAs (001) is prepared by adding a few percent of Mn into the

  5. Semiconductor Laser Measurements Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Semiconductor Laser Measurements Laboratory is equipped to investigate and characterize the lasing properties of semiconductor diode lasers. Lasing features such...

  6. Detection of defects in electron-irradiated synthetic silica quartz probed by positron annihilation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watauchi, Satoshi; Uedono, Akira; Ujihira, Yusuke; Yoda, Osamu.

    1994-01-01

    Defects in amorphous SiO 2 films, formed on MOS(metal/oxide/semiconductor) devices as gates, perturb its operation. The positron annihilation techniques, were applied to the study of the annealing behavior of the defects, introduced in the high purity synthetic quartz glass by the irradiation of 3-MeV electrons up to the 1x10 18 e - /cm 2 dosage. It was proved that the positron annihilation techniques were sufficiently sensitive to detect the defects in the electron-irradiated silica glasses. Three types of open-space defects were detected by the positron lifetime measurements. These can be attributed to monovacancy or divacancy type defects, vacancy clusters, and open-volume defects. A high formation probability (∼90%) of positroniums(Ps) was found in unirradiated specimens. These Ps were considered to be formed in open-volume defects. The formation probability of Ps was drastically decreased by the electron irradiation. But the size of open-volume defects was kept unchanged by the irradiation. These facts suggest that vacancy-type defects were introduced by the electron irradiation and that positrons were trapped in these defects. By the isochronal annealing in nitrogen atmosphere, the lifetime component (τ 2 ) and its relative intensity (I 2 ), attributed to positrons trapped in monovacancy or divacancy type defects and annihilated there, changed remarkably. τ 2 was constant in the temperature range up to 300degC, getting slightly shorter between 300degC and 700degC, and constant above 700degC. I 2 decreased gradually up to 300degC, constant between 300degC and 550degC, decreased above 550degC, and constant above 700degC. This revealed that the behavior of the defects, in which positrons were trapped, change by the elevation of the annealing temperature. (author)

  7. Electrical conduction by interface states in semiconductor heterojunctions

    OpenAIRE

    El Yacoubi, Mohamed; Evrard, Roger; Nguyen, Ngoc Duy; Schmeits, Marcel

    2000-01-01

    Electrical conduction in semiconductor heterojunctions containing defect states in the interface region is studied. As the classical drift-diffusion mechanism cannot in any case explain electrical conduction in semiconductor heterojunctions, tunnelling involving interface states is often considered as a possible conduction path. A theoretical treatment is made where defect states in the interface region with a continuous energy distribution are included. Electrical conduction through this def...

  8. Beams of mass-selected clusters: realization and first experiments; Faisceau d'agregats charges selectionnes en taille: realisation et premieres experiences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamalou, O

    2007-04-15

    The main objective of this work concerns the production of beams of mass-selected clusters of metallic and semiconductor materials. Clusters are produced in magnetron sputtering source combined with a gas aggregation chamber, cooled by liquid nitrogen circulation. Downstream of the cluster source, a Wiley-McLaren time-of-flight setup allows to select a given cluster size or a narrow size range. The pulsed mass-selected cluster ion beam is separated from the continuous neutral one by an electrostatic 90-quadrupole deflector. After the deflector, the density of the pulsed beam amounts to about 10{sup 3} particles/cm{sup 3}. Preliminary deposition experiments of mass-selected copper clusters with a deposition energy of about 0.5 eV/atom have ben performed on highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) substrates, indicating that copper clusters are evidently mobile on the HOPG-surface until they reach cleavage steps, dislocation lines or other surface defects. In order to lower the cluster mobility on the HOPG-surface, we have first irradiated HOPG samples with slow highly charged ions (high dose) in order to create superficial defects. In a second step we have deposited mass-selected copper clusters on these pre-irradiated samples. The first analysis by AFM (Atomic Force Microscopy) techniques showed that the copper clusters are trapped on the defects produced by the highly charged ions. (author)

  9. Simulation of neutron radiation damage in silicon semiconductor devices.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shadid, John Nicolas; Hoekstra, Robert John; Hennigan, Gary Lee; Castro, Joseph Pete Jr.; Fixel, Deborah A.

    2007-10-01

    A code, Charon, is described which simulates the effects that neutron damage has on silicon semiconductor devices. The code uses a stabilized, finite-element discretization of the semiconductor drift-diffusion equations. The mathematical model used to simulate semiconductor devices in both normal and radiation environments will be described. Modeling of defect complexes is accomplished by adding an additional drift-diffusion equation for each of the defect species. Additionally, details are given describing how Charon can efficiently solve very large problems using modern parallel computers. Comparison between Charon and experiment will be given, as well as comparison with results from commercially-available TCAD codes.

  10. Birth Defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    A birth defect is a problem that happens while a baby is developing in the mother's body. Most birth defects happen during the first 3 months of ... in the United States is born with a birth defect. A birth defect may affect how the ...

  11. Semiconductor studies by radioactive probe atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wichert, Thomas

    2003-01-01

    There are a growing number of experimental techniques that have in common the usage of radioactive isotopes for the characterization of semiconductors. These techniques deliver atomistic information about identity, formation, lattice environment, and electronic structure, as well as dynamics of defects and defect complexes. The results obtained by different hyperfine techniques are discussed in context with the study of intrinsic and extrinsic defects, i.e. of vacancies or self-interstitials and dopant or impurity atoms, respectively. In addition, the employment of electrical and optical techniques in combination with radioactive isotopes is presented

  12. Studies of defects and defect agglomerates by positron annihilation spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eldrup, Morten Mostgaard; Singh, B.N.

    1997-01-01

    A brief introduction to positron annihilation spectroscopy (PAS), and in particular lo its use for defect studies in metals is given. Positrons injected into a metal may become trapped in defects such as vacancies, vacancy clusters, voids, bubbles and dislocations and subsequently annihilate from...

  13. Semiconductor nanostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marstein Erik Stensrud

    2003-07-01

    This thesis presents a study of two material systems containing semiconductor nanocrystals, namely porous silicon (PSi) films and germanium (Ge) nanocrystals embedded in silicon dioxide (SiO2) films. The PSi films were made by anodic etching of silicon (Si) substrates in an electrolyte containing hydrofluoric acid. The PSi films were doped with erbium (Er) using two different doping methods. electrochemical doping and doping by immersing the PSi films in a solution containing Er. The resulting Er concentration profiles were investigated using scanning electron microscopy (SEN1) combined with energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDS). The main subject of the work on PSi presented in this thesis was investigating and comparing these two doping methods. Ge nanocrystals were made by implanting Ge ions into Si02 films that were subsequently annealed. However. nanocrystal formation occurred only for certain sets of processing parameters. The dependence of the microstructure of the Ge implanted Si02 films on the processing parameters were therefore investigated. A range of methods were employed for these investigations, including transmission electron microscopy (TEM) combined with EDS, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS). The observed structures, ranging from Ge nanocrystals to voids with diameters of several tens of nanometers and Ge rich Si02 films without any nanocrystals is described. A model explaining the void formation is also presented. For certain sets of processing parameters. An accumulation of Ge at the Si-Si02 interface was observed. The effect of this accumulation on the electrical properties of MOS structures made from Ge implanted SiO2 films was investigated using CV-measurements. (Author)

  14. Fundamentals of semiconductor devices

    CERN Document Server

    Lindmayer, Joseph

    1965-01-01

    Semiconductor properties ; semiconductor junctions or diodes ; transistor fundamentals ; inhomogeneous impurity distributions, drift or graded-base transistors ; high-frequency properties of transistors ; band structure of semiconductors ; high current densities and mechanisms of carrier transport ; transistor transient response and recombination processes ; surfaces, field-effect transistors, and composite junctions ; additional semiconductor characteristics ; additional semiconductor devices and microcircuits ; more metal, insulator, and semiconductor combinations for devices ; four-pole parameters and configuration rotation ; four-poles of combined networks and devices ; equivalent circuits ; the error function and its properties ; Fermi-Dirac statistics ; useful physical constants.

  15. Defect Tolerance to Intolerance in the Vacancy-Ordered Double Perovskite Semiconductors Cs 2 SnI 6 and Cs 2 TeI 6

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maughan, Annalise E.; Ganose, Alex M.; Bordelon, Mitchell M.; Miller, Elisa M.; Scanlon, David O.; Neilson, James R.

    2016-07-13

    Vacancy-ordered double perovskites of the general formula, A2BX6, are a family of perovskite derivatives composed of a face-centered lattice of nearly isolated [BX6] units with A-site cations occupying the cuboctahedral voids. Despite the presence of isolated octahedral units, the close-packed iodide lattice provides significant electronic dispersion, such that Cs2SnI6 has recently been explored for applications in photovoltaic devices. To elucidate the structure-property relationships of these materials, we have synthesized the solid solution Cs2Sn1-xTexI6. However, even though tellurium substitution increases electronic dispersion via closer I-I contact distances, the substitution experimentally yields insulating behavior from a significant decrease in carrier concentration and mobility. Density functional calculations of native defects in Cs2SnI6 reveal that iodine vacancies exhibit a low enthalpy of formation and the defect energy level is a shallow donor to the conduction band, rendering the material tolerant to these defect states. The increased covalency of Te-I bonding renders the formation of iodine vacancy states unfavorable, and is responsible for the reduction in conductivity upon Te substitution. Additionally, Cs2TeI6 is intolerant to the formation of these defects, as the defect level occurs deep within the band gap and thus localizes potential mobile charge carriers. In these vacancy-ordered double perovskites, the close-packed lattice of iodine provides significant electronic dispersion, while the interaction of the B- and X-site ions dictates the properties as they pertain to electronic structure and defect tolerance. This simplified perspective -- based on extensive experimental and theoretical analysis -- provides a platform from which to understand structure-property relationships in functional perovskite halides.

  16. Solid spectroscopy: semiconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, C.E.T.G. da

    1983-01-01

    Photoemission as technique of study of the semiconductor electronic structure is shortly discussed. Homogeneous and heterogeneous semiconductors, where volume and surface electronic structure, core levels and O and H chemisorption in GaAs, Schottky barrier are treated, respectively. Amorphous semiconductors are also discussed. (L.C.) [pt

  17. Amorphous Semiconductor Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madan, Arun

    1985-08-01

    Amorphous silicon (a-Si) based alloys have attracted a considerable amount of interest because of their applications in a wide variety of technologies. However, the major effort has concentrated on inexpensive photovoltaic device applications and has moved from a laboratory curiosity in the early 1970's to viable commercial applications in the 1980's. Impressive progress in this field has been made since the group at University of Dundee demonstrated that a low defect, device quality hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) 12 material could be produced using the radio frequency (r.f.) glow discharge in SiH4 gas ' and that the material could be doped n- and p-type.3 These results spurred a worldwide interest in a-Si based alloys, especially for photovoltaic devices which has resulted in a conversion efficiency approaching 12%. There is now a quest for even higher conversion efficiencies by using the multijunction cell approach. This necessitates the synthesis of new materials of differing bandgaps, which in principle amorphous semiconductors can achieve. In this article, we review some of this work and consider from a device and a materials point of view the hurdles which have to be overcome before this type of concept can be realized.

  18. Electrical characterisation of semiconductor structures using AFM techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kovac jr, J.; Kovac, J.; Hotovy, J.; Novotny, I.; Skriniarova, J.; Dutkova, E.; Balaz, P.

    2011-01-01

    The microscopic dimensions appear to be a fundamental limitation to many common measurement techniques. The use of Current-Atomic Force Microscopy (I-AFM) bids a possibility to acquire topography image along with the current flow mappings which can be lapped over in resulting image as presented in this paper. A current distribution on the ZnO surface of p-Si/n- ZnO diode structure with CdS or ZnS nanocrystalline quantum dot clusters at the interface has been measured. The resulting images show a conductivity mapping different from topography what induces a conductive channels at the edges of the ZnO grains. We have successfully used I-AFM method where conductive AFM tip is scanning over the surface of the sample to create a topography image along with a current flow mapping of p-Si substrate covered with CdS or ZnS nanocrystalline clusters overlapped by 100 nm thick n-ZnO layer. The measured current mappings of both samples revealed a formation of conductive channels between the clusters of quantum dots when the sample is forward biased. We are able to create 3D topography images of combined with the forward biased current mapping textures which gives complex information about local conductivity and using this method it should be possible to find hidden current leaks in the samples for example defects in most semiconductor materials. A drift current generated in p-n junction was recorded when the sample was reverse biased while the sample has been exposed to light. Possible UV light source should cause a higher reverse current due to high bandgap of ZnS clusters which is a motivation to further research. The devices fabricated from these structures have the potential applications for solar cells or broadband photodetectors. (authors)

  19. Quantum computing with defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, J R; Koehl, W F; Varley, J B; Janotti, A; Buckley, B B; Van de Walle, C G; Awschalom, D D

    2010-05-11

    Identifying and designing physical systems for use as qubits, the basic units of quantum information, are critical steps in the development of a quantum computer. Among the possibilities in the solid state, a defect in diamond known as the nitrogen-vacancy (NV(-1)) center stands out for its robustness--its quantum state can be initialized, manipulated, and measured with high fidelity at room temperature. Here we describe how to systematically identify other deep center defects with similar quantum-mechanical properties. We present a list of physical criteria that these centers and their hosts should meet and explain how these requirements can be used in conjunction with electronic structure theory to intelligently sort through candidate defect systems. To illustrate these points in detail, we compare electronic structure calculations of the NV(-1) center in diamond with those of several deep centers in 4H silicon carbide (SiC). We then discuss the proposed criteria for similar defects in other tetrahedrally coordinated semiconductors.

  20. Plastic deformation of ferritic grains in presence of ODS particles and irradiation-induced defect clusters: A 3D dislocation dynamics simulation study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, C.; Gururaj, K.

    2011-08-01

    Ferritic steels strengthened by oxide particle dispersions (ODS) are prime candidate for future nuclear applications. So far, the beneficial mechanical characteristics of ODS steels are not fully understood, in terms of dislocation-based mechanisms. In this work, three-dimensional discrete dislocation dynamics simulations were carried out to analyze pre and post-irradiation plastic deformation in ferritic grains, with and without ODS particles. In the absence of irradiation induced defect loops, ODS-grains are stronger and plastic strain is more localized than in the corresponding, particle-free grain. After irradiation however, ODS-grain become more resistant to loop-induced hardening, while plastic strain spreading is broader, with respect to particle-free grain. This effect is due to dislocations accumulating next to the precipitates, generating internal stress allowing cross-slipped dislocations to go past the irradiation induced defect loops. Cross-slip is therefore a key feature of our model, for explaining the beneficial role of ODS particles on post-irradiation plastic deformation.

  1. Electronegativity and doping in semiconductors

    KAUST Repository

    Schwingenschlögl, Udo

    2012-08-23

    Charge transfer predicted by standard models is at odds with Pauling’s electronegativities but can be reconciled by the introduction of a cluster formation model [Schwingenschlögl et al., Appl. Phys. Lett. 96, 242107 (2010)]. Using electronic structure calculations, we investigate p- and n-type doping in silicon and diamond in order to facilitate comparison as C has a higher electronegativity compared to Si. All doping conditions considered can be explained in the framework of the cluster formation model. The implications for codoping strategies and dopant-defect interactions are discussed.

  2. Stoichiometric Defects in Silicon Carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liao, Ting; Bedoya-Martinez, O. N.; Roma, G.; Liao, Ting; Liao, Ting

    2010-01-01

    Defect structures showing odd-membered rings are known features of several tetrahedral semiconductors as well as carbon nano-structures; examples of them are bond defects in crystalline and amorphous silicon, Stone Wales defects in fullerenes and carbon nano-tubes, and the core structure of partial dislocations in some tetrahedral semiconductors. We investigate, using Density Functional Theory, two types of stoichiometry-conserving defects, which we call SCD and anti-SCD and which are metastable structures presenting five- and seven-membered rings, both in the cubic and in the hexagonal 4H-SiC polytypes. We also investigate the annealing properties of the two mentioned variants and find that one of them (SCD) easily disappears, turning back to a normal site, while the other (anti-SCD) transforms to an antisite pair, overcoming a barrier of 0. 21 eV. The very short lifetimes at ambient conditions explain why those defects have not been observed up to now, but they suggest they should be observable at very low temperature, and we provide local vibrational modes to facilitate their identification. (authors)

  3. Optical properties and defect structure of crystalline bodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gindin, I.A.; Chirkina, L.A.; Metolidi, Eh.N.

    1989-01-01

    The main features of optical characteristics of ion, semiconductor and metal crystals have been analysed. It is shown that various types of defects resulting from mechanical and thermal action have significant effect on optical properties of materials with various types of interatomic interaction. The main regularities and differences in defect structure effect on optical properties of ion, semiconductor and metal crystal are detected. 52 refs.; 17 figs

  4. InSb semiconductors and (In,Mn)Sb diluted magnetic semiconductors: Growth and properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tran, Lien

    2011-01-01

    This dissertation describes investigations of the growth by molecular beam epitaxy and the characterization of the semiconductor InSb as well as the diluted magnetic semiconductor (DMS) In 1-x Mn x Sb. The InSb films were grown on GaAs (001) substrate and Si (001) offcut by 4 toward (110) substrate up to a thickness of about 2 μm, in spite of a large lattice mismatch between the epi-layer and substrate (14.6% between InSb and GaAs, and 19.3% between InSb and Si). After optimizing the growth conditions, the best InSb films grown directly on GaAs without any special technique results in a high crystal quality, low noise, and an electron mobility of 41100 cm 2 /V s Vs with associated electron concentration of 2.9.10 6 cm -3 at 300 K. Such structures could be used, for example, for infrared detector structures. The growth of InSb on Si, however, is a challenge. In order to successfully grow InSb on Si, tilted substrates and the insertion of buffer layers were used, which helps to reduce the lattice mismatch as well as the formation of defects, and hence to improve the crystal quality. An electron mobility of 24000 cm 2 /V s measured at 300 K, with an associated carrier concentration of 2.6.10 1 6 cm -3 is found for the best sample that was grown at 340 C with a 0.06 μm-thick GaSb/AlSb superlattice buffer layer. The smaller value of electron mobility (compared to the best GaAsbased sample) is related to a higher density of microtwins and stacking faults as well as threading dislocations in the near-interface region as shown by transmission electron microscopy. Deep level noise spectra indicate the existence of deep levels in both GaAs and Si-based samples. The samples grown on Si exhibit the lowest Hooge factor at 300 K, lower than the samples grown on GaAs. Taking the optimized growth conditions of InSb/GaAs, the diluted magnetic semiconductor In 1-x Mn x Sb/GaAs (001) is prepared by adding a few percent of Mn into the host material InSb during growth. I have

  5. Semiconductor Physical Electronics

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Sheng

    2006-01-01

    Semiconductor Physical Electronics, Second Edition, provides comprehensive coverage of fundamental semiconductor physics that is essential to an understanding of the physical and operational principles of a wide variety of semiconductor electronic and optoelectronic devices. This text presents a unified and balanced treatment of the physics, characterization, and applications of semiconductor materials and devices for physicists and material scientists who need further exposure to semiconductor and photonic devices, and for device engineers who need additional background on the underlying physical principles. This updated and revised second edition reflects advances in semicondutor technologies over the past decade, including many new semiconductor devices that have emerged and entered into the marketplace. It is suitable for graduate students in electrical engineering, materials science, physics, and chemical engineering, and as a general reference for processing and device engineers working in the semicondi...

  6. Large-area, laterally-grown epitaxial semiconductor layers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Jung; Song, Jie; Chen, Danti

    2017-07-18

    Structures and methods for confined lateral-guided growth of a large-area semiconductor layer on an insulating layer are described. The semiconductor layer may be formed by heteroepitaxial growth from a selective growth area in a vertically-confined, lateral-growth guiding structure. Lateral-growth guiding structures may be formed in arrays over a region of a substrate, so as to cover a majority of the substrate region with laterally-grown epitaxial semiconductor tiles. Quality regions of low-defect, stress-free GaN may be grown on silicon.

  7. Semiconductor Modeling Techniques

    CERN Document Server

    Xavier, Marie

    2012-01-01

    This book describes the key theoretical techniques for semiconductor research to quantitatively calculate and simulate the properties. It presents particular techniques to study novel semiconductor materials, such as 2D heterostructures, quantum wires, quantum dots and nitrogen containing III-V alloys. The book is aimed primarily at newcomers working in the field of semiconductor physics to give guidance in theory and experiment. The theoretical techniques for electronic and optoelectronic devices are explained in detail.

  8. Contacts to semiconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tove, P.A.

    1975-08-01

    Contacts to semiconductors play an important role in most semiconductor devices. These devices range from microelectronics to power components, from high-sensitivity light or radiation detectors to light-emitting of microwave-generating components. Silicon is the dominating material but compound semiconductors are increasing in importance. The following survey is an attempt to classify contact properties and the physical mechanisms involved, as well as fabrication methods and methods of investigation. The main interest is in metal-semiconductor type contacts where a few basic concepts are dealt with in some detail. (Auth.)

  9. Semiconductor Electrical Measurements Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Semiconductor Electrical Measurements Laboratory is a research laboratory which complements the Optical Measurements Laboratory. The laboratory provides for Hall...

  10. A Review of the Application of Rate Theory to Simulate Vacancy Cluster Formation and Interstitial Defect Formation in Reactor Pressure Vessel Steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fallon Laliberte

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The beltline region of the reactor pressure vessel (RPV is subject to an extreme radiation, temperature, and pressure environment over several decades of operation; therefore it is necessary to understand the mechanisms through which radiation damage occurs and how it affects the mechanical and chemical properties of the RPV steel. Chemical rate theory is a mean field rate theory simulation model which applies chemistry to the evaluation of irradiation-induced embrittlement. It presents one method of analysis that may be coupled to other distinct methods, in order to analyze defect formation, ultimately providing useful information on strength, ductility, toughness and dimensional stability changes for effects such as embrittlement, reduction in ductility and toughness, void swelling, hardening, irradiation creep, stress corrosion cracking, etc. over time as materials are subjected to reactor operational irradiation. This paper serves as a brief review of rate theory fundamentals and presents several examples of research that exemplify the application and importance of rate theory in examining the effects of radiation damage on RPV steel.

  11. New Icosahedral Boron Carbide Semiconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Echeverria Mora, Elena Maria

    Novel semiconductor boron carbide films and boron carbide films doped with aromatic compounds have been investigated and characterized. Most of these semiconductors were formed by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition. The aromatic compound additives used, in this thesis, were pyridine (Py), aniline, and diaminobenzene (DAB). As one of the key parameters for semiconducting device functionality is the metal contact and, therefore, the chemical interactions or band bending that may occur at the metal/semiconductor interface, X-ray photoemission spectroscopy has been used to investigate the interaction of gold (Au) with these novel boron carbide-based semiconductors. Both n- and p-type films have been tested and pure boron carbide devices are compared to those containing aromatic compounds. The results show that boron carbide seems to behave differently from other semiconductors, opening a way for new analysis and approaches in device's functionality. By studying the electrical and optical properties of these films, it has been found that samples containing the aromatic compound exhibit an improvement in the electron-hole separation and charge extraction, as well as a decrease in the band gap. The hole carrier lifetimes for each sample were extracted from the capacitance-voltage, C(V), and current-voltage, I(V), curves. Additionally, devices, with boron carbide with the addition of pyridine, exhibited better collection of neutron capture generated pulses at ZERO applied bias, compared to the pure boron carbide samples. This is consistent with the longer carrier lifetimes estimated for these films. The I-V curves, as a function of external magnetic field, of the pure boron carbide films and films containing DAB demonstrate that significant room temperature negative magneto-resistance (> 100% for pure samples, and > 50% for samples containing DAB) is possible in the resulting dielectric thin films. Inclusion of DAB is not essential for significant negative magneto

  12. Semiconductor processing with excimer lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Young, R.T.; Narayan, J.; Christie, W.H.; van der Leeden, G.A.; Rothe, D.E.; Cheng, L.J.

    1983-01-01

    The advantages of pulsed excimer lasers for semiconductor processing are reviewed. Extensive comparisons of the quality of annealing of ion-implanted Si obtained with XeCl and ruby lasers have been made. The results indicate that irrespective of the large differences in the optical properties of Si at uv and visible wavelengths, the efficiency of usage of the incident energy for annealing is comparable for the two lasers. However, because of the excellent optical beam quality, the XeCl laser can provide superior control of the surface melting and the resulting junction depth. Furthermore, the concentrations of electrically active point defects in the XeCl laser annealed region are 2 to 3 orders of magnitude lower than that obtained from ruby or Nd:YAG lasers. All these results seem to suggest that XeCl lasers should be suitable for fabricating not only solar cells but also the more advanced device structures required for VLSI or VHSIC applications

  13. Defects and permutation branes in the Liouville field theory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sarkissian, Gor

    2009-01-01

    The defects and permutation branes for the Liouville field theory are considered. By exploiting cluster condition, equations satisfied by permutation branes and defects reflection amplitudes are obtained. It is shown that two types of solutions exist, discrete and continuous families....

  14. Semiconductor Research Experimental Techniques

    CERN Document Server

    Balkan, Naci

    2012-01-01

    The book describes the fundamentals, latest developments and use of key experimental techniques for semiconductor research. It explains the application potential of various analytical methods and discusses the opportunities to apply particular analytical techniques to study novel semiconductor compounds, such as dilute nitride alloys. The emphasis is on the technique rather than on the particular system studied.

  15. Terahertz semiconductor nonlinear optics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Turchinovich, Dmitry; Hvam, Jørn Märcher; Hoffmann, Matthias

    2013-01-01

    In this proceedings we describe our recent results on semiconductor nonlinear optics, investigated using single-cycle THz pulses. We demonstrate the nonlinear absorption and self-phase modulation of strong-field THz pulses in doped semiconductors, using n-GaAs as a model system. The THz nonlinear...

  16. Semiconductors data handbook

    CERN Document Server

    Madelung, Otfried

    2004-01-01

    This volume Semiconductors: Data Handbook contains frequently used data from the corresponding larger Landolt-Börnstein handbooks in a low price book for the individual scientist working in the laboratory. The Handbook contain important information about a large number of semiconductors

  17. Semiconductor radiation detection systems

    CERN Document Server

    2010-01-01

    Covers research in semiconductor detector and integrated circuit design in the context of medical imaging using ionizing radiation. This book explores other applications of semiconductor radiation detection systems in security applications such as luggage scanning, dirty bomb detection and border control.

  18. Microscopical Studies of Structural and Electronic Properties of Semiconductors

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    The electronic and structural properties of point defects in semiconductors, e.g. radiation defects, impurities or passivating defects can excellently be studied by the hyperfine technique of Perturbed Angular Correlation (PAC). The serious limitation of this method, the small number of chemically different radioactive PAC probe atoms can be widely overcome by means of ISOLDE. Providing shortliving isotopes, which represent common dopants as well as suitable PAC probe atoms, the ISOLDE facility enables a much broader application of PAC to problems in semiconductor physics.\\\\ Using the probe atom $^{111m}$ Cd , the whole class of III-V compounds becomes accessible for PAC investigations. First successful experiments in GaAs, InP and GaP have been performed, concerning impurity complex formation and plasma induced defects. In Si and Ge, the electronic properties~-~especially their influence on acceptor-donor interaction~-~could be exemplarily st...

  19. Deep sub-wavelength metrology for advanced defect classification

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Walle, P; Van Der Donck, J. C.J.; Mulckhuyse, W; Nijsten, L.; Bernal Arango, F.A.; De Jong, A.; Van Zeijl, E.; Spruit, H. E.T.; van den Berg, J.H.; Nanda, G.; van Langen-Suurling, A.K.; Alkemade, P.F.A.; Pereira, S.F.; Maas, D.J.; Lehmann, Peter; Osten, Wolfgang; Albertazzi Gonçalves, Armando

    2017-01-01

    Particle defects are important contributors to yield loss in semi-conductor manufacturing. Particles need to be detected and characterized in order to determine and eliminate their root cause. We have conceived a process flow for advanced defect classification (ADC) that distinguishes three

  20. Deep sub-wavelength metrology for advanced defect classification

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Walle, P. van der; Kramer, E.; Donck, J.C.J. van der; Mulckhuyse, W.F.W.; Nijsten, L.; Bernal Arango, F.A.; Jong, A. de; Zeijl, E. van; Spruit, H.E.T.; Berg, J.H. van den; Nanda, G.; Langen-Suurling, A.K. van; Alkemade, P.F.A.; Pereira, S.F.; Maas, D.J.

    2017-01-01

    Particle defects are important contributors to yield loss in semi-conductor manufacturing. Particles need to be detected and characterized in order to determine and eliminate their root cause. We have conceived a process flow for advanced defect classification (ADC) that distinguishes three

  1. Compound Semiconductor Radiation Detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Owens, Alan

    2012-01-01

    Although elemental semiconductors such as silicon and germanium are standard for energy dispersive spectroscopy in the laboratory, their use for an increasing range of applications is becoming marginalized by their physical limitations, namely the need for ancillary cooling, their modest stopping powers, and radiation intolerance. Compound semiconductors, on the other hand, encompass such a wide range of physical and electronic properties that they have become viable competitors in a number of applications. Compound Semiconductor Radiation Detectors is a consolidated source of information on all aspects of the use of compound semiconductors for radiation detection and measurement. Serious Competitors to Germanium and Silicon Radiation Detectors Wide-gap compound semiconductors offer the ability to operate in a range of hostile thermal and radiation environments while still maintaining sub-keV spectral resolution at X-ray wavelengths. Narrow-gap materials offer the potential of exceeding the spectral resolutio...

  2. Defects and defect processes in nonmetallic solids

    CERN Document Server

    Hayes, W

    2004-01-01

    This extensive survey covers defects in nonmetals, emphasizing point defects and point-defect processes. It encompasses electronic, vibrational, and optical properties of defective solids, plus dislocations and grain boundaries. 1985 edition.

  3. EDITORIAL The 23rd Nordic Semiconductor Meeting The 23rd Nordic Semiconductor Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ólafsson, Sveinn; Sveinbjörnsson, Einar

    2010-12-01

    A Nordic Semiconductor Meeting is held every other year with the venue rotating amongst the Nordic countries of Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway and Sweden. The focus of these meetings remains 'original research and science being carried out on semiconductor materials, devices and systems'. Reports on industrial activity have usually featured. The topics have ranged from fundamental research on point defects in a semiconductor to system architecture of semiconductor electronic devices. Proceedings from these events are regularly published as a topical issue of Physica Scripta. All of the papers in this topical issue have undergone critical peer review and we wish to thank the reviewers and the authors for their cooperation, which has been instrumental in meeting the high scientific standards and quality of the series. This meeting of the 23rd Nordic Semiconductor community, NSM 2009, was held at Háskólatorg at the campus of the University of Iceland, Reykjavik, Iceland, 14-17 June 2009. Support was provided by the University of Iceland. Almost 50 participants presented a broad range of topics covering semiconductor materials and devices as well as related material science interests. The conference provided a forum for Nordic and international scientists to present and discuss new results and ideas concerning the fundamentals and applications of semiconductor materials. The meeting aim was to advance the progress of Nordic science and thus aid in future worldwide technological advances concerning technology, education, energy and the environment. Topics Theory and fundamental physics of semiconductors Emerging semiconductor technologies (for example III-V integration on Si, novel Si devices, graphene) Energy and semiconductors Optical phenomena and optical devices MEMS and sensors Program 14 June Registration 13:00-17:00 15 June Meeting program 09:30-17:00 and Poster Session I 16 June Meeting program 09:30-17:00 and Poster Session II 17 June Excursion and dinner

  4. Metal-Semiconductor Contacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pugh, D. I.

    Metal-semiconductor contacts display a range of electrical characteristics from strongly rectifying to ohmic, each having its own applications. The rectifying properties of metal points on metallic sulphides were used extensively as detectors in early radio experiments, while during the second world war the rectifying point contact diode became important as a frequency detector and low level microwave radar detector [1]. Since 1945 the development of metal semiconductor contacts has been stimulated by the intense activity in the field of semiconductor physics and has remained vital in the ohmic connection of semiconductor devices with the outside world. The developments in surface science and the increased use of Schottky barriers in microelectronics has lead to much research with the aim of obtaining a full understanding of the physics of barrier formation and of current transport across the metal-semiconductor interface. Large gain spin electronic devices are possible with appropriate designs by incorporating ferromagnetic layers with semiconductors such as silicon [2]. This inevitably leads to metal-semiconductor contacts, and the impact of such junctions on the device must be considered. In this section we aim to look simply at the physical models that can be used to understand the electrical properties that can arise from these contacts, and then briefly discuss how deviations of these models can occur in practical junctions.

  5. Probing the Electronic Structure and Band Gap Evolution of Titanium Oxide Clusters (TiO2)n- (n=1-10) Using Photoelectron Spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhai, Hua-jin; Wang, Lai S.

    2007-01-01

    TiO2 is a wide-band gap semiconductor and it is an important material for photocatalysis. Here we report an experimental investigation of the electronic structure of (TiO2)n clusters and how their band gap evolves as a function of size using anion photoelectron spectroscopy (PES). PES spectra of (TiO2)n- clusters for n = 1-10 have been obtained at 193 (6.424 eV) and 157 nm (7.866 eV). The high photon energy at 157 nm allows the band gap of the TiO2 clusters to be clearly revealed up to n = 10. The band gap is observed to be strongly size-dependent for n 1 appears to be localized in a tricoordinated Ti atom, creating a single Ti3+ site and making these clusters ideal molecular models for mechanistic understanding of TiO2 surface defects and photocatalytic properties

  6. Structure and bonding in clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, V.

    1991-10-01

    We review here the recent progress made in the understanding of the electronic and atomic structure of small clusters of s-p bonded materials using the density functional molecular dynamics technique within the local density approximation. Starting with a brief description of the method, results are presented for alkali metal clusters, clusters of divalent metals such as Mg and Be which show a transition from van der Waals or weak chemical bonding to metallic behaviour as the cluster size grows and clusters of Al, Sn and Sb. In the case of semiconductors, we discuss results for Si, Ge and GaAs clusters. Clusters of other materials such as P, C, S, and Se are also briefly discussed. From these and other available results we suggest the possibility of unique structures for the magic clusters. (author). 69 refs, 7 figs, 1 tab

  7. Coherent dynamics in semiconductors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvam, Jørn Märcher

    1998-01-01

    Ultrafast nonlinear optical spectroscopy is used to study the coherent dynamics of optically excited electron-hole pairs in semiconductors. Coulomb interaction implies that the optical inter-band transitions are dominated, at least at low temperatures, by excitonic effects. They are further...... and molecular systems are found and studied in the exciton-biexciton system of semiconductors. At densities where strong exciton interactions, or many-body effects, become dominant, the semiconductor Bloch equations present a more rigorous treatment of the phenomena Ultrafast degenerate four-wave mixing is used...

  8. Physics of semiconductor lasers

    CERN Document Server

    Mroziewicz, B; Nakwaski, W

    2013-01-01

    Written for readers who have some background in solid state physics but do not necessarily possess any knowledge of semiconductor lasers, this book provides a comprehensive and concise account of fundamental semiconductor laser physics, technology and properties. The principles of operation of these lasers are therefore discussed in detail with the interrelations between their design and optical, electrical and thermal properties. The relative merits of a large number of laser structures and their parameters are described to acquaint the reader with the various aspects of the semiconductor l

  9. Semiconductors bonds and bands

    CERN Document Server

    Ferry, David K

    2013-01-01

    As we settle into this second decade of the twenty-first century, it is evident that the advances in micro-electronics have truly revolutionized our day-to-day lifestyle. The technology is built upon semiconductors, materials in which the band gap has been engineered for special values suitable to the particular application. This book, written specifically for a one semester course for graduate students, provides a thorough understanding of the key solid state physics of semiconductors. It describes how quantum mechanics gives semiconductors unique properties that enabled the micro-electronics revolution, and sustain the ever-growing importance of this revolution.

  10. Spin physics in semiconductors

    CERN Document Server

    2017-01-01

    This book offers an extensive introduction to the extremely rich and intriguing field of spin-related phenomena in semiconductors. In this second edition, all chapters have been updated to include the latest experimental and theoretical research. Furthermore, it covers the entire field: bulk semiconductors, two-dimensional semiconductor structures, quantum dots, optical and electric effects, spin-related effects, electron-nuclei spin interactions, Spin Hall effect, spin torques, etc. Thanks to its self-contained style, the book is ideally suited for graduate students and researchers new to the field.

  11. EDITORIAL: Oxide semiconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawasaki, M.; Makino, T.

    2005-04-01

    Blue or ultraviolet semiconducting light-emitting diodes have the potential to revolutionize illumination systems in the near-future. Such industrial need has propelled the investigation of several wide-gap semiconducting materials in recent years. Commercial applications include blue lasers for DVD memory and laser printers, while military applications are also expected. Most of the material development has so far been focused on GaN (band gap 3.5 eV at 2 K), and ZnSe (2.9 eV) because these two representative direct transition semiconductors are known to be bright emitting sources. GaN and GaN-based alloys are emerging as the winners in this field because ZnSe is subject to defect formation under high current drive. On the other hand, another II-VI compound, ZnO, has also excited substantial interest in the optoelectronics-oriented research communities because it is the brightest emitter of all, owing to the fact that its excitons have a 60 meV binding energy. This is compared with 26 meV for GaN and 20 meV for ZnSe. The stable excitons could lead to laser action based on their recombination even at temperatures well above room temperature. ZnO has additional major properties that are more advantageous than other wide-gap materials: availability of large area substrates, higher energy radiation stability, environmentally-friendly ingredients, and amenability to wet chemical etching. However, ZnO is not new to the semiconductor field as exemplified by several studies made during the 1960s on structural, vibrational, optical and electrical properties (Mollwo E 1982 Landolt-Boernstein New Series vol 17 (Berlin: Springer) p 35). In terms of devices, the luminescence from light-emitting diode structures was demonstrated in which Cu2O was used as the p-type material (Drapak I T 1968 Semiconductors 2 624). The main obstacle to the development of ZnO has been the lack of reproducible p-type ZnO. The possibility of achieving epitaxial p-type layers with the aid of thermal

  12. Semiconductor optoelectronic infrared spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hollingworth, A.R.

    2001-08-01

    We use spectroscopy to study infrared optoelectronic inter and intraband semiconductor carrier dynamics. The overall aim of this thesis was to study both III-V and Pb chalcogenide material systems in order to show their future potential use in infrared emitters. The effects of bandstructure engineering have been studied in the output characteristics of mid-IR III-V laser diodes to show which processes (defects, radiative, Auger and phonon) dominate and whether non-radiative processes can be suppressed. A new three-beam pump probe experiment was used to investigate interband recombination directly in passive materials. Experiments on PbSe and theory for non-parabolic near-mirror bands and non-degenerate statistics were in good agreement. Comparisons with HgCdTe showed a reduction in the Auger coefficient of 1-2 orders of magnitude in the PbSe. Using Landau confinement to model spatial confinement in quantum dots (QDs) 'phonon bottlenecking' was studied. The results obtained from pump probe and cyclotron resonance saturation measurements showed a clear suppression in the cooling of carriers when Landau level separation was not resonant with LO phonon energy. When a bulk laser diode was placed in a magnetic field to produce a quasi quantum wire device the resulting enhanced differential gain and reduced Auger recombination lowered I th by 30%. This result showed many peaks in the light output which occurred when the LO phonon energy was a multiple of the Landau level separation. This showed for the first time evidence of the phonon bottleneck in a working laser device. A new technique called time resolved optically detected cyclotron resonance, was used as a precursor to finding the carrier dynamics within a spatially confined quantum dot. By moving to the case of a spatial QD using an optically detected intraband resonance it was possible to measure the energy separation interband levels and conduction and valence sublevels within the dot simultaneously. Furthermore

  13. Electrical Characterization of Semiconductor Materials and Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deen, M.; Pascal, Fabien

    Semiconductor materials and devices continue to occupy a preeminent technological position due to their importance when building integrated electronic systems used in a wide range of applications from computers, cell-phones, personal digital assistants, digital cameras and electronic entertainment systems, to electronic instrumentation for medical diagnositics and environmental monitoring. Key ingredients of this technological dominance have been the rapid advances made in the quality and processing of materials - semiconductors, conductors and dielectrics - which have given metal oxide semiconductor device technology its important characteristics of negligible standby power dissipation, good input-output isolation, surface potential control and reliable operation. However, when assessing material quality and device reliability, it is important to have fast, nondestructive, accurate and easy-to-use electrical characterization techniques available, so that important parameters such as carrier doping density, type and mobility of carriers, interface quality, oxide trap density, semiconductor bulk defect density, contact and other parasitic resistances and oxide electrical integrity can be determined. This chapter describes some of the more widely employed and popular techniques that are used to determine these important parameters. The techniques presented in this chapter range in both complexity and test structure requirements from simple current-voltage measurements to more sophisticated low-frequency noise, charge pumping and deep-level transient spectroscopy techniques.

  14. Voltage-controlled quantum light from an atomically thin semiconductor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, Chitraleema; Kinnischtzke, Laura; Goodfellow, Kenneth M.; Beams, Ryan; Vamivakas, A. Nick

    2015-06-01

    Although semiconductor defects can often be detrimental to device performance, they are also responsible for the breadth of functionality exhibited by modern optoelectronic devices. Artificially engineered defects (so-called quantum dots) or naturally occurring defects in solids are currently being investigated for applications ranging from quantum information science and optoelectronics to high-resolution metrology. In parallel, the quantum confinement exhibited by atomically thin materials (semi-metals, semiconductors and insulators) has ushered in an era of flatland optoelectronics whose full potential is still being articulated. In this Letter we demonstrate the possibility of leveraging the atomically thin semiconductor tungsten diselenide (WSe2) as a host for quantum dot-like defects. We report that this previously unexplored solid-state quantum emitter in WSe2 generates single photons with emission properties that can be controlled via the application of external d.c. electric and magnetic fields. These new optically active quantum dots exhibit excited-state lifetimes on the order of 1 ns and remarkably large excitonic g-factors of 10. It is anticipated that WSe2 quantum dots will provide a novel platform for integrated solid-state quantum photonics and quantum information processing, as well as a rich condensed-matter physics playground with which to explore the coupling of quantum dots and atomically thin semiconductors.

  15. Oxygen defect processes in silicon and silicon germanium

    KAUST Repository

    Chroneos, A.

    2015-06-18

    Silicon and silicon germanium are the archetypical elemental and alloy semiconductor materials for nanoelectronic, sensor, and photovoltaic applications. The investigation of radiation induced defects involving oxygen, carbon, and intrinsic defects is important for the improvement of devices as these defects can have a deleterious impact on the properties of silicon and silicon germanium. In the present review, we mainly focus on oxygen-related defects and the impact of isovalent doping on their properties in silicon and silicon germanium. The efficacy of the isovalent doping strategies to constrain the oxygen-related defects is discussed in view of recent infrared spectroscopy and density functional theory studies.

  16. Hydrogen sensors using nitride-based semiconductor diodes: the role of metal/semiconductor interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irokawa, Yoshihiro

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, I review my recent results in investigating hydrogen sensors using nitride-based semiconductor diodes, focusing on the interaction mechanism of hydrogen with the devices. Firstly, effects of interfacial modification in the devices on hydrogen detection sensitivity are discussed. Surface defects of GaN under Schottky electrodes do not play a critical role in hydrogen sensing characteristics. However, dielectric layers inserted in metal/semiconductor interfaces are found to cause dramatic changes in hydrogen sensing performance, implying that chemical selectivity to hydrogen could be realized. The capacitance-voltage (C-V) characteristics reveal that the work function change in the Schottky metal is not responsible mechanism for hydrogen sensitivity. The interface between the metal and the semiconductor plays a critical role in the interaction of hydrogen with semiconductor devises. Secondly, low-frequency C-V characterization is employed to investigate the interaction mechanism of hydrogen with diodes. As a result, it is suggested that the formation of a metal/semiconductor interfacial polarization could be attributed to hydrogen-related dipoles. In addition, using low-frequency C-V characterization leads to clear detection of 100 ppm hydrogen even at room temperature where it is hard to detect hydrogen by using conventional current-voltage (I-V) characterization, suggesting that low-frequency C-V method would be effective in detecting very low hydrogen concentrations.

  17. Hydrogen Sensors Using Nitride-Based Semiconductor Diodes: The Role of Metal/Semiconductor Interfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshihiro Irokawa

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, I review my recent results in investigating hydrogen sensors using nitride-based semiconductor diodes, focusing on the interaction mechanism of hydrogen with the devices. Firstly, effects of interfacial modification in the devices on hydrogen detection sensitivity are discussed. Surface defects of GaN under Schottky electrodes do not play a critical role in hydrogen sensing characteristics. However, dielectric layers inserted in metal/semiconductor interfaces are found to cause dramatic changes in hydrogen sensing performance, implying that chemical selectivity to hydrogen could be realized. The capacitance-voltage (C-V characteristics reveal that the work function change in the Schottky metal is not responsible mechanism for hydrogen sensitivity. The interface between the metal and the semiconductor plays a critical role in the interaction of hydrogen with semiconductor devises. Secondly, low-frequency C-V characterization is employed to investigate the interaction mechanism of hydrogen with diodes. As a result, it is suggested that the formation of a metal/semiconductor interfacial polarization could be attributed to hydrogen-related dipoles. In addition, using low-frequency C-V characterization leads to clear detection of 100 ppm hydrogen even at room temperature where it is hard to detect hydrogen by using conventional current-voltage (I-V characterization, suggesting that low-frequency C-V method would be effective in detecting very low hydrogen concentrations.

  18. Biggest semiconductor installed

    CERN Multimedia

    2008-01-01

    Scientists and technicians at the European Laboratory for Particle Physics, commonly known by its French acronym CERN (Centre Europen pour la Recherche Nuclaire), have completed the installation of the largest semiconductor silicon detector.

  19. Isotopically controlled semiconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haller, E.E.

    2004-11-15

    A review of recent research involving isotopically controlled semiconductors is presented. Studies with isotopically enriched semiconductor structures experienced a dramatic expansion at the end of the Cold War when significant quantities of enriched isotopes of elements forming semiconductors became available for worldwide collaborations. Isotopes of an element differ in nuclear mass, may have different nuclear spins and undergo different nuclear reactions. Among the latter, the capture of thermal neutrons which can lead to neutron transmutation doping, can be considered the most important one for semiconductors. Experimental and theoretical research exploiting the differences in all the properties has been conducted and will be illustrated with selected examples. Manuel Cardona, the longtime editor-in-chief of Solid State Communications has been and continues to be one of the major contributors to this field of solid state physics and it is a great pleasure to dedicate this review to him.

  20. Semiconductor nuclear detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schaub, Bernard

    1976-01-01

    Three semiconductors are nowadays available for nuclear detection (germanium, mercury iodide, cadmium telluride). Their methods of elaboration are briefly described and, as a conclusion, a very close at-hand development of cadmium telluride is foreseen [fr

  1. Compact semiconductor lasers

    CERN Document Server

    Yu, Siyuan; Lourtioz, Jean-Michel

    2014-01-01

    This book brings together in a single volume a unique contribution by the top experts around the world in the field of compact semiconductor lasers to provide a comprehensive description and analysis of the current status as well as future directions in the field of micro- and nano-scale semiconductor lasers. It is organized according to the various forms of micro- or nano-laser cavity configurations with each chapter discussing key technical issues, including semiconductor carrier recombination processes and optical gain dynamics, photonic confinement behavior and output coupling mechanisms, carrier transport considerations relevant to the injection process, and emission mode control. Required reading for those working in and researching the area of semiconductors lasers and micro-electronics.

  2. Radiation effects in semiconductors

    CERN Document Server

    2011-01-01

    There is a need to understand and combat potential radiation damage problems in semiconductor devices and circuits. Written by international experts, this book explains the effects of radiation on semiconductor devices, radiation detectors, and electronic devices and components. These contributors explore emerging applications, detector technologies, circuit design techniques, new materials, and innovative system approaches. The text focuses on how the technology is being used rather than the mathematical foundations behind it. It covers CMOS radiation-tolerant circuit implementations, CMOS pr

  3. Market survey of semiconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mackintosh, I.M.; Diegel, D.; Brown, A.; Brinker, C.S. den

    1977-06-01

    Examination of technology and product trends over the range of current and future products in integrated circuits and optoelectronic displays. Analysis and forecast of major economic influences that affect the production costs of integrated circuits and optoelectronic displays. Forecast of the applications and markets for integrated circuits up to 1985 in West Europe, the USA and Japan. Historic development of the semiconductor industry and the prevailing tendencies - factors which influence success in the semiconductor industry. (orig.) [de

  4. Lattice Location of Transition Metals in Semiconductors

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    %IS366 %title\\\\ \\\\Transition metals (TMs) in semiconductors have been the subject of considerable research for nearly 40 years. This is due both to their role as important model impurities for deep centers in semiconductors, and to their technological impact as widespread contaminants in Si processing, where the miniaturization of devices requires to keep their sheet concentration below 10$^{10}$ cm$^{-2}$. As a consequence of the low TM solubility, conventional ion beam methods for direct lattice location have failed completely in identifying the lattice sites of isolated transition metals. Although electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) has yielded valuable information on a variety of TM centers, it has been unable to detect certain defects considered by theory, e.g., isolated interstitial or substitutional Cu in Si. The proposed identity of other EPR centers such as substitutional Fe in Si, still needs confirmation by additional experimental methods. As a consequence, the knowledge on the structural propert...

  5. Yield impacting systematic defects search and management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jing; Xu, Qingxiu; Zhang, Xin; Zhao, Xing; Ning, Jay; Cheng, Guojie; Chen, Shijie; Zhang, Gary; Vikram, Abhishek; Su, Bo

    2012-03-01

    Despite great effort before design tapeout, there are still some pattern related systematic defects showing up in production, which impact product yield. Through various check points in the production life cycle endeavor is made to detect these defective patterns. It is seen that apart from the known defective patterns, slight variations of polygon sizes and shapes in the known defective patterns also cause yield loss. This complexity is further compounded when interactions among multiple process layers causes the defect. Normally the exact pattern matching techniques cannot detect these variations of the defective patterns. With the currently existing tools in the fab it is a challenge to define the 'sensitive patterns', which are arbitrary variations in the known 'defective patterns'. A design based approach has been successfully experimented on product wafers to detect yield impacting defects that greatly reduces the TAT for hotspot analysis and also provides optimized care area definition to enable high sensitivity wafer inspection. A novel Rule based pattern search technique developed by Anchor Semiconductor has been used to find sensitive patterns in the full chip design. This technique allows GUI based pattern search rule generation like, edge move or edge-to-edge distance range, so that any variations of a particular sensitive pattern can be captured and flagged. Especially the pattern rules involving multiple process layers, like M1-V1-M2, can be defined easily using this technique. Apart from using this novel pattern search technique, design signatures are also extracted around the defect locations in the wafer and used in defect classification. This enhanced defect classification greatly helps in determining most critical defects among the total defect population. The effectiveness of this technique has been established through design to defect correlation and SEM verification. In this paper we will report details of the design based experiments that

  6. Electrical conduction by interface states in semiconductor heterojunctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Yacoubi, M.; Evrard, R.; Nguyen, N. D.; Schmeits, M.

    2000-04-01

    Electrical conduction in semiconductor heterojunctions containing defect states in the interface region is studied. As the classical drift-diffusion mechanism cannot in any case explain electrical conduction in semiconductor heterojunctions, tunnelling involving interface states is often considered as a possible conduction path. A theoretical treatment is made where defect states in the interface region with a continuous energy distribution are included. Electrical conduction through this defect band then allows the transit of electrons from the conduction band of one semiconductor to the valence band of the second component. The analysis is initiated by electrical measurements on n-CdS/p-CdTe heterojunctions obtained by chemical vapour deposition of CdS on (111) oriented CdTe single crystals, for which current-voltage and capacitance-frequency results are shown. The theoretical analysis is based on the numerical resolution of Poisson's equation and the continuity equations of electrons, holes and defect states, where a current component corresponding to the defect band conduction is explicitly included. Comparison with the experimental curves shows that this formalism yields an efficient tool to model the conduction process through the interface region. It also allows us to determine critical values of the physical parameters when a particular step in the conduction mechanism becomes dominant.

  7. Electronic Properties of Metallic Nanoclusters on Semiconductor Surfaces: Implications for Nanoelectronic Device Applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Takhee; Liu Jia; Chen, N.-P.; Andres, R.P.; Janes, D.B.; Reifenberger, R.

    2000-01-01

    We review current research on the electronic properties of nanoscale metallic islands and clusters deposited on semiconductor substrates. Reported results for a number of nanoscale metal-semiconductor systems are summarized in terms of their fabrication and characterization. In addition to the issues faced in large-area metal-semiconductor systems, nano-systems present unique challenges in both the realization of well-controlled interfaces at the nanoscale and the ability to adequately characterize their electrical properties. Imaging by scanning tunneling microscopy as well as electrical characterization by current-voltage spectroscopy enable the study of the electrical properties of nanoclusters/semiconductor systems at the nanoscale. As an example of the low-resistance interfaces that can be realized, low-resistance nanocontacts consisting of metal nanoclusters deposited on specially designed ohmic contact structures are described. To illustrate a possible path to employing metal/semiconductor nanostructures in nanoelectronic applications, we also describe the fabrication and performance of uniform 2-D arrays of such metallic clusters on semiconductor substrates. Using self-assembly techniques involving conjugated organic tether molecules, arrays of nanoclusters have been formed in both unpatterned and patterned regions on semiconductor surfaces. Imaging and electrical characterization via scanning tunneling microscopy/spectroscopy indicate that high quality local ordering has been achieved within the arrays and that the clusters are electronically coupled to the semiconductor substrate via the low-resistance metal/semiconductor interface

  8. The calculation of deep levels in semiconductors by using a recursion method for super-cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wong Yongliang.

    1987-01-01

    The paper presents the theory of deep levels in semiconductors, the super-cell approach to the theory of deep level impurities, the calculation of band structure by using the tight-binding method and the recursion method used to study the defects in the presence of lattice relaxation and extended defect complexes. 47 refs

  9. Photoluminescence analysis of semiconductors using radioactive isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henry, M.O.; Deicher, M.; Magerle, R.; McGlynn, E.; Stotzler, A.

    2000-01-01

    The combination of photoluminescence spectroscopy with the radioactive isotopes 7 Be, 71 As, 111 Ag, 111 In, 191 Pt, 193 Au and 197 Hg is shown to provide definitive proof of the chemical identity of impurities producing photoluminescence spectra in all classes of semiconductors. The isotope 71 As is used to show that radioactive isotopes can provide a powerful means of producing and studying a fundamental crystal defect such as an anti-site. Factors governing the luminescence intensities which can lead to apparently anomalous results are also discussed

  10. Embedded defects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barriola, M.; Vachaspati, T.; Bucher, M.

    1994-01-01

    We give a prescription for embedding classical solutions and, in particular, topological defects in field theories which are invariant under symmetry groups that are not necessarily simple. After providing examples of embedded defects in field theories based on simple groups, we consider the electroweak model and show that it contains the Z string and a one-parameter family of strings called the W(α) string. It is argued that although the members of this family are gauge equivalent when considered in isolation, each member becomes physically distinct when multistring configurations are considered. We then turn to the issue of stability of embedded defects and demonstrate the instability of a large class of such solutions in the absence of bound states or condensates. The Z string is shown to be unstable for all values of the Higgs boson mass when θ W =π/4. W strings are also shown to be unstable for a large range of parameters. Embedded monopoles suffer from the Brandt-Neri-Coleman instability. Finally, we connect the electroweak string solutions to the sphaleron

  11. Amphoteric oxide semiconductors for energy conversion devices: a tutorial review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Kalpana; Nowotny, Janusz; Thangadurai, Venkataraman

    2013-03-07

    In this tutorial review, we discuss the defect chemistry of selected amphoteric oxide semiconductors in conjunction with their significant impact on the development of renewable and sustainable solid state energy conversion devices. The effect of electronic defect disorders in semiconductors appears to control the overall performance of several solid-state ionic devices that include oxide ion conducting solid oxide fuel cells (O-SOFCs), proton conducting solid oxide fuel cells (H-SOFCs), batteries, solar cells, and chemical (gas) sensors. Thus, the present study aims to assess the advances made in typical n- and p-type metal oxide semiconductors with respect to their use in ionic devices. The present paper briefly outlines the key challenges in the development of n- and p-type materials for various applications and also tries to present the state-of-the-art of defect disorders in technologically related semiconductors such as TiO(2), and perovskite-like and fluorite-type structure metal oxides.

  12. Coherent dynamics in semiconductors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvam, Jørn Märcher

    1998-01-01

    enhanced in quantum confined lower-dimensional systems, where exciton and biexciton effects dominate the spectra even at room temperature. The coherent dynamics of excitons are at modest densities well described by the optical Bloch equations and a number of the dynamical effects known from atomic......Ultrafast nonlinear optical spectroscopy is used to study the coherent dynamics of optically excited electron-hole pairs in semiconductors. Coulomb interaction implies that the optical inter-band transitions are dominated, at least at low temperatures, by excitonic effects. They are further...... and molecular systems are found and studied in the exciton-biexciton system of semiconductors. At densities where strong exciton interactions, or many-body effects, become dominant, the semiconductor Bloch equations present a more rigorous treatment of the phenomena Ultrafast degenerate four-wave mixing is used...

  13. Hydrogen in semiconductors II

    CERN Document Server

    Nickel, Norbert H; Weber, Eicke R; Nickel, Norbert H

    1999-01-01

    Since its inception in 1966, the series of numbered volumes known as Semiconductors and Semimetals has distinguished itself through the careful selection of well-known authors, editors, and contributors. The "Willardson and Beer" Series, as it is widely known, has succeeded in publishing numerous landmark volumes and chapters. Not only did many of these volumes make an impact at the time of their publication, but they continue to be well-cited years after their original release. Recently, Professor Eicke R. Weber of the University of California at Berkeley joined as a co-editor of the series. Professor Weber, a well-known expert in the field of semiconductor materials, will further contribute to continuing the series' tradition of publishing timely, highly relevant, and long-impacting volumes. Some of the recent volumes, such as Hydrogen in Semiconductors, Imperfections in III/V Materials, Epitaxial Microstructures, High-Speed Heterostructure Devices, Oxygen in Silicon, and others promise that this tradition ...

  14. Fundamentals of semiconductor lasers

    CERN Document Server

    Numai, Takahiro

    2015-01-01

    This book explains physics under the operating principles of semiconductor lasers in detail based on the experience of the author, dealing with the first manufacturing of phase-shifted DFB-LDs and recent research on transverse modes.   The book also bridges a wide gap between journal papers and textbooks, requiring only an undergraduate-level knowledge of electromagnetism and quantum mechanics, and helps readers to understand journal papers where definitions of some technical terms vary, depending on the paper. Two definitions of the photon density in the rate equations and two definitions of the phase-shift in the phase-shifted DFB-LD are explained, and differences in the calculated results are indicated, depending on the definitions.    Readers can understand the physics of semiconductor lasers and analytical tools for Fabry-Perot LDs, DFB-LDs, and VCSELs and will be stimulated to develop semiconductor lasers themselves.

  15. Basic Semiconductor Physics

    CERN Document Server

    Hamaguchi, Chihiro

    2010-01-01

    This book presents a detailed description of the basic semiconductor physics. The reader is assumed to have a basic command of mathematics and some elementary knowledge of solid state physics. The text covers a wide range of important phenomena in semiconductors, from the simple to the advanced. The reader can understand three different methods of energy band calculations, empirical pseudo-potential, k.p perturbation and tight-binding methods. The effective mass approximation and electron motion in a periodic potential, Boltzmann transport equation and deformation potentials used for full band Monte Carlo simulation are discussed. Experiments and theoretical analysis of cyclotron resonance are discussed in detail because the results are essential to the understanding of semiconductor physics. Optical and transport properties, magneto-transport, two dimensional electron gas transport (HEMT and MOSFET), and quantum transport are reviewed, explaining optical transition, electron phonon interactions, electron mob...

  16. Nonradiative Step Facets in Semiconductor Nanowires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez, Ana M; Zhang, Yunyan; Tait, Edward W; Hine, Nicholas D M; Liu, Huiyun; Beanland, Richard

    2017-04-12

    One of the main advantages of nanowires for functional applications is their high perfection, which results from surface image forces that act on line defects such as dislocations, rendering them unstable and driving them out of the crystal. Here we show that there is a class of step facets that are stable in nanowires, with no long-range strain field or dislocation character. In zinc-blende semiconductors, they take the form of Σ3 (112) facets with heights constrained to be a multiple of three {111} monolayers. Density functional theory calculations show that they act as nonradiative recombination centers and have deleterious effects on nanowire properties. We present experimental observations of these defects on twin boundaries and twins that terminate inside GaAsP nanowires and find that they are indeed always multiples of three monolayers in height. Strategies to use the three-monolayer rule during growth to prevent their formation are discussed.

  17. Heavy ions amorphous semiconductors irradiation study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benmalek, M.

    1978-01-01

    The behavior of amorphous semiconductors (germanium and germanium and arsenic tellurides) under ion bombardment at energies up to 2 MeV was studied. The irradiation induced modifications were followed using electrical parameter changes (resistivity and activation energy) and by means of the transmission electron microscopy observations. The electrical conductivity enhancement of the irradiated samples was interpreted using the late conduction theories in amorphous compounds. In amorphous germanium, Electron Microscopy showed the formations of 'globules', these defects are similar to voids observed in irradiated metals. The displacement cascade theory was used for the interpretation of the irradiation induced defects formation and a coalescence mechanism of growth was pointed out for the vacancy agglomeration [fr

  18. Semiconductor opto-electronics

    CERN Document Server

    Moss, TS; Ellis, B

    1972-01-01

    Semiconductor Opto-Electronics focuses on opto-electronics, covering the basic physical phenomena and device behavior that arise from the interaction between electromagnetic radiation and electrons in a solid. The first nine chapters of this book are devoted to theoretical topics, discussing the interaction of electromagnetic waves with solids, dispersion theory and absorption processes, magneto-optical effects, and non-linear phenomena. Theories of photo-effects and photo-detectors are treated in detail, including the theories of radiation generation and the behavior of semiconductor lasers a

  19. Advances in semiconductor lasers

    CERN Document Server

    Coleman, James J; Jagadish, Chennupati

    2012-01-01

    Semiconductors and Semimetals has distinguished itself through the careful selection of well-known authors, editors, and contributors. Originally widely known as the ""Willardson and Beer"" Series, it has succeeded in publishing numerous landmark volumes and chapters. The series publishes timely, highly relevant volumes intended for long-term impact and reflecting the truly interdisciplinary nature of the field. The volumes in Semiconductors and Semimetals have been and will continue to be of great interest to physicists, chemists, materials scientists, and device engineers in academia, scien

  20. Ternary chalcopyrite semiconductors

    CERN Document Server

    Shay, J L; Pamplin, B R

    2013-01-01

    Ternary Chalcopyrite Semiconductors: Growth, Electronic Properties, and Applications covers the developments of work in the I-III-VI2 and II-IV-V2 ternary chalcopyrite compounds. This book is composed of eight chapters that focus on the crystal growth, characterization, and applications of these compounds to optical communications systems. After briefly dealing with the status of ternary chalcopyrite compounds, this book goes on describing the crystal growth of II-IV-V2 and I-III-VI2 single crystals. Chapters 3 and 4 examine the energy band structure of these semiconductor compounds, illustrat

  1. Introductory semiconductor device physics

    CERN Document Server

    Parker, Greg

    2004-01-01

    ATOMS AND BONDINGThe Periodic TableIonic BondingCovalent BondingMetallic bondingvan der Waals BondingStart a DatabaseENERGY BANDS AND EFFECTIVE MASSSemiconductors, Insulators and MetalsSemiconductorsInsulatorsMetalsThe Concept of Effective MassCARRIER CONCENTRATIONS IN SEMICONDUCTORSDonors and AcceptorsFermi-LevelCarrier Concentration EquationsDonors and Acceptors Both PresentCONDUCTION IN SEMICONDUCTORSCarrier DriftCarrier MobilitySaturated Drift VelocityMobility Variation with TemperatureA Derivation of Ohm's LawDrift Current EquationsSemiconductor Band Diagrams with an Electric Field Presen

  2. Compound semiconductor device physics

    CERN Document Server

    Tiwari, Sandip

    2013-01-01

    This book provides one of the most rigorous treatments of compound semiconductor device physics yet published. A complete understanding of modern devices requires a working knowledge of low-dimensional physics, the use of statistical methods, and the use of one-, two-, and three-dimensional analytical and numerical analysis techniques. With its systematic and detailed**discussion of these topics, this book is ideal for both the researcher and the student. Although the emphasis of this text is on compound semiconductor devices, many of the principles discussed will also be useful to those inter

  3. Optical processes in semiconductors

    CERN Document Server

    Pankove, Jacques I

    1975-01-01

    Based on a series of lectures at Berkeley, 1968-1969, this is the first book to deal comprehensively with all of the phenomena involving light in semiconductors. The author has combined, for the graduate student and researcher, a great variety of source material, journal research, and many years of experimental research, adding new insights published for the first time in this book.Coverage includes energy states in semiconductors and their perturbation by external parameters, absorption, relationships between optical constants, spectroscopy, radiative transitions, nonradiative recombination

  4. Novel room temperature ferromagnetic semiconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gupta, Amita [KTH Royal Inst. of Technology, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2004-06-01

    distribution of Mn substituting for Zn a 2+ state in the ZnO lattice. Ferromagnetic Resonance (FMR) technique is used to confirm the existence of ferromagnetic ordering at temperatures as high as 425K. The ab initio calculations were found to be consistent with the observation of ferromagnetism arising from fully polarized Mn 2+ state. The key to observed room temperature ferromagnetism in this system is the low temperature processing, which prevents formation of clusters, secondary phases and the host ZnO from becoming n-type. The electronic structure of the same Mn doped ZnO thin films studied using XAS, XES and RIXS, revealed a strong hybridization between Mn 3d and O 2p states, which is an important characteristic of a Dilute magnetic Semiconductor (DMS). It is shown that the various processing conditions like sintering temperature, dopant concentration and the properties of precursors used for making of DMS have a great influence on the final properties. Use of various experimental techniques to verify the physical properties, and to understand the mechanism involved to give rise to ferromagnetism is presented. Methods to improve the magnetic moment in Mn doped ZnO are also described. New promising DMS materials (such as Cu doped ZnO are explored). The demonstrated new capability to fabricate powder, pellets, and thin films of room temperature ferromagnetic semiconductors thus makes possible the realization of a wide range of complex elements for a variety of new multifunctional phenomena related to Spintronic devices as well as magneto-optic components.

  5. Proceedings of the International Symposium on the Structure and Properties of Dislocations in Semiconductors (6th) held in Oxford (England) 5-8 April 1989: Structure and Properties of Dislocations in Semiconductors 1989

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-04-08

    extended lattice defects on silicon semiconductor devices B 0 Kolbesen, W Bergholz, H Cerva , F Gelsdorf, H Wendt and G Zoth 431-442 Observations of...Effects of extended lattice defects on silicon semiconductor devices B.O. Kolbesen, W. Bergholz, H. Cerva , F. Gelsdorf, H. Wendt and G. Zoth Siemens AG...oxide spacers have steep side walls the high dose As implanted regions terminate abruptly at the e-dge of the spacers. Cerva and Kusters (1989) have

  6. High-Resolution Differential Thermography of Semiconductor Edifices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vera Marie Sastine

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available We develop a cost-effective, high-resolution, and noninvasive imaging technique for thermal mapping of semiconductor edifices in integrated circuits. Initial implementation was done using a power-stabilized optical feedback laser system that detects changes in the optical beam-induced current when the package temperature of the device is increased. The linear change in detected current can be translated to a thermal gradient, which can reveal semiconductor “hotspots”—localized sites with anomalous thermal activity. These locales are possible fault sites or areas susceptible to defects, which are the best jump-off points for failure analysis.

  7. Electromagnetic radiation screening of semiconductor devices for long life applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, T. C.; Brammer, W. G.

    1972-01-01

    A review is presented of the mechanism of interaction of electromagnetic radiation in various spectral ranges, with various semiconductor device defects. Previous work conducted in this area was analyzed as to its pertinence to the current problem. The task was studied of implementing electromagnetic screening methods in the wavelength region determined to be most effective. Both scanning and flooding type stimulation techniques are discussed. While the scanning technique offers a considerably higher yield of useful information, a preliminary investigation utilizing the flooding approach is first recommended because of the ease of implementation, lower cost and ability to provide go-no-go information in semiconductor screening.

  8. Metal semiconductor contacts and devices

    CERN Document Server

    Cohen, Simon S; Einspruch, Norman G

    1986-01-01

    VLSI Electronics Microstructure Science, Volume 13: Metal-Semiconductor Contacts and Devices presents the physics, technology, and applications of metal-semiconductor barriers in digital integrated circuits. The emphasis is placed on the interplay among the theory, processing, and characterization techniques in the development of practical metal-semiconductor contacts and devices.This volume contains chapters that are devoted to the discussion of the physics of metal-semiconductor interfaces and its basic phenomena; fabrication procedures; and interface characterization techniques, particularl

  9. Physical principles of semiconductor detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Micek, S.L.

    1979-01-01

    The general properties of semiconductors with respect to the possibilities of their use as the ionization radiation detectors are discussed. Some chosen types of semiconductor junctions and their characteristics are briefly presented. There are also discussed the physical phenomena connected with the formation of barriers in various types of semiconductor counters. Finally, the basic properties of three main types of semiconductor detectors are given. (author)

  10. Handbook of luminescent semiconductor materials

    CERN Document Server

    Bergman, Leah

    2011-01-01

    Photoluminescence spectroscopy is an important approach for examining the optical interactions in semiconductors and optical devices with the goal of gaining insight into material properties. With contributions from researchers at the forefront of this field, Handbook of Luminescent Semiconductor Materials explores the use of this technique to study semiconductor materials in a variety of applications, including solid-state lighting, solar energy conversion, optical devices, and biological imaging. After introducing basic semiconductor theory and photoluminescence principles, the book focuses

  11. Understanding lattice defects to influence ferromagnetic order of ZnO nanoparticles by Ni, Cu, Ce ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verma, Kuldeep Chand, E-mail: dkuldeep.physics@gmail.com [Department of Physics, Panjab University, Chandigarh 160014 (India); Kotnala, R.K., E-mail: rkkotnala@gmail.com [CSIR-National Physical Laboratory, New Delhi 110012 (India)

    2017-02-15

    Future spintronics technologies based on diluted magnetic semiconductors (DMS) will rely heavily on a sound understanding of the microscopic origins of ferromagnetism in such materials. It remains unclear, however, whether the ferromagnetism in DMS is intrinsic - a precondition for spintronics - or due to dopant clustering. For this, we include a simultaneous doping from transition metal (Ni, Cu) and rare earth (Ce) ions in ZnO nanoparticles that increase the antiferromagnetic ordering to achieve high-T{sub c} ferromagnetism. Rietveld refinement of XRD patterns indicate that the dopant ions in ZnO had a wurtzite structure and the dopants, Ni{sup 2+}, Cu{sup 2+}, Ce{sup 3+} ions, are highly influenced the lattice constants to induce lattice defects. The Ni, Cu, Ce ions in ZnO have nanoparticles formation than nanorods was observed in pure sample. FTIR involve some organic groups to induce lattice defects and the metal-oxygen bonding of Zn, Ni, Cu, Ce and O atoms to confirm wurtzite structure. Raman analysis evaluates the crystalline quality, structural disorder and defects in ZnO lattice with doping. Photoluminescence spectra have strong near-band-edge emission and visible emission bands responsible for defects due to oxygen vacancies. The energy band gap is calculated using Tauc relation. Room temperature ferromagnetism has been described due to bound magnetic polarons formation with Ni{sup 2+}, Cu{sup 2+}, Ce{sup 3+} ions in ZnO via oxygen vacancies. The zero field and field cooling SQUID measurement confirm the strength of antiferromagnetism in ZnO. The field cooling magnetization is studied by Curie-Weiss law that include antiferromagnetic interactions up to low temperature. The XPS spectra have involve +3/+4 oxidation states of Ce ions to influence the observed ferromagnetism. - Graphical abstract: The lattice defects/vacancies attributed by Ni and Ce ions in the wurtzite ZnO structure are responsible in high T{sub c} -ferromagnetism due to long-range magnetic

  12. Nonlinear Elasticity of Doped Semiconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-02-01

    AFRL-RY-WP-TR-2016-0206 NONLINEAR ELASTICITY OF DOPED SEMICONDUCTORS Mark Dykman and Kirill Moskovtsev Michigan State University...2016 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE NONLINEAR ELASTICITY OF DOPED SEMICONDUCTORS 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER FA8650-16-1-7600 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM...vibration amplitude. 15. SUBJECT TERMS semiconductors , microresonators, microelectromechanical 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF

  13. Intense terahertz excitation of semiconductors

    CERN Document Server

    Ganichev, S D

    2006-01-01

    This work presents the first comprehensive treatment of high-power terahertz applications to semiconductors and low-dimensional semiconductor structures. Terahertz properties of semiconductors are in the centre of scientific activities because of the need of high-speed electronics.

  14. Semiconductor radiation detectors device physics

    CERN Document Server

    Lutz, Gerhard

    1999-01-01

    Describes the field of modern semiconductor detectors used for energy and position measurement radiation. This book includes an introduction to semiconductor physics. It explains the principles of semiconductor radiation detectors, followed by formal quantitative analysis. It also covers electronic signal readout.

  15. Semiconductors for plasmonics and metamaterials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Naik, G.V.; Boltasseva, Alexandra

    2010-01-01

    with semiconductors can alleviate these problems if only semiconductors could exhibit negative real permittivity. Aluminum doped zinc oxide (AZO) is a low loss semiconductor that can show negative real permittivity in the NIR. A comparative assessment of AZO-based plasmonic devices such as superlens and hyperlens...

  16. Transparent Oxide Semiconductors for Emerging Electronics

    KAUST Repository

    Caraveo-Frescas, Jesus Alfonso

    2013-11-01

    Transparent oxide electronics have emerged as promising materials to shape the future of electronics. While several n-type oxides have been already studied and demonstrated feasibility to be used as active materials in thin film transistors, high performance p-type oxides have remained elusive. This dissertation is devoted to the study of transparent p-type oxide semiconductor tin monoxide and its use in the fabrication of field effect devices. A complete study on the deposition of tin monoxide thin films by direct current reactive magnetron sputtering is performed. Carrier density, carrier mobility and conductivity are studied over a set of deposition conditions where p-type conduction is observed. Density functional theory simulations are performed in order to elucidate the effect of native defects on carrier mobility. The findings on the electrical properties of SnO thin films are then translated to the fabrication of thin films transistors. The low processing temperature of tin monoxide thin films below 200 oC is shown advantageous for the fabrication of fully transparent and flexible thin film transistors. After careful device engineering, including post deposition annealing temperature, gate dielectric material, semiconductor thickness and source and drain electrodes material, thin film transistors with record device performance are demonstrated, achieving a field effect mobility >6.7 cm2V-1s-1. Device performance is further improved to reach a field effect mobility of 10.8 cm2V-1s-1 in SnO nanowire field effect transistors fabricated from the sputtered SnO thin films and patterned by electron beam lithography. Downscaling device dimension to nano scale is shown beneficial for SnO field effect devices not only by achieving a higher hole mobility but enhancing the overall device performance including better threshold voltage, subthreshold swing and lower number of interfacial defects. Use of p-type semiconductors in nonvolatile memory applications is then

  17. Semiconductor detector physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Equer, B.

    1987-01-01

    Comprehension of semiconductor detectors follows comprehension of some elements of solid state physics. They are recalled here, limited to the necessary physical principles, that is to say the conductivity. P-n and MIS junctions are discussed in view of their use in detection. Material and structure (MOS, p-n, multilayer, ..) are also reviewed [fr

  18. Biexcitons in semiconductor microcavities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borri, P.; Langbein, W.; Woggon, U.

    2003-01-01

    In this paper, the present status of the experimental study of the optical properties of biexcitons in semiconductor microcavities is reviewed. In particular, a detailed investigation of a polariton-biexciton transition in a high-quality single quantum well GaAs/AlGaAs microcavity is reported...

  19. Defect formation energy for charge states of CdMnTe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mehrabova, M.A.; Orujov, H.S.; Hasanli, R.N.

    2014-01-01

    Full text : Cd 1 -xMn x Te semimagnetic semiconductors are promising materials for X-ray and gamma-detectors, solar cells, optic insulators and etc. For obtaining high-sensitive and radiation-resistant materials, as well as creation of devices based on them it is necessary to know the mechanism of defect formation in semimagnetic conductors. Defects in semiconductors not only influence on electrical and optic properties of these materials, but also display their interesting physical properties

  20. Importance of elastic finite-size effects: Neutral defects in ionic compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burr, P. A.; Cooper, M. W. D.

    2017-09-01

    Small system sizes are a well-known source of error in density functional theory (DFT) calculations, yet computational constraints frequently dictate the use of small supercells, often as small as 96 atoms in oxides and compound semiconductors. In ionic compounds, electrostatic finite-size effects have been well characterized, but self-interaction of charge-neutral defects is often discounted or assumed to follow an asymptotic behavior and thus easily corrected with linear elastic theory. Here we show that elastic effects are also important in the description of defects in ionic compounds and can lead to qualitatively incorrect conclusions if inadequately small supercells are used; moreover, the spurious self-interaction does not follow the behavior predicted by linear elastic theory. Considering the exemplar cases of metal oxides with fluorite structure, we show that numerous previous studies, employing 96-atom supercells, misidentify the ground-state structure of (charge-neutral) Schottky defects. We show that the error is eliminated by employing larger cells (324, 768, and 1500 atoms), and careful analysis determines that elastic, not electrostatic, effects are responsible. The spurious self-interaction was also observed in nonoxide ionic compounds irrespective of the computational method used, thereby resolving long-standing discrepancies between DFT and force-field methods, previously attributed to the level of theory. The surprising magnitude of the elastic effects is a cautionary tale for defect calculations in ionic materials, particularly when employing computationally expensive methods (e.g., hybrid functionals) or when modeling large defect clusters. We propose two computationally practicable methods to test the magnitude of the elastic self-interaction in any ionic system. In commonly studied oxides, where electrostatic effects would be expected to be dominant, it is the elastic effects that dictate the need for larger supercells: greater than 96 atoms.

  1. Coagulation defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soliman, Doreen E; Broadman, Lynn M

    2006-09-01

    The present understanding of the coagulation process emphasizes the final common pathway and the proteolytic systems that result in the degradation of formed clots and the prevention of unwanted clot formations, as well as a variety of defense systems that include tissue repair, autoimmune processes, arteriosclerosis, tumor growth, the spread of metastases, and defense systems against micro-organisms. This article discusses diagnosis and management of some of the most common bleeding disorders. The goals are to provide a simple guide on how best to manage patients afflicted with congenital or acquired clotting abnormalities during the perioperative period, present a brief overview of the methods of testing and monitoring the coagulation defects, and discuss the appropriate pharmacologic or blood component therapies for each disease.

  2. Distribution of defects in wind turbine blades and reliability assessment of blades containing defects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stensgaard Toft, Henrik; Branner, Kim; Berring, Peter

    2009-01-01

    on the assumption that one error in the production process tends to trigger several defects. For both models additional information about number, type and size of the defects is included as stochastic variables. The probability of failure for a wind turbine blade will not only depend on variations in the material......In the present paper two stochastic models for the distribution of defects in wind turbine blades are proposed. The first model assumes that the individual defects are completely randomly distributed in the blade. The second model assumes that the defects occur in clusters of different size based...... properties and the load but also on potential defects in the blades. As a numerical example the probability of failure is calculated for the main spar both with and without defects in terms of delaminations. The delaminations increase the probability of failure compared to a perfect blade, but by applying...

  3. Quantum information processing using designed defect states in

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Jesper; Flindt, Christian; Mortensen, Niels Asger

    2007-01-01

    We propose a new physical implementation of spin qubits for quantum information processing, namely defect states in antidot lattices de¯ned in the two-dimensional electron gas at a semiconductor heterostructure. Calculations of the band structure of the periodic antidot lattice are presented. A p......-coupled defect states is calculated numerically.We ¯nd results reminiscent of double quantum dot structures, indicating that the suggested structure is a feasible physical implementation of spin qubits....

  4. Compound semiconductor device modelling

    CERN Document Server

    Miles, Robert

    1993-01-01

    Compound semiconductor devices form the foundation of solid-state microwave and optoelectronic technologies used in many modern communication systems. In common with their low frequency counterparts, these devices are often represented using equivalent circuit models, but it is often necessary to resort to physical models in order to gain insight into the detailed operation of compound semiconductor devices. Many of the earliest physical models were indeed developed to understand the 'unusual' phenomena which occur at high frequencies. Such was the case with the Gunn and IMPATI diodes, which led to an increased interest in using numerical simulation methods. Contemporary devices often have feature sizes so small that they no longer operate within the familiar traditional framework, and hot electron or even quantum­ mechanical models are required. The need for accurate and efficient models suitable for computer aided design has increased with the demand for a wider range of integrated devices for operation at...

  5. Semiconductor physics an introduction

    CERN Document Server

    Seeger, Karlheinz

    1999-01-01

    Semiconductor Physics - An Introduction - is suitable for the senior undergraduate or new graduate student majoring in electrical engineering or physics. It will also be useful to solid-state scientists and device engineers involved in semiconductor design and technology. The text provides a lucid account of charge transport, energy transport and optical processes, and a detailed description of many devices. It includes sections on superlattices and quantum well structures, the effects of deep-level impurities on transport, the quantum Hall effect and the calculation of the influence of a magnetic field on the carrier distribution function. This 6th edition has been revised and corrected, and new sections have been added to different chapters.

  6. Basic semiconductor physics

    CERN Document Server

    Hamaguchi, Chihiro

    2017-01-01

    This book presents a detailed description of basic semiconductor physics. The text covers a wide range of important phenomena in semiconductors, from the simple to the advanced. Four different methods of energy band calculations in the full band region are explained: local empirical pseudopotential, non-local pseudopotential, KP perturbation and tight-binding methods. The effective mass approximation and electron motion in a periodic potential, Boltzmann transport equation and deformation potentials used for analysis of transport properties are discussed. Further, the book examines experiments and theoretical analyses of cyclotron resonance in detail. Optical and transport properties, magneto-transport, two-dimensional electron gas transport (HEMT and MOSFET) and quantum transport are reviewed, while optical transition, electron-phonon interaction and electron mobility are also addressed. Energy and electronic structure of a quantum dot (artificial atom) are explained with the help of Slater determinants. The...

  7. Single frequency semiconductor lasers

    CERN Document Server

    Fang, Zujie; Chen, Gaoting; Qu, Ronghui

    2017-01-01

    This book systematically introduces the single frequency semiconductor laser, which is widely used in many vital advanced technologies, such as the laser cooling of atoms and atomic clock, high-precision measurements and spectroscopy, coherent optical communications, and advanced optical sensors. It presents both the fundamentals and characteristics of semiconductor lasers, including basic F-P structure and monolithic integrated structures; interprets laser noises and their measurements; and explains mechanisms and technologies relating to the main aspects of single frequency lasers, including external cavity lasers, frequency stabilization technologies, frequency sweeping, optical phase locked loops, and so on. It paints a clear, physical picture of related technologies and reviews new developments in the field as well. It will be a useful reference to graduate students, researchers, and engineers in the field.

  8. Images through semiconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1986-01-01

    Improved image processing techniques are constantly being developed for television and for scanners using X-rays or other radiation for industrial or medical applications, etc. As Erik Heijne of CERN explains here, particle physics too has its own special requirements for image processing. The increasing use of semiconductor techniques for handling measurements down to the level of a few microns provides another example of the close interplay between scientific research and technological development. (orig.).

  9. Quantum Confined Semiconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-02-01

    RCR    , (5) which considers all elastic scattering events on the energy shell kk EEE   , which is appropriate for all scattering...fluctuations in semiconductor superlattices using a magneto -transport technique,” Superlattices and Microstructures 15, 225-228 (1994). 12. I. Dharssi and...εyy is consistently slightly tensile (≈ -1%), which agreed with theoretical calculations of εyy based on published values of elastic constants. An

  10. Muonium states in semiconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patterson, B.D.

    1987-01-01

    There is a brief summary of what is known about the muonium states isotropic, anisotropic and diamagnetic in diamond and zincblende semiconductors. The report deals with muonium spectroscopy, including the formation probabilities, hyperfine parameters and electronic g-factors of the states. The dynamics of the states is treated including a discussion of the transition from isotropic Mu to anisotropic Mu in diamond, temperature-dependent linewidthes in silicon and germanium and effects of daping and radiation damage

  11. Semiconductor projectile impact detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shriver, E. L. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    A semiconductor projectile impact detector is described for use in determining micrometeorite presence, as well as its flux and energy comprising a photovoltaic cell which generates a voltage according to the light and heat emitted by the micrometeorites upon impact. A counter and peak amplitude measuring device were used to indicate the number of particules which strike the surface of the cell as well as the kinetic energy of each of the particles.

  12. Nonradiative recombination in semiconductors

    CERN Document Server

    Abakumov, VN; Yassievich, IN

    1991-01-01

    In recent years, great progress has been made in the understandingof recombination processes controlling the number of excessfree carriers in semiconductors under nonequilibrium conditions. As a result, it is now possible to give a comprehensivetheoretical description of these processes. The authors haveselected a number of experimental results which elucidate theunderlying physical problems and enable a test of theoreticalmodels. The following topics are dealt with: phenomenological theory ofrecombination, theoretical models of shallow and deep localizedstates, cascade model of carrier captu

  13. Semiconductor detectors. Recent evolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siffert, P.

    1977-01-01

    The recent evolution as well as the problems appearing in the use of semiconductor counters in both X and γ-ray as well as heavy ions spectroscopy are reviewed. For the photon counters the discussion is limited to cadmium telluride and mercuric iodide room temperature diodes, whereas for heavy ions, identification by means of thin ΔE/Δx counters and some problems related to the pulse amplitude in E detectors are considered [fr

  14. Survey of semiconductor physics

    CERN Document Server

    Böer, Karl W

    1992-01-01

    Any book that covers a large variety of subjects and is written by one author lacks by necessity the depth provided by an expert in his or her own field of specialization. This book is no exception. It has been written with the encouragement of my students and colleagues, who felt that an extensive card file I had accumulated over the years of teaching solid state and semiconductor physics would be helpful to more than just a few of us. This file, updated from time to time, contained lecture notes and other entries that were useful in my research and permitted me to give to my students a broader spectrum of information than is available in typical textbooks. When assembling this material into a book, I divided the top­ ics into material dealing with the homogeneous semiconductor, the subject of the previously published Volume 1, and the inhomoge­ neous semiconductor, the subject of this Volume 2. In order to keep the book to a manageable size, sections of tutorial character which can be used as text for a g...

  15. SEM evaluation of metallization on semiconductors. [Scanning Electron Microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fresh, D. L.; Adolphsen, J. W.

    1974-01-01

    A test method for the evaluation of metallization on semiconductors is presented and discussed. The method has been prepared in MIL-STD format for submittal as a proposed addition to MIL-STD-883. It is applicable to discrete devices and to integrated circuits and specifically addresses batch-process oriented defects. Quantitative accept/reject criteria are given for contact windows, other oxide steps, and general interconnecting metallization. Figures are provided that illustrate typical types of defects. Apparatus specifications, sampling plans, and specimen preparation and examination requirements are described. Procedures for glassivated devices and for multi-metal interconnection systems are included.

  16. Synthesis and catalytic properties of metal and semiconductor nanoclusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilcoxon, J. P.; Martino, T.; Klavetter, E.; Sylwester, A. P.

    Synthesis of metal or semiconductor nanoclusters in microheterogeneous oil-continuous inverse micelle systems is discussed. We focus on synthesis and catalytic properties of palladium, iron, and iron sulfide nanoclusters. Cluster size-control is achieved by changing the micelle size which is determined by small angle neutron scattering (SANS) and chosen to produce cluster in size range of 1-20 nm. Cluster sizes were determined by either transmission electron microscopy (TEM) or small-angle x-ray scattering (SAXS). Cluster structure was determined by either x-ray or electron diffraction. In the case of Fe nanoclusters, the crystal structure depended on the chemical nature of the surfactant micelle used in the synthesis, illustrating the important role of the surfactant during the growth process. Results of in-situ pyrene hydrogenation using size-selected Pd clusters show a significant increase in activity/total surface area as the size decreases. These clusters also proved effective as unsupported catalysts for direct coal hydropyrolysis, even at very low metal concentrations. Synthesis and optical features of a new semiconductor cluster material, FeS2, are discussed with regard to its use in photocatalysis. Application of FeS2 in coal hydrogenolysis reactions has improved yields of short chain hydrocarbons significantly compared to conventional FeS2 powders.

  17. DX centers in III-V semiconductors under hydrostatic pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wolk, J.A.

    1992-11-01

    DX centers are deep level defects found in some III-V semiconductors. They have persistent photoconductivity and large difference between thermal and optical ionization energies. Hydrostatic pressure was used to study microstructure of these defects. A new local vibrational mode (LVM) was observed in hydrostatically stressed, Si-doped GaAs. Corresponding infrared absorption peak is distinct from the Si Ga shallow donor LVM peak, which is the only other LVM peak observed in our samples, and is assigned to the Si DX center. Analysis of the relative intensities of the Si DX LVM and the Si shallow donor LVM peaks, combined with Hall effect and resistivity indicate that the Si DX center is negatively charged. Frequency of this new mode provides clues to the structure of this defect. A pressure induced deep donor level in S-doped InP was also discovered which has the properties of a DX center. Pressure at which the new defect becomes more stable than the shallow donor is 82 kbar. Optical ionization energy and energy dependence of the optical absorption cross section was measured for this new effect. Capture barrier from the conduction band into the DX state were also determined. That DX centers can be formed in InP by pressure suggests that DX states should be common in n-type III-V semiconductors. A method is suggested for predicting under what conditions these defects will be the most stable form of the donor impurity

  18. Acceptors in II-IV Semiconductors - Incorporation and Complex Formation

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    A strong effort is currently devoted to the investigation of defects and the electrical activation of dopant atoms in II-VI semiconductors. In particular, the knowledge about the behaviour of acceptors, prerequisite for the fabrication of p-type semiconductors, is rather limited. The perturbed $\\,{\\gamma\\gamma}$ -angular correlation technique (PAC) and the photoluminescence spectroscopy (PL) using the radioactive isotopes $^{77}\\!$Br and $^{111}\\!$Ag will be applied for investigating the behaviour of acceptor dopant atoms and their interactions with defects in II-VI semiconductors. The main topic will be the identification of the technical conditions for the incorporation of electrically active acceptors in the II-VI semiconductors ~ZnS, ZnSe, ZnTe, CdS, CdSe, and CdTe with particular emphasis on the compounds~ CdTe, ZnSe, and ZnTe. The investigations will be supplemented by first exploratory PL experiments with the group V acceptors $^{71}\\!$As and $^{121}\\!$Sb. With help of the probe $^{111}\\!$Ag, the pos...

  19. Inhomogeneous Oxygen Vacancy Distribution in Semiconductor Gas Sensors: Formation, Migration and Determination on Gas Sensing Characteristics

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Jianqiao; Gao, Yinglin; Wu, Xu; Jin, Guohua; Zhai, Zhaoxia; Liu, Huan

    2017-01-01

    The density of oxygen vacancies in semiconductor gas sensors was often assumed to be identical throughout the grain in the numerical discussion of the gas-sensing mechanism of the devices. In contrast, the actual devices had grains with inhomogeneous distribution of oxygen vacancy under non-ideal conditions. This conflict between reality and discussion drove us to study the formation and migration of the oxygen defects in semiconductor grains. A model of the gradient-distributed oxygen vacanc...

  20. Cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy of semiconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sadana, D.K.

    1982-10-01

    A method to prepare cross-sectional (X) semiconductor specimens for transmission electron microscopy (TEM) has been described. The power and utility of XTEM has been demonstrated. It has been shown that accuracy and interpretation of indirect structural-defects profiling techniques, namely, MeV He + channeling and secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) can be greatly enhanced by comparing their results with those obtained by XTEM from the same set of samples

  1. 75 FR 49526 - Freescale Semiconductor, Inc., Technical Information Center, Tempe, AZ; Freescale Semiconductor...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-13

    ... Semiconductor, Inc., Technical Information Center, Tempe, AZ; Freescale Semiconductor, Inc., Technical... October 1, 2009, applicable to workers of Freescale Semiconductor, Inc., Technical Information Center..., Massachusetts location of Freescale Semiconductor, Inc., Technical Information Center. The intent of the...

  2. Cluster headache

    Science.gov (United States)

    Histamine headache; Headache - histamine; Migrainous neuralgia; Headache - cluster; Horton's headache; Vascular headache - cluster ... Doctors do not know exactly what causes cluster headaches. They ... (chemical in the body released during an allergic response) or ...

  3. Neural Tube Defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neural tube defects are birth defects of the brain, spine, or spinal cord. They happen in the ... that she is pregnant. The two most common neural tube defects are spina bifida and anencephaly. In ...

  4. New developments in power semiconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundberg, G. R.

    1983-06-01

    This paper represents an overview of some recent power semiconductor developments and spotlights new technologies that may have significant impact for aircraft electric secondary power. Primary emphasis will be on NASA-Lewis-supported developments in transistors, diodes, a new family of semiconductors, and solid-state remote power controllers. Several semiconductor companies that are moving into the power arena with devices rated at 400 V and 50 A and above are listed, with a brief look at a few devices.

  5. DLTS study of annihilation of oxidation induced deep-level defects ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    and optoelectronic devices. With technological scaling of semiconductor devices, the processing steps tend to be- come more complicated and are likely to result in more process-induced defects. Hence, defect investigation and characterization are interesting from the cognitive and practical point of view, as they govern the ...

  6. Radiation defects in complex perovskite solid solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuklja, M.M., E-mail: mkukla@nsf.gov [Materials Science and Engineering Dept., University of Maryland, College Park (United States); Kotomin, E.A. [Institute for Solid State Physics, University of Latvia, Riga (Latvia); Max Planck Institute for Solid State Research, Heisenbergstr. 1, 70569 Stuttgart (Germany); Sharia, O. [Materials Science and Engineering Dept., University of Maryland, College Park (United States); Mastrikov, Yu.A. [Materials Science and Engineering Dept., University of Maryland, College Park (United States); Institute for Solid State Physics, University of Latvia, Riga (Latvia); Maier, J. [Max Planck Institute for Solid State Research, Heisenbergstr. 1, 70569 Stuttgart (Germany)

    2014-05-01

    First principles density functional theory (DFT) based modeling is performed to explore formation energies of a series of point cation and oxygen defects, Frenkel and Schottky disorder, as well as structural disorder in Ba{sub 1−x}Sr{sub x}Co{sub 1−y}Fe{sub y}O{sub 3−δ} (BSCF) perovskite solid solutions. The results are compared with previous studies on a prototype SrTiO{sub 3} perovskite. It is shown that BSCF permits accommodation of a high concentration of defects and cation clusters but not antisite defects.

  7. Radiation defects in complex perovskite solid solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuklja, M. M.; Kotomin, E. A.; Sharia, O.; Mastrikov, Yu. A.; Maier, J.

    2014-05-01

    First principles density functional theory (DFT) based modeling is performed to explore formation energies of a series of point cation and oxygen defects, Frenkel and Schottky disorder, as well as structural disorder in Ba1-xSrxCo1-yFeyO3-δ (BSCF) perovskite solid solutions. The results are compared with previous studies on a prototype SrTiO3 perovskite. It is shown that BSCF permits accommodation of a high concentration of defects and cation clusters but not antisite defects.

  8. Band structure of semiconductors

    CERN Document Server

    Tsidilkovski, I M

    2013-01-01

    Band Structure of Semiconductors provides a review of the theoretical and experimental methods of investigating band structure and an analysis of the results of the developments in this field. The book presents the problems, methods, and applications in the study of band structure. Topics on the computational methods of band structure; band structures of important semiconducting materials; behavior of an electron in a perturbed periodic field; effective masses and g-factors for the most commonly encountered band structures; and the treatment of cyclotron resonance, Shubnikov-de Haas oscillatio

  9. Physics of Organic Semiconductors

    CERN Document Server

    Brütting, Wolfgang

    2005-01-01

    Filling the gap in the literature currently available, this book presents an overview of our knowledge of the physics behind organic semiconductor devices. Contributions from 18 international research groups cover various aspects of this field, ranging from the growth of organic layers and crystals, their electronic properties at interfaces, their photophysics and electrical transport properties to the application of these materials in such different devices as organic field-effect transistors, photovoltaic cells and organic light-emitting diodes. From the contents:. * Excitation Dynamics in O

  10. Semiconductor ionizino. radiation detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-01-01

    Spectrometric semiconductor detectors of ionizing radiation with the electron-hole junction, based on silicon and germanium are presented. The following parameters are given for the individual types of germanium detectors: energy range of detected radiation, energy resolution given as full width at half maximum (FWHM) and full width at one tenth of maximum (FWTM) for 57 Co and 60 Co, detection sensitivity, optimal voltage, and electric capacitance at optimal voltage. For silicon detectors the value of FWHM for 239 Pu is given, the sensitive area and the depth of the sensitive area. (E.S.)

  11. Basic properties of semiconductors

    CERN Document Server

    Landsberg, PT

    2013-01-01

    Since Volume 1 was published in 1982, the centres of interest in the basic physics of semiconductors have shifted. Volume 1 was called Band Theory and Transport Properties in the first edition, but the subject has broadened to such an extent that Basic Properties is now a more suitable title. Seven chapters have been rewritten by the original authors. However, twelve chapters are essentially new, with the bulk of this work being devoted to important current topics which give this volume an almost encyclopaedic form. The first three chapters discuss various aspects of modern band theory and the

  12. Layered semiconductor neutron detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Samuel S; Perry, Dale L

    2013-12-10

    Room temperature operating solid state hand held neutron detectors integrate one or more relatively thin layers of a high neutron interaction cross-section element or materials with semiconductor detectors. The high neutron interaction cross-section element (e.g., Gd, B or Li) or materials comprising at least one high neutron interaction cross-section element can be in the form of unstructured layers or micro- or nano-structured arrays. Such architecture provides high efficiency neutron detector devices by capturing substantially more carriers produced from high energy .alpha.-particles or .gamma.-photons generated by neutron interaction.

  13. Semiconductor Properties Near Interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-07-31

    Sputtered from Semiconductors", Proc. 13th Annual Conference of the Microbeam Analysis Society, 1978. 4. J. C. Potosky and D. B. Wittry, "The Secondary...Ion Optics of a Quadru- pole Ion Microprobe", Proc. 13th Annual Conference of the Microbeam Analysis Society, 1978. 5. F. Guo and D. B. Wittry, "Use...of Specimen Current Integration in SIMS", Proc. 13th Annual Conference of the Microbeam Analysis Society, 1978. 6. D. B. Wittry, ’. Y. Yin, and R. A

  14. EDITORIAL: The 24th Nordic Semiconductor Meeting The 24th Nordic Semiconductor Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Páll Gunnlaugsson, Haraldur; Nylandsted Larsen, Arne; Uhrenfeldt, Christian

    2012-03-01

    A Nordic Semiconductor Meeting is held every other year with the venue rotating amongst the Nordic countries of Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway and Sweden. The focus of these meetings remains 'original research and science being carried out on semiconductor materials, devices and systems'. Reports on industrial activity have usually featured. The topics have ranged from fundamental research on point defects in a semiconductor to system architecture of semiconductor electronic devices. Proceedings from these events are regularly published as a Topical Issue of Physica Scripta. All of the papers in this Topical Issue have undergone critical peer review and we wish to thank the reviewers and the authors for their cooperation, which has been instrumental in meeting the high scientific standards and quality of the series. This 24th meeting of the Nordic Semiconductor community, NSM 2011, was held at Fuglsøcentret, close to Aarhus, Denmark, 19-22 June 2011. Support was provided by the Carlsberg Foundation, Danfysik and the semiconductor group at Aarhus University. Over 30 participants presented a broad range of topics covering semiconductor materials and devices as well as related material science interests. The conference provided a forum for Nordic and international scientists to present and discuss new results and ideas concerning the fundamentals and applications of semiconductor materials. The aim of the meeting was to advance the progress of Nordic science and thus aid in future worldwide technological advances concerning technology, education, energy and the environment. The 25th Nordic Semiconductor Meeting will be organized in June 2013 in Finland, chaired by Dr Filip Tuomisto, Aalto University. A Nordic Summer School on Semiconductor Science will be organized in connection with the conference (just before), chaired by Dr Jonatan Slotte, Aalto University. Information on these events can be found at physics.aalto.fi/nsm2013. List of participants Søren Vejling

  15. X-ray topographic study of defects in Si-based multilayer epitaxial power devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iren L. Shul'pina

    2016-03-01

    The X-ray methods used in the work allow revealing and identifying growth and process defects in device structures, studying their distributions, analyzing their mutual interactions and obtaining valuable information on the nature and evolution of the defects during device structure fabrication processes. This information allowed us to optimize the choice of initial materials and processes aiming to reduce the content of critical electrically active structural defects in the crystals that can influence the parameters of fabricated semiconductor devices; we also increased process yield and tangibly improved semiconductor device operation reliability in severe conditions and emergency modes.

  16. Semi-conductor switches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-01-01

    Methods are described of improving certain electrical characteristics of bidirectional thyristors by selective irradiation of the boundary region between current-carrying portions of the device. Irradiation, preferably by electrons but also by neutrons, gamma radiation or protons, causes carrier lifetime reducing lattice defects. (U.K.)

  17. The structure and morphology of semiconductor nanocrystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kadavanich, Andreas V. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry

    1997-11-01

    Colloidal semiconductor nanocrystals were studied using High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy (HRTEM). Organically capped nanocrystals were found to have faceted shapes consistent with Wulff polyhedra after the effects of capping ligands on surface energies were taken into account. The basic shape thus derived for wurtzite (WZ) structure CdSe nanocrystals capped by tri-octyl phosphine oxide (TOPO) was a truncated hexagonal prism, elongated alone the <001> axis with (100) and (002) facets. This structure has C{sub 3v} point group symmetry. The main defect in this structure is a stacking fault (a single layer of zinc blende type stacking), which does not significantly affect the shape (does not alter the point group).

  18. Defects induced luminescence and tuning of bandgap energy narrowing in ZnO nanoparticles doped with Li ions

    KAUST Repository

    Awan, Saif Ullah

    2014-08-28

    Microstructural and optical properties of Zn1-yLiyO (0.00 ≤y ≤0.10) nanoparticles are investigated. Li incorporation leads to substantial changes in the structural characterization. From micro-structural analysis, no secondary phases or clustering of Li was detected. Elemental maps confirmed homogeneous distribution of Li in ZnO. Sharp UV peak due to the recombination of free exciton and defects based luminescence broad visible band was observed. The transition from the conduction band to Zinc vacancy defect level in photoluminescence spectra is found at 518±2.5nm. The yellow luminescence was observed and attributed to Li related defects in doped samples. With increasing Li doping, a decrease in energy bandgap was observed in the range 3.26±0.014 to 3.17±0.018eV. The bandgap narrowing behavior is explained in terms of the band tailing effect due to structural disorder, carrier-impurities, carrier-carrier, and carrier-phonon interactions. Tuning of the bandgap energy in this class of wide bandgap semiconductor is very important for room temperature spintronics applications and optical devices. © 2014 AIP Publishing LLC.

  19. Squeezed light in semiconductors

    CERN Document Server

    Ward, M B

    2001-01-01

    Experimental evidence is presented for the generation of photon-number squeezed states of light as a result of multi-photon absorption. Photon-number squeezing as a result of non-linear absorption has long been predicted and results have been obtained utilising two very different material systems: (i) an AIGaAs waveguide in which high optical intensities can be maintained over a relatively long interaction length of 2 mm; (ii) the organic polymer p-toluene sulphonate polydiacetylene that is essentially a one-dimensional semiconductor possessing a highly nonlinear optical susceptibility. The resulting nonlinear absorption is shown to leave the transmitted light in a state that is clearly nonclassical, exhibiting photon-number fluctuations below the shot-noise limit. Tuning the laser wavelength across the half-bandgap energy has enabled a comparison between two- and three-photon processes in the semiconductor waveguide. The correlations created between different spectral components of a pulsed beam of light as ...

  20. Single filament semiconductor laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Botez, D.

    1980-01-01

    A semiconductor laser comprising: a body of semiconductor material including a substrate having a surface and a pair of spaced, substantially parallel dove-tailed shaped grooves in said surface, said body having a pair of end surfaces between which said grooves extend, said end surfaces being reflective to light with at least one of said end surfaces being partially transparent to light a first epitaxial layer over said surface of the substrate and the surfaces of the grooves, said first epitaxial layer having a flat surface portion over the portion of the substrate surface between the grooves, a thin second epitaxial layer over said first epitaxial layer, a third epitaxial layer over said second epitaxial layer, said first and third epitaxial layers being of opposite conductivity types and the second epitaxial layer being the active recombination region of the laser with the light being generated therein in the vicinity of the portion which is over the flat surface portion of the first epitaxial layer, and a pair of contacts on said body with one contact being over said third epitaxial body and the other being on said substrate

  1. Doped semiconductor nanocrystal junctions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borowik, Ł.; Mélin, T., E-mail: thierry.melin@isen.iemn.univ-lille1.fr [Institut d’Electronique, de Microélectronique et de Nanotechnologie, CNRS-UMR8520, Avenue Poincaré, F-59652 Villeneuve d’Ascq (France); Nguyen-Tran, T.; Roca i Cabarrocas, P. [Laboratoire de Physique des Interfaces et des Couches Minces, CNRS-UMR7647, Ecole Polytechnique, F-91128 Palaiseau (France)

    2013-11-28

    Semiconductor junctions are the basis of electronic and photovoltaic devices. Here, we investigate junctions formed from highly doped (N{sub D}≈10{sup 20}−10{sup 21}cm{sup −3}) silicon nanocrystals (NCs) in the 2–50 nm size range, using Kelvin probe force microscopy experiments with single charge sensitivity. We show that the charge transfer from doped NCs towards a two-dimensional layer experimentally follows a simple phenomenological law, corresponding to formation of an interface dipole linearly increasing with the NC diameter. This feature leads to analytically predictable junction properties down to quantum size regimes: NC depletion width independent of the NC size and varying as N{sub D}{sup −1/3}, and depleted charge linearly increasing with the NC diameter and varying as N{sub D}{sup 1/3}. We thus establish a “nanocrystal counterpart” of conventional semiconductor planar junctions, here however valid in regimes of strong electrostatic and quantum confinements.

  2. Process for producing chalcogenide semiconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noufi, R.; Chen, Y.W.

    1985-04-30

    A process for producing chalcogenide semiconductor material is disclosed. The process includes forming a base metal layer and then contacting this layer with a solution having a low pH and containing ions from at least one chalcogen to chalcogenize the layer and form the chalcogenide semiconductor material.

  3. Progress in semiconductor drift detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rehak, P.; Walton, J.; Gatti, E.

    1985-01-01

    Progress in testing semiconductor drift detectors is reported. Generally better position and energy resolutions were obtained than resolutions published previously. The improvement is mostly due to new electronics better matched to different detectors. It is shown that semiconductor drift detectors are becoming versatile and reliable detectors for position and energy measurements

  4. Terahertz Nonlinear Optics in Semiconductors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Turchinovich, Dmitry; Hvam, Jørn Märcher; Hoffmann, Matthias C.

    2013-01-01

    We demonstrate the nonlinear optical effects – selfphase modulation and saturable absorption of a single-cycle THz pulse in a semiconductor. Resulting from THz-induced modulation of Drude plasma, these nonlinear optical effects, in particular, lead to self-shortening and nonlinear spectral...... breathing of a single-cycle THz pulse in a semiconductor....

  5. Optical coherent control in semiconductors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, John Erland; Vadim, Lyssenko; Hvam, Jørn Märcher

    2001-01-01

    of quantum control including the recent applications to semiconductors and nanostructures. We study the influence of inhomogeneous broadening in semiconductors on CC results. Photoluminescence (PL) and the coherent emission in four-wave mixing (FWM) is recorded after resonant excitation with phase...

  6. Electronic structure of semiconductor interfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herman, F.

    1983-01-01

    The study of semiconductor interfaces is one of the most active and exciting areas of current semiconductor research. Because interfaces play a vital role in modern semiconductor technology (integrated circuits, heterojunction lasers, solar cells, infrared detectors, etc.), there is a strong incentive to understand interface properties at a fundamental level and advance existing technology thereby. At the same time, technological advances such as molecular beam epitaxy have paved the way for the fabrication of semiconductor heterojunctions and superlattices of novel design which exhibit unusual electronic, optical, and magnetic properties and offer unique opportunities for fundamental scientific research. A general perspective on this subject is offered treating such topics as the atomic and electronic structure of semiconductor surfaces and interfaces; oxidation and oxide layers; semiconductor heterojunctions and superlattices; rectifying metal-semiconductor contacts; and interface reactions. Recent progress is emphasized and some future directions are indicated. In addition, the role that large-scale scientific computation has played in furthering our theoretical understanding of semiconductor surfaces and interfaces is discussed. Finally, the nature of theoretical models, and the role they play in describing the physical world is considered. (Author) [pt

  7. II-VI semiconductor compounds

    CERN Document Server

    1993-01-01

    For condensed matter physicists and electronic engineers, this volume deals with aspects of II-VI semiconductor compounds. Areas covered include devices and applications of II-VI compounds; Co-based II-IV semi-magnetic semiconductors; and electronic structure of strained II-VI superlattices.

  8. Semiconductor photocatalysis principles and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Kisch, Horst

    2014-01-01

    Focusing on the basic principles of semiconductor photocatalysis, this book also gives a brief introduction to photochemistry, photoelectrochemistry, and homogeneous photocatalysis. In addition, the author - one of the leading authorities in the field - presents important environmental and practical aspects. A valuable, one-stop source for all chemists, material scientists, and physicists working in this area, as well as novice researchers entering semiconductor photocatalysis.

  9. Quantum transport in semiconductor nanowires

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Dam, J.

    2006-01-01

    This thesis describes a series of experiments aimed at understanding the low-temperature electrical transport properties of semiconductor nanowires. The semiconductor nanowires (1-100 nm in diameter) are grown from nanoscale gold particles via a chemical process called vapor-liquid-solid (VLS)

  10. Electrostatic Doping in Semiconductor Devices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gupta, Gaurav; Rajasekharan, Bijoy; Hueting, Raymond J.E.

    2017-01-01

    To overcome the limitations of chemical doping in nanometer-scale semiconductor devices, electrostatic doping (ED) is emerging as a broadly investigated alternative to provide regions with a high electron or hole density in a semiconductor device. In this paper, we review various reported ED

  11. Luminescence studies of semiconductor electrodes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kelly, J.J.; Kooij, Ernst S.; Meulenkamp, E.A.

    1999-01-01

    In this paper we review our recent results of in-situ luminescence studies of semiconductor electrodes. Three classes of materials are considered: single crystal compound semiconductors, porous silicon and semiconducting oxides doped with luminescent ions. We show how photoluminescence (PL) and

  12. Hydrogen-related effects in crystalline semiconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haller, E.E.

    1988-08-01

    Recent experimental and theoretical information regarding the states of hydrogen in crystalline semiconductors is reviewed. The abundance of results illustrates that hydrogen does not preferentially occupy a few specific lattice sites but that it binds to native defects and impurities, forming a large variety of neutral and electrically active complexes. The study of hydrogen passivated shallow acceptors and donors and of partially passivated multivalent acceptors has yielded information on the electronic and real space structure and on the chemical composition of these complexes. Infrared spectroscopy, ion channeling, hydrogen isotope substitution and electric field drift experiments have shown that both static trigonal complexes as well as centers with tunneling hydrogen exist. Total energy calculations indicate that the charge state of the hydrogen ion which leads to passivation dominates, i.e., H + in p-type and H/sup /minus// in n-type crystals. Recent theoretical calculations indicate that is unlikely for a large fraction of the atomic hydrogen to exist in its neutral state, a result which is consistent with the total absence of any Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) signal. An alternative explanation for this result is the formation of H 2 . Despite the numerous experimental and theoretical results on hydrogen-related effects in Ge and Si there remains a wealth of interesting physics to be explored, especially in compound and alloy semiconductors. 6 refs., 6 figs

  13. Hydrogen-related effects in crystalline semiconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haller, E.E.

    1988-08-01

    Recent experimental and theoretical information regarding the states of hydrogen in crystalline semiconductors is reviewed. The abundance of results illustrates that hydrogen does not preferentially occupy a few specific lattice sites but that it binds to native defects and impurities, forming a large variety of neutral and electrically active complexes. The study of hydrogen passivated shallow acceptors and donors and of partially passivated multivalent acceptors has yielded information on the electronic and real space structure and on the chemical composition of these complexes. Infrared spectroscopy, ion channeling, hydrogen isotope substitution and electric field drift experiments have shown that both static trigonal complexes as well as centers with tunneling hydrogen exist. Total energy calculations indicate that the charge state of the hydrogen ion which leads to passivation dominates, i.e., H/sup +/ in p-type and H/sup /minus// in n-type crystals. Recent theoretical calculations indicate that is unlikely for a large fraction of the atomic hydrogen to exist in its neutral state, a result which is consistent with the total absence of any Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) signal. An alternative explanation for this result is the formation of H/sub 2/. Despite the numerous experimental and theoretical results on hydrogen-related effects in Ge and Si there remains a wealth of interesting physics to be explored, especially in compound and alloy semiconductors. 6 refs., 6 figs.

  14. Organic semiconductors in a spin

    CERN Document Server

    Samuel, I

    2002-01-01

    A little palladium can go a long way in polymer-based light-emitting diodes. Inorganic semiconductors such as silicon and gallium arsenide are essential for countless applications in everyday life, ranging from PCs to CD players. However, while they offer unrivalled computational speed, inorganic semiconductors are also rigid and brittle, which means that they are less suited to applications such as displays and flexible electronics. A completely different class of materials - organic semiconductors - are being developed for these applications. Organic semiconductors have many attractive features: they are easy to make, they can emit visible light, and there is tremendous scope for tailoring their properties to specific applications by changing their chemical structure. Research groups and companies around the world have developed a wide range of organic-semiconductor devices, including transistors, light-emitting diodes (LEDs), solar cells and lasers. (U.K.)

  15. Ion implantation for semiconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grey-Morgan, T.

    1995-01-01

    Full text: Over the past two decades, thousands of particle accelerators have been used to implant foreign atoms like boron, phosphorus and arsenic into silicon crystal wafers to produce special embedded layers for manufacturing semiconductor devices. Depending on the device required, the atomic species, the depth of implant and doping levels are the main parameters for the implantation process; the selection and parameter control is totally automated. The depth of the implant, usually less than 1 micron, is determined by the ion energy, which can be varied between 2 and 600 keV. The ion beam is extracted from a Freeman or Bernas type ion source and accelerated to 60 keV before mass analysis. For higher beam energies postacceleration is applied up to 200 keV and even higher energies can be achieved by mass selecting multiplycharged ions, but with a corresponding reduction in beam output. Depending on the device to be manufactured, doping levels can range from 10 10 to 10 15 atoms/cm 2 and are controlled by implanter beam currents in the range up to 30mA; continuous process monitoring ensures uniformity across the wafer of better than 1 % . As semiconductor devices get smaller, additional sophistication is required in the design of the implanter. The silicon wafers charge electrically during implantation and this charge must be dissipated continuously to reduce the electrical stress in the device and avoid destructive electrical breakdown. Electron flood guns produce low energy electrons (below 10 electronvolts) to neutralize positive charge buildup and implanter design must ensure minimum contamination by other isotopic species and ensure low internal sputter rates. The pace of technology in the semiconductor industry is such that implanters are being built now for 256 Megabit circuits but which are only likely to be widely available five years from now. Several specialist companies manufacture implanter systems, each costing around US$5 million, depending on the

  16. ILT based defect simulation of inspection images accurately predicts mask defect printability on wafer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deep, Prakash; Paninjath, Sankaranarayanan; Pereira, Mark; Buck, Peter

    2016-05-01

    At advanced technology nodes mask complexity has been increased because of large-scale use of resolution enhancement technologies (RET) which includes Optical Proximity Correction (OPC), Inverse Lithography Technology (ILT) and Source Mask Optimization (SMO). The number of defects detected during inspection of such mask increased drastically and differentiation of critical and non-critical defects are more challenging, complex and time consuming. Because of significant defectivity of EUVL masks and non-availability of actinic inspection, it is important and also challenging to predict the criticality of defects for printability on wafer. This is one of the significant barriers for the adoption of EUVL for semiconductor manufacturing. Techniques to decide criticality of defects from images captured using non actinic inspection images is desired till actinic inspection is not available. High resolution inspection of photomask images detects many defects which are used for process and mask qualification. Repairing all defects is not practical and probably not required, however it's imperative to know which defects are severe enough to impact wafer before repair. Additionally, wafer printability check is always desired after repairing a defect. AIMSTM review is the industry standard for this, however doing AIMSTM review for all defects is expensive and very time consuming. Fast, accurate and an economical mechanism is desired which can predict defect printability on wafer accurately and quickly from images captured using high resolution inspection machine. Predicting defect printability from such images is challenging due to the fact that the high resolution images do not correlate with actual mask contours. The challenge is increased due to use of different optical condition during inspection other than actual scanner condition, and defects found in such images do not have correlation with actual impact on wafer. Our automated defect simulation tool predicts

  17. Semiconductor testing method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, Stephen.

    1992-01-01

    In a method of avoiding use of nuclear radiation, eg gamma rays, X-rays, electron beams, for testing semiconductor components for resistance to hard radiation, which hard radiation causes data corruption in some memory devices and 'latch-up' in others, similar fault effects can be achieved using a xenon or other 'light' flash gun even though the penetration of light is significantly less than that of gamma rays. The method involves treating a device with gamma radiation, measuring a particular fault current at the onset of a fault event, repeating the test with light to confirm the occurrence of the fault event at the same measured fault current, and using the fault current value as a reference for future tests using light on similar devices. (author)

  18. Hydrogen in compound semiconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haller, E.E.

    1993-05-01

    Progress in the understanding of hydrogen and its interactions in III/V and II/VI compound semiconductors is reviewed. Donor, acceptor and deep level passivation is well established in III/V compounds based on electrical measurements and on spectroscopic studies. The hydrogen donor levels in GaAs and GaP are estimated to lie near E{sub v}+0.5 eV and E{sub v}+0.3 eV, respectively. Arsenic acceptors have been passivated by hydrogen in CdTe and the very first nitrogen-hydrogen local vibrational model spectra in ZnSe have been reported. This long awaited result may lead to an explanation for the poor activation of nitrogen acceptors in ZnSe grown by techniques which involve high concentrations of hydrogen.

  19. The point-defect of carbon nanotubes anchoring Au nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lv, Y. A.; Cui, Y. H.; Li, X. N.

    2010-01-01

    between Au clusters and CNTs by means of density functional theory calculations. Both experimental and theoretical studies show that point defects are the anchoring sites of Au nanoparticles. The mechanisms of enhanced bond between Au and CNTs via the point defects are explained by the analysis of density...

  20. Effect of Defects Distribution on Fatigue Life of Wind Turbine Components

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rafsanjani, Hesam Mirzaei; Sørensen, John Dalsgaard

    2015-01-01

    The reliability of the component of a wind turbine is often highly dependent on defects introduced during the manufacturing process. In this paper a stochastic model is proposed for modeling these defects and the influence on the fatigue life is considered. Basically the defects assumed distributed...... by stochastic models. In this paper, the Poisson distribution for modeling of defects of component are considered and the surface and sub-surface defects categorized. Furthermore, a model to estimate the probability of failure by fatigue due to the defects is proposed. Moreover, the relation between defect...... by a Poisson process / field where the defects form clusters that consist of a parent defect and related defects around the parent defect. The fatigue life is dependent on the number, type, location and size of the defects in the component and is therefore quite uncertain and needs to be described...

  1. Structural trends in off stoichiometric chalcopyrite type compound semiconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stephan, Christiane

    2011-01-01

    Energy supply is one of the most controversial topics that are currently discussed in our global community. Most of the energy delivered to the customer today has its origin in fossil and nuclear power plants. Indefinable risks and the radioactive waste repository problem of the latter as well as the global scarcity of fossil resources cause the renewable energies to grow more and more important for achieving sustainability. The main renewable energy sources are wind power, hydroelectric power and solar energy. On the photovoltaic (PV) market different materials are competing as part of different kinds of technologies, with the largest contribution still coming from wafer based crystalline silicon solar cells (95 %). Until now thin film solar cells only contribute a small portion to the whole PV market, but large capacities are under construction. Thin film photovoltaic shows a number of advantages in comparison to wafer based crystalline silicon PV. Among these material usage and production cost reduction are two prominent examples. The type of PV materials, which are analyzed in this work, are high potential compounds that are widely used as absorber layer in thin film solar cells. These are compound semiconductors of the type CuB III C VI 2 (B III = In, Ga and C VI = Se, S). Several years of research have already gone into understanding the efficiency limiting factors for solar cell devices fabricated from this compound. Most of the studies concerning electronic defects are done by spectroscopic methods mostly performed using thin films from different kinds of synthesis, without any real knowledge regarding the structural origin of these defects. This work shows a systematic fundamental structural study of intrinsic point defects that are present within the material at various compositions in CuB III C VI 2 compound semiconductors. The study is done on reference powder samples with well determined chemical composition and using advanced diffraction techniques

  2. Details in Semiconductors Gordon Conference, New London, NH, August 3-8, 2008

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Shengbai [Rensselaer Polytechnic Inst., Troy, NY (United States); Gray, Nancy Ryan [Gordon Research Conferences, West Kingston, RI (United States)

    2009-09-16

    Continuing its tradition of excellence, this Gordon Conference will focus on research at the forefront of the field of defects in homogeneous and structured semiconductors. The conference will have a strong emphasis on the control of defects during growth and processing, with an increases emphasis on nanostructures as compared to previous conferences. Electronic, magnetic, and optical properties of bulk, thin film, and nanoscale semiconductors will be discussed in detail. In contrast to many conferences, which tend to focus on specific semiconductors, this conference deals with defects in a broad range of bulk and nanoscale electronic materials. This approach has proved to be extremely fruitful for advancing fundamental understanding in emerging materials such as wide-band-gap semiconductors, doped nanoparticles, and organic semiconductors. Presentations of state-of-the-art theoretical methods will contribute to a fundamental understanding of atomic-scale phenomena. The program consists of about twenty invited talks, with plenty of discussion time, and a number of contributed poster sessions. Because of the large amount of discussion time, the conference provides an ideal forum for dealing with topics that are new and/or controversial.

  3. The relationship between grain boundary structure, defect mobility, and grain boundary sink efficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uberuaga, Blas Pedro; Vernon, Louis J.; Martinez, Enrique; Voter, Arthur F.

    2015-01-01

    Nanocrystalline materials have received great attention due to their potential for improved functionality and have been proposed for extreme environments where the interfaces are expected to promote radiation tolerance. However, the precise role of the interfaces in modifying defect behavior is unclear. Using long-time simulations methods, we determine the mobility of defects and defect clusters at grain boundaries in Cu. We find that mobilities vary significantly with boundary structure and cluster size, with larger clusters exhibiting reduced mobility, and that interface sink efficiency depends on the kinetics of defects within the interface via the in-boundary annihilation rate of defects. Thus, sink efficiency is a strong function of defect mobility, which depends on boundary structure, a property that evolves with time. Further, defect mobility at boundaries can be slower than in the bulk, which has general implications for the properties of polycrystalline materials. Finally, we correlate defect energetics with the volumes of atomic sites at the boundary. PMID:25766999

  4. Semiconductor Nanocrystals for Biological Imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fu, Aihua; Gu, Weiwei; Larabell, Carolyn; Alivisatos, A. Paul

    2005-06-28

    Conventional organic fluorophores suffer from poor photo stability, narrow absorption spectra and broad emission feature. Semiconductor nanocrystals, on the other hand, are highly photo-stable with broad absorption spectra and narrow size-tunable emission spectra. Recent advances in the synthesis of these materials have resulted in bright, sensitive, extremely photo-stable and biocompatible semiconductor fluorophores. Commercial availability facilitates their application in a variety of unprecedented biological experiments, including multiplexed cellular imaging, long-term in vitro and in vivo labeling, deep tissue structure mapping and single particle investigation of dynamic cellular processes. Semiconductor nanocrystals are one of the first examples of nanotechnology enabling a new class of biomedical applications.

  5. FY 2000 report on the results of the research and development project for new industry creation type industrial science technologies. Cluster ion beam process technology; 2000 nendo shinki sangyo soshutsugata sangyo kagaku gijutsu kenkyu kaihatsu seido seika hokokusho. Cluster ion beam process technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-03-01

    Described herein are the FY 2000 results of development of cluster ion beams. This technology generates the strong ion beams of atom and molecule clusters, and irradiate them onto the solid surfaces, to create new materials or treat materials. It allows the nano-level treatment. The program for high-current cluster ion beam generation/irradiation technology for industrial purposes attains the target high-current beam of 500{mu}m. It is necessary to establish the optimum cluster size, irradiated energy and ion species for the highly functional surface treatment, for which applicable technologies, e.g., those related to time of flight and molecular dynamics, are developed. Studies on high-current, large-area irradiation technologies are started. The program for material processing technologies involves evaluation of crystalline defects formed during the beam implantation by photoluminescence spectroscopy, and studies on semiconductor surface processing technologies. The surface smoothening technology is investigated to reduce crystalline defects and stress-induced strains for difficult-to-process materials, e.g., SiC and diamond, and the good results are produced. The program for development of superflat/superhard thin film formation technology involves irradiation of the Ar ion beams during the deposition of C{sub 60}(fullerene), to produce the superhard thin film. (NEDO)

  6. Defects and diffusion, theory & simulation II

    CERN Document Server

    Fisher, David J

    2010-01-01

    This second volume in a new series covering entirely general results in the fields of defects and diffusion includes 356 abstracts of papers which appeared between the end of 2009 and the end of 2010. As well as the abstracts, the volume includes original papers on theory/simulation, semiconductors and metals: ""Predicting Diffusion Coefficients from First Principles ..."" (Mantina, Chen & Liu), ""Gouge Assessment for Pipes ..."" (Meliani, Pluvinage & Capelle), ""Simulation of the Impact Behaviour of ... Hollow Sphere Structures"" (Ferrano, Speich, Rimkus, Merkel & Öchsner), ""Elastic-Plastic

  7. State of the art in semiconductor detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rehak, P.; Gatti, E.

    1989-01-01

    The state of the art in semiconductor detectors for elementary particle physics and x-ray astronomy is briefly reviewed. Semiconductor detectors are divided into two groups; classical semiconductor diode detectors; and semiconductor memory detectors. Principles of signal formation for both groups of detectors are described and their performance is compared. New developments of silicon detectors are reported here. 13 refs., 8 figs

  8. Ionization annealing of semiconductor crystals. Part two: the experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Garkavenko A. S.

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available There is a conception that irradiation of semiconductor crystals with high energy electrons (300 keV results in a significant and irreversible deterioration of their electrical, optical and structural properties. Semiconductors are typically irradiated by low voltage electron accelerators with a continuous flow, the current density in such accelerators is 10–5—10–6 A/cm2, the energy — 0,3—1 MeV. All changes in the properties after such irradiation are resistant at room temperature, and marked properties recovery to baseline values is observed only after prolonged heating of the crystals to a high temperature. In contrast, the authors in their studies observe an improvement of the structural properties of semiconductor crystals (annealing of defects under irradiation with powerful (high current pulsed electron beams of high energy (E0 = 0,3–1 MeV, t = 0,1—10 ns, Ω = 1—10 Hz, j = 20—300 A/cm2. In their previous paper, the authors presented theoretical basis of this effect. This article describes an experimental study on the influence of high-current pulsed electron beams on the optical homogeneity of semiconductor GaAs and CdS crystals, confirming the theory put forward earlier.

  9. Cluster Headache

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... re at risk of cluster headache. A family history. Having a parent or sibling who has had cluster headache might ... of Nondiscrimination Advertising Mayo Clinic is a not-for-profit organization ...

  10. Using the scanning electron microscope on the production line to assure quality semiconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adolphsen, J. W.; Anstead, R. J.

    1972-01-01

    The use of the scanning electron microscope to detect metallization defects introduced during batch processing of semiconductor devices is discussed. A method of determining metallization integrity was developed which culminates in a procurement specification using the scanning microscope on the production line as a quality control tool. Batch process control of the metallization operation is monitored early in the manufacturing cycle.

  11. Magnetic resonance of semiconductors and their nanostructures basic and advanced applications

    CERN Document Server

    Baranov, Pavel G; Jelezko, Fedor; Wrachtrup, Jörg

    2017-01-01

    This book explains different magnetic resonance (MR) techniques and uses different combinations of these techniques to analyze defects in semiconductors and nanostructures. It also introduces novelties such as single defects MR and electron-paramagnetic-resonance-based methods: electron spin echo, electrically detected magnetic resonance, optically detected magnetic resonance and electron-nuclear double resonance – the designated tools for investigating the structural and spin properties of condensed systems, living matter, nanostructures and nanobiotechnology objects. Further, the authors address problems existing in semiconductor and nanotechnology sciences that can be resolved using MR, and discuss past, current and future applications of MR, with a focus on advances in MR methods. The book is intended for researchers in MR studies of semiconductors and nanostructures wanting a comprehensive review of what has been done in their own and related fields of study, as well as future perspectives.

  12. Selective, electrochemical etching of a semiconductor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dahal, Rajendra P.; Bhat, Ishwara B.; Chow, Tat-Sing

    2018-03-20

    Methods for facilitating fabricating semiconductor structures are provided which include: providing a multilayer structure including a semiconductor layer, the semiconductor layer including a dopant and having an increased conductivity; selectively increasing, using electrochemical processing, porosity of the semiconductor layer, at least in part, the selectively increasing porosity utilizing the increased conductivity of the semiconductor layer; and removing, at least in part, the semiconductor layer with the selectively increased porosity from the multilayer structure. By way of example, the selectively increasing porosity may include selectively, anodically oxidizing, at least in part, the semiconductor layer of the multilayer structure.

  13. Metastable defect response in CZTSSe from admittance spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koeper, Mark J.; Hages, Charles J.; Li, Jian V.; Levi, Dean; Agrawal, Rakesh

    2017-10-02

    Admittance spectroscopy is a useful tool used to study defects in semiconductor materials. However, metastable defect responses in non-ideal semiconductors can greatly impact the measurement and therefore the interpretation of results. Here, admittance spectroscopy was performed on Cu2ZnSn(S,Se)4 where metastable defect response is illustrated due to the trapping of injected carriers into a deep defect state. To investigate the metastable response, admittance measurements were performed under electrically and optically relaxed conditions in comparison to a device following a low level carrier-injection pretreatment. The relaxed measurement demonstrates a single capacitance signature while two capacitance signatures are observed for the device measured following carrier-injection. The deeper level signature, typically reported for kesterites, is activated by charge trapping following carrier injection. Both signatures are attributed to bulk level defects. The significant metastable response observed on kesterites due to charge trapping obscures accurate interpretation of defect levels from admittance spectroscopy and indicates that great care must be taken when performing and interpreting this measurement on non-ideal devices.

  14. Meaningful Clusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanfilippo, Antonio P.; Calapristi, Augustin J.; Crow, Vernon L.; Hetzler, Elizabeth G.; Turner, Alan E.

    2004-05-26

    We present an approach to the disambiguation of cluster labels that capitalizes on the notion of semantic similarity to assign WordNet senses to cluster labels. The approach provides interesting insights on how document clustering can provide the basis for developing a novel approach to word sense disambiguation.

  15. Clusters of atoms and molecules theory, experiment, and clusters of atoms

    CERN Document Server

    1994-01-01

    Clusters of Atoms and Molecules is devoted to theoretical concepts and experimental techniques important in the rapidly expanding field of cluster science. Cluster properties are dicussed for clusteres composed of alkali metals, semiconductors, transition metals, carbon, oxides and halides of alkali metals, rare gases, and neutral molecules. The book is composed of several well-integrated treatments all prepared by experts. Each contribution starts out as simple as possible and ends with the latest results so that the book can serve as a text for a course, an introduction into the field, or as a reference book for the expert.

  16. Semiconductor technology program. Progress briefs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bullis, W. M.

    1980-01-01

    Measurement technology for semiconductor materials, process control, and devices is reviewed. Activities include: optical linewidth and thermal resistance measurements; device modeling; dopant density profiles; resonance ionization spectroscopy; and deep level measurements. Standardized oxide charge terminology is also described.

  17. Rhombohedrel Hybrid Crystal Semiconductor Device

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Development of a new high speed and high efficiency hybrid crystal structure semiconductor device based on the the recent invention of rhombohedral hybrid crystal...

  18. Semiconductor radiation detectors. Device physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lutz, G. [Max-Planck-Institutes for Physics and Extraterrestrial Physics, Muenchen (Germany). Semiconductor Lab.

    2007-07-01

    Starting from basic principles, the author, whose own contributions to these developments have been significant, describes the rapidly growing field of modern semiconductor detectors used for energy and position measurement radiation. This development was stimulated by requirements in elementary particle physics where it has led to important scientific discoveries. It has now spread to many other fields of science and technology. The book is written in a didactic way and includes an introduction to semiconductor physics. The working principles of semiconductor radiation detectors are explained in an intuitive way, followed by formal quantitative analysis. Broad coverage is also given to electronic signal readout and to the subject of radiation damage. The book is the first to comprehensively cover the semiconductor radiation detectors currently in use. It is useful as a teaching guide and as a reference work for research and applications. (orig.)

  19. Metal-insulator-semiconductor photodetectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chu-Hsuan; Liu, Chee Wee

    2010-01-01

    The major radiation of the sun can be roughly divided into three regions: ultraviolet, visible, and infrared light. Detection in these three regions is important to human beings. The metal-insulator-semiconductor photodetector, with a simpler process than the pn-junction photodetector and a lower dark current than the MSM photodetector, has been developed for light detection in these three regions. Ideal UV photodetectors with high UV-to-visible rejection ratio could be demonstrated with III-V metal-insulator-semiconductor UV photodetectors. The visible-light detection and near-infrared optical communications have been implemented with Si and Ge metal-insulator-semiconductor photodetectors. For mid- and long-wavelength infrared detection, metal-insulator-semiconductor SiGe/Si quantum dot infrared photodetectors have been developed, and the detection spectrum covers atmospheric transmission windows.

  20. Metal-Insulator-Semiconductor Photodetectors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chu-Hsuan Lin

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The major radiation of the Sun can be roughly divided into three regions: ultraviolet, visible, and infrared light. Detection in these three regions is important to human beings. The metal-insulator-semiconductor photodetector, with a simpler process than the pn-junction photodetector and a lower dark current than the MSM photodetector, has been developed for light detection in these three regions. Ideal UV photodetectors with high UV-to-visible rejection ratio could be demonstrated with III-V metal-insulator-semiconductor UV photodetectors. The visible-light detection and near-infrared optical communications have been implemented with Si and Ge metal-insulator-semiconductor photodetectors. For mid- and long-wavelength infrared detection, metal-insulator-semiconductor SiGe/Si quantum dot infrared photodetectors have been developed, and the detection spectrum covers atmospheric transmission windows.

  1. Semiconductor nanocrystals or quantum dots

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 18; Issue 8. Various Quantum Mechanical Concepts for Confinements in Semiconductor Nanocrystals. Jayakrishna Khatei Karuna Kar Nanda. Classroom Volume 18 Issue 8 August 2013 pp 771-776 ...

  2. Atomic layer deposition for semiconductors

    CERN Document Server

    Hwang, Cheol Seong

    2014-01-01

    This edited volume discusses atomic layer deposition (ALD) for all modern semiconductor devices, moving from the basic chemistry of ALD and modeling of ALD processes to sections on ALD for memories, logic devices, and machines.

  3. Quantum optics with semiconductor nanostructures

    CERN Document Server

    Jahnke, Frank

    2012-01-01

    A guide to the theory, application and potential of semiconductor nanostructures in the exploration of quantum optics. It offers an overview of resonance fluorescence emission.$bAn understanding of the interaction between light and matter on a quantum level is of fundamental interest and has many applications in optical technologies. The quantum nature of the interaction has recently attracted great attention for applications of semiconductor nanostructures in quantum information processing. Quantum optics with semiconductor nanostructures is a key guide to the theory, experimental realisation, and future potential of semiconductor nanostructures in the exploration of quantum optics. Part one provides a comprehensive overview of single quantum dot systems, beginning with a look at resonance fluorescence emission. Quantum optics with single quantum dots in photonic crystal and micro cavities are explored in detail, before part two goes on to review nanolasers with quantum dot emitters. Light-matter interaction...

  4. Temperature controller of semiconductor laser

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Matoušek, Vít; Číp, Ondřej

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 73, č. 3 (2003), s. 10 - 12 ISSN 0928-5008 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z2065902 Keywords : temperature controller * semiconductor laser * laser diode Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers

  5. Reducing leakage current in semiconductor devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Bin; Matioli, Elison de Nazareth; Palacios, Tomas Apostol

    2018-03-06

    A semiconductor device includes a first region having a first semiconductor material and a second region having a second semiconductor material. The second region is formed over the first region. The semiconductor device also includes a current blocking structure formed in the first region between first and second terminals of the semiconductor device. The current blocking structure is configured to reduce current flow in the first region between the first and second terminals.

  6. Fractal properties of nanostructured semiconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhanabaev, Z.Zh. [Al-Farabi Khazakh National University, Tole bi Street, 96, Almaty 050012 (Kazakhstan); Grevtseva, T.Yu. [Al-Farabi Khazakh National University, Tole bi Street, 96, Almaty 050012 (Kazakhstan)]. E-mail: kenwp@mail.ru

    2007-03-15

    A theory for the temperature and time dependence of current carrier concentration in semiconductors with different non-equilibrium nanocluster structure has been developed. It was shown that the scale-invariant fractal self-similar and self-affine laws can exist near by the transition point to the equilibrium state. Results of the theory have been compared to the experimental data from electrical properties of semiconductor films with nanoclusters.

  7. Wake fields in semiconductor plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berezhiani, V.I.; Mahajan, S.M.

    1994-05-01

    It is shown that an intense short laser pulse propagating through a semiconductor plasma will generated longitudinal Langmuir waves in its wake. The measurable wake field can be used as a diagnostic to study nonlinear optical phenomena. For narrow gap semiconductors (for examples InSb) with Kane-type dispersion relation, the system can simulate, at currently available laser powers, the physics underlying wake-field accelerators. (author). 9 refs, 1 fig

  8. Large-area and bright pulsed electroluminescence in monolayer semiconductors

    KAUST Repository

    Lien, Der-Hsien

    2018-04-04

    Transition-metal dichalcogenide monolayers have naturally terminated surfaces and can exhibit a near-unity photoluminescence quantum yield in the presence of suitable defect passivation. To date, steady-state monolayer light-emitting devices suffer from Schottky contacts or require complex heterostructures. We demonstrate a transient-mode electroluminescent device based on transition-metal dichalcogenide monolayers (MoS, WS, MoSe, and WSe) to overcome these problems. Electroluminescence from this dopant-free two-terminal device is obtained by applying an AC voltage between the gate and the semiconductor. Notably, the electroluminescence intensity is weakly dependent on the Schottky barrier height or polarity of the contact. We fabricate a monolayer seven-segment display and achieve the first transparent and bright millimeter-scale light-emitting monolayer semiconductor device.

  9. Survey of cryogenic semiconductor devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Talarico, L.J.; McKeever, J.W.

    1996-04-01

    Improved reliability and electronic performance can be achieved in a system operated at cryogenic temperatures because of the reduction in mechanical insult and in disruptive effects of thermal energy on electronic devices. Continuing discoveries of new superconductors with ever increasing values of T{sub c} above that of liquid nitrogen temperature (LNT) have provided incentive for developing semiconductor electronic systems that may also operate in the superconductor`s liquid nitrogen bath. Because of the interest in high-temperature superconductor (HTS) devices, liquid nitrogen is the cryogen of choice and LNT is the temperature on which this review is focused. The purpose of this survey is to locate and assemble published information comparing the room temperature (298 K), performance of commercially available conventional and hybrid semiconductor device with their performance at LNT (77K), to help establish their candidacy as cryogenic electronic devices specifically for use at LNT. The approach to gathering information for this survey included the following activities. Periodicals and proceedings were searched for information on the behavior of semiconductor devices at LNT. Telephone calls were made to representatives of semiconductor industries, to semiconductor subcontractors, to university faculty members prominent for their research in the area of cryogenic semiconductors, and to representatives of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and NASA subcontractors. The sources and contacts are listed with their responses in the introduction, and a list of references appears at the end of the survey.

  10. Defect of the Eyelids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Guanning Nina; Pelton, Ron W; Humphrey, Clinton D; Kriet, John David

    2017-08-01

    Eyelid defects disrupt the complex natural form and function of the eyelids and present a surgical challenge. Detailed knowledge of eyelid anatomy is essential in evaluating a defect and composing a reconstructive plan. Numerous reconstructive techniques have been described, including primary closure, grafting, and a variety of local flaps. This article describes an updated reconstructive ladder for eyelid defects that can be used in various permutations to solve most eyelid defects. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Semiconductor integrated circuits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michel, A.E.; Schwenker, R.O.; Ziegler, J.F.

    1979-01-01

    An improved method involving ion implantation to form non-epitaxial semiconductor integrated circuits. These are made by forming a silicon substrate of one conductivity type with a recessed silicon dioxide region extending into the substrate and enclosing a portion of the silicon substrate. A beam of ions of opposite conductivity type impurity is directed at the substrate at an energy and dosage level sufficient to form a first region of opposite conductivity within the silicon dioxide region. This impurity having a concentration peak below the surface of the substrate forms a region of the one conductivity type which extends from the substrate surface into the first opposite type region to a depth between the concentration peak and the surface and forms a second region of opposite conductivity type. The method, materials and ion beam conditions are detailed. Vertical bipolar integrated circuits can be made this way when the first opposite type conductivity region will function as a collector. Also circuits with inverted bipolar devices when this first region functions as a 'buried'' emitter region. (U.K.)

  12. Semiconductor film Cherenkov lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, John E.

    1994-12-01

    The technical achievements for the project 'Semiconductor Film Cherenkov Lasers' are summarized. Described in the fourteen appendices are the operation of a sapphire Cherenkov laser and various grating-coupled oscillators. These coherent radiation sources were operated over the spectral range extending from 3 mm down to 400 micrometers. The utility of various types of open, multi-grating resonators and mode-locked operation were also demonstrated. In addition to these experiments, which were carried out with a 10-100 kV pulse generator, a low-energy (3-3.6 MeV) Van de Graaff generator and a low-energy RF linac (2.8 MeV) were used to investigate the properties of continuum incoherent Smith-Purcell radiation. It was shown that levels of intensity comparable to the infrared beam lines on a synchrotron could be obtained and thus that grating-coupled sources are potentially an important new source for Fourier transform spectroscopy. Finally, a scanning electron microscope was adapted for investigating mu-electron-beam-driven far-infrared sources. At the close of the project, spontaneous emission over the 288-800 micrometers band had been observed. Intensity levels were in accord with expectations based on theory. One or more of the Appendices address these topics in detail.

  13. Vacancy-indium clusters in implanted germanium

    KAUST Repository

    Chroneos, Alexander I.

    2010-04-01

    Secondary ion mass spectroscopy measurements of heavily indium doped germanium samples revealed that a significant proportion of the indium dose is immobile. Using electronic structure calculations we address the possibility of indium clustering with point defects by predicting the stability of indium-vacancy clusters, InnVm. We find that the formation of large clusters is energetically favorable, which can explain the immobility of the indium ions. © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Semiconductor lasers stability, instability and chaos

    CERN Document Server

    Ohtsubo, Junji

    2017-01-01

    This book describes the fascinating recent advances made concerning the chaos, stability and instability of semiconductor lasers, and discusses their applications and future prospects in detail. It emphasizes the dynamics in semiconductor lasers by optical and electronic feedback, optical injection, and injection current modulation. Applications of semiconductor laser chaos, control and noise, and semiconductor lasers are also demonstrated. Semiconductor lasers with new structures, such as vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers and broad-area semiconductor lasers, are intriguing and promising devices. Current topics include fast physical number generation using chaotic semiconductor lasers for secure communication, development of chaos, quantum-dot semiconductor lasers and quantum-cascade semiconductor lasers, and vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers. This fourth edition has been significantly expanded to reflect the latest developments. The fundamental theory of laser chaos and the chaotic dynamics in se...

  15. On holographic defect entropy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Estes, John [Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College,London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Jensen, Kristan [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Victoria,Victoria, BC V8W 3P6 (Canada); C.N. Yang Institute for Theoretical Physics, SUNY Stony Brook,Stony Brook, NY 11794-3840 (United States); O’Bannon, Andy [Rudolf Peierls Centre for Theoretical Physics, University of Oxford,1 Keble Road, Oxford OX1 3NP (United Kingdom); Tsatis, Efstratios [8 Kotylaiou Street, Athens 11364 (Greece); Wrase, Timm [Stanford Institute for Theoretical Physics, Stanford University,Stanford, CA 94305 (United States)

    2014-05-19

    We study a number of (3+1)- and (2+1)-dimensional defect and boundary conformal field theories holographically dual to supergravity theories. In all cases the defects or boundaries are planar, and the defects are codimension-one. Using holography, we compute the entanglement entropy of a (hemi-)spherical region centered on the defect (boundary). We define defect and boundary entropies from the entanglement entropy by an appropriate background subtraction. For some (3+1)-dimensional theories we find evidence that the defect/boundary entropy changes monotonically under certain renormalization group flows triggered by operators localized at the defect or boundary. This provides evidence that the g-theorem of (1+1)-dimensional field theories generalizes to higher dimensions.

  16. On holographic defect entropy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estes, John; Jensen, Kristan; O'Bannon, Andy; Tsatis, Efstratios; Wrase, Timm

    2014-05-01

    We study a number of (3 + 1)- and (2 + 1)-dimensional defect and boundary conformal field theories holographically dual to supergravity theories. In all cases the defects or boundaries are planar, and the defects are codimension-one. Using holography, we compute the entanglement entropy of a (hemi-)spherical region centered on the defect (boundary). We define defect and boundary entropies from the entanglement entropy by an appropriate background subtraction. For some (3 + 1)-dimensional theories we find evidence that the defect/boundary entropy changes monotonically under certain renormalization group flows triggered by operators localized at the defect or boundary. This provides evidence that the g-theorem of (1 + 1)-dimensional field theories generalizes to higher dimensions.

  17. Data Clustering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagstaff, Kiri L.

    2012-03-01

    On obtaining a new data set, the researcher is immediately faced with the challenge of obtaining a high-level understanding from the observations. What does a typical item look like? What are the dominant trends? How many distinct groups are included in the data set, and how is each one characterized? Which observable values are common, and which rarely occur? Which items stand out as anomalies or outliers from the rest of the data? This challenge is exacerbated by the steady growth in data set size [11] as new instruments push into new frontiers of parameter space, via improvements in temporal, spatial, and spectral resolution, or by the desire to "fuse" observations from different modalities and instruments into a larger-picture understanding of the same underlying phenomenon. Data clustering algorithms provide a variety of solutions for this task. They can generate summaries, locate outliers, compress data, identify dense or sparse regions of feature space, and build data models. It is useful to note up front that "clusters" in this context refer to groups of items within some descriptive feature space, not (necessarily) to "galaxy clusters" which are dense regions in physical space. The goal of this chapter is to survey a variety of data clustering methods, with an eye toward their applicability to astronomical data analysis. In addition to improving the individual researcher’s understanding of a given data set, clustering has led directly to scientific advances, such as the discovery of new subclasses of stars [14] and gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) [38]. All clustering algorithms seek to identify groups within a data set that reflect some observed, quantifiable structure. Clustering is traditionally an unsupervised approach to data analysis, in the sense that it operates without any direct guidance about which items should be assigned to which clusters. There has been a recent trend in the clustering literature toward supporting semisupervised or constrained

  18. Scanning tip measurement for identification of point defects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raineri Vito

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Self-assembled iron-silicide nanostructures were prepared by reactive deposition epitaxy of Fe onto silicon. Capacitance-voltage, current-voltage, and deep level transient spectroscopy (DLTS were used to measure the electrical properties of Au/silicon Schottky junctions. Spreading resistance and scanning probe capacitance microscopy (SCM were applied to measure local electrical properties. Using a preamplifier the sensitivity of DLTS was increased satisfactorily to measure transients of the scanning tip semiconductor junction. In the Fe-deposited area, Fe-related defects dominate the surface layer in about 0.5 μm depth. These defects deteriorated the Schottky junction characteristic. Outside the Fe-deposited area, Fe-related defect concentration was identified in a thin layer near the surface. The defect transients in this area were measured both in macroscopic Schottky junctions and by scanning tip DLTS and were detected by bias modulation frequency dependence in SCM.

  19. Magnetoresistance and Curie temperature of GaAs semiconductor doped with Mn ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yalishev, V.Sh.

    2006-02-01

    Key words: diluted magnetic semiconductors, magnetoresistance, ferromagnetism, ionic implantation, molecular-beam epitaxy, magnetic clusters, Curie temperature. Subjects of the inquiry: Diluted magnetic semiconductor GaAs:Mn. Aim of the inquiry: determination of the possibility of the increase of Curie temperature in diluted magnetic semiconductors based on GaAs doped with Mn magnetic impurity. Method of inquiry: superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID), Hall effect, magnetoresistance, atomic and magnetic force microscopes. The results achieved and their novelty: 1. The effect of the additional doping of Ga 0,965 Mn 0,035 As magnetic epitaxial layers by nonmagnetic impurity of Be on on the Curie temperature was revealed. 2. The exchange interaction energy in the investigated Ga 0,965 Mn 0,035 As materials was determined by the means of the magnetic impurity dispersion model from the temperature dependence of the resistivity measurements. 3. The effect of magnetic clusters dimensions and illumination on the magnetoresistance of GaAs materials containing nano-dimensional magnetic clusters was studied for the first time. Practical value: Calculated energy of the exchange interaction between local electrons of magnetic ions and free holes in Ga 1-x Mn x As magnetic semiconductors permitted to evaluate the theoretical meaning of Curie temperature depending on concentration of free holes and to compare it with experimental data. Sphere of usage: micro- and nano-electronics, solid state physics, physics of semiconductors, magnetic materials physics, spin-polarized current sources. (author)

  20. Characterization Method for the Relaxation Process of Metastable Defect States in Cu(In,Ga)Se2 Thin Films with Photoisothermal Capacitance Transient Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okada, Hiroshi; Minemoto, Takashi

    2011-02-01

    A simple, spectroscopic method is proposed for the characterization of metastable defects in semiconductors using modified photoisothermal capacitance transient spectroscopy (photo-ICTS). A photo-ICTS method using a weighting function is formularized for the conversion process between two defect states. The potential energy barrier separating two configurations of the metastable defect in Cu(In,Ga)Se2 thin films has been successfully analyzed along with a tentatively determined defect concentration.

  1. Simulation of space protons influence on silicon semiconductor devices using gamma-neutron irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhukov, Y.N.; Zinchenko, V.F.; Ulimov, V.N.

    1999-01-01

    In this study the authors focus on the problems of simulating the space proton energy spectra under laboratory gamma-neutron radiation tests of semiconductor devices (SD). A correct simulation of radiation effects implies to take into account and evaluate substantial differences in the processes of formation of primary defects in SD in space environment and under laboratory testing. These differences concern: 1) displacement defects, 2) ionization defects and 3) intensity of radiation. The study shows that: - the energy dependence of nonionizing energy loss (NIEL) is quite universal to predict the degradation of SD parameters associated to displacement defects, and - MOS devices that are sensitive to ionization defects indicated the same variation of parameters under conditions of equality of ionization density generated by protons and gamma radiations. (A.C.)

  2. Thiophene-Based Organic Semiconductors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turkoglu, Gulsen; Cinar, M Emin; Ozturk, Turan

    2017-10-24

    Thiophene-based π-conjugated organic small molecules and polymers are the research subject of significant current interest owing to their potential use as organic semiconductors in material chemistry. Despite simple and similar molecular structures, the hitherto reported properties of thiophene-based organic semiconductors are rather diverse. Design of high performance organic semiconducting materials requires a thorough understanding of inter- and intra-molecular interactions, solid-state packing, and the influence of both factors on the charge carrier transport. In this chapter, thiophene-based organic semiconductors, which are classified in terms of their chemical structures and their structure-property relationships, are addressed for the potential applications as organic photovoltaics (OPVs), organic field-effect transistors (OFETs) and organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs).

  3. Catalysts, Protection Layers, and Semiconductors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chorkendorff, Ib

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogen is the simplest solar fuel to produce and in this presentation we shall give a short overview of the pros and cons of various tandem devices [1]. The large band gap semiconductor needs to be in front, but apart from that we can chose to have either the anode in front or back using either...... acid or alkaline conditions. Since most relevant semiconductors are very prone to corrosion the advantage of using buried junctions and using protection layers offering shall be discussed [2-4]. Next we shall discuss the availability of various catalysts for being coupled to these protections layers...... and how their stability may be evaluated [5, 6]. Examples of half-cell reaction using protection layers for both cathode and anode will be discussed though some of recent examples under both alkaline and acidic conditions. Si is a very good low band gap semiconductor and by using TiO2 as a protection...

  4. High pressure semiconductor physics I

    CERN Document Server

    Willardson, R K; Paul, William; Suski, Tadeusz

    1998-01-01

    Since its inception in 1966, the series of numbered volumes known as Semiconductors and Semimetals has distinguished itself through the careful selection of well-known authors, editors, and contributors. The "Willardson and Beer" Series, as it is widely known, has succeeded in publishing numerous landmark volumes and chapters. Not only did many of these volumes make an impact at the time of their publication, but they continue to be well-cited years after their original release. Recently, Professor Eicke R. Weber of the University of California at Berkeley joined as a co-editor of the series. Professor Weber, a well-known expert in the field of semiconductor materials, will further contribute to continuing the series' tradition of publishing timely, highly relevant, and long-impacting volumes. Some of the recent volumes, such as Hydrogen in Semiconductors, Imperfections in III/V Materials, Epitaxial Microstructures, High-Speed Heterostructure Devices, Oxygen in Silicon, and others promise indeed that this tra...

  5. Selenium semiconductor core optical fibers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. W. Tang

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Phosphate glass-clad optical fibers containing selenium (Se semiconductor core were fabricated using a molten core method. The cores were found to be amorphous as evidenced by X-ray diffraction and corroborated by Micro-Raman spectrum. Elemental analysis across the core/clad interface suggests that there is some diffusion of about 3 wt % oxygen in the core region. Phosphate glass-clad crystalline selenium core optical fibers were obtained by a postdrawing annealing process. A two-cm-long crystalline selenium semiconductor core optical fibers, electrically contacted to external circuitry through the fiber end facets, exhibit a three times change in conductivity between dark and illuminated states. Such crystalline selenium semiconductor core optical fibers have promising utility in optical switch and photoconductivity of optical fiber array.

  6. Charge separation sensitized by advanced II-VI semiconductor nanostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kelley, David F. [Univ.of California, Merced, CA (United States)

    2017-04-11

    This proposal focuses on how the composition and morphology of pure and alloyed II-VI semiconductor heterostructures control their spectroscopic and dynamical properties. The proposed research will use a combination of synthesis development, electron microscopy, time-resolved electronic spectroscopy and modeling calculations to study these nanostructures. The proposed research will examine the extent to which morphology, compression due to lattice mismatch and alloy effects can be used to tune the electron and hole energies and the spectroscopic properties of II-VI heterojunctions. It will also use synthesis, optical spectroscopy and HRTEM to examine the role of lattice mismatch and hence lattice strain in producing interfacial defects, and the extent to which defect formation can be prevented by controlling the composition profile through the particles and across the interfaces. Finally, we will study the magnitude of the surface roughness in core/shell nanostructures and the role of shell thickness variability on the inhomogeneity of interfacial charge transfer rates.

  7. Weighted Clustering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ackerman, Margareta; Ben-David, Shai; Branzei, Simina

    2012-01-01

    the partitional and hierarchical settings, characterizing the conditions under which algorithms react to weights. Extending a recent framework for clustering algorithm selection, we propose intuitive properties that would allow users to choose between clustering algorithms in the weighted setting and classify...

  8. Cluster editing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Böcker, S.; Baumbach, Jan

    2013-01-01

    . The problem has been the inspiration for numerous algorithms in bioinformatics, aiming at clustering entities such as genes, proteins, phenotypes, or patients. In this paper, we review exact and heuristic methods that have been proposed for the Cluster Editing problem, and also applications...

  9. Chalcopyrite semimagnetic semiconductors: From nanocomposite to homogeneous material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kilanski L.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Currently, complex ferromagnetic semiconductor systems are of significant interest due to their potential applicability in spintronics. A key feature in order to use semiconductor materials in spintronics is the presence of room temperature ferromagnetism. This feature was recently observed and is intensively studied in several Mn-alloyed II-IV-V2 group diluted magnetic semiconductor systems. The paper reviews the origin of room temperature ferromagnetism in II-IV-V2 compounds. In view of our recent reports the room temperature ferromagnetism in Mn-alloyed chalcopyrite semiconductors with more than 5 molar % of Mn is due to the presence of MnAs clusters. The solubility of magnetic impurities in bulk II-IV-V2 materials is of the order of a few percent, depending on the alloy composition. High values of the conducting hole - Mn ion exchange constant Jpd have significant value equal to 0.75 eV for Zn0.997Mn0.003GeAs2. The sample quality has significant effect on the magnetotransport of the alloy. The magnetoresistance of the alloy change main physical mechanism from spin-disorder scattering and weak localization for homogeneous samples to cluster-related geometrical effect observed for nanocomposite samples. The magnetoresistance of the II-IV-V2 alloys can be then tuned up to a few hundreds of percent via changes of the chemical composition of the alloy as well as a degree of disorder present in a material. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. III45003

  10. Semiconductor X-ray spectrometers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muggleton, A.H.F.

    1978-02-01

    An outline is given of recent developments in particle and photon induced x-ray fluorescence (XRF) analysis. Following a brief description of the basic mechanism of semiconductor detector operation a comparison is made between semiconductor detectors, scintillators and gas filled proportional devices. Detector fabrication and cryostat design are described in more detail and the effects of various device parameters on system performance, such as energy resolution, count rate capability, efficiency, microphony, etc. are discussed. The main applications of these detectors in x-ray fluorescence analysis, electron microprobe analysis, medical and pollution studies are reviewed

  11. Modeling of semiconductor optical amplifiers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mørk, Jesper; Bischoff, Svend; Berg, Tommy Winther

    We discuss the modelling of semiconductor optical amplifiers with emphasis on their high-speed properties. Applications in linear amplification as well as ultrafast optical signal processing are reviewed. Finally, the possible role of quantum-dot based optical amplifiers is discussed.......We discuss the modelling of semiconductor optical amplifiers with emphasis on their high-speed properties. Applications in linear amplification as well as ultrafast optical signal processing are reviewed. Finally, the possible role of quantum-dot based optical amplifiers is discussed....

  12. Semiconductors and semimetals epitaxial microstructures

    CERN Document Server

    Willardson, Robert K; Beer, Albert C; Gossard, Arthur C

    1994-01-01

    Newly developed semiconductor microstructures can now guide light and electrons resulting in important consequences for state-of-the-art electronic and photonic devices. This volume introduces a new generation of epitaxial microstructures. Special emphasis has been given to atomic control during growth and the interrelationship between the atomic arrangements and the properties of the structures.Key Features* Atomic-level control of semiconductor microstructures* Molecular beam epitaxy, metal-organic chemical vapor deposition* Quantum wells and quantum wires* Lasers, photon(IR)detectors, heterostructure transistors

  13. Semiconductor lasers and herterojunction leds

    CERN Document Server

    Kressel, Henry

    2012-01-01

    Semiconductor Lasers and Heterojunction LEDs presents an introduction to the subject of semiconductor lasers and heterojunction LEDs. The book reviews relevant basic solid-state and electromagnetic principles; the relevant concepts in solid state physics; and the p-n junctions and heterojunctions. The text also describes stimulated emission and gain; the relevant concepts in electromagnetic field theory; and the modes in laser structures. The relation between electrical and optical properties of laser diodes; epitaxial technology; binary III-V compounds; and diode fabrication are also consider

  14. Semiconductor device physics and simulation

    CERN Document Server

    Yuan, J S

    1998-01-01

    This volume provides thorough coverage of modern semiconductor devices -including hetero- and homo-junction devices-using a two-dimensional simulator (MEDICI) to perform the analysis and generate simulation results Each device is examined in terms of dc, ac, and transient simulator results; relevant device physics; and implications for design and analysis Two hundred forty-four useful figures illustrate the physical mechanisms and characteristics of the devices simulated Comprehensive and carefully organized, Semiconductor Device Physics and Simulation is the ideal bridge from device physics to practical device design

  15. Introduction to semiconductor manufacturing technology

    CERN Document Server

    2012-01-01

    IC chip manufacturing processes, such as photolithography, etch, CVD, PVD, CMP, ion implantation, RTP, inspection, and metrology, are complex methods that draw upon many disciplines. [i]Introduction to Semiconductor Manufacturing Technologies, Second Edition[/i] thoroughly describes the complicated processes with minimal mathematics, chemistry, and physics; it covers advanced concepts while keeping the contents accessible to readers without advanced degrees. Designed as a textbook for college students, this book provides a realistic picture of the semiconductor industry and an in-depth discuss

  16. Wide band gap semiconductor templates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arendt, Paul N. (Los Alamos, NM); Stan, Liliana (Los Alamos, NM); Jia, Quanxi (Los Alamos, NM); DePaula, Raymond F. (Santa Fe, NM); Usov, Igor O. (Los Alamos, NM)

    2010-12-14

    The present invention relates to a thin film structure based on an epitaxial (111)-oriented rare earth-Group IVB oxide on the cubic (001) MgO terminated surface and the ion-beam-assisted deposition ("IBAD") techniques that are amendable to be over coated by semiconductors with hexagonal crystal structures. The IBAD magnesium oxide ("MgO") technology, in conjunction with certain template materials, is used to fabricate the desired thin film array. Similarly, IBAD MgO with appropriate template layers can be used for semiconductors with cubic type crystal structures.

  17. Organic semiconductors in sensor applications

    CERN Document Server

    Malliaras, George; Owens, Róisín

    2008-01-01

    Organic semiconductors offer unique characteristics such as tunability of electronic properties via chemical synthesis, compatibility with mechanically flexible substrates, low-cost manufacturing, and facile integration with chemical and biological functionalities. These characteristics have prompted the application of organic semiconductors and their devices in physical, chemical, and biological sensors. This book covers this rapidly emerging field by discussing both optical and electrical sensor concepts. Novel transducers based on organic light-emitting diodes and organic thin-film transistors, as well as systems-on-a-chip architectures are presented. Functionalization techniques to enhance specificity are outlined, and models for the sensor response are described.

  18. Singular electrostatic energy of nanoparticle clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Jian; Krapf, Nathan W.; Witten, Thomas A.

    2016-02-01

    The binding of clusters of metal nanoparticles is partly electrostatic. We address difficulties in calculating the electrostatic energy when high charging energies limit the total charge to a single quantum, entailing unequal potentials on the particles. We show that the energy at small separation h has a singular logarithmic dependence on h . We derive a general form for this energy in terms of the singular capacitance of two spheres in near contact c (h ) , together with nonsingular geometric features of the cluster. Using this form, we determine the energies of various clusters, finding that more compact clusters are more stable. These energies are proposed to be significant for metal-semiconductor binary nanoparticle lattices found experimentally. We sketch how these effects should dictate the relative abundances of metal nanoparticle clusters in nonpolar solvents.

  19. Quantifying clustering in disordered carbon thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carey, J.D.

    2006-01-01

    The quantification of disorder and the effects of clustering in the sp 2 phase of amorphous carbon thin films are discussed. The sp 2 phase is described in terms of disordered nanometer-sized conductive sp 2 clusters embedded in a less conductive sp 3 matrix. Quantification of the clustering of the sp 2 phase is estimated from optical as well as from electron and nuclear magnetic resonance methods. Unlike in other disordered group IV thin film semiconductors, we show that care must be exercised in attributing a meaning to the Urbach energy extracted from absorption measurements in the disordered carbon system. The influence of structural disorder, associated with sp 2 clusters of similar size, and topological disorder due to undistorted clusters of different sizes is also discussed. Extensions of this description to other systems are also presented

  20. Semiconductor structure and recess formation etch technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Bin; Sun, Min; Palacios, Tomas Apostol

    2017-02-14

    A semiconductor structure has a first layer that includes a first semiconductor material and a second layer that includes a second semiconductor material. The first semiconductor material is selectively etchable over the second semiconductor material using a first etching process. The first layer is disposed over the second layer. A recess is disposed at least in the first layer. Also described is a method of forming a semiconductor structure that includes a recess. The method includes etching a region in a first layer using a first etching process. The first layer includes a first semiconductor material. The first etching process stops at a second layer beneath the first layer. The second layer includes a second semiconductor material.

  1. Waveguide based external cavity semiconductor lasers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oldenbeuving, Ruud; Klein, E.J.; Offerhaus, Herman L.; Lee, Christopher James; Verhaegen, M.; Boller, Klaus J.

    2012-01-01

    We report on progress of the project waveguide based external cavity semiconductor laser (WECSL) arrays. Here we present the latest results on our efforts to mode lock an array of tunable, external cavity semiconductor lasers.

  2. Fundamentals of semiconductors physics and materials properties

    CERN Document Server

    Yu, Peter Y

    2005-01-01

    Provides detailed explanations of the electronic, vibrational, transport, and optical properties of semiconductors. This textbook emphasizes understanding the physical properties of Si and similar tetrahedrally coordinated semiconductors and features an extensive collection of tables of material parameters, figures, and problems.

  3. Influence of phonons on semiconductor quantum emission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feldtmann, Thomas

    2009-07-06

    A microscopic theory of interacting charge carriers, lattice vibrations, and light modes in semiconductor systems is presented. The theory is applied to study quantum dots and phonon-assisted luminescence in bulk semiconductors and heterostructures. (orig.)

  4. Accumulation capacitance frequency dispersion of III-V metal-insulator-semiconductor devices due to disorder induced gap states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galatage, R. V.; Zhernokletov, D. M.; Dong, H.; Brennan, B.; Hinkle, C. L.; Wallace, R. M.; Vogel, E. M.

    2014-01-01

    The origin of the anomalous frequency dispersion in accumulation capacitance of metal-insulator-semiconductor devices on InGaAs and InP substrates is investigated using modeling, electrical characterization, and chemical characterization. A comparison of the border trap model and the disorder induced gap state model for frequency dispersion is performed. The fitting of both models to experimental data indicate that the defects responsible for the measured dispersion are within approximately 0.8 nm of the surface of the crystalline semiconductor. The correlation between the spectroscopically detected bonding states at the dielectric/III-V interface, the interfacial defect density determined using capacitance-voltage, and modeled capacitance-voltage response strongly suggests that these defects are associated with the disruption of the III-V atomic bonding and not border traps associated with bonding defects within the high-k dielectric.

  5. KELVIN PROBE SELF-CALIBRATION MODE FOR SEMICONDUCTOR WAFERS PROPERTIES MONITORING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. I. Vorobey

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Improvement of repeatability and reliability of semiconductor wafers properties monitoring with a probe charge-sensitive methods is achieved by realization of Kelvin probe self-calibration mode using a wafer’s surface itself as a reference sample. Results of wafer surface scanning are visualized in the form of parameter distribution color map. A method of measurements based on Kelvin probe self-calibration mode is realized in a measurement installation for non-destructive non-contact monitoring of semiconductor wafer defects. Method can be used to define defects’ physical properties including minority carrier diffusion length and lifetime, trapped charge density and energy distribution etc.

  6. Diode having trenches in a semiconductor region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palacios, Tomas Apostol; Lu, Bin; Matioli, Elison de Nazareth

    2016-03-22

    An electrode structure is described in which conductive regions are recessed into a semiconductor region. Trenches may be formed in a semiconductor region, such that conductive regions can be formed in the trenches. The electrode structure may be used in semiconductor devices such as field effect transistors or diodes. Nitride-based power semiconductor devices are described including such an electrode structure, which can reduce leakage current and otherwise improve performance.

  7. Anomalous lattice parameter of magnetic semiconductor alloys

    OpenAIRE

    CAETANO, Clovis; MARQUES, Marcelo; FERREIRA, Luiz G.; TELES, Lara K.

    2009-01-01

    The addition of transition metals (TM) to III-V semiconductors radically changes their electronic, magnetic and structural properties. In contrast to the conventional semiconductor alloys, the lattice parameter in magnetic semiconductor alloys, including the ones with diluted concentration (the diluted magnetic semiconductors - DMS), cannot be determined uniquely from the composition. By using first-principles calculations, we find a direct correlation between the magnetic moment and the anio...

  8. Bandgap engineering in semiconductor alloy nanomaterials with widely tunable compositions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ning, Cun-Zheng; Dou, Letian; Yang, Peidong

    2017-12-01

    Over the past decade, tremendous progress has been achieved in the development of nanoscale semiconductor materials with a wide range of bandgaps by alloying different individual semiconductors. These materials include traditional II-VI and III-V semiconductors and their alloys, inorganic and hybrid perovskites, and the newly emerging 2D materials. One important common feature of these materials is that their nanoscale dimensions result in a large tolerance to lattice mismatches within a monolithic structure of varying composition or between the substrate and target material, which enables us to achieve almost arbitrary control of the variation of the alloy composition. As a result, the bandgaps of these alloys can be widely tuned without the detrimental defects that are often unavoidable in bulk materials, which have a much more limited tolerance to lattice mismatches. This class of nanomaterials could have a far-reaching impact on a wide range of photonic applications, including tunable lasers, solid-state lighting, artificial photosynthesis and new solar cells.

  9. Content-Based Image Retrieval for Semiconductor Process Characterization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenneth W. Tobin

    2002-07-01

    Full Text Available Image data management in the semiconductor manufacturing environment is becoming more problematic as the size of silicon wafers continues to increase, while the dimension of critical features continues to shrink. Fabricators rely on a growing host of image-generating inspection tools to monitor complex device manufacturing processes. These inspection tools include optical and laser scattering microscopy, confocal microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and atomic force microscopy. The number of images that are being generated are on the order of 20,000 to 30,000 each week in some fabrication facilities today. Manufacturers currently maintain on the order of 500,000 images in their data management systems for extended periods of time. Gleaning the historical value from these large image repositories for yield improvement is difficult to accomplish using the standard database methods currently associated with these data sets (e.g., performing queries based on time and date, lot numbers, wafer identification numbers, etc.. Researchers at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory have developed and tested a content-based image retrieval technology that is specific to manufacturing environments. In this paper, we describe the feature representation of semiconductor defect images along with methods of indexing and retrieval, and results from initial field-testing in the semiconductor manufacturing environment.

  10. Structural damage at the Si/SiO2 interface resulting from electron injection in metal-oxide-semiconductor devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikawa, R. E.; Lenahan, P. M.

    1985-03-01

    With electron spin resonance, we have observed structural changes in metal-oxide-semiconductor structures resulting from the photoemisson of electrons from the silicon into the oxide. A trivalent silicon defect at the Si/SiO2 interface, termed Pb, is shown to be responsible for the interface states induced by electron injection. We find that these Pb centers are amphoteric interface state defects.

  11. Clustering Dycom

    KAUST Repository

    Minku, Leandro L.

    2017-10-06

    Background: Software Effort Estimation (SEE) can be formulated as an online learning problem, where new projects are completed over time and may become available for training. In this scenario, a Cross-Company (CC) SEE approach called Dycom can drastically reduce the number of Within-Company (WC) projects needed for training, saving the high cost of collecting such training projects. However, Dycom relies on splitting CC projects into different subsets in order to create its CC models. Such splitting can have a significant impact on Dycom\\'s predictive performance. Aims: This paper investigates whether clustering methods can be used to help finding good CC splits for Dycom. Method: Dycom is extended to use clustering methods for creating the CC subsets. Three different clustering methods are investigated, namely Hierarchical Clustering, K-Means, and Expectation-Maximisation. Clustering Dycom is compared against the original Dycom with CC subsets of different sizes, based on four SEE databases. A baseline WC model is also included in the analysis. Results: Clustering Dycom with K-Means can potentially help to split the CC projects, managing to achieve similar or better predictive performance than Dycom. However, K-Means still requires the number of CC subsets to be pre-defined, and a poor choice can negatively affect predictive performance. EM enables Dycom to automatically set the number of CC subsets while still maintaining or improving predictive performance with respect to the baseline WC model. Clustering Dycom with Hierarchical Clustering did not offer significant advantage in terms of predictive performance. Conclusion: Clustering methods can be an effective way to automatically generate Dycom\\'s CC subsets.

  12. Semiconductor technology program: Progress briefs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galloway, K. F.; Scace, R. I.; Walters, E. J.

    1981-01-01

    Measurement technology for semiconductor materials, process control, and devices, is discussed. Silicon and silicon based devices are emphasized. Highlighted activities include semiinsulating GaAs characterization, an automatic scanning spectroscopic ellipsometer, linewidth measurement and coherence, bandgap narrowing effects in silicon, the evaluation of electrical linewidth uniformity, and arsenicomplanted profiles in silicon.

  13. Towards filament free semiconductor lasers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McInerney, John; O'Brien, Peter; Skovgaard, Peter M. W.

    2000-01-01

    We outline physical models and simulations for suppression of self-focusing and filamentation in large aperture semiconductor lasers. The principal technical objective is to generate multi-watt CW or quasi-CW outputs with nearly diffraction limited beams, suitable for long distance free space...

  14. Ultrafast Spectroscopy of Semiconductor Devices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borri, Paola; Langbein, Wolfgang; Hvam, Jørn Marcher

    1999-01-01

    In this work we present an experimental technique for investigating ultrafast carrier dynamics in semiconductor optical amplifiers at room temperature. These dynamics, influenced by carrier heating, spectral hole-burning and two-photon absorption, are very important for device applications in inf...

  15. Semiconductor radiation detectors: device physics

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lutz, Gerhard

    1999-01-01

    ..., including nuclear physics, elementary particle physics, optical and x-ray astronomy, medicine, and materials testing - and the number of applications is growing continually. Closely related, and initiated by the application of semiconductors, is the development of low-noise low-power integrated electronics for signal readout. The success of semicond...

  16. Review of semiconductor drift detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gatti, Emilio; Rehak, Pavel

    2005-04-01

    A short review of semiconductor drift detectors is given. The emphasis is given to detectors intended for tracking of fast charged particles for experiments in particle physics and high energy heavy-ion physics. The use and performance of this kind of detector in past, present and future experiments is described together with the experience learned during the design, production and data taking phases.

  17. Atomistic Models of Amorphous Semiconductors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jarolimek, K.

    2011-01-01

    Crystalline silicon is probably the best studied material, widely used by the semiconductor industry. The subject of this thesis is an intriguing form of this element namely amorphous silicon. It can contain a varying amount of hydrogen and is denoted as a-Si:H. It completely lacks the neat long

  18. Towards filament free semiconductor lasers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McInerney, John; O'Brien, Peter; Skovgaard, Peter M. W.

    2000-01-01

    We outline physical models and simulations for suppression of self-focusing and filamentation in large aperture semiconductor lasers. The principal technical objective is to generate multi-watt CW or quasi-CW outputs with nearly diffraction limited beams, suitable for long distance free space...... propagation structures in lasers and amplifiers which suppress lateral reflections....

  19. A Brief History of ... Semiconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, Tudor

    2005-01-01

    The development of studies in semiconductor materials is traced from its beginnings with Michael Faraday in 1833 to the production of the first silicon transistor in 1954, which heralded the age of silicon electronics and microelectronics. Prior to the advent of band theory, work was patchy and driven by needs of technology. However, the arrival…

  20. Clustering analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Romli

    1997-01-01

    Cluster analysis is the name of group of multivariate techniques whose principal purpose is to distinguish similar entities from the characteristics they process.To study this analysis, there are several algorithms that can be used. Therefore, this topic focuses to discuss the algorithms, such as, similarity measures, and hierarchical clustering which includes single linkage, complete linkage and average linkage method. also, non-hierarchical clustering method, which is popular name K -mean method ' will be discussed. Finally, this paper will be described the advantages and disadvantages of every methods

  1. Cluster analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Everitt, Brian S; Leese, Morven; Stahl, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    Cluster analysis comprises a range of methods for classifying multivariate data into subgroups. By organizing multivariate data into such subgroups, clustering can help reveal the characteristics of any structure or patterns present. These techniques have proven useful in a wide range of areas such as medicine, psychology, market research and bioinformatics.This fifth edition of the highly successful Cluster Analysis includes coverage of the latest developments in the field and a new chapter dealing with finite mixture models for structured data.Real life examples are used throughout to demons

  2. Calculation of the thermal mode in semiconductor devices in conditions of their operation in semiconductor apparatuses

    OpenAIRE

    Сосков, Анатолій Георгійович; Глєбова, Марина Леонідівна; Сабалаєва, Наталія Олегівна; Форкун, Яна Борисівна

    2014-01-01

    The study of the temperature field of power semiconductor devices, operating in semiconductor apparatuses, either non-contact or hybrid was carried out in the paper.It was also shown that the main mode of the current load of power semiconductor devices, operating in semiconductor apparatuses is a pulse mode.Analytical method for calculating the values of the temperature rise in the structure of power semiconductor devices when subjected to a current pulse of arbitrary shape based on a model t...

  3. Defective TiO2 with oxygen vacancies: synthesis, properties and photocatalytic applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Xiaoyang; Yang, Min-Quan; Fu, Xianzhi; Zhang, Nan; Xu, Yi-Jun

    2013-04-01

    Titanium dioxide (TiO2), as an important semiconductor metal oxide, has been widely investigated in the field of photocatalysis. The properties of TiO2, including its light absorption, charge transport and surface adsorption, are closely related to its defect disorder, which in turn plays a significant role in the photocatalytic performance of TiO2. Among all the defects identified in TiO2, oxygen vacancy is one of the most important and is supposed to be the prevalent defect in many metal oxides, which has been widely investigated both by theoretical calculations and experimental characterizations. Here, we give a short review on the existing strategies for the synthesis of defective TiO2 with oxygen vacancies, and the defect related properties of TiO2 including structural, electronic, optical, dissociative adsorption and reductive properties, which are intimately related to the photocatalytic performance of TiO2. In particular, photocatalytic applications with regard to defective TiO2 are outlined. In addition, we offer some perspectives on the challenge and new direction for future research in this field. We hope that this tutorial minireview would provide some useful contribution to the future design and fabrication of defective semiconductor-based nanomaterials for diverse photocatalytic applications.Titanium dioxide (TiO2), as an important semiconductor metal oxide, has been widely investigated in the field of photocatalysis. The properties of TiO2, including its light absorption, charge transport and surface adsorption, are closely related to its defect disorder, which in turn plays a significant role in the photocatalytic performance of TiO2. Among all the defects identified in TiO2, oxygen vacancy is one of the most important and is supposed to be the prevalent defect in many metal oxides, which has been widely investigated both by theoretical calculations and experimental characterizations. Here, we give a short review on the existing strategies for the

  4. Defects in hardwood timber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roswell D. Carpenter; David L. Sonderman; Everette D. Rast; Martin J. Jones

    1989-01-01

    Includes detailed information on all common defects that may aRect hardwood trees and logs. Relationships between manufactured products and those forms of round material to be processed from the tree for conversion into marketable products are discussed. This handbook supersedes Agriculture Handbook No. 244, Grade defects in hardwood timber and logs, by C.R. Lockard, J...

  5. Craniotomy Frontal Bone Defect

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2018-03-01

    Mar 1, 2018 ... with cosmetic deformity of fore head (Figure 1), and he claimed that he could not get job because of ... 1: Pre-operative forontal view of patient. Figure 2: Intra operative photography of defect (A) reconstructed defect (B) ... with a cosmetic deformity of forehead on left side. (4nA and B). He was a candidate for.

  6. Controlled growth of semiconductor crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourret-Courchesne, Edith D.

    1992-01-01

    A method for growth of III-V, II-VI and related semiconductor single crystals that suppresses random nucleation and sticking of the semiconductor melt at the crucible walls. Small pieces of an oxide of boron B.sub.x O.sub.y are dispersed throughout the comminuted solid semiconductor charge in the crucible, with the oxide of boron preferably having water content of at least 600 ppm. The crucible temperature is first raised to a temperature greater than the melt temperature T.sub.m1 of the oxide of boron (T.sub.m1 =723.degree. K. for boron oxide B.sub.2 O.sub.3), and the oxide of boron is allowed to melt and form a reasonably uniform liquid layer between the crucible walls and bottom surfaces and the still-solid semiconductor charge. The temperature is then raised to approximately the melt temperature T.sub.m2 of the semiconductor charge material, and crystal growth proceeds by a liquid encapsulated, vertical gradient freeze process. About half of the crystals grown have a dislocation density of less than 1000/cm.sup.2. If the oxide of boron has water content less than 600 ppm, the crucible material should include boron nitride, a layer of the inner surface of the crucible should be oxidized before the oxide of boron in the crucible charge is melted, and the sum of thicknesses of the solid boron oxide layer and liquid boron oxide layer should be at least 50 .mu.m.

  7. Limitations to band gap tuning in nitride semiconductor alloys

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gorczyca, I.; Suski, T.; Christensen, Niels Egede

    2010-01-01

    Relations between the band gaps of nitride alloys and their lattice parameters are presented and limits to tuning of the fundamental gap in nitride semiconductors are set by combining a large number of experimental data with ab initio theoretical calculations. Large band gap bowings obtained...... theoretically for GaxAl1-xN, InxGa1-xN, and InxAl1-xN for uniform as well as clustered arrangements of the cation atoms are considered in the theoretical analysis. It is shown that indium plays a particular role in nitride alloys being responsible for most of the observed effects....

  8. Defects at oxide surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Thornton, Geoff

    2015-01-01

    This book presents the basics and characterization of defects at oxide surfaces. It provides a state-of-the-art review of the field, containing information to the various types of surface defects, describes analytical methods to study defects, their chemical activity and the catalytic reactivity of oxides. Numerical simulations of defective structures complete the picture developed. Defects on planar surfaces form the focus of much of the book, although the investigation of powder samples also form an important part. The experimental study of planar surfaces opens the possibility of applying the large armoury of techniques that have been developed over the last half-century to study surfaces in ultra-high vacuum. This enables the acquisition of atomic level data under well-controlled conditions, providing a stringent test of theoretical methods. The latter can then be more reliably applied to systems such as nanoparticles for which accurate methods of characterization of structure and electronic properties ha...

  9. Occupational Clusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pottawattamie County School System, Council Bluffs, IA.

    The 15 occupational clusters (transportation, fine arts and humanities, communications and media, personal service occupations, construction, hospitality and recreation, health occupations, marine science occupations, consumer and homemaking-related occupations, agribusiness and natural resources, environment, public service, business and office…

  10. Cancer Clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Peer Review and Funding Outcomes Step 4: Award Negotiation & Issuance Manage Your Award Grants Management Contacts Monitoring ... potentially hazardous working conditions, including suspected cancer clusters. Employees, authorized employee representatives, and employers can request these ...

  11. Cluster generator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donchev, Todor I [Urbana, IL; Petrov, Ivan G [Champaign, IL

    2011-05-31

    Described herein is an apparatus and a method for producing atom clusters based on a gas discharge within a hollow cathode. The hollow cathode includes one or more walls. The one or more walls define a sputtering chamber within the hollow cathode and include a material to be sputtered. A hollow anode is positioned at an end of the sputtering chamber, and atom clusters are formed when a gas discharge is generated between the hollow anode and the hollow cathode.

  12. First principles studies of semiconductor epitaxial growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Bao-Liang

    This thesis conducts investigations mainly on the structures, energetics, and recations of semiconductor as well as oxide surfaces using first principles cluster model approach. The first part of the research work addresses the issues in the epitaxial growth of Hgsb{1-x}Cdsb{x}Te (MCT) materials. Hg divalent compounds were studied thoroughly using a variety of quantum chemical methods in order to understand the energetics of Hg precursors for growth. The (001) growth surfaces were then examined in detail using cluster model calculations. Based on these results, a novel metal-organic molecular beam epitaxial (MOMBE) growth strategy with favorable energetics for growing MCT using Hsb2C=CH-CHsb2-Hg-Cequiv C-CHsb3 is proposed. It is hoped that with this new growth strategy, the Hg vacancy and p-doping problems that currently exist in growth can be avoided. The second part of the thesis discusses the molecular beam epitaxial (MBE) growth of cubic GaN on the (001) surface using various N sources. Surface reconstructions and the interactions of gas-phase atomic and molecular nitrogens with the surface were elucidated using cluster models. Using these results an energy phase diagram for the growth of GaN has been constructed. It suggests that excited state molecular Nsb2\\ (sp3Sigmasbsp{u}{+}) is the most favorable of all N species for growth of high quality GaN because it can undergo a dissociative chemisorption process. Ground state atomic N\\ (sp4S) is also good for growth. The doublet excited states N\\ (sp2D and sp2P) might cause surface N abstraction, leading to N vacancies in the material. Finally, a Fe(OH)sb3(Hsb2O)sb3 GVB cluster model of crystalline alpha-Fesb2Osb3 was developed. This simple model can describe the local geometry and bonding of Fe in the bulk oxide. Using quantum mechanical calculations, the orientation of the oleic imidazoline (OI) molecule bonding to the oxide surface has been determined. OI class of molecules are used extensively for corrosion

  13. Accurate prediction of defect properties in density functional supercell calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lany, Stephan; Zunger, Alex

    2009-01-01

    The theoretical description of defects and impurities in semiconductors is largely based on density functional theory (DFT) employing supercell models. The literature discussion of uncertainties that limit the predictivity of this approach has focused mostly on two issues: (1) finite-size effects, in particular for charged defects; (2) the band-gap problem in local or semi-local DFT approximations. We here describe how finite-size effects (1) in the formation energy of charged defects can be accurately corrected in a simple way, i.e. by potential alignment in conjunction with a scaling of the Madelung-like screened first order correction term. The factor involved with this scaling depends only on the dielectric constant and the shape of the supercell, and quite accurately accounts for the full third order correction according to Makov and Payne. We further discuss in some detail the background and justification for this correction method, and also address the effect of the ionic screening on the magnitude of the image charge energy. In regard to (2) the band-gap problem, we discuss the merits of non-local external potentials that are added to the DFT Hamiltonian and allow for an empirical band-gap correction without significantly increasing the computational demand over that of standard DFT calculations. In combination with LDA + U, these potentials are further instrumental for the prediction of polaronic defects with localized holes in anion-p orbitals, such as the metal-site acceptors in wide-gap oxide semiconductors

  14. Modulation spectroscopy characterization of MOCVD semiconductors and semiconductors structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollak, Fred H.; Shen, H.

    1989-11-01

    This paper reviews recent developments in the use of contactless modulation spectroscopy to yield important information about MOCVD growth as well as the properties of MOCVD fabricated semiconductors and semiconductor microstructures. The method of reflectance difference spectroscopy can be used to gain significant insights into chemical and structural parameters during actual growth conditions. The electromodulation technique of photoreflectance (PR) probes the electronic states of the material. It has many applications for in-situ post-growth characterization of crystal quality, very thin Ga 1-xAl xAs/GaAs epitaxial layers, Ga 1-xAl xAs alloy composition, deep trap states, surface electric fields and carrier concentrations, lattice-mismatch strain, etc, as well as the determination of relevant parameters of heterojunction structures. In addition, recent PR experiments at 600°C on GaAs and Ga 0.82Al 0.18As show potential for in-situ monitoring during growth.

  15. Interaction between dangling bonds in vacancy-defects in silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caldas, M.J.; Fazzio, A.

    1983-01-01

    The 'defect-molecule' model in the simplest scheme (without configuration interaction) is reviewed and the concept of 'delocalized dangling-bonds' is explorated in the study of the interaction between the unsaturated hybrids of the mono and divacancy in silicon. The 'defect-molecule' hamiltonian is written in parametric form, and the parameters are extracted from full self-consistent calculations for both systems carried out through the MS-Xα molecular cluster model. (Author) [pt

  16. First-principles studies on graphene-supported transition metal clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sahoo, Sanjubala; Khanna, Shiv N.; Gruner, Markus E.; Entel, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Theoretical studies on the structure, stability, and magnetic properties of icosahedral TM 13 (TM = Fe, Co, Ni) clusters, deposited on pristine (defect free) and defective graphene sheet as well as graphene flakes, have been carried out within a gradient corrected density functional framework. The defects considered in our study include a carbon vacancy for the graphene sheet and a five-membered and a seven-membered ring structures for graphene flakes (finite graphene chunks). It is observed that the presence of defect in the substrate has a profound influence on the electronic structure and magnetic properties of graphene-transition metal complexes, thereby increasing the binding strength of the TM cluster on to the graphene substrate. Among TM 13 clusters, Co 13 is absorbed relatively more strongly on pristine and defective graphene as compared to Fe 13 and Ni 13 clusters. The adsorbed clusters show reduced magnetic moment compared to the free clusters

  17. Defect kinetics in novel detector materials

    CERN Document Server

    MacEvoy, B C

    2000-01-01

    Silicon particle detectors will be used extensively in experiments at the CERN Large Hadron Collider, where unprecedented particle fluences will cause significant atomic displacement damage. We present a model of the evolution of defect concentrations and consequent electrical behaviour in "novel" detector materials with various oxygen and carbon impurity concentrations. The divacancy-oxygen (V/sub 2/O) defect is identified as the cause of changes in device characteristics during /sup 60/Co gamma irradiation. In the case of hadron irradiation changes in detector doping concentration (N/sub eff/) are dominated by cluster defects, in particular the divacancy (V/sub 2/), which exchange charge directly via a non-Shockley-Read- Hall mechanism. The V/sub 2/O defect also contributes to Ne/sub eff/. This defect is more copiously produced during 24 GeV/c proton irradiation than during 1 MeV neutron irradiation on account of the higher vacancy introduction rate, hence the radiation hardness of materials is more sensiti...

  18. Quantitative Determination of Organic Semiconductor Microstructure from the Molecular to Device Scale

    KAUST Repository

    Rivnay, Jonathan

    2012-10-10

    A study was conducted to demonstrate quantitative determination of organic semiconductor microstructure from the molecular to device scale. The quantitative determination of organic semiconductor microstructure from the molecular to device scale was key to obtaining precise description of the molecular structure and microstructure of the materials of interest. This information combined with electrical characterization and modeling allowed for the establishment of general design rules to guide future rational design of materials and devices. Investigations revealed that a number and variety of defects were the largest contributors to the existence of disorder within a lattice, as organic semiconductor crystals were dominated by weak van der Waals bonding. Crystallite size, texture, and variations in structure due to spatial confinement and interfaces were also found to be relevant for transport of free charge carriers and bound excitonic species over distances that were important for device operation.

  19. Automated capacitive spectrometer for measuring the parameters of deep centers in semiconductor materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shajmeev, S.S.

    1985-01-01

    An automated capacitive spectrometer for determining deep centers parameters in semiconductor materials and instruments is described. The facility can be used in studying electrically active defects (impurity, radiation, thermal) having deep levels in the forbidden semiconductor zone. The facility permits to determine the following parameters of the deep centers: concentration of each deep level taken separately within 5x10 -1 +-5x10 -15 of the alloying impurity concentration, level energy position in the forbidden semiconductor zone in the range from 0.08 MeV above the valency zone ceiling to 0.08 eV below the conductivity zone bottom, hole or electron capture cross-section on the deep center; concentration profile of deep levels

  20. Laser-based semiconductor fabrication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wachter, J.R.

    1989-01-01

    This paper discusses research that has concentrated on methods for direct processing of integrated circuits (IC's), such as defect reduction in epitaxial silicon, large grain polysilicon growth, laser-assisted etching and film deposition methods, and removal of dislocation networks

  1. Graphene antidot lattices: Designed defects and spin qubits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Thomas; Flindt, Christian; Pedersen, Jesper Goor

    2008-01-01

    similar phenomenology, but within a much more favorable energy scale, a consequence of the Dirac fermion nature of the states around the Fermi level. Further, by leaving out some of the holes one can create defect states, or pairs of coupled defect states, which can function as hosts for electron spin......Antidot lattices, defined on a two-dimensional electron gas at a semiconductor heterostructure, are a well-studied class of man-made structures with intriguing physical properties. We point out that a closely related system, graphene sheets with regularly spaced holes ("antidots"), should display...... qubits. We present a detailed study of the energetics of periodic graphene antidot lattices, analyze the level structure of a single defect, calculate the exchange coupling between a pair of spin qubits, and identify possible avenues for further developments....

  2. Multiple-level defect species evaluation from average carrier decay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debuf, Didier

    2003-10-01

    An expression for the average decay is determined by solving the the carrier continuity equations, which include terms for multiple defect recombination. This expression is the decay measured by techniques such as the contactless photoconductance decay method, which determines the average or volume integrated decay. Implicit in the above is the requirement for good surface passivation such that only bulk properties are observed. A proposed experimental configuration is given to achieve the intended goal of an assessment of the type of defect in an n-type Czochralski-grown silicon semiconductor with an unusually high relative lifetime. The high lifetime is explained in terms of a ground excited state multiple-level defect system. Also, minority carrier trapping is investigated.

  3. Screening Tests for Birth Defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Advocacy For Patients About ACOG Screening Tests for Birth Defects Home For Patients Search FAQs Screening Tests ... FAQ165, April 2014 PDF Format Screening Tests for Birth Defects Pregnancy What is a birth defect? What ...

  4. Topological excitations in semiconductor heterostructures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koushik, R.; Mukerjee, Subroto; Ghosh, Arindam; Baenninger, Matthias; Narayan, Vijay; Pepper, Michael; Farrer, Ian; Ritchie, David A.

    2013-01-01

    Topological defects play an important role in the melting phenomena in two-dimensions. In this work, we report experimental observation of topological defect induced melting in two-dimensional electron systems (2DES) in the presence of strong Coulomb interaction and disorder. The phenomenon is characterised by measurement of conductivity which goes to zero in a Berezinskii-Kosterlitz-Thouless like transition. Further evidence is provided via low-frequency conductivity noise measurements

  5. Surface Bonding Effects in Compound Semiconductor Nanoparticles: II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Helen H. Farrell

    2008-07-01

    Small nanoparticles have a large proportion of their atoms either at or near the surface, and those in clusters are essentially all on the surface. As a consequence, the details of the surface structure are of paramount importance in governing the overall stability of the particle. Just as with bulk materials, factors that determine this stability include “bulk” structure, surface reconstruction, charge balance and hybridization, ionicity, strain, stoichiometry, and the presence of adsorbates. Needless to say, many of these factors, such as charge balance, hybridization and strain, are interdependent. These factors all contribute to the overall binding energy of clusters and small nanoparticles and play a role in determining the deviations from an inverse size dependence that we have previously reported for compound semiconductor materials. Using first-principles density functional theory calculations, we have explored how these factors influence particle stability under a variety of conditions.

  6. Bussines Clusters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarmiza Pencea

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Clusters are complex economic structures in which similar companies, their up-stream and down-stream business partners, universities, research institutes, educational units, various service providers, diverse private and public institutions concentrate geografically, striving to get economies of agglomeration and scale, to capitalize on the resulting spill over effects, to cut costs, to better harness resources, to exchange information and experience, to improve quality, innovation, skills and productivity. By somehow unexpectedly combining competition and cooperation, they form a new, sophisticated stage in the evolution of production structures in quest of higher efficiency. This paper forays into the world of clusters and clusterization, which seem to increasingly capture the interest of businesses, scholars and policy makers. It looks at what clusters are, how they arise, what are their specific features, what benefits and challenges they can generate for companies and for the regions in which they locate and if and how they should be fostered by industrial policy interventions. The conclusion is that clusters can be very important development triggers and therefore they should be encouraged and nurtured by adequate policy measures. They should not only be used as a regular policy tool, but be placed at the very center of the development strategies of emerging economies.

  7. Hypersonic modes in nanophononic semiconductors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hepplestone, S P; Srivastava, G P

    2008-09-05

    Frequency gaps and negative group velocities of hypersonic phonon modes in periodically arranged composite semiconductors are presented. Trends and criteria for phononic gaps are discussed using a variety of atomic-level theoretical approaches. From our calculations, the possibility of achieving semiconductor-based one-dimensional phononic structures is established. We present results of the location and size of gaps, as well as negative group velocities of phonon modes in such structures. In addition to reproducing the results of recent measurements of the locations of the band gaps in the nanosized Si/Si{0.4}Ge{0.6} superlattice, we show that such a system is a true one-dimensional hypersonic phononic crystal.

  8. Spectroscopic analysis of optoelectronic semiconductors

    CERN Document Server

    Jimenez, Juan

    2016-01-01

    This book deals with standard spectroscopic techniques which can be used to analyze semiconductor samples or devices, in both, bulk, micrometer and submicrometer scale. The book aims helping experimental physicists and engineers to choose the right analytical spectroscopic technique in order to get specific information about their specific demands. For this purpose, the techniques including technical details such as apparatus and probed sample region are described. More important, also the expected outcome from experiments is provided. This involves also the link to theory, that is not subject of this book, and the link to current experimental results in the literature which are presented in a review-like style. Many special spectroscopic techniques are introduced and their relationship to the standard techniques is revealed. Thus the book works also as a type of guide or reference book for people researching in optical spectroscopy of semiconductors.

  9. Semiconductor electrolyte photovoltaic energy converter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, W. W.; Anderson, L. B.

    1975-01-01

    Feasibility and practicality of a solar cell consisting of a semiconductor surface in contact with an electrolyte are evaluated. Basic components and processes are detailed for photovoltaic energy conversion at the surface of an n-type semiconductor in contact with an electrolyte which is oxidizing to conduction band electrons. Characteristics of single crystal CdS, GaAs, CdSe, CdTe and thin film CdS in contact with aqueous and methanol based electrolytes are studied and open circuit voltages are measured from Mott-Schottky plots and open circuit photo voltages. Quantum efficiencies for short circuit photo currents of a CdS crystal and a 20 micrometer film are shown together with electrical and photovoltaic properties. Highest photon irradiances are observed with the GaAs cell.

  10. Formation of strain-induced quantum dots in gated semiconductor nanostructures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ted Thorbeck

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available A long-standing mystery in the field of semiconductor quantum dots (QDs is: Why are there so many unintentional dots (also known as disorder dots which are neither expected nor controllable. It is typically assumed that these unintentional dots are due to charged defects, however the frequency and predictability of the location of the unintentional QDs suggests there might be additional mechanisms causing the unintentional QDs besides charged defects. We show that the typical strains in a semiconductor nanostructure from metal gates are large enough to create strain-induced quantum dots. We simulate a commonly used QD device architecture, metal gates on bulk silicon, and show the formation of strain-induced QDs. The strain-induced QD can be eliminated by replacing the metal gates with poly-silicon gates. Thus strain can be as important as electrostatics to QD device operation operation.

  11. Semiconductor Nanowires: Epitaxy and Applications

    OpenAIRE

    Mårtensson, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    Semiconductor nanowires are nanoscale objects formed by bottom-up synthesis. In recent years their unique properties have been exploited in fields such as electronics, photonics, sensors and the life sciences. In this work, the epitaxial growth of nanowires and their applications were studied. Heteroepitaxial growth of III-V nanowires on silicon substrates was demonstrated. This may enable direct band gap materials for optoelectronic devices, as well as high-mobility, low-contact resis...

  12. Quantum correlations in semiconductor microcavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kira, M.; Hoyer, W.; Koch, S. W.; Brick, P.; Ell, C.; Hübner, M.; Khitrova, G.; Gibbs, H. M.

    2003-10-01

    The quantum mechanical nature of the light field in semiconductor microcavities leads to non-classical coupling effects between photons and electron-hole excitations. It is shown that these quantum correlations give rise to characteristic corrections of the semiclassical light-matter coupling dynamics. Examples of quantum correlation signatures include entanglement effects in the probe reflection of a microcavity system and squeezing in the incoherent emission.

  13. Modeling of Microwave Semiconductor Diodes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Raida

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with the multi-physical mode-ling of microwave diodes. The electrostatic, drift-diffusion and thermal phenomena are considered in the physical model of the components. The basic semiconductor equati-ons are summarized, and modeling issues are discussed. The simulations of the Gunn Effect in transferred electron devices and the carrier injection effect in PIN diodes are investigated and discussed. The analysis was performed in COMSOL Multiphysics using the finite element method.

  14. Modeling of Microwave Semiconductor Diodes

    OpenAIRE

    Pokorny, M.; Raida, Zbyněk

    2008-01-01

    The paper deals with the multi-physical mode-ling of microwave diodes. The electrostatic, drift-diffusion and thermal phenomena are considered in the physical model of the components. The basic semiconductor equati-ons are summarized, and modeling issues are discussed. The simulations of the Gunn Effect in transferred electron devices and the carrier injection effect in PIN diodes are investigated and discussed. The analysis was performed in COMSOL Multiphysics using the finite element method.

  15. Optoelectronics with 2D semiconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, Thomas

    2015-03-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) atomic crystals, such as graphene and layered transition-metal dichalcogenides, are currently receiving a lot of attention for applications in electronics and optoelectronics. In this talk, I will review our research activities on electrically driven light emission, photovoltaic energy conversion and photodetection in 2D semiconductors. In particular, WSe2 monolayer p-n junctions formed by electrostatic doping using a pair of split gate electrodes, type-II heterojunctions based on MoS2/WSe2 and MoS2/phosphorene van der Waals stacks, 2D multi-junction solar cells, and 3D/2D semiconductor interfaces will be presented. Upon optical illumination, conversion of light into electrical energy occurs in these devices. If an electrical current is driven, efficient electroluminescence is obtained. I will present measurements of the electrical characteristics, the optical properties, and the gate voltage dependence of the device response. In the second part of my talk, I will discuss photoconductivity studies of MoS2 field-effect transistors. We identify photovoltaic and photoconductive effects, which both show strong photoconductive gain. A model will be presented that reproduces our experimental findings, such as the dependence on optical power and gate voltage. We envision that the efficient photon conversion and light emission, combined with the advantages of 2D semiconductors, such as flexibility, high mechanical stability and low costs of production, could lead to new optoelectronic technologies.

  16. Dry etching technology for semiconductors

    CERN Document Server

    Nojiri, Kazuo

    2015-01-01

    This book is a must-have reference to dry etching technology for semiconductors, which will enable engineers to develop new etching processes for further miniaturization and integration of semiconductor integrated circuits.  The author describes the device manufacturing flow, and explains in which part of the flow dry etching is actually used. The content is designed as a practical guide for engineers working at chip makers, equipment suppliers and materials suppliers, and university students studying plasma, focusing on the topics they need most, such as detailed etching processes for each material (Si, SiO2, Metal etc) used in semiconductor devices, etching equipment used in manufacturing fabs, explanation of why a particular plasma source and gas chemistry are used for the etching of each material, and how to develop etching processes.  The latest, key technologies are also described, such as 3D IC Etching, Dual Damascene Etching, Low-k Etching, Hi-k/Metal Gate Etching, FinFET Etching, Double Patterning ...

  17. Structural trends in off stoichiometric chalcopyrite type compound semiconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stephan, Christiane

    2011-03-15

    Energy supply is one of the most controversial topics that are currently discussed in our global community. Most of the energy delivered to the customer today has its origin in fossil and nuclear power plants. Indefinable risks and the radioactive waste repository problem of the latter as well as the global scarcity of fossil resources cause the renewable energies to grow more and more important for achieving sustainability. The main renewable energy sources are wind power, hydroelectric power and solar energy. On the photovoltaic (PV) market different materials are competing as part of different kinds of technologies, with the largest contribution still coming from wafer based crystalline silicon solar cells (95 %). Until now thin film solar cells only contribute a small portion to the whole PV market, but large capacities are under construction. Thin film photovoltaic shows a number of advantages in comparison to wafer based crystalline silicon PV. Among these material usage and production cost reduction are two prominent examples. The type of PV materials, which are analyzed in this work, are high potential compounds that are widely used as absorber layer in thin film solar cells. These are compound semiconductors of the type CuB{sup III}C{sup VI}{sub 2} (B{sup III} = In, Ga and C{sup VI} = Se, S). Several years of research have already gone into understanding the efficiency limiting factors for solar cell devices fabricated from this compound. Most of the studies concerning electronic defects are done by spectroscopic methods mostly performed using thin films from different kinds of synthesis, without any real knowledge regarding the structural origin of these defects. This work shows a systematic fundamental structural study of intrinsic point defects that are present within the material at various compositions in CuB{sup III}C{sup VI}{sub 2} compound semiconductors. The study is done on reference powder samples with well determined chemical composition and

  18. Single Ventricle Defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... heart defects along with pulmonary atresia. (Children with tetralogy of Fallot who also have pulmonary atresia may have treatment similar to others with tetralogy of Fallot.) How does it affect the heart? An opening ...

  19. Neural tube defects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.E. Marshall

    1981-09-01

    Full Text Available Neural tube defects refer to any defect in the morphogenesis of the neural tube, the most common types being spina bifida and anencephaly. Spina bifida has been recognised in skeletons found in north-eastern Morocco and estimated to have an age of almost 12 000 years. It was also known to the ancient Greek and Arabian physicians who thought that the bony defect was due to the tumour. The term spina bifida was first used by Professor Nicolai Tulp of Amsterdam in 1652. Many other terms have been used to describe this defect, but spina bifida remains the most useful general term, as it describes the separation of the vertebral elements in the midline.

  20. Rate theory modeling of defect evolution under cascade damage conditions: the influence of vacancy-type cascade remnants and application to the defect production characterization by microstructural analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katoh, Yutai; Muroga, Takeo; Kohyama, Akira; Stoller, R.E.; Namba, Chusei; Motojima, Osamu.

    1995-11-01

    Recent computational and experimental studies have confirmed that high energy cascades produce clustered defects of both vacancy- and interstitial-types as well as isolated point defects. However, the production probability, configuration, stability and other characteristics of the cascade clusters are not well understood in spite of the fact that clustered defect production would substantially affect the irradiation-induced microstructures and the consequent property changes in a certain range of temperatures and displacement rates. In this work, a model of point defect and cluster evolution in irradiated materials under cascade damage conditions was developed by combining the conventional reaction rate theory and the results from the latest molecular dynamics simulation studies. This paper provides a description of the model and a model-based fundamental investigation of the influence of configuration, production efficiency and the initial size distribution of cascade-produced vacancy clusters. In addition, using the model, issues on characterizing cascade-induced defect production by microstructural analysis will be discussed. In particular, the determination of cascade vacancy cluster configuration, surviving defect production efficiency and cascade-interaction volume is attempted by analyzing the temperature dependence of swelling rate and loop growth rate in austenitic steels and model alloys. (author)

  1. Polariton solitons and nonlinear localized states in a one-dimensional semiconductor microcavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ting-Wei; Cheng, Szu-Cheng

    2018-01-01

    This paper presents numerical studies of cavity polariton solitons (CPSs) in a resonantly pumped semiconductor microcavity with an imbedded spatial defect. In the bistable regime of the well-known homogeneous polariton condensate, with proper incident wave vector and pump strength, bright and/or dark cavity solitons can be found in the presence of a spatially confined potential. The minimum pump strength required to observe the CPSs or nonlinear localized states in this parametric pump scheme is therefore reported.

  2. Influence of phosphorus on point defects in an austenitic alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boulanger, L.

    1988-06-01

    The influence of phosphorus on points defects clusters has been studied in an austenitic alloy (Fe/19% at. Cr/13% at. Ni). Clusters are observed by transmission electron microscopy. After quenching and annealing, five types of clusters produced by vacancies or phosphorus-vacancies complexes are observed whose presence depends on cooling-speed. Vacancy concentration (with 3.6 10 -3 at. P) in clusters is about 10 -5 and apparent vacancy migration is 2 ± 0.1 eV. These observations suggest the formation of metastable small clusters during cooling which dissociate during annealing and migrate to create the observed clusters. With phosphorus, the unfrequent formation of vacancy loops has been observed during electron irradiation. Ions irradiations show that phosphorus does not favour nucleation of interstitial loops but slowers their growth. It reduces swelling by decreasing voids diameter. Phosphorus forms vacancy complexes whose role is to increase the recombination rate and to slow vacancy migration [fr

  3. Transport-reaction model for defect and carrier behavior within displacement cascades in gallium arsenide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wampler, William R.; Myers, Samuel Maxwell,

    2014-02-01

    A model is presented for recombination of charge carriers at displacement damage in gallium arsenide, which includes clustering of the defects in atomic displacement cascades produced by neutron or ion irradiation. The carrier recombination model is based on an atomistic description of capture and emission of carriers by the defects with time evolution resulting from the migration and reaction of the defects. The physics and equations on which the model is based are presented, along with details of the numerical methods used for their solution. The model uses a continuum description of diffusion, field-drift and reaction of carriers and defects within a representative spherically symmetric cluster. The initial radial defect profiles within the cluster were chosen through pair-correlation-function analysis of the spatial distribution of defects obtained from the binary-collision code MARLOWE, using recoil energies for fission neutrons. Charging of the defects can produce high electric fields within the cluster which may influence transport and reaction of carriers and defects, and which may enhance carrier recombination through band-to-trap tunneling. Properties of the defects are discussed and values for their parameters are given, many of which were obtained from density functional theory. The model provides a basis for predicting the transient response of III-V heterojunction bipolar transistors to pulsed neutron irradiation.

  4. Fuzzy Clustering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berks, G.; Keyserlingk, Diedrich Graf von; Jantzen, Jan

    2000-01-01

    and clustering are the basic concerns in medicine. Classification depends on definitions of the classes and their required degree of participant of the elements in the cases' symptoms. In medicine imprecise conditions are the rule and therefore fuzzy methods are much more suitable than crisp ones. Fuzzy c...

  5. Cluster Matters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gulati, Mukesh; Lund-Thomsen, Peter; Suresh, Sangeetha

    2018-01-01

    In this chapter, we investigate corporate social responsibility (CSR) in industrial clusters in the Indian context. We use the definition of CSR as given in the Indian Ministry of Corporate Affairs’ National Voluntary Guidelines (NVGs) for Business Responsibility: ‘the commitment of an enterprise...

  6. Freely-migrating defects: Their production and interaction with cascade remnants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rehn, L.E.; Wiedersich, H.

    1991-05-01

    Many microstructural changes that occur during irradiation are driven primarily by freely-migrating defects, i.e. those defects which escape from nascent cascades to migrate over distances that are large relative to typical cascade dimensions. Several measurements during irradiation at elevated temperatures have shown that the survival rate of freely-migrating defects decreases much more strongly with increasing primary recoil energy than does the survival rate for defects generated at liquid helium temperatures. For typical fission or fusion recoil spectra, and for heavy-ion bombardment, the fraction of defects that migrate long-distances is apparently only ∼1% of the calculated dpa. This small surviving fraction of freely-migrating defects results at least partially from additional intracascade recombination at elevated temperatures. However, cascade remnants, e.g., vacancy and interstitial clusters, also contribute by enhancing intercascade defect annihilation. A recently developed rate-theory approach is used to discuss the relative importance of intra- and intercascade recombination to the survival rate of freely-migrating defects. Within the validity of certain simplifying assumptions, the additional sink density provided by defect clusters produced directly within individual cascades can explain the difference between a defect survival rate of about 30% for low dose, low temperature irradiations with heavy ions, and a survival rate of only ∼1% for freely-migrating defects at elevated temperatures. The status of our current understanding of freely-migrating defects, including remaining unanswered questions, is also discussed. 33 refs., 5 figs

  7. Unipolar resistive switching in metal oxide/organic semiconductor non-volatile memories as a critical phenomenon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bory, Benjamin F.; Meskers, Stefan C. J.; Rocha, Paulo R. F.; Gomes, Henrique L.; Leeuw, Dago M. de

    2015-01-01

    Diodes incorporating a bilayer of an organic semiconductor and a wide bandgap metal oxide can show unipolar, non-volatile memory behavior after electroforming. The prolonged bias voltage stress induces defects in the metal oxide with an areal density exceeding 10 17  m −2 . We explain the electrical bistability by the coexistence of two thermodynamically stable phases at the interface between an organic semiconductor and metal oxide. One phase contains mainly ionized defects and has a low work function, while the other phase has mainly neutral defects and a high work function. In the diodes, domains of the phase with a low work function constitute current filaments. The phase composition and critical temperature are derived from a 2D Ising model as a function of chemical potential. The model predicts filamentary conduction exhibiting a negative differential resistance and nonvolatile memory behavior. The model is expected to be generally applicable to any bilayer system that shows unipolar resistive switching

  8. Product manufacturing, quality, and reliability initiatives to maintain a competitive advantage and meet customer expectations in the semiconductor industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capps, Gregory

    Semiconductor products are manufactured and consumed across the world. The semiconductor industry is constantly striving to manufacture products with greater performance, improved efficiency, less energy consumption, smaller feature sizes, thinner gate oxides, and faster speeds. Customers have pushed towards zero defects and require a more reliable, higher quality product than ever before. Manufacturers are required to improve yields, reduce operating costs, and increase revenue to maintain a competitive advantage. Opportunities exist for integrated circuit (IC) customers and manufacturers to work together and independently to reduce costs, eliminate waste, reduce defects, reduce warranty returns, and improve quality. This project focuses on electrical over-stress (EOS) and re-test okay (RTOK), two top failure return mechanisms, which both make great defect reduction opportunities in customer-manufacturer relationship. Proactive continuous improvement initiatives and methodologies are addressed with emphasis on product life cycle, manufacturing processes, test, statistical process control (SPC), industry best practices, customer education, and customer-manufacturer interaction.

  9. Effect of structural defects on electronic and magnetic properties of ZrS2 monolayer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Haiyang; Zhao, Xu; Gao, Yonghui; Wang, Tianxing; Wei, Shuyi

    2018-04-01

    We aimed at ten configurations of vacancy defects and used the first-principles methods based on density functional theory to research electronic and magnetic properties of ZrS2 monolayer. Results show that the system of two-zirconium vacancy (V2zr) and one Zr atom + one S atom vacancy (V1Zr+1S) can induce to total spin magnetic moment of 0.245μB and 0.196μB, respectively. In addition, three and six S atoms vacancy can induce corresponding system to manifest spin magnetic moment of 0.728μB and 3.311μB, respectively. In S atom vacancy defects, vacancy defects can transform the system from semiconductor to metal, several of the Zr atoms and adjacent S atoms display antiferromagnetism coupling in three apart S atom vacancy defects. Vacancy defects can make the intrisic monolayer ZrS2 transform semiconductor into metal. These results are important for the achievement of spin devices based on ZrS2 semiconductor.

  10. Electronic properties of semiconductor surfaces and metal/semiconductor interfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tallarida, M.

    2005-05-15

    This thesis reports investigations of the electronic properties of a semiconductor surface (silicon carbide), a reactive metal/semiconductor interface (manganese/silicon) and a non-reactive metal/semiconductor interface (aluminum-magnesium alloy/silicon). The (2 x 1) reconstruction of the 6H-SiC(0001) surface has been obtained by cleaving the sample along the (0001) direction. This reconstruction has not been observed up to now for this compound, and has been compared with those of similar elemental semiconductors of the fourth group of the periodic table. This comparison has been carried out by making use of photoemission spectroscopy, analyzing the core level shifts of both Si 2p and C 1s core levels in terms of charge transfer between atoms of both elements and in different chemical environments. From this comparison, a difference between the reconstruction on the Si-terminated and the C-terminated surface was established, due to the ionic nature of the Si-C bond. The growth of manganese films on Si(111) in the 1-5 ML thickness range has been studied by means of LEED, STM and photoemission spectroscopy. By the complementary use of these surface science techniques, two different phases have been observed for two thickness regimes (<1 ML and >1 ML), which exhibit a different electronic character. The two reconstructions, the (1 x 1)-phase and the ({radical}3 x {radical}3)R30 -phase, are due to silicide formation, as observed in core level spectroscopy. The growth proceeds via island formation in the monolayer regime, while the thicker films show flat layers interrupted by deep holes. On the basis of STM investigations, this growth mode has been attributed to strain due to lattice mismatch between the substrate and the silicide. Co-deposition of Al and Mg onto a Si(111) substrate at low temperature (100K) resulted in the formation of thin alloy films. By varying the relative content of both elements, the thin films exhibited different electronic properties

  11. Roadmap on semiconductor-cell biointerfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Bozhi; Xu, Shuai; Rogers, John A.; Cestellos-Blanco, Stefano; Yang, Peidong; Carvalho-de-Souza, João L.; Bezanilla, Francisco; Liu, Jia; Bao, Zhenan; Hjort, Martin; Cao, Yuhong; Melosh, Nicholas; Lanzani, Guglielmo; Benfenati, Fabio; Galli, Giulia; Gygi, Francois; Kautz, Rylan; Gorodetsky, Alon A.; Kim, Samuel S.; Lu, Timothy K.; Anikeeva, Polina; Cifra, Michal; Krivosudský, Ondrej; Havelka, Daniel; Jiang, Yuanwen

    2018-05-01

    This roadmap outlines the role semiconductor-based materials play in understanding the complex biophysical dynamics at multiple length scales, as well as the design and implementation of next-generation electronic, optoelectronic, and mechanical devices for biointerfaces. The roadmap emphasizes the advantages of semiconductor building blocks in interfacing, monitoring, and manipulating the activity of biological components, and discusses the possibility of using active semiconductor-cell interfaces for discovering new signaling processes in the biological world.

  12. Theoretical Investigation of Bismuth-Based Semiconductors for Photocatalytic Applications

    KAUST Repository

    Laradhi, Shaikhah

    2017-11-01

    Converting solar energy to clean fuel has gained remarkable attention as an emerged renewable energy resource but optimum efficiency in photocatalytic applications has not yet been reached. One of the dominant factors is designing efficient photocatalytic semiconductors. The research reveals a theoretical investigation of optoelectronic properties of bismuth-based metal oxide and oxysulfide semiconductors using highly accurate first-principles quantum method based on density functional theory along with the range-separated hybrid HSE06 exchange-correlation functional. First, bismuth titanate compounds including Bi12TiO20, Bi4Ti3O12, and Bi2Ti2O7 were studied in a combined experimental and theoretical approach to prove its photocatalytic activity under UV light. They have unique bismuth layered structure, tunable electronic properties, high dielectric constant and low electron and effective masses in one crystallographic direction allowing for good charge separation and carrier diffusion properties. The accuracy of the investigation was determined by the good agreement between experimental and theoretical values. Next, BiVO4 with the highest efficiency for oxygen evolution was investigated. A discrepancy between the experimental and theoretical bandgap was reported and inspired a systematic study of all intrinsic defects of the material and the corresponding effect on the optical and transport properties. A candidate defective structure was proposed for an efficient photocatalytic performance. To overcome the carrier transport limitation, a mild hydrogen treatment was also introduced. Carrier lifetime was enhanced due to a significant reduction of trap-assisted recombination, either via passivation of deep trap states or reduction of trap state density. Finally, an accurate theoretical approach to design a new family of semiconductors with enhanced optoelectronic properties for water splitting was proposed. We simulated the solid solutions Bi1−xRExCuOS (RE = Y, La

  13. Chaotic electron transport in semiconductor devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scannell, William Christian

    The field of quantum chaos investigates the quantum mechanical behavior of classically chaotic systems. This dissertation begins by describing an experiment conducted on an apparatus constructed to represent a three dimensional analog of a classically chaotic system. Patterns of reflected light are shown to produce fractals, and the behavior of the fractal dimension D F is shown to depend on the light's ability to escape the apparatus. The classically chaotic system is then used to investigate the conductance properties of semiconductor heterostructures engineered to produce a conducting plane relatively free of impurities and defects. Introducing walls that inhibit conduction to partition off sections considerably smaller than the mean distance between impurities defines devices called 'billiards'. Cooling to low temperatures enables the electrons traveling through the billiard to maintain quantum mechanical phase. Exposure to a changing electric or magnetic field alters the electron's phase, leading to fluctuations in the conductance through the billiard. Magnetoconductance fluctuations in billiards have previously been shown to be fractal. This behavior has been charted using an empirical parameter, Q, that is a measure of the resolution of the energy levels within the billiard. The relationship with Q is shown to extend beyond the ballistic regime into the 'quasi-ballistic' and 'diffusive' regimes, characterized by having defects within the conduction plane. A model analogous to the classically chaotic system is proposed as the origin of the fractal conductance fluctuations. This model is shown to be consistent with experiment and to account for changes of fine scale features in MCF known to occur when a billiard is brought to room temperature between low temperature measurements. An experiment is conducted in which fractal conductance fluctuations (FCF) are produced by exposing a billiard to a changing electric field. Comparison of DF values of FCF produced by

  14. Ab initio study of native defects in SnO under strain

    KAUST Repository

    Bianchi Granato, Danilo

    2014-04-01

    Tin monoxide (SnO) has promising properties to be applied as a p-type semiconductor in transparent electronics. To this end, it is necessary to understand the behaviour of defects in order to control them. We use density functional theory to study native defects of SnO under tensile and compressive strain. We show that Sn vacancies are less stable under tension and more stable under compression, irrespectively of the charge state. In contrast, O vacancies behave differently for different charge states. It turns out that the most stable defect under compression is the +1 charged O vacancy in an Sn-rich environment and the charge neutral O interstitial in an O-rich environment. Therefore, compression can be used to transform SnO from a p-type into either an n-type or an undoped semiconductor. Copyright © EPLA, 2014.

  15. Defects in ZnO, CdTe, and Si: Optical, structural, and electrical characterization

    CERN Multimedia

    Deicher, M; Kronenberg, J; Johnston, K; Roder, J; Byrne, D J

    Electronic and optical properties of semiconductors are extremely sensitive to defects and impurities that have localized electronic states with energy levels in the band gap of the semiconductor. Spectroscopic techniques like photo-luminescence (PL), deep level transient spectroscopy (DLTS), or Hall effect that are able to detect and characterize band gap states do not reveal direct information about their microscopic origin. To overcome this chemical "blindness" radioactive isotopes are used as a tracer. Moreover, the recoil energies involved in ${\\beta}$- and ${\\gamma}$-decays can be used to create intrinsic, isolated point defects (interstitials, vacancies) in a controlled way. A microscopic insight into the structure and the thermodynamic properties of complexes formed by interacting defects can be gained by detecting the hyperfine interaction between the nuclear moments of radioactive dopants and the electromagnetic fields present at the site of the radioactive nucleus. These techniques will be used to...

  16. The negative binomial distribution as a model for external corrosion defect counts in buried pipelines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valor, Alma; Alfonso, Lester; Caleyo, Francisco; Vidal, Julio; Perez-Baruch, Eloy; Hallen, José M.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Observed external-corrosion defects in underground pipelines revealed a tendency to cluster. • The Poisson distribution is unable to fit extensive count data for these type of defects. • In contrast, the negative binomial distribution provides a suitable count model for them. • Two spatial stochastic processes lead to the negative binomial distribution for defect counts. • They are the Gamma-Poisson mixed process and the compound Poisson process. • A Rogeŕs process also arises as a plausible temporal stochastic process leading to corrosion defect clustering and to negative binomially distributed defect counts. - Abstract: The spatial distribution of external corrosion defects in buried pipelines is usually described as a Poisson process, which leads to corrosion defects being randomly distributed along the pipeline. However, in real operating conditions, the spatial distribution of defects considerably departs from Poisson statistics due to the aggregation of defects in groups or clusters. In this work, the statistical analysis of real corrosion data from underground pipelines operating in southern Mexico leads to conclude that the negative binomial distribution provides a better description for defect counts. The origin of this distribution from several processes is discussed. The analysed processes are: mixed Gamma-Poisson, compound Poisson and Roger’s processes. The physical reasons behind them are discussed for the specific case of soil corrosion.

  17. Porous and Nanoporous Semiconductors and Emerging Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helmut Föll

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Pores in single-crystalline semiconductors can be produced in a wide range of geometries and morphologies, including the “nanometer” regime. Porous semiconductors may have properties completely different from the bulk, and metamaterials with, for example, optical properties not encountered in natural materials are emerging. Possible applications of porous semiconductors include various novel sensors, but also more “exotic” uses as, for example, high explosives or electrodes for micro-fuel cells. The paper briefly reviews pore formation (including more applied aspects of large area etching, properties of porous semiconductors, and emerging applications.

  18. Semiconductor Lasers Stability, Instability and Chaos

    CERN Document Server

    Ohtsubo, Junji

    2008-01-01

    This monograph describes fascinating recent progress in the field of chaos, stability and instability of semiconductor lasers. Applications and future prospects are discussed in detail. The book emphasizes the various dynamics induced in semiconductor lasers by optical and electronic feedback, optical injection, and injection current modulation. Recent results of both theoretical and experimental investigations are presented. Demonstrating applications of semiconductor laser chaos, control and noise, Semiconductor Lasers describes suppression and chaotic secure communications. For those who are interested in optics but not familiar with nonlinear systems, a brief introduction to chaos analysis is presented.

  19. Emission and Absorption Entropy Generation in Semiconductors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reck, Kasper; Varpula, Aapo; Prunnila, Mika

    2013-01-01

    While emission and absorption entropy generation is well known in black bodies, it has not previously been studied in semiconductors, even though semiconductors are widely used for solar light absorption in modern solar cells [1]. We present an analysis of the entropy generation in semiconductor...... materials due to emission and absorption of electromagnetic radiation. It is shown that the emission and absorption entropy generation reduces the fundamental limit on the efficiency of any semiconductor solar cell even further than the Landsberg limit. The results are derived from purely thermodynamical...

  20. Scanning electron microscopy of semiconductor materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bresse, J.F.; Dupuy, M.

    1978-01-01

    The use of scanning electron microscopy in semiconductors opens up a large field of use. The operating modes lending themselves to the study of semiconductors are the induced current, cathodoluminescence and the use of the potential contrast which can also be applied very effectively to the study of the devices (planar in particular). However, a thorough knowledge of the mechanisms of the penetration of electrons, generation and recombination of generated carriers in a semiconductor is necessary in order to attain a better understanding of the operating modes peculiar to semiconductors [fr

  1. Semiconductor power devices physics, characteristics, reliability

    CERN Document Server

    Lutz, Josef; Scheuermann, Uwe; De Doncker, Rik

    2011-01-01

    Semiconductor power devices are the heart of power electronics. They determine the performance of power converters and allow topologies with high efficiency. Semiconductor properties, pn-junctions and the physical phenomena for understanding power devices are discussed in depth. Working principles of state-of-the-art power diodes, thyristors, MOSFETs and IGBTs are explained in detail, as well as key aspects of semiconductor device production technology. In practice, not only the semiconductor, but also the thermal and mechanical properties of packaging and interconnection technologies are esse

  2. Lattice defects in ion-implanted aluminium studied by means of perturbed angular correlations. Pt. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pleiter, F.; Prasad, K.G.

    1984-01-01

    Migration and clustering of lattice defects after implantation of 111 In in Al and subsequent annealing at temperatures in the range from 80 to 800 K were investigated applying the DPAC technique. The effects of implantation dose, implantation temperature, laser irradiation, and plastic deformation were studied. The measurements on plastically deformed Al were complemented by positron lifetime measurements. Four In-defect clusters were observed that can be flagged by well-defined hyperfine interaction parameters, and their symmetry properties were determined by using single-crystal samples. Important conclusions are: (i) monovacancies are not trapped by In-atoms, (ii) small In-defect clusters are formed by direct trapping of divacancies and/or trivacancies, and (iii) extended In-defect clusters are very stable and anneal in the temperature range 600-700 K. Consequences for the interpretation of other measurements on dilute Al(In) alloys are discussed. (Auth.)

  3. Accuracy of pulsed laser atom probe tomography for compound semiconductor analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Müller, M; Gault, B; Smith, G D W; Grovenor, C R M

    2011-01-01

    Atom probe tomography has recently experienced a renaissance, strongly promoted by the revival of pulsed laser atom probe. The technique is now widely employed to study semiconductor materials at the nanometre level. This paper summarises some aspects of the accuracy of pulsed laser atom probe relevant to semiconductor applications. It is shown that laser pulsing can reduce the lateral resolution due to thermally stimulated surface migration. Moreover, the commonly observed cluster ions can undergo field dissociation which results in an increased probability of ion loss due to pile-up effects at the detector. Field dissociation can also induce a new type of local magnification that increases spatial inaccuracy in the data reconstruction. These effects can be reduced by an appropriate choice of experimental parameters. Despite these difficulties, the atom probe technique can provide unparalleled insight into the nanoscale structure and chemistry of a wide range of semiconductor devices.

  4. Charge transport in single crystal organic semiconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Wei

    Organic electronics have engendered substantial interest in printable, flexible and large-area applications thanks to their low fabrication cost per unit area, chemical versatility and solution processability. Nevertheless, fundamental understanding of device physics and charge transport in organic semiconductors lag somewhat behind, partially due to ubiquitous defects and impurities in technologically useful organic thin films, formed either by vacuum deposition or solution process. In this context, single-crystalline organic semiconductors, or organic single crystals, have therefore provided the ideal system for transport studies. Organic single crystals are characterized by their high chemical purity and outstanding structural perfection, leading to significantly improved electrical properties compared with their thin-film counterparts. Importantly, the surfaces of the crystals are molecularly flat, an ideal condition for building field-effect transistors (FETs). Progress in organic single crystal FETs (SC-FETs) is tremendous during the past decade. Large mobilities ~ 1 - 10 cm2V-1s-1 have been achieved in several crystals, allowing a wide range of electrical, optical, mechanical, structural, and theoretical studies. Several challenges still remain, however, which are the motivation of this thesis. The first challenge is to delineate the crystal structure/electrical property relationship for development of high-performance organic semiconductors. This thesis demonstrates a full spectrum of studies spanning from chemical synthesis, single crystal structure determination, quantum-chemical calculation, SC-OFET fabrication, electrical measurement, photoelectron spectroscopy characterization and extensive device optimization in a series of new rubrene derivatives, motivated by the fact that rubrene is a benchmark semiconductor with record hole mobility ~ 20 cm2V-1s-1. With successful preservation of beneficial pi-stacking structures, these rubrene derivatives form

  5. Ion implantation in semiconductor bodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Badawi, M.H.

    1984-01-01

    Ions are selectively implanted into layers of a semiconductor substrate of, for example, semi-insulating gallium arsenide via a photoresist implantation mask and a metallic layer of, for example, titanium disposed between the substrate surface and the photoresist mask. After implantation the mask and metallic layer are removed and the substrate heat treated for annealing purposes. The metallic layer acts as a buffer layer and prevents possible contamination of the substrate surface, by photoresist residues, at the annealing stage. Such contamination would adversely affect the electrical properties of the substrate surface, particularly gallium arsenide substrates. (author)

  6. Quantum Optical Effects in Semiconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoyer, W.; Kira, M.; Koch, S. W.

    Quantum optical effects in semiconductors are studied using a density-matrix approach which takes into account the many-body Coulomb interaction among the charge carriers, coupling to lattice vibrations, and the quantum nature of light. The theory provides a consistent set of equations which is used to compute photoluminescence spectra, predict the emission of squeezed light, investigate correlations between photons emitted by quantum-well structures, and to show examples where light-matter entanglement influences experiments done with classical optical fields.

  7. Electron beam writing on semiconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bierhenke, H.; Kutzer, E.; Pascher, A.; Plitzner, H.; Rummel, P.; Siemens A.G., Muenchen; Siemens A.G., Muenchen

    1979-08-01

    Reported are the results of the 3 1/2 year research project 'Electron beam Writing on Semiconductors'. Work has been done in the field of direct wafer exposure techniques, and of mask making. Described are resist technology, setting up of a research device, exploration of alignment procedures, manufacturing of devices and their radiation influence. Furthermore, investigations and measurements of an electron beam machine bought for mask making purposes, the development of LSI-circuits with this machine, the software necessary and important developments of digital subsystems are reported. (orig.) [de

  8. Bistable amphoteric centers in semiconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nikitina, A. G.; Zuev, V. V.

    2008-01-01

    It is shown that, at thermodynamic equilibrium, the release of charge carriers from the localized states of bistable amphoteric centers into quasi-free states depends on the degree of compensation. This brings about different functional dependences of the concentration of free charge carriers on temperature. It is found that, in uncompensated semiconductors, the concentration of free charge carriers follows the same dependence in the case of bistable amphoteric centers and bistable amphoteric U - centers, although the distributions of charge carriers over the charge states and configurations are different for these types of centers. The results can be used for interpreting various experimental data insufficiently explained in the context of the traditional approach

  9. Trace analysis of semiconductor materials

    CERN Document Server

    Cali, J Paul; Gordon, L

    1964-01-01

    Trace Analysis of Semiconductor Materials is a guidebook concerned with procedures of ultra-trace analysis. This book discusses six distinct techniques of trace analysis. These techniques are the most common and can be applied to various problems compared to other methods. Each of the four chapters basically includes an introduction to the principles and general statements. The theoretical basis for the technique involved is then briefly discussed. Practical applications of the techniques and the different instrumentations are explained. Then, the applications to trace analysis as pertaining

  10. Optoelectronic properties of semiconductor nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maher, Kristin Nicole

    Semiconductor nanostructures have unique optical and electronic properties that have inspired research into their technological applications and basic science. This thesis presents approaches to the fabrication and characterization of optoelectronic devices incorporating individual semiconductor nanostructures. Nanowires of the II-VI semiconductors CdSe and CdS were synthesized using nanoparticle-catalysed solution-liquid-solid growth. Single-component nanowires and heterostructure nanowires with axial compositional modulation were generated using this method. Individual nanowires and nanocrystals were then incorporated into devices with a three-terminal field-effect transistor geometry. An experimental platform was developed which allows for simultaneous electrical characterization of devices and measurement of their optical properties. This setup enables the measurement of spatially and spectrally resolved electroluminescence (EL) and photoluminescence (PL) from individual nanostructures and nanostructure devices. It also allows the measurement of photon coincidence histograms for emitted light and the acquisition of photocurrent images via laser scanning microscopy. Electroluminescence was observed from individual CdSe nanocrystals contacted by gold electrodes. Concomitant transport measurements at low temperature showed clear evidence of Coulomb blockade at low bias voltage, with light only emitted from devices exhibiting asymmetric tunnel couplings between the nanocrystal and electrodes. Combined analyses of the data indicate that the resistances of the tunnel barriers are bias voltage dependent and that light emission results from the inelastic scattering of tunneling electrons. Three-terminal devices incorporating individual CdSe nanoNvires exhibited EL localized near the positively-biased electrode. Characterization of these devices by scanning photocurrent microscopy (SPCM) and Kelvin probe microscopy (KPM) indicates that while there are n-type Schottky

  11. Chaotic bursting in semiconductor lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruschel, Stefan; Yanchuk, Serhiy

    2017-11-01

    We investigate the dynamic mechanisms for low frequency fluctuations in semiconductor lasers subjected to delayed optical feedback, using the Lang-Kobayashi model. This system of delay differential equations displays pronounced envelope dynamics, ranging from erratic, so called low frequency fluctuations to regular pulse packages, if the time scales of fast oscillations and envelope dynamics are well separated. We investigate the parameter regions where low frequency fluctuations occur and compute their Lyapunov spectra. Using the geometric singular perturbation theory, we study this intermittent chaotic behavior and characterize these solutions as bursting slow-fast oscillations.

  12. DEFECTS SIMULATION OF ROLLING STRIP

    OpenAIRE

    Rudolf Mišičko; Tibor Kvačkaj; Martin Vlado; Lucia Gulová; Miloslav Lupták; Jana Bidulská

    2009-01-01

    The defects in the continuous casting slabs can be developed or kept down in principle by rolling technology, especially depend to sort, size and distribution of primary defects, as well as used of rolling parameters. Scope of the article is on observation behavior artificial surface and undersurface defects (scores) without filler (surface defects) and filling by oxides and casting powder (subsurface defects). First phase of hot rolling process have been done by software simulation DEFORM 3D...

  13. Cluster forcing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Thomas Budde

    , Portugal and New Zealand have adopted the concept. Public sector interventions that aim to support cluster development in industries most often focus upon economic policy goals such as enhanced employment and improved productivity, but rarely emphasise broader societal policy goals relating to e.......g. sustainability or quality of life. The purpose of this paper is to explore how and to what extent public sector interventions that aim at forcing cluster development in industries can support sustainable development as defined in the Brundtland tradition and more recently elaborated in such concepts as eco...... in 2000 by the Welsh Automotive Task Force under the Welsh Assembly Government. The Accelerate programme takes basically different two directions: The first one, which was the first to be launched, is concerned with the upgrading of existing supply chains in the automotive industry in Wales. The programme...

  14. Deep sub-wavelength metrology for advanced defect classification

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Walle, P.; Kramer, E.; van der Donck, J. C. J.; Mulckhuyse, W.; Nijsten, L.; Bernal Arango, F. A.; de Jong, A.; van Zeijl, E.; Spruit, H. E. T.; van den Berg, J. H.; Nanda, G.; van Langen-Suurling, A. K.; Alkemade, P. F. A.; Pereira, S. F.; Maas, D. J.

    2017-06-01

    Particle defects are important contributors to yield loss in semi-conductor manufacturing. Particles need to be detected and characterized in order to determine and eliminate their root cause. We have conceived a process flow for advanced defect classification (ADC) that distinguishes three consecutive steps; detection, review and classification. For defect detection, TNO has developed the Rapid Nano (RN3) particle scanner, which illuminates the sample from nine azimuth angles. The RN3 is capable of detecting 42 nm Latex Sphere Equivalent (LSE) particles on XXX-flat Silicon wafers. For each sample, the lower detection limit (LDL) can be verified by an analysis of the speckle signal, which originates from the surface roughness of the substrate. In detection-mode (RN3.1), the signal from all illumination angles is added. In review-mode (RN3.9), the signals from all nine arms are recorded individually and analyzed in order to retrieve additional information on the shape and size of deep sub-wavelength defects. This paper presents experimental and modelling results on the extraction of shape information from the RN3.9 multi-azimuth signal such as aspect ratio, skewness, and orientation of test defects. Both modeling and experimental work confirm that the RN3.9 signal contains detailed defect shape information. After review by RN3.9, defects are coarsely classified, yielding a purified Defect-of-Interest (DoI) list for further analysis on slower metrology tools, such as SEM, AFM or HIM, that provide more detailed review data and further classification. Purifying the DoI list via optical metrology with RN3.9 will make inspection time on slower review tools more efficient.

  15. Regional Innovation Clusters

    Data.gov (United States)

    Small Business Administration — The Regional Innovation Clusters serve a diverse group of sectors and geographies. Three of the initial pilot clusters, termed Advanced Defense Technology clusters,...

  16. Quantum computing with defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varley, Joel

    2011-03-01

    The development of a quantum computer is contingent upon the identification and design of systems for use as qubits, the basic units of quantum information. One of the most promising candidates consists of a defect in diamond known as the nitrogen-vacancy (NV-1) center, since it is an individually-addressable quantum system that can be initialized, manipulated, and measured with high fidelity at room temperature. While the success of the NV-1 stems from its nature as a localized ``deep-center'' point defect, no systematic effort has been made to identify other defects that might behave in a similar way. We provide guidelines for identifying other defect centers with similar properties. We present a list of physical criteria that these centers and their hosts should meet and explain how these requirements can be used in conjunction with electronic structure theory to intelligently sort through candidate systems. To elucidate these points, we compare electronic structure calculations of the NV-1 center in diamond with those of several deep centers in 4H silicon carbide (SiC). Using hybrid functionals, we report formation energies, configuration-coordinate diagrams, and defect-level diagrams to compare and contrast the properties of these defects. We find that the NC VSi - 1 center in SiC, a structural analog of the NV-1 center in diamond, may be a suitable center with very different optical transition energies. We also discuss how the proposed criteria can be translated into guidelines to discover NV analogs in other tetrahedrally coordinated materials. This work was performed in collaboration with J. R. Weber, W. F. Koehl, B. B. Buckley, A. Janotti, C. G. Van de Walle, and D. D. Awschalom. This work was supported by ARO, AFOSR, and NSF.

  17. Effects of spatial confinement on conduction electrons in semiconductor nanostructures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Germeau, Alexander

    2003-01-01

    Semiconductor nanostructures show electrical and optical properties which can be very different from bulk semiconductors. The various effects that occur due to the spatial confinement of electrons in such structures are of scientific importance. In addition, semiconductor nanostructures are very

  18. Structure defects in cementite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmitt, Bernard

    1971-01-01

    After a presentation of experimental techniques (elaboration principles, elaboration techniques, and investigation techniques for cementite thin layers and iron-carbon massive alloys), the author of this research thesis reports the study of cementite structure (interatomic distance, description and representation), reports the study of iron-carbon thin layers (structure, influence of silicon, defects), reports the study of perfect and imperfect dislocations and of plane defects in cementite. The author also reports hardness measurements, and discusses the relationships between cementite and other iron carbides

  19. α-emission channeling studies of the interaction of Li with defects in Si and diamond

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    In most semiconductors Li is a fast diffusing impurity and acts as a shallow interstitial donor, i.e. Li atoms normally appear as positively charged ions located on non-substitutional lattice sites. However, due to the positive charge Li may interact with other, preferentially negatively charged, defects present in the material. The major three groups of defects where interaction with Li was observed are p-type dopants, vacancy defects and defects containing trace impurities like oxygen. Although the influence of Li on electrical or optical properties of Si was investigated extensively in the past, the microscopical structure of Li-defect complexes and the relation between structure and electronic properties is still unresolved in many cases. In diamond, Li is the only impurity to date which was found to be an interstitial donor after ion implantation. Up to now there are no systematic investigations of the behavior of Li in diamond.\\\\ ...

  20. Oxidation behavior of graphene-coated copper at intrinsic graphene defects of different origins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwak, Jinsung; Jo, Yongsu; Park, Soon-Dong; Kim, Na Yeon; Kim, Se-Yang; Shin, Hyung-Joon; Lee, Zonghoon; Kim, Sung Youb; Kwon, Soon-Yong

    2017-11-16

    The development of ultrathin barrier films is vital to the advanced semiconductor industry. Graphene appears to hold promise as a protective coating; however, the polycrystalline and defective nature of engineered graphene hinders its practical applications. Here, we investigate the oxidation behavior of graphene-coated Cu foils at intrinsic graphene defects of different origins. Macro-scale information regarding the spatial distribution and oxidation resistance of various graphene defects is readily obtained using optical and electron microscopies after the hot-plate annealing. The controlled oxidation experiments reveal that the degree of structural deficiency is strongly dependent on the origins of the structural defects, the crystallographic orientations of the underlying Cu grains, the growth conditions of graphene, and the kinetics of the graphene growth. The obtained experimental and theoretical results show that oxygen radicals, decomposed from water molecules in ambient air, are effectively inverted at Stone-Wales defects into the graphene/Cu interface with the assistance of facilitators.