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Sample records for semiconductor catalytic reduction

  1. Catalytic photooxidation of pentachlorophenol using semiconductor nanoclusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    WILCOXON,JESS P.

    2000-04-17

    Pentachlorophenol (PCP) is a toxic chlorinated aromatic molecule widely used as fungicide, a bactericide and a wood preservation, and thus ubiquitous in the environment. The authors report photo-oxidation of PCP using a variety of nanosize semiconductor metal oxides and sulfides in both aqueous and polar organic solvents and compare the photo-oxidation kinetics of these nanoclusters to widely studied bulk powders like Degussa P-25 TiO{sub 2} and CdS. They study both the light intensity dependence of PCP photooxidation for nanosize SnO{sub 2} and the size dependence of PCP photooxidation for both nanosize SnO{sub 2} and MoS{sub 2}. They find an extremely strong size dependence for the latter which they attribute to its size-dependent band gap and the associated change in redox potentials due to quantum confinement of the hole-electron pair. The authors show that nanosize MoS{sub 2} with a diameter of d=3.0 nm and an absorbance edge of {approximately}450 nm is a very effective photooxidation catalyst for complete PCP mineralization, even when using only visible light irradiation.

  2. Catalytic reduction of ruthenium tetroxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakhutin, I.E.; Polyakov, A.S.; Ananyan, O.S.; Blinnikov, S.A.; Kulakov, A.I.; Takmazyan, A.S.

    1978-01-01

    RuO 4 removal from the gaseous phase by reduction to solid RuO 2 with carbon oxide has been investigated. The reaction has been shown to be autocatalytic. A catalyst (RuO 2 on Al 2 O 3 ) for the reduction has been developed. There have been determined the region of reaction RuO 4 +CO on the catalyst containing RuO 2 , the temperature dependence of the decontamination factor and the reaction order in RuO 4 . The feasibility of RuO 4 thermal decomposition on the catalyst has been shown. A number of other metal oxides that can catalyze the process is listed

  3. Reaction Current Phenomenon in Bifunctional Catalytic Metal-Semiconductor Nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashemian, Mohammad Amin

    Energy transfer processes accompany every elementary step of catalytic chemical processes on material surface including molecular adsorption and dissociation on atoms, interactions between intermediates, and desorption of reaction products from the catalyst surface. Therefore, detailed understanding of these processes on the molecular level is of great fundamental and practical interest in energy-related applications of nanomaterials. Two main mechanisms of energy transfer from adsorbed particles to a surface are known: (i) adiabatic via excitation of quantized lattice vibrations (phonons) and (ii) non-adiabatic via electronic excitations (electron/hole pairs). Electronic excitations play a key role in nanocatalysis, and it was recently shown that they can be efficiently detected and studied using Schottky-type catalytic nanostructures in the form of measureable electrical currents (chemicurrents) in an external electrical circuit. These nanostructures typically contain an electrically continuous nanocathode layers made of a catalytic metal deposited on a semiconductor substrate. The goal of this research is to study the direct observations of hot electron currents (chemicurrents) in catalytic Schottky structures, using a continuous mesh-like Pt nanofilm grown onto a mesoporous TiO2 substrate. Such devices showed qualitatively different and more diverse signal properties, compared to the earlier devices using smooth substrates, which could only be explained on the basis of bifunctionality. In particular, it was necessary to suggest that different stages of the reaction are occurring on both phases of the catalytic structure. Analysis of the signal behavior also led to discovery of a formerly unknown (very slow) mode of the oxyhydrogen reaction on the Pt/TiO2(por) system occurring at room temperature. This slow mode was producing surprisingly large stationary chemicurrents in the range 10--50 microA/cm2. Results of the chemicurrent measurements for the bifunctional

  4. Flowthrough Reductive Catalytic Fractionation of Biomass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, Eric M.; Stone, Michael L.; Katahira, Rui; Reed, Michelle; Beckham, Gregg T.; Román-Leshkov, Yuriy

    2017-11-01

    Reductive catalytic fractionation (RCF) has emerged as a leading biomass fractionation and lignin valorization strategy. Here, flowthrough reactors were used to investigate RCF of poplar. Most RCF studies to date have been conducted in batch, but a flow-based process enables the acquisition of intrinsic kinetic and mechanistic data essential to accelerate the design, optimization, and scale-up of RCF processes. Time-resolved product distributions and yields obtained from experiments with different catalyst loadings were used to identify and deconvolute events during solvolysis and hydrogenolysis. Multi-bed RCF experiments provided unique insights into catalyst deactivation, showing that leaching, sintering, and surface poisoning are causes for decreased catalyst performance. The onset of catalyst deactivation resulted in higher concentrations of unsaturated lignin intermediates and increased occurrence of repolymerization reactions, producing high-molecular-weight species. Overall, this study demonstrates the concept of flowthrough RCF, which will be vital for realistic scale-up of this promising approach.

  5. Reductive Catalytic Fractionation of Corn Stover Lignin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, Eric M.; Katahira, Rui; Reed, Michelle; Resch, Michael G.; Karp, Eric M.; Beckham, Gregg T.; Román-Leshkov, Yuriy

    2016-12-05

    Reductive catalytic fractionation (RCF) has emerged as an effective biomass pretreatment strategy to depolymerize lignin into tractable fragments in high yields. We investigate the RCF of corn stover, a highly abundant herbaceous feedstock, using carbon-supported Ru and Ni catalysts at 200 and 250 degrees C in methanol and, in the presence or absence of an acid cocatalyst (H3PO4 or an acidified carbon support). Three key performance variables were studied: (1) the effectiveness of lignin extraction as measured by the yield of lignin oil, (2) the yield of monomers in the lignin oil, and (3) the carbohydrate retention in the residual solids after RCF. The monomers included methyl coumarate/ferulate, propyl guaiacol/syringol, and ethyl guaiacol/syringol. The Ru and Ni catalysts performed similarly in terms of product distribution and monomer yields. The monomer yields increased monotonically as a function of time for both temperatures. At 6 h, monomer yields of 27.2 and 28.3% were obtained at 250 and 200 degrees C, respectively, with Ni/C. The addition of an acid cocatalysts to the Ni/C system increased monomer yields to 32% for acidified carbon and 38% for phosphoric acid at 200 degrees C. The monomer product distribution was dominated by methyl coumarate regardless of the use of the acid cocatalysts. The use of phosphoric acid at 200 degrees C or the high temperature condition without acid resulted in complete lignin extraction and partial sugar solubilization (up to 50%) thereby generating lignin oil yields that exceeded the theoretical limit. In contrast, using either Ni/C or Ni on acidified carbon at 200 degrees C resulted in moderate lignin oil yields of ca. 55%, with sugar retention values >90%. Notably, these sugars were amenable to enzymatic digestion, reaching conversions >90% at 96 h. Characterization studies on the lignin oils using two-dimensional heteronuclear single quantum coherence nuclear magnetic resonance and gel permeation chromatrography revealed

  6. Catalytic/non-catalytic combination process for nitrogen oxides reduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luftglass, B.K.; Sun, W.H.; Hofmann, J.E.

    1992-01-01

    This patent describes a process for the reduction of nitrogen oxides in the effluent from the combustion of a carbonaceous fuel. It comprises introducing a nitrogenous treatment agent comprising urea, one or more of the hydrolysis products of urea, ammonia, compounds which produce ammonia as a by-product, ammonium salts of organic acids, 5- or 6-membered heterocyclic hydrocarbons having at least one cyclic nitrogen, hydroxy amino hydrocarbons, or mixtures thereof into the effluent at an effluent temperature between about 1200 degrees F and about 2100 degrees F; and contacting the treated effluent under conditions effective to reduce the nitrogen oxides in the effluent with a catalyst effective for the reduction of nitrogen oxides in the presence of ammonia

  7. REDUCTION OF ARSENIC WASTES IN THE SEMICONDUCTOR INDUSTRY

    Science.gov (United States)

    The research described in this report was aimed at initiating and developing processes and process modifications that could be incorporated into semiconductor manufacturing operations to accomplish pollution prevention, especially to accomplish significant reduction in the quanti...

  8. Highly efficient catalytic reductive degradation of various organic ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    aDepartment of Applied Sciences (Chemical Science Division), GUIST, Gauhati University, ... Highly improved catalytic reductive degradation of different organic dyes, in the ... was prepared by a facile co-precipitation method using ultra-high dilute aqueous solutions. ...... face chemical-modification for engineering the intrin-.

  9. Catalytic membrane in reduction of aqueous nitrates: operational principles and catalytic performance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ilinitch, O.M.; Cuperus, F.P.; Nosova, L.V.; Gribov, E.N.

    2000-01-01

    The catalytic membrane with palladium-copper active component supported over the macroporous ceramic membrane, and a series of γ-Al 2O 3 supported Pd-Cu catalysts were prepared and investigated. In reduction of nitrate ions by hydrogen in water at ambient temperature, pronounced internal diffusion

  10. INDUSTRIAL BOILER RETROFIT FOR NOX CONTROL: COMBINED SELECTIVE NONCATALYTIC REDUCTION AND SELECTIVE CATALYTIC REDUCTION

    Science.gov (United States)

    The paper describes retrofitting and testing a 590 kW (2 MBtu/hr), oil-fired, three-pass, fire-tube package boiler with a combined selective noncatalytic reduction (SNCR) and selective catalytic reduction (SCR) system. The system demonstrated 85% nitrogen oxides (NOx) reduction w...

  11. Catalytic and inhibitory effects of thechnetium on reduction processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grases, F.; Genestar, C.; March, J.G.; March, P.

    1986-01-01

    Interactions between technetium and some anthraquinones and tartrazin in the presence of tin(II) are described. It was found that whereas the reductive process between Sn(II) and 1-amino-4-hydroxyanthraquinone is catalyzed by technetium, the reduction of tartrazin is inhibited by this element. Study of such process seems to indicate that the catalytic effect of technetium on the reduction processes is due to Tc(V) action whereas the inhibitory effect is due to the Tc(IV) species. (author)

  12. Development of a chronocoulometric method for uranium traces determination with basis on nitrate catalytic reduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cantagallo, M.I.C.; Gutz, I.G.R.

    1990-01-01

    The application of chronocoulometric technique with catalytic reduction of uranium/nitrate with catalytic reduction of uranium/nitrate system is described to give a detection limits on the sub-nanomolar region of uranium. (author)

  13. Catalytic activity of lanthanum oxide for the reduction of cyclohexanone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugunan, S.; Sherly, K.B.

    1994-01-01

    Lanthanum oxides, La 2 O 3 has been found to be an effective catalyst for the liquid phase reduction of cyclohexanone. The catalytic activities of La 2 O 3 activated at 300, 500 and 800 degC and its mixed oxides with alumina for the reduction of cylcohexanone with 2-propanol have been determined and the data parallel that of the electron donating properties of the catalysts. The electron donating properties of the catalysts have been determined from the adsorption of electron acceptors of different electron affinities on the surface of these oxides. (author). 15 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab

  14. General Observation of Photocatalytic Oxygen Reduction to Hydrogen Peroxide by Organic Semiconductor Thin Films and Colloidal Crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gryszel, Maciej; Sytnyk, Mykhailo; Jakešová, Marie; Romanazzi, Giuseppe; Gabrielsson, Roger; Heiss, Wolfgang; Głowacki, Eric Daniel

    2018-04-25

    Low-cost semiconductor photocatalysts offer unique possibilities for industrial chemical transformations and energy conversion applications. We report that a range of organic semiconductors are capable of efficient photocatalytic oxygen reduction to H 2 O 2 in aqueous conditions. These semiconductors, in the form of thin films, support a 2-electron/2-proton redox cycle involving photoreduction of dissolved O 2 to H 2 O 2 , with the concurrent photooxidation of organic substrates: formate, oxalate, and phenol. Photochemical oxygen reduction is observed in a pH range from 2 to 12. In cases where valence band energy of the semiconductor is energetically high, autoxidation competes with oxidation of the donors, and thus turnover numbers are low. Materials with deeper valence band energies afford higher stability and also oxidation of H 2 O to O 2 . We found increased H 2 O 2 evolution rate for surfactant-stabilized nanoparticles versus planar thin films. These results evidence that photochemical O 2 reduction may be a widespread feature of organic semiconductors, and open potential avenues for organic semiconductors for catalytic applications.

  15. Catalytic briquettes from low-rank coal for NO reduction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    A. Boyano; M.E. Galvez; R. Moliner; M.J. Lazaro [Instituto de Carboquimica, CSIC, Zaragoza (Spain)

    2007-07-01

    The briquetting is one of the most ancient and widespread techniques of coal agglomeration which is nowadays becoming useless for combustion home applications. However, the social increasing interest in environmental protection opens new applications to this technique, especially in developed countries. In this work, a series of catalytic briquettes were prepared from low-rank Spanish coal and commercial pitch by means of a pressure agglomeration method. After that, they were cured in air and doped by equilibrium impregnation with vanadium compounds. Preparation conditions (especially those of activation and oxidizing process) were changed to study their effects on catalytic behaviour. Catalytic briquettes showed a relative high NO conversion at low temperatures in all cases, however, a strong relation between the preparation process and the reached NO conversion was observed. Preparation procedure has an effect not only on the NO reduction efficiency but also on the mechanical strength of the briquettes as a consequence of the structural and chemical changes carried out during the activation and oxidation procedures. Generally speaking mechanical resistance is enhanced by an optimal porous volume and the creation of new carboxyl groups on surface. Just on the contrary, NO reduction is promoted by high microporous structures and higher amounts of surface oxygen groups. Both facts force to find an optimum point in the preparation produce which will depend on the application. 24 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  16. SNCR technology for NO sub x reduction in the cement industry. [Selective non-catalytic reduction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kupper, D; Brentrup, L [Krupp Polysius AG, Beckum (Germany)

    1992-03-01

    This article discusses the selective non-catalytic (SNCR) process for reducing nitrogen oxides in exhaust gases from cement plants. Topics covered include operating experience, injection of additives, selection of the additive, operating costs, reduction efficiency of SNCR, capital expenditure, secondary emissions and cycles of ammonium. (UK).

  17. Selective catalytic reduction of NO{sub x} by olefins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Radtke, F

    1997-12-31

    The removal of nitrogen oxides from the exhaust of lean-burn gasoline fuelled and diesel-fuelled engines, operating under net oxidizing conditions, has recently attracted considerable attention. In this work, three different catalytic systems (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Cu/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and Cu/ZSM-5) are investigated for their suitability as catalysts for the selective reduction of nitrogen oxides by hydrocarbons in excess oxygen. Special emphasis is given to the formation of potentially harmful byproducts such as hydrogen cyanide (HCN), cyanic acid (HNCO), ammonia (NH{sub 3}) and nitrous oxide (N{sub 2}O). The effect of reaction temperature, nitrogen oxide (NO, NO{sub 2}), hydrocarbon (ethene, propene) and water on activity and the formation of byproducts is investigated. In situ FTIR spectroscopy and temperature-programmed surface reactions (TPSR) of absorbed species in different atmospheres were used to investigate the nature and reactivity of adsorbates formed under reaction conditions. The catalytic activity was strongly influenced by the presence of water in the feed. The effects of the other parameters were suppressed and the performance generally decreased, except when propene was used for the reduction of NO{sub x} over Cu/ZSM-5. Over Cu/ZSM-5 clearly higher conversion was obtained, when ethene was used as reducing agent, while there was no significant difference when starting from NO or NO{sub 2}. In contrast, with {gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} NO{sub 2} was reduced more efficiently than NO with both reductants. The impregnation of {gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} with copper led to an extensive loss of this performance. For dry feeds and with increasing CuO loading, the catalysts reached maximum activity at lower temperature and the maximum yield of nitrogen slightly decreased. (author) figs., tabs., refs.

  18. Experimental investigation on emission reduction in neem oil biodiesel using selective catalytic reduction and catalytic converter techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viswanathan, Karthickeyan

    2018-05-01

    In the present study, non-edible seed oil namely raw neem oil was converted into biodiesel using transesterification process. In the experimentation, two biodiesel blends were prepared namely B25 (25% neem oil methyl ester with 75% of diesel) and B50 (50% neem oil methyl ester with 50% diesel). Urea-based selective catalytic reduction (SCR) technique with catalytic converter (CC) was fixed in the exhaust tail pipe of the engine for the reduction of engine exhaust emissions. Initially, the engine was operated with diesel as a working fluid and followed by refilling of biodiesel blends B25 and B50 to obtain the baseline readings without SCR and CC. Then, the same procedure was repeated with SCR and CC technique for emission reduction measurement in diesel, B25 and B50 sample. The experimental results revealed that the B25 blend showed higher break thermal efficiency (BTE) and exhaust gas temperature (EGT) with lower break-specific fuel consumption (BSFC) than B50 blend at all loads. On comparing with biodiesel blends, diesel experiences increased BTE of 31.9% with reduced BSFC of 0.29 kg/kWh at full load. A notable emission reduction was noticed for all test fuels in SCR and CC setup. At full load, B25 showed lower carbon monoxide (CO) of 0.09% volume, hydrocarbon (HC) of 24 ppm, and smoke of 14 HSU and oxides of nitrogen (NOx) of 735 ppm than diesel and B50 in SCR and CC setup. On the whole, the engine with SCR and CC setup showed better performance and emission characteristics than standard engine operation.

  19. Catalytic Reduction of NO and NOx Content in Tobacco Smoke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cvetkovic N

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In order to reduce the nitric oxide (NO and nitrogen oxides (NO content in mainstream tobacco smoke, a new class of catalyst based on Cu-ZSM-5 zeolite has been synthesized. The effectiveness of the new catalyst (degree of reduction and specific catalytic ability was tested both by adding Cu-ZSM-5 zeolite directly to the tobacco blend and by addition to the filter. We have determined that adding the catalyst to the tobacco blend does not cause any changes in the physical, chemical or organoleptic properties of the cigarette blend. But, the addition reduces the yield of nitrogen oxides while having no influence on nicotine and “tar” content in the tobacco smoke of the modified blend. The catalyst addition increases the static burning rate (SBR. The changes in the quantity of NO and NOmay be explained by changes in burning conditions due to the increase of Oobtained from catalytic degradation of NO and NO, and adsorptive and diffusive properties of the catalyst. The changes in mainstream smoke analytes are also given on a puff-by-puff basis.

  20. Multi-Stage Selective Catalytic Reduction of NOx in Lean-Burn Engine Exhaust

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Penetrante, B

    1997-01-01

    .... A plasma can also be used to oxidize NO to NO2. This paper compares the multi-stage catalytic scheme with the plasma-assisted catalytic scheme for reduction of NOx in lean-burn engine exhausts. The advantages of plasma oxidation over catalytic oxidation are presented.

  1. Cocatalysts in Semiconductor-based Photocatalytic CO2 Reduction: Achievements, Challenges, and Opportunities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ran, Jingrun; Jaroniec, Mietek; Qiao, Shi-Zhang

    2018-02-01

    Ever-increasing fossil-fuel combustion along with massive CO 2 emissions has aroused a global energy crisis and climate change. Photocatalytic CO 2 reduction represents a promising strategy for clean, cost-effective, and environmentally friendly conversion of CO 2 into hydrocarbon fuels by utilizing solar energy. This strategy combines the reductive half-reaction of CO 2 conversion with an oxidative half reaction, e.g., H 2 O oxidation, to create a carbon-neutral cycle, presenting a viable solution to global energy and environmental problems. There are three pivotal processes in photocatalytic CO 2 conversion: (i) solar-light absorption, (ii) charge separation/migration, and (iii) catalytic CO 2 reduction and H 2 O oxidation. While significant progress is made in optimizing the first two processes, much less research is conducted toward enhancing the efficiency of the third step, which requires the presence of cocatalysts. In general, cocatalysts play four important roles: (i) boosting charge separation/transfer, (ii) improving the activity and selectivity of CO 2 reduction, (iii) enhancing the stability of photocatalysts, and (iv) suppressing side or back reactions. Herein, for the first time, all the developed CO 2 -reduction cocatalysts for semiconductor-based photocatalytic CO 2 conversion are summarized, and their functions and mechanisms are discussed. Finally, perspectives in this emerging area are provided. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. COST OF SELECTIVE CATALYTIC REDUCTION (SCR) APPLICATION FOR NOX CONTROL ON COAL-FIRED BOILERS

    Science.gov (United States)

    The report provides a methodology for estimating budgetary costs associated with retrofit applications of selective catalytic reduction (SCR) technology on coal-fired boilers. SCR is a postcombustion nitrogen oxides (NOx) control technology capable of providing NOx reductions >90...

  3. Diesel Engine Emission Reduction Using Catalytic Nanoparticles: An Experimental Investigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ajin C. Sajeevan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Cerium oxide being a rare earth metal with dual valance state existence has exceptional catalytic activity due to its oxygen buffering capability, especially in the nanosized form. Hence when used as an additive in the diesel fuel it leads to simultaneous reduction and oxidation of nitrogen dioxide and hydrocarbon emissions, respectively, from diesel engine. The present work investigates the effect of cerium oxide nanoparticles on performance and emissions of diesel engine. Cerium oxide nanoparticles were synthesized by chemical method and techniques such as TEM, EDS, and XRD have been used for the characterization. Cerium oxide was mixed in diesel by means of standard ultrasonic shaker to obtain stable suspension, in a two-step process. The influence of nanoparticles on various physicochemical properties of diesel fuel has also been investigated through extensive experimentation by means of ASTM standard testing methods. Load test was done in the diesel engine to investigate the effect of nanoparticles on the efficiency and the emissions from the engine. Comparisons of fuel properties with and without additives are also presented.

  4. Alkali resistivity of Cu based selective catalytic reduction catalysts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Putluru, Siva Sankar Reddy; Jensen, Anker Degn; Riisager, Anders

    2012-01-01

    The deactivation of V2O5–WO3–TiO2, Cu–HZSM5 and Cu–HMOR plate type monolithic catalysts was investigated when exposed to KCl aerosols in a bench-scale reactor. Fresh and exposed catalysts were characterized by selective catalytic reduction (SCR) activity measurements, scanning electron microscope......–energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (SEM–EDX) and NH3-temperature programmed desorption (NH3-TPD). 95% deactivation was observed for the V2O5–WO3–TiO2 catalyst, while the Cu–HZSM5 and Cu–HMOR catalysts deactivated only 58% and 48%, respectively, after 1200 h KCl exposure. SEM analysis of the KCl aerosol exposed...... catalysts revealed that the potassium salt not only deposited on the catalyst surface, but also penetrated into the catalyst wall. Thus, the K/M ratio (M = V or Cu) was high on V2O5–WO3–TiO2 catalyst and comparatively less on Cu–HZSM5 and Cu–HMOR catalysts. NH3-TPD revealed that the KCl exposed Cu–HZSM5...

  5. Reaction mechanisms of CO2 activation and catalytic reduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wolff, Niklas von

    2016-01-01

    The use of CO 2 as a C1 chemical feedstock for the fine chemical industry is interesting both economically and ecologically, as CO 2 is non-toxic, abundant and cheap. Nevertheless, transformations of CO 2 into value-added products is hampered by its high thermodynamic stability and its inertness toward reduction. In order to design new catalysts able to overcome this kinetic challenge, a profound understanding of the reaction mechanisms at play in CO 2 reduction is needed. Using novel N/Si+ frustrated Lewis pairs (FLPs), the influence of CO 2 adducts and different hydro-borane reducing agents on the reaction mechanism in the catalytic hydroboration of CO 2 were investigated, both by DFT calculations and experiments. In a second step, the reaction mechanism of a novel reaction for the creation of C-C bonds from CO 2 and pyridyl-silanes (C 5 H 4 N-SiMe 3 ) was analyzed by DFT calculations. It was shown that CO 2 plays a double role in this transformation, acting both as a catalyst and a C1-building block. The fine understanding of this transformation then led to the development of a novel approach for the synthesis of sulfones and sulfonamides. Starting from SO 2 and aromatic silanes/amine silanes, these products were obtained in a single step under metal-free conditions. Noteworthy, sulfones and sulfonamides are common motifs in organic chemistry and found in a variety of highly important drugs. Finally, this concept was extended to aromatic halides as coupling partners, and it was thus shown for the first time that a sulfonylative Hiyama reaction is a possible approach to the synthesis of sulfones. (author) [fr

  6. Physical chemistry of catalytic reduction of nitroarenes using various nanocatalytic systems: past, present, and future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Begum, Robina; Rehan, Rida; Farooqi, Zahoor H.; Butt, Zonarah; Ashraf, Sania

    2016-01-01

    The catalytic reduction of nitroarenes under various catalytic systems has been widely reported in the flood of publications during last twenty years. This reaction has become a benchmark for testing catalytic activity of inorganic nanoparticles stabilized in various systems. This tutorial review presents design and classification of inorganic nanocatalysts along with their stabilizing agents used for catalytic reduction of nitroarenes. The techniques used for characterization of catalysts have been highlighted in this review. The mechanism of catalytic reduction has been described in a tutorial way. Factors affecting the rate of reduction of nitroarenes in the presence of metal nanoparticles stabilized in polyelectrolyte brushes, polyionic liquids, micelles, dendrimers, and microgels have been discussed for further development in this area.Graphical abstract

  7. Physical chemistry of catalytic reduction of nitroarenes using various nanocatalytic systems: past, present, and future

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Begum, Robina [University of the Punjab, Centre for Undergraduate Studies (Pakistan); Rehan, Rida; Farooqi, Zahoor H., E-mail: zhfarooqi@gmail.com; Butt, Zonarah; Ashraf, Sania [University of the Punjab, Institute of Chemistry (Pakistan)

    2016-08-15

    The catalytic reduction of nitroarenes under various catalytic systems has been widely reported in the flood of publications during last twenty years. This reaction has become a benchmark for testing catalytic activity of inorganic nanoparticles stabilized in various systems. This tutorial review presents design and classification of inorganic nanocatalysts along with their stabilizing agents used for catalytic reduction of nitroarenes. The techniques used for characterization of catalysts have been highlighted in this review. The mechanism of catalytic reduction has been described in a tutorial way. Factors affecting the rate of reduction of nitroarenes in the presence of metal nanoparticles stabilized in polyelectrolyte brushes, polyionic liquids, micelles, dendrimers, and microgels have been discussed for further development in this area.Graphical abstract.

  8. Two-stage Catalytic Reduction of NOx with Hydrocarbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Umit S. Ozkan; Erik M. Holmgreen; Matthew M. Yung; Jonathan Halter; Joel Hiltner

    2005-12-21

    A two-stage system for the catalytic reduction of NO from lean-burn natural gas reciprocating engine exhaust is investigated. Each of the two stages uses a distinct catalyst. The first stage is oxidation of NO to NO{sub 2} and the second stage is reduction of NO{sub 2} to N{sub 2} with a hydrocarbon. The central idea is that since NO{sub 2} is a more easily reduced species than NO, it should be better able to compete with oxygen for the combustion reaction of hydrocarbon, which is a challenge in lean conditions. Early work focused on demonstrating that the N{sub 2} yield obtained when NO{sub 2} was reduced was greater than when NO was reduced. NO{sub 2} reduction catalysts were designed and silver supported on alumina (Ag/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}) was found to be quite active, able to achieve 95% N{sub 2} yield in 10% O{sub 2} using propane as the reducing agent. The design of a catalyst for NO oxidation was also investigated, and a Co/TiO{sub 2} catalyst prepared by sol-gel was shown to have high activity for the reaction, able to reach equilibrium conversion of 80% at 300 C at GHSV of 50,000h{sup -1}. After it was shown that NO{sub 2} could be more easily reduced to N{sub 2} than NO, the focus shifted on developing a catalyst that could use methane as the reducing agent. The Ag/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalyst was tested and found to be inactive for NOx reduction with methane. Through iterative catalyst design, a palladium-based catalyst on a sulfated-zirconia support (Pd/SZ) was synthesized and shown to be able to selectively reduce NO{sub 2} in lean conditions using methane. Development of catalysts for the oxidation reaction also continued and higher activity, as well as stability in 10% water, was observed on a Co/ZrO{sub 2} catalyst, which reached equilibrium conversion of 94% at 250 C at the same GHSV. The Co/ZrO{sub 2} catalyst was also found to be extremely active for oxidation of CO, ethane, and propane, which could potential eliminate the need for any separate

  9. Semiconductor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-01-01

    This book deals with process and measurement of semiconductor. It contains 20 chapters, which goes as follows; semiconductor industry, introduction of semiconductor manufacturing, yield of semiconductor process, materials, crystal growth and a wafer forming, PN, control pollution, oxidation, photomasking photoresist chemistry, photomasking technologies, diffusion and ion injection, chemical vapor deposition, metallization, wafer test and way of evaluation, semiconductor elements, integrated circuit and semiconductor circuit technology.

  10. Catalytic reduction of NO by methane using a Pt/C/polybenzimidazole/Pt/C fuel cell

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petrushina, Irina; Cleemann, Lars Nilausen; Refshauge, Rasmus

    2007-01-01

    with participation of H+ or electrochemically produced hydrogen. When added, methane partially suppresses the electrochemical reduction of NO. Methane outlet concentration monitoring has shown the CH4 participation in the chemical catalytic reduction, i.e., methane co-adsorption with NO inhibited the electrochemical...... NO reduction and introduced a dominant chemical path of the NO reduction. The products of the NO reduction with methane were N2, C2H4, and water. The catalytic NO reduction by methane was promoted when the catalyst was negatively polarized (−0.2 V). Repeated negative polarization of the catalyst increased...

  11. Novel, Regenerable Microlith Catalytic Reactor for CO2 Reduction via Bosch Process, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Precision Combustion, Inc. (PCI) proposes to develop an extremely compact, lightweight and regenerable MicrolithREG catalytic CO2 reduction reactor, capable of...

  12. Uniformity index measurement technology using thermocouples to improve performance in urea-selective catalytic reduction systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sangki; Oh, Jungmo

    2018-05-01

    The current commonly used nitrogen oxides (NOx) emission reduction techniques employ hydrocarbons (HCs), urea solutions, and exhaust gas emissions as the reductants. Two of the primary denitrification NOx (DeNOx) catalyst systems are the HC-lean NOx trap (HC-LNT) catalyst and urea-selective catalytic reduction (urea-SCR) catalyst. The secondary injection method depends on the type of injector, injection pressure, atomization, and spraying technique. In addition, the catalyst reaction efficiency is directly affected by the distribution of injectors; hence, the uniformity index (UI) of the reductant is very important and is the basis for system optimization. The UI of the reductant is an indicator of the NOx conversion efficiency (NCE), and good UI values can reduce the need for a catalyst. Therefore, improving the UI can reduce the cost of producing a catalytic converter, which are expensive due to the high prices of the precious metals contained therein. Accordingly, measurement of the UI is an important process in the development of catalytic systems. Two of the commonly used methods for measuring the reductant UI are (i) measuring the exhaust emissions at many points located upstream/downstream of the catalytic converter and (ii) acquisition of a reductant distribution image on a section of the exhaust pipe upstream of the catalytic converter. The purpose of this study is to develop a system and measurement algorithms to measure the exothermic response distribution in the exhaust gas as the reductant passes through the catalytic converter of the SCR catalyst system using a set of thermocouples downstream of the SCR catalyst. The system is used to measure the reductant UI, which is applied in real-time to the actual SCR system, and the results are compared for various types of mixtures for various engine operating conditions and mixer types in terms of NCE.

  13. Adaptive Model Predictive Control of Diesel Engine Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKinley, Thomas L.

    2009-01-01

    Selective catalytic reduction or SCR is coming into worldwide use for diesel engine emissions reduction for on- and off-highway vehicles. These applications are characterized by broad operating range as well as rapid and unpredictable changes in operating conditions. Significant nonlinearity, input and output constraints, and stringent performance…

  14. Catalytic reduction of nitric oxide with ammonia over transition metal ion-exchanged Y zeolites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sciyama, T; Arakawa, T; Matsuda, T; Yamazoe, N; Takita, Y

    1975-01-01

    The catalytic reduction of nitric oxide with ammonia was studied over transition metal ion-exchanged Y zeolite (Me-Y) catalysts. The reaction products are nitrogen, nitrous oxide, and water in all cases. Selectivities to N/sub 2/ are 60 to 80% on all the cation exchanged zeolite catalysts exhibiting a relatively minor variation with the cationic species exchanged. The copper (II)-Y catalyst exhibits low temperature activity and has an unusual catalytic activity-temperature profile with a maximum at 120/sup 0/C. The catalytic activity is enhanced considerably when a second cation, especially cobalt (II) or iron (III) is coexchanged together with Cu (II) in Y zeolite.

  15. Multi-stage selective catalytic reduction of NOx in lean burn engine exhaust

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Penetrante, B.M.; Hsaio, M.C.; Merritt, B.T.; Vogtlin, G.E. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

    1997-12-31

    Many studies suggest that the conversion of NO to NO{sub 2} is an important intermediate step in the selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of NO{sub x} to N{sub 2}. Some effort has been devoted to separating the oxidative and reductive functions of the catalyst in a multi-stage system. This method works fine for systems that require hydrocarbon addition. The hydrocarbon has to be injected between the NO oxidation catalyst and the NO{sub 2} reduction catalyst; otherwise, the first-stage oxidation catalyst will also oxidize the hydrocarbon and decrease its effectiveness as a reductant. The multi-stage catalytic scheme is appropriate for diesel engine exhausts since they contain insufficient hydrocarbons for SCR, and the hydrocarbons can be added at the desired location. For lean-burn gasoline engine exhausts, the hydrocarbons already present in the exhausts will make it necessary to find an oxidation catalyst that can oxidize NO to NO{sub 2} but not oxidize the hydrocarbon. A plasma can also be used to oxidize NO to NO{sub 2}. Plasma oxidation has several advantages over catalytic oxidation. Plasma-assisted catalysis can work well for both diesel engine and lean-burn gasoline engine exhausts. This is because the plasma can oxidize NO in the presence of hydrocarbons without degrading the effectiveness of the hydrocarbon as a reductant for SCR. In the plasma, the hydrocarbon enhances the oxidation of NO, minimizes the electrical energy requirement, and prevents the oxidation of SO{sub 2}. This paper discusses the use of multi-stage systems for selective catalytic reduction of NO{sub x}. The multi-stage catalytic scheme is compared to the plasma-assisted catalytic scheme.

  16. Catalytic properties of Ru-mordenite for NO reduction

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Labhsetwar, NK.; Minamino, H.; Mukherjee, M.; Mitsuhashi, T.; Rayalu, S.; Dhakad, M.; Haneda, H.; Šubrt, Jan; Devotta, S.

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 261, č. 2 (2007), s. 213-217 ISSN 1381-1169 Grant - others:CSIR(IN) CORE(08) Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40320502 Keywords : NO reduction * catalyst * Ru-zeolite Subject RIV: CA - Inorganic Chemistry Impact factor: 2.707, year: 2007

  17. Long-time experience in catalytic flue gas cleaning and catalytic NO{sub x} reduction in biofueled boilers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahonen, M [Tampella Power Inc., Tampere (Finland)

    1997-12-31

    NO emissions are reduced by primary or secondary methods. Primary methods are based on NO reduction in the combustion zone and secondary methods on flue gas cleaning. The most effective NO reduction method is selective catalytic reduction (SCR). It is based on NO reduction by ammonia on the surface of a catalyst. Reaction products are water and nitrogen. A titanium-dioxide-based catalyst is very durable and selective in coal-fired power plants. It is not poisoned by sulphur dioxide and side reactions with ammonia and sulphur dioxide hardly occur. The long time experience and suitability of a titanium-dioxide-based catalyst for NO reduction in biofuel-fired power plants was studied. The biofuels were: peat, wood and bark. It was noticed that deactivation varied very much due to the type of fuel and content of alkalinities in fuel ash. The deactivation in peat firing was moderate, close to the deactivation noticed in coal firing. Wood firing generally had a greater deactivation effect than peat firing. Fuel and fly ash were analyzed to get more information on the flue gas properties. The accumulation of alkali and alkaline earth metals and sulphates was examined together with changes in the physical composition of the catalysts. In the cases where the deactivation was the greatest, the amount of alkali and alkaline earth metals in fuels and fly ashes and their accumulation were very significant. (author) (3 refs.)

  18. Long-time experience in catalytic flue gas cleaning and catalytic NO{sub x} reduction in biofueled boilers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahonen, M. [Tampella Power Inc., Tampere (Finland)

    1996-12-31

    NO emissions are reduced by primary or secondary methods. Primary methods are based on NO reduction in the combustion zone and secondary methods on flue gas cleaning. The most effective NO reduction method is selective catalytic reduction (SCR). It is based on NO reduction by ammonia on the surface of a catalyst. Reaction products are water and nitrogen. A titanium-dioxide-based catalyst is very durable and selective in coal-fired power plants. It is not poisoned by sulphur dioxide and side reactions with ammonia and sulphur dioxide hardly occur. The long time experience and suitability of a titanium-dioxide-based catalyst for NO reduction in biofuel-fired power plants was studied. The biofuels were: peat, wood and bark. It was noticed that deactivation varied very much due to the type of fuel and content of alkalinities in fuel ash. The deactivation in peat firing was moderate, close to the deactivation noticed in coal firing. Wood firing generally had a greater deactivation effect than peat firing. Fuel and fly ash were analyzed to get more information on the flue gas properties. The accumulation of alkali and alkaline earth metals and sulphates was examined together with changes in the physical composition of the catalysts. In the cases where the deactivation was the greatest, the amount of alkali and alkaline earth metals in fuels and fly ashes and their accumulation were very significant. (author) (3 refs.)

  19. An efficient catalytic reductive amination: A facile one-pot access to ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    An efficient catalytic reductive amination: A facile one-pot access to ... itors and in the manufacture of detergents and plastics.1 ... ammoniaborane/Ti(OiPr)4,5e ... demonstrated the first method for synthesis of 1,2- ... and column chromatography (Silica gel, n-hexane/ethyl .... supporting information at www.ias.ac.in/chemsci.

  20. COMPARISON OF WEST GERMAN AND U.S. FLUE GAS DESULFURIZATION AND SELECTIVE CATALYTIC REDUCTION COSTS

    Science.gov (United States)

    The report documents a comparison of the actual cost retrofitting flue gas desulfurization (FGD) and selective catalytic reduction (SCR) on Federal Republic of German (FRG) boilers to cost estimating procedures used in the U.S. to estimate the retrofit of these controls on U.S. b...

  1. Azeotropic distillation assisted fabrication of silver nanocages and their catalytic property for reduction of 4-nitrophenol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, Jianzhong; Wang, Fei; Cai, Yunliang; Liang, Shuai; Zhang, Zhenwei; Jiang, Xingmao

    2015-01-14

    Monodisperse silver nanocages (AgNCs) with specific interiors were successfully synthesized by an azeotropic distillation (AD) assisted method and exhibited excellent catalytic activities for reduction of 4-nitrophenol (4-NP) into 4-aminophenol (4-AP) due to the unique hollow morphology and small thickness of the silver shell.

  2. Catalytic reduction of hexaminecobalt(III) by pitch-based spherical activated carbon (PBSAC)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Yu; Mao, Yan-Peng; Zhu, Hai-Song; Cheng, Jing-Yi; Long, Xiang-Li; Yuan, Wei-Kang [State Key Laboratory of Chemical Engineering, East China University of Science and Technology, Shanghai (China)

    2010-07-15

    The wet ammonia (NH{sub 3}) desulfurization process can be retrofitted to remove nitric oxide (NO) and sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) simultaneously by adding soluble cobalt(II) salt into the aqueous ammonia solution. Activated carbon is used as a catalyst to regenerate hexaminecobalt(II), Co(NH{sub 3}){sub 6}{sup 2+}, so that NO removal efficiency can be maintained at a high level for a long time. In this study, the catalytic performance of pitch-based spherical activated carbon (PBSAC) in the simultaneous removal of NO and SO{sub 2} with this wet ammonia scrubbing process has been studied systematically. Experiments have been performed in a batch stirred cell to test the catalytic characteristics of PBSAC in the catalytic reduction of hexaminecobalt(III), Co(NH{sub 3}){sub 6}{sup 3+}. The experimental results show that PBSAC is a much better catalyst in the catalytic reduction of Co(NH{sub 3}){sub 6}{sup 3+} than palm shell activated carbon (PSAC). The Co(NH{sub 3}){sub 6}{sup 3+} reduction reaction rate increases with PBSAC when the PBSAC dose is below 7.5 g/L. The Co(NH{sub 3}){sub 6}{sup 3+} reduction rate increases with its initial concentration. Best Co(NH{sub 3}){sub 6}{sup 3+} conversion is gained at a pH range of 2.0-6.0. A high temperature is favorable to such reaction. The intrinsic activation energy of 51.00 kJ/mol for the Co(NH{sub 3}){sub 6}{sup 3+} reduction catalyzed by PBSAC has been obtained. The experiments manifest that the simultaneous elimination of NO and SO{sub 2} by the hexaminecobalt solution coupled with catalytic regeneration of hexaminecobalt(II) can maintain a NO removal efficiency of 90% for a long time. (Abstract Copyright [2010], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  3. GENERIC VERIFICATION PROTOCOL FOR DETERMINATION OF EMISSIONS REDUCTIONS FROM SELECTIVE CATALYTIC REDUCTIONS CONTROL TECHNOLOGIES FOR HIGHWAY, NONROAD, AND STATIONARY USE DIESEL ENGINES

    Science.gov (United States)

    The protocol describes the Environmental Technology Verification (ETV) Program's considerations and requirements for verification of emissions reduction provided by selective catalytic reduction (SCR) technologies. The basis of the ETV will be comparison of the emissions and perf...

  4. A Systematic Cycle Time Reduction Procedure for Enhancing the Competitiveness and Sustainability of a Semiconductor Manufacturer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toly Chen

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Cycle time reduction plays an important role in improving the competitiveness and sustainability of a semiconductor manufacturer. However, in the past, cycle time reduction was usually unplanned owing to the lack of a systematic and quantitative procedure. To tackle this problem, a systematic procedure was established in this study for planning cycle time reduction actions to enhance the competitiveness and sustainability of a semiconductor manufacturer. First, some controllable factors that are influential to the job cycle time are identified. Subsequently, the relationship between the controllable factors and the job cycle time is fitted with a back propagation network. Based on this relationship, actions to shorten the job cycle time can be planned. The feasibility and effectiveness of an action have to be assessed before it can be taken in practice. An example containing the real data of hundreds of jobs has been used to illustrate the applicability of the proposed methodology. In addition, the financial benefits of the cycle time reduction action were analyzed, which provided the evidence that the proposed methodology enabled the sustainable development of the semiconductor manufacturer, since capital adequacy is very important in the semiconductor manufacturing industry.

  5. Threshold reduction through photon recycling in semiconductor lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gigase, Y.B.; Harder, C.S.; Kesler, M.P.; Meier, H.P. (IBM Research Division, Zurich Research Laboratory, CH-8803 Rueschlikon (Switzerland)); Van Zeghbroeck, B. (University of Colorado, Boulder, CO (USA))

    1990-09-24

    The threshold pump power of an AlGaAs-GaAs ridge quantum well laser diode has been reduced by 42% by recycling the spontaneous emission. An integrated photodiode absorbs the spontaneous radiation emitted by the laser diode and converts it back into electrical power. The recycling of this power results in a reduction of the electrical power required to reach the lasing threshold.

  6. I.C. Engine emission reduction by copper oxide catalytic converter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkatesan, S. P.; Shubham Uday, Desai; Karan Hemant, Borana; Rajarshi Kushwanth Goud, Kagita; Lakshmana Kumar, G.; Pavan Kumar, K.

    2017-05-01

    The toxic gases emitted from diesel engines are more than petrol engines. Predicting the use of diesel engines, even more in future, this system is developed and can be used to minimize the harmful gases. Toxic gases include NOX, CO, HC and Smoke which are harmful to the atmosphere as well as to the human beings. The main aim of this work is to fabricate system, where the level of intensity of toxic gases is controlled through chemical reaction to more agreeable level. This system acts itself as an exhaust system; hence there is no needs to fit separate the silencer. The whole assembly is fitted in the exhaust pipe from engine. In this work, catalytic converter with copper oxide as a catalyst, by replacing noble catalysts such as platinum, palladium and rhodium is fabricated and fitted in the engine exhaust. With and without catalytic converter, the experimentations are carried out at different loads such as 0%, 25%, 50%, 75%, and 100% of maximum rated load. From the experimental results it is found that the maximum reduction is 32%, 61% and 21% for HC, NOx and CO respectively at 100% of maximum rated load when compared to that of without catalytic converter. This catalytic converter system is cash effective and more economical than the existing catalytic converter.

  7. Aligned carbon nanotube with electro-catalytic activity for oxygen reduction reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Di-Jia; Yang, Junbing; Wang, Xiaoping

    2010-08-03

    A catalyst for an electro-chemical oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) of a bundle of longitudinally aligned carbon nanotubes having a catalytically active transition metal incorporated longitudinally in said nanotubes. A method of making an electro-chemical catalyst for an oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) having a bundle of longitudinally aligned carbon nanotubes with a catalytically active transition metal incorporated throughout the nanotubes, where a substrate is in a first reaction zone, and a combination selected from one or more of a hydrocarbon and an organometallic compound containing an catalytically active transition metal and a nitrogen containing compound and an inert gas and a reducing gas is introduced into the first reaction zone which is maintained at a first reaction temperature for a time sufficient to vaporize material therein. The vaporized material is then introduced to a second reaction zone maintained at a second reaction temperature for a time sufficient to grow longitudinally aligned carbon nanotubes over the substrate with a catalytically active transition metal incorporated throughout the nanotubes.

  8. How light-harvesting semiconductors can alter the bias of reversible electrocatalysts in favor of H2 production and CO2 reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachmeier, Andreas; Wang, Vincent C C; Woolerton, Thomas W; Bell, Sophie; Fontecilla-Camps, Juan C; Can, Mehmet; Ragsdale, Stephen W; Chaudhary, Yatendra S; Armstrong, Fraser A

    2013-10-09

    The most efficient catalysts for solar fuel production should operate close to reversible potentials, yet possess a bias for the fuel-forming direction. Protein film electrochemical studies of Ni-containing carbon monoxide dehydrogenase and [NiFeSe]-hydrogenase, each a reversible electrocatalyst, show that the electronic state of the electrode strongly biases the direction of electrocatalysis of CO2/CO and H(+)/H2 interconversions. Attached to graphite electrodes, these enzymes show high activities for both oxidation and reduction, but there is a marked shift in bias, in favor of CO2 or H(+) reduction, when the respective enzymes are attached instead to n-type semiconductor electrodes constructed from CdS and TiO2 nanoparticles. This catalytic rectification effect can arise for a reversible electrocatalyst attached to a semiconductor electrode if the electrode transforms between semiconductor- and metallic-like behavior across the same narrow potential range (<0.25 V) that the electrocatalytic current switches between oxidation and reduction.

  9. Selective catalytic reduction of nitrogen oxides from industrial gases by hydrogen or methane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Engelmann Pirez, M.

    2004-12-01

    This work deals with the selective catalytic reduction of nitrogen oxides (NO x ), contained in the effluents of industrial plants, by hydrogen or methane. The aim is to replace ammonia, used as reducing agent, in the conventional process. The use of others reducing agents such as hydrogen or methane is interesting for different reasons: practical, economical and ecological. The catalyst has to convert selectively NO into N 2 , in presence of an excess of oxygen, steam and sulfur dioxide. The developed catalyst is constituted by a support such as perovskites, particularly LaCoO 3 , on which are dispersed noble metals (palladium, platinum). The interaction between the noble metal and the support, generated during the activation of the catalyst, allows to minimize the water and sulfur dioxide inhibitor phenomena on the catalytic performances, particularly in the reduction of NO by hydrogen. (O.M.)

  10. HYBRID SELECTIVE NON-CATALYTIC REDUCTION (SNCR)/SELECTIVE CATALYTIC REDUCTION (SCR) DEMONSTRATION FOR THE REMOVAL OF NOx FROM BOILER FLUE GASES; FINAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jerry B. Urbas

    1999-01-01

    The U. S. Department of Energy (DOE), Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), Pennsylvania Electric Energy Research Council, (PEERC), New York State Electric and Gas and GPU Generation, Inc. jointly funded a demonstration to determine the capabilities for Hybrid SNCR/SCR (Selective Non-Catalytic Reduction/Selective Catalytic Reduction) technology. The demonstration site was GPU Generation's Seward Unit No.5 (147MW) located in Seward Pennsylvania. The demonstration began in October of 1997 and ended in December 1998. DOE funding was provided through Grant No. DE-FG22-96PC96256 with T. J. Feeley as the Project Manager. EPRI funding was provided through agreements TC4599-001-26999 and TC4599-002-26999 with E. Hughes as the Project Manager. This project demonstrated the operation of the Hybrid SNCR/SCR NO(sub x) control process on a full-scale coal fired utility boiler. The hybrid technology was expected to provide a cost-effective method of reducing NO(sub x) while balancing capital and operation costs. An existing urea based SNCR system was modified with an expanded-duct catalyst to provide increased NO(sub x) reduction efficiency from the SNCR while producing increased ammonia slip levels to the catalyst. The catalyst was sized to reduce the ammonia slip to the air heaters to less than 2 ppm while providing equivalent NO(sub x) reductions. The project goals were to demonstrate hybrid technology is capable of achieving at least a 55% reduction in NO(sub x) emissions while maintaining less than 2ppm ammonia slip to the air heaters, maintain flyash marketability, verify the cost benefit and applicability of Hybrid post combustion technology, and reduce forced outages due to ammonium bisulfate (ABS) fouling of the air heaters. Early system limitations, due to gas temperature stratification, restricted the Hybrid NO(sub x) reduction capabilities to 48% with an ammonia slip of 6.1 mg/Nm(sup 3) (8 ppm) at the catalyst inlet. After resolving the stratification problem

  11. HYBRID SELECTIVE NON-CATALYTIC REDUCTION (SNCR)/SELECTIVE CATALYTIC REDUCTION (SCR) DEMONSTRATION FOR THE REMOVAL OF NOx FROM BOILER FLUE GASES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jerry B. Urbas

    1999-05-01

    The U. S. Department of Energy (DOE), Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), Pennsylvania Electric Energy Research Council, (PEERC), New York State Electric and Gas and GPU Generation, Inc. jointly funded a demonstration to determine the capabilities for Hybrid SNCR/SCR (Selective Non-Catalytic Reduction/Selective Catalytic Reduction) technology. The demonstration site was GPU Generation's Seward Unit No.5 (147MW) located in Seward Pennsylvania. The demonstration began in October of 1997 and ended in December 1998. DOE funding was provided through Grant No. DE-FG22-96PC96256 with T. J. Feeley as the Project Manager. EPRI funding was provided through agreements TC4599-001-26999 and TC4599-002-26999 with E. Hughes as the Project Manager. This project demonstrated the operation of the Hybrid SNCR/SCR NO{sub x} control process on a full-scale coal fired utility boiler. The hybrid technology was expected to provide a cost-effective method of reducing NO{sub x} while balancing capital and operation costs. An existing urea based SNCR system was modified with an expanded-duct catalyst to provide increased NO{sub x} reduction efficiency from the SNCR while producing increased ammonia slip levels to the catalyst. The catalyst was sized to reduce the ammonia slip to the air heaters to less than 2 ppm while providing equivalent NO{sub x} reductions. The project goals were to demonstrate hybrid technology is capable of achieving at least a 55% reduction in NO{sub x} emissions while maintaining less than 2ppm ammonia slip to the air heaters, maintain flyash marketability, verify the cost benefit and applicability of Hybrid post combustion technology, and reduce forced outages due to ammonium bisulfate (ABS) fouling of the air heaters. Early system limitations, due to gas temperature stratification, restricted the Hybrid NO{sub x} reduction capabilities to 48% with an ammonia slip of 6.1 mg/Nm{sup 3} (8 ppm) at the catalyst inlet. After resolving the stratification

  12. Natural clinoptilolite exchanged with iron: characterization and catalytic activity in nitrogen monoxide reduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daria Tito-Ferro

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work was to characterize the natural clinoptilolite from Tasajeras deposit, Cuba, modified by hydrothermal ion-exchange with solutions of iron (II sulfate and iron (III nitrate in acid medium. Besides this, its catalytic activity to reduce nitrogen monoxide with carbon monoxide/propene in the presence of oxygen was evaluated. The characterization was performed by Mössbauer and UV-Vis diffuse reflectance spectroscopies and adsorption measurements. The obtained results lead to conclude that in exchanged samples, incorporated divalent and trivalent irons are found in octahedral coordination. Both irons should be mainly in cationic extra-framework positions inside clinoptilolite channels as charge compensating cations, and also as iron oxy-hydroxides resulting from limited hydrolysis of these cations. The iron (III exchanged samples has a larger amount of iron oxy-hydroxides agglomerates. The iron (II exchanged samples have additionally iron (II sulfate adsorbed. The catalytic activity in the nitrogen monoxide reduction is higher in the exchanged zeolites than starting. Among all samples, those exchanged of iron (II has the higher catalytic activity. This lead to outline that, main catalytically active centers are associated with divalent iron.

  13. NOx Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) on Self-Supported V-W-doped TiO2 Nanofibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marani, Debora; Silva, Rafael Hubert; Dankeaw, Apiwat

    2017-01-01

    Electrospun V–W–TiO2 catalysts, resulting in a solid solution of V and W in the anatase phase, are prepared as nonwoven nanofibers for NOx selective catalytic reduction (SCR). Preliminary catalytic characterization indicates their superior NOx conversion efficiency to the-state-of-the-art materia...

  14. IN SITU DESTRUCTION OF CHLORINATED HYDROCARBON COMPOUNDS IN GROUNDWATER USING CATALYTIC REDUCTIVE REDUCTIVE DEHALOGENATION IN A REACTIVE WELL: TESTING AND OPERATIONAL EXPERIENCES. (R825421)

    Science.gov (United States)

    A groundwater treatment technology based on catalytic reductive dehalogenation has been developed to efficiently destroy chlorinated hydrocarbons in situ using a reactive well approach. The treatment process utilizes dissolved H2 as an electron donor, in...

  15. Communication: Towards catalytic nitric oxide reduction via oligomerization on boron doped graphene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cantatore, Valentina, E-mail: valcan@chalmers.se; Panas, Itai [Department of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Energy & Materials, Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg (Sweden)

    2016-04-21

    We use density functional theory to describe a novel way for metal free catalytic reduction of nitric oxide NO utilizing boron doped graphene. The present study is based on the observation that boron doped graphene and O—N=N—O{sup −} act as Lewis acid-base pair allowing the graphene surface to act as a catalyst. The process implies electron assisted N=N bond formation prior to N—O dissociation. Two N{sub 2} + O{sub 2} product channels, one of which favoring N{sub 2}O formation, are envisaged as outcome of the catalytic process. Besides, we show also that the N{sub 2} + O{sub 2} formation pathways are contrasted by a side reaction that brings to N{sub 3}O{sub 3}{sup −} formation and decomposition into N{sub 2}O + NO{sub 2}{sup −}.

  16. Mean field approximation for the kinetics of the selective catalytic reduction of NO by ammonia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, M.; Bodanese, J.P. [Centro de Ensino Sao Jose, Universidade do Vale do Itajai (Brazil); S. Grandi, B.C. da [Departamento de Fisica, Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, Florianopolis (Brazil)

    2007-04-15

    In this work we study a catalytic reaction model among three monomers in order to understand the chemical kinetics of the selective catalytic reduction of nitrogen oxide by ammonia (4NO+4NH{sub 3}+O{sub 2}{yields}4N{sub 2}+6H{sub 2}O). Our model takes into account the formation of the intermediate species in the global scheme of the reaction. In order to determine the dynamical behaviour of the model we used single site approximation method. In this approach we have observed that, depending on the values of the control parameters, the model presents an active or an inactive phase. In fact, the dynamical phase diagram of the model exhibits a first order line separating these two phases. (copyright 2007 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  17. A consistent reaction scheme for the selective catalytic reduction of nitrogen oxides with ammonia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Janssens, Ton V.W.; Falsig, Hanne; Lundegaard, Lars Fahl

    2015-01-01

    For the first time, the standard and fast selective catalytic reduction of NO by NH3 are described in a complete catalytic cycle, that is able to produce the correct stoichiometry, while only allowing adsorption and desorption of stable molecules. The standard SCR reaction is a coupling of the ac...... for standard SCR. Finally, the role of a nitrate/nitrite equilibrium and the possible in uence of Cu dimers and Brønsted sites are discussed, and an explanation is offered as to how a catalyst can be effective for SCR, while being a poor catalyst for NO oxidation to NO2....... spectroscopy (FTIR). A consequence of the reaction scheme is that all intermediates in fast SCR are also part of the standard SCR cycle. The calculated activation energy by density functional theory (DFT) indicates that the oxidation of an NO molecule by O2 to a bidentate nitrate ligand is rate determining...

  18. Modelling of catalytic oxidation of NH3 and reduction of NO on limestone during sulphur capture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kiil, Søren; Bhatia, Suresh K.; Dam-Johansen, Kim

    1996-01-01

    activity with respect to each species involved. An existing particle model, the Grain-Micrograin Model, which simulates sulphur capture on limestone under oxidizing conditions is considered in the modelling. Simulation results in good qualitative agreement with experimental data are obtained here......A theoretical study of the complex transient system of simultaneous sulphur capture and catalytic reactions of N-containing compounds taking place on a single limestone particle is conducted. The numerical technique developed previously by the authors (Kiil et al. 1994) based on collocation...... for the catalytic chemistry of NH3 during simultaneous sulphur capture on a Stevns Chalk particle. The reduction of NO by NH3 over CaSO4 (which is the product of the reaction between SO2, O2 and limestone) was found to be important because this reaction could explain the change in selectivity with increased solid...

  19. Selective catalytic reduction of nitric oxide by ammonia over Cu-exchanged Cuban natural zeolites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moreno-Tost, Ramon; Santamaria-Gonzalez, Jose; Rodriguez-Castellon, Enrique; Jimenez-Lopez, Antonio; Autie, Miguel A.; Glacial, Marisol Carreras; Gonzalez, Edel; Pozas, Carlos De las

    2004-01-01

    The catalytic selective reduction of NO over Cu-exchanged natural zeolites (mordenite (MP) and clinoptilolite (HC)) from Cuba using NH 3 as reducing agent and in the presence of excess oxygen was studied. Cu(II)-exchanged zeolites are very active catalysts, with conversions of NO of 95%, a high selectivity to N 2 at low temperatures, and exhibiting good water tolerance. The chemical state of the Cu(II) in exchanged zeolites was characterized by H 2 -TPR and XPS. Cu(II)-exchanged clinoptilolite underwent a severe deactivation in the presence of SO 2 . However, Cu(II)-exchanged mordenite not only maintained its catalytic activity, but even showed a slight improvement after 20h of reaction in the presence of 100ppm of SO 2

  20. Green synthesis of gold nanoparticles using aspartame and their catalytic activity for p-nitrophenol reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Shufen; Yan, Songjing; Qi, Wei; Huang, Renliang; Cui, Jing; Su, Rongxin; He, Zhimin

    2015-05-01

    We demonstrated a facile and environmental-friendly approach to form gold nanoparticles through the reduction of HAuCl4 by aspartame. The single-crystalline structure was illustrated by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) results indicated that aspartame played a pivotal role in the reduction and stabilization of the gold crystals. The crystals were stabilized through the successive hydrogen-bonding network constructed between the water and aspartame molecules. Additionally, gold nanoparticles synthesized through aspartame were shown to have good catalytic activity for the reduction of p-nitrophenol to p-aminophenol in the presence of NaBH4.

  1. Catalytic selective reduction of NO with ethylene over a series of copper catalysts on amorphous silicas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carniti, P.; Gervasini, A.; Modica, V.H.; Ravasio, N.

    2000-01-01

    Catalytic selective reduction of NO to N 2 was studied comparing a series of Cu-based catalysts (ca. 8wt.%) supported over amorphous pure and modified silicas: SiO 2 , SiO 2 -Al 2 O 3 , SiO 2 -TiO 2 , SiO 2 -ZrO 2 . The catalysts were prepared by the chemisorption-hydrolysis method which ensured the formation of a unique copper phase well dispersed over all supports, as confirmed by scanning electron micrographs (SEMs). Temperature-programmed reduction (TPR) analyses confirmed the presence of dispersed copper species which underwent complete reduction at a temperature of about 220C, independently of the support. It was found that the support affects the extent of NO reduction as well as the selectivity to N 2 formation. Maximum N 2 yield was found in the range 275-300C. The catalyst prepared over SiO 2 -Al 2 O 3 was the most active and selective with respect to the other silicas. Competitiveness factors (c.f.'s) as high as 13-20% in the temperature range 200-250C could be calculated. For all catalysts, the temperature of the N 2 peak maximum did not correspond to that of the maximum C 2 H 4 oxidation to CO 2 , suggesting the presence of two different sites for the oxidation and the reduction activity. On the catalyst prepared on SiO 2 -Al 2 O 3 , a kinetic interpretation of catalytic data collected at different contact times and temperatures permitted evaluating the ratio between kinetic coefficients as well as the difference between activation energies of NO reduction by C 2 H 4 and C 2 H 4 oxidation by O 2

  2. Selective catalytic reduction of sulfur dioxide to elemental sulfur. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, W.; Flytzani-Stephanopoulos, M.; Sarofim, A.F.

    1995-06-01

    This project has investigated new metal oxide catalysts for the single stage selective reduction of SO{sub 2} to elemental sulfur by a reductant, such as CO. Significant progress in catalyst development has been made during the course of the project. We have found that fluorite oxides, CeO{sub 2} and ZrO{sub 2}, and rare earth zirconates such as Gd{sub 2}Zr{sub 2}O{sub 7} are active and stable catalysts for reduction Of SO{sub 2} by CO. More than 95% sulfur yield was achieved at reaction temperatures about 450{degrees}C or higher with the feed gas of stoichiometric composition. Reaction of SO{sub 2} and CO over these catalysts demonstrated a strong correlation of catalytic activity with the catalyst oxygen mobility. Furthermore, the catalytic activity and resistance to H{sub 2}O and CO{sub 2} poisoning of these catalysts were significantly enhanced by adding small amounts of transition metals, such as Co, Ni, Co, etc. The resulting transition metal-fluorite oxide composite catalyst has superior activity and stability, and shows promise in long use for the development of a greatly simplified single-step sulfur recovery process to treat variable and dilute SO{sub 2} concentration gas streams. Among various active composite catalyst systems the Cu-CeO{sub 2} system has been extensively studied. XRD, XPS, and STEM analyses of the used Cu-CeO{sub 2} catalyst found that the fluorite crystal structure of ceria was stable at the present reaction conditions, small amounts of copper was dispersed and stabilized on the ceria matrix, and excess copper oxide particles formed copper sulfide crystals of little contribution to catalytic activity. A working catalyst consisted of partially sulfated cerium oxide surface and partially sulfided copper clusters. The overall reaction kinetics were approximately represented by a first order equation.

  3. Surface coverage of Pt atoms on PtCo nanoparticles and catalytic kinetics for oxygen reduction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang Rongzhong, E-mail: rongzhong.jiang@us.army.mi [Sensors and Electron Devices Directorate, U.S. Army Research Laboratory, 2800 Powder Mill Road, Adelphi, MD 20783-1197 (United States); Rong, Charles; Chu, Deryn [Sensors and Electron Devices Directorate, U.S. Army Research Laboratory, 2800 Powder Mill Road, Adelphi, MD 20783-1197 (United States)

    2011-02-01

    The surface coverage of Pt atoms on PtCo nanoparticles and its effect on catalytic kinetics for oxygen reduction were investigated. The PtCo nanoparticles with different surface coverage of Pt atoms were synthesized with various methods, including normal chemical method, microemulsion synthesis, and ultrasound-assisted microemulsion. A model of Pt atoms filling into a spherical nanoparticle was proposed to explain the relationship of surface metal atoms and nanoparticle size. The catalytic activity of the PtCo nano-particles is highly dependent on the synthetic methods, even if they have the same chemical composition. The PtCo nano-particles synthesized with ultrasound-assisted microemulsion showed the highest activity, which is attributed to an increase of active surface coverage of Pt atoms on the metal nanoparticles. The rate of oxygen reduction at 0.5 V (vs. SCE) catalyzed by the PtCo synthesized with ultrasound-assisted micro-emulsion was about four times higher than that of the PtCo synthesized with normal chemical method. As demonstrated with rotating-ring disk electrode measurement, the PtCo nano-particles can catalyze oxygen 4-electron reduction to water without intermediate H{sub 2}O{sub 2} detected.

  4. Enhanced Activity of Nanocrystalline Zeolites for Selective Catalytic Reduction of NOx

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarah C. Larson; Vicki H. Grassian

    2006-01-01

    Nanocrystalline zeolites with discrete crystal sizes of less than 100 nm have different properties relative to zeolites with larger crystal sizes. Nanocrystalline zeolites have improved mass transfer properties and very large internal and external surface areas that can be exploited for many different applications. The additional external surface active sites and the improved mass transfer properties of nanocrystalline zeolites offer significant advantages for selective catalytic reduction (SCR) catalysis with ammonia as a reductant in coal-fired power plants relative to current zeolite based SCR catalysts. Nanocrystalline NaY was synthesized with a crystal size of 15-20 nm and was thoroughly characterized using x-ray diffraction, electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy, nitrogen adsorption isotherms and Fourier Transform Infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy. Copper ions were exchanged into nanocrystalline NaY to increase the catalytic activity. The reactions of nitrogen dioxides (NO x ) and ammonia (NH 3 ) on nanocrystalline NaY and CuY were investigated using FT-IR spectroscopy. Significant conversion of NO 2 was observed at room temperature in the presence of NH 3 as monitored by FT-IR spectroscopy. Copper-exchanged nanocrystalline NaY was more active for NO 2 reduction with NH 3 relative to nanocrystalline NaY

  5. Selective catalytic reduction system and process using a pre-sulfated zirconia binder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobolevskiy, Anatoly; Rossin, Joseph A.

    2010-06-29

    A selective catalytic reduction (SCR) process with a palladium catalyst for reducing NOx in a gas, using hydrogen as a reducing agent is provided. The process comprises contacting the gas stream with a catalyst system, the catalyst system comprising (ZrO.sub.2)SO.sub.4, palladium, and a pre-sulfated zirconia binder. The inclusion of a pre-sulfated zirconia binder substantially increases the durability of a Pd-based SCR catalyst system. A system for implementing the disclosed process is further provided.

  6. Development of a choronocoulometric method for determining traces of uranium using the catalytic nitrate reduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cantagallo, M.I.C.; Gutz, I.G.R.

    1990-01-01

    With the aim of improving the sensitivity of the electroanalytical determination of uranium at trace levels. The uranium catalyzed reduction of nitrate on mercury electrode and the technique of chronocoulometry were used. Several experimental parameters were investigated (electrolyte composition, potential program, integration time, blank correction, temperature, previous separation) and adequate conditions were selected for the analytical determination. Under these conditions it was possible to exceed the best reported sensitivity for the catalytic determination, extending the detection limit to 3.10 -10 M. Exploratory study of the combination of this procedure with pre-concentration of uranium ions on the electrode revealed a detection limit ten limes lower. (author) [pt

  7. Hydrogen cyanide formation in selective catalytic reduction of nitrogen oxides over Cu/ZSM-5

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Radtke, F; Koeppel, R; Baiker, A [Department of Chemical Engineering and Industrial Chemistry, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, Zurich, (Switzerland)

    1994-01-06

    Hydrogen cyanide is formed over Cu/ZSM-5 during the selective catalytic reduction of NO[sub x] by either propylene or ethylene in the temperature range 450-600 K. Under the reaction conditions used (reactant feed: 973 ppm NO, 907 ppm propene or 1448 ppm ethylene, 2% oxygen, W/F=0.1 g s cm[sup -3]), the concentration of hydrogen cyanide reaches 20, respectively, 30 ppm, depending on whether ethylene or propene are used as hydrocarbons. In addition, significant N[sub 2]O formation is observed at temperatures lower than 700 K, independent of the hydrocarbon used

  8. Semi-catalytic reduction of secondary amides to imines and aldehydes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sun-Hwa; Nikonov, Georgii I

    2014-06-21

    Secondary amides can be reduced by silane HSiMe2Ph into imines and aldehydes by a two-stage process involving prior conversion of amides into iminoyl chlorides followed by catalytic reduction mediated by the ruthenium complex [Cp(i-Pr3P)Ru(NCCH3)2]PF6 (1). Alkyl and aryl amides bearing halogen, ketone, and ester groups were converted with moderate to good yields under mild reaction conditions to the corresponding imines and aldehydes. This procedure does not work for substrates bearing the nitro-group and fails for heteroaromatic amides. In the case of cyano substituted amides, the cyano group is reduced to imine.

  9. Semiconductor/metal nanocomposites formed by in situ reduction method in multilayer thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song Yanli; Wang Enbo; Tian Chungui; Mao Baodong; Wang Chunlei

    2009-01-01

    A layer-by-layer adsorption and in situ reduction method was adopted for synthesizing semiconductor/metal nanocomposites in multilayer ultra-thin films. Alternate adsorption of ZnO nanoparticles modified with poly(ethyleneimine), hydrogentetrachloroaurate and poly(styrenesulfonate) sodium results in the formation of ZnO/AuCl 4 - -loaded multilayer films. In situ reduction of the incorporated metal ions by heating yields ZnO/Au nanocomposites in the films. UV-vis absorption spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy were used to characterize the components of the composite films. UV-vis spectra indicate regular growth of the films. The electrochemistry behavior of the multilayer films was studied in detail on indium tin oxide electrode. The combined results suggest that the layer-by-layer adsorption and subsequent reduction method used here provides an effective way to synthesize ZnO/Au nanocomposites in the polymer matrix

  10. Gold Decorated Graphene for Rapid Dye Reduction and Efficient Electro Catalytic Oxidation of Ethanol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siddhardha, R. S.; Kumar v, Lakshman; Kaniyoor, A.; Podila, R.; Kumar, V. S.; Venkataramaniah, K.; Ramaprabhu, S.; Rao, A.; Ramamurthy, S. S.; Clemson University Team; Sri Sathya Sai Institute of Higher Learning Team; IITMadras Team

    2013-03-01

    A well known disadvantage in fabrication of metal-graphene composite is the use of surfactants that strongly adsorb on the surface and reduce the performance of the catalyst. Here, we demonstrate a novel one pot synthesis of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) by laser ablation of gold strip and simultaneous decoration of these on functionalized graphene derivatives. Not only the impregnation of AuNPs was linker free, but also the synthesis by itself was surfactant free. This resulted in in-situ decoration of pristine AuNPs on functionalized graphene derivatives. These materials were well characterized and tested for catalytic applications pertaining to dye reduction and electrooxidation. The catalytic reduction rates are 1.4 x 102 and 9.4x102 times faster for Rhodamine B and Methylene Blue dyes respectively, compared to earlier reports. The enhanced rate involves synergistic interplay of electronic relay between AuNPs and the dye, also charge transfer between the graphene system and dye. In addition, the onset potential for ethanol oxidation was found to be more negative ~ 100 mV, an indication of its promising application in direct ethanol fuel cells.

  11. Poly(N-isopropylacrylamide-co-methacrylic acid microgel stabilized copper nanoparticles for catalytic reduction of nitrobenzene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farooqi Zahoor H.

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Poly(N-isopropylacrylamide-co-methacrylic acid microgels [p(NIPAM-co-MAAc] were synthesized by precipitation polymerization of N-isopropylacrylamide and methacrylic acid in aqueous medium. These microgels were characterized by dynamic light scattering and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. These microgels were used as micro-reactors for in situ synthesis of copper nanoparticles using sodium borohydride (NaBH4 as reducing agent. The hybrid microgels were used as catalysts for the reduction of nitrobenzene in aqueous media. The reaction was performed with different concentrations of cat­alyst and reducing agent. A linear relationship was found between apparent rate constant (kapp and amount of catalyst. When the amount of catalyst was increased from 0.13 to 0.76 mg/mL then kapp was increased from 0.03 to 0.14 min-1. Activation parameters were also determined by performing reaction at two different temperatures. The catalytic process has been discussed in terms of energy of activation, enthalpy of activation and entropy of activation. The synthesized particles were found to be stable even after 14 weeks and showed catalytic activity for the reduction of nitrobenzene.

  12. Preparation of silver nanoparticles/polydopamine functionalized polyacrylonitrile fiber paper and its catalytic activity for the reduction 4-nitrophenol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Shixiang, E-mail: shixianglu@bit.edu.cn [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Beijing Institute of Technology, Beijing 100081 (China); Univ. Lille, CNRS, Centrale Lille, ISEN, Univ. Valenciennes, UMR 8520 – IEMN, Lille F-59000 (France); Yu, Jianying; Cheng, Yuanyuan [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Beijing Institute of Technology, Beijing 100081 (China); Wang, Qian; Barras, Alexandre [Univ. Lille, CNRS, Centrale Lille, ISEN, Univ. Valenciennes, UMR 8520 – IEMN, Lille F-59000 (France); Xu, Wenguo [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Beijing Institute of Technology, Beijing 100081 (China); Szunerits, Sabine [Univ. Lille, CNRS, Centrale Lille, ISEN, Univ. Valenciennes, UMR 8520 – IEMN, Lille F-59000 (France); Cornu, David [Institut Européen des Membranes, UMR 5635, Ecole Nationale Supérieure de Chimie de Montpellier (ENSCM), CNRS, Université Montpellier 2, 276 rue de la Galéra, Montpellier 34000 (France); Boukherroub, Rabah, E-mail: rabah.boukherroub@iemn.univ-lille1.fr [Univ. Lille, CNRS, Centrale Lille, ISEN, Univ. Valenciennes, UMR 8520 – IEMN, Lille F-59000 (France)

    2017-07-31

    Graphical abstract: Illustration of the preparation of Ag nanoparticles coated paper and its catalytic application for 4-nitrophenol reduction into the corresponding 4-aminophenol. - Highlights: • Polyacrylonitrile paper was functionalized with polydopamine and Ag nanoparticles. • Polydopamine coating layer played both reductive and adhesive roles. • The composite material displayed good catalytic activity for 4-nitrophenol reduction. • The process was environmentally benign and facile. - Abstract: The study reports on the preparation of polyacrylonitrile fiber paper (PANFP) functionalized with polydopamine (PD) and silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs), named as Ag NPs/PD/PANFP. The composite material was obtained via a simple two-step chemical process. First, a thin polydopamine layer was coated onto the PANFP surface through immersion into an alkaline dopamine (pH 8.5) aqueous solution at room temperature. The reductive properties of polydopamine were further exploited for the deposition of Ag NPs. The morphology and chemical composition of the composite material were characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction pattern (XRD) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The catalytic activity of the nanocomposite was evaluated for the reduction of 4-nitrophenol using sodium borohydride (NaBH{sub 4}) at room temperature. The Ag NPs/PD/PANFP displayed good catalytic performance with a full reduction of 4-nitrophenol into the corresponding 4-aminophenol within 30 min. Moreover, the composite material exhibited a good stability up to 4 cycles without a significant loss of its catalytic activity.

  13. Electrochemical preparation of iron cuboid nanoparticles and their catalytic properties for nitrite reduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Yanxin; Chen Shengpei; Chen Qingsong; Zhou Zhiyou; Sun Shigang

    2008-01-01

    Iron cuboid nanoparticles supported on glassy carbon (denoted nm-Fe/GC) were prepared by electrochemical deposition under cyclic voltammetric (CV) conditions. The structure and composition of the Fe nanomaterials were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), selected area electron diffraction (SAED), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX). The results demonstrated that the Fe cuboid nanoparticles are dispersed discretely on GC substrate with an average size ca. 171 nm, and confirmed that the electrochemical synthesized nanocubes are single crystals of pure Fe. The catalytic properties of the Fe cuboid nanoparticles towards nitrite electroreduction were investigated, and enhanced electrocatalytic activity of the Fe nanocubes has been determined. In comparison with the data obtained on a bulk-Fe electrode, the onset potential of nitrite reduction on nm-Fe/GC is positively sifted by 100 mV, and the steady reduction current density is enhanced about 2.4-3.2 times

  14. Catalytic reduction of NO and N20 for CO on Co-ZSM-5

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rios, Luis Alberto; Aristizabal, Gladys Liliana; Ruiz, Julio Fernando; Montes Consuelo

    1996-01-01

    Several catalysts with the help of ZSM-5 with Co were tested in the catalytic reduction of NO and N2O using CO like agent reducer and in presence of variable quantities of O2 The cobalt incorporated in the zeolite ZSM-5 for the methods of ionic exchange, impregnation and substitution. ZSM-5 exchanged with Co presented the highest conversions of NO (80% to 5OO oC), in presence of 3000 ppm of O2; When adding 25.700 ppm of O2 the conversion it diminished notably, that which shows an effect inhibitor of the O2. The substituted catalysts and impregnated they were less active for the reduction of the NO. With all the catalysts conversions of 70-90% were achieved for the N2O; Additionally, marked deactivation of the catalyst was not presented with the time

  15. Nanostructured p-Type Semiconductor Electrodes and Photoelectrochemistry of Their Reduction Processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matteo Bonomo

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available This review reports the properties of p-type semiconductors with nanostructured features employed as photocathodes in photoelectrochemical cells (PECs. Light absorption is crucial for the activation of the reduction processes occurring at the p-type electrode either in the pristine or in a modified/sensitized state. Beside thermodynamics, the kinetics of the electron transfer (ET process from photocathode to a redox shuttle in the oxidized form are also crucial since the flow of electrons will take place correctly if the ET rate will overcome that one of recombination and trapping events which impede the charge separation produced by the absorption of light. Depending on the nature of the chromophore, i.e., if the semiconductor itself or the chemisorbed dye-sensitizer, different energy levels will be involved in the cathodic ET process. An analysis of the general properties and requirements of electrodic materials of p-type for being efficient photoelectrocatalysts of reduction processes in dye-sensitized solar cells (DSC will be given. The working principle of p-type DSCs will be described and extended to other p-type PECs conceived and developed for the conversion of the solar radiation into chemical products of energetic/chemical interest like non fossil fuels or derivatives of carbon dioxide.

  16. Effect of process parameters and injector position on the efficiency of NOx reduction by selective non catalytic reduction technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamid, A.; Mehmood, M.A.; Irfan, N.; Javed, M.T.; Waheed, K.

    2009-01-01

    An experimental investigation has been performed to study the effect of atomizer pressure dilution of the reducing reagent and the injector position on the efficiency or the NOx reduction by a selective non-catalytic reduction technique using urea as a reducing agent. Experiments were performed with a flow reactor in which flue gas was generated by the combustion of methane in air at stoichiometric amount of oxygen and the desired levels of initial NOx (400-450 ppm) were achieved by doping the flame with ammonia. The work was directed to investigate the effect of atomizer pressure, dilution of urea reagent and the injector position. The atomizer pressure was varied from 1 to 3bar and 20-25% increase in efficiency was observed by decreasing the pressure. Effect of dilution of urea solution was investigated by varying the strength of the solution from the 8 to 32% and 40-45% increase in the efficiency was observed. Effects of injector position was investigated by injecting the urea solution both in co current and counter current direction of the flue gases and 20-25% increase in the efficiency was observed in counter current direction. (author)

  17. Catalytically supported reduction of emissions from small-scale biomass furnace systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hartmann, Ingo; Lenz, Volker; Schenker, Marian; Thiel, Christian; Kraus, Markus; Matthes, Mirjam; Roland, Ulf; Bindig, Rene; Einicke, Wolf-Dietrich

    2011-01-01

    The increased use of solid biomass in small combustion for generating heat from renewable energy sources is unfortunately associated with increased emissions of airborne pollutants. The reduction is possible on the one hand by the use of high-quality modern furnaces to the latest state of the art. On the other hand, several promising approaches method for retrofitting small-scale furnaces are currently being developed that will allow an effective emission reduction by the subsequent treatment of the exhaust gas. The overview of current available emission control technologies for small-scale biomass combustion plants shows that there is still considerable need for research on the sustainable production of heat from solid biofuels. The amendment to the 1st BImSchV provides a necessary drastic reduction of discharged pollutants from small-scale biomass furnaces. When using the fuel wood in modern central heating boilers the required limits can be met at full load. However, dynamic load changes can cause brief dramatic emission increases even with wood central heating boilers. Firebox and control optimization must contribute in the future to a further reduction of emissions. The typical simple single-room fireplaces like hand-fed wood stoves are suitable under type test conditions to comply the limit values. By contrast, in practical operation, the harmful gas emissions be exceeded without secondary measures normally. The performed experimental investigations show that a reduction of both CO and of organic compounds by catalytic combustion is possible. In addition to developing specially adapted catalysts, it is necessary to provide additional dust separation by combined processes, since conventional catalysts are not suitable for deposition and retention of particulate matter or would lose their activity due to dust accumulation on the active surface, when the catalyst would act as a filter at the same time. To enable sufficiently high reaction temperatures and thus a

  18. Selective catalytic reduction (SCR) NOx control for small natural gas-fired prime movers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shareef, G.S.; Stone, D.K.; Ferry, K.R.; Johnson, K.L.; Locke, K.S.

    1992-01-01

    The application of selective catalytic reduction (SCR) to small natural gas-fired prime movers at cogeneration facilities and compressor stations could possibly increase due to regulatory forces to limit NO x from such sources. The natural gas industry is presently without a current database with which to evaluate the cost and operating characteristics of SCR under the conditions anticipated for small prime movers. This paper presents the results from a two-phase study undertaken to document SCR applications with emphasis on SCR system performance and costs. The database of small natural gas-fired prime mover SCR experience, focusing on prime mover characterization, SCR system performance, and SCR system costs will be described. Result from analysis of performance and cost data will be discussed, including analytical tools developed to project SCR system performance and costs

  19. On the Pt(+) and Rh(+) Catalytic Activity in the Nitrous Oxide Reduction by Carbon Monoxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rondinelli, F; Russo, N; Toscano, M

    2008-11-11

    Nitrous oxide activation by CO in the presence of platinum and rhodium monocations was elucidated by density functional methods for ground and first excited states. Platinum and rhodium cations fulfill the thermodynamic request for the oxygen-atom transport that allows the catalytic cycle to be completed, but actually, just the first one meaningfully improves the kinetics of the process. For both catalysts, the reaction pathways show the only activation barrier in correspondence of nitrogen release and monoxide cation formation. The kinetic analysis of the potential energy profile, in agreement with ICP/SIFT MS experimental data, indicates that platinum performs more in the reduction, while the whole process is not sufficiently fast in the case of rhodium ionic catalyst.

  20. Comparative study involving the uranium determination through catalytic reduction of nitrates and nitrides by using decoupled plasma nitridation (DPN)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aguiar, Marco Antonio Souza; Gutz, Ivano G. Rolf

    1999-01-01

    This paper reports a comparative study on the determination of uranium through the catalytic reduction of nitrate and nitride using the decoupled plasma nitridation. The uranyl ions are a good catalyst for the reduction of NO - 3 and NO - 2 ions on the surface of a hanging drop mercury electrode (HDME). The presence of NO - in a solution with p H = 3 presented a catalytic signal more intense than the signal obtained with NO - 3 (concentration ten times higher). A detection limit of 1x10 9 M was obtained using the technique of decoupled plasma nitridation (DPN), suggesting the development of a sensitive way for the determination of uranium in different matrixes

  1. Effects of a TiC substrate on the catalytic activity of Pt for NO reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Xingli; Fu, Zhaoming; Li, Shasha; Zhang, Xilin; Yang, Zongxian

    2016-05-11

    Density functional theory calculations are used to elucidate the catalytic properties of a Pt monolayer supported on a TiC(001) substrate (Pt/TiC) toward NO reduction. It is found that the compound system of Pt/TiC has a good stability due to the strong Pt-TiC interaction. The diverse dissociation paths (namely the direct dissociation mechanism and the dimeric mechanism) are investigated. The transition state searching calculations suggest that NO has strong diffusion ability and small activation energy for dissociation on the Pt/TiC. For NO reduction on the Pt/TiC surface, we have found that the direct dissociation mechanisms (NO + N + O → NO2 + N and NO + N + O → N2 + O + O) are easier with a smaller dissociation barrier than those on the Pt(111) surface; and the dimeric process (NO + NO → (NO)2 → N2O + O → N2 + O + O) is considered to be dominant or significant with even a lower energy barrier than that of the direct dissociation. The results show that Pt/TiC can serve as an efficient catalyst for NO reduction.

  2. Identification of catalytic sites in cobalt-nitrogen-carbon materials for the oxygen reduction reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zitolo, Andrea; Ranjbar-Sahraie, Nastaran; Mineva, Tzonka; Li, Jingkun; Jia, Qingying; Stamatin, Serban; Harrington, George F; Lyth, Stephen Mathew; Krtil, Petr; Mukerjee, Sanjeev; Fonda, Emiliano; Jaouen, Frédéric

    2017-10-16

    Single-atom catalysts with full utilization of metal centers can bridge the gap between molecular and solid-state catalysis. Metal-nitrogen-carbon materials prepared via pyrolysis are promising single-atom catalysts but often also comprise metallic particles. Here, we pyrolytically synthesize a Co-N-C material only comprising atomically dispersed cobalt ions and identify with X-ray absorption spectroscopy, magnetic susceptibility measurements and density functional theory the structure and electronic state of three porphyrinic moieties, CoN 4 C 12 , CoN 3 C 10,porp and CoN 2 C 5 . The O 2 electro-reduction and operando X-ray absorption response are measured in acidic medium on Co-N-C and compared to those of a Fe-N-C catalyst prepared similarly. We show that cobalt moieties are unmodified from 0.0 to 1.0 V versus a reversible hydrogen electrode, while Fe-based moieties experience structural and electronic-state changes. On the basis of density functional theory analysis and established relationships between redox potential and O 2 -adsorption strength, we conclude that cobalt-based moieties bind O 2 too weakly for efficient O 2 reduction.Nitrogen-doped carbon materials with atomically dispersed iron or cobalt are promising for catalytic use. Here, the authors show that cobalt moieties have a higher redox potential, bind oxygen more weakly and are less active toward oxygen reduction than their iron counterpart, despite similar coordination.

  3. Observation of modulation speed enhancement, frequency modulation suppression, and phase noise reduction by detuned loading in a coupled-cavity semiconductor laser

    OpenAIRE

    Vahala, Kerry; Paslaski, Joel; Yariv, Amnon

    1985-01-01

    Simultaneous direct modulation response enhancement, phase noise (linewidth) reduction, and frequency modulation suppression are produced in a coupled-cavity semiconductor laser by the detuned loading mechanism.

  4. Low Temperature Selective Catalytic Reduction of Nitrogen Oxides in Production of Nitric Acid by the Use of Liquid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kabljanac, Ž.

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the application of low-temperature selective catalytic reduction of nitrous oxides in the tail gas of the dual-pressure process of nitric acid production. The process of selective catalytic reduction is carried out using the TiO2/WO3 heterogeneous catalyst applied on a ceramic honeycomb structure with a high geometric surface area per volume. The process design parameters for nitric acid production by the dual-pressure procedure in a capacity range from 75 to 100 % in comparison with designed capacity for one production line is shown in the Table 1. Shown is the effectiveness of selective catalytic reduction in the temperature range of the tail gas from 180 to 230 °C with direct application of liquid ammonia, without prior evaporation to gaseous state. The results of inlet and outlet concentrations of nitrous oxides in the tail gas of the nitric acid production process are shown in Figures 1 and 2. Figure 3 shows the temperature dependence of the selective catalytic reduction of nitrous oxides expressed as NO2in the tail gas of nitric acid production with the application of a constant mass flow of liquid ammonia of 13,0 kg h-1 and average inlet mass concentration of the nitrous oxides expressed as NO2of 800,0 mgm-3 during 100 % production capacity. The specially designed liquid-ammonia direct-dosing system along with the effective homogenization of the tail gas resulted in emission levels of nitrous oxides expressed as NO2 in tail gas ranging from 100,0 to 185,0 mg m-3. The applied low-temperature selective catalytic reduction of the nitrous oxides in the tail gases by direct use of liquid ammonia is shown in Figure 4. It is shown that low-temperature selective catalytic reduction with direct application of liquid ammonia opens a new opportunity in the reduction of nitrous oxide emissions during nitric acid production without the risk of dangerous ammonium nitrate occurring in the process of subsequent energy utilization of

  5. Catalytic pyrolysis of LDPE leads to valuable resource recovery and reduction of waste problems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shah, Jasmin [Institute of Chemical Sciences, University of Peshawar, N.W.F.P. (Pakistan); Jan, M. Rasul [University of Malakand, Chakdara, N.W.F.P. (Pakistan); Mabood, Fazal [Department of Chemistry, University of Malakand, Chakdara, N.W.F.P. (Pakistan); Jabeen, Farah [Department of Chemistry, Sarhad University, N.W.F.P. (Pakistan)

    2010-12-15

    . This was further confirmed by Bromine number tests. The values of which lie in the range of 0.1-12.8 g/ml, which fall in the range for olefin mixture. Phenol and carbonyl contents were quantified using UV/Visible spectroscopy and the values lie in the range of 1-8920 {mu}g/ml and 5-169 {mu}g/ml for both phenols and carbonyls respectively. The components of different hydrocarbons in the oil mixture were separated by using column chromatography and fractional distillation followed by characterization with FT-IR spectroscopy. The interpretation of FT-IR spectra shows that catalytic pyrolysis of LDPE leads to the formation of a complex mixture of alkanes, alkenes, carbonyl group containing compounds like aldehydes, ketones, aromatic compounds and substituted aromatic compounds like phenols. It could be concluded, that catalytic pyrolysis of LDPE leads to valuable resource recovery and reduction of waste problem. (author)

  6. A novel green synthesis and characterization of Ag NPs with its ultra-rapid catalytic reduction of methyl green dye

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Junejo, Y.; Sirajuddin; Baykal, A.; Safdar, M.; Balouch, A.

    2014-01-01

    Ampicillin derived silver nanoparticles were synthesized in an aqueous medium. Particle size and shape were determined by Transmission electron microscopy which showed the monodispersed morphology. The Fourier transform infrared spectra were represented the interaction of Ampicillin with surface of Ampicillin derived silver nanoparticles. X-ray powder diffraction study gave crystalline nature of the Ampicillin derived silver nanoparticles which exhibited exceptional catalytic activity for the reduction of Methylene Green dye. However, complete reduction of dye was accomplished by Ampicillin derived silver nanoparticles within 4 min only. The catalytic performance of these nanoparticles was adsorbed on glass. They were recovered easily from reaction medium and reused with enhanced catalytic potential. Based upon these results it has been concluded that Ampicillin derived silver nanoparticles are novel, rapid and highly economical alternative for environmental safety against pollution by dyes and extendable for control of other reducible contaminants as well.

  7. Application of chronocoulomentry for trace levels uranium determination using catalytic nitrate reduction on mercury electrode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cantagallo, M.I.C.

    1988-01-01

    With the aim of improving the sensitivity of the electro-analytical determination of uranium at trace levels, the uranium catalyzed reduction of nitrate on mercury electrodes was used and the technique of chronocoulometry was compared with other voltammetric techniques. The catalytic process offers high sensitivity in comparison with uranyl reduction in absence of nitrate. The chronocoulometry, virtually unexplored for analytical applications, was found to be specially well suited for determinations based on this kind of electrode process, when using current integration times in the range of several seconds. Under these conditions the interference from diffusion controlled faradaic processes is reduced to a minimum. Several experimental parameters were investigated (eletrolyte composition, potential program, integration time, blank correction, temperature, previous separation) and adequate conditions were selected for the analytical determination of pure and real samples. The proposed method was applied and evaluated with real and, when necessary, an adapted liquid-liquid extraction procedure was used. Reference materials with complex matrices like rocks were first solubilized by hot digestion under pressure. The obtained results are in good agreement with the values obtained with other techniques such as X-ray fluorescence, mass spectrometry-isotope dilution and epithermal netron activation analysis. (author) [pt

  8. Efficient Catalytic Reduction of Hexavalent Chromium With Pd-decorated Carbon Nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Ji Dang; Choi, Hyun Chul [Chonnam National University, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    Heavy metal pollution is currently a serious environmental issue. Chromium (Cr) and chromium compounds are commonly found in wastewater discharged by various industries such as wood preservation, leather tanning, electroplating, metal finishing, and the production of chemicals. Pd nanoparticles can easily be introduced into CNTs by performing DCC-activated amidation. Our TEM and XRD results indicate that well-dispersed metallic Pd nanoparticles are anchored on the surface of the amidated CNTs. The XPS results suggest that the Pd content of the sample is approximately 9.8 atomic %. In comparison with the commercial Pd catalyst, the prepared Pd-CNTs were demonstrated to exhibit good catalytic activity in the reduction of 4-NP by NaBH4. Moreover, the Pd-CNT catalyst can easily be separated by performing a simple filtration and reused over at least 10 cycles. This Pd-CNT catalyst is therefore believed to have significant potential for use as a reusable catalyst in the reduction of Cr(Vi)

  9. A fuzzy logic urea dosage controller design for two-cell selective catalytic reduction systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Kun; Wei, Lijiang; Jiang, Kai

    2017-12-22

    Diesel engines have dominated in the heavy-duty vehicular and marine power source. However, the induced air pollution is a big problem. As people's awareness of environmental protection increasing, the emission regulations of diesel-engine are becoming more stringent. In order to achieve the emission regulations, the after-treatment system is a necessary choice. Specifically, the selective catalytic reduction (SCR) system has been widely applied to reduce the NO X emissions of diesel engine. Different from single-cell SCR systems, the two-cell systems have various benefits from the modeling and control perspective. In this paper, the urea dosage controller design for two-cell SCR systems was investigated. Firstly, the two-cell SCR modeling was introduced. Based on the developed model, the design procedure for the fuzzy logic urea dosage controller was well addressed. Secondly, simulations and comparisons were employed via an experimental verification of the whole vehicle simulator. And the results showed that the designed controller simultaneously achieved high NO X reduction rate and low tail-pipe ammonia slip. Copyright © 2017 ISA. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. System and method for selective catalytic reduction of nitrogen oxides in combustion exhaust gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobolevskiy, Anatoly; Rossin, Joseph A

    2014-04-08

    A multi-stage selective catalytic reduction (SCR) unit (32) provides efficient reduction of NOx and other pollutants from about 50-550.degree. C. in a power plant (19). Hydrogen (24) and ammonia (29) are variably supplied to the SCR unit depending on temperature. An upstream portion (34) of the SCR unit catalyzes NOx+NH.sub.3 reactions above about 200.degree. C. A downstream portion (36) catalyzes NOx+H.sub.2 reactions below about 260.degree. C., and catalyzes oxidation of NH.sub.3, CO, and VOCs with oxygen in the exhaust above about 200.degree. C., efficiently removing NOx and other pollutants over a range of conditions with low slippage of NH.sub.3. An ammonia synthesis unit (28) may be connected to the SCR unit to provide NH.sub.3 as needed, avoiding transport and storage of ammonia or urea at the site. A carbonaceous gasification plant (18) on site may supply hydrogen and nitrogen to the ammonia synthesis unit, and hydrogen to the SCR unit.

  11. Mesoporous Fe-containing ZSM-5 zeolite single crystal catalysts for selective catalytic reduction of nitric oxide by ammonia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kustov, Arkadii; Egeblad, Kresten; Kustova, Marina

    2007-01-01

    Mesoporous and conventional Fe-containing ZSM-5 catalysts (0.5–8 wt% Fe) were prepared using a simple impregnationmethod and tested in NO selective catalytic reduction (SCR) with NH3. It was found that mesoporous Fe-ZSM-5 catalysts exhibit higher SCR activities than comparable conventional cataly...

  12. Validation of the catalytic properties of Cu-Os/13X using single fixed bed reactor in selective catalytic reduction of NO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oh, Kwang Seok; Woo, Seong Ihl

    2007-01-01

    Catalytic decomposition of NO over Cu-Os/13X has been carried out in a tubular fixed bed reactor at atmospheric pressure and the results were compared with literature data performed by high-throughput screening (HTS). The activity and durability of Cu-Os/13X prepared by conventional ion-exchange method have been investigated in the presence of H 2 O and SO 2 . It was found that Cu-Os/13X prepared by ion-exchange shows a high activity in a wide temperature range in selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of NO with C 3 H 6 compared to Cu/13X, proving the existence of more NO adsorption site on Cu-Os/13X. However, Cu-Os/13X exhibited low activity in the presence of water, and was quite different from the result reported in literature. SO 2 resistance is also low and does not recover its original activity when the SO 2 was blocked in the feed gas stream. This result suggested that catalytic activity between combinatorial screening and conventional testing should be compared to confirm the validity of high-throughput screening

  13. Enhanced catalytic activity over MIL-100(Fe) loaded ceria catalysts for the selective catalytic reduction of NOx with NH₃ at low temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Peng; Sun, Hong; Quan, Xie; Chen, Shuo

    2016-01-15

    The development of catalysts for selective catalytic reduction (SCR) reactions that are highly active at low temperatures and show good resistance to SO2 and H2O is still a challenge. In this study, we have designed and developed a high-performance SCR catalyst based on nano-sized ceria encapsulated inside the pores of MIL-100(Fe) that combines excellent catalytic power with a metal organic framework architecture synthesized by the impregnation method (IM). Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) revealed the encapsulation of ceria in the cavities of MIL-100(Fe). The prepared IM-CeO2/MIL-100(Fe) catalyst shows improved catalytic activity both at low temperatures and throughout a wide temperature window. The temperature window for 90% NOx conversion ranges from 196 to 300°C. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and in situ diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy (DRIFT) analysis indicated that the nano-sized ceria encapsulated inside MIL-100(Fe) promotes the production of chemisorbed oxygen on the catalyst surface, which greatly enhances the formation of the NO2 species responsible for fast SCR reactions. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Defect-meditated efficient catalytic activity toward p-nitrophenol reduction: A case study of nitrogen doped calcium niobate system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Su, Yiguo; Huang, Shushu; Wang, Tingting; Peng, Liman; Wang, Xiaojing

    2015-01-01

    Graphical abstract: A series of nitrogen doped Ca 2 Nb 2 O 7 was successfully prepared via ion-exchange method, which was found to be an efficient and green noble-metal-free catalyst toward catalytic reduction of p-nitrophenol. - Highlights: • Nitrogen doped Ca 2 Nb 2 O 7 was found to be an efficient and green noble-metal-free catalyst toward catalytic reduction of p-nitrophenol. • Defective nitrogen and oxygen species were found to play synergetic roles in the reduction of p-nitrophenol. • Nitrogen doped Ca 2 Nb 2 O 7 showed photo-synergistic promotion effects toward p-nitrophenol reduction under UV light irradiation. - Abstract: This work reported on the synthesis of a series of nitrogen doped Ca 2 Nb 2 O 7 with tunable nitrogen content that were found to be efficient and green noble-metal-free catalysts toward catalytic reduction of p-nitrophenol. XPS and ESR results indicated that the introduction of nitrogen in Ca 2 Nb 2 O 7 gave rise to a large number of defective nitrogen and oxygen species. Defective nitrogen and oxygen species were found to play synergetic roles in the reduction of p-nitrophenol. The underlying mechanism is completely different from those reported for metallic nanoparticles. Moreover, the more negative conduction band edge potential enabled nitrogen doped Ca 2 Nb 2 O 7 to show photo-synergistic effects that could accelerate the reduction rate toward p-nitrophenol under UV light irradiation. This work may provide a strategy for tuning the catalytic performance by modulating the chemical composition, electronic structure as well as surface defect chemistry

  15. Enhancement of high-energy distribution tail in Monte Carlo semiconductor simulations using a Variance Reduction Scheme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincenza Di Stefano

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available The Multicomb variance reduction technique has been introduced in the Direct Monte Carlo Simulation for submicrometric semiconductor devices. The method has been implemented in bulk silicon. The simulations show that the statistical variance of hot electrons is reduced with some computational cost. The method is efficient and easy to implement in existing device simulators.

  16. Ultra-fast catalytic reduction of dyes by ionic liquid recoverable and reusable mefenamic acid derived gold nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hassan, Syeda Sara [National Center of Excellence in Analytical Chemistry, University of Sindh, Jamshoro 76080 (Pakistan); Sirajuddin, E-mail: drsiraj03@yahoo.com [National Center of Excellence in Analytical Chemistry, University of Sindh, Jamshoro 76080 (Pakistan); Solangi, Amber Rehana [National Center of Excellence in Analytical Chemistry, University of Sindh, Jamshoro 76080 (Pakistan); Agheem, Mohammad Hassan [Center for Pure and Applied Geology, University of Sindh, Jamshoro 76080 (Pakistan); Junejo, Yasmeen; Kalwar, Nazar Hussain; Tagar, Zulfiqar Ali [National Center of Excellence in Analytical Chemistry, University of Sindh, Jamshoro 76080 (Pakistan)

    2011-06-15

    Highlights: {yields} Gold nanoparticles (AuNps) have been fabricated by a simple chemical method. {yields} AuNps were capped successfully in one step by mefenamic acid (MA). {yields} MA capped AuNps catalytically reduced the mixture of 3 dyes in just 15 s. {yields} AuNps were recovered by ionic liquid and reused for dye(s) reduction effectively. - Abstract: We synthesized mefenamic acid (MA) derived gold nanoparticles (MA-AuNps) in aqueous solution (MA-Au sol). Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) of the sol at 1, 5, 15 and 60 min showed changes in size and shape of formed AuNps. Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) Spectroscopy revealed the interaction between AuNps and MA. Each Au sol exhibited exceptional catalytic activity for the reduction of Methylene Blue (MB), Rose Bengal (RB) and Eosin B (EB) dye individually as well as collectively. However, complete reduction of dye(s) was accomplished by Au sol of 5 min in just 15 s. The catalytic performance of Ma-Au sol was far superior to that adsorbed on glass. AuNps were recovered with the help of water insoluble room temperature ionic liquid and reused with enhanced catalytic potential. This finding is a novel, rapid and highly economical alternative for environmental safety against pollution by dyes and extendable for control of other reducible contaminants as well.

  17. Green and facile synthesis of fibrous Ag/cotton composites and their catalytic properties for 4-nitrophenol reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ziyu; Jia, Zhigang; Ni, Tao; Li, Shengbiao

    2017-12-01

    Natural cotton, featuring abundant oxygen-containing functional groups, has been utilized as a reductant to synthesize Ag nanoparticles on its surface. Through the facile and environment-friendly reduction process, the fibrous Ag/cotton composite (FAC) was conveniently synthesized. Various characterization techniques including XRD, XPS, TEM, SEM, EDS and FT-IR had been utilized to study the material microstructure and surface properties. The resulting FAC exhibited favorable activity on the catalytic reduction of 4-nitrophenol with high reaction rate. Moreover, the fibrous Ag/cotton composites were capable to form a desirable catalytic mat for catalyzing and simultaneous product separation. Reactants passing through the mat could be catalytically transformed to product, which is of great significance for water treatment. Such catalyst (FAC) was thus expected to have the potential as a highly efficient, cost-effective and eco-friendly catalyst for industrial applications. More importantly, this newly developed synthetic methodology could serve as a general tool to design and synthesize other metal/biomass composites catalysts for a wider range of catalytic applications.

  18. Ultra-fast catalytic reduction of dyes by ionic liquid recoverable and reusable mefenamic acid derived gold nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hassan, Syeda Sara; Sirajuddin; Solangi, Amber Rehana; Agheem, Mohammad Hassan; Junejo, Yasmeen; Kalwar, Nazar Hussain; Tagar, Zulfiqar Ali

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Gold nanoparticles (AuNps) have been fabricated by a simple chemical method. → AuNps were capped successfully in one step by mefenamic acid (MA). → MA capped AuNps catalytically reduced the mixture of 3 dyes in just 15 s. → AuNps were recovered by ionic liquid and reused for dye(s) reduction effectively. - Abstract: We synthesized mefenamic acid (MA) derived gold nanoparticles (MA-AuNps) in aqueous solution (MA-Au sol). Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) of the sol at 1, 5, 15 and 60 min showed changes in size and shape of formed AuNps. Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) Spectroscopy revealed the interaction between AuNps and MA. Each Au sol exhibited exceptional catalytic activity for the reduction of Methylene Blue (MB), Rose Bengal (RB) and Eosin B (EB) dye individually as well as collectively. However, complete reduction of dye(s) was accomplished by Au sol of 5 min in just 15 s. The catalytic performance of Ma-Au sol was far superior to that adsorbed on glass. AuNps were recovered with the help of water insoluble room temperature ionic liquid and reused with enhanced catalytic potential. This finding is a novel, rapid and highly economical alternative for environmental safety against pollution by dyes and extendable for control of other reducible contaminants as well.

  19. Dual passivation of intrinsic defects at the compound semiconductor/oxide interface using an oxidant and a reductant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kent, Tyler; Chagarov, Evgeniy; Edmonds, Mary; Droopad, Ravi; Kummel, Andrew C

    2015-05-26

    Studies have shown that metal oxide semiconductor field-effect transistors fabricated utilizing compound semiconductors as the channel are limited in their electrical performance. This is attributed to imperfections at the semiconductor/oxide interface which cause electronic trap states, resulting in inefficient modulation of the Fermi level. The physical origin of these states is still debated mainly because of the difficulty in assigning a particular electronic state to a specific physical defect. To gain insight into the exact source of the electronic trap states, density functional theory was employed to model the intrinsic physical defects on the InGaAs (2 × 4) surface and to model the effective passivation of these defects by utilizing both an oxidant and a reductant to eliminate metallic bonds and dangling-bond-induced strain at the interface. Scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy were employed to experimentally determine the physical and electronic defects and to verify the effectiveness of dual passivation with an oxidant and a reductant. While subsurface chemisorption of oxidants on compound semiconductor substrates can be detrimental, it has been shown theoretically and experimentally that oxidants are critical to removing metallic defects at oxide/compound semiconductor interfaces present in nanoscale channels, oxides, and other nanostructures.

  20. Catalytic reduction of NOx in gasoline engine exhaust over copper- and nickel-exchanged X-zeolite catalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhattacharyya, S.; Das, R.K.

    2001-01-01

    Catalytic removal of NO x in engine exhaust gases can be accomplished by non-selective reduction, selective reduction and decomposition. Noble metals are extensively used for non-selective reduction of NO x and up to 90% of engine NO x emissions can be reduced in a stoichiometric exhaust. This requirement of having the stoichiometric fuel-air ratio acts against efficiency improvement of engines. Selective NO x reduction in the presence of different reductants such as, NH 3 , urea or hydrocarbons, requires close control of the amount of reductant being injected which otherwise may be emitted as a pollutant. Catalytic decomposition is the best option for NO x removal. Nevertheless, catalysts which are durable, economic and active for NO x reduction at normal engine exhaust temperature ranges are still being investigated. Three catalysts based on X-zeolite have been developed by exchanging the Na+ ion with copper, nickel and copper-nickel metal ions and applied to the exhaust of a stationary gasoline engine to explore their potential for catalytic reduction of NO x under a wide range of engine and exhaust conditions. Some encouraging results have been obtained. The catalyst Cu-X exhibits much better NO x reduction performance at any temperature in comparison to Cu-Ni-X and Ni-X; while Cu-Ni-X catalyst exhibits slightly better performance than Ni-X catalyst. Maximum NO x efficiency achieved with Cu-X catalyst is 59.2% at a space velocity (sv) of 31 000 h -1 ; while for Cu-Ni-X and Ni-X catalysts the equivalent numbers are 60.4% and 56% respectively at a sv of 22 000 h -1 . Unlike noble metals, the doped X-zeolite catalysts exhibit significant NO x reduction capability for a wide range of air/fuel ratio and with a slower rate of decline as well with increase in air/fuel ratio. (author)

  1. Research and proposal on selective catalytic reduction reactor optimization for industrial boiler.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yiming; Li, Jian; He, Hong

    2017-08-24

    The advanced computational fluid dynamics (CFD) software STAR-CCM+ was used to simulate a denitrification (De-NOx) project for a boiler in this paper, and the simulation result was verified based on a physical model. Two selective catalytic reduction (SCR) reactors were developed: reactor 1 was optimized and reactor 2 was developed based on reactor 1. Various indicators, including gas flow field, ammonia concentration distribution, temperature distribution, gas incident angle, and system pressure drop were analyzed. The analysis indicated that reactor 2 was of outstanding performance and could simplify developing greatly. Ammonia injection grid (AIG), the core component of the reactor, was studied; three AIGs were developed and their performances were compared and analyzed. The result indicated that AIG 3 was of the best performance. The technical indicators were proposed for SCR reactor based on the study. Flow filed distribution, gas incident angle, and temperature distribution are subjected to SCR reactor shape to a great extent, and reactor 2 proposed in this paper was of outstanding performance; ammonia concentration distribution is subjected to ammonia injection grid (AIG) shape, and AIG 3 could meet the technical indicator of ammonia concentration without mounting ammonia mixer. The developments above on the reactor and the AIG are both of great application value and social efficiency.

  2. Environmental and economic evaluation of selective non-catalytic reduction of nitrogen oxides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parchevskii, V. M.; Shchederkina, T. E.; Proshina, A. O.

    2017-11-01

    There are two groups of atmosphere protecting measures: technology (primary) and treatment (secondary). When burning high-calorie low-volatile brands of coals in the furnaces with liquid slag removal to achieve emission standards required joint use of these two methods, for example, staged combustion and selective non-catalytic reduction recovery (SNCR). For the economically intelligent combination of these two methods it is necessary to have information not only about the environmental performance of each method, but also the operating costs per unit of reduced emission. The authors of this report are made an environmental-economic analysis of SNCR on boiler Π-50P Kashirskaya power station. The obtained results about the dependence of costs from the load of the boiler and the mass emissions of nitrogen oxides then approximates into empirical formulas, is named as environmental and economic characteristics, which is suitable for downloading into controllers and other control devices for subsequent implementation of optimal control of emissions to ensure compliance with environmental regulations at the lowest cost at any load of the boiler.

  3. A catalytic wet oxidation process for mixed waste volume reduction/recycling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dhooge, Patrick M.

    1992-01-01

    Mixed wastes have presented a challenge to treatment and destruction technologies. A recently developed catalytic wet oxidation method has promising characteristics for volume reduction and recycling of mixed wastes. The process utilizes iron (III) as an oxidant in the presence of homogeneous cocatalysts which increase organics' oxidation rates and the rate of oxidation of iron (II) by oxygen. The reaction is conducted in an aqueous mineral acid solution at temperatures of 373 - 573 deg K. The mineral acid should solvate a number of heavy metals, including U and Pu. Studies of reaction rates show that the process can oxidize a wide range of organic compounds including aromatics and chlorinated hydrocarbons. Rate constants in the range of 10 -7 to 10 -4 sec -1 , depending on the cocatalyst, acidity, type of anions, type of organic, temperature, and time. Activation energies ranged from 25. to 32. KJ/mole. Preliminary measurements of the extent of oxidation which could be obtained ranged from 80% for trichloroethylene to 99.8% for 1,2,4-trimethylbenzene; evidence was obtained that absorption by the fluorocarbon liners of the reaction bombs allowed some of the organics to escape exposure to the catalyst solution. The results indicate that complete oxidation of the organics used here, and presumably many others, can be achieved. (author)

  4. Synergetic Effects of Alcohol/Water Mixing on the Catalytic Reductive Fractionation of Poplar Wood

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Renders, Tom; Van den Bosch, Sander; Vangeel, Thijs; Ennaert, Thijs; Koelewijn, Steven-Friso; Van den Bossche, Gil; Courtin, Christophe M.; Schutyser, Wouter; Sels, Bert F.

    2016-12-05

    One of the foremost challenges in lignocellulose conversion encompasses the integration of effective lignin valorization in current carbohydrate-oriented biorefinery schemes. Catalytic reductive fractionation (CRF) of lignocellulose offers a technology to simultaneously produce lignin-derived platform chemicals and a carbohydrate-enriched pulp via the combined action of lignin solvolysis and metal-catalyzed hydrogenolysis. Herein, the solvent (composition) plays a crucial role. In this contribution, we study the influence of alcohol/water mixtures by processing poplar sawdust in varying MeOH/water and EtOH/water blends. The results show particular effects that strongly depend on the applied water concentration. Low water concentrations enhance the removal of lignin from the biomass, while the majority of the carbohydrates are left untouched (scenario A). Contrarily, high water concentrations favor the solubilization of both hemicellulose and lignin, resulting in a more pure cellulosic residue (scenario B). For both scenarios, an evaluation was made to determine the most optimal solvent composition, based on two earlier introduced empirical efficiency descriptors (denoted LFDE and LFFE). According to these measures, 30 (A) and 70 vol % water (B) showed to be the optimal balance for both MeOH/water and EtOH/water mixtures. This successful implementation of alcohol/water mixtures allows operation under milder processing conditions in comparison to pure alcohol solvents, which is advantageous from an industrial point of view.

  5. Oxidation of mercury across selective catalytic reduction catalysts in coal-fired power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Constance L. Senior [Reaction Engineering International, Salt Lake City, UT (United States)

    2006-01-15

    A kinetic model for predicting the amount of mercury (Hg) oxidation across selective catalytic reduction (SCR) systems in coal-fired power plants was developed and tested. The model incorporated the effects of diffusion within the porous SCR catalyst and the competition between ammonia and Hg for active sites on the catalyst. Laboratory data on Hg oxidation in simulated flue gas and slipstream data on Hg oxidation in flue gas from power plants were modeled. The model provided good fits to the data for eight different catalysts, both plate and monolith, across a temperature range of 280-420{sup o}C, with space velocities varying from 1900 to 5000 hr{sup -1}. Space velocity, temperature, hydrochloric acid content of the flue gas, ratio of ammonia to nitric oxide, and catalyst design all affected Hg oxidation across the SCR catalyst. The model can be used to predict the impact of coal properties, catalyst design, and operating conditions on Hg oxidation across SCRs. 20 refs., 9 figs., 2 tabs.

  6. INVESTIGATION OF AMMONIA ADSORPTION ON FLY ASH DUE TO INSTALLATION OF SELECTIVE CATALYTIC REDUCTION SYSTEMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    G.F. Brendel; J.E. Bonetti; R.F. Rathbone; R.N. Frey Jr.

    2000-11-01

    This report summarizes an investigation of the potential impacts associated with the utilization of selective catalytic reduction (SCR) systems at coal-fired power plants. The study was sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy Emission Control By-Products Consortium, Dominion Generation, the University of Kentucky Center for Applied Energy Research and GAI Consultants, Inc. SCR systems are effective in reducing nitrogen oxides (NOx) emissions as required by the Clean Air Act (CAA) Amendments. However, there may be potential consequences associated with ammonia contamination of stack emissions and combustion by-products from these systems. Costs for air quality, landfill and pond environmental compliance may increase significantly and the marketability of ash may be seriously reduced, which, in turn, may also lead to increased disposal costs. The potential impacts to air, surface water, groundwater, ash disposal, ash utilization, health and safety, and environmental compliance can not be easily quantified based on the information presently available. The investigation included: (1) a review of information and data available from published and unpublished sources; (2) baseline ash characterization testing of ash samples produced from several central Appalachian high-volatile bituminous coals from plants that do not currently employ SCR systems in order to characterize the ash prior to ammonia exposure; (3) an investigation of ammonia release from fly ash, including leaching and thermal studies; and (4) an evaluation of the potential impacts on plant equipment, air quality, water quality, ash disposal operations, and ash marketing.

  7. Alumina- and titania-based monolithic catalysts for low temperature selective catalytic reduction of nitrogen oxides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blanco, J.; Avila, P.; Suarez, S.; Martin, J.A.; Knapp, C.

    2000-01-01

    The selective catalytic reduction of NO+NO 2 (NO x ) at low temperature (180-230C) with ammonia has been investigated with copper-nickel and vanadium oxides supported on titania and alumina monoliths. The influence of the operating temperature, as well as NH 3 /NO x and NO/NO 2 inlet ratios has been studied. High NO x conversions were obtained at operating conditions similar to those used in industrial scale units with all the catalysts. Reaction temperature, ammonia and nitrogen dioxide inlet concentration increased the N 2 O formation with the copper-nickel catalysts, while no increase was observed with the vanadium catalysts. The vanadium-titania catalyst exhibited the highest DeNO x activity, with no detectable ammonia slip and a low N 2 O formation when NH 3 /NO x inlet ratio was kept below 0.8. TPR results of this catalyst with NO/NH 3 /O 2 , NO 2 /NH 3 /O 2 and NO/NO 2 /NH 3 /O 2 feed mixtures indicated that the presence of NO 2 as the only nitrogen oxide increases the quantity of adsorbed species, which seem to be responsible for N 2 O formation. When NO was also present, N 2 O formation was not observed

  8. Emission reduction from a diesel engine fueled by pine oil biofuel using SCR and catalytic converter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallinayagam, R.; Vedharaj, S.; Yang, W. M.; Saravanan, C. G.; Lee, P. S.; Chua, K. J. E.; Chou, S. K.

    2013-12-01

    In this work, we propose pine oil biofuel, a renewable fuel obtained from the resins of pine tree, as a potential substitute fuel for a diesel engine. Pine oil is endowed with enhanced physical and thermal properties such as lower viscosity and boiling point, which enhances the atomization and fuel/air mixing process. However, the lower cetane number of the pine oil hinders its direct use in diesel engine and hence, it is blended in suitable proportions with diesel so that the ignition assistance could be provided by higher cetane diesel. Since lower cetane fuels are prone to more NOX formation, SCR (selective catalyst reduction), using urea as reducing agent, along with a CC (catalytic converter) has been implemented in the exhaust pipe. From the experimental study, the BTE (brake thermal efficiency) was observed to be increased as the composition of pine oil increases in the blend, with B50 (50% pine oil and 50% diesel) showing 7.5% increase over diesel at full load condition. The major emissions such as smoke, CO, HC and NOX were reduced by 70.1%, 67.5%, 58.6% and 15.2%, respectively, than diesel. Further, the average emissions of B50 with SCR and CC assembly were observed to be reduced, signifying the positive impact of pine oil biofuel on atmospheric environment. In the combustion characteristics front, peak heat release rate and maximum in-cylinder pressure were observed to be higher with longer ignition delay.

  9. Evaluation of mechanical properties in metal wire mesh supported selective catalytic reduction (SCR) catalyst structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajath, S.; Siddaraju, C.; Nandakishora, Y.; Roy, Sukumar

    2018-04-01

    The objective of this research is to evaluate certain specific mechanical properties of certain stainless steel wire mesh supported Selective catalytic reduction catalysts structures wherein the physical properties of the metal wire mesh and also its surface treatments played vital role thereby influencing the mechanical properties. As the adhesion between the stainless steel wire mesh and the catalyst material determines the bond strength and the erosion resistance of catalyst structures, surface modifications of the metal- wire mesh structure in order to facilitate the interface bonding is therefore very important to realize enhanced level of mechanical properties. One way to enhance such adhesion properties, the stainless steel wire mesh is treated with the various acids, i.e., chromic acid, phosphoric acid including certain mineral acids and combination of all those in various molar ratios that could generate surface active groups on metal surface that promotes good interface structure between the metal- wire mesh and metal oxide-based catalyst material and then the stainless steel wire mesh is dipped in the glass powder slurry containing some amount of organic binder. As a result of which the said catalyst material adheres to the metal-wire mesh surface more effectively that improves the erosion profile of supported catalysts structure including bond strength.

  10. Catalytic reduction of emissions from small-scale combustion of biomass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berg, Magnus; Gustavsson, Patrik; Berge, Niklas

    1998-01-01

    This report covers a study on the prospect of using catalytic techniques for the abatement of emissions from small-scale combustion of biomass. The results show that there is a great potential for catalytic techniques and that the emissions of primarily CO and unburned hydrocarbons can be reduced but also that indirectly the emissions of NO x can be reduced. The aim of the project was to methodically indicate the requirement that both the catalyst and the stove must meet to enable the development of low emission stoves utilising this technique. The project should also aim at the development of catalysts that meet these requirements and apply the technique on small-scale stoves. By experimental work these appliances have been evaluated and conclusions drawn on the optimisation of the technique. The project has been performed in close collaboration between TPS Termiska Processer AB, Department of Chemical Technology at KTH, Perstorp AB and CTC-PARCA AB. The development of new catalysts have been conduc ted by KTH in collaboration with Perstorp while the work performed by TPS have been directed towards the integration of the monolithic catalysts in two different stoves that have been supplied by CTC. In one of these stoves a net based catalyst developed by KATATOR have also been tested. Within the project it has been verified experimentally that in a wood fired stove a reduction of the CO-emissions of 60% can be achieved for the monolithic catalysts. This reduction could be achieved even without any optimisation of the design. Experiments in a smaller scale and under well controlled conditions have shown that almost 100% reduction of CO can be achieved. The parameters that limits the conversion over the catalyst, and thereby prevents that the targeted low emissions can be reached, have been identified as: * Short residence time, * Mass transport limitations caused by the large channel width, * Uneven temperature profile over the catalyst, and * Insufficient mixing

  11. Oxygen Reduction Reaction for Generating H2 O2 through a Piezo-Catalytic Process over Bismuth Oxychloride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Dengkui; Zhang, Ling; Sun, Songmei; Wang, Wenzhong

    2018-02-09

    Oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) for generating H 2 O 2 through green pathways have gained much attention in recent years. Herein, we introduce a piezo-catalytic approach to obtain H 2 O 2 over bismuth oxychloride (BiOCl) through an ORR pathway. The piezoelectric response of BiOCl was directly characterized by piezoresponse force microscopy (PFM). The BiOCl exhibits efficient catalytic performance for generating H 2 O 2 (28 μmol h -1 ) only from O 2 and H 2 O, which is above the average level of H 2 O 2 produced by solar-to-chemical processes. A piezo-catalytic mechanism was proposed: with ultrasonic waves, an alternating electric field will be generated over BiOCl, which can drive charge carriers (electrons) to interact with O 2 and H 2 O, then to form H 2 O 2 . © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Catalytic conversion of CO, NO and SO2 on supported sulfide catalysts. Part 2. Catalytic reduction of NO and SO2 by CO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhuang, S.-X.; Yamazaki, M.; Omata, K.; Takahashi, Y.; Yamada, M.

    2001-01-01

    To investigate the possibility of simultaneous catalytic reduction of NO and SO 2 by CO, reactions of NO, NO-CO, and NO-SO 2 -CO were performed on γ-alumina-supported sulfides of transition metals including Co, Mo, CoMo and FeMo. NO was decomposed into N 2 O and N 2 accompanied with the formation of SO 2 ; this serious oxidation of lattice sulfur resulted in the deactivation of the catalysts. The addition of CO to the NO stream suppressed SO 2 formation and yielded COS instead. A stoichiometric conversion of NO and CO to N 2 and CO 2 was observed above 350C on the CoMo and the FeMo catalysts. Although the CO addition lengthened catalyst life, it was not enough to maintain activity. After the NO-CO reaction, an XPS analysis showed the growth of Mo 6+ and SO 4 2- peaks, especially for the sulfided FeMo/Al 2 O 3 ; the FeMo catalyst underwent strong oxidation in the NO-CO reaction. The NO and the NO-CO reactions proceeded non-catalytically, consuming catalyst lattice sulfur to yield SO 2 or COS. The addition of SO 2 in the NO-CO system enabled in situ regeneration of the catalysts; the catalysts oxidized through abstraction of lattice sulfur experienced anew reduction and sulfurization through the SO 2 -CO reaction at higher temperature. NO and SO 2 were completely and catalytically converted at 400C on the sulfided CoMo/Al 2 O 3 . By contrast, the sulfided FeMo/Al 2 O 3 was easily oxidized by NO and hardly re-sulfided under the test conditions. Oxidation states of the metals before and after the reactions were determined. Silica and titania-supported CoMo catalysts were also evaluated to study support effects

  13. Does Density of Cationic Sites Affect Catalytic Activity of Co Zeolites in Selective Catalytic Reduction of NO with Methane?

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dědeček, Jiří; Kaucký, Dalibor; Wichterlová, Blanka

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 18, 3/4 (2002), s. 283-290 ISSN 1022-5528 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IBS4040016 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z4040901 Keywords : Co zeolites * ZSM-5 * NO reduction Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 1.648, year: 2002

  14. NOx formation and selective non-catalytic reduction (SNCR) in a fluidized bed combustor of biomass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahmoudi, Shiva; Baeyens, Jan; Seville, Jonathan P.K.

    2010-01-01

    Caledonian Paper (CaPa) is a major paper mill, located in Ayr, Scotland. For its steam supply, it previously relied on the use of a Circulating Fluidized Bed Combustor (CFBC) of 58 MW th , burning coal, wood bark and wastewater treatment sludge. It currently uses a bubbling fluidized bed combustor (BFBC) of 102 MW th to generate steam at 99 bar, superheated to 465 o C. The boiler is followed by steam turbines and a 15 kg/s steam circuit into the mill. Whereas previously coal, wood bark and wastewater treatment sludge were used as fuel, currently only plantation wood (mainly spruce), demolition wood, wood bark and sludge are used. Since these biosolids contain nitrogen, fuel NO x is formed at the combustion temperature of 850-900 o C. NO x emissions (NO + NO 2 ) vary on average between 300 and 600 mg/Nm 3 (dry gas). The current emission standard is 350 mg/Nm 3 but will be reduced in the future to a maximum of 233 mg/Nm 3 for stand-alone biomass combustors of capacity between 50 and 300 MW th according to the EU LCP standards. NO x abatement is therefore necessary. In the present paper we firstly review the NO x formation mechanisms, proving that for applications of fluidized bed combustion, fuel NO x is the main consideration, and the contribution of thermal NO x to the emissions insignificant. We then assess the deNO x techniques presented in the literature, with an updated review and special focus upon the techniques that are applicable at CaPa. From these techniques, Selective Non-catalytic Reduction (SNCR) using ammonia or urea emerges as the most appropriate NO x abatement solution. Although SNCR deNO x is a selective reduction, the reactions of NO x reduction by NH 3 in the presence of oxygen, and the oxidation of NH 3 proceed competitively. Both reactions were therefore studied in a lab-scale reactor and the results were transformed into design equations starting from the respective reaction kinetics. An overall deNO x yield can then be predicted for any

  15. Selective catalytic reduction system and process for treating NOx emissions using a palladium and rhodium or ruthenium catalyst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobolevskiy, Anatoly [Orlando, FL; Rossin, Joseph A [Columbus, OH; Knapke, Michael J [Columbus, OH

    2011-07-12

    A process for the catalytic reduction of nitrogen oxides (NOx) in a gas stream (29) in the presence of H.sub.2 is provided. The process comprises contacting the gas stream with a catalyst system (38) comprising zirconia-silica washcoat particles (41), a pre-sulfated zirconia binder (44), and a catalyst combination (40) comprising palladium and at least one of rhodium, ruthenium, or a mixture of ruthenium and rhodium.

  16. Enhanced catalytic activity over MIL-100(Fe) loaded ceria catalysts for the selective catalytic reduction of NO{sub x} with NH{sub 3} at low temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Peng [School of Environmental Science and Technology, Dalian University of Technology, Key Laboratory of Industrial Ecology and Environmental Engineering (Ministry of Education, China), Dalian 116024 (China); Sun, Hong [School of Environmental & Chemical Engineering, Dalian Jiaotong University, Dalian 116028 (China); Quan, Xie, E-mail: quanxie@dlut.edu.cn [School of Environmental Science and Technology, Dalian University of Technology, Key Laboratory of Industrial Ecology and Environmental Engineering (Ministry of Education, China), Dalian 116024 (China); Chen, Shuo [School of Environmental Science and Technology, Dalian University of Technology, Key Laboratory of Industrial Ecology and Environmental Engineering (Ministry of Education, China), Dalian 116024 (China)

    2016-01-15

    Highlights: • Nano-ceria was successfully encapsulated into MIL-100(Fe) for the SCR of NO{sub x}. • The incorporated ceria in MIL-100(Fe) showed high content of chemisorbed oxygen. • The added ceria into MIL-100(Fe) improved the formation of adsorbed NO{sub 2} species. • The addition of ceria into MIL-100(Fe) enhanced SCR activity at low temperature. - Abstract: The development of catalysts for selective catalytic reduction (SCR) reactions that are highly active at low temperatures and show good resistance to SO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O is still a challenge. In this study, we have designed and developed a high-performance SCR catalyst based on nano-sized ceria encapsulated inside the pores of MIL-100(Fe) that combines excellent catalytic power with a metal organic framework architecture synthesized by the impregnation method (IM). Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) revealed the encapsulation of ceria in the cavities of MIL-100(Fe). The prepared IM-CeO{sub 2}/MIL-100(Fe) catalyst shows improved catalytic activity both at low temperatures and throughout a wide temperature window. The temperature window for 90% NO{sub x} conversion ranges from 196 to 300 °C. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and in situ diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy (DRIFT) analysis indicated that the nano-sized ceria encapsulated inside MIL-100(Fe) promotes the production of chemisorbed oxygen on the catalyst surface, which greatly enhances the formation of the NO{sub 2} species responsible for fast SCR reactions.

  17. ADVANCED BYPRODUCT RECOVERY: DIRECT CATALYTIC REDUCTION OF SO2 TO ELEMENTAL SULFUR; FINAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robert S. Weber

    1999-01-01

    Arthur D. Little, Inc., together with its commercialization partner, Engelhard Corporation, and its university partner Tufts, investigated a single-step process for direct, catalytic reduction of sulfur dioxide from regenerable flue gas desulfurization processes to the more valuable elemental sulfur by-product. This development built on recently demonstrated SO(sub 2)-reduction catalyst performance at Tufts University on a DOE-sponsored program and is, in principle, applicable to processing of regenerator off-gases from all regenerable SO(sub 2)-control processes. In this program, laboratory-scale catalyst optimization work at Tufts was combined with supported catalyst formulation work at Engelhard, bench-scale supported catalyst testing at Arthur D. Little and market assessments, also by Arthur D. Little. Objectives included identification and performance evaluation of a catalyst which is robust and flexible with regard to choice of reducing gas. The catalyst formulation was improved significantly over the course of this work owing to the identification of a number of underlying phenomena that tended to reduce catalyst selectivity. The most promising catalysts discovered in the bench-scale tests at Tufts were transformed into monolith-supported catalysts at Engelhard. These catalyst samples were tested at larger scale at Arthur D. Little, where the laboratory-scale results were confirmed, namely that the catalysts do effectively reduce sulfur dioxide to elemental sulfur when operated under appropriate levels of conversion and in conditions that do not contain too much water or hydrogen. Ways to overcome those limitations were suggested by the laboratory results. Nonetheless, at the end of Phase I, the catalysts did not exhibit the very stringent levels of activity or selectivity that would have permitted ready scale-up to pilot or commercial operation. Therefore, we chose not to pursue Phase II of this work which would have included further bench-scale testing

  18. ADVANCED BYPRODUCT RECOVERY: DIRECT CATALYTIC REDUCTION OF SO2 TO ELEMENTAL SULFUR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robert S. Weber

    1999-05-01

    Arthur D. Little, Inc., together with its commercialization partner, Engelhard Corporation, and its university partner Tufts, investigated a single-step process for direct, catalytic reduction of sulfur dioxide from regenerable flue gas desulfurization processes to the more valuable elemental sulfur by-product. This development built on recently demonstrated SO{sub 2}-reduction catalyst performance at Tufts University on a DOE-sponsored program and is, in principle, applicable to processing of regenerator off-gases from all regenerable SO{sub 2}-control processes. In this program, laboratory-scale catalyst optimization work at Tufts was combined with supported catalyst formulation work at Engelhard, bench-scale supported catalyst testing at Arthur D. Little and market assessments, also by Arthur D. Little. Objectives included identification and performance evaluation of a catalyst which is robust and flexible with regard to choice of reducing gas. The catalyst formulation was improved significantly over the course of this work owing to the identification of a number of underlying phenomena that tended to reduce catalyst selectivity. The most promising catalysts discovered in the bench-scale tests at Tufts were transformed into monolith-supported catalysts at Engelhard. These catalyst samples were tested at larger scale at Arthur D. Little, where the laboratory-scale results were confirmed, namely that the catalysts do effectively reduce sulfur dioxide to elemental sulfur when operated under appropriate levels of conversion and in conditions that do not contain too much water or hydrogen. Ways to overcome those limitations were suggested by the laboratory results. Nonetheless, at the end of Phase I, the catalysts did not exhibit the very stringent levels of activity or selectivity that would have permitted ready scale-up to pilot or commercial operation. Therefore, we chose not to pursue Phase II of this work which would have included further bench-scale testing

  19. Chemiluminescence analyzer of NOx as a high-throughput screening tool in selective catalytic reduction of NO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oh, Kwang Seok; Woo, Seong Ihl

    2011-01-01

    A chemiluminescence-based analyzer of NO x gas species has been applied for high-throughput screening of a library of catalytic materials. The applicability of the commercial NO x analyzer as a rapid screening tool was evaluated using selective catalytic reduction of NO gas. A library of 60 binary alloys composed of Pt and Co, Zr, La, Ce, Fe or W on Al 2 O 3 substrate was tested for the efficiency of NO x removal using a home-built 64-channel parallel and sequential tubular reactor. The NO x concentrations measured by the NO x analyzer agreed well with the results obtained using micro gas chromatography for a reference catalyst consisting of 1 wt% Pt on γ-Al 2 O 3 . Most alloys showed high efficiency at 275 °C, which is typical of Pt-based catalysts for selective catalytic reduction of NO. The screening with NO x analyzer allowed to select Pt-Ce (X) (X=1–3) and Pt–Fe (2) as the optimal catalysts for NO x removal: 73% NO x conversion was achieved with the Pt–Fe (2) alloy, which was much better than the results for the reference catalyst and the other library alloys. This study demonstrates a sequential high-throughput method of practical evaluation of catalysts for the selective reduction of NO.

  20. Photo catalytic reduction of benzophenone on TiO2: Effect of preparation method and reaction conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Albiter E, E.; Valenzuela Z, M. A.; Alfaro H, S.; Flores V, S. O.; Rios B, O.; Gonzalez A, V. J.; Cordova R, I.

    2010-01-01

    The photo catalytic reduction of benzophenone was studied focussing on improving the yield to benzhydrol. TiO 2 was synthesized by means of a hydrothermal technique. TiO 2 (Degussa TiO 2 -P25) was used as a reference. Catalysts were characterized by X-ray diffraction and nitrogen physisorption. The photo catalytic reduction was carried out in a batch reactor at 25 C under nitrogen atmosphere, acetonitrile as solvent and isopropanol as electron donor. A 200 W Xe-Hg lamp (λ= 360 nm) was employed as irradiation source. The chemical composition of the reaction system was determined by HPLC. Structural and textural properties of the synthesized TiO 2 depended on the type of acid used during sol formation step. Using HCl, a higher specific surface area and narrower pore size distribution of TiO 2 was obtained in comparison with acetic acid. As expected, the photochemical reduction of benzophenone yielded benzopinacol as main product, whereas, benzhydrol is only produced in presence of TiO 2 (i.e. photo catalytic route). In general, the hydrothermally synthesized catalysts were less active and with a lower yield to benzhydrol. The optimal reaction conditions to highest values of benzhydrol yield (70-80%) were found at 2 g/L (catalyst loading) and 0.5 m M of initial concentration of benzophenone, using commercial TiO 2 -P25. (Author)

  1. Photo catalytic reduction of benzophenone on TiO{sub 2}: Effect of preparation method and reaction conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Albiter E, E.; Valenzuela Z, M. A.; Alfaro H, S.; Flores V, S. O.; Rios B, O.; Gonzalez A, V. J.; Cordova R, I., E-mail: mavalenz@ipn.m [IPN, Escuela Superior de Ingenieria Quimica e Industrias Extractivas, Laboratorio de Catalisis y Materiales, Zacatenco, 07738 Mexico D. F. (Mexico)

    2010-07-01

    The photo catalytic reduction of benzophenone was studied focussing on improving the yield to benzhydrol. TiO{sub 2} was synthesized by means of a hydrothermal technique. TiO{sub 2} (Degussa TiO{sub 2}-P25) was used as a reference. Catalysts were characterized by X-ray diffraction and nitrogen physisorption. The photo catalytic reduction was carried out in a batch reactor at 25 C under nitrogen atmosphere, acetonitrile as solvent and isopropanol as electron donor. A 200 W Xe-Hg lamp ({lambda}= 360 nm) was employed as irradiation source. The chemical composition of the reaction system was determined by HPLC. Structural and textural properties of the synthesized TiO{sub 2} depended on the type of acid used during sol formation step. Using HCl, a higher specific surface area and narrower pore size distribution of TiO{sub 2} was obtained in comparison with acetic acid. As expected, the photochemical reduction of benzophenone yielded benzopinacol as main product, whereas, benzhydrol is only produced in presence of TiO{sub 2} (i.e. photo catalytic route). In general, the hydrothermally synthesized catalysts were less active and with a lower yield to benzhydrol. The optimal reaction conditions to highest values of benzhydrol yield (70-80%) were found at 2 g/L (catalyst loading) and 0.5 m M of initial concentration of benzophenone, using commercial TiO{sub 2}-P25. (Author)

  2. Electrochemical characterization of praseodymia doped zircon. Catalytic effect on the electrochemical reduction of molecular oxygen in polar organic solvents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Domenech, Antonio, E-mail: antonio.domenech@uv.es [Departament de Quimica Analitica, Universitat de Valencia, Dr. Moliner, 50, 46100 Burjassot, Valencia (Spain); Montoya, Noemi; Alarcon, Javier [Departament de Quimica Inorganica, Universitat de Valencia, Dr. Moliner, 50, 46100 Burjassot, Valencia (Spain)

    2011-08-01

    Highlights: > Electrochemical characterization of Pr centers in praseodymia-doped zircon. > Study of the catalytic effect on the reduction of peroxide radical anion in nonaqueous solvents. > Assessment of non-uniform distribution of Pr centers in the zircon grains. - Abstract: The voltammetry of microparticles and scanning electrochemical microscopy methodologies are applied to characterize praseodymium centers in praseodymia-doped zircon (Pr{sub x}Zr{sub (1-y)}Si{sub (1-z)}O{sub 4}; y + z = x; 0.02 < x < 0.10) specimens prepared via sol-gel synthetic routes. In contact with aqueous electrolytes, two overlapping Pr-centered cathodic processes, attributable to the Pr (IV) to Pr (III) reduction of Pr centers in different sites are obtained. In water-containing, air-saturated acetone and DMSO solutions as solvent, Pr{sub x}Zr{sub (1-y)}Si{sub (1-z)}O{sub 4} materials produce a significant catalytic effect on the electrochemical reduction of peroxide radical anion electrochemically generated. These electrochemical features denote that most of the Pr centers are originally in its 4+ oxidation state in the parent Pr{sub x}Zr{sub (1-y)}Si{sub (1-z)}O{sub 4} specimens. The variation of the catalytic performance of such specimens with potential scan rate, water concentration and Pr loading suggests that Pr is not uniformly distributed within the zircon grains, being concentrated in the outer region of such grains.

  3. Catalytic Destruction of a Surrogate Organic Hazardous Air Pollutant as a Potential Co-benefit for Coal-fired Selective Catalyst Reduction Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catalytic destruction of benzene (C6H6), a surrogate for organic hazardous air pollutants (HAPs) produced from coal combustion, was investigated using a commercial selective catalytic reduction (SCR) catalyst for evaluating the potential co-benefit of the SCR technology for reduc...

  4. Ni0 encapsulated in N-doped carbon nanotubes for catalytic reduction of highly toxic hexavalent chromium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Yunjin; Zhang, Jie; Chen, Hao; Yu, Maojing; Gao, Mengxue; Hu, Yi; Wang, Shaobin

    2018-05-01

    N-doped carbon nanotubes encapsulating Ni0 nanoparticles (Ni@N-C) were fabricated via thermal reduction of dicyandiamide and NiCl2·6H2O, and used to remove CrVI in polluted water. The resultant products present an excellent catalytic activity for CrVI reduction using formic acid under relatively mild conditions. The CrVI reduction efficiency of Ni@N-C was significantly affected by the preparation conditions including the mass of nickel salt and synthesis temperatures. The impacts of several reaction parameters, such as initial concentrations of CrVI and formic acid, solution pH and temperatures, as well as inorganic anions in solution on CrVI reduction efficiency were also evaluated in view of scalable industrial applications. Owing to the synergistic effects amongst tubes-coated Ni0, doped nitrogen, oxygen containing groups, and the configuration of carbon nanotubes, Ni@N-C catalysts exhibit excellent catalytic activity and recyclable capability for CrVI reduction. Carbon shell can efficiently protect inner Ni0 core and N species from corrosion and subsequent leaching, while Ni0 endows the Ni@N-C catalysts with ferromagnetism, so that the composites can be easily separated via a permanent magnet. This study opens up an avenue for design of N-doped carbon nanotubes encapsulating Ni0 nanoparticles with high CrVI removal efficiency and magnetic recyclability as low-cost catalysts for industrial applications.

  5. Ultra-fast catalytic reduction of dyes by ionic liquid recoverable and reusable mefenamic acid derived gold nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, Syeda Sara; Sirajuddin; Solangi, Amber Rehana; Agheem, Mohammad Hassan; Junejo, Yasmeen; Kalwar, Nazar Hussain; Tagar, Zulfiqar Ali

    2011-06-15

    We synthesized mefenamic acid (MA) derived gold nanoparticles (MA-AuNps) in aqueous solution (MA-Au sol). Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) of the sol at 1, 5, 15 and 60 min showed changes in size and shape of formed AuNps. Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) Spectroscopy revealed the interaction between AuNps and MA. Each Au sol exhibited exceptional catalytic activity for the reduction of Methylene Blue (MB), Rose Bengal (RB) and Eosin B (EB) dye individually as well as collectively. However, complete reduction of dye(s) was accomplished by Au sol of 5 min in just 15s. The catalytic performance of Ma-Au sol was far superior to that adsorbed on glass. AuNps were recovered with the help of water insoluble room temperature ionic liquid and reused with enhanced catalytic potential. This finding is a novel, rapid and highly economical alternative for environmental safety against pollution by dyes and extendable for control of other reducible contaminants as well. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Novel Catalytic Mechanisms For The Chemical Reduction Of Carbon Dioxide To Energy-Dense Liquids

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-14

    It appears the 4 mM KCl helps catalyze the formation of an unusually thick Cu2O film , which after reduced back to metallic copper, retains the...aromatic amines as catalysts, at various semiconductor and metal electrodes. The underpinning philosophy driving this work is that a critical...applied our synthetic capabilities to the growth of polycrystalline thin films of layered transition-metal dichalcogenides (MX2s). This work is

  7. Pt skin coated hollow Ag-Pt bimetallic nanoparticles with high catalytic activity for oxygen reduction reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Tao; Huang, Jianxing; Lai, Shaobo; Zhang, Size; Fang, Jun; Zhao, Jinbao

    2017-10-01

    The catalytic activity and stability of electrocatalyst is critical for the commercialization of fuel cells, and recent reports reveal the great potential of the hollow structures with Pt skin coat for developing high-powered electrocatalysts due to their highly efficient utilization of the Pt atoms. Here, we provide a novel strategy to prepare the Pt skin coated hollow Ag-Pt structure (Ag-Pt@Pt) of ∼8 nm size at room temperature. As loaded on the graphene, the Ag-Pt@Pt exhibits a remarkable mass activity of 0.864 A/mgPt (at 0.9 V, vs. reversible hydrogen electrode (RHE)) towards oxygen reduction reaction (ORR), which is 5.30 times of the commercial Pt/C catalyst, and the Ag-Pt@Pt also shows a better stability during the ORR catalytic process. The mechanism of this significant enhancement can be attributed to the higher Pt utilization and the unique Pt on Ag-Pt surface structure, which is confirmed by the density functional theory (DFT) calculations and other characterization methods. In conclusion, this original work offers a low-cost and environment-friendly method to prepare a high active electrocatalyst with cheaper price, and this work also discloses the correlation between surface structures and ORR catalytic activity for the hollow structures with Pt skin coat, which can be instructive for designing novel advanced electrocatalysts for fuel cells.

  8. Efficient selective catalytic reduction of NO by novel carbon-doped metal catalysts made from electroplating sludge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jia; Zhang, Jingyi; Xu, Yunfeng; Su, Huimin; Li, Xiaoman; Zhou, Ji Zhi; Qian, Guangren; Li, Li; Xu, Zhi Ping

    2014-10-07

    Electroplating sludges, once regarded as industrial wastes, are precious resources of various transition metals. This research has thus investigated the recycling of an electroplating sludge as a novel carbon-doped metal (Fe, Ni, Mg, Cu, and Zn) catalyst, which was different from a traditional carbon-supported metal catalyst, for effective NO selective catalytic reduction (SCR). This catalyst removed >99.7% NO at a temperature as low as 300 °C. It also removed NO steadily (>99%) with a maximum specific accumulative reduced amount (MSARA) of 3.4 mmol/g. Gas species analyses showed that NO removal was accompanied by evolving N2 and CO2. Moreover, in a wide temperature window, the sludge catalyst showed a higher CO2 selectivity (>99%) than an activated carbon-supported metal catalyst. Structure characterizations revealed that carbon-doped metal was transformed to metal oxide in the sludge catalyst after the catalytic test, with most carbon (2.33 wt %) being consumed. These observations suggest that NO removal over the sludge catalyst is a typical SCR where metals/metal oxides act as the catalytic center and carbon as the reducing reagent. Therefore, our report probably provides an opportunity for high value-added utilizations of heavy-metal wastes in mitigating atmospheric pollutions.

  9. System and method for controlling an engine based on ammonia storage in multiple selective catalytic reduction catalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, MIn; Perry, Kevin L.

    2015-11-20

    A system according to the principles of the present disclosure includes a storage estimation module and an air/fuel ratio control module. The storage estimation module estimates a first amount of ammonia stored in a first selective catalytic reduction (SCR) catalyst and estimates a second amount of ammonia stored in a second SCR catalyst. The air/fuel ratio control module controls an air/fuel ratio of an engine based on the first amount, the second amount, and a temperature of a substrate disposed in the second SCR catalyst.

  10. Impact of selective catalytic reduction systems on the operation of coal and oil fired boilers and downstream equipment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2006-07-01

    The history of the development of selective catalytic reduction (SCR) technology has clearly demonstrated that whenever the technology arrives in a new region of the world new challenges are met. This paper discusses some of these historical challenges and their particular solutions in some detail. The paper shows that the design of successful SCR systems is extremely site-specific, but that the technology continues to evolve to meet these continuously changing demands. Most recently the increased power of CFD technology has enabled SCR to meet the more stringent North American emissions criteria through optimal fluid dynamic design. 4 figs.

  11. Catalytic reduction of emissions from small scale wood combustion. State of the art

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hargitai, T.; Silversand, F.A. [Katator AB, Lund (Sweden)

    1998-12-31

    Small-scale combustion of big-fuel often results in excessive emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOC), polyaromatic compounds (PAM) and carbon monoxide (CO). These compounds have a negative impact on human health and urban air quality. The predominant volatile organic compounds present in flue gases from big-fuel combustion are propylene, ethylene, butadiene, methanol, ethanol, methane, phenol and benzene. The poor combustion performance of some wood stoves has in certain cases led to legislation against small-scale combustion of big-fuel in urban areas. Catalytic cleaning is one very efficient way of decreasing the environmental impacts of big-fuel combustion. Several studies concerning catalytic purification of flue gases from big-fuel combustion have been presented over the years. Several problems must be addressed when designing a catalyst for this application: Clogging problems from deposition of ashes and particulates in the catalyst; Catalyst poisoning by sulphur, phosphorus, alkali metals etc.; Catalyst fouling due to deposition of ashes and particulates; Catalyst overheating at high flue-gas temperatures and Poor catalyst performance during start-up Most studies have been focused on monolith-type catalysts and- the conversion of CO, VOC and PAH typically is above 80 %. The observed problems are associated with increased pressure drop due to catalyst clogging and decreased catalyst performance due to fouling and poisoning. In most cases precious metals, preferably Pt. have been used as active combustion catalyst. Precious metals have a high activity for the combustion of CO and hydrocarbons and a fair stability against poisoning with compounds present in flue gases from big-fuel, e.g. sulphur and alkali metals. The majority of the studies on precious metals have been focused on Pt. Rh and Pd, which are especially active in catalytic combustion. Some metal oxides are used in catalytic combustion, especially at low temperatures (e.g. in VOC abatement

  12. Role of Precursor-Conversion Chemistry in the Crystal-Phase Control of Catalytically Grown Colloidal Semiconductor Quantum Wires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fudong; Buhro, William E

    2017-12-26

    Crystal-phase control is one of the most challenging problems in nanowire growth. We demonstrate that, in the solution-phase catalyzed growth of colloidal cadmium telluride (CdTe) quantum wires (QWs), the crystal phase can be controlled by manipulating the reaction chemistry of the Cd precursors and tri-n-octylphosphine telluride (TOPTe) to favor the production of either a CdTe solute or Te, which consequently determines the composition and (liquid or solid) state of the Bi x Cd y Te z catalyst nanoparticles. Growth of single-phase (e.g., wurtzite) QWs is achieved only from solid catalysts (y ≪ z) that enable the solution-solid-solid growth of the QWs, whereas the liquid catalysts (y ≈ z) fulfill the solution-liquid-solid growth of the polytypic QWs. Factors that affect the precursor-conversion chemistry are systematically accounted for, which are correlated with a kinetic study of the composition and state of the catalyst nanoparticles to understand the mechanism. This work reveals the role of the precursor-reaction chemistry in the crystal-phase control of catalytically grown colloidal QWs, opening the possibility of growing phase-pure QWs of other compositions.

  13. Facile synthesis of SiO{sub 2}@Cu{sub x}O@TiO{sub 2} heterostructures for catalytic reductions of 4-nitrophenol and 2-nitroaniline organic pollutants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zelekew, Osman Ahmed; Kuo, Dong-Hau, E-mail: dhkuo@mail.ntust.edu.tw

    2017-01-30

    Highlights: • The synthesis of SiO{sub 2}@Cu{sub x}O@TiO{sub 2}catalystwasillustrated (*). • The p-n junction between p-type Cu{sub x}O and n-type TiO{sub 2} built electric field. • The electric field results in avoiding the recombination of electron and hole. • The n-type TiO{sub 2} rich in electron outward facilitates the reduction. - Abstract: Herein, we designed the p-type Cu{sub x}O (x = 1 or 2) nanoparticles deposited on SiO{sub 2} spherical particle inside and coated with thin layered n-type TiO{sub 2} semiconductors outside for reduction purpose. The composite material, abbreviated as SiO{sub 2}@Cu{sub x}O@TiO{sub 2}, was characterized. The catalytic performance of the composite was tested for the reductions of 4-nitrophenol (4-NP) and 2-nitroaniline (2-NA). Complete reductions of 4-NP and 2-NA took, 210 and 150 s, respectively. The catalytic efficiency of the composite material may be associated with electron and hole separation resulted from the p-n junction formation between p-type Cu{sub x}O and n-type TiO{sub 2} and the built-in electric field. Moreover, the hydride ion and electrons released from NaBH{sub 4} together with outward electrons from n-type TiO{sub 2}, synergistically, are also responsible for the reduction of nitro aromatic compounds. Our design of composite material from low-priced metal oxides was successful towards reduction of nitro-aromatic compounds.

  14. Catalytic reduction of 4-nitrophenol using gold nanoparticles biosynthesized by cell-free extracts of Aspergillus sp. WL-Au

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shen, Wenli; Qu, Yuanyuan, E-mail: qyy@dlut.edu.cn; Pei, Xiaofang; Li, Shuzhen; You, Shengnan; Wang, Jingwei; Zhang, Zhaojing; Zhou, Jiti

    2017-01-05

    Highlights: • A green process for AuNPs synthesis was achieved by fungus Aspergillus. • Uniform spherical AuNPs with well dispersity and stability were biosynthesized. • The biogenic AuNPs possessed remarkable catalytic activities for 4-NP reduction. - Abstract: A facile one-pot eco-friendly process for synthesis of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) with high catalytic activity was achieved using cell-free extracts of Aspergillus sp. WL-Au as reducing, capping and stabilizing agents. The surface plasmon resonance band of UV–vis spectrum at 532 nm confirmed the presence of AuNPs. Transmission electron microscopy images showed that quite uniform spherical AuNPs were synthesized and the average size of nanoparticles increased from 4 nm to 29 nm with reaction time. X-ray diffraction analysis verified the formation of nano-crystalline gold particles. Fourier transform infrared spectra showed the presence of functional groups on the surface of biosynthesized AuNPs, such as O−H, N−H, C=O, C−H, C−OH and C−O−C groups, which increased the stability of AuNPs. The biogenic AuNPs could serve as a highly efficient catalyst for 4-nitrophenol reduction. The reaction rate constant was linearly correlated with the concentration of AuNPs, which increased from 0.59 min{sup −1} to 1.51 min{sup −1} with the amount of AuNPs increasing form 1.46 × 10{sup −6} to 17.47 × 10{sup −6} mmol. Moreover, the as-synthesized AuNPs exhibited a remarkable normalized catalytic activity (4.04 × 10{sup 5} min{sup −1} mol{sup −1}), which was much higher than that observed for AuNPs synthesized by other biological and conventional chemical methods.

  15. Catalytic reduction of 4-nitrophenol using gold nanoparticles biosynthesized by cell-free extracts of Aspergillus sp. WL-Au

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shen, Wenli; Qu, Yuanyuan; Pei, Xiaofang; Li, Shuzhen; You, Shengnan; Wang, Jingwei; Zhang, Zhaojing; Zhou, Jiti

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • A green process for AuNPs synthesis was achieved by fungus Aspergillus. • Uniform spherical AuNPs with well dispersity and stability were biosynthesized. • The biogenic AuNPs possessed remarkable catalytic activities for 4-NP reduction. - Abstract: A facile one-pot eco-friendly process for synthesis of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) with high catalytic activity was achieved using cell-free extracts of Aspergillus sp. WL-Au as reducing, capping and stabilizing agents. The surface plasmon resonance band of UV–vis spectrum at 532 nm confirmed the presence of AuNPs. Transmission electron microscopy images showed that quite uniform spherical AuNPs were synthesized and the average size of nanoparticles increased from 4 nm to 29 nm with reaction time. X-ray diffraction analysis verified the formation of nano-crystalline gold particles. Fourier transform infrared spectra showed the presence of functional groups on the surface of biosynthesized AuNPs, such as O−H, N−H, C=O, C−H, C−OH and C−O−C groups, which increased the stability of AuNPs. The biogenic AuNPs could serve as a highly efficient catalyst for 4-nitrophenol reduction. The reaction rate constant was linearly correlated with the concentration of AuNPs, which increased from 0.59 min −1 to 1.51 min −1 with the amount of AuNPs increasing form 1.46 × 10 −6 to 17.47 × 10 −6 mmol. Moreover, the as-synthesized AuNPs exhibited a remarkable normalized catalytic activity (4.04 × 10 5 min −1 mol −1 ), which was much higher than that observed for AuNPs synthesized by other biological and conventional chemical methods.

  16. Catalytic reduction of 4-nitrophenol over Ni-Pd nanodimers supported on nitrogen-doped reduced graphene oxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Lijun, E-mail: liulj@wtu.edu.cn [College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Wuhan Textile University, Wuhan 430073, People' s Republic of China (China); Department of Chemical and Petroleum Engineering, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15261 (United States); Chen, Ruifen; Liu, Weikai [College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Wuhan Textile University, Wuhan 430073, People' s Republic of China (China); Wu, Jiamin [Department of Chemical and Petroleum Engineering, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15261 (United States); Gao, Di, E-mail: gaod@pitt.edu [Department of Chemical and Petroleum Engineering, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15261 (United States)

    2016-12-15

    Catalytic reduction of toxic 4-nitrophenol to 4-aminophenol over magnetically recoverable nanocatalysts has attracted much attention. Herein, we report a Ni-Pd/NrGO catalyst through the growth of Ni-Pd nanodimers (NDs) on nitrogen-doped reduced graphene oxide (NrGO). The Ni-Pd NDs show a heterogeneous nanostructure with Ni and Pd subparts contacting with each other, remarkably different from the frequently-observed core/shell nanoparticles (NPs) or nanoalloy. The formation of Ni-Pd NDs follows an initial deposition of Pd NPs on the graphene and in-situ catalytic generation of Ni subparts over the newly-generated Pd NPs. The resulting Ni-Pd/NrGO exhibits a superior catalytic activity towards the reduction of 4-nitrophenol at room temperature with a high rate constant (3400 s{sup -1} g{sup -1}) and a low activated energy (29.1 kJ mol{sup -1}) as compared to unsupported Ni-Pd NDs and supported monometallic catalysts. The conversion rate of 4-NP is calculated to be 99.5% and the percent yield (%) of 4-AP is as high as 99.1%. A synergistic catalysis mechanism is rationally proposed, which is ascribed to the electronic modification of Ni-Pd metals due to the strong metal/support interaction (SMSI) effect as well as the electron transfer between Ni and Pd. The hybrid catalyst shows soft ferromagnetic properties and can be magnetically separated and recycled without obvious loss of activity.

  17. Combined Particle Filter and Selective Catalytic Reduction Catalyst for Diesel Engines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvam, Jeanette

    Abstract Silicon carbide has many outstanding properties. It is an extremely hard and tough material with a high thermal and chemical stability, in addition to being an important semiconductor material. Silicon carbide macro-, micro- and nanostructures can be tailored to fit specific needs, making...... and better solutions for exhaust purification systems, and porous silicon carbide has superior characteristics for this purpose. The continuously increasing requirements for low emission levels of both toxic and polluting nitric oxides (NOxes) and health damaging sod particles, requires novel methods...

  18. AuPd Bimetallic Nanocrystals Embedded in Magnetic Halloysite Nanotubes: Facile Synthesis and Catalytic Reduction of Nitroaromatic Compounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Jia

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available In this research, a facile and effective approach was developed for the preparation of well-designed AuPd alloyed catalysts supported on magnetic halloysite nanotubes (HNTs@Fe3O4@AuPd. The microstructure and the magnetic properties of HNTs@Fe3O4@AuPd were confirmed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM, high resolution TEM (HRTEM, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS, and vibrating sample magnetometry (VSM analyses. The catalysts, fabricated by a cheap, environmentally friendly, and simple surfactant-free formation process, exhibited high activities during the reduction of 4-nitrophenol and various other nitroaromatic compounds. Moreover, the catalytic activities of the HNTs@Fe3O4@AuPd nanocatalysts were tunable via adjusting the atomic ratio of AuPd during the synthesis. As compared with the monometallic nanocatalysts (HNTs@Fe3O4@Au and HNTs@Fe3O4@Pd, the bimetallic alloyed HNTs@Fe3O4@AuPd nanocatalysts exhibited excellent catalytic activities toward the reduction of 4-nitrophenol (4-NP to 4-aminophenol. Furthermore, the as-obtained HNTs@Fe3O4@AuPd can be recycled several times, while retaining its functionality due to the stability and magnetic separation property.

  19. Effect of selective catalytic reduction (SCR) on fine particle emission from two coal-fired power plants in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhen; Jiang, Jingkun; Ma, Zizhen; Wang, Shuxiao; Duan, Lei

    2015-11-01

    Nitrogen oxides (NOx) emission abatement of coal-fired power plants (CFPPs) requires large-scaled installation of selective catalytic reduction (SCR), which would reduce secondary fine particulate matter (PM2.5) (by reducing nitrate aerosol) in the atmosphere. However, our field measurement of two CFPPs equipped with SCR indicates a significant increase of SO42- and NH4+ emission in primary PM2.5, due to catalytic enhancement of SO2 oxidation to SO3 and introducing of NH3 as reducing agent. The subsequent formation of (NH4)2SO4 or NH4HSO4 aerosol is commonly concentrated in sub-micrometer particulate matter (PM1) with a bimodal pattern. The measurement at the inlet of stack also showed doubled primary PM2.5 emission by SCR operation. This effect should therefore be considered when updating emission inventory of CFPPs. By rough estimation, the enhanced primary PM2.5 emission from CFPPs by SCR operation would offset 12% of the ambient PM2.5 concentration reduction in cities as the benefit of national NOx emission abatement, which should draw attention of policy-makers for air pollution control.

  20. Abroma augusta Linn bark extract-mediated green synthesis of gold nanoparticles and its application in catalytic reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Subhajit; Bag, Braja Gopal; Basu, Ranadhir

    2015-10-01

    The bark extract of Abroma augusta Linn is rich in medicinally important phytochemicals including antioxidants and polyphenols. First one step green synthesis of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) has been described utilizing the bark extract of Abroma augusta L. and chloroauric acid under very mild reaction conditions. The phytochemicals present in the bark extract acted both as a reducing as well as a stabilizing agent, and no additional stabilizing and capping agents were needed. Detailed characterizations of the stabilized AuNPs were carried out by surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy, high resolution transmission electron microscopy, and X-ray diffraction studies. The catalytic activity of the freshly synthesized gold nanoparticles has been demonstrated for the sodium borohydride reduction of 4-nitrophenol to 4-aminophenol, and the kinetics of the reduction reaction have been studied spectrophotometrically.

  1. Selective catalytic reduction of nitric oxide with acetaldehyde over NaY zeolite catalyst in lean exhaust feed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmieg, Steven J.; Cho, Byong K.; Oh, Se H.

    2004-01-01

    Steady-state selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of nitric oxide (NO) was investigated under simulated lean-burn conditions using acetaldehyde (CH 3 CHO) as the reductant. This work describes the influence of catalyst space velocity and the impact of nitric oxide, acetaldehyde, oxygen, sulfur dioxide, and water on NO x reduction activity over NaY zeolite catalyst. Results indicate that with sufficient catalyst volume 90% NO x conversion can be achieved at temperatures relevant to light-duty diesel exhaust (150-350C). Nitric oxide and acetaldehyde react to form N 2 , HCN, and CO 2 . Oxygen is necessary in the exhaust feed stream to oxidize NO to NO 2 over the catalyst prior to reduction, and water is required to prevent catalyst deactivation. Under conditions of excess acetaldehyde (C 1 :N>6:1) and low temperature ( x conversion is apparently very high; however, the NO x conversion steadily declines with time due to catalytic oxidation of some of the stored (adsorbed) NO to NO 2 , which can have a significant impact on steady-state NO x conversion. With 250ppm NO in the exhaust feed stream, maximum NO x conversion at 200C can be achieved with =400ppm of acetaldehyde, with higher acetaldehyde concentrations resulting in production of acetic acid and breakthrough of NO 2 causing lower NO x conversion levels. Less acetaldehyde is necessary at lower NO concentrations, while more acetaldehyde is required at higher temperatures. Sulfur in the exhaust feed stream as SO 2 can cause slow deactivation of the catalyst by poisoning the adsorption and subsequent reaction of nitric oxide and acetaldehyde, particularly at low temperature

  2. Contribution of gold nanoparticles to the catalytic DNA strand displacement in leakage reduction and signal amplification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Bei; Zhou, Xiang; Yao, Dongbao; Sun, Xianbao; He, Miao; Wang, Xiaojing; Yin, Xue; Liang, Haojun

    2017-10-03

    A new model using a gold nanoparticle (AuNP)-DNA system to constrain leakage and improve efficiency of catalytic toehold-mediated strand displacement reactions was outlined. A 10-bp spacer on AuNPs and fourfold amount of fuels were determined for good performance of this model with an optimized toehold strategy. After the reaction at 25 °C for 10 h, a 258 pM target could be identified, which is a remarkable improvement compared with the traditional AuNP-DNA system without fuel. Moreover, this model was also studied to differentiate specific single nucleotide polymorphism on target with superior selection factors. This model may help by introducing a proposition of target detection to guide further investigation.

  3. Boosting catalytic activity of metal nanoparticles for 4-nitrophenol reduction: Modification of metal naoparticles with poly(diallyldimethylammonium chloride)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    You, Jyun-Guo; Shanmugam, Chandirasekar [Department of Chemistry, National Sun Yat-sen University, Taiwan (China); Liu, Yao-Wen; Yu, Cheng-Ju [Department of Applied Physics and Chemistry, University of Taipei, Taiwan (China); Tseng, Wei-Lung, E-mail: tsengwl@mail.nsysu.edu.tw [Department of Chemistry, National Sun Yat-sen University, Taiwan (China); School of Pharmacy, College of Pharmacy, Kaohsiung Medical University, Taiwan (China); Center for Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, National Sun Yat-sen University, Taiwan (China)

    2017-02-15

    Highlights: • The choice of capping ligand determines catalytic activity of metal nanocatalysts. • PDDA-capped metal nanoparticles electrostatically interact with 4-NP and BH4{sup −}. • PDDA-capped metal nanoparticles have good recyclability and large scalability. • PDDA-capped Pd nanoparticles show the highest rate constant and activity parameter. - Abstract: Most of the previously reported studies have focused on the change in the size, morphology, and composition of metal nanocatalysts for improving their catalytic activity. Herein, we report poly(diallyldimethylammonium chloride) [PDDA]-stabilized nanoparticles (NPs) of platinum (Pt) and palladium (Pd) as highly active and efficient catalysts for hydrogenation of 4-nitrophenol (4-NP) in the presence of NaBH4. PDDA-stabilized Pt and Pd NPs possessed similar particle size and same facet with citrate-capped Pt and Pd NPs, making this study to investigate the inter-relationship between catalytic activity and surface ligand without the consideration of the effects of particle size and facet. Compared to citrate-capped Pt and Pd NPs, PDDA-stabilized Pt and Pd NPs exhibited excellent pH and salt stability. PDDA could serve as an electron acceptor for metal NPs to produce the net positive charges on the metal surface, which provide strong electrostatic attraction with negatively charged nitrophenolate and borohydride ions. The activity parameter and rate constant of PDDA-stabilized metal NPs were higher than those of citrate-capped metal NPs. Compared to the previously reported Pd nanomaterials for the catalysis of NaBH4-mediated reduction of 4-NP, PDDA-stabilized Pd NPs exhibited the extremely high activity parameter (195 s{sup −1} g{sup −1}) and provided excellent scalability and reusability.

  4. Catalytic reduction of organic dyes at gold nanoparticles impregnated silica materials: influence of functional groups and surfactants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azad, Uday Pratap; Ganesan, Vellaichamy; Pal, Manas

    2011-01-01

    Gold nanoparticles (Au NPs) in three different silica based sol–gel matrixes with and without surfactants are prepared. They are characterized by UV–vis absorbance and transmission electron microscopic (TEM) studies. The size and shape of Au NPs varied with the organo-functional group present in the sol–gel matrix. In the presence of mercaptopropyl functionalized organo-silica, large sized (200–280 nm) spherical Au NPs are formed whereas in the presence of aminopropyl functionalized organo-silica small sized (5–15 nm) Au NPs are formed inside the tube like organo-silica. Further, it is found that Au NPs act as efficient catalyst for the reduction of organic dyes. The catalytic rate constant is evaluated from the decrease in absorbance of the dye molecules. Presence of cationic or anionic surfactants greatly influences the catalytic reaction. The other factors like hydrophobicity of the organic dyes, complex formation of the dyes with anionic surfactants, repulsion between dyes and cationic surfactant, adsorption of dyes on the Au NPs also play important role on the reaction rate.

  5. Catalytic reduction of organic dyes at gold nanoparticles impregnated silica materials: influence of functional groups and surfactants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Azad, Uday Pratap; Ganesan, Vellaichamy, E-mail: velganesh@yahoo.com; Pal, Manas [Banaras Hindu University, Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science (India)

    2011-09-15

    Gold nanoparticles (Au NPs) in three different silica based sol-gel matrixes with and without surfactants are prepared. They are characterized by UV-vis absorbance and transmission electron microscopic (TEM) studies. The size and shape of Au NPs varied with the organo-functional group present in the sol-gel matrix. In the presence of mercaptopropyl functionalized organo-silica, large sized (200-280 nm) spherical Au NPs are formed whereas in the presence of aminopropyl functionalized organo-silica small sized (5-15 nm) Au NPs are formed inside the tube like organo-silica. Further, it is found that Au NPs act as efficient catalyst for the reduction of organic dyes. The catalytic rate constant is evaluated from the decrease in absorbance of the dye molecules. Presence of cationic or anionic surfactants greatly influences the catalytic reaction. The other factors like hydrophobicity of the organic dyes, complex formation of the dyes with anionic surfactants, repulsion between dyes and cationic surfactant, adsorption of dyes on the Au NPs also play important role on the reaction rate.

  6. Graphene oxide nanoplatforms to enhance catalytic performance of iron phthalocyanine for oxygen reduction reaction in bioelectrochemical systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa de Oliveira, Maida Aysla; Mecheri, Barbara; D'Epifanio, Alessandra; Placidi, Ernesto; Arciprete, Fabrizio; Valentini, Federica; Perandini, Alessando; Valentini, Veronica; Licoccia, Silvia

    2017-07-01

    We report the development of electrocatalysts based on iron phthalocyanine (FePc) supported on graphene oxide (GO), obtained by electrochemical oxidation of graphite in aqueous solution of LiCl, LiClO4, and NaClO4. Structure, surface chemistry, morphology, and thermal stability of the prepared materials were investigated by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), Raman spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy (AFM), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The catalytic activity toward oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) at neutral pH was evaluated by cyclic voltammetry. The experimental results demonstrate that the oxidation degree of GO supports affects the overall catalytic activity of FePc/GO, due to a modulation effect of the interaction between FePc and the basal plane of GO. On the basis of electrochemical, spectroscopic, and morphological investigations, FePc/GO_LiCl was selected to be assembled at the cathode side of a microbial fuel cell prototype, demonstrating a good electrochemical performance in terms of voltage and power generation.

  7. Comparative catalytic reduction of 4-nitrophenol by polyacrylamide-gold nanocomposite synthesized by hydrothermal autoclaving and conventional heating routes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salaheldin, Hosam I.

    2017-12-01

    Gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) in polymeric polyacrylamide (PAAm) matrix were synthesized using conventional heating and autoclaving thermal techniques. The synthesized Au/PAAm nanocomposite was characterized using UV-vis spectroscopy and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. The size of the synthesized particles was approximately 6.37 nm and 8.19 nm with the conventional heating and autoclaving thermal techniques, respectively. Electron diffraction x-ray spectroscopy and the Fourier transformation infrared spectroscopy were used for the composition and elemental studies, which confirmed that the Au metallic atoms were synthesized and embedded within a PAAm matrix via a coordination bond between the carbonyl (-CONH2) group and the metallic NPs. X-ray diffraction confirmed the crystalline nature of the fabricated AuNPs with face centered cubic of nanocrystals. The catalytic activity of the as-prepared Au/PAAm nanocomposite for the reduction of 4-nitrophenol to 4-aminophenol was studied in the presence of sodium borohydrate. The synthesized AuNPs had an effective catalytic activity; the smaller NPs synthesized NPs with the conventional heating technique had a higher reaction kinetic rate in comparation with those synthesized with the autoclaving technique. Therefore, the Au/PAAm nanocomposite can be widely used as an eco-friendly, non-toxic, a fast and cost-effective product to remove versatile organic pollutants such as aromatic nitro compounds.

  8. A facile approach to fabricate Au nanoparticles loaded SiO{sub 2} microspheres for catalytic reduction of 4-nitrophenol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, Mingyi, E-mail: mingyitjucu@163.com [Department of Applied Chemistry, School of Science, Tianjin University of Commerce, Tianjin 300134 (China); Huang, Guanbo, E-mail: gbhuang2007@hotmail.com [Department of Chemistry, School of Science, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China); Li, Xianxian; Pang, Xiaobo [Department of Applied Chemistry, School of Science, Tianjin University of Commerce, Tianjin 300134 (China); Qiu, Haixia [Department of Chemistry, School of Science, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China)

    2015-07-15

    Hydrophilic and biocompatible macromolecules were used to improve and simplify the process for the fabrication of core/shell SiO{sub 2}@Au composite particles. The influence of polymers on the morphology of SiO{sub 2}@Au particles with different size of SiO{sub 2} cores was analyzed by transmission electron microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. The optical property of the SiO{sub 2}@Au particles was studied with UV–Vis spectroscopy. The results indicate that the structure and composition of macromolecules affect the morphology of Au layers on SiO{sub 2} microspheres. The SiO{sub 2}@Au particles prepared in the presence of polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) or polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) have thin and complete Au nanoshells owing to their inducing act in preferential growth of Au nanoparticles along the surface of SiO{sub 2} microspheres. SiO{sub 2}@Au particles can be also prepared from SiO{sub 2} microspheres modified with 3-aminopropyltrimethoxysilane in the presence of PVA or PVP. This offers a simple way to fabricate a Au layer on SiO{sub 2} or other microspheres. The SiO{sub 2}@Au particles demonstrated high catalytic activity in the reduction of 4-nitrophenol. - Highlights: • Facile direct deposition method for Au nanoparticles on silica microspheres. • Influence of different types of macromolecule on the formation of Au shell. • High catalytic performance of Au nanoparticles on silica microspheres.

  9. A facile approach to fabricate Au nanoparticles loaded SiO2 microspheres for catalytic reduction of 4-nitrophenol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang, Mingyi; Huang, Guanbo; Li, Xianxian; Pang, Xiaobo; Qiu, Haixia

    2015-01-01

    Hydrophilic and biocompatible macromolecules were used to improve and simplify the process for the fabrication of core/shell SiO 2 @Au composite particles. The influence of polymers on the morphology of SiO 2 @Au particles with different size of SiO 2 cores was analyzed by transmission electron microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. The optical property of the SiO 2 @Au particles was studied with UV–Vis spectroscopy. The results indicate that the structure and composition of macromolecules affect the morphology of Au layers on SiO 2 microspheres. The SiO 2 @Au particles prepared in the presence of polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) or polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) have thin and complete Au nanoshells owing to their inducing act in preferential growth of Au nanoparticles along the surface of SiO 2 microspheres. SiO 2 @Au particles can be also prepared from SiO 2 microspheres modified with 3-aminopropyltrimethoxysilane in the presence of PVA or PVP. This offers a simple way to fabricate a Au layer on SiO 2 or other microspheres. The SiO 2 @Au particles demonstrated high catalytic activity in the reduction of 4-nitrophenol. - Highlights: • Facile direct deposition method for Au nanoparticles on silica microspheres. • Influence of different types of macromolecule on the formation of Au shell. • High catalytic performance of Au nanoparticles on silica microspheres

  10. System and method for controlling ammonia levels in a selective catalytic reduction catalyst using a nitrogen oxide sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    None

    2017-07-25

    A system according to the principles of the present disclosure includes an air/fuel ratio determination module and an emission level determination module. The air/fuel ratio determination module determines an air/fuel ratio based on input from an air/fuel ratio sensor positioned downstream from a three-way catalyst that is positioned upstream from a selective catalytic reduction (SCR) catalyst. The emission level determination module selects one of a predetermined value and an input based on the air/fuel ratio. The input is received from a nitrogen oxide sensor positioned downstream from the three-way catalyst. The emission level determination module determines an ammonia level based on the one of the predetermined value and the input received from the nitrogen oxide sensor.

  11. Anisotropic electrical conduction and reduction in dangling-bond density for polycrystalline Si films prepared by catalytic chemical vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niikura, Chisato; Masuda, Atsushi; Matsumura, Hideki

    1999-07-01

    Polycrystalline Si (poly-Si) films with high crystalline fraction and low dangling-bond density were prepared by catalytic chemical vapor deposition (Cat-CVD), often called hot-wire CVD. Directional anisotropy in electrical conduction, probably due to structural anisotropy, was observed for Cat-CVD poly-Si films. A novel method to separately characterize both crystalline and amorphous phases in poly-Si films using anisotropic electrical conduction was proposed. On the basis of results obtained by the proposed method and electron spin resonance measurements, reduction in dangling-bond density for Cat-CVD poly-Si films was achieved using the condition to make the quality of the included amorphous phase high. The properties of Cat-CVD poly-Si films are found to be promising in solar-cell applications.

  12. Size Control of Iron Oxide Nanoparticles Using Reverse Microemulsion Method: Morphology, Reduction, and Catalytic Activity in CO Hydrogenation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Reza Housaindokht

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Iron oxide nanoparticles were prepared by microemulsion method and evaluated in Fischer-Tropsch synthesis. The precipitation process was performed in a single-phase microemulsion operating region. Different HLB values of surfactant were prepared by mixing of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS and Triton X-100. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM, surface area, pore volume, average pore diameter, pore size distribution, and XRD patterns were used to analyze size distribution, shape, and structure of precipitated hematite nanoparticles. Furthermore, temperature programmed reduction (TPR and catalytic activity in CO hydrogenation were implemented to assess the performance of the samples. It was found that methane and CO2 selectivity and also the syngas conversion increased as the HLB value of surfactant decreased. In addition, the selectivity to heavy hydrocarbons and chain growth probability (α decreased by decreasing the catalyst crystal size.

  13. Carbothermal reduction of Ti-modified IRMOF-3: an adaptable synthetic method to support catalytic nanoparticles on carbon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jongsik; McNamara, Nicholas D; Her, Theresa H; Hicks, Jason C

    2013-11-13

    This work describes a novel method for the preparation of titanium oxide nanoparticles supported on amorphous carbon with nanoporosity (Ti/NC) via the post-synthetic modification of a Zn-based MOF with an amine functionality, IRMOF-3, with titanium isopropoxide followed by its carbothermal pyrolysis. This material exhibited high purity, high surface area (>1000 m(2)/g), and a high dispersion of metal oxide nanoparticles while maintaining a small particle size (~4 nm). The material was shown to be a promising catalyst for oxidative desulfurization of diesel using dibenzothiophene as a model compound as it exhibited enhanced catalytic activity as compared with titanium oxide supported on activated carbon via the conventional incipient wetness impregnation method. The formation mechanism of Ti/NC was also proposed based on results obtained when the carbothermal reduction temperature was varied.

  14. Reduction of nitrogen oxides from simulated exhaust gas by using plasma-catalytic process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mok, Young Sun; Koh, Dong Jun; Shin, Dong Nam; Kim, Kyong Tae

    2004-01-01

    Removal of nitrogen oxides (NO x ) using a nonthermal plasma reactor (dielectric-packed bed reactor) combined with monolith V 2 O 5 /TiO 2 catalyst was investigated. The effect of initial NO x concentration, feed gas flow rate (space velocity), humidity, and reaction temperature on the removal of NO x was examined. The plasma reactor used can be energized by either ac or pulse voltage. An attempt was made to utilize the electrical ignition system of an internal combustion engine as a high-voltage pulse generator for the plasma reactor. When the plasma reactor was energized by the electrical ignition system, NO was readily oxidized to NO 2 . Performance was as good as with ac energization. Increasing the fraction of NO 2 in NO x , which is the main role of the plasma reactor, largely enhanced the NO x removal efficiency. In the plasma-catalytic reactor, the increases in initial NO x concentration, space velocity (feed gas flow rate) and humidity lowered the NO x removal efficiency. However, the reaction temperature in the range up to 473 K did not significantly affect the NO x removal efficiency in the presence of plasma discharge

  15. Identification of intrinsic catalytic activity for electrochemical reduction of water molecules to generate hydrogen

    KAUST Repository

    Shinagawa, Tatsuya

    2015-01-01

    Insufficient hydronium ion activities at near-neutral pH and under unbuffered conditions induce diffusion-limited currents for hydrogen evolution, followed by a reaction with water molecules to generate hydrogen at elevated potentials. The observed constant current behaviors at near neutral pH reflect the intrinsic electrocatalytic reactivity of the metal electrodes for water reduction. This journal is © the Owner Societies.

  16. AuCu@Pt Nanoalloys for Catalytic Application in Reduction of 4-Nitrophenol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sadia Mehmood

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available To enhance and optimize nanocatalyst ability for nitrophenol (4-NP reduction reaction we look beyond Au-metal nanoparticles and describe a new class of Au nanoalloys with controlled composition for core of AuCu-metals and Pt-metal shell. The reduction of 4-NP was investigated in aqueous media spectroscopically on 7.8 nm Au nanospheres (AuNSs, 8.3 nm AuCuNSs, and 9.1 nm AuCu@Pt core-shell NSs in diameter. The rate constants of the catalyzed reaction at room temperature, activation energies, and entropies of activation of reactions catalyzed by the AuCu@Pt core-shell NSs are found to have different values to those of the pure metal NSs. The results strongly support the proposal that catalysis by nanoparticles is taking place efficiently on the surface of NSs. These core-shell nanocatalysts exhibited stability throughout the reduction reaction and proved that heterogonous type mechanisms are most likely to be dominant in nanoalloy based catalysis if the surface of the NSs is not defected upon shell incorporation.

  17. Theophylline-assisted, eco-friendly synthesis of PtAu nanospheres at reduced graphene oxide with enhanced catalytic activity towards Cr(VI) reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Ling-Ya; Chen, Li-Xian; Liu, Meng-Ting; Wang, Ai-Jun; Wu, Lan-Ju; Feng, Jiu-Ju

    2017-05-01

    Theophylline as a naturally alkaloid is commonly employed to treat asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disorder. Herein, a facile theophylline-assisted green approach was firstly developed for synthesis of PtAu nanospheres/reduced graphene oxide (PtAu NSs/rGO), without any surfactant, polymer, or seed involved. The obtained nanocomposites were applied for the catalytic reduction and removal of highly toxic chromium (VI) using formic acid as a model reductant at 50°C, showing the significantly enhanced catalytic activity and improved recyclability when compared with commercial Pt/C (50%) and home-made Au nanocrystals supported rGO (Au NCs/rGO). It demonstrates great potential applications of the catalyst in wastewater treatment and environmental protection. The eco-friendly route provides a new platform to fabricate other catalysts with enhanced catalytic activity. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. The influence of a silica pillar in lamellar tetratitanate for selective catalytic reduction of NOx using NH3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nogueira da Cunha, Beatriz; Gonçalves, Alécia Maria; Gomes da Silveira, Rafael; Urquieta-González, Ernesto A.; Magalhães Nunes, Liliane

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Potassium ions significantly affected the SCR. • The introduction of silica in the catalyst promotes the NH 3 -SCR reaction. • The catalysts activities were not significantly influenced by SO 2 addition. - Abstract: Silica-pillared layered titanate (SiO 2 –Ti 4 O 9 ) was prepared by intercalating organosilanes into the interlayers of a layered K 2 Ti 4 O 9 followed by calcination at 500 °C. The lamellar titanates produced were used as a support to prepare vanadium catalysts (1 and 2 wt%) through wet impregnation for selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of NO. The catalysts were characterized using nitrogen adsorption (BET), X-ray diffraction (XRD), temperature programmed reduction (H 2 -TPR), nuclear magnetic resonance ( 29 Si NMR), and infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR). Reduction of NO by NH 3 was studied in a fixed-bed reactor packed with the catalysts and fed a mixture comprising 1% NH 3 , 1% NO, 10% O 2 , and 34 ppm SO 2 (when used) in helium. The results demonstrate that activity is correlated with the support, i.e., with acidic strength of catalysts. The potassium in the support, K 2 Ti 4 O 9 , significantly affected the reaction and level of vanadium species reduction. The catalyst (1VSiT) with 1 wt% vanadium impregnated on the SiO 2 –Ti 4 O 9 support reduced ∼80% of the NO. Approximately the same conversion rate was generated on the catalyst (2VSiT) with 2 wt% vanadium using the same support. The increased NH 3 adsorption demonstrate that introduction of silica in the catalyst promotes the NH 3 -SCR reaction. More importantly, 2VSiT and 1VSiT were strongly resistant to SO 2 poisoning

  19. Real-world exhaust temperature profiles of on-road heavy-duty diesel vehicles equipped with selective catalytic reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boriboonsomsin, Kanok; Durbin, Thomas; Scora, George; Johnson, Kent; Sandez, Daniel; Vu, Alexander; Jiang, Yu; Burnette, Andrew; Yoon, Seungju; Collins, John; Dai, Zhen; Fulper, Carl; Kishan, Sandeep; Sabisch, Michael; Jackson, Doug

    2018-09-01

    On-road heavy-duty diesel vehicles are a major contributor of oxides of nitrogen (NO x ) emissions. In the US, many heavy-duty diesel vehicles employ selective catalytic reduction (SCR) technology to meet the 2010 emission standard for NO x . Typically, SCR needs to be at least 200°C before a significant level of NO x reduction is achieved. However, this SCR temperature requirement may not be met under some real-world operating conditions, such as during cold starts, long idling, or low speed/low engine load driving activities. The frequency of vehicle operation with low SCR temperature varies partly by the vehicle's vocational use. In this study, detailed vehicle and engine activity data were collected from 90 heavy-duty vehicles involved in a range of vocations, including line haul, drayage, construction, agricultural, food distribution, beverage distribution, refuse, public work, and utility repair. The data were used to create real-world SCR temperature and engine load profiles and identify the fraction of vehicle operating time that SCR may not be as effective for NO x control. It is found that the vehicles participated in this study operate with SCR temperature lower than 200°C for 11-70% of the time depending on their vocation type. This implies that real-world NO x control efficiency could deviate from the control efficiency observed during engine certification. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Experimental investigation of N2O formation in selective non-catalytic NOx reduction processes performed in stoker boiler

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krawczyk Piotr

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Stoker fired boiler plants are common throughout Eastern Europe. Increasingly strict emission standards will require application of secondary NOx abatement systems on such boilers. Yet operation of such systems, in addition to reducing NOx emissions, may also lead to emission of undesirable substances, for example N2O. This paper presents results of experimental tests concerning N2O formation in the selective non-catalytic NOx emission reduction process (SNCR in a stoker boiler (WR 25 type. Obtained results lead to an unambiguous conclusion that there is a dependency between the NOx and N2O concentrations in the exhaust gas when SNCR process is carried out in a coal-fired stoker boiler. Fulfilling new emission standards in the analysed equipment will require 40–50% reduction of NOx concentration. It should be expected that in such a case the N2O emission will be approximately 55–60 mg/m3, with the NOx to N2O conversion factor of about 40%.

  1. Gold nanocatalyst-based immunosensing strategy accompanying catalytic reduction of 4-nitrophenol for sensitive monitoring of chloramphenicol residue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Que, Xiaohua; Tang, Dianyong; Xia, Biyun; Lu, Minghua; Tang, Dianping

    2014-06-09

    A new competitive-type immunosensing system based on gold nanoparticles toward catalytic reduction of 4-nitrophenol (4-NP) was developed for sensitive monitoring of antibiotic residue (chloramphenicol, CAP, used in this case) by using ultraviolet-visible (UV-vis) spectrometry. Gold nanoparticle (AuNP) with 16 nm in diameter was initially synthesized and functionalized with CAP-bovine serum albumin (CAP-BSA) conjugate, which were used as the competitor on monoclonal anti-CAP antibody-coated polystyrene microtiter plate (MTP). In the presence of target CAP, the labeled CAP-BSA on the AuNP competed with target CAP for the immobilized antibody on the MTP. The conjugated amount of CAP-BSA-AuNP on the MTP decreased with the increase of target CAP in the sample. Upon addition of 4-NP and NaBH4 into the MTP, the carried AuNP could catalytically reduce 4-NP to 4-aminophenol (4-AP), and the as-produced 4-AP could be monitored by using UV-vis absorption spectroscopy. Experimental results indicated that the absorbance at 403 nm increased with the increment of target CAP concentration in the sample, and exhibited a dynamic range from 0.1 to 100 ng mL(-1) with a detection limit (LOD) of 0.03 ng mL(-1) at the 3s(blank) level. Intra- and inter-assay coefficients of variation were lower than 5.5% and 8.0%, respectively. In addition, the methodology was evaluated for CAP spiked honey and milk samples, respectively. The recovery was 92-112%. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  2. Synergistic effect of Nitrogen-doped hierarchical porous carbon/graphene with enhanced catalytic performance for oxygen reduction reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kong, Dewang; Yuan, Wenjing; Li, Cun; Song, Jiming; Xie, Anjian, E-mail: anjx@163.com; Shen, Yuhua, E-mail: s_yuhua@163.com

    2017-01-30

    Graphical abstract: This work demonstrates an example for turning rubbish into valuable products and addresses the disposal issue of waste biomass simultaneously for environment clean. And the typical sample exhibits excellent catalytic performance toward ORR, which is similar to that of commercial Pt/C. - Highlights: • This work demonstrates an example for turning rubbish into valuable products and addresses the disposal issue of waste biomass. • The HPC/RGO composite not only prevents the aggregation of RGO, but also takes advantage of the synergy between them. • This method was accessible, without using any activator, which is an effective strategy for the large scale application of FCs. - Abstract: Developing efficient and economical catalysts for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) is important to promote the commercialization of fuel cells. Here, we report a simple and environmentally friendly method to prepare nitrogen (N) –doped hierarchical porous carbon (HPC)/reduced graphene oxide (RGO) composites by reusing waste biomass (pomelo peel) coupled with graphene oxide (GO). This method is green, low-cost and without using any acid or alkali activator. The typical sample (N-HPC/RGO-1) contains 5.96 at.% nitrogen and larger BET surface area (1194 m{sup 2}/g). Electrochemical measurements show that N-HPC/RGO-1 exhibits not only a relatively positive onset potential and high current density, but also considerable methanol tolerance and long-term durability in alkaline media as well as in acidic media. The electron transfer number is close to 4, which means that it is mostly via a four-electron pathway toward ORR. The excellent catalytic performance of N-HPC/RGO-1 is due to the synergistic effect of the inherent interwoven network structure of HPC, the good electrical conductivity of RGO, and the heteroatom doping for the composite. More importantly, this work demonstrates a good example for turning discarded rubbish into valuable functional products and

  3. Catalytic reduction of nitrate and nitrite ions by hydrogen : investigation of the reaction mechanism over Pd and Pd-Cu catalysts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ilinitch, OM; Nosova, LV; Gorodetskii, VV; Ivanov, VP; Trukhan, SN; Gribov, EN; Bogdanov, SV; Cuperus, FP

    2000-01-01

    The catalytic behavior of mono- and bimetallic catalysts with Pd and/or Cu supported over gamma-Al2O3 in the reduction of aqueous nitrate and nitrite ions by hydrogen was investigated. The composition of the supported metal catalysts was analysed using secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS) and

  4. Substantial Humic Acid Adsorption to Activated Carbon Air Cathodes Produces a Small Reduction in Catalytic Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Wulin; Watson, Valerie J; Logan, Bruce E

    2016-08-16

    Long-term operation of microbial fuel cells (MFCs) can result in substantial degradation of activated carbon (AC) air-cathode performance. To examine a possible role in fouling from organic matter in water, cathodes were exposed to high concentrations of humic acids (HA). Cathodes treated with 100 mg L(-1) HA exhibited no significant change in performance. Exposure to 1000 mg L(-1) HA decreased the maximum power density by 14% (from 1310 ± 30 mW m(-2) to 1130 ± 30 mW m(-2)). Pore blocking was the main mechanism as the total surface area of the AC decreased by 12%. Minimization of external mass transfer resistances using a rotating disk electrode exhibited only a 5% reduction in current, indicating about half the impact of HA adsorption was associated with external mass transfer resistance and the remainder was due to internal resistances. Rinsing the cathodes with deionized water did not restore cathode performance. These results demonstrated that HA could contribute to cathode fouling, but the extent of power reduction was relatively small in comparison to large mass of humics adsorbed. Other factors, such as biopolymer attachment, or salt precipitation, are therefore likely more important contributors to long-term fouling of MFC cathodes.

  5. A Mild and Convenient Method for the Reduction of Carbonyl Compounds with NaBH4 in the Presence of Catalytic Amounts of MoCl5

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeynizadeh, Behzad; Yahyaei, Saiedeh

    2003-01-01

    NaBH 4 with catalytic amounts of MoCl 5 can readily reduce a variety of carbonyl compounds such as aldehydes, ketones, acyloins, α-diketones and conjugated enones to their corresponding alcohols in good to excellent yields. Reduction reactions were performed under aprotic condition in CH 3 CN at room temperature or reflux. In addition, the chemoselective reduction of aldehydes over ketones was accomplished successfully with this reducing system

  6. Catalytic reduction of NOx with H2/CO/CH4 over PdMOR catalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pieterse, Johannis A.Z.; Booneveld, Saskia

    2007-01-01

    Conversion of NO x with reducing agents H 2 , CO and CH 4 , with and without O 2 , H 2 O, and CO 2 were studied with catalysts based on MOR zeolite loaded with palladium and cerium. The catalysts reached high NO x to N 2 conversion with H 2 and CO (>90% conversion and N 2 selectivity) range under lean conditions. The formation of N 2 O is absent in the presence of both H 2 and CO together with oxygen in the feed, which will be the case in lean engine exhaust. PdMOR shows synergic co-operation between H 2 and CO at 450-500 K. The positive effect of cerium is significant in the case of H 2 and CH 4 reducing agent but is less obvious with H 2 /CO mixture and under lean conditions. Cerium lowers the reducibility of Pd species in the zeolite micropores. The catalysts showed excellent stability at temperatures up to 673 K in a feed with 2500 ppm CH 4 , 500 ppm NO, 5% O 2 , 10% H 2 O (0-1% H 2 ), N 2 balance but deactivation is noticed at higher temperatures. Combining results of the present study with those of previous studies it shows that the PdMOR-based catalysts are good catalysts for NO x reduction with H 2 , CO, hydrocarbons, alcohols and aldehydes under lean conditions at temperatures up to 673 K. (author)

  7. Screening of catalytic oxygen reduction reaction activity of metal-doped graphene by density functional theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Xin; Chen, Shuangjing; Wang, Jinyu

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • The screened M-G structures are very thermodynamically stable, and the stability is even higher than that of the corresponding bulk metal surfaces. • The binding energies of ORR intermediates suggest that they are not linear dependence, which are different form the cases found on some metal-based catalysts. • The Au-, Co-, and Ag-G structures could be used as the ORR catalysts. - Abstract: Graphene doping is a promising direction for developing effective oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) catalysts. In this paper, we computationally investigated the ORR performance of 10 kinds of metal-doped graphene (M-G) catalysts, namely, Al-, Si-, Mn-, Fe-, Co-, Ni-, Pd-, Ag-, Pt-, and Au-G. The results shown that the binding energies of the metal atoms incorporated into the graphene vacancy are higher than their bulk cohesive energies, indicating the formed M-G catalysts are even more stable than the corresponding bulk metal surfaces, and thus avoid the metals dissolution in the reaction environment. We demonstrated that the linear relation among the binding energies of the ORR intermediates that found on metal-based materials does not hold for the M-G catalysts, therefore a single binding energy of intermediate alone is not sufficient to evaluate the ORR activity of an arbitrary catalyst. By analysis of the detailed ORR processes, we predicted that the Au-, Co-, and Ag-G materials can be used as the ORR catalysts.

  8. Technology Roadmap: Energy and GHG reductions in the chemical industry via catalytic processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2013-06-01

    The chemical industry is a large energy user; but chemical products and technologies also are used in a wide array of energy saving and/or renewable energy applications so the industry has also an energy saving role. The chemical and petrochemical sector is by far the largest industrial energy user, accounting for roughly 10% of total worldwide final energy demand and 7% of global GHG emissions. The International Council of Chemical Associations (ICCA) has partnered with the IEA and DECHEMA (Society for Chemical Engineering and Biotechnology) to describe the path toward further improvements in energy efficiency and GHG reductions in the chemical sector. The roadmap looks at measures needed from the chemical industry, policymakers, investors and academia to press on with catalysis technology and unleash its potential around the globe. The report uncovers findings and best practice opportunities that illustrate how continuous improvements and breakthrough technology options can cut energy use and bring down greenhouse gas (GHG) emission rates. Around 90% of chemical processes involve the use of catalysts – such as added substances that increase the rate of reaction without being consumed by it – and related processes to enhance production efficiency and reduce energy use, thereby curtailing GHG emission levels. This work shows an energy savings potential approaching 13 exajoules (EJ) by 2050 – equivalent to the current annual primary energy use of Germany.

  9. Selective catalytic reduction system and process for control of NO.sub.x emissions in a sulfur-containing gas stream

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobolevskiy, Anatoly

    2015-08-11

    An exhaust gas treatment process, apparatus, and system for reducing the concentration of NOx, CO and hydrocarbons in a gas stream, such as an exhaust stream (29), via selective catalytic reduction with ammonia is provided. The process, apparatus and system include a catalytic bed (32) having a reducing only catalyst portion (34) and a downstream reducing-plus-oxidizing portion (36). Each portion (34, 36) includes an amount of tungsten. The reducing-plus-oxidizing catalyst portion (36) advantageously includes a greater amount of tungsten than the reducing catalyst portion (36) to markedly limit ammonia salt formation.

  10. Numerical simulation of urea based selective non-catalytic reduction deNOx process for industrial applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baleta, Jakov; Mikulčić, Hrvoje; Vujanović, Milan; Petranović, Zvonimir; Duić, Neven

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • SNCR is a simple method for the NOx reduction from large industrial facilities. • Capabilities of the developed mathematical framework for SNCR simulation were shown. • Model was used on the geometry of experimental reactor and municipal incinerator. • Results indicate suitability of the developed model for real industrial cases. - Abstract: Industrial processes emit large amounts of diverse pollutants into the atmosphere, among which NOx takes a significant portion. Selective non-catalytic reduction (SNCR) is a relatively simple method for the NOx reduction in large industrial facilities such as power plants, cement plants and waste incinerator plants. It consists of injecting the urea-water solution in the hot flue gas stream and its reaction with the NOx. During this process flue gas enthalpy is used for the urea-water droplet heating and for the evaporation of water content. After water evaporates, thermolysis of urea occurs, during which ammonia, a known NO_x reductant, and isocyanic acid are generated. In order to cope with the ever stringent environmental norms, equipment manufacturers need to develop energy efficient products that are at the same time benign to environment. This is becoming increasingly complicated and costly, and one way to reduce production costs together with the maintaining the same competitiveness level is to employ computational fluid dynamics (CFD) as a tool, in a process today commonly known under the term “virtual prototyping”. The aim of this paper is to show capabilities of the developed mathematical framework implemented in the commercial CFD code AVL FIRE®, to simulate physical processes of all relevant phenomena occurring during the SNCR process. First, mathematical models for description of SNCR process are presented and afterwards, models are used on the 3D geometry of an industrial reactor and a real industrial case to predict SNCR efficiency, temperature and velocity field. Influence of the main

  11. Evaluating the Catalytic Effects of Carbon Materials on the Photocatalytic Reduction and Oxidation Reactions of TiO2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, Gulzar; Kim, Young Kwang; Choi, Sung Kyu; Han, Dong Suk; Abdelwahab, Ahmed; Park, Hyunwoong

    2013-01-01

    TiO 2 composites with seven different carbon materials (activated carbons, graphite, carbon fibers, single-walled carbon nanotubes, multi-walled carbon nanotubes, graphene oxides, and reduced graphene oxides) that are virgin or treated with nitric acid are prepared through an evaporation method. The photocatalytic activities of the as-prepared samples are evaluated in terms of H 2 production from aqueous methanol solution (photo-catalytic reduction: PCR) and degradation of aqueous pollutants (phenol, methylene blue, and rhodamine B) (photocatalytic oxidation: PCO) under AM 1.5-light irradiation. Despite varying effects depending on the kinds of carbon materials and their surface treatment, composites typically show enhanced PCR activity with maximum 50 times higher H 2 production as compared to bare TiO 2 . Conversely, the carbon-induced synergy effects on PCO activities are insignificant for all three substrates. Colorimetric quantification of hydroxyl radicals supports the absence of carbon effects. However, platinum deposition on the binary composites displays the enhanced effect on both PCR and PCO reactions. These differing effects of carbon materials on PCR and PCO reactions of TiO 2 are discussed in terms of physicochemical properties of carbon materials, coupling states of TiO 2 /carbon composites, interfacial charge transfers. Various surface characterizations of composites (UV-Vis diffuse reflectance, SEM, FTIR, surface area, electrical conductivity, and photoluminescence) are performed to gain insight on their photocatalytic redox behaviors

  12. Radio-Frequency-Based NH3-Selective Catalytic Reduction Catalyst Control: Studies on Temperature Dependency and Humidity Influences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markus Dietrich

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The upcoming more stringent automotive emission legislations and current developments have promoted new technologies for more precise and reliable catalyst control. For this purpose, radio-frequency-based (RF catalyst state determination offers the only approach for directly measuring the NH3 loading on selective catalytic reduction (SCR catalysts and the state of other catalysts and filter systems. Recently, the ability of this technique to directly control the urea dosing on a current NH3 storing zeolite catalyst has been demonstrated on an engine dynamometer for the first time and this paper continues that work. Therefore, a well-known serial-type and zeolite-based SCR catalyst (Cu-SSZ-13 was investigated under deliberately chosen high space velocities. At first, the full functionality of the RF system with Cu-SSZ-13 as sample was tested successfully. By direct RF-based NH3 storage control, the influence of the storage degree on the catalyst performance, i.e., on NOx conversion and NH3 slip, was investigated in a temperature range between 250 and 400 °C. For each operation point, an ideal and a critical NH3 storage degree was found and analyzed in the whole temperature range. Based on the data of all experimental runs, temperature dependent calibration functions were developed as a basis for upcoming tests under transient conditions. Additionally, the influence of exhaust humidity was observed with special focus on cold start water and its effects to the RF signals.

  13. Radio-Frequency-Based NH₃-Selective Catalytic Reduction Catalyst Control: Studies on Temperature Dependency and Humidity Influences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietrich, Markus; Hagen, Gunter; Reitmeier, Willibald; Burger, Katharina; Hien, Markus; Grass, Philippe; Kubinski, David; Visser, Jaco; Moos, Ralf

    2017-07-12

    The upcoming more stringent automotive emission legislations and current developments have promoted new technologies for more precise and reliable catalyst control. For this purpose, radio-frequency-based (RF) catalyst state determination offers the only approach for directly measuring the NH₃ loading on selective catalytic reduction (SCR) catalysts and the state of other catalysts and filter systems. Recently, the ability of this technique to directly control the urea dosing on a current NH₃ storing zeolite catalyst has been demonstrated on an engine dynamometer for the first time and this paper continues that work. Therefore, a well-known serial-type and zeolite-based SCR catalyst (Cu-SSZ-13) was investigated under deliberately chosen high space velocities. At first, the full functionality of the RF system with Cu-SSZ-13 as sample was tested successfully. By direct RF-based NH₃ storage control, the influence of the storage degree on the catalyst performance, i.e., on NO x conversion and NH₃ slip, was investigated in a temperature range between 250 and 400 °C. For each operation point, an ideal and a critical NH₃ storage degree was found and analyzed in the whole temperature range. Based on the data of all experimental runs, temperature dependent calibration functions were developed as a basis for upcoming tests under transient conditions. Additionally, the influence of exhaust humidity was observed with special focus on cold start water and its effects to the RF signals.

  14. Model predictive control of a lean-burn gasoline engine coupled with a passive selective catalytic reduction system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Pingen [Tennessee Technological University (TTU); Lin, Qinghua [Tennessee Technological University (TTU); Prikhodko, Vitaly Y. [ORNL

    2017-10-01

    Lean-burn gasoline engines have demonstrated 10–20% engine efficiency gain over stoichiometric engines and are widely considered as a promising technology for meeting the 54.5 miles-per-gallon (mpg) Corporate Average Fuel Economy standard by 2025. Nevertheless, NOx emissions control for lean-burn gasoline for meeting the stringent EPA Tier 3 emission standards has been one of the main challenges towards the commercialization of highly-efficient lean-burn gasoline engines in the United States. Passive selective catalytic reduction (SCR) systems, which consist of a three-way catalyst and SCR, have demonstrated great potentials of effectively reducing NOx emissions for lean gasoline engines but may cause significant fuel penalty due to ammonia generation via rich engine combustion. The purpose of this study is to develop a model-predictive control (MPC) scheme for a lean-burn gasoline engine coupled with a passive SCR system to minimize the fuel penalty associated with passive SCR operation while satisfying stringent NOx and NH3 emissions requirements. Simulation results demonstrate that the MPC-based control can reduce the fuel penalty by 47.7% in a simulated US06 cycle and 32.0% in a simulated UDDS cycle, compared to the baseline control, while achieving over 96% deNOx efficiency and less than 15 ppm tailpipe ammonia slip. The proposed MPC control can potentially enable high engine efficiency gain for highly-efficient lean-burn gasoline engine while meeting the stringent EPA Tier 3 emission standards.

  15. Radio-Frequency-Based NH3-Selective Catalytic Reduction Catalyst Control: Studies on Temperature Dependency and Humidity Influences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietrich, Markus; Hagen, Gunter; Reitmeier, Willibald; Burger, Katharina; Hien, Markus; Grass, Philippe; Kubinski, David; Visser, Jaco; Moos, Ralf

    2017-01-01

    The upcoming more stringent automotive emission legislations and current developments have promoted new technologies for more precise and reliable catalyst control. For this purpose, radio-frequency-based (RF) catalyst state determination offers the only approach for directly measuring the NH3 loading on selective catalytic reduction (SCR) catalysts and the state of other catalysts and filter systems. Recently, the ability of this technique to directly control the urea dosing on a current NH3 storing zeolite catalyst has been demonstrated on an engine dynamometer for the first time and this paper continues that work. Therefore, a well-known serial-type and zeolite-based SCR catalyst (Cu-SSZ-13) was investigated under deliberately chosen high space velocities. At first, the full functionality of the RF system with Cu-SSZ-13 as sample was tested successfully. By direct RF-based NH3 storage control, the influence of the storage degree on the catalyst performance, i.e., on NOx conversion and NH3 slip, was investigated in a temperature range between 250 and 400 °C. For each operation point, an ideal and a critical NH3 storage degree was found and analyzed in the whole temperature range. Based on the data of all experimental runs, temperature dependent calibration functions were developed as a basis for upcoming tests under transient conditions. Additionally, the influence of exhaust humidity was observed with special focus on cold start water and its effects to the RF signals. PMID:28704929

  16. Catalytic reduction of methane/unburned hydrocarbons in smoke from lean-burn gas engines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wit, Jan de.

    1999-01-01

    The aim of this project has been: To describe the flue gas conditions of typical stationary gas engines for cogeneration; To evaluate the predominant causes of deactivation of oxidation catalysts under realistic operation conditions; To develop improved long-term stable oxidation catalysts; To evaluate alternative catalyst-based methane reduction technologies. Most gas engines for stationary purposes are efficient lean-burn gas engines. Both the high efficiency and the very lean operation lead to low exhaust temperatures. However, there is now a tendency to design engines with un-cooled exhaust manifolds. This leads to higher shaft efficiency and increases the exhaust temperature. Exhaust gas composition and temperatures during continuous operation and start/stops are given in this report. Analyses have been made of catalyst samples to find predominant causes for oxidation catalyst deactivation. The analyses have shown that the presence of sulphur dioxide in the flue gas causes sulphur poisoning on the active catalyst surface. This effect is dependent on both the catalyst formulation and the catalyst support material composition. Neither sintering, nor other poisoning components than sulphur have been on the examined catalyst samples. The sulphur dioxide in the exhaust is a result of the sulphur in the odorisation additive used in the natural gas (approx. 10 mg/n 3 m THT) and of the sulphur present in combusted lubrication oil. These sources leads to a level of approx. 0.3 - 0.6 ppm (vol) SO 2 in the exhaust gas. Based on a large number of laboratory tests, a new oxidation catalyst formulation has been developed and successfully tested over 5000 hours of operation at a commercial cogeneration plant. This long-term testing has been additionally supplemented by short-term testings at test sites to see performance under other operation conditions. It has been shown that a rise in flue gas temperature (from e.g. 450 deg. C) will significantly reduce the necessary

  17. Characterization and reaction studies of dimeric molybdenum(III) complexes with bridging dithiolate ligands. Catalytic reduction of acetylene to ethylene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DuBois, M.R.; Haltiwanger, R.C.; Miller, D.J.; Glatzmaier, G.

    1979-01-01

    The complexes [C 5 H 5 MoSC/sub n/H/sub 2n/S] 2 (where n = 2 and 3) have been prepared by the reaction of ethylene sulfide and propylene sulfide, respectively, with C 5 H 5 MoH(CO) 3 or with [C 5 H 5 Mo(CO) 3 ] 2 . Cyclic voltammetry shows that each complex undergoes two reversible oxidations at 0.13 and 0.79 V vs. SCE (in acetonitrile with 0.1 M Bu 4 NBF 4 ). Both the one-electron and two-electron oxidation products have been synthesized and characterized by spectral and magnetic data. Electrochemical data for the oxidized complexes support the conclusion that the complexes have the same gross structural features in all three oxidation states. A single crystal of the monocation [C 5 H 5 MoSC 3 H 6 S] 2 BF 4 has been characterized by an x-ray diffraction study. The compound crystallizes in the space group C2/c with a = 18.266 (1) A, b = 9.206 (4) A, c = 12.911 (5) A, β = 100.83 (3) 0 , and V = 2128 A 3 . The metal ions of the cation are bridged by two 1,2-propanedithiolate ligands. The four sulfur atoms of these ligands form a plane which bisects the metal-metal distance. The neutral dimeric complexes undergo a unique reaction with alkenes and alkynes in which the hydrocarbon portion of the bridging dithiolate ligands is exchanged. The reaction has been characterized with olefinswith both electron-withdrawing and electron-donating substituents. When [C 5 H 5 MoSC 2 H 4 S] 2 (1) is reacted with acetylene at 25 0 C, ethene is produced and the complex [C 5 H 5 MoSC 2 H 2 S] 2 is isolated. The latter complex is reduced by hydrogen (2 atm) at 60 0 C to re-form 1. The utility of these reactions in the catalytic reduction of acetylene to ethylene has been investigated. The role of the sulfur ligands in this catalytic cycle is discussed. 50 references, 2 figures, 5 tables

  18. Investigation of neptunium(V) reduction to neptunium(IV) by semiconductor photocatalysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, M.; Nakamura, T.; Ikeda, T.; Karasawa, H.

    1990-01-01

    Np(V) is the dominant Np oxidation state in high level liquid waste from reprocessing plants. Since low extractability of Np(V) makes its separation from other nuclei difficult, valence control is required. When a 1mM Np(V) solution of 3M nitric acid was irradiated by a Xe-lamp, using n-SiC (5g/dm 3 ) as photocatalyst and hydrazine (0.1M) as donor, 100% of the Np(V) was reduced to Np(IV) within 30 min at room temperature. Electrochemical investigations suggested that Np(V) is reduced by the atomic hydrogen adsorbed on the photocatalyst surface. According to this mechanism, platinum group metals can act as reducing catalysts for No(V) reduction due to their low hydrogen overvoltage. The proposed mechanism was experimentally confirmed using platinum black (5g/dm 3 ) as catalyst and hydroxylammonium nitrate (0.9M) as reducing agent

  19. Catalytic and peroxidase-like activity of carbon based-AuPd bimetallic nanocomposite produced using carbon dots as the reductant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Liuqing; Liu, Xiaoying; Lu, Qiujun; Huang, Na; Liu, Meiling; Zhang, Youyu; Yao, Shouzhuo

    2016-01-01

    In this report, carbon-based AuPd bimetallic nanocomposite (AuPd/C NC) was synthesized using carbon dots (C-dots) as the reducing agent and stabilizer by a simple green sequential reduction strategy, without adding other agents. The as synthesized AuPd/C NC showed good catalytic activity and peroxidase-like property. The structure and morphology of these nanoparticles were clearly characterized by UV–Vis spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The AuPd/C NC catalyst exhibits noticeably higher catalytic activity than Pd and Au nanoparticles in catalysis reduction of 4-nitrophenol (4-NP). Moreover, based on the high peroxidase-like property of AuPd/C NC, a new colorimetric detection method for hydrogen peroxide (H 2 O 2 ) has been designed using 3,3′,5,5′-tetramethyl-benzidine (TMB) as the substrate, which provides a simple and sensitive means to detect H 2 O 2 in wide linear range of 5 μM–500 μM and 500 μM–4 mM with low detection limit of 1.6 μM (S/N = 3). Therefore, the facile synthesis strategy for bimetallic nanoparticles by the mild reductant of carbon dot will provide some new thoughts for preparing of carbon-based metal nanomaterials and expand their application in catalysis and analytical chemistry areas. - Highlights: • Carbon-based AuPd bimetallic nanocomposite was synthesized using carbon dots. • The green sequential reduction strategy synthesis method is simple, green, convenient and effective. • The as synthesized AuPd/C NC showed good catalytic activity and peroxidase-like activity. • The AuPd/C NC exhibits noticeably higher catalytic activity in reduction of 4-nitrophenol. • A new colorimetric detection method for hydrogen peroxide based on AuPd/C NC was proposed.

  20. Drastic reduction in the surface recombination velocity of crystalline silicon passivated with catalytic chemical vapor deposited SiNx films by introducing phosphorous catalytic-doped layer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thi, Trinh Cham; Koyama, Koichi; Ohdaira, Keisuke; Matsumura, Hideki

    2014-01-01

    We improve the passivation property of n-type crystalline silicon (c-Si) surface passivated with a catalytic chemical vapor deposited (Cat-CVD) Si nitride (SiN x ) film by inserting a phosphorous (P)-doped layer formed by exposing c-Si surface to P radicals generated by the catalytic cracking of PH 3 molecules (Cat-doping). An extremely low surface recombination velocity (SRV) of 2 cm/s can be achieved for 2.5 Ω cm n-type (100) floating-zone Si wafers passivated with SiN x /P Cat-doped layers, both prepared in Cat-CVD systems. Compared with the case of only SiN x passivated layers, SRV decreases from 5 cm/s to 2 cm/s. The decrease in SRV is the result of field effect created by activated P atoms (donors) in a shallow P Cat-doped layer. Annealing process plays an important role in improving the passivation quality of SiN x films. The outstanding results obtained imply that SiN x /P Cat-doped layers can be used as promising passivation layers in high-efficiency n-type c-Si solar cells.

  1. Pt-Ag cubic nanocages with wall thickness less than 2 nm and their enhanced catalytic activity toward oxygen reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xiaojun; Yang, Xuan; Zhang, Yun; Ding, Yong; Su, Dong; Qin, Dong

    2017-10-12

    We report a facile synthesis of Pt-Ag nanocages with walls thinner than 2 nm by depositing a few atomic layers of Pt as conformal shells on Ag nanocubes and then selectively removing the Ag template via wet etching. In a typical process, we inject a specific volume of aqueous H 2 PtCl 6 into a mixture of Ag nanocubes, ascorbic acid (H 2 Asc), NaOH, and poly(vinylpyrrolidone) in water under ambient conditions. At an initial pH of 11.9, the Pt(iv) precursor is quickly reduced by an ascorbate monoanion, a strong reducing agent derived from the neutralization of H 2 Asc with NaOH. The newly formed Pt atoms are deposited onto the edges and then corners and side faces of Ag nanocubes, leading to the generation of Ag@Pt core-shell nanocubes with a conformal Pt shell of approximately three atomic layers (or, about 0.6 nm in thickness) when 0.4 mL of 0.2 mM H 2 PtCl 6 is involved. After the selective removal of Ag in the core using an etchant based on a mixture of Fe(NO 3 ) 3 and HNO 3 , we transform the core-shell nanocubes into Pt-Ag alloy nanocages with an ultrathin wall thickness of less than 2 nm. We further demonstrate that the as-obtained nanocages with a composition of Pt 42 Ag 58 exhibit an enhanced catalytic activity toward the oxygen reduction reaction, with a mass activity of 0.30 A mg -1 and a specific activity of 0.93 mA cm -2 , which are 1.6 and 2.5 times, respectively, greater than those of a commercial Pt/C catalyst.

  2. Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) for mobile application - heavy duty diesel; Selektive Katalytische Reduktion (SCR) fuer die mobile Anwendung - LKW

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huennekes, E.; Neubauer, T. [Engelhard Technologies GmbH, Hannover (Germany); Roth, S.A.; Patchett, J.A. [Engelhard Corp., R and D, Iselin, NJ (United States)

    2006-07-01

    Different system configurations of particulate and NOx control via selective catalytic reduction (SCR) were discussed. Advantages and disadvantages were described and the final choice of the optimum system will strongly depend on the application, the market (US, EU) and the system costs. Especially when considering low temperature NOx control, the optimum adjustment of the NO{sub 2}/NO{sub x} ratio in front of an SCR system plays an important role. When generating NO2 over an oxidation catalyst, the resulting NO{sub 2}/NO{sub x} ratio strongly depends on temperature and space velocity. Steady state data show an optimum NO{sub 2}/NO{sub x} ratio between 35 and 60% at temperatures about 240 C. Three DOC systems in front of an SCR system were investigated with the purpose to generate high, low and optimum NO{sub 2}/NO{sub x} ratios. The fast SCR reaction at 1:1 NO: NO2 with NH{sub 3} is the preferred reaction pathway until either NO or NO{sub 2} are consumed. The benefit of an optimum designed DOC system can be seen in the transient response after a sudden increase in urea dosing. The time for the optimum designed system to reach maximum NO{sub x} conversion is much shorter compared with systems having excess NO or NO{sub 2} Ammonia oxidation catalysts (AMOX) are effective means in controlling ammonia from SCR systems. To be effective, AMOX must have selectivity to nitrogen over N{sub 2}O and NO{sub x}. (orig.)

  3. Effects of Particle Filters and Selective Catalytic Reduction on In-Use Heavy-Duty Diesel Truck Emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preble, C.; Cados, T.; Harley, R.; Kirchstetter, T.

    2016-12-01

    Heavy-duty diesel trucks (HDDT) are a major source of nitrogen oxides (NOx) and black carbon (BC) in urban environments, contributing to persistent ozone and particulate matter air quality problems. Diesel particle filters (DPFs) and selective catalytic reduction (SCR) systems that target PM and NOx emissions, respectively, have recently become standard equipment on new HDDT. DPFs can also be installed on older engines as a retrofit device. Previous work has shown that DPF and SCR systems can reduce NOx and BC emissions by up to 70% and 90%, respectively, compared to modern trucks without these after-treatment controls (Preble et al., ES&T 2015). DPFs can have the undesirable side-effect of increasing ultrafine particle (UFP) and nitrogen dioxide (NO2) emissions. While SCR systems can partially mitigate DPF-related NO2 increases, these systems can emit nitrous oxide (N2O), a potent greenhouse gas. We report new results from a study of HDDT emissions conducted in fall 2015 at the Port of Oakland and Caldecott Tunnel in California's San Francisco Bay Area. We report pollutant emission factors (g kg-1) for emitted NOx, NO2, BC, PM2.5, UFP, and N2O on a truck-by-truck basis. Using a roadside license plate recognition system, we categorize each truck by its engine model year and installed after-treatment controls. From this, we develop emissions profiles for trucks with and without DPF and SCR. We evaluate the effectiveness of these devices as a function of their age to determine whether degradation is an issue. We also compare the emission profiles of trucks traveling at low speeds along a level, arterial road en route to the port and at high speeds up a 4% grade highway approaching the tunnel. Given the climate impacts of BC and N2O, we also examine the global warming potential of emissions from trucks with and without DPF and SCR.

  4. Anodically-grown TiO_2 nanotubes: Effect of the crystallization on the catalytic activity toward the oxygen reduction reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sacco, Adriano; Garino, Nadia; Lamberti, Andrea; Pirri, Candido Fabrizio; Quaglio, Marzia

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Anodically-grown TiO_2 nanotubes as catalysts for the oxygen reduction reaction. • Amorphous NTs compared to thermal- and vapor-treated crystalline nanostructures. • The selection of the crystallization conditions leads to performance similar to Pt. - Abstract: In this work we investigated the behavior of TiO_2 nanotube (NT) arrays, grown by anodic oxidation of Ti foil, as catalysts for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in alkaline water solution. In particular, as-grown amorphous NTs were compared to crystalline anatase nanostructures, obtained following two different procedures, namely thermal and vapor-induced crystallizations. The catalytic activity of these materials toward the ORR was evaluated by cyclic voltammetry measurements. ORR polarization curves, combined with the rotating disk technique, indicated a predominant four-electrons reduction path, especially for crystalline samples. The effect of the structural characteristics of the investigated materials on the catalytic activity was analyzed in details by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. The catalytic performance of the crystalline NTs is only slightly lower with respect to the reference material for fuel cell applications, namely platinum, but is in line with other cost-effective catalysts recently proposed in the literature. However, if compared to the larger part of these low-cost catalysts, anodically-grown TiO_2 NTs are characterized by a synthesis route which is highly reproducible and easily up-scalable.

  5. Anodically-grown TiO{sub 2} nanotubes: Effect of the crystallization on the catalytic activity toward the oxygen reduction reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sacco, Adriano, E-mail: adriano.sacco@iit.it [Center for Sustainable Future Technologies @Polito, Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia, Corso Trento 21, 10129, Torino (Italy); Garino, Nadia [Center for Sustainable Future Technologies @Polito, Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia, Corso Trento 21, 10129, Torino (Italy); Applied Science and Technology Department, Politecnico di Torino, Corso Duca degli Abruzzi 24, 10129, Torino (Italy); Lamberti, Andrea, E-mail: andrea.lamberti@polito.it [Center for Sustainable Future Technologies @Polito, Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia, Corso Trento 21, 10129, Torino (Italy); Applied Science and Technology Department, Politecnico di Torino, Corso Duca degli Abruzzi 24, 10129, Torino (Italy); Pirri, Candido Fabrizio [Center for Sustainable Future Technologies @Polito, Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia, Corso Trento 21, 10129, Torino (Italy); Applied Science and Technology Department, Politecnico di Torino, Corso Duca degli Abruzzi 24, 10129, Torino (Italy); Quaglio, Marzia [Center for Sustainable Future Technologies @Polito, Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia, Corso Trento 21, 10129, Torino (Italy)

    2017-08-01

    Highlights: • Anodically-grown TiO{sub 2} nanotubes as catalysts for the oxygen reduction reaction. • Amorphous NTs compared to thermal- and vapor-treated crystalline nanostructures. • The selection of the crystallization conditions leads to performance similar to Pt. - Abstract: In this work we investigated the behavior of TiO{sub 2} nanotube (NT) arrays, grown by anodic oxidation of Ti foil, as catalysts for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in alkaline water solution. In particular, as-grown amorphous NTs were compared to crystalline anatase nanostructures, obtained following two different procedures, namely thermal and vapor-induced crystallizations. The catalytic activity of these materials toward the ORR was evaluated by cyclic voltammetry measurements. ORR polarization curves, combined with the rotating disk technique, indicated a predominant four-electrons reduction path, especially for crystalline samples. The effect of the structural characteristics of the investigated materials on the catalytic activity was analyzed in details by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. The catalytic performance of the crystalline NTs is only slightly lower with respect to the reference material for fuel cell applications, namely platinum, but is in line with other cost-effective catalysts recently proposed in the literature. However, if compared to the larger part of these low-cost catalysts, anodically-grown TiO{sub 2} NTs are characterized by a synthesis route which is highly reproducible and easily up-scalable.

  6. Fabrication and characterisation of gold nano-particle modified polymer monoliths for flow-through catalytic reactions and their application in the reduction of hexacyanoferrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Floris, Patrick; Twamley, Brendan; Nesterenko, Pavel N.; Paull, Brett; Connolly, Damian

    2014-01-01

    Polymer monoliths in capillary (100 μm i.d.) and polypropylene pipette tip formats (vol: 20 μL) were modified with gold nano-particles (AuNP) and subsequently used for flow-through catalytic reactions. Specifically, methacrylate monoliths were modified with amine-reactive monomers using a two-step photografting method and then reacted with ethylenediamine to provide amine attachment sites for the subsequent immobilisation of 4 nm, 7 nm or 16 nm AuNP. This was achieved by flushing colloidal suspensions of gold nano-particles through each aminated polymer monolith which resulted in a multi-point covalent attachment of gold via the lone pair of electrons on the nitrogen of the free amine groups. Field emission scanning electron microscopy and scanning capacitively coupled conductivity detection was used to characterise the surface coverage of AuNP on the monoliths. The catalytic activity of AuNP immobilised on the polymer monoliths in both formats was then demonstrated using the reduction of Fe(III) to Fe(II) by sodium borohydride as a model reaction by monitoring the reduction in absorbance of the hexacyanoferrate (III) complex at 420 nm. Catalytic activity was significantly enhanced on monoliths modified with smaller AuNP with almost complete reduction (95 %) observed when using monoliths agglomerated with 7 nm AuNPs. (author)

  7. Catalytic reduction of NO{sub x} in gasoline engine exhaust over copper- and nickel-exchanged X-zeolite catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhattacharyya, S. [Indian Inst. of Technology, Kharagpur (India). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering; Das, R.K. [Indian School of Mines, Dhanbad (India). Dept. of Engineering and Mining Machinery

    2001-10-11

    Catalytic removal of NO{sub x} in engine exhaust gases can be accomplished by non-selective reduction, selective reduction and decomposition. Noble metals are extensively used for non-selective reduction of NO{sub x} and up to 90% of engine NO{sub x} emissions can be reduced in a stoichiometric exhaust. This requirement of having the stoichiometric fuel-air ratio acts against efficiency improvement of engines. Selective NO{sub x} reduction in the presence of different reductants such as, NH{sub 3}, urea or hydrocarbons, requires close control of the amount of reductant being injected which otherwise may be emitted as a pollutant. Catalytic decomposition is the best option for NO{sub x} removal. Nevertheless, catalysts which are durable, economic and active for NO{sub x} reduction at normal engine exhaust temperature ranges are still being investigated. Three catalysts based on X-zeolite have been developed by exchanging the Na+ ion with copper, nickel and copper-nickel metal ions and applied to the exhaust of a stationary gasoline engine to explore their potential for catalytic reduction of NO{sub x} under a wide range of engine and exhaust conditions. Some encouraging results have been obtained. The catalyst Cu-X exhibits much better NO{sub x} reduction performance at any temperature in comparison to Cu-Ni-X and Ni-X; while Cu-Ni-X catalyst exhibits slightly better performance than Ni-X catalyst. Maximum NO{sub x} efficiency achieved with Cu-X catalyst is 59.2% at a space velocity (sv) of 31 000 h{sup -1}; while for Cu-Ni-X and Ni-X catalysts the equivalent numbers are 60.4% and 56% respectively at a sv of 22 000 h{sup -1}. Unlike noble metals, the doped X-zeolite catalysts exhibit significant NO{sub x} reduction capability for a wide range of air/fuel ratio and with a slower rate of decline as well with increase in air/fuel ratio. (author)

  8. Selective catalytic reduction of nitrogen oxides from industrial gases by hydrogen or methane; Reduction catalytique selective des oxydes d'azote (NO{sub x}) provenant d'effluents gazeux industriels par l'hydrogene ou le methane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Engelmann Pirez, M

    2004-12-15

    This work deals with the selective catalytic reduction of nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}), contained in the effluents of industrial plants, by hydrogen or methane. The aim is to replace ammonia, used as reducing agent, in the conventional process. The use of others reducing agents such as hydrogen or methane is interesting for different reasons: practical, economical and ecological. The catalyst has to convert selectively NO into N{sub 2}, in presence of an excess of oxygen, steam and sulfur dioxide. The developed catalyst is constituted by a support such as perovskites, particularly LaCoO{sub 3}, on which are dispersed noble metals (palladium, platinum). The interaction between the noble metal and the support, generated during the activation of the catalyst, allows to minimize the water and sulfur dioxide inhibitor phenomena on the catalytic performances, particularly in the reduction of NO by hydrogen. (O.M.)

  9. Liquid-phase pulsed laser ablation synthesis of graphitized carbon-encapsulated palladium core–shell nanospheres for catalytic reduction of nitrobenzene to aniline

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Yu-jin; Ma, Rory; Reddy, D. Amaranatha; Kim, Tae Kyu, E-mail: tkkim@pusan.ac.kr

    2015-12-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Graphitized carbon-encapsulated palladium core–shell nanospheres fabricated by laser ablation. • Physical characterizations of synthesized Pd@C nanospheres. • Assessments of catalytic performance of Pd@C nanospheres for the reduction of nitrobenzene to aniline. • Significant improvement of the catalytic activity due to the graphitized carbon-layered structure and the high specific surface area. - Abstract: Graphitized carbon-encapsulated palladium (Pd) core–shell nanospheres were produced via pulsed laser ablation of a solid Pd foil target submerged in acetonitrile. The microstructural features and optical properties of these nanospheres were characterized via high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and UV-visible spectroscopy. Microstructural analysis indicated that the core–shell nanostructures consisted of single-crystalline cubic metallic Pd spheres that serve as the core material, over which graphitized carbon was anchored as a heterogeneous shell. The absorbance spectrum of the synthesized nanostructures exhibited a broad (absorption) band at ∼264 nm; this band corresponded to the typical inter-band transition of a metallic system and resulted possibly from the absorbance of the ionic Pd{sup 2+}. The catalytic properties of the Pd and Pd@C core–shell nanostructures were investigated using the reduction of nitrobenzene to aniline by an excess amount of NaBH{sub 4} in an aqueous solution at room temperature, as a model reaction. Owing to the graphitized carbon-layered structure and the high specific surface area, the resulting Pd@C nanostructures exhibited higher conversion efficiencies than their bare Pd counterparts. In fact, the layered structure provided access to the surface of the Pd nanostructures for the hydrogenation reaction, owing to the synergistic effect between graphitized carbon and the nanostructures. Their

  10. Liquid-phase pulsed laser ablation synthesis of graphitized carbon-encapsulated palladium core–shell nanospheres for catalytic reduction of nitrobenzene to aniline

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Yu-jin; Ma, Rory; Reddy, D. Amaranatha; Kim, Tae Kyu

    2015-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Graphitized carbon-encapsulated palladium core–shell nanospheres fabricated by laser ablation. • Physical characterizations of synthesized Pd@C nanospheres. • Assessments of catalytic performance of Pd@C nanospheres for the reduction of nitrobenzene to aniline. • Significant improvement of the catalytic activity due to the graphitized carbon-layered structure and the high specific surface area. - Abstract: Graphitized carbon-encapsulated palladium (Pd) core–shell nanospheres were produced via pulsed laser ablation of a solid Pd foil target submerged in acetonitrile. The microstructural features and optical properties of these nanospheres were characterized via high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and UV-visible spectroscopy. Microstructural analysis indicated that the core–shell nanostructures consisted of single-crystalline cubic metallic Pd spheres that serve as the core material, over which graphitized carbon was anchored as a heterogeneous shell. The absorbance spectrum of the synthesized nanostructures exhibited a broad (absorption) band at ∼264 nm; this band corresponded to the typical inter-band transition of a metallic system and resulted possibly from the absorbance of the ionic Pd 2+ . The catalytic properties of the Pd and Pd@C core–shell nanostructures were investigated using the reduction of nitrobenzene to aniline by an excess amount of NaBH 4 in an aqueous solution at room temperature, as a model reaction. Owing to the graphitized carbon-layered structure and the high specific surface area, the resulting Pd@C nanostructures exhibited higher conversion efficiencies than their bare Pd counterparts. In fact, the layered structure provided access to the surface of the Pd nanostructures for the hydrogenation reaction, owing to the synergistic effect between graphitized carbon and the nanostructures. Their unique

  11. Facile Fabrication of Highly Active Magnetic Aminoclay Supported Palladium Nanoparticles for the Room Temperature Catalytic Reduction of Nitrophenol and Nitroanilines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Jia

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Magnetically recyclable nanocatalysts with excellent performance are urgent need in heterogeneous catalysis, due to their magnetic nature, which allows for convenient and efficient separation with the help of an external magnetic field. In this research, we developed a simple and rapid method to fabricate a magnetic aminoclay (AC based an AC@Fe3O4@Pd nanocatalyst by depositing palladium nanoparticles (Pd NPs on the surface of the magnetic aminoclay nanocomposite. The microstructure and the magnetic properties of as-prepared AC@Fe3O4@Pd were tested using transmission electron microscopy (TEM, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS, X-ray diffraction (XRD, and vibrating sample magnetometry (VSM analyses. The resultant AC@Fe3O4@Pd nanocatalyst with the magnetic Fe-based inner shell, catalytically activate the outer noble metal shell, which when combined with ultrafine Pd NPs, synergistically enhanced the catalytic activity and recyclability in organocatalysis. As the aminoclay displayed good water dispersibility, the nanocatalyst indicated satisfactory catalytic performance in the reaction of reducing nitrophenol and nitroanilines to the corresponding aminobenzene derivatives. Meanwhile, the AC@Fe3O4@Pd nanocatalyst exhibited excellent reusability, while still maintaining good activity after several catalytic cycles.

  12. Local Environment and Nature of Cu Active Sites in Zeolite-Based Catalysts for the Selective Catalytic Reduction of NOx

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Deka, U.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/325811202; Lezcano-Gonzalez, I.; Weckhuysen, B.M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/285484397; Beale, A.M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/325802068

    2013-01-01

    Cu-exchanged zeolites have demonstrated widespread use as catalyst materials in the abatement of NOx, especially from mobile sources. Recent studies focusing on Cu-exchanged zeolites with the CHA structure have demonstrated them to be excellent catalysts in the ammonia-assisted selective catalytic

  13. Catalytic and peroxidase-like activity of carbon based-AuPd bimetallic nanocomposite produced using carbon dots as the reductant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Liuqing [Key Laboratory of Chemical Biology & Traditional Chinese Medicine Research (Ministry of Education, China), College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Hunan Normal University, Changsha 410081 (China); Liu, Xiaoying [College of Science, Science and Technological Innovation Platform, Hunan Agricultural University, Hunan, Changsha 410128 (China); Lu, Qiujun; Huang, Na [Key Laboratory of Chemical Biology & Traditional Chinese Medicine Research (Ministry of Education, China), College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Hunan Normal University, Changsha 410081 (China); Liu, Meiling, E-mail: liumeilingww@126.com [Key Laboratory of Chemical Biology & Traditional Chinese Medicine Research (Ministry of Education, China), College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Hunan Normal University, Changsha 410081 (China); Zhang, Youyu; Yao, Shouzhuo [Key Laboratory of Chemical Biology & Traditional Chinese Medicine Research (Ministry of Education, China), College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Hunan Normal University, Changsha 410081 (China)

    2016-08-03

    In this report, carbon-based AuPd bimetallic nanocomposite (AuPd/C NC) was synthesized using carbon dots (C-dots) as the reducing agent and stabilizer by a simple green sequential reduction strategy, without adding other agents. The as synthesized AuPd/C NC showed good catalytic activity and peroxidase-like property. The structure and morphology of these nanoparticles were clearly characterized by UV–Vis spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The AuPd/C NC catalyst exhibits noticeably higher catalytic activity than Pd and Au nanoparticles in catalysis reduction of 4-nitrophenol (4-NP). Moreover, based on the high peroxidase-like property of AuPd/C NC, a new colorimetric detection method for hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) has been designed using 3,3′,5,5′-tetramethyl-benzidine (TMB) as the substrate, which provides a simple and sensitive means to detect H{sub 2}O{sub 2} in wide linear range of 5 μM–500 μM and 500 μM–4 mM with low detection limit of 1.6 μM (S/N = 3). Therefore, the facile synthesis strategy for bimetallic nanoparticles by the mild reductant of carbon dot will provide some new thoughts for preparing of carbon-based metal nanomaterials and expand their application in catalysis and analytical chemistry areas. - Highlights: • Carbon-based AuPd bimetallic nanocomposite was synthesized using carbon dots. • The green sequential reduction strategy synthesis method is simple, green, convenient and effective. • The as synthesized AuPd/C NC showed good catalytic activity and peroxidase-like activity. • The AuPd/C NC exhibits noticeably higher catalytic activity in reduction of 4-nitrophenol. • A new colorimetric detection method for hydrogen peroxide based on AuPd/C NC was proposed.

  14. Catalytic activity of dual catalysts system based on nano-manganese oxide and cobalt octacyanophthalocyanine toward four-electron reduction of oxygen in alkaline media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Dun; Chi, Dahe; Okajima, Takeyoshi; Ohsaka, Takeo

    2007-01-01

    The electrocatalysis of the dual functional catalysts system composed of electrolytic nano-manganese oxide (nano-MnOx) and cobalt octacyanophthalocyanine (CoPcCN) toward 4-electron reduction of oxygen (O 2 ) in alkaline media was studied. Nano-MnOx electrodeposited on the CoPcCN monolayer-modified glassy carbon (GC) electrode was clarified as the nano-rods with ca. 10-20 nm diameter by scanning electron microscopy. The peak current for O 2 reduction at the dual catalysts-modified GC electrode increases largely and the peak potential shifts by ca. 160 mV to the positive direction in cyclic voltammograms compared with those obtained at the bare GC electrode. The Koutecky-Levich plots indicate that the O 2 reduction at the dual catalysts-modified GC electrode is an apparent 4-electron process. Collection efficiencies obtained at the dual catalysts-modified GC electrode are much lower than those at the GC electrode and are almost similar to those at the Pt nano-particles modified GC electrode. The obtained results demonstrate that the dual catalysts system possesses a bifuctional catalytic activity for redox-mediating 2-electron reduction of O 2 to HO 2 - by CoPcCN as well as catalyzing the disproportionation of HO 2 - to OH - and O 2 by nano-MnOx, and enables an apparent 4-electron reduction of O 2 at a relatively low overpotential in alkaline media. In addition, it has been found that the cleaning of the dual catalysts-modified electrode by soaking in 0.1 M sulfuric acid solution enhances its catalytic activity toward the reduction of O 2

  15. Mathematical optimization techniques for managing selective catalytic reduction for a fleet of coal-fired power plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alanis Pena, Antonio Alejandro

    Major commercial electricity generation is done by burning fossil fuels out of which coal-fired power plants produce a substantial quantity of electricity worldwide. The United States has large reserves of coal, and it is cheaply available, making it a good choice for the generation of electricity on a large scale. However, one major problem associated with using coal for combustion is that it produces a group of pollutants known as nitrogen oxides (NO x). NOx are strong oxidizers and contribute to ozone formation and respiratory illness. The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) regulates the quantity of NOx emitted to the atmosphere in the United States. One technique coal-fired power plants use to reduce NOx emissions is Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR). SCR uses layers of catalyst that need to be added or changed to maintain the required performance. Power plants do add or change catalyst layers during temporary shutdowns, but it is expensive. However, many companies do not have only one power plant, but instead they can have a fleet of coal-fired power plants. A fleet of power plants can use EPA cap and trade programs to have an outlet NOx emission below the allowances for the fleet. For that reason, the main aim of this research is to develop an SCR management mathematical optimization methods that, with a given set of scheduled outages for a fleet of power plants, minimizes the total cost of the entire fleet of power plants and also maintain outlet NO x below the desired target for the entire fleet. We use a multi commodity network flow problem (MCFP) that creates edges that represent all the SCR catalyst layers for each plant. This MCFP is relaxed because it does not consider average daily NOx constraint, and it is solved by a binary integer program. After that, we add the average daily NOx constraint to the model with a schedule elimination constraint (MCFPwSEC). The MCFPwSEC eliminates, one by one, the solutions that do not satisfy the average daily

  16. EMISSION REDUCTION FROM A DIESEL ENGINE FUELED BY CERIUM OXIDE NANO-ADDITIVES USING SCR WITH DIFFERENT METAL OXIDES COATED CATALYTIC CONVERTER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. JOTHI THIRUMAL

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports the results of experimental investigations on the influence of the addition of cerium oxide in nanoparticle form on the major physiochemical properties and the performance of diesel. The fuel is modified by dispersing the catalytic nanoparticle by ultrasonic agitation. The physiochemical properties of sole diesel fuel and modified fuel are tested with ASTM standard procedures. The effects of the additive nanoparticles on the individual fuel properties, the engine performance, and emissions are studied, and the dosing level of the additive is optimized. Cerium oxide acts as an oxygen-donating catalyst and provides oxygen for the oxidation of CO during combustion. The active energy of cerium oxide acts to burn off carbon deposits within the engine cylinder at the wall temperature and prevents the deposition of non-polar compounds on the cylinder wall which results in reduction in HC emission by 56.5%. Furthermore, a low-cost metal oxide coated SCR (selective catalyst reduction, using urea as a reducing agent, along with different types of CC (catalytic converter, has been implemented in the exhaust pipe to reduce NOx. It was observed that a reduction in NOx emission is 50–60%. The tests revealed that cerium oxide nanoparticles can be used as an additive in diesel to improve complete combustion of the fuel and reduce the exhaust emissions significantly.

  17. The Poisoning Effect of Na Doping over Mn-Ce/TiO2 Catalyst for Low-Temperature Selective Catalytic Reduction of NO by NH3

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Yang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Sodium carbonate (Na2CO3, sodium nitrate (NaNO3, and sodium chloride (NaCl were chosen as the precursors to prepare the Na salts deposited Mn-Ce/TiO2 catalysts through an impregnation method. The influence of Na on the performance of the Mn-Ce/TiO2 catalyst for low-temperature selective catalytic reduction of NOx by NH3 was investigated. Experimental results showed that Na salts had negative effects on the activity of Mn-Ce/TiO2 and the precursors of Na salts also affected the catalytic activity. The precursor Na2CO3 had a greater impact on the catalytic activity, while NaNO3 had minimal effect. The characterization results indicated that the significant changes in physical and chemical properties of Mn-Ce/TiO2 were observed after Na was doped on the catalysts. The significant decreases in surface areas and NH3 adsorption amounts were observed after Na was doped on the catalysts, which could be considered as the main reasons for the deactivation of Na deposited Mn-Ce/TiO2.

  18. Fabrication of magnetically recyclable Fe3O4@Cu nanocomposites with high catalytic performance for the reduction of organic dyes and 4-nitrophenol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang, Mingyi; Zhang, Sai; Li, Xianxian; Pang, Xiaobo; Qiu, Haixia

    2014-01-01

    A facile and efficient approach to synthesize Fe 3 O 4 @Cu nanocomposites using L-Lysine as a linker was developed. The morphology, composition and crystallinity of the Fe 3 O 4 @Cu nanocomposites were characterized by Fourier Transform infrared spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, and powder X-ray diffraction. In addition, the magnetic properties were determined with vibrating sample magnetometer. The surface of the Fe 3 O 4 contained many small Cu nanoparticles with sizes of about 3 nm. It was found that the Fe 3 O 4 @Cu nanocomposites could catalyze the degradation of organic dyes. The catalytic activities of the Fe 3 O 4 @Cu nanocomposites for the reduction of nitrophenol were also studied. The Fe 3 O 4 @Cu nanocomposites are more efficient catalysts compared with Cu nanoparticles and can easily be recovered from the reaction mixture with magnet. The cost effective and recyclable Fe 3 O 4 @Cu nanocomposites provide an exciting new material for environmental protection applications. - Highlights: • Cu nanoparticles as small as 3 nm are synthesized. • Low cost Fe 3 O 4 @Cu magnetical nanoparticles show catalytic activity for organic dyes and 4-nitrophenol. • The Fe 3 O 4 @Cu display high catalytic activity after 13 cycles

  19. Fabrication of magnetically recyclable Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}@Cu nanocomposites with high catalytic performance for the reduction of organic dyes and 4-nitrophenol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, Mingyi, E-mail: mingyitjucu@163.com [Department of Applied Chemistry, School of Science, Tianjin University of Commerce, Tianjin 300134 (China); Zhang, Sai; Li, Xianxian; Pang, Xiaobo [Department of Applied Chemistry, School of Science, Tianjin University of Commerce, Tianjin 300134 (China); Qiu, Haixia [School of Science, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China)

    2014-12-15

    A facile and efficient approach to synthesize Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}@Cu nanocomposites using L-Lysine as a linker was developed. The morphology, composition and crystallinity of the Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}@Cu nanocomposites were characterized by Fourier Transform infrared spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, and powder X-ray diffraction. In addition, the magnetic properties were determined with vibrating sample magnetometer. The surface of the Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} contained many small Cu nanoparticles with sizes of about 3 nm. It was found that the Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}@Cu nanocomposites could catalyze the degradation of organic dyes. The catalytic activities of the Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}@Cu nanocomposites for the reduction of nitrophenol were also studied. The Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}@Cu nanocomposites are more efficient catalysts compared with Cu nanoparticles and can easily be recovered from the reaction mixture with magnet. The cost effective and recyclable Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}@Cu nanocomposites provide an exciting new material for environmental protection applications. - Highlights: • Cu nanoparticles as small as 3 nm are synthesized. • Low cost Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}@Cu magnetical nanoparticles show catalytic activity for organic dyes and 4-nitrophenol. • The Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}@Cu display high catalytic activity after 13 cycles.

  20. Selective catalytic reduction of NO{sub x} to nitrogen over Co-Pt/ZSM-5: Part A. Characterization and kinetic studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maisuls, S.E.; Seshan, K.; Feast, S.; Lercher, J.A. [Laboratory for Catalytic Processes and Materials, Faculty of Chemical Technology, University of Twente, P.O. Box 217, 7500 AE Enschede (Netherlands)

    2001-01-01

    The selective catalytic reduction of NO by propene in the presence of excess oxygen has been studied over catalysts based on Co-Pt supported on ZSM-5. Pure Pt based catalysts are highly active, but produce large amounts of N{sub 2}O. Bimetallic Co-Pt/ZSM-5 catalysts with low Pt contents (0.1wt.%) show a synergistic effect by combining high stability and activity of Pt catalysts with the high N{sub 2} selectivity of Co catalysts. The lower selectivity to N{sub 2}O is attributed to its selective conversion over Co. The catalysts also showed high water and sulfur tolerance above 350C.

  1. The Catalytic Bias of 2-Oxoacid:ferredoxin Oxidoreductase in CO_2: evolution and reduction through a ferredoxin-mediated electrocatalytic assay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Bin; Elliott, Sean J.

    2016-01-01

    Enzymes from the 2-oxoacid: ferredoxin oxidoreductase (OFOR) family engage in both CO_2 evolution and reduction in nature, depending on their physiological roles. Two enzymes and their redox partner ferredoxins (Fds) from Hydrogenobacter thermophilus and Desulfovibrio africanus were examined to investigate the basis of the catalytic bias. The Fd1 from H. thermophilus demonstrated a potential of ∼ −485 mV at room temperature, the lowest for known single [4Fe-4S] cluster Fds. It suggests a low potential electron donor may be the key factor in overcoming the large thermodynamic barrier of CO_2 reduction. The Fd-mediated electrocatalytic experiments further demonstrated the impact of Fd’s potential on the direction of the OFOR reaction: as OFOR enzymes could essentially catalyze both CO_2 evolution and reduction in vitro, the difference in their physiological roles is associated with the reduction potential of the redox partner Fd. The electrocatalytic assay could study both CO_2 evolution and reduction in one setup and is a good tool to probe Fds’ reactivity that arise from their reduction potentials.

  2. A microwave assisted one-pot route synthesis of bimetallic PtPd alloy cubic nanocomposites and their catalytic reduction for 4-nitrophenol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jian; Gan, Wei; Fu, Xucheng; Hao, Hequn

    2017-10-01

    We herein report a simple, rapid, and eco-friendly chemical route to the one-pot synthesis of bimetallic PtPd alloy cubic nanocomposites under microwave irradiation. During this process, water was employed as an environmentally benign solvent, while dimethylformamide served as a mild reducing agent, and polyvinylpyrrolidone was used as both a dispersant and a stabilizer. The structure, morphology, and composition of the resulting alloy nanocomposites were examined by x-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, and energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy. A detailed study was then carried out into the catalytic activity of the PtPd nanocomposites with a Pt:Pd molar ratio of 50:50 in the reduction of 4-nitrophenol (4-NP) by sodium borohydride as a model reaction. Compared with pristine Pt and Pd monometallic nanoparticles (PtNPs and PdNPs), the bimetallic PtPd alloy nanocomposites exhibited enhanced catalytic activities and were readily recyclable in the reduction of 4-NP due to synergistic effects.

  3. Preparation of FeO(OH Modified with Polyethylene Glycol and Its Catalytic Activity on the Reduction of Nitrobenzene with Hydrazine Hydrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ke Ying Cai

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Iron oxyhydroxide was prepared by dropping ammonia water to Fe(NO33.9H2O dispersed in polyethylene glycol (PEG 1000. The catalyst was characterized by X-ray powder diffraction, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and laser particle size analyzer. The results showed the catalyst modified with polyethylene glycol was amorphous. The addition of PEG during the preparation make the particle size of the catalyst was smaller and more uniform. The catalytic performance was tested in the reduction of nitroarenes to corresponding amines with hydrazine hydrate, and the catalyst showed excellent activity and stability. Copyright © 2016 BCREC GROUP. All rights reserved Received: 2nd February 2016; Revised: 26th April 2016; Accepted: 7th June 2016 How to Cite: Cai, K.Y., Liu, Y.S., Song, M., Zhou, Y.M., Liu, Q., Wang, X.H. (2016. Preparation of FeO(OH Modified with Polyethylene Glycol and Its Catalytic Activity on the Reduction of Nitrobenzene with Hydrazine Hydrate. Bulletin of Chemical Reaction Engineering & Catalysis, 11 (3: 363-368 (doi:10.9767/bcrec.11.3.576.363-368 Permalink/DOI: http://doi.org/10.9767/bcrec.11.3.576.363-368

  4. Enhanced hydrothermal stability of Cu-ZSM-5 catalyst via surface modification in the selective catalytic reduction of NO with NH_3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Tao; Shi, Juan; Liu, Jian; Wang, Daxi; Zhao, Zhen; Cheng, Kai; Li, Jianmei

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • The hydrothermal stability of Cu-ZSM-5 catalyst was enhanced after surface modification. • An inert silica layer was deposited on the surface of Cu-ZSM-5 and formed a protective layer. • The contact between Si and Cu and Al atoms could form Si-O-Al and Si- O−Cu bonds. • The redox and acidity properties of Cu-ZSM-5-CLD-Aged catalyst were largely retained. • The adsorption and activation of NO and NH_3 was almost unchanged over Cu-ZSM-5-CLD catalyst before and after hydrothermal treatment. - Abstract: The surface of Cu-ZSM-5 catalyst was modified by chemical liquid deposition (CLD) of tetraethoxysilane (TEOS) for enhancing its hydrothermal stability in the selective catalytic reduction of NO with NH_3. After hydrothermal aging at 750 °C for 13 h, the catalytic performance of Cu-ZSM-5-Aged catalyst was significantly reduced for NO reduction in the entire temperature range, while that of Cu-ZSM-5-CLD-Aged catalyst was affected very little. The characterization results indicated that an inert silica layer was deposited on the surface of Cu-ZSM-5 and formed a protective layer, which prevents the detachment of Cu"2"+ from ZSM-5 ion-exchange positions and the dealumination of zeolite during the hydrothermal aging process. Based on the data it is hypothesized to be the primary reason for the high hydrothermal stability of Cu-ZSM-5-CLD catalyst.

  5. Highly recyclable and ultra-rapid catalytic reduction of organic pollutants on Ag-Cu@ZnO bimetal nanocomposite synthesized via green technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gangarapu, Manjari; Sarangapany, Saran; Suja, Devipriya P.; Arava, Vijaya Bhaskara Rao

    2018-04-01

    In this study, synthesis of Ag-Cu alloy bimetal nanoparticles anchored on high surface and porous ZnO using a facile, greener and low-cost aqeous bark extract of Aglaia roxburghiana for highly active, ultra-rapid and stable catalyst is performed. The nanocomposite was scrupulously characterized using UV-Vis spectrophotometer, X-ray diffraction, Raman spectrophotometer, high-resolution transmission electron microscope, selected area (electron) diffraction, scanning electron microscope with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, and Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy. The catalytic activity of the green synthesized Ag-Cu bimetal nanocomposite was evaluated in the reduction of 4-nitrophenol (4-NP), methylene blue (MB) and rhodamine B (Rh B) dyes. The different types of dye exhibited very high and effective catalytic activity within few seconds. The theoretical investigations reveal that the unique synergistic effect of Ag-Cu nanoparticles and immobilization over ZnO assists in the reduction of 4-NP, MB and Rh B. Loading and leaching of metal nanoparticles were obtained using inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy. Moreover, the stable and efficient recyclability of nanocomposite by centrifugation after completion of the reaction was demonstrated. The results lead to the design different possible bimetal on ZnO with boosting and an effective catalyst for the environmental applications.

  6. Remarkable promoting effect of rhodium on the catalytic performance of Ag/Al2O3 for the selective reduction of NO with decane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Kazuhito; Yoshinari, Tomohiro; Kintaichi, Yoshiaki; Haneda, Masaaki; Hamada, Hideaki

    2003-01-01

    The addition of small amounts of rhodium enhanced the activity of Ag/Al 2 O 3 catalyst for the selective reduction of NO with decane at low temperatures. The Rh-promoted Ag/Al 2 O 3 showed its high performance even in the presence of low concentrations of SO 2 . Based on the catalytic activity for elementary reactions, it was suggested that the role of added rhodium is to enhance the reaction between NO x and decane-derived species, leading to NO reduction. Catalyst characterization by UV-Vis spectroscopy indicated that the major silver species on Rh-promoted Ag/Al 2 O 3 is Ag nn δ+ clusters, which would be responsible for the high activity. FT-IR measurements revealed that the formation rate of isocyanate species, which is a major reaction intermediate, is higher on Rh-promoted Ag/Al 2 O 3

  7. Advanced byproduct recovery: Direct catalytic reduction of sulfur dioxide to elemental sulfur. Quarterly report, April 1--June 30, 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-12-31

    The team of Arthur D. Little, Tufts University and Engelhard Corporation are conducting Phase 1 of a four and a half year, two-phase effort to develop and scale-up an advanced byproduct recovery technology that is a direct, single-stage, catalytic process for converting sulfur dioxide to elemental sulfur. This catalytic process reduces SO{sub 2} over a fluorite-type oxide (such as ceria and zirconia). The catalytic activity can be significantly promoted by active transition metals, such as copper. More than 95% elemental sulfur yield, corresponding to almost complete sulfur dioxide conversion, was obtained over a Cu-Ce-O oxide catalyst as part of an on-going DOE-sponsored, University Coal Research Program. This type of mixed metal oxide catalyst has stable activity, high selectivity for sulfur production, and is resistant to water and carbon dioxide poisoning. Tests with CO and CH{sub 4} reducing gases indicate that the catalyst has the potential for flexibility with regard to the composition of the reducing gas, making it attractive for utility use. The performance of the catalyst is consistently good over a range of SO{sub 2} inlet concentration (0.1 to 10%) indicating its flexibility in treating SO{sub 2} tail gases as well as high concentration streams. The principal objective of the Phase 1 program is to identify and evaluate the performance of a catalyst which is robust and flexible with regard to choice of reducing gas. In order to achieve this goal, the authors have planned a structured program including: Market/process/cost/evaluation; Lab-scale catalyst preparation/optimization studies; Lab-scale, bulk/supported catalyst kinetic studies; Bench-scale catalyst/process studies; and Utility review. Progress is reported from all three organizations.

  8. Catalytic reduction of NO{sub x}. Final report; Katalytisk Reduktion av NO{sub x}. Slutrapport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khodayari, Raziyeh; Odenbrand, Ingemar [Lund Univ. (Sweden). Chemical Engineering II

    2002-02-01

    This report is intended to show the work regarding the SCR technique performed at Chemical Engineering II, Lund Inst. of Tech. since the start in 1982. The emphasis is on work performed the last 7 years which deals with deactivation and regeneration of SCR catalysts. In chapter 1 a short general introduction to the SCR technique is given. Chapter 2 describes the work performed up to 1995. It shows the kinetics for the reaction between NO and NH{sub 3}, reactions between NO{sub 2} and NH{sub 3} as well as patents for a new process for cleaning flue gases based on our research results. Later work on using zeolites as catalysts for the reduction and for the oxidation of NO was presented. Then a series of characterisations were performed on model catalysts consisting of 2-30 wt.% V{sub 2}O{sub 5} on a coprecipitated silica-titania support. The formation of nitrous oxide was studied and found to be noticeable when water is not present in the gas and on a catalyst which contains large amounts of crystallites of V{sub 2}O{sub 5}. Chapter 3 deals with international research in the area of deactivation of SCR catalysts in i.e. biofuelled applications. Material from a literature search from December 2001 is presented. It contains general material on the deactivation with alkali metals and SO{sub 2}. Chapter 4 deals with our studies of deactivated SCR catalysts. During 1995-2001 we have studied the deactivation of catalysts in a number of Swedish plants. The sensitivity of zeolites to poisoning in waste combustion (GRAAB) was tested by artificial poisoning with 2 wt.% metal of the elements; Na, K, Mg, Fe, Zn, Cu, Al, Ni and Cr. The combustion of waste at SYSAV gave high contents of Na, Y, Ca, Pb and Zn on the catalyst after 2000 hours on stream. Activity measurements showed that low concentrations of ammonium sulphate, 1-5 vol.%, promotes the SCR reaction. A maximal activity is obtained at around 5 vol.%. There exists an optimal content of ammonium sulphate on the catalyst

  9. Simple one-pot synthesis of platinum-palladium nanoflowers with enhanced catalytic activity and methanol-tolerance for oxygen reduction in acid media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheng, Jie-Ning; He, Li-Li; Chen, Fang-Yi; Wang, Ai-Jun; Xue, Meng-Wei; Feng, Jiu-Ju

    2014-01-01

    Graphical abstract: PtPd nanoflowers were fabricated by one-pot solvothermal co-reduction method in oleylamine system, which exhibited the improved electrocatalytic activity and higher methanol tolerance for oxygen reduction, compared with commercial Pt and Pd black catalysts. - Highlights: • Bimetallic alloyed PtPd nanoflowers are prepared by a simple one-pot solvothermal co-reduction method. • PtPd nanoflowers display high catalytic performance for ORR dominated by a four-electron pathway. • PtPd nanoflowers show good methanol tolerance for ORR. - Abstract: In this work, bimetallic alloyed platinum-palladium (PtPd) nanoflowers are fabricated by one-pot solvothermal co-reduction of Pt (II) acetylacetonate and Pd (II) acetylacetonate in oleylamine system. The as-prepared nanostructures show the enhanced electrocatalytic activity for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR), dominated by a four-electron pathway based on the Koutecky-Levich plots, mainly owing to the inhibition of the formation of Pt–OH ad via the downshift of d-band center for Pt. Meanwhile, PtPd nanoflowers display good methanol tolerance and improved stability for ORR. The chronoamperometry test reveals that the current of PtPd nanoflowers remains 45.9% of its original value within 6000 s, much higher than those of commercial Pt (36.7%) and Pd (32.2%) black catalysts. Therefore, PtPd nanoflowers with unique interconnected structures can be used as a promising cathode catalyst in direct methanol fuel cells

  10. Effect of metal ions doping (M = Ti4+, Sn4+) on the catalytic performance of MnOx/CeO2 catalyst for low temperature selective catalytic reduction of NO with NH3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Yan; Tang, Changjin; Dong, Lin

    2015-04-01

    Key Laboratory of Mesoscopic Chemistry of MOE, School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093, PR China The abatement of nitrogen oxides (NOx) emission from exhaust gases of diesel and stationary sources is a significant challenge for economic and social development. Ceria-based solid solutions were synthesized and used as supports to prepare MnOx/Ce0.8Ti0.2O2 and MnOx/Ce0.8Sn0.2O2 catalysts (Mn/CeTi and Mn/CeSn) for low temperature selective catalytic reduction of NO by NH3 (NH3-SCR). The effects of Ti or Sn doping on the catalytic performance of MnOx/CeO2 catalyst were investigated. Experimental results show that doping of Ti or Sn increases the NO removal efficiency of MnOx/CeO2. The NO conversion of Mn/CeTi catalyst is more than 90 % at temperature window of 175 ~ 300 °C under a gas hour space velocity of 60,000 mL.g-1.h-1. Modified catalysts are also found to exhibit greatly improved resistance to sulfur-poisoning. NH3-TPD results suggest that NH3 desorption on the catalysts is observed over a wide temperature range, due to the variability of adsorbed NH3 species with different thermal stabilities. Doping of Ti and Sn into Mn/CeO2 greatly increased the NH3 adsorption ability of the composites which could promote the SCR reaction. Characterization results also indicate that doping of Ti or Sn brings about catalysts with higher BET surface area, enhanced oxygen storage capacity and increased surface acidity.

  11. Catalytic role of Cu(II) in the reduction of Cr(VI) by citric acid under an irradiation of simulated solar light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ying; Chen, Cheng; Zhang, Jing; Lan, Yeqing

    2015-05-01

    The catalytic role of Cu(II) in the reduction of Cr(VI) by citric acid with simulated solar light was investigated. The results demonstrated that Cu(II) could significantly accelerate Cr(VI) reduction and the reaction obeyed to pseudo zero-order kinetics with respect to Cr(VI). The removal of Cr(VI) was related to the initial concentrations of Cu(II), citric acid, and the types of organic acids. The optimal removal of Cr(VI) was achieved at pH 4, and the rates of Cu(II) photocatalytic reduction of Cr(VI) by organic acids were in the order: tartaric acid (two α-OH groups, two -COOH groups)>citric acid (one α-OH group, three -COOH groups)>malic acid (one α-OH group, two -COOH groups)>lactic acid (one α-OH group, one -COOH group)≫succinic acid (two -COOH groups), suggesting that the number of α-OH was the key factor for the reaction, followed by the number of -COOH. The formation of Cu(II)-citric acid complex could generate Cu(I) and radicals through a pathway of metal-ligand-electron transfer, promoting the reduction of Cr(VI). This study is helpful to fully understanding the conversion of Cr(VI) in the existence of both organic acids and Cu(II) with solar light in aquatic environments. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. The selective catalytic reduction of NO with NH3 over a novel Ce-Sn-Ti mixed oxides catalyst: Promotional effect of SnO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Ming'e.; Li, Caiting; Zeng, Guangming; Zhou, Yang; Zhang, Xunan; Xie, Yin'e.

    2015-07-01

    A series of novel catalysts (CexSny) for the selective catalytic reduction of NO by NH3 were prepared by the inverse co-precipitation method. The aim of this novel design was to improve the NO removal efficiency of CeTi by the introduction of SnO2. It was found that the Ce-Sn-Ti catalyst was much more active than Ce-Ti and the best Ce:Sn molar ratio was 2:1. Ce2Sn1 possessed a satisfied NO removal efficiency at low temperature (160-280 °C), while over 90% NO removal efficiency maintained in the temperature range of 280-400 °C at the gas hourly space velocity (GHSV) of 50,000 h-1. Besides, Ce2Sn1 kept a stable NO removal efficiency within a wide range of GHSV and a long period of reacting time. Meanwhile, Ce2Sn1 exhibited remarkable resistance to both respectively and simultaneously H2O and SO2 poisoning due to the introduction of SnO2. The promotional effect of SnO2 was studied by N2 adsorption-desorption, X-ray diffraction (XRD), Raman spectra, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and H2 temperature programmed reduction (H2-TPR) for detail information. The characterization results revealed that the excellent catalytic performance of Ce2Sn1 was associated with the higher specific surface area, larger pore volume and poorer crystallization. Besides, the introduction of SnO2 could result in not only greater conversion of Ce4+ to Ce3+ but also the increase amount of chemisorbed oxygen, which are beneficial to improve the SCR activity. More importantly, a novel peak appearing at lower temperatures through the new redox equilibrium of 2Ce4+ + Sn2+ ↔ 2Ce3+ + Sn4+ and higher total H2 consumption can be obtained by the addition of SnO2. Finally, the possible reaction mechanism of the selective catalytic reduction over Ce2Sn1 was also proposed.

  13. Microwave-irradiated preparation of reduced graphene oxide-Ni nanostructures and their enhanced performance for catalytic reduction of 4-nitrophenol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qiu, Hanxun; Qiu, Feilong; Han, Xuebin; Li, Jing; Yang, Junhe

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Nickel nanoparticle-decorated reduced graphene-oxide nanostructures were prepared by an environmentally friendly, one-pot strategy via an efficient microwave irradiation approach. • Upon microwave irradiation, the composites could be prepared within only a few hundred seconds, much faster than using the widely used traditional hydrothermal methods that may take tens of hours generally. • The nanostructure exhibits superior catalytic activity and selectivity towards transforming the highly toxic nitroaromatic compounds to industrially useful intermediates • The corresponding kinetic reaction rate constant (κ) is even four-fold compared to pure Ni nanoparticles. - Abstract: Here we report an environmentally friendly, one-pot strategy toward preparation of nickel nanoparticle-decorated reduced graphene-oxide (Ni-RGO) nanostructures, by employing Ni(AC) 2 as nickel source and ethylene glycol as both solvent and reducing agent via a facile microwave irradiation heating approach. The results show that Ni nanoparticles with an average diameter of around 40 nm are homogeneously anchored onto the surface of RGO sheets. As compared to the pure Ni nanoparticles and RGO sheets, Ni-RGO composites with over 64 wt% loading of Ni nanoparticles possess superior catalytic activities and selectivity toward the reduction of 4-nitrophenol. The corresponding kinetic reaction rate constant (defined as κ) is even four-fold compared to pure Ni nanoparticles. Such promising composites show great potential for friendly treatment of industrial waste containing nitrophenol in a simple, sustainable and green way.

  14. Liquid-phase pulsed laser ablation synthesis of graphitized carbon-encapsulated palladium core-shell nanospheres for catalytic reduction of nitrobenzene to aniline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yu-jin; Ma, Rory; Reddy, D. Amaranatha; Kim, Tae Kyu

    2015-12-01

    Graphitized carbon-encapsulated palladium (Pd) core-shell nanospheres were produced via pulsed laser ablation of a solid Pd foil target submerged in acetonitrile. The microstructural features and optical properties of these nanospheres were characterized via high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and UV-visible spectroscopy. Microstructural analysis indicated that the core-shell nanostructures consisted of single-crystalline cubic metallic Pd spheres that serve as the core material, over which graphitized carbon was anchored as a heterogeneous shell. The absorbance spectrum of the synthesized nanostructures exhibited a broad (absorption) band at ∼264 nm; this band corresponded to the typical inter-band transition of a metallic system and resulted possibly from the absorbance of the ionic Pd2+. The catalytic properties of the Pd and Pd@C core-shell nanostructures were investigated using the reduction of nitrobenzene to aniline by an excess amount of NaBH4 in an aqueous solution at room temperature, as a model reaction. Owing to the graphitized carbon-layered structure and the high specific surface area, the resulting Pd@C nanostructures exhibited higher conversion efficiencies than their bare Pd counterparts. In fact, the layered structure provided access to the surface of the Pd nanostructures for the hydrogenation reaction, owing to the synergistic effect between graphitized carbon and the nanostructures. Their unique structure and excellent catalytic performance render Pd@C core-shell nanostructures highly promising candidates for catalysis applications.

  15. Microwave-irradiated preparation of reduced graphene oxide-Ni nanostructures and their enhanced performance for catalytic reduction of 4-nitrophenol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qiu, Hanxun, E-mail: hxqiu@usst.edu.cn; Qiu, Feilong; Han, Xuebin; Li, Jing; Yang, Junhe, E-mail: jhyang@usst.edu.cn

    2017-06-15

    Highlights: • Nickel nanoparticle-decorated reduced graphene-oxide nanostructures were prepared by an environmentally friendly, one-pot strategy via an efficient microwave irradiation approach. • Upon microwave irradiation, the composites could be prepared within only a few hundred seconds, much faster than using the widely used traditional hydrothermal methods that may take tens of hours generally. • The nanostructure exhibits superior catalytic activity and selectivity towards transforming the highly toxic nitroaromatic compounds to industrially useful intermediates • The corresponding kinetic reaction rate constant (κ) is even four-fold compared to pure Ni nanoparticles. - Abstract: Here we report an environmentally friendly, one-pot strategy toward preparation of nickel nanoparticle-decorated reduced graphene-oxide (Ni-RGO) nanostructures, by employing Ni(AC){sub 2} as nickel source and ethylene glycol as both solvent and reducing agent via a facile microwave irradiation heating approach. The results show that Ni nanoparticles with an average diameter of around 40 nm are homogeneously anchored onto the surface of RGO sheets. As compared to the pure Ni nanoparticles and RGO sheets, Ni-RGO composites with over 64 wt% loading of Ni nanoparticles possess superior catalytic activities and selectivity toward the reduction of 4-nitrophenol. The corresponding kinetic reaction rate constant (defined as κ) is even four-fold compared to pure Ni nanoparticles. Such promising composites show great potential for friendly treatment of industrial waste containing nitrophenol in a simple, sustainable and green way.

  16. Microwave-irradiated preparation of reduced graphene oxide-Ni nanostructures and their enhanced performance for catalytic reduction of 4-nitrophenol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Hanxun; Qiu, Feilong; Han, Xuebin; Li, Jing; Yang, Junhe

    2017-06-01

    Here we report an environmentally friendly, one-pot strategy toward preparation of nickel nanoparticle-decorated reduced graphene-oxide (Ni-RGO) nanostructures, by employing Ni(AC)2 as nickel source and ethylene glycol as both solvent and reducing agent via a facile microwave irradiation heating approach. The results show that Ni nanoparticles with an average diameter of around 40 nm are homogeneously anchored onto the surface of RGO sheets. As compared to the pure Ni nanoparticles and RGO sheets, Ni-RGO composites with over 64 wt% loading of Ni nanoparticles possess superior catalytic activities and selectivity toward the reduction of 4-nitrophenol. The corresponding kinetic reaction rate constant (defined as κ) is even four-fold compared to pure Ni nanoparticles. Such promising composites show great potential for friendly treatment of industrial waste containing nitrophenol in a simple, sustainable and green way.

  17. Metal-Carbon-CNF Composites Obtained by Catalytic Pyrolysis of Urban Plastic Residues as Electro-Catalysts for the Reduction of CO2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesica Castelo-Quibén

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Metal–carbon–carbon nanofibers composites obtained by catalytic pyrolysis of urban plastic residues have been prepared using Fe, Co or Ni as pyrolitic catalysts. The composite materials have been fully characterized from a textural and chemical point of view. The proportion of carbon nanofibers and the final content of carbon phases depend on the used pyrolitic metal with Ni being the most active pyrolitic catalysts. The composites show the electro-catalyst activity in the CO2 reduction to hydrocarbons, favoring all the formation of C1 to C4 hydrocarbons. The tendency of this activity is in accordance with the apparent faradaic efficiencies and the linear sweep voltammetries. The cobalt-based composite shows high selectivity to C3 hydrocarbons within this group of compounds.

  18. Life cycle assessment of selective non-catalytic reduction (SNCR) of nitrous oxides in a full-scale municipal solid waste incinerator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Jacob; Munk, Bjarne; Crillesen, Kim

    2011-01-01

    Selective non-catalytic reduction (SNCR) of nitrous oxides in a full-scale municipal solid waste incinerator was investigated using LCA. The relationship between NOx-cleaning and ammonia dosage was measured at the plant. Un-reacted ammonia – the ammonia slip – leaving the flue-gas cleaning system......-cleaning efficiency, the fate of the ammonia slip as well as the environmental impact from ammonia production, the potential acidification and nutrient enrichment from NOx-cleaning was calculated as a function of ammonia dosage. Since the exact fate of the ammonia slip could not be measured directly, a number...... of scenarios were set up ranging from “best case” with no ammonia from the slip ending up in the environment to “worst case” where all the ammonia slip eventually ended up in the environment and contributed to environmental pollution. In the “best case” scenario the highest ammonia dosage was most beneficial...

  19. Macrodynamic study and catalytic reduction of NO by ammonia under mild conditions over Pt-La-Ce-O/Al2O3 catalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Yanhui; Zhu, Jingli; Ma, Runyu

    2007-01-01

    Catalytic reduction of NO using ammonia upon series prepared catalysts under 423-573 K in a fixed bed reactor was investigated. Results showed that the performance of supported platinum catalyst could be improved by addition of La and Ce to it. Experimental studies indicated that the suitable molar ratio of Pt:La:Ce would be 1.0:3.78:3.56, Pt-La-Ce (c). Results also found Pt-La-Ce (c) catalyst had good stability and tolerance to certain amounts of sulfur compounds under the used experimental conditions. Characterization for the fresh and used catalysts showed the Pt-La-Ce (c) catalyst had a stable structure. In addition, based on experimental data and using a nonlinear regression algorithm method, an empirical macrodynamic equation was obtained in this study

  20. Green synthesis of gold and silver nanoparticles using gallic acid: catalytic activity and conversion yield toward the 4-nitrophenol reduction reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jisu; Cha, Song-Hyun; Cho, Seonho; Park, Youmie

    2016-06-01

    In the present report, gallic acid was used as both a reducing and stabilizing agent to synthesize gold and silver nanoparticles. The synthesized gold and silver nanoparticles exhibited characteristic surface plasmon resonance bands at 536 and 392 nm, respectively. Nanoparticles that were approximately spherical in shape were observed in high-resolution transmission electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy images. The hydrodynamic radius was determined to be 54.4 nm for gold nanoparticles and 33.7 nm for silver nanoparticles in aqueous medium. X-ray diffraction analyses confirmed that the synthesized nanoparticles possessed a face-centered cubic structure. FT-IR spectra demonstrated that the carboxylic acid functional groups of gallic acid contributed to the electrostatic binding onto the surface of the nanoparticles. Zeta potential values of -41.98 mV for the gold nanoparticles and -53.47 mV for the silver nanoparticles indicated that the synthesized nanoparticles possess excellent stability. On-the-shelf stability for 4 weeks also confirmed that the synthesized nanoparticles were quite stable without significant changes in their UV-visible spectra. The synthesized nanoparticles exhibited catalytic activity toward the reduction reaction of 4-nitrophenol to 4-aminophenol in the presence of sodium borohydride. The rate constant of the silver nanoparticles was higher than that of the gold nanoparticles in the catalytic reaction. Furthermore, the conversion yield (%) of 4-nitrophenol to 4-aminophenol was determined using reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography with UV detection at 254 nm. The silver nanoparticles exhibited an excellent conversion yield (96.7-99.9 %), suggesting that the synthesized silver nanoparticles are highly efficient catalysts for the 4-nitrophenol reduction reaction.

  1. Electronic coupling induced high performance of N, S-codoped graphene supported CoS2 nanoparticles for catalytic reduction and evolution of oxygen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Bohong; Jiang, Zhongqing; Zhou, Lingshan; Deng, Binglu; Jiang, Zhong-Jie; Huang, Jianlin; Liu, Meilin

    2018-06-01

    A simple synthetic method is developed for the synthesis of CoS2/N, S-codoped graphene. The result shows the existence of a strong electronic coupling between CoS2 and N, S-codoped graphene. The pyrrolic and pyridinic type nitrogen and S in the form of C-S-C in N, S-codoped graphene are found to be the anchoring sites of the CoS2 nanoparticles. As a bifunctional catalyst, the CoS2/N, S-codoped graphene exhibits an oxygen reduction onset potential of 0.963 V vs. RHE and delivers an oxygen evolution overpotential of 393 mV at the current density of 10 mA cm-2. Its oxygen reduction and evolution catalytic activities are comparable to those of the Pt/C and the state-of-art RuO2/C, respectively. Most impressively, the CoS2/N, S-codoped graphene exhibits a potential gap of 771 mV. This value is lower than those of most bifuntional catalysts reported, clearly indicating its potential use as the bifunctional catalyst to replace the noble-metal based catalysts for practical applications. Additionally, our results also suggest a great importance to prepare a single pure phase CoS2 in improving the catalytic bifunctionality of the CoS2/N, S-codoped graphene. The primary Zn-air battery with CoS2/N, S-codoped graphene shows a higher discharge peak power density than that with Pt/C.

  2. Green synthesis of gold and silver nanoparticles using gallic acid: catalytic activity and conversion yield toward the 4-nitrophenol reduction reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Jisu; Cha, Song-Hyun; Cho, Seonho; Park, Youmie

    2016-01-01

    In the present report, gallic acid was used as both a reducing and stabilizing agent to synthesize gold and silver nanoparticles. The synthesized gold and silver nanoparticles exhibited characteristic surface plasmon resonance bands at 536 and 392 nm, respectively. Nanoparticles that were approximately spherical in shape were observed in high-resolution transmission electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy images. The hydrodynamic radius was determined to be 54.4 nm for gold nanoparticles and 33.7 nm for silver nanoparticles in aqueous medium. X-ray diffraction analyses confirmed that the synthesized nanoparticles possessed a face-centered cubic structure. FT-IR spectra demonstrated that the carboxylic acid functional groups of gallic acid contributed to the electrostatic binding onto the surface of the nanoparticles. Zeta potential values of −41.98 mV for the gold nanoparticles and −53.47 mV for the silver nanoparticles indicated that the synthesized nanoparticles possess excellent stability. On-the-shelf stability for 4 weeks also confirmed that the synthesized nanoparticles were quite stable without significant changes in their UV–visible spectra. The synthesized nanoparticles exhibited catalytic activity toward the reduction reaction of 4-nitrophenol to 4-aminophenol in the presence of sodium borohydride. The rate constant of the silver nanoparticles was higher than that of the gold nanoparticles in the catalytic reaction. Furthermore, the conversion yield (%) of 4-nitrophenol to 4-aminophenol was determined using reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography with UV detection at 254 nm. The silver nanoparticles exhibited an excellent conversion yield (96.7–99.9 %), suggesting that the synthesized silver nanoparticles are highly efficient catalysts for the 4-nitrophenol reduction reaction.

  3. Green synthesis of gold and silver nanoparticles using gallic acid: catalytic activity and conversion yield toward the 4-nitrophenol reduction reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Jisu [Inje University, College of Pharmacy (Korea, Republic of); Cha, Song-Hyun; Cho, Seonho [Seoul National University, Department of Naval Architecture and Ocean Engineering (Korea, Republic of); Park, Youmie, E-mail: youmiep@inje.ac.kr [Inje University, College of Pharmacy (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-06-15

    In the present report, gallic acid was used as both a reducing and stabilizing agent to synthesize gold and silver nanoparticles. The synthesized gold and silver nanoparticles exhibited characteristic surface plasmon resonance bands at 536 and 392 nm, respectively. Nanoparticles that were approximately spherical in shape were observed in high-resolution transmission electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy images. The hydrodynamic radius was determined to be 54.4 nm for gold nanoparticles and 33.7 nm for silver nanoparticles in aqueous medium. X-ray diffraction analyses confirmed that the synthesized nanoparticles possessed a face-centered cubic structure. FT-IR spectra demonstrated that the carboxylic acid functional groups of gallic acid contributed to the electrostatic binding onto the surface of the nanoparticles. Zeta potential values of −41.98 mV for the gold nanoparticles and −53.47 mV for the silver nanoparticles indicated that the synthesized nanoparticles possess excellent stability. On-the-shelf stability for 4 weeks also confirmed that the synthesized nanoparticles were quite stable without significant changes in their UV–visible spectra. The synthesized nanoparticles exhibited catalytic activity toward the reduction reaction of 4-nitrophenol to 4-aminophenol in the presence of sodium borohydride. The rate constant of the silver nanoparticles was higher than that of the gold nanoparticles in the catalytic reaction. Furthermore, the conversion yield (%) of 4-nitrophenol to 4-aminophenol was determined using reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography with UV detection at 254 nm. The silver nanoparticles exhibited an excellent conversion yield (96.7–99.9 %), suggesting that the synthesized silver nanoparticles are highly efficient catalysts for the 4-nitrophenol reduction reaction.

  4. Enhanced hydrothermal stability of Cu-ZSM-5 catalyst via surface modification in the selective catalytic reduction of NO with NH{sub 3}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Tao; Shi, Juan; Liu, Jian, E-mail: liujian@cup.edu.cn; Wang, Daxi; Zhao, Zhen, E-mail: zhenzhao@cup.edu.cn; Cheng, Kai; Li, Jianmei

    2016-07-01

    Highlights: • The hydrothermal stability of Cu-ZSM-5 catalyst was enhanced after surface modification. • An inert silica layer was deposited on the surface of Cu-ZSM-5 and formed a protective layer. • The contact between Si and Cu and Al atoms could form Si-O-Al and Si- O−Cu bonds. • The redox and acidity properties of Cu-ZSM-5-CLD-Aged catalyst were largely retained. • The adsorption and activation of NO and NH{sub 3} was almost unchanged over Cu-ZSM-5-CLD catalyst before and after hydrothermal treatment. - Abstract: The surface of Cu-ZSM-5 catalyst was modified by chemical liquid deposition (CLD) of tetraethoxysilane (TEOS) for enhancing its hydrothermal stability in the selective catalytic reduction of NO with NH{sub 3}. After hydrothermal aging at 750 °C for 13 h, the catalytic performance of Cu-ZSM-5-Aged catalyst was significantly reduced for NO reduction in the entire temperature range, while that of Cu-ZSM-5-CLD-Aged catalyst was affected very little. The characterization results indicated that an inert silica layer was deposited on the surface of Cu-ZSM-5 and formed a protective layer, which prevents the detachment of Cu{sup 2+} from ZSM-5 ion-exchange positions and the dealumination of zeolite during the hydrothermal aging process. Based on the data it is hypothesized to be the primary reason for the high hydrothermal stability of Cu-ZSM-5-CLD catalyst.

  5. Carbon-based catalytic briquettes for the reduction of NO: Effect of H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} and HNO{sub 3} carbon support treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    A. Boyano; M.E. Galvez; R. Moliner; M.J. Lazaro [Instituto de Carboquimica CSIC, Zaragoza (Spain)

    2008-08-15

    The influence of treating carbon with sulphuric and nitric acids on the activity of a carbon-based briquette catalyst for NO reduction with NH{sub 3} was examined in a fixed-bed reactor at low temperature (150{sup o}C). The briquette catalysts were prepared from a low-rank coal and a commercial tar pitch. The active phase was impregnated from a suspension of ashes of petroleum coke by means of an equilibrium adsorption method. The catalytic behaviour of NO reduction over acid treated briquettes was found to vary with the surface characteristics of the carbon support. This suggests that the number of oxygen-containing sites as well as vanadium load and dispersion affect the reaction activity. In the presence of oxygen, the SCR activity is enhanced with a nitric acid treatment, activity is promoted by the presence of acidic surface groups such as carboxyl and lactone, which can help not only to create a reservoir of reactants on the catalysts surface but also to improve the dispersion or even increase the amount of vanadium loading. Therefore, the results of this study suggest that the formation of acidic sites on the surface is an important step for NO reduction with NH{sub 3} over carbon-based catalysts. Additional techniques such as XPS and TPD to characterize the oxygen surface and those such as N{sub 2} adsorption to characterize the textural properties were also used in this study. 46 refs., 6 figs., 5 tabs.

  6. Charge transfer-resistance in nitrogen-doped/undoped graphene: Its influence on the electro-catalytic reduction of H2O2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magerusan, Lidia; Pogacean, Florina; Socaci, Crina; Coros, Maria; Rosu, Marcela-Corina; Pruneanu, Stela

    2016-01-01

    Nitrogen doped (N-Gr) and undoped (TRGO) graphene were chemically synthesized and characterized by TEM, STEM-EDX and XPS. The electrochemical reduction of H 2 O 2 was investigated with bare glassy carbon (GC) electrode and with GC modified with each graphene sample. The active area of TRGO/GC and N-Gr/GC modified electrodes were found to be 0.75 and 0.295 cm 2 , respectively. Both were considerably larger than that of bare GC (0.07 cm 2 ). We carefully looked at the kinetic of interfacial electron transfer process and found that the charge-transfer resistance (R ct ) of TRGO/GC electrode (7.83 × 10 6 Ω) was significantly lower than that of N-Gr/GC electrode (4.81 × 10 7 Ω) or bare GC (1.74 × 10 9 Ω). Interestingly, although TRGO/GC electrode had the largest active area and the smallest charge transfer resistance, it did not promote the H 2 O 2 electrochemical reduction. In contrast, N-Gr/GC modified electrode exhibited an enhanced electro-catalytic activity towards H 2 O 2 reduction, which was related to the presence of heterogeneous atoms into the sp 2 carbon network.

  7. Simulated solarlight catalytic reduction of Cr(VI) on microwave–ultrasonication synthesized flower-like CuO in the presence of tartaric acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, Zhihui; Yu, Yaqun; Fang, Di; Liang, Jianru; Zhou, Lixiang

    2016-01-01

    In this study, flower-like CuO was successfully synthesized by a microwave–ultrasound assisted method and well characterized by X-ray diffractions, Fourier transform infrared spectrum, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, specific surface area, UV–vis diffused reflection spectra, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and point of zero charge. The photocatalytic performance of the as-prepared CuO was examined on the Cr(VI) reduction in the presence of tartaric acid under simulated solarlight irradiation. The results show that the developed CuO catalyst exhibited good photocatalytic activity with 100% reduction of Cr(VI) after irradiation of 30 min under the test condition of c(Cr(VI)) = 100 μM, catalyst loading = 400 mg/L, c(tartaric acid) = 4 mM and initial pH = 3. The reaction mechanism was proposed. The effects of test parameters, such as catalyst loading, tartaric acid concentration and initial pH, on Cr(VI) reduction efficiency were also investigated. It is worth mentioning that the developed catalyst can work at a relatively wide range of pH with quite high catalytic performance. - Highlights: • Flower-like CuO microstructure was prepared by MW-US assisted method. • The prepared CuO can catalyze the reduction Cr(VI) by tartaric acid under simulated solarlight. • The formation of ≡Cu(II)-tartaric acid complex play a key role in the reduction of Cr(VI). • The catalyst can operate effectively at a relatively wide range of pH.

  8. Structure Investigation of Ti(IV)BODOLates Involved in the Catalytic Asymmetric Reduction of Ketones Using Catecholborane

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sarvary, Ian; Norrby, Per-Ola; Frejd, Torbjörn

    2004-01-01

    The complexes formed on mixing Ti(OiPr)4 and bicyclo-octanediols (BODOLs) 1 and 2 (1:1) are useful as chiral catalysts in asymmetric reductions and were investigated by 1HNMR-spectroscopy and by computational methods. A consistent picture emerged of head-to-tail dimers being kept together via a T...

  9. Reduction of light cycle oil in catalytic cracking of bitumen-derived crude HGOs through catalyst selection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ding, Fuchen; Xu, Chunming [State Key Laboratory of Heavy Oil Processing, China University of Petroleum Beijing, 102200 (China); Ng, Siauw H. [National Centre for Upgrading Technology, 1 Oil Patch Drive, Suite A202, Devon, Alberta (Canada); Yui, Sok [Syncrude Research Centre, 9421-17 Avenue, Edmonton, Alberta (Canada)

    2007-09-15

    In an attempt to reduce the production of light cycle oil (LCO), a non-premium fluid catalytic cracking (FCC) product in North America, a large-pore catalyst containing rare-earth-exchanged Y (REY) zeolite, was used to crack two Canadian bitumen-derived crude heavy gas oils (HGOs) hydrotreated to different extents. For comparison, a regular equilibrium FCC catalyst with ultra-stable Y (USY) zeolite and a conventional western Canadian crude HGO were also included in the study. Cracking experiments were conducted in a fixed-bed microactivity test (MAT) reactor at 510 C, 30 s oil injection time, and varying catalyst-to-oil ratios for different conversions. The results show that pre-cracking of heavy molecules with wide-pore matrix, followed by zeolite cracking, enhanced conversion at the expense of light and heavy cycle oils at a constant catalyst-to-oil ratio, giving improved product selectivities (e.g., higher gasoline and lower dry gas, LCO, and coke yields, in general, at a given conversion). To systematically assess the benefits of employing the specialty catalyst over the regular catalyst in cracking Canadian HGOs, individual product yields were compared at common bases, including constant catalyst-to-oil ratios, conversions, and coke yields for three feeds, and at maximum gasoline yield for one feed. In most cases, the preferred choice of large-pore zeolite-rich catalyst over its counterpart was evident. The observed cracking phenomena were explained based on properties of catalysts and characterization data of feedstocks, including their hydrocarbon type analyses by gas chromatograph with a mass-selective detector (GC-MSD). (author)

  10. Implementation of activity-based costing (ABC) to drive cost reduction efforts in a semiconductor manufacturing operation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naguib, Hussein; Bol, Igor I.; Lora, J.; Chowdhry, R.

    1994-09-01

    This paper presents a case study on the implementation of ABC to calculate the cost per wafer and to drive cost reduction efforts for a new IC product line. The cost reduction activities were conducted through the efforts of 11 cross-functional teams which included members of the finance, purchasing, technology development, process engineering, equipment engineering, production control, and facility groups. The activities of these cross functional teams were coordinated by a cost council. It will be shown that these activities have resulted in a 57% reduction in the wafer manufacturing cost of the new product line. Factors contributed to successful implementation of an ABC management system are discussed.

  11. In-line localized monitoring of catalyst activity in selective catalytic NO.sub.x reduction systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muzio, Lawrence J [Laguna Niguel, CA; Smith, Randall A [Huntington Beach, CA

    2009-12-22

    Localized catalyst activity in an SCR unit for controlling emissions from a boiler, power plant, or any facility that generates NO.sub.x-containing flue gases is monitored by one or more modules that operate on-line without disrupting the normal operation of the facility. Each module is positioned over a designated lateral area of one of the catalyst beds in the SCR unit, and supplies ammonia, urea, or other suitable reductant to the catalyst in the designated area at a rate that produces an excess of the reductant over NO.sub.x on a molar basis through the designated area. Sampling probes upstream and downstream of the designated area draw samples of the gas stream for NO.sub.x analysis, and the catalyst activity is determined from the difference in NO.sub.x levels between the two probes.

  12. Catalytic Activity Enhancement for Oxygen Reduction on Epitaxial Perovskite Thin Films for Solid-Oxide Fuel Cells

    KAUST Repository

    la O', Gerardo Jose; Ahn, Sung-Jin; Crumlin, Ethan; Orikasa, Yuki; Biegalski, Michael D.; Christen, Hans M.; Shao-Horn, Yang

    2010-01-01

    Figure Presented The active ingredient: La0.8Sr 0.2CoO3-δ (LSC) epitaxial thin films are prepared on (001 )-oriented yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) single crystals with a gadolinium-doped ceria (GDC) buffer layer (see picture). The LSC epitaxial films exhibit better oxygen reduction kinetics than bulk LSC. The enhanced activity is attributed in part to higher oxygen nonstoichiometry. © 2010 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KCaA, Weinheim.

  13. Catalytic Activity Enhancement for Oxygen Reduction on Epitaxial Perovskite Thin Films for Solid-Oxide Fuel Cells

    KAUST Repository

    la O', Gerardo Jose

    2010-06-22

    Figure Presented The active ingredient: La0.8Sr 0.2CoO3-δ (LSC) epitaxial thin films are prepared on (001 )-oriented yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) single crystals with a gadolinium-doped ceria (GDC) buffer layer (see picture). The LSC epitaxial films exhibit better oxygen reduction kinetics than bulk LSC. The enhanced activity is attributed in part to higher oxygen nonstoichiometry. © 2010 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KCaA, Weinheim.

  14. Biomimetic Polymeric Semiconductor Based Hybrid Nanosystems for Artificial Photosynthesis towards Solar Fuels Generation via CO2 reduction

    OpenAIRE

    Zhou, H.; Li, P.; Liu, J.; Chen, Z.; Liu, L.; Dontsova, D.; Yan, R.; Fan, T.; Zhang, D.; Ye, J.

    2016-01-01

    In photosynthesis, an intricate polymeric system is constructed by connecting a light-harvesting antenna network, a molecular water oxidation center, and \\CO2\\} or proton-reduction machinery in a nanolayered architecture as a basic photosynthetic unit for solar-to-fuels conversion. Herein, we present a prototype basic artificial photosynthetic unit by connecting a typical CO2/proton reduction catalyst, a cocatalyst and an electron mediator as well as \\{CO2\\} activator into a polymer based nan...

  15. Combustion, performance, and selective catalytic reduction of NOx for a diesel engine operated with combined tri fuel (H_2, CH_4, and conventional diesel)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abu-Jrai, Ahmad M.; Al-Muhtaseb, Ala'a H.; Hasan, Ahmad O.

    2017-01-01

    In this study, the effect of tri fuel (ULSD, H_2, and CH_4) operation under real exhaust gas conditions with different gaseous fuel compositions on the combustion characteristics, engine emissions, and selective catalytic reduction (SCR) after treatment was examined at low, medium, and high engine loads. Pt/Al_2O_3-SCR reactor was used and operated at different exhaust gas temperatures. Results revealed that at low load, the two gaseous fuels (H_2 and CH_4) have the same trend on combustion proccess, where both reduce the in-cylinder pressure and rate of heat release. At the high engine load there was a considerable influence appeared as an increase of the premixed combustion phase and a significant decrease of the total combustion duration. In terms of emissions, it was observed that at high engine load, fuels with high CH_4 content tend to reduce NOx formation, whereas, fuels with high H_2 content tend to reduce PM formation, moreover, combustion of tri fuel with 50:50 fuel mixture resulted in lower BSFC compared to the other ratios and hence, the best engine efficiency. The hydrocarbon-SCR catalyst has shown satisfactory performance in NOx reduction under real diesel exhaust gas in a temperature window of 180–280 °C for all engine loads. - Highlights: • Effect of tri fuel (ULSD, H_2, CH_4) on combustion and engine emissions was examined. • Fuel with high CH_4 content (H50-M50 and H25-M75) tend to reduce NOx formation. • Fuel with high H_2 content (H75-M25 and H50-M50) tend to reduce PM formation. • Increasing the percentage of H_2 in the feed gas improved the NO_x reduction. • The hydrocarbon-SCR catalyst has shown satisfactory performance in NO_x reduction.

  16. Catalytic N2O decomposition and reduction by NH3 over Fe/Beta and Fe/SSZ-13 catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Aiyong; Wang, Yilin; Walter, Eric D.; Kukkadapu, Ravi K.; Guo, Yanglong; Lu, Guanzhong; Weber, Robert S.; Wang, Yong; Peden, Charles H. F.; Gao, Feng

    2018-02-01

    Fe/zeolites are important N2O abatement catalysts, efficient in direct N2O decomposition and (selective) catalytic N2O reduction. In this study, Fe/Beta and Fe/SSZ-13 were synthesized via solution ion-exchange and used to catalyze these two reactions. Nature of the Fe species was probed with UV-vis, Mössbauer and EPR spectroscopies and H2-TPR. The characterizations collectively indicate that isolated and dinuclear Fe sites dominate in Fe/SSZ-13, whereas Fe/Beta contains higher concentrations of oligomeric FexOy species. H2-TPR results suggest that Fe-O interactions are weaker in Fe/SSZ-13, as evidenced by the lower reduction temperatures and higher extents of autoreduction during high-temperature pretreatments in inert gas. Kinetic measurements show that Fe/SSZ-13 has higher activity in catalytic N2O decomposition, thus demonstrating a positive correlation between activity and Fe-O binding, consistent with O2 desorption being rate-limiting for this reaction. However, Fe/Beta was found to be more active in catalyzing N2O reduction by NH3. This indicates that larger active ensembles (i.e., oligomers) are more active for this reaction, consistent with the fact that both N2O and NH3 need to be activated in this case. The authors from PNNL gratefully acknowledge the US Department of Energy (DOE), Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Vehicle Technologies Office for the support of this work. The research described in this paper was performed in the Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL), a national scientific user facility sponsored by the DOE’s Office of Biological and Environmental Research and located at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). PNNL is operated for the US DOE by Battelle. Aiyong Wang gratefully acknowledges the China Scholarship Council for the Joint-Training Scholarship Program with the Pacific

  17. A Catalytic Path for Electrolyte Reduction in Lithium-Ion Cells Revealed by in Situ Attenuated Total Reflection-Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy

    KAUST Repository

    Shi, Feifei; Ross, Philip N.; Zhao, Hui; Liu, Gao; Somorjai, Gabor A.; Komvopoulos, Kyriakos

    2015-01-01

    © 2015 American Chemical Society. Although controlling the interfacial chemistry of electrodes in Li-ion batteries (LIBs) is crucial for maintaining the reversibility, electrolyte decomposition has not been fully understood. In this study, electrolyte decomposition on model electrode surfaces (Au and Sn) was investigated by in situ attenuated total reflection-Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopy. Simultaneously obtained ATR-FTIR spectra and cyclic voltammetry measurements show that lithium ethylene dicarbonate and lithium propionate form on the Au electrode at 0.6 V, whereas diethyl 2,5-dioxahexane dicarboxylate and lithium propionate form on the Sn electrode surface at 1.25 V. A noncatalytic reduction path on the Au surface and a catalytic reduction path on the Sn surface are introduced to explain the surface dependence of the overpotential and product selectivity. This represents a new concept for explaining electrolyte reactions on the anode of LIBs. The present investigation shows that catalysis plays a dominant role in the electrolyte decomposition process and has important implications in electrode surface modification and electrolyte recipe selection, which are critical factors for enhancing the efficiency, durability, and reliability of LIBs.

  18. A Catalytic Path for Electrolyte Reduction in Lithium-Ion Cells Revealed by in Situ Attenuated Total Reflection-Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy

    KAUST Repository

    Shi, Feifei

    2015-03-11

    © 2015 American Chemical Society. Although controlling the interfacial chemistry of electrodes in Li-ion batteries (LIBs) is crucial for maintaining the reversibility, electrolyte decomposition has not been fully understood. In this study, electrolyte decomposition on model electrode surfaces (Au and Sn) was investigated by in situ attenuated total reflection-Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopy. Simultaneously obtained ATR-FTIR spectra and cyclic voltammetry measurements show that lithium ethylene dicarbonate and lithium propionate form on the Au electrode at 0.6 V, whereas diethyl 2,5-dioxahexane dicarboxylate and lithium propionate form on the Sn electrode surface at 1.25 V. A noncatalytic reduction path on the Au surface and a catalytic reduction path on the Sn surface are introduced to explain the surface dependence of the overpotential and product selectivity. This represents a new concept for explaining electrolyte reactions on the anode of LIBs. The present investigation shows that catalysis plays a dominant role in the electrolyte decomposition process and has important implications in electrode surface modification and electrolyte recipe selection, which are critical factors for enhancing the efficiency, durability, and reliability of LIBs.

  19. Integrated Removal of NOx with Carbon Monoxide as Reductant, and Capture of Mercury in a Low Temperature Selective Catalytic and Adsorptive Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neville Pinto; Panagiotis Smirniotis; Stephen Thiel

    2010-08-31

    Coal will likely continue to be a dominant component of power generation in the foreseeable future. This project addresses the issue of environmental compliance for two important pollutants: NO{sub x} and mercury. Integration of emission control units is in principle possible through a Low Temperature Selective Catalytic and Adsorptive Reactor (LTSCAR) in which NO{sub x} removal is achieved in a traditional SCR mode but at low temperature, and, uniquely, using carbon monoxide as a reductant. The capture of mercury is integrated into the same process unit. Such an arrangement would reduce mercury removal costs significantly, and provide improved control for the ultimate disposal of mercury. The work completed in this project demonstrates that the use of CO as a reductant in LTSCR is technically feasible using supported manganese oxide catalysts, that the simultaneous warm-gas capture of elemental and oxidized mercury is technically feasible using both nanostructured chelating adsorbents and ceria-titania-based materials, and that integrated removal of mercury and NO{sub x} is technically feasible using ceria-titania-based materials.

  20. Artificial neural networks study of the catalytic reduction of resazurin: stopped-flow injection kinetic-spectrophotometric determination of Cu(II) and Ni(II)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magni, Diana M.; Olivieri, Alejandro C.; Bonivardi, Adrian L.

    2005-01-01

    An artificial neural network (ANN) procedure was used in the development of a catalytic spectrophotometric method for the determination of Cu(II) and Ni(II) employing a stopped-flow injection system. The method is based on the catalytic action of these ions on the reduction of resazurin by sulfide. ANNs trained by back-propagation of errors allowed us to model the systems in a concentration range of 0.5-6 and 1-15 mg l -1 for Cu(II) and Ni(II), respectively, with a low relative error of prediction (REP) for each cation: REP Cu(II) = 0.85% and REP Ni(II) = 0.79%. The standard deviations of the repeatability (s r ) and of the within-laboratory reproducibility (s w ) were measured using standard solutions of Cu(II) and Ni(II) equal to 2.75 and 3.5 mg l -1 , respectively: s r [Cu(II)] = 0.039 mg l -1 , s r [Ni(II)] = 0.044 mg l -1 , s w [Ni(II)] = 0.045 mg l -1 and s w [Ni(II)] = 0.050 mg l -1 . The ANNs-kinetic method has been applied to the determination of Cu(II) and Ni(II) in electroplating solutions and provided satisfactory results as compared with flame atomic absorption spectrophotometry method. The effect of resazurin, NaOH and Na 2 S concentrations and the reaction temperature on the analytical sensitivity is discussed

  1. Mixture of fuels approach for the synthesis of SrFeO(3-δ) nanocatalyst and its impact on the catalytic reduction of nitrobenzene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naveenkumar, Akula; Kuruva, Praveena; Shivakumara, Chikkadasappa; Srilakshmi, Chilukoti

    2014-11-17

    A modified solution combustion approach was applied in the synthesis of nanosize SrFeO(3-δ) (SFO) using single as well as mixture of citric acid, oxalic acid, and glycine as fuels with corresponding metal nitrates as precursors. The synthesized and calcined powders were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), X-ray diffraction (XRD), thermogravimetric analysis and derivative thermogravimetric analysis (TG-DTG), scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, N2 physisorption methods, and acidic strength by n-butyl amine titration methods. The FT-IR spectra show the lower-frequency band at 599 cm(-1) corresponds to metal-oxygen bond (possible Fe-O stretching frequencies) vibrations for the perovskite-structure compound. TG-DTG confirms the formation temperature of SFO ranging between 850-900 °C. XRD results reveal that the use of mixture of fuels in the preparation has effect on the crystallite size of the resultant compound. The average particle size of the samples prepared from single fuels as determined from XRD was ∼50-35 nm, whereas for samples obtained from mixture of fuels, particles with a size of 30-25 nm were obtained. Specifically, the combination of mixture of fuels for the synthesis of SFO catalysts prevents agglomeration of the particles, which in turn leads to decrease in crystallite size and increase in the surface area of the catalysts. It was also observed that the present approach also impacted the catalytic activity of the SFO in the catalytic reduction of nitrobenzene to azoxybenzene.

  2. Nonlinear Model Reduction for RTCVD

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Newman, Andrew J; Krishnaprasad, P. S

    1998-01-01

    ...) for semiconductor manufacturing. They focus on model reduction for the ordinary differential equation model describing heat transfer to, from, and within a semiconductor wafer in the RTCVD chamber...

  3. Program to reduce NOx emissions of HNO{sub 3} plants with selective catalytic reduction; Programme visant a reduire les emissions de NOx d'ateliers d'HNO{sub 3} par reduction catalytique selective

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gry, Ph. [Grande Paroisse SA, Group ATOFINA, 92 - Paris la Defense (France)

    2001-07-01

    Grande Paroisse well known as G.P. has been created in 1919. Nowadays, it is an affiliated company of ATOFINA. The Company is the first French producer of fertilizers and the third West European. In its sites G.P. controls 1.3 millions metric tons per year of nitric acid, on 13 units. Continuous improvement of its technology together with productivity development make G.P. one of the most competitive fertilizer manufacturer. A technical team achieves this objective and maintains a world wide reputable technology. For the past 15 years, industry has tried to reduce NO{sub x} atmospheric pollution. The SCR (Selective Catalytic Reduction) is most used with ammonia for nitric acid units and described here under. (author)

  4. A Mild and Convenient Method for the Reduction of Carbonyl Compounds with NaBH{sub 4} in the Presence of Catalytic Amounts of MoCl{sub 5}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zeynizadeh, Behzad; Yahyaei, Saiedeh [Urmia University, Urmia (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2003-11-15

    NaBH{sub 4} with catalytic amounts of MoCl{sub 5} can readily reduce a variety of carbonyl compounds such as aldehydes, ketones, acyloins, α-diketones and conjugated enones to their corresponding alcohols in good to excellent yields. Reduction reactions were performed under aprotic condition in CH{sub 3}CN at room temperature or reflux. In addition, the chemoselective reduction of aldehydes over ketones was accomplished successfully with this reducing system.

  5. Synthesis of honeycomb-like palladium nanostructures by using cucurbit[7]uril and their catalytic activities for reduction of 4-nitrophenol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Premkumar, Thathan [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology (GIST), 1 Oryong-dong, Buk-gu, Gwangju 500-712 (Korea, Republic of); The University College/Department of Chemistry, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Geckeler, Kurt E., E-mail: keg@gist.ac.kr [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology (GIST), 1 Oryong-dong, Buk-gu, Gwangju 500-712 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Nanobio Materials and Electronics (WCU), Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology (GIST), 1 Oryong-dong, Buk-gu, Gwangju 500-712 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-12-15

    An eco-friendly one-pot method to synthesize self-assembled palladium nanoclusters using a macrocycle, namely cucurbit[7]uril, in the alkaline medium without employing any special reducing or capping agents and/or external energy at room temperature is described. This greener approach, which utilizes water as a benign solvent and biocompatible cucurbit[7]uril as both reducing and protecting agents, can be applied to synthesize other noble metal nanoparticles such as gold, silver, and platinum. Owing to unique structural arrangement of cucurbit[7]uril, it was possible to prepare palladium nanoclusters of honeycomb-like structure irrespective of the reaction conditions. The honeycomb-like palladium nanoclusters were characterized using transmission electron microscopy (TEM), higher-resolution TEM (HR-TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), UV–vis, and FT-IR spectroscopy. Significantly, the synthesized palladium nanoclusters exhibited catalytic activity for the reduction reaction of 4-nitrophenol at room temperature. The approach launched here is easy, green, and user-friendly in contrast to the conventional techniques using polymers or surfactants and harsh reductants. - Highlights: • A simple and one-pot method to synthesis palladium nanostructures with honey-comb like structure. • The strategy established here does not require any harsh and toxic reducing agents. • It has a potential to be a general method for the synthesis of metal nanoparticles in water medium. • Palladium nanoclusters can be used as catalyst for the reduction reaction of 4-nitrophenol. • This system makes a novel platform for industrial and biomedical applications.

  6. Semiconductor statistics

    CERN Document Server

    Blakemore, J S

    1987-01-01

    In-depth exploration of the implications of carrier populations and Fermi energies examines distribution of electrons in energy bands and impurity levels of semiconductors. Also: kinetics of semiconductors containing excess carriers, particularly in terms of trapping, excitation, and recombination.

  7. A novel bio-degradable polymer stabilized Ag/TiO2 nanocomposites and their catalytic activity on reduction of methylene blue under natural sun light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geetha, D; Kavitha, S; Ramesh, P S

    2015-11-01

    In the present work we defined a novel method of TiO2 doped silver nanocomposite synthesis and stabilization using bio-degradable polymers viz., chitosan (Cts) and polyethylene glycol (PEG). These polymers are used as reducing agents. The instant formation of AgNPs was analyzed by visual observation and UV-visible spectrophotometer. TiO2 nanoparticles doped at different concentrations viz., 0.03, 0.06 and 0.09mM on PEG/Cts stabilized silver (0.04wt%) were successfully synthesized. This study presents a simple route for the in situ synthesis of both metal and polymer confined within the nanomaterial, producing ternary hybrid inorganic-organic nanomaterials. The results reveal that they have higher photocatalytic efficiencies under natural sun light. The synthesized TiO2 doped Ag nanocomposites (NCs) were characterized by SEM/EDS, TEM, XRD, FTIR and DLS with zeta potential. The stability of Ag/TiO2 nanocomposite is due to the high negative values of zeta potential and capping of constituents present in the biodegradable polymer which is evident from zeta potential and FT-IR studies. The XRD and EDS pattern of synthesized Ag/TiO2 NCs showed their crystalline structure, with face centered cubic geometry oriented in (111) plane. AFM and DLS studies revealed that the diameter of stable Ag/TiO2 NCs was approximately 35nm. Moreover the catalytic activity of synthesize Ag/TiO2 NCs in the reduction of methylene blue was studied by UV-visible spectrophotometer. The synthesized Ag/TiO2 NCs are observed to have a good catalytic activity on the reduction of methylene blue by bio-degradable which is confirmed by the decrease in absorbance maximum value of methylene blue with respect to time using UV-vis spectrophotometer. The significant enhancement in the photocatalytic activity of Ag/TiO2 nanocomposites under sun light irradiation can be ascribed to the effect of noble metal Ag by acting as electron traps in TiO2 band gap. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  8. Selective catalytic reduction of NOx in lean-burn engine exhaust over a Pt/V/MCM-41 catalyst

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeon, Jong Yeol; Kim, Hee Young; Woo, Seong Ihl

    2003-01-01

    The activities of Pt supported on various metal-substituted MCM-41 (V-, Ti-, Fe-, Al-, Ga-, La-, Co-, Mo-, Ce-, and Zr-MCM-41) and V-impregnated MCM-41 were investigated for the reduction of NO by C 3 H 6 . Among these catalysts, Pt supported on V-impregnated MCM-41 showed the best activity. The maximum conversion of NO into N 2 +N 2 O over this Pt/V/MCM-41 catalyst (Pt=1wt.%, V=3.8wt.%) was 73%, and this maximum conversion was sustained over a temperature range of 70C from 270 to 340C. The high activity of Pt/V/MCM-41 over a broad temperature range resulted from two additional reactions besides the reaction occurring on usual supported Pt, the reaction of NO with surface carbonaceous materials, and the reaction of NO occurring on support V-impregnated MCM-41. The former additional reaction showed an oscillation characteristic, a phenomenon in which the concentrations of parts of reactant and product gases oscillate continuously. At low temperature, some water vapor injected into the reactant gas mixture promoted the reaction occurring on usual supported Pt, whereas at high temperature, it suppressed the additional reaction related to carbonaceous materials. Five-hundred parts per million of SO 2 added to the reactant gas mixture only slightly decreased the NO conversion of Pt/V/MCM-41

  9. Semiconductor physics

    CERN Document Server

    Böer, Karl W

    2018-01-01

    This handbook gives a complete survey of the important topics and results in semiconductor physics. It addresses every fundamental principle and most research topics and areas of application in the field of semiconductor physics. Comprehensive information is provided on crystalline bulk and low-dimensional as well as amporphous semiconductors, including optical, transport, and dynamic properties.

  10. Preparation of zeolite supported TiO{sub 2}, ZnO and ZrO{sub 2} and the study on their catalytic activity in NO{sub x} reduction and 1-pentanol dehydration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fatimah, Is [Chemistry Department, Islamic University of Indonesia Kampus Terpadu UII, Jl. Kaliurang Km 14, Sleman, Yogyakarta (Indonesia)

    2016-03-29

    Preparation of zeolite supported TiO{sub 2}, ZnO and ZrO{sub 2} and their catalytic activity was studied. Activated natural zeolite from Indonesia was utilized for the preparation and catalytic activity test on NO{sub x} reduction by NH{sub 3} and also 1-pentanol dehydration were examined. Physicochemical characterization of materials was studied by x-ray diffraction (XRD) measurement, scanning electron microscope, solid acidity determination and also gas sorption analysis. The results confirmed that the preparation gives some improvements on physicochemical characters suitable for catalysis mechanism in those reactions. Solid acidity and specific surface area contributed significantly to the activity.

  11. Selective catalytic reduction of NO{sub x} with NH{sub 3} over iron-cerium-tungsten mixed oxide catalyst prepared by different methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiong, Zhi-bo, E-mail: xzb328@163.com [School of Energy and Power Engineering, University of Shanghai for Science & Technology, Shanghai 200093 (China); Collaborative Innovation Research Institute, University of Shanghai for Science & Technology, Shanghai 200093 (China); Shanghai Power Equipment Research Institute, Shanghai 200240 (China); Liu, Jing; Zhou, Fei; Liu, Dun-yu; Lu, Wei [School of Energy and Power Engineering, University of Shanghai for Science & Technology, Shanghai 200093 (China); Jin, Jing [School of Energy and Power Engineering, University of Shanghai for Science & Technology, Shanghai 200093 (China); Collaborative Innovation Research Institute, University of Shanghai for Science & Technology, Shanghai 200093 (China); Ding, Shi-fa [Shanghai Power Equipment Research Institute, Shanghai 200240 (China)

    2017-06-01

    Highlights: • Iron-cerium-tungsten mixed oxide catalysts were prepared through three different methods. • The effect of preparation methods on the NH{sub 3}-SCR activity and the surface structure properties of catalyst were investigated. • Iron-cerium-tungsten mixed oxide prepared through microwave irradiation assistant critic acid sol-gel shows higher NH{sub 3}-SCR activity. - Abstract: A series of magnetic Fe{sub 0.85}Ce{sub 0.10}W{sub 0.05}O{sub z} catalysts were synthesized by three different methods(Co-precipitation(Fe{sub 0.85}Ce{sub 0.10}W{sub 0.05}O{sub z}-CP), Hydrothermal treatment assistant critic acid sol-gel method(Fe{sub 0.85}Ce{sub 0.10}W{sub 0.05}O{sub z}-HT) and Microwave irradiation assistant critic acid sol-gel method(Fe{sub 0.85}Ce{sub 0.10}W{sub 0.05}O{sub z}-MW)), and the catalytic activity was evaluated for selective catalytic reduction of NO with NH{sub 3}. The catalyst was characterized by XRD, N{sub 2} adsorption-desorption, XPS, H{sub 2}-TPR and NH{sub 3}-TPD. Among the tested catalysts, Fe{sub 0.85}Ce{sub 0.10}W{sub 0.05}O{sub z}-MW shows the highest NO{sub x} conversion over per gram in unit time with NO{sub x} conversion of 60.8% at 350 °C under a high gas hourly space velocity of 1,200,000 ml/(g h). Different from Fe{sub 0.85}Ce{sub 0.10}W{sub 0.05}O{sub z}-CP catalyst, there exists a large of iron oxide crystallite(γ-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} and α-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}) scattered in Fe{sub 0.85}Ce{sub 0.10}W{sub 0.05}O{sub z} catalysts prepared through hydrothermal treatment or microwave irradiation assistant critic acid sol-gel method, and higher iron atomic concentration on their surface. And Fe{sub 0.85}Ce{sub 0.10}W{sub 0.05}O{sub z}-MW shows higher surface absorbed oxygen concentration and better dispersion compared with Fe{sub 0.85}Ce{sub 0.10}W{sub 0.05}O{sub z}-HT catalyst. These features were favorable for the high catalytic performance of NO reduction with NH{sub 3} over Fe{sub 0.85}Ce{sub 0.10}W{sub 0.05}O{sub z}-MW catalyst.

  12. Optimization of the fluid catalytic cracking unit performance by application of a high motor Octane catalyst and reduction of gasoline vapour pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chavdarov, I.; Stratiev, D.; Shishkova, I.; Dinkov, R.; Petkov, P.

    2013-01-01

    Full text: The fluid catalytic cracking (FCC) gasoline is the main contributor to the refinery gasoline pool in the LUKOIL Neftohim Burgas (LNB) refinery. Next in quantity contributor in the refinery gasoline pool is the reformate. The FCC gasoline sensitivity (MON-RON) is about 12 points. The reformer gasoline sensitivity is 11 points. The high sensitivity of the main contributors to the LNB refinery gasoline pool leads to a shortage in the motor octane number. For that reason a selection of an FCC catalyst that is capable of increasing the motor octane number of the FCC gasoline was performed. The application of this catalyst in the LNB FCC unit has led to an increase of the motor octane number of the FCC gasoline by 0.5 points, which enabled the refinery to increase the production of automotive gasolines by 1.3 % and to increase the share of premium automotive gasoline by 5 %. This had an effect of improvement of the refinery economics by a six figure number of US $ per year. The optimization of the FCC gasoline Reid Vapor Pressure (RVP) during the winter season, consisting in a reduction of the RVP from 60 to 50 kPa and an increase of the FCC C 4 olefins yield, has led to an augmentation of high motor octane number alkylate production. As a result the refinery economics was improved by a five figure number of US $ per year. key words: FCC gasoline motor octane number, gasoline RVP, FCC operation profitability

  13. Influence of flue gas desulfurization (FGD) installations on emission characteristics of PM2.5 from coal-fired power plants equipped with selective catalytic reduction (SCR).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhen; Jiang, Jingkun; Ma, Zizhen; Fajardo, Oscar A; Deng, Jianguo; Duan, Lei

    2017-11-01

    Flue gas desulfurization (FGD) and selective catalytic reduction (SCR) technologies have been widely used to control the emissions of sulphur dioxide (SO 2 ) and nitrogen oxides (NO X ) from coal-fired power plants (CFPPs). Field measurements of emission characteristics of four conventional CFPPs indicated a significant increase in particulate ionic species, increasing PM 2.5 emission with FGD and SCR installations. The mean concentrations of PM 2.5 from all CFPPs tested were 3.79 ± 1.37 mg/m 3 and 5.02 ± 1.73 mg/m 3 at the FGD inlet and outlet, respectively, and the corresponding contributions of ionic species were 19.1 ± 7.7% and 38.2 ± 7.8%, respectively. The FGD was found to enhance the conversion of NH 3 slip from the SCR to NH 4 + in the PM 2.5 , together with the conversion of SO 2 to SO 4 2- , and increased the primary NH 4 + and SO 4 2- aerosol emissions by approximately 18.9 and 4.2 times, respectively. This adverse effect should be considered when updating the emission inventory of CFPPs and should draw the attention of policy-makers for future air pollution control. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Facile approach to synthesize uniform Au@mesoporous SnO{sub 2} yolk–shell nanoparticles and their excellent catalytic activity in 4-nitrophenol reduction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Ya [Changchun University of Science and Technology, School of Chemistry & Environmental Engineering (China); Li, Lu; Wang, Chungang, E-mail: wangcg925@nenu.edu.cn [Northeast Normal University, Faculty of Chemistry (China); Wang, Tingting, E-mail: wangtt@cust.edu.cn [Changchun University of Science and Technology, School of Chemistry & Environmental Engineering (China)

    2016-01-15

    Monodispersed and uniform Au@mesoporous SnO{sub 2} yolk–shell nanoparticles (Au@mSnO{sub 2} yolk–shell NPs) composed of the moveable Au NP cores and mSnO{sub 2} shells have been successfully fabricated via a facile and reproducible approach. The outside mSnO{sub 2} shells of Au@mSnO{sub 2} yolk–shell NPs not only prevent Au NPs from aggregating and corroding by the reaction solution but also allow the Au NPs to contact with reactant molecules easily through the mesoporous channels. The obtained Au@mSnO{sub 2} yolk–shell NPs are characterized by means of transmission electron microscope, scanning electron microscopy, X-ray powder diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectrum, and UV–vis absorption spectroscopy. The synthesized materials exhibit excellent catalytic performance and high stability towards the reduction of 4-nitrophenol with NaBH{sub 4} as a reducing agent, which may be ascribed to their high specific surface area and unique mesoporous structure. Moreover, the synthetic strategy reported in this paper can be extended to fabricate a series of multifunctional noble metal@metal oxide yolk–shell nanocomposite materials with unique properties for various applications.

  15. Promoted V2O5/TiO2 catalysts for selective catalytic reduction of NO with NH3 at low temperatures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Putluru, Siva Sankar Reddy; Schill, Leonhard; Godiksen, Anita

    2016-01-01

    characterized by N2 physisorption, XRPD, NH3-TPD, H2-TPR, Raman, FTIR and EPR spectroscopy to investigate the properties of the catalysts. XRPD, Raman and FTIR showed that promotion with 15 wt.% HPA does not cause V2O5 to be present in crystalline form, also at a loading of 5 wt.% V2O5. Hence, use of HPAs does......The influence of varying the V2O5 content (3–6 wt.%) was studied for the selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of nitrogen oxides by ammonia on heteropoly acid (HPA)- and tungsten oxide (WO3)-promoted V2O5/TiO2 catalysts. The SCR activity and alkali deactivation resistance of HPA-promoted V2O5/TiO2...... catalysts was found to be much higher than for WO3-promoted catalysts. By increasing the vanadium content from 3 to 5 wt.% the catalysts displayed a two fold increase in activity at 225 °C and retained their initial activity after alkali doping at a molar K/V ratio of 0.181. Furthermore, the catalysts were...

  16. Reducing NO(x) emissions from a nitric acid plant of domestic petrochemical complex: enhanced conversion in conventional radial-flow reactor of selective catalytic reduction process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbasfard, Hamed; Hashemi, Seyed Hamid; Rahimpour, Mohammad Reza; Jokar, Seyyed Mohammad; Ghader, Sattar

    2013-01-01

    The nitric acid plant of a domestic petrochemical complex is designed to annually produce 56,400 metric tons (based on 100% nitric acid). In the present work, radial-flow spherical bed reactor (RFSBR) for selective catalytic reduction of nitric oxides (NO(x)) from the stack of this plant was modelled and compared with the conventional radial-flow reactor (CRFR). Moreover, the proficiency of a radial-flow (water or nitrogen) membrane reactor was also compared with the CRFR which was found to be inefficient at identical process conditions. In the RFSBR, the space between the two concentric spheres is filled by a catalyst. A mathematical model, including conservation of mass has been developed to investigate the performance of the configurations. The model was checked against the CRFR in a nitric acid plant located at the domestic petrochemical complex. A good agreement was observed between the modelling results and the plant data. The effects of some important parameters such as pressure and temperature on NO(x) conversion were analysed. Results show 14% decrease in NO(x) emission annually in RFSBR compared with the CRFR, which is beneficial for the prevention of NO(x) emission, global warming and acid rain.

  17. A review of carbon-based and non-carbon-based catalyst supports for the selective catalytic reduction of nitric oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anthonysamy, Shahreen Binti Izwan; Afandi, Syahidah Binti; Khavarian, Mehrnoush; Mohamed, Abdul Rahman Bin

    2018-01-01

    Various types of carbon-based and non-carbon-based catalyst supports for nitric oxide (NO) removal through selective catalytic reduction (SCR) with ammonia are examined in this review. A number of carbon-based materials, such as carbon nanotubes (CNTs), activated carbon (AC), and graphene (GR) and non-carbon-based materials, such as Zeolite Socony Mobil-5 (ZSM-5), TiO 2 , and Al 2 O 3 supported materials, were identified as the most up-to-date and recently used catalysts for the removal of NO gas. The main focus of this review is the study of catalyst preparation methods, as this is highly correlated to the behaviour of NO removal. The general mechanisms involved in the system, the Langmuir-Hinshelwood or Eley-Riedeal mechanism, are also discussed. Characterisation analysis affecting the surface and chemical structure of the catalyst is also detailed in this work. Finally, a few major conclusions are drawn and future directions for work on the advancement of the SCR-NH 3 catalyst are suggested.

  18. Deactivation of La-Fe-ZSM-5 catalyst for selective catalytic reduction of NO with NH{sup 3}. Field study results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qi, Gongshin; Yang, Ralph T. [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Chang, Ramsay; Cardoso, Sylvio [Air Pollution Control, Power Generation, Electric Power Research Institute, Palo Alto, CA 94304-1395 (United States); Smith, Randall A. [Fossil Energy Research Corporation, Laguna Hills, CA 92653 (United States)

    2004-11-08

    Results are summarized for a study on the effects of poisons on the La-Fe-ZSM-5 catalyst activity for the selective catalytic reduction of NO by ammonia. The deactivation of La-Fe-ZSM-5 honeycombs was studied in field tests. A honeycomb catalyst containing 25%La-Fe-ZSM-5 had an overall activity similar to that of a commercial vanadia honeycomb catalyst. Long-term activity test results show that the 25%La-Fe-ZSM-5 catalyst activity decreased to 50% after 300h and 25% after 1769h of on-stream flue gas exposure. The deactivation is correlated to the amounts of poisons deposited on the catalyst. Poisons include alkali and alkaline earth metals, As and Hg. Hg was found to be ion-exchanged from HgCl{sup 2} to form Hg-ZSM-5, and Hg was found to be among the strongest poisons. The poisoning effects of these elements appeared to be additive. Thus, from the chemical analysis of the deactivated catalyst, the deactivation of Fe-ZSM-5 can be predicted.

  19. Ethanol-selective catalytic reduction of NO by Ag/Al2O3 catalysts: Activity and deactivation by alkali salts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schill, Leonhard; Putluru, Siva Sankar Reddy; Jacobsen, Casper Funk

    2012-01-01

    Ag/Al2O3 catalysts with and without potassium doping were prepared by incipient wetness impregnation and characterized by N2 physisorption, XRPD, NH3-TPD and SEM. The influence of the Ag content from 1 to 5 wt.% was investigated for the selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of NO with ethanol. The 3...... wt.% Ag/Al2O3 catalyst was found to be the most active and CO2 selective over a wide temperature window (300–500 ◦C). Addition of 500 ppm of H2 has a mild promotional effect on the activity while SO2 has a strong negative influence on the SCR activity. Furthermore, the Ag/Al2O3 ethanol-SCR catalyst......3 ethanol-SCR catalyst compared to the conventional NH3-SCR catalyst. The still low potassium resistance, in combination with the high sensitivity to SO2, seems not to make these catalysts a real option for biomass fired boilers....

  20. Fe-N-C electrocatalysts for oxygen reduction reaction synthesized by using aniline salt and Fe3+/H2O2 catalytic system

    KAUST Repository

    Bukola, Saheed; Merzougui, Belabbes A.; Akinpelu, Akeem; Laoui, Tahar; Hedhili, Mohamed N.; Swain, Greg M.; Shao, Minhua

    2014-01-01

    Non-precious metal (NPM) catalysts are synthesized by polymerizing aniline salt using an aqueous Fe3+/H2O2 coupled catalytic system on a carbon matrix with a porous creating agent. The sulfur containing compunds such as ammonium peroxydisulfate, are eliminated in this method resulting in a much simpler process. The catalysts' porous structures are enhanced with ammonium carbonate as a sacrificial material that yields voids when decomposed during the heat treatment at 900 °C in N2 atmosphere. Two catalysts Fe-N-C/Vu and Fe-N-C/KB (Vu = Vulcan and KB = Ketjen black) were synthesized and characterized. Their oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) activities were investigated using a rotating ring-disk electrode (RRDE) in both 0.1 M KOH and 0.1 M HClO4. The catalysts show improved ORR activities close to that of Pt-based catalysts, low H2O2 formation and also demonstrated a remarkable tolerance towards methanol oxidation.

  1. Synthesis and kinetics investigation of meso-microporous Cu-SAPO-34 catalysts for the selective catalytic reduction of NO with ammonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jixing; Yu, Fuhong; Liu, Jian; Cui, Lifeng; Zhao, Zhen; Wei, Yuechang; Sun, Qianyao

    2016-10-01

    A series of meso-microporous Cu-SAPO-34 catalysts were successfully synthesized by a one-pot hydrothermal crystallization method, and these catalysts exhibited excellent NH 3 -SCR performance at low temperature. Their structure and physic chemical properties were characterized by means of X-ray diffraction patterns (XRD), Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Transmission electron microscopy (TEM), N 2 sorption-desorption, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), Inductively Coupled Plasma-Atomic Emission spectrometer (ICP-AES), X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XPS), Temperature-programmed desorption of ammonia (NH 3 -TPD), Ultraviolet visible diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (UV-Vis DRS) and Temperature programmed reduction (TPR). The analysis results indicate that the high activities of Cu-SAPO-34 catalysts could be attributed to the enhancement of redox property, the formation of mesopores and the more acid sites. Furthermore, the kinetic results verify that the formation of mesopores remarkably reduces diffusion resistance and then improves the accessibility of reactants to catalytically active sites. The 1.0-Cu-SAPO-34 catalyst exhibited the high NO conversion (>90%) among the wide activity temperature window in the range of 150-425°C. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  2. Fe-N-C electrocatalysts for oxygen reduction reaction synthesized by using aniline salt and Fe3+/H2O2 catalytic system

    KAUST Repository

    Bukola, Saheed

    2014-11-01

    Non-precious metal (NPM) catalysts are synthesized by polymerizing aniline salt using an aqueous Fe3+/H2O2 coupled catalytic system on a carbon matrix with a porous creating agent. The sulfur containing compunds such as ammonium peroxydisulfate, are eliminated in this method resulting in a much simpler process. The catalysts\\' porous structures are enhanced with ammonium carbonate as a sacrificial material that yields voids when decomposed during the heat treatment at 900 °C in N2 atmosphere. Two catalysts Fe-N-C/Vu and Fe-N-C/KB (Vu = Vulcan and KB = Ketjen black) were synthesized and characterized. Their oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) activities were investigated using a rotating ring-disk electrode (RRDE) in both 0.1 M KOH and 0.1 M HClO4. The catalysts show improved ORR activities close to that of Pt-based catalysts, low H2O2 formation and also demonstrated a remarkable tolerance towards methanol oxidation.

  3. Synergy of CuO and CeO2 combination for mercury oxidation under low-temperature selective catalytic reduction atmosphere

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Hailong

    2016-07-19

    Synergy for low temperature Hg0 oxidation under selective catalytic reduction (SCR) atmosphere was achieved when copper oxides and cerium oxides were combined in a CuO-CeO2/TiO2 (CuCeTi) catalyst. Hg0 oxidation efficiency as high as 99.0% was observed on the CuCeTi catalyst at 200 °C, even the gas hourly space velocity was extremely high. To analyze the synergistic effect, comparisons of catalyst performance in the presence of different SCR reaction gases were systematically conducted over CuO/TiO2 (CuTi), CeO2/TiO2 (CeTi) and CuCeTi catalysts prepared by sol-gel method. The interactions between copper oxides and cerium oxides in CuCeTi catalyst yielded more surface chemisorbed oxygen, and facilitated the conversion of gas-phase O2 to surface oxygen, which are favorable for Hg0 oxidation. Copper oxides in the combination interacted with NO forming more chemisorbed oxygen for Hg0 oxidation in the absence of gas-phase O2. Cerium oxides in the combination promoted Hg0 oxidation through enhancing the transformations of NO to NO2. In the absence of NO, NH3 exhibited no inhibitive effect on Hg0 oxidation, because enough Lewis acid sites due to the combination of copper oxides and cerium oxides scavenged the competitive adsorption between NH3 and Hg0. In the presence of NO, although NH3 lowered Hg0 oxidation rate through inducing reduction of oxidized mercury, complete recovery of Hg0 oxidation activity over the CuCeTi catalyst was quickly achieved after cutting off NH3. This study revealed the synergistic effect of the combination of copper oxides and cerium oxides on Hg0 oxidation, and explored the involved mechanisms. Such knowledge would help obtaining maximum Hg0 oxidation co-benefit from SCR units in coal-fired power plants.

  4. Adaptation of HepG2 cells to a steady-state reduction in the content of protein phosphatase 6 (PP6) catalytic subunit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boylan, Joan M. [Department of Pediatrics, Brown University and Rhode Island Hospital, Providence, RI (United States); Salomon, Arthur R. [Department of Molecular Biology, Cell Biology and Biochemistry, Brown University, Providence, RI (United States); Department of Chemistry, Brown University, Providence, RI (United States); Tantravahi, Umadevi [Division of Genetics, Department of Pathology, Brown University and Women and Infants Hospital, Providence, RI (United States); Gruppuso, Philip A., E-mail: philip_gruppuso@brown.edu [Department of Pediatrics, Brown University and Rhode Island Hospital, Providence, RI (United States); Department of Molecular Biology, Cell Biology and Biochemistry, Brown University, Providence, RI (United States)

    2015-07-15

    Protein phosphatase 6 (PP6) is a ubiquitous Ser/Thr phosphatase involved in an array of cellular processes. To assess the potential of PP6 as a therapeutic target in liver disorders, we attenuated expression of the PP6 catalytic subunit in HepG2 cells using lentiviral-transduced shRNA. Two PP6 knock-down (PP6KD) cell lines (90% reduction of PP6-C protein content) were studied in depth. Both proliferated at a rate similar to control cells. However, flow cytometry indicated G2/M cell cycle arrest that was accounted for by a shift of the cells from a diploid to tetraploid state. PP6KD cells did not show an increase in apoptosis, nor did they exhibit reduced viability in the presence of bleomycin or taxol. Gene expression analysis by microarray showed attenuated anti-inflammatory signaling. Genes associated with DNA replication were downregulated. Mass spectrometry-based phosphoproteomic analysis yielded 80 phosphopeptides representing 56 proteins that were significantly affected by a stable reduction in PP6-C. Proteins involved in DNA replication, DNA damage repair and pre-mRNA splicing were overrepresented among these. PP6KD cells showed intact mTOR signaling. Our studies demonstrated involvement of PP6 in a diverse set of biological pathways and an adaptive response that may limit the effectiveness of targeting PP6 in liver disorders. - Highlights: • Lentiviral-transduced shRNA was used to generate a stable knockdown of PP6 in HepG2 cells. • Cells adapted to reduced PP6; cell proliferation was unaffected, and cell survival was normal. • However, PP6 knockdown was associated with a transition to a tetraploid state. • Genomic profiling showed downregulated anti-inflammatory signaling and DNA replication. • Phosphoproteomic profiling showed changes in proteins associated with DNA replication and repair.

  5. Adaptation of HepG2 cells to a steady-state reduction in the content of protein phosphatase 6 (PP6) catalytic subunit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boylan, Joan M.; Salomon, Arthur R.; Tantravahi, Umadevi; Gruppuso, Philip A.

    2015-01-01

    Protein phosphatase 6 (PP6) is a ubiquitous Ser/Thr phosphatase involved in an array of cellular processes. To assess the potential of PP6 as a therapeutic target in liver disorders, we attenuated expression of the PP6 catalytic subunit in HepG2 cells using lentiviral-transduced shRNA. Two PP6 knock-down (PP6KD) cell lines (90% reduction of PP6-C protein content) were studied in depth. Both proliferated at a rate similar to control cells. However, flow cytometry indicated G2/M cell cycle arrest that was accounted for by a shift of the cells from a diploid to tetraploid state. PP6KD cells did not show an increase in apoptosis, nor did they exhibit reduced viability in the presence of bleomycin or taxol. Gene expression analysis by microarray showed attenuated anti-inflammatory signaling. Genes associated with DNA replication were downregulated. Mass spectrometry-based phosphoproteomic analysis yielded 80 phosphopeptides representing 56 proteins that were significantly affected by a stable reduction in PP6-C. Proteins involved in DNA replication, DNA damage repair and pre-mRNA splicing were overrepresented among these. PP6KD cells showed intact mTOR signaling. Our studies demonstrated involvement of PP6 in a diverse set of biological pathways and an adaptive response that may limit the effectiveness of targeting PP6 in liver disorders. - Highlights: • Lentiviral-transduced shRNA was used to generate a stable knockdown of PP6 in HepG2 cells. • Cells adapted to reduced PP6; cell proliferation was unaffected, and cell survival was normal. • However, PP6 knockdown was associated with a transition to a tetraploid state. • Genomic profiling showed downregulated anti-inflammatory signaling and DNA replication. • Phosphoproteomic profiling showed changes in proteins associated with DNA replication and repair

  6. Hybrid selective noncatalytic reduction (SNCR)/selective catalytic reduction (SCR) for NOx removal using low-temperature SCR with Mn-V2O5/TiO2 catalyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Sung-Woo; Choi, Sang-Ki; Bae, Hun-Kyun

    2015-04-01

    A hybrid selective noncatalytic reduction/selective catalytic reduction (SNCR/SCR) system that uses two types of technology, low-temperature SCR process and SNCR process, was designed to develop nitrogen oxide (NOx) reduction technology. SCR was conducted with space velocity (SV)=2400 hr(-1) and hybrid SNCR/SCR with SV=6000 hr(-1), since the study focused on reducing the amount of catalyst and both achieved 98% NOx reduction efficiency. Characteristics of NOx reduction by NH3 were studied for low-temperature SCR system at 150 °C using Mn-V2O5/TiO2 catalyst. Mn-added V2O5/TiO2 catalyst was produced, and selective catalyst reduction of NOx by NH3 was experimented. NOx reduction rate according to added Mn content in Mn-V2O5/TiO2 catalyst was studied with varying conditions of reaction temperature, normalized stoichiometric ratio (NSR), SV, and O2 concentration. In the catalyst experiment according to V2O5 concentration, 1 wt.% V2O5 catalyst showed the highest NOx reduction rate: 98% reduction at temperature window of 200~250 °C. As a promoter of the V2O5 catalyst, 5 wt.% Mn was added, and the catalyst showed 47~90% higher efficiency even with low temperatures, 100~200 °C. Mn-V2O5/TiO2 catalyst, prepared by adding 5 wt.% Mn in V2O5/TiO2 catalyst, showed increments of catalyst activation at 150 °C as well as NOx reduction. Mn-V2O5/TiO2 catalyst showed 8% higher rate for NOx reduction compared with V2O5/TiO2 catalyst in 150 °C SCR. Thus, (5 wt.%)Mn-(1 wt.%)V2O5/TiO2 catalyst was applied in SCR of hybrid SNCR/SCR system of low temperature at 150 °C. Low-temperature SCR hybrid SNCR/SCR (150 °C) system and hybrid SNCR/SCR (350 °C) showed 91~95% total reduction rate with conditions of SV=2400~6000 hr(-1) SCR and 850~1050 °C SNCR, NSR=1.5~2.0, and 5% O2. Hybrid SNCR/SCR (150 °C) system proved to be more effective than the hybrid SNCR/SCR (350 °C) system at low temperature. NOx control is very important, since they are the part of greenhouse gases as well as the

  7. The influence of a silica pillar in lamellar tetratitanate for selective catalytic reduction of NO{sub x} using NH{sub 3}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nogueira da Cunha, Beatriz; Gonçalves, Alécia Maria; Gomes da Silveira, Rafael [Institute of Chemistry, Federal University of Goiás, C. Postal 131, CEP 74001-970 Goiânia, GO (Brazil); Urquieta-González, Ernesto A. [Laboratory of Applied Catalysis, Department of Chemical Engineering, Federal University of Sao Carlos, Rodovia Washington Luis Km 235, C. Postal 676, CEP 13565-905 São Carlos, SP (Brazil); Magalhães Nunes, Liliane, E-mail: lilianemnunes@gmail.com [Institute of Chemistry, Federal University of Goiás, C. Postal 131, CEP 74001-970 Goiânia, GO (Brazil)

    2015-01-15

    Highlights: • Potassium ions significantly affected the SCR. • The introduction of silica in the catalyst promotes the NH{sub 3}-SCR reaction. • The catalysts activities were not significantly influenced by SO{sub 2} addition. - Abstract: Silica-pillared layered titanate (SiO{sub 2}–Ti{sub 4}O{sub 9}) was prepared by intercalating organosilanes into the interlayers of a layered K{sub 2}Ti{sub 4}O{sub 9} followed by calcination at 500 °C. The lamellar titanates produced were used as a support to prepare vanadium catalysts (1 and 2 wt%) through wet impregnation for selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of NO. The catalysts were characterized using nitrogen adsorption (BET), X-ray diffraction (XRD), temperature programmed reduction (H{sub 2}-TPR), nuclear magnetic resonance ({sup 29}Si NMR), and infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR). Reduction of NO by NH{sub 3} was studied in a fixed-bed reactor packed with the catalysts and fed a mixture comprising 1% NH{sub 3}, 1% NO, 10% O{sub 2}, and 34 ppm SO{sub 2} (when used) in helium. The results demonstrate that activity is correlated with the support, i.e., with acidic strength of catalysts. The potassium in the support, K{sub 2}Ti{sub 4}O{sub 9}, significantly affected the reaction and level of vanadium species reduction. The catalyst (1VSiT) with 1 wt% vanadium impregnated on the SiO{sub 2}–Ti{sub 4}O{sub 9} support reduced ∼80% of the NO. Approximately the same conversion rate was generated on the catalyst (2VSiT) with 2 wt% vanadium using the same support. The increased NH{sub 3} adsorption demonstrate that introduction of silica in the catalyst promotes the NH{sub 3}-SCR reaction. More importantly, 2VSiT and 1VSiT were strongly resistant to SO{sub 2} poisoning.

  8. The effect of soot on ammonium nitrate species and NO2 selective catalytic reduction over Cu-zeolite catalyst-coated particulate filter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mihai, Oana; Tamm, Stefanie; Stenfeldt, Marie; Olsson, Louise

    2016-02-28

    A selective catalytic reduction (SCR)-coated particulate filter was evaluated by means of dynamic tests performed using NH3, NO2, O2 and H2O. The reactions were examined both prior to and after soot removal in order to study the effect of soot on ammonium nitrate formation and decomposition, ammonia storage and NO2 SCR. A slightly larger ammonia storage capacity was observed when soot was present in the sample, which indicated that small amounts of ammonia can adsorb on the soot. Feeding of NO2 and NH3 in the presence of O2 and H2O at low temperature (150, 175 and 200°C) leads to a large formation of ammonium nitrate species and during the subsequent temperature ramp using H2O and argon, a production of nitrous oxides was observed. The N2O formation is often related to ammonium nitrate decomposition, and our results showed that the N2O formation was clearly decreased by the presence of soot. We therefore propose that in the presence of soot, there are fewer ammonium nitrate species on the surface due to the interactions with the soot. Indeed, we do observe CO2 production during the reaction conditions also at 150°C, which shows that there is a reaction with these species and soot. In addition, the conversion of NOx due to NO2 SCR was significantly enhanced in the presence of soot; we attribute this to the smaller amount of ammonium nitrate species present in the experiments where soot is available since it is well known that ammonium nitrate formation is a major problem at low temperature due to the blocking of the catalytic sites. Further, a scanning electron microscopy analysis of the soot particles shows that they are about 30-40 nm and are therefore too large to enter the pores of the zeolites. There are likely CuxOy or other copper species available on the outside of the zeolite crystallites, which could have been enhanced due to the hydrothermal treatment at 850°C of the SCR-coated filter prior to the soot loading. We therefore propose that soot is

  9. Synthesis of Superparamagnetic Core-Shell Structure Supported Pd Nanocatalysts for Catalytic Nitrite Reduction with Enhanced Activity, No Detection of Undesirable Product of Ammonium, and Easy Magnetic Separation Capability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Wuzhu; Yang, Weiyi; Xu, Zhengchao; Li, Qi; Shang, Jian Ku

    2016-01-27

    Superparamagnetic nanocatalysts could minimize both the external and internal mass transport limitations and neutralize OH(-) produced in the reaction more effectively to enhance the catalytic nitrite reduction efficiency with the depressed product selectivity to undesirable ammonium, while possess an easy magnetic separation capability. However, commonly used qusi-monodispersed superparamagnetic Fe3O4 nanosphere is not suitable as catalyst support for nitrite reduction because it could reduce the catalytic reaction efficiency and the product selectivity to N2, and the iron leakage could bring secondary contamination to the treated water. In this study, protective shells of SiO2, polymethylacrylic acid, and carbon were introduced to synthesize Fe3O4@SiO2/Pd, Fe3O4@PMAA/Pd, and Fe3O4@C/Pd catalysts for catalytic nitrite reduction. It was found that SiO2 shell could provide the complete protection to Fe3O4 nanosphere core among these shells. Because of its good dispersion, dense structure, and complete protection to Fe3O4, the Fe3O4@SiO2/Pd catalyst demonstrated the highest catalytic nitrite reduction activity without the detection of NH4(+) produced. Due to this unique structure, the activity of Fe3O4@SiO2/Pd catalysts for nitrite reduction was found to be independent of the Pd nanoparticle size or shape, and their product selectivity was independent of the Pd nanoparticle size, shape, and content. Furthermore, their superparamagnetic nature and high saturation magnetization allowed their easy magnetic separation from treated water, and they also demonstrated a good stability during the subsequent recycling experiment.

  10. The Effect of Acidic and Redox Properties of V2O5/CeO2-ZrO2 Catalysts in Selective Catalytic Reduction of NO by NH3

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Putluru, Siva Sankar Reddy; Riisager, Anders; Fehrmann, Rasmus

    2009-01-01

    V2O5 supported ZrO2 and CeO2–ZrO2 catalysts were prepared and characterized by N2 physisorption, XRPD, TPR, and NH3-TPD methods. The influence of calcination temperature from 400 to 600 °C on crystallinity, acidic and redox properties were studied and compared with the catalytic activity...... in the selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of NO with ammonia. The surface area of the catalysts decreased gradually with increasing calcination temperature. The SCR activity of V2O5/ZrO2 catalysts was found to be related with the support crystallinity, whereas V2O5/CeO2–ZrO2 catalysts were also dependent...... on acidic and redox properties of the catalyst. The V2O5/CeO2–ZrO2 catalysts showed high activity and selectivity for reduction of NO with NH3....

  11. New self-assembled material based on Ru nanoparticles and 4-sulfocalix[4]arene as an efficient and recyclable catalyst for reduction of brilliant yellow azo dye in water: a new model catalytic reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rambabu, Darsi; Pradeep, Chullikkattil P.; Dhir, Abhimanew, E-mail: abhimanew@iitmandi.ac.in [Indian Institute of Technology (India)

    2016-12-15

    New self-assembled material (Ru@SC) with ruthenium nanoparticles (Ru NPs) and 4-sulfocalix[4]arene (SC) is synthesized in water at room temperature. Ru@SC is characterized by thermal gravimetric analysis, FT-IR, powder x-ray diffraction, TEM and SEM analysis. The size of Ru nanoparticles in the self-assembly is approximately 5 nm. The self-assembled material Ru@SC shows an efficient catalytic reduction of toxic ‘brilliant yellow’ (BY) azo dye. The reduced amine products were successfully separated and confirmed by single-crystal XRD, NMR and UV-Vis spectroscopy. Ru@SC showed a better catalytic activity in comparison with commercial catalysts Ru/C (ruthenium on charcoal 5 %) and Pd/C (palladium on charcoal 5 and 10 %). The catalyst also showed a promising recyclability and heterogeneous nature as a catalyst for reduction of ‘BY’ azo dye.

  12. Influence on the oxidative potential of a heavy-duty engine particle emission due to selective catalytic reduction system and biodiesel blend.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godoi, Ricardo H M; Polezer, Gabriela; Borillo, Guilherme C; Brown, Andrew; Valebona, Fabio B; Silva, Thiago O B; Ingberman, Aline B G; Nalin, Marcelo; Yamamoto, Carlos I; Potgieter-Vermaak, Sanja; Penteado Neto, Renato A; de Marchi, Mary Rosa R; Saldiva, Paulo H N; Pauliquevis, Theotonio; Godoi, Ana Flavia L

    2016-08-01

    Although the particulate matter (PM) emissions from biodiesel fuelled engines are acknowledged to be lower than those of fossil diesel, there is a concern on the impact of PM produced by biodiesel to human health. As the oxidative potential of PM has been suggested as trigger for adverse health effects, it was measured using the Electron Spin Resonance (OP(ESR)) technique. Additionally, Energy Dispersive X-ray Fluorescence Spectroscopy (EDXRF) was employed to determine elemental concentration, and Raman Spectroscopy was used to describe the amorphous carbon character of the soot collected on exhaust PM from biodiesel blends fuelled test-bed engine, with and without Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR). OP(ESR) results showed higher oxidative potential per kWh of PM produced from a blend of 20% soybean biodiesel and 80% ULSD (B20) engine compared with a blend of 5% soybean biodiesel and 95% ULSD (B5), whereas the SCR was able to reduce oxidative potential for each fuel. EDXRF data indicates a correlation of 0.99 between concentration of copper and oxidative potential. Raman Spectroscopy centered on the expected carbon peaks between 1100cm(-1) and 1600cm(-1) indicate lower molecular disorder for the B20 particulate matter, an indicative of a more graphitic carbon structure. The analytical techniques used in this study highlight the link between biodiesel engine exhaust and increased oxidative potential relative to biodiesel addition on fossil diesel combustion. The EDXRF analysis confirmed the prominent role of metals on free radical production. As a whole, these results suggest that 20% of biodiesel blends run without SCR may pose an increased health risk due to an increase in OH radical generation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Fabrication of Bi-Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}@RGO hybrids and their catalytic performance for the reduction of 4-nitrophenol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Xuefang; Xia, Fengling; Li, Xichuan; Xu, Xiaoyang; Wang, Huan; Yang, Nian; Gao, Jianping, E-mail: jianpinggaols@126.com [Tianjin University, School of Science (China)

    2015-11-15

    Nanocatalysts are frequently connected to magnetic nanoparticles. These composites are easy to be retrieved from the reaction system under a magnetic field because of their magnetic properties. Magnetic separation is particularly promising in industry since it can solve many issues present in filtration, centrifugation, or gravitation separation. Herein, a facile method to prepare bismuth and Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticles loaded on reduced graphene oxide magnetic hybrids (Bi-Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}@RGO) using soluble starch as a dispersant is demonstrated. The magnetic Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticles were synthesized by the co-precipitation of Fe{sup 2+} and Fe{sup 3+} ions, and Bi nanoparticles were fabricated by the redox reactions between sodium borohydride and ammonium bismuth citrate in the presence of soluble starch. Transmission electron microscopy images demonstrate that the average diameter of the Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticles is about 5 nm and the diameters of Bi nanoparticles range from 10 to 20 nm. The magnetic Bi-Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}@RGO hybrids exhibit high catalytic activity in the reduction of 4-nitrophenol (4-NP) to 4-aminophenol (4-AP) by NaBH{sub 4} with a first-order rate constant (K) of 0.00808 s{sup −1} and is magnetically recyclable for at least five cycles. This strategy provides an efficient and recyclable catalyst for the use in environmental protection applications.

  14. Assessment of Malawi's success in child mortality reduction through the lens of the Catalytic Initiative Integrated Health Systems Strengthening programme: Retrospective evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doherty, Tanya; Zembe, Wanga; Ngandu, Nobubelo; Kinney, Mary; Manda, Samuel; Besada, Donela; Jackson, Debra; Daniels, Karen; Rohde, Sarah; van Damme, Wim; Kerber, Kate; Daviaud, Emmanuelle; Rudan, Igor; Muniz, Maria; Oliphant, Nicholas P; Zamasiya, Texas; Rohde, Jon; Sanders, David

    2015-12-01

    Malawi is estimated to have achieved its Millennium Development Goal (MDG) 4 target. This paper explores factors influencing progress in child survival in Malawi including coverage of interventions and the role of key national policies. We performed a retrospective evaluation of the Catalytic Initiative (CI) programme of support (2007-2013). We developed estimates of child mortality using four population household surveys undertaken between 2000 and 2010. We recalculated coverage indicators for high impact child health interventions and documented child health programmes and policies. The Lives Saved Tool (LiST) was used to estimate child lives saved in 2013. The mortality rate in children under 5 years decreased rapidly in the 10 CI districts from 219 deaths per 1000 live births (95% confidence interval (CI) 189 to 249) in the period 1991-1995 to 119 deaths (95% CI 105 to 132) in the period 2006-2010. Coverage for all indicators except vitamin A supplementation increased in the 10 CI districts across the time period 2000 to 2013. The LiST analysis estimates that there were 10 800 child deaths averted in the 10 CI districts in 2013, primarily attributable to the introduction of the pneumococcal vaccine (24%) and increased household coverage of insecticide-treated bednets (19%). These improvements have taken place within a context of investment in child health policies and scale up of integrated community case management of childhood illnesses. Malawi provides a strong example for countries in sub-Saharan Africa of how high impact child health interventions implemented within a decentralised health system with an established community-based delivery platform, can lead to significant reductions in child mortality.

  15. Assessment of Malawi’s success in child mortality reduction through the lens of the Catalytic Initiative Integrated Health Systems Strengthening programme: Retrospective evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanya Doherty

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Malawi is estimated to have achieved its Millennium Development Goal (MDG 4 target. This paper explores factors influencing progress in child survival in Malawi including coverage of interventions and the role of key national policies. We performed a retrospective evaluation of the Catalytic Initiative (CI programme of support (2007–2013. We developed estimates of child mortality using four population household surveys undertaken between 2000 and 2010. We recalculated coverage indicators for high impact child health interventions and documented child health programmes and policies. The Lives Saved Tool (LiST was used to estimate child lives saved in 2013. The mortality rate in children under 5 years decreased rapidly in the 10 CI districts from 219 deaths per 1000 live births (95% confidence interval (CI 189 to 249 in the period 1991–1995 to 119 deaths (95% CI 105 to 132 in the period 2006–2010. Coverage for all indicators except vitamin A supplementation increased in the 10 CI districts across the time period 2000 to 2013. The LiST analysis estimates that there were 10 800 child deaths averted in the 10 CI districts in 2013, primarily attributable to the introduction of the pneumococcal vaccine (24% and increased household coverage of insecticide–treated bednets (19%. These improvements have taken place within a context of investment in child health policies and scale up of integrated community case management of childhood illnesses. Malawi provides a strong example for countries in sub–Saharan Africa of how high impact child health interventions implemented within a decentralised health system with an established community–based delivery platform, can lead to significant reductions in child mortality.

  16. Unique catalytic properties of a butoxy chain-containing ruthenated porphyrin towards oxidation of uric acid and reduction of dioxygen for visible light-enhanced fuel cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Junchen; Wang, Yi; Deng, Qiang; Zhu, Licai; Chao, Hui; Li, Hong

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Ru(II)PTPP/CdS shows two Ru(II)-based oxidation peaks at 0.296 V and 0.830 V. • Photoelectrocatalytic oxidation of UA exhibits good linear responses. • The butoxy chain endows Ru(II)PTPP with multifunctional catalytic properties. • Ru(II)PTPP on CF electrode can remarkably promote the reduction of oxygen. • The assembled cell has I_S_C of 0.136 mA cm"−"2 and P_m_a_x of 31.50 μW cm"−"2. - Abstract: This paper reports the photoelectrocatalytic activities of a ruthenated porphyrin [Ru(phen)_2(IP-C_4O-TPP)]"2"+ (denoted as Ru(II)PTPP, phen = 1,10-phenanthroline, IP = imidazo[4,5-f][1,10]phenanthroline and TPP = 5,10,15,20-tetraphenylporphyrin) containing a covalently-linked butoxy chain (-C_4O-) between IP and TPP moieties by means of various electrochemical techniques in combination with absorption spectroscopy and scanning electronic microscopy. Ru(II)PTPP is assembled on the surface of CdS nanoparticles, showing two Ru(II)-based peaks at 0.296 V and 0.830 V, where uric acid (UA) can be photoelectrocatalytically oxidized in a linear range of 0.01-10.0 mmol L"−"1. The −C_4O- chain endows the Ru(II)PTPP/carbon felt (CF) electrode with favorable dioxygen (O_2) binding sites to achieve a couple of new redox peaks at −0.213 V, where O_2 involves electrocatalytic reduction reactions. While employing 5.0 mmol L"−"1 UA as fuel, and 60 mL min"−"1 O_2 as oxidant, the proposed photoelectrochemical fuel cell shows open-circuit photovoltage of 0.656 V, short-circuit photocurrent density of 0.136 mA cm"−"2, and maximum power density of 31.50 μW cm"−"2 at 0.497 V under visible-light illumination of 0.18 mW cm"−"2. The present study provides an interesting platform for the utilization of renewable energy sources.

  17. An unsaturated metal site-promoted approach to construct strongly coupled noble metal/HNb3O8 nanosheets for efficient thermo/photo-catalytic reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Lijuan; Xia, Yuzhou; Lin, Sen; Liang, Shijing; Wu, Ling

    2017-10-05

    Creating two-dimensional (2D) crystal-metal heterostructures with an ultrathin thickness has spurred increasing research endeavors in catalysis because of its fascinating opportunities in tuning the electronic state at the surface and enhancing the chemical reactivity. Here we report a novel and facile Nb 4+ -assisted strategy for the in situ growth of highly dispersed Pd nanoparticles (NPs) on monolayer HNb 3 O 8 nanosheets (HNb 3 O 8 NS) constituting a 2D Pd/HNb 3 O 8 NS heterostructure composite without using extra reducing agents and stabilizing agents. The Pd NP formation is directed via a redox reaction between an oxidative Pd salt precursor (H 2 PdCl 4 ) and reductive unsaturated surface metal (Nb 4+ ) sites induced by light irradiation on monolayer HNb 3 O 8 NS. The periodic arrangement of metal Nb nodes on HNb 3 O 8 NS leads to a homogeneous distribution of Pd NPs. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations reveal that the direct redox reaction between the Nb 4+ and Pd 2+ ions leads to a strong chemical interaction between the formed Pd metal NPs and the monolayer HNb 3 O 8 support. Consequently, the as-obtained Pd/HNb 3 O 8 composite serves as a highly efficient bifunctional catalyst in both heterogeneous thermocatalytic and photocatalytic selective reduction of aromatic nitro compounds in water under ambient conditions. The achieved high activity originates from the unique 2D nanosheet configuration and in situ Pd incorporation, which leads to a large active surface area, strong metal-support interaction and enhanced charge transport capability. Moreover, this facile Nb 4+ -assisted synthetic route has demonstrated to be general, which can be applied to load other metals such as Au and Pt on monolayer HNb 3 O 8 NS. It is anticipated that this work can extend the facile preparation of noble metal/nanosheet 2D heterostructures, as well as promote the simultaneous capture of duple renewable thermal and photon energy sources to drive an energy efficient

  18. Catalytically supported reduction of emissions from small-scale biomass furnace systems; Katalytisch unterstuetzte Minderung von Emissionen aus Biomasse-Kleinfeuerungsanlagen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hartmann, Ingo; Lenz, Volker; Schenker, Marian; Thiel, Christian [DBFZ Deutsches Biomasseforschungszentrum gemeinnuetzige GmbH, Leipzig (Germany); Kraus, Markus; Matthes, Mirjam; Roland, Ulf [Helmholtz-Zentrum fuer Umweltforschung GmbH - UFZ, Leipzig (Germany); Bindig, Rene; Einicke, Wolf-Dietrich [Leipzig Univ. (Germany)

    2011-06-29

    The increased use of solid biomass in small combustion for generating heat from renewable energy sources is unfortunately associated with increased emissions of airborne pollutants. The reduction is possible on the one hand by the use of high-quality modern furnaces to the latest state of the art. On the other hand, several promising approaches method for retrofitting small-scale furnaces are currently being developed that will allow an effective emission reduction by the subsequent treatment of the exhaust gas. The overview of current available emission control technologies for small-scale biomass combustion plants shows that there is still considerable need for research on the sustainable production of heat from solid biofuels. The amendment to the 1st BImSchV provides a necessary drastic reduction of discharged pollutants from small-scale biomass furnaces. When using the fuel wood in modern central heating boilers the required limits can be met at full load. However, dynamic load changes can cause brief dramatic emission increases even with wood central heating boilers. Firebox and control optimization must contribute in the future to a further reduction of emissions. The typical simple single-room fireplaces like hand-fed wood stoves are suitable under type test conditions to comply the limit values. By contrast, in practical operation, the harmful gas emissions be exceeded without secondary measures normally. The performed experimental investigations show that a reduction of both CO and of organic compounds by catalytic combustion is possible. In addition to developing specially adapted catalysts, it is necessary to provide additional dust separation by combined processes, since conventional catalysts are not suitable for deposition and retention of particulate matter or would lose their activity due to dust accumulation on the active surface, when the catalyst would act as a filter at the same time. To enable sufficiently high reaction temperatures and thus a

  19. Catalytically supported reduction of emissions from small-scale biomass furnace systems; Katalytisch unterstuetzte Minderung von Emissionen aus Biomasse-Kleinfeuerungsanlagen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hartmann, Ingo; Lenz, Volker; Schenker, Marian; Thiel, Christian [DBFZ Deutsches Biomasseforschungszentrum gemeinnuetzige GmbH, Leipzig (Germany); Kraus, Markus; Matthes, Mirjam; Roland, Ulf [Helmholtz-Zentrum fuer Umweltforschung GmbH - UFZ, Leipzig (Germany); Bindig, Rene; Einicke, Wolf-Dietrich [Leipzig Univ. (Germany)

    2011-06-29

    The increased use of solid biomass in small combustion for generating heat from renewable energy sources is unfortunately associated with increased emissions of airborne pollutants. The reduction is possible on the one hand by the use of high-quality modern furnaces to the latest state of the art. On the other hand, several promising approaches method for retrofitting small-scale furnaces are currently being developed that will allow an effective emission reduction by the subsequent treatment of the exhaust gas. The overview of current available emission control technologies for small-scale biomass combustion plants shows that there is still considerable need for research on the sustainable production of heat from solid biofuels. The amendment to the 1st BImSchV provides a necessary drastic reduction of discharged pollutants from small-scale biomass furnaces. When using the fuel wood in modern central heating boilers the required limits can be met at full load. However, dynamic load changes can cause brief dramatic emission increases even with wood central heating boilers. Firebox and control optimization must contribute in the future to a further reduction of emissions. The typical simple single-room fireplaces like hand-fed wood stoves are suitable under type test conditions to comply the limit values. By contrast, in practical operation, the harmful gas emissions be exceeded without secondary measures normally. The performed experimental investigations show that a reduction of both CO and of organic compounds by catalytic combustion is possible. In addition to developing specially adapted catalysts, it is necessary to provide additional dust separation by combined processes, since conventional catalysts are not suitable for deposition and retention of particulate matter or would lose their activity due to dust accumulation on the active surface, when the catalyst would act as a filter at the same time. To enable sufficiently high reaction temperatures and thus a

  20. Reduction of Charge Traps and Stability Enhancement in Solution-Processed Organic Field-Effect Transistors Based on a Blended n-Type Semiconductor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campos, Antonio; Riera-Galindo, Sergi; Puigdollers, Joaquim; Mas-Torrent, Marta

    2018-05-09

    Solution-processed n-type organic field-effect transistors (OFETs) are essential elements for developing large-area, low-cost, and all organic logic/complementary circuits. Nonetheless, the development of air-stable n-type organic semiconductors (OSCs) lags behind their p-type counterparts. The trapping of electrons at the semiconductor-dielectric interface leads to a lower performance and operational stability. Herein, we report printed small-molecule n-type OFETs based on a blend with a binder polymer, which enhances the device stability due to the improvement of the semiconductor-dielectric interface quality and a self-encapsulation. Both combined effects prevent the fast deterioration of the OSC. Additionally, a complementary metal-oxide semiconductor-like inverter is fabricated depositing p-type and n-type OSCs simultaneously.

  1. Influence on the oxidative potential of a heavy-duty engine particle emission due to selective catalytic reduction system and biodiesel blend

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Godoi, Ricardo H.M.; Polezer, Gabriela; Borillo, Guilherme C.; Brown, Andrew; Valebona, Fabio B.; Silva, Thiago O.B.; Ingberman, Aline B.G.; Nalin, Marcelo; Yamamoto, Carlos I.; Potgieter-Vermaak, Sanja; Penteado Neto, Renato A.; Marchi, Mary Rosa R. de; Saldiva, Paulo H.N.; Pauliquevis, Theotonio; Godoi, Ana Flavia L.

    2016-01-01

    Although the particulate matter (PM) emissions from biodiesel fuelled engines are acknowledged to be lower than those of fossil diesel, there is a concern on the impact of PM produced by biodiesel to human health. As the oxidative potential of PM has been suggested as trigger for adverse health effects, it was measured using the Electron Spin Resonance (OP"E"S"R) technique. Additionally, Energy Dispersive X-ray Fluorescence Spectroscopy (EDXRF) was employed to determine elemental concentration, and Raman Spectroscopy was used to describe the amorphous carbon character of the soot collected on exhaust PM from biodiesel blends fuelled test-bed engine, with and without Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR). OP"E"S"R results showed higher oxidative potential per kWh of PM produced from a blend of 20% soybean biodiesel and 80% ULSD (B20) engine compared with a blend of 5% soybean biodiesel and 95% ULSD (B5), whereas the SCR was able to reduce oxidative potential for each fuel. EDXRF data indicates a correlation of 0.99 between concentration of copper and oxidative potential. Raman Spectroscopy centered on the expected carbon peaks between 1100 cm"−"1 and 1600 cm"−"1 indicate lower molecular disorder for the B20 particulate matter, an indicative of a more graphitic carbon structure. The analytical techniques used in this study highlight the link between biodiesel engine exhaust and increased oxidative potential relative to biodiesel addition on fossil diesel combustion. The EDXRF analysis confirmed the prominent role of metals on free radical production. As a whole, these results suggest that 20% of biodiesel blends run without SCR may pose an increased health risk due to an increase in OH radical generation. - Highlights: • PM emission from biodiesel burning may be more harmful to human health than diesel. • Euro V (SCR) engine fuelled with B5 and B20 tested in a bench dynamometer • Electron Spin Resonance (ESR) to access the oxidative potential of PM emission

  2. Influence on the oxidative potential of a heavy-duty engine particle emission due to selective catalytic reduction system and biodiesel blend

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Godoi, Ricardo H.M., E-mail: rhmgodoi@ufpr.br [Environmental Engineering Department, Federal University of Parana, Curitiba, PR (Brazil); Polezer, Gabriela; Borillo, Guilherme C. [Environmental Engineering Department, Federal University of Parana, Curitiba, PR (Brazil); Brown, Andrew [Division of Chemistry and Environmental Science, School of Science and the Environment, Manchester Metropolitan University, Manchester (United Kingdom); Valebona, Fabio B.; Silva, Thiago O.B.; Ingberman, Aline B.G. [Environmental Engineering Department, Federal University of Parana, Curitiba, PR (Brazil); Nalin, Marcelo [LAVIE - Institute of Chemistry, São Paulo State University - UNESP, Araraquara (Brazil); Yamamoto, Carlos I. [Chemical Engineering Department, Federal University of Parana, Curitiba, PR (Brazil); Potgieter-Vermaak, Sanja [Division of Chemistry and Environmental Science, School of Science and the Environment, Manchester Metropolitan University, Manchester (United Kingdom); Penteado Neto, Renato A. [Vehicle Emissions Laboratory, Institute of Technology for Development (LACTEC), Curitiba, PR (Brazil); Marchi, Mary Rosa R. de [Analytical Chemistry Department, Institute of Chemistry, São Paulo State University - UNESP, Araraquara (Brazil); Saldiva, Paulo H.N. [Laboratory of Experimental Air Pollution, Department of Pathology, School of Medicine, University of São Paulo, São Paulo (Brazil); Pauliquevis, Theotonio [Department of Natural and Earth Sciences, Federal University of São Paulo, Diadema (Brazil); Godoi, Ana Flavia L. [Environmental Engineering Department, Federal University of Parana, Curitiba, PR (Brazil)

    2016-08-01

    Although the particulate matter (PM) emissions from biodiesel fuelled engines are acknowledged to be lower than those of fossil diesel, there is a concern on the impact of PM produced by biodiesel to human health. As the oxidative potential of PM has been suggested as trigger for adverse health effects, it was measured using the Electron Spin Resonance (OP{sup ESR}) technique. Additionally, Energy Dispersive X-ray Fluorescence Spectroscopy (EDXRF) was employed to determine elemental concentration, and Raman Spectroscopy was used to describe the amorphous carbon character of the soot collected on exhaust PM from biodiesel blends fuelled test-bed engine, with and without Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR). OP{sup ESR} results showed higher oxidative potential per kWh of PM produced from a blend of 20% soybean biodiesel and 80% ULSD (B20) engine compared with a blend of 5% soybean biodiesel and 95% ULSD (B5), whereas the SCR was able to reduce oxidative potential for each fuel. EDXRF data indicates a correlation of 0.99 between concentration of copper and oxidative potential. Raman Spectroscopy centered on the expected carbon peaks between 1100 cm{sup −1} and 1600 cm{sup −1} indicate lower molecular disorder for the B20 particulate matter, an indicative of a more graphitic carbon structure. The analytical techniques used in this study highlight the link between biodiesel engine exhaust and increased oxidative potential relative to biodiesel addition on fossil diesel combustion. The EDXRF analysis confirmed the prominent role of metals on free radical production. As a whole, these results suggest that 20% of biodiesel blends run without SCR may pose an increased health risk due to an increase in OH radical generation. - Highlights: • PM emission from biodiesel burning may be more harmful to human health than diesel. • Euro V (SCR) engine fuelled with B5 and B20 tested in a bench dynamometer • Electron Spin Resonance (ESR) to access the oxidative potential of

  3. Demonstration of Selective Catalytic Reduction Technology to Control Nitrogen Oxide Emissions From High-Sulfur, Coal-Fired Boilers: A DOE Assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Federal Energy Technology Center

    1999-01-01

    The goal of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Clean Coal Technology (CCT) program is to furnish the energy marketplace with a number of advanced, more efficient, and environmentally responsible coal utilization technologies through demonstration projects. These projects seek to establish the commercial feasibility of the most promising advanced coal technologies that have developed beyond the proof-of-concept stage. This document serves as a DOE post-project assessment of a project selected in CCT Round 2. The project is described in the report ''Demonstration of Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) Technology for the Control of Nitrogen Oxide (NO(sub x)) Emissions from High-Sulfur, Coal-Fired Boilers'' (Southern Company Services 1990). In June 1990, Southern Company Services (Southern) entered into a cooperative agreement to conduct the study. Southern was a cofunder and served as the host at Gulf Power Company's Plant Crist. Other participants and cofunders were EPRI (formerly the Electric Power Research Institute) and Ontario Hydro. DOE provided 40 percent of the total project cost of$23 million. The long-term operation phase of the demonstration was started in July 1993 and was completed in July 1995. This independent evaluation is based primarily on information from Southern's Final Report (Southern Company Services 1996). The SCR process consists of injecting ammonia (NH(sub 3)) into boiler flue gas and passing the 3 flue gas through a catalyst bed where the NO(sub x) and NH(sub 3) react to form nitrogen and water vapor. The objectives of the demonstration project were to investigate: Performance of a wide variety of SCR catalyst compositions, geometries, and manufacturing methods at typical U.S. high-sulfur coal-fired utility operating conditions; Catalyst resistance to poisoning by trace metal species present in U.S. coals but not present, or present at much lower concentrations, in fuels from other countries; and Effects on the balance-of-plant equipment

  4. Semiconductor Manufacturing equipment introduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Im, Jong Sun

    2001-02-01

    This book deals with semiconductor manufacturing equipment. It is comprised of nine chapters, which are manufacturing process of semiconductor device, history of semiconductor manufacturing equipment, kinds and role of semiconductor manufacturing equipment, construction and method of semiconductor manufacturing equipment, introduction of various semiconductor manufacturing equipment, spots of semiconductor manufacturing, technical elements of semiconductor manufacturing equipment, road map of technology of semiconductor manufacturing equipment and semiconductor manufacturing equipment in the 21st century.

  5. Semiconductor spintronics

    CERN Document Server

    Xia, Jianbai; Chang, Kai

    2012-01-01

    Semiconductor Spintronics, as an emerging research discipline and an important advanced field in physics, has developed quickly and obtained fruitful results in recent decades. This volume is the first monograph summarizing the physical foundation and the experimental results obtained in this field. With the culmination of the authors' extensive working experiences, this book presents the developing history of semiconductor spintronics, its basic concepts and theories, experimental results, and the prospected future development. This unique book intends to provide a systematic and modern foundation for semiconductor spintronics aimed at researchers, professors, post-doctorates, and graduate students, and to help them master the overall knowledge of spintronics.

  6. Catalytic treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bindley, W T.R.

    1931-04-18

    An apparatus is described for the catalytic treatment of liquids, semi-liquids, and gases comprising a vessel into which the liquid, semi-liquid, or gas to be treated is introduced through a common inlet to a chamber within the vessel whence it passes to contact with a catalyst through radially arranged channels or passages to a common outlet chamber.

  7. Enhanced catalytic four-electron dioxygen (O2) and two-electron hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) reduction with a copper(II) complex possessing a pendant ligand pivalamido group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakuda, Saya; Peterson, Ryan L; Ohkubo, Kei; Karlin, Kenneth D; Fukuzumi, Shunichi

    2013-05-01

    A copper complex, [(PV-tmpa)Cu(II)](ClO4)2 (1) [PV-tmpa = bis(pyrid-2-ylmethyl){[6-(pivalamido)pyrid-2-yl]methyl}amine], acts as a more efficient catalyst for the four-electron reduction of O2 by decamethylferrocene (Fc*) in the presence of trifluoroacetic acid (CF3COOH) in acetone as compared with the corresponding copper complex without a pivalamido group, [(tmpa)Cu(II)](ClO4)2 (2) (tmpa = tris(2-pyridylmethyl)amine). The rate constant (k(obs)) of formation of decamethylferrocenium ion (Fc*(+)) in the catalytic four-electron reduction of O2 by Fc* in the presence of a large excess CF3COOH and O2 obeyed first-order kinetics. The k(obs) value was proportional to the concentration of catalyst 1 or 2, whereas the k(obs) value remained constant irrespective of the concentration of CF3COOH or O2. This indicates that electron transfer from Fc* to 1 or 2 is the rate-determining step in the catalytic cycle of the four-electron reduction of O2 by Fc* in the presence of CF3COOH. The second-order catalytic rate constant (k(cat)) for 1 is 4 times larger than the corresponding value determined for 2. With the pivalamido group in 1 compared to 2, the Cu(II)/Cu(I) potentials are -0.23 and -0.05 V vs SCE, respectively. However, during catalytic turnover, the CF3COO(-) anion present readily binds to 2 shifting the resulting complex's redox potential to -0.35 V. The pivalamido group in 1 is found to inhibit anion binding. The overall effect is to make 1 easier to reduce (relative to 2) during catalysis, accounting for the relative k(cat) values observed. 1 is also an excellent catalyst for the two-electron two-proton reduction of H2O2 to water and is also more efficient than is 2. For both complexes, reaction rates are greater than for the overall four-electron O2-reduction to water, an important asset in the design of catalysts for the latter.

  8. Semiconductor spintronics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fabian, J.; Abiague, A.M.; Ertler, Ch.; Stano, P.; Zutic, I.

    2007-01-01

    Spintronics refers commonly to phenomena in which the spin of electrons in a solid state environment plays the determining role. In a more narrow sense spintronics is an emerging research field of electronics: spintronics devices are based on a spin control of electronics, or on an electrical and optical control of spin of magnetism. While metal spintronics has already found its niche in the computer industry - giant magnetoresistance systems are used as hard disk read heads - semiconductor spintronics is vet demonstrate its full potential. This review presents selected themes of semiconductor spintronics, introducing important concepts in spin transport, spin transport, spin injection. Silsbee-Johnson spin-charge coupling, and spin-dependent tunneling, as well as spin relaxation and spin dynamics. The most fundamental spin-dependent interaction in nonmagnetic semiconductors is spin-orbit coupling. Depending on the crystal symmetries of the material, as well as on the structural properties of semiconductor based heterostructures, the spin-orbit coupling takes on different functional forms, giving a nice playground of effective spin-orbit Hamiltonians. The effective Hamiltonians for the most relevant classes of materials and heterostructures are derived here from realistic electronic band structure descriptions. Most semiconductor device systems are still theoretical concepts, waiting for experimental demonstrations. A review of selected proposed, and a few demonstrated devices is presented, with detailed description of two important classes: magnetic resonant tunnel structures and bipolar magnetic diodes and transistors. In view of the importance of ferromagnetic semiconductor material, a brief discussion of diluted magnetic semiconductors is included. In most cases the presentation is of tutorial style, introducing the essential theoretical formalism at an accessible level, with case-study-like illustrations of actual experimental results, as well as with brief

  9. TiO2/SiO2 prepared via facile sol-gel method as an ideal support for green synthesis of Ag nanoparticles using Oenothera biennis extract and their excellent catalytic performance in the reduction of 4-nitrophenol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bahar Khodadadi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, the extract of the plant of Oenothera biennis was used to green synthesis of silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs as an environmentally friendly, simple and low cost method. And Additionally, TiO2/SiO2 was prepared via facile sol-gel method using starch as an important, naturally abundant organic polymer as an ideal support. The Ag NPs/TiO2/SiO2 as an effective catalyst was prepared through reduction of Ag+ ions using Oenothera biennis extract as the reducing and stabilizing agent and Ag NPs immobilization on TiO2/SiO2 surface in the absence of any stabilizer or surfactant. Several techniques such as FT-IR spectroscopy, UV-Vis spectroscopy, X-ray Diffraction (XRD, sScanning eElectron mMicroscopy (FE-SEM, Eenergy dDispersive X-ray sSpectroscopy (EDS, and Ttransmission Eelectron Mmicroscopy (TEM were used to characterize TiO2/SiO2, silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs, and Ag NPs/TiO2/SiO2. Moreover, the catalytic activity of the Ag NPs/ TiO2/SiO2 was investigated in the reduction of 4-nitrophenol (4-NP at room temperature. On the basis of the results, the Ag NPs/TiO2/SiO2 was found to be high catalytic activity highly active catalyst according to the experimental results in this study. In addition, Ag NPs/TiO2/SiO2 can be recovered and reused several times in the reduction of 4-NP with no significant loss of catalytic activity.

  10. A Study of Different Doped Metal Cations on the Physicochemical Properties and Catalytic Activities of Ce20 M1 Ox (M=Zr, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Sn) Composite Oxides for Nitric Oxide Reduction by Carbon Monoxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Changshun; Li, Min; Qian, Junning; Hu, Qun; Huang, Meina; Lin, Qingjin; Ruan, Yongshun; Dong, Lihui; Li, Bin; Fan, Minguang

    2016-08-05

    This work is mainly focused on investigating the effects of different doped metal cations on the formation of Ce20 M1 Ox (M=Zr, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Sn) composite oxides and their physicochemical and catalytic properties for NO reduction by CO as a model reaction. The obtained samples were characterized by using N2 physisorption, X-ray diffraction, laser Raman spectroscopy, UV/Vis diffuse reflectance spectroscopy, inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, temperature-programmed reduction by hydrogen and by oxygen (H2 -TPR and O2 -TPD), in situ diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy, and the NO+CO model reaction. The results imply that the introduction of M(x+) into the lattice of CeO2 increases the specific surface area and pore volume, especially for variable valence metal cations, and enhances the catalytic performance to a great extent. In this regard, increases in the oxygen vacancies, reduction properties, and chemisorbed O2 (-) (and/or O(-) ) species of these Ce20 M1 Ox composite oxides (M refers to variable valence metals) play significant roles in this reaction. Among the samples, Ce20 Cr1 Ox exhibited the best catalytic performance, mainly because it has the best reducibility and more chemisorbed oxygen, and significant reasons for these attributes may be closely related to favorable synergistic interactions of the vacancies and near-surface Ce(3+) and Cr(3+) . Finally, a possible reaction mechanism was tentatively proposed to understand the reactions. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Selective catalytic reduction of nitrogen oxides from industrial gases by hydrogen or methane; Reduction catalytique selective des oxydes d'azote (NO{sub x}) provenant d'effluents gazeux industriels par l'hydrogene ou le methane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Engelmann Pirez, M

    2004-12-15

    This work deals with the selective catalytic reduction of nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}), contained in the effluents of industrial plants, by hydrogen or methane. The aim is to replace ammonia, used as reducing agent, in the conventional process. The use of others reducing agents such as hydrogen or methane is interesting for different reasons: practical, economical and ecological. The catalyst has to convert selectively NO into N{sub 2}, in presence of an excess of oxygen, steam and sulfur dioxide. The developed catalyst is constituted by a support such as perovskites, particularly LaCoO{sub 3}, on which are dispersed noble metals (palladium, platinum). The interaction between the noble metal and the support, generated during the activation of the catalyst, allows to minimize the water and sulfur dioxide inhibitor phenomena on the catalytic performances, particularly in the reduction of NO by hydrogen. (O.M.)

  12. Oxide semiconductors

    CERN Document Server

    Svensson, Bengt G; Jagadish, Chennupati

    2013-01-01

    Semiconductors and Semimetals has distinguished itself through the careful selection of well-known authors, editors, and contributors. Originally widely known as the ""Willardson and Beer"" Series, it has succeeded in publishing numerous landmark volumes and chapters. The series publishes timely, highly relevant volumes intended for long-term impact and reflecting the truly interdisciplinary nature of the field. The volumes in Semiconductors and Semimetals have been and will continue to be of great interest to physicists, chemists, materials scientists, and device engineers in academia, scient

  13. Semiconductor statistics

    CERN Document Server

    Blakemore, J S

    1962-01-01

    Semiconductor Statistics presents statistics aimed at complementing existing books on the relationships between carrier densities and transport effects. The book is divided into two parts. Part I provides introductory material on the electron theory of solids, and then discusses carrier statistics for semiconductors in thermal equilibrium. Of course a solid cannot be in true thermodynamic equilibrium if any electrical current is passed; but when currents are reasonably small the distribution function is but little perturbed, and the carrier distribution for such a """"quasi-equilibrium"""" co

  14. Catalytic exhaust control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heinemann, H

    1973-09-01

    Recent achievements and problems in the development of exhaust control devices in the USA are reviewed. To meet the 1976 emission standards, catalytic systems for the oxidation of carbon monoxide and hydrocarbons and for the reduction of nitrogen oxides to nitrogen and water are needed. While oxidizing catalysts using platinum, palladium, copper, vanadium, and chromium appplied on alumina or ceramic materials are more or less effective in emission control, there are no catalytic devices for the reduction of nitrogen oxides with the required useful life of 25,000 to 50,000 miles as yet available. In the case of platinum catalysts on monolithic supports, the operating temperature of 650 to 750/sup 0/C as required for the oxidation process may cause inactivation of the catalysts and fusion of the support material. The oxidation of CO and hydrocarbons is inhibited by high concentrations of CO, nitric oxide, and hydrocarbons. The use of catalytic converters requires the use of lead-free or low-lead gasoline. The nitrogen oxides conversion efficiency is considerably influenced by the oxygen-to-CO ratio of the exhaust gas, which makes limitation of this ratio necessary.

  15. Mn/TiO2 and Mn–Fe/TiO2 catalysts synthesized by deposition precipitation—promising for selective catalytic reduction of NO with NH3 at low temperatures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Putluru, Siva Sankar Reddy; Schill, Leonhard; Jensen, Anker Degn

    2015-01-01

    Mn/TiO2and Mn–Fe/TiO2catalysts have been prepared by impregnation (IMP) and deposition-precipitation (DP) techniques and characterized by N2 physisorption, XRPD, NH3-TPD, H2-TPR, XPS and TGA. 25 wt% Mn0.75Fe0.25Ti-DP catalyst, prepared by deposition precipitation with ammonium carbamate (AC......) as a precipitating agent, showed superior low-temperature SCR (selective catalytic reduction) of NO with NH3. The superior catalytic activity of the 25 wt% Mn0.75Fe0.25Ti-DP catalyst is probably due to the presence of amorphous phases of manganese oxide, iron oxide, high surface area, high total acidity......, acidstrength and ease of reduction of manganese oxide and iron oxide on TiO2in addition to formation of an SCR active MnOx phase with high content of chemisorbed oxygen (Oα). The optimum catalyst might beused as tail-end SCR catalysts in, e.g., biomass-fired power plants and waste incineration plants....

  16. Semiconductor Detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cortina, E.

    2007-01-01

    Particle detectors based on semiconductor materials are among the few devices used for particle detection that are available to the public at large. In fact we are surrounded by them in our daily lives: they are used in photoelectric cells for opening doors, in digital photographic and video camera, and in bar code readers at supermarket cash registers. (Author)

  17. Exmination of catalytic reduction of NO by CH4 in a Pt-polybenimidazole membrane-Pt system with and without polarization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petrushina, Irina; Cleemann, Lars Nilausen; Bjerrum, Niels

    “NO reduction in the NO, CH4, Ar/Pt/C//polybenzimidazole-H3PO4//Pt/C/H2, Ar was studied at 135°C”......“NO reduction in the NO, CH4, Ar/Pt/C//polybenzimidazole-H3PO4//Pt/C/H2, Ar was studied at 135°C”...

  18. Semiconductor sensors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hartmann, Frank

    2011-01-01

    Semiconductor sensors have been around since the 1950s and today, every high energy physics experiment has one in its repertoire. In Lepton as well as Hadron colliders, silicon vertex and tracking detectors led to the most amazing physics and will continue doing so in the future. This contribution tries to depict the history of these devices exemplarily without being able to honor all important developments and installations. The current understanding of radiation damage mechanisms and recent R and D topics demonstrating the future challenges and possible technical solutions for the SLHC detectors are presented. Consequently semiconductor sensor candidates for an LHC upgrade and a future linear collider are also briefly introduced. The work presented here is a collage of the work of many individual silicon experts spread over several collaborations across the world.

  19. Semiconductor Optics

    CERN Document Server

    Klingshirn, Claus F

    2012-01-01

    This updated and enlarged new edition of Semiconductor Optics provides an introduction to and an overview of semiconductor optics from the IR through the visible to the UV, including linear and nonlinear optical properties, dynamics, magneto and electrooptics, high-excitation effects and laser processes, some applications, experimental techniques and group theory. The mathematics is kept as elementary as possible, sufficient for an intuitive understanding of the experimental results and techniques treated. The subjects covered extend from physics to materials science and optoelectronics. Significantly updated chapters add coverage of current topics such as electron hole plasma, Bose condensation of excitons and meta materials. Over 120 problems, chapter introductions and a detailed index make it the key textbook for graduate students in physics. The mathematics is kept as elementary as possible, sufficient for an intuitive understanding of the experimental results and techniques treated. The subjects covered ...

  20. Semiconductor annealing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Young, J.M.; Scovell, P.D.

    1982-01-01

    A process for annealing crystal damage in ion implanted semiconductor devices in which the device is rapidly heated to a temperature between 450 and 900 0 C and allowed to cool. It has been found that such heating of the device to these relatively low temperatures results in rapid annealing. In one application the device may be heated on a graphite element mounted between electrodes in an inert atmosphere in a chamber. (author)

  1. Optically coupled semiconductor device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumagaya, Naoki

    1988-11-18

    This invention concerns an optically coupled semiconductor device using the light as input signal and a MOS transistor for the output side in order to control on-off of the output side by the input signal which is insulated from the output. Concerning this sort of element, when a MOS transistor and a load resistance are planned to be accumulated on the same chip, a resistor and control of impurity concentration of the channel, etc. become necessary despite that the only formation of a simple P-N junction is enough, for a solar cell, hence cost reduction thereof cannot be done. In order to remove this defect, this invention offers an optically coupled semiconductor device featuring that two solar cells are connected in reverse parallel between the gate sources of the output MOS transistors and an operational light emitting element is individually set facing a respective solar cell. 4 figs.

  2. Final Technical Report on Investigation of Selective Non-Catalytic Processes for In-Situ Reduction of NOx and CO Emissions from Marine Gas Turbines and Diesel Engines

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bowman, Craig

    1997-01-01

    .... These observations suggest the possibility of utilizing SNCR for reducing NO(x) emissions from marine gas turbines and Diesel engines by direct injection of a reductant species into the combustion chamber, possibly as a fuel...

  3. Novel selective catalytic reduction with tritium: synthesis of the GABAA receptor radioligand 1-(4-ethynylphenyl)-4-[2,3-3H2]propyl-2,6,7-trioxabicyclo[2.2.2 ]octane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palmer, C.J.; Casida, J.E.

    1991-01-01

    Protection of the terminal alkyne function in 1-(4-ethynylphenyl)-4-(prop-2-enyl)-2,6,7-trioxabicyclo[2.2.2] octane with a trimethylsilyl group permits the selective catalytic reduction of the olefin moiety with tritium gas to give after deprotection 1-(4-ethynylphenyl)-4-[2,3- 3 H 2 ] propyl-2,6,7-trioxabicyclo-[2.2.2] octane. The labeled product at high specific activity is an improved radioligand for the GABA-gated chloride channel of insects and mammals and the intermediate 4-[2,3- 3 H 2 ]propyl-1-[4-[(trimethylsilyl)ethynyl]phenyl]-2,6,7-trioxabicyclo[2.2.2]octane is useful for studies on the metabolic activation of this selective proinsecticide. (author)

  4. Novel selective catalytic reduction with tritium: synthesis of the GABA sub A receptor radioligand 1-(4-ethynylphenyl)-4-(2,3- sup 3 H sub 2 )propyl-2,6,7-trioxabicyclo(2. 2. 2 )octane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palmer, C J; Casida, J E [California Univ., Berkeley, CA (United States). Pesticide Chemistry and Toxicology Lab.

    1991-07-01

    Protection of the terminal alkyne function in 1-(4-ethynylphenyl)-4-(prop-2-enyl)-2,6,7-trioxabicyclo(2.2.2) octane with a trimethylsilyl group permits the selective catalytic reduction of the olefin moiety with tritium gas to give after deprotection 1-(4-ethynylphenyl)-4-(2,3-{sup 3}H{sub 2}) propyl-2,6,7-trioxabicyclo-(2.2.2) octane. The labeled product at high specific activity is an improved radioligand for the GABA-gated chloride channel of insects and mammals and the intermediate 4-(2,3-{sup 3}H{sub 2})propyl-1-(4-((trimethylsilyl)ethynyl)phenyl)-2,6,7-trioxabicyclo(2.2.2)octane is useful for studies on the metabolic activation of this selective proinsecticide. (author).

  5. Green synthesis, characterization and catalytic activity of natural bentonite-supported copper nanoparticles for the solvent-free synthesis of 1-substituted 1H-1,2,3,4-tetrazoles and reduction of 4-nitrophenol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akbar Rostami-Vartooni

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In this study, Cu nanoparticles were immobilized on the surface of natural bentonite using Thymus vulgaris extract as a reducing and stabilizing agent. The natural bentonite-supported copper nanoparticles (Cu NPs/bentonite were characterized by FTIR spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD, X-ray fluorescence (XRF, field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS, transmission electron microscopy (TEM, selected area electron diffraction (SAED and Brunauer–Emmett–Teller (BET analysis. Afterward, the catalytic performance of the prepared catalyst was investigated for the solvent-free synthesis of 1-substituted 1H-1,2,3,4-tetrazoles and reduction of 4-nitrophenol (4-NP in water. It was found that the Cu NPs/bentonite is a highly active and recyclable catalyst for related reactions.

  6. Initial Reduction of CO2 on Pd-, Ru-, and Cu-Doped CeO2(111) Surfaces: Effects of Surface Modification on Catalytic Activity and Selectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Chen; Wei, Shuxian; Zhou, Sainan; Zhang, Tian; Wang, Zhaojie; Ng, Siu-Pang; Lu, Xiaoqing; Wu, Chi-Man Lawrence; Guo, Wenyue

    2017-08-09

    Surface modification by metal doping is an effective treatment technique for improving surface properties for CO 2 reduction. Herein, the effects of doped Pd, Ru, and Cu on the adsorption, activation, and reduction selectivity of CO 2 on CeO 2 (111) were investigated by periodic density functional theory. The doped metals distorted the configuration of a perfect CeO 2 (111) by weakening the adjacent Ce-O bond strength, and Pd doping was beneficial for generating a highly active O vacancy. The analyses of adsorption energy, charge density difference, and density of states confirmed that the doped metals were conducive for enhancing CO 2 adsorption, especially for Cu/CeO 2 (111). The initial reductive dissociation CO 2 → CO* + O* on metal-doped CeO 2 (111) followed the sequence of Cu- > perfect > Pd- > Ru-doped CeO 2 (111); the reductive hydrogenation CO 2 + H → COOH* followed the sequence of Cu- > perfect > Ru- > Pd-doped CeO 2 (111), in which the most competitive route on Cu/CeO 2 (111) was exothermic by 0.52 eV with an energy barrier of 0.16 eV; the reductive hydrogenation CO 2 + H → HCOO* followed the sequence of Ru- > perfect > Pd-doped CeO 2 (111). Energy barrier decomposition analyses were performed to identify the governing factors of bond activation and scission along the initial CO 2 reduction routes. Results of this study provided deep insights into the effect of surface modification on the initial reduction mechanisms of CO 2 on metal-doped CeO 2 (111) surfaces.

  7. Synthesis of TiO2-loaded Co0.85Se thin films with heterostructure and their enhanced catalytic activity for p-nitrophenol reduction and hydrazine hydrate decomposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zuo, Yong; Song, Ji-Ming; Niu, He-Lin; Mao, Chang-Jie; Zhang, Sheng-Yi; Shen, Yu-Hua

    2016-01-01

    P-nitrophenol (4-NP) and hydrazine hydrate are considered to be highly toxic pollutants in wastewater, and it is of great importance to remove them. Herein, TiO 2 -loaded Co 0.85 Se thin films with heterostructure were successfully synthesized by a hydrothermal route. The as-synthesized samples were characterized by x-ray diffraction, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy and selective-area electron diffraction. The results demonstrate that TiO 2 nanoparticles with a size of about 10 nm are easily loaded on the surface of graphene-like Co 0.85 Se nanofilms, and the NH 3  · H 2 O plays an important role in the generation and crystallization of TiO 2 nanoparticles. Brunauer–Emmett–Teller measurement shows that the obtained nanocomposites have a larger specific surface area (199.3 m 2 g −1 ) than that of Co 0.85 Se nanofilms (55.17 m 2 g −1 ) and TiO 2 nanoparticles (19.49 m 2 g −1 ). The catalytic tests indicate Co 0.85 Se–TiO 2 nanofilms have the highest activity for 4-NP reduction and hydrazine hydrate decomposition within 10 min and 8 min, respectively, compared with the corresponding precursor Co 0.85 Se nanofilms and TiO 2 nanoparticles. The enhanced catalytic performance can be attributed to the larger specific surface area and higher rate of interfacial charge transfer in the heterojunction than that of the single components. In addition, recycling tests show that the as-synthesized sample presents stable conversion efficiency for 4-NP reduction. (paper)

  8. Semiconductor annealing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Young, J.M.; Scovell, P.D.

    1981-01-01

    A process for annealing crystal damage in ion implanted semiconductor devices is described in which the device is rapidly heated to a temperature between 450 and 600 0 C and allowed to cool. It has been found that such heating of the device to these relatively low temperatures results in rapid annealing. In one application the device may be heated on a graphite element mounted between electrodes in an inert atmosphere in a chamber. The process may be enhanced by the application of optical radiation from a Xenon lamp. (author)

  9. Magnetic semiconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bihler, Christoph

    2009-04-15

    In this thesis we investigated in detail the properties of Ga{sub 1-x}Mn{sub x}As, Ga{sub 1-x}Mn{sub x}P, and Ga{sub 1-x}Mn{sub x}N dilute magnetic semiconductor thin films with a focus on the magnetic anisotropy and the changes of their properties upon hydrogenation. We applied two complementary spectroscopic techniques to address the position of H in magnetic semiconductors: (i) Electron paramagnetic resonance, which provides direct information on the symmetry of the crystal field of the Mn{sup 2+} atoms and (ii) x-ray absorption fine structure analysis which allows to probe the local crystallographic neighborhood of the absorbing Mn atom via analysing the fine structure at the Mn K absorption edge. Finally, we discussed the obstacles that have to be overcome to achieve Curie temperatures above the current maximum in Ga{sub 1-x}Mn{sub x}As of 185 K. Here, we outlined in detail the generic problem of the formation of precipitates at the example of Ge:MN. (orig.)

  10. Catalytic reduction of NH4NO3 by NO. Effects of solid acids and implications for low temperature DeNOx processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Savara, Aditya; Li, Mei-Jun; Sachtler, Wolfgang M.H.; Weitz, Eric

    2008-01-01

    Ammonium nitrate is thermally stable below 250 C and could potentially deactivate low temperature NO x reduction catalysts by blocking active sites. It is shown that NO reduces neat NH 4 NO 3 above its 170 C melting point, while acidic solids catalyze this reaction even at temperatures below 100 C. NO 2 , a product of the reduction, can dimerize and then dissociate in molten NH 4 NO 3 to NO + + NO 3 - , and may be stabilized within the melt as either an adduct or as HNO 2 formed from the hydrolysis of NO + or N 2 O 4 . The other product of reduction, NH 4 NO 2 , readily decomposes at ≤100 C to N 2 and H 2 O, the desired end products of DeNO x catalysis. A mechanism for the acid catalyzed reduction of NH 4 NO 3 by NO is proposed, with HNO 3 as an intermediate. These findings indicate that the use of acidic catalysts or promoters in DeNO x systems could help mitigate catalyst deactivation at low operating temperatures (<150 C). (author)

  11. Catalytic asymmetric Meerwein-Ponndorf-Verley reduction of glyoxylates induced by a chiral N,N'-dioxide/Y(OTf)3 complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Wangbin; Zou, Sijia; Lin, Lili; Ji, Jie; Zhang, Yuheng; Ma, Baiwei; Liu, Xiaohua; Feng, Xiaoming

    2017-03-18

    An asymmetric Meerwein-Ponndorf-Verley (MPV) reduction of glyoxylates was for the first time accomplished via an N,N'-dioxide/Y(OTf) 3 complex with aluminium alkoxide and molecular sieves (MSs) as crucial additives. A variety of optically active α-hydroxyesters were obtained with excellent results. A possible reaction mechanism was proposed based on the experiments.

  12. Semiconductor Laser Measurements Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Semiconductor Laser Measurements Laboratory is equipped to investigate and characterize the lasing properties of semiconductor diode lasers. Lasing features such...

  13. Bio-hydrogen production based on catalytic reforming of volatiles generated by cellulose pyrolysis: An integrated process for ZnO reduction and zinc nanostructures fabrication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maciel, Adriana Veloso; Job, Aldo Eloizo; Nova Mussel, Wagner da; Brito, Walter de; Duarte Pasa, Vanya Marcia

    2011-01-01

    The paper presents a process of cellulose thermal degradation with bio-hydrogen generation and zinc nanostructures synthesis. Production of zinc nanowires and zinc nanoflowers was performed by a novel processes based on cellulose pyrolysis, volatiles reforming and direct reduction of ZnO. The bio-hydrogen generated in situ promoted the ZnO reduction with Zn nanostructures formation by vapor-solid (VS) route. The cellulose and cellulose/ZnO samples were characterized by thermal analyses (TG/DTG/DTA) and the gases evolved were analyzed by FTIR spectroscopy (TG/FTIR). The hydrogen was detected by TPR (Temperature Programmed Reaction) tests. The results showed that in the presence of ZnO the cellulose thermal degradation produced larger amounts of H 2 when compared to pure cellulose. The process was also carried out in a tubular furnace with N 2 atmosphere, at temperatures up to 900 o C, and different heating rates. The nanostructures growth was catalyst-free, without pressure reduction, at temperatures lower than those required in the carbothermal reduction of ZnO with fossil carbon. The nanostructures were investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The optical properties were investigated by photoluminescence (PL). One mechanism was presented in an attempt to explain the synthesis of zinc nanostructures that are crystalline, were obtained without significant re-oxidation and whose morphologies are dependent on the heating rates of the process. This route presents a potential use as an industrial process taking into account the simple operational conditions, the low costs of cellulose and the importance of bio-hydrogen and nanostructured zinc.

  14. Nitric Oxide Reduction by Carbon Monoxide over Supported Hexaruthenium Cluster Catalysts. 1. The Active Site Structure That Depends on Supporting Metal Oxide and Catalytic Reaction Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minato, Taketoshi; Izumi, Yasuo; Aika, Ken-Ichi; Ishiguro, Atsushi; Nakajima, Takayuki; Wakatsuki, Yasuo

    2003-08-28

    Ruthenium site structures supported on metal oxide surfaces were designed by reacting organometallic Ru cluster [Ru6C(CO)16](2-) or [Ru6(CO)18](2-) with various metal oxides, TiO2, Al2O3, MgO, and SiO2. The surface Ru site structure, formed under various catalyst preparation and reaction conditions, was investigated by the Ru K-edge extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS). Samples of [Ru6C(CO)16](2-)/TiO2(anatase) and [Ru6C(CO)16](2-)/TiO2(rutile) were found to retain the original Ru6C framework when heated in the presence of NO (2.0 kPa) or NO (2.0 kPa) + CO (2.0 kPa) at 423 K, i.e., catalytic reaction conditions for NO decomposition. At 523 K, the Ru-Ru bonds of the Ru6C framework were cleaved by the attack of NO. In contrast, the Ru site became spontaneously dispersed over TiO2 (anatase). When being supported over TiO2 (mesoporous), MgO, or Al2O3, the Ru6C framework split into fragments in gaseous NO or NO + CO even at 423 K. The Ru6 framework of [Ru6(CO)18](2-) was found to break easily into smaller ensembles in the presence of NO and/or CO at 423 K on support. Taking into consideration the realistic environments in which these catalysts will be used, we also examined the effect of water and oxygen. When water was introduced to the sample [Ru6C(CO)16](2-)/TiO2(anatase) at 423 K, it did not have any effects on the stabilized Ru6C framework structure. In the presence of oxygen gas, however, the Ru hexanuclear structure decomposed into isolated Ru cations bound to surface oxygen atoms of TiO2 (anatase).

  15. A novel approach for the synthesis of ultrathin silica-coated iron oxide nanocubes decorated with silver nanodots (Fe3O4/SiO2/Ag) and their superior catalytic reduction of 4-nitroaniline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbas, Mohamed; Torati, Sri Ramulu; Kim, Cheolgi

    2015-07-01

    A novel sonochemical approach was developed for the synthesis of different core/shell structures of Fe3O4/SiO2/Ag nanocubes and SiO2/Ag nanospheres. The total reaction time of the three sonochemical steps for the synthesis of Fe3O4/SiO2/Ag nanocubes is shorter than that of the previously reported methods. A proposed reaction mechanism for the sonochemical functionalization of the silica and the silver on the surface of magnetic nanocubes was discussed in detail. Transmission electron microscopy revealed that the surface of Fe3O4/SiO2 nanocubes was decorated with small Ag nanoparticles of approximately 10-20 nm in size, and the energy dispersive spectroscopy mapping analysis confirmed the morphology of the structure. Additionally, X-ray diffraction data were used to confirm the formation of both phases of a cubic inverse spinel structure for Fe3O4 and bcc structures for Ag in the core/shell structure of the Fe3O4/SiO2/Ag nanocubes. The as-synthesized Fe3O4/SiO2/Ag nanocubes showed a high efficiency in the catalytic reduction reaction of 4-nitroaniline to 4-phenylenediamine and a better performance than both Ag and SiO2/Ag nanoparticles. The grafted silver catalyst was recycled and reused at least fifteen times without a significant loss of catalytic efficiency.A novel sonochemical approach was developed for the synthesis of different core/shell structures of Fe3O4/SiO2/Ag nanocubes and SiO2/Ag nanospheres. The total reaction time of the three sonochemical steps for the synthesis of Fe3O4/SiO2/Ag nanocubes is shorter than that of the previously reported methods. A proposed reaction mechanism for the sonochemical functionalization of the silica and the silver on the surface of magnetic nanocubes was discussed in detail. Transmission electron microscopy revealed that the surface of Fe3O4/SiO2 nanocubes was decorated with small Ag nanoparticles of approximately 10-20 nm in size, and the energy dispersive spectroscopy mapping analysis confirmed the morphology of the

  16. Innovative clean coal technology (ICCT): demonstration of selective catalytic reduction (SCR) technology for the control of nitrogen oxide (NOx) emission from high-sulfur, coal-fired boilers - economic evaluation of commercial-scale SCR applications for utility boilers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Healy, E.C.; Maxwell, J.D.; Hinton, W.S.

    1996-09-01

    This report presents the results of an economic evaluation produced as part of the Innovative Clean Coal Technology project, which demonstrated selective catalytic reduction (SCR) technology for reduction of NO x emissions from utility boilers burning U.S. high-sulfur coal. The document includes a commercial-scale capital and O ampersand M cost evaluation of SCR technology applied to a new facility, coal-fired boiler utilizing high-sulfur U.S. coal. The base case presented herein determines the total capital requirement, fixed and variable operating costs, and levelized costs for a new 250-MW pulverized coal utility boiler operating with a 60-percent NO x removal. Sensitivity evaluations are included to demonstrate the variation in cost due to changes in process variables and assumptions. This report also presents the results of a study completed by SCS to determine the cost and technical feasibility of retrofitting SCR technology to selected coal-fired generating units within the Southern electric system

  17. Semiconductor laser shearing interferometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ming Hai; Li Ming; Chen Nong; Xie Jiaping

    1988-03-01

    The application of semiconductor laser on grating shearing interferometry is studied experimentally in the present paper. The method measuring the coherence of semiconductor laser beam by ion etching double frequency grating is proposed. The experimental result of lens aberration with semiconductor laser shearing interferometer is given. Talbot shearing interferometry of semiconductor laser is also described. (author). 2 refs, 9 figs

  18. Dicationic ionic liquid mediated fabrication of Au@Pt nanoparticles supported on reduced graphene oxide with highly catalytic activity for oxygen reduction and hydrogen evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Ya-Cheng; Chen, Sai-Sai; Feng, Jiu-Ju; Lin, Xiao-Xiao; Wang, Weiping; Wang, Ai-Jun

    2018-05-01

    Ionic liquids as templates or directing agents have attracted great attention for shaping-modulated synthesis of advanced nanomaterials. In this work, reduced graphene oxide supported uniform core-shell Au@Pt nanoparticles (Au@Pt NPs/rGO) were fabricated by a simple one-pot aqueous approach, using N-methylimidazolium-based dicationic ionic liquid (1,1-bis(3-methylimadazoilum-1-yl)butylene bromide, [C4(Mim)2]2Br) as the shape-directing agent. The morphology evolution, structural information and formation mechanism of Au@Pt NPs anchored on rGO were investigated by a series of characterization techniques. The obtained nanocomposites displayed superior electrocatalytic features toward hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) and oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) compared with commercial Pt/C catalyst. This approach provides a novel route for facile synthesis of nanocatalysts in fuel cells.

  19. Selective catalytic reduction of nitric oxide by ethylene over metal-modified ZSM-5- and {gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eraenen, K; Kumar, N; Lindfors, L E [Aabo Akademi, Turku (Finland). Lab. of Industrial Chemistry

    1997-12-31

    Metal-modified ZSM-5 and {gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalysts were tested in reduction of nitric oxide by ethylene. Different metals were introduced into the ZSM-5 catalyst by ion-exchange and by introduction of metals during the zeolite synthesis. To prepare bimetallic catalysts a combination of these methods was used. The {gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} was impregnated with different metals by the incipient wetness technique and by adsorption. Activity measurements showed that the ZSM-5 based catalysts were more active than the {gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} based catalysts. The highest conversion was obtained over a ZSM-5 catalyst prepared by introduction of Pd during synthesis of the zeolite and subsequently ion-exchanged with copper. (author)

  20. Selective catalytic reduction of nitric oxide by ethylene over metal-modified ZSM-5- and {gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eraenen, K.; Kumar, N.; Lindfors, L.E. [Aabo Akademi, Turku (Finland). Lab. of Industrial Chemistry

    1996-12-31

    Metal-modified ZSM-5 and {gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalysts were tested in reduction of nitric oxide by ethylene. Different metals were introduced into the ZSM-5 catalyst by ion-exchange and by introduction of metals during the zeolite synthesis. To prepare bimetallic catalysts a combination of these methods was used. The {gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} was impregnated with different metals by the incipient wetness technique and by adsorption. Activity measurements showed that the ZSM-5 based catalysts were more active than the {gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} based catalysts. The highest conversion was obtained over a ZSM-5 catalyst prepared by introduction of Pd during synthesis of the zeolite and subsequently ion-exchanged with copper. (author)

  1. Intercalation assembly of Li{sub 3}VO{sub 4} nanoribbons/graphene sandwich-structured composites with enhanced oxygen reduction catalytic performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, K.; Ling, Q.N.; Huang, C.H.; Bi, K. [State Key Laboratory of Information Photonics and Optical Communications & School of Science, Beijing University of Posts and Telecommunications, Beijing 100876 (China); Wang, W.J.; Yang, T.Z. [Beijing National Laboratory for Condensed Matter Physics, Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Lu, Y.K. [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Central South University, Changsha, Hunan 410083 (China); Liu, J., E-mail: liujun4982004@csu.edu.cn [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Central South University, Changsha, Hunan 410083 (China); Zhang, R.; Fan, D.Y.; Wang, Y.G. [State Key Laboratory of Information Photonics and Optical Communications & School of Science, Beijing University of Posts and Telecommunications, Beijing 100876 (China); Lei, Ming, E-mail: mlei@bupt.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Information Photonics and Optical Communications & School of Science, Beijing University of Posts and Telecommunications, Beijing 100876 (China)

    2015-10-15

    Novel sandwich-like nanocomposites of alternative stacked ultrathin Li{sub 3}VO{sub 4} nanoribbons and graphene sheets (LVO-G) were successfully developed by a facile intercalation assembly method with a post heating treatment. The characterization results demonstrate that the average size of the Li{sub 3}VO{sub 4} nanoribbons with a non-layered crystal structure is a few micrometers in length, 50–100 nm in width and a few atomic layers in height. The addition of graphene sheets can modify the preferred orientation of the Li{sub 3}VO{sub 4} nanoribbons from (110) to (011) plane and restrict the growth of impurity phase at the same time. In addition, EIS analysis has also verified the reduced resistance and thus the enhance conductivity of LVO-G nanocomposites compared with bare Li{sub 3}VO{sub 4} nanoribbons. What's more, the electrocatalytic performances of these novel LVO-G nanocomposites for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in alkaline solution are further investigated by cyclic voltammetry (CV), rotating disk electrode (RDE) and chronoamperometry test. It is found that the enhanced activity and stability of LVO-G can be attributed to the synergistic effect between the Li{sub 3}VO{sub 4} nanoribbons and graphene sheets with a larger reduction current density and a smaller onset potential value for LVO-G25 compared with LVO-G50 due to the change of components. - Highlights: • Novel sandwich-structured LVO-G by a facile intercalation assembly method. • Addition of G sheets can modify the preferred orientation of Li{sub 3}VO{sub 4} nanoribbon. • Enhanced ORR activity and stability due to synergistic effect are demonstrated.

  2. A Au/Cu2O-TiO2 system for photo-catalytic hydrogen production. A pn-junction effect or a simple case of in situ reduction?

    KAUST Repository

    Sinatra, Lutfan

    2015-02-01

    Photo-catalytic H2 production from water has been studied over Au-Cu2O nanoparticle deposited on TiO2 (anatase) in order to probe into both the plasmon resonance effect (Au nanoparticles) and the pn-junction at the Cu2O-TiO2 interface. The Au-Cu2O composite is in the form of ∼10 nm Au nanoparticles grown on ∼475 nm Cu2O octahedral nanocrystals with (111) facets by partial galvanic replacement. X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) Cu2p and Auger L3M4,5M4,5 lines indicate that the surface of Cu2O is mainly composed of Cu+. The rate for H2 production (from 95 water/5 ethylene glycol; vol.%) over 2 wt.% (Au/Cu2O)-TiO2 is found to be ∼10 times faster than that on 2 wt.% Au-TiO2 alone. Raman spectroscopy before and after reaction showed the disappearance of Cu+ lines (2Eu) at 220 cm-1. These observations coupled with the induction time observed for the reaction rate suggest that in situ reduction from Cu+ to Cu0 occurs upon photo-excitation. The reduction requires the presence of TiO2 (electron transfer). The prolonged activity of the reaction (with no signs of deactivation) despite the reduction to Cu0 indicates that the latter takes part in the reaction by providing additional sites for the reaction, most likely as recombination centers for hydrogen atoms to form molecular hydrogen. This phenomenon provides an additional route for enhancing the efficiency and lifetime of Cu2O-TiO2 photocatalytic systems, beyond the usually ascribed pn-junction effect.

  3. The poisoning effect of PbO on Mn-Ce/TiO{sub 2} catalyst for selective catalytic reduction of NO with NH{sub 3} at low temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Lingling [College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Hunan University, Changsha 410082 (China); Key Laboratory of Environmental Biology and Pollution Control (Hunan University), Ministry of Education, Changsha 410082 (China); Li, Caiting, E-mail: ctli@hnu.edu.cn [College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Hunan University, Changsha 410082 (China); Key Laboratory of Environmental Biology and Pollution Control (Hunan University), Ministry of Education, Changsha 410082 (China); Zhao, Lingkui; Zeng, Guangming; Gao, Lei; Wang, Yan; Yu, Ming’e [College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Hunan University, Changsha 410082 (China); Key Laboratory of Environmental Biology and Pollution Control (Hunan University), Ministry of Education, Changsha 410082 (China)

    2016-12-15

    Highlights: • The poisoning effects of PbO-doped Mn-Ce/TiO{sub 2} catalysts for low temperature NH{sub 3}-SCR were investigated. • Low concentration of Mn{sup 4+} and chemisorbed oxygen (O{sub b}) were not favorable for the generation of intermediates. • The decreased Ce{sup 3+} and less reducible of manganese oxides hindered the redox cycle (Mn{sup 3+} + Ce{sup 4+} ↔ Mn{sup 4+} + Ce{sup 3+}). • The doping of PbO not only altered acid sites but also inhibited ammonia adsorption as well as activation. • The poisoning of PbO resulted in the decrease of ad-NO{sub x} species (only a spot of bidentate nitrates remained). - Abstract: Lead oxide (PbO) as one of the typical heavy metals in flue gas from power plants has strong accumulation as well as poisoning effects on SCR catalysts. In this paper, a series of PbO-doped Mn-Ce/TiO{sub 2} catalysts were synthesized by impregnation method. The poisoning effects of PbO over Mn-Ce/TiO{sub 2} samples for selective catalytic reduction of NO by NH{sub 3} were investigated based on catalytic activity test and characterizations. The NO conversion of Mn-Ce/TiO{sub 2} was greatly decreased after the addition of PbO. It was obvious that the NO conversion efficiency of Mn-Ce/TiO{sub 2} catalyst declined from 96.75% to about 40% at 200 °C when Pb:Mn molar ratio reached 0.5. Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), Hydrogen temperature programmed reduction (H{sub 2}-TPR), Ammonia temperature programmed desorption (NH{sub 3}-TPD) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) were carried out to study the deactivation reasons of PbO poisoned catalysts. Manganese oxides’ crystallization, less reducible of manganese and cerium oxides, the decreasing of surface area, Mn{sup 4+} as well as Ce{sup 3+} concentration and chemisorbed oxygen (O{sub b}) after the introduction of PbO, all of these resulted in a poor SCR performance

  4. Modeling the selective catalytic reduction of NOx by ammonia over a Vanadia-based catalyst from heavy duty diesel exhaust gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yun, Byoung Kyu; Kim, Man Young

    2013-01-01

    A numerical simulation for prediction of NO X conversion over a commercial V 2 O 5 catalyst with NH 3 as a reductant was performed for a heavy duty diesel engine applications. The chemical behaviors of the SCR reactor are described by using the global NO X kinetics including standard, fast, and NH 3 oxidation reactions with the Langmuir–Hinshelwood (LH) mechanism incorporated into the commercial Boost code. After introducing mathematical models for the SCR reaction with specific reaction parameters, the effects of various parameters such as space velocities, the O 2 , H 2 O, NO 2 , and NH 3 concentrations on the NOx conversion are thoroughly studied and validated by comparing with the experimental data available in the literature. It is found that NO X conversion increases with decreasing space velocity, H 2 O concentration, and NH 3 /NO X ratio, and increasing O 2 concentration and NO 2 /NO X ratio. The study shows that not only is the present approach adopted is flexible in treating performance of the commercial V 2 O 5 based SCR catalyst, it is also accurate and efficient for the prediction of NO X conversion in diesel exhaust environments. - Highlights: ► To find the reaction parameters for LH mechanism over a commercial V2O5 catalyst. ► To investigate the effects of various parameters on the SCR NO X conversion. ► To present benchmark solutions on SCR behavior with diesel exhaust environments.

  5. Selective catalytic reduction of NO{sub x} in lean-burn engine exhaust over a Pt/V/MCM-41 catalyst

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeon, Jong Yeol; Kim, Hee Young [Division of Advanced Chemical Technology, Korea Reasearch Institute of Chemical Technology, P.O. Box 107, Yusong, Taejon 305-600 (Korea, Republic of); Woo, Seong Ihl [Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, Center for Ultramicrochemical Process Systems, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, 373-1, Kusong-dong, Yusong-gu, Taejon, 305-701 (Korea, Republic of)

    2003-09-08

    The activities of Pt supported on various metal-substituted MCM-41 (V-, Ti-, Fe-, Al-, Ga-, La-, Co-, Mo-, Ce-, and Zr-MCM-41) and V-impregnated MCM-41 were investigated for the reduction of NO by C{sub 3}H{sub 6}. Among these catalysts, Pt supported on V-impregnated MCM-41 showed the best activity. The maximum conversion of NO into N{sub 2}+N{sub 2}O over this Pt/V/MCM-41 catalyst (Pt=1wt.%, V=3.8wt.%) was 73%, and this maximum conversion was sustained over a temperature range of 70C from 270 to 340C. The high activity of Pt/V/MCM-41 over a broad temperature range resulted from two additional reactions besides the reaction occurring on usual supported Pt, the reaction of NO with surface carbonaceous materials, and the reaction of NO occurring on support V-impregnated MCM-41. The former additional reaction showed an oscillation characteristic, a phenomenon in which the concentrations of parts of reactant and product gases oscillate continuously. At low temperature, some water vapor injected into the reactant gas mixture promoted the reaction occurring on usual supported Pt, whereas at high temperature, it suppressed the additional reaction related to carbonaceous materials. Five-hundred parts per million of SO{sub 2} added to the reactant gas mixture only slightly decreased the NO conversion of Pt/V/MCM-41.

  6. Semiconductor nanostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marstein Erik Stensrud

    2003-07-01

    This thesis presents a study of two material systems containing semiconductor nanocrystals, namely porous silicon (PSi) films and germanium (Ge) nanocrystals embedded in silicon dioxide (SiO2) films. The PSi films were made by anodic etching of silicon (Si) substrates in an electrolyte containing hydrofluoric acid. The PSi films were doped with erbium (Er) using two different doping methods. electrochemical doping and doping by immersing the PSi films in a solution containing Er. The resulting Er concentration profiles were investigated using scanning electron microscopy (SEN1) combined with energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDS). The main subject of the work on PSi presented in this thesis was investigating and comparing these two doping methods. Ge nanocrystals were made by implanting Ge ions into Si02 films that were subsequently annealed. However. nanocrystal formation occurred only for certain sets of processing parameters. The dependence of the microstructure of the Ge implanted Si02 films on the processing parameters were therefore investigated. A range of methods were employed for these investigations, including transmission electron microscopy (TEM) combined with EDS, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS). The observed structures, ranging from Ge nanocrystals to voids with diameters of several tens of nanometers and Ge rich Si02 films without any nanocrystals is described. A model explaining the void formation is also presented. For certain sets of processing parameters. An accumulation of Ge at the Si-Si02 interface was observed. The effect of this accumulation on the electrical properties of MOS structures made from Ge implanted SiO2 films was investigated using CV-measurements. (Author)

  7. Catalytic modification of cellulose and hemicellulose - Sugarefine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Repo, T. [Helsinki Univ. (Finland),Laboratory of Inorganic Chemistry], email: timo.repo@helsinki.fi

    2012-07-01

    The main goal of the project is to develop catalytic methods for the modification of lignocellulose-based saccharides in the biorefineries. The products of these reactions could be used for example as biofuel components, raw materials for the chemical industry, solvents and precursors for biopolymers. The catalyst development aims at creating efficient, selective and green catalytic methods for profitable use in biorefineries. The project is divided in three work packages: In WP1 (Catalytic dehydration of cellulose) the aim is at developing non-toxic, efficient methods for the catalytic dehydration of cellulose the target molecule being here 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (5-HMF). 5-HMF is an interesting platform chemical for the production of fuel additives, solvents and polymers. In WP2 (Catalytic reduction), the objective of the catalytic reduction studies is to produce commercially interesting monofunctional chemicals, such as 1-butanol or 2-methyltetrahydrofuran (2-MeTHF). In WP3 (Catalytic oxidation), the research focuses on developing a green and efficient oxidation method for producing acids. Whereas acetic and formic acids are bulk chemicals, diacids such as glucaric and xylaric acids are valuable specialty chemicals for detergent, polymer and food production.

  8. Catalytic Wittig and aza-Wittig reactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhiqi Lao

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available This review surveys the literature regarding the development of catalytic versions of the Wittig and aza-Wittig reactions. The first section summarizes how arsenic and tellurium-based catalytic Wittig-type reaction systems were developed first due to the relatively easy reduction of the oxides involved. This is followed by a presentation of the current state of the art regarding phosphine-catalyzed Wittig reactions. The second section covers the field of related catalytic aza-Wittig reactions that are catalyzed by both phosphine oxides and phosphines.

  9. Stress-first protocol for myocardial perfusion SPECT imaging with semiconductor cameras: high diagnostic performances with significant reduction in patient radiation doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perrin, Mathieu; Claudin, Marine; Veran, Nicolas; Morel, Olivier; Besseau, Cyril; Boutley, Henri; Djaballah, Wassila; Poussier, Sylvain; Verger, Antoine; Moulin, Frederic; Imbert, Laetitia; Karcher, Gilles; Marie, Pierre-Yves

    2015-01-01

    Effective doses of 14 mSv or higher are currently being attained in patients having stress and rest myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) performed on the same day with conventional protocols. This study aimed to assess the actual reduction in effective doses as well as diagnostic performances for MPI routinely planned with: (1) high-sensitivity cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) cameras, (2) very low injected activities and (3) a stress-first protocol where the normality of stress images may lead to avoiding rest imaging. During a 1-year period, 2,845 patients had MPI on a CZT camera, a single-day stress-first protocol and low injected activities (120 MBq of 99m Tc-sestamibi at stress for 75 kg body weight and threefold higher at rest). The ability to detect > 50 % coronary stenosis was assessed in a subgroup of 149 patients who also had coronary angiography, while the normalcy rate was assessed in a subgroup of 128 patients with a low pretest likelihood of coronary artery disease (<10 %). Overall, 33 % of patients had abnormal MPI of which 34 % were women and 34 % were obese. The mean effective doses and the percentage of exams involving only stress images were: (1) 3.53 ± 2.10 mSv and 37 % in the overall population, (2) 4.83 ± 1.56 mSv and 5 % in the subgroup with angiography and (3) 1.96 ± 1.52 mSv and 71 % in the low-probability subgroup. Sensitivity and global accuracy for identifying the 106 patients with coronary stenosis were 88 and 80 %, respectively, while the normalcy rate was 97 %. When planned with a low-dose stress-first protocol on a CZT camera, MPI provides high diagnostic performances and a dramatic reduction in patient radiation doses. This reduction is even greater in low-risk subgroups with high rates of normal stress images, thus allowing the mean radiation dose to be balanced against cardiac risk in targeted populations. (orig.)

  10. Fundamentals of semiconductor devices

    CERN Document Server

    Lindmayer, Joseph

    1965-01-01

    Semiconductor properties ; semiconductor junctions or diodes ; transistor fundamentals ; inhomogeneous impurity distributions, drift or graded-base transistors ; high-frequency properties of transistors ; band structure of semiconductors ; high current densities and mechanisms of carrier transport ; transistor transient response and recombination processes ; surfaces, field-effect transistors, and composite junctions ; additional semiconductor characteristics ; additional semiconductor devices and microcircuits ; more metal, insulator, and semiconductor combinations for devices ; four-pole parameters and configuration rotation ; four-poles of combined networks and devices ; equivalent circuits ; the error function and its properties ; Fermi-Dirac statistics ; useful physical constants.

  11. Platinum nanoparticles on gallium nitride surfaces: effect of semiconductor doping on nanoparticle reactivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schäfer, Susanne; Wyrzgol, Sonja A; Caterino, Roberta; Jentys, Andreas; Schoell, Sebastian J; Hävecker, Michael; Knop-Gericke, Axel; Lercher, Johannes A; Sharp, Ian D; Stutzmann, Martin

    2012-08-01

    Platinum nanoparticles supported on n- and p-type gallium nitride (GaN) are investigated as novel hybrid systems for the electronic control of catalytic activity via electronic interactions with the semiconductor support. In situ oxidation and reduction were studied with high pressure photoemission spectroscopy. The experiments revealed that the underlying wide-band-gap semiconductor has a large influence on the chemical composition and oxygen affinity of supported nanoparticles under X-ray irradiation. For as-deposited Pt cuboctahedra supported on n-type GaN, a higher fraction of oxidized surface atoms was observed compared to cuboctahedral particles supported on p-type GaN. Under an oxygen atmosphere, immediate oxidation was recorded for nanoparticles on n-type GaN, whereas little oxidation was observed for nanoparticles on p-type GaN. Together, these results indicate that changes in the Pt chemical state under X-ray irradiation depend on the type of GaN doping. The strong interaction between the nanoparticles and the support is consistent with charge transfer of X-ray photogenerated free carriers at the semiconductor-nanoparticle interface and suggests that GaN is a promising wide-band-gap support material for photocatalysis and electronic control of catalysis.

  12. Composite nanomaterials of semiconductors and noble metals as plasmonic photocatalysts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engelbrekt, Christian; Law, Matt; Zhang, Jingdong

    behavior, and can be more stable under operating conditions. Composite photocatalysts of semiconductor nanoparticles (SNPs) and PNPs exploit broadly the solar spectrum, provide new catalytic routes and expand the scope of solar photocatalysis. The newly initiated project aims at developing composite...

  13. In situ IR studies of Co and Ce doped Mn/TiO{sub 2} catalyst for low-temperature selective catalytic reduction of NO with NH{sub 3}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qiu, Lu; Pang, Dandan; Zhang, Changliang; Meng, Jiaojiao; Zhu, Rongshu; Ouyang, Feng, E-mail: ouyangfh@hit.edu.cn

    2015-12-01

    Highlights: • A SCR mechanistic pathway over Mn–Co–Ce/TiO{sub 2} is proposed. • The cobalt oxide produces lots of Brønsted acid sites, which favor to the adsorption of coordinated NH{sub 3} through NH{sub 3} migration. • Ce addition improves amide ions formation to reach best NO reduction selectivity. • At low-temperature coordinated NH{sub 3} reacts with NO{sub 2}{sup −}, or amide reacts with NO (ad) or NO (g) to form N{sub 2}. At high temperature, the reaction also occurs between coordinated NH{sub 3} and nitrate species. - Abstract: The Mn–Co–Ce/TiO{sub 2} catalyst was prepared by wet co-impregnation method for selective catalytic reduction of NO by NH{sub 3} in the presence of oxygen. The adsorption and co-adsorption of NH{sub 3}, NO and O{sub 2} on catalysts were investigated by in situ FTIR spectroscopy. The results suggested that addition of cobalt and cerium oxides increased the numbers of acid and redox sites. Especially, the cobalt oxide produced lots of Brønsted acid sites, which favor to the adsorption of coordinated NH{sub 3} through NH{sub 3} migration. Ce addition improved amide ions formation to reach best NO reduction selectivity. A mechanistic pathway over Mn–Co–Ce/TiO{sub 2} was proposed. At low-temperature SCR reaction, coordinated NH{sub 3} reacted with NO{sub 2}{sup −}, and amide reacted with NO (ad) or NO (g) to form N{sub 2}. NO{sub 2} was related to the formation of nitrite on Co-contained catalysts and the generation of −NH{sub 2}{sup −} on Ce-contained catalysts. At high temperature, the other branch reaction also occurred between the coordinated NH{sub 3} and nitrate species, resulting in N{sub 2}O yield increase.

  14. Preparation of Cu/La{sub 2}O{sub 3}-ZrO{sub 2}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalyst and its catalytic properties for selective reduction of NO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xi-kun Guo; Ping-ping Xie; Shu-dong Lin [Shantou University, Shantou (China). Department of Chemistry

    2008-12-15

    An La{sub 2}O{sub 3}-ZrO{sub 2}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} composite support was prepared by co-precipitation with the mixed aqueous solution of La(NO{sub 3}{sub 3}, Al(NO{sub 3){sub 3}, and ZrOCl{sub 2} dropping into the precipitant of (NH{sub 4})2CO{sub 3} aqueous solution. The Cu/La{sub 2}O{sub 3}-ZrO{sub 2}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalyst was prepared by the impregnation of La{sub 2}O{sub 3}-ZrO{sub 2}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} with active component Cu{sup 2+} aqueous solution. The effects of the catalyst on the selective catalytic reduction of NO with propylene in excess oxygen were investigated. The relationships between the preparation method, structure and properties of the Cu/La{sub 2}O{sub 3}-ZrO{sub 2}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalyst were also explored by means of scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), surface area measurements (BET), pyridine absorption infrared spectrum (Py-IR), thermal gravimetry (TG), and temperature-programmed reduction (TPR). The results indicate that the support {gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} prepared by Al(NO{sub 3})3 dropping into (NH{sub 4}{sub 2} CO{sub 3} can remarkably enlarge the surface area; the addition of La{sub 2}O{sub 3} contributes mainly to the enhancement of the thermal stability; and the introduction of ZrO{sub 2} can increase the amount of Lewis and Broenstead acid. Consequently, the catalyst Cu/La{sub 2}O{sub 3}-ZrO{sub 2}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} has excellent activity for the selective reduction of NO with propylene in excess oxygen. NO conversion is up to 88.9% at 300{sup o}C and 81.9% even at the presence of 10% volume fraction of water vapor. 15 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  15. Solid spectroscopy: semiconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, C.E.T.G. da

    1983-01-01

    Photoemission as technique of study of the semiconductor electronic structure is shortly discussed. Homogeneous and heterogeneous semiconductors, where volume and surface electronic structure, core levels and O and H chemisorption in GaAs, Schottky barrier are treated, respectively. Amorphous semiconductors are also discussed. (L.C.) [pt

  16. Demonstration of Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) technology for the control of nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}) emissions from high-sulfur coal-fired boilers. Technical progress report, first and second quarters 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-11-01

    The objective of this project is to demonstrate and evaluate commercially available Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) catalysts from U.S., Japanese and European catalyst suppliers on a high-sulfur U.S. coal-fired boiler. SCR is a post-combustion nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}) control technology that involve injecting ammonia into the flue gas generated from coal combustion in a boiler. The flue gas containing ammonia is then passed through a reactor that contains a specialized catalyst. In the presence of the catalyst, the ammonia reacts with NO{sub x} to form nitrogen and water vapor. Although SCR is widely practiced in Japan and Europe on gas-, oil-, and low-sulfur coal-fired boilers, there are several technical uncertainties associated with applying SCR to U.S. coals. These uncertainties include: (1) potential catalyst deactivation due to poisoning by trace metal species present in U.S. coals that are not present in other fuels; (2) performance of the technology and effects on the balance-of-plant equipment in the presence of high amounts of SO{sub 2} and SO{sub 3}; and (3) performance of a wide variety of SCR catalyst compositions, geometries and methods of manufacture under typical high-sulfur coal-fired utility operating conditions. These uncertainties are being explored by operating a series of small-scale SCR reactors and simultaneously exposing different SCR catalysts to flue gas derived from the combustion of high sulfur U.S. coal. The project is being conducted in the following three phases: permitting, environmental monitoring plan and preliminary engineering; detailed design engineering and construction; and operation, testing, disposition and final report. The project was in the operation and testing phase during this reporting period. Accomplishments for this period are described.

  17. Innovative Clean Coal Technology (ICCT): Demonstration of selective catalytic reduction (SCR) technology for the control of nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}) emissions from high-sulfur coal-fired boilers. Technical progress report, third and fourth quarters 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-11-01

    The objective of this project is to demonstrate and evaluate commercially available selective catalytic reduction (SCR) catalysts from U.S., Japanese, and European catalyst suppliers on a high-sulfur U.S. Coal-fired boiler. SCR is a post-combustion nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}) control technology that involves injecting ammonia into the flue gas generated from coal combustion in an electric utility boiler. The flue gas containing ammonia is then passed through a reactor that contains a specialized catalyst. In the presence of the catalyst, the ammonia reacts with NO{sub x} to form nitrogen and water vapor. Although SCR is widely practiced in Japan and European gas-, oil-, and low-sulfur coal-fired boilers, there are several technical uncertainties associated with applying SCR to U.S. coals. These uncertainties include: (1) potential catalyst deactivation due to poisoning by trace metal species present in U.S. coals that are not present in other fuels; (2) performance of the technology and effects on the balance-of-plant equipment in the presence of high amounts of SO{sub 2} and SO{sub 3}; performance of a wide variety of SCR catalyst compositions, geometries, and methods of manufacture under typical high-sulfur coal-fired utility operating conditions. These uncertainties are being explored by operating a series of small- scale SCR reactors and simultaneously exposing different SCR catalysts to flue gas derived from the combustion of high sulfur U.S. coal. The demonstration is being performed at Gulf Power Company`s Plant Crist Unit No. 5 (75 MW capacity) near Pensacola, Florida. The project is funded by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Southern Company Services, Inc. (SCS on behalf of the entire Southern electric system), the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), and Ontario Hydro. SCS is the participant responsible for managing al aspects of this project. 1 ref., 69 figs., 45 tabs.

  18. Ion implantation for semiconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grey-Morgan, T.

    1995-01-01

    Full text: Over the past two decades, thousands of particle accelerators have been used to implant foreign atoms like boron, phosphorus and arsenic into silicon crystal wafers to produce special embedded layers for manufacturing semiconductor devices. Depending on the device required, the atomic species, the depth of implant and doping levels are the main parameters for the implantation process; the selection and parameter control is totally automated. The depth of the implant, usually less than 1 micron, is determined by the ion energy, which can be varied between 2 and 600 keV. The ion beam is extracted from a Freeman or Bernas type ion source and accelerated to 60 keV before mass analysis. For higher beam energies postacceleration is applied up to 200 keV and even higher energies can be achieved by mass selecting multiplycharged ions, but with a corresponding reduction in beam output. Depending on the device to be manufactured, doping levels can range from 10 10 to 10 15 atoms/cm 2 and are controlled by implanter beam currents in the range up to 30mA; continuous process monitoring ensures uniformity across the wafer of better than 1 % . As semiconductor devices get smaller, additional sophistication is required in the design of the implanter. The silicon wafers charge electrically during implantation and this charge must be dissipated continuously to reduce the electrical stress in the device and avoid destructive electrical breakdown. Electron flood guns produce low energy electrons (below 10 electronvolts) to neutralize positive charge buildup and implanter design must ensure minimum contamination by other isotopic species and ensure low internal sputter rates. The pace of technology in the semiconductor industry is such that implanters are being built now for 256 Megabit circuits but which are only likely to be widely available five years from now. Several specialist companies manufacture implanter systems, each costing around US$5 million, depending on the

  19. Twin defects engineered Pd cocatalyst on C3N4 nanosheets for enhanced photocatalytic performance in CO2 reduction reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Qingqing; Hu, Wenli; Zhou, Penghui; Huang, Tianlong; Zhong, Shuxian; Yang, Lining; Chen, Jianrong; Bai, Song

    2017-12-01

    Photocatalytic conversion of CO2 to value-added chemicals, a potential route to addressing the depletion of fossil fuels and anthropogenic climate change, is greatly limited by the low-efficient semiconductor photocatalyst. The integration of cocatalyst with light-harvesting semiconductor is a promising approach to enhancing the photocatalytic performance in CO2 reduction reaction. The enhancement is greatly determined by the catalytic active sites on the surface of cocatalyst. Herein, we demonstrate that the photocatalytic performance in the CO2 reduction reaction is greatly promoted by twin defects engineered Pd cocatalyst. In this work, Pd nanoicosahedrons with twin defects were in situ grown on C3N4 nanosheets, which effectively improve the photocatalytic performance in reduction of CO2 to CO and CH4 in comparison with Pd nanotetrahedrons without twin defects. It is proposed that the twin boundary (TB) terminations on the surface of Pd cocatalysts are highly catalytic active sites for CO2 reduction reaction. Based on the proposed mechanism, the photocatalytic activity and selectivity in CO2 reduction were further advanced through reducing the size of Pd icosahedral cocatalyst resulted from the increased surface density of TB terminations. The defect engineering on the surface of cocatalyst represents a novel route in realizing high-performance photocatalytic applications.

  20. Characterization and study of reduction and sulfurization processing in phase transition from molybdenum oxide (MoO{sub 2}) to molybdenum disulfide (MoS{sub 2}) chalcogenide semiconductor nanoparticles prepared by one-stage chemical reduction method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shomalian, K.; Bagheri-Mohagheghi, M.M.; Ardyanian, M. [Damghan University, School of Physics, Damghan (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2017-01-15

    In this research, molybdenum disulfide (MoS{sub 2}) nanoparticles were prepared by chemical reduction method using MoO{sub 3} and thiourea as a precursor. The physical properties of the synthesized MoO{sub 2}-MoS{sub 2} nanoparticles annealed at different temperatures of 200, 300, 750 C have been investigated, before and after exposure to sulfur vapor. The nanostructure of nanoparticles has been characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) analyses and UV-Vis spectrophotometer. The X-ray diffraction analysis showed the formation of MoS{sub 2} single phase at annealing temperature of 750 C in the presence of sulfur vapor. The Raman spectrum of the nanoparticles revealed that the formation of MoS{sub 2} at 750 C after annealing in sulfur vapor. The values of band gap were obtained in the range of 3.64-3.17 eV and 3.47-1.95 eV for MoS{sub 2} nanoparticles before and after exposure to sulfur vapor, respectively. According to SEM images, the grain size decreases with increasing annealing temperature up to 750 C. Also, nanoplate-nanoparticles of MoS{sub 2} are formed at annealing temperature of 200-750 C. The TEM images of MoS{sub 2} nanoparticles at T{sub a} = 750 C confirm that the nanoparticles have a homogeneous distribution with a hexagonal structure. The FTIR spectra of the MoS{sub 2} nanoparticles showed the peaks at about 467 cm {sup -1} belong to the characteristic bands of Mo-S. (orig.)

  1. Compound Semiconductor Radiation Detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Y. K.; Park, S. H.; Lee, W. G.; Ha, J. H.

    2005-01-01

    In 1945, Van Heerden measured α, β and γ radiations with the cooled AgCl crystal. It was the first radiation measurement using the compound semiconductor detector. Since then the compound semiconductor has been extensively studied as radiation detector. Generally the radiation detector can be divided into the gas detector, the scintillator and the semiconductor detector. The semiconductor detector has good points comparing to other radiation detectors. Since the density of the semiconductor detector is higher than that of the gas detector, the semiconductor detector can be made with the compact size to measure the high energy radiation. In the scintillator, the radiation is measured with the two-step process. That is, the radiation is converted into the photons, which are changed into electrons by a photo-detector, inside the scintillator. However in the semiconductor radiation detector, the radiation is measured only with the one-step process. The electron-hole pairs are generated from the radiation interaction inside the semiconductor detector, and these electrons and charged ions are directly collected to get the signal. The energy resolution of the semiconductor detector is generally better than that of the scintillator. At present, the commonly used semiconductors as the radiation detector are Si and Ge. However, these semiconductor detectors have weak points. That is, one needs thick material to measure the high energy radiation because of the relatively low atomic number of the composite material. In Ge case, the dark current of the detector is large at room temperature because of the small band-gap energy. Recently the compound semiconductor detectors have been extensively studied to overcome these problems. In this paper, we will briefly summarize the recent research topics about the compound semiconductor detector. We will introduce the research activities of our group, too

  2. Semiconductor apparatus and method of fabrication for a semiconductor apparatus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    2010-01-01

    The invention relates to a semiconductor apparatus (1) and a method of fabrication for a semiconductor apparatus (1), wherein the semiconductor apparatus (1) comprises a semiconductor layer (2) and a passivation layer (3), arranged on a surface of the semiconductor layer (2), for passivating the

  3. Catalytic Organometallic Reactions of Ammonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klinkenberg, Jessica L.

    2012-01-01

    Until recently, ammonia had rarely succumbed to catalytic transformations with homogeneous catalysts, and the development of such reactions that are selective for the formation of single products under mild conditions has encountered numerous challenges. However, recently developed catalysts have allowed several classes of reactions to create products with nitrogen-containing functional groups from ammonia. These reactions include hydroaminomethylation, reductive amination, alkylation, allylic substitution, hydroamination, and cross-coupling. This Minireview describes examples of these processes and the factors that control catalyst activity and selectivity. PMID:20857466

  4. Reduced semiconductor three-level interline dynamic voltage restorer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Lei; Loh, Poh Chang; Gao, Feng

    2011-01-01

    IDVR system are mainly attributed to its complexity in topology and underutilizations of semiconductors. Aimed to improve the system in these aspects, the paper proposes a new IDVR topology with 25% reduction in semiconductors totally used. The theoretical analysis and its operating principles are also...

  5. Semiconductor Physical Electronics

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Sheng

    2006-01-01

    Semiconductor Physical Electronics, Second Edition, provides comprehensive coverage of fundamental semiconductor physics that is essential to an understanding of the physical and operational principles of a wide variety of semiconductor electronic and optoelectronic devices. This text presents a unified and balanced treatment of the physics, characterization, and applications of semiconductor materials and devices for physicists and material scientists who need further exposure to semiconductor and photonic devices, and for device engineers who need additional background on the underlying physical principles. This updated and revised second edition reflects advances in semicondutor technologies over the past decade, including many new semiconductor devices that have emerged and entered into the marketplace. It is suitable for graduate students in electrical engineering, materials science, physics, and chemical engineering, and as a general reference for processing and device engineers working in the semicondi...

  6. Catalytic production of biodiesel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Theilgaard Madsen, A.

    2011-07-01

    The focus of this thesis is the catalytic production of diesel from biomass, especially emphasising catalytic conversion of waste vegetable oils and fats. In chapter 1 an introduction to biofuels and a review on different catalytic methods for diesel production from biomass is given. Two of these methods have been used industrially for a number of years already, namely the transesterification (and esterification) of oils and fats with methanol to form fatty acid methyl esters (FAME), and the hydrodeoxygenation (HDO) of fats and oils to form straight-chain alkanes. Other possible routes to diesel include upgrading and deoxygenation of pyrolysis oils or aqueous sludge wastes, condensations and reductions of sugars in aqueous phase (aqueous-phase reforming, APR) for monofunctional hydrocarbons, and gasification of any type of biomass followed by Fischer-Tropsch-synthesis for alkane biofuels. These methods have not yet been industrialised, but may be more promising due to the larger abundance of their potential feedstocks, especially waste feedstocks. Chapter 2 deals with formation of FAME from waste fats and oils. A range of acidic catalysts were tested in a model fat mixture of methanol, lauric acid and trioctanoin. Sulphonic acid-functionalised ionic liquids showed extremely fast convertion of lauric acid to methyl laurate, and trioctanoate was converted to methyl octanoate within 24 h. A catalyst based on a sulphonated carbon-matrix made by pyrolysing (or carbonising) carbohydrates, so-called sulphonated pyrolysed sucrose (SPS), was optimised further. No systematic dependency on pyrolysis and sulphonation conditions could be obtained, however, with respect to esterification activity, but high activity was obtained in the model fat mixture. SPS impregnated on opel-cell Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and microporous SiO{sub 2} (ISPS) was much less active in the esterification than the original SPS powder due to low loading and thereby low number of strongly acidic sites on the

  7. Contacts to semiconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tove, P.A.

    1975-08-01

    Contacts to semiconductors play an important role in most semiconductor devices. These devices range from microelectronics to power components, from high-sensitivity light or radiation detectors to light-emitting of microwave-generating components. Silicon is the dominating material but compound semiconductors are increasing in importance. The following survey is an attempt to classify contact properties and the physical mechanisms involved, as well as fabrication methods and methods of investigation. The main interest is in metal-semiconductor type contacts where a few basic concepts are dealt with in some detail. (Auth.)

  8. Semiconductor Electrical Measurements Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Semiconductor Electrical Measurements Laboratory is a research laboratory which complements the Optical Measurements Laboratory. The laboratory provides for Hall...

  9. A Au/Cu2O-TiO2 system for photo-catalytic hydrogen production. A pn-junction effect or a simple case of in situ reduction?

    KAUST Repository

    Sinatra, Lutfan; LaGrow, Alec P.; Peng, Wei; Kirmani, Ahmad R.; Amassian, Aram; Idriss, Hicham; Bakr, Osman

    2015-01-01

    Photo-catalytic H2 production from water has been studied over Au-Cu2O nanoparticle deposited on TiO2 (anatase) in order to probe into both the plasmon resonance effect (Au nanoparticles) and the pn-junction at the Cu2O-TiO2 interface. The Au-Cu2O

  10. Catalytic hydrogenation of carbon monoxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wayland, B.B.

    1993-12-01

    Focus of this project is on developing new approaches for hydrogenation of carbon monoxide to produce organic oxygenates at mild conditions. The strategies to accomplish CO reduction are based on favorable thermodynamics manifested by rhodium macrocycles for producing a series of intermediates implicated in the catalytic hydrogenation of CO. Metalloformyl complexes from reactions of H 2 and CO, and CO reductive coupling to form metallo α-diketone species provide alternate routes to organic oxygenates that utilize these species as intermediates. Thermodynamic and kinetic-mechanistic studies are used in guiding the design of new metallospecies to improve the thermodynamic and kinetic factors for individual steps in the overall process. Electronic and steric effects associated with the ligand arrays along with the influences of the reaction medium provide the chemical tools for tuning these factors. Non-macrocyclic ligand complexes that emulate the favorable thermodynamic features associated with rhodium macrocycles, but that also manifest improved reaction kinetics are promising candidates for future development

  11. Semiconductors data handbook

    CERN Document Server

    Madelung, Otfried

    2004-01-01

    This volume Semiconductors: Data Handbook contains frequently used data from the corresponding larger Landolt-Börnstein handbooks in a low price book for the individual scientist working in the laboratory. The Handbook contain important information about a large number of semiconductors

  12. Semiconductor radiation detection systems

    CERN Document Server

    2010-01-01

    Covers research in semiconductor detector and integrated circuit design in the context of medical imaging using ionizing radiation. This book explores other applications of semiconductor radiation detection systems in security applications such as luggage scanning, dirty bomb detection and border control.

  13. Spin physics in semiconductors

    CERN Document Server

    Dyakonov, Mikhail I

    2008-01-01

    This book describes beautiful optical and transport phenomena related to the electron and nuclear spins in semiconductors with emphasis on a clear presentation of the physics involved. Recent results on quantum wells and quantum dots are reviewed. The book is intended for students and researchers in the fields of semiconductor physics and nanoelectronics.

  14. SHORT COMMUNICATION CATALYTIC KINETIC ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    IV) catalyzes the discoloring reaction of DBS-arsenazo oxidized by potassium bromate, a new catalytic kinetic spectrophotometric method for the determination of trace titanium (IV) was developed. The linear range of the determination of ...

  15. Catalytic distillation process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, L.A. Jr.

    1982-06-22

    A method is described for conducting chemical reactions and fractionation of the reaction mixture comprising feeding reactants to a distillation column reactor into a feed zone and concurrently contacting the reactants with a fixed bed catalytic packing to concurrently carry out the reaction and fractionate the reaction mixture. For example, a method for preparing methyl tertiary butyl ether in high purity from a mixed feed stream of isobutene and normal butene comprising feeding the mixed feed stream to a distillation column reactor into a feed zone at the lower end of a distillation reaction zone, and methanol into the upper end of said distillation reaction zone, which is packed with a properly supported cationic ion exchange resin, contacting the C[sub 4] feed and methanol with the catalytic distillation packing to react methanol and isobutene, and concurrently fractionating the ether from the column below the catalytic zone and removing normal butene overhead above the catalytic zone.

  16. Compound Semiconductor Radiation Detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Owens, Alan

    2012-01-01

    Although elemental semiconductors such as silicon and germanium are standard for energy dispersive spectroscopy in the laboratory, their use for an increasing range of applications is becoming marginalized by their physical limitations, namely the need for ancillary cooling, their modest stopping powers, and radiation intolerance. Compound semiconductors, on the other hand, encompass such a wide range of physical and electronic properties that they have become viable competitors in a number of applications. Compound Semiconductor Radiation Detectors is a consolidated source of information on all aspects of the use of compound semiconductors for radiation detection and measurement. Serious Competitors to Germanium and Silicon Radiation Detectors Wide-gap compound semiconductors offer the ability to operate in a range of hostile thermal and radiation environments while still maintaining sub-keV spectral resolution at X-ray wavelengths. Narrow-gap materials offer the potential of exceeding the spectral resolutio...

  17. Terahertz semiconductor nonlinear optics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Turchinovich, Dmitry; Hvam, Jørn Märcher; Hoffmann, Matthias

    2013-01-01

    In this proceedings we describe our recent results on semiconductor nonlinear optics, investigated using single-cycle THz pulses. We demonstrate the nonlinear absorption and self-phase modulation of strong-field THz pulses in doped semiconductors, using n-GaAs as a model system. The THz...... nonlinearity in doped semiconductors originates from the near-instantaneous heating of free electrons in the ponderomotive potential created by electric field of the THz pulse, leading to ultrafast increase of electron effective mass by intervalley scattering. Modification of effective mass in turn leads...... to a decrease of plasma frequency in semiconductor and produces a substantial modification of THz-range material dielectric function, described by the Drude model. As a result, the nonlinearity of both absorption coefficient and refractive index of the semiconductor is observed. In particular we demonstrate...

  18. Organic semiconductor crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chengliang; Dong, Huanli; Jiang, Lang; Hu, Wenping

    2018-01-22

    Organic semiconductors have attracted a lot of attention since the discovery of highly doped conductive polymers, due to the potential application in field-effect transistors (OFETs), light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) and photovoltaic cells (OPVs). Single crystals of organic semiconductors are particularly intriguing because they are free of grain boundaries and have long-range periodic order as well as minimal traps and defects. Hence, organic semiconductor crystals provide a powerful tool for revealing the intrinsic properties, examining the structure-property relationships, demonstrating the important factors for high performance devices and uncovering fundamental physics in organic semiconductors. This review provides a comprehensive overview of the molecular packing, morphology and charge transport features of organic semiconductor crystals, the control of crystallization for achieving high quality crystals and the device physics in the three main applications. We hope that this comprehensive summary can give a clear picture of the state-of-art status and guide future work in this area.

  19. Catalytic distillation structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, L.A. Jr.

    1984-04-17

    Catalytic distillation structure is described for use in reaction distillation columns, and provides reaction sites and distillation structure consisting of a catalyst component and a resilient component intimately associated therewith. The resilient component has at least about 70 volume % open space and is present with the catalyst component in an amount such that the catalytic distillation structure consists of at least 10 volume % open space. 10 figs.

  20. Photochemical decomposition of H2O and HN3 using colloidal semiconductor catalysts as a method of tritium recovery from water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monserrat, K.J.; D'Souza, L.M.

    1985-02-01

    Colloidal semiconductor redox catalysts were used to accelerate the photodecomposition of water and ammonia in aqueous solution. Parameters that affect overall catalytic efficiency, e.g. support material, doping and surface modification, were investigated

  1. Heterogeneous nanocomposites composed of silver sulfide and hollow structured Pd nanoparticles with enhanced catalytic activity toward formic acid oxidation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Dong; Cui, Penglei; Liu, Hui; Yang, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Core–shell Ag-Ag/Pd nanoparticles with an Ag core and an Ag/Pd alloy shell are prepared via galvanic replacement reaction. • Heterogeneous Ag2S-hollow Pd nanocomposites are fabricated by converting the Ag component into Ag2S using element sulfur. • The heterogeneous Ag2S-hollow Pd nanocomposites display enhanced activity for formic acid oxidation due to electronic coupling effect. • The methodology may find applications to produce the semiconductor-metal nanocomposites with interesting architectures and tailored functionalities. - Abstract: Nanocomposites consisting semiconductor and noble metal domains are of great interest for their synergistic effect-based enhanced properties in a given application. Herein, we demonstrate a facile approach for the synthesis of heterogeneous nanocomposites consisting of silver sulfide (Ag 2 S) and hollow structured Pd nanoparticles (hPd). It begins with the preparation of core–shell nanoparticles with an Ag core and an alloy Ag/Pd shell in an organic solvent via galvanic replacement reaction (GRR) between Ag seed particles pre-synthesized and Pd 2+ ion precursors. The Ag component is then removed from the core and shell regions of core–shell Ag-Ag/Pd nanoparticles, and converted into Ag 2 S by elemental sulfur (S). The Ag 2 S forms the semiconductor domain in the nanocomposite and shares the solid-state interface with the resultant hollow structured Pd nanoparticle. As demonstrated, the Ag 2 S-hPd nanocomposites exhibit superior catalytic activity and durability for formic acid oxidation, compared to the pure Pd nanoparticles prepared by oleylamine reduction of Pd ion precursors and commercial Pd/C catalyst, due to the electronic coupling between semiconductor and noble metal domains in the nanocomposites. In addition, the structural transformation from core–shell to heterogeneous nanocomposites may provide new opportunities to design and fabricate hybrid nanostructures with interesting

  2. Defects in semiconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pimentel, C.A.F.

    1983-01-01

    Some problems openned in the study of defects in semiconductors are presented. In particular, a review is made of the more important problems in Si monocrystals of basic and technological interest: microdefects and the presence of oxigen and carbon. The techniques usually utilized in the semiconductor material characterization are emphatized according its potentialities. Some applications of x-ray techniques in the epitaxial shell characterization in heterostructures, importants in electronic optics, are shown. The increase in the efficiency of these defect analysis methods in semiconductor materials with the use of synchrotron x-ray sources is shown. (L.C.) [pt

  3. Introduction to Semiconductor Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brennan, Kevin F.

    2005-03-01

    This volume offers a solid foundation for understanding the most important devices used in the hottest areas of electronic engineering today, from semiconductor fundamentals to state-of-the-art semiconductor devices in the telecommunications and computing industries. Kevin Brennan describes future approaches to computing hardware and RF power amplifiers, and explains how emerging trends and system demands of computing and telecommunications systems influence the choice, design and operation of semiconductor devices. In addition, he covers MODFETs and MOSFETs, short channel effects, and the challenges faced by continuing miniaturization. His book is both an excellent senior/graduate text and a valuable reference for practicing engineers and researchers.

  4. Spin physics in semiconductors

    CERN Document Server

    2017-01-01

    This book offers an extensive introduction to the extremely rich and intriguing field of spin-related phenomena in semiconductors. In this second edition, all chapters have been updated to include the latest experimental and theoretical research. Furthermore, it covers the entire field: bulk semiconductors, two-dimensional semiconductor structures, quantum dots, optical and electric effects, spin-related effects, electron-nuclei spin interactions, Spin Hall effect, spin torques, etc. Thanks to its self-contained style, the book is ideally suited for graduate students and researchers new to the field.

  5. Physics of semiconductor lasers

    CERN Document Server

    Mroziewicz, B; Nakwaski, W

    2013-01-01

    Written for readers who have some background in solid state physics but do not necessarily possess any knowledge of semiconductor lasers, this book provides a comprehensive and concise account of fundamental semiconductor laser physics, technology and properties. The principles of operation of these lasers are therefore discussed in detail with the interrelations between their design and optical, electrical and thermal properties. The relative merits of a large number of laser structures and their parameters are described to acquaint the reader with the various aspects of the semiconductor l

  6. Semiconductors bonds and bands

    CERN Document Server

    Ferry, David K

    2013-01-01

    As we settle into this second decade of the twenty-first century, it is evident that the advances in micro-electronics have truly revolutionized our day-to-day lifestyle. The technology is built upon semiconductors, materials in which the band gap has been engineered for special values suitable to the particular application. This book, written specifically for a one semester course for graduate students, provides a thorough understanding of the key solid state physics of semiconductors. It describes how quantum mechanics gives semiconductors unique properties that enabled the micro-electronics revolution, and sustain the ever-growing importance of this revolution.

  7. Defects in semiconductors

    CERN Document Server

    Romano, Lucia; Jagadish, Chennupati

    2015-01-01

    This volume, number 91 in the Semiconductor and Semimetals series, focuses on defects in semiconductors. Defects in semiconductors help to explain several phenomena, from diffusion to getter, and to draw theories on materials' behavior in response to electrical or mechanical fields. The volume includes chapters focusing specifically on electron and proton irradiation of silicon, point defects in zinc oxide and gallium nitride, ion implantation defects and shallow junctions in silicon and germanium, and much more. It will help support students and scientists in their experimental and theoret

  8. Catalytic nanoporous membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellin, Michael J; Hryn, John N; Elam, Jeffrey W

    2013-08-27

    A nanoporous catalytic membrane which displays several unique features Including pores which can go through the entire thickness of the membrane. The membrane has a higher catalytic and product selectivity than conventional catalysts. Anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) membranes serve as the catalyst substrate. This substrate is then subjected to Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD), which allows the controlled narrowing of the pores from 40 nm to 10 nm in the substrate by deposition of a preparatory material. Subsequent deposition of a catalytic layer on the inner surfaces of the pores reduces pore sizes to less than 10 nm and allows for a higher degree of reaction selectivity. The small pore sizes allow control over which molecules enter the pores, and the flow-through feature can allow for partial oxidation of reactant species as opposed to complete oxidation. A nanoporous separation membrane, produced by ALD is also provided for use in gaseous and liquid separations. The membrane has a high flow rate of material with 100% selectivity. Also provided is a method for producing a catalytic membrane having flow-through pores and discreet catalytic clusters adhering to the inside surfaces of the pores.

  9. Biggest semiconductor installed

    CERN Multimedia

    2008-01-01

    Scientists and technicians at the European Laboratory for Particle Physics, commonly known by its French acronym CERN (Centre Europen pour la Recherche Nuclaire), have completed the installation of the largest semiconductor silicon detector.

  10. Compact semiconductor lasers

    CERN Document Server

    Yu, Siyuan; Lourtioz, Jean-Michel

    2014-01-01

    This book brings together in a single volume a unique contribution by the top experts around the world in the field of compact semiconductor lasers to provide a comprehensive description and analysis of the current status as well as future directions in the field of micro- and nano-scale semiconductor lasers. It is organized according to the various forms of micro- or nano-laser cavity configurations with each chapter discussing key technical issues, including semiconductor carrier recombination processes and optical gain dynamics, photonic confinement behavior and output coupling mechanisms, carrier transport considerations relevant to the injection process, and emission mode control. Required reading for those working in and researching the area of semiconductors lasers and micro-electronics.

  11. Radiation effects in semiconductors

    CERN Document Server

    2011-01-01

    There is a need to understand and combat potential radiation damage problems in semiconductor devices and circuits. Written by international experts, this book explains the effects of radiation on semiconductor devices, radiation detectors, and electronic devices and components. These contributors explore emerging applications, detector technologies, circuit design techniques, new materials, and innovative system approaches. The text focuses on how the technology is being used rather than the mathematical foundations behind it. It covers CMOS radiation-tolerant circuit implementations, CMOS pr

  12. Market survey of semiconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mackintosh, I.M.; Diegel, D.; Brown, A.; Brinker, C.S. den

    1977-06-01

    Examination of technology and product trends over the range of current and future products in integrated circuits and optoelectronic displays. Analysis and forecast of major economic influences that affect the production costs of integrated circuits and optoelectronic displays. Forecast of the applications and markets for integrated circuits up to 1985 in West Europe, the USA and Japan. Historic development of the semiconductor industry and the prevailing tendencies - factors which influence success in the semiconductor industry. (orig.) [de

  13. Electronic properties of semiconductor heterostructures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Einevoll, G.T.

    1991-02-01

    Ten papers on the electronic properties of semiconductors and semiconductor heterostructures constitute the backbone of this thesis. Four papers address the form and validity of the single-band effective mass approximation for semiconductor heterostructures. In four other papers properties of acceptor states in bulk semiconductors and semiconductor heterostructures are studied using the novel effective bond-orbital model. The last two papers deal with localized excitions. 122 refs

  14. Steam reformer with catalytic combustor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voecks, Gerald E. (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    A steam reformer is disclosed having an annular steam reforming catalyst bed formed by concentric cylinders and having a catalytic combustor located at the center of the innermost cylinder. Fuel is fed into the interior of the catalytic combustor and air is directed at the top of the combustor, creating a catalytic reaction which provides sufficient heat so as to maintain the catalytic reaction in the steam reforming catalyst bed. Alternatively, air is fed into the interior of the catalytic combustor and a fuel mixture is directed at the top. The catalytic combustor provides enhanced radiant and convective heat transfer to the reformer catalyst bed.

  15. Selective catalytic oxidation of ammonia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leppaelahti, J; Koljonen, T [VTT Energy, Espoo (Finland)

    1997-12-31

    In the combustion of fossil fuels, the principal source of nitrogen oxides is nitrogen bound in the fuel structure. In gasification, a large part of fuel nitrogen forms NH{sub 3}, which may form nitrogen oxides during gas combustion. If NH{sub 3} and other nitrogen species could be removed from hot gas, the NO emission could be considerably reduced. However, relatively little attention has been paid to finding new means of removing nitrogen compounds from the hot gasification gas. The possibility of selectively oxidizing NH{sub 3} to N{sub 2} in the hot gasification has been studied at VTT Energy. The largest NH{sub 3} reductions have been achieved by catalytic oxidation on aluminium oxides. (author) (4 refs.)

  16. Studies of Catalytic Model Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holse, Christian

    The overall topic of this thesis is within the field of catalysis, were model systems of different complexity have been studied utilizing a multipurpose Ultra High Vacuum chamber (UHV). The thesis falls in two different parts. First a simple model system in the form of a ruthenium single crystal...... of the Cu/ZnO nanoparticles is highly relevant to industrial methanol synthesis for which the direct interaction of Cu and ZnO nanocrystals synergistically boost the catalytic activity. The dynamical behavior of the nanoparticles under reducing and oxidizing environments were studied by means of ex situ X......-ray Photoelectron Electron Spectroscopy (XPS) and in situ Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM). The surface composition of the nanoparticles changes reversibly as the nanoparticles exposed to cycles of high-pressure oxidation and reduction (200 mbar). Furthermore, the presence of metallic Zn is observed by XPS...

  17. Selective catalytic oxidation of ammonia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leppaelahti, J.; Koljonen, T. [VTT Energy, Espoo (Finland)

    1996-12-31

    In the combustion of fossil fuels, the principal source of nitrogen oxides is nitrogen bound in the fuel structure. In gasification, a large part of fuel nitrogen forms NH{sub 3}, which may form nitrogen oxides during gas combustion. If NH{sub 3} and other nitrogen species could be removed from hot gas, the NO emission could be considerably reduced. However, relatively little attention has been paid to finding new means of removing nitrogen compounds from the hot gasification gas. The possibility of selectively oxidizing NH{sub 3} to N{sub 2} in the hot gasification has been studied at VTT Energy. The largest NH{sub 3} reductions have been achieved by catalytic oxidation on aluminium oxides. (author) (4 refs.)

  18. Catalytic pyrolysis of hydrocarbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vail' eva, N A; Buyanov, R A

    1979-01-01

    Catalytic pyrolysis of petroleum fractions (undecane) was performed with the object of clarifying such questions as the mechanism of action of the catalyst, the concepts of activity and selectivity of the catalyst, the role of transport processes, the temperature ranges and limitations of the catalytic process, the effect of the catalyst on secondary processes, and others. Catalysts such as quartz, MgO, Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/, were used. Analysis of the experimental findings and the fact that the distribution of products is independent of the nature of the surface, demonstrate that the pyrolysis of hydrocarbons in the presence of catalysts is based on the heterogeneous-homogeneous radical-chain mechanism of action, and that the role of the catalysts reduces to increasing the concentration of free radicals. The concept of selectivity cannot be applied to catalysts here, since they do not affect the mechanism of the unfolding of the process of pyrolysis and their role consists solely in initiating the process. In catalytic pyrolysis the concepts of kinetic and diffusive domains of unfolding of the catalytic reaction do not apply, and only the outer surface of the catalyst is engaged, whereas the inner surface merely promotes deletorious secondary processes reducing the selectivity of the process and the activity of the catalyst. 6 references, 2 figures.

  19. Catalytic Conversion of Biofuels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Betina

    This thesis describes the catalytic conversion of bioethanol into higher value chemicals. The motivation has been the unavoidable coming depletion of the fossil resources. The thesis is focused on two ways of utilising ethanol; the steam reforming of ethanol to form hydrogen and the partial oxida...

  20. CATALYTIC KINETIC SPECTROPHOTOMETRIC DETERMINATION ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Preferred Customer

    acetylchlorophosphonazo(CPApA) by hydrogen peroxide in 0.10 M phosphoric acid. A novel catalytic kinetic-spectrophotometric method is proposed for the determination of copper based on this principle. Copper(II) can be determined spectrophotometrically ...

  1. Catalytic methanol dissociation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alcinikov, Y.; Fainberg, V.; Garbar, A.; Gutman, M.; Hetsroni, G.; Shindler, Y.; Tatrtakovsky, L.; Zvirin, Y.

    1998-01-01

    Results of the methanol dissociation study on copper/potassium catalyst with alumina support at various temperatures are presented. The following gaseous and liquid products at. The catalytic methanol dissociation is obtained: hydrogen, carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, methane, and dimethyl ether. Formation rates of these products are discussed. Activation energies of corresponding reactions are calculated

  2. Semiconductor Nanowires and Nanotubes for Energy Conversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fardy, Melissa Anne

    In recent years semiconductor nanowires and nanotubes have garnered increased attention for their unique properties. With their nanoscale dimensions comes high surface area and quantum confinement, promising enhancements in a wide range of applications. 1-dimensional nanostructures are especially attractive for energy conversion applications where photons, phonons, and electrons come into play. Since the bohr exciton radius and phonon and electron mean free paths are on the same length scales as nanowire diameters, optical, thermal, and electrical properties can be tuned by simple nanowire size adjustments. In addition, the high surface area inherent to nanowires and nanotubes lends them towards efficient charge separation and superior catalytic performance. In thermoelectric power generation, the nanoscale wire diameter can effectively scatter phonons, promoting reductions in thermal conductivity and enhancements in the thermoelectric figure of merit. To that end, single-crystalline arrays of PbS, PbSe, and PbTe nanowires have been synthesized by a chemical vapor transport approach. The electrical and thermal transport properties of the nanowires were characterized to investigate their potential as thermoelectric materials. Compared to bulk, the lead chalcogenide nanowires exhibit reduced thermal conductivity below 100 K by up to 3 orders of magnitude, suggesting that they may be promising thermoelectric materials. Smaller diameters and increased surface roughness are expected to give additional enhancements. The solution-phase synthesis of PbSe nanowires via oriented attachment of nanoparticles enables facile surface engineering and diameter control. Branched PbSe nanowires synthesized by this approach showed near degenerately doped charge carrier concentrations. Compared to the bulk, the PbSe nanowires exhibited a similar Seebeck coefficient and a significant reduction in thermal conductivity in the temperature range 20 K to 300 K. Thermal annealing of the Pb

  3. Semiconductor nanostructures for artificial photosynthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Peidong

    2012-02-01

    Nanowires, with their unique capability to bridge the nanoscopic and macroscopic worlds, have already been demonstrated as important materials for different energy conversion. One emerging and exciting direction is their application for solar to fuel conversion. The generation of fuels by the direct conversion of solar energy in a fully integrated system is an attractive goal, but no such system has been demonstrated that shows the required efficiency, is sufficiently durable, or can be manufactured at reasonable cost. One of the most critical issues in solar water splitting is the development of a suitable photoanode with high efficiency and long-term durability in an aqueous environment. Semiconductor nanowires represent an important class of nanostructure building block for direct solar-to-fuel application because of their high surface area, tunable bandgap and efficient charge transport and collection. Nanowires can be readily designed and synthesized to deterministically incorporate heterojunctions with improved light absorption, charge separation and vectorial transport. Meanwhile, it is also possible to selectively decorate different oxidation or reduction catalysts onto specific segments of the nanowires to mimic the compartmentalized reactions in natural photosynthesis. In this talk, I will highlight several recent examples in this lab using semiconductor nanowires and their heterostructures for the purpose of direct solar water splitting.

  4. Application of Zeolitic Additives in the Fluid Catalytic Cracking (FCC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Nemati Kharat

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Current article describes application of zeolites in fluid catalytic cracking (FCC. The use of several zeolitic additives for the production light olefins and reduction of pollutants is described. Application of zeolites as fluid catalytic cracking (FCC catalysts and additives due to the presence of active acid sites in the zeolite framework  increase the formation of desired cracking products (i.e., olefin and branched products  in the FCC unit.

  5. Method of doping a semiconductor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, C.Y.; Rapp, R.A.

    1983-01-01

    A method is disclosed for doping semiconductor material. An interface is established between a solid electrolyte and a semiconductor to be doped. The electrolyte is chosen to be an ionic conductor of the selected impurity and the semiconductor material and electrolyte are jointly chosen so that any compound formed from the impurity and the semiconductor will have a free energy no lower than the electrolyte. A potential is then established across the interface so as to allow the impurity ions to diffuse into the semiconductor. In one embodiment the semiconductor and electrolyte may be heated so as to increase the diffusion coefficient

  6. Fundamentals of semiconductor lasers

    CERN Document Server

    Numai, Takahiro

    2015-01-01

    This book explains physics under the operating principles of semiconductor lasers in detail based on the experience of the author, dealing with the first manufacturing of phase-shifted DFB-LDs and recent research on transverse modes.   The book also bridges a wide gap between journal papers and textbooks, requiring only an undergraduate-level knowledge of electromagnetism and quantum mechanics, and helps readers to understand journal papers where definitions of some technical terms vary, depending on the paper. Two definitions of the photon density in the rate equations and two definitions of the phase-shift in the phase-shifted DFB-LD are explained, and differences in the calculated results are indicated, depending on the definitions.    Readers can understand the physics of semiconductor lasers and analytical tools for Fabry-Perot LDs, DFB-LDs, and VCSELs and will be stimulated to develop semiconductor lasers themselves.

  7. Coherent dynamics in semiconductors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvam, Jørn Märcher

    1998-01-01

    enhanced in quantum confined lower-dimensional systems, where exciton and biexciton effects dominate the spectra even at room temperature. The coherent dynamics of excitons are at modest densities well described by the optical Bloch equations and a number of the dynamical effects known from atomic......Ultrafast nonlinear optical spectroscopy is used to study the coherent dynamics of optically excited electron-hole pairs in semiconductors. Coulomb interaction implies that the optical inter-band transitions are dominated, at least at low temperatures, by excitonic effects. They are further...... and molecular systems are found and studied in the exciton-biexciton system of semiconductors. At densities where strong exciton interactions, or many-body effects, become dominant, the semiconductor Bloch equations present a more rigorous treatment of the phenomena Ultrafast degenerate four-wave mixing is used...

  8. Hydrogen in semiconductors II

    CERN Document Server

    Nickel, Norbert H; Weber, Eicke R; Nickel, Norbert H

    1999-01-01

    Since its inception in 1966, the series of numbered volumes known as Semiconductors and Semimetals has distinguished itself through the careful selection of well-known authors, editors, and contributors. The "Willardson and Beer" Series, as it is widely known, has succeeded in publishing numerous landmark volumes and chapters. Not only did many of these volumes make an impact at the time of their publication, but they continue to be well-cited years after their original release. Recently, Professor Eicke R. Weber of the University of California at Berkeley joined as a co-editor of the series. Professor Weber, a well-known expert in the field of semiconductor materials, will further contribute to continuing the series' tradition of publishing timely, highly relevant, and long-impacting volumes. Some of the recent volumes, such as Hydrogen in Semiconductors, Imperfections in III/V Materials, Epitaxial Microstructures, High-Speed Heterostructure Devices, Oxygen in Silicon, and others promise that this tradition ...

  9. Photoelectronic properties of semiconductors

    CERN Document Server

    Bube, Richard H

    1992-01-01

    The interaction between light and electrons in semiconductors forms the basis for many interesting and practically significant properties. This book examines the fundamental physics underlying this rich complexity of photoelectronic properties of semiconductors, and will familiarise the reader with the relatively simple models that are useful in describing these fundamentals. The basic physics is also illustrated with typical recent examples of experimental data and observations. Following introductory material on the basic concepts, the book moves on to consider a wide range of phenomena, including photoconductivity, recombination effects, photoelectronic methods of defect analysis, photoeffects at grain boundaries, amorphous semiconductors, photovoltaic effects and photoeffects in quantum wells and superlattices. The author is Professor of Materials Science and Electrical Engineering at Stanford University, and has taught this material for many years. He is an experienced author, his earlier books having fo...

  10. Semiconductor optoelectronic infrared spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hollingworth, A.R.

    2001-08-01

    We use spectroscopy to study infrared optoelectronic inter and intraband semiconductor carrier dynamics. The overall aim of this thesis was to study both III-V and Pb chalcogenide material systems in order to show their future potential use in infrared emitters. The effects of bandstructure engineering have been studied in the output characteristics of mid-IR III-V laser diodes to show which processes (defects, radiative, Auger and phonon) dominate and whether non-radiative processes can be suppressed. A new three-beam pump probe experiment was used to investigate interband recombination directly in passive materials. Experiments on PbSe and theory for non-parabolic near-mirror bands and non-degenerate statistics were in good agreement. Comparisons with HgCdTe showed a reduction in the Auger coefficient of 1-2 orders of magnitude in the PbSe. Using Landau confinement to model spatial confinement in quantum dots (QDs) 'phonon bottlenecking' was studied. The results obtained from pump probe and cyclotron resonance saturation measurements showed a clear suppression in the cooling of carriers when Landau level separation was not resonant with LO phonon energy. When a bulk laser diode was placed in a magnetic field to produce a quasi quantum wire device the resulting enhanced differential gain and reduced Auger recombination lowered I th by 30%. This result showed many peaks in the light output which occurred when the LO phonon energy was a multiple of the Landau level separation. This showed for the first time evidence of the phonon bottleneck in a working laser device. A new technique called time resolved optically detected cyclotron resonance, was used as a precursor to finding the carrier dynamics within a spatially confined quantum dot. By moving to the case of a spatial QD using an optically detected intraband resonance it was possible to measure the energy separation interband levels and conduction and valence sublevels within the dot simultaneously. Furthermore

  11. Selective catalytic reduction of nitrogen oxide. Pt. 2. Side flow system for the provision of gaseous ammonia; Selektive katalytische Reduktion von Strickoxiden. T. 2. Nebenstromverfahren zur Bereitstellung gasfoermigen Ammoniaks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heubuch, Alexander; Wachtmeister, Georg [Technische Univ. Muenchen (Germany). Lehrstuhl fuer Verbrennungskraftmaschinen; Toshev, Plamen [MAN Diesel and Turbo SE, Augsburg (Germany); Sattelmayer, Thomas [Technische Univ. Muenchen (Germany). Lehrstuhl fuer Thermodynamik

    2012-12-01

    The limitation of NO{sub x} emissions from diesel engines has been significantly tightened, among other things by the introduction of Euro 5 and Euro 6. In numerous applications on passenger car diesel engines, SCR catalytic converters were introduced to reduce NO{sub x} emissions in order to comply with the strict standards. Insufficient properties make the use of the required aqueous urea solution more difficult. The first part of this article published in MTZ 11 reported on the findings achieved at the Paul Scherrer Institute on the use of guanidinium formiate (GuFo) and its properties as an alternative to established urea SCR technology. In the second part, the TU Munich presents the application on a diesel engine and the ammonia generator (NH{sub 3} generator) with a bypass system developed for this purpose.

  12. Advances in semiconductor lasers

    CERN Document Server

    Coleman, James J; Jagadish, Chennupati

    2012-01-01

    Semiconductors and Semimetals has distinguished itself through the careful selection of well-known authors, editors, and contributors. Originally widely known as the ""Willardson and Beer"" Series, it has succeeded in publishing numerous landmark volumes and chapters. The series publishes timely, highly relevant volumes intended for long-term impact and reflecting the truly interdisciplinary nature of the field. The volumes in Semiconductors and Semimetals have been and will continue to be of great interest to physicists, chemists, materials scientists, and device engineers in academia, scien

  13. Superconductivity in doped semiconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bustarret, E., E-mail: Etienne.bustarret@neel.cnrs.fr

    2015-07-15

    A historical survey of the main normal and superconducting state properties of several semiconductors doped into superconductivity is proposed. This class of materials includes selenides, tellurides, oxides and column-IV semiconductors. Most of the experimental data point to a weak coupling pairing mechanism, probably phonon-mediated in the case of diamond, but probably not in the case of strontium titanate, these being the most intensively studied materials over the last decade. Despite promising theoretical predictions based on a conventional mechanism, the occurrence of critical temperatures significantly higher than 10 K has not been yet verified. However, the class provides an enticing playground for testing theories and devices alike.

  14. Semiconductor opto-electronics

    CERN Document Server

    Moss, TS; Ellis, B

    1972-01-01

    Semiconductor Opto-Electronics focuses on opto-electronics, covering the basic physical phenomena and device behavior that arise from the interaction between electromagnetic radiation and electrons in a solid. The first nine chapters of this book are devoted to theoretical topics, discussing the interaction of electromagnetic waves with solids, dispersion theory and absorption processes, magneto-optical effects, and non-linear phenomena. Theories of photo-effects and photo-detectors are treated in detail, including the theories of radiation generation and the behavior of semiconductor lasers a

  15. Ternary chalcopyrite semiconductors

    CERN Document Server

    Shay, J L; Pamplin, B R

    2013-01-01

    Ternary Chalcopyrite Semiconductors: Growth, Electronic Properties, and Applications covers the developments of work in the I-III-VI2 and II-IV-V2 ternary chalcopyrite compounds. This book is composed of eight chapters that focus on the crystal growth, characterization, and applications of these compounds to optical communications systems. After briefly dealing with the status of ternary chalcopyrite compounds, this book goes on describing the crystal growth of II-IV-V2 and I-III-VI2 single crystals. Chapters 3 and 4 examine the energy band structure of these semiconductor compounds, illustrat

  16. Compound semiconductor device physics

    CERN Document Server

    Tiwari, Sandip

    2013-01-01

    This book provides one of the most rigorous treatments of compound semiconductor device physics yet published. A complete understanding of modern devices requires a working knowledge of low-dimensional physics, the use of statistical methods, and the use of one-, two-, and three-dimensional analytical and numerical analysis techniques. With its systematic and detailed**discussion of these topics, this book is ideal for both the researcher and the student. Although the emphasis of this text is on compound semiconductor devices, many of the principles discussed will also be useful to those inter

  17. Introductory semiconductor device physics

    CERN Document Server

    Parker, Greg

    2004-01-01

    ATOMS AND BONDINGThe Periodic TableIonic BondingCovalent BondingMetallic bondingvan der Waals BondingStart a DatabaseENERGY BANDS AND EFFECTIVE MASSSemiconductors, Insulators and MetalsSemiconductorsInsulatorsMetalsThe Concept of Effective MassCARRIER CONCENTRATIONS IN SEMICONDUCTORSDonors and AcceptorsFermi-LevelCarrier Concentration EquationsDonors and Acceptors Both PresentCONDUCTION IN SEMICONDUCTORSCarrier DriftCarrier MobilitySaturated Drift VelocityMobility Variation with TemperatureA Derivation of Ohm's LawDrift Current EquationsSemiconductor Band Diagrams with an Electric Field Presen

  18. Concentric catalytic combustor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruck, Gerald J [Oviedo, FL; Laster, Walter R [Oviedo, FL

    2009-03-24

    A catalytic combustor (28) includes a tubular pressure boundary element (90) having a longitudinal flow axis (e.g., 56) separating a first portion (94) of a first fluid flow (e.g., 24) from a second portion (95) of the first fluid flow. The pressure boundary element includes a wall (96) having a plurality of separate longitudinally oriented flow paths (98) annularly disposed within the wall and conducting respective portions (100, 101) of a second fluid flow (e.g., 26) therethrough. A catalytic material (32) is disposed on a surface (e.g., 102, 103) of the pressure boundary element exposed to at least one of the first and second portions of the first fluid flow.

  19. Tunable radiation emitting semiconductor device

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    2009-01-01

    A tunable radiation emitting semiconductor device includes at least one elongated structure at least partially fabricated from one or more semiconductor materials exhibiting a bandgap characteristic including one or more energy transitions whose energies correspond to photon energies of light

  20. Physical principles of semiconductor detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Micek, S.L.

    1979-01-01

    The general properties of semiconductors with respect to the possibilities of their use as the ionization radiation detectors are discussed. Some chosen types of semiconductor junctions and their characteristics are briefly presented. There are also discussed the physical phenomena connected with the formation of barriers in various types of semiconductor counters. Finally, the basic properties of three main types of semiconductor detectors are given. (author)

  1. Metal semiconductor contacts and devices

    CERN Document Server

    Cohen, Simon S; Einspruch, Norman G

    1986-01-01

    VLSI Electronics Microstructure Science, Volume 13: Metal-Semiconductor Contacts and Devices presents the physics, technology, and applications of metal-semiconductor barriers in digital integrated circuits. The emphasis is placed on the interplay among the theory, processing, and characterization techniques in the development of practical metal-semiconductor contacts and devices.This volume contains chapters that are devoted to the discussion of the physics of metal-semiconductor interfaces and its basic phenomena; fabrication procedures; and interface characterization techniques, particularl

  2. Handbook of luminescent semiconductor materials

    CERN Document Server

    Bergman, Leah

    2011-01-01

    Photoluminescence spectroscopy is an important approach for examining the optical interactions in semiconductors and optical devices with the goal of gaining insight into material properties. With contributions from researchers at the forefront of this field, Handbook of Luminescent Semiconductor Materials explores the use of this technique to study semiconductor materials in a variety of applications, including solid-state lighting, solar energy conversion, optical devices, and biological imaging. After introducing basic semiconductor theory and photoluminescence principles, the book focuses

  3. Depletion field focusing in semiconductors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prins, M.W.J.; Gelder, Van A.P.

    1996-01-01

    We calculate the three-dimensional depletion field profile in a semiconductor, for a planar semiconductor material with a spatially varying potential upon the surface, and for a tip-shaped semiconductor with a constant surface potential. The nonuniform electric field gives rise to focusing or

  4. Nonlinear Elasticity of Doped Semiconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-02-01

    AFRL-RY-WP-TR-2016-0206 NONLINEAR ELASTICITY OF DOPED SEMICONDUCTORS Mark Dykman and Kirill Moskovtsev Michigan State University...2016 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE NONLINEAR ELASTICITY OF DOPED SEMICONDUCTORS 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER FA8650-16-1-7600 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM...vibration amplitude. 15. SUBJECT TERMS semiconductors , microresonators, microelectromechanical 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF

  5. Semi-conductor rectifiers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-01-01

    A method is described for treating a semiconductor rectifier, comprising: heating the rectifier to a temperature in the range of 100 0 C to 500 0 C, irradiating the rectifier while maintaining its temperature within the said range, and then annealing the rectifier at a temperature of between 280 0 C and 350 0 C for between two and ten hours. (author)

  6. Semiconductor detector physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Equer, B.

    1987-01-01

    Comprehension of semiconductor detectors follows comprehension of some elements of solid state physics. They are recalled here, limited to the necessary physical principles, that is to say the conductivity. P-n and MIS junctions are discussed in view of their use in detection. Material and structure (MOS, p-n, multilayer, ..) are also reviewed [fr

  7. Modeling of semiconductor nanostructures and semiconductor-electrolyte interfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Birner, Stefan

    2011-01-01

    The main objective of Part I is to give an overview of some of the methods that have been implemented into the nextnano 3 software. Examples are discussed that give insight into doping, strain and mobility. Applications of the single-band Schroedinger equation include three-dimensional superlattices, and a qubit that is manipulated by a magnetic field. Results of the multi-band k.p method are presented for HgTe-CdTe and InAs-GaSb superlattices, and for a SiGe-Si quantum cascade structure. Particular focus is put on a detailed description of the contact block reduction (CBR) method that has been developed within our research group. By means of this approach, quantum transport in the ballistic limit in one, two and three dimensions can be calculated. I provide a very detailed description of the algorithm and present several well documented examples that highlight the key points of this method. Calculating quantum transport in three dimensions is a very challenging task where computationally efficient algorithms - apart from the CBR method - are not available yet. Part II describes the methods that I have implemented into the nextnano 3 software for calculating systems that consist of a combination of semiconductor materials and liquids. These biosensors have a solid-electrolyte interface, and the charges in the solid and in the electrolyte are coupled to each other through the Poisson-Boltzmann equation. I apply this model to a silicon based protein sensor, where I solve the Schroedinger equation together with the Poisson-Boltzmann equation self-consistently, and compare theoretical results with experiment. Furthermore, I have developed a novel approach to model the charge density profiles at semiconductor-electrolyte interfaces that allows us to distinguish hydrophobic and hydrophilic interfaces. Our approach extends previous work where ion specific potentials of mean force describe the distribution of ion species at the interface. I apply this new model to recently

  8. Modeling of semiconductor nanostructures and semiconductor-electrolyte interfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Birner, Stefan

    2011-11-15

    The main objective of Part I is to give an overview of some of the methods that have been implemented into the nextnano{sup 3} software. Examples are discussed that give insight into doping, strain and mobility. Applications of the single-band Schroedinger equation include three-dimensional superlattices, and a qubit that is manipulated by a magnetic field. Results of the multi-band k.p method are presented for HgTe-CdTe and InAs-GaSb superlattices, and for a SiGe-Si quantum cascade structure. Particular focus is put on a detailed description of the contact block reduction (CBR) method that has been developed within our research group. By means of this approach, quantum transport in the ballistic limit in one, two and three dimensions can be calculated. I provide a very detailed description of the algorithm and present several well documented examples that highlight the key points of this method. Calculating quantum transport in three dimensions is a very challenging task where computationally efficient algorithms - apart from the CBR method - are not available yet. Part II describes the methods that I have implemented into the nextnano{sup 3} software for calculating systems that consist of a combination of semiconductor materials and liquids. These biosensors have a solid-electrolyte interface, and the charges in the solid and in the electrolyte are coupled to each other through the Poisson-Boltzmann equation. I apply this model to a silicon based protein sensor, where I solve the Schroedinger equation together with the Poisson-Boltzmann equation self-consistently, and compare theoretical results with experiment. Furthermore, I have developed a novel approach to model the charge density profiles at semiconductor-electrolyte interfaces that allows us to distinguish hydrophobic and hydrophilic interfaces. Our approach extends previous work where ion specific potentials of mean force describe the distribution of ion species at the interface. I apply this new model

  9. Hydrophilic Pt nanoflowers: synthesis, crystallographic analysis and catalytic performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mourdikoudis, Stefanos; Altantzis, Thomas; Liz-Marzán, Luis M; Bals, Sara; Pastoriza-Santos, Isabel; Pérez-Juste, Jorge

    2016-05-21

    Water-soluble Pt nanoflowers (NFs) were prepared by diethylene glycol-mediated reduction of Pt acetylacetonate (Pt(acac) 2 ) in the presence of polyethylenimine. Advanced electron microscopy analysis showed that the NFs consist of multiple branches with a truncated cubic morphology and different crystallographic orientations. We demonstrate that the nature of the solvent strongly influences the resulting morphology. The catalytic performance of the Pt NFs in 4-nitrophenol reduction was found to be superior to that of other nanoparticle-based catalysts. Additionally, the Pt NFs display good catalytic reusability with no loss of activity after five consecutive cycles.

  10. Catalytic biomass pyrolysis process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dayton, David C.; Gupta, Raghubir P.; Turk, Brian S.; Kataria, Atish; Shen, Jian-Ping

    2018-04-17

    Described herein are processes for converting a biomass starting material (such as lignocellulosic materials) into a low oxygen containing, stable liquid intermediate that can be refined to make liquid hydrocarbon fuels. More specifically, the process can be a catalytic biomass pyrolysis process wherein an oxygen removing catalyst is employed in the reactor while the biomass is subjected to pyrolysis conditions. The stream exiting the pyrolysis reactor comprises bio-oil having a low oxygen content, and such stream may be subjected to further steps, such as separation and/or condensation to isolate the bio-oil.

  11. Catalytic reforming methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tadd, Andrew R; Schwank, Johannes

    2013-05-14

    A catalytic reforming method is disclosed herein. The method includes sequentially supplying a plurality of feedstocks of variable compositions to a reformer. The method further includes adding a respective predetermined co-reactant to each of the plurality of feedstocks to obtain a substantially constant output from the reformer for the plurality of feedstocks. The respective predetermined co-reactant is based on a C/H/O atomic composition for a respective one of the plurality of feedstocks and a predetermined C/H/O atomic composition for the substantially constant output.

  12. Effect of support on the catalytic activity of manganese oxide catalyts for toluene combustion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pozan, Gulin Selda

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► α-Al 2 O 3 , obtained from Bohmite, as a support for enhancing of the activity. ► The support material for catalytic oxidation. ► The manganese state and oxygen species effect on the catalytic combustion reaction. - Abstract: The aim of this work was to study combustion of toluene (1000 ppm) over MnO 2 modified with different supports. α-Al 2 O 3 and γ-Al 2 O 3 obtained from Boehmite, γ-Al 2 O 3 (commercial), SiO 2 , TiO 2 and ZrO 2 were used as commercial support materials. In view of potential interest of this process, the influence of support material on the catalytic performance was discussed. The deposition of 9.5MnO 2 was performed by impregnation over support. The catalysts were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), temperature programmed reduction and oxidation (TPR/TPO) and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). The catalytic tests were carried out at atmospheric pressure in a fixed-bed flow reactor. 9.5MnO 2 /α-Al 2 O 3 (B) (synthesized from Boehmite) catalyst exhibits the highest catalytic activity, over which the toluene conversion was up to 90% at a temperature of 289 °C. Considering all the characterization and reaction data reported in this study, it was concluded that the manganese state and oxygen species played an important role in the catalytic activity.

  13. Single frequency semiconductor lasers

    CERN Document Server

    Fang, Zujie; Chen, Gaoting; Qu, Ronghui

    2017-01-01

    This book systematically introduces the single frequency semiconductor laser, which is widely used in many vital advanced technologies, such as the laser cooling of atoms and atomic clock, high-precision measurements and spectroscopy, coherent optical communications, and advanced optical sensors. It presents both the fundamentals and characteristics of semiconductor lasers, including basic F-P structure and monolithic integrated structures; interprets laser noises and their measurements; and explains mechanisms and technologies relating to the main aspects of single frequency lasers, including external cavity lasers, frequency stabilization technologies, frequency sweeping, optical phase locked loops, and so on. It paints a clear, physical picture of related technologies and reviews new developments in the field as well. It will be a useful reference to graduate students, researchers, and engineers in the field.

  14. Basic semiconductor physics

    CERN Document Server

    Hamaguchi, Chihiro

    2017-01-01

    This book presents a detailed description of basic semiconductor physics. The text covers a wide range of important phenomena in semiconductors, from the simple to the advanced. Four different methods of energy band calculations in the full band region are explained: local empirical pseudopotential, non-local pseudopotential, KP perturbation and tight-binding methods. The effective mass approximation and electron motion in a periodic potential, Boltzmann transport equation and deformation potentials used for analysis of transport properties are discussed. Further, the book examines experiments and theoretical analyses of cyclotron resonance in detail. Optical and transport properties, magneto-transport, two-dimensional electron gas transport (HEMT and MOSFET) and quantum transport are reviewed, while optical transition, electron-phonon interaction and electron mobility are also addressed. Energy and electronic structure of a quantum dot (artificial atom) are explained with the help of Slater determinants. The...

  15. Semiconductor physics an introduction

    CERN Document Server

    Seeger, Karlheinz

    1999-01-01

    Semiconductor Physics - An Introduction - is suitable for the senior undergraduate or new graduate student majoring in electrical engineering or physics. It will also be useful to solid-state scientists and device engineers involved in semiconductor design and technology. The text provides a lucid account of charge transport, energy transport and optical processes, and a detailed description of many devices. It includes sections on superlattices and quantum well structures, the effects of deep-level impurities on transport, the quantum Hall effect and the calculation of the influence of a magnetic field on the carrier distribution function. This 6th edition has been revised and corrected, and new sections have been added to different chapters.

  16. Three dimensional strained semiconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voss, Lars; Conway, Adam; Nikolic, Rebecca J.; Leao, Cedric Rocha; Shao, Qinghui

    2016-11-08

    In one embodiment, an apparatus includes a three dimensional structure comprising a semiconductor material, and at least one thin film in contact with at least one exterior surface of the three dimensional structure for inducing a strain in the structure, the thin film being characterized as providing at least one of: an induced strain of at least 0.05%, and an induced strain in at least 5% of a volume of the three dimensional structure. In another embodiment, a method includes forming a three dimensional structure comprising a semiconductor material, and depositing at least one thin film on at least one surface of the three dimensional structure for inducing a strain in the structure, the thin film being characterized as providing at least one of: an induced strain of at least 0.05%, and an induced strain in at least 5% of a volume of the structure.

  17. Compound semiconductor device modelling

    CERN Document Server

    Miles, Robert

    1993-01-01

    Compound semiconductor devices form the foundation of solid-state microwave and optoelectronic technologies used in many modern communication systems. In common with their low frequency counterparts, these devices are often represented using equivalent circuit models, but it is often necessary to resort to physical models in order to gain insight into the detailed operation of compound semiconductor devices. Many of the earliest physical models were indeed developed to understand the 'unusual' phenomena which occur at high frequencies. Such was the case with the Gunn and IMPATI diodes, which led to an increased interest in using numerical simulation methods. Contemporary devices often have feature sizes so small that they no longer operate within the familiar traditional framework, and hot electron or even quantum­ mechanical models are required. The need for accurate and efficient models suitable for computer aided design has increased with the demand for a wider range of integrated devices for operation at...

  18. Front-end electronics for multichannel semiconductor detector systems

    CERN Document Server

    Grybos, P

    2010-01-01

    Front-end electronics for multichannel semiconductor detektor systems Volume 08, EuCARD Editorial Series on Accelerator Science and Technology The monograph is devoted to many different aspects related to front-end electronics for semiconductor detector systems, namely: − designing and testing silicon position sensitive detectors for HEP experiments and X-ray imaging applications, − designing and testing of multichannel readout electronics for semiconductor detectors used in X-ray imaging applications, especially for noise minimization, fast signal processing, crosstalk reduction and good matching performance, − optimization of semiconductor detection systems in respect to the effects of radiation damage. The monograph is the result mainly of the author's experience in the above-mentioned areas and it is an attempt of a comprehensive presentation of issues related to the position sensitive detection system working in a single photon counting mode and intended to X-ray imaging applications. The structure...

  19. Conductivity-limiting bipolar thermal conductivity in semiconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shanyu; Yang, Jiong; Toll, Trevor; Yang, Jihui; Zhang, Wenqing; Tang, Xinfeng

    2015-01-01

    Intriguing experimental results raised the question about the fundamental mechanisms governing the electron-hole coupling induced bipolar thermal conduction in semiconductors. Our combined theoretical analysis and experimental measurements show that in semiconductors bipolar thermal transport is in general a “conductivity-limiting” phenomenon, and it is thus controlled by the carrier mobility ratio and by the minority carrier partial electrical conductivity for the intrinsic and extrinsic cases, respectively. Our numerical method quantifies the role of electronic band structure and carrier scattering mechanisms. We have successfully demonstrated bipolar thermal conductivity reduction in doped semiconductors via electronic band structure modulation and/or preferential minority carrier scatterings. We expect this study to be beneficial to the current interests in optimizing thermoelectric properties of narrow gap semiconductors. PMID:25970560

  20. Novel Catalytic Membrane Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stuart Nemser, PhD

    2010-10-01

    There are many industrial catalytic organic reversible reactions with amines or alcohols that have water as one of the products. Many of these reactions are homogeneously catalyzed. In all cases removal of water facilitates the reaction and produces more of the desired chemical product. By shifting the reaction to right we produce more chemical product with little or no additional capital investment. Many of these reactions can also relate to bioprocesses. Given the large number of water-organic compound separations achievable and the ability of the Compact Membrane Systems, Inc. (CMS) perfluoro membranes to withstand these harsh operating conditions, this is an ideal demonstration system for the water-of-reaction removal using a membrane reactor. Enhanced reaction synthesis is consistent with the DOE objective to lower the energy intensity of U.S. industry 25% by 2017 in accord with the Energy Policy Act of 2005 and to improve the United States manufacturing competitiveness. The objective of this program is to develop the platform technology for enhancing homogeneous catalytic chemical syntheses.

  1. Doping of organic semiconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luessem, B.; Riede, M.; Leo, K. [Institut fuer Angewandte Photophysik, TU Dresden (Germany)

    2013-01-15

    The understanding and applications of organic semiconductors have shown remarkable progress in recent years. This material class has been developed from being a lab curiosity to the basis of first successful products as small organic LED (OLED) displays; other areas of application such as OLED lighting and organic photovoltaics are on the verge of broad commercialization. Organic semiconductors are superior to inorganic ones for low-cost and large-area optoelectronics due to their flexibility, easy deposition, and broad variety, making tailor-made materials possible. However, electrical doping of organic semiconductors, i.e. the controlled adjustment of Fermi level that has been extremely important to the success of inorganic semiconductors, is still in its infancy. This review will discuss recent work on both fundamental principles and applications of doping, focused primarily to doping of evaporated organic layers with molecular dopants. Recently, both p- and n-type molecular dopants have been developed that lead to efficient and stable doping of organic thin films. Due to doping, the conductivity of the doped layers increases several orders of magnitude and allows for quasi-Ohmic contacts between organic layers and metal electrodes. Besides reducing voltage losses, doping thus also gives design freedom in terms of transport layer thickness and electrode choice. The use of doping in applications like OLEDs and organic solar cells is highlighted in this review. Overall, controlled molecular doping can be considered as key enabling technology for many different organic device types that can lead to significant improvements in efficiencies and lifetimes. (Copyright copyright 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  2. Images through semiconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1986-01-01

    Improved image processing techniques are constantly being developed for television and for scanners using X-rays or other radiation for industrial or medical applications, etc. As Erik Heijne of CERN explains here, particle physics too has its own special requirements for image processing. The increasing use of semiconductor techniques for handling measurements down to the level of a few microns provides another example of the close interplay between scientific research and technological development. (orig.).

  3. Muonium states in semiconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patterson, B.D.

    1987-01-01

    There is a brief summary of what is known about the muonium states isotropic, anisotropic and diamagnetic in diamond and zincblende semiconductors. The report deals with muonium spectroscopy, including the formation probabilities, hyperfine parameters and electronic g-factors of the states. The dynamics of the states is treated including a discussion of the transition from isotropic Mu to anisotropic Mu in diamond, temperature-dependent linewidthes in silicon and germanium and effects of daping and radiation damage

  4. Nonradiative recombination in semiconductors

    CERN Document Server

    Abakumov, VN; Yassievich, IN

    1991-01-01

    In recent years, great progress has been made in the understandingof recombination processes controlling the number of excessfree carriers in semiconductors under nonequilibrium conditions. As a result, it is now possible to give a comprehensivetheoretical description of these processes. The authors haveselected a number of experimental results which elucidate theunderlying physical problems and enable a test of theoreticalmodels. The following topics are dealt with: phenomenological theory ofrecombination, theoretical models of shallow and deep localizedstates, cascade model of carrier captu

  5. Doping of organic semiconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luessem, B.; Riede, M.; Leo, K.

    2013-01-01

    The understanding and applications of organic semiconductors have shown remarkable progress in recent years. This material class has been developed from being a lab curiosity to the basis of first successful products as small organic LED (OLED) displays; other areas of application such as OLED lighting and organic photovoltaics are on the verge of broad commercialization. Organic semiconductors are superior to inorganic ones for low-cost and large-area optoelectronics due to their flexibility, easy deposition, and broad variety, making tailor-made materials possible. However, electrical doping of organic semiconductors, i.e. the controlled adjustment of Fermi level that has been extremely important to the success of inorganic semiconductors, is still in its infancy. This review will discuss recent work on both fundamental principles and applications of doping, focused primarily to doping of evaporated organic layers with molecular dopants. Recently, both p- and n-type molecular dopants have been developed that lead to efficient and stable doping of organic thin films. Due to doping, the conductivity of the doped layers increases several orders of magnitude and allows for quasi-Ohmic contacts between organic layers and metal electrodes. Besides reducing voltage losses, doping thus also gives design freedom in terms of transport layer thickness and electrode choice. The use of doping in applications like OLEDs and organic solar cells is highlighted in this review. Overall, controlled molecular doping can be considered as key enabling technology for many different organic device types that can lead to significant improvements in efficiencies and lifetimes. (Copyright copyright 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  6. Isotopically controlled semiconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haller, Eugene E.

    2006-06-19

    The following article is an edited transcript based on the Turnbull Lecture given by Eugene E. Haller at the 2005 Materials Research Society Fall Meeting in Boston on November 29, 2005. The David Turnbull Lectureship is awarded to recognize the career of a scientist who has made outstanding contributions to understanding materials phenomena and properties through research, writing, and lecturing, as exemplified by the life work of David Turnbull. Haller was named the 2005 David Turnbull Lecturer for his 'pioneering achievements and leadership in establishing the field of isotopically engineered semiconductors; for outstanding contributions to materials growth, doping and diffusion; and for excellence in lecturing, writing, and fostering international collaborations'. The scientific interest, increased availability, and technological promise of highly enriched isotopes have led to a sharp rise in the number of experimental and theoretical studies with isotopically controlled semiconductor crystals. This article reviews results obtained with isotopically controlled semiconductor bulk and thin-film heterostructures. Isotopic composition affects several properties such as phonon energies, band structure, and lattice constant in subtle, but, for their physical understanding, significant ways. Large isotope-related effects are observed for thermal conductivity in local vibrational modes of impurities and after neutron transmutation doping. Spectacularly sharp photoluminescence lines have been observed in ultrapure, isotopically enriched silicon crystals. Isotope multilayer structures are especially well suited for simultaneous self- and dopant-diffusion studies. The absence of any chemical, mechanical, or electrical driving forces makes possible the study of an ideal random-walk problem. Isotopically controlled semiconductors may find applications in quantum computing, nanoscience, and spintronics.

  7. Catalyzed reactions at illuminated semiconductor interfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wrighton, M.S.

    1984-01-01

    Many desirable minority carrier chemical redox processes are too slow to compete with e - -h + recombination at illuminated semiconductor/liquid electrolyte junction interfaces. Reductions of H 2 O to H 2 or CO 2 to compounds having C--H bonds are too slow to compete with e - -h + recombination at illuminated p-type semiconductors, for example. Approaches to improve the rate of the desired processes involving surface modification techniques are described. Photoanodes are plagued by the additional problem of oxidative decomposition under illumination with > or =E/sub g/ illumination. The photo-oxidation of Cl - , Br - , and H 2 O is considered to illustrate the concepts involved. Proof of concept experiments establish that catalysis can be effective in dramatically improving direct solar fuel production; efficiencies of >10% have been demonstrated

  8. Survey of semiconductor physics

    CERN Document Server

    Böer, Karl W

    1992-01-01

    Any book that covers a large variety of subjects and is written by one author lacks by necessity the depth provided by an expert in his or her own field of specialization. This book is no exception. It has been written with the encouragement of my students and colleagues, who felt that an extensive card file I had accumulated over the years of teaching solid state and semiconductor physics would be helpful to more than just a few of us. This file, updated from time to time, contained lecture notes and other entries that were useful in my research and permitted me to give to my students a broader spectrum of information than is available in typical textbooks. When assembling this material into a book, I divided the top­ ics into material dealing with the homogeneous semiconductor, the subject of the previously published Volume 1, and the inhomoge­ neous semiconductor, the subject of this Volume 2. In order to keep the book to a manageable size, sections of tutorial character which can be used as text for a g...

  9. Semiconductor Ion Implanters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MacKinnon, Barry A.; Ruffell, John P.

    2011-01-01

    In 1953 the Raytheon CK722 transistor was priced at $7.60. Based upon this, an Intel Xeon Quad Core processor containing 820,000,000 transistors should list at $6.2 billion! Particle accelerator technology plays an important part in the remarkable story of why that Intel product can be purchased today for a few hundred dollars. Most people of the mid twentieth century would be astonished at the ubiquity of semiconductors in the products we now buy and use every day. Though relatively expensive in the nineteen fifties they now exist in a wide range of items from high-end multicore microprocessors like the Intel product to disposable items containing 'only' hundreds or thousands like RFID chips and talking greeting cards. This historical development has been fueled by continuous advancement of the several individual technologies involved in the production of semiconductor devices including Ion Implantation and the charged particle beamlines at the heart of implant machines. In the course of its 40 year development, the worldwide implanter industry has reached annual sales levels around $2B, installed thousands of dedicated machines and directly employs thousands of workers. It represents in all these measures, as much and possibly more than any other industrial application of particle accelerator technology. This presentation discusses the history of implanter development. It touches on some of the people involved and on some of the developmental changes and challenges imposed as the requirements of the semiconductor industry evolved.

  10. The Physics of Semiconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brennan, Kevin F.

    1999-02-01

    Modern fabrication techniques have made it possible to produce semiconductor devices whose dimensions are so small that quantum mechanical effects dominate their behavior. This book describes the key elements of quantum mechanics, statistical mechanics, and solid-state physics that are necessary in understanding these modern semiconductor devices. The author begins with a review of elementary quantum mechanics, and then describes more advanced topics, such as multiple quantum wells. He then disusses equilibrium and nonequilibrium statistical mechanics. Following this introduction, he provides a thorough treatment of solid-state physics, covering electron motion in periodic potentials, electron-phonon interaction, and recombination processes. The final four chapters deal exclusively with real devices, such as semiconductor lasers, photodiodes, flat panel displays, and MOSFETs. The book contains many homework exercises and is suitable as a textbook for electrical engineering, materials science, or physics students taking courses in solid-state device physics. It will also be a valuable reference for practicing engineers in optoelectronics and related areas.

  11. Combined effects Na and SO{sub 2} in flue gas on Mn-Ce/TiO{sub 2} catalyst for low temperature selective catalytic reduction of NO by NH{sub 3} simulated by Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4} doping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Aiyi [Department of Environmental Science and Engineering, Nanjing Normal University, Nanjing 210023 (China); Jiangsu Provincial Key Laboratory of Materials Cycling and Pollution Control, Nanjing 210023 (China); Yu, Danqing [School of Chemical Engineering and Technology, Wuhan University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430081 (China); Yang, Liu [Department of Environmental Science and Engineering, Nanjing Normal University, Nanjing 210023 (China); Jiangsu Provincial Key Laboratory of Materials Cycling and Pollution Control, Nanjing 210023 (China); Sheng, Zhongyi, E-mail: 09377@njnu.edu.cn [Department of Environmental Science and Engineering, Nanjing Normal University, Nanjing 210023 (China); Jiangsu Provincial Key Laboratory of Materials Cycling and Pollution Control, Nanjing 210023 (China)

    2016-08-15

    Highlights: • Sodium sulfate (Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4}) was deposited on Mn-Ce/TiO{sub 2} catalyst to simulate the co-existing of sodium and SO{sub 2} in the flue gas. • Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4} had strong and fluctuant influence on Mn-Ce/TiO{sub 2} catalyst’s performance in SCR of NOx with NH{sub 3}, due to the combined effect of the deactivation of sodium salts and the enhanced performance of ceria with surface sulfation. • The changes of the surface chemical species and acid sites on the Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4} deposited catalysts could be considered as the main reasons for the fluctuation changes with the catalytic activity. - Abstract: A series of Mn-Ce/TiO{sub 2} catalysts were synthesized through an impregnation method and used for low temperature selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of NOx with ammonia (NH{sub 3}). Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4} was added into the catalyst to simulate the combined effects of alkali metal and SO{sub 2} in the flue gas. Experimental results showed that Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4} had strong and fluctuant influence on the activity of Mn-Ce/TiO{sub 2}, because the effect of Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4} included pore occlusion and sulfation effect simultaneously. When Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4} loading content increased from 0 to 1 wt.%, the SCR activities of Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4}-doped catalysts decreased greatly. With further increasing amount of Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4}, however, the catalytic activity increased gradually. XRD results showed that Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4} doping could induce the crystallization of MnOx phases, which were also confirmed by TEM and SEM results. BET results showed that the surface areas decreased and a new bimodal mesoporous structure formed gradually with the increasing amount of Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4}. XPS results indicated that part of Ce{sup 4+} and Mn{sup 3+} were transferred to Ce{sup 3+} and Mn{sup 4+} due to the sulfation after Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4} deposition on the surface of the catalysts. When the doped amounts of Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4} increased, NH{sub 3

  12. Catalytic hydrogenation of carbon monoxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wayland, B.B.

    1992-12-01

    This project is focused on developing strategies to accomplish the reduction and hydrogenation of carbon monoxide to produce organic oxygenates at mild conditions. Our approaches to this issue are based on the recognition that rhodium macrocycles have unusually favorable thermodynamic values for producing a series of intermediate implicated in the catalytic hydrogenation of CO. Observations of metalloformyl complexes produced by reactions of H{sub 2} and CO, and reductive coupling of CO to form metallo {alpha}-diketone species have suggested a multiplicity of routes to organic oxygenates that utilize these species as intermediates. Thermodynamic and kinetic-mechanistic studies are used in constructing energy profiles for a variety of potential pathways, and these schemes are used in guiding the design of new metallospecies to improve the thermodynamic and kinetic factors for individual steps in the overall process. Variation of the electronic and steric effects associated with the ligand arrays along with the influences of the reaction medium provide the chemical tools for tuning these factors. Emerging knowledge of the factors that contribute to M-H, M-C and M-O bond enthalpies is directing the search for ligand arrays that will expand the range of metal species that have favorable thermodynamic parameters to produce the primary intermediates for CO hydrogenation. Studies of rhodium complexes are being extended to non-macrocyclic ligand complexes that emulate the favorable thermodynamic features associated with rhodium macrocycles, but that also manifest improved reaction kinetics. Multifunctional catalyst systems designed to couple the ability of rhodium complexes to produce formyl and diketone intermediates with a second catalyst that hydrogenates these imtermediates are promising approaches to accomplish CO hydrogenation at mild conditions.

  13. Effect of support on the catalytic activity of manganese oxide catalyts for toluene combustion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pozan, Gulin Selda

    2012-06-30

    The aim of this work was to study combustion of toluene (1000ppm) over MnO(2) modified with different supports. α-Al(2)O(3) and γ-Al(2)O(3) obtained from Boehmite, γ-Al(2)O(3) (commercial), SiO(2), TiO(2) and ZrO(2) were used as commercial support materials. In view of potential interest of this process, the influence of support material on the catalytic performance was discussed. The deposition of 9.5MnO(2) was performed by impregnation over support. The catalysts were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), temperature programmed reduction and oxidation (TPR/TPO) and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). The catalytic tests were carried out at atmospheric pressure in a fixed-bed flow reactor. 9.5MnO(2)/α-Al(2)O(3)(B) (synthesized from Boehmite) catalyst exhibits the highest catalytic activity, over which the toluene conversion was up to 90% at a temperature of 289°C. Considering all the characterization and reaction data reported in this study, it was concluded that the manganese state and oxygen species played an important role in the catalytic activity. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Engineering reactors for catalytic reactions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Extensive studies have been conducted to establish sound basis for design and engineering of reactors for practising such catalytic reactions and for realizing improvements in reactor performance. In this article, application of recent (and not so recent) developments in engineering reactors for catalytic reactions is ...

  15. Selective catalytic reduction of NOx and N{sub 2}O by NH{sub 3} over Fe-FER; Developpement d'un traitement catalytique combine des NOx et de N{sub 2}O par NH{sub 3} sur Fe-Fer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kieger, St. [Grande Paroisse, 76 - Grand-Quevilly (France); Navascues, L.; Gry, Ph. [Grande Paroisse, 92 - Paris la Defense (France)

    2001-07-01

    The emission of nitrogen oxides from anthropogenic activities is a major environmental issue. N{sub 2}O is taking part to the global warming and depletion of the stratospheric ozone layer, and NOx to acid rains. At the Kyoto Conference in 1997, the European Union committed itself to reduce by 8% the release of greenhouse gases at the horizon 2010. The selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of NOx by NH{sub 3} is nowadays the main control technology for the emissions from nitric acid plant. Therefore, Grande Paroisse and IRMA have developed a new catalyst (Fe-FER) for the SCR of N{sub 2}O by NH{sub 3}. The catalyst was evaluated in a pilot plant and in the same operating conditions than a DeNOx catalyst. At a space velocity of 9000 to 12000 h{sup -1}, a decomposition of 50% of N{sub 2}O was achieved at 440 deg C. Moreover for the same decomposition level, the temperature could be shifted to 390 deg C by adding ammonia, and the complete reduction of NOx was also observed. This new catalyst is rather bi-functional. Also after months of using, the catalyst did not show major loss of activity nor mechanical strength. (authors)

  16. Catalytic detritiation of water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rogers, M.L.; Lamberger, P.H.; Ellis, R.E.; Mills, T.K.

    1977-01-01

    A pilot-scale system has been used at Mound Laboratory to investigate the catalytic detritiation of water. A hydrophobic, precious metal catalyst is used to promote the exchange of tritium between liquid water and gaseous hydrogen at 60 0 C. Two columns are used, each 7.5 m long by 2.5 cm ID and packed with catalyst. Water flow is 5-10 cm 3 /min and countercurrent hydrogen flow is 9,000-12,000 cm 3 /min. The equipment, except for the columns, is housed in an inert atmosphere glovebox and is computer controlled. The hydrogen is obtained by electrolysis of a portion of the water stream. Enriched gaseous tritium is withdrawn for further enrichment. A description of the system is included along with an outline of its operation. Recent experimental data are discussed

  17. In situ DRIFTs investigation of the reaction mechanism over MnO{sub x}-MO{sub y}/Ce{sub 0.75}Zr{sub 0.25}O{sub 2} (M = Fe, Co, Ni, Cu) for the selective catalytic reduction of NO{sub x} with NH{sub 3}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Hang; Zha, Kaiwen; Li, Hongrui; Shi, Liyi; Zhang, Dengsong, E-mail: dszhang@shu.edu.cn

    2016-11-30

    Highlights: • MnO{sub x}-FeO{sub y}/Ce{sub 0.75}Zr{sub 0.25}O{sub 2} catalyst has a strong NO oxidation ability. • A high dispersion of active components is achieved on catalyst surface. • At high temperatures, bidentate nitrate is the common active species. • The addition of Fe can improve the reactivity of gaseous NO{sub 2} and bridged nitrates. - Abstract: A series of MnO{sub x}-MO{sub y}/Ce{sub 0.75}Zr{sub 0.25}O{sub 2} (M = Fe, Co, Ni, Cu) catalysts were synthesized by an impregnation method and used for selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of NO{sub x} with NH{sub 3}. The catalytic performances of various MnO{sub x}-MO{sub y}/Ce{sub 0.75}Zr{sub 0.25}O{sub 2} catalysts were studied. It was found that MnO{sub x}-FeO{sub y}/Ce{sub 0.75}Zr{sub 0.25}O{sub 2} catalyst showed excellent low-temperature activity and a broad temperature window. The catalysts were characterized by N{sub 2} adsorption/desorption, X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and in situ diffuse reflectance infrared transform spectroscopy (DRIFTS). Characterization of the catalyst confirmed the addition of iron oxide can enhance the NO oxidation ability of the catalyst which results in the outstanding low-temperature SCR activity. Meanwhile, iron oxides were well dispersed on catalyst surface which could avoid the agglomeration of active species, contributing to the strong interaction between active species and the support. More importantly, in situ DRIFTS results confirmed that bidentate nitrates are general active species on these catalysts, whereas the reactivity of gaseous NO{sub 2} and bridged nitrates got improved because of the addition of Fe.

  18. Facile morphology-controlled synthesis of nickel-coated graphite core-shell particles for excellent conducting performance of polymer-matrix composites and enhanced catalytic reduction of 4-nitrophenol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bian, Juan; Lan, Fang; Wang, Yilong; Ren, Ke; Zhao, Suling; Li, Wei; Chen, Zhihong; Li, Jiangyu; Guan, Jianguo

    2018-04-01

    We have developed a novel seed-mediated growth method to fabricate nickel-coated graphite composite particles (GP@Ni-CPs) with controllable shell morphology by simply adjusting the concentration of sodium hydroxide ([NaOH]). The fabrication of two kinds of typical GP@Ni-CPs includes adsorption of Ni2+ via electrostatic attraction, sufficient heterogeneous nucleation of Ni atoms by an in situ reduction, and shell-controlled growth by regulating the kinetics of electroless Ni plating in turn. High [NaOH] results in fast kinetics of electroless plating, which causes heterogeneous nuclei to grow isotropically. After fast and uniform growth of Ni nuclei, GP@Ni-CPs with dense shells can be achieved. The first typical GP@Ni-CPs exhibit denser shells, smaller diameters and higher conductivities than the available commercial ones, indicating their important applications in the conducting of polymer-matrix composites. On the other hand, low [NaOH] favors slow kinetics. Thus, the reduction rate of Ni2+ slows down to a relatively low level so that electroless plating is dominated thermodynamically instead of kinetically, leading to an anisotropic crystalline growth of nuclei and finally to the formation of GP@Ni-CPs with nanoneedle-like shells. The second typical samples can effectively catalyze the reduction of p-nitrophenol into p-aminophenol with NaBH4 in comparison with commercial GP@Ni-CPs and RANEY® Ni, owing to the strong charge accumulation effect of needle-like Ni shells. This work proposes a model system for fundamental investigations and has important applications in the fields of electronic interconnection and catalysis.

  19. EFFECT OF THE REDUCTION TEMPERATURE INTO CATALYTIC ACTIVITY OF Ni SUPPORTED BY TiO2, AL2O2 AND TiO2/AL2O3 FOR CONVERSION CO2 INTO METHANE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hery Haerudin

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Nickel catalysts, containing 6% (w/w of nickel, have been prepared using TiO2, Al2O3 and mixture of TiO2-Al2O3 (1:9. The catalysts were used for CO2 conversion into methane. The characteristics of catalysts were studied by determination of its specific surface area, temperature programmed reaction technique and X-ray diffraction. The specific surface area were varied slightly by different temperature of reduction, namely after reduction at 300°C it was 39, 120 and 113 m2/g and after reduction at 400°C it was 42, 135  and 120 m2/g for 6% nickel catalysts supported on TiO2, Al2O3 and mixture of TiO2-Al2O3 (1:9 respectively. Temperature program reaction studies (TPO and TPR showed that NiTiOx species were possibly formed during the pretreatments which has shown by the shift of its peak to the lower temperature on Ni catalyst, that supported on mixture of TiO2-Al2O3 compared with catalysts supported on individual TiO2 or Al2O3. The nickel species on reduced Ni catalysts supported on TiO2 and on mixture of TiO2-Al2O3 could be detected by X-ray diffraction. The catalyst's activities toward CH4 formation were affected by the reduction temperature. Activity for CH4 formation was decreased in the following order: Ni/ TiO2 > Ni/ TiO2: Al2O3 > Ni/ Al2O3 and Ni/ TiO2: Al2O3 > Ni/ TiO2> Ni/ Al2O3, when catalysts were reduced at 300°C or 400°C respectively. The CO2 conversion was decreased in the following order: Ni/ Al2O3 > Ni/ TiO2: Al2O3 > Ni/ TiO2 when catalysts were reduced at 300°C or 400°C respectively.   Keywords: nickel catalyst, carbondioxide, methane

  20. Catalytic Combustion of Gasified Waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kusar, Henrik

    2003-09-01

    This thesis concerns catalytic combustion for gas turbine application using a low heating-value (LHV) gas, derived from gasified waste. The main research in catalytic combustion focuses on methane as fuel, but an increasing interest is directed towards catalytic combustion of LHV fuels. This thesis shows that it is possible to catalytically combust a LHV gas and to oxidize fuel-bound nitrogen (NH{sub 3}) directly into N{sub 2} without forming NO{sub x} The first part of the thesis gives a background to the system. It defines waste, shortly describes gasification and more thoroughly catalytic combustion. The second part of the present thesis, paper I, concerns the development and testing of potential catalysts for catalytic combustion of LHV gases. The objective of this work was to investigate the possibility to use a stable metal oxide instead of noble metals as ignition catalyst and at the same time reduce the formation of NO{sub x} In paper II pilot-scale tests were carried out to prove the potential of catalytic combustion using real gasified waste and to compare with the results obtained in laboratory scale using a synthetic gas simulating gasified waste. In paper III, selective catalytic oxidation for decreasing the NO{sub x} formation from fuel-bound nitrogen was examined using two different approaches: fuel-lean and fuel-rich conditions. Finally, the last part of the thesis deals with deactivation of catalysts. The various deactivation processes which may affect high-temperature catalytic combustion are reviewed in paper IV. In paper V the poisoning effect of low amounts of sulfur was studied; various metal oxides as well as supported palladium and platinum catalysts were used as catalysts for combustion of a synthetic gas. In conclusion, with the results obtained in this thesis it would be possible to compose a working catalytic system for gas turbine application using a LHV gas.

  1. Reduction in the interface-states density of metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistors fabricated on high-index Si (114) surfaces by using an external magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molina, J.; De La Hidalga, J.; Gutierrez, E.

    2014-01-01

    After fabrication of Metal-Oxide-Semiconductor Field-Effect Transistor (MOSFET) devices on high-index silicon (114) surfaces, their threshold voltage (Vth) and interface-states density (Dit) characteristics were measured under the influence of an externally applied magnetic field of B = 6 μT at room temperature. The electron flow of the MOSFET's channel presents high anisotropy on Si (114), and this effect is enhanced by using an external magnetic field B, applied parallel to the Si (114) surface but perpendicular to the electron flow direction. This special configuration results in the channel electrons experiencing a Lorentzian force which pushes the electrons closer to the Si (114)-SiO 2 interface and therefore to the special morphology of the Si (114) surface. Interestingly, Dit evaluation of n-type MOSFETs fabricated on Si (114) surfaces shows that the Si (114)-SiO 2 interface is of high quality so that Dit as low as ∼10 10  cm −2 ·eV −1 are obtained for MOSFETs with channels aligned at specific orientations. Additionally, using both a small positive Vds ≤ 100 mV and B = 6 μT, the former Dit is reduced by 35% in MOSFETs whose channels are aligned parallel to row-like nanostructures formed atop Si (114) surfaces (channels having a 90° rotation), whereas Dit is increased by 25% in MOSFETs whose channels are aligned perpendicular to these nanostructures (channels having a 0° rotation). From these results, the special morphology of a high-index Si (114) plane having nanochannels on its surface opens the possibility to reduce the electron-trapping characteristics of MOSFET devices having deep-submicron features and operating at very high frequencies

  2. Electrodes for Semiconductor Gas Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sung Pil

    2017-01-01

    The electrodes of semiconductor gas sensors are important in characterizing sensors based on their sensitivity, selectivity, reversibility, response time, and long-term stability. The types and materials of electrodes used for semiconductor gas sensors are analyzed. In addition, the effect of interfacial zones and surface states of electrode–semiconductor interfaces on their characteristics is studied. This study describes that the gas interaction mechanism of the electrode–semiconductor interfaces should take into account the interfacial zone, surface states, image force, and tunneling effect. PMID:28346349

  3. Catalytic abatement of nitrous oxide from nitric and production

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oonk, J.

    1998-01-01

    Nitric acid production is identified as a main source of nitrous oxide. Options for emission reduction however are not available. TNO and Hydro Agri studied the technological and economic feasibility of catalytic decomposition of nitrous oxide in nitric acid tail-gases. Although in literature

  4. Catalytic Methane Decomposition over Fe-Al2O3

    KAUST Repository

    Zhou, Lu; Enakonda, Linga Reddy; Saih, Youssef; Loptain, Sergei; Gary, Daniel; Del-Gallo, Pascal; Basset, Jean-Marie

    2016-01-01

    The presence of a Fe-FeAl2O4 structure over an Fe-Al2O3 catalysts is demonstrated to be vital for the catalytic methane decomposition (CMD) activity. After H2 reduction at 750°C, Fe-Al2O3 prepared by means of a fusion method, containing 86.5wt% Fe

  5. Development of semiconductor electronics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bardeen, John.

    1977-01-01

    In 1931, Wilson applied Block's theory about the energy bands for the motion of electrons in a crystal lattice to semiconductors and showed that conduction can take place in two different ways, by electrons and by holes. Not long afterwards Frenkel showed that these carriers can flow by diffusion in a concentration gradient as well as under the influence of an electric field and wrote down equations for the current flow. The third major contribution, in the late 1930's was the explanation of rectification at a metalsemiconductor contact by Mott and more completely by Schottky. In late 1947 the first transistor of the point contact type was invented by Brattin, Shockley and Bardeen. Then after single crystals of Ge were grown, the junction transistor was developed by the same group. The first silicon transistors appeared in 1954. Then an important step was discovery of the planar transistor by Hoenri in 1960 which led to development of integrated circuits by 1962. Many transistors are produced by batch processing on a slice of silicon. Then in 1965 Mos (Metal-Oxide Semiconductor) transistor and in 1968 LSI (Large Scale Intergration circuits) were developed. Aside from electronic circuits, there are many other applications of semiconductors, including junction power rectifiers, junction luminescence (including lasers), solar batteries, radiation detectors, microwave oscillators and charged-coupled devices for computer memories and devices. One of the latest developments is a microprocessor with thousands of transistors and associated circuitry on a single small chip of silicon. It can be programmed to provide a variety of circuit functions, thus it is not necessary to go through the great expense of LSI's for each desired function, but to use standard microprocessors and program to do the job

  6. Layered semiconductor neutron detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Samuel S; Perry, Dale L

    2013-12-10

    Room temperature operating solid state hand held neutron detectors integrate one or more relatively thin layers of a high neutron interaction cross-section element or materials with semiconductor detectors. The high neutron interaction cross-section element (e.g., Gd, B or Li) or materials comprising at least one high neutron interaction cross-section element can be in the form of unstructured layers or micro- or nano-structured arrays. Such architecture provides high efficiency neutron detector devices by capturing substantially more carriers produced from high energy .alpha.-particles or .gamma.-photons generated by neutron interaction.

  7. Basic properties of semiconductors

    CERN Document Server

    Landsberg, PT

    2013-01-01

    Since Volume 1 was published in 1982, the centres of interest in the basic physics of semiconductors have shifted. Volume 1 was called Band Theory and Transport Properties in the first edition, but the subject has broadened to such an extent that Basic Properties is now a more suitable title. Seven chapters have been rewritten by the original authors. However, twelve chapters are essentially new, with the bulk of this work being devoted to important current topics which give this volume an almost encyclopaedic form. The first three chapters discuss various aspects of modern band theory and the

  8. Electrowetting on semiconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palma, Cesar; Deegan, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Applying a voltage difference between a conductor and a sessile droplet sitting on a thin dielectric film separating it from the conductor will cause the drop to spread. When the conductor is a good metal, the change of the drop's contact angle due to the voltage is given by the Young-Lippmann (YL) equation. Here, we report experiments with lightly doped, single crystal silicon as the conductive electrode. We derive a modified YL equation that includes effects due to the semiconductor and contact line pinning. We show that light induces a non-reversible wetting transition, and that our model agrees well with our experimental results.

  9. Semiconductor ionizino. radiation detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-01-01

    Spectrometric semiconductor detectors of ionizing radiation with the electron-hole junction, based on silicon and germanium are presented. The following parameters are given for the individual types of germanium detectors: energy range of detected radiation, energy resolution given as full width at half maximum (FWHM) and full width at one tenth of maximum (FWTM) for 57 Co and 60 Co, detection sensitivity, optimal voltage, and electric capacitance at optimal voltage. For silicon detectors the value of FWHM for 239 Pu is given, the sensitive area and the depth of the sensitive area. (E.S.)

  10. Band structure of semiconductors

    CERN Document Server

    Tsidilkovski, I M

    2013-01-01

    Band Structure of Semiconductors provides a review of the theoretical and experimental methods of investigating band structure and an analysis of the results of the developments in this field. The book presents the problems, methods, and applications in the study of band structure. Topics on the computational methods of band structure; band structures of important semiconducting materials; behavior of an electron in a perturbed periodic field; effective masses and g-factors for the most commonly encountered band structures; and the treatment of cyclotron resonance, Shubnikov-de Haas oscillatio

  11. A comparative evaluation on the emission characteristics of ceramic and metallic catalytic converter in internal combustion engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leman, A. M.; Jajuli, Afiqah; Rahman, Fakhrurrazi; Feriyanto, Dafit; Zakaria, Supaat

    2017-09-01

    Enforcement of a stricter regulation on exhaust emission by many countries has led to utilization of catalytic converter to reduce the harmful pollutant emission. Ceramic and metallic catalytic converters are the most common type of catalytic converter used. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the performance of the ceramic and metallic catalytic converter on its conversion efficiency using experimental measurement. Both catalysts were placed on a modified exhaust system equipped with a Mitshubishi 4G93 single cylinder petrol engine that was tested on an eddy current dynamometer under steady state conditions for several engine speeds. The experimental results show that the metallic catalytic converter reduced a higher percentage of CO up to 98.6% reduction emissions while ceramic catalytic converter had a better reduction efficiency of HC up to 85.4% and 87.2% reduction of NOx.

  12. Metal-surfactant interaction as a tool to control the catalytic selectivity of Pd catalysts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Perez-Coronado, A. M.; Calvo, L.; Baeza, J.A.; Palomar, J.; Lefferts, L.; Rodriguez, J-C.; Gilarranz, M.A.

    2017-01-01

    The catalytic activity of Palladium nanoparticles synthesized via sodium bis[2-ethylhexyl] sulfosuccinate (AOT)/isooctane reverse microemulsion was studied in nitrite reduction. The influence of reaction conditions and the synthesis and purification of the nanoparticles was evaluated. In the

  13. Effects of ion sputtering on semiconductor surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McGuire, G.E.

    1978-01-01

    Ion beam sputtering has been combined with Auger spectroscopy to study the effects of ion beams on semiconductor surfaces. Observations on the mass dependence of ion selective sputtering of two component systems are presented. The effects of ion implantation are explained in terms of atomic dilution. Experimental data are presented that illustrate the super-position of selective sputtering and implantation effects on the surface composition. Sample reduction from electron and ion beam interaction is illustrated. Apparent sample changes which one might observe from the effects of residual gas contamination and electric fields are also discussed. (Auth.)

  14. Single filament semiconductor laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Botez, D.

    1980-01-01

    A semiconductor laser comprising: a body of semiconductor material including a substrate having a surface and a pair of spaced, substantially parallel dove-tailed shaped grooves in said surface, said body having a pair of end surfaces between which said grooves extend, said end surfaces being reflective to light with at least one of said end surfaces being partially transparent to light a first epitaxial layer over said surface of the substrate and the surfaces of the grooves, said first epitaxial layer having a flat surface portion over the portion of the substrate surface between the grooves, a thin second epitaxial layer over said first epitaxial layer, a third epitaxial layer over said second epitaxial layer, said first and third epitaxial layers being of opposite conductivity types and the second epitaxial layer being the active recombination region of the laser with the light being generated therein in the vicinity of the portion which is over the flat surface portion of the first epitaxial layer, and a pair of contacts on said body with one contact being over said third epitaxial body and the other being on said substrate

  15. Tunable preparation of ruthenium nanoparticles with superior size-dependent catalytic hydrogenation properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Yuan; Luo, Yaodong; Yang, Xuan; Yang, Yaxin; Song, Qijun, E-mail: qsong@jiangnan.edu.cn

    2017-06-15

    Highlights: • A facile and efficient strategy is firstly developed for the synthesis of Ru NPs. • Ru NPs are stable and uniform with the controllable sizes from 2.6 to 51.5 nm. • Ru NPs exhibit size-dependent and superior catalytic hydrogenation activity. - Abstract: Ruthenium (Ru) featured with an unusual catalytic behavior is of great significance in several heterogeneous and electro-catalytic reactions. The preparation of tractable Ru nanocatalysts and the building of highly active catalytic system at ambient temperature remains a grand challenge. Herein, a facile strategy is developed for the controllable preparation of Ru nanoparticles (NPs) with the sizes ranging from 2.6 to 51.5 nm. Ru NPs show superior size-dependent catalytic performance with the best kinetic rate constant as high as −1.52 min{sup −1}, which could far surpass the other traditional noble metals. Ru NPs exert exceedingly efficient low-temperature catalytic activity and good recyclability in the catalytic reduction of nitroaromatic compounds (NACs) and azo dyes. The developed catalytic system provides a distinguishing insight for the artificial preparation of Ru NPs with desired sizes, and allows for the development of rational design rules for exploring catalysts with superior catalytic performances, potentially broadening the applications of metallic NP-enabled catalytic analysis.

  16. II-VI semiconductor compounds

    CERN Document Server

    1993-01-01

    For condensed matter physicists and electronic engineers, this volume deals with aspects of II-VI semiconductor compounds. Areas covered include devices and applications of II-VI compounds; Co-based II-IV semi-magnetic semiconductors; and electronic structure of strained II-VI superlattices.

  17. Electronic structure of semiconductor interfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herman, F

    1983-02-01

    The study of semiconductor interfaces is one of the most active and exciting areas of current semiconductor research. Because interfaces play a vital role in modern semiconductor technology (integrated circuits, heterojunction lasers, solar cells, infrared detectors, etc.), there is a strong incentive to understand interface properties at a fundamental level and advance existing technology thereby. At the same time, technological advances such as molecular beam epitaxy have paved the way for the fabrication of semiconductor heterojunctions and superlattices of novel design which exhibit unusual electronic, optical, and magnetic properties and offer unique opportunities for fundamental scientific research. A general perspective on this subject is offered treating such topics as the atomic and electronic structure of semiconductor surfaces and interfaces; oxidation and oxide layers; semiconductor heterojunctions and superlattices; rectifying metal-semiconductor contacts; and interface reactions. Recent progress is emphasized and some future directions are indicated. In addition, the role that large-scale scientific computation has played in furthering our theoretical understanding of semiconductor surfaces and interfaces is discussed. Finally, the nature of theoretical models, and the role they play in describing the physical world is considered.

  18. Quantum transport in semiconductor nanowires

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Dam, J.

    2006-01-01

    This thesis describes a series of experiments aimed at understanding the low-temperature electrical transport properties of semiconductor nanowires. The semiconductor nanowires (1-100 nm in diameter) are grown from nanoscale gold particles via a chemical process called vapor-liquid-solid (VLS)

  19. Semiconductor photocatalysis principles and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Kisch, Horst

    2014-01-01

    Focusing on the basic principles of semiconductor photocatalysis, this book also gives a brief introduction to photochemistry, photoelectrochemistry, and homogeneous photocatalysis. In addition, the author - one of the leading authorities in the field - presents important environmental and practical aspects. A valuable, one-stop source for all chemists, material scientists, and physicists working in this area, as well as novice researchers entering semiconductor photocatalysis.

  20. Progress in semiconductor drift detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rehak, P.; Walton, J.; Gatti, E.

    1985-01-01

    Progress in testing semiconductor drift detectors is reported. Generally better position and energy resolutions were obtained than resolutions published previously. The improvement is mostly due to new electronics better matched to different detectors. It is shown that semiconductor drift detectors are becoming versatile and reliable detectors for position and energy measurements

  1. Semiconductor materials and their properties

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reinders, Angelina H.M.E.; Verlinden, Pierre; van Sark, Wilfried; Freundlich, Alexandre; Reinders, Angele; Verlinden, Pierre; van Sark, Wilfried; Freundlich, Alexandre

    2017-01-01

    Semiconductor materials are the basic materials which are used in photovoltaic (PV) devices. This chapter introduces solid-state physics and semiconductor properties that are relevant to photovoltaics without spending too much time on unnecessary information. Usually atoms in the group of

  2. Optical coherent control in semiconductors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, John Erland; Vadim, Lyssenko; Hvam, Jørn Märcher

    2001-01-01

    of quantum control including the recent applications to semiconductors and nanostructures. We study the influence of inhomogeneous broadening in semiconductors on CC results. Photoluminescence (PL) and the coherent emission in four-wave mixing (FWM) is recorded after resonant excitation with phase...

  3. Terahertz Nonlinear Optics in Semiconductors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Turchinovich, Dmitry; Hvam, Jørn Märcher; Hoffmann, Matthias C.

    2013-01-01

    We demonstrate the nonlinear optical effects – selfphase modulation and saturable absorption of a single-cycle THz pulse in a semiconductor. Resulting from THz-induced modulation of Drude plasma, these nonlinear optical effects, in particular, lead to self-shortening and nonlinear spectral...... breathing of a single-cycle THz pulse in a semiconductor....

  4. Electronic structure of semiconductor interfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herman, F.

    1983-01-01

    The study of semiconductor interfaces is one of the most active and exciting areas of current semiconductor research. Because interfaces play a vital role in modern semiconductor technology (integrated circuits, heterojunction lasers, solar cells, infrared detectors, etc.), there is a strong incentive to understand interface properties at a fundamental level and advance existing technology thereby. At the same time, technological advances such as molecular beam epitaxy have paved the way for the fabrication of semiconductor heterojunctions and superlattices of novel design which exhibit unusual electronic, optical, and magnetic properties and offer unique opportunities for fundamental scientific research. A general perspective on this subject is offered treating such topics as the atomic and electronic structure of semiconductor surfaces and interfaces; oxidation and oxide layers; semiconductor heterojunctions and superlattices; rectifying metal-semiconductor contacts; and interface reactions. Recent progress is emphasized and some future directions are indicated. In addition, the role that large-scale scientific computation has played in furthering our theoretical understanding of semiconductor surfaces and interfaces is discussed. Finally, the nature of theoretical models, and the role they play in describing the physical world is considered. (Author) [pt

  5. Catalytic cracking of lignites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seitz, M.; Nowak, S.; Naegler, T.; Zimmermann, J. [Hochschule Merseburg (Germany); Welscher, J.; Schwieger, W. [Erlangen-Nuernberg Univ. (Germany); Hahn, T. [Halle-Wittenberg Univ., Halle (Germany)

    2013-11-01

    A most important factor for the chemical industry is the availability of cheap raw materials. As the oil price of crude oil is rising alternative feedstocks like coal are coming into focus. This work, the catalytic cracking of lignite is part of the alliance ibi (innovative Braunkohlenintegration) to use lignite as a raw material to produce chemicals. With this new one step process without an input of external hydrogen, mostly propylene, butenes and aromatics and char are formed. The product yield depends on manifold process parameters. The use of acid catalysts (zeolites like MFI) shows the highest amount of the desired products. Hydrogen rich lignites with a molar H/C ratio of > 1 are to be favoured. Due to primary cracking and secondary reactions the ratio between catalyst and lignite, temperature and residence time are the most important parameter to control the product distribution. Experiments at 500 C in a discontinuous rotary kiln reactor show yields up to 32 wt-% of hydrocarbons per lignite (maf - moisture and ash free) and 43 wt-% char, which can be gasified. Particularly, the yields of propylene and butenes as main products can be enhanced four times to about 8 wt-% by the use of catalysts while the tar yield decreases. In order to develop this innovative process catalyst systems fixed on beads were developed for an easy separation and regeneration of the used catalyst from the formed char. (orig.)

  6. Organic semiconductors in a spin

    CERN Document Server

    Samuel, I

    2002-01-01

    A little palladium can go a long way in polymer-based light-emitting diodes. Inorganic semiconductors such as silicon and gallium arsenide are essential for countless applications in everyday life, ranging from PCs to CD players. However, while they offer unrivalled computational speed, inorganic semiconductors are also rigid and brittle, which means that they are less suited to applications such as displays and flexible electronics. A completely different class of materials - organic semiconductors - are being developed for these applications. Organic semiconductors have many attractive features: they are easy to make, they can emit visible light, and there is tremendous scope for tailoring their properties to specific applications by changing their chemical structure. Research groups and companies around the world have developed a wide range of organic-semiconductor devices, including transistors, light-emitting diodes (LEDs), solar cells and lasers. (U.K.)

  7. Engineering reactors for catalytic reactions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    126, No. 2, March 2014, pp. 341–351. c Indian Academy of Sciences. ... enhancement was realized by catalyst design, appropriate choice of reactor, better injection and .... Gas–liquid and liquid–solid transport processes in catalytic reactors.5.

  8. Exploring asymmetric catalytic transformations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Guduguntla, Sureshbabu

    2017-01-01

    In Chapter 2, we report a highly enantioselective synthesis of β-alkyl-substituted alcohols through a one-pot Cu- catalyzed asymmetric allylic alkylation with organolithium reagents followed by reductive ozonolysis. The synthesis of γ-alkyl-substituted alcohols was also achieved through Cu-catalyzed

  9. Semiconductor radiation detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Zane W.; Burger, Arnold

    2010-03-30

    A semiconductor detector for ionizing electromagnetic radiation, neutrons, and energetic charged particles. The detecting element is comprised of a compound having the composition I-III-VI.sub.2 or II-IV-V.sub.2 where the "I" component is from column 1A or 1B of the periodic table, the "II" component is from column 2B, the "III" component is from column 3A, the "IV" component is from column 4A, the "V" component is from column 5A, and the "VI" component is from column 6A. The detecting element detects ionizing radiation by generating a signal proportional to the energy deposited in the element, and detects neutrons by virtue of the ionizing radiation emitted by one or more of the constituent materials subsequent to capture. The detector may contain more than one neutron-sensitive component.

  10. Semiconductor testing method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, Stephen.

    1992-01-01

    In a method of avoiding use of nuclear radiation, eg gamma rays, X-rays, electron beams, for testing semiconductor components for resistance to hard radiation, which hard radiation causes data corruption in some memory devices and 'latch-up' in others, similar fault effects can be achieved using a xenon or other 'light' flash gun even though the penetration of light is significantly less than that of gamma rays. The method involves treating a device with gamma radiation, measuring a particular fault current at the onset of a fault event, repeating the test with light to confirm the occurrence of the fault event at the same measured fault current, and using the fault current value as a reference for future tests using light on similar devices. (author)

  11. Radial semiconductor drift chambers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rawlings, K.J.

    1987-01-01

    The conditions under which the energy resolution of a radial semiconductor drift chamber based detector system becomes dominated by the step noise from the detector dark current have been investigated. To minimise the drift chamber dark current attention should be paid to carrier generation at Si/SiO 2 interfaces. This consideration conflicts with the desire to reduce the signal risetime: a higher drift field for shorter signal pulses requires a larger area of SiO 2 . Calculations for the single shaping and pseudo Gaussian passive filters indicate that for the same degree of signal risetime sensitivity in a system dominated by the step noise from the detector dark current, the pseudo Gaussian filter gives only a 3% improvement in signal/noise and 12% improvement in rate capability compared with the single shaper performance. (orig.)

  12. Energy distribution in semiconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ance, C.

    1979-01-01

    For various semiconductors the dispersive energy Esub(d) defined in the Wemple-Didomenico model is connected with the covalent and ionic energies Esub(h) and C. A continuous curve of ionicity against the ratio of the two energies Esub(A) and Esub(B), connected to Esub(h) and C is reported. Afromowitz's model is applied to the ternary compounds Gasub(1-x)Alsub(x)Sb using optical decomposition. From these results the average energy gap Esub(g) is given by Esub(g) = D 0 M 0 sup((IB))/(epsilon 1 (0)-1) where M 0 sup((IB)) is the interband transition contribution to the optical moment M 0 . (author)

  13. Organic Semiconductor Photovoltaics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sariciftci, Niyazi Serdar

    2005-03-01

    Recent developments on organic photovoltaic elements are reviewed. Semiconducting conjugated polymers and molecules as well as nanocrystalline inorganic semiconductors are used in composite thin films. The photophysics of such photoactive devices is based on the photoinduced charge transfer from donor type semiconducting molecules onto acceptor type molecules such as Buckminsterfullerene, C60 and/or nanoparticles. Similar to the first steps in natural photosynthesis, this photoinduced electron transfer leads to a number of potentially interesting applications which include sensitization of the photoconductivity and photovoltaic phenomena. Examples of photovoltaic architectures are discussed with their potential in terrestrial solar energy conversion. Several materials are introduced and discussed for their photovoltaic activities. Furthermore, nanomorphology has been investigated with AFM, SEM and TEM. The morphology/property relationship for a given photoactive system is found to be a major effect.

  14. PARAMETRIC EVALUATION OF VOC CONVERSION VIA CATALYTIC INCINERATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaskantzis Neto G.

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract - A pilot-scale catalytic incineration system was used to investigate the effectiveness of catalytic incineration as a means of reducing volatile organic compound (VOC air pollutants. The objectives of the study were: 1 to investigate the effects of operating and design variables on the reduction efficiency of VOCs; and 2 to evaluate reduction efficiencies for specific compounds in different chemical classes. The study results verified that the following factors affect the catalyst performance: inlet temperature, space velocity, compound type, and compound inlet concentration. Tests showed that reduction efficiencies exceeding 98% were possible, given sufficiently high inlet gas temperatures for the following classes of compounds: alcohols, acetates, ketones, hydrocarbons, and aromatics

  15. Photolytic AND Catalytic Destruction of Organic Waste Water Pollutants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torosyan, V. F.; Torosyan, E. S.; Kryuchkova, S. O.; Gromov, V. E.

    2017-01-01

    The system: water supply source - potable and industrial water - wastewater - sewage treatment - water supply source is necessary for water supply and efficient utilization of water resources. Up-to-date technologies of waste water biological treatment require for special microorganisms, which are technologically complex and expensive but unable to solve all the problems. Application of photolytic and catalytically-oxidizing destruction is quite promising. However, the most reagents are strong oxidizers in catalytic oxidation of organic substances and can initiate toxic substance generation. Methodic and scientific approaches to assess bread making industry influence on the environment have been developed in this paper in order to support forecasting and taking technological decisions concerning reduction of this influence. Destructive methods have been tested: ultra violet irradiation and catalytic oxidation for extraction of organic compounds from waste water by natural reagents.

  16. Magnetic excitations in ferromagnetic semiconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furdyna, J.K.; Liu, X.; Zhou, Y.Y.

    2009-01-01

    Magnetic excitations in a series of GaMnAs ferromagnetic semiconductor films were studied by ferromagnetic resonance (FMR). Using the FMR approach, multi-mode spin wave resonance spectra have been observed, whose analysis provides information on magnetic anisotropy (including surface anisotropy), distribution of magnetization precession within the GaMnAs film, dynamic surface spin pinning (derived from surface anisotropy), and the value of exchange stiffness constant D. These studies illustrate a combination of magnetism and semiconductor physics that is unique to magnetic semiconductors

  17. Semiconductor Nanocrystals for Biological Imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fu, Aihua; Gu, Weiwei; Larabell, Carolyn; Alivisatos, A. Paul

    2005-06-28

    Conventional organic fluorophores suffer from poor photo stability, narrow absorption spectra and broad emission feature. Semiconductor nanocrystals, on the other hand, are highly photo-stable with broad absorption spectra and narrow size-tunable emission spectra. Recent advances in the synthesis of these materials have resulted in bright, sensitive, extremely photo-stable and biocompatible semiconductor fluorophores. Commercial availability facilitates their application in a variety of unprecedented biological experiments, including multiplexed cellular imaging, long-term in vitro and in vivo labeling, deep tissue structure mapping and single particle investigation of dynamic cellular processes. Semiconductor nanocrystals are one of the first examples of nanotechnology enabling a new class of biomedical applications.

  18. State of the art in semiconductor detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rehak, P.; Gatti, E.

    1990-01-01

    The state of the art in semiconductor detectors for elementary particle physics and X-ray astronomy is briefly reviewed. Semiconductor detectors are divided into two groups; i) classical semiconductor diode detectors and ii) semiconductor memory detectors. Principles of signal formation for both groups of detectors are described and their performance is compared. New developments of silicon detectors are reported here. (orig.)

  19. State of the art in semiconductor detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rehak, P.; Gatti, E.

    1989-01-01

    The state of the art in semiconductor detectors for elementary particle physics and x-ray astronomy is briefly reviewed. Semiconductor detectors are divided into two groups; classical semiconductor diode detectors; and semiconductor memory detectors. Principles of signal formation for both groups of detectors are described and their performance is compared. New developments of silicon detectors are reported here. 13 refs., 8 figs

  20. Semiconductor device comprising a pn-heterojunction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    2007-01-01

    An electric device is disclosed comprising a pn-heterojunction ( 4 ) formed by a nanowire ( 3 ) of 111 -V semiconductor material and a semiconductor body ( 1 ) comprising a group IV semiconductor material. The nanowire ( 3 ) is positioned in direct contact with the surface ( 2 ) of the semiconductor

  1. Toward designing semiconductor-semiconductor heterojunctions for photocatalytic applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Liping; Jaroniec, Mietek

    2018-02-01

    Semiconductor photocatalysts show a great potential for environmental and energy-related applications, however one of the major disadvantages is their relatively low photocatalytic performance due to the recombination of electron-hole pairs. Therefore, intensive research is being conducted toward design of heterojunctions, which have been shown to be effective for improving the charge-transfer properties and efficiency of photocatalysts. According to the type of band alignment and direction of internal electric field, heterojunctions are categorized into five different types, each of which is associated with its own charge transfer characteristics. Since the design of heterojunctions requires the knowledge of band edge positions of component semiconductors, the commonly used techniques for the assessment of band edge positions are reviewed. Among them the electronegativity-based calculation method is applied for a large number of popular visible-light-active semiconductors, including some widely investigated bismuth-containing semiconductors. On basis of the calculated band edge positions and the type of component semiconductors reported, heterojunctions composed of the selected bismuth-containing semiconductors are proposed. Finally, the most popular synthetic techniques for the fabrication of heterojunctions are briefly discussed.

  2. Oscillatory behaviour of catalytic properties, structure and temperature during the catalytic partial oxidation of methane on Pd/Al2O3

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kimmerle, B.; Baiker, A.; Grunwaldt, Jan-Dierk

    2010-01-01

    Pd/Al2O3 catalysts showed an oscillatory behaviour during the catalytic partial oxidation (CPO) of methane, which was investigated simultaneously by IR-thermography, X-ray absorption spectroscopy, and online mass-spectrometry to correlate the temperature, state of the catalyst and catalytic...... to self-reduction leading to extinction of the process. The latter was the key driver for the oscillations and thus gave additional insight into the mechanism of partial methane oxidation....

  3. Numerical methods for semiconductor heterostructures with band nonparabolicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Weichung; Hwang Tsungmin; Lin Wenwei; Liu Jinnliang

    2003-01-01

    This article presents numerical methods for computing bound state energies and associated wave functions of three-dimensional semiconductor heterostructures with special interest in the numerical treatment of the effect of band nonparabolicity. A nonuniform finite difference method is presented to approximate a model of a cylindrical-shaped semiconductor quantum dot embedded in another semiconductor matrix. A matrix reduction method is then proposed to dramatically reduce huge eigenvalue systems to relatively very small subsystems. Moreover, the nonparabolic band structure results in a cubic type of nonlinear eigenvalue problems for which a cubic Jacobi-Davidson method with an explicit nonequivalence deflation method are proposed to compute all the desired eigenpairs. Numerical results are given to illustrate the spectrum of energy levels and the corresponding wave functions in rather detail

  4. Semiconductor technology for reducing emissions and increasing efficiency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duffin, B.; Frank, R. [Motorola Semiconductor Products Sector, Phoenix, AZ (United States)

    1997-12-31

    The cooperation and support of all industries are required to significantly impact a worldwide reduction in gaseous emissions that may contribute to climate change. Each industry also is striving to more efficiently utilize the resources that it consumes since this is both conservation for good citizenship and an intelligent approach to business. The semiconductor industry is also extremely concerned with these issues. However, semiconductor manufacturer`s products provide solutions for reduced emissions and increased efficiency in their industry, other industries and areas that can realize significant improvements through control technology. This paper will focus on semiconductor technologies of digital control, power switching and sensing to improve efficiency and reduce emissions in automotive, industrial, and office/home applications. 10 refs., 13 figs.

  5. Method of manufacturing a semiconductor device and semiconductor device obtained with such a method

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    2008-01-01

    The invention relates to a method of manufacturing a semiconductor device (10) with a semiconductor body (1) which is provided with at least one semiconductor element, wherein on the surface of the semiconductor body (1) a mesa- shaped semiconductor region (2) is formed, a masking layer (3) is

  6. Selective, electrochemical etching of a semiconductor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahal, Rajendra P.; Bhat, Ishwara B.; Chow, Tat-Sing

    2018-03-20

    Methods for facilitating fabricating semiconductor structures are provided which include: providing a multilayer structure including a semiconductor layer, the semiconductor layer including a dopant and having an increased conductivity; selectively increasing, using electrochemical processing, porosity of the semiconductor layer, at least in part, the selectively increasing porosity utilizing the increased conductivity of the semiconductor layer; and removing, at least in part, the semiconductor layer with the selectively increased porosity from the multilayer structure. By way of example, the selectively increasing porosity may include selectively, anodically oxidizing, at least in part, the semiconductor layer of the multilayer structure.

  7. Disorder phenomena in covalent semiconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Popescu, M.A.

    1975-01-01

    The structure of the amorphous semiconductors has been investigated by means of X-ray diffraction and by computer simulation of random network models. Amorphous germanium contains mainly five and six-membered rings of atoms. In glassy state, the ternary compounds A 2 B 4 C 2 5 , such as CdGeAs 2 contain only even rings of atoms (six-membered and eight-membered rings). In the memory glasses of the type A 2 B 4 C 2 5 , such as GeAs 2 Te 7 , the valency state of every element is that from the crystal and important van der Waals forces are effective in the network. No Ge-Ge, Ge-As and As-As bonds are formed. The high pressure forms of the germanium have been simulated by computer. The force constants of the covalent bonds in Ge III and Ge IV differ from those in Ge I. The bond bending force constant decreases rapidly when the density of the crystal increases, a fact which has been imparted to a reduction of the sp 3 hybridization. The compressibility curve of the Ge I has been explained. The effect of the radial and uniaxial deformation on the non-crystalline networks has been studied. The compressibility of the amorphous germanium is by 1.5 per cent greater than that of crystalline germanium. The Poisson coefficient for a-Ge network is 0.233. The structure of the As 2 S 3 glass doped with different amounts of germanium (up to 40 at. per cent) and silver (up to 12 at. per cent) has been investigated. The As 2 S 3 Gesub(x) compositions are constituted from a disordered packing of structural units whose chemical composition and relative proportion in the glass essentially depends on the germanium content. (author)

  8. Metal-insulator-semiconductor photodetectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chu-Hsuan; Liu, Chee Wee

    2010-01-01

    The major radiation of the sun can be roughly divided into three regions: ultraviolet, visible, and infrared light. Detection in these three regions is important to human beings. The metal-insulator-semiconductor photodetector, with a simpler process than the pn-junction photodetector and a lower dark current than the MSM photodetector, has been developed for light detection in these three regions. Ideal UV photodetectors with high UV-to-visible rejection ratio could be demonstrated with III-V metal-insulator-semiconductor UV photodetectors. The visible-light detection and near-infrared optical communications have been implemented with Si and Ge metal-insulator-semiconductor photodetectors. For mid- and long-wavelength infrared detection, metal-insulator-semiconductor SiGe/Si quantum dot infrared photodetectors have been developed, and the detection spectrum covers atmospheric transmission windows.

  9. Metal-Insulator-Semiconductor Photodetectors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chu-Hsuan Lin

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The major radiation of the Sun can be roughly divided into three regions: ultraviolet, visible, and infrared light. Detection in these three regions is important to human beings. The metal-insulator-semiconductor photodetector, with a simpler process than the pn-junction photodetector and a lower dark current than the MSM photodetector, has been developed for light detection in these three regions. Ideal UV photodetectors with high UV-to-visible rejection ratio could be demonstrated with III-V metal-insulator-semiconductor UV photodetectors. The visible-light detection and near-infrared optical communications have been implemented with Si and Ge metal-insulator-semiconductor photodetectors. For mid- and long-wavelength infrared detection, metal-insulator-semiconductor SiGe/Si quantum dot infrared photodetectors have been developed, and the detection spectrum covers atmospheric transmission windows.

  10. Quantum optics with semiconductor nanostructures

    CERN Document Server

    Jahnke, Frank

    2012-01-01

    A guide to the theory, application and potential of semiconductor nanostructures in the exploration of quantum optics. It offers an overview of resonance fluorescence emission.$bAn understanding of the interaction between light and matter on a quantum level is of fundamental interest and has many applications in optical technologies. The quantum nature of the interaction has recently attracted great attention for applications of semiconductor nanostructures in quantum information processing. Quantum optics with semiconductor nanostructures is a key guide to the theory, experimental realisation, and future potential of semiconductor nanostructures in the exploration of quantum optics. Part one provides a comprehensive overview of single quantum dot systems, beginning with a look at resonance fluorescence emission. Quantum optics with single quantum dots in photonic crystal and micro cavities are explored in detail, before part two goes on to review nanolasers with quantum dot emitters. Light-matter interaction...

  11. Atomic layer deposition for semiconductors

    CERN Document Server

    Hwang, Cheol Seong

    2014-01-01

    This edited volume discusses atomic layer deposition (ALD) for all modern semiconductor devices, moving from the basic chemistry of ALD and modeling of ALD processes to sections on ALD for memories, logic devices, and machines.

  12. Semiconductor technology program. Progress briefs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bullis, W. M.

    1980-01-01

    Measurement technology for semiconductor materials, process control, and devices is reviewed. Activities include: optical linewidth and thermal resistance measurements; device modeling; dopant density profiles; resonance ionization spectroscopy; and deep level measurements. Standardized oxide charge terminology is also described.

  13. Semiconductor radiation detectors. Device physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lutz, G.

    2007-01-01

    Starting from basic principles, the author, whose own contributions to these developments have been significant, describes the rapidly growing field of modern semiconductor detectors used for energy and position measurement radiation. This development was stimulated by requirements in elementary particle physics where it has led to important scientific discoveries. It has now spread to many other fields of science and technology. The book is written in a didactic way and includes an introduction to semiconductor physics. The working principles of semiconductor radiation detectors are explained in an intuitive way, followed by formal quantitative analysis. Broad coverage is also given to electronic signal readout and to the subject of radiation damage. The book is the first to comprehensively cover the semiconductor radiation detectors currently in use. It is useful as a teaching guide and as a reference work for research and applications. (orig.)

  14. Self-assembling peptide semiconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Kai; Makam, Pandeeswar; Aizen, Ruth; Gazit, Ehud

    2017-01-01

    Semiconductors are central to the modern electronics and optics industries. Conventional semiconductive materials bear inherent limitations, especially in emerging fields such as interfacing with biological systems and bottom-up fabrication. A promising candidate for bioinspired and durable nanoscale semiconductors is the family of self-assembled nanostructures comprising short peptides. The highly ordered and directional intermolecular π-π interactions and hydrogen-bonding network allow the formation of quantum confined structures within the peptide self-assemblies, thus decreasing the band gaps of the superstructures into semiconductor regions. As a result of the diverse architectures and ease of modification of peptide self-assemblies, their semiconductivity can be readily tuned, doped, and functionalized. Therefore, this family of electroactive supramolecular materials may bridge the gap between the inorganic semiconductor world and biological systems. PMID:29146781

  15. Temperature controller of semiconductor laser

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Matoušek, Vít; Číp, Ondřej

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 73, č. 3 (2003), s. 10 - 12 ISSN 0928-5008 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z2065902 Keywords : temperature controller * semiconductor laser * laser diode Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers

  16. Catalytic bioreactors and methods of using same

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worden, Robert Mark; Liu, Yangmu Chloe

    2017-07-25

    Various embodiments provide a bioreactor for producing a bioproduct comprising one or more catalytically active zones located in a housing and adapted to keep two incompatible gaseous reactants separated when in a gas phase, wherein each of the one or more catalytically active zones may comprise a catalytic component retainer and a catalytic component retained within and/or thereon. Each of the catalytically active zones may additionally or alternatively comprise a liquid medium located on either side of the catalytic component retainer. Catalytic component may include a microbial cell culture located within and/or on the catalytic component retainer, a suspended catalytic component suspended in the liquid medium, or a combination thereof. Methods of using various embodiments of the bioreactor to produce a bioproduct, such as isobutanol, are also provided.

  17. Wake fields in semiconductor plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berezhiani, V.I.; Mahajan, S.M.

    1994-05-01

    It is shown that an intense short laser pulse propagating through a semiconductor plasma will generated longitudinal Langmuir waves in its wake. The measurable wake field can be used as a diagnostic to study nonlinear optical phenomena. For narrow gap semiconductors (for examples InSb) with Kane-type dispersion relation, the system can simulate, at currently available laser powers, the physics underlying wake-field accelerators. (author). 9 refs, 1 fig

  18. Semiconductor research with reactor neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kimura, Itsuro

    1992-01-01

    Reactor neutrons play an important role for characterization of semiconductor materials as same as other advanced materials. On the other hand reactor neutrons bring about not only malignant irradiation effects called radiation damage, but also useful effects such as neutron transmutation doping and defect formation for opto-electronics. Research works on semiconductor materials with the reactor neutrons of the Kyoto University Reactor (KUR) are briefly reviewed. In this review, a stress is laid on the present author's works. (author)

  19. Semiconductor crystal high resolution imager

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levin, Craig S. (Inventor); Matteson, James (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A radiation imaging device (10). The radiation image device (10) comprises a subject radiation station (12) producing photon emissions (14), and at least one semiconductor crystal detector (16) arranged in an edge-on orientation with respect to the emitted photons (14) to directly receive the emitted photons (14) and produce a signal. The semiconductor crystal detector (16) comprises at least one anode and at least one cathode that produces the signal in response to the emitted photons (14).

  20. Dissipative chaos in semiconductor superlattices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Moghadam

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available In this paper the motion of electron in a miniband of a semiconductor superlattice (SSL under the influence of external electric and magnetic fields is investigated. The electric field is applied in a direction perpendicular to the layers of the semiconductor superlattice, and the magnetic field is applied in different direction Numerical calculations show conditions led to the possibility of chaotic behaviors.