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Sample records for semi-natural beech forests

  1. How does litter quality and site heterogeneity interact on decomposer food webs of a semi-natural forest?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Strandmark, Lisa Bjørnlund; Christensen, Søren

    2005-01-01

    in gaps. Taxonomic diversity of nematodes increased during decomposition and functional diversity of nematodes followed a pattern often encountered, i.e. opportunistic bacterial-feeders were gradually replaced by fungal-feeders and slower growing bacterial-feeders while predators and omnivors peaked......The relative importance of litter quality and site heterogeneity on population dynamics of decomposer food webs was investigated in a semi-natural mixed deciduous forest in Denmark. Litterbags containing beech or ash leaves were placed in four plots. Plots were located within gaps and under closed...

  2. VEGETATION DYNAMICS IN EUROPEAN BEECH FORESTS

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    A. FISCHER

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available Dynamic processes can be classified in terms of their time scale, their spatial scale, the elements observed, and the degree of human impact. Using these categories the regeneration of the tree layer, the regeneration of the herb layer as well as successional changes of supraregional importance (immissions, global change are discussed. A virgin (mixed European beech forest consists of a mosaic of sub-stands that can be typified by their structure and developmental stage (phase of the tree layer; in some phases the tree individuals of each sub-stand are rather even-aged. Natural cyclic regeneration of virgin (mixed European beech forests mainly includes the tree species of the terminal phases, expecially the beech itself. Changes of tree species composition within the cycle are the exception; in European beech forests light-demanding pioneers seem to be restricted to rather small patches under natural conditions. In contrast, the sequence (1 felled-area flora, (2 pioneer shrub/pioneer forest and (3 terminal forest is a characteristic feature of managed deciduous forests as a consequence of soil disturbances. During the cyclic regeneration of the tree layer of European beech forests the floristic content of the ground layer vegetation does not change fundamentally. Regeneration of many of the ground layer species of beech forests via generative diaspores is more or less restricted to micro-disturbances. In contrast disturbance of the topsoil and creation of open habitats for the establishment of saplings in the absence of competition is taking place all over a clear-cutting area. European beech forests are subject to changes of floristic structure caused by immissions. Especially nitrogen, emitted over decades in large quantities, causes a successive change in floristics: species requiring high amounts of nitrogen are increasing in beech forests all over Europe. Most of them are rapidly and tall growing species, outcompeting the slower and smaller

  3. Biomass in Serbia - potential of beech forests

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    Brasanac-Bosanac, Lj.; Cirkovic-Mitrovic, T.; Popovic, V.; Jokanovic, D.

    2012-04-01

    As for the renewable sources for energy production, biomass from forests and wood processing industry comes to the second place. The woody biomass accounts for 1.0 Mtoe, that is equivalent with 1.0 Mtoe of oil. Due to current evaluations, the greatest part of woody biomass would be used for briquettes and pallets production. As the biomass from forests is increasingly becoming the interest of national and international market, a detailed research on overall potential of woody supply from Serbian forests is required. Beech forests account for 29.4 % of forest cover of Serbia. They also have the greatest standing volume (42.4 % of the overall standing volume) and the greatest mean annual increment (32.3 %)(Bankovic,et.al.2009). Herewith, the aim of this poster is to determine the long-term biomass production of these forests.For this purpose a management unit called Lomnicka reka has been chosen. As these beech forests have similar structural development, this location is considered representative for whole Serbia. DBH of all trees were measured with clipper and the accuracy of 0.01 mm, and the heights with a Vertex 3 device (with accuracy of 0.1 m). All measurements were performed on the fields each 500 m2 (square meters). The overall quantity of root biomass was calculated using the allometric equations. The poster shows estimated biomass stocks of beech forests located in Rasina area. Dates are evaluated using non-linear regression (Wutzler,T.et.al.2008). Biomass potential of Serbian beech forests will enable the evaluation of long-term potential of energy generation from woody biomass in agreement with principles of sustainable forest management. The biomass from such beech forests can represent an important substitution for energy production from fossil fuels (e.g. oil) and herewith decrease the CO2 emissions.

  4. Water balance of forest and semi natural areas in Hungary (2000-2008)

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    Csáki, Péter

    2017-04-01

    Water balance of forest and semi natural areas in Hungary was analyzed using remote-sensing based evapotranspiration (ET ) maps (1ṡ1 km spatial resolution) by CREMAP model over the 2000-2008 period. Recharge (R) was calculated as the difference of precipitation and evapotranspiration: R = P - ET . For Hungary, the mean annual ET and R in the percentage of the mean annual precipitation were about 90 percent and 10 percent, respectively. ET and R were analyzed in the context of land cover types (artificial surfaces, agricultural areas, forest and semi natural areas, wetlands, water bodies), based on Corine Land Cover 2006. As the ET and R maps have 1 km2 while the land cover map has higher resolution, a number of ET and R pixels would be calculated to more than one land cover types. Thus, there were selected only the pixels that have 90 percent of their area belong to only one land cover type ("clear pixels"). For forest and semi natural areas 4424 "clear pixels" were selected. The ET and R of forest and semi natural areas were analyzed by regions, in the context of groundwater depth, soil texture and leaf area index (LAI). Among the regions, Little Plain (riparian forest ecosystems) presented the highest ET mean (633 mm), while Southern Transdanubia (mostly sandy areas with good infiltration capacity) presented the highest R mean (106 mm) for forests. An interesting phenomenon that, in the case of forests (especially for the Great Plain region), an increasing ET tendency can be detected with the groundwater depth, down to ten meters. This research has been partly supported by the Agroclimate.2 VKSZ_12-1-2013-0034 project.

  5. Edaphic potentials of beech forests on Brezovica

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    Knežević Milan

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The study deals with the soils in the montane beech forest (Fagetum moesiacae montanum Jov. 53 in the management units "Južni Kuèaj II" and "Bogovina I", on the mountain massif Brezovica. Soil genesis in the beech forests of Brezovica, along with vegetation and relief, was affected by the character of parent rock. The study soils occur over two types of bedrock: limestone and argilloschist The soil types and sub-types are defined based on the profile morphology, parent rock and pedogenetic processes Two types of soil were analysed on limestone: black earth (calcomelanosol and brown soil (calcocambisol. Two sub-types of black earth were defined: organomineral and brownised. There are two varieties of organomineral black earth: colluvial and lithic. Also two sub-types of brown soils were defined and: typical and illimerised. The soils on limestone are characterised by great spatial variability. Different combinations of soil formations occur on a small area. Soil combinations consist of two or three development phases, the most represented of which are the following: organomineral black earth - brownised black earth; organomineral black earth - brownised black earth - typical brown soil; typical brown soil - illimerised soil Typical brown soil is formed on argilloschists and it occurs in two forms: medium deep, medium skeletal acid brown soil and deep, poorly skeletal acid brown soil The most productive sites of the montane beech forest on Brezovica are deep acid brown soils and the soil combination: typical brown soil - illimerised soil on limestone.

  6. Ecology of beech forests in the northern hemisphere

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peters, R.

    1992-01-01

    Beech forests are dominated or codominated by at least one Fagus species. The beeches are a homogeneous group of 11 deciduous tree species growing in the Northern Hemisphere (Figure 1.1). They often dominate forest ecosystems throughout their ranges. The optimum for

  7. Climate Change Impairs Nitrogen Cycling in European Beech Forests.

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    Dannenmann, Michael; Bimüller, Carolin; Gschwendtner, Silvia; Leberecht, Martin; Tejedor, Javier; Bilela, Silvija; Gasche, Rainer; Hanewinkel, Marc; Baltensweiler, Andri; Kögel-Knabner, Ingrid; Polle, Andrea; Schloter, Michael; Simon, Judy; Rennenberg, Heinz

    2016-01-01

    European beech forests growing on marginal calcareous soils have been proposed to be vulnerable to decreased soil water availability. This could result in a large-scale loss of ecological services and economical value in a changing climate. In order to evaluate the potential consequences of this drought-sensitivity, we investigated potential species range shifts for European beech forests on calcareous soil in the 21st century by statistical species range distribution modelling for present day and projected future climate conditions. We found a dramatic decline by 78% until 2080. Still the physiological or biogeochemical mechanisms underlying the drought sensitivity of European beech are largely unknown. Drought sensitivity of beech is commonly attributed to plant physiological constraints. Furthermore, it has also been proposed that reduced soil water availability could promote nitrogen (N) limitation of European beech due to impaired microbial N cycling in soil, but this hypothesis has not yet been tested. Hence we investigated the influence of simulated climate change (increased temperatures, reduced soil water availability) on soil gross microbial N turnover and plant N uptake in the beech-soil interface of a typical mountainous beech forest stocking on calcareous soil in SW Germany. For this purpose, triple 15N isotope labelling of intact beech seedling-soil-microbe systems was combined with a space-for-time climate change experiment. We found that nitrate was the dominant N source for beech natural regeneration. Reduced soil water content caused a persistent decline of ammonia oxidizing bacteria and therefore, a massive attenuation of gross nitrification rates and nitrate availability in the soil. Consequently, nitrate and total N uptake of beech seedlings were strongly reduced so that impaired growth of beech seedlings was observed already after one year of exposure to simulated climatic change. We conclude that the N cycle in this ecosystem and here

  8. Gap formation in Danish beech (Fagus sylvatica) forests of low management intensity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ritter, Eva; Vesterdal, Lars

    2006-01-01

    Soil moisture content (0-90 cm depth) and nitrate-nitrogen (NO3-N) concentrations in soil solution (90 cm depth) were monitored after gap formation (diameter 15-18 m) in three Danish beech-dominated forests on nutrient-rich till soils. NO3-N drainage losses were estimated by the water balance model......-based managed forest, soil solution was collected for 5 years and soil moisture measured in the fourth year after gap formation. Average NO3-N concentrations were significantly higher in the gaps (9.9 and 8.1 mg NO3-N l(-1), respectively) than under closed canopy (0.2 mg l(-1)). In the semi-natural forest...... WATBAL for one of the sites. Two forests were non-intervention forests (semi-natural and unmanaged), the third was subject to nature-based management. The study was intended to assess the range of effects of gap formation in forests of low management intensity. In the unmanaged and the nature...

  9. Beech forests of Azerbaijan: The modern condition, age structure and regeneration

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    Z.M. Hasanov

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Azerbaijan is a country with low forest cover, only 11.8% of the territory is covered with forests. All forests perform important water-soil-protection functions. In forests, naturally grow 107 species of trees and 328 shrubs species. Despite the fact that there are many species in dendroflora, only 10 tree species have economic value for the forest sector of the country. Beech (31.68%, oak (27.40% and hornbeam (26.01% are growing in 85.09% of forested areas. Beech forests are spread on 327 thousand hectares from 989,5 of total forest lands of he Republic. Beech forests are a source of high-quality wood and beech nuts. All beech forests grow in mountains at heights of 600–800 and 1600–1800 m above the sea level and performing important ecological functions. Until recently there were no problems with natural renewal of the beech forests, but now the regeneration of beech forests is alarming. In recent years, the productivity and density of beech forests decreased substantially, the natural regeneration proceeds unsatisfactorily and, consequently, reduction of beech forests takes place. We have researched 33,8 thousand hectares of beech forests of the Lesser Caucasus, their natural regeneration and made analysis of age structure of forests. Keywords: Fagus orientalis, Beech forests, Silviculture, Natural regeneration, Age class

  10. Arthropod diversity in pristine vs. managed beech forests in Transcarpathia (Western Ukraine

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    Vasyl Chumak

    2015-01-01

    We conclude that biodiversity in pristine beech forests is not generally higher than in managed beech forests. However, the much higher amount of dead wood in pristine forests provides a source habitat for saproxylic species spreading into managed forest plots in the same region, but not to distant forests, far from virgin forests, such as in Western Europe.

  11. Flux-profile relationships over a fetch limited beech forest

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dellwik, E.; Jensen, N.O.

    2005-01-01

    The influence of an internal boundary layer and a roughness sublayer on flux-profile relationships for momentum and sensible heat have been investigated for a closed beech forest canopy with limited fetch conditions. The influence was quantified by derivation of local scaling functions for sensib...

  12. Upland beech trees significantly contribute to forest methane exchange

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    Machacova, Katerina; Maier, Martin; Svobodova, Katerina; Halaburt, Ellen; Haddad, Sally; Lang, Friederike; Urban, Otmar

    2016-04-01

    Methane (CH4) can be emitted not only from soil, but also from plants. Fluxes of CH4were predominantly investigated in riparian herbaceous plants, whereas studies on trees, particularly those lacking an aerenchyma, are rare. In soil produced CH4 can be taken up by roots, transported via intercellular spaces and the aerenchyma system, or transpiration stream to aboveground plant tissues and released to the atmosphere via lenticels or stomata. Although CH4 might be also produced by microorganisms living in plant tissues or photochemical processes in plants, these processes are relatively minor. It has been shown that seedlings of European beech (Fagus sylvatica) emit CH4 from its stems despite the lack of an aerenchyma. Our objectives were to determine the CH4 fluxes from mature beech trees and adjacent soil under natural field conditions, and to estimate the role of trees in the CH4exchange within the soil-tree-atmosphere continuum. Measurements were conducted in two mountain beech forests with different geographical and climatic conditions (White Carpathians, Czech Republic; Black Forest, Germany). CH4 fluxes at stems (profile) and root bases level were simultaneously measured together with soil-atmosphere fluxes using static chamber systems followed by chromatographic analysis or continuous laser detection of CH4 concentrations. Our study shows that mature beech trees have the ability to exchange CH4 with the atmosphere. The beech stems emitted CH4 into the atmosphere at the White Carpathians site in the range from 2.00 to 179 μg CH4 m-2 stem area h-1, while CH4 flux rates ranged between -1.34 to 1.73 μg CH4 m-2 h-1 at the Black Forest site. The root bases of beech trees from the White Carpathians released CH4 into the atmosphere (from 0.62 to 49.8 μg CH4 m-2 root area h-1), whereas a prevailing deposition was observed in the Black Forest (from -1.21 to 0.81 μg CH4 m-2 h-1). These fluxes seem to be affected by soil water content and its spatial heterogeneity

  13. China's Beech Forests in the Pre-Quaternary

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    L. Yu-Sheng

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available Fagus in China is never dominant in Late Cretaceous and Tertiary floras although it might reach its highest diversity in the Miocene. The genus Fagus was more widely distributed during the Palaeogene than in the Neogene. Furthermore, the ecological requirements of Fagus in the Palaeogene seem much broader than those in the Neogene onwards. This is because the Palaeogene floras containing Fagus lived in various conditions from an arid and hot climate to a humid and warm habitat. Additionally, Fagus then coexisted with many kinds of hygrophilous, thermophilous and xerophilous plants. However, the wide distribution, broad ecological adaptation and species composition changed greatly in the Neogene. The Neogene Fagus-containing floras are slightly more similar to the modern beech forests than the Palaeogene ones, although a big difference remains. Chinese fossil data document the post-Tertiary development of the modern beech forests. doi:10.1002/mmng.19980010111

  14. SYNTAXOMOMICAL SURVEY O F EUROPEAN BEECH FORESTS: SOME GENERAL CONCLUSIONS

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    H. DIERSCHKE

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available A short overwiev is given about the historical development of syntaxonomy of European beech forests. Different solutions of classification have been proposed, following more or less two main approaches: Division of alliances and suballiances by ecologically or geographically orientated species groups. A new classification of European beech forests is proposed with 8 (or more geographically orientated alliances, which can be further divided into suballiances by ecological species groups. For each alliance character and differential species, nomenclatural type and the area is mentioned, based on a (non puplished synthetic table, including 10.006 relevés from all parts of Europe. From this table also some overlapping species groups (a-n are given.

  15. Characterization of soil microarthropod communities in Italian beech forest

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    Conti, F. D.; Menta, C.; Piovesan, G.

    2009-04-01

    The contribution of soil organisms to ecosystem functions such as decomposition, nutrient recycling and the maintenance of physico-chemical properties is well recognised, as is the fact that soil fauna plays an important role in the formation and stabilisation of soil structure. The diversity of soil fauna includes a quarter of described living species, the majority of which are insects and arachnids. Soil fauna plays an essential role in forests and agro-ecosystems by maintaining their functionality and productivity. The aim of this study is to evaluate the biodiversity of soil microarthropods communities in different Italian beech forest. Particular attention is paid to the role of fossorial microarthropods in the maintenance of soil structure and in the organic matter movements. Three beech forests are studied, two located in the North and one in the Centre of Italy. Microarthropods are extracted from litter and soil with a Berlese-Tullgren funnel, identified to order level (class level for myriapods) and counted using a microscope. Relative order abundance and biodiversity are expressed using the Shannon-Weaver diversity index (H) and evenness index (J). Soil biological quality is expressed using the QBS-ar index and Acari/Collembola ratio. The results show a richness of microarthropods: several orders, till 19 different groups, are determined and identified. Acari and collembola are the main represented taxa and, especially in litter samples, pseudoscorpions, different specimens of diplopods (or millipedes) and chilopods (centipedes) are found. Thus the presence in particular of diplopods offers the possibility of studying fossorial microarthropods functions in detail. Furthermore, both in soil and in litter samples, adapted groups are recognized, such as pauropods, symphyla, proturans and diplurans, with specific morphological characteristics that these species suited to soil habitat. Therefore they attest a good level of soil quality and high natural value

  16. Safeguarding saproxylic fungal biodiversity in Apennine beech forest priority habitats

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    Maggi, Oriana; Lunghini, Dario; Pecoraro, Lorenzo; Sabatini, Francesco Maria; Persiani, Anna Maria

    2015-04-01

    The FAGUS LIFE Project (LIFE11/NAT/IT/135) targets two European priority habitats, i.e. Habitat 9210* Apennine beech forests with Taxus and Ilex, and Habitat 9220* Apennine beech forests with Abies alba, within two National Parks: Cilento, Vallo di Diano and Alburni; Gran Sasso and Monti della Laga. The current limited distribution of the target habitats is also due to the impact of human activities on forest systems, such as harvesting and grazing. The FAGUS project aims at developing and testing management strategies able to integrate the conservation of priority forest habitats (9210* and 9220*) and the sustainable use of forest resources. In order to assess the responses to different management treatments the BACI monitoring design (Before-After, Control-Intervention) has been applied on forest structure and diversity of focus taxa before and after experimental harvesting treatments. Conventional management of Apennine beech forests impacts a wealth of taxonomic groups, such as saproxylic beetles and fungi, which are threatened throughout Europe by the lack of deadwood and of senescing trees, and by the homogeneous structure of managed forests. Deadwood has been denoted as the most important manageable habitat for biodiversity in forests not only for supporting a wide diversity of organisms, but also for playing a prominent role in several ecological processes, creating the basis for the cycling of photosynthetic energy, carbon, and nutrients stored in woody material. Especially fungi can be regarded as key group for understanding and managing biodiversity associated with decaying wood. The before-intervention field sampling was carried out in Autumn 2013 in 33 monitoring plots across the two national Parks. The occurrence at plot level of both Ascomycota and Basidiomycota sporocarps was surveyed. All standing and downed deadwood with a minimum diameter of 10 cm was sampled for sporocarps larger than 1 mm, and information on decay class and fungal morphogroups

  17. INVASION OF BEECH AND E STABLISHMENT OF BEECH FORESTS IN EUROPE

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    R. POTT

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available When studying the natural development in the evolution of beechwood forests in Central Europe after the last glaciation, it is necessary to look at the warm periods prior to the last Weichselian glaciation. The Eem interglacial period has already been studied in great detail in Europe; it is evidend with similar climatic conditions as the current Holocene. At that time nearly all of Europe was more or less completely covered with forests. As laminated sediments and datings indicate, the Eem interglacial period lasted from approximately 125000 to 113000 years before today. The types of trees were generally the same as those of the present, except for the beech (Fagus which was missing due to its delayed re-migration and was replaced by the hornbeam (Carpinus. It was not until the present time following the glaciation-periods that Fagus sylvatica could be found again widespread throughout the woodland vegetation covering Central Europe. The Holocene expansion and re-colonisation of Fagus sylvatica from its refuges during the glacial periods will be described in great detail, based on the most recent pollen analytic proofs.

  18. INVASION OF BEECH AND E STABLISHMENT OF BEECH FORESTS IN EUROPE

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    R. POTT

    1997-04-01

    Full Text Available When studying the natural development in the evolution of beechwood forests in Central Europe after the last glaciation, it is necessary to look at the warm periods prior to the last Weichselian glaciation. The Eem interglacial period has already been studied in great detail in Europe; it is evidend with similar climatic conditions as the current Holocene. At that time nearly all of Europe was more or less completely covered with forests. As laminated sediments and datings indicate, the Eem interglacial period lasted from approximately 125000 to 113000 years before today. The types of trees were generally the same as those of the present, except for the beech (Fagus which was missing due to its delayed re-migration and was replaced by the hornbeam (Carpinus. It was not until the present time following the glaciation-periods that Fagus sylvatica could be found again widespread throughout the woodland vegetation covering Central Europe. The Holocene expansion and re-colonisation of Fagus sylvatica from its refuges during the glacial periods will be described in great detail, based on the most recent pollen analytic proofs.

  19. Is there a Future for the Isolated Oriental Beech (Fagus orientalis Lipsky Forests in Southern Turkey?

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    YILMAZ, Mustafa

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Oriental beech (Fagus orientalis Lipsky is mainly found in the northern region of Turkey.There is also an approximate 40,000 ha of isolated relict oriental beech forest in southern Turkey. Thisrelict population differs somewhat from the northern distribution in terms of average altitudinaldistribution, health conditions, and reactions to climate change. Beech forest distribution in southernTurkey starts at about 1000 m, contrary to the northern distribution, which begins at about 150-200 m. Insouthern Turkey, the average temperature is higher, and summer drought occurs due to irregular rainfall.Beech trees in the south decay at earlier ages due to their sprout origins and higher temperatures than in thenorth. In recent decades, some part of the beech forests have shed leaves during the summer in response tosevere drought. Therefore, these relict populations are on the verge of extinction under unfavorableconditions.

  20. Macromycetes of beech forests within the eastern part of the Fagus area in Europe

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    Maria Lisiewska

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available This work presents the author's view on the habitat if individual forest communities based on the fungi she has collected and gives a comparison of the mycoflora of beech forest in Poland and in south and central Europe. The beech forest were studied by the phytosociological method. Fruit bodies occurring on the soil, in the litter and on rotten wood were studied.

  1. Evaluating management regimes for European beech forests using dynamic programming

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    Juan Torres Rojo

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim of study: This contribution describes a systematic search method for identifying optimum thinning regimes for beech forests (Fagus sylvatica L. by using a combination of optimization heuristics and a simple whole stand growth prediction model. Area of study: Data to build the model come from standard and management forest inventories as well as yield tables from the Northern and Western part of Germany and from southern and central Denmark.Material and Methods: Growth projections are made from equations to project basal area and top height.  The remaining stand variables are recovered from additional equations fitted from forest inventory data or acquired from other authors.  Mortality is estimated through an algorithm based on the maximum density line. The optimization routine uses a two-state dynamic programming model. Thinning type is defined by the NG index, which describes the ratio of the proportion of removed trees and basal area with respect to the same proportion  before thinning. Main results: Growth equations fitted from inventory data show high goodness of fit with R2 values larger than 0.85 and high significance levels for the parameter estimates. The mortality algorithm converges quickly providing mortality estimates within the expected range.Research Highlights: The combination of a simple growth and yield model within a Dynamic Programming framework in conjunction with NG values as indicators of thinning type yield good estimates of practical thinning schedules compared to thinning recommendations provided by diverse authors.Keywords: beech (Fagus sylvatica L.; NG ratio; thinning optimization; growth and yield simulation; mortality.

  2. Characterizing Stand Structure and Growth of Natural Beech Forests for the Development of Sustainable Forest Practices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ghalandarayeshi, Shaaban

    forests in northern Iran lack such scientific foundation. The objective of the present study is to assist in this process by characterizing growth and stand structure of oriental beech for a range of growing conditions in northern Iran and to provide useful insight for application in sustainable...

  3. Water shortage affects the water and nitrogen balance in Central European beech forests.

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    Gessler, A; Keitel, C; Nahm, M; Rennenberg, H

    2004-05-01

    Whilst forest policy promotes cultivation and regeneration of beech dominated forest ecosystems, beech itself is a highly drought sensitive tree species likely to suffer from the climatic conditions prognosticated for the current century. Taking advantage of model ecosystems with cool-moist and warm-dry local climate, the latter assumed to be representative for future climatic conditions, the effects of climate and silvicultural treatment (different thinning regimes) on water status, nitrogen balance and growth parameters of adult beech trees and beech regeneration in the understorey were assessed. In addition, validation experiments with beech seedlings were carried out under controlled conditions, mainly in order to assess the effect of drought on the competitive abilities of beech. As measures of water availability xylem flow, shoot water potential, stomatal conductance as well as delta (13)C and delta (18)O in different tissues (leaves, phloem, wood) were analysed. For the assessment of nitrogen balance we determined the uptake of inorganic nitrogen by the roots as well as total N content and soluble N compounds in different tissues of adult and young trees. Retrospective and current analysis of delta (13)C, growth and meteorological parameters revealed that beech growing under warm-dry climatic conditions were impaired in growth and water balance during periods with low rain-fall. Thinning affected water, N balance and growth mostly of young beech, but in a different way under different local climatic conditions. Under cool, moist conditions, representative for the current climatic and edaphic conditions in beech forests of Central Europe, thinning improves nutrient and water status consistent to published literature and long-term experience of forest practitioners. However, beech regeneration was impaired as a result of thinning at higher temperatures and under reduced water availability, as expected in future climate.

  4. Methanol and other VOC fluxes from a Danish beech forest during late springtime

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schade, Gunnar W.; Solomon, Sheena J.; Dellwik, Ebba

    2011-01-01

    In-canopy mixing ratio gradients and above-canopy fluxes of several volatile organic compounds (VOCs) were measured using a commercial proton transfer reaction mass spectrometer (PTR-MS) in a European beech (Fagus sylvatica) forest in Denmark. Fluxes of methanol were bidirectional: Emission...... results from tropical and pine forest ecosystems in that they did not show this beech ecosystem to be a strong sink for oxygenated VOCs (OVOCs). Instead, their gradients were flat and only small deposition velocities (...

  5. Eddy-covariance methane flux measurements over a European beech forest

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    Gentsch, Lydia; Siebicke, Lukas; Knohl, Alexander

    2015-04-01

    The role of forests in global methane (CH4) turnover is currently not well constrained, partially because of the lack of spatially integrative forest-scale measurements of CH4 fluxes. Soil chamber measurements imply that temperate forests generally act as CH4 sinks. Upscaling of chamber observations to the forest scale is however problematic, if the upscaling is not constrained by concurrent 'top-down' measurements, such as of the eddy-covariance type, which provide sufficient integration of spatial variations and of further potential CH4 flux components within forest ecosystems. Ongoing development of laser absorption-based optical instruments, resulting in enhanced measurement stability, precision and sampling speed, has recently improved the prospects for meaningful eddy-covariance measurements at sites with presumably low CH4 fluxes, hence prone to reach the flux detection limit. At present, we are launching eddy-covariance CH4 measurements at a long-running ICOS flux tower site (Hainich National Park, Germany), located in a semi natural, unmanaged, beech dominated forest. Eddy-covariance measurements will be conducted with a laser spectrometer for parallel CH4, H2Ov and CO2 measurements (FGGA, Los Gatos Research, USA). Independent observations of the CO2 flux by the FGGA and a standard Infrared Gas Analyser (LI-7200, LI-COR, USA) will allow to evaluate data quality of measured CH4 fluxes. Here, we want to present first results with a focus on uncertainties of the calculated CH4 fluxes with regard to instrument precision, data processing and site conditions. In future, we plan to compare eddy-covariance flux estimates to side-by-side turbulent flux observations from a novel eddy accumulation system. Furthermore, soil CH4 fluxes will be measured with four automated chambers situated within the tower footprint. Based on a previous soil chamber study at the same site, we expect the Hainich forest site to act as a CH4 sink. However, we hypothesize that our

  6. Soil Heterogeneity Reflected in Biogeography of Beech Forests in the Borderland Between the Bohemian Massif and the Outer Western Carpathians

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    Samec Pavel

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Soil environment characteristics naturally affect the biogeographical classification of forests in central Europe. However, even on the same localities, different systems of vegetation classification de-scribe the forest types according to the naturally dominant tree species with different accuracy. A set of 20 representative natural beech stands in the borderland between the Bohemian Massif (Hercyni-an biogeographical subprovince and the Outer Western Carpathians (Westcarpathian subprovince was selected in order to compare textural, hydrostatic, physico-chemical and chemical properties of soils between the included geomorphological regions, bioregions and biotopes. Differences in the soils of the surveyed beech stands were mainly due to volume weight and specific weight, maximum capillary capacity (MCC, porosity, base saturation (BS, total soil nitrogen (Nt and fulvic acids. Specifics in the relations between these soil characteristics indicated that transient trans-Hercynian beech forests developed in the borderland between the two compared subprovinces. Soils of the investigated Hercynian beech forests were generally characterized by lower BS and lower Nt. Soils of the trans-Hercynian beech forests were more similar to the Carpathian beech forest soils than soils in the other Hercynian beech forests. Soils of the trans-Hercynian and Carpathian beech forests showed similarly higher BS, deeper occurrence of humic substances, lower specific weight and also higher MCC. Higher content of humic substances as well as MCC indicated an equal effect on forest ecology, which may contribute to more accurate classification of forests.

  7. C Stocks in Forest Floor and Mineral Soil of Two Mediterranean Beech Forests

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    Anna De Marco

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available This study focuses on two Mediterranean beech forests located in northern and southern Italy and therefore subjected to different environmental conditions. The research goal was to understand C storage in the forest floor and mineral soil and the major determinants. Relative to the northern forest (NF, the southern forest (SF was found to produce higher amounts of litterfall (4.3 vs. 2.5 Mg·ha−1 and to store less C in the forest floor (~8 vs. ~12 Mg·ha−1 but more C in the mineral soil (~148 vs. ~72 Mg·ha−1. Newly-shed litter of NF had lower P (0.4 vs. 0.6 mg·g−1 but higher N concentration (13 vs. 10 mg·g−1 than SF. Despite its lower Mn concentration (0.06 vs. 0.18 mg·g−1, SF litter produces a Mn-richer humus (0.32 vs. 0.16 mg·g−1 that is less stable. The data suggest that decomposition in the NF forest floor is limited by the shorter growing season (178 days vs. 238 days and the higher N concentrations in newly shed litter and forest floor. Differences in C stock in the mineral soil reflect differences in ecosystem productivity and long-term organic-matter accumulation. The vertical gradient of soluble and microbial fractions in the soil profile of SF was consistent with a faster turnover of organic matter in the forest floor and greater C accumulation in mineral soil relative to NF. With reference to regional-scale estimates from Italian National Forest Inventory data, the C stock in the mineral soil and the basal area of Italian beech forests were found to be significantly related, whereas C stock in the forest floor and C stock in the mineral soil were not.

  8. Insect attraction to herbivore-induced beech volatiles under different forest management regimes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gossner, Martin M; Weisser, Wolfgang W; Gershenzon, Jonathan; Unsicker, Sybille B

    2014-10-01

    Insect herbivore enemies such as parasitoids and predators are important in controlling herbivore pests. From agricultural systems we know that land-use intensification can negatively impact biological control as an important ecosystem service. The aim of our study was to investigate the importance of management regime for natural enemy pressure and biological control possibilities in forests dominated by European beech. We hypothesize that the volatile blend released from herbivore-infested beech trees functions as a signal, attracting parasitoids and herbivore enemies. Furthermore, we hypothesize that forest management regime influences the composition of species attracted by these herbivore-induced beech volatiles. We installed flight-interception traps next to Lymantria dispar caterpillar-infested young beech trees releasing herbivore-induced volatiles and next to non-infested control trees. Significantly more parasitoids were captured next to caterpillar-infested trees compared to non-infested controls, irrespective of forest type. However, the composition of the trophic guilds in the traps did vary in response to forest management regime. While the proportion of chewing insects was highest in non-managed forests, the proportion of sucking insects peaked in forests with low management and of parasitoids in young, highly managed, forest stands. Neither the number of naturally occurring beech saplings nor herbivory levels in the proximity of our experiment affected the abundance and diversity of parasitoids caught. Our data show that herbivore-induced beech volatiles attract herbivore enemies under field conditions. They further suggest that differences in the structural complexity of forests as a consequence of management regime only play a minor role in parasitoid activity and thus in indirect tree defense.

  9. Mapping beech (Fagus sylvatica L.) forest structure with airborne hyperspectral imagery

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Cho, Moses A

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to assess the utility of hyperspectral data in estimating and mapping forest structural parameters including mean diameter-at-breast-height (DBH), mean tree height and tree density of a closed canopy beech forest...

  10. Cascading effects of a highly specialized beech-aphid–fungus interaction on forest regeneration

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    Susan C. Cook-Patton

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Specialist herbivores are thought to often enhance or maintain plant diversity within ecosystems, because they prevent their host species from becoming competitively dominant. In contrast, specialist herbivores are not generally expected to have negative impacts on non-hosts. However, we describe a cascade of indirect interactions whereby a specialist sooty mold (Scorias spongiosa colonizes the honeydew from a specialist beech aphid (Grylloprociphilus imbricator, ultimately decreasing the survival of seedlings beneath American beech trees (Fagus grandifolia. A common garden experiment indicated that this mortality resulted from moldy honeydew impairing leaf function rather than from chemical or microbial changes to the soil. In addition, aphids consistently and repeatedly colonized the same large beech trees, suggesting that seedling-depauperate islands may form beneath these trees. Thus this highly specialized three-way beech-aphid–fungus interaction has the potential to negatively impact local forest regeneration via a cascade of indirect effects.

  11. How do soil fauna and soil microbiota respond to beech forest growth?

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    Matthieu CHAUVAT, Andrei S. ZAITSEV, Ernst GABRIEL, Volkmar WOLTERS

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available The dynamics and performance of soil biota during forest rotation were studied in monoculture beech stands forming a chronosequence of four different age-classes (30, 62, 111, 153 yr. Biomass was monitored in major groups of microflora, microfauna, mesofauna, and macrofauna. Resource availability (litter layer, soil organic mater, biomass of the two dominant decomposer groups (microflora, earthworms as well as the biomass of mesofauna and microfauna were found to remain quite stable during forest succession. Nevertheless, the marked increase of the biomasses of primary decomposers (fungi, saprophagous macroinvertebrates in the 62-year-old stand, followed by an increase of the biomasses of macropredators in the 111-year-old stand, indicate substantial changes of several components of edaphic communities during forest development. However, constant values of soil respiration suggest that the overall performance of the soil food web does not change during beech forest succession. Thus, the decomposer system of lowland managed beech forests on calcareous soils seems to be very stable over time. We suggest that earthworm activity might have masked impacts of forest development on other soil biota and led to an astounding stability of decomposer assemblages during beech forest rotation [Current Zoology 55 (4: 272–278, 2009].

  12. Nematode communities of natural and managed beech forests - a pilot study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Strandmark, Lisa Bjørnlund; Madsen, Mette Vestergård; Johansson, Sanne

    2002-01-01

    forests is discussed. We suggest dead wood input to be the driving variable leading to the observed differences in the nematode community between managed and natural forests of Zealand, Denmark. The marked site differences found in this study emphasizes the need to carefully choose reference areas where...... soil conditions etc. are very similar to the managed forest in question when reference schemes for nature-based forestry are being developed.......The soil nematode communities of natural beech forests and managed beech forests were surveyed in order to examine which community parameters, if any, would be suited to differentiate between the two management regimes. Nematodes were collected from mineral soil at three sites, each including...

  13. Assessments of Impacts of Nitrogen Deposition on Beech Forests: Results from the Pan-European Intensive Monitoring Programme

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    Johannes Eichhorn

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available The article reviews effects of nitrogen (N deposition on beech forest ecosystems in Europe. On the basis of beech plots of the Pan-European Monitoring Programme of ICP Forests and the EU, the deposition of N compounds as well as input-output budgets are listed and compared with studies in North America. The authors also discuss the critical threshold for N leaching. At present, N is leached in 10% of the plots evaluated. An in-depth evaluation of a beech plot in central Germany is presented. The high N leaching results in a considerable increase (four times higher N content in 2000 compared to 1965 in the export of nitrate from the beech forests from a nearby source. Finally, ecophysiological indicators (N content in beech leaves, fine root system, N content, root/shoot ratios are discussed as a result of high N input.

  14. The effects of Douglas fir monoculture on stand characteristics in a zone of Montane beech forest

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    Kostić Olga

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The right choice of tree species to form forest cultures is of paramount importance to the preservation of the diversity, fertility and ecological stability of forest ecosystems. To that end, we examined the effect of a 40-year-long cultivation of Douglas fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii (Mirb Franco on the floristic composition, characteristics of the forest floor, physical and chemical properties of the soil and the intensity of organic matter decomposition in a beech forest in western Serbia (Mt. Maljen. It was found that the cultivation of Douglas fir caused a reduction in biodiversity, changes in the chemical properties of the soil, that were most pronounced in the surface layers (0-10 cm, and a slowing down in the metabolism of the beech stand. The absence of many plant species characteristic to natural beech forests was observed in the Douglas fir plantation, these were reflected in the detected changes in the chemical properties of the soil, such as lower substitutional acidity (p<0.05, depletion of the adsorption of basis in the cation complex (p<0.001 and lower amounts of C, N, P (p<0.001 and K (p<0.01 in relation to the beech stand (control. No differences were found in soil moisture and active acidity levels. The higher value of the C/N ratio of the Douglas fir litter (p<0.001 provided proof for its lower decomposition rate compared to beech litter (p<0.05. Over time, all these changes could lead to further acidification and degradation of the soil and a reduction in this ecosystem’s productivity.

  15. Thirty-two years of change in an old-growth Ohio beech-maple forest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Runkle, James R

    2013-05-01

    Old-growth forests dominated by understory-tolerant tree species are among forest types most likely to be in equilibrium. However, documentation of the degree to which they are in equilibrium over decades-long time periods is lacking. Changes in climate, pathogens, and land use all are likely to impact stand characteristics and species composition, even in these forests. Here, 32 years of vegetation changes in an old-growth beech (Fagus grandifolia)-sugar maple (Acer saccharum) forest in Hueston Woods, southwest Ohio, USA, are summarized. These changes involve canopy composition and structure, turnover in snags, and development of vegetation in treefall gaps. Stand basal area and canopy density have changed little in 32 years. However, beech has decreased in canopy importance (49% to 32%) while sugar maple has increased (32% to 47%). Annual mortality was about 1.3% throughout the study period. Mortality rates increased with stem size, but the fraction of larger stems increased due to ingrowth from smaller size classes. Beech was represented by more very large stems than small canopy stems: over time, death of those larger stems with inadequate replacement has caused the decrease in beech importance. Sugar maple was represented by more small canopy stems whose growth has increased its importance. The changes in beech and sugar maple relative importance are hypothesized to be due to forest fragmentation mostly from the early 1800s with some possible additional effects associated with the formation of the state park. Snag densities (12-16 snags/ha) and formation rates (1-3 snags.ha(-1).yr(-1)) remained consistent. The treefall gaps previously studied are closing, with a few, large stems remaining. Death of gap border trees occurs consistently enough to favor species able to combine growth in gaps and survival in the understory.

  16. Leaf litter decomposition in temperate deciduous forest stands with a decreasing fraction of beech (Fagus sylvatica).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacob, Mascha; Viedenz, Karin; Polle, Andrea; Thomas, Frank M

    2010-12-01

    We hypothesised that the decomposition rates of leaf litter will increase along a gradient of decreasing fraction of the European beech (Fagus sylvatica) and increasing tree species diversity in the generally beech-dominated Central European temperate deciduous forests due to an increase in litter quality. We studied the decomposition of leaf litter including its lignin fraction in monospecific (pure beech) stands and in stands with up to five tree genera (Acer spp., Carpinus betulus, Fagus sylvatica, Fraxinus excelsior, Tilia spp.) using a litterbag approach. Litter and lignin decomposition was more rapid in stand-representative litter from multispecific stands than in litter from pure beech stands. Except for beech litter, the decomposition rates of species-specific tree litter did not differ significantly among the stand types, but were most rapid in Fraxinus excelsior and slowest in beech in an interspecific comparison. Pairwise comparisons of the decomposition of beech litter with litter of the other tree species (except for Acer platanoides) revealed a "home field advantage" of up to 20% (more rapid litter decomposition in stands with a high fraction of its own species than in stands with a different tree species composition). Decomposition of stand-representative litter mixtures displayed additive characteristics, not significantly more rapid than predicted by the decomposition of litter from the individual tree species. Leaf litter decomposition rates were positively correlated with the initial N and Ca concentrations of the litter, and negatively with the initial C:N, C:P and lignin:N ratios. The results support our hypothesis that the overall decomposition rates are mainly influenced by the chemical composition of the individual litter species. Thus, the fraction of individual tree species in the species composition seems to be more important for the litter decomposition rates than tree species diversity itself.

  17. Gap dynamics and structure of two old-growth beech forest remnants in Slovenia.

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    Tihomir Rugani

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: Due to a long history of intensive forest exploitation, few European beech (Fagus sylvatica L. old-growth forests have been preserved in Europe. MATERIAL AND METHODS: We studied two beech forest reserves in southern Slovenia. We examined the structural characteristics of the two forest reserves based on data from sample plots and complete inventory obtained from four previous forest management plans. To gain a better understanding of disturbance dynamics, we used aerial imagery to study the characteristics of canopy gaps over an 11-year period in the Kopa forest reserve and a 20-year period in the Gorjanci forest reserve. RESULTS: The results suggest that these forests are structurally heterogeneous over small spatial scales. Gap size analysis showed that gaps smaller than 500 m(2 are the dominant driving force of stand development. The percentage of forest area in canopy gaps ranged from 3.2 to 4.5% in the Kopa forest reserve and from 9.1 to 10.6% in the Gorjanci forest reserve. These forests exhibit relatively high annual rates of coverage by newly established (0.15 and 0.25% and closed (0.08 and 0.16% canopy gaps. New gap formation is dependant on senescent trees located throughout the reserve. CONCLUSION: We conclude that these stands are not even-sized, but rather unevenly structured. This is due to the fact that the disturbance regime is characterized by low intensity, small-scale disturbances.

  18. Diversity and primary productivity of hill beech forests from Doftana Valley (Romanian Subcarpathians

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    Mihaela Paucã-Comãnescu

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available The hill beech forests cover most of the woody area in the Doftana Valley. The present study refers, for the first time, to two beech forests typical to this belt, which belong to the phytocoenological associations Epipactieto-Fagetum (Resmeritã,1972, in the Lunca Mare area, and Hieracio rotundati-Fagetum (Vida 1983, Täuber 1987 in the Sotrile area, from floristic, structural, biomass and necromassaccumulation point of view, within the framework of the vertical structure of biocoenosis.The limestone substratum, occasionally with small outcrops in the first beech forest, differs chiefly through the pH levels (6.34-5.67 from the siliceous substratum (pH 5.11-4.36 in the second beech forest. The layer of trees is dominated by Fagus sylvatica in both forests; this species is associated with Cerasus avium (4.5%,Acer pseudoplatanus (2% and Sorbus torminalis (2% in the first beech forest, and is monodominant in the second. Although the forest underwent selective cuts, more intense in the Lunca Mare area, the aboveground ligneous biomass reaches nowadays 222 t/ha in the Lunca Mare area compared to only 163 t/ha in the Sotrile area; theaverage height is 28.8±2.49 m and 23.7±1.12 m, respectively, and the diameter is 33.30±7.9 cm and 31.60±6.28 cm, respectively. The species of macrofungi, not very numerous during the study because of scarce precipitations (6 and 7 species, respectively,are predominant on the rhytidoma trees in the beech forest rooted on the limestone ground; in the Sotrile beech forest they are joined by mycorrhizal and parasite species. The layer of shrub is underdeveloped. The herbaceous layer is discontinuous, and includes, along herbs, small plants and saplings belonging to the ligneous species and to liana Hedera helix. The maximal value of the aboveground biomass of thelayer is 317 kg/ha DM in the Lunca Mare area and 235 kg /ha DM in the Sotrile area.Bryophyta is present in large quantities, especially in the ªotrile area

  19. Comparison of the carbon stock in forest soil of sessile oak and beech forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horváth, Adrienn; Bene, Zsolt; Bidló, András

    2016-04-01

    Forest ecosystems are the most important carbon sinks. The forest soils play an important role in the global carbon cycle, because the global climate change or the increase of atmospheric CO2 level. We do not have enough data about the carbon stock of soils and its change due to human activities, which have similar value to carbon content of biomass. In our investigation we measured the carbon stock of soil in 10 stands of Quercus petraea and Fagus sylvatica. We took a 1.1 m soil column with soil borer and divided to 11 samples each column. The course organic and root residues were moved. After evaluation, we compared our results with other studies and the carbon stock of forests to each other. Naturally, the amount of SOC was the highest in the topsoil layers. However, we found significant difference between forest stands which stayed on the same homogenous bedrock, but very close to each other (e.g. distance was 1 or 2 km). We detected that different forest utilizations and tree species have an effect on the forest carbon as the litter as well (amount, composition). In summary, we found larger amount (99.1 C t/ha on average) of SOC in soil of stands, where sessile oak were the main stand-forming tree species. The amount of carbon was the least in turkey oak-sessile oak stands (85.4 C t/ha on average). We found the highest SOC (118.3 C t/ha) in the most mixed stand (silver lime-beech-red oak). In the future, it will be very important: How does climate change affect the spread of tree species or on carbon storage? Beech is more sensitive, but even sessile oak. These species are expected to replace with turkey oak, which is less sensitive to drought. Thus, it is possible in the future that we can expect to decrease of forest soil carbon stock capacity, which was confirmed by our experiment. Keywords: carbon sequestration, mitigation, Fagus sylvatica, Quercus petraea, litter Acknowledgements: Research is supported by the "Agroclimate.2" (VKSZ_12-1-2013-0034) EU

  20. Heavy metals in the organic soil layer of beech forests in Serbia

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    Kadović Ratko

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available During the last decades, forest ecosystems have been strongly exposed to the effect of different harmful pollutants, especially from the atmosphere. Harmful substances from the air, in addition to the direct effect on forest trees, also deposit in the soil, and have an adverse effect on soil chemistry and pedogenetic processes. The results of previous studies in Serbia (Kadović, Knežević, 2002, 2004 show some specificities regarding the accumulation and migration of heavy metals in the soil. The highest concentrations were found in the layers of forest litter and in the surface organo-mineral horizons. This paper presents the results of the study of heavy metal contents (Zn, Mn, Cu, Fe, Cd, Pb, Ni and Cr in the organic horizon (forest litter of beech forests in Serbia. The study of the heavy metal content in the organic horizon (forest litter is very significant primarily in the aim of monitoring the trend of their migration through the soil profile and the effect on the soil properties and genesis. The soil quality in beech forests in Serbia was assessed within the Project ICP Forest, Level I, by the methodology UN/ECE-EC, 2000.

  1. Natural Regeneration of Beech Forests in the Strict Protected Area of the Plitvice Lakes National Park

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    Tomislav Dubravac

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and Purpose: The study presents the results of an investigation of regeneration processes, growth, development and survival of young growth by field measurement and three-dimensional visualization of horizontal and vertical structure. The results are based on the ten-year investigation (1998-2009 on a permanent experimental plot in a mountain beech forest with dead nettle tree (Lamio orvale - Fagetum sylvaticae Ht. 1938 in conditions of passive protection. Materials and Methods: Basic structural indicators were measured (diameter at breast height and height, structural crown elements (size and shape, ground cover crowns and the occurrence and survival of young growth as the basic conditions of natural regeneration. Particular emphasis in the investigation was paid to the development of crown structures and the process of natural regeneration during the 10 year period. Results and Conclusions: Investigation indicates the occurrence of young growth regeneration cores arising as a result of the die-back of one dominant beech tree with horizontal crown projections of 145 m2 which initiated the possibility of natural regeneration. The greatest change occurred in the beech seedling count, whose numbers increased fourfold from 3556 plants per hectare in 1998 to 12694 plants per hectare in 2009. The share of beech seedlings increased from 8.7% to 22.6% of all species of young growth and shrubs. Thus beech became dominant among the tree species regeneration. However, the majority of the young plants of beech are of poor quality and thus their further development in conditions of passive protection is questionable. The investigations also showed the possibility of a new approach to the study of the dynamics of crown structures and the process of natural regeneration by methods of three-dimensional visualization of horizontal and vertical structures. The methods presented offer a more graphic illustration of the development of stands and high

  2. Plant biodiversity of beech forests in central-northern Italy: a methodological approach for conservation purposes

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    Marcantonio M

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Forests are reckoned essentials as biodiversity reservoirs and carbon sinks. Current threats to forest ecosystems (e.g., climate changes, habitat loss and fragmentation, management changes call for monitoring their biodiversity and preserving their ecological functions. In this study, we characterized plants diversity of five beech forests located in central and north Apennines mountain chain, using results by a probabilistic sampling. In order to achieve our goals, we have considered species richness and abundance, taxonomic distinctness and species composition, using both old and new analytical approaches. Results have shown how: (1 the forest type dominated by Fagus sylvatica is characterized by high complexity, with marked compositional, structural and biodiversity differences; (2 beech forests of Pigelleto di Piancastagnaio and Valle della Corte show the highest plants diversity values. The ecological characteristics of these areas, which sustain high diversity values, are unique and of great conservation interest; (3 the use of species richness as the only diversity measure have not allowed an efficient differentiation between studied areas. Indeed, the use of different indexes and analytical methods is required to detect multiple characteristics of biological diversity, as well as to carry out efficient biodiversity surveys aimed to develop optimal conservation strategies. In the future, we plan to apply the sampling methodology and the analytical approach used in this paper to characterize plants diversity of similar forest types.

  3. Contributions to the phytocoenologic study in pure european beech stand forests in Codru-Moma Mountains (North-Western Romania

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    Călin-Gheorghe PĂŞCUŢ

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available In the present work we present a phytocoenologic study on the associations found in pure European beech stand forests in Codru-Moma Mountains namely: Festuco drymejae-Fagetum Morariu et al. 1968, Luzulo albidae-Fagetum sylvaticae Zólyomi 1955.Characterization of the associations we studied and presentation of the tables have been made considering the selection of the most representative relevées of pure European beech forests belonging to Codru-Moma Mountains.The phytocoenoses of pure forest stands of European beech forests belonging to the two associations were analyzed in terms of floristic composition, life forms spectrum, spectrum chart of the floral elements and ecological indices.

  4. Foliage litter turnover and earthworm populations in three beech forests of contrasting soil and vegetation types.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staaf, H

    1987-04-01

    Leaf litter decomposition, levels of accumulated litter as well as the abundance and biomass of earthworms were measured in three mature beech forests in southern Sweden: one mor site, one poor mull site, and one rich mull site. The disappearance rate of beech litter, measured with litter bags, increased with increasing soil fertility. On the rich mull site, the disappearance rate was much higher than in the two other forests, due to the combined effects of higher earthworm activity, more favouable soil moisture conditions, and higher litter quality. Incubating the litter in finely meshed bags (1-mm mesh) to exclude macrofauna had a great effect on litter mass loss in the rich mull site, but it had only a minor effect in the other sites. Simultaneous incubations of local and transplanted leaf litter on the three study sites showed that the substrate quality of the litter increased in the order: mor site - poor mull site - rich mull site. Lignin, N, and P concentrations of the leaf litter failed to explain the observed differences in decomposition rates, and acid/base properties are suggested to be more important. Earthworm numbers per m(2) were 2.5 (1 species) in the mor, 40 (6 species) in the poor mull and 220 (9 species) in the rich mull forest. Soil chemical conditions, notably pH, were suggested as the main factors determining the inter-site differences in abundance and species composition of earthworms. The role of litter decomposition and earthworm activity in the accumulation of organic matter in the forest floor in different types of beech woodlands are discussed.

  5. Diversity and primary productivity of hill beech forests from Doftana Valley (Romanian Subcarpathians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihaela Paucã-Comãnescu

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The hill beech forests cover most of the woody area in the Doftana Valley. The present study refers, for the first time, to two beech forests typical to this belt, which belong to the phytocoenological associations Epipactieto-Fagetum (Resmeriţă, 1972, in the Lunca Mare area, and Hieracio rotundati-Fagetum (Vida 1983, Täuber 1987 in the Sotrile area, from floristic, structural, biomass and necromass accumulation point of view, within the framework of the vertical structure of biocoenosis. The limestone substratum, occasionally with small outcrops in the first beech forest, differs chiefly through the pH levels (6.34-5.67 from the siliceous substratum (pH 5.11-4.36 in the second beech forest. The layer of trees is dominated by Fagus sylvatica in both forests; this species is associated with Cerasus avium (4.5%, Acer pseudoplatanus (2% and Sorbus torminalis (2% in the first beech forest, and is monodominant in the second. Although the forest underwent selective cuts, more intense in the Lunca Mare area, the aboveground ligneous biomass reaches nowadays 222 t/ha in the Lunca Mare area compared to only 163 t/ha in the Sotrile area; the average height is 28.8ą2.49 m and 23.7ą1.12 m, respectively, and the diameter is 33.30ą7.9 cm and 31.60ą6.28 cm, respectively. The species of macrofungi, not very numerous during the study because of scarce precipitations (6 and 7 species, respectively, are predominant on the rhytidoma trees in the beech forest rooted on the limestone ground; in the Sotrile beech forest they are joined by mycorrhizal and parasite species. The layer of shrub is underdeveloped. The herbaceous layer is discontinuous, and includes, along herbs, small plants and saplings belonging to the ligneous species and to liana Hedera helix. The maximal value of the aboveground biomass of the layer is 317 kg/ha DM in the Lunca Mare area and 235 kg /ha DM in the Sotrile area. Bryophyta is present in large quantities, especially in the Sotrile

  6. Model calculation of radiocaesium transfer into food products in semi-natural forest ecosystems in the Czech Republic after a nuclear reactor accident and an estimate of the population dose burden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svadlenková, M; Konecný, J; Smutný, V

    1996-01-01

    Radioactivity of food products from semi-natural forest ecosystems can contribute appreciably to the radiological burden of the human population following a nuclear accident, as found after the Chernobyl disaster in 1986. In the Czech Republic, radiocaesium radioactivity has been measured since 1986 in various components of forest ecosystems, such as soil, mushrooms, bilberries, deer and boar. In this work, the data are employed to predict how a model accident of the Temelín nuclear power plant in southern Bohemia (which is under construction) would affect selected forest ecosystems in its surroundings. The dose commitment to the critical population group is also estimated.

  7. Major characteristics of mixed fir and beech virgin forests in the National park Biogradska Gora in Montenegro

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    Čurović Milić

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to manage forest ecosystems at a sufficiently high biodiversity level it is necessary to study the ecological, structural and production characteristics of virgin forests. The research was directed towards identifying the characteristics of mixed fir and beech forests (Abieti-Fagetum s. lat. in the area of the strict reserve of the National Park Biogradska Gora in Montenegro. Basic characteristics of these forests were researched in the process of definition of forest types. In this manner, it is for the first time that a realistic base for typological management of forests and forest ecosystems with similar ecological and structural characteristics was provided for the specific sites.

  8. Increased carbon sequestration in a Danish beech forest during 1996-2016: Observations and hypotheses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilegaard, Kim; Ibrom, Andreas

    2017-04-01

    A study of the net exchange of CO2 (NEE) between the atmosphere and a beech forest near Sorø, Denmark, during 14 years (1996-2009) showed that the beech forest acted as an increasing sink of CO2 [1]. A significant increase in gross primary production (GPP) and a smaller and not significant increase in ecosystem respiration (RE) were also found. Thus, the increased NEE was mainly attributed to an increase in GPP. The length of the carbon uptake period (CUP) significantly increased, whereas there was a no increase in the leafed period (LP). This means that the leaves stayed active longer. The increase in the carbon uptake period explained about half of the increasing NEE. The remaining increase was believed to be due to an observed increased uptake capacity of the canopy and increased annual radiation efficiency[2]. The causes for this were hypothesized to be a combination of increase in atmospheric CO2 concentration, higher summer precipitation, and increased availability of N. A higher nitrogen content in the leaves was observed towards the end of the observation period. An updated analysis of the flux data, now including the years 1996-2016, confirms the increasing trend in carbon sequestration of the forest, an increasingly longer growing season, and a significant correlation of NEE and CUP, however, similarly to the first study, the increase in CUP only explains about half of the total increase. Here we investigate three hypotheses for the remaining reasons for the increase: H1: increased canopy nitrogen content H2: carbon dioxide fertilisation H3: increased water availability due to changing precipitation patterns. We describe the multiannual development of canopy photosynthesis capacity with regression analysis and perform sensitivity studies with the canopy model MAESTRA [3] to investigate the above hypotheses. The results will be presented, critically discussed and interpreted with respect to general effects of global climate change and site specific, local

  9. Joining of the historical research and future prediction as a support tool for the assessment of management strategy for European beech-dominated forests in protected areas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivo Machar

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available European beech-dominated forests are crucial for maintaining biodiversity in forested mountain landscapes of the European temperate zone. This paper presents the results of research and assessment of management strategy for mountain beech-dominated forests in the Jeseníky Mountains (Czech Republic. Our approach is based on combining research on historical development of the forest ecosystem, assessment of its current state, and predictions of future dynamics using a forest growth simulation model. Using such a method makes it possible to understand the current state of the mountain beech-dominated forest ecosystem and predict its future development as a response to specific management strategies. The application of this method is therefore appropriate for assessing the suitability of selected management strategies in mountain protected areas. Our results show that a non-intervention management for mountain beech forest in the next 80 years complies with the Natura 2000 requirement to maintain the existing character of the forest habitat. Thus, the current management plan for the beech-dominated forests in the Jeseníky Mountains does not require significant corrections in the context of its conservation targets (i.e. maintaining biodiversity and current character of the forest ecosystem dominated by beech. The results of this study suggest that combining the knowledge on historical development with forest growth simulation can be used as a suitable support tool to assess management strategies for forest habitats in protected areas.

  10. Height-Diameter Models for Mixed-Species Forests Consisting of Spruce, Fir, and Beech

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    Petráš Rudolf

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Height-diameter models define the general relationship between the tree height and diameter at each growth stage of the forest stand. This paper presents generalized height-diameter models for mixed-species forest stands consisting of Norway spruce (Picea abies Karst., Silver fir (Abies alba L., and European beech (Fagus sylvatica L. from Slovakia. The models were derived using two growth functions from the exponential family: the two-parameter Michailoff and three-parameter Korf functions. Generalized height-diameter functions must normally be constrained to pass through the mean stand diameter and height, and then the final growth model has only one or two parameters to be estimated. These “free” parameters are then expressed over the quadratic mean diameter, height and stand age and the final mathematical form of the model is obtained. The study material included 50 long-term experimental plots located in the Western Carpathians. The plots were established 40-50 years ago and have been repeatedly measured at 5 to 10-year intervals. The dataset includes 7,950 height measurements of spruce, 21,661 of fir and 5,794 of beech. As many as 9 regression models were derived for each species. Although the “goodness of fit” of all models showed that they were generally well suited for the data, the best results were obtained for silver fir. The coefficient of determination ranged from 0.946 to 0.948, RMSE (m was in the interval 1.94-1.97 and the bias (m was -0.031 to 0.063. Although slightly imprecise parameter estimation was established for spruce, the estimations of the regression parameters obtained for beech were quite less precise. The coefficient of determination for beech was 0.854-0.860, RMSE (m 2.67-2.72, and the bias (m ranged from -0.144 to -0.056. The majority of models using Korf’s formula produced slightly better estimations than Michailoff’s, and it proved immaterial which estimated parameter was fixed and which parameters

  11. Nitrous oxide emissions from a beech forest floor measured by eddy covariance and soil enclosure techniques

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pihlatie, M.; Rinne, J.; Ambus, P.

    2005-01-01

    Spring time nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions from an old beech (Fagus sylvatica L.) forest were measured with eddy covariance (EC) and chamber techniques. The aim was to obtain information on the spatial and temporal variability in N2O emissions and link the emissions to soil environmental parameters...... the first week of May when the trees were leafing and the soil moisture content was at its highest. If chamber techniques are used to estimate ecosystem level N2O emissions from forest soils, placement of the chambers should be considered carefully to cover the spatial variability in the soil N2O emissions....... Mean N2O fluxes over the five week measurement period were 5.6 +/- 1.1, 10 +/- 1 and 16 +/- 11 mu g N m(-2) h(-1) from EC, automatic chamber and manual chambers, respectively. High temporal variability characterized the EC fluxes in the trunk-space. To reduce this variability, resulting mostly from...

  12. Stand dynamics in Fontainebleau; dynamics in beech forest structure and composition over 17 years in La Tillaie forest reserve, Fontainebleau, France

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wijdeven, S.M.J.

    2004-01-01

    Developments in forest structure and composition were studied over a 17 year period in a near-natural beech forests reserve in Fontainebleau, France. In two 1ha plots, all individuals with a dbh > 5cm were mapped, identified and measured in 1983, 1990 and 2000. Individual growth was highly

  13. The effects of habitat degradation on metacommunity structure of wood-inhabiting fungi in European beech forests

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Halme, Panu; Ódor, Péter; Christensen, Morten

    2013-01-01

    with different management histories. For this purpose, we used a large data set of wood-inhabiting fungi collected from dead beech trees in European beech-dominated forest reserves. The structure of fungal assemblages showed high beta diversity, while nestedness and similarity was low. During the decomposition...... extirpated specialized species from the local species pools in managed sites, and resulted in more homogeneous communities in managed sites. It is alarming that community structure is affected the most in the latest decay stages where the decay process turns the dead wood into litter, and which is thus......Intensive forest management creates habitat degradation by reducing the variation of forest stands in general, and by removing old trees and dead wood in particular. Non-intervention forest reserves are commonly believed to be the most efficient tool to counteract the negative effects...

  14. Drought Stress Distribution Responses of Continental Beech Forests at their Xeric Edge in Central Europe

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    Éva Salamon-Albert

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available In order to develop adequate adaptation measures for environmental vulnerability, we need detailed knowledge on the climatic performance of forest ecosystems. In this study, we aim to explore climate function variability of lowland beech forest distribution at a landscape scale. We also construct the response profiles of these forests near their xeric limit under wet continental climatic conditions. We studied distribution responses using presence-absence forest records and 18 bioclimatic variables. We performed exploratory factor analysis and frequency estimation to evaluate climate function distribution responses. We found that temperature adjusted precipitation measures during summer were the most important, followed by winter rainfall indices. The relative Drought Response Range (rDRR in the response profile presented the climate limitation function of the distribution. According to our results, higher level of climate function variability is associated with lower level of rDRR, presenting an ecological trade-off. Our results suggest that distribution functions of the rDRR, especially the Ombrothermic index, can be used as landscape indicators of drought stress. Consequently, rDRR could be a useful measure to assess regional climatic vulnerability of forest occurrence and distribution patterns.

  15. Effect of environmental variables and stand structure on ecosystem respiration components in a Mediterranean beech forest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guidolotti, Gabriele; Rey, Ana; D'Andrea, Ettore; Matteucci, Giorgio; De Angelis, Paolo

    2013-09-01

    The temporal variability of ecosystem respiration (RECO) has been reported to have important effects on the temporal variability of net ecosystem exchange, the net amount of carbon exchanged between an ecosystem and the atmosphere. However, our understanding of ecosystem respiration is rather limited compared with photosynthesis or gross primary productivity, particularly in Mediterranean montane ecosystems. In order to investigate how environmental variables and forest structure (tree classes) affect different respiration components and RECO in a Mediterranean beech forest, we measured soil, stem and leaf CO2 efflux rates with dynamic chambers and RECO by the eddy-covariance technique over 1 year (2007-2008). Ecosystem respiration showed marked seasonal variation, with the highest rates in spring and autumn and the lowest in summer. We found that the soil respiration (SR) was mainly controlled by soil water content below a threshold value of 0.2 m(3) m(-3), above which the soil temperature explained temporal variation in SR. Stem CO2 effluxes were influenced by air temperature and difference between tree classes with higher rates measured in dominant trees than in co-dominant ones. Leaf respiration (LR) varied significantly between the two canopy layers considered. Non-structural carbohydrates were a very good predictor of LR variability. We used these measurements to scale up respiration components to ecosystem respiration for the whole canopy and obtained cumulative amounts of carbon losses over the year. Based on the up-scaled chamber measurements, the relative contributions of soil, stem and leaves to the total annual CO2 efflux were: 56, 8 and 36%, respectively. These results confirm that SR is the main contributor of ecosystem respiration and provided an insight on the driving factors of respiration in Mediterranean montane beech forests.

  16. Dead wood characteristics influencing macrofungi species abundance and diversity in Caspian natural beech (Fagus orientalis Lipsky) forests

    OpenAIRE

    Kiomars Sefidi; Vahid Etemad

    2015-01-01

    Aim of study: This study aimed to examine the dead wood inhabiting macrofungi communities occurring on dead beech and hornbeam trees in Caspian forests. Area of study: The Kheiroud forest in the north of Iran. Material and Methods: Data from 205 sampling dead tree were analyzed by means of Generalized Linear Models (GLM) to test the effects of decay stage, DBH, Length or Height on macrofungi diversity. Additionally, tree species, dead wood size, log position, decay stage were used a...

  17. Floristic diversity analysis along a fragmentation gradients: a case study of beech forests in the Molisean Appenines (southern Italy

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    Frate L

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The process of fragmentation of natural habitats is increasing exponentially worldwide and represents one of the foremost threats to biological diversity. Forest fragmentation is considered to heavily affect the demographic and genetic structure of forest plant populations. Habitat fragmentation is a landscape process occurring when areas of continuous habitat are broken into smaller and discontinuous patches. In this paper we analyzed the effects of fragmentation on vascular plant diversity of Fagus sylvatica forest in central Italy (habitat of Community interest -92/43/ECC- “Appenine beech forests with Taxus and Ilex” - cod. 9210*. First, by integrating five parameters that describe beech forest patches structure (patch area, perimeter, shape index, corea area, euclidean nearest neighbor we identified three levels of fragmentation: high, medium and absent. Then the vascular plants of each level of fragmentation were sampled following a random stratified design. The diversity of vascular plant species was analyzed considering two species groups: all sampled species and “diagnostic” species of the habitat 9210* (sensu Directive 92/43/ECC. We compared the biodiversity patterns of the different fragmentation levels by using rarefaction curves and Rényi’s profiles. We also tested the significance of the founded differences by a bootstrapping procedure. The diversity pattern of the two species groups (diagnostics and all species showed two opposite trends. As the diversity of the entire pool of species increased on fragmented beech forests the diversity of the diagnostic group decreased. The differences between diversity values of high and low fragmentation levels resulted significant. Our results emphasize the existence of two diagnostic species: Cardamine kitaibelii and Paris quadrifolia that are indicators of not fragmented beech forests. Additionally the diversity pattern of the diagnostics species allow us to propose them as

  18. The impact of forest roads on understory plant diversity in temperate hornbeam-beech forests of Northern Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deljouei, Azade; Abdi, Ehsan; Marcantonio, Matteo; Majnounian, Baris; Amici, Valerio; Sohrabi, Hormoz

    2017-08-01

    Forest roads alter the biotic and abiotic components of ecosystems, modifying temperature, humidity, wind speed, and light availability that, in turn, cause changes in plant community composition and diversity. We aim at investigating and comparing the diversity of herbaceous species along main and secondary forest roads in a temperate-managed hornbeam-beech forest, north of Iran. Sixteen transects along main and secondary forest roads were established (eight transects along main roads and eight along secondary roads). To eliminate the effect of forest type, all transects were located in Carpinetum-Fagetum forests, the dominant forest type in the study area. The total length of each transect was 200 m (100 m toward up slope and 100 m toward down slope), and plots were established along it at different distances from road edge. The diversity of herbaceous plant species was calculated in each plot using Shannon-Wiener index, species richness, and Pielou's index. The results showed that diversity index decreased when distance from road edge increases. This decreasing trend continued up to 60 m from forest road margin, and after this threshold, the index slightly increased. Depending on the type of road (main or secondary) as well as cut or fill slopes, the area showing a statistical different plant composition and diversity measured through Shannon-Wiener, species richness, and Pielou's index is up to 10 m. The length depth of the road edge effect found in main and secondary forest roads was small, but it could have cumulative effects on forest microclimate and forest-associated biota at the island scale. Forest managers should account for the effect of road buildings on plant communities.

  19. Two years of continuous CO2 eddy-flux measurements over a Danish beech forest

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pilegaard, K.; Hummelshøj, P.; Jensen, N.O.

    2001-01-01

    As part of the EUROFLUX network a long-term monitoring station for fluxes of CO2 and water vapour has been established in an 80-year old beech forest in Denmark. The station has been in continuous operation since June 1996 and will be so at least to the end of 2002. A primary goal of EUROFLUX...... is to combine flux measurements on a continuous multi-year time basis with ecological processes interpretation and modeling. The station consists of a 57 m high mast with conventional meteorological profile instrumentation and one level of eddy-flux measurements. Ancillary measurements such as soil respiration......, soil moisture, soil temperature, leaf surface temperature and leaf area index are also made. Results from the first 2 years of measurements are described. The observed diurnal and seasonal variation in the fluxes are discussed and the monthly and annual sums of ecosystem exchange are contrasted between...

  20. Harvested wood products and carbon sink in a young beech high forest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pilli R

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available According to art. 3.4 of the Kyoto Protocol (KP, Italy has elected forest management as additional human-induced activity to attain the goal of reduction in greenhouse gas emissions. The whole forest area not subjected to afforestation, reforestation or deforestation processes since 1990 will be considered as managed forest. In order to analyse different management strategies, the Carbon-Pro Project, involving 9 partners of the European CADSES area, considered a young beech high forest (ex-coppice, defined as "transitory silvicultural system" as a common case study for the Pre-alps region. Using data collected with forest plans during the period 1983 - 2005, aboveground and belowground forest carbon stock and sink of a specific forest compartment were estimated by the Carbon Stock Method proposed by the IPCC Guidelines. In order to apply this approach 41 trees were cut and a species-specific allometric equation was developed. Considering the aboveground tree biomass, the carbon sink amounts to 1.99 and 1.84 Mg C ha-1 y-1 for the period 1983 - 1994 and 1994 - 2005 respectively. Adding the belowground tree biomass, the estimated sink amounts to 2.59 and 2.39 Mg C ha-1 y-1 for each period. Taking the harvested wood products (firewood, the total carbon sequestration during the second period is 0.16 Mg C ha-1 y-1. The case study highlights the possible rules for the different management strategies. In effect, the utilisation of the entire increase in aboveground biomass as firewood gives an energy substitution effect but, according to the Marrakesh Accords, it cannot be accounted for the KP. On the other hand, an accumulation strategy gives the maximum possible carbon absorption and retention.

  1. Current near-to-nature forest management effects on functional trait composition of saproxylic beetles in beech forests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gossner, Martin M; Lachat, Thibault; Brunet, Jörg; Isacsson, Gunnar; Bouget, Christophe; Brustel, Hervé; Brandl, Roland; Weisser, Wolfgang W; Müller, Jörg

    2013-06-01

    With the aim of wood production with negligible negative effects on biodiversity and ecosystem processes, a silvicultural practice of selective logging with natural regeneration has been implemented in European beech forests (Fagus sylvatica) during the last decades. Despite this near-to-nature strategy, species richness of various taxa is lower in these forests than in unmanaged forests. To develop guidelines to minimize the fundamental weaknesses in the current practice, we linked functional traits of saproxylic beetle species to ecosystem characteristics. We used continental-scale data from 8 European countries and regional-scale data from a large forest in southern Germany and forest-stand variables that represented a gradient of intensity of forest use to evaluate the effect of current near-to-nature management strategies on the functional diversity of saproxylic beetles. Forest-stand variables did not have a statistically significant effect on overall functional diversity, but they did significantly affect community mean and diversity of single functional traits. As the amount of dead wood increased the composition of assemblages shifted toward dominance of larger species and species preferring dead wood of large diameter and in advanced stages of decay. The mean amount of dead wood across plots in which most species occurred was from 20 to 60 m(3) /ha. Species occurring in plots with mean dead wood >60 m(3) /ha were consistently those inhabiting dead wood of large diameter and in advanced stages of decay. On the basis of our results, to make current wood-production practices in beech forests throughout Europe more conservation oriented (i.e., promoting biodiversity and ecosystem functioning), we recommend increasing the amount of dead wood to >20 m(3) /ha; not removing dead wood of large diameter (50 cm) and allowing more dead wood in advanced stages of decomposition to develop; and designating strict forest reserves, with their exceptionally high amounts of

  2. Climate change impairs processes of soil and plant N cycling in European beech forests on marginal soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tejedor, Javier; Gasche, Rainer; Gschwendtner, Silvia; Leberecht, Martin; Bimüller, Carolin; Kögel-Knabner, Ingrid; Pole, Andrea; Schloter, Michael; Rennenberg, Heinz; Simon, Judy; Hanewinkel, Marc; Baltensweiler, Andri; Bilela, Silvija; Dannenmann, Michael

    2014-05-01

    Beech forests of Central Europe are covering large areas with marginal calcareous soils, but provide important ecological services and represent a significant economical value. The vulnerability of these ecosystems to projected climate conditions (higher temperatures, increase of extreme drought and precipitation events) is currently unclear. Here we present comprehensive data on the influence of climate change conditions on ecosystem performance, considering soil nitrogen biogeochemistry, soil microbiology, mycorrhiza ecology and plant physiology. We simultaneously quantified major plant and soil gross N turnover processes by homogenous triple 15N isotope labeling of intact beech natural regeneration-soil-microbe systems. This isotope approach was combined with a space for time climate change experiment, i.e. we transferred intact beech seedling-soil-microbe mesocosms from a slope with N-exposure (representing present day climate conditions) to a slope with S exposure (serving as a warmer and drier model climate for future conditions). Transfers within N slope served as controls. After an equilibration period of 1 year, three isotope labeling/harvest cycles were performed. Reduced soil water content resulted in a persistent decline of ammonia oxidizing bacteria in soil (AOB). Consequently, we found a massive five-fold reduction of gross nitrification in the climate change treatment and a subsequent strong decline in soil nitrate concentrations as well as nitrate uptake by microorganisms and beech. Because nitrate was the major nutrient for beech in this forest type with little importance of ammonium and amino acids, this resulted in a strongly reduced performance of beech natural regeneration with reduced N content, N metabolite concentrations and plant biomass. These findings provided an explanation for a large-scale decline of distribution of beech forests on calcareous soils in Europe by almost 80% until 2080 predicted by statistical modeling. Hence, we

  3. Forty-two years of change in an old-growth and second-growth beech-maple forest of north central Ohio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natalie R. Pinheiro; P. Charles Goebel; David M. Hix

    2008-01-01

    Using data collected in 1964 and 2006, we examined changes in the composition and structure of a second-growth and old-growth beech-maple forest of Crall Woods, located in Ashland County of north central Ohio. Over the 42 years, the old-growth forest (estimated to be at least 250 years old) experienced a significant shift in species composition as American beech,...

  4. Effect of species composition on carbon and nitrogen stocks in forest floor and mineral soil in Norway spruce and European beech mixed forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andivia, Enrique; Rolo, Víctor; Jonard, Mathieu; Formánek, Pavel; Ponette, Quentin

    2015-04-01

    Management of existing forests has been identified as the main strategy to enhance carbon sequestration and to mitigate the impact of climate change on forest ecosystems. In this direction, the conversion of Norway spruce monospecific stands into mixed stands by intermingling individuals of European beech is an ongoing trend in adaptive forest management strategies, especially in Central Europe. However, studies assessing the effect of changes in tree species composition on soil organic carbon (SOC) and nitrogen stocks are still scarce and there is a lack of scientific evidence supporting tree species selection as a feasible management option to mitigate the effects of predicted future climatic scenarios. We compared C and N stocks in the forest floor (litter and humus) and the top 10 cm of mineral soil in two monospecific stands of Norway spruce and European beech and in a mixed stand of both species. The effect of tree species composition on the C and N stocks and its spatial distribution was evaluated based on litterfall, root production, elevation and canopy opening, and by using a combination of modelling and geostatistical techniques. C stock was highest in the Norway spruce and the mixed stands, while N stock was highest in the mixed stand and lowest under European beech, with intermediate values in the Norway spruce stand. Each forest type showed differences in forest floor properties, suggesting that species composition is an important factor governing forest floor characteristics, including C and N stocks. The distribution of C and N stocks between forest soil layers was different for each forest type. C and N stocks were highest in the hummus layer under Norway spruce, whereas both stocks were lowest in the European beech stand. On the other hand, the mixed stand showed the highest C and N accumulation in the uppermost mineral soil layer, while the monospecific stands showed similar values. Litterfall was the main contribution to C and N stocks of the

  5. Factors affecting industrial wood, material production yield in Turkey’s natural beech forests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atilla Atik

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The objectives of the present study are to determine the most important factors affecting industrial wood material production yield in natural oriental beech forests in Turkey using a multifaceted approach and to help entrepreneurs consider these factors to develop more sensitive and realistic production plans. In Günye Forest Management in Bartın province of the West Black Sea Region of Turkey, 41 production units were chosen as the study area. The 1277 ha study area was included in the 2007 and 2010 production management plan. The general state of the stand, natural stand structure, and production methods and tools are the factors thought most strongly affect industrial wood material production yield; 26 variables representing these factors were evaluated in the study. Through multidimensional statistical analyses, including main components, factor and regression  analysis, we found that the most important factors affecting production yield were fertility, aspect of land, skidding method, stand structure, skidding distance, growing stock, transportation and harmful abiotic factors. Production units were divided into three groups based on yield rates and the 26 variables, using discriminate analysis. From the results of the study, a sample model can be developed to help forest managers predict and plan annual industrial wood production more sensitively and realistically.

  6. Influences of different large mammalian fauna on dung beetle diversity in beech forests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enari, Hiroto; Koike, Shinsuke; Sakamaki, Haruka

    2013-01-01

    This paper focuses on biological relationships between mammalian species richness and the community structure of dung beetles in cool-temperate forests in the northernmost part of mainland Japan. The composition of beetle assemblages was evaluated at 3 sites in undisturbed beech forests with different mammalian fauna. In spring and summer 2009, beetles were collected at each site using pitfall traps baited with feces from Japanese macaques, Macaca fuscata Blyth (Primates: Cercopithecidae); Asiatic black bears, Ursus thibetanus Cuvier (Carnivora: Ursidae); Japanese serows, Capricornis crispus Temminck (Artiodactyla: Bovidae); and cattle. In the present study, 1,862 dung beetles representing 14 species were collected, and most dung beetles possessed the ecological characteristic of selecting specific mammalian feces. The present findings indicated that although species diversity in dung beetle assemblages was not necessarily positively correlated with mammalian species richness in cool-temperate forests, the absence of the macaque population directly resulted in the marked reduction of the beetle abundance, with the loss of the most frequent species, Aphodius eccoptus Bates (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae) during spring.

  7. Modelling of Climate Conditions in Forest Vegetation Zones as a Support Tool for Forest Management Strategy in European Beech Dominated Forests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivo Machar

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The regional effects of climate change on forest ecosystems in the temperate climate zone of Europe can be modelled as shifts of forest vegetation zones in the landscape, northward and to higher elevations. This study applies a biogeographical model of climate conditions in the forest vegetation zones of the Central European landscape, in order to predict the impact of future climate change on the most widespread tree species in European deciduous forests—the European beech (Fagus sylvatica L.. The biogeographical model is supported by a suite of software applications in the GIS environment. The model outputs are defined as a set of conditions - climate scenario A1B by the Special Report on Emission Scenarios (SRES for a forecast period, for a specified geographical area and with ecological conditions appropriate for the European beech, which provide regional scenarios for predicted future climatic conditions in the context of the European beech’s environmental requirements. These predicted changes can be graphically visualized. The results of the model scenarios for regional climate change show that in the Czech Republic from 2070 onwards, optimal growing conditions for the European beech will only exist in some parts of those areas where it currently occurs naturally. Based on these results, it is highly recommended that the national strategy for sustainable forest management in the Czech Republic be partly re-evaluated. Thus, the presented biogeographical model of climate conditions in forest vegetation zones can be applied, not only to generate regional scenarios of climate change in the landscape, but also as a support tool for the development of a sustainable forest management strategy.

  8. Belowground effects of enhanced tropospheric ozone and drought in a beech/spruce forest (Fagus sylvatica L./Picea abies [L.] Karst)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nikolova, Petia S., E-mail: nikolova@wzw.tum.d [Ecophysiology of Plants, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Weihenstephan Center of Life and Food Sciences, Am Hochanger 13, 85354 Freising (Germany); Andersen, Christian P. [Western Ecology Division, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, United States Environmental Protection Agency, 200 SW 35th St., Corvallis, OR 97333 (United States); Blaschke, Helmut; Matyssek, Rainer; Haeberle, Karl-Heinz [Ecophysiology of Plants, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Weihenstephan Center of Life and Food Sciences, Am Hochanger 13, 85354 Freising (Germany)

    2010-04-15

    The effects of experimentally elevated O{sub 3} on soil respiration rates, standing fine-root biomass, fine-root production and delta{sup 13}C signature of newly produced fine roots were investigated in an adult European beech/Norway spruce forest in Germany during two subsequent years with contrasting rainfall patterns. During humid 2002, soil respiration rate was enhanced under elevated O{sub 3} under beech and spruce, and was related to O{sub 3}-stimulated fine-root production only in beech. During dry 2003, the stimulating effect of O{sub 3} on soil respiration rate vanished under spruce, which was correlated with decreased fine-root production in spruce under drought, irrespective of the O{sub 3} regime. delta{sup 13}C signature of newly formed fine-roots was consistent with the differing g{sub s} of beech and spruce, and indicated stomatal limitation by O{sub 3} in beech and by drought in spruce. Our study showed that drought can override the stimulating O{sub 3} effects on fine-root dynamics and soil respiration in mature beech and spruce forests. - Drought has the capacity to override the stimulating ozone effect on soil respiration in adult European beech/Norway spruce forest.

  9. Inter-specific competition in mixed forests of Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii) and common beech (Fagus sylvatica) under climate change – a model-based analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reyer, C.; Lasch, P.; Mohren, G.M.J.; Sterck, F.J.

    2010-01-01

    Mixed forests feature competitive interactions of the contributing species which influence their response to environmental change. • We analyzed climate change effects on the inter-specific competition in a managed Douglas-fir/beech mixed forest. • Therefore, we initialised the process-based forest

  10. Girdling affects ectomycorrhizal fungal (EMF) diversity and reveals functional differences in EMF community composition in a beech forest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pena, Rodica; Offermann, Christine; Simon, Judy; Naumann, Pascale Sarah; Gessler, Arthur; Holst, Jutta; Dannenmann, Michael; Mayer, Helmut; Kögel-Knabner, Ingrid; Rennenberg, Heinz; Polle, Andrea

    2010-03-01

    The relationships between plant carbon resources, soil carbon and nitrogen content, and ectomycorrhizal fungal (EMF) diversity in a monospecific, old-growth beech (Fagus sylvatica) forest were investigated by manipulating carbon flux by girdling. We hypothesized that disruption of the carbon supply would not affect diversity and EMF species numbers if EM fungi can be supplied by plant internal carbohydrate resources or would result in selective disappearance of EMF taxa because of differences in carbon demand of different fungi. Tree carbohydrate status, root demography, EMF colonization, and EMF taxon abundance were measured repeatedly during 1 year after girdling. Girdling did not affect root colonization but decreased EMF species richness of an estimated 79 to 90 taxa to about 40 taxa. Cenococcum geophilum, Lactarius blennius, and Tomentella lapida were dominant, colonizing about 70% of the root tips, and remained unaffected by girdling. Mainly cryptic EMF species disappeared. Therefore, the Shannon-Wiener index (H') decreased but evenness was unaffected. H' was positively correlated with glucose, fructose, and starch concentrations of fine roots and also with the ratio of dissolved organic carbon to dissolved organic nitrogen (DOC/DON), suggesting that both H' and DOC/DON were governed by changes in belowground carbon allocation. Our results suggest that beech maintains numerous rare EMF species by recent photosynthate. These EM fungi may constitute biological insurance for adaptation to changing environmental conditions. The preservation of taxa previously not known to colonize beech may, thus, form an important reservoir for future forest development.

  11. Făgetele primare din România, o contribuţie la Patrimoniul Mondial UNESCO [Romania’s primary beech forests, a contribution to UNESCO World Heritage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iovu Adrian Biriș

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The World Heritage List (WHL of UNESCO currently comprises 1007 properties in 161 States Parties. Most of these sites are cultural (779 and only 197 are natural sites whereas 31 are mixed sites with outstanding universal cultural and natural values. Romania has only 8 sites registered on WHL of UNESCO, 7 cultural sites and one natural site – The Danube Delta Biosphere Reserve - being underrepresented in relation with the real value of its natural patrimony. Beech is a deciduous species exclusively European and the beech forests constitute the potential natural vegetation for the temperate zone of Europe. Beech forests represent an outstanding and globally unparalleled example of the ongoing ecological processes of post-glacial expansion. This is a key factor for supporting the nomination of beech forests under WHL of UNESCO. Romania, the country with the larges area of beech forests and well preserved primary beech forests, has an important responsibility for the conservation of an adequate and representative network of beech forests. Considering these aspects, the Ministry of the Environment and Climate Change - Department for Waters, Forests and Fisheries, National Forest Administration – Romsilva, Forest Research and Management Institute, WWF Danube-Carpathian Programme Office and Greenpeace CEE Romania Foundation have signed a protocol for collaboration having as target the selection of certain beech forests to be included on the WHL of UNESCO. Keywords

  12. Types of ectomycorrhiza of mature beech and spruce at ozone-fumigated and control forest plots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grebenc, Tine; Kraigher, Hojka

    2007-05-01

    In the Kranzberg forest near Freising (Germany) a novel "Free-Air Canopy O3 Exposure" system has been employed for analysing O3-induced responses from sub-cellular to ecosystem levels that are relevant for carbon balance and CO2 demand of 60-year-old beech trees. The below-ground ectomycorrhizal community was studied in two-fold ambient O3 concentrations (five cores per sampling) and in a control plot with an ambient O3 concentration (four cores per sampling). Five samplings were taken throughout two vegetation seasons (2003 and 2004). Types of ectomycorrhiza were determined by their morphological, anatomical and molecular characteristics and quantified by counting. The total number of mycorrhizal fine roots was higher at the fumigated plot as compared with the control site. The numbers of ectomycorrhizal types at the fumigated and control plots were 28 and 26, respectively. Cenococcum geophilum was present in all soil cores at all sampling times with a significant increase in abundance under ozone-fumigated trees. Other mycorrhizal types present at higher abundance at the fumigated than at the control plot were identified as Russula densiflora, R. fellea, R. illota, Tuber puberulum, Lactarius sp. 2 and Russula sp. 2. Some mycorrhizal types were present exclusively at the fumigated plot (Fagirhiza fusca, F. setifera, Lactarius acris, Piceirhiza nigra and Russula sp. 1). A possible ecological role for the abundant types of ectomycorrhiza and their putative application in bio-indication is discussed.

  13. Projected effects of climate change on the carbon stocks of European beech (Fagus sylvatica L. forests in Zala County, Hungary

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Somogyi Zoltán

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies suggest that climate change will lead to the local extinction of many tree species from large areas during this century, affecting the functioning and ecosystem services of many forests. This study reports on projected carbon losses due to the assumed local climate change-driven extinction of European beech (Fagus sylvatica L. from Zala County, South-Western Hungary, where the species grows at the xeric limit of its distribution. The losses were calculated as a difference between carbon stocks in climate change scenarios assuming an exponentially increasing forest decline over time, and those in a baseline scenario assuming no climate change. In the climate change scenarios, three different sets of forest management adaptation measures were studied: (1 only harvesting damaged stands, (2 additionally salvaging dead trees that died due to climate change, and (3 replacing, at an increasing rate over time, beech with sessile oak (Quercus petraea Matt. Lieb. after final harvest. Projections were made using the open access carbon accounting model CASMOFOR based on modeling or assuming effects of climate change on mortality, tree growth, root-to-shoot ratio and decomposition rates. Results demonstrate that, if beech disappears from the region as projected by the end of the century, over 80% of above-ground biomass carbon, and over 60% of the carbon stocks of all pools (excluding soils of the forests will be lost by 2100. Such emission rates on large areas may have a discernible positive feedback on climate change, and can only partially be offset by the forest management adaptation measures.

  14. Seasonal evolution of carbon allocation to biomass in a French beech forest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heid, Laura; Calvaruso, Christophe; Conil, Sébastien; Turpault, Marie-Pierre; Longdoz, Bernard

    2015-04-01

    The objective of this study is to get a better understanding of ecosystem behavior in term of assimilated carbon (C) use. In the global climate change context, this C allocation could play a critical role in predicting ecosystems long terms emissions (Trumbore 2006) and has become a major goal of several emergent studies The monthly C allocation has been determined for a 50-year old beech forest located in north-east of France through the quantification of Gross Primary Production (GPP), biomass production and some of its components (holocelluloses, lignin). In a second phase, the potential factors influencing those productions and allocations throughout a year have been assessed. The temporal evolution of GPP was obtained from the partitioning of eddy-covariance flux measurements and monitored for one year. It was connected to tree aboveground C biomass growth at a monthly step. To achieve the latter, site specific allometric equations were used with trees diameter at breast height (DBH) measured monthly during the growing season on one hand and, on the other hand, C concentrations were deduced from analyses on trunk cores (sampled monthly) and on leaves and bulk branches cores (sampled at the beginning and at the end of the growing season). The C allocated to the aboveground biomass was then estimated, along with the portion allocated to structural C. The results show the delay existing between the end of the tree growth and carbon assimilation. We analyze the possibility to explain this divergence by a compensation coming from the C concentration evolution. Keywords: Carbon allocation, Forest, Biomass production, Carbon concentration, Eddy Covariance Trumbore S. 2006. Carbon Respired by Terrestrial Ecosystems - Recent Progress and Challenges. Global Change Biology 12 (2): 141-53.

  15. Within-population genetic structure in beech (Fagus sylvatica L.) stands characterized by different disturbance histories: does forest management simplify population substructure?

    OpenAIRE

    Andrea Piotti; Stefano Leonardi; Myriam Heuertz; Joukje Buiteveld; Thomas Geburek; Sophie Gerber; Koen Kramer; Cristina Vettori; Giovanni Giuseppe Vendramin

    2013-01-01

    The fine-scale assessment of both spatially and non-spatially distributed genetic variation is crucial to preserve forest genetic resources through appropriate forest management. Cryptic within-population genetic structure may be more common than previously thought in forest tree populations, which has strong implications for the potential of forests to adapt to environmental change. The present study was aimed at comparing within-population genetic structure in European beech (Fagus sylvatic...

  16. The effects of forty years of spruce cultivation in a zone of beech forest on mt. Maljen (Serbia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavlović P.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This study investigates the effects of the forty-year cultivation of Picea abies on the floristic composition, physical and chemical soil characteristics, and the intensity of organic matter decomposition in a zone of mountainous beech forest (mt. Maljen, northwestern Serbia. The long-term cultivation of conifers in a deciduous habitat has caused a reduction in biodiversity, as well as changes in the soil which were most pronounced in the top soil layer. There were found to be lower soil moisture levels (p<0.05, lower active (p<0.01 and substitutional acidity (p<0.001, depletion of the adsorption complex in base cations (p<0.001, and lower levels of n, P and K (p<0.001 in the spruce stand in relation to the beech stand (control. The higher C/n ratio of spruce litter (p<0.001 caused its lower decomposition rate in comparison to beech litter (p<0.01. All these changes have led to degradation and a reduction in this ecosystem’s productivity. [Acknowledgments. This work was supported by the ministry of education and Science of Serbia, grant no 173018

  17. Influence of litter diversity on dissolved organic matter release and soil carbon formation in a mixed beech forest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheibe, Andrea; Gleixner, Gerd

    2014-01-01

    We investigated the effect of leaf litter on below ground carbon export and soil carbon formation in order to understand how litter diversity affects carbon cycling in forest ecosystems. 13C labeled and unlabeled leaf litter of beech (Fagus sylvatica) and ash (Fraxinus excelsior), characterized by low and high decomposability, were used in a litter exchange experiment in the Hainich National Park (Thuringia, Germany). Litter was added in pure and mixed treatments with either beech or ash labeled with 13C. We collected soil water in 5 cm mineral soil depth below each treatment biweekly and determined dissolved organic carbon (DOC), δ13C values and anion contents. In addition, we measured carbon concentrations and δ13C values in the organic and mineral soil (collected in 1 cm increments) up to 5 cm soil depth at the end of the experiment. Litter-derived C contributes less than 1% to dissolved organic matter (DOM) collected in 5 cm mineral soil depth. Better decomposable ash litter released significantly more (0.50±0.17%) litter carbon than beech litter (0.17±0.07%). All soil layers held in total around 30% of litter-derived carbon, indicating the large retention potential of litter-derived C in the top soil. Interestingly, in mixed (ash and beech litter) treatments we did not find a higher contribution of better decomposable ash-derived carbon in DOM, O horizon or mineral soil. This suggest that the known selective decomposition of better decomposable litter by soil fauna has no or only minor effects on the release and formation of litter-derived DOM and soil organic matter. Overall our experiment showed that 1) litter-derived carbon is of low importance for dissolved organic carbon release and 2) litter of higher decomposability is faster decomposed, but litter diversity does not influence the carbon flow.

  18. Influence of litter diversity on dissolved organic matter release and soil carbon formation in a mixed beech forest.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Scheibe

    Full Text Available We investigated the effect of leaf litter on below ground carbon export and soil carbon formation in order to understand how litter diversity affects carbon cycling in forest ecosystems. 13C labeled and unlabeled leaf litter of beech (Fagus sylvatica and ash (Fraxinus excelsior, characterized by low and high decomposability, were used in a litter exchange experiment in the Hainich National Park (Thuringia, Germany. Litter was added in pure and mixed treatments with either beech or ash labeled with 13C. We collected soil water in 5 cm mineral soil depth below each treatment biweekly and determined dissolved organic carbon (DOC, δ13C values and anion contents. In addition, we measured carbon concentrations and δ13C values in the organic and mineral soil (collected in 1 cm increments up to 5 cm soil depth at the end of the experiment. Litter-derived C contributes less than 1% to dissolved organic matter (DOM collected in 5 cm mineral soil depth. Better decomposable ash litter released significantly more (0.50±0.17% litter carbon than beech litter (0.17±0.07%. All soil layers held in total around 30% of litter-derived carbon, indicating the large retention potential of litter-derived C in the top soil. Interestingly, in mixed (ash and beech litter treatments we did not find a higher contribution of better decomposable ash-derived carbon in DOM, O horizon or mineral soil. This suggest that the known selective decomposition of better decomposable litter by soil fauna has no or only minor effects on the release and formation of litter-derived DOM and soil organic matter. Overall our experiment showed that 1 litter-derived carbon is of low importance for dissolved organic carbon release and 2 litter of higher decomposability is faster decomposed, but litter diversity does not influence the carbon flow.

  19. Contributions to the phytocoenological study of the beech forests of the Luzulo-Fagetum type in the Oraştie river basin (Central-Western Romania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petru BURESCU

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available n the current paper we present a phytocoenologic study of the phytocoenoses of the association Luzulo albidae-Fagetum sylvaticae Zólyomi 1955 (Syn.: Hieracio rotundati-Fagetum (Vida 1963 Täuber 1987, Dechampsio flexuosae-Fagetum Soó 1962, Luzulo-Fagetum silvaticae Beldie 1951 Morariu et al. 1968 identified in the acidophylous beech forests of the Orăştie river basin, situated in the central-western part of Romania. The characterisation of the association under analysis as well as the presentation of the synthetic table have been done by selecting the most representative relevées performed in the beech forests of the Luzulo-Fagetum type belonging to the Orăştie river. The phytocoenoses of these beech forests were analysed in terms of physiognomy and floristic composition, life forms spectrum, floristic elements, and ecological indices.

  20. Response of Soil Respiration to Repeated Extreme Events in a Temperate Beech Forest in Austria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leitner, S.; Kobler, J.; Holtermann, C.; Zechmeister-Boltenstern, S.; Saronjic, N.; Zimmermann, M.

    2015-12-01

    Climate change research predicts an increase in weather extremes like severe droughts and heavy rainfalls in central Europe. Since soil moisture is one of the most important drivers of soil respiration, a change in precipitation regime is likely to influence ecosystem C cycling. During drying of soils, soil microbial activity decreases and dead microbial cells, osmolytes, and semi-decomposed organic matter accumulate. When dry soils are rewetted, this easily-decomposable C leads to a pulse in soil respiration, a phenomenon known as "Birch-effect". In terms of annual soil CO2emissions, it is not clear whether these post-wetting respiration pulses outweigh or even overcompensate preceding drought-induced reductions in soil respiration. To investigate the impact of repeated drought and heavy rainfall events, a two-year precipitation manipulation experiment was conducted in an Austrian beech forest. Experimental plots were covered with transparent roofs to exclude rainfall, and an irrigation system was used to simulate heavy rainfall events. Control plots received natural precipitation. Soil respiration was monitored 3-hourly with an automatic static chamber system connected to an infrared CO2 analyzer. Soil temperature (Tsoil) and volumetric water content (VWC) were recorded with a datalogger. Various statistical models were tested to describe the relationship between soil respiration, Tsoiland VWC. Our results showed that repeated extreme events strongly reduced variation in soil respiration. Droughts significantly reduced soil respiration, and reductions depended on the length of the drought period. Post-wetting respiration pulses did not outweigh drought-induced reductions. Temperature sensitivity of soil respiration was best described with a Lloyd & Taylor model. Furthermore, in stressed plots VWC became limiting for soil respiration. Overall, our data corroborate the importance of the precipitation regime for soil respiration.

  1. Comparisons of protein profiles of beech bark disease resistant and susceptible American beech (Fagus grandifolia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mary E. Mason; Jennifer L. Koch; Marek Krasowski; Judy. Loo

    2013-01-01

    Beech bark disease is an insect-fungus complex that damages and often kills American beech trees and has major ecological and economic impacts on forests of the northeastern United States and southeastern Canadian forests. The disease begins when exotic beech scale insects feed on the bark of trees, and is followed by infection of damaged bark tissues by one of the...

  2. Nitrogen oxides emission from two beech forests subjected to different nitrogen loads

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Kitzler

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available We analysed nitrogen oxides (N2O, NO and carbon dioxide (CO2 emissions from two beech forest soils close to Vienna, Austria, which were exposed to different nitrogen input from the atmosphere. The site Schottenwald (SW received 20.2 kg N ha−1 y−1 and Klausenleopoldsdorf (KL 12.6 kg N ha−1 y−1 through wet deposition. Nitric oxide emissions from soil were measured hourly with an automatic dynamic chamber system. Daily N2O measurements were carried out by an automatic gas sampling system. Measurements of nitrous oxide (N2O and CO2 emissions were conducted over larger areas on a biweekly (SW or monthly (KL basis by manually operated chambers. We used an autoregression procedure (time-series analysis for establishing time-lagged relationships between N-oxides emissions and different climate, soil chemistry and N-deposition data. It was found that changes in soil moisture and soil temperature significantly effected CO2 and N-oxides emissions with a time lag of up to two weeks and could explain up to 95% of the temporal variations of gas emissions. Event emissions after rain or during freezing and thawing cycles contributed significantly (for NO 50% to overall N-oxides emissions. In the two-year period of analysis the annual gaseous N2O emissions at SW ranged from 0.64 to 0.79 kg N ha−1 y−1 and NO emissions were 0.24 to 0.49 kg N ha−1 per vegetation period. In KL significantly lower annual N2O emissions (0.52 to 0.65 kg N2O-N kg ha−1 y−1 as well as considerably lower NO-emissions were observed. During a three-month measurement campaign NO emissions at KL were 0.02 kg N ha−1, whereas in the same time period significantly more NO was emitted in SW (0.32 kg NO-N ha−1. Higher N-oxides emissions, especially NO emissions from the high N-input site (SW may indicate that atmospheric deposition has an impact on emissions of gaseous N from our forest soils. At KL there was a strong correlation between N-deposition and N-emission over time

  3. Temporal variability of stemflow volume in a beech-yellow poplar forest in relation to tree species and size

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levia, D. F.; Van Stan, J. T., II; Mage, S. M.; Kelley-Hauske, P. W.

    2010-01-01

    SummaryStemflow has distinguishable effects on the hydrology and biogeochemistry of wooded ecosystems. Nonetheless, it is a relatively poorly understood hydrologic process. No known studies have investigated the temporal variability of stemflow volume at 5-min intervals in a beech-yellow poplar forest of eastern North America. The aim of this research is to compare the temporal variability of stemflow generation by Fagus grandifolia Ehrh. (American beech) and Liriodendron tulipifera L. (yellow poplar) in relation to tree species and size. Employing a dense network of tipping-bucket stemflow gages interfaced with a datalogger, a 5 min stemflow yield database was assembled and analyzed to better discern how stemflow production varies (temporally) with tree species and size. Results indicate that both tree species and size have detectable effects on the temporal variability of stemflow yield. Observational data, scientific analysis, and correspondence analysis reveals that stemflow yield: (1) is more similar within than between the two tree species with differences likely being attributable to differences in bark texture and water storage capacity; (2) tree size affects stemflow yield within species; (3) rain event characteristics affect stemflow yield; and (4) stemflow yield for particular trees and rain events is the result of a complex set of interactions among tree species, tree size, and meteorological conditions. These results suggest that the temporal variation in stemflow yield from co-occurring forest trees may play a significant role in subsurface drainage of wooded ecosystems during rain events.

  4. Impact of repeated dry-wet cycles on soil CO2 efflux in a beech forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leitner, Sonja; Saronjic, Nermina; Kobler, Johannes; Holtermann, Christian; Zechmeister-Boltenstern, Sophie; Zimmermann, Michael

    2015-04-01

    Climate change research predicts that both frequency and intensity of weather extremes such as severe droughts and heavy rainfall events will increase in mid Europe over the next decades. Because soil moisture is one of the major factors controlling microbially-driven soil processes, a changed moisture regime will impact soil organic matter (SOM) decomposition and nutrient cycling. This in turn can lead to feedback effects between altered precipitation and changed soil CO2 fluxes which can intensify climate change. Soil microorganisms can go into a state of dormancy or form inactive cysts to protect themselves from osmotic stress during soil drying. However, severe droughts increase microbial mortality which slows down SOM decomposition and decreases soil CO2 efflux. The rewetting of dry soil, on the other hand, causes large CO2 emissions, which is also known as the "Birch effect". Until today it is not clear whether these CO2 peaks outweigh the drought-induced decrease of total CO2 efflux. To investigate the impact of repeated dry-wet cycles on soil CO2 efflux we are conducting a precipitation manipulation experiment in a temperate Austrian beech forest. Roofs exclude rainfall and simulate drought periods, and heavy rainfall events are simulated with a sprinkler system. We apply repeated dry-wet cycles in two intensities: one treatment receives 6 cycles of 1 month drought followed by 75mm irrigation, and a parallel treatment receives 3 cycles of 2 months drought followed by 150mm irrigation. Soil CO2 efflux is constantly monitored with an automated flux chamber system, and environmental parameters are recorded via dataloggers. Our results show that droughts significantly reduce soil CO2 effluxes, and that the reductions depend on the length of the drought periods, with longer droughts leading to stronger reductions of CO2 effluxes. In the first 24 to 48h after rewetting, CO2 emissions strongly increased, and then slowly decreased again. Soil CO2 efflux was

  5. Early impact of alternative thinning approaches on structure diversity and complexity at stand level in two beech forests in Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Becagli

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Stand structure, tree density as well as tree spatial pattern define natural dynamics and competition process. They are therefore parameters used to define any silvicultural management type. This work aims to report first data resulting from a silvicultural experiment in beech forests. The objective of the trial is testing the structure manipulation in terms of diversity and the reduction of inter-tree competition of different thinning approaches. Alternative thinning methods have been applied in two independent experimental sites located in the pre-Alps and Southern Apennines, in Italy. Specific goals were to: (i verify the impact early after thinning implementation on forest structure through a set of diversity and competition metrics resulting from a literature review; (ii the sensitivity of tested indexes to effectively detect thinning manipulation. Main result show the low sensitivity of stand structure indexes and the ability of competition metrics to detect thinning outcome.

  6. Increased phytotoxic O3 dose accelerates autumn senescence in an O3-sensitive beech forest even under the present-level O3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitao, Mitsutoshi; Yasuda, Yukio; Kominami, Yuji; Yamanoi, Katsumi; Komatsu, Masabumi; Miyama, Takafumi; Mizoguchi, Yasuko; Kitaoka, Satoshi; Yazaki, Kenichi; Tobita, Hiroyuki; Yoshimura, Kenichi; Koike, Takayoshi; Izuta, Takeshi

    2016-09-01

    Ground-level ozone (O3) concentrations are expected to increase over the 21st century, especially in East Asia. However, the impact of O3 has not been directly assessed at the forest level in this region. We performed O3 flux-based risk assessments of carbon sequestration capacity in an old cool temperate deciduous forest, consisting of O3-sensitive Japanese beech (Fagus crenata), and in a warm temperate deciduous and evergreen forest dominated by O3-tolerant Konara oak (Quercus serrata) based on long-term CO2 flux observations. On the basis of a practical approach for a continuous estimation of canopy-level stomatal conductance (Gs), higher phytotoxic ozone dose above a threshold of 0 uptake (POD0) with higher Gs was observed in the beech forest than that in the oak forest. Light-saturated gross primary production, as a measure of carbon sequestration capacity of forest ecosystem, declined earlier in the late growth season with increasing POD0, suggesting an earlier autumn senescence, especially in the O3-sensitive beech forest, but not in the O3-tolerant oak forest.

  7. Validation of PROBA-V GEOV1 and MODIS C5 & C6 fAPAR Products in a Deciduous Beech Forest Site in Italy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Nestola, E.; Sanchez-Zapero, J.; Latorre, C.; Mazzenga, F.; Matteucci, G.; Calfapietra, Carlo; Camacho, F.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 9, č. 2 (2017), č. článku 126. ISSN 2072-4292 Institutional support: RVO:86652079 Keywords : fAPAR * validation * PROBA-V GEOV1 * MODIS C5 * MODIS C6 * beech forest * up-scaling * GCOS requirements * in-situ comparison and evaluation Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour Impact factor: 3.244, year: 2016

  8. Below-ground effects of enhanced tropospheric ozone and drought in a beech/spruce forest (Fagus sylvatica L. / Picea abies [L.] Karst)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The effects of experimentally elevated O3 on soil respiration rates, standing fine-root biomass, fine-root production and δ13C signature of newly produced fine roots were investigated in an adult European beech/Norway spruce forest in Germany during two subsequent years with cont...

  9. Effects of litter quality and parent material on organic matter characteristics and N-dynamics in Luxembourg beech and hornbeam forests

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kooijman, A.M.; Martinez-Hernandez, G.B.

    2009-01-01

    To test effects of litter quality and soil conditions on N-dynamics, we selected seven forests in Luxembourg dominated by beech (Fagus sylvatica, L.) and hornbeam (Carpinus betulus L.), and located on acid loam, decalcified marl or limestone, and measured organic matter characteristics, microbial C

  10. Root-derived carbon and nitrogen from beech and ash trees differentially fuel soil animal food webs of deciduous forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ammerschubert, Silke; Polle, Andrea; Scheu, Stefan

    2017-01-01

    Evidence is increasing that soil animal food webs are fueled by root-derived carbon (C) and also by root-derived nitrogen (N). Functioning as link between the above- and belowground system, trees and their species identity are important drivers structuring soil animal communities. A pulse labeling experiment using 15N and 13C was conducted by exposing beech (Fagus sylvatica) and ash (Fraxinus excelsior) seedlings to 13CO2 enriched atmosphere and tree leaves to 15N ammonium chloride solution in a plant growth chamber under controlled conditions for 72 h. C and N fluxes into the soil animal food web of beech, associated with ectomycorrhizal fungi (EMF), and ash, associated with arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF), were investigated at two sampling dates (5 and 20 days after labeling). All of the soil animal taxa studied incorporated root-derived C, while root-derived N was only incorporated into certain taxa. Tree species identity strongly affected C and N incorporation with the incorporation in the beech rhizosphere generally exceeding that in the ash rhizosphere. Incorporation differed little between 5 and 20 days after labeling indicating that both C and N are incorporated quickly into soil animals and are used for tissue formation. Our results suggest that energy and nutrient fluxes in soil food webs depend on the identity of tree species with the differences being associated with different types of mycorrhiza. Further research is needed to prove the generality of these findings and to quantify the flux of plant C and N into soil food webs of forests and other terrestrial ecosystems. PMID:29236746

  11. Can decision rules simulate carbon allocation for years with contrasting and extreme weather conditions? A case study for three temperate beech forests

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Campioli, Matteo; Verbeeck, Hans; Van den Bossche, Joris

    2013-01-01

    The allocation of carbohydrates to different tree processes and organs is crucial to understand the overall carbon (C) cycling rate in forest ecosystems. Decision rules (DR) (e.g. functional balances and source-sink relationships) are widely used to model C allocation in forests. However, standard...... allocation scheme taking into account drought-induced changes in allocation dynamics and acclimation of respiration. Model validation was performed against extensive datasets of C fluxes and C pools for a 9 years period (2000-2008) for the site of parameterisation (the beech forest of Hesse, France......) and for two contrasting sites not used for parameterisation (the beech forest of Sorø, Denmark, for 1999-2006, and Collelongo, Italy, for 2005-2006). At Hesse, 2003 was characterised by a severe and extreme drought and heat wave. The standard DR allocation scheme captured the average annual dynamics of C...

  12. Distribution model of understory vegetation in beech forests from Central Apennines (Italy in relation to edaphic parameters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    De Nicola C

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available The first results of a study of monitoring species and habitats in the framework of the Life 04NAT/IT/000190 "Tutela dei siti Natura 2000 gestiti dal Corpo Forestale dello Stato" are presented. This study was carried out by the Department of Plant Biology of the University of Rome (La Sapienza and the National Forest Service. We focused the investigation on the relationships between herbaceous species and pedological parameters (humus and soil in Central-Apennine beech forests. Data have been collected through 40 phytosociological relevés, 15 soil profiles and 40 humus profiles in 40 forest plots, between March 2005 and September 2006. In this paper we presented data elaborated on a subset of 15 plots where soil profiles were available. The species of undergrowth showed different ecological requirements to some edaphic and humus parameters (pH, sand, loam, clay, organic matter, nitrogen, carbon/nitrogen ratio, Ca++, K+;thickness and carbon content of the organic layers: significant correlations have been found using Pearson correlation test. The multiple regression analysis allowed to identify the factors more influencing the species distribution: thickness of the organic layers, carbon content (% C and carbon/nitrogen ratio (C/N. Basing on the thickness of humus horizons (OL, OF, OH, and on carbon content, two species groups with different ecology have been recognized: (a nemoral species typical of shady beech stands on oligomull/dysmull/thin amphimull (0 < 1cm.; 5.7 < %C < 9.9; (b heliophilous species of more xeric stands on thick amphimull (1.25 < 11.5 cm.; 9.9 < %C < 13.7. The relationships among species and soil parameters and humus forms allow to recognize small differences within a homogeneous habitat and therefore they can provide management indications also at micro-scale level.

  13. Variation of Soil Organic Carbon Pool Weight Associated with Plant Biodiversity (Case Study: Mixed-Beech Forests of Glandrood in Nour)

    OpenAIRE

    A. A. Vahedi; A. Motaji; J. Eshaghi Rad

    2014-01-01

    Soil organic carbon pool plays an important role in the global C cycle and climate change mitigation. Therefore, improving our understanding of some factors such as plant biodiversity that can affect forest soil C storage is fundamentally important for anticipating changes. This study was carried out in the mixed-beech forests of Glandrood located in Noor using a systematic network of points including 400 m2 plot for trees layer regularly distributed by a distance of 100 m from each other. Wi...

  14. Soil base saturation combines with Beech Bark Disease to influence composition and structure of Sugar Maple-Beech forests in an acid rain-impacted region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, Gregory B.; McDonnell, Todd C.; Sullivan, Timothy J.; Dovciak, Martin; Bailey, Scott W.; Antidormi, Michael; Zarfos, Michael R.

    2017-01-01

    Sugar maple, an abundant and highly valued tree species in eastern North America, has experienced decline from soil calcium (Ca) depletion by acidic deposition, while beech, which often coexists with sugar maple, has been afflicted with beech bark disease (BBD) over the same period. To investigate how variations in soil base saturation combine with effects of BBD in influencing stand composition and structure, measurements of soils, canopy, subcanopy, and seedlings were taken in 21 watersheds in the Adirondack region of NY (USA), where sugar maple and beech were the predominant canopy species and base saturation of the upper B horizon ranged from 4.4 to 67%. The base saturation value corresponding to the threshold for Al mobilization (16.8%) helped to define the species composition of canopy trees and seedlings. Canopy vigor and diameter at breast height (DBH) were positively correlated (P soils, soil-Ca depletion and BBD may have created opportunities for gap-exploiting species such as red maple and black cherry, whereas in high-base saturation soils, sugar maple dominated the canopy. Where soils were beginning to recover from acidic deposition effects, sugar maple DBH and basal area increased progressively from 2000 to 2015, whereas for beech, average DBH did not change and basal area did not increase after 2010.

  15. Using Remote Sensing Technologies to Quantify the Effects of Beech Bark Disease on the Structure, Composition, and Function of a Late-Successional Forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuart-Haëntjens, E. J.; Ricart, R. D.; Fahey, R. T.; Fotis, A. T.; Gough, C. M.

    2016-12-01

    Ecological theory maintains that as forests age, the rate at which carbon (C) is stored declines because C released through organic matter decomposition offsets declining C sequestration in new vegetative growth. Recent observational studies are challenging this long-held hypothesis, with limited evidence suggesting higher-than-expected rates in late-successional forests could be, counterintuitively, tied to canopy structural changes associated with low intensity tree mortality. As forests age, canopy structural complexity may increase when old trees die and form upper canopy gaps that release subcanopy vegetation. This provides one explanation for observations of sustained high production in old forests. Recent studies have found that this increased structural complexity and resource-use efficiency maintain C storage in mid-successional deciduous forests; whether a similar mechanism extends to late-successional forests is unknown. We will present how a slow, moderate disturbance affects the structure and C sequestration of late-successional forests. Our study site is a forest recently infected by Beech Bark Disease (BBD), which will result in the eventual mortality of American beech trees in this late successional forest in Northern Michigan, at the University of Michigan Biological Station. American Beech, Hemlock, Sugar Maple, and White Pine dominate the landscape, with American Beech making up 30% of the canopy trees on average. At the plot scale American Beech is distributed heterogeneously, comprising 1% to 60% of total plot basal area, making it possible to examine the interplay between disturbance severity, canopy structural change, and primary production resilience in this forest. Within each of the 13 plots, species and stem diameter were collected in 1992, 1994, 2014, and 2016, with future remeasurements planned. We will discuss how ground-based lidar coupled with airborne spectral (IR and RGB) imagery are being used to track canopy BBD

  16. Assessing the use of delta C-13 natural abundance in separation of root and microbial respiration in a Danish beech (¤Fagus Sylvatica¤ L.) forest

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Formanek, P.; Ambus, P.

    2004-01-01

    Our understanding of forest biosphere-atmosphere interactions is fundamental for predicting forest ecosystem responses to climatic changes. Currently, however, our knowledge is incomplete partly due to inability to separate the major components of soil CO2 effluxes, viz. root respiration, microbial...... decomposition of soil organic matter and microbial decomposition of litter material. In this study we examined whether the delta(13)C characteristics of solid organic matter and respired CO2 from different soil-C components and root respiration in a Danish beech forest were useful to provide information...... layers (delta(13)C range -23.6 to -23.4parts per thousand). The CO2 evolved from root respiration in isolated young beech plants revealed a value intermediate between those for the soil humus and mineral horizons, delta(13)C(root) = -22.2parts per thousand, but was associated with great variability (SE...

  17. HOW ARE PLANT SPECIES IN CENTRAL EUROPEAN BEECH (FAGUS SYLVATICA L. FORESTS AFFECTED BY TEMPERATURE CHANGES? SHIFT OF POTENTIAL SUITABLE HABITATS UNDER GLOBAL WARMING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. C. Jantsch

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available This study reveals which temperature range is favoured or avoided by 156 forest plant species and how the distribution of potential suitable habitats of species in beech forests may change in the future. We performed 140 phytosociological relevés along a temperature gradient (4.1 to 9.8 °C in Bavaria, southern Germany, on south exposed slopes. One half of the plots were located on acidic substrate, the other half on base-rich substrate. Generalized linear models (GLM were used to analyse species occurrence along the temperature gradient and to model habitats for species in beech forests under a present (1971-2000 and a future climate (2071-2100 scenario assuming a temperature increase of 1.8 °C. Herb species of beech forests are more adapted to lower temperatures and tree species more to higher temperatures. Current habitats will clearly change under increasing temperatures. We found large habitat losses for Luzula sylvatica (Huds. Gaudin, Maianthemum bifolium (L. F. W. Schmidt, Picea abies (L. H. Karst., Prenanthes purpurea L. and large habitat gains for Carpinus betulus L., Impatiens parviflora DC., Prunus avium (L. L. and Quercus petraea (Matt. Liebl. on both substrates. Forestry will be affected positively as well as negatively with a change in tree cultivation. Losses in biodiversity might be strong for mountainous forests and must also be considered in future conservation plans.

  18. Changes in forms of available nitrogen and respiration in soil of beech forest as a reaction to a deforestation resulting from wind storm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleš Kučera

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with the reaction of soil environment to a violent deforestation resulting from a wind storm. As a material, permanent inventory plot located in Training Forest Enterprise Masaryk Forest Křtiny was selected. The plot represents beech high forest, where soil was sampled from four types of sample plots: (1 maternal forest representing situation before the storm; (2 zone of transition from the maternal forest to the open area; (3 reafforested clearing; (4 natural evolution. From each sample plot type, 6 mixed samples of Ah horizon were analysed to assess N-ammonium (N-NH4+ and N-nitrates (NO3− content and respiration activity. The results show a significant difference between the respiration activities of the particular sample plots, as well as a significant difference in the content of N-ammonium and N-nitrate forms, the maternal forest representing a site of the lowest biological (and respiration activity on the one hand, and, on the other hand, site of high N-ammonium and low N-nitrate content, respectively. From the results, intensive nitrification caused by the deforestation is evident. The results are to be used as a starting level for a long-term observation of reaction of the forest beech ecosystem to deforestation and selected types of forest management.

  19. Beech forests in the Ruhr and in the Westphalian Bight. A comparative study. Buchenwaelder im Ruhrgebiet und in der Westfaelischen Bucht. Eine vergleichende Untersuchung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wittig, R. (Frankfurt Univ. (Germany, F.R.). Fachbereich 16 - Biologie); Werner, W. (Trier Univ. (Germany, F.R.). Fachbereich 3 - Geographie/Geowissenschaften, Geschichte, Politikwissenschaft, Klassische Archaeologie, Aegyptologie, Kunstgeschichte, Papyrologie)

    1989-01-01

    The Ruhr district, one of the most industrialized and most densely populated regions of Germany, is part of the Westphalian Bight. The potential natural vegetation of the Ruhrgebiet are loess beech forests (Milio-Fagetum), which are also common in other parts of the Westphalian Bight. However, a comparison of the beech forests of the Ruhrgebiet with the Milio-Fagetum stands of other areas of the Westphalian Bight shows distinct differences in floristic composition of the herb layer as well as in C/N ratio and heavy metal contents of the upper 4 cm of the mineral soil. The differences can only be explained by the former long lasting immission load of the Ruhrdistrict. (orig.).

  20. A new approach in the monitoring of the phytosanitary conditions of forests: the case of oak and beech stands in the Sicilian Regional Parks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cinzia Rizza

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to investigate the health conditions of oak and beech stands in the three Regional Parks of Sicily (Etna, Madonie and Nebrodi. A total of 81 sampling areas were investigated, 54 in oak stands and 27 in beech stands. The phytosanitary conditions of each tree within the respective sampling area was expressed with a synthetic index namely phytosanitary class (PC. Oak stands showed severe symptoms of decline, with 85% of the sampling areas including symptomatic trees. In general, beech stands were in better condition, with the exception of Nebrodi Park, where trees showed severe symptoms of decline. On oak trees, infections of fungal pathogens were also observed, including Biscogniauxia mediterranea, Polyporus sp., Fistulina hepatica, Mycrosphaera alphitoides and Armillaria sp. By contrast, on beech trees Biscogniauxia nummularia, Fomes fomentarius and Neonectria radicicola were recognized. Furthermore, twenty-two permanent sampling areas were delimited with the aim of monitoring regularly the health conditions of forests in these three parks.

  1. Modeling Soil Organic Carbon Sequestration in Relation to Plant Biodiversity in the Natural Mixed-Beech Forests

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    A. A. Vahedi

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Having the richest plants biodiversity, Hyrcanian natural mixed-beech forests contribute to the huge carbon pool in the different soil layers. This research aims to develop modeling soil carbon sequestration in terms of the plant biodiversity indices to manage soil carbon stock with respect to trend of sustainability, fertility, carbon cycle, and planning to face with climate change in local/ regional scales. After measuring plants biodiversity indices and soil carbon factor over the field operations, simple and multiple linear regressions as well as curve estimation regression were applied in the process of modeling. According to Adj.R2, SEE and AIC, simple and multiple linear regressions had no considerable accuracy (AICmin = +151.74. Analysis of non-linear models showed that model S including index of species dominance belonging to herbal coverage was the best predictor with the least error and highest certainty (AICmin= -171.23 to estimate soil carbon pool in the studied forests. In the following, the results showed that although the log-transformed models with increasing the parameters and adding the correlated explanatory variables were valid (VIF < 10, the accuracy of the estimates was less than the optimal model.

  2. Impact of white-rot fungi on numbers and community composition of bacteria colonizing beech wood from forest soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Folman, Larissa B; Klein Gunnewiek, Paulien J A; Boddy, Lynne; de Boer, Wietse

    2008-02-01

    White-rot fungi are important wood-decomposing organisms in forest ecosystems. Their ability to colonize and decompose woody resources may be strongly influenced by wood-inhabiting bacteria that grow on easily utilizable compounds e.g. oligomers of wood-polymers released by fungal enzymes. However, so far, it is not known how white-rot fungi deal with the presence of potential competing bacteria. Here, the effects of two white-rot fungi, Hypholoma fasciculare and Resinicium bicolor, on the numbers and composition of bacteria colonizing sterile beech wood blocks from forest soil are reported. Both total numbers (microscopic counts) and the numbers of cultivable wood-inhabiting bacteria were considerably lower in wood blocks that became colonized by the white-rot fungi than in control blocks. This points to the fungi out-competing the opportunistic bacteria. The presence of white-rot fungi resulted in a change in the relative abundance of families of cultivable bacteria in wood and also in a change of denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis patterns of directly amplified 16S rRNA gene fragments. Analysis of the bacterial community structure in soil adhering to exploratory mycelium (cords) indicated that fungal species-specific effects on bacterial community composition were also apparent in this fungal growth phase.

  3. Occurrence, spatial pattern, and influence of atmospheric deposition on top- and subsoil water repellency in a beech forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachmann, Joerg; Böttcher, Jürgen; Krüger, Jiem; Woche, Susanne K.

    2017-04-01

    It is well known that enhanced solute input due to stemflow infiltration causes enhanced soil acidification near the tree base. Infiltration-driven alteration of chemical soil properties like pH, and carbon to nitrogen ratio (C/N) may also affect soil wettability (quantified as contact angle, CA) with a trend to increased soil water repellency (SWR) with decreased pH. Objective of this study was to analyze the impact of tree location on top- and subsoil wettability and selected soil chemical parameters on two large-scale transects (length  50 m, sampling depths 0.1-0.2 m). The transects were about 50 m apart from each other, time of sampling was in July 2013 and July 2015. To analyze subsoil wettability in the vicinity of selected trees, three transects (lengths =3 m, sampling depths = 0.1 - 2.0 m) were additionally sampled in June 2013. Sampling site is a 100 years old beech forest (Fagus sylvatica L.). Soil type is a well-drained sandy Dystric Cambisol in northern Germany with moderate to locally extended acidification. According to standard statistics, the total variance of chemical soil properties and SWR was independent of stemflow infiltration pattern. Results of spectral variance analyses, however, showed that the spatial variability of acidification (pH, Al content) as well as SWR in the soil horizon close to the surface was strongly affected by the pattern of patches with and without stemflow infiltration on both large-distance transects, no matter if sampling took place in 2013 (mean CA = 40°, SD = 12°) or 2015 (mean CA = 110°, SD = 14°). Regarding subsoil wettability on the smaller transects, CA were always in the range 0° non-polar C species and CA (r2=0.77), and the amount of Al and CA (r2=0.87). For C/N ratio, sulfate, and oxalate-soluble Fe content no significant relations to SWR or soil acidity were found. We conclude that our study provides a link between chemical soil quality and physical behavior with respect to SWR and, accordingly

  4. Waste heaps left by historical Zn-Pb ore mining are hotspots of species diversity of beech forest understory vegetation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woch, Marcin W; Stefanowicz, Anna M; Stanek, Małgorzata

    2017-12-01

    Metalliferous mining and smelting industries are associated with very high levels of heavy metal(loid) contamination of the environment. Heavy metals have been proved to significantly influence the species diversity and composition of grassland communities, but little is known on their effects on forest understory vegetation. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate the effects of the presence of small heaps of waste rock left by historical Zn-Pb ore mining on understory vegetation. The heaps are scattered over vast areas of beech forests in southern Poland. Three types of study plots were established: (1) on waste heaps themselves, (2) in their vicinity (5-10m from the foot of the heaps, with no waste rock but potentially influenced by the heaps through drainage water), and (3) at least 100m from the foot of the heaps (pseudo-control). In all plots vegetation parameters, i.e., plant species number, cover and community composition, life forms and strategies, as well as basic soil properties were assessed. Although the heaps contained high concentrations of metals, namely Cd, Pb and Zn, they were characterised by higher cover and diversity of understory vegetation, including ancient forest and endangered species, in comparison to their surroundings. They were also characterised by the distinct species composition of their plant communities. This might have resulted from the beneficial influence of high pH and Ca content originating from waste rock composed of dolomite and calcite, as well as from increased habitat heterogeneity, e.g. soil skeleton and steeper slopes. Another important factor influencing the richness and composition of understory was tree cover, which relates to the light transmissibility of the canopy. Our study proved that the disturbance brought about by the former mining and processing of metal ores led to the formation of species-rich understory with high frequency and cover of naturally-valuable species. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B

  5. Mapping beech (Fagus sylvatica L.) forest structure with airborne hyperspectral imagery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cho, M.A.; Skidmore, A.K.; Sobhan, I.

    2009-01-01

    Estimating forest structural attributes using multispectral remote sensing is challenging because of the saturation of multispectral indices at high canopy cover. The objective of this study was to assess the utility of hyperspectral data in estimating and mapping forest structural parameters

  6. Romanian legal management rules limit wood production in Norway spruce and beech forests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olivier Bouriaud

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Background The quantitative impact of forest management on forests’ wood resource was evaluated for Picea and Fagus mixed forests. The effects on the productivity of tendering operations, thinnings and rotation length have seldom been directly quantified on landscape scale. Methods Two sites of similar fertility but subject to contrasted forest management were studied with detailed inventories: one in Germany, the other in Romania, and compared with the respective national forest inventories. In Romania, regulations impose very long rotations, low thinnings and a period of no-cut before harvest. In contrast, tending and thinnings are frequent and intense in Germany. Harvests start much earlier and must avoid clear cutting but maintain a permanent forest cover with natural regeneration. While Germany has an average annual wood increment representative for Central Europe, Romania represents the average for Eastern Europe. Results The lack of tending and thinning in the Romanian site resulted in twice as many trees per hectare as in the German site for the same age. The productivity in Romanian production forests was 20 % lower than in Germany despite a similar fertility. The results were supported by the data from the national forest inventory of each country, which confirmed that the same differential exists at country scale. Furthermore, provided the difference in rotation length, two crops are harvested in Germany when only one is harvested in Romania. The losses of production due to a lower level of management in Romania where estimated to reach 12.8 million m3.y-1 in regular mountain production forests, and to 15 million m3.y-1 if managed protection forest is included. Conclusions The productivity of Picea and Fagus mountain forests in Romania is severely depressed by the lack of tending and thinning, by overly long rotations and the existence of a 25-years no-cut period prior to harvest. The average standing volume in Germany was 50

  7. Temporal variability of the NPP-GPP ratio at seasonal and interannual time scales in a temperate beech forest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Campioli

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The allocation of carbon (C taken up by the tree canopy for respiration and production of tree organs with different construction and maintenance costs, life span and decomposition rate, crucially affects the residence time of C in forests and their C cycling rate. The carbon-use efficiency, or ratio between net primary production (NPP and gross primary production (GPP, represents a convenient way to analyse the C allocation at the stand level. In this study, we extend the current knowledge on the NPP-GPP ratio in forests by assessing the temporal variability of the NPP-GPP ratio at interannual (for 8 years and seasonal (for 1 year scales for a young temperate beech stand, reporting dynamics for both leaves and woody organs, in particular stems. NPP was determined with biometric methods/litter traps, whereas the GPP was estimated via the eddy covariance micrometeorological technique.

    The interannual variability of the proportion of C allocated to leaf NPP, wood NPP and leaf plus wood NPP (on average 11% yr−1, 29% yr−1 and 39% yr−1, respectively was significant among years with up to 12% yr−1 variation in NPP-GPP ratio. Studies focusing on the comparison of NPP-GPP ratio among forests and models using fixed allocation schemes should take into account the possibility of such relevant interannual variability. Multiple linear regressions indicated that the NPP-GPP ratio of leaves and wood significantly correlated with environmental conditions. Previous year drought and air temperature explained about half of the NPP-GPP variability of leaves and wood, respectively, whereas the NPP-GPP ratio was not decreased by severe drought, with large NPP-GPP ratio on 2003 due mainly to low GPP. During the period between early May and mid June, the majority of GPP was allocated to leaf and stem NPP, whereas these sinks were of little importance later on. Improved estimation of seasonal GPP and of the

  8. Lead and zinc concentrations in soils and vegetation of beech forest stands in North-Rhine Westphalia. Blei- und Zinkgehalte in Boeden und Pflanzen einiger Buchenwaelder Nordrhein-Westfalens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neite, H. (Duesseldorf Univ. (Germany, F.R.). Inst. fuer Oekologische Pflanzenphysiologie und Geobotanik); Wittig, R. (Frankfurt Univ. (Germany, F.R.). Botanisches Inst.)

    1989-01-01

    Heavy metals were highly accumulated in forest ecosystems during the last decades. In beech forests close to the industrialized Ruhr Area very high lead contents were measured in the upper soil. The contents of lead and zinc in the leaves of Sambucus nigra in this highly polluted regions were also up to 4 times higher than in less affected areas. (orig.).

  9. Non-linear height-diameter models for oriental beech (Fagus orientalis Lipsky in the Hyrcanian forests, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmadi, K.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The relationship between tree height and diameter is an important element in growth and yield models, in carbon budget and timber volume models, and in the description of stand dynamics. Six non-linear growth functions (i.e. Chapman-Richards, Schnute, Lundqvist/Korf, Weibull, Modified Logistic and Exponential were fitted to tree height-diameter data of oriental beech in the Hyrcanian mixed hardwood forests of Iran. The predictive performance of these models was in the first place assessed by means of different model evaluation criteria such as adjusted R squared (adjR2, root mean square error (RMSE, Akaike information criterion (AIC, mean difference (MD, mean absolute difference (MAD and mean square (MS error criteria. Although each of the six models accounted for approximately 75% of total variation in height, a large difference in asymptotic estimates was observed. Apart from this, the predictive performance of the models was also evaluated by means of cross-validation and by splitting the data into 5-cm diameter classes. Plotting the MD in relation to these diameter at breast height (DBH classes showed for all growth functions, except for the Modified Logistic function, similar mean prediction errors for small- and medium-sized trees. Large-sized trees, however, showed a higher mean prediction error. The Modified Logistic function showed the worst performance due to a large model bias. The Exponential and Lundqvist/Korf models were discarded due to their showing biologically illogical behavior and unreasonable estimates for the asymptotic coefficient, respectively. Considering all the above-mentioned criteria, the Chapman-Richards, Weibull, and Schnute functions provided the most satisfactory height predictions. However, we would recommend the Chapman-Richards function for further analysis because of its higher predictive performance.

  10. Contributions to the phytocoenological study of pure european beech forests in Oraştie river basin (central-western Romania)

    OpenAIRE

    Petru BURESCU; Valeriu Ioan VINŢAN

    2012-01-01

    În the current paper we present a phytocoenologic study of the phytocoenoses of the association Festuco drymejaeFagetum Morariu et al. 1968 (Syn.: Fagetum sylvaticae transylvaticum facies with Festuca drymeja I. Pop et al. 1974), found in the pure European beech forests of the Orăştie river basin, lying in the central-western part of Romania. The characterisation of the association under analysis as well as the presentation of the synthetic table have been done byselecting the most representa...

  11. Contributions to the phytocoenological study of the beech forests of the Luzulo-Fagetum type in the Oraştie river basin (Central-Western Romania)

    OpenAIRE

    Petru BURESCU; Valeriu Ioan VINTAN

    2012-01-01

    n the current paper we present a phytocoenologic study of the phytocoenoses of the association Luzulo albidae-Fagetum sylvaticae Zólyomi 1955 (Syn.: Hieracio rotundati-Fagetum (Vida 1963) Täuber 1987, Dechampsio flexuosae-Fagetum Soó 1962, Luzulo-Fagetum silvaticae Beldie 1951) Morariu et al. 1968) identified in the acidophylous beech forests of the Orăştie river basin, situated in the central-western part of Romania. The characterisation of the association under analysis as well as the pre...

  12. Identifying the relationships of climate and physiological responses of a beech forest using the Standardised Precipitation Index: a case study for Slovakia

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    Vido Jaroslav

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents relationship between the Standardised Precipitation Index (SPI and physiological responses of individual trees in a beech stand using an example of an experimental plot in Bienska valley (Zvolen, Slovakia. SPI is a widely used tool for monitoring both short-term and long-term droughts, and for the assessments of drought impacts on agriculture. Due to the complex ecosystem bonds, monitoring of drought in forests often requires a sophisticated technological approach. The aim of the paper was to correlate the SPI on the physiological responses of trees that were recorded during the performed physiological research (sap flow, and stem circumference increment at the site in the growing seasons (May to September of the years 2012-2014. The results revealed a relationship between the index and the physiological responses, although the problem with the impact of other environmental factors has also come up. The secondary correlation, in which soil water potential that significantly affects physiological responses of forest tree species was used as a dependent variable, showed a tighter relationship with the SPI. We found the highest correlation between the soil water potential and the values of SPI aggregated for five weeks. This indicates that the beech forest has a five week resistance to drought stress. The results also enable simple monitoring of the initiation of the drought stress by applying SPI for five weeks.

  13. Enhanced ozone strongly reduces carbon sink strength of adult beech (Fagus sylvatica) - Resume from the free-air fumigation study at Kranzberg Forest

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matyssek, R., E-mail: matyssek@wzw.tum.d [Ecophysiology of Plants, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Hans-Carl-von-Carlowitz-Platz 2, D-85354 Freising (Germany); Wieser, G. [Dept. Alpine Timberline Ecophysiology, Federal Office and Research Centre for Forests, Rennweg 1, A-6020 Innsbruck (Austria); Ceulemans, R. [Dept. of Biology, University of Antwerp, Universiteitsplein 1, B-2610 Wilrijk (Belgium); Rennenberg, H. [Tree Physiology, Institute of Forest Botany and Tree Physiology, University of Freiburg, Georges-Koehler-Allee 53, D-79110 Freiburg (Germany); Pretzsch, H. [Forest Growth and Yield Sciences, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Hans-Carl-von-Carlowitz-Platz 2, D-85354 Freising (Germany); Haberer, K. [Tree Physiology, Institute of Forest Botany and Tree Physiology, University of Freiburg, Georges-Koehler-Allee 53, D-79110 Freiburg (Germany); Loew, M.; Nunn, A.J. [Ecophysiology of Plants, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Hans-Carl-von-Carlowitz-Platz 2, D-85354 Freising (Germany); Werner, H. [Ecoclimatology (formerly: Bioclimatology and Air Pollution Research), Hans-Carl-von-Carlowitz-Platz 2, D-85354 Freising (Germany); Wipfler, P. [Forest Growth and Yield Sciences, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Hans-Carl-von-Carlowitz-Platz 2, D-85354 Freising (Germany); Osswald, W. [Phytopathology of Woody Plants, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Hans-Carl-von-Carlowitz-Platz 2, D-85354 Freising (Germany); Nikolova, P. [Ecophysiology of Plants, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Hans-Carl-von-Carlowitz-Platz 2, D-85354 Freising (Germany); Hanke, D.E. [Dept. Plant Sciences, University of Cambridge, Downing Street, Cambridge CB2 3EA (United Kingdom); Kraigher, H. [Slovenian Forestry Institute, Forest Biology, Ecology and Technology, Vecna pot 2, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Tausz, M. [Dept. of Forest and Ecosystem Science, Melbourne School of Land and Environment, Water Street, Creswick Vic 3363 (Australia)

    2010-08-15

    Ground-level ozone (O{sub 3}) has gained awareness as an agent of climate change. In this respect, key results are comprehended from a unique 8-year free-air O{sub 3}-fumigation experiment, conducted on adult beech (Fagus sylvatica) at Kranzberg Forest (Germany). A novel canopy O{sub 3} exposure methodology was employed that allowed whole-tree assessment in situ under twice-ambient O{sub 3} levels. Elevated O{sub 3} significantly weakened the C sink strength of the tree-soil system as evidenced by lowered photosynthesis and 44% reduction in whole-stem growth, but increased soil respiration. Associated effects in leaves and roots at the gene, cell and organ level varied from year to year, with drought being a crucial determinant of O{sub 3} responsiveness. Regarding adult individuals of a late-successional tree species, empirical proof is provided first time in relation to recent modelling predictions that enhanced ground-level O{sub 3} can substantially mitigate the C sequestration of forests in view of climate change. - Empirical proof corroborates substantial mitigation of carbon sequestration in the tree-soil system of a forest site under enhanced O{sub 3} impact for adult beech.

  14. The influence of gap size on plant species diversity and composition in beech (Fagus orientalis forests, Ramsar, Mazandaran Province, North of Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MARZIEH BEGYOM-FAGHIR

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Pourbabaei H, Haddadi-Moghaddam H, Begyom-Faghir M, Abedi T. 2013. The influence of gap size on plant species diversity and composition in beech (Fagus orientalis forests, Ramsar, Mazandaran Province, North of Iran. Biodiversitas 14: 89-94.This study was conducted to investigate the influence of gap size on plant species diversity and composition in beech (Fagus orientalis Lipsky. forests, Ramsar, Mazandaran province. Fifteen gaps in small, medium, and large sizes were randomly selected. Abundance of tree saplings, shrubs and herbaceous species were counted on 4 m2 micro-plots within the gaps. Diversity indices including Shannon-Wiener, Simpson, Mc Arthur's N1, Hill's N2, species richness and Smith-Wilson’s evenness index were computed. The results revealed that there was significant difference among three gap categories in terms of diversity. The highest diversity values of tree and herbaceous species were obtained in the large gaps, while the highest diversity value of shrub species was in the medium gaps. Species composition of small gaps (28 species: 7 trees and 21 herbaceous, medium gaps (37 species: 7 trees, 5 shrubs and 25 herbaceous and large gaps (40 species: 7 trees, 4 shrubs and 29 herbaceous were recognized. Therefore, based on the results of this study, it is recommended that in order to maintain plant diversity and composition up to 400 m2 gap size cloud be used in this forests.

  15. Mineralisation, leaching and stabilisation of 13C-labelled leaf and twig litter in a beech forest soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Hagedorn

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Very few field studies have quantified the different pathways of C loss from decomposing litter even though the partitioning of C fluxes is essential to understand soil C dynamics. Using 0.75 kg m−2 of 13C-depleted leaf (δ13C = −40.8 ‰ and 2 kg m−2 of twig litter (δ13C = −38.4 ‰, we tracked the litter-derived C in soil CO2 effluxes, dissolved organic C (DOC, and soil organic matter of a beech forest in the Swiss Jura. Autotrophic respiration was reduced by trenching. Our results show that mineralisation was the main pathway of C loss from decomposing litter over 1 yr, amounting to 24 and 31 % of the added twig and leaf litter. Contrary to our expectations, the leaf litter C was mineralised only slightly (1.2 times more rapidly than the twig litter C. The leaching of DOC from twigs amounted to half of that from leaves throughout the experiment (2 vs. 4 % of added litter C. Tracing the litter-derived DOC in the soil showed that DOC from both litter types was mostly removed (88–96 % with passage through the top centimetres of the mineral soil (0–5 cm where it might have been stabilised. In the soil organic C at 0–2 cm depth, we indeed recovered 4 % of the initial twig C and 8 % of the leaf C after 1 yr. Much of the 13C-depleted litter remained on the soil surface throughout the experiment: 60 % of the twig litter C and 25 % of the leaf litter C. From the gap in the 13C-mass balance based on C mineralisation, DOC leaching, C input into top soils, and remaining litter, we inferred that another 30 % of the leaf C but only 10 % of twig C could have been transported via soil fauna to soil depths below 2 cm. In summary, over 1 yr, twig litter was mineralised more rapidly relative to leaf litter than expected, and much less of the twig-derived C was transported to the mineral soil than of the leaf-derived C. Both findings provide some evidence that twig litter could contribute less to the C storage in these base-rich forest soils than

  16. Evolution and structure of Artikutza, an 80-year-old beech forest in navarra (northern Spain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Castro Gil, A.

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Se ha estudiado la estructura forestal y la historia del hayedo de Artikutza. El objetivo ha sido analizar la evolución natural y recuperación del bosque tras 80 años sin intervenciones significativas. El bosque se ha desarrollado sobre un territorio previamente cubierto de robles (Quercus robur L., hayas (Fagus sylvatica L. y castaños (Castanea sativa Mill. trasmochos, los cuales fueron talados. Los datos actuales de regeneración y distribución de frecuencias de clases diametrales no son típicos de bosques maduros. Investigaciones futuras son necesarias para confirmar si estas características son el efecto del ganado. El volumen de madera muerta acumulada es alto, aunque no de gran diámetro (menor que 40 cm. Los árboles senescentes son poco comunes y no se encntraron troncos con cavidades. Por tanto, se sugiere la protección y creación de árboles trasmochos como medida necesaria para aumentar la disponibilidad de recursos para la biodiversidad forestal.

  17. SOILS UNDER BEECH IN THE KODRY HILLS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Ursu

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available In the Kodry Hills, small areas of virgin beech forests stands are preserved. These beech groves are developed on specific intrazonal lithomorphic soils. The mineralogical composition of substrate impedes the development of eluvial−illuvial processes and leaching of carbonates typical of the zonal soils that form under broad-leaved forests. The soils under study belong to the group of rendzic soils and can be referred to as marly rendzinas (or pseudorendzinas.

  18. Fungal community in sclerotia of Japanese Beech forest soils in north eastern Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fathia Amasya, Anzilni; Narisawa, Kazuhiko; Watanabe, Makiko

    2014-05-01

    Sclerotia are resting structures of ectomycorrhizal fungi and appear as a response to unfavorable environmental conditions such as desiccation. They are hard, black, comparatively smooth and mostly spherical. Sclerotia are formed in rhizosphere and the 14C ages of sclerotia from A horizons of volcanic ash soils may range from modern until ca. 100~1,200 yr B.P. Most sclerotia-forming fungal species are known to be host-specific plant pathogens and therefore their abundance may indicate the presence of their host plants. The purpose of this study was to investigate fungal communities in sclerotia with an interest in describing the existing or may have previously existed host plant community. To investigate fungal community inside of sclerotia by 16S rDNA gene clone library, several hundred of sclerotia (ca. 1g) were collected from Fagus crenata forest soil in north eastern Japan. The rDNA ITS regions were then amplified by the PCR using primer pair ITS-1F/ITS-4. Aliquots of the amplified DNA were digested with restriction endonucleases AluI, Hae III, and HhaI to obtain ITS-RFLPs. To obtain the fungal community profiles a quenching fluorescence primer was used for real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR) assay to monitor the PCR amplification and then used for T-RFLP. The predominant group determined by clone library analysis from the sclerotia was Ascomycota: Arthrinium arundinis, which has been reported to be one of the soil fungal species responsible for bamboo degradation and a pathogen for many species belonging to Poaceae family.

  19. Effects of forest management practices in temperate beech forests on bacterial and fungal communities involved in leaf litter degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purahong, Witoon; Kapturska, Danuta; Pecyna, Marek J; Jariyavidyanont, Katalee; Kaunzner, Jennifer; Juncheed, Kantida; Uengwetwanit, Tanaporn; Rudloff, Renate; Schulz, Elke; Hofrichter, Martin; Schloter, Michael; Krüger, Dirk; Buscot, François

    2015-05-01

    Forest management practices (FMPs) significantly influence important ecological processes and services in Central European forests, such as leaf litter decomposition and nutrient cycling. Changes in leaf litter diversity, and thus, its quality as well as microbial community structure and function induced by different FMPs were hypothesized to be the main drivers causing shifts in decomposition rates and nutrient release in managed forests. In a litterbag experiment lasting 473 days, we aimed to investigate the effects of FMPs (even-aged timber management, selective logging and unmanaged) on bacterial and fungal communities involved in leaf litter degradation over time. Our results showed that microbial communities in leaf litter were strongly influenced by both FMPs and sampling date. The results from nonmetric multidimensional scaling (NMDS) ordination revealed distinct patterns of bacterial and fungal successions over time in leaf litter. We demonstrated that FMPs and sampling dates can influence a range of factors, including leaf litter quality, microbial macronutrients, and pH, which significantly correlate with microbial community successions.

  20. Environment vs. Plant Ontogeny: Arthropod Herbivory Patterns on European Beech Leaves along the Vertical Gradient of Temperate Forests in Central Germany

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie Stiegel

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Environmental and leaf trait effects on herbivory are supposed to vary among different feeding guilds. Herbivores also show variability in their preferences for plant ontogenetic stages. Along the vertical forest gradient, environmental conditions change, and trees represent juvenile and adult individuals in the understorey and canopy, respectively. This study was conducted in ten forests sites in Central Germany for the enrichment of canopy research in temperate forests. Arthropod herbivory of different feeding traces was surveyed on leaves of Fagus sylvatica Linnaeus (European beech; Fagaceae in three strata. Effects of microclimate, leaf traits, and plant ontogenetic stage were analyzed as determining parameters for herbivory. The highest herbivory was caused by exophagous feeding traces. Herbivore attack levels varied along the vertical forest gradient for most feeding traces with distinct patterns. If differences of herbivory levels were present, they only occurred between juvenile and adult F. sylvatica individuals, but not between the lower and upper canopy. In contrast, differences of microclimate and important leaf traits were present between the lower and upper canopy. In conclusion, the plant ontogenetic stage had a stronger effect on herbivory than microclimate or leaf traits along the vertical forest gradient.

  1. Seasonal and inter-annual dynamics of growth, non-structural carbohydrates and C stable isotopes in a Mediterranean beech forest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scartazza, Andrea; Moscatello, Stefano; Matteucci, Giorgio; Battistelli, Alberto; Brugnoli, Enrico

    2013-07-01

    Seasonal and inter-annual dynamics of growth, non-structural carbohydrates (NSC) and carbon isotope composition (δ(13)C) of NSC were studied in a beech forest of Central Italy over a 2-year period characterized by different environmental conditions. The net C assimilated by forest trees was mainly used to sustain growth early in the season and to accumulate storage carbohydrates in trunk and root wood in the later part of the season, before leaf shedding. Growth and NSC concentration dynamics were only slightly affected by the reduced soil water content (SWC) during the drier year. Conversely, the carbon isotope analysis on NSC revealed seasonal and inter-annual variations of photosynthetic and post-carboxylation fractionation processes, with a significant increase in δ(13)C of wood and leaf soluble sugars in the drier summer year than in the wetter one. The highly significant correlation between δ(13)C of leaf soluble sugars and SWC suggests a decrease of the canopy C isotope discrimination and, hence, an increased water-use efficiency with decreasing soil water availability. This may be a relevant trait for maintaining an acceptable plant water status and a relatively high C sink capacity during dry seasonal periods. Our results suggest a short- to medium-term homeostatic response of the Collelongo beech stand to variations in water availability and solar radiation, indicating that this Mediterranean forest was able to adjust carbon-water balance in order to prevent C depletion and to sustain plant growth and reserve accumulation during relatively dry seasons.

  2. Influence of soil temperature on growth traits of European beech seedlings

    OpenAIRE

    Štraus, Ines; Frederick, Peter C.; Hylton, Becky; Mrak, Tanja; Ferlan, Mitja; Heath, Julie; Železnik, Peter; Spalding, Marilyn; Kraigher, Hojka

    2014-01-01

    European beech (Fagus sylvatica L.) is an economically and ecologically important forest tree species in Europe. Expected future temperature increases due to global climate change may significantly affect growth of beech trees and consequently influence carbon cycling in beech forests. We tested the hypothesis that soil temperature influences the growth of both belowground and aboveground parts of beech seedlings. One-year-old seedlings were transferred into rhizotrons and subjected ...

  3. Millipede and centipede (Myriapoda: Diplopoda, Chilopoda assemblages in secondary succession: variance and abundance in Western German beech and coniferous forests as compared to fallow ground

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Schreiner

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Successional processes are an important element of commercial-forest ecosystems. They can be followed by studying the species composition of various animal groups, e.g. millipedes. Over the vegetation periods 2009 and 2010, we pitfall-trapped millipedes and centipedes (Myriapoda: Diplopoda, Chilopoda on 21 Western German (North Rhine-Westphalian deciduous and coniferous forest as well as fallow-ground sites of increasing age (1–165 yr and determined them to the species and sex. Diplopoda (2009: 1659/2010: 3417 individuals outnumbered the trapped Chilopoda (2009: 37/2010: 111 individuals by far while the general catching results approximately doubled from 2009 to 2010. Indirect gradient analysis (CA revealed that the influence of the habitat type on the formation of diplopod assemblages exceeded the influence of the successional stage. Although no clear trend in individual-count development over time occurred in most species detected, Julus scandinavius (Latzel, 1884 significantly increased in numbers with ageing of the deciduous (beech forests. In conclusion, J. scandinavius may be a suitable bioindicator of deciduous-forest succession. More data are necessary to transfer our results into a mathematical function describing the course of increasing J. scandinavius abundance.

  4. Within-population genetic structure in beech (Fagus sylvatica L.) stands characterized by different disturbance histories: does forest management simplify population substructure?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piotti, Andrea; Leonardi, Stefano; Heuertz, Myriam; Buiteveld, Joukje; Geburek, Thomas; Gerber, Sophie; Kramer, Koen; Vettori, Cristina; Vendramin, Giovanni Giuseppe

    2013-01-01

    The fine-scale assessment of both spatially and non-spatially distributed genetic variation is crucial to preserve forest genetic resources through appropriate forest management. Cryptic within-population genetic structure may be more common than previously thought in forest tree populations, which has strong implications for the potential of forests to adapt to environmental change. The present study was aimed at comparing within-population genetic structure in European beech (Fagus sylvatica L.) plots experiencing different disturbance levels. Five plot pairs made up by disturbed and undisturbed plots having the same biogeographic history were sampled throughout Europe. Overall, 1298 individuals were analyzed using four highly polymorphic nuclear microsatellite markers (SSRs). Bayesian clustering within plots identified 3 to 11 genetic clusters (within-plot θ ST ranged from 0.025 to 0.124). The proportion of within-population genetic variation due to genetic substructuring (F CluPlot = 0.067) was higher than the differentiation among the 10 plots (F PlotTot = 0.045). Focusing on the comparison between managed and unmanaged plots, disturbance mostly explains differences in the complexity of within-population genetic structure, determining a reduction of the number of genetic clusters present in a standardized area. Our results show that: i) genetic substructuring needs to be investigated when studying the within-population genetic structure in forest tree populations, and ii) indices describing subtle characteristics of the within-population genetic structure are good candidates for providing early signals of the consequences of forest management, and of disturbance events in general.

  5. Within-population genetic structure in beech (Fagus sylvatica L. stands characterized by different disturbance histories: does forest management simplify population substructure?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Piotti

    Full Text Available The fine-scale assessment of both spatially and non-spatially distributed genetic variation is crucial to preserve forest genetic resources through appropriate forest management. Cryptic within-population genetic structure may be more common than previously thought in forest tree populations, which has strong implications for the potential of forests to adapt to environmental change. The present study was aimed at comparing within-population genetic structure in European beech (Fagus sylvatica L. plots experiencing different disturbance levels. Five plot pairs made up by disturbed and undisturbed plots having the same biogeographic history were sampled throughout Europe. Overall, 1298 individuals were analyzed using four highly polymorphic nuclear microsatellite markers (SSRs. Bayesian clustering within plots identified 3 to 11 genetic clusters (within-plot θ ST ranged from 0.025 to 0.124. The proportion of within-population genetic variation due to genetic substructuring (F CluPlot = 0.067 was higher than the differentiation among the 10 plots (F PlotTot = 0.045. Focusing on the comparison between managed and unmanaged plots, disturbance mostly explains differences in the complexity of within-population genetic structure, determining a reduction of the number of genetic clusters present in a standardized area. Our results show that: i genetic substructuring needs to be investigated when studying the within-population genetic structure in forest tree populations, and ii indices describing subtle characteristics of the within-population genetic structure are good candidates for providing early signals of the consequences of forest management, and of disturbance events in general.

  6. Assessing the risk caused by ground level ozone to European forest trees: A case study in pine, beech and oak across different climate regions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Emberson, Lisa D. [Stockholm Environment Institute, University of York, York YO10 5DD (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: l.emberson@york.ac.uk; Bueker, Patrick [Stockholm Environment Institute, University of York, York YO10 5DD (United Kingdom); Ashmore, Mike R. [Stockholm Environment Institute, University of York, York YO10 5DD (United Kingdom)

    2007-06-15

    Two different indices have been proposed for estimation of the risk caused to forest trees across Europe by ground-level ozone, (i) the concentration based AOT40 index (Accumulated Over a Threshold of 40 ppb) and (ii) the recently developed flux based AFstY index (Accumulated stomatal Flux above a flux threshold Y). This paper compares the AOT40 and AFstY indices for three forest trees species at different locations in Europe. The AFstY index is estimated using the DO{sub 3}SE (Deposition of Ozone and Stomatal Exchange) model parameterized for Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris), beech (Fagus sylvatica) and holm oak (Quercus ilex). The results show a large difference in the perceived O{sub 3} risk when using AOT40 and AFstY indices both between species and regions. The AOT40 index shows a strong north-south gradient across Europe, whereas there is little difference between regions in the modelled values of AFstY. There are significant differences in modelled AFstY between species, which are predominantly determined by differences in the timing and length of the growing season, the periods during which soil moisture deficit limits stomatal conductance, and adaptation to soil moisture stress. This emphasizes the importance of defining species-specific flux response variables to obtain a more accurate quantification of O{sub 3} risk. - A new flux-based model provides a revised assessment of risks of ozone impacts to European forests.

  7. Similar net ecosystem exchange of beech stands located in France and Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Granier, A.; Pilegaard, K.; Jensen, N.O.

    2002-01-01

    Net ecosystem exchange (NEE), as measured with eddy covariance was compared for two European beech stands for the years 1996-1999: a young beech forest (32 year-old) growing in east France, and a mature beech stand (80 year-old) located in Denmark. Those sites are included in the Carboeuroflux...

  8. Fractionation of sulfur (S) in beech (Fagus sylvatica) forest soils in relation to distance from the stem base as useful tool for modeling S biogeochemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanousek, Ondrej; Prohaska, Thomas; Kulhanek, Martin; Balik, Jiri; Tejnecky, Vaclav; Berger, Torsten W

    2017-09-01

    The investigation of the fractionation of S compounds in forest soils is a powerful tool for interpreting S dynamics and S biogeochemistry in forest ecosystems. Beech stands on high pH (nutrient-rich) sites on Flysch and on low pH (nutrient-poor) sites on Molasse were selected for testing the influence of stemflow, which represents a high input of water and dissolved elements to the soil, on spatial patterns of sulfur (S) fractions. Soil cores were taken at six distances from a beech stem per site at 55 cm uphill and at 27, 55, 100, 150 and 300 cm downhill from the stem. The cores were divided into the mineral soil horizons 0-3, 3-10, 10-20, 20-30 and 30-50 cm. Soil samples were characterized for pH, Corg, pedogenic Al and Fe oxides and S fractions. Sequential extraction by NH4Cl, NH4H2PO4 and HCl yielded readily available sulfate-S (RAS), adsorbed sulfate-S (AS) and HCl-soluble sulfate-S (HCS). Organic sulfur (OS) was estimated as the difference between total sulfur (ToS) and inorganic sulfur (RAS + AS + HCS). Organic sulfur was further divided into ester sulfate-S (ES, HI-reduction) and carbon bonded sulfur (CS). On Flysch, RAS represented 3-6%, AS 2-12%, HCS 0-8% and OS 81-95% of ToS. On Molasse, RAS amounted 1-6%, AS 1-60%, HCS 0-8% and OS 37-95% of ToS. Spatial S distribution patterns with respect to the distance from the tree stem base could be clearly observed at all investigated sites. The presented data is a contribution to current reports on negative input-output S budgets of forest watersheds, suggesting that mineralization of OS on nutrient rich soils and desorption of historic AS on nutrient-poor soils are the dominant S sources, which have to be considered in future modeling of sulfur.

  9. A unique Middle Pleistocene beech (Fagus)-rich deciduous broad-leaved forest in the Yangtze Delta Plain, East China: Its climatic and stratigraphic implication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shu, Jun-wu; Wang, Wei-ming

    2012-08-01

    Pollen analysis of Middle Pleistocene sediments from the Yangtze Delta Plain provides a paleoecological reconstruction and has implications for stratigraphic correlation in East China. The pollen assemblage is characterized by high values of Fagus (16.8% on average), which is unusual because Fagus is generally present only sporadically in other lowland Quaternary pollen records from the region. In addition to Fagus, the assemblage has a rich diversity of broad-leaved deciduous trees, including Quercus, Ulmus, Carpinus/Ostrya, Juglans, Betula, and Liquidambar, as well as conifers, including Pinus, Picea, Abies, Larix, and Tsuga. Thus, the pollen flora suggests a broad-leaved deciduous forest mixed with abundant conifers, which developed under cooler and more humid conditions than present. The stable pollen sequence throughout the studied section suggests a stable environment. Beech forests also characterize the Middle Pleistocene of Taiwan and Japan, and thus may be a stratigraphic indicator of the Middle Pleistocene in East Asia. The Yangtze Delta Plain may have been an important refugium for the last survival of Fagus in the lowlands.

  10. Enhanced ozone strongly reduces carbon sink strength of adult beech (Fagus sylvatica)--resume from the free-air fumigation study at Kranzberg Forest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matyssek, R; Wieser, G; Ceulemans, R; Rennenberg, H; Pretzsch, H; Haberer, K; Löw, M; Nunn, A J; Werner, H; Wipfler, P; Osswald, W; Nikolova, P; Hanke, D E; Kraigher, H; Tausz, M; Bahnweg, G; Kitao, M; Dieler, J; Sandermann, H; Herbinger, K; Grebenc, T; Blumenröther, M; Deckmyn, G; Grams, T E E; Heerdt, C; Leuchner, M; Fabian, P; Häberle, K-H

    2010-08-01

    Ground-level ozone (O(3)) has gained awareness as an agent of climate change. In this respect, key results are comprehended from a unique 8-year free-air O(3)-fumigation experiment, conducted on adult beech (Fagus sylvatica) at Kranzberg Forest (Germany). A novel canopy O(3) exposure methodology was employed that allowed whole-tree assessment in situ under twice-ambient O(3) levels. Elevated O(3) significantly weakened the C sink strength of the tree-soil system as evidenced by lowered photosynthesis and 44% reduction in whole-stem growth, but increased soil respiration. Associated effects in leaves and roots at the gene, cell and organ level varied from year to year, with drought being a crucial determinant of O(3) responsiveness. Regarding adult individuals of a late-successional tree species, empirical proof is provided first time in relation to recent modelling predictions that enhanced ground-level O(3) can substantially mitigate the C sequestration of forests in view of climate change. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Effects of tree diversity and environmental factors on the soil microbial community in three soil depth in a Central European beech forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fornacon, C.; Jacob, M.; Guckland, A.; Meinen, C.; Gleixner, G.

    2009-04-01

    We investigated the link between aboveground and belowground diversity in forest ecosystems. Therefore, we determined the effect of tree composition on amount and composition of the soil microbial community using phospholipid fatty acid profiles in the Hainich National Park in Thuringia, a deciduous mixed forest on loess over limestone in Central Germany. On the one hand we investigated the composition of the microbial community in dependence of leave litter composition, hypothesizing that distinct leave litter compositions activated signature PLFA's. On the other hand we determined if environmental factor like clay content or nutrient status influence the microbial community in deeper soil horizons. Consequently soil was sampled from depth intervals of 0-5 cm, 5-10 cm and 10-20 cm. Plots with highest diversity of leave litter had highest total amounts of fatty acids in the upper 5 cm. Mainly PLFA 16:1?5 was activated in autumn, being a common marker for mycorrhizal fungi. In soil depth below 5 cm the environmental factors like clay and soil nutrients like phosphorus and carbon, explained most of the soil microbial variability. On pure beech sites the total phosphorus content of soil influenced soil microbial diversity, but on sites with higher tree diversity no single factor varying the microbial community could be identified. Tree diversity and environmental factors together effect soil microbial community and are closely related to the link between aboveground and belowground diversity.

  12. Energy efficiency of biomass production in managed versus natural temperate forest and grassland ecosystems

    OpenAIRE

    Callesen, I; Østergård, H.

    2008-01-01

    In a conceptual model study based on literature data from Danish ecosystems, energy yield from biomass production was compared in two semi-natural ecosystems (broadleaved forest and grassland) and their managed counterparts. The highest net energy yield of harvested biomass was obtained in the managed grassland system. The energy efficiency in terms of output:input ratios were about 190:1 in the managed beech forest and 6:1 in the managed grassland. This is discussed in relation to nitrogen c...

  13. Impacts of repeated timber skidding on the chemical properties of topsoil, herbaceous cover and forest floor in an eastern beech (Fagus orientalis Lipsky) stand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demir, Murat; Makineci, Ender; Comez, Aydin; Yilmaz, Ersel

    2010-07-01

    In this study, long-term timber skidding effects on herbaceous understory forest floor and soil were investigated on a skid road in a stand of the eastern beech (Fagus orientalis Lipsky). For this purpose, herbaceous understory forest floor and soil samples were collected from the skid road and from an undisturbed area used as a control plot. The mass (kg ha(-1)) of herbaceous and forest floor samples was determined, and soil characteristics were examined at two depths (0-5 cm and 5-10 cm). We quantified sand, silt and clay content, as well as bulk density compaction, pH, and organic carbon content in soil samples. The quantities of N, K, P, Na, Ca, Mg, Fe, Mn, Zn and Cu were determined in all herbaceous cover forest floor and soil samples. The quantities of Na, Fe, Zn, Cu and Mn in herbaceous understory samples from the skid road were considerably higher than those in the undisturbed area, while the quantity of Mg was considerably lower. These differences could have been caused by decreased herbaceous cover in addition to variations in the properties of the forest floor and soil after skidding. A lower amount of forest floor on the skid road was the result of skidding and harvesting activities. Mg and Zn contents in forest floor samples were found to be considerably lower for the skid road than for the undisturbed area. No significant differences were found in soil chemical properties (quantities of N, P, K, Na, Ca, Mg, Fe, Zn, Cu and Mn) at the 0-5 cm soil depth. Important differences exist between soil quantities of Mg at a 5-10 cm depth on the skid road and in undisturbed areas. Both 0-5 cm and 5-10 cm soil depths, the average penetrometer resistance values for the skid road was higher than for the undisturbed area. This result shows that the compaction caused by skidding is maintained to depth of 10 cm. Skid road soil showed higher bulk density values than undisturbed areas because of compaction.

  14. Soil respiration rates and δ13C(CO2) in natural beech forest (Fagus sylvatica L.) in relation to stand structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cater, Matjaz; Ogrinc, Nives

    2011-06-01

    Soil respiration rates were studied as a function of soil type, texture and light intensity at five selected natural beech forest stands with contrasting geology: stands on silicate bedrock at Kladje and Bricka in Pohorje, a stand on quartz sandstone at Vrhovo and two stands on a carbonate bedrock in the Karstic-Dinaric area in Kocevski Rog, Snezna jama and Rajhenav, Slovenia, during the growing season in 2005-2006. Soil respiration exhibited pronounced seasonal and spatial variations in the studied forest ecosystem plots. The CO(2) flux rates ranged from minimum averages of 2.3 μmol CO(2) m(-2) s(-1) (winter) to maximum averages of about 7 μmol CO(2) m(-2) s(-1) (summer) at all the investigated locations. An empirical model describing the relationship between soil respiration and soil temperature predicted seasonal variations in soil respiration reasonably well during 2006. Nevertheless, there were also some indications that soil moisture in relation to soil texture could influence the soil CO(2) efflux rates in both sampling seasons. It was shown that spatial variability of mean soil respiration at the investigated sites was high and strongly related to root biomass. Based on the [image omitted]  data, it was shown that new photoassimilates could account for a major part of the total soil respiration under canopy conditions in forest ecosystems where no carbonate rocks are present, indicating that microbial respiration could not always dominate bulk soil CO(2) fluxes. At Snezna jama and Rajhenav, the abiotic CO(2) derived from carbonate dissolution had a pronounced influence on CO(2) efflux accounting, on average, to ∼17%. Further spatial heterogeneity of soil respiration was clearly affected by management practice. Higher respiration rates as well as higher variability in respiration rates were observed in the virgin forest (Rajhenav) than in the management forest (Snezna jama) and could be related to a higher amount of detritus and consequently to less

  15. Fluxes of CO2, CH4 and N2O at two European beech forests: linking soil gas production profiles with soil and stem fluxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maier, Martin; Machacova, Katerina; Halaburt, Ellen; Haddad, Sally; Urban, Otmar; Lang, Friederike

    2016-04-01

    Soil and plant surfaces are known to exchange greenhouse gases with the atmosphere. Some gases like nitrous oxide (N2O) and methane (CH4) can be produced and re-consumed in different soil depths and soil compartments, so that elevated concentrations of CH4 or N2O in the soil do not necessarily mean a net efflux from the soil into the atmosphere. Soil aeration, and thus the oxygen status can underlay a large spatial variability within the soil on the plot and profile scale, but also within soil aggregates. Thus, conditions suitable for production and consumption of CH4 and N2O can vary on different scales in the soil. Plant surfaces can also emit or take up CH4 and N2O, and these fluxes can significantly contribute to the net ecosystem exchange. Since roots usually have large intercellular spaces or aerenchyma they may represent preferential transport ways for soil gases, linking possibly elevated soil gas concentrations in the subsoil in a "shortcut" to the atmosphere. We tested the hypothesis that the spatial variability of the soil-atmosphere fluxes of CO2, CH4 and N2O is caused by the heterogeneity in soil properties. Therefore, we measured soil-atmosphere gas fluxes, soil gas concentrations and soil diffusivity profiles and did a small scale field assessment of soil profiles on the measurments plots. We further tried to link vertical profiles of soil gas concentrations and diffusivity to derive the production and consumption profiles, and to link these profiles to the stem-atmosphere flux rates of individual trees. Measurements were conducted in two mountain beech forests with different geographical and climatic conditions (White Carpathians, Czech Republic; Black Forest, Germany). Gas fluxes at stem and soil levels were measured simultaneously using static chamber systems and chromatographic and continuous laser analyses. Monitoring simultaneously vertical soil gas profiles allowed to assess the within-soil gas fluxes, and thus to localize the production and

  16. Belowground carbon allocation by trees drives seasonal patterns of extracellular enzyme activities by altering microbial community composition in a beech forest soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaiser, Christina; Koranda, Marianne; Kitzler, Barbara; Fuchslueger, Lucia; Schnecker, Jörg; Schweiger, Peter; Rasche, Frank; Zechmeister-Boltenstern, Sophie; Sessitsch, Angela; Richter, Andreas

    2010-01-01

    Plant seasonal cycles alter carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) availability for soil microbes, which may affect microbial community composition and thus feed back on microbial decomposition of soil organic material and plant N availability. The temporal dynamics of these plant–soil interactions are, however, unclear. Here, we experimentally manipulated the C and N availability in a beech forest through N fertilization or tree girdling and conducted a detailed analysis of the seasonal pattern of microbial community composition and decomposition processes over 2 yr. We found a strong relationship between microbial community composition and enzyme activities over the seasonal course. Phenoloxidase and peroxidase activities were highest during late summer, whereas cellulase and protease peaked in late autumn. Girdling, and thus loss of mycorrhiza, resulted in an increase in soil organic matter-degrading enzymes and a decrease in cellulase and protease activity. Temporal changes in enzyme activities suggest a switch of the main substrate for decomposition between summer (soil organic matter) and autumn (plant litter). Our results indicate that ectomycorrhizal fungi are possibly involved in autumn cellulase and protease activity. Our study shows that, through belowground C allocation, trees significantly alter soil microbial communities, which may affect seasonal patterns of decomposition processes. PMID:20553392

  17. The impact of Norway spruce planting on herb vegetation in the mountain beech forests on two bedrock types

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Máliš, František; Ujházy, K.; Vodálová, A.; Barka, I.; Čaboun, V.; Sitková, Z.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 131, č. 5 (2012), s. 1551-1569 ISSN 1612-4669 Institutional support: RVO:67985939 Keywords : boreal forests * Bavarian Alps * temperate forests * soil * biodiversity * nitrogen mineralizaton Subject RIV: EF - Botanics Impact factor: 1.959, year: 2012

  18. Characteristics of organic matter fractions separated by wet-sieving and differences in density from five soils of different pedogenesis under mature beech forest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vormstein, Svendja; Kaiser, Michael; Ludwig, Bernard

    2017-04-01

    Forest top- and subsoil account for approximately 70 % of the organic C (OC) globally stored in soil reasoning their large importance for terrestrial ecosystem services such as the mitigation of climate change. In contrast to forest topsoil, there is much less information about the decomposition and stabilization of organic matter (OM) in subsoil. Therefore, we sampled the pedogenetic horizons of five soils under mature beech forest developed on different parent material (i.e. Tertiary Sand, Loess, Basalt, Lime Stone, Red Sandstone) down to the bedrock. The bulk soil samples were characterized for texture, oxalate and dithionite soluble Fe and Al, pH, OC, microbial biomass C and basal respiration (cumulative CO2 emission after 7 and 14 days). Furthermore, we analyzed aggregate size fractions separated by wet-sieving (i.e. >1000 µm, 1000-250 µm, 250-53 µm, Stone and Red Sandstone was predominately stored in the larger macro-aggregates (>1000 µm). In contrast, the major part of the topsoil OC on Basalt and Tertiary Sand was found in the smaller macro-aggregates (1000-250 µm). For the topsoil samples, we found that the basal respiration as well as the microbial biomass C were positively correlated (p ≤0.05) with the OC amounts associated with the free and occluded light fraction and with the macro-aggregates (1000-250 µm) and micro-aggregates (250-53 µm) suggesting these fractions to store the major part of the easily decomposable OM. The OC amount associated with the heavy fraction and the fraction forest topsoil. In the subsoil (horizons below the Ah), the contribution of the OC associated with the aggregate size fractions 53 µm were positively correlated with basal respiration and the microbial biomass C. This suggests, in contrast to the topsoil, the easily decomposable OM to be distributed more homogeneously among fractions. Only the OC content of the forest top- and subsoils but revealed differences in the distribution of easily decomposable OM within

  19. Tests for attraction to prey and predator avoidance by chemical cues in spiders of the beech forest floor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wetter, Melissa B.

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Spiders leave draglines, faeces and other secretions behind when traveling through their microhabitat. The presence of these secretions may unintentionally inform other animals, prey as well as predators, about a recent and possible current predation risk or food availability. For a wolf spider, other spiders including smaller conspecifics, form a substantial part of their prey, and larger wolf spiders, again including conspecifics, are potential predators. We tested two hypotheses: that large wolf spiders may locate patches of potential spider prey through the presence of silk threads and/or other secretions; and that prey spiders may use secretions from large wolf spiders to avoid patches with high predation risk. We used large (subadult or adult Pardosa saltans to provide predator cues and mixed dwarf spiders or small (juvenile P. saltans to provide prey cues. Subadult wolf spiders were significantly attracted to litter contaminated by dwarf spiders or small conspecifics after 6 hours but no longer after 24 hours. In contrast, neither dwarf spiders nor small P. saltans showed significant avoidance of substrate contaminated by adult P. saltans. However, small P. saltans showed different activity patterns on the two substrates. The results indicate that wolf spiders are able to increase the efficiency of foraging by searching preferentially in patches with the presence of intraguild prey. The lack of a clear patch selection response of the prey in spite of a modified activity pattern may possibly be associated with the vertical stratification of the beech litter habitat: the reduced volume of spaces in the deeper layers could make downward rather than horizontal movement a fast and safe tactic against a large predator that cannot enter these spaces.

  20. Different mixtures of Norway spruce, silver fir, and European beech modify competitive interactions in central European mature mixed forests

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Tobin, Brian; Larocque, Guy R; Petráš, Rudolf; Bosela, Michal; Šebeň, Vladimír

    2015-01-01

    ...–spruce forests, mostly because of a lack of long-term experimental research. In the 1960s, long-term sample plots were established in the Western Carpathians to develop region-specific yield models...

  1. Hypoxylon species on beech and other broadleaves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milijašević Tanja

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Fungi in the genus Hypoxylon cause wood decay and most of them are saprophytes on dead wood or parasites of weakness. The following species in this genus were identified in this study performed at several localities in Serbia and Montenegro: H. deustum, H. fragiforme, H. nummularium, H. multiforme, H. rubiginosum and H. fuscum. Among them the most significant species is H. deustum, the fungus causing root and butt rot of standing beech trees. It was recorded from all coppice and high forests of beech. This paper presents the morphological characteristics of the recorded fungi their range, plant hosts and significance.

  2. Thermoregulation under semi-natural conditions in speckled ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We recorded body temperature (Tb) in speckled mousebirds (Colius striatus) under semi-natural conditions in outdoor aviaries, and examined interactions between behavioural and metabolic thermoregulation by experimentally manipulating food availability and communal roosting behaviour. When food was available ad ...

  3. Impact of white-rot fungi on numbers and community composition of bacteria colonizing beech wood from forest soil

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Folman, L.B.; Klein Gunnewiek, P.J.A.; Boddy, L.; De Boer, W.

    2008-01-01

    White-rot fungi are important wood-decomposing organisms in forest ecosystems. Their ability to colonize and decompose woody resources may be strongly influenced by wood-inhabiting bacteria that grow on easily utilizable compounds e.g. oligomers of wood-polymers released by fungal enzymes. However,

  4. Managing climate change in conservation practice: an exploration of the science–management interface in beech forest management.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koning, de J.; Turnhout, E.; Winkel, G.; Blondet, M.; Borras, L.; Ferranti, F.; Geitzenauer, M.; Sotirov, M.; Jump, A.

    2014-01-01

    Scientific studies reveal significant consequences of climate change for nature, from ecosystems to individual species. Such studies are important factors in policy decisions on forest conservation and management in Europe. However, while research has shown that climate change research start to

  5. Managing climate change in conservation practice: an exploration of the science-management interface in beech forest management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Koning, Jessica; Turnhout, Esther; Winkel, Georg; Blondet, Marieke; Borras, Lars; Ferranti, Francesca; Geitzenauer, Maria; Sotirov, Metodi; Jump, Alistair

    Scientific studies reveal significant consequences of climate change for nature, from ecosystems to individual species. Such studies are important factors in policy decisions on forest conservation and management in Europe. However, while research has shown that climate change research start to impact on European conservation policies like Natura 2000, climate change information has yet to translate into management practices. This article contributes to the on-going debates about science-society relations and knowledge utilization by exploring and analysing the interface between scientific knowledge and forest management practice. We focus specifically on climate change debates in conservation policy and on how managers of forest areas in Europe perceive and use climate change ecology. Our findings show that forest managers do not necessarily deny the potential importance of climate change for their management practices, at least in the future, but have reservations about the current usefulness of available knowledge for their own areas and circumstances. This suggests that the science-management interface is not as politicized as current policy debates about climate change and that the use of climate change ecology is situated in practice. We conclude the article by discussing what forms of knowledge may enable responsible and future oriented management in practice focusing specifically on the role of reflexive experimentation and monitoring.

  6. Differences in top-soil features between beech-mixture and Norway spruce forests of the Šumava Mts

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Matějka, K.; Starý, Josef

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 55, č. 12 (2009), s. 540-555 ISSN 1212-4834 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA206/07/1200 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60660521 Keywords : ash content * Bohemia Forest * element content (P, Ca, Mg, Fe, Al) Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour

  7. [The effect of light and temperature of the CO2 exchange of different life forms in the ground vegetation of a montane beech forest].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulze, E-D

    1972-09-01

    In a montane beech (Fagus sylvatica) forest the influence of the climatic factors, light and temperature, on net photosynthesis and on the CO2 balance of the ground vegetation was investigated. The total turnover of carbon was calculated. Species studied included: Athyrium filix-femina, Oxalis acetosella, Luzula luzuloides, Deschampsia flexuosa and young plants of Fagus sylvatica. 1. The light compensation point in all spp. is between 300 and 500 lux except for D. flexuosa where it is 2 klx. Light saturation is attained at 2-3 klx for A. filix-femina, at 5-6 klx for O. acetosella, and at 6-7 klx for L. luzuloides and F. sylvatica. The net photosynthesis of D. flexuosa increases linearly upto 12 klx. This plant, therefore, is more closely related to plants with high light requirements than all the other species under experiment. 2. The maximum rates of net photosynthesis in O. acetosella and A. filix-femina are higher than in all the other plants, independent of the reference system. Per unit dry weight they even attain rates of CO2 uptake (22-27 mg CO2/gdw·h) known from herbs under the much better light conditions of an open habitat. F. sylvatica and L. luzuloides exhibit per unit dry weight only 30% of this rate and D. flexuosa 25%. On a leaf surface area and chlorophyll content basis differences are smaller: F. sylvatics attains 75%, L. luzuloides reaches 50% and D. flexuosa only 30% of the maximal rates of net photosynthesis of O. acetosella and A. filix-femina. The higher CO2 uptake of O. acetosella and A. filix-femina points to a better adaptation of their photosynthetic apparatus in comparison to all the other species of the same habitat. 3. At light saturation the temperature optimum of A. filix-femina and O. acetosella covers a smaller range at lower temperatures than was found in the other species. These attain almost maximal rates of net photosynthesis over the whole range of temperatures of their natural habitat. At decreasing light intensities the

  8. Timely salvage can reduce losses from beech scale-Nectria attack

    Science.gov (United States)

    David Crosby; J. C. Bjorkbom

    1958-01-01

    Beech is one of our more common hardwoods. It is an important component of the northern hardwood forest type, which occupies about 29 percent of the commercial forest land in the New England and Middle Atlantic States. In terms of total sawtimber volume, beech follows close on sugar maple, red oak, and yellow birch. It is used for a variety of products such as...

  9. Variation of Soil Organic Carbon Pool Weight Associated with Plant Biodiversity (Case Study: Mixed-Beech Forests of Glandrood in Nour

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Vahedi

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Soil organic carbon pool plays an important role in the global C cycle and climate change mitigation. Therefore, improving our understanding of some factors such as plant biodiversity that can affect forest soil C storage is fundamentally important for anticipating changes. This study was carried out in the mixed-beech forests of Glandrood located in Noor using a systematic network of points including 400 m2 plot for trees layer regularly distributed by a distance of 100 m from each other. Within each sampling plot, five different smaller sub-plots (1m2 corresponded to the herbal coverage on the four cardinals and the center of sampling plots in order to measure Shannon-winner index H΄, Pielou index J΄, Species richness SR, Dominance index D, Abundance index and Species Importance Value index SIV. After removing the litter and large plant materials, soil samples were collected at 0-10, 10-30 and 30-50 cm depths within each sub-plot, air dried and 2 mm sieved. The results of one-way ANOVA indicated that soil organic C pool was significantly different in the second depth compared to other soil layers. Based on the Pearson's correlation test across different soil layers, a positive strong correlation was detected between soil organic carbon storage at the first depth and abundance of tree layer. Furthermore, the aforementioned test showed that there was a strong correlation between Pielou index, dominance index of herbal coverage and soil C pool weight in the third depth as well as across the whole depths. Moreover, there was a inverse correlation between Dominance of herbal coverage and soil C pool weight in the third depth and the whole depth. In addition, there was a positive strong correlation between Shannon's index of herbal coverage and soil C pool weight in the third depth, total soil C pool weight. In contrast to the above conclusion, there was no significant correlation between species richness, SIV and soil C pool weight in different

  10. Protecting the forests while allowing removal of damaged trees may imperil saproxylic insect biodiversity in the Hyrcanian Beech Forests of Iran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller Jörg; Thorn Simon; Baier Roland; Sagheb-Talebi Khosro; Barimani Hassan V.; Seibold Sebastian; Michael D. Ulyshen; Gossner Martin M.

    2015-01-01

    The 1.8 million ha of forest south of the Caspian Sea represent a remarkably intact ecosystem with numerous old-growth features and unique species assemblages. To protect these forests, Iranian authorities recently passed a law which protects healthy trees but permits the removal of injured, dying and dead trees. To quantify the biodiversity effects of this strategy,...

  11. Ecology of beech regeneration in the allochthonous spruce stands – a case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lumír Dobrovolný

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We study the successional process of beech in a allochthonous spruce monocultures. In the natural regeneration of the predominatly spruce stand (area: 14.28 ha, age: 110 years with single mother beech trees admixture the spruce regeneration occupies the most part of the study area. However, about one quarter of area is occupied relatively regular by beech regeneration. The spruce density was at all times higher than that of beech while the spruce height grow was by contrast at all times lower than that of beech. Mean distance of beech seedlings dispersion is 12.7; at a distance greater than 40 m, the density already neared zero. Density of spruce increases with increasing light intensity, the density of beech decreases – the competition point was found about 19% of diffuse radiation or about 14% of canopy openness. The both species respond to increase of light intensity with increase of height grow (by beech only weekly – the spruce starts to dominate the beech at about 32% of diffuse radiation or about 22% of canopy openness. The silvicultural goal in the next stand generation – converting of spruce forest into mixed forest, i.e. achievement of the legal proportion of beech as a soil-improving and reinforcing tree species (proportion about 30% and more in the spruce stand can be reliably realized by natural way only using a combination of more intensive shelterwood or border felling with group selection system.

  12. Validation of PROBA-V GEOV1 and MODIS C5 & C6 fAPAR Products in a Deciduous Beech Forest Site in Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enrica Nestola

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The availability of new fAPAR satellite products requires simultaneous efforts in validation to provide users with a better comprehension of product performance and evaluation of uncertainties. This study aimed to validate three fAPAR satellite products, GEOV1, MODIS C5, and MODIS C6, against ground references to determine to what extent the GCOS requirements on accuracy (maximum 10% or 5% can be met in a deciduous beech forest site in a gently and variably sloped mountain site. Three ground reference fAPAR, differing for temporal (continuous or campaign mode and spatial sampling (single points or Elementary Sampling Units—ESUs, were collected using different devices: (1 Apogee (defined as benchmark in this study; (2 PASTIS; and (3 Digital cameras for collecting hemispherical photographs (DHP. A bottom-up approach for the upscaling process was used in the present study. Radiometric values of decametric images (Landsat-8 were extracted over the ESUs and used to develop empirical transfer functions for upscaling the ground measurements. The resulting high-resolution ground-based maps were aggregated to the spatial resolution of the satellite product to be validated considering the equivalent point spread function of the satellite sensors, and a correlation analysis was performed to accomplish the accuracy assessment. PASTIS sensors showed good performance as fAPARPASTIS appropriately followed the seasonal trends depicted by fAPARAPOGEE (benchmark (R2 = 0.84; RMSE = 0.01. Despite small dissimilarities, mainly attributed to different sampling schemes and errors in DHP classification process, the agreement between fAPARPASTIS and fAPARDHP was noticeable considering all the differences between both approaches. The temporal courses of the three satellite products were found to be consistent with both Apogee and PASTIS, except at the end of the summer season when ground data were more affected by senescent leaves, with both MODIS C5 and C6 displaying

  13. Carbon flux to woody tissues in a beech/spruce forest during summer and in response to chronic O3 exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    The present study compares the dynamics in carbon (C) allocation of adult deciduous beech (Fagus sylvatica) and evergreen spruce (Picea abies) during summer and in response to seven-year-long exposure with twice-ambient ozone (O3) concentrations (2 × O3). Focus was on the respira...

  14. Assessment of a relaxed eddy accumulation for measurements of fluxes of biogenic volatile organic compounds: Study over arable crops and a mature beech forest

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gallagher, M.W.; Clayborough, R.; Beswick, K.M.

    2000-01-01

    A relaxed eddy accumulation (REA) system, based on the design by Beverland et al. (Journal of Geophysics Research 101 (D17) 22, 807-22, 815), for the measurement of biogenic VOC species was evaluated by intercomparison with an eddy correlation CO2 flux system over a mature deciduous beech canopy ...

  15. Genetic diversity and differentiation in European beech (Fagus sylvatica L.) stands varying in management history

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buiteveld, J.; Vendramin, G.G.; Leonardi, S.; Kramer, K.; Geburek, T.

    2007-01-01

    The impact of forest management on genetic diversity and mating was examined in European beech (Fagus sylvatica L.). Ten beech stands located in Europe were studied in pair-wise plots, differing in management intensity. The stands were genotyped with four highly polymorphic microsatellite loci.

  16. GHG Fluxes in semi-natural grasslands in the Pyrenees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debouk, Haifa; Altimir, Nuria; Ribas, Angela; Ibañez, Mercedes; Sebastià, Teresa

    2015-04-01

    Mountain areas are identified by the IPCC report (2013) as particularly sensitive to climate change. The need to understand mountain grasslands is crucial since these ecosystems can act as both sinks and sources of CO2. Investigating CH4 and N2O fluxes is important because they can offset potential CO2 sequestration. While most studies have been focusing on CO2, the knowledge on the temporal and spatial variability of CH4 and N2O, particularly in semi-natural mountain grasslands, is scarce. This study describes the magnitude and range of variability of the fluxes of CO2, N2O, and CH4 from four semi-natural pastures in the Pyrenees across an altitudinal gradient (1026 to 2436 m a.s.l.) during the growth period in 2012 and 2013. We measured GHG fluxes of the grassland during both light and dark conditions in the study sites using a photoacoustic field gas-monitor (INNOVA 1412, LumaSense Technologies). After completing the GHG measurements, we collected vegetation samples for the estimation of above-ground and below-ground biomass and separated them into functional groups and species. We present here the analysis of the relationship between GHG fluxes and above-ground biomass including the contribution of the relative abundance of plant functional types. Our preliminary results showed a clear seasonal pattern of GHG fluxes. We observed a negative impact of the summer period on the GHG fluxes, which was mostly pronounced in the CO2. We will further elaborate in-depth the effect of the temporal and spatial variability on the fluxes of CO2, N2O and CH4. Also, we will present the relationship between the GHG fluxes and the contribution of the vegetation in terms of the relative abundance of different plant functional types.

  17. Changes within a single land-use category alter microbial diversity and community structure: molecular evidence from wood-inhabiting fungi in forest ecosystems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purahong, Witoon; Hoppe, Björn; Kahl, Tiemo; Schloter, Michael; Schulze, Ernst-Detlef; Bauhus, Jürgen; Buscot, François; Krüger, Dirk

    2014-06-15

    The impact of changes within a single land-use category or land-use intensity on microbial communities is poorly understood, especially with respect to fungi. Here we assessed how forest management regimes and a change in forest type affect the richness and community structure of wood-inhabiting fungi across Germany. We used molecular methods based on the length polymorphism of the internal transcribed spacers and the 5.8S rRNA gene to assess fungal operational taxonomic units (OTUs). A cloning/sequencing approach was used to identify taxonomic affinities of the fungal OTUs. Overall, 20-24% and 25-27% of native fungal OTUs from forest reserves and semi-natural forests became undetectable or were lost in managed and converted forests, respectively. Fungal richness was significantly reduced during a regeneration phase in age-class beech forests with a high level of wood extraction (P = 0.017), whereas fungal community structures were not significantly affected. Conversion of forests from native, deciduous to coniferous species caused significant changes in the fungal community structure (R = 0.64-0.66, P = 0.0001) and could reduce fungal richness (P forests were converted from beech to coniferous. We conclude that changes within a single land-use category can be regarded as a major threat to fungal diversity in temperate forest ecosystems. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Long-term effects of gap creation and liming on understory vegetation with a focus on tree regeneration in a European beech (Fagus sylvatica L. forest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Lin

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The long-term effects of gap creation and liming on tree regeneration and understory competition were examined in a mature European beech (Fagus sylvatica stand on a nutrient-poor site. In 1989, trees were felled to create four 30 m wide circular gaps, and 3 t ha-1 fine dolomite was applied to two of these gaps and the surrounding area, whereas the remaining two gaps and most parts of the stand remained untreated. In 2010, the stand density was 153 trees x ha-1 and the basal area was 29.51 m2 x ha-1. Testing a factorial combination of two levels of canopy cover (gap and stand and two levels of lime application (limed and unlimed, the results of the case study partly support our initial hypothesis that the combined or single effects of liming and canopy removal on understory plant communities last for more than 20 years. Some effects disappeared slowly over time, while others did not. Understory vegetation of the unlimed gaps and thelimed and unlimed stands was rapidly dominated by beech regeneration, whereas limed gaps were dominated by fireweed (Epilobium angustifolium, bramble (Rubus fruticosus agg. and raspberry (Rubus ideaus for around 14 years. There, the density of the beech regeneration was reduced by competitive ground vegetation species. Plant species richness (n/100 m² was still significantly different after 23 years, with an average 10 species per 100 m² in the limed stand area, 5 species in the unlimed stand area, 25 species in the limed gaps, and only 5 species in the unlimed gaps. Only the combination of liming and canopy removal enhanced the species richness in the long run. On our study site, this combination of liming and canopy opening had a long lasting influence on the ground vegetation in terms of retarding the beech regeneration and enhancing species’ richness.

  19. Natural and semi-natural vegetation in Japan

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Numata, M.; Miyawaki, A.; Itow, D.

    1972-01-01

    Studies on the composition of the forests and other vegetation of Japan were initiated by J. Tanaka (1887) in the Meiji Era. According to his introduction his field survey started in 1879 and resulted into a classification of vegetation zones (forest zones), mainly of the lowland, based on

  20. Long-term dynamics of radionuclides in semi-natural environments. Derivation of parameters and modelling. Final Report 1996-1999

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belli, M. [Agenzia Nazionale per la Protezione dell' Ambiente, Rome (Italy). Dipt. Stato Ambiente, Controlli e Sistemi Informativi, Unita' Interdipartimentale di Metrologia Ambientale

    2000-07-01

    During the Chernobyl accident large areas of semi-natural ecosystems were affected by radionuclide deposition. Meadows and forests are typical semi-natural ecosystems. Meadows are used extensively in many countries as pastures for cattle, sheep and goats, while forests are important to man since they provide wood, paper, wild berries, mushrooms, game and recreational areas. Post-Chernobyl investigations have shown that dose to man from semi-natural ecosystems is relatively greater than from agricultural systems and that this dose risk persists for the long-term. Predictive models are essential to take long-term decisions on the management of contaminated environment and to identify key processes controlling the dynamics of radionuclides inside the ecosystems. During the period following the atmospheric fallout due to the nuclear weapons testing, few models for some specific semi-natural environments were developed. The applicability of these models to a wide range of semi-natural ecosystem is questionable, because in these complex systems it is more difficult to identify general key processes and to apply to other sites models developed for one site. Studies carried out since the Chernobyl accident have increased the understanding of radionuclide behaviour in semi-natural ecosystems, especially for boreal forests and middle European meadow systems which have been extensively investigated. Data sets have been obtained which describe the distribution and the cycling of radionuclides (especially {sup 137}Cs and {sup 90}Sr) within these systems. However, predictive modelling has largely been restricted to aggregated transfer factors which provide good contamination estimates, but only for the sites from which data have been obtained directly. There was a need to develop models that can be applied to a broad variety of ecosystems. They are needed for dose estimation, countermeasure implementation and environmental management. They should give reliable estimates of the

  1. A quantitative survey of semi-natural habitats on Dutch arable farms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Manhoudt, A.G.E.; Snoo, de G.R.

    2003-01-01

    To enhance biodiversity, guidelines for farm-based nature management recommend that farmers manage at least 5% of their land as semi-natural habitat, in tandem with other measures. Semi-natural habitats are defined here as those areas of a farm that are non-productive, i.e. areas with no intentional

  2. Modelling Facilitates Silvicultural Decision-Making for Improving the Mitigating Effect of Beech (Fagus Sylvatica L. Dominated Alpine Forest against Rockfall

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petra Kajdiž

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In southeast Europe, silvicultural measures for improving forest protective effects against rockfall are often based on unsystematic observation and experience. We compared formalised expert assessment of forest protective effects and silvicultural decision-making with an approach supported by modelling (Rockyfor3D, Rockfor.NET, shadow angle method. The case study was conducted in Fagus sylvatica dominated Alpine forests above the regional road leading to the Ljubelj pass, in Slovenia. We analysed rock sources, silent witnesses, forest structure and regeneration. Expert assessment indicated acceptable protection effects of the forest and their decline in the future. Modelling revealed several road sections endangered by rockfalls. It also indicated subtle differences between silvicultural alternatives: current forest, current forest with cable crane lines, selection forest and non-forested slope. This outcome may be due to short transition zones, small rock sizes, low rock source heights and low resolution of the digital elevation model. Modelling requires more initial input than formalised expert assessment but gives spatially explicit results that enable comparison of silvicultural alternatives, coordination of silviculture and forest operations, and delineation of protection forests. Modelling also supported prioritising of silvicultural measures, where the necessity of silvicultural measures increases with increasing rockfall susceptibility and decreasing long-term stability of stands.

  3. Differential responses of herbivores and herbivory to management in temperate European beech.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin M Gossner

    Full Text Available Forest management not only affects biodiversity but also might alter ecosystem processes mediated by the organisms, i.e. herbivory the removal of plant biomass by plant-eating insects and other arthropod groups. Aiming at revealing general relationships between forest management and herbivory we investigated aboveground arthropod herbivory in 105 plots dominated by European beech in three different regions in Germany in the sun-exposed canopy of mature beech trees and on beech saplings in the understorey. We separately assessed damage by different guilds of herbivores, i.e. chewing, sucking and scraping herbivores, gall-forming insects and mites, and leaf-mining insects. We asked whether herbivory differs among different forest management regimes (unmanaged, uneven-aged managed, even-aged managed and among age-classes within even-aged forests. We further tested for consistency of relationships between regions, strata and herbivore guilds. On average, almost 80% of beech leaves showed herbivory damage, and about 6% of leaf area was consumed. Chewing damage was most common, whereas leaf sucking and scraping damage were very rare. Damage was generally greater in the canopy than in the understorey, in particular for chewing and scraping damage, and the occurrence of mines. There was little difference in herbivory among differently managed forests and the effects of management on damage differed among regions, strata and damage types. Covariates such as wood volume, tree density and plant diversity weakly influenced herbivory, and effects differed between herbivory types. We conclude that despite of the relatively low number of species attacking beech; arthropod herbivory on beech is generally high. We further conclude that responses of herbivory to forest management are multifaceted and environmental factors such as forest structure variables affecting in particular microclimatic conditions are more likely to explain the variability in herbivory

  4. Assessment of CH4 and N2O fluxes in a Danish Beech (Fagus sylvatica) forest and an adjacent N-fertilised barley (Hordeum vulgare)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ambus, P.; Jensen, J.M.; Prieme, A.

    2001-01-01

    emissions immediately following soil applications of digested sewage sludge. Cumulated values for CH4 emissions over the course of 328 days after sludge applications indicated a small net source in sludge treated plots (7.6 mg C m(-2)) whereas sludge-free soil constituted a small sink (-0.9 mg C m(-2......)). The CH4 emission amounted 0.01% of the sludge-C. Extrapolated to current rates of sludge applications in Danish agriculture this amounts to 0.1% of the total agricultural derived CH4. Sludge applications did not affect cumulated fluxes of N2O showing 312 mg N2O-N m(-2) and 304 mg N m(-2) with and without...... sludge, respectively. Four months after the sludge applications a significant effect on CO2 and NO emissions was still obvious in the field, the latter perhaps due to elevated nitrification. Nitrous oxide emission in the beech forest was about six times smaller (45 mg N m(-2)) than in the field...

  5. Effects of stand composition and thinning in mixed-species forests : a modeling approach applied to Douglas-fir and beech

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bartelink, H.H.

    2000-01-01

    Models estimating growth and yield of forest stands provide important tools for forest management. Pure stands have been modeled extensively and successfully for decades; however, relatively few models for mixed-species stands have been developed. A spatially explicit, mechanistic model (COMMIX) is

  6. Forages from intensively managed and semi-natural grasslands in the diet of dairy cows

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruinenberg, M.H.

    2003-01-01

    Keywords : Intensively managed grass, semi-natural grasslands, forage species, dairy cows, in vivo digestibility, feed degradation, energy metabolism, milk production, ruminant nutrition, rumen fermentation, rumen kinetics, voluntary intake, feed

  7. Differential impacts of calcium and aluminum treatments on sugar maple and American beech growth dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshua M. Halman; Paul G. Schaberg; Gary J. Hawley; Christopher F. Hansen; Timothy J. Fahey

    2015-01-01

    Acid deposition induced losses of calcium (Ca) from northeastern forests have had negative effects on forest health for decades, including the mobilization of potentially phytotoxic aluminum (Al) from soils. To evaluate the impact of changes in Ca and Al availability on sugar maple (Acer saccharum Marsh.) and American beech (Fagus...

  8. Short-term natural δ13C variations in pools and fluxes in a beech forest: the transfer of isotopic signal from recent photosynthates to soil respired CO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavrichkova, O.; Proietti, S.; Moscatello, S.; Portarena, S.; Battistelli, A.; Matteucci, G.; Brugnoli, E.

    2011-03-01

    The fate of photosynthetic products within the plant-soil continuum determines how long the reduced carbon resides within the ecosystem and when it returns back to the atmosphere in the form of respiratory CO2. We have tested the possibility of measuring natural variation in δ13C to disentangle potential times needed to transfer carbohydrates produced by photosynthesis down to roots and, in general, to belowground up to its further release in the form of soil respiration into the atmosphere in a beech (Fagus sylvatica) forest. For these purposes we have measured the variation in stable carbon and oxygen isotope compositions in plant material and in soil respired CO2 every three hours for three consequent days. Possible steps and different signs of post-photosynthetic fractionation during carbon translocation were also identified. A 12 h-periodicity was observed for variation in δ13C in soluble sugars in the top crown leaves and it can be explained by starch day/night dynamics in synthesis and breakdown and by stomatal limitations under elevated vapour pressure deficits. Photosynthetic products were transported down the trunk and mixed with older carbon pools, therefore causing the dampening of the δ13C signal variation. The strongest periodicity of 24 h was found in δ13C in soil respiration indicating changes in root contribution to the total CO2 efflux. Nevertheless, it was possible to identify the speed of carbon translocation through the plant-soil continuum. A period of 24 h was needed to transfer the C assimilated by photosynthesis from the top crown leaves to the tree trunk at breast height and additional 3 h for further respiration of that C by roots and soil microorganisms and its to subsequent diffusion back to the atmosphere.

  9. Radiation components of beech stands in southwest Germany

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holst, T.; Mayer, H. [Meteorological Inst., Univ. of Freiburg (Germany)

    2005-04-01

    Within the framework of an interdisciplinary project on the impact of climate and forest management on beech dominated deciduous forests, forest meteorological measurements are carried out within and above different beech stands (Fagus sylvatica L.) on opposite slopes of a narrow valley located in the Swabian Jura mountain range (south-west Germany). Referring to test plots on both slopes, the following cycles of radiation components are discussed: (1) Monthly mean values of transmission and extinction of global solar irradiance, photosynthetically active radiation as well as UV-A and UV-B radiation through the canopy, (2) diurnal courses of surface albedo {alpha}, net short-wave radiation K{sup *}, net long-wave radiation L{sup *} and net all-wave radiation Q{sup *} for a cloudless day in March (leafless period) and a cloudless day in July (fully-leaved period) above and below the canopy of different beech stands, and (3) monthly mean values of {alpha}, K{sup *}, L{sup *} and Q{sup *} for the same stand conditions as for (2). The results point out the combined impact on the investigated radiation components emanating from seasonally variable canopy density (quantified by the plant area index), exposure and sun elevation. (orig.)

  10. Fine-root carbon and nitrogen concentration of European beech (Fagus sylvatica L. in Italy Prealps: possible implications of coppice conversion to high forest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mattia eTerzaghi

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Fine-root systems represent a very sensitive plant compartment to environmental changes. Gaining further knowledge about their dynamics would improve soil carbon input understanding. This paper investigates C and N concentrations in fine roots in relation to different stand characteristics resulting from conversion of coppiced forests to high forests. In order to evaluate possible interferences due to different vegetative stages of vegetation, fine-root sampling was repeated 6 times in each stand during the same 2008 growing season. Fine-root sampling was conducted within three different soil depths (0-10; 10-20; and 20-30 cm. Fine-root traits were measured by means of WinRHIZO software which enable us to separate them into three different diameter classes (0-0.5, 0.5-1.0 and 1.0-2.0 mm. The data collected indicate that N concentration was higher in converted stands than in the coppiced stand whereas C concentration was higher in the coppiced stand than in converted stands. Consequently the fine-root C:N ratio was significantly higher in coppiced than in converted stands and showed an inverse relationship with fine-root turnover rate, confirming a significant change of fine-root status after the conversion of a coppice to high forest.

  11. Assessing Restoration Potential of Semi-natural Grasslands by Landscape Change Trajectories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitkänen, Timo P.; Mussaari, Maija; Käyhkö, Niina

    2014-04-01

    Species-rich semi-natural grasslands have rapidly declined and become fragmented in Northern Europe due to ceased traditional agricultural practices and animal husbandry. Restoration actions have been introduced in many places to improve the habitat conditions and increase the area to prevent any further losses of their ecological values. However, given the limited resources and long time span needed for successful restoration, it is essential to target activities on sites having a suitable initial state and where the effects of restoration are most beneficial for the habitat network. In this paper we present a conceptual framework for evaluating the restoration potential of partially overgrown and selectively managed semi-natural grasslands in a moderately transformed agricultural environment in south-western Finland. On the basis of the spatio-temporal landscape trajectory analysis, we construct potential restoration scenarios based on expected semi-natural grassland characteristics that are derived from land productivity, detected grassland continuum, and date of overgrowth. These scenarios are evaluated using landscape metrics, their feasibility is discussed and the effects of potential restoration are compared to the present extent of open semi-natural grasslands. Our results show that landscape trajectory analysis and scenario construction can be valuable tools for the restoration planning of semi-natural grasslands with limited resources. The approach should therefore be considered as an essential tool to find the most optimal restoration sites and to pre-evaluate the effects.

  12. Atmospheric particulate deposition in temperate deciduous forest ecosystems: interactions with the canopy and nutrient inputs in two beech stands of Northeastern France.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lequy, Emeline; Calvaruso, Christophe; Conil, Sébastien; Turpault, Marie-Pierre

    2014-07-15

    As wood harvests are expected to increase to satisfy the need for bio-energy in Europe, quantifying atmospheric nutrient inputs in forest ecosystems is essential for forest management. Current atmospheric measurements only take into account the 0.45 μm fraction of atmospheric deposition, below the canopy, to study the influence of the canopy on APD, and to determine the influence of APD below canopy to nutrient input-output budgets with a focus on base cations calcium, magnesium and potassium, and phosphorus. APD was sampled every four weeks by passive collectors. We divided APD into an organic and a mineral fraction, respectively POM and MDD. MDD was divided into a soluble and a hardly soluble fraction in hydrogen peroxide, referred to as S-MDD and H-MDD, respectively. In order to better understand the influence of the canopy on APD, we studied APD in three pathways below the canopy (litterfall, stemflow and throughfall), and in open field. Our results indicated that APD in throughfall (123 ± 64 kg ha(-1)year(-1)) was significantly higher and synchronic with that in open field (33 ±9 kg ha(-1)year(-1)) in the two study sites. This concerned both POM and MDD, suggesting a large interception of APD by foliar surfaces, which is rapidly washed off by rain within four weeks. Throughfall H-MDD was the main pathway with an average of 16 ± 2 kg ha(-1)year(-1). Stemflow and litterfall were neglected. In one study site, canopy intercepted about 8 kg ha(-1)year(-1) of S-MDD. Although base cations and phosphorus inputs by APD are lower than those of <0.45 μm deposition, they contributed from 5 to 32% to atmospheric deposition and improved the nutrient budget in one of the study sites. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Species accumulation curves and incidence-based species richness estimators to appraise the diversity of cultivable yeasts from beech forest soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yurkov, Andrey M; Kemler, Martin; Begerow, Dominik

    2011-01-01

    Yeast-like fungi inhabit soils throughout all climatic zones in a great abundance. While recent estimations predicted a plethora of prokaryotic taxa in one gram of soil, similar data are lacking for fungi, especially yeasts. We assessed the diversity of soil yeasts in different forests of central Germany using cultivation-based techniques with subsequent identification based on rDNA sequence data. Based on experiments using various pre-cultivation sample treatment and different cultivation media we obtained the highest number of yeasts by analysing mixed soil samples with a single nutrient-rich medium. Additionally, several species richness estimators were applied to incidence-based data of 165 samples. All of them predicted a similar range of yeast diversity, namely 14 to 16 species. Randomized species richness curves reached saturation in all applied estimators, thus indicating that the majority of species is detected after approximately 30 to 50 samples analysed. In this study we demonstrate that robust species identification as well as mathematical approaches are essential to reliably estimate the sampling effort needed to describe soil yeast communities. This approach has great potential for optimisation of cultivation techniques and allows high throughput analysis in the future.

  14. Semi-natural habitats support biological control, pollination and soil conservation in Europe. A review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Holland, John M.; Douma, Jacob C.; Crowley, Liam; James, Laura; Kor, Laura; Stevenson, David R.W.; Smith, Barbara M.

    2017-01-01

    Semi-natural habitats are integral to most agricultural areas and have the potential to support ecosystem services, especially biological control and pollination by supplying resources for the invertebrates providing these services and for soil conservation by preventing erosion and run-off. Some

  15. Tree Species Composition and Harvest Intensity Affect Herbivore Density and Leaf Damage on Beech, Fagus sylvatica, in Different Landscape Contexts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangels, Jule; Blüthgen, Nico; Frank, Kevin; Grassein, Fabrice; Hilpert, Andrea; Mody, Karsten

    2015-01-01

    Most forests are exposed to anthropogenic management activities that affect tree species composition and natural ecosystem processes. Changes in ecosystem processes such as herbivory depend on management intensity, and on regional environmental conditions and species pools. Whereas influences of specific forest management measures have already been addressed for different herbivore taxa on a local scale, studies considering effects of different aspects of forest management across different regions are rare. We assessed the influence of tree species composition and intensity of harvesting activities on arthropod herbivores and herbivore-related damage to beech trees, Fagus sylvatica, in 48 forest plots in three regions of Germany. We found that herbivore abundance and damage to beech trees differed between regions and that - despite the regional differences - density of tree-associated arthropod taxa and herbivore damage were consistently affected by tree species composition and harvest intensity. Specifically, overall herbivore damage to beech trees increased with increasing dominance of beech trees - suggesting the action of associational resistance processes - and decreased with harvest intensity. The density of leaf chewers and mines was positively related to leaf damage, and several arthropod groups responded to beech dominance and harvest intensity. The distribution of damage patterns was consistent with a vertical shift of herbivores to higher crown layers during the season and with higher beech dominance. By linking quantitative data on arthropod herbivore abundance and herbivory with tree species composition and harvesting activity in a wide variety of beech forests, our study helps to better understand the influence of forest management on interactions between a naturally dominant deciduous forest tree and arthropod herbivores.

  16. Short-term natural δ13C and δ18O variations in pools and fluxes in a beech forest: the transfer of isotopic signal from recent photosynthates to soil respired CO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavrichkova, O.; Proietti, S.; Moscatello, S.; Portarena, S.; Battistelli, A.; Matteucci, G.; Brugnoli, E.

    2011-10-01

    The fate of photosynthetic products within the plant-soil continuum determines how long the reduced carbon resides within the ecosystem and when it returns back to the atmosphere in the form of respiratory CO2. We have tested the possibility of measuring natural variation in δ13C and δ18O to disentangle the potential times needed to transfer carbohydrates produced by photosynthesis down to trunk, roots and, in general, to belowground up to its further release in the form of soil respiration into the atmosphere in a beech (Fagus sylvatica) forest. We have measured the variation in stable carbon and oxygen isotope compositions in plant material and in soil respired CO2 every three hours for three consecutive days. Possible steps and different signs of post-photosynthetic fractionation during carbon translocation were also identified. A 12 h-periodicity was observed for variation in δ13C in soluble sugars in the top crown leaves and it can be explained by starch day/night dynamics in synthesis and breakdown and by stomatal limitations under elevated vapour pressure deficits. Photosynthetic products were transported down the trunk and mixed with older carbon pools, therefore causing the dampening of the δ13C signal variation. The strongest periodicity of 24 h was found in δ13C in soil respiration indicating changes in root contribution to the total CO2 efflux. Other non-biological causes like diffusion fractionation and advection induced by gas withdrawn from the measurement chamber complicate data interpretation on this step of C transfer path. Nevertheless, it was possible to identify the speed of carbohydrates' translocation from the point of assimilation to the trunk breast height because leaf-imprinted enrichment of δ18O in soluble sugars was less modified along the downward transport and was well related to environmental parameters potentially linked to stomatal conductance. The speed of carbohydrates translocation from the site of assimilation to the trunk

  17. Short-term natural δ13C and δ18O variations in pools and fluxes in a beech forest: the transfer of isotopic signal from recent photosynthates to soil respired CO2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Matteucci

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The fate of photosynthetic products within the plant-soil continuum determines how long the reduced carbon resides within the ecosystem and when it returns back to the atmosphere in the form of respiratory CO2. We have tested the possibility of measuring natural variation in δ13C and δ18O to disentangle the potential times needed to transfer carbohydrates produced by photosynthesis down to trunk, roots and, in general, to belowground up to its further release in the form of soil respiration into the atmosphere in a beech (Fagus sylvatica forest. We have measured the variation in stable carbon and oxygen isotope compositions in plant material and in soil respired CO2 every three hours for three consecutive days. Possible steps and different signs of post-photosynthetic fractionation during carbon translocation were also identified. A 12 h-periodicity was observed for variation in δ13C in soluble sugars in the top crown leaves and it can be explained by starch day/night dynamics in synthesis and breakdown and by stomatal limitations under elevated vapour pressure deficits. Photosynthetic products were transported down the trunk and mixed with older carbon pools, therefore causing the dampening of the δ13C signal variation. The strongest periodicity of 24 h was found in δ13C in soil respiration indicating changes in root contribution to the total CO2 efflux. Other non-biological causes like diffusion fractionation and advection induced by gas withdrawn from the measurement chamber complicate data interpretation on this step of C transfer path. Nevertheless, it was possible to identify the speed of carbohydrates' translocation from the point of assimilation to the trunk breast height because leaf-imprinted enrichment of δ18O in soluble sugars was less modified along the downward transport and was well related to environmental parameters potentially linked to stomatal conductance. The speed of carbohydrates translocation from the site of

  18. Data from: EuMIXFOR empirical forest mensuration and ring width data from pure and mixed stands of Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) and European beech (Fagus sylvatica L.) through Europe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heym, Michael; Ruíz-Peinado, Ricardo; Río, del Miren; Bielak, Kamil; Forrester, David Ian; Dirnberger, Gerald; Barbeito, I.; Brazaitis, Gediminas; Ruškytkė, Indré; Coll, L.; Ouden, den J.

    2017-01-01

    This data set provides unique empirical data from triplets of Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) and European beech (Fagus sylvatica L.) across Europe. Dendrometric variables are provided for 32 triplets, 96 plots, 7555 trees and 4695 core samples. These data contribute to our understanding of mixed

  19. Lizards on Ice: Evidence for Multiple Refugia in Liolaemus pictus (Liolaemidae) during the Last Glacial Maximum in the Southern Andean Beech Forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vera-Escalona, Iván; D'Elía, Guillermo; Gouin, Nicolás; Fontanella, Frank M.; Muñoz-Mendoza, Carla; Sites, Jack W.; Victoriano, Pedro F.

    2012-01-01

    Historical climate changes and orogenesis are two important factors that have shaped intraspecific biodiversity patterns worldwide. Although southern South America has experienced such complex events, there is a paucity of studies examining the effects on intraspecific diversification in this part of the world. Liolaemus pictus is the southernmost distributed lizard in the Chilean temperate forest, whose genetic structure has likely been influenced by Pleistocene glaciations. We conducted a phylogeographic study of L. pictus in Chile and Argentina based on one mitochondrial and two nuclear genes recovering two strongly divergent groups, Northern and Southern clades. The first group is distributed from the northernmost limit of the species to the Araucanía region while the second group is distributed throughout the Andes and the Chiloé archipelago in Southern Chile. Our results suggest that L. pictus originated 751 Kya, with divergence between the two clades occurring in the late Pleistocene. Demographic reconstructions for the Northern and Southern clades indicate a decrease in effective population sizes likely associated with Pleistocene glaciations. Surprisingly, patterns of genetic variation, clades age and historical gene flow in populations distributed within the limits of the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) are not explained by recent colonization. We propose an “intra-Andean multiple refuge” hypothesis, along with the classical refuge hypothesis previously proposed for the biota of the Chilean Coastal range and Eastern Andean Cordillera. Our hypothesis is supported by niche modelling analysis suggesting the persistence of fragments of suitable habitat for the species within the limits of the LGM ice shield. This type of refuge hypothesis is proposed for the first time for an ectothermic species. PMID:23209552

  20. Lizards on ice: evidence for multiple refugia in Liolaemus pictus (Liolaemidae during the last glacial maximum in the Southern Andean beech forests.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iván Vera-Escalona

    Full Text Available Historical climate changes and orogenesis are two important factors that have shaped intraspecific biodiversity patterns worldwide. Although southern South America has experienced such complex events, there is a paucity of studies examining the effects on intraspecific diversification in this part of the world. Liolaemus pictus is the southernmost distributed lizard in the Chilean temperate forest, whose genetic structure has likely been influenced by Pleistocene glaciations. We conducted a phylogeographic study of L. pictus in Chile and Argentina based on one mitochondrial and two nuclear genes recovering two strongly divergent groups, Northern and Southern clades. The first group is distributed from the northernmost limit of the species to the Araucanía region while the second group is distributed throughout the Andes and the Chiloé archipelago in Southern Chile. Our results suggest that L. pictus originated 751 Kya, with divergence between the two clades occurring in the late Pleistocene. Demographic reconstructions for the Northern and Southern clades indicate a decrease in effective population sizes likely associated with Pleistocene glaciations. Surprisingly, patterns of genetic variation, clades age and historical gene flow in populations distributed within the limits of the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM are not explained by recent colonization. We propose an "intra-Andean multiple refuge" hypothesis, along with the classical refuge hypothesis previously proposed for the biota of the Chilean Coastal range and Eastern Andean Cordillera. Our hypothesis is supported by niche modelling analysis suggesting the persistence of fragments of suitable habitat for the species within the limits of the LGM ice shield. This type of refuge hypothesis is proposed for the first time for an ectothermic species.

  1. Lizards on ice: evidence for multiple refugia in Liolaemus pictus (Liolaemidae) during the last glacial maximum in the Southern Andean beech forests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vera-Escalona, Iván; D'Elía, Guillermo; Gouin, Nicolás; Fontanella, Frank M; Muñoz-Mendoza, Carla; Sites, Jack W; Victoriano, Pedro F

    2012-01-01

    Historical climate changes and orogenesis are two important factors that have shaped intraspecific biodiversity patterns worldwide. Although southern South America has experienced such complex events, there is a paucity of studies examining the effects on intraspecific diversification in this part of the world. Liolaemus pictus is the southernmost distributed lizard in the Chilean temperate forest, whose genetic structure has likely been influenced by Pleistocene glaciations. We conducted a phylogeographic study of L. pictus in Chile and Argentina based on one mitochondrial and two nuclear genes recovering two strongly divergent groups, Northern and Southern clades. The first group is distributed from the northernmost limit of the species to the Araucanía region while the second group is distributed throughout the Andes and the Chiloé archipelago in Southern Chile. Our results suggest that L. pictus originated 751 Kya, with divergence between the two clades occurring in the late Pleistocene. Demographic reconstructions for the Northern and Southern clades indicate a decrease in effective population sizes likely associated with Pleistocene glaciations. Surprisingly, patterns of genetic variation, clades age and historical gene flow in populations distributed within the limits of the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) are not explained by recent colonization. We propose an "intra-Andean multiple refuge" hypothesis, along with the classical refuge hypothesis previously proposed for the biota of the Chilean Coastal range and Eastern Andean Cordillera. Our hypothesis is supported by niche modelling analysis suggesting the persistence of fragments of suitable habitat for the species within the limits of the LGM ice shield. This type of refuge hypothesis is proposed for the first time for an ectothermic species.

  2. Ecological, Typological Properties and Photosynthetic Activity (FAPAR of Common Beech (Fagus sylvatica L. Ecosystems in Croatia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan Pilaš

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and purpose: The purpose of this study was to assess the structural and functional properties of common beech forest ecosystems in Croatia across a wide macro-climatic gradient (Mediterranean, Alpine and Continental and to gain insight into the ways they adapt to progressing short-term climatic extremes and anomalies. Material and Methods: Research was undertaken by integration of the expert based, country scale typological delineation of 13 beech ecosystem types, climatic and topographic grids and indices of ecosystem performances such as the JRC FAPAR (Fraction of Absorbed Photosynthetically Active Radiation. Results: This study reveals preferential environmental conditions for beech ecosystem types together with limiting conditions in three margins of the beech distribution area: highest altitudinal zone, south-eastern continental Pannonian zone and the Mediterranean. The results show that the common beech can adapt to a very wide range of environmental conditions: annual mean temperatures from 2.1oC to 13.5oC, annual precipitation from 739 mm to 3444 mm, and altitudinal range from 20.3 m up to 1576 m above sea level. FAPAR reveals some new insight into the adaptive potential and response mechanisms of the common beech to emerging climate change. Conclusion: The common beech has great potential to adapt to increasing spring warming by a preterm shift of phenology onset and retain relatively stable productivity during the phenology peak in July and August, unrelated to external climatic forcing. These findings indicate that the flexibility of phenological timing, especially during springtime, present one of the important mechanisms of adaptation and resilience of the common beech.

  3. Ecological, Typological Properties and Photosynthetic Activity (FAPAR of Common Beech (Fagus sylvatica L. Ecosystems in Croatia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan Pilaš

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and purpose: The purpose of this study was to assess the structural and functional properties of common beech forest ecosystems in Croatia across a wide macro-climatic gradient (Mediterranean, Alpine and Continental and to gain insight into the ways they adapt to progressing short-term climatic extremes and anomalies. Material and Methods: Research was undertaken by integration of the expert based, country scale typological delineation of 13 beech ecosystem types, climatic and topographic grids and indices of ecosystem performances such as the JRC FAPAR (Fraction of Absorbed Photosynthetically Active Radiation. Results: This study reveals preferential environmental conditions for beech ecosystem types together with limiting conditions in three margins of the beech distribution area: highest altitudinal zone, south-eastern continental Pannonian zone and the Mediterranean. The results show that the common beech can adapt to a very wide range of environmental conditions: annual mean temperatures from 2.1oC to 13.5oC, annual precipitation from 739 mm to 3444 mm, and altitudinal range from 20.3 m up to 1576 m above sea level. FAPAR reveals some new insight into the adaptive potential and response mechanisms of the common beech to emerging climate change. Conclusion: The common beech has great potential to adapt to increasing spring warming by a preterm shift of phenology onset and retain relatively stable productivity during the phenology peak in July and August, unrelated to external climatic forcing. These findings indicate that the flexibility of phenological timing, especially during springtime, present one of the important mechanisms of adaptation and resilience of the common beech.

  4. A technique to artificially infest beech bark with beech scale, Cryptococcus fagisuga (Lindinger)

    Science.gov (United States)

    David R. Houston

    1982-01-01

    Beech bark disease is initiated when bark of beech trees (Fagus spp.) is attacked by the beech scale, Cryptococcus fagisuga Lindinger. The effects of the insect predispose tissues to bark cankering fungi of the genus Nectria. Critical studies of insect-fungus-host interactions had been stymied by the inability to...

  5. Wood quality and value production in mixed fir-spruce-beech stands: long-term research in the Western Carpathians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petráš Rudolf

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Stem quality and damage was evaluated in mixed spruce-fir-beech stands. Moreover, an assortments structure was determined with their financial value. Results were compared with pure spruce (Picea abies [L.] Karst., fir (Abies alba Mill. and beech (Fagus sylvatica L. stands. Repeated measurements on 31 long-term research plots, stand assortment models, assortment yield models and value yield models were used. Stem quality of fir and spruce was only slightly lower in mixed stands compared to pure stands but beech stem quality was considerably worse in mixed stands. Fir and spruce had slightly lower proportions of better IIIA quality logs and higher proportions of IIIB quality in mixed stands. Beech had worse assortment structure than spruce and fir, in general. Pure beech stands had higher proportions of better I–IIIA quality assortments than mixed stands by 1–7%. Fir and spruce average value production (€ m−3 culminated at about 56 and 62 cm mean diameters. Almost the same value production was found in pure stands. In these stands it culminated at the mean diameter of 58 and 60 cm. Beech produced substantially less value on the same sites. In mixed stands, its value production culminated at the mean diameter of 40 cm. In pure stands, it culminated at the mean diameter of 36 cm. Although the production was found to be similar in both mixed and pure forests, higher damage intensity and less stem quality in mixed forests suggest that the pure forests can be more profitable.

  6. Comparison of protein profiles of beech bark disease-resistant or beech bark disease-susceptible American beech

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mary E. Mason; Marek Krasowski; Judy Loo; Jennifer. Koch

    2011-01-01

    Proteomic analysis of beech bark proteins from trees resistant and susceptible to beech bark disease (BBD) was conducted. Sixteen trees from eight geographically isolated stands, 10 resistant (healthy) and 6 susceptible (diseased/infested) trees, were studied. The genetic complexity of the sample unit, the sampling across a wide geographic area, and the complexity of...

  7. Patterns of mast fruiting of common beech, sessile and common oak, Norway spruce and Scots pine in Central and Northern Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nussbaumer, Anita; Waldner, Peter; Etzold, Sophia

    2016-01-01

    Occurrence of mast years, i.e. the synchronous production of vast amounts of fruits or seeds, has an important impact on forest ecosystems, their functioning and their services. We investigated the mast patterns of the forest tree species common beech, common and sessile oak, Norway spruce and Sc...... hypotheses, and beech and spruce supported the economy of scale, predator satiation and resource allocation hypotheses....

  8. Variation in performance of beech saplings of 7 European provenances under shade and full light conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kramer, K.; Hees, van A.F.M.; Jans, W.W.P.

    2001-01-01

    The use of beech seedlings from South-East European and North-West (NW) provenances for underplanting in coniferous forests in North-West Europe was investigated by means of experimental shading. The effects of this treatment on survival, morphology, phenology, physiology and growth were analysed by

  9. SOIL CO2 EFFLUX FROM ISOTOPICALLY LABELED BEECH AND SPRUCE IN SOUTHERN GERMANY

    Science.gov (United States)

    • Carbon acquisition and transport to roots in forest trees is difficult to quantify and is affected by a number of factors, including micrometeorology and anthropogenic stresses. The canopies of mature European beech (Fagus sylvatica) and Norway spruce (Picea abies) were expose...

  10. Factors Affecting the Price of Beech Timber Sale by Auctions in Turkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    İsmet DAŞDEMİR

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available There are many factors affecting the auction price of timber in the state forest enterprises in Turkey. This studywas handled to determine the factors affecting the price of third class normal sized beech timber sale by auctions.It was carried out in two rival state forest enterprises (Bartın and Yenice of Zonguldak Regional ForestDirectorate in the Western Blacksea Region of Turkey. The data obtained from the total 149 timber auctions inthe period 1998-2002 were used as material in this study. The effects of seasonal and other factors on the auctionprice of beech timber were investigated by variance analysis, season and month indexes, and correlation,regression and factors analyses respectively. At the end of statistical analyses, it was determined that the seasonsaffected the beech timber prices at the 90% significant level. The most positive effect in spring and the mostnegative effect in winter were determined. The month most affecting timber price was April. Also, the factorsthe most affecting the price of beech timber sale by auctions were determined as follows: (1 Timing of theauctions, (2 Quantity of supply and size of timber stack, (3 Demand level, (4 Quality and appropriateness tostandardization in timber production. Furthermore, based on these conclusions, some suggestions were made inorder to plan marketing activities optimally and to improve the marketing policies and to ensure economicallysustainability in state forest enterprises.

  11. Decomposition of beech (Fagus sylvatica) and pine (Pinus nigra) litter along an Alpine elevation gradient: Decay and nutrient release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, Torsten W; Duboc, Olivier; Djukic, Ika; Tatzber, Michael; Gerzabek, Martin H; Zehetner, Franz

    2015-08-01

    Litter decomposition is an important process for cycling of nutrients in terrestrial ecosystems. The objective of this study was to evaluate direct and indirect effects of climate on litter decomposition along an altitudinal gradient in a temperate Alpine region. Foliar litter of European beech (Fagus sylvatica) and Black pine (Pinus nigra) was incubated in litterbags during two years in the Hochschwab massif of the Northern Limestone Alps of Austria. Eight incubation sites were selected following an altitudinal/climatic transect from 1900 to 900 m asl. The average remaining mass after two years of decomposition amounted to 54% (beech) and 50% (pine). Net release of N, P, Na, Al, Fe and Mn was higher in pine than in beech litter due to high immobilization (retention) rates of beech litter. However, pine litter retained more Ca than beech litter. Altitude retarded decay (mass loss and associated C release) in beech litter during the first year only but had a longer lasting effect on decaying pine litter. Altitude comprises a suite of highly auto-correlated characteristics (climate, vegetation, litter, soil chemistry, soil microbiology, snow cover) that influence litter decomposition. Hence, decay and nutrient release of incubated litter is difficult to predict by altitude, except during the early stage of decomposition, which seemed to be controlled by climate. Reciprocal litter transplant along the elevation gradient yielded even relatively higher decay of pine litter on beech forest sites after a two-year adaptation period of the microbial community.

  12. Estimating species richness and status of solitary bees and bumblebees in agricultural semi-natural habitats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Calabuig, Isabel

    2000-01-01

    Estimation of Western Europe number of bee species varies between 2000 and 4500 (Williams 1995) but there are substantial indications of a decline in bee species in Europe and other regions. In Denmark, wild bee species richness, distribution, and abundance have not been studied in detail for about...... 75 years, and nothing is known about which species are potentially vulnerable or endangered. A rough estimate of solitary bees and bumblebees includes approximately 238 species (26 genera) and 29 species respectively. In a pan-trap survey of six kilometres of semi-natural habitats in a Danish...... agricultural landscape, 72 solitary bee species and 19 species of bumblebees were recorded, several of which are considered vulnerable or endangered in neighbouring countries. Nesting conditions for rare cavity-nesting species and the possible role of the semi-natural habitats as corridors for species...

  13. Mechanical soil disturbance as a determinant of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungal communities in semi-natural grassland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schnoor, Tim Krone; Lekberg, Ylva; Rosendahl, Søren

    2011-01-01

    While the effect of disturbance on overall abundance and community composition of arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi has been researched in agricultural fields, less is known about the impact in semi-natural grasslands. We sampled two AM plant species, Festuca brevipila and Plantago lanceolata, from...... an ongoing grassland restoration experiment that contained replicated plowed and control plots. The AM fungal community in roots was determined using nested PCR and LSU rDNA primers. We identified 38 phylotypes within the Glomeromycota, of which 29 belonged to Glomus A, six to Glomus B, and three...... the control or disturbed plots. We found no evidence of host preference in this system, except for one phylotype that preferentially seemed to colonize Festuca. Our results show that disturbance imposed a stronger structuring force for AM fungal communities than did host plants in this semi-natural grassland....

  14. Beech cupules as keystone structures for soil fauna.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melguizo-Ruiz, Nereida; Jiménez-Navarro, Gerardo; Moya-Laraño, Jordi

    2016-01-01

    Facilitative or positive interactions are ubiquitous in nature and play a fundamental role in the configuration of ecological communities. In particular, habitat modification and niche construction, in which one organism locally modifies abiotic conditions and favours other organisms by buffering the effects of adverse environmental factors, are among the most relevant facilitative interactions. In line with this, 'keystone structures', which provide resources, refuge, or advantageous services decisive for other species, may allow the coexistence of various species and thus considerably contribute to diversity maintenance. Beech cupules are woody husks harbouring beech fruits that remain in the forest soil for relatively long periods of time. In this study, we explored the potential role of these cupules in the distribution and maintenance of the soil fauna inhabiting the leaf litter layer. We experimentally manipulated cupule availability and soil moisture in the field to determine if such structures are limiting and can provide moist shelter to soil animals during drought periods, contributing to minimize desiccation risks. We measured invertebrate abundances inside relative to outside the cupules, total abundances in the leaf litter and animal body sizes, in both dry and wet experimental plots. We found that these structures are preferentially used by the most abundant groups of smaller soil animals-springtails, mites and enchytraeids-during droughts. Moreover, beech cupules can be limiting, as an increase in use was found with higher cupule densities, and are important resources for many small soil invertebrates, driving the spatial structure of the soil community and promoting higher densities in the leaf litter, probably through an increase in habitat heterogeneity. We propose that fruit woody structures should be considered 'keystone structures' that contribute to soil community maintenance. Therefore, beech trees may indirectly facilitate soil fauna

  15. Beech cupules as keystone structures for soil fauna

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nereida Melguizo-Ruiz

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Facilitative or positive interactions are ubiquitous in nature and play a fundamental role in the configuration of ecological communities. In particular, habitat modification and niche construction, in which one organism locally modifies abiotic conditions and favours other organisms by buffering the effects of adverse environmental factors, are among the most relevant facilitative interactions. In line with this, ‘keystone structures’, which provide resources, refuge, or advantageous services decisive for other species, may allow the coexistence of various species and thus considerably contribute to diversity maintenance. Beech cupules are woody husks harbouring beech fruits that remain in the forest soil for relatively long periods of time. In this study, we explored the potential role of these cupules in the distribution and maintenance of the soil fauna inhabiting the leaf litter layer. We experimentally manipulated cupule availability and soil moisture in the field to determine if such structures are limiting and can provide moist shelter to soil animals during drought periods, contributing to minimize desiccation risks. We measured invertebrate abundances inside relative to outside the cupules, total abundances in the leaf litter and animal body sizes, in both dry and wet experimental plots. We found that these structures are preferentially used by the most abundant groups of smaller soil animals—springtails, mites and enchytraeids—during droughts. Moreover, beech cupules can be limiting, as an increase in use was found with higher cupule densities, and are important resources for many small soil invertebrates, driving the spatial structure of the soil community and promoting higher densities in the leaf litter, probably through an increase in habitat heterogeneity. We propose that fruit woody structures should be considered ‘keystone structures’ that contribute to soil community maintenance. Therefore, beech trees may

  16. Micropropagation of juvenile and mature american beech

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melanie J. Barker; Paula M. Pijut; Michael E. Ostry; David R. Houston

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to micropropagate juvenile and mature American beech (Fagus grandifolia Ehrh.) resistant to beech bark disease. Shoot tips (from juvenile seedlings and root sprouts of mature trees) and buds from branches of mature trees, were cultured and multiplied on aspen culture medium supplemented with 0.89 ?M 6-benzyladenine, 0.27 ?M a-...

  17. Comparison of ozone uptake and sensitivity between a phytotron study with young beech and a field experiment with adult beech (Fagus sylvatica)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nunn, Angela J. [Ecophysiology of Plants, Department of Ecology, TU Muenchen, Am Hochanger 13, D-85354 Freising (Germany)]. E-mail: nunn@wzw.tum.de; Kozovits, A.R. [Ecophysiology of Plants, Department of Ecology, TU Muenchen, Am Hochanger 13, D-85354 Freising (Germany); Reiter, I.M. [Ecophysiology of Plants, Department of Ecology, TU Muenchen, Am Hochanger 13, D-85354 Freising (Germany); Heerdt, C. [Bioclimatology, TU Muenchen, Am Hochanger 13, D-85354 Freising (Germany); Leuchner, M. [Bioclimatology, TU Muenchen, Am Hochanger 13, D-85354 Freising (Germany); Luetz, C. [Department of Physiology and Cell Physiology of Alpine Plants, University of Innsbruck, Sternwartestrasse 15, A-6020 Innsbruck (Austria); Liu, X. [Institute of Forest Botany and Tree Physiology, University of Freiburg, Georges-Koehler-Allee 53/54, D-79110 Freiburg (Germany); Low, M. [Ecophysiology of Plants, Department of Ecology, TU Muenchen, Am Hochanger 13, D-85354 Freising (Germany); Winkler, J.B. [GSF National Research Center for Environment and Health, Institute for Soil Ecology, Department of Environmental Engineering, Ingolstaedter Landstrasse 1, D-85764 Neuherberg (Germany); Grams, T.E.E. [Ecophysiology of Plants, Department of Ecology, TU Muenchen, Am Hochanger 13, D-85354 Freising (Germany); Haeberle, K.-H. [Ecophysiology of Plants, Department of Ecology, TU Muenchen, Am Hochanger 13, D-85354 Freising (Germany); Werner, H. [Bioclimatology, TU Muenchen, Am Hochanger 13, D-85354 Freising (Germany); Fabian, P. [Bioclimatology, TU Muenchen, Am Hochanger 13, D-85354 Freising (Germany); Rennenberg, H. [Departamento de Ecologia, Universidade de Brasilia, caixa postal 04457, Brasilia-DF 70919-970 (Brazil); Matyssek, R. [Ecophysiology of Plants, Department of Ecology, TU Muenchen, Am Hochanger 13, D-85354 Freising (Germany)

    2005-10-15

    Chamber experiments on juvenile trees have resulted in severe injury and accelerated loss of leaves along with reduced biomass production under chronically enhanced O{sub 3} levels. In contrast, the few studies conducted on adult forest trees in the field have reported low O{sub 3} sensitivity. In the present study, young beech in phytotrons was more sensitive to O{sub 3} than adult beech in the field, although employed O{sub 3} regimes were similar. The hypotheses tested were that: (1) differences in O{sub 3} uptake were caused by the ontogenetically higher stomatal conductance of young compared to adult trees (2) the experimental settings in the phytotrons enhanced O{sub 3} uptake compared to field conditions, and (3) a low detoxification capacity contributes to the higher O{sub 3} sensitivity of the young trees. The higher O{sub 3} sensitivity of juvenile beech in the phytotrons is demonstrated to relate to both the experimental conditions and the physiological responsiveness inherent to tree age. - Juvenile beech trees in phytotrons are more sensitive to ozone than adult forest trees due to lower defence capacity and growth conditions.

  18. Faunal diversity of Fagus sylvatica forests: A regional and European perspective based on three indicator groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Walentowski

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available While the postglacial history of European beech (Fagus sylvatica and the plant species composition of beech forests in  Central Europe are fairly well understood, the faunal biodiversity has been less well investigated. We studied three groups of  mostly sedentary organisms in beech forest at regional and European scales by combining field studies with a compilation of existing literature and expert knowledge. Specifically, we examined the relationship between host tree genera and saproxylic  beetles, and the diversity and composition of forest ground-dwelling molluscs and ground beetles in relation to the abundance  of beech. At a west central European scale (Germany, where beech has a “young” ecological and biogeographical history,  we found 48 primeval forest relict species of saproxylic beetles associated with beech, 124 ground beetles and 91 molluscs  inhabiting beech forest, yet none exclusive of west central European beech forests. High levels of faunal similarity between beech and other woodland trees suggested that many of the beech forest dwelling species are euryoecious and likely to  originate from mid-Holocene mixed broadleaf forests. Beech forests of the mountain ranges in southern and east central  Europe, which are ecologically and biogeographically “old”, were found to harbour distinct species assemblages, including  beech forest specialists (such as 10 carabid species in the Carpathians and narrow-range endemics of broadleaf forest. The  observed biodiversity patterns suggest differentiated conservation priorities in “young” and “old” European beech forest  regions.

  19. Growth trends of beech and Norway spruce in Switzerland: The role of nitrogen deposition, ozone, mineral nutrition and climate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun, Sabine; Schindler, Christian; Rihm, Beat

    2017-12-01

    Understanding the effects of nitrogen deposition, ozone and climate on tree growth is important for planning sustainable forest management also in the future. The complex interplay of all these factors cannot be covered by experiments. Here we use observational data of mature forests for studying associations of various biotic and abiotic factors with tree growth. A 30year time series on basal area increment of Fagus sylvatica L. and Picea abies Karst. in Switzerland was analyzed to evaluate the development in relation to a variety of predictors. Basal area increment of Fagus sylvatica has clearly decreased during the observation period. For Picea abies no trend was observed. N deposition of more than 26 (beech) or 20-22kgNha(-1)year(-1) (Norway spruce) was negatively related with basal area increment, in beech stronger than in Norway spruce. High N deposition loads and low foliar K concentrations in Fagus were correlated with increased drought sensitivity. High air temperatures in winter were negatively related with basal area increment in Norway spruce in general and in beech at high N:Mg ratio or high N deposition while on an average the relation was positive in beech. Fructification in beech was negatively related to basal area increment. The increase of fructification observed during the last decades contributed thus to the growth decrease. Ozone flux was significantly and negatively correlated with basal area increment both in beech and Norway spruce. The results show clear non-linear effects of N deposition on stem increment of European beech and Norway spruce as well as strong interactions with climate which have contributed to the growth decrease in beech and may get more important in future. The results not only give suggestions for ecological processes but also show the potential of an integral evaluation of observational data. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Wisconsin's Forests 2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles H. Perry; Vern A. Everson; Brett J. Butler; Susan J. Crocker; Sally E. Dahir; Andrea L. Diss-Torrance; Grant M Domke; Dale D. Gormanson; Sarah K. Herrick; Steven S. Hubbard; Terry R. Mace; Patrick D. Miles; Mark D. Nelson; Richard B. Rodeout; Luke T. Saunders; Kirk M. Stueve; Barry T. Wilson; Christopher W. Woodall

    2012-01-01

    The second full annual inventory of Wisconsin's forests reports more than 16.7 million acres of forest land with an average volume of more than 1,400 cubic feet per acre. Forest land is dominated by the oak/hickory forest-type group, which occupies slightly more than one quarter of the total forest land area; the maple/beech/birch forest-type group occupies an...

  1. Vermont's Forests 2007

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randall S. Morin; Chuck J. Barnett; Gary J. Brand; Brett J. Butler; Robert De Geus; Mark H. Hansen; Mark A. Hatfield; Cassandra M. Kurtz; W. Keith Moser; Charles H. Perry; Ron Piva; Rachel Riemann; Richard Widmann; Sandy Wilmot; Chris W. Woodall

    2011-01-01

    The first full annual inventory of Vermont's forests reports more than 4.5 million acres of forest land with an average volume of more than 2,200 cubic feet per acre. Forest land is dominated by the maple/beech/birch forest-type group, which occupies 70 percent of total forest land area. Sixty-three percent of forest land consists of large-diameter trees, 27...

  2. New Hampshire's Forests 2007

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randall S. Morin; Chuck J. Barnett; Gary J. Brand; Brett J. Butler; Grant M. Domke; Susan Francher; Mark H. Hansen; Mark A. Hatfield; Cassandra M. Kurtz; W. Keith Moser; Charles H. Perry; Ron Piva; Rachel Riemann; Chris W. Woodall

    2011-01-01

    The first full annual inventory of New Hampshire's forests reports nearly 4.8 million acres of forest land with an average volume of nearly 2,200 cubic feet per acre. Forest land is dominated by the maple/beech/birch forest-type group, which occupies 53 percent of total forest land area. Fifty-seven percent of forest land consists of large-diameter trees, 32...

  3. Thinning in artificially regenerated young beech stands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Novák Jiří

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Although beech stands are usually regenerated naturally, an area of up to 5,000 ha year−1 is artificially regenerated by beech in the Czech Republic annually. Unfortunately, these stands often showed insufficient stand density and, consequently, lower quality of stems. Therefore, thinning methods developed for naturally regenerated beech stands are applicable with difficulties. The paper evaluates the data from two thinning experiments established in young artificially regenerated beech stands located in different growing conditions. In both experiments, thinning resulted in the lower amount of salvage cut in following years. Positive effect of thinning on periodic stand basal area increment and on periodic diameter increment of dominant trees was found in the beech stand located at middle elevations. On the other hand, thinning effects in mountain conditions were negligible. Thinning focusing on future stand quality cannot be commonly applied in artificially regenerated beech stands because of their worse initial quality and lower density. However, these stands show good growth and response to thinning, hence their management can be focused on maximising beech wood production.

  4. Attitudes of ornamental trees and shrubs producers towards nursery production of ornamental beech cultivars in Serbia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nonić Marina

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available European beech (Fagus sylvatica L. is, along with its significance as a forest species, renowned as an ornamental species, due to its numerous cultivars. Ornamental beech cultivars are planted in various green spaces, but a small number of such trees have ascertained in Serbia. For the time being, production of beech cultivars is represented in a very small number of nurseries, with a negligible share of those seedlings in their total assortment. The aim of this research is to study the attitudes of ornamental trees and shrubs producers towards the nursery production of ornamental beech cultivars, and possibilities of its improvements in Serbia. “Door to door” survey and in-depth interviews were used as research techniques. Surveys with the representatives of 65 nurseries in Serbia (in the selected statistical region Šumadija and Western Serbia were conducted in the first stage of data collection. In the second stage of data collection were interviewed the representatives of the 10 nurseries who, during the survey, pointed out that they produce ornamental beech cultivars. Nurserymen’s attitudes suggest that there is a possibility to improve the production of ornamental beech cultivars in Serbia, with the appropriate support measures and increased interest of customers on the market, i.e. with the provision of subsidies for the production of seedlings and greater use of cultivars by utility companies in the cities of Serbia. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. ТP 31041: Establishment of forest plantations to increase the afforested areas in Serbia

  5. A slight recovery of soils from Acid Rain over the last three decades is not reflected in the macro nutrition of beech (Fagus sylvatica) at 97 forest stands of the Vienna Woods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, Torsten W; Türtscher, Selina; Berger, Pétra; Lindebner, Leopold

    2016-09-01

    Rigorous studies of recovery from soil acidification are rare. Hence, we resampled 97 old-growth beech stands in the Vienna Woods. This study exploits an extensive data set of soil (infiltration zone of stemflow and between trees area at different soil depths) and foliar chemistry from three decades ago. It was hypothesized that declining acidic deposition is reflected in soil and foliar chemistry. Top soil pH within the stemflow area increased significantly by 0.6 units in both H2O and KCl extracts from 1984 to 2012. Exchangeable Ca and Mg increased markedly in the stemflow area and to a lower extent in the top soil of the between trees area. Trends of declining base cations in the lower top soil were probably caused by mobilization of organic S and associated leaching with high amounts of sulfate. Contents of C, N and S decreased markedly in the stemflow area from 1984 to 2012, suggesting that mineralization rates of organic matter increased due to more favorable soil conditions. It is concluded that the top soil will continue to recover from acidic deposition. However, in the between trees areas and especially in deeper soil horizons recovery may be highly delayed. The beech trees of the Vienna Woods showed no sign of recovery from acidification although S deposition levels decreased. Release of historic S even increased foliar S contents. Base cation levels in the foliage declined but are still adequate for beech trees. Increasing N/nutrient ratios over time were considered not the result of marginally higher N foliar contents in 2012 but of diminishing nutrient uptake due to the decrease in ion concentration in soil solution. The mean foliar N/P ratio already increased to the alarming value of 31. Further nutritional imbalances will predispose trees to vitality loss. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  6. Alterations in the nitrogen dynamics of European beech trees infested by the woolly beech aphid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levia, D. F.; Michalzik, B.

    2012-12-01

    Insects are a major stressor in wooded ecosystems, triggering profound changes in the hydrology, biogeochemistry, and net primary productivity of infested forests. The influence of woolly beech aphids (Phyllaphis fagi L.) on nitrogen cycling via throughfall, stemflow, and litter leachates is not well understood. Employing a combination of field sampling, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and scanning electron microscopy, we examined and compared the alterations and partitioning of nitrogen (particulate, dissolved, organic, inorganic) between control (uninfested) and infested trees. Preliminary results suggest that the amount of nitrogen routed to the soil is much lower in throughfall and stemflow of infested trees than control trees. Preliminary X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy measurements on the abaxial surface of sample leaves have demonstrated that the surface microbiology and nitrogen chemistry of control, lightly infested, and heavily infested leaves are notably different. These observations suggest that the aphids alter the phyllosphere ecology to such an extent that they trigger nitrogen uptake by microbes on the leaf surface in the presence of easily available carbon from aphid excretions (i.e., honeydew). A better understanding of nitrogen cycling in stressed forests would advance theories of nitrogen cycling.

  7. Stomatal conductance of semi-natural Mediterranean grasslands: Implications for the development of ozone critical levels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alonso, R. [Ecotoxicology of Air Pollution, CIEMAT (Ed. 70), Avda. Complutense 22, Madrid 28040 (Spain)]. E-mail: rocio.alonso@ciemat.es; Bermejo, V. [Ecotoxicology of Air Pollution, CIEMAT (Ed. 70), Avda. Complutense 22, Madrid 28040 (Spain); Sanz, J. [Ecotoxicology of Air Pollution, CIEMAT (Ed. 70), Avda. Complutense 22, Madrid 28040 (Spain); Valls, B. [Ecotoxicology of Air Pollution, CIEMAT (Ed. 70), Avda. Complutense 22, Madrid 28040 (Spain); Elvira, S. [Ecotoxicology of Air Pollution, CIEMAT (Ed. 70), Avda. Complutense 22, Madrid 28040 (Spain); Gimeno, B.S. [Ecotoxicology of Air Pollution, CIEMAT (Ed. 70), Avda. Complutense 22, Madrid 28040 (Spain)

    2007-04-15

    Intra-genus and intra-specific variation and the influence of nitrogen enrichment on net assimilation and stomatal conductance of some annual Trifolium species of Mediterranean dehesa grasslands were assessed under experimental conditions. Also gas exchange rates were compared between some Leguminosae and Poaceae species growing in the field in a dehesa ecosystem in central Spain. The results showed that the previously reported different O{sub 3} sensitivity of some Trifolium species growing in pots does not seem to be related to different maximum g {sub s} values. In addition, no clear differences on gas exchange rates could be attributed to Leguminosae and Poaceae families growing in the field, with intra-genus variation being more important than differences found between families. Further studies are needed to increase the database for developing a flux-based approach for setting O{sub 3} critical levels for semi-natural Mediterranean species. - The stomatal conductance model incorporated within the EMEP DO{sub 3}SE deposition module needs to be re-parameterised for Mediterranean semi-natural vegetation.

  8. Chronotype differences in Drosophila are enhanced by semi-natural conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaze, Koustubh M; Kannan, Nisha N; Abhilash, L; Sharma, Vijay Kumar

    2012-11-01

    Morning and evening chronotypes of sleep/wake cycles in humans are often metaphorically termed as 'larks' and 'owls'. We derived Drosophila populations early and late, displaying lark- and owl-like emergence chronotypes by imposing selection for adult emergence during morning and evening hours. Preference for morning and evening emergence in these populations was accompanied by divergence in their circadian period (τ) and photic phase response curve. To test if lark- and owl-like emergence chronotypes displayed by these flies under weak environmental cycles of the laboratory would also persist in nature where several zeitgebers are present in the strongest form, we examined the emergence rhythm of early and late flies under semi-natural conditions. The early and late flies not only continued to exhibit divergent emergence waveforms under semi-natural conditions, the differences became even more prominent. However, phases of early and late emergence waveforms did not match natural morning and evening transitions, unlike that observed under laboratory conditions. These results thus provide evidence consistent with the notion that chronotypes are the result of interactions between circadian clocks and natural environmental cycles.

  9. Testing the applicability of BIOME-BGC to simulate beech gross primary production in Europe using a new continental weather dataset

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chiesi, Marta; Chirici, Gherardo; Marchetti, Marco

    2016-01-01

    A daily 1-km Pan-European weather dataset can drive the BIOME-BGC model for the estimation of current and future beech gross primary production (GPP). Annual beech GPP is affected primarily by spring temperature and more irregularly by summer water stress.The spread of beech forests in Europe...... forest ecosystems having different climatic conditions where the eddy covariance technique is used to measure water and carbon fluxes. The experiment is in three main steps. First, the accuracy of BIOME-BGC GPP simulations is assessed through comparison with flux observations. Second, the influence...... enhances the importance of modelling and monitoring their growth in view of ongoing climate changes.The current paper assesses the capability of a biogeochemical model to simulate beech gross primary production (GPP) using a Pan-European 1-km weather dataset.The model BIOME-BGC is applied in four European...

  10. The partitioning of N2O emissions between denitrification and other sources in natural and semi-natural land use types in the UK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sgouridis, Fotis; Ullah, Sami

    2017-04-01

    Natural and semi-natural terrestrial ecosystems (unmanaged peatlands and forests, extensive and intensive grasslands) have been under-represented in the UK greenhouse gas (GHG) inventory, thus increasing the uncertainty of annual GHG emission estimates. This uncertainty is further exacerbated by the high spatio-temporal variability of the processes responsible for nitrous oxide (N2O) emission. The partitioning of N2O emission to its different sources can further improve our understanding of the controls on the different microbial processes responsible for N2O production and consumption and ultimately inform GHG mitigation strategies. We have measured in situ N2O fluxes from natural and semi-natural ecosystems in two replicated UK catchments monthly between April 2013 and October 2014. An adapted 15N-Gas Flux method1 for low level additions of 15N tracer (0.03 - 0.5 kg 15N ha-1) appropriate for natural (unfertilised) ecosystems was used to quantify denitrification2 and elucidate its relative contribution to net N2O production. Total N2O fluxes were 40 times higher in the intensive grasslands than in the peatlands and ranged between 0.05 and 1.98 kg N ha-1 y-1. The mean contribution of denitrification to the total N2O flux (DN2O/TN2O) ranged between 9 and 59 % and was lowest in a well-drained forest and highest in a poorly-drained forest soil, while in peatlands and grassland soils it was 48% and 41% on average, respectively. Soil moisture was shown as the key environmental driver regulating the partitioning of N2O between denitrification and other sources (r2=0.46) across land use types. Total N2O fluxes across land use types were explained by a simple regression model (r2=0.83) including parameters such as total dissolved nitrogen, organic carbon availability and volumetric water content. Nitrous oxide emission factors (EFs) calculated as a fraction of mineral N inputs averaged at 0.4 and 0.9% for the semi-improved and improved grasslands, respectively. Using

  11. Stomatal conductance of semi-natural Mediterranean grasslands: implications for the development of ozone critical levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso, R; Bermejo, V; Sanz, J; Valls, B; Elvira, S; Gimeno, B S

    2007-04-01

    Intra-genus and intra-specific variation and the influence of nitrogen enrichment on net assimilation and stomatal conductance of some annual Trifolium species of Mediterranean dehesa grasslands were assessed under experimental conditions. Also gas exchange rates were compared between some Leguminosae and Poaceae species growing in the field in a dehesa ecosystem in central Spain. The results showed that the previously reported different O3 sensitivity of some Trifolium species growing in pots does not seem to be related to different maximum g(s) values. In addition, no clear differences on gas exchange rates could be attributed to Leguminosae and Poaceae families growing in the field, with intra-genus variation being more important than differences found between families. Further studies are needed to increase the database for developing a flux-based approach for setting O3 critical levels for semi-natural Mediterranean species.

  12. Acaricidal activity of thymol against larvae of Rhipicephalus microplus (Acari: Ixodidae) under semi-natural conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araújo, Laryssa Xavier; Novato, Tatiane Pinheiro Lopes; Zeringota, Viviane; Matos, Renata Silva; Senra, Tatiane Oliveira Souza; Maturano, Ralph; Prata, Márcia Cristina Azevedo; Daemon, Erik; Monteiro, Caio Márcio Oliveira

    2015-09-01

    This is the first study to investigate the activity of thymol on Rhipicephalus microplus larvae under semi-natural conditions. For this purpose, tests were conducted in pots with Brachiaria decumbens seedlings containing cattle tick larvae. Thymol, diluted in ethanol 50° GL, was tested at concentrations of 2.5, 5.0, 10.0, 15.0, and 20.0 mg/mL, along with the control group treated with the solvent alone. Each treatment was composed of five pots (1 pot = a repetition). The experiment was performed in three steps. On the first day, the larvae were applied at the base of the signalgrass. Twenty-four hours later, approximately 25 mL of the solution was applied with thymol on the top of the vegetation in each pot. The survival of the larvae was measured 24 h after application of the solutions. Each pot was analyzed individually, and the grass fillets contained larvae were cut with scissors, placed in Petri dishes, and taken to the laboratory to count the number of living larvae. At the highest concentrations (10, 15, and 20 mg /mL), the number of live larvae declined by more than 95 % in relation to the control group. The lethal concentration 50 % (LC50) and LC90 values were 3.45 and 9.25 mg/ml, respectively. The application of thymol in semi-natural conditions starting concentration of 10 mg/mL significantly reduced the number of living R. microplus larvae.

  13. Ecohydrology of Graciosa semi-natural grasslands: water use and evapotranspiration partition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paço, Teresa A.; Paredes, Paula; Azevedo, Eduardo B.; Madruga, João S.; Pereira, Luís S.

    2016-04-01

    Semi-natural grasslands are a main landscape of Graciosa and other Islands of Azores. The present study aims at calibrate and validate the soil water balance model SIMDualKc for those grasslands aiming at assessing the dynamics of soil water and evapotranspiration. This objective relates with the need to improve knowledge on the ecohydrology of grasslands established in (volcanic) Andosols. This model adopts the dual crop coefficient approach to compute daily crop evapotranspiration (ETc) and to perform its partition into transpiration (T) and soil evaporation (Es). The application refers to a semi-natural grassland sporadically sowed with ryegrass (Lolium multiflorum Lam.). Model calibration and validation were performed comparing simulated against observed grassland evapotranspiration throughout two periods in consecutive years. Daily ET values were derived from eddy covariance data collected at the Eastern North Atlantic (ENA) facility of the ARM programme (established and supported by the U.S. Department of Energy with the collaboration of the local government and University of the Azores), at Graciosa, Azores (Portugal). Various statistical performance indicators were used to assess model accuracy and results show a good adequacy of the model for predicting vegetation ET in such conditions. Surface flux energy balance was also evaluated throughout the observation period (2014-2016). The ratio Es/ET shows that soil evaporation is much small than T/ET due to high soil cover by vegetation. The model was then applied to contrasting climatic conditions (dry vs. wet years) to assess related impacts on water balance components and grassland transpiration.

  14. Modelling of plant-soil carbon, nitrogen and phosphorus cycling in semi-natural terrestrial ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Jessica; Quinton, John; Rowe, Ed; Tipping, Ed

    2013-04-01

    In recent centuries pools and fluxes of C, N and P in natural and semi-natural UK ecosystems have been transformed by atmospheric pollution leading to: acidification; eutrophication of surface waters; loss of biodiversity; and increased greenhouse gas emissions. In addition, climate change now threatens to perturb these systems further. Understanding in this field is vital in determining the consequences of artificial nutrient enrichment and land use and climate change, and mitigating against their effects. The N14CP model has been recently developed to assess the temporal responses of soil C, N and P pools to nutrient enrichment in semi-natural ecosystems, and explore the connections between these nutrients. It is a dynamic, mechanistic model, driven by: climate; CO2, N (fixation and pollutant deposition), and P (weathering and atmospheric deposition) inputs; and plant cover type. It explicitly links C, N, and P in both plants and soils, using plant element stoichiometry as the primary constraint. Net primary production, and plant/soil element pools, are calculated over time, and output fluxes of dissolved organic and inorganic, and gaseous, forms of C, N, and P produced. Radiocarbon data are used to constrain Soil Organic Matter (SOM) turnover. The SOM is represented as three pools, undergoing first-order decomposition reactions with turn-over rates ranging from 2 to 1000 years. The N14CP modelling methodology is discussed and its calibration and verification using observations from 200 northern European sites presented. Whilst the primary period of interest with respect to nutrient enrichment is from the industrial revolution onwards, plant-soil C, N and P are simulated at these sites for a period spanning from the start of the Holocene (to provide a spin-up period) to the present day. Clearly, during this time span land cover and usage will have changed at these sites, and histories of these changes are used as an input to the model. The influence of these land

  15. Maine's forests 2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    George L. McCaskill; William H. McWilliams; Charles J. Barnett; Brett J. Butler; Mark A. Hatfield; Cassandra M. Kurtz; Randall S. Morin; W. Keith Moser; Charles H. Perry; Christopher W. Woodall

    2011-01-01

    The second annual inventory of Maine's forests was completed in 2008 after more than 3,160 forested plots were measured. Forest land occupies almost 17.7 million acres, which represents 82 percent of the total land area of Maine. The dominant forest-type groups are maple/beech/yellow birch, spruce/fir, white/red/jack pine, and aspen/white birch. Statewide volume...

  16. Linking floral biodiversity with nitrogen and carbon translocations in semi-natural grasslands in Lithuani

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcinkonis Saulius

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study is to evaluate the long-term effects of long-term piggery effluent application on semi-natural grassland ecotop-phytotop changes (above- and below-ground phytomass production, and carbon and nitrogen allocation in grassland communities in relation to changes (or variability in topsoil properties. Analysis of phytomass distribution in piggery effluent irrigated grassland communities showed that dry biomass yield varied from 1.7−5.3 t ha-1. Variability in soil and plant cover created a unique and highly unpredictable site specific system, where long-term anthropogenic influences established successor communities with specific characteristics of above- and below-ground biomass distribution. These characteristics depend more on grassland communities than on soil chemical properties. Families of grasses (Poaceae dominated the surveyed communities and accumulated most carbon and least nitrogen, while legumes accumulated most nitrogen and lignin and least carbon. Carbon concentrations in above-ground biomass had minor variations, while accumulation of nitrogen was strongly influenced by species diversity (r = 0.94, n = 10, p <0.001 and production of above-ground biomass

  17. CLASSIFICATION OF SEMI-NATURAL GRASSLANDS IN NORTH-EASTERN BULGARIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    IVA APOSTOLOVA

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available This study presents the syntaxonomic diversity of the semi-natural grasslands in NorthEastern Bulgaria following the principles of the Ziirich-Montpellier School. A total number of 172 releves, collected during 2002-2004, is used. TWINSPAN clustering is applied for determination vegetation types. The diagnostic species groups for the associations and subassociations are created by Cocktail method using the phi-coefficient with values above 0.3 within the JUICE software. As a result class Fesluco-Brometea is established with the alliances Festucion valesiacae, Pimpinello-Thymion and Chrysopogoni-Danthonion. The originally described Botriochloetum ischaemi Pop 1977 association is considered as typical on the subassociation level and a part of our releves are referred to it. Following the nomenclature rules we determined the subassotiation typicum. One new subassociation named Thymefosum pannonici of more xerophytic character, as compared to typical one, and well represented by differential species is established. The geographical distribution of Agropyro-Thymetum zygoidi and Agrostideto-Chrysopogonetum grylli associations is extended to the territory of Bulgaria. Class Molinio-Arrhenalherefea is represented by Cynosurion alliance and Festuco-Agrostidetum association is established by its probably most eastern area of distribution.

  18. Investigations about the effects of lime application and ammonium sulfate fertilisation on fine roots and ectomycorrhiza of an old beech forest in the Solling mountains. Untersuchungen zum Einfluss von Kalkung und Ammoniumsulfat-Duengung auf Feinwurzeln und Ektomykorrhizen eines Buchenaltbestandes im Solling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rapp, C.

    1991-01-01

    In a 139-year-old beech forest in the Soelling mountains, the effects of lime application and ammonium sulfate fertilisation on fine roots and ectomycorrhiza were investigated. The influence of the fertilizer supply on the fine root mass was quantified by means of the parameters biomass and necromass. From comparative analysis of the fine root concentrations in selected soil depths and the fine root density gradients, effects on the radication intensities and the depth distribution of the fine roots were determined. The temporal development of the fine roots was documented by repeated sampling during the vegetation period. The fine root investigations were carried out parallel to the acquisition of data of some important growth factors, i.e.: Soil temperature, soil suction force and element inventory in the soil solution. Possible relationships were determined by comparison of fine root and soil parameters. The element concentrations in living and dead fine roots as well as in mycorrhized very fine roots were specified for diagnosing soil-chemically induced nutritional disturbances. The influence of fertilisation on the mycorrhization was quantified by the biomass determination of vital mycorrhiza. (orig./VHE).

  19. Time-lagged response of carabid species richness and composition to past management practices and landscape context of semi-natural field margins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alignier, Audrey; Aviron, Stéphanie

    2017-12-15

    Field margins are key features for the maintenance of biodiversity and associated ecosystem services in agricultural landscapes. Little is known about the effects of management practices of old semi-natural field margins, and their historical dimension regarding past management practices and landscape context is rarely considered. In this paper, the relative influence of recent and past management practices and landscape context (during the last five years) were assessed on the local biodiversity (species richness and composition) of carabid assemblages of field margins in agricultural landscapes of northwestern France. The results showed that recent patterns of carabid species richness and composition were best explained by management practices and landscape context measured four or five years ago. It suggests the existence of a time lag in the response of carabid assemblages to past environmental conditions of field margins. The relative contribution of past management practices and past landscape context varied depending on the spatial scale at which landscape context was taken into account. Carabid species richness was higher in grazed or sprayed field margins probably due to increased heterogeneity in habitat conditions. Field margins surrounded by grasslands and crops harbored species associated with open habitats whilst forest species dominated field margins surrounded by woodland. Landscape effect was higher at fine spatial scale, within 50 m around field margins. The present study highlights the importance of considering time-lagged responses of biodiversity when managing environment. It also suggests that old semi-natural field margins should not be considered as undisturbed habitats but more as management units being part of farming activities in agricultural landscapes, as for arable fields. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Anthropogenic nitrogen deposition alters growth responses of European beech (Fagus sylvativa L.) to climate change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hess, Carsten; Niemeyer, Thomas; Fichtner, Andreas; Jansen, Kirstin; Kunz, Matthias; Maneke, Moritz; von Wehrden, Henrik; Quante, Markus; Walmsley, David; von Oheimb, Goddert; Härdtle, Werner

    2018-02-01

    Global change affects the functioning of forest ecosystems and the services they provide, but little is known about the interactive effects of co-occurring global change drivers on important functions such as tree growth and vitality. In the present study we quantified the interactive (i.e. synergistic or antagonistic) effects of atmospheric nitrogen (N) deposition and climatic variables (temperature, precipitation) on tree growth (in terms of tree-ring width, TRW), taking forest ecosystems with European beech (Fagus sylvatica L.) as an example. We hypothesised that (i) N deposition and climatic variables can evoke non-additive responses of the radial increment of beech trees, and (ii) N loads have the potential to strengthen the trees' sensitivity to climate change. In young stands, we found a synergistic positive effect of N deposition and annual mean temperature on TRW, possibly linked to the alleviation of an N shortage in young stands. In mature stands, however, high N deposition significantly increased the trees' sensitivity to increasing annual mean temperatures (antagonistic effect on TRW), possibly due to increased fine root dieback, decreasing mycorrhizal colonization or shifts in biomass allocation patterns (aboveground vs. belowground). Accordingly, N deposition and climatic variables caused both synergistic and antagonistic effects on the radial increment of beech trees, depending on tree age and stand characteristics. Hence, the nature of interactions could mediate the long-term effects of global change drivers (including N deposition) on forest carbon sequestration. In conclusion, our findings illustrate that interaction processes between climatic variables and N deposition are complex and have the potential to impair growth and performance of European beech. This in turn emphasises the importance of multiple-factor studies to foster an integrated understanding and models aiming at improved projections of tree growth responses to co-occurring drivers

  1. Nitrogen and phosphorus limited production of cereals and semi-natural annual-type pastures in SW-Spain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Esselink, Peter; VANGILS, H

    Nutrient limited primary production of semi-natural pastures dominated by annuals and of cereals grown in rotation with grazing was surveyed in Extremadura (Spain), using the N and P concentration and the P/N ratio of plant tissue. The N concentration varied between 2.0-3.2 % in pasture legumes and

  2. Response of nitrogen dynamics in semi-natural and agricultural grassland soils to experimental variation in tide and salinity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Antheunisse, A.M.; Loeb, R.; Miletto, M.; Lamers, L.P.M.; Laanbroek, H.J.; Verhoeven, J.T.A.

    2007-01-01

    In the framework of rehabilitation efforts to enhance the ecological value of closed-off estuaries, we studied the effects of restoring a tidal movement and seawater incursion on soil nitrogen conversion rates and vegetation response of semi-natural and agricultural grasslands in an outdoor mesocosm

  3. Species groups occupying different trophic levels respond differently to the invasion of semi-natural vegetation by Solidago canadensis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groot, de M.; Kleijn, D.; Jogan, N.

    2007-01-01

    We studied the impact of the invasive plant species Solidago canadensis on the species richness of vascular plants and the abundance, species richness and diversity of butterflies, hoverflies and carabid beetles in herbaceous semi-natural habitats near Ljubljana, Slovenia. The species groups were

  4. The importance of flooded terrestrial habitats for larval fish in a semi-natural large floodplain (Volga, Russian Federation)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gorski, Konrad; Leeuw, De Joep; Winter, Hendrik; Khoruzhaya, Victoria; Boldyrev, Vasily; Vekhov, Dmitry; Nagelkerke, Leo

    2016-01-01

    We assessed the importance of flooded terrestrial habitats for fish larvae in a semi-natural large floodplain (Volga, Russian Federation) by comparing abundances at the shoreline of permanent waterbodies with flooded terrestrial habitats. We found that overall larval abundance at the shoreline of

  5. Impacts of environmental stress on genetic structures of forest tree stands as exemplified by European beech (Fagus sylvatica L.); Auswirkungen von Umweltbelastungen auf genetische Strukturen von Waldbestaenden am Beispiel der Buche (Fagus sylvatica L.)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mueller-Starck, G. [Goettingen Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Forstgenetik und Forstpflanzenzuechtung, Forstliche Biometrie und Informatik

    1993-12-31

    Inheritance of isoenzymes in European beech was verified by means of analysis of segregations among full-sib families. 42 alleles were shown to be controlled genetically by a total of 17 polymorphic gene loci. In six adult stands, genetic structures between tolerant and sensitive subsets were compared (574 individuals). Furthermore, in order to study the dynamics of genetic variation, genetic structures were compared between germinating seeds (initial populations) and survivors at the age of two years under various field stress conditions (2986 individuals). The following tendencies are evident: (1) Genetic structures deviate significantly between tolerant and sensitive subsets in adult stands and between initial populations and juvenile survivors. (2) In adult stands, tolerant subsets reveal greater observed heterozygosities than sensitive subsets (surplus of 23.1%). (3) Among juvenile survivors, severe losses of genetic multiplicity can be expected (at least 17% of alleles). (4) Much greater gene pool diversity is indicated in tolerant subsets as compared to sensitive ones (trends to greater evenness of frequency distributions). (5) In the expression of viability characters, additive allelic effects are suggested in adult stands, but the genetic background is complex in heterogeneous environments. (6) In juvenile survivors, genetic selection is clearly indicated. Environmental stress affects genetic structures of beech populations in many different ways. It is concluded that long term exposure to complex field stress results in a viability advantage for genetically diverse populations and individuals. In juvenile stages, certain alleles may account for superior viabilities, but this phenomenon does not seem to hold for succeeding life stages. In such environments, genetically heterogeneous populations are strongly suggested. (orig./UWa) [Deutsch] Ziel der Untersuchungen war die Ueberpruefung genetischer Auswirkungen von Umweltstress auf Altbestaende und

  6. Climate change induces shifts in abundance and activity pattern of bacteria and archaea catalyzing major transformation steps in nitrogen turnover in a soil from a mid-European beech forest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gschwendtner, Silvia; Tejedor, Javier; Bimüller, Carolin; Bimueller, Carolin; Dannenmann, Michael; Kögel-Knabner, Ingrid; Knabner, Ingrid Kögel; Schloter, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Ongoing climate change will lead to more extreme weather events, including severe drought periods and intense drying rewetting cycles. This will directly influence microbial nitrogen (N) turnover rates in soil by changing the water content and the oxygen partial pressure. Therefore, a space for time climate change experiment was conducted by transferring intact beech seedling-soil mesocosms from a northwest (NW) exposed site, representing today's climatic conditions, to a southwest (SW) exposed site, providing a model climate for future conditions with naturally occurring increased soil temperature (+0.8°C in average). In addition, severe drought and intense rainfall was simulated by a rainout shelter at SW and manual rewetting after 39 days drought, respectively. Soil samples were taken in June, at the end of the drought period (August), 24 and 72 hours after rewetting (August) and after a regeneration period of four weeks (September). To follow dynamics of bacterial and archaeal communities involved in N turnover, abundance and activity of nitrifiers, denitrifiers, N2-fixing microbes and N-mineralizers was analyzed based on marker genes and the related transcripts by qPCR from DNA and RNA directly extracted from soil. Abundance of the transcripts was reduced under climate change with most pronounced effects for denitrification. Our results revealed that already a transfer from NW to SW without further treatment resulted in decreased cnor and nosZ transcripts, encoding for nitric oxide reductase and nitrous oxide reductase, respectively, while nirK transcripts, encoding for nitrite reductase, remained unaffected. Severe drought additionally led to reduced nirK and cnor transcripts at SW. After rewetting, nirK transcripts increased rapidly at both sites, while cnor and nosZ transcripts increased only at NW. Our data indicate that the climate change influences activity pattern of microbial communities involved in denitrification processes to a different extend

  7. Climate change induces shifts in abundance and activity pattern of bacteria and archaea catalyzing major transformation steps in nitrogen turnover in a soil from a mid-European beech forest.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Gschwendtner

    Full Text Available Ongoing climate change will lead to more extreme weather events, including severe drought periods and intense drying rewetting cycles. This will directly influence microbial nitrogen (N turnover rates in soil by changing the water content and the oxygen partial pressure. Therefore, a space for time climate change experiment was conducted by transferring intact beech seedling-soil mesocosms from a northwest (NW exposed site, representing today's climatic conditions, to a southwest (SW exposed site, providing a model climate for future conditions with naturally occurring increased soil temperature (+0.8°C in average. In addition, severe drought and intense rainfall was simulated by a rainout shelter at SW and manual rewetting after 39 days drought, respectively. Soil samples were taken in June, at the end of the drought period (August, 24 and 72 hours after rewetting (August and after a regeneration period of four weeks (September. To follow dynamics of bacterial and archaeal communities involved in N turnover, abundance and activity of nitrifiers, denitrifiers, N2-fixing microbes and N-mineralizers was analyzed based on marker genes and the related transcripts by qPCR from DNA and RNA directly extracted from soil. Abundance of the transcripts was reduced under climate change with most pronounced effects for denitrification. Our results revealed that already a transfer from NW to SW without further treatment resulted in decreased cnor and nosZ transcripts, encoding for nitric oxide reductase and nitrous oxide reductase, respectively, while nirK transcripts, encoding for nitrite reductase, remained unaffected. Severe drought additionally led to reduced nirK and cnor transcripts at SW. After rewetting, nirK transcripts increased rapidly at both sites, while cnor and nosZ transcripts increased only at NW. Our data indicate that the climate change influences activity pattern of microbial communities involved in denitrification processes to a

  8. Spatial heterogeneity confounded ozone-exposure experiment in semi-natural grassland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stampfli, Andreas; Fuhrer, Jürg

    2010-02-01

    Interpretation of observations from manipulative experiments is often complicated by a multitude of uncontrolled processes operating at various spatial and temporal scales. As such processes may differ among experimental plots there is a risk that effects of experimental treatments are confounded. Here we report on a free-air ozone-exposure experiment in permanent semi-natural grassland that suggested strong ozone effects on community productivity after 5 years. We tested ozone effects and investigated the potential of confounding due to changes in nutrient management. Repeated-measure ANOVA revealed mainly negative temporal trends for frequency of abundant productive plant species. Constrained ordination additionally showed converging trajectories of species compositions for ozone and control treatments with time. Yields sampled prior to the start of the experiment and soil nitrogen concentrations revealed that spatial heterogeneity in the soil nutrient status was not accounted for by the random allocation of treatments to plots with a bias towards less productive patches in the elevated-ozone plots. Re-analysis of yield data using repeated-measure ANOVA with a covariable to account for productivity prior to the start of fumigation revealed effects on the temporal changes in total yield and yield of legumes that cannot be separated between ozone and pre-treatment nutrient status. Changes in species composition favour an ecological interpretation with spatial heterogeneity as the major cause of different yield declines. Although elevated ozone may cause subtle physiological changes with longer term implications, our new results suggest that species-rich mature grassland such as the one studied at Le Mouret may be less sensitive to elevated ozone than previously assumed. In this experiment a confounded design was hidden at the start by transitory effects of a prior change in nutrient treatments.

  9. Major Changes in Growth Rate and Growth Variability of Beech (Fagus sylvatica L. Related to Soil Alteration and Climate Change in Belgium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas Latte

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Global change—particularly climate change, forest management, and atmospheric deposition—has significantly altered forest growing conditions in Europe. The influences of these changes on beech growth (Fagus sylvatica L. were investigated for the past 80 years in Belgium, using non-linear mixed effects models on ring-width chronologies of 149 mature and dominant beech trees (87–186 years old. The effects of the developmental stage (i.e., increasing tree size were filtered out in order to focus on time-dependent growth changes. Beech radial growth was divided into a low-frequency signal (=growth rate, mainly influenced by forest management and atmospheric deposition, and into a high-frequency variability (≈mean sensitivity, mainly influenced by climate change. Between 1930 and 2008, major long-term and time-dependent changes were highlighted. The beech growth rate has decreased by about 38% since the 1950–1960s, and growth variability has increased by about 45% since the 1970–1980s. Our results indicate that (1 before the 1980s, beech growth rate was not predominantly impacted by climate change but rather by soil alteration (i.e., soil compaction and/or nitrogen deposition; and (2 since the 1980s, climate change induced more frequent and intense yearly growth reductions that amplified the growth rate decrease. The highlighted changes were similar in the two ecoregions of Belgium, although more pronounced in the lowlands than in the uplands.

  10. Forest Conservation Opportunity Areas - Conservative Model (ECO_RES.COA_FORREST66)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This layer designates areas with potential for forest conservation. These are areas of natural or semi-natural forest land cover patches that area at least 395...

  11. Forest Conservation Opportunity Areas - Liberal Model (ECO_RES.COA_FORREST33)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This layer designates areas with potential for forest conservation. These are areas of natural or semi-natural forest land cover patches that are at least 75 meters...

  12. Tree- and Stand-Level Thinning Effects on Growth of European Beech (Fagus sylvatica L. on a Northeast- and a Southwest-Facing Slope in Southwest Germany

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Diaconu

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Anticipated changes in climate and research findings on the drought sensitivity of beech have triggered controversial discussions about the future of European beech. We investigated the growth response of beech on the tree- and stand-level in mature stands to three different thinning intensities (no thinning, strong thinning, very strong thinning on a northeast- and southwest-facing slope in Southwest Germany. Linear mixed-effects models were formulated to describe effects on growth parameters on the tree- and stand-level (diameter, height, basal area, volume. At the stand-level, the stand basal area increment and stand volume increment were lower on the thinned plots. At the tree-level, the basal area increment significantly increased with increasing thinning intensity. The growth of individual trees was also influenced by initial tree size, the size-related rank of the tree within a stand, and by the aspect of the site. Our data indicate that growth of European beech is impaired on the southwest-facing slope with a warmer and drier climate and that a very strong thinning regime applied at advanced age can accelerate growth of European beech trees even on the warmer and drier site. Our findings, therefore, imply that in a warmer climate intensive thinning may also represent an important adaptive forest management measure in European beech stands.

  13. Raman spectroscopic investigation of 13CO 2 labeling and leaf dark respiration of Fagus sylvatica L. (European beech).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keiner, Robert; Gruselle, Marie-Cécile; Michalzik, Beate; Popp, Jürgen; Frosch, Torsten

    2015-03-01

    An important issue, in times of climate change and more extreme weather events, is the investigation of forest ecosystem reactions to these events. Longer drought periods stress the vitality of trees and promote mass insect outbreaks, which strongly affect ecosystem processes and services. Cavity-enhanced Raman gas spectrometry was applied for online multi-gas analysis of the gas exchange rates of O2 and CO2 and the labeling of Fagus sylvatica L. (European beech) seedlings with (13)CO2. The rapid monitoring of all these gases simultaneously allowed for the separation of photosynthetic uptake of CO2 by the beech seedlings and a constant (12)CO2 efflux via respiration and thus for a correction of the measured (12)CO2 concentrations in course of the labeling experiment. The effects of aphid infestation with the woolly beech aphid (Phyllaphis fagi L.) as well as the effect of a drought period on the respirational gas exchange were investigated. A slightly decreased respirational activity of drought-stressed seedlings in comparison to normally watered seedlings was found already for a low drought intensity. Cavity-enhanced Raman gas monitoring of O2, (12)CO2, and (13)CO2 was proven to be a powerful new tool for studying the effect of drought stress and aphid infestation on the respirational activity of European beech seedlings as an example of important forest species in Central Europe.

  14. Aphid infestation affecting the biogeochemistry of European beech saplings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michalzik, B.; Levia, D. F., Jr.; Bischoff, S.; Näthe, K.

    2014-12-01

    Mass outbreaks of herbivore insects are known to perturb the functional properties of forests. However, it is less clear how endemic to moderate aboveground herbivory affects the vertical flow of nutrients from tree canopies to the soil. Here, we report on the effects of low to moderate infestation levels of the woolly beech aphid (Phyllaphis fagi L.) on the nutrient dynamics and hydrology of European beech (Fagus sylvatica L.). In a potted sapling experiment, we followed the vertical dynamics of nutrients via throughfall (TF), stemflow (SF) and litter leachates (LL) collected over ten weeks underneath infested and uninfested control trees. Aphid infestation amplifies the fluxes of K+, Mn2+ and particulate nitrogen (0.45μm aphid abundance by 26 and 16%, respectively. Differences in canopy-derived dissolved nitrogen and carbon compounds, sulfur (S), Ca2+, Mg2+, Na+ were aphid abundance on nutrient dynamics was most notable in TF and SF and diminished in LL.Aphid infestation greatly altered the SF fluxes of DOC, K+, Mn2+, DON and sulfur-species, which were significantly concentrated at the tree base by "funneling" the rainfall through the canopy biomass to the trunk. Normalized to one square meter, water and nutrient fluxes were amplified by a factor of up to 200 compared to TF.Imaging of leaf surfaces by scanning electron microscopy exhibited notable differences of the surface morphology and microbiology of control, lightly infested, and heavily infested leaves. This observation might point to an aphid-mediated alteration of the phyllosphere ecology triggering the microbial uptake of NH4-N and SO4-S and its transformation to particulate N by magnified biomass growth of the phyllosphere microflora, consequently changing the chemical partitioning and temporal availability of nitrogen.

  15. Pennsylvania forests 2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas A. Albright; William H. McWilliams; Richard H. Widmann; Brett J. Butler; Susan J. Crocker; Cassandra M. Kurtz; Shawn Lehman; Tonya W. Lister; Patrick D. Miles; Randall S. Morin; Rachel Riemann; James E. Smith

    2017-01-01

    This report summarizes the third cycle of annualized inventory of Pennsylvania with field data collected from 2009 through 2014. Pennsylvania has 16.9 million acres of forest land dominated by sawtimber stands of oak/hickory and maple/beech/birch forest-type groups. Volumes continue to increase as the forests age with an average of 2,244 cubic feet per acre on...

  16. Local-scale spatial structure and community composition of orchid mycorrhizal fungi in semi-natural grasslands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oja, Jane; Vahtra, Johanna; Bahram, Mohammad; Kohout, Petr; Kull, Tiiu; Rannap, Riinu; Kõljalg, Urmas; Tedersoo, Leho

    2017-05-01

    Orchid mycorrhizal (OrM) fungi play a crucial role in the ontogeny of orchids, yet little is known about how the structure of OrM fungal communities varies with space and environmental factors. Previous studies suggest that within orchid patches, the distance to adult orchids may affect the abundance of OrM fungi. Many orchid species grow in species-rich temperate semi-natural grasslands, the persistence of which depends on moderate physical disturbances, such as grazing and mowing. The aim of this study was to test whether the diversity, structure and composition of OrM fungal community are influenced by the orchid patches and management intensity in semi-natural grasslands. We detected putative OrM fungi from 0 to 32 m away from the patches of host orchid species (Orchis militaris and Platanthera chlorantha) in 21 semi-natural calcareous grasslands using pyrosequencing. In addition, we assessed different ecological conditions in semi-natural grasslands but primarily focused on the effect of grazing intensity on OrM fungal communities in soil. We found that investigated orchid species were mostly associated with Ceratobasidiaceae and Tulasnellaceae and, to a lesser extent, with Sebacinales. Of all the examined factors, the intensity of grazing explained the largest proportion of variation in OrM fungal as well as total fungal community composition in soil. Spatial analyses showed limited evidence for spatial clustering of OrM fungi and their dependence on host orchids. Our results indicate that habitat management can shape OrM fungal communities, and the spatial distribution of these fungi appears to be weakly structured outside the orchid patches.

  17. Plantation forests and biodiversity: oxymoron or opportunity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckehard G. Brockerhoff; Hervé Jactel; John A. Parrotta; Christopher Quine; Jeffrey Sayer

    2008-01-01

    Losses of natural and semi-natural forests, mostly to agriculture, are a significant concern for biodiversity. Against this trend, the area of intensively managed plantation forests increases, and there is much debate about the implications for biodiversity. We provide a comprehensive review of the function of plantation forests as habitat compared with other land...

  18. Is multifunctionality the future of mountain pastoralism? Lessons from the management of semi-natural grasslands in the Pyrenees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feliu López-i-Gelats

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Land abandonment is pervasive in mountainous Europe. In the present situation of price-cost squeeze on pastoral households and general shift in the role of farming, the development of farming abandonment risk regions is generally associated with adoption of new multifunctional rural development strategies, such as farm tourism, which in the end entail less time being devoted to farming practices. We explored the effects of such developmental scheme on the preservation of semi-natural grasslands, in particular, and on the sustainability of mountain pastoralism, in general. While the effects on the preservation of semi-natural grasslands of full abandonment have been extensively explored, this is not the case of partial abandonment. Results showed that the adoption of simplified and low-cost management regimes, associated with partial abandonment and the increased adoption of part-time farming, immerses semi-natural grasslands in processes of secondary succession that undermine both their conservation and pastoral functions. This points the need for caution when endorsing multifunctional developmental schemes in farming abandonment risk regions, particularly when those imply less labor being devoted to pastoral practices. In conclusion, we stress that in farming abandonment risk regions it is possible to guarantee both viable pastoralism and diversified rural economy. However, it is necessary to implement developmental strategies that are centered on stimulating synergies between pastoralism and other economic activities, rather than promoting activities that depend on additional farmers’ polyvalence.

  19. Is multifunctionality the future of mountain pastoralism? Lessons from the management of semi-natural grasslands in the Pyrenees

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    López-i-Gelats, F.; Rivera-Ferre, M.G.; Madruga-Andreu, C.; Bartolomé-Filella, J.

    2015-07-01

    Land abandonment is pervasive in mountainous Europe. In the present situation of price-cost squeeze on pastoral households and general shift in the role of farming, the development of farming abandonment risk regions is generally associated with adoption of new multifunctional rural development strategies, such as farm tourism, which in the end entail less time being devoted to farming practices. We explored the effects of such developmental scheme on the preservation of semi-natural grasslands, in particular, and on the sustainability of mountain pastoralism, in general. While the effects on the preservation of semi-natural grasslands of full abandonment have been extensively explored, this is not the case of partial abandonment. Results showed that the adoption of simplified and low-cost management regimes, associated with partial abandonment and the increased adoption of part-time farming, immerses semi-natural grasslands in processes of secondary succession that undermine both their conservation and pastoral functions. This points the need for caution when endorsing multifunctional developmental schemes in farming abandonment risk regions, particularly when those imply less labor being devoted to pastoral practices. In conclusion, we stress that in farming abandonment risk regions it is possible to guarantee both viable pastoralism and diversified rural economy. However, it is necessary to implement developmental strategies that are centered on stimulating synergies between pastoralism and other economic activities, rather than promoting activities that depend on additional farmers’ polyvalence. (Author)

  20. THE CHIPS SHAPES AT THE BEECH WOODTURNING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iulian POPESCU

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available we did research on the process of beech woodturning with low cutting speed. We studied the different chip shapes resulted for different feeds. Based on chip shapes, the phenomena that occur in the cutting area were interpreted by the theory of woodturning. It was found that broken chips occur and the variable hardness of some areas on the workingpiece determined forming of smaller flowing chips. We give the resulting images of the chips which are then analysed and commented.

  1. Nothophytophthora gen. nov., a new sister genus of Phytophthora from natural and semi-natural ecosystems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jung, T.; Scanu, B.; Bakonyi, J.; Seress, D.; Kovács, G.M.; Durán, A.; Sanfuentes von Stowasser, E.; Schena, L.; Mosca, S.; Thu, P.Q.; Nguyen, C.M.; Fajardo, S.; González, M.; Pérez-Sierra, A.; Rees, H.; Cravador, A.; Maia, C.; Horta Jung, M.

    2017-01-01

    During various surveys of Phytophthora diversity in Europe, Chile and Vietnam slow growing oomycete isolates were obtained from rhizosphere soil samples and small streams in natural and planted forest stands. Phylogenetic analyses of sequences from the nuclear ITS, LSU, β-tubulin and HSP90 loci and

  2. Segregation of nitrogen use between ammonium and nitrate of ectomycorrhizas and beech trees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leberecht, Martin; Dannenmann, Michael; Tejedor, Javier; Simon, Judy; Rennenberg, Heinz; Polle, Andrea

    2016-12-01

    Here, we characterized nitrogen (N) uptake of beech (Fagus sylvatica) and their associated ectomycorrhizal (EM) communities from NH4+ and NO3- . We hypothesized that a proportional fraction of ectomycorrhizal N uptake is transferred to the host, thereby resulting in the same uptake patterns of plants and their associated mycorrhizal communities. 15 N uptake was studied under various field conditions after short-term and long-term exposure to a pulse of equimolar NH4+ and NO3- concentrations, where one compound was replaced by 15 N. In native EM assemblages, long-term and short-term 15 N uptake from NH4+ was higher than that from NO3- , regardless of season, water availability and site exposure, whereas in beech long-term 15 N uptake from NO3- was higher than that from NH4+ . The transfer rates from the EM to beech were lower for 15 N from NH4+ than from NO3- . 15 N content in EM was correlated with 15 N uptake of the host for 15 NH4+ , but not for 15 NO3- -derived N. These findings suggest stronger control of the EM assemblage on N provision to the host from NH4+ than from NO3- . Different host and EM accumulation patterns for inorganic N will result in complementary resource use, which might be advantageous in forest ecosystems with limited N availability. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louis R. Iverson; Mark W. Schwartz

    1994-01-01

    Originally diminished by development, forests are coming back: forest biomass is accumulating. Forests are repositories for many threatened species. Even with increased standing timber, however, biodiversity is threatened by increased forest fragmentation and by exotic species.

  4. Different conditions for drying of beech lumbers in Kosovo

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PRECIOUS

    2010-01-11

    Jan 11, 2010 ... The aim of the study is to present the coefficients of swelling and shrinkage for the beech wood. Mostly, the values of swelling and shrinkage, obtained from of heart of red wood, are higher than white beech wood. The swelling is smaller in naturally drying lumbers than in kiln drying. Because of calculated ...

  5. Radial variations in cation exchange capacity and base saturation rate in the wood of pedunculate oak and European beech

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herbauts, J.; Penninckx, V.; Gruber, W.; Meerts, P. [Universite Libre de Bruxelles, Laboratoire de genetique et d' ecologie vegetales, Brussels (Belgium)

    2002-10-01

    Visual observation of pedunculate oak trees and European beech trees in a mixed forest stand in the Belgian Ardennes revealed decreasing cation concentration profiles in wood. In order to determine whether these profiles are attributable to endogenous factors or to decreased availability of cations in the soil, radial profiles of water-soluble, exchangeable and total cations were investigated. Cation exchange capacity of wood was also determined. Results showed wood cation exchange capacity to decrease from pith to bark in European beech and from pith to outer heartwood in pedunculate oak. Decreasing profiles of exchangeable calcium and magnesium in peduncular oak and exchangeable calcium in European beech were found to be strongly constrained by cation exchange capacity, and thus not related to environmental change. Base cation saturation rate showed no consistent radial change in either species. It was concluded that the results did not provide convincing evidence to attribute the decrease in divalent cation concentration in pedunculate oak and European beech in this location to be due to atmospheric pollution. 42 refs., 1 tab., 4 figs.

  6. Beech wood – correlations between the quality of trees, logs and sawn wood

    OpenAIRE

    Marenče, Jurij; Gornik Bučar , Dominika; Šega, Bogdan

    2016-01-01

    The research addresses beech wood, from a standing tree to sawn wood. It focuses on the quality evaluation of individual trees and its impact on the later products made of the respective wood. For the needs of observing the quality of standing trees, the current 5-class scale for quality evaluation of the Slovenia Forest Service (SFS) was used. To evaluate the wood assortment, the SIST EN 1316-1:2013 standard was applied, while the evaluation of sawn wood was performed as per the rules of ...

  7. Use of microsatellite markers in an American beech (Fagus grandifolia) population and paternity testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jennifer Koch; Dave Carey; M.E. Mason

    2010-01-01

    Cross-species amplification of six microsatellite markers from European beech (Fagus sylvatica Linn) and nine markers from Japanese beech (Fagus crenata Blume) was tested in American beech (Fagus grandifolia Ehrh.). Three microsatellites from each species were successfully adapted for use in American beech...

  8. Climate threats on growth of rear-edge European beech peripheral populations in Spain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorado-Liñán, I.; Akhmetzyanov, L.; Menzel, A.

    2017-12-01

    European beech ( Fagus sylvatica L.) forests in the Iberian Peninsula are a clear example of a temperate forest tree species at the rear edge of its large distribution area in Europe. The expected drier and warmer climate may alter tree growth and species distribution. Consequently, the peripheral populations will most likely be the most threatened ones. Four peripheral beech forests in the Iberian Peninsula were studied in order to assess the climate factors influencing tree growth for the last six decades. The analyses included an individual tree approach in order to detect not only the changes in the sensitivity to climate but also the potential size-mediated sensitivity to climate. Our results revealed a dominant influence of previous and current year summer on tree growth during the last six decades, although the analysis in two equally long periods unveiled changes and shifts in tree sensitivity to climate. The individual tree approach showed that those changes in tree response to climate are not size dependent in most of the cases. We observed a reduced negative effect of warmer winter temperatures at some sites and a generalized increased influence of previous year climatic conditions on current year tree growth. These results highlight the crucial role played by carryover effects and stored carbohydrates for future tree growth and species persistence.

  9. Carbon cycling along a gradient of beech bark disease impact in the Catskill Mountains, New York

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hancock, J.E.; Arthur, M.A. [Kentucky Univ., Lexington, KY (United States). Dept. of Forestry; Weathers, K.C.; Lovett, G.M. [Inst. of Ecosystem Studies, Millbrook, NY (United States)

    2008-05-15

    Beech bark disease (BBD) is having a significant impact on the forest structure and composition of the Catskill Mountains, where forests formerly co-dominated by American beech and sugar maples are now shifting towards sugar maple dominance. In this study, the effects of BBD on annual aboveground net primary production and soil carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) efflux were investigated in 8 forest plots in order to examine differences in aboveground net primary productivity (ANPP) and soil CO{sub 2} efflux across a gradient of BBD impacts. A series of plots in a single watershed was used to represent different points along the gradient. The study hypothesized that ANPP would initially increase with BBD impact. The influence of higher nitrogen (N) mineralization rates and greater N availability was also examined. Annual ANPP was estimated as the sum of annual litterfall and annual wood increment. Allometric equations were used to estimate the wood biomass of each tree over a period of 2 years. Soil CO{sub 2} efflux measurements were measured with a temperature probe. Univariate linear and nonlinear regression analyses were used to detect relationships between response variables. Results of the study showed that growing season soil CO{sub 2} efflux declined by 40 per cent along the BBD gradient. 32 refs., 1 tab., 4 figs.

  10. Effects of some metals on beech ectomycorrhizae with special reference to Cenococcum geophilum (Fr. ). An in vivo and in vitro study. In vivo und in vitro Untersuchungen zur Schadwirkung einiger Metalle and Buchen-Ektomykorrhizen mit besonderer Beruecksichtigung von Cenococcum geophilum Fr

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hofmann, H.P.

    1989-07-12

    This thesis tries to establish whether damage of the mycorrhiza could be one of the causes of the new type of forest decline. In vivo and in vitro examinations on beech mycorrhiza were carried out to investigate whether a hypothetically assumed disorder in the ectomycorrhiza symbiosis can be caused by substratum changes, for instance. It was presumed that such disorders would be structurally noticeable. For this purpose, the beech mycorrhiza of two long term observation sites near Karlsruhe were investigated as to vitality in forests affected by forest decline. Root samples taken at regular intervals during 1985 and 1986 from areas of severely damaged beeches and from areas of undamaged to lightly damaged beeches were prepared for cytological examinations. As the analysis of trace elements showed increased metal contents, particularly of copper, in the ground of damaged trees, experiments with artificial mycorrhizal formation and mycelium cultures were carried out to check the above mentioned hypothesis. Test fungus was Cenococcum geophilum. (orig.).

  11. EnviroAtlas - Biological nitrogen fixation in natural/semi-natural ecosystems by 12-digit HUC for the Conterminous United States, 2006

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This EnviroAtlas dataset contains data on the mean biological nitrogen fixation in natural/semi-natural ecosystems per 12-digit Hydrologic Unit (HUC) in 2006....

  12. Characteristics of the soil in mountain beech communities on mountain Manjača

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eremija Saša

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The presented results of soil study, which will be used for defining the beech forest types of management unit 'Dubička Gora' on Mt. Manjača, are the basis for solving a series of current tasks of forestry profession. Relief and chemical nature of limestone are the main factors of the soil cover differentiation (Knežević, Košanin, 2004.. The results of physical and chemical soil properties are shown and its taxonomy is determined. Forest cover is represented by heterogeneous units-forest combinations. Four basic soil types are defined on the basis of detailed field and laboratory research: rendzina on dolomite, chernozem on limestone, brown soil on limestone, illimerised soil on limestone and dolomite.

  13. Variability of European beech wood density as influenced by interactions between tree-ring growth and aspect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Diaconu

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Wood density is considered to be the most important predictor of wood quality but despite its importance, diffuse-porous tree species have been the subject of only a limited number of studies. The importance of European beech forests for Central Europe calls for profound research to examine the potential impact of a warmer climate on the quality of beech timber. Methods: In this study we analysed the influence of tree-ring width and tree-ring age on the wood density of beech, and whether the wood density response to these two parameters is modified by aspect. A linear mixed-effects model for wood density was constructed for mean density data measured with high frequency densitometry on stem discs from 72 beech trees sampled from two different aspects (northeast -NE and southwest -SW of a valley in southwestern Germany. Results: Part of the variability of mean annual wood density was explained by cambial age: an increase in cambial age resulted in an increase in mean wood density. Tree-ring width and aspect had only a small influence on wood density. Wood density on the SW aspect was lower than on the NE with a difference of approximately 0.006 g/cm3. The between-tree variability was very high. Conclusions: The significant interaction between cambial age and aspect reflects the importance of site conditions at older tree ages: with increasing cambial age the difference between aspects becomes stronger. Our results give a better understanding of the importance of site conditions on the wood quality of beech. Keywords: Fagus sylvatica, HF densitometry, Wood quality, Wood density, Aspect

  14. Forest Biomass for Climate Change Mitigation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Anders Tærø

    on southern Scandinavian sites, managed under different systems both in agriculture and in forests. In addition, the objective is to assess the potential of the poplar plantations to mitigate climate change by using poplar biomass for substitution of fossil fuels in comparison to a traditional product....... The production results were, however, heavily site dependent, with soil texture and C/N ratio of the soils being the best site productivity indicators for poplar. The comparison of three forest management strategies, poplar, beech or unmanaged beech, showed that the poplar for bioenergy management strategy...... favorable for reduction of CO2 emissions. In all analyzed scenarios, however, the managed poplar and beech forest strategies resulted in lower CO2 emissions than the unmanaged forest. The studies also showed that it cannot readily be assumed that the use of biomass is entirely CO2 neutral, due to use...

  15. Spatial variability and temporal stability of throughfall deposition under beech (Fagus sylvatica L.) in relationship to canopy structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Staelens, Jeroen [Ghent University, Laboratory of Forestry, Geraardsbergsesteenweg 267, 9090 Gontrode (Belgium)]. E-mail: jeroen_staelens@yahoo.com; De Schrijver, An [Ghent University, Laboratory of Forestry, Geraardsbergsesteenweg 267, 9090 Gontrode (Belgium); Verheyen, Kris [Ghent University, Laboratory of Forestry, Geraardsbergsesteenweg 267, 9090 Gontrode (Belgium); Verhoest, Niko E.C. [Ghent University, Laboratory of Hydrology and Water Management, Coupure links 653, 9000 Gent (Belgium)

    2006-07-15

    Although the spatial variability of throughfall (TF) in forest ecosystems can have important ecological implications, little is known about the driving factors of within-stand TF variability, particularly in deciduous forests. While the spatial variability of TF water amount and H{sup +} deposition under a dominant beech (Fagus sylvatica L.) tree was significantly higher in the leafed period than in the leafless period, the spatial TF deposition patterns of most major ions were similar in both periods. The semiannual TF depositions of all ions other than H{sup +} were significantly positively correlated (r = 0.68-0.90, p < 0.05) with canopy structure above sample locations throughout the entire year. The amounts of TF water and H{sup +} deposition during the leafed period were negatively correlated with branch cover. We conclude that the spatial heterogeneity of ion deposition under beech was significantly affected by leaves in the growing period and by branches in non-foliated conditions. - Ion deposition under a deciduous beech tree was strongly affected by the canopy structure throughout the entire year.

  16. Development of collagen/polydopamine complexed matrix as mechanically enhanced and highly biocompatible semi-natural tissue engineering scaffold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yang; Dan, Weihua; Xiong, Shanbai; Kang, Yang; Dhinakar, Arvind; Wu, Jun; Gu, Zhipeng

    2017-01-01

    To improve the mechanical properties and biocompatibility of collagen I matrix, a novel and facile strategy was developed to modify porcine acellular dermal matrix (PADM) via dopamine self-polymerization followed by collagen immobilization to enhance the biological, mechanical and physicochemical properties of PADM. Mechanism study indicated that the polymerization of dopamine onto PADM surface could be regulated by controlling the amount of hydrogen bonds forming between phenol hydroxyl (COH) and nitrogen atom (NCO) within collagen fibers of PADM. The investigations of surface interactions between PDA and PADM illustrated that PDA-PADM system yielded better mechanical properties, thermal stability, surface hydrophilicity and the structural integrity of PADM was maintained after dopamine coating. Furthermore, collagen (COL) was immobilized onto the fresh PDA-PADM to fabricate the collagen-PDA-PADM (COL-PDA-PADM) complexed scaffold. The MTT assay and CLSM observation showed that COL-PDA-PADM had better biocompatibility and higher cellular attachment than pure PADM and COL-PADM without dopamine coating, thus demonstrating the efficacy of PDA as the intermediate layer. Meanwhile, the expression of basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) of COL-PDA-PADM were investigated by an in vivo study. The results revealed that COL-PDA-PADM could effectively promote bFGF and VEGF expression, possibly leading to enhancing the dura repairing process. Overall, this work contributed a new insight into the development of a semi-natural tissue engineering scaffold with high biocompatibility and good mechanical properties. Obtaining scaffolds with high biocompatibility and good mechanical properties is still one of the most challenging issues in tissue engineering. To have excellent in vitro and in vivo performance, scaffolds are desired to have similar mechanical and biological properties as the natural extracellular matrix, such as collagen

  17. Bark vegetation contributes to nitrous oxide (N2O) deposition by mature beech trees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machacova, Katerina; Maier, Martin; Svobodova, Katerina; Lang, Friederike; Urban, Otmar

    2017-04-01

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) contributes to the acceleration of the greenhouse effect. Accordingly, there is an urgent need to investigate the natural capability of forest ecosystems to exchange N2O with the atmosphere. While the soils of temperate forests were shown to be a significant natural source of N2O, trees have been so far overlooked in the forest N2O inventories. Trees are known, however, to emit this gas, especially at very high N2O concentration in soil. We determined the N2O fluxes in mature beech trees (Fagus sylvatica) in two upland mountain forests (White Carpathians, CZ; Black Forest, DE) with predominant soil N2O uptake. To understand these fluxes, N2O exchange in photoautotrophic organisms associated with beech stems (lichens, mosses, and algae) was further investigated under laboratory conditions. Fluxes were measured in situ in June and July 2015 using static chamber systems followed by chromatographic and photo-acoustic analyses of N2O concentration changes. In both forests studied, all beech stems deposited N2O from the atmosphere. Such consistent uptake of N2O by stems represents a novel and unique finding which is in the contrast to current limited studies presenting trees as N2O emitters. The mean stem deposition rates were significantly higher in the White Carpathians (-3.8 μg N2O m-2 stem area h-1) than in the Black Forest (-2.3 μg N2O m-2 h-1). The forest floor was a strong sink for N2O (White Carpathians: -111, Black Forest: -81 μg N2O m-2 soil area h-1). The N2O concentration profiles within the soil did not identify any apparent production or consumption processes. Photoautotrophic organisms (lichens, mosses, and algae), largely associated with the bark of studied trees, were collected for further analyses. The detailed incubation experiments revealed that all sampled organisms deposited N2O under the conditions of full rehydration and air temperature of 25˚ C. Their deposition rates per unit area were in the same order of magnitude as

  18. Use of sap flow measurements to validate stomatal functions for mature beech (Fagus sylvatica) in view of ozone uptake calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun, Sabine; Schindler, Christian; Leuzinger, Sebastian

    2010-09-01

    For a quantitative estimate of the ozone effect on vegetation reliable models for ozone uptake through the stomata are needed. Because of the analogy of ozone uptake and transpiration it is possible to utilize measurements of water loss such as sap flow for quantification of ozone uptake. This technique was applied in three beech (Fagus sylvatica) stands in Switzerland. A canopy conductance was calculated from sap flow velocity and normalized to values between 0 and 1. It represents mainly stomatal conductance as the boundary layer resistance in forests is usually small. Based on this relative conductance, stomatal functions to describe the dependence on light, temperature, vapour pressure deficit and soil moisture were derived using multivariate nonlinear regression. These functions were validated by comparison with conductance values directly estimated from sap flow. The results corroborate the current flux parameterization for beech used in the DO3SE model. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Disintegration of beech wood char during thermal conversion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hindsgaul, Claus

    In the present work the processes occurring in the structures of slowly pyrolysed beech wood char during thermal gasification have been investigated. Emphasis was put on physical changes and gas transport properties during conversion. The highly anisotropic structure of wood was preserved in its...... differences of 3—4 orders of magnitude between the longitudinal and other directions in freshly pyrolysed beech wood char. Diffusion in the longitudinal direction of the beech wood char before gasification corresponded to direct, unobstructed diffusion through its vessel cells. Radial and tangential diffusion...... were limited by Knudsen diffusion through the pits in the wood cell walls for degrees of conversion by gasification up to at least 0.5. A computer model of slab gasification based on the diffusion measurements successfully predicted the mass loss rate during diffusion-limited gasification of beech wood...

  20. Climate and land use changes effects on soil organic carbon stocks in a Mediterranean semi-natural area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lozano-García, Beatriz; Muñoz-Rojas, Miriam; Parras-Alcántara, Luis

    2017-02-01

    A thorough knowledge of the effects of climate and land use changes on the soil carbon pool is critical to planning effective strategies for adaptation and mitigation in future scenarios of global climate and land use change. In this study, we used CarboSOIL model to predict changes in soil organic carbon stocks in a semi-natural area of Southern Spain in three different time horizons (2040, 2070, 2100), considering two general circulation models (BCM2 and ECHAM5) and three IPCC scenarios (A1b, A2, B2). The effects of potential land use changes from natural vegetation (Mediterranean evergreen oak woodland) to agricultural land (olive grove and cereal) on soil organic carbon stocks were also evaluated. Predicted values of SOC contents correlated well those measured (R2 ranging from 0.71 at 0-25cm to 0.97 at 50-75cm) showing the efficiency of the model. Results showed substantial differences among time horizons, climate and land use scenarios and soil depth with larger decreases of soil organic carbon stocks in the long term (2100 time horizon) and particularly in olive groves. The combination of climate and land use scenarios (in particular conversion from current 'dehesa' to olive groves) resulted in yet higher losses of soil organic carbon stocks, e.g. -30, -15 and -33% in the 0-25, 25-50 and 50-75cm sections respectively. This study shows the importance of soil organic carbon stocks assessment under both climate and land use scenarios at different soil sections and point towards possible directions for appropriate land use management in Mediterranean semi natural areas. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. On the influence of provenance to soil quality enhanced stress reaction of young beech trees to summer drought.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buhk, Constanze; Kämmer, Marcel; Beierkuhnlein, Carl; Jentsch, Anke; Kreyling, Jürgen; Jungkunst, Hermann F

    2016-11-01

    Climate projections propose that drought stress will become challenging for establishing trees. The magnitude of stress is dependent on tree species, provenance, and most likely also highly influenced by soil quality. European Beech (Fagus sylvatica) is of major ecological and economical importance in Central European forests. The species has an especially wide physiological and ecological amplitude enabling growth under various soil conditions within its distribution area in Central Europe. We studied the effects of extreme drought on beech saplings (second year) of four climatically distinct provenances growing on different soils (sandy loam and loamy sand) in a full factorial pot experiment. Foliar δ(13)C, δ(15)N, C, and N as well as above- and belowground growth parameters served as measures for stress level and plant growth. Low-quality soil enhanced the effect of drought compared with qualitatively better soil for the above- and belowground growth parameters, but foliar δ(13)C values revealed that plant stress was still remarkable in loamy soil. For beeches of one provenance, negative sandy soil effects were clearly smaller than for the others, whereas for another provenance drought effects in sandy soil were sometimes fatal. Foliar δ(15)N was correlated with plant size during the experiment. Plasticity of beech provenances in their reaction to drought versus control conditions varied clearly. Although a general trend of declining growth under control or drought conditions in sandy soil was found compared to loamy soil, the magnitude of the effect of soil quality was highly provenance specific. Provenances seemed to show adaptations not only to drought but also to soil quality. Accordingly, scientists should integrate information about climatic pre-adaptation and soil quality within the home range of populations for species distribution modeling and foresters should evaluate soil quality and climatic parameters when choosing donor populations for

  2. Implications of changing from grazed or semi-natural vegetation to forestry for carbon stores and fluxes in upland organo-mineral soils in the UK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available In the UK, as organo-mineral soils are a significant store of soil organic carbon (SOC, they may become increasingly favoured for the expansion of upland forestry. It is important, therefore, to assess the likely impacts on SOC of this potentially major land use change. Currently, these assessments rely on modelling approaches which assume that afforestation of organo-mineral soils is "carbon neutral". This review evaluates this assumption in two ways. Firstly, UK information from the direct measurement of SOC change following afforestation is examined in the context of international studies. Secondly, UK data on the magnitude and direction of the major fluxes in the carbon cycle of semi-natural upland ecosystems are assessed to identify the likely responses of the fluxes to afforestation of organo-mineral soils. There are few directly relevant measurements of SOC change following afforestation of organo-mineral soils in the UK uplands but there are related studies on peat lands and agricultural soils. Overall, information on the magnitude and direction of change in SOC with afforestation is inconclusive. Data on the accumulation of litter beneath conifer stands have been identified but the extent to which the carbon held in this pool is incorporated into the stable soil carbon reservoir is uncertain. The effect of afforestation on most carbon fluxes is small because the fluxes are either relatively minor or of the same magnitude and direction irrespective of land use. Compared with undisturbed moorland, particulate organic carbon losses increase throughout the forest cycle but the data are exclusively from plantation conifer forests and in many cases pre-date current industry best practice guidelines which aim to reduce such losses. The biggest uncertainty in flux estimates is the relative magnitude of the sink for atmospheric carbon as trees grow and mature compared with that lost during site preparation and harvesting. Given the size of this

  3. Effect of the density of transplants in reforestation on the morphological quality of the above-ground part of European beech (Fagus sylvatica L. six years after planting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kateřina Houšková

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Quality of the above-ground part of European beech planted at different densities and spacing patterns for the purpose of artificial forest regeneration was monitored 3, 4 and 6 years after planting. The initial numbers of beech transplants were 5,000 pcs.ha−1, 10,000 pcs.ha−1, 15,000 pcs.ha−1 and 20,000 pcs.ha−1. The spacing pattern of transplants was either square or rectangular nearly in all variants: 1.4 × 1.4 m, 2 × 1 m, 1 × 1 m, 0.8 × 0.8 m, 1 ×0.65 m, 0.7 × 0.7 m and 1 × 0.5 m. Conclusions following out from the research are as follows: 1. neither the chosen density of transplants nor their spacing pattern had an essential influence on the after-planting loss or damage of trees; 2. through the planting of larger-diameter transplants it is possible to achieve canopy closure more rapidly as well as faster growth of the plantation; these beech plants keep the edge in growth and quality even 6 years after planting; 3. the higher is the beech plantation density, the less individuals occur in such a plantation with inappropriate stem form; 4. beech plants of the worst quality were found on plots with the lowest initial density of transplants (5,000 and 10,000 pcs.ha−1, yet the number of promising trees was sufficient even there. Thus, none of the experimental numbers of transplants per hectare or spacing arrangements of the European beech transplants can be claimed as inappropriate; however, further monitoring of the plots is necessary.

  4. Tree-ring growth of Scots pine, Common beech and Pedunculate oak under future climate in northeastern Germany

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jurasinski, Gerald; Scharnweber, Tobias; Schröder, Christian; Lennartz, Bernd; Bauwe, Andreas

    2017-04-01

    Germany Scots pine has great potential to remain resilient to projected climate change without any greater impairment, whereas Common beech and Pedunculate oak will likely face lesser growth under the expected warmer and dryer climate conditions. The results call for an adaptation of forest management to mitigate the negative effects of climate change for beech and oak in the region.

  5. PROSPECTS FOR BEECH GENETIC RESOURCES ADMINISTRATION IN FĂGETUL SECULAR STUHOASA NATURAL AREA

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Liviu Fartais

    2014-01-01

    ...% proportion of beech plus trees. An efficient in situ conservation of the beech genetic resources require the elimination of all risk factors which might disturb the genetic integrity in the natural area and then to make ample...

  6. Spatiotemporal dynamics of soil rotifers in a South-Bohemian beech forest Dinâmica espaço-temporal de rotíferos edáficos em uma floresta de faias no sul da Boêmia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miloslav Devetter

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work was to determine seasonal variation and vertical distribution of the soil rotifer assemblage in a climax beech forest in South Bohemia. During 2005, soil rotifer was investigated to the species level. Soil samples of 10 cm² and 10 cm in depth were divided into five layers, which were processed separately. Thirty one rotifer species were identified during the investigation. Dominant species significantly changed throughout the seasons. The most abundant species were Encentrum arvicola and Wierzejskiella vagneri among the monogononts, and Adineta steineri, Ceratotrocha cornigera, Habrotrocha filum, Habrotrocha ligula, Macrotrachela plicata, Mniobia tentans, Mniobia incrassata and Mniobia granulosa among the bdelloids. Mean Shannon diversity index varied from 1.99 to 2.63. Total rotifer abundance varied from 212±63 to 513±127 10³ individuals m-2 along the year, with the highest numbers found in May, and the lowest in July. The great part of the community was concentrated in the upper (fresh litter and second (partially decomposed litter layers and significantly decreased in the soil vertical profile on all sampling dates. The highest rotifer density of 43 individuals g-1 was found in the upper layer in May.O objetivo deste trabalho foi determinar a variação sazonal e a distribuição vertical de comunidades de rotíferos edáficos em uma floresta de faias em clímax, no Sul da Boêmia. Durante 2005, as comunidades de rotíferos edáficos foram estudadas até o nível da espécie. Amostras de 10 cm² de área com 10 cm de profundidade foram divididas em cinco camadas, que foram processadas separadamente. Trinta e uma espécies de rotíferos foram identificadas durante a investigação. Todas as espécies dominantes tiveram variações significativas durante as estações climáticas. As espécies mais abundantes foram Encentrum arvicola e Wierzejskiella vagneri entre os monogonontes e Adineta steineri, Ceratotrocha

  7. Advantages of masting in European beech: timing of granivore satiation and benefits of seed caching support the predator dispersal hypothesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwolak, Rafał; Bogdziewicz, Michał; Wróbel, Aleksandra; Crone, Elizabeth E

    2016-03-01

    The predator satiation and predator dispersal hypotheses provide alternative explanations for masting. Both assume satiation of seed-eating vertebrates. They differ in whether satiation occurs before or after seed removal and caching by granivores (predator satiation and predator dispersal, respectively). This difference is largely unrecognized, but it is demographically important because cached seeds are dispersed and often have a microsite advantage over nondispersed seeds. We conducted rodent exclosure experiments in two mast and two nonmast years to test predictions of the predator dispersal hypothesis in our study system of yellow-necked mice (Apodemus flavicollis) and European beech (Fagus sylvatica). Specifically, we tested whether the fraction of seeds removed from the forest floor is similar during mast and nonmast years (i.e., lack of satiation before seed caching), whether masting decreases the removal of cached seeds (i.e., satiation after seed storage), and whether seed caching increases the probability of seedling emergence. We found that masting did not result in satiation at the seed removal stage. However, masting decreased the removal of cached seeds, and seed caching dramatically increased the probability of seedling emergence relative to noncached seeds. European beech thus benefits from masting through the satiation of scatterhoarders that occurs only after seeds are removed and cached. Although these findings do not exclude other evolutionary advantages of beech masting, they indicate that fitness benefits of masting extend beyond the most commonly considered advantages of predator satiation and increased pollination efficiency.

  8. CASIROZ: Root parameters and types of ectomycorrhiza of young beech plants exposed to different ozone and light regimes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeleznik, P; Hrenko, M; Then, C; Koch, N; Grebenc, T; Levanic, T; Kraigher, H

    2007-03-01

    Tropospheric ozone (O(3)) triggers physiological changes in leaves that affect carbon source strength leading to decreased carbon allocation below-ground, thus affecting roots and root symbionts. The effects of O(3) depend on the maturity-related physiological state of the plant, therefore adult and young forest trees might react differently. To test the applicability of young beech plants for studying the effects of O(3) on forest trees and forest stands, beech seedlings were planted in containers and exposed for two years in the Kranzberg forest FACOS experiment (Free-Air Canopy O(3) Exposure System, http://www.casiroz.de ) to enhanced ozone concentration regime (ambient [control] and double ambient concentration, not exceeding 150 ppb) under different light conditions (sun and shade). After two growing seasons the biomass of the above- and below-ground parts, beech roots (using WinRhizo programme), anatomical and molecular (ITS-RFLP and sequencing) identification of ectomycorrhizal types and nutrient concentrations were assessed. The mycorrhization of beech seedlings was very low ( CA. 5 % in shade, 10 % in sun-grown plants), no trends were observed in mycorrhization (%) due to ozone treatment. The number of Cenococcum geophilum type of ectomycorrhiza, as an indicator of stress in the forest stands, was not significantly different under different ozone treatments. It was predominantly occurring in sun-exposed plants, while its majority share was replaced by Genea hispidula in shade-grown plants. Different light regimes significantly influenced all parameters except shoot/root ratio and number of ectomycorrhizal types. In the ozone fumigated plants the number of types, number of root tips per length of 1 to 2 mm root diameter, root length density per volume of soil and concentration of Mg were significantly lower than in control plants. Trends to a decrease were found in root, shoot, leaf, and total dry weights, total number of root tips, number of vital

  9. Investigation of process of interception in beech-fir stand on mountain Goch

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ristić Ratko

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Part of the precipitation is intercepted by vegetation before reaching the ground. The portion of intercepted water, which is retained in storage of the vegetal cover and evaporates, is called the interception loss. Interception represents important component of water balance, because of reduction of total rainfall. It decreases potential for forming of surface runoff. Depends on complex of vegetative and climate factors. In humid forested regions about 25% of the annual precipitation may become interception loss. Results of investigation in beech-fir stand on mountain Goch are presented in this paper Investigation was carried out on experimental catchment area Vaona IV (A=0.098 km2, in association Abieti-fagetum, on mountain Goch, in Central Serbia. Standard rain gauges were used to determine total precipitation and throughfalls, during vegetation period (1992-1997. Total interception (Ic depends on total precipitation (Pb, kind of trees, shape and density of the crown, position in the stand and age. Average values of interception (Icsr during vegetation period (1992-1997, amount to Icsr=43.7-53.3% of total precipitation (fir, and Icsr=17.7-22.8% (beech.

  10. Summertime canopy albedo is sensitive to forest thinning

    OpenAIRE

    Otto, J.; Berveiller, D.; F. M. Bréon; Delpierre, N.; Geppert, G.; Granier, A.; Jans, W.W.P.; Knohl, A.; MOORS, E. J.

    2013-01-01

    Despite an emerging body of literature linking canopy albedo to forest management, understanding of the process is still fragmented. We combined a stand-level forest gap model with a canopy radiation transfer model and satellite-derived model parameters to quantify the effects of forest thinning, that is removing trees at a certain time during the forest rotation, on summertime canopy albedo. The effects of different forest species (pine, beech, oak) and four thinning strategies (light to int...

  11. The influence of low intensities of light pollution on bat communities in a semi-natural context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacoeuilhe, Aurelie; Machon, Nathalie; Julien, Jean-François; Le Bocq, Agathe; Kerbiriou, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Anthropogenic light pollution is an increasingly significant issue worldwide. Over the past century, the use of artificial lighting has increased in association with human activity. Artificial lights are suspected to have substantial effects on the ecology of many species, e.g., by producing discontinuities in the territories of nocturnal animals. We analyzed the potential influence of the intensity and type of artificial light on bat activity in a semi-natural landscape in France. We used a species approach, followed by a trait-based approach, to light sensitivity. We also investigated whether the effect of light could be related to foraging traits. We performed acoustic surveys at sites located along a gradient of light intensities to assess the activity of 15 species of bats. We identified 2 functional response groups of species: one group that was light-tolerant and one group that was light-intolerant. Among the species in the latter group that appear to be disadvantaged by lighting conditions, many are rare and threatened in Europe, whereas the species from the former group are better able to thrive in disturbed habitats such as lighted areas and may actually benefit from artificial lighting. Finally, several methods of controlling light pollution are suggested for the conservation of bat communities. Recommendations for light management and the creation of dim-light corridors are proposed; these strategies may play an important role in protecting against the impact of light pollution on nocturnal animals.

  12. Effect of Festuca arundinacea and Festulolium additional sown on the change of stand composition by semi-natural grass stand

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    Jiří Skládanka

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The work was carried aut to study influence of additional sown on the change of herbage composition. The experiment was situated in the Bohemian-Moravian Highland (Czech Republic at an altitude 553 m. a. s. l. The semi-natural grass sward was created Festuca rubra (19.7%, Agrostis capillaris (15.5%, Taraxacum officinale (11.3%, Dactylis glomerata (11.0%, Elytrigia repens (9.4%, Trisetum flavescens (8.6%, Phleum pratense (8.0%, Poa ssp. (7.6% and Trifolium pratense (7.7% species. Additional sown of Festuca arundinacea (35 kg ha – 1 and Festulolium (35 kg ha – 1 was performed in the year 2000. The grass sward was cuted twice for year. First cut was in June and second cut in November. The proportion of Festuca arundinacea was 1.0% in June 2001 and 34.2% in June 2003. The proportion of Festulolium was 1.0% in June 2001 and 20.6% in June 2003. The additional sown species dominated more in November than in June. The proportion of Festuca arundinacea was fourth year for additional sown 73.7% and proportion of Festulolium 48.7%. The additional sown reflected on the change of herbage composition. The herbage composition was most expressive between second and third year.

  13. The influence of low intensities of light pollution on bat communities in a semi-natural context.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aurelie Lacoeuilhe

    Full Text Available Anthropogenic light pollution is an increasingly significant issue worldwide. Over the past century, the use of artificial lighting has increased in association with human activity. Artificial lights are suspected to have substantial effects on the ecology of many species, e.g., by producing discontinuities in the territories of nocturnal animals. We analyzed the potential influence of the intensity and type of artificial light on bat activity in a semi-natural landscape in France. We used a species approach, followed by a trait-based approach, to light sensitivity. We also investigated whether the effect of light could be related to foraging traits. We performed acoustic surveys at sites located along a gradient of light intensities to assess the activity of 15 species of bats. We identified 2 functional response groups of species: one group that was light-tolerant and one group that was light-intolerant. Among the species in the latter group that appear to be disadvantaged by lighting conditions, many are rare and threatened in Europe, whereas the species from the former group are better able to thrive in disturbed habitats such as lighted areas and may actually benefit from artificial lighting. Finally, several methods of controlling light pollution are suggested for the conservation of bat communities. Recommendations for light management and the creation of dim-light corridors are proposed; these strategies may play an important role in protecting against the impact of light pollution on nocturnal animals.

  14. Plant species selection by goats foraging on montane semi-natural grasslands and grazable forestlands in the Italian Alps

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    Gabriele Iussig

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The interest for goats rearing has increased during last decades on the Italian Alps. However, feeding preferences by grazing goats have not undergone detailed investigation in extensive montane grazing systems. Our study aimed to assess plant species selection by integrating vegetation surveys with animal GPS tracking under two contrasting alpine vegetation communities: a semi-natural grassland (SG and a grazable forestland (GF. Goats selected a high array of plant species (56 and 47 species in the SG and GF, respectively, but most of their diet was composed by a few species (ten species accounted for 95% and 91% of the total species intake in the SG and GF, respectively. The selection by goats seemed to be more species-dependent rather than functional group-dependent. Goats appeared to be less selective within a homogeneous herbaceous grassland, because they selected plant species proportionally to their abundance (P=0.05. Conversely, in a heterogeneous and stratified grazable forestland they showed a more pronounced preference for most of the browse species, regardless of species abundance. Plant species selection was positively correlated with species height in both vegetation communities (i.e., implementation of different stocking rates and densities could be an important tool in modifying diet selection, promoting the consumption of particular plant species and thus managing the dynamics of plant communities in alpine environments.

  15. Altered reward processing in pathological computer gamers--ERP-results from a semi-natural gaming-design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duven, Eva C P; Müller, Kai W; Beutel, Manfred E; Wölfling, Klaus

    2015-01-01

    Internet Gaming Disorder has been added as a research diagnosis in section III for the DSM-V. Previous findings from neuroscientific research indicate an enhanced motivational attention toward cues related to computer games, similar to findings in substance-related addictions. On the other hand in clinical observational studies tolerance effects are reported by patients with Internet Gaming disorder. In the present study we investigated whether an enhanced motivational attention or tolerance effects are present in patients with Internet Gaming Disorder. A clinical sample from the Outpatient Clinic for Behavioral Addictions in Mainz, Germany was recruited, fulfilling the diagnostic criteria for Internet Gaming Disorder. In a semi-natural EEG design participants played a computer game during the recording of event-related potentials to assess reward processing. The results indicated an attenuated P300 for patients with Internet Gaming Disorder in response to rewards in comparison to healthy controls, while the latency of N100 was prolonged and the amplitude of N100 was increased. Our findings support the hypothesis that tolerance effects are present in patients with Internet Gaming Disorder, when actively playing computer games. In addition, the initial orienting toward the gaming reward is suggested to consume more capacity for patients with Internet Gaming Disorder, which has been similarly reported by other studies with other methodological background in disorders of substance-related addictions.

  16. Altered reward processing in pathological computer gamers – ERP-results from a semi-natural Gaming-Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duven, Eva C P; Müller, Kai W; Beutel, Manfred E; Wölfling, Klaus

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Internet Gaming Disorder has been added as a research diagnosis in section III for the DSM-V. Previous findings from neuroscientific research indicate an enhanced motivational attention toward cues related to computer games, similar to findings in substance-related addictions. On the other hand in clinical observational studies tolerance effects are reported by patients with Internet Gaming disorder. In the present study we investigated whether an enhanced motivational attention or tolerance effects are present in patients with Internet Gaming Disorder. Methods A clinical sample from the Outpatient Clinic for Behavioral Addictions in Mainz, Germany was recruited, fulfilling the diagnostic criteria for Internet Gaming Disorder. In a semi-natural EEG design participants played a computer game during the recording of event-related potentials to assess reward processing. Results The results indicated an attenuated P300 for patients with Internet Gaming Disorder in response to rewards in comparison to healthy controls, while the latency of N100 was prolonged and the amplitude of N100 was increased. Conclusions Our findings support the hypothesis that tolerance effects are present in patients with Internet Gaming Disorder, when actively playing computer games. In addition, the initial orienting toward the gaming reward is suggested to consume more capacity for patients with Internet Gaming Disorder, which has been similarly reported by other studies with other methodological background in disorders of substance-related addictions. PMID:25722946

  17. Effects of hatchery rearing on Florida largemouth bass Micropterus floridanus resource allocation and performance under semi-natural conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garlock, T M; Monk, C T; Lorenzen, K; Matthews, M D; St Mary, C M

    2014-12-01

    This study examined the growth, activity, metabolism and post-release survival of three groups of Florida largemouth bass Micropterus floridanus: wild-caught fish, hatchery fish reared according to standard practice (hatchery standard) and hatchery fish reared under reduced and unpredictable food provisioning (hatchery manipulated). Hatchery-standard fish differed from wild-caught fish in all measured variables, including survival in semi-natural ponds. Hatchery-standard and hatchery-manipulated fish showed higher activity levels, faster growth and lower standard metabolic rates than wild-caught fish in the hatchery. Fish reared under the manipulated feeding regime showed increased metabolic rates and increased post-release growth, similar to wild-caught fish. Their activity levels and post-release survival, however, remained similar to those of hatchery-standard fish. Activity was negatively correlated with post-release survival and failure of the feed manipulation to reduce activity may have contributed to its failure to improve post-release survival. Activity and post-release survival may be influenced by characteristics of the rearing environment other than the feeding regime, such as stock density or water flow rates. © 2014 The Fisheries Society of the British Isles.

  18. Changes in the invasion level, and impact of alien plants in Finnish semi-natural agricultural habitats

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    Miia Jauni

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Using dataset of 508 transects of 50 m2, we assessed changes in the invasion level of alien plant species in semi-natural agricultural habitats in three study years (2001, 2005 and 2010 in four geographical regions of Finland. In addition, the impact of environmental factors on the occurrence of the most common neophytes (alien species introduced after the 17th century and the impact of neophytes on native species diversity were studied. In total, 37 neophyte species were detected, but neophytes regarded as highly invasive were rare and occasional. We detected spatio-temporal variation in the invasion level, but it changed according to the measure used. For instance, alien species diversity was lower in south-western Finland than in other years in 2005, and the relative alien species richness was highest in southern and lowest in eastern Finland. Preferences for environmental conditions (disturbance, habitat type and geographical location and the impact on plant diversity varied among the most common neophytes. The most common neophytes were positively rather than negatively associated with native and alien species diversity. The results suggest that alien species management and control methods should be species-specific and considered case-by-case. Neophytes do not yet cause severe problems, but regular monitoring is needed to detect changes in their invasion levels.

  19. Predators and predation rates of skylark Alauda arvensis and woodlark Lullula arborea nests in a semi-natural area in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Praus, Libor; Hegemann, Arne; Tieleman, B. Irene; Weidinger, Karel

    2014-01-01

    Predation is a major cause of breeding failure in bird species with open nests. Although many studies have investigated nest predation rates, direct identification of nest predators is sporadic, especially in (semi-)natural habitats. We quantified nest success and identified nest predators in a

  20. Tree biomass and deadwood density into aged holm oak (Sardinia and beech coppices (Tuscany

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    Bertini G

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Current National Forest Inventory highlight the further increase over the last two decades of coppice area under the position of mature standing crop or in the post-cultivation phase, both being developed throughout the original cultivation area. This pattern, mainly due to the unprofitable fuel wood harvesting, also involved holm oak and beech forests, some of the most diffused forest covers in Sardinia, along the Apennines and pre-Alps. The alternative management option to ageing (the pro-active way of coppice conversion into high forest has been also practiced in the public domain, but on much smaller areas as compared with those undergoing post-cultivation phase. Aged coppices located into medium-good site classes showed a positive growth pattern resulting in a high, age-related, wood matter storage. At the meantime, regular mortality occurring since former rotation into the fully-stocked shoot populations, stocked up high deadwood amounts, this becoming an outstanding attribute of these types. Carbon storage is becoming one of the major tasks attributable to these systems within the post-cultivation phase. Purposes are here to: (i estimate living woody and standing + lying deadwood mass densities; (ii determine deadwood/living mass ratio; (iii verify lying deadwood decay class; (iv analyse diversity between two sites aged likewise but different as for geographical location and tree species. A holm oak coppice aged 55 in Sardinia and a beech coppice aged 57 in Tuscany were selected at the purpose. Both stands have been developing the post-cultivation phase since two-three times the traditional rotation and represent the maximum ages in this position. Living and standing dead woody dry mass density were determined in each site by specific allometric functions. Lying deadwood amount was assessed by a sampling design covering systematically the full test area. Three decay classes were determined according to Hunter (modified. The tree species

  1. Effects of ozone-induced stomatal closure on ozone uptake and its changes due to leaf age in sun and shade leaves of Siebold's beech

    OpenAIRE

    Hoshika, Yasutomo; Watanabe, Makoto; Inada, Naoki; Koike, Takayoshi

    2015-01-01

    An estimation of stomatal ozone uptake for the assessment of ozone risks in forest trees can be modified by ozone-induced stomatal closure. We thus examined a seasonal course of stomatal conductance in sun and shade leaves of Siebold's beech native to northern Japan (Fagus crenata) grown under free-air ozone exposure. A performance of multiplicative stomatal conductance model was also tested, when considering ozone-induced stomatal closure into the model. Ozone caused stomatal closure in both...

  2. A unigene set for European beech (Fagus sylvatica L.) and its use to decipher the molecular mechanisms involved in dormancy regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lesur, Isabelle; Bechade, Alison; Lalanne, Céline; Klopp, Christophe; Noirot, Céline; Leplé, Jean-Charles; Kremer, Antoine; Plomion, Christophe; Le Provost, Grégoire

    2015-09-01

    Systematic sequencing is the method of choice for generating genomic resources for molecular marker development and candidate gene identification in nonmodel species. We generated 47,357 Sanger ESTs and 2.2M Roche-454 reads from five cDNA libraries for European beech (Fagus sylvatica L.). This tree species of high ecological and economic value in Europe is among the most representative trees of deciduous broadleaf forests. The sequences generated were assembled into 21,057 contigs with MIRA software. Functional annotations were obtained for 85% of these contigs, from the proteomes of four plant species, Swissprot accessions and the Gene Ontology database. We were able to identify 28,079 in silico SNPs for future marker development. Moreover, RNAseq and qPCR approaches identified genes and gene networks regulated differentially between two critical phenological stages preceding vegetative bud burst (the quiescent and swelling buds stages). According to climatic model-based projection, some European beech populations may be endangered, particularly at the southern and eastern edges of the European distribution range, which are strongly affected by current climate change. This first genomic resource for the genus Fagus should facilitate the identification of key genes for beech adaptation and management strategies for preserving beech adaptability. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE STUDY OF FORESTS VEGETATION FROM THE SUPERIOR MOUNTAIN LEVEL OF HĂŞMAŞUL MARE MASSIF (EASTERN CARPATHIANS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MARDARI CONSTANTIN

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available The ecological conditions specific to the researched territory have favoured installation of a wooden vegetation represented by mountain beech forests, beech and resinous mixed forests and pure spruce-fir forests. Locally, on limited areas and superficial soils, relict pine phytocoenosis have been identified. Two plant communities from Vaccinio – Piceetea Br.-Bl. 1939 and Erico – Pinetea Horv. 1959 classes are presented and analysed in this paper from the bioforms, floristic elements and ecological requests perspectives.

  4. How Biotic Differentiation of Human Impacted Nutrient Poor Deciduous Forests Can Affect the Preservation Status of Mountain Forest Vegetation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomasz Durak

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available A significant loss of biodiversity resulting from human activity has caused biotic homogenisation to become the dominant process shaping forest communities. In this paper, we present a rare case of biotic differentiation in European temperate deciduous forest herb layer vegetation. The process is occurring in nutrient poor oak-hornbeam forests in mountain areas (Polish Eastern Carpathians, Central Europe where non-timber use was converted into conventional forest management practice. This change contributed to increases in the nitrogen content and pH reaction of the soil that, contrary to predominant beliefs on the negative impact of habitat eutrophication on diversity, did not result in a decrease in the latter. We discuss possible reasons for this phenomenon that indicate the important role of tree stand composition (an increasing admixture of beech worsening the trophic properties of the soil. The second issue considered involves the effect of the changes in herb species composition of oak-hornbeam forest on its distinctiveness from the beech forest predominating in the Polish Eastern Carpathians. Unfortunately, despite the increase in the species compositional dissimilarity of oak-hornbeam forest, a reduction in their distinctiveness in relation to the herb species composition of beech forest was found. Such a phenomenon is an effect of the major fragmentation of oak-hornbeam forests, a spread of beech forest-type species, and forest management that gives preference to beech trees. Consequently, it can be expected that changes occurring in oak-hornbeam forest vegetation will contribute to a decrease in the forest vegetation variability at the regional scale.

  5. A preview of Vermont's forest resource

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph E. Barnard; Teresa M. Bowers

    1974-01-01

    Forest land occupies 75 percent of the total land area in Vermont. Nearly one-half of this forest land is the beech-birch-maple forest type. The inventory data show volume increasing but at a lower rate than in neighboring states. This is due to large losses from cull and mortality. Total growing-stock volume is now 4.7 billion cubic feet.

  6. Throughfall deposition and canopy exchange processes along a vertical gradient within the canopy of beech (Fagus sylvatica L.) and Norway spruce (Picea abies (L.) Karst).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adriaenssens, Sandy; Hansen, Karin; Staelens, Jeroen; Wuyts, Karen; De Schrijver, An; Baeten, Lander; Boeckx, Pascal; Samson, Roeland; Verheyen, Kris

    2012-03-15

    To assess the impact of air pollution on forest ecosystems, the canopy is usually considered as a constant single layer in interaction with the atmosphere and incident rain, which could influence the measurement accuracy. In this study the variation of througfall deposition and derived dry deposition and canopy exchange were studied along a vertical gradient in the canopy of one European beech (Fagus sylvatica L.) tree and two Norway spruce (Picea abies (L.) Karst) trees. Throughfall and net throughfall deposition of all ions other than H(+) increased significantly with canopy depth in the middle and lower canopy of the beech tree and in the whole canopy of the spruce trees. Moreover, throughfall and net throughfall of all ions in the spruce canopy decreased with increasing distance to the trunk. Dry deposition occurred mainly in the upper canopy and was highest during the growing season for H(+), NH(4)(+), NO(3)(-) and highest during the dormant season for Na(+), Cl(-), SO(4)(2-) (beech and spruce) and K(+), Ca(2+) and Mg(2+) (spruce only). Canopy leaching of K(+), Ca(2+) and Mg(2+) was observed at all canopy levels and was higher for the beech tree compared to the spruce trees. Canopy uptake of inorganic nitrogen and H(+) occurred mainly in the upper canopy, although significant canopy uptake was found in the middle canopy as well. Canopy exchange was always higher during the growing season compared to the dormant season. This spatial and temporal variation indicates that biogeochemical deposition models would benefit from a multilayer approach for shade-tolerant tree species such as beech and spruce. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Birch management on the White Mountain National Forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elmer G. Kelso

    1969-01-01

    There are 605,000 acres of commercial forest land on the White Mountain National Forest (based on a 1960 timber inventory). Of this, 258,000 acres are classed as northern hardwood timber type. In general, this would include some 27 percent yellow birch, 16 percent sugar maple, and 31 percent beech in trees that are 6 inches and larger.

  8. Experimental Study on Dry Torrefaction of Beech Wood

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gucho, Eyerusalem Merin; Shahzad, K.; Bramer, Eduard A.; Akhtar, N.A.; Brem, Gerrit

    2015-01-01

    Torrefaction is a thermochemical pre-treatment process for upgrading the properties of biomass to resemble those of fossil fuels such as coal. Biomass properties of particular interest are chemical composition, physical property and combustion characteristics. In this work, torrefaction of beech

  9. Status of beech bark disease establishment and research in Michigan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Therese M. Poland; Deborah G. McCullough; Toby R. Petrice; Nathan W. Siegert

    2003-01-01

    Beech bark disease was first discovered in Michigan in spring 2000 in Ludington State Park on the shore of Lake Michigan in the lower peninsula. Soon thereafter it was found in the upper peninsula of Michigan in the Bass Lake campground.

  10. Hot callusing for propagation of American beech by grafting

    Science.gov (United States)

    David W. Carey; Mary E. Mason; Paul Bloese; Jennifer L. Koch

    2013-01-01

    To increase grafting success rate, a hot callus grafting system was designed and implemented as part of a multiagency collaborative project to manage beech bark disease (BBD) through the establishment of regional BBD-resistant grafted seed orchards. Five years of data from over 2000 hot callus graft attempts were analyzed using a logistic regression model to determine...

  11. Present state of beech bark disease in Germany

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klaus J. Lang

    1983-01-01

    Beech bark disease can be found at present time in young and old stands (20-150 years old) of Fagus sylvatica. The present state of the disease may be described as "normal" and apart from some cases, it is no threat to the existence of the stands.

  12. The influence of meteorological variables on CO2and CH4trends recorded at a semi-natural station.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez, Isidro A; Sánchez, M Luisa; García, M Ángeles; Pardo, Nuria; Fernández-Duque, Beatriz

    2018-03-01

    CO 2 and CH 4 evolution is usually linked with sources, sinks and their changes. However, this study highlights the role of meteorological variables. It aims to quantify their contribution to the trend of these greenhouse gases and to determine which contribute most. Six years of measurements at a semi-natural site in northern Spain were considered. Three sections are established: the first focuses on monthly deciles, the second explores the relationship between pairs of meteorological variables, and the third investigates the relationship between meteorological variables and changes in CO 2 and CH 4 . In the first section, monthly outliers were more marked for CO 2 than for CH 4 . The evolution of monthly deciles was fitted to three simple expressions, linear, quadratic and exponential. The linear and exponential are similar, whereas the quadratic evolution is the most flexible since it provided a variable rate of concentration change and a better fit. With this last evolution, a decrease in the change rate was observed for low CO 2 deciles, whereas an increasing change rate prevailed for the rest and was more accentuated for CH 4 . In the second section, meteorological variables were provided by a trajectory model. Backward trajectories from 1-day prior to reaching the measurement site were used to calculate distance and direction averages as well as the recirculation factor. Terciles of these variables were determined in order to establish three intervals with low, medium and high values. These intervals were used to classify the variables following their interval widths and skewnesses. The best correlation between pairs of meteorological variables was observed for the average distance, in particular with horizontal wind speed. Sinusoidal relationships with the average direction were obtained for average distance and for vertical wind speed. Finally, in the third section, the quadratic evolution was considered in each interval of all the meteorological variables

  13. How do plant communities and flower visitors relate? A case study of semi-natural xerothermic grasslands

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    Damian Chmura

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper examines the relationships between the species composition of flower visitors and plants in the semi-natural xerothermic grasslands in southern and central Poland. Thirty 10 × 10 m permanent plots were laid out in total, mainly in nature reserves. The vegetation units studied were classified according to the Braun-Blanquet system; these were phytocoenoses of the Festuco-Brometea classes Inuletum ensifoliae, Adonido-Brachypodietum pinnati and the transitional plant community. Entomological research was performed using the Pollard method within the same plots. A particular site was visited only once and different sites were studied between April and August 2008. We applied, among others, co-correspondence-analysis Co-CA, detrended correspondence analysis (DCA and redundancy analysis (RDA to investigate the co-occurrence patterns of plants and flower visitors and their biotopic requirements. We found that the species composition of flower visitors cannot be predicted by floristic composition when the duration of the study is restricted to one day (but under similar weather conditions; however, there is a positive relationship between the species richness of insects and plants and a positive relationship between the number of plant species and the abundance of flower visitors. The Ellenberg moisture index and the cover of meadow species significantly explained the species composition of insects. The three various vegetation units and five dominant xerothermic species, i.e. Adonis vernalis, Anemone sylvestris, Inula ensifolia, Linum hirsutum and Carlina onopordifolia that were studied across time differed in the species richness of insects. Our results demonstrate that possible patterns in the species composition and the assembly rules of flower visitors are not apparent when the Pollard method is applied. Based on the data obtained using this method, the flower visiting assemblages seem not to be driven by competition and they primarily

  14. Environmental quality of a semi-natural area of the Po Valley (northern Italy): aspects of soil and vegetation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manfredi, Paolo; Giupponi, Luca; Cassinari, Chiara; Trevisan, Marco

    2014-05-01

    This work, originating in the preliminary analyses of a Life project and co-financed by the European Union ("Environmental recovery of degraded soils and desertified by a new treatment technology for land reconstruction", Life 10 ENV IT 400 "New Life"; http://www.lifeplusecosistemi.eu), aims to evaluate the environmental quality of a semi-natural area of the Po Valley (northern Italy) by analysing the characteristics of soil and vegetation. The area of study is located in the municipal territory of Piacenza (Emilia-Romagna, Italy) along the eastern shores of the river Trebbia and is made up of the closed landfill of Solid Urban Waste of Borgotrebbia (active from 1972 to 1985) and of the neighbouring areas (in North-South order: riverside area, northern borders of the landfill, landfill disposal, southern borders and cultivated corn fields). For each area pedological and vegetational analyses were carried out and in particular, as regards the soil, various chemical-physical analyses were done among which: pH, organic carbon, total nitrogen, salinity, exchangeable bases and granulometry. The ground vegetation data were collected using phytosociological relevés according to the method of the Zurich-Montpellier Sigmatist School, (Braun-Blanquet, 1964). For the analysis of the environmental quality of each area, the floristic-vegetation indexes system was applied as proposed by Taffetani & Rismondo (2009) (updated by Rismondo et al., 2011) conveniently created for analysing the ecological functionality of the agro-ecosystems. The results obtained by such applications drew attention to a dynamic vegetation mass in the landfill which, despite a value of the floristic biodiversity index (IFB) comparable to that of the borders, shows a much lower value of the maturity index (IM). This is due to the elevated percentage of annual species (index of the therophytic component = 52.78%) belonging to the phytosociological class Stellarietea mediae Tüxen, Lohmeyer & Preising ex

  15. Effect of a long-term afforestation of pine in a beech domain in NE-Spain revealed by analytical pyrolysis (Py-GC/MS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girona García, Antonio; Badía-Villas, David; Tomás Jiménez-Morillo, Nicasio; Martí-Dalmau, Clara; González-Pérez, José Antonio

    2015-04-01

    The replacement of native beech forests (Fagus sylvatica) by Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris) afforestation may exert changes in soil properties, particularly in soil organic matter (SOM) [1]. It is known that the products generated by Pyrolysis-gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (Py-GC/MS) pyrolysis of organic matter are related to their origin [2 and references therein]. Therefore this technique can be used to investigate said changes. In this work, Py-GC/MS is used to study changes in SOM quality surrogated to the effect of the centennial replacement of beech by Scots pine. The soils studied were two acid soil profiles developed on quartzites under a humid climate at an altitude of 1400-1500 masl from Moncayo (Iberian range, NE-Spain). For each soil profile three organic layers (litter: OL, fragmented litter OF and humified litter OH) and the mineral soil horizons (Ah, E, Bhs and C) were sampled. After 100 years since the pine afforestation, differences in the relative abundance of lipids released by pyrolysis were observed in the O-layers ranging from 3.82-7.20% in pine soils and 0.98-1.25% in beech soils. No differences were observed in mineral horizons with depth except for the C horizons where beech lipid content was much higher (21.25%) than in that under pine (1.07%). Both pine and beech soils show similar nitrogen compounds relative contents along the soil profile, increasing from OL to Ah (3.49-9.11% and 2.75-11.73% in beech and pine respectively) with a conspicuous reduction in the E horizon. It is remarkable the absence of nitrogen compounds in beech Bhs and C horizons. The relative content of aromatic compounds in O-layers show opposite trends for beech and pine; an enrichment in aromatic compounds is observed in beech OL layer (12.39%) decreasing to 4.11% in OH layer in contrast, whereas for pine O-layers the aromatic compounds relative abundance was higher in the OH (5.83%) than in the OL layer (2.8%). Mineral Ah and E horizons show similar values in

  16. Size-dependence of tree growth response to drought for Norway spruce and European beech individuals in monospecific and mixed-species stands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, H; Pretzsch, H; Schütze, G; Rötzer, T

    2017-09-01

    Climate anomalies have resulted in changing forest productivity, increasing tree mortality in Central and Southern Europe. This has resulted in more severe and frequent ecological disturbances to forest stands. This study analysed the size-dependence of growth response to drought years based on 384 tree individuals of Norway spruce [Picea abies (L.) Karst.] and European beech [Fagus sylvatica ([L.)] in Bavaria, Germany. Samples were collected in both monospecific and mixed-species stands. To quantify the growth response to drought stress, indices for basal area increment, resistance, recovery and resilience were calculated from tree ring measurements of increment cores. Linear mixed models were developed to estimate the influence of drought periods. The results show that ageing-related growth decline is significant in drought years. Drought resilience and resistance decrease significantly with growth size among Norway spruce individuals. Evidence is also provided for robustness in the resilience capacity of European beech during drought stress. Spruce benefits from species mixing with deciduous beech, with over-yielding spruce in pure stands. The importance of the influence of size-dependence within tree growth studies during disturbances is highlighted and should be considered in future studies of disturbances, including drought. © 2017 German Botanical Society and The Royal Botanical Society of the Netherlands.

  17. Modelling Forest Water Consumption in The Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dolman, A.J.; Nonhebel, S.

    1988-01-01

    The water consumption of oak, beech, spruce and pine forest is predicted from routinely measured meteorological data for five locations in the Netherlands. Differences in water consumption are found to be primarily a result of differences in interception loss. Predicted interception loss was found

  18. Fate of recently fixed carbon in European beech (Fagus sylvatica) saplings during drought and subsequent recovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zang, Ulrich; Goisser, Michael; Grams, Thorsten E E; Häberle, Karl-Heinz; Matyssek, Rainer; Matzner, Egbert; Borken, Werner

    2014-01-01

    Drought reduces the carbon (C) assimilation of trees and decouples aboveground from belowground carbon fluxes, but little is known about the response of drought-stressed trees to rewetting. This study aims to assess dynamics and patterns of C allocation in beech saplings under dry and rewetted soil conditions. In October 2010, 5-year-old beech saplings from a forest site were transplanted into 20 l pots. In 2011, the saplings were subjected to different levels of soil drought ranging from non-limiting water supply (control) to severe water limitation with soil water potentials of less than -1.5 MPa. As a physiologically relevant measure of drought, the cumulated soil water potential (i.e., drought stress dose (DSD)) was calculated for the growing season. In late August, the saplings were transferred into a climate chamber and pulse-labeled with (13)C-depleted CO2 (δ(13)C of -47‰). Isotopic signatures in leaf and soil respiration were repeatedly measured. Five days after soil rewetting, a second label was applied using 99 atom% (13)CO2. After another 12 days, the fate of assimilated C in each sapling was assessed by calculating the (13)C mass balance. Photosynthesis decreased by 60% in saplings under severe drought. The mean residence time (MRT) of recent assimilates in leaf respiration was more than three times longer than under non-limited conditions and was positively correlated to DSD. Also, the appearance of the label in soil respiration was delayed. Within 5 days after rewetting, photosynthesis, MRT of recent assimilates in leaf respiration and appearance of the label in soil respiration recovered fully. Despite the fast recovery, less label was recovered in the biomass of the previously drought-stressed plants, which also allocated less C to the root compartment (45 vs 64% in the control). We conclude that beech saplings quickly recover from extreme soil drought, although transitional after-effects prevail in C allocation, possibly due to repair

  19. Biomass and nutrient content of sessile oak (Quercus petraea (Matt.) Liebl.) and beech (Fagus sylvatica L.) stem and branches in a mixed stand in southern Belgium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    André, Frédéric; Jonard, Mathieu; Ponette, Quentin

    2010-05-01

    Accurate estimates of the amounts of nutrients immobilised in the organs and tissues of different tree species are of prime importance to make appropriate tree species selection and determine the harvesting regime that will ensure forest sustainability. Sixteen sessile oaks (Quercus petraea (Matt.) Liebl.) (64-129years; stem diameters: 17-57cm) and twelve beeches (Fagus sylvatica L.) (43-86years; stem diameters: 9-50cm) were destructively sampled from a mixed stand located on an acid brown soil in southern Belgium. Statistical models were developed to investigate the differences in nutrient concentrations between tree species, between aboveground tree compartments of the same species, and between tissues of the same compartment. For stem tissues, vertical concentration profiles were described using a versatile equation. Allometric equations were used to predict biomass and nutrient content of tree compartments based on tree dimensions. Broadly speaking, nutrient concentrations tended to be somewhat higher for oak compared with beech, but the amplitude and the direction of inter-species differences varied greatly, depending on the nutrient and the tree compartment. For both species, living branch nutrient concentrations tended to decrease with increasing branch diameter, except for Ca (oak) and Mg (beech). Nutrient concentrations were consistently higher in bark than in wood; this difference between tissues was quite pronounced for Ca, particularly in the case of oak. The biomass and nutrient content equations were used to investigate the effects of tree species and harvesting regime on nutrient exports at harvesting. For equivalent harvesting scenarios, beech was found to induce higher Mg exports than oak, and inversely for Ca. Assuming stand clear cutting, complete tree harvesting would increase average nutrient exports from 65% (Ca) to 162% (P) compared with a stem-only harvesting scenario. These results provide valuable information in the current context of the

  20. Chemical Elements in Mulch and Litterfall of Beech Ecosystems and Their Total Turnover

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariyana I. Lyubenovа

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available The beech communities on the territory of Bulgaria had been objects of regional, local as well as large scale national investigations aiming their classification, determination of their ecological characteristics, conservation status, habitats etc. They are included as objects of the intensive monitoring of forest ecosystems in Bulgaria also. The investigations of chemical content of the litter – fall in these forests were conducted until now. The novelty of the present research is investigation of these elements in the mulch and the ratio between the established quantities calculation. The main goal is the biological turnover special features characterization of the investigated elements which give us a chance to define the investigated ecosystems state and functioning. The indexes as litter – mulch and acropetal coefficients were used for this aim. The content of macroelements as N, Ca and K and microelements as Pb, Zn, Mn and Fe in soils, mulch and in different litter fall fractions have been calculated. The investigation was carried out on three sample plots. During the investigation was established that the soils are characterized with acid reaction, high content of Fe, N and Mn and low content of Ca and K. The concentration of Zn and Pb are high also. The calculated average store of investigated elements in litter – fall is 81.312 kg.ha1 and in the mulch 314 kg.ha1. According to the acropetal coefficient N is accumulated mainly in the acorns, K – in the annual phytomass fractions and Ca – in the perennial fractions. The leaves and the acorns fraction accumulate Mn, and cupolas Fe. The litter – mulch coefficient vary from 1,6 (Mn to 4,2 (Pb. The tendencies of Zn and Ca turnovers acceleration are discovered, while the turnover of more investigated elements is inhibited. The litter – mulch coefficient for Zn and Ca is 0,8 and 1,4 accordingly, i.е. corresponding to the intensive type of turnovers which is not typical for the

  1. THE QUALITY OF THE SURFACE AT THE BEECH WOODTURNING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirela CHERCIU

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available There have been experiments made with outside cylindrical beech woodturning with low cutting speed, and feed successively changed. We study, qualitative rather than quantitative, the roughnesss of the surface achieved. It interprets the appearance of each surface based on the theory of cutting considerations. Resulted surface images are given, photographed with a camera and microscope. It appears that here are no propellers generated by the cutting tool nose on the cylindrical part, excepting the situation of using high feeds.

  2. Monitoring of Vegetative Phenological Stages in European Beech (Fagus sylvatica L. Growing in a Mixed Stand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristýna Slovíková

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents results of monitoring of beech (Fagus sylvatica L. vegetative phenophases within the period of years 2005–2010 as related to results of evaluation involving data collected since 1991. This phenological study was performed in a young mixed forest stand situated in the Drahanská vrchovina uplands in the altitude of 625 m.a.s.l. Beginnings and duration of individual phenophases differed in dependence on the course of weather conditions in individual years of study. The highest variability was observed in the stage of budbreak. The obtained results indicate that the onset of spring phenophases was dependent on temperatures existing already in early spring and to the end of winter period. The statistical analysis proved a high correlation existing between the onset of spring phenophases on the one hand and soil and air temperatures on the other. Temperature requirements as defined for the beginnings of individual phenophases were evaluated on the base of cumulative sums of temperatures higher than 0 °C. The obtained results indicate that, as compared with results of long-term monitoring, the period of the duration of spring phenophases had been gradually shortened. On the other side, however, the duration of autumn phenophases was extended and they ended in the late autumn. Repeated extensions of the growing season to the detriment of winter dormancy might show a negative effect on the health condition of forest stands.

  3. Mixed-Species Effects on Soil C and N Stocks, C/N Ratio and pH Using a Transboundary Approach in Adjacent Common Garden Douglas-Fir and Beech Stands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seid Muhie Dawud

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Mixed forest of Douglas-fir and beech has been suggested as one of the possible future forest types in Northwest Europe but the effects of this mixed forest on soil properties relative to monoculture stands are unknown. In a transboundary investigation of adjacent common garden Douglas-fir and beech stands, we determined the effects on topsoil properties. However, responses of C and N stocks, the C/N ratio and pH were site- and soil layer-specific and were mainly single-sided and without synergistic effects. Beech reduced the soil C and N stocks in Douglas-fir at the nutrient-poor site, caused an increase in the C/N ratio in the forest floor and mineral soil at both nutrient-poor and -rich sites, and reduced the acidifying effect of Douglas-fir at the nutrient-poor site. These results do not support the hypothesis that mixture effects would be consistent across sites and soil layers. The lack of synergistic effects may be attributed to the relatively similar litter quality or rooting depth that prevented any larger niche differentiation and complementarity. The results indicate that the transboundary approach within a mature common garden proved useful as a platform to test tree species interactions, and this approach could be explored in soil studies until dedicated mixed-species common gardens reach maturity.

  4. Immission-load-related dynamics of S-SO42− in precipitation and in lysimetric solutions penetrating through beech ecosystems

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    Kukla Ján

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the results of a 23-year study of sulphate sulphur dynamics in beech ecosystems exposed to different immission loads. The amounts of S-SO42− in precipitation water entering the ecosystems were: the Kremnické vrchy Mts, a clear-cut area 519 kg ha−1 (24.7 kg ha−1 per year, a beech forest 476 kg ha−1 (22.7 kg ha−1 per year; the Štiavnické vrchy Mts an open place 401 kg ha−1 (24.6 kg ha−1 per year, a beech forest 324 kg ha−1 (19.1 kg ha−1 per year. The average SO42− concentrations in lysimetric solutions penetrating through surface humus to a depth of Cambisol 10 and 25 cm were increased as follows: in the Kremnické vrchy Mts from 12.71 to 16.17 mg l−1 and in the Štiavnické vrchy Mts from 18.73 to 28.80 mg l−1. The S-SO4−2 amounts penetrating the individual soil layers in the Kremnické vrchy Mts were as follows: in case of surface humus on clear-cut area 459 kg ha−1 (20.9 kg ha−1 per year, in beech forest 433 kg ha−1 (19.7 kg ha−1 per year; below 10 cm organo-mineral layer of the mentioned plots penetrated 169–171 kg ha−1 (7.7–7.8 kg ha−1 per year, and below 25 cm mineral layer 155–255 kg ha−1 (7.1−11.6 kg ha−1 per year – a higher amount was found on clear-cut area with an episodic lateral flow of soil solutions. In beech forest of the Štiavnické vrchy Mts penetrated below surface humus 424 kg ha−1 S-SO42− (18.9 kg ha−1 per year, below 10 cm mineral layer 458 kg ha−1 S-SO42− (19.9 kg ha−1 per year, and below 25 cm mineral layer as much as 599 kg ha−1 S-SO42− (26.0 kg ha−1 per year. This fact was caused by frequent lateral flow of soil solutions. The results indicate that the assumption about lower immission load of the beech ecosystem in the Kremnické vrchy Mts is wrong, at least in the case of S-SO42−. The testing has revealed that the studied beech ecosystems differ very significantly in sulphur amounts penetrating under 0.10 m and 0.25 m. The

  5. Effect of stand edge on the natural regeneration of spruce, beech and Douglas-fir

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lumír Dobrovolný

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Our work aimed at studying the strategy of woody plants regeneration during the regeneration of a spruce stand with the admixture of beech and Douglas-fir by border cutting (NW-SE aspect on acidic sites of higher elevations in the Bohemian-Moravian Upland. Spruce is better adapted to bear shade than Douglas-fir. Nevertheless, in optimal light conditions up to a distance of ca. 35 m (about 16% DIFFSF from the stand edge, the Douglas-fir can put the spruce into danger as to height growth. By contrast to beech, the density of spruce is significantly higher within the distance of 45 m (about 15% DIFFSF from the stand edge but further on the situation would change to the benefit of beech. The density of Douglas-fir significantly dominates over beech within a distance of 35 m from the stand edge; from 55 m (less than 15% DIFFSF, the situation changes in favour of beech. Beech can survive in full shade deep in the stand core waiting for its opportunity to come. As compared to spruce and Douglas-fir, the height growth of beech was at all times significantly greater at a distance of 25 m from the stand edge. Converted to practical conditions, spruce and Douglas-fir with individually admixed beech seedlings showed good prosperity approximately up to a distance of one stand height from the edge. A mixture of spruce and beech did well at a greater distance but good prosperity at a distance of 2–3 stand heights was shown only by beech. Thus, border regeneration eliminates disadvantages of the climatic extremes of clear-cutting and specifics of shelterwood felling during which one – usually shade-tolerant tree species dominates in the natural regeneration (e.g. beech.

  6. Forest Conservation Opportunity Areas - Conservative Model (ECO_RES.COA_FORREST66)

    Science.gov (United States)

    This layer designates areas with potential for forest conservation. These are areas of natural or semi-natural forest land cover patches that area at least 395 meters away from roads and away from patch edges. OAs were modeled by creating distance grids using the National Land Cover Database and the Census Bureau's TIGER road files.

  7. Forest Conservation Opportunity Areas - Liberal Model (ECO_RES.COA_FORREST33)

    Science.gov (United States)

    This layer designates areas with potential for forest conservation. These are areas of natural or semi-natural forest land cover patches that are at least 75 meters away from roads and away from patch edges. OAs were modeled by creating distance grids using the National Land Cover Database and the Census Bureau's TIGER roads files.

  8. European perspective on the developments of planted forests, including projections to 2065

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nabuurs, G.J.; Schelhaas, M.; Orazio, C.; Hengeveld, G.M.; Tome, N.; Farrell, E.P.

    2014-01-01

    Background: The 27 countries in the European Union have a combined total of 177 million ha of forested and other wooded land. These are mainly characterised as semi-natural, multi-functional forests. Only about 13 million ha are characterised as plantationsi, although an additional 47 million ha are

  9. Modelling individual tree height to crown base of Norway spruce (Picea abies (L.) Karst.) and European beech (Fagus sylvatica L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Ram P; Vacek, Zdeněk; Vacek, Stanislav; Podrázský, Vilém; Jansa, Václav

    2017-01-01

    Height to crown base (HCB) of a tree is an important variable often included as a predictor in various forest models that serve as the fundamental tools for decision-making in forestry. We developed spatially explicit and spatially inexplicit mixed-effects HCB models using measurements from a total 19,404 trees of Norway spruce (Picea abies (L.) Karst.) and European beech (Fagus sylvatica L.) on the permanent sample plots that are located across the Czech Republic. Variables describing site quality, stand density or competition, and species mixing effects were included into the HCB model with use of dominant height (HDOM), basal area of trees larger in diameters than a subject tree (BAL- spatially inexplicit measure) or Hegyi's competition index (HCI-spatially explicit measure), and basal area proportion of a species of interest (BAPOR), respectively. The parameters describing sample plot-level random effects were included into the HCB model by applying the mixed-effects modelling approach. Among several functional forms evaluated, the logistic function was found most suited to our data. The HCB model for Norway spruce was tested against the data originated from different inventory designs, but model for European beech was tested using partitioned dataset (a part of the main dataset). The variance heteroscedasticity in the residuals was substantially reduced through inclusion of a power variance function into the HCB model. The results showed that spatially explicit model described significantly a larger part of the HCB variations [R2adj = 0.86 (spruce), 0.85 (beech)] than its spatially inexplicit counterpart [R2adj = 0.84 (spruce), 0.83 (beech)]. The HCB increased with increasing competitive interactions described by tree-centered competition measure: BAL or HCI, and species mixing effects described by BAPOR. A test of the mixed-effects HCB model with the random effects estimated using at least four trees per sample plot in the validation data confirmed that the

  10. Modelling individual tree height to crown base of Norway spruce (Picea abies (L. Karst. and European beech (Fagus sylvatica L..

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ram P Sharma

    Full Text Available Height to crown base (HCB of a tree is an important variable often included as a predictor in various forest models that serve as the fundamental tools for decision-making in forestry. We developed spatially explicit and spatially inexplicit mixed-effects HCB models using measurements from a total 19,404 trees of Norway spruce (Picea abies (L. Karst. and European beech (Fagus sylvatica L. on the permanent sample plots that are located across the Czech Republic. Variables describing site quality, stand density or competition, and species mixing effects were included into the HCB model with use of dominant height (HDOM, basal area of trees larger in diameters than a subject tree (BAL- spatially inexplicit measure or Hegyi's competition index (HCI-spatially explicit measure, and basal area proportion of a species of interest (BAPOR, respectively. The parameters describing sample plot-level random effects were included into the HCB model by applying the mixed-effects modelling approach. Among several functional forms evaluated, the logistic function was found most suited to our data. The HCB model for Norway spruce was tested against the data originated from different inventory designs, but model for European beech was tested using partitioned dataset (a part of the main dataset. The variance heteroscedasticity in the residuals was substantially reduced through inclusion of a power variance function into the HCB model. The results showed that spatially explicit model described significantly a larger part of the HCB variations [R2adj = 0.86 (spruce, 0.85 (beech] than its spatially inexplicit counterpart [R2adj = 0.84 (spruce, 0.83 (beech]. The HCB increased with increasing competitive interactions described by tree-centered competition measure: BAL or HCI, and species mixing effects described by BAPOR. A test of the mixed-effects HCB model with the random effects estimated using at least four trees per sample plot in the validation data confirmed

  11. Tree species richness as the element of structure and diversity in mixed stands of beech and valuable broadleaves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stajić Branko

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In our forest science and forest operations, the tree species richness and diversity of woody species in forest stands are most often evaluated based on the total number of tree species, which is a methodologically partly inadequate approach. For this reason, the quantification and the evaluation of diversity of woody species in mixed forests of beech with valuable broadleaves in the area of the National Park „Đerdap” were analyzed by five different indices of tree species richness: number of species (S index, two indices of the species richness (R1 and R2, expected number of species in the sample with equal numbers of trees (E(S84, and expected number of species in the sample with equal areas (E(S0,25ha. The results showed that the level of woody species diversity in forest stands depended on the applied index characterizing the tree species richness. It was concluded that the tree species richness and diversity were the highest in the stands of ecological unit B (E(S84=8.6 species and in the stands of ecological unit G (E(S0,25ha=9.4 species, and they were the lowest in the stands of ecological unit V (E(S84=5.8 species, E(S0,25ha=5.5 species.

  12. How closely does stem growth of adult beech (Fagus sylvatica) relate to net carbon gain under experimentally enhanced ozone stress?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitao, Mitsutoshi; Winkler, J Barbro; Löw, Markus; Nunn, Angela J; Kuptz, Daniel; Häberle, Karl-Heinz; Reiter, Ilja M; Matyssek, Rainer

    2012-07-01

    The hypothesis was tested that O(3)-induced changes in leaf-level photosynthetic parameters have the capacity of limiting the seasonal photosynthetic carbon gain of adult beech trees. To this end, canopy-level photosynthetic carbon gain and respiratory carbon loss were assessed in European beech (Fagus sylvatica) by using a physiologically based model, integrating environmental and photosynthetic parameters. The latter were derived from leaves at various canopy positions under the ambient O(3) regime, as prevailing at the forest site (control), or under an experimental twice-ambient O(3) regime (elevated O(3)), as released through a free-air canopy O(3) fumigation system. Gross carbon gain at the canopy-level declined by 1.7%, while respiratory carbon loss increased by 4.6% under elevated O(3). As this outcome only partly accounts for the decline in stem growth, O(3)-induced changes in allocation are referred to and discussed as crucial in quantitatively linking carbon gain with stem growth. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Use of sap flow measurements to validate stomatal functions for mature beech (Fagus sylvatica) in view of ozone uptake calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braun, Sabine, E-mail: sabine.braun@iap.c [Institute for Applied Plant Biology, Sangrubenstrasse 25, CH-4124 Schoenenbuch (Switzerland); Schindler, Christian [Swiss Tropical and Public Health Institute, University of Basel, Socinstrasse 57, CH-4051 Basel (Switzerland); Leuzinger, Sebastian [Forest Ecology, Institute of Terrestrial Ecosystems, ETH Zurich, Universitaetsstr. 16, 8092 Zuerich (Switzerland)

    2010-09-15

    For a quantitative estimate of the ozone effect on vegetation reliable models for ozone uptake through the stomata are needed. Because of the analogy of ozone uptake and transpiration it is possible to utilize measurements of water loss such as sap flow for quantification of ozone uptake. This technique was applied in three beech (Fagus sylvatica) stands in Switzerland. A canopy conductance was calculated from sap flow velocity and normalized to values between 0 and 1. It represents mainly stomatal conductance as the boundary layer resistance in forests is usually small. Based on this relative conductance, stomatal functions to describe the dependence on light, temperature, vapour pressure deficit and soil moisture were derived using multivariate nonlinear regression. These functions were validated by comparison with conductance values directly estimated from sap flow. The results corroborate the current flux parameterization for beech used in the DO{sub 3}SE model. - A method was developed to derive stomatal functions and ozone uptake calculation from sap flow.

  14. Phenotypic Plasticity Explains Response Patterns of European Beech (Fagus sylvatica L. Saplings to Nitrogen Fertilization and Drought Events

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christoph Dziedek

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: Climate and atmospheric changes affect forest ecosystems worldwide, but little is known about the interactive effects of global change drivers on tree growth. In the present study, we analyzed single and combined effects of nitrogen (N fertilization and drought events (D on the growth of European beech (Fagus sylvatica L. saplings in a greenhouse experiment. We quantified morphological and physiological responses to treatments for one‐ and two‐year‐old plants. N fertilization increased the saplings’ aboveground biomass investments, making them more susceptible to D treatments. This was reflected by the highest tissue dieback in combined N and D treatments and a significant N × D interaction for leaf δ13C signatures. Thus, atmospheric N deposition can strengthen the drought sensitivity of beech saplings. One‐year‐old plants reacted more sensitively to D treatments than two‐year‐old plants (indicated by D‐induced shifts in leaf δ13C signatures of one‐year‐old and two‐year‐old plants by +0.5‰ and −0.2‰, respectively, attributable to their higher shoot:root‐ratios (1.8 and 1.2, respectively. In summary, the saplings’ treatment responses were determined by their phenotypic plasticity (shifts in shoot:root‐ratios, which in turn was a function of both the saplings’ age (effects of allometric growth trajectories = apparent plasticity and environmental impacts (effects of N fertilization = plastic allometry.

  15. Comparison of pollen gene flow among four European beech (Fagus sylvatica L.) populations characterized by different management regimes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piotti, A; Leonardi, S; Buiteveld, J; Geburek, T; Gerber, S; Kramer, K; Vettori, C; Vendramin, G G

    2012-03-01

    The study of the dispersal capability of a species can provide essential information for the management and conservation of its genetic variability. Comparison of gene flow rates among populations characterized by different management and evolutionary histories allows one to decipher the role of factors such as isolation and tree density on gene movements. We used two paternity analysis approaches and different strategies to handle the possible presence of genotyping errors to obtain robust estimates of pollen flow in four European beech (Fagus sylvatica L.) populations from Austria and France. In each country one of the two plots is located in an unmanaged forest; the other plots are managed with a shelterwood system and inside a colonization area (in Austria and France, respectively). The two paternity analysis approaches provided almost identical estimates of gene flow. In general, we found high pollen immigration (~75% of pollen from outside), with the exception of the plot from a highly isolated forest remnant (~50%). In the two unmanaged plots, the average within-population pollen dispersal distances (from 80 to 184 m) were higher than previously estimated for beech. From the comparison between the Austrian managed and unmanaged plots, that are only 500 m apart, we found no evidence that either gene flow or reproductive success distributions were significantly altered by forest management. The investigated phenotypic traits (crown area, height, diameter and flowering phenology) were not significantly related with male reproductive success. Shelterwood seems to have an effect on the distribution of within-population pollen dispersal distances. In the managed plot, pollen dispersal distances were shorter, possibly because adult tree density is three-fold (163 versus 57 trees per hectare) with respect to the unmanaged one.

  16. Climate Change Adaptation in the Carpathian Mountain Region

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Werners, Saskia Elisabeth; Szalai, Sándor; Zingstra, Henk; Kőpataki, Éva; Beckmann, Andreas; Bos, Ernst; Civic, Kristijan; Hlásny, Tomas; Hulea, Orieta; Jurek, Matthias; Koch, Hagen; Kondor, Attila Csaba; Kovbasko, Aleksandra; Lakatos, M.; Lambert, Stijn; Peters, Richard; Trombik, Jiří; De Velde, Van Ilse; Zsuffa, István

    2016-01-01

    The Carpathian mountain region is one of the most significant natural refuges on the European continent. It is home to Europe’s most extensive tracts of montane forest, the largest remaining virgin forest and natural mountain beech-fir forest ecosystems. Adding to the biodiversity are semi-natural

  17. Beech bark necrosis: partitioning the environmental and spatial variation of the damage severity in Central and South-Eastern Europe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamín Jarčuška

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The beech bark necrosis (BBN infestation severity of Europeanbeech (Fagus sylvatica L. was assessed in regions of Central (CE andSouth-Eastern Europe (SE. Altogether more than 10,000 trees were sampled at 114 sites. Using variation partitioning method, we examined the pure and shared effects of stand, site, climate and spatial sets of variables on mean BBN severity. Our rating included (i the whole stand, (ii tree social status classes, (iii canopy (C and (iv understory (U trees separately. We found that C trees were less affected by BBN than sub-canopy and U trees in both regions. There were found inter-regional differences in amount of explained variability (25.4–73.9% for whole stand BBN and in the sensitivity of C and U trees to the environmental gradients. The analysisrevealed that the climate and spatial variables followed by stand variables had the largest marginal effects on mean BBN severity in all models, while the site set of variables had the weakest one. More than half of the explained variation was shared among four sets of variables in SE, contrary to CE. Except to U trees in SE, the effect of climate – pure or spatially structured – remained the highest also after partitioning of variance; more in SE than in CE. Taking into account positive association between mean annual temperature and mean BBN severity in C trees in SE, reinforced negative effect of climate change on the necrosis might be expected to be more seriousmainly in low situated beech forests there. Promoting the tree speciesdiversity in forested areas with higher incidence of beech bark necrosis, i.e. in low altitudes in SE, could reduce the susceptibility of forests to the necrosis at regional level in the future. For better understanding of the relative importance of environmental and spatial variables on BBN severity, further research performed on finer spatial scale (extent and grain is necessary, along with accounting for pathogens involved in the

  18. Declining atmospheric deposition of heavy metals over the last three decades is reflected in soil and foliage of 97 beech (Fagus sylvatica) stands in the Vienna Woods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Türtscher, Selina; Berger, Pétra; Lindebner, Leopold; Berger, Torsten W

    2017-11-01

    Rigorous studies on long-term changes of heavy metal distribution in forest soils since the implementation of emission controls are rare. Hence, we resampled 97 old-growth beech stands in the Vienna Woods. This study exploits an extensive data set of soil (infiltration zone of stemflow and between trees area) and foliar chemistry from three decades ago. It was hypothesized that declining deposition of heavy metals is reflected in soil and foliar total contents of Pb, Cu, Zn, Ni, Mn and Fe. Mean soil contents of Pb in the stemflow area declined at the highest rate from 223 to 50 mg kg-1 within the last three decades. Soil contents of Pb and Ni decreased significantly both in the stemflow area and the between trees area down to 80-90 cm soil depth from 1984 to 2012. Top soil (0-5 cm) accumulation and simultaneous loss in the lower soil over time for the plant micro nutrients Cu and Zn are suggested to be caused by plant uptake from deep horizons. Reduced soil leaching, due to a mean soil pH (H2O) increase from 4.3 to 4.9, and increased plant cycling are put forward to explain the significant increase of total Mn contents in the infiltration zone of beech stemflow. Top soil Pb contents in the stemflow area presently exceed the critical value at which toxicity symptoms may occur at numerous sites. Mean foliar contents of all six studied heavy metals decreased within the last three decades, but plant supply with the micro nutrients Cu, Zn, Mn and Fe is still in the optimum range for beech trees. It is concluded that heavy metal pollution is not critical for the studied beech stands any longer. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  19. Overview on the pest status and research plans on beech bark disease: A new exotic in Michigan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Therese M. Poland; Deborah G. McCullough; Toby R. Petrice; Nathan W. Siegert

    2001-01-01

    Beech bark disease was first discovered in Michigan in spring 2000 in Ludington State Park and soon thereafter it was found in the upper peninsula in the bass Lake campground. since then, surveyshave found it in six counties in Michigan. Beech bark disease involves two exotic organisms: the beech bark scale (Cryptococcus fagisuga Lind.; Eriococcidae...

  20. Great Tit Parus major survival, and the beech-crop cycle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Perdeck, A.C.; Visser, M.E.; Van Balen, J.H.

    2000-01-01

    The single most important environmental variable correlating with annual survival of both juvenile and adult Great Tits Parus major is the beech crop index (BCI). This index is a measure for the amount of seeds of beeches present in the winter, and correlates with crop size of several other tree

  1. Evaluation of the Antioxidant capacities and Total Phenolic Contents of beech and oak Barks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Fazli

    2013-05-01

    Background & aim: Anti-oxidant compounds prevent prevalence of chronic diseases and food spoiling. The aim of this study was to evaluate the total phenolic and flavonoid content and antioxidant activity of beech and oak barks. Methods: In this experimental study, the skin of beech and oak trees were prepared and then acetone extraction was obtained using Soxhle method. At the beginning, total phenol and flavonoid of extracts were determined and the anti-oxidant properties of the extracts were then evaluated by three methods (methods Biphenyl Pykryl Hydrosol, regenerative power produced- and nitric oxide. Results: The amount of phenolic was higher in bark of beech trees, but flavonoids were higher in oaks. The result of test to trap free radicals of Biphenyl Pykryl Hydrazyl showed the inhibitory concentration 50% of acetone extract of the bark of beech and oak, were 92.19 and 33.7 mg/L respectively. Beech extracts had greater regenerative power than oak. In Nitric oxide trap test acetone extract inhibited 50% in bark of beech trees was 98/23 and the oak extract was 92/90 mg/L respectively. Conclusion: Acetone extract of the bark in three models showed varying degrees of anti - oxidant activity. Beech extract had better antioxidant activity compared with oak extract. Key words: Anti-oxidant Activity, Phenols, Flavonoids, Beech, Oak

  2. Aggressiveness of Phytophthora cactorum and Phytophthora citricola isolates on European Beech and Lilac

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoculation experiments were conducted to compare the aggressiveness of Phytophthora cactorum and P. citricola isolates on European beech and lilac seedlings grown in a greenhouse. The isolates were obtained from bleeding cankers on European beech from five cities (Albany, Ithaca, Oyster Bay, P...

  3. Aggressiveness of Phytophthora cactorum, P. citricola I, and P. plurivora from European Beech

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phytophthora cactorum and P. citricola cause bleeding cankers on European beech trees in the northeastern United States. Inoculation experiments were conducted to compare the aggressiveness of P. cactorum and P. citricola isolates on stems, leaf disks, and roots of European beech and common lilac s...

  4. Size-structure dynamics of mixed versus pure forest stands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hans Pretzsch

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Mixed species forests are presently on the advance and widely held to provide many ecosystem functions and services better than pure stands. Recent studies well explored species mixing effects at the individual tree or stand level. However, the link between individual and stand level which is represented by the size-structure dynamics of stands, is still hardly understood.Aim of this study: The objective was to analyse how species mixing modifies the size-structure dynamics of mixed compared with pure forest stands. Area of the study: the study was carried out in Southern Germany.Material and Methods: We selected 11long-term experiments comprising 129 plots of un-thinned or just lightly thinned pure and mixed stands of European beech (Fagus sylvatica [ L.] and analysed their size structure dynamics.Main Results: Based on the Gini coefficient, skewness and kurtosis we show how mixing with Norway spruce (Picea abies [L.] Karst and sessile oak (Quercus petraea (Matt. Liebl. modifies the size-structure dynamics of European beech. The size distribution of beech in mixture mostly lags behind the pure stand, is more size-asymmetric, and the mortality shifts from the smaller diameter classes further to the taller trees than in pure stands.Research highlights: The revealed changes of the size-structure dynamics of beech in mixed versus pure stands result from a modification of both growth partitioning and self-thinning. We draw conclusions of the reduced size growth and size equality of beech in mixed versus pure stands for forest management planning and perspectives for forest research.Keywords: species selection effect; true mixing effect; morphological plasticity; size-distribution; growth partitioning between trees; mode of mortality; European beech (Fagus sylvatica [L.]; Norway spruce (Picea abies [L.] Karst; sessile oak (Quercus petraea (Matt. Liebl..

  5. Modelling and economic evaluation of forest biome shifts under climate change in Southwest Germany

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marc Hanewinkel; Susan Hummel; Dominik. Cullmann

    2010-01-01

    We evaluated the economic effects of a predicted shift from Norway spruce (Picea abies) to European beech (Fagus sylvatica) for a forest area of 1.3 million ha in southwest Germany. The shift was modelled with a generalized linear model (GLM) by using presence/absence data from the National Forest Inventory in Baden-Wurttemberg...

  6. Water Balance and Forest Productivity in Mediterranean Mountain Environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppe Scarascia-Mugnozza

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The availability of water resources is one of the major drivers affecting forest and agricultural productivity. The sensitivity of Mediterranean forest species to water shortage is becoming even more relevant in relation to climate changes, that for Southern Europe could lead to an increase in temperature of 2 to 3 °C, paralleled by a decrease of 5 to 15% of summer rainfall. It is then important to study the relationship between water balance and productivity of important forest tree species such as beech and mountain pines that represent the upper limit of forest vegetation in almost all the Apennines range. In the present paper, the measurements of water balance, evapotranspiration, carbon exchange and productivity in beech and pine forests of central-southern Italy (Abruzzo and Calabria regions are reported. The results are obtained in the course of several years of experimentation with innovative techniques and integrated at the canopy level.

  7. Bioecological principles of maintaining stability in mountain forest ecosystems of the Ukrainian Carpathians

    OpenAIRE

    PARPAN T.V.

    2016-01-01

    The forest cover of the Carpathians has been deeply transformed by productive activities over the past centuries. The forest cover, age and species structure of its ecosystems have been changed. Beech and fir forests were replaced by spruce monocultures. Consequently, nitrogen and mineral elements cycles changed, the genetic and population structures altered and the eco-stabilizing function of forests decreased. These negative trends make it desirable to process the bioecological principles o...

  8. Multi-level natural resources governance based on local community: A case study on semi-natural grassland in Tarōji, Nara, Japan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daisaku Shimada

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Japan is facing a bio-diversity crisis as a result of rapid industrialisation. The Japanese Ministry of the Environment formulated a National Biodiversity Strategy based on the Convention on Biological Diversity signed at the Earth Summit in 1992. After an amendment in 2002, the National Biodiversity Strategy addressed three crises in biodiversity: over-exploitation and development that destroys habitats, underutilisation (the satoyama problem and artificially introduced factors (chemicals, alien species and so on. This paper focuses on the second problem. Secondary natural environments called satoyama have been created and maintained over the centuries by human activity. Because natural environments in Japan have been affected by human-induced disturbances for 35,000 years, many species have evolved in response to these disturbances. If the human activities cease, many of the species that have evolved to survive in managed environments become threatened. Many satoyama have been managed as commonage or common lands, called iriai in Japan. One natural resource system created by commoners is semi-natural grassland, and economic modernisation has led to abandonment of traditional management practices on these grasslands – one of the more evident changes in Japanese iriai practices. Before industrialisation, semi-natural grasslands were managed as a source of green manure, as a harvest for roofing materials (thatch and as pasture for animals. After industrialisation, however, introduction of chemical fertilizers, changes in building practices and importation of animal feeds rapidly decreased the use value of these grasslands for local residents. On the other hand, their value as public goods – as historical, cultural landscapes and places of biodiversity – which concern a much broader population than the local community – became relatively more important. The resulting problem is how to manage this resource with its new value for new

  9. Preliminary results of studies on the distribution of invasive alien vascular plant species occurring in semi-natural and natural habitats in NW Poland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Popiela Agnieszka

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available In Western Pomerania, as in other areas of Europe, alien species play an increasingly important role. In particular, invasive plants tend to spread rapidly and in large numbers which may reduce diversity of native species, leading to the phenomenon of “trivialisation of flora”, and transform ecosystems. The list of invasive species (32 taxa includes alien species occurring throughout Western Pomerania, and penetrating natural or semi-natural habitats. The second group consists of potentially invasive species (23 taxa, i.e. those distributed across the area under study and tending to increase the number of their localities in semi-natural and natural habitats, taxa invasive only locally, as well as species with missing data, which does not currently allow including them into the first group. Invasive weeds, as well as some epecophytes and archaeophytes occurring only on anthropogenic sites and tending to spread, were not taken into account. Among hemiagriophytes, the most common and troublesome ones are: Conyza canadensis, Erigeron annuus, Lolium multiflorum, Lupinus polyphyllus, Solidago canadensis, S. gigantea. Among holoagriophytes, i.e. the taxa which received the highest naturalisation status, very expansive species, successful in land colonisation, like Acer negundo, Bidens frondosa, B. connata, Clematis vitalba, Elodea canadensis, Epilobium ciliatum, Heracleum sosnowskyi, Impatiens glandulifera, I. parviflora, Padus serotina, Quercus rubra and Robinia pseudoacacia, should be given particular attention. Among the invasive and potentially invasive species, most taxa penetrate plant communities of the Artemisietea and Molinio-Arrhenatheretea class, followed by Querco-Fagetea, Vaccinio-Piceetea, Stellarietea mediae, Salicetea purpurae and Koelerio-Corynophoretea. The number of invasive species is twice as high when compared to the situation of these species in Poland; on the contrary, the number of species inhabiting anthropogenic, semi-natural

  10. Flow tilt angles near forest edges - Part 1: Sonic anemometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dellwik, Ebba; Mann, Jakob; Larsen, Klaus Steenberg

    2010-01-01

    An analysis of flow tilt angles from a fetch-limited beech forest site with clearings is presented in the context of vertical advection of carbon dioxide. Flow angles and vertical velocities from two sonic anemometers by different manufacturers were analyzed. Instead of using rotations, where zero...... balance, unless all terms in the carbon dioxide conservation equation can be precisely estimated....

  11. Wood decomposing abilities of diverse lignicolous fungi on nondecayed and decayed beech wood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukasawa, Yu; Osono, Takashi; Takeda, Hiroshi

    2011-01-01

    We tested the decay abilities of 28 isolates from 28 lignicolous fungal species (Basidiomycota, Ascomycota and Zygomycota) with the pure culture test. We used beech wood powder in varying moisture conditions and decay stages (nondecayed, intermediately decayed and well decayed) as substrates. The weight loss in wood powder was -0.2-17.8%. Five isolates of Basidiomycota (Bjerkandera adusta, Mycena haematopus, Omphalotus guepiniformis, Trametes hirsuta, Trametes versicolor) caused high weight losses in nondecayed wood. We detected significant effects of decay stage on weight loss in wood in most isolates tested, whereas moisture content rarely had an effect on weight loss. Among Basidiomycota and Xylariaceae in Ascomycota weight loss was greater for nondecayed wood than for intermediately and well decayed wood. In contrast four isolates in Ascomycota (Scytalidium lignicola, Trichoderma hamatum, T. harzianum, T. koningii) caused substantial weight loss in intermediately and well decayed wood, although they rarely caused weight loss in nondecayed wood. Zygomycota caused low weight loss in wood. Wood decay stages also affected decomposition of wood chemical components. Acid-unhydrolyzable residue (AUR) decomposition was reduced, whereas holocellulose decomposition was stimulated by some strains of Basidiomycota and Ascomycota in well decayed wood. T. harzianum in particular caused significant weight loss of holocellulose in well decayed wood, although this fungus caused negligible weight loss of both AUR and holocellulose in nondecayed wood. We discuss these changes in the decay patterns of AUR and holocellulose with varying wood decay stages in relation to the role of fungal decomposition of woody debris in forests.

  12. Beech bark necrosis: partition- ing the environmental and spatial variation of the damage severity in Central and South-Eastern Europe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamín Jarčuška

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The beech bark necrosis (BBN infestation severity of European beech (Fagus sylvatica L. was assessed in regions of Central (CE and South-Eastern Europe (SE. Altogether more than 10,000 trees were sampled at 114 sites. Using variation partitioning method, we examined the pure and shared effects of stand, site, climate and spatial sets of variables on mean BBN severity. Our rating included (i the whole stand, (ii tree social status classes, (iii canopy (C and (iv understory (U trees separately. We found that C trees were less affected by BBN than sub-canopy and U trees in both regions. There were found inter-regional differences in amount of explained variability (25.4–73.9% for whole stand BBN and in the sensitivity of C and U trees to the environmental gradients. The analysis revealed that the climate and spatial variables followed by stand variables had the largest marginal effects on mean BBN severity in all models, while the site set of variables had the weakest one. More than half of the explained variation was shared among four sets of variables in SE, contrary to CE. Except to U trees in SE, the effect of climate – pure or spatially structured – remained the highest also after partitioning of variance; more in SE than in CE. Taking into account positive association between mean annual temperature and mean BBN severity in C trees in SE, reinforced negative effect of climate change on the necrosis might be expected to be more serious mainly in low situated beech forests there. Promoting the tree species diversity in forested areas with higher incidence of beech bark necrosis, i.e. in low altitudes in SE, could reduce the susceptibility of forests to the necrosis at regional level in the future. For better understanding of the relative importance of environmental and spatial variables on BBN severity, further research performed on finer spatial scale (extent and grain is necessary, along with accounting for pathogens involved in the

  13. Ground-level ozone differentially affects nitrogen acquisition and allocation in mature European beech (Fagus sylvatica) and Norway spruce (Picea abies) trees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weigt, R B; Häberle, K H; Millard, P; Metzger, U; Ritter, W; Blaschke, H; Göttlein, A; Matyssek, R

    2012-10-01

    Impacts of elevated ground-level ozone (O(3)) on nitrogen (N) uptake and allocation were studied on mature European beech (Fagus sylvatica L.) and Norway spruce (Picea abies [L.] Karst.) in a forest stand, hypothesizing that: (i) chronically elevated O(3) limits nutrient uptake, and (ii) beech responds more sensitively to elevated O(3) than spruce, as previously found for juvenile trees. Tree canopies were exposed to twice-ambient O(3) concentrations (2 × O(3)) by a free-air fumigation system, with trees under ambient O(3) serving as control. After 5 years of O(3) fumigation, (15)NH(4)(15)NO(3) was applied to soil, and concentrations of newly acquired N (N(labelled)) and total N (N(total)) in plant compartments and soil measured. Under 2 × O(3), N(labelled) and N(total) were increased in the bulk soil and tended to be lower in fine and coarse roots of both species across the soil horizons, supporting hypothesis (i). N(labelled) was reduced in beech foliage by up to 60%, and by up to 50% in buds under 2 × O(3). Similarly, N(labelled) in stem bark and phloem was reduced. No such reduction was observed in spruce, reflecting a stronger effect on N acquisition in beech in accordance with hypothesis (ii). In spruce, 2 × O(3) tended to favour allocation of new N to foliage. N(labelled) in beech foliage correlated with cumulative seasonal transpiration, indicating impaired N acquisition was probably caused by reduced stomatal conductance and, hence, water transport under elevated O(3). Stimulated fine root growth under 2 × O(3) with a possible increase of below-ground N sink strength may also have accounted for lowered N allocation to above-ground organs. Reduced N uptake and altered allocation may enhance the use of stored N for growth, possibly affecting long-term stand nutrition.

  14. Application of the 15N-Gas Flux method for measuring in situ N2 and N2O fluxes due to denitrification in natural and semi-natural terrestrial ecosystems and comparison with the acetylene inhibition technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sgouridis, F.; Ullah, S.; Stott, A.

    2015-08-01

    Soil denitrification is considered the most un-constrained process in the global N cycle due to uncertain in situ N2 flux measurements, particularly in natural and semi-natural terrestrial ecosystems. 15N tracer approaches can provide in situ measurements of both N2 and N2O simultaneously, but their use has been limited to fertilised agro-ecosystems due to the need for large 15N additions in order to detect 15N2 production against the high atmospheric N2. For 15N-N2 analyses, we have used an "in house" laboratory designed and manufactured N2 preparation instrument which can be interfaced to any commercial continuous flow isotope ratio mass spectrometer (CF-IRMS). The N2 prep unit has gas purification steps, a copper based reduction furnace, and allows the analysis of small gas injection volumes (4 μL) for 15N-N2 analysis. For the analysis of N2O, an automated Tracegas Pre-concentrator (Isoprime Ltd) coupled to an IRMS was used to measure the 15N-N2O (4 mL gas injection volume). Consequently, the coefficient of variation for the determination of isotope ratios for N2 in air and in standard N2O (0.5 ppm) was better than 0.5 %. The 15N Gas-Flux method was adapted for application in natural and semi-natural land use types (peatlands, forests and grasslands) by lowering the 15N tracer application rate to 0.04-0.5 kg 15N ha-1. For our chamber design (volume / surface = 8:1) and a 20 h incubation period, the minimum detectable flux rates were 4 μg N m-2 h-1 and 0.2 ng N m-2 h-1 for the N2 and N2O fluxes respectively. The N2 flux ranged between 2.4 and 416.6 μg N m-2 h-1, and the grassland soils showed on average 3 and 14 times higher denitrification rates than the woodland and organic soils respectively. The N2O flux was on average 20 to 200 times lower than the N2 flux, while the denitrification product ratio (N2O/N2 + N2O) was low, ranging between 0.03 and 13 %. Total denitrification rates measured by the acetylene inhibition technique under the same field conditions

  15. Application of the 15N gas-flux method for measuring in situ N2 and N2O fluxes due to denitrification in natural and semi-natural terrestrial ecosystems and comparison with the acetylene inhibition technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sgouridis, Fotis; Stott, Andrew; Ullah, Sami

    2016-03-01

    Soil denitrification is considered the most un-constrained process in the global N cycle due to uncertain in situ N2 flux measurements, particularly in natural and semi-natural terrestrial ecosystems. 15N tracer approaches can provide in situ measurements of both N2 and N2O simultaneously, but their use has been limited to fertilized agro-ecosystems due to the need for large 15N additions in order to detect 15N2 production against the high atmospheric N2. For 15N-N2 analyses, we have used an "in-house" laboratory designed and manufactured N2 preparation instrument which can be interfaced to any commercial continuous flow isotope ratio mass spectrometer (CF-IRMS). The N2 prep unit has gas purification steps and a copper-based reduction furnace, and allows the analysis of small gas injection volumes (4 µL) for 15N-N2 analysis. For the analysis of N2O, an automated Tracegas Preconcentrator (Isoprime Ltd) coupled to an IRMS was used to measure the 15N-N2O (4 mL gas injection volume). Consequently, the coefficient of variation for the determination of isotope ratios for N2 in air and in standard N2O (0.5 ppm) was better than 0.5 %. The 15N gas-flux method was adapted for application in natural and semi-natural land use types (peatlands, forests, and grasslands) by lowering the 15N tracer application rate to 0.04-0.5 kg 15N ha-1. The minimum detectable flux rates were 4 µg N m-2 h-1 and 0.2 ng N m-2 h-1 for the N2 and N2O fluxes respectively. Total denitrification rates measured by the acetylene inhibition technique in the same land use types correlated (r = 0.58) with the denitrification rates measured under the 15N gas-flux method, but were underestimated by a factor of 4, and this was partially attributed to the incomplete inhibition of N2O reduction to N2, under a relatively high soil moisture content, and/or the catalytic NO decomposition in the presence of acetylene. Even though relatively robust for in situ denitrification measurements, methodological

  16. Regional factors rather than forest type drive the community structure of soil living oribatid mites (Acari, Oribatida).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdmann, Georgia; Scheu, Stefan; Maraun, Mark

    2012-06-01

    Most European forests are managed by humans. However, the manner and intensity of management vary. While the effect of forest management on above-ground communities has been investigated in detail, effects on the below-ground fauna remain poorly understood. Oribatid mites are abundant microarthropods in forest soil and important decomposers in terrestrial ecosystems. Here, we investigated the effect of four forest types (i.e., managed coniferous forests; 30 and 70 years old managed beech forests; natural beech forests) on the density, diversity and community structure of oribatid mites (Acari). The study was replicated at three regions in Germany: the Swabian Alb, the Hainich and the Schorfheide. To relate changes in oribatid mite community structure to environmental factors, litter mass, pH, C and N content of litter, fine roots and C content of soil were measured. Density of oribatid mites was highest in the coniferous forests and decreased in the order 30 years old, 70 years old, and natural beech forests. Mass of the litter layer and density of oribatid mites were strongly correlated indicating that the litter layer is an important factor regulating oribatid mite densities. Diversity of oribatid mites was little affected by forest type indicating that they harbor similar numbers of niches. Species composition differed between the forest types, suggesting different types of niches. The community structure of oribatid mites differed more strongly between the three regions than between the forest types indicating that regional factors are more important than effects associated with forest type.

  17. Drying Time and Quality of EDS-Treated Compared to Untreated Beech Wood (Fagus japonica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihaela CAMPEAN

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the results of an experimental study performed with Japanese beech timber heattreated by the EDS method (Japanese patent and then dried in order to evaluate the effects of this treatment upon the drying rate and the drying uniformity. The obtained results demonstrate benefitting effects of the EDS treatment both upon the drying time and the drying quality. The drying rate of EDS-treated beech wood is by 29% higher in the case of wood without red heart and by 11% higher in the case of wood with red heart. As far as the drying uniformity is concerned, the minimum moisture content gradient across the 50mm thickness of the timber boards was recorded for the EDS-treated beech wood with red heart (∆MC=1.66, by 21.7% lower than in the case of untreated beech wood with red heart.

  18. Investigation of Welded Joints with Linear Turned Beech Elements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ŽUPČIĆ, Ivica

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Welding of wood is a process where chemical and physical reactions take place, heat isformed during the friction, which melts and softens the structure of wood, and a firm joint is formedby cooling of the melt.The paper discusses the present knowledge about wood welding and the results of wood weldingresearch obtained in the Faculty of Forestry, University of Zagreb. The results were obtained onsamples (solid beech wood with tapered entrance holes 9 mm in diameter, the bottom of the hole7 mm in diameter and dowel lengths of 20 mm and 30 mm, as well as samples with 8 mm holediameters and dowel lengths of 20 mm and 30 mm. The tensile strength of welded joints was analysed.The analysis results show that there is a big difference in tensile strength between the samples with 20and 30 mm long dowels and profile holes. 30 mm long dowels give better results than the 20 mmdowels.

  19. Ash recycling to spruce and beech stands effects on nutrients, growth, nitrogen dynamics and carbon balance; Askaaterfoering till gran- och bokbestaand - effekter paa naering, tillvaext, kvaevedynamik och kolbalans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thelin, Gunnar

    2006-03-15

    Ash recycling is an important part in a modern, sustainable forestry, especially in whole-tree harvest systems. Nutrients lost at harvest are returned to the forest with the wood-ash. In the project the effects of ash treatment on needle and leaf chemistry, tree growth, soil chemistry, soil water chemistry, and carbon and nitrogen dynamics were studied on 23 Norway spruce sites in south-western Sweden and in ten European beech sites in Scania, southern Sweden. On some of the sites there were previously established ash recycling experiments, but on a majority of the sites ash recycling was performed without experimental lay-out and ash and control plots were established afterwards. The most common dose was two tons of self hardened crushed wood-ash and two tons of Mg-lime. On average seven to eight years after ash recycling the results were 1. increased exchangeable stores of base cations in the soil in the beech and the spruce stands 2. increased base saturation in the beech and the spruce stands and increased BC/Al in the spruce stands 3. increased concentrations and ratios to N of P, Ca, Zn, and S in the needles, the increased P-values are especially important since P is close to or below deficiency levels in a majority of the spruce stands 4. decreased K-concentration in the beech leaves 5. increased tree growth with on average 14 % in the ash treated spruce stands compared to the control plots 6. increased carbon and nitrogen amounts in the biomass in the spruce stands 7. tendencies towards increased amounts of carbon and nitrogen in the soil in the beech stands and no effect in the soil in the spruce stands 8. increased concentrations of Ca, Mg, and SO{sub 4} and no effect on ANC in the soil water 9. no effect on potential net mineralization but increased potential nitrification rates 10. decreased concentration of nitrate in the soil water in the beech stands and no effect in the spruce stands 11. lower system N losses in the beech stands and possibly in the

  20. Caracterização genética de Brycon orbignyanus utilizando o sistema seminatural Genetic characterization of Brycon orbignyanus using the semi-natural system

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    N.M. Lopera-Barrero

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Avaliou-se o efeito do sistema seminatural na diversidade genética de um estoque de Brycon orbignyanus, utilizado em programas de repovoamento, com o marcador molecular RAPD. Vinte e quatro reprodutores, 12 machos e 12 fêmeas e 95 larvas da progênie foram analisados. Os nove primers utilizados produziram 90 fragmentos, dos quais 94,4% foram polimórficos. Houve diferença significativa na frequência de 20 dos 90 fragmentos entre os reprodutores e sua progênie sem a presença de fragmentos exclusivos. O índice de diversidade genética de Shannon, a porcentagem de fragmentos polimórficos e a diversidade genética de Nei foram mais altos nos indivíduos da progênie. A similaridade genética foi maior nos indivíduos do estoque de reprodutores. A análise de variância molecular mostrou que a maior parte da variação está dentro de cada grupo (89,1% e não entre os grupos (10,9%. A identidade e a distância genética entre os estoques foram de 0,944 e 0,057, respectivamente. Assim, a utilização do sistema seminatural evitou a mortalidade de reprodutores B. orbignyanus e conservou a variabilidade genética da progênie.The effect of the semi-natural system on the genetic diversity of a Brycon orbignyanus stock, used in stock enhancement programs, was evaluated with the RAPD molecular marker. Twenty-four broodstocks - 12 males and 12 females - and 95 larvae of the offspring were analyzed. The nine used primers produced 90 fragments, of which 94.4% were polymorphic. There was significant difference in the frequency of 20 out of the 90 fragments between the broodstocks and their offspring without the presence of exclusive fragments. The Shannon genetic diversity index, the percentage of polymorphic fragments and the Nei gene diversity were higher in the offspring individuals. Genetic similarity was higher in broodstock individuals. The analysis of molecular variance results showed that the major part of the genetic variation is within the

  1. Ciclo Vital de Schistosoma mansoni através do Holochilus brasiliensis (Desmarest, 1818 em ambiente semi-natural (Trematoda, Shistosomatidae; Rodentia, Cricetidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omar dos Santos Carvalho

    1976-10-01

    Full Text Available Junto ao Lago da Pampulha, Belo Horizonte, MG, foram capturados (julho/72-novembro/73 28 exemplares de Holochilus brasiliensis, dos quais 11 (39,3% eliminavam nas fezes ovos viáveis de S. mansoni. Miracídios da cepa mencionada ("H" infectaram Biomphalaria glabrata e as cercárias obtidas também infectaram camundongos albinos, recuperando-se, ao final do experimento, 35,3% de vermes adultos. Por outro lado, cercárias de cepa humana ("LE" de S. mansoni infectaram sete exemplares de H. brasiliensis, nascidos em laboratório, recuperando-se no fim de 60 dias, 30,5% de vermes adultos. Estudos anatomapatológicos de H. brasiliensis demonstraram infecção generalizada, encontrando-se granuloma no esôfago, estômago, intestino (delgado e grosso, fígado, baço, pâncreas e linfonodos abdominais. Espessamentos fibrosos da íntima da veia porta, granulomas em espaços porta e fibrose incipiente dos espaços porta e interlobular foram lesões decorrentes da presença de ovos de S. mansoni encontrados no fígado. Em ambiente semi-natural, foi possível fechar o ciclo do S. mansoni sem direta participação humana, utilizando-se B. glabrata experimentalmente infectadas com trematódeos da cepa "LE", H. brasiliensis nascidos em laboratório e B. glabrata nascida no ambiente semi-natural estabelecido. Verificou-se que ambas as cepas ("H" e "LE" comportaram-se de maneira análoga, não sendo verificadas, também, diferenças morfológicas entre os ovos e vermes adultos de ambas. As observações, realizadas no campo e no laboratório demonstraram que o Holochilus brasiliensis é bom hospedeiro de Schistosoma mansoni. Assim, em determinadas áreas e sob certas condições ecológicas, o cricetídeo em questão poderá, efetivamente, integrar-se ao ciclo do trematódeo na natureza, independente ou paralelamente à presença do homem. Assinala-se, finalmente, que o presente trabalho relata o segundo fechamento do ciclo biológico de S. mansoni em condi

  2. Carbon storage potential in size–density fractions from semi-natural grassland ecosystems with different productivities over varying soil depths

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Breulmann, Marc [Helmholtz-Centre for Environmental Research – UFZ, Department of Soil Ecology, Theodor-Lieser-Str. 4, 06120 Halle (Germany); Helmholtz-Centre for Environmental Research – UFZ, Environmental and Biotechnology Centre (UBZ), Permoserstraße 15, 04318 Leipzig (Germany); Boettger, Tatjana [Helmholtz-Centre for Environmental Research – UFZ, Department of Isotope Hydrology, Theodor-Lieser-Str. 4, D-06120 Halle (Germany); Buscot, François [Helmholtz-Centre for Environmental Research – UFZ, Department of Soil Ecology, Theodor-Lieser-Str. 4, 06120 Halle (Germany); German Centre for Integrative Biodiversity Research (iDiv) Halle-Jena-Leipzig, Deutscher Platz 5e, 04103 Leipzig (Germany); Gruendling, Ralf [Helmholtz-Centre for Environmental Research – UFZ, Department, Department of Soil Physics, Theodor-Lieser-Str. 4, D-06120 Halle (Germany); Schulz, Elke [Helmholtz-Centre for Environmental Research – UFZ, Department of Soil Ecology, Theodor-Lieser-Str. 4, 06120 Halle (Germany)

    2016-03-01

    Researchers have increasingly recognised a profound need for more information on SOC stocks in the soil and the factors governing their stability and dynamics. Many questions still remain unanswered about the interplay between changes in plant communities and the extent to which changes in aboveground productivity affect the carbon dynamics in soils through changes in its quantity and quality. Therefore, the main aim of this research was to examine the SOC accumulation potential of semi-natural grasslands of different productivities and determine the distribution of SOM fractions over varying soil depth intervals (0–10, 10–20, 20–30 30–50 50–80 and 80 + cm). SOM fractionation was considered as a relative measure of stability to separate SOM associated with clay minerals from SOM of specific light densities less than 2 g cm{sup −3} (size-density fractionation). Two clay-associated fractions (CF1, < 1 μm; and CF2, 1–2 μm) and two light fractions (LF1, < 1.8 g cm{sup −3}; and LF2, 1.8–2.0 g cm{sup −3}) were separated. The stability of these fractions was characterised by their carbon hot water extractability (C{sub HWE}) and stable carbon isotope composition. In the semi-natural grasslands studied, most OC was stored in the top 30 cm, where turnover is rapid. Effects of low productivity grasslands became only significantly apparent when fractional OC contributions of total SOM was considered (CF1 and LF1). In deeper soil depths OC was largely attributed to the CF1 fraction of low productivity grasslands. We suggest that the majority of OM in deeper soil depth intervals is microbially-derived, as evidenced by decreasing C/N ratios and decreasing δ{sup 13}C values. The hot water extraction and natural δ{sup 13}C abundance, employed here allowed the characterisation of SOM stabilisation properties, however how climatic changes affect the fate of OM within different soil depth intervals is still unknown. - Highlights: • OC stocks over varying

  3. Variation in Ecophysiological Traits and Drought Tolerance of Beech (Fagus sylvatica L.) Seedlings from Different Populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cocozza, Claudia; de Miguel, Marina; Pšidová, Eva; Ditmarová, L'ubica; Marino, Stefano; Maiuro, Lucia; Alvino, Arturo; Czajkowski, Tomasz; Bolte, Andreas; Tognetti, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    Frequency and intensity of heat waves and drought events are expected to increase in Europe due to climate change. European beech (Fagus sylvatica L.) is one of the most important native tree species in Europe. Beech populations originating throughout its native range were selected for common-garden experiments with the aim to determine whether there are functional variations in drought stress responses among different populations. One-year old seedlings from four to seven beech populations were grown and drought-treated in a greenhouse, replicating the experiment at two contrasting sites, in Italy (Mediterranean mountains) and Germany (Central Europe). Experimental findings indicated that: (1) drought (water stress) mainly affected gas exchange describing a critical threshold of drought response between 30 and 26% SWA for photosynthetic rate and Ci/Ca, respectively; (2) the Ci to Ca ratio increased substantially with severe water stress suggesting a stable instantaneous water use efficiency and an efficient regulation capacity of water balance achieved by a tight stomatal control; (3) there was a different response to water stress among the considered beech populations, differently combining traits, although there was not a well-defined variability in drought tolerance. A combined analysis of functional and structural traits for detecting stress signals in beech seedlings is suggested to assess plant performance under limiting moisture conditions and, consequently, to estimate evolutionary potential of beech under a changing environmental scenario. PMID:27446118

  4. Effect of utilization term on the quality of semi-natural grass stand in the autumn and in the winter time

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiří Skládanka

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Quality of green fodder from a semi-natural sward consisting of Festuca rubra, Taraxacum officinale, Dactylis glomerata, Trisetum flavescens, Poa ssp., Agrostis stolonifera and Phleum pratense as dominant species, situated in the Bohemian-Moravian Highlands (Czech Republic was studied in the months of the main forage utilization (November, December and January. Main usage in the winter months was preceded by usage in June, July and August (preparatory cut. The sward was fertilized in the first half of August with 50 kg N.ha-1. Qualitative characteristics studied in 2000/2001, 2001/2002 and 2002/2003 were N-substances and NEL. Sward quality was decreasing from November to January with the date of utilization exhibiting a highly significant effect (α < 0.01 on the NEL content in all three years of monitoring and on the content of N-substances in the first two years of monitoring. Effect of the preparatory cut on the contents of N-substances and NEL was significant (α < 0.05 in all three years of monitoring and in the first two years of monitoring, respectively. In November, the contents of N-substances and NEL were higher in variants with the preparatory cut made in August than in variants with the preparatory cut made in June or July. The effect of the date of preparatory cut on the contents of N-substances and NEL in December and January was depending on climatic conditions in the given year.

  5. Energetic conversion of European semi-natural grassland silages through the integrated generation of solid fuel and biogas from biomass: energy yields and the fate of organic compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hensgen, Frank; Bühle, Lutz; Donnison, Iain; Heinsoo, Katrin; Wachendorf, Michael

    2014-02-01

    Twelve European habitat types were investigated to determine the influence of the IFBB technique (integrated generation of biogas and solid fuel from biomass) on the fate of organic compounds and energy yields of semi-natural grassland biomass. Concentration of organic compounds in silage and IFBB press cake (PC), mass flows within that system and methane yields of IFBB press fluids (PF) were determined. The gross energy yield of the IFBB technique was calculated in comparison to hay combustion (HC) and whole crop digestion (WCD). The IFBB treatment increased fibre and organic matter (OM) concentrations and lowered non-fibre carbohydrates and crude protein concentrations. The PF was highly digestible irrespective of habitat types, showing mean methane yields between 312.1 and 405.0 LN CH4 kg(-1) VS. Gross energy yields for the IFBB system (9.75-30.19MWh ha(-1)) were in the range of HC, outperformed WCD and were influenced by the habitat type. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Sex-dependent effects of larval food stress on adult performance under semi-natural conditions: only a matter of size?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosa, Elena; Saastamoinen, Marjo

    2017-07-01

    Organisms with complex life-cycles acquire essential nutrients as juveniles, and hence even a short-term food stress during development can impose serious fitness costs apparent in adults. We used the Glanville fritillary butterfly to investigate the effects of larval food stress on adult performance under semi-natural conditions in a population enclosure. We were specifically interested in whether the negative effects observed were due to body mass reduction only or whether additional effects unrelated to pupal mass were evident. The two sexes responded differently to the larval food stress. In females, larval food stress reduced pupal mass and reproductive performance. The reduced reproductive performance was partially mediated by pupal mass reduction. Food stressed females also had reduced within-patch mobility, and this effect was not dependent on pupal mass. Conversely, food stress had no effect on male pupal mass, suggesting a full compensation via prolonged development time. Nonetheless, food stressed males were less likely to sire any eggs, potentially due to changes in their territorial behavior, as indicated by food stress also increasing male within-patch mobility (i.e., patrolling behavior). When males did sire eggs, the offspring number and viability were unaffected by male food stress treatment. Viability was in general higher for offspring sired by lighter males. Our study highlights how compensatory mechanisms after larval food stress can act in a sex-specific manner and that the alteration in body mass is only partially responsible for the reduced adult performance observed.

  7. Ciclo Vital de Schistosoma mansoni através do Holochilus brasiliensis (Desmarest, 1818 em ambiente semi-natural (Trematoda, Shistosomatidae; Rodentia, Cricetidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omar dos Santos Carvalho

    1976-10-01

    Full Text Available Junto ao Lago da Pampulha, Belo Horizonte, MG, foram capturados (julho/72-novembro/73 28 exemplares de Holochilus brasiliensis, dos quais 11 (39,3% eliminavam nas fezes ovos viáveis de S. mansoni. Miracídios da cepa mencionada ("H" infectaram Biomphalaria glabrata e as cercárias obtidas também infectaram camundongos albinos, recuperando-se, ao final do experimento, 35,3% de vermes adultos. Por outro lado, cercárias de cepa humana ("LE" de S. mansoni infectaram sete exemplares de H. brasiliensis, nascidos em laboratório, recuperando-se no fim de 60 dias, 30,5% de vermes adultos. Estudos anatomapatológicos de H. brasiliensis demonstraram infecção generalizada, encontrando-se granuloma no esôfago, estômago, intestino (delgado e grosso, fígado, baço, pâncreas e linfonodos abdominais. Espessamentos fibrosos da íntima da veia porta, granulomas em espaços porta e fibrose incipiente dos espaços porta e interlobular foram lesões decorrentes da presença de ovos de S. mansoni encontrados no fígado. Em ambiente semi-natural, foi possível fechar o ciclo do S. mansoni sem direta participação humana, utilizando-se B. glabrata experimentalmente infectadas com trematódeos da cepa "LE", H. brasiliensis nascidos em laboratório e B. glabrata nascida no ambiente semi-natural estabelecido. Verificou-se que ambas as cepas ("H" e "LE" comportaram-se de maneira análoga, não sendo verificadas, também, diferenças morfológicas entre os ovos e vermes adultos de ambas. As observações, realizadas no campo e no laboratório demonstraram que o Holochilus brasiliensis é bom hospedeiro de Schistosoma mansoni. Assim, em determinadas áreas e sob certas condições ecológicas, o cricetídeo em questão poderá, efetivamente, integrar-se ao ciclo do trematódeo na natureza, independente ou paralelamente à presença do homem. Assinala-se, finalmente, que o presente trabalho relata o segundo fechamento do ciclo biológico de S. mansoni em condi

  8. Ground beetles as indicators of past management of old-growth forests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mazzei A

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Old-growth forests are terrestrial ecosystems with the highest level of biodiversity and the main environments for the study of conservation and dynamics of the forest system. In Mediterranean Europe, two millennia of human exploitation deeply altered the structural complexity of the native forests. Some animal groups, including insects, may be used as a proxy of such changes. In this paper we explored the possible effects of forest management on the functional diversity (species traits of carabid beetle communities. Three old-growth forests of the Sila National Park were sampled by pitfall traps set up in pure beech, beech-silver fir and Calabrian black pine forests. In each forest, five managed vs. five unmanaged stands were considered. Managed sites were exploited until the sixties of the past century and then left unmanaged. More than 6000 carabid specimens belonging to 23 species were collected. The functional diversity in carabid groups is influenced by forest management especially in beech and beech-silver fir stands. Body size, specialized predators, endemic species and forest species were negatively affected by stand management. On the contrary, omnivorous ground beetles populations (or species with a high dispersal power (macropterous and large geographic distribution were positively influenced by stand management. In pine forests the old-growth community seems less sensitive to past management and more affected by soil evolution. Soil erosion and disturbance may reduce species diversity of ground beetles. Anyway, the composition of the carabid community shows that 50-60 years of forest restoration are enough for the reconstruction of a fairly diverse assemblage reflecting a “subclimax” situation.

  9. Assessing urban forest effects and values, Washington, D.C.'s urban forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    David J. Nowak; Robert E. III Hoehn; Daniel E. Crane; Jack C. Stevens; Jeffrey T. Walton

    2006-01-01

    An analysis of trees in Washington, D.C. reveals that this city has about 1,928,000 trees with canopies that cover 28.6 percent of the area. The most common tree species are American beech, red maple, and boxelder. The urban forest currently store about 526,000 tons of carbon valued at $9.7 million. In addition, these trees remove about 16,200 tons of carbon per year...

  10. Forest management type influences diversity and community composition of soil fungi across temperate forest ecosystems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kezia eGoldmann

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Fungal communities have been shown to be highly sensitive towards shifts in plant diversity and species composition in forest ecosystems. However, little is known about the impact of forest management on fungal diversity and community composition of geographically separated sites. This study examined the effects of four different forest management types on soil fungal communities. These forest management types include age class forests of young managed beech (Fagus sylvatica L., with beech stands age of approximately 30 years, age class beech stands with an age of approximately 70 years, unmanaged beech stands, and coniferous stands dominated by either pine (Pinus sylvestris L. or spruce (Picea abies Karst. which are located in three study sites across Germany. Soil were sampled from 48 study plots and we employed fungal ITS rDNA pyrotag sequencing to assess the soil fungal diversity and community structure.We found that forest management type significantly affects the Shannon diversity of soil fungi and a significant interaction effect of study site and forest management on the fungal OTU richness. Consequently distinct fungal communities were detected in the three study sites and within the four forest management types, which were mainly related to the main tree species. Further analysis of the contribution of soil properties revealed that C/N ratio being the most important factor in all the three study sites whereas soil pH was significantly related to the fungal community in two study sites. Functional assignment of the fungal communities indicated that 38% of the observed communities were Ectomycorrhizal fungi (ECM and their distribution is significantly influenced by the forest management. Soil pH and C/N ratio were found to be the main drivers of the ECM fungal community composition. Additional fungal community similarity analysis revealed the presence of study site and management type specific ECM genera.This study extends our knowledge

  11. Biological control of pedological and hydro-geomorphological processes in a deciduous forest ecosystem

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cammeraat, E.L.H.; Kooijman, A.M.

    2009-01-01

    This study describes the effect of soil fauna andvegetation on the development of landscapes and how these actually control soil formation, geomorphological development and hydrological response. The study area is located in a semi-natural deciduous forest on marl in Luxembourg, with a strong

  12. Multivariate analysis of physiological parameters reveals a consistent O3 response pattern in leaves of adult European beech (Fagus sylvatica).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Löw, Markus; Deckmyn, Gaby; Op de Beeck, Maarten; Blumenröther, Manuela C; Oßwald, Wolfgang; Alexou, Maria; Jehnes, Sascha; Haberer, Kristine; Rennenberg, Heinz; Herbinger, Karin; Häberle, Karl-Heinz; Bahnweg, Günther; Hanke, David; Wieser, Gerhard; Ceulemans, Reinhart; Matyssek, Rainer; Tausz, Michael

    2012-10-01

    • Increasing atmospheric concentrations of phytotoxic ozone (O(3) ) can constrain growth and carbon sink strength of forest trees, potentially exacerbating global radiative forcing. Despite progress in the conceptual understanding of the impact of O(3) on plants, it is still difficult to detect response patterns at the leaf level. • Here, we employed principal component analysis (PCA) to analyse a database containing physiological leaf-level parameters of 60-yr-old Fagus sylvatica (European beech) trees. Data were collected over two climatically contrasting years under ambient and twice-ambient O(3) regimes in a free-air forest environment. • The first principal component (PC1) of the PCA was consistently responsive to O(3) and crown position within the trees over both years. Only a few of the original parameters showed an O(3) effect. PC1 was related to parameters indicative of oxidative stress signalling and changes in carbohydrate metabolism. PC1 correlated with cumulative O(3) uptake over preceding days. • PC1 represents an O(3) -responsive multivariate pattern detectable in the absence of consistently measurable O(3) effects on individual leaf-level parameters. An underlying effect of O(3) on physiological processes is indicated, providing experimental confirmation of theoretical O(3) response patterns suggested previously. © 2012 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2012 New Phytologist Trust.

  13. Assessing native small mammals' responses to an incipient invasion of beech bark disease through changes in seed production of American beech

    Science.gov (United States)

    Justin N. Rosemier; Andrew J. Storer

    2011-01-01

    Exotic tree diseases have direct impacts on their host and may have indirect effects on native fauna that rely on host tree species. For example, American beech (Fagus grandifolia [Ehrh.]) is a dominant overstory component throughout its range and, like all tree species, is vulnerable to a broad array of insects and pathogens. These pests include...

  14. The effect of utilization term on the biomass production, organic matter digestibility and ergosterol content of semi-natural grass stand in the autumn and in winter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiří Skládanka

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The biomass of dry matter (DM and forage quality of a  grass pasture in the  Bohemian-Moravian Highlands (Czech Republic, situated at an altitude of 553 m a.s.l., was measured in late autumn and in winter in the  period from 2000 to 2003. The semi-natural grass pasture was dominated by Festuca rubra, Taraxacum officinale, Elytrigia repens, Dactylis glomerata, Trisetum flavescens, Poa spp., Agrostis tenuis and Phleum pratense. Biomass production and forage quality were measured in November, December and January after one preparatory cut in June or two preparatory cuts in June and July, and in June and August. Biomass of DM decreased from November to January and ranged, depending on the  year and the  number of preparatory cuts, from 0.37–3.13  t  ha – 1 in November to 0.15–1.36  t  ha – 1 in January. The biomass of DM decreased the  later the  preparatory cut. Organic matter digestibility decreased from November to January, ranging from 0.448–0.606 in November to 0.352–0.578 in January. A delayed preparatory cut resulted in an increased digestibility. Ergosterol concentration increased with the  progressing autumn and winter, ranging from 40–111  mg  kg – 1 DM in November to 110–265  mg  kg – 1 DM in January. Lower ergosterol concentrations were observed after a  late preparatory cut. The results were statistically analysed by ANOVA and Tukey HSD test. The length of the  main use was observed to have a significant effect on biomass of DM, digestibility of organic matter and ergosterol concentration (P < 0.05 in all three years of the  investigation.

  15. Rapid Buildup of Genetic Diversity in Founder Populations of the Gynodioecious Plant Species Origanum vulgare after Semi-Natural Grassland Restoration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helsen, Kenny; Jacquemyn, Hans; Hermy, Martin; Vandepitte, Katrien; Honnay, Olivier

    2013-01-01

    In most landscapes the success of habitat restoration is largely dependent on spontaneous colonization of plant species. This colonization process, and the outcome of restoration practices, can only be considered successful if the genetic makeup of founding populations is not eroded through founder effects and subsequent genetic drift. Here we used 10 microsatellite markers to investigate the genetic effects of recent colonization of the long-lived gynodioecious species Origanum vulgare in restored semi-natural grassland patches. We compared the genetic diversity and differentiation of fourteen recent populations with that of thirteen old, putative source populations, and we evaluated the effects of spatial configuration of the populations on colonization patterns. We did not observe decreased genetic diversity in recent populations, or inflated genetic differentiation among them. Nevertheless, a significantly higher inbreeding coefficient was observed in recent populations, although this was not associated with negative fitness effects. Overall population genetic differentiation was low (FST = 0.040). Individuals of restored populations were assigned to on average 6.1 different source populations (likely following the ‘migrant pool’ model). Gene flow was, however, affected by the spatial configuration of the grasslands, with gene flow into the recent populations mainly originating from nearby source populations. This study demonstrates how spontaneous colonization after habitat restoration can lead to viable populations in a relatively short time, overcoming pronounced founder effects, when several source populations are nearby. Restored populations can therefore rapidly act as stepping stones and sources of genetic diversity, likely increasing overall metapopulation viability of the study species. PMID:23840642

  16. Age-dependent baseline values of faecal cortisol metabolites in the American mink (Neovison vison) under semi-natural housing conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rauch, E; Bergmann, S; Hagn, A; Meixensperger, J; Reese, S; Palme, R; Erhard, M H

    2014-06-01

    The welfare of an animal is ensured if it is able to fully satisfy its essential species-typical needs in all functional aspects of behaviour. In mink, stereotypies and apathy, internal and/or external injuries as well as increased susceptibility to disease have been known to occur as a result of chronic stress. The non-invasive method of analysing faecal cortisol metabolites (FCM) allows conclusions to be drawn about the stress level in the respective housing system. The objective of this study is to find out how the cortisol metabolites content in the faecal changes with increasing age of the mink under semi-natural housing conditions. Thus, 40 American mink (Neovison vison) were housed in two outdoor enclosures imitating natural conditions. Throughout the entire study (13th to 32nd week of life), faecal samples were collected to measure cortisol metabolites. No differences in FCM concentrations between the two outdoor enclosures were found. In the young mink lower, less fluctuating FCM levels were found than in older animals. After the first faecal collection in the 13th/14th week of life, the level of metabolites decreased slightly (p = 0.032; 17th/18th week). From the 22nd/23rd week onwards until the 30th/31st week, shortly before the animals were pelted, continuously increasing concentrations were then measured. Increasing FCM levels with advancing age of the animals are probably attributable to the onset of sexual maturity and/or the respective season. This has to be taken into account in future studies using this method for assessing welfare and when comparing different mink housing systems. Journal of Animal Physiology and Animal Nutrition © 2013 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  17. Short-term dynamics and partitioning of newly assimilated carbon in the foliage of adult beech and pine are driven by seasonal variations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desalme, Dorine; Priault, Pierrick; Gérant, Dominique; Dannoura, Masako; Maillard, Pascale; Plain, Caroline; Epron, Daniel

    2017-04-01

    Carbon (C) allocation is a key process determining C cycling in forest ecosystems. However, the mechanisms underlying the annual patterns of C partitioning in trees, influenced by tree phenology and environmental conditions, are not well identified yet. This study aimed to characterize the short-term dynamics and partitioning of newly assimilated carbon in the foliage of adult European beeches (Fagus sylvatica) and maritime pines (Pinus pinaster) across the seasons. We hypothesized that residence times of recently assimilated C in C compounds should change according to the seasons and that seasonal pattern should differ between deciduous and evergreen tree species, since they have different phenology. 13CO2 pulse-labelling experiments were performed in situ at different dates corresponding to different phenological stages. In beech leaves and pine needles, C contents, isotopic compositions, and 13C dynamics parameters were determined in total organic matter (bulk foliage), in polar fraction (PF, including soluble sugars, amino acids, organic acids) and in starch. For both species and at each phenological stage, 13C amount in bulk foliage decreased following a two-pool exponential model, highlighting the partitioning of newly assimilated C between 'mobile' and 'stable' pools. The relative proportion of the stable pool was maximal in beech leaves in May, when leaves were still growing and could incorporate newly assimilated C in structural C compounds. Young pine needles were still receiving C from previous-year needles in June (two months after budburst) although they are already photosynthesizing, acting as a strong C sink. In summer, short mean residence times of 13C (MRT) in foliage of both tree species reflected the fast respiration and exportation of recent photosynthates to support the whole tree C demand (e.g., supplying perennial organ growth). At the end of the growing season, pre-senescing beech leaves were supplying 13C to perennial organs, whereas

  18. Assessment of spatial discordance of primary and effective seed dispersal of European beech (Fagus sylvatica L.) by ecological and genetic methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millerón, M; López de Heredia, U; Lorenzo, Z; Alonso, J; Dounavi, A; Gil, L; Nanos, N

    2013-03-01

    Spatial discordance between primary and effective dispersal in plant populations indicates that postdispersal processes erase the seed rain signal in recruitment patterns. Five different models were used to test the spatial concordance of the primary and effective dispersal patterns in a European beech (Fagus sylvatica) population from central Spain. An ecological method was based on classical inverse modelling (SSS), using the number of seed/seedlings as input data. Genetic models were based on direct kernel fitting of mother-to-offspring distances estimated by a parentage analysis or were spatially explicit models based on the genotype frequencies of offspring (competing sources model and Moran-Clark's Model). A fully integrated mixed model was based on inverse modelling, but used the number of genotypes as input data (gene shadow model). The potential sources of error and limitations of each seed dispersal estimation method are discussed. The mean dispersal distances for seeds and saplings estimated with these five methods were higher than those obtained by previous estimations for European beech forests. All the methods show strong discordance between primary and effective dispersal kernel parameters, and for dispersal directionality. While seed rain was released mostly under the canopy, saplings were established far from mother trees. This discordant pattern may be the result of the action of secondary dispersal by animals or density-dependent effects; that is, the Janzen-Connell effect. © 2013 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  19. Impacts of a water stress followed by an early frost event on beech (Fagus sylvatica L.) susceptibility to Scolytine ambrosia beetles - Research strategy and first results

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Spina, Sylvie; de Cannière, Charles; Molenberg, Jean-Marc; Vincke, Caroline; Deman, Déborah; Grégoire, Jean-Claude

    2010-05-01

    Climate change tends to induce more frequent abiotic and biotic extreme events, having large impacts on tree vitality. Weakened trees are then more susceptible to secondary insect outbreaks, as it happened in Belgium in the early 2000s: after an early frost event, secondary Scolytine ambrosia beetles attacks were observed on beech trees. In this study, we test if a combination of stress, i.e. a soil water deficit preceding an early frost, could render trees more attractive to beetles. An experimental study was set in autumn 2008. Two parcels of a beech forest were covered with plastic tents to induce a water stress by rain interception. The parcels were surrounded by 2-meters depth trenches to avoid water supply by streaming. Soil water content and different indicators of tree water use (sap flow, predawn leaf water potential, tree radial growth) were followed. In autumn 2010, artificial frost injuries will be inflicted to trees using dry ice. Trees attractivity for Scolytine insects, and the success of insect colonization will then be studied. The poster will focus on experiment setting and first results (impacts of soil water deficit on trees).

  20. Beech carbon productivity as driver of ectomycorrhizal abundance and diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Druebert, Christine; Lang, Christa; Valtanen, Kerttu; Polle, Andrea

    2009-08-01

    We tested the hypothesis that carbon productivity of beech (Fagus sylvatica) controls ectomycorrhizal colonization, diversity and community structures. Carbon productivity was limited by long-term shading or by girdling. The trees were grown in compost soil to avoid nutrient deficiencies. Despite severe limitation in photosynthesis and biomass production by shading, the concentrations of carbohydrates in roots were unaffected by the light level. Shade-acclimated plants were only 10% and sun-acclimated plants were 74% colonized by ectomycorrhiza. EM diversity was higher on roots with high than at roots with low mycorrhizal colonization. Evenness was unaffected by any treatment. Low mycorrhizal colonization had no negative effects on plant mineral nutrition. In girdled plants mycorrhizal colonization and diversity were retained although (14)C-leaf feeding showed almost complete disruption of carbon transport from leaves to roots. Carbohydrate storage pools in roots decreased upon girdling. Our results show that plant carbon productivity was the reason for and not the result of high ectomycorrhizal diversity. We suggest that ectomycorrhiza can be supplied by two carbon routes: recent photosynthate and stored carbohydrates. Storage pools may be important for ectomycorrhizal survival when photoassimilates were unavailable, probably feeding preferentially less carbon demanding EM species as shifts in community composition were found.

  1. Effect of tree species and soil properties on nutrient immobilization in the forest floor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raulund-Rasmussen, Karsten; Vejre, Henrik

    1995-01-01

    To investigate the effect of tree species and soil properties on organic matter accumulation and associated nutrients, an area-based sampling of the forest floor was carried out in a 28 years old species trial including Norway spruce, Douglas fir, beech, and common oak at two sites, a poor...... IMMOBILIZATION; SOIL PROPERTIES; SOIL SOLUTION; TREE SPECIES...

  2. Fagus dominance in Chinese montane forests : natural regeneration of Fagus lucida and Fagus hayatae var. pashanica

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cao, K.F.

    1995-01-01


    Fagus species are important components of certain mesic temperate forests in the Northern Hemisphere. Of eleven Fagus species distinguished, five are found in China. Chinese beeches are restricted to the mountains of southern China. In the montane

  3. Xylobios: patterns, roles and determinants of saproxylic diversity in Belgian deciduous forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philippe Fayt; Etienne Branquart; Marc Dufrene; Jean-Marc Henin; Christophe Pontegnie; Veerle Versteirt

    2003-01-01

    The XYLOBIOS project aims to study patterns, roles and determinants of saproxylic diversity (i.e., species richness and abundance of organisms which are dependent upon the dead or dying wood of moribund or dead trees, or upon the presence of other saproxylics) found in Belgian beech Fagus sylvatica and oak Quercus spp. forests. The...

  4. Effect on a long-term afforestation of pine in a beech domain in NE-Spain as reflected in soil C and N isotopic signature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girona García, Antonio; Badía-Villas, David; González-Pérez, José Antonio; Tomás Jiménez-Morillo, Nicasio; Martí-Dalmau, Clara

    2015-04-01

    The replacement of native beech forests (Fagus sylvatica) by Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris) afforestation may exert changes in soil properties, particularly in soil organic matter (SOM) (Carceller and Vallejo, 1996). Stable isotopic signatures of light elements (d13C, d15N) in soils and plants are valuable proxies for the identification of biogeochemical processes and their rates in the pedosphere (Andreeva et al., 2013 and refs therein). In this work the C and N stable isotopic analysis is used as a proxy to detect changes in SOM surrogated to the effect of centennial replacement of beech by the Scots pinewood. Two acid soil profiles, developed on quartzites under a humid climate at an altitude of 1400-1500 masl, have been sampled in Moncayo (Iberian range, NE-Spain). For each soil profile three O-layers (litter: OL, fragmented litter OF and humified litter OH) and mineral soil horizons (Ah, E, Bhs and C) were sampled. Content and bulk isotopic signature of light elements (C and N) were analysed in a Flash 2000 elemental micro-analyser coupled via a ConFlo IV interface to a Delta V Advantage isotope ratio mass spectrometer (IRMS) (Thermo Scientific, Bremen, Germany). Isotopic ratios are reported as parts per thousand deviations from appropriate standards. The standard deviations of d13C and d15N were typically less than ± 0.05 per thousand, ± 0.2 per thousand, respectively. After 100 years since the pine afforestation, no differences on C content were observed in the O-layers, ranging from 30-47% in pine soils and 37-47 % in beech soils. Similarly, no differences on N content were observed in the O-layers, ranging from 1.24-1.86 % in pine soils and 1.70-1.71 % in beech soils. C and N contents decrease progressively in depth with the exception of E-horizons where the lowest C and N content values were found. C/N ratio is higher in pine soil (20.7-38.1) than in beech O soil horizons (21.8-27.5), showing similar behavior with soil depth. Pine biomass was slightly

  5. Response of Selected Woody Species to Inoculation with Phytophthora citricola and P. cactorum from European Beech Using Multiple Inoculation Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phytophthora citricola and P. cactorum are important cosmopolitan plant pathogens with wide host ranges. Both species have recently been identified as the cause of bleeding canker of European beech (Fagus sylvatica) in the northeastern United States, but whether isolates from European beech had the...

  6. Interactions between leaf nitrogen status and longevity in relation to N cycling in three contrasting European forest canopies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, L.; Ibrom, Andreas; Korhonen, J. F. J.

    2013-01-01

    and Finland, respectively. The objectives were to investigate the distribution of N pools within the canopies of the different forests and to relate this distribution to factors and plant strategies controlling leaf development throughout the seasonal course of a vegetation period. Leaf N pools generally...... internal N cycling cannot be made on the basis of the leaf duration alone. During phases of intensive N turnover in spring and autumn, the NH4+ concentration in beech leaves rose considerably, while fully developed green beech leaves had relatively low tissue NH4+, similar to the steadily low levels...... of the leaf habit, i.e. deciduous versus evergreen, the majority of the canopy foliage N was retained within the trees. This was accomplished through an effective N re-translocation (beech), higher foliage longevity (fir) or both (boreal pine forest). In combination with data from a literature review...

  7. How climate, migration ability and habitat fragmentation affect the projected future distribution of European beech.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saltré, Frédérik; Duputié, Anne; Gaucherel, Cédric; Chuine, Isabelle

    2015-02-01

    Recent efforts to incorporate migration processes into species distribution models (SDMs) are allowing assessments of whether species are likely to be able to track their future climate optimum and the possible causes of failing to do so. Here, we projected the range shift of European beech over the 21st century using a process-based SDM coupled to a phenomenological migration model accounting for population dynamics, according to two climate change scenarios and one land use change scenario. Our model predicts that the climatically suitable habitat for European beech will shift north-eastward and upward mainly because (i) higher temperature and precipitation, at the northern range margins, will increase survival and fruit maturation success, while (ii) lower precipitations and higher winter temperature, at the southern range margins, will increase drought mortality and prevent bud dormancy breaking. Beech colonization rate of newly climatically suitable habitats in 2100 is projected to be very low (1-2% of the newly suitable habitats colonised). Unexpectedly, the projected realized contraction rate was higher than the projected potential contraction rate. As a result, the realized distribution of beech is projected to strongly contract by 2100 (by 36-61%) mainly due to a substantial increase in climate variability after 2050, which generates local extinctions, even at the core of the distribution, the frequency of which prevents beech recolonization during more favourable years. Although European beech will be able to persist in some parts of the trailing edge of its distribution, the combined effects of climate and land use changes, limited migration ability, and a slow life-history are likely to increase its threat status in the near future. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. The variations of aluminium species in mountainous forest soils and its implications to soil acidification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradová, Monika; Tejnecký, Václav; Borůvka, Luboš; Němeček, Karel; Ash, Christopher; Šebek, Ondřej; Svoboda, Miroslav; Zenáhlíková, Jitka; Drábek, Ondřej

    2015-11-01

    Aluminium (Al) speciation is a characteristic that can be used as a tool for describing the soil acidification process. The question that was answered is how tree species (beech vs spruce) and type of soil horizon affect Al speciation. Our hypotesis is that spruce and beech forest vegetation are able to modify the chemical characteristics of organic horizon, hence the content of Al species. Moreover, these characteristics are seasonally dependent. To answer these questions, a detailed chromatographic speciation of Al in forest soils under contrasting tree species was performed. The Jizera Mountains area (Czech Republic) was chosen as a representative mountainous soil ecosystem. A basic forestry survey was performed on the investigated area. Soil and precipitation samples (throughfall, stemflow) were collected under both beech and spruce stands at monthly intervals from April to November during the years 2008-2011. Total aluminium content and Al speciation, pH, and dissolved organic carbon were determined in aqueous soil extracts and in precipitation samples. We found that the most important factors affecting the chemistry of soils, hence content of the Al species, are soil horizons and vegetation cover. pH strongly affects the amount of Al species under both forests. Fermentation (F) and humified (H) organic horizons contain a higher content of water extractable Al and Al(3+) compared to organo-mineral (A) and mineral horizons (B). With increasing soil profile depth, the amount of water extractable Al, Al(3+) and moisture decreases. The prevailing water-extractable species of Al in all studied soils and profiles under both spruce and beech forests were organically bound monovalent Al species. Distinct seasonal variations in organic and mineral soil horizons were found under both spruce and beech forests. Maximum concentrations of water-extractable Al and Al(3+) were determined in the summer, and the lowest in spring.

  9. COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS OF INDICATORS OBTAINED BY CORINELAND COVER METHODOLOGY FOR SUSTAINABLE USE OF FOREST ECOSYSTEMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Slaviša Popović

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Serbian Environmental Protection Agency followed international and national indicators to do monitoring of forested landscape area for the period 1990-2000. Based on the data obtained by Corine Land Cover methodology following the indicators like Forest area, Forested landscape, Forest land and Forest and semi natural area, analysis was done. The forested landscape indicators analysis helped trends monitoring during the period from 1990 - 2000 year. Dynamic of forested area changes could have direct impact on the practical implementation of indicators. Indicator Forest area can be used in planning sustainable use of forests. Recorded growth rates value in 2000year, compared to the 1990th is 0.296%. Indicator Forested landscape increase for 0.186% till 2000 year, while the indicator Forested Land recorded value growth rate of 0.193%. Changes in rates of those indicators can be used in the future for “emission trading”. The smallest increment of rate change of 0.1% was recorded in indicator Forests and semi natural area. Information given by this indicator can be used for monitoring habitats in high mountain areas.

  10. Transformation of even-aged European beech (Fagus sylvatica L.) to uneven-aged management under changing growth conditions caused by climate change

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schou, Erik; Meilby, Henrik

    2013-01-01

    Transformation from even-aged to uneven-aged forest management is currently taking place throughout Europe. Climate change is, however, expected to change growth conditions—possibly quite radically. Using a deterministic approach, it was the objective of this study to investigate the influence...... of such changes on optimal transformation strategies for an even-aged stand of European Beech in Denmark. For a range of growth change scenarios, represented by changes in site index, optimal harvest policies were determined using a matrix modelling approach and a differential evolution algorithm. Transition...... probabilities were updated continuously based on stand level variables and the transition matrix was thus dynamic. With optimal transformation policies, stand development followed similar pathways during the transformation phase irrespective of climate change scenario. Optimal transformation policies were thus...

  11. Drought as a modifier of interaction between adult beech and spruce - impacts on tree water use, C budgets and biotic interactions above- and belowground

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grams, Thorsten

    2017-04-01

    Understanding biotic interactions among tree species with their microbial associates under drought will be crucial for silviculture in meeting ecological challenges of the future. This contribution gives an overview on a project integrating a throughfall-exclusion experiment (TEE) on adult trees with a natural precipitation gradient (PGR) in central European forests. Focus is on drought affecting species interaction above and belowground, including associated ectomycorrhizal (ECM) communities. Study objects are pure and mixed forests dominated by adult European beech and Norway spruce trees (c. 70-years old). At the throughfall-exclusion experiment (TEE), trees are readily accessible via scaffolding and canopy crane (Kranzberg Forest, southern Germany). Effects of experimentally induced, repeated summer drought are assessed with roughly 100 trees assigned to a total of 12 plots (Kranzberg forest ROOF experiment, kroof.wzw.tum.de). The summer drought treatment started in 2014 and was repeated in 2015 and 2106. The focus on species interaction is intensified by a parallel study along a natural precipitation gradient with plot triplets of monocultures and mixed cultures of European beech and Norway spruce at each of the five study sites. Complementary resource use, effects of competitive vs. facilitation and related changes in ECM communities are exemplified for the two tree species of contrasting foliage (i.e. deciduous vs. evergreen) and stomatal sensitivity to drought (i.e. an-isohydric vs. isohydric behavior). At the TEE site, precipitation throughfall was completely excluded from early spring to late fall (i.e. March to November), resulting in pre-dawn leaf water potentials of both beech and spruce as low as -2.5 MPa. Despite significant reductions in growth and rate of photosynthesis by up to 80% under drought, NSC budget of trees was hardly affected. Moreover, phloem functionality, tested as phloem transport velocity through 13C-labeling of recent

  12. Ectomycorrhizal Communities on the Roots of Two Beech (Fagus sylvatica) Populations from Contrasting Climates Differ in Nitrogen Acquisition in a Common Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leberecht, Martin; Dannenmann, Michael; Gschwendtner, Silvia; Bilela, Silvija; Meier, Rudolf; Simon, Judy; Rennenberg, Heinz; Schloter, Michael; Polle, Andrea

    2015-09-01

    Beech (Fagus sylvatica), a dominant forest species in Central Europe, competes for nitrogen with soil microbes and suffers from N limitation under dry conditions. We hypothesized that ectomycorrhizal communities and the free-living rhizosphere microbes from beech trees from sites with two contrasting climatic conditions exhibit differences in N acquisition that contribute to differences in host N uptake and are related to differences in host belowground carbon allocation. To test these hypotheses, young trees from the natural regeneration of two genetically similar populations, one from dryer conditions (located in an area with a southwest exposure [SW trees]) and the other from a cooler, moist climate (located in an area with a northeast exposure [NE trees]), were transplanted into a homogeneous substrate in the same environment and labeled with (13)CO2 and (15)NH4 (+). Free-living rhizosphere microbes were characterized by marker genes for the N cycle, but no differences between the rhizospheres of SW or NE trees were found. Lower (15)N enrichment was found in the ectomycorrhizal communities of the NE tree communities than the SW tree communities, whereas no significant differences in (15)N enrichment were observed for nonmycorrhizal root tips of SW and NE trees. Neither the ectomycorrhizal communities nor the nonmycorrhizal root tips originating from NE and SW trees showed differences in (13)C signatures. Because the level of (15)N accumulation in fine roots and the amount transferred to leaves were lower in NE trees than SW trees, our data support the suggestion that the ectomycorrhizal community influences N transfer to its host and demonstrate that the fungal community from the dry condition was more efficient in N acquisition when environmental constraints were relieved. These findings highlight the importance of adapted ectomycorrhizal communities for forest nutrition in a changing climate. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights

  13. Subcellular Nutrient Element Localization and Enrichment in Ecto- and Arbuscular Mycorrhizas of Field-Grown Beech and Ash Trees Indicate Functional Differences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seven, Jasmin; Polle, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    Mycorrhizas are the chief organ for plant mineral nutrient acquisition. In temperate, mixed forests, ash roots (Fraxinus excelsior) are colonized by arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AM) and beech roots (Fagus sylvatica) by ectomycorrhizal fungi (EcM). Knowledge on the functions of different mycorrhizal species that coexist in the same environment is scarce. The concentrations of nutrient elements in plant and fungal cells can inform on nutrient accessibility and interspecific differences of mycorrhizal life forms. Here, we hypothesized that mycorrhizal fungal species exhibit interspecific differences in mineral nutrient concentrations and that the differences correlate with the mineral nutrient concentrations of their associated root cells. Abundant mycorrhizal fungal species of mature beech and ash trees in a long-term undisturbed forest ecosystem were the EcM Lactarius subdulcis, Clavulina cristata and Cenococcum geophilum and the AM Glomus sp. Mineral nutrient subcellular localization and quantities of the mycorrhizas were analysed after non-aqueous sample preparation by electron dispersive X-ray transmission electron microscopy. Cenococcum geophilum contained the highest sulphur, Clavulina cristata the highest calcium levels, and Glomus, in which cations and P were generally high, exhibited the highest potassium levels. Lactarius subdulcis-associated root cells contained the highest phosphorus levels. The root cell concentrations of K, Mg and P were unrelated to those of the associated fungal structures, whereas S and Ca showed significant correlations between fungal and plant concentrations of those elements. Our results support profound interspecific differences for mineral nutrient acquisition among mycorrhizas formed by different fungal taxa. The lack of correlation between some plant and fungal nutrient element concentrations may reflect different retention of mineral nutrients in the fungal part of the symbiosis. High mineral concentrations, especially of

  14. Subcellular nutrient element localization and enrichment in ecto- and arbuscular mycorrhizas of field-grown beech and ash trees indicate functional differences.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jasmin Seven

    Full Text Available Mycorrhizas are the chief organ for plant mineral nutrient acquisition. In temperate, mixed forests, ash roots (Fraxinus excelsior are colonized by arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AM and beech roots (Fagus sylvatica by ectomycorrhizal fungi (EcM. Knowledge on the functions of different mycorrhizal species that coexist in the same environment is scarce. The concentrations of nutrient elements in plant and fungal cells can inform on nutrient accessibility and interspecific differences of mycorrhizal life forms. Here, we hypothesized that mycorrhizal fungal species exhibit interspecific differences in mineral nutrient concentrations and that the differences correlate with the mineral nutrient concentrations of their associated root cells. Abundant mycorrhizal fungal species of mature beech and ash trees in a long-term undisturbed forest ecosystem were the EcM Lactarius subdulcis, Clavulina cristata and Cenococcum geophilum and the AM Glomus sp. Mineral nutrient subcellular localization and quantities of the mycorrhizas were analysed after non-aqueous sample preparation by electron dispersive X-ray transmission electron microscopy. Cenococcum geophilum contained the highest sulphur, Clavulina cristata the highest calcium levels, and Glomus, in which cations and P were generally high, exhibited the highest potassium levels. Lactarius subdulcis-associated root cells contained the highest phosphorus levels. The root cell concentrations of K, Mg and P were unrelated to those of the associated fungal structures, whereas S and Ca showed significant correlations between fungal and plant concentrations of those elements. Our results support profound interspecific differences for mineral nutrient acquisition among mycorrhizas formed by different fungal taxa. The lack of correlation between some plant and fungal nutrient element concentrations may reflect different retention of mineral nutrients in the fungal part of the symbiosis. High mineral concentrations

  15. Hessian forest ecosystem study. Forest report 2005. Weather, oaks; Waldoekosystemstudie Hessen. Waldzustandsbericht 2005. Witterung, Eiche

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paar, U.; Gawehn, P.; Scheler, B.; Schmidt, M.; Schoenfelder, E.; Eichhorn, J. (comps.) [Hessen-Forst FIV - Forsteinrichtung, Information, Versuchswesen, Hannoversch Muenden (Germany). Fachgebiet fuer Waldoekosystemstudie Hessen/Forsthydrologie

    2005-07-01

    The Hessian Forest Ecosystem Study aims to document and explore changes of forest ecosystems as a result of emissions and climatic influences. Thus, it contributes importantly to a multifunctional and sustainable forest management. Crown condition assessment results show only slight differences compared to the previous year (over all defoliation 2004: 25%, 2005: 26%). Vitality of oak proved a significant increase of defoliation, closely correlated to insect damage in 2005. Crown condition of oak is worse in the Hessian Rhein-Main area compared to the whole country. In contradiction to other species beech shows some regeneration in 2005. Deposition of sulfur and acid components has been on a low level. A high deposition of nitrogen compounds needs further reduction. Long term monitoring of forest ecosystems allows interpretation of climate based effects on forests. (orig.)

  16. Nitrous oxide fluxes from tree stems of temperate forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Yuan; Corre, Marife D.; Rachow, Christine; Veldkamp, Edzo

    2017-04-01

    Although trees are recognized as conduits of soil-generated N2O, little is known about N2O fluxes from mature trees under field conditions and thier contributions to total forest N2O fluxes. Here, we quantified in situ stem N2O fluxes from mature alder trees on poorly-drained soil and mature beech and spruce trees on well-drained soils in Solling, Germany from March to October 2015. Soil N2O fluxes, soil N2O concentrations at 40-cm depth, and soil and climatic variables known to influence N2O fluxes were also measured concurrently with the stem N2O fluxes. Alder, beech and spruce consistently emitted N2O via stems and all displayed higher emission rates in summer than in spring and in autumn. Stem N2O fluxes from alder stand were higher than those from beech and spruce stands (P emissions in upland trees. Stem N2O fluxes represented 8-11% of the total (soil + stem) N2O fluxes in the spruce and beech stands whereas in the alder stand, with its large soil N2O emission, stem emission contributed only 1% of the total flux. Our results suggest that the relative contribution of tree-mediated N2O fluxes is more important in upland trees than in wetland trees.

  17. The presence of amino acids affects inorganic N uptake in non-mycorrhizal seedlings of European beech (Fagus sylvatica).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoelken, Gunda; Simon, Judy; Ehlting, Barbara; Rennenberg, Heinz

    2010-09-01

    To investigate the impact of organic N compounds for inorganic nitrogen uptake in the rhizosphere, we fed ammonium nitrate with or without amino acids (i.e., glutamine or arginine) to the roots of non-mycorrhizal beech (Fagus sylvatica L.) seedlings under controlled conditions at different levels of N availability. Uptake of individual N sources was determined from ¹⁵N (inorganic N) and ¹⁵N ¹³C (organic N) accumulation in the roots. In addition, gene fragments encoding proteins involved in N uptake and metabolism were cloned from beech for gene expression analyses by quantitative real-time PCR in the roots. Generally, ammonium was preferred over nitrate as N source. Organic N sources were taken up by beech roots as intact molecules. Uptake of organic N was significantly higher than inorganic N uptake, thus contributing significantly to N nutrition of beech. Depending on the level of N availability, inorganic N uptake was negatively affected by the presence of organic N sources. This result indicates an overestimation of the contribution of inorganic N uptake to N nutrition of beech in previous studies. Apparently, association with mycorrhizal fungi is not essential for organic N uptake by beech roots. Gene expression analyses showed that transcriptional regulation of the amino acid transporters FsCAT3, FsCAT5, FsAAT and FsAAP and the ammonium transporter FsAMT1.2 in the roots is involved in N nutrition of beech.

  18. Effects of climate variability and functional changes on the interannual variation of the carbon balance in a temperate deciduous forest

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, Jian; van der Linden, Leon; Lasslop, G.

    2012-01-01

    The net ecosystem exchange of CO2 (NEE) between the atmosphere and a temperate beech forest showed a significant interannual variation (IAV) and a decadal trend of increasing carbon uptake (Pilegaard et al., 2011). The objectives of this study were to evaluate to what extent and at which temporal...

  19. Beech tree analyses in the Bohemian/Austrian/Bavarian frontier region; Fallstudie Buche im Dreilaendereck Boehmen/Oberoesterreich/Bayern

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kirchner, M. [GSF - Forschungszentrum fuer Umwelt und Gesundheit GmbH, Muenchen (Germany). Inst. fuer Oekologische Chemie; Baumgarten, M.; Matyssek, R. [Muenchen Univ., Freising (DE). Lehrstuhl fuer Forstbotanik] [and others

    2000-08-01

    The condition of beech trees was investigated in six forest stands in the Bayerischer Wald and Boehmerwald mountains between 1995 and 1997 in order to establish the interdependence between tree conditions, the prevailing natural and anthropogenic site factors, and air pollution especially with groundlevel ozone. Details of the investigations are presented. Although a potential long-term effect of ozone cannot be excluded, the damage observed in beech trees in this region since the eighties is assumed to be caused not by a single factor but by complex interaction patterns between several anthropogenic and natural factors. [German] Es erfolgte im Untersuchungsgebiet Bayerischer Wald/Boehmerwald im Zeitraum 1995 bis 1997 eine detaillierte Zustandscharakterisierung von Altbuchen an sechs Standorten. Im Rahmen der Gesamtuntersuchung sollte geklaert werden, ob Zusammenhaenge zwischen dem Baumzustand und den herrschenden natuerlichen und anthropogenen Standortfaktoren und Luftbelastungen mit Schwerpunkt des bodennahen Ozons bestehen. An Hand kontinuierlicher Ozonmessungen konnte bestaetigt werden, dass die Konzentration des bodennahen Ozons im wesentlichen eine Funktion der Meereshoehe ist; somit ist an Hochlagenstandorten von hoeheren Immissionen auszugehen. Bei den moeglicherweise besser an photooxidativen Stress akklimatisierten Hochlagenbuchen waren die Schaeden bei erhoehter Ozonbelastung geringer ausgepraegt als bei Tieflagenbuchen. Fuer die Hypothese, wonach man eine staerkere Schaedigung der Hochlagenbestaende zu erwarten hat, wurde keine Bestaetigung gefunden. Inositol wird seit einiger Zeit als sensitiver Indikator diskutiert, der auf veraenderte Umweltbedingungen reagiert. Die Inositolkonzentration in Sonnenblaettern von Altbuchen im Bayerischen Wald war in 1995 um ca. 50% geringer als in 1996. Bei den Jungbuchen im Phytotronenexperiment kam es bei anhaltendem Ozonstress und zunehmender Schaedigung zu einer starken Reduktion der Inositolkonzentration in

  20. Flow distortion at a dense forest edge

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dellwik, Ebba; Bingöl, Ferhat; Mann, Jakob

    2014-01-01

    The flow near tall forest edges is complex, yet poorly described. A field experiment using two meteorological masts equipped with sonic anemometers and a horizontally staring lidar was performed upwind and downwind of the interface between an open flat farmland and a tall (hc = 24 m) beech forest...... qualitatively be explained with the concept of eddy‐blocking by the canopy top, which could also explain the observed increase in lateral variance and the decrease in the vertical variance. Despite the short distance to the edge of approximately 1.5hc, the beginning of a new internal boundary layer was visible...... at 1.04hc as a decrease in the vertical momentum flux. At this level, as well as within the forest, the results depended on the wind speed. The presented findings enhance the understanding of the forest edge flow and are useful for model verification and development....

  1. Shading and root-shoot relations in saplings of silver birch, pedunculate oak and beech

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hees, van A.F.M.; Clerkx, A.P.P.M.

    2003-01-01

    Silver birch (Betula pendula Roth), pedunculate oak (Quercus robur L.) and beech (Fagus sylvatica L.) can regenerate successfully under a canopy of Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.). Shading reduces plant growth and modifies plant form, two related aspects. This study focuses on the effects of

  2. Preharvest manual herbicide treatments for controlling American beech in Central West Virginia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeffery D. Kochenderfer; James N. Kochenderfer; David A. Warner; Gary W. Miller

    2004-01-01

    Application costs and efficacy were determined for manual preharvest herbicide treatments applied to control American beech (Fagus grandifolia Ehrh.) that was interfering with the establishment and development of black cherry (Prunus serotina Ehrh.) in central West Virginia. The treatments consisted of four levels of basal area...

  3. ESTIMATING ROOT RESPIRATION IN SPRUCE AND BEECH: DECREASES IN SOIL RESPIRATION FOLLOWING GIRDLING

    Science.gov (United States)

    A study was undertaken to follow seasonal fluxes of CO2 from soil and to estimate the contribution of autotrophic (root + mycorrhizal) to total soil respiration (SR) in a mixed stand of European beech (Fagus sylvatica) and Norway spruce (Picea abies) near Freising, Germany. Matu...

  4. Prevalence, distribution and identification of Phytophthora species from bleeding canker on European beech

    Science.gov (United States)

    While bleeding canker of European beech (Fagus sylvatica) has long been recognized as a problem, the cause in the northeastern United States has not been clear. To resolve this, we surveyed for disease prevalence, identified the pathogens involved, proved their pathogenicity, compared protocols for ...

  5. Chilocorus stigma (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) and other predators of beech scale in central New York

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mark Mayer; Douglas C. Allen

    1983-01-01

    The twice-stabbed lady beetle Chilocorus stigma (Say), was studied in two infestations of beech scale, Cryptococccus fagisuga Lind., to elucidate predator biology and to determine the predator's effect on scale populations. C. stigma is univoltine in north-central regions of New York and its seasonal...

  6. Plastic Growth response of European beech provenances to dry site conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stojnic, S.; Sass, U.G.W.; Orlovic, S.; Matovic, B.; Eilmann, B.

    2013-01-01

    Due to projected global warming, there is a great concern about the ability of European beech to adapt to future climate conditions. Provenance trials provide an excellent basis to assess the potential of various provenances to adjust to given climate conditions. In this study we compared the

  7. Signals from beech (Fagus sylvatica L.) in response to precipitation extremes - flowering induction and reduced foliation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Callesen, Ingeborg

    Reduced foliation in older (but also young) beech (Fagus sylvatica L.) stands was observed in Denmark in the mid 1990ies and culminated with the 1996 summer drought and heat wave. Large differences in the degree of reduced foliation between regions and within stands were observed e.g. reflecting ......) caused by poor internal drainage and minor depressions in micro relief ....

  8. Effect of particle geometry and micro-structure on fast pyrolysis of beech wood

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westerhof, Roel Johannes Maria; Nygard, H.; van Swaaij, Willibrordus Petrus Maria; Kersten, Sascha R.A.; Brilman, Derk Willem Frederik

    2012-01-01

    The influence of particle geometry and microstructure in fast pyrolysis of beech wood has been investigated. Milled wood particles (<0.08–2.4 mm) and natural wood cylinders (2–14 mm) with different lengths (10–50 mm) and artificial wood cylinders (Dp = 0.5–14 mm) made of steel walls, filled with

  9. An integrated approach to radionuclide flow in semi-natural ecosystems underlying exposure pathways to man. Final report of the LANDSCAPE project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moberg, L.; Hubbard, L.; Avila, R.; Wallberg, L. [Swedish Radiation Protection Inst., Stockholm (Sweden); Feoli, E.; Scimone, M.; Milesi, C. [Trieste Univ. (Italy); Mayes, B.; Iason, G. [Macaulay Land Use Research Inst., Aberdeen (United Kingdom); Rantavaara, A.; Vetikko, V. [Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority, Helsinki (Finland); Bergman, R.; Nylen, T. [National Defence Research Establishment, Umeaa (Sweden); Palo, T.; White, N. [Swedish Univ. of Agricultural Sciences, Umeaa (Sweden). Faculty of Forestry; Raitio, H.; Aro, L.; Kaunisto, S. [The Finnish Forest Research Inst., Parkano (Finland); Guillitte, O. [Faculte Univ. des Sciences Agronomiques de Gembloux (Belgium)

    1999-10-01

    The general objective of the LANDSCAPE project has been to obtain a basis for reliable assessments of the radiation exposure to man under different time scales from radionuclides in plant and animal products of representative forest ecosystems in Europe. The work has been focussed on radiocaesium, {sup 134}Cs, {sup 137}Cs. In particular, the project has included (i) to quantify some major processes which influence the radiocaesium contamination of vegetation and fungi, (ii) to quantify radiocaesium intake of key herbivores, particularly free ranging moose, relative to food availability and degree of contamination, (iii) to quantify the influence of forest management on radiocaesium dynamics, and (iv) to incorporate these processes in dynamic models. The LANDSCAPE project has been the combined effort of eight research groups from five European countries, and this report describes the results obtained during 30 months of common work.

  10. Is it possible and necessary to control European spruce bark beetle Ips typographus (L. outbreak in the Białowieża Forest?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hilszczański Jacek

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available In response to the information published in ‘Forest Research Papers’ (vol. 77(4, 2016, regarding the problem of the European spruce bark beetle Ips typographus (L. in the Białowieża Forest, we present our viewpoint on this issue. The role of the European spruce bark beetle in the Białowieża Forest is discussed based on the experience gained in Europe’s forests. We present the effects of I. typographus outbreaks on forest biodiversity as well as outbreak mitigation in the context of the processes taking place in semi-natural forests.

  11. Shifts in soil testate amoeba communities associated with forest diversification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobrov, Anatoly A; Zaitsev, Andrei S; Wolters, Volkmar

    2015-05-01

    We studied changes of testate amoeba communities associated with the conversion of spruce monocultures into mixed beech-fir-spruce forests in the Southern Black Forest Mountains (Germany). In this region, forest conversion is characterized by a gradual development of beech undergrowth within thinned spruce tree stands leading to multiple age continuous cover forests with a diversified litter layer. Strong shifts in the abundance of testate amoeba observed in intermediate stages levelled off to monoculture conditions again after the final stage of the conversion process had been reached. The average number of species per conversion stage (i.e., local richness) did not respond strongly to forest conversion, but the total number of species (i.e., regional richness) was considerably higher in the initial stage than in the mixed forests, due to the large number of hygrophilous species inhabiting spruce monocultures. Functional diversity of the testate amoeba community, however, significantly increased during the conversion process. This shift was closely associated with improved C and N availability as well as higher niche diversity in the continuous cover stands. Lower soil acidity in these forests coincided with a higher relative abundance of eurytopic species. Our results suggest that testate amoeba communities are much more affected by physicochemical properties of the soil than directly by litter diversity.

  12. Effects of soil preparation on the success of artificial beech regeneration in areas infested by weeds on Južni Kučaj Mountain, Serbia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krstić M.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the results of research on the effects of prior soil preparation on artificial regeneration by mountain beech forests (Fagenion moesiacae montanum in weed-covered plots on Južni Kučaj Mountain. Research was conducted on the survival of one-year-old containerized seedlings in weed-covered sites where different auxiliary measures had been carried out, i.e. the following methods of soil preparation: 1 control area, with no preparation; 2 living forest ground cover (blackberry removed; 3 living forest ground cover removed and soil tilled to a depth of 10 cm; 4 only the soil tilled. The above treatments were performed with five repetitions each for further statistical processing. Analysis of variance showed no statistically significant difference at level p <0.05 in initial seedling height, so that this did not considerably affect the influence of the different soil preparations on seedling growth. Half of the planted seedlings were treated with the chemical “Zeba” in order to establish and monitor its effects and needs for its use. The product has a sponge effect underground, meaning that it can absorb and retain moisture in the soil to be used later by the plants. The analysis carried out showed that only in certain elements were there statistically significant differences in one-year-old seedling height increment (annual shoot length.

  13. Investigating the European beech (Fagus sylvatica L.) leaf characteristics along the vertical canopy profile: leaf structure, photosynthetic capacity, light energy dissipation and photoprotection mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scartazza, Andrea; Di Baccio, Daniela; Bertolotto, Pierangelo; Gavrichkova, Olga; Matteucci, Giorgio

    2016-09-01

    Forest functionality and productivity are directly related to canopy light interception and can be affected by potential damage from high irradiance. However, the mechanisms by which leaves adapt to the variable light environments along the multilayer canopy profile are still poorly known. We explored the leaf morphophysiological and metabolic responses to the natural light gradient in a pure European beech (Fagus sylvatica L.) forest at three different canopy heights (top, middle and bottom). Structural adjustment through light-dependent modifications in leaf mass per area was the reason for most of the variations in photosynthetic capacity. The different leaf morphology along the canopy influenced nitrogen (N) partitioning, water- and photosynthetic N-use efficiency, chlorophyll (Chl) fluorescence and quali-quantitative contents of photosynthetic pigments. The Chl a to Chl b ratio and the pool of xanthophyll-cycle pigments (VAZ) increased at the highest irradiance, as well as lutein and β-carotene. The total pool of ascorbate and phenols was higher in leaves of the top and middle canopy layers when compared with the bottom layer, where the ascorbate peroxidase was relatively more activated. The non-photochemical quenching was strongly and positively related to the VAZ/(Chl a + b) ratio, while Chl a/Chl b was related to the photochemical efficiency of photosystem II. Along the multilayer canopy profile, the high energy dissipation capacity of leaves was correlated to an elevated redox potential of antioxidants. The middle layer gave the most relevant contribution to leaf area index and carboxylation capacity of the canopy. In conclusion, a complex interplay among structural, physiological and biochemical traits drives the dynamic leaf acclimation to the natural gradients of variable light environments along the tree canopy profile. The relevant differences observed in leaf traits within the canopy positions of the beech forest should be considered for

  14. Temporal changes in vegetation of a virgin beech woodland remnant: stand-scale stability with intensive fine-scale dynamics governed by stand dynamic events

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tibor Standovár

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this resurvey study is to check if herbaceous vegetation on the forest floor exhibits overall stability at the stand-scale in spite of intensive dynamics at the scale of individual plots and stand dynamic events (driven by natural fine scale canopy gap dynamics. In 1996, we sampled a 1.5 ha patch using 0.25 m² plots placed along a 5 m × 5 m grid in the best remnant of central European montane beech woods in Hungary. All species in the herbaceous layer and their cover estimates were recorded. Five patches representing different stand developmental situations (SDS were selected for resurvey. In 2013, 306 plots were resurveyed by using blocks of four 0.25 m² plots to test the effects of imperfect relocation. We found very intensive fine-scale dynamics in the herbaceous layer with high species turnover and sharp changes in ground layer cover at the local-scale (< 1 m2. A decrease in species richness and herbaceous layer cover, as well as high species turnover, characterized the closing gaps. Colonization events and increasing species richness and herbaceous layer cover prevailed in the two newly created gaps. A pronounced decrease in the total cover, but low species turnover and survival of the majority of the closed forest specialists was detected by the resurvey at the stand-scale. The test aiming at assessing the effect of relocation showed a higher time effect than the effect of imprecise relocation. The very intensive fine-scale dynamics of the studied beech forest are profoundly determined by natural stand dynamics. Extinction and colonisation episodes even out at the stand-scale, implying an overall compositional stability of the herbaceous vegetation at the given spatial and temporal scale. We argue that fine-scale gap dynamics, driven by natural processes or applied as a management method, can warrant the survival of many closed forest specialist species in the long-run. Nomenclature: Flora Europaea (Tutin et al. 2010 for

  15. Higher stability in forest-atmosphere exchange observed in a structurally diverse forest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamrakar, R.; Rayment, M.; Moyano, F.; Herbst, M.; Mund, M.; Knohl, A.

    2016-12-01

    We tested the hypothesis that structurally diverse forests have greater stability on exchange processes with the atmosphere compared to forests with less diverse structure. In a case study, we assessed how net ecosystem exchange (NEE) and normalized maximum assimilation (Amax) varied over time in two forests in Germany based on 11 years of continuous eddy flux measurements. The two sites differ in structure as well as in species composition: one (Hainich) is an unmanaged, uneven-aged and heterogeneous mixed beech forest (65% beech), the other (Leinefelde) is a managed, even-aged and homogeneous pure beech stand. The two selected forests are of similar mean ages (about 130 years old) and exposed to similar air temperatures and vapour pressure deficits. Even though Hainich (the unmanaged forest) received higher rainfall (720 ± 134 mm vs 599±166 mm), the soil water availability showed no significant difference between both sites. Based on detailed biomass inventory, trees in Hainich are well distributed in all diameter at breast height (dbh) classes (10 to 90cm dbh) whereas in Leinefelde (the managed forest) trees are mostly confined to dbh classes of 40 to 55 cm. Our results showed a strong difference in inter-annual variability of NEE, which was lower in the unmanaged than in the managed site (coefficient of variation (CV) of 0.13 and 0.27, respectively). The lowest NEE was observed in both sites in 2004, a mast year and a year after the strong summer drought of 2003. The variation in the inter-annual normalized maximum assimilation (Amax) was lower in Hainich (standard deviation of 2.5 compared to 3.9 µmol m-2 s-1). Also, the seasonal course of Amax differed between the two forests which could explain why the mixed forest was more affected by the late summer drought of 2003, despite showing a more conservative carbon budget than the pure stand in the long term. The interannual anomaly in Amax was correlated with fruit production, the latter being larger in

  16. Effect of environmental variables and stand structure on ecosystem respiration components in a Mediterranean beech forest

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Guidolotti, G.; Rey, A.; D'Andrea, E.; Matteucci, G.; De Angelis, Paolo

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 33, č. 9 (2013), s. 960-972 ISSN 0829-318X Institutional support: RVO:67179843 Keywords : ecosystem respiration * Fagus sylvatica * leaf respiration * soil CO2 efflux * stem CO2 efflux * total non-structural carbohydrates Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour Impact factor: 3.405, year: 2013

  17. Carbon and Nitrogen Pools and Fluxes in Adjacent Mature Norway Spruce and European Beech Forests

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Oulehle, Filip; Růžek, M.; Tahovská, K.; Bárta, J.; Myška, O.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 7, č. 11 (2016), č. článku 282. ISSN 1999-4907 Institutional support: RVO:67179843 Keywords : Fagus sylvatica * Picea abies * carbon * nitrogen * budget * respiration * productivity Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour Impact factor: 1.951, year: 2016

  18. Influence of Root Diameter and Soil Depth on the Xylem Anatomy of Fine- to Medium-Sized Roots of Mature Beech Trees in the Top- and Subsoil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirfel, Kristina; Leuschner, Christoph; Hertel, Dietrich; Schuldt, Bernhard

    2017-01-01

    Despite their importance for water uptake and transport, the xylem anatomical and hydraulic properties of tree roots have only rarely been studied in the field. We measured mean vessel diameter (D), vessel density (VD), relative vessel lumen area (lumen area per xylem area) and derived potential hydraulic conductivity (Kp) in the xylem of 197 fine- to medium-diameter roots (1-10 mm) in the topsoil and subsoil (0-200 cm) of a mature European beech forest on sandy soil for examining the influence of root diameter and soil depth on xylem anatomical and derived hydraulic traits. All anatomical and functional traits showed strong dependence on root diameter and thus root age but no significant relation to soil depth. Averaged over topsoil and deep soil and variable flow path lengths in the roots, D increased linearly with root diameter from ∼50 μm in the smallest diameter class (1-2 mm) to ∼70 μm in 6-7 mm roots (corresponding to a mean root age of ∼12 years), but remained invariant in roots >7 mm. D never exceeded ∼82 μm in the 1-10 mm roots, probably in order to control the risk of frost- or drought-induced cavitation. This pattern was overlain by a high variability in xylem anatomy among similar-sized roots with Kp showing a higher variance component within than between root diameter classes. With 8% of the roots exceeding average Kp in their diameter class by 50-700%, we obtained evidence of the existence of 'high-conductivity roots' indicating functional differentiation among similar-sized roots. We conclude that the hydraulic properties of small to medium diameter roots of beech are mainly determined by root age, rendering root diameter a suitable predictor of hydraulic functioning, while soil depth - without referring to path length - had a negligible effect.

  19. Influence of Root Diameter and Soil Depth on the Xylem Anatomy of Fine- to Medium-Sized Roots of Mature Beech Trees in the Top- and Subsoil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristina Kirfel

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Despite their importance for water uptake and transport, the xylem anatomical and hydraulic properties of tree roots have only rarely been studied in the field. We measured mean vessel diameter (D, vessel density (VD, relative vessel lumen area (lumen area per xylem area and derived potential hydraulic conductivity (Kp in the xylem of 197 fine- to medium-diameter roots (1–10 mm in the topsoil and subsoil (0–200 cm of a mature European beech forest on sandy soil for examining the influence of root diameter and soil depth on xylem anatomical and derived hydraulic traits. All anatomical and functional traits showed strong dependence on root diameter and thus root age but no significant relation to soil depth. Averaged over topsoil and deep soil and variable flow path lengths in the roots, D increased linearly with root diameter from ∼50 μm in the smallest diameter class (1–2 mm to ∼70 μm in 6–7 mm roots (corresponding to a mean root age of ∼12 years, but remained invariant in roots >7 mm. D never exceeded ∼82 μm in the 1–10 mm roots, probably in order to control the risk of frost- or drought-induced cavitation. This pattern was overlain by a high variability in xylem anatomy among similar-sized roots with Kp showing a higher variance component within than between root diameter classes. With 8% of the roots exceeding average Kp in their diameter class by 50–700%, we obtained evidence of the existence of ‘high-conductivity roots’ indicating functional differentiation among similar-sized roots. We conclude that the hydraulic properties of small to medium diameter roots of beech are mainly determined by root age, rendering root diameter a suitable predictor of hydraulic functioning, while soil depth – without referring to path length – had a negligible effect.

  20. Urban forests and pollution mitigation: analyzing ecosystem services and disservices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escobedo, Francisco J; Kroeger, Timm; Wagner, John E

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to integrate the concepts of ecosystem services and disservices when assessing the efficacy of using urban forests for mitigating pollution. A brief review of the literature identifies some pollution mitigation ecosystem services provided by urban forests. Existing ecosystem services definitions and typologies from the economics and ecological literature are adapted and applied to urban forest management and the concepts of ecosystem disservices from natural and semi-natural systems are discussed. Examples of the urban forest ecosystem services of air quality and carbon dioxide sequestration are used to illustrate issues associated with assessing their efficacy in mitigating urban pollution. Development of urban forest management alternatives that mitigate pollution should consider scale, contexts, heterogeneity, management intensities and other social and economic co-benefits, tradeoffs, and costs affecting stakeholders and urban sustainability goals. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Optimal Conventional and Semi-Natural Treatments for the Upper Yakima Spring Chinook Salmon Supplementation Project; Treatment Definitions and Descriptions and Biological Specifications for Facility Design, 1995-1999 Final Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hager, Robert C. (Hatchery Operations Consulting); Costello, Ronald J. (Mobrand Biometrics, Inc., Vashon Island, WA)

    1999-10-01

    This report describes the Yakima Fisheries Project facilities (Cle Elum Hatchery and acclimation satellites) which provide the mechanism to conduct state-of-the-art research for addressing questions about spring chinook supplementation strategies. The definition, descriptions, and specifications for the Yakima spring chinook supplementation program permit evaluation of alternative fish culture techniques that should yield improved methods and procedures to produce wild-like fish with higher survival that can be used to rebuild depleted spring chinook stocks of the Columbia River Basin. The definition and description of three experimental treatments, Optimal Conventional (OCT), Semi-Natural (SNT), Limited Semi-Natural (LSNT), and the biological specifications for facilities have been completed for the upper Yakima spring chinook salmon stock of the Yakima Fisheries Project. The task was performed by the Biological Specifications Work Group (BSWG) represented by Yakama Indian Nation, Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, National Marine Fisheries Service, and Bonneville Power Administration. The control and experimental variables of the experimental treatments (OCT, SNT, and LSNT) are described in sufficient detail to assure that the fish culture facilities will be designed and operated as a production scale laboratory to produce and test supplemented upper Yakima spring chinook salmon. Product specifications of the treatment groups are proposed to serve as the generic templates for developing greater specificity for measurements of product attributes. These product specifications will be used to monitor and evaluate treatment effects, with respect to the biological response variables (post release survival, long-term fitness, reproductive success and ecological interactions).

  2. Sudden distortion of turbulence at a forest edge

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mann, Jakob; Dellwik, Ebba

    2014-01-01

    Dellwik et al. (2013) presented data from a forest edge experiment based on two meteorological towers instrumented with sonic anemometers. The experiment was performed at a dense edge of the Tromnæs Forest, which is a 24 m tall mature beech stand on the island Falster, Denmark. The topography at ...... with the turbulence model by Mann (1994), and investigate whether this model can predict the observed changes of the flow. The presented results are relevant for understanding the rapid changes of turbulence in the heterogeneous landscape....

  3. Forest understory plant and soil microbial response to an experimentally induced drought and heat-pulse event: the importance of maintaining the continuum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isabell von Rein; Arthur Gessler; Katrin Premke; Claudia Keitel; Andreas Ulrich; Zachary E. Kayler

    2016-01-01

    Drought duration and intensity are expected to increase with global climate change. How changes in water availability and temperature affect the combined plant–soil–microorganism response remains uncertain. We excavated soil monoliths from a beech (Fagus sylvatica L.) forest, thus keeping the understory plant–microbe communities intact, imposed an...

  4. Computational snow avalanche simulation in forested terrain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teich, M.; Fischer, J.-T.; Feistl, T.; Bebi, P.; Christen, M.; Grêt-Regamey, A.

    2014-08-01

    Two-dimensional avalanche simulation software operating in three-dimensional terrain is widely used for hazard zoning and engineering to predict runout distances and impact pressures of snow avalanche events. Mountain forests are an effective biological protection measure against avalanches; however, the protective capacity of forests to decelerate or even to stop avalanches that start within forested areas or directly above the treeline is seldom considered in this context. In particular, runout distances of small- to medium-scale avalanches are strongly influenced by the structural conditions of forests in the avalanche path. We present an evaluation and operationalization of a novel detrainment function implemented in the avalanche simulation software RAMMS for avalanche simulation in forested terrain. The new approach accounts for the effect of forests in the avalanche path by detraining mass, which leads to a deceleration and runout shortening of avalanches. The relationship is parameterized by the detrainment coefficient K [kg m-1 s-2] accounting for differing forest characteristics. We varied K when simulating 40 well-documented small- to medium-scale avalanches, which were released in and ran through forests of the Swiss Alps. Analyzing and comparing observed and simulated runout distances statistically revealed values for K suitable to simulate the combined influence of four forest characteristics on avalanche runout: forest type, crown closure, vertical structure and surface cover, for example, values for K were higher for dense spruce and mixed spruce-beech forests compared to open larch forests at the upper treeline. Considering forest structural conditions within avalanche simulations will improve current applications for avalanche simulation tools in mountain forest and natural hazard management.

  5. EXPERIMENTAL RESEARCH CONCERNING THE OPTIMAL DIMENSIONS OF AN ELASTIC STRUCTURE OF BEECH WOOD PARQUET

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olimpia-Minerva ȚURCAȘ (DIACONU

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the results of the experimental research concerning the modulus of elasticity and the average value of the bending strength in case of beech (Fagus sylvatica L. wood. The investigations were performed according to SR EN 408-2004. The results of the research have been analysed in order to establish the variable parameters to be considered for the final experimental research focused on beech wood floor structures that meet the necessary requirements for the sports halls applications. The research presented in the paper is a part of the study theme of the Ph. D. thesis, which investigates the flooring structures able to support the requirements of sports halls activities, different from one sport to another.

  6. In-Situ Denitrification and N2O Emission from Natural and Semi-natural Land Use Types in two UK Catchments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sgouridis, F.; Ullah, S.

    2014-12-01

    Whilst data and understanding of the controls of denitrification process and the subsequent emission of N2O at microbial and plot scale exist, quantification of in situ annual denitrification rates at catchment scales is scarce due to methodological constraints in measuring in situ denitrification in large temporal and spatial scales. In situ denitrification (DNT) was measured monthly (April 2013 - October 2014) in organic (peat bog, heathland, acid grassland), forest (mixed and deciduous), and grassland (improved and semi-improved) land use types in the Ribble-Wyre and Conwy River catchments in the UK. A static chamber technique according to the 15N-Gas Flux method1 was employed for quantifying the fluxes of 15N-N2 and 15N-N2O gases after labelling the soil with 98 at% K15NO3- at tracer level amounts (10% of the ambient nitrate concentration) and sampling the chamber headspace at 0, 1, 2 and 20 hour intervals. The DNT rates ranged between 0 and 2.3 mg N m-2 h-1 and were significantly influenced by land use type (prate of organic and forest soils (4 kg N ha-1 y-1) was 3 and 6 times less than that of semi-improved (12 kg N ha-1 y-1) and improved (23 kg N ha-1 y-1) grassland soils, respectively. The N2O emission, due to denitrification, followed a similar trend with lower fluxes from organic and higher from improved grassland soils (range: 0 - 0.04 mg N m-2 h-1), whilst the N2O:N2 ratio ranged between 0.2 and 4%. The relative contribution of denitrification to net N2O flux varied temporally and across the different land use types and ranged from 0.2 to 75%. The 15N-Gas Flux method can be successfully applied in a variety of land use types for relatively high temporal and spatial resolution measurement of in situ denitrification and the simultaneous quantification of N2 and N2O fluxes due to denitrification. Therefore the ratio of N2O:N2 and also the source apportionment for N2O can be estimated more accurately. The results suggested a difference in DNT rates between

  7. Prediction of bending properties for beech lumber using stress wave method

    OpenAIRE

    Guntekin,Ergun; Ozkan, Serhat; Yilmaz,Tugba

    2014-01-01

    In this study; bending properties of beech wood (Fagus orientalis) were predicted using stress - wave method and compared with static bending tests. First, lumbers which were different in length and cross section were weighed and dimensions were measured. Then, moisture contents were obtained via moisture meter. By using the density, moisture, and dimensions of the samples in MTG Timber Grader device, dynamic modulus of elasticity values were determined. And then, samples were subjected to 3 ...

  8. Effects of altitude on transpiration, leaf vapor pressure deficit and leaf water potential in oriental beech

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatih Bayraktar

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available This study was designed to determine the effect of altitude on transpiration, leaf vapor pressure deficit and leaf water potential in oriental beech (Fagus orientalis Lipsky. The study area was located in Ortaköy, Artvin, and the experimental area had the same soil structure and aspect. The study showed that transpiration and leaf vapor pressure deficit increased but leaf water potential decreased by altitudinal gradient

  9. Correlation between degradation of Beech wood and penetration of Pilodyn 6J needle

    OpenAIRE

    Humar, Miha; Thaler, Nejc

    2013-01-01

    Assessment of white rot decay is one of the most important issues for appropriate treatment of infested wooden commodities, particularly damaged constructions. Pilodyn is a well-established tool for assessing density of several commercially important plantation species, therefore we were interested in its suitability to evaluate the rate of decay as well. The Pilodyn measurements performed on common beech wood (Fagus sylvatica), exposed to three white rot fungi (Trametes versicolor, ...

  10. Preparation, characterization and phenol adsorption capacity of activated carbons from African beech wood sawdust

    OpenAIRE

    N.T. Abdel-Ghani; G.A. El-Chaghaby; F. Helal

    2016-01-01

    In the present study, different activated carbons were prepared from carbonized African beech wood sawdust by potassium hydroxide activation. The activated carbons were characterized by brunauer–emmett–teller, scanning electron microscope, fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and thermogravimetric analyzer. The phenol adsorption capacity of the prepared carbons was evaluated. The different factors affecting phenol’s removal were studied including: contact time, solution pH and initial phe...

  11. Evaluation of beech stand condition based on the basic growth elements

    OpenAIRE

    Vučković Milivoj; Stajić Branko

    2003-01-01

    The state of a beech stand is analyzed from the aspect of stability and production level. The arguments are presented for the need of the objective definition of the stand condition by the criteria based on the characteristics of stand growth elements. This contributes to integral management procedures and their verification in the aim of optimal and stabile production. The study results show that there can be significant deviations from the optimal stand condition regarding the number of tre...

  12. Role of intracellular contents to facilitate supercooling capability in beech (Fagus crenata) xylem parenchyma cells

    OpenAIRE

    Kasuga, Jun; Mizuno, Kaoru; Miyaji, Natsuko; Arakawa, Keita; Fujikawa, Seizo

    2006-01-01

    In order to find the possible role of intracellular contents in facilitating the supercooling capability of xylem parenchyma cells, changes in the temperature of supercooling levels were compared before and after the release of intracellular substances from beech xylem parenchyma cells by DTA. Various methods were employed to release intracellular substances from xylem parenchyma cells and all resulted in a reduction of supercooling ability. It was concluded that the reduction of supercooling...

  13. The amount of carbon in the undergrowth biomass of main types of forests stands in Poland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janyszek Sławomir

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The sequestration of carbon in biomass of herb and moss layers of forest ecosystems is relatively less studied, than analogical processes in trees biomass and soil organic mass. The paper presents mean values of carbon concentration and mean amounts of dry mass of plant material in the herb and moss layer of phytocoenoses formed under canopy of stands of main forest-forming species of trees in Poland. The parameters were studied for beech, birch, oak, alder, pine, fir and spruce forest stands, for most of the particular age classes. The studied plots were contained in following plant associations and communities: Ribo nigri-Alnetum, Fraxino-Alnetum, Galio odorati-Fagetum, Luzulo luzuloidis-Fagetum, Molinio caeruleae-Quercetum roboris, Calamagrostio-Quercetum petraeae, Abietetum polonicum, Abieti-Piceetum montanum, Calamagrostio villosae-Piceetum, as well as anthropogenic communities: Betula pendula comm. on Leucobryo-Pinetum habitat, Larix decidua comm. on Tilio-Carpinetum habitat, Pinus sylvestris comm. on Tilio-Carpinetum habitat, Picea abies comm. on Luzulo pilosae-Fagetum habitat (in lowland and Picea abies comm. on Luzulo luzuloidis-Fagetum habitat (in lower mountain localities. The relatively highest carbon amount was observed in oak forests, pine forests and in older age classes of lowland beech forest, where the carbon concentration in dry mass reaches from 60 to 81%. The lowest concentrations were determined for lowland spruce forests, highland fir forests and for alder forests. The carbon concentration reached in these types of ecosystems from 39 to 41%.

  14. Leaf morphometric characteristics variability of different beech provenances in juvenile development stage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Šijačić-Nikolić Mirjana

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The taxonomic status of beech from the Balkan Peninsula is not yet clearly defined. There is no agreement among different authors about the morphological characteristics discriminating between the Balkan and European and/or Eastern beech. For most characteristics, the mean values are different but the ranges of variation overlap considerably. Provenance trial of beech established in Serbia, at the locality Debeli Lug, has provided an opportunity for research of interprovenance variability at the level of leaf morphometric characteristics in juvenile development stage. Research included 10 provenances originating from the Western Balkans (Serbian provenance 36 and 38; Croatian provenance 24 and 25; Bosnian provenance 30 and 32 and from Central Europe (German provenance 47 and 49; Austrian provenance 56 and Hungarian provenance 42, where following morphometric characteristics were analyzed: leaf length (Ll, leaf width (Lw, petiole lenght (Pl, leaf base width on 1 cm (Blw, number of veins - left (Vl, number of veins - right (Vr, distance between 3rd and 4th vein - left (Dv 3-4. The results of this research show existence of clear differentiation among provenances from the Western Balkan and from Central Europe, from the point of leaf dimensions, number of veins and leaf base width. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. TR31041: Establishment of Wood Plantations Intended for Afforestation of Serbia i br. 43007: Studying climate change and its influence on the environment: impacts, adaptation and mitigation

  15. The biotransformation of soil biocenosis by micromycetes under introduction of Fagus sylvatica L. to oak-hornbeam forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Likhanov, Artur; Bilyera, Nataliya; Sedykh, Olena; Melnychuk, Maksym

    2017-04-01

    Keywords: micromycetes, beech, soil enzymes, illuminance, Penicillium canescens. European beech (Fagus sylvatica L.) is a commercially valuable tree species. As the potential distribution area for beech forest is restricted by Europe, planting of artificial stands is adopted in this region. Beech introduction can alter ecosystem considerably, but the mechanism of this transformation is not clear. We aimed to define abiotic and biotic parameters affecting floor development in beech stands introduced to the oak-hornbeam forest ecosystem ca.50 years ago in Eastern Europe (Ukraine). The daylight illuminace level was similar (2.9-6.5 klx) for both stands. However, grass cover in beech stands did not exceed 0.1-0.5 % even on sites with illuminace level 7.5-8.3 klx. It does not comply with the commonly used suggestion that shading is the main factor causes forest floor absence in the beech stands. We indicated predominantly biotic factors influencing forest floor formation. Thus, particular edaphon represented by micromycetes was able to inhibit plants and microorganisms. We isolated Penicillium canescens strains from soil under beech stands. These fungi utilized beech root exudates and phenol compounds of leaf litter, and produced biologically active substances caused cytostatic and mutagenic effects. They also accelerated (in 2-3.2 times) soil β-glucosidase activity, but had no effect on phosphatase. The biomass of fungi varied under cultivation of Penicillium canescens strains on Czapek medium with the addition of aqueous extracts of beech leaf litter. The biomass of micromycetes increased on 10-15 % at plant phenols concentrations up to 1 mg mL-1. On the contrary, increasing the concentration of phenols up to 4 mg mL-1resulted in a biomass decrease to 40%. The relationship between the concentration of plant phenols and rate of fungal biomass formation indicates that there is probably seasonal regulation of micromycetes activity in the forest biocenosis. The highest

  16. Local-scale topoclimate effects on treeline elevations: a country-wide investigation of New Zealand's southern beech treelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Case, Bradley S; Buckley, Hannah L

    2015-01-01

    Although treeline elevations are limited globally by growing season temperature, at regional scales treelines frequently deviate below their climatic limit. The cause of these deviations relate to a host of climatic, disturbance, and geomorphic factors that operate at multiple scales. The ability to disentangle the relative effects of these factors is currently hampered by the lack of reliable topoclimatic data, which describe how regional climatic characteristics are modified by topographic effects in mountain areas. In this study we present an analysis of the combined effects of local- and regional-scale factors on southern beech treeline elevation variability at 28 study areas across New Zealand. We apply a mesoscale atmospheric model to generate local-scale (200 m) meteorological data at these treelines and, from these data, we derive a set of topoclimatic indices that reflect possible detrimental and ameliorative influences on tree physiological functioning. Principal components analysis of meteorological data revealed geographic structure in how study areas were situated in multivariate space along gradients of topoclimate. Random forest and conditional inference tree modelling enabled us to tease apart the relative effects of 17 explanatory factors on local-scale treeline elevation variability. Overall, modelling explained about 50% of the variation in treeline elevation variability across the 28 study areas, with local landform and topoclimatic effects generally outweighing those from regional-scale factors across the 28 study areas. Further, the nature of the relationships between treeline elevation variability and the explanatory variables were complex, frequently non-linear, and consistent with the treeline literature. To our knowledge, this is the first study where model-generated meteorological data, and derived topoclimatic indices, have been developed and applied to explain treeline variation. Our results demonstrate the potential of such an approach

  17. Air pollution, precipitation chemistry and forest health in the Retezat Mountains, Southern Carpathians, Romania

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bytnerowicz, Andrzej [USDA Forest Service, Pacific Southwest Research Station, 4955 Canyon Crest Drive, Riverside, CA (United States)]. E-mail: abytnerowicz@fs.fed.us; Badea, Ovidiu [Forest Research and Management Institute, Bucharest (Romania); Popescu, Flaviu [Forest Research and Management Institute, Simeria (Romania); Musselman, Robert [USDA Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station, Fort Collins, CO (United States); Tanase, Mihai [Forest Research and Management Institute, Bucharest (Romania); Barbu, Ioan [Forest Research and Management Institute, Campulung Moldovenecs (Romania); Fraczek, Witold [Environmental Systems Research Institute, Redlands, CA (United States); Gembasu, Nicolae [Forest Research and Management Institute, Bucharest (Romania); Surdu, Aurelia [Forest Research and Management Institute, Bucharest (Romania); Danescu, Florin [Forest Research and Management Institute, Bucharest (Romania); Postelnicu, Daniela [ESRI Romania, Bucharest (Romania); Cenusa, Radu [Forest Research and Management Institute, Campulung Moldovenecs (Romania); Vasile, Cristian [ESRI Romania, Bucharest (Romania)

    2005-10-15

    In the Retezat Mountains concentrations of O{sub 3}, NO{sub 2} and SO{sub 2} in summer season 2000-2002 were low and below toxicity levels for forest trees. While NH{sub 3} concentrations were low in 2000, the 2001 and 2002 concentrations were elevated indicating possibility for increased N deposition to forest stands. More than 90% of the rain events were acidic with pH values <5.5, contributing to increased acidity of soils. Crown condition of Norway spruce (Picea abies) and European beech (Fagus sylvatica) was good, however, defoliation described as >25% of foliage injured increased from 9.1% in 2000 to 16.1% in 2002. Drought that occurred in the southern Carpathians between fall 2000 and summer 2002 and frequent acidic rainfalls could cause the observed decline of forest condition. Both Norway spruce and European beech with higher defoliation had lower annual radial increments compared to the trees with low defoliation. Ambient O{sub 3} levels found in the Retezat did not affect crown condition of Norway spruce or European beech. - Retezat Mountains are characterized by relatively clean air, acidic precipitation, and healthy, well growing forests.

  18. Beech Fructification and Bank Vole Population Dynamics--Combined Analyses of Promoters of Human Puumala Virus Infections in Germany.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Reil

    Full Text Available The transmission of wildlife zoonoses to humans depends, amongst others, on complex interactions of host population ecology and pathogen dynamics within host populations. In Europe, the Puumala virus (PUUV causes nephropathia epidemica in humans. In this study we investigated complex interrelations within the epidemic system of PUUV and its rodent host, the bank vole (Myodes glareolus. We suggest that beech fructification and bank vole abundance are both decisive factors affecting human PUUV infections. While rodent host dynamics are expected to be directly linked to human PUUV infections, beech fructification is a rather indirect predictor by serving as food source for PUUV rodent hosts. Furthermore, we examined the dependence of bank vole abundance on beech fructification. We analysed a 12-year (2001-2012 time series of the parameters: beech fructification (as food resource for the PUUV host, bank vole abundance and human incidences from 7 Federal States of Germany. For the first time, we could show the direct interrelation between these three parameters involved in human PUUV epidemics and we were able to demonstrate on a large scale that human PUUV infections are highly correlated with bank vole abundance in the present year, as well as beech fructification in the previous year. By using beech fructification and bank vole abundance as predictors in one model we significantly improved the degree of explanation of human PUUV incidence. Federal State was included as random factor because human PUUV incidence varies considerably among states. Surprisingly, the effect of rodent abundance on human PUUV infections is less strong compared to the indirect effect of beech fructification. Our findings are useful to facilitate the development of predictive models for host population dynamics and the related PUUV infection risk for humans and can be used for plant protection and human health protection purposes.

  19. Soc stock in different forest-related land-uses in central Stara planina mountain, Bulgaria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhiyanski Miglena

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Forest conversions may lead to an accumulation of carbon in vegetation, but little is known about changes in soil C storage with establishment of plantation forests. Understanding these effects is important to addressing issues relevant to ecosystem function and productivity, and to global balance of carbon. The study investigated the effects of the created coniferous plantations on former beech and pasture sites on the soil organic carbon storage. The major forest-related land-uses in the high mountainous regions of central Stara Planina Mountain were investigated: mountainous pasture, coniferous plantations (planted on previous pasture and beech forests between four and five decades ago and natural beech forests. The experimental data of soil properties, conducted in 2005, 2006 and 2007, were used in determining the variations in organic carbon storage in forest litter and in mineral soil under different land-use patterns. At each site five representative soil profiles were opened and described giving a total 75 soil samples from the soil layers respectively at 0-10, 10-30 and 30-50 cm depth. A total of 55 samples from forest floor layers (Aol, Aof, Aoh and greensward were collected with 25:25 cm plastic frame. The main soil properties were determined in accordance with the standardized methods in the Laboratory of soil science at the Forest Research Institute - BAS. The IPCC Good Practice Guidance for Land Use, Land Use Change and Forestry was used to estimate the soil organic carbon stock in soil and litter. The results obtained showed that the SOC stock was quite similar among forest land-uses. The conversion of natural beech forests to coniferous plantations in studied region is related with slightly expressed decrease in soil carbon storage. The values of SOC stocks in 0-50 cm soil layer in these sites were 8.5 (±2.1 tones/ha for pine and 11.0 (±1.4 tones/ha for spruce, while under the natural beech forest it was 14.8 (±1.0 tones

  20. ESTIMATING DENSITY OF EDIBLE DORMOUSE GLIS GLIS (L IN FOREST HABITATS: WHICH METHOD SHOULD WE CHOSE WHEN THE MONITORING IS DONE IN A PRIMEVAL FOREST?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ioan DUMA

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study is trying to reveal the density of edible dormouse in beech forests of different ages and at different altitudes on the Semenic-Cheile Carasului National Park. The density was estimated based on two methods: with the already well known dormouse nestboxes and by census method. The results are analyzed and compared in order to provide the best solutions for dormouse monitoring in National Parks of Romania which have a chronic lack of personnel and resources.

  1. Sustainable forest management and impacts on forest responses to a changing climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stover, D. B.; Parker, G.; Riutta, T.; Capretz, R.; Murthy, I.; Haibao, R.; Bebber, D.

    2009-12-01

    Impacts from human activities at varying scales and intensities have a profound influence on forest carbon dynamics in addition to interactions with climate. As such, forest carbon stocks and fluxes are among the least well-defined elements of the global carbon cycle, and great uncertainty remains in predicting the effect of climate change on forest dynamics. In some cases, these management-climate interactions are well known, but often represent a fundamental gap in our understanding of ecosystem responses and are likely to be important in improving modeling of climate change, and in valuing forest carbon. To improve understanding of human induced forest management-climate interactions, a network of permanent study plots has been established in five sites around the world - in the US, UK, Brazil, India and China. The sites are near larger global monitoring (Smithsonian CTFS) plots to facilitate comparisons. At each site, a series of 1-ha plots have been placed in forest stands with differing management regimes and histories. Utilizing citizen scientists from HSBC bank, all trees >5 cm dbh are tagged, mapped, identified to species, and diameter is recorded within each plot. A subset of trees have dendrometer bands attached, to record seasonal growth. Dead wood and litterfall samples are taken, and microclimate is recorded with automatic sensors. Serial measurements will allow correlation of forest dynamics with weather. Although the studies are at an early stage current results indicate above-ground biomass estimates are 102-288 Mg ha-1 for intermediate and mature Liriodendron tulipifera-dominated stands in the US, respectively. In India, mature semi-natural evergreen forests biomass estimates are 192-235 Mg ha-1 while plantation and semi-natural core forests in the UK are estimated at 211-292 Mg ha-1. Successional Atlantic forests in Brazil are estimated to contain 192-235 Mg ha-1. In the US, initial results have demonstrated dramatic differences in microclimate

  2. Modelling the decadal trend of ecosystem carbon fluxes demonstrates the important role of functional changes in a temperate deciduous forest

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, Jian; Jansson, P.E.; van der Linden, Leon

    2013-01-01

    –2009) trend in carbon uptake when global parameter estimates were used. Annual parameter estimates were able to reproduce the decadal scale trend; the yearly fitted posterior parameters (e.g. the light use efficiency) indicated a role for changes in the ecosystem functional properties. A possible role......Temperate forests are globally important carbon sinks and stocks. Trends in net ecosystem exchange have been observed in a Danish beech forest and this trend cannot be entirely attributed to changing climatic drivers. This study sought to clarify the mechanisms responsible for the observed trend...... for nitrogen demand during mast years is supported by the inter-annual variability in the estimated parameters. The inter-annual variability of photosynthesis parameters was fundamental to the simulation of the trend in carbon fluxes in the investigated beech forest and this demonstrates the importance...

  3. Ungulate Impact on Natural Regeneration in Spruce-Beech-Fir Stands in Černý důl Nature Reserve in the Orlické Hory Mountains, Case Study from Central Sudetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zdeněk Vacek

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the results of a study on tree regeneration of forest stands in the Černý důl Nature Reserve, which is situated in the Orlické hory Mountains Protected Landscape area in the Czech Republic. Research was conducted in a spruce-beech stand with an admixture of silver fir, sycamore maple and rowan on two comparative permanent research plots (PRPs (PRP 1—fenced enclosure and PRP 2—unfenced. Typological, soil, phytosociological and stand characteristics of the two PRPs are similar. The results showed that ungulate browsing is a limiting factor for successful development of natural regeneration of autochthonous tree species. The population of tree species of natural regeneration on the fenced plot (PRP 1 is sufficient in relation to the site and stand conditions. However, natural regeneration on PRP 2 is considerably limited by browsing. Damage is greatest to fir, sycamore maple and rowan; less severe to beech; and the least to spruce.

  4. Forest report 2009; Waldzustandsbericht 2009

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2009-07-01

    The department of Forest Environmental Control assesses and evaluates eff ects of climate change and chemical deposition on forest ecosystems. The 2009 forest condition survey results show an average defoliation of 23 %. Compared to 2008, this is little worse. Defoliation of older beech (Fagus sylvatica, > 60 years) increased from 25 % in 2008 to 33 % in 2009. Older oak results changed from 26 % to 24 % (2009). Spruce (Picea abies) remains unchanged (30 %). Pinus sylvatica shows a small reduction from 25 % (2008) to 24 % (2009). Younger trees (< 60 years) follow the general trend of older trees. Over the long run, the average annual mortality in Hesse remains quite low (0.3 %). The amount of severe damages shows stable results (3 %). Regarding the heavy wind throws in 1990 and the very dry year of 2003, we found increasing results of mortality and severe damages. In general, climate conditions have changed during the last twenty years in Hesse. Non vegetation periods but also vegetation periods are getting warmer. For the next decades climate projections elongate this retrospective trend. Winters will become more humid and warmer, summer seasons dryer and to some extend warmer. This will cause multiple eff ects on forests. Measurements show, that acid deposition is reduced from the eighties. However, N deposition remains nearly unchanged on a too high level. (orig.)

  5. Phytocenological and edaphic characteristics of sessile oak forests on Miroč Mt in northeastern Serbia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cvjetićanin Rade

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This research was carried out in natural stands of sessile oak (Quercus petraea agg. Ehrendorfer 1967 on Miroč mountain. Three comunities were investigated: Pure sessile oak forest (Quercetum montanum Čer. et Jov. 1953. s.l., sessile oak-common hornbeam forest (Querco-Carpinetum moesiacum Rud. 1949. s.l. and sessile oak-balkan beech forest (Querco-Fagetum Gliš. 1971. Pure sessile oak forests are found on the following soils: dystric ranker and acid cambic soil on sandstone, dystric ranker and acid cambisols on phyllite, and acid cambic soil on schists. Sessile oak-hornbeam forests grow on sandstone, granite and schists. Sessile oak-beech forests are found on acid cambisol on phyllite and sandstone conglomerate. Various ecological conditions (exposition, slope, altitude, soil types and bedrock on Mt Miroč caused the occurence of diverse sessile oak forest communities, while different states of these forest stands resulted from the implementation of management measures. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 37008: Održivo gazdovanje ukupnim potencijalima šuma u Republici Srbiji

  6. Desiccation and Mortality Dynamics in Seedlings of Different European Beech (Fagus sylvatica L.) Populations under Extreme Drought Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolte, Andreas; Czajkowski, Tomasz; Cocozza, Claudia; Tognetti, Roberto; de Miguel, Marina; Pšidová, Eva; Ditmarová, Ĺubica; Dinca, Lucian; Delzon, Sylvain; Cochard, Hervè; Ræbild, Anders; de Luis, Martin; Cvjetkovic, Branislav; Heiri, Caroline; Müller, Jürgen

    2016-01-01

    European beech (Fagus sylvatica L., hereafter beech), one of the major native tree species in Europe, is known to be drought sensitive. Thus, the identification of critical thresholds of drought impact intensity and duration are of high interest for assessing the adaptive potential of European beech to climate change in its native range. In a common garden experiment with one-year-old seedlings originating from central and marginal origins in six European countries (Denmark, Germany, France, Romania, Bosnia-Herzegovina, and Spain), we applied extreme drought stress and observed desiccation and mortality processes among the different populations and related them to plant water status (predawn water potential, ΨPD) and soil hydraulic traits. For the lethal drought assessment, we used a critical threshold of soil water availability that is reached when 50% mortality in seedling populations occurs (LD50SWA). We found significant population differences in LD50SWA (10.5-17.8%), and mortality dynamics that suggest a genetic difference in drought resistance between populations. The LD50SWA values correlate significantly with the mean growing season precipitation at population origins, but not with the geographic margins of beech range. Thus, beech range marginality may be more due to climatic conditions than to geographic range. The outcome of this study suggests the genetic variation has a major influence on the varying adaptive potential of the investigated populations.

  7. De novo transcriptome assembly and analysis of differential gene expression in response to drought in European beech.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markus Müller

    Full Text Available Despite the ecological and economic importance of European beech (Fagus sylvatica L. genomic resources of this species are still limited. This hampers an understanding of the molecular basis of adaptation to stress. Since beech will most likely be threatened by the consequences of climate change, an understanding of adaptive processes to climate change-related drought stress is of major importance. Here, we used RNA-seq to provide the first drought stress-related transcriptome of beech. In a drought stress trial with beech saplings, 50 samples were taken for RNA extraction at five points in time during a soil desiccation experiment. De novo transcriptome assembly and analysis of differential gene expression revealed 44,335 contigs, and 662 differentially expressed genes between the stress and normally watered control group. Gene expression was specific to the different time points, and only five genes were significantly differentially expressed between the stress and control group on all five sampling days. GO term enrichment showed that mostly genes involved in lipid- and homeostasis-related processes were upregulated, whereas genes involved in oxidative stress response were downregulated in the stressed seedlings. This study gives first insights into the genomic drought stress response of European beech, and provides new genetic resources for adaptation research in this species.

  8. Influence of xylem ray integrity and degree of polymerization on bending strength of beech wood decayed by Pleurotus ostreatus and Trametes versicolor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehsan Bari; Reza Oladi; Olaf Schmidt; Carol A. Clausen; Katie Ohno; Darrel D. Nicholas; Mehrdad Ghodskhah Daryaei; Maryam Karim

    2015-01-01

    The scope of this research was to evaluate the influence of xylem ray (XR) and degree of polymerization (DP) of holocellulose in Oriental beech wood (Fagus orientalis Lipsky.) on impact bending strength against two white-rot fungi. Beech wood specimens, exposed to Pleurotus ostreatus and Trametes versicolor, were evaluated for...

  9. Radial patterns of 13 elements in the tree rings of beech trees from Mavrovo National park, FYROM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hristovski S.

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The radial patterns of 13 elements (N, P, K, Ca, Mg, Fe, Na, Mn, Zn, Cu, Pb, Cd and Co were analyzed in the tree rings of European beech (Fagus sylvatica L.. The study site was located in an 'unpolluted' beech ecosystem in Mavrovo National Park. Thus, the obtained radial patterns in the beech trees were considered to be physiologically driven without significant pollution influence. The influence of the main climatic factors (temperature and rainfall was tested. The radial patterns of individual trees were compared in order to find individual responses to environmental impacts. For most of the elements, higher concentrations were recorded in the pith and outer-most rings and lower in the middle part of the wood. The concentration of heavy metals was low, and followed the physiological patterns of other biogenic elements.

  10. Effect of CO2 enhancement on beech (Fagus sylvatica L. seedling root rot due to Phytophthora plurivora and Phytophthora cactorum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tkaczyk Miłosz

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Global climate change is associated with higher concentrations of atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2. The ongoing changes are likely to have significant, direct or indirect effects on plant diseases caused by many biotic agents such as phytopathogenic fungi. This study results showed that increased CO2 concentration did not stimulate the growth of 1-year-old beech Fagus sylvatica L seedlings but it activated pathogenic Phytophthora species (P. plurivora and P. cactorum which caused significant reduction in the total number of fine roots as well as their length and area. The results of the greenhouse experiment indicated that pathogens once introduced into soil survived in pot soil, became periodically active (in sufficient water conditions and were able to damage beech fine roots. However, the trees mortality was not observed during the first year of experiment. DNA analyses performed on soil and beech tissue proved persistence of introduced Phytophthora isolates.

  11. Occurrence and formation of chloroform at Danish forest sites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haselmann, K.F.; Ketola, R.A.; Laturnus, F.

    2000-01-01

    Ambient air and soil air of spruce forest, beech forest and grassland from Zealand, Denmark, were investigated for volatile chlorinated compounds by adsorbent tube sampling, thermodesorption, cryo-trapping and analysis by high-resolution gas chromatography with electron capture detection. The mean...... the initial soil air concentration after 38 h, while the concentrations of the other volatile chlorinated compounds investigated remained fairly constant. The observed chloroform concentration profiles and release rates may indicate a biogenic formation of chloroform in the upper soil layer of spruce forests......, whereas an anthropogenic origin is suggested for the other chlorinated compounds investigated. From the release study and concentration gradient measurements in the spruce forest soil, chloroform release to the atmosphere was calculated for northern temperate regions. The release was in the range...

  12. The impact of broadleaved woodland on water resources in lowland UK: I. Soil water changes below beech woodland and grass on chalk sites in Hampshire

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Roberts

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The possible effects of broadleaved woodland on recharge to the UK Chalk aquifer have led to a study of evaporation and transpiration from beech woodland (Black Wood and pasture (Bridgets Farm, growing in shallow soils above chalk in Hampshire. Eddy correlation measurements of energy balance components above both the forest and the grassland enabled calculation of latent heat flux (evaporation and transpiration as a residual. Comparative measurements of soil water content and soil water potential in 9 m profiles under both forest and grassland found changes in soil water content down to 6 m at both sites; however, the soil water potential measurements showed upward movement of water only above a depth of about 2 m. Below this depth, water continued to drain and the soil water potential measurements showed downward movement of water at both sites, notwithstanding significant negative soil water potentials in the chalk and soil above. Seasonal differences occur in the soil water content profiles under broadleaved woodland and grass. Before the woodland foliage emerges, greater drying beneath the grassland is offset in late spring and early summer by increased drying under the forest. Yet, when the change in soil water profiles is at a maximum, in late summer, the profiles below woodland and grass are very similar. A comparison of soil water balances for Black Wood and Bridgets Farm using changes in soil water contents, local rainfall and evaporation measured by the energy balance approach allowed drainage to be calculated at each site. Although seasonal differences occurred, the difference in cumulative drainage below broadleaved woodland and grass was small.

  13. Epiphytic lichens as sentinels for heavy metal pollution at forest ecosystems (central Italy)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loppi, Stefano; Pirintsos, S.A

    2003-03-01

    Epiphytic lichens were useful as an early warning system for changes in forest ecosystems. - The results of a study using epiphytic lichens (Parmelia caperata) as sentinels for heavy metal deposition at six selected forest ecosystems of central Italy are reported. The woods investigated are characterized by holm oak (Quercus ilex), turkey oak (Quercus cerris) and beech (Fagus sylvatica) and represent the typical forest ecosystems of central Italy at low, medium and high elevations, respectively. The results showed that levels of heavy metals in lichens were relatively low and consequently no risk of heavy metal air pollution is expected for the six forest ecosystems investigated. However, for two of them there are indications of a potential risk: the beech forest of Vallombrosa showed signs of contamination by Pb as a consequence of vehicle traffic due to the rather high touristic pressure in the area, and the holm oak forest of Cala Violina showed transboundary pollution by Mn, Cr and Ni originating from the steel industry in Piombino. Epiphytic lichens proved to be very effective as an early warning system to detect signs of a changing environment at forest ecosystems.

  14. Evaluation of beech stand condition based on the basic growth elements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vučković Milivoj

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The state of a beech stand is analyzed from the aspect of stability and production level. The arguments are presented for the need of the objective definition of the stand condition by the criteria based on the characteristics of stand growth elements. This contributes to integral management procedures and their verification in the aim of optimal and stabile production. The study results show that there can be significant deviations from the optimal stand condition regarding the number of trees crown development, taper and diameter increment, which are not perceptible to the eye until the visible signs of tree revitalization when the damage cannot be repaired.

  15. Analysis of ecological thresholds in a temperate forest undergoing dieback.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip Martin

    Full Text Available Positive feedbacks in drivers of degradation can cause threshold responses in natural ecosystems. Though threshold responses have received much attention in studies of aquatic ecosystems, they have been neglected in terrestrial systems, such as forests, where the long time-scales required for monitoring have impeded research. In this study we explored the role of positive feedbacks in a temperate forest that has been monitored for 50 years and is undergoing dieback, largely as a result of death of the canopy dominant species (Fagus sylvatica, beech. Statistical analyses showed strong non-linear losses in basal area for some plots, while others showed relatively gradual change. Beech seedling density was positively related to canopy openness, but a similar relationship was not observed for saplings, suggesting a feedback whereby mortality in areas with high canopy openness was elevated. We combined this observation with empirical data on size- and growth-mediated mortality of trees to produce an individual-based model of forest dynamics. We used this model to simulate changes in the structure of the forest over 100 years under scenarios with different juvenile and mature mortality probabilities, as well as a positive feedback between seedling and mature tree mortality. This model produced declines in forest basal area when critical juvenile and mature mortality probabilities were exceeded. Feedbacks in juvenile mortality caused a greater reduction in basal area relative to scenarios with no feedback. Non-linear, concave declines of basal area occurred only when mature tree mortality was 3-5 times higher than rates observed in the field. Our results indicate that the longevity of trees may help to buffer forests against environmental change and that the maintenance of old, large trees may aid the resilience of forest stands. In addition, our work suggests that dieback of forests may be avoidable providing pressures on mature and juvenile trees do

  16. Properties of dissolved and total organic matter in throughfall, stemflow and forest floor leachate of central European forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bischoff, S.; Schwarz, M. T.; Siemens, J.; Thieme, L.; Wilcke, W.; Michalzik, B.

    2015-05-01

    We present the first investigation of the composition of dissolved organic matter (DOM) compared to total organic matter (TOM, consisting of DOM, POM lignin-derived and aromatic C of the aryl C region resulting in lower aromaticity indices and a diminished degree of humification. Across the ecosystem compartments, differences in the structural composition of DOM and TOM under beech lessened in the following order: throughfall > stemflow ≈ forest floor leachate. In contrast to the broadleaved sites, differences between DOM and TOM in throughfall solution under spruce were less pronounced and spectra were, overall, dominated by the alkyl C region, representing aliphatic C. Explanations of the reported results might be substantiated in differences in tree species-specific structural effects, leaching characteristics or differences in the microbial community of the tree species' phyllosphere and cortisphere. However, the fact that throughfall DOM under beech showed the highest intensities of recalcitrant aromatic and phenolic C among all samples analysed likely points to a high allelopathic potential of beech trees negatively affecting other organisms and hence ecosystem processes and functions.

  17. Suchozemská malakofauna malokarpatských potočných jelšín a priľahlých porastov Terrestrial molluscan assemblages in alder alluvial forests and adjacent forests in the Small Carpathians (SW Slovakia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juraj Čačaný

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A total of 56 species of land snails and 9 freshwater species were recorded at 22 alluvial forest sites (14 alder sites, 8 beech or hornbeam sites in the Small Carpathian Mts. (SW Slovakia during the researches in 2008–2009. Fifty two species were recorded in alder carrs and 32 species in adjacent forests. Woodland species sensu stricto (17 species, 32.7% and euryecious species (10 species, 19.2% predominated in alder forests. Dominant ecological groups in beech and hornbeam forests were woodland species sensu stricto (14 species, 43.8% and woodland eurytopic species (6 species, 18.8%. There were 28 species (433 individuals at the highest species richness site (Lozorno, alder carr. Generally, the species richness was higher in alder forests in comparison to beech or hornbeam forests. As expected, there was a higher number of species at the carbonate sites than non-carbonate sites. The following species were recorded in the Small Carpathian Mts. for the first time: Deroceras rodnae s. lat. Grossu et Lupu, 1965, Deroceras turcicum (Simroth, 1894 and freshwater snail Gyraulus rossmaessleri (Auerswald, 1852.

  18. Forest vegetation in western Romania in relation to climate variables: Does community composition reflect modelled tree species distribution?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Heinrichs

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available European beech (Fagus sylvatica L. is the prevailing tree species of mesic forests in Central Europe. Increasing summer temperatures and decreasing precipitation, as climate change scenarios predict, may, however, negatively influence beech growth and induce a shift to more thermophilous forest communities. Temperatures as expected in the future for western Central Europe are currently found in parts of western Romania. In light of this climate analogy we investigated forest vegetation as an indicator for future vegetation changes in five regions of western Romania representing a climatic gradient. We related species composition to climate variables and examined if tree and understorey species composition respond similarly to the climatic gradient. We further analysed if tree species occurrences correspond with their modelled distance to the rear niche edge. We found evidence for climatic effects on vegetation composition among regions as well as within deciduous and pine forests, respectively. This underlines that vegetation composition is a useful indicator for environmental change. Tree and understorey species compositions were closely linked showing that community-based characterization of forest stands can provide additional information on tree species suitability along environmental gradients. Both, vegetation composition and a climatic marginality index demonstrate the rear niche edge occurrence of beech in the studied sites of Romania and can predict the site suitability for different tree species. While vegetation surveys indicate Quercus petraea to be associated to moderately mesic forests, the marginality index suggested an inner niche position of sessile oak along the climatic gradient. Phytosociological relevés that differentiate between subspecies (or microspecies of sessile oak with differing habitat requirements should be considered to complement national forest inventories and species distribution maps when modelling rear

  19. Meteorological Drivers of Extremes in Daily Stem Radius Variations of Beech, Oak and Pine in Northeastern Germany: An Event Coincidence Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonatan Frederik Siegmund

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Observed recent and expected future increases in frequency and intensity of climatic extremes in central Europe may pose critical challenges for domestic tree species. Continuous dendrometer recordings provide a valuable source of information on tree stem diameter or radius variations, offering the possibility to study a tree's response to environmental influences at a high temporal resolution. In this study, we analyze stem radius variations (SRV of three domestic tree species (beech, oak and pine from 2012 to 2014. We use the novel statistical approach of event coincidence analysis (ECA to investigate the simultaneous occurrence of extreme daily weather conditions and extreme SRVs, where extremes are defined with respect to the common values at a given phase of the annual growth period. Besides defining extreme events based on individual meteorological variables, we additionally introduce conditional and joint ECA as new multivariate extensions of the original methodology and apply them for testing 105 different combinations of variables regarding their impact on SRV extremes. Our results reveal a strong susceptibility of all three species to the extremes of several meteorological variables. Yet, the inter-species differences regarding their response to the meteorological extremes are comparatively low. The obtained results provide a thorough extension of previous correlation-based studies by emphasizing on the timings of climatic extremes only. We suggest that the employed methodological approach should be further promoted in forest research regarding the investigation of tree responses to changing environmental conditions.

  20. Nitrous oxide fluxes from tree stems in temperate forest ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Y.; Corre, M. D.; Veldkamp, E.

    2016-12-01

    Investigations on tree-mediated N2O fluxes are rare and restricted mostly to seedlings and saplings. Presently, little is known about N2O fluxes from mature trees in field conditions as well as their contributions to total forest N2O fluxes. Here we quantified in situ stem N2O fluxes from mature alder trees on poorly-drained soil and mature beech and spruce trees on well-drained soil in Solling, Germany from March to October 2015. Soil N2O fluxes, soil N2O concentrations in 40-cm depth and other environmental factors were also measured simultaneously. In the present study, alder, beech and spruce consistently emitted N2O via stems and all displayed higher emission rates in summer than in spring and autumn. Stem N2O fluxes increased with increasing air and soil temperature, suggesting the influence of temperature on soil N2O production and soil-plant N2O transport (via transpiration stream). Increased in vapor pressure deficit speeded up stem N2O fluxes in alder and spruce, possibly because of enhanced sap flow rates and the subsequent dissolved N2O transport rates. In the alder stand, the significant correlations between stem N2O fluxes, soil N2O fluxes and soil N2O concentrations suggest that N2O transport may have been facilitated by a combination of passive diffusion and convective mechanisms. In the beech and spruce stands, the significant correlations between stem N2O fluxes, temperature and vapor pressure deficit suggest convective transport of soil N2O to the stem. Overall, stem N2O fluxes from alder were higher than beech and spruce due to the presence of aerenchyma and lenticels as well as higher soil water content and soil N availability in the alder stand. Stem N2O fluxes represented 8-11% of the total N2O fluxes in the spruce and beech stands, whereas in the alder stand with large soil N2O fluxes its stem emissions contributed only 1% to total N2O fluxes. Our study provided information of hitherto unknown tree-mediated N2O contribution to forest N2O

  1. Preparation, characterization and phenol adsorption capacity of activated carbons from African beech wood sawdust

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N.T. Abdel-Ghani

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, different activated carbons were prepared from carbonized African beech wood sawdust by potassium hydroxide activation. The activated carbons were characterized by brunauer–emmett–teller, scanning electron microscope, fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and thermogravimetric analyzer. The phenol adsorption capacity of the prepared carbons was evaluated. The different factors affecting phenol’s removal were studied including: contact time, solution pH and initial phenol concentration. The optimum phenol removal was obtained after a contact time of 300 min. and at an initial phenol solution pH 7. The maximum removal percentages were determined at 5mg/l initial phenol concentration as 79, 93, 94 and 98% for AC0, AC1, AC2 and AC3; respectively. The adsorption of phenol on African beech sawdust activated carbons was found to follow the Lagergren first order kinetics and the intraparticle diffusion mechanism gave a good fit to the experimental data. The isothermal models applied fitted the experimental data in the order: Langmuir> Dubinin–Radushkevich> Freundlich and Temkin.

  2. Comparative economic and environmental assessment of four beech wood based biorefinery concepts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budzinski, Maik; Nitzsche, Roy

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze four conceptual beech wood based biorefineries generated during process design in terms of environmental and economic criteria. Biorefinery 1 annually converts 400,000 dry metric tons of beech wood into the primary products 41,600t/yr polymer-grade ethylene and 58,520tDM/yr organosolv lignin and the fuels 90,800tDM/yr hydrolysis lignin and 38,400t/yr biomethane. Biorefinery 2 is extended by the product of 58,400t/yr liquid "food-grade" carbon dioxide. Biorefinery 3 produces 69,600t/yr anhydrous ethanol instead of ethylene. Compared to biorefinery 3, biorefinery 4 additionally provides carbon dioxide as product. Biorefinery 3 and 4 seem most promising, since under basic assumptions both criteria, (i) economic effectiveness and (ii) reduction of potential environmental impacts, can be fulfilled. All four alternatives may reduce potential environmental impacts compared to reference systems using the ReCiPe methodology. Economic feasibilities of the analyzed biorefineries are highly sensitive. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Decrease in Danish semi-natural grassland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svenningsen, Stig Roar; Levin, Gregor Philipp; Jepsen, Martin Rudbeck

    2015-01-01

    landscapes, which are dominated by intensive agriculture. However, many of these studies are based on cartographical sources, such as topographical and thematic maps, and thus prone to uncertainties regarding classification systems over time, variations in definitions of land use categories and lacking......, which was based on an interpretation of aerial photos, and which indicated a much less pronounced reduction of SNGs. Year to year comparisons of these two analyses also revealed large discrepancies in the coverage of SNGs. Our results indicate that change detection studies must account for uncertainties...... in classifications and results should be interpreted with caution....

  4. Assessing relationships between forest structure and soil erosion in mountainous forest using a Cesium-137 tracer technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Kwanghun; Reineking, Björn

    2016-04-01

    The fallout radionuclides (FRNs) particularly Cesium-137 are known as a quantitatively reliable means of estimating sediment redistribution rates within agricultural landscapes and forested area. However, fewer studies have done using FRNs in forested areas even though understanding soil redistribution patterns in mountainous forest areas is one of the important issues for forest management. The objective of this study is to figure out key forest structures affecting soil redistribution rate. In this study, we estimated soil loss and gain rate at 50 points with various forest types and topography in steep mountainous forest area in the Experimental Forest of Kangwon National University in Kangwon Province, South Korea by the Cesium-137 tracing technique. The results show the factors related to the topography such as slope and water accumulation have little effect on soil redistribution rate. The shrub and small tree layer affect more on soil redistribution rate. Additionally, the data shows relatively higher erosion rate in Korean Pine tree plantation area (Pinus koraiensis Sieb. et Zucc.) than semi-natural deciduous and Quercus forests where shrubs and small trees are more prevalent.

  5. Impacts of Invasive Pests on Forest Carbon and Nitrogen Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovett, G. M.; Crowley, K. F.

    2014-12-01

    Forests of the U.S. have been subject to repeated invasions of destructive insects and diseases imported from other continents. Like other disturbances, these pests can produce short-term ecosystem effects due to tree mortality, but unlike other disturbances, they often target individual species and therefore can cause long-term species change in the forest. Because tree species vary in their influence on carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) cycles, pest-induced species change can radically alter the biogeochemistry of a forest. In this paper we use both data and modeling to examine how pest-induced species change may alter the C and N cycling in forests of the eastern U.S. We describe a new forest ecosystem model that distinguishes individual tree species and allows species composition to shift over the course of the model run. Results indicate that the mortality of eastern hemlock (Tsuga canadensis) by hemlock woolly adelgid and its replacement by faster-growing species such as black birch (Betula lenta) will reduce forest floor C stocks but increase productivity as the birch become established. Decline of American beech (Fagus grandifolia) from beech bark disease and its replacement by sugar maple (Acer saccharum) is likely to decrease soil C storage and increase N leaching from the ecosystem. Responses to other invasive pests will also be discussed. The magnitude of these species-specific effects on C and N cycling is in many cases larger than direct effects expected from changes in climate and atmospheric N deposition, indicating that species change should be included in models that predict forest ecosystem function under future environmental conditions.

  6. Interactions between leaf nitrogen status and longevity in relation to N cycling in three contrasting European forest canopies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, L.; Ibrom, Andreas; Korhonen, J. F. J.

    2013-01-01

    and Finland, respectively. The objectives were to investigate the distribution of N pools within the canopies of the different forests and to relate this distribution to factors and plant strategies controlling leaf development throughout the seasonal course of a vegetation period. Leaf N pools generally...... showed much higher seasonal and vertical variability in beech than in the coniferous canopies. However, also the two coniferous tree species behaved very differently with respect to peak summer canopy N content and N re-translocation efficiency, showing that generalisations on tree internal vs. ecosystem...... of the leaf habit, i.e. deciduous versus evergreen, the majority of the canopy foliage N was retained within the trees. This was accomplished through an effective N re-translocation (beech), higher foliage longevity (fir) or both (boreal pine forest). In combination with data from a literature review...

  7. Hessian forest ecosystem study. Hessian forest ecosystem study 2004: Weather - water balance - gas concentrations; Waldoekosystemstudie Hessen. Waldzustandsbericht 2004: Witterung - Wasserhaushalt - Gaskonzentrationen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paar, U.; Gawehn, P.; Scheler, B.; Schmidt, M.; Kolb, M.; Schoenfelder, E.; Eichhorn, J. (comps.) [Hessen-Forst, Hannoversch Muenden (Germany)

    2004-07-01

    The Hessian Forest Ecosystem Study aims to document and explore changes to forest ecosystems as a result of emissions and climatic influences. Thus, it contributes importantly to a multifunctional and sustainable forest management. 2003 has been an exceptional warm and dry year. High precipitation during summer 2004 reduced some of the drought induced risks. However, crown condition assessments proved an increase of defoliation, mainly regarding young and old beech. Deposition of sulfur and acid components has been on a low level in 2003/2004. Input of acidity and sulfur caused changes in forest soils, therefore a well balance liming is recommended. A further reduction of nitrogen input in Hessian forests and ozone content of ambient air is required. (orig.)

  8. The potential of beech seedlings to adapt to low P availability in soil - plant versus microbial effects on P mobilising potential in the rhizosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meller, Sonia; Frey, Beat; Frossard, Emmanuel; Spohn, Marie; Schack-Kirchner, Helmer; Luster, Jörg

    2016-04-01

    The objective of our work was to investigate to what extent tree seedlings (Fagus sylvatica) are able to adapt the process of P mobilisation in the rhizosphere according to P speciation in the soil. Such mobilisation activity can include root exudation of P mobilising compounds or stimulation of specific P mobilising soil microbes. We hypothesized that Fagus sylvatica seedlings can adapt their own activity based on their P nutritional status and genetic memory of how to react under a given nutritional situation. To test the hypothesis, we set up a cross-growth experiment with beech of different provenances growing in soil from their own provenance site and in soil differing in P availability. Experiments were performed as a greenhouse experiment, with temperature control and natural light, during one vegetation period in rhizoboxes . We used two acidic forest soils, contrasting in P availability, collected at field sites of the German research priority program "Ecosystem Nutrition". Juvenile trees were collected along with the soils at the sites and planted respectively. The occurrence of P mobilising compounds and available P in the rhizosphere and in bulk soil were measured during the active growth season of the plants. In particular, we assessed phosphatase activity, (measured with zymography and plate enzymatic assay at pH 4,6.5, and 11) carboxylates and phosphate (measured by application of ion exchange membranes to specific soil micro zones, and by microdialysis), and pH (mapping with optodes). Plant P nutrition status was assessed by total P, N/P, phosphatase activity, and metabolic (TCA extractable) P in the leaves. The P-nutritional status of the beech provenances differed markedly independent from the P status of the soil where they were actually grown during experiment. In particular, the juvenile trees from the site rich in mineral P were sufficient in P, while those from the P-poor site with mostly organic P, were deficient. Enzymatic activity at the

  9. Does reduced precipitation trigger physiological and morphological drought adaptations in European beech (Fagus sylvatica L.)? Comparing provenances across a precipitation gradient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knutzen, Florian; Meier, Ina Christin; Leuschner, Christoph

    2015-09-01

    Global warming and associated decreases in summer rainfall may threaten tree vitality and forest productivity in many regions of the temperate zone in the future. One option for forestry to reduce the risk of failure is to plant genotypes which combine high productivity with drought tolerance. Growth experiments with provenances from different climates indicate that drought exposure can trigger adaptive drought responses in temperate trees, but it is not well known whether and to what extent regional precipitation reduction can increase the drought resistance of a species. We conducted a common garden growth experiment with five European beech (Fagus sylvatica L.) populations from a limited region with pronounced precipitation heterogeneity (816-544 mm year(-1)), where phylogenetically related provenances grew under small to large water deficits. We grew saplings of the five provenances at four soil moisture levels (dry to moist) and measured ∼30 morphological (leaf and root properties, root : shoot ratio), physiological (leaf water status parameters, leaf conductance) and growth-related traits (above- and belowground productivity) with the aim to examine provenance differences in the drought response of morphological and physiological traits and to relate the responsiveness to precipitation at origin. Physiological traits were more strongly influenced by provenance (one-third of the studied traits), while structural traits were primarily affected by water availability in the experiment (two-thirds of the traits). The modulus of leaf tissue elasticity ϵ reached much higher values late in summer in plants from moist origins resulting in more rapid turgor loss and a higher risk of hydraulic failure upon drought. While experimental water shortage affected the majority of morphological and productivity-related traits in the five provenances, most parameters related to leaf water status were insensitive to water shortage. Thus, plant morphology, and root

  10. Patterns of late spring frost leaf damage and recovery in a European beech (Fagus sylvatica L. stand in south-eastern Germany based on repeated digital photographs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annette eMenzel

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Damage by late spring frost is a risk deciduous trees have to cope with in order to optimize the length of their growing season. The timing of spring phenological development plays a crucial role, not only at the species level, but also at the population and individual level, since fresh new leaves are especially vulnerable. For the pronounced late spring frost in May 2011 in Germany, we studied the individual leaf development of 35 deciduous trees (mainly European beech Fagus sylvatica L. at a mountainous forest site in the Bayerischer Wald National Park using repeated digital photographs. Analyses of the time series of greenness by a novel Bayesian multiple change point approach mostly revealed five change points which almost perfectly matched the expected break points in leaf development: i start of the first greening between DOY (day of the year 108 to 119 (mean 113, ii end of greening and iii visible frost damage after the frost on the night of May 3rd/4th (DOY 123, 124, iv re-sprouting 19 to 38 days after the frost, and v full maturity around DOY 178 (166 to 184 when all beech crowns had fully recovered. Since frost damage was nearly 100%, individual susceptibility did not depend on the timing of first spring leaf unfolding. However, we could identify significant patterns in fitness linked to an earlier start of leaf unfolding. Those individuals that had an earlier start of greening during the first flushing period had a shorter period of recovery and started the second greening earlier. Thus, phenological timing triggered the speed of recovery from such an extreme event. The maximum greenness achieved, however, did not vary with leaf unfolding dates. Two mountain ashes (Sorbus aucuparia L. were not affected by the low temperatures of −5°C. Time series analysis of webcam pictures can thus improve process-based knowledge and provide valuable insights into the link between phenological variation, late spring frost damage and recovery

  11. Effect of particle size on the composition of lignin derived oligomers obtained by fast pyrolysis of beech wood

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhou, Shuai; Garcia-Perez, Manuel; Pecha, Brennan; McDonald, Armando G.; Westerhof, Roel Johannes Maria

    2014-01-01

    The effect of particle size on the yield and composition of lignin derived oligomers (also known as pyrolytic lignin (PL)) was studied in a fluidized bed reactor. Milled beech wood particles of sizes between 0.3 and 0.55 and cylinders of 3–14 mm were pyrolyzed at 500 °C. The lignin oligomers were

  12. Mechanical properties and chemical composition of beech wood exposed for 30 and 120 days to white-rot fungi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehsan Bari; Hamid Reza Taghiyari; Behbood Mohebby; Carol A. Clausen; Olaf Schmidt; Mohammad Ali Tajick Ghanbary; Mohammad Javad Vaseghi

    2015-01-01

    The effects of exposing specimens of Oriental beech [Fagus sylvatica subsp. orientalis (Lipsky) Greuter and Burdet] to the white-rot fungi Pleurotus ostreatus (Jacq.: Fr.) Kummer and Trametes versicolor (L.: Fr.) Pilát strain 325 have been studied concerning the mechanical properties and...

  13. DECLINE IN SOIL CO2 EFFLUX FOLLOWING TREE GIRTLING IN MATURE BEECH AND SPRUCE STANDS IN GERMANY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Studies were undertaken to estimate the contribution of autotrophic respiration to total soil CO2 efflux in stands of mature European beech (Fagus sylvatica) and Norway spruce (Picea abies) near Freising, Germany. Five mature trees of each species were girdled to eliminate carbo...

  14. Tree and stand growth of mature Norway spruce and European beech under long-term ozone fumigation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pretzsch, Hans, E-mail: h.pretzsch@lrz.tum.d [Chair for Forest Growth and Yield Science, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Am Hochanger 13, D-85354 Freising (Germany); Dieler, Jochen [Chair for Forest Growth and Yield Science, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Am Hochanger 13, D-85354 Freising (Germany); Matyssek, Rainer [Chair for Ecophysiology of Plants, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Am Hochanger 13, D-85354 Freising (Germany); Wipfler, Philip [Chair for Forest Growth and Yield Science, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Am Hochanger 13, D-85354 Freising (Germany)

    2010-04-15

    In a 50- to 70-year-old mixed stand of Norway spruce (Picea abies (L.) Karst.) and European beech (Fagus sylvatica L.) in Germany, tree cohorts have been exposed to double ambient ozone (2xO{sub 3}) from 2000 through 2007 and can be compared with trees in the same stand under the ambient ozone regime (1xO{sub 3}). Annual diameter growth, allocation pattern, stem form, and stem volume were quantified at the individual tree and stand level. Ozone fumigation induced a shift in the resource allocation into height growth at the expense of diameter growth. This change in allometry leads to rather cone-shaped stem forms and reduced stem stability in the case of spruce, and even neiloidal stem shapes in the case of beech. Neglect of such ozone-induced changes in stem shape may lead to a flawed estimation of volume growth. On the stand level, 2xO{sub 3} caused, on average, a decrease of 10.2 m{sup 3} ha{sup -1} yr{sup -1} in European beech. - Ozone effects on tree growth and stem shape were investigated for Norway spruce and European beech; the study reveals species-specific reaction patterns in growth rate and allometry under ozone exposure.

  15. Contrasting carbon allocation responses of juvenile European beech (Fagus sylvatica) and Norway spruce (Picea abies) to competition and ozone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritter, Wilma; Lehmeier, Christoph Andreas; Winkler, Jana Barbro; Matyssek, Rainer; Edgar Grams, Thorsten Erhard

    2015-01-01

    Allocation of recent photoassimilates of juvenile beech and spruce in response to twice-ambient ozone (2 × O(3)) and plant competition (i.e. intra vs. inter-specific) was examined in a phytotron study. To this end, we employed continuous (13)CO(2)/(12)CO(2) labeling during late summer and pursued tracer kinetics in CO(2) released from stems. In beech, allocation of recent photoassimilates to stems was significantly lowered under 2 × O(3) and increased in spruce when grown in mixed culture. As total tree biomass was not yet affected by the treatments, C allocation reflected incipient tree responses providing the mechanistic basis for biomass partitioning as observed in longer experiments. Compartmental modeling characterized functional properties of substrate pools supplying respiratory C demand. Respiration of spruce appeared to be exclusively supplied by recent photoassimilates. In beech, older C, putatively located in stem parenchyma cells, was a major source of respiratory substrate, reflecting the fundamental anatomical disparity between angiosperm beech and gymnosperm spruce. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. The formation of a ligno-suberised layer and necrophylactic periderm in beech bark (Fagus sylvatica L.)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Primoz Oven; Niko Torelli; Walter C. Shortle; Martin Zupancic

    1999-01-01

    Beech (Fagus sylvatica L.) bark was wounded in early April of 1993 and tissue changes followed on days 7, 14, 21, 28, 35, 42, 49, 56, 84, 112, and 140. In 7 days, tissue at the wound surface became necrotic and discoloured. In 14 days the walls of the parenchyma cells immediately underneath the necrotic tissue became thickened and after 21 days...

  17. Impregnation of Scots pine and beech with tannin solutions: effect of viscosity and wood anatomy in wood infiltration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tondi, G; Thevenon, M F; Mies, B; Standfest, G; Petutschnigg, A; Wieland, S

    The impregnation process of Scots pine and beech samples with tannin solutions was investigated. The two materials involved in the process (impregnation solution and wood samples) are studied in depth. Viscosity of mimosa tannin solutions and the anatomical aspect of beech and Scots pine were analysed and correlated. The viscosity of tannin solutions presents a non-newtonian behaviour when its pH level increases, and in the case of addition of hexamine as a hardener, the crosslinking of the flavonoids turns out to be of great importance. During the impregnation of Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) and beech (Fagus sylvatica L.), the liquid and solid uptakes were monitored while taking into consideration the different conditions of the impregnation process. This method allowed to identify the best conditions needed in order to get a successful preservative uptake for each wooden substrate. The penetration mechanism within the wood of both species was revealed with the aid of a microscopic analysis. Scots pine is impregnated through the tracheids in the longitudinal direction and through parenchyma rays in the radial direction, whereas in beech, the penetration occurs almost completely through longitudinal vessels.

  18. Removal of non benzidine direct red dye from aqueous solution by using natural sorbents: Beech and silver fir

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Muntean, S.G.; Todea, A.; Bakardjieva, Snejana; Bologa, C.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 66, MAR (2017), s. 235-250 ISSN 1944-3994 Institutional support: RVO:61388980 Keywords : Adsorption * Beech * Direct red * Kinetics * Silver fir Subject RIV: CA - Inorganic Chemistry OBOR OECD: Inorganic and nuclear chemistry Impact factor: 1.631, year: 2016

  19. The role of the organic layer for phosphorus nutrition of young beech trees (Fagus sylvatica L.) at two sites differing in soil Phosphorus availability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauenstein, Simon

    2016-04-01

    Simon Hauenstein1, Thomas Pütz2, and Yvonne Oelmann1, 1 Geoecology, Department of Geosciences, University of Tübingen, Tübingen, Germany 2 Agrosphere (IBG-3), Forschungszentrum Jülich, Jülich, Germany The accumulation of an organic layer in forests is linked to the ratio between litterfall rates and decomposition rates with decomposition rates being decelerated due to acidification and associated nutrient depletion with proceeding ecosystem development. Nevertheless, the nutrient pool in the organic layer might still represent an important source for Phosphorus (P) nutrition of forests on nutrient-poor soils. Our objective was to assess the importance of the organic layer to P nutrition of young beech trees at two sites differing in soil P availability. We established a mesocosm experiment including plants and soil from a Phosphorus depleted forest site on a Haplic Podzol in Lüss and a Phosphorus rich forest site on a Eutric Cambisol in Bad Brückenau either with or without the organic layer. After 1 year under outdoor conditions, we applied 33P to the pots. After 0h, 24h, 48h, 96h, 192h, 528h we destructively harvested the young beech trees (separated into leaves, branches, stems) and sampled the organic layer and mineral soil of the pots. In each soil horizon we measured concentrations of resin-extractable P, plant available P fractions and total P. We extracted the xylem sap of the whole 2-year-old trees by means of scholander pressure bomb. 33P activity was measured for every compartment in soil and plant. The applied 33P was recovered mainly in the organic layer in Lüss, whereas it was evenly distributed among organic and mineral horizons in pots of Bad Brückenau soil. Comparing pots with and without an organic layer, the specific 33P activity differed by 323% between pots with and without an organic layer present in the Lüss soil. For both sites, the presence of the organic layer increased 33P activity in xylem sap compared to the treatment without

  20. Environmental change impacts on the C- and N-cycle of European forests: a model comparison study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. R. Cameron

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Forests are important components of the greenhouse gas balance of Europe. There is considerable uncertainty about how predicted changes to climate and nitrogen deposition will perturb the carbon and nitrogen cycles of European forests and thereby alter forest growth, carbon sequestration and N2O emission. The present study aimed to quantify the carbon and nitrogen balance, including the exchange of greenhouse gases, of European forests over the period 2010–2030, with a particular emphasis on the spatial variability of change. The analysis was carried out for two tree species: European beech and Scots pine. For this purpose, four different dynamic models were used: BASFOR, DailyDayCent, INTEGRATOR and Landscape-DNDC. These models span a range from semi-empirical to complex mechanistic. Comparison of these models allowed assessment of the extent to which model predictions depended on differences in model inputs and structure. We found a European average carbon sink of 0.160 ± 0.020 kgC m−2 yr−1 (pine and 0.138 ± 0.062 kgC m−2 yr−1 (beech and N2O source of 0.285 ± 0.125 kgN ha−1 yr−1 (pine and 0.575 ± 0.105 kgN ha−1 yr−1 (beech. The European average greenhouse gas potential of the carbon sink was 18 (pine and 8 (beech times that of the N2O source. Carbon sequestration was larger in the trees than in the soil. Carbon sequestration and forest growth were largest in central Europe and lowest in northern Sweden and Finland, N. Poland and S. Spain. No single driver was found to dominate change across Europe. Forests were found to be most sensitive to change in environmental drivers where the drivers were limiting growth, where changes were particularly large or where changes acted in concert. The models disagreed as to which environmental changes were most significant for the geographical variation in forest growth and as to which tree species showed the largest rate of carbon sequestration. Pine and beech forests were found to

  1. Phytosociological description of Quercus petraea forest stands with Chamaecytisus hirsutus and Erica carnea in the Vipavska brda (southwestern Slovenia)

    OpenAIRE

    Dakskobler, Igor

    2014-01-01

    We conducted a phytosociological study of Quercus petraea stands, whose herb layer is dominated by Erica carnea in the flysch hills of Vipavska brda and on the margins of the Vrhe plateau (southwestern Slovenia). We have determined that they are a long-term degradation stage on beech forest sites from the association Seslerio autumnalis-Fagetum. Based on comparisons with similar sessile oak stands from associations Melampyro vulgati-Quercetum petraeae, Seslerio autumnalis-Quercetum petraeae a...

  2. Ammonia emissions from deciduous forest after leaf fall

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Kristina; Sørensen, Lise Lotte; Hertel, Ole

    2013-01-01

    leaf fall, the magnitude and temporal structure of the measured NH3 emission fluxes could be adequately reproduced with the bi-directional resistance model; it suggested the forest ground layer (soil and litter) to be the main contributing component to the NH3 emissions. The modelled concentration from...... to 15 November) for the Danish beech forest Lille Bøgeskov to address the hypothesis that NH3 emissions occur from deciduous forests in relation to leaf fall. This is accomplished by using observations of vegetation status, NH3 fluxes and model calculations. Vegetation status was observed using plant...... area index (PAI) and leaf area index (LAI). NH3 fluxes were measured using the relaxed eddy accumulation (REA) method. The REA-based NH3 concentrations were compared to NH3 denuder measurements. Model calculations of the atmospheric NH3 concentration were obtained with the Danish Ammonia MOdelling...

  3. Impacts of climate and land-use changes on mountain forests in Central Apennines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calderaro, Chiara; Palombo, Caterina; Tognetti, Roberto; Marchetti, Marco

    2016-04-01

    The present study aims to analyze the vegetation dynamics of Pinus mugo Turra subsp. mugo and Fagus sylvatica (L.) at the treeline ecotone between the closed beech forest and the mountain pine krummholz vegetation. This transitional ecosystem zone dominates the high altitudes of the Majella massif, (Central Appennines) and represents the exception on the Apennines chain being treeline dominated by krummholz with mountain pine. This species in the Majella National Park is re-colonizing open areas both upward, to the alpine meadows, and downward, to areas potentially suitable by beech expansion. On the Apennine chain, Central Italy, global change could cause a negative impact on the spatial distribution of rare or endemic species, thus influencing the appearance, structure and productivity of the tree-line ecotone. Mountain pine, growing over the treeline, represents a very sensitive species to the effects of climate change acting in Mediterranean basin. In four sampling site a circular area of 40 m in diameter was established between beech forest and mountain pine krhummolz. For both species, dendrometric parameters were collected and woody cores were extracted. During sampling, basic information, to define the growth dynamics and competition between the two species, were also recorded. A landscape analysis from aerial photographs provided information to better understand the development dynamics of the two plant communities. The dendrochronological analysis, supported by dendrometric parameters, defined the population age, as well as the time of settlement. Climate-growth relationships was analized and showed responses, in terms of plant growth, to the current climate trend. The influence of temperature and precipitation on tree growth during the vegetation season was demonstrated by significant correlation coefficients, particularly for spring and summer temperatures and summer precipitation, in both species. An interesting result is the negative correlation of

  4. [Ultrastructural study of the biodegradation processes. I. Beech (Fagus sylvaticus L.) leaf white rot].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reisinger, O; Toutain, F; Mangenot, F; Arnould, M F

    1978-06-01

    An electron microscopic study of beech leaf white rot shows a certain number of characteristic developmental stages which are identical whether the material is from in vitro experimentation or from natural incubation. Endowed with a cellulolytic properly seemingly localized in the apical region only, hyphae of the white rot agent only traverse the plant cell walls. Subsequently, hyphae penetrate condensed protoplasmic residues and make them progressively transparent to electrons. During this discoloring process, a lethal factor of as yet unknown nature appears, affecting other microorganisms already present in the leaves. Phloem and xylem vascular bundles do not present notable ultrastructural modifications. Therefore, leaf discoloration is not due to an alteration of the xylem constituents but to changes having occurred in the condensed cytoplasmic residues of the dead tissues.

  5. Comparative study on the mechanical performance of beech and ash laminated panels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreea HEGYI

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a comparative study on the mechanical performance of beech and ash wood laminated panels. Within the experimental study the bending strength, bending modulus of elasticity and the bonding characteristics to gluing (bonding quality were analyzed. The experimental results emphasized the influence of the type of wood, the panel thickness, the effect on the bending strength, respectively on the gluing quality of the direction of the wood lamellas in relation with the mechanical load (direction of cutting specimens. It can be said that the use of hardwood meets the needs and demands of the construction area, but it’s necessary a careful analysis of the requests that occur mainly at the site, thus an optimal direction of the wooden glued lamellas can be chosen. Laminated wood panels are a product with real physical and mechanical qualities, which can be successfully used to obtain construction elements that are bringing benefits to environmental quality of living areas.

  6. Ascomycetes with cellulolytic, amylolytic, pectinolytic, and mannanolytic activities inhabiting dead beech (Fagus crenata) trees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujii, K; Sugimura, T; Nakatake, K

    2010-01-01

    It is generally accepted that dead tree decomposition is performed mainly by delignifying basidiomycetes. While ascomycetes have been reported to inhabit dead tree bark, their contribution to dead tree decomposition is still unclear. Here, we isolated five bark-inhabiting ascomycetes possessing cellulolytic activity from dead beech tree and assessed their polysaccharolytic activities. When cultivated in a medium containing filter paper as a sole carbon source, three strains degraded >40 % of the filter paper in a 4-week cultivation and the others degraded 15-30 % of the paper. The degraders possessed amylolytic, pectinolytic, and mannanolytic activities as well as cellulolytic activity, implying that they play an important role in dead tree decomposition after delignification by basidiomycetes. Phylogenetic analysis based on large subunit ribosomal DNA (lsu-DNA) sequences implied that the isolates belonged to Penicillium or Amorphotheca.

  7. Determining the degree of fire retardancy of plywood with thermogravimetry, part I: Beech plywood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gavrilović-Grmuša Ivana

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The basic motive of this work is the ever more pronounced need for fire-resistant plywood. In this work, beech veneers have been impregnated with solutions of chosen fire retardants, which are diammonium phosphate monoammonium phosphate, sodium acetate, water glass, sodium tetra borate and boric acid. To determine the preliminary level of fire retardancy achieved in veneers before manufacturing of finished plywood, thermo gravimetric (TG and derivative thermogravimetric (DTG methods are used. TG and DTG analyses of treated and untreated wood, as well as of fire retardants alone, were performed on a Perkin-Elmer TGS-2 thermo gravimetric equipment. Fire resistance of plywood was tested in accordance with standard test for resistance to the effects of fire and the most efficient fire retardants monoammonium phosphate and sodium tetra borate, had the same results as TG/DTG analyses, which points out the validity of TG methods in predicting success of fire retardants in future products.

  8. Effect of Altitude and Aspect on Wood-Water Relations of Beech (Fagus orientalis Lipsky. Wood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elif Topaloğlu

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Effects of altitude and aspect on wood-water relations in Oriental beech (Fagus orientalis Lipsky. were studied. Study area divided into five altitude steps and two aspect groups, total of 20 trees were cut off. In order to determine the wood-water relations; volume density value, fiber saturation point, maximum moisture content, and shrinkage and swelling percentages were determined. According to results, with 95% significance level (p<0,05, altitude affects volume density value, shrinkage and swelling percentages, fiber saturation point and maximum moisture content; aspect affects volume density value, tangential and radial shrinkage percentages, volumetric shrinkage percentage, tangential and longitudinal swelling percentages, fiber saturation point and maximum moisture content while it has no effect on longitudinal shrinkage percentage, radial and volumetric swelling percentages. Results demonstrated that northern aspect and first altitude step has the lowest values, thus, this aspect and altitude step making a suitable place for this tree species to be used as solid wood.

  9. Isoprenoid emission response to changing light conditions of English oak, European beech and Norway spruce

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Meeningen, Ylva; Schurgers, Guy; Rinnan, Riikka; Holst, Thomas

    2017-09-01

    Light is an important environmental factor controlling biogenic volatile organic compound (BVOC) emissions, but in natural conditions its impact is hard to separate from other influential factors such as temperature. We studied the light response of foliar BVOC emissions, photosynthesis and stomatal conductance on three common European tree species, namely English oak (Quercus robur), European beech (Fagus sylvatica) and two provenances of Norway spruce (Picea abies) in Taastrup, Denmark. Leaf scale measurements were performed on the lowest positioned branches of the tree in July 2015. Light intensity was increased in four steps (0, 500, 1000 and 1500 µmol m-2 s-1), whilst other chamber conditions such as temperature, humidity and CO2 levels were fixed. Whereas the emission rate differed between individuals of the same species, the relative contributions of compounds to the total isoprenoid emission remained similar. Whilst some compounds were species specific, the compounds α-pinene, camphene, 3-carene, limonene and eucalyptol were emitted by all of the measured tree species. Some compounds, like isoprene and sabinene, showed an increasing emission response with increasing light intensity, whereas other compounds, like camphene, had no significant emission response to light for most of the measured trees. English oak and European beech showed high light-dependent emission fractions from isoprene and sabinene, but other emitted compounds were light independent. For the two provenances of Norway spruce, the compounds α-pinene, 3-carene and eucalyptol showed high light-dependent fractions for many of the measured trees. This study highlights differences between compound emissions in their response to a change in light and a possible light independence for certain compounds, which might be valid for a wider range of tree species. This information could be of importance when improving emission models and to further emphasize the discussion regarding light or

  10. Transfer Analysis of Provenance Trials Reveals Macroclimatic Adaptedness of European Beech (Fagus sylvatica L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    RASZTOVITS, Ervin

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to analyse provenance tests of beech situated close to theSoutheastern-continental limits of the species, in order to develop a response model of adaptation andplasticity of populations on evolutionary-ecological basis, following sudden climatic changes as aresult of transplanting. Modelling of juvenile height was performed with the help of ecodistancevariables. The concept of transfer analysis and ecodistance is based on the hypothesis that phenotypicresponse to macroclimatic changes depends on the inherited adaptive potential of the population andon the magnitude and direction of experienced environmental change. In common garden experiments,the transfer to the planting site is interpreted as simulation of environmental change. The applicationof ecodistance of transfer for evaluating common garden experiments provides much neededquantitative information about response of tree populations to predicted climatic changes.The analysis of three field experiments of European beech in SE Europe invalidate earlier doubtsabout the existence of macroclimatic adaptation patterns in juvenile growth and justify restrictions ofuse of reproductive material on the basis of evolutionary ecology. The presented model illustrates thatresponse to climatic change is regionally divergent, depending on testing conditions and on hereditarytraits. In particular, climatic warming in the central-northern part of the range may lead to productionincrease. However, under the stressful and uncertain conditions at the lower (xeric limit of thespecies, growth depression and vitality loss are predicted. The deviating behaviour of higher elevationprovenances support their separate treatment.The results may be utilised in climate change adaptation and mitigation policy in forestry andnature conservation, to revise rules for use of reproductive material and also for validatingevolutionary and ecological hypotheses related to climate change effects.

  11. Impacts of drought on mineral macro- and microelements in provenances of beech (Fagus sylvatica L.) seedlings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peuke, Andreas D; Rennenberg, Heinz

    2011-02-01

    Beech seedlings originating from 11 German provenances with different climatic conditions were grown in pots and cultivated in a greenhouse. The composition of macro- and microelements in roots, axes and leaves was measured after half of the seedlings were subjected to a simulated summer drought. The recently described sensitivity of these provenances to drought was compared with drought-mediated changes in the elemental and ionic composition in organs of the seedlings; in addition, partitioning between roots and shoots was evaluated. A number of element concentrations were decreased in roots due to drought (K 94% of control, Mg 94%, Mn 75% and Zn 85%). However, chloride concentration increased in all organs (115-125%) and was the only element affected in leaves. Some changes in ionome can be related to sensitivity of provenances, but it is difficult to decide whether these changes are a result of, or a reason for, drought tolerance or sensitivity. Observed increases in chloride concentration in all plant parts of drought-treated beech seedlings can be explained by its function in charge balance, in particular since the level of phosphate was reduced. As a result of chloride accumulation, the sum of added charges of anions (and cations) in water extracts of leaf and root material was similar between drought and control plants. Since only the partitioning of Ca and Al (both only in axis) as well as Mn was affected and other elements (together with previously observed effects on C, N, S and P) remained unaffected by drought in all provenances, it can be concluded that direct effects by means of mass flow inhibition in xylem and phloem are unlikely. Secondary effects, for example on the pH of transport sap and the apoplastic space, cannot be excluded from the present study. These effects may affect partitioning between the apoplast and symplast and therefore may be significant for drought sensitivity.

  12. Effects of stoichiometry and temperature perturbations on beech litter decomposition, enzyme activities and protein expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keiblinger, K. M.; Schneider, T.; Roschitzki, B.; Schmid, E.; Eberl, L.; Hämmerle, I.; Leitner, S.; Richter, A.; Wanek, W.; Riedel, K.; Zechmeister-Boltenstern, S.

    2011-12-01

    Microbes are major players in leaf litter decomposition and therefore advances in the understanding of their control on element cycling are of paramount importance. Our aim was to investigate the influence of leaf litter stoichiometry in terms of carbon (C) : nitrogen (N) : phosphorus (P) on the decomposition process, and to follow changes in microbial community structure and function in response to temperature-stress treatments. To elucidate how the stoichiometry of beech litter (Fagus sylvatica L.) and stress treatments interactively affect the decomposition processes, a terrestrial microcosm experiment was conducted. Beech litter from different Austrian sites covering C:N ratios from 39 to 61 and C:P ratios from 666 to 1729 were incubated at 15 °C and 60% moisture for six months. Part of the microcosms were then subjected to severe changes in temperature (+30 °C and -15 °C) to monitor the influence of temperature stress. Extracellular enzyme activities were assayed and respiratory activities measured. A semi-quantitative metaproteomics approach (1D-SDS PAGE combined with liquid chromatography and tandem mass-spectrometry; unique spectral counting) was employed to investigate the impact of the applied stress treatments in dependency of litter stoichiometry on structure and function of the decomposing community. In litter with narrow C:nutrient ratios microbial decomposers were most abundant. Cellulase, chitinase, phosphatase and protease activity decreased after heat and frost treatments. Decomposer communities and specific functions varied with site i.e. stoichiometry. The applied stress evoked strong changes of enzyme activities, dissolved organic nitrogen and litter pH. Freeze treatments resulted in a decline in residual plant litter material, and increased fungal abundance indicating slightly accelerated decomposition. Overall, we could detect a strong effect of litter stoichiometry on microbial community structure as well as function. Temperature

  13. Isoprenoid emission response to changing light conditions of English oak, European beech and Norway spruce

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. van Meeningen

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Light is an important environmental factor controlling biogenic volatile organic compound (BVOC emissions, but in natural conditions its impact is hard to separate from other influential factors such as temperature. We studied the light response of foliar BVOC emissions, photosynthesis and stomatal conductance on three common European tree species, namely English oak (Quercus robur, European beech (Fagus sylvatica and two provenances of Norway spruce (Picea abies in Taastrup, Denmark. Leaf scale measurements were performed on the lowest positioned branches of the tree in July 2015. Light intensity was increased in four steps (0, 500, 1000 and 1500 µmol m−2 s−1, whilst other chamber conditions such as temperature, humidity and CO2 levels were fixed. Whereas the emission rate differed between individuals of the same species, the relative contributions of compounds to the total isoprenoid emission remained similar. Whilst some compounds were species specific, the compounds α-pinene, camphene, 3-carene, limonene and eucalyptol were emitted by all of the measured tree species. Some compounds, like isoprene and sabinene, showed an increasing emission response with increasing light intensity, whereas other compounds, like camphene, had no significant emission response to light for most of the measured trees. English oak and European beech showed high light-dependent emission fractions from isoprene and sabinene, but other emitted compounds were light independent. For the two provenances of Norway spruce, the compounds α-pinene, 3-carene and eucalyptol showed high light-dependent fractions for many of the measured trees. This study highlights differences between compound emissions in their response to a change in light and a possible light independence for certain compounds, which might be valid for a wider range of tree species. This information could be of importance when improving emission models and to further emphasize the

  14. Interactions between leaf nitrogen status and longevity in relation to N cycling in three contrasting European forest canopies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Wang

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Seasonal and spatial variations in foliar nitrogen (N parameters were investigated in three European forests with different tree species, viz. beech (Fagus sylvatica L., Douglas fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii (Mirb. Franco and Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L. growing in Denmark, the Netherlands and Finland, respectively. The objectives were to investigate the distribution of N pools within the canopies of the different forests and to relate this distribution to factors and plant strategies controlling leaf development throughout the seasonal course of a vegetation period. Leaf N pools generally showed much higher seasonal and vertical variability in beech than in the coniferous canopies. However, also the two coniferous tree species behaved very differently with respect to peak summer canopy N content and N re-translocation efficiency, showing that generalisations on tree internal vs. ecosystem internal N cycling cannot be made on the basis of the leaf duration alone. During phases of intensive N turnover in spring and autumn, the NH4+ concentration in beech leaves rose considerably, while fully developed green beech leaves had relatively low tissue NH4+, similar to the steadily low levels in Douglas fir and, particularly, in Scots pine. The ratio between bulk foliar concentrations of NH4+ and H+, which is an indicator of the NH3 emission potential, reflected differences in foliage N concentration, with beech having the highest values followed by Douglas fir and Scots pine. Irrespectively of the leaf habit, i.e. deciduous versus evergreen, the majority of the canopy foliage N was retained within the trees. This was accomplished through an effective N re-translocation (beech, higher foliage longevity (fir or both (boreal pine forest. In combination with data from a literature review, a general relationship of decreasing N re

  15. Interactions between leaf nitrogen status and longevity in relation to N cycling in three contrasting European forest canopies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, L.; Ibrom, A.; Korhonen, J. F. J.; Arnoud Frumau, K. F.; Wu, J.; Pihlatie, M.; Schjoerring, J. K.

    2013-02-01

    Seasonal and spatial variations in foliar nitrogen (N) parameters were investigated in three European forests with different tree species, viz. beech (Fagus sylvatica L.), Douglas fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii (Mirb.) Franco) and Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) growing in Denmark, the Netherlands and Finland, respectively. The objectives were to investigate the distribution of N pools within the canopies of the different forests and to relate this distribution to factors and plant strategies controlling leaf development throughout the seasonal course of a vegetation period. Leaf N pools generally showed much higher seasonal and vertical variability in beech than in the coniferous canopies. However, also the two coniferous tree species behaved very differently with respect to peak summer canopy N content and N re-translocation efficiency, showing that generalisations on tree internal vs. ecosystem internal N cycling cannot be made on the basis of the leaf duration alone. During phases of intensive N turnover in spring and autumn, the NH4+ concentration in beech leaves rose considerably, while fully developed green beech leaves had relatively low tissue NH4+, similar to the steadily low levels in Douglas fir and, particularly, in Scots pine. The ratio between bulk foliar concentrations of NH4+ and H+, which is an indicator of the NH3 emission potential, reflected differences in foliage N concentration, with beech having the highest values followed by Douglas fir and Scots pine. Irrespectively of the leaf habit, i.e. deciduous versus evergreen, the majority of the canopy foliage N was retained within the trees. This was accomplished through an effective N re-translocation (beech), higher foliage longevity (fir) or both (boreal pine forest). In combination with data from a literature review, a general relationship of decreasing N re-translocation efficiency with the time needed for canopy renewal was deduced, showing that leaves which live longer re

  16. Forest Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weicherding, Patrick J.; And Others

    This bulletin deals with forest management and provides an overview of forestry for the non-professional. The bulletin is divided into six sections: (1) What Is Forestry Management?; (2) How Is the Forest Measured?; (3) What Is Forest Protection?; (4) How Is the Forest Harvested?; (5) What Is Forest Regeneration?; and (6) What Is Forest…

  17. Urban Forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    David Nowak

    2016-01-01

    Urban forests (and trees) constitute the second forest resource considered in this report. We specifically emphasize the fact that agricultural and urban forests exist on a continuum defined by their relationship (and interrelationship) with a given landscape. These two forest types generally serve different purposes, however. Whereas agricultural forests are...

  18. Belowground carbon trade among tall forest trees