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Sample records for self-regulatory eating attitudes

  1. Eating on impulse: Implicit attitudes, self-regulatory resources, and trait self-control as determinants of food consumption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yan; Wang, Lei; Cui, Xianghua; Fang, Yuan; Chen, Qianqiu; Wang, Ya; Qiang, Yao

    2015-12-01

    Self-regulatory resources and trait self-control have been found to moderate the impulse-behavior relationship. The current study investigated whether the interaction of self-regulatory resources and trait self-control moderates the association between implicit attitudes and food consumption. One hundred twenty female participants were randomly assigned to either a depletion condition in which their self-regulatory resources were reduced or a no-depletion condition. Participants' implicit attitudes for chocolate were measured with the Single Category Implicit Association Test and self-report measures of trait self-control were collected. The dependent variable was chocolate consumption in an ostensible taste and rate task. Implicit attitudes predicted chocolate consumption in depleted participants but not in non-depleted participants. However, this predictive power of implicit attitudes on eating in depleted condition disappeared in participants with high trait self-control. Thus, trait self-control and self-regulatory resources interact to moderate the prediction of implicit attitude on eating behavior. Results suggest that high trait self-control buffers the effect of self-regulatory depletion on impulsive eating. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Exploring self-regulatory strategies for eating behaviour in Danish adolescents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nureeva, Liliya; Brunsø, Karen; Lähteenmäki, Liisa

    2016-01-01

    – Focusing on improving adolescents’ self-regulatory skills in the domain of eating behaviour is a promising approach in developing future interventions. Originality/value – The present article explores self-regulatory strategies for eating behaviour in adolescence and discusses their relevance.......Purpose – Healthy eating behaviour in adolescence may be negatively affected by lack of self-regulation. The purpose of this paper is to discuss strategies for regulating eating behaviour as formulated by adolescents themselves. Design/methodology/approach – Self-regulatory strategies were elicited...... with concept mapping, which is a group-based method. Three meetings were conducted with each of four school classes in Denmark. Participants in the 12-15-year age group were recruited for the study. At the first meeting, participants had to complete the phrase “Things I can do to ensure my healthy eating are...

  3. Eating attitudes among adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maor, Noga Roguin; Sayag, Shlomit; Dahan, Rachel; Hermoni, Doron

    2006-09-01

    Israeli youth lead 27 western countries in dieting. The prevalence of eating disorders has been rising in the last 30 years, causing social problems and medical complications. To examine the prevalence of eating disorders among high school students in a region in northern Israel (Misgav) and to examine the relationship between the parents' employment status and the subject's eating disorder. A structured questionnaire was administered to collect demographic data. The short version of the Eating Attitudes Test (EAT-26) was used to evaluate the subject's attitudes toward and preoccupation with food, dieting, eating, physical appearance, and personal control over eating. Of 360 students approached, 283 (78%) completed the self-report EAT-26. One of every 5 females and one in every 20 males had an abnormal eating attitude. The rate of pathologic EAT-26 results, 20.8%, falls within the high range of similar community-based samples of female adolescents. There were no differences in EAT-26 score between students with an employed or unemployed mother; however, there was a trend for higher EAT-26 scores among those whose father was unemployed (21.4% vs. 12.7%, chi2 = 0.14). The findings support our hypothesis of a relatively high rate of abnormal eating attitudes (as reflected by high EAT-26 score) in this population. Another possible risk factor is having an unemployed father, which warrants further research and attention. Our next step is to introduce an intervention program in the school and to study its effect.

  4. Social support influences on eating awareness in children and adolescents: the mediating effect of self-regulatory strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaspar de Matos, Margarida; Palmeira, Antonio L; Gaspar, Tania; De Wit, John B F; Luszczynska, Aleksandra

    2016-01-01

    The impact of the social environment on healthy eating awareness results from complex interactions among physical, economic, cultural, interpersonal and individual characteristics. This study investigated the impact of social support and social influence on healthy eating awareness, controlling for socio-economic status, gender and age. Additionally, the mediating effect of self-regulation strategies was examined. A total of 2764 children and adolescents aged 10-17 from four European countries completed self-report measures on healthy eating awareness, social influence and the use of self-regulation strategies. Healthy eating awareness and the use of self-regulation strategies were more likely to occur among younger participants. An interaction between gender and age was related to the use of some self-regulation strategies; compared to girls, boys decreased the use of self-regulation strategies more from pre-adolescence to adolescence. Peer social influence was associated with more unhealthy eating in older participants. Results suggest a need to promote self-regulatory competences among young people in order to assist them with regulating their eating behaviours, especially in the presence of peers. Both school-based interventions and family-based interventions, focusing on self-regulation cognitions and social (peer) influence, could help children and adolescents to use self-regulatory strategies which are essential to eat healthier.

  5. The impact of holiday eating cues on self-regulatory bolstering for dieters and non-dieters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, Chrissy M; Vallen, Beth

    2014-01-01

    Two studies examined the hypothesis that the presence vs. absence of holiday food cues leads dieters to bolster self-regulatory resources and reduce consumption of a snack food. Study 1 evaluated snack-food consumption on a holiday vs. a non-holiday and in Study 2, the proposed underlying mechanism--the bolstering of self-regulatory resources when facing holiday-related cues--was explored. Study 1 followed a quasi-experimental design in which participants (N = 152) consumed candies either on a holiday or a non-holiday. Dieting behaviour was measured and the main outcome measure was consumption quantity. In Study 2, a true experiment, participants (N = 110) read primes associated with holiday eating, holiday history or a neutral topic. Self-regulatory bolstering was assessed as the main outcome measure. Study 1 showed that dieters consume more of a food item on an ordinary day relative to a holiday; the consumption patterns of non-dieters did not vary based on holiday cues. Study 2 demonstrated that dieters, but not non-dieters, bolster self-regulatory resources to a greater extent in the presence vs. absence of a holiday food cue. Dieters are better equipped to defend their diet-related goals when facing strong holiday-related temptations than weaker, everyday temptations.

  6. Healthy cognition: Processes of self-regulatory success in restrained eating

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Papies, Esther K.; Stroebe, Wolfgang; Aarts, Henk

    2008-01-01

    Two studies examined self-regulatory success in dieting. Previous research has indicated that restrained eaters (i.e., chronic dieters) might fail in their attempts at weight control because the perception of attractive food cues triggers hedonic thoughts about food and inhibits their dieting goal.

  7. Self-perceived successful weight regulators are less affected by self-regulatory depletion in the domain of eating behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friese, Malte; Engeler, Michèle; Florack, Arnd

    2015-01-01

    Weight loss and maintenance goals are highly prevalent in many affluent societies, but many weight regulators are not successful in the long term. Research started to reveal psychological mechanisms that help successful weight regulators in being successful. In the present study, we tested the assumption that these mechanisms facilitate successful self-regulation particularly under conditions of self-regulatory depletion. Participants exerted or did not exert self-control in a first task before engaging in a taste test of a tempting but unhealthy food. Participants who had initially exerted self-control ate more than participants in the control condition. This effect was reduced in self-perceived successful weight regulators as compared to perceived unsuccessful self-regulators. A reduced susceptibility to self-regulatory depletion may be an important contributor to long-term weight regulation success in successful weight regulators. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Consumer attitudes to meat eating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, N J; Macfie, H J; Shepherd, R

    1994-01-01

    This study reports on current meat consumption in the UK and the factors that are percieved by the subjects to be influential in their choice of diet. A random sample of individuals from the population (n-1018) were questioned on their consumption and attitudes towards meat by a postal survey. The study revealed that 28·3% of the population considered themselves to be reducing meat consumption; attitudes found to be determinant in changes in the consumption of meat were healthiness, taste and concerns over additives. Hypothetical future events were found to affect people's estimated meat-eating. Knowledge of meat-related information was investigated with specific reference to the respondents' trust in the various sources used; food package labels were found to be an influential source of meat-related information. Copyright © 1993. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  9. Social support influences on eating awareness in children and adolescents : the mediating effect of self-regulatory strategies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gaspar de Matos, Margarida; Palmeira, Antonio L; Gaspar, Tania; De Wit, John B F; Luszczynska, Aleksandra

    2016-01-01

    The impact of the social environment on healthy eating awareness results from complex interactions among physical, economic, cultural, interpersonal and individual characteristics. This study investigated the impact of social support and social influence on healthy eating awareness, controlling for

  10. Self-regulatory skills usage strengthens the relations of self-efficacy for improved eating, exercise, and weight in the severely obese: toward an explanatory model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annesi, James J

    2011-07-01

    Lack of success with behavioral weight-management treatments indicates a need for a better understanding of modifiable psychological correlates. Adults with class 2 and 3 obesity (N = 183; Mean(BMI) = 42.0 kg/m(2)) volunteered for a 26-week nutrition and exercise treatment, based on social cognitive theory, that focused on self-efficacy and self-regulation applied to increasing cardiovascular exercise and fruit and vegetable consumption. Improved self-efficacy for controlled eating significantly predicted increased fruit and vegetable consumption (R(2) = .15). Improved self-efficacy for exercise significantly predicted increased exercise (R(2) = .46). When changes in self-regulatory skill usage were stepped into the 2 previous equations, the variances accounted for significantly increased. Increases in fruit and vegetable consumption and exercise significantly predicted weight loss (R(2) = .38). Findings suggest that behavioral theory should guide research on weight-loss treatment, and a focus on self-efficacy and self-regulatory skills applied to specific nutrition and exercise behaviors is warranted.

  11. Disordered eating attitudes: demographic and clinico ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Department of Psychiatry, Lagos University Teaching Hospital, PMB12003, ... attitudes among undergraduate students of two higher institutions in Lagos, Nigeria. .... as a profile of the eating attitudes of the sub-scale scores ..... lar studies conducted in Iran, Brazil and Canada where ..... Educational Research and Evaluation.

  12. Risk of Abnormal Eating Attitudes among Turkish Dietetic Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiziltan, Gul; Karabudak, Efsun

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence of abnormal eating attitudes among Turkish dietetic students and the relations between nutrition education and eating attitudes. The study population was 568 female university students (248 dietetic students, 320 non-dietetic students). Two scales were used: Eating Attitudes Test (EAT-26)…

  13. Abnormal eating attitudes and weight-loss behaviour of adolescent ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2014-06-18

    Jun 18, 2014 ... as anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa and eating disorder not ... The existence of eating disorders and abnormal eating attitudes in ...... Skyes DK, Leuser B, Melia M, Gross M. A demographic analysis of 252 patients with.

  14. Atypical Eating Attitudes and Behaviors in Thai Medical Students

    OpenAIRE

    Jarurin Pitanupong; Chonnakarn Jatchavala

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To determine the prevalence, and associated factors of atypical eating attitudes and behaviors in Thai medical students. Methods: A cross-sectional survey examined the eating abnormalities in Thai medical students, conducted in 2014. Research assistants collected data by using; self-reported questionnaires using The Eating Attitudes Test-26 (EAT-26 Thai Version). The statistical analysis used R-program for qualitative variables and logistic regression was applied to ...

  15. Implicit attitudes toward eating stimuli differentiate eating disorder and non-eating disorder groups and predict eating disorder behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, April R; Forrest, Lauren N; Velkoff, Elizabeth A; Ribeiro, Jessica D; Franklin, Joseph

    2018-04-01

    The current study tested whether people with and without eating disorders (EDs) varied in their implicit attitudes toward ED-relevant stimuli. Additionally, the study tested whether implicit evaluations of ED-relevant stimuli predicted ED symptoms and behaviors over a 4-week interval. Participants were people without EDs (N = 85) and people seeking treatment for EDs (N = 92). All participants completed self-report questionnaires and a version of the affect misattribution procedure (AMP) at baseline. The AMP indexed implicit evaluations of average body stimuli, eating stimuli, and ED-symptom stimuli. Participants with EDs completed weekly follow-up measures of ED symptoms and behaviors for 4 weeks. Contrary to predictions, the anorexia nervosa (AN) group did not differ from the no ED group on implicit attitudes toward ED-symptom stimuli, and the bulimia nervosa (BN) group had less positive implicit attitudes toward ED-symptom stimuli relative to the no ED group. In line with predictions, people with AN and BN had more negative implicit attitudes toward average body and eating stimuli relative to the no ED group. In addition, among the ED group more negative implicit attitudes toward eating stimuli predicted ED symptoms and behaviors 4 weeks later, over and above baseline ED symptoms and behaviors. Taken together, implicit evaluations of eating stimuli differentiated people with AN and BN from people without EDs and longitudinally predicted ED symptoms and behaviors. Interventions that increase implicit liking of eating-related stimuli may reduce ED behaviors. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Atypical Eating Attitudes and Behaviors in Thai Medical Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jarurin Pitanupong

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To determine the prevalence, and associated factors of atypical eating attitudes and behaviors in Thai medical students. Methods: A cross-sectional survey examined the eating abnormalities in Thai medical students, conducted in 2014. Research assistants collected data by using; self-reported questionnaires using The Eating Attitudes Test-26 (EAT-26 Thai Version. The statistical analysis used R-program for qualitative variables and logistic regression was applied to determine the correlation and P-value. Results: 141 Thai, medical students (15.9% were reported to have atypical attitudes towards eating, and displayed abnormal eating behaviors. There was no statistically significant correlation of attitude towards eating, and their current eating behaviors according to the medical students’ gender, year of studying and Grade Point Average. However, their eating attitudes and behaviors were, associated with Body Mass index. Normal weight (BMI 18.5- 23.49 and overweight (BMI 23.5-39.9 groups could increase by 2.2 (95% CI =1.2, 4.3 and 2.3 (95% CI=1.1, 4.8 times risk depending on atypical eating attitudes and abnormal eating behaviors respectively, when compared with the underweight group (BMI<18.5. Conclusion: There was no correlated difference in concerns to the Thai medical student’s abnormal eating habits, with gender, years of their study and Grade Point Average. Only normal to over-weight BMI were associated. Overweight male, medical students significantly represented more atypical attitudes towards eating and behaviors than other groups in this population. These results may reveal the changing trends of eating attitudes and behaviors due to the current ideal body image of being more muscular. However, prospective studies are still needed.

  17. Eating attitudes of anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa, binge eating disorder and obesity without eating disorder female patients: differences and similarities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarenga, M S; Koritar, P; Pisciolaro, F; Mancini, M; Cordás, T A; Scagliusi, F B

    2014-05-28

    The objective was to compare eating attitudes, conceptualized as beliefs, thoughts, feelings, behaviors and relationship with food, of anorexia nervosa (AN), bulimia nervosa (BN) and binge eating disorder (BED) patients and a group of obese (OBS) without eating disorders (ED). Female patients from an Eating Disorder (ED) Unit with AN (n=42), BN (n=52) and BED (n=53) and from an obesity service (n=37) in Brazil answered the Disordered Eating Attitude Scale (DEAS) which evaluate eating attitudes with 5 subscales: relationship with food, concerns about food and weight gain, restrictive and compensatory practices, feelings toward eating, and idea of normal eating. OBS patients were recruited among those without ED symptoms according to the Binge Eating Scale and the Questionnaire on Eating and Weight Patterns. ANOVA was used to compare body mass index and age between groups. Bonferroni test was used to analyze multiple comparisons among groups. AN and BN patients presented more dysfunctional eating attitudes and OBS patients less dysfunctional (peating." BED patients were worst than OBS for "Relationship with food" and as dysfunctional as AN patients - besides their behavior could be considered the opposite. Differences and similarities support a therapeutic individualized approach for ED and obese patients, call attention for the theoretical differences between obesity and ED, and suggest more research focused on eating attitudes. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Factors influencing eating attitudes in secondary-school girls in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Family, especially maternal, factors play a role in determining eating attitudes. Peer and media (television) factors are not significantly influential. The findings provide preliminary data on factors that influence eating attrtudes in a group at risk for the development of eating disorders. The findings have implications for the ...

  19. Eating Attitudes and Their Psychological Correlates among Turkish Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bas, Murat; Asci, F. Hulya; Karabudak, Efsun; Kiziltan, Gul

    2004-01-01

    This study examined the eating attitudes and psychological characteristics of Turkish late adolescents. Seven hundred eighty-three university students were administered the Eating Attitudes Test, Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale, State-Trait Anxiety Inventory, and Social Physique Anxiety Scale. More than one in ten (9.2% of the males and 13.1% of the…

  20. Stress, coping, and disturbed eating attitudes in teenage girls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fryer, S; Waller, G; Kroese, B S

    1997-12-01

    This study explored the relationship between stressors and disturbed eating attitudes among adolescent females, assessing the moderating role of coping and the mediating influence of poor self-esteem. Two hundred eighty-six teenage girls were recruited from local schools, and completed standardized measures of stressors, coping, self-esteem, perfectionism, and disturbed eating attitudes. Regression analyses were used to test for moderating and mediating effects. Stressors and emotion-focused coping were found to be associated with low self-esteem, which in turn was strongly associated with disturbed eating attitudes. Stressors were also directly related to disturbed eating attitudes. The findings provide partial support for existing models of the etiology and maintenance of eating psychopathology, but have wider implications for our understanding of the eating disorders and their treatment.

  1. Impact of an Intuitive Eating Education Program on High School Students' Eating Attitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Healy, Nicole; Joram, Elana; Matvienko, Oksana; Woolf, Suzanne; Knesting, Kimberly

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: There is a growing need for school-based nutritional educational programs that promote healthy eating attitudes without increasing an unhealthy focus on restrictive eating or promoting a poor body image. Research suggests that "intuitive eating" ("IE") approaches, which encourage individuals to focus on internal body…

  2. Heart rate variability reflects self-regulatory strength, effort, and fatigue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segerstrom, Suzanne C; Nes, Lise Solberg

    2007-03-01

    Experimental research reliably demonstrates that self-regulatory deficits are a consequence of prior self-regulatory effort. However, in naturalistic settings, although people know that they are sometimes vulnerable to saying, eating, or doing the wrong thing, they cannot accurately gauge their capacity to self-regulate at any given time. Because self-regulation and autonomic regulation colocalize in the brain, an autonomic measure, heart rate variability (HRV), could provide an index of self-regulatory strength and activity. During an experimental manipulation of self-regulation (eating carrots or cookies), HRV was elevated during high self-regulatory effort (eat carrots, resist cookies) compared with low self-regulatory effort (eat cookies, resist carrots). The experimental manipulation and higher HRV at baseline independently predicted persistence at a subsequent anagram task. HRV appears to index self-regulatory strength and effort, making it possible to study these phenomena in the field as well as the lab.

  3. "I Should Remember I Don't Want to become Fat": Adolescents' Views on Self-Regulatory Strategies for Healthy Eating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stok, F. Marijn; de Vet, Emely; de Ridder, Denise T. D.; de Wit, John B. F.

    2012-01-01

    Few studies have investigated the strategies adolescents identify to self-regulate eating behavior. Aiming to address this gap in the literature, the current article describes a bottom-up investigation of strategies adolescents identify for the successful self-regulation of eating behavior. Sixty-two adolescents generated statements about…

  4. Eating attitudes anda habits on adolescents in the Pilsen region

    OpenAIRE

    CÍROVÁ, Vanda

    2016-01-01

    This bachelor thesis deals with the eating habits of pupils at elementary schools and of the third-year students of high school. The theoretical part deals with the definition of teenagers and adolescents eating habits and attitudes, the principles of a healthy diet, fluid intake, the most common eating disorders, metabolic disorders and obesity. The practical part contains the research carried out at selected elementary and secondary schools. Results are compared by gender, education level a...

  5. Eating attitude, lifestyle practices and dietary intakes of female ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Eating attitude was evaluated using the EAT-26 questionnaire, lifestyle practice was assessed using the adapted health promoting lifestyle questionnaire (HPLP II) while 24-hour dietary recall and pretested food frequency questionnaire was used to assess the dietary intakes and pattern of the participants. Data were ...

  6. Factors influencing eating attitudes in secondary- school girls in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    self-perception, which may influence eating attitudes. Design. ... attrtudes in a group at risk for the development of eating disorders. ... self-approval with regard to body image jn young adolescent girls has been ... The current study aimed to explore the relationship between .... 'others' to sisters, aunts/uncles and brothers.

  7. Portuguese validation of the children's eating attitudes test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Del Carmen Bento Teixeira

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The Eating Attitudes Test (EAT is the most widely used instrument for evaluating eating disorders in adults and adolescents in a variety of cultures and samples. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to analyse the psychometric properties of the Portuguese version of the Children's Eating Attitudes Test (ChEAT. METHOD: Nine hundred and fifty-six Portuguese secondary students (565 girls and 391 boys answered the ChEAT. The test-retest reliability was obtained with data from 206 participants from the total sample who re-answered the questionnaire after 4-6 weeks. Psychometric analyses were carried out for the total sample and separately for girls and boys. RESULTS: Internal consistency and test-retest reliability were satisfactory. Principal components factorial analysis yielded four factors in the total sample, accounting for 42.35% of the total variance. Factor structure was similar in the total sample and in both genders. Factors were labelled: F1 "Fear of Getting Fat", F2 "Restrictive and Purgative Behaviours", F3 "Food Preoccupation" and F4 "Social Pressure to Eat". The concurrent validity, explored using the Contour Drawing Figure Rating Scale (CDRS was high. DISCUSSION: The Portuguese version of the ChEAT is a valid and useful instrument for the evaluation of abnormal eating attitudes and behaviours among Portuguese adolescents.

  8. Validity of the Eating Attitude Test among Exercisers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lane, Helen J; Lane, Andrew M; Matheson, Hilary

    2004-12-01

    Theory testing and construct measurement are inextricably linked. To date, no published research has looked at the factorial validity of an existing eating attitude inventory for use with exercisers. The Eating Attitude Test (EAT) is a 26-item measure that yields a single index of disordered eating attitudes. The original factor analysis showed three interrelated factors: Dieting behavior (13-items), oral control (7-items), and bulimia nervosa-food preoccupation (6-items). The primary purpose of the study was to examine the factorial validity of the EAT among a sample of exercisers. The second purpose was to investigate relationships between eating attitudes scores and selected psychological constructs. In stage one, 598 regular exercisers completed the EAT. Confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) was used to test the single-factor, a three-factor model, and a four-factor model, which distinguished bulimia from food pre-occupation. CFA of the single-factor model (RCFI = 0.66, RMSEA = 0.10), the three-factor-model (RCFI = 0.74; RMSEA = 0.09) showed poor model fit. There was marginal fit for the 4-factor model (RCFI = 0.91, RMSEA = 0.06). Results indicated five-items showed poor factor loadings. After these 5-items were discarded, the three models were re-analyzed. CFA results indicated that the single-factor model (RCFI = 0.76, RMSEA = 0.10) and three-factor model (RCFI = 0.82, RMSEA = 0.08) showed poor fit. CFA results for the four-factor model showed acceptable fit indices (RCFI = 0.98, RMSEA = 0.06). Stage two explored relationships between EAT scores, mood, self-esteem, and motivational indices toward exercise in terms of self-determination, enjoyment and competence. Correlation results indicated that depressed mood scores positively correlated with bulimia and dieting scores. Further, dieting was inversely related with self-determination toward exercising. Collectively, findings suggest that a 21-item four-factor model shows promising validity coefficients among

  9. Validity of the Eating Attitudes Test and the Eating Disorders Inventory in Bulimia Nervosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, Janet; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Assessed criterion and concurrent validity of the Eating Attitudes Test and the Eating Disorder Inventory in 82 women with bulimia nervosa. Both tests demonstrated criterion validity by discriminating bulimia nervosa subjects from normals. Only weak support was found for concurrent validity within bulimia subjects. Recommends combination of…

  10. Eating behaviour, eating attitude and body mass index of dietetic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2013-09-20

    Sep 20, 2013 ... index of dietetic students versus non-dietetic majors: a South African ... personal eating problem, then working with similar problems may exacerbate the ..... emotional states, such as anxiety or depression, that tend to interfere.

  11. Abnormal eating attitudes and weight-loss behaviour of adolescent ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives: This study aimed to determine the prevalence of abnormal eating attitudes and weight-loss behaviour in female Jewish adolescents. Teachersf awareness of these factors and their attitudes towards a school programme to address these were also investigated. Design: A cross-sectional study was conducted.

  12. Eating Attitudes and Behaviors among Female College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veazey Morris, Katherine D.; Parra, Gilbert R.; Stender, Sarah R. S.

    2011-01-01

    The authors assessed the influences of several risk factors--self-esteem, history of unwanted sexual contact (USC), depression, and sorority membership--on eating-related and weight-related attitudes and behaviors. Findings provide support for the roles of self-esteem, depression, and USC on restricting attitudes. According to the authors' model,…

  13. Abnormal eating attitudes in secondary-school girls in South Africa ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives. To document the existence of eating attitudes that may reflect current, pre- or subclinical eating disorders. To establish preliminary prevalence figures for abnormal eating attitudes. Design. Cross-sectional survey of eating attitudes. Setting. Non-clinical, community-based. Subjects. Female high-school pupils.

  14. Validity of the Eating Attitudes Test: a study of Mexican eating disorders patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez-Rayón, G; Mancilla-Díaz, J M; Vázquez-Arévalo, R; Unikel-Santoncini, C; Caballero-Romo, A; Mercado-Corona, D

    2004-12-01

    To evaluate the psychometric properties of the Mexican version of the Eating Attitudes Test (EAT-40) in clinical and control populations in Mexico City. 276 female patients with eating disorders [52 with anorexia nervosa (AN), 102 with bulimia nervosa (BN) and 122 with eating disorders not otherwise specified (EDNOS)] and a comparison group of 280 normal control female subjects completed the EAT. The EAT had an adequate level of internal consistency in the clinical sample (Cronbach's alpha=0.90). Total score was significantly correlated with criterion group membership (r=0.77, pBulimia, 3) Drive of thinness, 4) Food preoccupation and 5) Perceived social pressure. This study provides evidence that the Mexican version of the EAT is an economical, reliable and potentially useful instrument for research in this field.

  15. Disordered eating attitudes among University students in Kuwait: The role of gender and obesity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdulrahman O Musaiger

    2016-01-01

    Conclusions: About one third of university students in Kuwait had disordered eating attitudes. There is an urgent need to prevent and treat disordered eating attitudes in university students in Kuwait.

  16. Abnormal eating attitudes in secondary-school girls in South Africa ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    report questionnaire, Eating Attitudes Test (EAT-26), which measures eating attitudes. ... schoolgirls, while Le Grange et al.5 used both the EAT-40 ... school. An information letter was sent to all parents who, ... and media influences. (These findings are ..... Corrmer JF. DeSIre to be thlnn&f and weight contrOl among children.

  17. VALIDITY OF THE EATING ATTITUDE TEST AMONG EXERCISERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hilary Matheson

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Theory testing and construct measurement are inextricably linked. To date, no published research has looked at the factorial validity of an existing eating attitude inventory for use with exercisers. The Eating Attitude Test (EAT is a 26-item measure that yields a single index of disordered eating attitudes. The original factor analysis showed three interrelated factors: Dieting behavior (13-items, oral control (7-items, and bulimia nervosa-food preoccupation (6-items. The primary purpose of the study was to examine the factorial validity of the EAT among a sample of exercisers. The second purpose was to investigate relationships between eating attitudes scores and selected psychological constructs. In stage one, 598 regular exercisers completed the EAT. Confirmatory factor analysis (CFA was used to test the single-factor, a three-factor model, and a four-factor model, which distinguished bulimia from food pre-occupation. CFA of the single-factor model (RCFI = 0.66, RMSEA = 0.10, the three-factor-model (RCFI = 0.74; RMSEA = 0.09 showed poor model fit. There was marginal fit for the 4-factor model (RCFI = 0.91, RMSEA = 0.06. Results indicated five-items showed poor factor loadings. After these 5-items were discarded, the three models were re-analyzed. CFA results indicated that the single-factor model (RCFI = 0.76, RMSEA = 0.10 and three-factor model (RCFI = 0.82, RMSEA = 0.08 showed poor fit. CFA results for the four-factor model showed acceptable fit indices (RCFI = 0.98, RMSEA = 0.06. Stage two explored relationships between EAT scores, mood, self-esteem, and motivational indices toward exercise in terms of self-determination, enjoyment and competence. Correlation results indicated that depressed mood scores positively correlated with bulimia and dieting scores. Further, dieting was inversely related with self-determination toward exercising. Collectively, findings suggest that a 21-item four-factor model shows promising validity coefficients

  18. Adolescents' Awareness and Attitude towards Disordered Eating in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study investigated on the knowledge and attitude of secondary school students towards discovered eating. A sample of 300 students from six secondary schools was randomly selected in Owerri Municipal. A questionnaire titled QSKATDE was developed, structured and validated (r = 0.80). Four research questions and ...

  19. Application of the Eating Attitudes Test (EAT-26) in a rural, Zulu speaking, adolescent population in South Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szabo, Christopher P; Allwood, Clifford W

    2004-01-01

    This study was undertaken as part of an exploration of the potential risk for future eating disorders in the black female population of South Africa. Previous research has documented eating attitudes suggesting that such a risk exists in urban populations. A translated version of the Eating Attitudes Test (EAT-26) was applied in a Zulu speaking, rural population (n=361). A prevalence of 3% for abnormal eating attitudes was established. In keeping with the hypothesis, the findings suggest that the risk for developing an eating disorder in a rural population is somewhat lower. In this regard, there does appear to be an urban-rural divide, which may have implications for the prevention of the emergence of eating disorders in black, South African adolescents. However, the validity of the EAT-26 in this population is a consideration in interpreting the data. PMID:16633489

  20. The Relationship of Disordered Eating Attitudes With Body Composition and Anthropometric Indices in Physical Education Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouzitalab, Tohid; Pourghassem Gargari, Bahram; Amirsasan, Ramin; Asghari Jafarabadi, Mohammad; Farsad Naeimi, Alireza; Sanoobar, Meisam

    2015-11-01

    Abnormal eating behavior, unhealthy weight control methods, and eating disordered symptoms have risen among college students. The aim of this study was to examine disordered eating attitudes and their relationship with anthropometric and body composition indices in physical education students in Tabriz, the capital of East Azerbaijan province, Iran. This cross-sectional study was conducted on 210 physical education students, 105 males and 105 females aged 18 to 25, who were selected by systematic random sampling from physical education faculty of Tabriz University in Tabriz, Iran, in 2013. Eating attitude test (EAT-26) was used for the assessment of disordered eating attitudes. In addition, anthropometric and body composition indices were assessed. About 10% of the studied subject had disturbed eating attitudes; significantly more males (15.4%) reported an EAT-26 ≥ 20 (disordered eating attitudes) than females (4.8%) (P EAT-26 score was positively correlated with weist perimeter (WP) (r = 0.21, P EAT-26 score was positively correlated with weight (r = 0.19, P eating attitude and healthy subjects, while in males there was no significant difference between the two groups regarding the anthropometric and body composition indices. Abnormal eating attitude was notable among physical education students in Tabriz, Iran. It seems that some anthropometric indices such as BMI and central obesity indices were related to the increase of disordered eating attitude.

  1. Healthy eating in Ukraine: attitudes, barriers and information sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biloukha, O; Utermohlen, V

    2001-04-01

    To identify the major perceived influences on food choice, to examine the use of and trust in information sources concerning healthy eating, and to assess attitudes towards and barriers to adopting healthy eating practices in a post-USSR country (Ukraine). A survey of an urban adult population. The questions were adopted from the Pan-European Union (EU) Survey of Consumer Attitudes to Food, Nutrition and Health (1995-1996). Lviv city, Ukraine. The survey included 296 adults (84 males, 212 females) aged 18-55 years; they were primarily college students and subjects with tertiary education--the groups most likely to be both interested in healthy eating and affected by current socioeconomic downturns. The major factors in food choice were: 'quality/freshness' (cited by 80%), 'price' (58%) and 'taste' (47%); only 34% cited 'trying to eat healthily'. More older people cited 'price' than 'quality/freshness', and men were more likely than women to cite 'taste'. Sources of healthy eating information included: 'relatives/friends' (cited by 65%, trusted by 85%) and health professionals (trusted by 92%, but used by only 35%); while advertising was the least trusted source (cited by 28%). Fifty-three per cent of respondents considered their diet to be healthy enough without further changes; 50% thought of the nutritional aspects of the food they ate; fewer women than men considered their diet healthy, and more women than men thought about nutrition. Barriers to healthy eating included: 'cost' (cited by 65%), 'lack of time' (55%), 'self-control' (54%), 'selection influences' (41%), 'lack of knowledge' (32%), 'unpleasant foods' and 'resistance to change' (both 30%). Strategies to encourage healthy eating in this population should involve word-of-mouth nutrition education concerning low-cost healthy alternatives.

  2. Early improvement in eating attitudes during cognitive behavioural therapy for eating disorders: the impact of personality disorder cognitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Emma C; Waller, Glenn; Gannon, Kenneth

    2014-03-01

    The personality disorders are commonly comorbid with the eating disorders. Personality disorder pathology is often suggested to impair the treatment of axis 1 disorders, including the eating disorders. This study examined whether personality disorder cognitions reduce the impact of cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) for eating disorders, in terms of treatment dropout and change in eating disorder attitudes in the early stages of treatment. Participants were individuals with a diagnosed eating disorder, presenting for individual outpatient CBT. They completed measures of personality disorder cognitions and eating disorder attitudes at sessions one and six of CBT. Drop-out rates prior to session six were recorded. CBT had a relatively rapid onset of action, with a significant reduction in eating disorder attitudes over the first six sessions. Eating disorder attitudes were most strongly associated with cognitions related to anxiety-based personality disorders (avoidant, obsessive-compulsive and dependent). Individuals who dropped out of treatment prematurely had significantly higher levels of dependent personality disorder cognitions than those who remained in treatment. For those who remained in treatment, higher levels of avoidant, histrionic and borderline personality disorder cognitions were associated with a greater change in global eating disorder attitudes. CBT's action and retention of patients might be improved by consideration of such personality disorder cognitions when formulating and treating the eating disorders.

  3. Eating attitudes among adolescent girls in Tehran: A school-based study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hasti Sanaei

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available   Background: Eating attitude disorders may indicate an increased risk for eating disorders and their chronic health complications. The purpose of the present study was to determine the prevalence of eating attitude disorders and to identify the factors associated with them among female students in Tehran.  Methods: A total of 14–18-year-old high school girls (N=619 completed a standardized self-report Eating Attitude Test (EAT-26 questionnaire and a demographic questionnaire. Mental health problems were investigated by means of the Patient Health Questionnaire-2 and the Generalized Anxiety Disorders-2.  Results: Based on EAT-26 scores, 153 (24.7% students had eating attitude disorders. There was no relationship between abnormal eating attitudes and both individual and socioeconomic factors (P>0.05. Logistic regression analysis demonstrated that eating attitude disorders were significantly associated with depression [OR=1.8 (1.2-2.8, P=0.007], anxiety [OR=1.6 (1.1-2.4, P=0.04], and perception of body shape as overweight [OR=2.7 (1.7-4.3, P<0.001].  Conclusion: A relatively high rate of eating attitude disorders was found among adolescent school girls in Tehran. Related factors were body image and psychological issues including depression and anxiety. Preventive and screening programs in schools could identify students at risk and prevent development and complications of eating disorders.

  4. Disordered Eating Attitudes and Their Correlates among Iranian High School Girls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahdiyeh Hamed Behzad

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Disordered eating attitudes are contributing factors to the development of eatingdisorders. Adolescent girls are at high risk for eating diseases. In Iran, there is few data onthe subject, especially in Azarian adolescent girls, so we did this study for assessing disorderedeating attitudes and their correlates among Iranian Azarbaijani high school girls.Methods: In a cross-sectional study, 1887 high school girls were selected. Eating AttitudeTest-26 (EAT-26 and socio economical questionnaires were used. The EAT-26 score of 20or higher defined as disordered eating attitudes. Data were analyzed using the Statistical Programfor Social Sciences, by using from descriptive and analytical statistics.Results: Reliability and validity of the translated EAT-26 were 0.80, 0.76, respectively. Instudied subjects, mean (SD of EAT-26 was 11.71(8.48. Totally, 16.7% (C.I with 95%: 15.1-18.3% of students had disordered eating attitudes. About half of the participants were unhappywith their body weight and considered themselves as obese. Mean of EAT-26 washigher in this group. Groups, who intent to weight loss, were smoker, and who had age ofmenarche less than 11 years, also had higher EAT-26 scores. Parent’s literacy or job, birthorder, family size or income and house ownership had not any significant effect on EAT-26score.Conclusions: Persian version of EAT-26 has good reliability and validity for assessing disorderedeating attitudes in Azarian girl adolescents. Prevalence of disordered eating attitudesamong Azarian adolescent girls are in the range of some studies, but are less than Arabiancountries, and some European ones. In adolescent girls, body weight dissatisfaction, smokingand early menarche has important role in eating attitudes.

  5. Outcome of anorexia nervosa: eating attitudes, personality, and parental bonding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulik, C M; Sullivan, P F; Fear, J L; Pickering, A

    2000-09-01

    We examined eating attitudes, personality, and parental bonding in women with a history of anorexia nervosa stratified by degree of recovery in comparison to randomly selected controls. We were interested in the distinguishing characteristics of recovery and of chronic anorexia nervosa. All female new referrals to an eating disorders service between January 1, 1981 and December 31, 1984 with probable or definite anorexia nervosa were eligible for inclusion. 86.4% of these women ("cases") were located and agreed to participate. The control group was a random community sample. All subjects were interviewed with a structured diagnostic instrument and completed a battery of psychological inventories including the Eating Disorder Inventory (EDI), the Three-Factor Eating Questionnaire (TFEQ), the Temperament and Character Inventory (TCI), and the Parental Bonding Instrument (PBI). We divided the anorexia follow-up sample into full recovery (n = 21), partial recovery (n = 34), and chronically ill (n = 15) and compared them to community controls (n = 98). The chronically ill group was distinguished by a lower desired body mass index (BMI), higher cognitive restraint on the TFEQ, higher Drive for Thinness and Bulimia on the EDI, lower maternal and paternal care on the PBI, and high harm avoidance and low self-directedness on the TCI. The full recovery group scored high on self-directedness and cooperativeness on the TCI. The domains of personality, character, and parental bonding differ among categories of recovery in anorexia nervosa. Whether these differences contribute to recovery or emerge during recovery or lack thereof remains an unanswered question. Copyright 2000 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  6. Body attitudes in patients with eating disorders at presentation and completion of intensive outpatient day treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Exterkate, Cecile C; Vriesendorp, Patricia F; de Jong, Cor A J

    2009-01-01

    Due to the importance of the distorted body experience in eating disorder diagnosis and treatment, we wanted to explore body attitudes of patients with eating disorders before and after 5 months of intensive specialized outpatient day treatment. We assessed 193 patients diagnosed with Anorexia Nervosa (AN), Bulimia Nervosa (BN) and Eating Disorder Not Otherwise Specified (EDNOS) using the Body Attitude Test (BAT), Body Mass Index (BMI), Eating Disorder Evaluation Scale (EDES) and Symptom Checklist 90 (SCL-90). Eating disorder subtypes differed in BMI, total body attitudes and negative appreciation of body size at intake, but not at termination of treatment. Following treatment, all patient groups reported large improvements in eating disorder pathology and all but the AN-Restrictive (AN-R) group, reported large improvements in overall psychological functioning. The AN patients demonstrated significant improvement in BMI, however the Anorexia Nervosa purging (AN-P) and Anorexia Nervosa restrictive (AN-R) subtypes differed in their changes in body attitudes. AN-R patients indicated no significant improvement in body attitudes. AN-P patients improved in total body attitudes, except one subscale. Patients with Bulimia Nervosa non-purging (BN-NP) subtype, Bulimia Nervosa purging (BN-P) subtype and EDNOS demonstrated similar improvements in total body attitudes (BAT). Body attitudes provide important insights into differences between eating disorder diagnostic categories and their treatment responsiveness.

  7. 75 FR 63878 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; Self-Regulatory Organizations; Notice of Filing and Immediate...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-18

    ...-Regulatory Organizations; Self-Regulatory Organizations; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness of...(b)(1). \\2\\ 17 CFR 240.19b-4. I. Self-Regulatory Organization's Statement of the Terms of Substance... Public Reference Room. II. Self-Regulatory Organization's Statement of the Purpose of, and Statutory...

  8. Risk of disordered eating attitudes and its relation to mental health among university students in ASEAN.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pengpid, Supa; Peltzer, Karl

    2018-06-01

    Since there is a lack of information on eating disorders attitudes in Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN), the aim of this study was to explore the prevalence of eating disorder attitude and its relation to mental distress among university student populations in Indonesia, Malaysia, Myanmar, Thailand and Vietnam. A cross-sectional questionnaire survey and anthropometric measurement were conducted with undergraduate university students that were randomly recruited. The Eating Attitudes Test (EAT-26) was utilized to determine the prevalence of disordered eating attitudes. The sample included 3148 university students, with a mean age of 20.5 years, SD = 1.6. Using the EAT-26, 11.5% of the students across all countries were classified as being at risk for an eating disorder, ranging from below 10% in Indonesia, Thailand and Vietnam to 13.8% in Malaysia and 20.6% in Myanmar. In multivariable logistic regression analysis, sociodemographic factors (wealthier subjective economic status, and living in a lower middle income country), underweight and overweight body weight perception, psychological factors (depression symptoms and pathological internet use), and being obese were associated with eating disorder risk. Relatively high rates of eating disorder risk were found. This result calls for increased awareness, understanding of eating disorders and related risk factors and interventions in university students in ASEAN. Level V, descriptive cross-sectional survey.

  9. Risk of disordered eating attitudes among male adolescents in five Emirates of the United Arab Emirates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musaiger, Abdulrahman O; Al-Mannai, Mariam; Al-Lalla, Osama

    2014-12-01

    The aim of this study was to highlight the prevalence of disordered eating attitudes among male adolescents in the United Arab Emirates (UAE). A multistage stratified sampling method was used to select 731 male students aged 15-18 years from five Emirates of the UAE. The Eating Attitudes Test (EAT-26) was used to determine the prevalence of disordered eating attitudes in students. The findings revealed that the proportion of disordered eating attitudes in the UAE was relatively high compared with many developing and developed countries and ranged from 33.1% to 49.1%. Moreover, students living in the Emirates of Dubai and Al-Fujairah have double the risk of having disordered eating attitudes compared with students living in the other Emirates. The results suggest the need for screening adolescents for eating disorders, as well as for increased awareness and understanding of eating disorders and their associated risk factors in all male adolescents in the UAE. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Attitudes toward orthorexia nervosa relative to DSM-5 eating disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, Courtney C; Mazzeo, Suzanne E

    2017-07-01

    A pattern of disordered eating involving a pathological fixation with healthy food consumption, labeled orthorexia nervosa (ON), has recently generated attention; however, research has not yet investigated perceptions of ON-related behaviors. This study examined potential stigmatization of ON, compared with DSM-5 ED diagnoses. Participants (N = 505) were randomly assigned to read a vignette depicting a woman with anorexia nervosa (AN), bulimia nervosa (BN), binge-eating disorder (BED), or ON. They then answered questions about the individual depicted in the vignette. A series of MANOVAs investigated whether opinions and beliefs about the person depicted varied as a function of the disorder described in the vignette. Individuals with ON were perceived as less likely to "improve with treatment" than individuals with BN, and less likely to "pull themselves together," than individuals with BED. Individuals with ON and AN were viewed as "hard[er] to talk to" and more of a "danger to others" compared with individuals with BED. ON was viewed as less distressing, less likely to evoke sympathy, and more acceptable than the other disorders. Finally, "poor living choices" were perceived as contributing more substantially to ON. Participants' attributions of various personality characteristics did not differ based on ED diagnosis. Results suggest that ON is viewed as less severe, more desirable, and more often the result of personal life choices. However, findings also imply that ON is associated with stigma, similar to DSM-5 EDs. These negative attitudes might reinforce ON behaviors, and limit awareness of their potential complications. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. A cross-sectional study of disturbed eating attitudes and behaviours in medical students

    OpenAIRE

    Panchami; Teenu Samuel

    2016-01-01

    Background: The final phase of medical school is characterized by many demands, requirements, and responsibilities, in addition to insecurities that typify the end of the program. Weight and shape concerns are also considered part of the core pathology of eating disorders. The purpose of this study is to investigate eating attitudes and to correlate disturbed eating habits with anxiety, self-esteem, body weight satisfaction and BMI in medical students. Methods: This is a cross-sectional o...

  12. Attitudes and beliefs affect frequency of eating out in the Lower Mississippi Delta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attitudes and beliefs reflecting cultural values can have a positive or negative influence on eating behaviors. Eating out may negatively affect diet quality through increased fat intake and larger portion sizes. In a representative sample of the Lower Mississippi Delta (LMD) consisting of 1601 Af...

  13. Body attitudes in patients with eating disorders at presentation and completion of intensive outpatient day treatment.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Exterkate, C.C.; Vriesendorp, P.F.; Jong, C.A.J. de

    2009-01-01

    Due to the importance of the distorted body experience in eating disorder diagnosis and treatment, we wanted to explore body attitudes of patients with eating disorders before and after 5 months of intensive specialized outpatient day treatment. We assessed 193 patients diagnosed with Anorexia

  14. Gender differences in the relationship between impulsivity and disordered eating behaviors and attitudes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundahl, Alyssa; Wahlstrom, Laura C; Christ, Christa C; Stoltenberg, Scott F

    2015-08-01

    We investigated relationships among gender, impulsivity and disordered eating in healthy college students. Participants (N=1223) were healthy, undergraduate men (28.5%) and women (71.5%), who completed the Barratt Impulsiveness Scale - Version 11 (BIS-11) and a four-factor version of the Eating Attitudes Test (EAT-16). As predicted, mean scores on all four EAT-16 factors were significantly higher for women than for men. Attentional impulsivity was related to poorer self-perception of body shape, more dieting, and a greater preoccupation with food for the sample as a whole. Moreover, motor impulsivity was related to poorer self-perceptions of body shape and a greater preoccupation with food. However, no gender differences emerged in the relationship between impulsivity and disordered eating attitudes. This study elucidates the role of impulsivity in disordered eating behaviors among non-clinical college students. For both women and men, attentional and motor impulsivity were related to disordered eating attitudes and behaviors. Overall, these findings suggest that different facets of impulsivity are related to disordered eating attitudes and behaviors in a non-clinical college population. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Knowledge, attitudes and behaviours: Eating habits among students of nutrition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ignacio Jáuregui-Lobera

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To value in which proportion the nutrition knowledge guarantees in keeping with a healthy diet pattern behaviours. Method: Descriptive, transversal study, carried out with 50 second-year students belonging to the career in Human Nutrition and Dietetics, Seville (Spain, all of them females, with mean age of 21.16 years old. The collection of data related to the daily food ingestion was made following the 24-hours-recount technique and using two tables of food composition for the calculation of the contribution. Students have followed matters such as basic nutrition and life cycle, bromatology, nutrition education and dietetics. Results: There is an absolute fast from breakfast till lunch in more than half of the cases, 16% of the students do not eat anything during the evening, either; and in 20% of the cases the daily food consists in breakfast, lunch and dinner. From an energetic point of view, there is an hypocaloric pattern and, concerning macronutrients, an ingestion excess of fats and proteins. Fibre ingestion remains under current recommendations and iron -in an almost 60%-, calcium and folic acid ingestion are also deficient. Conclusions: It seems as if social pressure and feeding fashions had more weight at the time of determining the attitudes and behaviours in front of food than the fact of owning suitable knowledge on the matter. It is not likely that having that knowledge, even as in our sample, at a technical level, can guarantee proper behaviours and therefore a healthful feeding behaviour.

  16. Study of eating attitudes and behaviours in junior college students in Mumbai, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tendulkar, Prajakta; Krishnadas, Rajeev; Durge, Vijay; Sharma, Sumit; Nayak, Sapna; Kamat, Sanjeev; Dhavale, Hemangee

    2006-10-01

    Eating disorders have been described as possible 'culture-bound syndromes', with roots in Western cultural values and conflicts. They may, in fact, be more prevalent within various non-Western cultural groups than previously recognised, as Western values become more widely accepted. Cross-cultural experiences suggest that cultural change itself may be associated with increased vulnerability to eating disorders, especially when Western values about physical aesthetics are involved. to assess the eating attitudes and behaviours among adolescents in the urban ethnic city, Mumbai, a survey was conducted amongst 451 college students. the study, based in four junior colleges, comprised 451 subjects who completed a semi-structured questionnaire, a 26-item Eating Attitudes Test (EAT-26) and the Personal Assessment Inventory (IPAT). the results revealed faulty eating habits in 13.3% of the subjects. A statistically significant proportion perceived them-selves to have problems with eating, substance use, dieting and exercise practices, resorting to extreme measures to achieve weight loss. A high rate of faulty eating habits was observed in males. Higher scores on depression and suicidal ideation were reported in the population with faulty eating habits. a significant percentage of college-going populations in urban settings probably have faulty eating habits.

  17. Gender Perspectives on Adolescent Eating Behaviors: A Study on the Eating Attitudes and Behaviors of Junior Secondary Students in Hong Kong

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai Yeung, Wai-ling Theresa

    2010-01-01

    Objective: This research aimed to investigate the eating attitudes and behaviors of junior secondary students in Hong Kong, with a specific focus on possible gender differences. Design: A survey was conducted in 2005 to solicit data about participants' food knowledge, eating attitudes and behavior, perceptions of cooking skills and body weight,…

  18. Knowledge, Attitude, and Behaviors Related to Eating Out among University Students in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ping Hu

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available In many countries the frequency of eating out has steadily increased over the last few decades, and this behavioris often associated with unhealthy dietary patterns. This study aimed to describe the levels of knowledge, attitude, and behaviors (KAB related to eating out among university students. A cross-sectional study was conducted in the college town in Chongqing, China with a total of 1634 participants. The mean eating out related KAB scores were: knowledge 11.5 ± 2.9, attitude 17.0 ± 2.8, and behaviors 24.2 ± 4.8 (possible total scores: 20, 24, 40 respectively. As the level of knowledge increased, the percentage of highly satisfactory attitude and behaviors increased. Only 10% of the participants did not eat out for lunch and dinner during weekends in the last month. Gender, ethnicity, mother’s education, monthly boarding expenses, living place during the study, and the frequency of eating out for breakfast were statistically associated with the scores of KAB. In conclusion, Chinese junior students had poor knowledge of and behaviors towards eating out and ate out frequently. Educational interventionsto improve knowledge related eating out are needed in order to promote healthy eating out behaviors among Chinese university students.

  19. Knowledge, Attitude, and Behaviors Related to Eating Out among University Students in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Ping; Huang, Wenjie; Bai, Ruixue; Zhang, Fan; Sharma, Manoj; Shi, Zumin; Xiao, Xiaoqiu; Abdullah, Abu S; Zhao, Yong

    2016-07-12

    In many countries the frequency of eating out has steadily increased over the last few decades, and this behavioris often associated with unhealthy dietary patterns. This study aimed to describe the levels of knowledge, attitude, and behaviors (KAB) related to eating out among university students. A cross-sectional study was conducted in the college town in Chongqing, China with a total of 1634 participants. The mean eating out related KAB scores were: knowledge 11.5 ± 2.9, attitude 17.0 ± 2.8, and behaviors 24.2 ± 4.8 (possible total scores: 20, 24, 40 respectively). As the level of knowledge increased, the percentage of highly satisfactory attitude and behaviors increased. Only 10% of the participants did not eat out for lunch and dinner during weekends in the last month. Gender, ethnicity, mother's education, monthly boarding expenses, living place during the study, and the frequency of eating out for breakfast were statistically associated with the scores of KAB. In conclusion, Chinese junior students had poor knowledge of and behaviors towards eating out and ate out frequently. Educational interventionsto improve knowledge related eating out are needed in order to promote healthy eating out behaviors among Chinese university students.

  20. Eating Behavior and Attitude toward School Lunches in Elementary School Children

    OpenAIRE

    嶋田, さおり; 若林, 良和; 西村, 栄恵; 逸見, 幾代

    2015-01-01

    We conducted a survey of the eating habits of children in elementary schools that work actively in food education and take advantage of local products, and analyzed the trends in eating behavior and the attitude toward school lunches in each grade. The results of this study are summarized as follows: 1. 88.1% of children eat breakfast every day: second graders represent the highest percentage at 97.1% and sixth graders the lowest at 83.7%. The most common reason for not eating breakfast was "...

  1. Attitudes toward Seeking Professional Help for an Eating Disorder: The Role of Stigma and Anticipated Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hackler, Ashley H.; Vogel, David L.; Wade, Nathaniel G.

    2010-01-01

    This study examined the relationship between self-stigma, anticipated risks and benefits associated with seeking counseling, and attitudes toward seeking counseling among college students with disordered eating attitudes and behaviors. The results of hierarchical regression analyses demonstrated that self-stigma and the anticipated risks and…

  2. Danish and Chinese adolescents’ perceptions of healthy eating and attitudes toward regulatory measures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chan, Kara; Prendergast, Gerard; Grønhøj, Alice

    2011-01-01

    to be most effective in discouraging the consumption of soft drink. There were age, gender and market differences in attitudes toward selected regulatory measures that discourage the consumption of soft drinks. Research implications – Health educators and public health campaign designers should design health...... attempt to examine adolescents’ perception of healthy eating and attitudes toward food regulatory measures in more than one consumer market....

  3. Eating and body attitudes related to noncompetitive bodybuilding in military and general Hungarian male student populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukács, Liza; Murányi, István; Túry, Ferenc

    2007-02-01

    Pathological eating attitudes and extreme weight control practices occur most commonly in certain female populations. In some young male occupation groups, such as in the armed forces, the appearance of physical strength and muscularity has particular importance. We studied body and eating attitudes and the prevalence of bodybuilding and steroid abuse in 480 military college and 752 general college male students. The Eating Disorder Inventory was used for all subjects. General college students had higher body mass index values than did military students. The prevalence of bodybuilding and steroid abuse was significantly greater in the military population. Comparisons between the study groups and within groups showed significantly different scores on certain Eating Disorder Inventory subscales. The study revealed that male military college students have some protective factors against the psychopathological features of eating disorders.

  4. Big Five Personality Traits and Eating Attitudes in Intensively Training Dancers: The Mediating Role of Internalized Thinness Norms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scoffier-Mériaux, Stéphanie; Falzon, Charlène; Lewton-Brain, Peter; Filaire, Edith; d'Arripe-Longueville, Fabienne

    2015-09-01

    Dancers are at high risk of developing disordered eating attitudes, notably because of internalized thinness norms. Although the big five personality traits have been shown to be associated with eating attitudes in daily life, in dancers where eating issues and thinness norms internalization could be salient little is known about these associations and the role of the internalization of thinness norms in this relationship. The main objectives of this study were thus to examine the relationships between the personality traits defined in the big five model and the self-regulation of eating attitudes, and to assess the role of internalized thinness norms in this association. The study included 180 intensively training dancers with an average age of 15.6 years (SD = 2.8). Dancers completed questionnaires measuring the big five personality traits, internalization of thinness norms and self-regulation of eating attitudes in sport. Bootstrapped mediation analyses showed that neuroticism was negatively associated with self-regulation of eating attitudes, both directly and indirectly through the mediating role of internalized thinness norms. This study suggested that: (a) neuroticism is a vulnerability factor for self-regulation of eating attitudes in dancers, as already evidenced in the general population, and (b) the internalization of thinness norms is a pathway through which neuroticism affects self-regulation of eating attitudes. The big five model is therefore partially related to the internalization of thinness norms and eating attitudes in dancers. Key pointsThe big five model relates to the internalization of thinness norms and eating attitudes in dancers.Neuroticism is negatively related to the self-regulation of eating attitudes.The internalization of thinness norms is correlated to the relationship between neuroticism and self-regulation of eating attitudes.

  5. Are Elite Female Soccer Athletes at Risk for Disordered Eating Attitudes, Menstrual Dysfunction, and Stress Fractures?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prather, Heidi; Hunt, Devyani; McKeon, Kathryn; Simpson, Scott; Meyer, E Blair; Yemm, Ted; Brophy, Robert

    2016-03-01

    To determine the prevalence of stress fractures, menstrual dysfunction and disordered eating attitudes in elite female soccer athletes. Cross-sectional descriptive study. Female soccer athletes were recruited from a national level youth soccer club, an NCAA Division I university team, and a women's professional team. Two hundred twenty female soccer athletes with a mean age of 16.4 ± 4 years and BMI of 20.8 ± 2 kg/m(2) completed the study, representing all athletes from the included teams. One-time surveys completed by the athletes. Height and weight were recorded, and body mass index (BMI) was calculated for each athlete. Athletes reported age of menarche, history of missing 3 or more menses within a 12-month period and stress fracture. The Eating Attitudes Test (EAT-26) was used to assess the athlete's body perception and attitudes toward eating. Of the 220 soccer athletes, 3 athletes (1.6%) had a low BMI for their age, and 19 (8.6%) reported stress fractures of the lower extremity. Among athletes who had reached menarche, the average onset was 13 + 1 year; menstrual dysfunction were present in 21 (19.3%). On the EAT-26, 1 player scored in the high risk range (>20) and 17 (7.7%) scored in the intermediate risk range (10-19) for eating disorders. Athletes with an EAT-26 score ≥ 10 points had a significantly higher prevalence of menstrual dysfunction in the past year compared to athletes with an EAT-26 score of less than 10 (P = .02). Elite female soccer athletes are susceptible to stress fractures and menstrual dysfunction and have delayed onset of menarche despite normal BMI and appropriate body perception and attitudes towards eating. Further studies are needed to better understand stress fracture risk in female soccer athletes and in other team sports to determine how these findings relate to long-term bone health in this population. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  6. The Correlation between Obsessive Compulsive Features and Dimensions of Pathological Eating Attitudes in Non-clinical Samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Mohammadzadeh

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: Obsessive compulsive symptoms are prevalent in individuals with eating disorders at clinical level. The purpose of this study was to investigate the correlation between obsessive compulsive features and pathological eating attitudes. Methods: This research is a correlational study. A sample of 790 university students were selected using stratified random sampling method and investigated by Obsessive Compulsive Inventory-Revised (OCI-R, and Eating Attitudes Test (EAT-26 questionnaires. Data were analyzed using multivariate regression analysis. Results: There were a correlation between obsessive-compulsive features and pathological eating attitudes (p<0.001, r=0.38, The results showed that obsessive-compulsive features can predict 15% of pathological eating attitudes (p<0.001, r2=0.15. Conclusion: The identified correlation is possibly related to common components between obsessive compulsive and eating disorders.

  7. Residents' and Fellows' Knowledge and Attitudes About Eating Disorders at an Academic Medical Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Kristen; Accurso, Erin C; Kinasz, Kathryn R; Le Grange, Daniel

    2017-06-01

    This study examined physician residents' and fellows' knowledge of eating disorders and their attitudes toward patients with eating disorders. Eighty physicians across disciplines completed a survey. The response rate for this survey across disciplines was 64.5 %. Participants demonstrated limited knowledge of eating disorders and reported minimal comfort levels treating patients with eating disorders. Psychiatry discipline (p = 0.002), eating disorder experience (p = 0.010), and having ≥4 eating disorder-continuing medical education credits (p = 0.037) predicted better knowledge of anorexia nervosa but not bulimia nervosa. Psychiatry residents (p = 0.041), and those who had treated at least one eating disorder patient (p = 0.006), reported significantly greater comfort treating patients with eating disorders. These results suggest that residents and fellows from this sample may benefit from training to increase awareness and confidence necessary to treat patients with eating disorders. Sufficient knowledge and comfort are critical since physicians are often the first health care provider to have contact with patients who have undiagnosed eating disorders.

  8. Big Five Personality Traits and Eating Attitudes in Intensively Training Dancers: The Mediating Role of Internalized Thinness Norms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stéphanie Scoffier-Mériaux, Charlène Falzon, Peter Lewton-Brain, Edith Filaire, Fabienne d’Arripe-Longueville

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Dancers are at high risk of developing disordered eating attitudes, notably because of internalized thinness norms. Although the big five personality traits have been shown to be associated with eating attitudes in daily life, in dancers where eating issues and thinness norms internalization could be salient little is known about these associations and the role of the internalization of thinness norms in this relationship. The main objectives of this study were thus to examine the relationships between the personality traits defined in the big five model and the self-regulation of eating attitudes, and to assess the role of internalized thinness norms in this association. The study included 180 intensively training dancers with an average age of 15.6 years (SD = 2.8. Dancers completed questionnaires measuring the big five personality traits, internalization of thinness norms and self-regulation of eating attitudes in sport. Bootstrapped mediation analyses showed that neuroticism was negatively associated with self-regulation of eating attitudes, both directly and indirectly through the mediating role of internalized thinness norms. This study suggested that: (a neuroticism is a vulnerability factor for self-regulation of eating attitudes in dancers, as already evidenced in the general population, and (b the internalization of thinness norms is a pathway through which neuroticism affects self-regulation of eating attitudes. The big five model is therefore partially related to the internalization of thinness norms and eating attitudes in dancers.

  9. Neurobiochemical and psychological factors influencing the eating behaviors and attitudes in anorexia nervosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grzelak, Teresa; Dutkiewicz, Agata; Paszynska, Elzbieta; Dmitrzak-Weglarz, Monika; Slopien, Agnieszka; Tyszkiewicz-Nwafor, Marta

    2017-05-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the characteristic features which contribute to inappropriate eating attitudes in people suffering from anorexia nervosa, based on an analysis of recent data. Factors influencing these attitudes have a genetic, neurobiological, biochemical, affective-motivational, cognitive, and behavioral background. Another important issue addressed in the paper is a description of the mechanism leading to continuous dietary restrictions. The altered activity of neurotransmitters modulating patients' moods after the consumption of food and a disturbed responsiveness to enterohormones enhance affective-motivational and cognitive aspects which, in turn, impede the improvement of eating behaviors. An understanding of the mechanisms behind the factors affecting the maintenance of inappropriate eating attitudes may contribute to greater effectiveness in the treatment of anorexia nervosa.

  10. Attitudes toward healthy eating: a mediator of the educational level-diet relationship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lê, J; Dallongeville, J; Wagner, A; Arveiler, D; Haas, B; Cottel, D; Simon, C; Dauchet, L

    2013-08-01

    A higher educational level is associated with a healthier diet. The goal of this study was to establish whether this association is mediated by attitudes toward healthy eating. The cross-sectional MONA LISA-NUT study was performed in 2005-2007 on adults aged 35-64 years from northern and north-eastern France. Diet quality was assessed on the basis of a 3-day food record and a validated score based on French national dietary guidelines. Specific questions investigated attitudes toward healthy eating. Multivariate analyses were used to quantify the proportion of the educational level-diet relationship that was mediated by attitudes toward healthy eating. Among the 1631 subjects, favourable attitudes toward healthy eating were associated with both higher educational level and diet quality. In the mediation analysis, 'organic food consumption' explained 14% (95% confidence interval (8;24)) of the educational level-diet relationship and 'attention paid to health when buying food' explained 9% (3;16). In contrast, 'attention to food choice', 'searching for information about food' and 'perceived role of eating' were not mediators of the association between educational level and diet. In a multivariate model, the attitude items together accounted for 25% (10;45) of the relationship. The mediation was more pronounced in women than in men (37% (15;54) vs 16% (1;27), respectively) and was significant for consumption of fruits and vegetables (23% (13;37)), whole-grain food (32% (15;58)) and seafood (22% (9;55)). Our results suggest that poor attitudes toward healthy eating in groups with low socioeconomic status constitute an additional factor (along with cost constraints) in the choice of unhealthy foods.

  11. Body image and eating attitudes among adolescent Chinese girls in Hong Kong.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fung, Maria S C; Yuen, Mantak

    2003-02-01

    The study investigated the relation between body image and eating attitudes among adolescent girls in Hong Kong. A sample of 358 senior secondary school girls completed the measures assessing body-part satisfaction and behaviors associated with eating. Analysis indicated that even though only 4.8% of the girls were overweight, 85.16% desired to weigh less. These Chinese teenage girls were concerned about their weight, and the desire for slimness was widespread. Correlations indicated that higher Body Mass Index was associated with lower satisfaction with weight. Lower scores on weight satisfaction were associated with higher scores on attitudes of dieting and food preoccupation.

  12. Disordered eating attitudes in relation to body image and emotional intelligence in young women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costarelli, V; Demerzi, M; Stamou, D

    2009-06-01

    A number of different psychological factors have been implicated in the multifactorial aetiology of disordered eating (DE) attitudes and behaviours; however, the possible role of emotional intelligence in DE symptomatology has not been thoroughly investigated in the past. The present study aimed to explore the possible differences in emotional intelligence, body image and anxiety levels in young females with DE attitudes and healthy controls. A total of 92 Greek female university students, 18-30 years old, were recruited. Subjects completed the following questionnaires: the Eating Attitudes Test (EAT-26), the Multidimensional Body-Self Questionnaire (MBRSQ), the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI) and the BarOn Emotional Intelligence Questionnaire (BarOn EQ-I). The EAT-26 revealed that 23% of the subjects presented DE attitudes. Women in the DE attitudes group had lower levels of Emotional Intelligence (EI) in comparison to the control group, particularly in factors such as emotional self-awareness (P emotional intelligence, such as emotional self-awareness and interpersonal relationships, which is an important finding in terms of the prevention and management of DE, and warrants further investigation.

  13. Health concern, food choice motives, and attitudes toward healthy eating: the mediating role of food choice motives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yu-Hua Christine

    2008-07-01

    This study addresses how various health concerns might influence not only consumers' food choice motives but also consumers' subsequent attitudes toward healthy eating. This study expects that those consumers with greater health concerns would have different food choice motives and better attitudes toward healthy eating. A self-completion questionnaire was used to gather information. Participants, a random sample of 500 undergraduate students from a national university in Taipei, Taiwan, provided a total of 456 usable questionnaires, representing a valid response rate of 91%. The average age of the respondents at the time of the survey was 21 years and 63% of respondents were females. The relationship between health concern and healthy eating attitudes was confirmed. The relationship between health concern of developing diseases and attitudes toward healthy eating was fully mediated by food choice motives. However, the relationship between calorie consumption health concern and healthy eating attitudes was only partially mediated by food choice motives. Implications of these findings are discussed.

  14. Teasing, acculturation, and cultural conflict: psychosocial correlates of body image and eating attitudes among South Asian women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, Sheethal D; Crowther, Janis H

    2007-01-01

    The current study examined sociocultural correlates of body dissatisfaction and maladaptive eating attitudes among 74 South Asian American women. Participants completed measures assessing three forms of teasing--general appearance, weight/shape, and ethnic--as well as thin-ideal internalization, acculturation, cultural conflict, body dissatisfaction, and maladaptive eating attitudes. Results indicated that all three types of teasing and cultural conflict were significantly related to body dissatisfaction and maladaptive eating attitudes. Cultural conflict was found to mediate the relationship between ethnic teasing and body dissatisfaction. Neither thin-ideal internalization nor acculturation was significantly associated with either body dissatisfaction or maladaptive eating attitudes. However, body dissatisfaction was found to mediate the relationship between weight/shape teasing and maladaptive eating attitudes. Implications of these findings and possible future directions for research on South Asian American women are discussed. (c) 2007 APA, all rights reserved.

  15. SELF-REGULATORY ABILITIES IN PROFESSIONAL ACTIVITY

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    G V Ozhiganova

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The self-regulation is considered by the author as a general ability of the person. The levels of self-regulation relating to any professional activity, and corresponding to these levels self-regulatory capacities are distinguished: 1 psychophysiological - the ability for self-regulation of emotional and psycho- physiological states; 2 socio-psychological - the ability for self-regulation in the process of social interaction; 3 psychological (the ability to regulate activities; the capacity for personal self-control;spiritual - the highest capacity for self-regulation due to the higher values and meanings of existence. Self-regulation at the highest spiritual level is considered in this research in connection with the actualization of higher self-regulatory capacities, leading to self-realization of the person including professional activity. Processes, levels, components of self-regulation, associated with different conditions of professional activities (for example, in extreme situations, as well as with different types of professions (teachers, sales managers, etc. are described. A particular attention is given to self- regulation in the teaching activities: levels, techniques of teachers’ self-regulatory skills are presented; the importance of teachers’ personal self-regulation is emphasized, because it determines self-development, self-improvement and self-fulfillment in their chosen profession, and is associated with the manifestation of higher self-regulatory capacities. It is noted that in the process of professional activities different levels and types of self-regulation are demanded. The self-regulation in professional activities is carried out due to various self-regulatory capabilities - from simple to complex, including the highest.

  16. Changes in body weight, body composition, and eating attitudes in high school wrestlers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shriver, Lenka Humenikova; Betts, Nancy Mulhollen; Payton, Mark Edward

    2009-08-01

    Many wrestlers engage in chronic dieting and rapid "weight cutting" throughout the year to compete in a category below their natural weight. Such weight-management practices have a negative influence on their health and nutritional status, so the National Wrestling Coaches Association implemented a new weight-management program for high school wrestlers in 2006. The purpose of this study was to determine whether seasonal changes in weight, body fat, and eating attitudes occur among high school wrestlers after the implementation of the new weight-management rule. Fifteen high school wrestlers participated in the study. Their weight, body composition, and eating attitudes were measured preseason, in-season, and off-season. Body fat was assessed using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. Attitudes toward dieting, food, and body weight were assessed using the Eating Attitude Test (EAT). No significant changes in body fat were detected from preseason to off-season. Weight increased from preseason to in-season (p < .05) and off-season (p < .05). Although the EAT score did not change significantly from preseason to off-season, 60% reported "thinking about burning up calories when exercising" during preseason, and only 40% felt that way during the season (p < .05) and 47% during, off-season (p < .05). The wrestlers experienced a significant weight gain from preseason to off-season with no significant changes in body fat. Their eating attitudes did not change significantly from preseason to off-season in this study, but further research using a large sample of high school wrestlers is warranted to confirm these findings.

  17. The Influence of the Self-Regulatory Focus on the Effectiveness of Stop-Smoking Campaigns for Young Smokers

    OpenAIRE

    L. ADAMS; T. FASEUR; M. GEUENS

    2010-01-01

    People’s self-regulatory focus may determine the effectiveness of stop-smoking campaigns. An experiment with 226 young smokers investigated the persuasiveness of different emotional appeals (fear-relief versus sadness-joy) for different self-regulatory foci (prevention versus promotion). A congruency effect emerges for attitude toward the advertisement and behavioral intentions: Young smokers with a promotion focus are more persuaded by sadness-joy than fear-relief campaigns, and the opposite...

  18. Eating attitudes, body esteem, perfectionism and anxiety of judo athletes and nonathletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouveix, M; Bouget, M; Pannafieux, C; Champely, S; Filaire, E

    2007-04-01

    The aim of the study was to examine the prevalence and relationships between disordered eating, menstrual irregularity, musculoskeletal injuries and psychological characteristics in 24 judo athletes (12 females and 12 males) and 31 controls (14 females and 17 males). All these parameters were assessed by a health/medical, dieting and menstrual history questionnaire, the Eating Attitudes Test (EAT-26), the Multidimensional perfectionism scale, the Rosenberg Self-esteem, the Body esteem scale, and the Profile of Mood States. Body mass index (BMI) was also computed. Twenty-five percent of female athletes would be "at risk" of EDs (EAT-26 > 20) and 0 % in the other sample groups. Bone injuries sustained over the judo athlete career were reported by 25 % of females and 33.3 % of males, while 35.7 % of the female controls reported bone injuries. The total frequency of menstrual dysfunction among judo athletes was 58.3 %, while 7.1 % of female controls reported oligoamenorrhea. Regression analyses showed that BE-Weight Satisfaction and BMI contributed to 54.6 % and 17 % of the variance, respectively, in the prediction of log-transformed Global EAT scores among female judo athletes. These data indicate that while the prevalence of clinical eating disorders is low in judo athletes, many are "at risk" for an eating disorder, which places them at an increased risk for menstrual irregularity and bone injuries. This study also highlights the relevance of body esteem to eating disorder symptoms.

  19. Disordered eating attitudes and body shame among athletes, exercisers and sedentary female college students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jankauskiene, R; Pajaujiene, S

    2012-02-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine the disordered eating attitudes and sociocultural body ideals internalization among university athletes (N.=98), exercisers (N.=125) and sedentary (N.=81) undergraduate female students. The mean age (SD) of the sample was 20.17 (2.00). The students completed Eating Attitude Test - 26, Body Areas Satisfaction subscale of the Multidimensional Body-Self Relations Questionnaire, Body Shame subscale from the Objectified Body Consciousness Scale, Rosenberg Self- Esteem Scale, Appearance subscale from the Motives for Physical Activity Measure--Revised, reported their physical activity and fluid manipulation-related behaviour. We observed no significant differences in disordered eating, body dissatisfaction, self-esteem and fluid manipulation-related behaviour among athletes, exercisers and sedentary female students. Body shame predicted disordered eating in all groups of women. Students high in body shame reported higher levels of disordered eating, body dissatisfaction, appearance-related exercise motives, fluid manipulation-related behaviour and lower self-esteem, regardless of their physical activity level. The results show that internalization of the sociocultural body standards provide a mechanism through which different physical activity levels are associated with negative eating and physical activity-related outcomes in college-aged women.

  20. Predicting consumers’ intention to purchase ready- to-eat meals: The role of moral attitude

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Olsen, N.V.; Sijtsema, S.J.; Hall, G.

    2010-01-01

    This study investigates the usefulness of integrating moral attitude into the Theory of Planned Behavior (TPB) model when predicting intention to consume ready-to-eat (RTE) meals. Questionnaire data were gathered in three countries: Norway (N = 112), The Netherlands (N = 99), and Finland (N = 134)

  1. Prevalence of Bulimic Behaviors and Trends in Eating Attitudes among Turkish Late Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiziltan, Gul; Karabudak, Efsun; Unver, Sibel; Sezgin, Emine; Unal, Ayse

    2006-01-01

    The eating attitudes and the prevalence of bulimic behaviors in a group of 300 late adolescents were investigated using the key questions from the Bulimia Investigatory Test, Edinburgh (BITE), and additional questions. Only four subjects (1.3%) scored above the cut-off point on the BITE, and prevalence rates of males and females were the same.…

  2. Stigmatizing attitudes and beliefs toward bulimia nervosa: the importance of knowledge and eating disorder symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodgers, Rachel Florence; Paxton, Susan J; McLean, Siân A; Massey, Robin; Mond, Jonathan M; Hay, Phillipa J; Rodgers, Bryan

    2015-04-01

    Widely held stigmatizing attitudes and beliefs toward bulimic eating disorders may lead to self-blame and reduced treatment seeking. Knowledge and familiarity with mental disorders may help decrease associated stigma. However, these relationships are not well understood in bulimia nervosa (BN). A community sample of 1828 adults aged 18 to 70 years completed a survey assessing stigmatizing attitudes and beliefs toward BN, knowledge and familiarity with the disorder, as well as levels of eating disorder symptoms. Knowledge of BN was negatively associated with three dimensions of stigmatization, personal responsibility (ρ = -0.28), unreliability (ρ = -0.19), and advantages of BN (ρ = -0.23). Familiarity revealed no association with stigmatization. Both men and women with high levels of eating disorder symptoms perceived BN as less serious than the participants with low levels of symptoms. Increasing community knowledge about bulimia may help mitigate stigmatization and perceived barriers to treatment.

  3. The Effect of Nutrition Education on Eating Disorders Attitude in Girls High School Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahiminia

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: Adolescence is one of the important period in growth and evolution process, Also, eating disorders in adolescences, especially girls is one of the major problems in communities. Therefore, an effective education is of special priority for prevention of eating disorders. The current study was performed with the goal of assessment of the effect of nutrition education on eating disorders attitude in girls high school students. Methods: This non-experimental study with a single group pre- and post-test design, was performed using purposive sampling method on 97 students of the first year of high school, in 2015. Data collection tool was EAT-26 standardized questionnaire, which was completed by the participants using self-report method before and 3 months after the education. Data were analyzed using paired t-test. The significance level was set at p<0.05. Results: The mean score of abnormal eating attitude decreased from 1.7±0.04 (before education to 1.4±0.06 (after education. Also, there was a significant statistical difference between the results of before and after education (p=0.0001. Conclusion: The results of this study revealed that nutrition education has brought about desired changes in the attitude. However, the increase of nutrition awareness and attitude change can gradually lead to behavior change. Therefore, the current study can help the authorities to include a wider range of nutritional education in the curriculum of students in dorder to prevent eating disorder.

  4. Eating Attitudes, Perfectionism and Body-esteem of Elite Male Judoists and Cyclists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filaire, Edith; Rouveix, Matthieu; Pannafieux, Christelle; Ferrand, Claude

    2007-01-01

    This study tested the hypothesis that male athletes who feel pressured to maintain a specific body weight present an elevated risk of subclinical eating disorders. Twelve judoists (19.5 ± 0.5 yr), fifteen cyclists (21.2 ± 2.8 yr) and seventeen non- competitive students matched for BMI and used as controls (21.8 ± 1.8 yr) were studied using the Eating Attitudes Test (EAT-26). The Multidimensional Perfectionism Scale, the Body Esteem Scale and the Profile of Mood States were also used to evaluate the relationships between eating disorders and psychological characteristics. Athletes completed the tests during their competitive period and controls completed the same scales at the same time. Scores obtained on EAT-26 differed significantly from the control group on EAT (p athletes used weight loss methods. Self-induced vomiting, use of laxatives and diet pills were reported by 4%, 10%, and 8.5% of them, respectively. Increasing exercise was the primary method used by controls to lose body weight. Athletes reported greater negative feelings about their physical appearance and their Body Weight Satisfaction than controls (p athletes. Body-esteem Appearance and depression accounted for a significant proportion of the variance in Dieting scores. There was no difference in perfectionism and mood between athletes and controls. This study highlights that these athletes may tread a fine line between optimal competitive attitudes and detrimental health behaviors. Key pointsPrevalence of eating disorders has become a growing concern among athletic populations, but very little information is available concerning male athletes.This study highlights that these athletes may tread a fine line between optimal competitive attitudes and detrimental health behaviors.

  5. Prospective associations between problematic eating attitudes in midchildhood and the future onset of adolescent obesity and high blood pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wade, Kaitlin H; Kramer, Michael S; Oken, Emily; Timpson, Nicholas J; Skugarevsky, Oleg; Patel, Rita; Bogdanovich, Natalia; Vilchuck, Konstantin; Davey Smith, George; Thompson, Jennifer; Martin, Richard M

    2017-02-01

    Clinically diagnosed eating disorders may have adverse cardiometabolic consequences, including overweight or obesity and high blood pressure. However, the link between problematic eating attitudes in early adolescence, which can lead to disordered eating behaviors, and future cardiometabolic health is, to our knowledge, unknown. We assessed whether variations in midchildhood eating attitudes influence the future development of overweight or obesity and high blood pressure. Of 17,046 children who participated in the Promotion of Breastfeeding Intervention Trial (PROBIT), we included 13,557 participants (79.5% response rate) who completed the Children's Eating Attitudes Test (ChEAT) at age 11.5 y and in whom we measured adiposity and blood pressure at ages 6.5, 11.5, and 16 y. We assessed whether ChEAT scores ≥85th percentile (indicative of problematic eating attitudes) compared with scores high blood pressure were attenuated (OR: 1.14; 95% CI: 0.89, 1.45 and OR: 1.09; 95% CI: 0.86, 1.39 for new-onset systolic and diastolic blood pressure, respectively). Problematic eating attitudes in midchildhood seem to be related to the development of obesity in adolescence, a relatively novel observation with potentially important public health implications for obesity control. PROBIT was registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT01561612 and isrctn.com as ISRCTN37687716.

  6. An examination of eating attitudes and physical activity levels of Turkish university students with regard to self-presentational concern.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aşçi, F Hülya; Tüzün, Macide; Koca, Canan

    2006-11-01

    This study aimed to examine eating attitudes and physical activity level of young women and men university students with regard to social physique anxiety level. 482 university students participated in this study voluntarily. "Eating Attitude Test (EAT-40)", "Social Physique Anxiety Scale" and "Physical Activity Assessment Questionnaire" were used to assess the eating attitude, social physique anxiety and physical activity level of participants, respectively. Women and men participants in this study were assigned to high (HSPA) and low (LSPA) social physique anxiety groups with respect to their median scores. Men had favorable eating attitudes and higher physical activity level than women. In addition, participants in the HSPA group had unfavorable eating attitudes and higher physical activity MET values than participants in the LSPA group. On the other hand, groupxgender interaction was only significant for the eating attitudes scores but, not for physical activity level. Women in the HSPA group scored higher on the EAT-40 than men in HSPA and women and men in the LSPA groups.

  7. Investigation Of The Relationship of Eating Attitudes With Thought Shape Fusion, Gender and Body Mass Index

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sultan OKUMUSOGLU

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Certain patologies are accepted as characterized with relevant certain cognitive distortions. Eating Disorders and Obssessive Compulsive Disorders (OCD are related in terms of comorbidite, existence of similar distortions and intrusive thoughts. Distorted cognitions related with body shape and weight are associated with eating disorders and the distorted cognition which was conceptualised as thought shape fusion is accepted as a version of thought action fusion which is commonly seen at OCD. Because of its practical and theoretical relevance the aim of the present study is investigation of the relationship of eating attitudes of individuals with thought shape fusion cognitive distortion and gender and body mass index (BMI. Participants are 73 university students with age range 18-28 (58 male. Eating Attitudes Test (EAT and Thought Shape Fusion Scale (TSFS have been used for data collection. A positive correlation was found between TSFS and EAT (r= 0.53, p=0.01 and TSFS and BMI (r=0,34, p=0,01. According to stepwise regression analysis primary predictor of TSFS scores are EAT scores; %28 of the variance of the TSFS was explained by EAT scores and when BMI and gender variables are added the explained variance is %47. Women differed with significantly higher means in terms of EAT scores. Groups were formed according to pathology cut point of EAT scale (≥30 and the group above the cut point differed with significantly higher TSFS mean scores. Results of the present study seems parallel with the claims which associates eating disorders with distorted cognitions which are expressions of intrusive thoughts similar to OCD and associated with characteristics of eating disorders as overrating of food, body weight and shape. Findings are evaluated as having practical and theoretical significance. It is hoped that after supported with future studies the findings of the present study will be useful by adding to the existing knowledge in the field which

  8. Emotion: The Self-regulatory Sense.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peil, Katherine T

    2014-03-01

    While emotion is a central component of human health and well-being, traditional approaches to understanding its biological function have been wanting. A dynamic systems model, however, broadly redefines and recasts emotion as a primary sensory system-perhaps the first sensory system to have emerged, serving the ancient autopoietic function of "self-regulation." Drawing upon molecular biology and revelations from the field of epigenetics, the model suggests that human emotional perceptions provide an ongoing stream of "self-relevant" sensory information concerning optimally adaptive states between the organism and its immediate environment, along with coupled behavioral corrections that honor a universal self-regulatory logic, one still encoded within cellular signaling and immune functions. Exemplified by the fundamental molecular circuitry of sensorimotor control in the E coli bacterium, the model suggests that the hedonic (affective) categories emerge directly from positive and negative feedback processes, their good/bad binary appraisals relating to dual self-regulatory behavioral regimes-evolutionary purposes, through which organisms actively participate in natural selection, and through which humans can interpret optimal or deficit states of balanced being and becoming. The self-regulatory sensory paradigm transcends anthropomorphism, unites divergent theoretical perspectives and isolated bodies of literature, while challenging time-honored assumptions. While suppressive regulatory strategies abound, it suggests that emotions are better understood as regulating us, providing a service crucial to all semantic language, learning systems, evaluative decision-making, and fundamental to optimal physical, mental, and social health.

  9. Emotion: The Self-regulatory Sense

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    While emotion is a central component of human health and well-being, traditional approaches to understanding its biological function have been wanting. A dynamic systems model, however, broadly redefines and recasts emotion as a primary sensory system—perhaps the first sensory system to have emerged, serving the ancient autopoietic function of “self-regulation.” Drawing upon molecular biology and revelations from the field of epigenetics, the model suggests that human emotional perceptions provide an ongoing stream of “self-relevant” sensory information concerning optimally adaptive states between the organism and its immediate environment, along with coupled behavioral corrections that honor a universal self-regulatory logic, one still encoded within cellular signaling and immune functions. Exemplified by the fundamental molecular circuitry of sensorimotor control in the E coli bacterium, the model suggests that the hedonic (affective) categories emerge directly from positive and negative feedback processes, their good/bad binary appraisals relating to dual self-regulatory behavioral regimes—evolutionary purposes, through which organisms actively participate in natural selection, and through which humans can interpret optimal or deficit states of balanced being and becoming. The self-regulatory sensory paradigm transcends anthropomorphism, unites divergent theoretical perspectives and isolated bodies of literature, while challenging time-honored assumptions. While suppressive regulatory strategies abound, it suggests that emotions are better understood as regulating us, providing a service crucial to all semantic language, learning systems, evaluative decision-making, and fundamental to optimal physical, mental, and social health. PMID:24808986

  10. Nurses' perception of knowledge, attitudes and reported practice towards patients with eating disorders: A concurrent mixed-methods study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seah, Xin Yi; Tham, Xiang Cong; Kamaruzaman, Netty Ryanie; Yobas, Piyanee Klainin

    2018-02-01

    Eating disorders are complex disorders requiring specialised care, thus knowledge and attitudes are crucial for management. This study aims to examine nurses' knowledge, attitudes, reported practice, and perceptions towards patients with eating disorders in Singapore. A concurrent mixed-methods study was carried out in Southeast Asia's only psychiatric unit with eating disorders programme. Twenty nurses were recruited using census sampling. Quantitative data were analysed with descriptive and inferential statistics, while qualitative data were analysed with content and thematic analysis. Certain personal factors were associated with nurses' levels of perceived knowledge. Different attitudes towards managing these patients were identified during interview sessions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Public and Healthcare Professionals’ Knowledge and Attitudes toward Binge Eating Disorder: A Narrative Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reas, Deborah Lynn

    2017-01-01

    Binge eating disorder (BED) is characterized by recurrent binge eating and marked distress in the absence of inappropriate compensatory behaviors for weight control. BED is prevalent in men and women, is associated with elevated psychosocial and functional impairment, and is associated strongly with obesity and related medical comorbidities. The aim is to provide a brief, state-of-the-art review of the major and recent findings to inform educational and awareness campaigns, stigma reduction interventions, as well as current clinical practice and future research. A narrative approach was used to synthesize emerging literature on the public and healthcare professionals’ knowledge and attitudes toward individuals with BED in comparison to other eating disorders (EDs) or mental illness. A total of 13 articles were reviewed. Nine studies investigated community samples and four studies investigated healthcare professionals. The reviewed literature suggested that BED is perceived by the public as less impairing, less severe, and “easier-to-treat” than other EDs. Attitudes and beliefs reflecting perceived blameworthiness and lack of self-discipline were ascribed to vignettes with BED. Community studies indicated a low level of public awareness that BED constitutes a discreet eating disorder. The literature on healthcare professionals’ knowledge and attitudes toward BED remains very limited. The few existing studies suggest encouraging trends in recognition and diagnostic accuracy, yet there remains a need for increased clinical awareness of BED-associated medical complications and knowledge of full BED diagnostic criteria. PMID:29160843

  12. Public and Healthcare Professionals’ Knowledge and Attitudes toward Binge Eating Disorder: A Narrative Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deborah Lynn Reas

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Binge eating disorder (BED is characterized by recurrent binge eating and marked distress in the absence of inappropriate compensatory behaviors for weight control. BED is prevalent in men and women, is associated with elevated psychosocial and functional impairment, and is associated strongly with obesity and related medical comorbidities. The aim is to provide a brief, state-of-the-art review of the major and recent findings to inform educational and awareness campaigns, stigma reduction interventions, as well as current clinical practice and future research. A narrative approach was used to synthesize emerging literature on the public and healthcare professionals’ knowledge and attitudes toward individuals with BED in comparison to other eating disorders (EDs or mental illness. A total of 13 articles were reviewed. Nine studies investigated community samples and four studies investigated healthcare professionals. The reviewed literature suggested that BED is perceived by the public as less impairing, less severe, and “easier-to-treat” than other EDs. Attitudes and beliefs reflecting perceived blameworthiness and lack of self-discipline were ascribed to vignettes with BED. Community studies indicated a low level of public awareness that BED constitutes a discreet eating disorder. The literature on healthcare professionals’ knowledge and attitudes toward BED remains very limited. The few existing studies suggest encouraging trends in recognition and diagnostic accuracy, yet there remains a need for increased clinical awareness of BED-associated medical complications and knowledge of full BED diagnostic criteria.

  13. Worksite Health Program Promoting Changes in Eating Behavior and Health Attitudes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mache, Stefanie; Jensen, Sarah; Jahn, Reimo; Steudtner, Mirko; Ochsmann, Elke; Preuß, Geraldine

    2015-11-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effectiveness of a worksite multicomponent health promotion intervention on eating behavior and attitudes, changes in body weight, and readiness to make eating behavior changes among workers over a 12-month intervention period. A total of 3,095 workers of a logistic company participated in a quasi-experimental comparison group study design. The intervention group received a multicomponent health training. Two of the main elements of the multicomponent intervention were physical exercise training and nutrition counseling/training. During the pilot year, participants completed a survey at baseline and again after 12 months to assess physical activity-, health-, and diet-related factors. Results showed that participants' body weight did not significantly decrease in the intervention group. Mean weight loss in the intervention groups was 0.5 kg (body mass index = 0.1 kg/m(2)). Eating behaviors in the intervention group improved more than in the comparison group. Some positive intervention effects were observed for the cognitive factors (e.g., changes in eating attitudes). Baseline readiness to change eating behavior was significantly improved over time. We demonstrated initial results of a long-term multicomponent worksite health promotion program with regard to changes in body weight, eating behavior, and attitudes. This evaluation of a 12-month pilot study suggests that a worksite health promotion program may lead to improvements in nutritional health behaviors for a number of workers. An investigation of long-term effects of this multicomponent intervention is strongly recommended. © 2015 Society for Public Health Education.

  14. Abnormal eating attitudes and behaviours and perceived parental control: a study of white British and British-Asian school girls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furnham, A; Adam-Saib, S

    2001-09-01

    Previous studies have found significantly higher scores on the Eating Attitudes Test (EAT-26) which measures eating disorders among second-generation British-Asian schoolgirls in comparison to their White counterparts. Further, high EAT-26 scores (an indication of unhealthy eating attitudes and behaviours) are positively associated with parental overprotection scores on the Parental Bonding Instrument (PBI). This study aimed to replicate and extend previous findings, comparing British-Asian schoolgirls to White schoolgirls and consider 'intra-Asian' differences on the same measures, including factor scores. Participants completed three questionnaires: EAT-26, PBI and BSS (Body Satisfaction Scale). There were 168 participants: 46 White, 40 Indian, 44 Pakistani and 38 Bengali. Previous findings were supported; the Asian scores were significantly higher than the White scores on the EAT-26 and PBI, but not the BSS. The Bengali sample had significantly higher EAT-26 total and 'oral control' scores than the other groups. There were no intra-Asian differences for the overprotection scores. PBI scores were not associated with EAT-26 scores. The BSS score was the only significant predictor of EAT scores, when entered into a regression along with PBI scores and the body mass index. Results demonstrated sociocultural factors in the development of eating disorders. The results suggest that there are important psychological differences between second-generation migrants from different countries on the Indian subcontinent. In line with previous studies, significant differences were found between the four ethnic groups, parenting styles, but these did not relate to actual eating disorders.

  15. Disordered eating attitude and associated factors among high school adolescents aged 12?19?years in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia: a cross-sectional study

    OpenAIRE

    Yirga, Belachew; Assefa Gelaw, Yalemzewod; Derso, Terefe; Wassie, Molla Mesele

    2016-01-01

    Background Eating disorders are very complex, frequently developed and have a public health impact on adolescents. Different studies revealed that eating disorders is a pressing public health problem among adolescents. Eating disorders may also lead to mortality due to their physiological sequelae. There is no previous study regarding disordered of eating attitude in Ethiopian adolescents. Therefore, this study aimed to assess prevalence of disordered eating attitude and its associated factor...

  16. The association of early childhood cognitive development and behavioural difficulties with pre-adolescent problematic eating attitudes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richmond, Rebecca C; Skugarevsky, Oleg; Yang, Seungmi; Kramer, Michael S; Wade, Kaitlin H; Patel, Rita; Bogdanovich, Natalia; Vilchuck, Konstantin; Sergeichick, Natalia; Smith, George Davey; Oken, Emily; Martin, Richard M

    2014-01-01

    Few studies have prospectively investigated associations of child cognitive ability and behavioural difficulties with later eating attitudes. We investigated associations of intelligence quotient (IQ), academic performance and behavioural difficulties at 6.5 years with eating attitudes five years later. We conducted an observational cohort study nested within the Promotion of Breastfeeding Intervention Trial, Belarus. Of 17,046 infants enrolled at birth, 13,751 (80.7%) completed the Children's Eating Attitude Test (ChEAT) at 11.5 years, most with information on IQ (n = 12,667), academic performance (n = 9,954) and behavioural difficulties (n = 11,098) at 6.5 years. The main outcome was a ChEAT score ≥ 85th percentile, indicative of problematic eating attitudes. Boys with higher IQ at 6.5 years reported fewer problematic eating attitudes, as assessed by ChEAT scores ≥ 85th percentile, at 11.5 years (OR per SD increase in full-scale IQ = 0.87; 0.79, 0.94). No such association was observed in girls (1.01; 0.93, 1.10) (p for sex-interaction = 0.016). In both boys and girls, teacher-assessed academic performance in non-verbal subjects was inversely associated with high ChEAT scores five years later (OR per unit increase in mathematics ability = 0.88; 0.82, 0.94; and OR per unit increase in ability for other non-verbal subjects = 0.86; 0.79, 0.94). Behavioural difficulties were positively associated with high ChEAT scores five years later (OR per SD increase in teacher-assessed rating = 1.13; 1.07, 1.19). Lower IQ, worse non-verbal academic performance and behavioural problems at early school age are positively associated with risk of problematic eating attitudes in early adolescence.

  17. The association of early childhood cognitive development and behavioural difficulties with pre-adolescent problematic eating attitudes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca C Richmond

    Full Text Available Few studies have prospectively investigated associations of child cognitive ability and behavioural difficulties with later eating attitudes. We investigated associations of intelligence quotient (IQ, academic performance and behavioural difficulties at 6.5 years with eating attitudes five years later.We conducted an observational cohort study nested within the Promotion of Breastfeeding Intervention Trial, Belarus. Of 17,046 infants enrolled at birth, 13,751 (80.7% completed the Children's Eating Attitude Test (ChEAT at 11.5 years, most with information on IQ (n = 12,667, academic performance (n = 9,954 and behavioural difficulties (n = 11,098 at 6.5 years. The main outcome was a ChEAT score ≥ 85th percentile, indicative of problematic eating attitudes.Boys with higher IQ at 6.5 years reported fewer problematic eating attitudes, as assessed by ChEAT scores ≥ 85th percentile, at 11.5 years (OR per SD increase in full-scale IQ = 0.87; 0.79, 0.94. No such association was observed in girls (1.01; 0.93, 1.10 (p for sex-interaction = 0.016. In both boys and girls, teacher-assessed academic performance in non-verbal subjects was inversely associated with high ChEAT scores five years later (OR per unit increase in mathematics ability = 0.88; 0.82, 0.94; and OR per unit increase in ability for other non-verbal subjects = 0.86; 0.79, 0.94. Behavioural difficulties were positively associated with high ChEAT scores five years later (OR per SD increase in teacher-assessed rating = 1.13; 1.07, 1.19.Lower IQ, worse non-verbal academic performance and behavioural problems at early school age are positively associated with risk of problematic eating attitudes in early adolescence.

  18. Body image dissatisfaction: gender differences in eating attitudes, self-esteem, and reasons for exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furnham, Adrian; Badmin, Nicola; Sneade, Ian

    2002-11-01

    Two hundred and thirty-five adolescents completed a questionnaire on the subject of eating attitudes, self-esteem, reasons for exercise, and their ideal versus current body size and shape. As predicted, boys were as likely to want to be heavier as lighter, whereas very few girls desired to be heavier. Only girls associated body dissatisfaction with the concept of self-esteem. Male self-esteem was not affected by body dissatisfaction. Specific reasons for exercise were found to correlate with low self-esteem and disordered eating, regardless of sex. The results are discussed in relation to burgeoning published research in this area.

  19. EATING ATTITUDES, PERFECTIONISM AND BODY-ESTEEM OF ELITE MALE JUDOISTS AND CYCLISTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edith Filaire

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available This study tested the hypothesis that male athletes who feel pressured to maintain a specific body weight present an elevated risk of subclinical eating disorders. Twelve judoists (19.5 ± 0.5 yr, fifteen cyclists (21.2 ± 2.8 yr and seventeen non- competitive students matched for BMI and used as controls (21.8 ± 1.8 yr were studied using the Eating Attitudes Test (EAT-26. The Multidimensional Perfectionism Scale, the Body Esteem Scale and the Profile of Mood States were also used to evaluate the relationships between eating disorders and psychological characteristics. Athletes completed the tests during their competitive period and controls completed the same scales at the same time. Scores obtained on EAT-26 differed significantly from the control group on EAT (p < 0.01, Dieting (p < 0.01, and Bulimia scores (p < 0.05. Sixty percent of the athletes used weight loss methods. Self-induced vomiting, use of laxatives and diet pills were reported by 4%, 10%, and 8.5% of them, respectively. Increasing exercise was the primary method used by controls to lose body weight. Athletes reported greater negative feelings about their physical appearance and their Body Weight Satisfaction than controls (p < 0.01, p < 0.05, respectively. Our results also showed that depression mood accounted for 73% of the variance in Bulimia scores and for 64% of the variance in Global EAT scores in athletes. Body-esteem Appearance and depression accounted for a significant proportion of the variance in Dieting scores. There was no difference in perfectionism and mood between athletes and controls. This study highlights that these athletes may tread a fine line between optimal competitive attitudes and detrimental health behaviors

  20. Positive Attitude toward Healthy Eating Predicts Higher Diet Quality at All Cost Levels of Supermarkets☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aggarwal, Anju; Monsivais, Pablo; Cook, Andrea J.; Drewnowski, Adam

    2014-01-01

    Shopping at low-cost supermarkets has been associated with higher obesity rates. This study examined whether attitudes toward healthy eating are independently associated with diet quality among shoppers at low-cost, medium-cost, and high-cost supermarkets. Data on socioeconomic status (SES), attitudes toward healthy eating, and supermarket choice were collected using a telephone survey of a representative sample of adult residents of King County, WA. Dietary intake data were based on a food frequency questionnaire. Thirteen supermarket chains were stratified into three categories: low, medium, and high cost, based on a market basket of 100 commonly eaten foods. Diet-quality measures were energy density, mean adequacy ratio, and total servings of fruits and vegetables. The analytical sample consisted of 963 adults. Multivariable regressions with robust standard error examined relations between diet quality, supermarket type, attitudes, and SES. Shopping at higher-cost supermarkets was associated with higher-quality diets. These associations persisted after adjusting for SES, but were eliminated after taking attitudinal measures into account. Supermarket shoppers with positive attitudes toward healthy eating had equally higher-quality diets, even if they shopped at low-, medium-, or high-cost supermarkets, independent of SES and other covariates. These findings imply that shopping at low-cost supermarkets does not prevent consumers from having high-quality diets, as long as they attach importance to good nutrition. Promoting nutrition-education strategies among supermarkets, particularly those catering to low-income groups, can help to improve diet quality. PMID:23916974

  1. Supporting and Developing Self-Regulatory Behaviours in Early Childhood in Young Children with High Levels of Impulsive Behaviour

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dan, Aviva

    2016-01-01

    Deficits in self-regulatory skills underlie or contribute to a range of adverse developmental problems and disorders, including ADHD (Barkley, 1997), eating disorders (Attie & Brooks-Gunn, 1995) and risk -taking behaviour (Cantor & Sanderson 1998; Eisenberg et al., 2005). Self-regulation has been recognised as an important factor in aiding…

  2. Prevalence of eating disorder attitudes among men and women with exercise dependence symptoms: a non-athlete population study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elaine Fernanda da Silva

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The present study sought to describe the prevalence of Secondary Exercise Dependence (ScED, i.e. eating disorders attitudes along with exercise dependence symptoms may differ between men and women in a broader exercising population. In this study, 174 regularly exerciser, aged 18-62 years old, who were invited to respond the Exercise Dependence Scale (EDS and the Eating Attitudes Test (EAT-26. There were more women than men with ScED. However, only men in the sample presented exercise dependence symptoms without eating disorders attitudes. Eating disorders may or may not exist in those who are exercise dependent in the broad exercising population, although there is a higher prevalence of ScED in women than men.

  3. Eating attitudes, self-esteem and social physique anxiety among Iranian females who participate in fitness programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gargari, B P; Khadem-Haghighian, M; Taklifi, E; Hamed-Behzad, M; Shahraki, M

    2010-03-01

    Today, women's participation in sports has substantially increased. This growth has been accompanied by concerns about health risks, as eating disorders, and psychological features, as self-esteem (SE) and social physique anxiety (SPA). The purpose of this study was to determine disordered eating attitudes and their relation to SE, SPA, as well as body weight, and body mass index (BMI), in Iranian females who participate in fitness programs. Subjects were 250 females, aged 14-51 years, who participated in fitness programs. Eating attitude test-26 (EAT-26), Rosenberg's self esteem scale (RSES), and social physique anxiety scale (SPAS), were used. Body weight and height were measured, and then Body Mass Index (BMI) was calculated. According to BMI cut-offs, 36% of subjects were overweight or obese. 28.4% and 19.6% of subjects were disordered eating attitudes (EAT-26>or=20) and low self-esteem (RSES<15), respectively. Disordered eating attitude subjects had lower SE and higher SPA, body weight and BMI than normal subjects (P<0.05). The low SE group had higher SPAS than normal one (P<0.02). In bivariate analysis, EAT-26 score was correlated negatively with RSES (r=-0.13, P<0.04) and positively with body weight, BMI, and SPAS (r=0.40, 0.42, and 0.47, respectively, P<0.001). SPAS had positive correlation with body weight and BMI (r=0.22, 0.19, It can be concluded that disordered eating attitudes are prevalent among Iranian females who participate in fitness programs. In this group, high SPA, body weight and BMI, and low SE accompany disordered eating attitudes.

  4. Attitudes toward obesity in obese persons: A matched comparison of obese women with and without binge eating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puhl, R.M.; Masheb, R.M.; White, M.A.; Grilo, C.M.

    2013-01-01

    No research has compared expressions of weight bias across different subgroups of obese individuals. This study compared attitudes toward and beliefs about obesity in women with and without binge eating disorder (BED) and examined whether these attitudes are related to psychological factors. Fifty obese women with BED were compared with an age- and body mass index (BMI)-matched group of 50 obese women without BED on a battery of established measures of anti-fat attitudes and beliefs about weight controllability and psychological factors (self-esteem, depression, and eating disorder features). The age-and BMI-matched groups did not differ with respect to beliefs about obesity or attitudes toward obese persons, or in self-esteem or depression. Correlational analyses conducted separately within each group revealed that women with BED who reported more favorable attitudes towards obese persons had higher self-esteem and lower levels of depression, whereas there were no significant associations between these variables among women without BED. In addition, weight controllability beliefs and eating disorder features were unrelated to self-esteem and depression in both groups. These findings suggest that stigmatizing attitudes endorsed by obese persons are neither tempered nor worsened by psychological distress or eating pathology. Given that stigmatizing attitudes did not differ between obese women with and without BED, it may be that obesity itself, rather than psychological features or disordered eating, increases vulnerability to negative weight-based attitudes. Potential implications for stigma reduction efforts and clinical practice are discussed. PMID:20124783

  5. Food, mood, and attitude: reducing risk for eating disorders in college women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franko, Debra L; Mintz, Laurie B; Villapiano, Mona; Green, Traci Craig; Mainelli, Dana; Folensbee, Lesley; Butler, Stephen F; Davidson, M Meghan; Hamilton, Emily; Little, Debbie; Kearns, Maureen; Budman, Simon H

    2005-11-01

    Food, Mood, and Attitude (FMA) is a CD-ROM prevention program developed to decrease risk for eating disorders in college women. Female 1st-year students (N = 240) were randomly assigned to the intervention (FMA) or control group. Equal numbers of students at risk and of low risk for developing an eating disorder were assigned to each condition. Participants in the FMA condition improved on all measures relative to controls. Significant 3-way interactions (Time x Condition x Risk Status) were found on measures of internalization of sociocultural attitudes about thinness, shape concerns, and weight concerns, indicating that at-risk participants in the intervention group improved to a greater extent than did low-risk participants. At follow-up, significantly fewer women in the FMA group reported overeating and excessive exercise relative to controls.

  6. Predicting consumers' intention to consume ready-to-eat meals. The role of moral attitude

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Nina Veflen; Sijtsema, Siet J; Hall, Gunnar

    2010-01-01

    This study investigates the usefulness of integrating moral attitude into the Theory of Planned Behavior (TPB) model when predicting intention to consume ready-to-eat (RTE) meals. Questionnaire data were gathered in three countries: Norway (N = 112), The Netherlands (N = 99), and Finland (N = 134...... in all the three countries tested, and the explained variance (R²) for TPB increased when moral was added as an explanatory factor. However, although the test showed significant results for the effect of attitude towards behavior and moral in all countries, non-significant results were observed...

  7. The Role of School Design in Shaping Healthy Eating-Related Attitudes, Practices, and Behaviors among School Staff

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frerichs, Leah; Brittin, Jeri; Intolubbe-Chmil, Loren; Trowbridge, Matthew; Sorensen, Dina; Huang, Terry T.-K.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Schools have increasing responsibility to address healthy eating, but physical barriers influence their ability to adopt and sustain recommended strategies. We took advantage of a natural experiment to investigate the role of the physical environment in shaping healthy eating attitudes and practices among school staff members. Methods:…

  8. Eating habits, food and health related attitudes and beliefs reported by French students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monneuse, M O; Bellisle, F; Koppert, G

    1997-01-01

    To assess eating habits and some food related behaviours, beliefs and knowledge in educated young French adults. A standardized questionnaire administered in university classes. University or 'Grandes Ecoles' of Paris and Dijon. 660 male and female French students. International survey; questionnaire composed of three major sections: (1) Health-related attitudes such as substances used, dieting, health practices; (2) Beliefs concerning behaviour and health, including eating habits; (3) Knowledge, namely relevance of factors to diseases such as cancer or cardiovascular diseases. Gender, self-perception of body size, BMI and attempts to lose weight affected a number of behaviours. Average BMI corresponded to standard values. 'Healthy' behaviours were often reported such as: avoiding fat and cholesterol, efforts to eat fruit and fiber. The French students showed a low frequency of snacking and a high regularity in having breakfast, especially respondents with lower BMI (females eating factors in cardiovascular diseases was observed. The meal and snack pattern in French students is very close to the traditional model. More food- and health-related behaviours and attitudes are reported by women than men. Some of them could be due to a genuine motivation for prevention and health in females or else to a greater wish to be thin. 'Desire to lose weight' is often reported although BMI values are normally low in this young population. Beliefs in the importance of a behaviour for health are correlated with the reported performance of the behaviours.

  9. Body-related sport and exercise motives and disturbed eating attitudes and behaviours in adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maïano, Christophe; Morin, Alexandre J S; Lanfranchi, Marie-Christine; Therme, Pierre

    2015-07-01

    Motives underlying sport and exercise involvement have recently been hypothesized as potential factors influencing the positive association between sports/exercises involvement and disturbed eating attitudes and behaviours (DEAB) among adolescents. Nevertheless, very few studies have examined this hypothesis or the moderating role of gender, context of practice, performance levels and sport type on these relationships. In this study, these questions were addressed among 168 male and 167 female French adolescents involved in various types, contexts and performance levels of sport and exercise. Participants were asked to indicate their main motives for involvement in sport practice and to self-report DEAB (generic DEAB, vomiting-purging behaviours, and eating-related control) on a French adaptation of the Eating Attitudes Test-26. The results shared positive associations between body-related sport and exercise motives and most of the DEAB subscales. Furthermore, they show that the relationship between body-related sport and exercise motives and Vomiting-Purging Behaviours differs according to involvement in individual and competitive sports and exercises. Copyright ©2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd and Eating Disorders Association.

  10. Relationship between attitudes towards healthy eating and dietary behaviour, lifestyle and demographic factors in a representative sample of Irish adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hearty, A P; McCarthy, S N; Kearney, J M; Gibney, M J

    2007-01-01

    Attitudes towards healthy eating were explored according to dietary, lifestyle and socio-demographic correlates in a random sample of 1256 Irish adults. Data were obtained from an Irish cross-sectional survey (1997-1999). A self-administered questionnaire was used to obtain attitudinal information. Food consumption was estimated using a 7-d food diary. A majority of the sample had a positive attitude or motivation towards their healthy eating behaviour. Those who perceived their own eating habits to be healthy were more likely to comply with current dietary guidelines than those who did not. Females, increasing age, higher social class, tertiary education, non-smokers, lower body-weights and increased recreational activity were associated with a lower odds ratio (OR) for having a negative attitude towards their healthy eating behaviour. An increased intake (g/d) of breakfast cereals, vegetables, fruit and poultry dishes were associated with decreased OR for negative attitudes towards their healthy eating behaviour, while an increased intake of high-calorie beverages (g/d) was associated with an increased OR. It can be concluded that attitudes or motivation towards eating healthily was related to measured dietary and lifestyle behaviour in this sample. Future research is warranted to devise appropriate methods of instituting attitude change towards dietary behaviour in certain subgroups of the population.

  11. Australian Healthcare Professionals’ Knowledge of and Attitudes toward Binge Eating Disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Belinda Cain

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective: This study aimed to investigate Australian healthcare practitioners’ knowledge and attitudes toward binge eating disorder (BED.Method: Participants were 175 healthcare professionals, who were randomized to one of two conditions that assessed diagnostic and treatment knowledge of either comorbid BED and obesity or only obesity via case vignette, as well as weight bias toward obese patients.Results: Results suggested that participants demonstrated a reluctance to diagnose comorbid BED and obesity, that their knowledge of physical complications associated with BED was limited, and that they indicated a narrow range of evidence-based treatment options. When compared with levels of weight bias expressed by healthcare professionals in previous international studies, Australian clinicians were significantly less biased, however, still largely endorsed ‘negative’ attitudes toward obesity.Conclusion: Findings suggest that future clinical training in eating disorders should therefore focus not only on diagnostic criteria, physical complications and treatment options, but also on practitioner attitudes toward eating and weight.

  12. Eating flowers? Exploring attitudes and consumers' representation of edible flowers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, H; Cielo, D P; Goméz-Corona, C; Silveira, A A S; Marchesan, T A; Galmarini, M V; Richards, N S P S

    2017-10-01

    Edible flowers have gained more attention in recent years thanks to their perceived health benefits. Despite this attention, it seems that edible flowers are not popularized for consumption in South America, being considered unfamiliar for some cultures from this continent. In this context, the general goal of the present study was to investigate the three dimensions of social representation theory, the representational field, the information and the attitude of the two conditions of edible flowers: a more general "food made with flowers" and more directional product "yoghurt made with flowers", using Brazilian consumers. To achieve this goal, a free word association task was applied. A total of 549 consumers participated in this study. Participants were divided into two conditions, in which the inductor expressions for the free word association task changed: (a) food products made with flowers and (b) yoghurt made with flowers. Results showed a very positive attitude to both situations, and consumers associated Food products made with flowers to "health care" while the central core of yoghurt made with flowers reflected the innovative condition of this product, supported here by their unpredictable character (information generated). Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Attitudes to body weight, weight gain and eating behavior in pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abraham, S; King, W; Llewellyn-Jones, D

    1994-12-01

    The eating behavior and attitudes to body weight of 100 healthy women were studied 3 days after the birth of their first child. During pregnancy women 'watch their weight' and use a range of methods of weight control which include cigarette smoking and inducing vomiting. During pregnancy 41 women reported weight control problems and 20 women considered their weight and eating problems to be greater than at any previous time. Picking was the most common unwanted behavior. Binge eating was experienced by 44 women, nine of whom reported it to be a 'severe' problem. Although women were ambivalent about being weighed at each antenatal visit, 81 recommended weighing once each month. The women held differing opinions on the effects of breastfeeding on body weight and on the need for nutritional supplements during pregnancy. Women reporting 'disordered eating' were more likely to have antenatal complications and give birth to low birthweight babies. The results suggest good obstetric care should include a history of the woman's eating behavior and body weight.

  14. Youth internalizing symptoms, sleep-related problems, and disordered eating attitudes and behaviors: A moderated mediation analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chardon, Marie L; Janicke, David M; Carmody, Julia K; Dumont-Driscoll, Marilyn C

    2016-04-01

    Internalizing symptoms increase the risk for disordered eating; however, the mechanism through which this relationship occurs remains unclear. Sleep-related problems may be a potential link as they are associated with both emotional functioning and disordered eating. The present study aims to evaluate the mediating roles of two sleep-related problems (sleep disturbance and daytime sleepiness) in the relationship between youth internalizing symptoms and disordered eating, and to explore if age moderates these relations. Participants were 225 youth (8-17years) attending a primary care appointment. Youth and legal guardians completed questionnaires about youth disordered eating attitudes and behaviors, internalizing symptoms, sleep disturbance, and daytime sleepiness. Mediation and moderated mediation analyses were utilized. The mediation model revealed both youth sleep disturbance and daytime sleepiness independently mediated the association between internalizing symptoms and disordered eating attitudes and behaviors, and explained 18% of the variance in disordered eating. The moderated mediation model including youth age accounted for 21% of the variance in disordered eating; youth age significantly interacted with sleep disturbance, but not with daytime sleepiness, to predict disordered eating. Sleep disturbance only mediated the relationship between internalizing symptoms and disordered eating in youth 12years old and younger, while daytime sleepiness was a significant mediator regardless of age. As sleep-related problems are frequently improved with the adoption of health behaviors conducive to good sleep, these results may suggest a relatively modifiable and cost-effective target to reduce youth risk for disordered eating. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Influence of parental attitudes in the development of children eating behaviour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scaglioni, Silvia; Salvioni, Michela; Galimberti, Cinzia

    2008-02-01

    The present paper is a review of available data on effects of parental feeding attitudes and styles on child nutritional behaviour. Food preferences develop from genetically determined predispositions to like sweet and salty flavours and to dislike bitter and sour tastes. There is evidence for existence of some innate, automatic mechanism that regulate appetite. However, from birth genetic predispositions are modified by experience. There are mechanisms of taste development: mere exposure, medicine effect, flavour learning, flavour nutrient learning. Parents play a pivotal role in the development of their child's food preferences and energy intake, with research indicating that certain child feeding practices, such as exerting excessive control over what and how much children eat, may contribute to childhood overweight. Mothers are of particular interest on children's eating behaviour, as they have been shown to spend significantly more time than fathers in direct interactions with their children across several familial situations.A recent paper describes two primary aspects of control: restriction, which involves restricting children's access to junk foods and restricting the total amount of food, and pressure, which involves pressuring children to eat healthy foods (usually fruits and vegetables) and pressuring to eat more in general. The results showed significant correlations between parent and child for reported nutritional behaviour like food intake, eating motivations, and body dis- and satisfaction. Parents create environments for children that may foster the development of healthy eating behaviours and weight, or that may promote overweight and aspects of disordered eating. In conclusion positive parental role model may be a better method for improving a child's diet than attempts at dietary control.

  16. Body image dissatisfaction, nutritional status, and eating attitudes in adolescents - doi: 10.4025/actascihealthsci.v35i2.11937

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Fernanda Laus

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The study investigated the relationship between body image dissatisfaction, nutritional status, and eating attitudes in adolescents from a small town of the interior of São Paulo State. A total of 278 adolescents (106 boys and 172 girls aged between 15 and 18 years had completed measures of body image dissatisfaction through the Figure Rating Scale and eating attitudes by the Eating Attitudes Test (EAT-26 and had their weight and height measured. Girls related more dissatisfaction and abnormal eating behavior than boys and, in both genders the abnormal eating attitudes tend to increase with increasing dissatisfaction. Moreover, dissatisfaction was higher between those individuals classified as overweight and obesity. These results demonstrated that body image dissatisfaction and inappropriate eating behaviors afflict boys and girls even from small cities in developing countries, highlighting the need to undertake epidemiological studies to early recognition of populations at risk of developing eating disorders.

  17. Assessing the Relationship between Weight–Controlling Behaviors and Eating Attitude Disorders with Dietary Intake in Female Adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hengameh Khezri

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Adolescents pay more attention to their appearance and body.Irregular nutritional patterns, eating certain types of food, and consuming more protein-containing food are more common in this age group. Considering the importance of this issue and lack of adequate studies in Iran, especially in Fars province, we aimed to assess the relationship between weight-controlling attitudes and eating disorders with dietary intake in female adolescents. Methods: This cross-sectional study was done on 600 female students aged 14-17 years from the four educational districts of Shiraz, southern Iran, during 2011-2012 using the stratified random sampling method. Data were collected using three questionnaires as follows: demographic data questionnaire, Eating Attitudes Test (EAT-26 to assess eating attitude disorders in students, and the Food Frequency Questionnaire (FFQ. Data were analyzed using SPSS software, version 13 and the NUT 4 software. Results: Six (1% EAT-26 questionnaire were omitted from analysis for being incomplete. Also, 556, 446, and 491 questionnaires were evaluated in meat, bread, and fat groups, respectively; and the rest were omitted because of not being complete. The mean±SD age of the students was 15.8±0.9 years. According to the EAT-26, we found that 80.1% of the students were at risk of eating attitude disorders (CI=95%, 76.9-83.3. By comparing the results of the FFQ and the EAT-26 and weight controlling behaviors, we found that consumption of meat and fat was significantly higher in students with eating attitude disorder (P=0.027 and P=0.003 respectively. Bread intake was significantly higher in the groups with no disorder (P=0.08. (This P value is not significant. Moreover, the mean consumption of sandwiches was higher in students with eating attitude disorders (P=0.002. Conclusion: Considering the high prevalence of eating attitude disorders in our study, assessing the underlying reasons and implementing preventive

  18. Positive attitude toward healthy eating predicts higher diet quality at all cost levels of supermarkets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aggarwal, Anju; Monsivais, Pablo; Cook, Andrea J; Drewnowski, Adam

    2014-02-01

    Shopping at low-cost supermarkets has been associated with higher obesity rates. This study examined whether attitudes toward healthy eating are independently associated with diet quality among shoppers at low-cost, medium-cost, and high-cost supermarkets. Data on socioeconomic status (SES), attitudes toward healthy eating, and supermarket choice were collected using a telephone survey of a representative sample of adult residents of King County, WA. Dietary intake data were based on a food frequency questionnaire. Thirteen supermarket chains were stratified into three categories: low, medium, and high cost, based on a market basket of 100 commonly eaten foods. Diet-quality measures were energy density, mean adequacy ratio, and total servings of fruits and vegetables. The analytical sample consisted of 963 adults. Multivariable regressions with robust standard error examined relations between diet quality, supermarket type, attitudes, and SES. Shopping at higher-cost supermarkets was associated with higher-quality diets. These associations persisted after adjusting for SES, but were eliminated after taking attitudinal measures into account. Supermarket shoppers with positive attitudes toward healthy eating had equally higher-quality diets, even if they shopped at low-, medium-, or high-cost supermarkets, independent of SES and other covariates. These findings imply that shopping at low-cost supermarkets does not prevent consumers from having high-quality diets, as long as they attach importance to good nutrition. Promoting nutrition-education strategies among supermarkets, particularly those catering to low-income groups, can help to improve diet quality. Copyright © 2014 Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Psychometric Properties of the Chinese Version of the Eating Attitudes Test in Young Female Patients with Eating Disorders in Mainland China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Qing; Chan, Raymond C K; Li, Xiaoping; Arcelus, Jon; Yue, Ling; Huang, Jiabin; Gu, Lian; Fan, Qing; Zhang, Haiyin; Xiao, Zeping; Chen, Jue

    2017-11-01

    The study aimed to investigate the reliability and validity of the Chinese version of the eating attitudes test (EAT-26) among female adolescents and young adults in Mainland China. This scale was administered to 396 female eating disorder patients and 406 noneating disorder healthy controls, in addition 35 healthy controls completed a retest after a 4-week intervals. Tests for reliability, convergent validity and receiver operating characteristic analysis were performed to detect the psychometric properties. The EAT-26 demonstrated good internal consistency (Cronbach's alpha = 0.822-0.922), test-retest reliability (interclass correlation coefficient = 0.817) and convergent validity(r = 0.450-0.750). The receiver operating characteristic analysis showed that the cut-off 14 for anorexia nervosa and 15 for bulimia nervosa represented good compromises with approximate sensitivity (0.66-0.68) and specificity (0.85-0.86). Our findings provided evidence that the Chinese version of the EAT-26 was a psychometrically reliable and valid self-rating instrument for identifying people suffering from an eating disorder in Mainland China. A clinical cut-off range between 14 and 15 could be used, but caution should be exercised because of the low sensitivity of the tool. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd and Eating Disorders Association. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd and Eating Disorders Association.

  20. Children with food refusal: an assessment of parental eating attitudes and their styles of coping with stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Seda; Yilmaz, Ayse Esra; Karabel, Musemma; Kara, Semra; Aldemir, Seçil; Karabel, Duran

    2012-05-01

    In this study, we aimed to assess the eating attitudes and stress coping styles of parents whose children presented to the clinic complaining of food refusal. The parents of 31 children aged ≥3 years, presented to the clinic with the complaint of food refusal. The control group consisted of 30 healthy children with no prior history of food refusal, and their parents. In both groups, birth features, body mass indexes (BMIs), eating attitudes and stress coping styles of the parents were assessed. The parents of both groups were studied, in part utilizing the eating attitudes test (EAT), and the coping styles of stress scale (CSSS). Our study found that body weights and BMI values of the fathers in the study group were significantly lower than fathers in the control group. There was no significant difference in EAT scores between the two groups; however, where the children's body weight and height for age percentile was under 25%, the parents had significantly lower EAT scores. When CSSS scores were assessed, the optimistic approach score of the mother and the self-confident score of the father were found to be significantly high in both groups. The parental perception and definition of eating problems does not necessarily indicate the presence of an eating disorder in a child. In fact, the eating attitudes of the fathers were related to the low percentile weight and height values of the children, and a child's food refusal was not dependent on the stress coping style used by the parent. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  1. Body Image Satisfaction, Eating Attitudes and Perceptions of Female Body Silhouettes in Rural South African Adolescents.

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    Titilola M Pedro

    Full Text Available This study aims to examine the associations between BMI, disordered eating attitude, body dissatisfaction in female adolescents, and descriptive attributes assigned to silhouettes of varying sizes in male and female adolescents, aged 11 to 15, in rural South Africa. Height and weight were measured to determine BMI. Age and sex-specific cut-offs for underweight and overweight/obesity were determined using the International Obesity Task Force cut-offs. Body image satisfaction using Feel-Ideal Discrepancy (FID scores, Eating Attitudes Test-26 (EAT-26, and perceptual female silhouettes were collected through self-administered questionnaires in 385 adolescents from the Agincourt Health and Socio-Demographic Surveillance System (HSDSS. Participants self-reported their Tanner pubertal stage and were classified as early pubertal ( 2. Mid to post pubertal boys and girls were significantly heavier, taller, and had higher BMI values than their early pubertal counterparts (all p<0.001. The prevalence of overweight and obesity was higher in the girls than the boys in both pubertal stages. The majority (83.5% of the girls demonstrated body dissatisfaction (a desire to be thinner or fatter. The girls who wanted to be fatter had a significantly higher BMI than the girls who wanted to be thinner (p<0.001. There were no differences in EAT-26 scores between pubertal groups, within the same sex, and between boys and girls within the two pubertal groups. The majority of the boys and the girls in both pubertal groups perceived the underweight silhouettes to be "unhappy" and "weak" and the majority of girls in both pubertal groups perceived the normal silhouettes to be the "best". These findings suggest a need for policy intervention that will address a healthy body size among South African adolescents.

  2. Reformulation of the Children's Eating Attitudes Test (ChEAT): factor structure and scoring method in a non-clinical population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anton, S D; Han, H; Newton, R L; Martin, C K; York-Crowe, E; Stewart, T M; Williamson, D A

    2006-12-01

    The primary aims of this study were to empirically test the factor structure of the Children's Eating Attitudes Test (ChEAT) through both exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses and to interpret the factor structure of the ChEAT within the context of a new scoring method. The ChEAT was administered to 728 children in the 2nd through 6th grades (from five schools) at two different time points. Exactly half the students were male and half were female. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study to empirically test the merits of an alternative 6-point scoring system as compared to the traditionally used 4-point scoring system. With the new scoring procedure, the skewness for all factor scores decreased, which resulted in increased variance in the item scores, as well as the total ChEAT score. Since the internal consistency of two factors in a recently proposed model was not acceptable (ChEAT reported by previous investigations. Intercorrelations among the factors suggested three higher order constructs. These findings indicate that the ChEAT subscales may be sufficiently stable to allow use in non-clinical samples of children.

  3. A balance of activity in brain control and reward systems predicts self-regulatory outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, Richard B; Chen, Pin-Hao A; Huckins, Jeremy F; Hofmann, Wilhelm; Kelley, William M; Heatherton, Todd F

    2017-05-01

    Previous neuroimaging work has shown that increased reward-related activity following exposure to food cues is predictive of self-control failure. The balance model suggests that self-regulation failures result from an imbalance in reward and executive control mechanisms. However, an open question is whether the relative balance of activity in brain systems associated with executive control (vs reward) supports self-regulatory outcomes when people encounter tempting cues in daily life. Sixty-nine chronic dieters, a population known for frequent lapses in self-control, completed a food cue-reactivity task during an fMRI scanning session, followed by a weeklong sampling of daily eating behaviors via ecological momentary assessment. We related participants' food cue activity in brain systems associated with executive control and reward to real-world eating patterns. Specifically, a balance score representing the amount of activity in brain regions associated with self-regulatory control, relative to automatic reward-related activity, predicted dieters' control over their eating behavior during the following week. This balance measure may reflect individual self-control capacity and be useful for examining self-regulation success in other domains and populations. © The Author (2017). Published by Oxford University Press.

  4. Disordered Eating Attitudes and Exercise Behavior among Female Emirati College Students in the United Arab Emirates: A Cross- Sectional Study

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    Haleama Al Sabbah

    2016-09-01

    Results: The participants' mean age and standard deviation (Mean ± SD was 19 ± 1.3 years. 31.4% of the participants showed disordered eating attitudes. The percentage of participants engaged in at least one concerning behavior in the past six months was 43.8%. A membership in a health club was significantly related to disordered eating attitudes (p< 0.01. A high level of physical activity was correlated with laxative use, over the counter supplements, and exercising for more than 60 minutes to control weight (p < 0.05. Conclusion: There is a great need for intervention programs and policies to contain the level of abnormal eating attitudes and promote healthy level of physical activity among college students.

  5. Disordered eating attitude and associated factors among high school adolescents aged 12-19 years in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yirga, Belachew; Assefa Gelaw, Yalemzewod; Derso, Terefe; Wassie, Molla Mesele

    2016-12-07

    Eating disorders are very complex, frequently developed and have a public health impact on adolescents. Different studies revealed that eating disorders is a pressing public health problem among adolescents. Eating disorders may also lead to mortality due to their physiological sequelae. There is no previous study regarding disordered of eating attitude in Ethiopian adolescents. Therefore, this study aimed to assess prevalence of disordered eating attitude and its associated factors among adolescents in Addis Ababa high schools. A school-based cross sectional study was conducted. Data were collected among 836 high school adolescents aged 12-19 years from May to June, 2015 in Addis Ababa city. The data were collected by self-administered questionnaire containing eating attitudes test-26 items (EAT-26) and socio-demographic factors. Binary logistic regression analysis was carried out to identify factors associated with disordered eating attitude. Both crude odds ratio and adjusted odds ratio were calculated to show the strength of association. In multivariable analysis, variables with a P value of disordered eating attitude among adolescents was 8.6% [95% CI 4.9, 12.3]. Being female [AOR = 1.75, 95% CI 1.03, 3.00], Mother's educational status (Primary [AOR = 0.28, 95% CI 0.11, 0.78], Certificate/diploma [AOR = 0.22, 95% CI 0.07, 0.58] and first degree and above [AOR = 0.16, 95% CI 0.07, 0.40]) were found to be significantly associated with disordered eating attitude. The finding of this study revealed that a significant number of adolescents were susceptible to developing disordered eating attitude. Being female and Mothers' education status were significantly associated with disordered eating attitude among adolescents. Provision of screening test for eating disorders focusing on female adolescents is highly recommended.

  6. Eating attitudes, health-risk behaviors, self-esteem, and anxiety among adolescent females in a suburban high school.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, M; Schneider, M; Pegler, C; Napolitano, B

    1991-07-01

    In order to determine whether adolescent females with abnormal eating attitudes display lower levels of self-esteem and higher levels of anxiety than their peers, and whether these adolescents participate in health-risk behaviors to a greater or lesser degree than their peers, we administered a series of questionnaires to the females attending a suburban high school in New York State. The questionnaires, completed by 268 students (mean age, 16.2 years), included data on health-risk behaviors and weight attitudes, an Eating Attitudes Test, a self-esteem scale, and an anxiety inventory. Results indicated that almost two-thirds of the students described themselves as overweight, almost three-quarters felt they were above the healthiest weight for their age and height, and almost four-fifths were above the weight at which they would be most happy; 18% of the students scored 30 or more on the Eating Attitudes Test, a score suggestive of an eating disorder. Use of Spearman-rank correlation coefficients and multiple linear regression analysis revealed that those with more unhappiness with their weight and higher scores on the eating attitudes test were more likely to have lower self-esteem and higher anxiety and to participate more in health-risk behaviors, including cigarette smoking, alcohol use, drug use, and sexual activity with more total partners. The data from this study further corroborate the growing belief that health-risk behaviors tend to cluster together in vulnerable adolescents and demonstrate that abnormal eating attitudes and behaviors may be part of this cluster, especially in females with low self-esteem and high levels of anxiety.

  7. Predicting consumers' intention to consume ready-to-eat meals. The role of moral attitude.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen, Nina Veflen; Sijtsema, Siet J; Hall, Gunnar

    2010-12-01

    This study investigates the usefulness of integrating moral attitude into the Theory of Planned Behavior (TPB) model when predicting intention to consume ready-to-eat (RTE) meals. Questionnaire data were gathered in three countries: Norway (N = 112), The Netherlands (N = 99), and Finland (N = 134) in spring 2009. A stepwise hierarchical regression was conducted, and the analyses showed that moral attitude is an important predictor of RTE-meal consumption. The feeling of moral obligation, operationalised as a negative feeling of guilt, had a negative effect on peoples' intention to consume ready meals in all the three countries tested, and the explained variance (R²) for TPB increased when moral was added as an explanatory factor. However, although the test showed significant results for the effect of attitude towards behavior and moral in all countries, non-significant results were observed for the effect of subjective norm in both The Netherlands and Norway when moral attitude was included to the TPB-model, indicating cultural differences in the social pressure towards ready meal consumption. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. A Comparison of Eating Attitudes Between Vegans/Vegetarians and Nonvegans/Nonvegetarians in Terms of Orthorexia Nervosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çiçekoğlu, Pınar; Tunçay, Güzin Yasemin

    2018-04-01

    This descriptive study was performed to compare signs of orthorexia nervosa and eating habits and attitudes of vegans/vegetarians and nonvegans/nonvegetarians. The study sample included 62 people, of whom 31 were vegan/vegetarian and 31 were nonvegan/nonvegetarian. Data were gathered with a personal characteristics form, Orthorexia Nervosa Evaluation Scale-11, Eating Attitudes Test-40 and Maudsley Obsessive Compulsive Inventory. There were not any significant differences between scores for Orthorexia Nervosa Evaluation Scale-11, Eating Attitudes Test-40 and Maudsley Obsessive Compulsive Inventory (p>0,05). As scores for Orthorexia Nervosa Evaluation Scale-11 decreased, predisposition to orthorexia nervosa increased. Therefore, although correlation coefficients were negative, they were considered positive. There was a significant, negative relation between Eating Habits Test-40 scores and Orthorexia Nervosa Evaluation Scale-11 scores (r=-0.290, p=0.002) and between Maudsley Obsessive Compulsive Inventory scores and Orthorexia Nervosa Evaluation Scale-11 scores (r=-0.319, p=0.012). As poor eating habits and obsessive symptoms increased, so did orthorectic symptoms. In light of obtained results, it seems that people become vegan/vegetarian mainly for ethical reasons and that veganism/vegetarianism is not associated with obsession of healthy eating. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Influence of gender role orientation (masculinity versus femininity) on body satisfaction and eating attitudes in homosexuals, heterosexuals and transsexuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cella, Stefania; Iannaccone, Mara; Cotrufo, Paolo

    2013-06-01

    The primary aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between gender role orientation and eating disorder attitudes and behaviors and body dissatisfaction in a sample of homosexuals, heterosexuals, and transsexuals. We screened 132 homosexuals, 178 heterosexuals (both male and female), and 15 MtF transsexuals by means of an ad hoc socio-demographic schedule; the Eating Disorders Inventory-2 and Symptom Checklist; the Body Uneasiness Test and the Bem Sex Role Inventory. Differences between homosexual, heterosexual, and transsexual participants emerged, but those data seem to be best explained by the constructs of femininity and masculinity than by the biological gender. The empirical evidence of a positive correlation between femininity and eating problems, and the negative correlation between masculinity and eating problems, is full of implications. Eating disorders appear to be diseases of femininity; masculinity seems to be a protective factor, independently by the biological gender.

  10. Determinants of Problematic Internet use and its Association with Disordered Eating Attitudes among Minia University Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamal, Nashwa Nabil; Kamal, Nashaat Nabil

    2018-01-01

    To determine the association between problematic Internet use (PIU) and disordered eating attitudes (DEAs) and to detect the potential risk factors for PIU among University students in Minia, Egypt. A cross-sectional study was carried out among a random sample ( n = 2365) of Minia University students. PIU was assessed using The Problematic Internet Use Scale (PIUS), and the DEAs were assessed using eating attitudes test-26 questionnaire. Of the 2365 students, 424 (17.9%) had DEAs, and it was more in females than males (22.3% and 14.5%, respectively). The mean of the PIUS score also was significantly higher in males than females (120.3 ± 30.5, and 117.5 ± 30.6, respectively). A positive moderate correlation ( r = 0.48, P < 0.05) was detected between PIU and DEAs. The results of this study indicate that PIU is significantly correlated with DEAs among University students in Minia, Egypt, and further studies are needed to identify the association between DEAs and PIU.

  11. The prevalence of weight – controlling attitude and eating disorders and their association with anthropometric indices in female adolescent students

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    mohamad hasan Eftekhari

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background : Adolescence is one of the most critical growth periods in the human's life. Eating disorder is one of the most common nutritional-psychological disorders in this period, which can lead to acute and chronic physical and mental problems. Therefore, regarding the importance of the topic, the present study was designed to determine the prevalence of weight – controlling attitude and eating disorders, and their association with anthropometric indices in female adolescent school students. Materials and Methods: The present study was a cross-sectional descriptive analytical study. 594 high school adolescent girls were selected using multi-stage random sampling method. Nutritional attitude was assessed by use of a nutritional attitude questionnaire. Another specific questionnaire was used to gather demographic and anthropometric information. Data analysis was done using SPSS software, independent t- test and Chi-square (P˂0.05. Results: The information shows that 80% of the studied population are at risk of eating disorders. The number of the obese , over weight and underweight students were significantly more in the group with nutritional attitude disorders. Conclusion: Due to the high prevalence of eating disorders in adolescent girls, and the concomitant obesity and underweight with these disorders, the correction of these attitude could be mentioned as a health priority in this city

  12. [Eating habits and attitudes towards change in Spanish university students and workers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zazpe, Itziar; Marqués, María; Sánchez-Tainta, Ana; Rodríguez-Mourille, Ana; Beunza, Juan-José; Santiago, Susana; Fernández-Montero, Alejandro

    2013-01-01

    Universities and workplaces are important targets for the promotion of the nutritional interventions in adult population. The aim of this study was to assess the dietary habits and attitudes towards change in workers and university students from different academic fields. The study data came from a cross-sectional study of a Spanish University population of 1,429 participants. We analyzed the dietary habits and the attitudes toward dietary change. The mean age of workers and students was 37 and 23 years, respectively. Both groups reported eating four meals per day. Among students, the consumption of vegetables, wine, fish and nuts was less frequent whereas carbonated beverages, commercial bakery, fast food and red meat was higher. On the other hand, overall dietary pattern of science students was healthier than other students. Although no significant differences were found between students and workers in attitudes towards change, 32% of employees and 39% of students said they were seriously considering changing them. The dietary pattern was healthier among workers than among students, particularly those participants that studied social sciences degrees. They constituted the most vulnerable segment of the university population from a nutritional point of view. About a third of workers and students considered changing their habits. Copyright © AULA MEDICA EDICIONES 2013. Published by AULA MEDICA. All rights reserved.

  13. [Prevalence and relationship between physical activity and abnormal eating attitudes in Spanish women university students in Health and Education Sciences].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cancela Carral, José María; Ayán Pérez, Carlos

    2011-10-01

    Future education and health professionals will be responsible for promoting physical activity and correct eating habits among the general population. This work aims to describe the prevalence and the degree of correlation between physical level and eating disorders in a sample made of nursing, physiotherapy and education female students. A total of 258 female students doing university courses during the academic year 2009-2010 at the University of Vigo (Pontevedra's Campus) and who were registered in nursing (87), physiotherapy (73) and education (98) took part in this transversal descriptive study. The International Physical Activity Questionnaire and the Eating Attitude Test were used to assess the prevalence of physical activity and eating disturbed attitudes respectively. The data showed that 63 (64,7%) of nursing students and 63 (72,1%) of education students reported the higher physical inactivity values, while 19 (19.4%) and 13 (15,3%) of them were likely to suffer from eating disorders respectively. Significant differences were found between the academic degree and the physical activity level of the sample (chi²=10,265; Sig.students (OR= 3,58; IC 95%= 1,29-9,93; Sig.students. There is a chance that the performance of intense physical activity could be related to inadequate eating habits.

  14. Impact of female adult eating disorder inpatients' attitudes to compulsive exercise on outcome at discharge and follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danielsen, Marit; Rø, Øyvind; Romild, Ulla; Bjørnelv, Sigrid

    2016-01-01

    The link between compulsive exercise and eating disorders is well known, but research with clinical samples has been limited. The purpose of the study was to investigate changes in attitudes towards compulsive exercise and its impact on outcome at follow-up in female adult hospitalised patients with eating disorders. The sample consisted of 78 patients: Diagnostic distribution: anorexia nervosa 59 % (n = 46), approximately 22 % (n = 16) in bulimia nervosa, and Eating Disorder not Otherwise Specified respectively. The average follow-up period was 26 months (SD =15 months). Compulsive exercise was measured by the Exercise and Eating Disorder (EED) questionnaire. Other measures were the Eating Disorder Inventory (EDI-2), Body Attitude Test (BAT), Symptom Checklist (SCL-90), Inventory of Interpersonal Problems (IIP 64), Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), and body mass index (BMI). Outcome measures were EDI-2 and BMI (patients with admission BMI ≤ 18.5). Paired sample t-tests and mixed model regression analysis were conducted to investigate changes in compulsive exercise and predictors of outcome respectively. All measures revealed significant improvements (p exercise during treatment and follow-up. The change in compulsive exercise scores predicted the longer-term course of eating disorder symptoms and BMI.

  15. Low-income consumers' attitudes and behaviour towards access, availability and motivation to eat fruit and vegetables

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dibsdall, L.A.; Lambert, N.; Bobbin, R.F.; Frewer, L.J.

    2003-01-01

    To determine low-income consumers' attitudes and behaviour towards fruit and vegetables, in particular issues of access to, affordability of and motivation to eat fruit and vegetables. Design and setting: Questionnaire survey mailed to homes owned by a large UK housing association. Participants:

  16. Eating attitudes, body image satisfaction and self-esteem of South African Black and White male adolescents and their perception of female body silhouettes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gitau, Tabither M; Micklesfield, Lisa K; Pettifor, John M; Norris, Shane A

    2014-01-01

    This cross-sectional study of urban high schools in Johannesburg, South Africa, sought to examine eating attitudes, body image and self-esteem among male adolescents (n = 391). Anthropometric measurements, Eating Attitudes Test-26 (EAT-26), Rosenberg self-esteem, body image satisfaction and perception of females were collected at age 13, 15 and 17 years. Descriptive analysis was done to describe the sample, and non-parametric Wilcoxon Mann-Whitney test was used to test for significant differences between data that were not normally distributed (EAT-26). Spearman's rank correlation coefficient analyses were conducted to test for associations between self-esteem scores and eating attitudes, body mass indices and body image satisfaction scores. To assess the differences between groups that were normally distributed chi-square tests were carried out. Ethnic differences significantly affected adolescent boys' body mass index (BMI), eating attitudes and self-esteem; White boys had higher self-esteem, BMI and normal eating attitudes than the Black boys did. BMI was positively associated with self-esteem (p = 0.01, r = 0.134) and negatively with dieting behaviour in White boys (p = 0.004, r = -0.257), and with lower EAT-26 bulimic and oral control scores in Black boys. In conclusion, the findings highlight ethnic differences and a need to better understand cultural differences that influence adolescent attitudes and behaviour.

  17. Eat healthy? Attitudes of the German population towards industrially produced cardioprotective food.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, F U C E; Luck-Sikorski, C; Krüger, M; Wiacek, C; Braun, P G; Engeli, S; Riedel-Heller, S G

    2018-05-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is likely to increase in incidence. Foods with cardioprotective functions, e.g. specific functional food, could reduce CVD risk factors and hence CVD incidence. Little is known about industrially modified foods with cardioprotective functions. In a large German sample (n = 1007), attitudes of consumers in Germany towards industrially produced cardioprotective food were assessed using Cluster analyses. Consumers were contacted via telephone and interviewed using questionnaires. Overall, about 25% knew about industrially produced food with cardioprotective function. Our analysis revealed a small but determined group of consumers who think very skeptical about cardioprotective products, but we also identified a favorable group. These two groups only differed in age, with the skeptical group being ten years older. The rising number of industrially modified products with potential cardioprotective benefit is met by skepticism and a lack of knowledge by German costumers. If large scale studies show health benefits of these products, these will need to be better communicated to German customers in order to address possible doubts or concerns and to encourage healthy eating habits in consumer eating behavior. Copyright © 2018 The Italian Society of Diabetology, the Italian Society for the Study of Atherosclerosis, the Italian Society of Human Nutrition, and the Department of Clinical Medicine and Surgery, Federico II University. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Media influence on drive for thinness, body satisfaction, and eating attitudes among young women in Hong Kong and China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rochelle, Tina L; Hu, W Y

    2017-03-01

    The present study examined the impact of thin-ideal media exposure on Chinese women's drive for thinness, attitudes towards body shape, and eating attitude. Women were assigned to one of two video conditions, which portrayed the thin-ideal (experimental) or was neutral (control group), in terms of content. A total of 83 young women from Hong Kong (N = 38) and Shanghai (N = 45), aged between 18 and 25 years (M age  = 22.7) participated in the study. A significant interaction was observed between the experimental video condition and location. Hong Kong women in the experimental group experienced greater levels of body dissatisfaction than Shanghai women exposed to the same condition. Exposure to thin-ideal media produced an increase in drive for thinness, body dissatisfaction and problematic eating attitudes regardless of location, with a greater immediate impact shown in Hong Kong women.

  19. Self-regulatory failure and intimate partner violence perpetration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finkel, Eli J; DeWall, C Nathan; Slotter, Erica B; Oaten, Megan; Foshee, Vangie A

    2009-09-01

    Five studies tested the hypothesis that self-regulatory failure is an important predictor of intimate partner violence (IPV) perpetration. Study 1 participants were far more likely to experience a violent impulse during conflictual interaction with their romantic partner than they were to enact a violent behavior, suggesting that self-regulatory processes help individuals refrain from perpetrating IPV when they experience a violent impulse. Study 2 participants high in dispositional self-control were less likely to perpetrate IPV, in both cross-sectional and residualized-lagged analyses, than were participants low in dispositional self-control. Study 3 participants verbalized more IPV-related cognitions if they responded immediately to partner provocations than if they responded after a 10-s delay. Study 4 participants whose self-regulatory resources were experimentally depleted were more violent in response to partner provocation (but not when unprovoked) than were nondepleted participants. Finally, Study 5 participants whose self-regulatory resources were experimentally bolstered via a 2-week training regimen exhibited less violent inclinations than did participants whose self-regulatory resources had not been bolstered. These findings hint at the power of incorporating self-regulation dynamics into predictive models of IPV perpetration. (c) 2009 APA, all rights reserved).

  20. Changes in eating attitudes, body esteem and weight control behaviours during adolescence in a South African cohort.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tabither M Gitau

    Full Text Available Failure to consume an adequate diet or over consumption during adolescence can disrupt normal growth and development, resulting in undesirable weight change. This leads to an increase in unhealthy weight control practices related to eating and exercise among both adolescent girls and boys to meet the societal 'ideal' body shape. This study therefore aims to examine the longitudinal changes in eating attitudes, body-esteem and weight control behaviours among adolescents between 13 and 17 years; and, to describe perceptions around body shape at age 17 years. A total of 1435 urban South African black and mixed ancestry boys and girls, who had data at both age 13 and 17 years from the Birth to Twenty cohort were included. Data were collected through self-administered questionnaires on eating attitudes (EAT-26, body esteem and weight control behaviours for either weight loss or muscle gain attempts. Height and weight were measured at both time points and BMI was calculated. Black females had a higher BMI (p<0.001 and an increased risk of developing eating disorders as well as significant increase in the prevalence of weight loss practices between the ages 13 and 17 years. At age 17 years both Mixed ancestry adolescents had lower body-esteem compared to black adolescents. The prevalence of possible eating disorders was 11% and 13.1% in early and late adolescents respectively. Males and females shared similar opinions on normal silhouettes being the 'best', 'getting respect' and being the 'happiest', while the obese silhouette was associated with the 'worst' and the 'unhappiest', and the underweight silhouette with the "weakest". Black females had a higher BMI and an increased risk of developing eating disorders. Adolescent females engaged more in weight loss practices whereas, males in muscle gain practices indicating that Western norms of thinness as the ideal are becoming more common in South Africa.

  1. Chocolate cake. Guilt or celebration? Associations with healthy eating attitudes, perceived behavioural control, intentions and weight-loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuijer, Roeline G; Boyce, Jessica A

    2014-03-01

    Food and eating are often associated with ambivalent feelings: pleasure and enjoyment, but also worry and guilt. Guilt has the potential to motivate behaviour change, but may also lead to feelings of helplessness and loss of control. This study firstly examined whether a default association of either 'guilt' or 'celebration' with a prototypical forbidden food item (chocolate cake) was related to differences in attitudes, perceived behavioural control, and intentions in relation to healthy eating, and secondly whether the default association was related to weight change over an 18month period (and short term weight-loss in a subsample of participants with a weight-loss goal). This study did not find any evidence for adaptive or motivational properties of guilt. Participants associating chocolate cake with guilt did not report more positive attitudes or stronger intentions to eat healthy than did those associating chocolate cake with celebration. Instead, they reported lower levels of perceived behavioural control over eating and were less successful at maintaining their weight over an 18month period. Participants with a weight-loss goal who associated chocolate cake with guilt were less successful at losing weight over a 3month period compared to those associating chocolate cake with celebration. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  2. Psychometric Quality of the Dutch Version of the Children's Eating Attitude Test in a Community Sample and a Sample of Overweight Youngsters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lotte Theuwis

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Disturbed eating attitudes may be important precursors of pathological eating patterns and, therefore need to be researched adequately. The Children's Eating Attitude Test (ChEAT is indicated for detecting at-risk attitudes and concerns in youngsters. Method. The present study was designed to provide a preliminary psychometric evaluation of the Dutch version of the ChEAT, by examining reliability and validity in a sample of 166 youngsters. Results. Generally the ChEAT seems to be a reliable instrument. Concurrent validity was demonstrated by positive correlations with measures assessing pathological eating behaviour and with related psychological problems. The discriminant validity was good. Based on ChEAT scores we can distinguish overweight youngsters from the community sample and “dieters” from “non dieters”. Divergent validity and factor structure show still shortcomings. Discussion. The Dutch version of the ChEAT seems to be a promising screening- and research instrument. Future prospective research could focus on a cut-off score for identifying at-risk youngsters.

  3. Eating attitudes and body image in ethnic Japanese and Caucasian adolescent girls in the city of São Paulo, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sampei, Míriam A; Sigulem, Dirce M; Novo, Neil F; Juliano, Yara; Colugnati, Fernando A B

    2009-01-01

    Despite investigations into the rapid increase in eating disorders across diverse ethnic groups, conclusions concerning ethnicity and eating disorders are contradictory. The objective of the present study was to investigate eating attitudes in ethnic Japanese and Caucasian adolescents in Brazil. The influence of body mass index (BMI), menarche and social-affective relationships on the development of eating disorders was also assessed. Questionnaires evaluating the incidence of eating disorders and the influence of social-affective relationships were applied to 544 Japanese-Brazilian and Caucasian adolescent girls: 10 to 11-year-old Japanese-Brazilian (n = 122) and Caucasian (n = 176) pre-menarcheal adolescents, and 16 to 17-year-old Japanese-Brazilian (n = 71) and Caucasian (n = 175) post-menarcheal adolescents. Caucasian girls obtained higher scores on the Eating Attitudes Test (EAT-26), showed greater body image dissatisfaction, dieted more often and had more diet models introduced by their mothers and peers than the Japanese-Brazilian girls. CONCLUSION The Caucasian adolescents overall appeared to be more sensitive to aesthetic and social pressures regarding body image than the Japanese adolescents. The high incidence of EAT-26 scores above 20 in the Caucasian pre-menarcheal group indicates that individual body image concerns are developing at an earlier age. Multiple logistic regression revealed several associations between mother-teen interactions and the development of abnormal eating attitudes.

  4. Avoidance goal pursuit depletes self-regulatory resources

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oertig, D.; Schüler, J.; Schnelle, J.; Brandstätter, V.; Roskes, M.; Elliot, A.J.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Research on the strength model of self-regulation is burgeoning, but little empirical work has focused on the link between distinct types of daily goal pursuit and the depletion of self-regulatory resources. Here we conducted two studies on the link between avoidance goals and resource

  5. Avoidance goal pursuit depletes self-regulatory resources

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oertig, Daniela; Schüler, Julia; Schnelle, Jessica; Brandstätter, Veronika; Roskes, Marieke; Elliot, Andrew J.

    Objective: Research on the strength model of self-regulation is burgeoning, but little empirical work has focused on the link between distinct types of daily goal pursuit and the depletion of self-regulatory resources. The authors conducted two studies on the link between avoidance goals and

  6. Self-Regulatory Climate: A Positive Attribute of Public Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Curt M.; Ware, Jordan K.; Miskell, Ryan C.; Forsyth, Patrick B.

    2016-01-01

    This study contributes to the development of a positive framework for effective public schools in 2 ways. First, it advances the construct self-regulatory climate as consisting of 3 generative school norms--collective faculty trust in students, collective student trust in teachers, and student-perceived academic emphasis. The authors argue these…

  7. Guiding College Students to Develop Academic Self-Regulatory Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Pin-Hwa

    2011-01-01

    This study aimed to explore the efficaciousness of a guiding model for Taiwanese college students employed to develop their academic self-regulatory skills. Twenty-eight undergraduates in a university in southern Taiwan were recruited as participants. The participants received training on the proposed guiding model and were asked to take their own…

  8. Adolescents' perceptions of healthy eating and attitudes toward regulatory measures: A Denmark-Hong Kong comparison

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chan, Kara; Prendergast, Gerard; Grønhøj, Alice

    eating habits with healthy eating than Danish respondents. Danish respondents were more likely to practice healthy eating at schools than Hong Kong respondents. Making tanks of cold water freely available everywhere was perceived to be most effective in discouraging the consumption of soft drink. Danish......This study explores cross cultural differences in the perceptions of healthy eating, contexts where healthy or unhealthy eating are practiced, and consumer evaluation of regulatory measures that discourage the consumption of unhealthy foods such as soft drinks. A survey was conducted of 386 Danish...... and Chinese adolescents using a structured questionnaire. Results showed that perceptions of healthy eating were generally based on concepts such as balance and moderation. Unhealthy eating was most frequently practiced at parties and in festive periods. Hong Kong respondents were more likely to associate...

  9. Sociocultural influences on eating attitudes and behaviors, body image, and psychological functioning: a comparison of African-American, Asian-American, and Caucasian college women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akan, G E; Grilo, C M

    1995-09-01

    Eating attitudes and behaviors, body image, and psychological functioning were evaluated in 98 female college students: 36 African-Americans, 34 Asian-Americans, and 28 Caucasians. African-Americans had significantly higher body mass index than either Asian-American or Caucasians. In contrast, Caucasians reported greater levels of disordered eating and dieting behaviors and attitudes and greater body dissatisfaction than did Asian-Americans and African-Americans who differed little on these measures. The nature of variability in these eating behaviors and attitudes and body image was also examined within each of the three groups. A generally consistent pattern emerged within each racial group: low self-esteem and high public self-consciousness were associated with greater levels of problematic eating behaviors and attitudes and body dissatisfaction. A history of being teased about weight and size was associated with problematic eating behaviors and attitudes and body dissatisfaction in African-Americans and Caucasians but not in Asian-Americans. The findings suggest that there exist important racial differences on various aspects of eating, dieting, and body image in college women. Contrary to hypothesis, the degree of acculturation and assimilation within the African-American and Asian-American groups was unrelated to variability in these domains.

  10. 76 FR 47630 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; International Securities Exchange, LLC; Notice of Filing and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-05

    ... data and other products available to persons that are not members of the self-regulatory organization... in self-regulatory organization governance was mandated by the Act, non-members should be given the... the evolution of self-regulatory organization governance and competitive market structure have...

  11. 77 FR 12098 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; Financial Industry Regulatory Authority, Inc.; Notice of Filing of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-28

    ... 240.19b-4. I. Self-Regulatory Organization's Statement of the Terms of Substance of the Proposed Rule... FINRA and at the Commission's Public Reference Room. II. Self-Regulatory Organization's Statement of the..., and C below, of the most significant aspects of such statements. A. Self-Regulatory Organization's...

  12. 75 FR 4435 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness of Proposed Rule...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-27

    ... Items have been prepared by the self-regulatory organization. The Commission is publishing this notice...\\ 15 U.S.C. 78a. \\3\\ 17 CFR 240.19b-4. I. Self-Regulatory Organization's Statement of the Terms of... principal office and at the Commission's Public Reference Room. II. Self-Regulatory Organization's Statement...

  13. 76 FR 9838 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; Financial Industry Regulatory Authority, Inc.; Notice of Filing of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-22

    .... 78s(b)(1). \\2\\ 17 CFR 240.19b-4. I. Self-Regulatory Organization's Statement of the Terms of Substance..., and at the Commission's Public Reference Room. II. Self-Regulatory Organization's Statement of the... in sections A, B, and C below, of the most significant aspects of such statements. A. Self-Regulatory...

  14. 75 FR 61795 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; International Securities Exchange, LLC; Notice of Filing and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-06

    ... SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION [Release No. 34-63017; File No. SR-ISE-2010-95] Self-Regulatory...\\ 15 U.S.C. 78s(b)(3)(A). \\4\\ 17 CFR 240.19b-4(f)(6). I. Self-Regulatory Organization's Statement of... Exchange, and at the Commission's Public Reference Room. II. Self-Regulatory Organization's Statement of...

  15. 76 FR 77275 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; International Securities Exchange, LLC; Notice of Filing of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-12

    ... SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION [Release No. 34-65900; File No. SR-ISE-2011-82] Self-Regulatory... text of these statements may be examined at the places specified in Item IV below. The self-regulatory... such statements. A. Self-Regulatory Organization's Statement of the Purpose of, and Statutory Basis for...

  16. 17 CFR 201.420 - Appeal of determinations by self-regulatory organizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... self-regulatory organizations. 201.420 Section 201.420 Commodity and Securities Exchanges SECURITIES... Review § 201.420 Appeal of determinations by self-regulatory organizations. (a) Application for review... by a self-regulatory organization determination as to which a notice is required to be filed with the...

  17. 78 FR 57319 - Children's Online Privacy Protection Rule Safe Harbor Proposed Self-Regulatory Guidelines...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-18

    ...-AB20 Children's Online Privacy Protection Rule Safe Harbor Proposed Self-Regulatory Guidelines; kidSAFE... proposed self-regulatory guidelines submitted by the kidSAFE Seal Program (``kidSAFE''), owned and operated... enabling industry groups or others to submit to the Commission for approval self-regulatory guidelines that...

  18. 76 FR 82017 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; Chicago Board Options Exchange, Incorporated; Notice of Filing of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-29

    ... 240.19b-4. I. Self-Regulatory Organization's Statement of the Terms of Substance of the Proposed Rule... System platform are contained in Chapter XXIVB. II. Self-Regulatory Organization's Statement of the... in sections A, B, and C below, of the most significant parts of such statements. A. Self-Regulatory...

  19. 75 FR 16888 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; Chicago Board Options Exchange, Incorporated; Notice of Proposed...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-02

    ...(b)(1). \\2\\ 17 CFR 240.19b-4. I. Self-Regulatory Organization's Statement of the Terms of Substance....org/legal ), at the Exchange's Office of the Secretary and at the Commission. II. Self-Regulatory... with the Commission, the self-regulatory organization included statements concerning the purpose of and...

  20. 76 FR 9840 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; Financial Industry Regulatory Authority, Inc.; Notice of Filing of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-22

    .... 78s(b)(1). \\2\\ 17 CFR 240.19b-4. I. Self-Regulatory Organization's Statement of the Terms of Substance... Public Reference Room. II. Self-Regulatory Organization's Statement of the Purpose of, and Statutory..., and C below, of the most significant aspects of such statements. A. Self-Regulatory Organization's...

  1. 17 CFR 1.52 - Self-regulatory organization adoption and surveillance of minimum financial requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Self-regulatory organization... Miscellaneous § 1.52 Self-regulatory organization adoption and surveillance of minimum financial requirements. (a) Each self-regulatory organization must adopt, and submit for Commission approval, rules...

  2. 75 FR 36724 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; The Options Clearing Corporation; Notice of Filing of Proposed...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-28

    ... SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION [Release No. 34-62329; File No. SR-OCC-2010-09] Self-Regulatory... on the proposed rule change from interested persons. \\1\\ 15 U.S.C. 78s(b)(1). I. Self-Regulatory... futures any futures contracts on Sprott Physical Gold Shares. II. Self-Regulatory Organization's Statement...

  3. 77 FR 306 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; Chicago Board Options Exchange, Incorporated; Notice of Filing of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-04

    ...). \\2\\ 17 CFR 240.19b-4. Self-Regulatory Organization's Statement of the Terms of Substance of the... contained in Chapter XXIVB. II. Self-Regulatory Organization's Statement of the Purpose of, and Statutory Basis for, the Proposed Rule Change In its filing with the Commission, the self-regulatory organization...

  4. 76 FR 61447 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; Chicago Board Options Exchange, Incorporated; Notice of Proposed...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-04

    ... 240.19b-4. I. Self-Regulatory Organization's Statement of the Terms of Substance of the Proposed Rule... its filing with the Commission, the self-regulatory organization included statements concerning the... such statements. A. Self-Regulatory Organization's Statement of the Purpose of, and Statutory Basis for...

  5. 17 CFR 201.421 - Commission consideration of determinations by self-regulatory organizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... determinations by self-regulatory organizations. 201.421 Section 201.421 Commodity and Securities Exchanges... Commission Review § 201.421 Commission consideration of determinations by self-regulatory organizations. (a..., order review of any determination by a self-regulatory organization that could be subject to an...

  6. Tracing the self-regulatory bases of moral emotions

    OpenAIRE

    Sheikh, Sana; Janoff-Bulman, Ronnie

    2010-01-01

    In this article we explore a self-regulatory perspective on the self-evaluative moral emotions, shame and guilt. Broadly conceived, self-regulation distinguishes between two types of motivation: approach/activation and avoidance/inhibition. We use this distinction to conceptually understand the socialization dimensions (parental restrictiveness versus nurturance), associated emotions (anxiety versus empathy), and forms of morality (proscriptive versus prescriptive) that serve as precursors to...

  7. Stigmatizing attitudes differ across mental health disorders: a comparison of stigma across eating disorders, obesity, and major depressive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebneter, Daria S; Latner, Janet D

    2013-04-01

    The aim of the current article was to compare stigmatizing attitudes toward eating disorders (EDs), including anorexia nervosa (AN), bulimia nervosa (BN), and binge eating disorder (BED), with stigma toward another weight-related condition (obesity) and a non-weight-related mental disorder (major depressive disorder [MDD]). Participants (N = 447) read five vignettes describing a woman with AN, BN, BED, obesity, or MDD and responded to questionnaires examining stigmatizing attitudes. The targets with EDs were blamed more for their condition than the targets with MDD, whereas persons with obesity were held more responsible for their condition than any other target. On the other hand, the target with MDD was perceived as more impaired than any other target. Lack of self-discipline was attributed more to the development of BED and obesity than to any other condition. Stigmatizing attitudes vary across mental health disorders, and future research should aim to specifically target stigmatizing beliefs to reduce and prevent discrimination toward mental health disorders and obesity.

  8. Tendency toward Weight Loss among Iranian Adolescent Girls: Study on Perceived Weight, Ideal Body Mass Index and Attitude toward Eating Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malihe Farid

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Background Adolescents’ perception of their weight is a strong factor in shaping dietary habits and weight control and management. Among non-overweight and overweight adolescents, both overestimation and underestimation of weight status are associated with harmful effects. This study aimed to examine the relationship between perceived weight and attitude toward eating disorders among adolescent girls living in Karaj, Iran. Materials and Methods Involving a two-stage random sampling, this cross-sectional study was conducted on a total of 537 high school girls 14-18 years of age living in Karaj. The Eating Attitudes Test (EAT-26 was employed to screen for attitude toward eating disorders. Also, anthropometric measurements (weight and height, perceived and the ideal weights of the participants were assessed.  Results The average age of girls participating in the study was 16.12±1.20. According to the results, 70% of girls had normal body mass index. It was found that the ideal weight of 55% of the girls in the normal body mass index group fell under the lower than normal boundary. Moreover, the prevalence of eating disorders was estimated to be 23.6%. The attitude toward eating disorder was significantly correlated with body mass index of participants and their self-concept (P

  9. Eating disorders in the context of preconception care: fertility specialists' knowledge, attitudes, and clinical practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodino, Iolanda S; Byrne, Susan M; Sanders, Katherine A

    2017-02-01

    To gauge fertility specialists' knowledge, clinical practices, and training needs in regard to eating disorders. Cross-sectional study. Fertility clinics. Eighty Australian and New Zealand fertility specialists who were members of the Fertility Society of Australia. None. Responses to an anonymously completed online questionnaire. Approximately 54% of doctors correctly identified the body mass index relevant to anorexia nervosa, and 30% identified menstrual disturbances for anorexia, while 63.8% of doctors incorrectly nominated maladaptive weight control behaviors as a characteristic of binge eating disorder. While clinicians (83.7%) agreed it was important to screen for eating disorders during preconception assessments, 35% routinely screened for eating disorders and 8.8% indicated that their clinics had clinical practice guidelines for management of eating disorders. A minority of participants (13.8%) felt satisfied with their level of university training in eating disorders, 37.5% of doctors felt confident in their ability to recognize symptoms of an eating disorder, and 96.2% indicated a need for further education and clinical guidelines. On most items examined, knowledge and clinical practices regarding eating disorders did not differ according to doctor gender or years of clinical experience working as a fertility specialist. Knowledge about eating disorders in the context of fertility treatment is important. This study highlights the uncertainty among fertility specialists in detecting features of eating disorders. The findings point to the importance of further education and training, including the development of clinical guidelines specific to fertility health care providers. Copyright © 2016 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Do Depression, Self-Esteem, Body-Esteem, and Eating Attitudes Vary by BMI Among African American Adolescents?

    OpenAIRE

    Witherspoon, Dawn; Latta, Laura; Wang, Yan; Black, Maureen M.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To examine how psychosocial factors vary by body weight and gender among African-American adolescents. Methods A community sample of 235 low-income, predominantly African-American adolescents completed measures of depression, self-esteem, body-esteem, and eating attitudes. Measured weight and height were converted to body mass index (kg/m2) age and gender-adjusted z-scores. Data were analyzed using 2-factor multivariate analysis of variance. Results Obese youths had significantly wo...

  11. Consumer knowledge and attitudes toward healthy eating in Croatia: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ljubičić, Marija; Sarić, Marijana Matek; Barić, Irena Colić; Rumbak, Ivana; Komes, Draženka; Šatalić, Zvonimir; Guiné, Raquel P F

    2017-06-27

    Unlike fast and restaurant food, diet rich in fibre is known to contribute significantly to health. The aim of our study was to assess eating habits such as consumption of fibre-rich, fast, and restaurant food of the general population in Croatia. For this purpose we used a validated survey designed by the Polytechnic Institute Viseu in Portugal, which includes questions about demographics, good eating habits related to the consumption of the main sources of dietary fibre (fruit, vegetables, and whole grains), and unhealthy eating habits related to the consumption of fast food and restaurant meals. Between October 2014 and March 2015 we received answers from 2,536 respondents aged between 18-70 years, of whom 67.4 % were women and 32.6 % were men. Most respondents reported consuming one serving of vegetables and one piece of fruit a day, and whole grains every other day. Women and urban residents reported consuming larger amounts of fruit, vegetables, and whole grains than men (peating out and eating fast food more often than women (pEating out highly correlated with eating fast food, which translates to lower consumption of dietary fibre (peating fast food is not the predominant dietary practice in Croatia, over 50 % of respondents have reported eating fast food at least once a week. Our data also indicate that consumption of fruit, vegetables, and whole grains falls below the national and international dietary recommendations.

  12. Adaptação transcultural preliminar do Children's Eating Attitude Test (Cheat para o idioma português The preliminary transcultural adaptation of the Children's Eating Attitude Test (Cheat for portuguese

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana Loureiro Barillari

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVOS: traduzir e adaptar o instrumento "Children's Eating Attitude Test" (Cheat para o idioma português, avaliar a equivalência semântica e a compreensão verbal. MÉTODOS: envolveu quatro etapas: (1 tradução, (2 retradução, (3 revisão técnica e avaliação semântica, (4 pré-teste - avaliação da compreensão verbal por especialistas em transtorno alimentar. RESULTADOS: as 26 questões foram traduzidas e adaptadas para o idioma português. A versão final constou dos mesmos 26 itens apresentando-se de forma clara e de fácil compreensão (valores médios superior a 4,5 - máximo 5,0. CONCLUSÕES: o instrumento encontra-se traduzido e adaptado para o idioma português demonstrando bons resultados no processo de adaptação transcultural. São necessárias análises de validade externa, equivalência de mensuração e reprodutibilidade.OBJECTIVES: to translate and adapt the "Children's Eating Attitude Test" (Cheat to Portuguese and evaluate the semantic equivalence and verbal comprehension. METHODS: the process involved four stages: (1 translation, (2 back-translation, (3 technical review and semantic evaluation, (4 pre-test - evaluation of verbal comprehension by specialists in eating disorders. RESULTS: the 26 questions were translated and adapted for Portuguese. The final version contained the same 26 items presented in a clear and easy-tounderstand format (average score higher than 4.5 - maximum 5.0. CONCLUSIONS: the tool has been translated and adapted for Portuguese and the transcultural adaptation process was a success. There is still a need for analyses of external validity, measurement equivalence and reproducibility.

  13. Factors affecting self-regulatory driving practices among older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molnar, Lisa J; Charlton, Judith L; Eby, David W; Langford, Jim; Koppel, Sjaan; Kolenic, Giselle E; Marshall, Shawn

    2014-01-01

    The primary objective of this study was to better understand how self-regulatory driving practices at multiple levels of driver decision making are influenced by various factors. Specifically, the study investigated patterns of tactical and strategic self-regulation among a sample of 246 Australian older drivers. Of special interest was the relative influence of several variables on the adoption of self-regulation, including self-perceptions of health, functioning, and abilities for safe driving and driving confidence and comfort. The research was carried out at the Monash University Accident Research Centre, as part of its Ozcandrive study, a partnership with the Canadian Driving Research Initiative for Vehicular Safety in the Elderly (Candrive), and in conjunction with the University of Michigan Transportation Research Institute (UMTRI). Candrive/Ozcandrive represents the first study to follow a large group of older drivers over several years and collect comprehensive self-reported and objectively derived data on health, functioning, and driving. This study used a subset of data from the Candrive/Ozcandrive study. Upon enrolling in the study, participants underwent a comprehensive clinical assessment during which data on visual, cognitive, and psychomotor functioning were collected. Approximately 4 months after study enrollment, participants completed the Advanced Driving Decisions and Patterns of Travel (ADDAPT) questionnaire, a computer-based self-regulation instrument developed and pilot-tested at UMTRI. Self-regulation among older adults was found to be a multidimensional concept. Rates of self-regulation were tied closely to specific driving situations, as well as level of decision making. In addition, self-regulatory practices at the strategic and tactical levels of decision making were influenced by different sets of factors. Continuing efforts to better understand the self-regulatory practices of older drivers at multiple levels of driver performance and

  14. Staff attitude and experience in dealing with rational nursing home patients who refuse to eat and drink.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattiasson, A C; Andersson, L

    1994-11-01

    This paper describes the personal attitudes of nursing home staff and their experience of coping with rational nursing home patients who refused to eat and drink. Professional caregivers in 13 nursing homes and nursing home units in the county of Stockholm, Sweden, were asked to judge an ethical conflict involving a situation in which a patient of sound mind refused to eat and drink. Two questions were raised: (a) What would your unit's decision be in this case? (b) What is your personal opinion in this case? Answers to question (a) showed that 20% believed that the patient's autonomy would be respected, i.e. the patient would be allowed to die without medical intervention. Concerning question (b), the results showed that approximately 50% believed that the patient's wishes regarding food refusal must be respected. Furthermore, the results suggested that both professional category and number of years' service made a difference to the staff views on patient autonomy. Finally, the findings indicated that the nursing homes included in the study did not show any distinct policy with regard to the autonomy of elderly nursing home patients in refusing to eat and drink.

  15. Do depression, self-esteem, body-esteem, and eating attitudes vary by BMI among African American adolescents?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witherspoon, Dawn; Latta, Laura; Wang, Yan; Black, Maureen M

    2013-11-01

    To examine how psychosocial factors vary by body weight and gender among African-American adolescents. A community sample of 235 low-income, predominantly African-American adolescents completed measures of depression, self-esteem, body-esteem, and eating attitudes. Measured weight and height were converted to body mass index (kg/m(2)) age and gender-adjusted z-scores. Data were analyzed using 2-factor multivariate analysis of variance. Obese youths had significantly worse scores on all psychosocial domains than normal weight youths, with no differences between overweight and normal weight youths. Obese youths had significantly worse scores than overweight youths on body-esteem and self-esteem. Female adolescents had significantly worse scores than males on depressed mood, body-esteem, and eating attitudes. Among a community sample of predominantly African-American adolescents, obesity, not overweight, was associated with poor psychosocial health. Findings suggest that overweight may be perceived as normative, and that weight-related programs consider adolescents' psychosocial functioning.

  16. Prevalence and sport-related predictors of disturbed eating attitudes and behaviors: Moderating effects of sex and age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanfranchi, M-C; Maïano, C; Morin, A J S; Therme, P

    2014-08-01

    Very few studies examined the prevalence and sport-related predictors of disturbed eating attitudes and behaviors (DEABs) among adolescents involved in sport practice, and their results are mixed and inconclusive. These inconsistencies are most likely due to their methodological heterogeneity and to the fact that none of these studies took into consideration the potentially relevant characteristics of the sport practice context. This study attempts to answer this limitation among French adolescents not involved or involved in various sports contexts defined based on their organization, leanness-centration, and competitive level. Participants were 335 adolescents involved in sport practice, and 435 adolescents not involved in any form of regular sport practice. The DEABs were measured using the Eating Attitudes Test-26. Global results do not showed any significant association between the status of the participants and DEAB. However, these results drastically changed when we considered the potential moderating role of sex and age on these relations. Indeed, sports involvement in general, and involvement in leanness and competitive sports were found to exert sex- and age-differentiated effects on the risks of presenting clinically significant levels of DEAB. This study suggests the importance of monitoring, preventive, and early intervention mechanisms within the context of practice, particularly for adolescent girls. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. 17 CFR 1.59 - Activities of self-regulatory organization employees, governing board members, committee members...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Activities of self-regulatory... COMMODITY EXCHANGE ACT Miscellaneous § 1.59 Activities of self-regulatory organization employees, governing...) Self-regulatory organization means “self-regulatory organization,” as defined in Commission regulation...

  18. Knowledge, attitude and practice towards eating and physical activity among primary school children in Brunei: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murang, Zaidah Rizidah; Tuah, Naa; Naing, Lin

    2017-11-30

    Background Childhood obesity has become a global public health crisis. Many studies have been conducted to explore the knowledge, attitude and practices towards eating and physical activity amongst parents and healthcare workers. However, very little is known amongst children. It is imperative to understand these factors as they have been associated with obesity among children. Objective This study aimed to assess the knowledge, attitude and practices of Bruneian children towards eating and physical activity, in order to identify the factors that influence the development of obesity. Methods The study involved 353 children from four primary schools in Brunei. The data collection tool used was modified validated questionnaires with sections on demographic characteristic, knowledge about obesity, eating habits and physical activity. Results The majority of children (>60%) had good knowledge of obesity and intake of healthy food, but, 84.2% lacked knowledge on the required daily servings of fruits and vegetables. 68.8% purchased food and beverages from their school canteen. 93.8% were aware about the health benefits of physical activity and 70.2% spent only 1-2 h of screen time per day, however, 46.9% did not meet the recommended amount of physical activity although they reported to have performed enough. This suggested that a comprehensive education on food intake requirements and physical activity are necessary in order to better educate children. Conclusion Health educators and public health professionals may find our findings useful in order to plan and develop tailored interventions for children, as well as better promotion of a healthy lifestyle to children and their families.

  19. Definitions of 'healthy' eating: a pan-EU survey of consumer attitudes to food, nutrition and health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margetts, B M; Martinez, J A; Saba, A; Holm, L; Kearney, M; Moles, A

    1997-06-01

    To describe the perceptions of a healthy diet across Europe and to explore the socio-cultural factors that influence these perceptions. A cross-sectional study in which quota-controlled, nationally-representative samples of approximately 1000 adults from each country completed a face-to-face interview-assisted questionnaire. The survey was conducted between October 1995 and February 1996 in the 15 member states of the European Union. 14331 subjects (aged 15 y upwards) completed the questionnaire. Data were weighted by population size for each country and by sex, age and regional distribution within each member state. Responses were grouped into broad categories; overall 80% (specific country rates varied from 67-91%) of respondents mentioned either more fruit and vegetables or less fat, fatty foods, or a low fat diet, or balance and variety. The effects of age, gender and level of education were also explored: educational level appeared to have the strongest influence on perceptions of a healthy diet. Respondents who mentioned the family as a key influence on food choice, were more likely to mention eating more fruit and vegetables as part of a healthy diet. Respondents who stated that they did not have any source of information about diet were less likely to mention balance and variety or less fat or more vegetables. The results of the present study suggest that many people defined healthy eating in a way which would suggest that the healthy dietary guidelines are having some impact. The results also show, however, that there may be specific groups who are missed by current national campaigns, and that any European wide campaigns to change attitudes about healthy eating need to consider the baseline perception of healthy eating reported here.

  20. Individual differences and self-regulatory fatigue: optimism, conscientiousness, and self-consciousness

    OpenAIRE

    Nes, Lise Solberg; Carlson, Charles R.; Crofford, Leslie J.; de Leeuw, Reny; Segerstrom, Suzanne C.

    2011-01-01

    Ability to self-regulate varies and self-regulatory strength is a limited source that can be depleted or fatigued. Research on the impact of individual differences on self-regulatory capacity is still scarce, and this study aimed to examine whether personality factors such as dispositional optimism, conscientiousness, and self-consciousness can impact or buffer self-regulatory fatigue. Participants were patients diagnosed with chronic multi-symptom illnesses (N = 50), or pain free matched con...

  1. Eating attitudes, body image satisfaction and self-esteem of South ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    BMI was positively associated with self-esteem (p = 0.01, r = 0.134) and negatively with dieting behaviour in White boys (p = 0.004, r = −0.257), and with lower EAT-26 bulimic and oral control scores in Black boys. In conclusion, the findings highlight ethnic differences and a need to better understand cultural differences that ...

  2. Study of eating attitudes and behaviours in junior college students in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Eating disorders have been described as possible 'culture-bound syndromes', with roots in Western cultural values and conflicts. They may, in fact, be more prevalent within various non-Western cultural groups than previously recognised, as Western values become more widely accepted. Cross-cultural ...

  3. A Mediational Model of Autonomy, Self-Esteem, and Eating Disordered Attitudes and Behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frederick, Christina M.; Grow, Virginia M.

    1996-01-01

    Findings from a study of the relationships among autonomy deficits, low self-esteem, and eating disorders of 71 college women supported a mediational model in which lack of autonomy was related to decreased global self-esteem, which in turn was associated with bulimia and body dissatisfaction. (SLD)

  4. Childhood self-regulatory skills predict adolescent smoking behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    deBlois, Madeleine E; Kubzansky, Laura D

    2016-01-01

    Cigarette smoking is the primary preventable cause of premature death. Better self-regulatory capacity is a key psychosocial factor that has been linked with reduced likelihood of tobacco use. Studies point to the importance of multiple forms of self-regulation, in the domains of emotion, attention, behavior, and social regulation, although no work has evaluated all of these domains in a single prospective study. Considering those four self-regulation domains separately and in combination, this study prospectively investigated whether greater self-regulation in childhood is associated with reduced likelihood of either trying cigarettes or becoming a regular smoker. Hypotheses were tested using longitudinal data from a cohort of 1709 US children participating in the Panel Study of Income Dynamics--Child Development Supplement. Self-regulation was assessed at study baseline when children ranged in age from 6 to 14 years, using parent-reported measures derived from the Behavior Problems Index and Positive Behavior Scale. Children ages 12-19 self-reported their cigarette smoking, defined in two ways: (1) trying and (2) regular use. Separate multiple logistic regression models were used to evaluate odds of trying or regularly using cigarettes, taking account of various potential confounders. Over an average of five years of follow-up, 34.5% of children ever tried cigarettes and 10.6% smoked regularly. Higher behavioral self-regulation was the only domain associated with reduced odds of trying cigarettes (odds ratio (OR) = .85, 95% confidence interval (CI) = .73-.99). Effective regulation in each of the domains was associated with reduced likelihood of regular smoking, although the association with social regulation was not statistically significant (ORs range .70-.85). For each additional domain in which a child was able to regulate successfully, the odds of becoming a regular smoker dropped by 18% (95% CI = .70-.97). These findings suggest that effective childhood self-regulatory

  5. Enhancing Self-Regulatory Skills through an Intervention Embedded in a Middle School Mathematics Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Digiacomo, Gregory; Chen, Peggy P.

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the effects of a self-regulatory intervention strategy designed to improve middle-school students' calibration accuracy, self-regulatory skills, and math achievement. Focusing on self-monitoring and self-reflection as the two key processes of this intervention in relation to improving students' math achievement and overall…

  6. 75 FR 47666 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; National Futures Association; Notice of Filing and Immediate...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-06

    ... SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION [Release No. 34-62624; File No. SR-NFA-2010-02] Self-Regulatory... Interpretive Notice Entitled ``NFA Compliance Rule 2-30(b): Risk Disclosure Statement for Security Futures... President and General Counsel, NFA, dated July 26, 2010. I. Self-Regulatory Organization's Description of...

  7. 78 FR 61424 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; National Securities Clearing Corporation; Notice of Filing of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-03

    ... decommission the DTCC Trade Risk Pro service as more fully described below. II. Self-Regulatory Organization's... no Members that currently use Trade Risk Pro. (C) Self-Regulatory Organization's Statement on...-Regulatory Organizations; National Securities Clearing Corporation; Notice of Filing of Proposed Rule Change...

  8. The Interaction of Motivation, Self-Regulatory Strategies, and Autonomous Learning Behavior in Different Learner Groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kormos, Judit; Csizér, Kata

    2014-01-01

    Autonomous learning and effective self-regulatory strategies are increasingly important in foreign language learning; without these, students might not be able to exploit learning opportunities outside language classrooms. This study investigated the influence of motivational factors and self-regulatory strategies on autonomous learning behavior.…

  9. 77 FR 74722 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; Chicago Mercantile Exchange Inc.; Order Approving Proposed Rule...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-17

    ... SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION [Release No. 34-68401; File No. SR-CME-2012-42] Self-Regulatory Organizations; Chicago Mercantile Exchange Inc.; Order Approving Proposed Rule Change Regarding the Valuation of... to approve a proposed rule change of a self-regulatory organization if it finds that such proposed...

  10. 77 FR 12896 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; Pacific Clearing Corporation; Order Cancelling Clearing Agency...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-02

    ... SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION [Release No. 34-66459; File No. 600-11] Self-Regulatory..., 2006), 72 FR 814 (Jan. 8, 2007). Section 19(a)(3) of the Act \\14\\ provides that in the event any self-regulatory organization is no longer in existence or has ceased to do business in the capacity specified in...

  11. 77 FR 12897 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; Pacific Securities Depository Trust Company; Order Cancelling...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-02

    ... SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION [Release No. 34-66460; File No. 600-10] Self-Regulatory Organizations; Pacific Securities Depository Trust Company; Order Cancelling Clearing Agency Registration...(a)(3) of the Act \\14\\ provides that in the event any self-regulatory organization is no longer in...

  12. 77 FR 12896 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; Midwest Clearing Corporation; Order Cancelling Clearing Agency...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-02

    ... SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION [Release No. 34-66458; File No. 600-9] Self-Regulatory Organizations; Midwest Clearing Corporation; Order Cancelling Clearing Agency Registration February 24, 2012. I... Act provides that in the event any self- regulatory organization is no longer in existence or has...

  13. Self-Regulatory Private Speech Relates to Children's Recall and Organization of Autobiographical Memories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Namlah, Abdulrahman S.; Meins, Elizabeth; Fernyhough, Charles

    2012-01-01

    We investigated relations between 4- and 7-year-olds' (N=58) autobiographical memory and their use of self-regulatory private speech in a non-mnemonic context (a cognitive planning task). Children's use of self-regulatory private speech during the planning task was associated with longer autobiographical narratives which included specific rather…

  14. 77 FR 76319 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; BOX Options Exchange LLC; Order Approving Minor Rule Violation...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-27

    ... SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION [Release No. 34-68489; File No. 4-655] Self-Regulatory Organizations; BOX Options Exchange LLC; Order Approving Minor Rule Violation Plan for BOX Options Exchange LLC... \\4\\ requiring that a self-regulatory organization (``SRO'') promptly file notice with the Commission...

  15. 77 FR 27529 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; ICE Clear Credit LLC; Order Granting Accelerated Approval of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-10

    ... SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION [Release No. 34-66922; File No. SR-ICC-2012-05] Self-Regulatory... Commission to approve a proposed rule change of a self-regulatory organization if it finds that such proposed... of the Comptroller of the Currency, U.K. Financial Services Authority, or any other regulatory body...

  16. 78 FR 69168 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; National Securities Clearing Corporation; Order Approving Proposed...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-18

    ... approve a proposed rule change of a self-regulatory organization if it finds that such proposed rule... SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION [Release No. 34-70848; File No. SR-NSCC-2013-10] Self-Regulatory Organizations; National Securities Clearing Corporation; Order Approving Proposed Rule Change To...

  17. 78 FR 79028 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; National Securities Clearing Corporation; Notice of Filing of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-27

    ... finding or (ii) as to which the self-regulatory organization consents, the Commission will: (A) By order... SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION [Release No. 34-71156; File No. SR-NSCC-2013-13] Self-Regulatory Organizations; National Securities Clearing Corporation; Notice of Filing of Proposed Rule Change...

  18. The Association between Infants' Self-Regulatory Behavior and MAOA Gene Polymorphism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Minghao; Chen, Xinyin; Way, Niobe; Yoshikawa, Hirokazu; Deng, Huihua; Ke, Xiaoyan; Yu, Weiwei; Chen, Ping; He, Chuan; Chi, Xia; Lu, Zuhong

    2011-01-01

    Self-regulatory behavior in early childhood is an important characteristic that has considerable implications for the development of adaptive and maladaptive functioning. The present study investigated the relations between a functional polymorphism in the upstream region of monoamine oxidase A gene (MAOA) and self-regulatory behavior in a sample…

  19. 77 FR 40394 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; The Options Clearing Corporation; Order Approving Proposed Rule...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-09

    ... SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION [Release No. 34-67333; File No. SR-OCC-2012-07] Self-Regulatory Organizations; The Options Clearing Corporation; Order Approving Proposed Rule Change Relating to Adjustment... to approve a proposed rule change of a self-regulatory organization if it finds that such proposed...

  20. 77 FR 12898 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; Midwest Securities Trust Company; Order Cancelling Clearing Agency...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-02

    ... SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION [Release No. 34-66461; File No. 600-7] Self-Regulatory Organizations; Midwest Securities Trust Company; Order Cancelling Clearing Agency Registration February 24, 2012... the event any self-regulatory organization is no longer in existence or has ceased to do business in...

  1. The nature of self-regulatory fatigue and “ego depletion”: Lessons from physical fatigue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Daniel R.; Boggero, Ian A.; Segerstrom, Suzanne C.

    2016-01-01

    Self-regulation requires overriding a dominant response, and leads to temporary self-regulatory fatigue. Existing theories of the nature and causes of self-regulatory fatigue highlight physiological substrates such as glucose or psychological processes such as motivation, but these explanations are incomplete on their own. Historically, theories of physical fatigue demonstrate a similar pattern of useful but incomplete explanations, as recent views of physical fatigue emphasize the roles of both physiological and psychological factors. In addition to accounting for multiple inputs, these newer views also explain how fatigue can occur even in the presence of sufficient resources. Examining these newer theories of physical fatigue can serve as a foundation on which to build a more comprehensive understanding of self-regulatory fatigue that integrates possible neurobiological underpinnings of physical and self-regulatory fatigue, and suggests the possible function of self-regulatory fatigue. PMID:26228914

  2. The Nature of Self-Regulatory Fatigue and "Ego Depletion": Lessons From Physical Fatigue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Daniel R; Boggero, Ian A; Segerstrom, Suzanne C

    2015-07-30

    Self-regulation requires overriding a dominant response and leads to temporary self-regulatory fatigue. Existing theories of the nature and causes of self-regulatory fatigue highlight physiological substrates such as glucose, or psychological processes such as motivation, but these explanations are incomplete on their own. Historically, theories of physical fatigue demonstrate a similar pattern of useful but incomplete explanations, as recent views of physical fatigue emphasize the roles of both physiological and psychological factors. In addition to accounting for multiple inputs, these newer views also explain how fatigue can occur even in the presence of sufficient resources. Examining these newer theories of physical fatigue can serve as a foundation on which to build a more comprehensive understanding of self-regulatory fatigue that integrates possible neurobiological underpinnings of physical and self-regulatory fatigue, and suggests the possible function of self-regulatory fatigue. © 2015 by the Society for Personality and Social Psychology, Inc.

  3. Examining the relationships between body image, eating attitudes, BMI, and physical activity in rural and urban South African young adult females using structural equation modeling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandra Prioreschi

    Full Text Available The persistence of food insecurity, malnutrition, increasing adiposity, and decreasing physical activity, heightens the need to understand relationships between body image satisfaction, eating attitudes, BMI and physical activity levels in South Africa. Females aged 18-23 years were recruited from rural (n = 509 and urban (n = 510 settings. Body image satisfaction was measured using Stunkard's silhouettes, and the 26-item Eating Attitudes questionnaire (EAT-26 was used to evaluate participants' risk of disordered eating. Minutes per week of moderate to vigorous physical activity (MVPA was assessed using the Global Physical Activity Questionnaire (GPAQ. Significant linear correlates were included in a series of regressions run separately for urban and rural participants. Structural equation modeling (SEM was used to test the relationships between variables. Urban females were more likely to be overweight and obese than rural females (p = 0.02, and had a greater desire to be thinner (p = 0.02. In both groups, being overweight or obese was positively associated with a desire to be thinner (p<0.01, and negatively associated with a desire to be fatter (p<0.01. Having a disordered eating attitude was associated with body image dissatisfaction in the urban group (β = 1.27, p<0.01, CI: 0.38; 2.16, but only with a desire to be fatter in the rural group (β = 0.63, p = 0.04, CI: 0.03; 1.23. In the SEM model, body image dissatisfaction was associated with disordered eating (β = 0.63, as well as higher MVPA participation (p<0.01. These factors were directly associated with a decreased risk of disordered eating attitude, and with a decreased desire to be thinner. Findings indicate a shift in both settings towards more Westernised ideals. Physical activity may provide a means to promote a healthy body image, while reducing the risk of disordered eating. Given the high prevalence of overweight and obesity in both rural and urban women, this study provides

  4. A qualitative study conducted in the USA exploring Latino fathers' beliefs, attitudes and practices related to their young children's eating, physical activity and sedentary behaviours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindsay, Ana Cristina; Wallington, Sherrie F; Muñoz, Mario A; Greaney, Mary L

    2018-02-01

    Increasing evidence documents fathers' influential role in their children's eating, physical activity (PA) and sedentary behaviours (SB). We aimed to expand limited existing research examining fathers' influence in these areas by exploring Latino fathers' beliefs, attitudes and practices related to eating, PA and SB of their young children. Seven focus group discussions were conducted in Spanish with Latino fathers (n 28) of children aged 2-8 years. Audio recordings were transcribed and translated verbatim without identifiers. Data were analysed using thematic analysis to identify key concepts and themes using NVivo 11 software. Fathers expressed positive beliefs and attitudes about the importance of healthy eating for their young children, themselves and their families. Nevertheless, the majority reported familial practices including eating out, getting take-out, etc. that have been linked to increased obesity risk among Latino children. Fathers were more involved and engaged in children's PA than eating and feeding. However, several fathers reported engaging predominantly in sedentary activities with their children, appeared permissive of children's sedentary habits and struggled to set limits on children's screen-time. We provide new information on Latino fathers' beliefs and child feeding and PA practices that may provide important targets for interventions aimed at promoting healthful eating and PA behaviours of Latino children. Future research should further quantify the influence of Latino fathers' parenting styles and practices on development of children's eating, PA and SB. This information is needed to identify risk factors amenable to interventions and to design culturally appropriate parenting and family-based interventions targeting Latino children's home environment and designed to meet this ethnic group's specific needs.

  5. 77 FR 40392 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; EDGX Exchange, Inc.; Notice of Filing of Proposed Rule Changes To...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-09

    ... prepared by the self-regulatory organization. The Commission is publishing this notice to solicit comments.... I. Self-Regulatory Organization's Statement of the Terms of Substance of the Proposed Rule Change.... [[Page 40393

  6. 17 CFR 249.821 - Form PILOT, information required of self-regulatory organizations operating pilot trading systems...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... required of self-regulatory organizations operating pilot trading systems pursuant to § 240.19b-5 of this... Associations § 249.821 Form PILOT, information required of self-regulatory organizations operating pilot trading systems pursuant to § 240.19b-5 of this chapter. This form shall be used by all self-regulatory...

  7. 78 FR 19057 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; ICE Clear Europe Limited; Notice of Filing Proposed Rule Changes...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-28

    ... categories. II. Self-Regulatory Organization's Statement of the Purpose of, and Statutory Basis for, the... by ICEEU. A. Self-Regulatory Organization's Statement of the Purpose of, and Statutory Basis for, the.... 78q-1(b)(3)(F). B. Self-Regulatory Organization's Statement on Burden on Competition ICE Clear Europe...

  8. 75 FR 39714 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness of Rule Change by...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-12

    ... have been prepared by the self-regulatory organization. The Commission is publishing this notice to....C. 78a. \\3\\ 17 CFR 240.19b-4. I. Self-Regulatory Organization's Statement of the Terms of the.... II. Self-Regulatory Organization's Statement of the Purpose of, and Statutory Basis for, the Proposed...

  9. 77 FR 57173 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; C2 Options Exchange, Incorporated; Notice of Filing of a Proposed...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-17

    ... SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION [Release No. 34-67828; File No. SR-C2-2012-030] Self-Regulatory... change from interested persons. \\1\\ 15 U.S.C. 78s(b)(1). \\2\\ 17 CFR 240.19b-4. I. Self-Regulatory... the Commission's Public Reference Room. II. Self-Regulatory Organization's Statement of the Purpose of...

  10. 75 FR 15475 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; EDGX Exchange, Inc.; Notice of Filing of Proposed Minor Rule...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-29

    ... SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION [Release No. 34-61752; File No. 4-594] Self-Regulatory... Rule 19d-1(c)(1) of the Act \\3\\ requiring that a self- regulatory organization promptly file notice... Commission adopted amendments to paragraph (c) of Rule 19d-1 to allow self-regulatory organizations (``SROs...

  11. 75 FR 50013 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; NYSE Amex, Inc.; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-16

    ... been prepared by the self-regulatory organization. NYSE Amex filed the proposed rule change as a ``non.... Self-Regulatory Organization's Statement of the Terms of Substance of the Proposed Rule Change The... its filing with the Commission, the self-regulatory organization included statements concerning the...

  12. 76 FR 77877 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; EDGA Exchange, Inc.; Notice of Filing of Proposed Rule Change To...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-14

    .... \\1\\ 15 U.S.C. 78s(b)(1). \\2\\ 17 CFR 240.19b-4. I. Self-Regulatory Organization's Statement of the...). II. Self-Regulatory Organization's Statement of the Purpose of, and Statutory Basis for, the Proposed... self-regulatory organization has prepared summaries, set forth in Sections A, B and C below, of the...

  13. 75 FR 25009 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; NYSE Arca, Inc.; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-06

    ... Items have been prepared by the self-regulatory organization. The Commission is publishing this notice...\\ 15 U.S.C. 78a. \\3\\ 17 CFR 240.19b-4. I. Self-Regulatory Organization's Statement of the Terms of....sec.gov and at the Commission's Public Reference Room. II. Self-Regulatory Organization's Statement of...

  14. 75 FR 20030 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; NYSE Arca, Inc.; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-16

    ... have been prepared by the self-regulatory organization. The Commission is publishing this notice to....C. 78a. \\3\\ 17 CFR 240.19b-4. I. Self-Regulatory Organization's Statement of the Terms of Substance... Commission's Public Reference Room. II. Self-Regulatory Organization's Statement of the Purpose of, and...

  15. 77 FR 40396 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; EDGA Exchange, Inc.; Notice of Filing of Proposed Rule Changes To...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-09

    ... by the self-regulatory organization. The Commission is publishing this notice to solicit comments on.... Self-Regulatory Organization's Statement of the Terms of Substance of the Proposed Rule Change The... principal office and at the Public Reference Room of the Commission. II. Self-Regulatory Organization's...

  16. 75 FR 1734 - Children’s Online Privacy Protection Rule Safe Harbor Proposed Self-Regulatory Guidelines; i-SAFE...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-13

    ... Proposed Self-Regulatory Guidelines; i-SAFE, Inc. Application for Safe Harbor AGENCY: Federal Trade... for public comment concerning proposed self-regulatory guidelines submitted by i-SAFE, Inc. under the... approval self-regulatory guidelines that would implement the Rule's protections.\\3\\ \\1\\ 64 FR 59888 (1999...

  17. 75 FR 15471 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; EDGA Exchange, Inc.; Notice of Filing of Proposed Minor Rule...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-29

    ... SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION [Release No. 34-61753; File No. 4-595] Self-Regulatory... Rule 19d-1(c)(1) of the Act \\3\\ requiring that a self- regulatory organization promptly file notice... Commission adopted amendments to paragraph (c) of Rule 19d-1 to allow self-regulatory organizations (``SROs...

  18. 77 FR 74715 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; NASDAQ OMX PHLX LLC; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-17

    .... Self-Regulatory Organization's Statement of the Terms of Substance of the Proposed Rule Change The... Room. II. Self-Regulatory Organization's Statement of the Purpose of, and Statutory Basis for, the... significant aspects of such statements. A. Self-Regulatory Organization's Statement of the Purpose of, and...

  19. 76 FR 18813 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; NASDAQ OMX PHLX LLC; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-05

    ... change from interested persons. \\1\\ 15 U.S.C. 78s(b)(1). \\2\\ 17 CFR 240.19b-4. I. Self-Regulatory... Public Reference Room. II. Self-Regulatory Organization's Statement of the Purpose of, and Statutory... significant aspects of such statements. A. Self-Regulatory Organization's Statement of the Purpose of, and...

  20. 77 FR 1099 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; NASDAQ OMX PHLX LLC; Notice of Filing of Proposed Rule Change...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-09

    ... change from interested persons. \\1\\ 15 U.S.C. 78s(b)(1). \\2\\ 17 CFR 240.19b-4. I. Self-Regulatory.../ , and at the Commission's Public Reference Room. II. Self-Regulatory Organization's Statement of the... sections A, B, and C below, of the most significant aspects of such statements. A. Self-Regulatory...

  1. 75 FR 27609 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; NYSE Arca, Inc.; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-17

    ... have been prepared by the self-regulatory organization. The Commission is publishing this notice to....C. 78a. \\3\\ 17 CFR 240.19b-4. I. Self-Regulatory Organization's Statement of the Terms of Substance... Reference Room. II. Self-Regulatory Organization's Statement of the Purpose of, and Statutory Basis for, the...

  2. 17 CFR 1.64 - Composition of various self-regulatory organization governing boards and major disciplinary...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... ACT Miscellaneous § 1.64 Composition of various self-regulatory organization governing boards and major disciplinary committees. (a) Definitions. For purposes of this section: (1) Self-regulatory organization means “self-regulatory organization” as defined in § 1.3(ee), not including a “clearing...

  3. 75 FR 64771 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; Order Approving Minor Rule Violation Plan for BATS Y-Exchange, Inc.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-20

    ... SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION [Release No. 34-63113; File No. 4-616] Self-Regulatory... provisions of Rule 19d-1(c)(1) of the Act \\4\\ requiring that a self-regulatory organization promptly file... Commission adopted amendments to paragraph (c) of Rule 19d-1 to allow self-regulatory organizations (``SROs...

  4. 75 FR 63233 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; NYSE Arca, Inc.; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-14

    ..., which Items have been prepared by the self-regulatory organization. The Commission is publishing this...). \\2\\ 15 U.S.C. 78a. \\3\\ 17 CFR 240.19b-4. I. Self-Regulatory Organization's Statement of the Terms of...'s Web site at http://www.nyse.com . II. Self-Regulatory Organization's Statement of the Purpose of...

  5. 76 FR 61444 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; EDGX Exchange, Inc.; Notice of Filing of Proposed Rule Change To...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-04

    ... interested persons. \\1\\ 15 U.S.C. 78s(b)(1). \\2\\ 17 CFR 240.19b-4. I. Self-Regulatory Organization's... Public Reference Room. II. Self-Regulatory Organization's Statement of the Purpose of, and Statutory... IV below. The self-regulatory organization has prepared summaries, set forth in Sections A, B and C...

  6. 78 FR 48732 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; NASDAQ OMX PHLX LLC; Notice of Filing of Proposed Rule Changes to...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-09

    ... from interested persons. \\1\\ 15 U.S.C. 78s(b)(1). \\2\\ 17 CFR 240.19b-4. I. Self-Regulatory Organization... Exchange, and at the Commission's Public Reference Room. II. Self-Regulatory Organization's Statement of... A, B, and C below, of the most significant aspects of such statements. A. Self-Regulatory...

  7. 76 FR 61453 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; C2 Options Exchange, Incorporated; Notice of Proposed Rule Change...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-04

    ... SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION [Release No. 34-65433; File No. SR-C2-2011-024] Self-Regulatory... change from interested persons. \\1\\ 15 U.S.C. 78s(b)(1). \\2\\ 17 CFR 240.19b-4. I. Self-Regulatory... Office of the Secretary and at the Commission. II. Self-Regulatory Organization's Statement of the...

  8. 77 FR 31060 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; the Options Clearing Corporation; Notice of Filing and of Proposed...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-24

    ... SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION [Release No. 34-67021; File No. SR-OCC-2012-07] Self-Regulatory... from interested persons. \\1\\ 15 U.S.C. 78s(b)(1). \\2\\ 17 CFR 240.19b-4. I. Self-Regulatory Organization... equity options. II. Self-Regulatory Organization's Statement of the Purpose of, and Statutory Basis for...

  9. 17 CFR 31.28 - Self-regulatory organization adoption and surveillance of minimum financial, cover, segregation...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Self-regulatory organization... TRANSACTIONS § 31.28 Self-regulatory organization adoption and surveillance of minimum financial, cover, segregation and sales practice requirements. (a) Each self-regulatory organization must adopt, and submit for...

  10. 75 FR 18556 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; NYSE Amex LLC; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-12

    ... have been prepared by the self-regulatory organization. Amex filed the proposal pursuant to Section 19.... Self-Regulatory Organization's Statement of the Terms of Substance of the Proposed Rule Change The... , at the Exchange's principal office and at the Commission's Public Reference Room. II. Self-Regulatory...

  11. 17 CFR 1.63 - Service on self-regulatory organization governing boards or committees by persons with...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Service on self-regulatory... EXCHANGE ACT Miscellaneous § 1.63 Service on self-regulatory organization governing boards or committees by persons with disciplinary histories. (a) Definitions. For purposes of this section: (1) Self-regulatory...

  12. 77 FR 34420 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; NASDAQ OMX PHLX LLC; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-11

    ... statements. A. Self-Regulatory Organization's Statement of the Purpose of, and Statutory Basis for, the... respect to marking Strategy Trades would be uniformly applied to members. B. Self-Regulatory Organization... the Act. C. Self-Regulatory Organization's Statement on Comments on the Proposed Rule Change Received...

  13. 'Would you eat cultured meat?': Consumers' reactions and attitude formation in Belgium, Portugal and the United Kingdom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verbeke, Wim; Marcu, Afrodita; Rutsaert, Pieter; Gaspar, Rui; Seibt, Beate; Fletcher, Dave; Barnett, Julie

    2015-04-01

    Cultured meat has evolved from an idea and concept into a reality with the August 2013 cultured hamburger tasting in London. Still, how consumers conceive cultured meat is largely an open question. This study addresses consumers' reactions and attitude formation towards cultured meat through analyzing focus group discussions and online deliberations with 179 meat consumers from Belgium, Portugal and the United Kingdom. Initial reactions when learning about cultured meat were underpinned by feelings of disgust and considerations of unnaturalness. Consumers saw few direct personal benefits but they were more open to perceiving global societal benefits relating to the environment and global food security. Both personal and societal risks were framed in terms of uncertainties about safety and health, and possible adverse societal consequences dealing with loss of farming and eating traditions and rural livelihoods. Further reflection pertained to skepticism about 'the inevitable' scientific progress, concern about risk governance and control, and need for regulation and proper labeling. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Maternal mental health symptoms are positively related to emotional and restrained eating attitudes in a statewide sample of mothers participating in a supplemental nutrition program for women, infants and young children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emerson, Jillian A; Hurley, Kristen M; Caulfield, Laura E; Black, Maureen M

    2017-01-01

    Postpartum, low-income mothers are at risk for mental health symptoms and obesity, and disordered eating attitudes may be associated with both mental health and obesity in this vulnerable population. The study objective is to determine whether higher levels of mental health symptoms are associated with increased odds of emotional and restrained eating attitudes in this sample of Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants and Children (WIC) participants. Data on 711 mothers of infants Maternal mental health symptoms were measured on continuous scales for depression (PRIME-MD), stress (Perceived Stress Scale) and anxiety (Spielberger State-Trait Anxiety Inventory). Emotional and restrained eating attitudes were measured with questions adapted from the Dutch Eating Behavior Questionnaire. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was used. Obesity [body mass index (BMI) ≥ 30] was explored as a moderating variable. Mothers reporting higher levels of depression symptoms [odds ratio (OR) = 3.93, 95%CI: 2.71-5.69], anxiety symptoms (OR = 1.96, 95%CI: 1.47-2.65), stress symptoms (OR = 2.09, 95%CI: 1.67-2.61) and high overall mental health symptomatology (OR = 3.51, 95%CI: 2.43-5.3) had increased odds of emotional eating attitudes. There were significant associations between symptoms of depression (OR = 1.59, 95% CI: 1.12-2.25) and increased odds of restrained eating attitudes. Obesity did not moderate the association. Mothers with mental health symptoms are at risk for disordered eating attitudes, which may increase risk of poor diet. These findings underscore the need for greater focus on addressing maternal mental health status and eating attitudes in the postpartum period. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. 78 FR 19348 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; Chicago Board Options Exchange, Incorporated; Notice of Filing of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-29

    ... are trading, the proposed changes seek to create less of a disconnect if the ``primary'' market should... connected to the marketplace. B. Self-Regulatory Organization's Statement on Burden on Competition CBOE does...

  16. 78 FR 68497 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; International Securities Exchange, LLC; Notice of Filing and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-14

    ... are trading, the proposed rule change seeks to create less of a disconnect if the ``primary'' market... connected to the marketplace. B. Self-Regulatory Organization's Statement on Burden on Competition This...

  17. 77 FR 65730 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; Chicago Mercantile Exchange Inc.; Notice of Filing of Proposed...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-30

    ... of derivative agreements, contracts, and transactions, and to assure the safeguarding of securities... further safeguard customer funds held at the FCM level. B. Self-Regulatory Organization's Statement on...

  18. Self-Regulatory Fatigue, Quality of Life, Health Behaviors, and Coping in Patients with Hematologic Malignancies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehlers, Shawna L.; Patten, Christi A.; Gastineau, Dennis A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Self-regulatory fatigue may play an important role in a complex medical illness. Purpose Examine associations between self-regulatory fatigue, quality of life, and health behaviors in patients pre- (N=213) and 1-year post-hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT; N=140). Associations between self-regulatory fatigue and coping strategies pre-HSCT were also examined. Method Pre- and 1-year post-HSCT data collection. Hierarchical linear regression modeling. Results Higher self-regulatory fatigue pre-HSCT associated with lower overall, physical, social, emotional, and functional quality of life pre- (p’sself-regulatory fatigue pre-HSCT relating to decreased quality of life and health behaviors, and predicting changes in these variables 1-year post-HSCT. PMID:24802991

  19. Metacognitions, metacognitive processes and metacognitive control strategies in people with obesity and binge eating and people with obesity without binge eating

    OpenAIRE

    Hartley, Georgina

    2013-01-01

    Background Binge eating is often co-morbid with obesity. There is no widely accepted theoretical model for binge eating, this has treatment implications. Research has highlighted the role of metacognitions in psychopathology, including eating disorders. However, metacognitions in obesity and binge eating have not yet been researched. The self-regulatory executive functioning model (S-REF; Wells & Matthews, 1994, 1996) conceptualises the role of metacognition in the aetiology and mainten...

  20. Detección de trastornos alimentarios en niños: adaptación lingüística y conceptual del Children's Eating Attitudes Test (CHEAT Detection of eating disorders in children: linguistic and conceptual adaptation of the Children´S Eating Attitudes Test (CHEAT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciana Elizathe

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Este estudio tiene como objetivo presentar la adaptación lingüística y conceptual del Children`s Eating Attitudes Test (ChEAT, Maloney, McGuire, & Daniels, 1988, uno de los instrumentos de screening más utilizados internacionalmente para detectar trastornos alimentarios (TA en niños. Con este fin, se procedió a realizar una traducción del instrumento del idioma original -inglés- al idioma local-castellano-. Este primer borrador fue administrado a una primera prueba piloto con niños de entre 9 y 12 años, tras la cual se realizaron modificaciones en la mayoría de los reactivos a fin de adecuarlos al nivel de comprensión y a las expresiones lingüísticas propias de los niños de nuestro medio. A continuación, cinco expertos en TA analizaron el segundo borrador obtenido y evaluaron la adecuación de los ítems para detectar TA en niños. Por último se procedió a evaluar la versión final en una segunda prueba piloto con niños de entre 12 y 13 años. Se mantuvo dicha versión, dado que no se detectaron dificultades. Finalmente, puede concluirse que se cuenta con una adaptación lingüística y conceptualmente adecuada a niños y niñas de nuestro contexto cultural.The purpose of this work is to present the linguistic and conceptual adaptation of the Children´s Eating Attitudes Test (ChEAT, Maloney, McGuire & Daniels, 1988, one of the best known screening instruments to detect eating disorders (ED in children. With this end, a translation from the original language -english- to the local one -spanish- was performed. The first draft was tested with children between the ages of 9 to 12 years old, and after that some of the items had to be modified in order to obtain a reliable test of the understanding and linguistic expressions used by the local children. Next, five experts in ED analyzed a second draft and evaluated and assessed the adequacy of the items to evaluate ED in children. Last, a final test was conducted with children

  1. Eating Disorders in Paraguayan Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez, Maria E.; McIntosh, David E.; Kruczek, Theresa

    2013-01-01

    Eating disorders, once thought to be exclusively a disorder of the more affluent Western countries, are now spreading around the world. Despite the wealth of information on the prevalence of eating disorders in developed countries, epidemiological data for South America is scarce. The 26-item Eating Attitude Test (EAT-26) was used to explore the…

  2. Time perspective and social preference in older and younger adults: Effects of self-regulatory fatigue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segerstrom, Suzanne C; Geiger, Paul J; Combs, Hannah L; Boggero, Ian A

    2016-09-01

    Socioemotional selectivity theory predicts that when perceived time in life is limited, people will prefer emotionally close social partners over less emotionally rewarding partners. Regulating social choices with regard to time perspective can make the best use of time with regard to well-being. However, doing so may depend on the self-regulatory capacity of the individual. Two studies, 1 with younger adults (N = 101) and 1 with younger (N = 42) and older (N = 39) adults, experimentally tested the effects of time perspective and self-regulatory fatigue on preferences for emotionally close partners and knowledgeable partners. In both studies and across younger and older adults, when self-regulatory fatigue was low, the perception of limited time resulted in a greater preference for close social partners relative to knowledgeable social partners. However, this shift was eliminated by self-regulatory fatigue. In Study 2, when fatigued, younger adults preferred close social partners to knowledgeable partners across time perspectives; older adults preferred close and knowledgeable partners more equally across time perspectives. These findings have implications for social decision-making and satisfaction among people who experience chronic self-regulatory fatigue. They also contradict previous suggestions that only younger adults are susceptible to self-regulatory fatigue. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  3. Pain acceptance, psychological functioning, and self-regulatory fatigue in temporomandibular disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisenlohr-Moul, Tory A; Burris, Jessica L; Evans, Daniel R

    2013-12-01

    A growing body of evidence suggests that chronic pain patients suffer from chronic self-regulatory fatigue: difficulty controlling thoughts, emotions, and behavior. Pain acceptance, which involves responding to pain and related experiences without attempts to control or avoid them (pain willingness), and pursuit of valued life activities regardless of pain (activity engagement) has been associated with various favorable outcomes in chronic pain patients, including better psychological functioning. The study presented here tested the hypotheses that pain acceptance is associated with less psychological distress, higher psychological well-being, and reduced self-regulatory fatigue in temporomandibular disorder (TMD) patients, particularly for those with longer pain duration. Cross-sectional data were provided by 135 TMD patients during an initial evaluation at a university-based tertiary orofacial pain clinic. Results of hierarchical linear regression models indicated that, controlling for pain severity, pain willingness is associated with less psychological distress and lower self-regulatory fatigue, and activity engagement is associated with greater psychological well-being. Furthermore, the effect of pain willingness on psychological distress was moderated by pain duration such that pain willingness was more strongly associated with less psychological distress in patients with longer pain duration; this moderating effect was fully mediated by self-regulatory fatigue. These findings suggest pain willingness may buffer against self-regulatory fatigue in those with longer pain duration, and such conservation of self-regulatory resources may protect against psychological symptoms.

  4. Broadening the cancer and cognition landscape: the role of self-regulatory challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arndt, Jamie; Das, Enny; Schagen, Sanne B; Reid-Arndt, Stephanie A; Cameron, Linda D; Ahles, Tim A

    2014-01-01

    The potentially detrimental effects of cancer and related treatments on cognitive functioning have emerged as one of the key foci of cancer survivorship research, but little is known about how psychological variables other than depression influence these relationships. To illustrate the potential of social psychological perspectives, we examine how a self-regulatory analysis and specific self-regulatory challenges of contending with cancer-related expectancies and stereotypes provide conceptual frameworks for understanding some of the potential causes and consequences of cancer-related cognitive deficits. Literatures on cancer-related cognitive deficits, self-regulatory ego depletion, expectancy stereotypes, and their points of convergence are briefly reviewed. A review and conceptual integration of relevant literatures suggest that coping with cancer can impair self-regulatory capacity. There is an overlap between cognitive deficits associated with self-regulatory challenge and with cancer and its treatment, and restoring self-regulatory resources can attenuate cancer-related cognitive deficits. Examination of specific regulatory challenges of contending with expectancies and stereotypes related to treatment suggests insights that can inform when and among whom cognitive deficits may most likely emerge. Integrating social psychological ideas with a substantial knowledge base can illustrate novel research trajectories that can deepen our understanding of cancer-related cognitive deficits and their impact on psychosocial well-being. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. Evaluating brief motivational and self-regulatory hand hygiene interventions: a cross-over longitudinal design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lhakhang, Pempa; Lippke, Sonia; Knoll, Nina; Schwarzer, Ralf

    2015-02-04

    Frequent handwashing can prevent infections, but non-compliance to hand hygiene is pervasive. Few theory- and evidence-based interventions to improve regular handwashing are available. Therefore, two intervention modules, a motivational and a self-regulatory one, were designed and evaluated. In a longitudinal study, 205 young adults, aged 18 to 26 years, were randomized into two intervention groups. The Mot-SelfR group received first a motivational intervention (Mot; risk perception and outcome expectancies) followed by a self-regulatory intervention (SelfR; perceived self-efficacy and planning) 17 days later. The SelfR-Mot group received the same two intervention modules in the opposite order. Follow-up data were assessed 17 and 34 days after the baseline. Both intervention sequences led to an increase in handwashing frequency, intention, self-efficacy, and planning. Also, overall gains were found for the self-regulatory module (increased planning and self-efficacy levels) and the motivational module (intention). Within groups, the self-regulatory module appeared to be more effective than the motivational module, independent of sequence. Self-regulatory interventions can help individuals to exhibit more handwashing. Sequencing may be important as a motivation module (Mot) first helps to set the goal and a self-regulatory module (SelfR) then helps to translate this goal into actual behavior, but further research is needed to evaluate mechanisms.

  6. Eating symptomatology and general psychopathology in patients with anorexia nervosa from China, UK and Spain: A cross-cultural study examining the role of social attitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brewin, Nicola; Chen, Jue; Granero, Roser; Kang, Qing; Fernandez-Aranda, Fernando; Arcelus, Jon

    2017-01-01

    Cultural studies exploring differences in the manifestation of anorexia nervosa (AN) have primarily focus on Western and non-Western cultures. However, no study so far has considered the role that social attitudes (i.e. Collectivist vs. Individualist cultural values) have in the clinical manifestations of eating disorders, including AN patients. With this in mind, the aim of this study is to compare eating and general psychopathology in a large sample of individuals diagnosed with AN from China, Spain, and United Kingdom (UK), in order to study the differences according to belonging to Western or non-Western country, or the country's Individualist Index (IDV). The total sample comprised on 544 adults with a diagnosis of AN recruited from People´s Republic of China (n = 72), UK (n = 117), and Spain (n = 355). Assessment measures included the Eating Disorders Inventory and the Symptom Checklist-90-Revised. Our results show significant differences in most of the eating and psychopathological indices between the three countries. Patients from Western societies (Spain and UK) share more similarities regarding psychopathological expression of AN than the non-Western country (China). While Western countries show higher levels of body dissatisfaction, somatization and overall psychopathology, Chinese patients tend to deny or minimize depression, anxiety and other psychopathological symptoms. Besides, the IDV shows cultural differences in the interpersonal sensitivity scale, being AN patients from UK (the more individualistic society) who presented with higher levels of interpersonal sensitivity (i.e. discomfort during interpersonal interactions and more negative expectations concerning interpersonal behavior). In conclusion, our findings suggest that psychopathological expression of AN is better explained by Western/Eastern influence than by individualist/collectivist values. Although the diagnosis for the eating disorder may be the same, differences in the

  7. Eating symptomatology and general psychopathology in patients with anorexia nervosa from China, UK and Spain: A cross-cultural study examining the role of social attitudes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agüera, Zaida; Brewin, Nicola; Chen, Jue; Granero, Roser; Kang, Qing; Fernandez-Aranda, Fernando; Arcelus, Jon

    2017-01-01

    Cultural studies exploring differences in the manifestation of anorexia nervosa (AN) have primarily focus on Western and non-Western cultures. However, no study so far has considered the role that social attitudes (i.e. Collectivist vs. Individualist cultural values) have in the clinical manifestations of eating disorders, including AN patients. With this in mind, the aim of this study is to compare eating and general psychopathology in a large sample of individuals diagnosed with AN from China, Spain, and United Kingdom (UK), in order to study the differences according to belonging to Western or non-Western country, or the country's Individualist Index (IDV). The total sample comprised on 544 adults with a diagnosis of AN recruited from People´s Republic of China (n = 72), UK (n = 117), and Spain (n = 355). Assessment measures included the Eating Disorders Inventory and the Symptom Checklist-90-Revised. Our results show significant differences in most of the eating and psychopathological indices between the three countries. Patients from Western societies (Spain and UK) share more similarities regarding psychopathological expression of AN than the non-Western country (China). While Western countries show higher levels of body dissatisfaction, somatization and overall psychopathology, Chinese patients tend to deny or minimize depression, anxiety and other psychopathological symptoms. Besides, the IDV shows cultural differences in the interpersonal sensitivity scale, being AN patients from UK (the more individualistic society) who presented with higher levels of interpersonal sensitivity (i.e. discomfort during interpersonal interactions and more negative expectations concerning interpersonal behavior). In conclusion, our findings suggest that psychopathological expression of AN is better explained by Western/Eastern influence than by individualist/collectivist values. Although the diagnosis for the eating disorder may be the same, differences in the

  8. Eating symptomatology and general psychopathology in patients with anorexia nervosa from China, UK and Spain: A cross-cultural study examining the role of social attitudes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zaida Agüera

    Full Text Available Cultural studies exploring differences in the manifestation of anorexia nervosa (AN have primarily focus on Western and non-Western cultures. However, no study so far has considered the role that social attitudes (i.e. Collectivist vs. Individualist cultural values have in the clinical manifestations of eating disorders, including AN patients. With this in mind, the aim of this study is to compare eating and general psychopathology in a large sample of individuals diagnosed with AN from China, Spain, and United Kingdom (UK, in order to study the differences according to belonging to Western or non-Western country, or the country's Individualist Index (IDV. The total sample comprised on 544 adults with a diagnosis of AN recruited from People´s Republic of China (n = 72, UK (n = 117, and Spain (n = 355. Assessment measures included the Eating Disorders Inventory and the Symptom Checklist-90-Revised. Our results show significant differences in most of the eating and psychopathological indices between the three countries. Patients from Western societies (Spain and UK share more similarities regarding psychopathological expression of AN than the non-Western country (China. While Western countries show higher levels of body dissatisfaction, somatization and overall psychopathology, Chinese patients tend to deny or minimize depression, anxiety and other psychopathological symptoms. Besides, the IDV shows cultural differences in the interpersonal sensitivity scale, being AN patients from UK (the more individualistic society who presented with higher levels of interpersonal sensitivity (i.e. discomfort during interpersonal interactions and more negative expectations concerning interpersonal behavior. In conclusion, our findings suggest that psychopathological expression of AN is better explained by Western/Eastern influence than by individualist/collectivist values. Although the diagnosis for the eating disorder may be the same, differences in the

  9. Single-Session Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation Temporarily Improves Symptoms, Mood, and Self-Regulatory Control in Bulimia Nervosa: A Randomised Controlled Trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Kekic

    Full Text Available Evidence suggests that pathological eating behaviours in bulimia nervosa (BN are underpinned by alterations in reward processing and self-regulatory control, and by functional changes in neurocircuitry encompassing the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC. Manipulation of this region with transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS may therefore alleviate symptoms of the disorder.This double-blind sham-controlled proof-of-principle trial investigated the effects of bilateral tDCS over the DLPFC in adults with BN.Thirty-nine participants (two males received three sessions of tDCS in a randomised and counterbalanced order: anode right/cathode left (AR/CL, anode left/cathode right (AL/CR, and sham. A battery of psychological/neurocognitive measures was completed before and after each session and the frequency of bulimic behaviours during the following 24-hours was recorded.AR/CL tDCS reduced eating disorder cognitions (indexed by the Mizes Eating Disorder Cognitions Questionnaire-Revised when compared to AL/CR and sham tDCS. Both active conditions suppressed the self-reported urge to binge-eat and increased self-regulatory control during a temporal discounting task. Compared to sham stimulation, mood (assessed with the Profile of Mood States improved after AR/CL but not AL/CR tDCS. Lastly, the three tDCS sessions had comparable effects on the wanting/liking of food and on bulimic behaviours during the 24 hours post-stimulation.These data suggest that single-session tDCS transiently improves symptoms of BN. They also help to elucidate possible mechanisms of action and highlight the importance of selecting the optimal electrode montage. Multi-session trials are needed to determine whether tDCS has potential for development as a treatment for adult BN.

  10. Single-Session Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation Temporarily Improves Symptoms, Mood, and Self-Regulatory Control in Bulimia Nervosa: A Randomised Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kekic, Maria; McClelland, Jessica; Bartholdy, Savani; Boysen, Elena; Musiat, Peter; Dalton, Bethan; Tiza, Meyzi; David, Anthony S; Campbell, Iain C; Schmidt, Ulrike

    2017-01-01

    Evidence suggests that pathological eating behaviours in bulimia nervosa (BN) are underpinned by alterations in reward processing and self-regulatory control, and by functional changes in neurocircuitry encompassing the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC). Manipulation of this region with transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) may therefore alleviate symptoms of the disorder. This double-blind sham-controlled proof-of-principle trial investigated the effects of bilateral tDCS over the DLPFC in adults with BN. Thirty-nine participants (two males) received three sessions of tDCS in a randomised and counterbalanced order: anode right/cathode left (AR/CL), anode left/cathode right (AL/CR), and sham. A battery of psychological/neurocognitive measures was completed before and after each session and the frequency of bulimic behaviours during the following 24-hours was recorded. AR/CL tDCS reduced eating disorder cognitions (indexed by the Mizes Eating Disorder Cognitions Questionnaire-Revised) when compared to AL/CR and sham tDCS. Both active conditions suppressed the self-reported urge to binge-eat and increased self-regulatory control during a temporal discounting task. Compared to sham stimulation, mood (assessed with the Profile of Mood States) improved after AR/CL but not AL/CR tDCS. Lastly, the three tDCS sessions had comparable effects on the wanting/liking of food and on bulimic behaviours during the 24 hours post-stimulation. These data suggest that single-session tDCS transiently improves symptoms of BN. They also help to elucidate possible mechanisms of action and highlight the importance of selecting the optimal electrode montage. Multi-session trials are needed to determine whether tDCS has potential for development as a treatment for adult BN.

  11. Older Adult Consumer Knowledge, Attitudes, and Self-Reported Storage Practices of Ready-to-Eat Food Products and Risks Associated with Listeriosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Ellen W; Redmond, Elizabeth C

    2016-02-01

    Consumer implementation of recommended food safety practices, specifically relating to time and temperature control of ready-to-eat (RTE) food products associated with listeriosis are crucial. This is particularly the case for at-risk consumers such as older adults, given the increased listeriosis incidence reported internationally among adults aged ≥60 years. However, data detailing older adults' cognitive risk factors associated with listeriosis are lacking. Combining data about knowledge, self-reported practices, and attitudes can achieve a cumulative multilayered in-depth understanding of consumer food safety behavior and cognition. This study aims to ascertain older adults' cognition and behavior in relation to domestic food handling and storage practices that may increase the risks associated with L. monocytogenes. Older adults (≥60 years) (n = 100) participated in an interview and questionnaire to determine knowledge, self-reported practices, and attitudes toward recommended practices. Although the majority (79%) had positive attitudes toward refrigeration, 84% were unaware of recommended temperatures (5°C) and 65% self-reported "never" checking their refrigerator temperature. Although most (72%) knew that "use-by" dates indicate food safety and 62% reported "always" taking note, neutral attitudes were held, with 67% believing it was safe to eat food beyond use-by dates and 57% reporting doing so. Attitudes toward consuming foods within the recommended 2 days of opening were neutral, with 55% aware of recommendations and , 84% reporting that they consume RTE foods beyond recommendations. Although knowledgeable of some key practices, older adults self-reported potentially unsafe practices when storing RTE foods at home, which may increase risks associated with L. monocytogenes. This study has determined that older adults' food safety cognition may affect their behaviors; understanding consumer food safety cognition is essential for developing targeted

  12. Self-regulatory processes mediate the intention-behavior relation for adherence and exercise behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Bruin, Marijn; Sheeran, Paschal; Kok, Gerjo; Hiemstra, Anneke; Prins, Jan M; Hospers, Harm J; van Breukelen, Gerard J P

    2012-11-01

    Understanding the gap between people's intentions and actual health behavior is an important issue in health psychology. Our aim in this study was to investigate whether self-regulatory processes (monitoring goal progress and responding to discrepancies) mediate the intention-behavior relation in relation to HIV medication adherence (Study 1) and intensive exercise behavior (Study 2). In Study 1, questionnaire and electronically monitored adherence data were collected at baseline and 3 months later from patients in the control arm of an HIV-adherence intervention study. In Study 2, questionnaire data was collected at 3 time points 6-weeks apart in a cohort study of physical activity. Complete data at all time points were obtained from 51 HIV-infected patients and 499 intensive exercise participants. Intentions were good predictors of behavior and explained 25 to 30% of the variance. Self-regulatory processes explained an additional 11% (Study 1) and 6% (Study 2) of variance in behavior on top of intentions. Regression and bootstrap analyses revealed at least partial, and possibly full, mediation of the intention-behavior relation by self-regulatory processes. The present studies indicate that self-regulatory processes may explain how intentions drive behavior. Future tests, using different health behaviors and experimental designs, could firmly establish whether self-regulatory processes complement current health behavior theories and should become routine targets for intervention. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved).

  13. Behavioural ratings of self-regulatory mechanisms and driving behaviour after an acquired brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rike, Per-Ola; Ulleberg, Pål; Schultheis, Maria T; Lundqvist, Anna; Schanke, Anne-Kristine

    2014-01-01

    To explore whether measurements of self-regulatory mechanisms and cognition predict driving behaviour after an acquired brain injury (ABI). Consecutive follow-up study. At baseline participants included 77 persons with stroke and 32 persons with a traumatic brain injury (TBI), all of whom completed a multidisciplinary driving assessment (MDA). A follow-up cohort of 34 persons that succeeded the MDA was included. Baseline measurements: Neuropsychological tests and measurements of self-regulatory mechanisms (BRIEF-A and UPPS Impulsive Behaviour Scale), driving behaviour (DBQ) and pre-injury driving characteristics (mileage, compensatory driving strategies and accident rates). Follow-up measurements: Post-injury driving characteristics were collected by mailed questionnaires from the participants who succeeded the MDA. A MDA, which included a medical examination, neuropsychological testing and an on-road driving test, was considered in the decision for or against granting a driver's license. Self-regulatory mechanisms and driving behaviour were examined for research purposes only. At baseline, self-regulatory mechanisms were significantly associated to aberrant driving behaviour, but not with neuropsychological data or with the outcome of the on-road driving test. Aspects of self-regulation were associated to driving behaviour at follow-up. It is recommended that self-regulatory measurements should regularly be considered in the driving assessments after ABI.

  14. Sustained attention in infancy as a longitudinal predictor of self-regulatory functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansson, Maria; Marciszko, Carin; Gredebäck, Gustaf; Nyström, Pär; Bohlin, Gunilla

    2015-11-01

    Previous literature suggests that attention processes such as sustained attention would constitute a developmental foundation for the self-regulatory functions executive functioning and effortful control (e.g., Garon, Bryson, & Smith, 2008; Rothbart, Derryberry, & Posner, 1994). Our main aim was to test this hypothesis by studying whether sustained attention at age 1 year can predict individual differences in self-regulatory functions at age 2 years. Longitudinal data from 66 infants and their parents were included in the study. Sustained attention was assessed during free play at age 1 year; executive functioning, measured using an eye-tracking version of the A-not-B task, and effortful control, measured using parental ratings, were assessed at both age 1 and age 2 years. The results did support a longitudinal prediction of individual differences in 2-year-olds' self-regulatory functions as a function of sustained attention at age 1 year. We also found significant improvement in both executive functioning and effortful control over time, and the two self-regulatory constructs were related in toddlerhood but not in infancy. The study helps increase our understanding of the early development of self-regulatory functions necessary for identifying developmental risks and, in the future, for developing new interventions. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Mental imagery interventions reduce subsequent food intake only when self-regulatory resources are available.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Missbach, Benjamin; Florack, Arnd; Weissmann, Lukas; König, Jürgen

    2014-01-01

    Research has shown that imagining food consumption leads to food-specific habituation effects. In the present research, we replicated these effects and further examined whether the depletion of self-regulatory resources would reduce the habituation effects of imagined food consumption. Since self-regulatory resources have been shown to reduce habituation effects during the perception of emotional stimuli, we expected a reduction in habituation effects from imagined food consumption when self-regulatory resources were depleted. In Study 1, we replicated habituation effects as a response to imagining gummy bear consumption with a high (36) and medium number (18) of repetitions in a camouflaged taste test. Participants imagining gummy bear intake showed decreased food intake compared with participants who imagined putting a coin into a laundry machine. The number of repetitions did not significantly moderate the observed habituation effect. In Study 2, we investigated whether self-regulatory depletion would impede habituation effects evoked by the imagination of walnut consumption. Participants in a depleted state did not show a reduction in food intake after imagining walnut intake compared with participants in a non-depleted state. We discuss directions for future research and processes that might underlie the observed moderating effect of self-regulatory resources.

  16. Attitude and knowledge changes in collegiate dancers following a short-term, team-centered prevention program on eating disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres-McGehee, Toni M; Green, James M; Leaver-Dunn, Deidre; Leeper, James D; Bishop, Phillip A; Richardson, Mark T

    2011-06-01

    Eating knowledge, nutritional knowledge, and psychological changes among female collegiate dancers were examined before and after a 4-wk. team-centered program on sport nutrition, exercise, and disordered eating consequences. Collegiate female dancers from two NCAA Division I institutions participated in a control (n = 19; M age = 19.1 yr., SD = 1.0) or intervention (n = 21; M age = 19.2 yr., SD = 1.2) group. Measures were administered to both groups before and after intervention to assess eating disorders, depression, and nutritional and disordered eating knowledge. There was a statistically significant increase in scores on nutritional and overall eating disorder knowledge in the intervention group compared to the control group. Mean scores on depression, drive for thinness, body dissatisfaction, and maturity fears decreased in the intervention group.

  17. Learning to Eat: Behavioral and Psychological Aspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birch, Leann L

    2016-01-01

    Because infants are totally dependent upon parents (or other caregivers) for care and sustenance, parents' feeding practices are a key feature of the family environments in which infants and young children learn about food and eating. Feeding practices include not only what the child is fed, but also the how, when, why and how much of feeding. Extensive evidence indicates that parenting behavior influences a variety of child outcomes, including cognitive and socioemotional development, as well as the development of self-regulatory skills. The focus of this chapter is on what is known about how parenting, particularly feeding practices, influences the early development of several aspects of children's eating behavior, including the acquisition of food preferences, self-regulatory skills, children's reactivity to food cues, satiety responsiveness and 'picky eating'. It is argued that traditional feeding practices, which evolved to protect children from environmental threats and ensure adequate intake in the context of food scarcity, can be maladaptive in current environments. An evidence base is needed to inform public policy to reduce early obesity risk in current environments, where too much palatable food is a major threat to child health. Results of recent research provides evidence that promoting responsive feeding practices can alter the development of eating behavior, sleep patterns and early self-regulatory skills, as well as reduce early obesity risk. © 2016 Nestec Ltd., Vevey/S. Karger AG, Basel.

  18. Role of Resistive Self-Regulatory Efficacy and Moral Disengagement in the Relationship between Values and Aggressiveness in Athletes

    OpenAIRE

    Albouza Y; d'Arripe-Longueville F; Corrion K

    2017-01-01

    This study examined whether athletes’ values are related to aggressiveness through self-regulatory mechanisms. Athletes (N=225) completed four questionnaires to assess their values, resistive self-regulatory efficacy, moral disengagement and aggressiveness. The results of structural equation modeling showed a good fit to the data and illustrated that: (a) The status and moral values were indirectly associated with aggressiveness through the mediating roles of resistive self-regulatory efficac...

  19. 78 FR 47467 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; NYSE Arca, Inc.; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-05

    ... NMS, the Commission granted self-regulatory organizations and broker-dealers increased authority and... listings, trades, and market data itself, providing virtually limitless opportunities for entrepreneurs who...

  20. The role of self-regulatory efficacy, moral disengagement and guilt on doping likelihood: A social cognitive theory perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ring, Christopher; Kavussanu, Maria

    2018-03-01

    Given the concern over doping in sport, researchers have begun to explore the role played by self-regulatory processes in the decision whether to use banned performance-enhancing substances. Grounded on Bandura's (1991) theory of moral thought and action, this study examined the role of self-regulatory efficacy, moral disengagement and anticipated guilt on the likelihood to use a banned substance among college athletes. Doping self-regulatory efficacy was associated with doping likelihood both directly (b = -.16, P self-regulatory efficacy influences the likelihood to use banned performance-enhancing substances both directly and indirectly via moral disengagement.

  1. Building healthy eating habits in childhood: a study of the attitudes, knowledge and dietary habits of schoolchildren in Malaysia

    OpenAIRE

    Hoque, Kazi Enamul; Kamaluddin, Megat Ahmad; Abdul Razak, Ahmad Zabidi; Abdul Wahid, Afiq Athari

    2016-01-01

    Background Overweight and obesity have increased rapidly in incidence to become a global issue today. Overweight and obesity problems are significantly linked to unhealthy dietary patterns, physical inactivity and misperception of body image. This study aimed to determine whether Malaysian children build healthy eating habits from childhood. Methods A survey on eating habits was conducted among primary school students in standards 4 to 6 in the state of Selangor, Malaysia. The findings of the...

  2. The influence of sociocultural factors on the eating attitudes of Lebanese and Cypriot students: a cross-cultural study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeeni, N; Gharibeh, N; Katsounari, I

    2013-07-01

    The present comparative cross-cultural study aimed to explore the relationship between eating behaviour and sociocultural influences with respect to appearance and body image in female university students from two cultural contexts, namely Cyprus and Lebanon. The Dutch Eating Behavior questionnaire (DEBQ) and the Perceived Sociocultural Influences on Body Image and Body Change Questionnaire were used to assess sociocultural influences and body image, respectively, in 200 students from each country. The results indicated that the Lebanese students were more likely to engage in emotional and external eating and their body image was impacted to a larger extent by sociocultural agents, including media influences, compared to the Cypriot students. Also, a positive relationship was found between emotional and external eating in both cultures. Finally, sociocultural influences correlated positively with external eating only in the Cypriot sample. Culture-specific factors, such as the societal values and norms, as well as the Westernisation history of each country, are discussed as underpinnings for the differences found. These findings are significant for understanding the rise of eating pathology in these two cultures and provide evidence for a need to consider cultural environment when designing public health policies addressing the negative aspects of nutrition transition. © 2013 The Authors Journal of Human Nutrition and Dietetics © 2013 The British Dietetic Association Ltd.

  3. Social physique anxiety and disturbed eating attitudes and behaviors in adolescents: moderating effects of sport, sport-related characteristics, and gender.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanfranchi, Marie-Christine; Maïano, Christophe; Morin, Alexandre J S; Therme, Pierre

    2015-02-01

    The involvement of adolescents presenting high levels of social physique anxiety (SPA) in sport practice has been hypothesized as potentially problematic in terms of being associated with disturbed eating attitudes and behaviors (DEAB). Indeed, sport practice itself has been reported to be associated with higher levels of SPA and DEAB, and sport settings may sometimes promote unhealthy life habits. Nevertheless, current studies are few and present several limitations. The objective of the present study was to examine these relationships among adolescents involved or not in various types (i.e., leanness and individual) and contexts (i.e., organized and competitive) of sport practice. The sample included 766 French adolescents (337 boys and 429 girls), aged between 11 and 18 years, involved (n = 335) or not (n = 431) in sport practice. SPA and DEAB were assessed using French adaptations of the SPA scale and the Eating Attitudes Test-26. The results reveal a significant and positive association between SPA and the DEAB scales. Furthermore, they show a positive relationship between SPA and (a) vomiting-purging behaviors in adolescents involved in individual sports and (b) generic DEAB (i.e., a subscale covering fear of getting fat, food preoccupation, and eating-related guilt), particularly in adolescents involved in individual sports. The relationship between SPA and DEAB does not differ according to adolescents' involvement in sport practice or according to their involvement in organized, competitive, or leanness sport practice more specifically. However, higher levels of SPA and DEAB were observed in adolescents involved in individual sports.

  4. The moderating effect of gender role on the relationships between gender and attitudes about body and eating in a sample of Italian adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lampis, J; Cataudella, S; Busonera, A; De Simone, S; Tommasi, M

    2017-03-13

    The differential prevalence of eating disorders in males and females can be explained by the impact of gender-role orientations. Inside the Italian socio-cultural context, gender socialization can be influenced by stereotypical gender beliefs, and this may contribute to the psychological distress of individuals who identify with discrepant gender roles from their biological sex. Our study explored, within the Italian context, the potential moderating effect of masculinity and femininity on the relationships between gender and attitudes about body and eating. Nine hundred and twenty Italian male and female adolescents (M = 427, F = 493; age 14-21 years) completed the Eating Disorder Inventory-2 (EDI-2) and the Bem Sex-Role Inventory (BSRI). A moderating effect of gender role on the relationship between gender and bulimia, and drive of thinness emerged. Girls with higher levels of masculinity scored higher on bulimia than did their counterparts with lower levels, and boys with higher levels of femininity scored higher on bulimia and on drive for thinness than did their counterparts with lower levels. Data did not reveal a moderating effect of gender role on the relationship between gender and body satisfaction. Our data suggest that adolescents who endorsed a gender role that is socially considered discrepant from their biological sex (girls with higher levels of masculinity and boys with higher levels of femininity) are more likely to show higher level of bulimia and drive of thinness. This suggests the need for prevention and treatment programmes for eating disorders that take into account individuals' gender-role orientation and the influence that culturally dominant gender beliefs can exert on it.

  5. 78 FR 37865 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; BATS Exchange, Inc.; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-24

    ... SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION [Release No. 34-69793; File No. SR-BATS-2013-034] Self-Regulatory Organizations; BATS Exchange, Inc.; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness of Proposed Rule Change Related to Fees for Use of BATS Exchange, Inc. June 18, 2013. Pursuant to Section 19(b)(1) of the...

  6. 76 FR 50803 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; BATS Exchange, Inc.; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-16

    ... SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION [Release No. 34-65085; File No. SR-BATS-2011-025] Self-Regulatory Organizations; BATS Exchange, Inc.; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness of Proposed Rule Change Related to Fees for Use of BATS Exchange, Inc. August 10, 2011. Pursuant to Section 19(b)(1) of...

  7. 75 FR 27847 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; BATS Exchange, Inc.; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-18

    ... SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION [Release No. 34-62074; File No. SR-BATS-2010-012] Self-Regulatory Organizations; BATS Exchange, Inc.; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness of Proposed Rule Change Related to Fees for Use of BATS Exchange, Inc. May 11, 2010. Pursuant to Section 19(b)(1) of the...

  8. 78 FR 77736 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; BATS Exchange, Inc.; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-24

    ... SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION [Release No. 34-71129; File No. SR-BATS-2013-062] Self-Regulatory Organizations; BATS Exchange, Inc.; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness of a Proposed Rule Change To Modify BATS Options Market Maker Continuous Quoting Obligation Rules December 18, 2013...

  9. 76 FR 57092 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; BATS Exchange, Inc.; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-15

    ... SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION [Release No. 34-65307; File No. SR-BATS-2011-034] Self-Regulatory Organizations; BATS Exchange, Inc.; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness of Proposed Rule Change To Offer a Bulk-Quoting Interface To All Users of BATS Options September 9, 2011. Pursuant to...

  10. 77 FR 58195 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; BATS Exchange, Inc.; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-19

    ... SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION [Release No. 34-67855; File No. SR-BATS-2012-037] Self-Regulatory Organizations; BATS Exchange, Inc.; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness of Proposed Rule Change Related to Fees for Use of BATS Exchange, Inc. September 13, 2012. Pursuant to Section 19(b)(1) of...

  11. 76 FR 12155 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; BATS Exchange, Inc.; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-04

    ... SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION [Release No. 34-63969; File No. SR-BATS-2011-007] Self-Regulatory Organizations; BATS Exchange, Inc.; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness of Proposed Rule Change by BATS Exchange, Inc. to Adopt BATS Rule 11.21, entitled ``Input of Accurate Information...

  12. 78 FR 61422 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; BATS Exchange, Inc.; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-03

    ... SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION [Release No. 34-70548; File No. SR-BATS-2013-052] Self-Regulatory Organizations; BATS Exchange, Inc.; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness of a Proposed Rule Change To Modify the Trading Halt Rule of BATS Options September 27, 2013. Pursuant to Section 19...

  13. 78 FR 51261 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; BATS Exchange, Inc.; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-20

    ... SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION [Release No. 34-70190; File No. SR-BATS-2013-042] Self-Regulatory Organizations; BATS Exchange, Inc.; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness of Proposed Rule Change Related to Fees for Use of BATS Exchange, Inc. August 14, 2013. Pursuant to Section 19(b)(1) of...

  14. 78 FR 78460 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; BATS Exchange, Inc.; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-26

    ... SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION [Release No. 34-71140; File No. SR-BATS-2013-063] Self-Regulatory Organizations; BATS Exchange, Inc.; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness of Proposed Rule Change Related to Fees for Use of BATS Exchange, Inc. December 19, 2013. Pursuant to Section 19(b)(1) of...

  15. 78 FR 53814 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; BATS Exchange, Inc.; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-30

    ... SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION [Release No. 34-70257; File No. SR-BATS-2013-047] Self-Regulatory Organizations; BATS Exchange, Inc.; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness of a Proposed Rule Change Related to Registration and Continuing Education Fees for BATS Exchange, Inc. August 26...

  16. 77 FR 20858 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; BATS Exchange, Inc.; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-06

    ... SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION [Release No. 34-66723; File No. SR-BATS-2012-014] Self-Regulatory Organizations; BATS Exchange, Inc.; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness of a Proposed Rule Change To Amend the Certificate of Incorporation of BATS Global Markets, Inc. April 3, 2012...

  17. 76 FR 9841 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; BATS Exchange, Inc.; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-22

    ... SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION [Release No. 34-63916; File No. SR-BATS-2011-005] Self-Regulatory Organizations; BATS Exchange, Inc.; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness of Proposed Rule Change To Amend BATS Rule 11.13, Entitled ``Order Execution'' February 15, 2011. Pursuant to Section 19(b...

  18. 77 FR 63396 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; BATS Exchange, Inc.; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-16

    ... SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION [Release No. 34-68026; File No. SR-BATS-2012-040] Self-Regulatory Organizations; BATS Exchange, Inc.; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness of Proposed Rule Change Related to Fees for Use of BATS Exchange, Inc. October 10, 2012. Pursuant to Section 19(b)(1) of...

  19. 77 FR 7216 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; BATS Exchange, Inc.; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-10

    ... SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION [Release No. 34-66327; File No. SR-BATS-2012-008] Self-Regulatory Organizations; BATS Exchange, Inc.; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness of a Proposed Rule Change Related to Fees for Use of BATS Exchange, Inc. February 6, 2012. Pursuant to Section 19(b...

  20. 76 FR 61127 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; BATS Exchange, Inc.; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-03

    ... SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION [Release No. 34-65407; File No. SR-BATS-2011-037] Self-Regulatory Organizations; BATS Exchange, Inc.; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness of Proposed Rule Change Related to Fees for Use of BATS Exchange, Inc. September 27, 2011. Pursuant to Section 19(b)(1) of...

  1. 76 FR 28108 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; BATS Exchange, Inc.; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-13

    ... SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION [Release No. 34-64445; File No. SR-BATS-2011-017] Self-Regulatory Organizations; BATS Exchange, Inc.; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness of Proposed Rule Change To Add BATS Rule 11.22, Entitled ``Data Products'' May 9, 2011. Pursuant to Section 19(b)(1) of...

  2. 76 FR 70192 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; BATS Exchange, Inc.; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-10

    ... SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION [Release No. 34-65694; File No. SR-BATS-2011-046] Self-Regulatory Organizations; BATS Exchange, Inc.; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness of Proposed Rule Change Related to Fees for Use of BATS Exchange, Inc. November 4, 2011. Pursuant to Section 19(b)(1) of...

  3. 78 FR 16306 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; BATS Exchange, Inc.; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-14

    ... SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION [Release No. 34-69079; File No. SR-BATS-2013-017] Self-Regulatory Organizations; BATS Exchange, Inc.; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness of Proposed Rule Change Related to Fees for Use of BATS Exchange, Inc. March 8, 2013. Pursuant to Section 19(b)(1) of the...

  4. 76 FR 77576 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; BATS Exchange, Inc.; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-13

    ... SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION [Release No. 34-65907; File No. SR-BATS-2011-049] Self-Regulatory Organizations; BATS Exchange, Inc.; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness of a Proposed Rule Change Related to Fees for Use of BATS Exchange, Inc. December 7, 2011. Pursuant to Section 19(b...

  5. 76 FR 1208 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; BATS Exchange, Inc.; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-07

    ... SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION [Release No. 34-63630; File No. SR-BATS-2010-039] Self-Regulatory Organizations; BATS Exchange, Inc.; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness of Proposed Rule Change Related to Fees for Use of BATS Exchange, Inc. January 3, 2011. Pursuant to Section 19(b)(1) of...

  6. 76 FR 2734 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; BATS Exchange, Inc.; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-14

    ... SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION [Release No. 34-63663; File No. SR-BATS-2011-001] Self-Regulatory Organizations; BATS Exchange, Inc.; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness of Proposed Rule Change Related to Fees for Use of BATS Exchange, Inc. January 6, 2011. Pursuant to Section 19(b)(1) of...

  7. 78 FR 56760 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; BATS Exchange, Inc.; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-13

    ... SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION [Release No. 34-70348; File No. SR-BATS-2013-048) Self-Regulatory Organizations; BATS Exchange, Inc.; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness of Proposed Rule Change Related to Fees for Use of BATS Exchange, Inc. September 9, 2013. Pursuant to Section 19(b)(1) of...

  8. 78 FR 19555 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; BATS Exchange, Inc.; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-01

    ... SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION [Release No. 34-69238; File No. SR-BATS-2013-020] Self-Regulatory Organizations; BATS Exchange, Inc.; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness of Proposed Rule Change Related to Fees for Use of BATS Exchange, Inc. March 26, 2013. Pursuant to Section 19(b)(1) of the...

  9. 78 FR 16750 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; BATS Exchange, Inc.; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-18

    ... SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION [Release No. 34-69121; File No. SR-BATS-2013-014] Self-Regulatory Organizations; BATS Exchange, Inc.; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness of Proposed Rule Change To Modify the Operation of Market Orders for BATS Options March 12, 2013. Pursuant to Section 19(b...

  10. 75 FR 57097 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; BATS Exchange, Inc.; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-17

    ... SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION [Release No. 34-62901; File No. SR-BATS-2010-024] Self-Regulatory Organizations; BATS Exchange, Inc.; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness of Proposed Rule Change To Adopt BATS Rule 2.12, Entitled ``BATS Trading, Inc. as Inbound Router'' and To Make Related...

  11. 76 FR 7891 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; BATS Exchange, Inc.; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-11

    ... SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION [Release No. 34-63857; File No. SR-BATS-2011-004] Self-Regulatory Organizations; BATS Exchange, Inc.; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness of Proposed Rule Change Related to Fees for Use of BATS Exchange, Inc. February 7, 2011. Pursuant to Section 19(b)(1) of...

  12. 76 FR 64403 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; The Fixed Income Clearing Corporation; Notice of Filing and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-18

    ... Schedule of Timeframes, and Fee Structure in the GSD Rules. II. Self-Regulatory Organization's Statement of...-Regulatory Organizations; The Fixed Income Clearing Corporation; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness... Timeframes, and Fee Structure in the GSD Rules October 12, 2011. Pursuant to Section 19(b)(1) of the...

  13. 75 FR 57092 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness of Proposed Rule...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-17

    ... at the Commission's Public Reference Room. II. Self-Regulatory Organization's Statement of the..., there is no economic basis for regulating maximum prices for one of the joint products in an industry in... Arca did before registering as exchanges by publishing proprietary book data on the Internet. Second...

  14. 75 FR 70760 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; Municipal Securities Rulemaking Board; Notice of Filing and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-18

    ...'' and ``Economic indicators'' are added. Delivery Detail under this topic (``Book-entry only;'' ``Bearer... at the Commission's Public Reference Room. II. Self-Regulatory Organization's Statement of the... certain product knowledge and MSRB rules and eliminate redundancy; delete dated references to certain...

  15. THE ROLE OF SELF-REGULATORY AUDITING ASSOCIATIONS IN ARRANGEMENT OF AUDIT ACTIVITIES QUALITY CONTROL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zinaida P. Arharova

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The role of self-regulatory organizations in audit activities quality control is revealed in this article. Creation of a united audit association is the basis of certain regulating and auditing functions transfer from the government to the public sector.

  16. 78 FR 40788 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; Chicago Stock Exchange, Inc.; Notice of Filing and Immediate...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-08

    ... eliminate references in Sections E.1 and E.8 to ``Derivative Securities Products'' (``DSPs'') and ``Non-Derivative Securities Products'' (``Non-DSPs'') and to eliminate references in Section E.1 to ``Regular... SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION [Release No. 34-69903; File No. SR-CHX-2013-12] Self-Regulatory...

  17. 76 FR 61438 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; International Securities Exchange, LLC; Notice of Proposed Rule...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-04

    ... clarify that 2102(e) applies to trading halts in new derivative securities, so as to not be confused with... derivative securities products when a temporary interruption occurs in the calculation or wide dissemination... SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION [Release No. 34-65425; File No. SR-ISE-2011-61] Self-Regulatory...

  18. 78 FR 11258 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; Chicago Stock Exchange, Inc.; Notice of Filing and Immediate...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-15

    ....0022/share in all Derivative Securities Products priced $1.00/share or more executed in the Regular....0022/share in all Derivative Securities Products priced $1.00/share or more executed in the Regular... SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION [Release No. 34-68894; File No. SR-CHX-2013-06] Self-Regulatory...

  19. 78 FR 78424 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; Chicago Stock Exchange, Inc.; Notice of Filing and Immediate...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-26

    ... Tapes, eliminated the distinction between Derivative Securities Products and Non-Derivative Securities... SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION [Release No. 34-71137; File No. SR-CHX-2013-22] Self-Regulatory...) \\1\\ of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 (``Act'') \\2\\ and Rule 19b-4 thereunder,\\3\\ notice is...

  20. 77 FR 15417 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; International Securities Exchange, LLC; Notice of Filing of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-15

    ... SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION [Release No. 34-66566; File No. SR-ISE-2012-21] Self-Regulatory Organizations; International Securities Exchange, LLC; Notice of Filing of Proposed Rule Change Relating to a... Ownership Interest in ISE Holdings, Inc. to a Newly Formed Swiss Corporation, Eurex Global Derivatives AG...

  1. 75 FR 47049 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; National Stock Exchange, Inc.; Notice of Filing and Immediate...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-04

    ... Derivative Security products under NSX Rule 15.9. Proposed Rule 11.1(c) provides for the benefit of ETP... SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION [Release No. 34-62601; File No. SR-NSX-2010-09] Self-Regulatory... Hours July 29, 2010. Pursuant to Section 19(b)(1) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 (the ``Act...

  2. 78 FR 44994 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; Chicago Board Options Exchange, Incorporated; Notice of Filing and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-25

    ... improperly shared (except with persons in senior management who are involved in exercising general managerial... senior management who are involved in exercising general managerial oversight of one or both entities... ultimately benefits market participants and does not impose a burden on competition. C. Self-Regulatory...

  3. Teacher Self-Regulatory Climate: Conceptualizing an Indicator of Leader Support for Teacher Learning and Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, Timothy G.; Ware, Jordan K.

    2018-01-01

    Few studies that examine organizational conditions conducive to teacher learning utilize social-psychological theory to explain how leader actions specifically support teachers' psychological needs as learners. We apply self-determination theory to the conceptualization of a new construct, Teacher Self-Regulatory Climate (TSRC), defined as a set…

  4. 76 FR 77878 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; Chicago Board Options Exchange, Incorporated; Notice of Proposed...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-14

    ... SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION [Release No. 34-65914; File No. SR-CBOE-2011-114] Self-Regulatory Organizations; Chicago Board Options Exchange, Incorporated; Notice of Proposed Rule Change Related to Complex Order Processing in Hybrid 3.0 Classes December 8, 2011. Pursuant to Section 19(b)(1) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 (the ``Act...

  5. 77 FR 4844 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; Chicago Board Options Exchange, Incorporated; Order Approving a...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-31

    ... SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION [Release No. 34-66235; File No. SR-CBOE-2011-114] Self-Regulatory Organizations; Chicago Board Options Exchange, Incorporated; Order Approving a Proposed Rule Change Relating to Complex Order Processing in Hybrid 3.0 Classes January 25, 2012. I. Introduction On November 29, 2011, the Chicago Board Options...

  6. 78 FR 63263 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; The Options Clearing Corporation; Order Approving Proposed Rule...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-23

    ... internet service providers.\\5\\ \\5\\ Securities Exchange Act Release No. 53980 (June 14, 2006), 71 FR 36155... other things, promote the prompt and accurate clearance and settlement of securities transactions. \\8... SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION [Release No. 34-70704; File No. SR-OCC-2013-10] Self-Regulatory...

  7. 76 FR 12782 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; The Fixed Income Clearing Corporation; Notice of Filing and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-08

    ... Rule would allow them to comply with Basel Accord Standards relating to netting. Specifically, firms... change will have any impact or impose any burden on competition. (C) Self-Regulatory Organization's... Commission of any written comments received by FICC. III. Date of Effectiveness of the Proposed Rule Change...

  8. 78 FR 34421 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; Chicago Board Options Exchange, Incorporated; Notice of Filing and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-07

    .... 78s(b)(1). \\2\\ 17 CFR 240.19b-4. I. Self-Regulatory Organization's Statement of the Terms of Substance... of 15,000 customer open-outcry contracts per day (``CPD'') over the course of a calendar month in... Permit Holders and TPH organizations.\\4\\ As such, the Exchange believed that it was implied that the...

  9. 78 FR 8657 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; EDGA Exchange, Inc.; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-06

    ... (February 22, 2012) (SR-EDGA-2012- 05) (adopting EdgeBook Cloud service); see also, Securities Exchange Act...Book Cloud service). C. Self-Regulatory Organization's Statement on Comments on the Proposed Rule... its intent to file the proposed rule change at least five business days prior to the date of filing of...

  10. 78 FR 8650 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; EDGX Exchange, Inc.; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-06

    ... (February 15, 2012), 77 FR 10593 (February 22, 2012) (SR-EDGA-2012- 05) (adopting EdgeBook Cloud service..., 2012) (SR-EDGX-2012-05) (adopting EdgeBook Cloud service). C. Self-Regulatory Organization's Statement... written notice of its intent to file the proposed rule change at least five business days prior to the...

  11. 76 FR 77883 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; NASDAQ Stock Market LLC; Notice of Filing and Immediate...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-14

    ... funding of an SRO's regulatory operations in the Concept Release Concerning Self-Regulation \\18\\ and the release on the Fair Administration and Governance of Self- Regulatory Organizations.\\19\\ In the Concept... SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION [Release No. 34-65913; File No. SR-NASDAQ-2011-163] Self...

  12. 77 FR 18288 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; Chicago Mercantile Exchange Inc.; Notice of Filing and Order...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-27

    ... amendments to rules dealing with outsourcing to third parties. CME will also make corresponding changes to....3--Outsourcing to Third Parties In connection with the CFTC's final rules for Derivatives Clearing... any impact or impose any burden on competition. C. Self-Regulatory Organization's Statement on...

  13. 75 FR 76509 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness of Proposed Rule...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-08

    ... system (``PSX''). The text of the proposed rule change is available on the Exchange's Web site at http... the price changes upon the net fees paid by a particular market participant will depend upon a number... sizes through pricing or by operating as ``dark pools.'' C. Self-Regulatory Organization's Statement on...

  14. 77 FR 27822 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; Chicago Board Options Exchange, Incorporated; Notice of Proposed...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-11

    ... shall report to the Exchange, the name, address, and social security or tax identification number of any... SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION [Release No. 34-66934; File No. SR-CBOE-2012-040] Self-Regulatory Organizations; Chicago Board Options Exchange, Incorporated; Notice of Proposed Rule Change...

  15. 78 FR 65023 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; Chicago Board Options Exchange, Incorporated; Notice of Filing and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-30

    ... the Exchange, the name, address, and social security or tax identification number of any customer who... SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION [Release No. 34-70752; File No. SR-CBOE-2013-099] Self-Regulatory Organizations; Chicago Board Options Exchange, Incorporated; Notice of Filing and Immediate...

  16. 75 FR 44828 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; National Securities Clearing Corporation; Notice of Filing of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-29

    ... the SBP process to mitigate risks that the SBP poses to NSCC. \\6\\ 15 U.S.C. 78q-1. B. Self-Regulatory...-Regulatory Organizations; National Securities Clearing Corporation; Notice of Filing of Proposed Rule Change To Amend Addendum C of Its Rules and Procedures To Implement Risk Enhancements to Its Stock Borrow...

  17. 78 FR 73577 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; BATS Exchange, Inc.; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-06

    ...-Regulatory Organizations; BATS Exchange, Inc.; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness of a Proposed Rule Change To Modify the Risk Monitoring Functionality Offered by the Exchange December 2, 2013....19b-4(f)(6)(iii). I. Self-Regulatory Organization's Statement of the Terms of Substance of the...

  18. 75 FR 53998 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; Financial Industry Regulatory Authority, Inc.; Notice of Filing...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-02

    ... characteristics and risks of security futures. \\6\\ 15 U.S.C. 78o-3(b)(6). B. Self-Regulatory Organization's...-Regulatory Organizations; Financial Industry Regulatory Authority, Inc.; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness of Proposed Rule Change To Amend the Security Futures Risk Disclosure Statement August 27, 2010...

  19. 77 FR 74043 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; The Options Clearing Corporation; Order Granting Approval of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-12

    ... SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION [Release No. 34-68368; File No. SR-ODD-2012-02] Self-Regulatory... to the Options Disclosure Document Reflecting Certain Changes to Disclosure Regarding Adjustments for... (``November 2012 Supplement'') to amend the options disclosure document (``ODD'') to reflect certain changes...

  20. 76 FR 3684 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; The Options Clearing Corporation; Order Granting Approval of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-20

    ... SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION [Release No. 34-63711; File No. SR-ODD-2011-01] Self-Regulatory... to the Options Disclosure Document Reflecting Certain Changes to Disclosure Regarding Credit Default Options in, and Making Certain Technical Amendments to, the June 2007 Supplement to the Options Disclosure...

  1. 77 FR 3828 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; The Options Clearing Corporation; Order Granting Approval of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-25

    ... SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION [Release No. 34-66193; File No. SR-ODD-2012-01] Self-Regulatory... to the Options Disclosure Document Reflecting Certain Changes to Disclosure Regarding Relative... disclosure document (``ODD'') to reflect certain changes to disclosure regarding relative performance options...

  2. 75 FR 68390 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; The Options Clearing Corporation; Notice of Filing and Immediate...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-05

    .... currency. NYSE Liffe US, LLC (``NYL'') is proposing to introduce for trading futures contracts on certain... established on the prior business day. However, because of time zone differences and the planned use of... of European banks and time zone differences. \\3\\ 15 U.S.C. 78q-1. (B) Self-Regulatory Organization's...

  3. 78 FR 77512 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; Chicago Mercantile Exchange Inc.; Notice of Filing and Immediate...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-23

    ... transactions, to assure the safeguarding of securities and funds which are in the custody or control of the... securities clearing operations of CME or any rights or obligations of CME with respect to securities clearing... SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION [Release No. 34-71088; File No. SR-CME-2013-32] Self-Regulatory...

  4. 77 FR 38350 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; Chicago Mercantile Exchange Inc.; Notice of Filing and Order...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-27

    ... Act because it helps to assure the safeguarding of securities and funds which are in its custody or... designated clearing organization; and (iii) the activity relating to the non-security clearing operations of... SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION [Release No. 34-67232; File No. SR-CME-2012-24] Self-Regulatory...

  5. 78 FR 42579 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; Chicago Mercantile Exchange Inc.; Notice of Filing and Immediate...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-16

    ..., contracts and transactions, and to assure the safeguarding of securities and funds which are in the custody... affect the security-based swap clearing operations of CME or any related rights or obligations of CME... SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION [Release No. 34-69957; File No. SR-CME-2013-10] Self-Regulatory...

  6. 78 FR 42572 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; Chicago Mercantile Exchange Inc.; Notice of Filing and Immediate...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-16

    ... securities and funds which are in the custody or control of the clearing agency and, in general, help to...-based swap clearing operations of CME or any related rights or obligations of CME security-based swap... SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION [Release No. 34-69956; File No. SR-CME-2013-09] Self-Regulatory...

  7. 78 FR 67207 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; Chicago Mercantile Exchange Inc.; Notice of Filing and Immediate...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-08

    ..., contracts, and transactions, to assure the safeguarding of securities and funds which are in the custody or... mixed swaps; and (b) does not significantly affect any securities clearing operations of CME or any... SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION [Release No. 34-70801; File No. SR-CME-2013-25] Self-Regulatory...

  8. 78 FR 62787 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; Chicago Mercantile Exchange Inc.; Notice of Filing and Immediate...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-22

    ... changes contribute to the safeguarding of securities and funds in CME's custody or control or for which... securities clearing operations of CME or any rights or obligations of CME with respect to securities clearing... SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION [Release No. 34-70605; File No. SR-CME-2013-21] Self-Regulatory...

  9. 78 FR 53490 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; Chicago Mercantile Exchange Inc.; Notice of Filing and Immediate...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-29

    ... safeguarding of securities and funds which are in the custody or control of the clearing agency or for which it... operations of CME or any rights or obligations of CME with respect to securities clearing or persons using... SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION [Release No. 34-70247; File No. SR-CME-2013-16] Self-Regulatory...

  10. 75 FR 75529 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; Financial Industry Regulatory Authority, Inc.; Notice of Filing...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-03

    ... advance notice of the new Verification of Assets rule. \\8\\ 15 U.S.C. 78o-3(b)(6). B. Self-Regulatory... SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION [Release No. 34-63383; File No. SR-FINRA-2010-062] Self... in SR-FINRA-2010-042 (Verification of Assets) November 29, 2010. Pursuant to Section 19(b)(1) of the...

  11. 77 FR 62277 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; Chicago Board Options Exchange, Incorporated; Notice of Filing and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-12

    ... principal office of the Exchange, and at the Commission's Public Reference Room. II. Self-Regulatory... proprietary positions. For example, an LMM may have an incentive to lean their fair value determination in a... filing also will be available for inspection and copying at the principal office of the Exchange. All...

  12. 76 FR 7610 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; Chicago Board Options Exchange, Incorporated; Notice of Filing of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-10

    ... Executive Committee may need to make the decision. The CBOE Board is fully informed of any decision made by.... This approach simplifies the process of scheduling and conducting meetings and allows the Boards and... finding or (ii) as to which the self-regulatory organization consents, the Commission will: (A) By order...

  13. 76 FR 2737 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; National Securities Clearing Corporation; Order Approving Proposed...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-14

    ... SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION [Release No. 34-63668; File No. SR-NSCC-2010-09] Self-Regulatory Organizations; National Securities Clearing Corporation; Order Approving Proposed Rule Change... Facility January 6, 2011. I. Introduction On August 30, 2010, the National Securities Clearing Corporation...

  14. 77 FR 15432 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; The Options Clearing Corporation; Order Approving Proposed Rule...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-15

    ... corporate governance structure of OCC by: (i) Increasing the number of public directors on OCC's Board of... directs the Commission to approve a proposed rule change of a self-regulatory organization if it finds... Directors, OCC stated that the changes would enhance the corporate governance structure at OCC. As such, the...

  15. 76 FR 20752 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; International Securities Exchange, LLC; Notice of Filing and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-13

    ...). \\2\\ 17 CFR 240.19b-4. I. Self-Regulatory Organization's Statement of the Terms of Substance of the... whole number, resulting in an implied number of users based on quotes. Market makers are invoiced on a... number of implied users based on quotes. \\5\\ See Exchange Act Release No. 56721 (October 30, 2007), 72 FR...

  16. 76 FR 77881 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; International Securities Exchange, LLC; Notice of Filing and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-14

    ...). \\2\\ 17 CFR 240.19b-4. I. Self-Regulatory Organization's Statement of the Terms of Substance of the... million and rounded up to the nearest whole number, resulting in an implied number of users based on... that logged into the system, or (b) the number of implied users based on quotes. \\5\\ See Exchange Act...

  17. 76 FR 41839 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; Chicago Board Options Exchange, Incorporated; Notice of Filing and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-15

    ... existing PAR Official Fee structure that imposes a flat per contract fee does not provide an incentive for...-Regulatory Organizations; Chicago Board Options Exchange, Incorporated; Notice of Filing and Immediate... interested persons. \\1\\ 15 U.S.C. 78s(b)(1). \\2\\ 17 CFR 240.19b-4. I. Self-Regulatory Organization's...

  18. 76 FR 20793 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; Chicago Board Options Exchange, Incorporated; Notice of Filing and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-13

    ... structure that imposes a flat per contract fee does not provide an incentive for firms to adequately staff...-Regulatory Organizations; Chicago Board Options Exchange, Incorporated; Notice of Filing and Immediate.... \\1\\ 15 U.S.C. 78s(b)(1). \\2\\ 17 CFR 240.19b-4. I. Self-Regulatory Organization's Statement of the...

  19. 75 FR 68013 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; The Depository Trust Company; Notice of Filing and Immediate...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-04

    ... system developed by IBM in the early 1980s to move large amounts of data through the Internet. \\7\\ Some... Change To Implement a Disincentive Fee Associated With the Deposit Automation Management System October... certain deposits made through DTC's Deposit Automation Management (``DAM'') system. II. Self-Regulatory...

  20. 75 FR 28085 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; The Options Clearing Corporation; Notice of Filing of Proposed...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-19

    ... Options on the CBOE Gold ETF Volatility Index May 13, 2010. Pursuant to Section 19(b)(1) of the Securities... any option contracts on the CBOE Gold ETF Volatility Index. II. Self-Regulatory Organization's... rule change is to make clear that options on the CBOE Gold ETF Volatility Index, which is an index that...

  1. 76 FR 22939 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; CBOE Futures Exchange, LLC; Notice of Filing and Immediate...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-25

    ... SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION [Release No. 34-64153; File No. SR-CFE-2011-002] Self-Regulatory Organizations; CBOE Futures Exchange, LLC; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness of a Proposed Rule Change Relating to Listing and Trading CBOE Gold ETF Volatility Index Security Futures...

  2. 76 FR 20779 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; The Options Clearing Corporation; Notice of Filing and Immediate...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-13

    ... Change To Provide Legal Certainty for the Trading of Futures on the CBOE Gold ETF Volatility Index April... CBOE Gold ETF Volatility Index (``GVZ Index''). II. Self-Regulatory Organization's Statement of the..., LLC (``CFE'') as an up-to-the-minute market estimate of the expected volatility of SPDR Gold Shares...

  3. 77 FR 41864 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; EDGX Exchange, Inc.; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-16

    ... its filing with the Commission, the self-regulatory organization included statements concerning the... Members to route through EDGX first before going to other destinations on the System routing table, and... share in cost savings realized by EDGA when routing orders to other destinations). The concept is also...

  4. 77 FR 8938 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; Financial Industry Regulatory Authority, Inc.; Notice of Filing of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-15

    ... expenses as ``other'' (miscellaneous), a very general categorization that provides FINRA limited visibility... supplemental filing would play with respect to a broker-dealer's annual audit.\\28\\ \\26\\ CAI. \\27\\ Id. \\28\\ Id... any future schedules or reports be done through the more typical self- regulatory organization (``SRO...

  5. 78 FR 18382 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; The Options Clearing Corporation; Notice of Filing of Proposed...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-26

    ... Stock Loan/Hedge Program in a manner that protects the clearing system against risk through the same or... the By- Laws To Facilitate the Use of the Stock Loan/Hedge Program by Canadian Clearing Members March... the Stock Loan/Hedge Program by Canadian Clearing Members. II. Self-Regulatory Organization's...

  6. 77 FR 71848 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; The Options Clearing Corporation; Notice of Filing and Immediate...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-04

    ... reject requests to withdraw margin, minimize OCC's liquidity risk, and preserve its liquidity resources... Available Liquidity Resources November 28, 2012. Pursuant to Section 19(b)(1) of the Securities Exchange Act... available liquidity resources. II. Self-Regulatory Organization's Statement of Purpose of, and Statutory...

  7. 76 FR 21084 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; Financial Industry Regulatory Authority, Inc.; Notice of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-14

    ... Securities April 8, 2011. I. Introduction On March 3, 2011, the Financial Industry Regulatory Authority, Inc... SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION [Release No. 34-64283; File No. SR-FINRA-2011-012] Self-Regulatory Organizations; Financial Industry Regulatory Authority, Inc.; Notice of Designation of a Longer...

  8. 75 FR 33871 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; Fixed Income Clearing Corporation; Notice of Filing and Immediate...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-15

    ...-Regulatory Organizations; Fixed Income Clearing Corporation; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness of... is hereby given that on May 28, 2010, the Fixed Income Clearing Corporation (``FICC'') filed with the... Division's (``GSD'') rules pertaining to the Required Fund Deposit Deadline. II. Self-Regulatory...

  9. 78 FR 51242 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; Topaz Exchange, LLC; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-20

    ... themselves as participants on another. It is virtually impossible for any exchange to identify, and thus... SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION [Release No. 34-70200; File No. SR-Topaz-2013-01] Self-Regulatory Organizations; Topaz Exchange, LLC; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness of Proposed Rule...

  10. 78 FR 6155 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; Miami International Securities Exchange LLC; Notice of Filing and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-29

    ... virtually impossible for any exchange to identify, and thus assess fees such as an ORF on, each executing... SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION [Release No. 34-68711; File No. SR-MIAX-2013-01] Self-Regulatory Organizations; Miami International Securities Exchange LLC; Notice of Filing and Immediate...

  11. Application of the Self-Regulatory Model in Dealing with Encopresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimes, Lynn

    1983-01-01

    Behavioral techniques along with a self-regulation methodology were used successfully to decrease encopretic behaviors in a 9-year-old male. Kanfer's self-regulatory model appears to be generalizable to any child with the cognitive ability to understand that he or she has a problem and to make decisions about treatment. (Author/PN)

  12. 75 FR 32529 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness of Proposed Rule...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-08

    ... the requirements of Exchange Act Rule 15c3-1. The Exchange has conducted an analysis of financial.... 78a. \\3\\ 17 CFR 240.19b-4. I. Self-Regulatory Organization's Statement of the Terms of Substance of the Proposed Rule Change The Exchange proposes to amend Rule 6.82 by revising the minimum financial...

  13. 78 FR 62901 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; International Securities Exchange, LLC; Notice of Filing and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-22

    ... per contract from its prior rate of $0.05 per contract. See Securities Exchange Act Release No. 69768... similar products.\\13\\ \\13\\ At least one other exchange currently trades foreign currency options. While... SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION [Release No. 34-70647; File No. SR-ISE-2013-50] Self-Regulatory...

  14. 75 FR 41908 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; Fixed Income Clearing Corporation; Notice of Filing of Proposed...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-19

    ... by a U.S. regulator and/or state regulator so that an insolvency of such a member would be determined... domestic insolvency regime. \\6\\ 15 U.S.C. 78q-1. B. Self-Regulatory Organization's Statement on Burden on...

  15. 78 FR 28267 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; The Options Clearing Corporation; Order Approving Proposed Rule...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-14

    ... Trust Company (``DTC'') and maintain accounts to facilitate Delivery Orders (``DOs'') to approved... Commission to approve a proposed rule change of a self-regulatory organization if it finds that such proposed... securities transactions and foster cooperation and coordination with persons engaged in the clearance and...

  16. The Transitory Phase to the Attainment of Self-Regulatory Skill in Mathematical Problem Solving

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazakidou, G.; Paraskeva, F.; Retalis, S.

    2007-01-01

    Three phases of development of self-regulatory skill in the domain of mathematical problem solving were designed to examine students' behaviour and the effects on their problem solving ability. Forty-eight Grade 4 students (10 year olds) participated in this pilot study. The students were randomly assigned to one of three groups, each representing…

  17. 78 FR 70382 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; International Securities Exchange, LLC; Notice of Filing and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-25

    ..., with respect to index options, restrictions on exercise may be in effect until the opening of business... security of an option contract that is scheduled to be released just after the close on the business day... SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION [Release No. 34-70900; File No. SR-ISE-2013-58] Self-Regulatory...

  18. 75 FR 2915 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; International Securities Exchange, LLC; Order Approving a Proposed...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-19

    ... SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION [Release No. 34-61317; File No. SR-ISE-2009-103] Self-Regulatory Organizations; International Securities Exchange, LLC; Order Approving a Proposed Rule Change Relating to Market Data Fees January 8, 2010. I. Introduction On November 25, 2009, the International...

  19. Academic performance and self-regulatory skills in elite youth soccer players

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jonker, Laura; Elferink-Gemser, Marije T.; Toering, Tynke T.; Lyons, James; Visscher, Chris

    2010-01-01

    Although elite athletes have been reported to be high academic achievers, many elite soccer players struggle with a stereotype of being low academic achievers. The purpose of this study was to compare the academic level (pre-university or pre-vocational) and self-regulatory skills (planning,

  20. 75 FR 1437 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; Chicago Board Options Exchange, Incorporated; Order Approving a...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-11

    ... SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION [Release No. 34-61274; File No. SR-CBOE-2009-089] Self-Regulatory Organizations; Chicago Board Options Exchange, Incorporated; Order Approving a Proposed Rule... announce to members via Regulatory Circular any determination regarding the routing of market stock-option...

  1. 78 FR 25128 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; Fixed Income Clearing Corporation; Notice of Filing of Amended...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-29

    ... SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION [Release No. 34-69362A; File No. 600-23] Self-Regulatory Organizations; Fixed Income Clearing Corporation; Notice of Filing of Amended Application for Registration as a Clearing Agency; Correction AGENCY: Securities and Exchange Commission. ACTION: Notice; correction. SUMMARY...

  2. 76 FR 64980 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; International Securities Exchange, LLC; Order Approving a Proposed...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-19

    ... SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION [Release No. 34-65548; File No. SR-ISE-2011-39] Self-Regulatory Organizations; International Securities Exchange, LLC; Order Approving a Proposed Rule Change Relating to Complex Orders October 13, 2011. I. Introduction On July 1, 2011, the International Securities Exchange...

  3. 77 FR 4852 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; International Securities Exchange, LLC; Order Approving a Proposed...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-31

    ... SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION [Release No. 34-66234; File No. SR-ISE-2011-82] Self-Regulatory Organizations; International Securities Exchange, LLC; Order Approving a Proposed Rule Change Relating to Legging Orders January 25, 2012. I. Introduction On November 29, 2011, the International Securities...

  4. 76 FR 78059 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; Options Clearing Corporation; Order Approving Proposed Rule Change...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-15

    ... SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION [Release No. 34-65927; File No. SR-OCC-2011-15] Self-Regulatory Organizations; Options Clearing Corporation; Order Approving Proposed Rule Change Relating to Management of..., future regulatory requirements for clearinghouses could impose liquidity requirements that would be...

  5. Self-Regulatory Teaching in Mathematics: Relations to Teachers' Motivation, Affect and Professional Commitment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatzistamatiou, Mariza; Dermitzaki, Irini; Bagiatis, Vasilios

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the relationships between teachers' reports on self-regulatory strategy use in mathematics instruction and individual motivational and affective factors. Two hundred and ninety-two Greek primary school teachers responded to two questionnaires assessing (a) the strategies they use themselves to plan, monitor…

  6. The Effect of Blog Use on Self-Regulatory Learning of Prospective German Language Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seyhan Yucel, Mukadder

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to examine the effect of blog use on self-regulatory learning of prospective German language teachers. The study is semi-experimental. Pretest-posttest, experiment control model was used. Blog activities were conducted as extensive beyond classroom activities only for the experiment group. As the data collection tool…

  7. Motivational and Affective Determinants of Self-Regulatory Strategy Use in Elementary School Mathematics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatzistamatiou, Mariza; Dermitzaki, Irini; Efklides, Anastasia; Leondari, Angeliki

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the relationships between elementary students' reported use of self-regulatory strategies in mathematics and their motivational and affective determinants. Participants of the study were 344 fifth- and sixth-grade Greek students. Students were asked to complete self-reported measures regarding the strategies…

  8. Self-Regulatory Training for Helping Students with Special Needs to Learn Mathematics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Yanrong

    2010-01-01

    Previous research suggests that self-regulation interventions are effective in improving students' self-regulatory skill and school performance in a wide variety of educational domains. Inspired by social cognitive theory (Schunk & Zimmerman, 1997) and goal setting theory (Locke & Latham, 1990), I designed, implemented, and examined the beneficial…

  9. 77 FR 40928 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; C2 Options Exchange, Incorporated; Order Granting Approval of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-11

    ... SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION [Release No. 34-67357; File No. SR-C2-2012-011] Self-Regulatory Organizations; C2 Options Exchange, Incorporated; Order Granting Approval of Proposed Rule Change To Implement a... and subsequently migrates to the DRF, the regulatory data for the portion of the day that the main...

  10. Self-Regulatory Processes Mediate the Intention-Behavior Relation for Adherence and Exercise Behaviors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruin, de M.; Sheeran, P.; Kok, G.; Hiemstra, A.; Prins, J.M.; Hospers, H.J.; Breukelen, G.J.P.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: Understanding the gap between people's intentions and actual health behavior is an important issue in health psychology. Our aim in this study was to investigate whether self-regulatory processes (monitoring goal progress and responding to discrepancies) mediate the intention-behavior

  11. Self-Regulatory Strategies in Daily Life: Selection, Optimization, and Compensation and Everyday Memory Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Stephanie A.; Rickenbach, Elizabeth H.; Lachman, Margie E.

    2016-01-01

    The effective use of self-regulatory strategies, such as selection, optimization, and compensation (SOC) requires resources. However, it is theorized that SOC use is most advantageous for those experiencing losses and diminishing resources. The present study explored this seeming paradox within the context of limitations or constraints due to…

  12. Self-Regulatory Skill Among Children with and without Developmental Coordination Disorder: An Exploratory Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sangster Jokić, Claire A; Whitebread, David

    2016-11-01

    Children with developmental coordination disorder (DCD) experience difficulty learning and performing everyday motor tasks due to poor motor coordination. Recent research applying a cognitive learning paradigm has argued that children with DCD have less effective cognitive and metacognitive skills with which to effectively acquire motor skills. However, there is currently limited research examining individual differences in children's use of self-regulatory and metacognitive skill during motor learning. This exploratory study aimed to compare the self-regulatory performance of children with and without DCD. Using a mixed methods approach, this study observed and compared the self-regulatory behavior of 15 children with and without DCD, aged between 7 and 9 years, during socially mediated motor practice. Observation was conducted using a quantitative coding scheme and qualitative analysis of video-recorded sessions. This paper will focus on the results of quantitative analysis, while data arising from the qualitative analysis will be used to support quantitative findings. In general, findings indicate that children with DCD exhibit less independent and more ineffective self-regulatory skill during motor learning than their typically developing peers. In addition, children with DCD rely more heavily on external support for effective regulation and are more likely to exhibit negative patterns of motivational regulation. These findings provide further support for the notion that children with DCD experience difficulty effectively self-regulating motor learning. Implications for practice and directions for future research are discussed.

  13. 77 FR 4605 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; EDGA Exchange, Inc.; Order Granting Approval of Proposed Rule...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-30

    ... SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION [Release No. 34-66231; File No. SR-EDGA-2011-40] Self-Regulatory Organizations; EDGA Exchange, Inc.; Order Granting Approval of Proposed Rule Change Amending EDGA Rule 11.9 January 24, 2012. On December 2, 2011, EDGA Exchange, Inc. (``Exchange'' or ``EDGA'') filed...

  14. 75 FR 30095 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; NYSE Arca, Inc.; Order Approving Proposed Rule Amending Its...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-28

    ... SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION [Release No. 34-62157; File No. SR-NYSEArca-2010-28] Self-Regulatory Organizations; NYSE Arca, Inc.; Order Approving Proposed Rule Amending Its Schedule of Fees May 24, 2010. On April 12, 2010, NYSE Arca, Inc. (``NYSE Arca'') filed with the Securities and Exchange...

  15. 75 FR 53008 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; NASDAQ OMX PHLX, Inc.; Notice of Filing and Immediate...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-30

    ... SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION [Release No. 34-62759; File No. SR-Phlx-2010-111] Self.... 78s(b)(1). \\2\\ 17 CFR 240.19b-4. I. Self-Regulatory Organization's Statement of the Terms of Substance... that would change all references to the system from ``Phlx XL II'' to ``PHLX XL'' for branding purposes...

  16. 75 FR 73150 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; NASDAQ OMX PHLX, Inc.; Notice of Filing and Immediate...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-29

    ... SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION [Release No. 34-63350; File No. SR-Phlx-2010-156] Self.... 78s(b)(1). \\2\\ 17 CFR 240.19b-4. I. Self-Regulatory Organization's Statement of the Terms of Substance... branding purposes. The current pilot is scheduled to expire November 30, 2010. The text of the proposed...

  17. 75 FR 61799 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness of Proposed Rule...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-06

    ... SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION [Release No. 34-63024; File No. SR-Phlx-2010-134] Self... 240.19b-4. I. Self-Regulatory Organization's Statement of the Terms of Substance of the Proposed Rule... ``Phlx XL II'' to ``PHLX XL'' for branding purposes. \\4\\ The current rules relevant to this proposal are...

  18. 76 FR 76472 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; NASDAQ Stock Market LLC; Notice of Filing and Immediate...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-07

    ... at the Commission's Public Reference Room. II. Self-Regulatory Organization's Statement of the... facility or system which NASDAQ operates or controls. \\7\\ 15 U.S.C. 78f. \\8\\ 15 U.S.C. 78f(b)(4). NASDAQ... Release No. 61358 (January 14, 2010), 75 FR 3594 (January 21, 2010) (Concept Release on Equity Market...

  19. 78 FR 43947 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; New York Stock Exchange LLC; Notice of Filing and Immediate...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-22

    .... I. Self-Regulatory Organization's Statement of the Terms of Substance of the Proposed Rule Change... Basis for, the Proposed Rule Change In its filing with the Commission, the self-regulatory organization... because it will provide member organizations with greater flexibility in managing their personnel...

  20. 75 FR 4431 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; NASDAQ OMX BX, Inc.; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-27

    ... regulatory operations in the Concept Release Concerning Self-Regulation \\22\\ and the release on the Fair Administration and Governance of Self- Regulatory Organizations.\\23\\ In the Concept Release, the Commission... SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION [Release No. 34-61388; File No. SR-BX-2010-001] Self-Regulatory...

  1. 76 FR 53503 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; NASDAQ OMX BX, Inc.; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-26

    ... SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION [Release No. 34-65175; File No. SR-BX-2011-057] Self-Regulatory... Establish and Adopt Fees for the New BX Pre-Trade Risk Management Service August 19, 2011. Pursuant to... 240.19b-4. I. Self-Regulatory Organization's Statement of the Terms of Substance of the Proposed Rule...

  2. 78 FR 71689 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; Topaz Exchange, LLC; Notice of Filing of Proposed Minor Rule...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-29

    ... SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION [Release No. 34-70927; File No. 4-669] Self-Regulatory Organizations; Topaz Exchange, LLC; Notice of Filing of Proposed Minor Rule Violation Plan November 22, 2013... of Rule 19d-1(c)(1) of the Act \\3\\ requiring that a self- regulatory organization (``SRO'') promptly...

  3. 77 FR 67722 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; BOX Options Exchange LLC; Notice of Filing of Proposed Minor Rule...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-13

    ... SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION [Release No. 34-68170; File No. 4-655] Self-Regulatory Organizations; BOX Options Exchange LLC; Notice of Filing of Proposed Minor Rule Violation Plan November 6, 2012... Rule 19d-1(c)(1) of the Act \\3\\ requiring that a self- regulatory organization (``SRO'') promptly file...

  4. The Effect of Self-Regulatory and Metacognitive Strategy Instruction on Impoverished Students' Assessment Achievement in Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fouche, Jaunine

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this nonequivalent control group design study was to evaluate the effectiveness of metacognitive and self-regulatory strategy use on the assessment achievement of 215 9th-grade, residential physics students from low socioeconomic status (low-SES) backgrounds. Students from low-SES backgrounds often lack the self-regulatory habits…

  5. 75 FR 26827 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; Order Approving Minor Rule Violation Plan for EDGA Exchange, Inc.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-12

    ... SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION [Release No. 34-62037; File No. 4-595] Self-Regulatory... Commission adopted amendments to paragraph (c) of Rule 19d-1 to allow self-regulatory organizations (``SROs... would not be subject to the provisions of Rule 19d-1(c)(1) under the Act\\4\\ requiring that a self...

  6. 75 FR 58011 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; BATS Y-Exchange, Inc.; Notice of Filing of Proposed Minor Rule...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-23

    ... SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION [Release No. 34-62924; File No. 10-198] Self-Regulatory... subject to the provisions of Rule 19d-1(c)(1) of the Act \\3\\ requiring that a self-regulatory organization... 240.19d-1(c)(1). \\4\\ The Commission adopted amendments to paragraph (c) of Rule 19d-1 to allow self...

  7. Meta-Analysis of Single-Case Design Research on Self-Regulatory Interventions for Academic Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, Valerie; Albeg, Loren; Tung, Catherine

    2012-01-01

    The current study examined the effects of self-regulatory interventions on reading, writing, and math by conducting a meta-analysis of single-case design research. Self-regulatory interventions have promise as an effective approach that is both minimally invasive and involves minimal resources. Effects of the interventions were analyzed by…

  8. 75 FR 26822 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; Order Approving Minor Rule Violation Plan for EDGX Exchange, Inc.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-12

    ... SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION [Release No. 34-62036; File No. 4-594] Self-Regulatory... Commission adopted amendments to paragraph (c) of Rule 19d-1 to allow self-regulatory organizations (``SROs... would not be subject to the provisions of Rule 19d-1(c)(1) under the Act \\4\\ requiring that a self...

  9. The application of transformational leadership theory to parenting: questionnaire development and implications for adolescent self-regulatory efficacy and life satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morton, Katie L; Barling, Julian; Rhodes, Ryan E; Mâsse, Louise C; Zumbo, Bruno D; Beauchamp, Mark R

    2011-10-01

    We draw upon transformational leadership theory to develop an instrument to measure transformational parenting for use with adolescents. First, potential items were generated that were developmentally appropriate and evidence for content validity was provided through the use of focus groups with parents and adolescents. We subsequently provide evidence for several aspects of construct validity of measures derived from the Transformational Parenting Questionnaire (TPQ). Data were collected from 857 adolescents (M(age) = 14.70 years), who rated the behaviors of their mothers and fathers. The results provided support for a second-order measurement model of transformational parenting. In addition, positive relationships between mothers' and fathers' transformational parenting behaviors, adolescents' self-regulatory efficacy for physical activity and healthy eating, and life satisfaction were found. The results of this research support the application of transformational leadership theory to parenting behaviors, as well as the construct validity of measures derived from the TPQ.

  10. The adoption of physical activity and eating behaviors among persons with obesity and in the general population: the role of implicit attitudes within the Theory of Planned Behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chevance, Guillaume; Caudroit, Johan; Romain, Ahmed J; Boiché, Julie

    2017-03-01

    Obesity can be prevented by the combined adoption of a regular physical activity (PA) and healthy eating behaviors (EB). Researchers mainly focused on socio-cognitive models, such as the Theory of Planned Behavior (TPB), to identify the psychological antecedents of these behaviors. However, few studies were interested in testing the potential contribution of automatic processes in the prediction of PA and EB. Thus, the main objective of this study was to explore the specific role of implicit attitudes in the pattern of prediction of self-reported PA and EB in the TPB framework, among persons with obesity and in adults from the general population. One hundred and fifty-three adults participated to this cross-sectional study among which 59 obese persons (74% women, age: 50.6 ± 12.3 years, BMI: 36.8 ± 4.03 kg m - ²) and 94 people from the general population (51% women; age: 34.7 ± 8.9 years). Implicit attitudes toward PA and EB were estimated through two Implicit Association Tests. TPB variables, PA and EB were assessed by questionnaire. Regarding to the prediction of PA, a significant contribution of implicit attitudes emerged in obese people, β = .25; 95%[CI: .01, .50]; P = .044, beyond the TPB variables, contrary to participants from the general population. The present study suggests that implicit attitudes play a specific role among persons with obesity regarding PA. Other studies are needed to examine which kind of psychological processes are specifically associated with PA and EB among obese people.

  11. Do attitudes, intentions and actions of school food coordinators regarding public organic food procurement policy improve the eating environment at school? Results from the iPOPY study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Chen; Perez-Cueto, Federico J A; Mikkelsen, Bent E

    2014-06-01

    The present study investigates whether public organic food procurement policies have the potential to induce changes in the school food service environment. A comparative cross-national survey was conducted in public primary and/or secondary schools in Finland, Germany and Italy. The school food coordinators completed a web-based questionnaire on their attitudes, intentions and actions towards organic school food provision. In Germany, 122 out of 2050 schools in the state of Hesse responded. In Finland, 250 out of 998 schools across the country responded. In Italy, 215 out of 940 schools from eight provinces responded. School food coordinators in the sample of schools in the three countries. The German and Finnish school food coordinators separately most agreed with the promotion of healthy eating habits (P environment.

  12. Self-regulatory Behaviors and Approaches to Learning of Arts Students: A Comparison Between Professional Training and English Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng, Min-Chen; Chen, Chia-Cheng

    2017-06-01

    This study investigated the self-regulatory behaviors of arts students, namely memory strategy, goal-setting, self-evaluation, seeking assistance, environmental structuring, learning responsibility, and planning and organizing. We also explored approaches to learning, including deep approach (DA) and surface approach (SA), in a comparison between students' professional training and English learning. The participants consisted of 344 arts majors. The Academic Self-Regulation Questionnaire and the Revised Learning Process Questionnaire were adopted to examine students' self-regulatory behaviors and their approaches to learning. The results show that a positive and significant correlation was found in students' self-regulatory behaviors between professional training and English learning. The results indicated that increases in using self-regulatory behaviors in professional training were associated with increases in applying self-regulatory behaviors in learning English. Seeking assistance, self-evaluation, and planning and organizing were significant predictors for learning English. In addition, arts students used the deep approach more often than the surface approach in both their professional training and English learning. A positive correlation was found in DA, whereas a negative correlation was shown in SA between students' self-regulatory behaviors and their approaches to learning. Students with high self-regulation adopted a deep approach, and they applied the surface approach less in professional training and English learning. In addition, a SEM model confirmed that DA had a positive influence; however, SA had a negative influence on self-regulatory behaviors.

  13. Self-Regulatory Imagery and Physical Activity in Middle-Aged and Older Adults: A Social-Cognitive Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosteli, Maria-Christina; Cumming, Jennifer; Williams, Sarah E

    2018-01-01

    Limited research has investigated exercise imagery use in middle-aged and older adults and its relationship with affective and behavioral correlates. The study examined the association between self-regulatory imagery and physical activity (PA) through key social cognitive variables. Middle-aged and older adults (N = 299; M age = 59.73 years, SD = 7.73, range = 50 to 80) completed self-report measures assessing self-regulatory imagery use, self-efficacy, outcome expectations, perceived barriers, self-regulatory behavior, enjoyment, and PA levels. Path analysis supported a model (χ² [14] = 21.76, p = .08, CFI = .99, TLI = .97, SRMR = .03, RMSEA = .04) whereby self-regulatory imagery positively predicted self-efficacy, outcome expectations, and self-regulatory behaviors. Furthermore, self-regulatory imagery indirectly predicted barriers, outcome expectations, self-regulation, enjoyment, and PA. This research highlights self-regulatory imagery as an effective strategy in modifying exercise-related cognitions and behaviors. Incorporating social cognitive constructs into the design of imagery interventions may increase PA engagement.

  14. 17 CFR 240.19d-2 - Applications for stays of disciplinary sanctions or summary suspensions by a self-regulatory...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... disciplinary sanctions or summary suspensions by a self-regulatory organization. 240.19d-2 Section 240.19d-2... summary suspensions by a self-regulatory organization. If any self-regulatory organization imposes any... the appropriate regulatory agency may file with the Commission a written motion for a stay of...

  15. 17 CFR 240.19h-1 - Notice by a self-regulatory organization of proposed admission to or continuance in membership or...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Notice by a self-regulatory... Notice by a self-regulatory organization of proposed admission to or continuance in membership or... statutory disqualification. (1) Any self-regulatory organization proposing, conditionally or unconditionally...

  16. 17 CFR 249.819 - Form 19b-4, for electronic filing with respect to proposed rule changes by all self-regulatory...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... filing with respect to proposed rule changes by all self-regulatory organizations. 249.819 Section 249..., SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934 Forms for Self-Regulatory Organization Rule Changes and Forms for....819 Form 19b-4, for electronic filing with respect to proposed rule changes by all self-regulatory...

  17. 17 CFR 249.822 - Form 19b-7, for electronic filing with respect to proposed rule changes by self-regulatory...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... filing with respect to proposed rule changes by self-regulatory organizations under Section 19(b)(7)(A... proposed rule changes by self-regulatory organizations under Section 19(b)(7)(A) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934. This form shall be used by self-regulatory organizations, as defined in section 3(a)(25...

  18. Supporting the self-regulatory resource: does conscious self-regulation incidentally prime nonconscious support processes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorris, Derek C

    2009-11-01

    Ego-depletion (depletion of self-regulatory strength) can impair conscious efforts at self-regulation. Research into nonconscious self-regulation has demonstrated that preconscious automaticity and implementation intentions can automatically carry out regulatory tasks during times of ego-depletion. However, preconscious automaticity can only emerge during well-practiced tasks while implementation intentions can only support tasks that have been explicitly planned. Thus, when it comes to supporting the conscious self-regulation of nonroutine and unplanned behaviour during times of ego-depletion these processes should be ineffective. However, it is argued here that because the conscious self-regulation of nonroutine and unplanned behaviour can incidentally prime the underlying mental representations those primed representations can be postconsciously re-activated to support that behaviour during times of ego-depletion. Postconscious self-regulation might, therefore, support a type of self-regulatory behaviour that has, thus far, not been associated with any form of support.

  19. Building healthy eating habits in childhood: a study of the attitudes, knowledge and dietary habits of schoolchildren in Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazi Enamul Hoque

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Background Overweight and obesity have increased rapidly in incidence to become a global issue today. Overweight and obesity problems are significantly linked to unhealthy dietary patterns, physical inactivity and misperception of body image. This study aimed to determine whether Malaysian children build healthy eating habits from childhood. Methods A survey on eating habits was conducted among primary school students in standards 4 to 6 in the state of Selangor, Malaysia. The findings of the study were reported in the form of descriptive statistics involving frequencies and percentages. Data from 400 respondents were analyzed. Results Our findings showed that the students understood the definition of healthy food and the types of food that are considered healthy. Although the students knew that food such as deep-fried drumsticks and hamburgers contain a high amount of saturated fat and cholesterol, these foods were still consumed by them. There was also a high consumption of foods that are fried and contain sugar, salt and saturated fat. In choosing food, two major factors contributed to the students’ decisions: cleanliness (65.8% and the preference of their parents (12.3%. Discussion Our findings indicate that by implementing the Integrated School Health Program (ISHP properly, students’ eating habits can be improved by creating a school with a healthy environment.

  20. Building healthy eating habits in childhood: a study of the attitudes, knowledge and dietary habits of schoolchildren in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoque, Kazi Enamul; Kamaluddin, Megat Ahmad; Abdul Razak, Ahmad Zabidi; Abdul Wahid, Afiq Athari

    2016-01-01

    Overweight and obesity have increased rapidly in incidence to become a global issue today. Overweight and obesity problems are significantly linked to unhealthy dietary patterns, physical inactivity and misperception of body image. This study aimed to determine whether Malaysian children build healthy eating habits from childhood. A survey on eating habits was conducted among primary school students in standards 4 to 6 in the state of Selangor, Malaysia. The findings of the study were reported in the form of descriptive statistics involving frequencies and percentages. Data from 400 respondents were analyzed. Our findings showed that the students understood the definition of healthy food and the types of food that are considered healthy. Although the students knew that food such as deep-fried drumsticks and hamburgers contain a high amount of saturated fat and cholesterol, these foods were still consumed by them. There was also a high consumption of foods that are fried and contain sugar, salt and saturated fat. In choosing food, two major factors contributed to the students' decisions: cleanliness (65.8%) and the preference of their parents (12.3%). Our findings indicate that by implementing the Integrated School Health Program (ISHP) properly, students' eating habits can be improved by creating a school with a healthy environment.

  1. A balance of activity in brain control and reward systems predicts self-regulatory outcomes

    OpenAIRE

    Lopez, Richard B.; Chen, Pin-Hao A.; Huckins, Jeremy F.; Hofmann, Wilhelm; Kelley, William M.; Heatherton, Todd F.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Previous neuroimaging work has shown that increased reward-related activity following exposure to food cues is predictive of self-control failure. The balance model suggests that self-regulation failures result from an imbalance in reward and executive control mechanisms. However, an open question is whether the relative balance of activity in brain systems associated with executive control (vs reward) supports self-regulatory outcomes when people encounter tempting cues in daily lif...

  2. 75 FR 48731 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; Financial Industry Regulatory Authority, Inc.; Notice of Filing of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-11

    ... SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION [Release No. 34-62655; File No. SR-FINRA-2010-042] Self... Change To Adopt FINRA Rule 4160 (Verification of Assets) August 5, 2010. Pursuant to Section 19(b)(1) of... rule change from interested persons. \\1\\ 15 U.S.C. 78s(b)(1). \\2\\ 17 CFR 240.19b-4. I. Self-Regulatory...

  3. 78 FR 12803 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; BATS Exchange, Inc.; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-25

    ... certainty with respect to execution fees at groups of away options exchanges. Under its flat fee structure...-Regulatory Organizations; BATS Exchange, Inc.; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness of Proposed Rule... 240.19b-4. \\3\\ 15 U.S.C. 78s(b)(3)(A)(ii). \\4\\ 17 CFR 240.19b-4(f)(2). I. Self-Regulatory Organization...

  4. Exploring associations between self-regulatory mechanisms and neuropsychological functioning and driver behaviour after brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rike, Per-Ola; Johansen, Hans J; Ulleberg, Pål; Lundqvist, Anna; Schanke, Anne-Kristine

    2018-04-01

    The objective of this prospective one-year follow-up study was to explore the associations between self-regulatory mechanisms and neuropsychological tests as well as baseline and follow-up ratings of driver behaviour. The participants were a cohort of subjects with stroke and traumatic brain injury (TBI) who were found fit to drive after a multi-disciplinary driver assessment (baseline). Baseline measures included neuropsychological tests and ratings of self-regulatory mechanisms, i.e., executive functions (Behavior Rating Inventory of Executive Function-Adult Version; BRIEF-A) and impulsive personality traits (UPPS Impulsive Behavior Scale). The participants rated pre-injury driving behaviour on the Driver Behaviour Qestionnaire (DBQ) retrospectively at baseline and after one year of post-injury driving (follow-up). Better performance on neuropsychological tests was significantly associated with more post-injury DBQ Violations. The BRIEF-A main indexes were significantly associated with baseline and follow-up ratings of DBQ Mistakes and follow-up DBQ Inattention. UPPS (lack of) Perseverance was significantly associated with baseline DBQ Inattention, whereas UPPS Urgency was significantly associated with baseline DBQ Inexperience and post-injury DBQ Mistakes. There were no significant changes in DBQ ratings from baseline (pre-injury) to follow-up (post-injury). It was concluded that neuropsychological functioning and self-regulatory mechanisms are related to driver behaviour. Some aspects of driver behaviour do not necessarily change after brain injury, reflecting the influence of premorbid driving behaviour or impaired awareness of deficits on post-injury driving behaviour. Further evidence is required to predict the role of self-regulatory mechanisms on driver behaviour and crashes or near misses.

  5. Childhood cumulative risk and obesity: the mediating role of self-regulatory ability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Gary W; Fuller-Rowell, Thomas E; Doan, Stacey N

    2012-01-01

    We tested whether early childhood risk exposures are related to weight gain in adolescence and evaluate an underlying mechanism, self-regulatory behavior, for the risk-obesity link. Cumulative risk exposure to 9 sociodemographic (eg, poverty), physical (eg, substandard housing), and psychosocial (eg, family turmoil) stressors was assessed in 244 nine-year-old children. BMI was calculated at age 9 and then 4 years later. At age 9, children's ability to delay gratification as an index of self-regulatory behavior was assessed. Path analyses were then estimated to evaluate our mediational model (Cumulative risk → Self-regulation → BMI) over a 4-year period in a prospective, longitudinal design. Nine-year-old children exposed to a greater accumulation of multiple risk factors show larger gains in adiposity over the next four year period, net of their initial BMI. These gains in BMI during early adolescence are largely accounted for by deteriorated self-regulatory abilities among children facing more cumulative risks. Early childhood risk exposure leads to larger gains in BMI in adolescence. Given the importance of childhood adiposity to the development of obesity later in life, understanding the underlying mechanisms that link early experience to weight gain is an essential task. Deficiencies in self-regulation in response to chronic stress appears to be an important agent in the obesity epidemic.

  6. The Neural Correlates of Self-Regulatory Fatigability During Inhibitory Control of Eye Blinking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abi-Jaoude, Elia; Segura, Barbara; Cho, Sang Soo; Crawley, Adrian; Sandor, Paul

    2018-05-30

    The capacity to regulate urges is an important human characteristic associated with a range of social and health outcomes. Self-regulatory capacity has been postulated to have a limited reserve, which when depleted leads to failure. The authors aimed to investigate the neural correlates of self-regulatory fatigability. Functional MRI was used to detect brain activations in 19 right-handed healthy subjects during inhibition of eye blinking, in a block design. The increase in number of blinks during blink inhibition from the first to the last block was used as covariate of interest. There was an increase in the number of eye blinks escaping inhibitory control across blink inhibition blocks, whereas there was no change in the number of eye blinks occurring during rest blocks. Inhibition of blinking activated a wide network bilaterally, including the inferior frontal gyrus, dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, dorsal anterior cingulate cortex, supplementary motor area, and caudate. Deteriorating performance was associated with activity in orbitofrontal cortex, ventromedial prefrontal cortex, rostroventral anterior cingulate cortex, precuneus, somatosensory, and parietal areas. As anticipated, effortful eye-blink control resulted in activation of prefrontal control areas and regions involved in urge and interoceptive processing. Worsening performance was associated with activations in brain areas involved in urge, as well as regions involved in motivational evaluation. These findings suggest that self-regulatory fatigability is associated with relatively less recruitment of prefrontal cortical regions involved in executive control.

  7. The role of learning environment on high school chemistry students' motivation and self-regulatory processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Judd, Jeffrey S.

    Changes to the global workforce and technological advancements require graduating high school students to be more autonomous, self-directed, and critical in their thinking. To reflect societal changes, current educational reform has focused on developing more problem-based, collaborative, and student-centered classrooms to promote effective self-regulatory learning strategies, with the goal of helping students adapt to future learning situations and become life-long learners. This study identifies key features that may characterize these "powerful learning environments", which I term "high self-regulating learning environments" for ease of discussion, and examine the environment's role on students' motivation and self-regulatory processes. Using direct observation, surveys, and formal and informal interviews, I identified perceptions, motivations, and self-regulatory strategies of 67 students in my high school chemistry classes as they completed academic tasks in both high and low self-regulating learning environments. With social cognitive theory as a theoretical framework, I then examined how students' beliefs and processes changed after they moved from low to a high self-regulating learning environment. Analyses revealed that key features such as task meaning, utility, complexity, and control appeared to play a role in promoting positive changes in students' motivation and self-regulation. As embedded cases, I also included four students identified as high self-regulating, and four students identified as low self-regulating to examine whether the key features of high and low self-regulating learning environments played a similar role in both groups. Analysis of findings indicates that key features did play a significant role in promoting positive changes in both groups, with high self-regulating students' motivation and self-regulatory strategies generally remaining higher than the low self-regulating students; this was the case in both environments. Findings

  8. The Associations of Eating-related Attitudinal Balance with Psychological Well-being and Eating Behaviors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuglestad, Paul T.; Bruening, Meg; Graham, Dan J.; Eisenberg, Marla E.; Neumark-Sztainer, Dianne R.

    2014-01-01

    This study used balance theory to illuminate the relations of eating-related attitudinal consistency between self and friends to psychological well-being and eating behaviors. It was hypothesized that attitudinal inconsistency, relative to consistency, would predict lower well-being and poorer eating habits. A population-based sample of 2287 young adults participating in Project EAT-III (Eating Among Teens and Young Adults) completed measures of psychological well-being, eating behaviors, and eating-related attitudes from the standpoint of self and friends. Of participants who cared about healthy eating, those who perceived that their friends did not care about healthy eating had lower well-being and less-healthy eating behaviors (fewer fruits and vegetables and more sugary beverages per day) than those who perceived that their friends cared about healthy eating. Conversely, among participants who did not care about healthy eating, those who perceived that their friends cared about healthy eating had lower well-being and less-healthy eating behaviors (more snacks per day) than those who perceived that their friends did not care about healthy eating. In accord with balance theory, young adults who perceived inconsistent eating attitudes between themselves and their friends had lower psychological well-being and generally less-healthy eating behaviors than people who perceived consistent eating attitudes. PMID:24587589

  9. 77 FR 67427 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; ICE Clear Europe Limited; Notice of Filing of Proposed Rule Change...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-09

    ... Rules provide updates related to anti-money laundering legislation applicable to customers, clarify... proposed rule change will have any impact or impose any burden on competition. C. Self-Regulatory...

  10. 75 FR 39299 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; NASDAQ OMX BX, Inc.; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-08

    ... French as the Bourse de Montr[eacute]al Inc. II. Self-Regulatory Organization's Statement of the Purpose... submitted by any of the following methods: Electronic Comments Use the Commission's Internet comment form...

  11. 78 FR 47452 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; C2 Options Exchange, Incorporated; Notice of Filing and Immediate...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-05

    ... are trading, the proposed changes seek to create less of a disconnect if the ``primary'' market should... connected to the marketplace. B. Self-Regulatory Organization's Statement on Burden on Competition C2 does...

  12. 76 FR 49809 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; The NASDAQ Stock Market LLC; Notice of Filing and Immediate...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-11

    ... proprietary traders. The Series 56 examination program is shared by NASDAQ and the following self-regulatory..., experience and competence for members and their associated persons, in particular, by offering a new...

  13. 78 FR 58352 - Joint Industry Plan; Notice of Filing of Amendment No. 30 to the Joint Self-Regulatory...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-23

    ... Collection, Consolidation and Dissemination of Quotation and Transaction Information for Nasdaq-Listed... Exchange, Inc., EDGX Exchange, Inc., Financial Industry Regulatory Authority, Inc., International... ``Committee'') \\3\\ of the Joint Self-Regulatory Organization Plan Governing the Collection, Consolidation, and...

  14. 76 FR 5224 - Joint Industry Plan; Notice of Filing of Amendment No. 25 to the Joint Self-Regulatory...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-28

    ... Collection, Consolidation and Dissemination of Quotation and Transaction Information for Nasdaq-Listed... Exchange, Inc., EDGX Exchange, Inc., Financial Industry Regulatory Authority, Inc., International... Joint Self-Regulatory Organization Plan Governing the Collection, Consolidation, and Dissemination of...

  15. 77 FR 52769 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; NYSE Arca, Inc.; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-30

    ... Commission granted self-regulatory organizations and broker-dealers increased authority and flexibility to... virtually limitless opportunities for entrepreneurs who wish to produce and distribute their own market data...

  16. 76 FR 72011 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; C2 Options Exchange, Incorporated; Notice of Filing and Immediate...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-21

    ... SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION [Release No. 34-65744; File No. SR-C2-2011-034] Self-Regulatory... Change Related to the Quote Risk Monitor Mechanism November 14, 2011. Pursuant to Section 19(b)(1) of the...\\ 15 U.S.C. 78s(b)(3)(A)(iii). \\4\\ 17 CFR 240.19b-4(f)(6). I. Self-Regulatory Organization's Statement...

  17. 76 FR 72991 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; C2 Options Exchange, Incorporated; Notice of Filing and Immediate...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-28

    ... SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION [Release No. 34-65800; File No. SR-C2-2011-035] Self-Regulatory... Rule Change Related to a Temporary Quote Risk Monitor Mechanism Rule November 21, 2011. Pursuant to...). \\2\\ 17 CFR 240.19b-4. \\3\\ 15 U.S.C. 78s(b)(3)(A)(iii). \\4\\ 17 CFR 240.19b-4(f)(6). I. Self-Regulatory...

  18. Developing self-regulation for dietary temptations: intervention effects on physical, self-regulatory and psychological outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKee, Heather C; Ntoumanis, Nikos

    2014-12-01

    We aimed to investigate whether a self-regulatory skills intervention can improve weight loss-related outcomes. Fifty-five participants (M BMI = 32.60 ± 4.86) were randomized into self-regulation training and advice groups and received two training workshops and weekly practice tasks. The self-regulation training group was trained to use six self-regulatory skills: Delayed gratification, thought control, goal setting, self-monitoring, mindfulness, and coping. The advice group received dietary and physical activity advice for weight loss. Physical, self-regulatory, and psychological measures were taken at baseline, end of intervention (week 8) and at follow-up (week 12). Using intention-to-treat analysis, weight, waist circumference, body fat and body mass index (BMI) were significantly reduced at follow-up for both groups. There were significant increases in all six self-regulatory skills and the psychological measures of self-efficacy, self-regulatory success, and physical self-worth for both groups. Results indicate that self-regulatory skills training might be as effective as dietary and physical activity advice in terms of weight loss and related outcomes.

  19. Are better sleepers more engaged workers? A self-regulatory approach to sleep hygiene and work engagement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barber, Larissa; Grawitch, Matthew J; Munz, David C

    2013-10-01

    Previous research has emphasized facets of both the organizational environment and individual differences as predictors of work engagement. This study explored sleep hygiene as another important behavioural factor that may be related to work engagement. With a sample of 328 adult workers, we tested a multiple mediator model in which sleep hygiene predicts work engagement through one's appraisals of resource depletion stemming from demands (psychological strain) and general self-regulatory capacity (self-control). Results indicated that individuals who frequently engaged in poor sleep hygiene behaviours had lower self-regulatory capacity, experienced higher subjective depletion and were less engaged at work. Additionally, the path from poor sleep hygiene to decreased work engagement was attributed to perceptions of personal resources that are needed to exert self-regulatory energy at work. This is consistent with current self-regulatory theories suggesting that individuals have a limited amount of resources to allocate to demands and that the depletion of these resources can lead to stress and lower self-regulatory functioning in response to other demands. Specifically, poor sleep hygiene results in the loss of self-regulatory resources needed to be engaged in work tasks by impairing the after-work recovery process. Practical and research implications regarding sleep hygiene interventions for well-being and productivity improvement are discussed. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  20. Prediction of adaptive self-regulatory responses to arthritis pain anxiety in exercising adults: does pain acceptance matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cary, Miranda Ashley; Gyurcsik, Nancy C; Brawley, Lawrence R

    2015-01-01

    Exercising for ≥ 150 min/week is a recommended strategy for self-managing arthritis. However, exercise nonadherence is a problem. Arthritis pain anxiety may interfere with regular exercise. According to the fear-avoidance model, individuals may confront their pain anxiety by using adaptive self-regulatory responses (eg, changing exercise type or duration). Furthermore, the anxiety-self-regulatory responses relationship may vary as a function of individuals' pain acceptance levels. To investigate pain acceptance as a moderator of the pain anxiety-adaptive self-regulatory responses relationship. The secondary objective was to examine whether groups of patients who differed in meeting exercise recommendations also differed in pain-related and self-regulatory responses. Adults (mean [± SD] age 49.75 ± 13.88 years) with medically diagnosed arthritis completed online measures of arthritis pain-related variables and self-regulatory responses at baseline, and exercise participation two weeks later. Individuals meeting (n=87) and not meeting (n=49) exercise recommendations were identified. Hierarchical multiple regression analysis revealed that pain acceptance moderated the anxiety-adaptive self-regulatory responses relationship. When pain anxiety was lower, greater pain acceptance was associated with less frequent use of adaptive responses. When anxiety was higher, adaptive responses were used regardless of pain acceptance level. MANOVA findings revealed that participants meeting the recommended exercise dose reported significantly lower pain and pain anxiety, and greater pain acceptance (Pself-regulatory capacity to cope with additional challenges to exercise adherence (eg, busy schedule).

  1. Self-regulatory fatigue in hematologic malignancies: impact on quality of life, coping, and adherence to medical recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solberg Nes, Lise; Ehlers, Shawna L; Patten, Christi A; Gastineau, Dennis A

    2013-03-01

    Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is an intensive cancer therapy entailing numerous physical, emotional, cognitive, and practical challenges. Patients' ability to adjust and cope with such challenges may depend on their ability to exert control over cognitive, emotional, and behavioral processes, that is, ability to self-regulate. Self-regulatory capacity is a limited resource that can be depleted or fatigued (i.e., "self-regulatory fatigue"), particularly in the context of stressful life events such as cancer diagnosis and treatment. This is one of the first studies to examine self-regulatory fatigue in a cancer population. The current study aimed to (1) extract items for a specific scale of self-regulatory capacity and (2) examine the impact of such capacity on adaptation in patients with hematologic malignancies preparing for HSCT. Factor analysis of four existing scales gauging psychological adjustment and well-being in 314 patients preparing for HSCT (63% male and 89% Caucasian) identified 23 items (α = 0.85) related to self-regulatory control or fatigue. This measure was then examined using existing clinical data obtained from 178 patients (57% male and 91% Caucasian) undergoing treatment for hematologic malignancies in relationship to quality of life, coping, and self-reported adherence to physicians' recommendations. Controlling for pain severity, physical fatigue, and depression, self-regulatory fatigue scores were incrementally associated with decreased quality of life, use of avoidance coping strategies, and decreased adherence to physicians' recommendations. These results emphasize the potential role of self-regulatory capacity in coping with and adjusting to hematologic cancers and future research is warranted.

  2. Genetic determinants of eating disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slof-Op 't Landt, Margarita Cornelia Theodora

    2011-01-01

    In this thesis, a series of studies on different aspects of the genetics of eating disorders is presented. The heritability of disordered eating behavior and attitudes in relation with body mass index (BMI) was evaluated in a large adolescent twin-family sample ascertained through the Netherlands

  3. The relationship between Iranian EFL learners’ self-regulatory vocabulary strategy use and their vocabulary size

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed Mohammad Reza Amirian

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Self-regulation is referred to as learners’ self-generated ideas and actions which are systematically directed towards achieving educational goals and require learners’ active participation in the learning process (Zimmerman & Bandura, 1994. The present study investigated the relationship between Iranian EFL students’ self-regulation capacity for vocabulary learning and their vocabulary size. For this purpose, the researchers made use of two main instruments: the self-regulation capacity in vocabulary learning scale developed by Tseng et al. (2006 consisting of five subscales of commitment, metacognitive, emotion, satiation and environment control, and a bilingual vocabulary size test developed and validated by Karami (2012. The results of the data analysis revealed no significant relationship between the two variables measured by these instruments. However, the results of the multiple regressions indicated that the metacognitive control compared to the other subscales made a better contribution to the prediction of learners’ vocabulary size. In addition, based on the analysis of variance (ANOVA, which examined and compared the self-regulatory strategy use of learners in different experience groups, the first year students had a higher mean score in their self-regulation capacity, which can possibly be attributed to the strategies they have learnt in their Study Skills courses. Finally, it was suggested that teachers must try to develop self-regulatory power in the learners because their creative effort and informed decisions in trying to improve their own learning are highly important.

  4. Is Freedom Contagious? A Self-Regulatory Model of Reactance and Sensitivity to Deviant Peers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leander, N Pontus; vanDellen, Michelle R; Rachl-Willberger, Judith; Shah, James Y; Fitzsimons, Gavan J; Chartrand, Tanya L

    2016-12-01

    Psychological reactance is typically assumed to motivate resistance to controlling peer influences and societal prohibitions. However, some peer influences encourage behaviors prohibited by society. We consider whether reactant individuals are sensitive to such opportunities to enhance their autonomy. We specifically propose a self-regulatory perspective on reactance, wherein freedom/autonomy is the superordinate goal, and thus highly reactant individuals will be sensitive to peer influences that could enhance their behavioral freedoms. In two studies, we find that reactant individuals can be cooperative in response to autonomy-supportive peer influences. Participants read a scenario in which a peer's intentions to engage in substance use were manipulated to imply freedom of choice or not. Results indicated that highly reactant participants were sensitive to deviant peers whose own behavior towards alcohol (Study 1, N = 160) or marijuana (Study 2, N = 124) appeared to be motivated by autonomy and thus afforded free choice. Altogether, the results support a self-regulatory model of reactance, wherein deviant peer influence can be a means to pursue autonomy.

  5. Neuroimaging of developmental psychopathologies: the importance of self-regulatory and neuroplastic processes in adolescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spessot, Alexandra L; Plessen, Kerstin J; Peterson, Bradley S

    2004-06-01

    Normal brain maturational and developmental processes, together with plastic reorganization of the brain in response to experiential demands, contribute to the acquisition of improved capacities for self-regulation and impulse control during adolescence. The frontal lobe is a main focus for these developmental and plastic processes during the transition from adolescence into adulthood. Tourette syndrome (TS), defined as the chronic presence of motor and vocal tics, has been increasingly conceptualized as a disorder of impaired self-regulatory control. This disordered control is thought to give rise to semicompulsory urges to perform the movements that constitute simple tics, complex tics, or compulsions. Neuroimaging studies suggest that the expression of the genetic diathesis to TS is influenced by genetic and nongenetic factors affecting activity-dependent reorganization of neuroregulatory systems, thereby influencing the phenotype, illness severity, and adult outcome of tic disorders. Similar developmental processes during adolescence likely determine the phenotype and natural history of a broad range of other complex neuropsychiatric disorders of childhood onset, and they likely contribute to the acquisition of improved self-regulatory capacities that characterize normal adolescent development.

  6. Inflammation, Self-Regulation, and Health: An Immunologic Model of Self-Regulatory Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shields, Grant S; Moons, Wesley G; Slavich, George M

    2017-07-01

    Self-regulation is a fundamental human process that refers to multiple complex methods by which individuals pursue goals in the face of distractions. Whereas superior self-regulation predicts better academic achievement, relationship quality, financial and career success, and lifespan health, poor self-regulation increases a person's risk for negative outcomes in each of these domains and can ultimately presage early mortality. Given its centrality to understanding the human condition, a large body of research has examined cognitive, emotional, and behavioral aspects of self-regulation. In contrast, relatively little attention has been paid to specific biologic processes that may underlie self-regulation. We address this latter issue in the present review by examining the growing body of research showing that components of the immune system involved in inflammation can alter neural, cognitive, and motivational processes that lead to impaired self-regulation and poor health. Based on these findings, we propose an integrated, multilevel model that describes how inflammation may cause widespread biobehavioral alterations that promote self-regulatory failure. This immunologic model of self-regulatory failure has implications for understanding how biological and behavioral factors interact to influence self-regulation. The model also suggests new ways of reducing disease risk and enhancing human potential by targeting inflammatory processes that affect self-regulation.

  7. Adapting to an initial self-regulatory task cancels the ego depletion effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dang, Junhua; Dewitte, Siegfried; Mao, Lihua; Xiao, Shanshan; Shi, Yucai

    2013-09-01

    The resource-based model of self-regulation provides a pessimistic view of self-regulation that people are destined to lose their self-control after having engaged in any act of self-regulation because these acts deplete the limited resource that people need for successful self-regulation. The cognitive control theory, however, offers an alternative explanation and suggests that the depletion effect reflects switch costs between different cognitive control processes recruited to deal with demanding tasks. This account implies that the depletion effect will not occur once people have had the opportunity to adapt to the self-regulatory task initially engaged in. Consistent with this idea, the present study showed that engaging in a demanding task led to performance deficits on a subsequent self-regulatory task (i.e. the depletion effect) only when the initial demanding task was relatively short but not when it was long enough for participants to adapt. Our results were unrelated to self-efficacy, mood, and motivation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Production-Worthy USJ Formation by Self-Regulatory Plasma Doping Method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasaki, Y.; Ito, H.; Okashita, K.; Tamura, H.; Jin, C. G.; Mizuno, B.; Okumura, T.; Aiba, I.; Sauddin, H.; Iwai, H.; Fukagawa, Y.; Tsutsui, K.

    2006-01-01

    A new method of plasma doping that achieves tight control on dosimetry and uniformity has been developed. It uses a self-regulatory behavior of plasma processes that brings high accuracy on dose control and uniformity within 1.5%. The largest advantage of this self-regulatory plasma doping (SRPD) is that the accuracy of the process control is much less dependent on the uniformity of the plasma, which makes a revolutionary difference to the plasma process as it becomes free from the primary hardware constraint. A typical doping of boron using B2H6/He gas mixture at dose of 1x1015 ions/cm2 can achieve a uniformity of less than 1.5% across a 300mm silicon wafer when the plasma uniformity above the wafer plane is as poor as 10%. The SRPD process also forms very abrupt junctions such as less than 2nm/decade at the junction depth of 10nm due to an instantaneous amorphization of the wafer surface within the first 5 seconds of the process duration. Combined with the throughput advantage at low energy against the conventional ion implantation, the SRPD offers an ideal performance for USJ formation for 45nm technology node and beyond

  9. Eating Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of-control eating Women are more likely than men to have eating disorders. They usually start in the teenage years and often occur along with depression, anxiety disorders, and substance abuse. Eating disorders can ...

  10. Eating Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Application Process Managing Grants Clinical Research Training Small Business Research Labs at NIMH Labs at NIMH Home Research ... About Eating Disorders More Publications About Eating Disorders Research Results PubMed: Journal Articles about Eating Disorders Contact Us The National ...

  11. [Relationship between the attitudes towards improving eating habits and prevalence of metabolic syndrome. Data from the 2005 National Health and Nutrition Survey and the Comprehensive Survey of Living Conditions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Yoshiko; Hamasaki, Tomoko; Sato, Shinichi; Ando, Yuichi

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine the constructive attitudes towards improving eating habits and their relationship with the prevalence of metabolic syndrome (MetS) using data from the National Health and Nutrition Survey (2005) and the Comprehensive Survey of Living Conditions (2005). Individuals aged >30 years (N=3084) were enrolled in this study. Exploratory factor analyses were performed to examine the constructive attitudes towards improving eating habits by using 14 parameters. In addition, confirmatory factor analysis was performed and the Cronbach α value was calculated. Furthermore, the relationship between attitudes towards improving eating habits and MetS prevalence was examined according to gender by using multinomial logistic regression analysis, after adjusting for age, number of members in a household, exercise habits, and rest by sleeping. Two factors were extracted: balanced diet (BD) and control of food intake (CFI) (Cronbach α, 0.82 and 0.75, respectively). The goodness of fit model, based on the structural equation models, was adequate (goodness of fit, 0.96). No relationship was noted between BD and MetS prevalence. The MetS prevalence differed according to gender: "Strongly suspected MetS (sure MetS)", 16.3% (male, 24.4%; female, 10.7%), "Preliminary MetS (pre MetS)", 15.2% (male, 24.1%; female, 8.9%), "non-suspected MetS (non MetS)", 68.5% (male, 51.5%; female, 80.5%). The odds ratios (95% confidence interval) for pre MetS and sure MetS were 0.57 (0.42-0.78) and 0.52 (0.38-0.71) in males and 0.36 (0.25-0.53) and 0.39 (0.27-0.56) in females, respectively, when non MetS was used as a reference. The results of this study indicated that the attitudes towards improving eating habits primarily focused on BD and CFI. Therefore, improving eating habits towards in terms of better CFI would be effective in preventing MetS in both genders.

  12. Eating disorders in general practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, M B

    1986-01-01

    A total of 748 patients who attended four south London group practices were screened using the eating attitudes test; 1% of women had bulimia nervosa and a further 3% a partial syndrome eating disorder. Eating and weight control behaviour and psychiatric indicators for an eating disorder were analysed. Patients with bulimia nervosa and partial syndromes were remarkably similar. They were mainly women, from the middle to upper classes, in the normal weight range but having had considerable weight fluctuation in the past, more likely to have had a history of menstrual irregularity, often psychologically troubled, and tended to have more family psychopathology. PMID:3099893

  13. Pathological narcissism and maladaptive self-regulatory behaviours in a nationally representative sample of Canadian men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kealy, David; Ogrodniczuk, John S; Rice, Simon M; Oliffe, John L

    2017-10-01

    Clinical observation has linked externalizing coping strategies such as substance overuse and aggressive behaviours with narcissistic personality dysfunction. This study examined the relationship between pathological narcissism and maladaptive self-regulatory behaviours among Canadian men. An online survey was distributed among a stratified, nationally representative sample of 1000 men from across Canada. The survey included brief self-report measures of pathological narcissism, maladaptive externalizing coping behaviours, and general psychological distress. After controlling for the effects of age and general psychological distress, pathological narcissism was found to be significantly associated with alcohol overuse and aggressive behaviour. Significant though modest interaction effects were found between pathological narcissism and age - with regards to drug use - and distress - with regards to risk-taking behaviour. The findings point to the need for attention to narcissistic dysfunction as a clinical and public health issue among men. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Neuroimaging of developmental psychopathologies: the importance of self-regulatory and neuroplastic processes in adolescence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spessot, Alexandra L; Plessen, Kerstin J; Peterson, Bradley S

    2004-01-01

    for these developmental and plastic processes during the transition from adolescence into adulthood. Tourette syndrome (TS), defined as the chronic presence of motor and vocal tics, has been increasingly conceptualized as a disorder of impaired self-regulatory control. This disordered control is thought to give rise...... to semicompulsory urges to perform the movements that constitute simple tics, complex tics, or compulsions. Neuroimaging studies suggest that the expression of the genetic diathesis to TS is influenced by genetic and nongenetic factors affecting activity-dependent reorganization of neuroregulatory systems, thereby...... influencing the phenotype, illness severity, and adult outcome of tic disorders. Similar developmental processes during adolescence likely determine the phenotype and natural history of a broad range of other complex neuropsychiatric disorders of childhood onset, and they likely contribute to the acquisition...

  15. Critical thinking as a self-regulatory process component in teaching and learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phan, Huy P

    2010-05-01

    This article presents a theoretically grounded model of critical thinking and self-regulation in the context of teaching and learning. Critical thinking, deriving from an educational psychology perspective is a complex process of reflection that helps individuals become more analytical in their thinking and professional development. My conceptualisation in this discussion paper argues that both theoretical orientations (critical thinking and self-regulation) operate in a dynamic interactive system of teaching and learning. My argument, based on existing research evidence, suggests two important points: (i) critical thinking acts as another cognitive strategy of self-regulation that learners use in their learning, and (ii) critical thinking may be a product of various antecedents such as different self-regulatory strategies.

  16. The cognitive consequences of envy: attention, memory, and self-regulatory depletion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Sarah E; DelPriore, Danielle J; Vaughan, Phillip W

    2011-10-01

    In a series of 4 experiments, we provide evidence that--in addition to having an affective component--envy may also have important consequences for cognitive processing. Our first experiment (N = 69) demonstrated that individuals primed with envy better attended to and more accurately recalled information about fictitious peers than did a control group. Studies 2 (N = 187) and 3 (N = 65) conceptually replicated these results, demonstrating that envy elicited by targets predicts attention and later memory for information about them. We demonstrate that these effects cannot be accounted for by admiration or changes in negative affect or arousal elicited by the targets. Study 4 (N = 152) provides evidence that greater memory for envied--but not neutral--targets leads to diminished perseverance on a difficult anagram task. Findings demonstrate that envy may play an important role in attention and memory systems and deplete limited self-regulatory resources available for acts of volition. 2011 APA, all rights reserved

  17. Quiet Ego, Self-Regulatory Skills, and Perceived Stress in College Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wayment, Heidi A; Cavolo, Keragan

    2018-04-13

    Examine the unique contributions of self-control and grit subscales (perseverance, interest consistency) as potential mediators of the relationship between quiet ego characteristics and less perceived stress in college students. Data from 1117 college students were collected between October, 2015 and May, 2016. The sample was split randomly into exploratory and confirmatory samples. Multiple mediator models were tested with PROCESS module (SPSS v. 24) in both samples. Hypotheses were largely confirmed with self-control fully mediating the link between quiet ego and perceived stress in both samples. Although many self-regulatory constructs may argue for their positive impact on college student outcomes, interventions that strengthen self-control, and not grit, may be most promising to reduce perceived stress. Further, interventions to strengthen quiet ego characteristics may be beneficial for strengthening self-control in college students.

  18. Eating Competence of College Students in an Introductory Nutrition Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Lora Beth; Larsen, Katrina J.; Nyland, Nora K.; Eggett, Dennis L.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Describe eating competence, a positive and flexible way of conceptualizing eating attitudes and behaviors, in students enrolled in an introductory nutrition course. Methods: Online completion of the Satter Eating Competence Inventory (ecSI) and self-assessment of eating disorder status by 557 students (343 ages 18-20 years and 180 ages…

  19. A systematic review of the effectiveness of smartphone applications that encourage dietary self-regulatory strategies for weight loss in overweight and obese adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semper, H M; Povey, R; Clark-Carter, D

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this paper is to systematically review the evidence to explore whether smartphone applications that use self-regulatory strategies are beneficial for weight loss in overweight and obese adults over the age of 18 years. Sixteen electronic databases were searched for articles published up to April 2015 including MEDLINE, OVID, Ingenta, PSYCARTICLES and PSYCINFO, CINAHL, Sportdiscus, Science Direct, Web of Knowledge, Cochrane Library, JSTOR, EBSCO, Proquest, Wiley and Google Scholar. Twenty nine eligible studies were retrieved of which six studies met the inclusion criteria. Studies that recruited participants under the age of 18 years, adults with a chronic condition or did not report weight loss outcomes were excluded. Study findings were combined using a narrative synthesis. Overall, evidence suggests that smartphone applications may be a useful tool for self-regulating diet for weight loss as participants in the smartphone application group in all studies lost at least some bodyweight. However, when compared to other self-monitoring methods, there was no significant difference in the amount of weight lost. Findings should be interpreted with caution based on the design of the studies and the comparator groups used. Future research needs to be more methodologically rigorous and incorporate measures of whether eating habits become healthier in addition to measuring weight and BMI. © 2016 World Obesity.

  20. 77 FR 23305 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; New York Stock Exchange LLC; Notice of Filing and Immediate...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-18

    ... existence of information barriers when running automated surveillance patterns designed to identify... Commission's Public Reference Room, and the Commission's Web site at www.sec.gov . II. Self-Regulatory... ``false positives'' that are identified through automated surveillance patterns by permitting FINRA to...

  1. 77 FR 23303 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; NYSE Arca, Inc.; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-18

    ... of information barriers when running automated surveillance patterns designed to identify... Commission's Web site at www.sec.gov . II. Self-Regulatory Organization's Statement of the Purpose of, and... ``false positives'' that are identified through automated surveillance patterns by permitting FINRA to...

  2. 77 FR 62290 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; The NASDAQ Stock Market LLC; Notice of Filing and Immediate...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-12

    ... and self-regulatory organizations to do so by submitting a single form, fingerprint card and a... identical fee for FINRA's review of a Form BD submitted by NASDAQ members that are not members of FINRA. \\8... filing, and fingerprint fees would become effective for filings or fingerprints submitted on or after...

  3. 78 FR 13103 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; NYSE Arca, Inc.; Notice of Filing of Proposed Rule Change Amending...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-26

    ... intermediate holding company from the ownership structure of the Exchange. C. Self-Regulatory Organization's...-Regulatory Organizations; NYSE Arca, Inc.; Notice of Filing of Proposed Rule Change Amending Its Rules To..., Inc., Thereby Eliminating NYSE Arca Holdings, Inc. From the Ownership Structure of the Exchange...

  4. 77 FR 42345 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; NYSE MKT LLC; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-18

    ..., and at the Commission's Public Reference Room. II. Self-Regulatory Organization's Statement of the... Book, it will be viewed as taking liquidity. Conversely, whenever a participant posts a bid or offer... economic advantage relative to a NYSE Amex Options Market Maker's cost when trading with Customer order...

  5. 17 CFR 240.19b-4 - Filings with respect to proposed rule changes by self-regulatory organizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... and fairly implied by that rule. (e) For the purposes of this paragraph, new derivative securities... the product class that would include the new derivative securities product and the self-regulatory... within five business days after commencement of trading a new derivative securities product. (f) A...

  6. 76 FR 16844 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; NASDAQ OMX BX, Inc.; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-25

    ... trading in each UTP Derivative Security contain applicable trading hours for the UTP Derivative Security... SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION [Release No. 34-64105; File No. SR-BX-2011-016] Self-Regulatory... Starting Time March 22, 2011. Pursuant to Section 19(b)(1) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 (``Act...

  7. 78 FR 38747 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; NASDAQ OMX BX, Inc.; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-27

    ... 4120(a)(8)); A halt in a Derivative Securities Product (as defined in Rule 4120(b)(4)(A)) for which a..., 2012), 77 FR 33498 (June 6, 2012). A trading halt in a Derivative Security Product traded pursuant to... SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION [Release No. 34-69818; File No. SR-BX-2013-041] Self-Regulatory...

  8. Hope and self-regulatory goals applied to an advertising context : promoting prevention stimulates goal-directed behavior.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Poels, K.; Dewitte, S.

    2008-01-01

    This article proposes the existence of two types of hope which differ in terms of self-regulatory goals: prevention hope and promotion hope. Consistent with the functional emotion approach and regulatory focus theory, we show that prevention hope generates more goal-directed behavior compared to

  9. Hope and self regulatory goals applied to an advertising context : promoting prevention stimulates goal-directed behavior

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Poels, K.; Dewitte, S.; Astregaard, S.; Dwight, M.

    2007-01-01

    This article proposes the existence of two types of hope which differ in terms of self-regulatory goals: prevention hope and promotion hope. Consistent with the functional emotion approach and regulatory focus theory, we show that prevention hope generates more goal-directed behavior compared to

  10. 75 FR 76500 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; NASDAQ OMX PHLX, LLC; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-08

    ... not the issuer of any such securities or other financial products and makes no express or implied.... Self-Regulatory Organization's Statement of the Terms of Substance of the Proposed Rule Change The... implies a representation or opinion by Frank Russell Company as to the attractiveness of investment in any...

  11. 76 FR 67238 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; BATS Exchange, Inc.; Order Approving Proposed Rule Change by BATS...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-31

    ... SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION [Release No. 34-65619, File No. SR-BATS-2011-032] Self-Regulatory Organizations; BATS Exchange, Inc.; Order Approving Proposed Rule Change by BATS Exchange, Inc. To Adopt Rules Applicable to Auctions Conducted by the Exchange for Exchange-Listed Securities October 25, 2011. I. Introduction On August 22, 2011,...

  12. Self-regulatory processes and exercise adherence in older adults: executive function and self-efficacy effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAuley, Edward; Mullen, Sean P; Szabo, Amanda N; White, Siobhan M; Wójcicki, Thomas R; Mailey, Emily L; Gothe, Neha P; Olson, Erin A; Voss, Michelle; Erickson, Kirk; Prakash, Ruchika; Kramer, Arthur F

    2011-09-01

    Self-efficacy and the use of self-regulatory strategies are consistently associated with physical activity behavior. Similarly, behavioral inhibition and cognitive resource allocation-indices of executive control function-have also been associated with this health behavior. The purpose of this study was to examine the hypothesis that self-efficacy mediates the relationship between self-regulatory processes, such as executive function, and sustained exercise behavior. Older adults (N=177, mean age=66.44 years) completed measures of executive function, self-reported use of self-regulatory strategies, and self-efficacy prior to and during the first month of a 12-month exercise intervention. Percentage of exercise classes attended over the following 11 months was used to represent adherence. Data were collected from 2007 to 2010 and analyzed in 2010-2011. Structural equation models were tested examining the effect of executive function and strategy use on adherence via efficacy. As hypothesized, results showed significant direct effects of two elements of executive function and of strategy use on self-efficacy and of efficacy on adherence. In addition, there were significant indirect effects of strategy use and executive function on adherence via self-efficacy. Higher levels of executive function and use of self-regulatory strategies at the start of an exercise program enhance beliefs in exercise capabilities, which in turn leads to greater adherence. Copyright © 2011 American Journal of Preventive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. 77 FR 72902 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; BATS Y-Exchange, Inc.; Notice of Filing and Immediate...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-06

    ... of NYSE Risk Management Gateway). B. Self-Regulatory Organization's Statement on Burden on...-Regulatory Organizations; BATS Y-Exchange, Inc.; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness of Proposed Rule Change To Expand the Availability of Risk Management Tools November 30, 2012. Pursuant to Section...

  14. 77 FR 4077 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; NASDAQ OMX PHLX LLC; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-26

    ...-Regulatory Organizations; NASDAQ OMX PHLX LLC; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness of Proposed Rule Change Amending the Real-Time Risk Management Fee and Other Clarifying Amendments January 20, 2012.... \\1\\ 15 U.S.C. 78s(b)(1). \\2\\ 17 CFR 240.19b-4. I. Self-Regulatory Organization's Statement of the...

  15. 76 FR 79729 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; ICE Clear Credit LLC; Order Approving Proposed Rule Change To...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-22

    ... plc as signatories. II. Self-Regulatory Organization's Statement of the Terms of Substance of the... is the recognition that CDS contracts cleared by ICC referencing broad-based securities indices are... would, among other things, decompose CDS contracts referencing broad-based [[Page 79730

  16. 78 FR 26826 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; NASDAQ OMX PHLX LLC; Notice of Filing of Proposed Rule Change for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-08

    ...\\ Accordingly, the affiliate relationship between Phlx and NOS, its member, raises the issue of an exchange's... unfair competitive advantage and potential conflicts of interest between an exchange's self-regulatory... potential for conflicts of interest in instances where a member firm is affiliated with an exchange of which...

  17. 78 FR 29795 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; NASDAQ OMX BX, Inc ; Notice of Filing of Proposed Rule Change for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-21

    ...\\ Accordingly, the affiliate relationship between BX and NOS, its member, raises the issue of an exchange's... unfair competitive advantage and potential conflicts of interest between an exchange's self-regulatory... potential for conflicts of interest in instances where a member firm is affiliated with an exchange of which...

  18. 78 FR 10666 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; NASDAQ OMX PHLX LLC; Notice of Filing of Proposed Rule Change for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-14

    ... PHLX. BX, NASDAQ, PHLX and NES are affiliates. Accordingly, the affiliate relationship between PHLX and... conflicts of interest between an exchange's self-regulatory obligations and its commercial interests.\\7\\ \\7...). Recognizing that the Commission has previously expressed concern regarding the potential for conflicts of...

  19. 78 FR 26820 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; The NASDAQ Stock Market LLC; Notice of Filing of Proposed Rule...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-08

    ... affiliate relationship between NASDAQ and NOS, its member, raises the issue of an exchange's affiliation... unfair competitive advantage and potential conflicts of interest between an exchange's self-regulatory... regarding the potential for conflicts of interest in instances where a member firm is affiliated with an...

  20. Differences in self-regulatory skills among talented athletes : The significance of competitive level and type of sport

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jonker, Laura; Elferink-Gemser, Marije T.; Visscher, Chris

    2010-01-01

    Research has shown that talented athletes outscore their mainstream peers on the basis of self-regulation. Although valuable, this does not tell us more about the distinction between good athletes and the best, which is a prerequisite in talent development. Therefore, we examined the self-regulatory

  1. 76 FR 25389 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; The Depository Trust Company; Notice of Filing of Proposed Rule...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-04

    ... advised by the Regulatory and Clearance Committee of the Securities Operations Section of SIFMA that...: ``Entities holding securities in custody should employ accounting practices and safekeeping procedures that... SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION [Release No. 34-64360; File No. SR-DTC-2011-05] Self-Regulatory...

  2. 77 FR 39288 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; NYSE MKT LLC; Notice of Filing of Proposed Rule Change Amending...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-02

    ... (i) ``ATP Holders,'' as that term is defined in Rule 900.2NY(5); (ii) Sponsored Participants, as that term is defined in Rule 900.2NY(77); and (iii) non-ATP Holder broker-dealers and vendors that request... change as described in Items I, II, and III below, which Items have been prepared by the self-regulatory...

  3. 78 FR 12123 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; NYSE MKT LLC; Notice of Filing of Proposed Rule Change Amending...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-21

    ... in Items I, II, and III below, which Items have been prepared by the self-regulatory organization... Exchange proposes to amend the times in which certain ATP Holders are required to notify the Exchange in... to extend the time ATP Holders acting as agent for Customer orders have to notify the Exchange of a...

  4. 78 FR 16332 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; NYSE MKT LLC; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-14

    ..., and III below, which Items have been prepared by the self-regulatory organization. The Commission is...: (1) Clearing Member Trade Agreement (``CMTA'') information,\\5\\ and the name of the clearing ATP...\\ (iii) the exercise price; (iv) buy or sell with applicable limit or stop price or special instructions...

  5. 78 FR 54697 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; NYSE MKT LLC; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-05

    ... and NYSE Amex Options Rule 900.2NY(77); and (iii) non- member organization and non-ATP Holder broker... described in Items I, II and III below, which Items have been prepared by the self-regulatory organization... Rules of the NYSE MKT Equities Rules, and ATP Holders, as that term is defined in NYSE Amex Options Rule...

  6. 78 FR 68128 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; New York Stock Exchange LLC; NYSE MKT LLC; NYSE Arca, Inc.; Notice...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-13

    ... definition of ``emergency'' as that found in Section 12(k)(7) of the Act. Section 12(k)(7) defines an... NYSE so that the NYSE, as a self-regulatory organization (``SRO''), can remain operational. In essence... become a defined term under the amended rule-- shall include the authority to designate NYSE Arca to...

  7. 17 CFR 1.69 - Voting by interested members of self-regulatory organization governing boards and various...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... boards and various committees. (a) Definitions. For purposes of this section: (1) Disciplinary committee... defined in § 3.1(a); (D) Net positions held at that self-regulatory organization in “customer” accounts... member has unique or special expertise, knowledge or experience in the matter under consideration. (iii...

  8. 77 FR 21120 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; NYSE Arca, Inc.; Notice of Filing of Proposed Rule Change to List...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-09

    ..., specifically SPDR S&P 500 (SPY), Apple, Inc. (AAPL), SPDR Gold Trust (GLD), Google Inc. (GOOG), and Amazon.com...), and Amazon.com Inc. (AMZN) for all expirations applicable to 100 share options in each class. The... available at the Exchange, www.nyse.com , and the Commission's Public Reference Room. II. Self-Regulatory...

  9. 76 FR 21081 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; NASDAQ OMX PHLX LLC; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-14

    ... SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION [Release No. 34-64284; File No. SR-Phlx-2011-48] Self... Change To Update Provisions Regarding the Dress Code and Trade Verification April 8, 2011. Pursuant to.... 78s(b)(1). \\2\\ 17 CFR 240.19b-4. I. Self-Regulatory Organization's Statement of the Terms of Substance...

  10. 78 FR 51758 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; New York Stock Exchange LLC; NYSE MKT LLC; NYSE Arca, Inc.; Order...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-21

    ... limitation and voting limitation, such person must deliver notice of such person's intention to own or vote... books and records of any of the U.S. Regulated Subsidiaries; and (2) the self-regulatory function of the... information) contained in the books and records of the European Market Subsidiaries, and not use such...

  11. 76 FR 64403 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; The NASDAQ Stock Market LLC; Notice of Filing and Immediate...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-18

    ... SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION [Release No. 34-65381; File No. SR-NASDAQ-2011-128] Self-Regulatory Organizations; The NASDAQ Stock Market LLC; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness of Proposed Rule Change Relating to Customer Rebates To Add Liquidity September 22, 2011. Correction In notice...

  12. Environmentally friendly consumer choices: Cultural differences in the self-regulatory function of anticipated pride and guilt

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Onwezen, M.C.; Bartels, J.; Antonides, G.

    2014-01-01

    Anticipated self-conscious emotions, such as pride and guilt, help individuals to behave in line with their personal and social standards regarding the environment. We seek to explore whether ths self-regulatory role of anticipated pride and guilt functions similarly across individuals from

  13. Environmentally friendly consumer choices: Cultural differences in the self-regulatory function of anticipated pride and guilt

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Onwezen, M.C.; Bartels, J.; Antonides, G.

    2014-01-01

    Anticipated self-conscious emotions, such as pride and guilt, help individuals to behave in line with their personal and social standards regarding the environment. We seek to explore whether this self-regulatory role of anticipated pride and guilt functions similarly across individuals from

  14. 78 FR 55302 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; The NASDAQ Stock Market LLC; Notice of Filing and Immediate...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-10

    ... categories of rules and regulations generally applicable to such persons.\\7\\ The Continuing Education... the continuing education. B. Self-Regulatory Organization's Statement on Burden on Competition NASDAQ... SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION [Release No. 34-70316; File No. SR-NASDAQ-2013-108] Self...

  15. 75 FR 47332 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness of a Proposed Rule...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-05

    ...-Floating Rate Normal ITS issued by U.S. Bancorp Capital IX, each with a liquidation amount of $1,000 (the... SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION [Release No. 34-62607; File No. SR-ISE-2010-80] Self-Regulatory... Securities Exchange, LLC That Constitutes a Stated Interpretation With Respect to the Meaning, Administration...

  16. 77 FR 40683 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; New York Stock Exchange LLC; Notice of Filing and Immediate...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-10

    .... I. Self-Regulatory Organization's Statement of the Terms of Substance of the Proposed Rule Change... senior-level) Floor Official approval, both ``buying and selling members'' must agree to the publication... ``or member organizations'' after ``buying and selling members.'' Rule 2 defines a ``member'' as a...

  17. 75 FR 69502 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; The NASDAQ Stock Market LLC; Notice of Filing and Immediate...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-12

    ... structure and assess a flat fee of $300 per test port, per month for all but CTCI and FIX connections to ACT...-Regulatory Organizations; The NASDAQ Stock Market LLC; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness of... 240.19b-4. I. Self-Regulatory Organization's Statement of the Terms of the Substance of the Proposed...

  18. 75 FR 69492 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; NASDAQ OMX BX, Inc.; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-12

    ... structure and assess a flat fee of $300 per test port, per month. This fee will cover the cost of... Organizations; NASDAQ OMX BX, Inc.; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness of Proposed Rule Change To... rule change from interested persons. I. Self-Regulatory Organization's Statement of the Terms of the...

  19. 77 FR 62562 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; ICE Clear Credit LLC; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-15

    ... two single names (The Hillshire Brands Company and DE US, Inc.). II. Self-Regulatory Organization's... the Sara Lee Corporation's successor companies, The Hillshire Brands Company and DE US, Inc. This... things, that the rules of a clearing agency be designed to promote the prompt and accurate clearance and...

  20. 78 FR 9961 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; NASDAQ OMS BX, Inc.; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-12

    ... SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION [Release No. 34-68840; File No. SR-BX-2013-008] Self-Regulatory Organizations; NASDAQ OMS BX, Inc.; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness of Proposed Rule Change To Add Routing Functionality to the NASDAQ OMX BX Equities Market February 6, 2013. Pursuant to Section 19(b)(1...

  1. 78 FR 62841 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; NASDAQ OMX BX, Inc.; Notice of Filing of Proposed Rule Change To...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-22

    ... million, shares of liquidity during the month, which is a higher rate than the base rate of $0.0007 per... SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION [Release No. 34-70655; File No. SR-BX-2013-054] Self-Regulatory... Exchange Rule 7018(a) With Respect to Transactions in Securities Priced at $1 per Share or Greater October...

  2. 75 FR 15476 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; New York Stock Exchange LLC; Notice of Filing and Immediate...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-29

    ... virtually impossible in the liquid securities traded on the Exchange. \\7\\ This is similar to the method... SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION [Release No. 34-61756; File No. SR-NYSE-2010-24] Self-Regulatory Organizations; New York Stock Exchange LLC; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness of...

  3. 78 FR 50463 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; BATS Y-Exchange, Inc.; Notice of Filing and Immediate...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-19

    ... filing are intended to attract order flow to the Exchange by continuing to offer competitive pricing... competitive pricing, which, in turn, will benefit Members of the Exchange. B. Self-Regulatory Organization's... necessarily competitive. The Exchange also believes that its pricing for displayed orders is appropriately...

  4. Physical Activity in the Transition to University: The Role of Past Behavior and Concurrent Self-Regulatory Efficacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crozier, Alyson J.; Gierc, Madelaine S. H.; Locke, Sean R.; Brawley, Lawrence R.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Two studies were conducted to examine the relationship between past physical activity, concurrent self-regulatory efficacy (CSRE), and current physical activity during the transition to university. Participants: Study 1 included 110 first-year undergraduate students recruited during October/November of 2012. Study 2 involved 86…

  5. 75 FR 65541 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; Order Approving Proposed Rule Change by NASDAQ OMX PHLX, Inc. To...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-25

    ... SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION [Release No. 34-63132; File No. SR-Phlx-2010-118] Self-Regulatory Organizations; Order Approving Proposed Rule Change by NASDAQ OMX PHLX, Inc. To Expand the $.50 Strike Price Program October 19, 2010. On August 25, 2010, NASDAQ OMX PHLX, Inc. (``Phlx'' or ``Exchange...

  6. Learning by Preparing to Teach: Fostering Self-Regulatory Processes and Achievement during Complex Mathematics Problem Solving

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muis, Krista R.; Psaradellis, Cynthia; Chevrier, Marianne; Di Leo, Ivana; Lajoie, Susanne P.

    2016-01-01

    We developed an intervention based on the learning by teaching paradigm to foster self-regulatory processes and better learning outcomes during complex mathematics problem solving in a technology-rich learning environment. Seventy-eight elementary students were randomly assigned to 1 of 2 conditions: learning by preparing to teach, or learning for…

  7. Promoting Prosocial Behavior and Self-Regulatory Skills in Preschool Children through a Mindfulness-Based Kindness Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flook, Lisa; Goldberg, Simon B.; Pinger, Laura; Davidson, Richard J.

    2015-01-01

    Self-regulatory abilities are robust predictors of important outcomes across the life span, yet they are rarely taught explicitly in school. Using a randomized controlled design, the present study investigated the effects of a 12-week mindfulness-based Kindness Curriculum (KC) delivered in a public school setting on executive function,…

  8. The Impact of Self-Regulatory Skills Training for Reducing in School Suspension Placement: A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schilling-Dickey, Gwen

    2013-01-01

    Researchers have been looking for solutions to disciplinary problems within the school setting. Many studies have been conducted to assess the impact of a variety of intervention strategies with research indicating that strategies involving self-regulatory control of behavioral responses can benefit students. Additionally, positive behavioral…

  9. 78 FR 75437 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; NASDAQ OMX PHLX LLC; Order Granting Approval of Proposed Rule...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-11

    ... SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION [Release No. 34-71004; File No. SR-Phlx-2013-101] Self-Regulatory Organizations; NASDAQ OMX PHLX LLC; Order Granting Approval of Proposed Rule Change Regarding the Short Term Options Program December 6, 2013. I. Introduction On October 3, 2013, NASDAQ OMX PHLX LLC...

  10. 77 FR 67851 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; BOX Options Exchange LLC; Order Approving Proposed Rule Change To...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-14

    ... SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION [Release No. 34-68177; File No. SR-BOX-2012-003] Self-Regulatory Organizations; BOX Options Exchange LLC; Order Approving Proposed Rule Change To Amend the Price Improvement Period November 7, 2012. I. Introduction On July 25, 2012, BOX Options Exchange LLC (``Exchange...

  11. Self-Regulatory Processes Mediating between Career Calling and Perceived Employability and Life Satisfaction in Emerging Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Praskova, Anna; Creed, Peter A.; Hood, Michelle

    2015-01-01

    We tested a cross-sectional, mediation model of career calling, in which career calling was associated positively with life satisfaction and perceptions of future employability, and these relationships were explained by the self-regulatory mechanisms of work effort, career strategies, and emotional regulation. Using a sample of 664 emerging adults…

  12. Variability of Self-Regulatory Strategies in Children with Intellectual Disability and Typically Developing Children in Pretend Play Situations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nader-Grosbois, N.; Vieillevoye, S.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: This study has examined whether or not self-regulatory strategies vary depending on pretend play situations in 40 children with intellectual disability and 40 typically developing children. Method: Their cognitive, linguistic and individual symbolic play levels were assessed in order to match the children of the two groups. During two…

  13. 75 FR 12590 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; The Chicago Stock Exchange, Inc.; Order Approving a Proposed Rule...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-16

    ... SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION [Release No. 34-61680; File No. SR-CHX-2009-18] Self-Regulatory Organizations; The Chicago Stock Exchange, Inc.; Order Approving a Proposed Rule Change To Amend Its Co-Location Fees March 10, 2010. I. Introduction On December 22, 2009, the Chicago Stock Exchange, Inc. (``CHX'' or...

  14. 76 FR 8793 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; NASDAQ OMX PHLX LLC; Order Granting Approval of Proposed Rule...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-15

    ... SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION [Release No. 34-63875; File No. SR-Phlx-2010-183] Self-Regulatory Organizations; NASDAQ OMX PHLX LLC; Order Granting Approval of Proposed Rule Change Expanding Its Short Term Option Program February 9, 2011. I. Introduction On December 15, 2010, NASDAQ OMX PHLX LLC...

  15. Self-Regulatory Behaviors and Approaches to Learning of Arts Students: A Comparison between Professional Training and English Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng, Min-chen; Chen, Chia-cheng

    2017-01-01

    This study investigated the self-regulatory behaviors of arts students, namely memory strategy, goal-setting, self-evaluation, seeking assistance, environmental structuring, learning responsibility, and planning and organizing. We also explored approaches to learning, including deep approach (DA) and surface approach (SA), in a comparison between…

  16. 75 FR 38585 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; NASDAQ OMX BX, Inc.; Order Approving a Proposed Rule Change To...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-02

    ... SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION [Release No. 34-62396; File No. SR-BX-2010-012] Self-Regulatory Organizations; NASDAQ OMX BX, Inc.; Order Approving a Proposed Rule Change To Codify Prices for Co-Location Services June 28, 2010. I. Introduction On January 29, 2010, NASDAQ OMX BX, Inc. (``BX'' or ``Exchange...

  17. The Contributions of Teachers' Emotional Support to Children's Social Behaviors and Self-Regulatory Skills in First Grade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merritt, Eileen G.; Wanless, Shannon B.; Rimm-Kaufman, Sara E.; Cameron, Claire; Peugh, James L.

    2012-01-01

    The present observational study used hierarchical linear modeling to examine predictors of children's social and self-regulatory outcomes in first-grade classrooms. Specifically, goals were the following: (1) to explore relations between emotionally supportive teacher-child interactions and children's social behaviors (aggression with peers,…

  18. 75 FR 2899 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; New York Stock Exchange LLC; Order Approving Proposed Rule Change...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-19

    ... SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION [Release No. 34-61333; File No. SR-NYSE-2009-117] Self-Regulatory Organizations; New York Stock Exchange LLC; Order Approving Proposed Rule Change Amending Its... regulatory program. III. Discussion and Commission's Findings After careful review, the Commission finds that...

  19. 75 FR 69491 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; Order Approving Proposed Rule Change by New York Stock Exchange...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-12

    ... SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION [Release No. 34-63266; File No. SR-NYSE-2010-67] Self-Regulatory Organizations; Order Approving Proposed Rule Change by New York Stock Exchange LLC Changing the NYBX Order Execution Sequence November 5, 2010. I. Introduction On September 9, 2010, the New York...

  20. 75 FR 9988 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; NASDAQ OMX PHLX, Inc.; Order Granting Approval of Proposed Rule...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-04

    ... SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION [Release No. 34-61590; File No. SR-Phlx-2009-113] Self-Regulatory Organizations; NASDAQ OMX PHLX, Inc.; Order Granting Approval of Proposed Rule Change Relating to Index Option Position Limits February 25, 2010. On December 29, 2009, NASDAQ OMX PHLX, Inc. (``Phlx'' or...