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Sample records for self-etch adhesive system

  1. Self-etch and etch-and-rinse adhesive systems in clinical dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozer, Fusun; Blatz, Markus B

    2013-01-01

    Current adhesive systems follow either an "etch-and-rinse" or "self-etch" approach, which differ in how they interact with natural tooth structures. Etch-and-rinse systems comprise phosphoric acid to pretreat the dental hard tissues before rinsing and subsequent application of an adhesive. Self-etch adhesives contain acidic monomers, which etch and prime the tooth simultaneously. Etch-and-rinse adhesives are offered as two- or three-step systems, depending on whether primer and bonding are separate or combined in a single bottle. Similarly, self-etch adhesives are available as one- or two-step systems. Both etch-and-rinse and self-etch systems form a hybrid layer as a result of resins impregnating the porous enamel or dentin. Despite current trends toward fewer and simpler clinical application steps, one-step dentin bonding systems exhibit bonding agent lower bond strengths and seem less predictable than multi-step etch-and-rinse and self-etch systems. The varying evidence available today suggests that the choice between etch-and-rinse and self-etch systems is often a matter of personal preference. In general, however, phosphoric acid creates a more pronounced and retentive etching pattern in enamel. Therefore, etch-and-rinse bonding systems are often preferred for indirect restorations and when large areas of enamel are still present. Conversely, self-etch adhesives provide superior and more predictable bond strength to dentin and are, consequently, recommended for direct composite resin restorations, especially when predominantly supported by dentin.

  2. Clinical Evaluation of a Self-Etch Adhesive System in Non-Carious ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To evaluate the clinical performance of a selfetch adhesive system – Adper's Prompt L-Pop in noncarious cervical lesions over a six months period. Method: One hundred and eighty-one (181) restorations were placed by one operator for 35 patients. The self-etch adhesive was applied to the cavity and composite ...

  3. Enamel and dentin bond strengths of a new self-etch adhesive system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walter, Ricardo; Swift, Edward J; Boushell, Lee W; Braswell, Krista

    2011-12-01

    statement of problem:  Self-etch adhesives typically are mildly acidic and therefore less effective than etch-and-rinse adhesives for bonding to enamel.   The purpose of this study was to evaluate the enamel and dentin shear bond strengths of a new two-step self-etch adhesive system, OptiBond XTR (Kerr Corporation, Orange, CA, USA).   The labial surfaces of 80 bovine teeth were ground to create flat, 600-grit enamel or dentin surfaces. Composite was bonded to enamel or dentin using the new two-step self-etch system or a three-step etch-and-rinse (OptiBond FL, Kerr), two-step self-etch (Clearfil SE Bond, Kuraray America, Houston, TX, USA), or one-step self-etch adhesive (Xeno IV, Dentsply Caulk, Milford, DE, USA). Following storage in water for 24 hours, shear bond strengths were determined using a universal testing machine. The enamel and dentin data sets were subjected to separate analysis of variance and Tukey's tests. Scanning electron microscopy was used to evaluate the effects of each system on enamel.   Mean shear bond strengths to enamel ranged from 18.1 MPa for Xeno IV to 41.0 MPa for OptiBond FL. On dentin, the means ranged from 33.3 MPa for OptiBond FL to 47.1 MPa for Clearfil SE Bond. OptiBond XTR performed as well as Clearfil SE Bond on dentin and as well as OptiBond FL on enamel. Field emission scanning electron microscope revealed that OptiBond XTR produced an enamel etch pattern that was less defined than that of OptiBond FL (37.5% phosphoric acid) but more defined than that of Clearfil SE Bond or Xeno IV.   The new two-step self-etch adhesive system formed excellent bonds to enamel and dentin in vitro. OptiBond XTR, a new two-step self-etch adhesive system, is a promising material for bonding to enamel as well as to dentin. © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Bond strength and morphology of enamel using self-etching adhesive systems with different acidities

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    Sandra Kiss Moura

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: To assess the bond strength and the morphology of enamel after application of self-etching adhesive systems with different acidities. The tested hypothesis was that the performance of the self-etching adhesive systems does not vary for the studied parameters. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Composite resin (Filtek Z250 buildups were bonded to untreated (prophylaxis and treated (bur-cut or SiC-paper enamel surfaces of third molars after application of four self-etching and two etch-and-rinse adhesive systems (n=6/condition: Clearfil SE Bond (CSE; OptiBond Solo Plus Self-Etch (OP; AdheSe (AD; Tyrian Self Priming Etching (TY, Adper Scotchbond Multi-Purpose Plus (SBMP and Adper Single Bond (SB. After storage in water (24 h/37°C, the bonded specimens were sectioned into sticks with 0.8 mm² cross-sectional area and the microtensile bond strength was tested at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min. The mean bond strength values (MPa were subjected to two-way ANOVA and Tukey's test (α=0.05. The etching patterns of the adhesive systems were also observed with a scanning electron microscope. RESULTS: The main factor adhesive system was statistically significant (p<0.05. The mean bond strength values (MPa and standard deviations were: CSE (20.5±3.5, OP (11.3±2.3, AD (11.2±2.8, TY (11.1±3.0, SBMP (21.9±4.0 and SB (24.9±3.0. Different etching patterns were observed for the self-etching primers depending on the enamel treatment and the pH of the adhesive system. CONCLUSION: Although there is a tendency towards using adhesive systems with simplified application procedures, this may compromise the bonding performance of some systems to enamel, even when the prismless enamel is removed.

  5. Dentin bond strength and degree of conversion evaluation of experimental self-etch adhesive systems

    OpenAIRE

    Yazdi, Fatemeh-Maleknejad; Moosavi, Horieh; Atai, Mohammad; Zeynali, Mahsa

    2015-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of different concentrations of 10-methacryloyloxydecyl dihydrogen phosphate (10-MDP) monomer in one-step self-etch experimental adhesives on dentinal microshear bond strength (?SBS), their degree of conversion and bonded micro structure. Material and Methods Composite resin cylinders (Clearfil AP-X) were bonded on human sound molar dentinal surfaces by using five experimental one-step self-etching adhesives (1-SEAs) containing 0% ...

  6. The difference of tensile bond strength between total and self etch adhesive systems in dentin

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    Selly Yusalina

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Total etch adhesive system has been widely used in teeth conservation area as an adhesive agent before implicating composite resin restoration agent. The aim of this research is to prove the difference of tensile bond strength between total etch (Single Bond and self etch adhesive system (Adper prompt L-Pop on dentin surface in vitro. The extracted and non carries maxillary premolar teeth were used in this research and were divided into 2 groups. The first group comprised 15 specimen teeth etched in phosphoric acid and was applicated with the Single Bond adhesive agent. The second group comprised 15 specimen teeth, applicated with the Adper Prompt-L-Pop. The composite resin (Z 350, 3M was applied incrementally and each of the layers was rayed for 20 seconds. The specimens were stored in physiologic solution before they were tested. Tensile bond strength was measured by LRX Plus Lloyd Instrument, with 1 N load and 1 mm/minute speed, and the measurement result was in Mpa unit. The result was evaluated statistically by the Student t-test with α = 0.05. Single Bond (the 5th generation showed a better bond strength compared to the Adper Prompt-L-Pop (the 6th generation.

  7. Bond efficacy and interface morphology of self-etching adhesives to ground enamel

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abdalla, A.I.; El Zohairy, A.A.; Mohsen, M.M.A.; Feilzer, A.J.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: This study compared the microshear bond strengths to ground enamel of three one-step self-etching adhesive systems, a self-etching primer system and an etch-and-rinse adhesive system. Materials and Methods: Three self-etching adhesives, Futurabond DC (Voco), Clearfil S Tri Bond (Kuraray)

  8. Influence of voids in the hybrid layer based on self-etching adhesive systems: a 3-D FE analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Paula Martini

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The presence of porosities at the dentin/adhesive interface has been observed with the use of new generation dentin bonding systems. These porosities tend to contradict the concept that etching and hybridization processes occur equally and simultaneously. Therefore, the aim of this study was to evaluate the micromechanical behavior of the hybrid layer (HL with voids based on a self-etching adhesive system using 3-D finite element (FE analysis. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Three FE models (Mr were built: Mr, dentin specimen (41x41x82 μm with a regular and perfect (i.e. pore-free HL based on a self-etching adhesive system, restored with composite resin; Mp, similar to M, but containing 25% (v/v voids in the HL; Mpp, similar to Mr, but containing 50% (v/v voids in the HL. A tensile load (0.03N was applied on top of the composite resin. The stress field was obtained by using Ansys Workbench 10.0. The nodes of the base of the specimen were constrained in the x, y and z axes. The maximum principal stress (σmax was obtained for all structures at the dentin/adhesive interface. RESULTS: The Mpp showed the highest peak of σmax in the HL (32.2 MPa, followed by Mp (30 MPa and Mr (28.4 MPa. The stress concentration in the peritubular dentin was high in all models (120 MPa. All other structures positioned far from voids showed similar increase of stress. CONCLUSION: Voids incorporated into the HL raised the σmax in this region by 13.5%. This behavior might be responsible for lower bond strengths of self-etching and single-bottle adhesives, as reported in the literature.

  9. Effect of moisture and drying time on the bond strength of the one-step self-etching adhesive system

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    Yoon Lee

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Objectives To investigate the effect of dentin moisture degree and air-drying time on dentin-bond strength of two different one-step self-etching adhesive systems. Materials and Methods Twenty-four human third molars were used for microtensile bond strength testing of G-Bond and Clearfil S3 Bond. The dentin surface was either blot-dried or air-dried before applying these adhesive agents. After application of the adhesive agent, three different air drying times were evaluated: 1, 5, and 10 sec. Composite resin was build up to 4 mm thickness and light cured for 40 sec with 2 separate layers. Then the tooth was sectioned and trimmed to measure the microtensile bond strength using a universal testing machine. The measured bond strengths were analyzed with three-way ANOVA and regression analysis was done (p = 0.05. Results All three factors, materials, dentin wetness and air drying time, showed significant effect on the microtensile bond strength. Clearfil S3 Bond, dry dentin surface and 10 sec air drying time showed higher bond strength. Conclusions Within the limitation of this experiment, air drying time after the application of the one-step self-etching adhesive agent was the most significant factor affecting the bond strength, followed by the material difference and dentin moisture before applying the adhesive agent.

  10. What's new in dentine bonding? Self-etch adhesives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, F J Trevor

    2004-12-01

    Bonding to dentine is an integral part of contemporary restorative dentistry, but early systems were not user-friendly. The introduction of new systems which have a reduced number of steps--the self-etch adhesives--could therefore be an advantage to clinicians, provided that they are as effective as previous adhesives. These new self-etch materials appear to form hybrid layers as did the previous generation of materials. However, there is a need for further clinical research on these new materials. Advantages of self-etch systems include, no need to etch and rinse, reduced post-operative sensitivity and low technique sensitivity. Disadvantages include, the inhibition of set of self- or dual-cure resin materials and the need to roughen untreated enamel surfaces prior to bonding.

  11. Bonding effectiveness of self-etch adhesives to dentin after 24 h water storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarr, Mouhamed; Benoist, Fatou Leye; Bane, Khaly; Aidara, Adjaratou Wakha; Seck, Anta; Toure, Babacar

    2018-01-01

    This study evaluated the immediate bonding effectiveness of five self-etch adhesive systems bonded to dentin. The microtensile bond strength of five self-etch adhesives systems, including one two-step and four one-step self-etch adhesives to dentin, was measured. Human third molars had their superficial dentin surface exposed, after which a standardized smear layer was produced using a medium-grit diamond bur. The selected adhesives were applied according to their respective manufacturer's instructions for μTBS measurement after storage in water at 37°C for 24 h. The μTBS varied from 11.1 to 44.3 MPa; the highest bond strength was obtained with the two-step self-etch adhesive Clearfil SE Bond and the lowest with the one-step self-etch adhesive Adper Prompt L-Pop. Pretesting failures mainly occurring during sectioning with the slow-speed diamond saw were observed only with the one-step self-etch adhesive Adper Prompt L-Pop (4 out of 18). When bonded to dentin, the self-etch adhesives with simplified application procedures (one-step self-etch adhesives) still underperform as compared to the two-step self-etch adhesive Clearfil SE Bond.

  12. Pre-treating dentin with chlorhexadine and CPP-ACP: self-etching and universal adhesive systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dos Santos, Ricardo Alves; de Lima, Eliane Alves; Montes, Marcos Antônio Japiassu Resende; Braz, Rodivan

    2016-12-01

    Objective: The aim of the present study was to compare the effect of pre-treating dentin with chlorhexidine, at concentrations of 0.2% and 2%, and remineralizing paste containing CPP-ACP (MI Paste - GC) on the bond strength of adhesive systems. Material and methods: In total, 80 slides of dentin were used. These slides were 2 mm thick and were obtained from bovine incisors. Standard cavities were created using diamond bur number 3131. In the control groups, a Scotchbond Universal Adhesive (SUA) self-etching adhesive system of 3M ESPE and a Clearfil SE Bond (CSE) adhesive system of Kuraray were applied, following the manufacturer's instructions. In the other groups, dentin was pretreated with chlorhexidine (0.2% and 2%) for 1 min and with MI Paste for 3 min. The cavities were restored with Z350 XT resin (3M ESPE). After 24 h of storage, the push-out test was applied at a speed of 0.5 mm/min. Results: The different dentin pretreatment techniques did not affect the intra-adhesive bond strength. There was a difference between treatment with MI Paste and chlorhexidine 0.2% in favor of the SUA, with values of 15.22 and 20.25 Mpa, respectively. Conclusions: The different pretreatment methods did not alter the immediate bond strength to dentin. Differences were only recorded when comparing the adhesives.

  13. Effect of saliva contamination on the microshear bond strength of one-step self-etching adhesive systems to dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, H M; Oh, T S; Pereira, P N R

    2006-01-01

    This study evaluated the effect of saliva contamination and decontamination methods on the dentin bond strength of one-step self-etching adhesive systems. Three commercially available "all-in-one" adhesives (One Up Bond F, Xeno III and Adper Prompt) and one resin composite (Filtek Z-250) were used. Third molars stored in distilled water with 0.5% thymol at 4 degrees C were ground with #600 SiC paper under running water to produce a standardized smear layer. The specimens were randomly divided into groups according to contamination methods: no contamination, which was the control (C); contamination of the adhesive surface with fresh saliva before light curing (A) and contamination of the adhesive surface with fresh saliva after light curing (B). Each contamination group was further subdivided into three subgroups according to the decontamination method: A1-Saliva was removed by a gentle air blast and the adhesive was light-cured; A2-Saliva was rinsed for 10 seconds, gently air-dried and the was adhesive light-cured; A3-Saliva was rinsed and dried as in A2, then the adhesive was re-applied to the dentin surface and light-cured; B1-Saliva was removed with a gentle air blast; B2-Saliva was rinsed and dried; B3-Saliva was rinsed, dried and the adhesive was re-applied and light cured. Tygon tubes filled with resin composite were placed on each surface and light cured. All specimens were stored in distilled water at 37 degrees C for 24 hours. Microshear bond strength was measured using a universal testing machine (EZ test), and data were analyzed by one-way ANOVA followed by the Duncan test to make comparisons among the groups (p0.05). Bond strengths of all B groups were significantly lower compared to the controls (pcontamination after adhesive curing. There was no statistically significant difference among the control groups (p>0.05).

  14. Two-year water degradation of self-etching adhesives bonded to bur ground enamel

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abdalla, A.I.; Feilzer, A.J.

    2009-01-01

    To evaluate the effect of water storage on the microshear bond strength to ground enamel of three "all-in-one" self-etch adhesives: Futurabond DC, Clearfil S Tri Bond and Hybrid bond; a self-etching primer; Clearfil SE Bond and an etch-and-rinse adhesive system, Admira Bond. Sixty human molars were

  15. Microleakage assessment of one- and two-step self-etch adhesive systems with ‎the low shrinkage composites

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    Razieh Hoseinifar

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND AIM: Different studies evaluating one-step self-etch (SE adhesive systems show contradictory findings, so the aim of this study was to compare the microleakage of one-step SE adhesive systems and CLEARFIL SE BOND (that serves as the “gold-standard” SE adhesive with low shrinkage composites. METHODS: In this in vitro study, Class V cavities with the occlusal margin in enamel and cervical margin in cementum were prepared on the buccal and lingual surfaces of 36 human premolars and molars (72 cavities. The enamel surfaces of the cavities were etched with 37% phosphoric acid and then the specimens were divided into six groups of 6 (12 cavities and the cavities were restored according bellow: Group 1 (Kalore-GC + G-Bond, Group 2 (Grandio + Futurabond NR, Group 3 (Aelite LS Posterior + All Bond SE, Group 4 (Kalore-GC + CLEARFIL SE BOND, Group 5 (Grandio + CLEARFIL SE BOND, and Group 6 (Aelite LS Posterior + CLEARFIL SE BOND. All the specimens were thermocycled for 2000 cycles (5-55 °C and then placed in 0.5% basic fuchsine dye for 24 hours at 37 °C and finally sectioned and observed under the stereomicroscope. Data were analyzed using Kruskal-Wallis, Mann-Whitney, and Wilcoxon tests at a P 0.050. There were no significant differences in microleakage among two-step and one-step SE adhesive systems on both the occlusal and gingival margins. CONCLUSION: According to this study, two-step SE adhesive system (CLEARFIL SE BOND did not provide better marginal seal than the one-step SE adhesive systems.

  16. Effect of collagen fibrils removal on shear bond strength of total etch and self etch adhesive systems

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    Pishevar L.

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available "nBackground and Aim: Sodium hypochlorite can remove the organic phase of the demineralized dentin and it produces direct resin bonding with hydroxyapatite crystals. Therefore, the hydrolytic degradation of collagen fibrils which might affect the bonding durability is removed. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of collagen fibrils removal by 10% NaOCl on dentin shear bond strength of two total etch and self etch adhesive systems."nMaterials and Methods: Sixty extracted human premolar teeth were used in this study. Buccal surface of teeth were grounded until dentin was exposed. Then teeth were divided into four groups. According to dentin surface treatment, experimental groups were as follows: Group I: Single Bond (3M according to manufacture instruction, Group II: 10% NaOCl+Single bond (3M, Group III: Clearfil SE Bond (Kuraray according to manufacture instruction, and Group IV: Clearfil SE Bond primer. After that, the specimens were immersed in 50% acetone solution for removing extra monomer. Then the specimens were rinsed and dried. 10% NaOCl was applied and finally adhesive was used. Then composite was bonded to the treated surfaces using a 4 2 mm cylindrical plastic mold. Specimens were thermocycled for 500 cycles (5-55ºC. A shear load was employed by a universal testing machine with a cross head speed of 1mm/min. The data were analyzed for statistical significance with One-way ANOVA, Two-way ANOVA and Tukey HSD post-hoc tests."nResults: The mean shear bond strengths of groups were as follows: Single Bond=16.8±4.2, Clearfil SE Bond=23.7±4.07, Single Bond+NaOCl=10.5±4.34, Clearfil SE Bond+NaOCl=23.3±3.65 MPa. Statistical analysis revealed that using 10% NaOCl significantly decreased the shear bond strength in Single Bond group (P=0.00, but caused no significant difference in the shear bond strength in Clearfil SE Bond group (P=0.99."nConclusion: Based on the results of this study, NaOCl treatment did not improve the bond

  17. Influence of hydrostatic pulpal pressure on the microtensile bond strength of all-in-one self-etching adhesives

    OpenAIRE

    Hosaka, K; Nakajima, M; Monticelli, F; Carrilho, M; Yamauti, M; Aksornmuang, J; Nishitani, Y; Tayh, FR; Pashley, DH; Tagami, J

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the microtensile bond strength (mu TBS) of two all-in-one self-etching adhesive systems and two self etching adhesives with and without simulated hydrostatic pulpal pressure (PP). Materials and Methods: Flat coronal dentin surfaces of extracted human molars were prepared. Two all-in-one self-etching adhesive systems, One-Up Bond F (OBF; Tokuyama) and Clearfil S-3 Bond (Tri-S, Kuraray Medical) and two self-etching primer adhesives, Clearfil Protect Bond (PB; Kuraray) and C...

  18. Evaluation of the tensile bond strength of an adhesive system self-etching in dentin irradiated with Er:YAG laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mello, Andrea Malluf Dabul de

    2000-01-01

    Since Buonocore (1955), several researchers have been seeking for the best adhesive system and treatment for the enamel and dentin surfaces. The use of the acid has been presented as one of the best techniques of dentin conditioning , because this promotes the removal of the 'smear layer and exhibition of dentinal structure, for a best penetration and micro- retention of the adhesive system. However, some conditioning methods have been appearing in the literature, for the substitution or interaction with the acid substances, as the laser. The objective of this work is to evaluate the tensile bond strength of the adhesive system self-etching' associated to a composed resin, in dentin surfaces conditioned with the Er:YAG laser. For this study, freshly extracted human teeth were used and in each one the dentinal surfaces , which were treated with three sandpapers of different granulations (120,400,600), to obtain a standard of the smear layer, before the irradiation of the laser and of the restoring procedure. After these procedures the specimens were storage in distilled water at 37 deg C for 24 hours. Soon after, they were submitted to the tensile strength test .After analyzing the results, we can concluded that the use of the Er:YAG laser can substitute the drill without the need of conditioning, when using the adhesive system 'self-etching' in the dentinal surfaces because there was a decline in the strength of adhesion in the groups conditioned with the laser. (author)

  19. Comparison of enamel bond fatigue durability of universal adhesives and two-step self-etch adhesives in self-etch mode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsujimoto, Akimasa; Barkmeier, Wayne W; Hosoya, Yumiko; Nojiri, Kie; Nagura, Yuko; Takamizawa, Toshiki; Latta, Mark A; Miyazaki, Masashi

    2017-10-01

    To comparatively evaluate universal adhesives and two-step self-etch adhesives for enamel bond fatigue durability in self-etch mode. Three universal adhesives (Clearfil Universal Bond; G-Premio Bond; Scotchbond Universal Adhesive) and three two-step self-etch adhesives (Clearfil SE Bond; Clearfil SE Bond 2; OptiBond XTR) were used. The initial shear bond strength and shear fatigue strength of the adhesive to enamel in self-etch mode were determined. The initial shear bond strengths of the universal adhesives to enamel in self-etch mode was significantly lower than those of two-step self-etch adhesives and initial shear bond strengths were not influenced by type of adhesive in each adhesive category. The shear fatigue strengths of universal adhesives to enamel in self-etch mode were significantly lower than that of Clearfil SE Bond and Clearfil SE Bond 2, but similar to that OptiBond XTR. Unlike two-step self-etch adhesives, the initial shear bond strength and shear fatigue strength of universal adhesives to enamel in self-etch mode was not influenced by the type of adhesive. This laboratory study showed that the enamel bond fatigue durability of universal adhesives was lower than Clearfil SE Bond and Clearfil SE Bond 2, similar to Optibond XTR, and was not influenced by type of adhesive, unlike two-step self-etch adhesives.

  20. Active application of primer acid on acid-treated enamel: Influence on the bond effectiveness of self-etch adhesives systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araújo, Cíntia Tereza Pimenta; Prieto, Lúcia Trazzi; Costa, Daiane Cristianismo; Bosso, Mariana Avalone; Coppini, Erick Kamiya; Dias, Carlos Tadeu Santos; Paulillo, Luis Alexandre Maffei Sartini

    2017-08-01

    Evaluate the composite-to-enamel bond after passive or active application of self-etching primer systems on polished or pre-etched enamel with phosphoric acid. Two self-etch adhesives systems (SEAS) were used: Clearfil SE Bond and Easy Bond. Third human molars were divided into 8 groups (N = 10). The crown of each tooth was sectioned into halves and the mesial/distal surfaces were used. The adhesives were actively or passively applied on enamel with or without prior phosphoric-acid etching. Resin composite cylinders were built after adhesive application. After stored in relative humidity for 24 hr/37°C the specimens were subjected to microshear test in universal testing a machine at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/minute. The results were analyzed with three-way ANOVA and the Tukey test. The enamel-etching pattern was evaluated under SEM. The 2-step SEAS system presented significantly higher adhesive bond strength means (47.37 MPa) than the 1-step (36.87 MPa). A poor enamel- etching pattern was observed in active mode showing irregular and short resin tags, however there was not compromised the bond strength. Active or passive application produced similar values of bond strength to enamel regardless of enamel pretreatment and type of SEAS. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Influence of Nd:YAG laser on the bond strength of self-etching and conventional adhesive systems to dental hard tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marimoto, A K; Cunha, L A; Yui, K C K; Huhtala, M F R L; Barcellos, D C; Prakki, A; Gonçalves, S E P

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of Nd:YAG laser on the shear bond strength to enamel and dentin of total and self-etch adhesives when the laser was applied over the adhesives, before they were photopolymerized, in an attempt to create a new bonding layer by dentin-adhesive melting. One-hundred twenty bovine incisors were ground to obtain flat surfaces. Specimens were divided into two substrate groups (n=60): substrate E (enamel) and substrate D (dentin). Each substrate group was subdivided into four groups (n=15), according to the surface treatment accomplished: X (Xeno III self-etching adhesive, control), XL (Xeno III + laser Nd:YAG irradiation at 140 mJ/10 Hz for 60 seconds + photopolymerization, experimental), S (acid etching + Single Bond conventional adhesive, Control), and SL (acid etching + Single Bond + laser Nd:YAG at 140 mJ/10 Hz for 60 seconds + photopolymerization, experimental). The bonding area was delimited with 3-mm-diameter adhesive tape for the bonding procedures. Cylinders of composite were fabricated on the bonding area using a Teflon matrix. The teeth were stored in water at 37°C/48 h and submitted to shear testing at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min in a universal testing machine. Results were analyzed with three-way analysis of variance (ANOVA; substrate, adhesive, and treatment) and Tukey tests (α=0.05). ANOVA revealed significant differences for the substrate, adhesive system, and type of treatment: lased or unlased (penamel groups were X=20.2 ± 5.61, XL=23.6 ± 4.92, S=20.8 ± 4.55, SL=22.1 ± 5.14 and for the dentin groups were X=14.1 ± 7.51, XL=22.2 ± 6.45, S=11.2 ± 5.77, SL=15.9 ± 3.61. For dentin, Xeno III self-etch adhesive showed significantly higher shear bond strength compared with Single Bond total-etch adhesive; Nd:YAG laser irradiation showed significantly higher shear bond strength compared with control (unlased). Nd:YAG laser application prior to photopolymerization of adhesive systems

  2. Influence of water storage on fatigue strength of self-etch adhesives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takamizawa, Toshiki; Barkmeier, Wayne W; Tsujimoto, Akimasa; Scheidel, Donal D; Watanabe, Hidehiko; Erickson, Robert L; Latta, Mark A; Miyazaki, Masashi

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine enamel and dentin bond durability after long-term water storage using self-etch adhesives. Two single step self-etch adhesives (SU, Scotchbond Universal and GB, G-ӕnial Bond) and a two-step self-etch adhesive (OX, OptiBond XTR) were used. The shear bond strength (SBS) and shear fatigue strength (FS) of the enamel and dentin were obtained with and without phosphoric acid pre-etching prior to application of the adhesives. The specimens were stored in distilled water at 37 °C for 24 h, 6 months, and one year. A staircase method was used to determine the FS using a frequency of 10 Hz for 50,000 cycles or until failure occurred. The SBS and FS of enamel bonds were significantly higher with pre-etching, when compared to no pre-etching for the same water storage period. The FS of dentin bonds with pre-etching tended to decrease relative to no pre-etching at the same storage period. For the one year storage period, SU and GB with pre-etching showed significantly lower FS values than the groups without pre-etching. The influence of water storage on FS of the self-etch adhesives was dependent on the adhesive material, storage period and phosphoric acid pre-etching of the bonding site. Phosphoric acid pre-etching of enamel improves the effectiveness of self-etch adhesive systems. Inadvertent contact of phosphoric acid on dentin appears to reduce the ability of self-etch adhesives to effectively bond resin composite materials. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Influence of frequency on shear fatigue strength of resin composite to enamel bonds using self-etch adhesives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takamizawa, Toshiki; Scheidel, Donal D; Barkmeier, Wayne W; Erickson, Robert L; Tsujimoto, Akimasa; Latta, Mark A; Miyazaki, Masashi

    2016-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the influence of different frequency rates on of bond durability of self-etch adhesives to enamel using shear fatigue strength (SFS) testing. A two-step self-etch adhesive (OX, OptiBond XTR), and two single step self-etch adhesives (GB, G-ӕnial Bond and SU, Scotchbond Universal) were used in this study. The shear fatigue strength (SFS) to enamel was obtained. A staircase method was used to determine the SFS values with 50,000 cycles or until failure occurred. Fatigue testing was performed at frequencies of 5Hz, 10Hz, and 20Hz. For each test condition, 30 specimens were prepared for the SFS testing. Regardless of the bond strength test method, OX showed significantly higher SFS values than the two single-step self-etch adhesives. For each of the three individual self-etch adhesives, there was no significant difference in SFS depending on the frequency rate, although 20Hz results tended to be higher. Regardless of the self-etch adhesive system, frequencies of 5Hz, 10Hz, and 20Hz produced similar results in fatigue strength of resin composite bonded to enamel using 50,000 cycles or until bond failure. Accelerated fatigue testing provides valuable information regarding the long term durability of resin composite to enamel bonding using self-etch adhesive system. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Shear bond strength of self-etching adhesive systems with different pH values to bleached and/or CPP-ACP-treated enamel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oskoee, Siavash Savadi; Bahari, Mahmoud; Kimyai, Soodabeh; Navimipour, Elmira Jafari; Firouzmandi, Maryam

    2012-08-01

    To compare shear bond strengths of three different self-etching adhesive systems of different pH values to enamel bleached with carbamide peroxide, treated with casein phosphopeptide-amorphous calcium phosphate (CPP-ACP), or treated with CPP-ACP subsequent to bleaching with carbamide peroxide. Thirty-six human third molars were cut into 4 sections and randomly assigned to 4 groups (n = 36): group I: no treatment; group II: bleaching; group III: CPP-ACP; group IV: bleaching and CPP-ACP. After surface treatments, the samples of each group were further divided into three subgroups (n = 12) based on the adhesive used. The adhesives Clearfil SE Bond (CSE), AdhesE (ADE), and Adper SE Plus (ADP) were applied, and resin composite cylinders with a diameter of 2 mm and a height of 4 mm were bonded to the enamel. Then the specimens were subjected to shear bond strength testing. Two-way ANOVA and a post-hoc Tukey's test were used for statistical analysis (α = 0.05). There were significant differences between the adhesive systems (p system showed the highest bond strength, and the bleaching procedure reduced bond strengths (p = 0.001). Furthermore, there were no significant differences in shear bond strength values between the control and CPP groups. However, the differences between other groups were statistically significant (p material dependent.

  5. Effect of Sodium Ascorbate and Delayed Bonding on the Bond Strength of Silorane and Two-step Self-etch Adhesive Systems in Bleached Enamel

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    Mehdi Abed Kahnemooyi

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and aims. Studies have shown decreased bond strength of composite resin to human and bovine bleached enamel. This study evaluated the effect of sodium ascorbate and delayed bonding on the bond strength of two adhesive systems to bleached enamel. Materials and methods. The labial surfaces of 150 sound bovine incisor teeth were abraded with abrasive paper. The teeth were randomly divided into 8 groups: A: control; B: bleached with 35% hydrogen peroxide; C: bleached with 35% hydrogen peroxide + sodium ascorbate gel; and D: bleached with 35% hydrogen peroxide + delayed bonding. In groups A‒D, silorane adhesive system and Filtek silorane composite resin were used. In groups E‒H, the same preparation methods of groups A‒D were used. Two-step self-etch Clearfil SE Bond adhesive systems and AP-X composite resin were administered. Shear bond strength of each group was measured. Two samples were prepared for each surface preparation for ultrastructural evaluation. Two-way ANOVA and Tukey test were used for data analysis at P<0.05. Results. The interaction between the adhesive system type and surface preparation protocol was significant (P=0.014, with significant differences in shear bond strengths in terms of the adhesive systems (P<0.01. There were significant differences in shear bond strength in terms of surface preparation techniques irrespective of the adhesive system (P<0.01. Conclusion. The results showed that bleaching with 35% hydrogen peroxide decreased the shear bond strength values with both adhesive systems, and a one-week delay in bonding and 10% sodium ascorbate for 10 minutes restored the bond strength in both adhesive systems.

  6. Bond efficacy and interface morphology of self-etching adhesives to ground enamel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdalla, Ali I; El Zohairy, Ahmed A; Abdel Mohsen, Mohamed M; Feilzer, Albert J

    2010-02-01

    This study compared the microshear bond strengths to ground enamel of three one-step self-etching adhesive systems, a self-etching primer system and an etch-and-rinse adhesive system. Three self-etching adhesives, Futurabond DC (Voco), Clearfil S Tri Bond (Kuraray) and Hybrid bond (Sun-Medical), a self-etching primer, Clearfil SE Bond (Kuraray), and an etch-and-rinse system, Admira Bond (Voco), were selected. Thirty human molars were used. The root of each tooth was removed and the crown was sectioned into halves. The convex enamel surfaces were reduced by polishing on silicone paper to prepare a flat surface. The bonding systems were applied on this surface. Prior to adhesive curing, a hollow cylinder (2.0 mm height/0.75 mm internal diameter) was placed on the treated surfaces. A resin composite was then inserted into the tube and cured. After water storage for 24 h, the tube was removed and shear bond strength was determined in a universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min. The results were analyzed with ANOVA and the Tukey.-Kramer test at a 59 degrees confidence level. The enamel of five additional teeth was ground, and the etching component of each adhesive was applied and removed with absolute ethanol instead of being light cured. These teeth and selected fractured surfaces were examined by SEM. Adhesion to ground enamel of the Futurabond DC (25 +/- 3.5 MPa) and Clearfil SE Bond (23 +/- 2.9 MPa) self-etching systems was not significantly different from the etch-and-rinse system Admira Bond (27 +/- 2.3 MPa). The two self-etching adhesives Clearfil S Tri bond and Hybrid Bond demonstrated significantly lower bond strengths (14 +/- 1.4 MPa; 11 +/- 1.9 MPa) with no significant differences between them (p adhesive systems are dependent on the type of adhesive system. Some of the new adhesive systems showed bond strength values comparable to that of etch-and-rinse systems. There was no correlation between bond strength and morphological changes in

  7. Self-etching adhesive on intact enamel, with and without pre-etching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devarasa, G M; Subba Reddy, V V; Chaitra, N L; Swarna, Y M

    2012-05-01

    Bond strengths of composite resin to enamel using self-etch adhesive (SEA) Clearfil SE bond system on intact enamel and enamel pre-etched with phosphoric acid were compared. The objective was to determine if the pre-etching would increase the bond strengths of the SEA systems to intact enamel and to evaluate the effect of pre-etching on bond formation of self-etch adhesives on intact enamel. Labial surfaces of 40 caries free permanent upper central and lateral incisors were cleaned, sectioned of their roots. All specimens were mounted on acrylic block and divided randomly into four groups. In two groups the application of self-etch adhesive, Clearfil SE bond was carried as per manufacturer's instructions, composite cylinders were built, whereas in the other two groups, 37% phosphoric acid etching was done before the application of self-etching adhesives. Then the resin tags were analyzed using scanning electron microscope and shear bond strength was measured using Instron universal testing machine. When phosphoric acid was used, there was significant increase in the depth of penetration of resin tags and in the Shear Bond Strength of composite to enamel. The results indicate that out of both treatment groups, pre-etching the intact enamel with 37% phosphoric acid resulted in formation of longer resin tags and higher depth of penetration of resin tags of the Clearfil SE bond, and attaining higher bond strength of the Clearfil SE bond to intact enamel. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. A comparative clinical study of the failure rate of orthodontic brackets bonded with two adhesive systems: conventional and self-etching primer (SEP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dominguez, Gladys Cristina; Tortamano, André; Lopes, Luiz Vicente de Moura; Catharino, Priscilla Campanatti Chibebe; Morea, Camillo

    2013-01-01

    This study compared the clinical performance of orthodontic brackets bonded with Transbond adhesive paste after two primer systems: a two-stage conventional system (acid etching + Transbond XT adhesive primer) and a single-stage self-etching primer (SEP) (Transbond Plus). The sample comprised 480 metal brackets bonded to the teeth of 24 consecutive patients treated for 36 to 48 months. A split-mouth design was used for bonding, and both systems were used in each patient. Bracket failure rates for each system were analyzed; and failure causes as reported by the patients and the quadrant of teeth for which brackets failed were recorded. The conventional system group had a failure rate of 5.41%, whereas the rate for SEP was 4.58%. In this group, there were 5 failures (38.4%) in the right maxillary quadrant, 2 (15.4%) in the left maxillary quadrant, 4 (30.8%) in the right mandibular quadrant, and 2 (15.4%) in the left mandibular quadrant. In the SEP group, there were 4 (36.4%) failures in the right maxillary quadrant, 1 (9%) in the left maxillary quadrant, 3 (27.3%) in the right mandibular quadrant, and 3 (27.3%) in the left mandibular quadrant. Results of descriptive statistical analysis and odds ratio did not show any significant differences between rates (p = 0.67). The clinical efficiency of SEP was similar to that of the conventional system.

  9. A comparative clinical study of the failure rate of orthodontic brackets bonded with two adhesive systems: conventional and self-etching primer (SEP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gladys Cristina Dominguez

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: This study compared the clinical performance of orthodontic brackets bonded with Transbond adhesive paste after two priming systems: a two-stage conventional system (acid etching + Transbond XT adhesive primer and a singlestage self-etching primer (SEP (Transbond Plus. METHODS: The sample comprised 480 metal brackets bonded to the teeth of 24 consecutive patients treated for 36 to 48 months. A split-mouth design was used for bonding, and both systems were used in each patient. Bracket failure rates for each system were analyzed; and failure causes as reported by the patients and the quadrant of teeth for which brackets failed were recorded. RESULTS: The conventional system group had a failure rate of 5.41%, whereas the rate for SEP was 4.58%. In this group, there were 5 failures (38.4% in the right maxillary quadrant, 2 (15.4% in the left maxillary quadrant, 4 (30.8% in the right mandibular quadrant, and 2 (15.4% in the left mandibular quadrant. In the SEP group, there were 4 (36.4% failures in the right maxillary quadrant, 1 (9% in the left maxillary quadrant, 3 (27.3% in the right mandibular quadrant, and 3 (27.3% in the left mandibular quadrant. Results of descriptive statistical analysis and odds ratio did not show any significant differences between rates (p = 0.67. CONCLUSION: The clinical efficiency of SEP was similar to that of the conventional system.

  10. Two-year Randomized Clinical Trial of Self-etching Adhesives and Selective Enamel Etching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pena, C E; Rodrigues, J A; Ely, C; Giannini, M; Reis, A F

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this randomized, controlled prospective clinical trial was to evaluate the clinical effectiveness of restoring noncarious cervical lesions with two self-etching adhesive systems applied with or without selective enamel etching. A one-step self-etching adhesive (Xeno V(+)) and a two-step self-etching system (Clearfil SE Bond) were used. The effectiveness of phosphoric acid selective etching of enamel margins was also evaluated. Fifty-six cavities were restored with each adhesive system and divided into two subgroups (n=28; etch and non-etch). All 112 cavities were restored with the nanohybrid composite Esthet.X HD. The clinical effectiveness of restorations was recorded in terms of retention, marginal integrity, marginal staining, caries recurrence, and postoperative sensitivity after 3, 6, 12, 18, and 24 months (modified United States Public Health Service). The Friedman test detected significant differences only after 18 months for marginal staining in the groups Clearfil SE non-etch (p=0.009) and Xeno V(+) etch (p=0.004). One restoration was lost during the trial (Xeno V(+) etch; p>0.05). Although an increase in marginal staining was recorded for groups Clearfil SE non-etch and Xeno V(+) etch, the clinical effectiveness of restorations was considered acceptable for the single-step and two-step self-etching systems with or without selective enamel etching in this 24-month clinical trial.

  11. Hydroxyapatite induces spontaneous polymerization of model self-etch dental adhesives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ying; Wu, Ningjing; Bai, Xinyan; Xu, Changqi; Liu, Yi; Wang, Yong

    2013-10-01

    The objective of this study is to report for the first time the spontaneous polymerization phenomenon of self-etch dental adhesives induced by hydroxylapatite (HAp). Model self-etch adhesives were prepared by using a monomer mixture of bis[2-(methacryloyloxy)ethyl] phosphate (2MP) with 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA). The initiator system consisted of camphorquinone (CQ, 0.022 mmol/g) and ethyl 4-dimethylaminobenzoate (4E, 0.022-0.088 mmol/g). HAp (2-8 wt.%) was added to the neat model adhesive. In a dark environment, the polymerization was monitored in-situ using ATR/FT-IR, and the mechanical properties of the polymerized adhesives were evaluated using nanoindentation technique. Results indicated that spontaneous polymerization was not observed in the absence of HAp. However, as different amounts of HAp were incorporated into the adhesives, spontaneous polymerization was induced. Higher HAp content led to higher degree of conversion (DC), higher rate of polymerization (RP) and shorter induction period (IP). In addition, higher 4E content also elevated DC and RP and reduced IP of the adhesives. Nanoindentation result suggested that the Young's modulus of the polymerized adhesives showed similar dependence on HAp and 4E contents. In summary, interaction with HAp could induce spontaneous polymerization of the model self-etch adhesives. This result provides important information for understanding the initiation mechanism of the self-etch adhesives, and may be of clinical significance to strengthen the adhesive/dentin interface based on the finding. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. An In Vitro Evaluation of Leakage of Two Etch and Rinse and Two Self-Etch Adhesives after Thermocycling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geerts, Sabine; Bolette, Amandine; Seidel, Laurence; Guéders, Audrey

    2012-01-01

    Our experiment evaluated the microleakage in resin composite restorations bonded to dental tissues with different adhesive systems. 40 class V cavities were prepared on the facial and lingual surfaces of each tooth with coronal margins in enamel and apical margins in cementum (root dentin). The teeth were restored with Z100 resin composite bonded with different adhesive systems: Scotchbond Multipurpose (SBMP), a 3-step Etch and Rinse adhesive, Adper Scotchbond 1 XT (SB1), a 2-step Etch and Rinse adhesive, AdheSE One (ADSE-1), a 1-step Self-Etch adhesive, and AdheSE (ADSE), a 2-step Self-Etch adhesive. Teeth were thermocycled and immersed in 50% silver nitrate solution. When both interfaces were considered, SBMP has exhibited significantly less microleakage than other adhesive systems (resp., for SB1, ADSE-1 and ADSE, P = 0.0007, P adhesives, microleakage was found greater at enamel than at dentin interfaces (for ADSE, P = 0.024 and for ADSE-1, P adhesive systems, there was no significant difference between enamel and dentin interfaces; (3) SBMP was found significantly better than other adhesives both at enamel and dentin interfaces. In our experiment Etch and Rinse adhesives remain better than Self-Etch adhesives at enamel interface. In addition, there was no statistical difference between 1-step (ADSE-1) and 2-step (ADSE) Self-Etch adhesives. PMID:22675358

  13. Shear bond strength of one-step self-etch adhesives: pH influence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poggio, Claudio; Beltrami, Riccardo; Scribante, Andrea; Colombo, Marco; Chiesa, Marco

    2015-01-01

    Background: The aim of this study was to compare the shear bond strength of four one-step self-etch adhesives with different pH values to enamel and dentin. Materials and Methods: In this in vitro study, 200 bovine permanent mandibular incisors were used. Four one-step self-etch adhesives with different pH values were tested both on enamel and on dentin: Adper™ Easy Bond Self-Etch Adhesive (pH = 0.8-1), Futurabond NR (pH=2), G-aenial Bond (pH = 1.5), Clearfil S3 Bond (pH = 2.7). After adhesive systems application, a nanohybrid composite resin was inserted into the bonded surface. The specimens were placed in a universal testing machine. The shear bond strength was performed at a cross-head speed of 1 mm/min until the sample rupture. The shear bond strength values (MPa) of the different groups were compared with analysis of variance after that Kolmogorov and Smirnov tests were applied to assess normality of distributions. P enamel shear bond strength, the highest shear bond strength values were reported with Futurabond NR (P adhesive systems showed lower shear bond strength values with significant differences between them (P 0.05). Conclusion: The pH values of adhesive systems did not influence significantly their shear bond strength to enamel or dentin. PMID:26005459

  14. BOND STRENGTH OF SELF-ETCH ADHESIVES WITH PRIMARY AND PERMANENT TEETH DENTIN – IN VITRO STUDY.

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    Natalia Gateva

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of this study was to compare dentin bond strength of primary and permanent teeth with self-etching adhesive systems. Methods: On 40 intact specimens of primary and permanent teeth was created flat dentin surfaces. The patterns were divided in 4 groups. Two different self-etching adhesive systems were used – one two steps (AdheSE, VivaDent and one one step (AdheSE One, VivaDent. Resin composite build-ups were constructed by means of convetional copper ring after applying the adhesive. The specimens were stored in water for 72 h at room temperature. After that specimens were tested for macrotensile bond strength. Debonded surfaces were analyzed by SEM.Conclusions: The measured values of dentin bond strength after applying self-etching adhesives are statistically significant in group of permanent teeth in comparison with group of primary teeth, and for both adhesive generations. Two steps self-etching adhesive provide significant stronger dentin bond strength with both dentitions in comparison with one step self-etching adhesive.

  15. Bonding characteristics of self-etching adhesives to intact versus prepared enamel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perdigão, Jorge; Geraldeli, Saulo

    2003-01-01

    unprepared enamel. The field-emission scanning electron microscope revealed a deep interprismatic etching pattern for the total-etch adhesive, whereas the self-etching systems resulted in an etching pattern ranging from absent to moderate.

  16. Influence of application methods of one-step self-etching adhesives on microtensile bond strength

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    Chul-Kyu Choi,

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Objectives The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of various application methods of one-step self-etch adhesives to microtensile resin-dentin bond strength. Materials and Methods Thirty-six extracted human molars were used. The teeth were assigned randomly to twelve groups (n = 15, according to the three different adhesive systems (Clearfil Tri-S Bond, Adper Prompt L-Pop, G-Bond and application methods. The adhesive systems were applied on the dentin as follows: 1 The single coating, 2 The double coating, 3 Manual agitation, 4 Ultrasonic agitation. Following the adhesive application, light-cure composite resin was constructed. The restored teeth were stored in distilled water at room temperature for 24 hours, and prepared 15 specimens per groups. Then microtensile bond strength was measured and the failure mode was examined. Results Manual agitation and ultrasonic agitation of adhesive significantly increased the microtensile bond strength than single coating and double coating did. Double coating of adhesive significantly increased the microtensile bond strength than single coating did and there was no significant difference between the manual agitation and ultrasonic agitation group. There was significant difference in microtensile bonding strength among all adhesives and Clearfil Tri-S Bond showed the highest bond strength. Conclusions In one-step self-etching adhesives, there was significant difference according to application methods and type of adhesives. No matter of the material, the manual or ultrasonic agitation of the adhesive showed significantly higher microtensile bond strength.

  17. Evaluation of the tensile bond strength of an adhesive system self-etching in dentin irradiated with Er:YAG laser; Avaliacao da resistencia a tracao de um sistema adesivo self-etching em dentina irradiada com Er:YAG laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mello, Andrea Malluf Dabul de

    2000-07-01

    Since Buonocore (1955), several researchers have been seeking for the best adhesive system and treatment for the enamel and dentin surfaces. The use of the acid has been presented as one of the best techniques of dentin conditioning , because this promotes the removal of the 'smear layer and exhibition of dentinal structure, for a best penetration and micro- retention of the adhesive system. However, some conditioning methods have been appearing in the literature, for the substitution or interaction with the acid substances, as the laser. The objective of this work is to evaluate the tensile bond strength of the adhesive system self-etching' associated to a composed resin, in dentin surfaces conditioned with the Er:YAG laser. For this study, freshly extracted human teeth were used and in each one the dentinal surfaces , which were treated with three sandpapers of different granulations (120,400,600), to obtain a standard of the smear layer, before the irradiation of the laser and of the restoring procedure. After these procedures the specimens were storage in distilled water at 37 deg C for 24 hours. Soon after, they were submitted to the tensile strength test .After analyzing the results, we can concluded that the use of the Er:YAG laser can substitute the drill without the need of conditioning, when using the adhesive system 'self-etching' in the dentinal surfaces because there was a decline in the strength of adhesion in the groups conditioned with the laser. (author)

  18. In vitro bonding effectiveness of three different one-step self-etch adhesives with additional enamel etching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batra, Charu; Nagpal, Rajni; Tyagi, Shashi Prabha; Singh, Udai Pratap; Manuja, Naveen

    2014-08-01

    To evaluate the effect of additional enamel etching on the shear bond strength of three self-etch adhesives. Class II box type cavities were made on extracted human molars. Teeth were randomly divided into one control group of etch and rinse adhesive and three test groups of self-etch adhesives (Clearfil S3 Bond, Futurabond NR, Xeno V). The teeth in the control group (n = 10) were treated with Adper™ Single Bond 2. The three test groups were further divided into two subgroups (n = 10): (i) self-etch adhesive was applied as per the manufacturer's instructions; (ii) additional etching of enamel surfaces was done prior to the application of self-etch adhesives. All cavities were restored with Filtek Z250. After thermocycling, shear bond strength was evaluated using a Universal testing machine. Data were analyzed using anova independent sample's 't' test and Dunnett's test. The failure modes were evaluated with a stereomicroscope at a magnification of 10×. Additional phosphoric acid etching of the enamel surface prior to the application of the adhesive system significantly increased the shear bond strength of all the examined self-etch adhesives. Additional phosphoric acid etching of enamel surface significantly improved the shear bond strength. © 2013 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  19. Influence of application methods of one-step self-etching adhesives on microtensile bond strength

    OpenAIRE

    Chul-Kyu Choi,; Sung-Ae Son; Jin-Hee Ha; Bock Hur; Hyeon-Cheol Kim; Yong-Hun Kwon; Jeong-Kil Park

    2011-01-01

    Objectives The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of various application methods of one-step self-etch adhesives to microtensile resin-dentin bond strength. Materials and Methods Thirty-six extracted human molars were used. The teeth were assigned randomly to twelve groups (n = 15), according to the three different adhesive systems (Clearfil Tri-S Bond, Adper Prompt L-Pop, G-Bond) and application methods. The adhesive systems were applied on the dentin as follows: 1) T...

  20. Effect of EDTA and phosphoric Acid pretreatment on the bonding effectiveness of self-etch adhesives to ground enamel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, Ihab M; Elkassas, Dina W; Yousry, Mai M

    2010-10-01

    This in vitro study determined the effect of enamel pretreatment with phosphoric acid and ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) on the bond strength of strong, intermediary strong, and mild self-etching adhesive systems. Ninety sound human premolars were used. Resin composite cylinders were bonded to flat ground enamel surfaces using three self-etching adhesive systems: strong Adper Prompt L-Pop (pH=0.9-1.0), intermediary strong AdheSE (pH=1.6-1.7), and mild Frog (pH=2). Adhesive systems were applied either according to manufacturer instructions (control) or after pretreatment with either phosphoric acid or EDTA (n=10). After 24 hours, shear bond strength was tested using a universal testing machine at a cross-head speed of 0.5 mm/minute. Ultra-morphological characterization of the surface topography and resin/enamel interfaces as well as representative fractured enamel specimens were examined using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Neither surface pretreatment statistically increased the mean shear bond strength values of either the strong or the intermediary strong self-etching adhesive systems. However, phosphoric acid pretreatment significantly increased the mean shear bond strength values of the mild self-etching adhesive system. SEM examination of enamel surface topography showed that phosphoric acid pretreatment deepened the same etching pattern of the strong and intermediary strong adhesive systems but converted the irregular etching pattern of the mild self-etching adhesive system to a regular etching pattern. SEM examination of the resin/enamel interface revealed that deepening of the etching pattern was consistent with increase in the length of resin tags. EDTA pretreatment had a negligible effect on ultra-morphological features. Use of phosphoric acid pretreatment can be beneficial with mild self-etching adhesive systems for bonding to enamel.

  1. [Influence of thermalcycling on bonding durability of self-etch adhesives with dentin].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Fu-cong; Wang, Xiao-yan; Gao, Xue-jun

    2014-04-18

    To investigate influence of thermalcycling on the bonding durability of two one-step products [Adper Prompt (AP) and G-bond (GB)] and one two-step self-etching adhesive [Clearfil SE bond (SE)] with dentin in vitro. Forty-two extracted human molars were selected. The superficial dentin was exposed by grinding off the enamel. The teeth were randomly distributed into six groups with varied bonding protocols. The adhesives were applied to the dentin surface. Composite crowns were built up, then the samples were cut longitudinally into sticks with 1.0 mm×1.0 mm bonding area [for microtensile bond strength (MTBS) testing] or 1.0 mm thick slabs (for nanoleakage observation). Bonding performance was evaluated with or without thermalcyling. For the MTBS testing, the strength values were statistically analysed using One-Way ANOVA. Four slabs in each group were observed for nanoleakage by SEM with a backscattered electron detector. Thermalcycling procedures affected MTBS. In the two one-step groups, the MTBS decreased significantly (Padhesives showed lower MTBS than two-step bonding system after aging.For AP and GB, continuous nanoleakage appearance was notable and more obvious than for SE. Thermalcycling can affect the bonding performance of self-etch adhesives including decrease of bond strength and nanoleakage pattern. one-step self-etch adhesives showed more obvious change compared with their two-step counterparts.

  2. Effect of alternative modes of application on microleakage of one-step self-etch adhesives

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    Mustafa Ulker

    2013-12-01

    Conclusion: Alternative modes of application did not adversely affect the sealing ability of one-step self-etch adhesives. Depending on the type of adhesive, alternative modes of application may contribute to low microleakage values.

  3. Shear bond strength of one-step self-etch adhesives to enamel: effect of acid pretreatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poggio, Claudio; Scribante, Andrea; Della Zoppa, Federica; Colombo, Marco; Beltrami, Riccardo; Chiesa, Marco

    2014-02-01

    The purposes of this study were to evaluate the effect of surface pretreatment with phosphoric acid on the enamel bond strength of four-one-step self-etch adhesives with different pH values. One hundred bovine permanent mandibular incisors were used. The materials used in this study included four-one-step self-etch adhesives with different pH values: Adper(™) Easy Bond Self-Etch Adhesive (ph = 0,8-1), Futurabond NR (ph = 1,4), G-aenial Bond (ph = 1,5), Clearfil(3) S Bond (ph = 2,7). One two-step self-etch adhesive (Clearfil SE Bond/ph = 0,8-1) was used as control. The teeth were assigned into two subgroups according to bonding procedure. In the first subgroup (n = 50), no pretreatment agent was applied. In the second subgroup (n = 50), etching was performed using 37% phosphoric acid for 30 s. After adhesive systems application, a nanohybrid composite resin was inserted into the enamel surface. The specimens were placed in a universal testing machine (Model 3343, Instron Corp., Canton, Mass., USA). After the testing procedure, the fractured surfaces were examined with an optical microscope at a magnification of 10× to determine failure modes. The adhesive remnant index (ARI) was used to assess the amount of adhesive left on the enamel surface. Descriptive statistics of the shear bond strength and frequency distribution of ARI scores were calculated. Enamel pretreatment with phosphoric acid significantly increased bond strength values of all the adhesives tested. No significant differences in bond strength were detected among the four different one-step self-etch adhesives with different pH. Two-step self-etch adhesive showed the highest bond strength. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  4. Morphological Evaluation of the Adhesive/Enamel interfaces of Two-step Self-etching Adhesives and Multimode One-bottle Self-etching Adhesives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Takaaki; Takagaki, Tomohiro; Matsui, Naoko; Hamba, Hidenori; Sadr, Alireza; Nikaido, Toru; Tagami, Junji

    To evaluate the acid-base resistant zone (ABRZ) at the adhesive/enamel interface of self-etching adhesives with or without prior phosphoric acid etching. Four adhesives were used in 8 groups: Clearfil SE Bond (SEB), Optibond XTR (XTR), Scotchbond Universal Adhesive (SBU), and Clearfil BOND SE ONE (ONE) without prior phosphoric-acid etching, and each adhesive with phosphoric acid etching for 10 s (P-SEB, P-XTR, P-SBU and P-ONE, respectively). After application of self-etching adhesives on ground enamel surfaces of human teeth, a flowable composite was placed. For observation of the acid-base resistant zone (ABRZ), the bonded interface was exposed to demineralizing solution (pH 4.5) for 4.5 h, followed by 5% NaOCl with ultrasonication for 20 min. After the acid-base challenge, morphological attributes of the interface were observed using SEM. ABRZ formation was confirmed in all groups. The funnel-shaped erosion beneath the interface was present in SBU and ONE, where nearly 10 to 15 μm of enamel was dissolved. With phosphoric acid etching, the ABRZs were obviously thicker compared with no phosphoric acid etching. Enamel beneath the bonding interface was more susceptible to acid dissolution in SBU and ONE. In the case of the one-bottle self-etching adhesives and universal adhesives that intrinsically have higher pH values, enamel etching should be recommended to improve the interfacial quality.

  5. Bond strength of one-step self-etch adhesives and their predecessors to ground versus unground enamel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yazici, A. Ruya; Yildirim, Zeren; Ertan, Atila; Ozgunaltay, Gül; Dayangac, Berrin; Antonson, Sibel A; Antonson, Donald E

    2012-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to compare the shear bond strength of several self-etch adhesives to their two-step predecessors to ground and unground enamel. Methods: Seventy-five extracted, non-carious human third molar teeth were selected for this study. The buccal surfaces of each tooth were mechanically ground to obtain flat enamel surfaces (ground enamel), while the lingual surfaces were left intact (unground enamel). The teeth were randomly divided into five groups according to the adhesive systems (n=15): one-step self-etch adhesive - Clearfil S3 Bond, its two-step predecessor - Clearfil SE Bond, one-step self-etch adhesive - AdheSE One, and its two-step predecessor - AdheSE, and a two-step etch-and-rinse adhesive - Adper Single Bond 2(control). After application of the adhesives to the buccal and lingual enamel surfaces of each tooth, a cylindrical capsule filled with a hybrid composite resin (TPH) was seated against the surfaces. The specimens were stored in distilled water at 37°C for 24 hours, followed by thermocy-cling (5°C–55°C/500 cycles). They were subjected to shear bond strength test in a universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 1.0 mm/minute. The data were compared using a two-way ANOVA, followed by Bonferroni test at Padhesives exhibited statistically similar bond strengths to ground and unground enamel except for the etch-and-rinse adhesive that showed significantly higher bond strengths than the self-etch adhesives (Penamel for any of the adhesives tested (P=.17). Conclusion: Similar bond strengths to ground and unground enamel were achieved with one-step self-etch adhesives and their predecessors. Enamel preparation did not influence the bonding performance of the adhesives tested. PMID:22904656

  6. Bond strength of one-step self-etch adhesives and their predecessors to ground versus unground enamel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yazici, A Ruya; Yildirim, Zeren; Ertan, Atila; Ozgunaltay, Gül; Dayangac, Berrin; Antonson, Sibel A; Antonson, Donald E

    2012-07-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the shear bond strength of several self-etch adhesives to their two-step predecessors to ground and unground enamel. Seventy-five extracted, non-carious human third molar teeth were selected for this study. The buccal surfaces of each tooth were mechanically ground to obtain flat enamel surfaces (ground enamel), while the lingual surfaces were left intact (unground enamel). The teeth were randomly divided into five groups according to the adhesive systems (n=15): one-step self-etch adhesive - Clearfil S3 Bond, its two-step predecessor - Clearfil SE Bond, one-step self-etch adhesive - AdheSE One, and its two-step predecessor - AdheSE, and a two-step etch-and-rinse adhesive - Adper Single Bond 2(control). After application of the adhesives to the buccal and lingual enamel surfaces of each tooth, a cylindrical capsule filled with a hybrid composite resin (TPH) was seated against the surfaces. The specimens were stored in distilled water at 37°C for 24 hours, followed by thermocy-cling (5°C-55°C/500 cycles). They were subjected to shear bond strength test in a universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 1.0 mm/minute. The data were compared using a two-way ANOVA, followed by Bonferroni test at Padhesives exhibited statistically similar bond strengths to ground and unground enamel except for the etch-and-rinse adhesive that showed significantly higher bond strengths than the self-etch adhesives (Padhesives tested (P=.17). Similar bond strengths to ground and unground enamel were achieved with one-step self-etch adhesives and their predecessors. Enamel preparation did not influence the bonding performance of the adhesives tested.

  7. Effect of Phosphoric Acid Pre-etching on Fatigue Limits of Self-etching Adhesives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takamizawa, T; Barkmeier, W W; Tsujimoto, A; Scheidel, D D; Erickson, R L; Latta, M A; Miyazaki, M

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to use shear bond strength (SBS) and shear fatigue limit (SFL) testing to determine the effect of phosphoric acid pre-etching of enamel and dentin prior to application of self-etch adhesives for bonding resin composite to these substrates. Three self-etch adhesives--1) G- ænial Bond (GC Corporation, Tokyo, Japan); 2) OptiBond XTR (Kerr Corp, Orange, CA, USA); and 3) Scotchbond Universal (3M ESPE Dental Products, St Paul, MN, USA)--were used to bond Z100 Restorative resin composite to enamel and dentin surfaces. A stainless-steel metal ring with an inner diameter of 2.4 mm was used to bond the resin composite to flat-ground (4000 grit) tooth surfaces for determination of both SBS and SFL. Fifteen specimens each were used to determine initial SBS to human enamel/dentin, with and without pre-etching with a 35% phosphoric acid (Ultra-Etch, Ultradent Products Inc, South Jordan, UT, USA) for 15 seconds prior to the application of the adhesives. A staircase method of fatigue testing (25 specimens for each test) was then used to determine the SFL of resin composite bonded to enamel/dentin using a frequency of 10 Hz for 50,000 cycles or until failure occurred. A two-way analysis of variance and Tukey post hoc test were used for analysis of SBS data, and a modified t-test with Bonferroni correction was used for the SFL data. Scanning electron microscopy was used to examine the area of the bonded restorative/tooth interface. For all three adhesive systems, phosphoric acid pre-etching of enamel demonstrated significantly higher (padhesives clearly demonstrated different tendencies between enamel and dentin. The effect of using phosphoric acid, prior to the application of the self-etching adhesives, on SBS and SFL was dependent on the adhesive material and tooth substrate and should be carefully considered in clinical situations.

  8. Bond strength of composite to dentin: effect of acid etching and laser irradiation through an uncured self-etch adhesive system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castro, F L A; Carvalho, J G; Andrade, M F; Saad, J R C; Hebling, J; Lizarelli, R F Z

    2014-01-01

    This study evaluated the effect on micro-tensile bond strength (µ-TBS) of laser irradiation of etched/unetched dentin through an uncured self-etching adhesive. Dentinal surfaces were treated with Clearfil SE Bond Adhesive (CSE) either according to the manufacturer’s instructions (CSE) or without applying the primer (CSE/NP). The dentin was irradiated through the uncured adhesive, using an Nd:YAG laser at 0.75 or 1 W power settings. The adhesive was cured, composite crowns were built up, and the teeth were sectioned into beams (0.49 mm 2 ) to be stressed under tension. Data were analyzed using one-way ANOVA and Tukey statistics (α = 5%). Dentin of the fractured specimens and the interfaces of untested beams were observed under scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The results showed that non-etched irradiated surfaces presented higher µ-TBS than etched and irradiated surfaces (p < 0.05). Laser irradiation alone did not lead to differences in µ-TBS (p > 0.05). SEM showed solidification globules on the surfaces of the specimens. The interfaces were similar on irradiated and non-irradiated surfaces. Laser irradiation of dentin through the uncured adhesive did not lead to higher µ-TBS when compared to the suggested manufacturer’s technique. However, this treatment brought benefits when performed on unetched dentin, since bond strengths were higher when compared to etched dentin. (paper)

  9. Shear bond strength of one-step self-etch adhesives to dentin: Evaluation of NaOCl pretreatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colombo, Marco; Beltrami, Riccardo; Chiesa, Marco; Poggio, Claudio; Scribante, Andrea

    2018-02-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of dentin pretreatment with NaOCl on shear bond strength of four one-step self-etch adhesives with different pH values. Bovine permanent incisors were used. Four one-step self-etch adhesives were tested: Adper™ Easy Bond, Futurabond NR, G-aenial Bond, Clearfil S3 Bond. One two-step self-etch adhesive (Clearfil SE Bond) was used as control. Group 1- no pretreatment; group 2- pretratment with 5,25 % NaOCl; group 3- pretreatment with 37 % H3PO4 etching and 5,25 % NaOCl. A hybrid composite resin was inserted into the dentin surface. The specimens were tested in a universal testing machine. The examiners evaluated the fractured surfaces in optical microscope to determine failure modes, quantified with adhesive remnant index (ARI). Dentin pretreatment variably influenced bond strength values of the different adhesive systems. When no dentin pretreatment was applied, no significant differences were found ( P >.05) among four adhesives tested. No significant differences were recorded when comparing NaOCl pretreatment with H3PO4 + NaOCl pretreatment for all adhesive tested ( P >.05) except Clearfil S3 Bond that showed higher shear bond strength values when H3PO4 was applied. Frequencies of ARI scores were calculated. The influence of dentin pretreatment with NaOCl depends on the composition of each adhesive system used. There was no difference in bond strength values among self-etch adhesives with different pH values. Key words: Dentin, pretreatment, self-etch adhesives.

  10. Can previous acid etching increase the bond strength of a self-etching primer adhesive to enamel?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Paula Morales Cobra Carvalho

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Because a greater research effort has been directed to analyzing the adhesive effectiveness of self etch primers to dentin, the aim of this study was to evaluate, by microtensile testing, the bond strength to enamel of a composite resin combined with a conventional adhesive system or with a self-etching primer adhesive, used according to its original prescription or used with previous acid etching. Thirty bovine teeth were divided into 3 groups with 10 teeth each (n= 10. In one of the groups, a self-etching primer (Clearfil SE Bond - Kuraray was applied in accordance with the manufacturer's instructions and, in the other, it was applied after previous acid etching. In the third group, a conventional adhesive system (Scotchbond Multipurpose Plus - 3M-ESPE was applied in accordance with the manufacturer's instructions. The results obtained by analysis of variance revealed significant differences between the adhesive systems (F = 22.31. The self-etching primer (Clearfil SE Bond presented lower enamel bond strength values than the conventional adhesive system (Scotchbond Multipurpose Plus (m = 39.70 ± 7.07 MPa both when used according to the original prescription (m = 27.81 ± 2.64 MPa and with previous acid etching (m = 25.08 ± 4.92 MPa.

  11. Micromorphological characterization of adhesive interface of sound dentin and total-etch and self-etch adhesives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drobac, Milan; Stojanac, Igor; Ramić, Bojana; Premović, Milica; Petrović, Ljubomir

    2015-01-01

    The ultimate goal in restorative dentistry has always been to achieve strong and permanent bond between the dental tissues and filling materials. It is not easy to achieve this task because the bonding process is different for enamel and dentin-dentin is more humid and more organic than enamel. It is moisture and organic nature of dentin that make this hard tissue very complex to achieve adhesive bond. One of the first and most widely used tools for examining the adhesive bond between hard dental tissues and composite restorative materials is scanning electron microscopy. The aim of this study was scanning electron microscopy analyzes the interfacial micro morphology of total-etch and self-etch adhesives. Micro morphological characteristics of interface between total-etch adhesive (Prime & Bond NT) in combination with the corresponding composite (Ceram X Mono) were compared with those of self-etching adhesive (AdheSE One) in, combination with the corresponding composite (Tetric EvoCeram). The specimens were observed under 1000 x magnification of scanning electron microscopy (JEOL, JSM-6460 Low Vacuum). Measurement of the thickness of the hybrid layer of the examined com posite systems was performed with the software of the device used (NIH Image Analyser). Micromorphological analysis of interface showed that the hybrid layer in sound dentin was well formed, its average thickness being 2.68 microm, with a large number of resin tags and a large amount of lateral branches for specimens with a composite system Prime & Bond NT-Ceram X Mono. However, the specimens' with composite systems Adhese One-Tetric EvoCeram did not show the presence of hybrid layer and the resin tags were poorly represented. The results of this study suggest that total-etch adhesives bond better with sound dentin than self-etch adhesive.

  12. Does active application of universal adhesives to enamel in self-etch mode improve their performance?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loguercio, Alessandro D; Muñoz, Miguel Angel; Luque-Martinez, Issis; Hass, Viviane; Reis, Alessandra; Perdigão, Jorge

    2015-09-01

    To evaluate the effect of adhesion strategy on the enamel microshear bond strengths (μSBS), etching pattern, and in situ degree of conversion (DC) of seven universal adhesives. 84 extracted third molars were sectioned in four parts (buccal, lingual, proximal) and divided into 21 groups, according to the combination of the main factors adhesive (AdheSE Universal [ADU], All-Bond Universal [ABU], Clearfil Universal [CFU], Futurabond U [FBU], G-Bond Plus [GBP], Prime&Bond Elect (PBE), and Scotchbond Universal Adhesive [SBU]), and adhesion strategy (etch-and-rinse, active self-etch, and passive self-etch). Specimens were stored in water (37°C/24h) and tested at 1.0mm/min (μSBS). Enamel-resin interfaces were evaluated for DC using micro-Raman spectroscopy. The enamel-etching pattern was evaluated under a field-emission scanning electron microscope (direct and replica techniques). Data were analyzed with two-way ANOVA and Tukey's test (α=0.05). Active self-etch application increased μSBS and DC for five out of the seven universal adhesives when compared to passive application (padhesives in the etch-and-rinse strategy. A slight improvement in etching ability was observed in active self-etch application compared to that of passive self-etch application. Replicas of GBP and PBE applied in active self-etch mode displayed morphological features compatible with water droplets. The DC of GBP and PBE were not affected by the application/strategy mode. In light of the improved performance of universal adhesives when applied actively in SE mode, selective enamel etching with phosphoric acid may not be crucial for their adhesion to enamel. The active application of universal adhesives in self-etch mode may be a practical alternative to enamel etching in specific clinical situations. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Bond strength of etch-and-rinse and self-etch adhesive systems to enamel and dentin irradiated with a novel CO2 9.3 μm short-pulsed laser for dental restorative procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rechmann, Peter; Bartolome, N; Kinsel, R; Vaderhobli, R; Rechmann, B M T

    2017-12-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the influence of CO 2 9.3 μm short-pulsed laser irradiation on the shear bond strength of composite resin to enamel and dentin. Two hundred enamel and 210 dentin samples were irradiated with a 9.3 µm carbon dioxide laser (Solea, Convergent Dental, Inc., Natick, MA) with energies which either enhanced caries resistance or were effective for ablation. OptiBond Solo Plus [OptiBondTE] (Kerr Corporation, Orange, CA) and Peak Universal Bond light-cured adhesive [PeakTE] (Ultradent Products, South Jordan, UT) were used. In addition, Scotchbond Universal [ScotchbondSE] (3M ESPE, St. Paul, MN) and Peak SE self-etching primer with Peak Universal Bond light-cured adhesive [PeakSE] (Ultradent Products) were tested. Clearfil APX (Kuraray, New York, NY) was bonded to the samples. After 24 h, a single plane shear bond test was performed. Using the caries preventive setting on enamel resulted in increased shear bond strength for all bonding agents except for self-etch PeakSE. The highest overall bond strength was seen with PeakTE (41.29 ± 6.04 MPa). Etch-and-rinse systems achieved higher bond strength values to ablated enamel than the self-etch systems did. PeakTE showed the highest shear bond strength with 35.22 ± 4.40 MPa. OptiBondTE reached 93.8% of its control value. The self-etch system PeakSE presented significantly lower bond strength. The shear bond strength to dentin ranged between 19.15 ± 3.49 MPa for OptiBondTE and 43.94 ± 6.47 MPa for PeakSE. Etch-and-rinse systems had consistently higher bond strength to CO 2 9.3 µm laser-ablated enamel. Using the maximum recommended energy for dentin ablation, the self-etch system PeakSE reached the highest bond strength (43.9 ± 6.5 MPa).

  14. Enamel microhardness and bond strengths of self-etching primer adhesives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adebayo, Olabisi A; Burrow, Michael F; Tyas, Martin J; Adams, Geoffrey G; Collins, Marnie L

    2010-04-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the relationship between enamel surface microhardness and microshear bond strength (microSBS). Buccal and lingual mid-coronal enamel sections were prepared from 22 permanent human molars and divided into two groups, each comprising the buccal and lingual enamel from 11 teeth, to analyze two self-etching primer adhesives (Clearfil SE Bond and Tokuyama Bond Force). One-half of each enamel surface was tested using the Vickers hardness test with 10 indentations at 1 N and a 15-s dwell time. A hybrid resin composite was bonded to the other half of the enamel surface with the adhesive system assigned to the group. After 24 h of water storage of specimens at 37 degrees C, the microSBS test was carried out on a universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 1 mm min(-1) until bond failure occurred. The mean microSBS was regressed on the mean Vickers hardness number (VHN) using a weighted regression analysis in order to explore the relationship between enamel hardness and microSBS. The weights used were the inverse of the variance of the microSBS means. Neither separate correlation analyses for each adhesive nor combined regression analyses showed a significant correlation between the VHN and the microSBS. These results suggest that the microSBS of the self-etch adhesive systems are not influenced by enamel surface microhardness.

  15. Shear bond strength of self-etch adhesives to enamel with additional phosphoric acid etching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lührs, Anne-Katrin; Guhr, Silke; Schilke, Reinhard; Borchers, Lothar; Geurtsen, Werner; Günay, Hüsamettin

    2008-01-01

    This study evaluated the shear bond strength of self-etch adhesives to enamel and the effect of additional phosphoric acid etching. Seventy sound human molars were randomly divided into three test groups and one control group. The enamel surfaces of the control group (n=10) were treated with Syntac Classic (SC). Each test group was subdivided into two groups (each n=10). In half of each test group, ground enamel surfaces were coated with the self-etch adhesives AdheSe (ADH), Xeno III (XE) or Futurabond NR (FNR). In the remaining half of each test group, an additional phosphoric acid etching of the enamel surface was performed prior to applying the adhesives. The shear bond strength was measured with a universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 1 mm/minute after storing the samples in distilled water at 37 degrees C for 24 hours. Fracture modes were determined by SEM examination. For statistical analysis, one-way ANOVA and the two-sided Dunnett Test were used (p>0.05). Additional phosphoric etching significantly increased the shear bond strength of all the examined self-etch adhesives (padhesive fractures. For all the self-etch adhesives, a slight increase in mixed fractures occurred after conditioning with phosphoric acid. An additional phosphoric acid etching of enamel should be considered when using self-etch adhesives. More clinical studies are needed to evaluate the long-term success of the examined adhesives.

  16. Effect of evaporation of solvents from one-step, self-etching adhesives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Furuse, Adilson Yoshio; Peutzfeldt, Anne; Asmussen, Erik

    2008-01-01

    PURPOSE: To investigate whether and to what extent the bonding capacity of one-step, self-etching adhesives is influenced by the degree to which solvent is evaporated. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Seven one-step, self-etching adhesives were tested (Adper Prompt L-Pop, Clearfil S3 Bond, Futurabond NR, G....... After being stored in water at 37 degrees C for 1 week, the bonded specimens were broken in shear. Failure modes were evaluated under stereomicroscope. RESULTS: Air-blowing duration and brand of adhesive both had an effect on shear bond strength. An interaction was found between adhesive and air...... failures were observed with shorter air-blowing durations. A significant negative correlation between number of adhesive failures and bond strength was found. CONCLUSION: On the basis of this in vitro study, it may be concluded that the one-step, self-etching adhesives evaluated were sensitive to degree...

  17. Effect of pre-etching on sealing ability of two current self-etching adhesives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K Khosravi

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: We evaluated the effect of phosphoric acid etching on microleakage of two current self-etching adhesives on enamel margins in comparison to a conventional total- etch system. Methods: Sixty buccal class V cavities were made at the cemento-enamel junction with beveled enamel margins of extracted human premolar teeth and randomly divided into five groups (12 specimens in each group. Group 1 was applying with Clearfil SE bond, Group 2 with 35% phosphoric acid etching of enamel margins plus Clearfil SE bond, Group3 with I bond, Group 4 with 35% phosphoric acid etching of enamel margins plus I bond and Group5 with Scotchbond multi-purpose. All groups restored with a composite resins. After 24 hours storage with 100% humidity, the samples were thermocycled, immersed in a dye solution and sectioned buccoligually and enamel margins microleakage were evaluated on a scale of 0 to 2. Results: The differences between Groups 1 & 3 and Groups 3 & 4 were significant (P<0.05 but no significant differences between Groups1 & 2 or 1 & 5 were observed. Conclusion: The findings suggest that all-in-one adhesive systems need pre-etching enamel margins with phosphoric acid for effectively seal. Key words: Self-Etching Adhesives, Microleakage, Enamel, Total-Etch system

  18. Influence of Pre-etching Times on Fatigue Strength of Self-etch Adhesives to Enamel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takamizawa, Toshiki; Barkmeier, Wayne W; Tsujimoto, Akimasa; Endo, Hajime; Tsuchiya, Kenji; Erickson, Robert L; Latta, Mark A; Miyazaki, Masashi

    To use shear bond strength (SBS) and shear fatigue strength (SFS) testing to determine the influence of phosphoric acid pre-etching times prior to application of self-etch adhesives on enamel bonding. Two single-step self-etch universal adhesives (Prime&Bond Elect and Scotchbond Universal), a conventional single-step self-etch adhesive (G-ӕnial Bond), and a conventional two-step self-etch adhesive (OptiBond XTR) were used. The SBS and SFS were obtained with phosphoric acid pre-etching for 3, 10, or 15 s prior to application of the adhesives, and without pre-etching (0 s) as a control. A staircase method was used to determine the SFS with 10 Hz frequency for 50,000 cycles or until failure occurred. The mean demineralization depth for each treated enamel surface was also measured using a profilometer. For all the adhesives, the groups with pre-etching showed significantly higher SBS and SFS than groups without pre-etching. However, there was no significant difference in SBS and SFS among groups with > 3 s of preetching. In addition, although the groups with pre-etching showed significantly deeper demineralization depths than groups without pre-etching, there was no significant difference in depth among groups with > 3 s of pre-etching. Three seconds of phosphoric acid pre-etching prior to application of self-etch adhesive can enhance enamel bonding effectiveness.

  19. Influence of hydrostatic pulpal pressure on the microtensile bond strength of all-in-one self-etching adhesives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosaka, Keiichi; Nakajima, Masatoshi; Monticelli, Francesca; Carrilho, Marcela; Yamauti, Monica; Aksornmuang, Juthatip; Nishitani, Yoshihiro; Tay, Franklin R; Pashley, David H; Tagami, Junji

    2007-10-01

    To evaluate the microtensile bond strength (microTBS) of two all-in-one self-etching adhesive systems and two self-etching adhesives with and without simulated hydrostatic pulpal pressure (PP). Flat coronal dentin surfaces of extracted human molars were prepared. Two all-in-one self-etching adhesive systems, One-Up Bond F (OBF; Tokuyama) and Clearfil S3 Bond (Tri-S, Kuraray Medical) and two self-etching primer adhesives, Clearfil Protect Bond (PB; Kuraray) and Clearfil SE Bond (SE; Kuraray) were applied to the dentin surfaces according to manufacturers' instructions under either a pulpal pressure (PP) of zero or 15 cm H2O. A hybrid resin composite (Clearfil AP-X, Kuraray) was used for the coronal buildup. Specimens bonded under PP were stored in water at 37 degrees C under 15 cm H2O for 24 h. Specimens not bonded under PP were stored under a PP of zero. After storage, the bonded specimens were sectioned into slabs that were trimmed to hourglass-shaped specimens, and were subjected to microtensile bond testing (microTBS). The bond strength data were statistically analyzed using two-way ANOVA and the Holm-Sidak method for multiple comparison tests (alpha = 0.05). The surface area percentage of different failure modes for each material was also statistically analyzed with three one-way ANOVAs and Tukey's multiple comparison tests. The microTBS of OBF and Tri-S fell significantly under PP. However, in the, PB and SE bonded specimens under PP, there were no significant differences compared with the control groups without PP. The microTBS of the two all-in-one adhesive systems decreased when PP was applied. However, the microTBS of both self-etching primer adhesives did not decrease under PP.

  20. Microleakage after Thermocycling of Three Self-Etch Adhesives under Resin-Modified Glass-Ionomer Cement Restorations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabine O. Geerts

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This study was designed to evaluate microleakage that appeared on Resin-Modified Glass-Ionomer Cement (RMGIC restorations. Sixty class V cavities (h×w×l=2mm×2mm×3mm were cut on thirty extracted third molars, which were randomly allocated to three experimental groups. All the buccal cavities were pretreated with polyacrylic acid, whereas the lingual cavities were treated with three one-step Self-Etch adhesives, respectively, Xeno III (Dentsply Detrey GmbH, Konstanz, Germany, iBond exp (Heraeus Kulzer gmbH & Co. KG, Hanau, Germany, and Adper Prompt-L-Pop (3M ESPE AG, Dental products Seefeld, Germany. All cavities were completely filled with RMGIC, teeth were thermocycled for 800 cycles, and leakage was evaluated. Results were expressed as means ± standard deviations (SDs. Microleakage scores were analysed by means of generalized linear mixed models (GLMMs assuming an ordinal logistic link function. All results were considered to be significant at the 5% critical level (<.05. The results showed that bonding RMGIC to dentin with a Self-Etch adhesive rather than using polyacrylic acid did not influence microleakage scores (=.091, except for one tested Self-Etch adhesive, namely, Xeno III (<.0001. Nevertheless, our results did not show any significant difference between the three tested Self-Etch adhesive systems. In conclusion, the pretreatment of dentin with Self-Etch adhesive system, before RMGIC filling, seems to be an alternative to the conventional Dentin Conditioner for the clinicians as suggested by our results (thermocycling and others (microtensile tests.

  1. Effect of different air-drying time on the microleakage of single-step self-etch adhesives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Horieh Moosavi

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Objectives This study evaluated the effect of three different air-drying times on microleakage of three self-etch adhesive systems. Materials and Methods Class I cavities were prepared for 108 extracted sound human premolars. The teeth were divided into three main groups based on three different adhesives: Opti Bond All in One (OBAO, Clearfil S3 Bond (CSB, Bond Force (BF. Each main group divided into three subgroups regarding the air-drying time: without application of air stream, following the manufacturer's instruction, for 10 sec more than manufacturer's instruction. After completion of restorations, specimens were thermocycled and then connected to a fluid filtration system to evaluate microleakage. The data were statistically analyzed using two-way ANOVA and Tukey-test (α = 0.05. Results The microleakage of all adhesives decreased when the air-drying time increased from 0 sec to manufacturer's instruction (p < 0.001. The microleakage of BF reached its lowest values after increasing the drying time to 10 sec more than the manufacturer's instruction (p < 0.001. Microleakage of OBAO and CSB was significantly lower compared to BF in all three drying time (p < 0.001. Conclusions Increasing in air-drying time of adhesive layer in one-step self-etch adhesives caused reduction of microleakage, but the amount of this reduction may be dependent on the adhesive components of self-etch adhesives.

  2. Bond strength of self-etch adhesives after saliva contamination at different application steps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cobanoglu, N; Unlu, N; Ozer, F F; Blatz, M B

    2013-01-01

    This study evaluated and compared the effect of saliva contamination and possible decontamination methods on bond strengths of two self-etching adhesive systems (Clearfil SE Bond [CSE], Optibond Solo Plus SE [OSE]). Flat occlusal dentin surfaces were created on 180 extracted human molar teeth. The two bonding systems and corresponding composite resins (Clearfil AP-X, Kerr Point 4) were bonded to the dentin under six surface conditions (n=15/group): group 1 (control): primer/bonding/composite; group 2: saliva/drying/primer/bonding/composite; group 3: primer/saliva/rinsing/drying/primer/bonding/composite; group 4: primer/saliva/rinsing/drying/bonding/composite; group 5: primer/bonding (cured)/saliva/rinsing/drying/primer/bonding/composite; group 6: primer/bonding (cured)/saliva/removing contaminated layer with a bur/rinsing/drying/primer/bonding/composite. Shear bond strength was tested after specimens were stored in distilled water at 37°C for 24 hours. One-way analysis of variance and Tukey post hoc tests were used for statistical analyses. For CSE, groups 2, 3, and 4 and for OSE, groups 6, 2, and 4 showed significantly lower bond strengths than the control group (pcontamination occurred after light polymerization of the bonding agent, repeating the bonding procedure recovered the bonding capacity of both self-etch adhesives. However, saliva contamination before or after primer application negatively affected their bond strength.

  3. Effect of different air-drying time on the microleakage of single-step self-etch adhesives

    OpenAIRE

    Moosavi, Horieh; Forghani, Maryam; Managhebi, Esmatsadat

    2013-01-01

    Objectives This study evaluated the effect of three different air-drying times on microleakage of three self-etch adhesive systems. Materials and Methods Class I cavities were prepared for 108 extracted sound human premolars. The teeth were divided into three main groups based on three different adhesives: Opti Bond All in One (OBAO), Clearfil S3 Bond (CSB), Bond Force (BF). Each main group divided into three subgroups regarding the air-drying time: without application of air stream...

  4. Two-year water degradation of self-etching adhesives bonded to bur ground enamel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdalla, Ali I; Feilzer, Albert J

    2009-01-01

    To evaluate the effect of water storage on the microshear bond strength to ground enamel of three "all-in-one" self-etch adhesives: Futurabond DC, Clearfil S Tri Bond and Hybrid bond; a self-etching primer; Clearfil SE Bond and an etch-and-rinse adhesive system, Admira Bond. Sixty human molars were used. The root of each tooth was removed and the crown was sectioned into two halves. The convex enamel surfaces were reduced by polishing on silicon paper to prepare a flat surface that was roughened with a parallel-sided diamond bur with abundant water for five seconds. The bonding systems were applied on this surface. Prior to adhesive curing, a hollow cylinder (2.0 mm in height/0.75 mm in internal diameter) was placed on the treated surfaces and cured. A resin composite was then inserted into the tube and cured. For each adhesive, two procedures were carried out: A--the specimens were kept in water for 24 hours, then the tube was removed and the microshear bond strength was determined in a universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/minute; B--the specimens were stored in water for two-years before microshear testing. The fractured surface of the bonded specimens after each test procedure was examined by SEM. For the 24-hour control, there was no significant difference in bond strength between the tested adhesives. After two years of water storage, the bond strength of Admira Bond, Clearfil SE Bond and Futurabond DC decreased, but the reduction was not significantly different from that of 24 hours. For Clearfil S Tri Bond and Hybrid Bond, the bond strengths were significantly reduced compared to their 24-hour results.

  5. Bond durability of universal adhesive to bovine enamel using self-etch mode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Soshi; Takamizawa, Toshiki; Imai, Arisa; Tsujimoto, Akimasa; Sai, Keiichi; Takimoto, Masayuki; Barkmeier, Wayne W; Latta, Mark A; Miyazaki, Masashi

    2018-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the enamel bond durability of universal adhesives in the self-etch mode under 2-year water storage and thermal cycling conditions. Three commercially available universal adhesives and a gold standard two-step self-etch adhesive were used. Ten specimens of bovine enamel were prepared per test group, and shear bond strength (SBS) was measured to determine the bonding durability after thermal cycling (TC) or long-term water storage (WS). The bonded specimens were divided into three groups: (1) specimens subjected to TC, where the bonded specimens were stored in 37 °C distilled water for 24 h before being subjected to 3000, 10,000, 20,000 or 30,000 TC; (2) specimens stored in 37 °C distilled water for 3 months, 6 months, 1 year or 2 year; and (3) specimens stored in 37 °C distilled water for 24 h, serving as a baseline. The two-step self-etch adhesive showed significantly higher SBS than the universal adhesives tested, regardless of the type of degradation method. All universal adhesives showed no significant enamel SBS reductions in TC and WS, when compared to baseline and the other degradation conditions. Compared to the bond strengths obtained with the two-step self-etch adhesive, significantly lower bond strengths were obtained with universal adhesives. However, the enamel bond durability of universal adhesives was relatively stable under both degradation conditions tested. The present data indicate that the enamel bond durability of universal adhesives in the self-etch mode might be sufficient for clinical use.

  6. Improved degree of conversion of model self-etching adhesives through their interaction with dentin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ying; Wang, Yong

    2011-01-01

    Objective To investigate the correlation of the chemical interaction between model self-etching adhesives and dentin with the degree of conversion (DC) of the adhesives. Methods The model self-etching adhesives contained bis[2-methacryloyloxy)ethyl] phosphate (2MP) and 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA) with a mass ratio of 1/1, and 0-40% water contents, respectively. The adhesives were applied either onto the prepared dentin surface or unreactive substrates (such as glass slides), agitated for 15s, then light-cured for 40s. The DCs of the adhesives were determined using micro-Raman spectral and mapping analysis. Results The DCs of the adhesives cured on the dentin substrate were found to be significantly higher than those on the unreactive glass substrate. Moreover, the DCs of the adhesives displayed a decreasing trend as the distance from the dentin surface became greater. The chemical interaction of the acidic 2MP/HEMA adhesives with the mineral apatite in dentin was proposed to play a significant role for the observations. The chemical interaction could be validated by the spectral comparison in the phosphate regions of 1100 cm−1 and 960 cm−1 in the Raman spectra. The results also revealed a notable influence of water content on the DC of adhesives. The DCs of the adhesive at 10% water content exhibited the highest DC level for both substrates. Conclusions Interaction with dentin dramatically improved the degree of conversion of self-etching adhesives. Our ability to chemically characterize the a/d interface including in situ detection of the DC distribution is very important in understanding self-etching adhesive bonding under in vivo conditions. PMID:22024375

  7. Improved degree of conversion of model self-etching adhesives through their interaction with dentine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ying; Wang, Yong

    2012-01-01

    To investigate the correlation of the chemical interaction between model self-etching adhesives and dentine with the degree of conversion (DC) of the adhesives. The model self-etching adhesives contained bis[2-methacryloyloxy)ethyl] phosphate (2MP) and 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA) with a mass ratio of 1/1, and 0-40% water contents, respectively. The adhesives were applied either onto the prepared dentine surface or unreactive substrates (such as glass slides), agitated for 15s, then light-cured for 40s. The DCs of the adhesives were determined using micro-Raman spectral and mapping analysis. The DCs of the adhesives cured on the dentine substrate were found to be significantly higher than those on the unreactive glass substrate. Moreover, the DCs of the adhesives displayed a decreasing trend as the distance from the dentine surface became greater. The chemical interaction of the acidic 2MP/HEMA adhesives with the mineral apatite in dentine was proposed to play a significant role for the observations. The chemical interaction could be validated by the spectral comparison in the phosphate regions of 1100 cm(-1) and 960 cm(-1) in the Raman spectra. The results also revealed a notable influence of water content on the DC of adhesives. The DCs of the adhesive at 10% water content exhibited the highest DC level for both substrates. Interaction with dentine dramatically improved the degree of conversion of self-etching adhesives. Our ability to chemically characterise the a/d interface including in situ detection of the DC distribution is very important in understanding self-etching adhesive bonding under in vivo conditions. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Two methods to simulate intrapulpal pressure: effects upon bonding performance of self-etch adhesives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feitosa, V P; Gotti, V B; Grohmann, C V; Abuná, G; Correr-Sobrinho, L; Sinhoreti, M A C; Correr, A B

    2014-09-01

    To evaluate the effects of two methods to simulate physiological pulpal pressure on the dentine bonding performance of two all-in-one adhesives and a two-step self-etch silorane-based adhesive by means of microtensile bond strength (μTBS) and nanoleakage surveys. The self-etch adhesives [G-Bond Plus (GB), Adper Easy Bond (EB) and silorane adhesive (SIL)] were applied to flat deep dentine surfaces from extracted human molars. The restorations were constructed using resin composites Filtek Silorane or Filtek Z350 (3M ESPE). After 24 h using the two methods of simulated pulpal pressure or no pulpal pressure (control groups), the bonded teeth were cut into specimens and submitted to μTBS and silver uptake examination. Results were analysed with two-way anova and Tukey's test (P adhesives. No difference between control and pulpal pressure groups was found for SIL and GB. EB led significant drop (P = 0.002) in bond strength under pulpal pressure. Silver impregnation was increased after both methods of simulated pulpal pressure for all adhesives, and it was similar between the simulated pulpal pressure methods. The innovative method to simulate pulpal pressure behaved similarly to the classic one and could be used as an alternative. The HEMA-free one-step and the two-step self-etch adhesives had acceptable resistance against pulpal pressure, unlike the HEMA-rich adhesive. © 2013 International Endodontic Journal. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Light-Cured Self-Etch Adhesives Undergo Hydroxyapatite-Triggered Self-Cure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Y.; Bai, X.; Liu, Y.W.; Wang, Y.

    2015-01-01

    Light cure is a popular mode of curing for dental adhesives. However, it suffers from inadequate light delivery when the restoration site is less accessible, in which case a self-cure mechanism is desirable to salvage any compromised polymerization. We previously reported a novel self-cure system mediated by ethyl 4-(dimethylamino)-benzoate (4E) and hydroxyapatite (HAp). The present work aims to investigate if such self-cure phenomenon takes place in adhesives that underwent prior inadequate light cure and to elucidate if HAp released from the dental etching process is sufficient to trigger it. Model self-etch adhesives were formulated with various components, including bis[2-methacryloyloxy)ethyl]-phosphate (2MP) as acidic monomer and trimethylbenzoyl-diphenylphosphine oxide (TPO) as photoinitiator. In vitro evolution of degree of conversion (DC) of HAp-incorporated adhesives was monitored by infrared spectroscopy during light irradiation and dark storage. Selected adhesives were allowed to etch and extract HAp from enamel, light-cured in situ, and stored in the dark, after which Raman line mapping was used to obtain spatially resolved DC across the enamel-resin interface. Results showed that TPO+4E adhesives reached DC similar to TPO-only counterparts upon completion of light irradiation but underwent another round of initiation that boosted DC to ~100% regardless of HAp level or prior light exposure. When applied to enamel, TPO-only adhesives had ~80% DC in resin, which gradually descended to ~50% in enamel, whereas TPO+4E adhesives consistently scored ~80% DC across the enamel-resin interface. These observations suggest that polymerization of adhesives that underwent insufficient light cure is salvaged by the novel self-cure mechanism, and such salvaging effect can be triggered by HAp released from dental substrate during the etching process. PMID:26635279

  10. Light-Cured Self-Etch Adhesives Undergo Hydroxyapatite-Triggered Self-Cure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Y; Bai, X; Liu, Y W; Wang, Y

    2016-03-01

    Light cure is a popular mode of curing for dental adhesives. However, it suffers from inadequate light delivery when the restoration site is less accessible, in which case a self-cure mechanism is desirable to salvage any compromised polymerization. We previously reported a novel self-cure system mediated by ethyl 4-(dimethylamino)-benzoate (4E) and hydroxyapatite (HAp). The present work aims to investigate if such self-cure phenomenon takes place in adhesives that underwent prior inadequate light cure and to elucidate if HAp released from the dental etching process is sufficient to trigger it. Model self-etch adhesives were formulated with various components, including bis[2-methacryloyloxy)ethyl]-phosphate (2MP) as acidic monomer and trimethylbenzoyl-diphenylphosphine oxide (TPO) as photoinitiator. In vitro evolution of degree of conversion (DC) of HAp-incorporated adhesives was monitored by infrared spectroscopy during light irradiation and dark storage. Selected adhesives were allowed to etch and extract HAp from enamel, light-cured in situ, and stored in the dark, after which Raman line mapping was used to obtain spatially resolved DC across the enamel-resin interface. Results showed that TPO+4E adhesives reached DC similar to TPO-only counterparts upon completion of light irradiation but underwent another round of initiation that boosted DC to ~100% regardless of HAp level or prior light exposure. When applied to enamel, TPO-only adhesives had ~80% DC in resin, which gradually descended to ~50% in enamel, whereas TPO+4E adhesives consistently scored ~80% DC across the enamel-resin interface. These observations suggest that polymerization of adhesives that underwent insufficient light cure is salvaged by the novel self-cure mechanism, and such salvaging effect can be triggered by HAp released from dental substrate during the etching process. © International & American Associations for Dental Research 2015.

  11. Three-year randomized controlled clinical study of a one step universal adhesive and a two-step self-etch adhesive in Class II resin composite restorations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Dijken, Jan WV; Pallesen, Ulla

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate in a randomized clinical evaluation the 3-year clinical durability of a one-step universal adhesive bonding system and compare it intraindividually with a 2-step self-etch adhesive in Class II restorations. Materials and Methods: Each of 57 participants (mean age 58.3 yr......) received at least two, as similar as possible, extended Class II restorations. The cavities in each of the 60 individual pairs of cavities were randomly distributed to the 1-step universal adhesive (All Bond Universal: AU) and the control 2-step self-etch adhesive (Optibond XTR: OX). A low shrinkage resin......) success rates (p>0.05). Annual failure rates were 1.8% and 2.6%, respectively.The main reason for failure was resin composite fracture. Conclusion: Class II resin composite restorations placed with a one-step universal adhesive showed good short time effectiveness....

  12. Effect of increased exposure times on amount of residual monomer released from single-step self-etch adhesives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altunsoy, Mustafa; Botsali, Murat Selim; Tosun, Gonca; Yasar, Ahmet

    2015-10-16

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of increased exposure times on the amount of residual Bis-GMA, TEGDMA, HEMA and UDMA released from single-step self-etch adhesive systems. Two adhesive systems were used. The adhesives were applied to bovine dentin surface according to the manufacturer's instructions and were polymerized using an LED curing unit for 10, 20 and 40 seconds (n = 5). After polymerization, the specimens were stored in 75% ethanol-water solution (6 mL). Residual monomers (Bis-GMA, TEGDMA, UDMA and HEMA) that were eluted from the adhesives (after 10 minutes, 1 hour, 1 day, 7 days and 30 days) were analyzed by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The data were analyzed using 1-way analysis of variance and Tukey HSD tests. Among the time periods, the highest amount of released residual monomers from adhesives was observed in the 10th minute. There were statistically significant differences regarding released Bis-GMA, UDMA, HEMA and TEGDMA between the adhesive systems (p<0.05). There were no significant differences among the 10, 20 and 40 second polymerization times according to their effect on residual monomer release from adhesives (p>0.05). Increasing the polymerization time did not have an effect on residual monomer release from single-step self-etch adhesives.

  13. Effect of temporary cements on the microtensile bond strength of self-etching and self-adhesive resin cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Edilausson Moreno; Carvalho, Ceci Nunes; Loguercio, Alessandro Dourado; Lima, Darlon Martins; Bauer, José

    2014-11-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the microtensile bond strength (µTBS) of self-etching and self-adhesive resin cement systems to dentin affected by the presence of remnants of either eugenol-containing or eugenol-free temporary cements. Thirty extracted teeth were obtained and a flat dentin surface was exposed on each tooth. Acrylic blocks were fabricated and cemented either with one of two temporary cements, one zinc oxide eugenol (ZOE) and one eugenol free (ZOE-free), or without cement (control). After cementation, specimens were stored in water at 37°C for 1 week. The restorations and remnants of temporary cements were removed and dentin surfaces were cleaned with pumice. Resin composite blocks were cemented to the bonded dentin surfaces with one of two resin cements, either self-etching (Panavia F 2.0) or self-adhesive (RelyX U-100). After 24 h, the specimens were sectioned to obtain beams for submission to µTBS. The fracture mode was evaluated under a stereoscopic loupe and a scanning electron microscope (SEM). Data from µTBS were submitted to two-way repeated-measure ANOVA and the Tukey test (alpha = 0.05). The cross-product interaction was statistically significant (p cements reduced the bond strength to Panavia self-etching resin cements only (p cements did not interfere in the bond strength to dentin of self-adhesive resin cements.

  14. Shear bond strength of orthodontic brackets bonded with different self-etching adhesives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scougall Vilchis, Rogelio José; Yamamoto, Seigo; Kitai, Noriyuki; Yamamoto, Kohji

    2009-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the shear bond strength (SBS) of orthodontic brackets bonded with 4 self-etching adhesives. A total of 175 extracted premolars were randomly divided into 5 groups (n = 35). Group I was the control, in which the enamel was etched with 37% phosphoric acid, and stainless steel brackets were bonded with Transbond XT (3M Unitek, Monrovia, Calif). In the remaining 4 groups, the enamel was conditioned with the following self-etching primers and adhesives: group II, Transbond Plus and Transbond XT (3M Unitek); group III, Clearfil Mega Bond FA and Kurasper F (Kuraray Medical, Tokyo, Japan); group IV, Primers A and B, and BeautyOrtho Bond (Shofu, Kyoto, Japan); and group V, AdheSE and Heliosit Orthodontic (Ivoclar Vivadent AG, Liechtenstein). The teeth were stored in distilled water at 37 degrees C for 24 hours and debonded with a universal testing machine. The adhesive remnant index (ARI) including enamel fracture score was also evaluated. Additionally, the conditioned enamel surfaces were observed under a scanning electron microscope. The SBS values of groups I (19.0 +/- 6.7 MPa) and II (16.6 +/- 7.3 MPa) were significantly higher than those of groups III (11.0 +/- 3.9 MPa), IV (10.1 +/- 3.7 MPa), and V (11.8 +/- 3.5 MPa). Fluoride-releasing adhesives (Kurasper F and BeautyOrtho Bond) showed clinically acceptable SBS values. Significant differences were found in the ARI and enamel fracture scores between groups I and II. The 4 self-etching adhesives yielded SBS values higher than the bond strength (5.9 to 7.8 MPa) suggested for routine clinical treatment, indicating that orthodontic brackets can be successfully bonded with any of these self-etching adhesives.

  15. Solvent composition of one-step self-etch adhesives and dentine wettability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grégoire, Geneviève; Dabsie, Firas; Dieng-Sarr, Farimata; Akon, Bernadette; Sharrock, Patrick

    2011-01-01

    Our aim was to determine the wettability of dentine by four commercial self-etch adhesives and evaluate their spreading rate on the dentine surface. Any correlation with chemical composition was sought, particularly with the amount of solvent or HEMA present in the adhesive. The adhesives used were AdheSE One, Optibond All.In.One, Adper Easy Bond and XenoV. Chemical compositions were determined by proton nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy of the adhesives dissolved in dimethylsulfoxide. Apparent contact angles for sessile drops of adhesives were measured on dentine slices as a function of time for up to 180s. The water contact angles were determined for fully polymerised adhesives. All adhesives were water-based with total solvent contents ranging from 27% to 73% for HEMA-free adhesives, and averaging 45% for HEMA containing adhesives. The contents in hydrophobic groups decreased as water contents increased. No differences were found in the adhesive contact angles after 180s even though the spreading rates were different for the products tested. Water contact angles differed significantly but were not correlated with HEMA or solvent presence. Manufacturers use different approaches to stabilise acid co-monomer ingredients in self-etch adhesives. Co-solvents, HEMA, or acrylamides without co-solvents are used to simultaneously etch and infiltrate dentine. A large proportion of water is necessary for decalcification action. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Effect of double-layer application on dentin bond durability of one-step self-etch adhesives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taschner, M; Kümmerling, M; Lohbauer, U; Breschi, L; Petschelt, A; Frankenberger, R

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this in vitro study was 1) to analyze the influence of a double-layer application technique of four one-step self-etch adhesive systems on dentin and 2) to determine its effect on the stability of the adhesive interfaces stored under different conditions. Four different one-step self-etch adhesives were selected for the study (iBondSE, Clearfil S(3) Bond, XenoV(+), and Scotchbond Universal). Adhesives were applied according to manufacturers' instructions or with a double-layer application technique (without light curing of the first layer). After bonding, resin-dentin specimens were sectioned for microtensile bond strength testing in accordance with the nontrimming technique and divided into 3 subgroups of storage: a) 24 hours (immediate bond strength, T0), b) six months (T6) in artificial saliva at 37°C, or c) five hours in 10 % NaOCl at room temperature. After storage, specimens were stressed to failure. Fracture mode was assessed under a light microscope. At T0, iBond SE showed a significant increase in microtensile bond strength when the double-application technique was applied. All adhesive systems showed reduced bond strengths after six months of storage in artificial saliva and after storage in 10% NaOCl for five hours; however at T6, iBond SE, Clearfil S(3) Bond, and XenoV(+) showed significantly higher microtensile bond strength results for the double-application technique compared with the single-application technique. Scotchbond Universal showed no difference between single- or double-application, irrespective of the storage conditions. The results of this study show that improvements in bond strength of one-step self-etch adhesives by using the double-application technique are adhesive dependent.

  17. Shear bond strength of one-step self-etch adhesives to dentin : evaluation of NaOCl pretreatment

    OpenAIRE

    Colombo, Marco; Beltrami, Riccardo; Chiesa, Marco; Poggio, Claudio; Scribante, Andrea

    2018-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of dentin pretreatment with NaOCl on shear bond strength of four one-step self-etch adhesives with different pH values. Bovine permanent incisors were used. Four one-step self-etch adhesives were tested: Adper? Easy Bond, Futurabond NR, G-aenial Bond, Clearfil S3 Bond. One two-step self-etch adhesive (Clearfil SE Bond) was used as control. Group 1- no pretreatment; group 2- pretratment with 5,25 % NaOCl; group 3- pretreatment with 37 % H3PO4...

  18. [The durability of three self-etch adhesives bonded to dentin].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Fu-Cong; Wang, Xiao-Yan; Gao, Xue-Jun

    2013-04-01

    To investigate the durability of self-etch adhesives bonded to dentin in vitro. Forty-two extracted human molars were selected and occlusal dentin surfaces were exposed. The teeth were randomly distributed into three groups based on adhesives applied. The one-step self-etch adhesive B(Adper Prompt) and C(G-Bond) and two-step self-etch adhesive A (Clearfil SE bond) were used. After application of the adhesives to the dentin surfaces, composite crowns were built up, after 24 h water storage, the teeth were sectioned longitudinally into sticks (1.0 mm×1.0 mm bonding area) for microtensile testing or slabs (1 mm thick) for scanning electron microscopec (SEM) observation. Bonding strength (mTBS) and nano-leakage were evaluated immediately after cutting or after 6 months in water. The mTBS was analyzed using one-way ANOVA (SPSS 13.0). The nanoleakage was observed by SEM with a backscattered electron detector. Both adhesives and water storage time affected the mTBS. All adhesives showed decreased bond strength after six-month water aging [A dropped from (40.60 ± 5.76) MPa to (36.04 ± 3.15) MPa; B dropped from (19.06 ± 1.50) MPa to (11.19 ± 1.97) MPa; C dropped from (17.75 ± 1.10) MPa to (9.14 ± 1.15) MPa] (P adhesives tested were probably influenced by water aging, however, the two-step adhesive showed better durability than the one-step adhesives.

  19. Smear layer-deproteinizing improves bonding of one-step self-etch adhesives to dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thanatvarakorn, Ornnicha; Prasansuttiporn, Taweesak; Thittaweerat, Suppason; Foxton, Richard M; Ichinose, Shizuko; Tagami, Junji; Hosaka, Keiichi; Nakajima, Masatoshi

    2018-03-01

    Smear layer deproteinizing was proved to reduce the organic phase of smear layer covered on dentin surface. It was shown to eliminate hybridized smear layer and nanoleakage expression in resin-dentin bonding interface of two-step self-etch adhesive. This study aimed to investigate those effects on various one-step self-etch adhesives. Four different one-step self-etch adhesives were used in this study; SE One (SE), Scotchbond™ Universal (SU), BeautiBond Multi (BB), and Bond Force (BF). Flat human dentin surfaces with standardized smear layer were prepared. Smear layer deproteinizing was carried out by the application of 50ppm hypochlorous acid (HOCl) on dentin surface for 15s followed by Accel ® (p-toluenesulfinic acid salt) for 5s prior to adhesive application. No surface pretreatment was used as control. Microtensile bond strength (μTBS) and nanoleakage under TEM observation were investigated. The data were analyzed by two-way ANOVA and Tukey's post-hoc test and t-test at the significant level of 0.05. Smear layer deproteinizing significantly improved μTBS of SE, SU, and BB (player observed in control groups of SE, BB, and BF, and reticular nanoleakage presented throughout the hybridized complex in control groups of BB and BF were eliminated upon the smear layer deproteinizing. Smear layer deproteinizing by HOCl and Accel ® application could enhance the quality of dentin for bonding to one-step self-etch adhesives, resulting in the improving μTBS, eliminating hybridized smear layer and preventing reticular nanoleakage formation in resin-dentin bonding interface. Copyright © 2018 The Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Composite shear bond strength to dry and wet enamel with three self-etch adhesives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shafiee F

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: The bonding mechanisms of self etching primers, based upon the simultaneous etching and priming of dentin, simplifies the bonding technique, but the efficiency of these systems is still controversial. This study compared the shear bond strength of three self etch adhesive systems in dry and wet conditions. Materials and Method: In this experimental study, 77 intact bovine lower incisors with flat 600 grit sanded enamel surface were fixed in acrylic molds and divided into 7 groups, of 11 teeth. The enamel surfaces were treated according to a special procedure as follows: Group 1: Prompt L-Pop (PLP in dry condition, Group 2: Prompt L-Pop in wet condition, Group 3: Clearfield SE Bond (CSEB in dry condition, Group 4: Clearfield SE Bond in wet condition, Group 5: iBond (iB in dry condition, Group 6: iBond in wet condition, Group 7: Margin Bond (Control in dry condition. Surfaces were air dried for ten seconds, or blot dried in wet condition. Composite resin was bonded on the enamel and built up by applying a cylindric teflon split mold (4 mm height 2mm diameter. After 24 hours storage in dionized water at room temperature, all specimens were thermocycled and shear bond test was employed by a universal testing machine (Instron with a cross-head speed of 1mm/min. The shear bond strength was recorded in MPa and data were analyzed with ANOVA and Scheffe statistical tests. P<0.05 was considered as statistically significant. The mode of failure was examined under a stereomicroscope. Results: 1- Shear bond strength of CSEB in dry condition (21.5 ± 4.8 MPa was significantly higher than PLP and iB groups (p<0.0001. 2- Shear bond strength of iB and PLP groups in dry condition (9.60 ± 2.2, 9.49 ± 3 MPa were significantly lower than CSEB and control (2.99 ± 5.1 MPa (P<0.0001. 3- There was no significant difference between PLP and iB groups in dry condition (P=1. 4- Shear bond strength of CSEB in wet condition (21.8 ± 3 MPa was

  1. Comparison of enamel bond fatigue durability between universal adhesives and two-step self-etch adhesives: Effect of phosphoric acid pre-etching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suda, Shunichi; Tsujimoto, Akimasa; Barkmeier, Wayne W; Nojiri, Kie; Nagura, Yuko; Takamizawa, Toshiki; Latta, Mark A; Miyazaki, Masashi

    2018-03-30

    The effect of phosphoric acid pre-etching on enamel bond fatigue durability of universal adhesives and two-step self-etch adhesives was investigated. Four universal adhesives and three two-step self-etch adhesives were used. The initial shear bond strengths and shear fatigue strengths to enamel with and without phosphoric acid pre-etching using the adhesives were determined. SEM observations were also conducted. Phosphoric acid pre-etching of enamel was found to increase the bond fatigue durability of universal adhesives, but its effect on two-step self-etch adhesives was material-dependent. In addition, some universal adhesives with phosphoric acid pre-etching showed similar bond fatigue durability to the two-step self-etch adhesives, although the bond fatigue durability of universal adhesives in self-etch mode was lower than that of the two-step self-etch adhesives. Phosphoric acid pre-etching enhances enamel bond fatigue durability of universal adhesives, but the effect of phosphoric acid pre-etching on the bond fatigue durability of two-step self-etch adhesives was material-dependent.

  2. Longevity of Self-etch Dentin Bonding Adhesives Compared to Etch-and-rinse Dentin Bonding Adhesives: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masarwa, Nader; Mohamed, Ahmed; Abou-Rabii, Iyad; Abu Zaghlan, Rawan; Steier, Liviu

    2016-06-01

    A systematic review and meta-analysis were performed to compare longevity of Self-Etch Dentin Bonding Adhesives to Etch-and-Rinse Dentin Bonding Adhesives. The following databases were searched for PubMed, MEDLINE, Web of Science, CINAHL, the Cochrane Library complemented by a manual search of the Journal of Adhesive Dentistry. The MESH keywords used were: "etch and rinse," "total etch," "self-etch," "dentin bonding agent," "bond durability," and "bond degradation." Included were in-vitro experimental studies performed on human dental tissues of sound tooth structure origin. The examined Self-Etch Bonds were of two subtypes; Two Steps and One Step Self-Etch Bonds, while Etch-and-Rinse Bonds were of two subtypes; Two Steps and Three Steps. The included studies measured micro tensile bond strength (μTBs) to evaluate bond strength and possible longevity of both types of dental adhesives at different times. The selected studies depended on water storage as the aging technique. Statistical analysis was performed for outcome measurements compared at 24 h, 3 months, 6 months and 12 months of water storage. After 24 hours (p-value = 0.051), 3 months (p-value = 0.756), 6 months (p-value=0.267), 12 months (p-value=0.785) of water storage self-etch adhesives showed lower μTBs when compared to the etch-and-rinse adhesives, but the comparisons were statistically insignificant. In this study, longevity of Dentin Bonds was related to the measured μTBs. Although Etch-and-Rinse bonds showed higher values at all times, the meta-analysis found no difference in longevity of the two types of bonds at the examined aging times. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. A 12-month clinical evaluation of pit-and-fissure sealants placed with and without etch-and-rinse and self-etch adhesive systems in newly-erupted teeth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Karami Nogourani

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: The objective of this one-year clinical study was to investigate the effect of two adhesive systems (Adper Single Bond, a two-step etch-and-rinse and Clearfil SE Bond, a two-step self-etch system on pit-and-fissure sealant retention in newly-erupted teeth. This study compared the success of the sealants in mesial and distopalatal grooves with and without these two adhesive systems. MATERIAL AND METHODS: In a clinical trial, 35 children aged 6-8 years undergoing sealant placement were recruited. This one-year clinical study scored 70 mesial and 70 distopalatal sealants of newly-erupted permanent maxillary first molar, with a split-mouth design. All children received sealant alone in one permanent maxillary molar tooth. Children were randomized into two groups. One group received Self-etch (Se bond plus sealant and the other group received Single Bond plus sealant in another permanent maxillary molar tooth. Clinical evaluation at 3, 6 and 12 months was performed and the retention was studied in terms of the success and failure. RESULTS: The success rate of sealant in the distopalatal groove, using SeB at 3, 6 and 12 months was 93.3% (95% CI: 68.0, 99.8, 73.3% (95% CI: 44.9, 92.2 and 66.7% (95% CI: 38.4, 88.2, respectively. It was greater than that of the distopalatal groove in SB group with a success rate of 62.5% (95% CI: 35.4, 84.8, 31.3% (95% CI: 11.8, 58.7 and 31.3% (95% CI: 11.8, 58.7, at the three evaluation periods. The success rate of sealant in the mesial groove using SeB was 86.6% (95% CI: 59.5, 98.3, 53.3% (95% CI: 26.6, 78.7 and 53.3% (95% CI: 26.6, 78.7, while this was 100% (95% CI: 79.4, 100.0, 81.3% (95% CI: 54.4, 96.0 and 81.3% (95% CI: 54.4, 96.0 using SB, at 3, 6 and 12-month evaluation periods. CONCLUSIONS: These results support the use of these two bonding agents in pit-and-fissure sealants under both isolated and contaminated conditions. Further, Se bond seemed to be less sensitive to moisture contamination.

  4. [Evaluation of the effect of one-step self etching adhesives applied in pit and fissure sealing].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Hong-Ru; Xu, Pei-Cheng; Qian, Wen-Hao

    2016-06-01

    To observe the effect of three one-step self etching adhesive systems used in fit and fissure sealant and explore the feasibility of application in caries prevention in school. Seven hundred and twenty completely erupted mandibular first molars in 360 children aged 7 to 9 years old were chosen. The split-mouth design was used to select one side as the experimental group, divided into A1(Easy One Adper), B1(Adper Easy One), and C1(iBond SE).The contra lateral teeth served as A2,B2 and C2 groups (phosphoric acid). The retention and caries status were regularly reviewed .The clinical effect of the two groups was compared using SPSS19.0 software package for Chi - square test. At 3 and 6 months, pit and fissure sealant retention rate in A1 and A2, B1 and B2,C1 and C2 group had no significant difference. At 12 months, sealant retention in A1 and B1 group was significantly lower than A2 and B2 group (P0.05). At 24 months, sealant retention rate in A1, B1 and C1 group was significantly lower than A2, B2 and C2 group (P0.05). The clinical anticariogenic effect of three kinds of one-step etching adhesives and phosphoric acid etching sealant was similar .One-step self etching adhesive system was recommended for pit and fissure sealant to improve the students' oral health. The long-term retention rate of one-step self etching adhesive system was lower than the phosphoric acid method to long term observation is needed.

  5. Influence of laboratory degradation methods and bonding application parameters on microTBS of self-etch adhesives to dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erhardt, Maria Carolina G; Pisani-Proença, Jatyr; Osorio, Estrella; Aguilera, Fátima S; Toledano, Manuel; Osorio, Raquel

    2011-04-01

    To evaluate the laboratory resistance to degradation and the use of different bonding treatments on resin-dentin bonds formed with three self-etching adhesive systems. Flat, mid-coronal dentin surfaces from extracted human molars were bonded according to manufacturer's directions and submitted to two challenging regimens: (A) chemical degradation with 10% NaOC1 immersion for 5 hours; and (B) fatigue loading at 90 N using 50,000 cycles at 3.0 Hz. Additional dentin surfaces were bonded following four different bonding application protocols: (1) according to manufacturer's directions; (2) acid-etched with 36% phosphoric acid (H3PO4) for 15 seconds; (3) 10% sodium hypochlorite (NaOClaq) treated for 2 minutes, after H3PO4-etching; and (4) doubling the application time of the adhesives. Two one-step self-etch adhesives (an acetone-based: Futurabond/FUT and an ethanol-based: Futurabond NR/FNR) and a two-step self-etch primer system (Clearfil SE Bond/CSE) were examined. Specimens were sectioned into beams and tested for microtensile bond strength (microTBS). Selected debonded specimens were observed under scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Data (MPa) were analyzed by ANOVA and multiple comparisons tests (alpha= 0.05). microTBS significantly decreased after chemical and mechanical challenges (Padhesive systems, regardless the bonding protocol. FUT attained the highest microTBS after doubling the application time. H3PO4 and H3PO4 + NaOCl pretreatments significantly decreased bonding efficacy of the adhesives.

  6. Four-year water degradation of a total-etch and two self-etching adhesives bonded to dentin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abdalla, A.I.; Feilzer, A.J.

    2008-01-01

    Objectives: To evaluate effect of direct and indirect water storage on the microtensile dentin bond strength of one total-etch and two self-etching adhesives. Methods: The adhesive materials were: one total-etch adhesive; ‘Admira Bond’ and two selfetch adhesives; ‘Clearfil SE Bond’ and ‘Hybrid

  7. Hydroxyapatite Effect on Photopolymerization of Self-etching Adhesives with Different Aggressiveness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ying; Wang, Yong

    2012-01-01

    Objective To understand the correlation of the acidic monomer/hydroxyapatite (HAp) reaction with the photopolymerization behavior of self-etching adhesives with different aggressiveness. Methods Two commercial self-etching adhesives the strong Adper Prompt L-Pop (APLP, pH~0.8) and the mild Adper Easy Bond (AEB, pH~2.5) were used. HAp powders were incorporated into both adhesives to acquire solutions with concentrations of 0, 1, 3, 5, 7 wt%. The attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared (ATR/FT-IR) technique was employed to collect the in-situ spectra during light-curing, from which the degree of conversion (DC) and polymerization rate (PR) were calculated. The pH of each tested solution was also measured. Results Without HAp incorporation, the DC and PR of the strong APLP (7.8% and 0.12%/s, respectively) were much lower than those of the mild AEB (85.5% and 5.7%/s, respectively). The DC and PR of APLP displayed an apparent increasing trend with the HAp content. For example, the DC increased from 7.8% to 58.4% and the PR increased from 0.12 to 3.8%/s when the HAp content increased from 0 to 7 wt%. In contrast, the DC and PR of AEB were much less affected by the HAp content. The observations were correlated well with the spectral and pH changes, which indicated that APLP underwent a higher extent of chemical reaction with HAp than AEB. Conclusions The results disclosed the important role of the acidic monomer/HAp chemical reaction in improving the photopolymerization of the strong (low-pH) self-etching adhesives such as APLP. The phenomenon of polymerization improvement strongly depended on the adhesive aggressiveness. PMID:22445789

  8. Comparison of Self-Etch Primers with Conventional Acid Etching System on Orthodontic Brackets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zope, Amit; Zope-Khalekar, Yogita; Chitko, Shrikant S.; Kerudi, Veerendra V.; Patil, Harshal Ashok; Jaltare, Pratik; Dolas, Siddhesh G

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The self-etching primer system consists of etchant and primer dispersed in a single unit. The etching and priming are merged as a single step leading to fewer stages in bonding procedure and reduction in the number of steps that also reduces the chance of introduction of error, resulting in saving time for the clinician. It also results in smaller extent of enamel decalcification. Aim To compare the Shear Bond Strength (SBS) of orthodontic bracket bonded with Self-Etch Primers (SEP) and conventional acid etching system and to study the surface appearance of teeth after debonding; etching with conventional acid etch and self-etch priming, using stereomicroscope. Materials and Methods Five Groups (n=20) were created randomly from a total of 100 extracted premolars. In a control Group A, etching of enamel was done with 37% phosphoric acid and bonding of stainless steel brackets with Transbond XT (3M Unitek, Monrovia, California). Enamel conditioning in left over four Groups was done with self-etching primers and adhesives as follows: Group B-Transbond Plus (3M Unitek), Group C Xeno V+ (Dentsply), Group D-G-Bond (GC), Group E-One-Coat (Coltene). The Adhesive Remnant Index (ARI) score was also evaluated. Additionally, the surface roughness using profilometer were observed. Results Mean SBS of Group A was 18.26±7.5MPa, Group B was 10.93±4.02MPa, Group C was 6.88±2.91MPa while of Group D was 7.78±4.13MPa and Group E was 10.39±5.22MPa respectively. In conventional group ARI scores shows that over half of the adhesive was remaining on the surface of tooth (score 1 to 3). In self-etching primer groups ARI scores show that there was no or minor amount of adhesive remaining on the surface of tooth (score 4 and 5). SEP produces a lesser surface roughness on the enamel than conventional etching. However, statistical analysis shows significant correlation (pbracket bonding after enamel conditioning with any of the SEPs tested. The SEPs used in Groups C (Xeno V

  9. Influence of different pre-etching times on fatigue strength of self-etch adhesives to dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takamizawa, Toshiki; Barkmeier, Wayne W; Tsujimoto, Akimasa; Suzuki, Takayuki; Scheidel, Donal D; Erickson, Robert L; Latta, Mark A; Miyazaki, Masashi

    2016-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to use shear bond strength (SBS) and shear fatigue strength (SFS) testing to determine the influence on dentin bonding of phosphoric acid pre-etching times before the application of self-etch adhesives. Two single-step self-etch universal adhesives [Prime & Bond Elect (EL) and Scotchbond Universal (SU)], a conventional single-step self-etch adhesive [G-aenial Bond (GB)], and a two-step self-etch adhesive [OptiBond XTR (OX)] were used. The SBS and SFS values were obtained with phosphoric acid pre-etching times of 3, 10, or 15 s before application of the adhesives, and for a control without pre-etching. For groups with 3 s of pre-etching, SU and EL showed higher SBS values than control groups. No significant difference was observed for GB among the 3 s, 10 s, and control groups, but the 15 s pre-etching group showed significantly lower SBS and SFS values than the control group. No significant difference was found for OX among the pre-etching groups. Reducing phosphoric acid pre-etching time can minimize the adverse effect on dentin bonding durability for the conventional self-etch adhesives. Furthermore, a short phosphoric acid pre-etching time enhances the dentin bonding performance of universal adhesives. © 2016 Eur J Oral Sci.

  10. Effect of a Desensitizing Varnish on Microleakage of Two Self-Etch Adhesives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Saffarpour

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The aim of this in-vitro experimental study was to assess the effect of application of a desensitizing varnish on the enamel and dentin marginal seal.Materials and Methods: Seventy-two freshly extracted, intact human premolar teeth were divided into four groups (n=18. Class V cavities (3mm in length, 2mm in width and 2mm in depth were prepared on the buccal surface of each tooth. The following sealing materials were applied in the four groups: One-step Clearfil S3 Bond (S3 self-etch adhesive, two-step Clearfil SE Bond (SE self-etch adhesive, S3 Bond+ VivaSens desensitizing varnish (VS+S3 and Clearfil SE Bond + VivaSens (VS+SE. The cavities on the teeth were then incrementally filled with Z350 light-cure composite. The teeth were stored in distilled water for 24 hours at 37°C, and were then thermocycled for 1000 cycles. Then, all the specimens were prepared for dye penetration test and were immersed in 2% basic fuchsin dye and incubated at 37°C for 24 hours. The teeth were then sectioned buccolingually along the center of restorations with a diamond disk.   Microleakage at the tooth-restoration interface was assessed in the enamel and dentin margins blindly using dye penetration under a stereomicroscope at ×20 magnification.Results: There was significantly greater leakage at the enamel and dentin margins in group VS+SE than in group SE; also, these values were higher in group VS+S3 than in S3.Conclusion: Combined application of desensitizing varnish and self-etch adhesives seems to increase microleakage in composite restorations. Thus, its application is not suggested.

  11. BOND STRENGTH DURABILITY OF SELF-ETCHING ADHESIVES AND RESIN CEMENTS TO DENTIN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaves, Carolina de Andrade Lima; de Melo, Renata Marques; Passos, Sheila Pestana; Camargo, Fernanda Pelógia; Bottino, Marco Antonio; Balducci, Ivan

    2009-01-01

    Objectives: To evaluate the microtensile bond strength (μTBS) of one- (Xeno III, Dentsply) and two-step (Tyrian-One Step Plus, Bisco) self-etching adhesive systems bonded to dentin and cemented to chemically cured (C&B Metabond) or light-cured paste of a dual-cure resin cement (Variolink II, Ivoclar) within a short (24 h) and long period of evaluation (90 days). Material and Methods: Forty recently extracted human molars had their roots removed and their occlusal dentin exposed and ground wet with 600-grit SiC paper. After application of one of the adhesives, the resin cement was applied to the bonded surface and a composite resin block was incrementally built up to a height of 5 mm (n=10). The restored teeth were stored in distilled water at 37°C for 7 days. The teeth were then cut along two axes (x and y), producing beam-shaped specimens with 0.8 mm2 cross-sectional area, which were subjected to μTBS testing at a crosshead speed of 0.05 mm/min and stressed to failure after 24 h or 90 days of storage in water. The μTBS data in MPa were subjected to three-way analysis of variance and Tukey's test (α= 0.05). Results: The interaction effect for all three factors was statistically significant (three-way ANOVA, padhesive combination that provided the most promising bond strength after 90 days of storage in water. PMID:19466243

  12. Effect of ferric sulfate contamination on the bonding effectiveness of etch-and-rinse and self-etch adhesives to superficial dentin

    OpenAIRE

    Shahram Farzin Ebrahimi; Niloofar Shadman; Arezoo Abrishami

    2013-01-01

    Aim: This study investigated the effect of one hemostatic agent on the shear bond strength of self-etch and etch-and-rinse adhesive systems. Materials and Methods: Sixty extracted third molars were selected. After preparing a flat surface of superficial dentin, they were randomly divided into six groups. Adhesives were Tetric N-Bond, AdheSE, and AdheSE One F. Before applying adhesives, surfaces were contaminated with ViscoStat for 60 s in three groups and rinsed. Then composite were attached ...

  13. Bond strength of a pit-and-fissure sealant associated to etch-and-rinse and self-etching adhesive systems to saliva-contaminated enamel: individual vs. simultaneous light curing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes-Silva, Jaciara Miranda; Torres, Carolina Paes; Contente, Marta Maria Martins Giamatei; Oliveira, Maria Angélica Hueb de Menezes; Palma-Dibb, Regina Guenka; Borsatto, Maria Cristina

    2008-01-01

    This study evaluated in vitro the shear bond strength (SBS) of a resin-based pit-and-fissure sealant [Fluroshield (F), Dentsply/Caulk] associated with either an etch-and-rinse [Adper Single Bond 2 (SB), 3M/ESPE] or a self-etching adhesive system [Clearfil S3 Bond (S3), Kuraray Co., Ltd.] to saliva-contaminated enamel, comparing two curing protocols: individual light curing of the adhesive system and the sealant or simultaneous curing of both materials. Mesial and distal enamel surfaces from 45 sound third molars were randomly assigned to 6 groups (n=15), according to the bonding technique: I - F was applied to 37% phosphoric acid etched enamel. The other groups were contaminated with fresh human saliva (0.01 mL; 10 s) after acid etching: II - SB and F were light cured separately; III - SB and F were light cured together; IV - S3 and F were light cured separately; V - S3 and F were light cured simultaneously; VI - F was applied to saliva-contaminated, acid-etched enamel without an intermediate bonding agent layer. SBS was tested to failure in a universal testing machine at 0.5 mm/min. Data were analyzed by one-way ANOVA and Fisher's test (alpha=0.05).The debonded specimens were examined with a stereomicroscope to assess the failure modes. Three representative specimens from each group were observed under scanning electron microscopy for a qualitative analysis. Mean SBS in MPa were: I-12.28 (+/-4.29); II-8.57 (+/-3.19); III-7.97 (+/-2.16); IV-12.56 (+/-3.11); V-11.45 (+/-3.77); and VI-7.47 (+/-1.99). In conclusion, individual or simultaneous curing of the intermediate bonding agent layer and the resin sealant did not seem to affect bond strength to saliva-contaminated enamel. S3/F presented significantly higher SBS than the that of the groups treated with SB etch-and-rinse adhesive system and similar SBS to that of the control group, in which the sealant was applied under ideal dry, noncontaminated conditions.

  14. Shear bond strength of self-etch and total-etch bonding systems at different dentin depths

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Carolina Maito Villela-Rosa

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to evaluate the dentin shear bond strength of four adhesive systems (Adper Single Bond 2, Adper Prompt L-Pop, Magic Bond DE and Self Etch Bond in regards to buccal and lingual surfaces and dentin depth. Forty extracted third molars had roots removed and crowns bisected in the mesiodistal direction. The buccal and lingual surfaces were fixed in a PVC/acrylic resin ring and were divided into buccal and lingual groups assigned to each selected adhesive. The same specimens prepared for the evaluation of superficial dentin shear resistance were used to evaluate the different depths of dentin. The specimens were identified and abraded at depths of 0.5, 1.0, 1.5 and 2.0 mm. Each depth was evaluated by ISO TR 11405 using an EMIC-2000 machine regulated at 0.5 mm/min with a 200 Kgf load cell. We performed statistical analyses on the results (ANOVA, Tukey and Scheffé tests. Data revealed statistical differences (p < 0.01 in the adhesive and depth variation as well as adhesive/depth interactions. The Adper Single Bond 2 demonstrated the highest mean values of shear bond strength. The Prompt L-Pop product, a self-etching adhesive, revealed higher mean values compared with Magic Bond DE and Self Etch Bond adhesives, a total and self-etching adhesive respectively. It may be concluded that the shear bond strength of dentin is dependent on material (adhesive system, substrate depth and adhesive/depth interaction.

  15. Bond strength durability of self-etching adhesives and resin cements to dentin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina de Andrade Lima Chaves

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the microtensile bond strength (µTBS of one- (Xeno III, Dentsply and two-step (Tyrian-One Step Plus, Bisco self-etching adhesive systems bonded to dentin and cemented to chemically cured (C&B Metabond or light-cured paste of a dual-cure resin cement (Variolink II, Ivoclar within a short (24 h and long period of evaluation (90 days. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Forty recently extracted human molars had their roots removed and their occlusal dentin exposed and ground wet with 600-grit SiC paper. After application of one of the adhesives, the resin cement was applied to the bonded surface and a composite resin block was incrementally built up to a height of 5 mm (n=10. The restored teeth were stored in distilled water at 37ºC for 7 days. The teeth were then cut along two axes (x and y, producing beam-shaped specimens with 0.8 mm² cross-sectional area, which were subjected to µTBS testing at a crosshead speed of 0.05 mm/min and stressed to failure after 24 h or 90 days of storage in water. The µTBS data in MPa were subjected to three-way analysis of variance and Tukey's test (α= 0.05. RESULTS: The interaction effect for all three factors was statistically significant (three-way ANOVA, p<0.001. All eight experimental means (MPa were compared by the Tukey's test (p<0.05 and the following results were obtained: Tyrian-One Step Plus /C&B/24 h (22.4±7.3; Tyrian-One Step Plus /Variolink II/24 h (39.4±11.6; Xeno III/C&B/24 h (40.3±12.9; Xeno III/Variolink II/24 h (25.8±10.5; Tyrian-One Step Plus /C&B/90 d (22.1±12.8 Tyrian-One Step Plus/VariolinkII/90 d (24.2±14.2; Xeno III/C&B/90 d (27.0±13.5; Xeno III/Variolink II/90 d (33.0±8.9. CONCLUSIONS: Xeno III/Variolink II was the luting agent/adhesive combination that provided the most promising bond strength after 90 days of storage in water.

  16. Effect of air-drying time of single-application self-etch adhesives on dentin bond strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiba, Yasushi; Yamaguchi, Kanako; Miyazaki, Masashi; Tsubota, Keishi; Takamizawa, Toshiki; Moore, B Keith

    2006-01-01

    This study examined the effect of air-drying time of adhesives on the dentin bond strength of several single-application self-etch adhesive systems. The adhesive/resin composite combinations used were: Adper Prompt L-Pop/Filtek Z250 (AP), Clearfil Tri-S Bond/Clearfil AP-X (CT), Fluoro Bond Shake One/Beautifil (FB), G-Bond/Gradia Direct (GB) and One-Up Bond F Plus/Palfique Estelite (OF). Bovine mandibular incisors were mounted in self-curing resin and wet ground with #600 SiC to expose labial dentin. Adhesives were applied according to each manufacturer's instructions followed by air-drying time for 0 (without air-drying), 5 and 10 seconds. After light irradiation of the adhesives, the resin composites were condensed into a mold (phi4x2 mm) and polymerized. Ten samples per test group were stored in 37 degrees C distilled water for 24 hours; they were then shear tested at a crosshead speed of 1.0 mm/minute. One-way ANOVA followed by Tukey's HSD tests (alpha = 0.05) were done. FE-SEM observations of the resin/dentin interface were also conducted. Dentin bond strength varied with the different air drying times and ranged from 5.8 +/- 2.4 to 13.9 +/- 2.8 MPa for AP, 4.9 +/- 1.5 to 17.1 +/- 2.3 MPa for CT, 7.9 +/- 2.8 to 13.8 +/- 2.4 MPa for FB, 3.7 +/- 1.4 to 13.4 +/- 1.2 MPa for GB and 4.6 +/- 2.1 to 13.7 +/- 2.6 MPa for OF. With longer air drying of adhesives, no significant changes in bond strengths were found for the systems used except for OF. Significantly lower bond strengths were obtained for the 10-second air-drying group for OF. From FE-SEM observations, gaps between the cured adhesive and resin composites were observed for the specimens without the air drying of adhesives except for OF. The data suggests that, with four of the single-application self-etch adhesive systems, air drying is essential to obtain adequate dentin bond strengths, but increased drying time does not significantly influence bond strength. For the other system studied, the bond strength

  17. Microleakage of class V cavities restored with nanofilled resin modified glass ionomer and conventional glass ionomer with self etch adhesive and self etch primer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mansore Mirzaie

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims: Microleakage is a criterion proposed for assessing the success of any restorative material. Complete seal is difficult especially for dentin margins compared to enamel margins. The aim of this study was to assess the microleakage at the enamel and dentin margins of class V cavities restored by two GIs and two self-etch adhesive systems. Materials and Methods: This study was done on forty third molars. Class V cavities (3×2×2mm were prepared on the buccal and lingual surfaces of teeth using high speed handpiece with 0.8 mm diamond fissure burr. The occlusal margins of the cavities in the enamel and gingival marginswere placed 1 mm below the CEJ. The teeth were divided into 4 groups and the bondings were cured for 20 sec and the teeth were restored. The specimens were kept in distilled water at the temperature of 37°C for 24 hrs. The teeth were thermo cycled and cut in buccolingual direction using diamond disc under water. The dye penetration was evaluated using a stereomicroscope and the leakage was scored. The scores were compared using Kruskal-Wallis test while the paired comparisons were done using Bonferroni correction. P≤0.05 was regarded as significant results. Results: Microleakage scores were similar at the occlusal and gingival walls of all test groups. At the gingival walls, the least microleakage scores were observed. “Fuji IX + SE bond” group showed significant differences with the “Fuji IX + G bond” and “Nanoglass + G bond” groups (P≤0.05. At the occlusal walls, the least scores were observed in the “Fuji IX+SE bond” specimens which were significantly different from the other groups (P≤0.05. Conclusion: Self-Cure glass ionomers yielded less microleakage scores compared to the different types of light-cures due to the less polymerization shrinkage.

  18. Effect of blood contamination with 1-step self-etching adhesives on microtensile bond strength to dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, H M; Pereira, P N R

    2006-01-01

    This study evaluated the effect of blood contamination and decontamination methods on the microtensile bond strength of 1-step self-etching adhesive systems to dentin contaminated after adhesive application and light curing. Three commercially available "all-in-one" adhesives (One Up Bond F, Xeno III and Adper Prompt L-Pop) and 1 resin composite (Clearfil AP-X) were used. Third molars that had been stored in distilled water with 0.5% thymol at 4 degrees C were ground with #600 SiC paper under running water to produce a standardized smear layer. The specimens were randomly divided into groups according to the 3 adhesive systems. The adhesive systems were used under 3 conditions: no contamination, which was the control (C); contamination of the light-cured adhesive surface with blood and reapplication of adhesive (Contamination 1) and contamination of the light-cured adhesive surface with blood, then washing, drying and reapplication of the adhesive (Contamination 2). Following light curing of the adhesive, the resin composite was placed in 3 increments up to a 5-mm-thick layer on the bonded surface. All specimens were stored in distilled water at 37 degrees C for 24 hours. The microtensile bond strength was measured using a universal testing machine (EZ test), and data were analyzed by 1-way ANOVA followed by the Duncan test to make comparisons among the groups (p=0.05). After debonding, 5 specimens were selected from each group and examined in a scanning electron microscope to evaluate the modes of fracture. For all adhesives, contamination groups showed lower bond strength than the control (p0.05). For Xeno III and Adper Prompt L-Pop, contamination group #2 showed the lowest bond strength among the groups (pcontamination group #2 showed higher bond strength than contamination group #1 but showed no statistical significance between them (p>0.05).

  19. [Evaluation of shear bond strengths of self-etching and total-etching dental adhesives to enamel and dentin].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Ling; Liu, Jing-Ming; Wang, Xiao-Yan; Gao, Xue-Jun

    2009-03-01

    To evaluate the shear bond strengths of four dental adhesives in vitro. The facial surfaces of 20 human maxillary incisors were prepared to expose fresh enamel and randomly divided into four groups, in each group 5 teeth were bonded with one adhesives: group A (Clearfil Protect Bond, self-etching two steps), group B (Adper( Prompt, self-etching one step), group C (SwissTEC SL Bond, total-etching two steps), group D (Single Bond, total-etching two steps). Shear bond strengths were determined using an universal testing machine after being stored in distilled water for 24 h at 37 degrees C. The bond strengths to enamel and dentin were (25.33 +/- 2.84) and (26.07 +/- 5.56) MPa in group A, (17.08 +/- 5.13) and (17.93 +/- 4.70) MPa in group B, (33.14 +/- 6.05) and (41.92 +/- 6.25) MPa in group C, (22.51 +/- 6.25) and (21.45 +/- 7.34) MPa in group D. Group C showed the highest and group B the lowest shear bond strength to enamel and dentin among the four groups. The two-step self-etching adhesive showed comparable shear bond strength to some of the total-etching adhesives and higher shear bond strength than one-step self-etching adhesive.

  20. An evaluation of shear bond strength of self-etch adhesive on pre-etched enamel: an in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Bhadra; Reddy, Satti Narayana; Mujeeb, Abdul; Mehta, Kanchan; Saritha, G

    2013-11-01

    To determine the shear bond strength of self-etch adhesive G-bond on pre-etched enamel. Thirty caries free human mandibular premolars extracted for orthodontic purpose were used for the study. Occlusal surfaces of all the teeth were flattened with diamond bur and a silicon carbide paper was used for surface smoothening. The thirty samples were randomly grouped into three groups. Three different etch systems were used for the composite build up: group 1 (G-bond self-etch adhesive system), group 2 (G-bond) and group 3 (Adper single bond). Light cured was applied for 10 seconds with a LED unit for composite buildup on the occlusal surface of each tooth with 8 millimeters (mm) in diameter and 3 mm in thickness. The specimens in each group were tested in shear mode using a knife-edge testing apparatus in a universal testing machine across head speed of 1 mm/ minute. Shear bond strength values in Mpa were calculated from the peak load at failure divided by the specimen surface area. The mean shear bond strength of all the groups were calculated and statistical analysis was carried out using one-way Analysis of Variance (ANOVA). The mean bond strength of group 1 is 15.5 Mpa, group 2 is 19.5 Mpa and group 3 is 20.1 Mpa. Statistical analysis was carried out between the groups using one-way ANOVA. Group 1 showed statistically significant lower bond strength when compared to groups 2 and 3. No statistical significant difference between groups 2 and 3 (p adhesive G-bond showed increase in shear bond strength on pre-etched enamel.

  1. Effect of a whitening agent application on enamel bond strength of self-etching primer systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyazaki, Masashi; Sato, Hikaru; Sato, Tomomi; Moore, B Keith; Platt, Jeffrey A

    2004-06-01

    Though reduction in bond strength after tooth whitening has been reported, little is known about it's effect on enamel bond strength of two-step bonding systems that exclude phosphoric acid etching prior to bonding agent application. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of whitening procedure using an in-office whitening agent on enamel bond strength of self-etching primer systems. Three self-etching primer systems, Imperva Fluoro Bond, Mac Bond II, Clearfil SE Bond, and a one-bottle adhesive system Single Bond as a control material, were used. Bovine mandibular incisors were mounted in self-curing resin and the facial enamel or dentin surfaces were ground wet on 600-grit SiC paper. An in-office whitening agent, Hi-Lite was applied on the tooth surface according to the manufacturer's instruction. Bonding procedures were done soon after rinsing off the whitening agent or after 24 hours storage in distilled water. Specimens without whitening procedure were prepared as controls. Fifteen specimens per test group were stored in 37 degrees C distilled water for 24 hours, then shear tested at a crosshead speed of 1.0 mm/minute. One-way ANOVA followed by Duncan multiple range test were used for statistical analysis of the results. For the specimens made soon after rinsing off the whitening agent, a significant decrease in enamel bond strength was observed for all the bonding systems used. For the specimens made after 24 hours storage in water, a small decrease in enamel bond strength was observed and no significant differences were found compared to those of controls (without whitening). From the results of this study, enamel bond strengths of the self-etching primer systems might be affected to a lesser degree after rinsing with water followed by 24 hours storage in water.

  2. Enamel shear bond strength of two orthodontic self-etching bonding systems compared to Transbond™ XT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellak, Andreas; Rusdea, Patrick; Schauseil, Michael; Stein, Steffen; Korbmacher-Steiner, Heike Maria

    2016-11-01

    The aim of this in vitro study was to compare the shear bond strength (SBS) and Adhesive Remnant Index (ARI) scores of two self-etching no-mix adhesives (Prompt L-Pop™ and Scotchbond™) for orthodontic appliances to the commonly used total etch system Transbond XT™ (in combination with phosphoric acid). In all, 60 human premolars were randomly divided into three groups of 20 specimens each. In group 1 (control), brackets were bonded with Transbond™ XT primer. Prompt L-Pop™ (group 2) and Scotchbond™ Universal (group 3) were used in the experimental groups. Lower premolar brackets were bonded by light curing the adhesive. After 24 h of storage, the shear bond strength (SBS) was measured using a Zwicki 1120 testing machine. The adhesive remnant index (ARI) was determined under 10× magnification. The Kruskal-Wallis test was used to statistically compare the SBS and the ARI scores. No significant differences in the SBS between any of the experimental groups were detected (group 1: 15.49 ± 3.28 MPa; group 2: 13.89 ± 4.95 MPa; group 3: 14.35 ± 3.56 MPa; p = 0.489), nor were there any significant differences in the ARI scores (p = 0.368). Using the two self-etching no-mix adhesives (Prompt L-Pop™ and Scotchbond™) for orthodontic appliances does not affect either the SBS or ARI scores in comparison with the commonly used total-etch system Transbond™ XT. In addition, Scotchbond™ Universal supports bonding on all types of surfaces (enamel, metal, composite, and porcelain) with no need for additional primers. It might therefore be helpful for simplifying bonding in orthodontic procedures.

  3. Antibacterial Effect of All-in-one Self-etch Adhesives on Enterococcus faecalis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Esmaeel Ebrahimi Chaharom

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and aims. The aim of this study was to evaluate the antibacterial activity of one-step self-etch adhesives on Enterococcus faecalis on days 1, 7 and 14 with the use of modified direct contact test. Materials and methods. The modified directcontact test was used to evaluate the antibacterial effect of Adper Easy One, Bond Force, Clearfil S3 Bond, Futurabond M, G-Bond, iBond and OptiBond All-in-one adhesives on Enterococcus faecalisafter aging the samples in phosphate-buffered saline for one, seven and fourteen days. Data were analyzed using one-way ANOVA and post hoc Tukey tests. Aging effect of each adhesive was evaluated by paired-sample test. In this study, P0.05. Conclusion. iBond exhibited the highest antibacterial effect on E. faecalis after one week. Futurabond and OptiBond All-in-one exhibited antibacterial effects against E. faecalis for one week.

  4. Bond strengths of different orthodontic adhesives after enamel conditioning with the same self-etching primer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scougall-Vilchis, Rogelio J; Zárate-Díaz, Chrisel; Kusakabe, Shusuke; Yamamoto, Kohji

    2010-05-01

    To determine the shear bond strengths (SBS) of stainless steel brackets bonded with seven light-cured orthodontic adhesives after the enamel was conditioned with the same self-etching primer. A total of 140 extracted human molars were randomly divided into seven groups (N = 20). In all the groups, the enamel was conditioned with Transbond Plus SEP (TPSEP). Stainless steel brackets were bonded with the following orthodontic adhesives: Group I, Transbond XT; Group II, Blūgloo; Group III, BeautyOrtho Bond; Group IV, Enlight; Group V, Light Bond; Group VI, Transbond CC; Group VII, Xeno Ortho. The teeth were stored in distilled water at 37 degrees C for 24 hours and debonded with a universal testing machine. The modified adhesive remnant index (ARI) was also recorded. There were no significant differences in the SBS values among the groups: I (18.0 +/- 7.4 MPa); II (18.3 +/- 5.1 MPa); III (14.8 +/- 4.3 MPa); IV (18.3 +/- 7.0 MPa); V (16.4 +/- 4.3 MPa); VI (20.3 +/- 5.3 MPa); VII (15.9 +/- 6.4 MPa), but significant differences in ARI were found. The seven orthodontic adhesives evaluated in this study can be successfully used for bonding stainless steel brackets when the enamel is conditioned with TPSEP, however, the differences among some groups might influence the clinical bond strengths. In addition, the amount of residual adhesive remaining on the teeth after debonding differed among the adhesives. Further studies are required to better understand the differences in SBS and ARI.

  5. A 7-year randomized prospective study of a one-step self-etching adhesive in non-carious cervical lesions. The effect of curing modes and restorative material

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Dijken, Jan W V; Pallesen, Ulla

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical retention of a one-step self-etching adhesive system (Xeno III) in Class V non-carious cervical lesions and the effect of restorative material and curing techniques on longevity of the restorations. Material and methods: A total of 139...... be evaluated. No post-operative sensitivity was reported by the participants. Overall relative cumulative loss rate frequencies for the adhesive system at 6, 18 and 7 years, independent of curing technique and restorative material, were 0.8%, 6.9% and 23.0%, respectively. The self-etching adhesive fulfilled...... secondary caries was observed. Significance: The single-step self-etching adhesive showed acceptable clinical long-time retention rates to dentin surfaces independent of restorative material and curing technique used....

  6. Adhesive permeability affects coupling of resin cements that utilise self-etching primers to dentine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, R M; Pegoraro, T A; Tay, F R; Pegoraro, L F; Silva, N R F A; Pashley, D H

    2004-01-01

    To examine the effects of an experimental bonding technique that reduces the permeability of the adhesive layer on the coupling of resin cements to dentine. Extracted human third molars had their mid to deep dentin surface exposed flat by transversally sectioning the crowns. Resin composite overlays were constructed and cemented to the surfaces using either Panavia F (Kuraray) or Bistite II DC (Tokuyama) resin cements mediated by their respective one-step or two-step self-etch adhesives. Experimental groups were prepared in the same way, except that the additional layer of a low-viscosity bonding resin (LVBR, Scotchbond Multi-Purpose Plus, 3M ESPE) was placed on the bonded dentine surface before luting the overlays with the respective resin cements. The bonded assemblies were stored for 24 h in water at 37 degrees C and subsequently prepared for microtensile bond strength testing. Beams of approximately 0.8 mm(2) were tested in tension at 0.5 mm/min in a universal tester. Fractured surfaces were examined under scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Additional specimens were prepared and examined with TEM using a silver nitrate-staining technique. Two-way ANOVA showed significant interactions between materials and bonding protocols (p0.05). SEM observation of the fractured surfaces in Panavia F showed rosette-like features that were exclusive for specimens bonded according to manufacturer's directions. Such features corresponded well with the ultrastructure of the interfaces that showed more nanoleakage associated with the more permeable adhesive interface. The application of the additional layer of the LVBR reduced the amount of silver impregnation for both adhesives suggesting that reduced permeability of the adhesives resulted in improved coupling of the resin cements to dentin. Placement of an intermediate layer of a LVBR between the bonded dentine surface and the resin cements resulted in improved coupling of Panavia F to dentine.

  7. Microshear bond strength of self-etching systems associated with a hydrophobic resin layer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Vito Moraes, André Guaraci; Francci, Carlos; Carvalho, Ceci Nunes; Soares, Silvio Peixoto; Braga, Roberto Ruggiero

    2011-08-01

    To evaluate in vitro the microshear bond strength of adhesive systems applied to dentin according to manufacturers' instructions, associated or not with a hydrophobic layer of unfilled resin. Six self-etching adhesives (Clearfil SE Bond, Kuraray Medical; AdheSE, Ivoclar Vivadent; Xeno III, Dentsply; I Bond, Heraeus-Kulzer; Bond Force, Tokuyama; Futurabond DC, Voco) were tested. The labial dentin of sixty bovine incisors was exposed, and the teeth were divided into two groups according to the application or not of an extra hydrophobic resin layer (Scotchbond Multi Purpose Plus, bottle 3). Six composite cylinders (Filtek Z250, 3M ESPE) were built up on each treated surface. Specimens were stored in distilled water at 37ºC for 24 h and then subjected to the microshear bond strength test in a universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min. Microshear bond strength values were analyzed by 2-way ANOVA and Tukey's post-hoc test. Failure mode was determined using a stereomicroscope under 20X magnification. The application of the hydrophobic resin layer did not affect bond strength, except for AdheSE. However, the bond strengths with the hydrophobic layer were similar among the six tested systems (Clearfil: 17.1 ± 7.9; AdheSE: 14.5 ± 7.1; Xeno lll: 12.8 ± 7.7; I Bond: 9.5 ± 5.8; Bond Force: 17.5 ± 4.1; Futurabond: 7.7 ± 2.3). When used as recommended by the manufacturers, Bond Force presented statistically higher bond strength than AdheSE and I Bond (p AdheSE 1.6 ± 1.6; Xeno lll: 9.0 ± 3.8; I Bond: 3.0 ± 1.5; Bond Force: 14 ± 3.9; Futurabond: 8.8 ± 3.8). Failure mode was predominantly adhesive. The bond strength of the self-etching systems tested was not significantly affected by the application of a hydrophobic layer, but a significant improvement was observed in AdheSE.

  8. Evaluation of bond strength of self-etching adhesives having different pH on primary and permanent teeth dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozmen, Bilal; Koyuturk, Alp Erdin; Tokay, Ugur; Cortcu, Murat; Sari, Mustafa Erhan

    2015-10-16

    The purpose of this in vitro study was to evaluate the dentin shear bond strength of 4 self-etching adhesives having a different pH on primary and permanent teeth dentin. The occlusal enamel was removed from 60 freshly extracted third molar and 60 primary second molar human teeth, which were randomly separated into 4 groups (n = 15). Four adhesive systems were applied: G-Bond (GC Corporation, Tokyo, Japan, pH: 1.5), Futura Bond M (Voco, Cuxhaver, Germany, pH: 1.4), Adper Prompt L-Pop (3M/ESPE, St Paul, MN, USA, pH: 0.8), and Clearfil S(3) Bond (Kuraray Medical, Tokyo, Japan, pH: 2.7) according to the manufacturer's instructions. After the application of dentin bonding agents, a composite resin material (Z250 Restorative A2, 3M ESPE, St. Paul, MN, USA) for permanent teeth and a compomer resin material (Dyract Extra A2, Dentsply, Konstanz, Germany) for primary teeth was applied onto the prepared dentin surfaces. The data were obtained by using a universal test machine at a crosshead speed of 1 mm/min. The mean values were compared using Tukey's multiple comparison test. Although there was no difference between adhesives on the permanent teeth, Clearfil S3 adhesive showed higher bond (18.07 ± 0.58 MPa) (P>0.05). Lower bond strength values were obtained from primary teeth and especially G-Bond adhesive (9.36 ± 0.48 MPa) (Padhesives with different pH and solvent types can be used successfully for permanent teeth dentin but adhesives with low pH did not provide greater shear bond strength values.

  9. The Effect of Phosphoric Acid Pre-etching Times on Bonding Performance and Surface Free Energy with Single-step Self-etch Adhesives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsujimoto, A; Barkmeier, W W; Takamizawa, T; Latta, M A; Miyazaki, M

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of phosphoric acid pre-etching times on shear bond strength (SBS) and surface free energy (SFE) with single-step self-etch adhesives. The three single-step self-etch adhesives used were: 1) Scotchbond Universal Adhesive (3M ESPE), 2) Clearfil tri-S Bond (Kuraray Noritake Dental), and 3) G-Bond Plus (GC). Two no pre-etching groups, 1) untreated enamel and 2) enamel surfaces after ultrasonic cleaning with distilled water for 30 seconds to remove the smear layer, were prepared. There were four pre-etching groups: 1) enamel surfaces were pre-etched with phosphoric acid (Etchant, 3M ESPE) for 3 seconds, 2) enamel surfaces were pre-etched for 5 seconds, 3) enamel surfaces were pre-etched for 10 seconds, and 4) enamel surfaces were pre-etched for 15 seconds. Resin composite was bonded to the treated enamel surface to determine SBS. The SFEs of treated enamel surfaces were determined by measuring the contact angles of three test liquids. Scanning electron microscopy was used to examine the enamel surfaces and enamel-adhesive interface. The specimens with phosphoric acid pre-etching showed significantly higher SBS and SFEs than the specimens without phosphoric acid pre-etching regardless of the adhesive system used. SBS and SFEs did not increase for phosphoric acid pre-etching times over 3 seconds. There were no significant differences in SBS and SFEs between the specimens with and without a smear layer. The data suggest that phosphoric acid pre-etching of ground enamel improves the bonding performance of single-step self-etch adhesives, but these bonding properties do not increase for phosphoric acid pre-etching times over 3 seconds.

  10. Effect of EDTA Conditioning and Carbodiimide Pretreatment on the Bonding Performance of All-in-One Self-Etch Adhesives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shipra Singh

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. This study evaluated the effect of ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA conditioning and carbodiimide (EDC pretreatment on the shear bond strength of two all-in-one self-etch adhesives to dentin. Methods. Flat coronal dentin surfaces were prepared on one hundred and sixty extracted human molars. Teeth were randomly divided into eight groups according to two different self-etch adhesives used [G-Bond and OptiBond-All-In-One] and four different surface pretreatments: (a adhesive applied following manufacturer’s instructions; (b dentin conditioning with 24% EDTA gel prior to application of adhesive; (c EDC pretreatment followed by application of adhesive; (d application of EDC on EDTA conditioned dentin surface followed by application of adhesive. Composite restorations were placed in all the samples. Ten samples from each group were subjected to immediate and delayed (6-month storage in artificial saliva shear bond strength evaluation. Data collected was subjected to statistical analysis using three-way ANOVA and post hoc Tukey’s test at a significance level of p<0.05.  Results and Conclusion. EDTA preconditioning as well as EDC pretreatment alone had no significant effect on the immediate and delayed bond strengths of either of the adhesives. However, EDC pretreatment on EDTA conditioned dentin surface resulted in preservation of resin-dentin bond strength of both adhesives with no significant fall over six months.

  11. Antibacterial Effect and Tensile Bond Strength of Self-etching Adhesive Resins with and without Methacryloyloxydodecylpyridinium Bromide: An in vitro Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnamurthy, Madhuram; Kumar, V Naveen; Leburu, Ashok; Dhanavel, Chakravarthy; Selvendran, Kasiswamy E; Praveen, Nehrudhas

    2018-04-01

    Aim: The aim of the present study was to compare the antibacterial activity of a self-etching primer containing antibacterial monomer methacryloyloxydodecylpyridinium bromide (MDPB) (Clearfil protect bond) with a conventional self-etching primer without MDPB (Clearfil SE bond) against Streptococcus mutans and the effect of incorporation of MDPB on the tensile bond strength of the experimental self-etching primer (Clearfil protect bond). Materials and methods: The antibacterial activity of the self-etching primers was assessed using agar disk diffusion method and the diameters of the zones of inhibition were measured and ranked. For tensile bond strength testing, 20 noncarious human molars were selected and randomly divided into two groups comprising 10 teeth in each group. Group I specimens were treated with Clearfil SE bond (without MDPB). Group II specimens were treated with Clearfil protect bond (with MDPB). Composite material was placed incrementally and cured for 40 seconds in all the specimens. Tensile bond strength was estimated using the Instron Universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 1 mm/min. Results: The addition of MDPB into a self-etching primer exerts potential antibacterial effect against S. mutans. The tensile bond strength of MDPB containing self-etching primer was slightly lower than that of the conventional self-etching Clearfil protect bond primer, but the difference was not statistically significant. Conclusion: Thus, a self-etching primer containing MDPB will be a boon to adhesive dentistry as it has bactericidal property with adequate tensile bond strength. Clinical significance: The concept of prevention of extension in adhesive dentistry would result in micro/nanoleakage due to the presence of residual bacteria in the cavity. Self-etching primers with MDPB would improve the longevity of such restorations by providing adequate antibacterial activity without compromising the bond strength. Keywords: Antibacterial property

  12. The effect of hydroxyapatite presence on the degree of conversion and polymerization rate in a model self-etching adhesive

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ying; Wang, Yong

    2011-01-01

    Objective The effect of hydroxyapatite (HAp) content on photopolymerization of a model self-etching adhesive was studied by using attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared (ATR/FT-IR) spectroscopy. Materials and methods The model adhesive contained two monomers: bis[2-(methacryloyloxy)ethyl] phosphate (2MP) and 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA) using a 1:1 mass ratio, representing an acidic formulation. Camphorquinone and ethyl 4-dimethylaminobenzoate were added to enable visible light photopolymerization in a constant concentration of 0.022 mmol per gram monomer. HAp [Ca10(OH)2(PO4)6] powder were added to the test solutions to obtain mass fraction of 0, 1, 2, 3, 4 wt%. The degree of conversion (DC) and the polymerization rate (PR) with/without HAp were determined using ATR/FT-IR with a time-based spectrum analysis. Results Monomer DC and PR were significantly enhanced by addition of HAp. Incorporation of 4 wt% of HAp increased DC from 20.8 (±0.3) % to 93.4 (±1.1) %, and PR from 0.42 (±0.01) %/s to 3.21 (±0.07) %/s. The pH of adhesive solutions was measured and correlated with DC and PR. The pH of test solutions was also controlled using a base (sodium hydroxide, NaOH) to similar values as when using HAp. Results indicated that both the DC and PR increased with increasing pH, regardless of additive, confirming the role of pH on polymerization. From the IR spectral comparison, changes in molecular structures of the self-etching adhesive after the addition of HAp were observed, which were correlated with the specific interaction between 2MP and HAp. The effect of viscosity was also proposed to be another possible reason for the improved polymerization. Significance The photopolymerization of a self-etching adhesive was enhanced / accelerated in the presence of HAp. The results provide the critical information for understanding the interactions/bonding between self-etching adhesives and tooth substrates. PMID:22032933

  13. Marginal microleakage of resin-modified glass-ionomer and composite resin restorations: Effect of using etch-and-rinse and self-etch adhesives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Khoroushi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Previous studies have shown that dental adhesives increase the bond strength of resin-modified glass-ionomer (RMGI restorative materials to dentin. This in vitro study has evaluated the effect of etch-and-rinse and self-etch bonding systems v/s cavity conditioner, and in comparison to similar composite resin restorations on maintaining the marginal sealing of RMGI restorations. Materials and Methods: 98 rectangular cavities (2.5×3×1.5 mm were prepared on buccal and palatal aspects of 49 human maxillary premolars, randomly divided into 7 groups (N=14. The cavities in groups 1, 2 and 3 were restored using a composite resin (APX. The cavities in groups 4, 5, 6 and 7 were restored using a resin-modified glass-ionomer (Fuji II LC. Before restoring, adhesive systems (Optibond FL = OFL, three-step etch-and-rinse; One Step Plus = OSP, two-step etch-and-rinse; Clearfil Protect Bond = CPB, two-step self-etch were used as bonding agents in groups 1-6 as follow: OFL in groups 1 and 4, OSP in groups 2 and 5, and CPB in groups 3 and 6, respectively. The specimens in group 7 were restored with GC cavity conditioner and Fuji II LC. All the specimens were thermo-cycled for 1000 cycles. Microleakage scores were determined using dye penetration method. Statistical analyzes were carried out with Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney U tests (α=0.05. Results: There were significant differences in microleakage scores at both enamel and dentinal margins between the study groups (P<0.05. The lowest microleakage scores at enamel and dentin margins of RMGI restorations were observed in group 6. Conclusion: Use of two-step self-etch adhesive, prior to restoring cervical cavities with RMGIC, seems to be more efficacious than the conventional cavity conditioner in decreasing marginal microleakage.

  14. Comparison of shear bond strength of self-etch and self-adhesive cements bonded to lithium disilicate, enamel and dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naranjo, Jennifer; Ali, Mohsin; Belles, Donald

    2015-11-01

    Comparison of shear bond strength of self-etch and self-adhesive cements bonded to lithium disilicate, enamel and dentin. With several self-adhesive resin cements currently available, there is confusion about which product and technique is optimal for bonding ceramic restorations to teeth. The objective of this study was to compare the shear bond strength of lithium disilicate cemented to enamel and dentin using 5 adhesive cements. 100 lithium disilicate rods were pretreated with 5% hydrofluoric acid, silane, and cemented to 50 enamel and 50 dentin surfaces using five test cements: Variolink II (etch-and-rinse) control group, Clearfil Esthetic (two step self-etch), RelyX Unicem, SpeedCEM, and BifixSE (self-adhesive). All specimens were stored (37 degrees C, 100% humidity) for 24 hours before testing their shear bond strength using a universal testing machine (Instron). Debonded surfaces were observed under a low-power microscope to assess the location and type of failure. The highest bond strength for both enamel and dentin were recorded for Variolink II, 15.1MPa and 20.4MPa respectively, and the lowest were recorded for BifixSE, 0.6MPa and 0.9MPa respectively. Generally, higher bond strengths were found for dentin (7.4MPa) than enamel (5.3MPa). Tukey's post hoc test showed no significant difference between Clearfil Esthetic and SpeedCem (p = 0.059), Unicem and SpeedCem (p = 0.88), and Unicem and BifixSE (p = 0.092). All cements bonded better to lithium disilicate than to enamel or dentin, as all bond failures occurred at the tooth/adhesive interface except for Variolink II. Bond strengths recorded for self-adhesive cements were very low compared to the control "etch and rinse" and self-etch systems. Further improvements are apparently needed in self-adhesive cements for them to replace multistep adhesive systems. The use of conventional etch and rinse cements such as Veriolink II should be preferred for cementing all ceramic restorations over self-adhesive cements

  15. Clinical acceptability of two self-etch adhesive resins for the bonding of orthodontic brackets to enamel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnebel, Bradley; Mateer, Scott; Maganzini, Anthony Louis; Freeman, Katherine

    2012-12-01

    To determine whether two self-adhesive resin cements, Clearfil SA and RelyX, can be used to successfully bond orthodontic brackets to enamel. Seventy extracted premolars were custom mounted, cleaned and randomly divided into three groups. In group 1 (control), orthodontic brackets were bonded to 25 premolars using the Transbond Plus and Transbond XT two step adhesive systerm adhesive. In group 2, brackets were bonded to 25 premolars using Clearfil SA. In group 3, brackets were bonded to 20 premolars using RelyX. The brackets were debonded using a universal testing machine and shear bond strengths recorded. After debonding, each tooth was examined under 20× magnification to evaluate the residual adhesive remaining. An ANOVA with Duncan's Multiple Range Test was used to determine whether there were significant differences in shear bond strength between the groups. A Kruskal-Wallis Test and a Bonferroni multiple comparison procedure were used to compare the bond failure modes (adhesive remnant index scores) between the groups. The mean shear bond strengths for the brackets bonded using Clearfil SA and RelyX were 5·930±1·840 and 3·334±1·953 MPa, respectively. Both were significantly lower than that for the brackets bonded using Transbond (7·875±3·611 MPa). Both self-etch adhesive resin cement groups showed a greater incidence of bracket failure at the enamel/adhesive interface while the Transbond group showed a higher incidence at the bracket/adhesive interface. The shear bond strengths of the self-etch adhesive resin cements may be inadequate to successfully bond orthodontic brackets to enamel.

  16. Influence of the number of cycles on shear fatigue strength of resin composite bonded to enamel and dentin using dental adhesives in self-etching mode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsujimoto, Akimasa; Barkmeier, Wayne W; Erickson, Robert L; Takamizawa, Toshiki; Latta, Mark A; Miyazaki, Masashi

    2018-01-30

    The influence of the number of cycles on shear fatigue strength to enamel and dentin using dental adhesives in self-etch mode was investigated. A two-step self-etch adhesive and two universal adhesives were used to bond to enamel and dentin in self-etch mode. Initial shear bond strength and shear fatigue strength to enamel and dentin using the adhesive in self-etch mode were determined. Fatigue testing was used with 20 Hz frequency and cycling periods of 50,000, 100,000 and 1,000,000 cycles, or until failure occurred. For each of the cycling periods, there was no significant difference in shear fatigue strength across the cycling periods for the individual adhesives. Differences in shear fatigue strength were found between the adhesives within the cycling periods. Regardless of the adhesive used in self-etch mode for bonding to enamel or dentin, shear fatigue strength was not influenced by the number of cycles used for shear fatigue strength testing.

  17. Effect of a functional monomer (MDP) on the enamel bond durability of single-step self-etch adhesives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuchiya, Kenji; Takamizawa, Toshiki; Barkmeier, Wayne W; Tsubota, Keishi; Tsujimoto, Akimasa; Berry, Thomas P; Erickson, Robert L; Latta, Mark A; Miyazaki, Masashi

    2016-02-01

    The present study aimed to determine the effect of the functional monomer, 10-methacryloxydecyl dihydrogen phosphate (MDP), on the enamel bond durability of single-step self-etch adhesives through integrating fatigue testing and long-term water storage. An MDP-containing self-etch adhesive, Clearfil Bond SE ONE (SE), and an experimental adhesive, MDP-free (MF), which comprised the same ingredients as SE apart from MDP, were used. Shear bond strength (SBS) and shear fatigue strength (SFS) were measured with or without phosphoric acid pre-etching. The specimens were stored in distilled water for 24 h, 6 months, or 1 yr. Although similar SBS and SFS values were obtained for SE with pre-etching and for MF after 24 h of storage in distilled water, SE with pre-etching showed higher SBS and SFS values than MF after storage in water for 6 months or 1 yr. Regardless of the pre-etching procedure, SE showed higher SBS and SFS values after 6 months of storage in distilled water than after 24 h or 1 yr. To conclude, MDP might play an important role in enhancing not only bond strength but also bond durability with respect to repeated subcritical loading after long-term water storage. © 2015 Eur J Oral Sci.

  18. Effect of etching on bonding of a self-etch adhesive to dentine affected by amelogenesis imperfecta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epasinghe, Don Jeevanie; Yiu, Cynthia Kar Yung

    2018-02-01

    Dentine affected by amelogenesis imperfecta (AI) is histologically altered due to loss of hypoplastic enamel and becomes hypermineralized. In the present study, we examined the effect of additional acid etching on microtensile bond strength of a self-etch adhesive to AI-affected dentine. Flat coronal dentine obtained from extracted AI-affected and non-carious permanent molars were allocated to two groups: (a) Clearfil SE Bond (control); and (b) Clearfil SE Bond and additional etching with 34% phosphoric acid for 15 seconds. The bonded teeth were sectioned into .8-mm 2 beams for microtensile bond strength testing, and stressed to failure under tension. The bond strength data were analyzed using two-way analysis of variance (dentine type and etching step) and Student-Newman-Keuls multiple comparison test (P<.05). Representative fractured beams from each group were examined under scanning electron microscopy. Both factors, dentine substrate (P<.001) and etching step (P<.05), and their interactions (P<.001), were statistically significant. Additional etching had an adverse effect on the bond strength of Clearfil SE Bond to normal dentine (P<.005), and no significant improvement was found for AI-affected dentine (P=.479). Additional acid etching does not improve the bond strength of a self-etch adhesive to AI-affected dentine. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  19. Effect of nanotechnology in self-etch bonding systems on the shear bond strength of stainless steel orthodontic brackets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaza M. Hammad

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective: To evaluate the effect of silica dioxide (SiO2 nanofillers in different bonding systems on shear bond strength (SBS and mode of failure of orthodontic brackets at two experimental times. Methods: Ninety-six intact premolars were divided into four groups: A Conventional acid-etch and primer Transbond XT; B Transbond Plus self-etch primer; and two self-etch bonding systems reinforced with silica dioxide nanofiller at different concentrations: C Futurabond DC at 1%; D Optibond All-in-One at 7%. Each group was allocated into two subgroups (n = 12 according to experimental time (12 and 24 hours. SBS test was performed using a universal testing machine. ARI scores were determined under a stereomicroscope. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM and transmission electron microscopy (TEM were used to determine the size and distribution of nanofillers. One-way ANOVA was used to compare SBS followed by the post-hoc Tukey test. The chi-square test was used to evaluate ARI scores. Results: Mean SBS of Futurabond DC and Optibond All-in-One were significantly lower than conventional system, and there were no significant differences between means SBS obtained with all self-etch bonding systems used in the study. Lower ARI scores were found for Futurabond DC and Optibond All-in-One. There was no significant difference of SBS and ARI obtained at either time points for all bonding systems. Relative homogeneous distribution of the fillers was observed with the bonding systems. Conclusion: Two nanofilled systems revealed the lowest bond strengths, but still clinically acceptable and less adhesive was left on enamel. It is advisable not to load the brackets immediately to the maximum.

  20. Effect of nanotechnology in self-etch bonding systems on the shear bond strength of stainless steel orthodontic brackets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammad, Shaza M.; El-Wassefy, Noha; Maher, Ahmed; Fawakerji, Shafik M.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: To evaluate the effect of silica dioxide (SiO2) nanofillers in different bonding systems on shear bond strength (SBS) and mode of failure of orthodontic brackets at two experimental times. Methods: Ninety-six intact premolars were divided into four groups: A) Conventional acid-etch and primer Transbond XT; B) Transbond Plus self-etch primer; and two self-etch bonding systems reinforced with silica dioxide nanofiller at different concentrations: C) Futurabond DC at 1%; D) Optibond All-in-One at 7%. Each group was allocated into two subgroups (n = 12) according to experimental time (12 and 24 hours). SBS test was performed using a universal testing machine. ARI scores were determined under a stereomicroscope. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) were used to determine the size and distribution of nanofillers. One-way ANOVA was used to compare SBS followed by the post-hoc Tukey test. The chi-square test was used to evaluate ARI scores. Results: Mean SBS of Futurabond DC and Optibond All-in-One were significantly lower than conventional system, and there were no significant differences between means SBS obtained with all self-etch bonding systems used in the study. Lower ARI scores were found for Futurabond DC and Optibond All-in-One. There was no significant difference of SBS and ARI obtained at either time points for all bonding systems. Relative homogeneous distribution of the fillers was observed with the bonding systems. Conclusion: Two nanofilled systems revealed the lowest bond strengths, but still clinically acceptable and less adhesive was left on enamel. It is advisable not to load the brackets immediately to the maximum. PMID:28444018

  1. Effect of reactive and un-reactive substrates on photopolymerization of self-etching adhesives with different aggressiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ying; Wang, Yong

    2013-01-01

    The study investigated the influence of reactive (enamel) and un-reactive (glass) substrates on photo-polymerization of self-etching adhesives. Two commercial adhesives Adper Prompt L-Pop (APLP, pH~0.8) and Adper Easy Bond (AEB, pH~2.5) were applied onto prepared enamel and glass substrates using the same protocol. Micro-Raman spectroscopy was employed to determine the degree of conversion (DC) and the involved mechanism. DC of APLP was dramatically enhanced from ~9.4% to ~82.0% as when changing from glass to enamel, while DC of AEB on both substrates showed no difference. The DC distributions along the adhesive layers of the APLP and AEB on enamel showed descending and constant trends, respectively. Spectral analysis disclosed that the difference in chemical reaction of the two adhesives with enamel might be associated with the results. The chemical reaction of the adhesives with enamel significantly improved the DC of the strong APLP, but not that of the mild AEB.

  2. Six-year clinical performance of etch-and-rinse and self-etch adhesives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boushell, Lee W; Heymann, Harald O; Ritter, Andre V; Sturdevant, John R; Swift, Edward J; Wilder, Aldridge D; Chung, Yunro; Lambert, Cynthia A; Walter, Ricardo

    2016-09-01

    To evaluate the 6-year clinical performance of Xeno IV, Xeno III, and XP Bond adhesives in the restoration of non-carious cervical lesions (NCCLs). This was a randomized controlled clinical trial where 39 participants met the inclusion/exclusion criteria and were enrolled. Lesions restored were notch-shaped NCCLs. Prior to adhesive procedures, NCCLs were roughened. No enamel bevel was placed and no mechanical retention was created. Adhesive systems were applied following manufacturer's instructions and the NCCLs were restored with composite resin (TPH(3)). Restorations were finished immediately after placement and scored with regard to retention, marginal discoloration, marginal adaptation, sensitivity, and secondary caries using modified USPHS criteria. Descriptive statistics were performed. Logistic regression models were performed for each outcome separately with compound symmetry correlation structure where teeth were clustered by participants. All analyses were conducted using SAS 9.2. The 6-year recall rate was 77.5% of the restorations (76.9% of the participants). No statistical differences were found between adhesives for retention, marginal discoloration, and marginal adaptation. Restorations failed by loss of retention (16.7%, 27.6%, and 11.8% of Xeno IV, Xeno III, and XP Bond restorations, respectively) and marginal discoloration (7.4% of Xeno IV restorations). For every unit increase in restoration volume it was 1.31 (95%C.I. 1.05, 1.63, P=0.01) times more likely that the restoration retention would be maintained. The tested adhesive systems presented similar clinical performance after six years of service, with annual failure rates of 2.8%, 4.6%, and 2.0% for Xeno IV, Xeno III, and XP Bond, respectively. Copyright © 2016 The Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Microtensile bond strength of etch-and-rinse and self-etching adhesives to intrapulpal dentin after endodontic irrigation and setting of root canal sealer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wattanawongpitak, Nipaporn; Nakajima, Masatoshi; Ikeda, Masaomi; Foxton, Richard M; Tagami, Junji

    2009-02-01

    To evaluate the effect of endodontic irrigation regimens and calcium hydroxide root canal sealer (Sealapex) on the microtensile bond strengths (muTBS) of dual-curing resin composite (Clearfil DC Core Automix) to the intrapulpal dentin. Forty standardized coronal-half root canal dentin specimens obtained from human premolars were divided into 4 groups: group A, no treatment (control); group B, Sealapex; group C, NaOCl/Sealapex; group D, EDTA/NaOCl/Sealapex. After 7 days of storage in 100% relative humidity, Sealapex was removed. Dentin surfaces were bonded with adhesives, either etch-and-rinse (Single Bond) or self-etching (Clearfil SE Bond), and built up with resin composite. The bonded specimens were trimmed into an hourglass shape with a 1-mm2 cross-sectional area for microtensile testing (n = 20). The muTBS to intrapulpal dentin was analyzed using two-way ANOVA and Dunnett's TC test. Two teeth of each group were prepared for micromorphological analysis of dentin surface. The root canal sealer with or without endodontic irrigation significantly affected the bond strengths of resin composite to intrapulpal dentin compared with the control group (p 0.05). The dentin surface was covered with a mud-like material after sealer application for 7 days. The root canal sealer reduced the muTBS of dual-curing resin composite with etch-and-rinse and self-etching adhesive systems to intrapulpal dentin. Treatment with EDTA followed by NaOCI prior to obturation caused an additional reduction in muTBS of both adhesive systems to intrapulpal dentin.

  4. Effect of Different Protocols in Preconditioning With EDTA in Sclerotic Dentin and Enamel Before Universal Adhesives Applied in Self-etch Mode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martini, E C; Parreiras, S O; Gutierrez, M F; Loguercio, A D; Reis, A

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of different protocols of 17% ethylene diamine tetra-acetic acid (EDTA) conditioning on the etching pattern and immediate bond strength of universal adhesives to enamel and sclerotic dentin. Forty bovine teeth with sclerotic dentin and 20 human third molars were randomly divided into eight groups resulting from the combination of the main factors surface treatment (none, two-minute EDTA conditioning manual application, 30-second EDTA manual application, 30-second EDTA sonic application) and adhesives systems (Scotchbond Universal Adhesive [SBU] and Prime & Bond Elect [PBE]). Resin-dentin and enamel-dentin bond specimens were prepared and tested under the microtensile bond strength (μTBS) and microshear bond strength (μSBS) tests, respectively. The etching pattern produced on the unground enamel and the sclerotic dentin surfaces under the different protocols and adhesive systems was evaluated under scanning electron microscopy. For enamel, only the main factor adhesive was significant (padhesives in the self-etch mode on sclerotic dentin, mainly when applied for 30 seconds with the aid of a sonic device. EDTA pretreatment also improves the retentive etching pattern of enamel, but it does not result in higher enamel bond strength.

  5. The effect of warm air-blowing on the microtensile bond strength of one-step self-etch adhesives to root canal dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taguchi, Keita; Hosaka, Keiichi; Ikeda, Masaomi; Kishikawa, Ryuzo; Foxton, Richard; Nakajima, Masatoshi; Tagami, Junji

    2018-02-01

    The use of warm air-blowing to evaporate solvents of one-step self-etch adhesive systems (1-SEAs) has been reported to be a useful method. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of warm air-blowing on root canal dentin. Four 1-SEAs (Clearfil Bond SE ONE, Unifil Core EM self-etch bond, Estelink, BeautiDualbond EX) were used. Each 1-SEA was applied to root canal dentin according to the manufacturers' instructions. After the adhesives were applied, solvent was evaporated using either normal air (23±1°C) or warm air (80±1°C) for 20s, and resin composite was placed in the post spaces. The air from the dryer, which could be used in normal- or hot-air-mode, was applied at a distance of 5cm above the root canal cavity in the direction of tooth axis. The temperature of the stream of air from the dryer in the hot-air-mode was 80±1°C, and in the normal mode, 23±1°C. After water storage of the specimens for 24h, the μTBS were evaluated at the coronal and apical regions. The μTBSs were statistically analyzed using three-way ANOVA and Student's t-test with Bonferroni correction (α=0.05). The warm air-blowing significantly increased the μTBS of all 1-SEAs at the apical regions, and also significantly increased the μTBS of two adhesives (Estelink and BeautiDualBond EX) at coronal regions. The μTBS of 1-SEAs to root canal dentin was improved by using warm air-blowing. Copyright © 2017 Japan Prosthodontic Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Influence of warm air-drying on enamel bond strength and surface free-energy of self-etch adhesives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiratsuchi, Koji; Tsujimoto, Akimasa; Takamizawa, Toshiki; Furuichi, Tetsuya; Tsubota, Keishi; Kurokawa, Hiroyasu; Miyazaki, Masashi

    2013-08-01

    We examined the effect of warm air-drying on the enamel bond strengths and the surface free-energy of three single-step self-etch adhesives. Bovine mandibular incisors were mounted in self-curing resin and then wet ground with #600 silicon carbide (SiC) paper. The adhesives were applied according to the instructions of the respective manufacturers and then dried in a stream of normal (23°C) or warm (37°C) air for 5, 10, and 20 s. After visible-light irradiation of the adhesives, resin composites were condensed into a mold and polymerized. Ten samples per test group were stored in distilled water at 37°C for 24 h and then the bond strengths were measured. The surface free-energies were determined by measuring the contact angles of three test liquids placed on the cured adhesives. The enamel bond strengths varied according to the air-drying time and ranged from 15.8 to 19.1 MPa. The trends for the bond strengths were different among the materials. The value of the γS⁺ component increased slightly when drying was performed with a stream of warm air, whereas that of the γS⁻ component decreased significantly. These data suggest that warm air-drying is essential to obtain adequate enamel bond strengths, although increasing the drying time did not significantly influence the bond strength. © 2013 Eur J Oral Sci.

  7. Bonding efficacy of new self-etching, self-adhesive dual-curing resin cements to dental enamel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benetti, Paula; Fernandes, Virgílio Vilas; Torres, Carlos Rocha; Pagani, Clovis

    2011-06-01

    This study evaluated the efficacy of the union between two new self-etching self-adhesive resin cements and enamel using the microtensile bond strength test. Buccal enamel of 80 bovine teeth was submitted to finishing and polishing with metallographic paper to a refinement of #600, in order to obtain a 5-mm2 flat area. Blocks (2 x 4 x 4 mm) of laboratory composite resin were cemented to enamel according to different protocols: (1) untreated enamel + RelyX Unicem cement (RX group); (2) untreated enamel + Bifix SE cement (BF group); (3) enamel acid etching and application of resin adhesive Single Bond + RelyX Unicem (RXA group); (4) enamel acid etching and application of resin adhesive Solobond M + Bifix SE (BFA group). After 7 days of storage in distillated water at 37°C, the blocks were sectioned for obtaining microbar specimens with an adhesive area of 1 mm2 (n = 120). Specimens were submitted to the microtensile bond strength test at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min. The results (in MPa) were analyzed statistically by ANOVA and Tukey's test. Enamel pre-treatment with phosphoric acid and resin adhesive (27.9 and 30.3 for RXA and BFA groups) significantly improved (p ≤ 0.05) the adhesion of both cements to enamel compared to the union achieved with as-polished enamel (9.9 and 6.0 for RX and BF). Enamel pre-treatment with acid etching and the application of resin adhesive significantly improved the bond efficacy of both luting agents compared to the union achieved with as-polished enamel.

  8. Effect of nanotechnology in self-etch bonding systems on the shear bond strength of stainless steel orthodontic brackets

    OpenAIRE

    Hammad, Shaza M.; El-Wassefy, Noha; Maher, Ahmed; Fawakerji, Shafik M.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: To evaluate the effect of silica dioxide (SiO2) nanofillers in different bonding systems on shear bond strength (SBS) and mode of failure of orthodontic brackets at two experimental times. Methods: Ninety-six intact premolars were divided into four groups: A) Conventional acid-etch and primer Transbond XT; B) Transbond Plus self-etch primer; and two self-etch bonding systems reinforced with silica dioxide nanofiller at different concentrations: C) Futurabond DC at 1%; D...

  9. Shear bond strength and debonding characteristics of metal and ceramic brackets bonded with conventional acid-etch and self-etch primer systems: An in-vivo study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirzakouchaki, Behnam; Shirazi, Sajjad; Sharghi, Reza; Shirazi, Samaneh; Moghimi, Mahsan; Shahrbaf, Shirin

    2016-02-01

    Different in-vitro studies have reported various results regarding shear bond strength (SBS) of orthodontic brackets when SEP technique is compared to conventional system. This in-vivo study was designed to compare the effect of conventional acid-etching and self-etching primer adhesive (SEP) systems on SBS and debonding characteristics of metal and ceramic orthodontic brackets. 120 intact first maxillary and mandibular premolars of 30 orthodontic patients were selected and bonded with metal and ceramic brackets using conventional acid-etch or self-etch primer system. The bonded brackets were incorporated into the wire during the study period to simulate the real orthodontic treatment condition. The teeth were extracted and debonded after 30 days. The SBS, debonding characteristics and adhesive remnant indices (ARI) were determined in all groups. The mean SBS of metal brackets was 10.63±1.42 MPa in conventional and 9.38±1.53 MPa in SEP system, (P=0.004). No statistically significant difference was noted between conventional and SEP systems in ceramic brackets. The frequency of 1, 2 and 3 ARI scores and debonding within the adhesive were the most common among all groups. No statistically significant difference was observed regarding ARI or failure mode of debonded specimens in different brackets or bonding systems. The SBS of metal brackets bonded using conventional system was significantly higher than SEP system, although the SBS of SEP system was clinically acceptable. No significant difference was found between conventional and SEP systems used with ceramic brackets. Total SBS of metal brackets was significantly higher than ceramic brackets. Due to adequate SBS of SEP system in bonding the metal brackets, it can be used as an alternative for conventional system. Shear bond strength, Orthodontic brackets, Adhesive remnant index, self-etch.

  10. Effect of dentin dehydration and composite resin polymerization mode on bond strength of two self-etch adhesives

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    Pooran Samimi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Dual-cured composite resins are similar to self-cured composite resins in some of their clinical applications due to inadequate irradiation, lack of irradiation, or delayed irradiation. Therefore, incompatibility with self-etch adhesives (SEAs should be taken into account with their use. On the other, the extent of dentin dehydration has a great role in the quality of adhesion of these resin materials to dentin. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of dentin dehydration and composite resin polymerization mode on bond strength of two SEAs. Materials and Methods: A total of 120 dentinal specimens were prepared from extracted intact third molars. Half of the samples were dehydrated in ethanol with increasing concentrations. Then Clearfil SE Bond (CSEB and Prompt L-Pop (PLP adhesives were applied in the two groups. Cylindrical composite resin specimens were cured using three polymerization modes: (1 Immediate light-curing, (2 delayed light-curing after 20 min, and (3 self-curing. Bond strength was measured using universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 1 mm/min. Data were analyzed with two-way ANOVA and Duncan post hoc tests. Statistical significance was defined at P 0.05. PLP showed significant differences between subgroups with the lowest bond strength in hydrated dentin with delayed light-curing and self-cured mode of polymerization. Conclusion: Within the limitations of this study, a delay in composite resin light-curing or using chemically cured composite resin had a deleterious effect on dentin bond strength of single-step SEAs used in the study.

  11. One-step partial or complete caries removal and bonding with antibacterial or traditional self-etch adhesives: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villat, Cyril; Attal, Jean-Pierre; Brulat, Nathalie; Decup, Franck; Doméjean, Sophie; Dursun, Elisabeth; Fron-Chabouis, Hélène; Jacquot, Bruno; Muller Bolla, Michèle; Plasse-Pradelle, Nelly; Roche, Laurent; Maucort-Boulch, Delphine; Nony, Patrice; Gritsch, Kerstin; Millet, Pierre; Gueyffier, François; Grosgogeat, Brigitte

    2016-08-15

    Current concepts in conservative dentistry advocate minimally invasive dentistry and pulp vitality preservation. Moreover, complete removal of carious dentin in deep carious lesions often leads to pulp exposure and root canal treatment, despite the absence of irreversible pulp inflammation. For years, partial caries removal has been performed on primary teeth, but little evidence supports its effectiveness for permanent teeth. Furthermore, the recent development of new antibacterial adhesive systems could be interesting in the treatment of such lesions. The objectives of this study are to compare the effectiveness of partial versus complete carious dentin removal in deep lesions (primary objective) and the use of an antibacterial versus a traditional two-step self-etch adhesive system (main secondary objective). The DEep CAries Treatment (DECAT) study protocol is a multicenter, randomized, controlled superiority trial comparing partial versus complete caries removal followed by adhesive restoration. The minimum sample size required is 464 patients. Two successive randomizations will be performed (allocation ratio 1:1): the first for the type of excavation (partial versus complete) and the second (if no root canal treatment is required) for the type of adhesive (antibacterial versus traditional). For the two objectives, the outcome is the success of the treatment after 1 year, measured according to a composite outcome of five FDI criteria: material fracture and retention, marginal adaptation, radiographic examination (including apical pathologies), postoperative sensitivity and tooth vitality, and carious lesion recurrence. The study will investigate the interest of a conservative approach for the management of deep carious lesions in terms of dentin excavation and bioactive adhesive systems. The results may help practitioners achieve the most efficient restorative procedure to maintain pulp vitality and increase the restoration longevity. Clinical

  12. Effect of sonic application mode on the resin-dentin bond strength and dentin permeability of self-etching systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mena-Serrano, Alexandra; Costa, Thays Regina Ferreira da; Patzlaff, Rafael Tiago; Loguercio, Alessandro Dourado; Reis, Alessandra

    2014-10-01

    To compare manual and sonic adhesive application modes in terms of the permeability and microtensile bond strength of a self-etching adhesive applied in the one-step or two-step protocol. Self-etching All Bond SE (Bisco) was applied as a one- or a two-step adhesive under manual or sonic vibration modes on flat occlusal dentin surfaces of 64 human molars. Half of the teeth were used to measure the hydraulic conductance of dentin at 200 cm H₂O hydrostatic pressure for 5 min immediately after the adhesive application. In the other half, composite buildups (Opallis) were constructed incrementally to create resin-dentin sticks with a cross-sectional area of 0.8 mm² to be tested in tension (0.5 mm/min) immediately after restoration placement. Data were analyzed using a two-way ANOVA and Tukey's test (α = 0.05). The fluid conductance of dentin was significantly reduced by the sonic vibration mode for both adhesives, but no effect on the bond strength values was observed for either adhesive. The sonic application mode at an oscillating frequency of 170 Hz can reduce the fluid conductance of the one- and two-step All Bond SE adhesive when applied on dentin.

  13. Sealing properties of a self-etching primer system to normal caries-affected and caries-infected dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kwang-Won; Son, H-H; Yoshiyama, Masatoshi; Tay, Franklin R; Carvalho, Ricardo M; Pashley, David H

    2003-09-01

    To compare the ability of an experimental antibacterial self-etching primer adhesive system to seal exposure sites in normal, caries-affected and caries-infected human dentin. 30 extracted human third molars were used within 1 month of extraction. 10 intact normal teeth comprised the normal group. 20 teeth with occlusal caries that radiographically extended halfway to the pulp were excavated using caries-detector solution (CDS) and a #4 round carbide bur in a slowspeed handpiece. Half of those teeth were fully excavated free of CDS-stained material without exposing the pulp, and were designated as the caries-affected dentin group. The remaining 10 teeth were excavated as close to the pulp as possible without obtaining an exposure, but whose dentin continued to stain red with CDS; this group was designated as the caries-infected dentin group. The remaining dentin thickness in all of the specimens in the other two groups was then reduced to the same extent as the caries-infected group. Direct exposures of the pulp chamber were made with a 1/4 round bur in the normal dentin or a 25 gauge needle in the other two groups. After measuring the fluid flow through the exposure, the sites were then sealed with an experimental antibacterial fluoride-containing self-etching primer adhesive systems (ABF). Fluid conductance was remeasured every week for 16 weeks. The fluid conductance through the exposure fell 99% in all groups following resin sealing. The seals of normal and caries-affected dentin remained relatively stable over the 16 weeks, while the seals of caries-infected dentin gradually deteriorated, reaching significance at 8 weeks. TEM examination revealed very thin (ca. 0.5 mm) hybrid layers in normal dentin, 3-4 microm thick hybrid layers in caries-affected dentin and 40 microm thick hybrid layers in caries-infected dentin. The tubules of caries-infected dentin were enlarged and filled with bacteria. Resin tags passed around these bacteria in the top 20-40 microm

  14. An In Vitro Evaluation of Leakage of Two Etch and Rinse and Two Self-Etch Adhesives after Thermocycling

    OpenAIRE

    Geerts, Sabine; Bolette, Amandine; Seidel, Laurence; Guéders, Audrey

    2012-01-01

    Our experiment evaluated the microleakage in resin composite restorations bonded to dental tissues with different adhesive systems. 40 class V cavities were prepared on the facial and lingual surfaces of each tooth with coronal margins in enamel and apical margins in cementum (root dentin). The teeth were restored with Z100 resin composite bonded with different adhesive systems: Scotchbond Multipurpose (SBMP), a 3-step Etch and Rinse adhesive, Adper Scotchbond 1 XT (SB1), a 2-step Etch and Ri...

  15. ADHESIVE SYSTEM AFFECTS REPAIR BOND STRENGTH OF RESIN COMPOSITE

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    Özgür IRMAK

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: This study evaluated the effects of different adhesive systems on repair bond strength of aged resin composites. Materials and Methods: Ninety composite discs were built and half of them were subjected to thermal aging. Aged and non-aged specimens were repaired with resin composite using three different adhesive systems; a two-step self-etch adhesive, a two-step total-etch adhesive and a one-step self-etch adhesive; then they were subjected to shear forces. Data were analyzed statistically. Results: Adhesive type and aging significantly affected the repair bond strengths (p<0.0001. No statistical difference was found in aged composite groups repaired with two-step self- etch or two-step total-etch adhesive. One-step self-etch adhesive showed lower bond strength values in aged composite repair (p<0.0001. Conclusion: In the repair of aged resin composite, two-step self-etch and two-step total-etch adhesives exhibited higher shear bond strength values than that of one-step self-etch adhesive.

  16. Influence of Air Abrasion and Sonic Technique on Microtensile Bond Strength of One-Step Self-Etch Adhesive on Human Dentin

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    Baraba Anja

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this in vitro study was to evaluate the microtensile bond strength of one-step self-etch adhesive to human dentin surface modified with air abrasion and sonic technique and to assess the morphological characteristics of the pretreated dentin surface. The occlusal enamel was removed to obtain a flat dentin surface for thirty-six human molar teeth. The teeth were randomly divided into three experimental groups (n = 12 per group, according to the pretreatment of the dentin: (1 control group, (2 air abrasion group, and (3 sonic preparation group. Microtensile bond strength test was performed on a universal testing machine. Two specimens from each experimental group were subjected to SEM examination. There was no statistically significant difference in bond strength between the three experimental groups (P > 0.05. Mean microtensile bond strength (MPa values were 35.3 ± 12.8 for control group, 35.8 ± 13.5 for air abrasion group, and 37.7 ± 12.0 for sonic preparation group. The use of air abrasion and sonic preparation with one-step self-etch adhesive does not appear to enhance or impair microtensile bond strength in dentin.

  17. Marginal microleakage of cervical composite resin restorations bonded using etch-and-rinse and self-etch adhesives: two dimensional vs. three dimensional methods

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    Maryam Khoroushi

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Objectives This study was evaluated the marginal microleakage of two different adhesive systems before and after aging with two different dye penetration techniques. Materials and Methods Class V cavities were prepared on the buccal and lingual surfaces of 48 human molars. Clearfil SE Bond and Single Bond (self-etching and etch-and-rinse systems, respectively were applied, each to half of the prepared cavities, which were restored with composite resin. Half of the specimens in each group underwent 10,000 cycles of thermocycling. Microleakage was evaluated using two dimensional (2D and three dimensional (3D dye penetration techniques separately for each half of each specimen. Data were analyzed with SPSS 11.5 (SPSS Inc., using the Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney U tests (α = 0.05. Results The difference between the 2D and 3D microleakage evaluation techniques was significant at the occlusal margins of Single bond groups (p = 0.002. The differences between 2D and 3D microleakage evaluation techniques were significant at both the occlusal and cervical margins of Clearfil SE Bond groups (p = 0.017 and p = 0.002, respectively. The difference between the 2D and 3D techniques was significant at the occlusal margins of non-aged groups (p = 0.003. The difference between these two techniques was significant at the occlusal margins of the aged groups (p = 0.001. The Mann-Whitney test showed significant differences between the two techniques only at the occlusal margins in all specimens. Conclusions Under the limitations of the present study, it can be concluded that the 3D technique has the capacity to detect occlusal microleakage more precisely than the 2D technique.

  18. Tensile bond strength of self-etching versus total-etching adhesive systems under different dentinal substrate conditions Resistência de união à tração de sistemas adesivos autocondicionantes versus de condicionamento total, em diferentes condições de substrato dentinário

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    Alexandre Henrique Susin

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available The use of acid etchants to produce surface demineralization and collagen network exposure, allowing adhesive monomers interdiffusion and consequently the formation of a hybrid layer, has been considered the most efficient mechanism of dentin bonding. The aim of this study was to compare the tensile bond strength to dentin of three adhesive systems, two self-etching ones (Clearfil SE Bond - CSEB and One Up Bond F - OUBF and one total-etching one (Single Bond - SB, under three dentinal substrate conditions (wet, dry and re-wet. Ninety human, freshly extracted third molars were sectioned at the occlusal surface to remove enamel and to form a flat dentin wall. The specimens were restored with composite resin (Filtek Z250 and submitted to tensile bond strength testing (TBS in an MTS 810. The data were submitted to two-way ANOVA and Tukey's test (p = 0.05. Wet dentin presented the highest TBS values for SB and CSEB. Dry dentin and re-wet produced significantly lower TBS values when using SB. OUBF was not affected by the different conditions of the dentin substrate, producing similar TBS values regardless of the surface pretreatments.O uso de condicionadores ácidos para desmineralizar a superfície dental e expor a rede de fibras colágenas para interdifusão dos monômeros adesivos e conseqüente formação da camada híbrida tem sido considerado o mais eficiente mecanismo de adesão dos agentes de união. O objetivo deste estudo foi comparar a resistência de união à dentina de três sistemas adesivos, dois autocondicionantes (Clearfil SE Bond - CSEB e One Up Bond F - OUBF e um de condicionamento total (Single Bond - SB, sob três diferentes condições de substrato dentinário (úmido, seco e reidratado. Noventa terceiros molares humanos recém-extraídos foram cortados na superfície oclusal, para se remover o esmalte e formar uma parede plana de dentina. Os espécimes foram restaurados com resina composta (Filtek Z250 e submetidos ao teste de

  19. Initial and long-term bond strengths of one-step self-etch adhesives with silane coupling agent to enamel-dentin-composite in combined situation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamanee, Teerapong; Takahashi, Masahiro; Nakajima, Masatoshi; Foxton, Richard M; Tagami, Junji

    2015-01-01

    This study evaluated the effect of adding silane coupling agent on initial and long-term bond strengths of one-step self-etch adhesives to enamel-dentin-composite in combined situation. Cervical cavities were prepared on extracted molars and filled with Clearfil AP-X. After water-storage for one-week, the filled teeth were sectioned in halves to expose enamel, dentin and composite surfaces and then enamel-dentin-composite surface was totally applied with one of adhesive treatments (Clearfil SE One, Clearfil SE One with Clearfil Porcelain Bond Activator, Beautibond Multi, Beautibond Multi with Beautibond Multi PR Plus and Scotchbond Universal). After designed period, micro-shear bond strengths (µSBSs) to each substrate were determined. For each period of water-storage, additive silane treatments significantly increased µSBS to composite (penamel (p>0.05). Moreover, the stability of µSBS was depended on materials and substrates used.

  20. Effect of smear layer deproteinization on bonding of self-etch adhesives to dentin: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alshaikh, Khaldoan H.; Mahmoud, Salah H.

    2018-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this systematic review was to critically analyze previously published studies of the effects of dentin surface pretreatment with deproteinizing agents on the bonding of self-etch (SE) adhesives to dentin. Additionally, a meta-analysis was conducted to quantify the effects of the above-mentioned surface pretreatment methods on the bonding of SE adhesives to dentin. Materials and Methods An electronic search was performed using the following databases: Scopus, PubMed and ScienceDirect. The online search was performed using the following keywords: ‘dentin’ or ‘hypochlorous acid’ or ‘sodium hypochlorite’ and ‘self-etch adhesive.’ The following categories were excluded during the assessment process: non-English articles, randomized clinical trials, case reports, animal studies, and review articles. The reviewed studies were subjected to meta-analysis to quantify the effect of the application time and concentration of sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl) and hypochlorous acid (HOCl) deproteinizing agents on bonding to dentin. Results Only 9 laboratory studies fit the inclusion criteria of this systematic review. The results of the meta-analysis revealed that the pooled average microtensile bond strength values to dentin pre-treated with deproteinizing agents (15.71 MPa) was significantly lower than those of the non-treated control group (20.94 MPa). Conclusions In light of the currently available scientific evidence, dentin surface pretreatment with deproteinizing agents does not enhance the bonding of SE adhesives to dentin. The HOCl deproteinizing agent exhibited minimal adverse effects on bonding to dentin in comparison with NaOCl solutions. PMID:29765895

  1. Effect of salivary contamination and decontamination on bond strength of two one-step self-etching adhesives to dentin of primary and permanent teeth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santschi, Katharina; Peutzfeldt, Anne; Lussi, Adrian; Flury, Simon

    2015-02-01

    To evaluate the effects of human saliva contamination and two decontamination procedures at different stages of the bonding procedure on the bond strength of two one-step self-etching adhesives to primary and permanent dentin. Extracted human primary and permanent molars (210 of each) were ground to mid-coronal dentin. The dentin specimens were randomly divided into 7 groups (n = 15/group/molar type) for each adhesive (Xeno V+ and Scotchbond Universal): no saliva contamination (control); saliva contamination before or after light curing of the adhesives followed by air drying, rinsing with water spray/air drying, or by rinsing with water spray/air drying/reapplication of the adhesives. Resin composite (Filtek Z250) was applied on the treated dentin surfaces. The specimens were stored at 37°C and 100% humidity for 24 h. After storage, shear bond strength (SBS) was measured and data analyzed with nonparametric ANOVA followed by exact Wilcoxon rank sum tests. Xeno V+ generated significantly higher SBS than Scotchbond Universal when no saliva contamination occurred. Saliva contamination reduced SBS of Xeno V+, with the reduction being more pronounced when contamination occurred before light curing than after. In both situations, decontamination involving reapplication of the adhesive restored SBS. Saliva contamination had no significant effect on Scotchbond Universal. There were no differences in SBS between primary and permanent teeth. Rinsing with water and air drying followed by reapplication of the adhesive restored bond strength to saliva-contaminated dentin.

  2. Influence of de/remineralization of enamel on the tensile bond strength of etch-and-rinse and self-etching adhesives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farias de Lacerda, Ana Julia; Ferreira Zanatta, Rayssa; Crispim, Bruna; Borges, Alessandra Bühler; Gomes Torres, Carlos Rocha; Tay, Franklin R; Pucci, Cesar Rogério

    2016-10-01

    To evaluate the bonding behavior of resin composite and different adhesives applied to demineralized or remineralized enamel. Bovine tooth crowns were polished to prepare a 5 mm2 enamel bonding area, and divided into five groups (n= 48) according to the surface treatment: CONT (sound enamel control), DEM (demineralized with acid to create white spot lesions), REMS (DEM remineralized with artificial saliva), REMF (DEM remineralized with sodium fluoride) and INF (DEM infiltrated with Icon resin infiltrant). The surface-treated teeth were divided into two subgroups (n= 24) according to adhesive type: ER (etch-and-rinse; Single Bond Universal) and SE (self-etching; Clearfill S3 Bond), and further subdivided into two categories (n= 12) according to aging process: Thermo (thermocycling) and NA (no aging). Composite blocks were made over bonded enamel and sectioned for microtensile bond strength (MTBS) testing. Data were analyzed with three-way ANOVA and post-hoc Tukey's test (α= 0.05). Significant differences were observed for enamel surface treatment (Padhesive type (PUniversal had higher MTBS than Clearfil S3 Bond; thermo-aging resulted in lower MTBS irrespective of adhesive type and surface treatment condition. The predominant failure mode was mixed for all groups. Enamel surface infiltrated with Icon does not interfere with adhesive resin bonding procedures. Treatment of enamel surface containing white spot lesions or cavities with cavosurface margins in partially-demineralized enamel can benefit from infiltration with a low viscosity resin infiltrant prior to adhesive bonding of resin composites.

  3. Four-year clinical evaluation of Class II nano-hybrid resin composite restorations bonded with a one-step self-etch and a two-step etch-and-rinse adhesive

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Dijken, Jan W V; Pallesen, Ulla

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this prospective clinical trial was to evaluate the 4-year clinical performance of an ormocer-based nano-hybrid resin composite (Ceram X; Dentsply/DeTrey) in Class II restorations placed with a one-step self-etch (Xeno III; Dentsply/DeTrey) and two-step etch-and-rinse adhesive (I...

  4. Effect of chlorhexidine on bonding durability of two self-etching adhesives with and without antibacterial agent to dentin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fereshteh Shafiei

    2013-01-01

    Conclusion: Chlorhexidine was capable of diminishing the loss of BS of these adhesives over time. However, considering the negative effect of chlorhexidine on the initial BS, the benefits of chlorhexidine associated with these adhesives cannot possibly be used.

  5. The effect of Er:YAG laser irradiation on the bond stability of self-etch adhesives at different dentin depths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karadas, Muhammet; Çağlar, İpek

    2017-07-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of Er:YAG laser irradiation on the micro-shear bond strength of self-etch adhesives to the superficial dentin and the deep dentin before and after thermocycling. Superficial dentin and deep dentin surfaces were prepared by flattening of the occlusal surfaces of extracted human third molars. The deep or superficial dentin specimens were randomized into three groups according to the following surface treatments: group I (control group), group II (Er:YAG laser; 1.2 W), and group III (Er:YAG laser; 0.5 W). Clearfil SE Bond or Clearfil S 3 Bond was applied to each group's dentin surfaces. After construction of the composite blocks on the dentin surface, the micro-shear bond testing of each adhesive was performed at 24 h or after 15,000 thermal cycles. The data were analyzed using a univariate analysis of variance and Tukey's test (p  0.05). However, deep-dentin specimens irradiated with laser showed significantly higher bond strengths than did control specimens after thermocycling (p adhesives may be altered by the dentin depth. Regardless of the applied surface treatment, deep dentin showed significant bond degradation.

  6. Marginal microleakage of class V resin-based composite restorations bonded with six one-step self-etch systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfonso Sánchez-Ayala

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available This study compared the microleakage of class V restorations bonded with various one-step self-etching adhesives. Seventy class V resin-based composite restorations were prepared on the buccal and lingual surfaces of 35 premolars, by using: Clearfil S 3 Bond, G-Bond, iBond, One Coat 7.0, OptiBond All-In-One, or Xeno IV. The Adper Single Bond etch-and-rinse two-step adhesive was employed as a control. Specimens were thermocycled for 500 cycles in separate water baths at 5°C and 55°C and loaded under 40 to 70 N for 50,000 cycles. Marginal microleakage was measured based on the penetration of a tracer agent. Although the control showed no microleakage at the enamel margins, there were no differences between groups (p = 0.06. None of the adhesives avoided microleakage at the dentin margins, and they displayed similar performances (p = 0.76. When both margins were compared, iBond® presented higher microleakage (p < 0.05 at the enamel margins (median, 1.00; Q3–Q1, 1.25–0.00 compared to the dentin margins (median, 0.00; Q3–Q1, 0.25–0.00. The study adhesives showed similar abilities to seal the margins of class V restorations, except for iBond®, which presented lower performance at the enamel margin.

  7. Shear Bond Strengths of Different Adhesive Systems to Biodentine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odabaş, Mesut Enes; Bani, Mehmet; Tirali, Resmiye Ebru

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to measure the shear bond strength of different adhesive systems to Biodentine with different time intervals. Eighty specimens of Biodentine were prepared and divided into 8 groups. After 12 minutes, 40 samples were randomly selected and divided into 4 groups of 10 each: group 1: (etch-and-rinse adhesive system) Prime & Bond NT; group 2: (2-step self-etch adhesive system) Clearfil SE Bond; group 3: (1-step self-etch adhesive systems) Clearfil S3 Bond; group 4: control (no adhesive). After the application of adhesive systems, composite resin was applied over Biodentine. This procedure was repeated 24 hours after mixing additional 40 samples, respectively. Shear bond strengths were measured using a universal testing machine, and the data were subjected to 1-way analysis of variance and Scheffé post hoc test. No significant differences were found between all of the adhesive groups at the same time intervals (12 minutes and 24 hours) (P > .05). Among the two time intervals, the lowest value was obtained for group 1 (etch-and-rinse adhesive) at a 12-minute period, and the highest was obtained for group 2 (two-step self-etch adhesive) at a 24-hour period. The placement of composite resin used with self-etch adhesive systems over Biodentine showed better shear bond strength. PMID:24222742

  8. Marginal Micro-leakage of Self-etch and All-in One Adhesives to Primary Teeth, with Mechanical or Chemo-Mechanical Caries Removal

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    Nouzari A

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Statement of Problem: Chemo-mechanical caries removal is an effective alternative to the traditional rotary drilling method. One of the factors that can influence micro-leakage is the method of caries removal. Objectives: To compare the micro-leakage of resin composite in primary dentition using self-etch and all-in one adhesives following conventional and chemo-mechanical caries removal. Materials and Methods: Sixty extracted human primary anterior teeth with class III carious lesions were collected. The selected teeth were divided randomly into two groups each consisting of 30 teeth. In group1 carious lesions were removed using Carisolv multi mix gel. In group 2, caries was removed using round steel burs in a slow–speed hand piece. Then, the specimens in each group were randomly divided into two subgroups (A and B of 15 and treated by either Clearfil SE Bond (CSEB or Scotch bond. All prepared cavities were filled with a resin composite (Estellite. All the specimens were stored in distilled water at 37ºC for 24 hours and then thermocycled in 5ºC and 55ºC water with a dwell time of 20 seconds for 1500 cycles. The specimens were immersed in 1% methylene blue solution for 24 hours, removed, washed and sectioned mesiodistally. The sectioned splits were examined under a stereomicroscope to determine the micro-leakage scores. The data were analyzed using Kruskal-Wallis Test in SPSS version 21. Results: There were no significant differences between micro-leakage scores among the four groups (p = 0.127. Score 0 of micro-leakage was detected for 60% of the specimens in group 1-A (Carisolv + CSEB, 73% of the group 2-A (hand piece + CSEB, 80% of the group 1-B (Carisolv + Scotch bond, and 93% of the group 2-B in which caries was removed using hand piece and bonded with Scotch bond . Conclusions: Although caries removal using hand piece bur along with using Scotch bond adhesive performed less micro-leakage, it would seems that the use of Carisolv

  9. Eight-year randomized clinical evaluation of Class II nanohybrid resin composite restorations bonded with a one-step self-etch or a two-step etch-and-rinse adhesive

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Dijken, Jan WV; Pallesen, Ulla

    2015-01-01

    (13.5 %) and nine in the two-step etch-and-rinse group (13.0 %). This resulted in nonsignificant different annual failure rates of 1.69 and 1.63 %, respectively. Fracture of restoration was the main reason for failure. Conclusion: Good clinical performance was shown during the 8-year evaluation....... Results: One hundred and fifty-eight restorations were evaluated after 8 years. Three participants with five restorations (three Xeno III, two Excite) were registered as dropouts. Twenty-one failed restorations (13.3 %) were observed during the follow-up. Twelve in the one-step self-etch adhesive group...... and no significant difference in overall clinical performance between the two adhesives. Fracture was the main reason for failure. Clinical relevance: The one-step self-etch adhesive showed a good long-term clinical effectiveness in combination with the nanohybrid resin composite in Class II restorations....

  10. Comparison of shear bond strength of self-etching fluoride releasing adhesives with and without pumice prophylaxis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V R Shobbana Devi

    2015-01-01

    Conclusions: Fluoride releasing adhesives combined with antibacterial monomer can play a vital role in reducing white spot lesions by enhancing the cariostatic effect especially in noncompliant\\medically compromised patients.

  11. Laboratory evaluation of the effect of unfilled resin after the use of self-etch and total-etch dentin adhesives on the Shear Bond Strength of composite to dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasseri, Ehsan Baradaran; Majidinia, Sara; Sharbaf, Davood Aghasizadeh

    2017-05-01

    Based on the frequent application of composite resins as tooth-colored fillings, this method is considered a viable alternative to dental amalgam. However, this method has the low bond strength of the composite to dentin. To solve this issue, various dental adhesive systems with different characteristics have been developed by dentistry experts. To assess the effect of an additional layer of unfilled resin in self-etch and total-etch dentin adhesives on the shear bond strength (SBS) of composite to dentin. Moreover, we assessed the effects of sample storage in artificial saliva on the SBS of composite to dentin. Methods: This experimental study was conducted on 160 freshly extracted human first or second premolar teeth, which were randomly divided into 16 groups. The teeth were prepared from Mashhad University of Medical Sciences, Mashhad, Iran (2008-2009). Scotchbond Multi-purpose (SBMP), single bond (SB), Clearfil SE Bond, and Clearfil S3 Bond were applied to dentin surface with or without the placement of hydrophobic resin (Margin Bond) in accordance with the instructions of the manufacturers. To expose the coronal dentin, the teeth were abraded with 600 grit SiC paper. Immediately after restoration, half of the samples were tested in terms of SBS, while the other samples were evaluated in terms of SBS after three months of storage in artificial saliva. SBS rates of dental composites evaluated by universal testing machine and samples were studied by optical stereomicroscopy to verify the failure type. Data analysis was performed in SPSS V.16 using Kolmogorov-Smirnov test, independent-samples t-test, ANOVA, and Duncan's logistic regression test. In this study, a significant reduction was observed in the SBS rates of SB and S3 bond adhesive systems after storage with and without hydrophobic resin (p>0.000). Without storage in normal saline, a significant increase was observed in the SBS rate of the SE bond (p=0.013). In addition, SBS rate of SBMP significantly

  12. Comparing the effect of a desensitizing material and a self-etch adhesive on dentin sensitivity after periodontal surgery: a randomized clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hila Hajizadeh

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Objectives This double-blind randomized placebo-controlled clinical trial evaluated the ability of a desensitizing agent and a self-etch adhesive on cervical dentin sensitivity (CDS after periodontal surgery. Materials and Methods Ninety hypersensitive teeth of 13 subjects were included in the study. After periodontal surgery, the teeth of each posterior sextant treated with one of the following materials: G1: Clearfil S3 Bond (Kuraray Dental, G2: Gluma Desensitizer (Heraeus Kulzer, and G3: placebo (water. The sensitivity was assessed using evaporative stimuli before treatment (baseline, T0, 1 day after treatment (T1, after 1 week (T2, and after 1 month (T3 according to visual analog scale (VAS. Results Following the treatment, all the 3 groups showed significant reduction of CDS in T1 compared to T0. Reduction of CDS between T1 and T2 was observed only in G1 but there was no significant difference between T2 and T3 in this group. Although we observed a significant difference in T3 compared to T1 and T2 in G2 and G3, comparison of treatment groups in each assessment time showed a significant difference only in T3. According to paired comparison, this was due to the difference between G2 and G3. Conclusions Dentin sensitivity following periodontal surgery will decrease spontaneously over time, but treating the sensitive teeth with Gluma Desensitizer and Clearfil S3 Bond can have some benefits.

  13. Comparative evaluation of shear bond strength of two self-etching adhesives (sixth and seventh generation on dentin of primary and permanent teeth: An in vitro study

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    Yaseen S

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The present study was undertaken to compare and evaluate shear bond strength of two self-etching adhesives (sixth and seventh generation on dentin of primary and permanent teeth. Materials and Methods: Flat dentin surface of 64 human anterior teeth (32 primary and 32 permanent divided into four groups of 16 each. Groups A and C were treated with Contax (sixth generation, while groups B and D were treated with Clearfil S3 (seventh generation. A teflon mold was used to build the composite (Filtek Z-350 cylinders on the dentinal surface of all the specimens. Shear bond strength was tested for all the specimens with an Instron Universal Testing Machine. Data were statistically analyzed using one-way ANOVA for multiple group comparison, followed by student′s unpaired ′t′ test for group-wise comparison. Results: There was no statistically significant difference in shear bond strength among the study groups except that primary teeth bonded with Contax exhibited significantly lesser shear bond strength than permanent teeth bonded with Clearfil S3. Conclusion: This study revealed that Clearfil S3 could be of greater advantage in pediatric dentistry than Contax because of its fewer steps and better shear bond strength in dentin of both primary and permanent teeth.

  14. Current dental adhesives systems. A narrative review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milia, Egle; Cumbo, Enzo; Cardoso, Rielson Jose A; Gallina, Giuseppe

    2012-01-01

    Adhesive dentistry is based on the development of materials which establish an effective bond with the tooth tissues. In this context, adhesive systems have attracted considerable research interest in recent years. Successful adhesive bonding depends on the chemistry of the adhesive, on appropriate clinical handling of the material as well as on the knowledge of the morphological changes caused on dental tissue by different bonding procedures. This paper outlines the status of contemporary adhesive systems, with particular emphasis on chemical characteristics and mode of interaction of the adhesives with enamel and dentinal tissues. Dental adhesives are used for several clinical applications and they can be classified based on the clinical regimen in "etch-and-rinse adhesives" and "self-etch adhesives". Other important considerations concern the different anatomical characteristics of enamel and dentine which are involved in the bonding procedures that have also implications for the technique used as well as for the quality of the bond. Etch-and-rinse adhesive systems generally perform better on enamel than self-etching systems which may be more suitable for bonding to dentine. In order to avoid a possible loss of the restoration, secondary caries or pulp damage due to bacteria penetration or due to cytotoxicity effects of eluted adhesive components, careful consideration of several factors is essential in selecting the suitable bonding procedure and adhesive system for the individual patient situation.

  15. Effect of Water Storage on the Micro-shear Bond Strength of Two Self-etch Adhesives to Enamel and Dentin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Jaberi Ansari

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: This study evaluated the influence of storage time on micro-shear bond strength of two self-etching materials to enamel and dentin.Materials and Methods: Human third molar teeth were sectioned to 1.5 mm thick beams and randomly divided into 2 groups. In group I, SE Bond and in group II, Tri-S Bond was used to bond a composite rod (AP-X to each treated surface. Specimens were prepared according to manufacturer instructions. Each group was further divided into three subgroups according to water storage time; 1 day, 6 and 12 months. Microshear bond strengths were determined under a crosshead speed of 1mm/min using a universal testing machine and expressed in MPa. Data was statistically analyzed by ANOVA and Dunnett post hoc test.Results: Micro-shear bond strength of two adhesives to enamel and dentin showed a slight but not significant decrease over time (P>0.5. After one day, the mean bond strength of enamel in groups I and II were 39.47 and 34.65 MPa and in dentin were 45.20 and 36.0 MPa respectively. There was no statistically significant differencebetween two materials (P=0.190, P=0.082. After six months the bond strength in group I and II was 35.93 and 35.18 MPa for enamel, and 38.27and 35.19 MPa for dentin respectively, these differences was not statistically significant (P=0.520, P=0.179.After one year, the bond strength of enamel in groups I and II, were 34.47and 29.91MPa, and in dentin were 33.86 and 32.53 MPa respectively which was not statistically significant (P=0.609, P=0.991.Conclusion: The micro-shear bond strength of both adhesives to enamel and dentin decreased slightly over time; however these decreases were not statistically significant.

  16. Adhesive performance of a multi-mode adhesive system: 1-year in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchesi, Giulio; Frassetto, Andrea; Mazzoni, Annalisa; Apolonio, Fabianni; Diolosà, Marina; Cadenaro, Milena; Di Lenarda, Roberto; Pashley, David H; Tay, Franklin; Breschi, Lorenzo

    2014-05-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the adhesive stability over time of a multi-mode one-step adhesive applied using different bonding techniques on human coronal dentine. The hypotheses tested were that microtensile bond strength (μTBS), interfacial nanoleakage expression and matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) activation are not affected by the adhesive application mode (following the use of self-etch technique or with the etch-and-rinse technique on dry or wet dentine) or by ageing for 24h, 6 months and 1year in artificial saliva. Human molars were cut to expose middle/deep dentine and assigned to one of the following bonding systems (N=15): (1) Scotchbond Universal (3M ESPE) self-etch mode, (2) Scotchbond Universal etch-and-rinse technique on wet dentine, (3) Scotchbond Universal etch-and-rinse technique on dry dentine, and (4) Prime&Bond NT (Dentsply De Trey) etch-and-rinse technique on wet dentine (control). Specimens were processed for μTBS test in accordance with the non-trimming technique and stressed to failure after 24h, 6 months or 1 year. Additional specimens were processed and examined to assay interfacial nanoleakage and MMP expression. At baseline, no differences between groups were found. After 1 year of storage, Scotchbond Universal applied in the self-etch mode and Prime&Bond NT showed higher μTBS compared to the other groups. The lowest nanoleakage expression was found for Scotchbond Universal applied in the self-etch mode, both at baseline and after storage. MMPs activation was found after application of each tested adhesive. The results of this study support the use of the self-etch approach for bonding the tested multi-mode adhesive system to dentine due to improved stability over time. Improved bonding effectiveness of the tested universal adhesive system on dentine may be obtained if the adhesive is applied with the self-etch approach. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Effect of composite resin placement techniques on the microleakage of two self-etching dentin-bonding agents.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Santini, A.; Plasschaert, A.J.M.; Mitchell, S.M.

    2001-01-01

    PURPOSE: To evaluate microleakage of Class V resin-based composites (RBC) bonded with two self-etching dentin adhesive systems. Class V cavities were restored with either one or three increments of RBC to determine whether the restorative method affected microleakage. MATERIALS AND METHODS: 60

  18. In Vitro Evaluation of Shear Bond Strength of Self Etching Primers to Dentin

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    Reena Vora

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To evaluate and compare the shear bond strength of four self etching primer adhesives to dentin. Materials & Methods: A total of 75 extracted human maxillary and mandibular molars were selected for the study. The teeth were divided into 5 groups of 15 teeth each, Group A- AdheSE (Ivoclar Vivadent, Group B-Adper prompt (3M ESPE, Group C- i bond (Heraeus-Kulzer, Group D-XenoIII (Dentsply, De Trey Group E-Single bond (3M ESPE was used and served as control. All the adhesives were applied according to the manufacturer′s instructions. Composite post was built on these bonded surfaces using Z-100 hybrid composite. The teeth were subjected to thermocycling for 500 cycles between 5°C to 55°C. The teeth were then mounted on universal testing machine and fractured under a shearing load, applied at a speed of 0.2mm/min. The readings were noted, tabulated and shear bond strength calculated in Mega Pascal (Mpa units. Results: There was significant difference in the mean shear bond strength of the four self etching primers, adhesives tested. Shear strength values were in the range of 16.57 to 21.73 Mpa. Xeno III gave the highest mean of shear bond strength whereas Adhe SE showed the lowest value of shear strength. Conclusion: Based on the results of the study, it can be concluded that contemporary self etching primer adhesives bond successfully to dentin. Moreover the bonding ability of Self Etching Systems seems to be comparable to the conventional Total Etch Systems.

  19. Effect of double-layer application on bond quality of adhesive systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujiwara, Satoshi; Takamizawa, Toshiki; Barkmeier, Wayne W; Tsujimoto, Akimasa; Imai, Arisa; Watanabe, Hidehiko; Erickson, Robert L; Latta, Mark A; Nakatsuka, Toshiyuki; Miyazaki, Masashi

    2018-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effect of double-layer application of universal adhesives on the bond quality and compare to other adhesive systems. Two universal adhesives used were in this study: Scotchbond Universal (SU), [3M ESPE] and Prime & Bond elect (PE), [Dentsply Caulk]. The conventional single-step self-etch adhesives G-ӕnial Bond (GB), [GC Corporation.] and BeautiBond (BB), [Shofu Inc.], and a two-step self-etch adhesive, Optibond XTR (OX), [Kerr Corporation], were used as comparison adhesives. Shear bond strengths (SBS) and shear fatigue strengths (SFS) to human enamel and dentin were measured in single application mode and double application mode. For each test condition, 15 specimens were prepared for SBS testing and 30 specimens for SFS testing. Enamel and dentin SBS of the universal adhesives in the double application mode were significantly higher than those of the single application mode. In addition, the universal adhesives in the double application mode had significantly higher dentin SFS values than those of the single application mode. The two-step self-etch adhesive OX tended to have lower bond strengths in the double application mode, regardless of the test method or adherent substrate. The double application mode is effective in enhancing SBS and SFS of universal adhesives, but not conventional two-step self-etch adhesives. These results suggest that, although the double application mode may enhance the bonding quality of a universal adhesive, it may be counter-productive for two-step self-etch adhesives in clinical use. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Adhesive systems: important aspects related to their composition and clinical use

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    Mario Honorato Silva e Souza Junior

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available This literature review article addresses the types and the main components of different etch-and-rinse and self-etch adhesive systems available in the market, and relates them to their function, possible chemical interactions and infuence of handling characteristics. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM images are presented to characterize the interface between adhesives and dentin. Adhesive systems have been recently classifed according to their adhesion approaches in etch-and-rinse, self-etch and glass ionomer. The etch-and-rinse systems require a specifc acid-etch procedure and may be performed in two or three steps. Self-etch systems employ acidic monomers that demineralize and impregnate dental substrates almost at the same time. These systems are separated in one or two steps. Some advantages and defciencies were noted for etch-and-rinse and self-etch approaches, mainly for the simplifed ones due to some chemical associations and interactions. The SEM micrographs illustrate different relationships between adhesive systems and dental structures, particularly dentin. The knowledge of composition, characteristics and mechanisms of adhesion of each adhesive system is of fundamental importance to permit the adoption of ideal bonding strategies under clinical conditions.

  1. Influence of different etching modes on bond strength and fatigue strength to dentin using universal adhesive systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takamizawa, Toshiki; Barkmeier, Wayne W; Tsujimoto, Akimasa; Berry, Thomas P; Watanabe, Hedehiko; Erickson, Robert L; Latta, Mark A; Miyazaki, Masashi

    2016-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the dentin bonding ability of three new universal adhesive systems under different etching modes using fatigue testing. Prime & Bond elect [PE] (DENTSPLY Caulk), Scotchbond Universal [SU] (3M ESPE), and All Bond Universal [AU] (Bisco) were used in this study. A conventional single-step self-etch adhesive, Clearfil Bond SE ONE [CS] (Kuraray Noritake Dental) was also included as a control. Shear bond strengths (SBS) and shear fatigue strength (SFS) to human dentin were obtained in the total-etch mode and self-etch modes. For each test condition, 15 specimens were prepared for the SBS and 30 specimens for SFS. SEM was used to examine representative de-bonded specimens, treated dentin surfaces and the resin/dentin interface for each test condition. Among the universal adhesives, PE in total-etch mode showed significantly higher SBS and SFS values than in self-etch mode. SU and AU did not show any significant difference in SBS and SFS between the total-etch mode and self-etch mode. However, the single-step self-etch adhesive CS showed significantly lower SBS and SFS values in the etch-and-rinse mode when compared to the self-etch mode. Examining the ratio of SFS/SBS, for PE and AU, the etch-and-rinse mode groups showed higher ratios than the self-etch mode groups. The influence of different etching modes on dentin bond quality of universal adhesives was dependent on the adhesive material. However, for the universal adhesives, using the total-etch mode did not have a negative impact on dentin bond quality. Copyright © 2015 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. No-waiting dentine self-etch concept-Merit or hype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xue-Qing; Pucci, César R; Luo, Tao; Breschi, Lorenzo; Pashley, David H; Niu, Li-Na; Tay, Franklin R

    2017-07-01

    A recently-launched universal adhesive, G-Premio Bond, provides clinicians with the alternative to use the self-etch technique for bonding to dentine without waiting for the adhesive to interact with the bonding substrate (no-waiting self-etch; Japanese brochure), or after leaving the adhesive undisturbed for 10s (10-s self-etch; international brochure). The present study was performed to examine in vitro performance of this new universal adhesive bonded to human coronal dentine using the two alternative self-etch modes. One hundred and ten specimens were bonded using two self-etch application modes and examined with or without thermomechanical cycling (10,000 thermal cycles and 240,000 mechanical cycles) to simulate one year of intraoral functioning. The bonded specimens were sectioned for microtensile bond testing, ultrastructural and nanoleakage examination using transmission electron microscopy. Changes in the composition of mineralised dentine after adhesive application were examined using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Both reduced application time and thermomechanical cycling resulted in significantly lower bond strengths, thinner hybrid layers, and significantly more extensive nanoleakage after thermomechanical cycling. Using the conventional 10-s application time improved bonding performance when compared with the no-waiting self-etch technique. Nevertheless, nanoleakage was generally extensive under all testing parameters employed for examining the adhesive. Although sufficient bond strength to dentine may be achieved using the present universal adhesive in the no-waiting self-etch mode that does not require clinicians to wait prior to polymerisation of the adhesive, this self-etch concept requires further technological refinement before it can be recommended as a clinical technique. Although the surge for cutting application time to increase user friendliness remains the most frequently sought conduit for advancement of dentine bonding

  3. Comparative evaluation of self-etching primers and phosphoric acid effectiveness on composite to enamel bond: an in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patil, Basanagouda S; Rao, Bk Raghavendra; Sharathchandra, Sm; Hegde, Reshma; Kumar, G Vinay

    2013-09-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the effectiveness of the one total-etch self-priming adhesive, one two-step self-etching primer adhesive, and one 'all-in-one' self-etching adhesive system on the adhesion of a resin composite to enamel. Thirty-six freshly extracted human mandibular molars were selected for this study. A fat area about 5 mm in diameter was created on the exposed mesial surface of enamel of each tooth by moist grinding with 320, 420 and 600 grit silicon carbide paper. Twelve teeth were randomly assigned into three groups. In group 1, Adper Easy One (3M ESPE), a one step self-etching primer adhesive was applied and light curing unit for 10 seconds. In group 2, Adper SE Plus, a two-step self-etching primer with bottle A containing the aqueous primer and bottle B containing the acidic adhesive was applied and light cured for 10 seconds. Group 3 (control)-etchant 37% phosphoric acid is applied to the surface for 15 seconds and rinsed with water and air dried and adhesive (single bond 2) is applied to the surface and tube is placed and light cured for 20 seconds. Composite material (Z350) was placed in the tube and light cured for 40 seconds in all the groups. Bond strength testing was done using universal testing machine at the enamel-composite interface. The debonded enamel surface was evaluated in stereomicroscope to assess the cohesive, adhesive or mixed fracture. Data was statistically analyzed by one way analysis of variance (ANOVA). Group 1 performed least among all groups with a mean score of 19.46 MPa. Group 2 had a mean score of 25.67 MPa. Group 3 had a mean score of 27.16 MPa. Under the conditions of this in vitro study, the bond strength values of the two-step self-etching primer systems tested were similar to the total-etch. And, one step self-etching primers have lower bond strength compared to the total-etch.

  4. Automated margin analysis of contemporary adhesive systems in vitro: evaluation of discriminatory variables.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heintze, Siegward D; Forjanic, Monika; Roulet, François-Jean

    2007-08-01

    Using an optical sensor, to automatically evaluate the marginal seal of restorations placed with 21 adhesive systems of all four adhesive categories in cylindrical cavities of bovine dentin applying different outcome variables, and to evaluate their discriminatory power. Twenty-one adhesive systems were evaluated: three 3-step etch-and-rinse systems, three 2-step etch-and-rinse systems, five 2-step self-etching systems, and ten 1-step self-etching systems. All adhesives were applied in cylindrical cavities in bovine dentin together with Tetric Ceram (n=8). In the control group, no adhesive system was used. After 24 h of storage in water at 37 degrees C, the surface was polished with 4000-grit SiC paper, and epoxy resin replicas were produced. An optical sensor (FRT MicroProf) created 100 profiles of the restoration margin, and an algorithm detected gaps and calculated their depths and widths. The following evaluation criteria were used: percentage of specimens without gaps, the percentage of gap-free profiles in relation to all profiles per specimen, mean gap width, mean gap depth, largest gap, modified marginal integrity index MI. The statistical analysis was carried out on log-transformed data for all variables with ANOVA and post-hoc Tukey's test for multiple comparisons. The correlation between the variables was tested with regression analysis, and the pooled data accordingto the four adhesive categories were compared by applying the Mann-Whitney nonparametric test (p adhesive systems demonstrated the best marginal adaptation, followed by the 2-step self-etching and the 1-step self-etching adhesives; the latter showed the highest variability in test results between materials and within the same material. The only exception to this rule was Xeno IV, which showed a marginal adaptation that was comparable to that of the best 3-step etch-and-rinse systems. Except for the variables "largest gap" and "mean gap depth", all the other variables had a similar ability to

  5. Evaluation of microtensile bond strength of total-etch, self-etch, and glass ionomer adhesive to human dentin: An in vitro study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neelima Lakshmi

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To evaluate the microtensile bond strength of Single Bond, AdheSE, and Fuji Bond LC to human dentin. Fifteen non-carious third molars were selected for the study. The teeth were randomly divided into three groups of five teeth each. Each group was given a different bonding treatment. Group I was treated with Single Bond (3M, ESPE, group II with AdheSE (Ivoclar, Vivadent, and group III was treated with Fuji Bond LC (GC America. A T-band metal matrix was placed and composite resin bonded on to the tooth surface using appropriate bonding agents. The composite resin was packed in increments and light cured. Each tooth was sectioned to obtain 1 mm x 1 mm beams of dentin-resin samples. Tensile bond testing was done using a universal testing machine (Instron at a cross-head speed of 0.5 mm/min. Results: The mean bond strength of Single Bond (35.5 MPa was significantly higher than that of AdheSE (32.8 MPa and Fuji Bond LC (32.6 MPa. The difference between the microtensile bond strength values of AdheSE and Fuji Bond LC was statistically insignificant. Inference: Though the bond strength of AdheSE and Fuji Bond LC was above 30 MPa, it was less than that of Single Bond as evaluated by testing of microtensile bond strength.

  6. Randomized 3-year Clinical Evaluation of Class I and II Posterior Resin Restorations Placed with a Bulk-fill Resin Composite and a One-step Self-etching Adhesive

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Dijken, Jan Wv; Pallesen, Ulla

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: To evaluate the 3-year clinical durability of the flowable bulk-fill resin composite SDR in Class I and Class II restorations. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Thirty-eight pairs of Class I and 62 pairs of Class II restorations were placed in 44 male and 42 female patients (mean age 52.4 years......). Each patient received at least two extended Class I or Class II restorations that were as similar as possible. In all cavities, a one-step self-etching adhesive (XenoV+) was applied. One of the cavities of each pair was randomly assigned to receive the flowable bulk-fill resin composite SDR...... in increments up to 4 mm as needed to fill the cavity 2 mm short of the occlusal cavosurface. The occlusal part was completed with an ormocer-based nanohybrid resin composite (Ceram X mono+). In the other cavity, only the resin composite CeramX mono+ was placed in 2 mm increments. The restorations were...

  7. Classification review of dental adhesive systems: from the IV generation to the universal type

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sofan, Eshrak; Sofan, Afrah; Palaia, Gaspare; Tenore, Gianluca; Romeo, Umberto; Migliau, Guido

    2017-01-01

    Summary Adhesive dentistry has undergone great progress in the last decades. In light of minimal-invasive dentistry, this new approach promotes a more conservative cavity design, which relies on the effectiveness of current enamel-dentine adhesives. Adhesive dentistry began in 1955 by Buonocore on the benefits of acid etching. With changing technologies, dental adhesives have evolved from no-etch to total-etch (4th and 5th generation) to self-etch (6th, 7th and 8th generation) systems. Currently, bonding to dental substrates is based on three different strategies: 1) etch-and-rinse, 2) self-etch and 3) resin-modified glass-ionomer approach as possessing the unique properties of self-adherence to the tooth tissue. More recently, a new family of dentin adhesives has been introduced (universal or multi-mode adhesives), which may be used either as etch-and-rinse or as self-etch adhesives. The purpose of this article is to review the literature on the current knowledge for each adhesive system according to their classification that have been advocated by many authorities in most operative/restorative procedures. As noted by several valuable studies that have contributed to understanding of bonding to various substrates helps clinicians to choose the appropriate dentin bonding agents for optimal clinical outcomes. PMID:28736601

  8. The selection of adhesive systems for resin-based luting agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carville, Rebecca; Quinn, Frank

    2008-01-01

    The use of resin-based luting agents is ever expanding with the development of adhesive dentistry. A multitude of different adhesive systems are used with resin-based luting agents, and new products are introduced to the market frequently. Traditional adhesives generally required a multiple step bonding procedure prior to cementing with active resin-based luting materials; however, combined agents offer a simple application procedure. Self-etching 'all-in-one' systems claim that there is no need for the use of a separate adhesive process. The following review addresses the advantages and disadvantages of the available adhesive systems used with resin-based luting agents.

  9. Resistência ao cisalhamento de braquetes metálicos utilizando sistema adesivo autocondicionante Shear bond strength evaluation of metallic brackets using self-etching system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camilo Aquino Melgaço

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: avaliar a resistência ao cisalhamento de braquetes metálicos colados com sistema autocondicionante utilizado imediatamente e após 2, 5 e 9 dias depois da ativação e armazenagem. MÉTODOS: utilizaram-se 64 dentes bovinos divididos igualmente em quatro grupos e devidamente preparados para receber a colagem dos braquetes. Em T1, realizou-se a ativação de 7 blisters de adesivos autocondicionantes (de acordo com as normas do fabricante e procedeu-se à colagem imediata apenas dos braquetes do grupo I. Os adesivos ativados foram, então, armazenados à temperatura de 4ºC e reutilizados em períodos de 2 dias (T2, 5 dias (T3 e 9 dias (T4 para a colagem dos braquetes dos grupos II, III e IV, respectivamente. RESULTADOS: não se observou diferença estatística quando comparados os valores médios de tensão para resistência ao cisalhamento entre os grupos I, II e III. Entretanto, diferença estatística foi encontrada quando esses valores foram comparados aos do grupo IV. CONCLUSÃO: o armazenamento do adesivo autocondicionante depois de ativado, à temperatura média de 4ºC, por até 5 dias, parece não afetar os resultados quanto às tensões de resistência ao cisalhamento; novos estudos são necessários para avaliação das demais características do material quando de sua utilização por período de tempo prolongado após sua ativação.OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the shear bond strength of metallic brackets using the self-etching system after its activation and storage for 2, 5 and 9 day periods. METHODS: A total of 64 bovine teeth were divided in four groups and prepared to receive the brackets. Initially, seven self-etching primer blisters were activated and used to bond the brackets of group I. The blisters were store at a constant temperature of 4ºC for 2, 5 and 9 days and used to bond the brackets of groups II, III and IV, respectively. RESULTS: No statistic difference was found in shear bond strength comparing groups I, II

  10. Shear bond strength of three adhesive systems to enamel and dentin of permanent teeth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niloofar Shadman

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims: The purpose of this experimental study was to investigate the shear bond strength of three new adhesive systems to enamel and dentin of permanent human teeth using three new etch and rinse and self-etch adhesive systems.Materials and Methods: Sixty intact caries-free third molars were selected and randomly divided into 6 groups. Flat buccal and lingual enamel and dentin surfaces were prepared and mounted in the acrylic resin perpendicular to the plan of the horizon. Adhesives used in this study were Tetric N-Bond, AdheSE and AdheSE-One F (Ivoclar/Vivadent, Schaan, Liechtenstein. The adhesives were applied on the surfaces and cured with quartz tungsten halogen curing unit (600 mW/cm2 intensity for 20 s. After attaching composite to the surfaces and thermocycling (500 cycles, 5-55ºC, shear bond strength was measured using a universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min. The failure modes were examined under a stereomicroscope. The data were statistically analyzed using T-test, one-way ANOVA, Tukey and Fisher's exact tests.Results: In enamel, Tetric N-Bond (28.57±4.58 MPa and AdheSE (21.97±7.6 MPa had significantly higher bond strength than AdheSE-One F (7.16±2.09 MPa (P0.05.Conclusion: Shear bond strength to dentin in Tetric N-Bond (etch and rinse system( was higher than self-etch adhesives (AdheSE and AdheSE-One F. The bond strength to enamel and dentin in two-step self-etch (AdheSE was higher than one-step self-etch (AdheSE-One F.

  11. Bonding durability of a self-etching primer system to normal and caries-affected dentin under hydrostatic pulpal pressure in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakajima, Masatoshi; Hosaka, Keiichi; Yamauti, Monica; Foxton, Richard M; Tagami, Junji

    2006-06-01

    To evaluate the bonding durability of a self-etching primer system to normal and caries-affected dentin under hydrostatic pulpal pressure. 18 extracted human molars with occlusal caries were used. Their occlusal dentin surfaces were ground flat to expose normal and caries-affected dentin using #600 SiC paper under running water. Clearfil SE Bond was placed on the dentin surface including the caries-affected dentin according to the manufacturer's instructions and then the crowns were built up with resin composite (Clearfil AP-X) under either a pulpal pressure of 15 cm H2O or none (control). The bonded specimens were stored in 100% humidity for 1 day (control) or for 1 week and 1 month with hydrostatic pulpal pressure. After storage, the specimens were serially sectioned into 0.7 mm-thick slabs and trimmed to an hour-glass shape with a 1 mm2 cross-section, isolated by normal or caries-affected dentin, and then subjected to the micro-tensile bond test. Data were analyzed by two-way ANOVA and Tukey's test (PHydrostatic pulpal pressure significantly reduced the bond strength to normal dentin after 1-month storage (P< 0.05), but did not affect the bond strength to caries-affected dentin.

  12. Influence of Etching Mode on Enamel Bond Durability of Universal Adhesive Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, T; Takamizawa, T; Barkmeier, W W; Tsujimoto, A; Endo, H; Erickson, R L; Latta, M A; Miyazaki, M

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the enamel bond durability of three universal adhesives in different etching modes through fatigue testing. The three universal adhesives used were Scotchbond Universal, Prime&Bond Elect universal dental adhesive, and All-Bond Universal light-cured dental adhesive. A single-step self-etch adhesive, Clearfil S 3 Bond Plus was used as a control. The shear bond strength (SBS) and shear fatigue strength (SFS) to human enamel were evaluated in total-etch mode and self-etch mode. A stainless steel metal ring with an internal diameter of 2.4 mm was used to bond the resin composite to the flat-ground (4000-grit) tooth surfaces for determination of both SBS and SFS. For each enamel surface treatment, 15 specimens were prepared for SBS and 30 specimens for SFS. The staircase method for fatigue testing was then used to determine the SFS of the resin composite bonded to the enamel using 10-Hz frequencies for 50,000 cycles or until failure occurred. Scanning electron microscopy was used to observe representative debonded specimen surfaces and the resin-enamel interfaces. A two-way analysis of variance and the Tukey post hoc test were used for analysis of the SBS data, whereas a modified t-test with Bonferroni correction was used for the SFS data. All adhesives in total-etch mode showed significantly higher SBS and SFS values than those in self-etch mode. Although All-Bond Universal in self-etch mode showed a significantly lower SBS value than the other adhesives, there was no significant difference in SFS values among the adhesives in this mode. All adhesives showed higher SFS:SBS ratios in total-etch mode than in self-etch mode. With regard to the adhesive systems used in this study, universal adhesives showed higher enamel bond strengths in total-etch mode. Although the influence of different etching modes on the enamel-bonding performance of universal adhesives was found to be dependent on the adhesive material, total-etch mode

  13. Kekuatan Rekat Restorasi Komposit Resin pada Permukaan Dentin dengan Sistem Adhesif Self-Etch dalam Berbagai Temperatur

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iin Sundari

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Single-step self-etch adhesive systems are the system that combine self etching primer and bonding agent into one step application. This system was developed as the effort to simplified in application prosedures and give a good bond strength of resin composites to dentin surface. The purpose of this study was to examine the bond strength of resin composites with two singlestep self-etch adhesives system (Xeno III and Clearfil Tri-S Bond to bovine dentin at temperature of adhesive 3ºC, 22ºC and 30ºC. Adhesive was applied to dentin surface (bovine insisivus mandibular dentin follow by resin composites bonded according to the manufacturer’s instructions. Tensile bond strength of 60 specimens were tested UTM (universal testing machine after 24 hours storage in aquadest at 37 ºC. The results were analyzed using ANOVA test followed by Tukey’s test (p< 0,05. The bond strength of Xeno III was significantly diffrent from that of Clearfil tri-S Bond, 0,66±0,271, 2,70±1,528, 0,23±0,104 versus 2,07±0,272, 4,77±0,689, 4,39±1,205 MPa at temperature of materials 3ºC, 22ºC and 30ºC respectively. The bond strength of two single- step adhesives system (Xeno III and Clearfil Tri-S Bond were highest at temperature 22ºC than other temperatures of materials.DOI: 10.14693/jdi.v15i3.34

  14. Long-term dentin retention of etch-and-rinse and self-etch adhesives and a resin-modified glass ionomer cement in non-carious cervical lesions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dijken, J.W.V. van; Pallesen, U.

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical long-term retention to dentin of seven adhesive systems.......The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical long-term retention to dentin of seven adhesive systems....

  15. Classification review of dental adhesive systems: from the IV generation to the universal type

    OpenAIRE

    Sofan, Eshrak; Sofan, Afrah; Palaia, Gaspare; Tenore, Gianluca; Romeo, Umberto; Migliau, Guido

    2017-01-01

    Adhesive dentistry has undergone great progress in the last decades. In light of minimal-invasive dentistry, this new approach promotes a more conservative cavity design, which relies on the effectiveness of current enamel-dentine adhesives. Adhesive dentistry began in 1955 by Buonocore on the benefits of acid etching. With changing technologies, dental adhesives have evolved from no-etch to total-etch (4th and 5th generation) to self-etch (6th, 7th and 8th generation) systems. Currently, bon...

  16. Reflections about Adhesive Systems

    OpenAIRE

    de Freitas Borges, Marciano; Diesel, Pâmela Gutheil; Corrêa, Fernanda Gomez; Bernardi, Eledana; Fernandes Montagner, Anelise; Skupien, Jovito Adiel; Susin, Alexandre Henrique

    2010-01-01

    The adhesive systems are responsible for an efficient union between teeth and resin, resulting in a longevity restoration. They are organic molecules di or multifunctional that contain reactive groups that interact with dentin and with the resin monomer of composite resin. The adhesive systems are characterized by wet adhesion, which is a result of presence of hidrophylics radicals in their compositions, to promote a better bond and the best properties of the adhesion. Adhesive systems may us...

  17. Shear bond strength of hydrophilic adhesive systems to enamel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hara, A T; Amaral, C M; Pimenta, L A; Sinhoreti, M A

    1999-08-01

    To compare the enamel shear bond strength of four hydrophilic adhesive systems: one multiple-bottle (Scotchbond Multi-Purpose Plus), two one-bottle (Stae, Single Bond) and one self-etching (Etch & Prime). 120 bovine incisor teeth were obtained, embedded in polyester resin, polished to 600 grit to form standardized enamel surfaces, and randomly assigned to four groups (n = 30). Each adhesive system was used on enamel according to the manufacturer's instructions, and resin-based composite (Z100) cylinders with 3 mm diameter and 5 mm height were bonded. Specimens were stored in humid environment for 1 week, and bond strength was determined using a universal testing machine, at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/minute. The mean shear bond strength values (MPa +/- SD) were: Single Bond: 24.28 +/- 5.27 (a); Scotchbond Multi-Purpose Plus: 21.18 +/- 4.35 (ab); Stae: 19.56 +/- 4.71 (b); Etch & Prime 3.0: 15.13 +/- 4.92 (c). ANOVA revealed significant difference in means (P < 0.01) and Tukey's test showed the statistical differences that are expressed by different letters for each group. It could be concluded that the self-etching adhesive system did not provide as good a bond to enamel surface, as did the one- and multiple-bottle systems.

  18. Bonding stability of adhesive systems to eroded dentin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janaina Barros CRUZ

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This in vitro study evaluated the immediate and 6 months microshear bond strength (µSBS of different adhesive systems to sound and eroded dentin. Sixty bovine incisors were embedded in acrylic resin and ground to obtain flat buccal dentin surfaces. Specimens were randomly allocated into two groups: sound dentin (immersion in artificial saliva and eroded dentin (erosive challenge following a pH cycling model comprising 4 ×/day Sprite Light® drink for 10 days. Then, specimens were reassigned according to the adhesive system: etch-and-rinse adhesive (Adper Single Bond, two-step self-etch system (Clearfil SE Bond, or one-step self-etch adhesive (Adper Easy One. Polyethylene tubes with an internal diameter of 0.76 mm were placed over pre-treated dentin and filled with resin composite (Z250. Half of the specimens were evaluated by the µSBS test after 24 h, and the other half 6 months later, after water storage at 37°C. Failure mode was evaluated using a stereomicroscope (400×. Data were analyzed by three-way repeated measures analysis of variance and Tukey’s post hoc tests (α = 0.05. After 6 months of water aging, marked reductions in µSBS values were observed, irrespective of the substrate. The µSBS values for eroded dentin were lower than those obtained for sound dentin. No difference in bonding effectiveness was observed among adhesive systems. For all groups, adhesive/mixed failure was observed. In conclusion, eroded dentin compromises the bonding quality of adhesive systems over time.

  19. Microtensile bond strength of silorane-based composite specific adhesive system using different bonding strategies

    OpenAIRE

    Bastos, Laura Alves; Sousa, Ana Beatriz Silva; Drubi-Filho, Brahim; Panzeri Pires-de-Souza, Fernanda de Carvalho; Garcia, Lucas da Fonseca Roberti

    2014-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of pre-etching on the bond strength of silorane-based composite specific adhesive system to dentin. Materials and Methods Thirty human molars were randomly divided into 5 groups according to the different bonding strategies. For teeth restored with silorane-based composite (Filtek Silorane, 3M ESPE), the specific self-etching adhesive system (Adhesive System P90, 3M ESPE) was used with and without pre-etching (Pre-etching/S...

  20. Bond strength of a composite resin to glass ionomer cements using different adhesive systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Carolina de Oliveira BECCI

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Glass ionomer cements are often used as a base or cavity lining prior to restorative material. Objective To evaluate the bond strength of a composite resin to different glass ionomer cements, when using a two-step conventional and self-etching adhesive systems. Material and method Three glass ionomer cements (Ketac Molar Easymix, Vitremer and Vitrebond, the composite resin Filtek Z350 XT and the adhesive systems Adper Single Bond 2, Clearfil SE Bond and Adper Easy One were used. As negative control, resin was bonded to cement without using an adhesive system. Holes (4 mm diameter, 2 mm deep prepared in acrilic bloks were filled with the glass ionomer cements (n=12/group. On the surface, an area of 1mm in diameter was delimited, the adhesive system was applied, and a specimen of composite resin with 1 mm height was made. After 24 hours storage (37 °C and 100% humidity, the microshear test was performed. Data were analyzed using two-way ANOVA and Tukey test for comparison between groups (α=0.05. Result The adhesive systems significantly improved the bond strenght of composite resin to glass ionomer cements (p≤0.001. There was no significant difference in bond strength when self-etching adhesive systems were compared with the simplified etch-and-rinse adhesive, except for Vitrebond where Clearfil SE Bond determined higher bond strength when compared to Adper Single Bond 2 (p=0.003. Conclusion Self-etching adhesive systems are a good option for establishing the bond between the composite resin and the glass ionomer cement.

  1. Reactions of connective tissue to self-etching/priming dentin bonding systems: oxidative stress, tumor necrosis factor α expression, and tissue reactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yahya Orçun Zorba

    2009-09-01

    Conclusion: There were no statistical differences in levels of serum TNF-a and oxidative stress parameters in any groups during the course of the study. The four different adhesive systems exhibited different degrees of local toxicity to the subsurface of the skin of rats, but no systemic toxicity was detected.

  2. Microtensile Bond Strength and Micromorphology of Bur-cut Enamel Using Five Adhesive Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinagre, Alexandra; Ramos, João; Messias, Ana; Marques, Fernando; Caramelo, Francisco; Mata, António

    2015-04-01

    This study compared the microtensile bond strengths (μTBS) of two etch-and-rinse (ER) (OptiBond FL [OBFL]; Prime & Bond NT [PBNT]) and three self-etching (SE) (Clearfil SE Bond [CSEB]; Xeno III [XIII]; Xeno V+ [XV+]) adhesives systems to bur-prepared human enamel considering active (AA) and passive (PA) application of the self-etching systems. Ninety-six enamel surfaces were prepared with a medium-grit diamond bur and randomly allocated into 8 groups to receive adhesive restorations: G1: OBFL; G2: PBNT; G3: CSEB/PA; G4: CSEB/ AA; G5: XIII/PA; G6: XIII/AA; G7: XV+/PA; G8: XV+/AA. After composite buildup, samples were sectioned to obtain a total of 279 bonded sticks (1 mm2) that were submitted to microtensile testing (μTBS; 0.5 mm/min) after 24-h water storage (37°C). Etching patterns and adhesive interfacial ultramorphology were also evaluated with confocal laser scanning (CLSM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Data was analyzed with one-way ANOVA (α = 0.05). Weibull probabilistic distribution was also determined. Regarding μTBS, both adhesive system and application mode yielded statistically significant differences (p systems together with CSEB/AA and XIII/PA recorded the highest and statistically similar bond strength results. XV+ presented very low bond strength values, regardless of the application mode. Among self-etching adhesives, CSEB produced significantly higher μTBS values when applied actively. Qualitative evaluation by SEM and CLSM revealed substantial differences between groups both in adhesive interfaces and enamel conditioning patterns. ER and SE adhesive systems presented distinctive bond strengths to bur-cut enamel. The application mode effect was adhesive dependent. Active application improved etching patterns and resin interfaces micromorphology.

  3. Influence of chlorhexidine concentration on microtensile bond strength of contemporary adhesive systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edson Alves de Campos

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of chlorhexidine (CHX concentration on the microtensile bond strength (μTBS of contemporary adhesive systems. Eighty bovine central incisors were used in this study. The facial enamel surface of the crowns was abraded with 600-grit silicon carbide paper to expose flat, mid-coronal dentin surfaces. The tested materials were Scotchbond Multipurpose (SMP, Single-Bond (SB, Clearfil SE Bond (CSEB and Clearfil Tri S Bond (CTSB. All the materials were applied according to manufacturer's instructions and followed by composite application (Z250. The teeth were randomly divided into 16 groups: for the etch-and-rinse adhesives (SMP and SB, 0.12% or 2% CHX was applied prior to or after the acid etching procedure. For the self-etch adhesives (CSEB and CTSB 0.12% or 2% CHX was applied prior to the primer. Control groups for each one of the adhesive systems were also set up. The specimens were immediately submitted to μTBS testing and the data were analyzed using Analysis of Variance and the Tukey post hoc test (alpha = .01. The failure patterns of the specimens were observed using scanning electron microscopy. The effects of 2% CHX were statistically significant (p < 0.01 for the self-etch adhesives but were not significant for the etch-and-rinse adhesive systems. Analysis of the data demonstrated no statistical difference between the etch-and-rinse adhesive systems. CHX-based cavity disinfectants in concentrations higher than 0.12% should be avoided prior to the self-etch adhesive systems evaluated in this study to diminish the possibilities of reduction in bond strength.

  4. Influence of Different Etching Modes on Bond Strength to Enamel using Universal Adhesive Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diniz, Ana Cs; Bandeca, Matheus C; Pinheiro, Larissa M; Dos Santosh Almeida, Lauber J; Torres, Carlos Rg; Borges, Alvaro H; Pinto, Shelon Cs; Tonetto, Mateus R; De Jesus Tavarez, Rudys R; Firoozmand, Leily M

    2016-10-01

    The adhesive systems and the techniques currently used are designed to provide a more effective adhesion with reduction of the protocol application. The objective of this study was to evaluate the bond strength of universal adhesive systems on enamel in different etching modes (self-etch and total etch). The mesial and distal halves of 52 bovine incisors, healthy, freshly extracted, were used and divided into seven experimental groups (n = 13). The enamel was treated in accordance with the following experimental conditions: FUE-Universal System - Futurabond U (VOCO) with etching; FUWE - Futurabond U (VOCO) without etching; SB-Total Etch System - Single Bond 2 (3M); SBUE-Universal System - Single Bond Universal (3M ESPE) with etching; SBUWE - Single Bond Universal (3M ESPE) without etching; CLE-Self-etch System - Clearfil SE Bond (Kuraray) was applied with etching; CLWE - Clearfil SE Bond (Kuraray) without etching. The specimens were made using the composite spectrum TPH (Dentsply) and stored in distilled water (37 ± 1°C) for 1 month. The microshear test was performed using the universal testing machine EMIC DL 2000 with the crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/minute. The bond strength values were analyzed using statistical tests (Kruskal-Wallis test and Mann-Whitney test) with Bonferroni correction. There was no statistically significant difference between groups (p adhesive interface revealed that most failures occurred between the interface composite resin and adhesive. The universal adhesive system used in dental enamel varies according to the trademark, and the previous enamel etching for universal systems and the self-etch both induced greater bond strength values. Selective enamel etching prior to the application of a universal adhesive system is a relevant strategy for better performance bonding.

  5. Influence of an oxygen-inhibited layer on enamel bonding of dental adhesive systems: surface free-energy perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueta, Hirofumi; Tsujimoto, Akimasa; Barkmeier, Wayne W; Oouchi, Hajime; Sai, Keiichi; Takamizawa, Toshiki; Latta, Mark A; Miyazaki, Masashi

    2016-02-01

    The influence of an oxygen-inhibited layer (OIL) on the shear bond strength (SBS) to enamel and surface free-energy (SFE) of adhesive systems was investigated. The adhesive systems tested were Scotchbond Multipurpose (SM), Clearfil SE Bond (CS), and Scotchbond Universal (SU). Resin composite was bonded to bovine enamel surfaces to determine the SBS, with and without an OIL, of adhesives. The SFE of cured adhesives with and without an OIL were determined by measuring the contact angles of three test liquids. There were no significant differences in the mean SBS of SM and CS specimens with or without an OIL; however, the mean SBS of SU specimens with an OIL was significantly higher than that of SU specimens without an OIL. For all three systems, the mean total SFE (γS), polarity force (γSp), and hydrogen bonding force (γSh) values of cured adhesives with an OIL were significantly higher than those of cured adhesives without an OIL. The results of this study indicate that the presence of an OIL promotes higher SBS of a single-step self-etch adhesive system, but not of a three-step or a two-step self-etch primer system. The SFE values of cured adhesives with an OIL were significantly higher than those without an OIL. The SFE characteristics of the OIL of adhesives differed depending on the type of adhesive. © 2015 Eur J Oral Sci.

  6. Effect of chlorhexidine on the shear bond strength of self-etch ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of chlorhexidine on shear bond strength of self-etch adhesives to dentin. The crowns of 60 sound human premolars were horizontally sectioned to expose the coronal dentin. Dentin surfaces were polished with 320 grit silicon carbide papers, and were randomly divided into 4 ...

  7. Effect of thermal aging on the tensile bond strength at reduced areas of seven current adhesives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baracco, Bruno; Fuentes, M Victoria; Garrido, Miguel A; González-López, Santiago; Ceballos, Laura

    2013-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the micro-tensile bond strength (MTBS) to dentin of seven adhesive systems (total and self-etch adhesives) after 24 h and 5,000 thermocycles. Dentin surfaces of human third molars were exposed and bonded with two total-etch adhesives (Adper Scotchbond 1 XT and XP Bond), two two-step self-etch adhesives (Adper Scotchbond SE and Filtek Silorane Adhesive System) and three one-step self-etch adhesives (G-Bond, Xeno V and Bond Force). All adhesive systems were applied following manufacturers' instructions. Composite buildups were constructed and the bonded teeth were then stored in water (24 h, 37 °C) or thermocycled (5,000 cycles) before being sectioned and submitted to MTBS test. Two-way ANOVA and subsequent comparison tests were applied at α = 0.05. Characteristic de-bonded specimens were analyzed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). After 24 h water storage, MTBS values were highest with XP Bond, Adper Scotchbond 1 XT, Filtek Silorane Adhesive System and Adper Scotchbond SE and lowest with the one-step self-etch adhesives Bond Force, Xeno V and G-Bond. After thermocycling, MTBS values were highest with XP Bond, followed by Filtek Silorane Adhesive System, Adper Scotchbond SE and Adper Scotchbond 1 XT and lowest with the one-step self-etch adhesives Bond Force, Xeno V and G-Bond. Thermal aging induced a significant decrease in MTBS values with all adhesives tested. The resistance of resin-dentin bonds to thermal-aging degradation was material dependent. One-step self-etch adhesives obtained the lowest MTBS results after both aging treatments, and their adhesive capacity was significantly reduced after thermocycling.

  8. Microtensile bond strength of silorane-based composite specific adhesive system using different bonding strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura AlveBastos

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Objectives The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of pre-etching on the bond strength of silorane-based composite specific adhesive system to dentin. Materials and Methods Thirty human molars were randomly divided into 5 groups according to the different bonding strategies. For teeth restored with silorane-based composite (Filtek Silorane, 3M ESPE, the specific self-etching adhesive system (Adhesive System P90, 3M ESPE was used with and without pre-etching (Pre-etching/Silorane and Silorane groups. Teeth restored with methacrylate based-composite (Filtek Z250, 3M ESPE were hybridized with the two-step self-etching system (Clearfil SE Bond, Kuraray, with and without pre-etching (Pre-etching/Methacrylate and Methacrylate groups, or three-step adhesive system (Adper Scotchbond Multi-Purpose, 3M ESPE (Three-step/Methacrylate group (n = 6. The restored teeth were sectioned into stick-shaped test specimens (1.0 × 1.0 mm, and coupled to a universal test machine (0.5 mm/min to perform microtensile testing. Results Pre-etching/Methacrylate group presented the highest bond strength values, with significant difference from Silorane and Three-step/Methacrylate groups (p < 0.05. However, it was not significantly different from Preetching/Silorane and Methacrylate groups. Conclusions Pre-etching increased bond strength of silorane-based composite specific adhesive system to dentin.

  9. Microtensile bond strength of silorane-based composite specific adhesive system using different bonding strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastos, Laura Alves; Sousa, Ana Beatriz Silva; Drubi-Filho, Brahim; Panzeri Pires-de-Souza, Fernanda de Carvalho; Garcia, Lucas da Fonseca Roberti

    2015-02-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of pre-etching on the bond strength of silorane-based composite specific adhesive system to dentin. Thirty human molars were randomly divided into 5 groups according to the different bonding strategies. For teeth restored with silorane-based composite (Filtek Silorane, 3M ESPE), the specific self-etching adhesive system (Adhesive System P90, 3M ESPE) was used with and without pre-etching (Pre-etching/Silorane and Silorane groups). Teeth restored with methacrylate based-composite (Filtek Z250, 3M ESPE) were hybridized with the two-step self-etching system (Clearfil SE Bond, Kuraray), with and without pre-etching (Pre-etching/Methacrylate and Methacrylate groups), or three-step adhesive system (Adper Scotchbond Multi-Purpose, 3M ESPE) (Three-step/Methacrylate group) (n = 6). The restored teeth were sectioned into stick-shaped test specimens (1.0 × 1.0 mm), and coupled to a universal test machine (0.5 mm/min) to perform microtensile testing. Pre-etching/Methacrylate group presented the highest bond strength values, with significant difference from Silorane and Three-step/Methacrylate groups (p adhesive system to dentin.

  10. Microtensile bond strength of eleven contemporary adhesives to enamel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Satoshi; Vargas, Marcos A; Abe, Yasuhiko; Yoshida, Yasuhiro; Lambrechts, Paul; Vanherle, Guido; Sano, Hidehiko; Van Meerbeek, Bart

    2003-10-01

    To compare the microtensile bond strength (microTBS) to enamel of 10 contemporary adhesives, including three one-step self-etch systems, four two-step self-etch systems and three two-step total-etch systems, with that of a conventional three-step total-etch adhesive. Resin composite (Z100, 3M) was bonded to flat, #600-grit wet-sanded enamel surfaces of 18 extracted human third molars using the adhesives strictly according to the respective manufacturer's instructions. After storage overnight in 37 degrees C water, the bonded specimens were sectioned into 2-4 thin slabs of approximately 1 mm thickness and 2.5 mm width. They were then trimmed into an hourglass shape with an interface area of approximately 1 mm2, and subsequently subjected to microTBS-testing with a cross-head speed of 1 mm/minute. The microTBS to enamel varied from 3.2 MPa for the experimental one-step self-etch adhesive PQ/Universal (self-etch) to 43.9 MPa for the two-step total-etch adhesive Scotchbond 1. When compared with the conventional three-step total-etch adhesive OptiBond FL, the bond strengths of most adhesives with simplified application procedures were not significantly different, except for two one-step self-etch adhesives, experimental PQ/Universal (self-etch) and One-up Bond F, that showed lower bond strengths. Specimen failures during sample preparation were recorded for the latter adhesives as well.

  11. Study in electron microscopy of the formation of the hybrid layer using adhesive systems One Coat and Experimental (EXL 759), at the Facultad de Odontologia of the Universidad de Costa Rica

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santamaria Guzman, S. Marcela; Guevara Lopez, Rodrigo

    2012-01-01

    The formation of the hybrid layer is observed in dental pieces in vitro, utilizing conventional adhesives systems and of self etching with different times of acid etching, by applying of electron microscopy. Samples of dental pieces are prepared utilizing conventional adhesive systems as Single Bond 2 of 3M, One Coat of Coltene and the adhesive self etching Experimental (EXL 759) of 3M. Samples of dental pieces collected have been molars recently extracted and later stored in jars with water. Samples prepared with the adhesive systems are observed in the electron microscope to obtain images of the hybrid layers formed. The hybrid layers formed are compared observing the photographs of the images obtained in the electron microscope. The adhesive system that has allowed the formation of a hybrid layer more convenient is determined. The time of acid etching is determined and has interfered in the formation of a hybrid layer more stable [es

  12. Shear Bond Strength of Orthodontic Brackets Fixed with Remineralizing Adhesive Systems after Simulating One Year of Orthodontic Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gisele Lima Bezerra

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study is to assess, in vitro, the shear bond strength of orthodontic brackets fixed with remineralizing adhesive systems submitted to thermomechanical cycling, simulating one year of orthodontic treatment. Sixty-four bovine incisor teeth were randomly divided into 4 experimental groups (n=16: XT: Transbond XT, QC: Quick Cure, OL: Ortholite Color, and SEP: Transbond Plus Self-Etching Primer. The samples were submitted to thermomechanical cycling simulating one year of orthodontic treatment. Shear bond strength tests were carried out using a universal testing machine with a load cell of 50 KgF at 0.5 mm/minute. The samples were examined with a stereomicroscope and a scanning electron microscope (SEM in order to analyze enamel surface and Adhesive Remnant Index (ARI. Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney (with Bonferroni correction tests showed a significant difference between the studied groups (p<0.05. Groups XT, QC, and SEP presented the highest values of adhesive resistance and no statistical differences were found between them. The highest frequency of failures between enamel and adhesive was observed in groups XT, QC, and OL. Quick Cure (QC remineralizing adhesive system presented average adhesive resistance values similar to conventional (XT and self-etching (SEP adhesives, while remineralizing system (OL provided the lowest values of adhesive resistance.

  13. Bonding Durability of Four Adhesive Systems

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    Leila Atash Biz Yeganeh

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: This study aimed to compare the durability of four adhesive systems by assessing their microtensile bond strength (MTBS and microleakage during six months of water storage.Materials and Methods: A total of 128 human third molars were used. The adhesives tested were Scotch Bond Multipurpose (SBMP, Single Bond (SB, Clearfil-SE bond (CSEB, and All-Bond SE (ABSE. After sample preparation for MTBS testing, the microspecimens were subjected to microtensile tester after one day and six months of water storage. For microleakage evaluation, facial and lingual class V cavities were prepared and restored with composite. After thermocycling, microleakage was evaluated. Bond strength values were subjected to one-way ANOVA and Tamhane’s test, and the microleakage data were analyzed by the Kruskal-Wallis, Dunn, Mann Whitney and Wilcoxon tests (P<0.05.Results: Single Bond yielded the highest and ABSE yielded the lowest bond strength at one day and six months. Short-term bond strength of SBMP and CSEB was similar. After six months, a significant decrease in bond strength was observed in ABSE and SBMP groups. At one day, ABSE showed the highest microleakage at the occlusal margin; however, at the gingival margin, there was no significant difference among groups. Long-term microleakage of all groups at the occlusal margins was similar, whilst gingival margins of SBMP and SB showed significantly higher microleakage.Conclusion: The highest MTBS and favorable sealability were obtained by Clearfil SE bond. Water storage had no effect on microleakage of self-etch adhesives at the gingival margin or MTBS of CSEB and SB. 

  14. Effect of EDTA Conditioning on Microleakage of Four Adhesive Systems in Composite Restorations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Shafiei

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Evaluating the effect of dentin conditioning with EDTA on microleakage of composite resin restorations, using two etch and rinse and two self-etch adhesives.Materials and Methods: One hundred and sixty extracted molars received class V cavity preparations right under the CEJ and were randomly divided into eight groups of 20, usingfour different adhesive systems. These adhesives included Adper Scotchbond Multi-purpose (SBMP, Adper Single Bond (SB, Clearfil SE Bond (CSEB, and Adper Prompt L-Pop (PLP. In the SBMP and SB experimental groups, EDTA was applied instead of phosphoric acid. In the CSEB and PLP experimental groups, EDTA conditioning was added to the bonding process. After thermocycling, the amount of dye penetration was evaluated using stereomicroscope. The data were analyzed using the Kruskal-Wallis and Dunn tests.Results: Two etch and rinse adhesives (SBMP, SB showed a significantly lower micro-leakage than the two self-etch adhesives, CSEB and PLP, (P<0.05. No significant differ-ence was observed among the experimental groups. PLP and CSEB showed significantly less microleakage using EDTA conditioning (P<0.05. There was no significant difference for SBMP and SB when applying either phosphoric acid or EDTA.Conclusion: In the cases of SBMP and SB, EDTA conditioning is as effective as phos-phoric acid in preventing microleakage. In cases of CSEB and PLP, EDTA conditioning can significantly improve the sealing ability.

  15. Hybridization quality and bond strength of adhesive systems according to interaction with dentin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvio, Luciana Andrea; Hipólito, Vinicius Di; Martins, Adriano Luis; de Goes, Mario Fernando

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the hybridization quality and bond strength of adhesives to dentin. Materials and Methods: Ten human molars were ground to expose the dentin and then sectioned in four tooth-quarters. They were randomly divided into 5 groups according to the adhesive used: Two single-step self-etch adhesives – Adper Prompt (ADP) and Xeno III (XE), two two-step self-etching primer systems – Clearfil SE Bond (SE) and Adhe SE (ADSE), and one one-step etch-and-rinse system – Adper Single Bond (SB). Resin composite (Filtek Z250) crown buildups were made on the bonded surfaces and incrementally light-cured for 20 s. The restored tooth-quarters were stored in water at 37°C for 24 h and then sectioned into beams (0.8 mm2 in cross-section). Maximal microtensile bond strength (μ-TBS) was recorded (0.5 mm/min in crosshead speed). The results were submitted to one-way ANOVA and Tukey's test (α = 0.05). Thirty additional teeth were used to investigate the hybridization quality by SEM using silver methenamine or ammoniacal silver nitrate dyes. Results: SE reached significantly higher μ-TBS (P 0.05), and between SB and ADP (P > 0.05); ADSE and XE were significantly higher than SB and ADP (P adhesives with dentin. The hybridization quality was essential to improve the immediate μ-TBS to dentin. PMID:24926212

  16. Influence of intrapulpal pressure simulation on the bond strength of adhesive systems to dentin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcio Vivan Cardoso

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to evaluate the influence of intrapulpal pressure simulation on the bonding effectiveness of etch & rinse and self-etch adhesives to dentin. Eighty sound human molars were distributed into eight groups, according to the permeability level of each sample, measured by an apparatus to assess hydraulic conductance (Lp. Thus, a similar mean permeability was achieved in each group. Three etch & rinse adhesives (Prime & Bond NT - PB, Single Bond -SB, and Excite - EX and one self-etch system (Clearfil SE Bond - SE were employed, varying the presence or absence of an intrapulpal pressure (IPP simulation of 15 cmH2O. After adhesive and restorative procedures were carried out, the samples were stored in distilled water for 24 hours at 37°C, and taken for tensile bond strength (TBS testing. Fracture analysis was performed using a light microscope at 40 X magnification. The data, obtained in MPa, were then submitted to the Kruskal-Wallis test ( a = 0.05. The results revealed that the TBS of SB and EX was significantly reduced under IPP simulation, differing from the TBS of PB and SE. Moreover, SE obtained the highest bond strength values in the presence of IPP. It could be concluded that IPP simulation can influence the bond strength of certain adhesive systems to dentin and should be considered when in vitro studies are conducted.

  17. Microtensile bond strength of three simplified adhesive systems to caries-affected dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scholtanus, J D; Purwanta, Kenny; Dogan, Nilgun; Kleverlaan, Cees J; Feilzer, Albert J

    2010-08-01

    The purpose of the study was to determine the microtensile bond strength of three different simplified adhesive systems to caries-affected dentin. Fifteen extracted human molars with primary carious lesions were ground flat until dentin was exposed. Soft caries-infected dentin was excavated with the help of caries detector dye. On the remaining hard dentin, a standardized smear layer was created by polishing with 600-grit SiC paper. Teeth were divided into three groups and treated with one of the three tested adhesives: Adper Scotchbond 1 XT (3M ESPE), a 2-step etch-andrinse adhesive, Clearfil S3 Bond (Kuraray), a 1-step self-etching or all-in-one adhesive, and Clearfil SE Bond (Kuraray), a 2-step self-etching adhesive. Five-mm-thick composite buildups (Z-250, 3M ESPE) were built and light cured. After water storage for 24 h at 37ºC, the bonded specimens were sectioned into bars (1.0 x 1.0 mm; n = 20 to 30). Microtensile bond strength of normal dentin specimens and caries-affected dentin specimens was measured in a universal testing machine (crosshead speed = 1 mm/min). Data were analyzed using two-way ANOVA and Tukey's post-hoc test (p adhesives were found. Adper Scotchbond 1 XT and Clearfil S3 Bond showed significantly lower bond strength values to caries-affected dentin. For Clearfil SE Bond, bond strength values to normal and caries-affected dentin were not significantly different. All the tested simplified adhesives showed similar bond strength values to normal dentin. For the tested 2-step etch-and-rinse adhesive and the all-in-one adhesive, the bond strength values to caries-affected dentin were lower than to normal dentin.

  18. Bioinspired pressure actuated adhesive system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Paretkar, D.R.; Kamperman, M.M.G.; Schneider, A.S.; Martina, D.; Creton, C.; Arzt, E.

    2011-01-01

    We developed a dry synthetic adhesive system inspired by gecko feet adhesion that can switch reversibly from adhesion to non-adhesion with applied pressure as external stimulus. Micropatterned polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) surfaces with pillars of 30 µm length and 10 µm diameter were fabricated using

  19. Effect of adhesive system and application strategy on reduction of dentin permeability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana Oliveira Carvalho

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluated the effect of adhesive systems and application strategies on dentin hydraulic conductance (HC. The buccal enamel was removed from bovine incisors to simulate laminate cavity preparations. After removing the roots and the coronal pulp, the buccal dentin was treated with EDTA solution (0.5 M for 5 minutes, rinsed, ultrasonicated for 12 minutes and connected to a permeability device. HC of the specimens was measured at 10 psi (n = 5. Permeability was measured before and after bonding procedures using G-Bond (GB, Clearfil Tri-S Bond (CTS, Hybrid Coat (HY, Bond Force (BF, Adper Easy Bond (AEB Silorane (SI, Clearfil SE Bond (CSE and Adper Scotchbond Multi-Purpose (SMP adhesives systems, which were applied following three strategies: 1 according to the manufacturers' instructions; 2 two coats of all-in-one self-etching adhesives (GB, CTS, HY, BF, AEB or priming step plus two coats of bonding resin for the other systems (SI, CSE and SMP; and 3 a thin layer of a flowable composite applied over one coat of all-in-one self-etching adhesives or primed surface for SI, CSE and SMP adhesives. No significant difference was observed among the application modes concerning their ability to reduce HC. None of the adhesives showed complete sealing (100% of the bovine tooth dentin. SI exhibited lower HC than SMP, however, they were not significantly different from the other systems. The results suggest that all systems tested result in an HC reduction of more than 90%. The wet bonding technique seemed to be more sensitive for dentin sealing.

  20. Comparative evaluation of shear bond strength of two adhesive systems before and after contamination with oral fluids: An In vitro study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nupur Kesar

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: This study aims to evaluate the effect of saliva and blood contamination on the shear bond strength (SBS of self- and total-etch adhesive systems on enamel and dentin. Materials and Methods: Sample of 100 extracted noncarious primary molars were taken as experimental groups, which were divided into two groups: self-etch group and total-etch group containing fifty teeth each. These groups were further divided into five subgroups - 10 teeth each. The specimens were then subjected to contamination with saliva or blood; before and after application of adhesive agent, whereas, in control group, there was no contamination done before and after adhesive application. Fresh saliva and blood were used. After the bonding procedure, resin composite was built up with diameter and height of 3 mm. After that, the specimens were tested for SBS in universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 1 cm/min. The results were then statistically analyzed using one-way ANOVA. Results: The results of the study revealed that the SBS of self-etch adhesive system was better than the total-etch adhesive system and there was significant difference found among various subgroups of total-etch group, i.e., when adhesive application was done before, after and without saliva or blood contamination. There was no significant difference found within the subgroups of self-etch group when adhesive application was done before, after, and without saliva contamination. In case of blood contamination, significant difference was found in SBS in both self- and total-etch groups.

  1. In vitro evaluation of microleakage under orthodontic brackets bonded with different adhesive systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atash, Ramin; Fneiche, Ali; Cetik, Sibel; Bahrami, Babak; Balon-Perin, Alain; Orellana, Maria; Glineur, Régine

    2017-01-01

    Adhesives systems have a drawback when utilized for bonding orthodontic brackets: they shrink during photopolymerization creating microleakage. The aim of this study was to assess the stability of different orthodontic adhesives around brackets and enamel. Sixty noncarious mandibular premolars extracted for orthodontic reasons were randomly divided into six groups of adhesives used for bonding brackets to dental enamel: NeoBond ® Light Cure Adhesive Kit, Transbond™ Plus Self-Etching, Victory V-Slot APC PLUS ® + Transbond™ MIP, Rely-A-Bond ® Kit, Light Cure Orthodontic Adhesive Kit (OptiBond ® ), and Transbond™ MIP. Following bonding, all teeth underwent 2500 cycles of thermal cycling in baths ranging from 5°C to 55°C before being immersed in 2% methylene blue for 24 h. All samples were examined under a binocular microscope to assess the degree of microleakage at the "bracket-adhesive" and "adhesive-enamel" interfaces in the gingival and occlusal regions of the bracket. A significant difference was found at the "occlusal bracket-adhesive" interface. The highest microleakage values were found in the occlusal region, although no significant. Microleakage was observed in all groups. Group 2 had the highest microleakage values whereas Group 6 had the lowest values.

  2. Microleakage of hydrophilic adhesive systems in Class V composite restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amaral, C M; Hara, A T; Pimenta, L A; Rodrigues, A L

    2001-02-01

    To investigate the microleakage of four hydrophilic adhesive systems: one "multiple-bottles" (Scotchbond Multi-Purpose Plus); two "one-bottle" (Single Bond, Stae); and one self-etching (Etch & Prime 3.0). 120 bovine incisor teeth were divided into four groups (n = 30) and Class V cavities were prepared at the cemento-enamel junction. The cavities were restored with the adhesive systems and with Z100 composite. The teeth were thermocycled 1,000 times between 5+/-2 degrees C and 55+/-2 degrees C with a dwell time of 1 min, and then placed in a 2% methylene blue dye (pH 7.0) for 4 hrs, washed and sectioned vertically through the center of the restorations. The qualitative evaluation was made by three examiners who distributed pre-established scores (0-4) for each tooth using a stereomicroscope at x30 magnification. In enamel margins little microleakage was observed and the Kruskal-Wallis analysis did not show differences. In dentin margins the Kruskal-Wallis and multiple comparison analyses were applied: microleakage was significantly greater with Stae (median 3) and Scotchbond MP Plus (median 4). Single Bond (median 1) and Etch & Prime 3.0 (median 2) showed the best results in dentin margins, and the statistical analysis did not demonstrate differences in microleakage among these groups.

  3. Bond strength of dental adhesive systems irradiated with ionizing radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dibo da Cruz, Adriana; Goncalves, Luciano de Souza; Rastelli, Alessandra Nara de Souza; Correr-Sobrinho, Lorenco; Bagnato, Vanderlei Salvador; Boscolo, Frab Norberto

    2010-04-01

    The aim of the present paper was to determine the effect of different types of ionizing radiation on the bond strength of three different dentin adhesive systems. One hundred twenty specimens of 60 human teeth (protocol number: 032/2007) sectioned mesiodistally were divided into 3 groups according to the adhesives systems used: SB (Adper Single Bond Plus), CB (Clearfil SE Bond) and AP (Adper Prompt Self-Etch). The adhesives were applied on dentin and photo-activated using LED (Lec 1000, MMoptics, 1000 mW/cm2). Customized elastomer molds (0.5 mm thickness) with three orifices of 1.2 mm diameter were placed onto the bonding areas and filled with composite resin (Filtek Z-250), which was photo-activated for 20 s. Each group was subdivided into 4 subgroups for application of the different types of ionizing radiation: ultraviolet radiation (UV), diagnostic x-ray radiation (DX), therapeutic x-ray radiation (TX) and without irradiation (control group, CG). Microshear tests were carried out (Instron, model 4411), and afterwards the modes of failure were evaluated by optical and scanning electron microscope and classified using 5 scores: adhesive failure, mixed failures with 3 significance levels, and cohesive failure. The results of the shear bond strength test were submitted to ANOVA with Tukey's test and Dunnett's test, and the data from the failure pattern evaluation were analyzed with the Mann Whitney test (p = 0.05). No change in bond strength of CB and AP was observed after application of the different radiation types, only SB showed increase in bond strength after UV (p = 0.0267) irradiation. The UV also changed the failure patterns of SB (p = 0.0001). The radio-induced changes did not cause degradation of the restorations, which means that they can be exposed to these types of ionizing radiation without weakening the bond strength.

  4. Enamel Wetness Effects on Microshear Bond Strength of Different Bonding Agents (Adhesive Systems): An in vitro Comparative Evaluation Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulkarni, Girish; Mishra, Vinay K

    2016-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the effect of enamel wetness on microshear bond strength using different adhesive systems. To evaluate microshear bond strength of three bonding agents on dry enamel; to evaluate microshear bond strength of three bonding agents on wet enamel; and to compare microshear bond strength of three different bonding agents on dry and wet enamel. Sixty extracted noncarious human premolars were selected for this study. Flat enamel surfaces of approximately 3 mm were obtained by grinding the buccal surfaces of premolars with water-cooled diamond disks. This study evaluated one etch-and-rinse adhesive system (Single Bond 2) and two self-etching adhesive systems (Clearfil SE Bond and Xeno-V). The specimens were divided into two groups (n = 30). Group I (dry) was air-dried for 30 seconds and in group II (wet) surfaces were blotted with absorbent paper to remove excess water. These groups were further divided into six subgroups (n = 10) according to the adhesives used. The resin composite, Filtek Z 250, was bonded to flat enamel surfaces that had been treated with one of the adhesives, following the manufacturer's instructions. After being stored in water at 37°C for 24 hours, bonded specimens were stressed in universal testing machine (Fig. 3) at a crosshead speed of 1 mm/min. The data were evaluated with one-way and two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA), t-test, and Tukey's Multiple Post hoc tests (a = 0.05). The two-way ANOVA and Tukey's Multiple Post hoc tests showed significant differences among adhesive systems, but wetness did not influence microshear bond strength (p = 0.1762). The one-way ANOVA and t-test showed that the all-in-one adhesive (Xeno-V) was the only material influenced by the presence of water on the enamel surface. Xeno-V showed significantly higher microshear bond strength when the enamel was kept wet. Single Bond 2 adhesive showed significantly higher microshear bond strength as compared with Xeno-V adhesive but no

  5. Influence of human and bovine substrate on the microleakage of two adhesive systems

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    Karoline Guará Brusaca Almeida

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate in vitro the marginal sealing of two adhesive systems and to analyze the influence of human and bovine substrates on marginal microleakage in enamel. Rectangular-shaped class V cavities (4 mm wide x 2 mm high x 2 mm deep were made as follows: 8 cavities were prepared on the buccal and lingual surfaces of the human teeth with margins located on enamel and 16 cavities were prepared on the buccal surfaces of the bovine teeth. The cavities were randomly assigned to 4 groups of 8 cavities according to the adhesive system and substrate: G1 - Prime & Bond 2.1 (Dentsply/human substrate; G2 - Adhese (Ivoclar/Vivadent/human substrate; G3 - Prime & Bond 2.1 (Dentsply/bovine substrate; G4 - Adhese (Ivoclar/Vivadent/bovine substrate. The cavities were filled with microhybrid composite resin (Fillmagic and after polishing/finishing procedures, the teeth were subjected to a thermocycling regimen of 500 cycles with 1-min immersions in water at 55° ±2°C and 5° ± 2°C. Next, the teeth were coated with two layers of nail polish to within 1 mm of the margin, submerged in a 50% silver nitrate solution for 2 h, rinsed thoroughly in running tap and immersed in developing solution for 8 h. The restorations were bisected resulting in 16 specimens. Microleakage was observed under a stereomicroscope at x25 and recorded using four-point (0-3 scoring system. The data were analyzed statistically by the Mann Whitney U-test at 5% significance level. Leakage was present in all specimens and there was statistically significant difference between the adhesive systems. Adhese self-etching system showed significantly more leakage in both substrates (human - p= 0.0001 and bovine - p= 0.0031. There was no statistically significant difference between human and bovine substrates for either of the adhesive systems based on different bonding mechanisms (Prime & Bond 2.1 - p= 0.6923 and Adhese - p= 0.6109. Neither of the adhesive systems was

  6. Effects of type I collagen degradation on the durability of three adhesive systems in the early phase of dentin bonding.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Hu

    Full Text Available This study was designed to evaluate the effects of type I collagen degradation on the durability of three adhesive systems in the early phase of dentin bonding.Bonded dentin specimens were prepared using three different types of adhesive systems. Micro-tensile bond strength and degradation of collagen were tested before, and after 1 month or 4 months of aging in artificial saliva. The relationship between micro-tensile bond strength and collagen degradation was analyzed by calculating their Pearson's correlation coefficient.Aging induced time-dependent reduction in micro-tensile bond strengths for all the tested adhesive systems, although such reduction for the single-step self-etching adhesive G-Bond (GB was not statistically significant. The bond strength of the two-step self-etching primer adhesive system Clearfil SE Bond (SEB was similar to that of the two-step etch-and-rinse self-priming adhesive system Single Bond 2 (SB, and they were both significantly reduced after one or four months of aging. A negative correlation was found between the degree of collagen degradation and magnitude of micro-tensile bond strength (r = -0.65, p = 0.003. The Pearson's correlation coefficient was 0.426, indicating that 42.6% of the aging-induced reduction in bond strength can be explained by the degradation of collagen.In the early phase of dentin bonding, there was a negative correlation between the degree of collagen degradation and the magnitude of micro-tensile bond strength. The reduction of bond strength was accompanied by the degradation of collagen. These results provide evidence for the causative relationship between the degradation of collagen and the deterioration of dentin-adhesive interface.

  7. Hybridization quality and bond strength of adhesive systems according to interaction with dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvio, Luciana Andrea; Hipólito, Vinicius Di; Martins, Adriano Luis; de Goes, Mario Fernando

    2013-07-01

    To evaluate the hybridization quality and bond strength of adhesives to dentin. Ten human molars were ground to expose the dentin and then sectioned in four tooth-quarters. They were randomly divided into 5 groups according to the adhesive used: Two single-step self-etch adhesives - Adper Prompt (ADP) and Xeno III (XE), two two-step self-etching primer systems - Clearfil SE Bond (SE) and Adhe SE (ADSE), and one one-step etch-and-rinse system - Adper Single Bond (SB). Resin composite (Filtek Z250) crown buildups were made on the bonded surfaces and incrementally light-cured for 20 s. The restored tooth-quarters were stored in water at 37°C for 24 h and then sectioned into beams (0.8 mm(2) in cross-section). Maximal microtensile bond strength (μ-TBS) was recorded (0.5 mm/min in crosshead speed). The results were submitted to one-way ANOVA and Tukey's test (α = 0.05). Thirty additional teeth were used to investigate the hybridization quality by SEM using silver methenamine or ammoniacal silver nitrate dyes. SE reached significantly higher μ-TBS (P 0.05), and between SB and ADP (P > 0.05); ADSE and XE were significantly higher than SB and ADP (P quality than that observed for ADP and XE. The bond strength and hybridization quality were affected by the interaction form of the adhesives with dentin. The hybridization quality was essential to improve the immediate μ-TBS to dentin.

  8. Comparative bonding ability to dentin of a universal adhesive system and monomer conversion as functions of extended light curing times and storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sampaio, Paula Costa Pinheiro; Kruly, Paula de Castro; Ribeiro, Clara Cabral; Hilgert, Leandro Augusto; Pereira, Patrícia Nóbrega Rodrigues; Scaffa, Polliana Mendes Candia; Di Hipólito, Vinicius; D'Alpino, Paulo Henrique Perlatti; Garcia, Fernanda Cristina Pimentel

    2017-11-01

    The purpose of this in vitro study was to evaluate the bonding ability and monomer conversion of a universal adhesive system applied to dentin as functions of different curing times and storage. The results were compared among a variety of commercial adhesives. Flat superficial dentin surfaces were exposed on human molars and assigned into one of the following adhesives (n = 15): total-etch Adper Single Bond 2 (SB) and Optibond Solo Plus (OS), self-etch Optibond All in One (OA) and Clearfil SE Bond (CSE), and Scotchbond Universal Adhesive in self-etch mode (SU). The adhesives were applied following the manufacturers' instructions and cured for 10, 20, or 40s. Specimens were processed for the microtensile bond strength (µTBS) test in accordance with the non-trimming technique and tested after 24h and 2 years. The fractured specimens were classified under scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Infrared (IR) spectra were obtained and monomer conversion (%) was calculated by comparing the aliphatic-to-aromatic IR absorption peak ratio before and after polymerization (n=5). Data were analyzed by 2-way ANOVA/Tukey's tests (α = 0.05). At 24-h evaluation, OA and CSE presented similar bond strength means irrespective of the curing time, whereas SB and SU exhibited significantly higher means when cured for 40s as did OS when cured for 20 or 40s (p storage, only the self-etching adhesive Optibond All-In-One exhibited the same bonding ability when cured for longer periods of time. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Sealing effectiveness of fissure sealant bonded with universal adhesive systems on saliva-contaminated and noncontaminated enamel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Memarpour, Mahtab; Shafiei, Fereshteh; Zarean, Mehran; Razmjoei, Faranak

    2018-01-01

    The effectiveness of sealants is dependent upon their adhesion to enamel surface. The aim of the study was to evaluate the sealing ability of a pit and fissure sealant used with a universal adhesive (etch-and-rinse vs. self-etch modes) when the site is contaminated with saliva. Adhesive properties were evaluated as microleakage and scanning electron microscopic (SEM) characteristics. A total of 72 mandibular third molars were randomly divided into 6 groups (n=12). Occlusal pits and fissures were sealed with an unfilled resin fissure sealant (FS) material with or without saliva contamination. The groups included: 1) phosphoric acid etching + FS (control), 2) phosphoric acid etching + Scotchbond Universal (etch-and-rinse) + FS, 3) phosphoric acid etching + saliva + Scotchbond Universal (etch-and-rinse) + FS, 4) Scotchbond Universal (self-etching) + FS,5) Scotchbond Universal (self-etching) + saliva + FS, and 6) Scotchbond Universal (self-etching) + saliva + Scotchbond Universal + FS. After thermocycling, the teeth were placed in 0.5% fuchsin, sectioned, and evaluated by digital microscopy. Two samples from each group were also observed by SEM. The data were analyzed with Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney tests for a significance of p universal adhesive in etch-and-rinse or self-etch modes was similar to that of conventional acid etching. Saliva contamination had a negative effect on sealant adhesion to pretreated enamel. Key words: Pit and fissure sealant, Universal adhesive, Saliva.

  10. Adhesion of multimode adhesives to enamel and dentin after one year of water storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vermelho, Paulo Moreira; Reis, André Figueiredo; Ambrosano, Glaucia Maria Bovi; Giannini, Marcelo

    2017-06-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the ultramorphological characteristics of tooth-resin interfaces and the bond strength (BS) of multimode adhesive systems to enamel and dentin. Multimode adhesives (Scotchbond Universal (SBU) and All-Bond Universal) were tested in both self-etch and etch-and-rinse modes and compared to control groups (Optibond FL and Clearfil SE Bond (CSB)). Adhesives were applied to human molars and composite blocks were incrementally built up. Teeth were sectioned to obtain specimens for microtensile BS and TEM analysis. Specimens were tested after storage for either 24 h or 1 year. SEM analyses were performed to classify the failure pattern of beam specimens after BS testing. Etching increased the enamel BS of multimode adhesives; however, BS decreased after storage for 1 year. No significant differences in dentin BS were noted between multimode and control in either evaluation period. Storage for 1 year only reduced the dentin BS for SBU in self-etch mode. TEM analysis identified hybridization and interaction zones in dentin and enamel for all adhesives. Silver impregnation was detected on dentin-resin interfaces after storage of specimens for 1 year only with the SBU and CSB. Storage for 1 year reduced enamel BS when adhesives are applied on etched surface; however, BS of multimode adhesives did not differ from those of the control group. In dentin, no significant difference was noted between the multimode and control group adhesives, regardless of etching mode. In general, multimode adhesives showed similar behavior when compared to traditional adhesive techniques. Multimode adhesives are one-step self-etching adhesives that can also be used after enamel/dentin phosphoric acid etching, but each product may work better in specific conditions.

  11. Microshear bond strength of a flowable resin to enamel according to the different adhesive systems

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    Jeong-Ho Kim

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives The purpose of this study was to compare the microshear bond strength (uSBS of two total-etch and four self-etch adhesive systems and a flowable resin to enamel. Materials and Methods Enamels of sixty human molars were used. They were divided into one of six equal groups (n = 10 by adhesives used; OS group (One-Step Plus, SB group (Single Bond, CE group (Clearfil SE Bond, TY group (Tyrian SPE/One-Step Plus, AP group (Adper Prompt L-Pop and GB group (G-Bond. After enamel surfaces were treated with six adhesive systems, a flowable composite resin (Filek Z 350 was bonded to enamel surface using Tygon tubes. the bonded specimens were subjected to uSBS testing and the failure modes of each group were observed under FE-SEM. Results 1. The uSBS of SB group was statistically higher than that of all other groups, and the uSBS of OS, SE and AP group was statistically higher than that of TY and GB group (p < 0.05. 2. The uSBS for TY group was statistically higher than that for GB group (p < 0.05. 3. Adhesive failures in TY and GB group and mixed failures in SB group and SE group were often analysed. One cohesive failure was observed in OS, SB, SE and AP group, respectively. Conclusions Although adhesives using the same step were applied the enamel sur

  12. Influence of laser etching on enamel and dentin bond strength of Silorane System Adhesive.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ustunkol, Ildem; Yazici, A Ruya; Gorucu, Jale; Dayangac, Berrin

    2015-02-01

    The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate the shear bond strength (SBS) of Silorane System Adhesive to enamel and dentin surfaces that had been etched with different procedures. Ninety freshly extracted human third molars were used for the study. After the teeth were embedded with buccal surfaces facing up, they were randomly divided into two groups. In group I, specimens were polished with a 600-grit silicon carbide (SiC) paper to obtain flat exposed enamel. In group II, the overlying enamel layer was removed and exposed dentin surfaces were polished with a 600-grit SiC paper. Then, the teeth in each group were randomly divided into three subgroups according to etching procedures: etched with erbium, chromium:yttrium-scandium-gallium-garnet laser (a), etched with 35% phosphoric acid (b), and non-etched (c, control). Silorane System Adhesive was used to bond silorane restorative to both enamel and dentin. After 24-h storage in distilled water at room temperature, a SBS test was performed using a universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 1 mm/min. The data were analyzed using two-way ANOVA and Bonferroni tests (p enamel and dentin (p > 0.05). The SBS of self-etch adhesive to dentin was not statistically different from enamel (p > 0.05). Phosphoric acid treatment seems the most promising surface treatment for increasing the enamel and dentin bond strength of Silorane System Adhesive.

  13. Effect of Fluoride-Releasing Adhesive Systems on the Mechanical Properties of Eroded Dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guedes, Ana Paula Albuquerque; Moda, Mariana Dias; Suzuki, Thaís Yumi Umeda; Godas, André Gustavo de Lima; Sundfeld, Renato Herman; Briso, André Luiz Fraga; Santos, Paulo Henrique dos

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the effect of erosive pH cycling with solutions that simulate dental erosion on Martens hardness (HMV) and elastic modulus (Eit) of dentin restored with fluoride-releasing adhesive systems. Twenty-seven bovine dentin slabs were restored with three adhesive systems: Adper Single Bond 2 total-etch adhesive system, One Up Bond F and Clearfil SE Protect fluoride-containing self-etching adhesive systems. The restorations were made with Filtek Z250. The HMV and Eit values at distances of 10, 30, 50 and 70 µm from the interface were evaluated using a dynamic ultra microhardness tester before and after immersion in deionized water, citric acid and hydrochloric acid (n=9). Data were submitted to repeated-measures ANOVA and Fisher's PLSD tests (=0.05). After erosive cycling, HMV values of dentin decreased in all groups. For dentin restored with Adper Single Bond 2, the lowest values were found closer to the hybrid layer, while for One Up Bond F and Clearfil SE Protect, the values remained unaltered at all distances. For dentin restored with fluoride-releasing adhesive systems, a decrease in Eit was found, but after 30 µm this difference was not significant. The acid substances were able to alter HMV and Eit of the underlying dentin. For fluoride-releasing adhesives, the greater the distance from bonded interface, the lower the Eit values. The fluoride in One Up Bond F and Clearfil SE Protect was able to protect the underlying dentin closer to the materials. In this way, the fluoride from adhesive systems could have some positive effect in the early stages of erosive lesions.

  14. In vitro antibacterial activity of adhesive systems on Streptococcus mutans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paradella, Thaís Cachuté; Koga-Ito, Cristiane Yumi; Jorge, Antonio Olavo Cardoso

    2009-04-01

    To evaluate the antibacterial activity of three adhesive systems -- Prime & Bond 2.1 (PB), Clearfil SE Bond (CS) and One Up Bond F (OU) -- on Streptococcus mutans in vitro. Adherence and agar disk-diffusion tests were performed. For the adherence testing, 40 human enamel specimens (4 mm2) were sterilized and the adhesive sytems were applied (n = 10). The control group did not receive the application of any adhesive system. Specimens were immersed in brain heart infusion broth (BHI) inoculated with S. mutans standardized suspension (10(6) cells/ml) for 48 h at 37 degrees C and 5% CO2. The number of S. mutans cells adhered to each specimen was evaluated by the plating method on BHI agar. For agar disk-diffusion testing, adhesive disks and disks soaked in distilled water (negative control) or 0.2% chlorexidine (positive control) were incubated with S. mutans for 48 h. The diameters of the zones of bacterial inhibition were measured. Adherence data were transformed in logarithms of base 10 (log10). Data were submitted to Kruskal-Wallis and Student-Neuman-Keuls tests at the 5% level of significance. The results of the adherence test showed that One Up Bond F (OU) and Clearfil SE Bond (CS) did not differ significantly from one another, but allowed significantly less adherence than Prime & Bond 2.1 (PB) and control [mean log10 (standard deviation) values: PB 6.10 (0.19); CS primer 4.55 (0.98); OU 4.65 (0.54); control group 6.34 (0.27)]. The disk-diffusion test showed no significant difference between OU (diameter in mm: 3.02 +/- 0.13) and CS (3.0 +/- 0.12), but both were significantly more effective in inhibiting bacterial growth than PB (1.0 +/- 0.10). The self-etching systems Clearfil SE Bond and One Up Bond F presented a greater inhibitory effect against S. mutans, also in terms of adherence, than did the conventional system, Prime & Bond 2.1.

  15. Bond Stability of a Universal Adhesive System to Eroded/Abraded Dentin After Deproteinization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Augusto, M G; Torres, Crg; Pucci, C R; Schlueter, N; Borges, A B

    Erosive/abrasive challenges can potentially compromise bonding to dentin. Aiming to improve the quality and stability of bonding to this substrate, this study investigated the combined effect of erosion and toothbrush abrasion on the microtensile bond strength (μTBS) stability to dentin using a universal adhesive system in total and self-etching modes, associated or not associated with deproteinization. Bovine dentin specimens were divided into five groups according to the organic matrix condition (n=20): control (C); erosion (E); erosion + abrasion (EA); erosion + sodium hypochlorite (EH); erosion + abrasion + sodium hypochlorite (EAH). The groups were further divided (n=10) according to the mode of application (total or self-etching) of a universal adhesive. After the bonding procedure, composite blocks were built up, and the samples were cut to obtain sticks for μTBS testing. For each specimen, one-half of the sticks was immediately tested, and the other one-half was tested after artificial aging (5000 thermocycles, 5°C and 55°C). Three-way analysis of variance (α=5%) showed a significant difference for the triple interaction ( p=0.0007). Higher μTBS means were obtained for the EH and EAH groups compared with the E and EA groups. The control group showed immediate μTBS values similar to that of the E and EA groups for both bond strategies. Erosion and erosion/abrasion did not significantly influence the immediate μTBS to dentin. Artificial aging reduced μTBS values for the groups C, E, and EA using the total-etching mode. Deproteinization maintained the bond stability to artificially aged eroded and eroded/abraded dentin.

  16. Influence of application method on surface free-energy and bond strength of universal adhesive systems to enamel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imai, Arisa; Takamizawa, Toshiki; Sai, Keiichi; Tsujimoto, Akimasa; Nojiri, Kie; Endo, Hajime; Barkmeier, Wayne W; Latta, Mark A; Miyazaki, Masashi

    2017-10-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine the influence of different adhesive application methods and etching modes on enamel bond effectiveness of universal adhesives using shear bond strength (SBS) testing and surface free-energy (SFE) measurements. The adhesives Scotchbond Universal, All-Bond Universal, Adhese Universal, and G-Premio Bond were used. Prepared bovine enamel specimens were divided into four groups, based on type of adhesive, and subjected to the following surface treatments: (i) total-etch mode with active application; (ii) total-etch mode with inactive application; (iii) self-etch mode with active application; and (iv) self-etch mode with inactive application. Bonded specimens were subjected to SBS testing. The SFE of the enamel surfaces with adhesive was measured after rinsing with acetone and water. The SBS values in total-etch mode were significantly higher than those in self-etch mode. In total-etch mode, significantly lower SBS values were observed with active application compared with inactive application; in contrast, in self-etch mode there were no significant differences in SBS between active and inactive applications. A reduction in total SFE was observed for active application compared with inactive application. The interaction between etching mode and application method was statistically significant, and the application method significantly affected enamel bond strength in total-etch mode. © 2017 Eur J Oral Sci.

  17. Degradation of Multimode Adhesive System Bond Strength to Artificial Caries-Affected Dentin Due to Water Storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Follak, A C; Miotti, L L; Lenzi, T L; Rocha, R O; Soares, F Z

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the influence of water storage on bond strength of multimode adhesive systems to artificially induced caries-affected dentin. One hundred twelve sound bovine incisors were randomly assigned to 16 groups (n=7) according to the dentin condition (sound; SND, artificially induced caries-affected dentin; CAD, cariogenic challenge by pH cycling for 14 days); the adhesive system (SU, Scotchbond Universal Adhesive; AB, All-Bond Universal; PB, Prime & Bond Elect; SB, Adper Single Bond 2; and CS, Clearfil SE Bond), and the etching strategy (etch-and-rinse and self-etch). All adhesive systems were applied under manufacturer's instructions to flat dentin surfaces, and a composite block was built up on each dentin surface. After 24 hours of water storage, the specimens were sectioned into stick-shaped specimens (0.8 mm 2 ) and submitted to a microtensile test immediately (24 hours) or after six months of water storage. Bond strength data (MPa) were analyzed using three-way repeated-measures analysis of variance and post hoc Tukey test (α=5%), considering each substrate separately (SND and CAD). The etching strategy did not influence the bond strength of multimode adhesives, irrespective of the dentin condition. Water storage only reduced significantly the bond strength to CAD. The degradation of bond strength due to water storage was more pronounced in CAD, regardless of the etching strategy.

  18. [In vitro study of marginal microleakage of Clearfil S3 BOND adhesive systems and Majesty composite resin].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Bei; Zhu, Ya-qin

    2009-08-01

    To evaluate the microleakage of standard box-type cavity filled with Clearfil S3 BOND self-etch adhesive systems and Majesty composite resin. 40 permanent molars were randomly divided into experimental and control groups, 20 of each . The box-type cavities, 3mm in length and width and 2mm in depth, were prepared at the cemento-enamel junction on buccal surface of forty permanent extracted teeth. According to grouping, the experimental group was filled with Clearfil S(3) BOND self-adhesive systems and Majesty composite resin, and the control group was filled with 3M Adper Prompt self-adhesive and Filtek Z350 composite resin. After thermal circulation(2000 times, 5 degrees centigrade-55 degrees centigrade) and soaked for 24 hours in 2% methyl blue solution, the samples were cut through the midline of the restoration and the leakage depth was measured with vernier caliper. The microleakage degrees and microleakage depth of 2 groups were analyzed with SPSS 17.0 software package for Mann-Whitney U test and independent-samples t test. Microleakage was observed in both groups. But the microleakage degrees and microleakage depth of 2 groups had no significant difference (P>0.05). The marginal sealibility of Clearfil S(3) BOND self-adhesive systems and Majesty composite resin is as good as Adper Prompt self-adhesive and Filtek Z350 composite resin,it may be an ideal clinical restoration material.

  19. Two-year clinical evaluation of three adhesive systems in non-carious cervical lesions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evrim Eliguzeloglu Dalkilic

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: Adhesive systems are continuously being introduced to Dentistry, unfortunately often without sufficient clinical validation. The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical performance of cervical restorations done with three different adhesive systems. MATERIAL AND METHODS: 158 non-carious cervical lesions of 23 patients were restored with a nanofilled composite resin (Filtek Supreme, 3M/ESPE combined with Single Bond (3M/ESPE, group SI, Clearfil SE (Kuraray Medical Inc., group CL and Xeno III (De Trey Dentsply, group XE. In groups SI-B, CL-B and XE-B, the outer surface of the sclerotic dentin was removed by roughening with a diamond bur before application of the respective adhesive systems. In groups CL-BP and XE-BP, after removal of the outer surface of the sclerotic dentin with the bur, the remaining dentin was etched with 37% phosphoric acid and the self-etch adhesive systems Clearfil SE and Xeno III were applied, respectively. Lesions were evaluated at baseline, and restorations after 3 months, 1 year and 2 years using modified USPHS criteria. RESULTS: After 2 years, no significant difference was found between the retention rates of the groups (p >0.05. Although groups CL and SI showed significantly better marginal adaptation than group XE (p0.05. After 2 years no significant difference was observed among the marginal staining results of all groups (p>0.05. CONCLUSION: Although all adhesive systems showed similar retention rates, Clearfil SE and Single Bond showed better marginal adaptation than Xeno III after 2 years of follow-up.

  20. Effect of Nd:YAG laser on the solvent evaporation of adhesive systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batista, Graziela Ribeiro; Barcellos, Daphne Câmara; Rocha Gomes Torres, Carlos; Damião, Álvaro José; de Oliveira, Hueder Paulo Moisés; de Paiva Gonçalves, Sérgio Eduardo

    2015-01-01

    This study evaluated the influence of Nd:YAG laser on the evaporation degree (ED) of the solvent components in total-etch and self-etch adhesives. The ED of Gluma Comfort Bond (Heraeus-Kulzer) one-step self-etch adhesive, and Adper Single Bond 2 (3M ESPE), and XP Bond (Dentsply) total-etch adhesives was determined by weight alterations using two techniques: Control--spontaneous evaporation of the solvent for 5 min; Experimental--Nd:YAG laser irradiation for 1 min, followed by spontaneous evaporation for 4 min. The weight loss due to evaporation of the volatile components was measured at baseline and after 10 s, 20 s, 30 s, 40 s, 50 s, 60 s, 70 s, 80 s, 90 s, 100 s, 110 s, 2 min, 3 min, 4 min, and 5 min. Evaporation of solvent components significantly increased with Nd:YAG laser irradiation for all adhesives investigated. Gluma Comfort Bond showed significantly higher evaporation of solvent components than Adper Single Bond 2 and XP Bond. All the adhesives lost weight quickly during the first min of Nd:YAG laser irradiation. The application of Nd:YAG laser on adhesives before light curing had a significant effect on the evaporation of the solvent components, and the ED of Gluma Comfort Bond one-step self-etch adhesive was significantly higher than with Adper Single Bond 2 and XP Bond total-etch adhesives. The use of the Nd:YAG laser on the uncured adhesive technique can promote a greater ED of solvents, optimizing the longevity of the adhesive restorations.

  1. Effect of adhesive system application for cavities prepared with erbium, chromium: yttrium scandium gallium garnet laser on rat dental pulp tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takada, Mayo; Suzuki, Masaya; Haga-Tsujimura, Maiko; Shinkai, Koichi

    2017-07-01

    We examined the effects of adhesive systems under study applied for a laser-cut cavity using an Er,Cr:YSGG laser on rat dental pulp at 24 h and 14 days postoperatively. Group 1, laser-cut cavities were treated with a self-etching-primer and bonding agent; group 2, pretreated with a phosphoric-acid, and then treated with a self-etching-primer and bonding agent; group 3, pretreated with a phosphoric-acid and sodium-hypochlorite, and then treated with a self-etching-primer and bonding agent; and group 4, treated with an all-in-one adhesive. A flowable resin composite was used as filling material for each cavity treated with each group. A glass-ionomer-cement was used as a control. The following items were evaluated: pulp-tissue-disorganization (PTD), inflammatory-cell-infiltration (ICI), tertiary-dentin-formation (TDF), and bacterial-penetration (BP). The results were statistically analyzed using the Kruskal-Wallis test and Mann-Whitney U test. No significant differences were observed among the experimental groups for all parameters after 24 h and 14 days (P > 0.05). The majority of the specimens showed PTD with edema formation after 24 h; however, all the specimens demonstrated pulpal healing with TDF after 14 days. On the parameter of TDF, all groups showed significant differences between the two postoperative periods (P < 0.01). On the parameter of ICI, a significant difference was found between the two postoperative periods in group 4 (P < 0.05). No specimens showed BP. The pretreatment on the cavity prepared with the laser using phosphoric-acid or sodium-hypochlorite did not affect the dental pulp healing of rat tooth.

  2. Bracket bond strength and cariostatic potential of an experimental resin adhesive system containing Portland cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iijima, Masahiro; Hashimoto, Masanori; Nakagaki, Susumu; Muguruma, Takeshi; Kohda, Naohisa; Endo, Kazuhiko; Mizoguchi, Itaru

    2012-09-01

    To determine if a new experimental resin-based material containing Portland cement (PC) can help prevent enamel caries while providing adequate shear bond strength (SBS). Brackets were bonded to human premolars with experimental resin-based adhesive pastes composed of three weight rations of resin and PC powder (PC 30, 7:3; PC 50, 5:5; PC 70, 3:7; n  =  7). Self-etching primer (SEP) adhesive (Transbond Plus) and resin-modified glass ionomer cement (RMGIC) adhesive (Fuji Ortho FC Automix) were used for comparison. All of the bonded teeth were subjected to alternating immersion in demineralizing (pH 4.55) and remineralizing (pH 6.8) solutions for 14 days. The SBS for each sample was examined, and the Adhesive Remnant Index (ARI) score was calculated. The hardness and elastic modulus of the enamel were determined by a nanoindenter at 20 equidistant depths from the external surface at 100 µm from the bracket edge. Data were compared by one-way analysis of variance and a chi-square test. PC 50 and PC 70 showed significantly greater SBS than Fuji Ortho FC Automix, although Transbond Plus showed significantly greater SBS than other bonding systems. No significant difference in the ARI category was observed among the five groups. For specimens bonded with PC 50 and PC 70, the hardness and elastic modulus values in most locations were equivalent to those of Fuji Ortho FC Automix. Experimental resin-based bonding material containing PC provides adequate SBS and a caries-preventive effect equivalent to that of the RMGIC adhesive system.

  3. Water permeability, hybrid layer long-term integrity and reaction mechanism of a two-step adhesive system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grégoire, Geneviève; Dabsie, Firas; Delannée, Mathieu; Akon, Bernadette; Sharrock, Patrick

    2010-07-01

    Our aim was to investigate the reaction mechanism of formation of the hybrid layer by a HEMA-containing self-etch adhesive and to study fluid filtration, contact angle and interfacial ultrastructure by SEM following a 1 year ageing period. Acidic behaviour and chemical interactions between Silorane System Adhesive and dentine were studied by potentiometric titrations, atomic absorption spectroscopy and infrared spectroscopy. The hydrophilicity of the adhesive was evaluated using the sessile drop method and dentine permeability by hydraulic conductance. The morphological study of the dentine/adhesive system interface was conducted using SEM. The Silorane System Adhesive behaved as a multi-acid with several different pK(a) values. When the adhesive was in contact with dentine, the acid was progressively consumed and calcium ions were released. The acrylate substituted phosphonate bound strongly to apatite crystals. The polyacrylic acid copolymer reacted with calcium ions and formed an interpenetrating polymer network (IPN). Water contact angle measurements showed rapid spreading on primer (angles reached 15 degrees at 30s) and larger contact angles when the Silorane bonding layer was added (from over 60 degrees to 44 degrees ). A thick, homogeneous hybrid layer was observed both initially and after 1 year of ageing, with a corresponding hydraulic conductance of -48.50% initially and -52.07% at 12 months. The Silorane System Adhesive is capable of both dissolving calcium ions and binding to apatite surfaces. The results showed the hydrophilicity of the adhesive, which formed an IPN-like hybrid layer that conserved adequate impermeability over a 1-year period. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Monomer-to-polymer conversion and micro-tensile bond strength to dentine of experimental and commercial adhesives containing diphenyl(2,4,6-trimethylbenzoyl)phosphine oxide or a camphorquinone/amine photo-initiator system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miletic, Vesna; Pongprueksa, Pong; De Munck, Jan; Brooks, Neil R; Van Meerbeek, Bart

    2013-10-01

    To compare the degree of conversion (DC) of adhesives initiated by diphenyl(2,4,6-trimethylbenzoyl)phosphine oxide (TPO) or a camphorquinone/tertiary amine system (CQ/Amine) as well as their 'immediate' micro-tensile bond strength (μTBS) to bur-cut dentine. DC of Scotchbond Universal ('SBU'; 3M ESPE), its experimental counterpart containing TPO as photo-initiator system, an experimental G-aenial Bond ('Ga-B'; GC) adhesive formulation, and an experimental LUB-102 adhesive formulation ('LUB', Kuraray Noritake), containing as photo-initiatior system either 2wt% CQ along with 2wt% tertiary amine ('SBU_CQ/Amine'; 'Ga-B_CQ/Amine'; 'LUB_CQ/Amine'), or 2wt% TPO ('SBU_TPO'; 'Ga-B_TPO'; 'LUB_TPO'), was determined using Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), after being cured with a dual-wavelength light-curing unit (bluephase 20i, Ivoclar Vivadent). The same adhesive formulations were applied to bur-cut mid-coronal dentine of intact human molars, and subjected to a μTBS test after 1-week water storage. Besides being applied following a self-etch (SE) application mode, the adhesive formulations SBU_CQ/Amine and SBU_TPO were also applied following an etch-and-rinse (E&R) mode, this both for DS and μTBS measurement. No significant difference in DC was found for any of the adhesive formulations, except for SBU_CQ/Amine_SE and SBU_TPO_SE. For both SBU formulations, a significantly higher DC was reached for the E&R than the SE approach. Regarding μTBS, no significant differences were recorded, except for the significantly higher μTBS measured for SBU_CQ/Amine_E&R and SBU_TPO_E&R. In self-etch adhesives, the photo-initiator TPO may be used instead of CQ/Amine. The curing and 'immediate' bonding efficiency depended on the application protocol (E&R versus SE), but not on the photo-initiator system. The photo-initiator TPO may be used in self-etch adhesives instead of CQ/Amine with similar curing and 'immediate' bonding efficiency. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All

  5. Effect of various bleaching treatments on shear bond strength of different universal adhesives and application modes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate the bond strength of 2 universal adhesives used in different application modes to bleached enamel. Materials and Methods Extracted 160 sound human incisors were used for the study. Teeth were divided into 4 treatment groups: No treatment, 35% hydrogen peroxide, 16% carbamid peroxide, 7.5% carbamid peroxide. After bleaching treatments, groups were divided into subgroups according to the adhesive systems used and application modes (n = 10): 1) Single Bond Universal, etch and rinse mode; 2) Single Bond Universal, self-etch mode; 3) Gluma Universal, etch and rinse mode; 4) Gluma Universal, self-etch mode. After adhesive procedures nanohybrid composite resin cylinders were bonded to the enamel surfaces. All specimens were subjected to shear bond strength (SBS) test after thermocycling. Data were analyzed using a 3-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Tukey post hoc test. Results No significant difference were found among bleaching groups (35% hydrogen peroxide, 16% carbamid peroxide, 7.5% carbamid peroxide, and no treatment groups) in the mean SBS values. There was also no difference in SBS values between Single Bond Universal and Gluma Universal at same application modes, whereas self-etch mode showed significantly lower SBS values than etch and rinse mode (p adhesives was enhanced with the etch and rinse mode application to bleached enamel and non-bleached enamel. PMID:29765900

  6. Universal adhesives: the next evolution in adhesive dentistry?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alex, Gary

    2015-01-01

    Every so often a new material, technique, or technological breakthrough spurs a paradigm shift in the way dentistry is practiced. The development and evolution of reliable enamel and dentin bonding agents is one such example. Indeed, the so-called "cosmetic revolution" in dentistry blossomed in large part due to dramatic advances in adhesive technology. It is the ability to bond various materials in a reasonably predictable fashion to both enamel and dentin substrates that enables dentists to routinely place porcelain veneers, direct and indirect composites, and a plethora of other restorative and esthetic materials. In fact, the longevity and predictability of many (if not most) current restorative procedures is wholly predicated on the dentist's ability to bond various materials to tooth tissues. Adhesive systems have progressed from the largely ineffective systems of the 1970s and early 1980s to the relatively successful total- and self-etching systems of today. The latest players in the adhesive marketplace are the so-called "universal adhesives." In theory, these systems have the potential to significantly simplify and expedite adhesive protocols and may indeed represent the next evolution in adhesive dentistry. But what defines a universal system, and are all these new systems truly "universal" and everything they are claimed to be? This article will examine the origin, chemistry, strengths, weaknesses, and clinical relevance of this new genre of dental adhesives.

  7. Influence of dentin contamination by temporary cements on the bond strength of adhesive systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josimeri Hebling

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of this study was to assess the bond strength of adhesive systems to dentin contaminated by temporary cements with or without eugenol. Method: Flat dentin surfaces were obtained from twenty-four human third molars. With exception of the control group (n=8, the surfaces were covered with Interim Restorative Material (Caulk Dentsplay, Milford, DE, USA or Cavit (3M ESPE, St. Paul, MN, USA and kept in an oven at 37oC for seven days. After removing the cements, the adhesive systems Adper Single Bond (3M ESPE, St. Paul, MN, USA or Clearfil SE Bond (Kuraray Co. Ltd., Osaka, Japan were applied in accordance with the manufacturers’ recommendations, and then the crowns were constructed in of resin composite. The teeth were sectioned into specimens with a cross-sectional bond area of 0.81mm2, which were sub mitted to microtensile testing in a mechanical test machine at an actuator speed of 0.5mm/min. The data were analyzed by t- and ANOVA tests, complemented by Tukey tests (α=0.05. Results: For Adper Single Bond (3M ESPE, St. Paul, MN, USA, bond strength did not differ statistically (p>0.05 for all the experimental conditions. For Clearfil SE Bond (Kuraray Co. Ltd., Osaka, Japan, only the Interim Restorative Material (Caulk Dentsplay, Milford, DE, USA Group showed significantly lower bond strength (30.1±13.8 MPa in comparison with the other groups; control (38.9±13.5 MPa and Cavit (3M ESPE, St. Paul, MN, USA (42.1±11.0 MPa, which showed no significant difference between them.Conclusion: It was concluded that the previous covering of dentin with temporary cement containing eugenol had a deleterious effect on the adhesive performance of the self-etching system only.

  8. Influence of degradation conditions on dentin bonding durability of three universal adhesives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sai, Keiichi; Shimamura, Yutaka; Takamizawa, Toshiki; Tsujimoto, Akimasa; Imai, Arisa; Endo, Hajime; Barkmeier, Wayne W; Latta, Mark A; Miyazaki, Masashi

    2016-11-01

    This study aims to determine dentin bonding durability of universal adhesives using shear bond strength (SBS) tests under various degradation conditions. G-Premio Bond (GP, GC), Scotchbond Universal (SU, 3M ESPE) and All Bond Universal (AB, Bisco) were compared with conventional two-step self-etch adhesive Clearfil SE Bond (SE, Kuraray Noritake Dental). Bonded specimens were divided into three groups of ten, and SBSs with bovine dentin were determined after the following treatments: 1) Storage in distilled water at 37°C for 24h followed by 3000, 10,000, 20,000 or 30,000 thermal cycles (TC group), 2) Storage in distilled water at 37°C for 3 months, 6 months or 1year (water storage, WS group) and 3) Storage in distilled water at 37°C for 24h (control). SE bonded specimens showed significantly higher SBSs than universal adhesives, regardless of TC or storage periods, although AB specimens showed significantly increased SBSs after 30,000 thermal cycles. In comparisons of universal adhesives under control and degradation conditions, SBS was only reduced in SU after 1year of WS. Following exposure of various adhesive systems to degradation conditions of thermal cycling and long term storage, SBS values of adhesive systems varied primarily with degradation period. Although universal adhesives have lower SBSs than the two-step self-etch adhesive SE, the present data indicate that the dentin bonding durability of universal adhesives in self-etch mode is sufficient for clinical use. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Microtensile bond strength of contemporary adhesives to primary enamel and dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marquezan, Marcela; da Silveira, Bruno Lopes; Burnett, Luiz Henrique; Rodrigues, Célia Regina Martins Delgado; Kramer, Paulo Floriani

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess bond strength of three self-etching and two total-etch adhesive systems bonded to primary tooth enamel and dentin. Forty extracted primary human molars were selected and abraded in order to create flat buccal enamel and occlusal dentin surfaces. Teeth were assigned to one of the adhesive systems: Adper Scotch Bond Multi Purpose, Adper Single Bond 2, Adper Prompt L-Pop, Clearfil SE Bond and AdheSE. Immediately to adhesive application, a composite resin (Filtek Z250) block was built up. After 3 months of water storage, each sample was sequentially sectioned in order to obtain sticks with a square cross-sectional area of about 0.72 mm2. The specimens were fixed lengthways to a microtensile device and tested using a universal testing machine with a 50-N load cell at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min. Microtensile bond strength values were recorded in MPa and compared by Analysis of Variance and the post hoc Tukey test (a = 0.05). In enamel, Clearfil SE Bond presented the highest values, followed by Adper Single Bond 2, AdheSE and Adper Scotch Bond Multi Purpose, without significant difference. The highest values in dentin were obtained with Adper Scotch Bond Multi Purpose and all other adhesives did not present significant different values from that, except Adper Prompt L-Pop that achieved the lowest bond strength in both substrates. Adper Scotch Bond Multi Purpose and Adper Single Bond 2 presented significantly lower values in enamel than in dentin although all other adhesives presented similar results in both substrates. contemporary adhesive systems present similar behaviors when bonded to primary teeth, with the exception of the one-step self-etching system; and self-etching systems can achieve bond strength values as good in enamel as in dentin of primary teeth.

  10. Bond strength of adhesive resin cement with different adhesive systems

    OpenAIRE

    Lorenzoni e Silva, Fabrizio; Pamato, Saulo; Kuga, Milton-Carlos; S?, Marcus-Vinicius-Reis; Pereira, Jefferson-Ricardo

    2017-01-01

    Background To assess the immediate bond strength of a dual-cure adhesive resin cement to the hybridized dentin with different bonding systems. Material and Methods Fifty-six healthy human molars were randomly divided into 7 groups (n=8). After 3 longitudinal sections, the central cuts were included in PVC matrix and were submitted to dentin hybridization according to the groups: G1 - etch & rinse system with 3-step (Apder? Scotchbond? Multi-Purpose, 3M ESPE), G2 - etch & rinse system with 3-s...

  11. The adhesive system and root canal region do not influence the degree of conversion of dual resin cement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priscilla Cristoforides Pereira

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of two adhesive systems and the post space region on the degree of conversion of dual resin cement and its bond strength to root dentin. MATERIAL AND METHODS: One three-step etch-and-rinse (All-bond 2, Bisco and another one-step self-etch (Xeno III, Dentsply adhesive systems were applied on 20 (n=10 crownless bovine incisors, at 12-mm-deep post space preparation, and a fiber post (FRC Postec, Ivoclar was cemented using a dual cure resin cement (Duo-Link, Bisco. Three transverse sections (3 mm were obtained, being one from each study region (cervical, middle and apical. The degree of conversion of the dual cure resin cement was determined by a micro-Raman spectrometer. The data (% were submitted to repeated-measures analysis of variance and Tukey's test (p<0.05. RESULTS: For both groups, the degree of conversion means (% (All bond 2cervical = 69.3; All bond 2middle = 55.1; All bond 2apical= 56; Xeno III cervical = 68.7; Xeno IIImiddle = 68.8; Xeno III apical = 54.3 were not significantly different along the post space regions (p<0.05. CONCLUSION: Neither the adhesive nor the post space region influenced the degree of conversion of the cement layer.

  12. Microleakage comparison of three types of adhesive systems versus GIC-based adhesive in class V composite restorations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mostafa Sadeghi

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Background and aims: New dentin bonding agents and techniques have been developed to reduce microleakage and create higher bond strength. This in-vitro study compared the microleakage of three resin-based adhesives versus a GIC-based adhesive on class V composite restorations.  Materials and Methods: Class V cavities were prepared on the buccal surfaces of 72 sound premolars, randomly assigned to six groups (n=12 and treated as follows: without any treatment (negative control group; total-etch (OptiBond Solo Plus; two-step self-etch (OptiBond XTR; one-step self-etch (OptiBond All-in-One and GIC-based adhesive (Fuji bond LC with pre-cure and co-cure techniques. The treated cavities were filled with a micro-hybrid resin composite (Point 4, Kerr. Following finishing and polishing procedures, the specimens were placed in 100% humidity, stored in distilled water, thermocycled and then immersed in a methylene blue, sectioned, evaluated for microleakage and scored on a 0 to 3 ordinal scale.  Results: None of the adhesives tested were capable of completely eliminating marginal microleakage. There were statistically significant differences among the test groups at occlusal margins; but at cervical margins were not. The Fuji Bond LC with co-cure and control groups had significantly greater microleakage scores at the occlusal margins. At the cervical margins, the bonded restorations with OptiBond XTR and OptiBond All-in-One adhesives presented significantly lower microleakage scores. Also, there were no significant differences between the resin adhesive groups both at occlusal and cervical margins. The microleakage scores at the cervical margins were markedly higher than the occlusal margins in the groups bonded with OptiBond Solo Plus and Fuji Bond LC with pre-cure. The differences between Fuji Bond LC adhesive with pre-cure and co-cure techniques were significant. Conclusion: This study encourages application of the Fuji bond LC adhesive with pre

  13. Tensile Bond Strengths of Two Adhesives on Irradiated and Nonirradiated Human Dentin

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    Cécile Bernard

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to assess the effect of radiotherapy on bond efficiency of two different adhesive systems using tensile bond strength test. Twenty extracted teeth after radiotherapy and twenty nonirradiated extracted teeth were used. The irradiation was applied in vivo to a minimal dose of 50 Gy. The specimens of each group were randomly assigned to two subgroups to test two different adhesive systems. A three-step/etch-and-rinse adhesive system (Optibond FL and a two-steps/self-etch adhesive system (Optibond XTR were used. Composite buildups were performed with a nanohybrid composite (Herculite XTR. All specimens were submitted to thermocycling ageing (10000 cycles. The specimens were sectioned in 1 mm2 sticks. Microtensile bond strength tests were measured. Nonparametric statistical analyses were performed due to nonnormality of data. Optibond XTR on irradiated and nonirradiated teeth did not show any significant differences. However, Optibond FL bond strength was more effective on nonirradiated teeth than on irradiated teeth. Within the limitations of an in vitro study, it can be concluded that radiotherapy had a significant detrimental effect on bond strength to human dentin. However, it seems that adhesive choice could be adapted to the substrata. According to the present study, the two-steps/self-etch (Optibond XTR adhesive system tested could be more effective on irradiated dentin compared to three-steps/etch-and-rinse adhesive system (Optibond FL.

  14. Effect of At-home and In-office Bleaching on Marginal Microleakage in Composite Resin Restorations using Two Adhesive Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Celso A; da Silva, Douglas; Reston, Eduardo G; Borghetti, Diana Lb; Zimmer, Roberto

    2018-03-01

    The aim of this study is to assess marginal microleakage of cervical cavities restored with composite resins and two different adhesive techniques subjected to at-home and in-office bleaching. In this randomized, blind laboratory experiment, 60 bovine teeth recently extracted were collected and divided into six groups (n = 10 each group). The teeth received cervical cavity preparations (2 mm × 3 mm × 1 mm) with enamel margins. Two different adhesive systems were used (Single Bond 2 and Clearfil SE Bond), in addition to composite resin (Z250). Restored teeth received two different bleaching gels (Opalescence PF and Opalescence Boost). Teeth were thermo-cycled and analyzed under confocal laser scanning microscopy. No significant differences were observed (p > 0.05) in microleakage scores between the two groups not subjected to bleaching nor between the four groups that received bleaching treatment (p > 0.05), regardless of the gel and adhesive system employed. However, when comparing nonbleached with bleached teeth, those not subjected to bleaching showed statistically lower marginal microleakage scores (p bleaching agents used both at-home and in-office, regardless of the adhesive system employed (total-etch or self-etch). Both at-home and in-office bleaching agents have an influence on the adhesive interface of resin restorations, producing changes and inducing marginal leakage.

  15. Comparative study to evaluate shear bond strength of RMGIC to composite resin using different adhesive systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manoj G Chandak

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The aim of the study is to compare and evaluate the role of new dental adhesives to bond composite to the resinmodified glass inomer cement (RMGIC. Materials and Methods: Thirty specimens were prepared on acrylic blocks, with wells prepared in it by drilling holes, to retain the RMGIC. The specimens were randomly divided into three groups of ten specimens each. In Group a thin layer of selfetch adhesive (3M ESPE was applied between the RMGIC and the composite resin FILTEK P60 (3M SPE. In Group II, total etch adhesive (Adeper Scotch bond 2, 3M ESPE was applied, and in Group III, there was no application of any adhesive between RMGIC and the composite resin. After curing all the specimens, the shear bond strength was measured using an Instron universal testing machine. Results: The results were drawn and tabulated using ANOVA-fishers and Dunnet D statistical tests.The maximum shear bond strength values were recorded in Group I specimens with self-etch adhesive showing a mean value of 2.74 when compared to the Group II adhesive (Total etch showing a mean shear strength of value 1.89, where no adhesive was used, showed a minimum mean shear bond strength of 1.42. There was a great and significant difference between Group I and Group II (P value 0.05 whereas, both Group I and Group II showed a vast and significant difference from Group III (P value = 0-001. Conclusion: Hence, this present study concludes that application of self-etch adhesive (3M ESPE, U.S.A in between RMGIC and composite resin increases the shear bond strength between RMGIC and the resin composites, as compared to the total-etch type adhesive (Adeper Scotch bond 2,3M ESPE, U.S.A as well as without application of the adhesive agent.

  16. Marginal adaptation of composite resins under two adhesive techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dačić, Stefan; Veselinović, Aleksandar M; Mitić, Aleksandar; Nikolić, Marija; Cenić, Milica; Dačić-Simonović, Dragica

    2016-11-01

    In the present research, different adhesive techniques were used to set up fillings with composite resins. After the application of etch and rinse or self etch adhesive technique, marginal adaptation of composite fillings was estimated by the length of margins without gaps, and by the microretention of resin in enamel and dentin. The study material consisted of 40 extracted teeth. Twenty Class V cavities were treated with 35% phosphorous acid and restored after rinsing by Adper Single Bond 2 and Filtek Ultimate-ASB/FU 3M ESPE composite system. The remaining 20 cavities were restored by Adper Easy One-AEO/FU 3M ESPE composite system. Marginal adaptation of composite fillings was examined using a scanning electron microscope (SEM). The etch and rinse adhesive technique showed a significantly higher percentage of margin length without gaps (in enamel: 92.5%, in dentin: 57.3%), compared with the self-etch technique with lower percentage of margin length without gaps, in enamel 70.4% (p resin tugs in interprismatic spaces of enamel, while the dentin microretention was composed of adhesive and hybrid layers with resin tugs in dentin canals. In the second technique, resin tugs were rarely seen and a microgap was dominant along the border of restoration margins. The SEM analysis showed a better marginal adaptation of composite resin to enamel and dentin with better microretention when the etch and rinse adhesive procedure was applied. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Evaluation of microshear bond strength of resin composites to enamel of dental adhesive systems associated with Er,Cr:YSGG laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassimiro-Silva, Patricia F.; Zezell, Denise M.; Monteiro, Gabriela Q. d. M.; Benetti, Carolina; de Paula Eduardo, Carlos; Gomes, Anderson S. L.

    2016-02-01

    The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate the microshear bond strength (μSBS) of resin composite to enamel etching by Er,Cr:YSGG laser with the use of two differents adhesives systems. Fifty freshly extracted human molars halves were embedded in acrylic resin before preparation for the study, making a total of up to 100 available samples. The specimens were randomly assigned into six groups (η=10) according to substrate pre-treatment and adhesive system on the enamel. A two-step self-etching primer system (Clearfil SE Bond) and a universal adhesive used as an etch-andrinse adhesive (Adper Single Bond Universal) were applied to the nonirradiated enamel surface according to manufacturer's instructions, as control groups (Control CF and Control SB, respectively). For the other groups, enamel surfaces were previously irradiated with the Er,Cr:YSGG laser with 0.5 W, 75 mJ and 66 J/cm2 (CF 5 Hz and SB 5 Hz) and 1.25 W, 50 mJ and 44 J/cm2 (CF 15 Hz and SB 15 Hz). Irradiation was performed under air (50%) and water (50%) cooling. An independent t-test was performed to compare the adhesive systems. Mean μSBS ± sd (MPa) for each group was 16.857 +/- 2.61, 17.87 +/- 5.83, 12.23 +/- 2.02, 9.88 +/- 2.26, 15.94 +/- 1.98, 17.62 +/- 2.10, respectively. The control groups and the 50 mJ laser groups showed no statistically significant differences, regardless of the adhesive system used. The results obtained lead us to affirm that the bonding interaction of adhesives to enamel depends not only on the morphological aspects of the dental surface, but also on the characteristics of the adhesive employed and the parameters of the laser.

  18. Effect of bur-cut dentin on bond strength using two all-in-one and one two-step adhesive systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koase, Kaori; Inoue, Satoshi; Noda, Mamoru; Tanaka, Toru; Kawamoto, Chiharu; Takahashi, Akiko; Nakaoki, Yasuko; Sano, Hidehiko

    2004-01-01

    To compare the microtensile bond strength (MTBS) of two all-in-one adhesive systems and one experimental two-step self-etching adhesive system to two types of bur-cut dentin. Using one of the three adhesives, Xeno CF Bond (Xeno), Prompt L-Pop (PL), or the experimental two-step system ABF (ABF), resin composite was bonded to flat buccal and root dentin surfaces of eight extracted human premolars. These surfaces were produced using either regular-grit or superfine-grit diamond burs. After storage overnight in 37 degrees C water, the bonded specimens were sectioned into six or seven slices approximately 0.7 mm thick perpendicular to the bonded surface. They were then subjected to microtensile testing. The surfaces of the fractured specimens were observed microscopically to determine the failure mode. In addition, to observe the effect of conditioning, the two types of bur-cut dentin surfaces were conditioned with the adhesives, rinsed with acetone, and observed with SEM. When Xeno and PL were bonded to dentin cut with a regular-grit diamond bur, MTBS values were lower than to superfine bur-cut dentin, and failures occurred adhesively at the interface, whereas the experimental two-step adhesive showed no significant difference in microtensile bond strength between two differently cut surfaces. The all-in-one adhesives tested here improved bond strengths when bonded to superfine bur-cut dentin as a substrate, whereas the experimental two-step adhesive system showed unchanged bonding to both regular and superfine bur-cut dentin surfaces.

  19. Preparation and study of new rubber to steel adhesive systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Labaj, I.; Ondrusova, D.; Dubec, A.; Pajtasova, M.; Kohutiar, M.

    2017-01-01

    The present paper deals with the preparation of new rubber to steel adhesive systems using the steel surface treatment by applying the adhesive coats based on Co (II) and Cu(II) salts. For demonstration of coats chemical composition EDX analysis was used. The topography and microstructure of prepared adhesive coats were investigated using Scanning Electron Microscopy. Finally the efficiency of adhesion between rubber blends and coated metal steel pieces was evaluated according to Test ASTM D429 Rubber to metal adhesion, method A. The adhesive strength resulting values of prepared steel samples with new adhesive coats were compared with samples covered with adhesive systems commonly used in industry. (authors)

  20. Microbial adhesion in flow displacement systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Busscher, HJ; van der Mei, HC

    Flow displacement systems are superior to many other (static) systems for studying microbial adhesion to surfaces because mass transport and prevailing shear conditions can be adequately controlled and notoriously ill-defined slight rinsing steps to remove so-called "loosely adhering organisms" can

  1. Systemic Inflammatory Response and Adhesion Molecules

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    L. V. Molchanova

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The lecture presents the materials of foreign studies on the mechanisms responsible for the formation of a systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS. The hypotheses accounting for the occurrence of SIRS in emergencies are described. Adhesion molecules (AM and endothelial dysfunction are apparent to be involved in the inflammatory process, no matter what the causes of SIRS are. The current classification of AM and adhesion cascades with altered blood flow is presented. There are two lines in the studies of AM. One line is to measure the concentration of AM in the plasma of patients with emergencies of various etiology. The other is to study the impact of antiadhesion therapy on the alleviation of the severity of terminal state and its outcome. The studies provide evidence for that an adhesive process is a peculiar prelude to a systemic inflammatory response.

  2. Effect of adhesive resin cements on bond strength of ceramic core materials to dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gundogdu, M; Aladag, L I

    2018-03-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effects of self-etch and self-adhesive resin cements on the shear bond strength of ceramic core materials bonded to dentin. Extracted, caries-free, human central maxillary incisor teeth were selected, and the vestibule surfaces were cut flat to obtain dentin surfaces. Ceramic core materials (IPS e.max Press and Prettau Zirconia) were luted to the dentin surfaces using three self-etch adhesive systems (Duo-Link, Panavia F 2.0, and RelyX Ultimate Clicker) and two self-adhesive resin systems (RelyX U200 Automix and Maxcem Elite). A shear bond strength test was performed using a universal testing machine. Failure modes were observed under a stereomicroscope, and bonding interfaces between the adhesive resin cements and the teeth were evaluated with a scanning electron microscope. Data were analyzed with Student's t-test and one-way analysis of variance followed by Tukey's test (α = 0.05). The type of adhesive resin cement significantly affected the shear bond strengths of ceramic core materials bonded to dentin (P materials when the specimens were luted with self-adhesive resin cements (P materials.

  3. Effect of glutaraldehyde and ferric sulfate on shear bond strength of adhesives to primary dentin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prabhakar A

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The present study was undertaken to evaluate the effect of alternative pulpotomy agents such as glutaraldehyde and ferric sulfate on the shear bond strength of self-etch adhesive systems to dentin of primary teeth. Materials and Methods: Eighty human primary molar teeth were sectioned in a mesiodistal direction and divided into experimental and control groups. Lingual dentin specimens in experimental groups were treated with glutaraldehyde and ferric sulfate. Buccal surfaces soaked in water served as control group. Each group was then divided into two groups based on the adhesive system used: Clearfil SE Bond and Adper Prompt L-Pop. A teflon mold was used to build the composite (Filtek Z-250 cylinders on the dentinal surface of all the specimens. Shear bond strength was tested for all the specimens with an Instron Universal Testing Machine. The failure mode analysis was performed with a Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM. Results: The results revealed that glutaraldehyde and ferric sulfate significantly reduced the shear bond strength of the tested adhesive systems to primary dentin. Clearfil SE Bond showed much higher shear bond strength than Adper Prompt L Pop to primary dentin. SEM analysis revealed a predominant cohesive failure mode for both adhesive systems. Conclusion: This study revealed that the pulpotomy medicaments glutaraldehyde and ferric sulfate adversely affected the bonding of self-etch adhesive systems to primary dentin.

  4. Advances in modeling and design of adhesively bonded systems

    CERN Document Server

    Kumar, S

    2013-01-01

    The book comprehensively charts a way for industry to employ adhesively bonded joints to make systems more efficient and cost-effective Adhesively bonded systems have found applications in a wide spectrum of industries (e.g., aerospace, electronics, construction, ship building, biomedical, etc.) for a variety of purposes. Emerging adhesive materials with improved mechanical properties have allowed adhesion strength approaching that of the bonded materials themselves. Due to advances in adhesive materials and the many potential merits that adhesive bonding offers, adhesive bonding has replac

  5. Influence of Blood Contamination During Multimode Adhesive ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives: The present study evaluated the effects of blood contamination performed at different steps of bonding on the microtensile bond strength (μTBS) of multimode adhesives to dentin when using the self-etch approach. Materials and Methods: Seventy-five molars were randomly assigned to three adhesive groups ...

  6. Effect of clearfil protect bond and transbond plus self-etch primer on shear bond strength of orthodontic brackets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Hamid Raji

    2011-01-01

    Conclusion: The shear bond strength of clearfil protect bond and transbond plus self-etch primer was enough for bonding the orthodontic brackets. The mode of failure of bonded brackets with these two self-etch primers is safe for enamel.

  7. In vivo evaluation of microleakage from composites with new dentine adhesives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koliniotou-Koumpia, E; Dionysopoulos, P; Koumpia, E

    2004-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate microleakage in V class composite restorations with total etch versus self-etching adhesives. Experiments were conducted in vivo and were also evaluated interfacial micromorphology. Forty class V cavities were prepared on the buccal surfaces of teeth in three healthy dogs. The cavities were randomly assigned into five groups of eight teeth and restored with one of the following adhesive systems: Etch and Prime 3.0/Definite flow/Definite, Prompt L-pop/Filtek flow/P-60, Admira bond/Admira Flow /Admira, Bond 1/Flow it/Alert, Stae/Wave/Glacier. After 60 days the animals were killed and the teeth were extracted. The teeth were then immersed in a solution of 0.5% basic fuchsin dye for 24 h, sectioned and scored for microleakage. Features of the tooth/restoration interfaces were also examined using Scanning electron microscopy. Student-Newman-Keuls and one-way anova revealed significance differences among the groups for overall wall scores (P < 0.05). The total-etch adhesives revealed significantly less microleakage scores than the self-etching adhesive systems tested. Wilcoxon Signed Ranks Test revealed significant differences between the occlusal and gingival microleakage scores for each adhesive restorative system, with the exception of Admira (P < 0.05).

  8. Influence of Application Time and Etching Mode of Universal Adhesives on Enamel Adhesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sai, Keiichi; Takamizawa, Toshiki; Imai, Arisa; Tsujimoto, Akimasa; Ishii, Ryo; Barkmeier, Wayne W; Latta, Mark A; Miyazaki, Masashi

    2018-01-01

    To investigate the influence of application time and etching mode of universal adhesives on enamel adhesion. Five universal adhesives, Adhese Universal, Bondmer Lightless, Clearfil Universal Bond Quick, G-Premio Bond, and Scotchbond Universal, were used. Bovine incisors were prepared and divided into four groups of ten teeth each. SBS, Ra, and SFE were determined after the following procedures: 1. self-etch mode with immediate air blowing after application (IA); 2. self-etch mode with prolonged application time (PA); 3. etch-and-rinse mode with IA; 4. etch-and-rinse mode with PA. After 24-h water storage, the bonded assemblies were subjected to shear bond strength (SBS) tests. For surface roughness (Ra) and surface free energy (SFE) measurements, the adhesives were simply applied to the enamel and rinsed with acetone and water before the measurements were carried out. Significantly higher SBS and Ra values were obtained with etch-and-rinse mode than with self-etch mode regardless of the application time or type of adhesive. Although most adhesives showed decreased SFE values with increased application time in self-etch mode, SFE values in etch-and-rinse mode were dependent on the adhesive type and application time. Etching mode, application time, and type of adhesive significantly influenced the SBS, Ra, and SFE values.

  9. Design and fabrication of polymer based dry adhesives inspired by the gecko adhesive system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Kejia

    There has been significant interest in developing dry adhesives mimicking the gecko adhesive system, which offers several advantages compared to conventional pressure sensitive adhesives. Specifically, gecko adhesive pads have anisotropic adhesion properties: the adhesive pads (spatulae) stick strongly when sheared in one direction but are non-adherent when sheared in the opposite direction. This anisotropy property is attributed to the complex topography of the array of fine tilted and curved columnar structures (setae) that bear the spatulae. In this thesis, easy, scalable methods, relying on conventional and unconventional techniques are presented to incorporate tilt in the fabrication of synthetic polymer-based dry adhesives mimicking the gecko adhesive system, which provide anisotropic adhesion properties. In the first part of the study, the anisotropic adhesion and friction properties of samples with various tilt angles to test the validity of a nanoscale tape-peeling model of spatular function are measured. Consistent with the Peel Zone model, samples with lower tilt angles yielded larger adhesion forces. Contact mechanics of the synthetic array were highly anisotropic, consistent with the frictional adhesion model and gecko-like. Based on the original design, a new design of gecko-like dry adhesives was developed which showed superior tribological properties and furthermore showed anisotropic adhesive properties without the need for tilt in the structures. These adhesives can be used to reversibly suspend weights from vertical surfaces (e.g., walls) and, for the first time to our knowledge, horizontal surfaces (e.g., ceilings) by simultaneously and judiciously activating anisotropic friction and adhesion forces. Furthermore, adhesion properties between artificial gecko-inspired dry adhesives and rough substrates with varying roughness are studied. The results suggest that both adhesion and friction forces on a rough substrate depends significantly on the

  10. Selective Acid Etching Improves the Bond Strength of Universal Adhesive to Sound and Demineralized Enamel of Primary Teeth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antoniazzi, Bruna Feltrin; Nicoloso, Gabriel Ferreira; Lenzi, Tathiane Larissa; Soares, Fabio Zovico Maxnuck; Rocha, Rachel de Oliveira

    To evaluate the influence of enamel condition and etching strategy on bond strength of a universal adhesive in primary teeth. Thirty-six primary molars were randomly assigned to six groups (n = 6) according to the enamel condition (sound [S] and demineralized [DEM]/cariogenic challenge by pH cycling prior to restorative procedures) and adhesive system (Scotchbond Universal Adhesive [SBU]) used in either etch-and-rinse (ER) or selfetching (SE) mode, with Clearfil SE Bond as the self-etching control. The adhesives were applied to flat enamel surfaces and composite cylinders (0.72 mm2) were built up. After 24-h storage in water, specimens were subjected to the microshear test. Bond strength (MPa) data were analyzed using two-way ANOVA and Tukey's post-hoc tests (α = 0.05). Significant differences were found considering the factors adhesive system (p = 0.003) and enamel condition (p = 0.001). Demineralized enamel negatively affected the bond strength, with μSBS values approximately 50% lower than those obtained for sound enamel. SBU performed better in etch-and-rinse mode, and the bond strength found for SBU applied in self-etching mode was similar to that of CSE. Enamel etching with phosphoric acid improves the bond strength of a universal adhesive system to primary enamel. Demineralized primary enamel results in lower bond strength.

  11. Effect of erosive challenges on deciduous teeth undergoing restorative procedures with different adhesive protocols - an in vitro study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assunção, Cristiane Meira; Goulart, Marcelo; Essvein, Tattiana Enrich; dos Santos, Nicole Marchioro; Erhardt, Maria Carolina Guilherme; Lussi, Adrian; Rodrigues, Jonas de Almeida

    2018-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective To evaluate the effect of erosive challenges on the tooth- restoration interface of deciduous teeth treated with different adhesive protocols. Material and Methods Deciduous molars were cut mesiodistally, then embedded, abraded and polished (n=80). Samples were randomly divided according to the adhesive system used into: G1 (Adper Single Bond2®, etch-and-rinse), G2 (Universal Single Bond®, self-etching), G3 (OptibondFL®, etch-and-rinse with Fluoride) and G4 (BondForce®, self-etching with Fluoride). After standardized cavity preparation (2 mm diameter x 2 mm depth), adhesive systems were applied and samples were restored (composite resin Z350®). Half of the samples were exposed to erosive/abrasive cycles (n = 10, each adhesive group), and the other half (control group; n = 10) remained immersed in artificial saliva. For microleakage analysis, samples were submersed in methylene blue and analyzed at 40x magnifications. Cross-sectional microhardness (CSMH) was carried out (50 g/5 s) at 25 μm, 50 μm, and 100 μm from the eroded surface and at 25 μm, 75 μm, and 125 μm from the enamel bond interface. Results Regarding microleakage, 7.5% of the samples showed no dye infiltration, 30% showed dye infiltration only at the enamel interface, and 62.5% showed dye infiltration through the dentin-enamel junction, with no difference between groups (p≥0.05). No significant difference was observed in CSMH at different depths (two-way ANOVA, p≥0.05). Conclusions We did not observe significant changes in microleakage or CSMH after erosive/abrasive challenges in deciduous teeth treated with different adhesive protocols (etch-and-rinse and self-etching adhesives, with and without fluoride). PMID:29364339

  12. Effect of erosive challenges on deciduous teeth undergoing restorative procedures with different adhesive protocols - an in vitro study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristiane Meira Assunção

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective: To evaluate the effect of erosive challenges on the tooth- restoration interface of deciduous teeth treated with different adhesive protocols. Material and Methods: Deciduous molars were cut mesiodistally, then embedded, abraded and polished (n=80. Samples were randomly divided according to the adhesive system used into: G1 (Adper Single Bond2®, etch-and-rinse, G2 (Universal Single Bond®, self-etching, G3 (OptibondFL®, etch-and-rinse with Fluoride and G4 (BondForce®, self-etching with Fluoride. After standardized cavity preparation (2 mm diameter x 2 mm depth, adhesive systems were applied and samples were restored (composite resin Z350®. Half of the samples were exposed to erosive/abrasive cycles (n = 10, each adhesive group, and the other half (control group; n = 10 remained immersed in artificial saliva. For microleakage analysis, samples were submersed in methylene blue and analyzed at 40x magnifications. Cross-sectional microhardness (CSMH was carried out (50 g/5 s at 25 μm, 50 μm, and 100 μm from the eroded surface and at 25 μm, 75 μm, and 125 μm from the enamel bond interface. Results: Regarding microleakage, 7.5% of the samples showed no dye infiltration, 30% showed dye infiltration only at the enamel interface, and 62.5% showed dye infiltration through the dentin-enamel junction, with no difference between groups (p≥0.05. No significant difference was observed in CSMH at different depths (two-way ANOVA, p≥0.05. Conclusions: We did not observe significant changes in microleakage or CSMH after erosive/abrasive challenges in deciduous teeth treated with different adhesive protocols (etch-and-rinse and self-etching adhesives, with and without fluoride.

  13. Effect of polymerization mode of two adhesive systems on push-out bond strength of fiber post to different regions of root canal dentin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahram Farzin Ebrahimi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: A few studies have investigated the effect of the activation mode of adhesive systems on bond strength of fiber posts to root canal dentin. This study investigated the push-out bond strengths of a glass fiber post to different root canal regions with the use of two adhesives with light- and dual-cure polymerization modes. Materials and Methods: In this in vitro study, 40 maxillary central incisors were decoronated at cement-enamel junction with 15 ± 1 mm root length. After root canal therapy and post space preparations, they were randomly divided into four groups. Post spaces were treated with four different adhesives: Excite, Excite Dual cure Single Component (DSC, self-etch adhesive (AdheSE, and AdheSE dual-cure. Then the fiber-reinforced composite (FRC post, Postec Plus, was cemented with dual-cure resin cement, Variolink II. The roots were cut into three 2-mm-thick slices. Push-out tests were performed with a universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min. The mode of failures was determined under a stereomicroscope. Data were analyzed by three-way analysis of variance (ANOVA and Tukey test was conducted to compare post hoc with P < 0.05 as the level of significance. Results: The highest bond strength was obtained for AdheSE dual-cure (15.54 ± 6.90 MPa and the lowest was obtained for Excite light-cure (10.07 ± 7.45 MPa and only the bond strength between these two adhesives had significant difference (P = 0.02. Bond strength decreased from the coronal to the apical in all groups and this was significant in Excite (group 1 and AdheSE (group 3 (P < 0.001. In apical regions, bond strength of dual-cure adhesives was significantly higher than light-cure adhesives (P < 0.001. Conclusion: Push-out bond strength of fiber post to different regions of root canal dentin was affected by both adhesive systems and their polymerization modes.

  14. Microleakage of three self-etch bonding agents in class 5 composite cavities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saeed Nemati Anaraki

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims: Microleakage is one of the most common problems in bonding systems, which cause different clinical shortcomings such as post operative sensitivity, marginal discoloration and pulp necrosis that can decrease those using bonding systems. The aim of this study was to compare the microleakage of three self etch bonding agents (generation 6 and 7 in class 5 composite cavities. Materials and Methods: In this experimental study, 30 facial class 5 cavities were prepared in 30 human premolar teeth which were freshly extracted for orthodontic purposes. Cl V cavities were prepared in 2*3*2 mm dimensions. Occlusal margins were in enamel and gingival ones in cementum and randomly divided into 3 groups of 10 each. Then the cavities were treated by clearhil SE Bond (Kuraray, Japan, G Bond (GC, Japan, and Opti Bond Solo Plus (Kerr, USA, according to the manufacturers’ insductions. Then the cavities were filled using Z100 resin composite. The specimens were then immersed in a 50% AgNo solution for 24 hrs. Then, the teeth were cut buccolingually to be evaluated for dye penetration with stereomicroscope. Data were analyzed using Kruskal-Wallis test. Results: This study revealed that Opti bond solo plus had type1 microleakage (dye penetration up to 1/3 of cavity in 80% of specimen, and type 4 microleakage (along axial wall in 10%. Clearfil SE bond had no leakage in 50%, type1 in 40% and type 2 (up to 2/3 of cavity in 10%. But there was no significant difference in the microleakage at the gingival margins between 3 groups (P>0.05. Conclusion: Clearfil SE Bond and G bond could prevent microleakage more effectively than that of Opti Bond Solo Plus on the occlusal margins. However, no difference in the microleakage on the gingival surfaces was found.

  15. Adhesion

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Supplements Videos & Tools Español You Are Here: Home → Medical Encyclopedia → Adhesion URL of this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/001493.htm Adhesion To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Adhesions are bands of scar-like tissue that form between two ...

  16. Leakage Testing for Different Adhesive Systems and Composites to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2015-11-16

    Nov 16, 2015 ... resin composite, the fifth group – two‑stage SE adhesive applied and cavities filled with ... KEYWORDS: Adhesives, composite, evaluation, leakage ... the glass ionomers. ... systems are realized in one or two clinical step(s).[5].

  17. Effect of Er,Cr:YSGG laser on the microtensile bond strength of two different adhesives to the sound and caries-affected dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ergücü, Z; Celik, E U; Unlü, N; Türkün, M; Ozer, F

    2009-01-01

    This study examined the effect of Er,Cr:YSGG laser irradiation on the microtensile bond strength (microTBS) of a three-step etch-and-rinse and a two-step self-etch adhesive to sound and caries-affected dentin. Sixteen freshly extracted human molars with occlusal dentin caries were used. The caries lesion was removed by one of the following methods: conventional treatment with burs or Er,Cr:YSGG laser (Waterlase MD, Biolase). The adhesive systems (AdheSE, Ivoclar Vivadent and Scotchbond Multi Purpose, 3M ESPE) were applied to the entire tooth surface according to the manufacturers' instructions. Resin composites were applied to the adhesive-treated dentin surfaces and light-cured. Each tooth was sectioned into multiple beams with the "non-trimming" version of the microtensile test. The specimens were subjected to microtensile forces (BISCO Microtensile Tester, BISCO). The data was analyzed by three-way ANOVA and independent t-tests (p=0.05). Er,Cr:YSGG laser irradiation exhibited similar microTBS values compared to that of conventional bur treatment, regardless of the adhesive system and type of treated dentin. The self-etch system revealed lower microTBS values, both with conventional and laser treatment techniques, compared to the etch-and-rinse adhesive in sound and caries-affected dentin (padhesive systems to sound and caries-affected dentin.

  18. Combined effect of smear layer characteristics and hydrostatic pulpal pressure on dentine bond strength of HEMA-free and HEMA-containing adhesives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahdan, Mohd Haidil Akmal; Nakajima, Masatoshi; Foxton, Richard M; Tagami, Junji

    2013-10-01

    This study evaluated the combined effect of smear layer characteristics with hydrostatic pulpal pressure (PP) on bond strength and nanoleakage expression of HEMA-free and -containing self-etch adhesives. Flat dentine surfaces were obtained from extracted human molars. Smear layers were created by grinding with #180- or #600-SiC paper. Three HEMA-free adhesives (Xeno V, G Bond Plus, Beautibond Multi) and two HEMA-containing adhesives (Bond Force, Tri-S Bond) were applied to the dentine surfaces under hydrostatic PP or none. Dentine bond strengths were determined using the microtensile bond test (μTBS). Data were statistically analyzed using three- and two-way ANOVA with Tukey post hoc comparison test. Nanoleakage evaluation was carried out under a scanning electron microscope (SEM). Coarse smear layer preparation and hydrostatic PP negatively affected the μTBS of HEMA-free and -containing adhesives, but there were no significant differences. The combined experimental condition significantly reduced μTBS of the HEMA-free adhesives, while the HEMA-containing adhesives exhibited no significant differences. Two-way ANOVA indicated that for HEMA-free adhesives, there were significant interactions in μTBS between smear layer characteristics and pulpal pressure, while for HEMA-containing adhesives, there were no significant interactions between them. Nanoleakage formation within the adhesive layers of both adhesive systems distinctly increased in the combined experimental group. The combined effect of coarse smear layer preparation with hydrostatic PP significantly reduced the μTBS of HEMA-free adhesives, while in HEMA-containing adhesives, these effects were not obvious. Smear layer characteristics and hydrostatic PP would additively compromise dentine bonding of self-etch adhesives, especially HEMA-free adhesives. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Enamel Bond Strength of New Universal Adhesive Bonding Agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLean, D E; Meyers, E J; Guillory, V L; Vandewalle, K S

    2015-01-01

    Universal bonding agents have been introduced for use as self-etch or etch-and-rinse adhesives depending on the dental substrate and clinician's preference. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the shear bond strength (SBS) of composite to enamel using universal adhesives compared to a self-etch adhesive when applied in self-etch and etch-and-rinse modes over time. Extracted human third molars were used to create 120 enamel specimens. The specimens were ground flat and randomly divided into three groups: two universal adhesives and one self-etch adhesive. Each group was then subdivided, with half the specimens bonded in self-etch mode and half in etch-and-rinse mode. The adhesives were applied as per manufacturers' instructions, and composite was bonded using a standardized mold and cured incrementally. The groups were further divided into two subgroups with 10 specimens each. One subgroup was stored for 24 hours and the second for six months in 37°C distilled water and tested in shear. Failure mode was also determined for each specimen. A three-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) found a significant difference between groups based on bonding agent (p0.05). Clearfil SE in etch-and-rinse and self-etch modes had more mixed fractures than either universal adhesive in either mode. Etching enamel significantly increased the SBS of composite to enamel. Clearfil SE had significantly greater bond strength to enamel than either universal adhesive, which were not significantly different from each other.

  20. Tensile bond strength of different adhesive systems to primary dentin treated by Er:YAG laser and conventional high-speed drill

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marques, Barbara A.; Navarro, Ricardo S.; Silvestre, Fellipe D.; Pinheiro, Sergio L.; Freitas, Patricia M.; Imparato, Jose Carlos P.; Oda, Margareth

    2005-03-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the tensile strength of different adhesive systems to primary tooth dentin prepared by high-speed drill and Er:YAG laser (2.94μm). Buccal surfaces of 38 primary canines were ground and flattened with sand paper disks (#120-600 grit) and distributed into five groups (n=15): G1: diamond bur in high-speed drill (HD)+ 35% phosphoric acid (PA)+Single Bond (SB); G2: HD+self-etching One Up Bond F (OUB);G3: Er:YAG laser (KaVo 3- LELO-FOUSP)(4Hz, 80mJ, 25,72J/cm2) (L)+PA+SB, G4: L+SB, G5: L+OUB. The inverted truncated cone samples built with Z-100 composite resin after storage in water (37°C/24h) were submitted to tensile bond strength test on Mini Instron 4442 (0.5mm/min, 500N). The data were analyzed with ANOVA and Tukey Test (pHD+PA+SB and HD+OUB (p=0.000), L+SB showed higher values than L+PA+SB and L+OUB (p=0.0311). Er:YAG laser radiation promoted significant increase of bond strength of different adhesive systems evaluated in the dentin of primary teeth.

  1. Micro-CT evaluation of internal adaptation in resin fillings with different dentin adhesives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seung-Hoon Han

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Objectives The purpose of present study was to evaluate the internal adaptation of composite restorations using different adhesive systems. Materials and Methods Typical class I cavities were prepared in 32 human third molars. The teeth were divided into the following four groups: 3-step etch-and-rinse, 2-step etch-and-rinse, 2-step self-etch and 1-step self-etch system were used. After the dentin adhesives were applied, composite resins were filled and light-cured in two layers. Then, silver nitrate solution was infiltrated, and all of the samples were scanned by micro-CT before and after thermo-mechanical load cycling. For each image, the length to which silver nitrate infiltrated, as a percentage of the whole pulpal floor length, was calculated (%SP. To evaluate the internal adaptation using conventional method, the samples were cut into 3 pieces by two sectioning at an interval of 1 mm in the middle of the cavity and they were dyed with Rhodamine-B. The cross sections of the specimens were examined by stereomicroscope. The lengths of the parts where actual leakage was shown were measured and calculated as a percentage of real leakage (%RP. The values for %SP and %RP were compared. Results After thermo-mechanical loading, all specimens showed significantly increased %SP compared to before thermo-mechanical loading and 1-step self-etch system had the highest %SP (p < 0.05. There was a tendency for %SP and %RP to show similar microleakage percentage depending on its sectioning. Conclusions After thermo-mechanical load cycling, there were differences in internal adaptation among the groups using different adhesive systems.

  2. Tensile bond strength of indirect composites luted with three new self-adhesive resin cements to dentin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cafer Türkmen

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The aims of this study were to evaluate the tensile bond strengths between indirect composites and dentin of 3 recently developed self-adhesive resin cements and to determine mode of failure by SEM. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Exposed dentin surfaces of 70 mandibular third molars were used. Teeth were randomly divided into 7 groups: Group 1 (control group: direct composite resin restoration (Alert with etch-and-rinse adhesive system (Bond 1 primer/adhesive, Group 2: indirect composite restoration (Estenia luted with a resin cement (Cement-It combined with the same etch-and-rinse adhesive, Group 3: direct composite resin restoration with self-etch adhesive system (Nano-Bond, Group 4: indirect composite restoration luted with the resin cement combined with the same self-etch adhesive, Groups 5-7: indirect composite restoration luted with self-adhesive resin cements (RelyX Unicem, Maxcem, and Embrace WetBond, respectively onto the non-pretreated dentin surfaces. Tensile bond strengths of groups were tested with a universal testing machine at a constant speed of 1 mm/min using a 50 kgf load cell. Results were statistically analyzed by the Student's t-test. The failure modes of all groups were also evaluated. RESULTS: The indirect composite restorations luted with the self-adhesive resin cements (groups 5-7 showed better results compared to the other groups (p0.05. The surfaces of all debonded specimens showed evidence of both adhesive and cohesive failure. CONCLUSION: The new universal self-adhesive resins may be considered an alternative for luting indirect composite restorations onto non-pretreated dentin surfaces.

  3. The effect of various adhesives, enamel etching, and base treatment on the failure frequency of customized lingual brackets: a randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mavreas, Dimitrios; Cuzin, Jean-François; Boonen, Guillaume; Vande Vannet, Bart

    2018-05-25

    The aim of this paper was to compare failure differences in precious metal customized lingual brackets bonded with three adhesive systems. Also, differences in failure of non-precious metal brackets with and without a silicatized base layer bonded with the same adhesive, as well as the influence of enamel etching prior to using a self-etching dual cure resin were explored. Five different groups were defined in a semi-randomized approach. Group 1 (IME): Maxcem Elite with 378 Incognito brackets and etched teeth, Group 2 (IMNE): Maxcem Elite with 193 Incognito brackets on non-etched teeth, Group 3 (INE): Nexus+Excite with 385 Incognito brackets, Group 4 (IRE): Relyx with 162 Incognito brackets, Group 5 (HRME) and Group 6 (HNRME): Maxcem Elite with 182 Harmony brackets with silicatized and non-slicatized bases respectively. Bracket failures were recorded over a 12-month period. The number of failures during the observation period was small in the various adhesives types of groups, as well as in HRME and HNRME groups, and the comparisons among those groups were non-significant (P > 0.05). A statistically significant difference (P brackets failure frequencies (rates) are not different for the three adhesive materials tested. 2. Eliminating the etching stage when using self-etch/self-adhesive adhesives, may lead to a dramatic increase in the failure rates. 3. Silicoating of stainless steel customized lingual brackets does not seem to influence the failure of the bonds.

  4. Two-year clinical performance of four adhesive strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salah Hasab Mahmoud

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To assess the clinical performance of four adhesive strategies; 3-step etch-and-rinse Adper Scotchbond Multi-Purpose (SM, 2-step etch-and-rinse (Adper Single Bond-2 [S2], 2-step self-etch Adper Scotchbond SE (SE and 1-step self-etch (Adper Single Bond Universal [SU]. Materials and Methods: Eighty cervical cavities exhibiting dentin carious lesions were used. Four adhesives from the same manufacturer (3M ESPE, St. Paul, MN, USA representing different bonding strategies were used; SM (3-step etch-and-rinse, Adper S2 (2-step etch-and-rinse, SE (2-step self-etch and SU (1-step self-etch. Cavities were restored with a nanohybrid composite resin (Z-350XT - 3M ESPE, St. Paul, MN, USA, and clinically followed up for 24 months using the modified United States Public Health Service criteria. Results: The outcome of Wilcoxon signed rank test showed no significant difference among the groups for each adhesive material at different evaluation periods (P > 0.05. Furthermore, the Friedman test revealed that there was no significant difference between all materials in all evaluation criteria, except for marginal discoloration at 24-month evaluation period. At 24-month evaluation period, teeth restored with self-etch adhesives showed more marginal staining. Conclusions: The four bonding strategies used in the current study showed an acceptable 2-year clinical performance.

  5. Bond durability of adhesives containing modified-monomer with/without-fluoride after aging in artificial saliva and under intrapulpal pressure simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Deeb, H A; Al Sherbiney, H H; Mobarak, E H

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate the dentin bond strength durability of adhesives containing modified-monomer with/without-fluoride after storage in artificial saliva and under intrapulpal pressure simulation (IPPS). The occlusal enamel of 48 freshly extracted teeth was trimmed to expose midcoronal dentin. Roots were sectioned to expose the pulp chamber and to connect the specimens to the pulpal-pressure assembly. Specimens were assigned into four groups (n=12) according to adhesive system utilized: a two-step etch-and-rinse adhesive system (SB, Adper Single Bond 2, 3M ESPE), a two-step self-etch adhesive system (CSE, Clearfil SE Bond, Kuraray Medical Inc), and two single-step self-etch adhesives with the same modified monomer (bis-acrylamide)-one with fluoride (AOF, AdheSE One F, Ivoclar-Vivadent) and the other without (AO, AdheSE One, Ivoclar-Vivadent). Bonding was carried out while the specimens were subjected to 15-mm Hg IPPS. Resin composite (Valux Plus, 3M ESPE) buildups were made. After curing, specimens were aged in artificial saliva and under 20-mm Hg IPPS at 37°C in a specially constructed incubator either for 24 hours or six months prior to testing. Bonded specimens (n=6/group) were sectioned into sticks (n=24/group) with a cross section of 0.9 ± 0.01 mm(2) and subjected to microtensile bond strength (μTBS) testing using a universal testing machine. Data were statistically analyzed using two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) with repeated measures, one-way ANOVA tests, and a t-test (partificial saliva and under IPPS, yet these values remained significantly higher than those for the other two adhesives with modified monomers. There was no significant difference in the bond strength values between fluoride-containing and fluoride-free self-etch adhesive systems (AOF and AO) after 24 hours or six months. Modes of failure were mainly adhesive and mixed. Based on the results of this study, 1) Fluoride addition did not affect dentin bond durability; and 2) despite the fact that

  6. Influence of Conditioning Time of Universal Adhesives on Adhesive Properties and Enamel-Etching Pattern.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardenas, A M; Siqueira, F; Rocha, J; Szesz, A L; Anwar, M; El-Askary, F; Reis, A; Loguercio, A

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the effect of application protocol in resin-enamel microshear bond strength (μSBS), in situ degree of conversion, and etching pattern of three universal adhesive systems. Sixty-three extracted third molars were sectioned in four parts (buccal, lingual, and proximals) and divided into nine groups, according to the combination of the main factors-Adhesive (Clearfil Universal, Kuraray Noritake Dental Inc, Tokyo, Japan; Futurabond U, VOCO, Cuxhaven, Germany; and Scotchbond Universal Adhesive, 3M ESPE, St Paul, MN, USA)-and enamel treatment/application time (etch-and-rinse mode [ER], self-etch [SE] application for 20 seconds [SE20], and SE application for 40 seconds [SE40]). Specimens were stored in water (37°C/24 h) and tested at 1.0 mm/min (μSBS). The degree of conversion of the adhesives at the resin-enamel interfaces was evaluated using micro-Raman spectroscopy. The enamel-etching pattern was evaluated under a scanning electron microscope. Data were analyzed with two-way analysis of variance and Tukey test (α=0.05). In general, the application of the universal adhesives in the SE40 produced μSBS and degree of conversion that were higher than in the SE20 (puniversal adhesives in the SE mode may be a viable alternative to increase the degree of conversion, etching pattern, and resin-enamel bond strength.

  7. Microshear bond strength of resin composite to teeth affected by molar hypomineralization using 2 adhesive systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    William, Vanessa; Burrow, Michael F; Palamara, Joseph E A; Messer, Louise B

    2006-01-01

    When restoring hypomineralized first permanent molars, placement of cavo-surface margins can be difficult to ascertain due to uncertainty of the bonding capability of the tooth surface. The purpose of this study was to investigate the adhesion of resin composite bonded to control and hypomineralized enamel with an all-etch single-bottle adhesive or self-etching primer adhesive. Specimens of control enamel (N=44) and hypomineralized enamel (N=45) had a 0.975-mm diameter composite rod (Filtek Supreme Universal Restorative) bonded with either 3M ESPE Single Bond or Clearfil SE Bond following manufacturers' instructions. Specimens were stressed in shear at 1 mm/min to failure (microshear bond strength). Etched enamel surfaces and enamel-adhesive interfaces were examined under scanning electron microscopy. The microshear bond strength (MPa) of resin composite bonded to hypomineralized enamel was significantly lower than for control enamel (3M ESPE Single Bond=7.08 +/- 4.90 vs 16.27 +/- 10.04; Clearfil SE Bond=10.39 +/- 7.56 vs 19.63 +/- 7.42; P=.001). Fractures were predominantly adhesive in control enamel and cohesive in hypomineralized enamel. Scotchbond etchant produced deep interprismatic and intercrystal porosity in control enamel and shallow etch patterns with minimal intercrystal porosity in hypomineralized enamel. Control enamel appeared almost unaffected by SE Primer; hypomineralized enamel showed shallow etching. The hypomineralized enamel-adhesive interface was porous with cracks in the enamel. The control enamel-adhesive interface displayed a hybrid layer of even thickness. The microshear bond strength of resin composite bonded to hypomineralized enamel was significantly lower than for control enamel. This was supported by differences seen in etch patterns and at the enamel-adhesive interface.

  8. In vivo effect of a self-etching primer on dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milia, E; Lallai, M R; García-Godoy, F

    1999-08-01

    To determine the ultrastructural aspects of the dentin collagen area in the cavity preparation floor produced in vivo after phosphoric acid acid-etching or after using Clearfil Liner Bond 2 self-etching primer (LB2 Primer). Twenty-four non-carious third molars scheduled for extraction from young adult patients (16-30 years old) were used. Conventional Class I cavities (+/- 2 mm deep) were prepared on the occlusal surfaces of all teeth using a cylindrical diamond bur on a high-speed handpiece with copious water spray. To avoid dehydration of the dentin, the smear layer-covered dentin was briefly air-dried for 2 seconds. Cavities were assigned at random to the following groups: Group A: Dentin etched for 15 seconds with 34% phosphoric acid, rinsed for 20 seconds and then briefly air-dried for 2 seconds with oil-free compressed air leaving the surfaces slightly moist. Group B: LB2 Primer was applied to the cavity surfaces for 30 seconds and then briefly air-dried to remove the solvent. Group C: The untreated dentin smear layer was used as a control. In all three groups, the cavities were filled incrementally with a resin-based composite (APX), light curing every increment for 40 seconds. After 30 minutes, the teeth were extracted atraumatically and the samples immediately prepared for evaluation with the transmission electron microscope. The use of a self-etching primer did not produce significant morphological changes in the moist dentin substrate. Adverse morphological conditions where observed when there was an excess water on the dentin surface. Phosphoric acid altered the collagen more severely than the self-etching primer.

  9. pKa value and buffering capacity of acidic monomers commonly used in self-etching primers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salz, Ulrich; Mücke, Angela; Zimmermann, Jörg; Tay, Franklin R; Pashley, David H

    2006-06-01

    The aim of this investigation was to characterize acidic monomers used in self-etching primers/adhesives by determination of their pKa values and by calculation of their calcium dissolving capacity in comparison with phosphoric and hydrochloric acid. The following acidic monomers were included in this study: 4-methacryloyloxyethyl trimellitate anhydride (4-META), 10-methacryloyloxydecyl dihydrogen phosphate (MDP), dimethacryloyloxyethyl hydrogen phosphate (di-HEMA-phosphate), ethyl 2-[4-(dihydroxyphosphoryl)-2-oxabutyl]acrylate (EAEPA), 2-[4-(dihydroxyphosphoryl)-2-ox-abutyl]acrylic acid (HAEPA), and 2,4,6 trimethylphenyl 2-[4-(dihydroxyphosphoryl)-2-oxabutyl]acrylate (MAEPA). The pKa values were obtained by titration with 0.1 mol/l NaOH in aqueous solution. The inflection points of the resulting potentiometric titration curve were determined as pKa values. In the case of the sparingly water-soluble acidic monomers MAEPA and 4-META, the co-solvent method using different water/ethanol ratios for MAEPA or water/acetone ratios for 4-META was used. The dissolving capacity of each acidic monomer is defined as the amount of hydroxyapatite (HA) dissolved by 1 g of acid. For each monomer, the HA dissolving capacity was calculated bythe corresponding pKa value and the molecular weight. To confirm the calculated dissolving capacities, increasing amounts of HA powder (100 mg portions) were slowly added to 15 mmol/l aqueous solutions of the monomers to determine how much HA could be dissolved in the acidic solutions. For all the investigated acidic monomers, pKal values between 1.7 to 2.5 were observed. The pKa2 values for the phosphate/phosphonate derivatives are between 7.0 and 7.3, and are comparable to phosphoric acid. For dicarboxylic acid derivatives, the pKa2 values are in the range of 4.2 to 4.5. Due to their comparable molecular weights and pKal values, the three tested acids di-HEMA phosphate, MDP and 4-META all possess comparable dissolving capacities for HA (ie, 0

  10. Shear bond strength of composite bonded with three adhesives to Er,Cr:YSGG laser-prepared enamel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Türkmen, Cafer; Sazak-Oveçoğlu, Hesna; Günday, Mahir; Güngör, Gülşad; Durkan, Meral; Oksüz, Mustafa

    2010-06-01

    To assess in vitro the shear bond strength of a nanohybrid composite resin bonded with three adhesive systems to enamel surfaces prepared with acid and Er,Cr:YSGG laser etching. Sixty extracted caries- and restoration-free human maxillary central incisors were used. The teeth were sectioned 2 mm below the cementoenamel junction. The crowns were embedded in autopolymerizing acrylic resin with the labial surfaces facing up. The labial surfaces were prepared with 0.5-mm reduction to receive composite veneers. Thirty specimens were etched with Er,Cr:YSGG laser. This group was also divided into three subgroups, and the following three bonding systems were then applied on the laser groups and the other three unlased groups: (1) 37% phosphoric acid etch + Bond 1 primer/adhesive (Pentron); (2) Nano-bond self-etch primer (Pentron) + Nano-bond adhesive (Pentron); and (3) all-in-one adhesive-single dose (Futurabond NR, Voco). All of the groups were restored with a nanohybrid composite resin (Smile, Pentron). Shear bond strength was measured with a Zwick universal test device with a knife-edge loading head. The data were analyzed with two-factor ANOVA. There were no significant differences in shear bond strength between self-etch primer + adhesive and all-in-one adhesive systems for nonetched and laser-etched enamel groups (P > .05). However, bond strength values for the laser-etched + Bond 1 primer/adhesive group (48.00 +/- 13.86 MPa) were significantly higher than the 37% phosphoric acid + Bond 1 primer/adhesive group (38.95 +/- 20.07 MPa) (P enamel surface more effectively than 37% phosphoric acid for subsequent attachment of composite material.

  11. The effect of water on the gecko adhesive system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stark, Alyssa Yeager

    The gecko adhesive system is a dry, reversible adhesive that is virtually surface-insensitive due to the utilization of intermolecular van der Waals forces. Remarkably, although detailed models of the adhesive mechanism exist and hundreds of gecko-inspired synthetics have been fabricated, our ability to fully replicate the system still falls short. One reason for this is our limited understanding of how the system performs in natural environments. To begin to resolve this I focused on one particular environmental parameter, water. Although thin layers of water can disrupt van der Waals forces, I hypothesized that geckos are able to retain or regain adhesive function on wet surfaces. I was motivated to investigate this hypothesis because many species of gecko are native to the tropics, a climate where we expect surface water to be prevalent, thus it is likely geckos have some mechanism to overcome the challenges associated with surface water and wetting. Despite the challenge water should pose to adhesion, I found that when tested on hydrophobic substrates geckos cling equally well in air and water. Conversely, on wet hydrophilic substrates geckos cannot support their body weight. Investigating these results further, I found that the superhydrophobic nature of the adhesive toe pads allows geckos to form an air bubble around their foot, which when pressed into contact with a hydrophobic substrate likely removes water from the adhesive interface. When the toe pads are no longer superhydrophobic however, geckos cannot support their body weight and fall from substrates. In order to regain adhesion geckos only need to take about ten steps on a dry substrate to self-dry their toe pads. Finally, when measuring a dynamic component of adhesion, running, we found that geckos are able to maintain speed on misted hydrophobic and hydrophilic substrates, contrary to what we would predict based on static shear adhesion measurements. In conclusion, my research provides a detailed

  12. Protective Effect of Adhesive Systems associated with Neodymium-doped Yttrium Aluminum Garnet Laser on Enamel Erosive/Abrasive Wear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crastechini, Erica; Borges, Alessandra B; Becker, Klaus; Attin, Thomas; Torres, Carlos Rg

    2017-10-01

    This study evaluated the efficacy of self-etching adhesive systems associated or not associated with the neodymium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet (Nd:YAG) laser on the protection against enamel erosive/abrasive wear. Bovine enamel specimens were demineralized with 0.3% citric acid (5 minutes). The samples were randomly assigned to eight groups (n = 20): SB - Single Bond Universal (3M/ESPE); SB+L - Single Bond Universal + laser (80 mJ/10 Hz); FB - Futurabond U (Voco); FB+L -Futurabond U + laser; GEN - G-aenial bond (GC); GEN+L -G-aenial bond + laser; L - laser irradiation; and C - no treatment. The laser was applied before light curing. The samples were subjected to erosive/abrasive challenges (0.3% citric acid - 2 minutes and tooth brushing four times daily for 5 days). Enamel surface loss was recovered profilometrically by comparison of baseline and final profiles. The adhesive layer thickness, retention percentage of the protective layer, and microhardness of cured adhesive were measured. Data were analyzed using one-way analysis of variance and Tukey's test (5%). There were significant differences for all parameters (p = 0.0001). Mean values ± SD and results of the Tukey's test were: Surface wear: GEN - 4.88 (±1.09)a, L - 5.04 ± 0.99)a, FB - 5.32 (±0.93)ab, GEN + L - 5.46 (±1.27)abc, SB + L - 5.78 (±1.12)abc, FB + L - 6.23 (±1.25)bc, SB - 6.35 (±1.11)c, and C - 6.46 (±0.61)c; layer thickness: GEN - 15.2 (±8.63)c, FB - 5.06 (±1.96)a, GEN + L - 13.96 (±7.07)bc, SB + L - 4.24 (±2.68)a, FB + L - 9.03 (±13.02)abc, and SB - 7.49 (±2.80)ab; retention: GEN - 68.89 (±20.62)c, FB - 54.53 (±24.80)abc, GEN + L - 59.90 (±19.79)abc, SB + L - 63.37 (±19.30)bc, FB + L - 42.23 (±17.68) a, and SB - 47.78 (±18.29)ab; microhardness: GEN - 9.27 (±1.75)c; FB - 6.99 (±0.89)b; GEN + L - 6.22 (±0.87)ab; SB + L - 15.48 (±2.51)d; FB + L - 10.67 (±1.58)c; SB - 5.00 (±1.60)a. The application of Futurabond U and G-aenial bond on enamel surface, as well as the Nd

  13. Controlled, prospective, randomized, clinical split-mouth evaluation of partial ceramic crowns luted with a new, universal adhesive system/resin cement: results after 18 months.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogl, Vanessa; Hiller, Karl-Anton; Buchalla, Wolfgang; Federlin, Marianne; Schmalz, Gottfried

    2016-12-01

    A new universal adhesive with corresponding luting composite was recently marketed which can be used both, in a self-etch or in an etch-and-rinse mode. In this study, the clinical performance of partial ceramic crowns (PCCs) inserted with this adhesive and the corresponding luting material used in a self-etch or selective etch approach was compared with a self-adhesive universal luting material. Three PCCs were placed in a split-mouth design in 50 patients. Two PCCs were luted with a combination of a universal adhesive/resin cement (Scotchbond Universal/RelyX Ultimate, 3M ESPE) with (SB+E)/without (SB-E) selective enamel etching. Another PCC was luted with a self-adhesive resin cement (RelyX Unicem 2, 3M ESPE). Forty-eight patients were evaluated clinically according to FDI criteria at baseline and 6, 12 and 18 months. For statistical analyses, the chi-square test (α = 0.05) and Kaplan-Meier analysis were applied. Clinically, no statistically significant differences between groups were detected over time. Within groups, clinically significant increase for criterion "marginal staining" was detected for SB-E over 18 months. Kaplan-Meier analysis revealed significantly higher retention rates for SB+E (97.8 %) and SB-E (95.6 %) in comparison to RXU2 (75.6 %). The 18-month clinical performance of a new universal adhesive/composite combination showed no differences with respect to bonding strategy and may be recommended for luting PCCs. Longer-term evaluation is needed to confirm superiority of SB+E over SB-E. At 18 months, the new multi-mode adhesive, Scotchbond Universal, showed clinically reliable results when used for luting PCCs.

  14. In-vitro transdentinal diffusion of monomers from adhesives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putzeys, Eveline; Duca, Radu Corneliu; Coppens, Lieve; Vanoirbeek, Jeroen; Godderis, Lode; Van Meerbeek, Bart; Van Landuyt, Kirsten L

    2018-06-01

    Biocompatibility of adhesives is important since adhesives may be applied on dentin near the pulp. Accurate knowledge of the quantity of monomers reaching the pulp is important to determine potential side effects. The aim of this study was to assess the transdentinal diffusion of residual monomers from dental adhesive systems using an in-vitro pulp chamber model. Dentin disks with a thickness of 300 µm were produced from human third molars. These disks were fixed between two open-ended glass tubes, representing an in-vitro pulp chamber. The etch-and-rinse adhesive OptiBond FL and the self-etch adhesive Clearfil SE Bond were applied to the dentin side of the disks, while on in the pulpal side, the glass tube was filled with 600 µL water. The transdentinal diffusion of different monomers was quantified using ultra-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. The monomers HEMA, CQ, BisGMA, GPDM, 10-MDP and UDMA eluted from the dental materials and were able to diffuse through the dentin disks to a certain extent. Compounds with a lower molecular weight (uncured group: HEMA 7850 nmol and CQ 78.2 nmol) were more likely to elute and diffuse compared to monomers with a higher molecular weight (uncured group: BisGMA 0.42 nmol). When the adhesives were left uncured, diffusion was up to 10 times higher compared to the cured conditions. This in-vitro research resulted in the quantification of various monomers able to diffuse through dentin and therefore contributes to a more detailed understanding about the potential exposure of the dental pulp to monomers from dental adhesives. Biocompatibility of adhesives is important since adhesives may be applied on dentin near the pulp, where tubular density and diameter are greatest. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  15. Bond strength of adhesive systems to human tooth enamel Resistência adesiva de sistemas adesivos ao esmalte dentário humano

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thaís Cachuté Paradella

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to evaluate in vitro three adhesive systems: a total etching single-component system (G1 Prime & Bond 2.1, a self-etching primer (G2 Clearfil SE Bond, and a self-etching adhesive (G3 One Up Bond F, through shear bond strength to enamel of human teeth, evaluating the type of fracture through stereomicroscopy, following the ISO guidance on adhesive testing. Thirty sound premolars were bisected mesiodistally and the buccal and lingual surfaces were embedded in acrylic resin, polished up to 600-grit sandpapers, and randomly assigned to three experimental groups (n = 20. Composite resin cylinders were added to the tested surfaces. The specimens were kept in distilled water (37°C/24 h, thermocycled for 500 cycles (5°C-55°C and submitted to shear testing at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min. The type of fracture was analyzed under stereomicroscopy and the data were submitted to Anova, Tukey and Chi-squared (5% statistical analyses. The mean adhesive strengths were G1: 18.13 ± 6.49 MPa, (55% of resin cohesive fractures; G2: 17.12 ± 5.80 MPa (90% of adhesive fractures; and G3: 10.47 ± 3.14 MPa (85% of adhesive fractures. In terms of bond strength, there were no significant differences between G1 and G2, and G3 was significantly different from the other groups. G1 presented a different type of fracture from that of G2 and G3. In conclusion, although the total etching and self-etching systems presented similar shear bond strength values, the types of fracture presented by them were different, which can have clinical implications.O objetivo deste estudo foi avaliar in vitro três sistemas adesivos: um monocomponente com condicionamento ácido total (G1 Prime & Bond 2.1, um "primer" autocondicionante (G2 Clearfil SE Bond e um adesivo autocondicionante (G3 One Up Bond F, através de resistência ao cisalhamento ao esmalte de dentes humanos, avaliando o tipo de fratura por estereomicroscopia, seguindo as normas ISO para testes

  16. Performance of a new one-step multi-mode adhesive on etched vs non-etched enamel on bond strength and interfacial morphology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Goes, Mario Fernando; Shinohara, Mirela Sanae; Freitas, Marcela Santiago

    2014-06-01

    To compare microtensile bond strength (μTBS) and interfacial morphology of a new one-step multimode adhesive with a two-step self-etching adhesive and two etch-and-rinse adhesives systems on enamel. Thirty human third molars were sectioned to obtain two enamel fragments. For μTBS, 48 enamel surfaces were ground using 600-grit SiC paper and randomly assigned into 6 groups (n = 8): nonetched Scotchbond Universal [SBU]; etched SBU [SBU-et]; non-etched Clearfil SE Bond [CSE]; etched CSE [CSE-et]; Scotchbond Multi-PURPOSE [SBMP]; Excite [EX]. The etched specimens were conditioned with 37% phosphoric acid for 30 s, each adhesive system was applied according to manufacturers' instructions, and composite resin blocks (Filtek Supreme Plus, 3M ESPE) were incrementally built up. Specimens were sectioned into beams with a cross-sectional area of 0.8-mm2 and tested under tension (1 mm/min). The data were analyzed with oneway ANOVA and Fisher's PLSD (α = 0.05). For interface analysis, two samples from each group were embedded in epoxy resin, polished, and then observed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The μTBS values (in MPa) and the standard deviations were: SBU = 27.4 (8.5); SBU-et = 33.6 (9.3); CSE = 28.5 (8.3); CSE-et = 34.2 (9.0); SBMP = 30.4 (11.0); EX = 23.3 (8.2). CSE-et and SBU-et presented the highest bond strength values, followed by SBMP, CSE, and SBU which did not differ significantly from each other. EX showed the statistically significantly lowest bond strength values. SEM images of interfaces from etched samples showed long adhesive-resin tags penetrating into demineralized enamel. Preliminary etching of enamel significantly increased bond strength for the new one-step multimode adhesive SBU and two-step self-etching adhesive CSE.

  17. Self-etching ceramic primer versus hydrofluoric acid etching: Etching efficacy and bonding performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Damanhoury, Hatem M; Gaintantzopoulou, Maria D

    2018-01-01

    This study assessed the effect of pretreatment of hybrid and glass ceramics using a self-etching primer on the shear bond strength (SBS) and surface topography, in comparison to pretreatment with hydrofluoric acid and silane. 40 rectangular discs from each ceramic material (IPS e.max CAD;EM, Vita Mark II;VM, Vita Enamic;VE), were equally divided (n=10) and assigned to one of four surface pretreatment methods; etching with 4.8% hydrofluoric acid followed by Monobond plus (HFMP), Monobond etch & prime (Ivoclar Vivadent) (MEP), No treatment (NT) as negative control and Monobond plus (Ivoclar Vivadent) with no etching (MP) as positive control. SBS of resin cement (Multilink-N, Ivoclar Vivadent) to ceramic surfaces was tested following a standard protocol. Surface roughness was evaluated using an Atomic force microscope (AFM). Surface topography and elemental analysis were analyzed using SEM/EDX. Data were analyzed with two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and post-hoc Bonferroni test at a significance level of α=0.05. Pretreatment with HFMP resulted in higher SBS and increased surface roughness in comparison to MEP and MP. Regardless the method of surface pretreatment, the mean SBS values of EM ceramic was significantly higher (pceramics for resin-luting cementation. Copyright © 2017 Japan Prosthodontic Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Adhesion of resin composite core materials to dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Keefe, K L; Powers, J M

    2001-01-01

    This study determined (1) the effect of polymerization mode of resin composite core materials and dental adhesives on the bond strength to dentin, and (2) if dental adhesives perform as well to dentin etched with phosphoric acid as to dentin etched with self-etching primer. Human third molars were sectioned 2 mm from the highest pulp horn and polished. Three core materials (Fluorocore [dual cured], Core Paste [self-cured], and Clearfil Photo Core [light cured]) and two adhesives (Prime & Bond NT Dual Cure and Clearfil SE Bond [light cured]) were bonded to dentin using two dentin etching conditions. After storage, specimens were debonded in microtension and bond strengths were calculated. Scanning electron micrographs of representative bonding interfaces were analyzed. Analysis showed differences among core materials, adhesives, and etching conditions. Among core materials, dual-cured Fluorocore had the highest bond strengths. There were incompatibilities between self-cured Core Paste and Prime & Bond NT in both etched (0 MPa) and nonetched (3.0 MPa) dentin. Among adhesives, in most cases Clearfil SE Bond had higher bond strengths than Prime & Bond NT and bond strengths were higher to self-etched than to phosphoric acid-etched dentin. Scanning electron micrographs did not show a relationship between resin tags and bond strengths. There were incompatibilities between a self-cured core material and a dual-cured adhesive. All other combinations of core materials and adhesives produced strong in vitro bond strengths both in the self-etched and phosphoric acid-etched conditions.

  19. Microleakage of different adhesive systems in primary molars ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background and aim: This study aimed to examine the microleakage of class V cavities of primary molars prepared by either a conventional dental bur or Er:YAG laser and one of two different adhesive systems. Methods: A total of 50 tooth samples from primary molars were used in this study. They were randomly assigned ...

  20. Pharmacology of cell adhesion molecules of the nervous system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kiryushko, Darya; Bock, Elisabeth; Berezin, Vladimir

    2007-01-01

    Cell adhesion molecules (CAMs) play a pivotal role in the development and maintenance of the nervous system under normal conditions. They also are involved in numerous pathological processes such as inflammation, degenerative disorders, and cancer, making them attractive targets for drug...

  1. Influence of previous acid etching on bond strength of universal adhesives to enamel and dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, Carlos Rocha Gomes; Zanatta, Rayssa Ferreira; Silva, Tatiane Josefa; Huhtala, Maria Filomena Rocha Lima; Borges, Alessandra Bühler

    2017-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of acid pretreatment on the bond strength of composite resin bonded to enamel and dentin with 2 different universal self-etching adhesives. The null hypothesis was that the acid treatment performed prior to adhesive application would not significantly change the bond strength to enamel or dentin for either universal adhesive tested. A sample of 112 bovine incisors were selected and embedded in acrylic resin. Half were ground until a flat enamel surface was obtained, and the other half were polished until a 6 × 6-mm area of dentin was exposed, resulting into 2 groups (n = 56). The enamel and dentin groups were divided into 2 subgroups according to the adhesive system applied: Futurabond U or Scotchbond Universal. Each of these subgroups was divided into 2 additional subgroups (n = 14); 1 subgroup received phosphoric acid pretreatment, and 1 subgroup did not. The bond strength was assessed with a microtensile test. Data from enamel and dentin specimens were analyzed separately using 1-way analysis of variance. The acid pretreatment did not significantly change the bond strength of the adhesives tested, either to enamel (P = 0.4161) or to dentin (P = 0.4857). The acid etching pretreatment did not affect the bond strength to dentin and enamel when the tested universal multipurpose adhesive systems were used.

  2. Effect of Dentin Wetness on the Bond Strength of Universal Adhesives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ji-Hye; Son, Sung-Ae; Jung, Kyoung-Hwa; Kwon, Yong Hoon

    2017-01-01

    The effects of dentin wetness on the bond strength and adhesive interface morphology of universal adhesives have been investigated using micro-tensile bond strength (μTBS) testing and confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). Seventy-two human third molars were wet ground to expose flat dentin surfaces. They were divided into three groups according to the air-drying time of the dentin surfaces: 0 (without air drying), 5, and 10 s. The dentin surfaces were then treated with three universal adhesives: G-Premio Bond, Single Bond Universal, and All-Bond Universal in self-etch or etch-and-rinse mode. After composite build up, a μTBS test was performed. One additional tooth was prepared for each group by staining the adhesives with 0.01 wt % of Rhodamine B fluorescent dye for CLSM analysis. The data were analyzed statistically using ANOVA and Tukey’s post hoc tests (α = 0.05). Two-way ANOVA showed significant differences among the adhesive systems and dentin moisture conditions. An interaction effect was also observed (p adhesives. PMID:29068404

  3. Effect of Dentin Wetness on the Bond Strength of Universal Adhesives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    An-Na Choi

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The effects of dentin wetness on the bond strength and adhesive interface morphology of universal adhesives have been investigated using micro-tensile bond strength (μTBS testing and confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM. Seventy-two human third molars were wet ground to expose flat dentin surfaces. They were divided into three groups according to the air-drying time of the dentin surfaces: 0 (without air drying, 5, and 10 s. The dentin surfaces were then treated with three universal adhesives: G-Premio Bond, Single Bond Universal, and All-Bond Universal in self-etch or etch-and-rinse mode. After composite build up, a μTBS test was performed. One additional tooth was prepared for each group by staining the adhesives with 0.01 wt % of Rhodamine B fluorescent dye for CLSM analysis. The data were analyzed statistically using ANOVA and Tukey’s post hoc tests (α = 0.05. Two-way ANOVA showed significant differences among the adhesive systems and dentin moisture conditions. An interaction effect was also observed (p < 0.05. One-way ANOVA showed that All-Bond Universal was the only material influenced by the wetness of the dentin surfaces. Wetness of the dentin surface is a factor influencing the micro-tensile bond strength of universal adhesives.

  4. Comparison of shear bond strength of universal adhesives on etched and nonetched enamel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beltrami, Riccardo; Chiesa, Marco; Scribante, Andrea; Allegretti, Jessica; Poggio, Claudio

    2016-04-06

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of surface pretreatment with 37% phosphoric acid on the enamel bond strength of different universal adhesives. One hundred and sixty bovine permanent mandibular incisors freshly extracted were used as a substitute for human teeth. The materials tested in this study included 6 universal adhesives, and 2 self-etch adhesives as control. The teeth were assigned into 2 groups: In the first group, etching was performed using 37% phosphoric acid for 30 seconds. In the second group, no pretreatment agent was applied. After adhesive application, a nanohybrid composite resin was inserted into the enamel surface by packing the material into cylindrical-shaped plastic matrices. After storing, the specimens were placed in a universal testing machine. The normality of the data was calculated using the Kolmogorov-Smirnov test. Analysis of variance (ANOVA) was applied to determine whether significant differences in debond strength values existed among the various groups. Groups with phosphoric acid pretreatment showed significantly higher shear bond strength values than groups with no enamel pretreatment (p<0.001). No significant variation in shear strength values was detected when comparing the different adhesive systems applied onto enamel after orthophosphoric acid application (p>0.05). All adhesives provide similar bond strength values when enamel pretreatment is applied even if compositions are different. Bond strength values are lower than promised by manufacturers.

  5. Efficacy of Hydrophobic Layer On Sealing Ability of Dentin Adhesive Systems in Class V Composite Resin Restorations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatemeh Maleknejad

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Background and aims. Adhesive permeability is hindered by application of an additional layer of hydrophobic resin, which increases its concentration within the hydrophilic layer, reduces its affinity to water, and enhances its physical properties. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of a hydrophobic layer on the microleakage of class V composite restorations using different adhesives. Materials and methods. The adhesives including total-etch Scotchbond MP and Single Bond, and the self-etch Clearfil SE Bond and Clearfil S3 Bond were applied to 80 class V cavities in vitro on the buccal surface in CEJ and then were followed by hydrophobic resin (Margin Bond in half of the cavities in each group (n=10. After restoration with microhybrid composite, Z100 and immersion in fuchsine, the degree of microleakage was assessed. Data were analyzed using the Kruskal-Wallis, Man-Whitney, and Wilcoxon tests. Results. The hydrophobic layer significantly reduced the microleakage of Clearfil SE Bond and Clearfil S3 Bond only in dentin (p0.05. Conclusion. Within the limitation of this study, only Clearfil S3 Bond could demonstrate the identical values of microleakage in enamel and dentinal margins.

  6. Survival of self-etch adhesive Class II composite restorations using ART and conventional cavity preparations in primary molars.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eden, E.; Topaloglu-Ak, A.; Frencken, J.E.F.M.; Hof, M.A. van 't

    2006-01-01

    PURPOSE: To test the null-hypothesis that there was no difference in the survival percentages of Class II composite restorations in primary teeth produced through either ART or conventional approaches after 2 years. METHODS: 157 children with 325 Class II cavitated dentin lesions were included in a

  7. Evaluation of cell responses toward adhesives with different photoinitiating systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Landuyt, Kirsten L; Krifka, Stephanie; Hiller, Karl-Anton; Bolay, Carola; Waha, Claudia; Van Meerbeek, Bart; Schmalz, Gottfried; Schweikl, Helmut

    2015-08-01

    The photoinitiator diphenyl-(2,4,6-trimethylbenzoyl)phosphine oxide (TPO) is more reactive than a camphorquinone/amine (CQ) system, and TPO-based adhesives obtained a higher degree of conversion (DC) with fewer leached monomers. The hypothesis tested here is that a TPO-based adhesive is less toxic than a CQ-based adhesive. A CQ-based adhesive (SBU-CQ) (Scotchbond Universal, 3M ESPE) and its experimental counterpart with TPO (SBU-TPO) were tested for cytotoxicity in human pulp-derived cells (tHPC). Oxidative stress was analyzed by the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and by the expression of antioxidant enzymes. A dentin barrier test (DBT) was used to evaluate cell viability in simulated clinical circumstances. Unpolymerized SBU-TPO was significantly more toxic than SBU-CQ after a 24h exposure, and TPO alone (EC50=0.06mM) was more cytotoxic than CQ (EC50=0.88mM), EDMAB (EC50=0.68mM) or CQ/EDMAB (EC50=0.50mM). Cultures preincubated with BSO (l-buthionine sulfoximine), an inhibitor of glutathione synthesis, indicated a minor role of glutathione in cytotoxic responses toward the adhesives. Although the generation of ROS was not detected, a differential expression of enzymatic antioxidants revealed that cells exposed to unpolymerized SBU-TPO or SBU-CQ are subject to oxidative stress. Polymerized SBU-TPO was more cytotoxic than SBU-CQ under specific experimental conditions only, but no cytotoxicity was detected in a DBT with a 200μm dentin barrier. Not only DC and monomer-release determine the biocompatibility of adhesives, but also the cytotoxicity of the (photo-)initiator should be taken into account. Addition of TPO rendered a universal adhesive more toxic compared to CQ; however, this effect could be annulled by a thin dentin barrier. Copyright © 2015 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Effect of changes to the manufacturer application techniques 
on the shear bond strength of simplified dental adhesives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chasqueira, Ana Filipa; Arantes-Oliveira, Sofia; Portugal, Jaime

    2013-09-13

    The aim of this work was to assess the shear bond strength (SBS) between a composite resin and dentin, promoted by two dental adhesive systems (one-step self-etching adhesive Easy Bond [3M ESPE], and two-step etch-and-rinse adhesive Scotchbond 1XT [3M ESPE]) with different application protocols (per manufacturer's instruction (control group); with one to four additional adhesive layers; or with an extra hydrophobic adhesive layer). Proximal enamel was removed from ninety caries-free human molars to obtain two dentin discs per tooth, which were randomly assigned to twelve experimental groups (n=15). After adhesion protocol, the composite resin (Filtek Z250 [3M ESPE]) was applied. Specimens were mounted in the Watanabe test device and shear bond test was performed in a universal testing machine with a crosshead speed of 5 mm/min. Data were analyzed with ANOVA followed by Student-Newman-Keuls tests (PScotchbond 1XT per manufacturer's instructions (27.15±2.99 MPa). Easy Bond yielded higher SBS values than Scotchbond 1XT. There were no statistically significant differences (P>0.05) between the application protocols tested, except for the three and four layers groups, that presented higher SBS results compared to manufacturer's instruction groups (Padhesive layers when using Easy Bond and Scotchbond 1XT adhesives, since it improves SBS values without consuming much time.

  9. Shear bond strength and SEM morphology evaluation of different dental adhesives to enamel prepared with ER:YAG laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pires, Patrícia T; Ferreira, João C; Oliveira, Sofia A; Azevedo, Alvaro F; Dias, Walter R; Melo, Paulo R

    2013-01-01

    Early observations of enamel surfaces prepared by erbium lasers motivated clinicians to use laser as an alternative to chemical etching. Evaluate shear bond strength (SBS) values of different dental adhesives on Erbium:Yttrium Aluminum Garnet (Er:YAG) laser prepared enamel and to evaluate possible etching patterns correlations between dental adhesives and SBS values. One hundred bovine incisors were randomly assigned to SBS tests on enamel (n = 15) and to enamel morphology analysis (n = 5) after Er:YAG laser preparation as follows: Group I - 37% phosphoric acid (PA)+ ExciTE(®); Group II - ExciTE(®); Group III - AdheSE(®) self-etching; Group IV - FuturaBond(®) no-rinse. NR; Group V - Xeno(®) V. Teeth were treated with the adhesive systems and subjected to thermal cycling. SBS were performed in a universal testing machine at 5 mm/min. One-way ANOVA and post-hoc tests (P adhesive systems yielded significantly different SBSs. Acid etching significantly increased the adhesion in laser treated enamel. No differences in SBS values were obtained between AdheSE(®) and ExciTE(®) without condition with PA. FuturaBond(®) NR and Xeno(®) V showed similar SBS, which was lower in comparison to the others adhesives. No correlation between enamel surface morphology and SBS values was observed, except when PA was used.

  10. A comparison of orthodontic bracket shear bond strength on enamel deproteinized by 5.25% sodium hypochlorite using total etch and self-etch primer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ongkowidjaja, F.; Soegiharto, B. M.; Purbiati, M.

    2017-08-01

    The shear bond strength (SBS) can be increased by removing protein pellicles from the enamel surface by deproteinization using 5.25% sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl). The SBS of a self-etch primer is lower than that of a total etch primer; nonetheless, it prevents white spot lesions. This study aimed to assess the SBS of the Anyetch (AE) total etch primer and FL-Bond II Shofu (FL) self-etch primer after enamel deproteinization using 5.25% NaOCl. Forty eight human maxillary first premolars were extracted, cleaned, and divided into four groups. In group A, brackets were bonded to the enamel without deproteinization before etching (A1: 10 teeth using total etch primer (AE); A2: 10 teeth using self-etch primer (FL)). In group B, brackets were bonded to the enamel after deproteinization with 5.25% NaOCl before etching (B1: 10 teeth using total etch primer (AE); B2: 10 teeth using self-etch primer (FL)). Brackets were bonded using Transbond XT, stored in artificial saliva for 24 h at 37°C, mounted on acrylic cylinders, and debonded using a Shimadzu AG-5000 universal testing machine. There were no significant differences in SBS between the total etch (AE) groups (p > 0.05) and between the self-etch (FL) groups (p > 0.05). There were significant differences in SBS between groups A and B. The mean SBS for groups A1, A2, B1, and B2 was 12.91±3.99, 4.46±2.47, 13.06±3.66, and 3.62±2.36 MPa, respectively. Deproteinization using NaOCl did not affect the SBS of the total etch primer (AE) group; it reduced the SBS of the self-etch primer (FL) group, but not with a statistically significant difference.

  11. Leakage testing for different adhesive systems and composites to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The teeth were randomly assigned to six groups of 14 teeth each as follows: The first group – etch‑rinse adhesive applied and cavities filled with flowable composite, the second group – etch‑rinse adhesive applied and cavities filled with bulk‑fill resin composite, the third group – one‑stage self‑etch (SE) adhesive applied ...

  12. Bonding performance of universal adhesives to er,cr:YSGG laser-irradiated enamel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayar, Muhammet Kerim; Erdemir, Fatih

    2017-04-01

    Universal adhesives have been recently introduced for use as self-etch or etch-and-rinse adhesives depending on the dental substrate and clinical condition. However, their bonding effectiveness to laser-irradiated enamel is still not well-known. Thus, the aim of this study was to compare the shear bond strength (SBS) of universal adhesives (Single Bond Universal; Nova Compo-B Plus) applied to Er,Cr:YSGG laser-irradiated enamel with SBS of the same adhesives applied in self-etch and acid-etching modes, respectively. Crown segments of sixty bovine incisors were embedded into standardized acrylic blocks. Flattened enamel surfaces were prepared. Specimens were divided into six groups according to universal adhesives and application modes randomly (n = 10), as follows: Single Bond Universal/acid-etching mode; Nova Compo-B Plus/acid-etching mode; Single Bond Universal/self-etching mode; Nova Compo-B Plus/self-etching mode; and Single Bond Universal/Er,Cr:YSGG Laser-etching mode; Nova Compo-B Plus/Er,Cr:YSGG Laser-etching mode. After surface treatments, universal adhesives were applied onto surfaces. SBS was determined after storage in water for 24 h using a universal testing machine with a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm min -1 . Failure modes were evaluated using a stereomicroscope. Data was analyzed using two-way of analyses of variances (ANOVA) (p = 0.05). Two-way ANOVA revealed that adhesive had no effect on SBS (p = 0.88), but application mode significantly influenced SBS (p = 0.00). Acid-etching significantly increased SBS, whereas there are no significant differences between self-etch mode and laser-etching for both adhesives. The bond strength of universal adhesives may depend on application mode. Acid etching may significantly increase bond strength, while laser etching may provide similar bond strength when compared to self-etch mode. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Performance of Universal Adhesive in Primary Molars After Selective Removal of Carious Tissue: An 18-Month Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenzi, Tathiane Larissa; Pires, Carine Weber; Soares, Fabio Zovico Maxnuck; Raggio, Daniela Prócida; Ardenghi, Thiago Machado; de Oliveira Rocha, Rachel

    2017-09-15

    To evaluate the 18-month clinical performance of a universal adhesive, applied under different adhesion strategies, after selective carious tissue removal in primary molars. Forty-four subjects (five to 10 years old) contributed with 90 primary molars presenting moderately deep dentin carious lesions on occlusal or occluso-proximal surfaces, which were randomly assigned following either self-etch or etch-and-rinse protocol of Scotchbond Universal Adhesive (3M ESPE). Resin composite was incrementally inserted for all restorations. Restorations were evaluated at one, six, 12, and 18 months using the modified United States Public Health Service criteria. Survival estimates for restorations' longevity were evaluated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Multivariate Cox regression analysis with shared frailty to assess the factors associated with failures (Padhesion strategy did not influence the restorations' longevity (P=0.06; 72.2 percent and 89.7 percent with etch-and-rinse and self-etch mode, respectively). Self-etch and etch-and-rinse strategies did not influence the clinical behavior of universal adhesive used in primary molars after selective carious tissue removal; although there was a tendency for better outcome of the self-etch strategy.

  14. Bonding of universal adhesives to dentine--Old wine in new bottles?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, C; Niu, L-N; Xie, H; Zhang, Z-Y; Zhou, L-Q; Jiao, K; Chen, J-H; Pashley, D H; Tay, F R

    2015-05-01

    Multi-mode universal adhesives offer clinicians the choice of using the etch-and-rinse technique, selective enamel etch technique or self-etch technique to bond to tooth substrates. The present study examined the short-term in vitro performance of five universal adhesives bonded to human coronal dentine. Two hundred non-carious human third molars were assigned to five groups based on the type of the universal adhesives (Prime&Bond Elect, Scotchbond Universal, All-Bond Universal, Clearfil Universal Bond and Futurabond U). Two bonding modes (etch-and-rinse and self-etch) were employed for each adhesive group. Bonded specimens were stored in deionized water for 24h or underwent a 10,000-cycle thermocycling ageing process prior to testing (N=10). Microtensile bond testing (μTBS), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) of resin-dentine interfaces in non-thermocycled specimens and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) of tracer-infused water-rich zones within hybrid layers of thermocycled specimens were performed. Both adhesive type and testing condition (with/without thermocycling) have significant influences on μTBS. The use of each adhesive in either the etch-and-rinse or self-etch application mode did not result in significantly different μTBS to dentine. Hybrid layers created by these adhesives in the etch-and-rinse bonding mode and self-etch bonding mode were ∼5μm and ≤0.5μm thick respectively. Tracer-infused regions could be identified within the resin-dentine interface from all the specimens prepared. The increase in versatility of universal adhesives is not accompanied by technological advances for overcoming the challenges associated with previous generations of adhesives. Therapeutic adhesives with bio-protective and bio-promoting effects are still lacking in commercialized adhesives. Universal adhesives represent manufacturers' attempt to introduce versatility in product design via adaptation of a single-bottle self-etch adhesive for other application

  15. Clinical Effect of Dental Adhesive on Marginal Integrity in Class I And Class II Resin-Composite Restorations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manchorova-Veleva Neshka A.

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Dental adhesives are believed to influence marginal adaptation and marginal discoloration when used under posterior resin-based composite restorations. Studies on the latest adhesive systems reveal that the group of the three-step etch-and-rinse adhesive (3-E&RA and the one-step self-etch adhesive (1-SEA have entirely different bonding mechanisms, as well as different bond strength and resistance to chemical, thermal and mechanical factors. STUDY OBJECTIVES: A hypothesis that a 1-SEA would result in greater enamel marginal discoloration and poorer marginal adaptation than a 3-E&RA was tested. MATERIAL AND METHODS: One hundred restorations were placed with a 1-SEA and 100 restorations with a 3-E&RA. Teeth were restored with Filtek Supreme nanofilled resin-composite and were evaluated for marginal adaptation and marginal discoloration at baseline, and 6 months, 12 months, and 36 months postoperatively. RESULTS: The statistical analysis revealed significant differences in marginal integrity between test groups. The 1-SEA resulted in greater enamel marginal discoloration and poorer marginal adaptation than the 3-E&RA at any recall time. CONCLUSIONS: Marginal adaptation and marginal discoloration depend on the type of dentin adhesive used. The restorations with Filtek Supreme and Scotchbond MP are better than the restorations with Adper Prompt L-Pop with regard to the marginal adaptation and marginal discoloration at 6-, 12- and 36-month evaluations.

  16. A comparison of shear bond strength of orthodontic brackets bonded with four different orthodontic adhesives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Sudhir; Tandon, Pradeep; Nagar, Amit; Singh, Gyan P; Singh, Alka; Chugh, Vinay K

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: The objective of this study is to compare the shear bond strength (SBS) of stainless steel (SS) orthodontic brackets bonded with four different orthodontic adhesives. Materials and Methods: Eighty newly extracted premolars were bonded to 0.022 SS brackets (Ormco, Scafati, Italy) and equally divided into four groups based on adhesive used: (1) Rely-a-Bond (self-cure adhesive, Reliance Orthodontic Product, Inc., Illinois, USA), (2) Transbond XT (light-cure adhesive, 3M Unitek, CA, USA), (3) Transbond Plus (sixth generation self-etch primer, 3M Unitek, CA, USA) with Transbond XT (4) Xeno V (seventh generation self-etch primer, Dentsply, Konstanz, Germany) with Xeno Ortho (light-cure adhesive, Dentsply, Konstanz, Germany) adhesive. Brackets were debonded with a universal testing machine (Model No. 3382 Instron Corp., Canton, Mass, USA). The adhesive remnant index (ARI) was recordedIn addition, the conditioned enamel surfaces were observed under a scanning electron microscope (SEM). Results: Transbond XT (15.49 MPa) attained the highest bond strength. Self-etching adhesives (Xeno V, 13.51 MPa; Transbond Plus, 11.57 MPa) showed clinically acceptable SBS values and almost clean enamel surface after debonding. The analysis of variance (F = 11.85, P adhesives left on the tooth) to be the most prevalent in Transbond XT (40%), followed by Rely-a-Bond (30%), Transbond Plus with Transbond XT (15%), and Xeno V with Xeno Ortho (10%). Under SEM, enamel surfaces after debonding of the brackets appeared porous when an acid-etching process was performed on the surfaces of Rely-a-Bond and Transbond XT, whereas with self-etching primers enamel presented smooth and almost clean surfaces (Transbond Plus and Xeno V group). Conclusion: All adhesives yielded SBS values higher than the recommended bond strength (5.9-7–8 MPa), Seventh generation self-etching primer Xeno V with Xeno Ortho showed clinically acceptable SBS and the least amount of residual adhesive left on the

  17. Cell Adhesion Molecules of the Immunoglobulin Superfamily in the Nervous System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Walmod, Peter Schledermann; Pedersen, Martin Volmer; Berezin, Vladimir

    2007-01-01

    Cell adhesion molecules (CAMs) are proteins mediating cell-cell or cell-extracellular matrix (ECM) interactions. CAMs are traditionally divided into four groups, the cadherins, the selectins, the integrins and CAMs belonging to the immunoglobulin superfamily (IgSF). The present chapter describes...... CAMs belonging to IgSF, that exclusively or in part, are expressed in the nervous system. The chapter includes descriptions of myelin protein zero (P0), integrin-associated protein (CD47), neuroplastin, activated leukocyte-cell adhesion molecule (ALCAM), melanoma cell adhesion molecule (MCAM......), myelinassociated glycoprotein (MAG), the neural cell adhesion molecules 1 and 2 (NCAM, NCAM2), Down Syndrome cell adhesion molecule (DSCAM) and Down Syndrome cell adhesion molecule-like-1 (DSCAML1), sidekick 1 and 2 (SDK1, SDK2), signal-regulatory proteins (SIRPs), nectins, nectin-like proteins (necls...

  18. A role for the fibrinolytic system in postsurgical adhesion formation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hellebrekers, Bart W. J.; Emeis, Jef J.; Kooistra, Teake; Trimbos, J. Baptist; Moore, Norma R.; Zwinderman, Koos H.; Trimbos-Kemper, Trudy C. M.

    2005-01-01

    To look for evidence of a fibrinolytic insufficiency as a cause of adhesion formation. Retrospective and prospective study. University medical center. Retrospective study: 50 patients undergoing laparoscopy, divided into patients with and without endometriosis. Prospective study: 18 patients

  19. Dentine bond strength and antimicrobial activity evaluation of adhesive systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    André, Carolina Bosso; Gomes, Brenda Paula Figueiredo Almeida; Duque, Thais Mageste; Stipp, Rafael Nobrega; Chan, Daniel Chi Ngai; Ambrosano, Glaucia Maria Bovi; Giannini, Marcelo

    2015-04-01

    This study evaluated the dentine bond strength (BS) and the antibacterial activity (AA) of six adhesives against strict anaerobic and facultative bacteria. Three adhesives containing antibacterial components (Gluma 2Bond (glutaraldehyde)/G2B, Clearfil SE Protect (MDPB)/CSP and Peak Universal Bond (PUB)/chlorhexidine) and the same adhesive versions without antibacterial agents (Gluma Comfort Bond/GCB, Clearfil SE Bond/CSB and Peak LC Bond/PLB) were tested. The AA of adhesives and control groups was evaluated by direct contact method against four strict anaerobic and four facultative bacteria. After incubation, according to the appropriate periods of time for each microorganism, the time to kill microorganisms was measured. For BS, the adhesives were applied according to manufacturers' recommendations and teeth restored with composite. Teeth (n=10) were sectioned to obtain bonded beams specimens, which were tested after artificial saliva storage for one week and one year. BS data were analyzed using two-way ANOVA and Tukey test. Saliva storage for one year reduces the BS only for GCB. In general G2B and GCB required at least 24h for killing microorganisms. PUB and PLB killed only strict anaerobic microorganisms after 24h. For CSP the average time to eliminate the Streptococcus mutans and strict anaerobic oral pathogens was 30 min. CSB showed no AA against facultative bacteria, but had AA against some strict anaerobic microorganisms. Storage time had no effect on the BS for most of the adhesives. The time required to kill bacteria depended on the type of adhesive and never was less than 10 min. Most of the adhesives showed stable bond strength after one year and the Clearfil SE Protect may be a good alternative in restorative procedures performed on dentine, considering its adequate bond strength and better antibacterial activity. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Salivary contamination during bonding procedures with a one-bottle adhesive system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fritz, U B; Finger, W J; Stean, H

    1998-09-01

    The effect of salivary contamination of enamel and dentin on bonding efficacy of an experimental one-bottle resin adhesive was investigated. The adhesive was a light-curing urethane dimethacrylate/hydroxyethyl methacrylate/4-methacryloxyethyl trimellitate anhydride mixture dissolved in acetone. Evaluation parameters were shear bond strength and marginal gap width in a dental cavity. Apart from a control group without contamination (group 1), etched enamel and dentin were (2) contaminated with saliva and air dried; (3) contaminated, rinsed, and blot dried; (4) coated with adhesive, contaminated, rinsed, and blot dried; (5) coated with adhesive, light cured, contaminated, rinsed, and air dried; or (6) treated as in group 5, with additional adhesive application after air drying. There was no negative effect in groups 3 and 4, compared with control. Air drying after salivary contamination (group 2) resulted in low shear bond strengths and wide marginal gaps. Contamination of the cured adhesive layer (groups 5 and 6) had no adverse effect on enamel shear bond strengths, but resulted in 50% reduced dentin shear bond strengths and wide marginal gaps. The one-bottle adhesive system is relatively insensitive to salivary contamination, provided that the contamination occurs prior to light curing of the adhesive and is carefully rinsed and blot dried. Salivary contact after adhesive curing must be avoided.

  1. Adhesive Bonding for Optical Metrology Systems in Space Applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gohlke, Martin; Schuldt, Thilo; Braxmaier, Claus; Döringshoff, Klaus; Peters, Achim; Johann, Ulrich; Weise, Dennis

    2015-01-01

    Laser based metrology systems become more and more attractive for space applications and are the core elements of planned missions such as LISA (NGO, eLISA) or NGGM where laser interferometry is used for distance measurements between satellites. The GRACE-FO mission will for the first time demonstrate a Laser Ranging Instrument (LRI) in space, starting 2017. Laser based metrology also includes optical clocks/references, either as ultra-stable light source for high sensitivity interferometry or as scientific payload e.g. proposed in fundamental physics missions such as mSTAR (mini SpaceTime Asymmetry Research), a mission dedicated to perform a Kennedy-Thorndike experiment on a satellite in a low-Earth orbit. To enable the use of existing optical laboratory setups, optimization with respect to power consumption, weight and dimensions is necessary. At the same time the thermal and structural stability must be increased. Over the last few years we investigated adhesive bonding of optical components to thermally highly stable glass ceramics as an easy-to-handle assembly integration technology. Several setups were implemented and tested for potential later use in space applications. We realized a heterodyne LISA related interferometer with demonstrated noise levels in the pm-range for translation measurement and nano-radiant-range for tilt measurements and two iodine frequency references on Elegant Breadboard (EBB) and Engineering Model (EM) level with frequency stabilities in the 10 -15 range for longer integration times. The EM setup was thermally cycled and vibration tested. (paper)

  2. Durability of a low shrinkage TEGDMA/HEMA-free resin composite system in Class II restorations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Dijken, Jan WV; Pallesen, Ulla

    2017-01-01

    with a mean age of 53 years (range 29-82). Each participant received at random two, as similar as possible, Class II restorations. In the first cavity of each pair the TEGDMA/HEMA-free resin composite system was placed with its 3-step etch-and-rinse adhesive (cmf-els). In the second cavity a 1-step HEMA......Objective: The objective of this randomized controlled prospective trial was to evaluate the durability of a low shrinkage and TEGDMA/HEMA-free resin composite system in posterior restorations in a 6-year follow up. Material and methods: 139 Class II restorations were placed in 67 patients......-free self-etch adhesive was used (AdheSe One F). The restorations were evaluated using slightly modified USPHS criteria at baseline and then yearly during 6 years. Caries risk and parafunctional habits of the participants were estimated. Results: Three molar teeth showed mild post-operative sensitivity...

  3. Integrative systems and synthetic biology of cell-matrix adhesion sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamir, Eli

    2016-09-02

    The complexity of cell-matrix adhesion convolves its roles in the development and functioning of multicellular organisms and their evolutionary tinkering. Cell-matrix adhesion is mediated by sites along the plasma membrane that anchor the actin cytoskeleton to the matrix via a large number of proteins, collectively called the integrin adhesome. Fundamental challenges for understanding how cell-matrix adhesion sites assemble and function arise from their multi-functionality, rapid dynamics, large number of components and molecular diversity. Systems biology faces these challenges in its strive to understand how the integrin adhesome gives rise to functional adhesion sites. Synthetic biology enables engineering intracellular modules and circuits with properties of interest. In this review I discuss some of the fundamental questions in systems biology of cell-matrix adhesion and how synthetic biology can help addressing them.

  4. Adhesive Bonding to Computer-aided Design/ Computer-aided Manufacturing Esthetic Dental Materials: An Overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awad, Mohamed Moustafa; Alqahtani, H; Al-Mudahi, A; Murayshed, M S; Alrahlah, A; Bhandi, Shilpa H

    2017-07-01

    To review the adhesive bonding to different computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) esthetic restorative materials. The use of CAD/CAM esthetic restorative materials has gained popularity in recent years. Several CAD/ CAM esthetic restorative materials are commercially available. Adhesive bonding is a major determinant of success of CAD/ CAM restorations. Review result: An account of the currently available bonding strategies are discussed with their rationale in various CAD/ CAM materials. Different surface treatment methods as well as adhesion promoters can be used to achieve reliable bonding of CAD/CAM restorative materials. Selection of bonding strategy to such material is determined based on its composition. Further evidence is required to evaluate the effect of new surface treatment methods, such as nonthermal atmospheric plasma and self-etching ceramic primer on bonding to different dental ceramics. An understanding of the currently available bonding strategies to CA/CAM materials can help the clinician to select the most indicated system for each category of materials.

  5. Influence of a hydrophobic resin coating on the immediate and 6-month dentin bonding of three universal adhesives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sezinando, Ana; Luque-Martinez, Issis; Muñoz, Miguel Angel; Reis, Alessandra; Loguercio, Alessandro D; Perdigão, Jorge

    2015-10-01

    To test the influence of a hydrophobic resin coating (HC) on the immediate (24h) and 6-month (6m) microtensile dentin bond strengths (μTBS) and nanoleakage (NL) of three universal adhesives applied in self-etch (SE) or in etch-and-rinse (ER) mode. Sixty caries-free extracted third molars were assigned to 12 experimental groups resulting from the combination of the factors "adhesive system" (Scotchbond Universal Adhesive [SBU], 3M ESPE; All-Bond Universal [ABU], Bisco Inc.; and G-Bond Plus [GBP], GC Corporation); "adhesive strategy" (SE or ER); "hydrophobic resin coating" [HC] (with or without Heliobond, Ivoclar Vivadent); and "storage time" (24h or 6m). Specimens were prepared for μTBS testing - (24h) half of the beams were immediately tested under tension; and (6m) the other half was stored in distilled water (37°C) for 6m prior to testing. For each tooth, two beams were randomly selected for NL evaluation for both evaluation times. Data were analyzed for each adhesive system using three-way ANOVA and Tukey's post-hoc test (α=0.05). μTBS: (24h): In SE mode, HC resulted in statistically greater mean μTBS for all adhesives. (6m): When HC was not used the mean μTBS for SBU/ER, ABU/ER, GBP/ER and SBU/SE decreased significantly. NL: (24h): SBU/ER, ABU/ER and GBP/SE resulted in a significant reduction in NL when HC was applied. (6m): No significant reduction was observed for SBU/ER or for SBU/SE regardless of the use of HC. The application of a hydrophobic resin coating improved the 24h and the 6m performances of all three adhesives systems in SE mode. Copyright © 2015 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Tensile and bending fatigue of the adhesive interface to dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belli, Renan; Baratieri, Luiz Narciso; Braem, Marc; Petschelt, Anselm; Lohbauer, Ulrich

    2010-12-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the fatigue limits of the dentin-composite interfaces established either with an etch-and-rinse or an one-step self-etch adhesive systems under tensile and bending configurations. Flat specimens (1.2 mm×5 mm×35 mm) were prepared using a plexiglass mold where dentin sections from human third molars were bonded to a resin composite, exhibiting the interface centrally located. Syntac Classic and G-Bond were used as adhesives and applied according to the manufacturer's instructions. The fluorochrome Rhodamine B was added to the adhesives to allow for fractographic evaluation. Tensile strength was measured in an universal testing machine and the bending strength (n=15) in a Flex machine (Flex, University of Antwerp, Belgium), respectively. Tensile (TFL) and bending fatigue limits (BFL) (n=25) were determined under wet conditions for 10(4) cycles following a staircase approach. Interface morphology and fracture mechanisms were observed using light, confocal laser scanning and scanning electron microscopy. Statistical analysis was performed using three-way ANOVA (mod LSD test, pTensile and bending characteristic strengths at 63.2% failure probability for Syntac were 23.8 MPa and 71.5 MPa, and 24.7 MPa and 72.3 MPa for G-Bond, respectively. Regarding the applied methods, no significant differences were detected between adhesives. However, fatigue limits for G-Bond (TFL=5.9 MPa; BFL=36.2 MPa) were significantly reduced when compared to Syntac (TFL=12.6 MPa; BFL=49.7 MPa). Fracture modes of Syntac were generally of adhesive nature, between the adhesive resin and dentin, while G-Bond showed fracture planes involving the adhesive-dentin interface and the adhesive resin. Cyclic loading under tensile and bending configurations led to a significant strength degradation, with a more pronounced fatigue limit decrease for G-Bond. The greater decrease in fracture strength was observed in the tensile configuration. Copyright © 2010 Academy of

  7. In-vitro comparison of micro-leakage between nanocomposite and microhybrid composite in class v cavities treated with the self-etch technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahvish, S.; Khan, F.R.

    2016-01-01

    Background: When a light cure composite resin is used to restore a class V lesion, certain stresses are generated at the tooth-restoration interface. If these stresses exceed the bond strength of the restorative material, microscopic gaps are formed which eventually cause micro-leakage at the tooth-restoration interface. The objective of the present study was to compare the micro-leakage values at the tooth-restoration interface using dye penetration method between a Nano filled and a Micro hybrid light cured composite resin in class V cavities using the self-etch technique. Methods: Sixty class V cavities were made coronal to the cemento-enamel junction in the extracted premolars. These were then randomly divided into two study groups. Group A: Self-etch; filled with P-60 (micro-hybrid) n=30. Group B: Self-etch; filled with Z-350 (nano-filled) n=30. Specimens were subjected to thermo-cycling at 5-55 degree C ± 2 degree C with a 30 seconds dwell time. After which they were stained with 2% methylene blue. Later, sectioned bucco-lingually and examined using a stereo microscope (magnification X4) at the occlusal, axial and gingival surfaces. Micro-leakage around the tooth-restoration interface was assessed by using the degree of dye penetration in millimetres. Results: There was 100% micro leakage seen at both the occlusal and gingival surfaces when using the P-60 composite. With the Z-350 composite 84% occlusal and 88% of the gingival surfaces exhibited micro-leakage. Conclusions: With respect to micro-leakage in class V cavities, Z-350 was found to be a superior restorative material compared to P-60 on the occlusal surface. Overall, there is no statistically significant difference in the micro-leakage exhibited by the two restorative materials in class V preparations subjected to self-etch protocol. (author)

  8. Influence of eugenol-containing temporary restorations on the microleakage of total-etch and self-etching adhesive systems = Influência de restaurações temporárias contendo eugenol na microinfiltração de sistemas adesivos convencional e autocondicionante

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azevedo, Eduardo Costa de

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Objetivo: Este estudo in vitro avaliou a influência de um cimento restaurador temporário à base de óxido de zinco-eugenol (CT-OZE no selamento marginal de restaurações diretas, utilizando dois sistemas adesivos. Metodologia: Cavidades classe V foram preparadas em 20 incisivos bovinos e restauradas com dois cimentos temporários, CT-OZE (IRM® ou cimento livre de eugenol (Cavit® (n=10/ cimento temporário. Após sete dias, cinco dentes de cada grupo de cimento temporário foram restaurados utilizando o sistema Single Bond® (SB e os demais cinco com o sistema Adper Prompt® (AP. As cavidades foram restauradas com resina composta (Filtek Z-250, termocicladas (500 ciclos, imersas em fucsina básica e longitudinalmente seccionadas. A penetração do corante foi avaliada em microscópio ótico. Os dados analisados por teste de Kruskal-Wallis (P = 0,05. Resultados: A infiltração em dentina foi similar à do esmalte. Em esmalte, o grupo com Cavit® e AP apresentou infiltração significativamente maior. Em dentina, AP exibiu maior infiltração que SB, e não houve diferença entre CT-OZE e Cavit®. Conclusão: Em geral, SB produziu melhor selamento marginal que AP, e CT-OZE não aumentou a penetração de corante. A presença de eugenol no material restaurador temporário não afetou o selamento marginal de restaurações adesivas

  9. Investigation of the shear bond strength to dentin of universal adhesives applied with two different techniques

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    Elif Yaşa

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the shear bond strength of universal adhesives applied with self-etch and etch&rinse techniques to dentin. Materials and Method: Fourty-eight sound extracted human third molars were used in this study. Occlusal enamel was removed in order to expose the dentinal surface, and the surface was flattened. Specimens were randomly divided into four groups and were sectioned vestibulo-lingually using a diamond disc. The universal adhesives: All Bond Universal (Group 1a and 1b, Gluma Bond Universal (Group 2a and 2b and Single Bond Universal (Group 3a and 3b were applied onto the tooth specimens either with self-etch technique (a or with etch&rinse technique (b according to the manufacturers’ instructions. Clearfil SE Bond (Group 4a; self-etch and Optibond FL (Group 4b; etch&rinse were used as control groups. Then the specimens were restored with a nanohybrid composite resin (Filtek Z550. After thermocycling, shear bond strength test was performed with a universal test machine at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min. Fracture analysis was done under a stereomicroscope (×40 magnification. Data were analyzed using two-way ANOVA and post-hoc Tukey tests. Results: Statistical analysis showed significant differences in shear bond strength values between the universal adhesives (p<0.05. Significantly higher bond strength values were observed in self-etch groups (a in comparison to etch&rinse groups (b (p<0.05. Among all groups, Single Bond Universal showed the greatest shear bond strength values, whereas All Bond Universal showed the lowest shear bond strength values with both application techniques. Conclusion: Dentin bonding strengths of universal adhesives applied with different techniques may vary depending on the adhesive material. For the universal bonding agents tested in this study, the etch&rinse technique negatively affected the bond strength to dentin.

  10. Effects of Different Combinations of Er:YAG Laser-Adhesives on Enamel Demineralization and Bracket Bond Strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çokakoğlu, Serpil; Nalçacı, Ruhi; Üşümez, Serdar; Malkoç, Sıddık

    2016-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the demineralization around brackets and shear bond strength (SBS) of brackets bonded to Er:YAG laser-irradiated enamel at different power settings with various adhesive systems combinations. A total of 108 premolar teeth were used in this study. Teeth were assigned into three groups according to the etching procedure, then each group divided into three subgroups based on the application of different adhesive systems. There were a total of nine groups as follows. Group 1: Acid + Transbond XT Primer; group 2: Er:YAG (100 mJ, 10 Hz) etching + Transbond XT Primer; group 3: Er:YAG (200 mJ, 10 Hz) etching + Transbond XT Primer; group 4: Transbond Plus self-etching primer (SEP); group 5: Er:YAG (100 mJ, 10 Hz) etching + Transbond Plus SEP; group 6: Er:YAG (200 mJ, 10 Hz) etching + Transbond Plus SEP; group 7: Clearfil Protect Bond; group 8: Er:YAG (100 mJ, 10 Hz) etching + Clearfil Protect Bond; group 9: Er:YAG (200 mJ, 10 Hz) etching + Clearfil Protect Bond. Brackets were bonded with Transbond XT Adhesive Paste in all groups. Teeth to be evaluated for demineralization and SBS were exposed to pH and thermal cyclings, respectively. Then, demineralization samples were scanned with micro-CT to determine lesion depth values. For SBS test, a universal testing machine was used and adhesive remnant was index scored after debonding. Data were analyzed statistically. No significant differences were found among the lesion depth values of the various groups, except for G7 and G8, in which the lowest values were recorded. The lowest SBS values were in G7, whereas the highest were in G9. The differences between the other groups were not significant. Er:YAG laser did not have a positive effect on prevention of enamel demineralization. When two step self-etch adhesive is preferred for bonding brackets, laser etching at 1 W (100 mJ, 10 Hz) is suggested to improve SBS of brackets.

  11. Cellular Adhesion and Adhesion Molecules

    OpenAIRE

    SELLER, Zerrin

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, cell adhesion and cell adhesion molecules have been shown to be important for many normal biological processes, including embryonic cell migration, immune system functions and wound healing. It has also been shown that they contribute to the pathogenesis of a large number of common human disorders, such as rheumatoid arthritis and tumor cell metastasis in cancer. In this review, the basic mechanisms of cellular adhesion and the structural and functional features of adhes...

  12. Comparative Evaluation of shear Bond Strength of universal Dental Adhesives -An in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayasheel, Arun; Niranjan, Nandini; Pamidi, Hemanthkumar; Suryakanth, Mayuri B

    2017-07-01

    Patient demand for tooth colored restorations and desire for minimally invasive restorations have made composites an indispensable part of the restorative process. An important factor affecting the intra-oral performance of composite restorations is bonding. Ninty six freshly extracted molar teeth were collected and occlusal 3mm is removed using a diamond disc to expose dentine. Following with samples were divided in to two main groups (self-etch & total etch). Each main group is again sub divided in to three groups each according to bonding agent used (Tetric N- Bond Universal, Single Bond Universal, Tetric N Bond Total etch in total etch group and Clear Fill SE in self etch group). Following which bonding protocol is followed according to manufacture instructions, a composite buildup of 2x3 mm is done on each specimen and then specimen were subjected to shear bond test under universal testing machine. All the readings were noted and subjected to statistical analysis using One way ANOVA and Tukey's posthoc test. It showed that there is no significant difference among the groups in both self-etch and total etch modes. It can be concluded that application of an etching step prior to Universal Adhesives significantly improves their dentine penetration pattern, although this does not affect their mean SBS. The bond strength values of the TBU regardless of application mode were comparable to SBU making them reliable for working under different clinical conditions. Key words: Dentine bonding agents, self-etch mode, total etch mode, shear bond strength.

  13. Effect of Storage Time on Bond Strength and Nanoleakage Expression of Universal Adhesives Bonded to Dentin and Etched Enamel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makishi, P; André, C B; Ayres, Apa; Martins, A L; Giannini, M

    2016-01-01

    To investigate bond strength and nanoleakage expression of universal adhesives (UA) bonded to dentin and etched enamel. Extracted human third molars were sectioned and ground to obtain flat surfaces of dentin (n = 36) and enamel (n = 48). Dentin and etched enamel surfaces were bonded with one of two UAs, All-Bond Universal (ABU) or Scotchbond Universal (SBU); or a two-step self-etching adhesive, Clearfil SE Bond (CSEB). A hydrophobic bonding resin, Adper Scotchbond Multi-Purpose Bond (ASMP Bond) was applied only on etched enamel. Following each bonding procedure, resin composite blocks were built up incrementally. The specimens were sectioned and subjected to microtensile bond strength (MTBS) testing after 24 hours or one year water storage, or immersed into ammoniacal silver nitrate solution after aging with 10,000 thermocycles and observed using scanning electron microscopy. The percentage distribution of silver particles at the adhesive/tooth interface was calculated using digital image-analysis software. The MTBS (CSEB = SBU > ABU, for dentin; and CSEB > ABU = SBU = ASMP Bond, for etched enamel) differed significantly between the adhesives after 24 hours. After one year, MTBS values were reduced significantly within the same adhesive for both substrates (analysis of variance, Bonferroni post hoc, padhesives for etched enamel. Silver particles could be detected within the adhesive/dentin interface of all specimens tested. Kruskal-Wallis mean ranks for nanoleakage in ABU, SBU, and CSEB were 16.9, 18.5 and 11, respectively (p>0.05). In the short term, MTBS values were material and dental-substrate dependent. After aging, a decrease in bonding effectiveness was observed in all materials, with nanoleakage at the adhesive/dentin interface. The bonding of the UAs was equal or inferior to that of the conventional restorative systems when applied to either substrate and after either storage period.

  14. Effect of a Novel Quaternary Ammonium Methacrylate Polymer (QAMP on Adhesion and Antibacterial Properties of Dental Adhesives

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    Yasmine M. Pupo

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the resin–dentin bond strength (μTBS, degree of conversion (DC, and antibacterial potential of an innovative adhesive system containing a quaternary ammonium methacrylate polymer (QAMP using in situ and in vitro assays. Forty-two human third molars were flattened until the dentin was exposed and were randomly distributed into three groups of self-etching adhesive systems: Clearfil™ SE Bond containing 5% QAMP (experimental group, Clearfil™ Protect Bond (positive control and Clearfil™ SE Bond (negative control. After light curing, three 1 mm-increments of composite resin were bonded to each dentin surface. A total of thirty of these bonded teeth (10 teeth per group was sectioned to obtain stick-shaped specimens and tested under tensile stress immediately, and after 6 and 12 months of storage in distilled water. Twelve bonded teeth (4 teeth per group were longitudinally sectioned in a mesio-to-distal direction to obtain resin-bonded dentin slabs. In situ DC was evaluated by micro-Raman spectroscopy. In vitro DC of thin films of each adhesive system was measured using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. In vitro susceptibility tests of these three adhesive systems were performed by the minimum inhibitory/minimum bactericidal concentration (MIC/MBC assays against Streptococcus mutans, Lactobacillus casei, and Actinomyces naeslundii. No statistically significant difference in μTBS was observed between Clearfil™ SE Bond containing 5% QAMP and Clearfil™ SE Bond (p > 0.05 immediately, and after 6 and 12 months of water storage. However Clearfil™ Protect Bond showed a significant reduction of μTBS after 12 months of storage (p = 0.039. In addition, QAMP provided no significant change in DC after incorporating into Clearfil™ SE Bond (p > 0.05. Clearfil™ SE Bond containing 5% QAMP demonstrated MIC/MBC values similar to the positive control against L. casei and A. naeslundii and higher than the negative

  15. Halloysite nanotube incorporation into adhesive systems—effect on bond strength to human dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkatheeri, Mohammed S; Palasuk, Jadesada; Eckert, George J; Platt, Jeffrey A; Bottino, Marco C

    2015-11-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the effect of Halloysite® aluminosilicate clay nanotube (HNT) incorporation into a two-step etch-and-rinse (ER) and a one-step self-etch (SE) adhesive on human dentin shear bond strength (SBS). Ten groups (n = 12) were prepared according to the adhesive system (i.e., ER or SE) and amount of HNT incorporated (5-20%, w/v), as follows: commercial control (i.e., the adhesive was used as purchased, 0% HNT); experimental control (i.e., the adhesive was processed through mixing/stirring and sonication similarly to the HNT-incorporated experimental groups, but without HNT); and 5, 10, and 20% HNT. SBS testing was performed after 24 h of storage in deionized water at 37 °C. Failure modes were examined using a stereomicroscope (×40). Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) of the resin-dentin interface of selected specimens was carried out. Two-way ANOVA revealed that incorporation of HNT up to 20% (w/v) in ER and up to 10% (w/v) in SE demonstrated an increased SBS compared to their experimental controls. Compared to the commercial control, SBS of HNT-modified dentin adhesives was not significantly different for ER adhesives (p > 0.05) but was significantly higher with 5% HNT in the SE adhesive (p < 0.05). Failure modes were predominantly adhesive and mixed failures. SEM micrographs of resin-dentin interfaces for ER-commercial control and ER-10% showed a similar morphology. A thicker adhesive layer and the presence of agglomerated HNT on the resin tags were seen in ER-10%. An increased number of short resin tags in SE-5% compared with SE-commercial control were observed. HNT addition up to 20% in ER and up to 10 % in SE showed increased SBS to dentin compared with the experimental control. HNT can be used not only to reinforce adhesive resins but also hold potential for the development of bioactive adhesives by the encapsulation of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) inhibitors or anticariogenic agents.

  16. Antibacterial Activity of Commercial Dentine Bonding Systems against E. faecalis–Flow Cytometry Study

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    Monika Lukomska-Szymanska

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Literature presents inconsistent results on the antibacterial activity of dentine bonding systems (DBS. Antibacterial activity of adhesive systems depends on several factors, including composition and acidity. Flow cytometry is a novel detection method to measure multiple characteristics of a single cell: total cell number, structural (size, shape, and functional parameters (viability, cell cycle. The LIVE/DEAD® BacLightTM bacterial viability assay was used to evaluate an antibacterial activity of DBS by assessing physical membrane disruption of bacteria mediated by DBS. Ten commercial DBSs: four total-etching (TE, four self-etching (SE and two selective enamel etching (SEE were tested. Both total-etching DBS ExciTE F and OptiBond Solo Plus showed comparatively low antibacterial activity against E. faecalis. The lowest activity of all tested TE systems showed Te-Econom Bond. Among SE DBS, G-ænial Bond (92.24% dead cells followed by Clearfil S3 Bond Plus (88.02% and Panavia F 2.0 ED Primer II (86.67% showed the highest antibacterial activity against E. faecalis, which was comparable to isopropranol (positive control. In the present study, self-etching DBS exhibited higher antimicrobial activity than tested total-etching adhesives against E. faecalis.

  17. Role of pressure-sensitive adhesives in transdermal drug delivery systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobo, Shabbir; Sachdeva, Sameer; Goswami, Tarun

    2016-01-01

    Transdermal drug delivery systems (TDDS) are employed for the delivery of drugs across skin into the systemic circulation. Pressure-sensitive adhesive (PSA) is one of the most critical components used in a TDDS. The primary function of PSA is to help in adhesion of patch to skin, but more importantly it acts as a matrix for the drug and other excipients. Hence, apart from adhesion of the patch, PSA also affects other critical quality attributes of the TDDS such as drug delivery, flux through skin and physical and chemical stability of the finished product. This review article provides a summary of the adhesives used in various types of TDDS. In particular, this review will cover the design types of TDDS, categories of PSAs and their evaluation and regulatory aspects.

  18. Polymeric reaction of polymer-monomer system for pressure sensitive adhesives by low energy electron beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takiguchi, R.; Uryu, T.

    1985-01-01

    Application of low-energy electron beam to non-solvent type pressure sensitive adhesives is investigated. The adhesive properties such as peel strength and holding time (dead-load strength) were closely related to the reaction of acrylate polymer-monomer systems. The reaction behavior is elucidated by combining the measurement of gel fraction, infrared spectrum of gel, and the molecular weight distribution detected by gel permeation chromatography. It was important for the production of pressure sensitive adhesives by electron beam that the adhesive with high peel strength and long holding time is composed of a proper combination of three factors, that is, about 35% gel fraction, 25% monomer units in gel, and 15% graft efficiency by irradiating the polymer-monomer system containing low molecular weight poly (butyl acrylate). (author)

  19. Effects of endodontic tri-antibiotic paste on bond strengths of dentin adhesives to coronal dentin

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    Parvin Mirzakoucheki

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Objectives The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of tri-antibiotic paste (TAP on microtensile bond strengths (MTBS of dental adhesives to dentin. Materials and Methods Sixty extracted molars had their occlusal surfaces flattened to expose dentin. They were divided into two groups, i.e., control group with no dentin treatment and experimental group with dentin treatment with TAP. After 10 days, specimens were bonded using self-etch (Filtek P90 adhesive or etch-and-rinse (Adper Single Bond Plus adhesives and restored with composite resin. Teeth were sectioned into beams, and the specimens were subjected to MTBS test. Data were analyzed using two-way ANOVA and post hoc Tukey tests. Results There was a statistically significant interaction between dentin treatment and adhesive on MTBS to coronal dentin (p = 0.003. Despite a trend towards worse MTBS being noticed in the experimental groups, TAP application showed no significant effect on MTBS (p = 0.064. Conclusions The etch-and-rinse adhesive Adper Single Bond Plus presented higher mean bond strengths than the self-etch adhesive Filtek P90, irrespective of the group. The superior bond performance for Adper Single Bond when compared to Filtek P90 adhesive was confirmed by a fewer number of adhesive failures. The influence of TAP in bond strength is insignificant.

  20. Bond strength of universal adhesives: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosa, Wellington Luiz de Oliveira da; Piva, Evandro; Silva, Adriana Fernandes da

    2015-07-01

    A systematic review was conducted to determine whether the etch-and-rinse or self-etching mode is the best protocol for dentin and enamel adhesion by universal adhesives. This report followed the PRISMA Statement. A total of 10 articles were included in the meta-analysis. Two reviewers performed a literature search up to October 2014 in eight databases: PubMed, Web of Science, Scopus, BBO, SciELO, LILACS, IBECS and The Cochrane Library. In vitro studies evaluating the bond strength of universal adhesives to dentin and/or enamel by the etch-and-rinse and self-etch strategies were eligible to be selected. Statistical analyses were conducted using RevMan 5.1 (The Cochrane Collaboration, Copenhagen, Denmark). A global comparison was performed with random-effects models at a significance level of puniversal adhesives (p≥0.05). However, for the ultra-mild All-Bond Universal adhesive, the etch-and-rinse strategy was significantly different than the self-etch mode in terms of dentin micro-tensile bond strength, as well as in the global analysis of enamel micro-tensile and micro-shear bond strength (p≤0.05). The enamel bond strength of universal adhesives is improved with prior phosphoric acid etching. However, this effect was not evident for dentin with the use of mild universal adhesives with the etch-and-rinse strategy. Selective enamel etching prior to the application of a mild universal adhesive is an advisable strategy for optimizing bonding. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Effect of hydroxyl bond formation on the adhesion improvement of a polyethylene copper thin film system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Camacho, M.; Blantocas, G.; Ramos, H.

    2009-01-01

    Formation of hydroxyl bonds on the surface of a gas plasma treated high density polyethylene (HDPE) sheets significantly enhanced the adhesion strength of the polyethylene copper thin film system. Surface treatments using oxygen gas plasmas at varying plasma parameters are applied in this study to identify the most effective plasma parameters that would promote the best adhesion strength. Analysis of gas plasma adulterated HDPE sheets showed best enhancement of polyethylene copper adhesion after an oxygen gas plasma treatment for 60 minutes at 5mA discharge current. Scanning Electron Microscopy Analysis, Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy and Adhesion measurements using Pull out Force Analysis were used to measure the changes in the surface chemistry and surface topology of the HDPE sheets. (author)

  2. Prevention of Intraabdominal Adhesions by Local and Systemic Administration of Immunosuppressive Drugs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peker, Kemal; Inal, Abdullah; Sayar, Ilyas; Sahin, Murat; Gullu, Huriye; Inal, Duriye Gul; Isik, Arda

    2013-01-01

    Background: Intraperitoneal adhesion formation is a serious postsurgical issue. Adhesions develop after damage to the peritoneum by surgery, irradiation, infection or trauma. Objectives: Using a rat model, we compared the effectiveness of systemic and intraperitoneally administered common immunosuppressive drugs for prevention of postoperative intraperitoneal adhesions. Materials and Methods: Peritoneal adhesions were induced in 98 female Wistar-Albino rats by cecal abrasion and peritoneal excision. Rats were randomly separated into seven groups, each containing fourteen rats, and the standard experimental model was applied to all of rats. 14 days later, rats were euthanized, intraperitoneal adhesions were scored and tissues were examined histologically using hematoxylin/eosin and Masson’s trichrome staining. Results: Throughout the investigation, no animal died during or after surgery. In all of experimental groups, decrease in fibrosis was statistically significant. Decrease in fibrosis was most prominently in intraperitoneal tacrolimus group (P = 0.000), and decrease was least in intraperitoneal cyclosporine group (P = 0.022). Vascular proliferation was significantly decreased in all experimental groups (P < 0.05) except for systemic tacrolimus group (P = 0.139). Most prominent reduction in vascular proliferation was in intraperitoneal tacrolimus group (P = 0.000). Conclusions: Administration of immunosuppressive drugs is effective for prevention of intraperitoneal adhesions. PMID:24693396

  3. Study of new rubber to steel adhesive systems based on Co(II and Cu(II sulphides coats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Labaj Ivan

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The presented paper deals with the preparation of new rubber to steel adhesive systems using the steel surface treatment with deposition of adhesive coats based on Co(II and Cu(II sulphides. Efficiency of new prepared adhesive systems containing Co(II and Cu(II sulphides has been compared with the efficiency of double layer adhesive system commonly used in industry. The chemical composition of prepared adhesive systems was determined using the EDX analysis. Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM was used for study of topography and microstructure of prepared rubber to steel adhesive systems (Co(II, Cu(II sulphide, double layer adhesive system. For determination of adhesion strength between rubber blends and metal pieces with various adhesive systems deposited on these pieces, the test according to ASTM D429 standard relating to Rubber to metal adhesion, method A was used. For all test samples, the same type of rubber blend and the same curing conditions have been used.

  4. Immediate adhesive properties to dentin and enamel of a universal adhesive associated with a hydrophobic resin coat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perdigão, J; Muñoz, M A; Sezinando, A; Luque-Martinez, I V; Staichak, R; Reis, A; Loguercio, A D

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate the effect of acid etching and application of a hydrophobic resin coat on the enamel/dentin bond strengths and degree of conversion (DC) within the hybrid layer of a universal adhesive system (G-Bond Plus [GB]). A total of 60 extracted third molars were divided into four groups for bond-strength testing, according to the adhesive strategy: GB applied as a one-step self-etch adhesive (1-stepSE); GB applied as in 1-stepSE followed by one coat of the hydrophobic resin Heliobond (2-stepSE); GB applied as a two-step etch-and-rinse adhesive (2-stepER); GB applied as in 2-stepER followed by one coat of the hydrophobic resin Heliobond (3-stepER). There were 40 teeth used for enamel microshear bond strength (μSBS) and DC; and 20 teeth used for dentin microtensile bond strength (μTBS) and DC. After restorations were constructed, specimens were stored in water (37°C/24 h) and then tested at 0.5 mm/min (μTBS) or 1.0 mm/min (μSBS). Enamel-resin and dentin-resin interfaces from each group were evaluated for DC using micro-Raman spectroscopy. Data were analyzed with two-way analysis of variance for each substrate and the Tukey test (α=0.05). For enamel, the use of a hydrophobic resin coat resulted in statistically significant higher mean enamel μSBS only for the ER strategy (3-stepER vs 2-stepER, penamel etching technique, because it improves bond strengths to enamel when applied with the ER strategy and to dentin when used with the SE adhesion strategy. The application of a hydrophobic resin coat may improve DC in resin-dentin interfaces formed with either the SE or the ER strategy. On enamel, DC may benefit from the application of a hydrophobic resin coat over 1-stepSE adhesives.

  5. Effects of solvent evaporation on water sorption/solubility and nanoleakage of adhesive systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chimeli, Talita Baumgratz Cachapuz; D'Alpino, Paulo Henrique Perlatti; Pereira, Patrícia Nóbrega; Hilgert, Leandro Augusto; Di Hipólito, Vinicius; Garcia, Fernanda Cristina Pimentel

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate the influence of solvent evaporation in the kinetics of water diffusion (water sorption-WS, solubility-SL, and net water uptake) and nanoleakage of adhesive systems. Disk-shaped specimens (5.0 mm in diameter x 0.8 mm in thickness) were produced (N=48) using the adhesives: Clearfil S3 Bond (CS3)/Kuraray, Clearfil SE Bond - control group (CSE)/Kuraray, Optibond Solo Plus (OS)/Kerr and Scotchbond Universal Adhesive (SBU)/3M ESPE. The solvents were either evaporated for 30 s or not evaporated (N=24/per group), and then photoactivated for 80 s (550 mW/cm2). After desiccation, the specimens were weighed and stored in distilled water (N=12) or mineral oil (N=12) to evaluate the water diffusion over a 7-day period. Net water uptake (%) was also calculated as the sum of WS and SL. Data were submitted to 3-way ANOVA/Tukey's test (α=5%). The nanoleakage expression in three additional specimens per group was also evaluated after ammoniacal silver impregnation after 7 days of water storage under SEM. Statistical analysis revealed that only the factor "adhesive" was significant (padhesives. CSE (control) presented significantly lower net uptake (5.4%). The nanoleakage was enhanced by the presence of solvent in the adhesives. Although the evaporation has no effect in the kinetics of water diffusion, the nanoleakage expression of the adhesives tested increases when the solvents are not evaporated.

  6. Laboratory Performance of Universal Adhesive Systems for Luting CAD/CAM Restorative Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siqueira, Fabiana; Cardenas, Andres Millan; Gutierrez, Mario Felipe; Malaquias, Pâmela; Hass, Viviane; Reis, Alessandra; Loguercio, Alessandro D; Perdigão, Jorge

    To evaluate the microshear bond strength (μSBS) of several universal adhesive systems applied on five different indirect restorative materials. Five CAD/CAM materials were selected: 1) indirect resin composite (LAV); 2) feldspathic glass ceramic (VTR); 3) leucite-reinforced glass-ceramic (EMP); 4) lithium disilicate ceramic (EMX); 5) yttrium-stabilized zirconium dioxide (CZI). For each material, 15 blocks were cut into 4 rectangular sections (6 × 6 × 6 mm) (n = 60 per group), and processed as recommended by the respective manufacturer. For each indirect material, the following adhesive systems were applied according to the respective manufacturer's instructions: 1) AdheSE Universal [ADU]; 2) All-Bond Universal (ABU); 3) Ambar Universal (AMB); 4) Clearfil Universal (CFU); 5) Futurabond U (FBU); 6) One Coat 7 Universal (OCU); 7) Peak Universal Bond (PUB); 8) Prime&Bond Elect (PBE); 9) Scotchbond Universal Adhesive (SBU); 10) Xeno Select (XEN, negative control). After the application of the adhesive system, cylinder-shaped transparent matrices were filled with a dual-curing resin cement (NX3) and light cured. Specimens were stored in water (37°C for 24 h) and tested in shear mode at 1.0 mm/min (mSBS). The failure pattern and μSBS were statistically evaluated (a = 0.05). LAV, VTR, and EMP showed a greater number of cohesive fractures than EMX and CZI (p materials. There was a wide variability in mean μSBS when different universal adhesives were applied to the several CAD/CAM indirect materials. Most universal adhesives bonded well to air-abraded zirconia.

  7. New strategy to create “Super Dentin” using adhesive technology: Reinforcement of adhesive–dentin interface and protection of tooth structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toru Nikaido

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Dentin bonding systems have been dramatically simplified and improved during the recent decades. Monomer penetration into dentin and its polymerization in situ creates a hybrid layer, which is essential to obtain good bonding to dentin. Moreover, the presence of an acid–base resistant zone below the hybrid layer has been documented with self-etching adhesive systems in an artificial secondary caries attack. When ultrastructure of the acid–base resistant zone is assessed by SEM and TEM observations, formation of the acid–base resistant zone is considered to be due to the monomer penetration potential and fluoride release in the adhesive systems. Natural dentin has a limited potential to resist an acid attack of secondary caries; however, the acid–base resistant zone does not purely consist of dentin in morphology, it is rather a combination of dentin and the adjacent hybrid layer. Therefore, the reinforced dentin has been called “Super Dentin” bearing the ability to prevent primary and secondary caries. Prospectively, the great potential of adhesive technology in creation of the “Super Dentin” would lead to the development of new materials for mechanical, chemical and biological protection of the dental structures.

  8. An experimental study of double-peeling mechanism inspired by biological adhesive systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heepe, Lars; Raguseo, Saverio; Gorb, Stanislav N.

    2017-01-01

    Double- (or multiple-) peeling systems consist of two (or numerous) tapes adhering to a substrate and having a common hinge, where the pulling force is applied. Biological systems, consisting of tape-like (or spatula-like) contact elements, are widely observed in adhesive pads of flies, beetles...

  9. Shape and Dynamics of Adhesive Cells: Mechanical Response of Open Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yuehua; Jiang, Hongyuan

    2017-05-01

    Cell adhesion is an essential biological process. However, previous theoretical and experimental studies ignore a key variable, the changes of cellular volume and pressure, during the dynamic adhesion process. Here, we treat cells as open systems and propose a theoretical framework to investigate how the exchange of water and ions with the environment affects the shape and dynamics of cells adhered between two adhesive surfaces. We show that adherent cells can be either stable (convex or concave) or unstable (spontaneous rupture or collapse) depending on the adhesion energy density, the cell size, the separation of two adhesive surfaces, and the stiffness of the flexible surface. Strikingly, we find that the unstable states vanish when cellular volume and pressure are constant. We further show that the detachments of convex and concave cells are very different. The mechanical response of adherent cells is mainly determined by the competition between the loading rate and the regulation of the cellular volume and pressure. Finally, we show that as an open system the detachment of adherent cells is also significantly influenced by the loading history. Thus, our findings reveal a major difference between living cells and nonliving materials.

  10. Self-adhesive microculture system for extended live cell imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skommer, J; McGuinness, D; Wlodkowic, D

    2011-06-01

    Gas permeable and biocompatible soft polymers are convenient for biological applications. Using the soft polymer poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS), we established a straightforward technique for in-house production of self-adhesive and optical grade microculture devices. A gas permeable PDMS layer effectively protects against medium evaporation, changes in osmolarity, contamination and drug diffusion. These chip-based devices can be used effectively for long term mammalian cell culture and support a range of bioassays used in pharmacological profiling of anti-cancer drugs. Results obtained on a panel of hematopoietic and solid tumor cell lines during screening of investigative anti-cancer agents corresponded well to those obtained in a conventional cell culture on polystyrene plates. The cumulative correlation analysis of multiple cell lines and anti-cancer drugs showed no adverse effects on cell viability or cell growth retardation during microscale static cell culture. PDMS devices also can be custom modified for many bio-analytical purposes and are interfaced easily with both inverted and upright cell imaging platforms. Moreover, PDMS microculture devices are suitable for extended real time cell imaging. Data from the multicolor, real time analysis of apoptosis on human breast cancer MCF-7 cells provided further evidence that elimination of redundant centrifugation/washing achieved during microscale real time analysis facilitates preservation of fragile apoptotic cells and provides dynamic cellular information at high resolution. Because only small reaction volumes are required, such devices offer reduced use of consumables as well as simplified manipulations during all stages of live cell imaging.

  11. Wood : adhesives

    Science.gov (United States)

    A.H. Conner

    2001-01-01

    This chapter on wood adhesives includes: 1) Classification of wood adhesives 2) Thermosetting wood adhesives 3) Thermoplastic adhesives, 4) Wood adhesives based on natural sources 5) Nonconventional bonding of wood 6) Wood bonding.

  12. Effects of solvent evaporation on water sorption/solubility and nanoleakage of adhesive systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Talita Baumgratz Cachapuz CHIMELI

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate the influence of solvent evaporation in the kinetics of water diffusion (water sorption-WS, solubility-SL, and net water uptake and nanoleakage of adhesive systems. Material and Methods: Disk-shaped specimens (5.0 mm in diameter x 0.8 mm in thickness were produced (N=48 using the adhesives: Clearfil S3 Bond (CS3/Kuraray, Clearfil SE Bond - control group (CSE/Kuraray, Optibond Solo Plus (OS/Kerr and Scotchbond Universal Adhesive (SBU/3M ESPE. The solvents were either evaporated for 30 s or not evaporated (N=24/per group, and then photoactivated for 80 s (550 mW/cm2. After desiccation, the specimens were weighed and stored in distilled water (N=12 or mineral oil (N=12 to evaluate the water diffusion over a 7-day period. Net water uptake (% was also calculated as the sum of WS and SL. Data were submitted to 3-way ANOVA/Tukey's test (α=5%. The nanoleakage expression in three additional specimens per group was also evaluated after ammoniacal silver impregnation after 7 days of water storage under SEM. Results: Statistical analysis revealed that only the factor "adhesive" was significant (p<0.05. Solvent evaporation had no influence in the WS and SL of the adhesives. CSE (control presented significantly lower net uptake (5.4%. The nanoleakage was enhanced by the presence of solvent in the adhesives. Conclusions: Although the evaporation has no effect in the kinetics of water diffusion, the nanoleakage expression of the adhesives tested increases when the solvents are not evaporated.

  13. A new angle on clinging in geckos: incline, not substrate, triggers the deployment of the adhesive system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, Anthony P.; Higham, Timothy E.

    2009-01-01

    Lizards commonly climb in complex three-dimensional habitats, and gekkotans are particularly adept at doing this by using an intricate adhesive system involving setae on the ventral surface of their digits. However, it is not clear whether geckos always deploy their adhesive system, given that doing so may result in decreased (i.e. reduction in speed) locomotor performance. Here, we investigate circumstances under which the adhesive apparatus of clinging geckos becomes operative, and examine the potential trade-offs between speed and clinging. We quantify locomotor kinematics of a gecko with adhesive capabilities (Tarentola mauritanica) and one without (Eublepharis macularius). Whereas, somewhat unusually, E. macularius did not suffer a decrease in locomotor performance with an increase in incline, T. mauritanica exhibited a significant decrease in speed between the level and a 10° incline. We demonstrate that this results from the combined influence of slope and the deployment of the adhesive system. All individuals kept their digits hyperextended on the level, but three of the six individuals deployed their adhesive system on the 10° incline, and they exhibited the greatest decrease in velocity. The deployment of the adhesive system was dependent on incline, not surface texture (600 grit sandpaper and Plexiglas), despite slippage occurring on the level Plexiglas substrate. Our results highlight the type of sensory feedback (gravity) necessary for deployment of the adhesive system, and the trade-offs associated with adhesion. PMID:19656797

  14. Combination Effect of Hemostatic and Disinfecting Agents on Micro-leakage of Restorations Bonded with Different Bonding Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farhadpour H

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Statement of Problem: Hemostatic agents may affect the micro-leakage of different adhesive systems. Also, chlorhexidine has shown positive effects on micro-leakage. However, their interaction effect has not been reported yet. Objectives: To evaluate the effect of contamination with a hemostatic agent on micro- leakage of total- and self-etching adhesive systems and the effect of chlorhexidine application after the removal of the hemostatic agent. Materials and Methods: Standardized Class V cavity was prepared on each of the sixty caries free premolars at the cemento-enamel junction, with the occlusal margin located in enamel and the gingival margin in dentin. Then, the specimens were randomly divided into 6 groups (n = 10 according to hemostatic agent (H contamination, chlorhexidine (CHX application, and the type of adhesive systems (Adper Single Bond and Clearfil SE Bond used. After filling the cavities with resin composite, the root apices were sealed with utility wax. Furthermore, all the surfaces, except for the restorations and 1mm from the margins, were covered with two layers of nail varnish. The teeth were immersed in a 0.5% basic fuschin dye for 24 hours, rinsed, blot-dried and sectioned longitudinally through the center of the restorations bucco- lingualy. The sections were examined using a stereomicroscope and the extension of dye penetration was analyzed according to a non-parametric scale from 0 to 3. Statistical analysis was performed using Kruskal-Wallis test and Mann-Whitney U-test. Results: While ASB group showed no micro-leakage in enamel, none of the groups showed complete elimination of micro-leakage from the dentin. Regarding micro- leakage at enamel, and dentin margins, there was no significant difference between groups 1 and 2, 1 and 3, and 2 and 3 (p > 0.05. A significantly lower micro-leakage at the enamel and dentin margins was observed in group 3, compared to group 6. No significant difference was observed between

  15. Modelling and Laboratory Studies on the Adhesion Fatigue Performance for Thin-Film Asphalt and Aggregate System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dongsheng Wang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Adhesion between asphalt and aggregate plays an important role in the performance of asphalt mixtures. A low-frequency adhesion fatigue test was proposed in this paper to study the effect of environment on the asphalt-aggregate adhesion system. The stress-based fatigue model had been utilized to describe the fatigue behavior of thin-film asphalt and aggregate system. The factors influencing the adhesion fatigue performance were also investigated. Experiment results show that asphalt has more important effect on the adhesion performance comparing with aggregate. Basalt, which is regarded as hydrophobic aggregates with low silica content, has better adhesion performance to asphalt binder when compared with granite. The effects of aging on the adhesion fatigue performance are different for PG64-22 and rubber asphalt. Long-term aging is found to reduce the adhesion fatigue lives for rubber asphalt and aggregate system, while the effect of long-term aging for aggregate and PG64-22 binder system is positive. Generally the increased stress amplitude and test temperature could induce greater damage and lead to less fatigue lives for adhesion test system.

  16. Effects of Different Radiation Doses on the Bond Strengths of Two Different Adhesive Systems to Enamel and Dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Cunha, Sandra Ribeiro de Barros; Ramos, Pedro Augusto Minorin Mendes; Haddad, Cecília Maria Kalil; da Silva, João Luis Fernandes; Fregnani, Eduardo Rodrigues; Aranha, Ana Cecília Corrêa

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the effects of three different radiation doses on the bond strengths of two different adhesive systems to enamel and dentin. Eighty human third molars were randomly divided into four groups (n = 20) according to the radiation dose (control/no radiation, 20 Gy, 40 Gy, and 70 Gy). The teeth were sagittally sectioned into three slices: one mesial and one distal section containing enamel and one middle section containing dentin. The sections were then placed in the enamel and dentin groups, which were further divided into two subgroups (n = 10) according to the adhesive used. Three restorations were performed in each tooth (one per section) using Adper Single Bond 2 (3M ESPE) or Universal Single Bond (3M ESPE) adhesive system and Filtek Z350 XT (3M ESPE) resin composite and subjected to the microshear bond test. Data were analyzed using a two-way ANOVA followed by Tukey's test. Failure modes were examined under a stereoscopic loupe. Radiotherapy did not affect the bond strengths of the adhesives to either enamel or dentin. In dentin, the Universal Single Bond adhesive system showed higher bond strength values when compared with the Adper Single Bond adhesive system. More adhesive failures were observed in the enamel for all radiation doses and adhesives. Radiotherapy did not influence the bond strength to enamel or dentin, irrespective of the adhesive or radiation dose used.

  17. Microtensile bond strength of three simplified adhesive systems to caries-affected dentin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scholtanus, J.D.; Purwanta, K.; Dogan, N.; Kleverlaan, C.J.; Feilzer, A.J.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of the study was to determine the microtensile bond strength of three different simplified adhesive systems to caries-affected dentin. Materials and Methods: Fifteen extracted human molars with primary carious lesions were ground flat until dentin was exposed. Soft

  18. Microtensile Bond Strength of Three Simplified Adhesive Systems to Caries-affected Dentin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scholtanus, Johannes; Purwanta, Kenny; Dogan, Nilgun; Kleverlaan, Cees J.; Feilzer, Albert J.

    Purpose: The purpose of the study was to determine the microtensile bond strength of three different simplified adhesive systems to caries-affected dentin. Materials and Methods: Fifteen extracted human molars with primary carious lesions were ground flat until dentin was exposed. Soft

  19. Systemic EP4 Inhibition Increases Adhesion Formation in a Murine Model of Flexor Tendon Repair.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael B Geary

    Full Text Available Flexor tendon injuries are a common clinical problem, and repairs are frequently complicated by post-operative adhesions forming between the tendon and surrounding soft tissue. Prostaglandin E2 and the EP4 receptor have been implicated in this process following tendon injury; thus, we hypothesized that inhibiting EP4 after tendon injury would attenuate adhesion formation. A model of flexor tendon laceration and repair was utilized in C57BL/6J female mice to evaluate the effects of EP4 inhibition on adhesion formation and matrix deposition during flexor tendon repair. Systemic EP4 antagonist or vehicle control was given by intraperitoneal injection during the late proliferative phase of healing, and outcomes were analyzed for range of motion, biomechanics, histology, and genetic changes. Repairs treated with an EP4 antagonist demonstrated significant decreases in range of motion with increased resistance to gliding within the first three weeks after injury, suggesting greater adhesion formation. Histologic analysis of the repair site revealed a more robust granulation zone in the EP4 antagonist treated repairs, with early polarization for type III collagen by picrosirius red staining, findings consistent with functional outcomes. RT-PCR analysis demonstrated accelerated peaks in F4/80 and type III collagen (Col3a1 expression in the antagonist group, along with decreases in type I collagen (Col1a1. Mmp9 expression was significantly increased after discontinuing the antagonist, consistent with its role in mediating adhesion formation. Mmp2, which contributes to repair site remodeling, increases steadily between 10 and 28 days post-repair in the EP4 antagonist group, consistent with the increased matrix and granulation zones requiring remodeling in these repairs. These findings suggest that systemic EP4 antagonism leads to increased adhesion formation and matrix deposition during flexor tendon healing. Counter to our hypothesis that EP4 antagonism

  20. Application of the total etching technique or self-etching primers on primary teeth after air abrasion Aplicação da técnica de condicionamento total ou de "primers" autocondicionantes em dentes decíduos após abrasão a ar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fábio Renato Manzolli Leite

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Since the use of air abrasion has grown in pediatric dentistry, the aim of this study was to evaluate, by means of shear bond strength testing, the need to use the total etching technique or self-etching primers on dentin of primary teeth after air abrasion. Twenty-five exfoliated primary molars had their occlusal dentin exposed by trimming and polishing. Specimens were treated by: Air abrasion + Scotchbond MultiPurpose adhesive (G1; 37% phosphoric acid + Scotchbond MP adhesive (G2; Clearfil SE (G3; Air abrasion + 37% phosphoric acid + Scotchbond MP adhesive (G4; Air abrasion + Clearfil SE (G5. On the treated surface, a cylinder of 2 mm by 6 mm was made using a composite resin (Z100. Duncan's test showed that: (G2 = G3 = G5 > (G1 = G4. The use of a self-etching primer on air abraded dentin is recommended to obtain higher bond strengths.Como o uso da abrasão a ar tem aumentado em odontopediatria, o objetivo deste trabalho foi avaliar a resistência ao cisalhamento da resina composta Z100 sobre a superfície dentinária de dentes decíduos após abrasionamento a ar associado ou não a técnica de condicionamento total (ácido fosfórico + Scotchbond Multi Purpose ou "primer" autocondicionante (Clearfil SE Bond. A superfície oclusal de 25 molares decíduos foi removida para exposição completa da superfície dentinária. Após polimento com lixas abrasivas, foram divididos em 5 grupos (5 espécimes em cada tratados por abrasão + adesivo Scotchbond (G1; condicionamento ácido + adesivo Scotchbond (G2; adesivo Clearfil (G3; abrasão a ar + condicionamento ácido + adesivo Scotchbond (G4; abrasão a ar + adesivo Clearfil (G5. Uma matriz bipartida foi adaptada à superfície dentinária e preenchida com resina composta. Após polimerização, corpos-de-prova de 2 mm x 6 mm foram obtidos. O teste de Duncan mostrou a desigualdade (G1 = G4 < (G2 = G3 = G5. Desse modo, conclui-se que, após o abrasionamento dentinário, deve ser utilizado o sistema de

  1. Amalgam shear bond strength to dentin using single-bottle primer/adhesive systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cobb, D S; Denehy, G E; Vargas, M A

    1999-10-01

    To evaluate the in vitro shear bond strengths (SBS) of a spherical amalgam alloy (Tytin) to dentin using several single-bottle primer/adhesive systems both alone: Single Bond (SB), OptiBond Solo (Sol), Prime & Bond 2.1 (PB), One-Step (OS) and in combination with the manufacturer's supplemental amalgam bonding agent: Single Bond w/3M RelyX ARC (SBX) and Prime & Bond 2.1 w/Amalgam Bonding Accessory Kit (PBA). Two, three-component adhesive systems, Scotchbond Multi-Purpose (SBMP) and Scotchbond Multi-Purpose Plus w/light curing (S + V) and w/o light curing (S+) were used for comparison. One hundred eight extracted human third molars were mounted lengthwise in phenolic rings with acrylic resin. The proximal surfaces were ground to expose a flat dentin surface, then polished to 600 grit silicon carbide paper. The teeth were randomly assigned to 9 groups (n = 12), and dentin surfaces in each group were treated with an adhesive system according to the manufacturer's instructions, except for S + V specimens, where the adhesive was light cured for 10 s before placing the amalgam. Specimens were then secured in a split Teflon mold, having a 3 mm diameter opening and amalgam was triturated and condensed onto the treated dentin surfaces. Twenty minutes after condensation, the split mold was separated. Specimens were placed in distilled water for 24 hrs, then thermocycled (300 cycles, between 5 degrees C and 55 degrees C, with 12 s dwell time). All specimens were stored in 37 degrees C distilled water for 7 days, prior to shear strength testing using a Zwick Universal Testing Machine at a cross-head speed of 0.5 mm/min. The highest to the lowest mean dentin shear bond strength values (MPa) for the adhesive systems tested were: S + V (10.3 +/- 2.3), SBX (10.2 +/- 3.5), PBA, (6.4 +/- 3.6), SOL (5.8 +/- 2.5), SBMP (5.7 +/- 1.8), S+ (4.8 +/- 2.3), PB (2.7 +/- 2.6), SB (2.7 +/- 1.1) and OS (2.5 +/- 1.8). One-way ANOVA and Duncan's Multiple Range Test indicated significant

  2. Shear bond strength of different adhesive systems to normal and caries-affected dentin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niloofar Shadman

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND AIM: According to the effect of the adhesive and substrate type on the bond strength, examination of the adhesive is required in all aspects. The aim of this study was to evaluate the shear bond strength of different adhesive systems to normal dentin (ND and caries affected dentin (CAD in permanent teeth. METHODS: Thirty extracted molars with small occlusal caries were selected. After preparation and determination of ND and CAD by caries detector, teeth were divided into three groups and treated with one of the two tested adhesives: Single Bond 2 (SB2, Scotchbond Universal with etch (SBU-ER, and Scotchbond Universal without etch (SBU-SE. Then composite (Filtek Z-250 XT were attached to the surfaces and cured. After water storage (24 hours and thermocycling (500 cycles 5-55 °C, bond strength was calculated and failure modes were determined by stereomicroscope. The data were analyzed by one-way ANOVA and post-hoc test [Tukey HSD (honest significant difference] and with P ˂ 0.050 as the level of significance. RESULTS: Only SBU-ER had significantly higher shear bond strength than SBU-SE in ND (P = 0.027 and CAD (P = 0.046. Bond strength in SBU-ER the highest and in SBU-SE had the lowest amounts in CAD and ND. There was no significant difference in each group between ND and CAD. CONCLUSION: The 2-step etch-and-rinse adhesive (SBU-ER had higher bond strength to ND and CAD than the selfetch adhesive (SBU-SE.

  3. Microshear Bond Strength of OptiBond All-in-One Self-adhesive Agent to Er:YAG Laser Treated Enamel After Thermocycling and Water Storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasraei, Shahin; Yarmohammadi, Ebrahim; Ghazizadeh, Mohammad Vahid

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: This study aimed to compare the microshear bond strength of composite to enamel treated with Erbium-Doped Yttrium Aluminum Garnet (Er:YAG) laser using a self-etch one step bonding agent. Methods: Seventy-six enamel surfaces were prepared from 38 sound human third molar teeth. Specimens were randomly divided into four groups of 18. The enamel surface in half the specimens was irradiated with Er:YAG laser. One extra specimen from each group was evaluated under a scanning electron microscope (SEM). Composite micro-cylinders were bonded to the specimen surfaces using OptiBond All-In-One (OB) adhesive agent and stored in distilled water for 24 hours. Half the specimens were thermocycled (2000 cycles) and stored in distilled water at 37°C for three months (TW). The microshear bond strength of composite to enamel was measured using a universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 1 mm/min. The fractured surfaces were evaluated under a stereomicroscope at ×40 magnification to determine the mode of failure. Data were analyzed using repeated measures analysis of variance (ANOVA) and t test. Results: The mean values (±standard deviation) were 17.96 ± 2.92 MPa in OB group, 22.29 ± 4.25 MPa in laser + OB group, 18.11 ± 3.52 MPa in laser + OB + TW group and 9.42 ± 2.47 MPa in OB + TW group. Repeated measures ANOVA showed that laser irradiation increased the microshear bond strength ( P Enamel surface preparation with Er:YAG laser is recommended to enhance the durability of the bond of self-etch bonding systems to enamel.

  4. Influence of AC system design on the realisation of tractive efforts by high adhesion locomotives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiryagin, Maksym; Wolfs, Peter; Cole, Colin; Stichel, Sebastian; Berg, Mats; Manfred, Plöchl

    2017-08-01

    The main task for heavy haul railway operators is to reduce the cost of exported minerals and enhance the long-term viability of rail transport operations through increasing productivity by running longer and heavier trains. The common opinion is that this is achievable by means of implementation of high adhesion locomotives with advanced AC traction technologies. Modern AC high adhesion locomotives are very complex mechatronic systems and can be designed with two alternative traction topologies of either bogie or individual axle controls. This paper describes a modelling approach for these two types of AC traction systems with the application of an advanced co-simulation methodology, where an electrical system and a traction algorithm are modelled in Matlab/Simulink, and a mechanical system is modelled in a multibody software package. Although the paper concentrates on the analysis of the functioning for these two types of traction control systems, the choice of reference slip values also has an influence on the performance of both systems. All these design variations and issues have been simulated for various adhesion conditions at the wheel-rail interface and their influence on the high traction performance of a locomotive equipped with two three-axle bogies has been discussed.

  5. Effect of saliva decontamination procedures on shear bond strength of a one-step adhesive system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ülker, E; Bilgin, S; Kahvecioğlu, F; Erkan, A I

    2017-09-01

    To evaluate the effect of different saliva decontamination procedures on the shear bond strength of a one-step universal adhesive system (Single Bond™ Universal Adhesive, 3M ESPE, St. Paul, MN, USA). The occlusal surfaces of 75 human third molars were ground to expose dentin. The teeth were divided into the following groups: Group 1 (control group): Single Bond™ Universal Adhesive was applied to the prepared tooth according to the manufacturer's recommendations and light cured; no contamination procedure was performed. Group 2: Bonding, light curing, saliva contamination, and dry. Group 3: Bonding, light curing, saliva contamination, rinse, and dry. Group 4: After the procedure performed in Group 2, reapplication of bonding. Group 5: After the procedure performed in Group 3, reapplication of bonding. Then, composite resins were applied with cylindrical-shaped plastic matrixes and light cured. For shear bond testing, a notch-shaped force transducer apparatus was applied to each specimen at the interface between the tooth and composite until failure occurred. The data were statistically analyzed using one-way ANOVA. One-way ANOVA revealed significant differences in shear bond strength between the control group and experimental Groups 2 and 4 (P 0.05). The present in vitro study showed that water rinsing is necessary if cured adhesive resin is contaminated with saliva to ensure adequate bond strength.

  6. Long-term In Vitro Adhesion of Polyalkenoate-based Adhesives to Dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sezinando, Ana; Perdigão, Jorge; Ceballos, Laura

    2017-01-01

    To study the influence of a polyalkenoate copolymer (VCP) on the immediate (24 h) and 6-month dentin bonding stability of VCP-based adhesives, using microtensile bond strength (μTBS), nanoleakage (NL), and ultramorphological analyses (FE-SEM). Eighty-four caries-free molars were randomly assigned to seven adhesives: Clearfil SE Bond (CSE, Kuraray Noritake); Adper Single Bond Plus (SB, 3M ESPE); SB without VCP (SBnoVCP, 3M ESPE); Scotchbond Universal Adhesive applied as a etch-and-rinse adhesive (SBU_ER); SBU without VCP applied as an etch-and-rinse adhesive (SBUnoVCP_ER); SBU applied as a self-etch adhesive (SBU_SE, 3M ESPE); SBU without VCP applied as a self-etch adhesive (SBUnoVCP_SE, 3M ESPE). Half of the beams were tested after 24 h, and the other half was aged in water for 6 months prior to testing. For each tooth/evaluation time, two beams were randomly selected for NL analysis. Statistical analyses of µTBS results were performed using two-way ANOVA, Tukey's post-hoc tests, and Student's t-test for paired data (α = 0.05). Nanoleakage was statistically analyzed using the Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney tests, with Wilcoxon's test for paired data. For FE-SEM, four caries-free molars were assigned to each of the seven groups. Dentin disks were restored and cross sectioned into halves. One half was observed at 24 h, and the other at 6 months. The highest 6-month mean μTBS was obtained with SBU_SE/SBUnoVCP_SE and SBUnoVCP_ER. SBUnoVCP_SE resulted in greater silver deposition at 6 months. FE-SEM observations showed that CSE and SBU_SE specimens resulted in a submicron hybrid layer without signs of degradation at 6 months. VCP may contribute to the long-term bonding stability of VCP-based adhesives.

  7. Local and systemic effects of fibrin and cyanoacrylate adhesives on lung lesions in rabbits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcus V.H. Carvalho

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: Tissue adhesives can be used to prevent pulmonary air leaks, which frequently occur after lung interventions. The objective of this study is to evaluate local and systemic effects of fibrin and cyanoacrylate tissue adhesives on lung lesions in rabbits. METHODS: Eighteen rabbits were submitted to videothoracoscopy + lung incision alone (control or videothoracoscopy + lung incision + local application of fibrin or cyanoacrylate adhesive. Blood samples were collected and assessed for leukocyte, neutrophil and lymphocyte counts and interleukin-8 levels preoperatively and at 48 hours and 28 days post-operatively. After 28 days, the animals were euthanized for gross examination of the lung surface, and lung fragments were excised for histopathological analysis. RESULTS: Fibrin and cyanoacrylate produced similar adhesion scores of the lung to the parietal pleura. Microscopic analysis revealed uniform low-cellular tissue infiltration in the fibrin group and an intense tissue reaction characterized by dense inflammatory infiltration of granulocytes, giant cells and necrosis in the cyanoacrylate group. No changes were detected in the leukocyte, neutrophil or lymphocyte count at any time-point, while the interleukin-8 levels were increased in the fibrin and cyanoacrylate groups after 48 hours compared with the pre-operative control levels (p<0.01. CONCLUSION: Both adhesive agents promoted normal tissue healing, with a more pronounced local inflammatory reaction observed for cyanoacrylate. Among the serum markers of inflammation, only the interleukin-8 levels changed post-operatively, increasing after 48 hours and decreasing after 28 days to levels similar to those of the control group in both the fibrin and cyanoacrylate groups.

  8. Effect of saliva contamination on cementation of orthodontic brackets using different adhesive systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robaski, Aliden-Willian; Pamato, Saulo; Tomás-de Oliveira, Marcelo; Pereira, Jefferson-Ricardo

    2017-07-01

    The enamel condition and the quality of surface are points that need to be considered for achieving optimal efficiency in the treatment with orthodontic brackets. The aim of this study was to assess the immediate bond strength of metallic brackets cemented to dental. Forty human premolars were double-sectioned, placed in PVC matrices and randomly divided into 10 groups (n=8). They received artificial saliva contamination before or after the application of adhesive systems, except for the control groups. The metallic brackets were cemented using two orthodontic cements (Transbond™ Plus Color Change, 3M Unitek e Transbond™ XT Light, 3M Unitek). The specimens were subjected to mechanical shear bond strength testing and classified according to the fracture pattern. The results were analyzed using a two-way ANOVA and Tukey's test for multiple comparisons ( p brackets cemented on the dental enamel. Key words: Bonding, orthodontic brackets, shear bond strength, saliva, adhesive systems.

  9. Opto-acoustic technique to evaluate adhesion strength of thin-film systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Yoshida

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available An opto-acoustic technique is proposed to evaluate the adhesion strength of thin film systems at the film-substrate interface. The thin-film system to be examined is configured as an end-mirror of a Michelson interferometer, and driven from the rear with an acoustic transducer at audible frequencies. The amplitude of the resultant oscillation of the film is quantified as the variation in the contrast of the interferometric fringe pattern observed with a digital camera at 30 frames/s. As a proof of concept, experiment has been conducted with the use of a pair of strongly and weakly adhered Au-coated Si-wafer specimens. The technique successfully differentiates the adhesion strength of the specimens.

  10. Shear bond strength of amalgam to dentin using different dentin adhesive systems

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    Farimah Sardari

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims: The aim of this in vitro study was to assess the shear bond strength of amalgam to dentin using four dentin adhesive systems.Materials and Methods: One hundred human molars were selected. After enamel removal, a dentin cylinder with 3 mm thickness was prepared. Eighty specimens were resorted with amalgam and four dentin adhesive systems as follows (n=20: group 1, Scotch Bond Multi-Purpose; group 2, One Coat Bond; group 3, PQ1; and group 4, Panavia-F. In group 5, 20 specimens were resorted with amalgam and varnish as control group. The specimens were incubated at 37°C for 24 h. The shear bond strengths were then measured by using push out method. The data were analyzed by one-way ANOVA and post hoc Duncan's tests.Results: Mean values for bond strengths of test groups were as follows: group 1=21.03±8.9, group 2=23.47±9, group 3=13.16±8.8, group 4=20.07±8.9 and group 5=14.15±8.7 MPa±SD. One-way ANOVA showed the statistically significant difference between the bond strengths of five groups (P=0.001. Post hoc Duncan's test showed significant difference between groups 1and 3 (P=0.008, groups 1 and 5 (P=0.019, groups 2 and 5 (P=0.0008, groups 4 and 5 (P=0.042, and groups 3 and 4 (P=0.018.Conclusion: Results of this study showed that the bond strength of amalgam to dentin using One Coat Bond as dentin adhesive system was higher than that observed in other dentin adhesive systems.

  11. Effects of bleaching agents and adhesive systems in dental pulp: a literature review

    OpenAIRE

    Oliveira, Maria Antonieta Veloso Carvalho de; Quagliatto, Paulo Sérgio; Magalhães, Denildo; Biffi, João Carlos Gabrielli

    2012-01-01

    The dental pulp may be exposed to several irritants that are potentially noxious to the health and functions of this tissue. Each type of irritant or injury has different effects on the pulp, which are generally characterized by acute inflammation, chronic inflammation or necrosis. Common examples of irritants are dental caries, cavity preparation procedures, traumatic injuries, and chemical substances like bleaching agents and adhesive systems. The present study aimed to review the current k...

  12. Evaluation of bond strength of a conventional adhesive system in irradiated teeth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emanuel Jordan de CARVALHO

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction One of the most common treatments of head and neck cancer patients is radiotherapy, a treatment method which uses ionizing radiation beam and destroys tumor cells, minimizing damage to neighbor cells. Purpose To evaluate the bond strength of a conventional adhesive system in irradiated teeth. Method 24 third human molars, 12 of which were randomly exposed to radiation and prepared from the removal of occlusal enamel, then exposed to a flat dentine surface. The adhesive system Stae was applied according to the manufacturer’s instructions. Next, two 2 mm increments of resin were implemented. The samples were hemi sectioned specimens, originating shapped toothpick. To evaluate the bond strength, a micro tensile test was done with 500N load and speed of 0.5 mm/minute. Result There was no statistically significant difference between the bond strength of teeth which were or were not exposed to radiation and which used a conventional adhesive system. Conclusion Although the radiation doses applied may cause some alterations in microscopic range in dental tissues, it can be concluded that these alterations do not influence in the bond strength in dentin of irradiated teeth.

  13. Influence of CVD diamond tips and Er:YAG laser irradiation on bonding of different adhesive systems to dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Melissa Aline; Di Nicolo, Rebeca; Barcellos, Daphne Camara; Batista, Graziela Ribeiro; Pucci, Cesar Rogerio; Rocha Gomes Torres, Carlos; Borges, Alessandra Bühler

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the microtensile bond strength of three adhesive systems, using different methods of dentin preparation. A hundred and eight bovine teeth were used. The dentin from buccal face was exposed and prepared with three different methods, divided in 3 groups: Group 1 (DT)- diamond tip on a high-speed handpiece; Group 2 (CVD)-CVD tip on a ultrasonic handpiece; Group 3 (LA)-Er: YAG laser. The teeth were divided into 3 subgroups, according adhesive systems used: Subgroup 1-Adper Single Bond Plus/3M ESPE (SB) total-etch adhesive; Subgroup 2-Adper Scotchbond SE/3M ESPE (AS) selfetching adhesive; Subgroup 3-Clearfil SE Bond/Kuraray (CS) selfetching adhesive. Blocks of composite (Filtek Z250-3M ESPE) 4 mm high were built up and specimens were stored in deionized water for 24 hours at 37°C. Serial mesiodistal and buccolingual cuts were made and stick-like specimens were obtained, with transversal section of 1.0 mm(2). The samples were submitted to microtensile test at 1 mm/min and load of 10 kg in a universal testing machine. Data (MPa) were subjected to ANOVA and Tukey's tests (p adhesive produced significantly lower bond strength values compared to other groups. Surface treatment with Er: YAG laser associated with Single Bond Plus or Clearfil SE Bond adhesives and surface treatment with CVD tip associated with Adper Scotchbond SE adhesive produced significantly lower bond strength values compared to surface treatment with diamond or CVD tips associated with Single Bond Plus or Adper Scotchbond SE adhesives. Interactions between laser and the CVD tip technologies and the different adhesive systems can produce a satisfactory bonding strength result, so that these associations may be beneficial and enhance the clinical outcomes.

  14. Influence of different adhesive systems on bond strength of carbon fiber posts used to restore endodontically treated teeth

    OpenAIRE

    Silva, Lorena dos Santos; Reis, Kátia Rodrigues; Ambrosano, Glaucia Maria Bovi; Chuí, Fabíola Mendonça da Silva; Sena, Neylla Teixeira; Carvalhal, Cintia Iara Oda; Oliveira, Jonas Alves de

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of three adhesive systems on resinous bonding of carbon fiber posts on roots of endodontically treated bovine incisors. Thirty bovine lower incisors with similar dimensions were selected for this study. The roots were endodontically treated and subsequently prepared for post cementation. The posts were treated with adhesive systems Scotchbond MultiPurpose Plus – 3M chemical cure (Group I), light cure (Group II) and dual cure (Group III). Car...

  15. EVALUATION OF MICROLEAKAGE DEGREE IN COMPOSITE RESIN RESTORATIONS BY COMPARING TWO ADHESIVES SYSTEMS AFTER DIFFERENT AGING PERIODS

    OpenAIRE

    Falconí-Borja, Gabriela Marina; Molina-Pule, Carla Grimaneza; Velásquez-Ron, Byron Vinicio; Armas-Vega, Ana del Carmen

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Introduction: the clinical success of adhesive systems is based on the use of a responsible for creating microporosity in the dental structure acid and arises assess in vitro the degree of microfiltration in direct restorations with cavities class V where two adhesive systems differently used composition and at different periods of time. Methods: in the cervical third of 60 third molars extracted by therapeutic indication performed by diamond instruments, two cavities one on the ...

  16. Interference of functional monomers with polymerization efficiency of adhesives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanabusa, Masao; Yoshihara, Kumiko; Yoshida, Yasuhiro; Okihara, Takumi; Yamamoto, Takatsugu; Momoi, Yasuko; Van Meerbeek, Bart

    2016-04-01

    The degree of conversion (DC) of camphorquinone/amine-based adhesives is affected by acidic functional monomers as a result of inactivation of the amine co-initiator through an acid-base reaction. During bonding, functional monomers of self-etch adhesives chemically interact with hydroxyapatite (HAp). Here, we tested in how far the latter interaction of functional monomers with HAp counteracts the expected reduction in DC of camphorquinone/amine-based adhesives. The DC of three experimental adhesive formulations, containing either of the two functional monomers [10-methacryloyloxydecyl dihydrogen phosphate (10-MDP) or 4-methacryloxyethyl trimellitic acid anhydride (4-META)] or no functional monomer (no-FM; control), was measured with and without HAp powder added to the adhesive formulations. Both the variables 'functional monomer' and 'HAp' were found to be significant, with the functional monomer reducing the DC and HAp counteracting this effect. It is concluded that the functional monomers 10-MDP and 4-META interfere with the polymerization efficiency of adhesives. This interference is less prominent in the presence of HAp, which would clinically correspond to when these two functional monomers of the adhesive simultaneously interact with HAp in tooth tissue. © 2016 Eur J Oral Sci.

  17. Long-term bond strength of adhesive systems applied to etched and deproteinized dentin

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    Ninoshka Uceda-Gómez

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the early and 12-month bond strength of two adhesive systems (Single Bond-SB and One Step-OS applied to demineralized dentin (WH and demineralized/NaOCl-treated dentin (H. Twenty flat dentin surfaces were exposed, etched, rinsed and slightly dried. For the H groups, a solution of 10% NaOCl was applied for 60 s, rinsed (15 s and slightly dried. The adhesives were applied according to the manufacturer's instructions and composite resin crowns were incrementally constructed. After 24 h (water-37ºC, the specimens was sectioned in order to obtain resin-dentin sticks (0.8 mm². The specimens were tested in microtensile (0.5 mm/min immediately (IM or after 12 months of water storage (12M. The data (MPa were subjected to ANOVA and Tukey's test (a=0.05. Only the main factors adhesive and time were significant (p=0.004 and p=0.003, respectively. SB (42.3±9.1 showed higher bond strengths than OS (33.6±11.6. The mean bond strength for IM-group (42.5±8.7 was statistically superior to 12M (33.3±11.8. The use of 10% NaOCl, after acid etching, did not improve the immediate and the long-term resin-dentin bond strength.

  18. Tetraspanin CD9: A Key Regulator of Cell Adhesion in the Immune System

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    Raquel Reyes

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available The tetraspanin CD9 is expressed by all the major subsets of leukocytes (B cells, CD4+ T cells, CD8+ T cells, natural killer cells, granulocytes, monocytes and macrophages, and immature and mature dendritic cells and also at a high level by endothelial cells. As a typical member of the tetraspanin superfamily, a prominent feature of CD9 is its propensity to engage in a multitude of interactions with other tetraspanins as well as with different transmembrane and intracellular proteins within the context of defined membranal domains termed tetraspanin-enriched microdomains (TEMs. Through these associations, CD9 influences many cellular activities in the different subtypes of leukocytes and in endothelial cells, including intracellular signaling, proliferation, activation, survival, migration, invasion, adhesion, and diapedesis. Several excellent reviews have already covered the topic of how tetraspanins, including CD9, regulate these cellular processes in the different cells of the immune system. In this mini-review, however, we will focus particularly on describing and discussing the regulatory effects exerted by CD9 on different adhesion molecules that play pivotal roles in the physiology of leukocytes and endothelial cells, with a particular emphasis in the regulation of adhesion molecules of the integrin and immunoglobulin superfamilies.

  19. Compatibility between dental adhesive systems and dual-polymerizing composite resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michaud, Pierre-Luc; MacKenzie, Alexandra

    2016-10-01

    Information is lacking about incompatibilities between certain types of adhesive systems and dual-polymerizing composite resins, and universal adhesives have yet to be tested with these resins. The purpose of this in vitro study was to investigate the bonding outcome of dual-polymerizing foundation composite resins by using different categories of adhesive solutions and to determine whether incompatibilities were present. One hundred and eighty caries-free, extracted third molar teeth were allocated to 9 groups (n=20), in which 3 different bonding agents (Single Bond Plus [SB]), Scotchbond Multi-purpose [MP], and Scotchbond Universal [SU]) were used to bond 3 different composite resins (CompCore AF [CC], Core Paste XP [CP], and Filtek Supreme Ultra [FS]). After restorations had been fabricated using an Ultradent device, the specimens were stored in water at 37°C for 24 hours. The specimens were tested under shear force at a rate of 0.5 mm/min. The data were analyzed with Kruskal-Wallis tests and post hoc pairwise comparisons (α=.05). All 3 composite resins produced comparable shear bond strengths when used with MP (P=.076). However, when either SB or SU was used, the light-polymerized composite resin (FS) and 1 dual-polymerized foundation composite resin (CC) bonded significantly better than the other dual-polymerized foundation composite resin (CP) (Pincompatibilities exist between different products. Copyright © 2016 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Impact of head and neck radiotherapy on the mechanical behavior of composite resins and adhesive systems: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madrid Troconis, Cristhian Camilo; Santos-Silva, Alan Roger; Brandão, Thaís Bianca; Lopes, Marcio Ajudarte; de Goes, Mario Fernando

    2017-11-01

    To analyze the evidence regarding the impact of head and neck radiotherapy (HNRT) on the mechanical behavior of composite resins and adhesive systems. Searches were conducted on PubMed, Embase, Scopus and ISI Web of Science databases using "Radiotherapy", "Composite resins" and "Adhesive systems" as keywords. Selected studies were written in English and assessed the mechanical behavior of composite resins and/or adhesive systems when bonding procedure was conducted before and/or after a maximum radiation dose ≥50Gy, applied under in vitro or in vivo conditions. In total, 115 studies were found but only 16 were included, from which five evaluated the effect of in vitro HNRT on microhardness, wear resistance, diametral tensile and flexural strength of composite resins, showing no significant negative effect in most of reports. Regarding bond strength of adhesive systems, 11 studies were included from which five reported no meaningful negative effect when bonding procedure was conducted before simulated HNRT. Conversely, five studies showed that bond strength diminished when adhesive procedure was done after in vitro radiation therapy. Only two studies about dental adhesion were conducted after in vivo radiotherapy but the results were not conclusive. The mechanical behavior of composite resins and adhesive systems seems not to be affected when in vitro HNRT is applied after bonding procedure. However, bond strength of adhesive systems tends to decrease when simulated radiotherapy is used immediately before bonding procedure. Studies assessing dentin bond strength after in-vivo HNRT were limited and controversial. Copyright © 2017 The Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Simplified cementation of lithium disilicate crowns: Retention with various adhesive resin cement combinations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Glen H; Lepe, Xavier; Patterson, Amanda; Schäfer, Oliver

    2017-09-27

    A composite resin cement and matching self-etch adhesive was developed to simplify the dependable retention of lithium disilicate crowns. The efficacy of this new system is unknown. The purpose of this in vitro study was to determine whether lithium disilicate crowns cemented with a new composite resin and adhesive system and 2 other popular systems provide clinically acceptable crown retention after long-term aging with monthly thermocycling. Extracted human molars were prepared with a flat occlusal surface, 20-degree convergence, and 4 mm axial length. The axio-occlusal line angle was slightly rounded. The preparation surface area was determined by optical scanning and the analysis of the standard tessellation language (STL) files. The specimens were distributed into 3 cement groups (n=12) to obtain equal mean surface areas. Lithium disilicate crowns (IPS e.max Press) were fabricated for each preparation, etched with 9.5% hydrofluoric acid for 15 seconds, and cleaned. Cement systems were RelyX Ultimate with Scotch Bond Universal (3M Dental Products); Monobond S, Multilink Automix with Multilink Primer A and B (Ivoclar Vivadent AG); and NX3 Nexus with OptiBond XTR (Kerr Corp). Each adhesive provided self-etching of the dentin. Before cementation, the prepared specimens were stored in 35°C water. A force of 196 N was used to cement the crowns, and the specimens were polymerized in a 35°C oven at 100% humidity. After 24 hours of storage at 100% humidity, the cemented crowns were thermocycled (5°C to 55°C) for 5000 cycles each month for 6 months. The crowns were removed axially at 0.5 mm/min. The removal force was recorded and the dislodgement stress calculated using the preparation surface area. The type of cement failure was recorded, and the data were analyzed by 1-way ANOVA and the chi-square test (α=.05) after the equality of variances had been assessed with the Levene test. The Levene test was nonsignificant (P=.936). The ANOVA revealed the mean removal

  2. Denture Adhesives

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Devices Products and Medical Procedures Dental Devices Denture Adhesives Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing options ... Wearers Reporting Problems to the FDA Background Denture adhesives are pastes, powders or adhesive pads that may ...

  3. Evaluation of Underwater Adhesives and Friction Coatings for In Situ Attachment of Fiber Optic Sensor System for Subsea Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Henry H.; Le, Suy Q.; Orndoff, Evelyne S.; Smith, Frederick D.; Tapia, Alma S.; Brower, David V.

    2012-01-01

    Integrity and performance monitoring of subsea pipelines and structures provides critical information for managing offshore oil and gas production operation and preventing environmentally damaging and costly catastrophic failure. Currently pipeline monitoring devices require ground assembly and installation prior to the underwater deployment of the pipeline. A monitoring device that could be installed in situ on the operating underwater structures could enhance the productivity and improve the safety of current offshore operation. Through a Space Act Agreement (SAA) between the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Johnson Space Center (JSC) and Astro Technology, Inc. (ATI), JSC provides technical expertise and testing facilities to support the development of fiber optic sensor technologies by ATI. This paper details the first collaboration effort between NASA JSC and ATI in evaluating underwater applicable adhesives and friction coatings for attaching fiber optic sensor system to subsea pipeline. A market survey was conducted to examine different commercial ]off ]the ]shelf (COTS) underwater adhesive systems and to select adhesive candidates for testing and evaluation. Four COTS epoxy based underwater adhesives were selected and evaluated. The adhesives were applied and cured in simulated seawater conditions and then evaluated for application characteristics and adhesive strength. The adhesive that demonstrated the best underwater application characteristics and highest adhesive strength were identified for further evaluation in developing an attachment system that could be deployed in the harsh subsea environment. Various friction coatings were also tested in this study to measure their shear strengths for a mechanical clamping design concept for attaching fiber optic sensor system. A COTS carbide alloy coating was found to increase the shear strength of metal to metal clamping interface by up to 46 percent. This study provides valuable data for

  4. Bond strength of an adhesive system irradiated with Nd:YAG laser in dentin treated with Er:YAG laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malta, D A M P; De Andrade, M F; Costa, M M; Lizarelli, R F Z; Pelino, J E P

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this in vitro study was to verify through micro tensile bond test the bond strength of an adhesive system irradiated with Nd:YAG laser in dentine previously treated with Er:YAG laser. Twenty caries free extracted human third molars were used. The teeth were divided in four experimental groups (n = 5): (G1) control group; (G2) irradiation of the adhesive system with the Nd:YAG laser; (G3) dentin treatment with Er:YAG laser; (G4) dentin treatment with Er:YAG laser followed by the irradiation of the adhesive system with Nd:YAG laser. The Er:YAG laser fluency parameter for the dentin treatment was of 60 J/cm 2 . The adhesive system was irradiated with the Nd:YAG laser with fluency of 100 J/cm 2 . Dental restorations were performed with Adper Single Bond 2/Z250. One tooth from each group was prepared for the evaluation of the adhesive interface under SEM and bond failure tests were also performed and evaluated. The statistical analysis showed statistical significant difference between the groups G1 and G3, G1 and G4, G2 and G3, and G2 and G4; and similarity between the groups G1 and G2, and G3 and G4. The adhesive failures were predominant in all the experimental groups. The SEM analysis showed an adhesive interface with features confirming the results of the mechanical tests. The Nd:YAG laser on the adhesive system did not influence the bond strength in dentin treated or not with the Er:YAG laser

  5. Effects of solvent evaporation time on immediate adhesive properties of universal adhesives to dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luque-Martinez, Issis V; Perdigão, Jorge; Muñoz, Miguel A; Sezinando, Ana; Reis, Alessandra; Loguercio, Alessandro D

    2014-10-01

    To evaluate the microtensile bond strengths (μTBS) and nanoleakage (NL) of three universal or multi-mode adhesives, applied with increasing solvent evaporation times. One-hundred and forty caries-free extracted third molars were divided into 20 groups for bond strength testing, according to three factors: (1) Adhesive - All-Bond Universal (ABU, Bisco, Inc.), Prime&Bond Elect (PBE, Dentsply), and Scotchbond Universal Adhesive (SBU, 3M ESPE); (2) Bonding strategy - self-etch (SE) or etch-and-rinse (ER); and (3) Adhesive solvent evaporation time - 5s, 15s, and 25s. Two extra groups were prepared with ABU because the respective manufacturer recommends a solvent evaporation time of 10s. After restorations were constructed, specimens were stored in water (37°C/24h). Resin-dentin beams (0.8mm(2)) were tested at 0.5mm/min (μTBS). For NL, forty extracted molars were randomly assigned to each of the 20 groups. Dentin disks were restored, immersed in ammoniacal silver nitrate, sectioned and processed for evaluation under a FESEM in backscattered mode. Data from μTBS were analyzed using two-way ANOVA (adhesive vs. drying time) for each strategy, and Tukey's test (α=0.05). NL data were computed with non-parametric tests (Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney tests, α=0.05). Increasing solvent evaporation time from 5s to 25s resulted in statistically higher mean μTBS for all adhesives when used in ER mode. Regarding NL, ER resulted in greater NL than SE for each of the evaporation times regardless of the adhesive used. A solvent evaporation time of 25s resulted in the lowest NL for SBU-ER. Residual water and/or solvent may compromise the performance of universal adhesives, which may be improved with extended evaporation times. Copyright © 2014 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Influence of blood contamination during multimode adhesive application on the microtensile bond strength to dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kucukyilmaz, E; Celik, E U; Akcay, M; Yasa, B

    2017-12-01

    The present study evaluated the effects of blood contamination performed at different steps of bonding on the microtensile bond strength (μTBS) of multimode adhesives to dentin when using the self-etch approach. Seventy-five molars were randomly assigned to three adhesive groups comprising 25 specimens each: two multimode adhesives [Single Bond Universal (SBU) and All-Bond Universal (ABU)] and a conventional one-step self-etch adhesive [Clearfil S3 Bond Plus (CSBP)]. Each group was subdivided as follows: (1) uncontaminated (control): bonding application/light curing as a positive control; (2) contamination-1 (cont-1): bonding application/light curing/blood contamination/dry as a negative control; (3) contamination-2 (cont-2): bonding application/light curing/blood contamination/rinse/dry; (4) contamination-3 (cont-3): bonding application/blood contamination/dry/bonding re-application/light curing; and (5) contamination-4 (cont-4): bonding application/blood contamination/rinse/dry/bonding re-application/light curing. Dentin specimens were prepared for μTBS testing after the composite resin application. Data were analyzed with two-way ANOVA and post-hoc tests (α = 0.05). μTBS values were similar in cont-3 groups, and ABU/cont-4 and corresponding control groups, but were significantly lower in the other groups than in their control groups (P groups showed the lowest μTBS values (P blood contaminants and reapplying the adhesive may regain the dentin adhesion when contamination occurs before light curing. Alternatively, rinsing and drying contaminants followed by adhesive re-application may be effective depending on adhesive type.

  7. Role of bacterial adhesion in the microbial ecology of biofilms in cooling tower systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yang; Zhang, Wei; Sileika, Tadas; Warta, Richard; Cianciotto, Nicholas P; Packman, Aaron

    2009-01-01

    The fate of the three heterotrophic biofilm forming bacteria, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Klebsiella pneumoniae and Flavobacterium sp. in pilot scale cooling towers was evaluated both by observing the persistence of each species in the recirculating water and the formation of biofilms on steel coupons placed in each cooling tower water reservoir. Two different cooling tower experiments were performed: a short-term study (6 days) to observe the initial bacterial colonization of the cooling tower, and a long-term study (3 months) to observe the ecological dynamics with repeated introduction of the test strains. An additional set of batch experiments (6 days) was carried out to evaluate the adhesion of each strain to steel surfaces under similar conditions to those found in the cooling tower experiments. Substantial differences were observed in the microbial communities that developed in the batch systems and cooling towers. P. aeruginosa showed a low degree of adherence to steel surfaces both in batch and in the cooling towers, but grew much faster than K. pneumoniae and Flavobacterium in mixed-species biofilms and ultimately became the dominant organism in the closed batch systems. However, the low degree of adherence caused P. aeruginosa to be rapidly washed out of the open cooling tower systems, and Flavobacterium became the dominant microorganism in the cooling towers in both the short-term and long-term experiments. These results indicate that adhesion, retention and growth on solid surfaces play important roles in the bacterial community that develops in cooling tower systems.

  8. A study on the compatibility between one-bottle dentin adhesives and composite resins using micro-shear bond strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Minju; Shin, Yooseok; Park, Jeong-Won; Roh, Byoung-Duck

    2015-02-01

    This study was performed to determine whether the combined use of one-bottle self-etch adhesives and composite resins from same manufacturers have better bond strengths than combinations of adhesive and resins from different manufacturers. 25 experimental micro-shear bond test groups were made from combinations of five dentin adhesives and five composite resins with extracted human molars stored in saline for 24 hr. Testing was performed using the wire-loop method and a universal testing machine. Bond strength data was statistically analyzed using two way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Tukey's post hoc test. Two way ANOVA revealed significant differences for the factors of dentin adhesives and composite resins, and significant interaction effect (p composite resin (p composite resin than other manufacturer's composite resin. Not all combinations of adhesive and composite resin by same manufacturers failed to show significantly higher bond strengths than mixed manufacturer combinations.

  9. Influence of different adhesive systems on the pull-out bond strength of glass fiber posts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Luciana Mendonça; Andrade, Andréa Mello de; Machuca, Melissa Fernanda Garcia; da Silva, Paulo Maurício Batista; da Silva, Ricardo Virgolino C; Veronezi, Maria Cecília

    2008-01-01

    This in vitro study evaluated the tensile bond strength of glass fiber posts (Reforpost - Angelus-Brazil) cemented to root dentin with a resin cement (RelyX ARC - 3M/ESPE) associated with two different adhesive systems (Adper Single Bond - 3M/ESPE and Adper Scotchbond Multi Purpose (MP) Plus - 3M/ESPE), using the pull-out test. Twenty single-rooted human teeth with standardized root canals were randomly assigned to 2 groups (n=10): G1- etching with 37% phosphoric acid gel (3M/ESPE) + Adper Single Bond + #1 post (Reforpost - Angelus) + four #1 accessory posts (Reforpin - Angelus) + resin cement; G2- etching with 37% phosphoric acid gel + Adper Scotchbond MP Plus + #1 post + four #1 accessory posts + resin cement. The specimens were stored in distilled water at 37 degrees C for 7 days and submitted to the pull-out test in a universal testing machine (EMIC) at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min. The mean values of bond strength (kgf) and standard deviation were: G1- 29.163 +/- 7.123; G2- 37.752 +/-13.054. Statistical analysis (Student's t-test; a=0.05 showed no statistically significant difference (pAdhesive bonding failures between resin cement and root canal dentin surface were observed in both groups, with non-polymerized resin cement in the apical portion of the post space when Single Bond was used (G1). The type of adhesive system employed on the fiber post cementation did not influence the pull-out bond strength.

  10. Influence of different adhesive systems on the pull-out bond strength of glass fiber posts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciana Mendonça da Silva

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available This in vitro study evaluated the tensile bond strength of glass fiber posts (Reforpost - Angelus-Brazil cemented to root dentin with a resin cement (RelyX ARC - 3M/ESPE associated with two different adhesive systems (Adper Single Bond - 3M/ESPE and Adper Scotchbond Multi Purpose (MP Plus - 3M/ESPE, using the pull-out test. Twenty single-rooted human teeth with standardized root canals were randomly assigned to 2 groups (n=10: G1- etching with 37% phosphoric acid gel (3M/ESPE + Adper Single Bond + #1 post (Reforpost - Angelus + four #1 accessory posts (Reforpin - Angelus + resin cement; G2- etching with 37% phosphoric acid gel + Adper Scotchbond MP Plus + #1 post + four #1 accessory posts + resin cement. The specimens were stored in distilled water at 37°C for 7 days and submitted to the pull-out test in a universal testing machine (EMIC at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min. The mean values of bond strength (kgf and standard deviation were: G1- 29.163 ± 7.123; G2- 37.752 ±13.054. Statistical analysis (Student's t-test; a=0.05 showed no statistically significant difference (p<0.05 between the groups. Adhesive bonding failures between resin cement and root canal dentin surface were observed in both groups, with non-polymerized resin cement in the apical portion of the post space when Single Bond was used (G1. The type of adhesive system employed on the fiber post cementation did not influence the pull-out bond strength.

  11. Comparative evaluation of microleakage of composite restorations using fifth and seventh generations of adhesive systems

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    Mitra Tabari

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Simultaneous etching of enamel and dentin using the novel generation of adhesive systems with contracted operational steps, has shown a good clinical efficacy. The aim of this study was to evaluate the microleakage of composite restorations using the V and VII generations of adhesive systems on primary teeth. Methods: This study was performed on 45 human intact extracted primary teeth. Following class V cavity preparation, the samples were randomly divided into three groups included 15 teeth based on the type of bonding agent Single Bond 2, Clearfil S3 Bond or G Bond. After applying the bonding agents, the teeth filled with composite Z250. The microleakage values of incisal and gingival margins were separately scored by 2% basic fuchsine staining based on a 0-3 ordinal ranking system. The data were analyzed by using Kruskal Wallis and Mann_whitney U tests. Results: In overall, the score of microleakage at incisal (0.58±0.94 and gingival (1.06±0.19 edges did not have significant difference. Also, there was no significant difference between incisal and gingival microleakage considering the different types of bonding. Conclusion: Regarding to less operational steps and lower risk of salivary contamination, the VII generation of dentin bonding agents can be applied for filling the class V cavities of primary teeth.

  12. A completely transparent, adhesively bonded soda-lime glass block masonry system

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    F. Oikonomopoulou

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A pioneering, all transparent, self-supporting glass block facade is presented in this paper. Previously realized examples utilize embedded metal components in order to obtain the desired structural performance despite the fact that these elements greatly affect the facade’s overall transparency level. Undeniably, the oxymoron ‘transparency and strength’ remains the prime concern in such applications. In this paper, a new, innovative structural system for glass block facades is described, which demonstrably meets both criteria. The structure is exclusively constructed by monolithic glass blocks, bonded with a colourless, UV-curing adhesive, obtaining thus a maximum transparency. In addition, the desired structural performance is achieved solely through the masonry system, without any opaque substructure. Differing from previous realized projects, solid soda-lime glass blocks are used rather than borosilicate ones. This article provides an overview of the integrated architectural and structural design and discusses the choice of materials. The structural verification of the system is demonstrated. The results show that the adhesively bonded glass block structure has the required self-structural behaviour, but only if strict tolerances are met in the geometry of the glass blocks.

  13. Adhesive and Cohesive Strength in FeB/Fe2B Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meneses-Amador, A.; Blancas-Pérez, D.; Corpus-Mejía, R.; Rodríguez-Castro, G. A.; Martínez-Trinidad, J.; Jiménez-Tinoco, L. F.

    2018-05-01

    In this work, FeB/Fe2B systems were evaluated by the scratch test. The powder-pack boriding process was performed on the surface of AISI M2 steel. The mechanical parameters, such as yield stress and Young's modulus of the boride layer, were obtained by the instrumented indentation technique. Residual stresses produced on the boride layer were estimated by using the x-ray diffraction (XRD) technique. The scratch test was performed in order to evaluate the cohesive/adhesive strength of the FeB/Fe2B coating. In addition, a numerical evaluation of the scratch test on boride layers was performed by the finite element method. Maximum principal stresses were related to the failure mechanisms observed by the experimental scratch test. Shear stresses at the interfaces of the FeB/Fe2B/substrate system were also evaluated. Finally, the results obtained provide essential information about the effect of the layer thickness, the residual stresses, and the resilience modulus on the cohesive/adhesive strength in FeB/Fe2B systems.

  14. Shear Bond Strength of Three Orthodontic Bonding Systems on Enamel and Restorative Materials

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    Andreas Hellak

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. The aim of this in vitro study was to determine the shear bond strength (SBS and adhesive remnant index (ARI score of two self-etching no-mix adhesives (iBond™ and Scotchbond™ on different prosthetic surfaces and enamel, in comparison with the commonly used total etch system Transbond XT™. Materials and Methods. A total of 270 surfaces (1 enamel and 8 restorative surfaces, n=30 were randomly divided into three adhesive groups. In group 1 (control brackets were bonded with Transbond XT primer. In the experimental groups iBond adhesive (group 2 and Scotchbond Universal adhesive (group 3 were used. The SBS was measured using a Zwicki 1120™ testing machine. The ARI and SBS were compared statistically using the Kruskal–Wallis test (P≤0.05. Results. Significant differences in SBS and ARI were found between the control group and experimental groups. Conclusions. Transbond XT showed the highest SBS on human enamel. Scotchbond Universal on average provides the best bonding on all other types of surface (metal, composite, and porcelain, with no need for additional primers. It might therefore be helpful for simplifying bonding in orthodontic procedures on restorative materials in patients. If metal brackets have to be bonded to a metal surface, the use of a dual-curing resin is recommended.

  15. Shear Bond Strength of Three Orthodontic Bonding Systems on Enamel and Restorative Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellak, Andreas; Ebeling, Jennifer; Schauseil, Michael; Stein, Steffen; Roggendorf, Matthias; Korbmacher-Steiner, Heike

    2016-01-01

    Objective. The aim of this in vitro study was to determine the shear bond strength (SBS) and adhesive remnant index (ARI) score of two self-etching no-mix adhesives (iBond ™ and Scotchbond ™ ) on different prosthetic surfaces and enamel, in comparison with the commonly used total etch system Transbond XT ™ . Materials and Methods . A total of 270 surfaces (1 enamel and 8 restorative surfaces, n = 30) were randomly divided into three adhesive groups. In group 1 (control) brackets were bonded with Transbond XT primer. In the experimental groups iBond adhesive (group 2) and Scotchbond Universal adhesive (group 3) were used. The SBS was measured using a Zwicki 1120 ™ testing machine. The ARI and SBS were compared statistically using the Kruskal-Wallis test ( P ≤ 0.05). Results . Significant differences in SBS and ARI were found between the control group and experimental groups. Conclusions . Transbond XT showed the highest SBS on human enamel. Scotchbond Universal on average provides the best bonding on all other types of surface (metal, composite, and porcelain), with no need for additional primers. It might therefore be helpful for simplifying bonding in orthodontic procedures on restorative materials in patients. If metal brackets have to be bonded to a metal surface, the use of a dual-curing resin is recommended.

  16. Effect of Adhesive Application on Sealant Success: A Clinical Study of Fifth and Seventh Generation Adhesive Systems

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    Vaibhav Tandon

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The aim of the study was to compare the effect of fifth and seventh generation bonding agent on sealant success.Materials and Methods: Sixty-four school children aged six to nine years received sealants in four permanent molars in a split mouth design, such that each patient received sealant in the first permanent molar with fifth generation bonding agent in one arch and seventh generation bonding agent in the other arch; contra-lateral molars were sealed with sealant alone. The evaluation was carried out at baseline, three months, six months and 12 months, according to the criteria by Feigal et al, in 2000. Chi- square test was used to analyze data at P<0.05 level of significance.Results: Statistically significant differences were found for sealant retention between fifth generation and sealant group, and fifth generation and seventh generation groups; whereas, no significant difference was found for sealant retention between seventh generation and sealant group at three, six and 12 months.Conclusion: As separate etch and rinse steps are not required for seventh generation bonding agents, and almost similar results were obtained for both sealant and seventh generation groups, it can be concluded that application of sealant along with a seventh generation bonding agent may enhance sealant success and can be used for caries prevention in preventive programs.Key words:  Pit and Fissure Sealants; Dental Caries; Adhesives

  17. Photopolymerizable phosphate acrylates as comonomers in dental adhesives with or without triclosan monomer units

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Melinte, Violeta; Buruiana, Tinca; Aldea, Horia; Matiut, Simona; Silion, Mihaela; Buruiana, Emil C.

    2014-01-01

    Phosphate diacrylates (CO-DAP, TMP-DAP) based on castor oil or trimethylolpropane were synthesized and evaluated in dental adhesive formulations in comparison with 3-acryloyloxy-2-hydroxypropyl methacrylate phosphate (AMP-P). In an attempt to promote antibacterial activity, another photopolymerizable monomer (TCS-UMA) containing 5-chloro-2-(2,4-dichlorophenoxy)phenol moiety (triclosan) was prepared and incorporated in adhesive resins. Each of these monomers had a molecular structure confirmed by spectral methods. The photopolymerization rates for monomers (0.063–0.088 s −1 ) were lower than those determined in the monomer combinations (0.116–0.158 s −1 ) incorporating phosphate diacrylate (11 wt.%), BisGMA (33 wt.%), TEGDMA (10 wt.%), UDMA (10 wt.%) and HEMA (15 wt.%), the degree of conversion varying between 63.4 and 74.5%. The formed copolymers showed high values for water sorption (18.65–57.02 μg/mm 3 ) and water solubility (3.51–13.38 μg/mm 3 ), and the contact angle was dependent on the presence of CO-DAP (θ F1 : 66.67°), TMP-DAP (θ F2 : 55.05°) or AMP-P (θ F3 : 52.90°) in the photocrosslinked specimens compared to the sample without phosphate monomer (θ F4 : 82.14°). The scanning electron microscopy image of the dentin–resin composite interface after applying our F1 formulation (pH: 4.1) and its light-curing for 20 s supports the evidence of the formation of the hybrid layer with the tooth structure created by self-etching approach, with no gaps or cracks in the adhesive. A comparative analysis of the adhesion achieved with commercial adhesive systems (Single Bond Universal, C-Bond) rather indicates similarities than differences between them. The addition of triclosan methacrylate (1 wt.%) into the formulation inhibited the bacterial growth of the Streptococcus mutans and Escherichia coli in the direct contact area due to the covalently linked antibacterial monomer. - Highlights: • Synthesis of photopolymerizable phosphate acrylate

  18. Photopolymerizable phosphate acrylates as comonomers in dental adhesives with or without triclosan monomer units

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melinte, Violeta [Petru Poni Institute of Macromolecular Chemistry, 41 A Gr. Ghica Voda Alley, 700487 Iasi (Romania); Buruiana, Tinca, E-mail: tbur@icmpp.ro [Petru Poni Institute of Macromolecular Chemistry, 41 A Gr. Ghica Voda Alley, 700487 Iasi (Romania); Aldea, Horia [Gr. T. Popa University of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Dentistry, Iasi (Romania); Matiut, Simona [Praxis Medical Investigations, 33 Independence, 700102 Iasi (Romania); Silion, Mihaela; Buruiana, Emil C. [Petru Poni Institute of Macromolecular Chemistry, 41 A Gr. Ghica Voda Alley, 700487 Iasi (Romania)

    2014-01-01

    Phosphate diacrylates (CO-DAP, TMP-DAP) based on castor oil or trimethylolpropane were synthesized and evaluated in dental adhesive formulations in comparison with 3-acryloyloxy-2-hydroxypropyl methacrylate phosphate (AMP-P). In an attempt to promote antibacterial activity, another photopolymerizable monomer (TCS-UMA) containing 5-chloro-2-(2,4-dichlorophenoxy)phenol moiety (triclosan) was prepared and incorporated in adhesive resins. Each of these monomers had a molecular structure confirmed by spectral methods. The photopolymerization rates for monomers (0.063–0.088 s{sup −1}) were lower than those determined in the monomer combinations (0.116–0.158 s{sup −1}) incorporating phosphate diacrylate (11 wt.%), BisGMA (33 wt.%), TEGDMA (10 wt.%), UDMA (10 wt.%) and HEMA (15 wt.%), the degree of conversion varying between 63.4 and 74.5%. The formed copolymers showed high values for water sorption (18.65–57.02 μg/mm{sup 3}) and water solubility (3.51–13.38 μg/mm{sup 3}), and the contact angle was dependent on the presence of CO-DAP (θ{sub F1}: 66.67°), TMP-DAP (θ{sub F2}: 55.05°) or AMP-P (θ{sub F3}: 52.90°) in the photocrosslinked specimens compared to the sample without phosphate monomer (θ{sub F4}: 82.14°). The scanning electron microscopy image of the dentin–resin composite interface after applying our F1 formulation (pH: 4.1) and its light-curing for 20 s supports the evidence of the formation of the hybrid layer with the tooth structure created by self-etching approach, with no gaps or cracks in the adhesive. A comparative analysis of the adhesion achieved with commercial adhesive systems (Single Bond Universal, C-Bond) rather indicates similarities than differences between them. The addition of triclosan methacrylate (1 wt.%) into the formulation inhibited the bacterial growth of the Streptococcus mutans and Escherichia coli in the direct contact area due to the covalently linked antibacterial monomer. - Highlights: • Synthesis of

  19. Influence of adhesive strategy on clinical parameters in cervical restorations: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroeder, Marcos; Correa, Ivo Carlos; Bauer, Jose; Loguercio, Alessandro D; Reis, Alessandra

    2017-07-01

    We aimed to answer the following PICO question: "Is the risk of postoperative sensitivity (POS), retention rates and marginal discoloration of composite restorations [CR] bonded with self-etch (SE) in non-carious cervical lesions (NCCLs) of adults equals to etch-and-rinse (ER) adhesives?". A comprehensive search was performed in May 2016 in the MEDLINE, Scopus, Web of Science, LILACS, BBO and Cochrane Library and SIGLE, abstracts of IADR, unpublished and ongoing trials registries, dissertations and theses without restrictions. Only randomized clinical trials that compared composite resin restorations placed with self-etch and etch-and-rinse in NCCLs were included. After removal of duplicates and non-eligible articles, 50 articles from 42 studies (follow-ups of the same study were merged) remained for synthesis of the risk of bias (Cochrane Risk of bias tool). Thirteen studies were at "high" risk of bias, yielding 29 studies for meta-analysis. No difference on the POS after restoration placement (risk ratio [RR] 1.04; 95% CI 0.81 to 1.34) as well as in the retention rates for all follow-up periods was observed. The etch-and-rinse approach produced less marginal discoloration at 18 months to 2 years (RR 1.51; 95% CI 1.21 to 1.90) and at 4 to 5 years (RR 1.81; 95% CI 1.28 to 2.55) (pPOS and the retention rates of composite resin in NCCLs in any of the follow-up periods; but less marginal discoloration was found in etch-and-rinse adhesives. Composite resin restorations placed with self-etch and etch-and-rinse adhesives produce restoration with the similar clinical service and POS, however using etch-and-rinse adhesives one can reduce marginal discoloration. PROSPERO registration number: CRD42015019533. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Effect of Bioactive Glass air Abrasion on Shear Bond Strength of Two Adhesive Resins to Decalcified Enamel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eshghi, Alireza; Khoroushi, Maryam; Rezvani, Alireza

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Bioactive glass air abrasion is a conservative technique to remove initial decalcified tissue and caries. This study examined the shear bond strength of composite resin to sound and decalcified enamel air-abraded by bioactive glass (BAG) or alumina using etch-and-rinse and self-etch adhesives. Materials and Methods: Forty-eight permanent molars were root-amputated and sectioned mesiodistally. The obtained 96 specimens were mounted in acrylic resin; the buccal and lingual surfaces remained exposed. A demineralizing solution was used to decalcify half the specimens. Both sound and decalcified specimens were divided into two groups of alumina and bioactive glass air abrasion. In each group, the specimens were subdivided into two subgroups of Clearfil SE Bond or OptiBond FL adhesives (n=12). Composite resin cylinders were bonded on enamel surfaces cured and underwent thermocycling. The specimens were tested for shear bond strength. Data were analyzed using SPSS 16.0 and three-way ANOVA (α=0.05). Similar to the experimental groups, the enamel surface of one specimen underwent SEM evaluation. Results: No significant differences were observed in composite resin bond strength subsequent to alumina or bioactive glass air abrasion preparation techniques (P=0.987). There were no statistically significant differences between the bond strength of etch-and-rinse and self-etch adhesive groups (P=1). Also, decalcified or intact enamel groups had no significant difference (P=0.918). However, SEM analysis showed much less enamel irregularities with BAG air abrasion compared to alumina air abrasion. Conclusion: Under the limitations of this study, preparation of both intact and decalcified enamel surfaces with bioactive glass air abrasion results in similar bond strength of composite resin in comparison with alumina air abrasion using etch-&-rinse or self-etch adhesives. PMID:25628694

  1. Effect of Bioactive Glass air Abrasion on Shear Bond Strength of Two Adhesive Resins to Decalcified Enamel.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alireza Eshghi

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Bioactive glass air abrasion is a conservative technique to remove initial decalcified tissue and caries. This study examined the shear bond strength of composite resin to sound and decalcified enamel air-abraded by bioactive glass (BAG or alumina using etch-and-rinse and self-etch adhesives.Forty-eight permanent molars were root-amputated and sectioned mesiodistally. The obtained 96 specimens were mounted in acrylic resin; the buccal and lingual surfaces remained exposed. A demineralizing solution was used to decalcify half the specimens. Both sound and decalcified specimens were divided into two groups of alumina and bioactive glass air abrasion. In each group, the specimens were subdivided into two subgroups of Clearfil SE Bond or OptiBond FL adhesives (n=12. Composite resin cylinders were bonded on enamel surfaces cured and underwent thermocycling. The specimens were tested for shear bond strength. Data were analyzed using SPSS 16.0 and three-way ANOVA (α=0.05. Similar to the experimental groups, the enamel surface of one specimen underwent SEM evaluation.No significant differences were observed in composite resin bond strength subsequent to alumina or bioactive glass air abrasion preparation techniques (P=0.987. There were no statistically significant differences between the bond strength of etch-and-rinse and self-etch adhesive groups (P=1. Also, decalcified or intact enamel groups had no significant difference (P=0.918. However, SEM analysis showed much less enamel irregularities with BAG air abrasion compared to alumina air abrasion.Under the limitations of this study, preparation of both intact and decalcified enamel surfaces with bioactive glass air abrasion results in similar bond strength of composite resin in comparison with alumina air abrasion using etch-&-rinse or self-etch adhesives.

  2. The role of type III secretion system and lens material on adhesion of Pseudomonas aeruginosa to contact lenses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Elizabeth P; Tsay, Ruey-Yug; Chia, Jean-San; Wu, Semon; Lee, Jing-Wen; Hu, Fung-Rong

    2012-09-21

    To determine the distribution of invasive and cytotoxic genotypes among ocular isolates of P. aeruginosa and investigate the influence of the type III secretion system (T3SS) on adhesion to conventional, cosmetic, and silicone hydrogel contact lenses (CL). Clinical isolates from 2001 to 2010 were analyzed by multiplex PCR for exoS, exoU, and exoT genes. Bacterial adhesion to etafilcon, nelfilcon (gray colored), balafilcon, and galyfilcon CL with or without artificial tear fluid (ATF) incubation were compared. Surface characteristics were determined with scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Among 87 total isolates, 64 strains were from microbial keratitis cases. CL-related microbial keratitis (CLMK) isolates were mostly of the cytotoxic genotype (expressing exoU) (P = 0.002). No significant differences were found in bacterial adhesion to all types of CL between the genotypes under T3SS-inducing conditions. A trend for least bacterial adhesion of galyfilcon compared to the other CL was noted for both genotypes. Needle complex pscC mutants adhered less to all materials than the wild type (P bacteria adhering on CL surfaces. CLMK isolates were mostly of cytotoxic genotype. Different genotypes did not significantly differ in its adhesion to various CL. T3SS and other adhesins are involved in bacteria-contact lens adhesion through complex interactions. Contact lens materials may also play an important role in the adherence of both genotypes of P. aeruginosa.

  3. Shear bond strength and SEM morphology evaluation of different dental adhesives to enamel prepared with ER:YAG laser

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    Patrícia T Pires

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Early observations of enamel surfaces prepared by erbium lasers motivated clinicians to use laser as an alternative to chemical etching. Aims: Evaluate shear bond strength (SBS values of different dental adhesives on Erbium:Yttrium Aluminum Garnet (Er:YAG laser prepared enamel and to evaluate possible etching patterns correlations between dental adhesives and SBS values. Subjects and Methods: One hundred bovine incisors were randomly assigned to SBS tests on enamel (n = 15 and to enamel morphology analysis ( n = 5 after Er:YAG laser preparation as follows: Group I - 37% phosphoric acid (PA+ ExciTE® ; Group II - ExciTE® ; Group III - AdheSE® self-etching; Group IV - FuturaBond® no-rinse. NR; Group V - Xeno® V. Teeth were treated with the adhesive systems and subjected to thermal cycling. SBS were performed in a universal testing machine at 5 mm/min. Statistical Analysis Used: One-way ANOVA and post-hoc tests (p < 0.05. For the morphology evaluation, specimens were immersed in Ethylenediamine tetraacetic acid (EDTA and the etching pattern analyzed under Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM. Results: Mean bond strengths were Group I - 47.17 ± 1.61 MPa (type I etching pattern; Group II - 32.56 ± 1.64 MPa, Group III - 29.10 ± 1.34 MPa, Group IV - 23.32 ± 1.53 MPa (type III etching pattern; Group V - 24.43 MPa ± 1.55 (type II etching pattern. Conclusions: Different adhesive systems yielded significantly different SBSs. Acid etching significantly increased the adhesion in laser treated enamel. No differences in SBS values were obtained between AdheSE® and ExciTE® without condition with PA. FuturaBond® NR and Xeno® V showed similar SBS, which was lower in comparison to the others adhesives. No correlation between enamel surface morphology and SBS values was observed, except when PA was used.

  4. Six-month storage-time evaluation of one-bottle adhesive systems to dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giannini, Marcelo; Seixas, Carla Alessandra Marcelino; Reis, Andre Figueiredo; Pimenta, Luiz André Freire

    2003-01-01

    The goal of this study was to evaluate the 1-week, 3-month, and 6-month performance of eight commercially available one-bottle adhesive systems to dentin. Lingual and buccal surfaces from human third molars were ground wet on 600-grit SiC paper to obtain a flat dentinal surface. The specimens were randomly divided into 24 groups (n = 10), which were established to measure the shear bond strengths of Bond-1 (B1), ONE-STEP (OS), OptiBond SOLO (OP), Prime & Bond 2.1 (PB), Single Bond (SB), STAE (ST), Syntac Sprint (SS), and Tenure Quick (TQ) after 1-week, 3-month, and 6-month water storage at 37 degrees C. One-bottle adhesives were applied according to manufacturers' instructions and Z100 composite cylinders were applied on the bonded dentinal surfaces. The 3-month water-storage groups were thermocycled for 1500 cycles at 5 degrees C and 55 degrees C and 6-month groups for 3000 cycles. After storage periods, specimens were tested in shear in a universal testing machine (0.5 mm/min). were statistically analyzed by analysis of variance and Tukey test. Results: The changes in shear bond strengths were not uniform over time. Over the test period, OS, PB, SB, and SS exhibited bond strength stability, however, SS presented low bond strengths on all tested periods. A significant decrease in bond strength was observed for B1, OP, ST, and TQ after the 6-month storage period.

  5. Climbing Robot for Ferromagnetic Surfaces with Dynamic Adjustment of the Adhesion System

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    Manuel F. Silva

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a climbing robot with wheeled locomotion and adhesion through permanent magnets, developed with the intention of being used in the inspection of different types of man-made ferromagnetic structures, such as towers for wind turbines, fuel storage tanks, and ship hulls. In this paper are presented the main considerations thought for its project, as well as several constructive aspects, among which are detailed its mechanical and electrical construction, the implemented control architecture, and the human-machine interface developed for the manual and automatic control of the vehicle while in operation. Although it can be manually controlled, the vehicle is designed to have a semiautonomous behavior, allowing a remote inspection process controlled by a technician, this way reducing the risks associated with the human inspection of tall structures and ATEX places. The distinguishing characteristic of this robot is its dynamic adjustment system of the permanent magnets in order to assure the machine adhesion to the surfaces, even when crossing slightly irregular and curved surfaces with a large radius.

  6. A contractile and counterbalancing adhesion system controls the 3D shape of crawling cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burnette, Dylan T; Shao, Lin; Ott, Carolyn; Pasapera, Ana M; Fischer, Robert S; Baird, Michelle A; Der Loughian, Christelle; Delanoe-Ayari, Helene; Paszek, Matthew J; Davidson, Michael W; Betzig, Eric; Lippincott-Schwartz, Jennifer

    2014-04-14

    How adherent and contractile systems coordinate to promote cell shape changes is unclear. Here, we define a counterbalanced adhesion/contraction model for cell shape control. Live-cell microscopy data showed a crucial role for a contractile meshwork at the top of the cell, which is composed of actin arcs and myosin IIA filaments. The contractile actin meshwork is organized like muscle sarcomeres, with repeating myosin II filaments separated by the actin bundling protein α-actinin, and is mechanically coupled to noncontractile dorsal actin fibers that run from top to bottom in the cell. When the meshwork contracts, it pulls the dorsal fibers away from the substrate. This pulling force is counterbalanced by the dorsal fibers' attachment to focal adhesions, causing the fibers to bend downward and flattening the cell. This model is likely to be relevant for understanding how cells configure themselves to complex surfaces, protrude into tight spaces, and generate three-dimensional forces on the growth substrate under both healthy and diseased conditions.

  7. Effect of dental bleaching after bracket bonding and debonding using three different adhesive systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucianna de Oliveira Gomes

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the influence of bonding and debonding of orthodontic brackets on dental in-home bleaching, taking into account three different adhesive systems. METHODS: Forty-four bovine incisors were divided into four groups according to the primer system used for orthodontic bracket bonding. Following the debonding of orthodontic brackets, the teeth were stored in staining solution for 96 hours. Then, teeth were whitened using 10% carbamide peroxide for two weeks at a 6-hour-a-day regime. Standardized digital photographs were taken at the following intervals: T0 (initial; T1 (after debonding; T2 (after pigmentation; T3, T4 and T5 representing 1, 7, and 14 days of bleaching. Repeatability and stability tests were carried out to check the method accuracy. Images were analyzed using Adobe Photoshop 7.0 software considering (L*a*b*color coordinate values and a modified color difference total (Δ;E'. RESULTS: The results of this study (ANOVA and Tukey; p < 0.01 demonstrated that after 7 days of bleaching, experimental groups showed significantly less teeth whitening compared to the control group. However, there were no significant color differences between the groups after 14 days, according to values of lightness (L*. CONCLUSIONS: Regardless of the adhesive primer system applied, bonding and debonding of orthodontic brackets alters the outcome of tooth whitening in the first 7 days of bleaching, however it has no influence on the whitening of the dental structure after 14 days of in-home dental bleaching with 10% carbamide peroxide.

  8. Degree of conversion of simplified contemporary adhesive systems as influenced by extended air-activated or passive solvent volatilization modes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borges, Boniek C D; Souza-Junior, Eduardo Jose; Brandt, William C; Loguercio, Alessandro D; Montes, Marcos A J R; Puppin-Rontani, Regina M; Sinhoreti, Mario Alexandre Coelho

    2012-01-01

    This study evaluated the effect of five methods of solvent volatilization on the degree of conversion (DC) of nine one-bottle adhesive systems using Fourier transform infrared/attenuated total reflectance (FTIR/ATR) analysis. Nine adhesives were tested: Adper Single Bond 2 (SB), Adper Easy One (EO), One Up Bond F Plus (OUP), One Coat Bond SL (OC), XP Bond (XP), Ambar (AM), Natural Bond (NB), GO, and Stae. The adhesive systems were applied to a zinc-selenide pellet and 1) cured without solvent volatilization, 2) left undisturbed for 10 seconds before curing, 3) left undisturbed for 60 seconds before curing, 4) air-dried with an air stream for 10 seconds before curing, and 5) air-dried with an air stream for 60 seconds before curing. FTIR/ATR spectra were obtained, and the DC was calculated by comparing the aliphatic bonds/reference peaks before and after light activation for 10 seconds (FlashLite 1401). The DC means of each material were analyzed by one-way analysis of variance and post hoc Tukey test (pStae adhesive systems was not affected by the five evaporation conditions. Air-drying for 60 seconds before curing yielded the highest DC for SB, EO, and OC. Extended solvent volatilization time (60 seconds) either with or without air-drying before curing provided the highest DC for AM, NB, XP, and OUP. Thus, the monomer conversion of adhesive systems was material dependent. In general, the 60-second passive or active air-drying modes to volatilize solvents before curing enhanced the degree of conversion for the one-bottle simplified adhesive systems.

  9. Shear bond strength evaluation of resin composite to resin-modified glass-ionomer cement using three different resin adhesives vs. glass-ionomer based adhesive

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mostafa Sadeghi

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: The clinical success of sandwich technique depends on the strength of resin-modified glass ionomer cement (RMGIC bonding to both dentin and resin composite. Therefore, the shear bond strength (SBS of resin composite bonded to RMGIC utilizing different resin adhesives versus a GIC-based adhesive was compared. Materials and methods: In this in vitro study, 84 holes (5×2 mm were prepared in acrylic blocks, randomly divided into seven groups (n=12 and filled with RMGIC (Light-Cured Universal Restorative, GC. In the Group I; no adhesive was applied on the RMGIC. In the Group II, non-etched and Group III was etched with phosphoric acid. In groups II and III, after rinsing, etch-and-rinse adhesive (OptiBond Solo Plus; in the Group IV; a two-step self-etch adhesive (OptiBond XTR and in Group V; a one-step self-etch (OptiBond All-in-One were applied on the cement surfaces. Group VI; a GIC-based adhesive (Fuji Bond LC was painted over the cement surface and cured. Group VII; the GIC-based adhesive was brushed over RMGIC followed by the placement of resin composite and co-cured. Afterward; resin composite (Point 4 cylinders were placed on the treated cement surfaces. The specimens were placed in 100% humidity at 37 ± 1°C and thermo cycled. The shear bond test was performed at a cross-head speed of 1 mm/min and calculated in MPa; the specimens were examined to determine mode of failure. The results were analyzed using one-way ANOVA and Tukey test. Results: The maximum (24.62±3.70 MPa and minimum (18.15±3.38 MPa SBS mean values were recorded for OptiBond XTR adhesive and the control group, respectively. The pairwise comparisons showed no significant differences between the groups that bonded with different adhesives. The adhesive failure was the most common failure mode observed. Conclusion: This study suggests that GIC-based adhesive could be applied over RMGIC as co-cure technique for sandwich restorations in lieu of employing the resin

  10. Effect of Cigarette Smoke on Resin Composite Bond Strength to Enamel and Dentin Using Different Adhesive Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theobaldo, J D; Catelan, A; Rodrigues-Filho, U; Marchi, G M; Lima, Danl; Aguiar, Fhb

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the microshear bond strength of composite resin restorations in dental blocks with or without exposure to cigarette smoke. Eighty bovine dental blocks were divided into eight groups (n=10) according to the type of adhesive (Scotchbond Multi-Purpose, 3M ESPE, St Paul, MN, USA [SBMP]; Single Bond 2, 3M ESPE [SB]; Clearfil SE Bond, Kuraray Medical Inc, Okayama, Japan [CSEB]; Single Bond Universal, 3M ESPE [SBU]) and exposure to smoke (no exposure; exposure for five days/20 cigarettes per day). The adhesive systems were applied to the tooth structure, and the blocks received a composite restoration made using a matrix of perforated pasta. Data were statistically analyzed using analysis of variance and Tukey test (αadhesive systems (padhesives, but no differences were noted in enamel.

  11. Differences of Streptococcus mutans adhesion between artificial mouth systems: a dinamic and static methods

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    Aryan Morita

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Various materials have been used for treating dental caries. Dental caries is a disease that attacks hard tissues of the teeth. The initial phase of caries is a formation of bacterial biofilm, called as dental plaque. Dental restorative materials are expected for preventing secondary caries formation initiated by dental plaque. Initial bacterial adhesion is assumed to be an important stage of dental plaque formation. Bacteria that recognize the receptor for binding to the pellicle on tooth surface are known as initial bacterial colonies. One of the bacteria that plays a role in the early stage of dental plaque formation is Streptococcus mutans (S. mutans. Artificial mouth system (AMS used in bacterial biofilm research on the oral cavity provides the real condition of oral cavity and continous and intermittent supply of nutrients for bacteria. Purpose: This study aimed to compare the profile of S. mutans bacterial adhesion as the primary etiologic agent for dental caries between using static method and using artificial mouth system, a dinamic. method (AMS. Method: The study was conducted at Faculty of Dentistry and Integrated Research and testing laboratory (LPPT in Universitas Gadjah Mada from April to August 2015. Composite resin was used as the subject of this research. Twelve composite resins with a diameter of 5 mm and a width of 2 mm were divided into two groups, namely group using static method and group using dynamic method. Static method was performed by submerging the samples into a 100µl suspension of 1.5 x 108 CFU/ml S. mutans and 200µl BHI broth. Meanwhile AMS method was carried out by placing the samples at the AMS tube drained with 20 drops/minute of bacterial suspension and sterile aquadest. After 72 hours, five samples from each group were calculated for their biofilm mass using 1% crystal violet and read by a spectrofotometer with a wavelength of 570 nm. Meanwhile, one sample from each group was taken for its

  12. Adhesive sealing of dentin surfaces in vitro: A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu-Nawareg, Manar M; Zidan, Ahmed Z; Zhou, Jianfeng; Agee, Kelli; Chiba, Ayaka; Tagami, Jungi; Pashley, David H

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this review is to describe the evolution of the use of dental adhesives to form a tight seal of freshly prepared dentin to protect the pulp from bacterial products, during the time between crown preparation and final cementum of full crowns. The evolution of these “immediate dentin sealants” follows the evolution of dental adhesives, in general. That is, they began with multiple-step, etch-and-rinse adhesives, and then switched to the use of simplified adhesives. Methods Literature was reviewed for evidence that bacteria or bacterial products diffusing across dentin can irritate pulpal tissues before and after smear layer removal. Smear layers can be solubilized by plaque organisms within 7–10 days if they are directly exposed to oral fluids. It is likely that smear layers covered by temporary restorations may last more than one month. As long as smear layers remain in place, they can partially seal dentin. Thus, many in vitro studies evaluating the sealing ability of adhesive resins use smear layer-covered dentin as a reference condition. Surprisingly, many adhesives do not seal dentin as well as do smear layers. Results Both in vitro and in vivo studies show that resin-covered dentin allows dentinal fluid to cross polymerized resins. The use of simplified single bottle adhesives to seal dentin was a step backwards. Currently, most authorities use either 3-step adhesives such as Scotchbond Multi-Purposea or OptiBond FLb or two-step self-etching primer adhesives, such as Clearfil SEc, Unifil Bondd or AdheSEe, respectfully. PMID:26846037

  13. Bond Strength of Resin Composite to Dentin with Different Adhesive Systems: Influence of Relative Humidity and Application Time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amsler, Fabienne; Peutzfeldt, Anne; Lussi, Adrian; Flury, Simon

    2015-06-01

    To investigate the influence of relative humidity and application time on bond strength to dentin of different classes of adhesive systems. A total of 360 extracted human molars were ground to mid-coronal dentin. The dentin specimens were treated with one of six adhesive systems (Syntac Classic, OptiBond FL, Clearfil SE Bond, AdheSE, Xeno Select, or Scotchbond Universal), and resin composite (Filtek Z250) was applied to the treated dentin surface under four experimental conditions (45% relative humidity/application time according to manufacturers' instructions; 45% relative humidity/reduced application time; 85% relative humidity/application time according to manufacturers' instructions; 85% relative humidity/reduced application time). After storage (37°C, 100% humidity, 24 h), shear bond strength (SBS) was measured and data analyzed with nonparametric ANOVA followed by Kruskal-Wallis tests and Mann-Whitney U-tests with Bonferroni-Holm correction for multiple testing (level of significance: α = 0.05). Increased relative humidity and reduced application time had no effect on SBS for Clearfil SE Bond and Scotchbond Universal (p = 1.00). For Syntac Classic, OptiBond FL, AdheSE, and Xeno Select there was no effect on SBS of reduced application time of the adhesive system (p ≥ 0.403). However, increased relative humidity significantly reduced SBS for Syntac Classic, OptiBond FL, and Xeno Select irrespective of application time (p ≤ 0.003), whereas for AdheSE, increased relative humidity significantly reduced SBS at recommended application time only (p = 0.002). Generally, increased relative humidity had a detrimental effect on SBS to dentin, but reduced application time had no effect.

  14. Protein adhesives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles R. Frihart; Linda F. Lorenz

    2018-01-01

    Nature uses a wide variety of chemicals for providing adhesion internally (e.g., cell to cell) and externally (e.g., mussels to ships and piers). This adhesive bonding is chemically and mechanically complex, involving a variety of proteins, carbohydrates, and other compounds.Consequently,the effect of protein structures on adhesive properties is only partially...

  15. Studies on Mathematical Models of Wet Adhesion and Lifetime Prediction of Organic Coating/Steel by Grey System Theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Fandi; Liu, Ying; Liu, Li; Li, Ying; Wang, Fuhui

    2017-06-28

    A rapid degradation of wet adhesion is the key factor controlling coating lifetime, for the organic coatings under marine hydrostatic pressure. The mathematical models of wet adhesion have been studied by Grey System Theory (GST). Grey models (GM) (1, 1) of epoxy varnish (EV) coating/steel and epoxy glass flake (EGF) coating/steel have been established, and a lifetime prediction formula has been proposed on the basis of these models. The precision assessments indicate that the established models are accurate, and the prediction formula is capable of making precise lifetime forecasting of the coatings.

  16. Friction and Adhesion Forces of Bacillus thuringiensis Spores on Planar Surfaces in Atmospheric Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kweon, Hyojin [Georgia Inst. of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States); Yiacoumi, Sotira [Georgia Inst. of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States); Tsouris, Costas [Georgia Inst. of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States); Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2011-11-07

    The kinetic friction force and the adhesion force of Bacillus thuringiensis spores on planar surfaces in atmospheric systems were studied using atomic force microscopy. The influence of relative humidity (RH) on these forces varied for different surface properties including hydrophobicity, roughness, and surface charge. The friction force of the spore was greater on a rougher surface than on mica, which is atomically flat. As RH increases, the friction force of the spores decreases on mica whereas it increases on rough surfaces. The influence of RH on the interaction forces between hydrophobic surfaces is not as strong as for hydrophilic surfaces. The friction force of the spore is linear to the sum of the adhesion force and normal load on the hydrophobic surface. In conclusion, the poorly defined surface structure of the spore and the adsorption of contaminants from the surrounding atmosphere are believed to cause a discrepancy between the calculated and measured adhesion forces.

  17. The Trw type IV secretion system of Bartonella mediates host-specific adhesion to erythrocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muriel Vayssier-Taussat

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial pathogens typically infect only a limited range of hosts; however, the genetic mechanisms governing host-specificity are poorly understood. The alpha-proteobacterial genus Bartonella comprises 21 species that cause host-specific intraerythrocytic bacteremia as hallmark of infection in their respective mammalian reservoirs, including the human-specific pathogens Bartonella quintana and Bartonella bacilliformis that cause trench fever and Oroya fever, respectively. Here, we have identified bacterial factors that mediate host-specific erythrocyte colonization in the mammalian reservoirs. Using mouse-specific Bartonella birtlesii, human-specific Bartonella quintana, cat-specific Bartonella henselae and rat-specific Bartonella tribocorum, we established in vitro adhesion and invasion assays with isolated erythrocytes that fully reproduce the host-specificity of erythrocyte infection as observed in vivo. By signature-tagged mutagenesis of B. birtlesii and mutant selection in a mouse infection model we identified mutants impaired in establishing intraerythrocytic bacteremia. Among 45 abacteremic mutants, five failed to adhere to and invade mouse erythrocytes in vitro. The corresponding genes encode components of the type IV secretion system (T4SS Trw, demonstrating that this virulence factor laterally acquired by the Bartonella lineage is directly involved in adherence to erythrocytes. Strikingly, ectopic expression of Trw of rat-specific B. tribocorum in cat-specific B. henselae or human-specific B. quintana expanded their host range for erythrocyte infection to rat, demonstrating that Trw mediates host-specific erythrocyte infection. A molecular evolutionary analysis of the trw locus further indicated that the variable, surface-located TrwL and TrwJ might represent the T4SS components that determine host-specificity of erythrocyte parasitism. In conclusion, we show that the laterally acquired Trw T4SS diversified in the Bartonella lineage

  18. Experimental etch-and-rinse adhesive systems containing MMP-inhibitors: Physicochemical characterization and resin-dentin bonding stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Eduardo Moreira; de Sá Rodrigues, Carolina Ullmann Fernandes; de Oliveira Matos, Marcos Paulo; de Carvalho, Thais Rodrigues; dos Santos, Glauco Botelho; Amaral, Cristiane Mariote

    2015-12-01

    To evaluate the degree of conversion (DC%), water sorption (WS), solubility (SO) and the resin-dentin bonding stability (μTBS) of experimental (EXP) etch-and-rinse adhesive systems containing MMP-inhibitors: Galardin-GAL, Batimastat-BAT, GM1489-GM1 and chlorhexidine diacetate-CHX. DC% was measured using FT-IR spectroscopy, while WS and SO were calculated based on ISO4049. Thirty-six human molars were wet ground until the occlusal dentin was exposed. The adhesive systems were applied and resin composite buildups were incrementally constructed. After 24 h immersion in distilled water at 37 °C, the specimens were cut into resin-dentin beams with a cross-sectional area of 1 mm(2). The μTBS was evaluated after 24 h, 6 months and 12 months of water storage at 37 °C. Adper Single Bond 2 (SB2) was used as a commercial control. The data were analyzed using ANOVA and Tukey's HSD test. SB2 presented the highest DC% (p0.05). SO was found to be not significant (p>0.05). All adhesive systems maintained μTBS stability after 6 months of water storage. Only BAT, GM1 and CHX maintained μTBs stability after 12 months of water storage. The experimental adhesive systems with GM1489 and chlorhexidine diacetate presented the best physicochemical properties and preserved resin-dentin bonding stability after 12 months of water storage. GM1489 could be suitable for inclusion as an MMP-inhibitor in etch-and-rinse adhesive systems to maintain resin-dentin bonding stability over time. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  19. Bonding of composite resins to PEEK: the influence of adhesive systems and air-abrasion parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stawarczyk, Bogna; Taufall, Simon; Roos, Malgorzata; Schmidlin, Patrick R; Lümkemann, Nina

    2018-03-01

    The objective of the study was to investigate the tensile bond strength (TBS) to polyaryletheretherketone (PEEK) after different pretreatment and conditioning methods. Four hundred PEEK specimens were fabricated and allocated to the following air-abrasion methods (n 1  = 80/pretreatment): (i) 50 μm Al 2 O 3 (0.05 MPa); (ii) 50 μm Al 2 O 3 (0.35 MPa); (iii) 110 μm Al 2 O 3 (0.05 MPa); (iv) 110 μm Al 2 O 3 (0.35 MPa); and (v) Rocatec 110 μm (0.28 MPa). These pretreatments were combined with the following conditioning methods (n 2  = 20/pretreatment/conditioning): (a) visio.link (VL); (b) Monobond Plus/Heliobond (MH); (c) Scotchbond Universal (SU); and (d) dialog bonding fluid (DB). After veneering of all specimens with dialog occlusal and aging (28 days H 2 O, 37 °C + 20,000 thermal cycles, 5/55 °C), TBS was measured. Data was analysed using Kaplan-Meier survival analysis with Breslow-Gehan test and Cox-regressions. The major impact on TBS showed the conditioning, followed by the air-abrasion-pressure, while the grain size of the air-abrasion powder did not show any effect. Specimens air-abraded at 0.35 MPa showed the highest survival rates. However, within VL groups, this observation was not statistically significant. Within MH groups, pretreatment using 110 μm Al 2 O 3 and 0.05 MPa resulted in higher survival rates compared to groups treated with 50 and 110 μm Al 2 O 3 using a pressure of 0.35 MPa. The use of VL showed the highest survival rates between the adhesive systems and the TBS values higher than 25 MPa independent of the pretreatment method. As an exception, only VL showed significantly higher survival rates when compared to MH. The adequate choice of the adhesive system and higher pressures improved the TBS between PEEK and veneering resin composite. The particle size had no major impact. According to this study, best veneering of PEEK with dialog occlusal can be achieved by conditioning with visio.link in combination with

  20. FLEXIBLE, HIGH CHAR YIELD HYBRIDSIL ADHESIVE MATERIALS FOR NEXT GENERATION ABLATIVE THERMAL PROTECTION SYSTEMS, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — NanoSonic will create and empirically validate flexible, high char yield HybridSil adhesive nanocomposites for use within current and next generation polymer based...

  1. Switchable bio-inspired adhesives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroner, Elmar

    2015-03-01

    Geckos have astonishing climbing abilities. They can adhere to almost any surface and can run on walls and even stick to ceilings. The extraordinary adhesion performance is caused by a combination of a complex surface pattern on their toes and the biomechanics of its movement. These biological dry adhesives have been intensely investigated during recent years because of the unique combination of adhesive properties. They provide high adhesion, allow for easy detachment, can be removed residue-free, and have self-cleaning properties. Many aspects have been successfully mimicked, leading to artificial, bio-inspired, patterned dry adhesives, and were addressed and in some aspects they even outperform the adhesion capabilities of geckos. However, designing artificial patterned adhesion systems with switchable adhesion remains a big challenge; the gecko's adhesion system is based on a complex hierarchical surface structure and on advanced biomechanics, which are both difficult to mimic. In this paper, two approaches are presented to achieve switchable adhesion. The first approach is based on a patterned polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) polymer, where adhesion can be switched on and off by applying a low and a high compressive preload. The switch in adhesion is caused by a reversible mechanical instability of the adhesive silicone structures. The second approach is based on a composite material consisting of a Nickel- Titanium (NiTi) shape memory alloy and a patterned adhesive PDMS layer. The NiTi alloy is trained to change its surface topography as a function of temperature, which results in a change of the contact area and of alignment of the adhesive pattern towards a substrate, leading to switchable adhesion. These examples show that the unique properties of bio-inspired adhesives can be greatly improved by new concepts such as mechanical instability or by the use of active materials which react to external stimuli.

  2. A short-time scale colloidal system reveals early bacterial adhesion dynamics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christophe Beloin

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available The development of bacteria on abiotic surfaces has important public health and sanitary consequences. However, despite several decades of study of bacterial adhesion to inert surfaces, the biophysical mechanisms governing this process remain poorly understood, due, in particular, to the lack of methodologies covering the appropriate time scale. Using micrometric colloidal surface particles and flow cytometry analysis, we developed a rapid multiparametric approach to studying early events in adhesion of the bacterium Escherichia coli. This approach simultaneously describes the kinetics and amplitude of early steps in adhesion, changes in physicochemical surface properties within the first few seconds of adhesion, and the self-association state of attached and free-floating cells. Examination of the role of three well-characterized E. coli surface adhesion factors upon attachment to colloidal surfaces--curli fimbriae, F-conjugative pilus, and Ag43 adhesin--showed clear-cut differences in the very initial phases of surface colonization for cell-bearing surface structures, all known to promote biofilm development. Our multiparametric analysis revealed a correlation in the adhesion phase with cell-to-cell aggregation properties and demonstrated that this phenomenon amplified surface colonization once initial cell-surface attachment was achieved. Monitoring of real-time physico-chemical particle surface properties showed that surface-active molecules of bacterial origin quickly modified surface properties, providing new insight into the intricate relations connecting abiotic surface physicochemical properties and bacterial adhesion. Hence, the biophysical analytical method described here provides a new and relevant approach to quantitatively and kinetically investigating bacterial adhesion and biofilm development.

  3. Reversible adhesion switching of porous fibrillar adhesive pads by humidity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Longjian; Kovalev, Alexander; Dening, Kirstin; Eichler-Volf, Anna; Eickmeier, Henning; Haase, Markus; Enke, Dirk; Steinhart, Martin; Gorb, Stanislav N

    2013-01-01

    We report reversible adhesion switching on porous fibrillar polystyrene-block-poly(2-vinyl pyridine) (PS-b-P2VP) adhesive pads by humidity changes. Adhesion at a relative humidity of 90% was more than nine times higher than at a relative humidity of 2%. On nonporous fibrillar adhesive pads of the same material, adhesion increased only by a factor of ~3.3. The switching performance remained unchanged in at least 10 successive high/low humidity cycles. Main origin of enhanced adhesion at high humidity is the humidity-induced decrease in the elastic modulus of the polar component P2VP rather than capillary force. The presence of spongelike continuous internal pore systems with walls consisting of P2VP significantly leveraged this effect. Fibrillar adhesive pads on which adhesion is switchable by humidity changes may be used for preconcentration of airborne particulates, pollutants, and germs combined with triggered surface cleaning.

  4. WHAT CAN WE LEARN FROM THE “WATER BEARS” FOR THE ADHESION SYSTEMS USING IN SPACE APPLICATIONS?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander E. Filippov

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Recent progress in space research and in particular appearance of complex movable constructions with a number of components exposed to the extreme conditions of open space causes a strong demand for development of new tribological and adhesion systems which are able to resist such conditions. In the last few years, many engineering solutions in the field of tribology and adhesion have been found based on “biomimetics approach” that is searching for ideas originally created by living nature and optimized during billions of years of natural selection. Surprisingly some of the living creatures are found to be optimized even for survival for a long time in the conditions of open space. Such ability is very promising from the point of view of development of new adhesives for future space applications. In this paper we discuss what we can learn in this context from the so-called “water bears” (tardigrades in a combination with some other features, already adopted to reversible technical adhesives from other animals, such as insects and Gecko lizards.

  5. Effects of moisture conditions of dental enamel surface on bond strength of brackets bonded with moisture-insensitive primer adhesive system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endo, Toshiya; Ozoe, Rieko; Sanpei, Sugako; Shinkai, Koichi; Katoh, Yoshiroh; Shimooka, Shohachi

    2008-07-01

    The purposes of this study were to evaluate the effects of different degrees of water contamination on the shear bond strength of orthodontic brackets bonded to dental enamel with a moisture-insensitive primer (MIP) adhesive system and to compare the modes of bracket/adhesive failure. A total of 68 human premolars were divided into four groups by primers and enamel surface conditions (desiccated, blot dry, and overwet). In group I, the hydrophobic Transbond XT primer adhesive system was used under desiccated conditions for bonding the brackets; in group II, the hydrophilic Transbond MIP adhesive system was used under desiccated conditions; in group III, the hydrophilic Transbond MIP adhesive system was used under blot dry conditions; and in group IV, the hydrophilic Transbond MIP adhesive system was used under overwet conditions. Shear bond strength was measured with a universal testing machine, and the mode of bracket/adhesive failure was determined according to the adhesive remnant index. The mean shear bond strengths were not significantly different among groups I, II, and III, and were higher than the clinically required range of 6 to 8 MPa. The mean shear bond strength achieved in group IV was significantly lower than that achieved in groups I, II, and III, and also lower than the clinically required values. Bond failure occurred at the enamel-adhesive interface more frequently in group IV than in groups I and III. To achieve clinically sufficient bond strengths with the hydrophilic MIP adhesive system, excess water should be blotted from the water-contaminated enamel surface.

  6. A new universal simplified adhesive: 6-month clinical evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mena-Serrano, Alexandra; Kose, Carlos; De Paula, Eloisa Andrade; Tay, Lidia Yileng; Reis, Alessandra; Loguercio, Alessandro D; Perdigão, Jorge

    2013-02-01

    Multimode adhesives, which can be used as etch-and-rinse or as self-etch adhesives, have been recently introduced without clinical data to back their use. To evaluate the 6-month clinical performance of Scotchbond Universal Adhesive (SU; 3M ESPE, St. Paul, MN, USA) in noncarious cervical lesions (NCCLs) using two evaluation criteria. Thirty-nine patients participated in this study. Two hundred restorations were assigned to four groups: SU-TEm: etch-and-rinse + moist dentin; SU-TEd: etch-and-rinse + dry dentin; SU-SEet: selective enamel etching; and SU-SE: self-etch. The composite resin Filtek Supreme Ultra (3M ESPE) was placed incrementally. The restorations were evaluated at baseline and after 6 months using both the World Dental Federation (FDI) and the United States Public Health Service (USPHS) criteria. Statistical analyses were performed with Friedman repeated measures analysis of variance by rank and McNemar test for significance in each pair (α = 0.05). Only four restorations (SU-SE: 3 and SU-TEm: 1) were lost after 6 months (p > 0.05 for either criteria). Marginal discoloration occurred in one restoration in the SU-SE group (p > 0.05 for either criteria). Only 2/200 restorations were scored as bravo for marginal adaptation using the USPHS criteria (one for SU-SE and one for SU-SEet, p > 0.05). However, when using the FDI criteria, the percentage of bravo scores for marginal adaptation at 6 months were 32%, 36%, 42%, and 46% for groups SU-TEm, SU-TEd, SU-SEet, and SU-SE, respectively (p > 0.05). The clinical behavior of the multimode adhesive does not depend on the bonding strategy at 6 months. The FDI evaluation criteria are more sensitive than the USPHS criteria. At 6 months, the clinical behavior of the new multimode adhesive Scotchbond Universal was found to be reliable when used in noncarious cervical lesions and may not depend on the bonding strategy employed. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Switchable Adhesion in Vacuum Using Bio-Inspired Dry Adhesives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purtov, Julia; Frensemeier, Mareike; Kroner, Elmar

    2015-11-04

    Suction based attachment systems for pick and place handling of fragile objects like glass plates or optical lenses are energy-consuming and noisy and fail at reduced air pressure, which is essential, e.g., in chemical and physical vapor deposition processes. Recently, an alternative approach toward reversible adhesion of sensitive objects based on bioinspired dry adhesive structures has emerged. There, the switching in adhesion is achieved by a reversible buckling of adhesive pillar structures. In this study, we demonstrate that these adhesives are capable of switching adhesion not only in ambient air conditions but also in vacuum. Our bioinspired patterned adhesive with an area of 1 cm(2) provided an adhesion force of 2.6 N ± 0.2 N in air, which was reduced to 1.9 N ± 0.2 N if measured in vacuum. Detachment was induced by buckling of the structures due to a high compressive preload and occurred, independent of air pressure, at approximately 0.9 N ± 0.1 N. The switch in adhesion was observed at a compressive preload between 5.6 and 6.0 N and was independent of air pressure. The difference between maximum adhesion force and adhesion force after buckling gives a reasonable window of operation for pick and place processes. High reversibility of the switching behavior is shown over 50 cycles in air and in vacuum, making the bioinspired switchable adhesive applicable for handling operations of fragile objects.

  8. A new universal simplified adhesive: 36-Month randomized double-blind clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loguercio, Alessandro D; de Paula, Eloisa Andrade; Hass, Viviane; Luque-Martinez, Issis; Reis, Alessandra; Perdigão, Jorge

    2015-09-01

    It is still debatable which technique should be used with universal adhesives, either etch-and-rinse (wet or dry) or self-etch strategy (with or without selective enamel etching). To evaluate the 36-month clinical performance of Scotchbond Universal Adhesive (SU, 3M ESPE) in non-carious cervical lesions (NCCLs) using two evaluation criteria. Thirty-nine patients participated in this study. Two-hundred restorations were assigned to four groups: ERm: etch-and-rinse+moist dentin; ERd: etch-and-rinse+dry dentin; Set: selective enamel etching; and SE: self-etch. The same composite resin was inserted for all restorations in up to 3 increments. The restorations were evaluated at baseline and at 6-, 18-, and 36-months using both the FDI and the USPHS criteria. Statistical analyses were performed with Friedman repeated measures ANOVA by rank and McNemar test for significance in each pair (α=0.05). Eight restorations (ERm: 1; ERd: 1; Set: 1 and SE: 5) were lost after 36 months, but only significant for SE when compared with baseline (p=0.02 for either criteria). Marginal staining occurred in 6.8% of the restorations (groups ERm, ERd, and Set) and 17.5% of the restorations (group SE), with significant difference for each group when compared with baseline using the FDI criteria (puniversal adhesive was used, there were signs of degradation when the universal adhesive was applied in SE mode. The FDI criteria remain more sensitive than the USPHS criteria, especially for the criteria marginal staining and marginal adaptation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Optical adhesive property study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sundvold, P.D.

    1996-01-01

    Tests were performed to characterize the mechanical and thermal properties of selected optical adhesives to identify the most likely candidate which could survive the operating environment of the Direct Optical Initiation (DOI) program. The DOI system consists of a high power laser and an optical module used to split the beam into a number of channels to initiate the system. The DOI requirements are for a high shock environment which current military optical systems do not operate. Five candidate adhesives were selected and evaluated using standardized test methods to determine the adhesives` physical properties. EC2216, manufactured by 3M, was selected as the baseline candidate adhesive based on the test results of the physical properties.

  10. Influence of dentinal regions on bond strengths of different adhesive systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozer, F; Unlü, N; Sengun, A

    2003-06-01

    This in vitro study assessed comparatively the shear bond strengths of three composite resins, 3M Valux Plus (3MVP), Herculite (H), Clearfil AP-X (CAP-X), a polyacid modified composite resin Dyract (D), and a resin modified glass-ionomer materials Vitremer (V), to cervical and buccal dentine regions of extracted human molar teeth. Four different bonding systems, 3M ScotchBond Multipurpose (SB), Clearfil Liner Bond 2 (LB2), Opti Bond (OB), and Prime & Bond 2.1 (PB 2.1) were used with the manufacturer's respective composite and compomer materials. One hundred freshly extracted mandibular molar teeth were selected for this study. Flat buccal dentine surfaces were created on 50 teeth and cylindrical rods of the five materials were bonded to the dentine surfaces. For assessment of cervical bond strengths, the materials were bonded to mesial and distal enamel bordered occlusal dentinal surfaces of the remaining 50 teeth. The five groups of restorative procedures were applied as follows; Group 1: SB + 3MVP, Group 2: LB2 + CAP-X, Group 3: OB + H, Group 4: PB2.1 + D, Group 5: Vitremer primer (VP) VP + V. Each restorative procedure thus had 20 specimens (10 buccal + 10 cervical). After 24 h of water storage (37 degrees C), the specimens were tested on a Universal Testing machine in shear with a cross head speed of 0.5 mm min-1. The bond strength values were calculated in MPa and the results were evaluated statistically using Kruskal-Wallis one-way/anova and Mann-Whitney U-tests. It was found that the bond strengths of SB + 3MVP, LB2 + CAP-X and VP + V to buccal dentine surfaces were significantly stronger (P 0.05). Vitremer was found the least successful adhesive material in terms of shear bond strength on both buccal and occluso-cervical dentine surfaces.

  11. Adhesion science

    CERN Document Server

    Comyn, John

    1997-01-01

    The use of adhesives is widespread and growing, and there are few modern artefacts, from the simple cereal packet, to the jumbo jet, that are without this means of joining. Adhesion Science provides an illuminating account of the science underlying the use of adhesives, a branch of chemical technology which is fundamental to the science of coatings and composite materials and to the performance of all types of bonded structures. This book guides the reader through the essential basic polymer science, and the chemistry of adhesives in use at present. It discusses surface preparation for adhesive bonding, and the use of primers and coupling agents. There is a detailed chapter on contact angles and what can be predicted from them. A simple guide on stress distribution joints and how this relates to testing is included. It also examines the interaction of adhesives and the environment, including an analysis of the resistance of joints to water, oxygen and ultra-violet light. Adhesion Science provides a comprehens...

  12. Thermally responsive polymer systems for self-healing, reversible adhesion and shape memory applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Xiaofan

    Responsive polymers are "smart" materials that are capable of performing prescribed, dynamic functions under an applied stimulus. In this dissertation, we explore several novel design strategies to develop thermally responsive polymers and polymer composites for self-healing, reversible adhesion and shape memory applications. In the first case described in Chapters 2 and 3, a thermally triggered self-healing material was prepared by blending a high-temperature epoxy resin with a thermoplastic polymer, poly(epsilon-caprolactone) (PCL). The initially miscible system undergoes polymerization induced phase separation (PIPS) during the curing of epoxy and yields a variety of compositionally dependent morphologies. At a particular PCL loading, the cured blend displays a "bricks-and-mortar" morphology in which epoxy exists as interconnected spheres ("bricks") within a continuous PCL matrix ("mortar"). A heat induced "bleeding" phenomenon was observed in the form of spontaneous wetting of all free surfaces by the molten PCL, and is attributed to the volumetric thermal expansion of PCL above its melting point in excess of epoxy brick expansion, which we term differential expansive bleeding (DEB). This DEB is capable of healing damage such as cracks. In controlled self-healing experiments, heating of a cracked specimen led to PCL bleeding from the bulk that yields a liquid layer bridging the crack gap. Upon cooling, a "scar" composed of PCL crystals was formed at the site of the crack, restoring a significant portion of mechanical strength. We further utilized DEB to enable strong and thermally-reversible adhesion of the material to itself and to metallic substrates, without any requirement for macroscopic softening or flow. After that, Chapters 4--6 present a novel composite strategy for the design and fabrication of shape memory polymer composites. The basic approach involves physically combining two or more functional components into an interpenetrating fiber

  13. Comparison of shear bond strength of the stainless steel metallic brackets bonded by three bonding systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehdi Ravadgar

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: In orthodontic treatment, it is essential to establish a satisfactory bond between enamel and bracket. After the self-etch primers (SEPs were introduced for the facilitation of bracket bonding in comparison to the conventional etch-and-bond system, multiple studies have been carried out on their shear bond strengths which have yielded different results. This study was aimed at comparing shear bond strengths of the stainless steel metallic brackets bonded by three bonding systems. Methods: In this experimental in vitro study, 60 extracted human maxillary premolar teeth were randomly divided into three equal groups: in the first group, Transbond XT (TBXT light cured composite was bonded with Transbond plus self-etching primer (TPSEP in the second group, TBXT composite was bonded with the conventional method of acid etching and in the third group, the self cured composite Unite TM bonding adhesive was bonded with the conventional method of acid etching. In all the groups, Standard edgewise-022 metallic brackets (American Orthodontics, Sheboygan, USA were used. Twenty-four hours after the completion of thermocycling, shear bond strength of brackets was measured by Universal Testing Machine (Zwick. In order to compare the shear bond strengths of the groups, the variance analysis test (ANOVA was adopted and p≤0.05 was considered as a significant level. Results: Based on megapascal, the average shear bond strength for the first, second, and third groups was 8.27±1.9, 9.78±2, and 8.92±2.5, respectively. There was no significant difference in the shear bond strength of the groups. Conclusions: Since TPSEP shear bond strength is approximately at the level of the conventional method of acid etching and within the desirable range for orthodontic brackets shear bond strength, applying TPSEP can serve as a substitute for the conventional method of etch and bond, particularly in orthodontic operations.

  14. Comparison of shear bond strength of the stainless steel metallic brackets bonded by three bonding systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehdi Ravadgar

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: In orthodontic treatment, it is essential to establish a satisfactory bond between enamel and bracket. After the self-etch primers (SEPs were introduced for the facilitation of bracket bonding in comparison to the conventional etch-and-bond system, multiple studies have been carried out on their shear bond strengths which have yielded different results. This study was aimed at comparing shear bond strengths of the stainless steel metallic brackets bonded by three bonding systems. Methods: In this experimental in vitro study, 60 extracted human maxillary premolar teeth were randomly divided into three equal groups: in the first group, Transbond XT (TBXT light cured composite was bonded with Transbond plus self-etching primer (TPSEP; in the second group, TBXT composite was bonded with the conventional method of acid etching; and in the third group, the self cured composite Unite TM bonding adhesive was bonded with the conventional method of acid etching. In all the groups, Standard edgewise-022 metallic brackets (American Orthodontics, Sheboygan, USA were used. Twenty-four hours after the completion of thermocycling, shear bond strength of brackets was measured by Universal Testing Machine (Zwick. In order to compare the shear bond strengths of the groups, the variance analysis test (ANOVA was adopted and p≤0.05 was considered as a significant level. Results: Based on megapascal, the average shear bond strength for the first, second, and third groups was 8.27±1.9, 9.78±2, and 8.92±2.5, respectively. There was no significant difference in the shear bond strength of the groups. Conclusions: Since TPSEP shear bond strength is approximately at the level of the conventional method of acid etching and within the desirable range for orthodontic brackets shear bond strength, applying TPSEP can serve as a substitute for the conventional method of etch and bond, particularly in orthodontic operations.

  15. Effect of repeated use on dentin bond strength of two adhesive systems: All-in-one and one-bottle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shafiei Fershteh

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims: To compare the effects of repeated use of two one-bottle adhesives with that of two all- in- one adhesives (with acetone solvent on bond strength to dentin. Materials and Methods: A flat dentin surface was prepared on 120 bovine incisors using 600- grit abrasive pape. The teeth were randomly assigned into 12 equal groups. The four adhesive systems [Prime and Bond NT (P&B NT, One-Step Plus (OS, iBond (iB, and G-Bond (GB] were used at baseline, after the lid of the container had been opened 30 times, and after it had been opened 60 times. Before each use of the adhesives, the lids of the containers were left open for 1 min. The resin composites were applied on the dentin in a cylindrical split mold. After thermocycling, shear bond strength test was performed with a universal testing machine at 1 mm/min. We used Kruskal-Wallis and Dunn tests for statistical analysis. Results: There was no statistically significant difference among bond strength (MPa of the groups of P&B NT (31.9 ± 4.6, 31.8 ± 6.5, 26.1 ± 6.7 and OS (33.2 ± 5.1, 30.9 ± 7, 29.3 ± 5.9, respectively (P > 0.05. The mean of the bond strength of iB and GB after 60 times (15.3 ± 4.1 and 12.2 ± 3.9, respectively was significantly lower than that of iB and GB at baseline (23.5 ± 4.8 and 22.2 ± 4.5, respectively (P < 0.05. Conclusions: Repeated use (60 times of the all-in-one adhesive led to a decline in the dentin bond strength. To avoid this problem it would be advisable to have containers with smaller amounts of adhesive or perhaps those with only a singe dose.

  16. Adhesion study of low-k/Si system using 4-point bending and nanoscratch test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Damayanti, M.; Widodo, J.; Sritharan, T.; Mhaisalkar, S.G.; Lu, W.; Gan, Z.H.; Zeng, K.Y.; Hsia, L.C.

    2005-01-01

    Chemical vapour deposited (CVD) low-k films using tri-methyl-silane (3MS) and tetra-methyl cyclo-tetra-siloxanes (TMCTS) precursors were studied. A 4-point bend test (4PBT) was performed to assess the adhesion property of the low-k films to Si substrates and the results were compared with that of simpler method, nanoscratch test (NST), as a quality control tool despite its drawbacks. Adhesion energy, G c , of the low-k/Si interface as measured by 4PBT and critical scratch load, P c , as obtained by NST display a linear relationship with hardness and modulus of the low-k film. The lowering of G c as the hardness of the film decreases can be explained by the effects of the C introduction into the Si-O networks found in these films. Lower carbon content for higher hardness films is thought to cause them to be more 'silica-like', and thus, exhibit better adhesion with the Si substrate. Two failure modes were observed for specimens under 4PBT. On one hand, films with low hardness ( c ( 2 ) with an adhesive separation of low-k from the Si substrate. On the other hand, films of high hardness (>5 GPa) display interfacial energies in excess of 10 J/m 2 with delamination of epoxy from the Si substrate, thus, indicating excellent adhesion between the low-k films and Si substrate. For the low hardness films, good correlation exists between P c and G c . However, the two data points of the high hardness films that gave the two highest P c and G c values do not lie on the correlation line drawn for the low hardness film data points due to different factors governing the failure in both tests and a change in the 4PBT failure mechanism

  17. Influence of incorrect application of a water-based adhesive system on the marginal adaptation of Class V restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peschke, A; Blunck, U; Roulet, J F

    2000-10-01

    To determine the influence of incorrectly performed steps during the application of the water-based adhesive system OptiBond FL on the marginal adaptation of Class V composite restorations. In 96 extracted human teeth Class V cavities were prepared. Half of the margin length was situated in dentin. The teeth were randomly divided into 12 groups. The cavities were filled with Prodigy resin-based composite in combination with OptiBond FL according to the manufacturer's instructions (Group O) and including several incorrect application steps: Group A: prolonged etching (60 s); Group B: no etching of dentin; Group C: excessive drying after etching; Group D: short rewetting after excessive drying; Group E: air drying and rewetting; Group F: blot drying; Group G: saliva contamination; Group H: application of primer and immediate drying; group I: application of only primer; group J: application of only adhesive; Group K: no light curing of the adhesive before the application of composite. After thermocycling, replicas were taken and the margins were quantitatively analyzed in the SEM. Statistical analysis of the results was performed using non-parametric procedures. With exception of the "rewetting groups" (D and E) and the group with saliva contamination (G), all other application procedures showed a significantly higher amount of marginal openings in dentin compared to the control group (O). Margin quality in enamel was only affected when the primer was not applied.

  18. Biological adhesion of the flatworm Macrostomum lignano relies on a duo-gland system and is mediated by a cell type-specific intermediate filament protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lengerer, Birgit; Pjeta, Robert; Wunderer, Julia; Rodrigues, Marcelo; Arbore, Roberto; Schärer, Lukas; Berezikov, Eugene; Hess, Michael W; Pfaller, Kristian; Egger, Bernhard; Obwegeser, Sabrina; Salvenmoser, Willi; Ladurner, Peter

    2014-02-12

    Free-living flatworms, in both marine and freshwater environments, are able to adhere to and release from a substrate several times within a second. This reversible adhesion relies on adhesive organs comprised of three cell types: an adhesive gland cell, a releasing gland cell, and an anchor cell, which is a modified epidermal cell responsible for structural support. However, nothing is currently known about the molecules that are involved in this adhesion process. In this study we present the detailed morphology of the adhesive organs of the free-living marine flatworm Macrostomum lignano. About 130 adhesive organs are located in a horse-shoe-shaped arc along the ventral side of the tail plate. Each organ consists of exactly three cells, an adhesive gland cell, a releasing gland cell, and an anchor cell. The necks of the two gland cells penetrate the anchor cell through a common pore. Modified microvilli of the anchor cell form a collar surrounding the necks of the adhesive- and releasing glands, jointly forming the papilla, the outer visible part of the adhesive organs. Next, we identified an intermediate filament (IF) gene, macif1, which is expressed in the anchor cells. RNA interference mediated knock-down resulted in the first experimentally induced non-adhesion phenotype in any marine animal. Specifically, the absence of intermediate filaments in the anchor cells led to papillae with open tips, a reduction of the cytoskeleton network, a decline in hemidesmosomal connections, and to shortened microvilli containing less actin. Our findings reveal an elaborate biological adhesion system in a free-living flatworm, which permits impressively rapid temporary adhesion-release performance in the marine environment. We demonstrate that the structural integrity of the supportive cell, the anchor cell, is essential for this adhesion process: the knock-down of the anchor cell-specific intermediate filament gene resulted in the inability of the animals to adhere. The RNAi

  19. Adhesion and friction of the smooth attachment system of the cockroach Gromphadorhina portentosa and the influence of the application of fluid adhesives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliver Betz

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Two different measurement techniques were applied to study the attachment of the smooth foot pads of the Madagascar hissing cockroach Gromphadorhina portentosa. The attachment of the non-manipulated adhesive organs was compared with that of manipulated ones (depletion or substitution by artificial secretions. From measurements of the friction on a centrifuge, it can be concluded that on nanorough surfaces, the insect appears to benefit from employing emulsions instead of pure oils to avoid excessive friction. Measurements performed with a nanotribometer on single attachment organs showed that, in the non-manipulated euplantulae, friction was clearly increased in the push direction, whereas the arolium of the fore tarsus showed higher friction in the pull direction. The surface of the euplantulae shows an imbricate appearance, whereupon the ledges face distally, which might contribute to the observed frictional anisotropy in the push direction. Upon depletion of the tarsal adhesion-mediating secretion or its replacement by oily fluids, in several cases, the anisotropic effect of the euplantula disappeared due to the decrease of friction forces in push-direction. In the euplantulae, adhesion was one to two orders of magnitude lower than friction. Whereas the tenacity was slightly decreased with depleted secretion, it was considerably increased after artificial application of oily liquids. In terms of adhesion, it is concluded that the semi-solid consistence of the natural adhesion-mediating secretion facilitates the detachment of the tarsus during locomotion. In terms of friction, on smooth to nanorough surfaces, the insects appear to benefit from employing emulsions instead of pure oils to avoid excessive friction forces, whereas on rougher surfaces the tarsal fluid rather functions in improving surface contact by keeping the cuticle compliable and compensating surface asperities of the substratum.

  20. Shear Bond Strength of Metal Brackets to Zirconia Conditioned with Various Primer-Adhesive Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-01

    adhesion to ceramic crowns through chemical bonding presents a risk of prosthesis surface damage at debond (Falkensammer et al., 2013). When bonding...enamel. Traditional protocol associated with attaching brackets to enamel must be altered for ceramic crowns due to the dissimilarity in composition. The...Uniform Services University of the Health Sciences In Partial Fulfillment Of the Requirements For the Degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE By Michael

  1. Effects of three silane primers and five adhesive agents on the bond strength of composite material for a computer-aided design and manufacturing system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinohara, Ayano; Taira, Yohsuke; Sakihara, Michino; Sawase, Takashi

    2018-01-01

    Objective The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of combinations of silane primers and adhesive agents on the bond strength of a composite block for a computer-aided design and manufacturing system. Material and Methods Three silane primers [Clearfil Ceramic Primer (CP), Super-Bond PZ Primer (PZ), and GC Ceramic Primer II (GP)] were used in conjunction with five adhesive agents [G-Premio Bond (P-Bond), Repair Adhe Adhesive (R-Adhesive), Super-Bond D-Liner Dual (SB-Dual), Super-Bond C&B (SB-Self), and SB-Dual without tributylborane derivative (SB-Light)]. The surface of a composite block (Gradia Block) was ground with silicon carbide paper. After treatment with a silane primer, a adhesive agent was applied to each testing specimen. The specimens were then bonded with a light-curing resin composite. After 24 h, the shear bond strength values were determined and compared using a post hoc test (α=0.05, n=8/group). We also prepared control specimens without primer (No primer) and/or without adhesive agent (No adhesive). Results PZ/SB-Dual and GP/SB-Dual presented the highest bond strength, followed by GP/P-Bond, CP/SB-Dual, CP/R-Adhesive, No primer/SB-Dual, GP/R-Adhesive, CP/P-Bond, No primer/R-Adhesive, PZ/R-Adhesive, CP/SB-Self, PZ/P-Bond, PZ/SB-Self, and GP/SB-Self in descending order of bond strength. No primer/P-Bond, No primer/SB-Self, and all specimens in the SB-Light and No adhesive groups presented the lowest bond strengths. Conclusion A dual-curing adhesive agent (SB-Dual) containing a tributylborane derivative in combination with a silane primer (GP or PZ) presents a greater bond strength between the composite block and the repairing resin composite than the comparators used in the study.

  2. Estimation and comparison of tensile bond strengths at resin-dentin ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nigerian Dental Journal ... Result: Etch-and-rinse adhesive Adper Single Bond 2 Total Etch® yielded high bond strength ... The self etch systems though convenient to use, do not match the bond strengths of conventional total etch systems.

  3. Influence of CVD diamond tips and Er:YAG laser irradiation on bonding of different adhesive systems to dentin

    OpenAIRE

    da Silva, Melissa Aline [UNESP; Nicolo, Rebeca Di [UNESP; Barcellos, Daphne Camara [UNESP; Batista, Graziela Ribeiro [UNESP; Pucci, Cesar Rogerio [UNESP; Torres, Carlos Rocha Gomes [UNESP; Borges, Alessandra Bühler [UNESP

    2013-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this study was to compare the microtensile bond strength of three adhesive systems, using different methods of dentin preparation. Materials and methods: A hundred and eight bovine teeth were used. The dentin from buccal face was exposed and prepared with three different methods, divided in 3 groups: Group 1 (DT)- diamond tip on a high-speed handpiece; Group 2 (CVD)-CVD tip on a ultrasonic handpiece; Group 3 (LA)-Er: YAG laser. The teeth were divided into 3 subgroups, accordin...

  4. Comparison of temperature change among different adhesive resin cement during polymerization process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murat Alkurt

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The aim of this study was to assess the intra-pulpal temperature changes in adhesive resin cements during polymerization. Materials and Methods: Dentin surface was prepared with extracted human mandibular third molars. Adhesive resin cements (Panavia F 2.0, Panavia SA, and RelyX U200 were applied to the dentin surface and polymerized under IPS e.max Press restoration. K-type thermocouple wire was positioned in the pulpal chamber to measure temperature change (n = 7. The temperature data were recorded (0.0001 sensible and stored on a computer every 0.1 second for sixteen minutes. Differences between the baseline temperature and temperatures of various time points (2, 4, 6, 8, 10, 12, 14, and 16 minute were determined and mean temperature changes were calculated. At various time intervals, the differences in temperature values among the adhesive resin cements were analyzed by two-way ANOVA and post-hoc Tukey honestly test (α = 0.05. Results: Significant differences were found among the time points and resin cements (P < 0.05. Temperature values of the Pan SA group were significantly higher than Pan F and RelyX (P < 0.05. Conclusion: Result of the study on self-adhesive and self-etch adhesive resin cements exhibited a safety intra-pulpal temperature change.

  5. Adhesion molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Preedy, Victor R

    2016-01-01

    This book covers the structure and classification of adhesion molecules in relation to signaling pathways and gene expression. It discusses immunohistochemical localization, neutrophil migration, and junctional, functional, and inflammatory adhesion molecules in pathologies such as leukocyte decompression sickness and ischemia reperfusion injury. Highlighting the medical applications of current research, chapters cover diabetes, obesity, and metabolic syndrome; hypoxia; kidney disease; smoking, atrial fibrillation, and heart disease, the brain and dementia; and tumor proliferation. Finally, it looks at molecular imaging and bioinformatics, high-throughput technologies, and chemotherapy.

  6. Further characterization of the adhesive-tumor-cell culture system for measuring the radiosensitivity of human tumor primary cultures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brock, W.A.; Bock, S.P.; Williams, M.; Baker, F.L.

    1987-01-01

    This study extends the use of the adhesive-tumor-cell culture system to include: over 100 sensitivity measurements at 2.0 Gy; tumorgenicity determinations in nude mice; and flow cytometry of the cells grown in the system. The malignant nature of the growing cells was proved by injecting cells into nude mice. Tumors resulted in 60% of the cases and the histology of each xenograft was similar to that of the human tumor. Flow cytometry was used to obtain DNA histograms of the original cell suspension and of cultures during