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Sample records for self-efficacy perceived control

  1. Self-Efficacy and Perceived Control in the Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Carpi Ballester, Amparo; Gonzalez Navarro, Pilar; Zurriaga Llorens, Rosario; Marzo Campos, Juan Carlos; Buunk, Abraham P.

    2010-01-01

    From the Theory of Planed Behaviour (TPB), the aim of this study is to analyse the effect of self-efficacy and perceived control on intention and preventive behaviors of cardiovascular disease. To this end, 359 participants were evaluated in an empirical study. Data were analysed using the

  2. Regulation of Cognitive Processes through Perceived Self-Efficacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandura, Albert

    1989-01-01

    Addresses issues concerning the extension of self-efficacy theory to memory functioning. Issues include perceived memory capabilities, memory self-appraisal, personal control over memory functioning, preservation of a favorable sense of memory self-efficacy, and strategies for generalizing the impact of training in memory skills. (RJC)

  3. Association of perceived physician communication style with patient satisfaction, distress, cancer-related self-efficacy, and perceived control over the disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zachariae, R; Pedersen, C G; Jensen, A B

    2003-01-01

    -efficacy, and perceived control were completed prior to and after the consultation by 454 patients attending an oncology outpatient clinic. After the consultation, the patients also rated the physicians' communicative behaviours by completing a patient-physician relationship inventory (PPRI), and the physicians were......The aim of the study was to investigate the association of physician communication behaviours as perceived by the patient with patient reported satisfaction, distress, cancer-related self-efficacy, and perceived control over the disease in cancer patients. Questionnaires measuring distress, self...

  4. Perceived Organisational Target Selling, Self- Efficacy, Sexual ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Open Access DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT ... Data were gathered using a self report questionnaire consisting of scales measuring variables in the study. Self efficacy, job insecurity, sexual harassment and target selling significantly jointly ...

  5. The relationship between perceived self-efficacy and adherence to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to determine the relationship between perceived self-efficacy and adherence to self-care activities in type 2 diabetic clients. Low adherence to diabetic self-care activities result in increased risks of developing chronic serious and life-threatening complications with increased morbidity ...

  6. Physical activity intervention effects on perceived stress in working mothers: the role of self-efficacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mailey, Emily L; McAuley, Edward

    2014-01-01

    Working mothers often report elevated stress, and efforts to improve their coping resources are needed to buffer the detrimental effects of stress on health. This study examined the impact of changes in physical activity, self-efficacy, and self-regulation across the course of a brief intervention on subsequent levels of stress in working mothers. Participants (N = 141) were randomly assigned to an intervention or control condition (2:1 ratio). The intervention was conducted in Illinois between March 2011 and January 2012 and consisted of two group-mediated workshop sessions with content based on social cognitive theory. Participants completed measures of physical activity, self-efficacy, self-regulation, and perceived stress at baseline, immediately postintervention, and 6-month follow-up. Stress levels declined across the 6-month period in both groups. Changes in stress were negatively associated with changes in self-efficacy and self-regulation among intervention participants only. Regression analyses revealed the intervention elicited short-term increases in physical activity, self-efficacy, and self-regulation, but only changes in self-efficacy predicted perceived stress at 6-month follow-up. These results suggest that enhancing self-efficacy is likely to improve working mothers' perceived capabilities to cope with stressors in their lives. Future interventions should continue to focus on increasing self-efficacy to promote improvements in physical activity and psychological well-being in this population.

  7. Dogmatism, Locus of Control, Perceived Counselor Self-Efficacy, and the Theoretical Orientation of Students in a Master's Level Counseling Practicum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benesh, Andrew Christopher

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to fill a gap in the literature by examining the relationship between dogmatism, locus of control, counselor self-efficacy, and counselor theoretical orientation in a sample of master's level practicum students. Method: A total of 45 master's practicum students completed a series of four instruments, the DOG…

  8. Effect of a 16-week Bikram yoga program on perceived stress, self-efficacy and health-related quality of life in stressed and sedentary adults: A randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hewett, Zoe L; Pumpa, Kate L; Smith, Caroline A; Fahey, Paul P; Cheema, Birinder S

    2018-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of 16 weeks of Bikram yoga on perceived stress, self-efficacy and health related quality of life (HRQoL) in sedentary, stressed adults. 16 week, parallel-arm, randomised controlled trial with flexible dosing. Physically inactive, stressed adults (37.2±10.8 years) were randomised to Bikram yoga (three to five classes per week) or control (no treatment) group for 16 weeks. Outcome measures, collected via self-report, included perceived stress, general self-efficacy, and HRQoL. Outcomes were assessed at baseline, midpoint and completion. Individuals were randomised to the experimental (n=29) or control group (n=34). Average attendance in the experimental group was 27±18 classes. Repeated measure analyses of variance (intention-to-treat) demonstrated significantly improved perceived stress (p=0.003, partial η 2 =0.109), general self-efficacy (p=0.034, partial η 2 =0.056), and the general health (p=0.034, partial η 2 =0.058) and energy/fatigue (p=0.019, partial η 2 =0.066) domains of HRQoL in the experimental group versus the control group. Attendance was significantly associated with reductions in perceived stress, and an increase in several domains of HRQoL. 16 weeks of Bikram yoga significantly improved perceived stress, general self-efficacy and HRQoL in sedentary, stressed adults. Future research should consider ways to optimise adherence, and should investigate effects of Bikram yoga intervention in other populations at risk for stress-related illness. Australia New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry ACTRN12616000867493. Registered 04 July 2016. URL: http://www.anzctr.org.au/ACTRN12616000867493.aspx. Copyright © 2017 Sports Medicine Australia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Social Self-Efficacy, Academic Locus of Control, and Internet Addiction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iskender, Murat; Akin, Ahmet

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to examine the relationship of internet addiction, social self-efficacy, and academic locus of control. Participants were 311 university students who completed a questionnaire package that included the Online Cognition Scale, the Academic Locus of Control Scale, and the Perceived Social Self-efficacy Scale. The…

  10. Effect of Education on Perceived Self-Efficacy for Individuals with Arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magfiret Kara Kasikci

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Arthritis self-efficacy characterizes individuals’ confidence in managing their arthritis. Patienteducation in arthritis aims to improve health outcomes by prompting people to adopt self-managementbehaviours. Therefore, perceived self-efficacy and patient education in arthritis is of great importance.Aims: This study was performed to determine the effects of education on self-efficacy perception in arthritisindividuals.Methodology: This study was a semi-experimental of pre-test and post test design in an equivalent controlgroup. The research was conducted in a physiotherapy and immunology clinics in Erzurum, Turkey. The datawere obtained from 80 individuals with arthritis. These eighty arthritis individuals were composed 40 of whomwere in the experimental and 40 of whom were in control group. As the data gathering tools, a questionnaireform and arthritis self-efficacy scale (ASES were used. ASES developed by Lorig et al. and adjusted fromEnglish to Turkish by Ünsal&Kaşıkçı was used to measure individuals’ self-efficacy. Questionnaire form andscale were completed by the individuals in both groups. Patients in the experimental group were educated withthe booklet. The education program was applied 4 times, once in 3 weeks. The time required for each stage was45~60 minutes. In the control group, care was provided according to the usual routine.Results: There was no statistically significant difference between the pre-test ASES scores of the individuals inboth groups. Self-efficacy levels after education were significantly improved in the experimental groupcompared to the control group.Conclusions: The results of this study showed that the planned education can be considered an effectiveintervention for increasing self-efficacy perception in arthritis individuals.

  11. Correlational Study between Teacher Perceived High School Principal Leadership Style and Teacher Self-Efficacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riggs, Robert

    2017-01-01

    This quantitative correlational study addressed the concept that teacher-perceived high school principal leadership style correlated with teacher self-efficacy. A relationship existed between teacher self-efficacy and student outcomes and research indicated a relationship between leadership style and teacher self-efficacy. Also, the effect of…

  12. Career Self-Efficacy Expectations and Perceived Range of Career Options in Community College Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rotberg, Heidi L.; And Others

    1987-01-01

    Explored the relation of socioeconomic status (SES), race, gender, career self-efficacy, career interests, and sex role orientation to career-choice range in female-male and non-gender-dominated careers and career self-efficacy. Career interest and career self-efficacy expectations significantly predicted range of perceived career options. Career…

  13. Preschool Teachers' Perceived Math Anxiety and Self-Efficacy for Teaching Mathematics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Carolyn D.

    2017-01-01

    This study explored the relationship between math anxiety and perceived self-efficacy for teaching mathematics in preschool teachers. Perceptions of and attributions for the teachers' perceived math anxiety and perceived self-efficacy for teaching mathematics were also explored. The study employed a mixed-method design consisting of both…

  14. The Relationship between Perceived Coaching Behaviours, Motivation and Self-Efficacy in Wrestlers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarı, İhsan; Bayazıt, Betül

    2017-01-01

    Abstract The current study aimed to determine the relationship between perceived coaching behaviours, motivation, self-efficacy and general self-efficacy of wrestlers who competed in the Super National Wrestling League. The sample consisted of 289 wrestlers. The Self-Efficacy Scale was used to measure self-efficacy perception, the Sports Motivation Scale to measure the motivation of the athletes, the Leadership Scale for Sport to determine perceived leadership behaviours, and the General Self-Efficacy Scale to determine the general self-efficacy perceptions of the athletes. For data analyses, SPSS 17.0 software was used. According to the results of the regression analyses performed with the enter method, it was found that perceived training and instruction behaviour along with perceived social support behaviour significantly explained self-efficacy (adjusted R2_ = .03), intrinsic motivation (adjusted R2 = .04) and amotivation (adjusted R2 = .05). Also, perceived training and instruction behaviour (β = .51), autocratic behaviour (β = -.17) and social support behaviour (β = -.27) significantly contributed to athletes’ general self-efficacy (adjusted R2 = .10). In light of these findings, it may be argued that perceived training and instruction behaviour may be beneficial for self-efficacy, general self-efficacy, intrinsic motivation, and amotivation. On the other hand, it could be stated that perceived autocratic behaviour may be detrimental for general self-efficacy of the athletes. As for social support behaviour, it may be suggested that it is negatively related to self-efficacy, general self-efficacy and intrinsic motivation. Lastly, a positive relationship was observed between perceived social support behaviour and amotivation in wrestlers. The results reveal the specific characteristics of wrestlers and suggest some implications for wrestling coaches. PMID:28713476

  15. The Relationship Between Perceived Coaching Behaviours, Motivation and Self-Efficacy in Wrestlers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarı İhsan

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The current study aimed to determine the relationship between perceived coaching behaviours, motivation, self-efficacy and general self-efficacy of wrestlers who competed in the Super National Wrestling League. The sample consisted of 289 wrestlers. The Self-Efficacy Scale was used to measure self-efficacy perception, the Sports Motivation Scale to measure the motivation of the athletes, the Leadership Scale for Sport to determine perceived leadership behaviours, and the General Self-Efficacy Scale to determine the general self-efficacy perceptions of the athletes. For data analyses, SPSS 17.0 software was used. According to the results of the regression analyses performed with the enter method, it was found that perceived training and instruction behaviour along with perceived social support behaviour significantly explained self-efficacy (adjusted R2_ = .03, intrinsic motivation (adjusted R2 = .04 and amotivation (adjusted R2 = .05. Also, perceived training and instruction behaviour (β = .51, autocratic behaviour (β = -.17 and social support behaviour (β = -.27 significantly contributed to athletes’ general self-efficacy (adjusted R2 = .10. In light of these findings, it may be argued that perceived training and instruction behaviour may be beneficial for self-efficacy, general self-efficacy, intrinsic motivation, and amotivation. On the other hand, it could be stated that perceived autocratic behaviour may be detrimental for general self-efficacy of the athletes. As for social support behaviour, it may be suggested that it is negatively related to self-efficacy, general self-efficacy and intrinsic motivation. Lastly, a positive relationship was observed between perceived social support behaviour and amotivation in wrestlers. The results reveal the specific characteristics of wrestlers and suggest some implications for wrestling coaches.

  16. The Relationship between Perceived Coaching Behaviours, Motivation and Self-Efficacy in Wrestlers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarı, İhsan; Bayazıt, Betül

    2017-06-01

    The current study aimed to determine the relationship between perceived coaching behaviours, motivation, self-efficacy and general self-efficacy of wrestlers who competed in the Super National Wrestling League. The sample consisted of 289 wrestlers. The Self-Efficacy Scale was used to measure self-efficacy perception, the Sports Motivation Scale to measure the motivation of the athletes, the Leadership Scale for Sport to determine perceived leadership behaviours, and the General Self-Efficacy Scale to determine the general self-efficacy perceptions of the athletes. For data analyses, SPSS 17.0 software was used. According to the results of the regression analyses performed with the enter method, it was found that perceived training and instruction behaviour along with perceived social support behaviour significantly explained self-efficacy (adjusted R 2_ = .03), intrinsic motivation (adjusted R 2 = .04) and amotivation (adjusted R 2 = .05). Also, perceived training and instruction behaviour (β = .51), autocratic behaviour (β = -.17) and social support behaviour (β = -.27) significantly contributed to athletes' general self-efficacy (adjusted R 2 = .10). In light of these findings, it may be argued that perceived training and instruction behaviour may be beneficial for self-efficacy, general self-efficacy, intrinsic motivation, and amotivation. On the other hand, it could be stated that perceived autocratic behaviour may be detrimental for general self-efficacy of the athletes. As for social support behaviour, it may be suggested that it is negatively related to self-efficacy, general self-efficacy and intrinsic motivation. Lastly, a positive relationship was observed between perceived social support behaviour and amotivation in wrestlers. The results reveal the specific characteristics of wrestlers and suggest some implications for wrestling coaches.

  17. Effects of a Structured Discharge Planning Program on Perceived Functional Status, Cardiac Self-efficacy, Patient Satisfaction, and Unexpected Hospital Revisits Among Filipino Cardiac Patients: A Randomized Controlled Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cajanding, Ruff Joseph

    Cardiovascular diseases remain the leading cause of morbidity and mortality among Filipinos and are responsible for a very large number of hospital readmissions. Comprehensive discharge planning programs have demonstrated positive benefits among various populations of patients with cardiovascular disease, but the clinical and psychosocial effects of such intervention among Filipino patients with acute myocardial infarction (AMI) have not been studied. In this study we aimed to determine the effectiveness of a nurse-led structured discharge planning program on perceived functional status, cardiac self-efficacy, patient satisfaction, and unexpected hospital revisits among Filipino patients with AMI. A true experimental (randomized control) 2-group design with repeated measures and data collected before and after intervention and at 1-month follow-up was used in this study. Participants were assigned to either the control (n = 68) or the intervention group (n = 75). Intervention participants underwent a 3-day structured discharge planning program implemented by a cardiovascular nurse practitioner, which is comprised of a series of individualized lecture-discussion, provision of feedback, integrative problem solving, goal setting, and action planning. Control participants received standard routine care. Measures of functional status, cardiac self-efficacy, and patient satisfaction were measured at baseline; cardiac self-efficacy and patient satisfaction scores were measured prior to discharge, and perceived functional status and number of revisits were measured 1 month after discharge. Participants in the intervention group had significant improvement in functional status, cardiac self-efficacy, and patient satisfaction scores at baseline and at follow-up compared with the control participants. Furthermore, participants in the intervention group had significantly fewer hospital revisits compared with those who received only standard care. The results demonstrate that a

  18. Primary School Teacher Perceived Self-Efficacy to Teach Fundamental Motor Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callea, Micarle B.; Spittle, Michael; O'Meara, James; Casey, Meghan

    2008-01-01

    Fundamental Movement Skills (FMS) are a part of the school curricula, yet many Australian primary-age children are not mastering FMS. One reason may be a lack of perceived self-efficacy of primary teachers to teach FMS. This study investigated the level of perceived self-efficacy of primary school teachers to teach FMS in Victoria, Australia. A…

  19. Self-esteem and self-efficacy; perceived parenting and family climate; and depression in university students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliver, J M; Paull, J C

    1995-07-01

    This study examined associations among self-esteem and self-efficacy; perceived unfavorable Parental Rearing Style (perceived PRS) and unfavorable family climate in the family of origin; and depression in undergraduates still in frequent contact with their families (N = 186). Unfavorable perceived PRS and family climate were construed as "affectionless control," in which parents and family provide little affection, but excessive control. Constructs were measured by the Self-Esteem Inventory, the Self-Efficacy Scale, the Child Report of Parental Behavior Inventory, the Family Environment Scale, and the Beck Inventory. Perceived "affectionless control" in both PRS and family climate accounted for about 13% of the variance in self-esteem, self-efficacy, and depression. Neither introversion nor depression mediated the relation between family socialization and self-esteem.

  20. ORIGINAL ARTICLE Perceived Self-Efficacy in English Use on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    consisting of two Universities, two Polytechnics, two Colleges of Education and one. School of Nursing. ... 12 No 2, March, 2017 82. INTRODUCTION ..... Park, & Baek, 2011) found self-efficacy .... Oxford: Oxford University Press. Facione, P.

  1. Measuring University Students' Perceived Self-Efficacy in Science Communication in Middle and High Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chi, Shaohui; Liu, Xiufeng; Gardella, Joseph A.

    2016-01-01

    Service learning typically involves university students in teaching and learning activities for middle and high school students, however, measurement of university students' self-efficacy in science communication is still lacking. In this study, an instrument to measure university students' perceived self-efficacy in communicating science to…

  2. Exploring Prospective EFL Teachers' Perceived Self-Efficacy and Beliefs on English Language Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genç, Gülten; Kulusakli, Emine; Aydin, Savas

    2016-01-01

    Learners' perceived self-efficacy and beliefs on English language learning are important in education. Taking into consideration the important impact of individual variables on language learning, this study seeks to highlight the relationship between Turkish EFL learners' beliefs about language learning and their sense of self-efficacy. The…

  3. Increased perceived self-efficacy facilitates the extinction of fear in healthy participants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Armin eZlomuzica

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Self-efficacy has been proposed as an important element of a successful cognitive behavioral treatment. Positive changes in perceived self-efficacy have been linked to an improved adaptive emotional and behavioral responding in the context of anxiety-provoking situations. Furthermore, a positive influence of self-efficacy on cognitive functions has been confirmed. The present study examined the effect of verbal persuasion on perceived self-efficacy and fear extinction. Healthy participants were subjected to a standardized differential fear conditioning paradigm. After fear acquisition, half of the participants received a verbal persuasion aimed at increasing perceived self-efficacy. The extinction of fear was assessed immediately thereafter on both the implicit and explicit level. Our results suggest that an increased perceived self-efficacy was associated with enhanced extinction, evidenced on the psychophysiological level and accompanied by more pronounced decrements in conditioned negative valence. Changes in extinction were not due to a decrease in overall emotional reactivity to conditioned stimuli. In addition, debriefing participants about the false positive feedback did not affect the processing of already extinguished conditioned responses during a subsequent continued extinction phase. Our results suggest that positive changes in perceived self-efficacy can be beneficial for emotional learning. Findings are discussed with respect to strategies aimed at increasing extinction learning in the course of exposure-based treatments.

  4. Depressive symptoms, perceived stress, self-efficacy, and outcome expectations: Predict fitness among adolescents with obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tulloch, Heather; Heenan, Adam; Sweet, Shane; Goldfield, Gary S; Kenny, Glen P; Alberga, Angela S; Sigal, Ronald J

    2017-10-01

    The objective of the present study was to test if outcome expectancy mediated the relationship between fitness and self-efficacy, perceived stress, and depressive symptoms.Adolescents with obesity ( n = 228) completed measures of perceived stress and depressive symptoms at baseline, self-efficacy and outcome expectancy at baseline and 3 months, and fitness at baseline and 6 months. Structural equation modeling was used to analyze the data. Results showed that self-efficacy was positively associated with fitness via outcome expectancies. For females, fewer depressive symptoms were linked to fitness via self-efficacy and outcome expectancies. Exercise interventions that enhance exercise self-efficacy, outcome expectancy, and reduce depressive symptoms may increase fitness.

  5. The relationships between academic self-efficacy, intrinsic motivation, and perceived competence

    OpenAIRE

    Buch, Robert; Säfvenbom, Reidar; Boe, Ole

    2015-01-01

    © 2015 Buch et al. This is an open access article. This study investigated the moderating role of intrinsic motivation for military studies on the relationship between academic self-efficacy and change in perceived military competence. We present two concurrent hypotheses based on theoretical interaction effects of intrinsic motivation. Data from 245 cadets from three military academies revealed a positive relationship between self-efficacy and an increase in perceived military competence ...

  6. Self-Efficacy as a Longitudinal Predictor of Perceived Cognitive Impairment in Individuals with Multiple Sclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Abbey J.; Beier, Meghan; Hartoonian, Narineh; Turner, Aaron P.; Amtmann, Dagmar; Ehde, Dawn M.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Self-efficacy plays an important role in symptom management and may be predictive of perceived cognitive impairment (PCI) for individuals with multiple sclerosis (MS). The primary aim of this study was to determine if self-efficacy longitudinally predicts two types of PCI in MS: general cognitive functioning and executive functioning. The secondary aim was to assess whether self-efficacy mediates the relationships between depression, fatigue, and PCI. Design Longitudinal analysis of self-report survey data collected over three years. Hierarchical regression analyses examined the relationship between self-efficacy and PCI, adjusting for depression and fatigue. Additional analyses tested self-efficacy as a mediator between depression, fatigue, and PCI. Setting Community-dwelling individuals with MS. Participants 233 individuals (age range 22-83 years) were recruited from a larger longitudinal survey study of 562 individuals with MS. Interventions Not applicable. Main Outcome Measures Primary outcome measures were the Applied Cognition General Concerns (ACGC) and Executive Function (ACEF) domains of the Quality of Life in Neurological Disorders (NeuroQoL) measures. Results Self-efficacy was significantly correlated with PCI at baseline (r = .40 to .53) and three years later (r = .36 to .44). In multivariate regression analyses, self-efficacy was a significant longitudinal predictor of PCI, both for general cognitive functioning (β = .20, p Self-efficacy partially mediated the relationships between depression, fatigue, and PCI. Conclusions Self-efficacy may influence how individuals with MS will perceive their cognitive functioning over time. Interventions that target self-efficacy, particularly early in the disease course, may lead to improvements in PCI, as well as improvements in fatigue and depression. PMID:25597915

  7. Predicting of perceived self efficacy in the amount of macronutrients intake in women with metabolic syndrome - 2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohebi, Siamak; Azadbakht, Leila; Feizi, Avat; Sharifirad, Gholamreza; Hozori, Mohammad

    2014-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome is a collection of metabolic disorders, which can increase the mortality rates from 20% to 80%. One of strategies to control the disease is the attention to the dietary habits. Compliance with proper diet is one of the major challenges in the management of this syndrome. Due to this fact, that the patient is responsible for the adjustment of the daily diet, it is important to identify the factors affecting the adoption of nutritional self-care. Besides, self-efficacy is considered as an important pre-requisite for this behavior because it acts as an independent part of the basic skills. This study was carried out with the purpose of determining the predictive role of perceived self-efficacy on macronutrients intake in women with metabolic syndrome. In this descriptive study with correlational nature in 2012, there were 329 patients with the metabolic syndrome. The patients were covered by Isfahan oil industry medical centers and selected by a systematic method. In order to gather information on perceived self-efficacy, the questionnaires constructed by the researchers were used and the validity and reliability had been confirmed by the calculation of content validity indexand content validity ratio values and the indices of internal consistency and stability of the tool. The 24-h dietary recall questionnaire was also used for 3 days in order to investigate the nutritional behavior. The obtained data from the dietary recall questionnaire were analyzed by the N4 nutritional software. In this study, AMOS software version 16 was used for the structural model fitting by using the generalized least squares method besides the SPSS statistical software version 16. THESE AVERAGES OBTAINED FROM THE RESULTS: 2512.37 kcal energy intake, 70.95 g protein, 420 g carbohydrates and 61.61 g of fat per day. The mean of perceived self-efficacy score was 47.89. The Pearson correlation coefficient was indicated a significant inverse relationship between the perceived

  8. Distinguishing Perceived Competence and Self-Efficacy: An Example from Exercise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodgers, Wendy M.; Markland, David; Selzler, Anne-Marie; Murray, Terra C.; Wilson, Philip M.

    2014-01-01

    This article examined the conceptual and statistical distinction between perceived competence and self-efficacy. Although they are frequently used interchangeably, it is possible that distinguishing them might assist researchers in better understanding their roles in developing enduring adaptive behavior patterns. Perceived competence is conceived…

  9. Self-Efficacy and Locus of Control as Predictors of Academic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    the procrastination behaviour of 300 undergraduate students from a Nigerian university. The participants responded to three valid scales (General Perceived Self Efficacy Scale, Locus of Control Scale and the procrastination scale). Data was analyzed using the Pearson product moment correlation and Multiple regression ...

  10. Parenting Styles Influence on Locus of Control, Self-Efficacy and Academic Adjustment in College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, Kimberly Tracey

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between perceived parenting style, locus of control, self-efficacy, and student outcome (i.e. academic performance, GPA) in a sample of college students. The relationship among gender and ethnicity were also examined across these variables. There were 100 participants in this study,…

  11. Surgeons' and trainees' perceived self-efficacy in operating theatre non-technical skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pena, G; Altree, M; Field, J; Thomas, M J W; Hewett, P; Babidge, W; Maddern, G J

    2015-05-01

    An important factor that may influence an individual's performance is self-efficacy, a personal judgement of capability to perform a particular task successfully. This prospective study explored newly qualified surgeons' and surgical trainees' self-efficacy in non-technical skills compared with their non-technical skills performance in simulated scenarios. Participants undertook surgical scenarios challenging non-technical skills in two simulation sessions 6 weeks apart. Some participants attended a non-technical skills workshop between sessions. Participants completed pretraining and post-training surveys about their perceived self-efficacy in non-technical skills, which were analysed and compared with their performance in surgical scenarios in two simulation sessions. Change in performance between sessions was compared with any change in participants' perceived self-efficacy. There were 40 participants in all, 17 of whom attended the non-technical skills workshop. There was no significant difference in participants' self-efficacy regarding non-technical skills from the pretraining to the post-training survey. However, there was a tendency for participants with the highest reported self-efficacy to adjust their score downwards after training and for participants with the lowest self-efficacy to adjust their score upwards. Although there was significant improvement in non-technical skills performance from the first to second simulation sessions, a correlation between participants' self-efficacy and performance in scenarios in any of the comparisons was not found. The results suggest that new surgeons and surgical trainees have poor insight into their non-technical skills. Although it was not possible to correlate participants' self-belief in their abilities directly with their performance in a simulation, in general they became more critical in appraisal of their abilities as a result of the intervention. © 2015 BJS Society Ltd Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Perceived Transcultural Self-Efficacy of Nurses in General Hospitals in Guangzhou, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Juan; He, Zhuang; Luo, Yong; Zhang, Rong

    2016-01-01

    Background Conflicts arising from cultural diversity among patients and hospital staff in China have become intense. Hospitals have an urgent need to improve transcultural self-efficacy of nurses for providing effective transcultural nursing. Objective The purpose of the research was to (a) evaluate the current status of perceived transcultural self-efficacy of nurses in general hospitals in Guangzhou, China; (b) explore associations between demographic characteristics of nurses and their perceived transcultural self-efficacy; and (c) assess the reliability and validity of scores on the Chinese version of the Transcultural Self-Efficacy Tool (TSET). Methods A cross-sectional survey of registered nurses from three general hospitals was conducted. Quota and convenience sampling were used. Participants provided demographic information and answered questions on the TSET. Results A total of 1,156 registered nurses took part. Most nurses had a moderate level of self-efficacy on the Cognitive (87.9%), Practical (87%), and Affective (89.2%) TSET subscales. Nurses who were older; who had more years of work experience, higher professional titles, higher incomes, and a minority background; and who were officially employed (not temporary positions) had higher perceived transcultural self-efficacy. Reliability estimated using Cronbach’s alpha was .99 for the total TSET score; reliability for the three subscales ranged from .97 to .98. Confirmatory factor analysis of TSET scores showed good fit with a three-factor model. Conclusion The results of this study can provide insights and guidelines for hospital nursing management to facilitate design of in-service education systems to improve transcultural self-efficacy of nurses. PMID:27454552

  13. Maternal Reading Self-Efficacy Associated with Perceived Barriers to Reading

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joyce Lin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Although early reading practices impact a host of child literacy, language, and school outcomes, many parents do not read to their young children. One possible explanation for this lack of early literacy practices is mothers’ feelings about their ability to successfully read to their children. A series of multiple regressions were used to explore whether new mothers’ reading self-efficacy predicted their perceived barriers to reading to their 18-month-old children. Findings suggest that self-efficacy buffers against mother-centered (e.g., too tired, child-centered (e.g., toddler fussy, and structural (e.g., environmental distractions barriers to reading. Given the importance of early literacy and that not all mothers read to their toddlers, increasing reading self-efficacy may offer a way to reduce perceived barriers to early literacy practices.

  14. Perceived self-efficacy, personality and bioethics before a heart rehabilitation programme in primary health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madueño Caro, Antonio J; Mellado Fernández, Manuel Luis; Delgado Pacheco, Juana; Muñoz Ayllon, Marta; Pardos Lafarga, Manuel; Saez García, Laura

    There is a clear evidence of the benefit of cardiac rehabilitation after a cardiovascular event on patients' mood and perceived self-efficacy in terms of their own health care. Our aim is to define the correlation between mood-related variables, biotype and self-efficacy in this population. Descriptive study. The entire population of patients discharged from thecardiac rehabilitation unit over 12 months. Universal anthropometric and psychometric (general self-efficacy scale, Salamanca personality traits questionnaire, Hamilton anxiety scale and Beck depression inventory) variables are determined. Descriptive statistics and association between variables (correlation) is determined. This study involved 88 patients, response rate 92%. The average age was 53 years old, 80.23% were males. Descriptive statistics and Pearson correlations for the main dependent variable and associated variables is performed. Significant evidence is shown, self-efficacy is negatively correlated with anxiety (r=-0.4009) and depression (r=-0.4152), as well as dependent(r=-03 175) and impulsive (r=-0.4243) personality traits. Higher levels of anxiety positively correlate with endomorph biotype (r=0.3304), and depression-associated symptoms (r=0.2563). Age and gender do not correlate with self-perceived efficacy. Self-efficacy in the study population is correlated with personality traits, mood and body biotype. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  15. Emotional energy, work self-efficacy, and perceived similarity during the Mars 520 study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solcová, Iva; Gushin, Vadim; Vinokhodova, Alla; Lukavský, Jirí

    2013-11-01

    The objective of the present research was to study the dynamics of changes in emotional energy, work self-efficacy and perceived similarity in the crew of the Mars 520 experimental study. The study comprised six volunteers, all men, between 27-38 yr of age (M = 32.16; SD = 4.99). The Mars 520 experimental study simulated all the elements of the proposed Mars mission that could be ground simulated, i.e., traveling to Mars, orbiting it, landing, and returning to Earth. During the simulation, measures of emotional energy, work self-efficacy, and perceived similarity were repeated every month. The data were analyzed using linear mixed effect models. Emotional energy, work self-efficacy, and perceived similarity gradually increased in the course of the simulation. There was no evidence for a so-called third quarter phenomenon (the most strenuous period of group isolation, psychologically, emotionally, and socially) in our data. On the contrary, work self-efficacy, emotional energy, and group cohesion (indexed here by the subject's perceived similarity to others) increased significantly in the course of the simulation, with the latter two variables showing positive growth in the group functioning.

  16. Culture, Gender, and the Development of Perceived Academic Self-Efficacy among Hawaiian Adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamauchi, Lois A.; Greene, William L.

    Social cognitive theory suggests that individuals' beliefs about their efficacy in specific contexts, such as school, influence their motivation in those settings. The relationship between various sociocultural factors and the development of adolescents' perceived academic self-efficacy are investigated in this paper. Participants (N=202), drawn…

  17. Perceived self-efficacy in English use on social media of tertiary ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    English language is gradually becoming the world's lingua franca, and the social media has broken all barriers to human connections and divides. The world has indeed become an e-village with social media as the platform and English language as the medium. This study examined the use of perceived self-efficacy in the ...

  18. Undergraduates' Perceived Knowledge, Self-Efficacy, and Interest in Social Science Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boswell, Stefanie S.

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated the relationship between perceived knowledge of research methods, research self-efficacy, interest in learning about research, and interest in performing research-related tasks in one's career. The study also investigated the effect of a research methods course with both didactic and experiential components on these…

  19. A survey of diet self-efficacy and food intake in students with high and low perceived stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nastaskin, Robyn S; Fiocco, Alexandra J

    2015-04-23

    Given the rise in obesity and obesity-related disorders, understanding the relationship between stress, self-efficacy and food choice in young adulthood may have implications for preventing negative health outcomes later in life that stem from poor eating habits. The current study examined whether stress levels and diet self-efficacy may be associated with unhealthy eating habits in young adults. Male and female undergraduate students (N = 136) completed questionnaires that tap into diet self-efficacy (DSE), perceived stress (PS), sodium, and fat intake. Sex differences in choice of food were predicted, and low levels of perceived stress and high diet self-efficacy were expected to be associated with lower fat and sodium intake. Findings indicate an interaction between perceived stress and diet self-efficacy on fat intake and a main effect for diet self-efficacy on sodium intake in this population. As expected, low levels of perceived stress and high diet self-efficacy were associated with the lowest levels of fat and sodium intake in students. Findings were driven by females. This study provides preliminary evidence that diet self-efficacy and perceived stress levels relate to nutrient intake in young adult females, and that increasing diet self-efficacy and reducing perceived stress in young adult females may lead to reductions in fat and sodium intake, leading to healthier eating habits.

  20. Fatigue in patients with Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis: relationship to perceived health, physical health, self-efficacy, and participation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armbrust, Wineke; Lelieveld, Otto H T M; Tuinstra, Jolanda; Wulffraat, Nico M; Bos, G J F Joyce; Cappon, Jeannette; van Rossum, Marion A J; Sauer, Pieter J J; Hagedoorn, Mariët

    2016-12-06

    Fatigue is common in patients with JIA and affects daily life negatively. We assessed the presence and severity of fatigue in patients with JIA, including factors presumed associated with fatigue (e.g., disease activity, disability, pain, physical activity, exercise capacity, and self-efficacy), and whether fatigue is related to participation in physical education classes, school attendance, and sports frequency. The current study used baseline data of 80 patients with JIA (age 8-13) who participated in an intervention aimed at promoting physical activity. Primary outcome measurements were fatigue, assessed using the Pediatric-Quality-of-Life-Inventory (PedsQl)-Fatigue-scale and energy level assessed using a VAS scale. Other outcome measurements were disease activity (VAS Physician Global Assessment Scale), disability (Childhood Health Assessment Questionnaire), physical activity (accelerometer), exercise capacity (Bruce treadmill test), self-efficacy (Childhood Arthritis Self-Efficacy Scale), and participation (self-report). Sixty percent of patients with JIA suffered from daily low-energy levels; 27% suffered from very low-energy levels more than half the week. Low energy levels were best predicted by disability and low physical activity. Fatigue measured with the PEDsQL was higher compared to the control-population. Disability and low self-efficacy were main predictors of fatigue. Self-efficacy was a predictor of fatigue but did not act as moderator. Fatigue was a predictor for sports frequency but not for school attendance. Fatigue is a significant problem for JIA patients. Interventions aimed at reducing perceived disability, stimulating physical activity, and enhancing self-efficacy might reduce fatigue and thereby enhance participation. Trial number ISRCTN92733069.

  1. Perceived self-efficacy and student-teacher relationships among diverse Title I students' achievement in science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larry, Triaka A.

    The need for more diversity in STEM-related careers and college majors is urgent. Self-efficacy and student-teacher relationships are factors that have been linked to influencing students’ pursuit of subject-specific careers and academic achievement. The impact of self-efficacy and student perceptions of teacher interpersonal behaviors on student achievement have been extensively researched in the areas of Mathematics and English, however, most studies using science achievement, as a criterion variable, were conducted using non-diverse, White upper middle class to affluent participants. In order to determine the strength of relationships between perceived science self-efficacy, and student perceptions of teacher interpersonal behaviors as factors that influence science achievement (science GPA), the Science Self-Efficacy Questionnaire (SSEQ) and Questionnaire on Teacher Interactions (QTI) were administered to twelfth grade students enrolled at a highly diverse urban Title I high school, while controlling for demographics, defined as gender, ethnicity, and minority status. Using a hierarchical multiple linear regression analysis, results demonstrated that the predictor variables (i.e., gender, ethnicity, minority status, science self-efficacy, and teacher interpersonal behaviors) accounted for 20.8% of the variance in science GPAs. Science self-efficacy made the strongest unique contribution to explaining science GPA, while minority status and gender were found to be statistically significant contributors to the full model as well. Ethnicity and teacher interpersonal behaviors did not make a statistically significant contribution to the variance in science GPA, and accounted for ≤ 1% of the variance. Implications and recommendations for future research are subsequently given.

  2. Barriers perceived by teachers at work, coping strategies, self-efficacy and burnout.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doménech Betoret, Fernando; Gómez Artiga, Amparo

    2010-11-01

    This study examines the relationships among stressors, coping strategies, self-efficacy and burnout in a sample of 724 Spanish primary and secondary teachers. We understood stressors as barriers perceived by teachers that interfere with their work meeting learning objectives and which cause them stress and burnout. An analysis of teacher responses using hierarchical regression revealed that pedagogical barriers had significant positive effects on the burnout dimensions. Furthermore, the results show not only the moderator role played by coping strategies in the pedagogical barriers-burnout dimensions relationship, but also the association between self-efficacy and the coping strategies used by teachers. Practical implications are discussed.

  3. Locus of control, self-efficacy, and the mediating effect of outcome control: predicting course-level and global outcomes in an academic context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Au, Evelyn W M

    2015-01-01

    The current study utilizes Skinner's framework to examine the unique contributions of internal locus of control, self-efficacy, and perceived outcome control over course performance on students' academic experiences. Undergraduate students (N = 225) took part in a longitudinal study and completed two surveys (Time 1: just before their mid-term exams; Time 2: just before their final exam in the same semester). Both locus of control and self-efficacy at Time 1 predicted course-level perceived control over course performance at Time 2. Student-level perceived control over course performance at Time 2 mediated the relationship between self-efficacy at Time 1 and course-level perseverance, course-specific stress, and course enjoyment at Time 2. For global perceived stress and life satisfaction measured at Time 2, both locus of control and self-efficacy at Time 1 had only a direct effect on global perceived stress at Time 2, but only self-efficacy at Time 1 predicted life satisfaction at Time 2. Both locus of control and self-efficacy uniquely contribute to students' academic experiences. Student-level perceived control plays an important mediating role between locus of control and self-efficacy at Time 1, and course-level perseverance, course-specific stress, and course enjoyment at Time 2.

  4. The contributions of self-efficacy and perceived organisational support when taking charge at work

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ike E. Onyishi

    2012-01-01

    Research purpose: The aim of the study was to investigate the contributions of self-efficacy and perceived organisational support when taking charge at work. Motivation for the study: Although many previous studies have examined the antecedents of taking charge in North American business environments, we know little about taking charge in the developing economies of Africa. Research about taking charge will provide valuable information for managers of businesses in developing countries in Africa. Research design, approach and method: This study used a cross-sectional survey design to examine the contributions of self-efficacy and perceived organisational support to taking charge at work amongst 201 bank workers in Nsukka, Southeast Nigeria. Main findings: Regression analysis results showed that self-efficacy had a significant relationship with taking charge at work. The results also showed a statistically significant relationship between perceived organisational support and taking charge at work. Practical/managerial implications: The implications of the results are that interventions that focus on improving self-efficacy will contribute to the behaviours of employees who take charge. In addition, organisations that develop strategies to make employees perceive the organisation as supportive will also have members that engage in more supervisory behaviours. Contribution/value-add: This study was one of the first attempts to investigate taking charge at work in a developing economy of Africa. The results of the study, that self-efficacy and perceived organisational support have relationships with taking charge at work, will contribute to a better understanding of the concept and to building robust theories.

  5. Multilevel Analysis of the Relationship between Principals' Perceived Practices of Instructional Leadership and Teachers' Self-Efficacy Perceptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellibas, Mehmet Sukru; Liu, Yan

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to investigate the extent to which principals' instructional leadership predicts teacher self-efficacy, in order to identify whether a relationship exists between principals' perceived instructional leadership practices and teachers perceived self-efficacy in classroom management, instruction, and student…

  6. Test Anxiety & Its Relation to Perceived Academic Self-Efficacy among Al Hussein Bin Talal University Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    sa'ad alzboon, Habis

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to identify the degree of perceived academic self-efficacy and the relationship nature between test anxiety and perceived academic self-efficacy among students of Al Hussein Bin Talal University (AHU). Moreover, to identify the degree of available statistical significance differences that are attributed to gender, college and…

  7. The impact of perceived self-efficacy on mental time travel and social problem solving.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Adam D; Dorfman, Michelle L; Marmar, Charles R; Bryant, Richard A

    2012-03-01

    Current models of autobiographical memory suggest that self-identity guides autobiographical memory retrieval. Further, the capacity to recall the past and imagine one's self in the future (mental time travel) can influence social problem solving. We examined whether manipulating self-identity, through an induction task in which students were led to believe they possessed high or low self-efficacy, impacted episodic specificity and content of retrieved and imagined events, as well as social problem solving. Compared to individuals in the low self efficacy group, individuals in the high self efficacy group generated past and future events with greater (a) specificity, (b) positive words, and (c) self-efficacious statements, and also performed better on social problem solving indices. A lack of episodic detail for future events predicted poorer performance on social problem solving tasks. Strategies that increase perceived self-efficacy may help individuals to selectively construct a past and future that aids in negotiating social problems. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Self-efficacy and Perceived Organizational Support by Workers in a Youth Development Setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Rockow

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The efficacy levels of workers in the youth development field can significantly impact the work done with youth.  These levels may be impacted by workers’ perceptions of administrative occupational support at their organization.  To date, limited research exists that examines youth work efficacy levels, and no research studies exist analyzing the relationship between youth workers’ efficacy levels and perceived organizational support.  The current study examined the relationship between self-efficacy and the perceived organizational support felt by workers in a youth development setting.  A total of 198 surveys were completed; results indicated that youth work efficacy was significantly related to perceived organizational support.  This study is important to enhancing the body of knowledge regarding self-efficacy levels of workers in a youth development setting, as well as understanding motivation and self-confidence of youth development professionals.

  9. Perceived Parenting Style of Fathers and Iranian Adolescents' Self-efficacy: The Moderating Role of Gender and Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keshavarz, Somayeh; Mounts, Nina S

    2017-01-01

    The authors examined the moderating role of adolescent's gender and father's education on the associations between perceived paternal parenting styles and self-efficacy in a socioeconomical diverse sample of Iranian ado-lescents (n = 382). Results revealed that paternal authoritative parenting was significantly and positively related to self-efficacy. Interestingly, a significant and positive relation was also found between paternal authoritarian parenting and self-efficacy. This finding might have been the result of the fact that this study was conducted as part of a collectivist culture. In addition, the results indicated that boys who perceived their fathers as highly authoritative indicated higher self-efficacy than girls did. Furthermore, the findings demonstrated that higher educational levels attenuate the negative impact of the permissive parenting style on self-efficacy. The present findings underscore the need to focus on the role of gender and father's education when assessing the link between parenting style and adolescents' self-efficacy.

  10. A Study of the Relationship of Perceived Principal Supervision and Support to the Perceived Self-Efficacy of Beginning and Experienced K-12 Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spearing, Leonard M.

    2013-01-01

    In this quantitative study the author examined the relationship between the perceived level of principal supervision and support to the perceived self-efficacy of K-12 teachers in a suburban public school district. The impact of perceived self-efficacy upon the commitment to remain in teaching was also considered. Finally the differential…

  11. Depression among Collage Students; The Role of General Self-Efficacy and Perceived Social Support

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Jalilian

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction & Objective: Depression is the most common psychiatric disorder reported among college students. Evidence suggests that depression rate is especially high among medical students. The goal of this study was to examine the relationship of general self-efficacy and social support with depression levels of university students.Materials & Methods: This was a descriptive analytic study carried out among 235 students in Hamadan University of medical sciences. Samples were classified with the appropriate assignment done and gathering information from standard questionnaires (Beck Depression Inventory test & General Self Efficacy Scale & Perceived Social Support Scale. The data were analyzed by SPSS-13.Results: 37 percent of students showed different degrees of depression. A significant negative correlation was found among depression, self efficacy (P.value= 0.000, r= -0.581, and social support (P.value= 0.000, r= -0.617. Also the results showed that there was significant relationship between depression and student's dwelling (P<0.05.Conclusion: These findings also indicated the potential roles of social support in mediating depression. According to the results self efficacy strategies could improve the students' mental health.(Sci J Hamadan Univ Med Sci 2012;18(4:60-66

  12. Comparison of the medical students' perceived self-efficacy and the evaluation of the observers and patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ammentorp, Jette; Thomsen, Janus Laust; Jarbøl, Dorte Ejg

    2013-01-01

    The accuracy of self-assessment has been questioned in studies comparing physicians' self-assessments to observed assessments; however, none of these studies used self-efficacy as a method for self-assessment.The aim of the study was to investigate how medical students' perceived self-efficacy...

  13. Perceived Parenting, Self-Esteem, and General Self-Efficacy of Iranian American Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, Gila; Plunkett, Scott W.; Otten, Mark P.

    2010-01-01

    We examined whether Iranian American adolescents' perceptions of parental support, parental knowledge, and parental psychological control relate to general self-efficacy directly, and indirectly through positive esteem and self-deprecation. To investigate this, self-report surveys were collected from 158 Iranian American adolescents attending…

  14. Relationship between healthy lifestyle behaviors and health locus of control and health-specific self-efficacy in university students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Açıkgöz Çepni, Serap; Kitiş, Yeter

    2017-07-01

    To investigate the relationship between the healthy lifestyle behaviors and the health locus of control and health-specific self-efficacy in university students. The study included 572 undergraduate students of a university in the central Anatolia region of Turkey. The data were collected with the General Characteristics Form, the Health-Promoting Lifestyle Profile II, the Multidimensional Health Locus of Control Scale, and the Perceived Health Competence Scale and investigated with the structural equation model. Health-specific self-efficacy was an important predictor of healthy lifestyle behaviors. The Internal health locus of control influenced the healthy lifestyle behaviors through health-specific self-efficacy. The other dimension was the Powerful Others health locus of control that affected healthy lifestyle behaviors, both directly and indirectly, through health-specific self-efficacy. There was a chance that the health locus of control had a negative effect on healthy lifestyle behaviors through self-efficacy. Health-specific self-efficacy is an important prerequisite for changes in healthy lifestyle behaviors, which supports Pender's model. The subscales of the health locus of control vary in their effects on healthy lifestyle behaviors, which partly supports Pender's model. Nurses, by using this model, can examine ways of improving these cognitive-perceptual factors and implement health education programs that are directed towards improving them in young persons. © 2016 Japan Academy of Nursing Science.

  15. Collective efficacy versus self-efficacy in coping responses to stressors and control: a cross-cultural study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaubroeck, J; Lam, S S; Xie, J L

    2000-08-01

    This study examined how cultural differences and efficacy perceptions influence the role of job control in coping with job demands. Perceiving higher control mitigated the effects of demands on psychological health symptoms and turnover intentions only among American bank tellers reporting high job self-efficacy. Among American tellers reporting low job self-efficacy, perceived control exacerbated the effects of demands. However, in a matched Hong Kong sample, collective efficacy interacted in the same way with control and demands as job self-efficacy had in the American sample. These differences appear to be explained by the individual attributes of idiocentrism and allocentrism that are linked to the societal norms of individualism and collectivism, respectively.

  16. Creating a measure of portion control self-efficacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fast, Lindsey C; Harman, Jennifer J; Maertens, Julie A; Burnette, Jeni L; Dreith, Francesca

    2015-01-01

    Over the last few decades, food portion sizes have steadily increased by as much as 700% (Young & Nestle, 2002). Food portions are often much larger than dietary guidelines recommend, leaving individuals to manage their food consumption on their own and making it necessary to understand individual factors impacting food consumption. In the current paper, we focus on self-efficacy for portion control. Specifically, across three studies, we developed and validated a new measure of portion control self-efficacy (PCSE). The PCSE measure yielded good fit statistics and had acceptable test-retest reliability using two cross-sectional surveys (Studies 1(a) and 1(b)). Results from Study 2 demonstrated construct and predictive validity of the PCSE using the Food Amount Rating Scale (FARS; Dohm, & Striegel-Moore, 2002). Study 3 offered additional support for reliability and validity with a sample of overweight and obese adults currently trying to lose weight. Overall, findings indicate that the new PCSE measure is reliable and valid. Individuals often make inaccurate food portion estimates (Slawson & Eck, 1997; Yuhas, Bolland, & Bolland, 1989) which can lead to overeating and weight-gain. Thus, the discussion centers on the need to incorporate PCSE in future research and intervention work targeting weight loss, health, and food consumption. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Psychosocial and behavioural factors in the regulation of weight: Self-regulation, self-efficacy and locus control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menéndez-González, Lara; Orts-Cortés, María Isabel

    To identify the relationship and behaviour of the variables of self-control, self-efficacy and locus control in weight regulation of obese, overweight and normal weight adults. Transversal study undertaken in the Health Centre of El Coto (Gijón) from 1st April to 30th July 2015. Subjects between 18-65 years of age with a body mass index recording within the last two years. serious medical illness, eating disorders or pregnant women. Behavioural variables: self-regulation of body weight (Inventory of self-control of body weight), perceived self-efficacy in weight regulation (Inventory of perceived self-efficacy in weight regulation) and locus control in weight regulation (Inventory of locus control in weight regulation). Anthropometric variables: weight (kg) and height (m), body mass index. One hundred and six participants were included: 32 were obese, 28 overweight and 46 normal weight. Significant differences were found between the 3 study groups for total scale of self-efficacy (F=61.77; pcontrol (F=13.92; p=.019), other weighty influences of locus control (F=9.21; pcontrol (F=3.50; p=.011). The relationship between body mass index and behavioural variables of self-efficacy, self-regulation and locus control, suggests the need for healthcare professionals to include psychological factors of behaviour in any preventive action and intervention directed at weight control. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  18. Children's Decision-Making Involvement About Research Participation: Associations With Perceived Fairness and Self-Efficacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Victoria A; Feudtner, Chris; Jawad, Abbas F

    2017-04-01

    The primary objective of this study was to examine the associations of children's involvement in decisions about research participation with their perceptions of the decision-making process and self-efficacy. Participants were children (ages 8-17) who enrolled in research studies in the prior 2 months. Children completed a questionnaire that yielded three decision-making involvement subscales: Researcher Engages Child, Researcher Supports Autonomy, and Child Participates. Children reported on fairness of the decision-making process and health-related decision self-efficacy. After adjusting for age, higher scores on Researcher Engages Child were associated with greater self-efficacy, and higher scores on Researcher Supports Autonomy were associated with greater perceived fairness. These data underscore the potential importance of researcher-child interactions about research participation when assent is sought, including proactively involving children in the decision by asking for their opinions and communicating their central role in the decision, which are likely to be more meaningful to children than receiving information or signing a form.

  19. Effect of educational intervention on knowledge, perceived benefits, barriers and self-efficacy regarding AIDS preventive behaviors among drug addicts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastami, Fatemeh; Mostafavi, Firoozeh; Hassanzadeh, Akbar

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Addicts account for approximately 68.15% of AIDS cases in Iran and injection drug users are considered as a major factor in the spread of AIDS in Iran. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of an educational intervention on the perceived self-efficacy, benefits, and barriers concerning AIDS preventive behaviors among drug addicts in Khorramabad, Iran. Methods: This is a quasi-experimental study carried out in 2013 on 88 addicts kept in rehabilitations center in Khorramabad. The data collection instruments included a questionnaire on self-efficacy, perceived benefits, perceived barriers, knowledge and preventive behaviors regarding HIV. Data were analyzed by paired t-test, independent t-test, Chi-square and analysis of covariance. Results: Paired t-test showed that the mean scores for perceived benefits and barriers, knowledge and preventive behaviors significantly increased in the intervention group after the intervention than before the intervention. But the increase in self-efficacy score was not statistically significant. Conclusions: The results of this study showed that training and education based on the health belief model led to an increase in knowledge, self-efficacy, perceived benefits, performance and reduction in perceived barriers in addicts. It is recommended that future studies should include strategies for enhancing self-efficacy and perceived benefits as well as strategies for reducing barriers to the adoption of preventive behaviors. PMID:27462632

  20. Impact of biofeedback on self-efficacy and stress reduction in obesity: a randomized controlled pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teufel, Martin; Stephan, Kerstin; Kowalski, Axel; Käsberger, Saskia; Enck, Paul; Zipfel, Stephan; Giel, Katrin E

    2013-09-01

    Biofeedback application is an evidence-based technique to induce relaxation. A primary mechanism of action is the improvement of self-efficacy, which is needed to facilitate the translation of health behavioral intentions into action. Obesity is often associated with low self-efficacy and dysfunctional eating patterns, including comfort eating as an inexpedient relaxation technique. This is the first study investigating the effects of biofeedback on self-efficacy and relaxation in obesity. In the present experiment, 31 women, mean body mass index 35.5 kg/m², were randomized to a food-specific biofeedback paradigm, a non-specific relaxation biofeedback paradigm, or a waiting list control. Eight sessions of biofeedback of the electrodermal activity were performed while presenting either a challenging food stimulus or a non-specific landscape stimulus. Self-efficacy, stress, ability to relax, eating behavior, and electrodermal activity were assessed before, directly after, and 3 months after the intervention. The food-specific biofeedback predominantly showed effects on food-related self-efficacy and perceived stress. The non-specific relaxation biofeedback showed effects on the ability to relax. Self-reported improvements were confirmed by corresponding decrease in the electrodermal reaction to food stimuli. Biofeedback treatment is effective in improving self-efficacy in individuals with obesity and might therefore be a valuable additional intervention in obesity treatment.

  1. Comparison of the medical students? perceived self-efficacy and the evaluation of the observers and patients

    OpenAIRE

    Ammentorp, Jette; Thomsen, Janus Laust; Jarb?l, Dorte Ejg; Holst, Ren?; ?vrehus, Anne Lindebo Holm; Kofoed, Poul-Erik

    2013-01-01

    Background The accuracy of self-assessment has been questioned in studies comparing physicians? self-assessments to observed assessments; however, none of these studies used self-efficacy as a method for self-assessment. The aim of the study was to investigate how medical students? perceived self-efficacy of specific communication skills corresponds to the evaluation of simulated patients and observers. Methods All of the medical students who signed up for an Objective Structured Clinical Exa...

  2. The Role of Academic Self-Efficacy as a Mediator Variable between Perceived Academic Climate and Academic Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abd-Elmotaleb, Moustafa; Saha, Sudhir K.

    2013-01-01

    This study examines the mediating influence of academic self-efficacy on the link between perceived academic climate and academic performance among university students. The participants in the study consist of 272 undergraduate students at the University of Assiut, Assiut, Egypt. A scale to measure perceived academic climate, was developed. To…

  3. Perceived Self-Efficacy to Avoid Cigarette Smoking and Addiction: Differences between Hispanics and Non-Hispanic Whites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabogal, Fabio; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Finds that, among 263 Hispanic and 150 non-Hispanic White smokers, Hispanics smoked fewer cigarettes, had lower levels of perceived addiction to nicotine, and had higher perceived self-efficacy to avoid smoking, but these differences shrank with greater acculturation. Discusses implications for smoking cessation programs. Contains 27 references.…

  4. The Impact of Academic Self-Efficacy and Perceived Stigma on the Performance of Students with Learning Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleming, Madalay; Wated, Guillermo

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate the mediating role of perceived stigma in the relationship between academic self-efficacy and academic performance among college students with learning disabilities and/or ADHD. Seventy-four college-aged participants with diagnosed learning disability or ADHD completed a perceived stigma scale…

  5. Relationship of Spiritual Health and Perceived Stress with Breastfeeding Self-efficacy: A Survey on Mothers with Hospitalized Neonates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alireza Didarloo

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Positive outcomes of breastfeeding on both mothers and neonates health are inevitable. Mother self-efficacy has a constructive role on initiating and continuing breastfeeding, in turn, it is influenced by several factors. The present study aimed to determine some risk factors associated with breastfeeding self-efficacy of mothers with hospitalized newborns.Materials and Methods: This descriptive-correlational study was carried out on 150 eligible mothers who were selected from Motahhari Hospital of Urmia in 2016, using consecutive sampling. Data was collected using questionnaires such as Demographics, Paloutzian and Ellison the Spiritual Health Scale (PESHS, Cohen’s Perceived Stress (PSS, and Dennis Breastfeeding Self-Efficacy Scale (BSEF. Descriptive (mean, standard deviation and inferential statistics (ANOVA, Independent t-test, Pearson’s correlation coefficient and multiple regressions were used to analyze the data in SPSS software under windows with version 16. Results: The results showed that the mean and standard deviation of breastfeeding self-efficacy score were 128.95±17.84, respectively. The final multivariate regression model showed that the variables of spiritual health (P=0.01, β(r =.208, t=2.54, perceived stress (P=0.03, β(r = -.173, t=-2.18, and monthly income (P=0.01, β(r=.214, t=2.55, had statistically significant relationships with breastfeeding self-efficacy. No significant relationships were observed between self-efficacy and other demographic variables (p>0.05.Conclusion: The study suggests that breastfeeding self-efficacy of mothers was influenced by spiritual health, perceived stress, and economic status. Hence, it is recommended and emphasized that health care providers consider these factors in designing their health interventions regarding breastfeeding.

  6. The Role of Perceived Stress and Self-Efficacy in Young People's Life Satisfaction: A Longitudinal Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burger, Kaspar; Samuel, Robin

    2017-01-01

    Life satisfaction is an important indicator of successful development. However, adolescents' life satisfaction tends to be relatively unsteady, and environmental influences play a critical role in shaping life satisfaction among adolescents in the transition to young adulthood. Given the paramount importance that education plays in adolescents' lives, adolescents' life satisfaction may vary as a function of school-related stress experience. At the same time, coping resources may help reduce adverse effects of stress on life satisfaction. With this in mind, we examined whether, and to what extent, perceived stress in education and general self-efficacy (a resource that facilitates coping) affect the life satisfaction of adolescents in transition to young adulthood. We distinguished between baseline levels of stress and self-efficacy and within-person change in stress and self-efficacy to determine whether life satisfaction is sensitive to fluctuations in stress and self-efficacy when person-specific levels of stress and self-efficacy are taken into account. Estimating growth curve models on data from a panel study on the life trajectories of compulsory-school leavers (n = 5126, 55.3 % female), we found that baseline levels of stress and self-efficacy, as well as within-person change in stress and self-efficacy, affected adolescents' life satisfaction. Moreover, our results showed that baseline self-efficacy mitigated the negative effect of baseline stress on life satisfaction. These findings improve our understanding of two major psychological determinants of adolescents' life satisfaction and extend our knowledge of life satisfaction trajectories during the transition to young adulthood.

  7. The impact of enhancing perceived self-efficacy in torture survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morina, Naser; Bryant, Richard A; Doolan, Emma L; Martin-Sölch, Chantal; Plichta, Michael M; Pfaltz, Monique C; Schnyder, Ulrich; Schick, Matthis; Nickerson, Angela

    2018-01-01

    Perceived self-efficacy (SE) is an important factor underlying psychological well-being. Refugees suffer many experiences that can compromise SE. This study tested the impact of enhancing perceived SE on coping with trauma reminders and distress tolerance in tortured refugees. Torture survivors (N = 40) were administered a positive SE induction in which they retrieved mastery-related autobiographical memories, or a non-SE (NSE) induction, and then viewed trauma-related images. Participants rated their distress following presentation of each image. Participants then completed a frustration-inducing mirror-tracing task to index distress tolerance. Participants in the SE condition reported less distress and negative affect, and improved coping in relation to viewing the trauma-related images than those in the NSE condition. The SE induction also led to greater persistence with the mirror-tracing task than the NSE induction. These findings provide initial evidence that promoting SE in tortured refugees can assist with managing distress from trauma reminders, and promoting greater distress tolerance. Enhancing perceived SE in tortured refugees may increase their capacity to tolerate distress during therapy, and may be a useful means to improve treatment response. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. The influence of self-efficacy and outcome expectations on the relationship between perceived environment and physical activity in the workplace

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Plotnikoff Ronald C

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent research and commentary contends that ecological approaches may be particularly useful for understanding and promoting physical activity participation in various settings including the workplace. Yet within the physical activity domain there is a lack of understanding of how ecological environment factors influence behaviour. Thus, the purpose of this study was to examine the relationships between perceived environment, social-cognitive variables, and physical activity behaviour. Methods Participants (N = 897 were employees from three large worksites who completed self-report inventories containing measures of self-efficacy, outcome expectations, perceptions of the workplace environment (PWES, and physical activity behaviour during both leisure-time and incorporated throughout the workday. Results Results of both bivariate and multiple regression analyses indicated the global PWES scores had a limited association with leisure-time physical activity (R2adj =.01. Sequential regression analyses supported a weak association between physical activity incorporated in the workplace and PWES (R2adj = .04 and the partial mediation of self-efficacy on the relationship between PWES and workplace physical activity (variance accounted for reduced to R2adj = .02 when self-efficacy was controlled. Conclusion Overall, the results of the present investigation indicate that self-efficacy acted as a partial mediator of the relationship between perceived environment and workplace physical activity participation. Implications of the findings for physical activity promotion using ecological-based approaches, and future directions for research from this perspective in worksite settings are discussed.

  9. Self-Efficacy versus Perceived Enjoyment as Predictors of Physical Activity Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Beth A.; Williams, David M.; Frayeh, Amanda L.; Marcus, Bess H.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Self-efficacy and physical activity (PA) enjoyment are related to PA behavior, but it is unclear which is more important and how they interrelate. The purpose of this study was to examine how these two constructs interrelate to influence PA behavior. Design Participants were low active adults (n=448) participating in a RCT examining the effect of a PA promotion intervention. Participants completed physical activity, enjoyment, and self-efficacy measures at baseline, six, and 12 months. Results Self-efficacy and enjoyment at both baseline and six months predicted PA at 12 months. However, enjoyment was a stronger predictor than self-efficacy in that self-efficacy no longer predicted PA behavior when included alongside enjoyment. In follow-up mediation analyses, enjoyment at six months did not mediate the effect of baseline self-efficacy on 12-month PA; however, six-month self-efficacy mediated the effect of baseline enjoyment on 12-month PA. Conclusion Our results indicate that interventions should perhaps initially focus on increasing enjoyment of physical activity. Greater PA enjoyment appears to influence individuals’ self-reported ability to engage in regular PA (i.e., higher self-efficacy ratings). Additional research is needed to better understand the interrelationships between self-efficacy and enjoyment and how these constructs affect PA. PMID:26541890

  10. Social Persuasions by Teachers as a Source of Student Self-Efficacy: The Moderating Role of Perceived Teacher Credibility

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    Won, Sungjun; Lee, Sun-Young; Bong, Mimi

    2017-01-01

    The primary purpose of this study was to ascertain whether the degree to which Korean middle school students perceived their teachers to be credible made a difference in the effectiveness of teachers' persuasion as a source of students' academic self-efficacy. In the contexts of both general school learning and a specific subject of Korean…

  11. The Effect of School and Teacher Themed Movies on Pre-Service Teachers' Professional Attitudes and Perceived Self-Efficacy

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    Kaskaya, Alper; Unlu, Ihsan; Akar, M. Said; Ozturan Sagirli, Meryem

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the effects of school and teacher themed movies on pre-service teachers' attitudes towards their profession and their perceived self-efficacy. As qualitative and quantitative research approaches were employed during data collection procedure, mixed methodology was adopted in this study. In the study, one of…

  12. Does Everyone Benefit Equally from Self-Efficacy Beliefs? The Moderating Role of Perceived Social Support on Motivation

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    Bagci, Sabahat Cigdem

    2018-01-01

    This study investigated whether perceived goal support from family and friends may moderate the relationship between academic self-efficacy and motivational outcomes among early adolescent students recruited from a low-middle socio-economic status (SES) background school in Turkey (N = 319, [X-bar][subscript age] = 13.13, SD = 0.80). Self-report…

  13. Association between perceived self-efficacy, outcome expectations and outcome evaluation and fruit and vegetables consumption in adolescent girls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Ramezankhani

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Unfortunately just a few number of children and adolescents use sufficient amounts of fruit and vegetables. This study aimed to investigate the association between fruit and vegetables consumption and perceived self-efficacy, outcome expectations and outcome evaluation in adolescent girls in Shahrekord city.This is a descriptive analytic study conducted on 308 high school girls (first grade who were selected by cluster sampling method in Shahrekord, Iran in 2013-2014. A researcher made questionnaire was used to collect the needed data like demographic variables, substructures of perceived self-efficacy, outcome expectations and outcome evaluation. In order to investigate the fruit and vegetables consumption status, the standard questionnaire of FFQ was used. The collected data was analyzed by SPSS 18 software, using descriptive and analytic tests such as one way variance analysis, Pearson and Spearman correlation. The mean scores of fruit and vegetables consumption and vegetables consumption were reported as 1.45±0.68 and 1.47±0.95 respectively as well. There was a direct significant association between adolescents’ perceived self-efficacy and outcome expectations. A direct significant association was also observed between fruit consumption and both outcome evaluation and perceived self-efficacy Regarding the status of fruit and vegetables consumption and the mean scores of outcome evaluation, outcome expectations and perceived self-efficacy in adolescents which was low, and also the importance of promoting healthy diet in the critical period of adolescence, it seems necessary to use efficient patterns and theories of health education and promotion in which the roles of individuals, family and environment has been considered.

  14. Turkish Prospective Middle School Mathematics Teachers' Beliefs and Perceived Self-Efficacy Beliefs Regarding the Use of Origami in Mathematics Education

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    Arslan, Okan; Isiksal-Bostan, Mine

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate beliefs and perceived self-efficacy beliefs of Turkish prospective elementary mathematics teachers in using origami in mathematics education. Furthermore, gender differences in their beliefs and perceived self-efficacy beliefs were investigated. Data for the current study was collected via Origami in…

  15. An acute exercise session increases self-efficacy in sedentary endometrial cancer survivors and controls.

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    Hughes, Daniel; Baum, George; Jovanovic, Jennifer; Carmack, Cindy; Greisinger, Anthony; Basen-Engquist, Karen

    2010-11-01

    Self-efficacy can be affected by mastery experiences and somatic sensations. A novel exercise experience and associated sensations may impact self-efficacy and subsequent behaviors. We investigated the effect of a single exercise session on self-efficacy for sedentary endometrial cancer survivors compared with sedentary women of a similar age, but with no cancer history. Twenty survivors and 19 controls completed an exercise session performed as a submaximal cycle ergometry test. Sensations and efficacy were measured before and after exercise. Repeated measures analysis of variance (ANOVA) was performed. Regression models were used to determine predictors of self-efficacy and subsequent exercise. Self-efficacy increased for both survivors and controls, but survivors had a higher rate of increase, and the change predicted subsequent exercise. The association between exercise-related somatic sensations and self-efficacy differed between the 2 groups. A novel exercise experience had a larger effect on self-efficacy and subsequent exercise activity for endometrial cancer survivors than controls. Somatic sensations experienced during exercise may differ for survivors, which may be related to the experience of having cancer. Understanding factors affecting confidence in novel exercise experiences for populations with specific cancer histories is of the utmost importance in the adoption of exercise behaviors.

  16. The Role of Work-Integrated Learning in Developing Students' Perceived Work Self-Efficacy

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    Reddan, Gregory

    2016-01-01

    The notion of work self-efficacy is significant as the self-efficacy beliefs of an individual have considerable influence on his/her level of motivation and performance in the workplace. This paper aims to determine the effects of the learning activities of a work-integrated learning course in Exercise Science in relation to students' perceived…

  17. Association of self-efficacy of parents/caregivers with childhood asthma control parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, Ana Lúcia Araújo; Lima, Kamila Ferreira; Mendes, Elizamar Regina da Rocha; Joventino, Emanuella Silva; Martins, Mariana Cavalcante; Almeida, Paulo César de; Ximenes, Lorena Barbosa

    2017-01-01

    Objective To verify the association between the self-efficacy of parents/caregivers and control parameters of childhood asthma. Method Cross-sectional study with parents/caregivers of asthmatic children. Data were collected through a sociodemographic questionnaire and the Self-efficacy and their child's level of asthma control scale: Brazilian version. Results Participation of 216 parents/caregivers in the study. There was a statistically significant association between self-efficacy scores and the following variables: unscheduled physician visit (p=0.001), visit to emergency department (pcrisis medication from control medication (p=0.024), use of spacer (p=0.001), performing oral hygiene after use of inhaled corticosteroids (p=0.003), and knowledge of medication gratuity (p=0.004). Conclusion A significant relationship of the self-efficacy of parents/caregivers of asthmatic children with control parameters and training on the necessary skills to reach this control was demonstrated in the study.

  18. PENGARUH PERSONALIZATION, COMPUTER SELF EFFICACY, DAN TRUST TERHADAP PERCEIVED USEFULLNESS PADA PENGGUNA INTERNET BANKING DI PT. BANK BRI (Persero, Tbk. CABANG MADIUN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoyok Sugiantoro

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Penelitian ini bertujuan untuk mengetahui pengaruh personalization terhadap perceived usefulness, pengaruh computer self efficacy terhadap perceived usefulness, pengaruh trust terhadap perceived usefulness, dan pengaruh secara simultan personalization, computer self efficacy, dan trust terhadap perceived usefulness. Populasi dalam penelitian ini adalah semua nasabah pengguna internet banking di Bank BRI KCP Dolopo Madiun hingga akhir bulan Mei 2014, yaitu sejumlah 157 orang. Pengambilan sampel menggunakan sampling jenuh sehingga jumlah sampel penelitian ini sebanyak 157 orang. Penelitian ini menggunakan metode analisis regresi linier berganda. Hasil penelitian ini menunjukkan bahwa variabel personalization berpengaruh terhadap perceived usefulness, variabel computer self efficacy berpengaruh terhadap perceived usefulness, variabel trust berpengaruh terhadap perceived usefulness, serta variabel personalization, computer self efficacy, dan trust secara simultan berpengaruh terhadap perceived usefulness pada pengguna layanan internet banking di PT. Bank BRI (Persero, Tbk Cabang Madiun.

  19. Self-efficacy, mathematics' anxiety and perceived importance: an empirical study with Portuguese engineering students

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    Alves, Manuela; Rodrigues, Cristina S.; Rocha, Ana Maria A. C.; Coutinho, Clara

    2016-01-01

    The accomplishment in mathematics has gained attention from educators and arises as an emerging field of study, including in engineering education. However, in Portugal, there is still incipient research in the area; so it is high time to explore factors that might enlighten the gap in the study of the relationship between Portuguese engineering students and the learning of mathematics. The main purpose of this study is to explore three factors identified in the literature as influencing the learning of mathematical concepts - self-efficacy, anxiety towards mathematics and perceived importance of mathematics - and search for differences by gender and by type of engineering course, a dimension not much reported in the literature but which was revealed as important in the team's previous research. Based on a sample of 140 undergraduate students of different engineering courses from University of Minho, results only identify differences in the type of course and not in gender. These results constitute a contribution and open new paths for future research in the engineering education.

  20. Self-Control Strength Depletion Reduces Self-Efficacy and Impairs Exercise Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Jeffrey D; Bray, Steven R

    2015-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the role of task self-efficacy as a psychological factor involved in the relationship between self-control depletion and physical endurance. Participants (N = 37) completed two isometric handgrip endurance trials, separated by a Stroop task, which was either congruent (control) or incongruent (causing depletion). Task self-efficacy for the second endurance trial was measured following the Stroop task. Participants in the depletion condition reported lower task self-efficacy and showed a greater reduction in performance on the second endurance trial when compared with controls. Task self-efficacy also mediated the relationship between self-control depletion and endurance performance. The results of this study provide evidence that task self-efficacy is negatively affected following self-control depletion. We recommend that task self-efficacy be further investigated as a psychological factor accounting for the negative change in self-control performance of physical endurance and sport tasks following self-control strength depletion.

  1. Perceived Exercise Self-Efficacy, Benefits and Barriers, and Commitment to a Plan for Exercise among Jordanians with Chronic Illnesses.

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    Darawad, Muhammad W; Khalil, Amani A; Hamdan-Mansour, Ayman M; Nofal, Basema M

    2016-11-01

    To explore Jordanian chronic illnesses patients' perceived exercise self-efficacy, benefits and barriers, and commitment to exercise planning, and to assess the relationship between those variables. Descriptive cross-sectional design. Data were collected from a convenience sample of 402 outpatient Jordanians with chronic illnesses, using Exercise Self-Efficacy Scale, Exercise Benefits and Barriers Scale, and Commitment to a Plan for Exercise Scale. The average BMI was 28.3, and exercise period 3.2 hours/ week. Participants reported moderate perceived self-efficacy (M= 47.5%, SD= 11.7), commitment to exercise planning (M=2.0/3, SD=0.3), exercise barriers (M=2.4/4, SD=0.3), and benefits (M=2.3/4, SD=0.3). Commitment to exercise planning had a significant correlation with barriers (r=0.11) and benefits (r=0.10). Self-efficacy was not found to correlate with other variables. Even though participants reported higher perceived self-efficacy and commitment to exercise plan than that reported in literature, they were found to be overweight and inactive, which indicates the importance of such study. Exercise education programs are needed taking into considerations patients' individual differences. However, the broad grouping of diseases may not produce a homogenous sample, for which disease categories are recommended in future studies. Patients with chronic illness need more encouragement to engage themselves in exercise practices. Exercise educational program for patients with chronic illnesses should consider patients' reported exercise benefits and barriers. © 2014 Association of Rehabilitation Nurses.

  2. Self-efficacy beliefs, locus of control, religiosity and non-adherence to immunosuppressive medications in kidney transplant patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Andresa Nascimento; Moratelli, Lucas; Tavares, Paula Liziero; Marsicano, Elisa De Oliveira; Pinhati, Renata Romanholi; Colugnati, Fernando Antonio Basile; Lucchetti, Giancarlo; Sanders-Pinheiro, Helady

    2016-11-01

    Adherence to immunosuppressive medication is essential for favourable kidney transplant outcomes. The present study aims to investigate how self-efficacy beliefs, health locus of control and religiosity are associated with adherence to immunosuppressives in post kidney transplant recipients. This is a cross-sectional study with 88 recipients with more than 1 year after transplantation. Three methods were used to classify patients as adherent or non-adherent: Basel Assessment of Adherence Scale for Immunosuppressives - BAASIS, the collateral report and blood levels of immunosuppressive medications. Self-efficacy, health locus of control, and religiosity were evaluated applying General Perceived Self-Efficacy Scale, Multidimensional Health Locus of Control Scale and Duke University Religion Index, respectively. Non-adherence was modelled by uni- and multivariated analysis. Sixty-three percent of the patients were male, age 47.2 ± 12.9 years, and median post-transplant time 108.71 (49.0-266.0) months. We found 70.5% of patients were non-adherent through at least one method. Adherent patients presented higher self-efficacy scores (45.1 ± 4.9 vs 38.3 ± 8.6; P locus of control (OR 1.23, IC 1.04-1.45, P = 0.016) and lower intrinsic religiosity (OR 0.56, IC 0.38-0.84, P = 0.006). Our study showed that self-efficacy, chance locus of control, and intrinsic religiosity were associated with non-adherence to immunosuppressives. A broader perception of the kidney transplant patient´s integrality can help health professionals to design strategies to promote adherence in this population. © 2015 Asian Pacific Society of Nephrology.

  3. Teacher self-efficacy and perceived autonomy: relations with teacher engagement, job satisfaction, and emotional exhaustion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skaalvik, Einar M; Skaalvik, Sidsel

    2014-02-01

    When studied separately, research shows that both teacher self-efficacy and teacher autonomy are associated with adaptive motivational and emotional outcomes. This study tested whether teacher self-efficacy and teacher autonomy are independently associated with engagement, job satisfaction, and emotional exhaustion. 2,569 Norwegian teachers in elementary school and middle school (719 men, 1,850 women; M age = 45.0 yr., SD = 11.5) were administered the Norwegian Teacher Self-Efficacy Scale, the Teacher Autonomy Scale, the Utrecht Work Engagement Scale, the Teacher Job Satisfaction Scale, and the Maslach Burnout Inventory. The analysis revealed that both teacher autonomy and self-efficacy were independent predictors of engagement, job satisfaction, and emotional exhaustion. This study suggests that autonomy or decision latitude works positively but through different processes for teachers with high and low mastery expectations.

  4. The effect of a creative art program on self-esteem, hope, perceived social support, and self-efficacy in individuals with multiple sclerosis: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraser, Cira; Keating, Michelle

    2014-12-01

    Creative art has been found to be beneficial to some patients with chronic illness. Little is understood about how creative art can benefit individuals living with multiple sclerosis (MS). The purpose of the pilot study was to determine if there was a difference in self-esteem, hope, perceived social support, and self-efficacy in individuals with MS after a 4-week creative art program. A one-group, pretest/posttest design was used. The convenience sample of 14 individuals was recruited from MS Centers and the National MS Society. They ranged in age from 29 to 70 years (M = 51.3 years, SD = 12.5 years). Participants included 14 women. The creative art program included week 1-watercolor, week 2-collage making, week 3-beading, and week 4-knitting. Each of the four weekly sessions was facilitated by a registered nurse with expertise in MS and lasted 2 hours. Creative artists instructed participants and provided a hands-on experience for each of the creative projects. Participants were free to share thoughts, experiences, and words of support and encouragement during each session. The variables were measured before starting the creative art program and after the final session. The instruments included the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale, the Herth Hope Index, the Modified Social Support Survey, the MS Self-Efficacy Scale, and a sociodemographic questionnaire. The Statistical Package for the Social Sciences Version 16.0 was used to analyze the data. There was a significant increase in all variables after the creative art program as follows: self-esteem (t = -3.05, p = 009), hope (t = -3.96, p = .002), social support (t = -2.21, p = .046), self-efficacy to function with MS (t = -2.68, p = .019), and self-efficacy to control MS (t = 3.22, p = .007). The power analysis revealed a large effect size for hope (d = 1.06), self-esteem (d = 0.82), and self-efficacy (control; d = 0.86). A medium effect size was found for self-efficacy (function; d = 0.72) and social support (d = 0

  5. The Role of Generational Status, Self-Esteem, Academic Self-Efficacy, and Perceived Social Support in College Students' Psychological Well-Being

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chia-Chih D. C.; Castaneda-Sound, Carrie

    2008-01-01

    This study examined the influences of generational status, self-esteem, academic self-efficacy, and perceived social support on 367 undergraduate college students' well-being. Findings showed that 1st-generation students reported significantly more somatic symptoms and lower levels of academic self-efficacy than did non-1st-generation students. In…

  6. Dealing with School Violence: The Effect of School Violence Prevention Training on Teachers' Perceived Self-Efficacy in Dealing with Violent Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sela-Shayovitz, Revital

    2009-01-01

    This study deals with the relationship between school violence prevention training and teachers' perceived self-efficacy in handling violent events. Three indicators were used to examine teachers' self-efficacy: personal teaching efficacy (PTE), teachers' efficacy in the school as an organisation (TESO), and teachers' outcome efficacy (TOE). Data…

  7. Predictive value of age for coping: the role of self-efficacy, social support satisfaction and perceived stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trouillet, Raphaël; Gana, Kamel; Lourel, Marcel; Fort, Isabelle

    2009-05-01

    The present study was prompted by the lack of agreement on how coping changes with age. We postulate that the effect of age on coping is mediated by coping resources, such as self-efficacy, perceived stress and social support satisfaction. The participants in the study were community dwelling and aged between 22 and 88 years old. Data were collected using the General Self Efficacy Scale, the Social Support Questionnaire, the Perceived Stress Scale, the Geriatric Depression Scale, the Social Readjustment Rating Scale (life-events) and the Way of Coping Checklist. We performed path analyses for two competitive structural models: M1 (age does not directly affect coping processes) and M2 (age directly affects coping processes). Our results supported a modified version of M2. Age was not found to predict either of two coping strategies: problem-focused coping is predicted by self-efficacy and social support satisfaction; emotion-focused coping is predicted by social support satisfaction and perceived stress. Changes in coping over the lifespan reflect the effectiveness with which a person's adaptive processes deal with age-associated changes in self-referred beliefs and environment perception.

  8. The effect of weight controllability beliefs on prejudice and self-efficacy

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    Loi, Natasha M.; Breadsell, Dana

    2016-01-01

    An experiment was conducted to test for the presence of prejudice towards obesity and whether weight controllability beliefs information reduces this prejudice and impacts on a person’s own healthy eating self-efficacy. The experiment randomly allocated 346 participants (49 males) into one of three conditions: controllable contributors toward obesity condition (e.g., information about personal control about diet and exercise); uncontrollable contributors toward obesity condition (e.g., information about genes, factors in society); and a control condition with no information given. Prejudice was present in 81% of the sample. High prejudice was predicted by low self-efficacy for exercise and weight. Weight controllability beliefs information had no significant effect on prejudice levels or exercise or healthy eating self-efficacy levels. Future research directions are discussed. PMID:26966679

  9. Perceived Self-Efficacy in Parents of Adolescents and Adults with Autism Spectrum Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Jonathan A.; Tint, Ami; Paquette-Smith, Melissa; Lunsky, Yona

    2016-01-01

    Many parents of adolescents and adults with autism spectrum disorder experience difficulty accessing appropriate services for their children, and may report low levels of parent self-efficacy. In an effort to identify the factors that contribute to the difficulties these families face, this study examined the role of demographic, systemic, and…

  10. Transformational School Leadership and Teacher Self-Efficacy as Predictors of Perceived Collective Teacher Efficacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ninkovic, Stefan R.; Kneževic Floric, Olivera C.

    2018-01-01

    Although scholars have acknowledged the role of collaborative relationships of teachers in improving the quality of instruction, teacher collective efficacy continues to be a neglected construct in educational research. The purpose of this paper is to explore the relations between transformational school leadership, teacher self-efficacy and…

  11. Exercise Self-Efficacy and Perceived Wellness among College Students in a Basic Studies Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidman, Cara L.; D'Abundo, Michelle Lee; Hritz, Nancy

    2009-01-01

    University basic studies courses provide a valuable opportunity for facilitating the knowledge, skills, and beliefs that develop healthy behaviors to last a lifetime. Belief in one's ability to participate in physical activity, exercise self-efficacy, is a psychological construct that has had a documented impact on physical activity. Although…

  12. Perceived benefits and barriers and self-efficacy affecting the attendance of health education programs among uninsured primary care patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamimura, Akiko; Nourian, Maziar M; Jess, Allison; Chernenko, Alla; Assasnik, Nushean; Ashby, Jeanie

    2016-12-01

    Lifestyle interventions have shown to be effective in improving health status, health behaviors, and self-efficacy. However, recruiting participants to health education programs and ensuring the continuity of health education for underserved populations is often challenging. The goals of this study are: to describe the attendance of health education programs; to identify stages of change to a healthy lifestyle; to determine cues to action; and to specify factors affecting perceived benefits and barriers to healthy food choices and physical activity among uninsured primary care patients. Uninsured primary care patients utilizing a free clinic (N=621) completed a self-administered survey from September to December of 2015. US born English speakers, non-US born English speakers, and Spanish speakers reported different kinds of cues to action in attending health education programs. While self-efficacy increases perceived benefits and decreases perceived barriers for physical activity, it increases both perceived benefits and perceived barriers for healthy food choices. The participants who had attended health education programs did not believe that there were benefits for healthy food choices and physical activity. This study adds to the body of literature on health education for underserved populations. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Perceived exercise self-efficacy as a predictor of exercise behavior in individuals aging with spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroll, Thilo; Kratz, Anna; Kehn, Matthew; Jensen, Mark P; Groah, Suzanne; Ljungberg, Inger H; Molton, Ivan R; Bombardier, Charles

    2012-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesized association between exercise self-efficacy and exercise behavior, controlling for demographic variables and clinical characteristics, in a sample of individuals with spinal cord injuries. A cross-sectional national survey of 612 community-dwelling adults with spinal cord injury in the United States ranging from 18 to 89 yrs of age was conducted. Sample consisted of 63.1% men with a mean (SD) duration of 15.8 (12.79) yrs postinjury; 86.3% reported using a wheelchair. Self-efficacy was the only independent variable that consistently predicted all four exercise outcomes. Self-efficacy beliefs were significantly related to frequency and intensity of resistance training (R(2) change = 0.08 and 0.03, respectively; P exercise frequency and intensity (R(2) change = 0.01 and 0.03, respectively; P exercise. Self-efficacy beliefs play an important role as predictors of exercise. Variations in exercise intensity along the age continuum have implications for exercise prescription and composition. Future research should replicate findings with objective activity measures.

  14. Equine-assisted activities and the impact on perceived social support, self-esteem and self-efficacy among adolescents – an intervention study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauge, Hilde; Kvalem, Ingela L.; Berget, Bente; Enders-Slegers, Marie-José; Braastad, Bjarne O.

    2013-01-01

    In this project, we examined the effect of a 4-month intervention with horses on perceived social support, self-esteem and general self-efficacy among Norwegian adolescents aged 12–15 years. The intervention took place at farm-based stables and included work with the horses and riding. A waiting-list crossover design was used and the participants answered questionnaires at three time periods. Study I (N = 49) examined the effect of the intervention compared with the control group. Study II (N = 41) examined the relationship between the same psychological variables and change in mastering skills with horse. The intervention group reported a significant increase in perceived social support compared with the control group. There were no differences in self-esteem and general self-efficacy between the groups. The results from study II showed that a lower level of perceived social support prior to the intervention predicted an increase in mastering skills with the horse during the intervention. PMID:24833811

  15. Comparison of the medical students' perceived self-efficacy and the evaluation of the observers and patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ammentorp, Jette; Thomsen, Janus Laust; Jarbøl, Dorte Ejg; Holst, René; Øvrehus, Anne Lindebo Holm; Kofoed, Poul-Erik

    2013-04-08

    The accuracy of self-assessment has been questioned in studies comparing physicians' self-assessments to observed assessments; however, none of these studies used self-efficacy as a method for self-assessment. The aim of the study was to investigate how medical students' perceived self-efficacy of specific communication skills corresponds to the evaluation of simulated patients and observers. All of the medical students who signed up for an Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE) were included. As a part of the OSCE, the student performance in the "parent-physician interaction" was evaluated by a simulated patient and an observer at one of the stations. After the examination the students were asked to assess their self-efficacy according to the same specific communication skills. The Calgary Cambridge Observation Guide formed the basis for the outcome measures used in the questionnaires. A total of 12 items was rated on a Likert scale from 1-5 (strongly disagree to strongly agree). We used extended Rasch models for comparisons between the groups of responses of the questionnaires. Comparisons of groups were conducted on dichotomized responses. Eighty-four students participated in the examination, 87% (73/84) of whom responded to the questionnaire. The response rate for the simulated patients and the observers was 100%. Significantly more items were scored in the highest categories (4 and 5) by the observers and simulated patients compared to the students (observers versus students: -0.23; SE:0.112; p=0.002 and patients versus students:0.177; SE:0.109; p=0.037). When analysing the items individually, a statistically significant difference only existed for two items. This study showed that students scored their communication skills lower compared to observers or simulated patients. The differences were driven by only 2 of 12 items. The results in this study indicate that self-efficacy based on the Calgary Cambridge Observation guide seems to be a reliable

  16. Association of self-efficacy of parents/caregivers with childhood asthma control parameters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Lúcia Araújo Gomes

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective To verify the association between the self-efficacy of parents/caregivers and control parameters of childhood asthma. Method Cross-sectional study with parents/caregivers of asthmatic children. Data were collected through a sociodemographic questionnaire and the Self-efficacy and their child’s level of asthma control scale: Brazilian version. Results Participation of 216 parents/caregivers in the study. There was a statistically significant association between self-efficacy scores and the following variables: unscheduled physician visit (p=0.001, visit to emergency department (p<0.001, hospital stays in the previous 12 months (p=0.005, physical activity limitation (p=0.003, school days missed (p<0.001, impaired sleep (p<0.001, ability to differentiate crisis medication from control medication (p=0.024, use of spacer (p=0.001, performing oral hygiene after use of inhaled corticosteroids (p=0.003, and knowledge of medication gratuity (p=0.004. Conclusion A significant relationship of the self-efficacy of parents/caregivers of asthmatic children with control parameters and training on the necessary skills to reach this control was demonstrated in the study.

  17. Relationships between Locus of Control, Self-Efficacy, Efforts and Academic Achievement among Engineering Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alias Maizam

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to investigate the relationships between the affective learning needs namely, self-efficacy and locus of control, learning efforts and academic achievement among engineering students. For this purpose, a survey was conducted on first year engineering students from two technical universities in Malaysia. Self-efficacy and locus of control were assessed using existing instruments while learning efforts were assessed using a specifically designed instrument based on Carbonaro’s model of learning effort. Academic achievement data were based on cumulative grade point average (CGPA obtained from self-report by participants. The findings indicate that females engineering students tend to have higher self-efficacy compared to males while both groups have similar locus of control and invest in similar learning efforts. Only locus of control is found to be related to academic achievement while self-efficacy is found to be related to efforts. In conclusion, locus of control seems to be an important factor in predicting academic achievement among engineering students.

  18. Effects of Locus of Control, Academic Self-Efficacy, and Tutoring on Academic Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drago, Anthony; Rheinheimer, David C.; Detweiler, Thomas N.

    2018-01-01

    This study investigated the connection between locus of control (LOC), academic self-efficacy (ASE), and academic performance, and whether these variables are affected by tutoring. Additional variables of interest, including gender, students' Pell Grant status, ethnicity, and class size, were also considered for the research models. The population…

  19. Self Esteem, locus of control, self-efficacy and neuroticism as ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Self Esteem, locus of control, self-efficacy and neuroticism as correlates of job satisfaction among secondary school teachers in Nigeria. Helen O Nwagwu, SO Salami. Abstract. No Abstract Available African Journal for the Psychological Study of Social Issues Vol.4(1) 1999: 48-61. Full Text: EMAIL FULL TEXT EMAIL FULL ...

  20. Health behaviours in emerging adulthood: Their relationship with perceived maternal and paternal parental attitudes and the mediating role of self-efficacy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Maria Jankowska

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Background The present research examined the mediating role of self-efficacy in the association between perceived maternal and paternal parental attitudes and health behaviours of males and females in emerging adulthood. Parental attitudes shape children’s self-esteem, positive self-image, and self-competence. This may affect their physical health and health behaviours throughout their lives. Participants and procedure A total of 147 (mean age: 19.70, SD = 0.85, 68.7% females participants took part in the study. They completed several questionnaires measuring health behaviours, perceived parental attitudes, and self-efficacy: the Inventory of Health Behaviours, the Retrospective Assessment of Parental Attitude, and the General Self-Efficacy Scale. Results We found that that female participants exhibited healthier eating habits but lower self-efficacy than male participants did. Accepting and autonomy granting maternal and paternal parental attitudes predicted a positive health attitude (of both male and female participants, preventive behaviours (of male participants, and healthy eating habits (of male participants. As predicted, emerging adults’ self-efficacy mediated the relationship between their health behaviours and perceived parental attitudes. However, the mediation patterns were different for female and male participants. Conclusions The quality of perceived parental attitudes and self-efficacy are important for health-related lifestyle choices among emerging adults. Mothers and fathers may play different roles in the formation of health behaviours.

  1. Outcome Expectations and Osteoarthritis: Association of Perceived Benefits of Exercise With Self-Efficacy and Depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marszalek, Jolanta; Price, Lori Lyn; Harvey, William F; Driban, Jeffrey B; Wang, Chenchen

    2017-04-01

    Outcome expectancy is recognized as a determinant of exercise engagement and adherence. However, little is known about which factors influence outcome expectations for exercise among people with knee osteoarthritis (OA). This is the first study to examine the association of outcome expectations for exercise with demographic, physical, and psychosocial outcomes in individuals with knee OA. We performed a cross-sectional analysis of the baseline data from a randomized trial of tai chi versus physical therapy in participants with symptomatic knee OA. Knee pain was evaluated using the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC). Outcome expectations for exercise, self-efficacy, depression, anxiety, stress, and social support were measured using standard instruments. Logistic regression models were utilized to determine associations with outcome expectations. There were 262 participants, with a mean age of 59.8 years and a mean body mass index of 32.1 kg/m 2 ; 69.1% of the participants were female, 51.5% were white, the mean disease duration was 8.6 years, and the mean WOMAC knee pain and function scores were 260.8 and 906.8, respectively. Higher outcome expectations for exercise were associated with greater self-efficacy (odds ratio [OR] 1.25 [95% confidence interval (95% CI) 1.11-1.41]; P = 0.0004), as well as with fewer depressive symptoms (OR 0.84 for each 5-point increase [95% CI 0.73-0.97]; P = 0.01). Outcome expectancy was not significantly associated with sex, race, education, pain, function, radiographic severity, social support, anxiety, or stress. Our results suggest significant associations between outcome expectations for exercise and self-efficacy and depression. Future studies should examine how these relationships longitudinally affect long-term clinical outcomes of exercise-based treatment for knee OA. © 2016, American College of Rheumatology.

  2. Self-Efficacy, Self-Care, and Metabolic Control in Persons with Type 2, Diet and Exercised Controlled Diabetes

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Randall, Lisa

    1998-01-01

    .... psychological determinants of self-care and metabolic control must be explored. Self-efficacy (Bandura, 1977) has demonstrated its importance in behavioral modification but has been minimally investigated in diabetes...

  3. Evaluation of Learned Helplessness, Perceived Self-efficacy, and Functional Capacity in Patients With Fibromyalgia and Rheumatoid Arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moyano, Sebastián; Scolnik, Marina; Vergara, Facundo; García, María Victoria; Sabelli, Mirtha Rosa; Rosa, Javier Eduardo; Catoggio, Luis José; Soriano, Enrique Roberto

    2018-03-19

    The aims of this study were to compare learned helplessness (LH) and perceived self-efficacy (SE) in patients with fibromyalgia (FM) and rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and to assess their correlation with functional disability, level of perceived pain, and fatigue. This multicenter, cross-sectional study included consecutive patients (aged ≥18 years) with RA, according to the 2010 American College of Rheumatology/European League Against Rheumatism criteria, and FM, according to 2010 American College of Rheumatology criteria. Learned helplessness was measured by the Rheumatology Attitude Index, Spanish version; SE with the Arthritis Self-efficacy Scale, Spanish version; functional capacity with the Health Assessment Questionnaire (HAQ), Argentine version; depression with Center for Epidemiological Studies-Depression Scale 7-item version and perceived pain and fatigue by the visual analog scale. Disease activity was measured by the Clinical Disease Activity Index (CDAI) and disease impact with the Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire (FIQ). A total of 215 patients, 100 with FM and 115 with RA, were included. Mean age was 59 (SD, 14) years and 58 (SD, 13) years for FM and RA, patients respectively. Whereas LH and depression were significantly higher, SE was significantly lower in FM patients. We found a positive correlation between LH and HAQ, pain, depression, fatigue, FIQ, and CDAI in FM and RA patients. We observed a negative correlation between SE and HAQ, pain, depression, fatigue, FIQ (FM), and CDAI (RA) in both groups. Both LH and SE correlate significantly with functional capacity, perceived pain, disease activity, and disease impact in RA and FM patients. Learned helplessness was higher in patients with active disease or high disease impact, as opposed to those in remission or with low disease impact, and the reverse was true for SE. Patients with FM had significantly more LH, pain, fatigue, and depression and less SE compared with those with RA.

  4. The influence of nurse home visits, including provision of 3 months of contraceptives and contraceptive counseling, on perceived barriers to contraceptive use and contraceptive use self-efficacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melnick, Alan L; Rdesinski, Rebecca E; Creach, E Dawn; Choi, Dongseok; Harvey, S Marie

    2008-01-01

    To identify the influence of a community health nurse (CHN) home visit on perceived barriers to contraceptive access and contraceptive use self-efficacy. We enrolled 103 women into two groups in a randomized trial evaluating the influence of contraceptive dispensing and family planning counseling during home visits on perceived barriers to accessing contraceptives and contraceptive use self-efficacy. Both groups received counseling by a CHN about sexually transmitted disease and pregnancy prevention, and a resource card listing phone numbers of family planning clinics. After randomization, the CHN dispensed three months of hormonal contraception to the intensive intervention group and advised the minimal intervention group to schedule an appointment at a family planning clinic. Data collection at baseline and 12 months included demographic, reproductive and other health-related information as well as quantitative assessments of information on perceived barriers to contraceptive access and contraceptive use self-efficacy. The mean age of participants was 24.7 years. Three-fourths had household incomes under $25,000. We found significant reductions in three perceived barriers to contraceptive access for both groups, as well as significant increases in two measures of contraceptive use self-efficacy at twelve months compared to baseline. Nurse home visits involving family planning counseling might be effective in reducing perceived barriers to contraceptive access and increasing contraceptive use self-efficacy.

  5. The Effect of Using in Computer Skills on Teachers’ Perceived Self-Efficacy Beliefs Towards Technology Integration, Attitudes and Performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Badrie Mohammad Nour EL-Daou

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The current study analyzes the relationship between the apparent teacher’s Self-efficacy and attitudes towards integrating technology into classroom teaching, self- evaluation reports and computer performance results. Pre-post measurement of the Computer Technology Integration Survey (CTIS (Wang et al,2004 was used to determine the confidence level with of 60 science teachers and 12 mixed-major teachers enrolled at the Lebanese University, Faculty of Education in the academic year 2011-2012. Pre –post measurement on teachers’ attitudes towards using technology was examined using an opened and a closed questionnaire. Teachers’ performance was measured by means of their Activeinspire projects results using active boards after their third practice of training in computer skills and Activeinspire program. To accumulate data on teachers’ self-report, this study uses Robert Reasoner's five components: feeling of security, feeling of belonging, feeling of identity, feeling of goal, and self-actualization which teachers used to rate themselves (Reasoner,1983. The study acknowledged probable impacts of computer training skills on teachers ‘self-evaluation report, effectiveness of computer technology skills, and evaluations of self-efficacy attitudes toward technology integration. Pearson correlation revealed a strong relationship r = 0.99 between the perceived self-efficacy towards technology incorporation and teachers’ self-evaluation report. Also, the findings of this research revealed that 82.7% of teachers earned high computer technology scores on their Activeinspire projects and 33.3% received excellent grades on computer performance test. Recommendations and potential research were discussed.

  6. Risk perception and perceived self-efficacy of deaf and hard-of-hearing seniors and young adults in emergencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engelman, Alina; Ivey, Susan L; Tseng, Winston; Neuhauser, Linda

    The authors explored the factors influencing risk perception and perceived self-efficacy before and during an emergency for deaf and hard-of-hearing (Deaf/HH) seniors and young adults. The authors collected demographic survey data and conducted four focus groups with 38 Deaf/HH residents of the San Francisco Bay Area; two groups were with young adults (ages 18-35), including one group of college students and one group of young professionals, and two were with older adults (ages 50-90). Significant differences were found between Deaf/HH young adults and seniors in both the sources of self-efficacy and risk perception and their attitudes toward preparedness. All groups demonstrated high resilience. Deaf/HH young professionals expressed more concern about their risk in an emergency than Deaf/HH college students. Alternately, the risk perception of Deaf/HH older adults was often rooted in their past experiences (survival of past emergencies, inaccessibility of communications during drills). Policy implications include the need to dedicate more resources to increasing accessibility and relevance of emergency communications technology for Deaf/HH populations. This could help increase adaptability before, during, and after emergencies among all groups of Deaf/HH people, particularly among young Deaf/HH professionals.

  7. The effect of using in computer skills on teachers’ perceived self-efficacy beliefs towards technology integration, attitudes and performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Badrie Mohammad Nour ELDaou

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The current study analyzesthe relationship between the apparentteacher’s Self-efficacyand attitudes towardsintegrating technology into classroom teaching, self-evaluation reportsand computer performance results. Pre-post measurement of the Computer Technology Integration Survey (CTIS (Wang et al, 2004 was used to determine theconfidence level with of 60 science teachers and 12 mixed-major teachers enrolled at the Lebanese University, Faculty of Education in the academic year 2011-2012. Pre –post measurement onteachers’attitudes towards usingtechnologywas examined using an opened and a closed questionnaire.Teachers’ performance was measured by means of their Activeinspire projects results using active boards after their third practice of training in computer skills and Activeinspire program. To accumulate data on teachers’ self-report, this study uses Robert Reasoner's five components: feeling of security, feeling of belonging, feeling of identity, feeling of goal, and self-actualization which teachers used to rate themselves (Reasoner,1983. The study acknowledged probable impacts of computer training skills on teachers ‘self-evaluation report, effectiveness of computer technology skills, and evaluations of self-efficacy attitudes toward technology integration. Pearson correlation revealed a strong relationship r= 0.99 between the perceived self-efficacy towards technology incorporation and teachers’ self-evaluation report. Also, the findings of this research revealed that 82.7% of teachers earned high computer technology scores on their Activeinspire projects and 33.3% received excellent grades on computer performance test. Recommendations and potential research were discussed

  8. Validation and reliability of the scale Self-efficacy and their child's level of asthma control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Lúcia Araújo Gomes

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective: To evaluate the psychometric properties in terms of validity and reliability of the scale Self-efficacy and their child's level of asthma control: Brazilian version. Method: Methodological study in which 216 parents/guardians of children with asthma participated. A construct validation (factor analysis and test of hypothesis by comparison of contrasted groups and an analysis of reliability in terms of homogeneity (Cronbach's alpha and stability (test-retest were carried out. Results: Exploratory factor analysis proved suitable for the Brazilian version of the scale (Kaiser-Meyer-Olkim index of 0.879 and Bartlett's sphericity with p < 0.001. The correlation matrix in factor analysis suggested the removal of item 7 from the scale. Cronbach's alpha of the final scale, with 16 items, was 0.92. Conclusion: The Brazilian version of Self-efficacy and their child's level of asthma control presented psychometric properties that confirmed its validity and reliability.

  9. Glycemic Control, Self-Efficacy and Fear of Hypoglycemia Among Iranian Children with Type 1 Diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amiri, Fatemehsadat; Vafa, Mohammadreza; Gonder-Frederick, Linda

    2015-08-01

    This study was designed to test the reliability of a Persian version of 2 questionnaires to assess the level of fear of hypoglycemia (FoH) and self-efficacy in diabetes management and their association with glycated hemoglobin (A1C) and parents' demographic characteristics in a sample of children with type 1 diabetes. We assessed 61 children with type 1 diabetes (35 boys and girls, 6.0 to 12.7 years of age) using the Hypoglycemia Fear Survey-Child version (HFS-C) and Self-Efficacy for Diabetes Scale-Child version (SED-C). Their glycemic control was evaluated by A1C levels. The internal consistency of the Persian version of HFS-C and SED-C were very good. Our results showed that children older than 10 years of age report lower levels of FoH, which are related to higher levels of self-efficacy (r=-.30, p=0.025 and r=-.30, p=0.02, respectively). Of the children, 42.3% of girls and 31.4% of boys reported that low blood sugar is a big problem for them. These findings suggest that FoH is a significant concern for this target group. Only 19.7% of children had controlled diabetes based on A1C levels. There was no significant association between higher A1C levels and other variables, including HFS-C, SED-C and parents' demographic characteristics. The Persian version of HFS-C and SED-C are reliable and valid measures of the fear of hypoglycemia and of self-efficacy in children with type 1 diabetes, and these questionnaires could be used in our country for identifying those children who may need diabetes education and other supports. The association between greater self-efficacy and lower fear of hypoglycemia suggests that addressing self-efficacy in diabetes education courses may be effective in helping to overcome FoH. Copyright © 2015 Canadian Diabetes Association. All rights reserved.

  10. Personality, Academic Self-Efficacy, Academic Locus of Control and Academic Procrastination Among University Students

    OpenAIRE

    Yazıcı, Hikmet; Albayrak, Elif; Reisoğlu, Serpil

    2016-01-01

    There are several variables to determine academic procrastination behavior among university students. The main aim of the present study was to investigate the relationships among big five personality, academic self-efficacy, academic locus of control and academic procrastination. Research group consisted of 885 university students (Female=496, Male=389) in 2012/2013 academic year in Karadeniz Technical University. Results from study indicated that responsibility and amenability subscales of b...

  11. Impact of Journaling on Students’ Self-Efficacy and Locus of Control

    OpenAIRE

    Krista K. Fritson, PsyD

    2008-01-01

    While considerable research has examined the academic and cognitive value of journaling, little has examined the psychological impact of journaling on the personal development of college students. Research on cognitive-behavioral therapy indicates that journaling can have a positive impact on individuals’ self-growth and intrapersonal characteristics. The purpose of this study is to examine the impact of classroom-based journaling on students’ self-efficacy and locus of control. Students in t...

  12. Self-efficacy for controlling upsetting thoughts and emotional eating in family caregivers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDougall, Megan; Steffen, Ann

    2017-10-01

    Self-efficacy for controlling upsetting thoughts was examined as a predictor of emotional eating by family caregivers of physically and cognitively impaired older adults. Adult women (N = 158) providing healthcare assistance for an older family member completed an online survey about caregiving stressors, depressive symptoms, self-efficacy, and emotional eating. A stress process framework was used as a conceptual model to guide selection of variables predicting emotional eating scores. A hierarchical multiple regression was conducted and the overall model was significant (R 2 = .21, F(4,153) = 10.02, p accounting for IADL, role overload, and depression scores. These findings replicate previous research demonstrating the relationship between managing cognitions about caregiving and behavioral responses to stressors, and point to the importance of addressing cognitive processes in efforts to improve caregiver health behaviors.

  13. Impact of Journaling on Students’ Self-Efficacy and Locus of Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krista K. Fritson, PsyD

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available While considerable research has examined the academic and cognitive value of journaling, little has examined the psychological impact of journaling on the personal development of college students. Research on cognitive-behavioral therapy indicates that journaling can have a positive impact on individuals’ self-growth and intrapersonal characteristics. The purpose of this study is to examine the impact of classroom-based journaling on students’ self-efficacy and locus of control. Students in two undergraduate courses were required to complete weekly journal assignments; one class received targeted information on cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT and one class did not. Students completed pre-, mid-, and postcourse assessments on self-efficacy, locus of control, and learning. Results revealed that self-efficacy scores for both groups significantly improved after the early journaling assignments; however, there were no differences between those who received direct CBT instruction and those who did not. These findings indicate that journaling may have important psychological benefits above and beyond its expected academic and cognitive outcomes.

  14. Effect of guided relaxation and imagery on falls self-efficacy: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Bang Hyun; Newton, Roberta A; Sachs, Michael L; Glutting, Joseph J; Glanz, Karen

    2012-06-01

    To examine the effects of guided relaxation and imagery (GRI) on improvement in falls self-efficacy in older adults who report having a fear of falling. Randomized, controlled trial with allocation to GRI or guided relaxation with music of choice. General community. Ninety-one men and women aged 60 to 92. Participants were randomized to listen to a GRI audio compact disk (intervention group) or a guided relaxation audio compact disk and music of choice (control group) twice a week for 6 weeks for 10 minutes per session. Primary outcome measure was the Short Falls Efficacy Scale-International (FES-I). Secondary outcome measures were the Leisure Time Exercise Questionnaire (LTEQ) and the Timed Up and Go (TUG) mobility test. GRI participants reported greater improvements on the Short FES-I (P = .002) and LTEQ (P = .001) scores and shorter time on the TUG (P = .002) than the guided relaxation and music-of-choice group. GRI was more effective at increasing falls self-efficacy and self-reported leisure time exercise and reducing times on a simple mobility test than was guided relaxation with music of choice. GRI is an effective, simple, low-cost tool for older adults to improve falls self-efficacy and leisure time exercise behaviors. © 2012, Copyright the Authors Journal compilation © 2012, The American Geriatrics Society.

  15. Impact of Journaling on Students’ Self-Efficacy and Locus of Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krista K. Fritson

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available While considerable research has examined the academic and cognitive value of journaling, little has examined the psychological impact of journaling on the personal development of college students. Research on cognitive-behavioral therapy indicates that journaling can have a positive impact on individuals’ self-growth and intrapersonal characteristics. The purpose of this study is to examine the impact of classroom-based journaling on students’ self-efficacy and locus of control. Students in two undergraduate courses were required to complete weekly journal assignments; one class received targeted information on cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT and one class did not. Students completed pre-, mid-, and post-course assessments on self-efficacy, locus of control, and learning. Results revealed that self-efficacy scores for both groups significantly improved after the early journaling assignments; however, there were no differences between those who received direct CBT instruction and those who did not. These findings indicate that journaling may have important psychological benefits above and beyond its expected academic and cognitive outcomes.

  16. The contribution of perceived parental support to the career self-efficacy of deaf, hard-of-hearing, and hearing adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michael, Rinat; Most, Tova; Cinamon, Rachel Gali

    2013-01-01

    The current study examined the contribution of different types of parental support to career self-efficacy among 11th and 12th grade students (N = 160): 66 students with hearing loss (23 hard of hearing and 43 deaf) and 94 hearing students. Participants completed the Career-Related Parent Support Scale, the Career Decision-Making Self-Efficacy Scale, and the Self-Efficacy for the Management of Work-Family Conflict questionnaire. Different aspects of parental support predicted different types of career self-efficacies across the 3 groups. Differences among groups were also found when levels of parental support were compared. The deaf group perceived lower levels of parental career-related modeling and verbal encouragement in comparison with the hard-of-hearing students and higher levels of parental emotional support compared with the hearing participants. No significant differences were found among the research groups in career decision-making self-efficacy and self-efficacy in managing work-family conflict. Implications for theory and practice are discussed.

  17. Older adults with poor self-rated memory have less depressive symptoms and better memory performance when perceived self-efficacy is high.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Shea, Deirdre M; Dotson, Vonetta M; Fieo, Robert A; Tsapanou, Angeliki; Zahodne, Laura; Stern, Yaakov

    2016-07-01

    To investigate whether self-efficacy moderates the association between self-rated memory and depressive symptoms in a large sample of older adults. The influence of self-efficacy and depressive symptoms on memory performance was also examined in a subsample of individuals who reported poor memory. Non-demented participants (n = 3766) were selected from the 2012 wave of the Health and Retirement Study. Depressive symptomatology was assessed with the 8-item Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale. A modified version of the Midlife Developmental Inventory Questionnaire was used as the measure of self-efficacy. Participants were asked to rate their memory presently on a five-point scale from Excellent (1) to Poor (5). Immediate memory and delayed memory (after a 5-min interval) were measured by the number of correct words recalled from a 10-item word list. Multiple regression analyses revealed that negative ratings of memory were significantly associated with greater levels of depressive symptoms, with this effect being greatest in those with low levels of self-efficacy. Additionally, greater self-efficacy was associated with optimal objective memory performances but only when depressive symptoms were low in individuals who reported poor memory function (n = 1196). Self-efficacy moderates the relationship between self-rated memory function and depressive symptoms. Higher self-efficacy may buffer against the impact of subjective memory difficulty on one's mood and thereby mitigating the effect of depressive symptoms on memory. Interventions should focus on increasing perceived self-efficacy in older adults reporting poor memory function to potentially minimize memory impairment. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  18. Benefits of personality characteristics and self-efficacy in the perceived academic achievement of medical students

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Guntern, Sabine; Korpershoek, Hanke; van der Werf, Greetje

    2017-01-01

    This study investigates the joint impact of personality characteristics and self‐efficacy on the perceived academic achievement of medical students on top of their prior high school performance. The sample consisted of medical students in their pre‐clinical years. The students’ grade point average

  19. Pre-Service Teachers' Knowledge of Phonemic Awareness: Relationship to Perceived Knowledge, Self-Efficacy Beliefs, and Exposure to a Multimedia-Enhanced Lecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinussen, Rhonda; Ferrari, Julia; Aitken, Madison; Willows, Dale

    2015-01-01

    This study examined the relations among perceived and actual knowledge of phonemic awareness (PA), exposure to PA instruction during practicum, and self-efficacy for teaching PA in a sample of 54 teacher candidates (TCs) enrolled in a 1-year Bachelor of Education program in a Canadian university. It also assessed the effects of a brief…

  20. The Effects of Perceived Barriers, Role Models, and Acculturation on the Career Self-Efficacy and Career Consideration of Hispanic Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera, Lourdes M.; Blumberg, Fran; Chen, Eric C.; Ponterotto, Joseph G.; Flores, Lisa Y.

    2007-01-01

    This study used path analysis to examine the relationship between perceived barriers, acculturation, and role model influence on the career self-efficacy and career considerations of a sample of Hispanic women. Two path models were examined. The male-dominated model accounted for 15% of the variance, and the female-dominated model accounted for…

  1. The Role of Exercise Self-Efficacy, Perceived Exertion, Event-Related Stress, and Demographic Factors in Predicting Physical Activity among College Freshmen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brannagan, Kim

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: The focus of this study was to examine the relationship among precursors to physical activity, including exercise self-efficacy, perceived exertion, stress, and demographic factors, among college students. Design: This study employed an associational design. Setting: The study population was college freshmen in southeast Louisiana who…

  2. Work-Family Conflict within the Family: Crossover Effects, Perceived Parent-Child Interaction Quality, Parental Self-Efficacy, and Life Role Attributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cinamon, Rachel Gali; Weisel, Amatzia; Tzuk, Kineret

    2007-01-01

    To better understand the work-family interface within the family domain, this study investigated crossover effects of two types of work-family conflict among 120 participants (60 married couples), these conflicts' relations with parental self-efficacy and perceived quality of parent-child interaction, and the contribution of attributions of…

  3. Perception of cancer patients of their disease, self-efficacy and locus of control and usage of complementary and alternative medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebel, Marie-Desirée; Rudolph, Ivonne; Keinki, Christian; Hoppe, Andrea; Muecke, Ralph; Micke, Oliver; Muenstedt, Karsten; Huebner, Jutta

    2015-08-01

    A high percentage of cancer patients use complementary and alternative medicine (CAM). The aim of our study was to learn more about the association of CAM usage, information needs, perceived impact of disease, locus of control and self-efficacy of cancer patients. We asked patients attending a series of lectures on CAM using a standardized questionnaire which integrated questions on information needs, CAM and validated short questionnaires on self-efficacy, perception of the disease and locus of control of reinforcement. One hundred and eighty-five patients answered the questionnaire, from whom 45 % used CAM. Sixty percentage disclosed using CAM to the general practitioner and 57 % to the oncologist. Physicians and nurses, print media and the Internet are the most important source of information on CAM (used by 20-25 % each). Impact on neither daily life, perceived personal control nor coherence was associated with CAM usage, disclosure to physicians or sources of information. There also was no association between CAM usage and self-efficacy. In contrast, there was a significant association between CAM user rate and a high external locus of control. While CAM usage is agreed upon by many physicians due to the idea that it helps patients to become active and feel more in control of the disease, our data are in favor of the contrary. A strong perception of external locus of control seems to be a driver of CAM usage. Physicians should be aware of this association when counseling on CAM.

  4. Self-controlled learning benefits: exploring contributions of self-efficacy and intrinsic motivation via path analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ste-Marie, Diane M; Carter, Michael J; Law, Barbi; Vertes, Kelly; Smith, Victoria

    2016-09-01

    Research has shown learning advantages for self-controlled practice contexts relative to yoked (i.e., experimenter-imposed) contexts; yet, explanations for this phenomenon remain relatively untested. We examined, via path analysis, whether self-efficacy and intrinsic motivation are important constructs for explaining self-controlled learning benefits. The path model was created using theory-based and empirically supported relationships to examine causal links between these psychological constructs and physical performance. We hypothesised that self-efficacy and intrinsic motivation would have greater predictive power for learning under self-controlled compared to yoked conditions. Participants learned double-mini trampoline progressions, and measures of physical performance, self-efficacy and intrinsic motivation were collected over two practice days and a delayed retention day. The self-controlled group (M = 2.04, SD = .98) completed significantly more skill progressions in retention than their yoked counterparts (M = 1.3, SD = .65). The path model displayed adequate fit, and similar significant path coefficients were found for both groups wherein each variable was predominantly predicted by its preceding time point (e.g., self-efficacy time 1 predicts self-efficacy time 2). Interestingly, the model was not moderated by group; thus, failing to support the hypothesis that self-efficacy and intrinsic motivation have greater predictive power for learning under self-controlled relative to yoked conditions.

  5. Parental supervision for their children's toothbrushing: Mediating effects of planning, self-efficacy, and action control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, Kyra; Cornish, Stephen; Kirkpatrick, Aaron; Kroon, Jeroen; Schwarzer, Ralf

    2018-05-01

    With 60-90% of children worldwide reportedly experiencing dental caries, poor oral health in the younger years is a major public health issue. As parents are important to children's oral hygiene practices, we examined the key self-regulatory behaviours of parents for supervising their children's toothbrushing using the health action process approach. Participants (N = 281, 197 mothers) comprised Australian parents of 2- to 5-year-olds. A longitudinal design was used to investigate the sequential mediation chain for the effect of intention (Time 1) on parental supervision for their youngest child's toothbrushing (Time 3), via self-efficacy and planning (Time 2), and action control (Time 3). A latent-variable structural equation model, controlling for baseline behaviour and habit, revealed significant indirect effects from intention via self-efficacy and action control and intention via planning and action control, on parental supervision behaviour. The model was a good fit to the data, explaining 74% of the variance in parents' supervising behaviour for their children's toothbrushing. While national recommendations are provided to guide parents in promoting good oral hygiene practices with their children, current results show the importance of going beyond simple knowledge transmission to support parents' intentions to supervise their children's toothbrushing actually materialize. Current findings make a significant contribution to the cumulative empirical evidence regarding self-regulatory components in health behaviour change and can inform intervention development to increase parents' participation in childhood oral hygiene practices, thus helping to curb rising oral health conditions and diseases. Statement of contribution What is already known on this subject? Self-regulatory skills are important to translate intentions into behaviour. Self-efficacy, planning, and action control are key self-regulatory skills for behaviour change. What does this study add

  6. Correct condom application among African-American adolescent females: the relationship to perceived self-efficacy and the association to confirmed STDs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crosby, R; DiClemente, R J; Wingood, G M; Sionean, C; Cobb, B K; Harrington, K; Davies, S; Hook, E W; Oh, M K

    2001-09-01

    To assess condom application ability and the relationship between perceived ability and demonstrated ability. Also, to examine the association between high-demonstrated condom application ability and recent sexual risk behaviors and laboratory-diagnosed sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) among African-American adolescent females. A purposeful sample of sexually active African-American females (n = 522) completed a structured interview and provided vaginal swab specimens for STD testing. Subsequent to the interview, adolescents demonstrated their condom application skills using a penile model. A 9-item scale assessed adolescents' perceived self-efficacy to apply condoms. Sexual risk behaviors assessed by interview were noncondom use at last intercourse and the last five intercourse occasions for steady and casual sex partners as well as any unprotected vaginal sex in the past 30 days and the past 6 months. Approximately 28% of the sample tested positive for at least one STD and nearly 26% self-reported a history of STDs. Controlled analyses indicated that adolescents' self-efficacy for correct use was not related to demonstrated skill. Adolescents' demonstrated ability was not related to any of the sexual risk behaviors. Likewise, recent experience applying condoms to a partner's penis and demonstrated ability were not related to laboratory-diagnosed STDs or self-reported STD history. Adolescents may unknowingly be at risk for human immunodeficiency virus and STD infection owing to incorrect condom application. Further, high-demonstrated ability to apply condoms was not related to safer sex or STDs. Reducing sexual risk behaviors may require more than enhancing adolescent females' condom application skills and may require addressing other relational skills.

  7. The Relationship between Elementary Teachers' Perceived Self-Efficacy and Principals' Facilitation of Professional Learning Communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathews, Tracy A.

    2017-01-01

    This quantitative correlation survey study investigated the relationship between teachers' perceptions of the effectiveness of school principals as instructional leaders in professional learning communities (PLCs) and self-efficacy beliefs of teachers. Social Cognitive Theory, self-efficacy concept, and Adult Learning Theory were at the core of…

  8. Adolescent and parent diabetes distress in type 1 diabetes: the role of self-efficacy, perceived consequences, family responsibility and adolescent-parent discrepancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Law, G Urquhart; Walsh, Jennifer; Queralt, Victoria; Nouwen, Arie

    2013-04-01

    To examine the association of adolescent and parent diabetes distress with perceived consequences, dietary self-efficacy, and discrepancies in diabetes family responsibility, in type 1 diabetes (T1D). 203 adolescents with T1D, aged 12-18, and their parents completed self-report questionnaires cross-sectionally. Higher HbA1c, greater perceived negative consequences of diabetes, and reduced self-efficacy predicted adolescent diabetes distress. Higher HbA1c predicted parental diabetes distress, as did diabetes family responsibility disagreements when both family members claimed responsibility, and parents' perception of reduced adolescent self-efficacy. Dietary self-efficacy and perceived negative consequences of diabetes are important factors to consider in assessing and managing adolescent diabetes distress. Perceptions of family responsibility for self-care tasks and parental confidence in adolescents' self-management have implications for parental diabetes distress. Clinical implications support long-held recommendations of taking a family-perspective of T1D care. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Acculturation Conflict, Cultural Parenting Self-Efficacy, and Perceived Parenting Competence in Asian American and Latino/a Families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiang, Lisa; Glatz, Terese; Buchanan, Christy M

    2017-12-01

    Parents from immigrant backgrounds must deal with normative parenting demands as well as unique challenges associated with acculturation processes. The current study examines the independent and interactive influences of acculturation conflict and cultural parenting self-efficacy (PSE; e.g., parents' confidence in instilling heritage, American, and bicultural values in their children) on perceptions of general parenting competence. Using data from 58 Asian American and 153 Latin American parents of children in grades 6-12, ethnic differences were also explored. Results suggest that lower acculturation conflict is associated with higher perceptions of general parenting competence for both Asian and Latin American parents. Higher cultural PSE is associated with higher perceived general parenting competence for Latino/a parents only. One significant interaction was found, and only for Asian Americans, whereby the negative association between acculturation conflict and perceptions of parenting competence was weaker for those who felt efficacious in transmitting heritage messages. Results are discussed in light of clinical implications and the need for further recognition and study of culturally relevant factors and frameworks among families from immigrant backgrounds. © 2016 Family Process Institute.

  10. Interdependent Self-Construal, Self-Efficacy, and Community Involvement as Predictors of Perceived Knowledge Gain Among MMORPG Players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopp, Toby; Barker, Valerie; Schmitz Weiss, Amy

    2015-08-01

    This study explored the relationship between interdependent self-construal, video game self-efficacy, massively multiplayer online role-playing game (MMORPG) community involvement, and self-reported learning outcomes. The results suggested that self-efficacy and interdependent self-construal were positive and significant predictors of MMORPG community involvement. For its part, MMORPG community involvement was a positive predictor of self-reported learning in both focused and incidental forms. Supplementary analyses suggested that self-efficacy was a comparatively more robust predictor of MMORPG community involvement when compared to self-construal. Moreover, the present data suggest that community involvement significantly facilitated indirect relationships between self-construal, game-relevant self-efficacy, and both focused and incidental learning.

  11. Association of Self-efficacy and Decisional Balance with Stages of Change for Fiber Intake and Glycemic Control in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parisa Keshani

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: Constructs of behavioral models such as trans-theoretical model can be associated with healthy eating behaviors like increasing fiber intake. They can also be effective in improving these behaviors in patients with diabetes. This study aimed to assess the association of self-efficacy and decisional balance with stages of change for fiber intake and glycemic control in patients with type 2 diabetes. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted on 145 literate male and female patients with type 2 diabetes (aged 30 to 65 years they were randomly selected from the patients’ list of “Charity Foundation for Special Diseases” and ”Iranian Diabetes Society” in Tehran-Iran. Stages of change, self-efficacy, and decisional balance questionnaires were filled out, and three food records were used to assess their nutritional status. Blood samples were taken to assess fasting blood glucose, HbA1c, serum insulin, and insulin resistance. One-way ANOVA and logistic regression were used to analyze the data. The tests were done using the SPSS software (ver. 16. P<0.05 was considered significant. Results: 126 patients with type 2 diabetes completed the study. Participants’ mean age was 53.5±6.02 and 65% were men. Patients in post-action stages revealed higher self-efficacy than did those in pre-action stages (P=0.035. A relationship was observed between insulin resistance and self-efficacy (P=0.040. One unit increase in self-efficacy decreased the risk of insulin resistance by 12%, and each unit increase in decisional balance increased the chance of eating sufficient fiber by 2.2 times. There was also a significant relationship between the perceived cons (P<0.0001 and self-efficacy (P=0.037 with fiber intake after adjustment with confounders. Conclusions: This study suggests that there is a relationship between transtheoretical model constructs such as self-efficacy and decisional balance, especially cons, with

  12. Attitudes, Interests, and Perceived Self-efficacy toward Science of Middle School Minority Female Students: Considerations for their Low Achievement and Participation in STEM Disciplines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dowey, Ana Lucrecia

    The under participation of minority females in STEM fields has been a chronic problem in the United States, mainly when it is analyzed through the lens of their relative representation in the population. The results of the first or quantitative phase, of this two phase sequential, mixed method study, revealed academic achievement or performance in science accounted for most of the variance of mean scores for students' attitudes and interests in science as measured by the TOSRA Likert-scale survey, when compared to the degree of parent education and ethnicity/ racial background. Additionally, this study investigated possible sources of perceived self-efficacy in eighteen seventh grade Hispanic female students by conducting personal semi-structured interviews. The purpose of this study was to explore if middle school female student ethnic/racial backgrounds and academic performance influence their attitudes and interests toward science and to study the possible effects external (family, school, peers, and community) and internal factors may have for Hispanic student self-efficacy toward science. The results revealed that of the five ethnic/racial groups studied, Asian/Filipino female students expressed higher positive attitudes and interests toward science, than the rest of the student ethnic groups studied, followed by the Hispanic student group. The results indicated that students' perceived encouragement from their mothers, regardless of the mother's degree of education, as being the main source of these girls' perceived self-efficacy in science. However, the lack of perceived school-related, peer-related, and community-related support was evident. These results are encouraging because they demonstrate how verbal persuasion, in the form of encouragement and support, fosters perceived self-efficacy for minority female students.

  13. Effect of verbal persuasion on self-efficacy for pain-related diagnostic sensory testing in individuals with chronic neck pain and healthy controls - a randomized, controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Söderlund, Anne; Sterling, Michele

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the differences in cold pain threshold (CTh), pressure pain threshold (PPT), cold pain tolerance (CPTo) tests, and the level of self-efficacy when self-efficacy for diagnostic sensory testing was manipulated by verbal persuasion before a testing situation in persons with neck pain and in healthy controls. A randomized experimental design was used. Twenty-one healthy volunteers and 22 individuals with either traumatic or nontraumatic chronic neck pain were recruited to participate in the study. The intervention consisted of two experimental verbal persuasion conditions: Increase self-efficacy and Decrease self-efficacy. The PPT was measured using a pressure algometer, the CTh was measured using a thermo test system, and CPTo was measured by submerging the participant's hand in ice water up to the elbow joint. On three occasions, the participants reported their self-efficacy level in performing the sensory tests. In the chronic neck pain group, there were no differences in pain threshold or tolerance. There was a difference in the self-efficacy level after verbal persuasion between the experimental conditions. In the healthy control group, the CThs increased following the condition that aimed to increase self-efficacy. No other differences were observed in the healthy controls. A short verbal persuasion in the form of manipulative instructions seems to have a marginal effect on the individual's self-efficacy levels in the chronic neck pain group and a slight influence on the results of sensory testing in healthy controls.

  14. Predicting depression from illness severity in cardiovascular disease patients: self-efficacy beliefs, illness perception, and perceived social support as mediators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greco, A; Steca, P; Pozzi, R; Monzani, D; D'Addario, M; Villani, A; Rella, V; Giglio, A; Malfatto, G; Parati, G

    2014-04-01

    Many studies have investigated the relationships between cardiovascular diseases and patients' depression; nevertheless, few is still known as regard the impact of illness severity on depression and whether psychosocial variables mediate this association. The aim of this study is to investigate the putative mediating role of illness representations, self-efficacy beliefs, and perceived social support on the relationship between illness severity and depression. A total of 75 consecutive patients with cardiovascular disease (80 % men; mean age = 65.44, SD = 10.20) were enrolled in an Italian hospital. Illness severity was measured in terms of left ventricular ejection fraction, whereas psychological factors were assessed using self-report questionnaires. The relationship between left ventricular ejection fraction and depression was mediated by identity illness perception, self-efficacy beliefs in managing cardiac risk factors, and perceived social support. The treatment of depression in cardiovascular disease patients may therefore benefit from a psychological intervention focused on patients' illness representations, self-efficacy beliefs, and their perceived social support.

  15. Development and validation of the Parents' Perceived Self-Efficacy to Manage Children's Internet Use Scale for parents of adolescents with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Yi-Ping; Chou, Wen-Jiun; Wang, Peng-Wei; Yen, Cheng-Fang

    2017-12-01

    Background and aims This study developed and validated the Parents' Perceived Self-Efficacy to Manage Children's Internet Use Scale (PSMIS) in the parents of children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Methods In total, 231 parents of children with ADHD were invited to complete the PSMIS, followed by the Chen Internet Addiction Scale and the short version of Swanson, Nolan, and Pelham, Version IV Scale - Chinese version for analyzing Internet addiction severity and ADHD symptoms, respectively. Results The results of exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses confirmed the four-factor structure of the 18-item PSMIS. The significant difference in the levels of parents' perceived self-efficacy between the parents of children with and without Internet addiction supported the criterion-related validity of the PSMIS. The internal consistency and 1-month test-retest reliability were acceptable. Conclusion The results indicate that the PSMIS has acceptable validity and reliability and can be used for measuring parents' perceived self-efficacy to manage children's Internet use among parents of children with ADHD.

  16. Perceived Self-Efficacy and Financial Incentives: Factors Affecting Health Behaviors and Weight Loss in a Workplace Weight Loss Intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faghri, Pouran D; Simon, Julia; Huedo-Medina, Tania; Gorin, Amy

    2017-05-01

    To evaluate if self-efficacy (SE) and financial incentives (FI) mediate the effect of health behavior on weight loss in a group of overweight and obese nursing-home employees participating in a 16-week weight-loss intervention with 12-week follow-up. Ninety nine overweight/obese (body mass index [BMI] > 25) employees from four nursing-homes participated, with a mean age of 46.98 years and BMI of 35.33. Nursing-homes were randomized to receiving an incentive-based intervention (n = 51) and no incentive (n = 48). Participants' health behaviors and eating and exercise self-efficacy (Ex-SE) were assessed at week 1, 16, and 28 using a self-reported questionnaire. Mediation and moderated mediation analysis assessed relationships among these variables. Eating self-efficacy (Eat-SE) and Ex-SE were significant mediators between health behaviors and weight loss (P self-efficacy (P = 0.00) on weight loss. Self-efficacy and FI may affect weight loss and play a role in weight-loss interventions.

  17. The Confounded Self-Efficacy Construct: Review, Conceptual Analysis, and Recommendations for Future Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, David; Rhodes, Ryan E.

    2014-01-01

    Self-efficacy is central to health behaviour theories due to its robust predictive capabilities. In this paper we present and review evidence for a self-efficacy-as-motivation argument in which standard self-efficacy questionnaires—i.e., ratings of whether participants “can do” the target behaviour—reflect motivation rather than perceived capability. The potential implication is that associations between self-efficacy ratings (particularly those that employ a “can do” operationalization) and health-related behaviours simply indicate that people are likely to do what they are motivated to do. There is some empirical evidence for the self-efficacy-as-motivation argument, with three studies demonstrating causal effects of outcome expectancy on subsequent self-efficacy ratings. Three additional studies show that—consistent with the self-efficacy-as-motivation argument—controlling for motivation by adding the phrase “if you wanted to” to the end of self-efficacy items decreases associations between self-efficacy ratings and motivation. Likewise, a qualitative study using a thought-listing procedure demonstrates that self-efficacy ratings have motivational antecedents. The available evidence suggests that the self-efficacy-as-motivation argument is viable, although more research is needed. Meanwhile, we recommend that researchers look beyond self-efficacy to identify the many and diverse sources of motivation for health-related behaviours. PMID:25117692

  18. Impact of the role of senior dual disability coordinator on the perceived self-efficacy and job satisfaction of mental health clinicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendren, Amanda Jayne; Kendall, Melissa Bianca

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate a new service role in mental health services, namely, the senior dual disability coordinator role (SDDC) for its impact on the perceived self-efficacy of mental health clinicians in managing clients with dual disability (mental illness and acquired brain injury and/or intellectual disability) and their job satisfaction. Mental health clinicians from a health service district in Queensland, Australia who contacted the SDDC for clinical consultation and liaison between July 2011 and July 2013 were asked to complete a questionnaire assessing perceived self-efficacy in working with clients with dual disability as well as their job satisfaction, prior to (T1) and following (T2) their contact with the SDDC. Twenty-five clinicians completed and returned pre- and post-measure questionnaires. Self-reported knowledge of dual disability, clinical skills in dual disability, service knowledge in dual disability as well as perceived self-efficacy, and job satisfaction increased significantly from T1 to T2. There were no significant differences across professional discipline or years of service. The delivery of a clinical consultation liaison service as part of the role of SDDC may assist mental health clinicians with self-efficacy and job satisfaction, regardless of the number of years they have worked in the service or their professional discipline. Mental health clinicians with improved self-efficacy for working with clients with dual disability may be more likely to consider the client suitable for services through mental health and follow-up with treatment and linking the client with other identified suitable services. Implications for Rehabilitation Dual disability (mental illness and acquired brain injury and/or intellectual disability) presents specific challenges for mental health services Specific strategies are needed to build capacity among mental health practitioners in order to meet the needs of people with dual disability and provide

  19. Relationship between self-efficacy, self-care behaviour and glycaemic control among patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus in the Malaysian primary care setting.

    OpenAIRE

    Tharek, Zahirah; Ramli, Anis Safura; Whitford, David L; Ismail, Zaliha; Mohd Zulkifli, Maryam; Ahmad Sharoni, Siti Khuzaimah; Shafie, Asrul A; Jayaraman, Thevaraajan

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Self-efficacy has been shown to be positively correlated with self-care behaviour and glycaemic control among patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. However, such evidence is lacking in the Malaysian primary care setting. The objectives of this study were to i) determine the levels of self-efficacy, self-care behaviour and glycaemic control among patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus in the Malaysian primary care setting ii) determine the relationship between self-efficacy, self...

  20. Academic Locus of Control, Tendencies Towards Academic Dishonesty and Test Anxiety Levels as the Predictors of Academic Self-Efficacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yesilyurt, Etem

    2014-01-01

    Many studies have focused on finding the level of effect that academic locus of control, tendencies towards academic dishonesty, and test anxiety levels have had on academic self-efficacy, and providing a separate explanation ratio for each. The relationship among the effects of the academic locus of control, tendencies towards academic…

  1. Interprofessional clinical training improves self-efficacy of health care students

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørgaard, Birgitte; Draborg, Eva; Vestergaard, Poul Erik

    2013-01-01

    study (ICS) unit including students from nursing, medicine, physiotherapy, occupational therapy, laboratory technology and radiography. Data on students' perceived self-efficacy were collected through web-based questionnaires. Aspects of self-efficacy measured were: (1) collaboration with other...... teamwork. The aim of this study was to assess the impact of an interprofessional training programme on students' perceived self-efficacy. Methods: A quasi-experimental study with an intervention group (239 students) and a control group (405 students). The intervention was an interprofessional clinical...... students' perception of self-efficacy more than traditional clinical training....

  2. Patient's Communication Perceived Self-efficacy Scale (PCSS): construction and validation of a new measure in a socio-cognitive perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capone, Vincenza; Petrillo, Giovanna

    2014-06-01

    In two studies we constructed and validated the Patient's Communication Perceived Self-efficacy Scale (PCSS) designed to assess patients' beliefs about their capability to successfully manage problematic situations related to communication with doctor. The 20-item scale was administered to 179 outpatients (study 1). An Exploratory Factor Analysis revealed a three-factor solution. In study 2, the 16-item scale was administered to 890 outpatients. Exploratory and Confirmatory Factor Analyses supported the 3-factor solution (Provide and Collect information, Express concerns and doubts, Verify information) that showed good psychometric properties and was invariant for gender. PCSS is an easily administered, reliable, and valid test of patients' communication self-efficacy beliefs. It can be applied optimally in the empirical study of factors influencing doctor-patient communication and used in training aimed at strengthening patients' communication skills. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. African American Adolescents' Future Education Orientation: Associations with Self-Efficacy, Ethnic Identity, and Perceived Parental Support

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerpelman, Jennifer L.; Eryigit, Suna; Stephens, Carolyn J.

    2008-01-01

    The current study, using data from 374 African American students (59.4% female) in grades 7-12 attending a rural, southern county public school, addressed associations of self-efficacy, ethnic identity and parental support with "future education orientation." Both gender and current level of achievement distinguished adolescents with…

  4. Health Value, Perceived Social Support, and Health Self-Efficacy as Factors in a Health-Promoting Lifestyle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Erin S.; Tucker, Carolyn M.; Herman, Keith C.

    2007-01-01

    During their college years, students may adopt health-promoting lifestyles that bring about long-term benefits. Objective and Participants: The purpose of this study was to explore the roles of health value, family/friend social support, and health self-efficacy in the health-promoting lifestyles of a diverse sample of 162 college students.…

  5. The Relationship of Career-Related Self-Efficacy Expectations to Perceived Career Options in College Women and Men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betz, Nancy E.; Hackett, Gail

    1981-01-01

    Subjects, (N=134) female and (N=101) male undergraduates, were asked to indicate their perceptions of their capabilities to successfully complete the educational requirements and job duties of each of 10 traditionally female and 10 traditionally male occupations. Results indicated sex differences in self-efficacy with regard to traditional versus…

  6. Academic Optimism, Hope and Zest for Work as Predictors of Teacher Self-Efficacy and Perceived Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sezgin, Ferudun; Erdogan, Onur

    2015-01-01

    This study explores the predictive influence of primary school teachers' academic optimism, hope and zest for work on perceptions of their self-efficacy and success. A total of 600 teachers were selected through stratified sampling from 27 primary schools in central districts of Ankara, Turkey, to form the research sample. Intervariable…

  7. Locus of Control, Self-Efficacy, and Task Value as Predictors of Learning Outcome in an Online University Context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joo, Young Ju; Lim, Kyu Yon; Kim, Jiyeon

    2013-01-01

    This study investigates the predictors of learner satisfaction, achievement and persistence in an online university located in South Korea. The specific predictors were learners' locus of control, self-efficacy, and task value, and the mediating effects of learner satisfaction and achievement were also tested. Structural equation modeling (SEM)…

  8. Relationship between Personalities Attributes (Neuroticism, Psychoticsism and Self-efficacy in Weight Control with People’s Weight

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Zakiei

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background: Today, overweight is a damaging agent that threats general health and mental states. So, the current research was done with the aim of specifying the relationship between personality attributes (neuroticism, psychoticism, self-efficacy in weight control with people’s weight. Materials and Methods: This was a descriptive - correlational study. The sample concluded of all of students in Razi university of Kermanshah in year 2015-2016; of them 459 people were selected with stochastic random sampling method. The research tools were self-efficacy of lifestyle that effects on weight and Eisenck personality questionnaires. Results: The results showed that there is a negative significant relationship between weight with neuroticism and psychotics (p<0.001, but there was no significant relationship between neuroticism and weight. Also, the results showed that the components of self-efficacy in weight control can predict weight of people. Based on this, overeating with impact factor equal to 0.001, diet with 0.28 and oral inhibition with -0.13 of impact factor can predict weight of people. Conclusion: Due to the results, psycho personality and self-efficacy have roles in weight control of people.

  9. Individual uncertainty and the uncertainty of science: The impact of perceived conflict and general self-efficacy on the perception of tentativeness and credibility of scientific information

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danny eFlemming

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available We examined in two empirical studies how situational and personal aspects of uncertainty influence laypeople’s understanding of the uncertainty of scientific information, with focus on the detection of tentativeness and perception of scientific credibility. In the first study (N = 48, we investigated the impact of a perceived conflict due to contradicting information as a situational, text-inherent aspect of uncertainty. The aim of the second study (N = 61 was to explore the role of general self-efficacy as an intra-personal uncertainty factor. In Study 1, participants read one of two versions of an introductory text in a between-group design. This text provided them with an overview about the neurosurgical procedure of deep brain stimulation (DBS. The text expressed a positive attitude toward DBS in one experimental condition or focused on the negative aspects of this method in the other condition. Then participants in both conditions read the same text that dealt with a study about DBS as experimental treatment in a small sample of patients with major depression. Perceived conflict between the two texts was found to increase the perception of tentativeness and to decrease the perception of scientific credibility, implicating that text-inherent aspects have significant effects on critical appraisal. The results of Study 2 demonstrated that participants with higher general self-efficacy detected the tentativeness to a lesser degree and assumed a higher level of scientific credibility, indicating a more naïve understanding of scientific information. This appears to be contradictory to large parts of previous findings that showed positive effects of high self-efficacy on learning. Both studies showed that perceived tentativeness and perceived scientific credibility of medical information contradicted each other. We conclude that there is a need for supporting laypeople in understanding the uncertainty of scientific information and that

  10. MUD and Self Efficacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kwan Min

    2000-01-01

    Proposes a theoretical framework for analyzing the effect of MUD (Multi-User Dungeons) playing on users' self-efficacy by applying Bandura's social learning theory, and introduces three types of self-efficacy: computer self-efficacy; social self-efficacy; and generalized self-efficacy. Considers successful performance, vicarious experience,…

  11. El papel mediador de la Autoeficacia Profesional entre situaciones de Demandas de Rol y Salud Autopercibida (The mediating role of Professional Self-efficacy between Role Demands situations and Self-perceived Health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Isabel Soler Sánchez

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between role stress, professional self-efficacy, and self-perceived health using the Job Demands-Resources Model (JD-R model. The proposed model hypothesizes that professional self-efficacy mediates the relationship between role ambiguity and role conflict on the one hand, and self-perceived health on the other. To test this hypothesis, data were collected from 272 workers from southern Spain. Mediation analyses were performed using the macro PROCESS for SPSS developed by Hayes (2013. Results showed that role conflict, role ambiguity, and self-efficacy were significant predictors of self-perceived health. In addition, self-efficacy partially mediated the relationship between role stress and health.

  12. Communication and mental health in general practice: physicians' self-perceived learning needs and self-efficacy

    OpenAIRE

    Stensrud, Tonje L; Mjaaland, Trond A; Finset, Arnstein

    2012-01-01

    Background General practitioners (GPs) often see patients presenting with mental health problems, but their training regarding mental health treatment varies. GPs' communication skills are of particular importance in these consultations, and communication skills training of GPs has been found to improve patients' mental health. To tailor a communication skills training by basing it on GPs' learning needs and self-efficacy, thereby maximising learning, we conducted a questionnaire study.

  13. Comparing Asian American Women's Knowledge, Self-Efficacy, and Perceived Risk of Heart Attack to Other Racial and Ethnic Groups: The mPED Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuoka, Yoshimi; Lisha, Nadra E; Vittinghoff, Eric

    2017-09-01

    The aim of the study was to compare knowledge and awareness of heart attacks/heart disease and perceived risk for future heart attack in Asian/Pacific Islander women, compared to other racial and ethnic groups. In this cross-sectional study, 318 women enrolled in a mobile phone-based physical activity education trial were analyzed. Heart attack knowledge, self-efficacy for recognizing and responding to heart attack symptoms, and perceived risk for a future heart attack were measured. Analyses were conducted using logistic, proportional odds, and linear regression models, depending on the outcome and adjusting for age. Pairwise differences between Asian/Pacific Islanders and the other four groups were assessed using a Bonferroni correction (p Asian/Pacific Islander women had significantly lower total scores for knowledge of heart attack and self-efficacy for heart attack recognition and care seeking behavior compared to the Caucasian women (p = 0.001 and p = 0.002, respectively). However, perceived risk did not differ among the groups. Forty-six percent of the Asian American women, compared to 25% of Caucasian women, falsely believed "breast cancer is the number one cause of death for women (p = 0.002)." In addition, Asian/Pacific Islander women were less likely to report "arm pain, numbness, tingling, or radiating" as one of the heart attack symptoms compared to the Caucasian and the multiracial group (34%, 63% [p Asian/Pacific Islander women and Caucasian women.

  14. Strengthened General Self-Efficacy with Multidisciplinary Vocational Rehabilitation in Women on Long-Term Sick Leave: A Randomised Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersén, Åsa; Larsson, Kjerstin; Lytsy, Per; Berglund, Erik; Kristiansson, Per; Anderzén, Ingrid

    2018-01-09

    Purpose To investigate the effects of two vocational rehabilitation interventions on self-efficacy, for women on long-term sick leave ≥ 1 year due to chronic pain and/or mental illness. Methods This study uses data from a randomised controlled trial consisting of two phases and comprising 401 women on long-term sick leave. They were allocated to either (1) a multidisciplinary team assessment and multimodal intervention (TEAM), (2) acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT), or (3) control group. Data were collected through repeated measurements from self-reported questionnaires before intervention, 6 and 12 months later and registry data. Data from measurements of general self-efficacy, sociodemographics, anxiety and depression were analysed with linear regression analyses. Results During the intervention period, the women in the TEAM group's self-efficacy mean increased from 2.29 to 2.74. The adjusted linear regression model, which included group allocation, sociodemographics, self-efficacy pre-treatment, anxiety and depression showed increased self-efficacy for those in the TEAM intervention at 12 months (B = 0.25, 95% CI 0.10-0.41). ACT intervention had no effect on self-efficacy at 12 months (B = 0.02, 95% CI - 0.16 to 0.19). The results in the adjusted model also showed that higher self-efficacy at pre-treatment was associated with a higher level of self-efficacy at 12 months (B = 0.68, 95% CI 0.54-0.81). Conclusion A multidisciplinary team assessment and multimodal intervention increased self-efficacy in women on sick leave for an extremely long time (mean 7.8 years) who had a low mean level of self-efficacy prior to inclusion. Thus, self-efficacy needs to be addressed in vocational rehabilitation.

  15. Relationship between self-efficacy, self-care behaviour and glycaemic control among patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus in the Malaysian primary care setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tharek, Zahirah; Ramli, Anis Safura; Whitford, David Leonard; Ismail, Zaliha; Mohd Zulkifli, Maryam; Ahmad Sharoni, Siti Khuzaimah; Shafie, Asrul Akmal; Jayaraman, Thevaraajan

    2018-03-09

    Self-efficacy has been shown to be positively correlated with self-care behaviour and glycaemic control among patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. However, such evidence is lacking in the Malaysian primary care setting. The objectives of this study were to i) determine the levels of self-efficacy, self-care behaviour and glycaemic control among patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus in the Malaysian primary care setting ii) determine the relationship between self-efficacy, self-care behaviour and glycaemic control iii) determine the factors associated with glycaemic control. This was a cross-sectional study involving patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus from two public primary care clinics in Malaysia. Self-efficacy and self-care behaviour levels were measured using previously translated and validated DMSES and SDSCA questionnaires in Malay versions, respectively. Glycaemic control was measured using HbA 1c. RESULTS: A total of 340 patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus were recruited. The total mean (±SD) of self-efficacy and self-care behaviour scores were 7.33 (±2.25) and 3.76 (±1.87), respectively. A positive relationship was found between self-efficacy and self-care behaviour (r 0.538, P self-efficacy score was shown to be correlated with lower HbA 1c (r - 0.41, P self-efficacy scores (b - 0.398; 95% CI: -0.024, - 0.014; P diabetes (b 0.177; 95% CI: 0.002, 0.007; P self-efficacy was correlated with improved self-care behaviour and better glycaemic control. Findings of this study suggest the importance of including routine use of self-efficacy measures in the management of type 2 diabetes mellitus in primary care.

  16. Information Needs of Cancer Patients and Perception of Impact of the Disease, of Self-Efficacy, and Locus of Control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keinki, C; Seilacher, E; Ebel, M; Ruetters, D; Kessler, I; Stellamanns, J; Rudolph, I; Huebner, J

    2016-09-01

    The aim of our study was to investigate the relationship between information needs and cancer patients' perceptions of the impact of the disease, self-efficacy, and locus of control. Using a standardized questionnaire, we obtained data from patients who attended a series of lectures. The questionnaire included questions on their information needs, sources of information, satisfaction with information, and short questionnaires on self-efficacy, perception of the disease, and locus of control of reinforcement. Data was obtained from 185 patients. Our results showed that the sources of information that were most often used were physicians (84 %), print media (68 %), and the Internet (59 %); online fora (7.5 %), non-medical practitioners (9.7 %), and telephone-based counseling (8.6 %) were only used by a minority. Patients with a high perception of their own control over the disease more often used any source of information available to them and were more often interested in acquiring additional information. Higher self-efficacy was significantly associated with the need for information on all topics. Patients with a higher external locus of control significantly more often used sources of information and had significantly more need for additional information. By contrast, there were no associations with an internal locus of control. Neither external nor internal locus of control showed any associations with satisfaction with information. Information needs seem to be higher in patients with a high external locus of control and low self-efficacy. Physicians, other professionals, and institutions that provide information may take these relationships into consideration for tailoring their services to patients.

  17. The impact of leadership programme on self-esteem and self-efficacy in school: a randomized controlled trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin C S Wong

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Leadership training programs by experiential learning among adolescents are very popular worldwide and in particular developed countries, but there exists few studies which formally assessed their impact on the psychological well-being of program participants. This study evaluated the effectiveness of leadership training programs on self-esteem and self-efficacy among adolescents. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: a total of 180 students of the same grade of one secondary school were randomized into an intervention (n = 50 and a control group (n = 130. The students in the intervention group participated in a 6-month program of leadership training and service learning, while the control group did not participate in any training. Their self-esteem and self-efficacy were assessed by Rosenberg Self-Esteem questionnaire and Chinese Adaptation of the General Self-Efficacy Scale, respectively, before and after the program. Both scales have been recognized internationally as valid and reliable survey instruments to measure these psychological attributes. The scores were compared by Student's tests according to gender. A total of 180 students were enrolled during the study period October, 2009 to May, 2010. Their mean age was 15.18 years (0.62 and 56.7% were male. Students allocated to the intervention and control group had statistically similar demographic characteristics except gender (male 36.0% vs. 64.6%, p = 0.001. Overall, the self-esteem scores increased by 1.28 and decreased by 0.30 (p = 0.161 while the self-efficacy scores increased by 0.26 and decreased by 0.76 (p = 0.429 in the intervention and control group, respectively. Among female students, the intervention group showed significant improvements in both self-esteem (2.38 vs. -0.24, p<0.001 and self-efficacy (1.32 vs. -0.04, p = 0.043. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Leadership training program were not found to be effective to enhance self-esteem and self-efficacy

  18. To curve or not to curve? The effect of college science grading policies on implicit theories of intelligence, perceived classroom goal structures, and self-efficacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haley, James M.

    There is currently a shortage of students graduating with STEM (science, technology, engineering, or mathematics) degrees, particularly women and students of color. Approximately half of students who begin a STEM major eventually switch out. Many switchers cite the competitiveness, grading curves, and weed-out culture of introductory STEM classes as reasons for the switch. Variables known to influence resilience include a student's implicit theory of intelligence and achievement goal orientation. Incremental theory (belief that intelligence is malleable) and mastery goals (pursuit of increased competence) are more adaptive in challenging classroom contexts. This dissertation investigates the role that college science grading policies and messages about the importance of effort play in shaping both implicit theories and achievement goal orientation. College students (N = 425) were randomly assigned to read one of three grading scenarios: (1) a "mastery" scenario, which used criterion-referenced grading, permitted tests to be retaken, and included a strong effort message; (2) a "norm" scenario, which used norm-referenced grading (grading on the curve); or (3) an "effort" scenario, which combined a strong effort message with the norm-referenced policies. The dependent variables included implicit theories of intelligence, perceived classroom goal structure, and self-efficacy. A different sample of students (N = 15) were randomly assigned a scenario to read, asked to verbalize their thoughts, and responded to questions in a semi-structured interview. Results showed that students reading the mastery scenario were more likely to endorse an incremental theory of intelligence, perceived greater mastery goal structure, and had higher self-efficacy. The effort message had no effect on self-efficacy, implicit theory, and most of the goal structure measures. The interviews revealed that it was the retake policy in the mastery scenario and the competitive atmosphere in the norm

  19. Pathways of empowerment perceptions, health literacy, self-efficacy, and self-care behaviors to glycemic control in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yau-Jiunn; Shin, Shyi-Jang; Wang, Ruey-Hsia; Lin, Kun-Der; Lee, Yu-Li; Wang, Yi-Hsien

    2016-02-01

    To validate a hypothesized model exploring the influencing pathways of empowerment perceptions, health literacy, self-efficacy, and self-care behaviors to glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) levels in patients with type 2 diabetes (T2DM). Overall, 295 patients with T2DM were recruited from five endocrine clinics in Taiwan through convenience sampling. Data regarding personal characteristics, empowerment perceptions, health literacy, self-efficacy, self-care behaviors, and HbA1c levels were collected. A structural equation modeling was used to validate the hypothesized model. Significant direct pathways were determined from empowerment perceptions to health literacy, from health literacy to self-efficacy, from self-efficacy to self-care behaviors, and from self-care behaviors to HbA1c levels. The empowerment perceptions and health literacy relatively influenced self-efficacy and self-care behaviors. Self-efficacy and self-care behaviors relatively influenced glycemic control in patients with T2DM. Modifying self-care behaviors have been demonstrated to be the most essential for improving glycemic control. To improve self-care behaviors, healthcare providers should target improving self-efficacy, and enhancing health literacy can be considered to be a potential strategy for improving self-efficacy. To enhance health literacy, healthcare providers could use an empowerment approach rather than an authoritative approach that emphasizes patient compliance in managing patients with T2DM. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Does self-efficacy mediate the cross-sectional relationship between perceived quality of health care and self-management of diabetes?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tregea, Hannah; Lee, Christina; Browne, Jessica L

    2016-01-01

    between self-reported QoC and diabetes self-management. DESIGN: Diabetes MILES-Australia was a national survey of 3,338 adults with diabetes. We analysed data from 1,624 respondents (age: M = 52.1, SD = 13.9) with type 1 (T1D; n = 680) or type 2 diabetes (T2D; n = 944), who responded to a version...... of the survey containing key measures. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: self-reported healthy eating, physical activity, self-monitoring of blood glucose frequency, HbA1c, medication/insulin adherence. RESULTS: We used Preacher and Hayes' bootstrapping method, controlling for age, gender and diabetes duration, to test......OBJECTIVE: Quality of health care (QoC) and self-efficacy may affect self-management of diabetes, but such effects are not well understood. We examined the indirect role of diabetes-specific self-efficacy (DSE) and generalised self-efficacy (GSE) in mediating the cross-sectional relationship...

  1. The Impact of the Project K Youth Development Program on Self-Efficacy: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deane, Kelsey L; Harré, Niki; Moore, Julie; Courtney, Matthew G R

    2017-03-01

    A key issue for youth development programs is whether the learning they provide is transferred to participants' daily lives. It is also important that they are effective for the diverse range of participants they attract. This study used a randomized controlled trial design to measure the impact of Project K, a New Zealand-based youth development program, on academic and social self-efficacy. Project K combines a 3-week wilderness adventure, a 10 day community service component, and 1 year of mentoring to promote positive growth in 14-15 year olds with low self-efficacy. At baseline, the evaluation included 600 Project K (46 % female) and 577 Control participants (48 % female) and revealed that Project K was effective in improving both social and academic self-efficacy from pre- to post-program with effects being sustained 1 year later. Parents' perceptions of changes in the participants' interpersonal skills supported these findings. Differential program effects were found across participant subgroups, particularly 1 year after program completion. The implications of these differences are discussed.

  2. The Impact of Tai Chi Exercise on Self-Efficacy, Social Support, and Empowerment in Heart Failure: Insights from a Qualitative Sub-Study from a Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, Gloria Y; Chan, Caroline W; Wayne, Peter M; Conboy, Lisa

    2016-01-01

    To qualitatively explore perceived physical and psychosocial effects and overall patient experience associated with a 12-week tai chi (TC) intervention and an education group in a clinical trial of patients with chronic heart failure (HF). We randomized 100 patients with chronic systolic HF (NYHA Class 1-3, ejection fraction≤40%) to a 12-week group TC program or an education control. At 12-weeks, semi-structured interviews were conducted on a random subset (n = 32; n = 17 in TC, n = 15 in control), audiorecorded and transcribed verbatim. Two independent reviewers extracted information using grounded-theory methods for emergent themes. We explored similarities and differences in themes/sub-themes between the groups, and examined qualitative association with changes from baseline to post-intervention in previously reported quantitative measures (e.g., Minnesota Living with HF, Cardiac Exercise Self Efficacy and Profile of Mood States). The mean age (±SD) of participants was 68±9 years, baseline ejection fraction 29±7%, and median New York Heart Association class 2 HF. We idenitifed themes related to the patient's experience of illness, perceptions of self, and relationship to others. Specific psychosocial and physical benefits were described. Common themes emerged from both groups including: social support and self-efficacy related to activity/exercise and diet. The tai chi group, however, also exhibited a more global empowerment and perceived control. Additional themes in TC included mindfulness/self-awareness, decreased stress reactivity, and renewed social role. These themes mirrored improvements in previously reported quantitative measures (quality-of-life, self-efficacy, and mood) in TC compared to control. Patients in TC also reported physical benefits (e.g., decreased pain, improved energy, endurance, flexibility). Positive themes emerged from both groups, although there were qualitative differences in concepts of self-efficacy and perceived control

  3. The Impact of Tai Chi Exercise on Self-Efficacy, Social Support, and Empowerment in Heart Failure: Insights from a Qualitative Sub-Study from a Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gloria Y Yeh

    Full Text Available To qualitatively explore perceived physical and psychosocial effects and overall patient experience associated with a 12-week tai chi (TC intervention and an education group in a clinical trial of patients with chronic heart failure (HF.We randomized 100 patients with chronic systolic HF (NYHA Class 1-3, ejection fraction≤40% to a 12-week group TC program or an education control. At 12-weeks, semi-structured interviews were conducted on a random subset (n = 32; n = 17 in TC, n = 15 in control, audiorecorded and transcribed verbatim. Two independent reviewers extracted information using grounded-theory methods for emergent themes. We explored similarities and differences in themes/sub-themes between the groups, and examined qualitative association with changes from baseline to post-intervention in previously reported quantitative measures (e.g., Minnesota Living with HF, Cardiac Exercise Self Efficacy and Profile of Mood States.The mean age (±SD of participants was 68±9 years, baseline ejection fraction 29±7%, and median New York Heart Association class 2 HF. We idenitifed themes related to the patient's experience of illness, perceptions of self, and relationship to others. Specific psychosocial and physical benefits were described. Common themes emerged from both groups including: social support and self-efficacy related to activity/exercise and diet. The tai chi group, however, also exhibited a more global empowerment and perceived control. Additional themes in TC included mindfulness/self-awareness, decreased stress reactivity, and renewed social role. These themes mirrored improvements in previously reported quantitative measures (quality-of-life, self-efficacy, and mood in TC compared to control. Patients in TC also reported physical benefits (e.g., decreased pain, improved energy, endurance, flexibility.Positive themes emerged from both groups, although there were qualitative differences in concepts of self-efficacy and perceived

  4. Gender differences in condom use prediction with Theory of Reasoned Action and Planned Behaviour: the role of self-efficacy and control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz-Silva, A; Sánchez-García, M; Nunes, C; Martins, A

    2007-10-01

    There is much evidence that demonstrates that programs and interventions based on the theoretical models of the Theory of Reasoned Action (TRA) and the Theory of Planned Behaviour (TPB) have been effective in the prevention of the sexual transmission of HIV. The objective of this work is to compare the effectiveness of both models in the prediction of condom use, distinguishing two components inside the variable Perceived Behavioural Control of the TPB model: self-efficacy and control. The perspective of gender differences is also added. The study was carried out in a sample of 601 Portuguese and Spanish university students. The results show that the females have a higher average in all the TPB variables than males, except in the frequency of condom use: females request the use of condoms less frequently than males. On the other hand, for both females and males the TPB model predicts better condom-use intention than the TRA. However there are no differences between the two models in relation to the prediction of condom-use behaviour. For prediction of intention, the most outstanding variable among females is attitude, while among males they are subjective norm and self-efficacy. Finally, we analyze the implications of these data from a theoretical and practical point of view.

  5. Analysis of Factors in Technological and Vocational School Teachers' Perceived Organizational Innovative Climate and Continuous Use of E-Teaching: Using Computer Self-Efficacy as an Intervening Variable

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Chun-Mei; Hsiao, His-Chi; Shen, Chien-Hua; Chen, Su-Chang

    2010-01-01

    This study aims to analyze the correlation (N = 335) among technological and vocational school teachers' perceived organizational innovative climate, computer self-efficacy, and continuous use of e-teaching in Taiwan. Teachers' perceived organizational innovative climate includes five factors, namely, job autonomy, innovative leadership, resource…

  6. The impact of leadership programme on self-esteem and self-efficacy in school: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Martin C S; Lau, Tony C M; Lee, Albert

    2012-01-01

    Leadership training programs by experiential learning among adolescents are very popular worldwide and in particular developed countries, but there exists few studies which formally assessed their impact on the psychological well-being of program participants. This study evaluated the effectiveness of leadership training programs on self-esteem and self-efficacy among adolescents. a total of 180 students of the same grade of one secondary school were randomized into an intervention (n = 50) and a control group (n = 130). The students in the intervention group participated in a 6-month program of leadership training and service learning, while the control group did not participate in any training. Their self-esteem and self-efficacy were assessed by Rosenberg Self-Esteem questionnaire and Chinese Adaptation of the General Self-Efficacy Scale, respectively, before and after the program. Both scales have been recognized internationally as valid and reliable survey instruments to measure these psychological attributes. The scores were compared by Student's tests according to gender. A total of 180 students were enrolled during the study period October, 2009 to May, 2010. Their mean age was 15.18 years (0.62) and 56.7% were male. Students allocated to the intervention and control group had statistically similar demographic characteristics except gender (male 36.0% vs. 64.6%, p = 0.001). Overall, the self-esteem scores increased by 1.28 and decreased by 0.30 (p = 0.161) while the self-efficacy scores increased by 0.26 and decreased by 0.76 (p = 0.429) in the intervention and control group, respectively. Among female students, the intervention group showed significant improvements in both self-esteem (2.38 vs. -0.24, pself-efficacy (1.32 vs. -0.04, p = 0.043). Leadership training program were not found to be effective to enhance self-esteem and self-efficacy in adolescents, except girls who showed modest increase in these outcomes. Future research

  7. Does self-efficacy mediate the cross-sectional relationship between perceived quality of health care and self-management of diabetes? : Results from Diabetes MILES - Australia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tregea, Hannah; Lee, Christina; Browne, Jessica L.; Pouwer, F.; Speight, Jane

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Quality of health care (QoC) and self-efficacy may affect self-management of diabetes, but such effects are not well understood. We examined the indirect role of diabetes-specific self-efficacy (DSE) and generalised self-efficacy (GSE) in mediating the cross-sectional relationship between

  8. The Effect of Social Support on Glycemic Control in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: The Mediating Roles of Self-Efficacy and Adherence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yechang Shao

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Ample evidence suggests that social support, self-efficacy, and adherence significantly, independently, and together affect glycemic control in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM, but the pathway from social support to glycemic control remains unclear. This study hypothesized that the effect of social support on glycemic control was mediated sequentially by self-efficacy and adherence. Patients with T2DM were recruited from two hospitals in Guangzhou, China, from January 1 to July 31, 2014, and their sociodemographic clinical data and their assessments on social support, self-efficacy, and adherence were obtained from medical records and self-completed questionnaires. Of the 532 patients who participated, 35% achieved glycemic control (i.e., HbA1c < 7%. Social support, self-efficacy, and adherence had significant correlations with each other and with glycemic control (P<0.05. Regression analyses and structural equation modeling showed that better social support was associated to better patient self-efficacy, which, in turn, was associated with better medical adherence, which was associated with improved glycemic control, and the relationship between social support and glycemic control was sequentially and completely mediated by self-efficacy and adherence. The five goodness-of-fit indices confirmed that our data fitted the hypothesized pathway model strongly.

  9. Genetic causal beliefs about obesity, self-efficacy for weight control, and obesity-related behaviours in a middle-aged female cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knerr, Sarah; Bowen, Deborah J; Beresford, Shirley A A; Wang, Catharine

    2016-01-01

    Obesity is a heritable condition with well-established risk-reducing behaviours. Studies have shown that beliefs about the causes of obesity are associated with diet and exercise behaviour. Identifying mechanisms linking causal beliefs and behaviours is important for obesity prevention and control. Cross-sectional multi-level regression analyses of self-efficacy for weight control as a possible mediator of obesity attributions (diet, physical activity, genetic) and preventive behaviours in 487 non-Hispanic White women from South King County, Washington. Self-reported daily fruit and vegetable intake and weekly leisure-time physical activity. Diet causal beliefs were positively associated with fruit and vegetable intake, with self-efficacy for weight control partially accounting for this association. Self-efficacy for weight control also indirectly linked physical activity attributions and physical activity behaviour. Relationships between genetic causal beliefs, self-efficacy for weight control, and obesity-related behaviours differed by obesity status. Self-efficacy for weight control contributed to negative associations between genetic causal attributions and obesity-related behaviours in non-obese, but not obese, women. Self-efficacy is an important construct to include in studies of genetic causal beliefs and behavioural self-regulation. Theoretical and longitudinal work is needed to clarify the causal nature of these relationships and other mediating and moderating factors.

  10. Health locus of control and the sense of self-efficacy in patients with systolic heart failure: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rydlewska, Agnieszka; Krzysztofik, Justyna; Libergal, Julia; Rybak, Agata; Banasiak, Waldemar; Ponikowski, Piotr; Jankowska, Ewa A

    2013-01-01

    Treatment of heart failure (HF) requires the lifelong adherence to medical self-care regimes. The objective of this study was to examine health-control beliefs and the sense of self-efficacy (psychological features particularly important for efficient compliance among patients suffering from chronic diseases) in patients with systolic HF in relation to clinical status and depressive symptoms. Sixty-six consecutive patients with chronic systolic HF, hospitalized in the Centre for Heart Diseases, Military Hospital (94% men, age: 61 ± 11 years, ischemic etiology: 63%, left ventricular ejection fraction: 32% ± 12%), filled in (during their hospital stay): (1) the Multidimensional Health Locus of Control Scale measuring three possible localizations of health control: "internality" (ie, the belief that health status depends only on personal decisions and behaviors); "powerful others externality" ([PHLC subscale] ie, the conviction that health depends on "powerful people" such as doctors, family members, close friends), and "chance externality" (ie, belief that health status is determined by chance, fate, or luck), and (2) the Generalized Self-Efficacy Scale. The results obtained by HF patients were compared to those reported by patients with other chronic diseases and healthy subjects. In patients with HF, internality was similar to values obtained by patients with diabetes, men after myocardial infarction, and women after mastectomy; and was lower than in healthy subjects. Powerful others externality was more pronounced in patients with HF as compared to other groups of patients and healthy people. Only women after mastectomy had higher scores of PHLC. In patients with HF, chance externality was similar to values reported in patients with renal failure, men after myocardial infarction, and women after mastectomy; and was less pronounced than in healthy subjects. The majority (77%) of patients with HF were characterized by a high sense of self-efficacy (>the 7th sten

  11. Relationships Between Health Literacy and Genomics-Related Knowledge, Self-Efficacy, Perceived Importance, and Communication in a Medically Underserved Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaphingst, Kimberly A; Blanchard, Melvin; Milam, Laurel; Pokharel, Manusheela; Elrick, Ashley; Goodman, Melody S

    2016-01-01

    The increasing importance of genomic information in clinical care heightens the need to examine how individuals understand, value, and communicate about this information. Based on a conceptual framework of genomics-related health literacy, we examined whether health literacy was related to knowledge, self-efficacy, and perceived importance of genetics and family health history (FHH) and communication about FHH in a medically underserved population. The analytic sample was composed of 624 patients at a primary care clinic in a large urban hospital. About half of the participants (47%) had limited health literacy; 55% had no education beyond high school, and 58% were Black. In multivariable models, limited health literacy was associated with lower genetic knowledge (β = -0.55, SE = 0.10, p interval [CI; 0.28, 0.90], p = .020), and greater perceived importance of genetic information (OR = 1.95, 95% CI [1.27, 3.00], p = .0022) but lower perceived importance of FHH information (OR = 0.47, 95% CI [0.26, 0.86], p = .013) and more frequent communication with a doctor about FHH (OR = 2.02, 95% CI [1.27, 3.23], p = .0032). The findings highlight the importance of considering domains of genomics-related health literacy (e.g., knowledge, oral literacy) in developing educational strategies for genomic information. Health literacy research is essential to avoid increasing disparities in information and health outcomes as genomic information reaches more patients.

  12. Association between the Five Factor personality traits and perceived stress: is the effect mediated by general self-efficacy?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ebstrup, Jeanette Frost; Eplov, Lene Falgaard; Pisinger, Charlotta

    2011-01-01

    Ill-health resulting from chronic stress is influenced by personality traits leading to different ways of appraising and coping with life's daily hassles. Using a large population sample the study aimed to investigate possible associations between perceived stress and the personality dimensions......-significant - whilst neuroticism had a positive association. The associations with agreeableness and openness became positive and significant, respectively, when GSE was included. All five personality-stress models were mediated by GSE, with extroversion and conscientiousness having the strongest mediating effect....... The strongest stress-association was found for neuroticism. GSE was shown to change the impact and interpretation of the personality dimensions on perceived stress. These results indicate that GSE is an important factor to consider in the link between personality and perceived stress....

  13. Longitudinal Analysis of the Role of Perceived Self-Efficacy for Self-Regulated Learning in Academic Continuance and Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caprara, Gian Vittorio; Fida, Roberta; Vecchione, Michele; Del Bove, Giannetta; Vecchio, Giovanni Maria; Barbaranelli, Claudio; Bandura, Albert

    2008-01-01

    The present study examined the developmental course of perceived efficacy for self-regulated learning and its contribution to academic achievement and likelihood of remaining in school in a sample of 412 Italian students (48% males and 52% females ranging in age from 12 to 22 years). Latent growth curve analysis revealed a progressive decline in…

  14. Prematurity and parental self-efficacy: the Preterm Parenting & Self-Efficacy Checklist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pennell, Claire; Whittingham, Koa; Boyd, Roslyn; Sanders, Matthew; Colditz, Paul

    2012-12-01

    There is a lack of research investigating parental self-efficacy in parents of infants born preterm as well as a paucity of parental self-efficacy measures that are domain-specific and theoretically grounded. This study aimed to compare parental self-efficacy in parents of infants born term, preterm and very preterm as well as to test whether parental self-efficacy mediates the relationship between psychological symptoms and parental competence. In order to achieve this, a new measure of parental self-efficacy and parental competence relevant for the preterm population and consistent with Bandura's (1977, 1986, 1989) conceptualisation of self-efficacy was developed. Participants included 155 parents, 83 of whom were parents of very preterm (GAparents of preterm (GAparents of term born infants. Parents completed the Preterm Parenting & Self-Efficacy Checklist (the new measure), Family Demographic Questionnaire, Depression Anxiety Stress Scale and Self-Efficacy Questionnaire. This initial study indicates that the Preterm Parenting & Self-Efficacy Checklist has adequate content validity, construct validity, internal consistency and split half reliability. Contrary to expectations, parents of very preterm infants did not report significantly lower overall levels of parental self-efficacy or significantly higher levels of psychological symptoms compared to parents of preterm and term infants. Parental self-efficacy about parenting tasks mediated the relationship between psychological symptoms and self perceived parental competence as predicted. Clinical implications of the results and suggestions for future research are discussed. Crown Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Heroin refusal self-efficacy and preference for medication-assisted treatment after inpatient detoxification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenney, Shannon R; Bailey, Genie L; Anderson, Bradley J; Stein, Michael D

    2017-10-01

    An individual's self-efficacy to refuse using heroin in high-risk situations is believed to minimize the likelihood for relapse. However, among individuals completing inpatient heroin detoxification, perceived refusal self-efficacy may also reduce one's perceived need for medication-assisted treatment (MAT), an effective and recommended treatment for opioid use disorder. In the current study, we examined the relationship between heroin refusal self-efficacy and preference for MAT following inpatient detoxification. Participants (N=397) were interviewed at the start of brief inpatient opioid detoxification. Multiple logistic regression was used to estimate the adjusted association of background characteristics, depressed mood, and perceived heroin refusal self-efficacy with preference for MAT. Controlling for other covariates, depressed mood and lower perceived refusal self-efficacy were associated with a significantly greater likelihood of expressing preference for MAT (versus no MAT). Perceived ability to refuse heroin after leaving detox is inversely associated with a heroin user's desire for MAT. An effective continuum of care model may benefit from greater attention to patient's perceived refusal self-efficacy during detoxification which may impact preference for MAT and long-term recovery. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  16. The impact of subacute whiplash-associated disorders on functional self-efficacy: a cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunketorp-Käll, Lina Sofia; Andersson, Caroline; Asker, Barbita

    2007-09-01

    Self-efficacy is increasingly being recognized as an important factor to consider in medical research, especially in different pain conditions such as whiplash-associated disorders (WAD). When pain is not effectively treated or relieved, it may negatively affect patients' life situation and cause a decline in perceived self-efficacy. Knowledge of what level of self-efficacy can be considered an actual deficit in patients with WAD is, however, sparse. The purpose of this study is to analyze whether subacute WAD has an impact on self-efficacy beliefs. A cohort study was designed to identify the impact of WAD on self-efficacy beliefs. The exposed group consisted of 47 patients with subacute WAD following a whiplash trauma. The control group representing the general population consisted of 212 participants, and was randomly selected to match the distribution of age and sex in the exposed group. The Self-Efficacy Scale was used to assess the individuals' confidence in their ability to successfully carry out activities of daily living. In the exposed group, 47 responded (100%), and in the control group, 113 (53%) responded. The results show that the total scores on the Self-Efficacy Scale were significantly lower in the exposed group compared with the control group, concerning both the mean (P<0.001) and median (P<0.001) scores. In conclusion, patients with subacute WAD experience a decline in functional self-efficacy, which stresses the importance of incorporating these beliefs in clinical practice and research.

  17. I Should but I Can't: Controlled Motivation and Self-Efficacy Are Related to Disordered Eating Behaviors in Adolescents With Type 1 Diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisenberg, Miriam H; Lipsky, Leah M; Dempster, Katherine W; Liu, Aiyi; Nansel, Tonja R

    2016-11-01

    Among adolescents with type 1 diabetes, disordered eating behaviors (DEBs) are more prevalent and have more serious health implications than in adolescents without diabetes, necessitating identification of modifiable correlates of DEB in this population. This study hypothesized that (1) autonomous motivation and (2) controlled motivation for healthy eating (i.e., eating healthfully because it is important to oneself vs. important to others, respectively) are associated with DEB among adolescents with type 1 diabetes. The third hypothesis was that baseline healthy eating self-efficacy moderates these associations. Adolescents with type 1 diabetes (n = 90; 13-16 years) participating in a behavioral nutrition intervention efficacy trial reported DEB, controlled and autonomous motivation, and self-efficacy at baseline, 6, 12, and 18 months. Linear-mixed models estimated associations of controlled and autonomous motivation with DEB, adjusting for treatment group, body mass index, socioeconomic status, age, and gender. Separate models investigated the interaction of self-efficacy with each motivation type. Controlled motivation was positively associated with DEB (B = 2.18 ± .33, p motivation was not associated with DEB (B = -.70 ± .43, p = .11). Findings identify controlled motivation for healthy eating as a novel correlate of DEB among adolescents with type 1 diabetes and show that self-efficacy can modify this association. Motivation and self-efficacy for healthy eating represent potential intervention targets to reduce DEB in adolescents with type 1 diabetes. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  18. I Should but I Can’t: Controlled Motivation and Self-efficacy are Related to Disordered Eating Behaviors in Adolescents with Type 1 Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisenberg, Miriam H.; Lipsky, Leah M.; Dempster, Katherine; Liu, Aiyi; Nansel, Tonja R.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Among adolescents with type 1 diabetes, disordered eating behaviors (DEB) are more prevalent and have more serious health implications than in adolescents without diabetes, necessitating identification of modifiable correlates of DEB in this population. This study hypothesized that 1) autonomous motivation and 2) controlled motivation for healthy eating (i.e., eating healthfully because it’s important to oneself versus important to others respectively) are associated with DEB among adolescents with type 1 diabetes. The third hypothesis was that baseline healthy eating self-efficacy moderates these associations. Methods Adolescents with T1D (n = 90; 13–16 years) participating in a behavioral nutrition intervention efficacy trial reported DEB, controlled and autonomous motivation, and self-efficacy at baseline, 6, 12, and 18 months. Linear mixed models estimated associations of controlled and autonomous motivation with DEB, adjusting for treatment group, BMI, socio-economic status, age, and gender. Separate models investigated the interaction of self-efficacy with each motivation type. Results Controlled motivation was positively associated with DEB (B=2.18±.33, pmotivation was not associated with DEB (B=−.70± .43, p=.11). Conclusions Findings identify controlled motivation for healthy eating as a novel correlate of DEB among adolescents with type 1 diabetes and show that self-efficacy can modify this association. Motivation and self-efficacy for healthy eating represent potential intervention targets to reduce DEB in adolescents with type 1 diabetes. PMID:27567063

  19. Relationship between perceived perinatal stress and depressive symptoms, anxiety, and parental self-efficacy in primiparous mothers and the role of social support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razurel, Chantal; Kaiser, Barbara; Antonietti, Jean-Philippe; Epiney, Manuela; Sellenet, Catherine

    2017-02-01

    The aim of the authors in this study was to evaluate the relationships between perceived perinatal stress and social support to psychological health outcomes in mothers. A longitudinal, quantitative study was conducted in Geneva, Switzerland on 235 primiparous mothers from September 2010 to January 2012. Data were collected between gestational weeks 37 and 41 (T1), 2 days post-delivery (T2), and at 6 weeks postpartum (T3). Perinatal stress was associated with depressive symptoms (R 2  = 0.223), anxiety (R 2  = 0.242), and a low sense of parental self-efficacy (R 2  = 0.21). However, satisfaction with social support moderated the relationship of stress to the health of mothers. In particular, the authors noted that the more women were provided with support from their partners, the less depressive symptoms and elevated levels of anxiety they reported, even under stressful conditions, while the satisfaction of support from their mothers boosted their sense of competency. Furthermore, satisfaction with emotional support from professionals tempered the stress during the post-partum period (∆R 2  = 0.032; p stress was related to the psychological health of mothers, but social support may modulate these effects. A number of approaches could be implemented to manage this stress.

  20. Reading Self-Efficacy Predicts Word Reading But Not Comprehension in Both Girls and Boys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroll, Julia M; Fox, Amy C

    2016-01-01

    The relationship between cognitive skills and reading has been well-established. However, the role of motivational factors such as self-efficacy in reading progress is less clear. In particular, it is not clear how self-efficacy relates to word level reading versus comprehension, and whether this differs in boys and girls. This study examines the relationship between self-efficacy, word reading and reading comprehension across the range of reading abilities after controlling for reading-related cognitive factors. One hundred and seventy nine children (86 males and 93 females) between 8 and 11 years old completed a self-report measure of reading self-efficacy together with measures of reading comprehension and word reading, working memory, auditory short-term memory, phonological awareness, and vocabulary. Boys and girls showed similar levels of attainment and reading self-efficacy. Reading self-efficacy was associated with word reading, but not with reading comprehension in either boys or girls. It is argued that this may reflect important differences between reading self-efficacy and more general measures of reading motivation and engagement. Reading self-efficacy is an element of reading motivation that is closely associated with a child's perceived attainments in reading and is less susceptible to the gender differences seen in broader measures.

  1. Reading Self-Efficacy Predicts Word Reading But Not Comprehension in Both Girls and Boys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroll, Julia M.; Fox, Amy C.

    2017-01-01

    The relationship between cognitive skills and reading has been well-established. However, the role of motivational factors such as self-efficacy in reading progress is less clear. In particular, it is not clear how self-efficacy relates to word level reading versus comprehension, and whether this differs in boys and girls. This study examines the relationship between self-efficacy, word reading and reading comprehension across the range of reading abilities after controlling for reading-related cognitive factors. One hundred and seventy nine children (86 males and 93 females) between 8 and 11 years old completed a self-report measure of reading self-efficacy together with measures of reading comprehension and word reading, working memory, auditory short-term memory, phonological awareness, and vocabulary. Boys and girls showed similar levels of attainment and reading self-efficacy. Reading self-efficacy was associated with word reading, but not with reading comprehension in either boys or girls. It is argued that this may reflect important differences between reading self-efficacy and more general measures of reading motivation and engagement. Reading self-efficacy is an element of reading motivation that is closely associated with a child’s perceived attainments in reading and is less susceptible to the gender differences seen in broader measures. PMID:28144223

  2. The Relationship between Health Literacy, Perceived Self-efficacy and Self-care Performance of Female Senior High School Students in Health Promoting Schools of Miyaneh, 2016-2017

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahnaz Khodabandeh

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective: Self-care in adolescents is considered as an effective measure in line with the promotion of health in each community. In this regard, the role of health promoting schools is of great importance. Furthermore, health literacy, as one of the basic tools for promoting community health, has been given much attention by policymakers. The present study aimed to investigate the relationship between the health literacy, perceived self-efficacy and self-care performance of female senior high school students in the health promoting schools of Miyaneh in 2016-2017. Methods: In this descriptive-correlational study, 320 female senior high school students were selected randomly using the multi –stage cluster sampling method. Data were collected by using the questionnaires of Health Literacy Measure for Adolescents (HELMA, General Self-efficacy Scale, and the Adolescent Health Promotion (AHP scale. Data were analyzed by SPSS software (version 21 using the statistical tests of Pearson correlation coefficient and Multiple Regression (ENTER method. Results: The results showed that there is a positive and significant relationship between the health literacy and perceived self-efficacy and the self-care performance of female students in the health promoting schools, as well as between the components of health literacy and self-care components. No significant relationship was found between the component of health literacy calculation and the self-care components of nutrition, responsibility for health, spiritual growth, and physical activity. The results of regression analysis indicated that the dimensions of self-efficacy, use and correlation of health literacy are good predictors of self-care performance (R2 = 0.605. Moreover, the health literacy and the perceived self-efficacy can predict the self-care performance of students by 51 percent. Conclusion: The results of the present study indicated that a student with high levels of

  3. Impact of an undergraduate course on medical students’ self-perceived nutrition intake and self-efficacy to improve their health behaviours and counselling practices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Crowley J

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Doctors are increasingly involved in the management of chronic disease and counsel patients about their lifestyle behaviours, including nutrition, to improve their health outcomes. AIM: This study aimed to assess the impact of a medical undergraduate course containing nutrition content on medical students’ self-perceived nutrition intake and self-efficacy to improve their health behaviours and counselling practices. METHODS: A total of 239 medical students enrolled in a 12-week nutrition-related course at The University of Auckland were invited to complete an anonymous questionnaire before and after the course. The questionnaire was adapted from a previous evaluation of a preventive medicine and nutrition course at Harvard Medical School. RESULTS: Sixty-one medical students completed both pre- and post-course questionnaires (25.5%. At baseline, medical students described their eating habits to be more healthy than non-medical students (p=0.0261. Post-course, medical students reported a higher frequency of wholegrain food intake (p=0.0229. Medical students also reported being less comfortable making nutrition recommendations to family and friends post-course (p=0.008. Most medical students (63.9% perceived increased awareness of their own dietary choices, and some (15.3% reported an increased likelihood to counsel patients on lifestyle behaviour post-course. DISCUSSION: Students can increase awareness of their own nutrition behaviour after undertaking a course that includes nutrition in the initial phase of their medical degree. Further investigation of how medical students’ confidence to provide nutrition advice evolves throughout their training and in future practice is required.

  4. Outcomes and Processes in the Meyerhoff Scholars Program: STEM PhD Completion, Sense of Community, Perceived Program Benefit, Science Identity, and Research Self-Efficacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maton, Kenneth I; Beason, Tiffany S; Godsay, Surbhi; Sto Domingo, Mariano R; Bailey, TaShara C; Sun, Shuyan; Hrabowski, Freeman A

    2016-01-01

    Previous research has shown that the Meyerhoff Scholars Program at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County, is an effective intervention for high-achieving underrepresented minority (URM) students; African-American Meyerhoff students are significantly more likely to enter science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) PhD programs than comparison students. The first of two studies in this report extends the prior research by examining levels of PhD completion for Meyerhoff (N = 479) versus comparison sample (N = 249) students among the first 16 cohorts. Entering African-American Meyerhoff students were 4.8 times more likely to complete STEM PhDs than comparison sample students. To enhance understanding of potential mechanisms of influence, the second study used data from the 22nd (Fall 2010) to 25th (Fall 2013) cohorts (N = 109) to test the hypothesis that perceived program benefit at the end of freshman year would mediate the relationship between sense of community at the end of Summer Bridge and science identity and research self-efficacy at the end of sophomore year. Study 2 results indicated that perceived program benefit fully mediated the relationship between sense of community and both criterion measures. The findings underscore the potential of comprehensive STEM intervention programs to enhance PhD completion, and suggest mechanisms of influence. © 2016 K. I. Maton et al. CBE—Life Sciences Education © 2016 The American Society for Cell Biology. This article is distributed by The American Society for Cell Biology under license from the author(s). It is available to the public under an Attribution–Noncommercial–Share Alike 3.0 Unported Creative Commons License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0).

  5. How a Multidimensional View of Perceived Organizational Support Impacts Self-Efficacy and Task Understanding during Training for Boundary Spanning Tasks

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wallace, Ronald S

    2008-01-01

    ...: corporate headquarters, the home office, or the training environment. These dimensions of POS were tested to discover their effect on the self-efficacy and task understanding of individuals training for boundary-spanning tasks...

  6. Effect of Instruction in Emotional Intelligence Skills on Locus of Control and Academic Self-Efficacy among Junior Secondary School Students in Niger State, Nigeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umaru, Yunusa; Umma, Abdulwahid

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of instruction in emotional intelligence Skills on locus of control and academic self-efficacy among junior secondary school students in Niger state, Nigeria. This study employed a quasi-experimental, non-equivalent control group, pre-test - post-test design. The population of this study was 105,034 secondary…

  7. Investigation of Teachers' Self-Efficacy Beliefs, Locus of Control and Intercultural Sensitivities from the Perspective of Individual Differences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akca, Figen; Ulutas, Emrah; Yabanci, Cemile

    2018-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine the correlation between Teachers' Self-efficacy beliefs, locus of control and intercultural sensitivities and to analyze these variables based on various demographic variables. The data of the study were collected through teachers' locus of control scale developed by Sadowski, Taylor, Woodward, Peacher,…

  8. The Relationship between Health Literacy, Perceived Self-efficacy and Self-care Performance of Female Senior High School Students in Health Promoting Schools of Miyaneh, 2016-2017

    OpenAIRE

    Mahnaz Khodabandeh; Sadegh Maleki Avarasin; Leila Nikniaz

    2017-01-01

    Background and objective: Self-care in adolescents is considered as an effective measure in line with the promotion of health in each community. In this regard, the role of health promoting schools is of great importance. Furthermore, health literacy, as one of the basic tools for promoting community health, has been given much attention by policymakers. The present study aimed to investigate the relationship between the health literacy, perceived self-efficacy and self-care performance of fe...

  9. Job-Demands, Job Control, Social Support, Self-Efficacy, and Burnout of Staff of Residential Children's Homes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brouwers, André; Tomic, Welko

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the current study was to examine among educational staff members of residential children's homes to what extent task demands, job control, emotional and social support from colleagues and management as well as self-efficacy beliefs concerning coping with aggressive behaviour in youngsters are associated with emotional exhaustion,…

  10. AIDS Health Locus of Control, Self-Efficacy for Safer Sexual Practices, and Future Time Orientation as Predictors of Condom Use in African American College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, Myron J.; Dillon, Frank R.

    2005-01-01

    This study examined the relationship between self-reported frequency of condom use (by self or partner during the past 6 months and lifetime), locus of control, self-efficacy, and future time orientation among African American college students who were single and sexually active during the past year. Data were collected from 106 undergraduate…

  11. Self-Efficacy and Social Support Mediate the Relationship between Internal Health Locus of Control and Health Behaviors in College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marr, Joni; Wilcox, Sara

    2015-01-01

    Background: Internal health locus of control has been associated with positive health outcomes and behaviors. Understanding the mechanisms of this relationship are key to designing and implementing effective health behavior intervention programs. Purpose: The purpose was to examine whether self-efficacy and social support mediate the relationship…

  12. An Examination of the Influence of Self Efficacy, Locus of Control, and Perceptions of Parent Involvement on Academic Achievement of Urban High School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myree, Claudia

    2011-01-01

    Current research indicates that there is an on-going concern for the graduation rate of African American students in urban settings. This particular study sought to investigate the impact of students' self-efficacy, locus of control, and parental involvement on academic achievement via a targeted sample of urban African American high school…

  13. The Effect of Locus of Control, Self-Efficacy, and Gender-Role Identity on Academic Performance Outcomes of Female College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sierra, Jade Simone

    2013-01-01

    This quantitative study investigated the predictive worthiness of the predictor variable indices--locus of control, self-efficacy, and gender identity--to ascertain if elevated levels of the predictors influence academic performance outcomes (individually as well as interactionally). The study theorized that students with increased levels of locus…

  14. SELF-EFFICACY BELIEFS, ACHIEVEMENT MOTIVATION AND GENDER AS RELATED TO EDUCATIONAL SOFTWARE DEVELOPMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alev ATES

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to investigate preservice computer teachers’ self-efficacy beliefs and achievement motivation levels for educational software development before and after the “Educational Software Design, Development and Evaluation (ESDDE” course. A pretest and post test design without a control group was employed. In 2008, 46 senior students (25 male and 21 female who were enrolled at Computer Education and Instructional Technology department participated in this study.The data were collected by the scale of self-efficacy beliefs towards Educational Software Development (ESD, achievement motivation scale besides student demographics form. Positively, the results revealed that the students’ self efficacy beliefs towards educational software development significantly improved after ESDDE course. Before the course, the students’ self-efficacy beliefs were significantly different according to perceived level of programming competency and gender in favor of male, however after the course there was no significant difference in self-efficacy beliefs regarding gender and perceived level of programming competency. Hence, achievement motivation levels after the course were significantly higher than before while gender and perceived level of programming competency had no significant effect on achievement motivation for ESD. The study is considered to contribute studies investigating gender and computer related self efficacy beliefs in IT education.

  15. Comparison of pharmacological and nonpharmacological treatment strategies in promotion of infertility self-efficacy scale in infertile women: A randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hajar Pasha

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: The infertility is associated with psychological consequence including depression, and lack of self-efficacy. Objective: The aim of this study was to compare the pharmacological and no pharmacological strategies in promotion of self-efficacy of infertile women. Materials and Methods: A randomized controlled clinical trial was conducted on 89 infertile women who were recruited from Fatemeh Zahra Infertility and Reproductive Health Research Center and were randomized into three groups; cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT, antidepressant therapy with flouxetine 20 mg daily for 3 month, and a control group. All participants completed Infertility Self-efficacy Inventory (ISE and the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI at the beginning and end of the study. Results: The means ISE scores among the CBT, fluoxetine, and control groups at the beginning and end of the study were 6.1±1.6 vs. 7.2±0.9, 6.4±1.4 vs. 6.9±1.3 and 6.1±1.1 vs. 5.9±1.4 respectively. Both CBT and fluoxetine increased the mean of ISE scores more than control group after intervention (p<0.0001, p=0.033; respectively, but increase in the CBT group was significantly greater than flouxetine group. Finally, there was evidence of high infertility self-efficacy for women exposed to the intervention compared with those in the control group. Also, there was an improvement in depression. Both fluoxetine and CBT decreased significantly the mean of BDI scores more than the control group; decrease in the CBT group was significantly more than that in the fluoxetine group. Conclusion: CBT can serve as an effective psychosocial intervention for promoting self-efficacy of infertile women

  16. 女子学生における一般性 self-efficacy と Locus of control の関係

    OpenAIRE

    藤田, 正; 笹川, 宏樹

    1991-01-01

    短期大学女子学生281名を対象に、一般性セルフ・エフィカシー尺度、主張行動のセルフ・エフィカシー尺度、自己統制尺度、およびタイプA行動測定尺度を実施し、self-efficacy と Locus of control の関係について検討し、タイプA者の行動の先行要因について調べた。その結果、一般性 self-efficacy と Locus of control には低い相関があったが、主張行動の self-efficacy と Locusof control では相関の有意性はなかった。また、タイプA者は、self-efficacy を高く認知していた。...

  17. Intrinsic religiousness and well-being among cancer patients: the mediating role of control-related religious coping and self-efficacy for coping with cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez, John E; Rex Smith, Amy

    2015-04-01

    We examined the relationship between intrinsic religiousness and well-being, with control-related religious coping and self-efficacy for coping with cancer as potential mediators of this relationship among cancer patients. In a cross-sectional design, 179 ambulatory cancer patients completed measures of intrinsic religiousness, religious coping, self-efficacy for coping with cancer, well-being, and demographic variables. Type of cancer, stage of cancer, and time since diagnosis were collected from electronic medical charts. In a path model, the positive association between intrinsic religiousness and three types of well-being--physical, functional, and social-was fully mediated by active religious surrender and self-efficacy for coping with cancer. In addition, the negative association between passive religious deferral and all four types of well-being--physical, functional, social, and emotional--was fully mediated by self-efficacy for coping with cancer. Finally, there was a negative direct association between pleading for God's direct intercession and emotional well-being. These findings suggest pathways by which intrinsic religiousness and control-related religious coping are linked to various dimensions of well-being among cancer patients.

  18. Seated T'ai Chi in Older Taiwanese People Using Wheelchairs: A Randomized Controlled Trial Investigating Mood States and Self-Efficacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Chen-Yuan; Moyle, Wendy; Cooke, Marie; Jones, Cindy

    2016-12-01

    There is growing interest in t'ai chi, but little research has addressed whether t'ai chi is effective in older people using wheelchairs for mobilization. The aim of this study was to compare the effects of seated t'ai chi exercise and usual standard activities on mood states and self-efficacy in older people living in a long-term care facility and using wheelchairs for mobilization. Randomized controlled trial (trial registration no. ACTRN12613000029796). One long-term-care facility in Taiwan. Sixty participants were randomly assigned by a computer-generated random sequence to a t'ai chi group (n = 30) or a usual exercise and entertainment activities group (n = 30). Seated t'ai chi exercise for 40 minutes three times a week for 26 weeks was provided. Mood states (Profile of Mood States Short Form [POMS-SF]) and self-efficacy (Self-Efficacy for Exercise [SEE]). At week 26, participants in the t'ai chi group reported significantly lower mood states on the fatigue-inertia dimension of the POMS-SF (mean score ± standard deviation, 3.56 ± 3.71) than did the control group (mean score, 7.16 ± 6.36) (F [1, 58] = 7.15; p self-efficacy for older people using wheelchairs.

  19. Testing the effectiveness of a self-efficacy based exercise intervention for inactive people with type 2 diabetes mellitus: design of a controlled clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Heijden, Marion M P; Pouwer, François; Romeijnders, Arnold C; Pop, Victor J M

    2012-07-04

    Sufficient exercise is important for people with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus (T2DM), as it can prevent future health problems. Despite, it is estimated that only 30-40% of people with T2DM are sufficiently active. One of the psychosocial constructs that is believed to influence physical activity behaviour, is exercise self-efficacy. The goal of this study is to evaluate a patient-tailored exercise intervention for people with T2DM that takes exercise self-efficacy into account. This study is conducted as a non-randomized controlled clinical trial. Patients are eligible when they are diagnosed with T2DM, exercise less than advised in the ADA guideline of 150 min/week of moderate-intensity aerobic physical activity, have an BMI >25 and are between 18 and 80 years old. Recruitment takes place at a Primary care organization of general practitioners and practice nurses in the south of the Netherlands.Participants are allocated to three groups: An advice intervention -for participants with a high exercise self-efficacy score- in which participants receive a patient-tailored exercise intervention, an intensive intervention -for participants with a low exercise self-efficacy score- in which participants receive a patient-tailored exercise intervention accomplished by a group based intervention, and a control group in which participants receive regular Dutch diabetes care. The primary outcome measure of this study is physical activity. Secondary outcome measures are health status, (symptoms of) depression, exercise self-efficacy, Body Mass Index (BMI), blood pressure and glycemic control. We aimed to design an intervention that can be implemented in Primary care, but also to design an easy accessible program. This study is innovative as it is -to our best knowledge- the first study that takes level of exercise self-efficacy of people with T2DM into account by means of giving extra support to those with the lowest exercise self-efficacy. If the program succeeds in increasing

  20. Testing the effectiveness of a self-efficacy based exercise intervention for inactive people with type 2 diabetes mellitus: design of a controlled clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van der Heijden Marion MP

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sufficient exercise is important for people with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus (T2DM, as it can prevent future health problems. Despite, it is estimated that only 30-40% of people with T2DM are sufficiently active. One of the psychosocial constructs that is believed to influence physical activity behaviour, is exercise self-efficacy. The goal of this study is to evaluate a patient-tailored exercise intervention for people with T2DM that takes exercise self-efficacy into account. Methods/Design This study is conducted as a non-randomized controlled clinical trial. Patients are eligible when they are diagnosed with T2DM, exercise less than advised in the ADA guideline of 150 min/week of moderate-intensity aerobic physical activity, have an BMI >25 and are between 18 and 80 years old. Recruitment takes place at a Primary care organization of general practitioners and practice nurses in the south of the Netherlands. Participants are allocated to three groups: An advice intervention -for participants with a high exercise self-efficacy score- in which participants receive a patient-tailored exercise intervention, an intensive intervention -for participants with a low exercise self-efficacy score- in which participants receive a patient-tailored exercise intervention accomplished by a group based intervention, and a control group in which participants receive regular Dutch diabetes care. The primary outcome measure of this study is physical activity. Secondary outcome measures are health status, (symptoms of depression, exercise self-efficacy, Body Mass Index (BMI, blood pressure and glycemic control. Discussion We aimed to design an intervention that can be implemented in Primary care, but also to design an easy accessible program. This study is innovative as it is -to our best knowledge- the first study that takes level of exercise self-efficacy of people with T2DM into account by means of giving extra support to those with the

  1. Effect of verbal persuasion on self-efficacy for pain-related diagnostic sensory testing in individuals with chronic neck pain and healthy controls – a randomized, controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Söderlund A

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Anne Söderlund,1 Michele Sterling,2 1Physiotherapy, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Mälardalen University, Västerås, Sweden; 2Centre for National Research on Disability and Rehabilitation Medicine (CONROD, Menzies Health Institute Queensland, Griffith University, Parklands, Australia Abstract: The aim of this study was to investigate the differences in cold pain threshold (CTh, pressure pain threshold (PPT, cold pain tolerance (CPTo tests, and the level of self-efficacy when self-efficacy for diagnostic sensory testing was manipulated by verbal persuasion before a testing situation in persons with neck pain and in healthy controls. A randomized experimental design was used. Twenty-one healthy volunteers and 22 individuals with either traumatic or nontraumatic chronic neck pain were recruited to participate in the study. The intervention consisted of two experimental verbal persuasion conditions: Increase self-efficacy and Decrease self-efficacy. The PPT was measured using a pressure algometer, the CTh was measured using a thermo test system, and CPTo was measured by submerging the participant's hand in ice water up to the elbow joint. On three occasions, the participants reported their self-efficacy level in performing the sensory tests. In the chronic neck pain group, there were no differences in pain threshold or tolerance. There was a difference in the self-efficacy level after verbal persuasion between the experimental conditions. In the healthy control group, the CThs increased following the condition that aimed to increase self-efficacy. No other differences were observed in the healthy controls. A short verbal persuasion in the form of manipulative instructions seems to have a marginal effect on the individual's self-efficacy levels in the chronic neck pain group and a slight influence on the results of sensory testing in healthy controls. Keywords: pressure pain threshold, cold pain threshold, cold pain tolerance, self-efficacy

  2. Does self-efficacy mediate functional change in older adults participating in an exercise program after hip fracture? A randomized control trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latham, Nancy K.; Ni, Pengsheng; Jette, Alan M.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives This study examined whether self-efficacy mediated the effect of the HIP Rehab exercise program on activity limitations in older adults after hip fracture, and whether the mediation effect was different between different gender and age groups. Design Randomized controlled trial (RCT) Setting Community Participants Two hundred and thirty two participants aged 79±9.4 years with hip fracture were randomly assigned to intervention (n=120) or attention control (n=112) groups. Interventions The 6-month intervention, the HIP Rehab, is a functionally-oriented, home-based exercise program. Data was collected at baseline, post-intervention (6 months), and follow-up (9 months). Main outcome measure Activity Measure for Post-Acute Care (AM-PAC) Results The mediation effect of the HIP Rehab exercise program on Basic Mobility function through self-efficacy for exercise was significant at 9 months (βindirect=0.21). Similarly, the mediation effect of the intervention on Daily Activity function through self-efficacy for exercise was significant at 9 months (βindirect=0.49). In subgroup analyses, the mediation effect was significant at 9 months in the younger group (≤79 years old) in comparison to the older group, and was significant in females in comparison to males. Conclusion Self-efficacy may play a partial mediating role for the effect on some longer-term functional outcomes in the HIP Rehab intervention. The results suggest that program components that target self-efficacy should be incorporated in the future hip fracture rehabilitation interventions. Age and gender of the targeted participants may also need to be considered when developing interventions. PMID:25701101

  3. Does self-efficacy mediate functional change in older adults participating in an exercise program after hip fracture? A randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Feng-Hang; Latham, Nancy K; Ni, Pengsheng; Jette, Alan M

    2015-06-01

    To examine whether self-efficacy mediated the effect of the Home-based Post-Hip Fracture Rehabilitation program on activity limitations in older adults after hip fracture and whether the mediating effect was different between sex and age groups. Randomized controlled trial. Community. Participants with hip fracture (N=232; mean age ± SD, 79±9.4y) were randomly assigned to intervention (n=120, 51.7%) and attention control (n=112, 48.3%) groups. The 6-month intervention, the Home-based Post-Hip Fracture Rehabilitation, is a functionally oriented, home-based exercise program. Data were collected at baseline, postintervention (6mo), and follow-up (9mo). Activity Measure for Post-Acute Care. The mediating effect of the Home-based Post-Hip Fracture Rehabilitation program on Basic Mobility function through self-efficacy for exercise was significant at 9 months (βindirect=.21). Similarly, the mediating effect of the intervention on Daily Activity function through self-efficacy for exercise was significant at 9 months (βindirect=.49). In subgroup analyses, the mediating effect was significant at 9 months in the younger group (age, ≤79y) in comparison to the older group and was significant in women in comparison to men. Self-efficacy may play a partial mediating role in the effect on some longer-term functional outcomes in the Home-based Post-Hip Fracture Rehabilitation intervention. The results suggest that program components that target self-efficacy should be incorporated in future hip fracture rehabilitation interventions. Age and sex of the targeted participants may also need to be considered when developing interventions. Copyright © 2015 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Effect of a Website That Presents Patients' Experiences on Self-Efficacy and Patient Competence of Colorectal Cancer Patients: Web-Based Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giesler, Jürgen M; Keller, Bettina; Repke, Tim; Leonhart, Rainer; Weis, Joachim; Muckelbauer, Rebecca; Rieckmann, Nina; Müller-Nordhorn, Jacqueline; Lucius-Hoene, Gabriele; Holmberg, Christine

    2017-10-13

    Patients often seek other patients' experiences with the disease. The Internet provides a wide range of opportunities to share and learn about other people's health and illness experiences via blogs or patient-initiated online discussion groups. There also exists a range of medical information devices that include experiential patient information. However, there are serious concerns about the use of such experiential information because narratives of others may be powerful and pervasive tools that may hinder informed decision making. The international research network DIPEx (Database of Individual Patients' Experiences) aims to provide scientifically based online information on people's experiences with health and illness to fulfill patients' needs for experiential information, while ensuring that the presented information includes a wide variety of possible experiences. The aim is to evaluate the colorectal cancer module of the German DIPEx website krankheitserfahrungen.de with regard to self-efficacy for coping with cancer and patient competence. In 2015, a Web-based randomized controlled trial was conducted using a two-group between-subjects design and repeated measures. The study sample consisted of individuals who had been diagnosed with colorectal cancer within the past 3 years or who had metastasis or recurrent disease. Outcome measures included self-efficacy for coping with cancer and patient competence. Participants were randomly assigned to either an intervention group that had immediate access to the colorectal cancer module for 2 weeks or to a waiting list control group. Outcome criteria were measured at baseline before randomization and at 2 weeks and 6 weeks. The study randomized 212 persons. On average, participants were 54 (SD 11.1) years old, 58.8% (124/211) were female, and 73.6% (156/212) had read or heard stories of other patients online before entering the study, thus excluding any influence of the colorectal cancer module on

  5. Self-Efficacy Expectations in Teacher Trainees and the Perceived Role of Schools and Their Physical Education Department in the Educational Treatment of Overweight Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez-Lopez, Emilio; Zagalaz Sanchez, Maria; Ramos Alvarez, Manuel; de la Torre Cruz, Manuel

    2010-01-01

    This study is about the relation between self-efficacy expectations and the attitude towards child and youth obesity, as well as the role of the school in this matter. A questionnaire was given to a sample of 436 trainee physical education teachers from eight universities in Andalusia (Spain). The questionnaire was a version of "Teaching…

  6. Effects of Peer Mentoring on Self-Efficacy and Hospital Readmission After Inpatient Rehabilitation of Individuals With Spinal Cord Injury: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gassaway, Julie; Jones, Michael L; Sweatman, W Mark; Hong, Minna; Anziano, Peter; DeVault, Karen

    2017-08-01

    To investigate the effect of intensive peer mentoring on patient-reported outcomes of self-efficacy and unplanned hospital readmissions for persons with spinal cord injury/disease (SCI/D) within the first 6 months after discharge from inpatient rehabilitation. Randomized controlled trial. Nonprofit inpatient rehabilitation hospital specializing in care of persons with SCI/D and brain injury. Patients (N=158) admitted to the SCI/D rehabilitation program whose discharge location was a community setting. Participants (51% with paraplegia and 49% with tetraplegia) were 73% white and 77% men, with a mean age of 38 years. Participants in the experimental group received initial consult/introduction with a peer support program liaison and were assigned a peer mentor, who met with the participant weekly throughout the inpatient stay and made weekly contact by phone, e-mail, or in person for 90 days postdischarge. Participants also were encouraged to participate in regularly scheduled peer support activities. Nonexperimental group participants were introduced to peer support and provided services only on request. General Self-efficacy Scale (adapted to SCI/D), project-developed community integration self-efficacy scale, and patient-reported unplanned rehospitalizations. Growth rate for self-efficacy in the first 6 months postdischarge was significantly higher for experimental group participants than nonexperimental group participants. Experimental group participants also had significantly fewer unplanned hospital days. This study provides evidence that individuals receiving intensive peer mentoring during and after rehabilitation for SCI/D demonstrate greater gains in self-efficacy over time and have fewer days of unplanned rehospitalization in the first 180 days postdischarge. More research is needed to examine the long-term effects of this intervention on health care utilization and the relation between improved health and patient-reported quality of life outcomes

  7. The impact of telenursing consultation by using the social networks to promote the self- efficacy and weight control in patients treating with hemodialysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marzieh Sadat Hosseini

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Hemodialysis as the most common renal replacement therapy alone cannot ensure the health and survival of the patient's life and along with it, training and consulting about self-care and adherence is one of the fundamental pillars of treatment. This study was conducted to determine the impact of telenursing consultation by using networks to promote the self-efficacy and weight control in patients treating with hemodialysis. This study was a clinical trial for two groups and had a pre-test and two post-test. 52 patients under treatment by hemodialysis were divided randomly into two groups of experimental and control groups. The experimental group received consultations by using the telegram software and the control group received usual nursing care for a month. The data were collected by the weight control of the patients before and after the sessions of hemodialysis and general self-efficacy questionnaire and were analyzed by SPSS software version 20, and using descriptive statistics and analytical tests. The two groups did not have a significant statistically differences in demographic variables. The average rates of the self-efficacy after intervention in the experimental group was significantly more than the control group and also the average overweight after the intervention was significantly lower. telenursing consultation by using the social networks is effective on the improvement of self-efficacy and weight control in patients treating with hemodialysis and due to the shortage of nurses and their high volume of work it can be used as a new way for training.

  8. Balance, Falls-Related Self-Efficacy, and Psychological Factors amongst Older Women with Chronic Low Back Pain: A Preliminary Case-Control Study

    OpenAIRE

    Champagne, Annick; Prince, François; Bouffard, Vicky; Lafond, Danik

    2012-01-01

    Objective. To investigate balance functions in older women and evaluate the association of the fear-avoidance beliefs model (FABM) factors with balance and mobility performance. Participants. Fifteen older women with CLBP was compared with age-matched pain-free controls (n = 15). Main Outcome Measures. Pain intensity, falls-related self-efficacy and intrinsic constructs in the FABM were evaluated. Postural steadiness (centre of pressure (COP)) and mobility functions were assessed. Linear rela...

  9. Perceived gender inequality, sexual communication self-efficacy, and sexual behaviour among female undergraduate students in the Mekong Delta of Vietnam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bui, Thanh Cong; Markham, Christine M.; Ross, Michael W.; Williams, Mark L.; Beasley, R. Palmer; Tran, Ly T. H.; Nguyen, Huong T. H.; Le, Thach Ngoc

    2012-01-01

    Background Worldwide, the literature on sexual behaviour has documented associations between gender-based relationship inequality and sexual communication ability and the actual use of condoms or other contraceptives among young women. This study aimed to examine these associations among undergraduate female students in the Mekong Delta of Vietnam. Methods A cross-sectional survey of 1181 female third-year students from two universities in the Mekong Delta was conducted. Latent variable modelling and logistic regression were employed to examine the hypothesised associations. Results Among the 72.4% of students who had ever had boyfriends, 44.8% indicated that their boyfriends had asked for sex, 13% had had penile–vaginal sex and 10.3% had had oral sex. For those who had had penile–vaginal sex, 33% did not use any contraceptive method, including condoms, during their first sexual intercourse. The greater a student’s perception that women were subordinate to men, the lower her self-efficacy for sexual communication and the lower her actual frequency of discussing safer sex matters and asking her partner to use a condom. Sexual communication self-efficacy was associated with actual contraceptive use (P = 0.039) but only marginally with condom use (P = 0.092) at first sexual intercourse. Conclusion Sexual health promotion strategies should address the influence of gender relations on young women’s sexual communication self-efficacy and the subsequent impact on actual contraceptive and condom use. PMID:22877589

  10. Does Digital Game Interactivity Always Promote Self-Efficacy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yu-Hao

    2015-11-01

    Interactive digital games can promote self-efficacy by engaging players in enactive and observational learning. However, interactivity does not always lead to greater self-efficacy. Important constructs in social cognitive theory, such as performance outcome and perceived similarity, are often not accounted for in studies that have tested the effect of digital game interactivity on self-efficacy. This study assessed the effects of interactive digital games compared with passive digital games based on video comparison, a common experimental design used to test the effect of digital game interactivity on self-efficacy. In addition, this study also evaluated player performance and measured perceived similarity to the observed player. Findings suggested that in general, digital game interactivity predicted higher self-efficacy compared with noninteractive passive games. However, in the noninteractive conditions, the effects of performance on self-efficacy were moderated by perceived similarity between the observer and the observed player. When the observed player was perceived to be similar to the observer, the effects of performance on self-efficacy were comparable to the interactive game, but when the observed player was perceived as dissimilar to the observer, observing the dissimilar player failed to increase observer self-efficacy. Implications for interactivity manipulations and game developers are discussed.

  11. A survey study comparing young adults with MS and healthy controls on self-esteem, self-efficacy, mood and quality of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messmer Uccelli, Michele; Traversa, Silvia; Ponzio, Michela

    2016-09-15

    Studies have shown that people with multiple sclerosis (MS) report low levels of self-efficacy and self-esteem, high levels of anxiety and depression and reduced quality of life. The study aims to assess self-esteem, self-efficacy, mood and quality of life in young adults with MS and to compare them to a healthy control group. The age range for inclusion in the study was between 18 and 35years of age for both groups. Subjects with MS were recruited through the Italian MS Society. Healthy controls were recruited through social media and from a university undergraduate program. Subjects completed an anonymous online questionnaire combining various scales. Group differences on demographic data were assessed using parametric and non-parametric tests. Analyses of covariance (ANCOVA) were performed to evaluate differences between the two groups on scales of self-perception, mood and quality of life, adjusting for potentially confounding factors. Eighty-nine subjects with MS and 109 HC were included in the analysis. ANCOVA failed to demonstrate statistically significant differences between groups on self-esteem (F=0.11, p=0.743), self-efficacy (F=2.22, p=0.138), mood (anxiety F=0.03, p=0.855; depression F=0.06, p=0.812) and quality of life (F=0.08, p=0.772). This study demonstrated that young adults with MS and healthy controls have similar levels of self-esteem and self-efficacy and that they do not differ significantly on measures of mood and quality of life, as previously reported. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  12. Principals' Self-Efficacy: Relations with Job Autonomy, Job Satisfaction, and Contextual Constraints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Federici, Roger A.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to explore relations between principals' self-efficacy, perceived job autonomy, job satisfaction, and perceived contextual constraints to autonomy. Principal self-efficacy was measured by a multidimensional scale called the Norwegian Principal Self-Efficacy Scale. Job autonomy, job satisfaction, and contextual…

  13. A course for nurses to handle difficult communication situations. A randomized controlled trial of impact on self-efficacy and performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doyle, Daniel; Copeland, H Liesel; Bush, Donna; Stein, Linda; Thompson, Scott

    2011-01-01

    to evaluate the impact of a communication skills course for nurses on how to handle difficult communication situations in their daily work. a 7-h course was developed using a construct of "Awareness, Feelings, Listen, Solve" (AFLS). A pedagogy of experiential, learner-centered learning was adopted. The course evaluation used a randomized controlled design with pre- and post-measures of self-efficacy and performance. forty-one nurses volunteered and thirty-three nurses completed all assigned parts of the study. On self-assessment, there was significant improvement for self-efficacy (F=24.43, pperformance, there was no significant improvement between intervention and control groups (F=3.46, p=0.073). a short course for nurses on handling difficult communication situations achieved significant improvements in self-efficacy but not in performance. teaching communication skills in community-based settings is important for the safety and effectiveness of patient care. Sponsoring organizations should weigh trade-offs between feasibility and achievement of measurable improvements in performance. One possible approach is to focus on specific communication skills rather than a full suite of skills. 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. The effects of scenario-based simulation course training on nurses' communication competence and self-efficacy: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Li-Ling; Chang, Wen-Hui; Hsieh, Suh-Ing

    2015-01-01

    Studies have shown that an underappreciation of the importance of person-centered communication and inappropriate communication training could result in unsatisfactory communication performance from nurses. There are a large number of studies about communication training for nurses, but not so many about communication training in early stages of nursing career. The purpose of this study is to compare the effect of a traditional course versus scenario-based simulation training on nurses' communication competency, communication self-efficacy, and communication performance in discharge planning Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE). A randomized controlled trial was used with a pretest and two posttests. The experimental group underwent the scenario-based simulation course, whereas the control group received the traditional course. A convenience sample of 116 nurses with qualifications ranging from N0 level (novice nurses) to N2 level (competent nurses) in Taiwan's clinical nursing ladder system was recruited from a medical center in northern Taiwan. Analysis of covariance was used to determine between-subjects effects on communication competency and self-efficacy, whereas independent t test and Mann-Whitney U test were used to examine between-subjects effects on learner satisfaction and discharge planning communication performance. Paired t test was used to determine communication self-efficacy. In this study, the nurses and independent raters found scenario-based simulation training more effective than traditional communication course. However, standardized patients reported no significant difference in communication performance between the two groups of nurses. Despite that traditional classroom lectures and simulation-based communication training could both produce enhanced communication competency and self-efficacy among nurses, this study has established that the latter may be better than the former in terms of learner satisfaction and communication

  15. CONCEPT ANALYSIS OF PERCEIVED CONTROL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mardiyono Mardiyono

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Background. Perceived control is a personality characteristic that contributes psychological adjustment. It was derived from various theories, so that definitions of perceived control were ambiguous meaning. Disclosing concept of perceived control is required.Objective. The analysis aims to identify definition and use of perceived control, examine the basic attributes of perceived control, and the measurements of perceived control.Method. Databases searched for electronic journals and books that were published from 1994 to 2010 were analyzed.Result. Perceived control is personal belief that refers to controllability on behalf of one’s self and ability to control threats or events. The use of perceived control includes maternal, pediatric, medical, surgical, psychiatric, community nursing, and pain management. Perceived control was composed of two dimensions: belief about controllability and belief about ability to control to threats.Conclusion. Instrument of Anxiety Control Questionnaire most closely corresponds to two dimensions: belief about controllability and ability to control. Defining attributes and dimensions of perceived control are useful for developing tool.Keywords: perceived control, controllability, ability to control, and agency

  16. Self-efficacy, personal goals, social comparison and scientific productivity.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vrugt, A.J.; Koenis, M.

    2002-01-01

    Investigated the extent to which perceived self-efficacy, personal goals, and upward comparison predict the scientific productivity of academic staff members. 123 academic staff employed at different Dutch universities answered written questions about their judgment of self-efficacy in the area of

  17. Creative Self-Efficacy Development and Creative Performance over Time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tierney, Pamela; Farmer, Steven M.

    2011-01-01

    Building from an established framework of self-efficacy development, this study provides a longitudinal examination of the development of creative self-efficacy in an ongoing work context. Results show that increases in employee creative role identity and perceived creative expectation from supervisors over a 6-month time period were associated…

  18. Comparative Influence of Self-Efficacy, Social Support and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    However, different psychosocial constructs are found in separate settings to ... 509 participants aged 35-80 years from randomly selected health facilities in ... Physical activity level, self-efficacy, social support and perceived barriers of the ... using the International Physical Activity Questionnaire, Exercise Self-Efficacy Scale, ...

  19. The effect of empowerment on the self-efficacy, quality of life and clinical and laboratory indicators of patients treated with hemodialysis: a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moattari Marzieh

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hemodialysis patients face numerous physical and psychological stresses that result in reduced health. The aim of this study is to determine the impact of an empowerment program on self-efficacy, quality of life, clinical indicators of blood pressure and interdialytic weight gain, and laboratory results in these patients. Methods This randomized, controlled trial was conducted at Boo Ali Sina Dialysis Center, Shiraz, Iran. A total of 48 hemodialysis patients participated in this study. After acquisition of informed consent, eligible patients were randomly divided into two groups, control and experimental. Pre-test data were obtained by using a demographic data form and two questionnaires for self-efficacy and quality of life. Blood pressure and interdialytic weight gain were measured. We extracted laboratory data from patients’ charts. A six-week empowerment intervention that included four individual and two group counselling sessions was performed for the experimental group. Six weeks after intervention, post-test data were obtained from both groups in the same manner as the pre-test. Data were analyzed by ANCOVA using SPSS v11.5. Results There were no statistically significant differences in demographic variables between the groups. Pre-test mean scores for self-efficacy, quality of life, blood pressure, interdialytic weight gain and laboratory results did not differ between the groups. There was a significant difference between the experimental and control groups in terms of pre-to post-intervention changes in overall self-efficacy scores, stress reduction, and decision making, in addition to overall quality of life and all dimensions included within quality of life based on this questionnaire. Additionally, the pre- to post-intervention changes in systolic/diastolic blood pressures, interdialytic weight gain, hemoglobin and hematocrit levels significantly differed between the groups. Conclusion Our study demonstrates

  20. Enhancing self-efficacy improves episodic future thinking and social-decision making in combat veterans with posttraumatic stress disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Adam D; Kouri, Nicole A; Rahman, Nadia; Joscelyne, Amy; Bryant, Richard A; Marmar, Charles R

    2016-08-30

    Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) is associated with maladaptive changes in self-identity, including impoverished perceived self-efficacy. This study examined if enhancing perceptions of self-efficacy in combat veterans with and without symptoms of PTSD promotes cognitive strategies associated with positive mental health outcomes. Prior to completing a future thinking and social problem-solving task, sixty-two OEF/OIF veterans with and without symptoms of PTSD were randomized to either a high self-efficacy (HSE) induction in which they were asked to recall three autobiographical memories demonstrating self-efficacy or a control condition in which they recalled any three autobiographical events. An interaction between HSE and PTSD revealed that individuals with symptoms of PTSD in the HSE condition generated future events with more self-efficacious statements than those with PTSD in the control condition, whereas those without PTSD did not differ in self-efficacy content across the conditions. In addition, individuals in the HSE condition exhibited better social problem solving than those in the control condition. Increasing perceptions of self-efficacy may promote future thinking and problem solving in ways that are relevant to overcoming trauma and adversity. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. The Effectiveness of Brief Information and Self-Efficacy-Based Interventions in Influencing Snack Choices in Homeless Individuals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chris Emmerson

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundHomeless adults frequently experience poor nutrition. Research suggests raising self-efficacy and nutritional knowledge can increase healthy eating but that the choice of specific behavioral change techniques (BCTs is also critical. This study investigated how BCTs, operationalized to increase nutrition knowledge and self-efficacy, might influence the choice of homeless adults when presented with a “healthy” and an “unhealthy” snack.MethodsA total of 125 homeless adults were randomly allocated to watch 1 of 4 brief films: “control,” “[nutrition] information only,” “self-efficacy” (aimed at increasing self-efficacy and general healthy eating knowledge, and “enhanced self-efficacy” (as “self-efficacy,” but the presenter identified themselves as a homeless adult. Post-film, participants were invited to choose between a healthy and an unhealthy snack. Data were analyzed using ANOVA and chi square.ResultsParticipants in the “enhanced self-efficacy” condition were significantly more likely to choose the healthy option compared to those in the control condition; for the “self-efficacy” condition, the difference was marginally significant. Perceived knowledge and self-efficacy were significantly associated and those with high self-efficacy were significantly more likely to choose a healthy snack regardless of condition.ConclusionHomeless adults are more likely to make healthy snack choices if their nutritional self-efficacy is increased through encouragement by a peer.

  2. Self-efficacy perception in high school students with mild intellectual disability in practical training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milanović-Dobrota Biljana

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The main goal of this paper is to determine how students with mild intellectual disability perceive self-efficacy in practical training, with regard to the intellectual level, gender, work field and professional level for which they are being trained. The sample consists of 120 students with mild intellectual disability, of both genders, undergoing vocational training in five work fields for the second and third level professions. Adapted Self-Efficacy to Regulate Training Scale (Bandura, 2006 was used to assess the influence of negative internal and external factors on the students' efficacy at performing tasks in practical training. It was determined that there is a statistically significant difference among the examinees of the same disability category, but different level of intellectual functioning. Girls with lower and higher levels of intellectual functioning were found to perceive self-efficacy in practical training with lower level of confidence than boys with the same levels of intellectual functioning. The examinees undergoing the third level vocational training are more confident in their abilities to coordinate knowledge and skills in training regardless of different distracting factors. There we no statistically significant differences determined with regard to the work field. Assessing self-efficacy in training can direct the development of self-efficacy, help individuals gain a sense of control over their career development, and for professionals involved in finding jobs for persons with intellectual disability provide a predictive success/failure role at work.

  3. Hispanic Acculturation and Gender Differences in Support and Self-Efficacy for Managing Diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansyur, Carol L; Rustveld, Luis O; Nash, Susan G; Jibaja-Weiss, Maria L

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether perceived support, social norms, and their association with self-efficacy varied by gender and language-based acculturation in Hispanic men and women with uncontrolled type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). A cross-sectional, secondary analysis of baseline survey data from a randomized control trial. Participants were 248 Hispanic patients from 4 community health centers who participated in a culturally targeted intervention for diabetes management. Quantitative statistical methods were used, including chi-square analyses, one-way ANOVA, and multiple regression. Gender and language both moderated the relationship between social factors and self-efficacy. Regardless of language, better perceived support was associated with improved self-efficacy in women but not men. Dietary norms were associated with self-efficacy in English-speaking men and women, while physical activity norms were associated with self-efficacy for Spanish-speaking women only. This study builds on previous research by exploring the extent to which the social context of diabetes self-management may vary in its effects depending on gender and acculturation. The findings revealed potentially important differences based on both gender and language, suggesting that interventions must be designed with these differences in mind. Diabetes-specific support from family members, especially spouses, may be especially important for Hispanic women. For both men and women, it may be effective to find creative ways of involving the family in creating healthier social norms and expectations. © 2016 The Author(s).

  4. Effect of job maintenance training program for employees with chronic disease - a randomized controlled trial on self-efficacy, job satisfaction, and fatigue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varekamp, Inge; Verbeek, Jos H; de Boer, Angela; van Dijk, Frank J H

    2011-07-01

    Employees with a chronic physical condition may be hampered in job performance due to physical or cognitive limitations, pain, fatigue, psychosocial barriers, or because medical treatment interferes with work. This study investigates the effect of a group-training program aimed at job maintenance. Essential elements of the program are exploration of work-related problems, communication at the workplace, and the development and implementation of solutions. Participants with chronic physical diseases were randomly assigned to the intervention (N=64) or the control group (N=58). Participants were eligible for the study if they had a chronic physical disease, paid employment, experienced work-related problems, and were not on long-term 100% sick leave. Primary outcome measures were self-efficacy in solving work- and disease-related problems (14-70), job dissatisfaction (0-100), fatigue (20-140) and job maintenance measured at 4-, 8-, 12- and 24-month follow-up. We used GLM repeated measures for the analysis. After 24 months, loss to follow-up was 5.7% (7/122). Self-efficacy increased and fatigue decreased significantly more in the experimental than the control group [10 versus 4 points (P=0.000) and 19 versus 8 points (P=0.032), respectively]. Job satisfaction increased more in the experimental group but not significantly [6 versus 0 points (P=0.698)]. Job maintenance was 87% in the experimental and 91% in the control group, which was not a significant difference. Many participants in the control group also undertook actions to solve work-related problems. Empowerment training increases self-efficacy and helps to reduce fatigue complaints, which in the long term could lead to more job maintenance. Better understanding of ways to deal with work-related problems is needed to develop more efficient support for employees with a chronic disease.

  5. Psychometric properties of Multidimensional Health Locus of Control - A and General Self-Efficacy Scale in civil servants: ELSA-Brasil Musculoskeletal Study (ELSA-Brasil MSK)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machado, Luciana A. C.; Telles, Rosa W.; Costa-Silva, Luciana; Barreto, Sandhi M.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background Health-related control and self-efficacy beliefs can be assessed in the general population using Multidimensional Health Locus of Control-A subscales (MHLC-A) and the General Self-Efficacy Scale (GSES), respectively. Objective To test construct validity, internal consistency, reliability (test-retest) and ceiling and floor effects of Portuguese-Brazil versions of MHLC-A and GSES. Method Civil servants (N=2901) enrolled in a large Brazilian cohort were included. A new version of the GSES was produced (GSES-Brazil). Procedures for cross-cultural adaptation and testing of psychometric properties followed well-accepted international guidelines. Results Confirmatory factor analyses yielded the following indices: MHLC-A (tridimensional model): χ2[df]=223.45[132], p-value <0.01; CFI=0.87; TLI=0.85; RMSEA=0.07 (0.07-0.08); WRMR=3.00. GSES-Brazil (unidimensional model): χ2[df]=788.60[35], p-value <0.01; CFI=0.95; TLI=0.94; RMSEA=0.09 (0.08-0.09); WRMR=2.50. Cronbach’s alpha coefficients and Intraclass Correlation Coefficients (ICC2,1) ranged from 0.57 (0.54-0.59) and 0.57 (0.47-0.65) for MHLC-A internality to 0.80 (0.79-0.81) and 0.71 (0.66-0.77) for GSES-Brazil, respectively. There was no evidence of ceiling and floor effects. Convergent validity analyses provided further support for construct validity of both scales. Conclusion These findings support the use of the newly developed version of GSES-Brazil for the assessment of general self-efficacy of adult Brazilians. Internal consistency was lower than ideal for MHLC-A, indicating these subscales may need further refinements to provide a more psychometrically sound measure of control beliefs. PMID:27878226

  6. Teachers' Self-efficacy Beliefs: The Relationship between Gender ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Faculty of Education and Communication Sciences, College of Technology .... low self-esteem and harbour pessimistic thoughts concerning their ability to ... Thus, teachers' perceived self-efficacy is not an assessment of their skill set, but ...

  7. Psychometric properties of the Danish versions of headache-specific locus of control scale and headache management self-efficacy scale

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Jacob Sander; Bendtsen, Lars; Jensen, Rigmor

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of the study is to test the cross-cultural adaptation and psychometric properties of a Danish version of the Headache-Specific Locus of Control Scale (HSLC) and the Headache Management Self-Efficacy Scale (HMSE) in a tertiary headache centre. HSLC and HMSE are headache-specific measures...... with other self-report measures concerning general distress, anxiety, depression, and health-related quality of life. Internal stability of the HSLC subscales and the HMSE were analysed using Chronbach's alpha coefficient. The psychometric properties of the Danish version of the HSLC and the HMSE were...

  8. Outcome expectancy and self-efficacy: theoretical implications of an unresolved contradiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, David M

    2010-11-01

    According to self-efficacy theory, self-efficacy--defined as perceived capability to perform a behavior--causally influences expected outcomes of behavior, but not vice versa. However, research has shown that expected outcomes causally influence self-efficacy judgments, and some authors have argued that this relationship invalidates self-efficacy theory. Bandura has rebutted those arguments saying that self-efficacy judgments are not invalidated when influenced by expected outcomes. This article focuses on a contradiction in Bandura's rebuttal. Specifically, Bandura has argued (a) expected outcomes cannot causally influence self-efficacy, but (b) self-efficacy judgments remain valid when causally influenced by expected outcomes. While the debate regarding outcome expectancies and self-efficacy has subsided in recent years, the inattention to this contradiction has led to a disproportionate focus on self-efficacy as a causal determinant of behavior at the expense of expected outcomes.

  9. The mediational role of panic self-efficacy in cognitive behavioral therapy for panic disorder: A systematic review and meta-analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fentz, Hanne Nørr; Arendt, Mikkel; OToole, Mia Skytte

    2014-01-01

    Cognitive models of panic disorder (PD) with and without agoraphobia have stressed the role of catastrophic beliefs of bodily symptoms as a central mediating variable of the efficacy of cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT). Perceived ability to cope with or control panic attacks, panic self......-efficacy, has also been proposed to play a key role in therapeutic change; however, this cognitive factor has received much less attention in research. The aim of the present review is to evaluate panic self-efficacy as a mediator of outcome in CBT for PD using descriptive and meta-analytic procedures. We...... an association between change in panic self-efficacy and change in outcome during therapy (criterion 2); three tested, and one established formal statistical mediation of panic self-efficacy (criterion 3); while four tested and three found change in panic self-efficacy occurring before the reduction of panic...

  10. Job Search Self-Efficacy of East Asian International Graduate Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yi-Jiun; Flores, Lisa Y.

    2013-01-01

    Using a sample of 86 East Asian international graduate students, this study examined Bandura's perceived self-efficacy model (1986) in the domain of job search self-efficacy and tested the mediating effects of job search self-efficacy in the relationship between efficacy source variables and job search behaviors. Results show that both performance…

  11. Parental control, nurturance, self-efficacy, and screen viewing among 5- to 6-year-old children: a cross-sectional mediation analysis to inform potential behavior change strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jago, Russell; Wood, Lesley; Zahra, Jesmond; Thompson, Janice L; Sebire, Simon J

    2015-04-01

    Children's screen viewing (SV) is associated with higher levels of childhood obesity. Many children exceed the American Academy of Pediatrics guideline of 2 hours of television (TV) per day. There is limited information about how parenting styles and parental self-efficacy to limit child screen time are associated with children's SV. This study examined whether parenting styles were associated with the SV of young children and whether any effects were mediated by parental self-efficacy to limit screen time. Data were from a cross-sectional survey conducted in 2013. Child and parent SV were reported by a parent, who also provided information about their parenting practices and self-efficacy to restrict SV. A four-step regression method examined whether parenting styles were associated with the SV of young children. Mediation by parental self-efficacy to limit screen time was examined using indirect effects. On a weekday, 90% of children watched TV for mediated associations between parental control and SV. Parental control was associated with lower levels of SV among 5- to 6-year-old children. This association was partially mediated by parental self-efficacy to limit screen time. The development of strategies to increase parental self-efficacy to limit screen-time may be useful.

  12. Self-Efficacy, Self-Care, and Metabolic Control in Persons with Type 2, Diet and Exercised Controlled Diabetes

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Randall, Lisa

    1998-01-01

    ... (Diabetes control and Complications Trial, 1993). Nurses' understanding of diabetes management coupled with a holistic view of person makes them the optimal professionals to facilitate patient movement toward tight metabolic control...

  13. Health Related Quality of Life and Weight Self-Efficacy of Life Style among Normal-Weight, Overweight and Obese Iranian Adolescents: A Case Control Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyedeh Fatemeh Miri

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Identifying and investigating the factors influencing self-efficacy and eventually health related quality of life (HRQoL can be an important step toward the prevention and treatment of the obesity. The aim of the study was to compare weight self-efficacy and HRQoL among normal-weight, overweight and obese Iranian adolescents. Materials and Methods In this case-control study, 118 obese and overweight adolescents (case group and 118 adolescents with normal weight (control group were recruited. Adolescent's anthropometric characteristics were measured. The Weight Efficacy Lifestyle Questionnaire (WEL, pediatric quality of life inventory (PedsQLTM 4.0 and self-reported physical activity were completed by the adolescents. Results: Multivariate logistic regression adjusting for various confounders indicated that overweight and obese adolescents were less likely to be physically active (adjusted odds ratio, AOR= 0.66; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.48 to 0.911, had lower ability to cope with social pressure (AOR= 0.54; 95% CI, 0.32 to 0.93, involved in less positive activities (AOR= 0.53; 95% CI, 0.37 to 0.75, and felt more negative emotions (AOR= 0.23; 95% CI, 0.14 to 0.36 than their normal-weight counterparts. Moreover, obese and overweight adolescents were more likely to report deteriorated quality of life in all PedsQL subscales than those with normal weight P

  14. How a Multidimensional View of Perceived Organizational Support Impacts Self-Efficacy and Task Understanding during Training for Boundary Spanning Tasks

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wallace, Ronald S

    2008-01-01

    Perceived organizational support (POS), defined as how much employees feel the organization they work for cares for them and assists them in their needs, has been traditionally characterized in a single dimension...

  15. THE EFFECTIVENESS OF SUPPORTIVE EDUCATIVE IN INCREASING SELF REGULATION, SELF EFFICACY, AND SELF CARE AGENCY TO CONTROL GLICHEMIC INDEX IN PATIENT WITH TYPE II DIABETES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darmansyah AF

    2017-04-01

    control and diet, physical exercise, medication, blood sugar control and foot care (p = <0.05, self efficacy (p = 0,05, self care agency (p = <0,05. Test result of the correlation among the variables using Partial Least Square (PLS suggest supportive educative model and the obtained value of self regulation is (0,561, self effi cacy is (0,548 self regulation to self care agency (0,592, self effi cacy to self regulation (0,162, self regulation to self care agency (0,094, and self care agency to HbA1c (0,130. Discussion and Conclusion: Novelty in this study indicated that supportive educative is able to improve self care agency patient and HbA1c through increasing self regulation. It is recommended that model of supportive educative could be applied in health service in Indonesia in regard to be independency patient with type 2 DM and other chronical disease.

  16. The Effects of an Interactive Nursing Skills Mobile Application on Nursing Students' Knowledge, Self-efficacy, and Skills Performance: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyunsun; Suh, Eunyoung E

    2018-03-01

    Clinical nursing practice is important because it helps nursing students experience realities of clinical nursing that cannot be learned through theoretical education. This study aimed to evaluate the effect of an interactive nursing skills mobile application for nursing students. Sixty-six senior nursing students were randomly assigned to experimental or control groups. The experimental group used an interactive nursing skills mobile application for 1 week. The control group was provided with a mobile application containing noninteractive nursing video contents for 1 week. Before (pre-test) and 1 week after (post-test) using the mobile application, participants' knowledge of clinical nursing skills, self-efficacy of nursing practice, and nursing skills performance were assessed. The experimental group showed a significantly higher value for knowledge after 1 week of treatment via their mobile application than the control group (t = 3.34, p = .001). In addition, they showed significantly improved self-efficacy before and after intervention (t = 2.46, p = .017) than the control group. The experimental group's nursing skills performance was also significantly enhanced after intervention (t = 7.05, p mobile application with systematic contents was an effective method for students to experience practical nursing skills. Developing and applying a mobile application with other nursing contents that can be effectively used across all range of nursing students is recommended. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  17. The Effects of an Interactive Nursing Skills Mobile Application on Nursing Students' Knowledge, Self-efficacy, and Skills Performance: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyunsun Kim, MSN, RN

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Clinical nursing practice is important because it helps nursing students experience realities of clinical nursing that cannot be learned through theoretical education. This study aimed to evaluate the effect of an interactive nursing skills mobile application for nursing students. Methods: Sixty-six senior nursing students were randomly assigned to experimental or control groups. The experimental group used an interactive nursing skills mobile application for 1 week. The control group was provided with a mobile application containing noninteractive nursing video contents for 1 week. Before (pre-test and 1 week after (post-test using the mobile application, participants' knowledge of clinical nursing skills, self-efficacy of nursing practice, and nursing skills performance were assessed. Results: The experimental group showed a significantly higher value for knowledge after 1 week of treatment via their mobile application than the control group (t = 3.34, p = .001. In addition, they showed significantly improved self-efficacy before and after intervention (t = 2.46, p = .017 than the control group. The experimental group's nursing skills performance was also significantly enhanced after intervention (t = 7.05, p < .001, with a significant difference in the degree of improvement (t = 4.47, p < .001. Conclusion: The interactive learner-centered nursing education mobile application with systematic contents was an effective method for students to experience practical nursing skills. Developing and applying a mobile application with other nursing contents that can be effectively used across all range of nursing students is recommended. Keywords: interactive learning, mobile applications, nursing education, nursing student, practical nursing

  18. Comparing the effect of e-learning and educational booklet on the childbirth self-efficacy: a randomized controlled clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbasi, Parastoo; Mohammad-Alizadeh Charandabi, Sakineh; Mirghafourvand, Mojgan

    2018-03-01

    This study aimed to compare the effect of e-learning and educational booklet on the childbirth self-efficacy (CBSE). This randomized controlled clinical trial was conducted on 153 pregnant women referred to health centers in the city of Miandoab, Iran in 2015-2016. Participants were assigned into two intervention groups (e-learning and educational booklet) and the control group. A single face-to-face session was held for intervention groups about the management of labor pain in 30-34 weeks of pregnancy and the booklet and software were provided. The CBSE questionnaire was filled out by the participants before intervention and active phase of labor at 4-5 cm dilatation of cervix. One-way ANOVA and ANCOVA test with adjusting the baseline scores were used to compare the mean score of self-efficacy among study groups respectively before and after the intervention. There was no significant difference between the three groups in terms of socio-demographic characteristics (p > 0.05). After the intervention, the mean score of the CBSE in the educational booklet group (adjusted mean difference: 113.4; confidence interval 95%: 100.7-126.1) and e-learning group (159.3; 146.5-172.0) was significantly higher than the control group. Also, the mean score of the CBSE in the e-learning group had a significant increase compared to the educational booklet group (45.9; 33.0-58.7). The results indicate that e-learning and educational booklet are effective in enhancing mothers' CBSE. Thus, the mothers are recommended to use these teaching methods.

  19. Neighborhood Processes, Self-Efficacy, and Adolescent Mental Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dupere, Veronique; Leventhal, Tama; Vitaro, Frank

    2012-01-01

    Self-efficacy beliefs are central to mental health. Because adolescents' neighborhoods shape opportunities for experiences of control, predictability, and safety, we propose that neighborhood conditions are associated with adolescents' self-efficacy and, in turn, their internalizing problems (i.e., depression/anxiety symptoms). We tested these…

  20. Social threat appeals in commercial advertising: the moderating impact of perceived level of self-efficacy and self-esteem on advertising effectiveness

    OpenAIRE

    Faseur, Tine; Cauberghe, Veroline; Hudders, Liselot

    2015-01-01

    This study investigates the impact of the level of fear evoked by an advertisement (for deodorant) framing a threatening social situation. Where the effectiveness of threat appeals has been investigated extensively in health communication, this study focuses on the impact of social threat appeals in a commercial setting. The study investigates the moderating impact of self-esteem on the interaction effect between the level of fear (evoked by a social threat ad) and perceived level of self-eff...

  1. The influence of self-efficacy and outcome expectations on the relationship between perceived environment and physical activity in the workplace

    OpenAIRE

    Plotnikoff Ronald C; Prodaniuk Tricia R; Spence John C; Wilson Phillip M

    2004-01-01

    Abstract Background Recent research and commentary contends that ecological approaches may be particularly useful for understanding and promoting physical activity participation in various settings including the workplace. Yet within the physical activity domain there is a lack of understanding of how ecological environment factors influence behaviour. Thus, the purpose of this study was to examine the relationships between perceived environment, social-cognitive variables, and physical activ...

  2. Entrepreneurship education revisited: perceived entrepreneurial role models increase perceived behavioural control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fellnhofer, Katharina

    2017-01-01

    Relying on Bandura’s (1986) social learning theory, Ajzen’s (1988) theory of planned behaviour (TPB), and Dyer’s (1994) model of entrepreneurial careers, this study aims to highlight the potential of entrepreneurial role models to entrepreneurship education. The results suggest that entrepreneurial courses would greatly benefit from real-life experiences, either positive or negative. The results of regression analysis based on 426 individuals, primarily from Austria, Finland, and Greece, show that role models increase learners’ entrepreneurial perceived behaviour control (PBC) by increasing their self-efficacy. This study can inform the research and business communities and governments about the importance of integrating entrepreneurs into education to stimulate entrepreneurial PBC. This study is the first of its kind using its approach, and its results warrant more in-depth studies of storytelling by entrepreneurial role models in the context of multimedia entrepreneurship education. PMID:29104604

  3. Entrepreneurship education revisited: perceived entrepreneurial role models increase perceived behavioural control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fellnhofer, Katharina

    2017-01-01

    Relying on Bandura's (1986) social learning theory, Ajzen's (1988) theory of planned behaviour (TPB), and Dyer's (1994) model of entrepreneurial careers, this study aims to highlight the potential of entrepreneurial role models to entrepreneurship education. The results suggest that entrepreneurial courses would greatly benefit from real-life experiences, either positive or negative. The results of regression analysis based on 426 individuals, primarily from Austria, Finland, and Greece, show that role models increase learners' entrepreneurial perceived behaviour control (PBC) by increasing their self-efficacy. This study can inform the research and business communities and governments about the importance of integrating entrepreneurs into education to stimulate entrepreneurial PBC. This study is the first of its kind using its approach, and its results warrant more in-depth studies of storytelling by entrepreneurial role models in the context of multimedia entrepreneurship education.

  4. Situated Self-efficacy in Introductory Physics Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, Rachel; DeVore, Seth; Michaluk, Lynnette; Stewart, John

    2017-01-01

    Within the general university environment, students' perceived self-efficacy has been widely studied and findings suggest it plays a role in student success. The current research adapted a self-efficacy survey, from the ``Self-Efficacy for Learning Performance'' subscale of the Motivated Learning Strategies Questionnaire and administered it to the introductory, calculus-based physics classes (N=1005) over the fall 2015 and spring 2016 semesters. This assessment measured students' self-efficacy in domains including the physics class, other science and mathematics classes, and their intended future career. The effect of gender was explored with the only significant gender difference (p gender difference was not explained by a student's performance which was measured by test average. However, a mediation analysis showed that students' overall academic self-efficacy, measured by their math and science self-efficacy, acts as a mediator for the effect of test average on self-efficacy towards the physics class domain. This mediation effect was significant for both female (p < . 01) and male students (p < . 001) however, it was more pronounced for male students.

  5. Mindfulness-based stress reduction and cognitive behavioral therapy for chronic low back pain: similar effects on mindfulness, catastrophizing, self-efficacy, and acceptance in a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Judith A; Anderson, Melissa L; Balderson, Benjamin H; Cook, Andrea J; Sherman, Karen J; Cherkin, Daniel C

    2016-11-01

    Cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) is believed to improve chronic pain problems by decreasing patient catastrophizing and increasing patient self-efficacy for managing pain. Mindfulness-based stress reduction (MBSR) is believed to benefit patients with chronic pain by increasing mindfulness and pain acceptance. However, little is known about how these therapeutic mechanism variables relate to each other or whether they are differentially impacted by MBSR vs CBT. In a randomized controlled trial comparing MBSR, CBT, and usual care (UC) for adults aged 20 to 70 years with chronic low back pain (N = 342), we examined (1) baseline relationships among measures of catastrophizing, self-efficacy, acceptance, and mindfulness and (2) changes on these measures in the 3 treatment groups. At baseline, catastrophizing was associated negatively with self-efficacy, acceptance, and 3 aspects of mindfulness (nonreactivity, nonjudging, and acting with awareness; all P values pain.

  6. Mediational effects of self-efficacy dimensions in the relationship between knowledge of dengue and dengue preventive behaviour with respect to control of dengue outbreaks: a structural equation model of a cross-sectional survey.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Affendi Isa

    Full Text Available Dengue fever is endemic in Malaysia, with frequent major outbreaks in urban areas. The major control strategy relies on health promotional campaigns aimed at encouraging people to reduce mosquito breeding sites close to people's homes. However, such campaigns have not always been 100% effective. The concept of self-efficacy is an area of increasing research interest in understanding how health promotion can be most effective. This paper reports on a study of the impact of self-efficacy on dengue knowledge and dengue preventive behaviour.We recruited 280 adults from 27 post-outbreak villages in the state of Terengganu, east coast of Malaysia. Measures of health promotion and educational intervention activities and types of communication during outbreak, level of dengue knowledge, level and strength of self-efficacy and dengue preventive behaviour were obtained via face-to-face interviews and questionnaires. A structural equation model was tested and fitted the data well (χ(2 = 71.659, df = 40, p = 0.002, RMSEA = 0.053, CFI = 0.973, TLI = 0.963. Mass media, local contact and direct information-giving sessions significantly predicted level of knowledge of dengue. Level and strength of self-efficacy fully mediated the relationship between knowledge of dengue and dengue preventive behaviours. Strength of self-efficacy acted as partial mediator in the relationship between knowledge of dengue and dengue preventive behaviours.To control and prevent dengue outbreaks by behavioural measures, health promotion and educational interventions during outbreaks should now focus on those approaches that are most likely to increase the level and strength of self-efficacy.

  7. Socio-economic variations in tobacco consumption, intention to quit and self-efficacy to quit among male smokers in Thailand and Malaysia: results from the International Tobacco Control-South-East Asia (ITC-SEA) survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siahpush, Mohammad; Borland, Ron; Yong, Hua-Hie; Kin, Foong; Sirirassamee, Buppha

    2008-03-01

    Aim To examine the association of socio-economic position (education, income and employment status) with cigarette consumption, intention to quit and self-efficacy to quit among male smokers in Thailand and Malaysia. Design and setting The data were based on a survey of adult smokers conducted in early 2005 in Thailand and Malaysia as part of the International Tobacco Control-South-East Asia (ITC-SEA) project. Participants A total of 1846 men in Thailand and 1906 men in Malaysia. Measurement Participants were asked questions on daily cigarette consumption, intention to quit and self-efficacy to quit in face-to-face interviews. Findings Analyses were based on multivariate regression models that adjusted for all three socio-economic indicators. In Thailand, higher level of education was associated strongly with not having self-efficacy, associated weakly with having an intention to quit and was not associated with cigarette consumption. Higher income was associated strongly with having self-efficacy, associated weakly with high cigarette consumption and was not associated with having an intention to quit. Being employed was associated strongly with having an intention to quit and was not associated with cigarette consumption or self-efficacy. In Malaysia, higher level of education was not associated with any of the outcomes. Higher income was associated strongly with having self-efficacy, and was not associated with the other outcomes. Being employed was associated moderately with higher cigarette consumption and was not associated with the other outcomes. Conclusion Socio-economic and cultural conditions, as well as tobacco control policies and tobacco industry activities, shape the determinants of smoking behaviour and beliefs. Existing knowledge from high-income countries about disparities in smoking should not be generalized readily to other countries.

  8. Mediational Effects of Self-Efficacy Dimensions in the Relationship between Knowledge of Dengue and Dengue Preventive Behaviour with Respect to Control of Dengue Outbreaks: A Structural Equation Model of a Cross-Sectional Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isa, Affendi; Loke, Yoon K.; Smith, Jane R.; Papageorgiou, Alexia; Hunter, Paul R.

    2013-01-01

    Background Dengue fever is endemic in Malaysia, with frequent major outbreaks in urban areas. The major control strategy relies on health promotional campaigns aimed at encouraging people to reduce mosquito breeding sites close to people's homes. However, such campaigns have not always been 100% effective. The concept of self-efficacy is an area of increasing research interest in understanding how health promotion can be most effective. This paper reports on a study of the impact of self-efficacy on dengue knowledge and dengue preventive behaviour. Methods and Findings We recruited 280 adults from 27 post-outbreak villages in the state of Terengganu, east coast of Malaysia. Measures of health promotion and educational intervention activities and types of communication during outbreak, level of dengue knowledge, level and strength of self-efficacy and dengue preventive behaviour were obtained via face-to-face interviews and questionnaires. A structural equation model was tested and fitted the data well (χ2 = 71.659, df = 40, p = 0.002, RMSEA = 0.053, CFI = 0.973, TLI = 0.963). Mass media, local contact and direct information-giving sessions significantly predicted level of knowledge of dengue. Level and strength of self-efficacy fully mediated the relationship between knowledge of dengue and dengue preventive behaviours. Strength of self-efficacy acted as partial mediator in the relationship between knowledge of dengue and dengue preventive behaviours. Conclusions To control and prevent dengue outbreaks by behavioural measures, health promotion and educational interventions during outbreaks should now focus on those approaches that are most likely to increase the level and strength of self-efficacy. PMID:24086777

  9. Self esteem, dependency, self-efficacy and self-criticism in social anxiety disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iancu, Iulian; Bodner, Ehud; Ben-Zion, Itzhak Z

    2015-04-01

    Social anxiety disorder (SAD) is characterized by fear and avoidance in social situations where one perceives being in danger of scrutiny by others. Low self-esteem, low self-efficacy, high self-criticism and high dependency are additional potential features of SAD, and thus their examination is warranted, as is the elucidation of their inter-relationship. Thirty-two SAD subjects diagnosed with the Mini-International Neuropsychiatric Interview and 30 healthy controls, were administered the Liebowitz Social Anxiety Scale (LSAS), the Rosenberg Self Esteem Scale, the Depressive Experiences Questionnaire (DEQ) that assesses self-criticism, dependency and self-efficacy, and a socio-demographic questionnaire. We hypothesized that the SAD group would present higher scores of dependency and self-criticism and lower self-esteem and self-efficacy. We also hypothesized that low self-esteem, low self-efficacy, high self-criticism and high dependency will predict the severity of SAD. In line with the hypotheses, SAD patients had higher scores of self-criticism and dependency and lower scores of self-esteem. The social anxiety score correlated negatively with self-esteem and self-efficacy, and positively with dependency and self-criticism. Self-criticism, but not the other measures, predicted the total LSAS score. Self-esteem, self-criticism, dependency and self-efficacy are related to SAD and their relations should be examined in future studies that will employ larger samples. It is suggested to search for ways to affect these factors through cognitive-behavioral interventions and additional psychotherapeutic treatments. Research should also focus on the specific role of self-criticism in SAD. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Effects of Social Support and Self-Efficacy on Maternal Prenatal Cares Among the First-Time Pregnant Women, Iranshahr, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossien Izadirad

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Social support and perceived self-efficacy affect health-related behaviors and play an important role on mothers' adaptability with pregnancy. This paper aims to study the impact of educational interventions based on social support and perceived self-efficacy on maternal prenatal care.Materials and methods: The present study is a before after experimental study in which 90 first-time pregnant women were randomly selected and divided into two 45- participants experimental and control groups. Data were collected from 21 January to 20 May 2016. Determining the validity and reliability of the questionnaire, we used the panel of experts and Cronbach's alpha. The data collected from the two groups were compared before and 3 months after intervention and were analyzed by SPSS 18.Results: Unlike the control subjects, there was a significant difference in maternal prenatal cares before and after an educational intervention between the scores of social support and perceived self-efficacy in the experimental group (p < 0.05. Before intervention, the average score of the experimental group was 12.62 ± 2.63 that rose to 17.71 ± 1.56, three months after the educational intervention, which is statistically significant (p < 0.05. There was a direct and positive relation between self-efficacy and maternal prenatal cares (p = 0.000, r = 0.538. Social support and self-efficacy predicted the variance of maternal cares by 69.2%.Conclusion: Developing an educational program based on social support and perceived self-efficacy on maternal prenatal cares is helpful and efficient. The health system, family and society are in charge of making facilities and opportunities to improve social support and perceived self-efficacy in pregnant women, resulting in improved maternal prenatal cares. 

  11. A structural Model of Self-efficacy in Handball Referees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diotaiuti, Pierluigi; Falese, Lavinia; Mancone, Stefania; Purromuto, Francesco

    2017-01-01

    The study aimed to identify factors predicting self-efficacy in a sample of 248 Italian handball referees. The main hypothesis was that perception of teamwork efficacy would be a significant predictor of self-efficacy in handball referees. Participants completed an online questionnaire including Referee Self-Efficacy Scale (α = 0.85), Self-Determination Scale (α = 0.78), and an adaptation for Referees of the Sport Commitment Model (α = 0.80). Two hierarchical regression analyses have identified: (1) Enjoyment (β = 0.226), Couple Efficacy (β = 0.233), and Personal Awareness (β = 0.243), as predictors of Self-Efficacy; (2) Span of Co-Refereeing (β = 0.253), Perceived Quality of the Relationship (β = 0.239), and Mutual Agreement (β = 0.274), as predictors of Couple Self-Efficacy. A further SEM analysis confirmed the fit of a structural model of Self-efficacy considering the reciprocal influence of Couple Efficacy, Enjoyment and Awareness (χ2: 5.67; RMSEA: 0.000; SRMR: 0.019). The study underlines the importance of teamwork (or co-refereeing) as it relates to enjoyment and awareness in officiating and how it enhances the psychological well-being of handball referees. Future studies should investigate the relationship between factors influencing perceived teamwork efficacy and officiating performance outcome. PMID:28572783

  12. Impact of Adolescents' Filial Self-Efficacy on Quality of Family Functioning and Satisfaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caprara, Gian Vittorio; Pastorelli, Concetta; Regalia, Camillo; Scabini, Eugenia; Bandura, Albert

    2005-01-01

    In this prospective study, we tested a structural model in which adolescents' perceived self-efficacy to manage parental relationships affected their satisfaction with family life both directly, and indirectly, through its impact on family practices. Findings based on 380 Italian adolescents showed that perceived filial self-efficacy was linked…

  13. Communication skills training for physicians performing work disability assessments increases knowledge and self-efficacy: results of a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Rijssen, Jolanda; Schellart, Antonius J M; Anema, Johannes R; van der Beek, Allard J

    2015-07-21

    It was assessed whether a post-graduate communication skills training course would increase physicians' competence and knowledge with regard to communication during work disability assessment interviews, and would change the determinants of their communication behaviour. A randomised controlled trial was performed. At baseline and at follow-up, 42 physicians completed questionnaires. The primary outcome measures were competence and knowledge about communication. The secondary outcome measures were 21 self-reported determinants of communication behaviour. One-way analyses of variance and covariance were performed. There was no significant difference between the intervention and control groups in overall competence, but there was for the introduction phase (intervention: mean = 7.0, SD 2.7; control: mean = 4.8, SD 2.7; p = 0.014). Knowledge about communication was significantly higher (p = 0.001) in the intervention group (mean = 79.6, SD 9.2) than in the control group (mean = 70.9, SD 6.7), especially concerning the information-gathering phase of the interview (intervention: mean = 80.0, SD 10.2; control: mean = 69.4, SD 8.9; p = 0.001). The intervention group scored significantly better on 7 of the 21 self-reported determinants (secondary outcomes), including self-efficacy, intentions, skills and knowledge. The communication skills training course may improve some aspects of physician communication, but not all. Because physicians were unanimously positive about the course, further development is warranted. Implications for Rehabilitation Even though optimal communication is essential in face-to-face assessment interviews for determining entitlement to work disability benefits, and there is a lot at stake for the claimants, this issue has scarcely been addressed in scientific research. A tailor-made two-day communication skills training course, based on scientific research, increases physicians' knowledge about communication

  14. Devising a Structural Equation Model of Relationships between Preservice Teachers' Time and Study Environment Management, Effort Regulation, Self-Efficacy, Control of Learning Beliefs, and Metacognitive Self-Regulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sen, Senol; Yilmaz, Ayhan

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study is to analyze the relationship between preservice teachers' time and study environment management, effort regulation, self-efficacy beliefs, control of learning beliefs and metacognitive self-regulation. This study also investigates the direct and indirect effects of metacognitive self-regulation on time and study…

  15. Self-Esteem, Self-Efficacy, and Resources in Adults With ADHD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newark, Patricia Elizabeth; Elsässer, Marina; Stieglitz, Rolf-Dieter

    2016-03-01

    The purpose of this study is to shed light on therapy-relevant factors, such as self-esteem, self-efficacy, and resources in adults with ADHD in comparison with a healthy control group. A total of 43 adults who met Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (4th ed., text rev.; DSM-IV-TR) criteria for ADHD in adulthood were matched with a nonclinical sample in terms of age and gender. All participants (N = 86) were assessed with self-ratings: Symptom Checklist-90-Revised (SCL-90-R), Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale, General Perceived Self-Efficacy Scale, and Dick's Resources Checklist. Adults with ADHD showed lower levels of self-esteem and self-efficacy when compared with the control group. The authors found some, but not all, of the resources of adults with ADHD to be reduced. In other words, people with ADHD seem to possess specific resources. Our results have important implications for the treatment of adult ADHD and suggest that specific therapy programs should include resources-oriented modules for enhancing self-esteem, self-efficacy, and fostering strengths. © The Author(s) 2012.

  16. Leading by Example: A Case Study of the Influence of Principal Self-Efficacy on Collective Efficacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Versland, Tena M.; Erickson, Joanne L.

    2017-01-01

    Self-efficacy is a perceived judgment that one has the ability to execute a course of action that brings about a desired result. Principal self-efficacy describes a set of beliefs that enable a principal to enact policies and procedures that promote the effectiveness of a school. Principal self-efficacy beliefs are also important because they…

  17. TRADUÇÃO E ADAPTAÇÃO CULTURAL DA ESCALA SELF-EFFICACY AND THEIR CHILD’S LEVEL OF ASTHMA CONTROL: VERSÃO BRASILEIRA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Lúcia Araújo Gomes

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available El objetivo fue traducir y adaptar la escala Self-Efficacy and Their Child’s Level Asthma Control para la realidad cultural de Brasil y evaluar la validez de contenido de la version en portugués. Estudio metodológico que siguió las fases: traducción inicial para la lengua portuguesa por dos traductores independientes, traducción de las síntesis de escala de vuelta para el idioma de origen- ingles( back-translation , pre prueba de la versión final con 30 padres/cuidadores, validez de contenido. La evaluación de la pre prueba suscito modificaciones para una mejor comprensión por la población escogida. La validez del contenido por el comité de especialistas fue considerada adecuada(IVC>0,80. El tiempo de aplicación de la escala con cada participante varió entre 5-13 minutos. Se recomienda la ampliación de la aplicación de la escala en Brasil con vistas a mejorar sus propiedades psicométricas y para que se tengan parámetros para intervenciones en el control y manejo de la asma.

  18. THE VALUE OF REMOVING DAILY OBSTACLES VIA EVERYDAY PROBLEM SOLVING THEORY: DEVELOPING AN APPLIED NOVEL PROCEDURE TO INCREASE SELF-EFFICACY FOR EXERCISE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniele eArtistico

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the study was to develop a novel procedure to increase self-efficacy for exercise. Gains in one’s ability to resolve day-to-day obstacles for entering an exercise routine were expected to cause an increase in self-efficacy for exercise. Fifty-five sedentary participants (did not exercise regularly for at least 4 months prior to the study who expressed an intention to exercise in the near future were selected for the study. Participants were randomly assigned to one of three conditions: 1 an Experimental Group in which they received a problem-solving training session to learn new strategies for solving day-to-day obstacles that interfere with exercise, 2 a Control Group with Problem Solving Training which received a problem solving training session focused on a typical day-to-day problem unrelated to exercise, or 3 a Control Group which did not receive any problem-solving training. Assessment of obstacles to exercise and perceived self-efficacy for exercise were conducted at baseline; perceived self-efficacy for exercise was reassessed post-intervention (one week later. No differences in perceived challenges posed by obstacles to exercise or self-efficacy for exercise were observed across groups at baseline. The Experimental Group reported greater improvement in self-efficacy for exercise compared to the Control Group with Training (p < 0.01 and the Control Group (p < 0.01. Results of this study suggest that a novel procedure that focuses on removing obstacles to intended planned fitness activities is effective in increasing self-efficacy to engage in exercise among sedentary adults. Implications of these findings for use in applied settings and treatment studies are discussed.

  19. The Value of Removing Daily Obstacles via Everyday Problem-Solving Theory: Developing an Applied Novel Procedure to Increase Self-Efficacy for Exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artistico, Daniele; Pinto, Angela Marinilli; Douek, Jill; Black, Justin; Pezzuti, Lina

    2013-01-01

    The objective of the study was to develop a novel procedure to increase self-efficacy for exercise. Gains in one's ability to resolve day-to-day obstacles for entering an exercise routine were expected to cause an increase in self-efficacy for exercise. Fifty-five sedentary participants (did not exercise regularly for at least 4 months prior to the study) who expressed an intention to exercise in the near future were selected for the study. Participants were randomly assigned to one of three conditions: (1) an Experimental Group in which they received a problem-solving training session to learn new strategies for solving day-to-day obstacles that interfere with exercise, (2) a Control Group with Problem-Solving Training which received a problem-solving training session focused on a typical day-to-day problem unrelated to exercise, or (3) a Control Group which did not receive any problem-solving training. Assessment of obstacles to exercise and perceived self-efficacy for exercise were conducted at baseline; perceived self-efficacy for exercise was reassessed post-intervention (1 week later). No differences in perceived challenges posed by obstacles to exercise or self-efficacy for exercise were observed across groups at baseline. The Experimental Group reported greater improvement in self-efficacy for exercise compared to the Control Group with Training and the Control Group. Results of this study suggest that a novel procedure that focuses on removing obstacles to intended planned fitness activities is effective in increasing self-efficacy to engage in exercise among sedentary adults. Implications of these findings for use in applied settings and treatment studies are discussed.

  20. Nivel de Actividad Física, Autoeficacia, Beneficios y Barreras Percibidas en Mujeres Mayores Mexicanas Independientes (Physical Activity Level, Exercise Self-Efficacy, Benefits and Perceived Barriers of Independent Mexican Older Women).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enríquez-Reyna, María Cristina; Cruz-Castruita, Rosa María; Zamarripa, Jorge; Ceballos-Gurrola, Oswaldo; Guevara-Valtier, Milton Carlos

    2016-03-01

    This descriptive comparative study examined differences in personal characteristics, exercise self-efficacy, benefits and barriers of independent elderly women to perform physical activity (PA) according with the PA level. Two hundred three women older than 60 years of age, from a community located in Nuevo Leon, Mexico participated in the study. Data was collected using: a) A personal data questionnaire, b) Exercise Self-Efficacy Scale, c) Exercise Benefits/ Barriers Scale and d) Physical Activity Scale for the Elderly were completed. Age was similar in participants with low and acceptable PA level. Participants with lower levels of PA reported consuming more medications, fewer years of education and lower values of exercise self-efficacy, benefits and barriers. In this sample, exercise self-efficacy and benefits were positively associated with the PA level. © 2016. All rights reserved.

  1. Exercise self-efficacy intervention in overweight and obese women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckley, Jude

    2016-06-01

    This study investigated the effects of a brief tailored intervention on self-efficacy beliefs and exercise energy expenditure in active and inactive overweight and obese women. Participants were randomly assigned to either control (N = 50) or intervention (N = 47) conditions, and their exercise self-efficacy was assessed three times over a 12-week period. Results showed that the intervention increased schedule, physical, exercise-worries efficacy, and energy expenditure in the previously inactive group. The results suggest that self-efficacy interventions are effective at increasing exercise energy expenditure in inactive overweight and obese women. © The Author(s) 2014.

  2. The Role of Self-Esteem and Self-Efficacy in Detecting Responses to Feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-07-01

    self -efficacy on a novel task may be a function of self - esteem and initial instruction on the task. It may be that low SEs initial self ...than will persons low in self -efficacy. This may also have implications for the interaction between self -efficacy and self - esteem . In situations...feedback than persons with low SE. Persons with low self - esteem are likely to perceive 32 greater feedback seeking costs (as noted earlier).

  3. The effect of training in communication skills on medical doctors' and nurses' self-efficacy. A randomized controlled trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ammentorp, Jette; Sabroe, Svend; Kofoed, Poul-Erik

    2007-01-01

    as a randomized trial. Clinicians in the intervention group received a 5 day communication course and the control group received no intervention. The impact of the intervention was evaluated by means of questionnaires measuring the effect of communication courses on changes in doctors' and nurses' self...

  4. The effects of antenatal education on fear of childbirth, maternal self-efficacy and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms following childbirth: an experimental study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gökçe İsbir, Gözde; İnci, Figen; Önal, Hatice; Yıldız, Pelin Dıkmen

    2016-11-01

    Fear of birth and low childbirth self-efficacy is predictive of post-traumatic stress disorder symptoms following childbirth. The efficacy of antenatal education classes on fear of birth and childbirth self-efficacy has been supported; however, the effectiveness of antenatal classes on post-traumatic stress disorder symptoms after childbirth has received relatively little research attention. This study examined the effects of antenatal education on fear of childbirth, maternal self-efficacy and post-traumatic stress disorder symptoms following childbirth. Quasi-experimental study. The study was conducted in a city located in the Middle Anatolia region of Turkey and data were collected between December 2013 and May 2015. Two groups of women were compared-an antenatal education intervention group (n=44), and a routine prenatal care control group (n=46). The Wijma Delivery Expectancy/Experience Questionnaire, Version A and B, Childbirth Self-efficacy Inventory and Impact of Event Scale-Revised was used to assess fear of childbirth, maternal self-efficacy and PTSD symptoms following childbirth. Compared to the control group, women who attended antenatal education had greater childbirth self-efficacy, greater perceived support and control in birth, and less fear of birth and post-traumatic stress disorder symptoms following childbirth (all comparisons, ppost-traumatic stress disorder symptoms after childbirth. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. The relationship between family functioning and caregiving appraisal of dementia family caregivers: caregiving self-efficacy as a mediator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hsin-Yi; Huang, Lian-Hua

    2018-04-01

    The aim of this study was to explore caregiving self-efficacy as a mediator for the association between family functioning and caregiving appraisal of dementia family caregivers in Taiwan. This study adopted a cross-sectional correlational design. Purposive sampling was used to recruit 115 dyads of dementia patients and family caregivers from the outpatient neurological clinics of two hospitals in northern Taiwan. Data were gathered through interviews with a structured questionnaire, which included demographic characteristics for caregivers and patients, family functioning, caregiving self-efficacy, as well as positive and negative aspects of caregiving appraisal. Family functioning, patients' activities of daily living score, Neuropsychiatric Inventory caregiver distress, and three domains of self-efficacy were significantly associated with caregiver burden. Hierarchical multiple regression analyses indicated that self-efficacy for obtaining respite (SE-OR) significantly explained 20.5% of the variance in caregiver esteem. Caregiver perceived worsened health status, family functioning, and SE-OR significantly explained 59% of the variance in caregiver burden. The mediation test only supported the partially mediating role of SE-OR on the relationship between family functioning and caregiver burden, while the mediating effect of self-efficacy for responding to disruptive behaviours and controlling upsetting thoughts were insignificant. Our findings provided preliminary evidence for health professionals recommending that future studies should assess the family dynamic and health problems of caregivers, and develop appropriate family-centred interventions that focus on strengthening interfamily support and respite services to alleviate caregiver burden.

  6. Instructional design considerations promoting engineering design self-efficacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Andrew M.

    Engineering design activities are frequently included in technology and engineering classrooms. These activities provide an open-ended context for practicing critical thinking, problem solving, creativity, and innovation---collectively part of the 21st Century Skills which are increasingly needed for success in the workplace. Self-efficacy is a perceptual belief that impacts learning and behavior. It has been shown to directly impact each of these 21st Century Skills but its relation to engineering design is only recently being studied. The purpose of this study was to examine how instructional considerations made when implementing engineering design activities might affect student self-efficacy outcomes in a middle school engineering classroom. Student responses to two self-efficacy inventories related to design, the Engineering Design Self-Efficacy Instrument and Creative Thinking Self-Efficacy Inventory, were collected before and after participation in an engineering design curriculum. Students were also answered questions on specific factors of their experience during the curriculum which teachers may exhibit control over: teamwork and feedback. Results were analyzed using Pearson's correlation coefficients, paired and independent t-tests, and structural equation modeling to better understand patterns for self-efficacy beliefs in students. Results suggested that design self-efficacy and creative thinking self-efficacy are significantly correlated, r(1541) = .783, p classroom strategies for increasing self-efficacy and given specific recommendations related to teamwork and feedback to support students. Finally, although there were weaknesses in the study related to the survey administration, future research opportunities are presented which may build from this work.

  7. Influence of self-efficacy on compliance to workplace exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedersen, Mette Merete; Zebis, Mette Kreutzfeldt; Langberg, Henning; Poulsen, Otto Melchior; Mortensen, Ole Steen; Jensen, Jette Nygaard; Sjøgaard, Gisela; Bredahl, Thomas; Andersen, Lars Louis

    2013-09-01

    Continuous neck and shoulder pain is a common musculoskeletal complaint. Physical exercise can reduce pain symptoms, but compliance to exercise is a challenge. Exercise-specific self-efficacy has been found to be a predictor of participation in preplanned exercise. Little is known about the influence of exercise-specific self-efficacy on compliance to workplace physical exercise. To determine the influence of exercise-specific self-efficacy on compliance to specific strength exercises during working hours for laboratory technicians. We performed a cluster-randomized controlled trial, including laboratory technicians from two industrial production units in Copenhagen, Denmark. The participants were randomized to supervised specific strength exercises for the neck and shoulder muscles for 20 minutes three times a week (n = 282) or to a reference group (n = 255). The participants answered baseline and follow-up questions regarding self-efficacy and registered all exercises in a diary. Overall compliance to exercises was 45 %. Compliance in company A (private sector) differed significantly between the three self-efficacy groups after 20 weeks. The odds ratio of compliance was 2.37 for moderate versus low self-efficacy, and 2.93 for high versus low self-efficacy. No significant difference was found in company B (public sector) or in the intervention group as a whole. We did not find self-efficacy to be a general statistically significant predictor of compliance to exercises during 20 weeks, but found self-efficacy to be a predictor of compliance in a private sector setting. Workplace-specific differences might be present and should be taken into account.

  8. Psychometric properties of the Academic Situations Specific Perceived Self-efficacy Scale in a Spanish students sample of Compulsory Secondary Education Propiedades psicométricas de la Escala de Autoeficacia Percibida Específica de Situaciones Académicas en una muestra de estudiantes españoles de Educación Secundaria Obligatoria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José M. García-Fernández

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to analyse the psychometric properties of the Academic Situations Specific Perceived Self-efficacy Scale in a 656 Spanish sample of Compulsory Secondary Education students, aged 12 to 16. Factor analyses revealed that the SPSASS shows a unidimensional structure, with adequate indices of internal consistency (0.89 and test-retest reliability (0.87. Relationships between academic self-efficacy and academic goals, academic self-concept and academic performance supported the construct validity of the scale. Logistic regression models used to predict academic performance using self-efficacy as predictor, and the prediction of self-efficacy using performance as predictor provided empirical support for the self-regulatory functioning of self-efficacy. It was revealed that the probability of showing high self-efficacy increases in 94% for each point increase in grade point average, whereas the probability of academic success increases in 8% when perceived self-efficacy increases. El objetivo de este estudio consistió en analizar las propiedades psicométricas de la Escala de Autoeficacia Percibida Específica de Situaciones Académicas en una muestra de 656 estudiantes españoles de Educación Secundaria Obligatoria de 12 a 16 años. Los análisis factoriales revelaron que la EAPESA presenta una estructura unidimensional, con coeficientes de consistencia interna (0.89 y fiabilidad test-retest (0.87 adecuados. Las relaciones entre autoeficacia académica, metas académicas, autoconcepto académico y rendimiento escolar apoyaron la validez de constructo de la escala. Los modelos de regresión logística para la predicción del rendimiento académico a partir de la autoeficacia y la predicción de ésta a partir del rendimiento apoyaron empíricamente el papel autorregulatorio de la autoeficacia ya que la probabilidad de presentar alta autoeficacia aumenta un 94% por cada punto que aumenta la nota media, mientras que la

  9. Cross-sectional analysis of self-efficacy and social capital in a community-based healthy village project in Santa Cruz, Bolivia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuasa, Motoyuki; Shirayama, Yoshihisa; Osato, Keiichi; Miranda, Cesar; Condore, Julia; Siles, Roxana

    2015-06-20

    An assessment of self-efficacy and social capital may have the potential to detect an effect of dynamic, complex and comprehensive collective actions in community-based health promotion. In 2003, a healthy village project was launched in Santa Cruz, Bolivia with technical assistance from the Japan International Cooperation Agency (JICA). The originally developed FORSA (Fortalecimiento de Redes de Salud) model accounted for participatory processes in which people could improve their health and well-being through individual behavioral changes and family/community-driven activities. This study aimed to examine the extent of self-efficacy and social capital obtained via project activities by a cross-sectional analysis. We randomly selected 340 subjects from the healthy village project site and 113 subjects from a control area. Both groups were interviewed using the same structured questionnaire. Self-efficacy was assessed with a General Self-Efficacy Scale (GSES), while social capital was measured as the frequency of formal group participation in community meetings during the past three months, perceived social solidarity, and general trust. The study results showed that the participants in the project site had higher self-efficacy and social capital compared to those in the control site. The number of times a subject participated in the health committee activities was positively associated with the self-efficacy scale. Regarding social capital, females and lower-educated people were more likely to have had more frequent participation in formal groups; males and higher-educated participants showed less formal group participation, but more generosity to contribute money for the community. The main perceived benefit of participation in formal group activities varied among individuals. The findings suggest that people in the healthy village project site have higher self-efficacy, especially those with active participation in the health committee activities. To recruit

  10. Mindfulness-based stress reduction and cognitive-behavioral therapy for chronic low back pain: similar effects on mindfulness, catastrophizing, self-efficacy, and acceptance in a randomized controlled trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Judith A.; Anderson, Melissa L.; Balderson, Benjamin H.; Cook, Andrea J.; Sherman, Karen J.; Cherkin, Daniel C.

    2016-01-01

    Cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) is believed to improve chronic pain problems by decreasing patient catastrophizing and increasing patient self-efficacy for managing pain. Mindfulness-based stress reduction (MBSR) is believed to benefit chronic pain patients by increasing mindfulness and pain acceptance. However, little is known about how these therapeutic mechanism variables relate to each other or whether they are differentially impacted by MBSR versus CBT. In a randomized controlled trial comparing MBSR, CBT, and usual care (UC) for adults aged 20-70 years with chronic low back pain (CLBP) (N = 342), we examined (1) baseline relationships among measures of catastrophizing, self-efficacy, acceptance, and mindfulness; and (2) changes on these measures in the 3 treatment groups. At baseline, catastrophizing was associated negatively with self-efficacy, acceptance, and 3 aspects of mindfulness (non-reactivity, non-judging, and acting with awareness; all P-values <0.01). Acceptance was associated positively with self-efficacy (P < 0.01) and mindfulness (P-values < 0.05) measures. Catastrophizing decreased slightly more post-treatment with MBSR than with CBT or UC (omnibus P = 0.002). Both treatments were effective compared with UC in decreasing catastrophizing at 52 weeks (omnibus P = 0.001). In both the entire randomized sample and the sub-sample of participants who attended ≥6 of the 8 MBSR or CBT sessions, differences between MBSR and CBT at up to 52 weeks were few, small in size, and of questionable clinical meaningfulness. The results indicate overlap across measures of catastrophizing, self-efficacy, acceptance, and mindfulness, and similar effects of MBSR and CBT on these measures among individuals with CLBP. PMID:27257859

  11. Self-Efficacy and social support of Academy cricketers | Cowan ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    South African Journal for Research in Sport, Physical Education and Recreation ... This article aims to provide an initial insight into the role that South African provincial cricket academies play in talent development of cricketers by reflecting on possible changes in academy cricketers' self-efficacy and perceived social ...

  12. Gender Differences In Academic Self-Efficacy Beliefs And ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The purpose of this study was to find out whether or not there were differences between male and female students in the way they perceived the conditions under which they studied collaboratively. It was also designed to find out if the collaborative learning context had a differential association with the self-efficacy of males ...

  13. Teachers' Self-Efficacy vs. Parental Involvement: Prediction and Implementation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Yael; Kostelitz, Yifat

    2015-01-01

    This research examines the influence of teachers' views regarding parental involvement on their perception of self-efficacy. Data were collected from a sample of 319 Israeli elementary schools teachers. A path analysis procedure was employed to test the mediating effect of personal background and organizational variables and perceived parental…

  14. Effects of self-monitoring of glucose on distress and self-efficacy in people with non-insulin-treated Type 2 diabetes: a randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Malanda, U. L.; Bot, S. D. M.; Kostense, P. J.; Snoek, F. J.; Dekker, J. M.; Nijpels, G.

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the effects of self-monitoring of glucose in blood or urine, on diabetes-specific distress and self-efficacy, compared with usual care in people with non-insulin-treated Type 2 diabetes mellitus. One hundred and eighty-one participants with non-insulin-treated Type 2 diabetes mellitus

  15. Implementation of the Participatory Approach for Supervisors to Increase Self-Efficacy in Addressing Risk of Sick Leave of Employees : Results of a Cluster-Randomized Controlled Trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ketelaar, S. M.; Schaafsma, F. G.; Geldof, M. F.; Kraaijeveld, R. A.; Boot, C. R. L.; Shaw, W. S.; Bultmann, U.; Anema, J. R.

    Purpose To study the effectiveness of a multifaceted strategy to implement the participatory approach (PA) for supervisors to increase their self-efficacy in addressing risk of sick leave of employees. Methods Supervisors from three organizations were invited to participate. Randomization was

  16. The Predictors for Maternal Self-efficacy in Early Parenthood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elham Azmoude

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Background & aim: Many parents do not believe in their ability to fulfill their parental responsibilities. Parental self-efficacy is crucial to parents’ sense of well-being and is considered a predictor for quality of life. However, evidence is scarce on the factors that influence parents’ perception of efficacy. Therefore, this study aimed to investigate the predictors for parental self-efficacy in the early postpartum period. Methods:This descriptive analytical study was conducted on 150 primiparous women referring to the health care centers of Mashhad during their early postpartum months. For data collection, we used demographic questionnaires, Bates’ Infant Characteristics Questionnaire (ICQ, Scale of Perceived Social Support, Reece’s parent expectations survey (PES, and Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS. For data analysis, independent T-test, one-way ANOVA, Pearson’s correlation coefficient, and stepwise regression were performed, using SPSS version 16. Results: In this study, a significant association was observed between self-efficacy scores and the parents’ income, educational status, depression, and infant’s gender. Furthermore, there was a significant correlation between self-efficacy scores and infant’s characteristics, mother’s satisfaction with childbirth experience, perceived support from friends, infant’s perceived temperament, infant’s gender, mother’s educational level, and depression, which could predict 26.1% of parental self-efficacy. Conclusion: According to the results of this study, the most significant predictors of maternal self-efficacy during the early postpartum months were maternal depression and educational status, infant’s gender, and infant’s characteristics.

  17. Teacher Perceptions of the Impact of Self-Efficacy on Classroom Management Style: A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCain, Patty Jo

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative case study was to develop an understanding of how current and former middle school teachers in a suburban school district in northeast Georgia perceive low self-efficacy impacts their classroom management style. The theory guiding this study was Bandura's (1977) self-efficacy theory as it supported the idea that…

  18. Self-Efficacy, Curriculum Content, Practicum Experience, and the Interest of Social Work Students in Gerontology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, Mark D.

    2011-01-01

    The present study examined the linkages among perceptions of self-efficacy, curriculum, and field experience on students' attitudes and interest in working with older adults. Graduate level social work students were surveyed regarding perceived self-efficacy to intervene with older adult clients, the amount of aging content in the master of social…

  19. Teacher Self-Efficacy for Teaching Students to Lead IEP Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, LaRon

    2010-01-01

    The level of self-efficacy exhibited by an individual has been closely linked to how that individual will perform a given task. Previous studies on teacher self-efficacy focused on general activities and were less specific regarding special education teachers' perceived ability to perform a given task. Based on the theoretical framework of…

  20. The relationship between self-efficacy and aggression in a group of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Self-efficacy is reported to be facilitated through interventions, such as sport ... The study also aimed at exploring whether there are significant differences in perceived self-efficacy and self-reported aggression in terms of participants' gender, ...

  1. Interaction between Task Values and Self-Efficacy on Maladaptive Achievement Strategy Use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jeesoo; Bong, Mimi; Kim, Sung-il

    2014-01-01

    We tested the interaction between task value and self-efficacy on defensive pessimism, academic cheating, procrastination and self-handicapping among 574 Korean 11th graders in the context of English as a foreign language. We hypothesised that perceiving high value in tasks or domains for which self-efficacy was low would pose a threat to…

  2. Self-Efficacy and Entrepreneurial Intention: The Mediation Effect of Self-Regulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pihie, Zaidatol Akmaliah Lope; Bagheri, Afsaneh

    2013-01-01

    Specifying the mechanism through which perceived self-efficacy affects one's behavior has been one of the main concerns of researchers and educators particularly in entrepreneurship domain due to the critical role that entrepreneurial self-efficacy plays in motivating and enabling individuals to establish a new venture. This study examines the…

  3. Academic self-efficacy among open and distance learners in Nigeria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Academic self-efficacy is regarded as aneffective predictor of students' motivation and learning. It is a performance-based measure of perceived capability. In order to determine if Open and Distance Learning (ODL) students in Nigeria have a high level of academic self-efficacy, 600 ODL students from 12 study centres of the ...

  4. Work Engagement, Organizational Commitment, Self Efficacy and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Work engagement, organizational commitment and self-efficacy will create a positive attitude in records ... counseling, effective communication and leadership skills. This study therefore ...... self-efficacy and self-esteem: Toward theoretical and ...

  5. Efficacy of preoperative uro-stoma education on self-efficacy after Radical Cystectomy; secondary outcome of a prospective randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Bente Thoft; Kiesbye, Berit; Soendergaard, Ingrid; Jensen, Jørgen B; Kristensen, Susanne Ammitzboell

    2017-06-01

    Radical Cystectomy with a creation of an uro-stoma is first line treatment in advanced bladder-cancer. Enhancing or maintaining an individual's condition, skills and physical wellbeing before surgery has been defined as prehabilitation. Whether preoperative stoma-education is an effective element in prehabilitation is yet to be documented. In a prospective randomized controlled design (RCT) the aim was to investigate the efficacy of a standardised preoperative stoma-education program on an individual's ability to independently change a stoma-appliance. A parent RCT-study investigated the efficacy of a multidisciplinary rehabilitation program on length of stay following cystectomy. A total of 107 patients were included in the intension-to-treat-population. Preoperatively, the intervention-group was instructed to a standardized stoma-education program consisting of areas recognized necessary to change a stoma appliance. The Urostomy Education Scale was used to measure stoma self-care at day 35, 120 and 365 postoperatively. Efficacy was expressed as a positive difference in UES-score between treatment-groups. A significant difference in mean score was found in the intervention group compared to standard of 2.7 (95% CI: 0.9; 4.5), 4.3 (95% CI: 2.1; 6.5) and 5.1 (95% CI: 2.3; 7.8) at day 35, 120 and 365 postoperatively. For the first time a study in a RCT-design have reported a positive efficacy of a short-term preoperative stoma intervention. Preoperative stoma-education is an effective intervention and adds to the evidence base of prehabilitation. Further RCT-studies powered with self-efficacy as the primer outcome are requested. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Item-level factor analysis of the Self-Efficacy Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunketorp Käll, Lina

    2014-03-01

    This study explores the internal structure of the Self-Efficacy Scale (SES) using item response analysis. The SES was previously translated into Swedish and modified to encompass all types of pain, not exclusively back pain. Data on perceived self-efficacy in 47 patients with subacute whiplash-associated disorders were derived from a previously conducted randomized-controlled trial. The item-level factor analysis was carried out using a six-step procedure. To further study the item inter-relationships and to determine the underlying structure empirically, the 20 items of the SES were also subjected to principal component analysis with varimax rotation. The analyses showed two underlying factors, named 'social activities' and 'physical activities', with seven items loading on each factor. The remaining six items of the SES appeared to measure somewhat different constructs and need to be analysed further.

  7. Self Efficacy among University Academic Staff

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Educator's Self Efficacy and Collective Educators' Self Efficacy among University Academic Staff: An Ethical Issue. ... staff on collective educators' self efficacy. The implication of the result in terms of collaborative work among academic staff was discussed in line with ethical principles and code of conduct of psychologists.

  8. Balance training with multi-task exercises improves fall-related self-efficacy, gait, balance performance and physical function in older adults with osteoporosis: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halvarsson, Alexandra; Franzén, Erika; Ståhle, Agneta

    2015-04-01

    To evaluate the effects of a balance training program including dual- and multi-task exercises on fall-related self-efficacy, fear of falling, gait and balance performance, and physical function in older adults with osteoporosis with an increased risk of falling and to evaluate whether additional physical activity would further improve the effects. Randomized controlled trial, including three groups: two intervention groups (Training, or Training+Physical activity) and one Control group, with a 12-week follow-up. Stockholm County, Sweden. Ninety-six older adults, aged 66-87, with verified osteoporosis. A specific and progressive balance training program including dual- and multi-task three times/week for 12 weeks, and physical activity for 30 minutes, three times/week. Fall-related self-efficacy (Falls Efficacy Scale-International), fear of falling (single-item question - 'In general, are you afraid of falling?'), gait speed with and without a cognitive dual-task at preferred pace and fast walking (GAITRite®), balance performance tests (one-leg stance, and modified figure of eight), and physical function (Late-Life Function and Disability Instrument). Both intervention groups significantly improved their fall-related self-efficacy as compared to the controls (p ≤ 0.034, 4 points) and improved their balance performance. Significant differences over time and between groups in favour of the intervention groups were found for walking speed with a dual-task (p=0.003), at fast walking speed (p=0.008), and for advanced lower extremity physical function (p=0.034). This balance training program, including dual- and multi-task, improves fall-related self-efficacy, gait speed, balance performance, and physical function in older adults with osteoporosis. © The Author(s) 2014.

  9. Pre-Service Teachers' Mathematics Self-Efficacy and Mathematics Teaching Self-Efficacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuya, Habila Elisha; Kwalat, Simon Kevin; Attah, Bala Galle

    2016-01-01

    Pre-service mathematics teachers' mathematics self-efficacy and mathematics teaching self-efficacy were investigated in this study. The purpose was to determine the confidence levels of their self-efficacy in mathematics and mathematics teaching. Also, the study was aimed at finding whether their mathematics self-efficacy and teaching…

  10. Self- Efficacy and Caregiver Strain in Alzheimer\\'s Caregivers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farahnaz Mohamadi Shahbalaghi

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available This study with a co relational design has conducted to determine relationship between caregiving strain and self-efficacy in family caregiver of patient with Alzheimer. Accessible sample of the study consisted of 81 family caregivers that all of them were member of Iranian Alzheimer Association. Data was gathered by demographic, self-efficacy and care giving strain questioners. Findings showed the most of the subjects were female (%60, spouse of care giving recipient (56%, married (64%, reside in same household (55%, 49% under high school education, 45% of them haven't taken formal courses about the care of the patients, 53% of them were satisfied about providing of care, 36% reported bad health status. The most important caring needs consisted education for better care providing. the Mean of self-efficacy was 66/96 (29-106 and strain 39/43 (17-65. There were not any relations between strain and self-efficacy with demographic variables. There was positive significant Pearson correlation (r=0/539, p=O/ 01 between self-efficacy and strain. Findings indicated that self-efficacy and care giving strain are subjective and individualized concepts. Care giving to elderly patients is a stressful event but moderate co-relationship shows that caregivers apprise the stress of care giving as a constructive and controllable manner.

  11. The effect of nurse-led problem-solving therapy on coping, self-efficacy and depressive symptoms for patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Haejung; Yoon, Ju Young; Lim, Yeonjung; Jung, HeeYoung; Kim, Sungmin; Yoo, Younja; Kim, Yunseong; Ahn, Jong-Joon; Park, Hye-Kyung

    2015-05-01

    to examine the effects of nurse-led, problem-solving therapy (PST) on coping, self-efficacy and depressive symptoms for patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) using a randomised controlled trial. a total of 254 patients with COPD were recruited, screened and randomly allocated into the intervention group with nurse-led PST or the comparison group with usual care. A total of 151 patients (intervention = 78 and comparison = 73) completed the study for 6 months. the nurse-led PST was an individualised and patient-centred intervention to improve patients' problem-solving skills related to symptom management and lifestyle modification. Twelve telephone-based PST sessions were provided to the intervention group, while the control group received usual care from their primary care providers. there were no group differences of post-test scores in problem-oriented coping, self-efficacy and depressive symptoms between the two groups. However, despite the lack of group differences, the nurse-led PST was effective for clinically depressed patients with COPD, who experienced decreased depressive symptoms (mean difference = 6.8, P = 0.009) and increased self-efficacy (mean difference = -0.6, P = 0.041) in the intervention group (n = 12). the nurse-led PST offered to patients with COPD did not demonstrate any different effects compared with usual care over 6 months; however, a subgroup analysis with clinically depressed subjects showed improved self-efficacy and decreased depressive symptoms in the intervention group. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Geriatrics Society. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  12. Self-Efficacy: Conditioning the Entrepreneurial Mindset

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Neergaard, Helle; Mauer, René; Kirketerp Linstad, Anne

    2009-01-01

    Research that has sought to identify the underlying determinants of self-efficacy is sparse. This chapter seeks to identify antecedents of entrepreneurial self-efficacy and the processes that produce and reinforce self-efficacy. It seeks to broaden our understanding of the self-efficacy concept t...... through an exploration of its origins and via a journey to its impact in the field of entrepreneurship. Finally, it suggests pedagogical initiatives needed to promote entrepreneurial self-efficacy in the different social arenas of life....

  13. Psychological and behavioral barriers to ART adherence among PLWH in China: role of self-efficacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Guangyu; Li, Xiaoming; Qiao, Shan; Zhou, Yuejiao; Shen, Zhiyong

    2017-12-01

    Globally, optimal adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART) is insufficient despite it is critical for maximum clinical benefits and treatment success among people living with HIV (PLWH). Many factors have been evidenced to influence medication adherence, including perceived barriers and self-efficacy. However, limited data are available regarding to psychological and behavioral barriers to ART adherence in China. Moreover, few studies have examined the mechanism of these two factors underlying HIV medication adherence. The aim of the current study is to examine the mediating role of adherence self-efficacy between perceived barriers and ART adherence among PLWH. Cross-sectional data were obtained from 2095 PLWH in Guangxi China who provided data on ART adherence. Participants reported their medication adherence, self-efficacy, barriers to ART adherence, as well as background characteristics. Results indicated a significant indirect effect from perceived barriers to medication adherence through adherence self-efficacy. Higher perceived psychological and behavioral barriers to ART adherence were related to lower adherence self-efficacy, which in turn was related to lower ART adherence. Self-efficacy could buffer the negative effects of perceived barriers on ART adherence. Future interventions to promote HIV medication adherence are recommended to focus on eliminating psychological and behavioral barriers, as well as increasing adherence self-efficacy.

  14. An eHealth Diary and Symptom-Tracking Tool Combined With Person-Centered Care for Improving Self-Efficacy After a Diagnosis of Acute Coronary Syndrome: A Substudy of a Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Axel; Fors, Andreas; Ulin, Kerstin; Thorn, Jörgen; Swedberg, Karl; Ekman, Inger

    2016-02-23

    Patients with cardiovascular diseases managed by a person-centered care (PCC) approach have been observed to have better treatment outcomes and satisfaction than with traditional care. eHealth may facilitate the often slow transition to more person-centered health care by increasing patients' beliefs in their own capacities (self-efficacy) to manage their care trajectory. eHealth is being increasingly used, but most studies continue to focus on health care professionals' logic of care. Knowledge is lacking regarding the effects of an eHealth tool on self-efficacy when combined with PCC for patients with chronic heart diseases. The objective of our study was to investigate the effect of an eHealth diary and symptom-tracking tool in combination with PCC for patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS). This was a substudy of a randomized controlled trial investigating the effects of PCC in patients hospitalized with ACS. In total, 199 patients with ACS aged eHealth tool, or both, for at least 2 months after hospital discharge. The primary end point was a composite score of changes in general self-efficacy, return to work or prior activity level, and rehospitalization or death 6 months after discharge. Of the 94 patients in the intervention arm, 37 (39%) used the eHealth tool at least once after the index hospitalization. Most of these (24/37, 65%) used the mobile app and not the Web-based app as the primary source of daily self-rating input. Patients used the eHealth tool a mean of 38 times during the first 8 weeks (range 1-118, SD 33) and 64 times over a 6-month period (range 1-597, SD 104). Patients who used the eHealth tool in combination with the PCC intervention had a 4-fold improvement in the primary end point compared with the control group (odds ratio 4.0, 95% CI 1.5-10.5; P=.005). This improvement was driven by a significant increase in general self-efficacy compared with the control group (P=.011). Patients in the PCC group who did not use the eHealth tool

  15. Do romantic partners' responses to entry dyspareunia affect women's experience of pain? The roles of catastrophizing and self-efficacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemieux, Ashley J; Bergeron, Sophie; Steben, Marc; Lambert, Bernard

    2013-09-01

    Entry dyspareunia is a sexual health concern which affects about 21% of women in the general population. Characterized by pain provoked during vaginal penetration, introital dyspareunia has been shown by controlled studies to have a negative impact on the psychological well-being, sexual function, sexual satisfaction, and quality of life of afflicted women. Many cognitive and affective variables may influence the experience of pain and associated psychosexual problems. However, the role of the partner's cognitive responses has been studied very little. The aim of the present study was to examine the associations between partners' catastrophizing and their perceptions of women's self-efficacy at managing pain on one side and women's pain intensity, sexual function, and sexual satisfaction on the other. One hundred seventy-nine heterosexual couples (mean age for women = 31, SD = 10.0; mean age for men = 33, SD = 10.6) in which the woman suffered from entry dyspareunia participated in the study. Both partners completed quantitative measures. Women completed the Pain Catastrophizing Scale and the Painful Intercourse Self-Efficacy Scale. Men completed the significant-other versions of these measures. Dependent measures were women's responses to (i) the Pain Numeric Visual Analog Scale; (ii) the Female Sexual Function Index; and (iii) the Global Measure of Sexual Satisfaction scale. Controlled for women's pain catastrophizing and self-efficacy, results indicate that higher levels of partner-perceived self-efficacy and lower levels of partner catastrophizing are associated with decreased pain intensity in women with entry dyspareunia, although only partner catastrophizing contributed unique variance. Partner-perceived self-efficacy and catastrophizing were not significantly associated with sexual function or satisfaction in women. The findings suggest that partners' cognitive responses may influence the experience of entry dyspareunia for women, pointing

  16. Quality of life, coping strategies, social support and self-efficacy in women after acute myocardial infarction: a mixed methods approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuochi, G; Foà, C

    2018-03-01

    Quality of life, coping strategies, social support and self-efficacy are important psychosocial variables strongly affecting the experience of acute myocardial infarction (AMI) in women. To gain a more in-depth understanding of how coping strategies, self-efficacy, quality of life and social support shape women's adjustment to AMI. Mixed methods study. Quantitative data were collected through a standardised questionnaire on coping strategies, self-efficacy, quality of life and social support. Qualitative data stemmed from 57 semistructured interviews conducted with post-AMI female patients on related topics. Quantitative data were analysed with unpaired two-sample t-tests on the means, comparing women who experienced AMI (N = 77) with a control group of women who did not have AMI (N = 173), and pairwise correlations on the AMI sample. Qualitative data were grouped into coding families and analysed through thematic content analysis. Qualitative and quantitative results were then integrated, for different age groups. Quantitative results indicated statistically significant differences between women who experienced AMI and the control group: the former showed lower self-perceived health, perceived social support and social support coping, but greater self-efficacy, use of acceptance, avoidance and religious coping. Pairwise correlations showed that avoidance coping strategy was negatively correlated with quality of life, while the opposite was true for problem-oriented coping, perceived social support and self-efficacy. Qualitative results extended and confirmed quantitative results, except for coping strategies: avoidance coping seemed more present than reported in the standardised measures. Mixed methods provide understanding of the importance of social support, self-efficacy and less avoidant coping strategies to women's adjustment to AMI. Women need support from health professionals with knowledge of these topics, to facilitate their adaptation to AMI. © 2017

  17. Learning how to recover from job stress: effects of a recovery training program on recovery, recovery-related self-efficacy, and well-being.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahn, Verena C; Binnewies, Carmen; Sonnentag, Sabine; Mojza, Eva J

    2011-04-01

    This quasi-experimental study evaluated the effects of a recovery training program on recovery experiences (psychological detachment from work, relaxation, mastery experiences, and control during off-job time), recovery-related self-efficacy, and well-being outcomes. The training comprised two sessions held one week apart. Recovery experiences, recovery-related self-efficacy, and well-being outcomes were measured before the training (T1) and one week (T2) and three weeks (T3) after the training. A training group consisting of 48 individuals and a waitlist control group of 47 individuals were compared (N = 95). Analyses of covariance revealed an increase in recovery experiences at T2 and T3 (for mastery only at T2). Recovery-related self-efficacy and sleep quality increased at T2 and T3, perceived stress and state negative affect decreased at T3. No training effects were found for emotional exhaustion.

  18. Developing and Validating the Scale of Economic Self-Efficacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoge, Gretchen L; Stylianou, Amanda M; Hetling, Andrea; Postmus, Judy L

    2017-05-01

    Experiencing intimate partner violence (IPV) and financial hardship are often intertwined. The dynamics of an abusive relationship may include economic abuse tactics that compromise a survivor's ability to work, pursue education, have access to financial resources, and establish financial skills, knowledge, and security. An increasingly common goal among programs serving IPV survivors is increasing financial empowerment through financial literacy. However, providing financial education alone may not be enough to improve financial behaviors. Psychological factors also play a role when individuals make financial choices. Economic self-efficacy focuses on the individual's perceived ability to perform economic or financial tasks, and may be considered a primary influence on one's ability to improve financial decisions and behaviors. The current study tests the reliability and validity of a Scale of Economic Self-Efficacy with a sample of female survivors of IPV. This study uses a calibration and validation analysis model including full and split-sample exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses, assesses for internal consistency, and examines correlation coefficients between economic self-efficacy, economic self-sufficiency, financial strain, and difficulty living with income. Findings indicate that the 10-item, unidimensional Scale of Economic Self-Efficacy demonstrates strong reliability and validity among this sample of IPV survivors. An ability to understand economic self-efficacy could facilitate individualized service approaches and allow practitioners to better support IPV survivors on their journey toward financial empowerment. Given the increase in programs focused on assets, financial empowerment, and economic well-being, the Scale of Economic Self-Efficacy has potential as a very timely and relevant tool in the design, implementation, and evaluation of such programs, and specifically for programs created for IPV survivors.

  19. Equilibrio trabajo-familia, apoyo familiar, autoeficacia parental y funcionamiento familiar percibidos por funcionarios públicos de Chile Work-Family Balance, Family Support, Parental Self Efficacy and Perceived Family Functioning in a Chilean Public Workers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth Riquelme Orellana

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Se analiza la relación entre Equilibrio trabajo-familia, Apoyo familiar, y Autoeficacia parental en funcionarios públicos, determinado las diferencias entre hombres y mujeres. A 181 funcionarios profesionales les fueron aplicados tres instrumentos de medición de las variables referidas. Se observa que existen diferencias estadísticamente significativas en el nivel de equilibrio trabajo-familia entre hombres y mujeres, obteniendo un mayor equilibrio las mujeres. Por otra parte no se encontró diferencias en apoyo familiar, autoeficacia parental y en funcionamiento familiar. En cuanto a la relación entre dichas variables se encontró una relación estadísticamente significativa entre Apoyo familiar y autoeficacia parental (r=-0,333; pIt is analyzed the relationship between work-family balance, family support, parental self-efficacy and public officials, given the differences between men and women. A 181 professional staff We applied three instruments measuring variables related. It is noted that there were significant differences in the level of work-family balance among men and women, giving women a better balance. On the other hand there was no difference in family support, parental self-efficacy and family functioning. Regarding the relationship between these variables was found a statistically significant relationship between family support and parental self-efficacy (r =- 0.333, p <0.01 between family support and family functioning (r = 0.734, p <0.01, work-family balance and parental self-efficacy (r = 0.275, p<0.01 and between parental efficacy and family functioning (r =-0.276, P <0.01.

  20. Condom use self-efficacy: effect on intended and actual condom use in adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baele, J; Dusseldorp, E; Maes, S

    2001-05-01

    To investigate aspects of adolescents' condom use self-efficacy that affect their intended and actual condom use. Four hundred twenty-four male and female sexually experienced and inexperienced adolescents with a mean age of 17.0 years filled out a questionnaire concerning condom use self-efficacy and intended and actual condom use. Specific condom use self-efficacy scales were constructed from 37 items on the basis of a principal component analysis. The effect of self-efficacy, both as a global measure and in terms of specific scales, on condom use intention and consistency was assessed using multiple hierarchic regression analyses. Six specific self-efficacy scales were constructed: Technical Skills, Image Confidence, Emotion Control, Purchase, Assertiveness, and Sexual Control. In sexually inexperienced adolescents, global self-efficacy explained 48%, the six self-efficacy scales 30%, and both together 51% of the variance in intention, after statistical control for gender, age, and education level. In the sexually experienced sample, this was 40%, 50%, and 57% for intention, and 23%, 29%, and 33% for consistency of condom use. Significant predictors of intention in the final model were gender, age, global self-efficacy and purchasing skills in the inexperienced sample, and global self-efficacy, emotion control, assertiveness, image confidence, and sexual control in the experienced sample, whereas gender, age, global self-efficacy, emotion control, assertiveness, and purchase predicted consistency of condom use in the experienced sample. Condom use self-efficacy is a multidimensional construct. Intended and actual condom use in adolescents are best predicted by self-efficacy measures that include both global and relevant specific aspects of condom use.

  1. The Development of Academic Self-Efficacy Scale for Filipino Junior High School Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angelo Reyes Dullas

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Primarily the research is focused on the development and validation of the Academic Self-efficacy Scale (ASES-FJHS for Filipino junior high school students. Self-efficacy refers to people’s beliefs in their capabilities to produce certain effects and to learn or perform behaviors at designated levels (Bandura, 2006, 2012. In relation to test construction, most of the developed self-efficacy scale focuses on one source of self-efficacy and are constructed as subscale. Given the limited published ASES for Filipino junior high school students as well as the non-existence of published and established ASES in Philippine context, this study sought to develop and validate a self-efficacy scale that is more holistic than those previously published. The design of the research is Test Development and anchored on Classical Test Theory. Respondents comprised of 4,759 junior high school students from selected 20 public and private schools in Nueva Ecija, Philippines. The study followed the two stages of test development, i.e., the development of the initial, preliminary, and final forms and validation of the scale. The items were developed through consultation with experts and literature reviews. After the development of table of specification, items were validated by four expert judges. Results showed using Lawshe Content Validation Ratio (CVI = 0.87 and Intra-class Correlation [ICC (2,4 = 0.953, a = 0.000] that the expert validators have high agreement on the items of ASES. Moreover, Upper Limit-Lower Limit method (d = 0.43, Cronbach alpha (0.95, split-half method (Spearman-Brown Coefficient = 0.86, item to total correlation, and Principal Component Analysis were also utilized to test the reliability of test items. The factor structure verified the four iterations which includes perceived control (PC, competence (C, persistence (P, and self-regulated learning domains. Convergent (r = 0.498; p < 0.05 and concurrent validity (r

  2. The Role of Self-Efficacy and Friend Support on Adolescent Vigorous Physical Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, Kyra; Warner, Lisa M; Schwarzer, Ralf

    2017-02-01

    Physical activity, including some form of vigorous activity, is a key component of a healthy lifestyle in young people. Self-efficacy and social support have been identified as key determinants of physical activity; however, the mechanism that reflects the interplay of these two factors is not well understood. The aim of the current study was to test social cognitive theory's notion that self-efficacy relates to intention that translates into behavior and to investigate whether friend support and self-efficacy synergize, interfere, or compensate for one another to predict vigorous physical activity in adolescents-a population at risk of rapid decreases in physical activity. A survey at two points in time was conducted in 226 students aged 12 to 16 years. In a conditional process analysis, friend support and physical activity self-efficacy were specified as interacting predictors of intention. The latter was specified as a mediator between self-efficacy and later vigorous physical activity, controlling for sex and age. Self-efficacy emerged as the dominant predictor of intention, followed by friend support, and an interaction between support and self-efficacy. In adolescents with high self-efficacy, intention was independent of support. In those with low self-efficacy, receiving friend support partly compensated for lack of self-efficacy. The effect of self-efficacy on vigorous physical activity was mediated by intention. Adolescent vigorous physical activity was indirectly predicted by self-efficacy via intention, and this mediation was further moderated by levels of friend support, indicating that friend support can partly buffer lack of self-efficacy.

  3. The importance of exercise self-efficacy for clinical outcomes in pulmonary rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selzler, Anne-Marie; Rodgers, Wendy M; Berry, Tanya R; Stickland, Michael K

    2016-11-01

    Pulmonary rehabilitation (PR) improves functional exercise capacity and health status in people with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), although these outcomes are often not maintained following PR. Self-efficacy is a precursor to outcomes achievement, yet few studies have examined the importance of self-efficacy to outcome improvement during PR, or how it develops over time. Further, the contribution of exercise-specific self-efficacy to outcomes in PR is unknown. The aims of this study were to determine (a) whether baseline exercise self-efficacy predicts PR attendance and change in functional exercise capacity and health status over PR, and (b) if exercise self-efficacy changes with PR. Fifty-eight out of 64 patients with COPD completed PR and assessments of exercise self-efficacy (task, coping, scheduling), the 6-minute walk test (6MWT), and St. George's Respiratory Questionnaire (SGRQ) at the beginning and end of PR. Analyses were conducted to predict attendance, and change in 6MWT and SGRQ, while controlling for baseline demographic and clinical indicators. Change in 6MWT, SGRQ, and self-efficacy with PR was also examined. Clinically significant increases in the 6MWT and SGRQ were achieved with PR. Stronger task self-efficacy predicted better attendance, while stronger coping self-efficacy predicted greater 6MWT improvement. No variables predicted SGRQ change. Scheduling self-efficacy significantly improved with PR, whereas task and coping self-efficacy did not. Baseline exercise self-efficacy appears to be a determinant of rehabilitation attendance and functional exercise improvement with PR. Clinicians should evaluate and target exercise self-efficacy to maximize adherence and health outcome improvement with PR. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  4. Eating habits, physical activity, nutrition knowledge, and self-efficacy by obesity status in upper-grade elementary school students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha, Seong Ah; Lee, Seo Yeon; Kim, Kyung A; Seo, Jung Sook; Sohn, Cheong Min; Park, Hae Ryun; Kim, Kyung Won

    2016-12-01

    Childhood obesity has increased in recent decades in Korea. This study was designed to examine differences in the eating habits, physical activity (PA), nutrition knowledge, and self-efficacy of children by obesity status. Subjects were 5th-grade children from 70 elementary schools in 17 cities nationwide. Two-stage stratified cluster sampling was employed. Survey questionnaire included items related to general characteristics, eating habits, PA, nutrition knowledge and self-efficacy. Excluding incomplete responses, 3,531 data were analyzed using SPSS. Subjects were categorized into overweight·obesity (OW) and normal weight (NW) groups based on body mass index percentiles for age by sex. A total of 21.5% of subjects was overweight or obese. There were significant differences in gender, perceived stress, perception of body shape, body satisfaction, and interest in weight control between the OW and NW groups ( P eating habits, the OW group ate breakfast ( P eating habits, PA, and self-efficacy between OW and NW children. Obesity management programs for children need to focus on increasing self-efficacy, modifying eating habits, and increasing PA.

  5. Work engagement, organizational commitment, self efficacy and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Information Impact: Journal of Information and Knowledge Management ... Work engagement, organizational commitment and self-efficacy will create a positive ... effective training, counseling, effective communication and leadership skills.

  6. Developing and validating an instrument for measuring mobile computing self-efficacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yi-Shun; Wang, Hsiu-Yuan

    2008-08-01

    IT-related self-efficacy has been found to have a critical influence on system use. However, traditional measures of computer self-efficacy and Internet-related self-efficacy are perceived to be inapplicable in the context of mobile computing and commerce because they are targeted primarily at either desktop computer or wire-based technology contexts. Based on previous research, this study develops and validates a multidimensional instrument for measuring mobile computing self-efficacy (MCSE). This empirically validated instrument will be useful to researchers in developing and testing the theories of mobile user behavior, and to practitioners in assessing the mobile computing self-efficacy of users and promoting the use of mobile commerce systems.

  7. Self-efficacy and its application in the treatment of knee osteoarthritis: a critical review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ray Marks

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Symptomatic knee osteoarthritis, a prevalent progressively disabling disease affecting one or both knee joints requires extensive self-management. Self-efficacy, a psychological attribute generally denoting one’s perceived belief about their ability to successfully perform a particular behavior, including health behaviors, is a significant predictor of psychological well-being, adherence to prescribed treatments, and pain coping mechanisms in persons with various forms of chronic disease, including arthritis. This paper examines the available peer-reviewed research published over the last 35 years detailing: i the concept of self-efficacy, ii the relationship between self-efficacy and adjustment to arthritis, iii the research concerning self-efficacy in the context of knee osteoarthritis disability, and iv some promising approaches for promoting the wellbeing of adults with knee osteoarthritis through the application of self-efficacy theory and other approaches. Based on this data, directions for future research and practice are offered.

  8. Social support and factors associated with self-efficacy among acute-care nurse practitioners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Sophia H; Yu, Ya-Mei; Chang, Wen-Yin; Lin, Yen-Kuang

    2018-02-01

    To investigate the relationship of nurse practitioners' social support as well as other factors associated with perceived self-efficacy. There is a growing demand for nurse practitioners in Taiwan, for whom self-perceived efficacy is associated with performance. Nevertheless, research on the self-efficacy and social support of nurse practitioners is limited. This is a cross-sectional survey study. Questionnaires were distributed to nurse practitioners in seven hospitals in northern Taiwan from May 2015 to March 2016. In total, data from 335 (78% return rate) certified nurse practitioners were analysed. Social support was measured by the Multidimensional Scale of Perceived Social Support (MSPSS) and the Job Content Questionnaire (JCQ), and perceived self-efficacy was measured by the General Self-Efficacy Scale (GSE). Data were analysed by ANOVAs with post hoc test and multiple linear regression. The mean score for self-efficacy was 27.60 ± 6.17. Support scores were 11.574 ± 2.37 for supervisors, 12.795 ± 1.92 for coworkers and 64.07 ± 10.16 for family, friends and significant others. nurse practitioners in the high monthly salary group had significantly higher self-efficacy than nurse practitioners in the medium and low monthly salary group (F = 8.99; p Social support from coworkers (β = 0.18, p social support were found to contribute to nurse practitioners' self-efficacy. Thus, to enhance nurse practitioners' self-efficacy and work performance, nursing leaders should address these issues. The findings inform hospital administrators to be aware of the importance of salary in relation to nurse practitioners' perceptions of social support and self-efficacy. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Self-efficacy scale for Brazilians with type 1 diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Alves Gastal

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available CONTEXT AND OBJECTIVE: Diabetes is a public health problem and good glycemic control is able to prevent or contain its complications. Self-efficacy is a key factor in successfully achieving behavior goals. The aim of this study was to analyze the psychometric properties of the insulin management diabetes self-efficacy scale (IMDSES on type 1 diabetes patients from southern Brazil. DESIGN AND SETTING: Validation study in two cities in southern Brazil. METHODS: The psychometric properties of IMDSES were evaluated in a population of type 1 diabetes patients (n = 213, from September to December 2004, who were attended within the Brazilian public healthcare system. Principal component analysis was conducted to develop the subscales. Cronbach’s alpha was used as the reliability coefficient. RESULTS: The analysis of psychometric properties resulted in an IMDSES consisting of 20 items and three subscales: diet (alpha: 0.83, insulin (alpha: 0.92 and general management (alpha: 0.78 and accounted for 53% of the variance. Criteria validity was investigated through two parameters: glycohemoglobin, which showed significant association with self-efficacy on the insulin subscale (p = 0.04, and the variable "adherence", which was significantly associated with self-efficacy on two subscales (p < 0.05. CONCLUSIONS: This study shows that the IMDSES is valid and reliable, and can be used to measure results from diabetes educational programs and to measure self-efficacy relating to diabetes management, for possible interventions.

  10. Self-Efficacy Beliefs, Motivation, Race, and Gender in Middle School Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Britner, Shari L.; Pajares, Frank

    The purpose of this study was to discover whether the science motivation beliefs of middle school students (N = 262) vary as a function of their gender or race/ethnicity and to determine whether science self-efficacy beliefs predict science achievement when motivation variables shown to predict achievement in other academic areas are controlled. Girls reported stronger science self-efficacy and self-efficacy for self-regulation, and they received higher grades in science. Boys had stronger performance-approach goals. White students had stronger self-efficacy and achievement, and African American students reported stronger task goals. Self-efficacy was the only motivation variable to predict the science achievement of girls, boys, and White students. Self-efficacy and self-concept predicted the science achievement of African American students. Results are interpreted from the perspective of Bandura's social cognitive theory.

  11. HUBUNGAN ANTARA SELF EFFICACY DENGAN FLOW AKADEMIK PADA SISWA AKSELERASI SMPN 1 SIDOARJO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eni Purwati

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Academic Flow is a condition where person feel comfortable, able to concentrate, has inner motivation, and also able to enjoy doing academic activity. Self efficacy is believe inside someone has the ability to decide correct behavior to achieve desired success. Purpose of this research is to know the correlation between self efficacy and academic flow on student acceleration. Self efficacy is acknowledged as the trigger which pushes someone learning activity until they had flow condition. This research is correlational quantitative with a subject 24 acceleration students. The result of the study showed correlation between self efficacy and academic flow on acceleration students positive linear, which is mean the higher self efficacy the higher academic flow. High self efficacy able to control the behavior to maintain the effort to do the assignment which make easy to reach the academic flow.

  12. Does Self-Efficacy Affect Cognitive Performance in Persons with Clinically Isolated Syndrome and Early Relapsing Remitting Multiple Sclerosis?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Joseph Jongen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In persons with multiple sclerosis (MS a lowered self-efficacy negatively affects physical activities. Against this background we studied the relationship between self-efficacy and cognitive performance in the early stages of MS. Thirty-three patients with Clinically Isolated Syndrome (CIS and early Relapsing Remitting MS (eRRMS were assessed for self-efficacy (MSSES-18, cognition (CDR System, fatigue (MFIS-5, depressive symptoms (BDI, disease impact (MSIS-29, and disability (EDSS. Correlative analyses were performed between self-efficacy and cognitive scores, and stepwise regression analyses identified predictors of cognition and self-efficacy. Good correlations existed between total self-efficacy and Power of Attention (r= 0.65; P< 0.001, Reaction Time Variability (r= 0.57; P< 0.001, and Speed of Memory (r= 0.53; P< 0.01, and between control self-efficacy and Reaction Time Variability (r= 0.55; P< 0.01. Total self-efficacy predicted 40% of Power of Attention, 34% of Reaction Time Variability, and 40% of Speed of Memory variabilities. Disease impact predicted 65% of total self-efficacy and 58% of control self-efficacy variabilities. The findings may suggest that in persons with CIS and eRRMS self-efficacy may positively affect cognitive performance and that prevention of disease activity may preserve self-efficacy.

  13. Direct and indirect influences of fate control belief, gambling expectancy bias, and self-efficacy on problem gambling and negative mood among Chinese college students: a multiple mediation analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Catherine So-Kum; Wu, Anise M S

    2010-12-01

    A multiple mediation model was proposed to integrate core concepts of the social axioms framework and the social cognitive theory in order to understand gambling behavior. It was hypothesized that the influence of general fate control belief on problem gambling and negative mood would be mediated by gambling-specific beliefs. Data from 773 Chinese college recreational gamblers were collected. The bootstrapping procedure was used to test the multiple mediation hypotheses. Significant indirect effects of fate control belief on problem gambling and negative mood through two gambling-specific mediators were found. Gambling expectancy bias was a more salient mediator than gambling self-efficacy. Fate control belief was also found to have a significant direct effect on negative mood. In general, a high level of general fate control belief was related to greater gambling expectancy bias and lower self-efficacy in resisting gambling, which were in turn related to problem gambling and negative mood. Limitations and implications of the study were discussed.

  14. The Relative Importance of Specific Self-Efficacy Sources in Pretraining Self-Efficacy Beliefs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howardson, Garett N.; Behrend, Tara S.

    2015-01-01

    Self-efficacy is clearly important for learning. Research identifying the most important sources of self-efficacy beliefs, however, has been somewhat limited to date in that different disciplines focus largely on different sources of self-efficacy. Whereas education researchers focus on Bandura's original sources of "enactive mastery,"…

  15. Principal Self-Efficacy and Work Engagement: Assessing a Norwegian Principal Self-Efficacy Scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Federici, Roger A.; Skaalvik, Einar M.

    2011-01-01

    One purpose of the present study was to develop and test the factor structure of a multidimensional and hierarchical Norwegian Principal Self-Efficacy Scale (NPSES). Another purpose of the study was to investigate the relationship between principal self-efficacy and work engagement. Principal self-efficacy was measured by the 22-item NPSES. Work…

  16. Measuring School Psychology Trainee Self-Efficacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lockwood, Adam B.; Mcclure, John; Sealander, Karen; Baker, Courtney N.

    2017-01-01

    There is an ever-increasing need for school psychology training programs to demonstrate their ability to produce competent practitioners. One method of addressing this need is through the assessment of self-efficacy. However, little research on self-efficacy in school psychology exists likely due to the lack of a psychometrically sound measure of…

  17. Predictors of breast feeding self-efficacy among Chinese mothers: a cross-sectional questionnaire survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Jiemin; Chan, Wai Chi Sally; Zhou, Xiuzhu; Ye, Benlan; He, Hong-Gu

    2014-06-01

    to examine breast feeding self-efficacy and identify its predictors among expectant Chinese mothers in the antenatal period. a cross-sectional descriptive questionnaire survey was conducted in the antenatal clinics of three university hospitals in China between September and December 2011. expectant mothers planning to breast feed, and who were at least 18 years of age, expecting a single, healthy, full-term baby, and competent in Mandarin (n=201). a socio-demographic data sheet, the Chinese version of the Breastfeeding Self-Efficacy Scale, and the Perceived Social Support Scale. the expectant Chinese mothers reported moderate levels of breast feeding self-efficacy. Expectant mothers who had had previous experience in breast feeding, who had watched other mothers breast feed their infants, or who had made the decision to breast feed earlier reported higher breast feeding self-efficacy. Expectant mothers' perceived social support, perceived attitude of significant others, including husband, mothers, and friends, towards breast feeding are correlated with breast feeding self-efficacy. The best-fit regression analysis revealed five variables that explained 34% of the variance in breast feeding self-efficacy in the antenatal period: perceived social support, previous experience of breast feeding, previous experience of watching others breast feed, timing of maternal decision to breast feed, and perceived husband's attitude towards breast feeding. this study highlighted the importance of improving Chinese mothers' breast feeding self-efficacy by considering the main predictors found in this study. health care professionals could develop strategies to promote breast feeding self-efficacy, such as providing opportunities for expectant mothers to learn from others' successful experience, adopt a family-centred approach in the provision of breast feeding education, provide breast feeding education at the beginning of pregnancy or even earlier, and rally comprehensive social

  18. General Self-Efficacy and Mortality in the USA; Racial Differences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assari, Shervin

    2017-08-01

    General self-efficacy has been historically assumed to have universal health implications. However, less is known about population differences in long-term health effects of general self-efficacy across diverse populations. This study compared black and white American adults for (1) the association between psychosocial and health factors and general self-efficacy at baseline, and (2) the association between baseline self-efficacy and long-term risk of all-cause mortality over 25 years. The Americans' Changing Lives (ACL) study, 1986-2011, is a nationally representative longitudinal cohort of US adults. The study followed 3361 black (n = 1156) and white (n = 2205) adults for up to 25 years. General self-efficacy as well as demographics, socioeconomics, stressful life events, health behaviors, obesity, depressive symptoms, and self-rated health were measured at baseline in 1986. The outcome was time to all-cause mortality since 1986. Race was the focal moderator. Logistic regression and proportional hazards models were used for data analysis. Although blacks had lower general self-efficacy, this association was fully explained by socioeconomic factors (education and income). Our logistic regression suggested interactions between race and education, self-rated health, and stress on general self-efficacy at baseline. Baseline general self-efficacy was associated with risk of mortality in the pooled sample. Race interacted with baseline general self-efficacy on mortality risk, suggesting stronger association for whites than blacks. Black-white differences exist in psychosocial and health factors associated with self-efficacy in the USA. Low general self-efficacy does not increase mortality risk for blacks. Future research should test whether socioeconomic status, race-related attitudes, world views, attributions, and locus of control can potentially explain why low self-efficacy is not associated with higher risk of mortality among American blacks.

  19. Social support and parenting self-efficacy among Chinese women in the perinatal period.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Ling-Ling; Sun, Ke; Chan, Sally Wai-Chi

    2014-05-01

    to examine the changes in and relationship between perceived social support and parenting self-efficacy in the perinatal period among pregnant women in mainland China. this was a secondary analysis with data from part of an experimental study of the effects of an interpersonal-psychotherapy-oriented childbirth psychoeducation programme on maternal adaptation. A longitudinal design was employed in the present study. The study was carried out from July 2008 to May 2009 in one general hospital in Guangzhou, China. a convenience sample of 68 first-time mothers in mainland China completed measurement of social support and parenting self-efficacy during pregnancy and at six weeks and three months post partum. perceived social support and parenting self-efficacy declined during early motherhood. Parenting self-efficacy increased from six weeks post partum to three months post partum. Perceived social support positively correlated with parenting self-efficacy. culturally competent health-care intervention should be developed during early motherhood to promote perceived social support and parenting self-efficacy for the new mothers. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. The relationship between maternal self-efficacy and parenting practices: implications for parent training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, M R; Woolley, M L

    2005-01-01

    The present study examined the relationship between maternal self-efficacy, dysfunctional discipline practices and child conduct problems. Specifically, three levels of self-efficacy, global, domain and task-specific self-efficacy, were assessed in mothers of 2- to 8-year-old children with conduct problems (clinic group, n=45) and non-clinic mothers from the community (non-clinic group, n=79). Measures of global, domain and task-specific self-efficacy were completed by mothers. Clinic mothers reported significantly lower self-efficacy than non-clinic mothers for all but one of the parenting tasks assessed. Both groups of mothers reported lowest self-efficacy for similar parenting tasks. In the sample as a whole self-efficacy measures were significant predictors of maternal discipline style after controlling for other parent, child and risk factors. Of the self-efficacy variables behavioural self-efficacy was the best predictor of mothers discipline style. The findings support the importance of developing parenting strategies that enable parents to generalize their parenting skills to a diverse range of diverse parenting contexts both in the home and in the community.

  1. Self-efficacy as a health-protective resource in teachers? A biopsychological approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwerdtfeger, Andreas; Konermann, Leslie; Schönhofen, Katja

    2008-05-01

    To examine the psychobiological correlates of self-efficacy in teachers. Study 1 examined associations between teacher self-efficacy and cardiac activation on a working day and Study 2 assessed the cortisol morning response in teachers with varying levels of teacher self-efficacy. Teacher self-efficacy was assessed by questionnaire. In Study 1 heart rate, heart rate variability, and locomotor activity were recorded by 22 hours ambulatory monitoring and subjective measures of stress and strain were obtained. Study 2 assessed the cortisol response to awakening to obtain a measure of HPA-axis activation and teachers filled in a questionnaire on physical complaints. Study 1 found that self-efficacy proved protective for psychological well-being. Moreover, after controlling for locomotor activity, demographic, and lifestyle variables, self-efficacy was associated with elevated heart rate and attenuated heart rate variability during school and leisure time, respectively, but not during the night, thus questioning the health-implications of self-efficacy. Study 2 found that teachers high in self-efficacy exhibited an attenuated cortisol response to awakening and fewer cardiac complaints. The results of both studies are compatible with the view that teacher self-efficacy might act as a physiological toughening agent with possibly favorable health outcomes.

  2. The roles of social factor and internet self-efficacy in nurses' web-based continuing learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Yen-Lin; Tsai, Chin-Chung

    2014-03-01

    This study was conducted to explore the relationships among social factor, Internet self-efficacy and attitudes toward web-based continuing learning in a clinical nursing setting. The participants recruited were 244 in-service nurses from hospitals in Taiwan. Three instruments were used to assess their perceptions of social factor, Internet self-efficacy (including basic and advanced Internet self-efficacy) and attitudes toward web-based continuing learning (including perceived usefulness, perceived ease of use, affection and behavior). Structural equation modeling (SEM) was utilized to identify the hypothesized structural model. The results of this study support that social factor is a significant factor correlated to Internet self-efficacy and attitudes toward web-based continuing learning (including perceived usefulness, perceived ease of use and affection). In addition, nurses' basic Internet self-efficacy plays a key role in attitudes including perceived usefulness, perceived ease of use and affection. However, advanced self-efficacy was not correlated to any of the attitudes. The behavior dimension was not linked to social factor or Internet self-efficacy, but was linked to perceived ease of use and affection. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. The Self-Efficacy Scale: A Construct Validity Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherer, Mark; Adams, Carol

    Self-efficacy is defined as the belief that one can successfully perform a behavior. Self-efficacy theory asserts that self-efficacy expectancies exert powerful influence on behavior and behavior change. The Self-efficacy Scale, which was developed to assess generalized self-efficacy expectations, consists of two subscales: general self-efficacy…

  4. The Effects of the SUN Project on Teacher Knowledge and Self-Efficacy Regarding Biological Energy Transfer Are Significant and Long-Lasting: Results of a Randomized Controlled Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batiza, Ann Finney; Gruhl, Mary; Zhang, Bo; Harrington, Tom; Roberts, Marisa; LaFlamme, Donna; Haasch, Mary Anne; Knopp, Jonathan; Vogt, Gina; Goodsell, David; Hagedorn, Eric; Marcey, David; Hoelzer, Mark; Nelson, Dave

    2013-01-01

    Biological energy flow has been notoriously difficult to teach. Our approach to this topic relies on abiotic and biotic examples of the energy released by moving electrons in thermodynamically spontaneous reactions. A series of analogical model-building experiences was supported with common language and representations including manipulatives. These materials were designed to help learners understand why electrons move in a hydrogen explosion and hydrogen fuel cell, so they could ultimately understand the rationale for energy transfer in the mitochondrion and the chloroplast. High school biology teachers attended a 2-wk Students Understanding eNergy (SUN) workshop during a randomized controlled trial. These treatment group teachers then took hydrogen fuel cells, manipulatives, and other materials into their regular biology classrooms. In this paper, we report significant gains in teacher knowledge and self-efficacy regarding biological energy transfer in the treatment group versus randomized controls. Significant effects on treatment group teacher knowledge and self-efficacy were found not only post–SUN workshop but even 1 yr later. Teacher knowledge was measured with both a multiple-choice exam and a drawing with a written explanation. Teacher confidence in their ability to teach biological energy transfer was measured by a modified form of the Science Teaching Efficacy Belief Instrument, In-Service A. Professional development implications regarding this topic are discussed. PMID:23737635

  5. Measuring the impact of multiple sclerosis on psychosocial functioning: the development of a new self-efficacy scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Airlie, J; Baker, G A; Smith, S J; Young, C A

    2001-06-01

    To develop a scale to measure self-efficacy in neurologically impaired patients with multiple sclerosis and to assess the scale's psychometric properties. Cross-sectional questionnaire study in a clinical setting, the retest questionnaire returned by mail after completion at home. Regional multiple sclerosis (MS) outpatient clinic or the Clinical Trials Unit (CTU) at a large neuroscience centre in the UK. One hundred persons with MS attending the Walton Centre for Neurology and Neurosurgery and Clatterbridge Hospital, Wirral, as outpatients. Cognitively impaired patients were excluded at an initial clinic assessment. Patients were asked to provide demographic data and complete the self-efficacy scale along with the following validated scales: Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale, Impact, Stigma and Mastery and Rankin Scales. The Rankin Scale and Barthel Index were also assessed by the physician. A new 11-item self-efficacy scale was constructed consisting of two domains of control and personal agency. The validity of the scale was confirmed using Cronbach's alpha analysis of internal consistency (alpha = 0.81). The test-retest reliability of the scale over two weeks was acceptable with an intraclass correlation coefficient of 0.79. Construct validity was investigated using Pearson's product moment correlation coefficient resulting in significant correlations with depression (r= -0.52) anxiety (r =-0.50) and mastery (r= 0.73). Multiple regression analysis demonstrated that these factors accounted for 70% of the variance of scores on the self-efficacy scale, with scores on mastery, anxiety and perceived disability being independently significant. Assessment of the psychometric properties of this new self-efficacy scale suggest that it possesses good validity and reliability in patients with multiple sclerosis.

  6. Role of illness perception and self-efficacy in lifestyle modification among non-alcoholic fatty liver disease patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zelber-Sagi, Shira; Bord, Shiran; Dror-Lavi, Gali; Smith, Matthew Lee; Towne, Samuel D; Buch, Assaf; Webb, Muriel; Yeshua, Hanny; Nimer, Assy; Shibolet, Oren

    2017-03-14

    To describe the relationships between non-alcoholic fatty-liver disease (NAFLD) patient's disease consequences and treatment perceptions, self-efficacy, and healthy lifestyle maintenance. A cross-sectional study among 146 ultrasound diagnosed NAFLD patients who visited the fatty liver clinic at the Tel-Aviv Medical Center. Eighty-seven of these individuals, participated in a clinical trial of physical activity and underwent fasting blood tests, analyzed at the same lab. Exclusion criteria included positivity for serum HBsAg or anti-HCV antibodies; fatty liver suspected to be secondary to hepatotoxic drugs; excessive alcohol consumption (≥ 30 g/d in men or ≥ 20 g/d in women) and positive markers of genetic or immune-mediated liver diseases. Patients were asked to complete a self-report structured questionnaire, assembled by the Israeli Center for Disease Control. Nutrition habits were measured using six yes/no questions (0 = no, 1 = yes) adopted from the national survey questionnaire. Participants in the clinical trial completed a detailed semi-quantitative food frequency questionnaire (FFQ) reporting their habitual nutritional intake during the past year. Self-efficacy was assessed by the Self-Efficacy Scale questionnaire, emotional representation, degree of illness understanding, timeline perception, treatment perception and symptoms were measured by the Brief Illness Perception questionnaire. Illness consequences were measured by the Personal Models of Diabetes Interview questionnaire. A path analysis was performed to describe the interrelationships between the patients' illness perceptions, and assess the extent to which the data fit a prediction of nutritional habits. The study sample included 54.1% men, with a mean age of 47.76 ± 11.68 years (range: 20-60) and mean body mass index of 31.56 ± 4.6. The average perceived nutrition habits score was 4.73 ± 1.45 on a scale between 0-6, where 6 represents the healthiest eating habits. Most of the study

  7. Multidimensional Self-Efficacy and Affect in Wheelchair Basketball Players

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Jeffrey J.

    2008-01-01

    In the current study, variables grounded in social cognitive theory with athletes with disabilities were examined. Performance, training, resiliency, and thought control self-efficacy, and positive (PA) and negative (NA) affect were examined with wheelchair basketball athletes (N = 79). Consistent with social cognitive theory, weak to strong…

  8. Enhancing of Self-Efficacy in Teacher Education Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malinauskas, Romualdas K.

    2017-01-01

    In this study, the effectiveness of training module on enhancing self-efficacy in teacher education students was investigated. Sixty-eight (68) teacher education students (M age = 22.74; SD = 0.57) participated in this study, 36 of whom were assigned to an experimental group and the other 32 were assigned to a control group. The training module on…

  9. The Relationship between Teachers' Self-Efficacy with Behavior Management and School-Wide Positive Behavior Supports

    Science.gov (United States)

    Micek, Kristin

    2014-01-01

    Classroom management is a common concern for educators. Teachers with high self-efficacy are strongly linked with having successful characteristics regarding their classroom management styles and strategies. With this in mind, the current study examined classroom teachers' perceived self-efficacy, specifically regarding their behavior…

  10. Teacher Self-Efficacy with Teaching Students to Lead IEP Meetings: A Correlation Study on Administrator Support

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Laron A.

    2012-01-01

    Self-efficacy has been closely linked to teacher performance of instructional tasks. Previous studies on teacher self-efficacy focused on general activities and were less specific regarding special education teachers' perceived ability to perform a given task. The purpose of this quantitative correlation study was to evaluate high school special…

  11. Effects of acculturation, coping strategies, locus of control, and self-efficacy on chronic pain: study of Chinese immigrant women in Italy - insights from a thematic field analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Re, Tania Simona; Bragazzi, Nicola Luigi; Siri, Anna; Cisneros Puebla, César; Friese, Susanne; Simões, Mário; Candau, Joël; Khabbache, Hicham

    2017-01-01

    Chronic pain represents a common public health concern worldwide. It is a complex phenomenon, owing to the interaction of different factors, including biological, physiological, psychological, environmental, and social variables. Some groups, such as women and immigrants, are particularly vulnerable. However, little is known about how Chinese women in Italy live with and face chronic pain. The present study aimed at filling this knowledge gap by examining the burden of chronic pain in Chinese immigrants in Italy in terms of acculturation processes, perceived control over disease, social networks, and coping strategies. A qualitative approach was used, performing a thematic field analysis. We interviewed 82 Chinese women from different Italian towns (Genoa, Milan, Turin, Bologna, Florence, and Prato) in depth. The sense of belonging to the host culture was strong in our sample. However, this did not simply reflect or translate into a linear engagement with medical systems, as health care pathways were more complex and dual (both Chinese and Western). Chinese women who felt deeply rooted in the Italian environment did not discontinue the use of traditional Chinese medicine. Chronic pain extensively and adversely affected daily life, particularly interfering with work. Coping strategies were mainly adaptive behaviors, being problem focused or maladaptive, relying upon "cope and avoid" mechanisms. Chinese women preferred to use traditional Chinese remedies rather than conventional medicine, while using the Italian system in emergencies. Perceived control over chronic pain was usually external. Finally, Chinese women with chronic pain benefit from social networks and support, which were mainly composed of Chinese peers. In conclusion, our findings underline the tremendous burden of chronic pain affecting all aspects of Chinese women's lives. Health care workers and providers should be aware of the complexity of chronic pain Therefore, a holistic approach, involving

  12. At-Risk Boys' Social Self-Efficacy and Physical Activity Self-Efficacy in a Summer Sports Camp

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Xiaoxia; Xiang, Ping; McBride, Ron E.; Liu, Jiling; Thornton, Michael A.

    2016-01-01

    This study examined at-risk boys' social self-efficacy and physical activity self-efficacy within Bandura's self-efficacy framework. A total of 97 boys, aged between 10 and 13 years, attending a summer sports camp completed questionnaires assessing their social self-efficacy, physical activity self- efficacy, prosocial behaviors, and effort.…

  13. The Sources of Self-Efficacy: Educational Research and Implications for Music

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendricks, Karin S.

    2016-01-01

    Music teachers can empower students with control over their own music ability development by helping them foster positive self-efficacy beliefs. This article reviews general education and music research concerning Bandura's theoretical four sources of self-efficacy (enactive mastery experience, vicarious experience, verbal/social persuasion, and…

  14. The Effect of Self-Assessment on EFL Learners' Self-Efficacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baleghizadeh, Sasan; Masoun, Atieh

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated the continuous influence of self-assessment on EFL (English as a foreign language) learners' self-efficacy. The participants, divided into an experimental and a control group, were 57 Iranian EFL learners in an English-language institute. The participants' self-efficacy was measured through a questionnaire that was the same…

  15. The Effects of Exercise Advertising on Self-efficacy and Decisional Balance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, Tanya R.; Howe, Bruce L.

    2005-01-01

    Objectives: To investigate the effects of exercise advertising on self-efficacy and decisional balance for changing exercise behavior. Methods: One hundred seventy-four university students (females = 108; males = 66) watched a video that contained health, appearance, or control advertising and completed stage of change, exercise self-efficacy, and…

  16. The Study, Evaluation, and Improvement of University Student Self-Efficacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartimote-Aufflick, Kathryn; Bridgeman, Adam; Walker, Richard; Sharma, Manjula; Smith, Lorraine

    2016-01-01

    In this review of 64 articles published since the year 2000, a strong association between self-efficacy and student learning outcomes was apparent. Self-efficacy is also related to other factors such as value, self-regulation and metacognition, locus of control, intrinsic motivation, and strategy learning use. The review revealed that university…

  17. Explaining infant feeding: The role of previous personal and vicarious experience on attitudes, subjective norms, self-efficacy, and breastfeeding outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartle, Naomi C; Harvey, Kate

    2017-11-01

    Breastfeeding confers important health benefits to both infants and their mothers, but rates are low in the United Kingdom and other developed countries despite widespread promotion. This study examined the relationships between personal and vicarious experience of infant feeding, self-efficacy, the theory of planned behaviour variables of attitudes and subjective norm, and the likelihood of breastfeeding at 6-8 weeks post-natally. A prospective questionnaire study of both first-time mothers (n = 77) and experienced breastfeeders (n = 72) recruited at an antenatal clinic in South East England. Participants completed a questionnaire at 32 weeks pregnant assessing personal and vicarious experience of infant feeding (breastfeeding, formula-feeding, and maternal grandmother's experience of breastfeeding), perceived control, self-efficacy, intentions, attitudes (to breastfeeding and formula-feeding), and subjective norm. Infant feeding behaviour was recorded at 6-8 weeks post-natally. Multiple linear regression modelled the influence of vicarious experience on attitudes, subjective norm, and self-efficacy (but not perceived control) and modelled the influence of attitude, subjective norm, self-efficacy, and past experience on intentions to breastfeed. Logistic regression modelled the likelihood of breastfeeding at 6-8 weeks. Previous experience (particularly personal experience of breastfeeding) explained a significant amount of variance in attitudes, subjective norm, and self-efficacy. Intentions to breastfeed were predicted by subjective norm and attitude to formula-feeding and, in experienced mothers, self-efficacy. Breastfeeding at 6 weeks was predicted by intentions and vicarious experience of formula-feeding. Vicarious experience, particularly of formula-feeding, has been shown to influence the behaviour of first-time and experienced mothers both directly and indirectly via attitudes and subjective norm. Interventions that reduce exposure to formula

  18. An Analysis on the Effect of Computer Self-Efficacy over Scientific Research Self-Efficacy and Information Literacy Self-Efficacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuncer, Murat

    2013-01-01

    Present research investigates reciprocal relations amidst computer self-efficacy, scientific research and information literacy self-efficacy. Research findings have demonstrated that according to standardized regression coefficients, computer self-efficacy has a positive effect on information literacy self-efficacy. Likewise it has been detected…

  19. Effects of self-monitoring of glucose on distress and self-efficacy in people with non-insulin-treated Type 2 diabetes: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malanda, U L; Bot, S D M; Kostense, P J; Snoek, F J; Dekker, J M; Nijpels, G

    2016-04-01

    To investigate the effects of self-monitoring of glucose in blood or urine, on diabetes-specific distress and self-efficacy, compared with usual care in people with non-insulin-treated Type 2 diabetes mellitus. One hundred and eighty-one participants with non-insulin-treated Type 2 diabetes mellitus [diabetes duration ≥ 1 year, age 45-75 years, HbA1c ≥ 53.0 mmol/mol (7.0%), self-monitoring frequency self-monitoring (n = 60), urine self-monitoring (n = 59) or usual care (n = 62). Primary outcomes were between-group differences in diabetes-specific distress [Problem Areas in Diabetes scale (PAID)] and self-efficacy [Confidence in Diabetes Self-Care questionnaire (CIDS-2)] after 12 months. Secondary outcomes included changes in HbA1c , treatment satisfaction and depressive symptoms. There were no statistically significant between-group differences in changes in PAID and CIDS-2 after 12 months. Mean difference in PAID between blood monitoring and control was -2.2 [95% confidence interval (CI) -7.1 to 2.7], between urine monitoring and control was -0.9 (95% CI -4.4 to 2.5) and between blood monitoring and urine monitoring was -2.0 (95% CI -4.1 to 0.1). Mean difference in CIDS-2 between blood monitoring and control was 0.6 [95% CI (-2.0 to 2.1), between urine monitoring and control was 2.8 (95% CI -2.3 to 7.9)] and between blood monitoring and urine monitoring was -3.3 (95% CI -7.9 to 1.3). No statistically significant between-group differences in change in any of the secondary outcome measures were found. This study did not find statistical or clinical evidence for a long-term effect of self-monitoring of glucose in blood or urine on diabetes-specific distress and self-efficacy in people with moderately controlled non-insulin-treated Type 2 diabetes mellitus. (Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN84568563). © 2015 Diabetes UK.

  20. Feasibility of the iPad as a hub for smart house technology in the elderly; effects of cognition, self-efficacy, and technology experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alvseike H

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Hilde Alvseike,1 Kolbjørn Brønnick2,31The Norwegian Centre for Movement Disorders, 2Regional Centre for Clinical Research in Psychosis, Division of Psychiatry, Stavanger University Hospital, Norway; 3The Reading Centre, University of Stavanger, NorwayAbstract: Smart house technology using tablet computers may help older people to master activities of daily living by making it easier to perform daily tasks like controlling lights and indoor temperature throughout the house with a few keystrokes. The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of age, cognition, self-efficacy, and technology experience on the ability of older people to perceive and use iPad tablet computers for this purpose. Twenty-eight participants were interviewed using a structured interview guide and questionnaires, and a practical test of how to use the iPad was performed. The Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE was used to assess cognition. Cognitive deficits and low self-efficacy significantly reduced the ability of the subjects to use the smart house technology and to perceive the smart house technology service as provided. Age was unrelated to the outcome variables. Finally, technology experience had an effect on technology perception. If further research supports these findings, it should influence smart-house implementation in an elderly population, raising awareness of usability problems in older people with low self-efficacy and cognitive problems.Keywords: smart house technology, iPad, cognition, self-efficacy, technology experience, elderly

  1. Comparing student clinical self-efficacy and team process outcomes for a DEU, blended, and traditional clinical setting: A quasi-experimental research study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plemmons, Christina; Clark, Michele; Feng, Du

    2018-03-01

    Clinical education is vital to both the development of clinical self-efficacy and the integration of future nurses into health care teams. The dedicated education unit clinical teaching model is an innovative clinical partnership, which promotes skill development, professional growth, clinical self-efficacy, and integration as a team member. Blended clinical teaching models are combining features of the dedicated education unit and traditional clinical model. The aims of this study are to explore how each of three clinical teaching models (dedicated education unit, blended, traditional) affects clinical self-efficacy and attitude toward team process, and to compare the dedicated education unit model and blended model to traditional clinical. A nonequivalent control-group quasi-experimental design was utilized. The convenience sample of 272 entry-level baccalaureate nursing students included 84 students participating in a dedicated education unit model treatment group, 66 students participating in a blended model treatment group, and 122 students participating in a traditional model control group. Perceived clinical self-efficacy was evaluated by the pretest/posttest scores obtained on the General Self-Efficacy scale. Attitude toward team process was evaluated by the pretest/posttest scores obtained on the TeamSTEPPS® Teamwork Attitude Questionnaire. All three clinical teaching models resulted in significant increases in both clinical self-efficacy (p=0.04) and attitude toward team process (p=0.003). Students participating in the dedicated education unit model (p=0.016) and students participating in the blended model (pteam process among entry-level baccalaureate nursing students. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. How specific is specific self-efficacy?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Tine; Makransky, Guido; Vang, Maria Louison

    2017-01-01

    academic learning self-efficacy (SAL-SE) and specific academic exam self-efficacy (SAE-SE), each scale being measurement invariant relative to age, Gender, admission method and specific course targeted. Furthermore, significant and relevant differences between the SAL-SE and SAE-SE scores dependent......Self-efficacy is an important and much used construct in psychology and social science studies. The validity of the measurements used is not always sufficiently evaluated. The aim was to evaluate the psychometric properties of the Danish translation of the self-efficacy subscale of The Motivated...... Strategies for Learning Questionnaire (MSLQ-SE) within a higher education context. Rasch measurement models were employed focusing on measurement invariance and dimensionality. Results with one students sample showed the MSLQ-SE to be not one, but two separate unidimensional subscales, measuring specific...

  3. An Exploration of Career Transition Self-Efficacy in Emerging Adult College Graduates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halstead, Tammy Jane; Lare, Douglas

    2018-01-01

    At the intersection of college and work is a complex transition that graduates face every day. Lower levels of college to career transition self-efficacy (CTSE) and lower levels of perceived adulthood may cause a more difficult transition. In this mixed-method study we sought to better understand the relationships among perceived adulthood, CTSE,…

  4. Self-Efficacy Beliefs as Shapers of Children's Aspirations and Career Trajectories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandura, Albert; Barbaranelli, Claudio; Caprara, Gian Vittorio; Pastorelli, Concetta

    2001-01-01

    Tested a structural model of the network of sociocognitive influences shaping children's career aspirations and trajectories among 272 early adolescents. Found that subjects' perceived efficacy rather than their actual academic achievement was the key determinant of their perceived occupational self-efficacy and preferred choice of worklife.…

  5. The Responsive Classroom approach and fifth grade students' math and science anxiety and self-efficacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griggs, Marissa Swaim; Rimm-Kaufman, Sara E; Merritt, Eileen G; Patton, Christine L

    2013-12-01

    Self-efficacy forecasts student persistence and achievement in challenging subjects. Thus, it is important to understand factors that contribute to students' self-efficacy, a key factor in their success in math and science. The current cross-sectional study examined the contribution of students' gender and math and science anxiety as well as schools' use of Social and Emotional Learning (SEL) practices to students' math and science self-efficacy. Fifth graders (n = 1,561) completed questionnaires regarding their feelings about math and science. Approximately half of the students attended schools implementing the Responsive Classroom® (RC) approach, an SEL intervention, as part of a randomized controlled trial. Results suggested no difference in math and science self-efficacy between boys and girls. Students who self-reported higher math and science anxiety also reported less self-efficacy toward these subjects. However, the negative association between students' anxiety and self-efficacy was attenuated in schools using more RC practices compared with those using fewer RC practices. RC practices were associated with higher science self-efficacy. Results highlight anxiety as contributing to poor self-efficacy in math and science and suggest that RC practices create classroom conditions in which students' anxiety is less strongly associated with negative beliefs about their ability to be successful in math and science. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2013 APA, all rights reserved.

  6. The relationship between self-efficacy and reductions in smoking in a contingency management procedure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romanowich, Paul; Mintz, Jim; Lamb, R J

    2009-06-01

    Social--cognitive and behavioral theories of change disagree on what the relevant controlling variables for initiating behavior change are. Correlations between baseline smoking cessation self-efficacy and the changes in breath carbon monoxide (CO) and the reduction in breath CO and increases in smoking cessation self-efficacy from baseline were obtained from a contingency management smoking cessation procedure. A test of the difference between the cross-lag correlations suggested a nonspurious causal relationship between smoking cessation self-efficacy and changes in breath CO. Path analyses showed that decreases in breath CO (reductions in smoking) predicted later increases in smoking cessation self-efficacy. Baseline self-reports of smoking cessation self-efficacy were not significantly correlated with subsequent changes in breath CO. Rather, significant correlations were found between reductions in breath CO and later increases in smoking cessation self-efficacy. These results suggest that self-efficacy may be a cognitive response to one's own behavior, and are inconsistent with a social--cognitive view of self-efficacy's role in behavior change. Implications for the development of smoking cessation programs and health-promoting behavior changes in general are discussed.

  7. Morning self-efficacy predicts physical activity throughout the day in knee osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhaoyang, Ruixue; Martire, Lynn M; Sliwinski, Martin J

    2017-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the within-day and cross-day prospective effects of knee osteoarthritis (OA) patients' self-efficacy to engage in physical activity despite the pain on their subsequent physical activity assessed objectively in their natural environment. Over 22 days, 135 older adults with knee OA reported their morning self-efficacy for being physically active throughout the day using a handheld computer and wore an accelerometer to measure moderate activity and steps. Morning self-efficacy had a significant positive effect on steps and moderate-intensity activity throughout that day, above and beyond the effects of demographic background and other psychosocial factors as well as spouses' support and social control. The lagged effect of morning self-efficacy on the next day's physical activity and the reciprocal lagged effect of physical activity on the next day's self-efficacy were not significant. Positive between-person effects of self-efficacy on physical activity were found. Future research should aim to better understand the mechanisms underlying fluctuations in patients' daily self-efficacy, and target patients' daily self-efficacy as a modifiable psychological mechanism for promoting physical activity. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  8. Evaluation of an intervention to increase self-efficacy for independent exercise in cardiac rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barkley, Sherry A; Fahrenwald, Nancy L

    2013-01-01

    Adherence to independent exercise is an essential outcome of cardiac rehabilitation (CR), yet limited theory-based interventions to improve adherence exist. This study tested the effects of an intervention based on Bandura's conceptualization of self-efficacy. The self-efficacy coaching intervention (SCI), a supplement to standard care, was designed to increase self-efficacy for independent exercise and independent exercise behavior in CR. We examined whether the SCI vs. attention control (AC) resulted in improved exercise self-efficacy (ESE), barriers self-efficacy (BARSE), and minutes of independent exercise for CR participants (n = 65). While between-group differences did not reach significance (p > .10) for any of the outcome measures, significant within-group changes were noted in BARSE scores and independent exercise (p exercise for the AC group was also significant (p =. 006). Further study is needed to explore whether short-term changes translate into maintenance of independent exercise participation after program completion.

  9. Social Media Self-Efficacy of Health Education Specialists: Training and Organizational Development Implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alber, Julia M; Paige, Samantha; Stellefson, Michael; Bernhardt, Jay M

    2016-11-01

    A growing number of public health organizations are applying the power of social media (SM) for health promotion and behavior change. This cross-sectional study of health education specialists (n = 353) examined which demographic and occupational factors were associated with SM self-efficacy, and evaluated SM self-efficacy related to each of the Seven Areas of Responsibility. A series of one-way analyses of variance were conducted to determine whether differences in SM self-efficacy existed by sex, age, years of work experience, and SM access at work. A multiple linear regression examined the relationship between SM self-efficacy and SM experience when controlling for demographic and occupational factors. Statistically significant differences in SM self-efficacy existed by age, F(2, 289) = 6.54, p = .002. SM experience (β = 1.43, t = 11.35, p education research and practice. © 2016 Society for Public Health Education.

  10. Expecting success: Factors influencing ninth graders' science self-efficacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donahue, Elizabeth

    What factors influence ninth grade students' expectations for success in science? Using social cognitive theory and bioecological systems theory as theoretical frameworks, this dissertation employs data from the High School Longitudinal Study of 2009 (HSLS:09) to examine the relative impact of teacher practices and their perceived attitudes on students' science self-efficacy. Further, as they relate to this broader issue, the relative impact of student subjective task value and teacher characteristics is also investigated. It has been well documented that U.S. students are not achieving at satisfactory levels in science. Education policy has focused on improving science teacher quality as one way to address this problem. Teacher effectiveness has been primarily measured by student achievement on standardized tests. However, not enough attention has been given to the social cognitive factors that can lead to increased achievement and persistence in science as well as how teachers may influence these factors. This study interrogates the relationship between student and teacher variables and the social cognitive construct of self-efficacy, which has proven to have a significant impact on student achievement and persistence in science. Findings add to the current literature surrounding ways that educators may increase student performance in science by employing policies and practices that benefit the development of student science self-efficacy.

  11. Self-efficacy and barriers to disaster evacuation in Hong Kong.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newnham, Elizabeth A; Balsari, Satchit; Lam, Rex Pui Kin; Kashyap, Shraddha; Pham, Phuong; Chan, Emily Y Y; Patrick, Kaylie; Leaning, Jennifer

    2017-12-01

    To investigate specific challenges to Hong Kong's capacity for effective disaster response, we assessed perceived barriers to evacuation and citizens' self-efficacy. Global positioning system software was used to determine random sampling locations across Hong Kong, weighted by population density. The resulting sample of 1023 participants (46.5% female, mean age 40.74 years) were invited to complete questionnaires on emergency preparedness, barriers to evacuation and self-efficacy. Latent profile analysis and multinomial logistic regression were used to identify self-efficacy profiles and predictors of profile membership. Only 11% of the sample reported feeling prepared to respond to a disaster. If asked to evacuate in an emergency, 41.9% of the sample cited significant issues that would preclude them from doing so. Self-efficacy was negatively associated with barriers to disaster response so that participants reporting higher levels of self-efficacy cited fewer perceived barriers to evacuation. Hong Kong has established effective strategies for emergency response, but concerns regarding evacuation and mobilisation remain. The findings indicate that improving self-efficacy for disaster response has potential to increase evacuation readiness.

  12. Self-Efficacy Buffers the Relationship between Educational Disadvantage and Executive Functioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zahodne, Laura B; Nowinski, Cindy J; Gershon, Richard C; Manly, Jennifer J

    2015-04-01

    Previous studies showed that control beliefs are more strongly related to global cognition and mortality among adults with low education, providing preliminary evidence that self-efficacy buffers against the negative impact of educational disadvantage on physical and cognitive health. The current study extends these findings to a nationally representative sample of men and women aged 30 to 85 and explores which cognitive domains are most strongly associated with self-efficacy, educational attainment, and their interaction. Data were obtained from 1032 adult (30-85) participants in the United States norming study for the NIH Toolbox. Self-efficacy, executive functioning, working memory, processing speed, episodic memory, and vocabulary were assessed with the NIH Toolbox. Multivariate analysis of covariance and follow-up regressions tested the hypothesis that self-efficacy would be more strongly related to cognitive performance among individuals with lower education, controlling for age, sex, race, ethnicity, education, reading level, testing language, and depressive symptoms. Higher education was associated with higher self-efficacy and better performance on all cognitive tests. Higher self-efficacy was associated with better set-switching and attention/inhibition. Significant self-efficacy by education interactions indicated that associations between self-efficacy and executive abilities were stronger for individuals with lower education. Specifically, individuals with low education but high self-efficacy performed similarly to individuals with high education. This study provides evidence that self-efficacy beliefs buffer against the negative effects of low educational attainment on executive functioning. These results have implications for future policy and/or intervention work aimed at reducing the deleterious effects of educational disadvantage on later cognitive health.

  13. Self-Efficacy Buffers the Relationship between Educational Disadvantage and Executive Functioning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zahodne, Laura B.; Nowinski, Cindy J.; Gershon, Richard C.; Manly, Jennifer J.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Previous studies showed that control beliefs are more strongly related to global cognition and mortality among adults with low education, providing preliminary evidence that self-efficacy buffers against the negative impact of educational disadvantage on physical and cognitive health. The current study extends these findings to a nationally-representative sample of men and women aged 30 to 85 and explores which cognitive domains are most strongly associated with self-efficacy, educational attainment, and their interaction. Method Data were obtained from 1,032 adult (30-85) participants in the United States norming study for the NIH Toolbox. Self-efficacy, executive functioning, working memory, processing speed, episodic memory, and vocabulary were assessed with the NIH Toolbox. Multivariate analysis of covariance and follow-up regressions tested the hypothesis that self-efficacy would be more strongly related to cognitive performance among individuals with lower education, controlling for age, sex, race, ethnicity, education, reading level, testing language, and depressive symptoms. Results Higher education was associated with higher self-efficacy and better performance on all cognitive tests. Higher self-efficacy was associated with better set-switching and attention/inhibition. Significant self-efficacy by education interactions indicated that associations between self-efficacy and executive abilities were stronger for individuals with lower education. Specifically, individuals with low education but high self-efficacy performed similarly to individuals with high education. Conclusions This study provides evidence that self-efficacy beliefs buffer against the negative effects of low educational attainment on executive functioning. These results have implications for future policy and/or intervention work aimed at reducing the deleterious effects of educational disadvantage on later cognitive health. PMID:25877284

  14. The feeling of doing across levels of analysis: The effects of perceived control on learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ljubica Chatman

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available A person's sense of control was initially conceptualized in psychology as either a trait (Rotter, 1966, an attribution style (Weiner, 1979 or self-efficacy belief (Bandura, 1989a. More recent work in social cognition focuses on the process of inferring one's own causality and how the feeling of doing comes about. This investigation centers on a cue based process as leading to the experience of agency. These cues include vision, proprioception, social cues, and action relevant thought (Wegner & Sparrow, 2004. Since the advent of Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI, progress has been made in understanding the neural substrates implicated when one's infers own causality (for review see David, Newen, & Vogeley, 2008. An analysis of the different approaches to studying human agency, reveals their contributions with each level of analysis adding to and refining our understanding of perceived control and its effect on learning.

  15. Effect of an EBM course in combination with case method learning sessions: an RCT on professional performance, job satisfaction, and self-efficacy of occupational physicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hugenholtz, Nathalie I R; Schaafsma, Frederieke G; Nieuwenhuijsen, Karen; van Dijk, Frank J H

    2008-10-01

    An intervention existing of an evidence-based medicine (EBM) course in combination with case method learning sessions (CMLSs) was designed to enhance the professional performance, self-efficacy and job satisfaction of occupational physicians. A cluster randomized controlled trial was set up and data were collected through questionnaires at baseline (T0), directly after the intervention (T1) and 7 months after baseline (T2). The data of the intervention group [T0 (n = 49), T1 (n = 31), T2 (n = 29)] and control group [T0 (n = 49), T1 (n = 28), T2 (n = 28)] were analysed in mixed model analyses. Mean scores of the perceived value of the CMLS were calculated in the intervention group. The overall effect of the intervention over time comparing the intervention with the control group was statistically significant for professional performance (p Job satisfaction and self-efficacy changes were small and not statistically significant between the groups. The perceived value of the CMLS to gain new insights and to improve the quality of their performance increased with the number of sessions followed. An EBM course in combination with case method learning sessions is perceived as valuable and offers evidence to enhance the professional performance of occupational physicians. However, it does not seem to influence their self-efficacy and job satisfaction.

  16. The Combined Effects of Classroom Teaching and Learning Strategy Use on Students' Chemistry Self-Efficacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Derek

    2015-02-01

    For students to be successful in school chemistry, a strong sense of self-efficacy is essential. Chemistry self-efficacy can be defined as students' beliefs about the extent to which they are capable of performing specific chemistry tasks. According to Bandura (Psychol. Rev. 84:191-215, 1977), students acquire information about their level of self-efficacy from four sources: performance accomplishments, vicarious experiences, verbal persuasion, and physiological states. No published studies have investigated how instructional strategies in chemistry lessons can provide students with positive experiences with these four sources of self-efficacy information and how the instructional strategies promote students' chemistry self-efficacy. In this study, questionnaire items were constructed to measure student perceptions about instructional strategies, termed efficacy-enhancing teaching, which can provide positive experiences with the four sources of self-efficacy information. Structural equation modeling was then applied to test a hypothesized mediation model, positing that efficacy-enhancing teaching positively affects students' chemistry self-efficacy through their use of deep learning strategies such as metacognitive control strategies. A total of 590 chemistry students at nine secondary schools in Hong Kong participated in the survey. The mediation model provided a good fit to the student data. Efficacy-enhancing teaching had a direct effect on students' chemistry self-efficacy. Efficacy-enhancing teaching also directly affected students' use of deep learning strategies, which in turn affected students' chemistry self-efficacy. The implications of these findings for developing secondary school students' chemistry self-efficacy are discussed.

  17. Self-efficacy strategies to improve exercise in patients with heart failure: A systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatemeh Rajati

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Despite exercise is recommended as an adjunct to medication therapy in patients with heart failure (HF, non-adherence to exercise is a major problem. While improving self-efficacy is an effective way to increase physical activity, the evidence concerning the relationship between strategies to enhance self-efficacy and exercise among HF has not been systematically reviewed. The objective of this systematic review is to assess the effect of interventions to change the self-efficacy on exercise in patients with HF. METHODS: A systematic database search was conducted for articles reporting exercise self-efficacy interventions. Databases such as PubMed, ProQuest, CINAHL, Scopus, and PsycINFO, and the Cochrane Library were searched with restrictions to the years 2000-June 2014. A search of relevant databases identified 10 studies. Published randomized controlled intervention studies focusing strategies to change self-efficacy to exercise adherence in HF were eligible for inclusion. In addition, studies that have applied self-efficacy-based interventions to improve exercise are discussed. RESULTS: Limited published data exist evaluating the self-efficacy strategies to improve exercise in HF. Dominant strategies to improve patients’ self-efficacy were performance accomplishments, vicarious experience, verbal persuasion, emotional arousal. CONCLUSION: Evidence from some trials supports the view that incorporating the theory of self-efficacy into the design of an exercise intervention is beneficial. Moreover, exercise interventions aimed at integrating the four strategies of exercise self-efficacy can have positive effects on confidence and the ability to initiate exercise and recover HF symptoms. Findings of this study suggest that a positive relationship exists between self-efficacy and initiating and maintaining exercise in HF, especially in the short-term period. 

  18. Self-efficacy strategies to improve exercise in patients with heart failure: A systematic review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajati, Fatemeh; Sadeghi, Masoumeh; Feizi, Awat; Sharifirad, Gholamreza; Hasandokht, Tolu; Mostafavi, Firoozeh

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Despite exercise is recommended as an adjunct to medication therapy in patients with heart failure (HF), non-adherence to exercise is a major problem. While improving self-efficacy is an effective way to increase physical activity, the evidence concerning the relationship between strategies to enhance self-efficacy and exercise among HF has not been systematically reviewed. The objective of this systematic review is to assess the effect of interventions to change the self-efficacy on exercise in patients with HF. METHODS A systematic database search was conducted for articles reporting exercise self-efficacy interventions. Databases such as PubMed, ProQuest, CINAHL, Scopus, and PsycINFO, and the Cochrane Library were searched with restrictions to the years 2000-June 2014. A search of relevant databases identified 10 studies. Published randomized controlled intervention studies focusing strategies to change self-efficacy to exercise adherence in HF were eligible for inclusion. In addition, studies that have applied self-efficacy-based interventions to improve exercise are discussed. RESULTS Limited published data exist evaluating the self-efficacy strategies to improve exercise in HF. Dominant strategies to improve patients’ self-efficacy were performance accomplishments, vicarious experience, verbal persuasion, emotional arousal. CONCLUSION Evidence from some trials supports the view that incorporating the theory of self-efficacy into the design of an exercise intervention is beneficial. Moreover, exercise interventions aimed at integrating the four strategies of exercise self-efficacy can have positive effects on confidence and the ability to initiate exercise and recover HF symptoms. Findings of this study suggest that a positive relationship exists between self-efficacy and initiating and maintaining exercise in HF, especially in the short-term period. PMID:25815022

  19. Self-efficacy in the context of heart transplantation - a new perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almgren, Matilda; Lennerling, Annette; Lundmark, Martina; Forsberg, Anna

    2017-10-01

    An in-depth exploration of self-efficacy among heart transplant recipients by means of Bandura's self-efficacy theory. An essential component of chronic illness management is self-management, which refers to activities carried out by people to create order, structure and control in their lives. Self-efficacy is an important aspect of self-management, which seems to have become the main paradigm for long-term management after solid organ transplantation. A directed content analysis using Bandura's self-efficacy theory. Open-ended, in-depth interviews were conducted with 14 heart transplant recipients at their 12-month follow-up after heart transplantation. This study generated the hypothesis that from the patients' perspective, self-efficacy after heart transplantation concerns balancing expectations to find the optimum level of self-efficacy. Performance accomplishment was found to have the greatest impact on self-efficacy, while its absence was the main source of disappointments. It was also revealed that the gap between performance accomplishment and efficacy expectations can be understood as uncertainty. It is essential to assess both expectations and disappointments from the patient perspective in order to promote an optimum level of self-efficacy among heart transplant recipients. This includes supporting the heart recipient to adopt mental and physical adjustment strategies to balance her/his expectations as a means of minimising disappointments. The understanding that uncertainty can undermine self-efficacy is crucial. The merging of the uncertainty in illness and self-efficacy theories provides an excellent framework for the provision of self-management support. In addition, focusing on a partnership between the transplant professionals and the recipient is essential because it minimises the use of a behavioural approach. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. A computational model of self-efficacy's various effects on performance: Moving the debate forward.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vancouver, Jeffrey B; Purl, Justin D

    2017-04-01

    Self-efficacy, which is one's belief in one's capacity, has been found to both positively and negatively influence effort and performance. The reasons for these different effects have been a major topic of debate among social-cognitive and perceptual control theorists. In particular, the findings of various self-efficacy effects has been motivated by a perceptual control theory view of self-regulation that social-cognitive theorists' question. To provide more clarity to the theoretical arguments, a computational model of the multiple processes presumed to create the positive, negative, and null effects for self-efficacy is presented. Building on an existing computational model of goal choice that produces a positive effect for self-efficacy, the current article adds a symbolic processing structure used during goal striving that explains the negative self-efficacy effect observed in recent studies. Moreover, the multiple processes, operating together, allow the model to recreate the various effects found in a published study of feedback ambiguity's moderating role on the self-efficacy to performance relationship (Schmidt & DeShon, 2010). Discussion focuses on the implications of the model for the self-efficacy debate, alternative computational models, the overlap between control theory and social-cognitive theory explanations, the value of using computational models for resolving theoretical disputes, and future research and directions the model inspires. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  1. Professional self-efficacy as a predictor of burnout and engagement: the role of challenge and hindrance demands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ventura, Mercedes; Salanova, Marisa; Llorens, Susana

    2015-01-01

    The objective of the current study is to analyze the role of professional self-efficacy as a predictor of psychosocial well-being (i.e., burnout and engagement) following the Social Cognitive Theory of Albert Bandura (1997). Structural Equation Modeling was performed in a sample of secondary school teachers (n = 460) and users of Information and Communication Technology (n = 596). Results show empirical support for the predicting role that professional self-efficacy plays in the perception of challenge (i.e., mental overload) and hindrance demands (i.e., role conflict, lack of control, and lack of social support), which are in turn related to burnout (i.e., erosion process) and engagement (i.e., motivational process). Specifically, employees with more professional self-efficacy will perceive more challenge demands and fewer hindrance demands, and this will in turn relate to more engagement and less burnout. A multi-group analysis showed that the research model was invariant across both samples. Theoretical and practical implications are discussed.

  2. Predictive value of work-related self-efficacy change on RTW for employees with common mental disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagerveld, Suzanne E; Brenninkmeijer, Veerle; Blonk, Roland W B; Twisk, Jos; Schaufeli, Wilmar B

    2017-05-01

    To improve interventions that aim to promote return to work (RTW) of workers with common mental disorders (CMD), insight into modifiable predictors of RTW is needed. This study tested the predictive value of self-efficacy change for RTW in addition to preintervention levels of self-efficacy. RTW self-efficacy was measured 5 times within 9 months among 168 clients of a mental healthcare organisation who were on sick leave due to CMD. Self-efficacy parameters were modelled with multilevel analyses and added as predictors into a Cox regression analysis. Results showed that both high baseline self-efficacy and self-efficacy increase until full RTW were predictive of a shorter duration until full RTW. Both self-efficacy parameters remained significant predictors of RTW when controlled for several relevant covariates and within subgroups of employees with either high or low preintervention self-efficacy levels. This is the first study that demonstrated the prognostic value of self-efficacy change, over and above the influence of psychological symptoms, for RTW among employees with CMD. By showing that RTW self-efficacy increase predicted a shorter duration until full RTW, this study points to the relevance of enhancing RTW self-efficacy in occupational or mental health interventions for employees with CMD. Efforts to improve self-efficacy appear valuable both for people with relatively low and high baseline self-efficacy. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  3. Physical self-efficacy is associated to body mass index in schoolchildren.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carissimi, Alicia; Adan, Ana; Tonetti, Lorenzo; Fabbri, Marco; Hidalgo, Maria Paz; Levandovski, Rosa; Natale, Vincenzo; Martoni, Monica

    The present study aimed to investigate the relationship between physical self-efficacy and body mass index in a large sample of schoolchildren. The Perceived Physical Ability Scale for Children was administered to 1560 children (50.4% boys; 8-12 years) from three different countries. Weight and height were also recorded to obtain the body mass index. In agreement with the literature, the boys reported greater perceived physical self-efficacy than girls. Moreover, the number of boys who are obese is double that of girls, while the number of boys who are underweight is half that found in girls. In the linear regression model, the increase in body mass index was negatively related to the physical self-efficacy score, differently for boys and girls. Furthermore, age and nationality also were predictors of low physical self-efficacy only for girls. The results of this study reinforce the importance of psychological aspect of obesity, as the perceived physical self-efficacy and body mass index were negatively associated in a sample of schoolchildren for boys and girls. Copyright © 2016 Sociedade Brasileira de Pediatria. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  4. An extended version of the theory of planned behaviour: the role of self-efficacy and past behaviour in predicting the physical activity of Chinese adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lijuan; Zhang, Ying

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to use an extended theory of planned behaviour (TPB), which incorporated additional self-efficacy and past behaviour, to predict the intention to engage in moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) and the MVPA level of Chinese adolescents. Questionnaires that focused on MVPA, attitude, subjective norm, perceived behavioural control (PBC), self-efficacy and past behaviour related to the MVPA engagement were administered to a sample of 488 young people. Multiple regression analyses provided moderate support for TPB. Three TPB constructs predicted 28.7% of the variance in intentions to engage in MVPA, and that PBC, but not intention, explained 3.4% of the variance in MVPA. Self-efficacy significantly affected intention and behaviour over and above the influence of TPB. Past behaviour had a small but significant improvement in the prediction of intention, but no improvement in the prediction of MVPA. Based on the results, interventions should target adolescent self-efficacy and PBC in physical activity participation.

  5. Self-regulation during job search: the opposing effects of employment self-efficacy and job search behavior self-efficacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Songqi; Wang, Mo; Liao, Hui; Shi, Junqi

    2014-11-01

    Adopting a self-regulatory perspective, the current study examined the within-person relationships among job search cognitions, job search behaviors, and job search success (i.e., number of job offers received). Specifically, conceptualizing job search behaviors as guided by a hierarchy of means-end (i.e., job search behavior-employment) goal structure, we differentiated employment self-efficacy from job search behavior self-efficacy. Our results showed that higher levels of perceived job search progress could lead to more frequent job search behaviors through enhancing job search behavior self-efficacy. However, higher levels of perceived job search progress could also lead to less frequent job search behaviors through elevating employment self-efficacy. In addition, the relationships between perceived job search progress and efficacy beliefs were moderated by job seekers' level of internal attribution of their progress. Finally, we found that at the within-person level, frequency of job search behaviors was positively related to number of job offers received. These findings were discussed in terms of their theoretical and practical implications. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved).

  6. Developing Self-Efficacy through a Massive Open Online Course on Study Skills

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brenda Cecilia Padilla Rodriguez

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Self-efficacy is a strong predictor of academic performance, and an area of interest for higher education institutions. This paper reports on a massive open online course (MOOC on study skills, aimed at increasing self-efficacy. Participants (n=32 were from Mexico and Colombia, with ages ranging from 21 to 45 years. At the beginning and the end of the MOOC, learners answered a survey that included the General Self-Efficacy Scale, items on specific study skills, and space for optional comments. Findings show statistically significant increases in general self-efficacy after completing the MOOC, as well as in the perceived self-efficacy related to five out of six study skills. Comments suggest that participants are aware of and value their own improvement. For students, MOOCs can represent low-risk, formative opportunities to widen their knowledge and increase their self-efficacy. For academic institutions, well-designed MOOCs on study skills provide a means to support students.

  7. Computer self-efficacy - is there a gender gap in tertiary level introductory computing classes?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shirley Gibbs

    Full Text Available This paper explores the relationship between introductory computing students, self-efficacy, and gender. Since the use of computers has become more common there has been speculation that the confidence and ability to use them differs between genders. Self-efficacy is an important and useful concept used to describe how a student may perceive their own ability or confidence in using and learning new technology. A survey of students in an introductory computing class has been completed intermittently since the late 1990\\'s. Although some questions have been adapted to meet the changing technology the aim of the survey has remain unchanged. In this study self-efficacy is measured using two self-rating questions. Students are asked to rate their confidence using a computer and also asked to give their perception of their computing knowledge. This paper examines these two aspects of a person\\'s computer self-efficacy in order to identify any differences that may occur between genders in two introductory computing classes, one in 1999 and the other in 2012. Results from the 1999 survey are compared with those from the survey completed in 2012 and investigated to ascertain if the perception that males were more likely to display higher computer self-efficacy levels than their female classmates does or did exist in a class of this type. Results indicate that while overall there has been a general increase in self-efficacy levels in 2012 compared with 1999, there is no significant gender gap.

  8. Self-Efficacy and green entrepreneurship

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tan, K L; Suhaida, S; Leong, Y P

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study is to investigate empirically the extent to which self-efficacy contributes to the development of green entrepreneurial intention. The measurement constructs of self-efficacy were classified into market opportunities, innovative environment, initiating relationships, defining purpose, coping with challenges, and developing human resources. The study comprises 252 usable convenient samples through structured questionnaires. The coefficient of determination R 2 shows that the variance of intention to entrepreneurship is explained by the variance of the independent variables. It was also found that the model is fit for prediction.

  9. Self-Efficacy and green entrepreneurship

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, K. L.; Suhaida, S.; Leong, Y. P.

    2013-06-01

    The objective of this study is to investigate empirically the extent to which self-efficacy contributes to the development of green entrepreneurial intention. The measurement constructs of self-efficacy were classified into market opportunities, innovative environment, initiating relationships, defining purpose, coping with challenges, and developing human resources. The study comprises 252 usable convenient samples through structured questionnaires. The coefficient of determination R2 shows that the variance of intention to entrepreneurship is explained by the variance of the independent variables. It was also found that the model is fit for prediction.

  10. A feasibility pilot study on the use of complementary therapies delivered via mobile technologies on Icelandic surgical patients' reports of anxiety, pain, and self-efficacy in healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Margaret M

    2015-03-28

    Complementary therapies (CT), such as relaxation technique, massage, guided imagery, and accupuncture have shown to benefit patients undergoing surgery. The aim of this study was to determine the feasibility of using audio relaxation technique (ART), music intervention (MI), nature video application with music (NVAM), and nature video application without music (NVA) delivered via mobile technologies in a clinical setting. Secondary, the effects of ART, MI, NVAM and NVA on patients' state anxiety, pain perception, and perceived self-efficacy in healing were determined. A randomized clinical trial (RCT) involving 105 same day surgery (SDS) patients, who were assigned to an ART (n = 25), MI (n = 25), NVAM (n = 15), NVA (n = 16), or a control group (n = 24) were assessed for state anxiety, self-reported pain, and self-efficacy four days prior to surgery, immediately prior and following a surgical intervention, and day five post-operative. ANOVA found no statistically significant differences in anxiety scores; pain, or perceived self-efficacy between the five groups. Matched pairs t-Test revealed all participants had an increase in anxiety from pre-op to day 10 follow-up; a significant change in pain levels from pre-op to day 10 follow-up; and all participants had a significant increase in general self-efficacy from pre-op to day 10 follow-up. Mean pain level scores from day 1 to pre-op showed a significant decrease in pain for the ART group and NVAM group. Matched pairs t-Test for self-efficacy scores indicated the MI group and the NVA group had significant increases in self-efficacy. A significant decrease in anxiety from pre-op to day 10 for participants reporting a prior history of anxiety and for those reporting prior history of taking anti-anxiety medications. Despite the non-significant findings between the five groups, at any measurement point, there were valuable trends toward significance and confirmed feasibility in a clinical setting

  11. Associations between depressive symptoms, self-efficacy, eating styles, exercise and body mass index in women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clum, Gretchen A; Rice, Janet C; Broussard, Marsha; Johnson, Carolyn C; Webber, Larry S

    2014-08-01

    This article explores cross-sectional associations between depressive symptoms and body mass index (BMI) in women working in schools in the Greater New Orleans area. Self-efficacy for eating and exercise, eating styles, and exercise are examined as potential pathways. This is a secondary data analysis of 743 women who were participating in a workplace wellness randomized controlled trial to address environmental factors influencing eating and exercise behaviors using baseline data prior to the intervention. BMI was the primary outcome examined. Path analysis suggested that increased depressive symptoms were associated with increased BMI in women. Indirect effects of depressive symptoms on BMI were found for increased healthy eating self-efficacy, increased emotional eating, and decreased exercise self-efficacy. The association between greater healthy eating self efficacy and BMI was unexpected, and may indicate a suppressor effect of eating self-efficacy in the relationship between depressive symptoms and BMI in women. The findings suggest the importance of depressive symptoms to BMI in women. Targets for interventions to reduce BMI include targeting depressive symptoms and related sequelae including self-efficacy for exercise, and emotional eating. Further investigation of eating self-efficacy and BMI are recommended with particular attention to both efficacy for health eating and avoidance of unhealthy foods.

  12. Synergistic effect of social support and self-efficacy on physical exercise in older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warner, Lisa M; Ziegelmann, Jochen P; Schüz, Benjamin; Wurm, Susanne; Schwarzer, Ralf

    2011-07-01

    The purpose of the current study was to examine whether the effects of social support on physical exercise in older adults depend on individual perceptions of self-efficacy. Three hundred nine older German adults (age 65-85) were assessed at 3 points in time (3 months apart). In hierarchical-regression analyses, support received from friends and exercise self-efficacy were specified as predictors of exercise frequency while baseline exercise, sex, age, and physical functioning were controlled for. Besides main effects of self-efficacy and social support, an interaction between social support and self-efficacy emerged. People with low self-efficacy were less likely to be active in spite of having social support. People with low support were less likely to be active even if they were high in self-efficacy. This points to the importance of both social support and self-efficacy and implies that these resources could be targets of interventions to increase older adults' exercise.

  13. Self-efficacy mediates the effects of topiramate and GRIK1 genotype on drinking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kranzler, Henry R; Armeli, Stephen; Wetherill, Reagan; Feinn, Richard; Tennen, Howard; Gelernter, Joel; Covault, Jonathan; Pond, Timothy

    2016-03-01

    Previous studies indicate that topiramate reduces alcohol use among problem drinkers, with one study showing that the effect was moderated by a polymorphism (rs2832407) in GRIK1, the gene encoding the GluK1 kainate subunit. We examined whether the interactive effect of medication and genotype (1) altered the association between daily self-efficacy and later-day drinking; and (2) had an indirect effect on drinking via self-efficacy. In a 12-week, placebo-controlled trial of topiramate, we used daily interactive voice response technology to measure self-efficacy (i.e. confidence in avoiding heavy drinking later in the day) and drinking behavior in 122 European-American heavy drinkers. Topiramate's effects on both self-efficacy and drinking level were moderated by rs2832407. C-allele homozygotes treated with topiramate showed higher levels of self-efficacy and lower levels of nighttime drinking across the 12-week trial. Further, the interactive effect of topiramate and genotype on mean nighttime drinking levels was mediated by mean levels of self-efficacy. By modeling topiramate's effects on nighttime drinking across multiple levels of analysis, we found that self-efficacy, a key psychologic construct, mediated the effect of topiramate, which was moderated by rs2832407 genotype. Thus, it may be possible to use an individualized assessment (i.e. genotype) to select treatment to optimize the reduction in heavy drinking and thereby provide a personalized treatment approach. © 2014 Society for the Study of Addiction.

  14. Leadership, Self-Efficacy, and Student Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grayson, Kristin

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the relationships between teacher leadership, science teacher self-efficacy, and fifth-grade science student achievement in diverse schools in a San Antonio, Texas, metropolitan school district. Teachers completed a modified version of the "Leadership Behavior Description Question" (LBDQ) Form XII by Stogdill (1969),…

  15. Career Self Efficacy, Achievement Motivation and Organizational ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Career self efficacy, achievement motivation and organizational commitments are considered as predictors of lecturers‟ conflict preventive behaviours in tertiary institutions in Oyo town. 300 lecturers (149 male and 151 female) of the four tertiary institutions were randomly sampled. What is the relative contributions of each ...

  16. Self-Efficacy and Academic Listening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Suzanne

    2011-01-01

    This paper takes as its starting point the difficulties inherent in listening in a second language. It argues that self-efficacy, broadly defined as the belief in one's ability to carry out specific tasks successfully, is crucial to the development of effective listening skills, and that listening strategy instruction has the potential to boost…

  17. Are parental self-efficacy and family flexibility mediators of treatment for anorexia nervosa?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadeh-Sharvit, Shiri; Arnow, Katherine D; Osipov, Lilya; Lock, James D; Jo, Booil; Pajarito, Sarah; Brandt, Harry; Dodge, Elizabeth; Halmi, Katherine A; Johnson, Craig; Kaye, Walter; Wilfley, Denise; Agras, W Stewart

    2018-03-01

    Family-based treatment (FBT) for adolescent anorexia nervosa (AN) promotes faster weight restoration when compared to other treatments. However, the mechanisms through which this occurs are not clarified. This study explored the trajectories of parental self-efficacy and perceived family flexibility during FBT and systemic family therapy (SyFT). We also explored whether parental self-efficacy mediates the effects of treatment on weight gain early in treatment. 158 adolescents (12-18 years old; 89% girls) and their parents were randomized to FBT or SyFT. Parental self-efficacy as well as adolescents' and parental perceptions of the family's flexibility were collected at baseline and at sessions 2, 4, 6, and 8. Over time, only parents in FBT reported significantly greater self-efficacy. The change in maternal self-efficacy over the first 8 weeks of treatment was a significant mediator of session 10 weight gain. There were no significant group differences in perceived flexibility by session 8. Both parents in FBT and mothers in SyFT understand early the need to change their family's rules and roles. However, the specific strategies of FBT appear to mediate early weight gain in AN. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Cultivating secondary traumatic growth among healthcare workers: the role of social support and self-efficacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoji, Kotaro; Bock, Judith; Cieslak, Roman; Zukowska, Katarzyna; Luszczynska, Aleksandra; Benight, Charles C

    2014-09-01

    This 2-study longitudinal investigation examined the indirect effects of secondary traumatic stress (STS) on secondary traumatic growth via two mediators: perceived social support and secondary trauma self-efficacy. In particular, we tested if the 2 hypothetical mediators operate sequentially, that is, with secondary trauma self-efficacy facilitating social support (i.e., cultivation hypothesis) and/or social support enhancing self-efficacy (i.e., enabling hypothesis). Participants in Study 1 (N = 293 at Time 1, N = 115 at Time 2) were behavioral healthcare providers working with U.S. military personnel suffering from trauma. Study 2 was conducted among Polish healthcare workers (N = 298 at Time 1, N = 189 at Time 2) providing services for civilian survivors of traumatic events. In both studies, multiple mediational analyses showed evidence for the cultivation hypothesis. The relationship between STS at Time 1 and secondary traumatic growth at Time 2 was mediated sequentially by secondary trauma self-efficacy at Time 1 and social support at Time 2. The enabling hypothesis was not supported. Education and development programs for healthcare workers may benefit from boosting self-efficacy with the intent to facilitate perceived social support. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. An exploratory examination of patient and parental self-efficacy as predictors of weight gain in adolescents with anorexia nervosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrne, Catherine E; Accurso, Erin C; Arnow, Katherine D; Lock, James; Le Grange, Daniel

    2015-11-01

    To determine whether increases in adolescent or parental self-efficacy predicted subsequent weight gain in two different therapies for adolescent anorexia nervosa (AN). Participants were 121 adolescents with AN (M = 14.4 years, SD = 1.6), from a two-site randomized clinical trial for family-based treatment (FBT) and individual adolescent focused therapy (AFT). Both adolescent and parental self-efficacy were assessed at baseline and sessions 2, 4, 6, and 8. Adolescent self-efficacy was assessed using a generic measure of self-efficacy, while parental self-efficacy was assessed using a measure specific to the recovery of an eating disorder. Weight was assessed at baseline, sessions 1 through 8, and end of treatment. Mixed-effects models were used to evaluate the relation between patient and parent self-efficacy and subsequent weight gain, controlling for weight at the previous time point. For families who received FBT, greater within-treatment increases in parental self-efficacy predicted greater subsequent adolescent weight gain compared to those who received FBT with lesser change in parental self-efficacy and those who received AFT. Interestingly, adolescent self-efficacy did not significantly predict subsequent weight gain. Greater increases in parental self-efficacy predicted significantly greater subsequent weight gain for adolescents who received FBT, but the same was not true for adolescents who received AFT. Neither overall level nor change in adolescent self-efficacy significantly predicted subsequent weight gain in either treatment group. These findings emphasize the importance of increasing parental self-efficacy in FBT in order to impact adolescent weight outcomes. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Exploring Teacher Self-Efficacy for Inclusive Practices in Three Diverse Countries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malinen, Olli-Pekka; Savolainen, Hannu; Engelbrecht, Petra; Xu, Jiacheng; Nel, Mirna; Nel, Norma; Tlale, Dan

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explain teachers' perceived efficacy for teaching in inclusive classrooms by using a sample of 1911 in-service teachers from China, Finland, and South Africa. Bandura's theory of self-efficacy was used as a starting point to develop distinct models for each country. We found that in all countries, experience in…

  1. Beginning Teachers' Self-Efficacy and Stress and the Supposed Effects of Induction Arrangements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helms-Lorenz, Michelle; Slof, Bert; Vermue, Carlien E.; Canrinus, Esther T.

    2012-01-01

    Induction arrangements are implemented in schools all over the world to support beginning teachers (BTs) (novices) in gradually growing into their profession. The aim of this study is to gain more insight into two key psychological processes involved in the work of a qualified beginning teacher, namely perceived stress and self-efficacy. This…

  2. Statistical Reasoning Ability, Self-Efficacy, and Value Beliefs in a University Statistics Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olani, A.; Hoekstra, R.; Harskamp, E.; van der Werf, G.

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: The study investigated the degree to which students' statistical reasoning abilities, statistics self-efficacy, and perceived value of statistics improved during a reform based introductory statistics course. The study also examined whether the changes in these learning outcomes differed with respect to the students' mathematical…

  3. Parents' Self-Efficacy Beliefs and Their Children's Psychosocial Adaptation during Adolescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steca, Patrizia; Bassi, Marta; Caprara, Gian Vittorio; Fave, Antonella Delle

    2011-01-01

    Research has shown that parents' perceived parental self-efficacy (PSE) plays a pivotal role in promoting their children's successful adjustment. In this study, we further explored this issue by comparing psychosocial adaptation in children of parents with high and low PSE during adolescence. One hundred and thirty Italian teenagers (55 males and…

  4. Protection Motivation and Self-Efficacy: A Model of Health Enhancement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanley, Melinda A.

    Protection motivation theory proposes that a perceived threat to health activates cognitive appraisals of the severity of the threatened event, the probability of its occurrence, and the efficacy of a coping response; a recent reformulation of the theory incorporates self-efficacy expectancy as a fourth mediating cognitive process. To test the…

  5. Quality of Life after Total Laryngectomy: Functioning, Psychological Well-Being and Self-Efficacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, Alison; Casey, Erica; Cotton, Sue

    2015-01-01

    Background: Quality of life (QoL) is an important construct when assessing treatment outcomes. Aims: To examine the relative contributions of functioning, psychological well-being and self-efficacy on self-perceived QoL with a sample of total laryngectomy patients in Australia who had surgery for advanced laryngeal cancer. Methods &…

  6. The Role of Social Self-Efficacy on Physical Activity: A Cross-Cultural Comparision

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alemdag, Serdar

    2018-01-01

    The purpose of this cross-cultural study exposes stages of change for exercise behavior (SCEB) in relation to perceived social self-efficacy (PSSE) between Turkey and England sport sciences students. The study group of the research consists of 168 (66 women and 102 men) students from Turkey and 217 (112 women and 105 men) students from England who…

  7. An Examination of Student Writing Self-Efficacy across Three Levels of Adult Writing Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alderman, Rodney L.

    2015-01-01

    Adults in today's society do not possess the necessary writing skills required to be successful in postsecondary education and in employment. Writing is an essential skill for college and the workplace. Society also expects college graduates to be critical thinkers and to utilize higher-order thinking skills. Perceived self-efficacy may impact…

  8. Self-Efficacy in Incarcerated Adolescents: The Role of Family and Social Supports

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tangeman, Keegan R.; Hall, Susan R.

    2011-01-01

    This research investigated the role of general and specific self-efficacy factors in positive family relationships and perceived social support within an U.S. incarcerated adolescent population. One hundred African American and Hispanic male adolescent participants, randomly selected from a southern California Probation Department, were included…

  9. The Influence of Self-Efficacy Beliefs for Student Parents Attending University

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Rhijn, Tricia M.; Lero, Donna S.

    2014-01-01

    Student parents (i.e. students who have their own dependent children) are a specific subpopulation of adult learners. This study investigated the impact of self-efficacy beliefs on student parents' perceived capacity to manage multiple roles and their satisfaction with family, school and life. Survey data collected from 398 student parents enroled…

  10. High School Pupils' Attitudes and Self-Efficacy of Using Mobile Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolopoulou, Kleopatra; Gialamas, Vasilis

    2017-01-01

    This paper regards a study aiming to investigate junior high school pupils' attitudes and self-efficacy of using mobile devices. A 25-item questionnaire was administered to 260 pupils aged 12-15 years old, in Greece. Pupils' attitudes were positive, and four factors were extracted, "perceived usefulness", "affection",…

  11. Effect of Verbal Feedback in Twelve Weeks Handball Training on Self-Efficacy and Life Satisfaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toros, Turhan

    2018-01-01

    The aim of this study was investigate the effect of verbal feedback on self-efficacy and life satisfaction. A total of 30 students as experimental group (n=15, mean age= 20.13±1.79) and control group (n=15, mean age=20.57±1.62) with similar characteristics were included in the study. Self-efficacy scale that originally developed by Riggs "et…

  12. Collective Problem-Solving: The Role of Self-Efficacy, Skill, and Prior Knowledge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dorit Geifman

    2015-12-01

    In a controlled experiment, 632 participants in 47 markets traded a solution to a complex problem, a naïve framing of the knapsack problem. Contrary to earlier research, we find that technical and functional self-efficacy perceptions are indistinguishable, probably due to a focus on outcomes rather than on resources. Further, results demonstrate that prediction markets are an effective collective problem-solving platform that correctly aggregates individual knowledge and is resilient to traders’ self-efficacy.

  13. The Effects of an Interactive Nursing Skills Mobile Application on Nursing Students' Knowledge, Self-efficacy, and Skills Performance: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    OpenAIRE

    Hyunsun Kim, MSN, RN; Eunyoung E. Suh, PhD, FNP, RN

    2018-01-01

    Purpose: Clinical nursing practice is important because it helps nursing students experience realities of clinical nursing that cannot be learned through theoretical education. This study aimed to evaluate the effect of an interactive nursing skills mobile application for nursing students. Methods: Sixty-six senior nursing students were randomly assigned to experimental or control groups. The experimental group used an interactive nursing skills mobile application for 1 week. The control grou...

  14. Self-efficacy and parental motivation as correlates ofstudends ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Self-efficacy and parental motivation as correlates ofstudends' academic ... and academic performance of secondary school students in attaining academic ... and improve their self-efficacy and to motivate parents to provide more support, care ...

  15. Empowering the Middle: A High School Study Skills Program and Its Impact on Academic Achievement and Self-Efficacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmons, Stephanie Yvette

    2017-01-01

    This study examined the impact of a self-regulatory skills course on the academic achievement and self-efficacy of 11th-grade students. The researcher compared intervention and control groups participants' pre- and posttest scores on the General Self-Efficacy Scale and the Learning and Study Skills Assessment Inventory-High School version. Scores…

  16. Feasibility of the iPad as a hub for smart house technology in the elderly; effects of cognition, self-efficacy, and technology experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvseike, Hilde; Brønnick, Kolbjørn

    2012-01-01

    Smart house technology using tablet computers may help older people to master activities of daily living by making it easier to perform daily tasks like controlling lights and indoor temperature throughout the house with a few keystrokes. The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of age, cognition, self-efficacy, and technology experience on the ability of older people to perceive and use iPad tablet computers for this purpose. Twenty-eight participants were interviewed using a structured interview guide and questionnaires, and a practical test of how to use the iPad was performed. The Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) was used to assess cognition. Cognitive deficits and low self-efficacy significantly reduced the ability of the subjects to use the smart house technology and to perceive the smart house technology service as provided. Age was unrelated to the outcome variables. Finally, technology experience had an effect on technology perception. If further research supports these findings, it should influence smart-house implementation in an elderly population, raising awareness of usability problems in older people with low self-efficacy and cognitive problems.

  17. A brief intervention changing oral self-care, self-efficacy, and self-monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarzer, Ralf; Antoniuk, Agata; Gholami, Maryam

    2015-02-01

    The roles of self-efficacy and self-monitoring as proximal predictors of dental flossing frequency are studied in the context of an oral health intervention. A study among 287 university students, aged 19 to 26 years, compared an intervention group that received a brief self-regulatory treatment, with a passive and an active control group. Dental flossing, self-efficacy, and self-monitoring were assessed at baseline and 3 weeks later. The intervention led to an increase in dental flossing regardless of experimental condition. However, treatment-specific gains were documented for self-efficacy and self-monitoring. Moreover, changes in the latter two served as mediators in a path model, linking the intervention with subsequent dental flossing and yielding significant indirect effects. Self-efficacy and self-monitoring play a mediating role in facilitating dental flossing. Interventions that aim at an improvement in oral self-care should consider using these constructs. Statement of contribution What is already known on this subject? The adoption and maintenance of oral self-care can be facilitated by a number of social-cognitive variables. Interventions that include planning, action control, or self-efficacy components have been shown to improve dental flossing. In one recent study on flossing in adolescent girls, planning intervention effects were mediated by self-efficacy. What does this study add? Self-monitoring is associated with better oral self-care. A 10-min intervention improves self-efficacy and self-monitoring. Self-efficacy and self-monitoring operate as mediators between treatment and flossing. © 2014 The British Psychological Society.

  18. Development and validation of a managerial decision making self-efficacy questionnaire

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wim Myburgh

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Orientation: Self-efficacy beliefs, given their task-specific nature, are likely to influence managers’ perceived decision-making competence depending on fluctuations in their nature and strength as non-ability contributors. Research purpose: The present research describes the conceptualisation, design and measurement of managerial decision-making self-efficacy. Motivation for the study: The absence of a domain-specific measure of the decision-making self-efficacy of managers was the motivation for the development of the Managerial Decisionmaking Self-efficacy Questionnaire (MDMSEQ. Research approach, design and method: A cross-sectional study was conducted on a nonprobability convenience sample of managers from various organisations in South Africa. Statistical analysis focused on the construct validity and reliability of items through exploratory and confirmatory factor analysis to test the factorial validity of the measure. Main findings: The research offers confirmatory validation of the factorial structure of the MDMSEQ. The results of two studies involving 455 (Study 1, n = 193; Study 2, n = 292 experienced managers evidenced a multidimensional structure and demonstrated respectable subscale internal consistencies. Findings also demonstrated that the MDMSEQ shared little common variance with confidence and problem-solving self-efficacy beliefs. In addition, several model fit indices suggested a reasonable to good model fit for the measurement model. Practical/managerial implications: The findings have implications for practical applications in employment selection and development with regard to managerial decision-making. Absence of the assessment of self-efficacy beliefs may introduce systematic, non-performance related variance into managerial decision-making outcomes in spite of abilities that managers possess. Contribution/value-add: Research on the volition-undermining effect of self-efficacy beliefs has been remarkably prominent

  19. The Effect of Special Olympics Programs on Down Syndrome People\\'s Self-Efficacy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Momeni

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Literature survey has shown that participation in social programs can promote the mental and social health among intellectually disabled individuals. One of these programs is the Special Olympics (SO and the programs related to it. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of SO programs on self-efficacy among Iranian Special Olympians with Down Syndrome (DS. Materials & Methods: In this quasi-experimental research, forty DS members of Iran's SO national team were selected as the intervention group and 37 DS non-athletes were selected as the control group. The SO group participated in 9 months of SO specific sport programs. The “Wheeler and Ladd's Children’s Self-Efficacy for Peer Interactions Scale” was used to collect data from the two groups before and after the 9-month long athletic programs. Data were analyzed by kolmogroff-Smirnoff, paired T and independent T tests. Results: The results showed that SO programs had significant effects on the self- efficacy of the experimental group. The SO athletes were significantly (P&le0.001 better than the control group in all sub-scales of self-efficacy. Conclusion: It seems that participation in social-sport aspects of the Special Olympics programs can promote self-efficacy among this population. Generalizing such programs for DS people can help them show their abilities and provide them with self-efficacy which is necessary for living independently.

  20. Motivational Partnerships: Increasing ESL Student Self-Efficacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cave, Paul N.; Evans, Norman W.; Dewey, Dan P.; Hartshorn, K. James

    2018-01-01

    The present study investigated the relationship between student use of self-efficacy-building strategies through motivational partnerships and student levels of self-efficacy and motivation in an adult intensive English programme in the United States. The extent to which self-efficacy influenced motivation was also examined. After being organized…

  1. Using Video Feedback to Measure Self-Efficacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobo, Linda; Andrews, Amanda

    2010-01-01

    When a student has a high sense of self-efficacy, foreseeing success and providing positive guides and supports for performing the skill will usually occur. A low self-efficacy tends to predict failure and anticipation of what could go wrong. Videotape feedback provided to students has reported favorable outcomes. Self-efficacy could alter…

  2. Examining Dimensions of Self-Efficacy for Writing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruning, Roger; Dempsey, Michael; Kauffman, Douglas F.; McKim, Courtney; Zumbrunn, Sharon

    2013-01-01

    A multifactor perspective on writing self-efficacy was examined in 2 studies. Three factors were proposed--self-efficacy for writing ideation, writing conventions, and writing self-regulation--and a scale constructed to reflect these factors. In Study 1, middle school students (N = 697) completed the Self-Efficacy for Writing Scale (SEWS), along…

  3. Examining Preservice Teachers' Culturally Responsive Teaching Self-Efficacy Doubts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siwatu, Kamau Oginga; Chesnut, Steven Randall; Alejandro, Angela Ybarra; Young, Haeni Alecia

    2016-01-01

    This study was designed to add to the research on teachers' self-efficacy beliefs by examining preservice teachers' culturally responsive teaching self-efficacy doubts. We examined the tasks that preservice teachers felt least efficacious to successfully execute and explored the reasoning behind these self-efficacy doubts. Consequently, we were…

  4. [Relationships among empathy, prosocial behavior, aggressiveness, self-efficacy and pupils' personal and social responsibility].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutiérrez Sanmartín, Melchor; Escartí Carbonell, Amparo; Pascual Baños, Carminal

    2011-02-01

    The aim of this study was, on the one hand, to present/display the Spanish version of diverse instruments that assess Empathy, Prosocial behavior, Aggressiveness, Self-efficacy and Personal and social responsibility, and, on the other hand, to analyze which of these variables could predict responsibility. Participants were 822 pupils, ages 8 to 15 years, who studied in 11 educational centres of the Valencian Community. Measures include Spanish versions of the Index of Empathy for Children and Adolescents, Prosocial Behaviour, and Physical and Verbal Aggression, the Multidimensional Scale of Perceived Self-Efficacy, and the Contextual Self-Responsibility Questionnaire. Through structural equation modelling (SEM), the results showed positive relationships between Prosocial behaviour, Empathy, Self-efficacy, and Responsibility; and negative relationships between Aggressiveness and Responsibility. The results and implications for education are discussed.

  5. The mediating role of self-efficacy in the development of entrepreneurial intentions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Hao; Seibert, Scott E; Hills, Gerald E

    2005-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the mediating role of self-efficacy in the development of students' intentions to become entrepreneurs. The authors used structural equation modeling with a sample of 265 master of business administration students across 5 universities to test their hypotheses. The results showed that the effects of perceived learning from entrepreneurship-related courses, previous entrepreneurial experience, and risk propensity on entrepreneurial intentions were fully mediated by entrepreneurial self-efficacy. Contrary to expectations, gender was not mediated by self-efficacy but had a direct effect such that women reported lower entrepreneurial career intentions. The authors discuss practical implications and directions for future research. ((c) 2005 APA, all rights reserved).

  6. Neither Basic Life Support knowledge nor self-efficacy are predictive of skills among dental students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mac Giolla Phadraig, C; Ho, J D; Guerin, S; Yeoh, Y L; Mohamed Medhat, M; Doody, K; Hwang, S; Hania, M; Boggs, S; Nolan, A; Nunn, J

    2017-08-01

    Basic life support (BLS) is considered a core competence for the graduating dentist. This study aimed to measure BLS knowledge, self-efficacy and skills of undergraduate dental students in Dublin. This study consisted of a cross-sectional survey measuring BLS knowledge and self-efficacy, accompanied by a directly observed BLS skills assessment in a subsample of respondents. Data were collected in January 2014. Bivariate correlations between descriptive and outcome variables (knowledge, self-efficacy and skills) were tested using Pearson's chi-square. We included knowledge and self-efficacy as predictor variables, along with other variables showing association, into a binary logistic regression model with BLS skills as the outcome measure. One hundred and thirty-five students participated. Almost all (n = 133, 98.5%) participants had BLS training within the last 2 years. One hundred and four (77%) felt that they were capable of providing effective BLS (self-efficacy), whilst only 46 (34.1%) scored >80% of knowledge items correct. Amongst the skills (n = 85) subsample, 38.8% (n = 33) were found to pass the BLS skills assessment. Controlling for gender, age and skills assessor, the regression model did not identify a predictive relationship between knowledge or self-efficacy and BLS skills. Neither knowledge nor self-efficacy was predictive of BLS skills. Dental students had low levels of knowledge and skills in BLS. Despite this, their confidence in their ability to perform BLS was high and did not predict actual competence. There is a need for additional hands-on training, focusing on self-efficacy and BLS skills, particularly the use of AED. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. The impact of poverty on self-efficacy: an Australian longitudinal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callander, E J; Schofield, D J

    2016-06-01

    People with strong feelings of 'self-efficacy', i.e. how much a person feels they have control over their life, perform better in the workplace. However, little is known about negative influences on feelings of self-efficacy. In view of the increasing number of people whose income places them below the poverty line despite being in employment, poverty may negatively influence feelings of self-efficacy and hence workplace productivity. To assess whether falling into poverty lowers self-efficacy. Longitudinal analysis of waves 7 to 11 of the nationally representative Household, Income and Labour Dynamics in Australia (HILDA) survey, using linear regression models. Those who fell into multidimensional poverty (income poverty plus poor health or insufficient level of education attainment) had significantly lower self-efficacy scores (up to 18% lower (95% CI -31% to -1%, P poverty, after accounting for initial self-efficacy score and other confounding factors. Income uniquely accounted for 3% of the variance in self-efficacy scores, physical health for 10%, mental health for 78% and education for 1%. Given the known links between self-efficacy and workplace productivity, workers who are below the poverty line may be at risk of poor productivity due to the experience of poverty. In addition to the poor outcomes from the employer's perceptive, this may also lead to a negative spiral for the employee. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society of Occupational Medicine. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. Self-Efficacy Mediates the Effects of Topiramate and GRIK1 Genotype on Drinking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kranzler, Henry R.; Armeli, Stephen; Wetherill, Reagan; Feinn, Richard; Tennen, Howard; Gelernter, Joel; Covault, Jonathan; Pond, Timothy

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies indicate that topiramate reduces alcohol use among problem drinkers, with one study showing that the effect was moderated by a polymorphism (rs2832407) in GRIK1, the gene encoding the GluK1 kainate subunit. We examined whether the interactive effect of medication and genotype (a) altered the association between daily self-efficacy and later day drinking and (b) had an indirect effect on drinking via self-efficacy. Methods In a 12-week, placebo-controlled trial of topiramate, we used daily interactive voice response technology to measure self-efficacy (i.e., confidence in avoiding heavy drinking later in the day) and drinking behavior in 122 European-American heavy drinkers. Results Topiramate’s effects on both self-efficacy and drinking level were moderated by rs2832407. C-allele homozygotes treated with topiramate showed higher levels of self-efficacy and lower levels of nighttime drinking across the 12-week trial. Further, the interactive effect of topiramate and genotype on mean nighttime drinking levels was mediated by mean levels of self-efficacy. Conclusion By modeling topiramate’s effects on nighttime drinking across multiple levels of analysis, we found that self-efficacy, a key psychological construct, mediated the effect of topiramate, which was moderated by rs2832407 genotype. Thus, it may be possible to use an individualized assessment (i.e., genotype) to select treatment (i.e., topiramate or psychotherapy aimed at enhancing self-efficacy) to optimize the reduction in heavy drinking to provide a personalized treatment approach. PMID:25496338

  9. Modeling Sources of Teaching Self-Efficacy for Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics Graduate Teaching Assistants

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeChenne, Sue Ellen; Koziol, Natalie; Needham, Mark; Enochs, Larry

    2015-01-01

    Graduate teaching assistants (GTAs) in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) have a large impact on undergraduate instruction but are often poorly prepared to teach. Teaching self-efficacy, an instructor’s belief in his or her ability to teach specific student populations a specific subject, is an important predictor of teaching skill and student achievement. A model of sources of teaching self-efficacy is developed from the GTA literature. This model indicates that teaching experience, departmental teaching climate (including peer and supervisor relationships), and GTA professional development (PD) can act as sources of teaching self-efficacy. The model is pilot tested with 128 GTAs from nine different STEM departments at a midsized research university. Structural equation modeling reveals that K–12 teaching experience, hours and perceived quality of GTA PD, and perception of the departmental facilitating environment are significant factors that explain 32% of the variance in the teaching self-efficacy of STEM GTAs. This model highlights the important contributions of the departmental environment and GTA PD in the development of teaching self-efficacy for STEM GTAs. PMID:26250562

  10. Teachers’ work ability: a study of relationships between collective efficacy and self-efficacy beliefs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guidetti G

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Gloria Guidetti,1 Sara Viotti,1 Andreina Bruno,2 Daniela Converso1 1Department of Psychology, University of Turin, Turin, Italy; 2Department of Education Science, University of Genoa, Genoa, Italy Introduction: Work ability constitutes one of the most studied well-being indicators related to work. Past research highlighted the relationship with work-related resources and demands, and personal resources. However, no studies highlight the role of collective and self-efficacy beliefs in sustaining work ability. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to examine whether and by which mechanism work ability is linked with individual and collective efficacies in a sample of primary and middle school teachers. Materials and methods: Using a dataset consisting of 415 primary and middle school Italian teachers, the analysis tested for the mediating role of self-efficacy between collective efficacy and work ability. Results: Mediational analysis highlights that teachers’ self-efficacy totally mediates the relationship between collective efficacy and perceived work ability. Conclusion: Results of this study enhance the theoretical knowledge and empirical evidence regarding the link between teachers’ collective efficacy and self-efficacy, giving further emphasis to the concept of collective efficacy in school contexts. Moreover, the results contribute to the study of well-being in the teaching profession, highlighting a process that sustains and promotes levels of work ability through both collective and personal resources. Keywords: collective efficacy, mediation, self-efficacy, teachers, work ability

  11. Modeling Sources of Teaching Self-Efficacy for Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics Graduate Teaching Assistants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeChenne, Sue Ellen; Koziol, Natalie; Needham, Mark; Enochs, Larry

    2015-01-01

    Graduate teaching assistants (GTAs) in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) have a large impact on undergraduate instruction but are often poorly prepared to teach. Teaching self-efficacy, an instructor's belief in his or her ability to teach specific student populations a specific subject, is an important predictor of teaching skill and student achievement. A model of sources of teaching self-efficacy is developed from the GTA literature. This model indicates that teaching experience, departmental teaching climate (including peer and supervisor relationships), and GTA professional development (PD) can act as sources of teaching self-efficacy. The model is pilot tested with 128 GTAs from nine different STEM departments at a midsized research university. Structural equation modeling reveals that K-12 teaching experience, hours and perceived quality of GTA PD, and perception of the departmental facilitating environment are significant factors that explain 32% of the variance in the teaching self-efficacy of STEM GTAs. This model highlights the important contributions of the departmental environment and GTA PD in the development of teaching self-efficacy for STEM GTAs. © 2015 S. E. DeChenne et al. CBE—Life Sciences Education © 2015 The American Society for Cell Biology. This article is distributed by The American Society for Cell Biology under license from the author(s). It is available to the public under an Attribution–Noncommercial–Share Alike 3.0 Unported Creative Commons License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0).

  12. Genetic Counseling Supervisors' Self-Efficacy for Select Clinical Supervision Competencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finley, Sabra Ledare; Veach, Pat McCarthy; MacFarlane, Ian M; LeRoy, Bonnie S; Callanan, Nancy

    2016-04-01

    Supervision is a primary instructional vehicle for genetic counseling student clinical training. Approximately two-thirds of genetic counselors report teaching and education roles, which include supervisory roles. Recently, Eubanks Higgins and colleagues published the first comprehensive list of empirically-derived genetic counseling supervisor competencies. Studies have yet to evaluate whether supervisors possess these competencies and whether their competencies differ as a function of experience. This study investigated three research questions: (1) What are genetic counselor supervisors' perceptions of their capabilities (self-efficacy) for a select group of supervisor competencies?, (2) Are there differences in self-efficacy as a function of their supervision experience or their genetic counseling experience, and 3) What training methods do they use and prefer to develop supervision skills? One-hundred thirty-one genetic counselor supervisors completed an anonymous online survey assessing demographics, self-efficacy (self-perceived capability) for 12 goal setting and 16 feedback competencies (Scale: 0-100), competencies that are personally challenging, and supervision training experiences and preferences (open-ended). A MANOVA revealed significant positive effects of supervision experience but not genetic counseling experience on participants' self-efficacy. Although mean self-efficacy ratings were high (>83.7), participant comments revealed several challenging competencies (e.g., incorporating student's report of feedback from previous supervisors into goal setting, and providing feedback about student behavior rather than personal traits). Commonly preferred supervision training methods included consultation with colleagues, peer discussion, and workshops/seminars.

  13. [The validity and reliability of the general self-efficacy scale-Turkish form].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yildirim, Fatma; Ilhan, Inci Ozgür

    2010-01-01

    Self-efficacy, which is a basic construct in social cognitive theory, has been defined as one's belief in his/her ability to start, continue, and complete an action in a manner that has an impact on his/her environment. This study aimed to investigate the psychometric properties of the General Self-Efficacy Scale-Turkish Form. The General Self-Efficacy Scale-Turkish Form was administered to 895 individuals ?18 years of age that had at least 5 years of education. Exploratory factor analysis, criterion validity testing (using the Beck Depression Scale, Spielberger Trait Anxiety Inventory, Locus of Control Scale, Learned Resourcefulness Scale, and Coopersmith Self Esteem Inventory), internal consistency analysis, and test-retest reliability analysis were performed. The 3-factor structure of the scale explained 41.5% of the observed variance. Correlations between the General Self-Efficacy Scale-Turkish Form and the other measures were statistically significant. The Cronbach's alpha coefficient for the entire scale was 0.80 and the test-retest reliability coefficient estimated from data for 236 individuals that were contacted for follow-up was 0.69. The General Self-Efficacy Scale-Turkish Form is a valid and reliable instrument for the assessment of general self-efficacy in individuals ?18 years of age with at least 5 years of education.

  14. Function Self-Efficacy Scale-FSES: Development, Evaluation, and Contribution to Well-Being.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tovel, Hava; Carmel, Sara

    2016-08-01

    This article describes the development and validation of the Function Self-Efficacy Scale (FSES) for assessing the degree of confidence in self-functioning while facing decline in health and function (DHF). The FSES was evaluated in two studies of older Israelis, aged 75+ years. Data were collected by structured home interviews. Exploratory factor analyses conducted in both studies clearly revealed two underlying factors: emotion self-efficacy and action self-efficacy. Confirmatory factor analyses resulted in acceptable model fit criteria. The shortened final 13-item FSES had good internal consistency and satisfactory criterion and convergent validity. Multiple regression analyses, conducted to predict subjective well-being in each of the studies, showed that function self-efficacy had a positive and significant contribution to the explanation of well-being, while controlling for general self-efficacy, self-rated health, and sociodemographic variables. We propose that appropriate interventions can strengthen function self-efficacy, thus improving the well-being of elderly persons and their ability to cope with DHF. © The Author(s) 2015.

  15. Patients with established cancer cachexia lack the motivation and self-efficacy to undertake regular structured exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasley, David; Gale, Nichola; Roberts, Sioned; Backx, Karianne; Nelson, Annmarie; van Deursen, Robert; Byrne, Anthony

    2018-02-01

    Patients with advanced cancer frequently suffer a decline in activities associated with involuntary loss of weight and muscle mass (cachexia). This can profoundly affect function and quality of life. Although exercise participation can maintain physical and psychological function in patients with cancer, uptake is low in cachectic patients who are underrepresented in exercise studies. To understand how such patients' experiences are associated with exercise participation, we investigated exercise history, self-confidence, and exercise motivations in patients with established cancer cachexia, and relationships between relevant variables. Lung and gastrointestinal cancer outpatients with established cancer cachexia (n = 196) completed a questionnaire exploring exercise history and key constructs of the Theory of Planned Behaviour relating to perceived control, psychological adjustment, and motivational attitudes. Patients reported low physical activity levels, and few undertook regular structured exercise. Exercise self-efficacy was very low with concerns it could worsen symptoms and cause harm. Patients showed poor perceived control and a strong need for approval but received little advice from health care professionals. Preferences were for low intensity activities, on their own, in the home setting. Regression analysis revealed no significant factors related to the independent variables. Frequently employed higher intensity, group exercise models do not address the motivational and behavioural concerns of cachectic cancer patients in this study. Developing exercise interventions which match perceived abilities and skills is required to address challenges of self-efficacy and perceived control identified. Greater engagement of health professionals with this group is required to explore potential benefits of exercise. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  16. Prior Self-Efficacy Interacts with Experiential Valence to Influence Self-Efficacy among Engineering Students: An Experimental Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Yevvon Yi-Chi; Chiou, Wen-Bin

    2017-01-01

    Self-efficacy toward science learning has been shown to play a crucial role in determining students' motivation and achievements. Social cognitive theory proposes that positive and negative task outcomes affect mastery experiences from which self-efficacy develops. The current research examined whether prior level of self-efficacy would serve as a…

  17. The mediating role of self-efficacy in the relationship between premotivational cognitions and engagement in multiple health behaviors: a theory-based cross-sectional study among township residents in South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tshuma, Ndumiso; Muloongo, Keith; Nkwei, Emile S; Alaba, Olufunke A; Meera, Maheedhariah S; Mokgobi, Maboe G; Nyasulu, Peter S

    2017-01-01

    Noncommunicable diseases (NCDs) are one of the major global health challenges in developed countries and are rapidly increasing globally. Perception of self-efficacy is important for complex activities and long-term changes in health behavior. This study aimed to determine whether self-efficacy mediates the effect of individual beliefs (perceived severity, susceptibility, benefits and barriers) among informal settlement residents' health behavior in relation to the prevention and management of NCDs. A cross-sectional survey was conducted using a closed-ended questionnaire among informal settlement residents in Diepsloot, Johannesburg. The proposed model was tested using structural equation modeling (AMOS software). A total of 2,277 participants were interviewed during this survey, consisting of 1,236 (54.3%) females, with the majority of them aged between 20 and 29 years. All constructs in the questionnaire had a good reliability with a Cronbach's alpha of >0.7. Perceived benefits and perceived barriers were the strongest predictors of self-efficacy, with the highest beta values of 0.14 and 0.15, respectively. Once associated with perceived self-efficacy, the direct effect of perceived susceptibility and perceived benefits on health behavior was statistically nonsignificant ( P =0.0894 and P =0.2839, respectively). Perceived benefits and perceived susceptibility were totally mediated by self-efficacy. The indirect effects of perceived severity and perceived barriers (through self-efficacy) on health behavior were significant. Thus, perceived severity and perceived barriers were partially mediated by self-efficacy. Perceived susceptibility and perceived benefits did not affect health behavior unless associated with self-efficacy. In contrast, individual perception of the seriousness of NCDs and perceived barriers might still have a direct influence on health behavior even if the person does not feel able to prevent NCDs. However, this influence would be more

  18. The effects of information about AIDS risk and self-efficacy on women's intentions to engage in AIDS preventive behavior

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yzer, MC; Fisher, JD; Bakker, AB; Siero, FW; Misovich, SJ

    1998-01-01

    Female college students' perceived vulnerability to AIDS and their perceived self-efficacy regarding AIDS preventive behavior (APB), were manipulated in a 2 x 2 design. Consistent with protection motivation theory (e.g.. Rogers, 1983), the results showed that intention to engage in APE was highest

  19. Engineering Professional Development: Elementary Teachers' Self-efficacy and Sources of Self-efficacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, Donna Louise

    Currently, STEM (science, technology, engineering, and mathematics) is a popular buzz word in P-12 education as it represents a means to advance American competitiveness in the global economy. Proponents of the engineering component of STEM advocate additional benefits in teaching engineering, such as its capacity to engage students in collaboration, and to apply critical thinking, systems thinking, negotiation, and communication skills to solve real-life contextual problems. Establishing a strong foundation of engineering knowledge at a young age will provide students with internal motivation as it taps into their curiosity toward how things work, and it also prepares them for secondary science courses. Successful STEM education is often constrained by elementary teachers' low perception of self-efficacy to teach science and engineering. Elementary teachers with low self-efficacy in science are more likely to spend less instructional time teaching science, which suggests that teachers with little to no training in engineering might avoid teaching this topic. Therefore, the purpose of this study was twofold: (a) to examine the effects of engineering professional development on elementary (K-6) teachers' content and pedagogical content knowledge (PCK) and perceptions of self-efficacy to teach engineering, and (b) to identify and explain sources influencing self-efficacy. Professional development was conducted in a metropolitan area in the Pacific Northwest. Results revealed that after the engineering professional development, teachers experienced statistically significant gains in content, PCK, and self-efficacy to teach engineering. Increases in self-efficacy were mainly attributed to mastery experiences and cultivation of a growth mindset by embracing the engineering design process.

  20. The relationship between employment-related self-efficacy and quality of life following traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsaousides, Theodore; Warshowsky, Adam; Ashman, Teresa A; Cantor, Joshua B; Spielman, Lisa; Gordon, Wayne A

    2009-08-01

    This study examines the relative contribution of employment-related and general self-efficacy to perceptions of quality of life (QoL) for individuals with traumatic brain injury. Correlational. Community-based research and training center. 427 individuals with self-reported TBI under the age of 65 were included in analysis. Employment-related self-efficacy, general self-efficacy, perceived quality of life (PQoL), unmet important needs (UIN). Significant correlations were found between income, injury severity, age at injury, and employment and the QoL variables. In addition, employment-related and general self-efficacy correlated positively with both PQoL and UIN. Employment-related and general self-efficacy accounted for 16% of the variance in PQoL and 9.5% of the variance in UIN, over and above other variables traditionally associated with QoL. These findings highlight the importance of including subjective appraisals of employment, such as perceived self-efficacy at the workplace, in assessing QoL and successful return to work following TBI. (c) 2009 APA

  1. An investigation of factors related to self-efficacy for Java programming among computer science education students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Desmond Wesley Govender

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Students usually perceived computer programming courses as one of the most difficult courses since learning to program is perceived as a difficult task. Quite often students’ negative perceptions on computer programming results in poor results and high drop-out rates. The purpose of this study is to examine the impact of factors that affect computer science education students’ Java programming self-efficacy and the relationship between Java programming self-efficacy and students’ age and gender. A questionnaire was used to gather data. A scale with thirty-two items assessing Java programming self-efficacy was adapted from Askar and Davenport’s (2009 computer programming self-efficacy scale. A total of twenty students from a Computer Science Education Discipline participated in this study. Collected data were analysed using SPSS version 22.0. Descriptive statistics, reliability test, mean, standard deviation, and rotated component matrix were utilized to analyze the resulting data. Results indicated that there is not much difference between males (45% and females (55% Java programming self-efficacy. Furthermore, the results also indicated that programming skills and Java constructs have higher influence on the self-efficacy for Java programming among computer science education students followed by non-complexity, time consciousness, ability to recode for better understanding and self-motivation.

  2. The attenuating effect of role overload on relationships linking self-efficacy and goal level to work performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Steven P; Jones, Eli; Leigh, Thomas W

    2005-09-01

    The reported research examines the moderating effects of role overload on the antecedents and consequences of self-efficacy and personal goal level in a longitudinal study conducted in an industrial selling context. The results indicate that role overload moderates the antecedent effect of perceived organizational resources on self-efficacy beliefs. They also show that role overload moderates the direct effects of both self-efficacy and goal level on performance, such that these relationships are positive when role overload is low but not significant when role overload is high. Further, the results reveal a pattern of moderated mediation, in which goal level mediates the indirect effect of self-efficacy on performance when role overload is low but not when it is high. Implications for theory and managerial practice are discussed. Copyright 2005 APA, all rights reserved.

  3. The effect of a self-efficacy-based educational programme on maternal breast feeding self-efficacy, breast feeding duration and exclusive breast feeding rates: A longitudinal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Man Yi; Ip, Wan Yim; Choi, Kai Chow

    2016-05-01

    breast feeding has a number of well-documented benefits. Numerous studies have been conducted to investigate an effective approach to increase the breast feeding rate, duration and exclusive breast feeding rate, in which maternal breast feeding self-efficacy was determined as one of the major contributors. Although numerous breast feeding educational programmes have been developed to enhance maternal breastfeeding self-efficacy, results on the effectiveness of these programmes remain inconclusive. this study aims to investigate the effectiveness of a self-efficacy-based breast feeding educational programme (SEBEP) in enhancing breast feeding self-efficacy, breast feeding duration and exclusive breast feeding rates among mothers in Hong Kong. eligible pregnant women were randomized to attend a 2.5-hour breast feeding workshop at 28-38 weeks of gestation and receive 30-60minutes of telephone counselling at two weeks post partum, whereas both intervention and control groups received usual care. At two weeks postpartum, the Breast feeding Self-Efficacy Scale-Short Form (BSES-SF) and a self-developed post partum questionnaire were completed via telephone interviews. The breast feeding duration, pattern of breast feeding and exclusive breast feeding rates were recorded at two weeks, four weeks, eight weeks and six months post partum. results of analyses based on an intention-to-treat (ITT) assumption showed a significant difference (p<0.01) in the change in BSES-SF mean scores between the mothers who received SEBEP and those who did not receive SEBEP at two weeks post partum. The exclusive breast feeding rate was 11.4% for the intervention group and 5.6% for the control group at six months post partum. the findings of this study highlight the feasibility of a major trial to implement breast feeding education targeted at increasing breast feeding self-efficacy and exclusive breast feeding rates in Hong Kong. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Resilience Building in Students: The Role of Academic Self-Efficacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassidy, Simon

    2015-01-01

    Self-efficacy relates to an individual's perception of their capabilities. It has a clear self-evaluative dimension leading to high or low perceived self-efficacy. Individual differences in perceived self-efficacy have been shown to be better predictors of performance than previous achievement or ability and seem particularly important when individuals face adversity. The study investigated the nature of the association between academic self-efficacy (ASE) and academic resilience. Undergraduate student participants (N = 435) were exposed to an adverse situation case vignette describing either personal or vicarious academic adversity. ASE was measured pre-exposure and academic resilience was measured post-exposure. ASE was correlated with, and a significant predictor of, academic resilience and students exhibited greater academic resilience when responding to vicarious adversity compared to personal adversity. Identifying constructs that are related to resilience and establishing the precise nature of how such constructs influence academic resilience will assist the development of interventions aimed at promoting resilience in students. PMID:26640447

  5. Resilience Building in Students: The Role of Academic Self-Efficacy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon eCassidy

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Self-efficacy relates to an individual’s perception of their capabilities. It has a clear self-evaluative dimension leading to high or low perceived self-efficacy. Individual differences in perceived self-efficacy have been shown to be better predictors of performance than previous achievement or ability and seem particularly important when individuals face adversity. The study investigated the nature of the association between academic self-efficacy (ASE academic resilience. Undergraduate student participants (N=435 were exposed to an adverse situation case vignette describing either personal or vicarious academic adversity. ASE was measured pre-exposure and academic resilience was measured post- exposure. ASE was correlated with, and a significant predictor of, academic resilience and students exhibited greater academic resilience when responding to vicarious adversity compared to personal adversity. Identifying constructs that are related to resilience and establishing the precise nature of how such constructs influence resilience will assist the development of interventions aimed at promoting resilience in students.

  6. Arbi Care application increases preschool children's hand-washing self-efficacy among preschool children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arbianingsih; Utario, Yossy; Rustina, Yeni; Krianto, Tri; Ayubi, Dian

    2018-02-01

    This research aimed to examine the effectiveness of an Android mobile game application called Arbi Care as a means to prevent diarrhea and build self-efficacy in hand washing among preschool children. This research used a pre- and post-test control group and time series design approach. Respondents were chosen randomly from a group of four to six years children. The intervention group (n = 60) received Arbi Care intervention for 25 minutes, twice a week, for five weeks while the control group (n = 60) received standard education. Self-efficacy was measured by using questionnaire and observation. Measurement was carried out three times in the sixth, eight, and tenth week post-intervention. The data was analyzed using the GLMRM test. There was a significant increase in the average score of self-efficacy in hand washing for the intervention group versus the control group. Moreover, there were significant differences in the results of average scores in which the intervention group showed much better self-efficacy improvement over the control group during the first, second, and final post-test after the intervention was given (p Android-based educational game can be an effective medium to improve hand washing self-efficacy among preschool children, thus helping to prevent diarrhea. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  7. Parental influences on adolescent fruit consumption: the role of adolescent self-efficacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearson, Natalie; Ball, Kylie; Crawford, David

    2012-02-01

    The aims of this study were to examine whether adolescent self-efficacy mediates the associations between parental control, perceptions of the importance of healthy nutrition for child health and barriers to buying fruits and vegetables and adolescent fruit consumption using a theoretically derived explanatory model. Data were drawn from a community-based sample of 1606 adolescents in Years 7 and 9 of secondary school and their parents, from Victoria, Australia. Adolescents completed a web-based survey assessing their fruit consumption and self-efficacy for increasing fruit consumption. Parents completed a survey delivered via mail assessing parental control, perceptions and barriers to buying fruit and vegetables. Adolescent self-efficacy for increasing fruit consumption mediated the positive associations between parental control and perceptions of the importance of healthy nutrition for child health and adolescent fruit consumption. Furthermore, adolescent self-efficacy mediated the negative association between parental barriers to buying fruits and vegetables and adolescent fruit consumption. The importance of explicating the mechanisms through which parental factors influence adolescent fruit consumption not only relates to the advancement of scientific knowledge but also offers potential avenues for intervention. Future research should assess the effectiveness of methods to increase adolescent fruit consumption by focussing on both improving adolescents' dietary self-efficacy and on targeting parental control, perceptions and barriers.

  8. Factors influencing Australian agricultural workers' self-efficacy using chemicals in the workplace.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackman, Ian R

    2012-11-01

    A hypothetical model was formulated to explore which factors can simultaneously influence the self-reported ability of agricultural employees to embrace chemical safety practices. Eight variables were considered in the study, including the employees' gender, age, duration of current employment status, and whether they were employed full-time or part-time. The self-efficacy measures of 169 participants were then estimated by measuring their self-rated ability to understand and perform different chemical safety practices. Models identifying employee self-efficacy pathways leading to worker readiness to engage in chemical safety were then tested using Partial Least Squares Path Analysis. Study results suggest that employees' self-efficacy to successfully engage in safe chemical practices in their workplace can be directly predicted by four variables, with additional indirect effects offered by one other variable, which cumulatively account for 41% of the variance of employees' chemical safety self-efficacy scores. The most significant predictor variables that directly influenced employees' self-efficacy in adopting chemical safety practices in the workplace were worker age, gender, years of employment, and concurrent confidence (self-efficacy) arising from prior experience using chemicals in the workplace. The variables of employees' prior knowledge and understanding about the use of administrative controls and personal protective equipment to protect workers from chemical exposure had no direct influence on self-efficacy to handle chemical emergencies. Employees' unfamiliarity with risk control strategies and reliance on material safety data sheets for information suggest that ongoing and targeted training are necessary if chemical safety issues are to be addressed.

  9. Enhancement of Self Efficacy of Vocational School Students in Buffer Solution Topics through Guided Inquiry Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    M, Ardiany; W, Wahyu; A, Supriatna

    2017-09-01

    The more students who feel less confident in learning, so doing things that are less responsible, such as brawl, drunkenness and others. So researchers need to do research related to student self efficacy in learning, in order to reduce unwanted things. This study aims to determine the effect of guided inquiry learning on improving self-efficacy of learners in the buffer solution topics. The method used is the mixed method which is the two group pretest postest design. The subjects of the study are 60 students of class XI AK in one of the SMKN in Bandung, consisting of 30 experimental class students and 30 control class students. The instruments used in this study mix method consist of self-efficacy questionnaire of pretest and posttest learners, interview guides, and observation sheet. Data analysis using t test with significant α = 0,05. Based on the result of inquiry of guided inquiry study, there is a significant improvement in self efficacy aspect of students in the topic of buffer solution. Data of pretest and posttest interview, observation, questionnaire showed significant result, that is improvement of experimental class with conventionally guided inquiry learning. The mean of self-efficacy of student learning there is significant difference of experiment class than control class equal to 0,047. There is a significant relationship between guided inquiry learning with self efficacy and guided inquiry learning. Each correlation value is 0.737. The learning process with guided inquiry is fun and challenging so that students can expose their ideas and opinions without being forced. From the results of questionnaires students showed an attitude of interest, sincerity and a good response of learning. While the results of questionnaires teachers showed that guided inquiry learning can make students learn actively, increased self-efficacy.

  10. Influence of Psychological Factors on Self and Perceived Stigma ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study was conducted to investigate the influence of self esteem, locus of control and self efficacy on self and perceived stigma among mentally ill patients. Also, to examined the efficacy of cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) in symptoms reduction. The first stage of the study as a cross sectional study which adopted ...

  11. The Online Big Blue Test for Promoting Exercise: Health, Self-Efficacy, and Social Support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Zúñiga, Beni; Pousada, Modesta; Hernandez, Manny M; Colberg, Sheri; Gabarrón, Elia; Armayones, Manuel

    2015-10-01

    Recent articles have documented the influence of self-efficacy and social support on exercising. Simultaneously, insulin use is also related to the perception of self-efficacy and social support in patients with diabetes. We combine these two ideas through the Big Blue Test experience in a social networking site and propose to analyze whether a change in blood sugar levels after completion of the Big Blue Test and insulin use are related to the perception of self-efficacy and social support in patients with diabetes. To undergo the Big Blue Test, 3,926 participants voluntarily joined the Diabetes Hands Foundation. Responses were analyzed using descriptive analysis. The participants who reduced their blood glucose after exercise the least were those with lower self-efficacy and also with lower perceived social support. There seems to have been no relationship between changes in blood sugar level and the explicit intention of doing exercise in the future. Insulin-dependent participants demonstrated a lower perception of self-efficacy and social support than non-insulin-dependent participants. Change in blood glucose level or being insulin-dependent or not do not explain completely a health behavior such as exercise. Hence, self-efficacy and social support have an impact on behavioral change such as exercise to become a habit in people with diabetes, and this experience through a social networking site is an important tool for this behavioral change. For exercise to become a habit in people with diabetes, it is necessary to consider not only the crucial physiological variables, but also those psychological variables that clearly have an impact on behavioral change.

  12. Acculturation, inner peace, cancer self-efficacy, and self-rated health among Latina breast cancer survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Jimenez, María; Santoyo-Olsson, Jasmine; Ortiz, Carmen; Lahiff, Maureen; Sokal-Gutierrez, Karen; Nápoles, Anna Mar

    2014-11-01

    Cancer self-efficacy (CSE) and spiritual well-being (SWB) have been associated with better self-rated health (SRH) among breast cancer survivors (BCS), but have not been well studied among Latina BCS (LBCS). Multivariate logistic regression analyses of secondary data from a cross-sectional population-based telephone survey of 330 LBCS explored relationships of language acculturation, CSE, and SWB subdomains of inner peace and faith with SRH. English proficiency was associated with SRH, independent of other covariates (OR=2.26, 95% CI 1.15, 4.45). Cancer self-efficacy attenuated this effect and was positively associated with SRH (OR=2.24, 95% CI 1.22, 4.10). Adding inner peace (a SWB subscale) attenuated the association of CSE and SRH (OR=1.67, 95% CI 0.88, 3.18). Inner peace remained associated with SRH (OR= 2.44, 95% CI 1.30, 4.56), controlling for covariates. Findings support the importance of a sense of inner peace and control over breast cancer to LBCS’ perceived health.

  13. Adapting Computer Programming Self-Efficacy Scale and Engineering Students' Self-Efficacy Perceptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korkmaz, Özgen; Altun, Halis

    2014-01-01

    Students might have different type and different level of perceptions: Positive or negative perceptions on programming; a perception on benefit of programming, perceptions related to difficulties of programming process etc. The perception of student on their own competence is defined as self-efficacy. Based on the discussions reported in…

  14. Self-Efficacy as Predictor of Collective Self-Efficacy among Preschool Teachers in Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arslan, Emel

    2017-01-01

    This study investigates the effect of preschool teachers' collective self-efficacy. A study group consists of 172 preschool teachers who are working in public preschools affiliated with the Ministry of National Education in different cities of Turkey. In this study, teacher self-efficiency scale is employed to assess professional efficiency…

  15. Understanding Girls' Circle as an Intervention on Perceived Social Support, Body Image, Self-Efficacy, Locus of Control, and Self-Esteem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steese, Stephanie; Dollette, Maya; Phillips, William; Hossfeld, Elizabeth; Matthews, Gail; Taormina, Giovanna

    2006-01-01

    The Girls' Circle is a support group for adolescent girls developed by Beth Hossfeld and Giovanna Taormina as a unique program that addresses the needs of girls by focusing on increasing connections, building empathic skills, and developing resiliency. The present study evaluates the effectiveness of the Girls' Circle intervention on improving…

  16. The effects of problem-based learning on the self-efficacy and attitudes of beginning biology majors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajab, Adel Mohammad

    The problem of low persistence of science majors has resulted in calls for changes in undergraduate instruction toward environments that foster positive self-efficacy among beginning science majors. Low science self-efficacy and poor attitudes toward science may contribute to high attrition rates of science majors. Classroom environments that foster positive self-efficacy development include pedagogies that promote authentic learning contexts and involve collaborative learning teams. Problem-based learning (PBL) is an instructional model that attempts to create both conditions and may provide every source of information needed for the development of self-efficacy (i.e., mastery experiences, vicarious experiences, verbal persuasion, and physiological states) as postulated by Albert Bandura. The degree to which these sources of self-efficacy are delivered to individuals within a PBL group may depend on how the group members interact and how students perceive the PBL process itself. This study examined the development of biology self-efficacy and attitudes among biology majors in a PBL setting and in a traditional lecture-based setting. Specifically, this project investigated changes in students' biology self-efficacy beliefs, mediating aspects of PBL in self-efficacy development, the relationship between PBL processes and group collective efficacy, the predictive nature of entering self-efficacy levels on attitudes toward PBL and mid-term grades, and changes in student attitudes toward biology. The study design was quasi-experimental and included quantitative pre- and post-surveys, qualitative interviews, and classroom observations. Findings revealed that students enrolled in a PBL class exhibited greater gains in biology self-efficacy and were likely to report more favorable attitudes toward biology compared to students enrolled in a traditional class. The aspects of PBL that most accounted for these findings were students' ownership of the learning process, their

  17. Physical activity, self-efficacy and self-esteem in breast cancer survivors: a panel model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awick, Elizabeth A; Phillips, Siobhan M; Lloyd, Gillian R; McAuley, Edward

    2017-10-01

    Physical activity (PA) has been consistently associated with improved self-esteem in breast cancer survivors. However, this relationship is poorly understood. The purpose of this study was to examine whether changes in PA and self-efficacy influenced changes in self-esteem in breast cancer survivors across 6 months. Increases in PA were hypothesized to result in increases in self-efficacy, which were hypothesized to influence increases in physical self-worth (PSW) and global self-esteem. Breast cancer survivors (n = 370; M age  = 56.04) wore accelerometers to measure PA and completed measures of self-efficacy (e.g., exercise and barriers self-efficacy), PSW, and global self-esteem at baseline and 6 months. The hypothesized model provided a good fit to the data (χ 2  = 67.56, df = 26, p self-efficacy. In turn, more efficacious women reported significantly higher PSW (β = 0.26, 0.16). Finally, higher PSW was significantly associated with greater global self-esteem (β = 0.47). Relationships were similar among changes in model constructs over 6 months. After controlling for covariates, the hypothesized model provided an excellent fit to the data (χ 2  = 59.93, df = 33, p = 0.003; comparative fit index = 0.99; standardized root mean residual = 0.03). Our findings provide support for the role played by PA and self-efficacy in positive self-esteem, a key component of well-being. Highlighting successful PA mastery experiences is likely to enhance self-efficacy and improve self-esteem in this population. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  18. A gender study investigating physics self-efficacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawtelle, Vashti

    The underrepresentation of women in physics has been well documented and a source of concern for both policy makers and educators. My dissertation focuses on understanding the role self-efficacy plays in retaining students, particularly women, in introductory physics. I use an explanatory mixed methods approach to first investigate quantitatively the influence of self-efficacy in predicting success and then to qualitatively explore the development of self-efficacy. In the initial quantitative studies, I explore the utility of self-efficacy in predicting the success of introductory physics students, both women and men. Results indicate that self-efficacy is a significant predictor of success for all students. I then disaggregate the data to examine how self-efficacy develops differently for women and men in the introductory physics course. Results show women rely on different sources of self-efficacy than do men, and that a particular instructional environment, Modeling Instruction, has a positive impact on these sources of self-efficacy. In the qualitative phase of the project, this dissertation focuses on the development of self-efficacy. Using the qualitative tool of microanalysis, I introduce a methodology for understanding how self-efficacy develops moment-by-moment using the lens of self-efficacy opportunities. I then use the characterizations of self-efficacy opportunities to focus on a particular course environment and to identify and describe a mechanism by which Modeling Instruction impacts student self-efficacy. Results indicate that the emphasizing the development and deployment of models affords opportunities to impact self-efficacy. The findings of this dissertation indicate that introducing key elements into the classroom, such as cooperative group work, model development and deployment, and interaction with the instructor, create a mechanism by which instructors can impact the self-efficacy of their students. Results from this study indicate that

  19. Parental Control, Nurturance, Self-Efficacy, and Screen Viewing among 5- to 6-Year-Old Children: A Cross-Sectional Mediation Analysis To Inform Potential Behavior Change Strategies

    OpenAIRE

    Jago, Russell; Wood, Lesley; Zahra, Jesmond; Thompson, Janice L.; Sebire, Simon J.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background: Children's screen viewing (SV) is associated with higher levels of childhood obesity. Many children exceed the American Academy of Pediatrics guideline of 2 hours of television (TV) per day. There is limited information about how parenting styles and parental self-efficacy to limit child screen time are associated with children's SV. This study examined whether parenting styles were associated with the SV of young children and whether any effects were mediated by parental...

  20. [Effectiveness of Self-efficacy Promoting Vestibular Rehabilitation Program for Patients with Vestibular Hypofunction].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyun Jung; Choi-Kwon, Smi

    2016-10-01

    In this study an examination was done of the effect of self-efficacy promoting vestibular rehabilitation (S-VR) on dizziness, exercise selfefficacy, adherence to vestibular rehabilitation (VR), subjective and objective vestibular function, vestibular compensation and the recurrence of dizziness in patients with vestibular hypofunction. This was a randomized controlled study. Data were collected 3 times at baseline, 4 and 8 weeks after beginning the intervention. Outcome measures were level of dizziness, exercise self-efficacy, and level of adherence to VR. Subjective and objective vestibular function, vestibular compensation and the recurrence of dizziness were also obtained. Data were analyzed using Windows SPSS 21.0 program. After 4 weeks of S-VR, there was no difference between the groups for dizziness, subjective and objective vestibular functions. However, exercise self-efficacy and adherence to VR were higher in the experimental group than in the control group. After 8 weeks of S-VR, dizziness (p=.018) exercise self-efficacy (pexercise self-efficacy, subjective vestibular function and adherence to VR. Objective vestibular function and vestibular compensation were also improved in the experimental group at the end of 8 weeks of S-VR.

  1. Role of Self-Directed Learning in Communication Competence and Self-Efficacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Youngshin; Yun, Soon Young; Kim, Sun-Ae; Ahn, Eun-Kyong; Jung, Mi Sook

    2015-10-01

    Although effective self-directed learning (SDL) has been shown to improve clinical performance, little is known about its role between communication competence and communication self-efficacy in nursing students. This study aimed to identify whether SDL mediates the relationship between communication competence and communication self-efficacy. A cross-sectional survey was conducted with a sample of 213 nursing students taking a basic fundamentals of nursing course. A path diagram, using structural equation modeling, was used to estimate the direct and indirect effects of communication competence on communication self-efficacy, controlling for SDL as a mediator. A structural equation model confirmed direct and indirect effects of communication competence on communication self-efficacy when SDL was controlled as a mediator. An appropriate fit to the data was identified in this mediation model of SDL. For enhancing self-efficacy regarding communication skill, the specified SDL program based on the level of communication competence will yield more effective results. Copyright 2015, SLACK Incorporated.

  2. Association of Self-Efficacy and Outcome Expectations with Physical Activity in Adults with Arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thelma J. Mielenz

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Purpose. The purpose of this study is to determine whether higher baseline levels of (a self-efficacy for physical activity, (b self-efficacy for arthritis self-management, and (c outcome expectations for exercise are associated with higher physical activity levels following an exercise intervention for adults with arthritis. Methods. A secondary analysis of the intervention cohort (n=130 within a randomized controlled trial of the People with Arthritis Can Exercise program was performed. Multiple linear regression evaluated the relationship between physical activity at a time point three months after the completion of an exercise intervention and three main explanatory variables. Results. After controlling for baseline physical activity, neither self-efficacy for arthritis self-management nor outcome expectations for exercise related to three-month physical activity levels. There was a relationship between three-month physical activity and self-efficacy for physical activity. Conclusions. Future research is needed to evaluate the ability of self-efficacy-enhancing programs to increase physical activity in adults with arthritis.

  3. Exploring self-efficacy as a predictor of disease management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, N M; Dodge, J A

    1999-02-01

    Self-efficacy is posited in social cognitive theory as fundamental to behavior change. Few health behavior studies have examined self-efficacy prospectively, viewed it as part of a reciprocal behavioral process, or compared self-efficacy beliefs in the same population across different behaviors. This article first discusses self-efficacy in its theoretical context and reviews the available prospective studies. Second, it explores self-efficacy as a predictor of disease management behaviors in 570 older women with heart disease. Although the R2 statistics in each case were modest, the construct is shown to be a statistically significant (pmanagement behaviors: using medicine as prescribed, getting adequate exercise, managing stress, and following a recommended diet. Building self-efficacy is likely a reasonable starting point for interventions aiming to enhance heart disease management behaviors of mature female patients.

  4. Effects of sex composition by class and instructor's sex on physical self-efficacy of college men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibbons, E S; Rust, D M; Blassingame, C L; Reed, J L

    2000-02-01

    The relationship of sex composition of class and instructor's sex to Physical Self-efficacy has yielded conflicting results in several studies. This study examined the relationship of sex composition of class and instructor's sex to scores on Physical Self-efficacy, Perceived Physical Ability, and Physical Self-presentation Confidence of 80 male students enrolled in one of four sections of a strength training class. Analysis indicated no significant difference on Physical Self-efficacy between male students who were enrolled in all male classes or in coeducational classes; improvements in scores on Physical Self-efficacy were not specific to the sex composition of the class or sex of the instructor and no significant difference on Perceived Physical Ability and Physical Self-presentation Confidence between male students who joined an all male class or a coeducational class. Perceived Physical Ability improved from the pretest to the posttest in all classes; and no improvement in scores for Physical Self-presentation Confidence was found in all classes. In conclusion, the analysis showed sex composition of the class and sex of the instructor were not significantly related to scores for self-efficacy.

  5. Influence of Self-Efficacy on Compliance to Workplace Exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Mette Merete; Zebis, Mette K; Jørgensen, Henning Langberg

    2013-01-01

    the influence of exercise-specific self-efficacy on compliance to workplace physical exercise. PURPOSE: To determine the influence of exercise-specific self-efficacy on compliance to specific strength exercises during working hours for laboratory technicians. METHODS: We performed a cluster...... of compliance to exercises during 20 weeks, but found self-efficacy to be a predictor of compliance in a private sector setting. Workplace-specific differences might be present and should be taken into account....

  6. Self-efficacy at work : Social, emotional, and cognitive dimensions

    OpenAIRE

    Loeb, Carina

    2016-01-01

    Research has shown that self-efficacy is one of the most important personal resources in the work context. However, research on working life has mainly focused on a cognitive and task-oriented dimension of self-efficacy representing employees’ perceptions of their capacity to successfully complete work tasks. Thus, little is known about the influence that believing in one’s social and emotional competence could have. This thesis aims to expand previous theory regarding self-efficacy in the wo...

  7. End-of-treatment abstinence self-efficacy, behavioral processes of change, and posttreatment drinking outcomes in Project MATCH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crouch, Taylor Berens; DiClemente, Carlo C; Pitts, Steven C

    2015-09-01

    This study evaluated whether alcohol abstinence self-efficacy at the end of alcohol treatment was moderated by utilization of behavioral processes of change (coping activities used during a behavior change attempt). It was hypothesized that self-efficacy would be differentially important in predicting posttreatment drinking outcomes depending on the level of behavioral processes, such that the relation between self-efficacy and outcomes would be stronger for individuals who reported low process use. Analyses were also estimated with end-of-treatment abstinence included as a covariate. Data were analyzed from alcohol-dependent individuals in both treatment arms of Project MATCH (Matching Alcoholism Treatments to Client Heterogeneity; N = 1,328), a large alcohol treatment study. Self-efficacy was moderated by behavioral process use in predicting drinking frequency 6 and 12 months posttreatment and drinking quantity 6 months posttreatment such that self-efficacy was more strongly related to posttreatment drinking when low levels of processes were reported than high levels, but interactions were attenuated when end-of-treatment abstinence was controlled for. Significant quadratic relations between end-of-treatment self-efficacy and 6- and 12-month posttreatment drinking quantity and frequency were found (p behavioral processes was attenuated when end-of-treatment abstinence was controlled for, the quadratic effect of self-efficacy on outcomes remained significant. The pattern of these effects did not support the idea of "overconfidence" as a negative indicator. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  8. Associations between self-esteem, general self-efficacy and approaches to studying in occupational therapy students: A cross-sectional study

    OpenAIRE

    Bonsaksen, Tore; Sadeghi, Talieh; Thørrisen, Mikkel Magnus

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to explore associations between self-esteem, general self-efficacy, and the deep, strategic, and surface approaches to studying. Norwegian occupational therapy students (n = 125) completed questionnaires measuring study approaches, self-esteem, and general self-efficacy. Regression analyses were used to explore the direct relationships between self-esteem, general self-efficacy and the approaches to studying, after controlling for age, gender, prior higher education,...

  9. The Influence of Guided Error-Based Learning on Motor Skills Self-Efficacy and Achievement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chien, Kuei-Pin; Chen, Sufen

    2018-01-01

    The authors investigated the role of errors in motor skills teaching, specifically the influence of errors on skills self-efficacy and achievement. The participants were 75 undergraduate students enrolled in pétanque courses. The experimental group (guided error-based learning, n = 37) received a 6-week period of instruction based on the students' errors, whereas the control group (correct motion instruction, n = 38) received a 6-week period of instruction emphasizing correct motor skills. The experimental group had significantly higher scores in motor skills self-efficacy and outcomes than did the control group. Novices' errors reflect their schema in motor skills learning, which provides a basis for instructors to implement student-centered instruction and to facilitate the learning process. Guided error-based learning can effectively enhance beginners' skills self-efficacy and achievement in precision sports such as pétanque.

  10. Memory self-efficacy predicts responsiveness to inductive reasoning training in older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payne, Brennan R; Jackson, Joshua J; Hill, Patrick L; Gao, Xuefei; Roberts, Brent W; Stine-Morrow, Elizabeth A L

    2012-01-01

    In the current study, we assessed the relationship between memory self-efficacy at pretest and responsiveness to inductive reasoning training in a sample of older adults. Participants completed a measure of self-efficacy assessing beliefs about memory capacity. Participants were then randomly assigned to a waitlist control group or an inductive reasoning training intervention. Latent change score models were used to examine the moderators of change in inductive reasoning. Inductive reasoning showed clear improvements in the training group compared with the control. Within the training group, initial memory capacity beliefs significantly predicted change in inductive reasoning such that those with higher levels of capacity beliefs showed greater responsiveness to the intervention. Further analyses revealed that self-efficacy had effects on how trainees allocated time to the training materials over the course of the intervention. Results indicate that self-referential beliefs about cognitive potential may be an important factor contributing to plasticity in adulthood.

  11. Breastfeeding Duration and the Theory of Planned Behavior and Breastfeeding Self-Efficacy Framework: A Systematic Review of Observational Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Christine Y K; Lok, Kris Y W; Tarrant, Marie

    2018-03-01

    Introduction Numerous studies have shown that the constructs of the Theory of Reasoned Action (TRA), Theory of Planned Behavior (TPB) and Breastfeeding Self-Efficacy (BSE) Framework can effectively identify relationships between maternal psychosocial factors and breastfeeding initiation. However, the ability of these theories to predict breastfeeding duration has not been adequately analyzed. The aim of the review was to examine the utility of the constructs of TRA/TPB and BSE to predict breastfeeding duration. Methods We conducted a literature search using Pubmed (1980-May 2015), Medline (1966-May 2015), CINAHL (1980-May 2015), EMBASE (1980-May 2015) and PsycINFO (1980-May 2015). We selected studies that were observational studies without randomization or blinding, using TRA, TPB or BSE as the framework for analysis. Only studies reporting on breastfeeding duration were included. Results Thirty studies were selected, which include four using TRA, 10 using TPB, 15 using BSE and one using a combination of TPB and BSE. Maternal intention and breastfeeding self-efficacy were found to be important predictors of breastfeeding duration. Inconsistent findings were found in assessing the relationship between maternal attitudes, subjective norms, perceived behavior control and breastfeeding duration. Discussion The inadequacy of these constructs in explaining breastfeeding duration indicates a need to further explore the role of maternal self-determination in breastfeeding behavior.

  12. Emotional intelligence and social skills on self-efficacy in Secondary Education students. Are there gender differences?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salavera, Carlos; Usán, Pablo; Jarie, Laurane

    2017-10-01

    Self-efficacy affects our students' academic results, which may be related to people's social skills and emotional intelligence. This study included 1402 (50.71% males) Secondary Education Spanish students (12-17 years), and analysed the relation of self-efficacy with emotional intelligence and social skills. It showed how these constructs were related, and how the self-efficacy perceived by students varied according to their social skills and emotional intelligence. Gender did not influence self-efficacy, social skills and emotional intelligence. These variables showed similar correlation indices in females and males. Self-efficacy was related with social skills and emotional intelligence in Secondary Education students, but this relation was not gender-sensitive. More studies and research are needed to study and describe these variables according to gender from other perspectives. One proposal is to investigate the association between gender identity and self-efficacy and social skills and emotional intelligence to better understand how these constructs participate in adolescent development. Copyright © 2017 The Foundation for Professionals in Services for Adolescents. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Health Self-Efficacy Among Populations with Multiple Chronic Conditions: the Value of Patient-Centered Communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finney Rutten, Lila J; Hesse, Bradford W; St Sauver, Jennifer L; Wilson, Patrick; Chawla, Neetu; Hartigan, Danielle B; Moser, Richard P; Taplin, Stephen; Glasgow, Russell; Arora, Neeraj K

    2016-08-01

    Using cross-sectional survey data, we assessed the association between chronic illness burden and health-related self-efficacy, evaluating whether patient-centered communication is associated with self-efficacy and if that relationship varies by chronic illness burden. Data were from the Health Information National Trends Survey, a cross-sectional survey of the US adult population collected in 2012-2013 (n = 3630). Health-related self-efficacy was measured with the item: "Overall, how confident are you about your ability to take good care of your health?" and the prevalence of six chronic conditions and depression/anxiety was assessed. Patient-centered communication was measured as the frequency with which respondents perceived their healthcare providers allowed them to ask questions, gave attention to their emotions, involved them in decisions, made sure they understood how to take care of their health, helped them to deal with uncertainty, and if they felt they could rely on their healthcare providers to take care of their healthcare needs. Health-related self-efficacy was significantly lower among individuals with greater illness burden. In adjusted analysis, individuals who experienced more positive patient-centered communication reported higher levels of self-efficacy (β = 0.26, P self-efficacy were observed among patients reporting more positive patient-centered communication; the observed association was stronger among those with greater chronic illness burden.

  14. Regulatory focus, self-efficacy and outcome expectations as drivers of motivation to consume healthy food products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tudoran, Ana Alina; Scholderer, Joachim; Brunsø, Karen

    2012-10-01

    In this paper we apply the principle of Regulatory Focus Theory to investigate the interaction between self-efficacy and outcome expectations on individuals' intentions to adopt health behaviors. The participants, 959 individuals (Survey 1) and 2400 individuals (Survey 2), reported self-efficacy beliefs and outcome expectations with regard to the consumption of omega-3 supplements and omega-3-enriched food products. We found that the relationship prevention outcome expectations-intention was significantly attenuated at low levels of self-efficacy and strengthened at high levels of self-efficacy, respectively; whereas, the relationship promotion outcome expectations-intention was unaffected by the perceived levels of self-efficacy. The implications suggest that consumers' motivation to adopt healthy food products, such as omega-3 supplements and omega-3 enriched products, should be encouraged by stimulating promotion outcome expectations. However, when a prevention frame is used, the individuals' motivation should be significantly enhanced by self-efficacy beliefs. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Importance of Self-Efficacy and Knowledge to Physical Activity Behavior in Older African Americans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babatunde, Oyinlola Toyin

    2015-11-01

    Regular physical activity is an important lifestyle behavior for preventing or reducing the burden of osteoporosis, and for promoting optimal bone health. This report evaluates the effect of an osteoporosis education program on knowledge, self-efficacy, and initiation and/maintenance of physical activity (PA) in older African Americans. African American adults 50 years and older (n=130) were randomly assigned to either experimental (EG) or control (CG) groups. Immediately following baseline assessment EG was offered six-weekly education sessions, using the Expanded Heath Belief Model and the CG offered same after the intervention. Main outcome measures were knowledge and self-efficacy regarding osteoporosis and engagement in PA. One hundred and ten (59=EG, 51=CG) participants completed all assessments. Overall, significantly higher (p<.01) mean self-efficacy and knowledge scores were observed in the EG than in the CG. Physical activity scores were positively related to self-efficacy but not knowledge scores. Self-efficacy is important in increasing PA in older African Americans, and emphasis on culturally appropriate strategies may improve PA and reduce the risk of osteoporotic fracture.

  16. Growth Trajectories of Exercise Self-Efficacy in Older Adults: Influence of Measures and Initial Status

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAuley, Edward; Mailey, Emily L.; Mullen, Sean P.; Szabo, Amanda N.; Wójcicki, Thomas R.; White, Siobhan M.; Gothe, Neha; Olson, Erin A.; Kramer, Arthur F.

    2012-01-01

    Objective This study examines differential trajectories of exercise-related self-efficacy beliefs across a 12-month randomized controlled exercise trial. Methods Previously inactive older adults (N = 144; M age = 66.5) were randomly assigned to one of two exercise conditions (walking, flexibility-toning-balance) and completed measures of barriers self-efficacy (BARSE), exercise self-efficacy (EXSE), and self-efficacy for walking (SEW) across a 12-month period. Changes in efficacy were examined according to efficacy type and inter-individual differences. Latent growth curve modeling was employed to (a) examine average levels and change in each type of efficacy for the collapsed sample and by intervention condition, and (b) explore subpopulations (i.e., latent classes) within the sample that differ in their baseline efficacy and trajectory. Results Analyses revealed two negative trends in BARSE and EXSE at predicted transition points, in addition to a positive linear trend in SEW. Two subgroups with unique baseline efficacy and trajectory profiles were also identified. Conclusions These results shed new light on the relationship between exercise and self-efficacy in older adults, and highlight the need for strategies for increasing and maintaining efficacy within interventions, namely targeting participants who start with a disadvantage (lower efficacy) and integrating efficacy-boosting strategies for all participants prior to program end. PMID:21038962

  17. PENGARUH MODEL PEMBELAJARAN SAINS TEKNOLOGI MASYARAKAT (STM TERHADAP KEMAMPUAN PEMECAHAN MASALAH DAN SELF-EFFICACY SISWA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Dwipayana

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Penelitian ini bertujuan menganalisis perbedaan kemampuan pemecahan masalah dan self-efficacy siswa antara kelompok siswa yang belajar dengan model pembelajaran Sains Teknologi Masyarakat (STM dibandingkan dengan kelompok siswa yang belajar dengan model pembelajaran langsung (Direct Instruction. Jenis penelitian ini adalah penelitian semu (quasi experiment dengan rancangan pretest-posttest non equivalent control group design Populasi dalam penelitian ini semua siswa kelas VII SMP 2 Singaraja dan sampel sebanyak 75 orang siswa. Data self-efficacy dikumpulkan dengan metode kuisioner dan data kemampuan pemecahan masalah dikumpulkan dengan tes essay. Analisis data yang digunakan dalam penelitian ini adalah Manova. Berdasarkan penelitian yang telah dilakukan didapatkan hasil bahwa terdapat perbedaan kemampuan pemecahan masalah dan self- efficacy siswa antara kelompok siswa yang belajar dengan model pembelajaran STM dibandingkan dengan kelompok siswa yang belajar dengan model pembelajaran langsung (Direct Instruction dengan rata-rata nilai gain score STM lebih unggul dari nilai gain score DI berturut-turut yaitu 0,53>0,48 pada variabel kemampuan pemecahan masalah dan 0,55>0,41 pada variabel self-efficacy. Hasil Uji LSD menunjukan gain score kemampuan pemecahan masalah dan self-efficacy antara kelompok siswa yang belajar dengan model pembelajaran STM lebih baik dibandingkan dengan kelompok siswa yang belajar dengan model pembelajaran langsung (Direct Instruction.

  18. Effects of an educational technology on self-efficacy for breastfeeding and practice of exclusive breastfeeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javorski, Marly; Rodrigues, Andreyna Javorski; Dodt, Regina Cláudia Melo; Almeida, Paulo César de; Leal, Luciana Pedrosa; Ximenes, Lorena Barbosa

    2018-06-11

    To evaluate the effects of using a flipchart (serial album) on maternal self-efficacy in breastfeeding and its effects on exclusive breastfeeding (EBF) in children's first two months of life. Clinical trial in Recife, Northeastern Brazil, with 112 women in the third trimester of gestation, randomly distributed in intervention group (IG) and control group (CG). The intervention was the use of the flipchart in IG. Data collection was performed through interviews in the prenatal period, and telephone contact at second, fourth and eighth weeks postpartum. The Breastfeeding Self-Efficacy Scale-Short-Form (BSES-SF) was used to measure self-efficacy scores. In the analysis, was used descriptive, bivariate statistics through tests of comparisons of proportions and means, and relative risk assessment. There was a statistically significant difference in mean values of self-efficacy scores between women in the IG and CG (peducational tool had positive effects on self-efficacy scores for breastfeeding and in maintenance of EBF in the IG. Brazilian Registry of Clinical Trials: RBR-5N7K99.

  19. RANCANGAN PROGRAM PELATIHAN UNTUK MENINGKATKAN SELF EFFICACY NEGOSIASI PADA SISWA SMK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syarvia Syarvia

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available This research aimed to develop a training design to increase self-efficacy on negotiation for students of vocational school. Research subjects were 18 students of the SMK 1 Bandung class of 2011 marketing majoring. The design of the training program was conceived and developed with reference to the strength aspect of self-efficacy and negotiation, by applying the model of experiential learning. The training material organized into two main activities to improve selfefficacy in negotiation namely our business and making a profit. The effectiveness of the training is measured by the increase of self-efficacy category by using an instrument on negotiation selfefficacy, behavioral observation and evaluation of training. This study used a quasi-experimental method with the untreated control group pretest and posttest sample dependent design. T-Test results showed there’s no significant improvement in the category of self-efficacy negotiations after the training program. Quantitatively and observations during training showed an increase in self-efficacy negotiation in aspects of communication, strategy and relationships, as well as a decrease in the emotional aspects among training participants.

  20. Differentiating the Sources of Taiwanese High School Students' Multidimensional Science Learning Self-Efficacy: An Examination of Gender Differences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Tzung-Jin; Tsai, Chin-Chung

    2017-04-01

    The main purpose of this study was to investigate Taiwanese high school students' multi-dimensional self-efficacy and its sources in the domain of science. Two instruments, Sources of Science Learning Self-Efficacy (SSLSE) and Science Learning Self-Efficacy (SLSE), were used. By means of correlation and regression analyses, the relationships between students' science learning self-efficacy and the sources of their science learning self-efficacy were examined. The findings revealed that the four sources of the students' self-efficacy were found to play significant roles in their science learning self-efficacy. By and large, Mastery Experience and Vicarious Experience were found to be the two salient influencing sources. Several gender differences were also revealed. For example, the female students regarded Social Persuasion as the most influential source in the "Science Communication" dimension, while the male students considered Vicarious Experience as the main efficacy source. Physiological and Affective States, in particular, was a crucial antecedent of the female students' various SLSE dimensions, including "Conceptual Understanding," "Higher-Order Cognitive Skills," and "Science Communication." In addition, the variations between male and female students' responses to both instruments were also unraveled. The results suggest that, first, the male students perceived themselves as having more mastery experience, vicarious experience and social persuasion than their female counterparts. Meanwhile, the female students experienced more negative emotional arousal than the male students. Additionally, the male students were more self-efficacious than the females in the five SLSE dimensions of "Conceptual Understanding," "Higher-Order Cognitive Skills," "Practical Work," "Everyday Application," and "Science Communication."

  1. Differentiating the Sources of Taiwanese High School Students' Multidimensional Science Learning Self-Efficacy: An Examination of Gender Differences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Tzung-Jin; Tsai, Chin-Chung

    2018-06-01

    The main purpose of this study was to investigate Taiwanese high school students' multi-dimensional self-efficacy and its sources in the domain of science. Two instruments, Sources of Science Learning Self-Efficacy (SSLSE) and Science Learning Self-Efficacy (SLSE), were used. By means of correlation and regression analyses, the relationships between students' science learning self-efficacy and the sources of their science learning self-efficacy were examined. The findings revealed that the four sources of the students' self-efficacy were found to play significant roles in their science learning self-efficacy. By and large, Mastery Experience and Vicarious Experience were found to be the two salient influencing sources. Several gender differences were also revealed. For example, the female students regarded Social Persuasion as the most influential source in the "Science Communication" dimension, while the male students considered Vicarious Experience as the main efficacy source. Physiological and Affective States, in particular, was a crucial antecedent of the female students' various SLSE dimensions, including "Conceptual Understanding," "Higher-Order Cognitive Skills," and "Science Communication." In addition, the variations between male and female students' responses to both instruments were also unraveled. The results suggest that, first, the male students perceived themselves as having more mastery experience, vicarious experience and social persuasion than their female counterparts. Meanwhile, the female students experienced more negative emotional arousal than the male students. Additionally, the male students were more self-efficacious than the females in the five SLSE dimensions of "Conceptual Understanding," "Higher-Order Cognitive Skills," "Practical Work," "Everyday Application," and "Science Communication."

  2. Self-efficacy as a predictor of patient-reported outcomes in adults with congenital heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomet, Corina; Moons, Philip; Schwerzmann, Markus; Apers, Silke; Luyckx, Koen; Oechslin, Erwin N; Kovacs, Adrienne H

    2018-04-01

    Self-efficacy is a known predictor of patient-reported outcomes in individuals with acquired diseases. With an overall objective of better understanding patient-reported outcomes in adults with congenital heart disease, this study aimed to: (i) assess self-efficacy in adults with congenital heart disease, (ii) explore potential demographic and medical correlates of self-efficacy and (iii) determine whether self-efficacy explains additional variance in patient-reported outcomes above and beyond known predictors. As part of a large cross-sectional international multi-site study (APPROACH-IS), we enrolled 454 adults (median age 32 years, range: 18-81) with congenital heart disease in two tertiary care centres in Canada and Switzerland. Self-efficacy was measured using the General Self-Efficacy (GSE) scale, which produces a total score ranging from 10 to 40. Variance in the following patient-reported outcomes was assessed: perceived health status, psychological functioning, health behaviours and quality of life. Hierarchical multivariable linear regression analysis was performed. Patients' mean GSE score was 30.1 ± 3.3 (range: 10-40). Lower GSE was associated with female sex ( p = 0.025), not having a job ( p = 0.001) and poorer functional class ( p = 0.048). GSE positively predicted health status and quality of life, and negatively predicted symptoms of anxiety and depression, with an additional explained variance up to 13.6%. No associations between self-efficacy and health behaviours were found. GSE adds considerably to our understanding of patient-reported outcomes in adults with congenital heart disease. Given that self-efficacy is a modifiable psychosocial factor, it may be an important focus for interventions targeting congenital heart disease patients' well-being.

  3. Relationships among spousal communication, self-efficacy, and motivation among expectant Latino fathers who smoke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khaddouma, Alexander; Gordon, Kristina Coop; Fish, Laura J; Bilheimer, Alicia; Gonzalez, Alicia; Pollak, Kathryn I

    2015-10-01

    Cigarette smoking is a prevalent problem among Latinos, yet little is known about what factors motivate them to quit smoking or make them feel more confident that they can. Given cultural emphases on familial bonds among Latinos (e.g., familismo), it is possible that communication processes among Latino spouses play an important role. The present study tested a mechanistic model in which perceived spousal constructive communication patterns predicted changes in level of motivation for smoking cessation through changes in self-efficacy among Latino expectant fathers. Latino males (n = 173) and their pregnant partners participated in a couple-based intervention targeting males' smoking. Couples completed self-report measures of constructive communication, self-efficacy (male partners only), and motivation to quit (male partners only) at 4 time points throughout the intervention. Higher levels of perceived constructive communication among Latino male partners predicted subsequent increases in male partners' self-efficacy and, to a lesser degree, motivation to quit smoking; however, self-efficacy did not mediate associations between constructive communication and motivation to quit smoking. Furthermore, positive relationships with communication were only significant at measurements taken after completion of the intervention. Female partners' level of perceived constructive communication did not predict male partners' outcomes. These results provide preliminary evidence to support the utility of couple-based interventions for Latino men who smoke. Findings also suggest that perceptions of communication processes among Latino partners (particularly male partners) may be an important target for interventions aimed at increasing desire and perceived ability to quit smoking among Latino men. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  4. The relationship between critical thinking skills and self-efficacy beliefs in mental health nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gloudemans, Henk A; Schalk, René M J D; Reynaert, Wouter

    2013-03-01

    In the Netherlands, the distinction between Bachelor degree and diploma nursing educational levels remains unclear. The added value of Bachelor degree nurses and how they develop professionally after graduation are subject to debate. The aim of this study is to investigate whether Bachelor degree nurses have higher critical thinking skills than diploma nurses do and whether there is a positive relationship between higher critical thinking skills and self-efficacy beliefs. Outcomes might provide instruments that are helpful in positioning of nursing levels in education and practice. Questionnaire data were used of a sample of 95 registered mental health staff nurses (62 diploma nurses and 33 Bachelor degree nurses). First, ANOVA was performed to test whether the two groups were comparable with respect to elements of work experience. Second, t-tests were conducted to compare the two groups of nurses on self-efficacy, perceived performance and critical thinking outcomes. Third, relationships between the study variables were investigated. Finally, structural equation modelling using AMOS was applied to test the relationships. The hypothesis that Bachelor degree nurses are better critical thinkers than diploma nurses was supported (p<0.01). Years in function turned out to be positively related to self-efficacy beliefs (p<0.01). No significant relation was found between the level of education and self-efficacy beliefs. The results of this study support career development and facilitate more efficient positioning of nursing levels. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Improving Preservice Teachers’ Self-Efficacy through Service Learning: Lessons Learned

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carianne Bernadowski

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available University students have been barraged with service learning opportunities both as course required and as volunteer opportunities in recent years. Currently, many universities now require students to participate in engaged learning as a graduation requirement. Situated in Bandura’s theory of self-efficacy, this study examines the effects service learning has on students teaching self-efficacy when required to participate in an activity (course connected, compared to when they chose to volunteer in service learning projects. As instructors of preservice teachers it is our commitment to prepare these students to their maximum potential. Identifying best practices for teacher preparation is an overarching goal of this study. A pre/post survey examined students’ self-perceptions for each service opportunity in regards to their perceived teaching self-efficacy. Results indicate that students’ self-efficacy improved when service learning was connected or imbedded in the context of learning and connected to a specific course. These findings indicate course connected service learning has a greater impact on preservice teachers’ perceptions of their ability to be effective future classroom teachers. Therefore course connected service learning can be viewed as a best practice in preservice teaching instruction.

  6. THE EFFECTS OF INTERVAL FEEDBACK ON THE SELF-EFFICACY OF NETBALL UMPIRES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alison J. Mahoney

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available The present study used quantitative and qualitative methods to explore the relationship between interval feedback and self-efficacy toward umpiring netball games. Grade "A" level umpires (n = 7 provided feedback to umpires (n = 40 under two conditions; 1 interval feedback given at the end of one tournament game (after 14 minutes and again at the end of a second consecutive game (after 28 minutes, and 2 feedback at the end of the game (after 28 minutes. Umpires in both conditions completed an Umpiring Self-Efficacy Questionnaire (USEQ which was a 14-item measure designed to assess factors relevant to netball umpire performance. Participants completed the USEQ immediately before game one, during the interval, and after a second game. Umpires also completed a feedback questionnaire which enabled them to reflect on the feedback received. A repeated measures factorial (time x feedback condition ANOVA indicated no significant interaction effect (F = 0.05, p > .05, and no main effect for condition (F = 0.06, p > .05 or time (F = 1.61, p > .05 for changes in self-efficacy. Although there were no significant effects, qualitative data alluded to aspects of feedback perceived to enhance umpire self-efficacy, thus identifying ways in which feedback might have a more consistent effect. Practical implications of the study in relation to verbal interval feedback are discussed

  7. Hope and self-efficacy are associated with better satisfaction with life in people with ALS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galin, Shir; Heruti, Irit; Barak, Noa; Gotkine, Marc

    2018-05-31

    The psychological phenotype in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is less negative than in other neurodegenerative diseases, manifested by a lower prevalence of psychopathology, such as anxiety and major depression, and a higher perceived quality of life by patients, irrespective of physical impairment. We hypothesized that positive psychological factors such as hope, optimism, and self-efficacy in people with ALS (PALS) were key determinants of satisfaction with life (SWL), despite physical impairment, and were protective against psychopathology. Forty PALS, at different functional levels, completed objective questionnaires to evaluate psychological factors of hope, optimism, self-efficacy, and SWL. Approximately 41% of the variance in SWL was accounted for by the Agency factor of hope. The results indicated that SWL was significantly correlated to specific positive psychological factors of hope and self-efficacy. Physical impairment was not correlated with positive psychological factors or SWL. These results support the role of hope and self-efficacy in maintaining satisfaction with life in PALS and consideration of these potentially modifiable factors could improve palliative therapy.

  8. Specific insomnia symptoms and self-efficacy explain CPAP compliance in a sample of OSAS patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philip, Pierre; Bioulac, Stéphanie; Altena, Elemarije; Morin, Charles M; Ghorayeb, Imad; Coste, Olivier; Monteyrol, Pierre-Jean; Micoulaud-Franchi, Jean-Arthur

    2018-01-01

    This study explores the association between specific insomnia symptoms (sleep onset, sleep maintenance and early morning awakenings symptoms) and self-efficacy (perceived self-confidence in the ability to use CPAP) with CPAP compliance in French patients with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS). We performed a retrospective, cross-sectional analysis of CPAP compliance in a cohort of 404 patients diagnosed with OSAS. Patients completed mailed questionnaires on sleepiness (ESS), insomnia (ISI) and self-efficacy in sleep apnea (SEMSA). Linear regression modeling analyses were performed to explore the impact of measured variables on the number of hours of CPAP use. Of the initial pool of 404 patients, 288 returned the questionnaires (71% response rate). Their mean age was 63.16±12.73 yrs, 31% were females, mean BMI was 30.39±6.31 kg/m2, mean daily CPAP use was 6.19±2.03 h, mean number of years of use was 6.58±6.03 yrs, and mean initial AHI before CPAP use was 34.61±20.71 /h. Age (pCPAP use. We found that specific insomnia symptoms and self-efficacy were associated with CPAP compliance. Our findings underline the need to demonstrate that interventions that reduce insomnia symptoms and improve self-efficacy will increase CPAP compliance.

  9. An Educational Intervention Designed to Increase Women's Leadership Self-Efficacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isaac, Carol; Kaatz, Anna; Lee, Barbara; Carnes, Molly

    2012-01-01

    Women are sparsely represented in leadership in academic science, technology, engineering, mathematics, and medicine (STEMM). Cultural stereotypes about men, women, and leaders influence the attitudes, judgments, and decisions that others make about women and the choices women make for themselves. Multilevel interventions are needed to counteract the impact of these pervasive and easily activated stereotypes, which conspire in multiple ways to constrain women's entry, persistence, and advancement in academic STEMM. We describe an individual-level educational intervention. Using the transtheoretical model of behavioral change as a framework, we assessed the success of a semester course on increasing women's leadership self-efficacy for the first three cohorts of course participants (n = 30). Pre/post questionnaires showed gains in leadership self-efficacy, personal mastery, and self-esteem, and decreases in perceived constraints. Qualitative text analysis of weekly journals indicated increasing leadership self-efficacy as course participants applied course information and integrated strategies to mitigate the impact of societal stereotypes into their own leadership practices. Follow-up queries of the first two cohorts supported the enduring value of course participation. We conclude that providing strategies to recognize and mitigate the impact of gender stereotypes is effective in increasing leadership self-efficacy in women at early stages of academic STEMM careers. PMID:22949427

  10. An educational intervention designed to increase women's leadership self-efficacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isaac, Carol; Kaatz, Anna; Lee, Barbara; Carnes, Molly

    2012-01-01

    Women are sparsely represented in leadership in academic science, technology, engineering, mathematics, and medicine (STEMM). Cultural stereotypes about men, women, and leaders influence the attitudes, judgments, and decisions that others make about women and the choices women make for themselves. Multilevel interventions are needed to counteract the impact of these pervasive and easily activated stereotypes, which conspire in multiple ways to constrain women's entry, persistence, and advancement in academic STEMM. We describe an individual-level educational intervention. Using the transtheoretical model of behavioral change as a framework, we assessed the success of a semester course on increasing women's leadership self-efficacy for the first three cohorts of course participants (n = 30). Pre/post questionnaires showed gains in leadership self-efficacy, personal mastery, and self-esteem, and decreases in perceived constraints. Qualitative text analysis of weekly journals indicated increasing leadership self-efficacy as course participants applied course information and integrated strategies to mitigate the impact of societal stereotypes into their own leadership practices. Follow-up queries of the first two cohorts supported the enduring value of course participation. We conclude that providing strategies to recognize and mitigate the impact of gender stereotypes is effective in increasing leadership self-efficacy in women at early stages of academic STEMM careers.

  11. Students’ Aesthetics Experience, Creative Self-Efficacy and Creativity: Is Creativity Instruction Effective?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan-Cheng Chang

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Based on creativity component theory, creativity system theory and creative self-efficacy theory, this study aims to explore the influence of college students’ aesthetics experience and creative self-efficacy on their creativity and the role of creativity instruction as a mediator variable. The participants were 338 college design majors in 50 teams who were working on their graduation exhibitions, and 50 advising professors from departments related to design. Hierarchical Linear Models were applied for analysis. The result showed that instruction on enhancing students’ creative intention positively affect students’ aesthetics experience. Students’ aesthetics experience affects their creativity and creative self-efficacy. Creativity instruction with focus on creativity skills by means of promoting aesthetic attitude, aesthetic understanding, and offering complete experiences had a moderating effect on students’ perception toward creative product. However, there was a negative moderating effect of creative instruction on perceived aesthetic pleasure and students’ perception toward creative product. There was no moderating effect of creative instruction on the relationship between students’ creative self-efficacy and creativity. Accordingly, the study concluded that in order to enhance students’ creativity, universities should stress on the development of students’ aesthetics experiences and re-evaluation of approaches to creativity instruction.

  12. The Effect of Childbirth Self-Efficacy on Perinatal Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tilden, Ellen L.; Caughey, Aaron B.; Lee, Christopher S.; Emeis, Cathy

    2016-01-01

    Objective To synthesize and critique the quantitative literature on measuring childbirth self-efficacy and the effect of childbirth self-efficacy on perinatal outcomes. Data Sources Eligible studies were identified through searching MEDLINE, CINAHL, Scopus, and Google Scholar databases. Study Selection Published research using a tool explicitly intended to measure childbirth self-efficacy and also examining outcomes within the perinatal period were included. All manuscripts were in English and published in peer-reviewed journals. Data Extraction First author, country, year of publication, reference and definition of childbirth self-efficacy, measurement of childbirth self-efficacy, sample recruitment and retention, sample characteristics, study design, interventions (with experimental and quasi-experimental studies), and perinatal outcomes were extracted and summarized. Data Synthesis Of 619 publications, 23 studies published between 1983 and 2015 met inclusion criteria and were critiqued and synthesized in this review. Conclusions There is overall consistency in how childbirth self-efficacy is defined and measured among studies, facilitating comparison and synthesis. Our findings suggest that increased childbirth self-efficacy is associated with a wide variety of improved perinatal outcomes. Moreover, there is evidence that childbirth self-efficacy is a psychosocial factor that can be modified through various efficacy-enhancing interventions. Future researchers will be able to build knowledge in this area through: (a) utilization of experimental and quasi-experimental design; (b) recruitment and retention of more diverse samples; (c) explicit reporting of definitions of terms (e.g. ‘high risk’); (d) investigation of interventions that increase childbirth self-efficacy during pregnancy; and, (e) investigation regarding how childbirth self-efficacy enhancing interventions might lead to decreased active labor pain and suffering. Exploratory research should

  13. Enhancing Self-Efficacy in Elementary Science Teaching With Professional Learning Communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mintzes, Joel J.; Marcum, Bev; Messerschmidt-Yates, Christl; Mark, Andrew

    2013-11-01

    Emerging from Bandura's Social Learning Theory, this study of in-service elementary school teachers examined the effects of sustained Professional Learning Communities (PLCs) on self-efficacy in science teaching. Based on mixed research methods, and a non-equivalent control group experimental design, the investigation explored changes in personal self-efficacy and outcome expectancy among teachers engaged in PLCs that featured Demonstration Laboratories, Lesson Study, and annual Summer Institutes. Significant changes favoring the experimental group were found on all quantitative measures of self-efficacy. Structured clinical interviews revealed that observed changes were largely attributable to a wide range of direct (mastery) and vicarious experiences, as well as emotional reinforcement and social persuasion.

  14. Antenatal education in small classes may increase childbirth self-efficacy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brixval, Carina S; Axelsen, Solveig F; Thygesen, Lau C

    2016-01-01

    Antenatal education in small classes may increase childbirth self-efficacy. In this randomised trial we assessed the effect of a structured antenatal programme versus auditorium-based lectures on childbirth self-efficacy measured by three single items. We found that women in the intervention group...... reported statistically significant higher levels of confidence in their ability to cope at home during labour compared to the control group. Likewise, the intervention had a positive effect on the women's confidence in own ability to handle the birth process....

  15. Sources of self-efficacy in academic contexts: A longitudinal perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phan, Huy P; Ngu, Bing H

    2016-12-01

    The formation of self-efficacy, according to Bandura's (1997) social-cognitive theory, is an important area of inquiry. This theoretical tenet posits the importance of enactive learning experience, followed by lesser influences of vicarious experience, verbal persuasion, and emotional and physiological states. Quantitative research, predominantly, has produced clear and consistent evidence that supports this position. We argue that the elementary school years may indicate differently, whereby children's limited cognitive maturity and learning experiences could compel them to rely on other psychosocial informational sources. To date and to our knowledge, very few studies, if any, have explored the sustained influence of enactive learning experience across time. In this study, consequently, we tested a sequential predictive model that involved the differential influences of the 4 major informational sources on self-efficacy and then self-efficacy on academic achievement. Three time points of data (N = 328, Year 6) were collected across the calendar year, and Mplus 7.3 (Muthén & Muthén, 1998-2012) was used to assist us in our structural modeling testing. At Time 1, only enactive learning experience and vicarious experience positively influenced self-efficacy. At Time 2, after controlling for prior variance of Time 1 corresponding factors, only enactive learning experience remained significant. At Time 3, after controlling for autoregressive paths, enactive learning experience remained significant, and both verbal persuasion and emotional and physiological states positively influenced self-efficacy. The impact of self-efficacy on academic achievement was significant across the 3 occasions (βs = .20-.46). (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  16. Collaborative curriculum design to increase science teaching self-efficacy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Velthuis, C.H.

    2014-01-01

    The focus in this study is on developing a teacher training program for improving teachers’ science teaching self-efficacy. Teachers with a high sense of self-efficacy will set higher goals for themselves, are less afraid of failure and will find new strategies when old ones fail. If their sense of

  17. Determining the Predictors of Self-Efficacy and Cyber Bullying

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bingöl, Tugba Yilmaz

    2018-01-01

    In this study, it was aimed to determine the variables affecting self-efficacy and cyber bullying. The participants of the study were 223 high school students. The data was collected through the use of self-administered questionnaires which were the General Self-efficacy Scale, the Gratitude Scale, the Early Memories of Warmth and Safeness Scale…

  18. The Accuracy of Self-Efficacy Beliefs in Outdoor Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schumann, Scott

    2013-01-01

    In the present era of outcome assessment and accountability, self-efficacy is a popular outcome measure in outdoor and adventure education. Self-efficacy beliefs are context specific perceptions an individual possesses about a likelihood of success in future tasks and are related to well-being confidence, and persistence. However, recent research…

  19. A Reanalysis of Engineering Majors' Self-Efficacy Beliefs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Concannon, James P.; Barrow, Lloyd H.

    2012-01-01

    This study examines differences in women's engineering self-efficacy beliefs across grade levels in comparison to men's engineering self-efficacy (ESE) beliefs across grade levels. Data for this study was collected from 746 (635 men, 111 women) engineering students enrolled in a large research extensive university. Four major conclusions resulted…

  20. Factor Structure of the Exercise Self-Efficacy Scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornick, Jessica E.

    2015-01-01

    The current study utilized exercise self-efficacy ratings from undergraduate students to assess the factor structure of the Self-Efficacy to Regulate Exercise Scale (Bandura, 1997, 2006). An exploratory factor analysis (n = 759) indicated a two-factor model solution and three separate confirmatory factor analyses (n = 1,798) supported this…

  1. Student Self-Efficacy and Gender-Personality Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fallan, Lars; Opstad, Leiv

    2016-01-01

    The present study examines the self-efficacy levels and self-efficacy strength for male and female students in a course in Principle of Economics. The groups of male and female students may be mutually heterogeneous when it comes to personality types in a business school (Fallan & Opstad, 2014). This study does not treat the gender groups as…

  2. Parental Self-Efficacy and Bullying in Elementary School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malm, Esther Kweiki; Henrich, Christopher; Varjas, Kris; Meyers, Joel

    2017-01-01

    This study investigated associations of general and specific parental self-efficacy factors with bullying and peer victimization behaviors among 142 fourth and fifth graders and their parents. Using structural equation modeling, exploratory factor analysis was used to examine one general parenting self-efficacy measure and a bullying-specific…

  3. Pre-Service Teacher Self-Efficacy in Digital Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemon, Narelle; Garvis, Susanne

    2016-01-01

    Self-efficacy is an important motivational construct for primary school teachers (teachers of children aged 5-12 years) within Australia. Teacher self-efficacy beliefs will determine the level of teacher confidence and competence to engage with a task. In this study, we explore engagement with digital technology and the associated learning and…

  4. Identifying events that impact self-efficacy in physics learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vashti Sawtelle

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available We present a method of analyzing the development of self-efficacy in real time using a framework of self-efficacy opportunities (SEOs. Considerable research has shown a connection between self-efficacy, or the confidence in one’s own ability to perform a task, and success in science fields. Traditional methods of investigating the development of self-efficacy have required participants to recollect past events. This reliance on participant memory makes it difficult to understand what impact particular events may have on developing self-efficacy in the moment. We use video recordings of three undergraduate Modeling Instruction students solving a physics problem to characterize SEOs in a moment-by-moment analysis. We then validate these characterizations of the development of self-efficacy by reviewing the problem-solving session with the participants and find evidence that the SEOs identified are taken up and impact self-efficacy. This characterization and validation of SEOs in the moment represents a first step towards establishing a methodology for analyzing the development of self-efficacy in real time.

  5. Study Skills Course Impact on Academic Self-Efficacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wernersbach, Brenna M.; Crowley, Susan L.; Bates, Scott C.; Rosenthal, Carol

    2014-01-01

    Although study skills courses improve student retention, the impact of study skills courses on students' academic self-efficacy has not been investigated. The present study examined pre- and posttest levels of academic self-efficacy in college students enrolled in a study skills course (n = 126) compared to students enrolled in a general education…

  6. Self-Efficacy and Burnout in Professional School Counselors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunduz, Bulent

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated the relationships between burnout and self-efficacy among school counselors. Also, the level of their burnout and self-efficacy was examined in terms of the social support, task perception and the number of students. A sample of 194 school counselors filled out the Maslach Burnout Inventory, The School Counselors…

  7. The Four Sources of Influence on Computer Self-Efficacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Sheila M.

    2001-01-01

    Using Bandura's four sources of influence on self-efficacy, 210 students rated their computer self-efficacy. Mastery experiences were most influential for white males; vicarious learning had the most influence for females and nonwhite students. (Contains 29 references.) (SK)

  8. Self-Efficacy and Academic Performance in English

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meera, K. P.; Jumana, M. K.

    2015-01-01

    This study reviews the relevant self-efficacy related literature, a central point of social cognitive theory, in the area of language learning. Role of self-efficacy in academic performance of learners is also considered. In the global world, English language has become the fundamental means of international affairs and communication. As a…

  9. Self-Efficacy in Second/Foreign Language Learning Contexts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raoofi, Saeid; Tan, Bee Hoon; Chan, Swee Heng

    2012-01-01

    This study reviews the empirical literature of self-efficacy, a central component of social cognitive theory, in the area of second language learning by focusing on two research questions: first, to what extent, has self-efficacy, as a predicting variable, been explored in the field of second language learning? Second, what factors affect…

  10. Teacher Effectiveness through Self-Efficacy, Collaboration and Principal Leadership

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sehgal, Prachee; Nambudiri, Ranjeet; Mishra, Sushanta Kumar

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: Teacher effectiveness has been a matter of concern not only for the parents and students but also for the policy makers, researchers, and educationists. Drawing from the "self-efficacy" theory (Bandura, 1977), the purpose of this paper is to explore the relationship between teacher self-efficacy and teacher effectiveness. In…

  11. Validation of the Sexual Communication Self-Efficacy Scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinn-Nilas, Christopher; Milhausen, Robin R.; Breuer, Rebecca; Bailey, Julia; Pavlou, Menelaos; DiClemente, Ralph J.; Wingood, Gina M.

    2016-01-01

    This study assessed a newly developed Sexual Communication Self-Efficacy Scale designed to measure the sexual communication self-efficacy of adolescent men and women. Three-hundred and seventy-four U.K. adolescents completed this new scale, along with several other validity measures. Factor analysis revealed that the Sexual Communication…

  12. Teacher self-efficacy in cross-cultural perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vieluf, S.; Kuenther, M.; van de Vijver, F.J.R.

    2013-01-01

    In the present study, teacher self-efficacy was examined in a cross-national setting. The cross-national generalizability of the scale and the meaning of cross-national variation in mean scores were investigated. Using data from TALIS involving 73,100 teachers in 23 countries, teacher self-efficacy

  13. Early breastfeeding experiences influence parental self-efficacy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kunseler, F.C.; Hankel, M.A.; Balm, K.E.; Oosterman, M.; Schuengel, C.

    2012-01-01

    Parental self-efficacy (PSE) is defined as "the expectation caregivers hold about their ability to parent successfully" (Jones & Prinz, 2005, p. 342). According to Bandura (1977), self-efficacy is based on four sources, including ‘performance accomplishments’: if successful experiences are repeated

  14. Examining the Computer Self-Efficacy Perceptions of Gifted Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, Abdullah; Öztürk, Mesut; Doruk, Muhammet; Yilmaz, Alper

    2013-01-01

    This study was conducted in order to determine the computer self-efficacy perceptions of gifted students. The research group of this study is composed of gifted students (N = 36) who were studying at the Science and Arts Center in Gümüshane province in the spring semester of the 2012-2013 academic year. The "Computer Self-Efficacy Perception…

  15. The investigation of STEM Self-Efficacy and Professional ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    self-efficacy and professional commitment to engineering. A total of 88 students from a national girls' high school participated in STEM project-based learning. A survey questionnaire named The STEM Self-efficacy and Professional Commitment to Engineering Questionnaire, developed by the researchers, was ...

  16. Academic Self-Efficacy of High Achieving Students in Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camelo-Lavadores, Ana Karen; Sánchez-Escobedo, Pedro; Pinto-Sosa, Jesus

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore for differences in the academic self-efficacy of Mexican high school students. A gird questionnaire was administered to 1,460 students form private and public schools. As expected, high achieving students showed significantly higher academic self-efficacy that their peers. However, interesting gender…

  17. Teacher Self-Efficacy According to Turkish Cypriot Science Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olmez, Cemil; Ozbas, Serap

    2017-01-01

    This study examined the self-efficacy of Turkish Cypriot science teachers working at high schools in Northern Cyprus. The study sample was 200 science teachers who participated in the survey. The Teacher Self-Efficacy (TSE) Scale was used as a data source. It was observed that the science teachers' efficacy beliefs about student engagement in…

  18. Influence of Self-Efficacy on Compliance to Workplace Exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Mette Merete; Zebis, Mette Kreutzfeldt; Langberg, Henning

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Continuous neck and shoulder pain is a common musculoskeletal complaint. Physical exercise can reduce pain symptoms, but compliance to exercise is a challenge. Exercise-specific self-efficacy has been found to be a predictor of participation in preplanned exercise. Little is known about...... the influence of exercise-specific self-efficacy on compliance to workplace physical exercise. PURPOSE: To determine the influence of exercise-specific self-efficacy on compliance to specific strength exercises during working hours for laboratory technicians. METHODS: We performed a cluster......). The participants answered baseline and follow-up questions regarding self-efficacy and registered all exercises in a diary. RESULTS: Overall compliance to exercises was 45 %. Compliance in company A (private sector) differed significantly between the three self-efficacy groups after 20 weeks. The odds ratio...

  19. Psychometric qualities of the short form of the self-efficacy for parenting tasks index-toddler scale

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Rijen, E. H M; Gasanova, N.; Boonstra, A. M.; Huijding, J.

    2014-01-01

    Parental self-efficacy (PSE; parental self-perceived competence in parenting) is known to have considerable impact on parenting quality. Although PSE is particularly under pressure during the turbulent period of toddlerhood, most studies so far have focused on PSE in parents of older children. The

  20. The Association between Spanish Physical Education Teachers' Self-Efficacy Expectations and Their Attitudes toward Overweight and Obese Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-López, Emilio J.; Grao-Cruces, Alberto; Zamora-Aguilera, Nestor; De la Torre-Cruz, Manuel J.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to investigate the association between Spanish physical education teachers' perceived self-efficacy toward including overweight and obese students and their attitudes toward overweight and obese students. Method: Four hundred and seventy-one physical education teachers filled out questionnaires to assess their…