WorldWideScience

Sample records for self-assembled single-crystal silicon

  1. Solar cell structure incorporating a novel single crystal silicon material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pankove, Jacques I.; Wu, Chung P.

    1983-01-01

    A novel hydrogen rich single crystal silicon material having a band gap energy greater than 1.1 eV can be fabricated by forming an amorphous region of graded crystallinity in a body of single crystalline silicon and thereafter contacting the region with atomic hydrogen followed by pulsed laser annealing at a sufficient power and for a sufficient duration to recrystallize the region into single crystal silicon without out-gassing the hydrogen. The new material can be used to fabricate semiconductor devices such as single crystal silicon solar cells with surface window regions having a greater band gap energy than that of single crystal silicon without hydrogen.

  2. Directed self-assembly of liquid crystalline blue-phases into ideal single-crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-González, Jose A.; Li, Xiao; Sadati, Monirosadat; Zhou, Ye; Zhang, Rui; Nealey, Paul F.; de Pablo, Juan J.

    2017-06-01

    Chiral nematic liquid crystals are known to form blue phases--liquid states of matter that exhibit ordered cubic arrangements of topological defects. Blue-phase specimens, however, are generally polycrystalline, consisting of randomly oriented domains that limit their performance in applications. A strategy that relies on nano-patterned substrates is presented here for preparation of stable, macroscopic single-crystal blue-phase materials. Different template designs are conceived to exert control over different planes of the blue-phase lattice orientation with respect to the underlying substrate. Experiments are then used to demonstrate that it is indeed possible to create stable single-crystal blue-phase domains with the desired orientation over large regions. These results provide a potential avenue to fully exploit the electro-optical properties of blue phases, which have been hindered by the existence of grain boundaries.

  3. Self-Assembly of Single-Crystal Silver Microflakes on Reduced Graphene Oxide and their Use in Ultrasensitive Sensors

    KAUST Repository

    Chen, Ye

    2016-01-19

    Compared to 1D structures, 2D structures have higher specific and active surface, which drastically improves electron transfer and extensibility along 2D plane. Herein, 2D-single crystal silver microflakes (AgMFs) are prepared for the first time in situ on reduced graphene oxide (RGO) by solvothermal synthesis with thickness around 100 nm and length around 10 μm. The oriented attachment mechanism is hypothesized to control the silver crystal growth and self-assembly of reduced silver units to form single-crystal AgMF structure on RGO sheets. Employing it as an electrode to fabricate reliable and extremely sensitive pressure sensors verifies the applicability of this novel 2D structure. Contrary to nanowires, 2D microflakes can intercalate better within the polymer matrix to provide an enhanced network for electron movement. The designed sensor can retain more than 4.7 MPa-1 after 10 000 cycles. The design proves functional for monitoring various actions such as wrist movement, squatting, walking, and delicate finger touch with high durability. A highly sensitive and flexible pressure sensor is fabricated based on the self-assembly of silver microflakes on reduced graphene oxide. This sensor exhibits an excellent pressure sensitivity as it can retain more than 4.7 MPa-1 after 10 000 cycles. This system is successfully used to monitor wrist movement, walking, and squatting and can be applied in touch screen panels, robotic systems, and prosthetics. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Hierarchical self-assembly of hexagonal single-crystal nanosheets into 3D layered superlattices with high conductivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Yulun; Shen, Yuhua; Yang, Liangbao; Han, Bin; Huang, Fangzhi; Li, Shikuo; Chu, Zhuwang; Xie, Anjian

    2012-05-01

    While the number of man-made nano superstructures realized by self-assembly is growing in recent years, assemblies of conductive polymer nanocrystals, especially for superlattices, are still a significant challenge, not only because of the simplicity of the shape of the nanocrystal building blocks and their interactions, but also because of the poor control over these parameters in the fabrication of more elaborate nanocrystals. Here, we firstly report a facile and general route to a new generation of 3D layered superlattices of polyaniline doped with CSA (PANI-CSA) and show how PANI crystallize and self-assemble, in a suitable single solution environment. In cyclohexane, 1D amorphous nanofibers transformed to 1D nanorods as building blocks, and then to 2D single-crystal nanosheets with a hexagonal phase, and lastly to 3D ordered layered superlattices with the narrowest polydispersity value (Mw/Mn = 1.47). Remarkably, all the instructions for the hierarchical self-assembly are encoded in the layered shape in other non-polar solvents (hexane, octane) and their conductivity in the π-π stacking direction is improved to about 50 S cm-1, which is even higher than that of the highest previously reported value (16 S cm-1). The method used in this study is greatly expected to be readily scalable to produce superlattices of conductive polymers with high quality and low cost.While the number of man-made nano superstructures realized by self-assembly is growing in recent years, assemblies of conductive polymer nanocrystals, especially for superlattices, are still a significant challenge, not only because of the simplicity of the shape of the nanocrystal building blocks and their interactions, but also because of the poor control over these parameters in the fabrication of more elaborate nanocrystals. Here, we firstly report a facile and general route to a new generation of 3D layered superlattices of polyaniline doped with CSA (PANI-CSA) and show how PANI crystallize and

  5. Resistivity distribution of silicon single crystals using codoping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jong Hoe

    2005-07-01

    Numerous studies including continuous Czochralski method and double crucible technique have been reported on the control of macroscopic axial resistivity distribution in bulk crystal growth. The simple codoping method for improving the productivity of silicon single-crystal growth by controlling axial specific resistivity distribution was proposed by Wang [Jpn. J. Appl. Phys. 43 (2004) 4079]. Wang [J. Crystal Growth 275 (2005) e73] demonstrated using numerical analysis and by experimental results that the axial specific resistivity distribution can be modified in melt growth of silicon crystals and relatively uniform profile is possible by B-P codoping method. In this work, the basic characteristic of 8 in silicon single crystal grown using codoping method is studied and whether proposed method has advantage for the silicon crystal growth is discussed.

  6. Self-assembling peptide hydrogels immobilized on silicon surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Franchi, Stefano; Battocchio, Chiara; Galluzzi, Martina; Navisse, Emanuele [Department of Sciences, University “Roma Tre”, Via della Vasca Navale 79, Roma, 00146 (Italy); Zamuner, Annj; Dettin, Monica [Department of Industrial Engineering, University of Padua, Via Marzolo, 9, Padua, 35131 (Italy); Iucci, Giovanna, E-mail: giovanna.iucci@uniroma3.it [Department of Sciences, University “Roma Tre”, Via della Vasca Navale 79, Roma, 00146 (Italy)

    2016-12-01

    The hydrogels of self-assembling ionic complementary peptides have collected in the scientific community increasing consensus as mimetics of the extracellular matrix that can offer 3D supports for cell growth or be vehicles for the delivery of stem cells or drugs. Such scaffolds have also been proposed as bone substitutes for small defects as they promote beneficial effects on human osteoblasts. In this context, our research deals with the introduction of a layer of self-assembling peptides on a silicon surface by covalent anchoring and subsequent physisorption. In this work, we present a spectroscopic investigation of the proposed bioactive scaffolds, carried out by surface-sensitive spectroscopic techniques such as XPS (X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy) and RAIRS (Reflection Absorption Infrared Spectroscopy) and by state-of-the-art synchrotron radiation methodologies such as angle dependent NEXAFS (Near Edge X-ray Absorption Fine Structure). XPS studies confirmed the change in the surface composition in agreement with the proposed enrichments, and led to assess the self-assembling peptide chemical stability. NEXAFS spectra, collected in angular dependent mode at the N K-edge, allowed to investigate the self-assembling behavior of the macromolecules, as well as to determine their molecular orientation on the substrate. Furthermore, Infrared Spectroscopy measurements demonstrated that the peptide maintains its secondary structure (β-sheet anti-parallel) after deposition on the silicon surface. The complementary information acquired by means of XPS, NEXAFS and RAIRS lead to hypothesize a “layer-by-layer” arrangement of the immobilized peptides, giving rise to an ordered 3D nanostructure. - Highlights: • A self-assembling peptide (SAP) was covalently immobilized of on a flat silicon surface. • A physisorbed SAP layer was grown on top of the covalently immobilized peptide layer. • Molecular order and orientation of the peptide overlayer on the flat silicon

  7. Self-assembling peptide hydrogels immobilized on silicon surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Franchi, Stefano; Battocchio, Chiara; Galluzzi, Martina; Navisse, Emanuele; Zamuner, Annj; Dettin, Monica; Iucci, Giovanna

    2016-01-01

    The hydrogels of self-assembling ionic complementary peptides have collected in the scientific community increasing consensus as mimetics of the extracellular matrix that can offer 3D supports for cell growth or be vehicles for the delivery of stem cells or drugs. Such scaffolds have also been proposed as bone substitutes for small defects as they promote beneficial effects on human osteoblasts. In this context, our research deals with the introduction of a layer of self-assembling peptides on a silicon surface by covalent anchoring and subsequent physisorption. In this work, we present a spectroscopic investigation of the proposed bioactive scaffolds, carried out by surface-sensitive spectroscopic techniques such as XPS (X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy) and RAIRS (Reflection Absorption Infrared Spectroscopy) and by state-of-the-art synchrotron radiation methodologies such as angle dependent NEXAFS (Near Edge X-ray Absorption Fine Structure). XPS studies confirmed the change in the surface composition in agreement with the proposed enrichments, and led to assess the self-assembling peptide chemical stability. NEXAFS spectra, collected in angular dependent mode at the N K-edge, allowed to investigate the self-assembling behavior of the macromolecules, as well as to determine their molecular orientation on the substrate. Furthermore, Infrared Spectroscopy measurements demonstrated that the peptide maintains its secondary structure (β-sheet anti-parallel) after deposition on the silicon surface. The complementary information acquired by means of XPS, NEXAFS and RAIRS lead to hypothesize a “layer-by-layer” arrangement of the immobilized peptides, giving rise to an ordered 3D nanostructure. - Highlights: • A self-assembling peptide (SAP) was covalently immobilized of on a flat silicon surface. • A physisorbed SAP layer was grown on top of the covalently immobilized peptide layer. • Molecular order and orientation of the peptide overlayer on the flat silicon

  8. Fabrication of Silicon nanostructures by UHV-STM lithography in Self-Assembled Monolayers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sundermann, M.; Brechling, A.; Rott, K.; Meyners, D.; Kleineberg, U.; Heinzmann, U.; Knueller, A.; Eck, W.; Goelzhueuser, A.; Grunze, M.

    2002-01-01

    Our approach utilizes UHV-STM writing in Self-Assembled Monolayers (SAM). SAMs form highly-ordered ultrathin (∼2-3 nm) monomolecular layers on top of pre-activated Si(100) or Si(111) surfaces. After patterning by UHV-STM writing in constant-current mode at different write parameters (gap voltage, electron dose) the modified Self-Assembled Monolayer serves as an etch mask for an anisotropic wet etch transfer (two-step etch process in aqueous solutions of 5 % HF and 1 M KOH), of the write structure into the silicon substrate. The corresponding silicon nano-structures have been analyzed afterwards by AFM or SEM to characterize the pattern accuracy. We have studied the suitability of three different types of SAMs on silicon single-crystals. Alkyl-chain-type SAMs like Octadecylsilane (ODS) monolayer have been formed by immersion of hydroxylated Si(100) in Octadecyltrichlorosilane (CH 3 (CH 27 SiCl 3 ) while SAMs with aromatic spacer groups such as Hydroxybiphenyl (HBP, (C 6 H 6 ) 2 OH) and Ethoxybiphenyl silane (EBP, (C 6 H 6 ) 2 O(CH 2 ) 3 Si(OCH 3 ) 3 ) are formed on Si(111). (Authors)

  9. Anisotropy of Single-Crystal Silicon in Nanometric Cutting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhiguo; Chen, Jiaxuan; Wang, Guilian; Bai, Qingshun; Liang, Yingchun

    2017-12-01

    The anisotropy exhibited by single-crystal silicon in nanometric cutting is very significant. In order to profoundly understand the effect of crystal anisotropy on cutting behaviors, a large-scale molecular dynamics model was conducted to simulate the nanometric cutting of single-crystal silicon in the (100)[0-10], (100)[0-1-1], (110)[-110], (110)[00-1], (111)[-101], and (111)[-12-1] crystal directions in this study. The simulation results show the variations of different degrees in chip, subsurface damage, cutting force, and friction coefficient with changes in crystal plane and crystal direction. Shear deformation is the formation mechanism of subsurface damage, and the direction and complexity it forms are the primary causes that result in the anisotropy of subsurface damage. Structurally, chips could be classified into completely amorphous ones and incompletely amorphous ones containing a few crystallites. The formation mechanism of the former is high-pressure phase transformation, while the latter is obtained under the combined action of high-pressure phase transformation and cleavage. Based on an analysis of the material removal mode, it can be found that compared with the other crystal direction on the same crystal plane, the (100)[0-10], (110)[-110], and (111)[-101] directions are more suitable for ductile cutting.

  10. Self-Assembly of Single-Crystal Silver Microflakes on Reduced Graphene Oxide and their Use in Ultrasensitive Sensors

    KAUST Repository

    Chen, Ye; Tao, Jing; Hammami, Mohamed Amen; Hoang, Phuong Mai; Khashab, Niveen M.

    2016-01-01

    Compared to 1D structures, 2D structures have higher specific and active surface, which drastically improves electron transfer and extensibility along 2D plane. Herein, 2D-single crystal silver microflakes (AgMFs) are prepared for the first time

  11. Investigation of functionalized silicon nanowires by self-assembled monolayer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hemed, Nofar Mintz [Dept. of Physical Electronics, Eng. Faculty, and the University Res. Inst. for Nano Science and Nano-Technologies, Tel-Aviv University, Ramat-Aviv 69978 (Israel); Convertino, Annalisa [Istituto per la Microelettronica e i Microsistemi C.N.R.-Area della Ricerca di Roma, via del Fosso del Cavaliere 100, I-00133 Roma (Italy); Shacham-Diamand, Yosi [Dept. of Physical Electronics, Eng. Faculty, and the University Res. Inst. for Nano Science and Nano-Technologies, Tel-Aviv University, Ramat-Aviv 69978 (Israel); The Department of Applied Chemistry, Waseda University, 3-4-1 Okubo, Shinjuku, Tokyo 169-8555 (Japan)

    2016-03-30

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • We characterize and verify the existence of self-assembled monolayer (SAM) on silicon nanowires and α-Si:H. • We define the term “electrical coverage” and find the formula for both cases. • The SAM's electrical coverage on silicon nanowires is found to be ∼63%. • The SAM's electrical coverage on α-Si:H is found to be ∼65 ± 3%. • The amount of SAM on the SiNWs is sufficient and it can serve as a linker to biological molecules. - Abstract: The functionalization using self assembled monolayer (SAM) of silicon nanowires (SiNW) fabricated by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) is reported here. The SAM is being utilized as the first building block in the functionalization process. The morphology of the SiNW comprises a polycrystalline core wrapped by an hydrogenated amorphous silicon (α-Si:H) shell. Since most of the available methods for SAM verification and characterization are suitable only for flat substrates; therefore, in addition to the SiNW α-Si:H on flat samples were produced in the same system as the SiNWs. First we confirmed the SAM's presence on the flat α-Si:H samples using the following methods: contact angle measurement to determine the change in surface energy; atomic force microscopy (AFM) to determine uniformity and molecular coverage. Spectroscopic ellipsometry and X-ray reflectivity (XRR) were performed to measure SAM layer thickness and density. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) was applied to study the chemical states of the surface. Next, SiNW/SAM were tested by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), and the results were compared to α-Si:H/SAM. The SAM electrical coverage on SiNW and α-Si:H was found to be ∼37% and ∼65 ± 3%, respectively. A model, based on transmission line theory for the nanowires is presented to explain the disparity in results between the nanowires and flat surface of the same materials.

  12. Thermal neutron scattering kernels for sapphire and silicon single crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cantargi, F.; Granada, J.R.; Mayer, R.E.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Thermal cross section libraries for sapphire and silicon single crystals were generated. • Debye model was used to represent the vibrational frequency spectra to feed the NJOY code. • Sapphire total cross section was measured at Centro Atómico Bariloche. • Cross section libraries were validated with experimental data available. - Abstract: Sapphire and silicon are materials usually employed as filters in facilities with thermal neutron beams. Due to the lack of the corresponding thermal cross section libraries for those materials, necessary in calculations performed in order to optimize beams for specific applications, here we present the generation of new thermal neutron scattering kernels for those materials. The Debye model was used in both cases to represent the vibrational frequency spectra required to feed the NJOY nuclear data processing system in order to produce the corresponding libraries in ENDF and ACE format. These libraries were validated with available experimental data, some from the literature and others obtained at the pulsed neutron source at Centro Atómico Bariloche

  13. Solvent-assisted self-assembly of fullerene into single-crystal ultrathin microribbons as highly sensitive UV-visible photodetectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Lang; Yao, Jiannian; Fu, Hongbing

    2013-09-24

    The size, shape, and crystallinity of organic nanostructures play an important role in their physical properties and are mainly determined by the self-assembling kinetics of molecular components often involving the solvent conditions. Here, we reported a kinetically controlled self-assembly of C60 assisted by the solvent carbon bisulfide (CS2) into single-crystal ultrathin microribbons of 2C60·3CS2, upon mixing the poor solvent isopropyl alcohol with a C60/CS2 stock solution. Surface energy calculations reveal that these microribbons represent a kinetically favored high-energy state as compared with the thermodynamically stable shape of prismatic rods. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy observations clarify that association of CS2 at the nucleation stage helps to guide and rigidify the formation of π-π stacking 1D chains of C60 through the surrounding CS2 cage-like structures, which further act as glue, boosting lateral assembly of as-formed 1D chains into untrathin 2D microribbon single crystals. Precise control over the thickness, width, and length of 2C60·3CS2 microribbons was achieved by manipulation of the growth kinetics through adjusting the solvent conditions. Upon heating to 120 °C, sublimation of CS2 components results in fcc C60 microribbons. We found that both microribbons of solvated monoclinic 2C60·3CS2 and pure fcc C60 exhibit highly sensitive photoconductivity properties with a spectral response range covering UV to visible. The highest on/off ratio of two-terminal photodetectors based on single ribbons reaches around 250, while the responsitivity is about 75.3 A W(-1) in the UV region and 90.4 A W(-1) in the visible region.

  14. The tensile effect on crack formation in single crystal silicon irradiated by intense pulsed ion beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Guoying; Shen, Jie; Zhang, Jie; Zhong, Haowen; Cui, Xiaojun; Yan, Sha; Zhang, Xiaofu; Yu, Xiao; Le, Xiaoyun

    2017-10-01

    Improving antifatigue performance of silicon substrate is very important for the development of semiconductor industry. The cracking behavior of silicon under intense pulsed ion beam irradiation was studied by numerical simulation in order to understand the mechanism of induced surface peeling observed by experimental means. Using molecular dynamics simulation based on Stillinger Weber potential, tensile effect on crack growth and propagation in single crystal silicon was investigated. Simulation results reveal that stress-strain curves of single crystal silicon at a constant strain rate can be divided into three stages, which are not similar to metal stress-strain curves; different tensile load velocities induce difference of single silicon crack formation speed; the layered stress results in crack formation in single crystal silicon. It is concluded that the crack growth and propagation is more sensitive to strain rate, tensile load velocity, stress distribution in single crystal silicon.

  15. Buckling of Single-Crystal Silicon Nanolines under Indentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min K. Kang

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Atomic force microscope-(AFM- based indentation tests were performed to examine mechanical properties of parallel single-crystal silicon nanolines (SiNLs of sub-100-nm line width, fabricated by a process combining electron-beam lithography and anisotropic wet etching. The SiNLs have straight and nearly atomically flat sidewalls, and the cross section is almost perfectly rectangular with uniform width and height along the longitudinal direction. The measured load-displacement curves from the indentation tests show an instability with large displacement bursts at a critical load ranging from 480 μN to 700 μN. This phenomenon is attributed to a transition of the buckling mode of the SiNLs under indentation. Using a set of finite element models with postbuckling analyses, we analyze the indentation-induced buckling modes and investigate the effects of tip location, contact friction, and substrate deformation on the critical load of mode transition. The results demonstrate a unique approach for the study of nanomaterials and patterned nanostructures via a combination of experiments and modeling.

  16. Influence of the solution pH in the 6-mercaptopurine self-assembled monolayer (6MP-SAM) on a Au(111) single-crystal electrode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madueño, Rafael; García-Raya, Daniel; Viudez, Alfonso J; Sevilla, José M; Pineda, Teresa; Blázquez, Manuel

    2007-10-23

    Self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) of 6-mercaptopurine (6MP) have been prepared on a Au(111) single-crystal electrode by immersion of the metal surface in a 100 microM 6MP and 0.01 M HClO4 solution. The 6MP-SAM Au(111) single-crystal electrodes were transferred to the cell and allowed to equilibrate with the different aqueous working solutions before the electrochemical experiments. The influence of the solution pH was studied by cyclic voltammetry, double layer capacitance curves, and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. The electrochemical behavior of the 6MP-SAM in acetic acid at pH 4 presents important differences in comparison to that obtained in 0.1 M KOH solutions. Cyclic voltammograms for the reductive desorption process in acid medium are broad and show some features that can be explained by a phase transition between a chemisorbed and a physisorbed state of the 6MP molecules. The low solubility of these molecules in acid medium could explain this phenomenon and the readsorption of the complete monolayer when the potential is scanned in the positive direction. The variation of the double-layer capacitance values in the potential range of monolayer stability with the pH suggests that the acid-base chemistry of the 6MP molecules is playing a role. This fact has been studied by following the variations of the electron-transfer rate constant of the highly charged redox probes as are Fe(CN)(6)-3/-4 and Ru(NH3)(6)+3/+2 as a function of solution pH. The apparent surface pKa value for the 6MP-SAM (pKa approximately 8) is explained by the total conversion of the different 6MP tautomers that exist in solution to the thiol species in the adsorbed state.

  17. Laser induced single-crystal transition in polycrystalline silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vitali, G.; Bertolotti, M.; Foti, G.; Rimini, E.

    1978-01-01

    Transition to single crystal of polycrystalline Si material underlying a Si crystal substrate of 100 orientation was obtained via laser irradiation. The changes in the structure were analyzed by reflection high energy electron diffraction and by channeling effect technique using 2.0 MeV He Rutherford scattering. The power density required to induce the transition in a 4500 A thick polycrystalline layer is about 70 MW/cm 2 (50ns). The corresponding amorphous to single transition has a threshold of about 45 MW/cm 2 . (orig.) 891 HPOE [de

  18. Self-assembled peptide nanotubes as an etching material for the rapid fabrication of silicon wires

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Martin Benjamin Barbour Spanget; Andersen, Karsten Brandt; Svendsen, Winnie Edith

    2011-01-01

    This study has evaluated self-assembled peptide nanotubes (PNTS) and nanowires (PNWS) as etching mask materials for the rapid and low-cost fabrication of silicon wires using reactive ion etching (RIE). The self-assembled peptide structures were fabricated under mild conditions and positioned on c...... characterization by SEM and I-V measurements. Additionally, the fabricated silicon structures were functionalized with fluorescent molecules via a biotin-streptavidin interaction in order to probe their potential in the development of biosensing devices....

  19. Infrared spectroscopy of self-assembled monolayer films on silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowell, N. L.; Tay, Lilin; Boukherroub, R.; Lockwood, D. J.

    2007-07-01

    Infrared vibrational spectroscopy in an attenuated total reflection (ATR) geometry has been employed to investigate the presence of organic thin layers on Si-wafer surfaces. The phenomena have been simulated to show there can be a field enhancement with the presented single-reflection ATR (SR-ATR) approach which is substantially larger than for conventional ATR or specular reflection. In SR-ATR, a discontinuity of the field normal to the film contributes a field enhancement in the lower index thin film causing a two order of magnitude increase in sensitivity. SR-ATR was employed to characterize a single monolayer of undecylenic acid self-assembled on Si(1 1 1) and to investigate a two monolayer system obtained by adding a monolayer of bovine serum albumin protein.

  20. Anisotropy effect of crater formation on single crystal silicon surface under intense pulsed ion beam irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Jie; Yu, Xiao; Zhang, Jie; Zhong, Haowen; Cui, Xiaojun; Liang, Guoying; Yu, Xiang; Huang, Wanying; Shahid, Ijaz; Zhang, Xiaofu; Yan, Sha; Le, Xiaoyun

    2018-04-01

    Due to the induced extremely fast thermal and dynamic process, Intense Pulsed Ion Beam (IPIB) is widely applied in material processing, which can bring enhanced material performance and surface craters as well. To investigate the craters' formation mechanism, a specific model was built with Finite Element Methods (FEM) to simulate the thermal field on irradiated single crystal silicon. The direct evidence for the existence of the simulated 6-fold rotational symmetric thermal distribution was provided by electron microscope images obtained on single crystal silicon. The correlation of the experiment and simulation is of great importance to understand the interaction between IPIB and materials.

  1. Thin Single Crystal Silicon Solar Cells on Ceramic Substrates: November 2009 - November 2010

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, A.; Ravi, K. V.

    2011-06-01

    In this program we have been developing a technology for fabricating thin (< 50 micrometres) single crystal silicon wafers on foreign substrates. We reverse the conventional approach of depositing or forming silicon on foreign substrates by depositing or forming thick (200 to 400 micrometres) ceramic materials on high quality single crystal silicon films ~ 50 micrometres thick. Our key innovation is the fabrication of thin, refractory, and self-adhering 'handling layers or substrates' on thin epitaxial silicon films in-situ, from powder precursors obtained from low cost raw materials. This 'handling layer' has sufficient strength for device and module processing and fabrication. Successful production of full sized (125 mm X 125 mm) silicon on ceramic wafers with 50 micrometre thick single crystal silicon has been achieved and device process flow developed for solar cell fabrication. Impurity transfer from the ceramic to the silicon during the elevated temperature consolidation process has resulted in very low minority carrier lifetimes and resulting low cell efficiencies. Detailed analysis of minority carrier lifetime, metals analysis and device characterization have been done. A full sized solar cell efficiency of 8% has been demonstrated.

  2. Annihilation of unthermalized positrons in a silicon single crystal at 770K

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zaitsev, Yu.E.; Mungir, L.; Ue'pe, L.R.

    1984-01-01

    A model is considered for the annihilation of nonrelativistic positrons from quantized states in lattice channels. Annihilation gamma rays of energy over 511 keV have been observed when the positrons from an Na 22 source strike a silicon single crystal at 77 0 K. The experimental results agree well with the proposed model

  3. Towards Ordered Silicon Nanostructures through Self-Assembling Mechanisms and Processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. A. Puglisi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The design and development of innovative architectures for memory storage and energy conversion devices are at the forefront of current research efforts driving us towards a sustainable future. However, issues related to the cost, efficiency, and reliability of current technologies are still severely limiting their overtake of the standard designs. The use of ordered nanostructured silicon is expected to overcome these limitations and push the advancement of the alternative technologies. Specifically, self-assembling of block copolymers has been recognized as a promising and cost-effective approach to organize silicon nanostructures. This work reviews some of the most important findings on block copolymer self-assembling and complements those with the results of new experimental studies. First of all, a quantitative analysis is presented on the ordering and fluctuations expected in the synthesis of silicon nanostructures by using standard synthesis methods like chemical vapour deposition. Then the effects of the several parameters guiding the ordering mechanisms in the block copolymer systems, such as film thickness, molecular weight, annealing conditions, solvent, and substrate topography are discussed. Finally, as a proof of concept, an in-house developed example application to solar cells is presented, based on silicon nanostructures resulting from self-assembling of block copolymers.

  4. Single-crystal silicon trench etching for fabrication of highly integrated circuits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engelhardt, Manfred

    1991-03-01

    The development of single crystal silicon trench etching for fabrication of memory cells in 4 16 and 64Mbit DRAMs is reviewed in this paper. A variety of both etch tools and process gases used for the process development is discussed since both equipment and etch chemistry had to be improved and changed respectively to meet the increasing requirements for high fidelity pattern transfer with increasing degree of integration. In additon to DRAM cell structures etch results for deep trench isolation in advanced bipolar ICs and ASICs are presented for these applications grooves were etched into silicon through a highly doped buried layer and at the borderline of adjacent p- and n-well areas respectively. Shallow trench etching of large and small exposed areas with identical etch rates is presented as an approach to replace standard LOCOS isolation by an advanced isolation technique. The etch profiles were investigated with SEM TEM and AES to get information on contathination and damage levels and on the mechanism leading to anisotropy in the dry etch process. Thermal wave measurements were performed on processed single crystal silicon substrates for a fast evaluation of the process with respect to plasma-induced substrate degradation. This useful technique allows an optimization ofthe etch process regarding high electrical performance of the fully processed memory chip. The benefits of the use of magnetic fields for the development of innovative single crystal silicon dry

  5. Fabrication of triangular nanobeam waveguide networks in bulk diamond using single-crystal silicon hard masks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bayn, I.; Mouradian, S.; Li, L.; Goldstein, J. A.; Schröder, T.; Zheng, J.; Chen, E. H.; Gaathon, O.; Englund, Dirk; Lu, M.; Stein, A.; Ruggiero, C. A.; Salzman, J.; Kalish, R.

    2014-01-01

    A scalable approach for integrated photonic networks in single-crystal diamond using triangular etching of bulk samples is presented. We describe designs of high quality factor (Q = 2.51 × 10 6 ) photonic crystal cavities with low mode volume (V m  = 1.062 × (λ/n) 3 ), which are connected via waveguides supported by suspension structures with predicted transmission loss of only 0.05 dB. We demonstrate the fabrication of these structures using transferred single-crystal silicon hard masks and angular dry etching, yielding photonic crystal cavities in the visible spectrum with measured quality factors in excess of Q = 3 × 10 3

  6. Modelling of thermal field and point defect dynamics during silicon single crystal growth using CZ technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabanskis, A.; Virbulis, J.

    2018-05-01

    Mathematical modelling is employed to numerically analyse the dynamics of the Czochralski (CZ) silicon single crystal growth. The model is axisymmetric, its thermal part describes heat transfer by conduction and thermal radiation, and allows to predict the time-dependent shape of the crystal-melt interface. Besides the thermal field, the point defect dynamics is modelled using the finite element method. The considered process consists of cone growth and cylindrical phases, including a short period of a reduced crystal pull rate, and a power jump to avoid large diameter changes. The influence of the thermal stresses on the point defects is also investigated.

  7. Deflection of high energy channeled charged particles by elastically bent silicon single crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gibson, W.M.; Kim, I.J.; Pisharodoy, M.; Salman, S.M.; Sun, C.R.; Wang, G.H.; Wijayawardana, R.; Forster, J.S.; Mitchell, I.V.; Baker, S.I.; Carrigan, R.A. Jr.; Toohig, T.E.; Avdeichikov, V.V.; Ellison, J.A.; Siffert, P.

    1984-01-01

    An experiment has been carried out to observe the deflection of charged particles by planar channeling in bent single crystals of silicon for protons with energy up to 180 GeV. Anomolous loss of particles from the center point of a three point bending apparatus was observed at high incident particle energy. This effect has been exploited to fashion a 'dechanneling spectrometer' to study dechanneling effects due to centripital displacement of channeled particle trajectories in a bent crystal. The bending losses generally conform to the predictions of calculations based on a classical model. (orig.)

  8. Electrochemical characterization of a 1,8-octanedithiol self-assembled monolayer (ODT-SAM) on a Au(111) single crystal electrode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia-Raya, Daniel; Madueno, Rafael; Sevilla, Jose Manuel; Blazquez, Manuel; Pineda, Teresa [Departamento de Quimica Fisica y Termodinamica Aplicada, Universidad de Cordoba, Campus de Rabanales, Cordoba (Spain)

    2008-11-15

    Recently, it has becoming increasingly important to control the organization of self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) of {omega}-functionalized thiols for its potential applications in the construction of more complex molecular architectures. In this paper, we report on the spontaneous formation of a SAM of octanedithiol (ODT) as a function of the modification time. Electrochemical techniques such as cyclic voltammetry, double layer capacitance and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy are used for the characterization of this monolayer. The increase in modification time brings about changes in the octanedithiol self-assembled monolayer (ODT-SAM) reductive desorption voltammograms that indicate an evolution toward a more ordered and compact monolayer. This trend has also been found by following the changes in the electron transfer processes of the redox probe K{sub 3}Fe(CN){sub 6}. In fact, the ODT-SAM formed at low-modification time does not significantly perturb the electrochemical response as it is typical of either a low coverage or of the presence of large defects in the layer. Upon increasing the modification time, the voltammograms of the redox probe adopt a sigmoidal shape indicating the existence of pinholes in the monolayer distributed as an array of microelectrodes. The surface coverage as well as the size and distribution of these pinholes have been determined by the impedance technique that gives a more reliable evaluation of these monolayer structural parameters. (author)

  9. Electrochemical characterization of a 1,8-octanedithiol self-assembled monolayer (ODT-SAM) on a Au(1 1 1) single crystal electrode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia-Raya, Daniel; Madueno, Rafael; Sevilla, Jose Manuel; Blazquez, Manuel [Departamento de Quimica Fisica y Termodinamica Aplicada, Universidad de Cordoba, Campus de Rabanales, Ed. Marie Curie, E-14071 Cordoba (Spain); Pineda, Teresa [Departamento de Quimica Fisica y Termodinamica Aplicada, Universidad de Cordoba, Campus de Rabanales, Ed. Marie Curie, E-14071 Cordoba (Spain)], E-mail: tpineda@uco.es

    2008-11-15

    Recently, it has becoming increasingly important to control the organization of self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) of {omega}-functionalized thiols for its potential applications in the construction of more complex molecular architectures. In this paper, we report on the spontaneous formation of a SAM of octanedithiol (ODT) as a function of the modification time. Electrochemical techniques such as cyclic voltammetry, double layer capacitance and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy are used for the characterization of this monolayer. The increase in modification time brings about changes in the octanedithiol self-assembled monolayer (ODT-SAM) reductive desorption voltammograms that indicate an evolution toward a more ordered and compact monolayer. This trend has also been found by following the changes in the electron transfer processes of the redox probe K{sub 3}Fe(CN){sub 6}. In fact, the ODT-SAM formed at low-modification time does not significantly perturb the electrochemical response as it is typical of either a low coverage or of the presence of large defects in the layer. Upon increasing the modification time, the voltammograms of the redox probe adopt a sigmoidal shape indicating the existence of pinholes in the monolayer distributed as an array of microelectrodes. The surface coverage as well as the size and distribution of these pinholes have been determined by the impedance technique that gives a more reliable evaluation of these monolayer structural parameters.

  10. Sub-50-nm self-assembled nanotextures for enhanced broadband antireflection in silicon solar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Atikur; Ashraf, Ahsan; Xin, Huolin; Tong, Xiao; Sutter, Peter; Eisaman, Matthew D; Black, Charles T

    2015-01-21

    Materials providing broadband light antireflection have applications as highly transparent window coatings, military camouflage, and coatings for efficiently coupling light into solar cells and out of light-emitting diodes. In this work, densely packed silicon nanotextures with feature sizes smaller than 50 nm enhance the broadband antireflection compared with that predicted by their geometry alone. A significant fraction of the nanotexture volume comprises a surface layer whose optical properties differ substantially from those of the bulk, providing the key to improved performance. The nanotexture reflectivity is quantitatively well-modelled after accounting for both its profile and changes in refractive index at the surface. We employ block copolymer self-assembly for precise and tunable nanotexture design in the range of ~10-70 nm across macroscopic solar cell areas. Implementing this efficient antireflection approach in crystalline silicon solar cells significantly betters the performance gain compared with an optimized, planar antireflection coating.

  11. Microstructural and magnetic characterizations of CoFeCu electrodeposited in self-assembled mesoporous silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fortas, G., E-mail: g.fortas@gmail.com [Centre de Recherche en Technologie des Semi-conducteur pour l’Energétique, Bd. 2 Frantz Fanon, les sept merveilles B.P.140, Alger (Algeria); Université des Sciences et de la Technologie Houari Boumediene, Faculté des Physique, BP 32 El Alia 16111 Bab Ezzouar, Alger (Algeria); Haine, N. [Université des Sciences et de la Technologie Houari Boumediene, Faculté des Physique, BP 32 El Alia 16111 Bab Ezzouar, Alger (Algeria); Sam, S.; Gabouze, N. [Centre de Recherche en Technologie des Semi-conducteur pour l’Energétique, Bd. 2 Frantz Fanon, les sept merveilles B.P.140, Alger (Algeria); Saifi, A. [Université Mouloud Mammeri, laboratoire de physique et de chimie quantique, BP No. 17 RP Hasnaoua Tizi-Ouzou 15000 (Algeria); Ouir, S. [Université Said SDB, Route De Soumaa BP 270, Blida (Algeria); Menari, H. [Centre de Recherche en Technologie des Semi-conducteur pour l’Energétique, Bd. 2 Frantz Fanon, les sept merveilles B.P.140, Alger (Algeria)

    2015-03-15

    Self-assembled mesoporous silicon with quasi-regular pore arrangements has been fabricated by the electrochemical anodization process in hydrofluoric acid solution. CoFeCu was electrodeposited in this structure from a bath containing sodium acetate as a complexing agent with a pH value of 5. The effect of current density on the morphology, the structure and the magnetic properties of CoFeCu deposit was studied by SEM, EDS, DRX and VSM. It has been shown that the morphology and structure of samples were strongly influenced by the current density and etching duration. The micrographs show the vertical and branched nanowires and also a discontinuous growth of wires. Further, the growth of a thick layer from the grain boundaries of released CoFeCu wires is produced. The magnetic hysteresis loops demonstrate that the CoFeCu nanowires exhibit easy magnetic axis perpendicular to the PS channels axis when the current density varied from 3 to 10 mA/cm{sup 2}. Nevertheless, they reveal a no magnetic anisotropy of CoFeCu nanostructures deposited only in the outside of porous silicon, probably due to the vanishing the shape anisotropy. - Highlights: • CoFeCu deposit has been electrodeposited on self assembled mesoporous silicon. • SEM observation shows that CoFeCu embedded in Porous silicon channels. • Magnetic measurements show the anisotropy magnetic behavior of CoFeCu nanostructures. • The growth rate of nanowires is enhanced with an increase of current density.

  12. Temperature dependent evolution of wrinkled single-crystal silicon ribbons on shape memory polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yu; Yu, Kai; Qi, H Jerry; Xiao, Jianliang

    2017-10-25

    Shape memory polymers (SMPs) can remember two or more distinct shapes, and thus can have a lot of potential applications. This paper presents combined experimental and theoretical studies on the wrinkling of single-crystal Si ribbons on SMPs and the temperature dependent evolution. Using the shape memory effect of heat responsive SMPs, this study provides a method to build wavy forms of single-crystal silicon thin films on top of SMP substrates. Silicon ribbons obtained from a Si-on-insulator (SOI) wafer are released and transferred onto the surface of programmed SMPs. Then such bilayer systems are recovered at different temperatures, yielding well-defined, wavy profiles of Si ribbons. The wavy profiles are shown to evolve with time, and the evolution behavior strongly depends on the recovery temperature. At relatively low recovery temperatures, both wrinkle wavelength and amplitude increase with time as evolution progresses. Finite element analysis (FEA) accounting for the thermomechanical behavior of SMPs is conducted to study the wrinkling of Si ribbons on SMPs, which shows good agreement with experiment. Merging of wrinkles is observed in FEA, which could explain the increase of wrinkle wavelength observed in the experiment. This study can have important implications for smart stretchable electronics, wrinkling mechanics, stimuli-responsive surface engineering, and advanced manufacturing.

  13. Transverse wave propagation in [ab0] direction of silicon single crystal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yun, Sang Jin; Kim, Hye Jeong; Kwon, Se Ho; Kim, Young H. [Applied Acoustics Lab, Korea Science Academy of KAIST, Busan(Korea, Republic of)

    2015-12-15

    The speed and oscillation directions of elastic waves propagating in the [ab0] direction of a silicon single crystal were obtained by solving Christoffel's equation. It was found that the quasi waves propagate in the off-principal axis, and hence, the directions of the phase and group velocities are not the same. The maximum deviation of the two directions was 7.2 degree angle. Two modes of the pure transverse waves propagate in the [110] direction with different speeds, and hence, two peaks were observed in the pulse echo signal. The amplitude ratio of the two peaks was dependent on the initial oscillating direction of the incident wave. The pure and quasi-transverse waves propagate in the [210] direction, and the oscillation directions of these waves are perpendicular to each other. The skewing angle of the quasi wave was calculated as 7.14 degree angle, and it was measured as 9.76 degree angle. The amplitude decomposition in the [210] direction was similar to that in the [110] direction, since the oscillation directions of these waves are perpendicular to each other. These results offer useful information in measuring the crystal orientation of the silicon single crystal.

  14. Self-assembled monolayers of perfluoroalkylsilane on plasma-hydroxylated silicon substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Lin; Cai, Lu; Liu, Anqi; Wang, Wei; Yuan, Yanhua [College of Textile, Clothing Engineering, Soochow University, Suzhou 215021 (China); National Engineering Laboratory for Modern Silk, Suzhou 215123 (China); Li, Zhanxiong, E-mail: lizhanxiong@suda.edu.cn [College of Textile, Clothing Engineering, Soochow University, Suzhou 215021 (China); State Key Laboratory of Disaster Prevention & Mitigation of Explosion & Impact, Nanjing 210007 (China)

    2015-09-15

    Highlights: • A novel kind of fluoroalkylsilane monomers with different fluoroalkyl chain length was synthesized. • The fluoroalkyl-terminated self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) on silanol-terminated silicon substrates were chemically fabricated using the liquid phase deposition method. • Fluoroalkylsilanes were used for the self-assembly rather than the silane coupling agents and fluorochemicals to fabricate controllable, ordered SAMs. • The angle-dependent XPS study was conducted to investigate the changes of surface structures as well as elemental compositions of the SAMs. • The results indicated that fluoroalkyl groups would migrate from the inner part of the monolayers to the outermost interface after heat treatment, resulting into the microphase separation of the SAMs surface. - Abstract: In this study, a novel kind of fluoroalkylsilane monomers with different fluoroalkyl chain lengths was synthesized via three steps method and characterized by Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy, {sup 1}H and {sup 19}F nuclear magnetic resonance ({sup 1}H NMR and {sup 19}F NMR), and mass spectra (MS). Fluoroalkyl-terminated self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) on silanol-terminated silicon substrates (O{sub 2} plasma treatment) were chemically fabricated via –Si–O– covalent bonds using the liquid phase deposition method (LPD). The wetabilities of the SAMs were characterized by water contact angles (CA), surface free energies and adhesive force (AF) measurements. 3-(1H,1H,2H,2H-perfluorooctyloxycarbonyl) -propionamidepropyl-triethoxysilane (PFOPT) assembled monolayer was chosen for in-depth investigation as its CA was higher than the others. Attenuated total reflection infrared spectroscopy (ATR-IR) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) were used to validate the attachment of PFOPT on the silicon substrate, together with the chemical composition and structure of the SAMs. The surface morphologies and roughness of the monolayers were obtained and

  15. CO2 laser-induced directional recrystallization to produce single crystal silicon-core optical fibers with low loss

    OpenAIRE

    Healy, Noel; Fokine, Michael; Franz, Yohann; Hawkins, Thomas; Jones, Maxwell; Ballato, John; Peacock, Anna C.; Gibson, Ursula J.

    2016-01-01

    Reduced losses in silicon-core fibers are obtained using CO2 laser directional recrystallization of the core. Single crystals with aspect ratios up to 1500:1 are reported, limited by the scan range of the equipment. This processing technique holds promise for bringing crystalline silicon-core fibers to a central role in nonlinear optics and signal processing applications.

  16. Self-assembly of silicon nanowires studied by advanced transmission electron microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Agati

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM was successfully applied to the analysis of silicon nanowires (SiNWs that were self-assembled during an inductively coupled plasma (ICP process. The ICP-synthesized SiNWs were found to present a Si–SiO2 core–shell structure and length varying from ≈100 nm to 2–3 μm. The shorter SiNWs (maximum length ≈300 nm were generally found to possess a nanoparticle at their tip. STEM energy dispersive X-ray (EDX spectroscopy combined with electron tomography performed on these nanostructures revealed that they contain iron, clearly demonstrating that the short ICP-synthesized SiNWs grew via an iron-catalyzed vapor–liquid–solid (VLS mechanism within the plasma reactor. Both the STEM tomography and STEM-EDX analysis contributed to gain further insight into the self-assembly process. In the long-term, this approach might be used to optimize the synthesis of VLS-grown SiNWs via ICP as a competitive technique to the well-established bottom-up approaches used for the production of thin SiNWs.

  17. Deep level transient spectroscopic investigation of phosphorus-doped silicon by self-assembled molecular monolayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Xuejiao; Guan, Bin; Mesli, Abdelmadjid; Chen, Kaixiang; Dan, Yaping

    2018-01-09

    It is known that self-assembled molecular monolayer doping technique has the advantages of forming ultra-shallow junctions and introducing minimal defects in semiconductors. In this paper, we report however the formation of carbon-related defects in the molecular monolayer-doped silicon as detected by deep-level transient spectroscopy and low-temperature Hall measurements. The molecular monolayer doping process is performed by modifying silicon substrate with phosphorus-containing molecules and annealing at high temperature. The subsequent rapid thermal annealing drives phosphorus dopants along with carbon contaminants into the silicon substrate, resulting in a dramatic decrease of sheet resistance for the intrinsic silicon substrate. Low-temperature Hall measurements and secondary ion mass spectrometry indicate that phosphorus is the only electrically active dopant after the molecular monolayer doping. However, during this process, at least 20% of the phosphorus dopants are electrically deactivated. The deep-level transient spectroscopy shows that carbon-related defects are responsible for such deactivation.

  18. Large-scale membrane transfer process: its application to single-crystal-silicon continuous membrane deformable mirror

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Tong; Sasaki, Takashi; Hane, Kazuhiro; Akiyama, Masayuki

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes a large-scale membrane transfer process developed for the construction of large-scale membrane devices via the transfer of continuous single-crystal-silicon membranes from one substrate to another. This technique is applied for fabricating a large stroke deformable mirror. A bimorph spring array is used to generate a large air gap between the mirror membrane and the electrode. A 1.9 mm × 1.9 mm × 2 µm single-crystal-silicon membrane is successfully transferred to the electrode substrate by Au–Si eutectic bonding and the subsequent all-dry release process. This process provides an effective approach for transferring a free-standing large continuous single-crystal-silicon to a flexible suspension spring array with a large air gap. (paper)

  19. Ultra-thin distributed Bragg reflectors via stacked single-crystal silicon nanomembranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Minkyu; Seo, Jung-Hun; Lee, Jaeseong; Mi, Hongyi; Kim, Munho; Ma, Zhenqiang, E-mail: mazq@engr.wisc.edu [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States); Zhao, Deyin; Zhou, Weidong [Nanophotonics Lab, Department of Electrical Engineering, University of Texas at Arlington, Arlington, Texas 76019 (United States); Yin, Xin; Wang, Xudong [Department of Material Science and Engineering, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States)

    2015-05-04

    In this paper, we report ultra-thin distributed Bragg reflectors (DBRs) via stacked single-crystal silicon (Si) nanomembranes (NMs). Mesh hole-free single-crystal Si NMs were released from a Si-on-insulator substrate and transferred to quartz and Si substrates. Thermal oxidation was applied to the transferred Si NM to form high-quality SiO{sub 2} and thus a Si/SiO{sub 2} pair with uniform and precisely controlled thicknesses. The Si/SiO{sub 2} layers, as smooth as epitaxial grown layers, minimize scattering loss at the interface and in between the layers. As a result, a reflection of 99.8% at the wavelength range from 1350 nm to 1650 nm can be measured from a 2.5-pair DBR on a quartz substrate and 3-pair DBR on a Si substrate with thickness of 0.87 μm and 1.14 μm, respectively. The high reflection, ultra-thin DBRs developed here, which can be applied to almost any devices and materials, holds potential for application in high performance optoelectronic devices and photonics applications.

  20. Channeling experiments at planar diamond and silicon single crystals with electrons from the Mainz Microtron MAMI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Backe, H.; Lauth, W.; Tran Thi, T. N.

    2018-04-01

    Line structures were observed for (110) planar channeling of electrons in a diamond single crystal even at a beam energy of 180 MeV . This observation motivated us to initiate dechanneling length measurements as function of the beam energy since the occupation of quantum states in the channeling potential is expected to enhance the dechanneling length. High energy loss signals, generated as a result of emission of a bremsstrahlung photon with about half the beam energy at channeling of 450 and 855 MeV electrons, were measured as function of the crystal thickness. The analysis required additional assumptions which were extracted from the numerical solution of the Fokker-Planck equation. Preliminary results for diamond are presented. In addition, we reanalyzed dechanneling length measurements at silicon single crystals performed previously at the Mainz Microtron MAMI at beam energies between 195 and 855 MeV from which we conclude that the quality of our experimental data set is not sufficient to derive definite conclusions on the dechanneling length. Our experimental results are below the predictions of the Fokker-Planck equation and somewhat above the results of simulation calculations of A. V. Korol and A. V. Solov'yov et al. on the basis of the MBN Explorer simulation package. We somehow conservatively conclude that the prediction of the asymptotic dechanneling length on the basis of the Fokker-Planck equation represents an upper limit.

  1. Temperature effect on phase states of quartz nano-crystals in silicon single crystal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalanov, M.U.; Ibragimova, E.M.; Khamraeva, R.N.; Rustamova, V.M.; Ummatov, Kh.D.

    2006-01-01

    Full text: Oxygen penetrates into the silicon lattice up to the concentration of 2·10 18 cm -3 in the course of growing [1]. By the author's opinion at a low oxygen content the formation of solid solution is possible in the local defect places of the silicon single crystal lattice due to the difference in effective ion radius of oxygen and silicon (r O 0.176 and r Si = 0.065 nm). Upon reaching some critical content (∼ 10 17 cm -3 ), it becomes favorable energetically for oxygen ions to form precipitates (SiO x ) and finally a dielectric layer (stoichiometric inclusions of SiO 2 ). It was shown later that depending on the growth conditions, indeed the quartz crystal inclusions are formed in the silicon single crystals at an amount of 0.3 /0.5 wt. % [2]. However the authors did not study a phase state of the quartz inclusions. Therefore the aim of this work was to study a phase state of the quartz inclusions in silicon crystal at various temperatures. We examined the silicon single crystals grown by Czochralski technique, which were cut in (111) plane in the form of disk of 20 mm diameter and 1.5 thickness and had hole conductivity with the specific resistance ρ o ≅ 1/10 Ohm cm. The dislocation density was N D ≅ 10 1 /10 3 cm -2 , the concentrations of oxygen and boron were N 0 ≅ 2/ 4·10 17 cm -3 and N B ≅ 3*10 15 cm -3 . Structure was analyzed at the set-up DRON-UM1 with high temperature supply UVD-2000 ( CuK = 0.1542 nm) at the temperatures of 300, 1173 and 1573 K measured with platinum-platinum-rhodium thermocouple. The high temperature diffraction spectrum measured at 1573 K in the angle range (2Θ≅10/70 d egree ) there is only one main structure reflection (111) with a high intensity and d/n ≅ 0.3136 nm (2 Θ≅ 28.5 d egree ) from the matrix lattice of silicon single crystal. The weak line at 2 Θ≅ 25.5 d egree ( d/n≅0.3136 nm) is β component of the main reflection (111), and the weak structure peak at 2Θ≅59 d egree ( d/n≅ 0.1568 nm

  2. Lightweight and High-Resolution Single Crystal Silicon Optics for X-ray Astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, William W.; Biskach, Michael P.; Chan, Kai-Wing; Mazzarella, James R.; McClelland, Ryan S.; Riveros, Raul E.; Saha, Timo T.; Solly, Peter M.

    2016-01-01

    We describe an approach to building mirror assemblies for next generation X-ray telescopes. It incorporates knowledge and lessons learned from building existing telescopes, including Chandra, XMM-Newton, Suzaku, and NuSTAR, as well as from our direct experience of the last 15 years developing mirror technology for the Constellation-X and International X-ray Observatory mission concepts. This approach combines single crystal silicon and precision polishing, thus has the potential of achieving the highest possible angular resolution with the least possible mass. Moreover, it is simple, consisting of several technical elements that can be developed independently in parallel. Lastly, it is highly amenable to mass production, therefore enabling the making of telescopes of very large photon collecting areas.

  3. Electronic properties of dislocations introduced mechanically at room temperature on a single crystal silicon surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogawa, Masatoshi; Kamiya, Shoji; Izumi, Hayato; Tokuda, Yutaka

    2012-01-01

    This paper focuses on the effects of temperature and environment on the electronic properties of dislocations in n-type single crystal silicon near the surface. Deep level transient spectroscopy (DLTS) analyses were carried out with Schottky electrodes and p + -n junctions. The trap level, originally found at E C -0.50 eV (as commonly reported), shifted to a shallower level at E C -0.23 eV after a heat treatment at 350 K in an inert environment. The same heat treatment in lab air, however, did not cause any shift. The trap level shifted by the heat treatment in an inert environment was found to revert back to the original level when the specimens were exposed to lab air again. Therefore, the intrinsic trap level is expected to occur at E C -0.23 eV and shift sensitively with gas adsorption in air.

  4. RBS/channeling analysis of hydrogen-implanted single crystals of FZ silicon and 6H silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Irwin, R.B.

    1984-01-01

    Single crystals of FZ silicon and 6H silicon carbide were implanted with hydrogen ions (50 and 80 keV, respectively) to fluences from 2 x 10 16 H + /cm 2 to 2 x 10 18 H+/cm 2 . The implantations were carried out at three temperatures: approx.95K, 300 K, and approx.800 K. Swelling of the samples was measured by surface profilometry. RBS/channeling was used to obtain the damage profiles and to determine the amount of hydrogen retained in the lattice. The damage profiles are centered around X/sub m/ for the implants into silicon and around R/sub p/ for silicon carbide. For silicon carbide implanted at 95 K and 300 K and for silicon implanted at 95 K, the peak damage region is amorphous for fluences above 8 x 10 16 H + /cm 2 , 4 x 10 17 H + /cm 2 , and 2 x 10 17 H + /cm 2 , respectively. Silicon implanted at 300 and 800 K and silicon carbide implanted at 800 K remain crystalline up to fluences of 1 x 10 18 H + /cm 2 . The channeling damage results agree with previously reported TEM and electron diffraction data. The predictions of a simple disorder-accumulation model with a linear annealing term explains qualitatively the observed damage profiles in silicon carbide. Quantitatively, however, the model predicts faster development of the damage profiles than is observed at low fluences in both silicon and silicon carbide. For samples implanted at 300 and 800 K, the model also predicts substantially less peak disorder than is observed. The effect of the surface, the retained hydrogen, the shape of S/sub D/(X), and the need for a nonlinear annealing term may be responsible for the discrepancy

  5. Tailoring the optical constants in single-crystal silicon with embedded silver nanostructures for advanced silicon photonics applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akhter, Perveen; Huang, Mengbing; Spratt, William; Kadakia, Nirag; Amir, Faisal

    2015-01-01

    Plasmonic effects associated with metal nanostructures are expected to hold the key to tailoring light emission/propagation and harvesting solar energy in materials including single crystal silicon which remains the backbone in the microelectronics and photovoltaics industries but unfortunately, lacks many functionalities needed for construction of advanced photonic and optoelectronics devices. Currently, silicon plasmonic structures are practically possible only in the configuration with metal nanoparticles or thin film arrays on a silicon surface. This does not enable one to exploit the full potential of plasmonics for optical engineering in silicon, because the plasmonic effects are dominant over a length of ∼50 nm, and the active device region typically lies below the surface much beyond this range. Here, we report on a novel method for the formation of silver nanoparticles embedded within a silicon crystal through metal gettering from a silver thin film deposited at the surface to nanocavities within the Si created by hydrogen ion implantation. The refractive index of the Ag-nanostructured layer is found to be 3–10% lower or higher than that of silicon for wavelengths below or beyond ∼815–900 nm, respectively. Around this wavelength range, the optical extinction values increase by a factor of 10–100 as opposed to the pure silicon case. Increasing the amount of gettered silver leads to an increased extinction as well as a redshift in wavelength position for the resonance. This resonance is attributed to the surface plasmon excitation of the resultant silver nanoparticles in silicon. Additionally, we show that the profiles for optical constants in silicon can be tailored by varying the position and number of nanocavity layers. Such silicon crystals with embedded metal nanostructures would offer novel functional base structures for applications in silicon photonics, optoelectronics, photovoltaics, and plasmonics

  6. Hollow Microtube Resonators via Silicon Self-Assembly toward Subattogram Mass Sensing Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Joohyun; Song, Jungki; Kim, Kwangseok; Kim, Seokbeom; Song, Jihwan; Kim, Namsu; Khan, M Faheem; Zhang, Linan; Sader, John E; Park, Keunhan; Kim, Dongchoul; Thundat, Thomas; Lee, Jungchul

    2016-03-09

    Fluidic resonators with integrated microchannels (hollow resonators) are attractive for mass, density, and volume measurements of single micro/nanoparticles and cells, yet their widespread use is limited by the complexity of their fabrication. Here we report a simple and cost-effective approach for fabricating hollow microtube resonators. A prestructured silicon wafer is annealed at high temperature under a controlled atmosphere to form self-assembled buried cavities. The interiors of these cavities are oxidized to produce thin oxide tubes, following which the surrounding silicon material is selectively etched away to suspend the oxide tubes. This simple three-step process easily produces hollow microtube resonators. We report another innovation in the capping glass wafer where we integrate fluidic access channels and getter materials along with residual gas suction channels. Combined together, only five photolithographic steps and one bonding step are required to fabricate vacuum-packaged hollow microtube resonators that exhibit quality factors as high as ∼ 13,000. We take one step further to explore additionally attractive features including the ability to tune the device responsivity, changing the resonator material, and scaling down the resonator size. The resonator wall thickness of ∼ 120 nm and the channel hydraulic diameter of ∼ 60 nm are demonstrated solely by conventional microfabrication approaches. The unique characteristics of this new fabrication process facilitate the widespread use of hollow microtube resonators, their translation between diverse research fields, and the production of commercially viable devices.

  7. Subsurface damage mechanism of high speed grinding process in single crystal silicon revealed by atomistic simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Jia; Fang, Qihong; Zhang, Liangchi; Liu, Youwen

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Molecular dynamic model of nanoscale high speed grinding of silicon workpiece has been established. • The effect of grinding speed on subsurface damage and grinding surface integrity by analyzing the chip, dislocation movement, and phase transformation during high speed grinding process are thoroughly investigated. • Subsurface damage is studied by the evolution of surface area at first time for more obvious observation on transition from ductile to brittle. • The hydrostatic stress and von Mises stress by the established analytical model are studied subsurface damage mechanism during nanoscale grinding. - Abstract: Three-dimensional molecular dynamics (MD) simulations are performed to investigate the nanoscale grinding process of single crystal silicon using diamond tool. The effect of grinding speed on subsurface damage and grinding surface integrity by analyzing the chip, dislocation movement, and phase transformation are studied. We also establish an analytical model to calculate several important stress fields including hydrostatic stress and von Mises stress for studying subsurface damage mechanism, and obtain the dislocation density on the grinding subsurface. The results show that a higher grinding velocity in machining brittle material silicon causes a larger chip and a higher temperature, and reduces subsurface damage. However, when grinding velocity is above 180 m s −1 , subsurface damage thickness slightly increases because a higher grinding speed leads to the increase in grinding force and temperature, which accelerate dislocation nucleation and motion. Subsurface damage is studied by the evolution of surface area at first time for more obvious observation on transition from ductile to brittle, that provides valuable reference for machining nanometer devices. The von Mises stress and the hydrostatic stress play an important role in the grinding process, and explain the subsurface damage though dislocation mechanism under high

  8. Template-based self-assembly for silicon chips and 01005 surface-mount components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoo, J H; Park, Kwang Soon; Baskaran, Rajashree; Böhringer, Karl F

    2014-01-01

    We present template-based microscale self-assembly as a technique that promotes the electronics industry's initiative towards functional diversification and function densification, demonstrating that our process can improve existing assembly and packaging techniques, and also enable possibilities restricted by current industry methodologies. We first present foundational work that performs part (370 × 370 × 150 µm 3 ) delivery to receptor sites (20 × 10 array) with a stochastic batch delivery process that completes within tens of seconds. The delivery mechanism is statistically characterized and a chemical kinetics inspired model is developed. Based on this understanding, repeatable and programmable 100% yield assembly is achieved in open-loop and feedback-based configurations. The established methodology is adapted to deliver and assemble standard 01 005 format (0.016″ × 0.008″, 0.4 mm × 0.2 mm) monolithic ceramic capacitors and thin-film resistors onto silicon substrates. This process is CMOS compatible and is competitive with capacitors and resistors fabricated through standard foundry processes. (paper)

  9. Silicon based near infrared photodetector using self-assembled organic crystalline nano-pillars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ajiki, Yoshiharu, E-mail: yoshiharu-ajiki@ot.olympus.co.jp, E-mail: isao@i.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Micromachine Center, 67 Kanda Sakumagashi, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 100-0026 (Japan); Kan, Tetsuo [Department of Mechano-Informatics, Graduate School of Information Science and Technology, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan); Yahiro, Masayuki; Hamada, Akiko; Adachi, Chihaya [Center for Organic Photonics and Electronics Research (OPERA), Kyushu University, 744 Motooka, Nishi, Fukuoka 819-0395 (Japan); Adachi, Junji [Office for Strategic Research Planning, Kyushu University, 6-10-1 Hakozaki, Higashi, Fukuoka 812-8581 (Japan); Matsumoto, Kiyoshi [IRT Research Initiative, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan); Shimoyama, Isao, E-mail: yoshiharu-ajiki@ot.olympus.co.jp, E-mail: isao@i.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Department of Mechano-Informatics, Graduate School of Information Science and Technology, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan); IRT Research Initiative, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan)

    2016-04-11

    We propose a silicon (Si) based near-infrared photodetector using self-assembled organic crystalline nano-pillars, which were formed on an n-type Si substrate and were covered with an Au thin-film. These structures act as antennas for near-infrared light, resulting in an enhancement of the light absorption on the Au film. Because the Schottky junction is formed between the Au/n-type Si, the electron excited by the absorbed light can be detected as photocurrent. The optical measurement revealed that the nano-pillar structures enhanced the responsivity for the near-infrared light by 89 (14.5 mA/W) and 16 (0.433 mA/W) times compared with those of the photodetector without nano-pillars at the wavelengths of 1.2 and 1.3 μm, respectively. Moreover, no polarization dependency of the responsivity was observed, and the acceptable incident angle ranged from 0° to 30°. These broad responses were likely to be due to the organic nano-pillar structures' having variation in their orientation, which is advantageous for near-infrared detector uses.

  10. Helium interaction with vacancy-type defects created in silicon carbide single crystal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linez, F.; Gilabert, E.; Debelle, A.; Desgardin, P.; Barthe, M.-F.

    2013-05-01

    Generation of He bubbles or cavities in silicon carbide is an important issue for the use of this material in nuclear and electronic applications. To understand the mechanisms prior to the growth of these structures, an atomic-scale study has been conducted. 6H-SiC single crystals have been implanted with 50 keV-He ions at 2 × 1014 and 1015 cm-2 and successively annealed at various temperatures from 150 to 1400 °C. After each annealing, the defect distributions in the samples have been probed by positron annihilation spectroscopy. Four main evolution stages have been evidenced for the two investigated implantation fluences: at (1) 400 °C for both fluences, (2) at 850 °C for the low fluence and 950 °C for the high one, (3) at 950 °C for the low fluence and 1050 °C for the high one and (4) at 1300 °C for both fluences. The perfect correlation between the positron annihilation spectroscopy and the thermodesorption measurements has highlighted the He involvement in the first two stages corresponding respectively to its trapping by irradiation-induced divacancies and the detrapping from various vacancy-type defects generated by agglomeration processes.

  11. Helium interaction with vacancy-type defects created in silicon carbide single crystal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Linez, F., E-mail: florence.linez@aalto.fi [CEMHTI CNRS, 3A rue de la Férollerie, 45071 Orléans (France); Gilabert, E. [CENBG, U.R.A. 451 CNRS, Université de Bordeaux I, BP120, Le Haut Vigneau, 33175 Gradignan Cedex (France); Debelle, A. [CSNSM, Univ. Paris-Sud, CNRS-IN2P3, 91405 Orsay Campus (France); Desgardin, P.; Barthe, M.-F. [CEMHTI CNRS, 3A rue de la Férollerie, 45071 Orléans (France)

    2013-05-15

    Generation of He bubbles or cavities in silicon carbide is an important issue for the use of this material in nuclear and electronic applications. To understand the mechanisms prior to the growth of these structures, an atomic-scale study has been conducted. 6H–SiC single crystals have been implanted with 50 keV-He ions at 2 × 10{sup 14} and 10{sup 15} cm{sup −2} and successively annealed at various temperatures from 150 to 1400 °C. After each annealing, the defect distributions in the samples have been probed by positron annihilation spectroscopy. Four main evolution stages have been evidenced for the two investigated implantation fluences: at (1) 400 °C for both fluences, (2) at 850 °C for the low fluence and 950 °C for the high one, (3) at 950 °C for the low fluence and 1050 °C for the high one and (4) at 1300 °C for both fluences. The perfect correlation between the positron annihilation spectroscopy and the thermodesorption measurements has highlighted the He involvement in the first two stages corresponding respectively to its trapping by irradiation-induced divacancies and the detrapping from various vacancy-type defects generated by agglomeration processes.

  12. Single-crystal-silicon-based microinstrument to study friction and wear at MEMS sidewall interfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ansari, N; Ashurst, W R

    2012-01-01

    Since the advent of microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) technology, friction and wear are considered as key factors that determine the lifetime and reliability of MEMS devices that contain contacting interfaces. However, to date, our knowledge of the mechanisms that govern friction and wear in MEMS is insufficient. Therefore, systematically investigating friction and wear at MEMS scale is critical for the commercial success of many potential MEMS devices. Specifically, since many emerging MEMS devices contain more sidewall interfaces, which are topographically and chemically different from in-plane interfaces, studying the friction and wear characteristics of MEMS sidewall surfaces is important. The microinstruments that have been used to date to investigate the friction and wear characteristics of MEMS sidewall surfaces possess several limitations induced either by their design or the structural film used to fabricate them. Therefore, in this paper, we report on a single-crystal-silicon-based microinstrument to study the frictional and wear behavior of MEMS sidewalls, which not only addresses some of the limitations of other microinstruments but is also easy to fabricate. The design, modeling and fabrication of the microinstrument are described in this paper. Additionally, the coefficients of static and dynamic friction of octadecyltrichlorosilane-coated sidewall surfaces as well as sidewall surfaces with only native oxide on them are also reported in this paper. (paper)

  13. Toward three-dimensional microelectronic systems: directed self-assembly of silicon microcubes via DNA surface functionalization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lämmerhardt, Nico; Merzsch, Stephan; Ledig, Johannes; Bora, Achyut; Waag, Andreas; Tornow, Marc; Mischnick, Petra

    2013-07-02

    The huge and intelligent processing power of three-dimensional (3D) biological "processors" like the human brain with clock speeds of only 0.1 kHz is an extremely fascinating property, which is based on a massively parallel interconnect strategy. Artificial silicon microprocessors are 7 orders of magnitude faster. Nevertheless, they do not show any indication of intelligent processing power, mostly due to their very limited interconnectivity. Massively parallel interconnectivity can only be realized in three dimensions. Three-dimensional artificial processors would therefore be at the root of fabricating artificially intelligent systems. A first step in this direction would be the self-assembly of silicon based building blocks into 3D structures. We report on the self-assembly of such building blocks by molecular recognition, and on the electrical characterization of the formed assemblies. First, planar silicon substrates were functionalized with self-assembling monolayers of 3-aminopropyltrimethoxysilane for coupling of oligonucleotides (single stranded DNA) with glutaric aldehyde. The oligonucleotide immobilization was confirmed and quantified by hybridization with fluorescence-labeled complementary oligonucleotides. After the individual processing steps, the samples were analyzed by contact angle measurements, ellipsometry, atomic force microscopy, and fluorescence microscopy. Patterned DNA-functionalized layers were fabricated by microcontact printing (μCP) and photolithography. Silicon microcubes of 3 μm edge length as model objects for first 3D self-assembly experiments were fabricated out of silicon-on-insulator (SOI) wafers by a combination of reactive ion etching (RIE) and selective wet etching. The microcubes were then surface-functionalized using the same protocol as on planar substrates, and their self-assembly was demonstrated both on patterned silicon surfaces (88% correctly placed cubes), and to cube aggregates by complementary DNA

  14. Chemical resistivity of self-assembled monolayer covalently attached to silicon substrate to hydrofluoric acid and ammonium fluoride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, N.; Youda, S.; Hayashi, K.; Sugimura, H.; Takai, O.

    2003-06-01

    Self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) were prepared on hydrogen-terminated silicon substrates through chemical vapor deposition using 1-hexadecene (HD) as a precursor. The HD-SAMs prepared in an atmosphere under a reduced pressure (≈50 Pa) showed better chemical resistivities to hydrofluoric acid and ammonium fluoride (NH 4F) solutions than that of an organosilane SAM formed on oxide-covered silicon substrates. The surface covered with the HD-SAM was micro-patterned by vacuum ultraviolet photolithography and consequently divided into two areas terminated with HD-SAM or silicon dioxide. This micro-patterned sample was immersed in a 40 vol.% NH 4F aqueous solution. Surface images obtained by an optical microscopy clearly show that the micro-patterns of HD-SAM/silicon dioxide were successfully transferred into the silicon substrate.

  15. Friction and metal transfer for single-crystal silicon carbide in contact with various metals in vacuum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyoshi, K.; Buckley, D.H.

    1978-04-01

    Sliding friction experiments were conducted with single-crystal silicon carbide in contact with transition metals (tungsten, iron, rhodium, nickel, titanium, and cobalt), copper, and aluminum. Results indicate the coefficient of friction for a silicon carbide-metal system is related to the d bond character and relative chemical activity of the metal. The more active the metal, the higher the coefficient of friction. All the metals examined transferred to the surface of silicon carbide in sliding. The chemical activity of metal to silicon and carbon and shear modulus of the metal may play important roles in metal transfer and the form of the wear debris. The less active metal is, and the greater resistance to shear it has, with the exception of rhodium and tungsten, the less transfer to silicon carbide

  16. Surface texture of single-crystal silicon oxidized under a thin V{sub 2}O{sub 5} layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nikitin, S. E., E-mail: nikitin@mail.ioffe.ru; Verbitskiy, V. N.; Nashchekin, A. V.; Trapeznikova, I. N.; Bobyl, A. V.; Terukova, E. E. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Ioffe Physical–Technical Institute (Russian Federation)

    2017-01-15

    The process of surface texturing of single-crystal silicon oxidized under a V{sub 2}O{sub 5} layer is studied. Intense silicon oxidation at the Si–V{sub 2}O{sub 5} interface begins at a temperature of 903 K which is 200 K below than upon silicon thermal oxidation in an oxygen atmosphere. A silicon dioxide layer 30–50 nm thick with SiO{sub 2} inclusions in silicon depth up to 400 nm is formed at the V{sub 2}O{sub 5}–Si interface. The diffusion coefficient of atomic oxygen through the silicon-dioxide layer at 903 K is determined (D ≥ 2 × 10{sup –15} cm{sup 2} s{sup –1}). A model of low-temperature silicon oxidation, based on atomic oxygen diffusion from V{sub 2}O{sub 5} through the SiO{sub 2} layer to silicon, and SiO{sub x} precipitate formation in silicon is proposed. After removing the V{sub 2}O{sub 5} and silicon-dioxide layers, texture is formed on the silicon surface, which intensely scatters light in the wavelength range of 300–550 nm and is important in the texturing of the front and rear surfaces of solar cells.

  17. Friction and Wear of Metals With a Single-Crystal Abrasive Grit of Silicon Carbide - Effect of Shear Strength of Metal

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Miyoshi, Kazuhisa

    1978-01-01

    An investigation was conducted to examine the removal and plastic deformation of metal as a function of the metal properties when the metal is in sliding contact with a single-crystal abrasive grit of silicon carbide...

  18. Study of a macrodefect in a silicon carbid single crystal by means of X-ray phase contrast

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Argunova, T. S., E-mail: argunova2002@mail.ru [Russian Academy of Sciences, Ioffe Institute (Russian Federation); Kohn, V. G. [National Research Centre “Kurchatov Institute” (Russian Federation); Lim, J. H. [Pohang Accelerator Laboratory (Korea, Republic of); Je, J. H. [Pohang University of Science and Technology, Department of Materials Science and Engineering (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-11-15

    The morphology of a macrodefect in a single-crystal silicon carbide wafer has been investigated by the computer simulation of an experimental X-ray phase-contrast image. A micropipe, i.e., a long cavity with a small (elliptical in the general case) cross section, in a single crystal has been considered as a macrodefect. A far-field image of micropipe has been measured with the aid of synchrotron radiation without a monochromator. The parameters of micropipe elliptical cross section are determined based on one projection in two directions: parallel and perpendicular to the X-ray beam propagation direction, when scanning along the pipe axis. The results demonstrate the efficiency of the phase contrast method supplemented with computer simulation for studying such macrodefects when the defect position in the sample volume is unknown beforehand.

  19. Process design and simulation for optimizing the oxygen concentration in Czochralski-grown single-crystal silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, Y. J.; Kim, W. K.; Jung, J. H.

    2014-01-01

    The highest-concentration impurity in a single-crystal silicon ingot is oxygen, which infiltrates the ingot during growth stage. This oxygen adversely affects the wafer is quality. This study was aimed at finding an optimal design for the Czochralski (Cz) process to enable high-quality and low cost (by reducing power consumption) wafer production by controlling the oxygen concentration in the silicon ingots. In the Cz process, the characteristics of silicon ingots during crystallization are greatly influenced by the design and the configuration of the hot zone, and by crystallization rate. In order to identify process conditions for obtaining an optimal oxygen concentration of 11 - 13 ppma (required for industrial-grade ingots), designed two shield shapes for the hot zone. Furthermore, oxygen concentrations corresponding to these two shapes were compared by evaluating each shape at five different production speeds. In addition, simulations were performed to identify the optimal shield design for industrial applications.

  20. Process design and simulation for optimizing the oxygen concentration in Czochralski-grown single-crystal silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Y. J.; Kim, W. K.; Jung, J. H. [Yeungnam University, Gyeongsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-08-15

    The highest-concentration impurity in a single-crystal silicon ingot is oxygen, which infiltrates the ingot during growth stage. This oxygen adversely affects the wafer is quality. This study was aimed at finding an optimal design for the Czochralski (Cz) process to enable high-quality and low cost (by reducing power consumption) wafer production by controlling the oxygen concentration in the silicon ingots. In the Cz process, the characteristics of silicon ingots during crystallization are greatly influenced by the design and the configuration of the hot zone, and by crystallization rate. In order to identify process conditions for obtaining an optimal oxygen concentration of 11 - 13 ppma (required for industrial-grade ingots), designed two shield shapes for the hot zone. Furthermore, oxygen concentrations corresponding to these two shapes were compared by evaluating each shape at five different production speeds. In addition, simulations were performed to identify the optimal shield design for industrial applications.

  1. Self-supporting film method of silicon single crystal by ion implantation and it`s application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saito, Kazuo; Nakao, Setsuo; Niwa, Hiroaki; Miyagawa, Soji [National Industrial Research Inst. of Nagoya (Japan)

    1996-12-01

    A few {mu}m of thickness of self-supporting film of silicon single crystal was produced by the ion implantation and the selective etching. This materials are distinguished by a uniform film thickness, good controllability, crystallization and the mechanical strength. For applying it to device, the detailed process has to be established, because there are some improved problems such as pinhole and morphology on the surface. This materials are very useful to the basic experiment of the base for epitaxial growth under irradiation of ion beams and the ion beam analysis in the atmosphere. (S.Y.)

  2. A new computationally-efficient two-dimensional model for boron implantation into single-crystal silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klein, K.M.; Park, C.; Yang, S.; Morris, S.; Do, V.; Tasch, F.

    1992-01-01

    We have developed a new computationally-efficient two-dimensional model for boron implantation into single-crystal silicon. This paper reports that this new model is based on the dual Pearson semi-empirical implant depth profile model and the UT-MARLOWE Monte Carlo boron ion implantation model. This new model can predict with very high computational efficiency two-dimensional as-implanted boron profiles as a function of energy, dose, tilt angle, rotation angle, masking edge orientation, and masking edge thickness

  3. Influence of molecular packing on the corrosion inhibition properties of self-assembled octadecyltrichlorosilane monolayers on silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hsieh, Shuchen; Chao, Wei-Jay; Lin, Pei-Ying; Hsieh, Chiung-Wen

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: •Molecular packing plays an important role in determining SAM film properties. •Loose-packed OTS monolayers on silicon were corroded by exposure to KMnO 4 . •Dense-packed OTS SAM films exhibited excellent corrosion protection efficacy. -- Abstract: The corrosion inhibition properties of octadecyltrichlorosilane (OTS) self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) on silicon were investigated. Atomic force microscopy (AFM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), contact angle (CA), and lateral force microscopy (LFM) were used to determine the OTS film formation time, packing density, and corrosion protection efficacy. The OTS films reached adsorption saturation after 15 s; however, the molecular density continued to increase up to 24 h. The films were exposed to the strong oxidant KMnO 4 , and while 15-s film samples exhibited corrosion after a 1 min exposure, samples with films grown for 24 h were protected even after 24 h

  4. Numerical and experimental study of a solid pellet feed continuous Czochralski growth process for silicon single crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anselmo, A.; Prasad, V.; Koziol, J.; Gupta, K. P.

    1993-07-01

    A polysilicon pellets (≅1 mm diameter) feed continuous Czochralski (CCZ) growth process for silicon single crystals is proposed and investigated. Experiments in an industrial puller (14-18 inch diameter crucible) successfully demonstrate the feasibility of this process. The advantages of the proposed scheme are: a steady state growth process, a low aspect ratio melt, uniformity of heat addition and a growth apparatus with single crucible and no baffle(s). The addition of dopant with the solid charge will allow a better control of oxygen concentration leading to crystals of uniform properties and better quality. This paper presents theoretical results on melting of fully and partially immersed silicon spheres and numerical solutions on temperature and flow fields in low aspect ration melts with and without the addition of solid pellets. The theoretical and experimental results obtained thus far show a great promise for the proposed scheme.

  5. single crystals

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2018-05-18

    May 18, 2018 ... Abstract. 4-Nitrobenzoic acid (4-NBA) single crystals were studied for their linear and nonlinear optical ... studies on the proper growth, linear and nonlinear optical ..... between the optic axes and optic sign of the biaxial crystal.

  6. Fabrication and tribological properties of self-assembled monolayer of n-alkyltrimethoxysilane on silicon: Effect of SAM alkyl chain length

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huo, Lixia; Du, Pengcheng; Zhou, Hui; Zhang, Kaifeng; Liu, Peng

    2017-02-01

    It is well known that the self-assembled organic molecules on a solid surface exhibit the friction-reducing performance. However, the effect of the molecular size of the self-assembled organic molecules has not been established. In the present work, self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) of n-alkyltrimethoxysilanes with different alkyl chain lengths (C6, C12, or C18) were fabricated on silicon substrate. The water contact angles of the SAMs increased from 26.8° of the hydroxylated silicon substrate to near 60° after self-assembly. The atomic force microscopy (AFM) analysis results showed that the mean roughness (Ra) of the SAMs decreased with increasing the alkyl chain length. The tribological properties of the SAMs sliding against Al2O3 ball were evaluated on an UMT-2 tribometer, and the worn surfaces of the samples were analyzed by means of Nano Scratch Tester and surface profilometry. It was found that lowest friction coefficient and smallest width of wear were achieved with the SAMs of C12 alkyl chain (C12-SAM). The superior friction reduction and wear resistance of the SAMs in comparison with the bare silicon substrate are attributed to good adhesion of the self-assembled films to the substrate, especially the C12-SAM with desirable alkyl chain length.

  7. Analysis about diamond tool wear in nano-metric cutting of single crystal silicon using molecular dynamics method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhiguo; Liang, Yingchun; Chen, Mingjun; Tong, Zhen; Chen, Jiaxuan

    2010-10-01

    Tool wear not only changes its geometry accuracy and integrity, but also decrease machining precision and surface integrity of workpiece that affect using performance and service life of workpiece in ultra-precision machining. Scholars made a lot of experimental researches and stimulant analyses, but there is a great difference on the wear mechanism, especially on the nano-scale wear mechanism. In this paper, the three-dimensional simulation model is built to simulate nano-metric cutting of a single crystal silicon with a non-rigid right-angle diamond tool with 0 rake angle and 0 clearance angle by the molecular dynamics (MD) simulation approach, which is used to investigate the diamond tool wear during the nano-metric cutting process. A Tersoff potential is employed for the interaction between carbon-carbon atoms, silicon-silicon atoms and carbon-silicon atoms. The tool gets the high alternating shear stress, the tool wear firstly presents at the cutting edge where intension is low. At the corner the tool is splitted along the {1 1 1} crystal plane, which forms the tipping. The wear at the flank face is the structure transformation of diamond that the diamond structure transforms into the sheet graphite structure. Owing to the tool wear the cutting force increases.

  8. Fabrication and tribological properties of self-assembled monolayer of n-alkyltrimethoxysilane on silicon: Effect of SAM alkyl chain length

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huo, Lixia [National Key Laboratory of Science and Technology on Vacuum Technology and Physics, Lanzhou Institute of Physics, Lanzhou, Gansu 730010 (China); Institute of Polymer Science and Engineering, College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Lanzhou University, Gansu 730000 (China); Du, Pengcheng [Institute of Polymer Science and Engineering, College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Lanzhou University, Gansu 730000 (China); Zhou, Hui; Zhang, Kaifeng [National Key Laboratory of Science and Technology on Vacuum Technology and Physics, Lanzhou Institute of Physics, Lanzhou, Gansu 730010 (China); Liu, Peng, E-mail: pliu@lzu.edu.cn [Institute of Polymer Science and Engineering, College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Lanzhou University, Gansu 730000 (China)

    2017-02-28

    Highlights: • n-Alkyltrimethoxysilanes with various chain lengths were self-assembled on silicon. • Effect of alkyl chain lengths (C6, C12, or C18) on the SAMs was investigated. • Surface roughness of the SAMs decreased with increasing the alkyl chain lengths. • The C{sub 12}-SAM possessed superior friction reduction and wear resistance. - Abstract: It is well known that the self-assembled organic molecules on a solid surface exhibit the friction-reducing performance. However, the effect of the molecular size of the self-assembled organic molecules has not been established. In the present work, self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) of n-alkyltrimethoxysilanes with different alkyl chain lengths (C{sub 6}, C{sub 12}, or C{sub 18}) were fabricated on silicon substrate. The water contact angles of the SAMs increased from 26.8° of the hydroxylated silicon substrate to near 60° after self-assembly. The atomic force microscopy (AFM) analysis results showed that the mean roughness (R{sub a}) of the SAMs decreased with increasing the alkyl chain length. The tribological properties of the SAMs sliding against Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} ball were evaluated on an UMT-2 tribometer, and the worn surfaces of the samples were analyzed by means of Nano Scratch Tester and surface profilometry. It was found that lowest friction coefficient and smallest width of wear were achieved with the SAMs of C{sub 12} alkyl chain (C{sub 12}-SAM). The superior friction reduction and wear resistance of the SAMs in comparison with the bare silicon substrate are attributed to good adhesion of the self-assembled films to the substrate, especially the C{sub 12}-SAM with desirable alkyl chain length.

  9. Fabrication and tribological properties of self-assembled monolayer of n-alkyltrimethoxysilane on silicon: Effect of SAM alkyl chain length

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huo, Lixia; Du, Pengcheng; Zhou, Hui; Zhang, Kaifeng; Liu, Peng

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • n-Alkyltrimethoxysilanes with various chain lengths were self-assembled on silicon. • Effect of alkyl chain lengths (C6, C12, or C18) on the SAMs was investigated. • Surface roughness of the SAMs decreased with increasing the alkyl chain lengths. • The C 12 -SAM possessed superior friction reduction and wear resistance. - Abstract: It is well known that the self-assembled organic molecules on a solid surface exhibit the friction-reducing performance. However, the effect of the molecular size of the self-assembled organic molecules has not been established. In the present work, self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) of n-alkyltrimethoxysilanes with different alkyl chain lengths (C 6 , C 12 , or C 18 ) were fabricated on silicon substrate. The water contact angles of the SAMs increased from 26.8° of the hydroxylated silicon substrate to near 60° after self-assembly. The atomic force microscopy (AFM) analysis results showed that the mean roughness (R a ) of the SAMs decreased with increasing the alkyl chain length. The tribological properties of the SAMs sliding against Al 2 O 3 ball were evaluated on an UMT-2 tribometer, and the worn surfaces of the samples were analyzed by means of Nano Scratch Tester and surface profilometry. It was found that lowest friction coefficient and smallest width of wear were achieved with the SAMs of C 12 alkyl chain (C 12 -SAM). The superior friction reduction and wear resistance of the SAMs in comparison with the bare silicon substrate are attributed to good adhesion of the self-assembled films to the substrate, especially the C 12 -SAM with desirable alkyl chain length.

  10. Patterning of Perovskite Single Crystals

    KAUST Repository

    Corzo, Daniel

    2017-06-12

    As the internet-of-things hardware integration continues to develop and the requirements for electronics keep diversifying and expanding, the necessity for specialized properties other than the classical semiconductor performance becomes apparent. The success of emerging semiconductor materials depends on the manufacturability and cost as much as on the properties and performance they offer. Solution-based semiconductors are an emerging concept that offers the advantage of being compatible with large-scale manufacturing techniques and have the potential to yield high-quality electronic devices at a lower cost than currently available solutions. In this work, patterns of high-quality MAPbBr3 perovskite single crystals in specific locations are achieved through the modification of the substrate properties and solvent engineering. The fabrication of the substrates involved modifying the surface adhesion forces through functionalization with self-assembled monolayers and patterning them by photolithography processes. Spin coating and blade coating were used to deposit the perovskite solution on the modified silicon substrates. While single crystal perovskites were obtained with the modification of substrates alone, solvent engineering helped with improving the Marangoni flows in the deposited droplets by increasing the contact angle and lowering the evaporation rate, therefore controlling and improving the shape of the grown perovskite crystals. The methodology is extended to other types of perovskites such as the transparent MAPbCl3 and the lead-free MABi2I9, demonstrating the adaptability of the process. Adapting the process to electrode arrays opened up the path towards the fabrication of optoelectronic devices including photodetectors and field-effect transistors, for which the first iterations are demonstrated. Overall, manufacturing and integration techniques permitting the fabrication of single crystalline devices, such as the method in this thesis work, are

  11. Annealing effect of H+ -implanted single crystal silicon on strain and crystal structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duo Xinzhong; Liu Weili; Zhang Miao; Gao Jianxia; Fu Xiaorong; Lin Chenglu

    2000-01-01

    The work focuses on the rocking curves of H + -implanted single silicon crystal detected by Four-Crystal X-ray diffractometer. The samples were annealed under different temperatures. Lattice defect in H + -implanted silicon crystals was detected by Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry. It appeared that H-related complex did not crush until annealing temperature reached about 400 degree C. At that temperature H 2 was formed, deflated in silicon lattice and strained the lattice. But defects did not come into being in large quantity. The lattice was undamaged. When annealing temperature reached 500 degree C, strain induced by H 2 deflation crashed the silicon lattice. A large number of defects were formed. At the same time bubbles in the crystal and blister/flaking on the surface could be observed

  12. Electrodeposition of cadmium on n-type silicon single crystals of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    sea

    type silicon have been studied as a function of different potential steps. Within appropriate potential ... including progressive nucleation on active sites and diffusion controlled cluster growth. ..... al CdSe nanocrystals on {111} gold. Surf. Sci.

  13. Synchrotron Topographic and Diffractometer Studies of Buried Layered Structures Obtained by Implantation with Swift Heavy Ions in Silicon Single Crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wierzchowski, W.; Wieteska, K.; Zymierska, D.; Graeff, W.; Czosnyka, T.; Choinski, J.

    2006-01-01

    A distribution of crystallographic defects and deformation in silicon crystals subjected to deep implantation (20-50 μm) with ions of the energy of a few MeV/amu is studied. Three different buried layered structures (single layer, binary buried structure and triple buried structure) were obtained by implantation of silicon single crystals with 184 MeV argon ions, 29.7 MeV boron ions, and 140 MeV argon ions, each implantation at a fluency of 1x10 14 ions cm -2 . The implanted samples were examined by means of white beam X-ray section and projection topography, monochromatic beam topography and by recording local rocking curves with the beam restricted to 50 x 50 μm 2 . The experiment pointed to a very low level of implantation-induced strain (below 10 -5 ). The white beam Bragg case section experiment revealed a layer producing district black contrast located at a depth of the expected mean ion range. The presence of these buried layered structures in studied silicon crystals strongly affected the fringe pattern caused by curvature of the samples. In case of white beam projection and monochromatic beam topographs the implanted areas were revealed as darker regions with a very tiny grain like structure. One may interpret these results as the effect of considerable heating causing annihilation of point defects and formation of dislocation loops connected with point defect clusters. (author)

  14. Activity and lifetime of urease immobilized using layer-by-layer nano self-assembly on silicon microchannels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forrest, Scott R; Elmore, Bill B; Palmer, James D

    2005-01-01

    Urease has been immobilized and layered onto the walls of manufactured silicon microchannels. Enzyme immobilization was performed using layer-by-layer nano self-assembly. Alternating layers of oppositely charged polyelectrolytes, with enzyme layers "encased" between them, were deposited onto the walls of the silicon microchannels. The polycations used were polyethylenimine (PEI), polydiallyldimethylammonium (PDDA), and polyallylamine (PAH). The polyanions used were polystyrenesulfonate (PSS) and polyvinylsulfate (PVS). The activity of the immobilized enzyme was tested by pumping a 1 g/L urea solution through the microchannels at various flow rates. Effluent concentration was measured using an ultraviolet/visible spectrometer by monitoring the absorbance of a pH sensitive dye. The architecture of PEI/PSS/PEI/urease/PEI with single and multiple layers of enzyme demonstrated superior performance over the PDDA and PAH architectures. The precursor layer of PEI/PSS demonstrably improved the performance of the reactor. Conversion rates of 70% were achieved at a residence time of 26 s, on d 1 of operation, and >50% at 51 s, on d 15 with a six-layer PEI/urease architecture.

  15. MICROSTRUCTURING OF SILICON SINGLE CRYSTALS BY FIBER LASER IN HIGH-SPEED SCANNING MODE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. A. Trifonova

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Subject of Study. The surface structure of the silicon wafers (substrate with a thermally grown silicon dioxide on the surface (of SiO2/Si is studied after irradiation by pulse fiber laser of ILI-1-20 type. The main requirements for exposure modes of the system are: the preservation of the integrity of the film of silicon dioxide in the process of microstructuring and the absence of interference of surrounding irradiated areas of the substrate. Method. Studies were carried out on silicon wafers KEF-4,5 oriented in the crystallographic plane (111 with the source (natural silicon dioxide (SiO2 with thickness of about 4 nm, and SiO2 with 40 nm and 150 nm thickness, grown by thermal oxidation in moist oxygen. Also, wafers KHB-10 oriented in the plane (100 with 500 nm thickness of thermal oxide were investigated. Irradiation of SiO2/Si system was produced by laser complex based on ytterbium fiber pulse laser ILI-1-20. Nominal output power of the laser was 20 W, and the laser wavelength was λ = 1062 nm. Irradiation was carried out by a focused beam spot with a diameter of 25 microns and a pulse repetition rate of 99 kHz. The samples with 150 nm and 40 nm thickness of SiO2 were irradiated at a power density equal to 1,2·102 W/cm2, and the samples of SiO2 with 500 nm thickness were irradiated at a power density equal to 2,0·102 W/cm2. Scanning was performed using a two-axis Coordinate Scanning Device based on VM2500+ drives with control via a PC with the software package "SinMarkTM." Only one scan line was used at the maximum speed of the beam equal to 8750 mm/s. Morphology control of the irradiated samples was conducted by an optical microscope ZeissA1M with high-resolution CCD array. A scanning probe microscope Nanoedicator of the NT-MDT company was used for structural measurements. Main Results. It has been shown that at a single exposure of high-frequency pulsed laser radiation on SiO2/Si system, with maintaining the integrity of the SiO2 film

  16. Increasing the radiation resistance of single-crystal silicon epitaxial layers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kurmashev Sh. D.

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The authors investigate the possibility of increasing the radiation resistance of silicon epitaxial layers by creating radiation defects sinks in the form of dislocation networks of the density of 109—1012 m–2. Such networks are created before the epitaxial layer is applied on the front surface of the silicon substrate by its preliminary oxidation and subsequent etching of the oxide layer. The substrates were silicon wafers KEF-4.5 and KDB-10 with a diameter of about 40 mm, grown by the Czochralski method. Irradiation of the samples was carried out using electron linear accelerator "Electronics" (ЭЛУ-4. Energy of the particles was 2,3—3,0 MeV, radiation dose 1015—1020 m–2, electron beam current 2 mA/m2. It is shown that in structures containing dislocation networks, irradiation results in reduction of the reverse currents by 5—8 times and of the density of defects by 5—10 times, while the mobility of the charge carriers is increased by 1,2 times. Wafer yield for operation under radiation exposure, when the semiconductor structures are formed in the optimal mode, is increased by 7—10% compared to the structures without dislocation networks. The results obtained can be used in manufacturing technology for radiation-resistant integrated circuits (bipolar, CMOS, BiCMOS, etc..

  17. Investigations of structural, dielectric and optical properties on silicon ion irradiated glycine monophosphate single crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kanagasekaran, T. [Department of Physics, Anna University, Chennai 600 025 (India); Department of Physics and Astrophysics, University of Delhi, New Delhi 110 007 (India); Mythili, P. [Department of Physics, Anna University, Chennai 600 025 (India); Bhagavannarayana, G. [Materials Characterization Division, National Physical Laboratory, New Delhi 110012 (India); Kanjilal, D. [Inter University Accelerator Centre, New Delhi 110 067 (India); Gopalakrishnan, R. [Department of Physics, Anna University, Chennai 600 025 (India)], E-mail: krgkrishnan@annauniv.edu

    2009-08-01

    The 50 MeV silicon ion irradiation induced modifications on structural, optical and dielectric properties of solution grown glycine monophosphate (GMP) crystals were studied. The high-resolution X-ray diffraction study shows the unaltered value of integrated intensity on irradiation. The dielectric constant as a function of frequency and temperature was studied. UV-visible studies reveal the decrease in bandgap values on irradiation and presence of F-centers. The fluorescence spectrum shows the existence of some energy levels, which remains unaffected after irradiation. The scanning electron micrographs reveal the defects formed on irradiation.

  18. 14 MeV neutron activation analysis for oxygen determination in silicon single-crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Timus, D.M.; Galatanu, V.; Catana, D.

    1985-01-01

    The nondestructive fast neutron activation method has been applied for the total oxygen content determination with regards to the correlation of this content with the material properties of the silicon. The nuclear reaction used is: 16 O (n,p) 16 N, (Tsub(1/2)=7,4 s). The equipment and experimental set-up of the analytical system contained fast neutron generator GENEDAC, gamma scintillation detector (NaI crystal), a photomultiplier, a preamplifier, a linear amplifier with variable energy discrimination thresholds and a pneumatic conveyor system. The method proposed is rapid (total analysis time is less than 60 s), specific (allows a good energetic discrimination in relation to other elements) and precise, being able to characterize nondestructively the whole volume of the analysed sample

  19. Self-assembled infrared-luminescent Er-Si-O crystallites on silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isshiki, H.; Dood, M.J.A. de; Polman, A.; Kimura, T.

    2004-01-01

    Optically active and electrically excitable erbium complexes on silicon are made by wet-chemical synthesis. The single-crystalline Er-Si-O compound is formed by coating a Si(100) substrate with an ErCl 3 /ethanol solution, followed by rapid thermal oxidation and annealing. Room-temperature Er-related 1.53 μm photoluminescence is observed with a peak linewidth as small as 4 meV. The complexes can be excited directly into the Er intra-4f states, or indirectly, through photocarriers. Er concentrations as high as 14 at. % are achieved, incorporated in a crystalline lattice with a 0.9 nm periodicity. Thermal quenching at room temperature is only a factor 5, and the lifetime at 1.535 μm is 200 μs

  20. Local structure of the silicon implanted in a graphite single crystal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baba, Yuji; Shimoyama, Iwao; Sekiguchi, Tetsuhiro

    2002-01-01

    Solid carbon forms two kinds of local structures, i.e., diamond-like and two-dimensional graphite structures. In contrast, silicon carbide tends to prefer only diamond structure that is composed of sp 3 bonds. In order to clarify weather or not two-dimensional graphitic Si x C layer exists, we investigate the local structures of Si x C layer produced by Si + -ion implantation into highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) by means of near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS). The energy of the resonance peak in the Si K-edge NEXAFS spectra for Si + -implanted HOPG is lower than those for any other Si-containing materials. The intensity of the resonance peak showed a strong polarization dependence. These results suggests that the final state orbitals around Si atoms have π*-like character and the direction of this orbital is perpendicular to the graphite plane. It is elucidated that the Si-C bonds produced by the Si + -ion implantation are nearly parallel to the graphite plane, and Si x C phase forms a two-dimensionally spread graphite-like layer with sp 2 bonds. (author)

  1. Two-dimensionally grown single-crystal silicon nanosheets with tunable visible-light emissions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sung Wook; Lee, Jaejun; Sung, Ji Ho; Seo, Dong-jae; Kim, Ilsoo; Jo, Moon-Ho; Kwon, Byoung Wook; Choi, Won Kook; Choi, Heon-Jin

    2014-07-22

    Since the discovery of graphene, growth of two-dimensional (2D) nanomaterials has greatly attracted attention. However, spontaneous growth of atomic two-dimensional (2D) materials is limitedly permitted for several layered-structure crystals, such as graphene, MoS2, and h-BN, and otherwise it is notoriously difficult. Here we report the gas-phase 2D growth of silicon (Si), that is cubic in symmetry, via dendritic growth and an interdendritic filling mechanism and to form Si nanosheets (SiNSs) of 1 to 13 nm in thickness. Thin SiNSs show strong thickness-dependent photoluminescence in visible range including red, green, and blue (RGB) emissions with the associated band gap energies ranging from 1.6 to 3.2 eV; these emission energies were greater than those from Si quantum dots (SiQDs) of the similar sizes. We also demonstrated that electrically driven white, as well as blue, emission in a conventional organic light-emitting diode (OLED) geometry with the SiNS assembly as the active emitting layers. Tunable light emissions in visible range in our observations suggest practical implications for novel 2D Si nanophotonics.

  2. Full characterization of laser-accelerated ion beams using Faraday cup, silicon carbide, and single-crystal diamond detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margarone, D.; Krása, J.; Giuffrida, L.; Picciotto, A.; Torrisi, L.; Nowak, T.; Musumeci, P.; Velyhan, A.; Prokůpek, J.; Láska, L.; Mocek, T.; Ullschmied, J.; Rus, B.

    2011-05-01

    Multi-MeV beams of light ions have been produced using the 300 picosecond, kJ-class iodine laser, operating at the Prague Asterix Laser System facility in Prague. Real-time ion diagnostics have been performed by the use of various time-of-flight (TOF) detectors: ion collectors (ICs) with and without absorber thin films, new prototypes of single-crystal diamond and silicon carbide detectors, and an electrostatic ion mass spectrometer (IEA). In order to suppress the long photopeak induced by soft X-rays and to avoid the overlap with the signal from ultrafast particles, the ICs have been shielded with Al foil filters. The application of large-bandgap semiconductor detectors (>3 eV) ensured cutting of the plasma-emitted visible and soft-UV radiation and enhancing the sensitivity to the very fast proton/ion beams. Employing the IEA spectrometer, various ion species and charge states in the expanding laser-plasma have been determined. Processing of the experimental data based on the TOF technique, including estimation of the plasma fast proton maximum and peak energy, ion beam currents and total charge, total number of fast protons, as well as deconvolution processes, ion stopping power, and ion/photon transmission calculations for the different metallic filters used, are reported.

  3. Anomalous decrease of resistance at 250 K in ultrathin Au-Nb film on single-crystal silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, H.; Kawashima, T.; Tanaka, M.

    1986-01-01

    Ultrathin Au-Nb films as thin as 0.2 about 10 nm were deposited on clean surfaces of single-crystal silicon in order to investigate interfacial excitonic superconductivity. The samples were classified into two types, Nb-Au/Si and Au-Nb-Au/Si. In the latter case, the secondary Au film was deposited on the former sample cooled by liquid nitrogen. In the Nb-Au/ Si type of sample, a sheet resistance, R /SUB s/ at room temperature abruptly increased from 10 3 Ωsq -1 order to about 10 5 Ωsq -1 in several days a few months after the sample preparation. Then the sample showed an anomalous decrease of R /SUB s/ at about 250 K and an approximately null resistance at lower temperatures. This phenomenon was not so stable and was observed only for a few days. The Au-Nb-Au/Si type of sample showed low R /SUB s/ (10 2 about 10 3 Ωsq -1 ) at room temperature. A decrease and disappearance of R /SUB s/ were also observed at about 240 K in the sample with comparatively good reproducibility. These phenomena are discussed qualitatively, based on the excitonic superconductive model for an interface of metal/semiconductor by Allender, Bray, and Bardeen

  4. Characterization of self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) on silicon substrate comparative with polymer substrate for Escherichia coli O157:H7 detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moldovan, Carmen; Mihailescu, Carmen; Stan, Dana; Ruta, Lavinia; Iosub, Rodica; Gavrila, Raluca; Purica, Munizer; Vasilica, Schiopu

    2009-01-01

    This article presents the characterization of two substrates, silicon and polymer coated with gold, that are functionalized by mixed self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) in order to efficiently immobilize the anti-Escherichia coli O157:H7 polyclonal purified antibody. A biosurface functionalized by SAMs (self-assembled monolayers) technique has been developed. Immobilization of goat anti-E. coli O157:H7 antibody was performed by covalently bonding of thiolate mixed self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) realized on two substrates: polymer coated with gold and silicon coated with gold. The F(ab') 2 fragments of the antibodies have been used for eliminating nonspecific bindings between the Fc portions of antibodies and the Fc receptor on cells. The properties of the monolayers and the biofilm formatted with attached antibody molecules were analyzed at each step using infrared spectroscopy (FTIR-ATR), atomic force microscopy (AFM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and cyclic voltammetry (CV). In our study the gold-coated silicon substrates approach yielded the best results. These experimental results revealed the necessity to investigate each stage of the immobilization process taking into account in the same time the factors that influence the chemistry of the surface and the further interactions as well and also provide a solid basis for further studies aiming at elaborating sensitive and specific immunosensor or a microarray for the detection of E. coli O157:H7.

  5. Characterization of self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) on silicon substrate comparative with polymer substrate for Escherichia coli O157:H7 detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moldovan, Carmen, E-mail: carmen.moldovan@imt.ro [National Institute for R and D in Microtechnologies, IMT-Bucharest, 126A Erou Iancu Nicolae, 077190 Bucharest (Romania); Mihailescu, Carmen, E-mail: carmen_mihail28@yahoo.com [University of Bucharest, 90-92 Sos Panduri, Bucharest (Romania); Stan, Dana, E-mail: dana_stan2005@yahoo.com [DDS Diagnostic, 1 Segovia Street, Bucharest (Romania); Ruta, Lavinia, E-mail: laviniacoco@yahoo.com [University of Bucharest, 90-92 Sos Panduri, Bucharest (Romania); Iosub, Rodica, E-mail: rodica.iosub@imt.ro [National Institute for R and D in Microtechnologies, IMT-Bucharest, 126A Erou Iancu Nicolae, 077190 Bucharest (Romania); Gavrila, Raluca, E-mail: raluca.gavrila@imt.ro [National Institute for R and D in Microtechnologies, IMT-Bucharest, 126A Erou Iancu Nicolae, 077190 Bucharest (Romania); Purica, Munizer, E-mail: munizer.purica@imt.ro [National Institute for R and D in Microtechnologies, IMT-Bucharest, 126A Erou Iancu Nicolae, 077190 Bucharest (Romania); Vasilica, Schiopu, E-mail: vasilica.schiopu@imt.ro [National Institute for R and D in Microtechnologies, IMT-Bucharest, 126A Erou Iancu Nicolae, 077190 Bucharest (Romania)

    2009-08-30

    This article presents the characterization of two substrates, silicon and polymer coated with gold, that are functionalized by mixed self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) in order to efficiently immobilize the anti-Escherichia coli O157:H7 polyclonal purified antibody. A biosurface functionalized by SAMs (self-assembled monolayers) technique has been developed. Immobilization of goat anti-E. coli O157:H7 antibody was performed by covalently bonding of thiolate mixed self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) realized on two substrates: polymer coated with gold and silicon coated with gold. The F(ab'){sub 2} fragments of the antibodies have been used for eliminating nonspecific bindings between the Fc portions of antibodies and the Fc receptor on cells. The properties of the monolayers and the biofilm formatted with attached antibody molecules were analyzed at each step using infrared spectroscopy (FTIR-ATR), atomic force microscopy (AFM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and cyclic voltammetry (CV). In our study the gold-coated silicon substrates approach yielded the best results. These experimental results revealed the necessity to investigate each stage of the immobilization process taking into account in the same time the factors that influence the chemistry of the surface and the further interactions as well and also provide a solid basis for further studies aiming at elaborating sensitive and specific immunosensor or a microarray for the detection of E. coli O157:H7.

  6. A comparative study of the growth of octadecyltrichlorosilane and 3-mercaptopropyltrimethoxysilane self-assembled monolayers on hydrophilic silicon surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, S.-R.; Kolbesen, Bernd O.

    2008-01-01

    Self-assembled monolayers of two different organosilane precursors, methyl-terminated nonpolar n-octadecyltrichlorosilane (OTS, Cl 3 Si(CH 2 ) 17 CH 3 ) and thiol-terminated polar 3-mercaptopropyltrimethoxysilane (MPTMS, (CH 3 O) 3 SiCH 2 CH 2 CH 2 SH), were prepared separately on hydrophilic silicon surfaces by immersion in millimolar solutions of the respective precursors in toluene at room temperature. Ex situ atomic force microscopy (AFM), lateral force microscopy (LFM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) were used to study the growth and the properties of OTS and MPTMS SAMs. For OTS SAMs, generally speaking, small islands surrounded large dendrite-shaped islands. But for MPTMS SAMs, sporadic small round islands appeared, but no dendrites. The impact of the solution age was more significant on the growth of OTS SAMs than MPTMS SAMs. At the same precursor concentration and solution age, the growth of OTS SAMs was much faster than MPTMS SAMs due to the greater hydrolysis ability of Si-Cl bonds in OTS as compared with that of Si-OCH 3 bonds in MPTMS. The difference in hydrolysis ability was confirmed by the absence of a Cl signal in the XP spectrum of OTS SAMs and the existence of a C 1s peak corresponding to unhydrolyzed Si-OCH 3 bonds in the XP spectrum of MPTMS SAMs. This trend together with the difference in alkyl chain length had a strong influence on the surface morphology and coverage of these two SAMs. According to the individual adsorption behavior of the components, the predictable kinetic difficulty of preparing OTS/MPTMS mixed SAMs by co-adsorption is pointed out. Furthermore, a potential reaction condition for stepwise adsorption is suggested.

  7. Hybrid Silicon-Based Organic/Inorganic Block Copolymers with Sol-Gel Active Moieties: Synthetic Advances, Self-Assembly and Applications in Biomedicine and Materials Science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czarnecki, Sebastian; Bertin, Annabelle

    2018-03-07

    Hybrid silicon-based organic/inorganic (multi)block copolymers are promising polymeric precursors to create robust nano-objects and nanomaterials due to their sol-gel active moieties via self-assembly in solution or in bulk. Such nano-objects and nanomaterials have great potential in biomedicine as nanocarriers or scaffolds for bone regeneration as well as in materials science as Pickering emulsifiers, photonic crystals or coatings/films with antibiofouling, antibacterial or water- and oil-repellent properties. Thus, this Review outlines recent synthetic efforts in the preparation of these hybrid inorganic/organic block copolymers, gives an overview of their self-assembled structures and finally presents recent examples of their use in the biomedical field and material science. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. On the stability of silicon field effect capacitors with phosphate buffered saline electrolytic gate and self assembled monolayer gate insulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hemed, Nofar Mintz; Inberg, Alexandra; Shacham-Diamand, Yosi

    2013-01-01

    We herein report on the stability of Electrolyte/Insulator/Semiconductor (EIS) devices with Self-Assembled Monolayer (SAM) gate insulator layers, i.e. Electrolyte/SAM/Semiconductor (ESS) devices. ESS devices can be functionalized creating highly specific sensors that can be integrated on standard silicon platform. However, biosensors by their nature are in contact with biological solutions that contain ions and molecules that may affect the device characteristics and cause electrical instability. In this paper we present a list of potential hazards to ESS devices and a study of the device stability under common testing conditions analyzing possible causes for the instabilities. ESS capacitors under open circuit conditions (i.e. open circuit bias of ∼0.6 V vs. Ag/AgCl reference electrode) were periodically characterized. We measured the complex impedance of the capacitors versus bias and extracted the effective capacitance vs. voltage (C–V) curves using two methods. We observed a parallel shift of the C–V curves toward negative bias; showing an effective accumulation of positive charge. The quantitative analysis of the drift vs. time was found to depend on the effective capacitance evaluation method. This effect is discussed and a best-known method is proposed. The devices surface composition was tested before and after the stress experiment by X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) and sodium accumulation was observed. To further explore the flat-band voltage drift effect and to challenge the assumption that alkali ions are involved in the drift we conceived a novel alkali-free phosphate buffer saline (AF-PBS) where the sodium and potassium ions are replaced by ammonium ion and tested the capacitor under similar conditions to standard PBS. We found that the drift of the AF-PBS solution was much less at the first hour but was similar to that of the conventional PBS for longer stress times; hence, AF-PBS does not solve the long-term instability problem

  9. Azeotropic binary solvent mixtures for preparation of organic single crystals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Li, X.; Kjellander, B.K.C.; Anthony, J.E.; Bastiaansen, C.W.M.; Broer, D.J.; Gelinck, G.H.

    2009-01-01

    Here, a new approach is introduced to prepare large single crystals of π-conjugated organic molecules from solution. Utilizing the concept of azeotropism, single crystals of tri-isopropylsilylethynyl pentacene (TIPS-PEN) with dimensions up to millimeters are facilely self-assembled from homogeneous

  10. Azeotropic binary solvent mixtures for preparation of organic single crystals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Li, X.; Kjellander, B.K.C.; Anthony, J.E.; Bastiaansen, C.W.M.; Broer, D.J.; Gelinck, G.H.

    2009-01-01

    Here, a new approach is introduced to prepare large single crystals of p-conjugated organic molecules from solution. Utilizing the concept of azeotropism, single crystals of tri-isopropylsilylethynyl pentacene (TIPS-PEN) with dimensions up to millimeters are facilely self-assembled from homogeneous

  11. Insitu synthesis of self-assembled gold nanoparticles on glass or silicon substrates through reactive inkjet printing

    KAUST Repository

    Abulikemu, Mutalifu; Da'As, Eman Husni; Haverinen, Hanna M.; Cha, Dong Kyu; Malik, Mohammad A.; Jabbour, Ghassan Elie

    2013-01-01

    A facile and low cost method for the synthesis of self-assembled nanoparticles (NPs) with minimal size variation and chemical waste by using reactive inkjet printing was developed. Gold NPs with diameters as small as (8±2)nm can be made at low

  12. Linear self-assembly and grafting of gold nanorods into arrayed micrometer-long nanowires on a silicon wafer via a combined top-down/bottom-up approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lestini, Elena; Andrei, Codrin; Zerulla, Dominic

    2018-01-01

    Macroscopically long wire-like arrangements of gold nanoparticles were obtained by controlled evaporation and partial coalescence of an aqueous colloidal solution of capped CTAB-Au nanorods onto a functionalised 3-mercaptopropyl trimethoxysilane (MPTMS) silicon substrate, using a removable, silicon wafer with a hydrophobic surface that serves as a "handrail" for the initial nanorods' linear self-assembly. The wire-like structures display a quasi-continuous pattern by thermal annealing of the gold nanorods when the solvent (i.e. water) is evaporated at temperatures rising from 20°C to 140°C. Formation of both single and self-replicating parallel 1D-superstructures consisting of two or even three wires is observed and explained under such conditions.

  13. Modelling of heating and photoexcitation of single-crystal silicon under multipulse irradiation by a nanosecond laser at 1.06 μm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polyakov, D. S.; Yakovlev, E. B.

    2018-03-01

    We report a theoretical study of heating and photoexcitation of single-crystal silicon by nanosecond laser radiation at a wavelength of 1.06 μm. The proposed physicomathematical model of heating takes into account the complex nonlinear dynamics of the interband absorption coefficient of silicon and the contribution of the radial heat removal to the cooling of silicon between pulses under multipulse irradiation, which allows one to obtain a satisfactory agreement between theoretical predictions of silicon melting thresholds at different nanosecond pulse durations and experimental data (both under single-pulse and multipulse irradiation). It is found that under irradiation by nanosecond pulses at a wavelength of 1.06 μm, the dynamic Burshtein–Moss effect can play an important role in processes of photoexcitation and heating. It is shown that with the regimes typical for laser multipulse microprocessing of silicon (the laser spot diameter is less than 100 μm, and the repetition rate of pulses is about 100 kHz), the radial heat removal cannot be neglected in the analysis of heat accumulation processes.

  14. High-Q energy trapping of temperature-stable shear waves with Lamé cross-sectional polarization in a single crystal silicon waveguide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabrizian, R.; Daruwalla, A.; Ayazi, F.

    2016-03-01

    A multi-port electrostatically driven silicon acoustic cavity is implemented that efficiently traps the energy of a temperature-stable eigen-mode with Lamé cross-sectional polarization. Dispersive behavior of propagating and evanescent guided waves in a ⟨100⟩-aligned single crystal silicon waveguide is used to engineer the acoustic energy distribution of a specific shear eigen-mode that is well known for its low temperature sensitivity when implemented in doped single crystal silicon. Such an acoustic energy trapping in the central region of the acoustic cavity geometry and far from substrate obviates the need for narrow tethers that are conventionally used for non-destructive and high quality factor (Q) energy suspension in MEMS resonators; therefore, the acoustically engineered waveguide can simultaneously serve as in-situ self-oven by passing large uniformly distributed DC currents through its body and without any concern about perturbing the mode shape or deforming narrow supports. Such a stable thermo-structural performance besides large turnover temperatures than can be realized in Lamé eigen-modes make this device suitable for implementation of ultra-stable oven-controlled oscillators. 78 MHz prototypes implemented in arsenic-doped single crystal silicon substrates with different resistivity are transduced by in- and out-of-plane narrow-gap capacitive ports, showing high Q of ˜43k. The low resistivity device shows an overall temperature-induced frequency drift of 200 ppm over the range of -20 °C to 80 °C, which is ˜15× smaller compared to overall frequency drift measured for the similar yet high resistivity device in the same temperature range. Furthermore, a frequency tuning of ˜2100 ppm is achieved in high resistivity device by passing 45 mA DC current through its body. Continuous operation of the device under such a self-ovenizing current over 10 days did not induce frequency instability or degradation in Q.

  15. AFM investigation of effect of absorbed water layer structure on growth mechanism of octadecyltrichlorosilane self-assembled monolayer on oxidized silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Shaowei; Zheng, Yanjun; Chen, Changfeng

    2016-01-01

    The growth mechanism of an octadecyltrichlorosilane (OTS) self-assembled monolayer on a silicon oxide surface at various relative humidities has been investigated. Atomic force microscopy images show that excess water may actually hinder the nucleation and growth of OTS islands. A moderate amount of water is favorable for the nucleation and growth of OTS islands in the initial stage; however, the completion of the monolayer is very slow in the final stage. The growth of OTS islands on a low-water-content surface maintains a relatively constant speed and requires the least amount of time. The mobility of water molecules is thought to play an important role in the OTS monolayers, and a low-mobility water layer provides a steady condition for OTS monolayer growth.

  16. A Facile Method for Detection of Substituted Salicylic Acids Using Pyrenesulfonamide-Terminated Self-Assembled Monolayers on Silicon Oxide Surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Gyeongyeop; Choi, Jaehyuck; Lee, Jungkyu; Kumar, Ashwani; Lee, Ju-Young; Kim, Hong-Seok [Kyungpook Nation al University, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    We have developed a method for sensing substituted salicylic acids on silicon oxide surfaces. The receptor molecule was successfully immobilized onto the surface by self-assembly, and, as a demonstration, micropatterns of substituted salicylic acids were generated by soft lithography techniques. We believe that this approach used herein will not only widen the understanding of the specific interactions between salicylic acids and pyrenesulfonamide derivatives, but also be applicable to practical devices such as chemo/bio analytical sensors. We have successfully demonstrated the molecular recognition between salicylic acids and pyrene derivatives in solution by fluorescence measurement. Briefly, selective recognition was achieved using intermolecular interactions, including π-π interactions and multi-hydrogen bonds, and intramolecular hydrogen bonding between the phenolic O-H group and the adjacent C=O group.

  17. A Facile Method for Detection of Substituted Salicylic Acids Using Pyrenesulfonamide-Terminated Self-Assembled Monolayers on Silicon Oxide Surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, Gyeongyeop; Choi, Jaehyuck; Lee, Jungkyu; Kumar, Ashwani; Lee, Ju-Young; Kim, Hong-Seok

    2016-01-01

    We have developed a method for sensing substituted salicylic acids on silicon oxide surfaces. The receptor molecule was successfully immobilized onto the surface by self-assembly, and, as a demonstration, micropatterns of substituted salicylic acids were generated by soft lithography techniques. We believe that this approach used herein will not only widen the understanding of the specific interactions between salicylic acids and pyrenesulfonamide derivatives, but also be applicable to practical devices such as chemo/bio analytical sensors. We have successfully demonstrated the molecular recognition between salicylic acids and pyrene derivatives in solution by fluorescence measurement. Briefly, selective recognition was achieved using intermolecular interactions, including π-π interactions and multi-hydrogen bonds, and intramolecular hydrogen bonding between the phenolic O-H group and the adjacent C=O group

  18. Electron transport through rectifying self-assembled monolayer diodes on silicon: Fermi-level pinning at the molecule-metal interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenfant, S; Guerin, D; Tran Van, F; Chevrot, C; Palacin, S; Bourgoin, J P; Bouloussa, O; Rondelez, F; Vuillaume, D

    2006-07-20

    We report the synthesis and characterization of molecular rectifying diodes on silicon using sequential grafting of self-assembled monolayers of alkyl chains bearing a pi group at their outer end (Si/sigma-pi/metal junctions). We investigate the structure-performance relationships of these molecular devices, and we examine the extent to which the nature of the pi end group (change in the energy position of their molecular orbitals) drives the properties of these molecular diodes. Self-assembled monolayers of alkyl chains (different chain lengths from 6 to 15 methylene groups) functionalized by phenyl, anthracene, pyrene, ethylene dioxythiophene, ethylene dioxyphenyl, thiophene, terthiophene, and quaterthiophene were synthesized and characterized by contact angle measurements, ellipsometry, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and atomic force microscopy. We demonstrate that reasonably well-packed monolayers are obtained in all cases. Their electrical properties were assessed by dc current-voltage characteristics and high-frequency (1-MHz) capacitance measurements. For all of the pi groups investigated here, we observed rectification behavior. These results extend our preliminary work using phenyl and thiophene groups (Lenfant et al., Nano Lett. 2003, 3, 741). The experimental current-voltage curves were analyzed with a simple analytical model, from which we extracted the energy position of the molecular orbital of the pi group in resonance with the Fermi energy of the electrodes. We report experimental studies of the band lineup in these silicon/alkyl pi-conjugated molecule/metal junctions. We conclude that Fermi-level pinning at the pi group/metal interface is mainly responsible for the observed absence of a dependence of the rectification effect on the nature of the pi groups, even though the groups examined were selected to have significant variations in their electronic molecular orbitals.

  19. Single-crystal-like GdNdO{sub x} thin films on silicon substrates by magnetron sputtering and high-temperature annealing for crystal seed layer application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Ziwei; Xiao, Lei; Liang, Renrong, E-mail: wang-j@tsinghua.edu.cn, E-mail: liangrr@tsinghua.edu.cn; Shen, Shanshan; Xu, Jun; Wang, Jing, E-mail: wang-j@tsinghua.edu.cn, E-mail: liangrr@tsinghua.edu.cn [Tsinghua National Laboratory for Information Science and Technology, Institute of Microelectronics, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)

    2016-06-15

    Single-crystal-like rare earth oxide thin films on silicon (Si) substrates were fabricated by magnetron sputtering and high-temperature annealing processes. A 30-nm-thick high-quality GdNdO{sub x} (GNO) film was deposited using a high-temperature sputtering process at 500°C. A Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3} and Nd{sub 2}O{sub 3} mixture was used as the sputtering target, in which the proportions of Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3} and Nd{sub 2}O{sub 3} were controlled to make the GNO’s lattice parameter match that of the Si substrate. To further improve the quality of the GNO film, a post-deposition annealing process was performed at a temperature of 1000°C. The GNO films exhibited a strong preferred orientation on the Si substrate. In addition, an Al/GNO/Si capacitor was fabricated to evaluate the dielectric constant and leakage current of the GNO films. It was determined that the single-crystal-like GNO films on the Si substrates have potential for use as an insulator layer for semiconductor-on-insulator and semiconductor/insulator multilayer applications.

  20. Single-crystal-like GdNdOx thin films on silicon substrates by magnetron sputtering and high-temperature annealing for crystal seed layer application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ziwei Wang

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Single-crystal-like rare earth oxide thin films on silicon (Si substrates were fabricated by magnetron sputtering and high-temperature annealing processes. A 30-nm-thick high-quality GdNdOx (GNO film was deposited using a high-temperature sputtering process at 500°C. A Gd2O3 and Nd2O3 mixture was used as the sputtering target, in which the proportions of Gd2O3 and Nd2O3 were controlled to make the GNO’s lattice parameter match that of the Si substrate. To further improve the quality of the GNO film, a post-deposition annealing process was performed at a temperature of 1000°C. The GNO films exhibited a strong preferred orientation on the Si substrate. In addition, an Al/GNO/Si capacitor was fabricated to evaluate the dielectric constant and leakage current of the GNO films. It was determined that the single-crystal-like GNO films on the Si substrates have potential for use as an insulator layer for semiconductor-on-insulator and semiconductor/insulator multilayer applications.

  1. High-Performance Flexible Thin-Film Transistors Based on Single-Crystal-like Silicon Epitaxially Grown on Metal Tape by Roll-to-Roll Continuous Deposition Process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Ying; Asadirad, Mojtaba; Yao, Yao; Dutta, Pavel; Galstyan, Eduard; Shervin, Shahab; Lee, Keon-Hwa; Pouladi, Sara; Sun, Sicong; Li, Yongkuan; Rathi, Monika; Ryou, Jae-Hyun; Selvamanickam, Venkat

    2016-11-02

    Single-crystal-like silicon (Si) thin films on bendable and scalable substrates via direct deposition are a promising material platform for high-performance and cost-effective devices of flexible electronics. However, due to the thick and unintentionally highly doped semiconductor layer, the operation of transistors has been hampered. We report the first demonstration of high-performance flexible thin-film transistors (TFTs) using single-crystal-like Si thin films with a field-effect mobility of ∼200 cm 2 /V·s and saturation current, I/l W > 50 μA/μm, which are orders-of-magnitude higher than the device characteristics of conventional flexible TFTs. The Si thin films with a (001) plane grown on a metal tape by a "seed and epitaxy" technique show nearly single-crystalline properties characterized by X-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy, reflection high-energy electron diffraction, and transmission electron microscopy. The realization of flexible and high-performance Si TFTs can establish a new pathway for extended applications of flexible electronics such as amplification and digital circuits, more than currently dominant display switches.

  2. Insitu synthesis of self-assembled gold nanoparticles on glass or silicon substrates through reactive inkjet printing

    KAUST Repository

    Abulikemu, Mutalifu

    2013-12-18

    A facile and low cost method for the synthesis of self-assembled nanoparticles (NPs) with minimal size variation and chemical waste by using reactive inkjet printing was developed. Gold NPs with diameters as small as (8±2)nm can be made at low temperature (120 °C). The size of the resulting NPs can be readily controlled through the concentration of the gold precursor and oleylamine ink. The pure gold composition of the synthesized NPs was confirmed by energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDXS) analysis. High-resolution SEM (HRSEM) and TEM (HRTEM), and X-ray diffraction revealed their size and face-centered cubic (fcc) crystal structure, respectively. Owing to the high density of the NP film, UV/Vis spectroscopy showed a red shift in the intrinsic plasmonic resonance peak. We envision the extension of this approach to the synthesis of other nanomaterials and the production of tailored functional nanomaterials and devices. Midas touch: The use of low-cost manufacturing approaches in the synthesis of nanoparticles is critical for many applications. Reactive inkjet printing, along with a judicious choice of precursor/solvent system, was used to synthesize a relatively uniform assembly of crystalline gold nanoparticles, with diameters as small as (8±2)nm, over a given substrate surface. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH.

  3. Analysis of polytype stability in PVT grown silicon carbide single crystal using competitive lattice model Monte Carlo simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui-Jun Guo

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Polytype stability is very important for high quality SiC single crystal growth. However, the growth conditions for the 4H, 6H and 15R polytypes are similar, and the mechanism of polytype stability is not clear. The kinetics aspects, such as surface-step nucleation, are important. The kinetic Monte Carlo method is a common tool to study surface kinetics in crystal growth. However, the present lattice models for kinetic Monte Carlo simulations cannot solve the problem of the competitive growth of two or more lattice structures. In this study, a competitive lattice model was developed for kinetic Monte Carlo simulation of the competition growth of the 4H and 6H polytypes of SiC. The site positions are fixed at the perfect crystal lattice positions without any adjustment of the site positions. Surface steps on seeds and large ratios of diffusion/deposition have positive effects on the 4H polytype stability. The 3D polytype distribution in a physical vapor transport method grown SiC ingot showed that the facet preserved the 4H polytype even if the 6H polytype dominated the growth surface. The theoretical and experimental results of polytype growth in SiC suggest that retaining the step growth mode is an important factor to maintain a stable single 4H polytype during SiC growth.

  4. Manipulation of extinction spectra of P3HT/PMMA medium arrays on silicon substrate containing self-assembled gold nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Ming-Chung; Chen, Shih-Wen; Li, Jia-Han; Chou, Yi; Lin, Jhih-Fong; Chen, Yang-Fang; Su, Wei-Fang

    2012-01-01

    In this study, we report a simple novel approach to modulate the extinction spectra of P3HT/PMMA by manipulating the medium arrays on a substrate that is coated with self-assembled gold nanoparticles. The 20 nm gold nanoparticles were synthesized and then self-assembled on the APTMS/silicon substrate surface by immersing the substrate into the gold colloid suspension. A high-resolution P3HT/PMMA photoluminescent electron beam resist was used to fabricate various square hole arrays on the substrate containing gold nanoparticles. The P3HT/PMMA medium composition causes the blue shifts in the extinction peaks of up to 40.6 nm by decreasing the period from 500 nm to 200 nm for P3HT/PMMA square hole arrays with a diameter of 100 nm. The magnitude of blue shift is directly proportional to the product of the changes of medium refractive index and the array structure factor. These peak shifts and intensity of extinction spectra for various P3HT/PMMA medium arrays are well described by the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) simulation results. Since this simple cost-effective technique can tune the extinction spectrum of medium and adding the gold nanoparticles can give more functionalities for sensing applications, such as surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS), that provides good opportunities for the design and fabrication of new optoelectronic devices and sensors. Highlights: ► We can tune the extinction spectra of P3HT/PMMA by manipulating the medium arrays. ► These optical behaviors of P3HT/PMMA medium arrays are well described by FDTD simulation results. ► Adding the Au nanoparticles can give more functionalities for sensing applications.

  5. Manipulation of extinction spectra of P3HT/PMMA medium arrays on silicon substrate containing self-assembled gold nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Ming-Chung [Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, Chang Gung University, Taoyuan 333-02, Taiwan (China); Chen, Shih-Wen; Li, Jia-Han [Department of Engineering Science and Ocean Engineering, National Taiwan University, Taipei 106-17, Taiwan (China); Chou, Yi; Lin, Jhih-Fong [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Taiwan University, Taipei 106-17, Taiwan (China); Chen, Yang-Fang [Department of Physics, National Taiwan University, Taipei 106-17, Taiwan (China); Su, Wei-Fang, E-mail: suwf@ntu.edu.tw [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Taiwan University, Taipei 106-17, Taiwan (China)

    2012-11-15

    In this study, we report a simple novel approach to modulate the extinction spectra of P3HT/PMMA by manipulating the medium arrays on a substrate that is coated with self-assembled gold nanoparticles. The 20 nm gold nanoparticles were synthesized and then self-assembled on the APTMS/silicon substrate surface by immersing the substrate into the gold colloid suspension. A high-resolution P3HT/PMMA photoluminescent electron beam resist was used to fabricate various square hole arrays on the substrate containing gold nanoparticles. The P3HT/PMMA medium composition causes the blue shifts in the extinction peaks of up to 40.6 nm by decreasing the period from 500 nm to 200 nm for P3HT/PMMA square hole arrays with a diameter of 100 nm. The magnitude of blue shift is directly proportional to the product of the changes of medium refractive index and the array structure factor. These peak shifts and intensity of extinction spectra for various P3HT/PMMA medium arrays are well described by the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) simulation results. Since this simple cost-effective technique can tune the extinction spectrum of medium and adding the gold nanoparticles can give more functionalities for sensing applications, such as surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS), that provides good opportunities for the design and fabrication of new optoelectronic devices and sensors. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We can tune the extinction spectra of P3HT/PMMA by manipulating the medium arrays. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer These optical behaviors of P3HT/PMMA medium arrays are well described by FDTD simulation results. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Adding the Au nanoparticles can give more functionalities for sensing applications.

  6. Monte Carlo calculation of energy loss of hydrogen and helium ions transmitted under channelling conditions in silicon single crystal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El Bounagui, O.; Erramli, H.

    2010-01-01

    In this work, we report on calculations of the electronic channelling energy loss of hydrogen and helium ions along Si and Si axial directions for the low energy range by using the Monte Carlo simulation code. Simulated and experimental data are compared for protons and He ions in the and axis of silicon. A reasonable agreement was found. Computer simulation was also employed to study the angular dependence of energy loss for 0.5, 0.8, 1, and 2 MeV channelled 4 He ions transmitted through a silicon crystal of 3 μm thickness along the axis.

  7. Self-assembled thin film of imidazolium ionic liquid on a silicon surface: Low friction and remarkable wear-resistivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gusain, Rashi; Kokufu, Sho; Bakshi, Paramjeet S.; Utsunomiya, Toru; Ichii, Takashi; Sugimura, Hiroyuki; Khatri, Om P.

    2016-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Ionic liquid thin film is deposited on a silicon surface via covalent interaction. • Chemical and morphological features of ionic liquid thin film are probed by XPS and AFM. • Ionic liquid thin film exhibited low and steady friction along with remarkable wear-resistivity. - Abstract: Imidazolium-hexafluorophosphate (ImPF_6) ionic liquid thin film is prepared on a silicon surface using 3-chloropropyltrimethoxysilane as a bifunctional chemical linker. XPS result revealed the covalent grafting of ImPF_6 thin film on a silicon surface. The atomic force microscopic images demonstrated that the ImPF_6 thin film is composed of nanoscopic pads/clusters with height of 3–7 nm. Microtribological properties in terms of coefficient of friction and wear-resistivity are probed at the mean Hertzian contact pressure of 0.35–0.6 GPa under the rotational sliding contact. The ImPF_6 thin film exhibited low and steady coefficient of friction (μ = 0.11) along with remarkable wear-resistivity to protect the underlying silicon substrate. The low shear strength of ImPF_6 thin film, the covalent interaction between ImPF_6 ionic liquid thin film and underlying silicon substrate, and its regular grafting collectively reduced the friction and improved the anti-wear property. The covalently grafted ionic liquid thin film further shows immense potential to expand the durability and lifetime of M/NEMS based devices with significant reduction of the friction.

  8. Efficient self-assembly of DNA-functionalized fluorophores and gold nanoparticles with DNA functionalized silicon surfaces: the effect of oligomer spacers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milton, James A.; Patole, Samson; Yin, Huabing; Xiao, Qiang; Brown, Tom; Melvin, Tracy

    2013-01-01

    Although strategies for the immobilization of DNA oligonucleotides onto surfaces for bioanalytical and top-down bio-inspired nanobiofabrication approaches are well developed, the effect of introducing spacer molecules between the surface and the DNA oligonucleotide for the hybridization of nanoparticle–DNA conjugates has not been previously assessed in a quantitative manner. The hybridization efficiency of DNA oligonucleotides end-labelled with gold nanoparticles (1.4 or 10 nm diameter) with DNA sequences conjugated to silicon surfaces via hexaethylene glycol phosphate diester oligomer spacers (0, 1, 2, 6 oligomers) was found to be independent of spacer length. To quantify both the density of DNA strands attached to the surfaces and hybridization with the surface-attached DNA, new methodologies have been developed. Firstly, a simple approach based on fluorescence has been developed for determination of the immobilization density of DNA oligonucleotides. Secondly, an approach using mass spectrometry has been created to establish (i) the mean number of DNA oligonucleotides attached to the gold nanoparticles and (ii) the hybridization density of nanoparticle–oligonucleotide conjugates with the silicon surface–attached complementary sequence. These methods and results will be useful for application with nanosensors, the self-assembly of nanoelectronic devices and the attachment of nanoparticles to biomolecules for single-molecule biophysical studies. PMID:23361467

  9. Self-assembled thin film of imidazolium ionic liquid on a silicon surface: Low friction and remarkable wear-resistivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gusain, Rashi [CSIR-Indian Institute of Petroleum, Mohkampur, Dehardun 248005 (India); Academy of Scientific and Innovative Research, New Delhi 110025 (India); Kokufu, Sho [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8501 (Japan); Bakshi, Paramjeet S. [CSIR-Indian Institute of Petroleum, Mohkampur, Dehardun 248005 (India); Utsunomiya, Toru; Ichii, Takashi; Sugimura, Hiroyuki [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8501 (Japan); Khatri, Om P., E-mail: opkhatri@iip.res.in [CSIR-Indian Institute of Petroleum, Mohkampur, Dehardun 248005 (India); Academy of Scientific and Innovative Research, New Delhi 110025 (India)

    2016-02-28

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Ionic liquid thin film is deposited on a silicon surface via covalent interaction. • Chemical and morphological features of ionic liquid thin film are probed by XPS and AFM. • Ionic liquid thin film exhibited low and steady friction along with remarkable wear-resistivity. - Abstract: Imidazolium-hexafluorophosphate (ImPF{sub 6}) ionic liquid thin film is prepared on a silicon surface using 3-chloropropyltrimethoxysilane as a bifunctional chemical linker. XPS result revealed the covalent grafting of ImPF{sub 6} thin film on a silicon surface. The atomic force microscopic images demonstrated that the ImPF{sub 6} thin film is composed of nanoscopic pads/clusters with height of 3–7 nm. Microtribological properties in terms of coefficient of friction and wear-resistivity are probed at the mean Hertzian contact pressure of 0.35–0.6 GPa under the rotational sliding contact. The ImPF{sub 6} thin film exhibited low and steady coefficient of friction (μ = 0.11) along with remarkable wear-resistivity to protect the underlying silicon substrate. The low shear strength of ImPF{sub 6} thin film, the covalent interaction between ImPF{sub 6} ionic liquid thin film and underlying silicon substrate, and its regular grafting collectively reduced the friction and improved the anti-wear property. The covalently grafted ionic liquid thin film further shows immense potential to expand the durability and lifetime of M/NEMS based devices with significant reduction of the friction.

  10. Sub-Micrometer Zeolite Films on Gold-Coated Silicon Wafers with Single-Crystal-Like Dielectric Constant and Elastic Modulus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tiriolo, Raffaele [Department of Medical and Surgical Sciences, University Magna Graecia of Catanzaro, Viale Europa 88100 Catanzaro Italy; Rangnekar, Neel [Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, University of Minnesota, 421 Washington Ave SE Minneapolis MN 55455 USA; Zhang, Han [Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, University of Minnesota, 421 Washington Ave SE Minneapolis MN 55455 USA; Shete, Meera [Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, University of Minnesota, 421 Washington Ave SE Minneapolis MN 55455 USA; Bai, Peng [Department of Chemistry and Chemistry Theory Center, University of Minnesota, 207 Pleasant St SE Minneapolis MN 55455 USA; Nelson, John [Characterization Facility, University of Minnesota, 12 Shepherd Labs, 100 Union St. S.E. Minneapolis MN 55455 USA; Karapetrova, Evguenia [Surface Scattering and Microdiffraction, X-ray Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 S. Cass Ave, Building 438-D002 Argonne IL 60439 USA; Macosko, Christopher W. [Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, University of Minnesota, 421 Washington Ave SE Minneapolis MN 55455 USA; Siepmann, Joern Ilja [Department of Chemistry and Chemistry Theory Center, University of Minnesota, 207 Pleasant St SE Minneapolis MN 55455 USA; Lamanna, Ernesto [Department of Health Sciences, University Magna Graecia of Catanzaro, Viale Europa 88100 Catanzaro Italy; Lavano, Angelo [Department of Medical and Surgical Sciences, University Magna Graecia of Catanzaro, Viale Europa 88100 Catanzaro Italy; Tsapatsis, Michael [Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, University of Minnesota, 421 Washington Ave SE Minneapolis MN 55455 USA

    2017-05-08

    A low-temperature synthesis coupled with mild activation produces zeolite films exhibiting low dielectric constant (low-k) matching the theoretically predicted and experimentally measured values for single crystals. This synthesis and activation method allows for the fabrication of a device consisting of a b-oriented film of the pure-silica zeolite MFI (silicalite-1) supported on a gold-coated silicon wafer. The zeolite seeds are assembled by a manual assembly process and subjected to optimized secondary growth conditions that do not cause corrosion of the gold underlayer, while strongly promoting in-plane growth. The traditional calcination process is replaced with a non-thermal photochemical activation to ensure preservation of an intact gold layer. The dielectric constant (k), obtained through measurement of electrical capacitance in a metal-insulator-metal configuration, highlights the ultralow k approximate to 1.7 of the synthetized films, which is among the lowest values reported for an MFI film. There is large improvement in elastic modulus of the film (E approximate to 54 GPa) over previous reports, potentially allowing for integration into silicon wafer processing technology.

  11. Self-assembled monolayer resists and nanoscale lithography of silicon dioxide thin films by chemically enhanced vapor etching (CEVE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, M.; Yun, M.; Kozicki, M. N.; Whidden, T. K.

    1996-10-01

    We report on the use of electron-beam exposed monolayers of undecylenic acid in the etch rate enhancement of silicon dioxide films in HF vapor for the formation of nanoscale features in the oxide. Variations of the etching characteristics with electron beam parameters are examined and the results analyzed in terms of proposed models of the etching mechanism. Apparent variations in the relative concentrations of etch initiator with the thermal history of the samples prior to etching provides support for the dominant etch initiator within this system as the carboxylic acid moiety bound at the oxide surface. Other variations in the etching characteristics are discussed in terms of differences in localized concentrations of hydrocarbon crosslinks and the effect that this has upon the etch initiation. The process has been employed in the production of features in silicon dioxide surface masks with sizes down to 50 nm.

  12. Large aperture deformable mirror with a transferred single-crystal silicon membrane actuated using large-stroke PZT Unimorph Actuators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hishinumat, Yoshikazu; Yang, Eui - Hyeok (EH)

    2005-01-01

    We have demonstrated a large aperture (50 mm x 50 mm) continuous membrane deformable mirror (DM) with a large-stroke piezoelectric unimorph actuator array. The DM consists of a continuous, large aperture, silicon membrane 'transferred' in its entirety onto a 20 x 20 piezoelectric unimorph actuator array. A PZT unimorph actuator, 2.5 mm in diameter with optimized PZT/Si thickness and design showed a deflection of 5.7 [m at 20V. An assembled DM showed an operating frequency bandwidth of 30 kHz and influence function of approximately 30%.

  13. Fabrication of three-dimensional MIS nano-capacitor based on nano-imprinted single crystal silicon nanowire arrays

    KAUST Repository

    Zhai, Yujia; Palard, Marylene; Mathew, Leo; Hussain, Muhammad Mustafa; Willson, Grant Grant; Tutuc, Emanuel; Banerjee, Sanjay Kumar

    2012-01-01

    We report fabrication of single crystalline silicon nanowire based-three-dimensional MIS nano-capacitors for potential analog and mixed signal applications. The array of nanowires is patterned by Step and Flash Imprint Lithography (S-FIL). Deep silicon etching (DSE) is used to form the nanowires with high aspect ratio, increase the electrode area and thus significantly enhance the capacitance. High-! dielectric is deposited by highly conformal atomic layer deposition (ALD) Al2O3 over the Si nanowires, and sputtered metal TaN serves as the electrode. Electrical measurements of fabricated capacitors show the expected increase of capacitance with greater nanowire height and decreasing dielectric thickness, consistent with calculations. Leakage current and time-dependent dielectric breakdown (TDDB) are also measured and compared with planar MIS capacitors. In view of greater interest in 3D transistor architectures, such as FinFETs, 3D high density MIS capacitors offer an attractive device technology for analog and mixed signal applications. - See more at: http://www.eurekaselect.com/105099/article#sthash.EzeJxk6j.dpuf

  14. Fabrication of three-dimensional MIS nano-capacitor based on nano-imprinted single crystal silicon nanowire arrays

    KAUST Repository

    Zhai, Yujia

    2012-11-26

    We report fabrication of single crystalline silicon nanowire based-three-dimensional MIS nano-capacitors for potential analog and mixed signal applications. The array of nanowires is patterned by Step and Flash Imprint Lithography (S-FIL). Deep silicon etching (DSE) is used to form the nanowires with high aspect ratio, increase the electrode area and thus significantly enhance the capacitance. High-! dielectric is deposited by highly conformal atomic layer deposition (ALD) Al2O3 over the Si nanowires, and sputtered metal TaN serves as the electrode. Electrical measurements of fabricated capacitors show the expected increase of capacitance with greater nanowire height and decreasing dielectric thickness, consistent with calculations. Leakage current and time-dependent dielectric breakdown (TDDB) are also measured and compared with planar MIS capacitors. In view of greater interest in 3D transistor architectures, such as FinFETs, 3D high density MIS capacitors offer an attractive device technology for analog and mixed signal applications. - See more at: http://www.eurekaselect.com/105099/article#sthash.EzeJxk6j.dpuf

  15. Calibration of the apparent temperature of silicon single crystals as a function of their true temperature and their thickness as determined by infrared measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smither, R.K.; Fernandez, P.B.

    1993-09-01

    Viewing the surface of objects subjected to high heat fluxes with an infrared camera or infrared sensor has proved to be a very effective method for monitoring the magnitude and distribution of surface temperature on the object. This approach has been quite useful in studies of cooling silicon crystals in monochromators subject to high heat loads. The main drawback to this method is that single crystals of silicon are partially transparent to the infrared radiation monitored in most infrared cameras. This means that the infrared radiation emitted from the surface contains a component that comes from the interior of the crystal and that the intensity of the emitted radiation and thus the apparent temperature of the surface of the crystal depends on the thickness of the crystal and the kind of coating on the back (and/or the front) of the crystal. The apparent temperature of the crystal increases as the crystal is made thicker. A series of experiments were performed at Argonne National Laboratory to calibrate the apparent surface temperature of the crystal as measured with an infrared camera as a function of the crystal thickness and the type of coating (if any) on the back side of the crystal. A good reflecting surface on the back side of the crystal increases the apparent temperature of the crystal and simulates the response of a crystal twice the thickness. These measurements make it possible to interpret the infrared signals from cooled silicon crystals used in past high heat load experiments. A number of examples are given for data taken in synchrotron experiments with high intensity x-ray beams

  16. Memory Effect of Metal-Oxide-Silicon Capacitors with Self-Assembly Double-Layer Au Nanocrystals Embedded in Atomic-Layer-Deposited HfO2 Dielectric

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yue, Huang; Hong-Yan, Gou; Qing-Qing, Sun; Shi-Jin, Ding; Wei, Zhang; Shi-Li, Zhang

    2009-01-01

    We report the chemical self-assembly growth of Au nanocrystals on atomic-layer-deposited HfO 2 films aminosilanized by (3-Aminopropyl)-trimethoxysilane aforehand for memory applications. The resulting Au nanocrystals show a density of about 4 × 10 11 cm −2 and a diameter range of 5–8nm. The metal-oxide-silicon capacitor with double-layer Au nanocrystals embedded in HfO 2 dielectric exhibits a large C – V hysteresis window of 11.9V for ±11 V gate voltage sweeps at 1 MHz, a flat-band voltage shift of 1.5 V after the electrical stress under 7 V for 1 ms, a leakage current density of 2.9 × 10 −8 A/cm −2 at 9 V and room temperature. Compared to single-layer Au nanocrystals, the double-layer Au nanocrystals increase the hysteresis window significantly, and the underlying mechanism is thus discussed

  17. Stable silicon/3D porous N-doped graphene composite for lithium-ion battery anodes with self-assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Xiaofu; Wen, Guangwu; Song, Yan

    2018-04-01

    We fabricate a novel 3D N-doped graphene/silicon composite for lithium-ion battery anodes, with Si nanoparticles uniformly dispersed and thoroughly embedded in the N-doped graphene matrix. The favorable structure of the composite results in a BET surface area and an average mesopore diameter of 189.2 m2 g-1 and 3.82 nm, respectively. The composite delivers reversible capacities as high as 1132 mA h g-1 after 100 cycles under a current of 5 A g-1 and 1017 mA h g-1 after 200 cycles at 1 A g-1, and exhibits an improved rate capability. The present approach shows promise for the preparation of other high-performance anode materials for lithium-ion batteries.

  18. Effect of nanodimensional polyethylenimine layer on surface potential barriers of hybrid structures based on silicon single crystal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malyar, Ivan V.; Gorin, Dmitry A.; Stetsyura, Svetlana V.

    2013-01-01

    In this report we present the analysis of I-V curves for MIS-structures like silicon substrate / nanodimensional polyelectrolyte layer / metal probe (contact) which is promising for biosensors, microfluidic chips, different devices of molecular electronics, such as OLEDs, solar cells, where polyelectrolyte layers can be used to modify semiconductor surface. The research is directed to investigate the contact phenomena which influence the resulting signal of devices mentioned above. The comparison of I-V characteristics of such structures measured by scanning tunnel microscopy (contactless technique) and using contact areas deposited by thermal evaporation onto the organic layer (the contact one) was carried out. The photoassisted I-V measurements and complex analysis based on Simmons and Schottky models allow one to extract the potential barriers and to observe the changes of charge transport in MIS-structures under illumination and after polyelectrolyte adsorption. The direct correlation between the thickness of the deposited polyelectrolyte layer and both equilibrium tunnel barrier and Schottky barrier height was observed for hybrid structures with polyethylenimine. The possibility of control over the I-V curves of hybrid structure and the height of the potential barriers (for different charge transports) by illumination was confirmed. Based on experimental data and complex analysis the band diagrams were plotted which illustrate the changes of potential barriers for MIS-structures due to the polyelectrolyte adsorption and under the illumination.

  19. A simplified boron diffusion for preparing the silicon single crystal p-n junction as an educational device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shiota, Koki, E-mail: a14510@sr.kagawa-nct.ac.jp; Kai, Kazuho; Nagaoka, Shiro, E-mail: nagaoka@es.kagawa-nct.ac.jp [National Institute of Technology, Kagawa College, Kagawa, Mitoyo, Takuma, Koda 551 (Japan); Tsuji, Takuto [National Institute of Technology, Suzuka College, Mie, Suzuka, Shiroko (Japan); Wakahara, Akihiro [Toyohashi University of Technology, Aichi, Toyohashi, Tenpaku, Hibarigaoka 1-1 (Japan); Rusop, Mohamad [University Technology Mara, Selangor, Shah Alam, 40450 (Malaysia)

    2016-07-06

    The educational method which is including designing, making, and evaluating actual semiconductor devices with learning the theory is one of the best way to obtain the fundamental understanding of the device physics and to cultivate the ability to make unique ideas using the knowledge in the semiconductor device. In this paper, the simplified Boron thermal diffusion process using Sol-Gel material under normal air environment was proposed based on simple hypothesis and the feasibility of the reproducibility and reliability were investigated to simplify the diffusion process for making the educational devices, such as p-n junction, bipolar and pMOS devices. As the result, this method was successfully achieved making p+ region on the surface of the n-type silicon substrates with good reproducibility. And good rectification property of the p-n junctions was obtained successfully. This result indicates that there is a possibility to apply on the process making pMOS or bipolar transistors. It suggests that there is a variety of the possibility of the applications in the educational field to foster an imagination of new devices.

  20. Effect of substrate bias voltage on tensile properties of single crystal silicon microstructure fully coated with plasma CVD diamond-like carbon film

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wenlei; Hirai, Yoshikazu; Tsuchiya, Toshiyuki; Tabata, Osamu

    2018-06-01

    Tensile strength and strength distribution in a microstructure of single crystal silicon (SCS) were improved significantly by coating the surface with a diamond-like carbon (DLC) film. To explore the influence of coating parameters and the mechanism of film fracture, SCS microstructure surfaces (120 × 4 × 5 μm3) were fully coated by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) of a DLC at five different bias voltages. After the depositions, Raman spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), thermal desorption spectrometry (TDS), surface profilometry, atomic force microscope (AFM) measurement, and nanoindentation methods were used to study the chemical and mechanical properties of the deposited DLC films. Tensile test indicated that the average strength of coated samples was 13.2-29.6% higher than that of the SCS sample, and samples fabricated with a -400 V bias voltage were strongest. The fracture toughness of the DLC film was the dominant factor in the observed tensile strength. Deviations in strength were reduced with increasingly negative bias voltage. The effect of residual stress on the tensile properties is discussed in detail.

  1. Ferroelectrics onto silicon prepared by chemical solution deposition methods: from the thin film to the self-assembled systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Calzada, M. L.

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available The work of the authors during the last years on ferroelectric thin and ultra-thin films deposited by Chemical Solution Deposition (CSD onto silicon based substrates is reviewed in this paper. Ferroelectric layers integrated with silicon substrates have potential use in the new micro/nanoelectronic devices. Two hot issues are here considered: 1 the use of low processing temperatures of the ferroelectric film, with the objective of not producing any damage on the different elements of the device heterostructure, and 2 the downscaling of the ferroelectric material with the aim of achieving the high densities of integration required in the next generation of nanoelectronic devices. The UV-assisted Rapid Thermal Processing has successfully been used in our laboratory for the fabrication of ferroelectric films at low temperatures. Preliminary results on the CSD preparation of nanosized ferroelectric structures are shown.

    Este artículo revisa el trabajo realizado por los autores durante los últimos años sobre lámina delgada y ultra-delgada ferroeléctrica preparada mediante el depósito químico de disoluciones (CSD sobre substratos de silicio. Las películas ferroeléctricas integradas con silicio tienen potenciales usos en los nuevos dispositivos micro/nanoelectrónicos. Dos aspectos claves son aquí considerados: 1 el uso de bajas temperaturas de procesado de la lámina ferroeléctrica, con el fin de no dañar los diferentes elementos que forman la heteroestructura del dispositivo y 2 la disminución de tamaño del material ferroeléctrico con el fin de conseguir las altas densidades de integración requeridas en la próxima generación de dispositivos nanoelectróncos. Los procesos térmicos rápidos asistidos con irradiación UV se están usando en nuestro laboratorio para conseguir la fabricación del material ferroeléctrico a temperaturas bajas compatibles con la tecnología del silicio. Se muestran resultados preliminares sobre

  2. Fluorescent Self-Assembled Polyphenylene Dendrimer Nanofibers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liu, Daojun; Feyter, Steven De; Cotlet, Mircea; Wiesler, Uwe-Martin; Weil, Tanja; Herrmann, Andreas; Müllen, Klaus; Schryver, Frans C. De

    2003-01-01

    A second-generation polyphenylene dendrimer 1 self-assembles into nanofibers on various substrates such as HOPG, silicon, glass, and mica from different solvents. The investigation with noncontact atomic force microscopy (NCAFM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) shows that the morphology of the

  3. Self-assembled nanostructures

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Jin Z; Liu, Jun; Chen, Shaowei; Liu, Gang-yu

    2003-01-01

    Nanostructures refer to materials that have relevant dimensions on the nanometer length scales and reside in the mesoscopic regime between isolated atoms and molecules in bulk matter. These materials have unique physical properties that are distinctly different from bulk materials. Self-Assembled Nanostructures provides systematic coverage of basic nanomaterials science including materials assembly and synthesis, characterization, and application. Suitable for both beginners and experts, it balances the chemistry aspects of nanomaterials with physical principles. It also highlights nanomaterial-based architectures including assembled or self-assembled systems. Filled with in-depth discussion of important applications of nano-architectures as well as potential applications ranging from physical to chemical and biological systems, Self-Assembled Nanostructures is the essential reference or text for scientists involved with nanostructures.

  4. Macroscopic magnetic Self assembly

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Löthman, Per Arvid

    2018-01-01

    Exploring the macroscopic scale's similarities to the microscale is part and parcel of this thesis as reflected in the research question: what can we learn about the microscopic scale by studying the macroscale? Investigations of the environment in which the self-assembly takes place, and the

  5. Modelling Polar Self Assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olvera de La Cruz, Monica; Sayar, Mehmet; Solis, Francisco J.; Stupp, Samuel I.

    2001-03-01

    Recent experimental studies in our group have shown that self assembled thin films of noncentrosymmetric supramolecular objects composed of triblock rodcoil molecules exhibit finite polar order. These aggregates have both long range dipolar and short range Ising-like interactions. We study the ground state of a simple model with these competing interactions. We find that the competition between Ising-like and dipolar forces yield a periodic domain structure, which can be controlled by adjusting the force constants and film thickness. When the surface forces are included in the potential, the system exhibits a finite macroscopic polar order.

  6. Czochralski method of growing single crystals. State-of-art

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bukowski, A.; Zabierowski, P.

    1999-01-01

    Modern Czochralski method of single crystal growing has been described. The example of Czochralski process is given. The advantages that caused the rapid progress of the method have been presented. The method limitations that motivated the further research and new solutions are also presented. As the example two different ways of the technique development has been described: silicon single crystals growth in the magnetic field; continuous liquid feed of silicon crystals growth. (author)

  7. Preparation and Investigation of the Microtribological Properties of Graphene Oxide and Graphene Films via Electrostatic Layer-by-Layer Self-Assembly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongshou Hu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Graphene oxide (GO films with controlled layers, deposited on single-crystal silicon substrates, were prepared by electrostatic self-assembly of negatively charged GO sheets. Afterward, graphene films were prepared by liquid-phase reduction of as-prepared GO films using hydrazine hydrate. The microstructures and microtribological properties of the samples were studied using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, UV-vis absorption spectroscopy, water contact angle measurement, and atomic force microscopy. It is found that, whether GO films or graphene films, the adhesion force and the coefficients of friction both show strong dependence on the number of self-assembled layers, which both allow a downward trend as the number of self-assembled layers increases due to the interlayer sliding and the puckering effect when the tip slipped across the top surface of the films. Moreover, in comparison with the GO films with the same self-assembled layers, the graphene films possess lower adhesion force and coefficient of friction attributed to the difference of surface functional groups.

  8. Self-assembly of self-assembled molecular triangles

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    While the solution state structure of 1 can be best described as a trinuclear complex, in the solidstate well-fashioned intermolecular - and CH- interactions are observed. Thus, in the solid-state further self-assembly of already self-assembled molecular triangle is witnessed. The triangular panels are arranged in a linear ...

  9. Supramolecular Self-Assembly of Histidine-Capped-Dialkoxy-Anthracene: A Visible Light Triggered Platform for facile siRNA Delivery

    KAUST Repository

    Patil, Sachin; Moosa, Basem; Alsaiari, Shahad; Alamoudi, Kholod; Alshamsan, Aws; Almailk, Abdulaziz; Adil, Karim; Eddaoudi, Mohamed; Khashab, Niveen M.

    2016-01-01

    Supramolecular self-assembly of histidine-capped-dialkoxy-anthracene (HDA) results in the formation of light responsive nanostructures.Single-crystal X-ray diffraction analysis of HDA shows two types of hydrogen bonding. The first hydrogen bond

  10. Ultrafine luminescent structures through nanoparticle self-assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prabhakaran, K; Goetzinger, S; Shafi, K V P M; Mazzei, A; Schietinger, S; Benson, O

    2006-01-01

    We report the fabrication of ultrafine structures consisting of regular arrays of nanoemitters through the self-assembly of luminescent nanoparticles on a silicon wafer. Nanoparticles of yttrium aluminium garnet (YAG) doped with Eu 3+ ions were synthesized by a sonochemical technique. These particles, suspended in ethanol, are introduced onto a pre-patterned silicon wafer, covered with a thin oxide layer. On annealing the sample in an ultrahigh-vacuum chamber, the nanoparticles self-assemble along the pattern. We demonstrate this 'chemical lithography' by assembling the nanoparticles along a variety of patterns. We believe that such self-organized nanopatterning of functional structures is important for the realization of nanodevices

  11. Advanced dendritic web growth development and development of single-crystal silicon dendritic ribbon and high-efficiency solar cell program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan, C. S.; Seidensticker, R. G.; Mchugh, J. P.; Hopkins, R. H.

    1986-01-01

    Efforts to demonstrate that the dendritic web technology is ready for commercial use by the end of 1986 continues. A commercial readiness goal involves improvements to crystal growth furnace throughput to demonstrate an area growth rate of greater than 15 sq cm/min while simultaneously growing 10 meters or more of ribbon under conditions of continuous melt replenishment. Continuous means that the silicon melt is being replenished at the same rate that it is being consumed by ribbon growth so that the melt level remains constant. Efforts continue on computer thermal modeling required to define high speed, low stress, continuous growth configurations; the study of convective effects in the molten silicon and growth furnace cover gas; on furnace component modifications; on web quality assessments; and on experimental growth activities.

  12. Self-assembly silicon/porous reduced graphene oxide composite film as a binder-free and flexible anode for lithium-ion batteries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang, H.; Zhang, Y.J.; Xiong, Q.Q.; Cheng, J.D.; Zhang, Q.; Wang, X.L.; Gu, C.D.; Tu, J.P.

    2015-01-01

    A Si/porous reduced graphene oxide (rGO) composite film synthesized by evaporation and leavening method are developed as a high-performance anode material for lithium ion batteries. The porous structure as buffer base can effectively release the volume expansion of the silicon particles, increase the electrical conductivity and reduce the transfer resistance of Li ions. The Si/porous rGO composite film presents high specific capacity and good cycling stability (1261 mA h g −1 at 50 mA g −1 up to 70 cycles), as well as enhanced rate capability. This approach to prepare such a unique structure is a low-cost and facile route for the silicon-based anode materials

  13. Onset of self-assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chitanvis, S.M.

    1998-01-01

    We have formulated a theory of self-assembly based on the notion of local gauge invariance at the mesoscale. Local gauge invariance at the mesoscale generates the required long-range entropic forces responsible for self-assembly in binary systems. Our theory was applied to study the onset of mesostructure formation above a critical temperature in estane, a diblock copolymer. We used diagrammatic methods to transcend the Gaussian approximation and obtain a correlation length ξ∼(c-c * ) -γ , where c * is the minimum concentration below which self-assembly is impossible, c is the current concentration, and γ was found numerically to be fairly close to 2/3. The renormalized diffusion constant vanishes as the critical concentration is approached, indicating the occurrence of critical slowing down, while the correlation function remains finite at the transition point. copyright 1998 The American Physical Society

  14. Self-assembling peptide semiconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Kai; Makam, Pandeeswar; Aizen, Ruth; Gazit, Ehud

    2017-01-01

    Semiconductors are central to the modern electronics and optics industries. Conventional semiconductive materials bear inherent limitations, especially in emerging fields such as interfacing with biological systems and bottom-up fabrication. A promising candidate for bioinspired and durable nanoscale semiconductors is the family of self-assembled nanostructures comprising short peptides. The highly ordered and directional intermolecular π-π interactions and hydrogen-bonding network allow the formation of quantum confined structures within the peptide self-assemblies, thus decreasing the band gaps of the superstructures into semiconductor regions. As a result of the diverse architectures and ease of modification of peptide self-assemblies, their semiconductivity can be readily tuned, doped, and functionalized. Therefore, this family of electroactive supramolecular materials may bridge the gap between the inorganic semiconductor world and biological systems. PMID:29146781

  15. Self-assembly of cyclodextrins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fülöp, Z.; Kurkov, S.V.; Nielsen, T.T.

    2012-01-01

    The design of functional cyclodextrin (CD) nanoparticles is a developing area in the field of nanomedicine. CDs can not only help in the formation of drug carriers but also increase the local concentration of drugs at the site of action. CD monomers form aggregates by self-assembly, a tendency...... that increases upon formation of inclusion complexes with lipophilic drugs. However, the stability of such aggregates is not sufficient for parenteral administration. In this review CD polymers and CD containing nanoparticles are categorized, with focus on self-assembled CD nanoparticles. It is described how...

  16. Thermal shock cracking of GSO single crystal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyazaki, Noriyuki; Yamamoto, Kazunari; Tamura, Takaharu; Kurashige, Kazuhisa; Ishibashi, Hiroyuki; Susa, Kenzo

    1998-01-01

    The quantitative estimation of the failure stress of a gadolinium orthosilicate (Gd 2 SiO 5 , hereafter abbreviated as GSO) single crystal due to thermal shock was investigated. A cylindrical test specimen was heated in a silicone oil bath, then subjected to thermal shock by pouring room temperature silicone oil. Cracking occurred during cooling. The heat conduction analysis was performed to obtain temperature distribution in a GSO single crystal at cracking, using the surface temperatures measured in the thermal shock cracking test. Then the thermal stress was calculated using temperature profile of the test specimen obtained from the heat conduction analysis. It is found from the results of the thermal stress analysis and the observation of the cracking in test specimens that the thermal shock cracking occurs in a cleavage plane due to the stress normal to the plane. Three-point bending tests were also performed to examine the relationship between the critical stress for thermal shock cracking and the three-point bending strength obtained from small-sized test specimens. (author)

  17. Photoluminescent properties of single crystal diamond microneedles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malykhin, Sergey A.; Ismagilov, Rinat R.; Tuyakova, Feruza T.; Obraztsova, Ekaterina A.; Fedotov, Pavel V.; Ermakova, Anna; Siyushev, Petr; Katamadze, Konstantin G.; Jelezko, Fedor; Rakovich, Yury P.; Obraztsov, Alexander N.

    2018-01-01

    Single crystal needle-like diamonds shaped as rectangular pyramids were produced by combination of chemical vapor deposition and selective oxidation with dimensions and geometrical characteristics depending on the deposition process parameters. Photoluminescence spectra and their dependencies on wavelength of excitation radiation reveal presence of nitrogen- and silicon-vacancy color centers in the diamond crystallites. Photoluminescence spectra, intensity mapping, and fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy indicate that silicon-vacancy centers are concentrated at the crystallites apex while nitrogen-vacancy centers are distributed over the whole crystallite. Dependence of the photoluminescence on excitation radiation intensity demonstrates saturation and allows estimation of the color centers density. The combination of structural parameters, geometry and photoluminescent characteristics are prospective for advantageous applications of these diamond crystallites in quantum information processing and optical sensing.

  18. A multistep single-crystal-to-single-crystal bromodiacetylene dimerization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoheisel, Tobias N.; Schrettl, Stephen; Marty, Roman; Todorova, Tanya K.; Corminboeuf, Clémence; Sienkiewicz, Andrzej; Scopelliti, Rosario; Schweizer, W. Bernd; Frauenrath, Holger

    2013-04-01

    Packing constraints and precise placement of functional groups are the reason that organic molecules in the crystalline state often display unusual physical or chemical properties not observed in solution. Here we report a single-crystal-to-single-crystal dimerization of a bromodiacetylene that involves unusually large atom displacements as well as the cleavage and formation of several bonds. Density functional theory computations support a mechanism in which the dimerization is initiated by a [2 + 1] photocycloaddition favoured by the nature of carbon-carbon short contacts in the crystal structure. The reaction proceeded up to the theoretical degree of conversion without loss of crystallinity, and it was also performed on a preparative scale with good yield. Moreover, it represents the first synthetic pathway to (E)-1,2-dibromo-1,2-diethynylethenes, which could serve as synthetic intermediates for the preparation of molecular carbon scaffolds. Our findings both extend the scope of single-crystal-to-single-crystal reactions and highlight their potential as a synthetic tool for complex transformations.

  19. Self-assembly of self-assembled molecular triangles

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    SB/S1/IC-05/2014) for providing financial support to our research endeav- ours. We gratefully acknowledge the single crystal X- ray diffractometer facility funded by IIT Madras. References. 1. (a) Cook T R, Zheng Y-R and Stang P J 2013 Chem. Rev. 113 734; (b) Debata N B, Tripathy D and Chand. D K 2012 Coord. Chem.

  20. Biomedical Applications of Self-Assembling Peptides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Radmalekshahi, Mazda; Lempsink, Ludwijn; Amidi, Maryam; Hennink, Wim E.; Mastrobattista, Enrico

    2016-01-01

    Self-assembling peptides have gained increasing attention as versatile molecules to generate diverse supramolecular structures with tunable functionality. Because of the possibility to integrate a wide range of functional domains into self-assembling peptides including cell attachment sequences,

  1. Adsorption Dynamics and Self-Assembled L-cysteine on Au(100)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engelbrekt, Christian; Nazmutdinov, Renat R.; Yan, Jiawei

    As the only amino acid with a functional thiol group, L - cysteine offers a strong perspective both for binding to gold and other metals, and for gentle immobilization of biomolecules. Binding to single - crystal, atomically planar surfaces offers the additional perspective that bound L - cysteine...... can be structurally mapped at the single - molecule level . In this work, we have followed the adsorption of L - cysteine on single - crystal Au(100) by measuring the electrode potential dynamics during the adsorption process. In situ STM revealed the structure of the self - assembled ordered layers...

  2. 3D Programmable Micro Self Assembly

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bohringer, Karl F; Parviz, Babak A; Klavins, Eric

    2005-01-01

    .... We have developed a "self assembly tool box" consisting of a range of methods for micro-scale self-assembly in 2D and 3D We have shown physical demonstrations of simple 3D self-assemblies which lead...

  3. Observation of plastic deformation in freestanding single crystal Au nanowires

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Dongyun; Zhao Manhong; Wei Xiaoding; Chen Xi; Jun, Seong C.; Hone, James; Herbert, Erik G.; Oliver, Warren C.; Kysar, Jeffrey W.

    2006-01-01

    Freestanding single crystal nanowires of gold were fabricated from a single grain of pure gold leaf by standard lithographic techniques, with center section of 7 μm in length, 250 nm in width, and 100 nm in thickness. The ends remained anchored to a silicon substrate. The specimens were deflected via nanoindenter until plastic deformation was achieved. Nonlocalized and localized plastic deformations were observed. The resulting force-displacement curves were simulated using continuum single crystal plasticity. A set of material parameters which closely reproduce the experimental results suggests that the initial critical resolved shear stress was as high as 135 MPa

  4. A micromotor based on polymer single crystals and nanoparticles: toward functional versatility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Mei; Liu, Limei; Gao, Wenlong; Su, Miaoda; Ge, Ya; Shi, Lili; Zhang, Hui; Dong, Bin; Li, Christopher Y.

    2014-07-01

    We report a multifunctional micromotor fabricated by the self-assembly technique using multifunctional materials, i.e. polymer single crystals and nanoparticles, as basic building blocks. Not only can this micromotor achieve autonomous and directed movement, it also possesses unprecedented functions, including enzymatic degradation-induced micromotor disassembly, sustained release and molecular detection.We report a multifunctional micromotor fabricated by the self-assembly technique using multifunctional materials, i.e. polymer single crystals and nanoparticles, as basic building blocks. Not only can this micromotor achieve autonomous and directed movement, it also possesses unprecedented functions, including enzymatic degradation-induced micromotor disassembly, sustained release and molecular detection. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Experimental section, Fig. S1-S8 and Video S1-S4. See DOI: 10.1039/c4nr02593h

  5. Three's company: co-crystallization of a self-assembled S(4) metallacyclophane with two diastereomeric metallacycle intermediates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindquist, Nathan R; Carter, Timothy G; Cangelosi, Virginia M; Zakharov, Lev N; Johnson, Darren W

    2010-05-28

    Three discrete supramolecular self-assembled arsenic(iii) complexes including an unusual S(4)-symmetric tetranuclear [As(4)L(2)Cl(4)] metallacyclophane and two diastereomeric cis/trans-[As(2)LCl(2)] metallacycle intermediates co-crystallize within a single crystal lattice.

  6. Metal Halide Perovskite Single Crystals: From Growth Process to Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuigen Li

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available As a strong competitor in the field of optoelectronic applications, organic-inorganic metal hybrid perovskites have been paid much attention because of their superior characteristics, which include broad absorption from visible to near-infrared region, tunable optical and electronic properties, high charge mobility, long exciton diffusion length and carrier recombination lifetime, etc. It is noted that perovskite single crystals show remarkably low trap-state densities and long carrier diffusion lengths, which are even comparable with the best photovoltaic-quality silicon, and thus are expected to provide better optoelectronic performance. This paper reviews the recent development of crystal growth in single-, mixed-organic-cation and fully inorganic halide perovskite single crystals, in particular the solution approach. Furthermore, the application of metal hybrid perovskite single crystals and future perspectives are also highlighted.

  7. Magnetic self-assembly of small parts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shetye, Sheetal B.

    Modern society's propensity for miniaturized end-user products is compelling electronic manufacturers to assemble and package different micro-scale, multi-technology components in more efficient and cost-effective manners. As the size of the components gets smaller, issues such as part sticking and alignment precision create challenges that slow the throughput of conventional robotic pick-n-place systems. As an alternative, various self-assembly approaches have been proposed to manipulate micro to millimeter scale components in a parallel fashion without human or robotic intervention. In this dissertation, magnetic self-assembly (MSA) is demonstrated as a highly efficient, completely parallel process for assembly of millimeter scale components. MSA is achieved by integrating permanent micromagnets onto component bonding surfaces using wafer-level microfabrication processes. Embedded bonded powder methods are used for fabrication of the magnets. The magnets are then magnetized using pulse magnetization methods, and the wafers are then singulated to form individual components. When the components are randomly mixed together, self-assembly occurs when the intermagnetic forces overcome the mixing forces. Analytical and finite element methods (FEM) are used to study the force interactions between the micromagnets. The multifunctional aspects of MSA are presented through demonstration of part-to-part and part-to-substrate assembly of 1 mm x 1mm x 0.5 mm silicon components. Part-to-part assembly is demonstrated by batch assembly of free-floating parts in a liquid environment with the assembly yield of different magnetic patterns varying from 88% to 90% in 20 s. Part-to-substrate assembly is demonstrated by assembling an ordered array onto a fixed substrate in a dry environment with the assembly yield varying from 86% to 99%. In both cases, diverse magnetic shapes/patterns are used to control the alignment and angular orientation of the components. A mathematical model is

  8. Fabrication of Nanostructures Using Self-Assembled Peptides as Templates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Castillo, Jaime

    2015-01-01

    the advantages of diphenylalanine are explained step by step offering new alternatives to fabricate nanostructures in a simple and rapid way. The chapter is complemented with techniques to manipulate the self-assembled diphenylalanine nanostructures without changing its properties during the manipulation process.......This chapter evaluates the use of a short-aromatic dipeptide, diphenylalanine, as a template in the fabrication of new nanostructures (nanowires, coaxial nanocables, nanochannels) using materials such as silicon, conducting and non-conducting polymers. Diphenylalanine self...

  9. Chemical reactions directed Peptide self-assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasale, Dnyaneshwar B; Das, Apurba K

    2015-05-13

    Fabrication of self-assembled nanostructures is one of the important aspects in nanoscience and nanotechnology. The study of self-assembled soft materials remains an area of interest due to their potential applications in biomedicine. The versatile properties of soft materials can be tuned using a bottom up approach of small molecules. Peptide based self-assembly has significant impact in biology because of its unique features such as biocompatibility, straight peptide chain and the presence of different side chain functionality. These unique features explore peptides in various self-assembly process. In this review, we briefly introduce chemical reaction-mediated peptide self-assembly. Herein, we have emphasised enzymes, native chemical ligation and photochemical reactions in the exploration of peptide self-assembly.

  10. Micro-‘‘factory’’ for self-assembled peptide nanostructures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Castillo, Jaime; Rodriguez-Trujíllo, Romén; Gauthier, Sébastian

    2011-01-01

    This study describes an integrated micro ‘‘factory’’ for the preparation of biological self-assembled peptide nanotubes and nanoparticles on a polymer chip, yielding controlled growth conditions. Self-assembled peptides constitute attractive building blocks for the fabrication of biological...... nanostructures due to the mild conditions of their synthesis process. This biological material can form nanostructures in a rapid way and the synthesis method is less expensive as compared to that of carbon nanotubes or silicon nanowires. The present article thus reports on the on-chip fabrication of self-assembled...

  11. Improved organic thin-film transistor performance using novel self-assembled monolayers

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDowell, M.; Hill, I. G.; McDermott, J. E.; Bernasek, S. L.; Schwartz, J.

    2006-02-01

    Pentacene-based organic thin-film transistors have been fabricated using a phosphonate-linked anthracene self-assembled monolayer as a buffer between the silicon dioxide gate dielectric and the active pentacene channel region. Vast improvements in the subthreshold slope and threshold voltage are observed compared to control devices fabricated without the buffer. Both observations are consistent with a greatly reduced density of charge trapping states at the semiconductor-dielectric interface effected by introduction of the self-assembled monolayer.

  12. Self-Assembly of Infinite Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott M. Summers

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available We review some recent results related to the self-assembly of infinite structures in the Tile Assembly Model. These results include impossibility results, as well as novel tile assembly systems in which shapes and patterns that represent various notions of computation self-assemble. Several open questions are also presented and motivated.

  13. Bola-amphiphile self-assembly

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svaneborg, Carsten

    2012-01-01

    Bola-amphiphiles are rod-like molecules where both ends of the molecule likes contact with water, while the central part of the molecule dislikes contact with water. What do such molecules do when they are dissolved in water? They self-assemble into micelles. This is a Dissipartive particle...... dynamics simulation of this self-assembly behaviour....

  14. Self-assembled nanomaterials for photoacoustic imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lei; Yang, Pei-Pei; Zhao, Xiao-Xiao; Wang, Hao

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, extensive endeavors have been paid to construct functional self-assembled nanomaterials for various applications such as catalysis, separation, energy and biomedicines. To date, different strategies have been developed for preparing nanomaterials with diversified structures and functionalities via fine tuning of self-assembled building blocks. In terms of biomedical applications, bioimaging technologies are urgently calling for high-efficient probes/contrast agents for high-performance bioimaging. Photoacoustic (PA) imaging is an emerging whole-body imaging modality offering high spatial resolution, deep penetration and high contrast in vivo. The self-assembled nanomaterials show high stability in vivo, specific tolerance to sterilization and prolonged half-life stability and desirable targeting properties, which is a kind of promising PA contrast agents for biomedical imaging. Herein, we focus on summarizing recent advances in smart self-assembled nanomaterials with NIR absorption as PA contrast agents for biomedical imaging. According to the preparation strategy of the contrast agents, the self-assembled nanomaterials are categorized into two groups, i.e., the ex situ and in situ self-assembled nanomaterials. The driving forces, assembly modes and regulation of PA properties of self-assembled nanomaterials and their applications for long-term imaging, enzyme activity detection and aggregation-induced retention (AIR) effect for diagnosis and therapy are emphasized. Finally, we conclude with an outlook towards future developments of self-assembled nanomaterials for PA imaging.

  15. Self-assembled nanomaterials for photoacoustic imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lei; Yang, Pei-Pei; Zhao, Xiao-Xiao; Wang, Hao

    2016-02-07

    In recent years, extensive endeavors have been paid to construct functional self-assembled nanomaterials for various applications such as catalysis, separation, energy and biomedicines. To date, different strategies have been developed for preparing nanomaterials with diversified structures and functionalities via fine tuning of self-assembled building blocks. In terms of biomedical applications, bioimaging technologies are urgently calling for high-efficient probes/contrast agents for high-performance bioimaging. Photoacoustic (PA) imaging is an emerging whole-body imaging modality offering high spatial resolution, deep penetration and high contrast in vivo. The self-assembled nanomaterials show high stability in vivo, specific tolerance to sterilization and prolonged half-life stability and desirable targeting properties, which is a kind of promising PA contrast agents for biomedical imaging. Herein, we focus on summarizing recent advances in smart self-assembled nanomaterials with NIR absorption as PA contrast agents for biomedical imaging. According to the preparation strategy of the contrast agents, the self-assembled nanomaterials are categorized into two groups, i.e., the ex situ and in situ self-assembled nanomaterials. The driving forces, assembly modes and regulation of PA properties of self-assembled nanomaterials and their applications for long-term imaging, enzyme activity detection and aggregation-induced retention (AIR) effect for diagnosis and therapy are emphasized. Finally, we conclude with an outlook towards future developments of self-assembled nanomaterials for PA imaging.

  16. Molecular self-assembly advances and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Dequan, Alex Li

    2012-01-01

    In the past several decades, molecular self-assembly has emerged as one of the main themes in chemistry, biology, and materials science. This book compiles and details cutting-edge research in molecular assemblies ranging from self-organized peptide nanostructures and DNA-chromophore foldamers to supramolecular systems and metal-directed assemblies, even to nanocrystal superparticles and self-assembled microdevices

  17. Controlled doping by self-assembled dendrimer-like macromolecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Haigang; Guan, Bin; Sun, Yingri; Zhu, Yiping; Dan, Yaping

    2017-02-01

    Doping via self-assembled macromolecules might offer a solution for developing single atom electronics by precisely placing individual dopants at arbitrary location to meet the requirement for circuit design. Here we synthesize dendrimer-like polyglycerol macromolecules with each carrying one phosphorus atom in the core. The macromolecules are immobilized by the coupling reagent onto silicon surfaces that are pre-modified with a monolayer of undecylenic acid. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) are employed to characterize the synthesized macromolecules and the modified silicon surfaces, respectively. After rapid thermal annealing, the phosphorus atoms carried by the macromolecules diffuse into the silicon substrate, forming dopants at a concentration of 1017 cm-3. Low-temperature Hall effect measurements reveal that the ionization process is rather complicated. Unlike the widely reported simple ionization of phosphorus dopants, nitrogen and carbon are also involved in the electronic activities in the monolayer doped silicon.

  18. Gallium arsenide single crystal solar cell structure and method of making

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stirn, Richard J. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    A production method and structure for a thin-film GaAs crystal for a solar cell on a single-crystal silicon substrate (10) comprising the steps of growing a single-crystal interlayer (12) of material having a closer match in lattice and thermal expansion with single-crystal GaAs than the single-crystal silicon of the substrate, and epitaxially growing a single-crystal film (14) on the interlayer. The material of the interlayer may be germanium or graded germanium-silicon alloy, with low germanium content at the silicon substrate interface, and high germanium content at the upper surface. The surface of the interface layer (12) is annealed for recrystallization by a pulsed beam of energy (laser or electron) prior to growing the interlayer. The solar cell structure may be grown as a single-crystal n.sup.+ /p shallow homojunction film or as a p/n or n/p junction film. A Ga(Al)AS heteroface film may be grown over the GaAs film.

  19. Electrically Anisotropic Layered Perovskite Single Crystal

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Ting-You

    2016-01-01

    -23). However, the difficulty in growing large-sized LOIHPs single crystal with superior electrical properties limits their practical applications. Here, we report a method to grow the centimeter-scaled LOIHP single crystal of [(HOC2H4NH3)2PbI4], demonstrating

  20. Confinement stabilises single crystal vaterite rods.

    OpenAIRE

    Schenk, AS; Albarracin, EJ; Kim, YY; Ihli, J; Meldrum, FC

    2014-01-01

    Single-crystals of vaterite, the least-stable anhydrous polymorph of CaCO3, are rare in biogenic and synthetic systems. We here describe the synthesis of high aspect ratio single crystal vaterite rods under additive-free conditions by precipitating CaCO3 within the cylindrical pores of track-etch membranes.

  1. Young's Modulus of Single-Crystal Fullerene C Nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tokushi Kizuka

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We performed bending tests on single-crystal nanotubes composed of fullerene C70 molecules by in situ transmission electron microscopy with measurements of loading forces by an optical deflection method. The nanotubes with the outer diameters of 270–470 nm were bent using simple-beam and cantilever-beam loading by the piezomanipulation of silicon nanotips. Young's modulus of the nanotubes increased from 61 GPa to 110 GPa as the outer diameter decreased from 470 nm to 270 nm. Young's modulus was estimated to be 66% of that of single-crystal C60 nanotubes of the same outer diameter.

  2. Self-Assembly of Colloidal Particles

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    is self-assembly where one engineers interaction between nanoscopic building blocks so ..... big question in the field how this microscopic chirality of the virus gets translated ... shape emerges due to a competition between the surface tension.

  3. Passivation effects in B doped self-assembled Si nanocrystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Puthen Veettil, B.; Wu, Lingfeng; Jia, Xuguang; Lin, Ziyun; Zhang, Tian; Yang, Terry; Johnson, Craig; Conibeer, Gavin; Perez-Würfl, Ivan; McCamey, Dane

    2014-01-01

    Doping of semiconductor nanocrystals has enabled their widespread technological application in optoelectronics and micro/nano-electronics. In this work, boron-doped self-assembled silicon nanocrystal samples have been grown and characterised using Electron Spin Resonance and photoluminescence spectroscopy. The passivation effects of boron on the interface dangling bonds have been investigated. Addition of boron dopants is found to compensate the active dangling bonds at the interface, and this is confirmed by an increase in photoluminescence intensity. Further addition of dopants is found to reduce the photoluminescence intensity by decreasing the minority carrier lifetime as a result of the increased number of non-radiative processes

  4. Polymorphism of lipid self-assembly systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Hiroshi

    2002-01-01

    When lipid molecules are dispersed into an aqueous medium, various self-organized structures are formed, depending on conditions (temperature, concentration, etc), in consequence of the amphipathic nature of the molecules. In addition, lipid self-assembly systems exhibit polymorphic phase transition behavior. Since lipids are one of main components of biomembranes, studies on the structure and thermodynamic properties of lipid self-assembly systems are fundamentally important for the consideration of the stability of biomembranes. (author)

  5. Directed Self-Assembly of Nanodispersions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Furst, Eric M [University of Delaware

    2013-11-15

    Directed self-assembly promises to be the technologically and economically optimal approach to industrial-scale nanotechnology, and will enable the realization of inexpensive, reproducible and active nanostructured materials with tailored photonic, transport and mechanical properties. These new nanomaterials will play a critical role in meeting the 21st century grand challenges of the US, including energy diversity and sustainability, national security and economic competitiveness. The goal of this work was to develop and fundamentally validate methods of directed selfassembly of nanomaterials and nanodispersion processing. The specific aims were: 1. Nanocolloid self-assembly and interactions in AC electric fields. In an effort to reduce the particle sizes used in AC electric field self-assembly to lengthscales, we propose detailed characterizations of field-driven structures and studies of the fundamental underlying particle interactions. We will utilize microscopy and light scattering to assess order-disorder transitions and self-assembled structures under a variety of field and physicochemical conditions. Optical trapping will be used to measure particle interactions. These experiments will be synergetic with calculations of the particle polarizability, enabling us to both validate interactions and predict the order-disorder transition for nanocolloids. 2. Assembly of anisotropic nanocolloids. Particle shape has profound effects on structure and flow behavior of dispersions, and greatly complicates their processing and self-assembly. The methods developed to study the self-assembled structures and underlying particle interactions for dispersions of isotropic nanocolloids will be extended to systems composed of anisotropic particles. This report reviews several key advances that have been made during this project, including, (1) advances in the measurement of particle polarization mechanisms underlying field-directed self-assembly, and (2) progress in the

  6. Mechanical Self-Assembly Science and Applications

    CERN Document Server

    2013-01-01

    Mechanical Self-Assembly: Science and Applications introduces a novel category of self-assembly driven by mechanical forces. This book discusses self-assembly in various types of small material structures including thin films, surfaces, and micro- and nano-wires, as well as the practice's potential application in micro and nanoelectronics, MEMS/NEMS, and biomedical engineering. The mechanical self-assembly process is inherently quick, simple, and cost-effective, as well as accessible to a large number of materials, such as curved surfaces for forming three-dimensional small structures. Mechanical self-assembly is complementary to, and sometimes offer advantages over, the traditional micro- and nano-fabrication. This book also: Presents a highly original aspect of the science of self-assembly Describes the novel methods of mechanical assembly used to fabricate a variety of new three-dimensional material structures in simple and cost-effective ways Provides simple insights to a number of biological systems and ...

  7. Relaxor-PT Single Crystal Piezoelectric Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoning Jiang

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Relaxor-PbTiO3 piezoelectric single crystals have been widely used in a broad range of electromechanical devices, including piezoelectric sensors, actuators, and transducers. This paper reviews the unique properties of these single crystals for piezoelectric sensors. Design, fabrication and characterization of various relaxor-PT single crystal piezoelectric sensors and their applications are presented and compared with their piezoelectric ceramic counterparts. Newly applicable fields and future trends of relaxor-PT sensors are also suggested in this review paper.

  8. Controllable synthesis of rice-shape Alq3 nanoparticles with single crystal structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Wanfeng; Fan, Jihui; Song, Hui; Jiang, Feng; Yuan, Huimin; Wei, Zhixian; Ji, Ziwu; Pang, Zhiyong; Han, Shenghao

    2016-10-01

    We report the controllable growth of rice-shape nanoparticles of Alq3 by an extremely facile self-assembly approach. Possible mechanisms have been proposed to interpret the formation and controlled process of the single crystal nanoparticles. The field-emission performances (turn-on field 7 V μm-1, maximum current density 2.9 mA cm-2) indicate the potential application on miniaturized nano-optoelectronics devices of Alq3-based. This facile method can potentially be used for the controlled synthesis of other functional complexes and organic nanostructures.

  9. Defect free single crystal thin layer

    KAUST Repository

    Elafandy, Rami Tarek Mahmoud

    2016-01-28

    A gallium nitride film can be a dislocation free single crystal, which can be prepared by irradiating a surface of a substrate and contacting the surface with an etching solution that can selectively etch at dislocations.

  10. Defect free single crystal thin layer

    KAUST Repository

    Elafandy, Rami Tarek Mahmoud; Ooi, Boon S.

    2016-01-01

    A gallium nitride film can be a dislocation free single crystal, which can be prepared by irradiating a surface of a substrate and contacting the surface with an etching solution that can selectively etch at dislocations.

  11. Preparation of TiC single crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scheerer, B.; Fink, J.; Reichardt, W.

    1975-07-01

    TiC single crystals were prepared by vertical zone melting for measurements of the phonon dispersion by inelastic neutron scattering. The influence of the starting material and of the growing conditions on the growth of the crystal were studied. The crystals were characterized by chemical methods, EMX and neutron diffraction. It was possible to grow single crystals with a volume of up to 0.6 cm 3 and mosaic spread of less then 0.4 0 . (orig.) [de

  12. Electrically Anisotropic Layered Perovskite Single Crystal

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Ting-You

    2016-04-01

    Organic-inorganic hybrid perovskites (OIHPs), which are promising materials for electronic and optoelectronic applications (1-10), have made into layered organic-inorganic hybrid perovskites (LOIHPs). These LOIHPs have been applied to thin-film transistors, solar cells and tunable wavelength phosphors (11-18). It is known that devices fabricated with single crystal exhibit the superior performance, which makes the growth of large-sized single crystals critical for future device applications (19-23). However, the difficulty in growing large-sized LOIHPs single crystal with superior electrical properties limits their practical applications. Here, we report a method to grow the centimeter-scaled LOIHP single crystal of [(HOC2H4NH3)2PbI4], demonstrating the potentials in mass production. After that, we reveal anisotropic electrical and optoelectronic properties which proved the carrier propagating along inorganic framework. The carrier mobility of in-inorganic-plane (in-plane) devices shows the average value of 45 cm2 V–1 s–1 which is about 100 times greater than the record of LOIHP devices (15), showing the importance of single crystal in device application. Moreover, the LOIHP single crystals show its ultra-short carrier lifetime of 42.7 ps and photoluminescence quantum efficiency (PLQE) of 25.4 %. We expect this report to be a start of LOIHPs for advanced applications in which the anisotropic properties are needed (24-25), and meets the demand of high-speed applications and fast-response applications.

  13. Self-assembled DNA Structures for Nanoconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Hao; Yin, Peng; Park, Sung Ha; Li, Hanying; Feng, Liping; Guan, Xiaoju; Liu, Dage; Reif, John H.; LaBean, Thomas H.

    2004-09-01

    In recent years, a number of research groups have begun developing nanofabrication methods based on DNA self-assembly. Here we review our recent experimental progress to utilize novel DNA nanostructures for self-assembly as well as for templates in the fabrication of functional nano-patterned materials. We have prototyped a new DNA nanostructure known as a cross structure. This nanostructure has a 4-fold symmetry which promotes its self-assembly into tetragonal 2D lattices. We have utilized the tetragonal 2D lattices as templates for highly conductive metallic nanowires and periodic 2D protein nano-arrays. We have constructed and characterized a DNA nanotube, a new self-assembling superstructure composed of DNA tiles. We have also demonstrated an aperiodic DNA lattice composed of DNA tiles assembled around a long scaffold strand; the system translates information encoded in the scaffold strand into a specific and reprogrammable barcode pattern. We have achieved metallic nanoparticle linear arrays templated on self-assembled 1D DNA arrays. We have designed and demonstrated a 2-state DNA lattice, which displays expand/contract motion switched by DNA nanoactuators. We have also achieved an autonomous DNA motor executing unidirectional motion along a linear DNA track.

  14. Correlation of Effective Dispersive and Polar Surface Energies in Heterogeneous Self-Assembled Monolayer Coatings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhuang, Yanxin; Hansen, Ole

    2009-01-01

    grown oil oxidized (100) silicon Surfaces in a vapor phase process using five different precursors. Experimentally, effective surface energy components of the fluorocarbon self-assembled monolayers were determined from measured contact angles using the Owens-Wendt-Rabel-Kaelble method. We show...

  15. Sensitive detection of plastic explosives with self-assembled monolayer-coated microcantilevers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinnaduwage, L. A.; Boiadjiev, V.; Hawk, J. E.; Thundat, T.

    2003-08-01

    We report the detection of 10-30 parts-per-trillion levels of pentaerythritol tetranitrate and hexahydro-1,3,5-triazine within 20 s of exposure to a silicon microcantilever with its gold surface modified with a self-assembled monolayer of 4-mercaptobenzoic acid. These measurements correspond to a limit of detection of a few fg.

  16. Manipulation of self-assembly amyloid peptide nanotubes by dielectrophoresis (DEP)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Castillo, Jaime; Tanzi, Simone; Dimaki, Maria

    2008-01-01

    Self-assembled amyloid peptide nanotubes (SAPNT) were manipulated and immobilized using dielectrophoresis. Micro-patterned electrodes of Au were fabricated by photolithography and lifted off on a silicon dioxide layer. SAPNT were manipulated by adjusting the amplitude and frequency of the applied...

  17. Rapid, Brushless Self-assembly of a PS-b-PDMS Block Copolymer for Nanolithography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasappa, Sozaraj; Schulte, Lars; Borah, Dipu

    2014-01-01

    and antidot patterns after short solvo-thermal annealing. Unlike previous reports on this system, low temperature and short annealing time provide self-assembly in homogeneous thin films covering large substrate areas. This on-chip mask was then used for pattern transfer to the underlying silicon substrate...

  18. Self-assembling segmented coiled tubing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raymond, David W.

    2016-09-27

    Self-assembling segmented coiled tubing is a concept that allows the strength of thick-wall rigid pipe, and the flexibility of thin-wall tubing, to be realized in a single design. The primary use is for a drillstring tubular, but it has potential for other applications requiring transmission of mechanical loads (forces and torques) through an initially coiled tubular. The concept uses a spring-loaded spherical `ball-and-socket` type joint to interconnect two or more short, rigid segments of pipe. Use of an optional snap ring allows the joint to be permanently made, in a `self-assembling` manner.

  19. Tailoring the optical characteristics of microsized InP nanoneedles directly grown on silicon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Kun; Sun, Hao; Ren, Fan; Ng, Kar Wei; Tran, Thai-Truong D; Chen, Roger; Chang-Hasnain, Connie J

    2014-01-08

    Nanoscale self-assembly offers a pathway to realize heterogeneous integration of III-V materials on silicon. However, for III-V nanowires directly grown on silicon, dislocation-free single-crystal quality could only be attained below certain critical dimensions. We recently reported a new approach that overcomes this size constraint, demonstrating the growth of single-crystal InGaAs/GaAs and InP nanoneedles with the base diameters exceeding 1 μm. Here, we report distinct optical characteristics of InP nanoneedles which are varied from mostly zincblende, zincblende/wurtzite-mixed, to pure wurtzite crystalline phase. We achieved, for the first time, pure single-crystal wurtzite-phase InP nanoneedles grown on silicon with bandgaps of 80 meV larger than that of zincblende-phase InP. Being able to attain excellent material quality while scaling up in size promises outstanding device performance of these nanoneedles. At room temperature, a high internal quantum efficiency of 25% and optically pumped lasing are demonstrated for single nanoneedle as-grown on silicon substrate. Recombination dynamics proves the excellent surface quality of the InP nanoneedles, which paves the way toward achieving multijunction photovoltaic cells, long-wavelength heterostructure lasers, and advanced photonic integrated circuits.

  20. Friction stir welding of single crystal aluminium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fonda, Richard Warren; Wert, John A.; Reynolds, A.P.

    2007-01-01

    Friction stir welds were prepared in different orientations in an aluminium single crystal. The welds were quenched to preserve the microstructure surrounding the tool and then electron backscattered diffraction was used to reveal the generation of grain boundaries and the evolution...... of crystallographic texture around the tool in each weld. The extent of both dynamic recrystallisation and conventional recrystallisation varied considerably as a function of weld orientation. As the base plate begins to interact with the deformation field surrounding the tool, regions of the single crystal rotate...

  1. Large branched self-assembled DNA complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tosch, Paul; Waelti, Christoph; Middelberg, Anton P J; Davies, A Giles

    2007-01-01

    Many biological molecules have been demonstrated to self-assemble into complex structures and networks by using their very efficient and selective molecular recognition processes. The use of biological molecules as scaffolds for the construction of functional devices by self-assembling nanoscale complexes onto the scaffolds has recently attracted significant attention and many different applications in this field have emerged. In particular DNA, owing to its inherent sophisticated self-organization and molecular recognition properties, has served widely as a scaffold for various nanotechnological self-assembly applications, with metallic and semiconducting nanoparticles, proteins, macromolecular complexes, inter alia, being assembled onto designed DNA scaffolds. Such scaffolds may typically contain multiple branch-points and comprise a number of DNA molecules selfassembled into the desired configuration. Previously, several studies have used synthetic methods to produce the constituent DNA of the scaffolds, but this typically constrains the size of the complexes. For applications that require larger self-assembling DNA complexes, several tens of nanometers or more, other techniques need to be employed. In this article, we discuss a generic technique to generate large branched DNA macromolecular complexes

  2. Self-assembled nanogaps for molecular electronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Qingxin; Tong, Yanhong; Jain, Titoo; Hassenkam, Tue; Wan, Qing; Moth-Poulsen, Kasper; Bjørnholm, Thomas

    2009-06-17

    A nanogap for molecular devices was realized using solution-based self-assembly. Gold nanorods were assembled to gold nanoparticle-coated conducting SnO2:Sb nanowires via thiol end-capped oligo(phenylenevinylene)s (OPVs). The molecular gap was easily created by the rigid molecule itself during self-assembly and the gap length was determined by the molecule length. The gold nanorods and gold nanoparticles, respectively covalently bonded at the two ends of the molecule, had very small dimensions, e.g. a width of approximately 20 nm, and hence were expected to minimize the screening effect. The ultra-long conducting SnO2:Sb nanowires provided the bridge to connect one of the electrodes of the molecular device (gold nanoparticle) to the external circuit. The tip of the atomic force microscope (AFM) was contacted onto the other electrode (gold nanorod) for the electrical measurement of the OPV device. The conductance measurement confirmed that the self-assembly of the molecules and the subsequent self-assembly of the gold nanorods was a feasible method for the fabrication of the nanogap of the molecular devices.

  3. Self-assembled nanogaps for molecular electronics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tang, Qingxin; Tong, Yanhong; Jain, Titoo

    2009-01-01

    A nanogap for molecular devices was realized using solution-based self-assembly. Gold nanorods were assembled to gold nanoparticle-coated conducting SnO2:Sb nanowires via thiol end-capped oligo(phenylenevinylene)s (OPVs). The molecular gap was easily created by the rigid molecule itself during se...

  4. Self-assembly of patchy colloidal dumbbells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Avvisati, Guido|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/407630198; Vissers, Teun|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304829943; Dijkstra, Marjolein|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/123538807

    2015-01-01

    We employ Monte Carlo simulations to investigate the self-assembly of patchy colloidal dumbbells interacting via a modified Kern-Frenkel potential by probing the system concentration and dumbbell shape. We consider dumbbells consisting of one attractive sphere with diameter sigma(1) and one

  5. Inverse Problem in Self-assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tkachenko, Alexei

    2012-02-01

    By decorating colloids and nanoparticles with DNA, one can introduce highly selective key-lock interactions between them. This leads to a new class of systems and problems in soft condensed matter physics. In particular, this opens a possibility to solve inverse problem in self-assembly: how to build an arbitrary desired structure with the bottom-up approach? I will present a theoretical and computational analysis of the hierarchical strategy in attacking this problem. It involves self-assembly of particular building blocks (``octopus particles''), that in turn would assemble into the target structure. On a conceptual level, our approach combines elements of three different brands of programmable self assembly: DNA nanotechnology, nanoparticle-DNA assemblies and patchy colloids. I will discuss the general design principles, theoretical and practical limitations of this approach, and illustrate them with our simulation results. Our crucial result is that not only it is possible to design a system that has a given nanostructure as a ground state, but one can also program and optimize the kinetic pathway for its self-assembly.

  6. Self-assembled nanogaps for molecular electronics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang Qingxin; Tong Yanhong; Jain, Titoo; Hassenkam, Tue; Moth-Poulsen, Kasper; Bjoernholm, Thomas; Wan Qing

    2009-01-01

    A nanogap for molecular devices was realized using solution-based self-assembly. Gold nanorods were assembled to gold nanoparticle-coated conducting SnO 2 :Sb nanowires via thiol end-capped oligo(phenylenevinylene)s (OPVs). The molecular gap was easily created by the rigid molecule itself during self-assembly and the gap length was determined by the molecule length. The gold nanorods and gold nanoparticles, respectively covalently bonded at the two ends of the molecule, had very small dimensions, e.g. a width of ∼20 nm, and hence were expected to minimize the screening effect. The ultra-long conducting SnO 2 :Sb nanowires provided the bridge to connect one of the electrodes of the molecular device (gold nanoparticle) to the external circuit. The tip of the atomic force microscope (AFM) was contacted onto the other electrode (gold nanorod) for the electrical measurement of the OPV device. The conductance measurement confirmed that the self-assembly of the molecules and the subsequent self-assembly of the gold nanorods was a feasible method for the fabrication of the nanogap of the molecular devices.

  7. Investigation of the structural anisotropy in a self-assembling glycinate layer on Cu(100) by scanning tunneling microscopy and density functional theory calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuzmin, Mikhail [Surface Science Laboratory, Optoelectronics Research Centre, Tampere University of Technology, P.O. Box 692, FI-33101 Tampere (Finland); Ioffe Physical Technical Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences, 26 Polytekhnicheskaya, St Petersburg 194021 (Russian Federation); Lahtonen, Kimmo; Vuori, Leena [Surface Science Laboratory, Optoelectronics Research Centre, Tampere University of Technology, P.O. Box 692, FI-33101 Tampere (Finland); Sánchez-de-Armas, Rocío [Materials Theory Division, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Uppsala University, P.O. Box 516, S75120 Uppsala (Sweden); Hirsimäki, Mika, E-mail: mikahirsi@gmail.com [Surface Science Laboratory, Optoelectronics Research Centre, Tampere University of Technology, P.O. Box 692, FI-33101 Tampere (Finland); Valden, Mika [Surface Science Laboratory, Optoelectronics Research Centre, Tampere University of Technology, P.O. Box 692, FI-33101 Tampere (Finland)

    2017-07-01

    Highlights: • Deprotonation reaction of glycine and self-assembly of glycinate is observed on Cu. • Bias-dependent scanning tunneling microscopy indicates two glycinate geometries. • Density functional theory calculations confirm the two non-identical configurations. • Non-identical adsorption explains the anisotropy in adlayer’s electronic structure. - Abstract: Self-assembling organic molecule-metal interfaces exhibiting free-electron like (FEL) states offers an attractive bottom-up approach to fabricating materials for molecular electronics. Accomplishing this, however, requires detailed understanding of the fundamental driving mechanisms behind the self-assembly process. For instance, it is still unresolved as to why the adsorption of glycine ([NH{sub 2}(CH{sub 2})COOH]) on isotropic Cu(100) single crystal surface leads, via deprotonation and self-assembly, to a glycinate ([NH{sub 2}(CH{sub 2})COO–]) layer that exhibits anisotropic FEL behavior. Here, we report on bias-dependent scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) experiments and density functional theory (DFT) calculations for glycine adsorption on Cu(100) single crystal surface. We find that after physical vapor deposition (PVD) of glycine on Cu(100), glycinate self-assembles into an overlayer exhibiting c(2 × 4) and p(2 × 4) symmetries with non-identical adsorption sites. Our findings underscore the intricacy of electrical conductivity in nanomolecular organic overlayers and the critical role the structural anisotropy at molecule-metal interface plays in the fabrication of materials for molecular electronics.

  8. Lattice effects in YVO3 single crystal

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marquina, C; Sikora, M; Ibarra, MR; Nugroho, AA; Palstra, TTM

    In this paper we report on the lattice effects in the Mott insulator yttrium orthovanadate (YVO3). Linear thermal expansion and magnetostriction experiments have been performed on a single crystal, in the temperature range from 5 K to room temperature. The YVO3 orders antiferromagnetically at T-N =

  9. Antiferromagnetism in chromium alloy single crystals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerrum Møller, Hans; Trego, A.L.; Mackintosh, A.R.

    1965-01-01

    The antiferromagnetism of single crystals of dilute alloys of V, Mn and Re in Cr has been studied at 95°K and 300°K by neutron diffraction. The addition of V causes the diffraction peaks to decrease in intensity and move away from (100), while Mn and Re cause them to increase and approach (100) s...

  10. Neutron forward diffraction by single crystal prisms

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    We have derived analytic expressions for the deflection as well as transmitted fraction of monochromatic neutrons forward diffracted by a single crystal prism. In the vicinity of a Bragg reflection, the neutron deflection deviates sharply from that for an amorphous prism, exhibiting three orders of magnitude greater sensitivity to ...

  11. Properties of single crystal beta''-aluminas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bates, J.B.; Brown, G.M.; Kaneda, T.; Brundage, W.E.; Wang, J.C.; Engstrom, H.

    1979-01-01

    Large single crystals of sodium beta''-alumina were grown by slow evaporation of Na 2 O at 1690 0 C from a mixture of Na 2 CO 3 , MgO, and Al 2 O 3 . Polarized Raman measurements were made on the Na β'' single crystals and on single crystals of Li, K, Rb, and Ag β'' prepared by ion exchange of Na β''. The low frequency Raman spectra of Na, K, Rb, and Ag β'' contained four or more bands due to vibrations of the mobile cations. These results were analyzed by assuming the spectra to be due to the normal modes of a defect cluster consisting of a cation vacancy surrounded by three cations. From model calculations, the Raman band of Na β'' at 33 cm -1 is assigned to the attempt mode for diffusion of Na + ions. The structure of a Ag β'' single crystal was investigated by neutron diffraction, and 20% of the Ag + ion sites were found to be vacant

  12. Method for manufacturing a single crystal nanowire

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Berg, Albert; Bomer, Johan G.; Carlen, Edwin; Chen, S.; Kraaijenhagen, Roderik Adriaan; Pinedo, Herbert Michael

    2013-01-01

    A method for manufacturing a single crystal nano-structure is provided comprising the steps of providing a device layer with a 100 structure on a substrate; providing a stress layer onto the device layer; patterning the stress layer along the 110 direction of the device layer; selectively removing

  13. Method for manufacturing a single crystal nanowire

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Berg, Albert; Bomer, Johan G.; Carlen, Edwin; Chen, S.; Kraaijenhagen, R.A.; Pinedo, Herbert Michael

    2010-01-01

    A method for manufacturing a single crystal nano-structure is provided comprising the steps of providing a device layer with a 100 structure on a substrate; providing a stress layer onto the device layer; patterning the stress layer along the 110 direction of the device layer; selectively removing

  14. Synthesis, electronic transport and optical properties of Si:α-Fe2O3 single crystals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rettie, A.J.E.; Chemelewski, W.D.; Wygant, B.R.; Lindemuth, J.; Lin, J.F.; Eisenberg, D.; Brauer, C.S.; Johnson, T.J.; Beiswenger, T.N.; Ash, R.D.; Li, X.; Zhou, J.; Mullins, C.B.

    2016-01-01

    We report the synthesis of silicon-doped hematite (Si:alpha-Fe2O3) single crystals via chemical vapor transport, with Si incorporation on the order of 1019 cm(-3). The conductivity, Seebeck and Hall effect were measured in the basal plane between 200 and 400 K. Distinct differences in electron

  15. Inkjet printing of single-crystal films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minemawari, Hiromi; Yamada, Toshikazu; Matsui, Hiroyuki; Tsutsumi, Jun'ya; Haas, Simon; Chiba, Ryosuke; Kumai, Reiji; Hasegawa, Tatsuo

    2011-07-13

    The use of single crystals has been fundamental to the development of semiconductor microelectronics and solid-state science. Whether based on inorganic or organic materials, the devices that show the highest performance rely on single-crystal interfaces, with their nearly perfect translational symmetry and exceptionally high chemical purity. Attention has recently been focused on developing simple ways of producing electronic devices by means of printing technologies. 'Printed electronics' is being explored for the manufacture of large-area and flexible electronic devices by the patterned application of functional inks containing soluble or dispersed semiconducting materials. However, because of the strong self-organizing tendency of the deposited materials, the production of semiconducting thin films of high crystallinity (indispensable for realizing high carrier mobility) may be incompatible with conventional printing processes. Here we develop a method that combines the technique of antisolvent crystallization with inkjet printing to produce organic semiconducting thin films of high crystallinity. Specifically, we show that mixing fine droplets of an antisolvent and a solution of an active semiconducting component within a confined area on an amorphous substrate can trigger the controlled formation of exceptionally uniform single-crystal or polycrystalline thin films that grow at the liquid-air interfaces. Using this approach, we have printed single crystals of the organic semiconductor 2,7-dioctyl[1]benzothieno[3,2-b][1]benzothiophene (C(8)-BTBT) (ref. 15), yielding thin-film transistors with average carrier mobilities as high as 16.4 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1). This printing technique constitutes a major step towards the use of high-performance single-crystal semiconductor devices for large-area and flexible electronics applications.

  16. A Novel Strategy for Synthesis of Gold Nanoparticle Self Assemblies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verma, Jyoti; Lal, Sumit; van Veen, Henk A.; van Noorden, Cornelis J. F.

    2014-01-01

    Gold nanoparticle self assemblies are one-dimensional structures of gold nanoparticles. Gold nanoparticle self assemblies exhibit unique physical properties and find applications in the development of biosensors. Methodologies currently available for lab-scale and commercial synthesis of gold

  17. Self assembled monolayers of octadecyltrichlorosilane for dielectric materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, Vijay, E-mail: cirivijaypilani@gmail.com [Centre for Nanoscience and Engineering, Indian Institute of Science-Bangalore (India); Mechanical Engineering Department, Birla Institute of Technology and Science-Pilani (India); Puri, Paridhi; Nain, Shivani [Mechanical Engineering Department, Birla Institute of Technology and Science-Pilani (India); Bhat, K. N. [Centre for Nanoscience and Engineering, Indian Institute of Science-Bangalore (India); Sharma, N. N. [Mechanical Engineering Department, Birla Institute of Technology and Science-Pilani (India); School of Automobile, Mechanical & Mechatronics, Manipal University-Jaipur (India)

    2016-04-13

    Treatment of surfaces to change the interaction of fluids with them is a critical step in constructing useful microfluidics devices, especially those used in biological applications. Selective modification of inorganic materials such as Si, SiO{sub 2} and Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} is of great interest in research and technology. We evaluated the chemical formation of OTS self-assembled monolayers on silicon substrates with different dielectric materials. Our investigations were focused on surface modification of formerly used common dielectric materials SiO{sub 2}, Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} and a-poly. The improvement of wetting behaviour and quality of monolayer films were characterized using Atomic force microscope, Scanning electron microscope, Contact angle goniometer, Raman spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) monolayer deposited oxide surface.

  18. Ternary self-assemblies in water

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hill, Leila R.; Blackburn, Octavia A.; Jones, Michael W.

    2013-01-01

    The self-assembly of higher order structures in water is realised by using the association of 1,3-biscarboxylates to binuclear meta-xylyl bridged DO3A complexes. Two dinicotinate binding sites are placed at a right-angle in a rhenium complex, which is shown to form a 1 : 2 complex with α,α'-bis(E......The self-assembly of higher order structures in water is realised by using the association of 1,3-biscarboxylates to binuclear meta-xylyl bridged DO3A complexes. Two dinicotinate binding sites are placed at a right-angle in a rhenium complex, which is shown to form a 1 : 2 complex with α...

  19. Self-assembling membranes and related methods thereof

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capito, Ramille M; Azevedo, Helena S; Stupp, Samuel L

    2013-08-20

    The present invention relates to self-assembling membranes. In particular, the present invention provides self-assembling membranes configured for securing and/or delivering bioactive agents. In some embodiments, the self-assembling membranes are used in the treatment of diseases, and related methods (e.g., diagnostic methods, research methods, drug screening).

  20. Self-assembled Nanomaterials for Chemotherapeutic Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shieh, Aileen

    The self-assembly of short designed peptides into functional nanostructures is becoming a growing interest in a wide range of fields from optoelectronic devices to nanobiotechnology. In the medical field, self-assembled peptides have especially attracted attention with several of its attractive features for applications in drug delivery, tissue regeneration, biological engineering as well as cosmetic industry and also the antibiotics field. We here describe the self-assembly of peptide conjugated with organic chromophore to successfully deliver sequence independent micro RNAs into human non-small cell lung cancer cell lines. The nanofiber used as the delivery vehicle is completely non-toxic and biodegradable, and exhibit enhanced permeability effect for targeting malignant tumors. The transfection efficiency with nanofiber as the delivery vehicle is comparable to that of the commercially available RNAiMAX lipofectamine while the toxicity is significantly lower. We also conjugated the peptide sequence with camptothecin (CPT) and observed the self-assembly of nanotubes for chemotherapeutic applications. The peptide scaffold is non-toxic and biodegradable, and drug loading of CPT is high, which minimizes the issue of systemic toxicity caused by extensive burden from the elimination of drug carriers. In addition, the peptide assembly drastically increases the solubility and stability of CPT under physiological conditions in vitro, while active CPT is gradually released from the peptide chain under the slight acidic tumor cell environment. Cytotoxicity results on human colorectal cancer cells and non-small cell lung cancer cell lines display promising anti-cancer properties compared to the parental CPT drug, which cannot be used clinically due to its poor solubility and lack of stability in physiological conditions. Moreover, the peptide sequence conjugated with 5-fluorouracil formed a hydrogel with promising topical chemotherapeutic applications that also display

  1. Centrioles: Some Self-Assembly Required

    OpenAIRE

    Song, Mi Hye; Miliaras, Nicholas B.; Peel, Nina; O'Connell, Kevin F.

    2008-01-01

    Centrioles play an important role in organizing microtubules and are precisely duplicated once per cell cycle. New (daughter) centrioles typically arise in association with existing (mother) centrioles (canonical assembly), suggesting that mother centrioles direct the formation of daughter centrioles. However, under certain circumstances, centrioles can also self-assemble free of an existing centriole (de novo assembly). Recent work indicates that the canonical and de novo pathways utilize a ...

  2. Ensembles of indium phosphide nanowires: physical properties and functional devices integrated on non-single crystal platforms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kobayashi, Nobuhiko P.; Lohn, Andrew; Onishi, Takehiro [University of California, Santa Cruz (United States). Baskin School of Engineering; NASA Ames Research Center, Nanostructured Energy Conversion Technology and Research (NECTAR), Advanced Studies Laboratories, Univ. of California Santa Cruz, Moffett Field, CA (United States); Mathai, Sagi; Li, Xuema; Straznicky, Joseph; Wang, Shih-Yuan; Williams, R.S. [Hewlett-Packard Laboratories, Information and Quantum Systems Laboratory, Palo Alto, CA (United States); Logeeswaran, V.J.; Islam, M.S. [University of California Davis, Electrical and Computer Engineering, Davis, CA (United States)

    2009-06-15

    A new route to grow an ensemble of indium phosphide single-crystal semiconductor nanowires is described. Unlike conventional epitaxial growth of single-crystal semiconductor films, the proposed route for growing semiconductor nanowires does not require a single-crystal semiconductor substrate. In the proposed route, instead of using single-crystal semiconductor substrates that are characterized by their long-range atomic ordering, a template layer that possesses short-range atomic ordering prepared on a non-single-crystal substrate is employed. On the template layer, epitaxial information associated with its short-range atomic ordering is available within an area that is comparable to that of a nanowire root. Thus the template layer locally provides epitaxial information required for the growth of semiconductor nanowires. In the particular demonstration described in this paper, hydrogenated silicon was used as a template layer for epitaxial growth of indium phosphide nanowires. The indium phosphide nanowires grown on the hydrogenerated silicon template layer were found to be single crystal and optically active. Simple photoconductors and pin-diodes were fabricated and tested with the view towards various optoelectronic device applications where group III-V compound semiconductors are functionally integrated onto non-single-crystal platforms. (orig.)

  3. Ensembles of indium phosphide nanowires: physical properties and functional devices integrated on non-single crystal platforms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, Nobuhiko P.; Lohn, Andrew; Onishi, Takehiro; Mathai, Sagi; Li, Xuema; Straznicky, Joseph; Wang, Shih-Yuan; Williams, R.S.; Logeeswaran, V.J.; Islam, M.S.

    2009-01-01

    A new route to grow an ensemble of indium phosphide single-crystal semiconductor nanowires is described. Unlike conventional epitaxial growth of single-crystal semiconductor films, the proposed route for growing semiconductor nanowires does not require a single-crystal semiconductor substrate. In the proposed route, instead of using single-crystal semiconductor substrates that are characterized by their long-range atomic ordering, a template layer that possesses short-range atomic ordering prepared on a non-single-crystal substrate is employed. On the template layer, epitaxial information associated with its short-range atomic ordering is available within an area that is comparable to that of a nanowire root. Thus the template layer locally provides epitaxial information required for the growth of semiconductor nanowires. In the particular demonstration described in this paper, hydrogenated silicon was used as a template layer for epitaxial growth of indium phosphide nanowires. The indium phosphide nanowires grown on the hydrogenerated silicon template layer were found to be single crystal and optically active. Simple photoconductors and pin-diodes were fabricated and tested with the view towards various optoelectronic device applications where group III-V compound semiconductors are functionally integrated onto non-single-crystal platforms. (orig.)

  4. Cross-section of single-crystal materials used as thermal neutron filters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adib, M.

    2005-01-01

    Transmission properties of several single crystal materials important for neutron scattering instrumentation are presented. A computer codes are developed which permit the calculation of thermal diffuse and Bragg-scattering cross-sections of silicon., and sapphire as a function of material's constants, temperature and neutron energy, E, in the range 0.1 MeV .A discussion of the use of their single-crystal as a thermal neutron filter in terms of the optimum crystal thickness, mosaic spread, temperature, cutting plane and tuning for efficient transmission of thermal-reactor neutrons is given

  5. Single-Crystal Diamond Nanobeam Waveguide Optomechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khanaliloo, Behzad; Jayakumar, Harishankar; Hryciw, Aaron C.; Lake, David P.; Kaviani, Hamidreza; Barclay, Paul E.

    2015-10-01

    Single-crystal diamond optomechanical devices have the potential to enable fundamental studies and technologies coupling mechanical vibrations to both light and electronic quantum systems. Here, we demonstrate a single-crystal diamond optomechanical system and show that it allows excitation of diamond mechanical resonances into self-oscillations with amplitude >200 nm . The resulting internal stress field is predicted to allow driving of electron spin transitions of diamond nitrogen-vacancy centers. The mechanical resonances have a quality factor >7 ×105 and can be tuned via nonlinear frequency renormalization, while the optomechanical interface has a 150 nm bandwidth and 9.5 fm /√{Hz } sensitivity. In combination, these features make this system a promising platform for interfacing light, nanomechanics, and electron spins.

  6. Single-Crystal Diamond Nanobeam Waveguide Optomechanics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Behzad Khanaliloo

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Single-crystal diamond optomechanical devices have the potential to enable fundamental studies and technologies coupling mechanical vibrations to both light and electronic quantum systems. Here, we demonstrate a single-crystal diamond optomechanical system and show that it allows excitation of diamond mechanical resonances into self-oscillations with amplitude >200  nm. The resulting internal stress field is predicted to allow driving of electron spin transitions of diamond nitrogen-vacancy centers. The mechanical resonances have a quality factor >7×10^{5} and can be tuned via nonlinear frequency renormalization, while the optomechanical interface has a 150 nm bandwidth and 9.5  fm/sqrt[Hz] sensitivity. In combination, these features make this system a promising platform for interfacing light, nanomechanics, and electron spins.

  7. Single Crystals Grown Under Unconstrained Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunagawa, Ichiro

    Based on detailed investigations on morphology (evolution and variation in external forms), surface microtopography of crystal faces (spirals and etch figures), internal morphology (growth sectors, growth banding and associated impurity partitioning) and perfection (dislocations and other lattice defects) in single crystals, we can deduce how and by what mechanism the crystal grew and experienced fluctuation in growth parameters through its growth and post-growth history under unconstrained condition. The information is useful not only in finding appropriate way to growing highly perfect and homogeneous single crystals, but also in deciphering letters sent from the depth of the Earth and the Space. It is also useful in discriminating synthetic from natural gemstones. In this chapter, available methods to obtain molecular information are briefly summarized, and actual examples to demonstrate the importance of this type of investigations are selected from both natural minerals (diamond, quartz, hematite, corundum, beryl, phlogopite) and synthetic crystals (SiC, diamond, corundum, beryl).

  8. Bloch walls in a nickel single crystal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peters, J.; Treimer, W.

    2001-01-01

    We present a consistent theory for the dependence of the magnetic structure in bulk samples on external static magnetic fields and corresponding experimental results. We applied the theory of micromagnetism to this crystal and calculated the Bloch wall thickness as a function of external magnetic fields. The theoretical results agree well with the experimental data, so that the Bloch wall thickness of a 71 deg. nickel single crystal was definitely determined with some hundred of nanometer

  9. Single crystal spectrometer FOX at KENS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, M.

    2001-01-01

    Single crystal spectrometer FOX installed at H1 thermal neutron line on KENS has been renewed recently for the measurement of very weak scattering. We have installed a multidetector system of 36 linearly placed 3 He detectors with collimators instead of former four-circle diffractometer and scintillator detectors. Though the system is quite simple, a large two-dimensional reciprocal space is observed effectively with high S/N rate on new FOX. (author)

  10. Self-assembled biomimetic nanoreactors I: Polymeric template

    Science.gov (United States)

    McTaggart, Matt; Malardier-Jugroot, Cecile; Jugroot, Manish

    2015-09-01

    The variety of nanoarchitectures made feasible by the self-assembly of alternating copolymers opens new avenues for biomimicry. Indeed, self-assembled structures allow the development of nanoreactors which combine the efficiency of high surface area metal active centres to the effect of confinement due to the very small cavities generated by the self-assembly process. A novel self-assembly of high molecular weight alternating copolymers is characterized in the present study. The self-assembly is shown to organize into nanosheets, providing a 2 nm hydrophobic cavity with a 1D confinement.

  11. Preparation of high purity yttrium single crystals by electrotransport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Volkov, V.T.; Nikiforova, T.V.; Ionov, A.M.; Pustovit, A.N.; Sikharulidse, G.G.

    1981-01-01

    The possibility of obtaining yttrium crystals of high purity by the method of solid state electrotransport (SSE) was investigated in the present work. The behaviour of low contents of iron, aluminium, silicon, tantalum, copper, silver and vanadium as metallic impurities was studied using mass spectrometry. It is shown that all the impurities investigated, except copper, migrate to the anode. During electrotransfer a purification with respect to these impurities by a factor of 4 - 6 is obtained. It is proposed that the diffusion coefficients of the metallic impurities investigated are anomalously high and that the behaviour of the impurities during SSE in adapters necessitates further investigation. By using a three-stage process with intermediate removal of the anode end yttrium single crystals with a resistance ratio rho 293 /rhosub(4.2)=570 were produced. (Auth.)

  12. Low trap-state density and long carrier diffusion in organolead trihalide perovskite single crystals

    KAUST Repository

    Shi, Dong

    2015-01-29

    The fundamental properties and ultimate performance limits of organolead trihalide MAPbX3(MA = CH3NH3 +; X = Br- or I- ) perovskites remain obscured by extensive disorder in polycrystalline MAPbX3 films. We report an antisolvent vapor-assisted crystallization approach that enables us to create sizable crack-free MAPbX3 single crystals with volumes exceeding 100 cubic millimeters. These large single crystals enabled a detailed characterization of their optical and charge transport characteristics.We observed exceptionally low trap-state densities on the order of 109 to 1010 per cubic centimeter in MAPbX3 single crystals (comparable to the best photovoltaic-quality silicon) and charge carrier diffusion lengths exceeding 10 micrometers. These results were validated with density functional theory calculations.

  13. Low trap-state density and long carrier diffusion in organolead trihalide perovskite single crystals

    KAUST Repository

    Shi, Dong; Adinolfi, Valerio; Comin, Riccardo; Yuan, Mingjian; Alarousu, Erkki; Buin, Andrei K.; Chen, Yin; Hoogland, Sjoerd H.; Rothenberger, Alexander; Katsiev, Khabiboulakh; Losovyj, Yaroslav B.; Zhang, Xin; Dowben, Peter A.; Mohammed, Omar F.; Sargent, E. H.; Bakr, Osman

    2015-01-01

    The fundamental properties and ultimate performance limits of organolead trihalide MAPbX3(MA = CH3NH3 +; X = Br- or I- ) perovskites remain obscured by extensive disorder in polycrystalline MAPbX3 films. We report an antisolvent vapor-assisted crystallization approach that enables us to create sizable crack-free MAPbX3 single crystals with volumes exceeding 100 cubic millimeters. These large single crystals enabled a detailed characterization of their optical and charge transport characteristics.We observed exceptionally low trap-state densities on the order of 109 to 1010 per cubic centimeter in MAPbX3 single crystals (comparable to the best photovoltaic-quality silicon) and charge carrier diffusion lengths exceeding 10 micrometers. These results were validated with density functional theory calculations.

  14. Isotopically pure single crystal epitaxial diamond films and their preparation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Banholzer, W.F.; Anthony, T.R.; Williams, D.M.

    1992-01-01

    The present invention is directed to the production of single crystal diamond consisting of isotopically pure carbon-12 or carbon-13. In the present invention, isotopically pure single crystal diamond is grown on a single crystal substrate directly from isotopically pure carbon-12 or carbon-13. One method for forming isotopically pure single crystal diamond comprises the steps of placing in a reaction chamber a single substrate heated to an elevated diamond forming temperature. Another method for forming isotopically pure single crystal diamond comprises diffusing isotopically pure carbon-12 or carbon-13 through a metallic catalyst under high pressure to a region containing a single crystal substrate to form an isotopically pure single crystal diamond layer on said single crystal substrate

  15. Centrioles: some self-assembly required.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Mi Hye; Miliaras, Nicholas B; Peel, Nina; O'Connell, Kevin F

    2008-12-01

    Centrioles play an important role in organizing microtubules and are precisely duplicated once per cell cycle. New (daughter) centrioles typically arise in association with existing (mother) centrioles (canonical assembly), suggesting that mother centrioles direct the formation of daughter centrioles. However, under certain circumstances, centrioles can also selfassemble free of an existing centriole (de novo assembly). Recent work indicates that the canonical and de novo pathways utilize a common mechanism and that a mother centriole spatially constrains the self-assembly process to occur within its immediate vicinity. Other recently identified mechanisms further regulate canonical assembly so that during each cell cycle, one and only one daughter centriole is assembled per mother centriole.

  16. Polarized neutron reflectivity from monolayers of self-assembled magnetic nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, D; Petracic, O; Devishvili, A; Theis-Bröhl, K; Toperverg, B P; Zabel, H

    2015-04-10

    We prepared monolayers of iron oxide nanoparticles via self-assembly on a bare silicon wafer and on a vanadium film sputter deposited onto a plane sapphire substrate. The magnetic configuration of nanoparticles in such a dense assembly was investigated by polarized neutron reflectivity. A theoretical model fit shows that the magnetic moments of nanoparticles form quasi domain-like configurations at remanence. This is attributed to the dipolar coupling amongst the nanoparticles.

  17. Structural and optical studies of local disorder sensitivity in natural organic-inorganic self-assembled semiconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vijaya Prakash, G; Pradeesh, K [Nanophotonics Lab, Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology Delhi, New Delhi (India); Ratnani, R; Saraswat, K [Department of Pure and Applied Chemistry, MDS University, Ajmer (India); Light, M E [School of Chemistry, University of Southampton, Southampton (United Kingdom); Baumberg, J J, E-mail: prakash@physics.iitd.ac.i [Nanophotonic Centre, Cavendish Laboratory, University Cambridge, Cambridge CB3 OHE (United Kingdom)

    2009-09-21

    The structural and optical spectra of two related lead iodide (PbI) based self-assembled hybrid organic-inorganic semiconductors are compared. During the synthesis, depending on the bridging of organic moiety intercalated between the PbI two-dimensional planes, different crystal structures are produced. These entirely different networks show different structural and optical features, including excitonic bandgaps. In particular, the modified organic environment of the excitons is sensitive to the local disorder both in single crystal and thin film forms. Such information is vital for incorporating these semiconductors into photonic device architectures.

  18. Investigation of the structural anisotropy in a self-assembling glycinate layer on Cu(100) by scanning tunneling microscopy and density functional theory calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzmin, Mikhail; Lahtonen, Kimmo; Vuori, Leena; Sánchez-de-Armas, Rocío; Hirsimäki, Mika; Valden, Mika

    2017-07-01

    Self-assembling organic molecule-metal interfaces exhibiting free-electron like (FEL) states offers an attractive bottom-up approach to fabricating materials for molecular electronics. Accomplishing this, however, requires detailed understanding of the fundamental driving mechanisms behind the self-assembly process. For instance, it is still unresolved as to why the adsorption of glycine ([NH2(CH2)COOH]) on isotropic Cu(100) single crystal surface leads, via deprotonation and self-assembly, to a glycinate ([NH2(CH2)COO-]) layer that exhibits anisotropic FEL behavior. Here, we report on bias-dependent scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) experiments and density functional theory (DFT) calculations for glycine adsorption on Cu(100) single crystal surface. We find that after physical vapor deposition (PVD) of glycine on Cu(100), glycinate self-assembles into an overlayer exhibiting c(2 × 4) and p(2 × 4) symmetries with non-identical adsorption sites. Our findings underscore the intricacy of electrical conductivity in nanomolecular organic overlayers and the critical role the structural anisotropy at molecule-metal interface plays in the fabrication of materials for molecular electronics.

  19. Designing and building nanowires: directed nanocrystal self-assembly into radically branched and zigzag PbS nanowires

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Fan; Ma Xin; Gerlein, L Felipe; Cloutier, Sylvain G

    2011-01-01

    Lead sulfide nanowires with controllable optoelectronic properties would be promising building blocks for various applications. Here, we report the hot colloidal synthesis of radically branched and zigzag nanowires through self-attachment of star-shaped and octahedral nanocrystals in the presence of multiple surfactants. We obtained high-quality single-crystal nanowires with uniform diameter along the entire length, and the size of the nanowire can be tuned by tailoring the reaction parameters. This slow oriented attachment provides a better understanding of the intricacies of this complex nanocrystal assembly process. Meanwhile, these self-assembled nanowire structures have appealing lateral conformations with narrow side arms or highly faceted edges, where strong quantum confinement can occur. Consequently, the single-crystal nanowire structures exhibit strong photoluminescence in the near-infrared region with a large blue-shift compared to the bulk material.

  20. Guided self-assembly of nanostructured titanium oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Baoxiang; Rozynek, Zbigniew; Fossum, Jon Otto; Knudsen, Kenneth D; Yu Yingda

    2012-01-01

    A series of nanostructured titanium oxide particles were synthesized by a simple wet chemical method and characterized by means of small-angle x-ray scattering (SAXS)/wide-angle x-ray scattering (WAXS), atomic force microscope (AFM), scanning electron microscope (SEM), transmission electron microscope (TEM), thermal analysis, and rheometry. Tetrabutyl titanate (TBT) and ethylene glycol (EG) can be combined to form either TiO x nanowires or smooth nanorods, and the molar ratio of TBT:EG determines which of these is obtained. Therefore, TiO x nanorods with a highly rough surface can be obtained by hydrolysis of TBT with the addition of cetyl-trimethyl-ammonium bromide (CTAB) as surfactant in an EG solution. Furthermore, TiO x nanorods with two sharp ends can be obtained by hydrolysis of TBT with the addition of salt (LiCl) in an EG solution. The AFM results show that the TiO x nanorods with rough surfaces are formed by the self-assembly of TiO x nanospheres. The electrorheological (ER) effect was investigated using a suspension of titanium oxide nanowires or nanorods dispersed in silicone oil. Oil suspensions of titanium oxide nanowires or nanorods exhibit a dramatic reorganization when submitted to a strong DC electric field and the particles aggregate to form chain-like structures along the direction of applied electric field. Two-dimensional SAXS images from chains of anisotropically shaped particles exhibit a marked asymmetry in the SAXS patterns, reflecting the preferential self-assembly of the particles in the field. The suspension of rough TiO x nanorods shows stronger ER properties than that of the other nanostructured TiO x particles. We find that the particle surface roughness plays an important role in modification of the dielectric properties and in the enhancement of the ER effect. (paper)

  1. Guided self-assembly of nanostructured titanium oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Baoxiang; Rozynek, Zbigniew; Fossum, Jon Otto; Knudsen, Kenneth D.; Yu, Yingda

    2012-02-01

    A series of nanostructured titanium oxide particles were synthesized by a simple wet chemical method and characterized by means of small-angle x-ray scattering (SAXS)/wide-angle x-ray scattering (WAXS), atomic force microscope (AFM), scanning electron microscope (SEM), transmission electron microscope (TEM), thermal analysis, and rheometry. Tetrabutyl titanate (TBT) and ethylene glycol (EG) can be combined to form either TiOx nanowires or smooth nanorods, and the molar ratio of TBT:EG determines which of these is obtained. Therefore, TiOx nanorods with a highly rough surface can be obtained by hydrolysis of TBT with the addition of cetyl-trimethyl-ammonium bromide (CTAB) as surfactant in an EG solution. Furthermore, TiOx nanorods with two sharp ends can be obtained by hydrolysis of TBT with the addition of salt (LiCl) in an EG solution. The AFM results show that the TiOx nanorods with rough surfaces are formed by the self-assembly of TiOx nanospheres. The electrorheological (ER) effect was investigated using a suspension of titanium oxide nanowires or nanorods dispersed in silicone oil. Oil suspensions of titanium oxide nanowires or nanorods exhibit a dramatic reorganization when submitted to a strong DC electric field and the particles aggregate to form chain-like structures along the direction of applied electric field. Two-dimensional SAXS images from chains of anisotropically shaped particles exhibit a marked asymmetry in the SAXS patterns, reflecting the preferential self-assembly of the particles in the field. The suspension of rough TiOx nanorods shows stronger ER properties than that of the other nanostructured TiOx particles. We find that the particle surface roughness plays an important role in modification of the dielectric properties and in the enhancement of the ER effect.

  2. Radiation effects in corundum single crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gevorkyan, V.A.; Harutunyan, V.V.; Hakhverdyan, E.A.

    2005-01-01

    On the basis of new experimental results and analysis of publications it is shown that in the lattice of corundum crystals the high-energy particles create stable structural defects due to knocking out of atoms from normal sites of the anionic sublattice; this leads to the formation of F and F '+ centers as well as to other complex [Al i '+ F] type color centers. The essence of 'radiation memory' effect in corundum single crystals is that the high-energy particles irradiation, annealing at high temperatures and additional irradiation by X-rays result in the restoration of some spectral bands of the optical absorption in the range 200-650 nm

  3. Single Crystal Filters for Neutron Spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Habib, N.

    2008-01-01

    A study of neutron transmission properties trough a large single crystals specimens of Si, Ge, Pb, Bi and sapphire at 300 K and 80 K have been made for a wide range of neutron energies. The effectiveness of such filters is given by the ratio of the total cross-section of unwanted epithermal neutrons to that the desired thermal neutron beam and by the optimum choice of the crystal orientation, its mosaic spread, thickness and temperature.Our study indicates that sapphire is significantly more effective than the others for a wide range of neutron energies

  4. Physically unclonable cryptographic primitives using self-assembled carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Zhaoying; Comeras, Jose Miguel M. Lobez; Park, Hongsik; Tang, Jianshi; Afzali, Ali; Tulevski, George S.; Hannon, James B.; Liehr, Michael; Han, Shu-Jen

    2016-06-01

    Information security underpins many aspects of modern society. However, silicon chips are vulnerable to hazards such as counterfeiting, tampering and information leakage through side-channel attacks (for example, by measuring power consumption, timing or electromagnetic radiation). Single-walled carbon nanotubes are a potential replacement for silicon as the channel material of transistors due to their superb electrical properties and intrinsic ultrathin body, but problems such as limited semiconducting purity and non-ideal assembly still need to be addressed before they can deliver high-performance electronics. Here, we show that by using these inherent imperfections, an unclonable electronic random structure can be constructed at low cost from carbon nanotubes. The nanotubes are self-assembled into patterned HfO2 trenches using ion-exchange chemistry, and the width of the trench is optimized to maximize the randomness of the nanotube placement. With this approach, two-dimensional (2D) random bit arrays are created that can offer ternary-bit architecture by determining the connection yield and switching type of the nanotube devices. As a result, our cryptographic keys provide a significantly higher level of security than conventional binary-bit architecture with the same key size.

  5. Quantifying quality in DNA self-assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagenbauer, Klaus F.; Wachauf, Christian H.; Dietz, Hendrik

    2014-01-01

    Molecular self-assembly with DNA is an attractive route for building nanoscale devices. The development of sophisticated and precise objects with this technique requires detailed experimental feedback on the structure and composition of assembled objects. Here we report a sensitive assay for the quality of assembly. The method relies on measuring the content of unpaired DNA bases in self-assembled DNA objects using a fluorescent de-Bruijn probe for three-base ‘codons’, which enables a comparison with the designed content of unpaired DNA. We use the assay to measure the quality of assembly of several multilayer DNA origami objects and illustrate the use of the assay for the rational refinement of assembly protocols. Our data suggests that large and complex objects like multilayer DNA origami can be made with high strand integration quality up to 99%. Beyond DNA nanotechnology, we speculate that the ability to discriminate unpaired from paired nucleic acids in the same macromolecule may also be useful for analysing cellular nucleic acids. PMID:24751596

  6. Oxide nanostructures through self-assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aggarwal, S.; Ogale, S. B.; Ganpule, C. S.; Shinde, S. R.; Novikov, V. A.; Monga, A. P.; Burr, M. R.; Ramesh, R.; Ballarotto, V.; Williams, E. D.

    2001-03-01

    A prominent theme in inorganic materials research is the creation of uniformly flat thin films and heterostructures over large wafers, which can subsequently be lithographically processed into functional devices. This letter proposes an approach that will lead to thin film topographies that are directly counter to the above-mentioned philosophy. Recent years have witnessed considerable research activity in the area of self-assembly of materials, stimulated by observations of self-organized behavior in biological systems. We have fabricated uniform arrays of nonplanar surface features by a spontaneous assembly process involving the oxidation of simple metals, especially under constrained conditions on a variety of substrates, including glass and Si. In this letter we demonstrate the pervasiveness of this process through examples involving the oxidation of Pd, Cu, Fe, and In. The feature sizes can be controlled through the grain size and thickness of the starting metal thin film. Finally, we demonstrate how such submicron scale arrays can serve as templates for the design and development of self-assembled, nanoelectronic devices.

  7. Stereochemistry in subcomponent self-assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castilla, Ana M; Ramsay, William J; Nitschke, Jonathan R

    2014-07-15

    CONSPECTUS: As Pasteur noted more than 150 years ago, asymmetry exists in matter at all organization levels. Biopolymers such as proteins or DNA adopt one-handed conformations, as a result of the chirality of their constituent building blocks. Even at the level of elementary particles, asymmetry exists due to parity violation in the weak nuclear force. While the origin of homochirality in living systems remains obscure, as does the possibility of its connection with broken symmetries at larger or smaller length scales, its centrality to biomolecular structure is clear: the single-handed forms of bio(macro)molecules interlock in ways that depend upon their handednesses. Dynamic artificial systems, such as helical polymers and other supramolecular structures, have provided a means to study the mechanisms of transmission and amplification of stereochemical information, which are key processes to understand in the context of the origins and functions of biological homochirality. Control over stereochemical information transfer in self-assembled systems will also be crucial for the development of new applications in chiral recognition and separation, asymmetric catalysis, and molecular devices. In this Account, we explore different aspects of stereochemistry encountered during the use of subcomponent self-assembly, whereby complex structures are prepared through the simultaneous formation of dynamic coordinative (N → metal) and covalent (N═C) bonds. This technique provides a useful method to study stereochemical information transfer processes within metal-organic assemblies, which may contain different combinations of fixed (carbon) and labile (metal) stereocenters. We start by discussing how simple subcomponents with fixed stereogenic centers can be incorporated in the organic ligands of mononuclear coordination complexes and communicate stereochemical information to the metal center, resulting in diastereomeric enrichment. Enantiopure subcomponents were then

  8. Self-assembly of triangular metallomacrocycles using unsymmetrical bisterpyridine ligands: isomer differentiation via TWIM mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Yen-Peng; He, Yun-Jui; Lee, Yin-Hsuan; Chan, Yi-Tsu

    2015-03-21

    Three unsymmetrical, 60°-bended bisterpyridine ligands with varying phenylene spacer lengths have been synthesized via the Suzuki-Miyaura coupling reactions. Their self-assembly processes were found to be strongly dependent on the ligand geometry. Upon complexation with Zn(II) ions, only 2,4''-di(4'-terpyridinyl)-1,1':4',1''-terphenyl underwent self-selection to give a trinuclear metallomacrocycle with perfect heteroleptic connectivity and the other two afforded a mixture of constitutional isomers. The metallosupramolecular assemblies were characterized by NMR spectroscopy, electrospray mass spectrometry (ESI MS), and single-crystal X-ray diffraction. In particular, the identification of isomeric architecture was accomplished using tandem mass spectrometry (MS(2)) coupled with traveling wave ion mobility mass spectrometry (TWIM MS).

  9. Electrochemically controlled self-assembled monolayers characterized with molecular and sub-molecular resolution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Jingdong; Welinder, Anna Christina; Chi, Qijin

    2011-01-01

    Self-assembled organization of functional molecules on solid surfaces has developed into a powerful and sophisticated tool for surface chemistry and nanotechnology. A number of reviews on the topic have been available since the mid 1990s. This perspective article aims to focus on recent development...... structures and the experimental operating conditions. This is followed by discussion of two major high-resolution experimental methods, scanning tunnelling microscopy (STM) and single-crystal electrochemistry. In Section 3, we briefly address choice of supporting electrolytes and substrate surfaces......, we give examples of what can be offered by theoretical computations for the detailed understanding of the SAM electronic structures revealed by STM images. A brief summary of the current applications of SAMs in wiring metalloproteins, design and fabrication of sensors, and single-molecule electronics...

  10. The new single crystal diffractometer SC3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schefer, J.; Koch, M.; Keller, P.; Fischer, S.; Thut, R.

    1996-01-01

    Single crystal diffraction is a powerful method for the determination of precise structure parameters, superlattices, stress. Neutron single crystal diffraction gives additionally to X-rays information on magnetic structures, both commensurate and incommensurate, hydrogen positions, hydrogen bonding behavior and accurate bondlengths, e.g. important in cuprates. The method is therefore especially powerful if combined with X-ray diffraction results. The new instrument at SINQ has been designed for inorganic materials and is positioned at a thermal beam tube, pointing on a water scatterer. This scatterer is presently operating with H 2 O at ambient temperature, but a change to another medium at different temperature is possible. The instrument will be equipped with three area detectors, moving at fixed difference in 2Θ. each detector may be individually moved around a vertical circle (tilting angle γ), allowing to use not only 4-circle geometry in the temperature range from 1.5 to 380 K, but also any equipment from a dilution refrigerator (7 mK) to a heavy magnet. A high temperature furnace for 4-circle geometry is foreseen as a future option. (author) 6 figs., 1 tab., 7 refs

  11. The new single crystal diffractometer SC3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schefer, J; Koch, M; Keller, P; Fischer, S; Thut, R [Lab. for Neutron Scattering ETH Zurich, Zurich (Switzerland) and Paul Scherrer Institute, Villigen (Switzerland)

    1996-11-01

    Single crystal diffraction is a powerful method for the determination of precise structure parameters, superlattices, stress. Neutron single crystal diffraction gives additionally to X-rays information on magnetic structures, both commensurate and incommensurate, hydrogen positions, hydrogen bonding behavior and accurate bondlengths, e.g. important in cuprates. The method is therefore especially powerful if combined with X-ray diffraction results. The new instrument at SINQ has been designed for inorganic materials and is positioned at a thermal beam tube, pointing on a water scatterer. This scatterer is presently operating with H{sub 2}O at ambient temperature, but a change to another medium at different temperature is possible. The instrument will be equipped with three area detectors, moving at fixed difference in 2{Theta}. each detector may be individually moved around a vertical circle (tilting angle {gamma}), allowing to use not only 4-circle geometry in the temperature range from 1.5 to 380 K, but also any equipment from a dilution refrigerator (7 mK) to a heavy magnet. A high temperature furnace for 4-circle geometry is foreseen as a future option. (author) 6 figs., 1 tab., 7 refs.

  12. The self-assembly of monodisperse nanospheres within microtubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheng Yuebing; Juluri, Bala Krishna; Huang, Tony Jun

    2007-01-01

    Self-assembled monodisperse nanospheres within microtubes have been fabricated and characterized. In comparison with colloidal crystals formed on planar substrates, colloidal nanocrystals self-assembled in microtubes demonstrate high spatial symmetry in their optical transmission and reflection properties. The dynamic self-assembly process inside microtubes is investigated by combining temporal- and spatial-spectrophotometric measurements. The understanding of this process is achieved through both experimentally recorded reflection spectra and finite difference time domain (FDTD)-based simulation results

  13. Multifunctional Materials Based on Self Assembly of Molecular Nanostructures

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Stupp, Samuel

    2001-01-01

    .... The objective was to integrate self assembly, encoded in the triblock structure, luminescent properties, and the properties characteristic of materials that have macroscopically polar structure...

  14. Self-assembled software and method of overriding software execution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouchard, Ann M.; Osbourn, Gordon C.

    2013-01-08

    A computer-implemented software self-assembled system and method for providing an external override and monitoring capability to dynamically self-assembling software containing machines that self-assemble execution sequences and data structures. The method provides an external override machine that can be introduced into a system of self-assembling machines while the machines are executing such that the functionality of the executing software can be changed or paused without stopping the code execution and modifying the existing code. Additionally, a monitoring machine can be introduced without stopping code execution that can monitor specified code execution functions by designated machines and communicate the status to an output device.

  15. Heterogeneous self-assembled media for biopolymerization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Monnard, Pierre-Alain

    2011-01-01

    Heterogeneous media, such as micro-structured aqueous environments, could offer an alternative approach to the synthesis of biopolymers with novel functions. Structured media are here defined as specialized, self-assembled structures that are formed, e.g, by amphiphiles, such as liposomes, emulsion...... polymerization, the initial elongation rates clearly depended on the complementarity of the monomers with the templating nucleobases3. However, metal-ion catalyzed reactions deliver RNA analogs with heterogeneous linkages. Moreover, the usefulness of this medium in the form of quasi-compartmentalization extends...... beyond metal-ion catalysis reactions, as we have recently demonstrated the catalytic power of a dipeptide, SerHis, for the regioselective formation of phosphodiester bonds. These results in conjonction with the synthesis of nucleobases at -78˚C, the demonstration of ribozyme activity (RNA ligase ribozyme...

  16. Controlling water evaporation through self-assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roger, Kevin; Liebi, Marianne; Heimdal, Jimmy; Pham, Quoc Dat; Sparr, Emma

    2016-09-13

    Water evaporation concerns all land-living organisms, as ambient air is dryer than their corresponding equilibrium humidity. Contrarily to plants, mammals are covered with a skin that not only hinders evaporation but also maintains its rate at a nearly constant value, independently of air humidity. Here, we show that simple amphiphiles/water systems reproduce this behavior, which suggests a common underlying mechanism originating from responding self-assembly structures. The composition and structure gradients arising from the evaporation process were characterized using optical microscopy, infrared microscopy, and small-angle X-ray scattering. We observed a thin and dry outer phase that responds to changes in air humidity by increasing its thickness as the air becomes dryer, which decreases its permeability to water, thus counterbalancing the increase in the evaporation driving force. This thin and dry outer phase therefore shields the systems from humidity variations. Such a feedback loop achieves a homeostatic regulation of water evaporation.

  17. Beam damage of self-assembled monolayers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rieke, P.C.; Baer, D.R.; Fryxell, G.E.; Engelhard, M.H.; Porter, M.S.

    1993-01-01

    X-ray and electron beam damage studies were performed on Br-terminated and methyl-terminated alkylsilane self-assembled monolayers. X-ray beam initiated damage was primarily limited to removal of the labile Br group and did not significantly damage the hydrocarbon chain. Some of the x-ray beam damage could be attributed to low-energy electrons emitted by the non-monochromatic source, but further damage was attributed to secondary electrons produced in the sample by x-ray exposure. Electron beams caused significant damage to the hydrocarbon chains. Maximum damage occurred with a beam energy of 600 eV and a dosage of 6x10 -3 C/cm 2

  18. Self-assembling of calcium salt of the new DNA base 5-carboxylcytosine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Irrera, Simona [Department of Chemistry, SAPIENZA University of Rome, Piazzale A. Moro 5, 00185 Rome (Italy); Department of Chemistry, University College London, 20 Grodon Street, WC1H0AJ London (United Kingdom); Ruiz-Hernandez, Sergio E. [School of Chemistry, Cardiff University Main Building, Park Place, CF103AT Cardiff (United Kingdom); Reggente, Melania [Department of Basic and Applied Sciences for Engineering, SAPIENZA University of Rome, Via A. Scarpa 16, 00161 Rome (Italy); Passeri, Daniele, E-mail: daniele.passeri@uniroma1.it [Department of Basic and Applied Sciences for Engineering, SAPIENZA University of Rome, Via A. Scarpa 16, 00161 Rome (Italy); Natali, Marco [Department of Basic and Applied Sciences for Engineering, SAPIENZA University of Rome, Via A. Scarpa 16, 00161 Rome (Italy); Gala, Fabrizio [Department of Basic and Applied Sciences for Engineering, SAPIENZA University of Rome, Via A. Scarpa 16, 00161 Rome (Italy); Department of Medical-Surgical, Techno-Biomedical Sciences and Translational Medicine of SAPIENZA University of Rome, Sant’Andrea Hospital, Rome (Italy); Zollo, Giuseppe [Department of Basic and Applied Sciences for Engineering, SAPIENZA University of Rome, Via A. Scarpa 16, 00161 Rome (Italy); Rossi, Marco [Department of Basic and Applied Sciences for Engineering, SAPIENZA University of Rome, Via A. Scarpa 16, 00161 Rome (Italy); Research Center for Nanotechnology applied to Engineering of SAPIENZA University of Rome (CNIS), Piazzale A. Moro 5, 00185 Rome (Italy); Portalone, Gustavo, E-mail: gustavo.portalone@uniroma1.it [Department of Chemistry, SAPIENZA University of Rome, Piazzale A. Moro 5, 00185 Rome (Italy)

    2017-06-15

    Highlights: • Ca salt of 5-carboxylcytosine has been deposited on HOPG substrate. • Molecules self-assembled in monolayers and filaments. • Height of the features were measured by atomic force microscopy. • Ab-initio calculations confirmed the AFM results. - Abstract: Supramolecular architectures involving DNA bases can have a strong impact in several fields such as nanomedicine and nanodevice manufacturing. To date, in addition to the four canonical nucleobases (adenine, thymine, guanine and cytosine), four other forms of cytosine modified at the 5 position have been identified in DNA. Among these four new cytosine derivatives, 5-carboxylcytosine has been recently discovered in mammalian stem cell DNA, and proposed as the final product of the oxidative epigenetic demethylation pathway on the 5 position of cytosine. In this work, a calcium salt of 5-carboxylcytosine has been synthesized and deposited on graphite surface, where it forms self-assembled features as long range monolayers and up to one micron long filaments. These structures have been analyzed in details combining different theoretical and experimental approaches: X-ray single-crystal diffraction data were used to simulate the molecule-graphite interaction, first using molecular dynamics and then refining the results using density functional theory (DFT); finally, data obtained with DFT were used to rationalize atomic force microscopy (AFM) results.

  19. Molecular self-assembly in substituted alanine derivatives: XRD, Hirshfeld surfaces and DFT studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajalakshmi, Periasamy; Srinivasan, Navaneethakrishnan; Sivaraman, Gandhi; Razak, Ibrahim Abdul; Rosli, Mohd Mustaqim; Krishnakumar, Rajaputi Venkatraman

    2014-06-01

    The molecular assemblage in the crystal structures of three modified chiral amino acids, two of which are isomeric D- and L-pairs boc-L-benzothienylalanine (BLA), boc-D-benzothienylalanine (BDA) and the other boc-D-naphthylalanine (NDA) differing from this pair very slightly in the chemical modification introduced, is accurately described. The aggregation of amino acid molecules is similar in all the crystals and may be described as a twisted double helical ladder in which two complementary long helical chains formed through O-H⋯O hydrogen bonds are interconnected through the characteristic head-to-tail N-H⋯O hydrogen bonds. Thus the molecular aggregation enabled through classical hydrogen bonds may be regarded as a mimic of the characteristic double helical structure of DNA. Also, precise structural information involving these amino acid molecules with lower symmetry exhibiting higher trigonal symmetry in their self-assembly is expected to throw light on the nature and strength of intermolecular interactions and their role in self-assembly of molecular aggregates, which are crucial in developing new or at least supplement existing crystal engineering strategies. Single crystal X-ray analysis and their electronic structures were calculated at the DFT level with a detailed analysis of Hirshfeld surfaces and fingerprint plots facilitating a comparison of intermolecular interactions in building different supramolecular architectures.

  20. Self-reporting inhibitors: single crystallization process to get two optically pure enantiomers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Xinhua; Ye, Xichong; Cui, Jiaxi; Li, Bowen; Li, Na; Zhang, Jie

    2018-05-22

    Collection of two optically pure enantiomers in a single crystallization process can significantly increase the chiral separation efficiency but it's hard to realize nowadays. Herein we describe, for the first time, a self-reporting strategy for visualizing the crystallization process by a kind of dyed self-assembled inhibitors made from the copolymers with tri(ethylene glycol)-grafting polymethylsiloxane as main chains and poly(N6-methacryloyl-L-lysine) as side chains. When applied with seeds together for the fractional crystallization of conglomerates, the inhibitors can label the formation of the secondary crystals and guide us to completely separate the crystallization process of two enantiomers with colorless crystals as the first product and red crystals as the secondary product. This method leads to high optical purity of D/L-Asn·H2O (99.9 ee% for D-crystals and 99.5 ee% for L-crystals) in a single crystallization process. Moreover, it requires low feeding amount of additives and shows excellent recyclability. We foresee its great potential in developing novel chiral separation methods that can be used in different scales. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Press forging of single crystal calcium fluoride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turk, R.R.

    1975-01-01

    Single crystals of high-purity calcium fluoride have been deformed uniaxially in an attempt to improve strength and resistance to cleavage, without impairing infrared transmission. Order of magnitude increases in strength, such as those found in forged KCl, have not been attained, but fine-grained polycrystalling material has been produced which is resistant to crystalline cleavage. Deformation rates of 10 -2 min -1 , reductions of 10 to 73 percent in height, and deformation temperatures of 550 to 1000 0 C have been used. Flexural strengths over 13,000 psi and grain sizes down to 5 μm have been obtained. Reduction of residual stress through heat treatment has been studied, and resultant techniques applied before, during, and after deformation. No increase in infrared absorption has been noted at the CO laser wavelength of 5.3 μm

  2. Colour centre-free perovskite single crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petit, Pierre-Olivier; Petit, Johan; Goldner, Philippe; Viana, Bruno

    2009-01-01

    Yb 3+ :YAlO 3 (YAP) and Yb 3+ :GdAlO 3 (GAP) are interesting 1 μm high-power laser media thanks to their very good thermo-mechanical properties. However, as-grown perovskite single crystals exhibit colour centres. Parasitic thermal load generated by these centres is deleterious for high-power laser action and can lead to crystal damages. Moreover these defects decrease Yb 3+ lifetime. They are related to trapped holes on the oxygen network. In the present work, several schemes to remove colour centres are presented. Attention is focused on cerium codoping, thermal annealing under reducing atmosphere and growth of non-stoechiometric compounds.

  3. Electronic structure of single crystal C60

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, J.; Shen, Z.X.; Dessau, D.S.; Cao, R.; Marshall, D.S.; Pianetta, P.; Lindau, I.; Yang, X.; Terry, J.; King, D.M.; Wells, B.O.; Elloway, D.; Wendt, H.R.; Brown, C.A.; Hunziker, H.; Vries, M.S. de

    1992-01-01

    We report angle-resolved photoemission data from single crystals of C 60 cleaved in UHV. Unlike the other forms of pure carbon, the valence band spectrum of C 60 consists of many sharp features that can be essentially accounted for by the quantum chemical calculations describing individual molecules. This suggests that the electronic structure of solid C 60 is mainly determined by the bonding interactions within the individual molecules. We also observe remarkable intensity modulations of the photoemission features as a function of photon energy, suggesting strong final state effects. Finally, we address the issue of the band width of the HOMO state of C 60 . We assert that the width of the photoemission peak of C 60 does not reflect the intrinsic band width because it is broadened by the non 0-0 transitions via the Franck-Condon principle. Our view point provides a possible reconciliation between these photoemission data and those measured by other techniques. (orig.)

  4. Hydrogen Annealing Of Single-Crystal Superalloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smialek, James L.; Schaeffer, John C.; Murphy, Wendy

    1995-01-01

    Annealing at temperature equal to or greater than 2,200 degrees F in atmosphere of hydrogen found to increase ability of single-crystal superalloys to resist oxidation when subsequently exposed to oxidizing atmospheres at temperatures almost as high. Supperalloys in question are principal constituents of hot-stage airfoils (blades) in aircraft and ground-based turbine engines; also used in other high-temperature applications like chemical-processing plants, coal-gasification plants, petrochemical refineries, and boilers. Hydrogen anneal provides resistance to oxidation without decreasing fatigue strength and without need for coating or reactive sulfur-gettering constituents. In comparison with coating, hydrogen annealing costs less. Benefits extend to stainless steels, nickel/chromium, and nickel-base alloys, subject to same scale-adhesion and oxidation-resistance considerations, except that scale is chromia instead of alumina.

  5. Self-assembled electrical materials from contorted aromatics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Shengxiong

    This thesis describes the design, synthesis, self-assembly and electrical properties of new types of contorted polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. These topologically interesting contorted aromatics show promising transistor characteristics as new building blocks for organic field-effect transistors (OFETs) at different length scales. In chapter 2, a class of pentacenes that are substituted along their long edges with aromatic rings were synthesized. Their solid-state assemblies were studied by X-ray crystallography. Their performance as thin film transistors (TFTs) and single crystal field effect transistors (SCFETs) were systematically evaluated. A structure-property relationship between these highly phenylated pentacenes was found. Chapter 3 explores the new concept of whether a non-planar aromatic core could yield efficacious electronic materials, as the ultimate success in the organic electronics will require a holistic approach to creating new building blocks. Synthesis, functionalization and assembly of a new type of contorted hexabenzocoronene (HBC) whose aromatic core is heavily distorted away from planarity due to the steric congestion around its proximal carbons were discussed. Structural studies by X-ray crystallography showed that these HBC molecules stack into columnar structures in the solid state, which are ideal for conduction. Chapter 4 describes that microscale liquid crystalline thin film OFETs of tetradodecyloxy HBC showed the best transistor properties of all discotic columnar materials. Chapter 5 details the fabrication and characterization of nanoscale single crystalline fiber OFETs of octadodecyloxyl HBC. In Chapter 6 we show that a molecular scale monolayer of HBC acid chlorides could be self-assembled on SiO2 insulating layer and could be organized laterally between the ends of 2 nm carbon nanotube gaps to form high quality FETs that act as environmental and chemical sensors. Chapter 7 details the enforced one-dimensional photoconductivity

  6. Chlorination of irradiated polyethylene single crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grimm, H.J.

    1978-01-01

    The chlorination of electron beam-irradiation polyethylene (PE) single crystals was studied for a range of irradiation doses, temperatures, and chlorine interaction times. The results presented show that PE chlorination was quite extensive, even in unirradiated PE single crystals at 25 0 C in the dark. Electron Spin Resonance (ESR, EPR) was used in this study in order to determine the alkyl radical concentration, decay constant, and diffusivity for (unchlorinated) specimens. An alkyl radical diffusivity D/sub a/ = 1.6 x 10 -17 cm 2 /sec at 25 0 C was estimated from ESR data and alkyl radical migration as one-dimensional unsteady-state diffusion process. In irradiated PE, chlorination occurred mainly via chain reactions which were initiated by the irradiation-produced free radicals. Chlorine content values were determined by X-ray Energy Spectroscopy (XES). It was found that the magnitude of the chlorine uptake increased with increasing dose, and decreased with decreasing temperature at constant dose. Otherwise the observed PE chlorination phenomena was quite similar for all of the doses and temperatures studied here, consisting of a two step mechanism: a fast uptake which occurred between time tCl 2 = 0 - 5 minutes and a slower, approximately first-order rate of uptake which occurred between times tCl 2 = 5 - 120 minutes. Chlorination was essentially complete by time tCl 2 = 120 minutes. The rapid uptake probably occurred in the amorphous surface zones where Cl 2 is relatively high and the second, slower step was probably attributable to Cl 2 diffusion into the crystalline regions and subsequent chlorination there. Inasmuch as the PE density decreases with increasing dose (for 1-600 Mrad), Cl 2 diffusivity was enhanced, resulting in higher chlorine uptake values at higher doses

  7. Multicomponent and Dissipative Self-Assembly Approaches : Towards functional materials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boekhoven, J.

    2012-01-01

    The use of self-assembly has proven to be a powerful approach to create smart and functional materials and has led to a vast variety of successful examples. However, the full potential of self-assembly has not been reached. Despite the number of successful artificial materials based on

  8. Multivalent protein assembly using monovalent self-assembling building blocks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Petkau - Milroy, K.; Sonntag, M.H.; Colditz, A.; Brunsveld, L.

    2013-01-01

    Discotic molecules, which self-assemble in water into columnar supramolecular polymers, emerged as an alternative platform for the organization of proteins. Here, a monovalent discotic decorated with one single biotin was synthesized to study the self-assembling multivalency of this system in regard

  9. Synthetic Self-Assembled Materials in Biological Environments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Versluis, F.; van Esch, J.H.; Eelkema, R.

    2016-01-01

    Synthetic self-assembly has long been recognized as an excellent approach for the formation of ordered structures on the nanoscale. Although the development of synthetic self-assembling materials has often been inspired by principles observed in nature (e.g., the assembly of lipids, DNA,

  10. Equilibrium polymerization models of re-entrant self-assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudowicz, Jacek; Douglas, Jack F.; Freed, Karl F.

    2009-04-01

    As is well known, liquid-liquid phase separation can occur either upon heating or cooling, corresponding to lower and upper critical solution phase boundaries, respectively. Likewise, self-assembly transitions from a monomeric state to an organized polymeric state can proceed either upon increasing or decreasing temperature, and the concentration dependent ordering temperature is correspondingly called the "floor" or "ceiling" temperature. Motivated by the fact that some phase separating systems exhibit closed loop phase boundaries with two critical points, the present paper analyzes self-assembly analogs of re-entrant phase separation, i.e., re-entrant self-assembly. In particular, re-entrant self-assembly transitions are demonstrated to arise in thermally activated equilibrium self-assembling systems, when thermal activation is more favorable than chain propagation, and in equilibrium self-assembly near an adsorbing boundary where strong competition exists between adsorption and self-assembly. Apparently, the competition between interactions or equilibria generally underlies re-entrant behavior in both liquid-liquid phase separation and self-assembly transitions.

  11. Self-assembly behaviour of conjugated terthiophene surfactants in water

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Rijn, Patrick; Janeliunas, Dainius; Brizard, Aurelie M.; Stuart, Marc C. A.; Koper, Ger J. M.; Eelkema, Rienk; van Esch, Jan H.

    2011-01-01

    Conjugated self-assembled systems in water are of great interest because of their potential application in biocompatible supramolecular electronics, but so far their supramolecular chemistry remains almost unexplored. Here we present amphiphilic terthiophenes as a general self-assembling platform

  12. Freezing-induced self-assembly of amphiphilic molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albouy, P. A.; Deville, S.; Fulkar, A.; Hakouk, K.; Impéror-Clerc, M.; Klotz, M.; Liu, Q.; Marcellini, M.; Perez, J.

    The self-assembly of amphiphilic molecules usually takes place in a liquid phase, near room temperature. Here, using small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) experiments performed in real time, we show that freezing of aqueous solutions of copolymer amphiphilic molecules can induce self-assembly below 0{\\deg}C.

  13. Self-Assembly of Microscale Parts through Magnetic and Capillary Interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madan Dubey

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Self-assembly is a promising technique to overcome fundamental limitations with integrating, packaging, and general handling of individual electronic-related components with characteristic lengths significantly smaller than 1 mm. Here we describe the use of magnetic and capillary forces to self-assemble 280 µm sized silicon building blocks into interconnected structures which approach a three-dimensional crystalline configuration. Integrated permanent magnet microstructures provided magnetic forces, while a low-melting-point solder alloy provided capillary forces. A finite element model of forces between the magnetic features demonstrated the utility of magnetic forces at this size scale. Despite a slight departure from designed dimensions in the actual fabricated parts, the combination of magnetic and capillary forces improved the assembly yield to 8%, over approximately 0.1% achieved previously with capillary forces alone.

  14. Self-assembly of micro- and nano-scale particles using bio-inspired events

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McNally, H.; Pingle, M.; Lee, S.W.; Guo, D.; Bergstrom, D.E.; Bashir, R.

    2003-01-01

    High sensitivity chemical and biological detection techniques and the development of future electronic systems can greatly benefit from self-assembly processes and techniques. We have approached this challenge using biologically inspired events such as the hybridization of single (ss)- to double-stranded (ds) DNA and the strong affinity between the protein avidin and its associated Vitamin, biotin. Using these molecules, micro-scale polystyrene beads and nano-scale gold particles were assembled with high efficiency on gold patterns and the procedures used for these processes were optimized. The DNA and avidin-biotin complex was also used to demonstrate the attachment of micro-scale silicon islands to each other in a fluid. This work also provides insight into the techniques for the self-assembly of heterogeneous materials

  15. Optical characterization of single-crystal diamond grown by DC arc plasma jet CVD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hei, Li-fu; Zhao, Yun; Wei, Jun-jun; Liu, Jin-long; Li, Cheng-ming; Lü, Fan-xiu

    2017-12-01

    Optical centers of single-crystal diamond grown by DC arc plasma jet chemical vapor deposition (CVD) were examined using a low-temperature photoluminescence (PL) technique. The results show that most of the nitrogen-vacancy (NV) complexes are present as NV- centers, although some H2 and H3 centers and B-aggregates are also present in the single-crystal diamond because of nitrogen aggregation resulting from high N2 incorporation and the high mobility of vacancies under growth temperatures of 950-1000°C. Furthermore, emissions of radiation-induced defects were also detected at 389, 467.5, 550, and 588.6 nm in the PL spectra. The reason for the formation of these radiation-induced defects is not clear. Although a Ni-based alloy was used during the diamond growth, Ni-related emissions were not detected in the PL spectra. In addition, the silicon-vacancy (Si-V)-related emission line at 737 nm, which has been observed in the spectra of many previously reported microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition (MPCVD) synthetic diamonds, was absent in the PL spectra of the single-crystal diamond prepared in this work. The high density of NV- centers, along with the absence of Ni-related defects and Si-V centers, makes the single-crystal diamond grown by DC arc plasma jet CVD a promising material for applications in quantum computing.

  16. Morphology evolution of PS-b-PDMS block copolymer and its hierarchical directed self-assembly on block copolymer templates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasappa, Sozaraj; Schulte, Lars; Borah, Dipu

    2018-01-01

    Cylinder-forming polystyrene-block-polydimethylsiloxane (PS-b-PDMS, 27.2k-b-11.7k, SD39) block copolymer having a total molecular weight of 39 kg mol−1 was exploited to achieve in-plane morphologies of lines, dots and antidots. Brush-free self-assembly of the SD39 on silicon substrates was invest...... substrates provides a simplified method for surface nanopatterning, templated growth of nanomaterials and nanofabrication....... the pattern into the underlying substrate. Directed self-assembly and hierarchical directed self-assembly on block copolymer templates for confinement of dots was successfully demonstrated. The strategy for achieving multiple morphologies using one BCP by mere choice of the annealing solvents on unmodified...

  17. Toward a molecular programming language for algorithmic self-assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patitz, Matthew John

    Self-assembly is the process whereby relatively simple components autonomously combine to form more complex objects. Nature exhibits self-assembly to form everything from microscopic crystals to living cells to galaxies. With a desire to both form increasingly sophisticated products and to understand the basic components of living systems, scientists have developed and studied artificial self-assembling systems. One such framework is the Tile Assembly Model introduced by Erik Winfree in 1998. In this model, simple two-dimensional square 'tiles' are designed so that they self-assemble into desired shapes. The work in this thesis consists of a series of results which build toward the future goal of designing an abstracted, high-level programming language for designing the molecular components of self-assembling systems which can perform powerful computations and form into intricate structures. The first two sets of results demonstrate self-assembling systems which perform infinite series of computations that characterize computably enumerable and decidable languages, and exhibit tools for algorithmically generating the necessary sets of tiles. In the next chapter, methods for generating tile sets which self-assemble into complicated shapes, namely a class of discrete self-similar fractal structures, are presented. Next, a software package for graphically designing tile sets, simulating their self-assembly, and debugging designed systems is discussed. Finally, a high-level programming language which abstracts much of the complexity and tedium of designing such systems, while preventing many of the common errors, is presented. The summation of this body of work presents a broad coverage of the spectrum of desired outputs from artificial self-assembling systems and a progression in the sophistication of tools used to design them. By creating a broader and deeper set of modular tools for designing self-assembling systems, we hope to increase the complexity which is

  18. Self-assembled nanostructures in oxide ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ansari, Haris Masood

    Self-assembled nanoislands in the gadolinia-doped ceria (GDC)/ yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) system have recently been discovered. This dissertation is an attempt to study the mechanism by which these nanoislands form. Nanoislands in the GDC/YSZ system form via a strain based mechanism whereby the stress accumulated in the GDC-doped surface layer on the YSZ substrate is relieved by creation of self-assembled nanoislands by a mechanism similar to the ATG instability. Unlike what was previously believed, a modified surface layer is not required prior to annealing, that is, this modification can occur during annealing by surface diffusion of dopants from the GDC sources (distributed on the YSZ surface in either lithographically defined patch or powder form) with simultaneous breakup, which occurs at the hold temperature independent of the subsequent cooling. Additionally, we have developed a simple powder based process of producing nanoislands which bypasses lithography and thin film deposition setups. The versatility of the process is apparent in the fact that it allows us to study the effect of experimental parameters such as soak time, temperature, cooling rate and the effect of powder composition on nanoisland properties in a facile way. With the help of this process, we have shown that nanoislands are not peculiar to Gd containing oxide source materials on YSZ substrates and can also be produced with other source materials such as La2O3, Nd2O3, Sm 2O3, Eu2O3, Tb2O3 and even Y2O3, which is already present in the substrate and hence simplifies the system further. We have extended our work to include YSZ substrates of the (110) surface orientation and have found that instead of nanoisland arrays, we obtain an array of parallel nanobars which have their long axes oriented along the [1-10] direction on the YSZ-(110) surface. STEM EDS performed on both the bars and the nanoislands has revealed that they are solid YSZ-rich solid solutions with the dopant species and

  19. Study of the effect of doping on the temperature stability of the optical properties of germanium single crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Podkopaev, O. I. [Joint-Stock Company “Germanium” (Russian Federation); Shimanskiy, A. F., E-mail: shimanaf@mail.ru [Siberian Federal University (Russian Federation); Kopytkova, S. A.; Filatov, R. A. [Joint-Stock Company “Germanium” (Russian Federation); Golubovskaya, N. O. [Siberian Federal University (Russian Federation)

    2016-10-15

    The effect of doping on the optical transmittance of germanium single crystals is studied by infrared Fourier spectroscopy. It is established that the introduction of silicon and tellurium additives into germanium doped with antimony provides a means for improving the temperature stability of the optical properties of the crystals.

  20. Study of the effect of doping on the temperature stability of the optical properties of germanium single crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Podkopaev, O. I.; Shimanskiy, A. F.; Kopytkova, S. A.; Filatov, R. A.; Golubovskaya, N. O.

    2016-01-01

    The effect of doping on the optical transmittance of germanium single crystals is studied by infrared Fourier spectroscopy. It is established that the introduction of silicon and tellurium additives into germanium doped with antimony provides a means for improving the temperature stability of the optical properties of the crystals.

  1. Molecular assembly and electro polymerization of 3,4-ethylenedioxy thiophene on Au(100) single crystal electrode using in-situ electrochemical scanning tunneling microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia, Jonyl L.; Tongol, Bernard John V.; ShuehLin Yau

    2012-01-01

    Electrochemical scanning tunneling microscopy (Ec-STM) is a powerful technique that can provide molecular-level information regarding electrode surface processes in-situ in electrolyte solvent under ambient conditions. In this study, the adsorption and electro polymerization of an industrially important conducting polymer precursor, 3,4-ethylenedioxy thiophene (EDOT), on Au (100) single crystal was probed using Ec-STM. The Au (100) single crystal electrode substrate used for this study was fabricated using the well-known Clavilier's flame melting procedure. Cyclic voltammetry (CV) was used along with Ec-STM to characterize the bare, EDOT-modified, and poly(EDOT)-modified Au (100) single crystal electrode. Time-dependent Ec-STM imaging at 0.550 V showed the formation of an EDOT self-assembled monolayer through 2-D surface dillusion. The resulting EDOT molecular assembly on Au (100) single crystal electrode was found to fit in a 4√2χ3√2 unit cell. Difference in apparent corrugation between molecular rows was attributed to different angular orientation with respect to the substrate. The electro polymerization of EDOT on Au (100) single crystal electrode was done by potentiostatic and potentiodynamic methods. Both methods suggested a solution-process mechanism for EDOT electro polymerization. (author)

  2. Production and several properties of single crystal austenitic stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okamoto, Kazutaka; Yoshinari, Akira; Kaneda, Junya; Aono, Yasuhisa; Kato, Takahiko

    1998-01-01

    The single crystal austenitic stainless steels Type 316L and 304L were grown in order to improve the resistance to stress corrosion cracking (SCC) using a unidirectional solidification method which can provide the large size single crystals. The mechanical properties and the chemical properties were examined. The orientation and temperature dependence of tensile properties of the single crystals were measured. The yield stress of the single crystal steels are lower than those of the conventional polycrystal steels because of the grain boundary strength cannot be expected in the single crystal steels. The tensile properties of the single crystal austenitic stainless steel Type 316L depend strongly on the orientation. The tensile strength in orientation are about 200 MPa higher than those in the and orientations. The microstructure of the single crystal consists of a mixture of the continuous γ-austenitic single crystal matrix and the δ-ferrite phase so that the effects of the γ/δ boundaries on the chemical properties were studied. The effects of the δ-ferrite phases and the γ/δ boundaries on the resistance to SCC were examined by the creviced bent beam test (CBB test). No crack is observed in all the CBB test specimens of the single crystals, even at the γ/δ boundaries. The behavior of the radiation induced segregation (RIS) at the γ/δ boundaries in the single crystal austenitic stainless steel Type 316L was evaluated by the electron irradiation test in the high voltage electron microscope (HVEM). The depletion of oversized solute chromium at the γ/δ boundary in the single crystal austenitic stainless steel Type 316L is remarkably lower than that at the grain boundary in the polycrystalline-type 316L. (author)

  3. Self-assembled biomimetic superhydrophobic hierarchical arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hongta; Dou, Xuan; Fang, Yin; Jiang, Peng

    2013-09-01

    Here, we report a simple and inexpensive bottom-up technology for fabricating superhydrophobic coatings with hierarchical micro-/nano-structures, which are inspired by the binary periodic structure found on the superhydrophobic compound eyes of some insects (e.g., mosquitoes and moths). Binary colloidal arrays consisting of exemplary large (4 and 30 μm) and small (300 nm) silica spheres are first assembled by a scalable Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) technology in a layer-by-layer manner. After surface modification with fluorosilanes, the self-assembled hierarchical particle arrays become superhydrophobic with an apparent water contact angle (CA) larger than 150°. The throughput of the resulting superhydrophobic coatings with hierarchical structures can be significantly improved by templating the binary periodic structures of the LB-assembled colloidal arrays into UV-curable fluoropolymers by a soft lithography approach. Superhydrophobic perfluoroether acrylate hierarchical arrays with large CAs and small CA hysteresis can be faithfully replicated onto various substrates. Both experiments and theoretical calculations based on the Cassie's dewetting model demonstrate the importance of the hierarchical structure in achieving the final superhydrophobic surface states. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Thermomechanical fatigue in single crystal superalloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moverare Johan J.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Thermomechanical fatigue (TMF is a mechanism of deformation which is growing in importance due to the efficiency of modern cooling systems and the manner in which turbines and associated turbomachinery are now being operated. Unfortunately, at the present time, relatively little research has been carried out particularly on TMF of single crystal (SX superalloys, probably because the testing is significantly more challenging than the more standard creep and low cycle fatigue (LCF cases; the scarcity and relative expense of the material are additional factors. In this paper, the authors summarise their experiences on the TMF testing of SX superalloys, built up over several years. Emphasis is placed upon describing: (i the nature of the testing method, the challenges involved in ensuring that an given testing methodology is representative of engine conditions (ii the behaviour of a typical Re-containing second generation alloy such as CMSX-4, and its differing performance in out-of-phase/in-phase loading and crystallographic orientation and (iii the differences in behaviour displayed by the Re-containing alloys and new Re-free variants such as STAL15. It is demonstrated that the Re-containing superalloys are prone to different degradation mechanisms involving for example microtwinning, TCP precipitation and recrystallisation. The performance of STAL15 is not too inferior to alloys such as CMSX-4, suggesting that creep resistance itself does not correlate strongly with resistance to TMF. The implications for alloy design efforts are discussed.

  5. Cyclic deformation of Nb single crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guiu, F.; Anglada, M.

    1982-01-01

    The temperature and strain-rate dependence of the cyclic flow stress of Nb single crystals with two different axial orientations has been studied at temperatures between 175 and 350 K. This dependence is found to be independent of the crystal orientation when the internal stresses are taken into account, and the results are discussed in terms of the theory of thermally activated dislocation glide. A transition temperature can be identified at about 250 K which separates two regions with different thermally activated deformation behaviour. Above this transition temperature the strain rate can be described by a stress power law, and the activation energy can be represented by a logarithmic function of the stress, as in Escaig's model of screw dislocation mobility. In the temperature range 170 to 250 K the results are also in agreement with the more recent model proposed by Seeger. The large experimental errors inherent in the values of activation enthalpy at low stresses are emphasized and taken into account in the discussion of the results. It is suggested that either impurity-kink interactions or the flexibility of the screw dislocations are responsible for the trend towards the high values of activation enthalpy measured at the low stresses. (author)

  6. Irradiation creep in zirconium single crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MacEwen, S.R.; Fidleris, V.

    1976-07-01

    Two identical single crystals of crystal bar zirconium have been creep tested in reactor. Both specimens were preirradiated at low stress to a dose of about 4 x 10 23 n/m 2 (E > 1 MeV), and were then loaded to 25 MPa. The first specimen was loaded with reactor at full power, the second during a shutdown. The loading strain for both crystals was more than an order of magnitude smaller than that observed when an identical unirradiated crystal was loaded to the same stress. Both crystals exhibited periods of primary creep, after which their creep rates reached nearly constant values when the reactor was at power. During shutdowns the creep rates decreased rapidly with time. Electron microscopy revealed that the irradiation damage consisted of prismatic dislocation loops, approximately 13.5 nm in diameter. Cleared channels, identified as lying on (1010) planes, were also observed. The results are discussed in terms of the current theories for flux enhanced creep in the light of the microstructures observed. (author)

  7. Spall response of single-crystal copper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turley, W. D.; Fensin, S. J.; Hixson, R. S.; Jones, D. R.; La Lone, B. M.; Stevens, G. D.; Thomas, S. A.; Veeser, L. R.

    2018-02-01

    We performed a series of systematic spall experiments on single-crystal copper in an effort to determine and isolate the effects of crystal orientation, peak stress, and unloading strain rate on the tensile spall strength. Strain rates ranging from 0.62 to 2.2 × 106 s-1 and peak shock stresses in the 5-14 GPa range, with one additional experiment near 50 GPa, were explored as part of this work. Gun-driven impactors, called flyer plates, generated flat top shocks followed by spall. This work highlights the effect of crystal anisotropy on the spall strength by showing that the spall strength decreases in the following order: [100], [110], and [111]. Over the range of stresses and strain rates explored, the spall strength of [100] copper depends strongly on both the strain rate and shock stress. Except at the very highest shock stress, the results for the [100] orientation show linear relationships between the spall strength and both the applied compressive stress and the strain rate. In addition, hydrodynamic computer code simulations of the spall experiments were performed to calculate the relationship between the strain rate near the spall plane in the target and the rate of free surface velocity release during the pullback. As expected, strain rates at the spall plane are much higher than the strain rates estimated from the free surface velocity release rate. We have begun soft recovery experiments and molecular dynamics calculations to understand the unusual recompression observed in the spall signature for [100] crystals.

  8. Magnetoresistance in terbium and holmium single crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, R.L.; Jericho, M.H.; Geldart, D.J.W.

    1976-01-01

    The longitudinal magnetoresistance of single crystals of terbium and holmium metals in their low-temperature ferromagnetic phase has been investigated in magnetic fields up to 80 kOe. Typical magnetoresistance isotherms exhibit a minimum which increases in depth and moves to higher fields as the temperature increases. The magnetoresistance around 1 0 K, where inelastic scattering is negligible, has been interpreted as the sum of a negative contribution due to changes in the domain structure and a positive contribution due to normal magnetoresistance. At higher temperatures, a phenomenological approach has been developed to extract the inelastic phonon and spin-wave components from the total measured magnetoresistance. In the temperature range 4--20 0 K (approximately), the phonon resistivity varies as T 3 . 7 for all samples. Approximate upper and lower bounds have been placed on the spin-wave resistivity which is also found to be described by a simple power law in this temperature range. The implications of this result for theoretical treatments of spin-wave resistivity due to s-f exchange interactions are considered. It is concluded that the role played by the magnon energy gap is far less transparent than previously suggested

  9. Ion implantation of CdTe single crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiecek, Tomasz; Popovich, Volodymir; Bester, Mariusz; Kuzma, Marian

    2017-01-01

    Ion implantation is a technique which is widely used in industry for unique modification of metal surface for medical applications. In semiconductor silicon technology ion implantation is also widely used for thin layer electronic or optoelectronic devices production. For other semiconductor materials this technique is still at an early stage. In this paper based on literature data we present the main features of the implantation of CdTe single crystals as well as some of the major problems which are likely to occur when dealing with them. The most unexpected feature is the high resistance of these crystals against the amorphization caused by ion implantation even at high doses (10"1"7 1/cm"2). The second property is the disposal of defects much deeper in the sample then it follows from the modeling calculations. The outline of principles of the ion implantation is included in the paper. The data based on RBS measurements and modeling results obtained by using SRIM software were taken into account.

  10. Synthesis, growth, structure, mechanical and optical properties of a new semi-organic 2-methyl imidazolium dihydrogen phosphate single crystal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagapandiselvi, P., E-mail: nagapandiselvip@ssn.edu.in [Department of Physics, SSN College of Engineering, Kalavakkam (India); Baby, C. [Sophisticated Analytical Instrument Facility, Indian Institute of Technology Madras, Chennai (India); Gopalakrishnan, R. [Crystal Research Lab, Department of Physics, Anna University, Chennai (India)

    2016-09-15

    Highlights: • 2MIDP crystals were grown by slow evaporation solution growth technique. • Single crystal XRD revealed self-assembled supramolecular framework. • Z scan technique is employed for third order nonlinear optical susceptibility. • Structure-property correlation is established. - Abstract: A new semi-organic compound, 2-methyl imidazolium dihydrogen phosphate (2MIDP), was prepared and good quality single crystals of 2MIDP were grown by slow evaporation solution growth technique. Crystal structure elucidated using Single crystal XRD showed that 2MIDP crystallizes in monoclinic system with P2{sub 1}/c space group. FT-IR, UV-Vis-NIR, Fluorescence and FT-NMR spectra confirm the molecular structure of 2MIDP. The UV-Vis-NIR spectra established the suitability of the compound for NLO applications. TG-DSC showed that 2MIDP is thermally stable up to 200 °C. Mechanical characteristics like hardness number (H{sub v}), stiffness constant (C{sub 11}), yield strength (σ{sub v}), fracture toughness (K{sub c}) and brittleness index (B{sub i}) were assessed using Vicker’s microhardness tester. Third order nonlinear optical properties determined from Z-scan measurement using femto and picosecond lasers showed two photon reverse saturable absorption. The enhancement of nonlinear optical properties in femto second laser, revealed the suitability of 2MIDP for optical limiting applications.

  11. Functional self-assembled lipidic systems derived from renewable resources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silverman, Julian R; Samateh, Malick; John, George

    2016-01-01

    Self-assembled lipidic amphiphile systems can create a variety of multi-functional soft materials with value-added properties. When employing natural reagents and following biocatalytic syntheses, self-assembling monomers may be inherently designed for degradation, making them potential alternatives to conventional and persistent polymers. By using non-covalent forces, self-assembled amphiphiles can form nanotubes, fibers, and other stimuli responsive architectures prime for further applied research and incorporation into commercial products. By viewing these lipid derivatives under a lens of green principles, there is the hope that in developing a structure-function relationship and functional smart materials that research may remain safe, economic, and efficient.

  12. Equation of State for Phospholipid Self-Assembly

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marsh, Derek

    2016-01-01

    Phospholipid self-assembly is the basis of biomembrane stability. The entropy of transfer from water to self-assembled micelles of lysophosphatidylcholines and diacyl phosphatidylcholines with different chain lengths converges to a common value at a temperature of 44°C. The corresponding enthalpies...... of transfer converge at ∼-18°C. An equation of state for the free energy of self-assembly formulated from this thermodynamic data depends on the heat capacity of transfer as the sole parameter needed to specify a particular lipid. For lipids lacking calorimetric data, measurement of the critical micelle...

  13. Onset wear in self-assembled monolayers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D'Acunto, Mario

    2006-01-01

    Self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) are very useful for the systematic modification of the physical, chemical and structural properties of a surface by varying the chain length, tail group and composition. Many of these properties can be studied making use of atomic force microscopy (AFM), and the interaction between the AFM probe tip and the SAMs can also be considered an excellent reference to study the fundamental properties of dissipation phenomena and onset wear for viscoelastic materials on the nanoscale. We have performed a numerical study showing that the fundamental mechanism for the onset wear is a process of nucleation of domains starting from initial defects. An SAM surface repeatedly sheared by an AFM probe tip with enough applied loads shows the formation of progressive damages nucleating in domains. The AFM induced surface damages involve primarily the formation of radicals from the carbon chain backbones, but the deformations of the chains resulting in changes of period lattice also have to be taken into consideration. The nucleation of the wear domains generally starts at the initial surface defects where the energy cohesion between chains is lower. Moreover, the presence of surface defects is consistent with the changes in lateral force increasing the probability of the activation for the removal of carbon debris from the chain backbone. The quantification of the progressive worn area is performed making use of the Kolmogorov-Johnson-Mehl-Avrami (KJMA) theory for phase transition kinetic processes. The advantage of knowing the general conditions for onset wear on the SAM surfaces can help in studying the fundamental mechanisms for the tribological properties of viscoelastic materials, in solid lubrication applications and biopolymer mechanics

  14. Optical orientation in self assembled quantum dots

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stevens, Gregory C.

    2002-01-01

    We examined Zeeman splitting in a series of ln x Ga (1-x) As/GaAs self assembled quantum dots (SAQD's) with different pump polarisations. All these measurements were made in very low external magnetic fields where direct determination of the Zeeman splitting energy is impossible due to its small value in comparison to the photoluminescence linewidths. The use of a technique developed by M. J. Snelling allowed us to obtain the Zeeman splitting and hence the excitonic g-factors indirectly. We observed a linear low field splitting, becoming increasingly non-linear at higher fields. We attribute this non-linearity to field induced level mixing. It is believed these are the first low field measurements in these structures. A number of apparent nuclear effects in the Zeeman splitting measurements led us onto the examination of nuclear effects in these structures. The transverse and oblique Hanie effects then allowed us to obtain the sign of the electronic g-factors in two of our samples, for one sample, a (311) grown In 0.5 Ga 0.5 As/GaAs SAQD sample, we were able to ascertain the spin relaxation time, the maximum value of the nuclear field, and provide evidence of the existence of nuclear spin freezing in at least one of our samples. We have then used a novel technique investigated by D. J. Guerrier, to examine optically detected nuclear magnetic resonance in our samples. We believe this is the first such study on these structures. We could not ascertain the dipolar indium resonance signal, even though all other isotopes were seen. We have therefore suggested a number of possible mechanisms that may be responsible for the lack of an indium resonance signal. (author)

  15. Excitonic polaritons of zinc diarsenide single crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Syrbu, N.N., E-mail: sirbunn@yahoo.com [Technical University of Moldova, Chisinau, Republic of Moldova (Moldova, Republic of); Stamov, I.G. [T.G. Shevchenko State University of Pridnestrovie, Tiraspol, Republic of Moldova (Moldova, Republic of); Zalamai, V.V. [Institute of Applied Physics, Academy of Sciences of Moldova, Chisinau, Republic of Moldova (Moldova, Republic of); Dorogan, A. [Technical University of Moldova, Chisinau, Republic of Moldova (Moldova, Republic of)

    2017-02-01

    Excitonic polaritons of ZnAs{sub 2} single crystals had been investigated. Parameters of singlet excitons with Г{sub 2}¯(z) symmetry and orthoexcitons 2Г{sub 1}¯(y)+Г{sub 2}¯(x) had been determined. Spectral dependencies of ordinary and extraordinary dispersion of refractive index had been calculated using interferential reflection and transmittance spectra. It was shown, that A excitonic series were due to hole (V{sub 1}) and electron (C{sub 1}) bands. The values of effective masses of electrons (m{sub c}{sup *}=0.10 m{sub 0}) and holes (m{sub v1}{sup *}=0.89 m{sub 0}) had been estimated. It was revealed that the hole mass m{sub v1}{sup *} changes from 1.03 m{sub 0} to 0.55 m{sub 0} at temperature increasing from 10 K up to 230 K and that the electron mass m{sub c}{sup *} does not depend on temperature. The integral absorption A (eV cm{sup −1}) of the states n=1, 2 and 3 of Г{sub 2}¯(z) excitons depends on the A{sub n}≈n{sup −3} equality, which it is characteristic for S-type excitonic functions. Temperature dependences of the integral absorption of ground states for Г{sub 2}¯(z) and Г{sub 2}¯(Ñ…) excitons differ. The ground states of B and C excitons formed by V{sub 3} – C{sub 1} and V{sub 4} – C{sub 1} bands and its parameters had been determined.

  16. High quality single crystal Ge nano-membranes for opto-electronic integrated circuitry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shah, V. A.; Gammon, P. M.; Rhead, S. D.; Halpin, J. E.; Trushkevych, O.; Wilson, N. R.; Myronov, M.; Edwards, R. S.; Patchett, D. H.; Allred, P. S.; Prest, M. J.; Whall, T. E.; Parker, E. H. C.; Leadley, D. R.; Chávez-Ángel, E.; Shchepetov, A.; Prunnila, M.; Kachkanov, V.; Dolbnya, I. P.; Reparaz, J. S.

    2014-01-01

    A thin, flat, and single crystal germanium membrane would be an ideal platform on which to mount sensors or integrate photonic and electronic devices, using standard silicon processing technology. We present a fabrication technique compatible with integrated-circuit wafer scale processing to produce membranes of thickness between 60 nm and 800 nm, with large areas of up to 3.5 mm 2 . We show how the optical properties change with thickness, including appearance of Fabry-Pérot type interference in thin membranes. The membranes have low Q-factors, which allow the platforms to counteract distortion during agitation and movement. Finally, we report on the physical characteristics showing sub-nm roughness and a homogenous strain profile throughout the freestanding layer, making the single crystal Ge membrane an excellent platform for further epitaxial growth or deposition of materials

  17. High quality single crystal Ge nano-membranes for opto-electronic integrated circuitry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shah, V. A., E-mail: vishal.shah@warwick.ac.uk; Gammon, P. M. [Department of Engineering, The University of Warwick, Coventry CV4 7AL (United Kingdom); Department of Physics, The University of Warwick, Coventry CV4 7AL (United Kingdom); Rhead, S. D.; Halpin, J. E.; Trushkevych, O.; Wilson, N. R.; Myronov, M.; Edwards, R. S.; Patchett, D. H.; Allred, P. S.; Prest, M. J.; Whall, T. E.; Parker, E. H. C.; Leadley, D. R. [Department of Physics, The University of Warwick, Coventry CV4 7AL (United Kingdom); Chávez-Ángel, E. [ICN2-Institut Catala de Nanociencia i Nanotecnologia, Campus UAB, 08193 Bellaterra (Barcelona) (Spain); Department of Physics, UAB, 08193 Bellaterra (Barcelona) (Spain); Shchepetov, A.; Prunnila, M. [VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, P.O. Box 1000, FI-02044 VTT, Espoo (Finland); Kachkanov, V.; Dolbnya, I. P. [Diamond Light Source, Harwell Science and Innovation Campus, Didcot, Oxfordshire OX11 0DE (United Kingdom); Reparaz, J. S. [ICN2-Institut Catala de Nanociencia i Nanotecnologia, Campus UAB, 08193 Bellaterra (Barcelona) (Spain); and others

    2014-04-14

    A thin, flat, and single crystal germanium membrane would be an ideal platform on which to mount sensors or integrate photonic and electronic devices, using standard silicon processing technology. We present a fabrication technique compatible with integrated-circuit wafer scale processing to produce membranes of thickness between 60 nm and 800 nm, with large areas of up to 3.5 mm{sup 2}. We show how the optical properties change with thickness, including appearance of Fabry-Pérot type interference in thin membranes. The membranes have low Q-factors, which allow the platforms to counteract distortion during agitation and movement. Finally, we report on the physical characteristics showing sub-nm roughness and a homogenous strain profile throughout the freestanding layer, making the single crystal Ge membrane an excellent platform for further epitaxial growth or deposition of materials.

  18. Self-Assembled Nanostructured Health Monitoring Sensors, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The objective of the proposed NASA SBIR program is to design, fabricate and evaluate the performance of self-assembled nanostructured sensors for the health...

  19. Self-Assembling Wireless Autonomous Reconfigurable Modules (SWARM), Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Payload Systems Inc. and the MIT Space Systems Laboratory propose Self-assembling, Wireless, Autonomous, Reconfigurable Modules (SWARM) as an innovative approach to...

  20. Self-Assembly of Rod-Coil Block Copolymers

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Jenekhe, S

    1999-01-01

    ... the self-assembly of new rod-coil diblock, rod- coil-rod triblock, and coil-rod-coil triblock copolymers from solution and the resulting discrete and periodic mesostmctares with sizes in the 100...

  1. Preparation and self-assembly of amphiphilic polylysine dendrons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mirsharghi, Sahar; Knudsen, Kenneth D.; Bagherifam, Shahla

    2016-01-01

    Polylysine dendrons with lipid tails prepared by divergent solid-phase synthesis showed self-assembling properties in aqueous solutions., Herein, we present the synthesis of new amphiphilic polylysine dendrons with variable alkyl chain lengths (C1–C18) at the C-terminal. The dendrons were...... synthesized in moderate to quantitative yields by divergent solid-phase synthesis (SPS) employing an aldehyde linker. The self-assembling properties of the dendrons in aqueous solutions were studied by small angle neutron scattering (SANS) and dynamic light scattering (DLS). The self-assembling properties...... were influenced by the length of the alkyl chain and the generation number (Gn). Increasing the temperature and concentration did not have significant impact on the hydrodynamic diameter, but the self-assembling properties were influenced by the pH value. This demonstrated the need for positively...

  2. Enabling complex nanoscale pattern customization using directed self-assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doerk, Gregory S; Cheng, Joy Y; Singh, Gurpreet; Rettner, Charles T; Pitera, Jed W; Balakrishnan, Srinivasan; Arellano, Noel; Sanders, Daniel P

    2014-12-16

    Block copolymer directed self-assembly is an attractive method to fabricate highly uniform nanoscale features for various technological applications, but the dense periodicity of block copolymer features limits the complexity of the resulting patterns and their potential utility. Therefore, customizability of nanoscale patterns has been a long-standing goal for using directed self-assembly in device fabrication. Here we show that a hybrid organic/inorganic chemical pattern serves as a guiding pattern for self-assembly as well as a self-aligned mask for pattern customization through cotransfer of aligned block copolymer features and an inorganic prepattern. As informed by a phenomenological model, deliberate process engineering is implemented to maintain global alignment of block copolymer features over arbitrarily shaped, 'masking' features incorporated into the chemical patterns. These hybrid chemical patterns with embedded customization information enable deterministic, complex two-dimensional nanoscale pattern customization through directed self-assembly.

  3. Understanding emergent functions in self-assembled fibrous networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinko, Robert; Keten, Sinan

    2015-09-01

    Understanding self-assembly processes of nanoscale building blocks and characterizing their properties are both imperative for designing new hierarchical, network materials for a wide range of structural, optoelectrical, and transport applications. Although the characterization and choices of these material building blocks have been well studied, our understanding of how to precisely program a specific morphology through self-assembly still must be significantly advanced. In the recent study by Xie et al (2015 Nanotechnology 26 205602), the self-assembly of end-functionalized nanofibres is investigated using a coarse-grained molecular model and offers fundamental insight into how to control the structural morphology of nanofibrous networks. Varying nanoscale networks are observed when the molecular interaction strength is changed and the findings suggest that self-assembly through the tuning of molecular interactions is a key strategy for designing nanostructured networks with specific topologies.

  4. Synthesis and self-assembly of complex hollow materials

    KAUST Repository

    Zeng, Hua Chun

    2011-01-01

    aspects of this field of development. The synthetic methodologies can be broadly divided into three major categories: (i) template-assisted synthesis, (ii) self-assembly with primary building blocks, and (iii) induced matter relocations. In most cases

  5. Low temperature self-assembled growth of rutile TiO2/manganese oxide nanocrystalline films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Zhenya; Zhou, Daokun; Du, Jianhua; Xie, Yuxing

    2017-10-01

    We report formation of rutile TiO2 nanocrystal at low temperature range in the presence of α-MnO2 which self-assembled onto sulfanyl radical activated silicon oxide substrate. SEM, HRTEM, XPS and Raman spectroscopy were used to study the morphology and oxidation state of synthesised crystals. The results showed that when the α-MnO2 was reduced to Mn3O4, it induced the formation of rutile instead of anatase phase in the TiCl4-HCl aqueous system. The finding will promote the understanding of phase transformation mechanism when manganese oxide and titanium oxide co-exist in soil and water environment.

  6. Photoconductivity of nanowires that are self-assembled from chiral porphyrins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menko, J. G.; Smith, W. F.; Lu, Y.; Johnson, A. T.; Iavicoli, P.

    2010-03-01

    Recently synthesized chiral porphyrin moleculesfootnotetextM. Linares, P. Iavicoli, K. Psychogyiopoulou, D. Beljonne, S. De Feyter, D. B. Amabilino, and R. Lazzaroni, Langmuir 2008, 24, 9566-9574. in a methlocyclohexane solvent self-assemble into aggregates which appear as a network of nanoscale filaments when deposited onto oxidized silicon. We have shown in preliminary experiments conducted in air that the aggregates are photoconductive, with an action spectrum (photoconductivity vs. wavelength) that matches the in-solution absorbance curve. We discuss these results, and also experiments conducted in a dry nitrogen environment.

  7. Formation of self assembled PbTe quantum dots in CdTe on Si(111)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felder, F.; Fognini, A.; Rahim, M.; Fill, M.; Müller, E.; Zogg, H.

    2010-01-01

    We describe the growth and formation of self assembled PbTe quantum dots in a CdTe host on a silicon (111) substrate. Annealing yields different photoluminescence spectra depending on initial PbTe layer thickness, thickness of the CdTe cap layer and annealing temperature. Generally two distinct emission peaks at ˜0.3 eV and ˜0.45 eV are visible. Model calculations explaining their temperature dependence are performed. The dot size corresponds well with the estimated sizes from electron microscopy images. The quantum dots may be used as absorber within a mid-infrared detector.

  8. RT Self-assembly of Silica Nanoparticles on Optical Fibres

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Canning, John; Lindoy, Lachlan; Huyang, George

    2013-01-01

    The room temperature deposition of self-assembling silica nanoparticles onto D-shaped optical fibres x201c;D-fibrex201d;), drawn from milled preforms fabricated by modified chemical vapor deposition, is studied and preliminary results reported here.......The room temperature deposition of self-assembling silica nanoparticles onto D-shaped optical fibres x201c;D-fibrex201d;), drawn from milled preforms fabricated by modified chemical vapor deposition, is studied and preliminary results reported here....

  9. Mesoscopic Self-Assembly: A Shift to Complexity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Massimo eMastrangeli

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available By focusing on the construction of thermodynamically stable structures, the self-assembly of mesoscopic systems has proven capable of formidable achievements in the bottom-up engineering of micro- and nanosystems. Yet, inspired by an analogous evolution in supramolecular chemistry, synthetic mesoscopic self-assembly may have a lot more ahead, within reach of a shift toward fully three-dimensional architectures, collective interactions of building blocks and kinetic control. All over these challenging fronts, complexity holds the key.

  10. Construction of Supramolecular Architectures via Self-assembly

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Takeharu; Haino

    2007-01-01

    1 Results In this paper we report supramolecular polymeric nano networks formed by the molecular-recognition-directed self-assembly between a calix[5]arene and C60[1]. Covalently-linked double-calix[5]arenes take up C60 into their cavities[2]. This complementary interaction creates a strong non-covalent bonding; thus,the iterative self-assembly between dumbbell fullerene 1 and ditopic host 2 can produce the supramolecular polymer networks (See Fig.1).

  11. Reshock and release response of aluminum single crystal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, H.; Asay, J. R.

    2007-01-01

    Reshock and release experiments were performed on single crystal aluminum along three orientations and on polycrystalline 1050 aluminum with 50 μm grain size at shock stresses of 13 and 21 GPa to investigate the mechanisms for previously observed quasielastic recompression behavior. Particle velocity profiles obtained during reshocking both single crystals and polycrystalline aluminum from initial shock stresses of 13-21 GPa show similar quasielastic recompression behavior. Quasielastic release response is also observed in all single crystals, but the magnitude of the effect is crystal orientation dependent, with [111] and [110] exhibiting more ideal elastic-plastic release for unloading from the shocked state than for the [100] orientation and polycrystalline aluminum. The quasielastic response of 1050 aluminum is intermediate to that of the [100] and [111] orientations. Comparison of the wave profiles obtained for both unloading and reloading of single crystals and polycrystalline 1050 aluminum from shocked states suggests that the observed quasielastic response of polycrystalline aluminum results from the averaging response of single crystals for shock propagation along different orientations, and that the response of 1050 aluminum with large grain boundaries is not significantly different from the results obtained on single crystal aluminum. The yield strength of the single crystals and 1050 aluminum is found to increase with shock stress, which is consistent with previous results [H. Huang and I. R. Asay, J. Appl. Phys. 98, 033524 (2005)

  12. Ultra-large single crystals by abnormal grain growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusama, Tomoe; Omori, Toshihiro; Saito, Takashi; Kise, Sumio; Tanaka, Toyonobu; Araki, Yoshikazu; Kainuma, Ryosuke

    2017-08-25

    Producing a single crystal is expensive because of low mass productivity. Therefore, many metallic materials are being used in polycrystalline form, even though material properties are superior in a single crystal. Here we show that an extraordinarily large Cu-Al-Mn single crystal can be obtained by abnormal grain growth (AGG) induced by simple heat treatment with high mass productivity. In AGG, the sub-boundary energy introduced by cyclic heat treatment (CHT) is dominant in the driving pressure, and the grain boundary migration rate is accelerated by repeating the low-temperature CHT due to the increase of the sub-boundary energy. With such treatment, fabrication of single crystal bars 70 cm in length is achieved. This result ensures that the range of applications of shape memory alloys will spread beyond small-sized devices to large-scale components and may enable new applications of single crystals in other metallic and ceramics materials having similar microstructural features.Growing large single crystals cheaply and reliably for structural applications remains challenging. Here, the authors combine accelerated abnormal grain growth and cyclic heat treatments to grow a superelastic shape memory alloy single crystal to 70 cm.

  13. Single-crystal growth of ceria-based materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ulbrich, Gregor

    2015-01-01

    In this work it could be shown that Skull-Melting is a suitable method for growing ceria single crystals. Twenty different ceria-based single crystals could be manufactured. It was possible to dope ceria single crystals with Gd, Sm, Y, Zr, Ti, Ta, and Pr in different concentrations. Also co-doping with the named metals was realized. However, there remain some problems for growing ceria-based single crystals by Skull-Melting. As ignition metal zirconium was used because no ceria-based material works well. For that reason all single crystals show small zirconium contamination. Another problem is the formation of oxygen by the heat-induced reduction of ceria during the melting process. Because of that the skull of sintered material is often destroyed by gas pressure. This problem had to be solved individually for every single crystal. The obtained single crystals were characterized using different methods. To ensure the single crystal character the y were examined by Laue diffraction. All manufactured crystals are single crystals. Also powder diffraction patterns of the milled and oxidized samples were measured. For the determination of symmetry and metric the structural parameters were analyzed by the Rietveld method. All synthesized materials crystallize in space group Fm-3m known from calcium fluoride. The cubic lattice parameter a was determined for all crystals. In the case of series with different cerium and zirconium concentrations a linear correlation between cerium content and cubic lattice parameter was detected. The elemental composition was determined by WDX. All crystals show a homogeneous elemental distribution. The oxygen content was calculated because the WDX method isn't useful for determination.

  14. Design strategies for self-assembly of discrete targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Madge, Jim; Miller, Mark A.

    2015-01-01

    Both biological and artificial self-assembly processes can take place by a range of different schemes, from the successive addition of identical building blocks to hierarchical sequences of intermediates, all the way to the fully addressable limit in which each component is unique. In this paper, we introduce an idealized model of cubic particles with patterned faces that allows self-assembly strategies to be compared and tested. We consider a simple octameric target, starting with the minimal requirements for successful self-assembly and comparing the benefits and limitations of more sophisticated hierarchical and addressable schemes. Simulations are performed using a hybrid dynamical Monte Carlo protocol that allows self-assembling clusters to rearrange internally while still providing Stokes-Einstein-like diffusion of aggregates of different sizes. Our simulations explicitly capture the thermodynamic, dynamic, and steric challenges typically faced by self-assembly processes, including competition between multiple partially completed structures. Self-assembly pathways are extracted from the simulation trajectories by a fully extendable scheme for identifying structural fragments, which are then assembled into history diagrams for successfully completed target structures. For the simple target, a one-component assembly scheme is most efficient and robust overall, but hierarchical and addressable strategies can have an advantage under some conditions if high yield is a priority

  15. Spherical Nb single crystals containerlessly grown by electrostatic levitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sung, Y.S.; Takeya, H.; Hirata, K.; Togano, K.

    2003-01-01

    Spherical Nb (T m =2750 K) single crystals were grown via containerless electrostatic levitation (ESL). Samples became spherical at melting in levitation and undercooled typically 300-450 K prior to nucleation. As-processed samples were still spherical without any macroscopic shape change by solidification showing a uniform dendritic surface morphology. Crystallographic {111} planes exposed in equilateral triangular shapes on the surface by preferential macroetching and spotty back-reflection Laue patterns confirm the single crystal nature of the ESL-processed Nb samples. No hysteresis in magnetization between zero field and field cooling also implies a clean defect-free condition of the spherical Nb single crystals

  16. Electroerosion impulse effect on W single crystal structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aleshina, S.A.; Khvostikova, V.D.; Zolotykh, B.N.; Marchuk, A.I.

    1977-01-01

    The mechanism has been studied of brittle failure of single crystal tungsten on planes of crystallographic orientations [100], [110]; [111] in the process of electro-erosion machining by pulses of energies ranging from 1200 to 5000 μJ and of duration of 1 μs. It is shown that the electro-erosion machining of single crystal tungsten is characterized by the formation of a defect layer with a grid of microcracks which lie at a depth of approximately 80 μm. The appearance and the distribution of cracks on the surface of single crystals depends on the crystallogrpahic orientation

  17. Dielectric and baric characteristics of TlS single crystal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mustafaeva, S.N., E-mail: solmust@gmail.com [Institute of Physics, ANAS, G. Javid prosp. 33, Az 1143 Baku (Azerbaijan); Asadov, M.M. [Institute of Chemical Problems, ANAS, G. Javid prosp. 29, Az 1143 Baku (Azerbaijan); Ismailov, A.A. [Institute of Physics, ANAS, G. Javid prosp. 33, Az 1143 Baku (Azerbaijan)

    2014-11-15

    The investigation of the frequency dependences of the dielectric coefficients and ac-conductivity of the TlS single crystals made it possible to elucidate the nature of dielectric loss and the charge transfer mechanism. Moreover, we evaluated the density and energy spread of localized states near the Fermi level, the average hopping time and the average hopping length. It was shown that the dc-conductivity of the TlS single crystals can be controlled by varying the hydrostatic pressure. This has opened up possibilities for using TlS single crystals as active elements of pressure detectors.

  18. Growth of Ga2O3 single crystal

    OpenAIRE

    龍見, 雅美; 小池, 裕之; 市木, 伸明; Tatsumi, Masami; Koike, Hiroyuki; Ichiki, Nobuaki

    2010-01-01

    Single crystals of β-Ga2O3 for substrates of GaN LED were grown by Floating Zone(FZ) method. The transparent single crystals of 5-6 mm in diameter were reproducibly obtained by applying necking procedure and the preferential growth direction was . Many cracks were induced along the cleavage plane of (100) in slicing process, which is related to thermal stress and the growth direction. However, this preliminary growth experiments suggested that β-Ga2O3 single crystal is promising as a substrat...

  19. The Self-Assembly of Nanogold for Optical Metamaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nidetz, Robert A.

    2011-12-01

    Optical metamaterials are an emerging field that enables manipulation of light like never before. Producing optical metamaterials requires sub-wavelength building blocks. The focus here was to develop methods to produce building blocks for metamaterials from nanogold. Electron-beam lithography was used to define an aminosilane patterned chemical template in order to electrostatically self-assemble citrate-capped gold nanoparticles. Equilibrium self-assembly was achieved in 20 minutes by immersing chemical templates into gold nanoparticle solutions. The number of nanoparticles that self-assembled on an aminosilane dot was controlled by manipulating the diameters of the dots and nanoparticles. Adding salt to the nanoparticle solution enabled the nanoparticles to self-assemble in greater numbers on the same sized dot. However, the preparation of the nanoparticle solution containing salt was sensitive to spikes in the salt concentration which led to aggregation of the nanoparticles and non-specific deposition. Gold nanorods were also electrostatically self-assembled. Polyelectrolyte-coated gold nanorods were patterned with limited success. A polyelectrolyte chemical template also patterned gold nanorods, but the gold nanorods preferred to pattern on the edges of the pattern. Ligand-exchanged gold nanorods displayed the best self-assembly, but suffered from slow kinetics. Self-assembled gold nanoparticles were cross-linked with poly(diallyldimethylammonium chloride). The poly(diallyldimethylammonium chloride) allowed additional nanoparticles to pattern on top of the already patterned nanoparticles. Cross-linked nanoparticles were lifted-off of the substrate by sonication in a sodium hydroxide solution. The presence of van der Waals forces and/or amine bonding prevent the nanogold from lifting-off without sonication. A good-solvent evaporation process was used to self-assemble poly(styrene) coated gold nanoparticles into spherical microbead assemblies. The use of larger

  20. New self-assembled material based on Ru nanoparticles and 4-sulfocalix[4]arene as an efficient and recyclable catalyst for reduction of brilliant yellow azo dye in water: a new model catalytic reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rambabu, Darsi; Pradeep, Chullikkattil P.; Dhir, Abhimanew, E-mail: abhimanew@iitmandi.ac.in [Indian Institute of Technology (India)

    2016-12-15

    New self-assembled material (Ru@SC) with ruthenium nanoparticles (Ru NPs) and 4-sulfocalix[4]arene (SC) is synthesized in water at room temperature. Ru@SC is characterized by thermal gravimetric analysis, FT-IR, powder x-ray diffraction, TEM and SEM analysis. The size of Ru nanoparticles in the self-assembly is approximately 5 nm. The self-assembled material Ru@SC shows an efficient catalytic reduction of toxic ‘brilliant yellow’ (BY) azo dye. The reduced amine products were successfully separated and confirmed by single-crystal XRD, NMR and UV-Vis spectroscopy. Ru@SC showed a better catalytic activity in comparison with commercial catalysts Ru/C (ruthenium on charcoal 5 %) and Pd/C (palladium on charcoal 5 and 10 %). The catalyst also showed a promising recyclability and heterogeneous nature as a catalyst for reduction of ‘BY’ azo dye.

  1. Investigations of morphological changes during annealing of polyethylene single crystals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tian, M.; Loos, J.

    2001-01-01

    The morphological evolution of isolated individual single crystals deposited on solid substrates was investigated during annealing experiments using in situ and ex situ atomic force microscopy techniques. The crystal morphology changed during annealing at temperatures slightly above the original

  2. Single Crystals of Organolead Halide Perovskites: Growth, Characterization, and Applications

    KAUST Repository

    Peng, Wei

    2017-01-01

    Despite their outstanding charge transport characteristics, organolead halide perovskite single crystals grown by hitherto reported crystallization methods are not suitable for most optoelectronic devices due to their small aspect ratios

  3. High-quality single crystals for neutron experiments

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    studies and our collaborative research projects with other UK and international groups will be discussed. Keywords. Crystal growth; floating zone method; neutron scattering. ... of single crystals of new materials is a highly competitive business.

  4. Single crystal magnetisation of UFe10Mo2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Estrela, P.; Godinho, M.; Spirlet, J.C.

    1997-01-01

    Magnetisation measurements have been performed for different directions on aligned UFe 10 Mo 2 single crystals. The results confirm a basal plane anisotropy and suggest an important magnetic contribution from the uranium sublattice. (orig.)

  5. Distributed Feedback Laser Based on Single Crystal Perovskite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Shang; Xiao, Shumin; Song, Qinghai

    2017-06-01

    We demonstrate a single crystal perovskite based, with grating-structured photoresist on top, highly polarized distributed feedback laser. A lower laser threshold than the Fabry-Perot mode lasers from the same single crystal CH3NH3PbBr3 microplate was obtained. Single crystal CH3NH3PbBr3 microplates was synthesized with one-step solution processed precipitation method. Once the photoresist on top of the microplate was patterned with electron beam, the device was realized. This one-step fabrication process utilized the advantage of single crystal to the greatest extend. The ultra-low defect density in single crystalline microplate offer an opportunity for lower threshold lasing action compare with poly-crystal perovskite films. In the experiment, the lasing action based on the distributed feedback grating design was found with lower threshold and higher intensity than the Fabry-Perot mode lasers supported by the flat facets of the same microplate.

  6. Growth and characterization of nonlinear optical single crystals: bis ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    molecules have received great attention for NLO applica- tions. However ... Figure 3. Single crystals of bis(cyclohexylammonium) terephthalate (crystal a) and cyclohexylammo- .... from ground state to higher energy states.17 Optical window ...

  7. Prospects for the synthesis of large single-crystal diamonds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khmelnitskiy, R A

    2015-01-01

    The unique properties of diamond have stimulated the study of and search for its applications in many fields, including optics, optoelectronics, electronics, biology, and electrochemistry. Whereas chemical vapor deposition allows the growth of polycrystalline diamond plates more than 200 mm in diameter, most current diamond application technologies require large-size (25 mm and more) single-crystal diamond substrates or films suitable for the photolithography process. This is quite a challenge, because the largest diamond crystals currently available are 10 mm or less in size. This review examines three promising approaches to fabricating large-size diamond single crystals: growing large-size single crystals, the deposition of heteroepitaxial diamond films on single-crystal substrates, and the preparation of composite diamond substrates. (reviews of topical problems)

  8. How far could energy transport within a single crystal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yifan; Che, Yanke; Zhao, Jincai; Steve, Granick

    Efficient transport of excitation energy over long distance is a vital process in light-harvesting systems and molecular electronics. The energy transfer distance is largely restricted by the probability decay of the exciton when hopping within a single crystal. Here, we fabricated an organic single crystal within which the energy could transfer more than 100 μm, a distance only limited by its crystal size. Our system could be regarded as a ``Sprint relay game'' performing on different surface of tracks. Photoinduced ``athletes'' (excitons) triggered intermolecular ``domino'' reaction to propagate energy for a long distance. In addition, athletes with the same ability runs much farther on smooth ideal track (single crystal assembled from merely van der Waals interaction) than bumpy mud track (crystal assembled from combination of pi-stacking, hydrogen bond and van der Waals interactions). Our finding presents new physics on enhancing energy transfer length within a single crystal. Current Affiliation: Institute for Basic Science, South Korea.

  9. Supramolecular Self-Assembly of Histidine-Capped-Dialkoxy-Anthracene: A Visible Light Triggered Platform for facile siRNA Delivery

    KAUST Repository

    Patil, Sachin

    2016-06-29

    Supramolecular self-assembly of histidine-capped-dialkoxy-anthracene (HDA) results in the formation of light responsive nanostructures.Single-crystal X-ray diffraction analysis of HDA shows two types of hydrogen bonding. The first hydrogen bond is established between the imidazole moieties while the second involves the oxygen atom of one amide group and the hydrogen atom of a second amide group. When protonated in acidic aqueous media, HDA successfully complexes siRNA yielding spherical nanostructures. This biocompatible platform controllably delivers siRNA with high efficacy upon visible light irradiation leading up to 90% of gene silencing in live cells.

  10. Self-assembled tethered bimolecular lipid membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinner, Eva-Kathrin; Ritz, Sandra; Naumann, Renate; Schiller, Stefan; Knoll, Wolfgang

    2009-01-01

    This chapter describes some of the strategies developed in our group for designing, constructing and structurally and functionally characterizing tethered bimolecular lipid membranes (tBLM). We introduce this platform as a novel model membrane system that complements the existing ones, for example, Langmuir monolayers, vesicular liposomal dispersions and bimolecular ("black") lipid membranes. Moreover, it offers the additional advantage of allowing for studies of the influence of membrane structure and order on the function of integral proteins, for example, on how the composition and organization of lipids in a mixed membrane influence the ion translocation activity of integral channel proteins. The first strategy that we introduce concerns the preparation of tethered monolayers by the self-assembly of telechelics. Their molecular architecture with a headgroup, a spacer unit (the "tether") and the amphiphile that mimics the lipid molecule allows them to bind specifically to the solid support thus forming the proximal layer of the final architecture. After fusion of vesicles that could contain reconstituted proteins from a liposomal dispersion in contact to this monolayer the tethered bimolecular lipid membrane is obtained. This can then be characterized by a broad range of surface analytical techniques, including surface plasmon spectroscopies, the quartz crystal microbalance, fluorescence and IR spectroscopies, and electrochemical techniques, to mention a few. It is shown that this concept allows for the construction of tethered lipid bilayers with outstanding electrical properties including resistivities in excess of 10 MOmega cm2. A modified strategy uses the assembly of peptides as spacers that couple covalently via their engineered sulfhydryl or lipoic acid groups at the N-terminus to the employed gold substrate, while their C-terminus is being activated afterward for the coupling of, for example, dimyristoylphosphatidylethanol amine (DMPE) lipid molecules

  11. Nanomechanical resonant structures in single-crystal diamond

    OpenAIRE

    Burek, Michael J.; Ramos, Daniel; Patel, Parth; Frank, Ian W.; Lončar, Marko

    2013-01-01

    With its host of outstanding material properties, single-crystal diamond is an attractive material for nanomechanical systems. Here, the mechanical resonance characteristics of freestanding, single-crystal diamond nanobeams fabricated by an angled-etching methodology are reported. Resonance frequencies displayed evidence of significant compressive stress in doubly clamped diamond nanobeams, while cantilever resonance modes followed the expected inverse-length-squared trend. Q-factors on the o...

  12. LASER PROCESSING ON SINGLE CRYSTALS BY UV PULSE LASER

    OpenAIRE

    龍見, 雅美; 佐々木, 徹; 高山, 恭宜

    2009-01-01

    Laser processing by using UV pulsed laser was carried out on single crystal such as sapphire and diamond in order to understand the fundamental laser processing on single crystal. The absorption edges of diamond and sapphire are longer and shorter than the wave length of UV laser, respectively. The processed regions by laser with near threshold power of processing show quite different state in each crystal.

  13. Radiation hardness of a single crystal CVD diamond detector for MeV energy protons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sato, Yuki, E-mail: y.sato@riken.jp [The Institute of Physical and Chemical Research (RIKEN), 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Shimaoka, Takehiro; Kaneko, Junichi H. [Graduate School of Engineering, Hokkaido University, N13, W8, Sapporo 060-8628 (Japan); Murakami, Hiroyuki [The Institute of Physical and Chemical Research (RIKEN), 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Isobe, Mitsutaka; Osakabe, Masaki [National Institute for Fusion Science, 322-6, Oroshi-cho Toki-city, Gifu 509-5292 (Japan); Tsubota, Masakatsu [Graduate School of Engineering, Hokkaido University, N13, W8, Sapporo 060-8628 (Japan); Ochiai, Kentaro [Fusion Research and Development Directorate, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai-mura, Naka-gun, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Chayahara, Akiyoshi; Umezawa, Hitoshi; Shikata, Shinichi [National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), 1-8-31 Midorigaoka, Ikeda, Osaka 563-8577 (Japan)

    2015-06-01

    We have fabricated a particle detector using single crystal diamond grown by chemical vapor deposition. The irradiation dose dependence of the output pulse height from the diamond detector was measured using 3 MeV protons. The pulse height of the output signals from the diamond detector decreases as the amount of irradiation increases at count rates of 1.6–8.9 kcps because of polarization effects inside the diamond crystal. The polarization effect can be cancelled by applying a reverse bias voltage, which restores the pulse heights. Additionally, the radiation hardness performance for MeV energy protons was compared with that of a silicon surface barrier detector.

  14. Cerium-doped single crystal and transparent ceramic lutetium aluminum garnet scintillators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cherepy, Nerine J.; Kuntz, Joshua D.; Tillotson, Thomas M.; Speaks, Derrick T.; Payne, Stephen A.; Chai, B.H.T.; Porter-Chapman, Yetta; Derenzo, Stephen E.

    2007-01-01

    For rapid, unambiguous isotope identification, scintillator detectors providing high-resolution gamma ray spectra are required. We have fabricated Lutetium Aluminum Garnet (LuAG) using transparent ceramic processing, and report a 2-mm thick ceramic exhibiting 75% transmission and light yield comparable to single-crystal LuAG:Ce. The LuAG:Ce luminescence peaks at 550 nm, providing an excellent match for Silicon Photodiode readout. LuAG is dense (6.67 g/cm 3 ) and impervious to water, exhibits good proportionality and a fast decay (∼40 ns), and we measure light yields in excess of 20,000 photons/MeV

  15. Directed Self-Assembly of Star-Block Copolymers by Topographic Nanopatterns through Nucleation and Growth Mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnan, Mohan Raj; Lu, Kai-Yuan; Chiu, Wen-Yu; Chen, I-Chen; Lin, Jheng-Wei; Lo, Ting-Ya; Georgopanos, Prokopios; Avgeropoulos, Apostolos; Lee, Ming-Chang; Ho, Rong-Ming

    2018-04-01

    Exploring the ordering mechanism and dynamics of self-assembled block copolymer (BCP) thin films under confined conditions are highly essential in the application of BCP lithography. In this study, it is aimed to examine the self-assembling mechanism and kinetics of silicon-containing 3-arm star-block copolymer composed of polystyrene (PS) and poly(dimethylsiloxane) blocks as nanostructured thin films with perpendicular cylinders and controlled lateral ordering by directed self-assembly using topographically patterned substrates. The ordering process of the star-block copolymer within fabricated topographic patterns with PS-functionalized sidewall can be carried out through the type of secondary (i.e., heterogeneous) nucleation for microphase separation initiated from the edge and/or corner of the topographic patterns, and directed to grow as well-ordered hexagonally packed perpendicular cylinders. The growth rate for the confined microphase separation is highly dependent upon the dimension and also the geometric texture of the preformed pattern. Fast self-assembly for ordering of BCP thin film can be achieved by lowering the confinement dimension and also increasing the concern number of the preformed pattern, providing a new strategy for the design of BCP lithography from the integration of top-down and bottom-up approaches. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Three-Dimensional Self-Assembled Photonic Crystal Waveguide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baek, Kang-Hyun

    Photonic crystals (PCs), two- or three-dimensionally periodic, artificial, and dielectric structures, have a specific forbidden band for electromagnetic waves, referred to as photonic bandgap (PBG). The PBG is analogous to the electronic bandgap in natural crystal structures with periodic atomic arrangement. A well-defined and embedded planar, line, or point defect within the PCs causes a break in its structural periodicity, and introduces a state in the PBG for light localization. It offers various applications in integrated optics and photonics including optical filters, sharp bending light guides and very low threshold lasers. Using nanofabrication processes, PCs of the 2-D slab-type and 3-D layer-by-layer structures have been investigated widely. Alternatively, simple and low-cost self-assembled PCs with full 3-D PBG, inverse opals, have been suggested. A template with face centered cubic closed packed structure, opal, may initially be built by self-assembly of colloidal spheres, and is selectively removed after infiltrating high refractive index materials into the interstitials of spheres. In this dissertation, the optical waveguides utilizing the 3-D self-assembled PCs are discussed. The waveguides were fabricated by microfabrication technology. For high-quality colloidal silica spheres and PCs, reliable synthesis, self-assembly, and characterization techniques were developed. Its theoretical and experimental demonstrations are provided and correlated. They suggest that the self-assembled PCs with PBG are feasible for the applications in integrated optics and photonics.

  17. Physical principles for DNA tile self-assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Constantine G; Winfree, Erik

    2017-06-19

    DNA tiles provide a promising technique for assembling structures with nanoscale resolution through self-assembly by basic interactions rather than top-down assembly of individual structures. Tile systems can be programmed to grow based on logical rules, allowing for a small number of tile types to assemble large, complex assemblies that can retain nanoscale resolution. Such algorithmic systems can even assemble different structures using the same tiles, based on inputs that seed the growth. While programming and theoretical analysis of tile self-assembly often makes use of abstract logical models of growth, experimentally implemented systems are governed by nanoscale physical processes that can lead to very different behavior, more accurately modeled by taking into account the thermodynamics and kinetics of tile attachment and detachment in solution. This review discusses the relationships between more abstract and more physically realistic tile assembly models. A central concern is how consideration of model differences enables the design of tile systems that robustly exhibit the desired abstract behavior in realistic physical models and in experimental implementations. Conversely, we identify situations where self-assembly in abstract models can not be well-approximated by physically realistic models, putting constraints on physical relevance of the abstract models. To facilitate the discussion, we introduce a unified model of tile self-assembly that clarifies the relationships between several well-studied models in the literature. Throughout, we highlight open questions regarding the physical principles for DNA tile self-assembly.

  18. Development of n- and p-type Doped Perovskite Single Crystals Using Solid-State Single Crystal Growth (SSCG) Technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-09

    for AGG should be minimal. For this purpose, the seeds for AGG may also be provided externally. This process is called the solid-state single...bonding process . Figure 31 shows (a) the growth of one large single crystal from one small single crystal seed as well as (b) the growth of one...one bi-crystal seed : One large bi-crystal can be grown from one small bi-crystal by SSCG process . Fig. 32. Diffusion bonding process for

  19. Self-assembly of nanosize coordination cages on si(100) surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busi, Marco; Laurenti, Marco; Condorelli, Guglielmo G; Motta, Alessandro; Favazza, Maria; Fragalà, Ignazio L; Montalti, Marco; Prodi, Luca; Dalcanale, Enrico

    2007-01-01

    Bottom-up fabrication of 3D organic nanostructures on Si(100) surfaces has been achieved by a two-step procedure. Tetradentate cavitand 1 was grafted on the Si surface together with 1-octene (Oct) as a spatial spectator by photochemical hydrosilylation. Ligand exchange between grafted cavitand 1 and self-assembled homocage 2, derived from cavitand 5 bearing a fluorescence marker, led to the formation of coordination cages on Si(100). Formation, quantification, and distribution of the nanoscale molecular containers on a silicon surface was assessed by using three complementary analytical techniques (AFM, XPS, and fluorescence) and validated by control experiments on cavitand-free silicon surfaces. Interestingly, the fluorescence of pyrene at approximately 4 nm above the Si(100) surface can be clearly observed.

  20. Self-Assembled Local Artificial Substrates of GaAs on Si Substrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frigeri C

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We propose a self-assembling procedure for the fabrication of GaAs islands by Droplet Epitaxy on silicon substrate. Controlling substrate temperature and amount of supplied gallium is possible to tune the base size of the islands from 70 up to 250 nm and the density from 107 to 109 cm−2. The islands show a standard deviation of base size distribution below 10% and their shape evolves changing the aspect ratio from 0.3 to 0.5 as size increases. Due to their characteristics, these islands are suitable to be used as local artificial substrates for the integration of III–V quantum nanostructures directly on silicon substrate.

  1. Robust, self-assembled, biocompatible films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swanson, Basil I; Anderson, Aaron S.; Dattelbaum, Andrew M.; Schmidt, Jurgen G.

    2014-06-24

    The present invention provides a composite material including a substrate having an oxide surface, and, a continuous monolayer on the oxide surface, the monolayer including a silicon atom from a trifunctional alkyl/alkenyl/alkynyl silane group that attaches to the oxide surface, an alkyl/alkenyl/alkynyl portion of at least three carbon atoms, a polyalkylene glycol spacer group, and either a reactive site (e.g., a recognition ligand) or a site resistant to non-specific binding (e.g., a methoxy or the like) at the terminus of each modified SAM. The present invention further provides a sensor element, a sensor array and a method of sensing, each employing the composite material. Patterning is also provided together with backfilling to minimize non-specific binding.

  2. Bioprinting synthetic self-assembling peptide hydrogels for biomedical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loo, Yihua; Hauser, Charlotte A E

    2016-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) bioprinting is a disruptive technology for creating organotypic constructs for high-throughput screening and regenerative medicine. One major challenge is the lack of suitable bioinks. Short synthetic self-assembling peptides are ideal candidates. Several classes of peptides self-assemble into nanofibrous hydrogels resembling the native extracellular matrix. This is a conducive microenvironment for maintaining cell survival and physiological function. Many peptides also demonstrate stimuli-responsive gelation and tuneable mechanical properties, which facilitates extrusion before dispensing and maintains the shape fidelity of the printed construct in aqueous media. The inherent biocompatibility and biodegradability bodes well for in vivo applications as implantable tissues and drug delivery matrices, while their short length and ease of functionalization facilitates synthesis and customization. By applying self-assembling peptide inks to bioprinting, the dynamic complexity of biological tissue can be recreated, thereby advancing current biomedical applications of peptide hydrogel scaffolds. (paper)

  3. Regulating DNA Self-assembly by DNA-Surface Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Longfei; Li, Yulin; Wang, Yong; Zheng, Jianwei; Mao, Chengde

    2017-12-14

    DNA self-assembly provides a powerful approach for preparation of nanostructures. It is often studied in bulk solution and involves only DNA-DNA interactions. When confined to surfaces, DNA-surface interactions become an additional, important factor to DNA self-assembly. However, the way in which DNA-surface interactions influence DNA self-assembly is not well studied. In this study, we showed that weak DNA-DNA interactions could be stabilized by DNA-surface interactions to allow large DNA nanostructures to form. In addition, the assembly can be conducted isothermally at room temperature in as little as 5 seconds. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Actinide Sequestration Using Self-Assembled Monolayers on Mesoporous Supports

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fryxell, Glen E.; Lin, Yuehe; Fiskum, Sandra K.; Birnbaum, Jerome C.; Wu, Hong; Kemner, K. M.; Kelly, Shelley

    2005-01-01

    Surfactant templated synthesis of mesoporous ceramics provides a versatile foundation upon which to create high efficiency environmental sorbents. These nanoporous ceramic oxides condense a huge amount of surface area into a very small volume. The ceramic oxide interface is receptive to surface functionalization through molecular self-assembly. The marriage of mesoporous ceramics with self-assembled monolayer chemistry creates a powerful new class of environmental sorbent materials called self-assembled monolayers on mesoporous supports (SAMMS). These SAMMS materials are highly efficient sorbents, whose interfacial chemistry can be fine-tuned to selectively sequester a specific target species, such as heavy metals, tetrahedral oxometallate anions and radionuclides. Details addressing the design, synthesis and characterization of SAMMS materials specifically designed to sequester actinides, of central importance to the environmental clean-up necessary after 40 years of weapons grade plutonium production, as well as evaluation of their binding affinities and kinetics are presented

  5. Hydrazine-mediated construction of nanocrystal self-assembly materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Ding; Liu, Min; Lin, Min; Bu, Xinyuan; Luo, Xintao; Zhang, Hao; Yang, Bai

    2014-10-28

    Self-assembly is the basic feature of supramolecular chemistry, which permits to integrate and enhance the functionalities of nano-objects. However, the conversion of self-assembled structures to practical materials is still laborious. In this work, on the basis of studying one-pot synthesis, spontaneous assembly, and in situ polymerization of aqueous semiconductor nanocrystals (NCs), NC self-assembly materials are produced and applied to design high performance white light-emitting diode (WLED). In producing self-assembly materials, the additive hydrazine (N2H4) is curial, which acts as the promoter to achieve room-temperature synthesis of aqueous NCs by favoring a reaction-controlled growth, as the polyelectrolyte to weaken inter-NC electrostatic repulsion and therewith facilitate the one-dimensional self-assembly, and in particular as the bifunctional monomers to polymerize with mercapto carboxylic acid-modified NCs via in situ amidation reaction. This strategy is versatile for mercapto carboxylic acid-modified aqueous NCs, for example CdS, CdSe, CdTe, CdSe(x)Te(1-x), and Cd(y)Hg(1-y)Te. Because of the multisite modification with carboxyl, the NCs act as macromonomers, thus producing cross-linked self-assembly materials with excellent thermal, solvent, and photostability. The assembled NCs preserve strong luminescence and avoid unpredictable fluorescent resonance energy transfer, the main problem in design WLED from multiple NC components. These advantages allow the fabrication of NC-based WLED with high color rendering index (86), high luminous efficacy (41 lm/W), and controllable color temperature.

  6. Buried oxide layer in silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadana, Devendra Kumar; Holland, Orin Wayne

    2001-01-01

    A process for forming Silicon-On-Insulator is described incorporating the steps of ion implantation of oxygen into a silicon substrate at elevated temperature, ion implanting oxygen at a temperature below 200.degree. C. at a lower dose to form an amorphous silicon layer, and annealing steps to form a mixture of defective single crystal silicon and polycrystalline silicon or polycrystalline silicon alone and then silicon oxide from the amorphous silicon layer to form a continuous silicon oxide layer below the surface of the silicon substrate to provide an isolated superficial layer of silicon. The invention overcomes the problem of buried isolated islands of silicon oxide forming a discontinuous buried oxide layer.

  7. Self-assembling of calcium salt of the new DNA base 5-carboxylcytosine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irrera, Simona; Ruiz-Hernandez, Sergio E.; Reggente, Melania; Passeri, Daniele; Natali, Marco; Gala, Fabrizio; Zollo, Giuseppe; Rossi, Marco; Portalone, Gustavo

    2017-06-01

    Supramolecular architectures involving DNA bases can have a strong impact in several fields such as nanomedicine and nanodevice manufacturing. To date, in addition to the four canonical nucleobases (adenine, thymine, guanine and cytosine), four other forms of cytosine modified at the 5 position have been identified in DNA. Among these four new cytosine derivatives, 5-carboxylcytosine has been recently discovered in mammalian stem cell DNA, and proposed as the final product of the oxidative epigenetic demethylation pathway on the 5 position of cytosine. In this work, a calcium salt of 5-carboxylcytosine has been synthesized and deposited on graphite surface, where it forms self-assembled features as long range monolayers and up to one micron long filaments. These structures have been analyzed in details combining different theoretical and experimental approaches: X-ray single-crystal diffraction data were used to simulate the molecule-graphite interaction, first using molecular dynamics and then refining the results using density functional theory (DFT); finally, data obtained with DFT were used to rationalize atomic force microscopy (AFM) results.

  8. Self-assembly of gas-phase synthesized magnesium nanoparticles on room temperature substrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Venturi, F; Calizzi, M; Pasquini, L; Bals, S; Perkisas, T

    2015-01-01

    Magnesium nanoparticles (NPs) with initial size in the 10–50 nm range were synthesized by inert gas condensation under helium flow and deposited on room temperature substrates. The morphology and crystal structure of the NPs ensemble were investigated as a function of the deposition time by complementary electron microscopy techniques, including high resolution imaging and chemical mapping. With increasing amount of material, strong coarsening phenomena were observed at room temperature: small NPs disappeared while large faceted NPs developed, leading to a 5-fold increase of the average NPs size within a few minutes. The extent of coarsening and the final morphology depended also on the nature of the substrate. Furthermore, large single-crystal NPs were seen to arise from the self-organization of primary NPs units, providing a mechanism for crystal growth. The dynamics of the self-assembly process involves the basic steps of NPs sticking, diffusion on substrate, coordinated rotation and attachment/coalescence. Key features are the surface energy anisotropy, reflected by the faceted shape of the NPs, and the low melting point of the material. The observed phenomena have strong implications in relation to the synthesis and stability of nanostructures based on Mg or other elements with similar features. (paper)

  9. Sambot II: A self-assembly modular swarm robot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yuchao; Wei, Hongxing; Yang, Bo; Jiang, Cancan

    2018-04-01

    The new generation of self-assembly modular swarm robot Sambot II, based on the original generation of self-assembly modular swarm robot Sambot, adopting laser and camera module for information collecting, is introduced in this manuscript. The visual control algorithm of Sambot II is detailed and feasibility of the algorithm is verified by the laser and camera experiments. At the end of this manuscript, autonomous docking experiments of two Sambot II robots are presented. The results of experiments are showed and analyzed to verify the feasibility of whole scheme of Sambot II.

  10. Self-assembled three-dimensional chiral colloidal architecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Zion, Matan Yah; He, Xiaojin; Maass, Corinna C.; Sha, Ruojie; Seeman, Nadrian C.; Chaikin, Paul M.

    2017-11-01

    Although stereochemistry has been a central focus of the molecular sciences since Pasteur, its province has previously been restricted to the nanometric scale. We have programmed the self-assembly of micron-sized colloidal clusters with structural information stemming from a nanometric arrangement. This was done by combining DNA nanotechnology with colloidal science. Using the functional flexibility of DNA origami in conjunction with the structural rigidity of colloidal particles, we demonstrate the parallel self-assembly of three-dimensional microconstructs, evincing highly specific geometry that includes control over position, dihedral angles, and cluster chirality.

  11. Self-assembly of active amphiphilic Janus particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallory, S. A.; Alarcon, F.; Cacciuto, A.; Valeriani, C.

    2017-12-01

    In this article, we study the phenomenology of a two dimensional dilute suspension of active amphiphilic Janus particles. We analyze how the morphology of the aggregates emerging from their self-assembly depends on the strength and the direction of the active forces. We systematically explore and contrast the phenomenologies resulting from particles with a range of attractive patch coverages. Finally, we illustrate how the geometry of the colloids and the directionality of their interactions can be used to control the physical properties of the assembled active aggregates and suggest possible strategies to exploit self-propulsion as a tunable driving force for self-assembly.

  12. Electrostatic Force Microscopy of Self Assembled Peptide Structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, Casper Hyttel; Dimaki, Maria; Pantagos, Spyros P.

    2011-01-01

    In this report electrostatic force microscopy (EFM) is used to study different peptide self-assembled structures, such as tubes and particles. It is shown that not only geometrical information can be obtained using EFM, but also information about the composition of different structures. In partic......In this report electrostatic force microscopy (EFM) is used to study different peptide self-assembled structures, such as tubes and particles. It is shown that not only geometrical information can be obtained using EFM, but also information about the composition of different structures...

  13. Self-Assembled Hydrogel Nanoparticles for Drug Delivery Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel Gama

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Hydrogel nanoparticles—also referred to as polymeric nanogels or macromolecular micelles—are emerging as promising drug carriers for therapeutic applications. These nanostructures hold versatility and properties suitable for the delivery of bioactive molecules, namely of biopharmaceuticals. This article reviews the latest developments in the use of self-assembled polymeric nanogels for drug delivery applications, including small molecular weight drugs, proteins, peptides, oligosaccharides, vaccines and nucleic acids. The materials and techniques used in the development of self-assembling nanogels are also described.

  14. Passivated graphene transistors fabricated on a millimeter-sized single-crystal graphene film prepared with chemical vapor deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, Meng-Yu; Lee, Si-Chen; Lin, Shih-Yen; Wang, Cheng-Hung; Chang, Shu-Wei

    2015-01-01

    In this work, we first investigate the effects of partial pressures and flow rates of precursors on the single-crystal graphene growth using chemical vapor depositions on copper foils. These factors are shown to be critical to the growth rate, seeding density and size of graphene single crystals. The prepared graphene films in millimeter sizes are then bubbling transferred to silicon-dioxide/silicon substrates for high-mobility graphene transistor fabrications. After high-temperature annealing and hexamethyldisilazane passivation, the water attachment is removed from the graphene channel. The elimination of uncontrolled doping and enhancement of carrier mobility accompanied by these procedures indicate that they are promising for fabrications of graphene transistors. (paper)

  15. Introducing single-crystal scattering and optical potentials into MCNPX: Predicting neutron emission from a convoluted moderator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gallmeier, F.X., E-mail: gallmeierfz@ornl.gov [Spallation Neutron Source, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Iverson, E.B.; Lu, W. [Spallation Neutron Source, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Baxter, D.V. [Center for the Exploration of Energy and Matter, Indiana University, Bloomington, IN 47408 (United States); Muhrer, G.; Ansell, S. [European Spallation Source, ESS AB, Lund (Sweden)

    2016-04-01

    Neutron transport simulation codes are indispensable tools for the design and construction of modern neutron scattering facilities and instrumentation. Recently, it has become increasingly clear that some neutron instrumentation has started to exploit physics that is not well-modeled by the existing codes. In particular, the transport of neutrons through single crystals and across interfaces in MCNP(X), Geant4, and other codes ignores scattering from oriented crystals and refractive effects, and yet these are essential phenomena for the performance of monochromators and ultra-cold neutron transport respectively (to mention but two examples). In light of these developments, we have extended the MCNPX code to include a single-crystal neutron scattering model and neutron reflection/refraction physics. We have also generated silicon scattering kernels for single crystals of definable orientation. As a first test of these new tools, we have chosen to model the recently developed convoluted moderator concept, in which a moderating material is interleaved with layers of perfect crystals to provide an exit path for neutrons moderated to energies below the crystal's Bragg cut–off from locations deep within the moderator. Studies of simple cylindrical convoluted moderator systems of 100 mm diameter and composed of polyethylene and single crystal silicon were performed with the upgraded MCNPX code and reproduced the magnitude of effects seen in experiments compared to homogeneous moderator systems. Applying different material properties for refraction and reflection, and by replacing the silicon in the models with voids, we show that the emission enhancements seen in recent experiments are primarily caused by the transparency of the silicon and void layers. Finally we simulated the convoluted moderator experiments described by Iverson et al. and found satisfactory agreement between the measurements and the simulations performed with the tools we have developed.

  16. Splitting of the spectral radiation density maximum for relativistic positrons moving through a single crystal near the crystallographic axis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adejshvili, D.I.; Anufriev, O.V.; Bochek, G.L.; Vit'ko, V.I.; Kovalenko, G.D.; Nikolajchuk, L.I.; Khizhnyak, N.A.; Shramenko, B.I.

    1986-01-01

    The fast particle radiation is studied on the basis of the periodic potential model which takes into account the discrete structure of atomic strings or planes along the channel direction. Results of the experiments on the linear accelerator on radiation of relativistic 1035 and 1050 MeV positrons in the diamond (axis 110) and silicon (axis 111) single crystals, respectively, are in good agreement with calculated data

  17. Single Crystal Synthesis and STM Studies of High Temperature Superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrientos, Alfonso

    1997-01-01

    This is a final report for the work initiated in September of 1994 under the grant NAG8-1085 - NASA/OMU, on the fabrication of bulk and single crystal synthesis, specific heat measuring and STM studies of high temperature superconductors. Efforts were made to fabricate bulk and single crystals of mercury based superconducting material. A systematic thermal analysis on the precursors for the corresponding oxides and carbonates were carried out to synthesized bulk samples. Bulk material was used as seed in an attempt to grow single crystals by a two-step self flux process. On the other hand bulk samples were characterized by x-ray diffraction, electrical resistivity and magnetic susceptibility, We studied the specific heat behavior in the range from 80 to 300 K. Some preliminary attempts were made to study the atomic morphology of our samples. As part of our efforts we built an ac susceptibility apparatus for measuring the transition temperature of our sintered samples.

  18. Mesoporous Zeolite Single Crystals for Catalytic Hydrocarbon Conversion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, I.; Christensen, Claus H.; Kustova, Marina

    2005-01-01

    Recently, mesoporous zeolite single crystals were discovered. They constitute a novel family of materials that features a combined micropore and mesopore architecture within each individual crystal. Here, we briefly summarize recent catalytic results from cracking and isomerization of alkalies......, alkylation of aromatics and present new results on isomerization of aromatics. Specifically, the shape-selective isomerization of meta-xylenc into para-xylene and ortho-xylene is studied. In all these reactions, rnesoporous zeolite single crystals prove to be unique catalysts since they provide easy...... transport to and from active sites and at the same time maintain the shape-selectivity required. Thus, all these results support the idea that the beneficial effect of the mesopores system in the mesoporous zeolite single crystals call be solely attributed to enhanced mass transport....

  19. Mechanical properties of hydroxyapatite single crystals from nanoindentation data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamiri, A.; De, S.

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we compute elasto-plastic properties of hydroxyapatite single crystals from nanindentation data using a two-step algorithm. In the first step the yield stress is obtained using hardness and Young’s modulus data, followed by the computation of the flow parameters. The computational approach is first validated with data from existing literature. It is observed that hydroxyapatite single crystals exhibit anisotropic mechanical response with a lower yield stress along the [1010] crystallographic direction compared to the [0001] direction. Both work hardening rate and work hardening exponent are found to be higher for indentation along the [0001] crystallographic direction. The stress-strain curves extracted here could be used for developing constitutive models for hydroxyapatite single crystals. PMID:21262492

  20. Light emission from organic single crystals operated by electrolyte doping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuki, Keiichiro; Sakanoue, Tomo; Yomogida, Yohei; Hotta, Shu; Takenobu, Taishi

    2018-03-01

    Light-emitting devices based on electrolytes, such as light-emitting electrochemical cells (LECs) and electric double-layer transistors (EDLTs), are solution-processable devices with a very simple structure. Therefore, it is necessary to apply this device structure into highly fluorescent organic materials for future printed applications. However, owing to compatibility problems between electrolytes and organic crystals, electrolyte-based single-crystal light-emitting devices have not yet been demonstrated. Here, we report on light-emitting devices based on organic single crystals and electrolytes. As the fluorescent materials, α,ω-bis(biphenylyl)terthiophene (BP3T) and 5,6,11,12-tetraphenylnaphthacene (rubrene) single crystals were selected. Using ionic liquids as electrolytes, we observed clear light emission from BP3T LECs and rubrene EDLTs.

  1. Pulse-height defect in single-crystal CVD diamond detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beliuskina, O.; Imai, N. [The University of Tokyo, Center for Nuclear Study, Wako, Saitama (Japan); Strekalovsky, A.O.; Aleksandrov, A.A.; Aleksandrova, I.A.; Ilich, S.; Kamanin, D.V.; Knyazheva, G.N.; Kuznetsova, E.A.; Mishinsky, G.V.; Pyatkov, Yu.V.; Strekalovsky, O.V.; Zhuchko, V.E. [JINR, Flerov Laboratory of Nuclear Reactions, Dubna, Moscow Region (Russian Federation); Devaraja, H.M. [Manipal University, Manipal Centre for Natural Sciences, Manipal, Karnataka (India); Heinz, C. [II. Physikalisches Institut, Justus-Liebig-Universitaet Giessen, Giessen (Germany); Heinz, S. [II. Physikalisches Institut, Justus-Liebig-Universitaet Giessen, Giessen (Germany); GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt (Germany); Hofmann, S.; Kis, M.; Kozhuharov, C.; Maurer, J.; Traeger, M. [GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt (Germany); Pomorski, M. [CEA, LIST, Diamond Sensor Laboratory, CEA/Saclay, Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

    2017-02-15

    The pulse-height versus deposited energy response of a single-crystal chemical vapor deposition (scCVD) diamond detector was measured for ions of Ti, Cu, Nb, Ag, Xe, Au, and of fission fragments of {sup 252} Cf at different energies. For the fission fragments, data were also measured at different electric field strengths of the detector. Heavy ions have a significant pulse-height defect in CVD diamond material, which increases with increasing energy of the ions. It also depends on the electrical field strength applied at the detector. The measured pulse-height defects were explained in the framework of recombination models. Calibration methods known from silicon detectors were modified and applied. A comparison with data for the pulse-height defect in silicon detectors was performed. (orig.)

  2. Principles of crystallization, and methods of single crystal growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chacra, T.

    2010-01-01

    Most of single crystals (monocrystals), have distinguished optical, electrical, or magnetic properties, which make from single crystals, key elements in most of technical modern devices, as they may be used as lenses, Prisms, or grating sin optical devises, or Filters in X-Ray and spectrographic devices, or conductors and semiconductors in electronic, and computer industries. Furthermore, Single crystals are used in transducer devices. Moreover, they are indispensable elements in Laser and Maser emission technology.Crystal Growth Technology (CGT), has started, and developed in the international Universities and scientific institutions, aiming at some of single crystals, which may have significant properties and industrial applications, that can attract the attention of international crystal growth centers, to adopt the industrial production and marketing of such crystals. Unfortunately, Arab universities generally, and Syrian universities specifically, do not give even the minimum interest, to this field of Science.The purpose of this work is to attract the attention of Crystallographers, Physicists and Chemists in the Arab universities and research centers to the importance of crystal growth, and to work on, in the first stage to establish simple, uncomplicated laboratories for the growth of single crystal. Such laboratories can be supplied with equipment, which are partly available or can be manufactured in the local market. Many references (Articles, Papers, Diagrams, etc..) has been studied, to conclude the most important theoretical principles of Phase transitions,especially of crystallization. The conclusions of this study, are summarized in three Principles; Thermodynamic-, Morphologic-, and Kinetic-Principles. The study is completed by a brief description of the main single crystal growth methods with sketches, of equipment used in each method, which can be considered as primary designs for the equipment, of a new crystal growth laboratory. (author)

  3. Photoluminescence properties of boron doped InSe single crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ertap, H.; Bacıoğlu, A.; Karabulut, M.

    2015-01-01

    Undoped and boron doped InSe single crystals were grown by Bridgman–Stockbarger technique. The PL properties of undoped, 0.1% and 0.5% boron doped InSe single crystals have been investigated at different temperatures. PL measurements revealed four emission bands labeled as A, B, C and D in all the single crystals studied. These emission bands were associated with the radiative recombination of direct free excitons (n=1), impurity-band transitions, donor–acceptor recombinations and structural defect related band (impurity atoms, defects, defect complexes, impurity-vacancy complex etc.), respectively. The direct free exciton (A) bands of undoped, 0.1% and 0.5% boron doped InSe single crystals were observed at 1.337 eV, 1.335 eV and 1.330 eV in the PL spectra measured at 12 K, respectively. Energy positions and PL intensities of the emission bands varied with boron addition. The FWHM of direct free exciton band increases while the FWHM of the D emission band decreases with boron doping. Band gap energies of undoped and boron doped InSe single crystals were calculated from the PL measurements. It was found that the band gap energies of InSe single crystals decreased with increasing boron content. - Highlights: • PL spectra of InSe crystals have been studied as a function of temperature. • Four emission bands were observed in the PL spectra at low temperatures. • PL intensity and position of free exciton band vary with doping and temperature. • Temperature dependences of the bands observed in the PL spectra were analyzed

  4. Self-assembly from milli- to nanoscales: methods and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mastrangeli, M; Celis, J-P; Abbasi, S; Varel, C; Böhringer, K F; Van Hoof, C

    2009-01-01

    The design and fabrication techniques for microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) and nanodevices are progressing rapidly. However, due to material and process flow incompatibilities in the fabrication of sensors, actuators and electronic circuitry, a final packaging step is often necessary to integrate all components of a heterogeneous microsystem on a common substrate. Robotic pick-and-place, although accurate and reliable at larger scales, is a serial process that downscales unfavorably due to stiction problems, fragility and sheer number of components. Self-assembly, on the other hand, is parallel and can be used for device sizes ranging from millimeters to nanometers. In this review, the state-of-the-art in methods and applications for self-assembly is reviewed. Methods for assembling three-dimensional (3D) MEMS structures out of two-dimensional (2D) ones are described. The use of capillary forces for folding 2D plates into 3D structures, as well as assembling parts onto a common substrate or aggregating parts to each other into 2D or 3D structures, is discussed. Shape matching and guided assembly by magnetic forces and electric fields are also reviewed. Finally, colloidal self-assembly and DNA-based self-assembly, mainly used at the nanoscale, are surveyed, and aspects of theoretical modeling of stochastic assembly processes are discussed. (topical review)

  5. Tuning of metal work functions with self-assembled monolayers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Boer, B; Hadipour, A; Mandoc, MM; van Woudenbergh, T; Blom, PWM

    2005-01-01

    Work functions of gold and silver are varied by over 1.4 and 1.7 eV, respectively, by using self-assembled monolayers. Using these modified electrodes, the hole current in a poly(2-methoxy-5-(2'-ethylhexyloxy)- 1,4-phenylene vinylene) light-emitting diode is tuned by more than six orders of

  6. Applications of self-assembled monolayers in materials chemistry

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Physical and Materials Chemistry Division, National Chemical Laboratory,. Pune 411 008, India e-mail: viji@ems.ncl.res.in. Abstract. Self-assembly provides a simple route to organise suitable organic molecules on noble metal and selected nanocluster surfaces by using monolayers of long chain organic molecules with ...

  7. Synthesis, characterization and self-assembly with gold nanoparticles

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    characterization and self-assembly with gold nanoparticles. JUN-BO LI. 1, ... gold surface lead to the enhancement of device prop- erties. 36,37 ... Reactions were monitored by thin-layer ..... plasmon (SP) absorption band (figure 5) of TOAB-.

  8. Complex Colloidal Structures by Self-assembly in Electric Fields

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vutukuri, H.R.

    2012-01-01

    The central theme of this thesis is exploiting the directed self-assembly of both isotropic and anisotropic colloidal particles to achieve the fabrication of one-, two-, and three-dimensional complex colloidal structures using external electric fields and/or a simple in situ thermal annealing

  9. Self-assembled domain structures: From micro- to nanoscale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir Shur

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The recent achievements in studying the self-assembled evolution of micro- and nanoscale domain structures in uniaxial single crystalline ferroelectrics lithium niobate and lithium tantalate have been reviewed. The results obtained by visualization of static domain patterns and kinetics of the domain structure by different methods from common optical microscopy to more sophisticated scanning probe microscopy, scanning electron microscopy and confocal Raman microscopy, have been discussed. The kinetic approach based on various nucleation processes similar to the first-order phase transition was used for explanation of the domain structure evolution scenarios. The main mechanisms of self-assembling for nonequilibrium switching conditions caused by screening ineffectiveness including correlated nucleation, domain growth anisotropy, and domain–domain interaction have been considered. The formation of variety of self-assembled domain patterns such as fractal-type, finger and web structures, broad domain boundaries, and dendrites have been revealed at each of all five stages of domain structure evolution during polarization reversal. The possible applications of self-assembling for micro- and nanodomain engineering were reviewed briefly. The review covers mostly the results published by our research group.

  10. Characterization of self-assembled monolayers on a ruthenium surface

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shaheen, Amrozia; Sturm, Jacobus Marinus; Ricciardi, R.; Huskens, Jurriaan; Lee, Christopher James; Bijkerk, Frederik

    2017-01-01

    We have modified and stabilized the ruthenium surface by depositing a self-assembled monolayer (SAM) of 1-hexadecanethiol on a polycrystalline ruthenium thin film. The growth mechanism, dynamics, and stability of these monolayers were studied. SAMs, deposited under ambient conditions, on

  11. Self-assembled fluorescent organic nanoparticles for live cell imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fischer, I.; Petkau, K.; Dorland, Y.L.; Schenning, A.P.H.J.; Brunsveld, L.

    2013-01-01

    Fluorescent, cell-permeable, organic nanoparticles based on self-assembled p-conjugated oligomers with high absorption cross-sections and high quantum yields have been developed. The nanoparticles are generated with a tuneable density of amino groups for charge-mediated cellular uptake by a

  12. Encapsulation of gold nanoparticles into self-assembling protein nanoparticles

    OpenAIRE

    Yang Yongkun; Burkhard Peter

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Gold nanoparticles are useful tools for biological applications due to their attractive physical and chemical properties. Their applications can be further expanded when they are functionalized with biological molecules. The biological molecules not only provide the interfaces for interactions between nanoparticles and biological environment, but also contribute their biological functions to the nanoparticles. Therefore, we used self-assembling protein nanoparticles (SAPNs...

  13. Self-assembly of concentric quantum double rings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mano, Takaaki; Kuroda, Takashi; Sanguinetti, Stefano; Ochiai, Tetsuyuki; Tateno, Takahiro; Kim, Jongsu; Noda, Takeshi; Kawabe, Mitsuo; Sakoda, Kazuaki; Kido, Giyuu; Koguchi, Nobuyuki

    2005-03-01

    We demonstrate the self-assembled formation of concentric quantum double rings with high uniformity and excellent rotational symmetry using the droplet epitaxy technique. Varying the growth process conditions can control each ring's size. Photoluminescence spectra emitted from an individual quantum ring complex show peculiar quantized levels that are specified by the carriers' orbital trajectories.

  14. Oscillatory persistent currents in self-assembled quantum rings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kleemans, N.A.J.M.; Bominaar-Silkens, I.M.A.; Fomin, V.; Gladilin, V.N.; Granados, D.; Taboada, A.G.; Garcia, J.M.; Offermans, P.; Zeitler, U.; Christianen, P.C.M.; Maan, J.C.; Devreese, J.T.; Koenraad, P.M.

    2007-01-01

    We report the direct measurement of the persistent current carried by a single electron by means of magnetization experiments on self-assembled InAs/GaAs quantum rings. We measured the first Aharonov-Bohm oscillation at a field of 14 T, in perfect agreement with our model based on the structural

  15. Dynamics of self-assembled cytosine nucleobases on graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saikia, Nabanita; Johnson, Floyd; Waters, Kevin; Pandey, Ravindra

    2018-05-01

    Molecular self-assembly of cytosine (C n ) bases on graphene was investigated using molecular dynamics methods. For free-standing C n bases, simulation conditions (gas versus aqueous) determine the nature of self-assembly; the bases prefer to aggregate in the gas phase and are stabilized by intermolecular H-bonds, while in the aqueous phase, the water molecules disrupt base-base interactions, which facilitate the formation of π-stacked domains. The substrate-induced effects, on the other hand, find the polarity and donor-acceptor sites of the bases to govern the assembly process. For example, in the gas phase, the assembly of C n bases on graphene displays short-range ordered linear arrays stabilized by the intermolecular H-bonds. In the aqueous phase, however, there are two distinct configurations for the C n bases assembly on graphene. For the first case corresponding to low surface coverage, the bases are dispersed on graphene and are isolated. The second configuration archetype is disordered linear arrays assembled with medium and high surface coverage. The simulation results establish the role of H-bonding, vdW π-stacking, and the influence of graphene surface towards the self-assembly. The ability to regulate the assembly into well-defined patterns can aid in the design of self-assembled nanostructures for the next-generation DNA based biosensors and nanoelectronic devices.

  16. Long lived coherence in self-assembled quantum dots

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Birkedal, Dan; Leosson, Kristjan; Hvam, Jørn Märcher

    2001-01-01

    We report measurements of ultralong coherence in self-assembled quantum dots. Transient four-wave mixing experiments at 5 K show an average dephasing time of 372 ps, corresponding to a homogeneous linewidth of 3.5 mu eV, which is significantly smaller than the linewidth observed in single...

  17. Multiphonon capture processes in self-assembled quantum dots

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Magnúsdóttir, Ingibjörg; Uskov, A.; Bischoff, Svend

    2001-01-01

    We investigate capture of carriers from states in the continuous part of the energy spectrum into the discrete states of self-assembled InAs/GaAs QDs via emission of one or two phonons. We are not aware of any other investigations of two-phonon mediated capture processes in QDs, but we show...

  18. Coherence and dephasing in self-assembled quantum dots

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvam, Jørn Märcher; Leosson, K.; Birkedal, Dan

    2003-01-01

    We measured dephasing times in InGaAl/As self-assembled quantum dots at low temperature using degenerate four-wave mixing. At 0K, the coherence time of the quantum dots is lifetime limited, whereas at finite temperatures pure dephasing by exciton-phonon interactions governs the quantum dot...

  19. Extending the self-assembly of coiled-coil hybrids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Robson Marsden, Hana

    2009-01-01

    Of the various biomolecular building blocks in use in nature, coiled-coil forming peptides are amongst those with the most potential as building blocks for the synthetic self-assembly of nanostructures. Native coiled coils have the ability to function in, and influence, complex systems composed of

  20. Electrostatic Self-Assembly of Polysaccharides into Nanofibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mendes, Ana Carina Loureiro; Strohmenger, Timm; Goycoolea, Francisco

    2017-01-01

    In this study, the anionic polysaccharide Xanthan gum (X) was mixed with positively charged Chitosan oligomers (ChO), and used as building blocks, to generate novel nanofibers by electrostatic self-assembly in aqueous conditions. Different concentrations, ionic strength and order of mixing of both...

  1. Self-assembly of hydrofluorinated Janus graphene monolayer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jin, Yakang; Xue, Qingzhong; Zhu, Lei

    2016-01-01

    With remarkably interesting surface activities, two-dimensional Janus materials arouse intensive interests recently in many fields. We demonstrate by molecular dynamic simulations that hydrofluorinated Janus graphene (J-GN) can self-assemble into Janus nanoscroll (J-NS) at room temperature. The van...

  2. Nanoporous Network Channels from Self-Assembled Triblock Copolymer Supramolecules

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    du Sart, Gerrit Gobius; Vukovic, Ivana; Vukovic, Zorica; Polushkin, Evgeny; Hiekkataipale, Panu; Ruokolainen, Janne; Loos, Katja; ten Brinke, Gerrit

    2011-01-01

    Supramolecular complexes of a poly(tert-butoxystyrene)-block-polystyrene-block-poly(4-vinylpyridine) triblock copolymers and less than stoichiometric amounts of pentadecylphenol (PDP) are shown to self-assemble into a core-shell gyroid morphology with the core channels formed by the hydrogen-bonded

  3. Self-assembling bilayers of palladiumthiolates in organic media

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    applications in catalytic systems, solubalizing agents and drug delivery matrices. Following the pioneering efforts of ... In this context, self-assembly of amphipiles in nonpolar organic media assumes significance 8 since .... structures in clear contrast to lamellar phases formed by the higher members. We sought to image the ...

  4. Self-assembling electroactive hydrogels for flexible display technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, Scott L; Wong, Kok Hou; Ladouceur, Francois [School of Electrical Engineering and Telecommunications, University of NSW, Sydney, NSW, 2052 (Australia); Thordarson, Pall, E-mail: f.ladouceur@unsw.edu.a [School of Chemistry, University of NSW, Sydney, NSW, 2052 (Australia)

    2010-12-15

    We have assessed the potential of self-assembling hydrogels for use in conformal displays. The self-assembling process can be used to alter the transparency of the material to all visible light due to scattering by fibres. The reversible transition is shown to be of low energy by differential scanning calorimetry. For use in technology it is imperative that this transition is controlled electrically. We have thus synthesized novel self-assembling hydrogelator molecules which contain an electroactive group. The well-known redox couple of anthraquinone/anthrahydroquinone has been used as the hydrophobic component for a series of small molecule gelators. They are further functionalized with peptide combinations of L-phenylalanine and glycine to provide the hydrophilic group to complete 'head-tail' models of self-assembling gels. The gelation and electroactive characteristics of the series were assessed. Cyclic voltammetry shows the reversible redox cycle to be only superficially altered by functionalization. Additionally, spectroelectrochemical measurements show a reversible transparency and colour change induced by the redox process.

  5. Self-assembled monolayers on metal oxides : applications in nanotechnology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yildirim, O.

    2010-01-01

    The thesis describes the use of phosph(on)ate-based self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) to modify and pattern metal oxides. Metal oxides have interesting electronic and magnetic properties such as insulating, semiconducting, metallic, ferromagnetic etc. and SAMs can tailor the surface properties. FePt

  6. Self-assembling electroactive hydrogels for flexible display technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, Scott L; Wong, Kok Hou; Ladouceur, Francois; Thordarson, Pall

    2010-01-01

    We have assessed the potential of self-assembling hydrogels for use in conformal displays. The self-assembling process can be used to alter the transparency of the material to all visible light due to scattering by fibres. The reversible transition is shown to be of low energy by differential scanning calorimetry. For use in technology it is imperative that this transition is controlled electrically. We have thus synthesized novel self-assembling hydrogelator molecules which contain an electroactive group. The well-known redox couple of anthraquinone/anthrahydroquinone has been used as the hydrophobic component for a series of small molecule gelators. They are further functionalized with peptide combinations of L-phenylalanine and glycine to provide the hydrophilic group to complete 'head-tail' models of self-assembling gels. The gelation and electroactive characteristics of the series were assessed. Cyclic voltammetry shows the reversible redox cycle to be only superficially altered by functionalization. Additionally, spectroelectrochemical measurements show a reversible transparency and colour change induced by the redox process.

  7. Hydrothermal growth of PbSO4 (Anglesite) single crystal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kikuta, Ko-ichi; Yoneta, Yasuhito; Yogo, Toshinobu; Hirano, Shin-ichi

    1994-01-01

    Hydrothermal growth of single crystals of PbSO 4 , which is known as a natural mineral called anglesite, was investigated. Lead nitrate and nitric acid solutions were found to be useful for the growth of angle-site on the basis of the experimental results on the dissolution behavior. Relatively large euhedral single crystals bound by {210} and {101} planes were successfully grown in 1.5 mol/kg Pb(NO 3 ) 2 at 400degC and 100 MPa. Optical characterization revealed that the grown anglesite crystals can be useful for scintillators material. (author)

  8. Welding and joining of single crystals of BCC refractory metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hiraoka, Yutaka; Fujii, Tadayuki

    1989-01-01

    Welding and joining is one of key technologies for the wider utilizations of a material. In the present work, the applicability of welding and joining for a single crystal of BCC refractory metal was investigated. Electron-beam welding and tungsten-inert-gas welding by a melt-run technique, and high-temperature brazing by using brazing metals such as Mo-40%Ru alloy, vanadium or platinum were conducted for molybdenum single crystal which had been prepared by means of secondary recrystallization. 12 refs.,12 figs., 2 tabs. (Author)

  9. Cryogenic motion performances of a piezoelectric single crystal micromotor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaotian; Wu, Yuting; Chen, Zhijiang; Wei, Xiaoyong; Luo, Haosu; Dong, Shuxiang

    2014-04-01

    This study investigates the cryogenic performances of a millimeter-size piezoelectric ultrasonic linear micromotor. The piezoelectric vibrator of the micromotor is made of Pb(In1/2Nb1/2)O3 -Pb(Mg1/3Nb2/3)-PbTiO3 single crystal and operated in first-bending wobbling mode. Experiments show that the piezoelectric single crystal micromotor works effectively even at extremely low temperature of -175 °C, although its resonance peaks vary with temperature significantly. This work confirms the feasibility of cryogenic operation of the piezo-micromotor, which is meaningful for aerospace or superconducting microwave application.

  10. Iron single crystal growth from a lithium-rich melt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fix, M.; Schumann, H.; Jantz, S. G.; Breitner, F. A.; Leineweber, A.; Jesche, A.

    2018-03-01

    α -Fe single crystals of rhombic dodecahedral habit were grown from a Li84N12Fe∼3 melt. Crystals of several millimeter along a side form at temperatures around T ≈ 800 ° C. Upon further cooling the growth competes with the formation of Fe-doped Li3N. The b.c.c. structure and good sample quality of α -Fe single crystals were confirmed by X-ray and electron diffraction as well as magnetization measurements and chemical analysis. A nitrogen concentration of 90 ppm was detected by means of carrier gas hot extraction. Scanning electron microscopy did not reveal any sign of iron nitride precipitates.

  11. Regularities of recrystallization in rolled Zr single crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isaenkova, M; Perlovich, Yu; Fesenko, V; Krymskaya, O; Krapivka, N; Thu, S S

    2015-01-01

    Experiments by rolled single crystals give a more visible conception of the operating mechanisms of plastic deformation and the following recrystallization, than experiments by polycrystals. Studies by usage of X-ray diffraction methods were conducted by Zr single crystals. It was revealed, that regions of the α-Zr matrix, deformed mainly by twinning, are characterized with decreased tendency to recrystallization. Orientations of recrystallized α-Zr grains correspond to “slopes” of maxima in the rolling texture, where the level of crystalline lattice distortion is maximal and the number of recrystallization nuclei is most of all. (paper)

  12. Growth and surface topography of WSe_2 single crystal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dixit, Vijay; Vyas, Chirag; Pataniya, Pratik; Jani, Mihir; Pathak, Vishal; Patel, Abhishek; Pathak, V. M.; Patel, K. D.; Solanki, G. K.

    2016-01-01

    Tungsten Di-Selenide belongs to the family of TMDCs showing their potential applications in the fields of Optoelectronics and PEC solar cells. Here in the present investigation single crystals of WSe_2 were grown by Direct Vapour Transport Technique in a dual zone furnace having temperature difference of 50 K between the two zones. These single crystals were characterized by EDAX which confirms the stiochiometry of the grown crystals. Surface topography of the crystal was studied by optical micrograph showing the left handed spirals on the surface of WSe_2 crystals. Single crystalline nature of the crystals was confirmed by SAED.

  13. Preparation of single-crystal copper ferrite nanorods and nanodisks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Du Jimin; Liu Zhimin; Wu Weize; Li Zhonghao; Han Buxing; Huang Ying

    2005-01-01

    This article, for the first time, reports the preparation of single-crystal copper ferrite nanorods and nanodisks. Using amorphous copper ferrite nanoparticles synthesized by reverse micelle as reaction precursor, single-crystal copper ferrite nanorods were synthesized via hydrothermal method in the presence of surfactant polyethylene glycol (PEG), however, copper ferrite nanodisks were prepared through the same procedures except the surfactant PEG. The resulting nanomaterials have been characterized by powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), selected electron area diffraction (SEAD), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The bulk composition of the samples was determined by means of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS)

  14. Building polyhedra by self-assembly: theory and experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, Ryan; Klobušický, Joseph; Pandey, Shivendra; Gracias, David H; Menon, Govind

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the utility of a mathematical framework based on discrete geometry to model biological and synthetic self-assembly. Our primary biological example is the self-assembly of icosahedral viruses; our synthetic example is surface-tension-driven self-folding polyhedra. In both instances, the process of self-assembly is modeled by decomposing the polyhedron into a set of partially formed intermediate states. The set of all intermediates is called the configuration space, pathways of assembly are modeled as paths in the configuration space, and the kinetics and yield of assembly are modeled by rate equations, Markov chains, or cost functions on the configuration space. We review an interesting interplay between biological function and mathematical structure in viruses in light of this framework. We discuss in particular: (i) tiling theory as a coarse-grained description of all-atom models; (ii) the building game-a growth model for the formation of polyhedra; and (iii) the application of these models to the self-assembly of the bacteriophage MS2. We then use a similar framework to model self-folding polyhedra. We use a discrete folding algorithm to compute a configuration space that idealizes surface-tension-driven self-folding and analyze pathways of assembly and dominant intermediates. These computations are then compared with experimental observations of a self-folding dodecahedron with side 300 μm. In both models, despite a combinatorial explosion in the size of the configuration space, a few pathways and intermediates dominate self-assembly. For self-folding polyhedra, the dominant intermediates have fewer degrees of freedom than comparable intermediates, and are thus more rigid. The concentration of assembly pathways on a few intermediates with distinguished geometric properties is biologically and physically important, and suggests deeper mathematical structure.

  15. Amphiphilic invertible polymers: Self-assembly into functional materials driven by environment polarity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hevus, Ivan

    Stimuli-responsive polymers adapt to environmental changes by adjusting their chain conformation in a fast and reversible way. Responsive polymeric materials have already found use in electronics, coatings industry, personal care, and bio-related areas. The current work aims at the development of novel responsive functional polymeric materials by manipulating environment-dependent self-assembly of a new class of responsive macromolecules strategically designed in this study,—amphiphilic invertible polymers (AIPs). Environment-dependent micellization and self-assembly of three different synthesized AIP types based on poly(ethylene glycol) as a hydrophilic fragment and varying hydrophobic constituents was demonstrated in polar and nonpolar solvents, as well as on the surfaces and interfaces. With increasing concentration, AIP micelles self-assemble into invertible micellar assemblies composed of hydrophilic and hydrophobic domains. Polarity-responsive properties of AIPs make invertible micellar assemblies functional in polar and nonpolar media including at interfaces. Thus, invertible micellar assemblies solubilize poorly soluble substances in their interior in polar and nonpolar solvents. In a polar aqueous medium, a novel stimuli-responsive mechanism of drug release based on response of AIP-based drug delivery system to polarity change upon contact with the target cell has been established using invertible micellar assemblies loaded with curcumin, a phytochemical drug. In a nonpolar medium, invertible micellar assemblies were applied simultaneously as nanoreactors and stabilizers for size-controlled synthesis of silver nanoparticles stable in both polar and nonpolar media. The developed amphiphilic nanosilver was subsequently used as seeds to promote anisotropic growth of CdSe semiconductor nanoparticles that have potential in different applications ranging from physics to medicine. Amphiphilic invertible polymers were shown to adsorb on the surface of silica

  16. Electrochemical Functionalization of Graphene at the Nanoscale with Self-Assembling Diazonium Salts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Zhenyuan; Leonardi, Francesca; Gobbi, Marco; Liu, Yi; Bellani, Vittorio; Liscio, Andrea; Kovtun, Alessandro; Li, Rongjin; Feng, Xinliang; Orgiu, Emanuele; Samorì, Paolo; Treossi, Emanuele; Palermo, Vincenzo

    2016-07-26

    We describe a fast and versatile method to functionalize high-quality graphene with organic molecules by exploiting the synergistic effect of supramolecular and covalent chemistry. With this goal, we designed and synthesized molecules comprising a long aliphatic chain and an aryl diazonium salt. Thanks to the long chain, these molecules physisorb from solution onto CVD graphene or bulk graphite, self-assembling in an ordered monolayer. The sample is successively transferred into an aqueous electrolyte, to block any reorganization or desorption of the monolayer. An electrochemical impulse is used to transform the diazonium group into a radical capable of grafting covalently to the substrate and transforming the physisorption into a covalent chemisorption. During covalent grafting in water, the molecules retain the ordered packing formed upon self-assembly. Our two-step approach is characterized by the independent control over the processes of immobilization of molecules on the substrate and their covalent tethering, enabling fast (t < 10 s) covalent functionalization of graphene. This strategy is highly versatile and works with many carbon-based materials including graphene deposited on silicon, plastic, and quartz as well as highly oriented pyrolytic graphite.

  17. Self-assembled magnetic nanostructures: Epitaxial Ni nanodots on TiN/Si (001) surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou, H.; Narayan, J.

    2006-01-01

    Systems containing single domain magnetic particles are of great interest in view of their possible applications in ultrahigh-density data storage and magnetoelectronic devices. The focus of this work is plan-view STEM Z-contrast imaging study of the self-assembly growth of magnetic nickel nanostructures by domain matching epitaxy under Volmer-Weber (V-W) mode. The growth was carried out using pulsed laser deposition (PLD) technique with epitaxial titanium nitride film as the template, which was in turn grown on silicon (001) substrate via domain matching epitaxy. Our results show that the base of nickel islands is rectangular with the two principal edges parallel to two orthogonal directions, which is [110] and [1-bar 1 0] for [001] oriented growth. The size distribution of the islands is relatively narrow, comparable to that obtained from self-assembled islands grown under Stranski-Krastanow (S-K) mode. A certain degree of self-organization was also found in the lateral distribution of islands: island chains were observed along the directions close to , which are also the edge directions. The interaction between neighboring islands through the island edge-induced strain field is believed to be responsible for the size uniformity and the lateral ordering

  18. Hierarchical self-assembly of a bow-shaped molecule bearing self-complementary hydrogen bonding sites into extended supramolecular assemblies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikeda, Masato; Nobori, Tadahito; Schmutz, Marc; Lehn, Jean-Marie

    2005-01-07

    The bow-shaped molecule 1 bearing a self-complementary DAAD-ADDA (D=donor A=acceptor) hydrogen-bonding array generates, in hydrocarbon solvents, highly ordered supramolecular sheet aggregates that subsequently give rise to gels by formation of an entangled network. The process of hierarchical self-assembly of compound 1 was investigated by the concentration and temperature dependence of UV-visible and (1)H NMR spectra, fluorescence spectra, and electron microscopy data. The temperature dependence of the UV-visible spectra indicates a highly cooperative process for the self-assembly of compound 1 in decaline. The electron micrograph of the decaline solution of compound 1 (1.0 mM) revealed supramolecular sheet aggregates forming an entangled network. The selected area electronic diffraction patterns of the supramolecular sheet aggregates were typical for single crystals, indicative of a highly ordered assembly. The results exemplify the generation, by hierarchical self-assembly, of highly organized supramolecular materials presenting novel collective properties at each level of organization.

  19. Deformation twinning in zinc-aluminium single crystals after slip

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lukac, P.; Kral, F.; Trojanova, Z.; Kral, R.

    1993-01-01

    Deformation twinning in Zn-Al single crystals deformed by slip in the basal system is examined. The influence of temperature and the content of aluminium in zinc on the twinning stress is investigated in the temperature range from 198 to 373 K. It is shown that the twinning stress rises with increasing temperature and increases with the concentration of Al atoms. (orig.)

  20. Structural science using single crystal and pulse neutron scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noda, Yukio; Kimura, Hiroyuki; Watanabe, Masashi; Ishikawa, Yoshihisa; Tamura, Itaru; Arai, Masatoshi; Takahashi, Miwako; Ohshima, Ken-ichi; Abe, Hiroshi; Kamiyama, Takashi

    2008-01-01

    The application to single crystal neutron structural analysis is overviewed. Special attention is paid to the pulse neutron method, which will be available soon under J-PARC project in Japan. New proposal and preliminary experiment using Sirius at KENS are described. (author)

  1. Annealing behavior of solution grown polyethylene single crystals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Loos, J.; Tian, M.

    2006-01-01

    The morphology evolution of solution grown polyethylene single crystals has been studied upon annealing below their melting temperature by using atomic force microscopy (AFM). AFM investigations have been performed ex situ, which means AFM investigations at room temperature after the annealing

  2. Corelli: Efficient single crystal diffraction with elastic discrimination

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Here, we discuss the potential of the cross-correlation technique for efficient measurement of single crystal diffuse scattering with energy discrimination, as will be implemented in a novel instrument, Corelli. Utilizing full experiment simulations, we show that this technique readily leads up to a fifty-fold gain in efficiency, ...

  3. Magnetic structure of URhSi single crystal

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Prokeš, K.; Andreev, Alexander V.; Honda, F.; Sechovský, V.

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 261, - (2003), s. 131-138 ISSN 0304-8853 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA202/02/0739 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z1010914 Keywords : URhSi single crystal * magnetization * neutron diffraction * magnetic structure determination Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 0.910, year: 2003

  4. Bulk study of a DyNiAl single crystal

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Prchal, J.; Andreev, Alexander V.; Javorský, P.; Honda, F.; Jurek, Karel

    272-276, - (2004), e419-e420 ISSN 0304-8853 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA106/02/0943 Keywords : rare-earth * DyNiAl * magnetic anisotropy * single crystal Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 1.031, year: 2004

  5. Lattice effects in HoVo(3) single crystal

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sikora, M.; Marquina, C.; Ibarra, M. R.; Nugroho, A. A.; Palstra, T. T. M.

    We report the study of lattice effects in the Mott insulator HoVO3 performed by means of linear thermal expansion on a single crystal in the temperature range 10-290 K. The holmium orthovanadate HoVO3 reveals gradual orbital ordering (OO) below T-OO = 200K and orders antiferromagnetically at T-N =

  6. Synthesis and room temperature single crystal EPR studies of a ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Hamiltonian parameters calculated from single crystal rotations are: g ... studies on two nickel complexes with SalX ligands (X = NH, NCH3) have shown the ..... here the positive sign is required for a shell that is less than half-filled and the ...

  7. Growth features of ammonium hydrogen d-tartrate single crystals

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Abstract. Ammonium hydrogen d-tartrate (d-AHT) single crystals were grown in silica gel. The growth fea- ... solution (specific gravity, 1⋅04 g/cc) with d-tartaric acid solution having ... resulting in the production of crystal nuclei. The interface.

  8. Attenuation of thermal neutrons by an imperfect single crystal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naguib, K.; Adib, M. [National Research Centre, Cairo (Egypt). Reactor and Neutron Physics Dept.

    1996-06-14

    A semi-empirical formula is given which allows one to calculate the total thermal cross section of an imperfect single crystal as a function of crystal constants, temperature and neutron energy E, in the energy range between 3 meV and 10 eV. The formula also includes the contribution of the parasitic Bragg scattering to the total cross section that takes into account the crystal mosaic spread value and its orientation with respect to the neutron beam direction. A computer program (ISCANF) was developed to calculate the total attenuation of neutrons using the proposed formula. The ISCANF program was applied to investigate the neutron attenuation through a copper single crystal. The calculated values of the neutron transmission through the imperfect copper single crystal were fitted to the measured ones in the energy range 3-40 meV at different crystal orientations. The result of fitting shows that use of the computer program ISCANF allows one to predict the behaviour of the total cross section of an imperfect copper single crystal for the whole energy range. (author).

  9. Attenuation of thermal neutrons by an imperfect single crystal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naguib, K.; Adib, M.

    1996-06-01

    A semi-empirical formula is given which allows one to calculate the total thermal cross section of an imperfect single crystal as a function of crystal constants, temperature and neutron energy E, in the energy range between 3 meV and 10 eV. The formula also includes the contribution of the parasitic Bragg scattering to the total cross section that takes into account the crystal mosaic spread value and its orientation with respect to the neutron beam direction. A computer program (ISCANF) was developed to calculate the total attenuation of neutrons using the proposed formula. The ISCANF program was applied to investigate the neutron attenuation through a copper single crystal. The calculated values of the neutron transmission through the imperfect copper single crystal were fitted to the measured ones in the energy range 3 - 40 meV at different crystal orientations. The result of fitting shows that use of the computer program ISCANF allows one to predict the behaviour of the total cross section of an imperfect copper single crystal for the whole energy range.

  10. Chromium and molybdenum diffusion in tungsten single crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klotsman, S.M.; Koloskov, V.M.; Osetrov, S.V.; Polikarpova, I.P.; Tatarinova, G.N.; Timofeev, A.N.

    1989-01-01

    Consideration is given to results of measuring temperature dependences of diffusion coefficients of homovalent impurities of chromium and molybdenum in tungsten single crystals. It is concluded that the difference of activation energies of selfdiffusion and impurity diffusion in the system 'tungsten-homovalent impurity' is conditioned by interaction of screened potentials of impurity and vacancy with Lazarus-Le Claire model

  11. Dynamic Actuation of Single-Crystal Diamond Nanobeams

    OpenAIRE

    Sohn, Young-Ik; Burek, Michael J.; Kara, Vural; Kearns, Ryan; Lončar, Marko

    2014-01-01

    We show the dielectrophoretic actuation of single-crystal diamond nanomechanical devices. Gradient radio-frequency electromagnetic forces are used to achieve actuation of both cantilever and doubly clamped beam structures, with operation frequencies ranging from a few MHz to ~50MHz. Frequency tuning and parametric actuation are also studied.

  12. High definition TV projection via single crystal faceplate technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kindl, H. J.; St. John, Thomas

    1993-03-01

    Single crystal phosphor faceplates are epitaxial phosphors grown on crystalline substrates with the advantages of high light output, resolution, and extended operational life. Single crystal phosphor faceplate industrial technology in the United States is capable of providing a faceplate appropriate to the projection industry of up to four (4) inches in diameter. Projection systems incorporating cathode ray tubes utilizing single crystal phosphor faceplates will produce 1500 lumens of white light with 1000 lines of resolution, non-interlaced. This 1500 lumen projection system will meet all of the currently specified luminance and resolution requirements of Visual Display systems for flight simulators. Significant logistic advantages accrue from the introduction of single crystal phosphor faceplate CRT's. Specifically, the full performance life of a CRT is expected to increase by a factor of five (5); ie, from 2000 to 10,000 hours of operation. There will be attendant reductions in maintenance time, spare CRT requirements, system down time, etc. The increased brightness of the projection system will allow use of lower gain, lower cost simulator screen material. Further, picture performance characteristics will be more balanced across the full simulator.

  13. Organic field-effect transistors using single crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hasegawa, Tatsuo; Takeya, Jun

    2009-01-01

    Organic field-effect transistors using small-molecule organic single crystals are developed to investigate fundamental aspects of organic thin-film transistors that have been widely studied for possible future markets for 'plastic electronics'. In reviewing the physics and chemistry of single-crystal organic field-effect transistors (SC-OFETs), the nature of intrinsic charge dynamics is elucidated for the carriers induced at the single crystal surfaces of molecular semiconductors. Materials for SC-OFETs are first reviewed with descriptions of the fabrication methods and the field-effect characteristics. In particular, a benchmark carrier mobility of 20-40 cm 2 Vs -1 , achieved with thin platelets of rubrene single crystals, demonstrates the significance of the SC-OFETs and clarifies material limitations for organic devices. In the latter part of this review, we discuss the physics of microscopic charge transport by using SC-OFETs at metal/semiconductor contacts and along semiconductor/insulator interfaces. Most importantly, Hall effect and electron spin resonance (ESR) measurements reveal that interface charge transport in molecular semiconductors is properly described in terms of band transport and localization by charge traps. (topical review)

  14. On the growth of calcium tartrate tetrahydrate single crystals

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Abstract. Calcium tartrate single crystals were grown using silica gel as the growth medium. Calcium for- mate mixed with formic acid was taken as the supernatant solution. It was observed that the nucleation den- sity was reduced and the size of the crystals was improved to a large extent compared to the conventional way.

  15. Lattice location of helium in uranium dioxide single crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garrido, F.; Nowicki, L. E-mail: lech.nowicki@fuw.edu.pl; Sattonnay, G.; Sauvage, T.; Thome, L

    2004-06-01

    Lattice location of {sup 3}He atoms implanted into UO{sub 2} single crystals was performed by means of the channeling technique combined with nuclear reaction analysis (NRA) and Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS). The {sup 3}He(d,p){sup 4}He reaction was used. The experimental angular scans show that helium atoms occupy octahedral interstitial positions.

  16. Multiscale modelling of single crystal superalloys for gas turbine blades

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tinga, T.

    2009-01-01

    Gas turbines are extensively used for power generation and for the propulsion of aircraft and vessels. Their most severely loaded parts, the turbine rotor blades, are manufactured from single crystal nickel-base superalloys. The superior high temperature behaviour of these materials is attributed to

  17. Discrete dislocation plasticity modeling of short cracks in single crystals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Deshpande, VS; Needleman, A; Van der Giessen, E

    2003-01-01

    The mode-I crack growth behavior of geometrically similar edge-cracked single crystal specimens of varying size subject to both monotonic and cyclic axial loading is analyzed using discrete dislocation dynamics. Plastic deformation is modeled through the motion of edge dislocations in an elastic

  18. Double minimum creep of single crystal Ni-base superalloys

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    WU, X.; Wollgramm, P.; Somsen, C.; Dlouhý, Antonín; Kostka, A.; Eggeler, G.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 112, JUN (2016), s. 242-260 ISSN 1359-6454 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA14-22834S Institutional support: RVO:68081723 Keywords : Single crystal Ni-base superalloys * Primary creep * Transmission electron microscopy * Dislocations * Stacking faults Subject RIV: JG - Metallurgy Impact factor: 5.301, year: 2016

  19. Detection of anomalies in NLO sulphamic acid single crystals by ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The ultrasonic pulse echo overlap technique (PEO) has been used to measure the ... acid single crystals in the range of 300–400 K. This study evaluated all the elastic stiff- .... tic constants C11, C22, C33, C44, C55 and C66 have direct rela-.

  20. Organic field-effect transistors using single crystals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatsuo Hasegawa and Jun Takeya

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Organic field-effect transistors using small-molecule organic single crystals are developed to investigate fundamental aspects of organic thin-film transistors that have been widely studied for possible future markets for 'plastic electronics'. In reviewing the physics and chemistry of single-crystal organic field-effect transistors (SC-OFETs, the nature of intrinsic charge dynamics is elucidated for the carriers induced at the single crystal surfaces of molecular semiconductors. Materials for SC-OFETs are first reviewed with descriptions of the fabrication methods and the field-effect characteristics. In particular, a benchmark carrier mobility of 20–40 cm2 Vs−1, achieved with thin platelets of rubrene single crystals, demonstrates the significance of the SC-OFETs and clarifies material limitations for organic devices. In the latter part of this review, we discuss the physics of microscopic charge transport by using SC-OFETs at metal/semiconductor contacts and along semiconductor/insulator interfaces. Most importantly, Hall effect and electron spin resonance (ESR measurements reveal that interface charge transport in molecular semiconductors is properly described in terms of band transport and localization by charge traps.

  1. METHOD FOR MANUFACTURING A SINGLE CRYSTAL NANO-WIRE

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Den Berg, Albert; Bomer, Johan; Carlen Edwin, Thomas; Chen, Songyue; Kraaijenhagen Roderik, Adriaan; Pinedo Herbert, Michael

    2012-01-01

    A method for manufacturing a single crystal nano-structure includes providing a device layer with a 100 structure on a substrate; providing a stress layer onto the device layer; patterning the stress layer along the 110 direction of the device layer; selectively removing parts of the stress layer to

  2. METHOD FOR MANUFACTURING A SINGLE CRYSTAL NANO-WIRE.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Den Berg, Albert; Bomer, Johan; Carlen Edwin, Thomas; Chen, Songyue; Kraaijenhagen Roderik, Adriaan; Pinedo Herbert, Michael

    2011-01-01

    A method for manufacturing a single crystal nano-structure is provided comprising the steps of providing a device layer with a 100 structure on a substrate; providing a stress layer onto the device layer; patterning the stress layer along the 110 direction of the device layer; selectively removing

  3. Electronic transport properties of single crystal thallium-2201 superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yandrofski, R.M.

    1992-01-01

    Four-probe resistance measurements on single crystals of the calcium-free thallium-based superconducting Tl 2 Ba 2 CuO 6+σ phase (Tl-2201) were performed in magnetic fields up to 12 Telsa. Single crystals of sizes were grown by a self-flux technique and were characterized by single crystal X-ray diffraction and X-ray Dispersive Analysis. Field measurements were taken at dc and at low frequencies using a lock-in technique. Techniques were developed to oxygen-anneal the as-grown single crystals to generate single crystal samples of the same Tl-2201 phase with varying transition interaction effect against appropriate composite general alternatives are developed for the standard two-way layout with a single observation per cell. Nonparametric aligned-rank test procedures are introduced. One of the new procedures is shown to be equivalent to a slight modification of the previously studied Latin square procedures when the factors have the same number of levels. The equal in distribution technique is used to show that any statistic based on the joint ranks should not be used to test the hypotheses of interest. The tests based on aligning with the averages do not depend on the nuisance main effects, while those based on aligning with the median do depend on the nuisance main effects. The relative power performance of the competing tests are examined via Monte Carlo simulation. Power studies conducted on the 5 x 5, 5 x 6, and 5 x 9 two-way layouts with one observation per cell show that the new procedures based on a comparison of all possible pairs of rank-profiles perform quite well for two types of product interaction, a general class of interaction effects proposed by Martin, and several sets of specific interaction effects. Approximate critical values for some of the proposed procedures are explored in the special case when the main effect parameters for one factor are known

  4. Predicting supramolecular self-assembly on reconstructed metal surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roussel, Thomas J.; Barrena, Esther; Ocal, Carmen; Faraudo, Jordi

    2014-06-01

    The prediction of supramolecular self-assembly onto solid surfaces is still challenging in many situations of interest for nanoscience. In particular, no previous simulation approach has been capable to simulate large self-assembly patterns of organic molecules over reconstructed surfaces (which have periodicities over large distances) due to the large number of surface atoms and adsorbing molecules involved. Using a novel simulation technique, we report here large scale simulations of the self-assembly patterns of an organic molecule (DIP) over different reconstructions of the Au(111) surface. We show that on particular reconstructions, the molecule-molecule interactions are enhanced in a way that long-range order is promoted. Also, the presence of a distortion in a reconstructed surface pattern not only induces the presence of long-range order but also is able to drive the organization of DIP into two coexisting homochiral domains, in quantitative agreement with STM experiments. On the other hand, only short range order is obtained in other reconstructions of the Au(111) surface. The simulation strategy opens interesting perspectives to tune the supramolecular structure by simulation design and surface engineering if choosing the right molecular building blocks and stabilising the chosen reconstruction pattern.The prediction of supramolecular self-assembly onto solid surfaces is still challenging in many situations of interest for nanoscience. In particular, no previous simulation approach has been capable to simulate large self-assembly patterns of organic molecules over reconstructed surfaces (which have periodicities over large distances) due to the large number of surface atoms and adsorbing molecules involved. Using a novel simulation technique, we report here large scale simulations of the self-assembly patterns of an organic molecule (DIP) over different reconstructions of the Au(111) surface. We show that on particular reconstructions, the molecule

  5. Twinning processes in Cu-Al-Ni martensite single crystals investigated by neutron single crystal diffraction method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molnar, P.; Sittner, P.; Novak, V.; Lukas, P.

    2008-01-01

    A neutron single crystal diffraction method for inspecting the quality of martensite single crystals is introduced. True interface-free martensite single crystals are indispensable for, e.g. measurement of elastic constants of phases by ultrasonic techniques. The neutron diffraction method was used to detect and distinguish the presence of individual lattice correspondence variants of the 2H orthorhombic martensite phase in Cu-Al-Ni as well as to follow the activity of twinning processes during the deformation test on the martensite variant single crystals. When preparing the martensite single variant prism-shaped crystals by compression deformation method, typically a small fraction of second unwanted martensitic variant (compound twin) remains in the prism samples. Due to the very low stress (∼1 MPa) for the compound twinning in many shape memory alloys, it is quite difficult not only to deplete the martensite prisms of all internal interfaces but mainly to keep them in the martensite single variant state for a long time needed for further investigations

  6. Twinning processes in Cu-Al-Ni martensite single crystals investigated by neutron single crystal diffraction method

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Molnar, P.; Šittner, P.; Novák, V.; Lukáš, Petr

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 481, Sp.Iss.SI (2008), s. 513-517 ISSN 0921-5093 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA100480704 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10480505 Keywords : Cu-Al-Ni * single crystals * neutron diffraction Subject RIV: BG - Nuclear, Atomic and Molecular Physics, Colliders Impact factor: 1.806, year: 2008

  7. Interactions of Na+, K+, Mg2+, and Ca 2+ with benzene self-assembled monolayers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Morten Rimmen; Matthiesen, Jesper; Bovet, Nicolas Emile

    2014-01-01

    that are most common in the natural world, namely, Na+, K+, Mg 2+, and Ca2+. Specifically, we investigated how these ions affect the interactions between surfaces covered by self-Assembled monolayers (SAMs) terminated with benzene molecules. We used a flat oxidized silicon substrate and an atomic force...... from X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) allowed us to conclude that K+ binds in the benzene layers, creating a positive surface charge on the benzene-covered surfaces, thus leading to lower adhesion in KCl solutions than in pure water. Evidence suggested that Ca2+ does not bind to the surfaces...... measurements. The results of our studies clearly show that even a nonpolar, hydrophobic molecule, such as benzene, has a role to play in the behavior of aqueous solutions and that it interacts differently depending on which ions are present. Even ions from the same column in the periodic table behave...

  8. High-speed logic integrated circuits with solution-processed self-assembled carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Shu-Jen; Tang, Jianshi; Kumar, Bharat; Falk, Abram; Farmer, Damon; Tulevski, George; Jenkins, Keith; Afzali, Ali; Oida, Satoshi; Ott, John; Hannon, James; Haensch, Wilfried

    2017-09-01

    As conventional monolithic silicon technology struggles to meet the requirements for the 7-nm technology node, there has been tremendous progress in demonstrating the scalability of carbon nanotube field-effect transistors down to the size that satisfies the 3-nm node and beyond. However, to date, circuits built with carbon nanotubes have overlooked key aspects of a practical logic technology and have stalled at simple functionality demonstrations. Here, we report high-performance complementary carbon nanotube ring oscillators using fully manufacturable processes, with a stage switching frequency of 2.82 GHz. The circuit was built on solution-processed, self-assembled carbon nanotube arrays with over 99.9% semiconducting purity, and the complementary feature was achieved by employing two different work function electrodes.

  9. High-speed logic integrated circuits with solution-processed self-assembled carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Shu-Jen; Tang, Jianshi; Kumar, Bharat; Falk, Abram; Farmer, Damon; Tulevski, George; Jenkins, Keith; Afzali, Ali; Oida, Satoshi; Ott, John; Hannon, James; Haensch, Wilfried

    2017-09-01

    As conventional monolithic silicon technology struggles to meet the requirements for the 7-nm technology node, there has been tremendous progress in demonstrating the scalability of carbon nanotube field-effect transistors down to the size that satisfies the 3-nm node and beyond. However, to date, circuits built with carbon nanotubes have overlooked key aspects of a practical logic technology and have stalled at simple functionality demonstrations. Here, we report high-performance complementary carbon nanotube ring oscillators using fully manufacturable processes, with a stage switching frequency of 2.82 GHz. The circuit was built on solution-processed, self-assembled carbon nanotube arrays with over 99.9% semiconducting purity, and the complementary feature was achieved by employing two different work function electrodes.

  10. Self-Assembly of Molecular Threads into Reversible Gels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayar, Mehmet; Stupp, Samuel I.

    2001-03-01

    Reversible gels formed by low concentrations of molecular gelators that self-assemble into fibers with molecular width and extremely long length have been studied via Monte Carlo simulations. The gelators of interest have two kinds of interactions, one governs self-assembly into fibers and the other provides inter-fiber connectivity to drive the formation of a network. The off-lattice Monte Carlo simulation presented here is based on a point particle representation of gelators. In this model each particle can form only two strong bonds, that enable linear fiber formation, but a variable number of weak bonds which provide inter-fiber connectivity. The gel formation has been studied as a function of concentration of monomers, the strength of interactions, number of bonding sites per particle for weak interactions, and the stiffness of the fibers. The simulation results are compared with two experimental systems synthesized in our group in order to understand gelation mechanisms.

  11. DNA Self-Assembly: From Chirality to Evolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Youri Timsit

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Transient or long-term DNA self-assembly participates in essential genetic functions. The present review focuses on tight DNA-DNA interactions that have recently been found to play important roles in both controlling DNA higher-order structures and their topology. Due to their chirality, double helices are tightly packed into stable right-handed crossovers. Simple packing rules that are imposed by DNA geometry and sequence dictate the overall architecture of higher order DNA structures. Close DNA-DNA interactions also provide the missing link between local interactions and DNA topology, thus explaining how type II DNA topoisomerases may sense locally the global topology. Finally this paper proposes that through its influence on DNA self-assembled structures, DNA chirality played a critical role during the early steps of evolution.

  12. Thermomechanical Response of Self-Assembled Nanoparticle Membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Yifan [Department; James; Chan, Henry [Center; Narayanan, Badri [Center; McBride, Sean P. [Department; Sankaranarayanan, Subramanian K. R. S. [Center; Lin, Xiao-Min [Center; Jaeger, Heinrich M. [Department; James

    2017-07-21

    Monolayers composed of colloidal nanoparticles, with a thickness of less than 10 nm, have remarkable mechanical moduli and can suspend over micrometer-sized holes to form free-standing membranes. In this paper, we discuss experiment's and coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations characterizing the thermomechanical properties of these self-assembled nanoparticle membranes. These membranes remain strong and resilient up to temperatures much higher than previous simulation predictions and exhibit an unexpected hysteretic behavior during the first heating cooling cycle. We show this hysteretic behavior can be explained by an asymmetric ligand configuration from the self assembly process and can be controlled by changing the ligand coverage or cross-linking the ligand molecules. Finally, we show the screening effect of water molecules on the ligand interactions can strongly affect the moduli and thermomechanical behavior.

  13. DNA-Based Self-Assembly of Fluorescent Nanodiamonds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Tao; Neumann, Andre; Lindlau, Jessica; Wu, Yuzhou; Pramanik, Goutam; Naydenov, Boris; Jelezko, Fedor; Schüder, Florian; Huber, Sebastian; Huber, Marinus; Stehr, Florian; Högele, Alexander; Weil, Tanja; Liedl, Tim

    2015-08-12

    As a step toward deterministic and scalable assembly of ordered spin arrays we here demonstrate a bottom-up approach to position fluorescent nanodiamonds (NDs) with nanometer precision on DNA origami structures. We have realized a reliable and broadly applicable surface modification strategy that results in DNA-functionalized and perfectly dispersed NDs that were then self-assembled in predefined geometries. With optical studies we show that the fluorescence properties of the nitrogen-vacancy color centers in NDs are preserved during surface modification and DNA assembly. As this method allows the nanoscale arrangement of fluorescent NDs together with other optically active components in complex geometries, applications based on self-assembled spin lattices or plasmon-enhanced spin sensors as well as improved fluorescent labeling for bioimaging could be envisioned.

  14. The self-assembling process and applications in tissue engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jennifer K.; Link, Jarrett M.; Hu, Jerry C. Y.; Athanasiou, Kyriacos A.

    2018-01-01

    Tissue engineering strives to create neotissues capable of restoring function. Scaffold-free technologies have emerged that can recapitulate native tissue function without the use of an exogenous scaffold. This chapter will survey, in particular, the self-assembling and self-organization processes as scaffold-free techniques. Characteristics and benefits of each process are described, and key examples of tissues created using these scaffold-free processes are examined to provide guidance for future tissue engineering developments. This chapter aims to explore the potential of self-assembly and self-organization scaffold-free approaches, detailing the recent progress in the in vitro tissue engineering of biomimetic tissues with these methods, toward generating functional tissue replacements. PMID:28348174

  15. Quantitative self-assembly prediction yields targeted nanomedicines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shamay, Yosi; Shah, Janki; Işık, Mehtap; Mizrachi, Aviram; Leibold, Josef; Tschaharganeh, Darjus F.; Roxbury, Daniel; Budhathoki-Uprety, Januka; Nawaly, Karla; Sugarman, James L.; Baut, Emily; Neiman, Michelle R.; Dacek, Megan; Ganesh, Kripa S.; Johnson, Darren C.; Sridharan, Ramya; Chu, Karen L.; Rajasekhar, Vinagolu K.; Lowe, Scott W.; Chodera, John D.; Heller, Daniel A.

    2018-02-01

    Development of targeted nanoparticle drug carriers often requires complex synthetic schemes involving both supramolecular self-assembly and chemical modification. These processes are generally difficult to predict, execute, and control. We describe herein a targeted drug delivery system that is accurately and quantitatively predicted to self-assemble into nanoparticles based on the molecular structures of precursor molecules, which are the drugs themselves. The drugs assemble with the aid of sulfated indocyanines into particles with ultrahigh drug loadings of up to 90%. We devised quantitative structure-nanoparticle assembly prediction (QSNAP) models to identify and validate electrotopological molecular descriptors as highly predictive indicators of nano-assembly and nanoparticle size. The resulting nanoparticles selectively targeted kinase inhibitors to caveolin-1-expressing human colon cancer and autochthonous liver cancer models to yield striking therapeutic effects while avoiding pERK inhibition in healthy skin. This finding enables the computational design of nanomedicines based on quantitative models for drug payload selection.

  16. Molecular Gels Materials with Self-Assembled Fibrillar Networks

    CERN Document Server

    Weiss, Richard G

    2006-01-01

    Molecular gels and fibrillar networks – a comprehensive guide to experiment and theory Molecular Gels: Materials with Self-Assembled Fibrillar Networks provides a comprehensive treatise on gelators, especially low molecular-mass gelators (LMOGs), and the properties of their gels. The structures and modes of formation of the self-assembled fibrillar networks (SAFINs) that immobilize the liquid components of the gels are discussed experimentally and theoretically. The spectroscopic, rheological, and structural features of the different classes of LMOGs are also presented. Many examples of the application of the principal analytical techniques for investigation of molecular gels (including SANS, SAXS, WAXS, UV-vis absorption, fluorescence and CD spectroscopies, scanning electron, transmission electron and optical microscopies, and molecular modeling) are presented didactically and in-depth, as are several of the theories of the stages of aggregation of individual LMOG molecules leading to SAFINs. Several actua...

  17. Understanding the self-assembly of TCNQ on Cu(111)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stradi, Daniele; Borca, Bogdana; Barja, Sara

    2016-01-01

    The structure of self-assembled monolayers of 7,7',8,8'-tetracyano-p-quinodimethane (TCNQ) adsorbed on Cu(111) has been studied using a combination of scanning tunnelling microscopy (STM) experiments and density functional theory (DFT) calculations. We show that the polymorphism of the self......-assembled molecular layer can be controlled by tuning of the experimental conditions under which the deposition is carried out. When the Cu(111) substrate is held above room temperature (T-Cu(111) = 350 K) during deposition, a structure is formed in which the two molecules in the unit cell are oriented one...... perpendicular to the other. Conversely, when the substrate is held at room temperature during deposition and slightly annealed afterwards, a more complex structure with five molecules per unit cell is formed. DFT calculations complement the experimental results by revealing that the building blocks of the two...

  18. Self-assembling enzymes and the origins of the cytoskeleton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barry, Rachael; Gitai, Zemer

    2011-01-01

    The bacterial cytoskeleton is composed of a complex and diverse group of proteins that self-assemble into linear filaments. These filaments support and organize cellular architecture and provide a dynamic network controlling transport and localization within the cell. Here, we review recent discoveries related to a newly appreciated class of self-assembling proteins that expand our view of the bacterial cytoskeleton and provide potential explanations for its evolutionary origins. Specifically, several types of metabolic enzymes can form structures similar to established cytoskeletal filaments and, in some cases, these structures have been repurposed for structural uses independent of their normal role. The behaviors of these enzymes suggest that some modern cytoskeletal proteins may have evolved from dual-role proteins with catalytic and structural functions. PMID:22014508

  19. Colloidal Self-Assembly Driven by Deformability & Near-Critical Phenomena

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Evers, C.H.J.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/338775188

    2016-01-01

    Self-assembly is the spontaneous formation of patterns or structures without human intervention. This thesis aims to increase our understanding of self-assembly. In self-assembly of proteins, the building blocks are very small and complex. Consequently, grasping the basic principles that drive the

  20. Self-Assembled Monolayers of CdSe Nanocrystals on Doped GaAs Substrates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marx, E.; Ginger, D.S.; Walzer, Karsten

    2002-01-01

    This letter reports the self-assembly and analysis of CdSe nanocrystal monolayers on both p- and a-doped GaAs substrates. The self-assembly was performed using a 1,6-hexanedithiol self-assembled monolayer (SAM) to link CdSe nanocrystals to GaAs substrates. Attenuated total reflection Fourier tran...

  1. Dispersion of nanoparticulate suspensions using self-assembled surfactant aggregates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Pankaj Kumar

    The dispersion of particles is critical for several industrial applications such as paints, inks, coatings, and cosmetics. Several emerging applications such as abrasives for precision polishing, and drug delivery systems are increasingly relying on nanoparticulates to achieve the desired performance. In the case of nanoparticles, the dispersion becomes more challenging because of the lack of fundamental understanding of dispersant adsorption and interparticle force prediction. Additionally, many of these processes use severe processing environments such as high normal forces (>100 mN/m), high shear forces (>10,000 s -1), and high ionic strengths (>0.1 M). Under such processing conditions, traditionally used dispersants based on electrostatics, and steric force repulsion mechanism may not be adequate. Hence, the development of optimally performing dispersants requires a fundamental understanding of the dispersion mechanism at the atomic/molecular scale. This study explores the use of self-assembled surfactant aggregates at the solid-liquid interface for dispersing nanoparticles in severe processing environments. Surfactant molecules can provide a feasible alternative to polymeric or inorganic dispersants for stabilizing ultrafine particles. The barrier to aggregation in the presence of surfactant molecules was measured using atomic force microscopy. The barrier heights correlated to suspension stability. To understand the mechanism for nanoparticulate suspension stability in the presence of surfactant films, the interface was characterized using zeta potential, contact angle, adsorption, and FT-IR (adsorbed surfactant film structure measurements). The effect of solution conditions such as pH and ionic strength on the suspension stability, and the self-assembled surfactant films was also investigated. It was determined that a transition from a random to an ordered orientation of the surfactant molecules at the interface was responsible for stability of

  2. Microtubule dynamics. II. Kinetics of self-assembly

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Flyvbjerg, H.; Jobs, E.

    1997-01-01

    Inverse scattering theory describes the conditions necessary and sufficient to determine an unknown potential from known scattering data. No similar theory exists for when and how one may deduce the kinetics of an unknown chemical reaction from quantitative information about its final state and i...... to analyze the self-assembly of microtubules from tubulin are general, and many other reactions and processes may be studied as inverse problems with these methods when enough experimental data are available....

  3. Spin State As a Probe of Vesicle Self-Assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sanghoon; Bellouard, Christine; Eastoe, Julian; Canilho, Nadia; Rogers, Sarah E; Ihiawakrim, Dris; Ersen, Ovidiu; Pasc, Andreea

    2016-03-02

    A novel system of paramagnetic vesicles was designed using ion pairs of iron-containing surfactants. Unilamellar vesicles (diameter ≈ 200 nm) formed spontaneously and were characterized by cryogenic transmission electron microscopy, nanoparticle tracking analysis, and light and small-angle neutron scattering. Moreover, for the first time, it is shown that magnetization measurements can be used to investigate self-assembly of such functionalized systems, giving information on the vesicle compositions and distribution of surfactants between the bilayers and the aqueous bulk.

  4. Spin State As a Probe of Vesicle Self-Assembly

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Sanghoon; Bellouard, Christine; Eastoe, Julian; Canilho, Nadia; Rogers, Sarah E; Ihiawakrim, Dris; Ersen, Ovidiu; Pasc, Andreea

    2016-01-01

    A novel system of paramagnetic vesicles was designed using ion pairs of iron-containing surfactants. Unilamellar vesicles (diameter ≈ 200 nm) formed spontaneously and were characterized by cryogenic transmission electron microscopy, nanoparticle tracking analysis, and light and small-angle neutron scattering. Moreover, for the first time, it is shown that magnetization measurements can be used to investigate self-assembly of such functionalized systems, giving information on the vesicle compo...

  5. Phosphorylation Modulates Ameloblastin Self-assembly and Ca2+ Binding

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Stakkestad, O.; Lyngstadaas, S. P.; Thiede, B.; Vondrášek, Jiří; Skalhegg, B. S.; Reseland, J. E.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 8, Jul 27 (2017), č. článku 531. ISSN 1664-042X Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : ameloblastin * phosphorylation * self-assembly * Ca2+-binding * enamel * intrinsically disordered proteins Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry OBOR OECD: Biochemistry and molecular biology Impact factor: 4.134, year: 2016 http://journal.frontiersin.org/article/10.3389/fphys.2017.00531/full

  6. Self-assembled containers based on extended tetrathiafulvalene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bivaud, Sébastien; Goeb, Sébastien; Croué, Vincent; Dron, Paul I; Allain, Magali; Sallé, Marc

    2013-07-10

    Two original self-assembled containers constituted each by six electroactive subunits are described. They are synthesized from a concave tetratopic π-extended tetrathiafulvalene ligand bearing four pyridyl units and cis-M(dppf)(OTf)2 (M = Pd or Pt; dppf = 1,1'-bis(diphenylphosphino)ferrocene; OTf = trifluoromethane-sulfonate) complexes. Both fully characterized assemblies present an oblate spheroidal cavity that can incorporate one perylene molecule.

  7. Self-assembly and speed distributions of active granular particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez, R.; Díaz-Leyva, P.

    2018-06-01

    The relationship between the dynamics of self-propelled systems and the self-assembly of structured clusters are studied via the experimental speed distributions of submonolayers of self-propelled granular particles. A distribution developed for non-self-propelled granular particles describes the speed distributions remarkably well, despite some of the assumptions behind its original derivation not being applicable. This is explained in terms of clustering and dissipation being the key phenomena governing this regime.

  8. Biocompatible and Biomimetic Self-Assembly of Functional Nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-28

    evaporation induced self-assembly of aqueous silica precursors with a biologically compatible surfactant, glycerol monooleate ( GMO ) via dip-coating...film is first deposited, it has a relatively low contact angle with water and remains in a semi-solid state. Upon exposure to UV/ozone, the GMO begins...Figure 8. A) Water contact angle of a GMO -templated silica film as a function of UV light and ozone exposure time, B) Localization of fluorescently

  9. Single Crystals of Organolead Halide Perovskites: Growth, Characterization, and Applications

    KAUST Repository

    Peng, Wei

    2017-04-01

    With the soaring advancement of organolead halide perovskite solar cells rising from a power conversion efficiency of merely 3% to more than 22% shortly in five years, researchers’ interests on this big material family have been greatly spurred. So far, both in-depth studies on the fundamental properties of organolead halide perovskites and their extended applications such as photodetectors, light emitting diodes, and lasing have been intensively reported. The great successes have been ascribed to various superior properties of organolead halide hybrid perovskites such as long carrier lifetimes, high carrier mobility, and solution-processable high quality thin films, as will be discussed in Chapter 1. Notably, most of these studies have been limited to their polycrystalline thin films. Single crystals, as a counter form of polycrystals, have no grain boundaries and higher crystallinity, and thus less defects. These characteristics gift single crystals with superior optical, electrical, and mechanical properties, which will be discussed in Chapter 2. For example, organolead halide perovskite single crystals have been reported with much longer carrier lifetimes and higher carrier mobilities, which are especially intriguing for optoelectronic applications. Besides their superior optoelectronic properties, organolead halide perovskites have shown large composition versatility, especially their organic components, which can be controlled to effectively adjust their crystal structures and further fundamental properties. Single crystals are an ideal platform for such composition-structure-property study since a uniform structure with homogeneous compositions and without distraction from grain boundaries as well as excess defects can provide unambiguously information of material properties. As a major part of work of this dissertation, explorative work on the composition-structure-property study of organic-cation-alloyed organolead halide perovskites using their single

  10. Self-assembly of inorganic nanoparticles: Ab ovo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotov, Nicholas A.

    2017-09-01

    There are numerous remarkable studies related to the self-organization of polymers, coordination compounds, microscale particles, biomolecules, macroscale particles, surfactants, and reactive molecules on surfaces. The focus of this paper is on the self-organization of nanoscale inorganic particles or simply nanoparticles (NPs). Although there are fascinating and profound discoveries made with other self-assembling structures, the ones involving NPs deserve particular attention because they (a) are omnipresent in Nature; (b) have relevance to numerous disciplines (physics, chemistry, biology, astronomy, Earth sciences, and others); (c) embrace most of the features, geometries, and intricacies observed for the self-organization of other chemical species; (d) offer new tools for studies of self-organization phenomena; and (e) have a large economic impact, extending from energy and construction industries, to optoelectronics, biomedical technologies, and food safety. Despite the overall success of the field it is necessary to step back from its multiple ongoing research venues and consider two questions: What is self-assembly of nanoparticles? and Why do we need to study it? The reason to bring them up is to achieve greater scientific depth in the understanding of these omnipresent phenomena and, perhaps, deepen their multifaceted impact. Contribution to the Focus Issue Self-assemblies of Inorganic and Organic Nanomaterials edited by Marie-Paule Pileni.

  11. Supramolecular ribbons from amphiphilic trisamides self-assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García, Fátima; Buendía, Julia; Sánchez, Luis

    2011-08-05

    Two amphiphilic C(3)-symmetric OPE-based trisamides have been synthesized and their self-assembling features investigated in solution and on surface. Variable-temperature UV-vis experiments demonstrate the cooperative supramolecular polymerization of these trisamides that self-assemble by the operation of triple C═O···H-N H-bonding arrays between the amide functional groups and π-π stacking between the aromatic units. The helical organization of the aggregates has been demonstrated by circular dichroism at a concentration as low as 1 × 10(-4) M in acetonitrile. In the reported trisamides, the large hydrophobic aromatic core acts as a solvophobic module impeding the interaction between the polar TEG chains and the amide H-bonds. This strategy makes unnecessary the separation of the amide functional groups to the polar tri(ethylene glycol) chains by paraffinic fragments. Achiral trisamide 1 self-assembles into flat ribbon-like structures that experience an amplification of chirality by the addition of a small amount of chiral 2 that generates twisted stripes.

  12. Molecular Motions in Functional Self-Assembled Nanostructures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Marc Saiter

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The construction of “smart” materials able to perform specific functions at the molecular scale through the application of various stimuli is highly attractive but still challenging. The most recent applications indicate that the outstanding flexibility of self-assembled architectures can be employed as a powerful tool for the development of innovative molecular devices, functional surfaces and smart nanomaterials. Structural flexibility of these materials is known to be conferred by weak intermolecular forces involved in self-assembly strategies. However, some fundamental mechanisms responsible for conformational lability remain unexplored. Furthermore, the role played by stronger bonds, such as coordination, ionic and covalent bonding, is sometimes neglected while they can be employed readily to produce mechanically robust but also chemically reversible structures. In this review, recent applications of structural flexibility and molecular motions in self-assembled nanostructures are discussed. Special focus is given to advanced materials exhibiting significant performance changes after an external stimulus is applied, such as light exposure, pH variation, heat treatment or electromagnetic field. The crucial role played by strong intra- and weak intermolecular interactions on structural lability and responsiveness is highlighted.

  13. Self-assembled magnetic filter for highly efficient immunomagnetic separation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Issadore, David; Shao, Huilin; Chung, Jaehoon; Newton, Andita; Pittet, Mikael; Weissleder, Ralph; Lee, Hakho

    2011-01-07

    We have developed a compact and inexpensive microfluidic chip, the self-assembled magnetic filter, to efficiently remove magnetically tagged cells from suspension. The self-assembled magnetic filter consists of a microfluidic channel built directly above a self-assembled NdFeB magnet. Micrometre-sized grains of NdFeB assemble to form alternating magnetic dipoles, creating a magnetic field with a very strong magnitude B (from the material) and field gradient ▽B (from the configuration) in the microfluidic channel. The magnetic force imparted on magnetic beads is measured to be comparable to state-of-the-art microfabricated magnets, allowing for efficient separations to be performed in a compact, simple device. The efficiency of the magnetic filter is characterized by sorting non-magnetic (polystyrene) beads from magnetic beads (iron oxide). The filter enriches the population of non-magnetic beads to magnetic beads by a factor of >10(5) with a recovery rate of 90% at 1 mL h(-1). The utility of the magnetic filter is demonstrated with a microfluidic device that sorts tumor cells from leukocytes using negative immunomagnetic selection, and concentrates the tumor cells on an integrated membrane filter for optical detection.

  14. Chitosan Based Self-Assembled Nanoparticles in Drug Delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier Pérez Quiñones

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Chitosan is a cationic polysaccharide that is usually obtained by alkaline deacetylation of chitin poly(N-acetylglucosamine. It is biocompatible, biodegradable, mucoadhesive, and non-toxic. These excellent biological properties make chitosan a good candidate for a platform in developing drug delivery systems having improved biodistribution, increased specificity and sensitivity, and reduced pharmacological toxicity. In particular, chitosan nanoparticles are found to be appropriate for non-invasive routes of drug administration: oral, nasal, pulmonary and ocular routes. These applications are facilitated by the absorption-enhancing effect of chitosan. Many procedures for obtaining chitosan nanoparticles have been proposed. Particularly, the introduction of hydrophobic moieties into chitosan molecules by grafting to generate a hydrophobic-hydrophilic balance promoting self-assembly is a current and appealing approach. The grafting agent can be a hydrophobic moiety forming micelles that can entrap lipophilic drugs or it can be the drug itself. Another suitable way to generate self-assembled chitosan nanoparticles is through the formation of polyelectrolyte complexes with polyanions. This paper reviews the main approaches for preparing chitosan nanoparticles by self-assembly through both procedures, and illustrates the state of the art of their application in drug delivery.

  15. DNA assisted self-assembly of PAMAM dendrimers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandal, Taraknath; Kumar, Mattaparthi Venkata Satish; Maiti, Prabal K

    2014-10-09

    We report DNA assisted self-assembly of polyamidoamine (PAMAM) dendrimers using all atom Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations and present a molecular level picture of a DNA-linked PAMAM dendrimer nanocluster, which was first experimentally reported by Choi et al. (Nano Lett., 2004, 4, 391-397). We have used single stranded DNA (ssDNA) to direct the self-assembly process. To explore the effect of pH on this mechanism, we have used both the protonated (low pH) and nonprotonated (high pH) dendrimers. In all cases studied here, we observe that the DNA strand on one dendrimer unit drives self-assembly as it binds to the complementary DNA strand present on the other dendrimer unit, leading to the formation of a DNA-linked dendrimer dimeric complex. However, this binding process strongly depends on the charge of the dendrimer and length of the ssDNA. We observe that the complex with a nonprotonated dendrimer can maintain a DNA length dependent inter-dendrimer distance. In contrast, for complexes with a protonated dendrimer, the inter-dendrimer distance is independent of the DNA length. We attribute this observation to the electrostatic complexation of a negatively charged DNA strand with the positively charged protonated dendrimer.

  16. Controlling Self-Assembly in Al(110) Homoepitaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiwary, Yogesh; Fichthorn, Kristen

    2010-03-01

    Homoepitaxial growth on Al(110) exhibits nanoscale self-assembly into huts with well-defined (100) and (111) facets [1]. Although some of the diffusion mechanisms underlying this kinetic self-assembly were identified and incorporated into a two-dimensional model [2], we used density-functional theory (DFT) to identify many other mechanisms that are needed to describe the three-dimensional assembly seen experimentally [3]. We developed a three-dimensional kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC) model of Al(110) homoepitaxy. The inputs to the model were obtained from DFT [3,4]. Our model is in agreement with experimentally observed trends for this system. We used KMC to predict self-assembly under various growth conditions. To achieve precise placement of Al nanohuts, we simulated thermal-field-directed assembly [5]. Our results indicate that this technique can be used to create uniform arrays of nanostructures. [1] F. Buatier de Mongeot, W. Zhu, A. Molle, R. Buzio, C. Boragno, U. Valbusa, E. Wang, and Z. Zhang, Phys. Rev. Lett. 91, 016102 (2003). [2] W. Zhu, F. Buatier de Mongeot, U. Valbusa, E. G. Wang, and Z. Y. Zhang, Phys. Rev. Lett. 92, 106102 (2004). [3] Y. Tiwary and K. A. Fichthorn, submitted to Phys. Rev. B. [4] Y. Tiwary and K. A. Fichthorn, Phys. Rev. B 78, 205418 (2008). [5] C. Zhang and R. Kalyanaraman, Appl. Phys. Lett. 83, 4827 (2003).

  17. Tracking performance of a single-crystal and a polycrystalline diamond pixel-detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Menasce, D.; et al.

    2013-06-01

    We present a comparative characterization of the performance of a single-crystal and a polycrystalline diamond pixel-detector employing the standard CMS pixel readout chips. Measurements were carried out at the Fermilab Test Beam Facility, FTBF, using protons of momentum 120 GeV/c tracked by a high-resolution pixel telescope. Particular attention was directed to the study of the charge-collection, the charge-sharing among adjacent pixels and the achievable position resolution. The performance of the single-crystal detector was excellent and comparable to the best available silicon pixel-detectors. The measured average detection-efficiency was near unity, ε = 0.99860±0.00006, and the position-resolution for shared hits was about 6 μm. On the other hand, the performance of the polycrystalline detector was hampered by its lower charge collection distance and the readout chip threshold. A new readout chip, capable of operating at much lower threshold (around 1 ke$-$), would be required to fully exploit the potential performance of the polycrystalline diamond pixel-detector.

  18. DETERMINATION OF VICKERS MICROHARDNESS IN β-Ga2O3 SINGLE CRYSTALS GROWN FROM THEIR OWN MELT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. I. Guzilova

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The results of microhardness measurements of β-Ga2O3 single crystals for (001 crystallographic face are reported. The crystals were grown by the free crystallization with the "Garnet-2M" equipment. Microhardness values ​​ were determined by the Vickers method at varying loads. A four-sided diamond pyramid was used as an indenter. The average value of gallium oxide microhardness was equal to 8.91 GPa. We have carried out comparison of the values ​​obtained with the microhardness for the other wide bandgap semiconductors - epitaxial GaN layers grown on 6H-SiC and GaP layers grown on GaP:S. The findings are usable for machining process development of β-Ga2O3 single crystal substrates. In particular, silicon carbide and electrocorundum may be recommended for β-Ga2O3 machine processing.

  19. Near surface mechanical properties of optical single crystals and surface response to deterministic microgrinding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randi, Joseph A., III

    2005-12-01

    This thesis makes use of microindentation, nanoindentation and nanoscratching methods to better understand the mechanical properties of single crystalline silicon, calcium fluoride, and magnesium fluoride. These properties are measured and are used to predict the material's response to material removal, specifically by grinding and polishing, which is a combination of elastic, plastic and fracture processes. The hardness anisotropy during Knoop microindentation, hardness from nanoindentation, and scratch morphology from nanoscratching are reported. This information is related to the surface microroughness from grinding. We show that mechanical property relationships that predict the surface roughness from lapping and deterministic microgrinding of optical glasses are applicable to single crystals. We show the range of hardness from some of the more common crystallographic faces. Magnesium fluoride, having a tetragonal structure, has 2-fold hardness anisotropy. Nanoindentation, as expected provides higher hardness than microindentation, but anisotropy is not observed. Nanoscratching provides the scratch profile during loading, after the load has been removed, and the coefficient of friction during the loading. Ductile and brittle mode scratching is present with brittle mode cracking being orientation specific. Subsurface damage (SSD) measurements are made using a novel process known as the MRF technique. Magnetorheological finishing is used to polish spots into the ground surface where SSD can be viewed. SSD is measured using an optical microscope and knowledge of the spot profile. This technique is calibrated with a previous technique and implemented to accurately measure SSD in single crystals. The data collected are compared to the surface microroughness of the ground surface, resulting in an upper bound relationship. The results indicate that SSD is always less than 1.4 times the peak-to-valley surface microroughness for single crystals regardless of the

  20. Self-assembled nanomaterials based on beta (β"3) tetrapeptides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seoudi, Rania S; Hinds, Mark G; Wilson, David J D; Adda, Christopher G; Mechler, Adam; Del Borgo, Mark; Aguilar, Marie-Isabel; Perlmutter, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    β "3-amino acid based polypeptides offer a unique starting material for the design of self-assembled nanostructures such as fibres and hierarchical dendritic assemblies, due to their well-defined helical geometry in which the peptide side chains align at 120° due to the 3.0–3.1 residue pitch of the helix. In a previous work we have described the head-to-tail self-assembly of N-terminal acetylated β "3-peptides into infinite helical nanorods that was achieved by designing a bioinspired supramolecular self-assembly motif. Here we describe the effect of consecutively more polar side chains on the self-assembly characteristics of β "3-tetrapeptides Ac-β "3Ala-β "3Leu-β "3Ile-β "3Ala (Ac-β"3[ALIA]), Ac-β "3Ser-β "3Leu-β "3Ile-β "3Ala (Ac-β"3[SLIA]) and Ac-β "3Lys-β "3Leu-β "3Ile-β "3Glu (Ac-β"3[KLIE]). β "3-tetrapeptides complete 1 1/3 turns of the helix: thus in the oligomeric form the side chain positions shift 120° with each added monomer, forming a regular periodic pattern along the nanorod. Dynamic light scattering (DLS) measurements confirmed that these peptides self-assemble even in highly polar solvents such as water and DMSO, while diffusion-ordered NMR spectroscopy revealed the presence of a substantial monomeric population. Temperature dependence of the size distribution in DLS measurements suggests a dynamic equilibrium between monomers and oligomers. Solution casting produced distinct fibrillar deposits after evaporating the solvent. In the case of the apolar Ac-β "3[ALIA] the longitudinal helix morphology gives rise to geometrically defined (∼70°) junctions between fibres, forming a mesh that opens up possibilities for applications e.g. in tissue scaffolding. The deposits of polar Ac-β "3[SLIA] and Ac-β "3[KLIE] exhibit fibres in regular parallel alignment over surface areas in the order of 10 μm. (paper)

  1. Self-assembled Block Copolymer Membranes with Bioinspired Artificial Channels

    KAUST Repository

    Sutisna, Burhannudin

    2018-04-01

    Nature is an excellent design that inspires scientists to develop smart systems. In the realm of separation technology, biological membranes have been an ideal model for synthetic membranes due to their ultrahigh permeability, sharp selectivity, and stimuliresponse. In this research, fabrications of bioinspired membranes from block copolymers were studied. Membranes with isoporous morphology were mainly prepared using selfassembly and non-solvent induced phase separation (SNIPS). An effective method that can dramatically shorten the path for designing new isoporous membranes from block copolymers via SNIPS was first proposed by predetermining a trend line computed from the solvent properties, interactions and copolymer block sizes of previously-obtained successful systems. Application of the method to new copolymer systems and fundamental studies on the block copolymer self-assembly were performed. Furthermore, the manufacture of bioinspired membranes was explored using (1) poly(styrene-b-4-hydroxystyrene-b-styrene) (PS-b-PHS-b-PS), (2) poly(styrene-bbutadiene- b-styrene) (PS-b-PB-b-PS) and (3) poly(styrene-b-γ-benzyl-L-glutamate) (PSb- PBLG) copolymers via SNIPS. The structure formation was investigated using smallangle X-ray scattering (SAXS) and time-resolved grazing-Incidence SAXS. The PS-b- PHS-b-PS membranes showed preferential transport for proteins, presumably due to the hydrogen bond interactions within the channels, electrostatic attraction, and suitable pore dimension. Well-defined nanochannels with pore sizes of around 4 nm based on PS-b- PB-b-PS copolymers could serve as an excellent platform to fabricate bioinspired channels due to the modifiable butadiene blocks. Photolytic addition of thioglycolic acid was demonstrated without sacrificing the self-assembled morphology, which led to a five-fold increase in water permeance compared to that of the unmodified. Membranes with a unique feather-like structure and a lamellar morphology for dialysis and

  2. Aluminum-rich mesoporous MFI - type zeolite single crystals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kustova, Marina; Kustov, Arkadii; Christensen, Christina Hviid

    2005-01-01

    Zeolitcs are crystalline materials, which are widely used as solid acid catalysts and supports in many industrial processes. Recently, mesoporous MFI-type zeolite single crystals were synthesized by use of carbon particles as a mesopore template and sodium aluminate as the aluminum Source....... With this technique, only zeolites with relatively low Al contents were reported (Si/Al ratio about 100). In this work, the preparation of aluminum-rich mesoporous MFI-type zeolite single crystals (Si/Al similar to 16-50) using aluminum isopropoxide as the aluminum Source is reported for the first time. All samples...... are characterized by X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), ammonia temperature programmed desorption (NH3-TPD), and N-2 adsorption measurements. The obtained zeolites combine the high crystallinity and the characteristic micropores of zeolites with an intracrystalline mesopore system...

  3. Ordered macro-microporous metal-organic framework single crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Kui; Zhang, Lei; Chen, Xiaodong; Liu, Lingmei; Zhang, Daliang; Han, Yu; Chen, Junying; Long, Jilan; Luque, Rafael; Li, Yingwei; Chen, Banglin

    2018-01-01

    We constructed highly oriented and ordered macropores within metal-organic framework (MOF) single crystals, opening up the area of three-dimensional–ordered macro-microporous materials (that is, materials containing both macro- and micropores) in single-crystalline form. Our methodology relies on the strong shaping effects of a polystyrene nanosphere monolith template and a double-solvent–induced heterogeneous nucleation approach. This process synergistically enabled the in situ growth of MOFs within ordered voids, rendering a single crystal with oriented and ordered macro-microporous structure. The improved mass diffusion properties of such hierarchical frameworks, together with their robust single-crystalline nature, endow them with superior catalytic activity and recyclability for bulky-molecule reactions, as compared with conventional, polycrystalline hollow, and disordered macroporous ZIF-8.

  4. Oriented hydroxyapatite single crystals produced by the electrodeposition method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, E.A. dos, E-mail: euler@ufs.br [INSA - Groupe Ingenierie des Surfaces, 24, Bld de la Victoire, 67084 Strasbourg (France); IPCMS - Departement de Surfaces et Interfaces, 23, rue du Loess, BP 43, 67034 Strasbourg (France); Moldovan, M.S. [INSA - Groupe Ingenierie des Surfaces, 24, Bld de la Victoire, 67084 Strasbourg (France); IPCMS - Departement de Surfaces et Interfaces, 23, rue du Loess, BP 43, 67034 Strasbourg (France); Jacomine, L. [INSA - Groupe Ingenierie des Surfaces, 24, Bld de la Victoire, 67084 Strasbourg (France); Mateescu, M. [IS2M - Equipe Interaction Surface-Matiere Vivant, 15, rue Jean Starcky, BP 2488, 68057 Mulhouse (France); Werckmann, J. [IPCMS - Departement de Surfaces et Interfaces, 23, rue du Loess, BP 43, 67034 Strasbourg (France); Anselme, K. [IS2M - Equipe Interaction Surface-Matiere Vivant, 15, rue Jean Starcky, BP 2488, 68057 Mulhouse (France); Mille, P.; Pelletier, H. [INSA - Groupe Ingenierie des Surfaces, 24, Bld de la Victoire, 67084 Strasbourg (France)

    2010-05-25

    We propose here the use of cathodic electrodeposition as tool to fabricate implant coatings consisting in nano/micro single crystals of hydroxyapatite (HA), preferentially orientated along the c-axis. Coating characterization is the base of this work, where we discuss the mechanisms related to the deposition of oriented hydroxyapatite thin films. It is shown that when deposited on titanium alloys, the HA coating is constituted by two distinct regions with different morphologies: at a distance of few microns from the substrate, large HA single crystals are oriented along the c-axis and appear to grow up from a base material, consisting in an amorphous HA. This organized system has a great importance for cell investigation once the variables involved in the cell/surface interaction are reduced. The use of such systems could give a new insight on the effect of particular HA orientation on the osteoblast cells.

  5. Heterogeneous Monolithic Integration of Single-Crystal Organic Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Kyung Sun; Baek, Jangmi; Park, Yoonkyung; Lee, Lynn; Hyon, Jinho; Koo Lee, Yong-Eun; Shrestha, Nabeen K; Kang, Youngjong; Sung, Myung Mo

    2017-02-01

    Manufacturing high-performance organic electronic circuits requires the effective heterogeneous integration of different nanoscale organic materials with uniform morphology and high crystallinity in a desired arrangement. In particular, the development of high-performance organic electronic and optoelectronic devices relies on high-quality single crystals that show optimal intrinsic charge-transport properties and electrical performance. Moreover, the heterogeneous integration of organic materials on a single substrate in a monolithic way is highly demanded for the production of fundamental organic electronic components as well as complex integrated circuits. Many of the various methods that have been designed to pattern multiple heterogeneous organic materials on a substrate and the heterogeneous integration of organic single crystals with their crystal growth are described here. Critical issues that have been encountered in the development of high-performance organic integrated electronics are also addressed. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Raman analysis of gold on WSe2 single crystal film

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mukherjee, Bablu; Sun Leong, Wei; Li, Yida; Thong, John T L; Gong, Hao; Sun, Linfeng; Xiang Shen, Ze; Simsek, Ergun

    2015-01-01

    Synthesis and characterization of high-quality single-crystal tungsten diselenide (WSe 2 ) films on a highly insulating substrate is presented. We demonstrate for the first time that the presence of gold (Au) nanoparticles in the basal plane of a WSe 2 film can enhance its Raman scattering intensity. The experimentally observed enhancement ratio in the Raman signal correlates well with the simulated electric field intensity using both three-dimensional electromagnetic software and theoretical calculation considering layered medium coupled-dipole approximation (LM-CDA). This work serves as a guideline for the use of Au nanoparticles on WSe 2 single-crystal thin films for surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) applications in the future. (paper)

  7. Ordered macro-microporous metal-organic framework single crystals

    KAUST Repository

    Shen, Kui

    2018-01-16

    We constructed highly oriented and ordered macropores within metal-organic framework (MOF) single crystals, opening up the area of three-dimensional-ordered macro-microporous materials (that is, materials containing both macro- and micropores) in single-crystalline form. Our methodology relies on the strong shaping effects of a polystyrene nanosphere monolith template and a double-solvent-induced heterogeneous nucleation approach. This process synergistically enabled the in situ growth of MOFs within ordered voids, rendering a single crystal with oriented and ordered macro-microporous structure. The improved mass diffusion properties of such hierarchical frameworks, together with their robust single-crystalline nature, endow them with superior catalytic activity and recyclability for bulky-molecule reactions, as compared with conventional, polycrystalline hollow, and disordered macroporous ZIF-8.

  8. Scintillation activity in an unirradiated single crystal of 3-hydroxyxanthine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cooke, D.W.; Jahan, M.S.; Alexander, C. Jr.

    1976-01-01

    A method of growing single crystals (approximately 4mm long) of 3-hydroxyxanthine is described. Observed scintillations occurring in an unirradiated single crystal of this potent oncogen as the temperature is lowered from 300 to 90 K are shown. It was found that these scintillations occur upon heating or cooling and do not diminish in activity as the number of heating and cooling cycles increase. It was found that a short duration u.v. exposure would terminate the scintillation activity and various attempts (such as annealing and pressure changes) to rejuvenate them were unsuccessful. With these observations in mind speculation is made concerning the mechanisms associated with the production of purine N-oxide derivatives. (U.K.)

  9. Ordered macro-microporous metal-organic framework single crystals

    KAUST Repository

    Shen, Kui; Zhang, Lei; Chen, Xiaodong; Liu, Lingmei; Zhang, Daliang; Han, Yu; Chen, Junying; Long, Jilan; Luque, Rafael; Li, Yingwei; Chen, Banglin

    2018-01-01

    We constructed highly oriented and ordered macropores within metal-organic framework (MOF) single crystals, opening up the area of three-dimensional-ordered macro-microporous materials (that is, materials containing both macro- and micropores) in single-crystalline form. Our methodology relies on the strong shaping effects of a polystyrene nanosphere monolith template and a double-solvent-induced heterogeneous nucleation approach. This process synergistically enabled the in situ growth of MOFs within ordered voids, rendering a single crystal with oriented and ordered macro-microporous structure. The improved mass diffusion properties of such hierarchical frameworks, together with their robust single-crystalline nature, endow them with superior catalytic activity and recyclability for bulky-molecule reactions, as compared with conventional, polycrystalline hollow, and disordered macroporous ZIF-8.

  10. Spall behaviour of single crystal aluminium at three principal orientations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owen, G. D.; Chapman, D. J.; Whiteman, G.; Stirk, S. M.; Millett, J. C. F.; Johnson, S.

    2017-10-01

    A series of plate impact experiments have been conducted to study the spall strength of the three principal crystallographic orientations of single crystal aluminium ([100], [110] and, [111]) and ultra-pure polycrystalline aluminium. The samples have been shock loaded at two impact stresses (4 GPa and 10 GPa). Significant differences have been observed in the elastic behaviour, the pullback velocities, and the general shape of the wave profiles, which can be accounted for by considerations of the microscale homogeneity, the dislocation density, and the absence of grain boundaries in the single crystal materials. The data have shown that there is a consistent order of spall strength measured for the four sample materials. The [111] orientation has the largest spall strength and elastic limit, followed closely by [110], [100], and then the polycrystalline material. This order is consistent with both quasi-static data and geometrical consideration of Schmid factors.

  11. A new generation of 99.999% enriched 28Si single crystals for the determination of Avogadro’s constant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrosimov, N. V.; Aref'ev, D. G.; Becker, P.; Bettin, H.; Bulanov, A. D.; Churbanov, M. F.; Filimonov, S. V.; Gavva, V. A.; Godisov, O. N.; Gusev, A. V.; Kotereva, T. V.; Nietzold, D.; Peters, M.; Potapov, A. M.; Pohl, H.-J.; Pramann, A.; Riemann, H.; Scheel, P.-T.; Stosch, R.; Wundrack, S.; Zakel, S.

    2017-08-01

    A metrological challenge is currently underway to replace the present definition of the kilogram. One prerequisite for this is that the Avogadro constant, N A, which defines the number of atoms in a mole, needs to be determined with a relative uncertainty of better than 2  ×  10-8. The method applied in this case is based on the x-ray crystal density experiment using silicon crystals. The first attempt, in which silicon of natural isotopic composition was used, failed. The solution chosen subsequently was the usage of silicon highly enriched in 28Si from Russia. First, this paper reviews previous efforts from the very first beginnings to an international collaboration with the goal of producing a 28Si single crystal with a mass of 5 kg, an enrichment greater than 0.9999 and of sufficient chemical purity. Then the paper describes the activities of a follow-up project, conducted by PTB, to produce a new generation of highly enriched silicon in order to demonstrate the quasi-industrial and reliable production of more than 12 kg of the 28Si material with enrichments of five nines. The intention of this project is also to show the availability of 28Si single crystals as a guarantee for the future realisation of the redefined kilogram.

  12. Low temperature deformation mechanisms in LiF single crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fotedar, H.L.; Stroebe, T.G.

    1976-01-01

    An analysis of the deformation behavior of high purity LiF single crystals is given using yielding and work hardening data and thermally activated deformation parameters obtained in the temperature range 77-423 0 K. It is found that while the Fleischer mechanism is apparently valid experimentally over the thermally activated temperature range, vacancies produced in large numbers at 77 0 K could also play a role in determining the critical resolved shear stress at that temperature

  13. Trapezoidal diffraction grating beam splitters in single crystal diamond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiss, Marcell; Graziosi, Teodoro; Quack, Niels

    2018-02-01

    Single Crystal Diamond has been recognized as a prime material for optical components in high power applications due to low absorption and high thermal conductivity. However, diamond microstructuring remains challenging. Here, we report on the fabrication and characterization of optical diffraction gratings exhibiting a symmetric trapezoidal profile etched into a single crystal diamond substrate. The optimized grating geometry diffracts the transmitted optical power into precisely defined proportions, performing as an effective beam splitter. We fabricate our gratings in commercially available single crystal CVD diamond plates (2.6mm x 2.6mm x 0.3mm). Using a sputter deposited hard mask and patterning by contact lithography, the diamond is etched in an inductively coupled oxygen plasma with zero platen power. The etch process effectively reveals the characteristic {111} diamond crystal planes, creating a precisely defined angled (54.7°) profile. SEM and AFM measurements of the fabricated gratings evidence the trapezoidal shape with a pitch of 3.82μm, depth of 170 nm and duty cycle of 35.5%. Optical characterization is performed in transmission using a 650nm laser source perpendicular to the sample. The recorded transmitted optical power as function of detector rotation angle shows a distribution of 21.1% in the 0th order and 23.6% in each +/-1st order (16.1% reflected, 16.6% in higher orders). To our knowledge, this is the first demonstration of diffraction gratings with trapezoidal profile in single crystal diamond. The fabrication process will enable beam splitter gratings of custom defined optical power distribution profiles, while antireflection coatings can increase the efficiency.

  14. Ion implantation induced blistering of rutile single crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiang, Bing-Xi [School of Physics, Shandong University, Jinan, Shandong 250100 (China); Jiao, Yang [College of Physics and Electronics, Shandong Normal University, Jinan, Shandong 250100 (China); Guan, Jing [School of Physics, Shandong University, Jinan, Shandong 250100 (China); Wang, Lei [School of Physics, Shandong University, Jinan, Shandong 250100 (China); Key Laboratory of Nanodevices and Applications, Suzhou Institute of Nano-Tech and Nano-Bionics, Chinese Academy of Sciences (China)

    2015-07-01

    The rutile single crystals were implanted by 200 keV He{sup +} ions with a series fluence and annealed at different temperatures to investigate the blistering behavior. The Rutherford backscattering spectrometry, optical microscope and X-ray diffraction were employed to characterize the implantation induced lattice damage and blistering. It was found that the blistering on rutile surface region can be realized by He{sup +} ion implantation with appropriate fluence and the following thermal annealing.

  15. Photon emission by electrons and positrons traversing thin single crystal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ol'chak, A.S.

    1984-01-01

    Radiation emission by planar channeled particles (electrons, positrons) in a thin single crystal of thickness L is considered. It is shown that for L approximately πb/THETAsub(L) (b is the lattice constant, THETA sub(L) the Lindhard angle) besides the main spontaneous channeling maxima there exist auxiliary interference maxima, the positions of all the maxima depending on L. The dependence of the radiation spectral intensity on crystal thickness is discussed

  16. Single-crystal diffraction instrument TriCS at SINQ

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schefer, J.; Könnecke, M.; Murasik, A.; Czopnik, A.; Strässle, Th; Keller, P.; Schlumpf, N.

    2000-03-01

    The single-crystal diffractometer TriCS at the Swiss Continuous Spallation Source (SINQ) is presently in the commissioning phase. A two-dimensional wire detector produced by EMBL was delivered in March 1999. The instrument is presently tested with a single detector. First measurements on magnetic structures have been performed. The instrument is remotely controlled using JAVA-based software and a UNIX DEC-α host computer.

  17. The Taylor relation in compression deformed Ge single crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nyilas, K; Ungar, T; Dupas, C; Martin, J L; Kruml, T

    2010-01-01

    Ge single crystals are deformed in compression at 850K and the same strain rate to various extents of strains. In each sample, the internal stress is measured through stress reduction tests and the dislocation densities by X-ray measurements. Data about these two parameters follow fairly well the Taylor-Saada relation, provided a correction term is added. It probably corresponds to dislocations which are seen by X-rays, though they do not contribute to crystal hardening.

  18. Three-dimensional charge transport in organic semiconductor single crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Tao; Zhang, Xiying; Jia, Jiong; Li, Yexin; Tao, Xutang

    2012-04-24

    Three-dimensional charge transport anisotropy in organic semiconductor single crystals - both plates and rods (above and below, respectively, in the figure) - is measured in well-performing organic field-effect transistors for the first time. The results provide an excellent model for molecular design and device preparation that leads to good performance. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. A macroscopic model for magnetic shape-memory single crystals

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bessoud, A. L.; Kružík, Martin; Stefanelli, U.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 64, č. 2 (2013), s. 343-359 ISSN 0044-2275 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA100750802; GA ČR GAP201/10/0357 Institutional support: RVO:67985556 Keywords : magnetostriction * evolution Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics Impact factor: 1.214, year: 2013 http://library.utia.cas.cz/separaty/2012/MTR/kruzik-a macroscopic model for magnetic shape- memory single crystals.pdf

  20. The early stages of oxidation of magnesium single crystal surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayden, B.E.; Schweizer, E.; Koetz, R.; Bradshaw, A.M.

    1981-01-01

    The early stages of oxidation of Mg(001) and Mg(100) single crystal surfaces at 300 K have been investigated by LEED, ELS, work function and ellipsometric measurements. A sharp decrease in work function on both surfaces during the first 12 L exposure indicates the incorporation of oxygen in the earliest stages of the interaction. The incorporated oxygen on Mg(001) gives rise to a broadening of the integral order LEED spots for an exposure 3 L. (orig.)

  1. Application of GRID to Foreign Atom Localization in Single Crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karmann, A; Wesch, W; Weber, B; Börner, H G; Jentschel, M

    2000-01-01

    The application of GRID (Gamma Ray Induced Doppler broadening) spectroscopy to the localization of foreign atoms in single crystals is demonstrated on erbium in YAP. By the investigation of the Doppler broadened secondary γ line for two crystalline directions, the Er was determined to be localized on the Y site. Conditions for the nuclear parameters of the impurity atoms used for the application of GRID spectroscopy are discussed.

  2. A Theoretical and Experimental Study of DNA Self-assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandran, Harish

    The control of matter and phenomena at the nanoscale is fast becoming one of the most important challenges of the 21st century with wide-ranging applications from energy and health care to computing and material science. Conventional top-down approaches to nanotechnology, having served us well for long, are reaching their inherent limitations. Meanwhile, bottom-up methods such as self-assembly are emerging as viable alternatives for nanoscale fabrication and manipulation. A particularly successful bottom up technique is DNA self-assembly where a set of carefully designed DNA strands form a nanoscale object as a consequence of specific, local interactions among the different components, without external direction. The final product of the self-assembly process might be a static nanostructure or a dynamic nanodevice that performs a specific function. Over the past two decades, DNA self-assembly has produced stunning nanoscale objects such as 2D and 3D lattices, polyhedra and addressable arbitrary shaped substrates, and a myriad of nanoscale devices such as molecular tweezers, computational circuits, biosensors and molecular assembly lines. In this dissertation we study multiple problems in the theory, simulations and experiments of DNA self-assembly. We extend the Turing-universal mathematical framework of self-assembly known as the Tile Assembly Model by incorporating randomization during the assembly process. This allows us to reduce the tile complexity of linear assemblies. We develop multiple techniques to build linear assemblies of expected length N using far fewer tile types than previously possible. We abstract the fundamental properties of DNA and develop a biochemical system, which we call meta-DNA, based entirely on strands of DNA as the only component molecule. We further develop various enzyme-free protocols to manipulate meta-DNA systems and provide strand level details along with abstract notations for these mechanisms. We simulate DNA circuits by

  3. Realization of thermally durable close-packed 2D gold nanoparticle arrays using self-assembly and plasma etching

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sivaraman, Sankar K; Santhanam, Venugopal

    2012-01-01

    Realization of thermally and chemically durable, ordered gold nanostructures using bottom-up self-assembly techniques are essential for applications in a wide range of areas including catalysis, energy generation, and sensing. Herein, we describe a modular process for realizing uniform arrays of gold nanoparticles, with interparticle spacings of 2 nm and above, by using RF plasma etching to remove ligands from self-assembled arrays of ligand-coated gold nanoparticles. Both nanoscale imaging and macroscale spectroscopic characterization techniques were used to determine the optimal conditions for plasma etching, namely RF power, operating pressure, duration of treatment, and type of gas. We then studied the effect of nanoparticle size, interparticle spacing, and type of substrate on the thermal durability of plasma-treated and untreated nanoparticle arrays. Plasma-treated arrays showed enhanced chemical and thermal durability, on account of the removal of ligands. To illustrate the application potential of the developed process, robust SERS (surface-enhanced Raman scattering) substrates were formed using plasma-treated arrays of silver-coated gold nanoparticles that had a silicon wafer or photopaper as the underlying support. The measured value of the average SERS enhancement factor (2 × 10 5 ) was quantitatively reproducible on both silicon and paper substrates. The silicon substrates gave quantitatively reproducible results even after thermal annealing. The paper-based SERS substrate was also used to swab and detect probe molecules deposited on a solid surface. (paper)

  4. Properties of the gold-sulphur interface: from self-assembled monolayers to clusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bürgi, Thomas

    2015-10-14

    The gold-sulphur interface of self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) was extensively studied some time ago. More recently tremendous progress has been made in the preparation and characterization of thiolate-protected gold clusters. In this feature article we address different properties of the two systems such as their structure, the mobility of the thiolates on the surface and other dynamical aspects, the chirality of the structures and characteristics related to it and their vibrational properties. SAMs and clusters are in the focus of different communities that typically use different experimental approaches to study the respective systems. However, it seems that the nature of the Au-S interfaces in the two cases is quite similar. Recent single crystal X-ray structures of thiolate-protected gold clusters reveal staple motifs characterized by gold ad-atoms sandwiched between two sulphur atoms. This finding contradicts older work on SAMs. However, newer studies on SAMs also reveal ad-atoms. Whether this finding can be generalized remains to be shown. In any case, more and more studies highlight the dynamic nature of the Au-S interface, both on flat surfaces and in clusters. At temperatures slightly above ambient thiolates migrate on the gold surface and on clusters. Evidence for desorption of thiolates at room temperature, at least under certain conditions, has been demonstrated for both systems. The adsorbed thiolate can lead to chirality at different lengths scales, which has been shown both on surfaces and for clusters. Chirality emerges from the organization of the thiolates as well as locally at the molecular level. Chirality can also be transferred from a chiral surface to an adsorbate, as evidenced by vibrational spectroscopy.

  5. Properties of the gold-sulphur interface: from self-assembled monolayers to clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bürgi, Thomas

    2015-09-01

    The gold-sulphur interface of self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) was extensively studied some time ago. More recently tremendous progress has been made in the preparation and characterization of thiolate-protected gold clusters. In this feature article we address different properties of the two systems such as their structure, the mobility of the thiolates on the surface and other dynamical aspects, the chirality of the structures and characteristics related to it and their vibrational properties. SAMs and clusters are in the focus of different communities that typically use different experimental approaches to study the respective systems. However, it seems that the nature of the Au-S interfaces in the two cases is quite similar. Recent single crystal X-ray structures of thiolate-protected gold clusters reveal staple motifs characterized by gold ad-atoms sandwiched between two sulphur atoms. This finding contradicts older work on SAMs. However, newer studies on SAMs also reveal ad-atoms. Whether this finding can be generalized remains to be shown. In any case, more and more studies highlight the dynamic nature of the Au-S interface, both on flat surfaces and in clusters. At temperatures slightly above ambient thiolates migrate on the gold surface and on clusters. Evidence for desorption of thiolates at room temperature, at least under certain conditions, has been demonstrated for both systems. The adsorbed thiolate can lead to chirality at different lengths scales, which has been shown both on surfaces and for clusters. Chirality emerges from the organization of the thiolates as well as locally at the molecular level. Chirality can also be transferred from a chiral surface to an adsorbate, as evidenced by vibrational spectroscopy.

  6. Preparation and characterization of single-crystal multiferroic nanofiber composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ren, Zhaohui; Xiao, Zhen; Yin, Simin; Mai, Jiangquan; Liu, Zhenya; Xu, Gang; Li, Xiang; Shen, Ge [State Key Lab of Silicon Materials, Department of Material Science and Engineering, Cyrus Tang Center for Sensor Materials and Applications, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China); Han, Gaorong, E-mail: hgr@zju.edu.cn [State Key Lab of Silicon Materials, Department of Material Science and Engineering, Cyrus Tang Center for Sensor Materials and Applications, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China)

    2013-03-05

    Graphical abstract: One-dimensional single-crystal multiferroic composites composed of PbTiO{sub 3} nanofiber-CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} nanodot have been prepared for the first time by a facile in situ solid state sintering method. The composites demonstrate ferroelectricity and ferromagnetism as well as strong coupling between them. Highlights: ► 1D single-crystal multiferroic PTO-CFO was prepared via in situ solid state sintering method. ► A simple epitaxial growth relation has been found between the PTO–CFO composites. ► The composites reveal ferroelectricity and ferromagnetism as well as coupling between them. -- Abstract: One-dimensional single-crystal multiferroic composites consisting of PbTiO{sub 3} (PTO) nanofiber-CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} (CFO) nanodot were prepared using an in situ solid state sintering method, where pre-perovskite PTO nanofibers and CFO nanodots were used as precursors. Structural analyses by using transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction determined a epitaxial growth relation between the PTO nanofiber and the CFO nanodot. Ferromagnetism and ferroelectricity of the nanofiber composites were investigated by using vibarting sample magnetometer (VSM) and piezoresponse force microscopy (PFM)

  7. AFM studies on heavy ion irradiated YBCO single crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lakhani, Archana; Marhas, M.K.; Saravanan, P.; Ganesan, V.; Srinivasan, R.; Kanjilal, D.; Mehta, G.K.; Elizabeth, Suja; Bhat, H.L.

    2000-01-01

    Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) is extensively used to characterise the surface morphology of high energy ion irradiated single crystals of high temperature superconductor - YBCO. Our earlier systematic studies on thin films of YBCO under high energy and heavy ion irradiation shows clear evidence of ion induced sputtering or erosion, even though the effect is more on the grain boundaries. These earlier results were supported by electrical resistance measurements. In order to understand more clearly, the nature of surface modification at these high energies, AFM studies were carried out on single crystals of YBCO. Single crystals were chosen in order to see the effect on crystallites alone without interference from grain boundaries. 200 MeV gold ions were used for investigation using the facilities available at Nuclear Science Centre, New Delhi. The type of ion and the range of energies were chosen to meet the threshold for electronically mediated defect production. The results are in conformity with our earlier studies and will be described in detail in the context of electronic energy loss mediated sputtering or erosion. (author)

  8. Parasitic neutron bragg reflections from large imperfect single crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naguib, K.; Adib, M

    1998-12-01

    A formula is given which allows to calculate the contribution of the total Bragg scattering from different (hkl) planes to the neutron transmission through a large imperfect single crystals. The formula takes into account the crystal structure type, its mosaic spread value, the plane along which the crystal surface is cut along and its orientation with respect to the neutron beam direction. A computer program ISCANF-1 was developed to calculate the total parasitic scattering cross-section from different (hkl) planes as well as the nuclear and diffuse scattering cross-sections. The ISCANF-1 program was applied to calculate the neutron attenuation through Cu and Zn single crystals, each of them cut along (002) planes. The calculated values of the neutron transmission through Cu and Zn crystals were compared with the measured ones in the wavelength range 0.21-0.47 nm and 0.04-0.52 nm respectively. The measured and calculated values were found to be in reasonable agreement within the statistical accuracy. The computer program ISCANF-1 was also applied to investigate the effect of parasitic Bragg scattering on the neutron filtering characteristics of both Zn and Cu single crystals as a function of their physical parameters.

  9. Parasitic neutron bragg reflections from large imperfect single crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naguib, K.; Adib, M.

    1998-01-01

    A formula is given which allows to calculate the contribution of the total Bragg scattering from different (hkl) planes to the neutron transmission through a large imperfect single crystals. The formula takes into account the crystal structure type, its mosaic spread value, the plane along which the crystal surface is cut along and its orientation with respect to the neutron beam direction. A computer program ISCANF-1 was developed to calculate the total parasitic scattering cross-section from different (hkl) planes as well as the nuclear and diffuse scattering cross-sections. The ISCANF-1 program was applied to calculate the neutron attenuation through Cu and Zn single crystals, each of them cut along (002) planes. The calculated values of the neutron transmission through Cu and Zn crystals were compared with the measured ones in the wavelength range 0.21-0.47 nm and 0.04-0.52 nm respectively. The measured and calculated values were found to be in reasonable agreement within the statistical accuracy. The computer program ISCANF-1 was also applied to investigate the effect of parasitic Bragg scattering on the neutron filtering characteristics of both Zn and Cu single crystals as a function of their physical parameters

  10. Neutron transmission measurements of zinc and lead single crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adib, M.; Abdel-Kawy, A.

    1988-01-01

    Neutron transmission measurements of zinc and lead single crystals have been carried out in a neutron wavelength band from 0.03 to 0.55 nm at different orientations of the crystal with regard to the beam direction. The measurements were performed using both time-of-flight and fixed-angle scattering spectrometers installed in front of the ET-RR-1 reactor horizontal channels. It was found that the position of the observed dips in the neutron transmission measurements corresponded to the reflections from the (h k l) planes of the hexagonal zinc single crystal which was cut along the (0 0 2) plane, while in the case of lead, the single crystal was cut perpendicular to the (3 1 1) plane. The reflectivity from the (0 0 2) plane of zinc was determined using both transmission and reflection methods. The maximum reflectivity was found to be 55% when the zinc crystal was orientated at 45 0 to the beam direction. The wavelength spread of the observed reflectivity curve was found to be in agreement with the calculated one, taking into consideration the spectrometer's resolution and the crystal mosaic spread. (author)

  11. Preparation of rod-like β-Si3N4 single crystal particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirao, K.; Tsuge, A.; Brito, M.E.; Kanzaki, S.

    1994-01-01

    The use of β-Si 3 N 4 particles as a seed material has been demonstrated to be effective for development of a self-reinforcing microstructure in sintered silicon nitride ceramics. We have confirmed the seeding effect and arrived at a concept that seed particles should consist of rod-like single crystals free from defects and with a large diameter. The present work describes our attempts to produce such particles with a controlled morphology and in high amount. β-Si 3 N 4 particles with a diameter of 1μm and length of 5μm were obtained by heating a mixture of α-Si 3 N 4 , SiO 2 and Y 2 O 3 , followed by acid rinse treatments to remove residual glassy phase. (orig.)

  12. Growth of Ba-hexaferrite films on single crystal 6-H SiC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Zhoahui; Yang, Aria; Yoon, S.D.; Ziemer, Katherine; Vittoria, Carmine; Harris, V.G.

    2006-01-01

    Barium hexaferrite films have been processed by pulsed laser deposition on single crystal 6-H silicon carbide substrates. Atomic force microscopy images show hexagonal crystals (∼0.5μm in diameter) oriented with the c-axis perpendicular to the film plane. X-ray θ-2θ diffraction measurements indicate a strong (0,0,2n) alignment of crystallites. The magnetization for low-pressure deposition (20mTorr) is comparable to bulk values (4πM s ∼4320G). The loop squareness, important for self-bias microwave device applications, increases with oxygen pressure reaching a maximum value of 70%. This marks the first growth of a microwave ferrite on SiC substrates and offers a new approach in the design and development of μ-wave and mm-wave monolithic integrated circuits. c integrated circuits

  13. X-ray diffraction patterns of single crystals implanted with high-energy light ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wieteska, K.

    1998-01-01

    X-ray diffraction patterns of silicon and gallium arsenide single crystals implanted with high-energy protons and α-particles were studied. A various models of lattice parameter changes were analysed. The agreement between the simulation and experiment proves that the lattice parameter depth-distribution can be assumed to be proportional to vacancy distribution obtained by Monte-Carlo method and from the Biersack-Ziegler theory. Most of the X-ray experiments were performed using synchrotron source of X-ray radiation in particular in the case of back-reflection and transmission section topographic methods. The new method of direct determination of the implanted ion ranges was proposed using synchrotron radiation back-reflection section topography. A number of new interference phenomena was revealed and explained. These interferences are important in the applications of diffraction theory in studying of the real structure of implanted layers. (author)

  14. Characterization of a synthetic single crystal diamond Schottky diode for radiotherapy electron beam dosimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Venanzio, C; Marinelli, Marco; Milani, E; Prestopino, G; Verona, C; Verona-Rinati, G; Falco, M D; Bagalà, P; Santoni, R; Pimpinella, M

    2013-02-01

    To investigate the dosimetric properties of synthetic single crystal diamond based Schottky diodes under irradiation with therapeutic electron beams from linear accelerators. A single crystal diamond detector was fabricated and tested under 6, 8, 10, 12, and 15 MeV electron beams. The detector performances were evaluated using three types of commercial detectors as reference dosimeters: an Advanced Markus plane parallel ionization chamber, a Semiflex cylindrical ionization chamber, and a p-type silicon detector. Preirradiation, linearity with dose, dose rate dependence, output factors, lateral field profiles, and percentage depth dose profiles were investigated and discussed. During preirradiation the diamond detector signal shows a weak decrease within 0.7% with respect to the plateau value and a final signal stability of 0.1% (1σ) is observed after about 5 Gy. A good linear behavior of the detector response as a function of the delivered dose is observed with deviations below ±0.3% in the dose range from 0.02 to 10 Gy. In addition, the detector response is dose rate independent, with deviations below 0.3% in the investigated dose rate range from 0.17 to 5.45 Gy∕min. Percentage depth dose curves obtained from the diamond detector are in good agreement with the ones from the reference dosimeters. Lateral beam profile measurements show an overall good agreement among detectors, taking into account their respective geometrical features. The spatial resolution of solid state detectors is confirmed to be better than that of ionization chambers, being the one from the diamond detector comparable to that of the silicon diode. A good agreement within experimental uncertainties was also found in terms of output factor measurements between the diamond detector and reference dosimeters. The observed dosimetric properties indicate that the tested diamond detector is a suitable candidate for clinical electron beam dosimetry.

  15. Free-standing nanomechanical and nanophotonic structures in single-crystal diamond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burek, Michael John

    Realizing complex three-dimensional structures in a range of material systems is critical to a variety of emerging nanotechnologies. This is particularly true of nanomechanical and nanophotonic systems, both relying on free-standing small-scale components. In the case of nanomechanics, necessary mechanical degrees of freedom require physically isolated structures, such as suspended beams, cantilevers, and membranes. For nanophotonics, elements like waveguides and photonic crystal cavities rely on light confinement provided by total internal reflection or distributed Bragg reflection, both of which require refractive index contrast between the device and surrounding medium (often air). Such suspended nanostructures are typically fabricated in a heterolayer structure, comprising of device (top) and sacrificial (middle) layers supported by a substrate (bottom), using standard surface nanomachining techniques. A selective, isotropic etch is then used to remove the sacrificial layer, resulting in free-standing devices. While high-quality, crystalline, thin film heterolayer structures are readily available for silicon (as silicon-on-insulator (SOI)) or III-V semiconductors (i.e. GaAs/AlGaAs), there remains an extensive list of materials with attractive electro-optic, piezoelectric, quantum optical, and other properties for which high quality single-crystal thin film heterolayer structures are not available. These include complex metal oxides like lithium niobate (LiNbO3), silicon-based compounds such as silicon carbide (SiC), III-V nitrides including gallium nitride (GaN), and inert single-crystals such as diamond. Diamond is especially attractive for a variety of nanoscale technologies due to its exceptional physical and chemical properties, including high mechanical hardness, stiffness, and thermal conductivity. Optically, it is transparent over a wide wavelength range (from 220 nm to the far infrared), has a high refractive index (n ~ 2.4), and is host to a vast

  16. Self-assembly of amorphous biophotonic nanostructures by phase separation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dufresne, Eric R.; Noh, Heeso; Saranathan, Vinodkumar; Mochrie, Simon G.J.; Cao, Hui; Prum, Richard O.; (Yale)

    2009-04-23

    Some of the most vivid colors in the animal kingdom are created not by pigments, but by wavelength-selective scattering of light from nanostructures. Here we investigate quasi-ordered nanostructures of avian feather barbs which produce vivid non-iridescent colors. These {beta}-keratin and air nanostructures are found in two basic morphologies: tortuous channels and amorphous packings of spheres. Each class of nanostructure is isotropic and has a pronounced characteristic length scale of variation in composition. These local structural correlations lead to strong backscattering over a narrow range of optical frequencies and little variation with angle of incidence. Such optical properties play important roles in social and sexual communication. To be effective, birds need to precisely control the development of these nanoscale structures, yet little is known about how they grow. We hypothesize that multiple lineages of birds have convergently evolved to exploit phase separation and kinetic arrest to self-assemble spongy color-producing nanostructures in feather barbs. Observed avian nanostructures are strikingly similar to those self-assembled during the phase separation of fluid mixtures; the channel and sphere morphologies are characteristic of phase separation by spinodal decomposition and nucleation and growth, respectively. These unstable structures are locked-in by the kinetic arrest of the {beta}-keratin matrix, likely through the entanglement or cross-linking of supermolecular {beta}-keratin fibers. Using the power of self-assembly, birds can robustly realize a diverse range of nanoscopic morphologies with relatively small physical and chemical changes during feather development.

  17. Particle self-assembly at ionic liquid-based interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frost, Denzil S; Nofen, Elizabeth M; Dai, Lenore L

    2014-04-01

    This review presents an overview of the nature of ionic liquid (IL)-based interfaces and self-assembled particle morphologies of IL-in-water, oil- and water-in-IL, and novel IL-in-IL Pickering emulsions with emphasis on their unique phenomena, by means of experimental and computational studies. In IL-in-water Pickering emulsions, particles formed monolayers at ionic liquid-water interfaces and were close-packed on fully covered emulsion droplets or aggregated on partially covered droplets. Interestingly, other than equilibrating at the ionic liquid-water interfaces, microparticles with certain surface chemistries were extracted into the ionic liquid phase with a high efficiency. These experimental findings were supported by potential of mean force calculations, which showed large energy drops as hydrophobic particles crossed the interface into the IL phase. In the oil- and water-in-IL Pickering emulsions, microparticles with acidic surface chemistries formed monolayer bridges between the internal phase droplets rather than residing at the oil/water-ionic liquid interfaces, a significant deviation from traditional Pickering emulsion morphology. Molecular dynamics simulations revealed aspects of the mechanism behind this bridging phenomenon, including the role of the droplet phase, surface chemistry, and inter-particle film. Novel IL-in-IL Pickering emulsions exhibited an array of self-assembled morphologies including the previously observed particle absorption and bridging phenomena. The appearance of these morphologies depended on the particle surface chemistry as well as the ILs used. The incorporation of particle self-assembly with ionic liquid science allows for new applications at the intersection of these two fields, and have the potential to be numerous due to the tunability of the ionic liquids and particles incorporated, as well as the particle morphology by combining certain groups of particle surface chemistry, IL type (protic or aprotic), and whether oil

  18. Matrix development in self-assembly of articular cartilage.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gidon Ofek

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Articular cartilage is a highly functional tissue which covers the ends of long bones and serves to ensure proper joint movement. A tissue engineering approach that recapitulates the developmental characteristics of articular cartilage can be used to examine the maturation and degeneration of cartilage and produce fully functional neotissue replacements for diseased tissue.This study examined the development of articular cartilage neotissue within a self-assembling process in two phases. In the first phase, articular cartilage constructs were examined at 1, 4, 7, 10, 14, 28, 42, and 56 days immunohistochemically, histologically, and through biochemical analysis for total collagen and glycosaminoglycan (GAG content. Based on statistical changes in GAG and collagen levels, four time points from the first phase (7, 14, 28, and 56 days were chosen to carry into the second phase, where the constructs were studied in terms of their mechanical characteristics, relative amounts of collagen types II and VI, and specific GAG types (chondroitin 4-sulfate, chondroitin 6-sulfate, dermatan sulfate, and hyaluronan. Collagen type VI was present in initial abundance and then localized to a pericellular distribution at 4 wks. N-cadherin activity also spiked at early stages of neotissue development, suggesting that self-assembly is mediated through a minimization of free energy. The percentage of collagen type II to total collagen significantly increased over time, while the proportion of collagen type VI to total collagen decreased between 1 and 2 wks. The chondroitin 6- to 4- sulfate ratio decreased steadily during construct maturation. In addition, the compressive properties reached a plateau and tensile characteristics peaked at 4 wks.The indices of cartilage formation examined in this study suggest that tissue maturation in self-assembled articular cartilage mirrors known developmental processes for native tissue. In terms of tissue engineering, it is

  19. Chemical solution route to self-assembled epitaxial oxide nanostructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obradors, X; Puig, T; Gibert, M; Queraltó, A; Zabaleta, J; Mestres, N

    2014-04-07

    Self-assembly of oxides as a bottom-up approach to functional nanostructures goes beyond the conventional nanostructure formation based on lithographic techniques. Particularly, chemical solution deposition (CSD) is an ex situ growth approach very promising for high throughput nanofabrication at low cost. Whereas strain engineering as a strategy to define nanostructures with tight control of size, shape and orientation has been widely used in metals and semiconductors, it has been rarely explored in the emergent field of functional complex oxides. Here we will show that thermodynamic modeling can be very useful to understand the principles controlling the growth of oxide nanostructures by CSD, and some attractive kinetic features will also be presented. The methodology of strain engineering is applied in a high degree of detail to form different sorts of nanostructures (nanodots, nanowires) of the oxide CeO2 with fluorite structure which then is used as a model system to identify the principles controlling self-assembly and self-organization in CSD grown oxides. We also present, more briefly, the application of these ideas to other oxides such as manganites or BaZrO3. We will show that the nucleation and growth steps are essentially understood and manipulated while the kinetic phenomena underlying the evolution of the self-organized networks are still less widely explored, even if very appealing effects have been already observed. Overall, our investigation based on a CSD approach has opened a new strategy towards a general use of self-assembly and self-organization which can now be widely spread to many functional oxide materials.

  20. Self-assembly of silver nanoparticles and bacteriophage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santi Scibilia

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Biohybrid nanostructured materials, composed of both inorganic nanoparticles and biomolecules, offer prospects for many new applications in extremely diverse fields such as chemistry, physics, engineering, medicine and nanobiotechnology. In the recent years, Phage display technique has been extensively used to generate phage clones displaying surface peptides with functionality towards organic materials. Screening and selection of phage displayed material binding peptides has attracted great interest because of their use for development of hybrid materials with multiple functionalities. Here, we present a self-assembly approach for the construction of hybrid nanostructured networks consisting of M13 P9b phage clone, specific for Pseudomonas aeruginosa, selected by Phage display technology, directly assembled with silver nanoparticles (AgNPs, previously prepared by pulsed laser ablation. These networks are characterized by UV–vis optical spectroscopy, scanning/transmission electron microscopies and Raman spectroscopy. We investigated the influence of different ions and medium pH on self-assembly by evaluating different phage suspension buffers. The assembly of these networks is controlled by electrostatic interactions between the phage pVIII major capsid proteins and the AgNPs. The formation of the AgNPs-phage networks was obtained only in two types of tested buffers at a pH value near the isoelectric point of each pVIII proteins displayed on the surface of the clone. This systematic study allowed to optimize the synthesis procedure to assembly AgNPs and bacteriophage. Such networks find application in the biomedical field of advanced biosensing and targeted gene and drug delivery. Keywords: Phage display, Silver nanoparticles, Self-assembly, Hybrid architecture, Raman spectroscopy

  1. Encapsulation of gold nanoparticles into self-assembling protein nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Yongkun

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gold nanoparticles are useful tools for biological applications due to their attractive physical and chemical properties. Their applications can be further expanded when they are functionalized with biological molecules. The biological molecules not only provide the interfaces for interactions between nanoparticles and biological environment, but also contribute their biological functions to the nanoparticles. Therefore, we used self-assembling protein nanoparticles (SAPNs to encapsulate gold nanoparticles. The protein nanoparticles are formed upon self-assembly of a protein chain that is composed of a pentameric coiled-coil domain at the N-terminus and trimeric coiled-coil domain at the C-terminus. The self-assembling protein nanoparticles form a central cavity of about 10 nm in size, which is ideal for the encapsulation of gold nanoparticles with similar sizes. Results We have used SAPNs to encapsulate several commercially available gold nanoparticles. The hydrodynamic size and the surface coating of gold nanoparticles are two important factors influencing successful encapsulation by the SAPNs. Gold nanoparticles with a hydrodynamic size of less than 15 nm can successfully be encapsulated. Gold nanoparticles with citrate coating appear to have stronger interactions with the proteins, which can interfere with the formation of regular protein nanoparticles. Upon encapsulation gold nanoparticles with polymer coating interfere less strongly with the ability of the SAPNs to assemble into nanoparticles. Although the central cavity of the SAPNs carries an overall charge, the electrostatic interaction appears to be less critical for the efficient encapsulation of gold nanoparticles into the protein nanoparticles. Conclusions The SAPNs can be used to encapsulate gold nanoparticles. The SAPNs can be further functionalized by engineering functional peptides or proteins to either their N- or C-termini. Therefore encapsulation of gold

  2. Evaluation of single crystal coefficients from mechanical and x-ray elastic constants of the polycrystal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hauk, V.; Kockelmann, H.

    1979-01-01

    Methods of calculation are developed for determination of single crystal elastic compliance or stiffness constants of cubic and hexagonal materials from mechanical and X-ray elastic constants of polycrystals. The calculations are applied to pure, cubic iron and hexagonal WC. There are no single crystal constants in the literature for WC, because no single crystals suitable for measurement are available. (orig.) [de

  3. Biomimetic self-assembly of a functional asymmetrical electronic device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boncheva, Mila; Gracias, David H; Jacobs, Heiko O; Whitesides, George M

    2002-04-16

    This paper introduces a biomimetic strategy for the fabrication of asymmetrical, three-dimensional electronic devices modeled on the folding of a chain of polypeptide structural motifs into a globular protein. Millimeter-size polyhedra-patterned with logic devices, wires, and solder dots-were connected in a linear string by using flexible wire. On self-assembly, the string folded spontaneously into two domains: one functioned as a ring oscillator, and the other one as a shift register. This example demonstrates that biomimetic principles of design and self-organization can be applied to generate multifunctional electronic systems of complex, three-dimensional architecture.

  4. Self-assembly of heterogeneous supramolecular structures with uniaxial anisotropy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-Osés, M; Gonzalez-Lakunza, N; Silanes, I; Gourdon, A; Arnau, A; Ortega, J E

    2006-12-28

    Uniaxial anisotropy in two-dimensional self-assembled supramolecular structures is achieved by the coadsorption of two different linear molecules with complementary amine and imide functionalization. The two-dimensional monolayer is defined by a one-dimensional stack of binary chains, which can be forced to line up along steps in vicinal surfaces. The competing driving forces in the self-organization process are discussed in light of the structures observed during single molecule adsorption and coadsorption on flat and vicinal surfaces and the corresponding theoretical calculations.

  5. A 3D Optical Metamaterial Made by Self-Assembly

    KAUST Repository

    Vignolini, Silvia

    2011-10-24

    Optical metamaterials have unusual optical characteristics that arise from their periodic nanostructure. Their manufacture requires the assembly of 3D architectures with structure control on the 10-nm length scale. Such a 3D optical metamaterial, based on the replication of a self-assembled block copolymer into gold, is demonstrated. The resulting gold replica has a feature size that is two orders of magnitude smaller than the wavelength of visible light. Its optical signature reveals an archetypal Pendry wire metamaterial with linear and circular dichroism. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. A 3D Optical Metamaterial Made by Self-Assembly

    KAUST Repository

    Vignolini, Silvia; Yufa, Nataliya A.; Cunha, Pedro S.; Guldin, Stefan; Rushkin, Ilia; Stefik, Morgan; Hur, Kahyun; Wiesner, Ulrich; Baumberg, Jeremy J.; Steiner, Ullrich

    2011-01-01

    Optical metamaterials have unusual optical characteristics that arise from their periodic nanostructure. Their manufacture requires the assembly of 3D architectures with structure control on the 10-nm length scale. Such a 3D optical metamaterial, based on the replication of a self-assembled block copolymer into gold, is demonstrated. The resulting gold replica has a feature size that is two orders of magnitude smaller than the wavelength of visible light. Its optical signature reveals an archetypal Pendry wire metamaterial with linear and circular dichroism. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Oscillatory persistent currents in self-assembled quantum rings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleemans, N A J M; Bominaar-Silkens, I M A; Fomin, V M; Gladilin, V N; Granados, D; Taboada, A G; García, J M; Offermans, P; Zeitler, U; Christianen, P C M; Maan, J C; Devreese, J T; Koenraad, P M

    2007-10-05

    We report the direct measurement of the persistent current carried by a single electron by means of magnetization experiments on self-assembled InAs/GaAs quantum rings. We measured the first Aharonov-Bohm oscillation at a field of 14 T, in perfect agreement with our model based on the structural properties determined by cross-sectional scanning tunneling microscopy measurements. The observed oscillation magnitude of the magnetic moment per electron is remarkably large for the topology of our nanostructures, which are singly connected and exhibit a pronounced shape asymmetry.

  8. Microcolumns with self-assembled particle frits for proteomics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ishihama, Yasushi; Rappsilber, Juri; Andersen, Jens S

    2002-01-01

    LC-MS-MS experiments in proteomics are usually performed with packed microcolumns employing frits or outlets smaller than the particle diameter to retain the packing material. We have developed packed microcolumns using self-assembled particles (SAPs) as frits that are smaller than the size...... of the outlet. A five to one ratio of outlet size to particle diameter appears to be the upper maximum. In these situations the particles assembled into an arch over the outlet like the stones in a stone bridge. When 3 microm particles were packed into a tapered column with an 8 microm outlet, two particles...

  9. Directed Formation of DNA Nanoarrays through Orthogonal Self-Assembly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eugen Stulz

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available We describe the synthesis of terpyridine modified DNA strands which selectively form DNA nanotubes through orthogonal hydrogen bonding and metal complexation interactions. The short DNA strands are designed to self-assemble into long duplexes through a sticky-end approach. Addition of weakly binding metals such as Zn(II and Ni(II induces the formation of tubular arrays consisting of DNA bundles which are 50-200 nm wide and 2-50 nm high. TEM shows additional long distance ordering of the terpy-DNA complexes into fibers.

  10. Self-assembly of silk fibroin under osmotic stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sohn, Sungkyun

    The supramolecular self-assembly behavior of silk fibroin was investigated using osmotic stress technique. In Chapter 2, a ternary phase diagram of water-silk-LiBr was constructed based on X-ray results on the osmotically stressed regenerated silk fibroin of Bombyx mori silkworm. Microscopic data indicated that silk I is a hydrated structure and a rough estimate of the number of water molecules lost by the structure upon converting from silk I to silk II has been made, and found to be about 2.2 per [GAGAGS] hexapeptide. In Chapter 3, wet-spinning of osmotically stressed, regenerated silk fibroin was performed, based on the prediction that the enhanced control over structure and phase behavior using osmotic stress method helps improve the physical properties of wet-spun regenerated silk fibroin fibers. The osmotic stress was applied in order to pre-structure the regenerated silk fibroin molecule from its original random coil state to more oriented state, manipulating the phase of the silk solution in the phase diagram before the start of spinning. Monofilament fiber with a diameter of 20 microm was produced. In Chapter 4, we investigated if there is a noticeable synergistic osmotic pressure increase between co-existing polymeric osmolyte and salt when extremely highly concentrated salt molecules are present both at sample subphase and stressing subphase, as is the case of silk fibroin self-assembly. The equilibration method that measures osmotic pressure relative to a reference with known osmotic pressure was introduced. Osmotic pressure of aqueous LiBr solution up to 2.75M was measured and it was found that the synergistic effect was insignificant up to this salt concentration. Solution parameters of stressing solutions and Arrhenius kinetics based on time-temperature relationship for the equilibration process were derived as well. In Chapter 5, self-assembly behavior of natural silk fibroin within the gland of Bombyx mori silkworm was investigated using osmotic

  11. Rapid self-assembly of block copolymers to photonic crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Yan; Sveinbjornsson, Benjamin R; Grubbs, Robert H; Weitekamp, Raymond; Miyake, Garret M; Atwater, Harry A; Piunova, Victoria; Daeffler, Christopher Scot; Hong, Sung Woo; Gu, Weiyin; Russell, Thomas P.

    2016-07-05

    The invention provides a class of copolymers having useful properties, including brush block copolymers, wedge-type block copolymers and hybrid wedge and polymer block copolymers. In an embodiment, for example, block copolymers of the invention incorporate chemically different blocks comprising polymer size chain groups and/or wedge groups that significantly inhibit chain entanglement, thereby enhancing molecular self-assembly processes for generating a range of supramolecular structures, such as periodic nanostructures and microstructures. The present invention also provides useful methods of making and using copolymers, including block copolymers.

  12. Light-assisted templated self assembly using photonic crystal slabs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mejia, Camilo A; Dutt, Avik; Povinelli, Michelle L

    2011-06-06

    We explore a technique which we term light-assisted templated self-assembly. We calculate the optical forces on colloidal particles over a photonic crystal slab. We show that exciting a guided resonance mode of the slab yields a resonantly-enhanced, attractive optical force. We calculate the lateral optical forces above the slab and predict that stably trapped periodic patterns of particles are dependent on wavelength and polarization. Tuning the wavelength or polarization of the light source may thus allow the formation and reconfiguration of patterns. We expect that this technique may be used to design all-optically reconfigurable photonic devices.

  13. Nanoporous network channels from self-assembled triblock copolymer supramolecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    du Sart, Gerrit Gobius; Vukovic, Ivana; Vukovic, Zorica; Polushkin, Evgeny; Hiekkataipale, Panu; Ruokolainen, Janne; Loos, Katja; ten Brinke, Gerrit

    2011-02-16

    Supramolecular complexes of a poly(tert-butoxystyrene)-block-polystyrene-block-poly(4-vinylpyridine) triblock copolymers and less than stoichiometric amounts of pentadecylphenol (PDP) are shown to self-assemble into a core-shell gyroid morphology with the core channels formed by the hydrogen-bonded P4VP(PDP)complexes. After structure formation, PDP was removed using a simple washing procedure, resulting in well-ordered nanoporous films that were used as templates for nickel plating. Copyright © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Self-Assembled Supramolecular Architectures Lyotropic Liquid Crystals

    CERN Document Server

    Garti, Nissim

    2012-01-01

    This book will describe fundamentals and recent developments in the area of Self-Assembled Supramolecular Architecture and their relevance to the  understanding of the functionality of  membranes  as delivery systems for active ingredients. As the heirarchial architectures determine their performance capabilities, attention will be paid to theoretical and design aspects related to the construction of lyotropic liquid crystals: mesophases such as lamellar, hexagonal, cubic, sponge phase micellosomes. The book will bring to the reader mechanistic aspects, compositional c

  15. Exploring the properties and possibilities of self-assembling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Karsten Brandt; Castillo, Jaime

    2013-01-01

    structures ranging from piezo electricity over semi conductance to fluorescence. If such peptide nanotubes could be controlled and incorporated in sensors such as a biological field effect transistor it would greatly reduce the fabrication costs while at the same time providing researchers with new...... and exciting possibilities. The major driving forces supporting the interest in the peptide nanotubes is the fast and simple assembly process combined with their remarkable stability towards alcohols, organic solvents, and biological analytes that was presented shortly after the self-assembling properties...... and illustrated their potential use as sensitive temperature sensor....

  16. Self-assembled manganese oxide structures through direct oxidation

    KAUST Repository

    Zhao, Chao; Wang, Qingxiao; Yang, Yang; Zhang, Bei; Zhang, Xixiang

    2012-01-01

    The morphology and phase of self-assembled manganese oxides during different stages of thermal oxidation were studied. Very interesting morphological patterns of Mn oxide films were observed. At the initial oxidation stage, the surface was characterized by the formation of ring-shaped patterns. As the oxidation proceeded to the intermediate stage, concentric plates formed to relax the compressive stress. Our experimental results gave a clear picture of the evolution of the structures. We also examined the properties of the structures. © 2012 Elsevier B.V.

  17. Self-assembled manganese oxide structures through direct oxidation

    KAUST Repository

    Zhao, Chao

    2012-12-01

    The morphology and phase of self-assembled manganese oxides during different stages of thermal oxidation were studied. Very interesting morphological patterns of Mn oxide films were observed. At the initial oxidation stage, the surface was characterized by the formation of ring-shaped patterns. As the oxidation proceeded to the intermediate stage, concentric plates formed to relax the compressive stress. Our experimental results gave a clear picture of the evolution of the structures. We also examined the properties of the structures. © 2012 Elsevier B.V.

  18. Surfactant self-assembly in alcohol-rich solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bouguerra, N.; Jebari, M.M.; Gomati, R.; Gharbi, A.

    2005-01-01

    Ionic conductivity and viscosity measurements are achieved along alcohol dilution lines of a single-isotropic phase domain, which extends from the alcohol corner to sponge phase domain to brine corner, of an alcohol-surfactant-brine phase diagram. The results are discussed in terms of amphiphilic self-assembly which leads to stable mixtures of the slightly miscible alcohol and brine used. We show the formation of reverse micelles, whose cores are either dry or charged of brine according to the samples composition, and whose sizes remain small near the sponge phase structure

  19. Biomimetic engineering: towards a self-assembled nanotechnology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braach-Maksvytis, V.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: The Nanoscience and Systems program was set up within CSIRO Telecommunications and Industrial Physics three years ago with an emphasis on biomimetic engineering, with the aim of developing new cross-disciplinary research in traditional physics areas. By combining expertise in experimental and theoretical physics with biology and chemistry, new approaches towards understanding and using nanoscale systems and devices are being explored. Research in the program ranges from using self-assembled lipid membranes for surface passivation of GaAs transistors to the electrical properties of nanoparticle films and devices. An overview of the research will be given, highlighting the diversity of nanotechnology applications

  20. Template mediated protein self-assembly as a valuable tool in regenerative therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kundu, B; Eltohamy, M; Yadavalli, V K; Reis, R L; Kim, H W

    2018-04-11

    The assembly of natural proteinaceous biopolymers into macro-scale architectures is of great importance in synthetic biology, soft-material science and regenerative therapy. The self-assembly of protein tends to be limited due to anisotropic interactions among protein molecules, poor solubility and stability. Here, we introduce a unique platform to self-immobilize diverse proteins (fibrous and globular, positively and negatively charged, low and high molecular weight) using silicon surfaces with pendant -NH 2 groups via a facile one step diffusion limited aggregation (DLA) method. All the experimental proteins (type I collagen, bovine serum albumin and cytochrome C) self-assemble into seaweed-like branched dendritic architectures via classical DLA in the absence of any electrolytes. The notable differences in branching architectures are due to dissimilarities in protein colloidal sub-units, which is typical for each protein type, along with the heterogeneous distribution of surface -NH 2 groups. Fractal analysis of assembled structures is used to explain the underlying route of fractal deposition; which concludes how proteins with different functionality can yield similar assembly. Further, the nano-micro-structured surfaces can be used to provide functional topographical cues to study cellular responses, as demonstrated using rat bone marrow stem cells. The results indicate that the immobilization of proteins via DLA does not affect functionality, instead serving as topographical cues to guide cell morphology. This indicates a promising design strategy at the tissue-material interface and is anticipated to guide future surface modifications. A cost-effective standard templating strategy is therefore proposed for fundamental and applied particle aggregation studies, which can be used at multiple length scales for biomaterial design and surface reformation.